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Transcripts count: 13
  1. The Three Beggars

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Spillane
    Age
    83

    pooled their alms together and bought a wether to eat. The question them arose as to where the wether should be killed. The Milltown beggar said it should be killed at Milltown. The Ardfield beggar said it should be killed at Ardfield, and the Donour beggar swore that it would be killed in no other place but Dunour.
    Then the fight began between them and the blows could be heard all over the fair but it ended in a draw for no one of them was too strong for the other. The Baron of the fair was then called upon to arbitrate and he said he would give judgement to the eldest of the three.
    The Milltown beggar swore that he was the eldest. "When I was a yound boy" said he "my father bought me a cargo of knives and forks. I sold none, I broke none, and I gave none away and this is all that is left of my cargo" So saying he showed an old knife and fork which was worn to the handle from use. The Ardfield beggar swore that he was the eldest. "When I was a young lad" said he "my father bought me a shipload of scissors, I sold none

  2. The Big Wind 1839

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kitty Driscoll

    About the year 1839 the big wind swept across the area of Ardfield. It was about Christmas and it began only with a guest of wind, people never expected it and so were not prepared for it. It blew from the north west and lasted for two days just 70 years after this the old pension was given so when people gave proof of their age they often said they were born the year of the big wind. This storm did a great deal of harm through the area of Ardfield. Luckily enough it did not kill any person in this locality.

  3. The Old Houses of Ardfield

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O Keeffe
    Informant
    John O Keeffe

    The old houses of Ardfield
    Up to a short time ago there were scarcely any cement houses in the parish of Ardfield.
    In the very old houses the walls were built of mud.
    The roofs were made of thatch.
    There were only one small window in the kitchen and as this showed very little light there was a half-door which was kept open all day. Most of the houses were only one storey high, and if there was a room above, it was very small lighted by a sky-light and this was reached generally by a ladder. There was a large open fireplace in the kitchen where turf and fir were burned. Near the fireplace

  4. Maura Gaelach

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O' Leary
    Informant
    Mr J. Walsh

    locked her children into a house and then burned the house children and all. She used appear to people on the road in the shape of dogs, pigs and other animals. She used to go into carts and very often the horse dropped dead while she was inside. There is a bush at Fisher[?] Cross in Ardfield under which she used to sit and no leaf has ever grown on that bush since. While she was alive nobody would go out after twelve o'clock at night for fear of meeting her. A priest banished her out in the ocean for seven years.

  5. Burial place of unbaptised children
    About one mile from the village of Ardfield is a cross leading to three different roads called Crois na Leanb. It is Mr. Finn Bowhigs boreen.
    It is so called because in the older times unbaptised children were buried there. This cross is now covered with grass and high furze and is never tampered with.

  6. Old Houses

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Johanna Sullivan
    Informant
    Michael Sullivan

    Old houses
    The people in Ardfield long ago made their own houses. Most of them were made of thatch and earthen floors. Most of them were made by themselves. There was a mason living in Brownstone named Michael O Regan. He made many of the houses in Farran. They had big open fireplaces with two holes in each side for holding salt and matches. They had a big hole in the bottom for the chickens. They had hangers for to hang the pots. They had a timber machine in some of the old houses. They used a turnip with a hole in the midle for a candle-stick.
    From: Michael Sullivan, Johanna Sullivan
    Farran Farran

  7. Old Shops

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Hurley
    Informant
    Patrick Hurley

    Old Shops
    There were two shops in Ardfield Chapel Cross about sixty years ago. One of them was owned by a woman called Kit Hickey, and the other one which is now owned by the Cochlans was owned by two sisters named Mary and Ellen Hodnett.
    Miss Hickey used sell buns called halfpenny tackers, and other small groceries. And the other people used sell penny puffs, sweets and a little groceries. At play-hour some of the children used go to these shops and buy a puff or a tacker.
    From Patrick Hurley, Mary Hurley
    Little Island.

  8. St James is the patron Saint of Ardfield. His feast day is held on the twenty-third of July. Long ago the people had a great day that day, but the old customs nowadays are dying out. There were a couple of dances held in the parish that day long ago, and the people used to go to the Public houses and get drunk and come home singing.

    There used tents come out from Clonakilty four or five of them long ago but nowadays only two come. All the children buy sugarstict from the tents and biscuits and Gooseberries.

    Maureen Burke
    Sandescove

  9. his head I let him have the contents of a bucket of lime which was my only ammunition. I put the run on him anyway. My supplies at length ran out. Then one of the police overpowered me at last and gave me a crack of his baton on the head and almost knocked me out. They did not evict me anyway.
    They brought me with them to Ardfield where they evicted an old lady Mrs. Coghlan. They then proceeded to Clonakilty. Many people cheered me as I passed handcuffed between the police through Lamb St. and up to the police Barracks.
    The coat was whitewashed with the lime I threw on it and the Inspector ordered its owner to turn it inside out to prevent him from being laughed at. I was detained in Clonakilty barracks until six o'clock and I got nothing to eat from them.
    I was then taken to Bandon in

  10. The Story of Castlefreke

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sheila Mc Carthy
    Informant
    Pat Joe Mc Carthy

    Barrys there lived at Ardfield a priest who was so depressed at the defeat of the Barrys that he put the "curse of the crows" on the demesne which the Frekes had seized. It is two hundred years since the curse of the crows fell on Castlefreke and ever sine not one crow ever perched on the trees of the demesne. The curse was to stay on the demesne for two hundred years. The time is up now and a few crows may be seen perching on the trees there.
    Sheila Mc Carthy, (Fifth Class)
    Caherlarig, Clonakilty

    Pat Joe Mc Carthy,
    Caherlarig, Clonakilty

  11. The Three Beggars

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Spillane
    Age
    83

    The Three Beggars
    got from
    Mrs. Mary Spillane (83 yrs)
    Kilkerran, Clonakilty
    22-11-1937
    The Story
    Therr beggars once lived in this parish. One at Milltown, another at Ardfield and another at Donour. The three set out for Bandon Fair and on their way they

  12. The Old School

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie Driscoll
    Informant
    Patrick Driscoll

    In olden times there were no schools in Ardfield like now. The school they had before these schools were built was an old shed situated in Dunowen east. The master who was teaching was Mickey Curley Duggan.
    The pay he used to get was a penny a week from every child. He lived in the house in which Conny Duggan lives now. He was Kitty Duggan's Great Great Grandfather

    Kitty Duggan is attending this school.
    From-
    Patrick Driscoll
    Annie Driscoll
    Dunowen.

  13. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Thomas Deasy
    Age
    45

    Carrigroe in the Parish of Ardfield and in the Barony of Ibane and Barryroe. There are sixteen houses in it now and there were twenty-eight long ago. They are all slate roofed houses but were thatched long ago. The reason the townland is called Carrigroe or (Carraigrúadh) is because there is red rock in it. There are nine persons over seventy years in the townland Some of them can speak Irish. Their names are:
    James O'Sullivan
    Patrick and Catherine Collins
    Denis O'Donovan
    Mrs Hayes
    Mrs. Beamish
    Mrs. O'Sullivan
    James and Mrs. Mac Carthy

    all of the same address, which is,
    Carrigroe,
    Castle Freke,
    Clonakilty
    There are two old ruins of houses still to be seen. It was usual for a lot of people from the land to go to America when emigration was open. The townland is not mentioned in any old song or old saying. The land is good throughout and crops are easily grown in it. There is none of it under wood. There is a river running through the lands of James