Text search

Transcripts count: 164
  1. Leaba Dhiarmuda

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    B.J. Hallinan
    Informant
    M. F. O' Mahony

    It is a great pity if it will be blown up or put on the roads, because everything that is connected with the past, should not be used, but it should be well kept.

    B.J. Hallinan
    Ballagh,
    Charleville

  2. Story - The Merry-Go-Round

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John O' Brien
    Informant
    Cormac Ó Briain
    Age
    13

    Twenty years ago a merry - go - round visited the town of Charleville for a week's entertainment. Two young men from the county district went in the great numbers to visit it each night. There used be a raffle among the various other entertainments each evening. Each of the two boys used to try their luck at the raffle but without success until the fifth night of the play. The two boys already mentioned went into a public house for refreshment. Who should come in after them but the old woman in charge of the raffle. One of the old men spoke to her, and asked her would she let him win the raffle to night she said: - "Yes! if you repeat certain words after me" and he agreed, with the result that he won. All went well until returning home, some time before midnight, a fine moonlight night. They heard footsteps beside them, and one looking behind could see nobody and still the strange footsteps continued until both men departed for their respective homes. Still the mysterious footsteps pursued the boy

  3. A Champion Athlete

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Keogh
    Informant
    Mrs Keogh
    Age
    52

    No country in the world has produced finer Athletes than our own and one of the most famous of these resides midway between Kilmeedy and Castletown Co. Limerick his name being Mr. J. J. Bresnihan N. T. Castletown. He was a champion weight thrower and jumper winning many prizes in his youth. Some of the places in which he won prizes are Rathkeale, Adare, and Newcastle West. In the latter he won a set of medals and in Charleville a silver cup. In his younger days he attended all sports meetings.
    Mr Bresnihan is a fine specimin of an Irishman being tall and broad in proportion. His parents, now dead were natives of Castletown, Co. Limerick. He himself is principal teacher of Castletown Boy's School

  4. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Nunan
    Informant
    Mrs J. Nunan
    Age
    circa 55

    Mick Lenane was working with a farmer in the Charleville district, it happened there was a mission in the parish at the time. Mick not having been at confession for a long time, made up his mind to go.
    So he strolled into the town and he asked some of the boys of the place what kind were they inside. He went into the confession box, and when he had all his sins told, the priest asked him "did he know know where he was standing" "I don't" says Mick. "Well you are standing on the brinks of hell" said the priest.
    Mick said "by gor 'twas a very quare place you pitched your little tent and to bring me into it".

  5. Local Fairs

    Collector
    Mary Jones
    Informant
    Mr M. Jones
    Age
    47

    Locally the fairs were held in the fair field on the land where the town houses are now built. The most important fairs in the area were held in Dromin and Knockaney hills for cattle and in Cahiramee and Spancel hill for horses but these fairs except for Cahiramee are now discontinued principally because there were no banks in those places which would facilitate the buyers. At the Cahiramee fairs tolls were collected by the baron of the fair. At the present day bargaining is of free nature and tolls are not generally collected. Fairs presently are held on the streets of towns and villages and the sale is agreed to or what is known as clinched by both parties slapping the palms of their hands with one another. After a sale being completed the purchaser is handed a luck penny which varies according to the amount of the transaction subsequently the stock are marked by raddle or by a special incision on the back by a scissors.
    The halters or wep strips that enclose the heads of the beasts are retained by the sellers. The most important bonham market is held at Charleville but this is gradually decaying owing to most pig breeders sending their stock by lorry to Limerick where better prices prevail.

  6. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Gleeson
    Age
    80

    there is a field near my house. It is in Mr Threnches Estate. It is called the Well field because there is a holy well in it. People say the Blessed Virgin appeared to a man who was praying near the well. There is a field aquarter of a mile from my house. It is in the parish of Ardpatrick and in the district of Fanningstown known as the Church field because there was a Church there long ago. The ruins of the Church can be seen yet. There is a stream in the same place called Spout Moor because it is very big. It rises on the side of Black Rock. There is a great hill in the parish of Ardpatrick. It is called the renowned Hill of Ardpatrick because St Patrick preached and fasted there. St Patrick built a Church and monastery there. The ruins of both can be seen yet. It is a graveyard now. There is a place on the side of the public road going to Charleville. It is called Leaba an Oscar, the bed of Oscar. People say that Oscar is buried there. There is a stone table over the grave. The words are written on stone. The words are Leaba an Oscar. The grave is on the side of the road. There is a great height near Doneraile. It is called Skakergannon height. There is a tree growing on the top of the height. Long ago there was a Priest hanged on that tree. A leaf never grew on that tree since.

  7. The Fenian Rising in Kilmallock

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Patrick Kelly
    Age
    78

    old woman, and it was worn by a man working over in Quarry Hill not far from Hassett's old home.

    Pat Riordan a black-smith by trade was one of the last to leave Water St., that day. He hung about in the fog and darkness as he dared not go in the direction of his home (which was Bruree) he made his way towards Charleville. There Sannders, another land agent like Weldon, had his spies every-where, and Riordan was well known as a pike maker. He was captured and was taken to jail near which was a row of small thatched hosues.
    Riordan was taken to the second floor of the jail because the first floor was full of prisoners

  8. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick O' Shaughnessy
    Age
    12
    Informant
    Thomas O' Shaughnessy
    Age
    25

    Hidden Treasure

    About six miles south west of Charleville in a dreary and lonesome place where four parishes Dromina, Newtown, Churchtown, and Ballyhea, meet lies a cave. The place is completely surrounded with briers and old bushes. The entrance to this cave is very small, so small that a dog or fox could onely pass through. In olden times the entrance to this cave was very large. At the present day can be seen the mason work done by the hand of man perhaps hundreds of years ago to prevent trespassers entering into it. In very rainy weather in Winter a large stream of water flows from its mouth. Some years ago after a flood, strange coins were found at its mouth, amongst some of the coins were silver fourpenny bits and twopenny bits. Since then it is thought that there is a hidden treasure in its unexplored crevices and under ground passages. The old people

  9. Historical Tradition

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Seán Ó Dhomhnaill
    Age
    57
    Occupation
    feirmeoir

    There was also a story told about the Holy Island, which is situated about five miles form Borris in Ossory. There was a Monastery on this Island and a bell erected outside. When the English Protestants came over they put the monks out and killed them. After a couple of years the Monastery was in ruins but the bell remained as good as ever.
    One day a wealthy gentleman named Charlie White who lived in Charleville house came to the Holy Island and brought the bell away with him. He being a Protestant had no regard for it. He erected it at his home. Next day when he went not to call in his workmen the bell would not ring. This man is dead mow and different people living in his house. The bell is still there and is now so rusty that it can hardly be recognised.

  10. A Tragedy

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Thomas Breen

    Mr. White Charleville, Ballaghmore gave a tennis party, August 1908. Mr. White and a lady companion went for a row on the lake in the demesne. The boat turned over and both were drowned. Their bodies were discovered the same night. The bank where Mr. White's body lay that night was wet for a few months. The lady wore white Summer clothes and they were stuck to her body. They were buried in the family plot.

    While the family of Butlers were living in Skierke they had a servant girl named Cashin and a servant boy named Drennan. One Sunday when she was on her way to Knock maass

  11. An Eviction in Roscrea

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Madeline Minogue
    Informant
    William Butler
    Age
    circa 60

    An Eviction In Roscrea

    Around the year 1873 a landlord named Charles White owned much of the land surrounding the town of Roscrea. This cruel landlord resided at Charleville in Leix. He evicted thirty two families from their home and destroyed their houses. Those tenants were Catholics and therefore were not liked by White. He purchased cattle and brought them to graze on the lands of the evicted tenants. Those cattle went mad and a man named Scully shook holy water on them. Next Sunday at mass the parish priest Father Meade inquired of the people who

  12. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Madge Heenan
    Informant
    (name not given)

    In Whites' of Charleville they got a new maid. She was a kind of a rough girl.
    One day some visitors came to Whites and their names were Browne's. The maid answered the door. She asked the visitors, whom would she tell the mistress was at the door. One of them told her to say Mr. Browne, Mrs. and Miss Browne. Mrs. White was engaged upstairs. The girl told her Mr. Mrs. and Miss Browne wanted to see her.
    Mrs. White said that she need not say it that way again. She should say the Browne family. In about a week after people came by the name of Penny. The man told the

  13. Cappoge Graveyard

    Language
    English

    Charleville. Several members of the family are interred there.


    (Three Photos)
    Mass is said each year on the 18th June in Mosstown graveyard. Snaps on left show the hut which used to be erected for same until the little chapel was built in 1936.

  14. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Christy Dowling

    Shragh castle is about one mile west of Tullamore. It is said that there is a tunnel running under the canal over to Charleville from Shragh castle. In Shragh castle there are windows built of stone. The lan around Shragh is very uneven that is why it is called Shragh.
    Ballycowan castle is situated three miles west of Tullamore. The walls at the present day are cracked and ready to fall. the castles are now used for housing pigs, sheep, cows, ducks and hens. On a big flat stone outside the castle are words written "By God of Might I hold my Right" Ballcowan castle was built by Sir Joseph Herbett in the year 1,600

  15. Famine Times

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Arthur Parker

    58
    Famine Times
    In the year 1846-47 a famine broke out because the potato crop failed. People died from starvation and fever. Efforts were made by Englishmen individually to save the famishing peasantry, but the Government took no measure, and about one-fourth of the people dies of famine and disease. There were many failures of the potato crops in 1730. The greathest failures was in 1845. During the year of the famine the people would work for six-pence a day. The charleville wall was built by men who agreed to work for six-pence a day. The people were so hungry that they eat grass and weeds. People went six

  16. 7
    trace of which remains went in by the gate nearest the town, turned to left at road to gardens, then through the woods. The demesne and forest contain 1500 acres, and is a part of the great wood of Fencall The biggest oak tree in the United Kingdom is there near Entrance gate.
    The town house of Baron Tullamore was in Great Denmark St Dublin, now the Irish Messenger Office.
    The first foundation of Charleville was laid in the Corn Market, opposite Egan's Matings (formerly Manly's distillery near the corner of Pikes lane.

  17. (no title)

    Q What is it the more is taken from it the bigger is gets. ¶ A When you are digging a hole.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bella Gamage
    Informant
    Mrs Gamage

    37
    Q. The longer it last the shorter it gets.
    A. A lighted candle
    Q. What runs and has no legs
    A. Water running from a tap.
    Q. What fruit is on a penny.
    A. A date
    Q. What is the difference between a tin of black polish and a negro fighting.
    A. One is a box of blacking and the other is a black boxing.
    Q. What has legs and cannot walk.
    A. A table.
    Information obtained from
    Mrs Gamage. 67
    Charleville Gdns.
    Tullamore
    Bellea Gamage
    Charleville Gdns
    Tullamore

  18. (no title)

    Live horse and you get grass. A still tongue makes a wise head.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bella Gamage
    Informant
    Mrs Gamage
    Age
    68

    41
    Live horse and you get grass.
    A still tongue makes a wise head.
    A man is known by the company he keeps
    an apple a day keeps the doctor away.
    Empty vessels makes most sounds.
    A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    If the cap fits you wear it.
    One man's meat is another man's poison
    Information obtained from
    Mrs Gamage 68
    Charleville.
    Tullamore.
    Offaly.
    Bella Gamage.
    Charleville.
    Tullamore
    Offaly.

  19. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máire Ní Concubhair
    Informant
    (name not given)

    Hidden Treasure

    There was once a castle in Mrs. William O'Connor's lands in Curraghs.
    There lived in this castle three chiefs named McCarthy. They were very sick and owned a lot of gold, silver and jewelery.
    There was a big battle going on down near Charleville. The three chiefs went there. Before they left they gathered all their gold, silver and jewelery adn put them into a lead box. They took it down to the river Allow and buried it in a fort there.

  20. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Morrissey
    Informant
    Mrs Morrissey
    Age
    86

    Local Fairs

    The local fairs are held in big towns Newmarket, Kantrk, Charleville and other big towns. Cattle fairs are held in town once a month and there are two horse-fairs during the year. There is a big horse fair in Mallow, one in Spring and the other in the Autumn. Sometimes buyers come to farmers houses to buy cattle and horses. There is a special for the cattle fairs and the horse fairs are held in the streets. There is a toll paid on the cattle that are sold and it is called "Custom". There is one shilling custom paid on cattle and sixpence on calves and threepence on pigs and two shillings on horses. There is luck money given which every animal that is sold.