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Transcripts count: 91
  1. Old Crafts

    Language
    English

    48
    Old Crafts
    The principal industries of Tullamore were Distilling (two disteillers, Manlys and Dalys). It was in the yard at Manly's Distillery. Cornmarket (now Egans Mallings) that Daniel O'Connell addressed a great public meeting. He was entertained to dinner that night in the Charleville Arms Hotel.
    Two breweries - Deveralls in Meath Lane and Manly's where Egans carried on brewing up to about twelve years ago. Goodbodys tobacco factory, burnt in 1883 Tanyard brickyard corn mills. (O Flanagan's); chandlery, sawmills, sailmaking, shoemakers, coopers, tailoring and others.
    The quarries were opened about 200 years ago, and according to tradition, the first quarry at Muinagh (Collin's) was worked by a man named Jack Horan. Other quarries were owned at worked at Ballyduff by the Molloys, Wrafters and others.

  2. Folklore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Tess Scully
    Informant
    Mrs Dooley
    Age
    77
    Occupation
    domestic worker

    woman baking a cake of bread and the soldiers saw the woman and they thought she might tell where the monks were and she was going to but she was turned into a pillar of stone and she is in the Holy Island yet with the cake of bread on her head.

    Sentry Hill
    Ths hill is about a mile outside Borrisinossory and in olden times several people were hanged there. There is a big Beech tree hangs over this pit and many children used to play on this hill in the Summer. They filled up the pit but you can still see where it was as the tree has many names cut in it.
    Charleville Lake
    There is a boathouse on this lake and several people used go out boating on it until one day the man that owned it and a lady friend went out boating and they both were drowned. Since that time no one would go in on this lake and

  3. Glantane R.C.Church is situated in the glen at the southern end of the village. It is a beautiful Gothic edifice which was completed in 1878 by the late Rev. Father Lynch P.P. who was afterwards appointed P.P. of Charleville where he died.
    "The Topographical Dictionary of Ireland" by Samuel Lewis, which was published in 1837 says "The chapel of Glauntane was rebuilt in 1821".
    According to that, the present church must be at least the third on the same site.
    The church which was demolished in 1878 was T-shaped and some of the older people in the parish remember hearing Mass in it. While the new one was being built the villagers used to attend Mass in Kilpadder.
    Beside the church is the Curate's residence which was built

  4. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kit Mc Auliffe
    Informant
    Michael Mc Auliffe

    My Home District

    My home district is named Freemount, in the Barony of Duhallow, Co. Cork. There are several families in this townland, and there are a couple of hundred people. The families most common are Noonans and Murphys. The types of houses around here are generally slated. Freemount is called after John Freeman, because he went over to England and got the rents lowered for them.
    In former times, houses were more numerous, but there are none to be seen now in ruins. The land around Freemount is hilly.
    Kit McAuliffe, Freemount
    Got from Michael McAuliffe, Freemount, Charleville

  5. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Simon O' Connell
    Informant
    Denis O' Connell
    Age
    46

    A FUNNY STORY

    There was once a man working for a farmer in County LImerick. After a time he left the farmer. Then he went to Charleville to be hired by another man. He was standing at a corner when he saw a man riding a horse through the town. The farmer asked him to come and work for him again. He said no that he was putting him to far too much trouble sending to America for (him) meal for him and eating his own himself.
    Written by Simon O'Connell, Liscarroll
    Told by Denis O'Connell, 46 Years, Liscarroll

  6. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Wall
    Occupation
    teacher

    would not boil and sticks from the tree would not burn. It is said that gypsies tried to light a fire with sticks from the tree and they would not light. It is said that they tried to boil water form the well and it would not boil. Tradition says that the well was at the other side of the road but a woman washed clothes with water from it changed to the other side of the road.

    It is said that St. Brigid passed along by Mount Brigid and she rested where the well now stands.
    Out Lady’s Well is situated on the left hand side of the road from Buttevant to Charleville. It is in the shade of a large whitethorn tree which is hundreds of years old. It is surrounded on three sides with small whitethorn trees. It is near the ruins of a small stone house. The water comes through the tree and is always flowing and it never runs dry. The water from the well is a cure for sores and pains.
    It is visited by many pole during the month of May in honour of the Blessed Virgin.

  7. Old Crafts - Basket-Making

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Evelyn O' Connor
    Informant
    Mrs Wall

    OLD CRAFTS: BASKET MAKING
    Basket making was a very common industry in this locality years ago.
    There were basket makers in every village and town. They use to collect suitable twigs - thick and thin ones - and weave them skilfully. They made cradles, armchairs, baskets and muzzles for calves. Sometimes they varnished the articles when made. They sold them to shopkeepers and to anyone who gave them an order.

    There is a basketmaker still in Buttevant (Mr O’Brien). He makes chairs, baskets and cradles and takes them in a donkey cart to Charleville every Saturday and sells them from house to house.

  8. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Michael Roche

    Cloncon is a townland situated in the South of Co Limerick in the Barony of Glenquin, in the parish of Killeedy and at the foot of a hill called Uallac Inis. Cloncon got its name from an old chieftain who lived there long ago, and whose name was Con. He was leader of a great Clan and he won almost every battle he engaged in, and the townland got its name form Con's Clan. It is inhabited by thirteen families. The family name most common is O Mahony. The town land is bounded by two streams East and West in the North by the river Bunoke. Most of the houses are thatched and made of mud walls.

    There are not many old people there now except one old man name John Sheahan aged about ninty years. He is a fluent Irish speaker and can sing songs and tell stories. He is still acitve and can do all classes of work up to the present day. His address is:
    Cloncon,
    Ballagh,
    Charleville,
    Co Limerick,

    About a quarter of a mile from Kantogher creamery stands an old ruined house

  9. Funny Stories - Irish Pat

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Hanly
    Informant
    Wm. Herlihy

    sell the hat for any money. The man offered him two thousand pounds for it. He gave it to them for the money. What harm,but the hat was not worth a half crown. The man gathered a crowd and went into a shop. He called for a thousand drinks, he got them and he said, you know the hat. The woman threatened him with the guards, and he would not pay. She summoned him. He was fined one thousand pounds. When he went out he tore the hat to ribbons, and flung it as far as he could.

    John Hanly (Pupil),
    Ashford,
    Charleville.
    From Wm. Herlihy,
    Same address.

  10. Swift Walkers and Runners

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dóra Ní Cuanach
    Informant
    James Nolan

    Swift Walkers and Runners.

    Years ago there lived in Ashford, two swift walkers named John Hanley and Michael Cregan. One day John and Michael walked to Limerick. They started on their journey at six o'clock in the morning and arrived home in the evening at half-five.
    James Kirby of Mauricetown, walked from Cork in one day to his home, and arrived home in the evening at six o'clock.

    Good Runners.
    Con Murphy of Maurraban, was one day on top of a hill when he saw a mountain hare in Mallaca Riarc on the "Hill of the Horns". He took off his shoes and followed him a distance of seven miles when he caught him.
    Another man named Thomas Forde of Mount Plummer ran in ten minutes from Drumcollegher to Charleville. On one occasion the minor Sullivan took him across to England to run a race for some Lord.
    The best runners in this locality and the most talked of are, Maurice Hourigan of Ballingarry and Davy Hogan

  11. The Local Landlords

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Michael O Byrnes
    Informant
    Stephen O Byrnes
    Age
    56

    The landlords in general were a hated class in Ireland. Our grand-fathers and mothers can remember the land agitation about 1880 or 1890.
    Ballinacarriga consisted of about 500 acres and of course was ruled by a landlord. Lord Charleville was the first landlord of Ballinacarriga. Mr. Dawson bought the lands from him and he was very unfair to his tenants. He lived in Bunratty and came to see his farm occasionally. He visited a local inn named Lynch's and he had a habit of saying that humans beings should be replaced by bullocks. This took great effect on the people and one night while crossing a field he was shot dead. No body was found guilty of this crime which was commited in June 1835.
    Mr Richaed Russel of Plassy succeeded Mr Dawson. He was very kind to his tenants and was very popular. He called his men by a bell the remains of which can be seen yet. He died in the year 1850 and he was succeeded by his son Norris. he was a very popular man and was very kind to his tenants. Mr. Norris died in the year 1878 and Ballinacarriga lands were purchased by the land Commission.
    Mr. Westropp was the landlord of Mellon. He was very cruel to his tenants and the shooting of Mr Dawson tamed him. He died in the year 1890 and his lands were purchased by the Land Commission.

  12. Old Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Murphy
    Informant
    Mr Murphy
    Age
    60
    Informant
    Pat Cronin
    Age
    60
    Informant
    Mrs Kiley
    Age
    68
    Informant
    Michael O' Grady
    Age
    81

    So far as can be found the hedge school masters of this place long ago were "The Great O Baggott, John Croke, John Murphy, John Murphy (2), John Moore and Thomas Dalton- Cronin-Farrell.
    The Great O Baggott was a member of the United Irish Society. Once Lord Edward Fitzgerald " the leader of the '98 rebellion visited him at Ballingarry and met him at the Bridge House now Sheehys public house.
    O Baggott also worked in union with Robert Emmet and had plans prepared for the capture of Limerick in 1803. These plans failed O Baggott died in Charleville in 1806 and is buried in Kilmacow graveyard about three miles east of Ballingarry. His school was in a field now belonging to Peter Dunworth at Tinkers Cross about a mile from Ballingarry. One of his pupils was John Croke who afterwards taught a hedge school near Ramhorn Line about three miles south west of Ballingarry.
    Patsy Mangan of Frankfort dead over twenty years was one who attended Croke's school.
    Crokes son became a professor. Professor John O Byrne Croke and was a professor of Blackrock College Dublin until his death in 1918.
    John Murphy taught at Knockfierna near the house of Mrs Broderick

  13. Local Wit

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Philip O Connell
    Occupation
    príomhoide

    About 2½ miles away on the road from Ardpatrick to Charleville there is a crossroads called Quinlan's Cross. On the right about 200 or 300 yds on the Kilmallock-Effin road is a forge in the townland of Gurraun Hay (?).
    The smith who lived in this forge till about 7 or 8 years ago was a noted wit and many stories are told about him.
    His name was James Buckley and in his youth he was an apprentice in the forge at Graigue. This is the nearest forge to this place & Buckley was fond of coming here from time to time on a visit.
    One day a number of men were working on the road near Quinlan's Cross. One of them, Michael H- had a spade belonging to a neighbour called Ned Slattery.
    The spade lost its edge during the work & began to 'turn'. Being near the forge the workmen went there & the smith was not long in putting the spade to 'rights'. Later on the day came wet & the men leaving work, collected at Buckley's house where before long they started a lively card game (the old game of 45).

  14. 12.7.38
    He was once working with a farmer near Charleville.
    The woman of the house was very miserly, and "Bill" was not often satisfied with the dinner he got.
    One day when he came into his dinner, she gave him a mug of goose soup.
    The soup was light and watery, and Bill said "What kind of soup is that Mam?" and the woman answered, "Why that is fine goose soup".
    "Well, if it is, the goose must have flown over it, Mam."

  15. A Queer Rosary Beads

    Language
    English

    8-7-'38
    There was a man employed by a farmer near Charleville whose name was Bill Linane.
    The woman of the house was always scolding "Bill" because he hadn't any rosary beads.
    One day she gave him a shilling to buy a beads, but when he went to town, he went into a public house and spent the money on drink.
    When he went home he told the woman that he spent the money and the next day she gave him another shilling, but the same thing happened.
    On the third day the woman got very vexed with "Bill" and she said she would give him the last shilling and if he didn't buy the beads he was not to enter the house that night.
    When he came home that night the rosary was being recited and when it came to Bill's turn to say his decade he took a cart

  16. How the Forget-Me-Not Got its Name

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Philip Jones
    Occupation
    teacher

    How the Forget-me-not got its Name (Story got from Philip Jones NT Broadford, Charleville)

    Once a very poor man met a lurgathan and asked him for his pot of gold. The little fellow tried all his tricks for getting away, but it was no use for him. The poor man held him fast and begged him to give him help as he was very poor.
    At last the lurgathan gave him a pretty little blue flower and told him to take it to a certain spot in the mountain where there was a hole, and put this little flower into the hole, and he would see what would happen.
    The man took the flower and let the little fellow off. When he put the flower into the hole a door opened as if he had opened a lock, and taking the flower in his hand again he went in the door into a cave in the side of the mountain.
    Inside was every kind of treasure, boxes of golden coins, golden ornaments, and every kind of glittering jewel. He hardly knew what to take, but at last he filled each pocket he had with what he considered the best of what was there. He then turned to go home and was at the door when the voice

  17. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Christy Dowling

    2
    Local Ruins
    Shragh castle is about one mile west of Tullamore. It is said that there is a tunnel running under the canal over to Charleville from Shragh castle. In Shragh castle there are windows built of stone. The lan around Shragh is very uneven that is why it is called Shragh.
    Ballycowan castle is situated three miles west of Tullamore. The walls at the present day are cracked and ready to fall. the castles are now used for housing pigs, sheep, cows, ducks and hens. On a big flat stone outside the castle are words written "By God of Might I hold my Right" Ballcowan castle was built by Sir Joseph Herbett in the year 1,600
    Christy Dowling.
    East View Terrace, Tullamore.

  18. Tullamore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John O' Brien

    6
    burned the thatch of all the houses.
    The people then built big, stron, nice houses. A man called " Moore who owned all the land around Tullamoore intended to build his castle in Henry St. but he changed his mind ? and he built it in Charleville.
    Long ago the Parochial House was a hotel called the Grand Canal Hotel, and the ticket office is near our school.
    Tullamoore means the district of O'Moore, because a man called O'Moore possessed all the land around the town.
    When the railway was extended from Portarlington to Cloomich Daingean ceased

  19. Tullamore Token

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Morris

    9
    token is written Charleville coat of arms. These show two black men standing to attention and having arrows in their hands.
    Between them is a shield having two crosses, two half moons and five stars. Under the coat of arms is written "Virtus sub cruce crescit"
    Round the edge is printed "Industry shall Prosper" and then the date 1802.
    James Morris
    8 Callary Terrace
    Tullamore

  20. Local Places

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Arthur Parker

    20
    Local Places
    There are many local places in Tullamore. Here are some of the places in my district; Rapp, Ballard Arden, Blueball, Muclagh, Hop-hill Kilcrutten, the Scrub, Clonminich, The Dry Arch, The Black Gate, The Grotto, Rose Grove, The wood of O, and the King's tree. It is called King's tree because it is the largest in the Charleville Estate. Arden is a place near Tullamore, it is one and a half miles from Tullamore Aden's Irish name is Arg which means high and hilly.
    Arthur Parker
    10 Cormac St,
    Tullamore