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Transcripts count: 107
  1. An Tulach Mhór

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Florence Rowlette
    Age
    12
    Informant
    Mr Rowlette

    with some bog. At Christmas the townsfolk go into the Grotto, which is lighted up and they dance Irish dances. There are two woods outside Tullamore, Charleville and Clonad wood. The Royal canal flows through the town. Coal and iron are brought from Dublin to the town in the canal boats. It is a good market town and it has a brewery and a distillery. There are four places of worship in the town.

    Florence Rowlette 9ad Feabra 1938.
    Std V Age 12
    Address The Castle, Kildare.

  2. Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Lallie Hayes
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    40
    Occupation
    labourer's wife

    This information was received from my mother who received it from her mother. She is a labourers wife and lives in the village of Feenagh. She is Forty years.

    Subject: heroes
    Many heroes were in this district long ago. The best known to all was Maurice Hourigan, who lived in the Parish of Ballingarry. He was one of the best walkers in Irish history. He toured mostly all Ireland and he always went by foot. He travelled from Ballingarry to Cork in almost one day and how he did it is a mystery to all, but it is an absolute fact.
    Famous jumpers and runners also lived in Charleville, they were two brothers Leahys they won many prizes and championships in jumping and running.
    Patrick

  3. The Dead Hunt

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Con Cahill
    Occupation
    oibrí tí

    The Dead Hunt. 22.6.38

    There was a groom working for a lord up near Charleville. Each night at about nidnight, he used to go and look at the horses to see if they were alright for the night.
    One night as he was looking at them, a huntsman came into the stable to him and asked him for the loan of one them. He promised he would have the horse back again in the stable safe and sound before morning. So the groom gave the horse but he noticed that the horse seemed terrified and was trembling all over. The groom went to his room, but before getting into bed, he looked out the window and saw a crowd of huntsmen in the yard. They had whips and hounds and he could see through the bodies of the huntsmen and dogs.
    During the night he could hear the blowing of horns, the cracking of whips and the shouting of the huntsmen. Next morning he went out and found the horse in the stable the same as if nothing had happened.

  4. Stories Current in the Locality Showing a Lively Belief in the Good People

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mick Fogarty
    Age
    70
    Occupation
    storyteller

    3. On one occasion a certain man was returning from a wake. At a very lonesome part of the road he was confronted by a woman dressed in white, who stared into his face. He had known this woman previously, but she was dead some time.
    4. Two men went up to the Bog (Martinstown) from Clune with a cow and a calf. When returning late that night at Hartigan's turn, four horses came behind the car, eating half off the car. One of the men tried to hit the horses with his whip but could hit nothing but air. They (the horses) disappeared, appeared again after a while, and finally disappeared at the 'turn' of Cunána. On arriving home one of the men got sick and could not speak until the priest was called to read over him 12 hours. He spent 6 weeks in bed.
    5. A man was coming home from Charleville one night. As he was passing a churchyard two black goats jumped over the wall, and walked by the horse. From the time the goats came, until they reached another churchyard, the horse refused to go at a pace faster than a walk. The horse all this time was covered with foam. When the goats jumped over the wall of the second churchyard the horse galloped and never stopped till he came to his own door.

  5. There's no doubt about it, the fairies are there. My own daughter saw them in a field near Knocksouna - a host of them, little people wearing red coats. Of course they never appear to people in sin, and they never harm the innocent.
    I was working as a young man in Thomastown with a Mr D[?] and his sister on a hundred-acres farm. One day he sent me to Charleville to hire a man for a few months. He was a bit mean about money but the sisters gave me 2/- to treat the man before I'd bring him home.
    I saw a fine hefty man on the street and settled with him. "Come down to Flaherty's now" says I "and we'll drink the two bob." We took three pints each (that was 1/-) and then he asked me as a favour to come down by Garrienderk. He told me he had been digging potatoes there with a man named Mr Carthy who was a great stick fancier. There was a moat near the farm and one day John Dunne (that was the man I had hired) saw a lovely black thorn which he thought would make a lovely walking stick for his [?]. He tried to cut it but his penknife wasn't sharp enough so he went in for another knife. When he returned he found the black thorn as crooked as a ram's horn. He got a terrible fright and left it alone of course. That was six months before I met him and he came to Thomastown by way of Garrienderk in order to have another look at the black thorn. We couldn't find a trace of it although we looked from one end of the moat to the other.

  6. The Bell

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Fogarty
    Informant
    Patrick Dunne

    The Bell
    One time the Danes destroyed the monastery, the monks wished to save the bell. They brought it away a distance of about 500 yards and buried it. The place where it is buried is marked by a ring od daisies which grow every year. They are the first daisies to bloom in Killurin. No one ever looked for the bell because some misfortune might happen to them. At times the Bell can be heard ringing if you were in the ruins.
    The Tree
    There is a tree growing near the ruins which is the oldest in Offaly. It still produces leaves. Beads and medals used to be put on this tree years ago. A tree which was a year younger grew in Charleville but fell some time ago.

  7. Famine Times

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Doyle

    30
    Famine Times
    The famine began in 1845 and continued until 1847. The cause of the famine was that the potato crop faced.
    There was a man in Gortonamona near Tullamore names O'Connor. This man was a kind landlord and he asked no rent from the people that lived in the houses in his land. The Charleville wall was built in the time of the famine. The men who built the wall worked for six-pence a day. Most of the people dies with he hunger, caused by the famine. The people gathered together at the market house during the famine time to get Indian meal to make porridge

  8. Local Happenings

    Language
    English

    Until 1790, Tullamore consisted mostly of thatched cottages, with a few public buildings but a great fire in that year, said to be caused by a fire balloon, sent up at the coming-of-age festivities in honour of the heir of the Earl of Charleville destroyed the town. The town was rebuilt by him in a more substantial manner, with wide streets and square well laid out as at present and good public buildings.
    In 1808 the town was a scene of conflict between the cavalry and infantry of the German Legion, then quartered under General Baron Bork, and a light brigade of militia said to be from Birr, which was passing through. A slight incident caused a struggle to beak out in Pound St. The German Cavalry charged but the militia received them with Rifle fire and a bayonet charge which out the Germans to flight.
    Frederick William Baron Oldenhausen was killed and is buried in Kilcrutten, where there is a stone pillar, with his name inscribed erected to his memory.
    An outbreak of Cholera occurred in 1830.

  9. Old Crafts

    Language
    English

    48
    Old Crafts
    The principal industries of Tullamore were Distilling (two disteillers, Manlys and Dalys). It was in the yard at Manly's Distillery. Cornmarket (now Egans Mallings) that Daniel O'Connell addressed a great public meeting. He was entertained to dinner that night in the Charleville Arms Hotel.
    Two breweries - Deveralls in Meath Lane and Manly's where Egans carried on brewing up to about twelve years ago. Goodbodys tobacco factory, burnt in 1883 Tanyard brickyard corn mills. (O Flanagan's); chandlery, sawmills, sailmaking, shoemakers, coopers, tailoring and others.
    The quarries were opened about 200 years ago, and according to tradition, the first quarry at Muinagh (Collin's) was worked by a man named Jack Horan. Other quarries were owned at worked at Ballyduff by the Molloys, Wrafters and others.

  10. Folklore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Tess Scully
    Informant
    Mrs Dooley
    Age
    77
    Occupation
    domestic worker

    woman baking a cake of bread and the soldiers saw the woman and they thought she might tell where the monks were and she was going to but she was turned into a pillar of stone and she is in the Holy Island yet with the cake of bread on her head.

    Sentry Hill
    Ths hill is about a mile outside Borrisinossory and in olden times several people were hanged there. There is a big Beech tree hangs over this pit and many children used to play on this hill in the Summer. They filled up the pit but you can still see where it was as the tree has many names cut in it.
    Charleville Lake
    There is a boathouse on this lake and several people used go out boating on it until one day the man that owned it and a lady friend went out boating and they both were drowned. Since that time no one would go in on this lake and

  11. Glantane R.C.Church is situated in the glen at the southern end of the village. It is a beautiful Gothic edifice which was completed in 1878 by the late Rev. Father Lynch P.P. who was afterwards appointed P.P. of Charleville where he died.
    "The Topographical Dictionary of Ireland" by Samuel Lewis, which was published in 1837 says "The chapel of Glauntane was rebuilt in 1821".
    According to that, the present church must be at least the third on the same site.
    The church which was demolished in 1878 was T-shaped and some of the older people in the parish remember hearing Mass in it. While the new one was being built the villagers used to attend Mass in Kilpadder.
    Beside the church is the Curate's residence which was built

  12. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kit Mc Auliffe
    Informant
    Michael Mc Auliffe

    My Home District

    My home district is named Freemount, in the Barony of Duhallow, Co. Cork. There are several families in this townland, and there are a couple of hundred people. The families most common are Noonans and Murphys. The types of houses around here are generally slated. Freemount is called after John Freeman, because he went over to England and got the rents lowered for them.
    In former times, houses were more numerous, but there are none to be seen now in ruins. The land around Freemount is hilly.
    Kit McAuliffe, Freemount
    Got from Michael McAuliffe, Freemount, Charleville

  13. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Simon O' Connell
    Informant
    Denis O' Connell
    Age
    46

    A FUNNY STORY

    There was once a man working for a farmer in County LImerick. After a time he left the farmer. Then he went to Charleville to be hired by another man. He was standing at a corner when he saw a man riding a horse through the town. The farmer asked him to come and work for him again. He said no that he was putting him to far too much trouble sending to America for (him) meal for him and eating his own himself.
    Written by Simon O'Connell, Liscarroll
    Told by Denis O'Connell, 46 Years, Liscarroll

  14. Old Fields in Shandrum Parish

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Sheehan
    Informant
    Sheehan

    There was a fair held in Shandrum long ago.
    The fair used to be held in a field and then it was called the "fair field".
    It is owned by Willie Moloney, Shandrum.

    There is a field in Killaree It is called Stantons field because they lived in it They were weavers. They used to weave the wool and make flannels of it.
    It is owned by Michael Sheehan Killaree Shandrum Charleville

  15. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Wall
    Occupation
    teacher

    would not boil and sticks from the tree would not burn. It is said that gypsies tried to light a fire with sticks from the tree and they would not light. It is said that they tried to boil water form the well and it would not boil. Tradition says that the well was at the other side of the road but a woman washed clothes with water from it changed to the other side of the road.

    It is said that St. Brigid passed along by Mount Brigid and she rested where the well now stands.
    Out Lady’s Well is situated on the left hand side of the road from Buttevant to Charleville. It is in the shade of a large whitethorn tree which is hundreds of years old. It is surrounded on three sides with small whitethorn trees. It is near the ruins of a small stone house. The water comes through the tree and is always flowing and it never runs dry. The water from the well is a cure for sores and pains.
    It is visited by many pole during the month of May in honour of the Blessed Virgin.

  16. Old Crafts - Basket-Making

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Evelyn O' Connor
    Informant
    Mrs Wall

    OLD CRAFTS: BASKET MAKING
    Basket making was a very common industry in this locality years ago.
    There were basket makers in every village and town. They use to collect suitable twigs - thick and thin ones - and weave them skilfully. They made cradles, armchairs, baskets and muzzles for calves. Sometimes they varnished the articles when made. They sold them to shopkeepers and to anyone who gave them an order.

    There is a basketmaker still in Buttevant (Mr O’Brien). He makes chairs, baskets and cradles and takes them in a donkey cart to Charleville every Saturday and sells them from house to house.

  17. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Michael Roche

    Cloncon is a townland situated in the South of Co Limerick in the Barony of Glenquin, in the parish of Killeedy and at the foot of a hill called Uallac Inis. Cloncon got its name from an old chieftain who lived there long ago, and whose name was Con. He was leader of a great Clan and he won almost every battle he engaged in, and the townland got its name form Con's Clan. It is inhabited by thirteen families. The family name most common is O Mahony. The town land is bounded by two streams East and West in the North by the river Bunoke. Most of the houses are thatched and made of mud walls.

    There are not many old people there now except one old man name John Sheahan aged about ninty years. He is a fluent Irish speaker and can sing songs and tell stories. He is still acitve and can do all classes of work up to the present day. His address is:
    Cloncon,
    Ballagh,
    Charleville,
    Co Limerick,

    About a quarter of a mile from Kantogher creamery stands an old ruined house

  18. Funny Stories - Irish Pat

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Hanly
    Informant
    Wm. Herlihy

    sell the hat for any money. The man offered him two thousand pounds for it. He gave it to them for the money. What harm,but the hat was not worth a half crown. The man gathered a crowd and went into a shop. He called for a thousand drinks, he got them and he said, you know the hat. The woman threatened him with the guards, and he would not pay. She summoned him. He was fined one thousand pounds. When he went out he tore the hat to ribbons, and flung it as far as he could.

    John Hanly (Pupil),
    Ashford,
    Charleville.
    From Wm. Herlihy,
    Same address.

  19. Swift Walkers and Runners

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dóra Ní Cuanach
    Informant
    James Nolan

    Swift Walkers and Runners.

    Years ago there lived in Ashford, two swift walkers named John Hanley and Michael Cregan. One day John and Michael walked to Limerick. They started on their journey at six o'clock in the morning and arrived home in the evening at half-five.
    James Kirby of Mauricetown, walked from Cork in one day to his home, and arrived home in the evening at six o'clock.

    Good Runners.
    Con Murphy of Maurraban, was one day on top of a hill when he saw a mountain hare in Mallaca Riarc on the "Hill of the Horns". He took off his shoes and followed him a distance of seven miles when he caught him.
    Another man named Thomas Forde of Mount Plummer ran in ten minutes from Drumcollegher to Charleville. On one occasion the minor Sullivan took him across to England to run a race for some Lord.
    The best runners in this locality and the most talked of are, Maurice Hourigan of Ballingarry and Davy Hogan

  20. The Local Landlords

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Michael O Byrnes
    Informant
    Stephen O Byrnes
    Age
    56

    The landlords in general were a hated class in Ireland. Our grand-fathers and mothers can remember the land agitation about 1880 or 1890.
    Ballinacarriga consisted of about 500 acres and of course was ruled by a landlord. Lord Charleville was the first landlord of Ballinacarriga. Mr. Dawson bought the lands from him and he was very unfair to his tenants. He lived in Bunratty and came to see his farm occasionally. He visited a local inn named Lynch's and he had a habit of saying that humans beings should be replaced by bullocks. This took great effect on the people and one night while crossing a field he was shot dead. No body was found guilty of this crime which was commited in June 1835.
    Mr Richaed Russel of Plassy succeeded Mr Dawson. He was very kind to his tenants and was very popular. He called his men by a bell the remains of which can be seen yet. He died in the year 1850 and he was succeeded by his son Norris. he was a very popular man and was very kind to his tenants. Mr. Norris died in the year 1878 and Ballinacarriga lands were purchased by the land Commission.
    Mr. Westropp was the landlord of Mellon. He was very cruel to his tenants and the shooting of Mr Dawson tamed him. He died in the year 1890 and his lands were purchased by the Land Commission.