Number of records in editorial history: 254329 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:43
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rejected
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One day a man named Mr Freaney told me a story about hidden treasure.
Out in Annas castle in one of the dungeons There is a big chest full of treasures hidden there. Three men tried to the treasure but when they were near the chest a bull came and chased them away. They dug a large in the ground by the side of the castles. The men were very excited at the thought of getting the chest of gold. They took off their coats, and they began to dig furiously for the treasure
They had about half a yard to dig, when the black bull followed them away. Nobody has tried to get the treasure since that night.
It is never known who put the treasure . There were gold cups and gold coins in the chest. It is supposed to
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:36
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they carried a coffin. They placed the coffin on the ground quite close to the man and several of them complained of being tired. Then one of them said they must get the man in the rushes to help them. But on the instant the man placed his tongue in his closed fist and they were unable to move him. He remained in this position and when morning came the coffin and people were gone.
Another version says they overtook the man at a bridge on the road through Altauure and he was compelled to carry the coffin to the old graveyard at Killaghaduff a dis- of five or six miles. Next morning the man was found in a dazed condition lying at the Churchyard andhe was brought home and put to bed and it was several weeks before he was fit to move around.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:31
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hills the people say three men went to dig for it when they were down about half way a red bull appeared and they left it so.
On the bank of the river at the northern side of the Ferry Bridge there is gold hidden and silver. My father told me that four men went to dig for it when they were down about three quarter way a fierce looking wolf hound appeared to them. They were frightened they went home and got a ball of woollen thread and they wet it with holy water and placed it round the hole and nothing appeared after but they did not get the treasure. In the Island pill near Mac Murrough there is gold and money hidden under the water ground.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:30
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A man, a weaver, was returning home very late one night and he heard the noise of a great number of people coming behind him. He hurried on but they seemed to come nearer and in the end they were so near that he decided to hide in a clump of rushes and let the crowd pass. As soon as the crowd reached the spot where the man lay he saw
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:28
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Do tharla oidhche an phósta gur eirig an fear breóidhte as a leabaidh agus níor stadadh leis go ndeaghaidh sé go doras tighe na bainise. Do sheasaimh sé ag an ndorus, ‘s d’fheuch sé isteach, agus chonnaic sé thuas í le háis na teine, agus í mar bheadh sí fé bhuadhairt aigne.
Do bhagair sé ar na daoine a bhí ag an ndoras agus dúbhairt:
Sí mo ghradh í thuas cois teine feadh na
h-oidhche
Agus mise anso thíos ag doras na gaoithe
Druidídh siar! is déinídh slighe dhom,
Go sínfead mo lámha go grádh mo chróidhe ‘stig.
Do chas sé ó’n ndoras, d’f[h]ill sé abhaile, agus i gcionn seachtaine fuair sé bás le briseadh croidhe.
Pádruig Ó Loingsigh, 14 bl., a fuair é seo ó na mháthair, 53 bl. Chuala sí sin é ó na seanamhathair atá le fada fé’n bhfód.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:27
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and in their midst was Ben Auclin. The man walked up to Ben Auclin and welcomed him and his men to the fair. Ben Auclin was surprised and asked him with which eye he could see them. The man replied it was with the left eye. Ben Auclin them struck him such a blow in the left eye that the man lost the sight of the eye forever.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:23
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I was told a story about hidden treasure on Sunday by an old man named William Hollern. He told me that there was money hidden in a place near Dunphy's old Mills Bawnmore. One day the people in the street said that they would go and get it. The money was hidden under a large stone it is said that it is there since the time of the Danes.
When they arrived at the place they decided that they would lift up the stone. When they got their spades and crowbars They had
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:18
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long time they thought that they were after hitting something.
They stopped digging for a while and they thought they heard something walking. The men were getting frightened then they saw a horse coming to them and they ran away.
These men went home very frightened they left their picks and spades after them they got such a fright when they saw the horse. The next night they went out with some more men. They started to dig up the place because it was covered in.
The first thing they found was the picks and spades that the five men left after them the night before. The men that were there the night before were afraid of the horse. But the other were not until they saw the horse and then the ran as quickly as the men the night before. They did not get the treasure nor never tried any more.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:10
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name earlier in the evening. The stranger told him he must now come with him and they passed into a large room where there were crowds and crowds of people passing in and out. The stranger told not to move or say a word and that he'd leave him safely at home next morning. The man sat for a long time and watched those passing to and fro and he noticed that each person dipped his hand in some liquid in a pail and rubbed it to his two eyes while passing on.
Towards morning the stranger returned and told him he was Ben Auchlin- one of the "Good People" and as they passed out the man continued without "Ben Auclin's" knowledge to dip his hand in the pail and he got as much liquid as wet his left eye.
He returned home and the following fair day in Swanlinbar he saw Ben Auchlin and several of his followers in the fair. A group of them were around a stall on the street
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:09
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In Mount Garret castle there is alot of treasure such as ammunition money and gold. If the stones and clay was taken away so that you could get down under ground you would find the treasure
My father told me this. On the hill of Ballymacare there is hidden treasure such as silver gold and chalices it was once called the "Convent of the Black Nuns" my cousin told me, There is gold hidden in Ballyanne
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:07
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Á! arsa é siud, ag eiriú aniar ar a leath-uilinn
Ní raibh ad ghrádh-sa ach mar bheadh mám de’n
sneachta gheal
Nó gainimh shéideáin do bheadh ar lár na
fairrge
Nó tuille ar na sléibhte dh’éis lae fearthainne
Nó cóch de’n ghaoithe de dhruim na ngarraidhthe.
Ach! Níor luig do chéile fós ar leabaidh
leat
‘S nuair a luighfidh, go luighfead-sa
eadraibh!
An Cailín arís:
Á! Faire! a ghrádh ghil. Ná déin-se dearmad
Ná cuir m’fhear pósta go deo in earraidh
liom
Mar do bheadh sé choidhche ‘s go deo ad chasadh
liom
Agus gan tu beó ’gam chun mo sceól
duit d’aithris.
Deabhruigheann an sceal ná raibh aon t-súil in a’chor aici go bhfágfadh sé an leabaidh ‘na shláinte. D’imig sí uaidh agus pósadh í féin ‘sa fear eile. Ach
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:03
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There is hidden treasure in Nevill's wood. It is supposed to be there for the past two hundred and twenty years. It is silver it was put by some robber who hid it there in case someone would get it and keep it. When the robber left the place some men tried to get it but were not able.
A horse used to appear to them. One night five men went out with spades and picks and started to dig for the treasure. They were digging for a long time before they could reach it. After digging for a
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:03
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A man from the Molly mountain was going to a weaver who lived in Rourke-field with some flannel to get made into clothes.
Evening was coming on and a neighbour meeting him advised him not to venture the journey or else he'd be benighted- night would follow and he might lose his way.But the man said he'd go on that he could sleep with "Ben Auchlin" that night. Ben Auchlin is the name of a mountain but it was probably called after some famous person of long ago.
The man went on his journey and sometimes later in the night he met a strange-looking man who asked him if he intended to sleep with "Ben Auchlin". The man was very much afraid as he had only been joking when he mentioned "Ben Auchlin's"
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:49
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Grádh ‘s Brón
Bhí buachaill ann aon uair amháin a bhí ana mhór ar fadh le cailín áirithe. Tráth de’s na tráthanna do buaileadh breóidhte é, agus dob éigean do an leabaidh do thógaint. Bhí sé go tréith-lag sínte ar an leabaidh sin tréimhse mhór fhada, agus ní raibh aon bhreis fhabhais a dul air. Lá de’s na laetheannta an fhaidh a bhí san amhlaidh do seineadh cleamhnas de’n cailín agus d’fhear eile. Sar ar pósadh iad amhthach dúbhairt sí lá léithi féin go raghadh sí a’féuchaint a grádha báin. Sar a scarfadh sí go deo leis. D’imig sí uirthi agus níor stad sí gur shuidh sí ag taobh na leabpan [?] mar a raibh sé sínte go tréith.
D’fhéuch sí air, agus má d’fhéuch, thuit na deóra síos léithi de’n amharcsan agus dúbhairt sí:
Mhuise mo grádh do shúile a bhí go lonnrach
leathan-gheal.
‘S mo ghrádh do chroidhe mór fiallmhar
catharannach
Mo ghrádh do ghruadhanna mar na caora nuair
a lasann siad
‘S mo ghrádh m’fhear óg, ‘sé mo bhrón bheith a
scaramhaint leat.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:48
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fire and got into her clothes. She was so much frightened that she ran to the room and in a minute or two she was in flames. Something in the room caught on fire and in a short time the whole house was on fire.
The people in the house shouted for help and they were heard by their neighbours and some one came with blankets. They held out the blankets and the people in the house threw out the children. The children were badly burned and they were removed to hospital, some of them died from the shock.
Their father and mother escaped but most of the house was burned and they had to get a new house built. It was a very exciting accident and it was very sad.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:43
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There was a house burned in Bawnboy, near Ballyconnell Co.Cavan about fifteen years ago. It belonged to John White and it was a fine big house with a thatched roof.
There were five or six children in that house and the eldest girl of them was sitting beside the fire one day when a spark flew out of the
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:24
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they are talking about a road or a lane.
The Irish word for my townland is Cilla Roinn which means the Church of the Divisions. There is a river running through it called the Black Water and it flows into Ballymagovern lake and there is a lake in it called Glebe.
There is also a railway running through my townland and there is a school in it called Killyran National School. I do not know any stories connected with it. The land in it is very hilly and there is some of it boggy. Some of the land is fertile enough but there is not much wood except clusters of bushes here and there.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:20
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Here are some of the games we play,"Tig Blindmans Buff, Ghost in the garden, Hide and seek, Putting the donkey's tail on."
In "Putting the donkey's tail on" we draw a donkey and somebody tries to put a tail on it with her eyes shut.
On Winter nights we play games of cards called, "Twenty five, Old Maid, Begger my neighbor and snap."
Mary Healy
Pontoon
Foxford
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:19
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I live in the townland of Killyran which is in the Parish of Templeport four miles from the village of Bawnboy and six miles from Ballyconnell.
There are ten families living in it and the best known name of the families is Downey. There are forty-nine people living in it and two of them are old as they are over seventy years of age. One is Mr. Mcaul and the other is Mr. Downey.
There was another very old woman living in it and her name was Mrs. Taylor and she was over ninety years of age but she died some years ago. There was another man living in it called Robert Downey and he was over seventy years of age and he died a couple months ago.
Most of the houses that are in it are thatched but a couple of them are slated. The people that live in it do not speak much Irish except a few words such as muc when they are speaking to the pig or botaireen when
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:17
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She is as clean as you are
You are
You are
She is as clean as you are
Humpty Dumpty Teddy bow-wow
8.
Then you may have her
Have her
Have her
Then you may have her
Humpty Dumpty Teddy bow-wow
Kathleen Healy (V Class)
Pontoon
Foxford
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:07
approved
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awaiting decision
these things when he is sewing. There is not a bit of home weaved cloth in this district now because there is no weaver in the district.
The people wear their best clothes when they are getting married in this parish. Long ago the old people never needed a tailor because they spun their own wool an cloth. When they had the cloth made they dyed it with a brown moss off the stones.
The clothes which they made or wore was woollen or linen. Now a days people never spin or weave but buy their own clothes in the shop.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 01:03
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There are two or three in this parish or maybe there are more in it. They work in their own homes all day long. They do not go from one house to another like they used to do long ago. Long ago the tailors went from one house to another and stayed in one village until they had made all the clothes in that village.
The tailors usually keep a big a big stock of cloth for making suits and over coats. Long ago the old people wove cloth for making suits. An old weaver lived in the village of Cuingmore his name is John MacCormack. He used to weave cloth on a loom. When the wool was taken off the sheep it was dyed with the brown moss of the stones.
A tailor has a machine, a thimble, a needle, a scissors and thread. The tailor uses all
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:58
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cures for burns. “If the hand is steeped in new” If the burnt limb be immersed in a bowl of new milk and left there for a few minutes, and a cloath is soaked in new milk, flour is shaken on the burn and the cloath is rapped round it. This cloth is not removed for days. It is soaked in hot castor oil before removed.
A simple cure for sleeplessness is raw onions and buttermilk taken with potatoes before going to bed. Another cure for sleeplessness is to drink a cup of strong black tea. A cure for a head ache is to tie a band soaked in vinegar round the head and to lie down.
I got these cures from my mother.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:54
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on the sprain limb cure it after a few days. The eel skin cures talah[?] if it is tied around the wrist. A sty in the eye is cured by pointing a gooseberry thorn to it, it is point[ed] three times and then thrown away. A small potatoe is carried in the pocket to cure stiffness in the bones. The water from a maren[?] is used to wash sore eyes.
Mountain-sage is used to cure colds indigestion and rheumatism, it is boiled in water and the juice or liquid drank every morning before meals. Ground ivy is used for a bad heart when boiled the juice is drank. White bread scalded with hot water is used for sores. Cobblers wax is used for sore fingers and hands it is heated to the fire and put to the sore finger and a cloth is put over it, it draws and heals the sore. Flour is good for a burn, it is put on the burn, it heals it. Where there is a waterfall it is good for a strained hand or foot to hold it under the fall of water and the bone goes back to its place.
There are various
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:46
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Now when a person gets ill to-day the doctor the doctor is taken to the person or he is taken to the the doctor. In former times in this district people sought remedies in various ways but not from the doctor.
Some [?] of these old cures are still in use. To cure a tooth-ache the stem of garlic is tied round the wrist and left there till the stem is withered and the pain is gone. Hooping-cough is cured by eating the leavings of the ferret. The fat of the goose and unsalted butter are used to cure sore mouths.
Hooping-cough is cured by crawling under the donkey's body and between his legs three times, another cure for hooping-cough is to drink donkey's milk. The ear of a goat is put around the patient's neck and it cures it. A thread of the flax taken from the loom tied
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:40
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out to a friend to seek shelter for the night. On his way he had to cross a graveyard he saw a ghost, through fear he ran away and he was a great runner, so he ran and ran until he fell then the spirit came up to him and asked him what was wrong with him. The poor man said that he was evicted by the landlord and he was going to his friends. “Come with me” said the spirit, “and I will set you free.” The man went with him until they reached the landlord's house the ghost made the landlord give a free receipt to the man and he went back to his house.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:37
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not married so when he died there was no one to take possession of his land so the people got back their own.
There was one field in his private lands in which any cattle which were found trespassing were kept until the people they belonged to came for them. Ruttledge made them pay for trespassing on his land, if they could not pay he kept the cattle. This field was called Gorrín na Phunt. Ruttledge had a soap factory beside his own house. He got most of the work done in this factory without any payment, because the people could not pay the rent and they had to work for it. The rent was not sent to him like it is sent today he went round to every house and collected it himself.
Once upon a time a poor man could not pay the rent and he could not give work for it because he had his own work to do. So when the landlord came round collecting the rent he turned the poor man out but he did not knock down his house.
The poor man set
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:32
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The landlord of Tavanaughmore was called Rutledge. He lived there 100 years ago. He belonged to a family of the Cromwelians.
Ruttledge was looked upon as a good landlord. There was very few evictions because the old people paid the rent by work or giving things for it and the homestead were not thrown down if any eviction took place. When Cromwell crossed the Moy into Tirawley one of his soldiers settled down in Tavanaughmore and took possession of the land people say for his service in Cromwell's army.
It is said that he liked to settle down there because of its fine scenery. A view of mountains lakes and woods as far as Ballina, Crossmolina, Lahardane and Ballyvary can be seen from this residence. His house was a big one. There is a farm-house built on the spot where it stood, it belongs to John Mchale. Ruttledge had no family he was
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:27
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to settle the question. The bishop arrived in due time with his priests, after a few days he selected one of the two abbots. He stayed in the monastery a while after that to see how would the settlement go on. The party whose chosen head was not selected grew very jealous so they determined to murder the bishop. One night they rose from their beds and murdered the bishop and people say he is buried there.
After the murder the monks were terrified by the appearance of an animal about twice the size of an ordinary horse, this animal came out of the lake and swallowed the monks cattle, the monks prayed and prayed when this appeared and it went back to the lake for another period. This animal is to be seen up to to-day before a drowning happens in Lough Conn.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:23
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In the distance past when monasteries were very numerous there was one in Glass Island. The ruins are to be seen today. The island is situated in Lough Conn.
The walls were of a good hight until a few years ago a storm knocked it down. The doors and windows were arched shape. The old people say that Francescians lived in it about 700 years ago and that some of the monks are buried in the ruins.
There is an old story that an abbot was to be elected as head. This caused a division in the house. One party wanted a head of their own choise so this caused trouble and disputes between the monks, they tried to sett[le] the matter but it was impossible. So they decided to send for the bishop of Killala
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:16
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spray is when the sun is shining. If stalks are sprayed in rain all the spray is washed off again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:15
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for a few days before they are set. The pitcher fills a bucket of slits out of the bag. He follows the sticker and when the sticker makes a hole on the ridge he puts in a slit.
The manure is taken from the stable on a donkey's back in pardogs. It is taken to the field and it is unloaded. The loads are left apart every four yards. It is left there for one night and one day. Then it is spread over the ridget from end to end. Then it is covered with clay. When the little buds come up they are weeded and the furrows are dug deeper than they were at first.
The potatoes are sprayed in May or in the beginning of June. They are sprayed so as to keep them safe from blight. Spraying is done with a mixture of water, washing soda, lime and blue stone. They are sprayed with a spraying machine. The machine is filled with spray and the man who sprays carries the machine on his back. The best time to
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:08
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We set potatoes every year on our farm. It is my father who sets them. We usually have a good dry crop of potatoes. My father sets them and when its the time for digging them, father digs them. All of them we do not eat or use we sell. My father prepares the ground for the setting of the potatoes. He ploughs the field when there are no stones, if there are (no) stones he digs the land with a spade.
If the land is damp he makes drills but if it is dry he makes ridges. The woman of the house cuts the potatoes. The cutting of the seed potatoes is a work in itself. One potatoe makes three or four slits according to the number of eyes in it.
The farmer is very careful not to put down a slit without an eye as it would not grow. The slits are taken to the field in an old bag. The slits are left to dry
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 00:03
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Sometime afterwards the figure of a girl appeared at the rock. A woman who got up in the middle of the night and looked out she saw a girl at the Mass Rock. The girl made signs to her to come near but she was afraid so she went to bed again. In a few hours time she got up again and looked out and the girl appeared to her again. She made signs to the woman again to go to her. She went to her. The girl told her that she could not go to heaven unless she would tell some Priest where the vestments hidden. When she had told the woman all this she vanished. The woman told a priest where the vestments were hidden and he came and brought them with him. The girl never appeared again as evidently her soul went to heaven.
Everybody in the district knows this story.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:59
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There is a Mass Rock in the village of Cuingmore. A strange story is told about it. Once upon a time when the red caps were after the Priests a Catholic girl was attending Mass one day she heard that the soldiers were after the Priest. When the soldiers came along she spied on the Priest. The priest went to some rock to hide on the soldiers. He met a rock in our field and he went into the rock to hide.
There are two big stones standing straight about twelve feet apart with one flat stone over them all. Nine or ten people could fit within inside the stones. There are two seats inside with a division between the two seats. The sign of the cross is carved on the inside of the north gable. The priest hid inside the two rocks but the soldiers did not find him.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:54
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old woman, and she takes a pain. Then the others send for a doctor and a priest, the doctor and priest come. The priest anoints the old woman then the old woman dies. They all start to cry. The old woman gets up, and they all run out with the old woman after them.
They all come in again and every one of them dances with the bride. They are all boys. The girls around here dress up like boys and go to the wedding as claharas.
The wedding is always held in the brides home. The bride stays with her parents for a week and the bridegroom goes to his own home. When the bride goes home she is superstitious about coming back to see her mother for a month or so.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:51
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and so that he will give her a good fortune.
The morning of the marriage the bride dresses in brown. Then two cars come to bring them to the church. The bride the bridegroom and the witnesses go in the first car and their friends go in the second car.
After the marriage they come home and have their breakfast. When the breakfast is over they go for a long drive to the sea shore. When they come home they have their supper. After the supper the claharas gather, they wait until morning and then they go home. The claharas having dressed themselves in old clothes go to the wedding. They go into the house they dance until morning. They have music and sport.
They play games, this is one of them. One of them dresses up like a
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:44
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Marriages are held in this district at Shrove time. If a granhog runs across the road before the people who are going to get married they say that they will have bad luck. If they hear a hen crowing in the morning they will kill her because it is for bad luck. When they are coming home they will light a sheaf of straw for good luck. If they see two hens fighting outside the door they say it is for bad luck.
The lucky days to get married are Thuesday and Thursday. Matches are made sometimes. When the man goes match-making he takes a bottle of whiskey with him. He sets the expected father-in-law drunk so that he will give his daughter easily
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:42
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:41
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The Land Lord of Clontra was Lord Singelton. He was agood man to his tennants. He gave them the Land purchase, and he reduced their rent to less than half, when he that the people were poor. He lived for a time in Kilmore where the post Offic now stands.
The Agent was Mr J Studders. He used to go around encouring the people to pay him the full Rent. The people did not like him, because he was a bad sort of a man. But Lord Singelton was a good man.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:36
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Black and Tans. When they came raiding their house, the Kelly girls hid this ring under the flag.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:34
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There are no holy wells in our district but there is one in Ahascragh called St Kevin's Well. It is situated in Castlegar land. There is also one in Brideswell and it is called St Brigid's Well. There is one in Athleague called St Patricks Well.
People go to Kevin's Well the 15th of October. There is a bush beside the well and on that people or pilgrims leave relics such as, hairpins, ribbons and pieces of cloth.
People bring home the
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:31
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water to drink it. It is supposed that there was a bullock drowned in the well,
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:24
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There are three graveyards in the parish of Taughboy. There is one in Dysart and there is a ruin of a chapel in it. There are no people buried in the old graveyard that is there now. The old graveyard in Dysart is square. People were digging up the grave and they found the bones of somebody who was buried there.
The new graveyard in Dysart is filled with head
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Turlough Parish. Cloonkesh means the meadow of the bridge of wattles. A “kesh” is a little bridge made of sticks and scraws in a bog. Cloontubrid is the meadow of the well. There is a beautiful spring well there. Cloonagleragh is the clerks or priests meadow. Killard means the high church, or graveyard. This village borders Turlough cemetary where St Patrick founded his church. St Patricks well is beside the graveyard. Ballyguinn means the village of the Quinns. Part of it was owned by a family of the Quinns until recently. Knockanour means the hill of the goats. Meelick means the bare flag-stone.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stones over the grave. Some people put head stones over the grave.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was quite a lot of people cured in olden times by quacks of different diseases.
Different people were cured of asthma and bronical trouble with corrigeen moss. This was burned and put under the nose of the sufferer to inhale it.
Wild-fire was cured by putting a gold ring on it.
Ring worm was cured by the seventh of a family and he cured ring worm.
Chin cough was supposed to be cured by treatment and the God mother of a child should tie a red ribbon
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
hills, and on this account is said to be at the back of the sun. Windsor gets its name from a Castle the McAlpines built there. They called it Windsor Castle after the Royal residence in England. Colonel McAlpine, the last occupier, sold his property to the C.D.B. and it is now divided up into holdings, and the castle has been levelled to the ground. Part of this village is called Clogher because it is filled with huge masses of rock. There is a bog near it called Seantalam. Part of the village of Gortnafolla is called Drimdaff. It takes name from the ridge of hills running through the centre of it, which are covered with ferns and heather. Cloonkesh, Cloontibrid, Cloonagleragh, Killard, Ballyguinn, Knockanour and Meelick are villages near the school in
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
round the child's neck. Boils were cured by oaten meal poultices. Sore eyes were cured with bees wax.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1920 there was a great rain storm a house was drowned under the water in hermitage The name of the man's house was Thomas Murly. He had to bar the doors and windows.
In that year also the bog moved down near Kilmore. It moved about a quarter of a mile. Many lives were lost. In the year 1917 there was
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of linen which continued down to a few years ago. Ballynew means the new village. The old Irish were driven out of it, and English settlers imported. It was again cleared in later years by the Fitzgeralds, and it has since been again divided into farms by the Irish Land Commission. Rockfield takes its name from its rocky nature. The Fitzgeralds lived in this village until 1860 when they built their present residence. Carrowkeel means the slender quarter. There are four villages this side of the road in Keelogues Parish. Capparanny takes its name from the clumps of bushes, and abundance of ferns which are found in it. The most of it was enclosed in a grazing farm until recent years, but it has now been divided among the tenantry. Culagrane is a village situated to the north side of a high ridge of
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:11
approved
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awaiting decision
a great fall of snow it lasted for six weeks it was about four feet high, all school were closed
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Jamse Miskell said he have her all the boys are fighting for her let the boys are fighting for her let the boys do what they will Jamse Miskell will have her still.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Carrowkeel, Capparanny, Coulagrane and Windsor are the villages about the school in the Parish of Keelogues. Gortnafolla means the field of the blood. A bloody battle is said to have been fought here between the Burkes and the Irish clans under O'Connor. It was on the side of the road running through this village that Randal McDonnell of Chancery, leader of the Volunteers in this area, was murdered at the instigation of George Robert Fitzgerald of Turlough. Turlough is said to have got its name from the swamp or lake in its centre which dries up in Summer. Leckneen probably got its name from the abundance of flat stones in it. George Robert Fitzgerald built a flax mill and a bleaching mill in this village, and started an industry in the production
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are no holy wells in this Parish but there is one in the joining parish.
People visit them every year in honour of the saint they are dedicated too. There is one in Ahascragh dedicated to Saint Kevin. People go to it from 1st to the 15th of October and make the rounds
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and say the rosaries
People pick 15 rushes and when they come to the stone and when they come to the stone the throw a rush.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In 1917 there was a terrible fall of snow which lasted about a fortnight. It was two feet deep. My father lost two sheep in that snow. About three or four years ago there was another fall of snow almost as bad as bad as the one before
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
colour and two more will stand out and one will be the Devil and the other the angel.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 23:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are a lot of games which I play at home and at school.
Chickens
Chickens are played by a whole lot of children joining up to-gether and another one to be the fox.
"Colours are played by a lot of children standing by a wall and one go round and give out the
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
married the come out and take off their shoes and go on the back of the bike with the man.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the olden times there was a lot of marriages for instance there certain days which people like to get married Friday Thursday and Monday.
People get married all the year round except Lent and Advent. In foreigin countries the people get married in the church and wear high hells shoes and when they are
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As I went up sandyhil sandyhill was shaking I met a hundred little devels and them all scraping
A harrow.
Middy, Noddy round body three feet and a wooden hat.
A pot.
As round as a apple as plump as a ball
The sun.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:52
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thing on earth?
A snail because he carries his house on his back.
Humpy dumpy sat on a wall humpy dumpy got a great fall?
A egg.
Little thing smaller than a mouse has as many windows as in a Gentlemans house
A thimble
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:50
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awaiting decision
What part of the cow is higest in the wood?
Her lew.
Under the water and over the water but never touches the water.
A Shadow
What is the strongest bridge in the world?
The bridge of your nose.
What is the strongest
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
have rain. If there is a blue light light in the fire it is the sign of rain. If frogs are black it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Turlough school is in Keelogues Parish. The Parish of Turlough is on the other side of the road. Cill dá-chomóg is the correct name for Keelogues. It takes its name from an old Church which was built near two bends in the Manulla river. Some of the old people say it got its name from a monastery which stood in Keelogues cemetery, in which there was a monk who had two crooked feet. St Patrick founded the first Church in Keelogues. It was then called Cill Iog. The Parish of Turlough gets its name from the Church St Patrick founded in Turlough village. The two parishes have been united and separated on numerous occasions. They were under the jurisdiction of the Arch-bishop of Armagh until the twelfth century. Gortnafolla, Turlough, Leckneen, Ballynew, Rockfield,
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Turlough school is in Keelogues Parish. The Parish of Turlough is on the other side of the road. Cill dá-chomóg is the correct name for Keelogues. It takes its name from an old Church which was built near two bends in the Manulla river. Some of the old people say it got its name from a monastery which stood in Keelogues cemetery, in which there was a monk who had two crooked feet. St Patrick founded the first Church in Keelogues. It was then called Cill Iog. The Parish of Turlough gets its name from the Church St Patrick founded in Turlough village. The two parishes have been united and separated on numerous occasions. They were under the jurisdiction of the Arch-bishop of Armagh until the twelfth century. Gortnafolla, Turlough, Leckneen, Ballynew, Rockfield
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:47
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rejected
awaiting decision
There are a lot of signs by things when we would have bad weather. If the cat sits at the fire with his back to it that is the sign of rain If foxes bark much in October it is the sign of snow.
The old people say that if soot falls down the chimney we are to
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and dancing and some of the people have a wren and they sang. The wren The wren the king of all birds, On St Stephen's day he was caught in the furzes.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:43
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awaiting decision
On St John's Eve we have a bonfire and in olden times people used to bring a stick or a coal and throw it in the field that they will have a good crop for the year and that day we do have a big crowd of people at the bonfire and we do have
music and dancing.
On the 26th of December we have St Stephen's Day a lot of people dress in old clothes and hats on them they go round from house to house playing
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:40
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awaiting decision
fairies will have the power to come in at night.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The people of olden times wore no shoes. Until they were 18 years of age. People should take great care of their feet, they should wash their feet every night.
Tight shoes are very bad for the feet, because it give aingrowintoenail which is very pain full.
There is an old superstition that the water used for washing the feet should never be left in at night or the
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:25
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black smith uses is a hammer. pincers, and many other things.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:22
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awaiting decision
There are six forges in this parish. The smiths are Pake Mulligan, Michael Kelly, Tom Donohoe, Tom Reilly, John Banertine. People have been smiths for many years. The forges are situated near a river or a stream and some on the side of the road. The roofs of the forges are slated. And a big door for the horses to in and out. The article the
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 22:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old well in this parish, but there is a holy well in the adjoining parishes.
There is a holy well called St Kevin's well in Ahascragh. There is another well called St Brigid's Well in Brides-Well. There is another well in Athleague called St Patrick's Well. Sir Goerge Mahon opwned the field in which St Kevin's Well is situated. He did not believe in this well, and he did not like the people to be going in, to do the Rosary.
Some people say this man took the cross from the well and
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 21:50
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awaiting decision
residents of the locality began to take a pride in this tree and as its roots struck deeper and even deeper into the close under soil they told the history of it to their children.
A generation ago or more when the public water supply of Kinsale of which we hear so much in our day, was even poorer than it is now, people used sit by the Abbey Well during a summer night with their earthenware jugs awaiting their turn to bail a cupful of water from the square shallow hole at the bottom. To while away the hours many a story went the rounds - stories of what happened in the Abbey or in the neighbourhood generations earlier; also predictions of future events,
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 21:46
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awaiting decision
It was a sycamore tree. In course of time it became a beautiful growth. As for the young planter his family fell gradually into poverty. The sovereigns one after another disappeared from the basin. Finally the family had to emigrate.
There can be no doubt that young Scott before turning his back forever on his native town went up the Abbey Well Lane to gaze for the last time at the sprout brought by him from Knockrobbin, and which was then beginning to spread its branches over an Tobar Mhuire. Well may we believe too that he told its history to the neighbours whom he was to see no more. At all events it is certain that the
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 21:07
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Tá daoine ann agus Oidhche Lae Sheain nuair a bhíonn an Teine Chnámh ag meathlú gheibheann siad sméaróid ó'n teine agus fágann siad imeasc na ngas bprátaí í chun go mbeidh prátaí maithe acu.
Cuireann siad sméaróid eile as an teine-chnámh in a dteinte féin.

From
Mary Gaughan
Emlybeg,
Belmullet,
Co Mayo
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 21:05
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awaiting decision
It is said that Saint Patrick passed through Raheens on his way to Croagh Patrick and that he built a small Church at Killeen in Raheens. There are six hills in Raheens namely, the Windmill, Strúán, Killeen, captain's Hill, Bridge Hill, and Cruagán igceanna.
The Windmill hill got its name from a windmill that was on the top of that hill. The windmill was a round building of about thirty feet in height, and it was knocked about six years ago.
Browns own by house is three storey high and there are thirty two rooms in it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:57
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about 80 feet in height and it was built in the year 1800. On one side of it there is an image of Maria Browne O'Donnell and on the other side the year it was built is marked. It was said that when the monument was built that there was a small tree set on top of it and that when the tree began to grow Brownes sent a man to take it down and when it was taken down there was a small concrete block was put in its place.
There is a vault in Raheens about a quarter of mile south of the Avenue.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:55
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beautiful plantation of pine trees on each side of it and long ago, Brownes used to have four or five men always employed to keep the avenue clean and repaired when it needed repairing but now as the place is uninhabited there is grass and weeds growing on it now and it is not kept repaired and about half way up the avenue there is a stone in the side of it which marks the mileage to the town of Castlebar.
On the South side of the avenue there is a monument erected in memory of Maria Browne O'Donnell, the 2nd daughter of Sir Neal O'Donnell. This monument is
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:51
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awaiting decision
to another country; another tenant is Mr. John Ward who lives in a small slated cottage, on the other side of the Newport-Castlebar road opposite Raheens Post Office at the entrance to the Avenue which leads to Brownes house, and the other tenant is Mr. John Walsh who lives in a small thatched cottage beside Brownes large house.
When Brownes were living in Raheens their estate was about one mile in length and about three quarters of a mile in breadth. The avenue that leads from Raheens Post Office to Brownes big house is a long winding avenue and about for half a mile up this avenue there is a
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:46
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awaiting decision
caught inside the walls of Raheens would be prosecuted.
There were men from Derrycoosh, Curnanool and Kilfea herding cattle and sheep for Brownes, at the rate of one penny per day or sixpence per week but each man used to get a very good dinner and tea, for his dinner each man 1lb of beef. At the time of the Brownes there were four houses in Raheens, Brownes own large house which is three storeys in height and in which nobody has lived for many years is now going to the rack and three other houses in which tenants were living, the names of the tenants, were Mrs. Quigly, who years ago went away
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:46
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awaiting decision
caught inside the walls of Raheens would be prosecuted.
There were men from Derrycoosh, Curnanool and Kilfea herding cattle and sheep for Brownes, at the rate of one penny per day or sixpence per week but each man used to get a very good dinner and tea, for his dinner each man 1lb of beef. At the time of the Brownes there were four houses in Raheens, Brownes own large house which is three storeys in height and in which nobody has lived for many years is now going to the rack and three other houses in which tenants were living, the names of the tenants, were Mrs. Quigly, who years ago went away
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:42
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The district that borders Derrycoosh on the South, is called Raheens. This district was owned by a family named Brownes who descended from the Anglo-Normans long ago, and who are now dead or gone away to "Ceylon" or to "Australia". The Brownes of Raheens are related to the Brownes of Breaffy who own a big house there now.
When the Brownes were living in Raheens they owned about 700 acres of land which they used for grazing purposes only, and anybody that was
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:37
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meaning for it.
"Now that is the history and details of the District of Derrycoosh at the present day to the best of my knowledge."
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:37
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All got away before dark as the "pooka" was supposed "to be out' that night.
On one occasion, a party who had visited their friends after the bonfire, were frightened almost to death, on the way home . Their path led past the remains of the bonfire . A mighty wind tore across the place throughout the neighbouring rushes, and left a road in its trail. The bonfire ceased to be held there afterwards. It was held about a quarter of a mile nearer to the houses.
Now , the bonfire is held near a cross roads as the young people are fewer in number and it requires more than one townsland to make up a number sufficient for the dance.
The fire from the remains of the bonfire is no longer taken away for the gardens and 'pookas' are regarded as things of a foolish age
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:35
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from the district called Corha.
There are no large trees growing in the district as they were all cut down and firewood was made of them but there are some fine hedges growing around some of the houses.
Some farmers have fine new outhouses on their farm and others have bad outhouses.
The oldest person that is alive in the district at present is "Pat McLoughlin" and he is, I suppose nearly 90 years of age. The children of Derrycoosh are taught in "Curnanool National School."
The name, Derrycoosh has different meanings, some say it is "the oak Wood" others say it is the hollow of the Wood, so I don't know the right
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:33
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Another custom in the West of Ireland is to light a large bon-fire on Saint John's eve. The boys who live in the towns collect money and buy a load of turf and the boys who live in the country bring turf with them from home. They build a large stack of turf at every cross-roads and spill a can of oil down on it. Then they put a big bone on the top of the turf and light it. When the fire is blazing up somebody starts to play music and all the boys and girls dance round about it until midnight. Sometimes the fires remain lit until the next morning.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:31
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the district. There are only a few women in the district able to spin their own thread and there is nobody in the district able to weave.
There is a man named "Michael Walsh" living to the East of the district on the Southside of the Newport road who owns a public house. There are no rivers of much importance in the district. There are two small rivers in the centre of the district which join into one river and then it flows on until it flows into a middling large river which separates the district from the district called Raheens and another small river to the West of the district which separates it
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:30
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awaiting decision
There are two bonfire nights celebrated one on 23rd June and the other on 28th June.
It is a common belief that if the weather breaks between these nights, it will be a wet Summer and I have known this to happen sometimes.
The bonfire is made on the hill top or often at a roadside convenient to a bog from which supplies of fuel could be easily provided.
When the fire blazes up as the result of a sprinkling of dry turf and sticks with paraffin oil supplied gratis by the local shopkeeper.
It is a pretty sight when on a dark night one after another of the bonfires of surrounding highlands all twinkle in the night while faint cheering may be carried from far off on calm nights.
I met an old woman on bonfire night carrying half-burnt turf sods from the bonfire. She told me that her husband had always taken turf home with him to throw into his cottage garden and that she was so to speak continuing the old custom.
Cattle are never driven through the smouldering ashes though I have heard of that custom in other counties.
While the fire burns brightly, the people - young and old gather round talking, singing or listening to the music of a violin or melodian.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:21
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would leave a dance every night of the week in the district, but now there is not a dance in any house in the district, except that there would be a stranger visiting in some house and that there might be a dance in that house that night that is all the dances that are in the district at the present day. It is said that St. Patrick passed near this district on his way to Croagh Patrick.
There are three ruins of old houses in the district which were inhabited years ago. One is built to the North of the district another is built to the North-East of the district and a third is built to the South of
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:18
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Bonfires are still kept up and in one family the farmer or his wife jump over the red embers for luck. The wife Mrs Murphy takes a kindled stick and ashes to each field where a crop is growing i.e. corn, wheat, potatoes and roots. This red ash is supposed to banish the fairies and keep the crop from being blighted.
In other parts the people dance around the fire and in Mayo a boy who has a wish to marry a neighbouring girl is particular to catch her hands and dance around the fire hoping to be lucky in this way of getting the colleen.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:18
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with a good fortune, then if he knew a girl with a good fortune he would go to that girl's father and then they would some bargaining after a while the match would be made and then the boy would get married to the girl and when they would get married, there would be a big wedding and all the neighbours and friends would be invited; but now it is not like that, because when boys or girls go away to England or to America or to any strange place working they stay there for a few years and after a few years more they get married there. About twenty five years ago every farmer would let a dance into their houses as it would come in their turn, and that
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:14
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The two most common names in the district are Walshs and McLoughlins. There are five women and and two men over seventy years of age and none of them knowing Irish nor any of the young people of the district knowing Irish either. A great many people of the district go away to England in the beginning of Spring and they stay there working hard until Christmas trying to earn money for themselves.
The people of the district do not get married like they used to years ago. The way they used get married long ago was if a man thought his son was old enough to get married he would like him to get married to a girl
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:09
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and it is a branch of the Newport road also, it leads to the Parish church of Islandeady and then it continues to the Westport road.
The principal grain crops which the people sow in the district are Wheat, Oats and Rye. Oats is sown in a larger quantity than any other of the grain crops. Some farmers sow an acre of potatoes and others sow an acre and a half of potatoes. The principal sort of potatoes the people sow in the district are Irish Queens, Champions and the principal early potatoes.
The people of Derrycoosh are nice neighbourly people and they are a very hard-working class of people.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:02
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that there were fairies seen there another is Tigh bán and the last one is Cruach no móna or Cruach na muime.
The main road which leads from Castlebar to Newport passes through the district, and hence the portion of the district which is the north side of that road is called "Northern Derrycoosh", and the portion which is the South side of the same road, is called "Southern Derrycoosh" and the other roads are not of much importance except two, one which is to the North of the district, a branch of the Newport road, it passes through the Parish of Glenisland and then continues on to the town of Belmullet, the other is to the South of the district
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:01
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8. Bird Lore
The wild birds which are found most commonly in this district are the thrush, the blackbird, the rook, robin, wren, sparrow, jackdaw, yellow-hammer, sparrow-hawk, and the gold-finch. Those birds do not migrate.
Some birds build their nests on tree-tops as the rook others build their nests in bushes as the blackbird, and thrush. Others build their nests in house-eaves and holes in walls and fences.
The blackbird a nest with with moss, and hay with mud inside. The rook builds a nest with small sticks and hay.
There are other birds also called migratory birds. Some of those birds come to us from northern Europe, namely the wild goose, the red-wing, the field-fare and the snipe, and different kinds of wild duck. Other come to us from southern Europe, namely the chiff-chaff and other. Other come to us from tropical Africa namely the cuckoo, and the nightingale.
The birds which come to us from Southern Africa are the swallow, swift, martin and the corncrake. Those birds come to us at the beginning of Summer, and the birds which come to us from the north, come to us in
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 19:58
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The Leipreachán
The Leipreachán in this locality is called a fairy a ghost or a banshee. He is about a foot high and he wears a red cap and a green jacket. The Leipreachán lives usually under a hill. His usual occupation is shoemaking and he found mending shoes on the top of a mushroom.
The Leipreacháns are looked upon as friendly beings if you do not interfere with them. The leipreacháns take away young children at night if you interfered with them. The leipreachán has in his possession, a hammer, a last, an awl and a purse of gold.
If you see a leipreachán keep your eye on him for if you take your eye off him he is gone and if you succeed in catching him, order him to give you the purse and you will take the money out of it shilling by shilling.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 19:56
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About fifty years ago, there were forty four houses in it and the people that lived in them were like savages because people going from town to Glenisland or to Letture used to be followed by a band of fellows with sticks and stones and if the people would not run fast the fellows would nearly kill them.
There are five slated houses and three tiled houses and twenty seven thatched houses in the district.
The village is bordered on the north by a range of small mountains, on the east by Curnanool, on the South by Raheens and on the west by Cora. There are three big hills one is called Lisheen, because there is a fort there and tradition tells us
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 19:52
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The name of my native district is Derrycoosh. It is situated almost in the centre of the Parish of Islandeady in the Barony of Cara in the County Mayo about three miles west of Castlebar.
It is a fairly large district, as there are thirty five houses in it, and a population of one hundred and sixty eight in the year 1937, and there are about three hundred and fifty acres of arable land and moor-land or bog land.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 19:52
approved
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awaiting decision
The name of my native district is Derrycoosh. It is situated almost in the centre of the Parish of Islandeady in the Barony of Cara in the County Mayo about three miles west of Castlebar.
It is a fairly large district, as there are thirty five houses in it, and a population of one hundred and sixty eight in the year 1937, and there are about three hundred and fifty acres of arable land and moor-land or bog land.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bonfires are lighted on St John's Eve and on the Eve. of the 29th June.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
held on the first of May they had various games and athletic feats, mirth and carousing and the pagan youth watched and watied eagerly for May Eve. So as St. Patrick went through Ireland converting young and old he found it difficult to keep the young men converted to his faith from patronising the great Pagan Bonfire. The saint being a very wise man thought the best way and only way to prevent his converts from intercourse with the pagans and their fires was to have a bonfire in memory of St. Peter an St. Paul on the Eve of the 23rd of June and on St. John's Eve. So that is how the first bonfires started and continued to be held but alas they are gone almost never to return.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:37
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awaiting decision
Bonfires were common about thirty years ago and they are not completely a thing of the past yet. The chief cause of the decay of bonfires is due in part to the lack of firewood and another cause is the decrease in the population of youngsters.
In olden times there was a bonfire on every hill but in parts of the locality there was a special bonfire and young men and some old people too walked a considerable distance to one of these given out (?) bonfires. There used to be fiddlers and all kinds of musicians present at the bonfires, tambouring and fives. Young girls were there by the score and if the night was good and dry they sang and danced unti the small hours of the morning and this custom was continued from the time of St. Patrick. When he came to convert the Irish people they had their great bonfires especially the great fire they had to memory of Baal, then chief God. Young men frequented these bonfires which were
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:27
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awaiting decision
On the twenty eight of June every year there is a bonfire lit on nearly every crossroads and especially near a bog or a wood where they can get lots of fire. On that day people come from all parts of the village and spend the whole evening getting sticks and make a big heap of them in one place.
Then they get a cart and pull it themselves, and draw them to some place
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:27
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awaiting decision
where everyone can see it. Then they build up the sods of turf like a churn and pack the sticks into the heart of it. They put lamp oil on it then and put a match to it and soon the whole thing is ablaze.
Then some of the boys play a mouth-organ or a fiddes and more of them sing so that it is more of a dance than anything else. The singing and dancing keeps on until about twelve or one o'clock when everyone starts for home.
When they are going home everyone brings a piece of a lit stick and throws it out in the tillage field so that all the crops in that field will be a success.

Tomás Mac Siómóin
Baile Ard
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"St John's night bonfires were lit always long ago and the cows were followed around the field with burning bushes in order to bring them in calf"

Nora Lyons
Cratloe West
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:06
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rejected
awaiting decision
The Saints in this place were St. Muireadach, St. Farnan, St. Baithen, St. Charles and St. Patrick visited this place.
St. Muireadach was a native of Inishmurray part of the parish of Templeboy. He left Inishmurray when he was young and came to live in Aughris for a while where there is a blessed well for him. Some people call it St. Patrick's well. It has a cure for sore eyes and some people go there the second Sunday in August. People say that St. Patrick made him the first bishop of Killala. Innismurray is called after him and some people has the name Muireadach in this district.

St. Farnan lived on the western side of the Parish of Templeboy on the top of Ballygilcash at a place called The Keeve. He lived in a valley on the bank of the river and his bed was a small cave on the side of a cliff. There is no well but there is a large heap of stones and people say that he used to say a Hail Mary for every one of them every day.

St. Baithen was a native of Aughris also and was in Innishmurray. St. Some people call him St. Molaise. Some say that Templeboy got its name from St. Baithen - Teampall Bhaoithín. St. Baithen went to Iona with Columcille and became head of the monastery there when Columcille died.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 14:02
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awaiting decision
My grandmother used to make rush candles in the following way. She cut a bundle of fresh clean rushes, peeled them but one very narrow stripe, which is left in order to keep the rush frim. She tied them in small bundles and put them in the chimney to dry. When dry and properly seasoned, she got a boat shaped metal pot with three legs and a long handle and placed it on the fire and filled it with pig's lard. The lard must be fresh from salt. When the lard was melted, she drew the rushes slowly through it and left them to dry. And then they were ready for use. A rush candle is a good light, but it burns away very quickly.
Pupil's name and address -
Mary MacManus
Lossetts
Carrickmacross
Co Monaghan
Obtained from -
Patrick MacManus
Lossetts
Carrickmacross
Co Monaghan
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 13:57
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rejected
awaiting decision
There are a lot of beliefs with regard of the weather. When the sun down red in the evening, and a ring around the moon, people say that these are the signs of rain.
Where the cat sits with her back to the fire, and the crickets singing or when the soot falls down the chimney, we are going to have rain. And when a robin comes into the house it's a sign of snow.
When the north wind blows it brings the rain. If you rise up early in the morning and see the sun up you will find it will be a wet day. There are lot of other signs with regard of the weather such as when a dog eats water grass it is a sign of rain. another sign of rain is when the animals gather around the house, or when you hear the ducks quacking. And when the hens gather into the hen-house it is the sign of a wet day.
Pupil's name and address -
Jane Babington
Carnaghey
Maghercloone
Kingscourt
Co Cavan
Obtained from - Thomas Babington
Carnaghey
Maghercloone
Kingscourt
Co Cavan
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 11:18
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awaiting decision
There are three grave yards in my distrect one old grave yard and two new ones.
Once upon a time were sent to clean Taughboy graveyard and did not. finish it one day a man went to see it but when he went in side the gate he saw a skull going from one side of the graveyard to the other and the next thing he saw was a rats tail coming out of the skull.
There is an old graveyard in the parish of
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 11:15
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Dysart about to miles away.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 11:14
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awaiting decision
There was a castle in my village in olden times. The name of it was Criuac [?] Stanley. It was built in the 16th century
There was a mill in my village the roof of it is down and nettles and thistles are growing in it
There was another mill in Ballyforan but only the walls are standing
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 11:09
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awaiting decision
In olden times peopleused to echange goods. One farmer gave what ever he did not want to another farmer for something he required. They sold oats for wheat and barley for a fish. At a [?] the old people made laws and checked robery then they were fasting for three day.
In olden times people called a pound a (quid)
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 11:06
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sixpenny (tanner) four penny bit tenpenny bit.
Paper money is still more common to carry and not as easy lost.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:52
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awaiting decision
My home is situated in the village of Ballyforan. In the parish of Trisrara and Dysart. in the Barony of Athlone and in the County Roscommon. There are fourteen houses in the village of Ballyforan. There was a Sweat House in Cheeher long ago and it is situated in Tom Gacquins land. The people put down the fire themselves and bring a stool and sit and sweat enough. There are fifty three people in my
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:48
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village.
The most common name is Kelly.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:48
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awaiting decision
There are not many holy wells in this district. There is a well situated about five miles from here in Ahascragh. It is called St Kevins Well.
Crouds of people visit it on the 15th October every year this is the proper day.
The priest says the rosary going round the well with the people.. Before they start they pul fifteen rushes and there is a stone with the image of Christ on it and when then they genulfect
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:37
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and let fall a rush.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:36
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represent the mother another the fox, and another to represent the chickens.
Rain Rain Rain the wind blows high snow is falling from the sky Peggie Mitchell said she die for the fellow with roughish eye she is handsome she is pretty, she is the pride of Ballyforan city pray and tell me who hell be James Mickell. said he'd have her all the boys are fighting for her let the boys for what they say James Miskell will have her still
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:33
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There are various kinds of games which I play. Out door games, and in door games, and fire side games.
Out door games are played in Summer and in door in Winter.
This is one of the games I play. are
Fox and chickens and this is how it is played. One child
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:30
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A Ladder.
What carries his house on his back.
A snail
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:30
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Why does the hen pick the pot.
because she cannot lick it.
Black and white and read all over?
A Paper
What runs and has no legs?
The Tap.
All patches and no stitches?
A head of cabbage
Up the road and down the road and carries the road on his back
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:28
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awaiting decision
rainbow in the evening is the sign of good weather.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:27
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awaiting decision
The old people tell that if you hear the fox barking we will have snow.
When you see a blue blaze in the fire we we will have a hard Winter.
If the North wind blow we will have snow. If the cat sits on the hearth with his back to the fire we will have a storm. When the clouds get dark we will have cold rain. A
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:24
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them and put them on the neck.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:23
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I olden times there were no Chemist Shops and no Trained Nures and the people had to cure their ailments with herbs.
For a back ache some flas and salt and warm it and put it on the back.
For a tooth ache a rosted raisin is very good.
For the mumps gladum to sew them together and warm
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:19
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and worked hard at his trade so he found the man was right at last.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:18
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I heard Grand-father tell a story about hidden treasures. He said there was a crock of gold under the tree in the garden?
Then they set to work they dug and dug until the ninth day but they saw a box they snapped it up with great joy they opened it and there they saw, a hammer, a last and a note with words on it where take the hent so he took the hent
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:15
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:15
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Monday for pigs
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 10:14
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awaiting decision
There are a lot of fairs all round. There will be a big fair in Ballinasloe and it is called the country fair and sheep cattle and hores and calves are bought.
A big fair in Ballyforan in October and there a lot of foals in the fair green for cattle and the people give so much a head for the cattle.
There is a lot of fairs in other's places and markets.
There is a fair every
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 09:59
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trouble.

St Stephen's Day is celebrated in much the same manner as St Brighid's Night. Boys and girls travel from house to house gathering money and when they are pleased with the collection the captain of the contingent divides it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 09:57
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awaiting decision
In this district the feasts which are celebrated in any special manner are limited to a few. If taken as they occur in the calendar they may be placed in the following order:- St Brigid's Night, St. John' Night, Halloween and St. Stephen's Day.

On St. Brigid's Night a party of "Clathardhas" consisting of men and boys equipped with old torn clothes and whatever musical instruments they can lay hands on, travel around to every house in the district. They sing and dance as best they can and they generally get a few pence in every house. At the end of the journey they divide the takings.

It is customary to light a bonfire on St. John's Night. It is usually lighted at a cross-roads. Turf and oil are gathered by the young men and boys of the district. When the fire is lighted the old men gather around it and spend the night conversing. The young people amuse themselves by throwing up lighted rockets saturated with oil. When they are going home a member of each family brings a lighted coal and throws it into the potato field to bring luck on the crops.

Hallowe'en is celebrated in a way that is not commendable. The old customs of breaking cabbage on the roads is still practised by the young men and boys of this district. They also throw stumps and "heads" at the doors and very often gives rise to
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:35
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awaiting decision
a nutshell round a person's neck is a cure for fever.
They say that if a person is very bad with the whooping cough three hairs from the cross of an as's back will cure the person, but they say the ass will die.
The old people would not let you eat cheese if it was long in the house. They say that the mice might be nibbling it, and you would get a sore throat.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:33
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They say that if a person has a tooth-acke, it is a great cure to get a wild yellow Iris, and get a little bit of the root, and run it around the painful tooth. They also say that a fried mouse is a very good cure for small-pox. They say also that a spider worn inside
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:30
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is to put your head out the window, or to smoke plenty of tobacco.
The cure for a headache is to take an aspro, or a cup of strong tea. Another cure is to get your head measured.
Many people get stys in their eyes, and the cure is to get nine gooseberry thorns and to point eight of them towards the spot where the sty is, and to throw the other one away. There is another cure also, and that is to rub the sty with cold black tea, and it will go.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:27
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The cure for warts is to rub a black snail on the spot where they are, and after that to stick the snail on a black thorn bush, and leave him their until he rots.
The people and cattle take the cowpock. When the people take it, the cure is to rub un-salted butter, and sulpher on it, and it will go. The cure for cattle is to rub it with paraffin oil, and a bag, and it will go.
The cure for the measles is to stay in bed, and to take sulpher, and plenty of whiskey, and keep yourself warm.
The cure for a toothache
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:17
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sixty to a hundred pounds per annum, and he assistants salaries were thirty to forty (pounds) pounds per annum.
Mr O'Doherty was a noted Irish teacher, and his father was a hedge teacher, and Mr Fahy of Galway was also a noted Irish teacher. The O'Doherty[s] were from Kiltimagh.
There was a Protestant school and a Presbyterian school in Turlough.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:15
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The schools we have at present were not like the schools that were in the olden times. Those old schools were called hedge schools.
The hedge schools were schools where the children were taught out in the air, or in old barns.
There were no desks in those days and slates were used instead of copies. In the hedge-schools they had books called sequel number one, and sequel number two.
The hedge teachers had no salaries at that time. They depended on the kindness of the people.
After the emancipation bill was passed in 1829 the government of the country commenced to build National schools. The principal teachers in those days were paid salaries from
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:10
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awaiting decision
Long ago there were alot of wild animals in Ireland. There were alot of wild cats through the country. Once there was a man, and he killed a wild cat, and when he came home after killing the wild cat he was telling the people of the house, and there was a tame cat sitting beside the fire, and he jumped up on the man, and began tearing the man's neck. The cat said:-
I'll tear your neck out, because you killed my father.”
The wild cats were not were not like the ordinary cats. They had a nail in their tail, and if they stuck anything with that nail they would kill it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:05
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tungsworth, and marshmallow.
Garlic is good for colds, and cures for cattle. Pot-margam is good for flavouring. Tungsworth is good for coughs, and lung complaints. Holy thistle is good for coughs, and boils, and swellings also.
There are many different kinds of weeds. There are the nettles, buacaláns, chicken weed, bráisteach [?], robin-run-the-hedge, comfrey, and dockens.
The nettles are good for young turkeys, and young ducks.
Chickenweed is good for pigs in summer time. Cumfrey is good for swelling. Dockans are good for stings of nettles.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:03
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Uncle Bob stopped with his aunt in Ballymurren
He got up this morning anyhow an' he went out for butter to the dairy for his breakfast.
When he went to the door it was all covered with mouldy butter,
an' when he went inside, it was the same.
He went to his aunt an' asked her
what was wrong with the butter.
He tould her all about it. She tould
him that the butter was gone
They were churning a couple of
days after, "An be whip to it, if I
was to stay churning all day I'd
never have a bit of butter only a
churn of froth," says Bob.
There was a fairy man living near by. an Bob went to him an' tauld him his story. The fairy man went down in a room and started to go around it.
After a certain length of time he stopped at one spot in the room.
An' "Be whip to it" says Bob, "you could hear milk flowin' in all quarters an'
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:00
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awaiting decision
Herbs
The herbs I know best are garlic and pot-margam, and taragon and solomon's seal and arum and plantain, chives and holy thistle, and
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:58
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awaiting decision
The man let him go. A short time after the man died, and he went to the gates of hell. When they saw him coming they said he was the man that beat them before, and they would not let him go in. So they drove him out through the world as Willo' the Wisp after that.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:56
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came back she knew she was going astray, and she turned her shawl, and went on the path, and continued her way home safely.
The old people also used to say that a little man the name of Willo' the Wisp used to be going around at night, and this is the story of how he came into existence.
A Devil turned himself into a sovereign, and a man found him, and put him in his purse under, and tied it.
When he went to bed at night he put his purse under his head, and the sovereign began jumping under his head. The man felt it, and he got up, and got a stick and began striking the pillow. A voice from the sovereign told him to let him go, and that when he would go to hell he would not let him in.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:51
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The oldest road in this district is supposed to be the Mill road. The others were made in the years of the famine, and four pence per day was the wages they used to get. There used to be alot of passages going through bogs to places, and passages going across fields to the chapel for short cuts.
Long ago the people used to go astray during the nights. There was once a woman, and she went astray and she was sitting on the bank of a drain. She got up, and continued her way, and came back again to the same place, and the third time she
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:48
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awaiting decision
not a single cow in all the house."
He went home that night an' he
hardly had cans enough to hould
the milk an' when he churned he
had a churn of butter.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:48
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awaiting decision
mind to make a well inside. The people say that these are pure spring wells.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:47
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awaiting decision
There are two forts in Rockfield. There is one in Joyces field. It is of square shape. I was in it once. There are two openings in it for windows. It leads to Browns field.
There is one in Brown's field also. It is of a round shape,. It was tilled once for potatoes, but they had to let it out again. When they were digging the potatoes they were haunted. I was in it a few times. There is a well in it, and the tracks of windows. It is very dark inside. There are the tracks of doors also in it.
They are called forts or raths because the fairies live in them. There were some wild animals seen around Brown's fort.
Long ago in the time of war the Danes made these as a place of safity. They are very well built,. The reason they had the well inside was because they were afraid of their enemies to come out of the fort, So they made up their
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:43
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awaiting decision
Do you know where the
cottage is at the butt of
the hill of Kellystown, well
there is an ould Corrigeen
to the right there, and a
man named Nolan was
coming home wan night and
he heard horses coming up
the hill gallopin' like
the divel.
He kep in and only for
his mother - she was dead -
the head would be cut
off him.
His mother stood behind him
and held her arm over
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:41
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awaiting decision
a long green weed with leaves that grows in rich land. If you catch a hold of it it will burn you, and if you get a docken leaf you will be cured.
The docken is a weed that grows in all kinds of land. The cold-foot is another weed like a cabbage plant but with finer leaves. It grows mostly in potato ground, and in oats ground.
There are many other different kinds of herbs. There is button ivy, and the lady's mantle, and [cuachinóir]. The button ivy is a small round herb like a button but that it is green. There is a cure in it for a sick cow.
The lady's mantle is a green herb like an umbrella with a white flower in the middle.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:35
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awaiting decision
There was an old woman living in Newbawn and she had a son in Kilbarney and he come home to her one day and sez he, "Mother I'm tired dreaming about sixty soverns that's under the leg of the bed."
"Tut you fool", sez she. "They weren't sixty soverns in the house this hundred years."
He said he'd dig it up, but she would not agree with him, she said, "You tare up the flure!"
He waited until she went some where. Then he pulled out the bed, and dug up the floor, and found the money under a slate in the very place he dreamt about.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:32
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awaiting decision
There are several different kinds of weeds which are harmful to the land. There is red-leg that grows in rich boggy ground, and chicken weed that (ground) grows in rich boggy ground also.
The red-leg is a long red weed that grows in tillage ground. The chicken weed is a short green weed that grows in potato ground, and in plants. The yellow weed is a yellow long weed that grows in potato, and in corn ground.
The farabán is a weed that grows in all kinds of land. It is very healthy for cattle to eat. The dadher [?] is a weed that grows in very poor bog. It is very like grass, but when it grows up a white flower comes on it.
The nettle is
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:24
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awaiting decision
there are ghosts still there.
There are very few old people living in Ballynew. Some of the oldest are Mrs Mac Cormac, Mrs Carney, and Hugh O'Donnell.
They know a good lot of Irish, and they say their prayers in Irish. The land in Ballynew is very good, but some parts of it is covered with rushes.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:24
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awaiting decision
There was a poor man with a wife and family.
He was in need of food and clothes.
An old man told him there was money near the Castle of Treacystown.
One night he went to dig for the money.
He was no length digging when he heard fairies singing, "Monday, Tuesday".
He went nearer the castle and said, "Wednesday."
The fairies were delighted with him for making their song longer
This man had two humps and the fairies took them off.
He ran home and told another man who had three humps.
This man was delighted, and he went to the castle, and stayed there until he heard the fairies, singing "Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. He said "Thursday,
The fairies brought him in and they were vexed with him for making their song too long. They put another hump on him and he never had anything to do with fairies again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:22
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awaiting decision
I live in the village of Ballynew. It is a very large village, and it is situated about two miles from Castlebar. It contains thirty houses.
The names of the people living near me are Jordans, Lavelles (Gear) Geraghtys, Mac Nicholases, and Heverins.
It is a very nice village in Spring, and Summer, because there are very high trees growing on both sides of the road, and in these seasons, they are clothed with thick green leaves.
There is the ruin of an old mill, and a graveyard, and a blessed well in Ballynew. There is a river running between Ballynew and Moanen, which divides Moanen village from Ballynew. There are two or three fairy forts in this village, and it is said that fairies live there, and
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:17
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We burn lime at home. Lime is got from lime stones. The lime stones are broken and burned in a lime kiln. A lime kiln is a hole in the ground, built round with stones. It is built on the side of a hill. It is wide at the top, and narrow at the bottom, and there is an opening at the bottom called a [puicín?].
The kiln is filled with alternate layers of turf and broken lime stones. Then fire is set to it at the [puicín?], and stones and turf, are put in according as the burnt material falls down until the kiln is full to the top. Then the top of the kiln is covered with scraws, and left until it is cool. The lime is taken out through
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:16
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the [puicín]. They use lime for building, for making floors, and for white washing, and many other purposes.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:13
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We burn lime at home. Lime is got from lime stones. The lime stones are broken and burned in a lime kiln. A lime kiln is a hole in the ground, built round with stones. It is built on the side of a hill. It is wide at the top, and narrow at the bottom, and there is an opening at the bottom called a [puitín?].
The kiln is filled with alternate layers of turf and broken lime stones. Then fire is set to it at the [puitín], and stones and turf, are put in according as the burnt material falls down until the kiln is full to the top. Then the top of the kiln is covered with scraws, and left until it is cool. The lime is taken out through
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:04
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Ould Jim Cullen and his wife were goin' to town one day and when they were goin' down the hill of Brownstown the band came off one of the wheels, and passed them, "And "be dammy but", Jim, what kind of a bicycle is that,?" sez she.
"Begob", sez he "Sure its he bicycle of our wheel.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:54
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and remained till mid night keeping the child. On coming back the first house was in great commotion, the child there having become suddenly ill. It was explained that little Paddy had been put to bed early + in good form + woke up suddenly very ill.
Peggy Kirwan said "Thats not Paddy here he is" + she produced the real Paddy. The iarlais was immediately "put out on the shovel" + thee was great rejoicing but we were not told what happened the iarlais but Miss O Connor thinks the fairies took it off
Aidan Dempsey (afore mentioned) when coming home one night between 9 + 10 p.m. saw a dresser of delph in John Darby's gravel hole.
Margaret Murray while milking at Aidan Dempseys was knocked down by a strange woman who quickly disappeared.
Pat Dempsey (brother of Aidans) saw a child in white climb the ladder to the barn loft + disappear into air.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:53
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Páirceanna mora = It is a very big field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:52
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coarse grass grows in it.
New Garden = It is so called as lately it was set.
Slough = It is wet and swampy.
Point = It is so called as there is a sharp corner in it.
Rubble = It is a swampy boggy place.
Sragh = It is always wet and lies beside a river.
Big field = It is the largest field.
Nora's garden = because an old woman called Nora had a house in it long ago.
Thobhar bhan = There is a well in it.
The Pound = There is a trench near it.
Porr-a-rush = There is a lot of rushes in it.
Gairridhe = There is a rock in the middle of it.
Balla gabha = There was a smith living in it long ago.
Maonach-a-eárru = It is said there was poteen hid in it long ago.
[Gcailean?] tobhar = There is a well in it.
Tóin bhán = There is a well outside it.
Piosa ruadh = There is red soil in it.
Páirc bán = In spring this field is covered with daisies.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:40
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Miss O'Connors next door neighbours - Dempseys had a child - eldest son named Con
The child's baptism was delayed so that the mother could take part in the doings that were planned. He was a lovely bonny baby but he suddenly changed and they thought that the fairies had taken him off + put some child in his place. They brought him and dipped him in Coolane well and finally put him out on the shovel for the fairies to take him but they did not. The child lived till he was four years.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:37
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Fíadan [feadán?] mór = because there is a river running through the field.
Gárride [Garrdha?] lár = because it means the middle garden.
Páirc a-lín = because flax was grown in this field long ago.
Corrach Ramha = because it is very rough and rocky.
Páirc beag = because this is a small field.
Pórtach bog = because it is a soft boggy field.
Tobar bán = because there is a spring well in it.
Cúl (Córnaraig?] = which means back of the hill.
Paircinn a [clasan?] = means the green field.
Cránnaibh fúir = means filled with bushes or whins.
Garrridhe beag = means the small garden.
Cluanach = Is a meadow field.
[Marenacaillog?] = It is said there was an old woman there long ago to used to rear fat cattle.
Talamh garbh = Is rough and rocky and
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:33
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Here is another "Fairy" story
An old lady named Peggy Kirwan who lived where Crane's cottage is situated now Kilmaest told the foll story to Miss O'Connor's mother, Another woman + Peggy went to a wake at night. It happened that the "wake" house was in the same bán as another house - two houses in one bán.
In going to the wake house they saw a hardy little child about 10 months half way out through the window in the gable end of the house. They took the child with them to the "wake" house
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:18
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Miss O'Connor already mentioned told the foll :-
The buachaill aimsiri in the old days used to herd horses when the days work was done. A certain John Wafer grandfather to Kehoes Mill Pond in this neighbourhood sent his "boy" to herd horses
The boy slept and it was night when he woke, and he got a great fright when he saw a woman standing in night attire near him. He spoke to her but she did not answer. He brought her to his employer's house but still she did not speak. She remained on for about a year in the same silence.
One night the boy heard voices which said :- "If only the bit of rush under her tongue were taken away she'd soon speak.
This was done and the woman soon got back her speech and told them she was taken away on her wedding night from the County Tipperary.
She was brought back to her friends and the boy was rewarded with his passage money to America.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 00:13
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it, it will do them good.
Steep some sheep droppings in water for a couple of hours and give a person who has the measles a small spoonful in a glass of water it will cure them.
To cure whooping cough pass the person who has the whooping cough under an asses belly and over its back three times in the name of the father, son and holy ghost.
A handful of the bark of the ''Burberry bush'' stewed in a pint of new milk was an old cure for jaundice.
Fasten an ivy leaf smeared with lard on the corn renew a couple of times it will bring up the corn.
Get a handful of the top of bruain stew like tea, strain when cool, and put into a bottle. A wine glassful taken every morning fasting would cure heart burn.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 00:09
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The May Bush is one of the customs we have in Killiskey. On the evening of May Eve the boys go out and gather money with which they buy candles. They purcahse about six penny ones and cut them in two. Next they get egg shells and flowers. A few boys then go and cut a sgeach tree from the root, one that is in blossom. When the May Bush arrives it is stuck into the ground at the Killiskey bridge. The candles, flowers and egg shells are then stuck on it. The candles are then lighted and the May Bush looks very nice. Other boys make on a bone fire a short distance away from the May Bush, and Killiskey for that night is a very pleasant place. The May Bush and the bone fire are all ready now, and some young boy is sent around the village to call all the people out to enjoy themselves. Soon the place is full. The older people sitting up on the bridge, while the young people dance around and play music.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 00:05
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and two or sometimes four is given for cattle. When a bargain is made between a buyer and seller they show their agreement by having a drink together.
When animals are to be sold they are marked with paint or mud or sometimes a piece of hair is clipped on their backs. The halter is always retained by the seller except on the sale of horses or bulls. The greatest fairs of the year are those which are held on the months of April and September. Sheep and bonhams are sold on the second fair day. There are no horse fairs held in Coachford and the nearest one to the local people is that which is held in Macroom.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:56
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New style was bought for the occasion. A dance was generally held there in the evening when the fair was ended. These fairs are discontinued. About four or five years ago a butter market was held at Coachford and Rooves which were also discontinued because the farmers thought it was more profitable to send all the milk to the creamery than to make the butter and sell it at the butter market. Some people make butter still for their own use as they prefer the home made butter to the creamery butter.
At the Coachford fairs the farmers pay sixpence or a shilling to the owner of the yard in which the animals are put. When animals are sold the seller gets some money from the buyer which is called "Luck money". This is calculated on the price that is paid for the animals . A shilling is generally given as luck money for sheep and calves
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:43
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proverb says "If you have only a goat bring it to the centre of the fair".
The fairs are held in Coachford in the village. In every district the fairs are not held in the towns and villages as they are in our district. In Macroom the fairs are held in the fair field in Massytown. In former times buyers were at the crossroads on fair mornings where they bought animals from the people going to the fairs. The buyers also went to farm houses, generally pigs were bought on these visits. The latter practice is carried on by some "jobbers" still. Long ago a fair was held in Carrigadrohid and Rooves Bridge each place about a mile from Coachford on St John's day, only sheep were sold at these fairs. Formerly great crowds of girls went to Carrigadrohid fair. They looked forward to it a long time before it occurred as there was always great enjoyment there.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:40
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Mulhuddart is the name of this village or in Gaedilg Mullaigh Eadairne. It is still called by the old inhabitants '' Mulla Heather''. Some people say that the right name of the village is Mullac Eadairne.

Cruice Rath and Hollywoodrath denote the presence of two Irish raths.
Huntstown, Tyrrellstown, Buzzardstown, Powerstown, Whitestown and Blakestown show the places around the village were once in the hands of Normans.

Godamendy
Godamendy is a townland north east of the village. There was an old church there and the priest came on horseback every Sunday to say mass there. One night the mare had a foal and the next morning being Sunday morning the priest had to bring the mare and her foal with him. He tied them to to the gate and went into the church
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:37
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Timcheall míle ó Chluain Ioraird tá áit fé leith a chuireann Laochra na h-Éireann i gcuimhne dhúinn, sí sin. Uagha na gCroppaí. Tá cros mhór 'n-a seasamh os cionn na n-uaigh, agus ainmneacha na bhfear geatma(?) do throid agus fuair bás ar son na h-Éireann sa bhliadhain 1798. scríobhtha uirri, in- Gaedilg agus i mBéarla.

I mbliadhain 1934, coimeádadh lá fé leith i gcuimhneachán na bhfear so, le h-ónóir is omós do thabhairt dóibh agus coimeadtar é gach bliadhain ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:30
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The fairs are held locally in Coachford on the last Tuesday and Wednesday of each month. Buyers and sellers come from distant places to attend them. The people come to the fairs as early as possible so as to get in the centre of the fair for as the old
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:22
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people would boil butter milk and sugar and drink it while it was hot.
If a person had a swollen foot he would bathe it in bog-water and put chicken-weed on it.
In case of fever the hair of the head would be shaved off.
Olive oil was a cure for a scald or a burn.
For a weak heart, the people used to turn a cupful of oatmeal upside down, on the heart and they would say some prayers, and according to the weakness of the heart, the meal would leave the cup.
Lick a man-keeper's back for the cure of a burn.
Forge-water is the cure for the warts.
Blue is a cure for the sting of a bee.
Another cure for warts was to go out early in the morning and the first black snail met was rubbed to the warts, then the snail was hung on a thorn, and when the snail would wither the warts would also wither.
Poteen is a cure for rheumatism.
A piece of straw was a cure for a 'crick' in the neck.
Nine goose-berry thorns for a 'stye' on the eye.
Sugar candy and vinegar for a cold.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:22
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(V)
And now to conclude with as sure as I began it
As much in its praises I could say
Its down to Inamore where the sportsmen cross the ferry
And along to sweet Ballinatray
Tis there you would hear the hounds and the sounding of the horn
The fox close pursued on a fine dewy morn
The race-horses coursing most beautiful and charming
By the lovely sweet banks of the Bride

(VI)
Farwell charming Glenville I never can forget thee
Where my forefathers lived at their ease
And the Hon Sir Edward Kinahan he lived in great splendour
May his offspring be always the same.
There is a spring well in yonder green isle
It cures both the lame the dumb and the blind
They have forgotten their crutches and left them behind
By the lovely sweet banks of the Bride.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:14
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John Glavin 14 Inchinanaugh got this poem from his father Wm Glavin

(1)
All you that are prone to sport and to pleasure
Come roam by the sweed Bride's side
Tis there you will be amused by the youths when collected
No grief there to trouble their minds
Where the fifers and fiddlers with pleasure do play
And the song birds do tune their sweet notes on each tree
Joining in each chorus in praises all the day
of the lovely sweet banks of the Bride.

(II)
Tis down by charming Glenville and Peet Driscoll's inn
The water do gently glide
Where numbers in coaches cross over Keame Bridge
With a sporting laugh and a smile
Where the trout and the salmon do jump with joy
And the long snouted otter do gently dive
The flat fish and eel no closer can lie
By the lovely sweet banks of the Bride
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:12
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(III)
And along to Castlelyons where oft time youve have heard
It mentioned, it always carries the swan(?)
Where lords, dukes, and knights combine together
To take the evening fresh air
Where the hare is on his seat, and the rabbit in his burrow
The fox well secured with his den and well cover(?)
The ducks wild and tame in the streams they do flutter
By the lovely Sweet banks of the Bride.

(IV)
Where the water glides is a fine situation
Its equals are scarce to be found
They have a wholesome air, and the plains they are bounded
All spangled with sweet scented flowers
Gentlemen have made it their place of abode
O'Brien brave Thompson likewise Mr Boles
A church they have for service and a bridge to cross over
On the lovely sweet banks of the Bride.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:00
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On a gibbet before the old jail
And they spoke of his mother whose dwelling
Was but a short distance away
And that son her sole solace and stay
III
Bring her here cried the chief of the yeomen
One lingering chance let us give
To this spawn of a rebel to babble
And by her sage counsel he'll live
Then fast a red trooper went trotting
From the town to the poor cabin door
There he found the old woman sitting
And spinning upon the bare floor
IV
Auld Madam your son is in trouble
They have him within in the town
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:56
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people would boil butter milk and sugar and drink it while it was hot.
If a person had a swollen foot he would bathe it in bog-water and put chicken-weed on it.
In case of fever the hair of the head would be shaved off.
olive oil was a cure for a scald or a burn.
For a weak heart, the people used to turn a cupful of oatmeal upside down, on the heart and they would say some prayers, and (?) to the weakness of the heart, the meal would leave the cup.
Lick a man-keeper's back for the cure of a burn.
Forge-water is the cure for the warts.
Blue is a cure for the sting of a bee.
Another cure for warts was to go out early in the morning and the first black snail met was rubbed to the warts, then the snail was hung on a thorn, and when the snail would wither the warts would also wither.
Poteen is a cure for rheumatism.
A piece of straw was a cure for a 'crick' in the neck.
Nine goose-berry thorns for a 'stye' on the eye.
Sugar candy and vinegar for a cold.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:55
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her eyes fixed on it. Suddenly it disappeared.
As she was coming near a bend in the road she was instantly faced to the opposite side. She tried to turn back for home but completely failed. She walked on. As she came near a cottage she saw a man coming towards her. She stopped him and havig told him her story he told her to turn her coat inside out. She did this and immediately she was able to turn back on her direction for home.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:54
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Composer: ?
Author: Mrs McKeon heard it from her father and recited it for Una.
Writer: Una McKeon 14 years VI
In the old marble town of Kilkenny
With its Abbey Cathedrals and halls
Where the Norman bell rings out at nightfall
And the relics of great Cromwell's wars
Where the outrageous Oliver revelled
In his falsely ill gotten hord
Burned down both abbot and monastery
Grimly and grave with his sword

II
Bring her here cried the chief of the yeomen
'Twas here in that old town of history
England in fame[d] 98
Was busy with gallows and yeomen
Propounding the laws of the state
They were hanging a young lad a rebel
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:53
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We have heard many fairy stories about a house which is only half a mile from Kilmadur school. There were many things seen and heard in it.
One night as my aunt was in this house minding little pigs [?] she heard the call Kitty - which was her name. The call was repeated and on hearing it the third time she ran upstairs to the people of the house. Next morning her finger was black and she had to have it attended to by a doctor for weeks.
A few weeks after as she was going home from this house she saw a strange light in the sky. She kept
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:53
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Composer: ?
Author: Mrs McKeon heard it from her father and recited it for Una.
Writer: Una McKeon 14 years VI
In the old marble town of Kilkenny
With its Abbey Cathedrals and halls
Where the Norman bell rings out at nightfall
And the relics of great Cromwell's wars
Where the outrageous Oliver revelled
In his falsely ill gotten hand[?]
Burned down both abbot and monastery
Grimly and grave with his sword

II
Bring her here cried the chief of the yeomen
'Twas here in that old town of history
England in fame[d] 98
Was busy with gallows and yeomen
Propounding the laws of the state
They were hanging a young lad a rebel
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:52
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Composer: ?
Author: Mrs McKeon heard it from her father and recited it for Una.
Writer: Una McKeon 14 years VI
In the old marble town of Kilkenny
With its Abbey Cathedrals and halls
Where the Norman bell rings out at nightfall
And the relics of great Cromwell's wars
Where the outrageous Wives revelled
In his falsely ill gotten hand[?]
Burned down both abbot and monastery
Grimly and grave with his sword

II
Bring her here cried the chief of the yeomen
'Twas here in that old town of history
England in fame[d] 98
Was busy with gallows and yeomen
Propounding the laws of the state
They were hanging a young lad a rebel
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:51
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Composer: ?
Author: Mrs McKeon heard it from her father and recited it for Una.
Writer: Una McKeon 14 years VI
In the old marble town of Kilkenny
With its Abbey Cathedrals and halls
Where the Norman bell rings out at nightfall
And the relics of great Cromwell's walls
Where the outrageous Wives revelled
In his falsely ill gotten hand[?]
Burned down both abbot and monastery
Grimly and grave with his sword

II
Bring her here cried the chief of the yeomen
'Twas here in that old town of history
England in fame[d] 98
Was busy with gallows and yeomen
Propounding the laws of the state
They were hanging a young lad a rebel
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:48
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from toothache.
As Peter sat on a marble stone
Jesus came to him alone
What hails you Peter, what makes you ache?
My Lord and Saviour it is only the toothache
Rise up Peter and you shall be healed, but not you alone but any person says those few words for my sake shall never be troubled with the toothache.
The following prayer is said as a safeguard against fever.
As Jesus our Saviour was brought to the cross to be crucified His body did tremble and shake
The Jews asked him had he the ache.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:47
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Ní fiú pingin
Arbh fiú dul ann? B'fiú go maith
Niorbh fiú. Narbh fiú
Dá mba bfiú liom ort é
Dubhairt sé narbh fiú

Ní fiú sean-dheich(?) truigh é
Ní fiú cáirt salainn é
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:44
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Coláiste le Gaedhilg i n-Eochaill
(File gan ainm do chum)

Tá an Gaedilg arís go ceannasach fé mheas ag buidhin na Fodla
Ní fhuil easonóir na tarcuisne dá thagairt leí níos mó (a)'gainn;
Acht óg is aosda ag formad go toilteanach le dásach,
Ag feucaint cé na ciaca 's mó molas is go grádhas í

Más áil libh togha 's siogha oideacais seo cuireadh dhíbh go h-Eochaill
Tá oide múinte clisde ann sár-oilte feidhmeamhail foghanta
An té do chaitheas sealadh ann is maise dho go deo é
Mar tugann blas na teangan leis go ceasda milis modhmharach

I n-eaghmuis léighinn buan-tairbheach is aiteasach an áit sin
Tá feoithne fíor na farrge faoi bhratacha na mbarc ann
Tá sláinte féile is fairsinge 's gan dearmhad céud fáilte
'S na radharca is breághtha i mBanba chum taisdeal libh a cáirde.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:42
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Coláiste le Gaedhilg i n-Eochaill
(File gan ainm do chum)

Tá an Gaedilg arís go ceannasach fé mheas ag buidhin na Fodla
Ní fhuil easonóir na tarcuisne dá thagairt leí níos mó (a)'gainn;

Acht óg is aosda ag formad go toilteanach le dásach,
Ag feucaint cé na ciaca 's mó molas is go grádhas í

Más áil libh togha 's siogha oideacais seo cuireadh dhíbh go h-Eochaill
Tá oide múinte clisde ann sár-oilte feidhmeamhail foghanta

An té do chaitheas sealadh ann is maise dho go deo é
Mar tugann blas na teangan leis go ceasda milis modhmharach

I n-eaghmuis léighinn buan-tairbheach is aiteasach an áit sin

Tá feoithne fíor na farrge faoi bhratacha na mbarc ann
Tá sláinte féile is fairsinge 's gan dearmhad céud fáilte
'S na radharca is breághtha i mBanba chum taisdeal libh a cáirde.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:34
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There is a silver mine on part of the land of Gorteen Free between Knockrogery and Athlone.
There is gold a hundred yards back of Lawrence Kennedy's house on a little road that leads to his land. There is a little woman supposed to be minding it. She wears a little red cloak. There is gold also hidden in a tillage field belonging to Thomas Kelly Coolatuber and how it was known that the gold was there.
Thomas Kelly was ploughing
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:31
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:31
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In olden times there was not as many fairs as there is nowadays. Some fairs are held in a green and some are held in a street.
Sometimes fairs are held in villages and others in towns. There are buyers and sellers at every fair.
People come to fairs to sell their animals. When they are selling them they make a bargain. Some people make a bargain by spitting on their hands and some make a bargain
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:44
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Cure for Burn
(1) A man, who got a mankeeper and licked it was able to cure a burn if he licked the burn.
(2) A hair from head of a posthumous child's head boiled in milk - cure for whooping cough.
(3) When a bee was found when not seeking for it and brought home and closed up in a box or a hole in wall - was believed to cure whooping cough.
(4) A woman, who did not change her name in marriage. The food left behind by her was believed to cure whooping cough.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:42
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In the town land of Killaneen in a large farm there is suppose to some treasure hidden.
It was supposed to have been put there by man named Conn Rourke who lived there over hundred years ago.
It is said that when he was making his will before he was dying he was asked about a friends share. His answer was "There is enough for him and he knows where he is lying."
It is supposed that the treasure consists of gold and that is in an iron box under a tree called the Little Park.
Buried treasure has never been found in our district. People have never been able to see this treasure by eating certain foods.
Sometimes lights are seen in the farm, but as there are more than one light it is not easy to tell that the light is near the treasure.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:26
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for his own pint I've only the price of my own said Mick.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:25
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One day a man by the name of Mick Ganour of Rathdowney took the pledge from a priest. The same day the priest was coming down the street and he saw Mick going into a Public House and he called him. Where are you going Mick said he.Into have a pint Father, I thought you took the pledge said the priest. Ah I did Father but I broke it again. Well now said the priest don't you know very well that when you're going into that Public House that the devil is going with you. Ah well if he is Father he can pay
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:21
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him, The priests overtook Jack and said to him. "Hello Jack" where are you going now? An I'm going into the town said Jack. Your'e looking very downhearted said one of the priests. An I am Father said he I haven't a penny in by pocket. One of the Priests called him over and gave him one shilling and Jack said "God bless you Father". Then the other priest said "here Jack I won't be worse than my friend" God almighty Bless you" said. Now said the priests what's the difference between "God Bless you" and "God almighty Bless you" Sixpence replied Jack.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:17
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When our Saviour went to be crucified he trembled and shook. The Jews asked him was he afraid he answered and said I am not afraid of Fever, Eager or the Fits.
His Angel Mother standing by with a heavy heart and a weeping eye.
Saying those who repeat those words five times either by night or by day shall never die in mortal sin or hells fire to enter in Amen.
A Prayer to be said after the Angelus.
We offer up this Holy Angelus in honour of the blessed and Holy Incarnation of You my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and for the suffering Souls in Purgatory especially the ones that were most devoted to the Angelus while on earth. Amen.
I got these Prayers from an old Woman.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:16
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Another day Jack Hooley was going into the town of Thurles and two priests were behind
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:16
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Some years ago there lived in Rahtdowney a man the name of Conn Cahill who was a contractor. It happened that he was building houses up in Tipperary, and he had a man by the name of Jack Hooley working with him. There was a warrant out for Hooley's arrest. One day he was working on the top of the houses when he saw the Policemen coming. He got down from the building and asked Mr, Cahill for a loan of his hat, coat, watch and chain, and Mr Cahill did so. When the Policemen came up they walked over to Hooley, but of course they did not recognise him and said are you the contractor. Oh yes I am said Hooley. Have you any man by the name of Hooley working with you said the Policemen. "Oh " he was here a week ago but hie is gone now, replied Hooley. That's alright then said the Policemen who started to go. "Wait" said Hooley and I'll go down a bit of the road with you. When they came to the cross road the Policemen went off one way and Hooley went the other way with Mr Cahill's clothes on him and he was never seen after.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:12
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There is a statue erected to the memory of Father Michael Murphy.
It is standing outside the Church.
When the English were after Father Murphy he passed through the town of Arklow with some soldiers with him.
When the Irish were on the point of victory some of the English soldiers gave them some barrels of whiskey and while the Irish were drinking the English soldiers came and took Father Murphy cut off his head and stuck it on a spike and put it outside the Barracks.
After several days a man from Coolroe by the name of Hackett took his head and buried it at the place where the Convent of Mercy is now.
I was told this story by my Grand Aunt.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:09
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The Pottery factory being so close to the sea got a severe flooding. Some of the fishing boats were washed out to sea, some sank to the bottom and had to be taken up by divers and towed into harbour.
These floods are generally caused by the snow melting on the hills. The water runs down and over-flows the river which cannot flow out to sea as it should owing to the condition of the sand bar in winter being covered with sand.
My mother Mrs. Mary White told me this story.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:06
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For asthma black treacle and honey was eaten, a herb called woundwort was used for wounds.
These cures were told to me by my mother who originally came from Waterford.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:05
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I (John Merrick) saw a man being killed at the eviction in the Village of Clareen (near Hollymount). His name was John Quinn. He lived in Hollybrook Gate Lodge. Ejectments were being served on the tenants in Clareen village. A great crowd, with Quinn as one of them, went to stop the police. A drain was cut across the road. Quinn hit two of the R.I.C. with a spade. Then Stephens one of the R.I.C. hit Quinn with his rifle and killed him.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:05
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legend about. This is called the Deer's Leap. At this particular place there is plainly to be seen the marks of Deer's (Leap) feet on the hard rock. The Legend in connection with these feet marks is as follows. In the penal Days a priest was celebrating Mass in the vicinity of the Lady well During the Mass he was startled to see a Deer Leap from the top of the rock. I was told this by My Grandfather.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:03
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On the opposite side of the Rock waggon track facing the well is another place of interest which old inhabitants have a
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:02
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After the school in the Catholic Church being broken up by the Parish Priest, another school was opened in a house on the Kilmaine-Roundfort Road (in the house that Michael Gannon lives now).
A Mr. Sullivan taught there. This was the same Thomas Sullivan as taught in the school in the Church. The new school was held in his own house. The junior scholars used to go to James Concannon and the senior pupils attended Sullivan's school.
Sullivan's father became assistant clerk of the Union in Ballinrobe. Thomas Maye was the Clerk of the Union and he used to send out for Sullivan (the young teacher's father) to assist him with the books. Frank Sullivan was coming home from Ballinrobe one night with the books, when he fell into a flooded part of the road and drowned. The books then were sent to Thomas Sullivan the son (and young teacher) and I used to be holding the chip (to show him light) while he used to be working at the books. During the month of July he used to go into Ballinrobe and stay there making up the Union accounts. Later he became Relieving Officer for the district and threw up the school.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 21:00
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of their pain at once. If a person gets a severe knock on the forehead it will prevent swelling to press a penny on the spot as quickly as possible. The sting of a wasp or a bee can be taken out by spreading blue or ink on it when you get the sting first. When a person sun he is almost sure to get sunburned. The cure for this is to get buttermilk and spread it on the burned place and it will take away the pain. The lucky day for beginning work are Mondays and Thursdays. There is an old saying that it is not lucky to begin work on Saturday
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:54
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Roundfort, Hollymount, Co. Mayo. He died about 1932. He was a native of Roundfort and owned about 500 acres of land in the town lands of Lagatallan, Lisnamoyle and Carrareagh. He told this story shortly before he died to me : Donnchadh Ó Riain (oide sgoile)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:53
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Another old custom we have in this district is "The Vizards". On Hallow E'en a great number of boys band themselves together and go from house to house, singing, dancing and playing music. Very old fashion clothes are worn by these boys and sometimes they dress in women's garments. Usually, the young boys never travel far. They just go to the neighbouring houses, and there is always a great welcome for them. The 'bean a' tighe' gives them apples and nuts, and often a few pence. Soon the merry people leave very pleased with their visit.
When the young men go out they journey far distances. Sometimes they go three or four miles, and in result of their work they collect a lot of money. Those men never keep this money. A few nights later a great dance is held in the most convenient hall with this collection. The dance being over the young boys and girls
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:48
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possibly in connection with the celebration of the old Carmelite Feast in the Abbey Church.
About eighty years ago a boy named Scott lived with his parents in a narrow lane leading from Friar's Gate to the Abbey.
They had "a basin of goold sovereigns on their dresser." Scott went to a Sunday dance in Browne's Mills as was then customary and whilst rambling around the village he noticed sprouting above the ground three young trees growing from seeds dropped there during the previous winter. These he carefully removed brought home and planted on a ditch by the Abbey Well.
Notwithstanding Scott's constant attention only one sapling took kindly to the strange ground.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:44
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The people that saw them say they had reel feet. The Irish for a "reel-foot" is common and from this the church (now a ruin) in the graveyard got its name "Cill Chomáin".
The witches when seen used to be going through a sham-fight, having the bones of the corpses as swords.
Riocard na bpaidreacha (an uncle of Mr. John Conry Ex N.T. at present living in Kilrush) used to teach catechism in the church every Sunday. He was a native of Carrowkeel, a village to the east of this parish. He was a weaver by trade.
The subjects taught in the hedge school were: Catechism (McHale's), English spelling and arithmetic.
Mass was said in the old church at Cregganwatta. It was a thatched building. The present Catholic Church was built in 1825. My father was one of the first children baptised in the new church.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:44
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to dig there. Among the stones he turned up was one bearing the inpression of a woman's foot. Old people who remember seeing this stone when it was kept in a house near the Well describe it as dark bluish in colour and the mark as similar to the imprint of a person's foot on soft mud which might harden in course of time and preserve the impression. It was called the Blessed Virgin's Foot. People used to apply it to their bodies while praying to get relief from their pains, but whether or not cures were made is not told.
It is told too that generations ago rounds were made at this well Lá Feile Muire i bhFóghmhair
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:39
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It is said that one day during a very dry summer which happened ages ago a holy man passing by this spot saw water bubbling from the ground This welcome sign urged him
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:39
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There was a holy well on the side of the road at Killglassan, about 1 mile south of Roundfort Catholic Church. There is a story told that an English soldier's wife washed her feet in the well and to the surprise of everybody the well changed from the side of the road into the field, where it now is. It is situated in the lands of J.J. Hession at present in the townland of Killglassan, Parish of Kilcommon. It was called Tobar Losáin. There is an old saying in connection with this well.
"Sláinte an bhrodáin
Anois as Tobar Losáin
An ait a raibh Aindriú is Liam breágh Meiric"
N.B. The Merricks were always strong in and around Hollymount and Killcommon.
This is the way John Merrick explained the meaning and derivation of Cill Comáin (the name of the local church):-
Two witches lived in the graveyard. They used to come out at night. Some people say they saw them long ago
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:32
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by clapping their hands.
There is a fair in Ballyforan every month it is a pig fair. People come there to sell their pigs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:31
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you want to know where a crock of gold is to be found."
The fairy said go to a big tree that grows in the centre of the rath.
Under the root of this tree the gold is hidden said the fairy. So the man dug under the tree and he found a small box under it. He opened the box and found an awl, a last, and a hammer, and he took the box home with him. When he looked into it again there was a piece of paper in it on which there were some words written. Here are the means of building your house and buying good clothes. The man took the hint, and
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:31
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We collected the price of a table. We had sticks all round by the walls for seats. James Concannon (father of Malachy Concannon of Creggduff) was the teacher in Davros. He lived in a little house at the foot of the hill between James McDonnell's house and the Roundfort Cross Road. (Joe Morris lived in this house up to 1936. The house and land all round it belongs to Garret Nally. We paid 2d a week fees:- 2d a week for a scholar in the double spelling book and keep the teacher a week in turn; 1d a week if in the single spelling book; 1/2d for scholar in "Reading made easy". (This was name of the easiest book then in school).
There was another hedge school run by Richard Nally. He lived where John Casey of Bushfield lives now. Richard Nally was surveyor. He originally lived in Boithrín na Laithighe. I never attended this school of Rd. Nally but my father did. My father William Merrick was 105 years old when he died in 1917. He is buried in the old cemetery in Kilcommon. Judge Murphy Co. Court Judge would not swear him. (I suppose he was so old and the judge had so much respect for is old age).
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:28
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worked steadily at his trade and was able to put money in the bank. He now began to see that the fairy had not played a trick upon him after all.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:27
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About a hundred years ago there was a man who was very poor and he wanted to know where he would find a crock of gold.
One night when he was sitting with some friends by the fireside he heard the story of the fairy who, if you can catch him will tell you where you may find a crock of gold. This fairy is met only in lonely places or on a bright night. All those who have met him say that he is to be seen sitting under a mushroom or a dock-leaf and he is to be seen
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:27
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About a hundred years ago there was a man who was very poor and he wanted to know where he would find a crock of gold.
One night when he was sitting with some friends by the fireside he heard the story of the fairy who, if you acn catch him will tell you where you may find a crock of gold. This fairy is met only in lonely places or on a bright night. All those who have met him say that he is to be seen sitting under a mushroom or a dock-leaf and he is to be seen
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:23
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Irish Folklore
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:23
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:23
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There are many Festival in Ireland. Other Countries have not the same Festivals as we have. The ones celebrated in Ireland are Saint Patrick's Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Easter Sunday, St John's Eve, and Saint Saint Stephens Day. On Christmas Eve night candles are lighted and left on the windows of the House. On Saint Stephens Day Boys dress up in
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:20
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There are not many old houses in my village as they are nearly all new ones. Long ago the people lived in thatched houses as there were no slates that time. The walls of the old houses were made of mud dried in the Sun. The floors of the rooms were made or clay. The windows of the old houses were very small and could not be raised up or down. There was a bed in the kitchen near the fire called a settle Bed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:18
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a High Mass we heard some time before that. While this was going on I pulled the maide Eadhmuin and left the door so that it could be open from the outside. Not long until the Parish priest walked in. From that forth he would not allow school to be conducted in the church.
I attended a Protestant school then - the Protestant school in Hollymount, myself and Tom McDonagh - father of Tom McDonagh the present clerk of the church in Roundfort. Miss Frazer was the teacher. Lindsay (the landlord) used to send out a churn of soup in a donkey cart with goblets to divide on the scholars and the poor of Hollymount. No Catholic would touch the soup. Soup was distributed Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and Bloomfield big house divided it on Thurs. Friday and Saturday.
Fr King, when he heard of the distribution of soup on the catholic scholars, came one day and compelled all the them to leave the school. Fr. King was the P.P.
Máire Lally of Davross gave an old barn. Our fathers cut scraws and got timber and roofed it and thatched it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:03
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stones were placed all round for seats. Lunch of pupils consisted of four or five potatoes per pupil. Willie Ansbro of Hollymount used to have bread. He was the only one. If he did not mind it well, the bread would be stolen from him.
During the winter months when we used to have the fire during school hours in the church, we used to roast our potatoes in this fire. That's where the struggle used to be - each looking for his own four potatoes. John Fair (of Roundfort) was at school with me. One day he was pushed into the fire at lunch time and was burnt.
Thomas Sullivan was the teacher. Sullivan himself never attended any but a hedge school. A good teacher he was. His father was estate clerk in Bloomfield (for the Ruttledges of Bloomfield House near Hollymount). The father taught the son, Thomas.
In 1869, I (John Merrick) attended school first. The senior pupils only had pens. They were quill pens. The ink was made from berries of the bore-tree (elder).
One day that the master did not turn up we began to sing High Mass in imitation of
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 20:00
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turf barrows. He binds wheels in the open air.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:59
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In a well in Killeigh Abbey a bell is buried. On Christmas Eve it is heard ringing. Pat Walsh listened at the well one time but did not hear it. But that same evening the people in the village heard it.
An other bell is lost in Corberts field neat Killeigh and when it is found some strange thing will happen in Offaly.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:56
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(1) I remember when I was a lad a "Patron" to be held in Roundfort. As far as I remember it was held on 30 Sept. each year. I saw 11 tents as well as stalls of gooseberries, apples etc. at the patron. It was a great matchmaking day for the district. If a man had a good "faction" (backing of local roughs) he would be able to get his daughter married for nothing (without any dowery being required). Lindsay (the local landlord) scattered coppers for "scib-scab" as sport for himself and the so called gentry.
(2) There was a hedge school in Roundfort too. It used to be held in the Catholic Church. There was a turf fire in the middle of the floor. Large
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:56
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Long ago, up in Killoughey there were men going to build a house, and they had no water. One morning St Brigid came down from a tree, and the mark of her hands and knees are there still. There was a hole in the stone, in which she put water, and ever since, there is water in it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:54
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About 250 yards, west, from the school, and on the right-side as you go up to Killurine Cross, there is a little stream called the Spa-well
The old people say that they saw a large number of people there, that came from all over Ireland to cure warts.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:51
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A watch-pot never boils.
Little said is easy mended.
Many hands make light work.
Money makes the mare go.
It is an ill wind that does'nt blow someone good.
Long fair, long foul.
Long threatening comes at last.
It is a long road that had no bend.
The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world.
A wise man carries his coat.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
A stitch in time saves nine.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.
Put a beggar on horseback and he will ride to the devil.
You will never miss the water until the
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:50
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Roundfort, Hollymount, Co. Mayo. He died about 1932. He was a native of Roundfort and owned about 500 acres of land in the town lands of Lagatallan, Lisnamoyle and Carrareagh. He told this story shortly before he died to me : Donnchadh Ó Riain (oide sgoile)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:49
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Roundfort, Hollymount, Co. Mayo. He died about 1932. He was a native of Roundfort and owned about 500 acres of land in the town lands of Lagatallan, Lisnamoyle and Carrareagh. He told this story shortly before he died to me : Donnchadh Ó Riain (oide soil)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:48
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There is also a Mass Path from the Bawn.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:47
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paid by the day. There was an old road through Mr Cahill's land. It goes on out by the Erry hills and along the railway. It is used from Pat Minnock's house. It was an old coach-road. There is a road leading into the bog called Poll Bree. It was made by a man named Hornidge in 1838. He was evicted and there were several little lanes leading to his land. He stopped all the lanes and made one road. There is a road leading from Daly's of the cross-roads into Clara called the Togher. It was made a hundred years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:46
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In winter when the weather got cold, we carried large stones into the church and placed them around a fire which was lighted on the floor in the centre of the church. We sat on the stones with our feet almost touching the fire. There was no chimney in the church which became filled with smoke in a short time, but we did not mind this. We thought the smoke warmed the place.
On Sundays, the teacher sat inside the sanctuary rails and read the catechism question and answer, for any of the congregation who were present. The catechism was in Irish. The priests exhorted the people to remain in for the catechism. Before Richard Nally's time, there was a teacher by the name of O'Sullivan.
In the village of Hollymount, which is about a mile away there was a Protestant school. During the "bad-times" of 1848 and 1881, the local parson had 'stir-a-bout" made in a big cauldron for any poor Catholic children who would attend the Protestant school.
This story was taken from : Garret Nally
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:44
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There is a Mass Path from Joe Shanley's house to the Chapel. There is also a path from the Bawn. All the people use it. There are two paths leading from Castletown. One leading from Coffee's and the other from Connolly's. The latter is seldom used
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:42
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In this hive the tinker died,
They gave him vitrols slyly.
If you be wise then you'll pass by
And go down to Charlie Reilly's.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:41
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The main road from Ballycumber to Clara was made during the famine period. Before this road was made there was another road behind Mr Fletcher's house a nd it went out by Mr. Cahills house in the Hollow. The people that time had not wheels on their carts but they had big heavy blocks round them. They were called blocked wheels.
The men who made the main road were
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:41
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When I was a boy I went to school in Roundfort. The school was held in the Catholic Church. The teacher was Richard Nally. All the children spoke nothing but Irish. The reading books were English. Each boy went up to the teacher in his turn and he heard their reading and spelling individually.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:38
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it with quaran's stone. The did not eat late at night. Wooden noggins were used before cups were brought into the parish.
The people always had a goose for their dinner on Christmas day and pan cakes for their tea on Shrove Tuesday night. Vegetables were always eaten and turnips were the principal ones. Nov. night was called potato cake night because they used to make potato cakes because they had no bracks. There was very little tea in this parish up to a hundred years ago. The old people got it sometimes and they would give to their children in egg-shells. The wooden noggins were a sort of a mug with hoops around them and a handle sticking up out of them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:36
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In the time of the White-boys, I often heard my father say that no man of the name of Mullen, Moloney or Staunton was allowed to join or take the oath of the White-boys. People of the name of Mullen, Moloney or Staunton were regarded as being of the breed of spies and informers.
Ainm an duine a bhfuaireas on sgéal suas : Thomas Canny, Roundfort, Hollymount, Co. Mayo, aged 80 years.
He was a native of Kilmaine Parish originally. He was an ex-RIC pensioner. He told me the above story in 1937. - Donnchadh Ó Riain, oide sgoile.
N.B. (i) I regard this information as important because it explains the reference in the poem "Donnchadh Bán" "A Mhic Uí Mholáin, a sciursa a mhí-adh......"
(ii) Moloney was the surname of "Seaghan na Sagart"
(iii) Staunton was the surname of those who murdered Eadmon de Burca in Lough Mask.
(iv)Mullan (Ó Moláin) was surname of the traitor in "Donnchadh Bán"
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:33
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all the Gormans who lived in Gorman's Town. The had no power to punish the people. The last landlord over the Bawn and Ballina was Mr Goodbody. He used to live in Clara. He evicted a family name Dalies but they got it back again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 19:31
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They used to eat three meals in the day, breakfast, dinner and supper. They eat oaten, wheaten and bear bread. The bear bread was like barley. They used to eat porridge for their breakfast and supper and potatoes and buttermilk for their dinner. They would work until nine o'clock before they would eat their breakfast. They had no tables but they put a skib or a crandy on a block and they used to place it in the middle of the floor and eat around it. They had no mills but they used to grind
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:26
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suidhte go leór
Ba deas liom ag gabhail na siíghe tú
Sé muin capaill fé scóip ag tarraingt sa ród
Ba mhinic ag ól is ag díol tú.
IV
Do shamhail sé d'fhear óg ní fheaca riamh fós
'S níor casadh fé dhó am líon tú
Cuir litir sa phost ó Shasana Núadh
Pé baile nó áit 'na mbíonn tú.
Fuaireas iad san go léir ó Pádraig Ó Duibhir as Carraig an Chobhaltaigh. Is gnáthach le Pádraig an amhran sin a chanadh.
Eibhlís Ní Mheiscil
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:22
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Amhrán
Mo chreach as mo chás ná tagann liom snámh
Mar luingeas ar bhárr na taoide
Nó eitilt mar chág nó go raghainn do dtí mo ghrádh
Pé baile nó áit a mbíonn sí
II
Go neósfainn mo ghearán as m'easba gach lá
Ó cuireadh cun fain sa tír mé
Gan scilling ar fáil acht uireasba is gá
As má bhristear an bád táim díolta
III
Is do chois deas i mbróig a bhí
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:12
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it, it will do them good.
Steep some sheep droppings in water for a couple of hours and give a person who has the measles a small spoonful in a glass of water it will cure them.
To cure whooping cough pass the person who has the whooping cough under an asses belly and over its back three times in the name of the father, son and holy ghost.
A handful of the bark of the ''Burberry bush'' stewed in a pint of new milk was an old cure for jaundice.
Fasten an ivy leaf smeared with lard on the corn (?) a couple of times it will bring up the corn.
Get a handful of the top of bruain stew like tea, strain when cool, and put into a bottle. A wine glassful taken every morning fasting would cure heart burn.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
or four days after a storm of rain, hail, or snow comes. They often cry like a child.
10. The wild geese come over from Scotland, and fly over this district on their way to the bog of Allen, when a strom is coming.
11. When the crane passes the bridge at Tiercahan School, a flood soon comes, even in the middle of summer. Some of the men get out, and stone the crane, when they see her, as they think she always brings the rain and flood, with her.
12. When the blackbirds come to the street and door or window, it is a sure sign of snow.
13. When the crows gather near the house in trees, or when they settle in great numbers on the fields, and begin to caw loudly, it is a sure sign of rain too.
14. Ducks clap their wings when wind is coming.
15. Frogs begin to croak when rain is coming.
16. The salt in the house gets damp when the rain is coming.
17. The cement floor in the kitchen always gets damp a few days before rain coming.
18. A blue blaze on the fire is a sign of storm, wind and rain.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:08
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rejected
awaiting decision
A cure for whooping cough is to go in and out between an asses legs.
A cure for a sprain is to hold it under a spring well and pour spring water on it. That would cure it.
There lives in Tinahely an old woman who had cures for cuts. She used put some kind of leaves into a can and boil them, when they were boiled she rolled them together in a lump and put it into a box.
In the townland of Coolroe there lived a woman who has a cure for the whooping cough. The person who had the whooping cough was to be passed over an asses back and under its legs three times.
Another cure she had for it was to put in a tin and put it beside the fire and heal it. If the person who has the whooping cough smells
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. A haw year is a braw (breezy) year.
2. A slow year is a woe year.
3. A dry May and a drizzle June (drizzling) makes the farmer whistle a merry tune.
4. If the cuckoo sings on a bare hawthorn you may sell your cows and buy corn.
5. It is a good sign of the weather, and the season, if the cuckoo sings early in the season and if she sings constantly day and night. When a couple of them sing to-gether it is a sign of good weather.
6. The cuckoo is always lazy if singing in a bad season.
7. If the cuckoo sings after the bonefire night (23rd June) it is a bad sign of the harvest. Corn that is sown after the cuckoo begins to sing, never opens.
8.It is a good sign of the harvest to hear the corn crakes singing constantly. She won't sing unless good weather is at hand.
9. The white birds (sea gulls) always come screaming around this district for three
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A cure for whooping cough is to go in and out between an asses legs.
A cure for a sprain is to hold it under a spring well and pour spring water on it. That would cure it.
There lives in Tinahely an old woman who had cures fr cuts. She used pit some kind of leaves into a can and boil them, when they were boiled she rolled them together in a lump and put it into a box.
In the townland of Coolroe there lived a woman who has a cure for the whooping cough. The person who has the whooping cough was to be passed over an asses back and under its legs three times.
Another cure she had for it was to put in a tin and put it beside the fire and heal it. If the person who has the whooping cough smell
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 18:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
People not strong enough to play football pitched marbles. These marbles were round, hard and of different colours. Young lads often spent a whole Sunday evening after mass pitching marbles in this district at the different cross roads.
They also spent evenings at pitching buttons. Young people used to cut buttons off clothes in the houses, and these people were more down on pitching buttons than they were on card playing, though card playing was thought to be fit for only the friends of the black boy himself. They used to have to go to the backs of ditches to play cards for they'd be let into no house to play either cards or dice which was common too. Every Sunday priests were preaching against card playing and no man would get absolution at loss.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 17:31
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rejected
awaiting decision
returning to their homes are delighted with their enjoyments.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Another old custom we have in this district is "The Vizards". On Hallow E'en a great number of boys band themselves together and go from house to house, singing, dancing and playign music. Very old fashion clothes are worn by these boys and sometimes they dress in women's garments. Usually, the young boys never travel far. They just go to the neighbouring houses, and there is always a great welcome for them. The 'bean a' [?]' gives them apples and nuts, and often a few pence. Soon the merry people leave very pleased with their visit.
When the young men go out they journey far distances. Sometimes they go three or four miles, and in result of their work they collect a lot of money. Those men never keep this money. A few nights later a great dance is held in the most convenient hall with this collection. The dance being over the young boys and girls
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 17:26
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rejected
awaiting decision
a quarrel with that person.
If you walk under a two ended briar you will have luck.
If your left hand is itchy you will get money.
If you give away a setting of eggs in exchange for another setting of eggs, you are giving away your luck.
If you are looking at the ground when you hear the cuckoo first, you will be dead again the next year.
If you see a whirlwind you should say "God speed all travelers, I don't know how soon I will be on the road myself". The fairies are suposed to be in this whirlwind and if you did not say this the fairies would take you.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 17:23
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rejected
awaiting decision
When the cat washes her face whoever she looks at first, that person will be married first.
If you leave a shoe on the table it is a sign of a quarrel.
To break a mirror you would have seven years' bad luck
It is unlucky to carry a tool in through the door on your shoulder.
It is unlucky to look through glass at the new moon.
It is unlucky to throw out the ashes on a Monday.
It is unlucky to cut your nails on a Sunday.
If the cock crows in the night it is a sign of a death.
If you hand a pin to anyone you will have
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 16:52
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rejected
awaiting decision
Stomach ache: Gun powder boiled in milk cures a pain in the stomach.
Nettle sting. A dock leaf rubbed on he blister takes the pain away.
Ringworm in calves: Sulphur and grease cures ringworm in calves.
Sty: Bathe eyes in cold tea
Chin Cough: Eat a piece of bread given by a child who never saw its father
Headache: Soak brown paper in vinegar and wrap paper round the head.
Burn: Olive oil and white of egg mixed
Earache: Roasted onion tied over ear.
Ringworm: Sulphur and unsalted butter ribbed in.
Chilblains. Bathe feet in potato water
Bee Sting: Put blue on sting
Sore throat: Roast salt on a griddle, pt into white cloth, put round neck and leave on during the night.
Bunions. tie an onion and salt over it
Thrush: Put honey and borax on the infants tongue.
Whittle: Keep finger in got potato water for an hour.
Cold in chest: Melt a tallow candle and smear on brown paper. Put paper over chest for 24 hours.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 16:46
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time Simon Clarke was going to the fair of Leitrim. He had with him an ass and cart, a crate on the cart, and a calf in the crate. It was in the early hours of the morning and it was almost dark.
When he came within a few miles of the town he met a big black dog on the road. The dog ran in under the feet of the ass. Simon made a shite of the stick at him and said: "Whatever you are be going out of that" and all at once the big dog disappeared.
Simon was very wondered at that but still he went on his way and further on he met a very tiny man about one foot in height. He had no shoes but very big feet. Simon said "Good Morning" to him, The little man gave no answer but immediately disappeared.
Simon went on another piece and soon he met a man and he told him the whole story. The man said to him "If you were living you would put no wonder in that for that little [...] is often seen up here and he is
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:44
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rejected
awaiting decision
eggs another pigeon comes and takes her place while she is away for food. She sits on the eggs for a fortnight or three weeks. Another pigeon comes and sits beside her to keep her company. When the young ones come out they are like young ducks. One of the parent birds has a busy time carrying food because the other one must stay and mind the young birds lest the hawk would come for them to feed his young. When the young ones are learning how to fly they fly from branch to branch and from tree to tree. They are very tame when they are learning how to fly. You could catch them. They would not be afraid. If their nest is near a house they eat with the hens in a garden. The pigeons always rear two broods in one year. Some people catch pigeons and tame them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
less.
The Landlord.
I
Brave Captain O'Rackrent
one evening in June
When all nature lay
smiling beneath the bright moon.
Went out for a ramble the
fresh air to breath.
Where Borora's stream waters
the green plains of Meath.
II
In a coat of chain armour
his honour was dressed,
While a six barrell revolver
lay snug in his breast,
For all that his conscience
was no way at ease,
When he thought of the hundreds
he drove o'er the seas.
III
And of others who sleep in
their dark workhouse graves
And their bones that lay snug
beneath the bright waves.
The thoughts of his victims -
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:26
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rejected
awaiting decision
Is go ndéaraimíd a réir
Mor uraim duit a Sheósaimh naomhtha
Mar is tusa fúair an grás Íosa is
Muire beith ag soláthair
‘S in a grádh seadh fúair tú bás
Seosaimh Naomhtha guidh orainne
Ó go bhfaghaimíd sólás
Bheith mar tú ar feadh ár mbeatha
Is mar tú go bhfaghaimíd bás
A Dhia síorruidhe na trócaire
Ar ár naomh féac anuas
Led’ ró naomhtha coimeád í
Síotcain aondacht is i bhfeabhas
Dár bpápa tabhair do beannacht Díadhac
Dár n-easbog is dár sagairt grás
Do peactaig tabhair ar grás aithrighe
Dár namhaid is cara tabhair sólás.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
less.
The Landlord.
I
Brave Captain O'Rackrent
one evening in June
When all nature lay
smiling beneath the bright moon.
Went out for a ramble the
fresh air to breath.
Where Borora's stream waters
the green plains of Meath.
II
In a coat of chain armour
his honour was dressed.
While a six barrell revolver
lay snug in his breast,
For all that his conscience
was no way at ease,
When he thought of the hundreds
he drove o'er the seas.
III
And of others who sleep in
their dark workhouse graves
And their bones that lay snug
beneath the bright waves.
The thoughts of his victims
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
a.24 An Croidhe Naomhtha

Is peacach gránna salach mé Neamh tairbheac deireoil
Atá lán le beartha gangaideach
Is malluightheacht an tsaoghail
Acht cum Croidhe ró Naomhtha Íosa
Iompuighim in uair mo gádh
Mar sé croidhe ró Naomhtha Íosa
mo dhócas ‘s mo grád
A shaoghail aicídeach malluighthe
Ó scaraim leat go deó
Le do bród fallsa scannalac
Le dfhormad is do gleó
Is do Croidhe ró-Naomhtha Íosa
Sead geillfid mé go bráth
Mar is é do croidhe ró Naomhtha Íosa
Mo dhócas is mo grád
Duinn ó a Maighdean ró onóireac
Grad dhuit ta nár gcroidhe go doimhin
Mar sé aon Mhac Riog na Glóire
Do chaith trí raithe ‘n do bhroinn
Guid orainn a Máthair dhílis
Is ó peacad tabhair sinn saor
Go molaimíd d’aon Mhac milis
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 14:46
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rejected
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Long ago where the village of Mullagh now stands was a wood. Some workmen started to cut down the trees to make room to build houses, and Lady Sanderson who was owner of the wood made them spare one of the trees because there was a linnet's nest built in it. That tree remains ever since growing along the side - walk close to the green of Mullagh.
In after years a local poet named Bernard Nulty made a beautiful poem. In it he described the tree and how
"The linnets fluttered wildly about
their leafy home
And the Lady whispered mildly, poor
birds where will you roam."
He went on to say that as kind as her heart was to the birds. She was very cruel to her tenants, she evicted all of them and left them home -
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 14:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Crossed out but see below)
I
Brave Captain O'Rackrent one evening in June.
When all nature lay smiling beneath the bright moon.
Went out for a ramble the fresh air to breathe
where Borora's stream, waters the green plains of Meath.
II
In a coat of Chain armour. his honour was dressed
While a six barrell revolver lay snug in his breast
For all that his conscience was no way at ease.
When he thought of the hundreds he drove o'er the seas.
III
And of others who sleep in their dark workhouse grave.
And their bones that lay snug beneath the bright waves.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 14:11
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rejected
awaiting decision
Amhrán na bhFataí Dubha
Míle slán leis na bhfataí bána
Ba suagh an áit a bheith in aice leo
Ba fáltach sruadhach iad ag teach an láthair
Iad ag gáire linn ag ceann an bhuird.
Ba chabhair don malrach iad
don gár is don gárlach
Don lag is don láidir
Don óg is don chríonn
Ach fáth mo dhochair
Gur lobh na fataí gan sioc gan síon
Sé mo dhiabhal deacrach is mo ghalra dubh chroidhe
Ná fataí dúbhchain ins gach ceárd don domhan
Go bhfuil an gas críona searacuighthe
Ón gcéad lá Lughnasa gan blas ná snuagh ortha
Ach mar a bheadh faoi Shamhain
Nach é seo an sgéal dubh chrooidhe ag teacht don fhóghmhar
Brón dúinn is briseadh croidhe
An bheatha a chleacht muid i dtús a' n-óige
Bheadh lobhtha deortha gan mhaith gan bhrígh
Ba iad ár ngarda iad ó am ár gcliabhán
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 14:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
Is é mo dhíoltas iad imtheacht uainn
Ba mhaith an chuideachta iad agus an t-ughdar rinnce
Bhíodh spórt agus siamsa againn in aice leo
B'iad ar gcáirde iad a bhíodh ghá mbréagadh
In aimsir bheile d'ló is d'oidhch'
Faoi cheann de leaba ba cheann maith réidhtigh
Go moch ag éirigh dúinn is ag dul a luighe
Míle bliadhain is a h-ocht de chéadta
Dhá fhichead gan bréag is an sé in a cheann
Ó tháinic ar slánuightheóir i gcolainn daoine
Go d'táinic an léar sgrios ar fhataí an domhain.
Sin é an dáta is ní fáth gan ádhbhar
A mbeidh cuimhne is trácht air i gcaitheamh an t-saoghail
Mar níor tháinic uathbhás dá mhéid a cháilidheacht
Is mó ná an gortan agus an easbhaidh bídh.
Nach h-iomdha duine bocht de bhárr an sgéil seo
Nach bhfuil thar béile aige ceann den ló
Gan buaile ar chnoc a thiubharfadh braon
Is gan seisreach gléasta le dhul chun cinn
(ó Mháire Ní Dhonnchadha Béal a' Daingin)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 14:03
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rejected
awaiting decision
Amhrán na bhFataí Dubha
Míle slán leis na bhfataí bána
Ba suagh an áit a bheith in aice leo
Ba fáltach sruadhach iad ag teach an láthair
Iad ag gáire linn ag ceann an bhuird.
Ba chabhair don malrach iad
do gár is don gárlach
Don lag is don láidir
Don óg is don chríonn
Ach fáth mo dhochair
Gur lobh na fataí gan sioc gan síon
Sé mo dhiabhal deacrach is mo ghalra dubh chroidhe
Ná fataí dúbhchain ins gach ceárd don domhan
Go bhfuil an gas críona searacuighthe
Ón gcéad lá Lughnasa gan blas ná snuagh ortha
Ach mar a bheadh faoi Shamhain
Nach é seo an sgéal dubh chrooidhe ag teacht don fhóghmhar
Brón dúinn is briseadh croidhe
An bheatha a chleacht muid i dtús a' n-óige
Bheadh lobhtha deortha gan mhaith gan bhrígh
Ba iad ár ngarda iad ó am ár gcliabhán
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 13:46
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rejected
awaiting decision
The enjoyment lasts until twelve o'clock. The May Bush is then stripped of her candles. The flowers and egg shells are left on her. Soon the May Bush is placed on top of the bone fire and it is nice to see the flames, and the egg shells make noise everlasting when they are burning. All the people then before parting sing a song together. They return home with joy in their hearts for the way they welcomed the Summer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 13:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
The May Bush is one of the customs we have in Killiskey. On the evening of May Eve the boys go out and gather money with which they buy candles. They purcahse about six penny ones and cut them in two. Next they get egg shells and flowers. A few boys then go and cut a [?] tree from the root, one that is in blossom. When the May Bush arrives it is stuck into the ground at the Killiskey bridge. The candles, flowers and egg shells are then stuck on it. The candles are then lighted and the May Bush looks very nice. Other boys make on a bone fire a short distance away from the May Bush, and Killiskey for that night is a very pleasant place. The May Bush and the bone fire are all ready now, and some young boy is sent around the village to call all the people out to enjoy themselves. Soon the place is full. The older people sitting up on the bridge, while the young people dance around and play music.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 13:35
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rejected
awaiting decision
One day a man put some sheep into a raheen in Bolinass. When he went to look at his sheep the next morning he saw a piece of cloth beside one of them. The man went home and the sheep and the piece of cloth disappeared and neither of them was ever seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 12:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sa reilg i dTuar an Fhíona a thit so amach agus le linn mm óige féin, sé san 45 bliain ó shoin ann anois.
Sochraid ón mBullán Bocht i bparóiste an Chaisleáin Chuanaig a bhí ann. Dheineadh socrúghadh le sagart óg Tuar an Fhíona a bheith ag an uaigh ag a dó a chlog um thráthnóna chun an corp d'fháiltiughadh ag geata an t-séipéil agus paidreacha na marbh do rá. B'shin an dinnéir an tsagairt ach gheall sé a bheith ann ach gan an t-socraid a bheith nóimant níos déanaí ná an t-am beartaithe.
Bhí san go maith ach tá's againn ná bíonn Éireannaigh ró-luath go bráth ar ócáidibh den saghas seo. Mar ba gnháth bhí an shocraid ós cionn uair a chloig déanach ag fágaint an tighe di agus buaileadh an reilg ag leath-tar-éis a trí. Bhí an sagart ann agus an chonach air mar bhí an t-ocras ag goilleamhaint go geur ar a bhfear bocht.
Thug sé aoide na mhuc agus na madraí ortha so a bhí cionntach le déanuidheacht na sochraide. Nuair a bhí an stuirm ar a h-aoirde d'airgeadh glór beag, bídeach, maol á rá "A Athair ní raibh leighis againne ar bheith déanach". "Dé cúis sin"? arsa an sagart go nimhneach feargach, agus go simplí umhail a tháinigh an freagra " mar níor tháinigh an sagart chun Aifreann an chuirp do léigheamh go dtí tar éis a bhricfásta"
Liuig gach duine ag gáire agus briseadh ar aghaidh an t-sagairt féin agus an ionad a thuille aighnis siad na paidreacha a bhí sé ag cur uaidh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 12:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
'Sé an cuimhne is sia siar im cheann Patsy Mulcahy d'fheiscint im thig féin. Cúpaer ab ea Patsy ach ní ar a chéird a mhair sé. Rinncóir den sean-aimsire agus den sean-nós ab ea é agus ní raibh a shárughadh lena linn. Is mó rinnceóir i mbaile sa i gcéin a bhain iarracht buachanta air, ach do theip ortha go léir mar ní raibh acu éadtromacht, gluaiseacht agus aicill, dheacht comh maith go leór chun Patsy do chur fé chois.
Bhíodh scoil le rinnce do mhúineadh ag Patsy i gcúinne páirce gach tráthnóna Samhraidh agus a thuarasdal 'leath-phiúnta' gach ceacht agus an cleachtadh saor.
Bhuaileadh sé isteach chughainn go minic ag braith ar a bholg a líonadh mar go deimhin ba mhinic folamh ná lán an bolg ceudna san. Bhíodh mo mháthair cráite aige agus théigheadh sí i bhfolach uaidh uaireannta. Chonaic sí ag teacht é tráthnóna agus shín sí ar an leaba ag coinne go mbogfadh sé leis arís gan mórán moille, ach ní mar shaoiltear a bhidhtear.
Nuair ná raibh mo mháthair á fáilltuighadh ghlaoidh sé ormsa agus d'iarr cá raibh Mommy. D'inniseas dó. Ansan ba ghairid go raibh sé ag portuidheacht mr seo :-
Tá an chearc ar gor, tá an charc ar gor, tá an chearc ar gor, a mhadainín
Tá an chearc ar gor is na luí ar shop is ní thabharfadh sí té don mbochtainín
Bé sin an cleas Patsy chun a nochta do mo mháthair go raibh fhios aige cleas mo mháthair
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 12:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
MACOIDHE - (macoy) - a fine boy
breall glic

Punóg - little knob formed on under clothing through wear as in flannelitte

Reiméad - a Rubber(?) or torn piece of garment hanging loosely

Umhnán - froth of milk
Snamhaire - a "snot", or cringing boy

Dearbhaoil - the cleaning of dykes consisting of briars and waste stuff. Dirty stuff

Dríodar - sediment
Scúirse - a whipser, applied to a girl, a fine active girl
Gamalóigín - an innocent youngster
Criocáilidhe - a bladder or one who speaks like a child

Dúlamán - the green stuff which floats in a spring well in summer

Rúmáile - water crowfoot
Gaibhsleach - an earwig
Tufóg - a smell

Tuifera - a stinking person
a cábog

Scrín - what passes from the male to the female at time of conception

Síafra - a fairy, a small person
Straoil - an untidy girl, Giobalach
Giobal - a rag
Gobal ime - a lump of butter (small say 1/4 or 1/2 lb.

Gabhlóg - (Illustration) a fork, wooden, used when cutting briars etc.

Stillers / Stileirs an ounsel or spring
balance (Omit S to suit the language) (??)

Buitseacán - a short thick man boy or person

Suidhistín - a small seat filled with curled hair, used for a child

Sáilslear - what is used to hold salt at table
Racait - a child's frock
Cába - collar of a coat
Cuarán, - slippers, sandal,
maothal, beistings 1st and 2nd milking
Nús - beistings
Ísbín - a sausage
Grísgín - a rasher or gizard of a bird roasted on coals
Glas - watery looking (milk)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
aige agus tar éis cimilte a mhuinicle le na phus agus treórughadh beag do dhéanadh ar a chroimbéil, labhair sé. Ní raibh dada ann ach ceó ar sé sin, dada ach ceó-treasc.
"Dar féidlimín", arsa mise "dé cúis ná faghainn cuimhnimh air agus é comh simplí de sin go m'fhíor dhuit ná raibh dada ann ach ceó, ach mar sin féin, nach é an ceó a dhalann an saol".
D'fhágamar slán ag a chéile agus d'imigh sé go lán-sásta leis féin mar d'éirigh leis deire do chur leis an dtart millteach a bhí á crád agus gan pingin mar scór ina choinne.
Níor leagas súil air ó shoin - fear siúl na mbóthair a bhí ann.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
adh ag an gceannuightheóir san áit san freisin.
Bhí Fireball in a gcomhnaidhe i gcaisleán i Aill i bparóiste Fiacail ar tamaill géarr agus do chaith sé tamaillín eile de a shaoghal i gCill Eanacha i dteach Donnachadha Ó Diolláin.
Fuair sé bás agus cuireadh é le a mhuinntear féin san mainistear Cuinnne.

Donachadha Ó Muineóg
Eanair 3, '38
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
an Spáinn agus nuair bhí sé ann do mharbh sé Spáineach i gcomhrach beirte.
Do lean mac na Spáineach go h-Éirinn é agus casadh ar a chéile iad ag Geata Bán taobh thoir dé Co. an Chláir agus bagairt mac na Spáineach é agus bhí comhrach beirte eile eathorra agus do mhairbh Fireball an Spáineach.
Deirtí go raibh morán áithmhéala ag Fireball an rud sin a dhéanamh acht ní raibh aon leigheas aige air.
Tar éis an troda do chas sé fear darbh ainm Drew idir Geata Bán agus Scairbh. Dúbhairt sé leis go raibh fear marbh i bpáirc i n-aice Geata Bán. D'órduigh sé é an t-airgead a bhí ag an Spáinneach do thógaint agus é do choiméad agus an Spáineach féin do chuir i n-áit éigin.
Do dhein Drew an obair sin agus ni raibh aon comhrach beirte eile aige. Do cheannuigh Drew píosa talmhan lámh dheis den mbóthar i n-aice Tighe na mBocht idir Scairbh agus Toma Gréine leis an airgead.
Deirtear nach raibh t-adh aige san áit san agus do dhíol sé é agus ní raibh
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Rángas cúpla bliain ó shoin ann gur bhuaileas le sean-fhear as Dúngarbháin. Bhí del an mí-ádh air agus scaoil mar rún liom go raibh an tart ag goilleamhaint go trom air agus go dtabharfadh a dhá shúil ar chúnta leanna. Ó bhí féith na cainnte comh láidir le sin ann, ní bhfuaras ainm an t-eiteach do thabhairt dó. Ghlaodhas ar phúnta dó. Is ar éigin a bhí sé buailte le na bealaibh, nuair a bhí sé uile ina bholg in aon slogáig amháin. "Bail ó Dhia, ar an scórnaigh" arsa mise. "Ainm a Thiarna" arsa sé ar ais "sin é an t-aon phioc amháin díom ná raibh orm riamh trioblóid do chur ar dochtúir ina thaobh". Níor bhacas le 'glaoch arís' ach chuireadh chugham an cheist neamh-cathianta seo "ar bhraithis riamh meachaint phóca folaimh agus ná bíonn sé níos truime ná lead?" Thugas fath na ceiste ach níor scaoileas leis a bidheacht m'intinne. Nuir nár d'oibrigh do an claonacht, tharraing sé chuige an 'módh díreach' mar seo. Innseosfainn duit adhb ná réiteach duine as ceud ar phúnta eile leanna. "Innis dom é" arsa mise. Déanfadh, ach glaoch ar an deoch i dtosach" arsa mo chara. Dheineas agus ansan dúirt go raibh tamall dá shaol i gCiarraí agus go bhfeacaidh sé, dar a chonsias go bhfeacaidh, i dTráilí lá, láncairte d'adhmud agus gan bata cam ná díreach ann.
"Réitigh é" arsa sé "agus dar bhrígh an bhata má éiríonn leat, raghadh chun do shocraide ór ná fuil sé im chumas aon rud níos fearr do dhéanadh dhuit.
D'fhanas ar mo mharana ag cogaint na tíre is ag pléidh na ceiste ach ní raibh pioc maitheasa dom ann mar theip orm fregra do thabhairt air.
Bhí an púnta folamh
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Do rugadh agus tógadh Fireball Mac Conmara i Mo Riasc in aice Tulach i gCo. an Chláir timcheall céad bliadhain ó shoin. Duine de sliocht muinntir Mac Conmara do b'eadh é agus fear calma laochrach do b'eadh é freisin.
An t-am sin bhí na Sasanaigh tíoránaigh san tír seo agus bhí gráin mór air iad a bheith ag déanamh sin.
Bhí dhá phiostal ag Fireball agus sgríobhadh 'bás gan sagart' ar ceann amháin aca agus 'casúr an bháis' ar an gceann eile. Thug sé casúr an bháis' do Ó Connall nuair a bhí sé ag troid i n-aghaidh D'Esterre.
Do chaith sé cuid is mó de a shaoghal isteach ag bagairt agus ag troid i n-aghaidh na Sasana agus bhí eagla an domhain ar na lucht Plandála i gCo. an Chláir air.
Nuair a bhí Ó Connall ag troid an comhrach beirte le D'Esterre do chabhruigh Fireball lámh uachtar d'fhágail air.
Is mó comhrach beirte do throid sé in a shaoghal. Chuaidh sé go dtí
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(I)
O Heart of Jesus out from Thee,
A mighty stream is flowing,
Of God's sweet grace and blessings,
And his mercies over flowing.
Oh Sacred Heart then keep my soul,
From every thing defiled,
The little while I am to stay,
Make me Thy grateful child.

(II)
Oh Heart of Jesus kindly grant,
That I at length may see,
With radiant orbs made heavenly bright
The way that leads to Thee,
That I may fill some vacant place,
Before Thy heavenly throne,
And that my heart unsullied,
May find rest within Thy known.

(III)
Oh when I think as oft I do,
How good God is to me,
My Heart with rapture clings to Thee,
Thy glory there to see,
That I may love Thee in my soul,
For thou hast been so kind,
And thank Thee for they blessings all,
Which I can bring to mind.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(IV)
Now I am old and nearing fast,
The ending days of life,
Oh Sacred Heart and be my strength,
And lead me in the strife,
Oh help me keep Thy fire of love,
A flame within my breast,
And give me grace to light my soul,
To its long eternal rest.

Treasa Ní Mhuineog
Rang (III)
25ad Mí Nodlag '37

Mo Shean-athair do cum. Tá sé nocha agus cuig bliadhain anois.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Remember Our Lady of the Sacred Heart the ineffable power which thy divine Son has imparted thee over His adorable Heart. Entirely trusting in thy merits we come begging thy protection O' Heavenly Treasurer of the Sacred Heart of that Heart inexhaustible fountain of all graces which thou mayest open when thou pleasest in order to distribute amoungst men.
All the treasures of love and mercy of light and salvation which it contains grant us we beseech thee the favours we solicit no we cannot be refused and since thou art Our Mother Our Lady of the Sacred Heart.
Propitiously hear and grant our prayers. Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, pray for us.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
thy holy will grant me health and strength never the less not my will but thine be done. O sweet heart of Jesus make me love thee ever more and more.
Eternal father, I offer thee the adorable face of thy beloved son for the honour and glory of thy name for the conversion of sinners and the salvation of the dying.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
not to offend you any more.

Prayer to the Virgin Mary
Oh we love thee Mary trusting all to thee what is past and present and what is yet to be our Lady our queen and our mother in the name of Jesus and for the love of Jesus help us in our troubles.

A Pray for a happy death
Oh my Lord and saviour support me in my last hour by the strong arms of thy sacraments and the fragrance of thy consolations. Let thy absolving words be said over me and thy holy oil sign and seal me. Let thy mother Mary come to me and my angel whisper peace to me that I may die as I desire to live in thy faith and in thy love.

A Prayer to the Sacred Heart.
Though I have asked for a long time still I ask thee O Sacred heart of Jesus once more to plead for me to thy Eternal Father for a great favour. I place it in the centre of thy broken bleeding heart when covered with the crimson clock of thy most precious blood of thy Eternal Father cannot refuse to her not my prayer but thine. O my God through the love of the Sacred Heart and the Precious blood which flows from it. If it be
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Oh Jesus I cast myself and all my concerns into your Sacred heart overflowing with all sweetness. I commit to you with perfect confidence all my spiritual and temporal interest. I beg of you in the hours of my weakness and excitement when I forget to call upon you for help to be still my protector and guide. Give me light to see your will, strength to do it and grace
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mark the animal in the same place, usually making a letter or drawing a cross, and others mark them with mud off the road.
When a bull is sold a bit of rope is usually given with it for to tie him in the wagon, and a halter is usually given also with a horse. March and April fairs are the two best fairs in this locality. The only tradition in connection with the selling of animals is the "Luck Penny".
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
are now discontinued, owing to there being no railway station in any of the two townlands, or any convenience for the distribution of the cattle bought or sold. There is a cross road and an old castle at Carrigadrohid, and five or six roads run to Rooves Bridge.
Toll is paid in towns, never in country places. The toll is usually paid to the town councils and its amount is anything from a penny to a sixpence "a head" which means per animal. Some of the owners of yards charge in Coachford for keeping the cattle.
When a bargain is made the parties show their agreement by marking the cattle with a scissors or with chalk, or sometimes they pay deposits, or the seller usually presents a docket to the buyer when he is demanding his payment.
When animals are sold each buyer has his own style of marking. Some buyers have a scissors and they mark the animal on the rump by cutting off some of his coat. Others have red or blue chalk, and they
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The local Coachford fairs which take place the fourth Tuesday and Wednesday of each month are held in the middle of the street.
On Tuesdays the cattle and sheep fairs are held and on Wednesdays the pig and bonahams fair. Fairs are held in all towns of this district, but not in the streets, there is generally a field near or in the centre of the town where the fair is held, and this is called the "Fair Field". Buyers still transact business especially at farmers houses, and when they are buying pigs and calves.
Luck money is still paid on cattle when sold. It is the person who is buying the animal that generally gets the money which is supposed to be for luck, and the amount of money given varies, usually about a half-crown or five shillings.
Fairs were held in Nadrid, and Carrigadrohid formerly, but they
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
few disused ones.
Different kinds of clothes are worn at certain times such as white frocks and wreathes and veils for the girls on the day of First Communion or on the day receiving Confirmation. After the death of a near relative black is worn. It is also a custom for some one in the house to wear articles of clothing of the deceased for a couple of Sundays going to Mass after the death, and it is right to sprinkle them with holy water. There is no special custom as regards clothes worn at weddings but black is never worn by women but it is an old saying to wear "something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue".
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Every year the farm is ploughed, and harrowed. If there is oats in the field one year there will be potatoes the next year because the same thing every year would not grow so well.
If there are potatoes in it you will have to pick the soil well or there
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Newly-calved cows sometimes take milk-fever. To cure this all that has to be done is to pump the udder and tie it.
If a cow takes black-leg it can never be cured and dies.
When a cow takes murrain it gets
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the horse's harness and some farm implements are kept. The old houses were built with clay and mortar. There were no chimneys in them, there was a hole in the roof to let the smoke out.
There are stables out-side the back of the kitchen.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The houses of this district are built generally facing the main road or some road. The foundation is dug out. They put old stones and slates under the cement to keep it firm.
Sometimes the people put slates in the new houses but they say the thatch is warm. It is often said that the banshee cannot be heard in the thatched house as much as in the slate houses.
The ceiling is made by putting the boards from side to side and nailing them. Bags and playing cards are put inside the ceiling becauce they say it is lucky.
In Mingwar long ago there were many wild beasts. They used to leave the windows two feet from the ground.
The people used to put medals and old beads hanging from the roof to have luck. In the old houses there is a loft. In that loft the
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are only a few forges in this parish. They are a long distance from where I live. The nearest one to me belongs to a man named Dolan. His father worked in it before him. It is situated not many miles from the main road, and there is a river running almost by the door. It is built outside the dwelling house, and it is thatched. Outside the door there is a horse-shoe up, so that the passers-by may know it is a forge. In the wall outside there are a lot of horse-shoes stuck, for the purpose of tying horses and asses.
The door is in two halves. The upper half is always opened, in order to give the blacksmith light to work, and the lower half is shut so that the horses cannot get out. There is only one fireplace, and it is built about three feet high and four feet broad. It is coal that is burned in it. One side of the fire there is a stone basin always full of water, and the blacksmith has a brush made of rushes, and he sprinkles the water on the fire with it when it is to strong. There is a big bellows in the corner
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 10:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Woolen Mills. Several people buy the cloth at the mills and get it made by one of the tailors.The chief kind of cloth used are tweeds and serges. The only saying I ever heard about a tailor is "a tinkers wife and a tailors wife never agree".
The implements the tailor uses are the needle, thread, thimble without any bottom, and iron for pressing called "flat iron", chalk for marking and a sewing machine. The shirts are still made in the homes of the people. The cloth used for making these is oxford shirting, flannel and flannelette. Some of the men still wear flannel jackets called "baneens" and trousers. Some of the people remember them (to be worn more as an inside garment) to be worn outside, and turned up at the waist and knotted in front but now they are worn more of an inside garment and pullovers are worn instead outside.
Socks ans stockings are knitted in every home also jumpers, cardigans, and all kinds of underwear. There is no spinning wheel in use in the District but there is a
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
little shop and had plenty of money but the neighbours were wondering where did he get all the money. During the time he broke the news to his wife and she advised him to give back the purse and the money which he got out of it. So when the fifty years were up there was a newly ordained priest and the man went to him and the priest made a pond of holy water around the man and when the devil came for the man he and the priest were around the pond praying. When the devil heard "Jesus" he went off in a ball of fire and he never bothered the man again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a shop on the Main street called "Sinnotts" the hard ware. There is a well under the shop called "the death well". In the time of Cromwell it was used. The prisoners Cromwell did not want to hang or to kill he opened a big iron trap-door and put the men standing on a stone stairs. The men used to walk down the stairs thinking they would get some way to escape, but they fell into the well.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:52
approved
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awaiting decision
A man who lived on the Rocks Road was going home late one night. He heard soldiers marching behind him and when he turned around he saw Cromwell and his soldiers and they were all headless. Some of them were carrying a coffin. Cromwell ordered them to "halt" and he told them to put the coffin on the man's shoulders and make him carry it to the top of the hill. When they came to the top of the hill they took the coffin from the man and they all rode away.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mr Hendrick of Byrne's Lane has an uncle who lives in Camolin. When he went to live there at first the priest told him that there was a ghost in the house but the man said he did (did) not care. The priest told the ghost to go into the room and when he was inside he locked the door and put paper over it and you would not know that there is a room there and it is there up to the present day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A girl named Lily Myler told me this Story of an old Nun who was so holy that the devil tempted her. God had told her to fast for some number of days to see would she obey him. One day she was praying in her room when something scrabed her and she told the nuns but they said it was the cat. So they locked the room but it was the devil all the time. Then he appeared to her again dressed in lovely garments and said to her. "If you do not eat you will die soon God is not wanting you to be greater then himself and he is wanting you to die. But she said "I will keep my promise to God but he tempted her so much that she gave in and as soon as she
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The boys in this town play "Cabbage stump night". This fun falls on the 31st October. Boys from four years old to 18 years old play this game and the night before they practise. All the boys get in one straight line and give each door a thumping of a cabbage stump but the people do not like this so they get up in the windows and get a bucket of water and when the boys are just going to knock at the doors they throw it on them but that does not keep them from knocking the door. They get the Cabbage stumps in the gardens and some times they get the stumps left after taking the Cabbage leaves off for the dinner.
Sometimes the doors are not shut only just closed over and some person of the house hides behind it and when the boys knock the door the person catches them and gives them a good beating.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The number of tailors presently in the district are three. Mr Twomey who lives in the village is both deaf and dumb. He learned his trade in the deaf and dumb Institute School in Dublin. Mr Carrol who lives in this side of Dripsey is a tailor who does good trade and Mr Keefe also lives in Coachford. Mr Twomey travels from house to house and mends all the rough clothes for the people. To the homes of the people who have a big family of boys and men he goes chiefly.
The tailor who lives in Coachford stocks cloth. There is no cloth made in the homes of the people but it is spun and woven at the local Dripsey
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:28
approved
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awaiting decision
death they only wear it for six months.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:27
approved
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awaiting decision
named Mrs Sullivan who lives in Clontead, she knits jumpers by hand and sells them to the people. Also her crochet is much to be praised. She does all the work with her hand.
Thread is not spun in the homes of the people. There is only one house in the district that I know that possesses a spinning wheel. That is the house of Mrs Buckley R.I.P. Clontead.
Special types of clothes are sometimes worn on certain occassion such as white dresses and wreaths and veils are worn for Confirmation and First Communion and sometimes at weddings especially when they are celebrated in the city. At the death of a relative the people wear black and if they do not like to wear all black they wear a piece of black cloth in the shape of a diamond on their arm. The men wear a black band on their hats and a black tie and the women wear a black dress and black stockings. After a parents death they wear black for a year, but after a brothers or sisters
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:25
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awaiting decision
There is a "warty" well in Bellnacanty. People who have warts on their hands, go to this well and throw a pin or a button or a coin into the well. Then they dip the wart into the well. In a few days the wart goes away.
There is a well on the Clones road called the Jaundice well. It is situated in the townland of Grelliboy. The disease of the Jaundice can be cured by bathing in this water. It is said that St. Patrick quenched his thirst at this well in Summer. He then blessed the water. The foot prints of the Saint and his dog can be seen in the rock adjoining the well yet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 09:07
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awaiting decision
Our School is a little thatched dwelling. Long ago, during the Penal Days, it was a hedge - school. The teachers were not paid for their teaching because it was forbidden. Up till recently it was hard for the teachers and pupils to get into the school, because the road leading to it was bad, but now it is repaired Monaghan County Council paid £300 to the local men for repairing it. There are 23 pupils at our school at present, but long ago there were 100 if not more. Killelina, as it is called is the oldest school for miles around. The people don't like to see the little school go down because their ancestors went to it too. Mrs McGilly is the principal teacher, and Miss McClave is the assistant. It is a mixed school.
Master McPhillips taught the hedge - school. After him came Master McKeown, Master Rooney, Master Murphy, Master Harte, Master Donnelly and Mrs. Rushe.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:43
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awaiting decision
There is a part of our farm which is called "Planxty" Long ago there were three fields in it, but Daddy took out a hedge and made two fields into one. It lies close to the country road and in the smallest field there is a well. The water in this well is the best I ever tasted. On the hottest day it is icy cold, and it never has gone dry. Old people say that long ago people who were sick came from all parts of Ireland on Mid - summer's night and danced round this well. When they were going away they took a bottle of water with them and they were supposed to leave some little thing at the well for the fairies. I have heard that there are two or three wells in Ireland all having the same name as ours. I would like to know where they are and I wonder what the word Planxty means.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
Near Clones there lives an old cattledealer by the name of James Mohan. One night he was coming home from town, and he had taken a few glasses too much so he fell into a boghole. A Protestant neighbour named Jemmie Howe heard him groaning and went down and pulled him out. When he was out he says. "Is that you, Jemmie Howe", "It is," says Jemmie, "Oh", says James, "throw me in again, I would rather be drowned than saved by an Orangeman."
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:17
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awaiting decision
My granny told me this story.
Not far from my house there is a field and in the middle of it htere is a tree which people say that every morning long ago there was mass said at. The tree is there still but no blossoms grow on it. It is rotton but it has never fallen. Many beads were found at it. There is a very large stone in the same field which it is said that fairies used to dance and play about.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:15
approved
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awaiting decision
is built with the stones from the castle. The name of the house is Belvin and it is the property of Mrs J. Lindstone.
There is supposed to be a cave under the island on which the castle was.
On a smaller island on the same lake there is a stone shaped like a chain. It is called the wishing chain and the people used to believe that if they got on the chain and wished their wish would be granted. This lake is sometimes called Lough Veagh which is wrong. Lough Veagh is the lake in Glen Veagh, almost seven miles from the place.
The right name for Lough Veagh is Lough Bheathach which means the lake of the Silver Birch. On this lake there is an island and there is supposed to be a cave under it, the entrance to which is covered by a large round stone.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:14
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awaiting decision
There was a man in Clones named Frank Morris. He was walking on the street one day and he met the late Dean O'Neill. Frank was after having a couple of pints of porter. The Dean said to Morris, "Drunk again, Morris" and Morris replied, "So am I, your reverence."
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:14
approved
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awaiting decision
1
There was a man named Donegan,
Who wandered up and down,
And always in the country stayed,
Unless he came to town.
2
The people to him kindly said
"What do you want, my man,"
'Tis work I want, oh, give me work"
Replied bold Donegan.
3.
But though he wandered north and south"
And travelled east and west"
No work came to brave Donegan"
Who passed his days at rest.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:10
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awaiting decision
Marriages take place mostly in Spring and Summer. Marriages don’t often take place at Shrove. The month of May is said to be an unlucky month for a marriage. Tuesday is also an unlucky day for a wedding. There are no matches made in the district now but long ago the used to be made. Money is not given as dowry nor is cattle or goods ever given. Long ago marriages took place in the house of the boy or girl who is getting married this was done for a good many years. When two people come out of church the people throw rice on them. A wedding feast is always held in the house of the bride. Straw boys do not visit the house now. The people do not go home on horseback.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:04
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awaiting decision
The potatoes are dug in September. My father and my uncle pick the potatoes. Then we gather them in a heap and we make a pit for them. The pit is made with scraws and rushes. Then we put the potatoes into a heap and cover them with rushes and scraws to keep them from getting damp.
handle
trettle
the iron (blade)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are potatoes growing on our land, and they are usually sown in drills. If the land has not been ploughed before, the potatoes are set in ridges. We usually set half an acre and this is the way they are set. The drills or ridges are made with the plough. There is manure then spread in the drills. Before sowing the old potatoes they are cut in small pieces called sciolláns and are spread evenly in the drills about ten inches apart. Then the drills are closed again with the plough, and when the gardens are in bloom about the month of July they are sprayed as a preventative against the blight.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:57
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rejected
awaiting decision
There are potatoes growing on our land. We set the potatoes in drills and we usually set about half an acre every year. If the land is not ploughed before it is made into ridges.
Before sowing the old potatoes they are first cut into sgiolláns and there must be an eye on every sgiollan. Then manure is put on the drills, or ridges, and they are closed again with a spade. When the stalks begin to appear over the ground the potatoes are "risen to" and the same is done as they grow up. When the stalks are withered the potatoes are fit to be dug. Everyone in the house helps to pick them. They are stored in a pit. It is usually made in the middle
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:45
approved
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awaiting decision
the river. When boiled together and mixed with lard and gun powder they make a cure for scurry. Bramhnán grows on the banks of the river and should be avoided as it is deadly poison. Chickweed is a very harmful weed in tillage land. It spreads quickly and kills many crops. It is sometimes used as fodder for cattle.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:42
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Rushes when cut and saved make good thatch for houses and also bedding for cattle. Mínscoth is found in upland meadows. When boiled and the juice mixed with honey it makes a good cure for coughs. Slanless grows in all kinds of land. It is sometimes used for cuts. Dandelion grows in high fields or in the sides of the roads. It is used as a syrup for certain diseases. Comfry grows in many places. It is good feeding for pigs. The roots when scraped make a cure for a sprained leg or hand. Nettles are very dirty weeds in grass lands or gardens. It is used sometimes as a vegetable. Caistreabhán is generally found everywhere and makes a good food for pigs. Fothrom and cropatrick are generally found by the side of
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:35
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These are the plants and weeds that grow in our district. Buachallán, thistle, praiseach buidhe, felistrium, rushes, mínscoth, slanless, caistreabhán, comfry, nettles, dandelion, cropatrick, fothrom, bramhnán (amhrán), chickweed.
The buachallán is a very harmful weed to pasture land. A great number of insects gather in it. It is harmful to cattle. It often The thistle is also a very harmful weed to the eyes of cattle. It often causes blindness. The praiseach buidhe is a very harmful weed to tillage land. It causes failure to many crops. It is generally found in bog land. Felistrium is a very harmful weed and spreads very quickly. Rushes always grow in wet land
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:14
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:14
approved
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:14
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awaiting decision
The Leipreachan is about two feet in height. He has a red cap on his head always. If you see him catch him, for if he is near a hedge he will go in through. Hold him and ask him for the purse. And every time you open it you will get a shilling in it.
This is a story about the Leipreachan. My father was going to work one morning and above in Tim Hayes's he heard a voice inside in the fort. "Isn't it a fine day the first of March".
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:13
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The Leipreachan is about two feet in height. He has a red cap on his head always. If you see him catch him, for if he is near a hedge he will go in through. Hold him and ask him for the purse. And every time you open it you will get a shilling in it.
This is a story about the Leipreachan. My father was going to work one morning and above in Tim Hayes's he heard a voice inside in the fort. "[?] it a fine day the first of March".
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:09
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and the cow told the boy to put warm clothes on him. So he dressed himself up and went out and went up on the cow's back and the cow galloped off and soon came to a forest. They stayed for the night and the cow said this is my last night with you, in the morning there will a big bull come across the hill and he will kill me and when I am killed cut off my tail and tie it around your waist and anyone you are fighting with only take off the tail and hit them with it and it will kill them. When the cow was killed he buried her and cried over her. Then he went away. It was about six o'clock when he saw a village and the first house he went to, there was a blacksmith working and he asked him for job and the
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 07:03
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him the next morning. So they watched him and they caught him and they made up the plan that his wife would go to bed and they would tell him that his wife was bad and to go for the doctor so he went for the doctor and his wife was talking to the doctor and he said that there was nothing to cure this sickness only the liver of the first cow that would come into the yard. This animal should be killed and to give his wife the liver so the first cow came into the yard and they killed her and no cure came from her liver. This held on until every cow was killed all to the white cow and the next morning she was to be killed
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 06:58
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spread it on the field and look away. He looked away and when he turned around again there was every class of food he could ask for on the towel. He ate his nough and he looked away again and on turning everything that was on the towel had disappeared. He rolled the towel up and put it into the horn again and put the horn on again. He carried the cows in and he ate no supper that night. He ate no breakfast the next morning only went out and had his fine breakfast in the field. The same thing happened that night. He ate no supper and they said that they would watch
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:54
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There was a man wan time who was reared as a pet.
He was the youngest son of a widow, and he married a neighbouring girl who had a house of her own.
This man's name was Jack Coleman.
After goin' to live with his wife in her farm, he became very morose and silent an' lost all his jolly ways
His wife consulted a neighbouring woman an' told her of his silent an' serious disposition.
"Wait", said the woman, "I bet yeh, I'll make him laugh to-morrow."
The following day, when they were eatin' their dinner, this woman flung a cock with the feathers all plucked off, in over the half-door, on to the kitchen floor, with the result the Misses and the servants went into fits of laughter, but Jack only said, "How funny yez are"
The wife next went to his mother and told her about Jack.
The mother asked her did she ever give him the serapin' of the pot, she said "No"
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:42
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The following day when the Misses was serving the sweet after the dinner, she asked Jack would he like to scrape the scillit
Jack got up and gripped the scillit, an' after takin' a few spoonfuls, he burst into laughter exclaiming aloud,
"Will yez ever forget the ould cock that came in yesterday an' we atein' our dinner"?
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:36
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The dog was nearly as big as an ass.
He went ahead in front of them; his two red eyes were blazing in his head. Dan got a fright. He never saw the dog before.
Pat said, "God, don't mind him young fellow."
Dan never went that way in the night, but the dog passed him.
The were very near home by the time the dog passed them.
When they came to the field at their own house, they saw a lot of little men, with red caps, kicking football.
They sat down on a big stone and watched them for about a quarter of an hour, then all of a sudden the little men disappeared so the two got up and went home to bed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:35
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The dog was nearly as big as an ass.
He went ahead in front of them; his two red eyes were blazing iin his head. Dan got a fright. He never saw the dog before.
Pat said, "God, don't mind him young fellow."
Dan never went that way in the night, but the dog passed him.
The were very near home by the time the dog passed them.
When they came to the field at their own house, they saw a lot of little men, with red caps, kicking football.
They sat down on a big stone and watched them for about a quarter of an hour, then all of a sudden the little men disappeared so the two got up and went home to bed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:26
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Some time ago there used to be a black dog seen on the Killystown road, between Ger Gorman's and the Leap.
There is a path through a field by the side of the road, and no one has ever crossed it, after dark.
There were two families named Morrissey living in Doonooney, and a boy out of each house used to ramble together at night. Pat Morrissey was one of the boys and Dan Morrissey was the other.
Pat used to call Dan the young fellow.
They were out very late this night, and they were coming home through Kellystown. It was about two oclock in the mornin'. They came to this path.
Pat wouldn't go around the lane, so the two got over the stile, and they talked away 'till they reached the middle of the field. It was a fine moonshiny night an' all of a sudden Pat said, "Good God young fellow," keep in an' let the beggar pass."
They could hear him trottin' like a pony long before he came up to them
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:15
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Two ould people lived in Coolnagree, be the name of Phil and Mary Jackman.
They were after gettin' so ould that they didn't know Sunday from Monday.
This day they went to sow pyates and it happened to be Saint Patrick's Day.
When Stasia Wickham was goin' down the lane for a can of water Phil asked her what time was it.
"What time is it Stasia", says Phil
"The people'll soon be comin' home from second Mass". says Stasia.
"What "! says Phil.
"They'll soon be comin' home from second Mass," says she.
Wud that he took off his hat and blessed himself and sez he, "Pick 'em up Mary, pick 'em up."
"What are you sayin'," sez she.
"Pick 'em up", sez he "This is Saint Patrick's Day."
They began pickin' up the pyates, and they picked up all the pyates that they had sown since morning.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:02
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early in the evening in the centre of a field, it is a sign of fine weather
22 There is an old saying "Wet Sunday wet week."
23 When the sea-gulls fly inland it is said that they bring us the rain.
24 When the ducks quack loudly all day rain is sure to answer their request on the following day.
25 "The evening (sky) red, and the morning, grey.
The traveller may go on his way.
The evening grey and the morning red,
The rain falls on the traveller's head."
26 When the goats gather looking for shelter it is the sign of a thunderstorm.
27 A cock crowing going to bed is sure to rise with a watery head
28 A circle around the moon is a sign of a change, and the farther the circle from the moon the nearer the rain.
29 Twinkling stars and falling stars are signs that it is freezing.
30 No morning sun lasts a whole day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:50
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the sign of wet weather.
11 When far away hills look near it is the sign of rain.
12 When snipe are heard whistling it is a sign of rain.
13 When the crickets are heard singing in the hob it is a sign of rain.
14 When a frog or a beetle it is a sign that the coming weather will be wet.
15 When the seagulls light on the land, it is the sign of rain.
There is an old saying, which runs as follows :
16 "Seagulls, seagulls sitting on the strand,
We'll have no fine weather, when you'll come to the land."
17 When frogs change their colour, it is a sign of rain.
18 When you see the sheep grazing anxiously in the middle of the field it is the sign of rain.
19 When a cement floor weeps, and when salt weeps, it is a sign of rain.
20 When there is a circle around the moon, it is a sign of rain.
21 When the sheep are lying down
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:49
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the sign of wet weather.
11 When far away hills look near it is the sign of rain.
12 When snipe are heard whistling it is a sign of rain.
13 When the crickets are heard singing in the hob it is a sign of rain.
14 When a frog or a beetle it is a sign that the coming weather will be wet.
15 When the seagulls light on the land, it is the sign of rain.
There is an old saying, which runs as follows :
16 "Seagulls, seagulls sitting on the strand,
We'll have no fine weather, when you'll come to the land."
17 When frogs change their colour, it is a sign of rain.
18 When you see the sheep grazing anxiously in the middle of the field it is the sign of rain.
19 When a cement floor weeps, and when salt weeps, it is a sign of rain.
20 When there is a circle around the moon, it is a sign of rain.
21 When the sheep are lying down
16
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:36
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1. When a cat sits with her back to the fire it is a sign of hard weather.
2. A rainbow in the morning is the shephard's warning, a rainbow at night is the shephard's delight.
3. When an ass is seen going to the sheltry side of a field it is the sign of rain.
4. When the swallows fly high it is the sign of fine weather, and when they fly low it is the sign of bad weather.
5. When the wind is in the East it is not fit for man or beast.
6. When Carrigbyrne puts on her hood the Coonogue river is at a flood,
7. Miss Byrne has on her hood (Miss Byrne refers to Carigbyrne Hill.)
8. If you see a dog eating grass it is a sign of rain.
9. When we hear the crows calling it is the sign of a storm.
10. When smoke goes straight to the sky it is the sign of fine weather, and when it goes to the ground it is
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:22
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Owner :-
Mr M. Fortune
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The church meadow.
b. The glibe

Owner :-
Mr T. Furlong.
Knockreigh,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a The white mountain.

Owner :-
Rev Father Wallace.
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a The castle field
b. The sand pit field.

Owner :-
Daniel Crean.
Glenour,
Adamstown
Co Wexford.
a The white field b. the old town
c The rath field d. The big field
e The gooseberry garden
f The back o' the house.
g. The Curcheen
h. The field over the mill
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:13
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Owner
Mr J O Gorman.
Poulpeasty.
a. The race course
b. Miss Annie's field
c. The orchard.
d The blessed well field

Owner :-
Mr A Whelan.
Rathquile
Adamstown
a. The spade step field

Owner:-
Mr P Jackman.
Ratheenduff
Adamstown
a. the bawn fother
b. The blind field.

Owner :-
Mr P. Murphy.
Knockreigh,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The pullavones.
b. The spade step
c. The fox burrow.
d. Carney's knock.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 01:01
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The landlord of Derryvenane was Mr Fitzgerald. He never crushed anyone but he always gave them time to pay their rents. He was a very good landlord. The people that had big valuation and that went before the land act for a reduction, he gave it to them and he reduced [?] rent of those who did not go before him. He lived in Carrigoran house Newmarket on Fergus.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 00:55
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The land in the Illies is boggy and hilly and bad and there are no woods in it + in fact very few trees.
The Craua [?] is the only river in the Illies and the [?] Brook flows into it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 00:53
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Townland:_
The Illies _ Parish of Lower Lahau Desertegny[?] and Barony of West Innishowen.
There are thirty families in this townland. and about one hundred and sixty-seven people. The most common family name is [?]. Most of the houses are thatched and only four or five are slated, and have only one room and a kitchen.
The townland got its name from an elbow or bend in the river Grana here.
There are about seven or eight people over seventy years in this Townland.
These old people do not know Irish but they can tell stories in English.
William Donaghey } Address
Mary McLaughlin }
Edward Doherty } Illies, Ballymagan P.O.
Mary Grant }
John Kelly } Lifford. Co. Donegal
Annie Kelly }
[?] McGowan }
Houses were more numerous locally in former times. There are a number of ruins of houses in the townland as the people emigrated to America in former years
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 00:21
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and woven locally at Dripsey Mills and is worn by many of the local people. Tweed and serge are the chief kinds cloth that are used. The chief implements that the tailor uses is a foot machine, an inch tape chalk and a lap board.
In olden times shirts were made from the flax that was grown locally. My grandmother who is still living remembers a time when men wore flannel shirts or "báneens" at their work. One man who died a few years ago and who lived in Direen always wore a flannel shirt, His name was Mr Twomey. Presently some men wear flannel shirts as an under garment. Nowadays the shirts are not generally made in the homes of the people, they are bought in the shops as they are cheaper than to make them. Stockings and socks are made in mostly all the homes in this district, jumpers are also made. Mrs Buckley, Rooves, has a knitting machine for knitting stockings. She sells the stockings to the people of the district. By this she earns her living. There is another woman
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 00:10
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An Old Story 2-11-'37
My mother told me this story, long ago. A man went to a funeral and when he went in to the churchyard he met a man's skull and he kicked it a couple of times, and then he left it there and he went away home.
Next day he went to the garden digging potatos. A man came up to him and he said you were at a funeral yesterday and the man said he was. "Did you kick any skull in the churchyard?" "I did," said the man but I did not mean to do any harm to it.
The man that came up to him was his brother who was dead a long time and it was his skull that the man kicked. He told him not to do any harm ever again in a churchyard; that he should not clean his shoes in the grass even.
Written by: Mortimer Ahern, Rooska, N.C.W.
Told by: my Mother, aged 52 years
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 00:05
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There are three tailors in the District of Coachford. Their names are Mr OKeefe, Mr J Carroll and Mr J Twomey, the last mentioned is deaf and dumb. He learned his trade in a Dublin Institution for the deaf and dumb. He travells from house to house as tailors did in former days, but the other two tailors do their work at home. The tailor does not stock cloth in his house. Cloth is spun and
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:59
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shape, and others just a black band, and they usually wear black ties, and the women generally wear black clothes.
At weddings there are no special kind of clothes worn, but often as not there are wreaths and veils and costumes worn. The wreaths and veils are usually white in colour, but the costumes generally vary.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:55
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tailor jumped off the table and said he would immediately. When he had the job done, Saint Patrick told him when he was about to leave "that a tailor would be always "light ans airy" and that his trade would never go down".
The following are the chief gear or implements the tailor uses in his work:- a needle, a sewing machine, a thimble, thread, a scissors, a pressing iron, a lap board, and coloured chalk.
Shirts are still made in the homes of some people in this district yet. The chief cloths used are flannelette and calico shirting.
Socks and stockings are still knitted locally. There is one spinning wheel in the district yet, but the woman who used to work it is dead.
There is a special kind of dress worn on First Communion days and on Confirmation days, and this is usually white in colour. There is also a wreath and veil worn. On the death of a relative men generally wear crapes on their arm, some diamond in
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:49
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and a big bag for the flour. He had names of his own for everything. He had "Jacke'en Sweetlips" on the sugar. "Susie Ann" on the teapot and "Rosie Ann" on the meat on the pan. He is dead these years. After him came the blind priest. This priest had to be led from house to house. He gathered money from the people to make a living.
Writer Josie McGlynn
Kingsland
Castlerea
Co. Roscommon
Eire
Heard from Mr. Matt Beirne (76)
Kingsland
Castlerea
Co. Roscommon
Eire
Aged 76 years
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:42
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There are three tailors in this district. One of these tailors a Mr Twomey who is a dummy goes around from house to house working when required. He learned the trade in a deaf and dumb Institute in Dublin. The other two tailors work at their homes.
The tailor in Dripsey whose name is Mr Carroll, stocks his own cloth. The only place in this district where cloth is spun and woven is in Dripsey Mills. The people of this district and of many other places wear the cloth that is made there. Their tweeds are far famed owing to their grand quality and colours. It is mostly all tweeds and serges that are used for suitings in this locality.
The only tradition that I ever heard connected with tailors was, that long ago Saint Patrick went to a tailor and asked him to put a patch on his coat as he wanted it badly, and the
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:41
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Travelling Folk 7-6-'38
Nearly every day throughout the year we see some travelling Folk. They are always poor people that you see travelling. Nearly every one of those has some occupation. The men sweep chimneys or put a bottom in a kettle or a can that might be leaking. The women sell little things such as saucepans which they make themselves and lanterns which they make themselves also. Some of them are more familiar to us than others. The following are well known the McGinleys or the McDonaghs. There was a Mrs. Gray and her son in this place. When she came she would stay more than a week and go from house to house. If there were any meetings or patterns about the country. A man named John Sampey from High Bog used to go to them and he would be the first man to be seen there. Then there was such a man as Jimmy Moore who used to go about from house to house telling stories to the people. Everybody liked this man. Young people followed him to what ever house in which he would be telling the story. He used to take nights for one story. He begged a little too. He had a box for the tea, and a box for the sugar.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:31
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One night a man staying in Wexford was awakened at midnight by the sound of a coach. He got up and looked out of the window and saw a headless man on the coach and two headless horses. The man was shutting the window and the headless man hit the man across the eyes and blinded his. This man was an uncle of Sonny Roche King street.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:29
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1. Heck -a beds 24. Tin can Capper
2. Blind man's buff 25. Flinch
3. Hide the linger 26. Queenio
4. Four Corners 27. Here are the robbers coming through
5. Who has the button 28. The beggar man on the hill
6. all birds fly 29. What will you give to the poor sailor
7. Frog in the well
8. Pin a throw 30. The cat and the mouse.
9. Colours 31. There was a farmer who had a dog
10. Black Booby
11. Plum pudding hot 32. Spy.
12. Skipping 33. Here we go gathering nuts in May
13. Lazy Mary
14. Tip the finger 34. Mother will you buy me a milking can.
15. Hop Clap
16. Jenny Joe 35. In and out goes naughty Blue Bell
17. Sally o
18. Rounders 36. See the big ship sail on the Illy Allu You
19 OXO or Fox and Goose
20. Jacks 37. Carry a Lady to London.
21. Guessens 39 Paddy on the Fireland
22. King of the castle 29. Paddy may I go across the water
23. What time is it? 40. Rasberry Apple
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:21
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" The hollow winds begin to blow
The clouds look bleak the glass is low
The soot falls down the spaniel sleeps,
And spiders from their cobwebs creep,
Last night the sun went pale to bed
The moon in halo hid her head
The boden shepherd heaves a sigh
To see a rainbow span the sky,
Low o'er the grass the swallow wings,
The cricket too how sharp he sings,
Puss on the hearth with velvet paws,
Sits swiping[?] o'er her whiskery jaws,
Loud quack the ducks, the peacock cries
The distant hills are looking nigh,
Hark! how the chairs, and tables crack
Old Billy's joints are on the rack,
T'will surely rain, I see with sorrow
Our jaunt must be put off to morrow. "
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:19
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awaiting decision
Giltesich is a weed, with a yellow flower when boiled, is a cure for errysipelas. This plant is not common. It grows like a tree on the top of a ditch and is used for making brooms. Ribleaf is very good food for young turkeys. It grows in most places and its leaves are lance shaped. It is to be found where there is a lot of grass growing. Chicken weed is harmful as it spreads over the land. Praseach is a harmful weed which mostly grows in potatoes, and in good land this weed spreads over the land rapidly.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:14
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awaiting decision
Bíonn cailín ag poc léimrigh i lár an urlár, agus 'na cailíní uilig a' rith 'na tímcheall; agus raon mar seo aca.

A bhearaidh tú orm a laoigh
A bhearaidh tú orm a laoigh
Ó bearad is fáilte a cuidiní
Dílse mo croidhe

Fuairas é seo ó'm mhatair

Úna Ní Shúilleabháin
Baile Gibb
An Uaimh
Co. na Midhe

An té a scriobh:-
Máirín Ní Shúilleabháin
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:14
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The following story was told to me by Johnny Belvin. When Syl Cullen grandfather of Syl a farmer now living died, his ghost walked.
Many neighbours met him at different times and places. He even visited his married daughter in the west of the county.
Naturally it created a scare throught the county. But there was a man named Nicholes Scallan who showed no fear at all. One night Scallan went to the "Hollow" field to close the gate. Just as he put his hand on the gate to close it, a hand from the back was laid on it, and he recognised the ghost at once.
People say that Scallan never recovered from the fright and the mark of a hand was to be seen by all on his own afterwards.
Some years after Scallan went to Wexford town where he committed suicide. Fr Dunne P.P. eventually laid the ghost and the poor man was never the same after.
Here is an account of the laying. The priest read some exercising prayers & the ghost came up through the floor of the parlour & though he expelled him from the house he failed to drive the ghost the bounds of the farm. So he laid him in the duck house a little faillig
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:14
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awaiting decision
monastery to be found except a few stones near the pump and a little holy water font now to be found in the Brothers' House.
About the close of the twelfth century Joceline de Angulo founded or rebuilt an Abbey at Navan for Canons Regulars of Saint Augustine. There is a tradition that a monastery of St Colmcille existed here before the Canons were brought over by De Angulo or Nangle and that is why the school is called St Columba's Abbey School.

Cannon or Canon:- Just one field away from the school is the street called Cannon Row. This is said to have belonged to the monks and derived its name from a row of Canons cells so the Irish name should be Sráid na Manac or Sráid na g-Canonac and not Sráid na nGunnaí Mór as it is locally called.
A famous statue was kept in this monastery of the Assumption of the B.V. and was called Our Lady of Navan. Miracles were worked here some of which will be found in another place. The statue was destroyed 19 July 1539.
Indulgences were granted to persons by Pope Nicholas V (to persons) who came on pilgrimages to this monastery.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:05
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awaiting decision
What is now known as the Abbey Schools is used as a school since 1917. Before it was unoccupied for a short period. But up to the time of the Great War it was occupied by the a section of the Meath Militia.
Many alterations have been made to give it the appearance of a school. The upper stories were used as sleeping quarters for the horse soldiers and the lower storey was the stable. These rooms are very dark and low and very depressing. We are all very glad to get out of the down stairs classrooms as it is very difficult to see the blackboard and on dull day it is difficult to write. The are four poles supporting the ceiling. These were used to hang the harness. They are made of iron and are hollow and might contain military relics.

A few days ago whilst making a new path to the W.C. human remains were found. These were re-buried underneath the path. This was the monastic graveyard up to the time of Henry VIII. And it is also said that during the cholera cart-loads of corpses were buried here.
There are very few remains of the
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:04
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In 1798, when the Rising broke out, there was a man by the name of Philip Roche living in Johanna Bishop's house which is situated down near Carrig. When the Battle of Jordan's Cross took place this man took part in it. There was a terrible battle fought between the Yeomen and the Rebels.
Fifty Yeoman and thirty-eight Rebels were killed and amongst those rebels was this man Philip Roche. His body was brought down to a field near the house. There a hole was dug and his body was buried. Some say that that's why Johanna Bishop's house is haunted. The people that lived in this house before the present owners found ten dozen guns. It was at this battle Leo Pearse's brother was killed and it was that that enticed Leo Pearse to rise against the Catholics.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:58
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In the year 1798 when the Rising broke out there lived a Yeoman named Leo Pearse. This man was an ancestor of the present Miss Pearse of Summer Hill. He was very cruel to the Irish people and he used to kill every Catholic on whom he could lay his hands.
One night as he and his followers were about to enter a Catholic man's home, a command came from inside not to enter, but he only laughed at it and he shouted to the people of the house to open the door for them and let them in. But the people took no heed of them as they were saying the Rosary.
After about ten minutes when the prayers were finished the husband went out to the door and opened it. The Yeos came in and arrested the family and Leo said he would kill the husband himself. But when the time came to kill him, Leo fell dead in his own kitchen.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:53
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Breacla
Gearrygorm
Bainnre
Pallyguney ( Poll a' Gaineamh ) A = U go minic
Lug Gorm
Saileog or Silouge

Sgeac Ranna - Bush of Division - Kells Navan and Mulgainmh

Páirc na h-Easmaighe
Duog = Dubhóg - a little black river

Cor an Eisg - a place frequented by the Cor an Eisg - the name for the Heron in Meath

Barrla - small pond
Clann Magadan - (Cluan Mac Paidín?)
Bun na gCros - at Joe Feely
Croc Béil
Grabhaidhe
Páirc a Clábhair
Croc Breac
Rath Dubh
Curragh Mór
The Bán
The Báinse
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:51
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In the year 1798 when the Rising was on, Father Murphy and his army were on the road to the "Three Rocks". (Wexford). When they got as far as the "Three Rocks" they saw an army of English coming against them and they got behind a ditch and put their hats on the tops of their guns. When the English saw them they began to fire at them.
When they had wasted their ammunition, Father Murphy shouted, "Charge", and all his men rushed over the ditch and began to slaughter the English soldiers.
Places are to be seen to-day where Father Murphy and his men hid from the English Soldiers.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:47
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:47
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In the year of 1796 there was a man named John Malone who lived down near Carrig, in the house where Johanna Bishop lives now. One day in the month of October John was going down the road on his way to a little forge near the Ferry, where the pump is now. This forge is known as "The Forge of the Pikes". As John went into the forge he asked for a pike. A very rough voice answered him saying, "Begone or you won't be able to go." But Malone was a brave man and replied, "Whoever you are come out from where you are hiding and let it be a hand to hand fight". But the coward would not come out from where he was but repeated the very same words John departed for he saw a body of Soldiers, through the window, coming down the hill.
For the next two years John planned to rise out with the rebels. He said that there was
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:40
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no use in rebelling without arms. One night, himself and a big crowd of others planned to capture the forge. At two o'clock that morning, they rushed down the hill, surrounded the forge and ordered the party that was in it to surrender.
They surrounded and gave up all their property, and amongst it were fifty pikes, ten flails and thirty-seven swords. With these weapons those men rose out in '98.
John himself used a flail and the English were terrified of that weapon, for one day a soldier on horse back was rushing on John, when suddenly John worked his flail and cut the legs clean off both horse and soldier.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:34
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1 The Queen of England wrote to the King and asked him to send her a bottom less vessel to put flesh and blood in what was in
(answer A ring)
2. The king of Morrocoo built a ship an in that ship his daughter sits an I'll be killed for telling her name an thats three times I have told its name
what was her name Answer ( an (Anne)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:28
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26.
Hockherns. (Cacthigheirnn Hearne)
There was a salmon weir at inside of Bar of Bannow, at the Fethard side, beyond living memory, called 'Hockern's' weir.
There was another at Carnivan, and another in Slade Bay, and one at Innyard Point, as well as the present one (a Scotch floating weir, fixed) at Baginbun Bay, except Baginbun, were destroyed by 'the Whiteboys'.
27. Sites.
Churches. Well known.
St Dubhán's at Churchtown. At burials here they take the complete sod off the grave plot, roll it on a pole, and when the grave is filled they roll this sod on like a blanket.
St. Dubhán's early cauldron lighthouse. It is said that a pirate living at Slade used extinguish the light at times & put one nearer Slade, farther inshore, so that ships would run ashore and be plundered
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:50
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Buying and Selling
Shops were common in olden times, because there were no motor deliveries and they had to go to the nearest shop to buy and sell things. Money was given for goods in olden times. Goods were bartered in the district in olden times, such as a man gives a load of turf for a bag of potatoes. Labour was also given in exchange for goods, such as a man would work for a couple of days and he would get a bag of flour instead. In olden times there were words used in buying and selling such as boot, tick, change and luck. Markets were held in former times in one part of the town called the Market Square. In this district in former times pedlars and dealers used to go around buying rags, feathers and bottles. They still go around buying rabbits, skins, rags and feathers. The names the various coins were called in olden times were as follows: Pound was called a quid, a shilling was called a bob and a sixpence a penny.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:45
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Bread.
There are no accounts from the grown up people with regard to the kind of bread made in the district in olden times. Bread was made from wheat and oats grown locally. There were different kinds of bread such as Potato Cake made from potatoes and baked in a pan, Flour Bread made from Flour and baked in an oven, Wheaten Bread made from Wheat and baked in an oven, and Oaten Bread made from Oat Meal and baked on a griddle. Bread was baked nearly every day because if it was baked every week it would be hard and stale. A cross was made on the top of the cake when made. An oven was given as a name to the vessel in which the bread was baked. Griddle bread was often made.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:44
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a poor man once more. He made up his mind that he would go back to the island and see would he hear another story. He went up in the bush, and towards midnight the cats came again and the leader cat said they would have to look around properly, that the King's daughter was cured and thatsomeone must have been listening to their story. THey made a dilligent search and found the man in the bush, so they ate him and tore him to pieces.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:41
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Grave, in the month of July.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:22
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Glann Moore In Lemgare on the farm of Denis Brennan.
Sounding Brae. Brae in Carrickaduff Co Armagh thus named because of a sound that comes from it.
Mass Hill. Hill in Tullinagagrove castle Blaney County Monaghan called because Mass was said there in Penal Times.
Canny's field. On the farm of Denis Brennan so called because it was owned by a man named Canny.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:17
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But I'd rather have my cabin than his rich lordly hall.
3rd
I have a nice little cabin I have pratties galore. I have always a welcome for those who are poor. When a family is evicted they are welcome home to me. In my little humble cabin I can hold a jubilee.
Chorus
With my big turf fire and my floor swept clean. There is no man more happy than I Paddy Kane. To the baby in the cradle I can hear the dear wife say. Agra go to asleep Alanna till I wet your daddy's tea.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:13
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Early O Early by the break of day
Down by these green fields I chanced to stray
I heard a fair maid to sigh and say
The lad I love is gone far away.
He has gone and left me in grief and woe
And where to find him I do not know.
I will search these green fields and valleys low
But where to find him I do not know
If the hills were covered with frost and snow
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _
What voice, what voice is that I hear
It is like the voice of my Willie dear.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:07
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built and it happened that it was built on a fairies path a fairy came and told the people of the house that it would fall and it was not too long after it until the house fell. On their path there was a spring well and it was called a fairy well a woman thinned turnips and she threw them in the well and filled the well and that night the well rose in under her bed and she said she would never interfere with it again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:04
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The Famine took place in Ireland between the years 1846 and 1847. The reason that the famine took place in Ireland was because the potato crop that year was a failure. Any wheat and corn that the farmers had that year they had to give it over to England and the people of England sent back a very small price for it. At that time the Irish were put out of their homes and some of them died on the roadside with hunger and starvation some of them emigrated to America and were sent away on ships to foreign lands and sold as
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:03
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Ceithre cúinne ar mo leabaig
Ceithre haspoil ortha san
Marcuis agus Lúcas, Seamus, agus Seán
Gabhaim Dia mar athair
Is Muire mar Mháthair
Flaitheas Dé mar dhúthaig
Is diúlthuighum don áirseóir
Tar a Mhichíl agus glac mo lámh
Dein mo siothcháin le Mac Dé
Is má tá Liúicifar ar mo thí
Do sgiath a Mhichíl idir mé is é
A Mhic a chuaidh sa chrann
Agus do dort orainne fuil Do bhall
Sin é chúghainn an tam
A thíghearna ná leig ár nanama i ngeall
Nár thughaidh Dia dhuit an bháis, ná gearra bháis, ná bás oban, ná báis in aon pheaca de's na seacht bpeacaí marbhthacha acht deagh bháis, deagh lá agus an ola coisrighthe i ngrádh Dé agus na gcómharsan.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 21:01
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slaves. When the Irish people died they were buried in wooden coffins and the coffins were painted black. In other places there was a door put on the bottom of the coffin and there was a white sheet tied round the dead body in it. When the people brought the coffin to the grave there was a deep hole dug and the door of the coffin was opened and the dead person was thrown into the hole and the coffin was brought back for more people.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:54
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a spade.Then a hole is dug into which the good big potatoes are put, while the good one which are small are brought up to the house for the pigs and hens. The names of the various kinds of potatoes are Epicures, Early rose, Champion, British Queen, Flounders Kerry Pink, Aran victory, Aran Banner, Aran Chief, Up to date. The potatoes that grow best in this area are Kerrs Pink and Epicure. Bread is also made from potatoes such as Potato Cakes and Boxty Bread. Potato Cakes are made from boiled potatoes and flour. Boxty bread is made from raw potatoes and flour. Long ago when potatoes were made into a drink when milk was very scarce.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:52
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Fadó sa t-sean shaoghal agus tímcheall na bliadhna 1847 sé an biadh a bhíodh ag nadaoine ná prátaí agus bainne. Dá bhéile bídh a bhíodh acu, an breicfeast agus an suipéar. An té na bíodh na prátaí aige bíodh min bhuidhe aige. Is minic a bheirítí an mhin ist oidhche i gcóir na maidne. Beireóchfaí braon leamhnachta annsan agus cuirfí ar an leite é agus is minic a dhein fear lá maith oibre ar sin. Bórd ar nós dorais a bhíodh acu go mbíodh aon chos amháin fé. Bhíodh sé sin na sheasamh ar shuidhcheán agus é crochta leis an bhfalla.
Nuair a tháinig an t-arán amach bé an t-arán seagail a tháinig ar dtúis. Annsan tháinig an t-arán cruithneachtan. Bainne a bhíodh le n-ól acu i gcómhnuidhe go mór mór bainne gabhar. Bhí alán gabhar sa pharóiste seo fadó.
Bíodh iasc go minic ag na sean daoine agus bíodh feoil acu leis a marbhuigidís féin. Mairt agus feóil gabhair a bíodh acu. Bhí sean fhocal i measg na sean daoine sa dúthaig seo.
Blais anairthe muilth
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:50
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Sometimes the people help their neighbours when they have large gardens of potatoes to set. They drop the potatoes and manure the ground. The potatoes are put about nine inches from another thus
(drawing)
About the month of June the spraying takes place. First of all a barrell of water is got into which eight lbs. of bluestone and ten lbs. of washing-soda are put. When they are well mixed together in the barrel, the wash is sprayed on the potato stalks and leaves by means of a sprayer carried on a man's back. This is done sometimes two or three times. About the month of April the shoveling of the potatoes takes place. About the month of July the digging of the potatoes takes place. Sometimes the people help to gather the potatoes. To dig the potatoes first of all the stalks are pulled and left one side. Then the potatoes are dug with
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:44
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The area of our garden is about twenty perches of which eighteen is planted with potatoes. My father prepares the ground in the Springtime. Sometime the ground is manured with farmyard and artificial manures. The potatoes are sown both in ridges and in drills. The ridges are made about three feet wide with a furrow about one foot wide between each, the clay being shovelled up on the ridge from the furrow. The drills are made with a plough or with a shovel, each drill being about eighteen inches wide. Before the iron plough was made wooden ploughs were used. There are a few of them still to be seen. Most of the spades are bougth in the shop. The following is an example of a local spade.
(drawing of a spade)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:39
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Question: What was the last animal to leave the Ark
Answer: The Elephant. Because he had to wait to pack his trunk
Question: Why can a man see more with one eye than a man with two eyes.
Answer: Because he can see two eyes in your head and you can only see one in his.
Question: What's cut in the wood and sounds in the town and earns his master many a pound
Answer: A fiddle
Question: What tree bears the most fruit to the market
Answer: The Axle tree
Question: I went into the wood and got it I sat down
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:38
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Question. In ran the toto out ran the toto the king of four feet came and stole away
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:37
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Answer: Addition tables
What is the difference between a schoolmaster and an engine driver
Answer: One mind the engine and the other engines the mind.
What is full and holds more
Answer: A pot of potatoes
What goes round the house and drags its puddings after it.
Answer. A hen and a flock of chickens
Why are doctors always bad characters
Answer: Because the worse people are the more they are with them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:37
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Lá dá raibh beirt fear a bhi 'na gcómhnuidhe i mBarrlinn ag teacht ó Bheanntraighe i dtrucail comónta do thosnuig an lá ag báisteach agus do lean sé de go raibh tuille mór san abhainn. Do tháinig na fir go dtí an áit na rabhadar chun dul treasna na h-abhann. Thiománadar an capall ar aghaidh an t-srutha. Do sgiobadh as an dtrucail iad le fórsa an tuille ach d'éirig le duine acu greim d'fhágáil ar sgeich a bhí ag fás ar bruach na h-abhann agus do rith sé go tigh cómharsa chun cabhair d'fhághail. Do tháinig beirt fear thar nais leis. Do chuarduígheadar tímcheall ach ní fuaradar tásg ná tuairisc an fhir eile. Do leanadar de'n gcuardach ar feadh seachtmhaine ach ní fuarathas corp an fhir. Fé dheire do cuireadh fios ar shagart agus thanig sé. Do léig sé leabhar san áit nar sgiob an tuille an fear agus annsan dúbhairt sé leis na fearaibh dul agus cuardach fé bhruach na h-abhann in áit áirithe agus go bhfaghadh siad corp an fhir ann. Do chuadar chun na h-áite. Do chuarduígheadar agus do fuaireadar.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:33
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Gawlogue Kirk
Brogue Bee
Dromawn Back
Skehogay Fin
Tahneen [?] Kippeen
Goil [?] sheac. Grainyeogue
goll Polthog
Praskeen Skeow
Brackenn Skeagh
Smithereens cheekeen
Bresna oal yawn
Risr Sidlog
Boshawn sgaoc
Crock Prashuck
Gawgue Skillawn
Bawnlack Suggan
Plawreen Scaldeen
leck nack Bool a bawsheen
Spawgue Spidéog
Spawl Cuck?
Bathog Scribe
Grafawn alannaln
Kithogue ownshack
Backawn amadain
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:08
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The turf clamp field (there used to be a clamp of turf ekpt in this field).
The sgeac field (there are sgeacs grows in this field).
The Bonfire Bank (There used to be bonfires lighted on this bank long ago).
The three cornered field (there are three corners and three sides on this field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:05
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The high-stone field (there is a big stone in the middle of the field).
The sheep walk (there used to be nothing else kept in this field only sheep).
The ass field (the people around this field that have an ass pay a shilling a forthnight to get their ass grazed).
The Clover field (a lot of clover grows in this field)
The Ram Park (There is a ram for water there).
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:05
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What part of the cow goes into the wood first?
Her breath.
Hairy all over rough in the skin two things shaken and one going in?
A pig eating.
Pull its nose and its tail will bleed?
A Pump.
There is a house over there and there is more windows on it than the Kings Palace?
A Thimble.
I boiled the kettle with truth and lies?
A Newspaper.
Kitchen full, a room full, and couldent catch a spoon full.
Smoke.
Twenty four white horses in a stall, up jumps a red one and licks them all?
Your tongue on your teeth.
Tink tank on the bank ten drawing four?
A woman milking a cow.
Brothers and sisters I have none but that man's father is my father's son?
Myself.
Through a rock, through a reel, through an old spinning wheel, through a bag of pepper, through an old horses shinbone?
A moth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:02
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Knockfada (The long hill)
Killiskey (The Church of the water)
Cairg bán (The white rock)
Cairg na Muc (The hill of the pigs)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:00
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The Well Field (There is a well in the corner of this field.)
The Big Field (This is a very big field.)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 19:59
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The Broom Hill (a lot of broom grows on this hill).
The Sally Bog (This is a bog in which sally trees grow)
The Sandhole Field (There is a big hole full of sand in the field)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 19:56
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Carragher, who was a very popular curate in his day. After his death his remains were interred in the Churchyard where they remained till 1930, when they were exhumed and placed in the new graveyard.
Fr. Corcoran had a new wall and entrance gates erected around the new cemetery (1930) and in 1931 planted trees and shrubs all around the church and graveyard. A special collection in aid of the purchase of the trees was taken up through the parish. In 1932 a huge boulder, stone weighing about ten ton was dug up in the new graveyard and rolled down to where it now lies near the main entrance.
P.Ps: The present P.P. is Fr. McBride who was appointed in 1937 in succession to the late Canon Donellan who died in July 1937. He was appointed to the parish in 1918 and succeeded Canon Clarke who died in that year. The Parish Priests before that time were Canon McCrystal, Fr McGinn and Fr Marmion. (this information was acquired from Mary P. Clarke (12) Cortial, and Jane McHue Dunbin (12) who got the information from their parents who are natives of the district)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 19:34
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Carragher, who was a very popular curate in his day. After his death his remains were interred in the Churchyard where they remained till 1930, when they were exhumed and placed in the new graveyard.
Fr. Corcoran had a new wall and entrance gates erected around the new cemetery (1930) and in 1931 planted trees and shrubs all around the church and graveyard. A special collection in aid of the purchase of the trees was taken up through the parish. In 1932 a huge boulder, stone weighing about ten ton was dug up in the new graveyard and rolled down to where it now lies near the main entrance.
P.Ps: The present P.P. is Fr. McBride who was appointed in 1937 in succession to the late Canon Donellan who died in July 1957
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 19:10
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It is said that if swallows fly low it is a sign of wet weather, and if they fly high it is a sign of fine weather. When the green-plover returns from the mountains it is said that it is a sign of frosty weather. If you see a blue flame in the fire stormy weather may be expected. A rainbow in the morning is a sign of rain. When the sun is pale it is a sign of rain also. When distant hills appear to be nearer it is a sign of rain.When the smoke of a chimney goes up straight it is a sign of a clear atmosphere. If the noise of the sea is heard at a great distance it is the sign of a storm. In the summer white clouds like little castles in the blue sky are a sign of thundery weather. There is always a great calm before a storm of wind or thunder. Little[?] seen at the side of a fire are a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 19:02
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If the sun rises red in the morning or if there is a small circle round the moon at night it is a sign of rain. If the stars are glittering in the sky it is said that we will have frost. When the clouds seem near it is also a sign of rain. When you see red clouds in the east, or a blue flame in the fire, it is a great sign of a storm. When the curlew is heard calling it is a sign of rain.
Swallows fly high when fine weather is due.
When the seagull is seen on the land it is sure to be stormy weather. It is a sign of bad weather when the cat turns its back to the fire or when the dog eats grass. The hills and mountains seem near when bad weather is nigh. It is a sure sign of rain when the crickets sing sharply. When the spider leaves his cobweb it is also a sign of rain. When rain is due there are always sparks in pots and kettles.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 18:12
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The following are names of fields in this townland.
Nell's garden:-this was owned by an old woman named Nell.
Cruachan Doigthe [Cruachán Dóite?]:- it got its name from, because in olden times the people burned it.
Cúll [Cúl?] Sionnach:- because the foxes den is in the corner of the field.
Gairride [Garridh?] Dubh:- because the soil is very black.
Cruachan na Móile [?]:- this was a hill which grew very little grass.
Teach an nGabhar:- because there was a little goat-house there long ago.
Garraíde [Garridh?] bán:- In spring time the field is covered with white daisies.
Pairc [Páirc] Carraig:- There is a big rock in the middle of the field.
Pairc [Páirc] a Rannaig [Raithní?]:- it is covered with ferns.
Pairc [Páirc] a línn [líon?]:- a field where flax was grown.
Poll bán:- which means the white hole.
Corrach ramha [?]:- which means very rough and rocky.
Bárr Aibhne [Abhainn?]:- It got its name from a river that is at the bottom.
Bearnach Feilim:- Pheilim's gap.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:45
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King Amarocar built a ship and in this ship his daughter sits and I am not ashamed to say her name and that is three times I have told you?
And.
As round as an apple as plump as a ball, can climb through the church over steeple and all?
The Sun.
What is it that walks with its head down?
A nail in your boot.
What is in an empty cart?
Plenty of room.
First it was green, then it was red, and then black?
A Blackberry.
Which part of the fish weighs the most?
The scales.
The longer it sits the shorter its gets?
A Candle.
Why is Ireland like a bottle?
Because there is a Cork in it.
Headed like timble, Tailed like a rat you may guess for ever but you couldn't guess that?
A Pipe.
If a man got a shilling for walking one mile what would he get for walking fifty miles?
Sore feet.
Put on the table and never cut?
A Deck of cards.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:40
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it is red then they begin churning and the butter comes on the milk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:40
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Churning
We have a churn at home. It is three feet tall, and it is sixteen inches at the top, and it is eighteen inches at the bottom. It is not round. It is eleven years old. There is no mark on the sides or bottom. Churning is done often in Summer than in Winter. Everyone helps to churn in our house. Strangers who come in help to churn. It is a custom to help, and if they don't help is a sign of bad luck. It takes an hour to do it. The churning is done by hand. The churning is done when the butter come out on the side. Water is poured in during the churning. Buttermilk is used for making bread, and for dringing, and for giving to the pigs, and for making whey. If the butter will not come on the milk, the people stop churning and the put a piece of the plough into the fire until
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:05
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Swan.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:05
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Gold finches.

Rooks.

Pheasant.

Green linet.

Wild hen

Water duck

Wild goos

King kisher

Wood cock
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:04
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Plover. gold, green,

Sea Gull.

Jackdaw.

Magpies.

Curlews.

Owl.

Snipe.

Patridge.

Crane.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:03
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There is a stable beside our hose which was a school at on time. The Teacher taught more Irish than English to the children and he would write on a slate with a stone pencil; This school was in the year 1720. There was another local schoolhouse in Reaghstown it is now a farmer's house. The Teacher came from Lishrinny. The children were taught their letters and Writhing and Arithmetic on slates with stone pencils and the older girls were taught needle work and knitting in the evening; Her name was Miss Filgate; The house is now occupied by Christopher Keegan;
There was another Old Hedge School near Arthurstown it was a wayside shed and the Teacher came from Dromin; His name was Mr Butterly and he taught the children how to speak Irish and a lot of Geometry they would write on slates with stone pencils, he was lodged in the farmers house and was paid by the children a penny or two a day. The farmers could afford to give a little more,
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:39
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of holy water into the nest.
Nancy Murphy
Told by. James Grant
Ballynooney
Mullinavat
Co. Kilkenny
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:35
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ago. One horse won a cup at a Dublin show, and when a horse would be going to "perish" (die) he would come home and lie down in the stable, and he would be got dead in about a quarter of an hour afterwards. When the people in this district call pigs they say "Hurrish bock, bock", and when we call a goat we say Minnie. When we call turkeys we say, "Bee, Bee." and when we call hens we say, Chuck, Chuck. When my mother puts down eggs she would shake holy water on them so that there wouldn't be any of them bad. When she put down Turkey eggs, she puts a number on them to distinguish them from each other.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:34
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There are five graveyards in the parish. Tallanstown, Philipstown, Charlestown, Cluain and Churchtown.
There are two of them not used, Charlestown and Cluain Crocáin. There are ruins of a church in Philipstown.
Tallanstown graveyard slopes in the direction of North East.
Some of the oldest dates in Tallanstown graveyard are 1791, 1761, 1789, 1788, 1802 and 1805.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:27
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There is a wall throwing a lovely view to the church and graveyard.
There are no old graveyards in the parish. They say in olden times unbaptised children were buried in the gardens.
People don't bury in their own parish graveyards, they generally bury with their own people as the old people counted it very unlucky to make a new grave.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:20
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There is only one graveyard in Knockbridge Parish.
It lies along the public road from Louth to Dundalk and is situated on the outskirts of the village in the church yard. It faces the south.
Passing in the evening on a nice sunny day you would think that the church was all lit up.
The church is situated in the centre of the graveyard.
Some very rich people are buried in Knockbridge, and we are told that there is one very rich headstone that cost one hundred pounds. It is a statue of Our Lord with a Cross in his hand. It is made of marble.
There is a mixture of headstones in Knockbridge, namely marble, stone, wood and iron.
There are no trees only little shrubs planted at the back. There are lovely gravel walks through the graveyard.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:14
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Once upon a time there lived two Giants in. One of them was called Clug and the Crug

Once upon a time there lived two Giants in Cantwellscourt. One of them was called Clug and the other Crug. They used to go around every night robbing and eating all belong to the neighbours and sleep during the day. One day all the people went to the King who lived in Rathcoole and asked if he would gather his army to kill them. The King said he would and after a week he was ready to fight. They fought hard for two days but the two Giants won and then they ate all the people. About half a mile away from the Giants' house there was a cottage and a little boy and his mother lived in it. The boy was called Tom the Giant-killer
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:12
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This woman was very fond of holding dances in her house and one Sunday the priest spoke about her off the altar. One day the priest was walking down the road and he had a little dog with him. As he was passing Clearys house the little dog ran out and all the hair gone off him and the priest turned back and he said, "The world will be surprised with the death you'll get", and since that she was sick and the husband said she was a fairy and they burned her and buried her bones in the ditch.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:10
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bottle and was finally buried in the Red Sea.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:09
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crime was remembered throughout Ireland. Infact the songs written about it were not allowed to be sung
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:09
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ill and was then bedridden for fourteen years. They went for the fairy doctor because they said the fairies took the the right woman away and left a hag.
When the doctor came he told them to give her three bits of bread and if she ate the three bits of bread the hag would disappear and Brigid Cleary would come back. So she succeeded in eating the first bit but she failed in eating the second and third bit.
Then they came to the conclusion that it was a fairy and they put her behind the fire every evening, for a while, and this is what they said to her:- "are you a witch, or are you a fairy, or are you the wife of Michael Cleary?" and this is what she answered:- "I am not a witch, nor I am not a fairy, but I am the wife of Michael Cleary". So in the end they pulled her out the fire and put her in behind it because they thought the fairy would go up the chimney and that Brigid Cleary would come back. She burned to ashes behind the fire and the
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:05
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In a place called Clogheen a man by the name of Michael Cleary got married to a beautiful girl. After three years of her married life she became very
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:04
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to hold his stirrup while he was getting up on the horse but John Dwyer refused because he knew if he held it Cromwell would make him a kind of a servant and Cromwell then took the castle and then Sean O Dwyer was going from place to place and Clune and Stuke are one of the many places he travelled to, therefore Clyne and Stuke are also mentioned in the poem. John Dwyer had two brothers. One of them had a castle in Dundrum and the other brother had a castle in Clonyharp.
The ruins of Ballagh castle are still to be seen. They are not far from the school and we have opportunity of seeing them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 16:01
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In the poetry that is written about John Dwyer of the Glens Ballagh is mentioned and that gives us an account of where he was born - Ballagh, Co Tipperary. He had a castle in Ballagh and one day as he was coming out of the church in Dundrum Cromwell was waiting outside and he asked John Dwyer
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:59
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Three men were hanged from a tree in Drumbane for committing murder there. This was the last execution of its like in Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:58
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The old custom was to bring the accused to be hanged where the murder was committed. There was a man found guilty of committing murder in Ballagh and he was brought to Ballagh and he was hanged out of a shaft of a car.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:57
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to build a house for the evicted tenant and about forty men there built it in one night.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:56
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There are eight graveyards in the parish namely - Tallanstown, Philipstown, Churchtown, Reaghstown, Louth-Hall, Clon, Charlestown Catholic and Protestant.
Tallanstown is the local one. Tallanstown is in the townland of Churchpark. Philipstown is in the townland of the Mill of Louth. Churchtown is in the townland of Churchtown. Cluain is in the townland of Corbollis. Louth-Hall is in the townland of Louth Hall. Reaghstown is in the townland of Reaghstown. The two Charlestown graveyards are in the townland of Charlestown.
Tallanstown, Philipstown, Churchtown, Reaghstown, Charlestown Catholic and Protestant graveyards are still in use.
There are two graveyards disused namely - Cluain and Louth Hall.
There are ruins of an old Church in Philipstown and there are ruins of an old monastery in Charlestown Catholic graveyard. There is a vault in Tallanstown graveyard. There is a story connected with Philipstown graveyard. It is about an old miser who lived nearby and whose ghost is said to have haunted the place after his death. This caused so much annoyance to the people in the house that they had to call in the assistance of the parochial clergy. One of these is said to have said so many prayers over the grave of the miser that the bad spirit came forth entered a
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:48
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[Flinge?]

Tomtit.

Yellow Hammer.

Ball Flinge.

Sparrow.

Linnet.

Stoney Chatter.

Wagtails.

Cuckoo.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:46
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The birds in this district.
Robin. She makes her nest in a bank, with hair, and she lines the inside with feathers. She lays five small eggs with brown dots on them.
Blackbird. She makes her nest in a bush, with moss, and hay, and she lines the inside with mud. She lays five blue eggs with brown dots on them.
Thrush. She makes her nest in ivy or in a bush, with hay and moss, and she lines the inside with mud. She lays four green eggs with brown dots on them.
Lark. She makes her nest on the ground, or in a bank, with moss, and she lines the inside with hair. She lays five black eggs.
Swallow. She makes her nest up high in a shed, with mud, and hay, and she lines the inside with feathers. She lays five white eggs with brown dots on them.
Crow. She makes her nest up high in a tree, with sticks and hay. She lays four big white eggs.
Wren. She makes her nest in a bush, with moss, and she lines the inside with hair. She lays twentyone white eggs with brown dots on them.
Starling. She builds her nest in any hole she can find, with sticks and hay, and hair, and she lines the inside with wool. She lays five blue eggs.
Pidgeon. She builds her nest up in a big tree where there is ivy, with sticks. She lays two big white eggs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:36
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In the parish there are four graveyards namely Tallanstown, Philipstown, Churchtown and Charlestown.
Tallanstown is situated about four miles from Ardee. Philipstown is situated between Tallanstown and Louth. Churchtown is situated between Tallanstown and Drumcondrath. Charlestown between Reaghstown.
There are tombstones over most of the graves very few of these are made from marble the rest are made from stone iron or wood. The farthest back dates on these crosses are 1624, 1653, 1703.
Some people in this district are still been buried in another graveyard outside the parish which they call their family "burial ground".
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:30
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and cooks his meals on it. Then he makes a little hut and sleeps in it. There is an old man called Mc Cable. He comes when there are sports held. He has a little table with colours on it and the man has a little box and a dice in it. If the dice falls on the colour you put the penny on you will win another penny. He sleeps in old stables about the village.
Written by Jane Beylan, on 4th Feb. 1938
Told by Mrs Beylan, on 3rd Feb. 1938
Reaghstown,
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:30
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There are three graveyards in the Parish of Philipstown Tallanstown and Charlestown.
The townland they are situated in is Philipstown Churchtown and Louthhall and it is not level but it slopes East.
There are palm trees growing in Philipstown and the old people say they represented the stations of the cross.
There are no monuments of crosses in it but there are headstones.
There are people buried in the church at Philipstown.
Unbaptised children were buried in the graveyards.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:17
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Landlord and gave the money to the poor woman. Collier died in the Mental Home in Drogheda. There is another story told about a poor woman.
The poor woman went into the Chapel for shelter and she was afraid she would be put out and she went into the Confession Box and at twelve o'clock that night the altar was all lit up w