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Transcripts count: 47
  1. Ballymana

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bernie Ruane
    Informant
    Thomas Ruane

    only one of them can speak Irish. He can tell Irish and English stories. His name is John Conelly Ballymana, Craughwell co Galway. The houses were more plentiful locally in former times in the district. Long ago from the cross of Ballymana to Seefin there was a row of houses and the people were evicted out of them and some of them went to America. The land is fairly good in the district.

    Bernie Ruane
    Ballymana, Craughwell
    Co Galway
    I obtained the above from Thomas Ruane, Ballymana Craughwell, Co Galway.

  2. Old Ruins

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Patrick Doherty
    Age
    73

    cannon entered. There are high walls around the castle with a tower in each corner.

    An Old Story
    Near Athenry is a place called Craughwell. It is only a small village. It was in Craughwell, Daly was tried for a murder he did not commit. Daly was fifty years old and a farmer. One night three men shot a man named Daly. This Daly was a tramp and he swore it was Daly that fired the shots.
    The soldiers arrested him and he was sentenced to death. He was to the be hanged in Craughwell. At the hanging his mother arose and said " Born a man and die a man" which meant not to tell on the three men that commited the murder.
    There was an old Presbyterian at the hanging and he was going around saying in Irish "may the same fate befall you all" A man named Lynch rose on one knee and hit the man on the side of the head with a cutting whip. The man escaped through the crowd.

  3. Kilquaine

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eileen Dolan
    Informant
    Thomas Finnegan

    "Kilquaine"
    21-6-1938

    The townland of Kilquaine is situated in the parish of Craughwell in the barony of Dunkellin. There are two families living in it. The exact number of people in it is ten. Both houses are slated. The first slated was built in the year 1758. There are two old people over sixty years of age living in the district. One of them can speak Irish and tell stories both in English and Irish his name is Thomas Finnegan, Kilquaine, Craughwell. The townland got its name from a church which was situated there in former times. The ruins of this church can still be seen. Houses were not more

  4. Raftery's Burial

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Raftery's Burial
    Informant
    Patrick Kelly
    Age
    58

    Raftery's Burial
    Raftery died in Cloonans in Laught a village about two miles north of Craughwell. It was on Christmas he died. He died in a barn belong[ing] to the Cloonans where they used to keep lodgers who were going from house to house. When the people brought him to Killeeneen the grave was dug before them and old man from Killeeneen named Terry Turey held the candles while the people buried him. It was in the evening when he was buried and it was dark and that is the reason were lighted when he was buried. The evening was very cold but the candles did not quench because there are ivy trees in the graveyard and they sheltered the candles. The people were poorer that time than they are now and that is the reason there's not such a good head-stone over Raftery's grave. Told by Patrick Kelly, Caherdine, Craughwell, age 58 yrs.

  5. Local Hedge-Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs Conway
    Informant
    Francis Finegan

    two houses were on the Grenage side of the railway bridge. There is a field now where Kean’s School was owned by Miss O’Grady. The field where Roche’s house was owned by James Cahill. There is a field between the bridge and Cahill’s field owned by Mr. Jennings.


    Francis Finegan
    Craughwell

    Bailighthe ó:-
    Mrs. Conway
    Craughwell

  6. An Old Fort

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brigid Hynes
    Informant
    Stephen Donohoe

    P.S. I obtained the above story from Stephen Donohoe, Ballymana, Craughwell, Co. Galway who got it from John Healy in who's land the fort is situated. He is dead about 17 years, and was 80 yeas at the time.

  7. Rooe Fort

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eileen Dolan
    Informant
    James Moran

    I obtained the above story from James Moran, Rooe, Craughwell, Co. Galway. He was born and spent his life in Rooe where he is residing at present.

  8. A Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Paddy Moylan
    Informant
    Edward Whelan

    (I got the story from) Paddy Moylan
    Edward Whelan Rathcosgrive
    Rathcosgrive Craughwell
    Craughwell Co Galway
    Co. Galway

  9. Kilquaine

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eileen Dolan
    Informant
    Thomas Finnegan

    numerous in former times. There is a field in the centre of the townland by the Leabaid Nora. In former times there was a queen by the name of Nora going to mass and she was shot. It is said that she was buried where she fell. There is a stone over it about three feet in height and a foot square. The land of this district is very good. There are about four acres of it boggy. There is a small wood in it. There are also a few small streams in it.

    Eileen Dolan,
    Shanelough,
    Craughwell,
    Co Galway
    I obtained the above from Thomas Finnegan, Kilquaine, Craughwell, Co Galway. He was born and spent his life in Kilquaine.

  10. Old Houses

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Seán Menihan
    Informant
    Martin Menihan

    of them are to be had at the present day.
    The fire used in former days was seraircín and bórae. Seraicín was got in bogs. Bórae was the dry manure gathered on the land after cattle. The old method for giving light was rushes and homemade candles. The candles were made from rushes dipped in tallow.

    Séan Menihan,
    Carheen,
    Craughwell,
    Co Galway.
    I obtained the above from Martin Menihan, Monksfield, Craughwell, County Galway.

  11. A Story About Biddy Earley

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Buckley

    be able to cure him, that he had two women in the house and that they had made a bad eye of him. But she said that he a press by the fire and a bottle in it and if that bottle were broken he would die. So it was broken and his son died.

    These stories about Biddy Earley were given by Mrs Buckley of Garracloone, Craughwell, who in turn lived on the borders of County Clare - Biddy's native County.

  12. a flag over his grave with the inscription "He was hanged at the hill of Seefin.
    Eileen Dolan,
    Shanclough,
    Craughwell,
    Co. Galway
    PS. This story was related to by
    Stephen Donohue,
    Rooe,
    Craughwell,
    Co. Galway
    He received it from his grandfather who was the leader of the army of Fenians who tried to save Daly

  13. Raftery's Funeral

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Michael Forde
    Age
    52

    Raftery the Poet died at John Cloonan's Laught near Craughwell. It was late in the night when he died and the people of the house did not like to keep the corpse during the night and they ordered, he to be buried that night. All the people made a Collection between them for the price of the coffin. It was late in the night when the coffin was bought. It was twelve a clock in the night when he was buried. The light they had was two candles made from " grace " or rushes. It was a very stormy night and the candles did not quench while they were burying him. The grave is still to be seen in

  14. The Callanan Poets

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Michael Forde
    Age
    52

    the beetle. one day there was a woman washing her clothes and while she was washing them the beetle went away on the water. When Pat Callanan the poet heard it he composed a song about it and as he was saying it he was writing it down in the side of his shoe. They are buried in Killeeneen grave yard. Mark was a brother of Pat and he was also a good poet. They had some schoolin[g] but Raftery had none and they were writing down some of it as they composed it. They composed a lot of songs, but they were not all gathered up. There are Callanans also in Caherdevain but there is no poet in this Generation. Told by: Michael Forde Killeeneen, Craughwell Co Galway 52 years

  15. Crann an tSagairt

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Keane
    Informant
    Tom Keane
    Age
    61

    On a sharp bend in the Seefin road, midway between Kilchreest and Craughwell grows a huge tree with all the branches growing in the direction of a little burying ground called Teampall na gCrann a few hundred yards across the fields on the opposite side of the road. There are still the ruins of a little church in the grave-yard where there was one (sic) a Holy Priest. He was loved by his people for his great holiness and charity.
    One day as he was leaving the church on horse-back his horse took fright and he was threw on the ground. He fell on his head and was killed instantly. The whip or plant he held in his hand went through the earth and grew into this great tree which has ever since been known as Crann 'a S[h]agairt

  16. An Old Story

    Abraham sat every day at the door of his tent, waiting to receive any strangers who might be passing the way.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brian Uniacke

    He thrust the old man out of this tent and left him emposed to all the dangers and discomforts of the night.
    When the old man was gone, God called to Abraham and asked where the stranger was. Abraham replied, 'I thrust him from me for he did not worship Thee.' 'The hundred years', was God's reply, 'I have suffered him although he dishonoured me and could'st not thou endure him for one night when he gave thee no trouble.'
    Abraham brought the old man back again and showed him all the kindness in his power, and gave him wise instruction.
    This story was given by Brian Uniacke of Lissalondonn. Craughwell.

  17. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pádhraic Ó Callanáin
    Informant
    John Morrissey

    Hidden Treasure 5/11/37
    Once upon a time a man named Patrick Maloney who still lives was digging potatoes in his own field at the back of his house in Carrigeen, Craughwell, Co. Galway. There happened to be a tree in the middle of the field. The field itself is called "Garrdha na gCrann". He had all the field dug except around the tree.Fortunately he found the "lerpreachán" at the headland under a mushroom mending his boot. He asked him where was the "Treasure" and he told him that it was at the root of the tree at the centre of the field. The man went home about thirty yard, trying the "lesprescan" to a potato stalk. When he came

  18. Galway and convicted. His death sentence was to be hanged on the hill of Seefin. He was the only man ever known to sit on his own coffin coming from Galway. He was surrounded by the British soldiers. On his was from Galway he was offered help. The Fenians were at Iscer Cleran's cross and told Daly they would save him but Daly begged of them not to interfere as they would be hundreds of lives lost if they interfered. This army of Fenians was lead by Thomas Donohue, Greenhouse, Craughwell.
    The British soldiers offered Daly money and drink and food if he turned a traitor to his country. When the scaffold was erected thousands of people gathered for miles around the hill

  19. Ballymana

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bernie Ruane
    Informant
    Thomas Ruane

    "Ballymana"
    15-6-1938
    The name of my home district is Ballymana. It is situated in the parish of Craughwell in the barony of Dunkellin in the co of Galway. There are six families living in it. The approximate number of people living in it twenty four. The most common name in my district are Farrells. There are four thatched houses in it and two slated. The first slated house was built in Ballymana nine years ago. There are three old people over seventy years of age living in Ballymana, but

  20. Raftery's Funeral

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pearl Kelly
    Informant
    Mrs Callanan
    Age
    63

    Raftery the poet had a splendid funeral. People came from all the surrounding districts as they liked him very well, he being so many years travelling amongst them. He was a good musician as well as poet, and used to amuse them by playing at dances from here to Athenry and on to Loughrea and all the villages around this place. Himself and the poets Mark and Patrick Callanan were good friends, except on one occasion they had a little dispute but they made up pretty soon and invited him to their house where they kept him for a month so they were great friends ever after that. Raftery had a great funeral. Hundreds of people on foot as there were few cars in those days. So they laid him to rest in Killeeen Cemetery where there is monument erected to his memory. The poets Mark and Patrick Callanan are also buried there.


    Pearl Kelly
    Told by Mrs Callanan, Caherdevane, Craughwell