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Transcripts count: 93
  1. Old Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Murphy
    Informant
    Mr Murphy
    Age
    60
    Informant
    Pat Cronin
    Age
    60
    Informant
    Mrs Kiley
    Age
    68
    Informant
    Michael O' Grady
    Age
    81

    So far as can be found the hedge school masters of this place long ago were "The Great O Baggott, John Croke, John Murphy, John Murphy (2), John Moore and Thomas Dalton- Cronin-Farrell.
    The Great O Baggott was a member of the United Irish Society. Once Lord Edward Fitzgerald " the leader of the '98 rebellion visited him at Ballingarry and met him at the Bridge House now Sheehys public house.
    O Baggott also worked in union with Robert Emmet and had plans prepared for the capture of Limerick in 1803. These plans failed O Baggott died in Charleville in 1806 and is buried in Kilmacow graveyard about three miles east of Ballingarry. His school was in a field now belonging to Peter Dunworth at Tinkers Cross about a mile from Ballingarry. One of his pupils was John Croke who afterwards taught a hedge school near Ramhorn Line about three miles south west of Ballingarry.
    Patsy Mangan of Frankfort dead over twenty years was one who attended Croke's school.
    Crokes son became a professor. Professor John O Byrne Croke and was a professor of Blackrock College Dublin until his death in 1918.
    John Murphy taught at Knockfierna near the house of Mrs Broderick

  2. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Thomas Hayes
    Informant
    Thomas O' Donnell

    One day Ned Dineen the undertaker of Ballingarry was coming from a funeral in Croom. He met Paddy the goat. Ned gave him a drive in the back of the hearse where the coffins are carried. The road was in a wretched condition and the hearse was a horse drawn one with iron tyres. Then they arrived in Ballingarry Paddy complained that he got a terrible jolting. Begor said Ned many another one got it there before you but you are the first to complain.

    Thomas Hayes
    Ballyneal
    Ballingarry
    Got from Thomas O Donnell
    Derryclough
    Ballingarry

  3. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Murphy
    Informant
    Mr Murphy
    Age
    60
    Informant
    Mr Switzer
    Age
    64

    There are the remains of three De Lacey castles in, or near Ballingarry.
    Seana Cluain Castle in Ballingarry built by John De Lacey in 1408 is said to have been knocked and rebuilt and is now in a well presented state.
    A cousin of John De Lacey - Sean Ruaro De Lacey built Lissamote and Bunistoe Castles. The latter is almost entirely in ruins. It is said that wishing to bury some treasure near Lissamote Castle he got trusted men to bury it after they swore oaths of secrecy.
    But when they had it buried he got them killed for greater safety and their spirits are still on guard over the treasure.
    It is also said that another De Lacey castle - Castle Ragge stood where the old graveyard is. There is no sign of it.
    At the Grove near Ballingarry lived O Dell who was a member of Lyrattan's parliament and voted for the Union.
    He led a party of British soldiers against the local insurgents in 1798 and defeated them.
    It is said that he had splendid house overlooking the glen east of Ballingarry.

  4. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    David Supple
    Informant
    John Supple
    Age
    50

    Long ago a man had a dream that gold was hidden in Treacy's field in the hill near Ballingarry convent. He went one night to dig for the gold. He carried a bottle of holy water with him and a black hafted knife. He made a ring with the knife around the spot where the gold was hidden and shook holy water. He began to dig and he came to a flag. A bull came roaring around him but was not able to go inside the ring. The man ran for his life. Next morning he went to the place again but the hole was covered and the grass was there the same as if it was never rooted. Nobody heard of the gold ever after.

    David Supple
    Ballingarry
    Got from my father John Supple Ballingarry age 50

  5. Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Dore
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    50
    Occupation
    labourer's wife

    There is no graveyard in this parish of Feenagh, but there is in Kilmeedy, Drumcollogher and Ballingarry. In the graveyard in Ballingarry, there grows a big ash tree no birds ever go near it or ever since it grew there was never a leaf seen on it. The foundation of that story was. Once upon a time there lived a widow who had an only son, who grew up to be a very bold boy. She could never chastise him. She told her story one day to a man who told her to bring her son to him and he would chastise him. The woman brought her son to him. The man took him into a room by himself and when the woman saw him again, he was dead. The man had him hung in the room.

  6. A Famous Runner

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kitty Donegan
    Informant
    William Donegan
    Age
    85

    Maurice Hourigan of Ballingarry, Co. Limerick, commenced his racing career at drag-hunts, and soon became famous for his long-distance running throughout Limerick county. His chief event was a nine mile race from Charleville to Dromcollogher, where he defeated the most famous runner of Mallow, his name being John Hayes. The two men were accompanied by horse men and cyclists and Hourigan won the race in record time. The race was getting so fast, that the horse men and cyclists were not able to keep in sight of them. He also won numerous minor events in his youth. He was a tall, elegant man and was well built in proportion. His parents, who resided in Ballingarry, are now dead.

  7. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Irwin
    Informant
    Patrick Irwin
    Age
    60

    Paddy the goat was a very odd tailor who lived in the Sparr Ballingarry. He never wore boots and it is said that he got the nick-name because his eyes were like goats eyes and he wore a beard like a goats. His name was Pat McEnery. One day Paddy went to the parson of Ballingarry for potatoes. The parson said to him that he could not eat protestant potatoes because he devil would be in them. "Yerra that's alright sir" said Paddy "sure I'll boil the devil out of them".

  8. Old Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Murphy
    Informant
    Mr Murphy
    Age
    60
    Informant
    Pat Cronin
    Age
    60
    Informant
    Mrs Kiley
    Age
    68
    Informant
    Michael O' Grady
    Age
    81

    It is considerably over 100 years since he taught there. It is said that he lived at Tinkers Cross about a mile from Ballingarry. He taught through Irish.
    Another teacher named John Murphy taught at the old school in the Ramhorn Line.
    He taught the father of the present John Ahern of Ballynoe.
    John Moore taught in Pound Lane Ballingarry and lived in the Sharr where Mrs Browne now lives. He had one very bright scholar who became a priest aterwards. His name was Father Boyce and he went on foreign mission.
    Thomas Dalton taught near Lee's Cross Ballynoe. One of his pupils was the late James Noonan who died about 25 years ago and was then over 90. He taught principally through Irish, but also taught English reading.
    He taught in his own house.
    Mr Cronin taught for some time near a cross road at Lissamota a mile and a half east of Ballingarry. The cross was then called Tim Dwan's Cross. Cronin taught in his own house and the foundations of the house are there yet.
    I have not heard of anyone who was there at school.
    Got from my father age 65
    also from Pat Cronin Doobeirne age 60 and from Mrs kiley Ballyguile age 68

    John Murphy
    Ballynoe
    Ballingarry

  9. Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Michael Danaher
    Informant
    Peter Fitzgerald
    Age
    68

    There is an old graveyard at Kilatal about 3 miles from Ballingarry on the south-east side. It has no boundary fence.
    There are mounds of earth to show where the graves are and a few rough headstones. One of which is lying flat has a hole in it and it is said that a Priest lies buried under it.
    Only unbaptized children are buried there now and the graveyard is called Killeens.

    There is an old graveyard at Ballynoe Ballingarry. Mounds of stones mark the graves. A man named Anderson who lived at the Polly Bross long ago told my grandfather that he remembers people to be buried there.
    Got from my Grandfather Michael Danaher
    Peter Fitzgerald aged 68 Odelville Ballingarry

  10. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Murphy
    Informant
    Patrick Murphy
    Age
    65

    There is a tradition in Ballingarry that gold is hidden at Bunistoe Castle which is at the end of a glen about half a mile north-east of Ballingarry.
    About 80 years ago four men went to get this gold. One man held a lantern while the other three were digging at the foundation of the castle and the side of the castle wall. The man with the lantern saw a coffin of gold rise up between the three diggers. He saw it going across the fields and it appeared to land in Mc Donnell's orchard a short distance away. The diggers did not see the coffin at all.
    John Tierney the grandfather of the Tierneys who now live beside the orchard heard the whizzing of the coffin through the air.

    John Murphy,
    Ballyroe
    Ballingarry
    Got from father Patrick Murphy Ballyroe age 65

  11. The Leprechauns

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eily Mc Kessy
    Informant
    Mrs Dunworth
    Age
    50

    [Title is spelt as "the Leipreachans"]

    Last summer, it was rumoured that leipreachans visited Ballingarry a village situated two miles from Kilmeedy. It appears that they were dressed in red coats, white capes and knee breeches and wearing vamps instead of shoes. It is said that they were less than two feet high, with hard, hairy faces, short fingers, and no ears. These leipreachans caused great excitement in the surrounding districts and crowds used to assemble every evening betweem Ballingarry and Kilfinny hoping to catch a glimpse of them but we later learned that the whole story was invented by children.
    Traditions says that leipreachans live in forts and caves and their usual occupation is shoemaking. No one ever succeeded in catching one of these people as they are supposed to be able to run as fast as greyhounds.

  12. Moats

    Language
    English

    Sampson's Moat, in townland of Ballingarry was associated with noise and music being heard there. There is no tale about it.

    Maguire's Moat in townsland Ballingarry is a large moat and one or two stories are told of it.
    A poor man and woman (beggars) were living in Ballylander and one day in the week was given to travelling this district for alms. Bright and early one morning the poor woman came along this old boreen, where the moat is, and as it was early she picked a bundle of [?] to have to light the fire on her return. Not wanting to load them all day, she put them into this moat till she'd be coming back. In the evening on entering the moat, she found her sticks gone and began to search for them, when a tall thin man dressed in black came round the moat and said "You'll find your sticks on the side of the road, and never come in here again." She came out and found them in a very orderly bundle, each one the same length, on the side of the road. She got so frightened that she left and was never seen in this place since.

  13. Leprechauns

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie O Grady
    Age
    13

    Leipreacáns
    Mr. Patrick Roche of Ballingarry was cutting hay one day in Lois na bfiann fort when a lepreachán appeared to him. He caught the lepreachán. The lepreachán gave him a special charm to let him go. This charm was that he need'nt ever edge his scythe. This was a great boon in those days because there were no machines. Mr. Roche never had to edge his scythe afterwards. He never got tired no matter how long he moved. this is supposed to happen about 100 yrs. ago.
    Given by Annie O' Grady , aged 13
    Ballinarouga,
    Ballingarry.

  14. About a mile and a half above Ballingarry in a very lonesome road there lived a farmer's wife named Mrs. MacCarthy. One night she was out walking with a girl, and she first saw a light and then it turned into a Ghost. The girl never saw it. The woman walked about a mile of the road on (the) her knees after seeing the Ghost.

  15. Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Lallie Hayes
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    40
    Occupation
    labourer's wife

    This information was received from my mother who received it from her mother. She is a labourers wife and lives in the village of Feenagh. She is Forty years.

    Subject: heroes
    Many heroes were in this district long ago. The best known to all was Maurice Hourigan, who lived in the Parish of Ballingarry. He was one of the best walkers in Irish history. He toured mostly all Ireland and he always went by foot. He travelled from Ballingarry to Cork in almost one day and how he did it is a mystery to all, but it is an absolute fact.
    Famous jumpers and runners also lived in Charleville, they were two brothers Leahys they won many prizes and championships in jumping and running.
    Patrick

  16. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joseph Doody
    Informant
    Daniel Doody

    There was a woman living in Frankfort Ballingarry and her name was Mrs. Croke. She had a servant boy and his name was Mick Blake. He was not any good to work. Sometimes he would fall asleep when he should be working. She was a very miserly woman. One day she asked Mick Blake if he knew where ere the good boys gone to. " Wisha mam" said he " they are all gone to the good house".

    Joseph Doody
    Ballingarry
    Got from my father
    Daniel Doody

  17. White Boys

    Language
    English

    The Whiteboys used to go around the district disguised with white shirts and sometimes blackened faces. When travelling through strange districts they used to be very careful about calling for food. Calling at a house between here and Ballingarry they were told to call next evening. When one of them put his hand for the food the hand was held and the whiteboy shot through the window. He was brought to Castletown Barrack but could not or would not be identified.

  18. (no title)

    "Orenagrook (? Árd na gcruach) means the hill of the reeks...

    Collector
    Dáithí Ó Ceanntabhail
    Occupation
    múinteoir
    Informant
    P. Dore
    Age
    56

    "Orenagrook (?Ard na gcruach) means the hill of the reeks. It is a place near me at home." (P. Dore], 56, Killatil, Ballingarry). I think it is an unofficial name from what I can learn. (D. O. B.)

  19. And poor Fr. James, he has banished the soupers.
    And purchased out Gubbin's old property.

    If Guiry was hunted, he would rest the the "Echo".*
    If he would reform, we would pray for his soul.
    The Angels in Heaven would all join in chorus.
    And welcome poor Bill to his heavenly home.
    *A place somewhere about Knockfierna.
    (The above from Ml. O'Grady, 74, Gurteen, Ballingarry.
    I have included it in the reply to the question re Bible schools and readers, which see for explanation.
    (D.O.C.)
    According to Ed. O'Connell
    (Cuid 1, Cuid 11). Fr. James Enright P.P. of ballingarry was himself a convert, and he,
    Ed. O'Connell, heard his mother say that the Priest said off the altar in Ballingarry, that he could not pray for the souls of his father and mother.

  20. (no title)

    Ballynockane (referred to on page 117 as the place where it is alleged leipreacáin appeared in the August of this year - 1938) is a townland in Ballingarry Parish.

    Language
    English
    Informant
    R. B.

    Ballynockane (referred to on page 117 as the place where it is alleged leipreacain appeared in the August of this year 1938) Is a townland in Ballingarry parish. In this parish also is Cnoc Firinne. Indeed the first swellings of