Number of records in editorial history: 274703 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:59
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The Aughrane estate was owned by Denis Kelly who lived at Castle-Kelly near Ballygar. He was a descendant of one of the chieftains of Hy-many and claimed to be heir to the kingship of Hy-many
He build most of the houses in Ballygar including the Protestant church and market house. He also planted most of the woods between
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:57
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senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:57
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In Killeroran cemetery there is a memorial in the form of a round tower, about a hundred feet high to perpetuate the memory of Denis H. Kelly, Landlord of Aughrane to whom reference is made in this book. A slab embedded in the tower about twelve feet from the ground bears the following inscription:
Dhonnachadh Anrí Uí Cheallaigh
ba Taoiseach é
Dio Chraobh na Scrín
Ritheann Uí Mháine
Dered doi Chloinse
in Éirinn.
do éag sé
Bealtaine 7 1877
(Above was transcribed by me from inside back cover of note book. C. Báiread.)
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:52
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car had to go to a big round about to get through, as there were tree's across the road in several places.
People who were coming home on Christmas holidays found it very hard to get home. Some people had to lock their doors, and put bag's up on the windows for fear the would blow in. Next day cattle were found killed with trees, that fell on them as they went in under them for shelter.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:50
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We had a big storm in the year 1914. It lasted about six hours. It was in day time on Christmas Eve. It knocked trees, houses, cocks of hay and straw. It was so disagreeble and disapointing to happen on that day it stopped traffic, and the mail
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:46
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What walks on its head.
Answer Studs.
How many sticks goes to a crows nest.
Answer None go they all have to be carried.
What has one head one foot and four legs
Answer A bed.
An empty barrel and as fast as I am filling it it is getting lighter what am I filling it with
Answer. Holes.
It is high and damp and it is green about the bank and it is fit for a lord and a lady
Answer A grave.
It opens up like a barn door and closes down like a trap and it is many a thing you would think of before you would think of that
Answer A coffin.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:42
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Around the wood and round the wood and never touches the wood.
Ans the bark of a tree.

What has a mouth and no tounge.
Ans. A river. 77What has a face and no mouth.
Ans. A clock.
What is full and holds more.
Abs. A pot of potatoes.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:40
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Why is an umbrella like fat
Answer Because it is dripping.
Black and white and read all over
Answer A newspaper.
A little house and it si full of meat there re no doors or windows and how will we get in to eat.
Answer An egg
Why is a bad schoolboy like a stamp
Answer Because he is licked and put in a corner and made stick to his letters.
Twenty-four white cows lying in a hall up comes a red one and separates them all.
Answer A tongue separating your teeth.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:37
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Long ago the old people used to say that it was not right to look at yourself in the mirror at night. There is hopes from the sea but there is none from the grave. Ask me no questions and I will tell you no lies. It is a small wind that would'nt bend a blade of grass. If you dont sow in Spring you wont reap in harvest. It is said that anyone born in the Month of May can have no luck and its said that you should put a grain of salt in your pocket for fear of the fairies. If you feel your house getting damp it is the sign of wet weather and if a blind-bat came into your house it is the sign of fine weather. It was an old custom when anyone would have a sty on
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:32
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their eye to put a fasting spit on it it is said it would cure it. It was an old custom if anyone had a cold to sniff some salt or pepper.
It is said that there was a family living around Monivea long ago and any time one of them would die the bean shee would keep crying for a week and the reason of that is that the bean shee is one who is buried without being Babtised and she is a friend.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:30
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In Ireland in the penial times. There was a lot of money offered for every priests or Bishops head. There was a Bishop in Athenry and he had only one brother who was nearly a fool. The English found out where the Bishop was hiding and the general sent him a messenger to tell him to meet him on the following morning and if he answered three questions he would put to him he would let him go free. The Bishop was very nerves and his brother knew he was afraid and he offered to change clothes with him, the Bishop did so and the fool went to meet the general to answer what questions
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:26
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he might put to him. The first question, what is thicker than grass on a callow? ans. the morning dew is much thicker. The second question what is crookeder than the river? ans. The brinks are a lot crookeder. The third question what am I thinking of now? ans. you are thinking you are talking to the Bishop of Athenry. I am said the Bishop. Well you are not but you are talking to his brother who is a fool. If the fool be that clever I have no business talking to his lordship.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:25
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When a cow ceases to 'chew the cud' it is a definite indication that she is not well. When a sick cow etc begins to chew her cud it is the surest sign that her condition has improved & she can be regarded as being completely out of danger.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:22
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You will never miss the water till the well is dry.
The world wouldn't make a rave horse out of an ass. It is a bad wind that doesn't blow good for someone.
The man who doesn't carry his coat with him on a fine day wont have it on a wet day.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:21
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Pigs if suffering from indigestion and many other ailments are quickly relieved by letting them out into fields and give scarcely any food. The fresh green grass which they will ravenously devour will completely cure them of many troubles in a short time. Gravel and coal-cinders are also very good for pigs.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:20
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Caigle midh an teine seo Mar chaigleann Criosta an cá. Muire na bón agus Brigidh in a báir. Dá oispeak dhé. Tá blasa mich dé. Cuigid an tigh seo agus na daoine go lár.
As I lie down on this bed of sleep my soul I give to God to keep; whether I rise now or ever, my soul I give to God for ever. Four corners on this bed four angels on them spread. Matthew, mark, Luke and John God bless this bed that I lie on. If I die before I wake I pray to God my soul to take. If any evil spirit comes before day mother of Jesus come save is and send them away.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:15
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Murrain is a disease which often attacks milch cows in spring-time or at other times of year. Salts and treacle is the usual remedy resorted to. Two lbs of salts are dissolved in luke-warm water & given to the cow.
This is followed a 1lb tin of treacle mixed with milk. Sour milk is often substituted for the treacle. Denis Sheahan, Meenbeag supplied this cure.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:12
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Once upon a time there lived in the village of Ballyskea a man named John Clancy. He was very fond of hunting. One night he went down to a cbler in Bullain to get soles on his boots. He borrowed a lump of wax of the cobler. The night being very bright on his way home which was a pathway through the fields. What did he see coming towards him but a hare. He had no weapon in his possession but the lump of wax. He fired the wax and struck him in the forehead he turned around immediately, and what did he meet but another hare. Both hares collided and got griped to each other, they started pulling and draging each other forgeting there was anyone nearby. Soon
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:08
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put into the fire until red-hot. In the meantime about half a gallon of milk is obtained and the red-hot iron are taken from the fire and the outer scales of iron rust are scraped off with a knife into the new-milk. The animal is then given the milk with the iron-rust to drink or more usually it is 'put back' by means of a bottle. Three such does should be sufficient to cure the disease.
Timothy Curtin, Meelin. John Curtin, Knockduff. Fionnbar O'Connor, Rowels. Patrick Browne, Knockeen supplied the above cure. Some people prefer to use horse-shoes (old disused ones) instead of irons.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 12:07
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John arrived to the place caught both hares. He had two hares and a lump of wax coming home. So ever since he brings a lump of was hunting.
Once upon a time there was a man coming home from a visit and he heard a noise where there was a running stream and he stoped and he asked who was there and the person never answered him but kept following him to his own house and he found out twas the bean Shee when he looked at her he found out her face was all holes like a riddle. It is said no should interfere with a bean Shee because she is supposed to be a child who dies without being baprized.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 11:57
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Cornelius Sheahan got the following cure from his father Denis Sheahan, Meenbeg, Meelin:-
A piece of rabbit-skin is obtained and a slit or hole is made in the skin of the calf, heifer at the shoulder. The rabbit skin is inserted into the hole and sewed to the skin of the animal.
No other person heard of this cure.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 11:51
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Foot-rot. There are many local cures for foot-rot e.g. :- Paraffin oil & car grease are mixed together & applied to the affected part of the foot when cleaned. Dry lime is afterwards applied over the car-grease & paraffin oil. The leg is then bandaged with canvas and the animal is kept indoors for a few days until there is a definite improvement.
I got this cure from John Curtin, Knockduff Lower and from William Brosnan, Knockscovane.
The following cures for foot-rot were got from Patrick Browne, Knockeen.
(1). Bluestone ground up into a powder, mixed with car-grease, bandage & keep dry.
(2). Hot (dry) lime applied in a powder-form is sufficient. Paraffin oil is used to wash the sore before the above remedies are applied.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 11:47
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There is an old stone in the village of Ballyskea and the people used to say that who ever could take the stone away would get a pot of gold under it and many people tried to take the stone away and it failed them. One day a man tried to take it away and he stirred it and when he stirred it a big Giant came out and the man fell dead.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 11:44
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Long ago when the people would be going to the town they would carry their shoes under their arms until they would come near the town they would put them on.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 11:30
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Young lambs are often attacked and killed by weasels. People tie a piece of red rag around the neck of the lambs as this will frighten off the weasel and prevent him killing the lamb. Other people claim that the fox is frightened off by the red cloth on the neck and that the weasel will not attack a lamb until it is asleep when it will steal on him and suck its blood.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 11:11
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10 “A shean – chaileach Gallta nach ngéileann do dia biseach nár fhághaidh tú dtéighidh tú ar mire”
(Buachaill a bhí ar an lagan. Bhí an déideadh ar a mhaighistreas. Cuir seiseaidh agus gcéill go rabh órtha an déididh aige agus d’iarr uirtí dhul ar a glúina go nabradh sé duithe é – Seo shuas an rud adubhairt sé. A.Ní .C)
11 Siúd amuigh é, shiúd astuigh é, siúd sa chlúid é agus dhá fhicid súil air. (Criathar) A. Ní C.
12 Preataí rósta ar maidin agus braon de bainne na bó ba é sin an biodh báidhte bhí ag Philib an ceó (A. Ní. C)
13 “Paidir le rádh in an Gheibhinn” Bhí brigh in Íosa i gcionn a mhíosa Ar níuin a mathar as an tóir na dhiaidh. “O gurb é an sluagh dall an sluagh seo chugainn le ua niór Éifeacht le na niór (grásta) glóire. Go spréididh tú do ghrásta tharainn. (A. Ní C.)
(14) “Sé cúl dubh Uaighe an cúl dhubh gan subhailce Is fuar agus is fluch bhur leabaidh tuighe Dá mbíodh gorthaid ar an stiúr ann na dornchadh ar a rámha. Níor bh’eagal daoibh an lá úd nach dtiocfadh sibh i dtír”
(as an amhran “Cul dubh Uaighe” an áit ar bathadh deichneabhar 1857) N. Ní Dh.
(15) Throcaire agus grásta go bhfágaidh tú agus bás gan peacaidh
(Deir tú seo le duine a thairgeas pins snaoisin duit – A. Ní .C.
(16) Ceithre gréasaidhe gan a beith bréagach
Ceithre tailliúr gan a bheath buidheach
Ceithre sagart gan a bheith samitach
C’an áit a bhfuighfea an dáréag na suidhe
Cuartaigh ifreann agus flaitheas dé
Faoi uisce agus ós a chionn
Saothar mascaidh níl siad ann.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 11:10
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1. D’éirigh fear ó dheas agus chuir sé Éirinn faoi bhrás o dheas nó ó chuaidh níl fhios ag an duine ca bhfuil a teas.
(alnm tAthair Maitíú a chuir Éirinn ‘faoi bhrás”-A.Ní C.
2. Ní fuil é agus ní feóil é agus is ó fail as feóil a d’fhás sé As ghníonn sé réidhteach idir caraid as námh ard.
(Reann cleite. te Ní Cheallochan.)
3. Rith mé agus fuair mé, suidh mé agus cuartaigh mé Dá bhfághainn é caithprin uaim é agus nuair nach bfuair thug mé liom
(dealg in do Chos. A. Ní. C.)
4. Suidh triúr Mac Gorra síos a Bhaint An méad a bhoin siad d’fhág siad na ndiaidhe é. Agus an mead nár bhain thug siad leó
(Triúr fear ag baint na feasoíge daobhtha fhéin) A. Ní. C.
5. Má casann an Sagart ort buail ins an leiceann é Olfaidh sé a bólgain agus a sháith é fhéin Smál nó Smólaidh nach rabh ar d’anál ól deoch uisge beatha as bí slán na dhiaidh.
(An poitire adubhairt – Ac Ní Ch.)
(6) Ól do dheoch go cliste
Is na feictear tú ar meisce
Tá go leór ag deanamh Cisde
Nach iólann ach an tuisge
As a gcraidhe chomhair briste
Ól mar sin, ní uisce
Golá deireadh an tsaoghail.
(7) Seo fá thuairin do shláinte
(8) Preataí rósta agus giota ime, sin a bhaineas sodar as na cáilíné óga.
(Nábla Ní Dhoinaill, Oileán Gabhla, 89 bl)
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 10:27
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Bhí trúir fear ag obair i bpairc lá ag baint coirce. Lá breagh brotallach ba eadh é agus bhí tart mór ortha.
Tháinig amadán isteach sa bpáirc agus dubhairt duine de na fir leis, dul go dtí an tobair agus uisge a thabhairt doibh.
Nuair a bhí an t-amadán ag dul do dtí an tobar do casadh bean air, ar an mbhothar, agus bhí canna uisge aicú. O'iarr an t-amadán cuid dé'n an uisge uirrí. "An bhfuil aon bhuidéal agat" "níl" aise an t-amadán acht cuir in mo hata é. Do chuir an bhean an t-uisge isteach sa hata. Bhí
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 10:18
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gcairt le tuitim na h-oidhche.
Chúaidh Páidín Mór ina chodhladh annsin. Tháinig codhladh trom annsion air ahus tosuigh sé ar sranntaol agus ní fhéadfadh siad dul isteach san seomra dhó go maidin agus sin sgéal Pháidín Móir.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 10:15
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Rugadh fear in Anach Cúan dárbh ainm "Sgoilte na Gaoithe" agus bhíodh se ag dul timpeall na h-Éireann ag rith. Bhíodh sé ag rith rasaí ar fud na h-Éireann agus tar éis tamaill ba é an fear ba sgiobta in Éirinn é. Annsin dúbhairt
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 10:09
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Siad seo na luibheanna is mó a dhéanann díoghnháil don talamh, billéoga sráide, blioscáín, neantóga agus fothanáin. Mara dtarrightí iad mhillfeadh siad an talamh ar fad agus ní bhéadh cead ag na barraí fás go maith. Déantat usáid as chuid aca. Druithtear na neantóga agus tugtar do na lachain iad. Níl aon mhaith ins na fothanáin ná ins na billeóga sráide. Déantar na blioscáin an talamh a bhochtú
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 10:05
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senior member (history)
2019-10-14 10:05
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Cuireann muid fataí ar an bgfeirm sa mbaile gach blian. Ulmhuigheann m'athair an talamh ina gcóir. Cuirtear leasughadh ar an talamh sal a cuirteat na fataí. Sgaiptear í líntibh iad ar na drilleanna. Cuirtear síol na bhfataí in drilleanna acht acht amháin ins na gáiddiní. Déantar na drilleanna le céacht Géarrtar na fataí i sgiolláin agus fágtar súíl in gach ceann aca. Cabhruigheann cuid de na cómharsain le cheile ag cur na bhfataí. Cuirtear spreágháil orra sa Samhradh agus baintear iad sa bhFhóghmhar agus cuir-
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 10:00
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tear i bpoll iad ar féadh an Gheimheidh.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:59
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Is fearr in am ná in am tráth Coinnigh rud ar feadh sceacht mbliadhain agus muna ndhéanfadh sé maith dhuit, caith uait é.
Ní hé lá na gaoithe lá na sgoilb
Ní théigheann cuileóga isteach san mbéal a bhíonn dúnta.
Is feárr dreoilín sa dorm ná corr ar cáirde.
Is féarr bheith ag obair ná bheith ag cainnt
Ta sé chóm crosta le mála easóg.
Mara bhfuil agat acht gabhar, bhí ar lár an aonaigh leis.
An té atá tinn, ní binn leis aon rud.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:53
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senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:53
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Bhí fear an uair amháin agus chuaidh sé go dtí margad ag ceannacht cruithneachtan. Bhí capall bacach sean aige. Nuair a shchroich sé an margadh cheannuigh sé an ceuithneacht acht bhí fhios aige go maith nach raibh an capall in ann é a thabhairt abhaile. Chuir sé slabhradh mór láidir thart ar na málaí agus tharrainga sé ina dhiaidh iad. Ní cuimhneach liom a ainm anois acht bhí sé ina chómhnaidhe thart annseo.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:51
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almost impossible for children to fall out. It was usually placed along a side-wall convenient to the hearth fire which added to its cosiness and warmth. Several of these settle-beds are still to be seen in various parts of Ireland in country houses.
In those old days there were few lamps or candles, except the candles which were made in the home. These were called rush-lights.
The chimney was in the middle of the house, and the fire-place was on the kitchen floor.
The walls were built of yellow clay and mortar mixed with chopped straw. The roof was thatched with straw or sedge. The windows were small and often consisted of only one pane of glass.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:49
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Old Houses
Written by Mona Monaghan, Ballintogher, 9th December, 1938.
Until recent years very few slated houses were to be seen in Ireland. The common type of house was the thatched one. It was a one-storeyed building containing two rooms and a kitchen. The kitchen was used for cooking and for eating in, and often contained a bed which was called a settle-bed. It was on hinges and could be closed in the day and left open at night when in use. When closed during the day the bench or ledge of the settle-bed could be used as a sort of side-table or shelf for holding kitchen utensils, or it could be used even for a seat. Besides these advantages it was a warm type of ted, being constructed entirely of wood - with the exception of the two strong hinges and two clasps to keep it closed. Furthermore when shut up it occupied comparatively little floor space. When open out it lay on the floor and therefore it was
(NB: This page contains drawing of a settle-bed)
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:48
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Old Houses
Written by Mona Monaghan, Ballintogher, 9th December, 1938.
Until recent years very few slated houses were to be seen in Ireland. The common type of house was the thatched one. It was a one-storeyed building containing two rooms and a kitchen. The kitchen was used for cooking and for eating in, and often contained a bed which was called a settle-bed. It was on hinges and could be closed in the day and left open at night when in use. When closed during the day the bench or ledge of the settle-bed could be used as a sort of side-table or shelf for holding kitchen utensils, or it could be used even for a seat. Besides these advantages it was a warm type of ted, being constructed entirely of wood - with the exception of the two strong hinges and two clasps to keep it closed. Furthermore when shut up it occupied comparatively little floor space. When open out it lay on the floor and therefore it was
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:46
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senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:46
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senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:44
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and dipped in fat which was melted in a grisset. The grisset was a small boat shaped article with a short handle in it, and had three feet like a pot.
The rushes were then tied in bundles and hung over the fire place ready for use.

(NB: Drawing of rush-light holder and grisset on this page)
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:43
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Old Houses
Written by Kathleen Hill, Milltown; 9th December, 1938.
Almost all the houses long ago were made of mud. Some of them were very comfortable and warm, others were very poor. They were roofed with rough poles, which were covered with bog screws and then thatched with straw, or sometimes rushes. In those days a thatcher was a good trade.
Where there were two rooms the fire was generally in the centre wall. The chimney was made of woven rods which was supported by a beam, which rested on two posts buried in the ground. The fire place was made of a few flags and the floors were made of yellow clay. In most houses the windows were very small and could not be opened. Most people burned turf as it was very plentiful in those days.
The light they had at night was obtained from rush candles. The rushes had to be pulled in the summer and they were put in water to prevent them drying too quickly. When taken out of the water they were spread on grass to bleach for a few ays. They were then peeled
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:39
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dipping the pith in a grisset of hot grease or melted fat.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:38
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Old Houses
Written by Lillie Guirke, Dromone, 9th December, 1938
My father told me that the houses which existed in this district in olden times were very different to what they are now. In those far off days very few slated houses were to be seen. They were thatched with rushes, straw, or sedge, or reeds. The straw was obtained from the oats, which had been previously threshed with a flail. The fires long ago used to be hearthstone fires, and they sued to be in the gable wall of the house. The chimneys used to be made of woven rods and blue clay.
There were half-doors on nearly all the houses. The fires used to be lit with sticks and fuel, and rushes, and also mill-seeds. Sometimes they were lit with boráin.
In the majority of cases the only light which the people used at night was that obtained from the kitchen fire. Sometimes rush-lights were used. These were made by peeling the skin off rushes, one narrow strip being left on for the sake of toughness, and
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:37
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Our hearts they will break.
I'll give candle light and all
"Right" says Jack Hawkins
And I'll fetch the delph".
Jack Hawkins commenced,
Gor to shout and to bawl.
For the dead Litany he then did call.
Miss Norah (Mackey) came there.
She was up at Tom Bowes
And she said to Big Vester (Campion)
You'll get larkins clothes.
I won't wear them " says he"
Do you think I', an ass
We'll raffle them next Sunday.
And they'll pay for a Mass.
Master Bill Tynan, walks in very neat.
Saying I have an inscription
For Larkins breast plate.
A short while ago, sure he said he would die.
He gave me his age, and this was his last wont
"Here lie the remains of a poet you may think"
Who would go to "hells blayes" for a good "Perry's drink".
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:30
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53. The Pigeon Field
54. Knock na nGhadh Field
55. The Tay Field
56. The Abbey "
57. The Rookery Field
58. The Castle "
59. The Furry Hill Field.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Mach na gCearc Field Long Field.
2. Madhra ruadh Hill Field Pump Field
3. Magpie Island " Round "
4. Barn Meadow The Moor.
5. Pairch na habhann Field Hollow.
6. The Gairdín " Long Acre.
7. The well-moon field The Monesia.
9. The Rhabe " The Hosiery.
10. Cluain Field Fry's
11. Tinimies " Hapkin's
12. Mulhall's Hill Field Hannigan's
13. Lamberys Garden Field Sugar's
14. The Church Meadow Bohan's
15. The Tane Hanlon's
16. The Bridge Field Kent's
17. The "L" " Turnip Pairc
18. The Black Well Field Far Field
19. Dowling's Hill " Fermoyle's
20. The Clump Field Huntin's
21. Guirt Na Laoig The Fuss Field
22. The Disheen Field The Lamb Pairc
23. The Horse Pond Field Tommies Field
24. Middle Pairc The Salvedge
25. The Herds garden Field The Pasture
26. Galaricken Field The Rock's
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
27. Mill-Ponf Field Sothern's Hill
27. The Ponies " The Sheep Hill
28. Biddie Goods " Miss Kitty's Grove
29 St. Kieran's Well Field The Cailleach
30. Charlie's Field Páidín Garden.
31. The Commonage " The clover Field.
32. The Limekiln Field
33. Fullertans "
34. Lowry's "
35. The Hill Field
36. The Bog "
37. The Highlands
38. The Fox-cover field.
39. The White Acre.
40. The Pan Field
41. The Cross Meadows
42. The Moate Field
43. Pounds "
44. Dinnies "
45. The Ring "
46. Lalor's "
47. The Quarry "
48. The Bán "
49 The White Lady Field
50 Corrageen Field
51. Hegarty's "
52. Deer Pairch
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
beg for turf also.
They go to every fair, and they buy and sell horses, mules, and asses. When they get the money, they drink whiskey. Then they get drunk, and they fight among themselves. Sometimes, they even kill each other. Then, the Guards come, and they put them into the Barrick. They leave them there until
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The tinkers and gypsies travel through this country begging for a living. Some of them live in a house on wheels, and it is drawn by horses. Others live in tents made from oilcloths.
The women beg for flour, tea, and sugar, and they sell saucepans. The men beg for hay and straw, and they
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
said the man.
The man went on his journey to the town. When he was about a half mile down the road, butter, new-milk, butter-milk, and other things came up his shoes, and down his trousers. The poor man because he was wet to skin.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time, there was a man going to Ballina on a horse. It happened that it was May morning. When he was passing a stream that flows through my village, he saw a woman beside the water, and she was saying.
"All for me, All for me, All for me."
"Half of it for me,"
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 09:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and rush at him with a red iron. The person would run away, and leave the rotten tooth behind him.
Sometimes, when the smith would not like a person he would turn the anvil on him. Then, the person would die. This is called the blacksmith's curse.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 08:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
house. If a farmer uses the old stones to build anything, some member of his family will surely die. Some people believe that the work proceeds in the old forge many years after the old smith has passed away.
Long ago, the smith was the village Dentist. He used to tie a persen by the sore tooth to the anvil,
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 08:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a forge in Swinford. It is built there for the past fifty or sixty years. There is a cement roof on the forge. The door is shaped like a horse-shoe. The smith shoes horses, mules, and asses.
The track of an old forge is a very unlucky place on which to build a new
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 08:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The priest went home, and he was very hungry. After this the woman always kept the tea-water, and threw out the tea-leaves.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 08:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
threw it into the garden. She put the tea-leaves on a nice place, and she left a spoon on the plate also.
When the Priest came up from the room he said,-
"What are these,"
"That is the tea you gave me."
"Where is the water that was in the saucepen," said the Priest.
"O, I threw it out."
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 08:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
under it. When the tea is made, put it on the table."
"All right", said the woman, "I will have the tea ready in ten minutes."
Then, the Priest went into another room to see the patient. While he was there, the woman that was getting the tea ready tool up the saucepen, and left it on the table. She strained the tea into a can, and
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 08:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and he came the next morning at eight o'clock. The priest did not eat his breakfast, but he brought some tea and sugar with him. This was the first time that the people of this house saw tea.
When the priest came into the house he said,-
"Put this tea into the saucepan, and fill it with water. Then, put a few very small coals
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 08:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About a hundred years and fifty ago, there was an old woman in my village. At that time the people knew very little about tea, because they had nothing but potatoes and milk, and some of them were very poor.
Once, there was a woman sick in a certain house. A man went for the Priest,
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The family name most common is Murphy.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of my townland is Gurtcreen. There are twelve people living in the district. It is situated in the parish of Listowel. It is in the barony of Errochty Ó Connor.
Murphy's (9) Mohonys (7)
Greaneys (9) Mochorty (8)
Stack (5) Murphy (4)
Hickey (3) Enright (4)
Lucy (4) Stack (14)
Fahy (4) Bealey (17)
Dee (2) (Ferris) (19)
Healey (?) Sweeney (7)
(Brennan) 6 Ryan (7)
Driscoll (6) Riordan (9)
Joy (7) Dunworth (19)
Connor (9) Galvin (9)
Dillon (10) Dowling (6)
Doyles 4 Murphy (3)
Buckley 4 Barry (9)
Finnuchane (1)
Hartnett (12)
Walsh (16)
Scanlon (4)
Granvel (9)
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
branching off the Greenville road and Ennismore road. First the Forge road leading up to Greenville bog. Second the Gorthnaminch road and third the black road in Ennismore leading up to Coolagown. There are two Bridges on this road, the Convent Street Bridge and the Second is called Markies Bridge in Greenville. In former days those roads were kept under repair by direct labour. Nowadays it is kept in repair by the County Council.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The road leading from Listowel to Ennis More is called the Greenville road. It runs straight from Listowel and comes to an end at Ennis More. The distance from Listowel to Ennismore where the road ends at Huson's gate would be about 3 1/2 miles. On the road from Listowel to Ennismore there are three cross roads. First the Convent cross leading to Ballybunion. The second is Scortlea cross leading on to Ballycondy and various districts. The third is Killocrim cross better known as Horgan's cross. It leads to Finuge and Lixnaw and by going on straight to Dromclough it will take you into Tralee. There are three by-roads
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4 football is played always in this district there do be football matches played
5 piching toss is played by throwing up a penny in the air and it would come down again and would look at the penny to see did they get head or harp
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. marbles
2. hurling
3. pitching toss
4. picking black berries
5. football
6. (draughts)
7
1 Marbles are played by making a hole in the ground and pink the marbles into the hole. There do be about nine playing in the game.
2 hurling is played often in this district people play commogie maths with them
3 People pick Black berries in the summer time. They make jam with the black berries for the year
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Paddy Drurey was a kind of a poet. The only local poet that I know in my district is Paddy Drurey.
In the neighbourhood of my house there lives a man who made a poem about the "Greenville boys". These poets when they wanted to hunt rats out of a house would make a poem about the rats to hunt them out of the house. If the man of the house did not let in a poet he would make a poem about him and call him every sort of names and tell all the people around about him.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many kinds of travelling people in this district especially tinkers. The Coffies, the MaCarthys most of them have camps and they make tin cans. Generally before a big horse fair they arrive. They all gather near the town. They come around for big fairs and Races. They trade on tin cans and on making tables. They change sixpence. They make saucepans and other things. They stop at certain places on the road. They stop over at the forge gate in Greenville. They tell you your fortune in the palm of your hand. They live on bread, potatoes and other fancy things. They wash their
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We make spinning tops out of empty spools of thread. Catta pults are made of rubber. Whistlers were also made long ago with a bit of a tree. We get a rod out of the sycamore tree. An elder gun is made by getting an elder stick about four inches long and scooping the pith out of it. Then get a piece of rubber and tie one end of it to the elder and the other to a stick the same length as the elder. Then put in a stone to the hole in the elder and when you strain
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 07:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
out the led rope which floats on top of the water. They sail to the opposite side of the river taking care to leave three feet between them and the bank. That space is called the "Kings path" and it is a point of law. They carry on then as far as their pool allows them. That would be from sixty to 80 yards in length. Then they cross the river to their own side again and tie up their boat. Then the work starts. Each man takes an end of the cork rope and closes in slowly drawing their net till they get clear out of the water. Then if there is any fish caught in the net it is killed and taken out. Then the captain of each boat packs up his fish and takes them to town to be sold. The fisherman's week commences at 12 o'clock on Saturday morning.
All the people say the rosary in every
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 04:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It has always been a habit amongst the old people here, to get up early on Easter Sunday morning to see the rising sun, dancing.
Another custom here is for people to get something new to wear on Easter Sunday morning. A very old custom which is beginning to die away now is this:-
A whole crowd of young people used to band together on Easter Sunday night and go around from house to house gathering eggs from the people. Sometimes there would be about forty, maybe and they would go to every house in the neighbourhood and outside of it too, asking eggs at every door.
At some houses they would get maybe one, two or three as
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 04:11
approved
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awaiting decision
the case might be, and maybe six, but they would seldom be refused even if they got bad eggs as sometimes happened.
When the crowd tired collecting, they went into some house or barn and cooked the eggs and ate them.
This very old custom was kept up in this place until about thirty years ago. Some of the boys got so well-up that they began to sell the eggs and that ended the sport. People would not give eggs any more.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 04:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following is another custom which used to be carried out on St Stephen's Day in Dunmain, where my mother was reared years ago.
It was beginning to die out when my mother was a child nearly fifty years ago.
A crowd of boys used to gather together on St. Stephen's Day and pick bunches of daisies. Then they used to go around from house to house and sell them. Some say that the people used to give a penny for a bunch and others say they used to they used to give a penny for two daisies. The money was given for luck. Maybe because daisies are scarce at this time of the year, the people took them from the boys.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 03:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
she was caught in the furze,
Although she was little
her honour was great,
Stand up landlady and
give us a treat"
and the boys would then hold out their caps for the money.
When they were finished collecting, they divided the money between them.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 03:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An old St Stephen's day custom here which is dying out now in this :-
A crowd of boys used to gather together on the morning of St Stephens day. They used to chase the wren through the fields until they caught one. The wren is believed to have two blind eyes until twelve o'clock.
One of its eyes opens ten and the other opens after six o' clock. That was the reason why they set out early in the morning as it was easier to catch the bird.
If they caught a wren, she would be put in a cage and they would go around from evening to night, from house to house, collecting pennies. At every door they would recite this rhyme:-
"The wren, the wren the king of all birds, St. Stephen's Day
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 03:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were more people living in Aclamon, who had no luck in churning. They would churn for a day and still no butter would come and they often churned for three and four days in sucession, but nothing only froth would appear. They say that a dreadful stench would come from the milk. The people got tired of this happening, every time they churned, so they sent for the priest. He prayed over it for half an hour.
The butter came back on it and it never happened in that place again. This happened in the house in Aclamon which used to be known as "Ling's" and which is owned by Richard Whitty, Aclare, now.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 03:19
approved
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awaiting decision
that he would mend it in the evening for her. The man ploughed all day and when evening came, the woman appeared again with the can. The man said he would mend it as soon as he had put the horses out in the field. She waited whilst he was doing this. When Mick Dunne came back, he took the can out of her hand, and he saw that it was full of gold. He became afraid then and he told the woman to go to someone else to mend it.
She disappeared then and no one knew who she was.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 03:10
approved
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awaiting decision
Aclamon. She was reared in Dunmain near Gusserawn, and her father Neddy Carbury used to tell about all those old happenings. He would be ninety nine years of age now if he were alive.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 03:05
approved
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awaiting decision
are living still are old. One is over seventy years and the other is nearly as old.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 03:03
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a man on horseback one night very late.
At a lane in Gusserawn a young filly came galloping up and passed the man by. The man's horse would not go any farther. The filly disappeared and the man was not far on the road again when up came the filly after him. He kept galloping before him until he came to a crass road. The filly turned to go another road, and when he was turning he gave the man a crack of his tail in the eye. The man lost his eye. The filly was never seen there afterwards. No one ever knew who owned the filly. It was said that he was a fairy filly.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Many people around here believe in fairies.
Mrs. Gannon, an old woman who lived in Ballinteskan, used to tell the people that one morning she looked out of the window, about six o'clock when she was getting up, and she saw a little fairyman sitting on a big stone. He was all dressed in red, with a pointed hat and he was mending a little shoe. She left the window to call her son to see him, but when she came back, the fairyman was gone, and she never saw him again.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:50
approved
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awaiting decision
on 1st May and take the butter from him.
The man got tired of this happening and one May morning he watched and he saw the girl skimming the well and this is what she said.
"Satin, half Myles Kehoe's butter is for me"
He had a big stick. He stole in behind her and gave her a stroke on the head saying "The other half for me" He then ran home and the next morning every pan he had was full of the best milk and his churning was splendid.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:44
approved
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awaiting decision
There is another farmer's house on Knockey hill; he never could have any butter off his cream.
One day an old man came in and told him to put an iron in the fire and redden it and he would get back his butter. He did this and a woman came came roaring
continued on page 91
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:40
approved
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awaiting decision
door of the house where the butter was to be taken. The people of the house would know then that they would have no butter when churning.
The cure for this was to get the colter out of a plough and put it in the fire and redden it in the devil's name.
Then the person who had "taken" the butter would have to come into the house whether he or she liked it or not, and then of course everyone would know who their awful enemy was.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was believed by the people long ago, that certain people were under the power of the devil, and that they could "take away" other people's butter, that is that you could churn and churn away for hours, and no butter would come. If the butter was "taken" the milk would rise in froth all over the churn but there would be no butter. Sometimes the cream would have an awful smell.
The power was supposed to be got from the Evil One on May morning by skimming a well before the sun rose. There was a rhyme to be recited whilst the skimming was going on.
A piece of whitish fat or butter with milk dropping from it, was supposed to be left at the
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:26
approved
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awaiting decision
There is a tunnel under the ground on Flynn's land Ballymaclare. It begins in the field at the New Line and it is said that it goes to the mountain of Sliabh Coillte. Both entrances are filled in now.
It is believed to be there since '98 when mass used to be said on the mountain.
Nellie Shannon. Ballymaclare.
Everyone around here, knows about the tunnel. I asked the Flynn family and many people around here, but they do not know any more about it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:21
approved
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awaiting decision
Long years ago. A road was supposed to extend from Curragh-duff along by the bounds of Aclamon amd Aclare, through our bogs on to Terrerath. This road was supposed to be made in one night and it was called "The Dublin Road"
It is said, that on one part of this road, a man used to be seen leaping across a drain every night at a certain time, and ever since this place is known as "The Leap."
At the present time that portion of the road is gone, and there is a ditch in its lace. It would be about the third field down our bog.
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 02:14
approved
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awaiting decision
put them back, they would be pulled off again. The chairs used to be tumbled around the floor in the morning. If any delph were left over night on the table it would be found on the floor, broken in the morning.
Every night, as regular as the clock, this went on. The noise of the chairs and the rattle of the delph would begin as soon as twelve o clock came. No-one could sleep, so in the end, they had to leave the house, and after some years it fell from damp and neglect as no-one would ever sleep a night in it after that.
Nellie Shannon. My father Richard Shannon told me this and he was reared in Camblin about ten yards from the house. When he was a boy, only the old ruins were there, but he used to hear my grand-father and the other old people talking about it. The stones of the house are all covered with grass and
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 01:57
approved
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awaiting decision
In the graveyard in Ballykerogue there are the remains of what was once a chapel. The altar is there still and you can see a little cement cross on it.
People say that this cross was taken away several times but it always appeared back again
Josie Caulfield. All the old people around my home in Ballykerogue say this
It is also said that there was also a chapel in years gone by in the second field
senior member (history)
2019-10-14 00:02
approved
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awaiting decision
There were several hedge-schools in this district long ago.
There was a school at Talty's cross (in Milford) in a part of the old house.
A teacher named Quilnan taught there.
There was another in Sexton's field (Milfoird) A teacher named Davitt was teaching there.
A teacher named John Crowe taught in a cabin in Crowe's field
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:56
approved
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awaiting decision
Tobar a' Churraigh (Cloonfinish)
This well changed from William Bourke's field into Thomas Adam's field because Biddy Tunny washed her feet in it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:55
approved
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awaiting decision
1. The first woman that's at the district well on New Year's Day will have the luck of the year.
2. You'll have a better return out of your milk if you use a crooked churn dash.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:54
approved
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awaiting decision
There is an old white thorn bush (at Gavagan's) Cloonfinish and they used to spread the clothes on it. One night a woman came and said "Don't spread anymore clothes on that bush, there does be more clothes spread on that bush at night than you'd see in your townland". They ceased spreading the clothes on that bush.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:51
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awaiting decision
My grandfather Patrick Banks of Curry happened to be going through Cloonfinish retreating from Curry with his mother. He heard the noise of the wagons of the French. They must have passed by the Culmore road.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:50
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awaiting decision
Sunday.
imbárach an domhnach
Lá beag Brónach
Cat dhá Róstadh
Agus luchóg ar Bhiorr
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:46
approved
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awaiting decision
they get sober.
The tinkers have a hard life because they are nearly always hungry and cold. Some of them never wears a shoe during the whole year round.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:45
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awaiting decision
Long ago, the people were very careful when they were churning. They would not let a person out of the house without striking three blows in the churn.
One day, there was a man going to Ballina on horse-back. He went into a house in the village of Lismorane, and he lit his pipe. The people were churning at this time. He
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:43
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awaiting decision
went out again without striking a blow. The people kept on churning for an hour and a half, and at the end of that time there was no butter in the churn.
When a man was passing a field outside the house, a spark from his pipe went into the field. When he was coming home, he saw butter in the field. He went into the house
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:41
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awaiting decision
and he asked them did they get any butter when they churned. They told him that they did not. Then, he brought them out to the field and he gave them the butter.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:40
approved
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awaiting decision
The kinds of houses which existed in former times were thatched houses.
Some of them were thatched with straw, and others with rushes. These were found in the land.
The old houses had a bed in the kitchen. It was plased near the fire in the out-shot. The fire-place was at the gable-wall.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:38
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awaiting decision
The chimney was built with stones, and plastered with mortar.
There were four panes of glass in each window. The floors were made from flags.
The fire-place was built with bricks. The fire was made from turf and bog-deal. Some of the people used to cut bog-deal very thin, and place it on a wooden candle-stick.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:36
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awaiting decision
A riddle, a riddle, a farmers fiddle, alive at both ends, and dead on the midle?
A plough.
Old mother - twisted had but one eye, a long tail, which she let fly, and every time she went over the gap, she left a piece of her tail in the trap?
A needle and thread.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:35
approved
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awaiting decision
Why is Ireland like a bottle of wine?
Because there is a cork in it.
What is the highiest number in a two foot rule?
Nine because all the rest are double numbers.
What does God never see@
One like Himself.
Why is a pig up-stairs like a house on fire?
The sooner put out the better.
Where was Moses when
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:33
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awaiting decision
the light went out?
In the dark.
Where was the candle first lit?
In the wick.
Why is a cobbler's shop like Hell?
Because there is a lot of bad soles in it.
When are the gooseberries fit for picking?
When they are ripe.
Why does a cow carry her tail?
Because it will not walk
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:31
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awaiting decision
with her.
How many twos make three?
Two eighteen - pences make three shillings.
If a herring costs a penny what is it worth when it is half eaten?
A turn over.
What is deeper than the sea?
A tailor's thimble.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:30
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awaiting decision
Tinkers travel the country from place to place. They sleep in tents and houses on wheels. They are a very healthy class of people. They rear large families. The women made flowers and sell them. The men make sauspons and cans. They buy nothing what so ever
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:28
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awaiting decision
They beg and steal because they do not work on the land.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:27
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awaiting decision
Long ago there was a big Famine in Ireland. It killed hundreds of people and cattle because they had nothing to eat. After some time the people had nothing to eat but potatoes. The blight appeared on the stalks and ruined the potato-crop.
The people were in a bad way because
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:26
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awaiting decision
the potatoes were rotten in the grond. No-body could get potatoes for love or money.
During the Famine the cattle were sent out of Ireland.
Daniel O Connell heard of this and he did not try to stop them. When the people were hungry they used to eat weeds and grass. The people died on the roards and under
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:24
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the ditches where they were eating grass.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:24
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there were two giants in Knockbawn Darby and wife. For a long time they lived very peacefully with their neighbours in Culduff. After this they were very anxious to get the village.
When they tried to do this all the people got together and rebelled
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:21
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against them. The night before they left, they threw two stones and very luckily the stones lodged away from the village. One of the stones covers a perch and the other stone a half a perch and they are to be seen there yet.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 23:20
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There is a forge in the village of Graffy.
It is about a half a mile from my house.
The door of every forge should be made like a horse-shoe. It should have a cement roof on it.
The track of an old forge is a very unlucky place to build a new house.
If a farmer uses the old stones to build anything
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 18:40
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When swallows fly low it is a sign of rain.
When the stars are plentiful in the sky at night it is a sign of frost.
When the smoke from the chimney goes up straight it denotes fine weather.
If the hare wears a thick coat in Autumn it is the sign of a hard Winter.
"The oak before the ash, there will only be a splash, but the ash before the oak there will be a soak."
A red moon is the sign of wind.
An east wind is the sign of snow or of hard weather.
"He who bathes in May will soon be
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 18:19
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There are five forges in this parish (Knockcroghery).
These are the smiths names, and the names of the villages where the forges are situated, Mr. Hanlon's forge situated in Ballymurry. Mr. Coyle's in Knockcroghery, Mr. Kelly's in Culleen, Mr. Scally's in Ballagh, Mr. Coyle's in St.John's.
One of the best known smiths in this district is Mr. Patrick Hanlon
The bellows are a large leather bag having a handle with which to blow them
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 18:08
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In this locality ploughs, gates, and firecranes are made by the smith.
He gets great demand for these as he is a good smith.
This smith lives in the parish of Kilmaine, in the townland of Corroy, in Co. Roscommon
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 18:03
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Nearly all the houses here in former times were one storey, and all of them had but one door which was in the front of the house.
The majority of the houses in former times had a bed in the kitchen as there were but two or three rooms in the house.
This bed was called a settle-bed.
The front of the chimney was usually made of yellow clay or wattles.
This yellow clay was found in certain parts of the land.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 17:48
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Several foot-ball matches and hurling matches were played in this locality formerly.
The two foot-ball teams that generally played in this district were Knockcroghery v. Kilteevan. Each team consisted of seventeen men
The best men of each of these parishes were selected to play the game. The game was played in Kilteevan.
The games played in this district were a parish versus parish game.
Hurling was not as popular here 100 years ago as it is now.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 17:28
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An Ráth-Mór : Rathmore
Sionnach - Shinnagh
Nuadhconghbhail : Nohoval
Carraig Uí Laidhn : Carrigaline
Ladhar Dá Abhainn : Lyreaoune
Ínse : Inches
Inse Beag : Inchabeg
Cluainte : Clounts
Lios Uí Concubar : Lissyconnor
Cnoc na ... : Knocknalomon
Baile ... : Ballydaly
Cnoicín a'Guláin : Knockeenagullane
Cnoc a'Chuilinn : Hollymount
Fúirnéis : Furnace
Cathair Béarnach : Cahirbarnuagh
Cluodach : Cladagh
Gorta' ... : Gortavehagh
Túir Bóinne : Turboingah
..?... : Islandeeragh
Screathan a'Ghuláin : Scrahanagullane
Millín : Milleen
Cnoc na Capall : Knocknacappal
Cnoc na gCroidhe : Knocknagree
..... : Oldchapel
Baile Coileain ? : Ballycullane
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 17:15
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You'll pay the pipers!
Ask it after him!
You'll be sorry during the yalla days of your life!
"Bruscar and sceannairt" says Daniel O'Keeffe!"
You took me for height! = you startled me
Put your leg on the hob" (take possession).
Keep your hand in! (deep used to it).
The old dog for the long road!
I'll take my davy!
You have played "Molly Bán" with it made Seán Báite of it (i.e. made tea too weak)
That I may get good of you!
If the cat went a £!
Kind father for him!
Making lanes! (doing a lot of work).
He'd eat the 1/4 sessions!
He pinched me with a 'stabrum' of a needle!
Stop your "gáwmées" = capers.
There is some "donas" on you! = mí-ádh.
You'd persuade a pig and a priest!
That bangs "Banagher" and
"Banagher banged the devil!
You've too much guff!"
You'll pay the piper!
You're no great shakes!
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 15:13
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And when you pull his leg his nose begins to bleed.
... a pump.
What is that which never used its teeth for eating purposes.
... a comb.
What is that which goes from Dublin to Cork without moving.
... the road.
The man that made it did not want it.
The man that wanted it did not see it
And the man that saw it did not use it.
... a coffin.
The poor have. The rich require,
The miser spends. The spender saves,
And all men carry to their grave.
... nothing.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 15:09
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not in the steeple, and it's in the grave among all the dead people.
... the letter 'e'.
What is that which you have and I haven't and I who haven't it make more use of it then you who have it.
... your name.
There are two pigs in yonder sty
Sometimes wet and sometimes dry
When they get food you hear them cry
And when they get none how quiet they lie
... mill wheels.
Where did Noah strike the first nail in the Ark
... on the head.
If a man fell from the top of a house what did he fall against first.
... his will.
Look at your hand and you will plainly see
What never was and never will be.
... No finger the same length.
What are the three funniest things in the world.
... a kid, a kitten, and a widow.
What bridge do people never cross
... bridge of the nose.
A bit of wood a bit of wire
A little house without a fire.
... A cage.
I have a little brother and he lives down the field
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:59
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Supplied by several school children.
I haven't it and I wouldn't like to have it, but if I had it I wouldn't give it away for the whold world.
... A grey head.
It's in the rock, it's not in the stone. It's in the marrow and it's not in the bone. It's in the church and
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:56
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In the past Stations were always held in the house when all the neighbours gathered. At one time an old pair who lived near Killucan were having a Station. Tea was known then only by name, but the old people had heard about it and decided to get some for the priest's breakfast. Two priests attended the Station and when Mass was over they went to have breakfast. There were two plates of boiled tea leaves with pepper and salt shaken on them for the priest and potatoes and buttermilk for the other people. The curate who was a young man seeing the table went home but the parish priest took the potatoes and buttermilk but he said he used not "eat tea".
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:52
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sprid gléigeal amháin foinnse fhíor-uisge fhionn-fhuair as an talamh, agus thart fán tobar seo, d’fhág na h-aingle eile bláthanna, agus chrainn móra cróchta le tortha, le cothughadh a fhághail ag An Teaghlach Beannuighthe.
Nuair a mhusgail Íosap agus na mná, chualaidh siad céileabhar na n-éan, agus chuir a’c’an rud aoibhneas agus áthas ar a gcroidhe.
Bhí togha gach bidh agus rogha gach dighe aca ins an bhfásach in nach raibh dadaidh acht ganntanas agus díoghbháil, nuair a thainic an néal codlatha ortha.
Ghuidh siad go binn leis an Athair Síorraidte, ag tabhairt buidheachais Dó, agus ag ádhradh an Chruthuightheóra A thug suaimhneas agus sógh daobhtha ar son a gcuid maitheasa do’n cailín bhócht a bhí ag fágháil bháis i bhfad ó na cáirdibh”.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:51
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Nuair a bhí an Teaglach Naomtha ar teicheadh ins an Éigipt chuaidh siad ar seáchran ins an bhfásach, agus ar an naomhadh lá ní raibh aca acht buillibhín amháin eórnach agus braon beag fíor uisge.
Ar gach taobh, chá rabh dadaidh le féiceal acht tonnaí gainimhe ‘a síabadh leis an ghaoith, ag dalladh a súil agus ag druideadh suas an uile chasán ‘san áit.
I gcionn tamaill, bhí Íosap bocht sáruighthe amach le h-ocras agus le tuirse. Luigh sé síos go brónach, acht thug Muire uchtach dó, ag iarraidh air dóchas a chuir in Dhia.
Bhí an Naoidhennán ‘n A Chodlash go suaimhneach I gcliabh bheag ar dhruim an asáil.
Ag meabhrúghadh léo, chualaidh Muire agus Íosap ósna throm, truaighmhéileach, ingár do’n áit in a raibh siad in a suidhe. Chuartaigh an Mhaighdean thart, agus indeireadh na dála, chonnaic sí cailín ‘na luighe ‘sa’ ghainimh, agus dreach an bháis ar a h-aghaidh – a lámha ar críth, a béal fosgáilte agus í ins na sméitheannai’ deireannacha le h-ocras agus tart.
Le truaigh díthe roinn Muire an méid bidh agus dighe a bhí aici leithe, agus ní raibh sí ibhfad go raibh sí in innibh labhairt leóbhtha. Ba í a bhí buidheach! agus líon a croidhe le lúghthair nuair a thainic sí slán as géill an bháis.
I gcúineas na h-oidhche sin, nuair a bhí siad uilig ‘na gcodladh, thainic sluagh áingeal as na Flaitheas, agus le ceól na gcláirseach agus filidheacht neimhe mhol siad An Báb Naomhta. Annsin tharraing
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:49
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XIII
“Ó’n bhaile de Nasairet” do fhreagair an Naomh,
Mar mháireamar I dtír an Judáidaigh;
Théitheamar ó Thíorán, deanguithe ar a láimh’
Le fuil de naoidheacháinibh do mharbhuigh.
XIV
Dubhraidh dúinn fanacht, go réidhteóchadh aithne
An aingil uair éigin d’ar gcasadh,
Acht go n-uige sin máirimid I dtír an choigcrighe,
Agus I nÉigipt béidh againn ár sosadh”
XV
“Din fanaidh sibh liom”, gháir an ghiophóg I sáimh,
‘S déanaidh de’m bhaile bhur n-áitighiughadh
Iomdha bliadhanta ghuidheas go nbéidheadh an t-am,
Go dtiocfadh Súil Bheannuighthe na Geinteadh”
XVI
Do phóg sí A Dhá Chais, agus de chrom sí a glúin,
Agus D’á adhradh A gCeadóir dob’ áil;
Bhí co taithaighthe an Mhathair as gur ghlac sí an rún,
Leis an Ghiopháig do mharthain, cois “Nile”.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:47
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VIII
‘S chaidridh sí an Báb le caidreamh d’fhíor-ghradh;
‘S d’iarr ar an seanóir sos a d’fágháil,
“Annseo” ar sí, fághann deóraidhe saoirtheacht de ghnath,
‘S an seachránach sgíth ó thaisdíol”.
IX
Din a h-oidhidh do threóir’ sí ó dhealradh meadhon lae,
Dá h-uaimh bhí fionn fhuar teachneamhail;
‘S leathnuigh sí fleadh Dhóibh de thorthaibh ‘s frith
Stábla agus biadh do’n mhúill;
X
Le fíon de chrann-pailm, le deagh-thorthaibh apuigh,
Saothar uile an bhealaigh do bheangráidh,
‘S do chiúin sí le h-amhrán, I dteangan choigrigh,
Fulaing an Pháisde taisdíolaigh.
XI
Nuair ‘chuir an ghiophóg ar seal, in a láimh buidhe,
Dearna an bheag naoidheacháin;
Och ! b’eaglach É d’fheicsin, mar sgrud sí ar ghnaoi
An Bháib bhí ‘n Na Chodladh cho chiúin.
XII
‘Maith do bhreathnuigh sí in Na Aghaidh, gach cómhartha ‘s gach clais,
‘Créad as ar thainic sibh”, gháir sí in-uathbhas,
Oir is diadha an Báb ‘n A gheineamhain.”
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:45
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III
Thug an bhean seo comhlaudar do dhraoidheacht, is dóigh,
Agus tugadh dhí fios neitheadh soilléir,
Óir chomharthuigh líagán a cómhnuidhe, ‘s chongbhuigh
“Sphines” faire ar a doras go síon.
IV
Ba thromdha aon ar ach í ‘s budh dheacair go daimhin,
Dá feicsin í d-taithighibh do’n bhuidhin,
Acht chomhlabhair sí re taibhsidh de “Pharaohs” dar liom,
No re cuairteóraibh bhí fillte ‘mbraitlíon.
V
Do thainic ó’n bhfásach lá eigin seanóir,
Re Maighdean ar múille, ar a ruaigh,
Claon – Leanbh ar a h-ucht, agus thug iad an treóir,
Go díreach go teach ana giophóig?
VI
Taisbean siad a bheith iar dtaisdíoladh aisdir tuirsigh
Ó’n A mbaile, bhí fad, fad, amuigh,
Ó thoir tióran, ó dhíbhfeirge droich ríogh.
Le rabh caithte iad le tuairse ‘s duadh.
VII
Thainic an ghiopóig amach as a cómhnuidhe, le impidhe
Ar na h-oilirthribh go nglácfuidis suan;
‘Gus thairg sí a leaba do’n Mháighdean eiglídhe,
Bhí ‘n eis aisdeárughadh ar bealach, cho buan.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:43
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(Nuair a shroich an Teaghlach Naomhtha an Éigipt, deirtear go dtainic siad fhad le teach giophóige. Bhí an bhean seo cleachtuighthe I ndraoidheacht, agus bhí fíos aici go raibh an Teaghlach ar a seachnadh. Chuir sí “céad míle fáilte rompa, a’radh go rabh oídean agus subhailce le fágháil I gcómhnuidhe I dtalaimh na Spinceacha.
Thug sí cothughadh dóbhtha, acht nuair a d’amharc sí ‘san Éadan ar an Naoidheanán a bhí in-A chodladh, d’fhiafridh sí inguth uathbhasach cé’r b’as a dtainic siad.
Thug Íosap an fios seo díthe, agus thug sí cuireadh daobhtha fanacht aicí. Thug Dia an Creideamh fíor do’n gíophóig bhocht da bhrígh go raibh sí co fíal agus co cineáltach sin. Chuaidh sí ar a glúnaibh ag tabhairt adhartha agus onóra do Dara Phearsa de’n Trionóid ró Naomhtha). (S. Bean Uí Dh.)
I
Tá sgéal ann noch innstear do’n giopháig do bhíos
‘San tír mar mbídheann na Puirmididh’,
‘S bhí gréasta a h-éadach le reultaibh, ‘s a crois
Le fíogharaibh; bhí ‘n ‘na mhóir-mhíorbhuilidh’.
II
Do mhair sí ‘sna laethibh mar bhí ár dTighearna thoir,
Ar ucht grádhmhar a Mháthar gan smál,
Nuair a ‘theith Sé ó n-a náimhdibh do’n Éigpt, faoi threóir
Naoimh Íosap, do’n tír dheas úd thall.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:19
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Then, they would light the candle, and leave it in the middle of the floor to show the people light during the night. Others used to pull rushes, and dry them by the fire. They would peal the skin off them when they would be dry. Then, they would steep them in grease, and they would be fit for lighting.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:17
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:17
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:16
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There are three fairy forts in my village. They are built for the past hundreds of years. Some people say that they were built when the Danes were in Ireland.
They are all built on the tops of hills. Some people say that there are fairies in the forts, and very ofter lights are to be seen
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:14
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beside them.
These forts are about six feet in height, and they are about four feet wide. The roof is made from flags.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:13
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some member of his family will die. Long ago the smith used to act as a Denist. He used to tie a person by the sore tooth to the anvil and then rush at him with a red iron. When the patient jerked his head, he left the rotten tooth behind him. Sometimes, when the smith do not like a person, he would turn the anvil on him, and
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 14:00
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he would be sure to die. The smith shoes horses and asses, and he fixes ploughs and harrows.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:59
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When you see the dog eating green grass and when the cat start eating the timber. It will rain.
When the sheep go up on top of the mountain.
It will be fine weather.
When the hens go up on the trees.
It will snow.
When there are blue
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:57
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lights in the fire
It is the sine of a storm.
When the goats come down from the mountain.
It will be bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:56
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:55
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Long ago, there lived in the village of Curnageltha, an old man who had a purse of gold. One day he as working in the field and he hid the gold under a heap of stones.
he worked all day until evening came. Then he went to get his purse but it had
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:51
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gone, to another heap. He got it, but there was a nest of weasels inside.
When he went to bed that night he put the gold under the pillow. That night the old weasel came, but the man put her away.
The next night he put it into the pot. The weasel smelled
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:49
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the gold in the pot and went in. The man killed the weasel, and he made a purse from her skin. After that he had plenty of money, because no matter how much money he took out, it always remained full.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:48
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Once upon a time there live in the village of Curnageltha a man named Roche. One night he went out to get his mare. There was a fort in the land and he got his own mare he thought.
When he jumped on her back he discovered that he was riding on the pookey
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:45
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She went round three times and jumped to the ox mountain and from that to nephin, and from that to Dublin.
It was breaking day and he gave one big jump and landed in the fort again. Now the cocks were crowing and the pookey let the man off his back and disappeared.
The man went home, but he was worn and
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:42
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spent. He was scarcely able to tell what had happened to him. He went to bed but he never got up until he died.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:41
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Long ago the people used to play a lot of games. When they used to have a dance in a house the piper would come in and spoil - the - tune.
On Sundays when the people used to be coming home from mass, the piper would be on the road playing tunes. The boys and girls
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:39
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used to stay dancing on the road until they would be tired.
When they used to be going home they would give the piper twopence or three pence each.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:38
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Once upon a time two young girls were churning with a dash churn.
A young man came in, and lit a cigarette and walked out.
The two girls were churning but there was no butter coming on the cream. The man came in a while after and he put a piece of paper under
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:36
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the churn. Then he told them to strike one blow on the dash.
A soon as they did the butter came up to the top of the churn.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 13:30
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There is a fairy fort in our land. There is a hole leading into it. The first room you is a big room with flags covering it and there are two small rooms each There is a long passage leading from it to two other forts.
People go back to see it sometimes. Every night at half past
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 12:40
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between two ducks? How many ducks.
Three.
What has an eye and cannot see?
A needle.
What has two lugs and a cannot hear?
A pot.
How many buckets of water in Callow lake?
Two, if the bucket was half the size of the lake.
Who is the man that
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:19
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There was a man from Ballyadams passing Rathaspic graveyard late one night. As he was passing he heard a voice saying, "What will I do, or where will I go to", "Go to Heaven", said the man, and a light arose up into the sky.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:17
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When the sky is red on a summer's evening, it is a sure sign that the next day will be fine.
"The nearer the ring to the moon, the farther the rain,
The father the ring from the moon, the nearer the rain."
"A rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's waring.
A rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight".
Wind blowing south-west is a sure sign of rain, but a North wind is the sign of fine weather.
When we see wild geese it is a sign of hard weather.
\When the goat comes home it is a sign of stormy weather.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:13
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When swallows fly low it is a sign of rsain.
When the stars are plentiful in the sky at night it is a sign of frost.
When the smoke from the chimney goes up straight it denotes fine weather.
If the hare wears a thick coat in Autumn it is the sign of a hard Winter.
"The oak before the ash, there will only be a splash, but the ash before the oak there will be sock."
A red moon is the sign of wind.
An east wind is the sign of snow or of hard weather.
"He who bathes in May will soon be
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:05
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Same Author
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:04
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senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:04
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laid in clay.
He who bathes in June will sing a merry tune.
He who bathes in July will dance like a fly".
Midsummer rain spoils hay and grain.
When oak trees bend snow good crops may be expected.
If march comes in like a lion, it will go out like a lamb.
If apples bloom in March they will be scarce.
When birds and badgers are fat in October we may expect a cold winter
A green Christmas makes a fat graveyard.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:01
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 10:00
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If you get a potato and cut it into two parts and carry one part around in your pocket until it withers it is supposed to cure pains.
Rub an onion on chilblains and it will cure them
A cure for sore eyes is to wash them with black tea.
A cure for a sore throat is to put roasted potatoes in a stocking and tie them around your neck. If you put salt that has been warmed, in a stocking and put it around your neck it will cure a sore throat. Another cure for a sore throat is to gargle it with salt and water.
If anyone had a toothache and out some salt and water in it, it is supposed to cure it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:55
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If anybody had a sty on his eye and prick it with a gooseberry thorn it will cure it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:54
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senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:54
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There was an old man living in Modubeagh named Owen Brennan. One night a small little man dressed in green with a tall hat on his head, came in and asked if he could stay until day-break. The man told him he could.
The fairy then told him he would tell him where gold was hid if he told nobody about his visit. The fairy said he would come back again, but in the meantime the man broke his promise and so the fairy never returned.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:51
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If the workers were going far away for a day's work, they would take a little bag of potatoes with them, and boiled them for their dinner. After dinner the men sat down and smoked their pipes and talked of the days news, deaths, and accidents.
Tea was first used in the district after the Great Famine.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:49
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Long ago only two meals a day were eaten. The chief eatables were potatoes, milk (mostly sour) and porridge. There was never any dinner. Breakfast was taken at about eleven o'clock and the supper at six. Potatoes and porridge were eaten at the breakfast, and porridge and milk were eaten at the supper. At these meals the people sat around the table which was placed in the centre of the floor, it was placed by the wall after the meal.
Black bread made from Indian meal was mostly eaten, and only on Christmas, and Easter was meat eaten. On Sunday night the people stayed up very late and had a dinner of meat, potatoes and bread, and called it the Sunday dinner. On Christmas Eve night the people had a big dinner of fish, the vessels they had before cups were called pigins.
Special foods were eaten on special feast-days such as:- pancakes on pancake night, Fish on Christmas Eve, Eggs on Easter Sunday. Black tea and black bread were eaten during fasting week. Black bread and tea are gone out of fashion now, so is Indian Meal.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:47
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One night a man was passing by Wolfhill graveyard and he heard the noise of rattling chains. He thought it was a ghost and was going to turn back, but what leaped over the wall, but a big dog with his tail caught in a rap-trap.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:45
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was found. One night a man saw the coach and the hair stood straight on his head for a week after. It is said that the coach does not pass now because it was smashed long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:44
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clab depended on to keep a secret - one who talks too freely
ceilidhe I was out on my ceilidhe = I was out visiting.
Lá fheil Muire This is the term generally used for Assumption Day
Fadar They say when speaking of football. He is a good "fadarer" meaning that he is 'good in attack
The "er" at the end of the word is English.
báirneach barnacle- The English word is never used always bairneach
Braichlin a large shell fish about the size of the palm of the hand. I think the name comes from braithlin in a sheet because the edible part inside the shell is thin and comparatevily large - somewhat like a sheet. This meaning is not given in "Dineen"
Piotach = a small fish - the young of the fish known in Inishowen as Dirseach
Dirseach Known in Standard English as The Coal fish.
Gibneach The horned sand eel.
"Siolog" This is the fish known on the other parts of the coast as magac = pollock.
"crainearach" This is the fish known in other parts of Donegal as "buyin" and in Irish ballan. It frequents places where there is a muddy or dirty bottom and is always caught with bait.
garbhan "Garvin". This is the fish known as bream
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:44
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One night there was four men coming from a football match in Dublin. They were in a motor-car. As they were passing a graveyard near Kildare, one of them saw a man lying on the road. Another of them saw him standing by the wall. The other man saw him lying in the ditch. The driver of the car didn't see anything. When the others told him about it he topped the car and they all went back to see what was it. When they reached the spot where they had seen the man there was nothing there.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:43
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The body snatchers must have been very busy in this district in the old days. I hear stories of them in every part of the parish.
John Belvin says they had a gear to open the end of the coffin and pull the body out. His father working at Bolgers' of Ballyvaldon mounted guard for nine consecutive nights, gun in hand, over the buried corpse of his former employer.
Mr Belvin speaks of a remarkable funeral which incidentally brings in how the people suffered in those days from these ghouls.
There was a man in the locality (where Denis Dempsey of Ballintubbert now lives, whose name was John Leary. On the day of his father's funeral there was an objection raised by some relatives about the opening of a grave for the corpse in the local cemetery in Ballyvaldon.
Leary collected his friends, twelve in all got a "spring car" and set out for Donaghmore sixteen miles off. The men handled the coffin in relays of four and these when tired sat on the "side laces" of the car. Mr Behan says the coffin was laid on forms outside Laffins' of Kilmuckridge while all hands consumed a half-gallon of whiskey.
Now the sequel. Mr Belvin declares emphatically that the above John Leary went to Donaghmore
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:42
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for nine successive nights for fear of the "snatchers" and then came home and worked all day.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:40
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There comes through a lane in Shanrath once every seven years a coach and four horses. People say it is the dead coach. When the mines were working in Modubeagh, a miner was waiting for his companion at Shanrath Cross.
The dead coach was coming and a light wind coming before. The wind swept the miner away and it was days after that he
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:38
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senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:36
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An Irishman was working in a coal mine in England.
One day some of his English companions, thought they would play a joke on him, so they drew an ass's head on his coat. When Paddy went to put on his coat he saw the ass's head, and turning to his companions he said, "Which of you cleaned your face in my coat."
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:34
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senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:34
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One time there was a simpleton living in Clough. One day he was sent to the forge with a horse to get shot. As he was going along the road the horse managed to get his head out of the winkers. The simpleton did not notice this, but kept dragging the winkers after him, thinking he had the horse. On entering the forge he said to the smith, "Put a set of shoes on this lad".
When the smith looked he saw nothing but the winkers!
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:31
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The robin is supposed to have tried to pick the thorns out of our Saviour's head when He was dying on the cross. As he was doing this a drop of our Saviour's Blood is supposed to have fallen on his breast. Hence the red breast.
The swallow is supposed to have got his forked tail from a bite he got from a snake. One day he was sitting on a branch of a tree when a snake came behind him and bit him on the tail.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:31
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A very long time ago a man was being buried in Rathaspic. It was getting very dark and one of the men who dug the grave said "Put him down to the devil out of that". When he was coming home his boot opened and as he bent down to tie it, he heard a voice say "Come back and bury me, saying, "In the Name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost". The man then went back and buried him again.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:30
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as I can to the pronunciation locally. To give an idea of the local pronunciation - It would rhyme with 'why' except the q at the beginning.
"Kib" This is the word used locally for planting potatoes with a kibbing iron. This implement is or was made like a mason's trowel but smaller. It is never used now here in Inishowen. I would say it would be in use here about seventy or eighty years ago
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:29
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nests of twigs and hay. The Lady-wagtail, tom-tit and robin & the sparrows build their nests with moss, wool, hair and twigs.
The blackbird's eggs are a light green with brown spots. The thrush's eggs are green with black spots. The wren's eggs are small white eggs. (Thrush's eggs are blue). The crow's and pigeon's eggs are large white eggs. The robin's eggs are light -grey with brown spots. The usual time for a bird sitting in the eggs is two or three weeks.
If the eggs in a nest are taken out the bird will forsake the nest. It is said that is any boy robs a birds nest warts will come on his hands.
When the swallows fly low it is a sign of rain. When the seagulls fly inland it is a sign of a storm. When the crows form a circle and start screeching it is a sign of a storm.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:28
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There was a man living in Kilcruise and he was afraid of his life of ghosts. One night a certain man who lived near him said he would frighten him, so he put a sheet around him & walked along after the man. When the man saw the white thing behind he ran for his life thinking it was a ghost. The other man then turned round to go home, but what did he see behind him, but a real ghost.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:25
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The birds most commonly found in this district are the Blackbird, Wren, Thrush, Robin, Pigeon, Crow, Sparrow, Tom Tit, Sandmartin, Lady Wagtail, and the Swallow. The birds that migrate are the Swallow, wild geese, cuckoo, and wood-cock.
The blackbird builds her nest in the hedges and in the bushes. The wagtail builds her nest in the wall. The sparrow, and swallow build their nests in the eaves of houses. The wren, robin and tom tit build their nests in walls and bushes. The sandmartin builds her nest in the bank of a river. The crow and the pigeon build their nests in the tops of the trees.
The blackbird's nest is made with moss, wool, hair and twigs. The thrush makes a similar nest only the inside is lined with mud. The wren's nest is made mostly of moss and feathers. The crow and the pigeon make their
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:25
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clab depended on to keep a secret - one who talks too freely
ceilidhe I was out on my ceilidhe = I was out visiting.
Lá fheil Muire This is the term generally used for Assumption Day
Fadar They say when speaking of football. He is a good "fadarer" meaning that he is 'good in attack
The "er" at the end of the word is English.
báirneach barnacle- The English word is never used always bairneach
Braichlin a large shell fish about the size of the palm of the hand. I think the name comes from braithlin in a sheet because the edible part inside the shell is thin and comparatevily large - somewhat like a sheet. This meaning is not given in "Dineen"
Piotach = a small fish - the young of the fish known in Inishowen as Dirseach
Dirseach Known in Standard English as The Coal fish.
Gibneach The horned sand eel.
"Siolog" This is the fish known on the other parts of the coast as magac = pollock.
"crainearach" This is the fish known in other parts of Donegal as "buyin" and in Irish ballan. It frequents places where there is a muddy or dirty bottom and is always caught with bait.
garbhan "Garvin". This is the fish known as becam bream
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:21
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buy a quarter stone, and an ounce of tea.
Sometimes, they would buy a pound of sugar, but only very seldom.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:21
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of each cake. Even this is still done. This was done to bless the bread, and to honour Our Lord who gave us the flour.
When a visitor came to a house, a special kind of bread was made. The people bought a half-stone of flour, and sometimes they bought currants.
At Christmas the rich people would buy a stone of flour, and the poor people would only
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:19
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About fifty or sixty years ago, the only grind-stone that was in district was in Killasser. The oat-meal bread was made from oats and hot water.
An iron pan was the vessel in which the bread was baked. Sometimes it was baked in a pot-oven, but very few people had one. The Sign of the Cross was made on the top
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:16
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Long ago, the people had very little white-bread. Potatoes were eaten very often. They ate them for the breakfast, and dinner. They had boxty for the lunch, and sometimes oaten-meal or potato-cake for the supper, but very often, they had none at all.
The people got the oats ground by querns.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:13
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be seen there yet.
There is another field in the village called -"Garra Fada" - which means the long garden. Vegetables grow in the garden very year.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:12
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many bushes grow where it once stood. Some people believe that there are fairies in the old ruins.
There is a field in my father's land called - "Sean Bhallaí"- which means old walls. About a hundred years ago, there was a house in it. Strangers come to this house, and lodged in it. It fell about fifty years ago, but some parts of the old walls are to
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:09
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My village is called Lismorane. It is called this name because a great man living in it long ago called Moran. He built a liss, and he lived in it for many years. He owned all the village, and he had a great many cattle grazing in it. The liss is fallen now, and a great
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:06
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village. It was said that he would know if she had any fortune.
The boy and girl would walk into the house together, because it was thought that which ever of them went in first would be the first to die.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:04
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Until quite recently a man from each party would have a race from th Church to the wedding house on two horses. The man that would be at the house first would divide the whiskey during the night.
Long ago, the people had very little money. A cow or a calf was given to a boy or girl.
Always a boy would marry a girl in his own
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 09:00
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married on May, November and December, because these were unlucky also.
A big feast was held on the wedding night. A goose was killed, and many wedding cakes were made or bought.
Sometimes, the boys of the village would gather together, and out straw-hats on themselves. Then they would wait in the wedding house for a few hours,- singing and dancing.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:57
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At present, marriages take place at any time of the year. Long ago, there was a certain time for marriages to take place. On any account, no one would get married during Lent. No one would receive the sacrament of Matrimony on Monday or Saturday because these were considered unlucky days. Even no one would get
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:54
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An Irish man with clothes on him,
As green as grass,
And every person puts something into his mouth?
- Letter-box.
A big strong woman,
Without any broom,
And she sweeps the ground,
As clean as a board?
- The wind.
Why does a cow look over a fence?
- Because she cannot look under it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:52
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Spell me the red rogue of the world in three letters?
-Fox.
Spell me a broken down fence in three letters?
-A Gap.
Twenty sheep went out a gap,
Twenty more went after that,
The shepherd and his dog,
How many feet were that?
- Two feet.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:50
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As round as an apple,
As deep as a cup,
And all the men in Derry,
Could not lift it up?
-A well.
It opens like a barn-door,
It close like a trap,
Twenty things you'll think of,
Before you think of that?
-An umbrella.
Where was Moses when the light was out?
- In the darkness.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:48
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:48
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have good luck for the year.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:48
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Some people would not put out the ashes on New Years Day. Other would not throw out water on that day because they say it is not right.
On New Years Day the old people believe that if you have the first bucket of water brought from the well you would
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:45
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That hay that was out in the fields was rotten also.
In some houses there were a great deal of trout swimming on the water.
The people were catching them.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 08:44
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About two years ago there was a big flood in the village of Asklawn. The houses were flooded with water. The hay and the potatoes were swimming. It destroyed many roads.
Some of the potatoes were rotten.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 04:09
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A whistle can be made from an ash stick. It can be made in summer when the sap is up in the young trees. It is made by
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 04:07
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they put straw and sticks on the irons and lit the fire. They left a hole in the roof for the smoke to go out.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 04:01
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A cure for the whooping - cough is for the person who has it to walk out under an ass three times. Another cure for it is to eat food got from a married couple who had the same surname before they were married.
A cure for a wart is to spit on it nine mornings fasting.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 03:52
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clothes and covered their faces with masks and went to the wedding too. These were called "fools." Sometimes they were a quiet crowd and at other times they did a lot of harm to outside property. They took cars and ran them into bogs and drains. The people could not get them for days after. At times they took all the cans and buckets and pots they could find and dropped tem into the pump. The next day the people of the house could not get anything bigger than a cup to get water for their breakfast
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 03:46
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Shrove is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday. It is called Shrove Tuesday. People made it a great feast day of pancakes. A ring was put into each cake and whoever got it was said to get married in that year. Pegs were also put into them and whoever got a peg was said to be an old maid or bacholer.
All the young boys and girls in villiages went to one house and they danced and sang. Sometimes it was a wedding feast. Boys dressed themselves up in old
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 03:39
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When people are getting married the bridegroom goes into the chapel by himself but a married man goes in with the bride and people say "He gives her away" When coming out of the chapel the bridegroom and bride walk together with the bridesmaid and bestman. If there are any tinkers or poor persons at the door the bridegroom gives them money.
At the dinner that day the bride cuts the wedding cake and the bridegroom helps her. Wine, lemonade, and beer are given to the guests after dinner, and at four o'clock the married pair go on their honeymoon.
The night that they come home after the honeymoon another dance is held.
The married couple are greeted and
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 03:31
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The most frequent time for marriages is before lent and during the Summer months. When the bride and bridegroom are leaving home to go on their honeymoon an old shoe is tied to the back of the carriage. A wedding-feast is generally held at the bride's home. The neighbour's and friends are invited and they dance and sing all day and all night.
At night the straw-boys (fools) gather at the house and go in to sing and dance and often the guests of the wedding are afraid of them. They dress with skirts and they put masks on their faces so that they cannot be known.
When they go in they ask for the tea and when that is over they start
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 03:20
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When the bride and bridegroom are leaving the church rice is thrown on them for luck.
A wedding breakfast is held at the house of the bride. The straw-boys come to the house where the breakfast is held and dance and sing all day and try to steal the bride. Money is given as a fortune. Some years ago cattle were given to the bride.
May is said to be an unlucky month in which to get married.
There is an old saying about May.
"Marry in May and you'll rue the day."
Long ago a barn dance was held on the wedding day.
There is an old rhyme,
Monday for wealth,
Tuesday for health,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
And Saturday no day at all.
That was an old saying about getting married.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 03:05
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two men got the money in a tin can. They opened the can and took out the money. They told the other man and then they went off. When they had gone across the field the man threw away the holy water which was the wrong thing to do and when he had done so the woman rushed at him and killed him. The other men escaped.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 03:02
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There is a big stone about fifty yards away from Whitechurch. The stone is buried down in the ground with the top uncovered. Several men dug for a crock of gold which is said to be hidden under the stone.
About two months ago a man dug for the crock of gold. The man's name was Nutty Cahill who was a labourer on Pillip Cleary's farm. He dug for an hour. When he had made a hole under the stone there was no sign of gold. Before he went to dig he went back to
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 02:55
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told their story to the Foleys. They also told them they would pay them if they gave them a car to go to Wexford with the money. It is said but we are not sure if it is true, that one of the Foleys stole out and took one bag of gold and hid it, or it was given to them.
When the murderers left the ship they thought it would sink. Instead it drifted into Duncannon. When the cabin boy got to land he went first to the gaurds and told them all that happened. The guards set out for Wexford and on their way they met the murderers. When they all reached Wexford the murderers were sent to England and hanged.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 02:46
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Pat Hickey Ballykelly New Ross told me one night that there was a treasure buried in Carnagh. It was buried under a large stone in a field where treasures are genrally buried. He was an old man named Jack Reilly who
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 02:42
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it was captured, Captain Glass was the captain on it. He was very rich. Three men who were on it killed the captain and all that was on the ship with the exception of the cabin boy. When the cabin boy knew what was happening he hid up in the riggings. The men thought they heard the boy throwing himself into the water. They took all the treasures and put them into a smaller boat. The treasures consisted of dollars and chests of gold and images.
Then they scuttled the ship inside the Tower of Hook. Then they sailed up the Barrow in the small boat to Piltown. The cabin boy escaped. They hid the chest at low water mark. Then they came up the Ballyvarne pill and washed the blood off their hands and went in search of a house.
After a while they came to a house.
The peoples' name was Foley. When the murderers went in they
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 02:31
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they saw a stairway and they heard the sound of footsteps coming up. The man who dreamt about the treasure stopped there and the other man ran away.
The man who stopped there saw the spirit. The spirit was dressed like an officer. He had a sword in one hand and a wolf-hound behind him. The man who dreamt about the treasure brought a stick with him to hit the spirit but he did not hit him but the spirit did hit him with the sword. When the spirit hit the man he fell and the next morning when the neighbours went to look for the man they found him lying down but he was not dead. He was bleeding from the head when they got him
They said that was where the spirit hit him with the sword.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 02:22
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Long ago when the Danes came to Ireland they burned the monasteries and took anything that was valuable and buried it. One of them is said to have treasure in Aoldertan. Before he buried it an Irish chief went to fight him for it. Then the Dane gave it to his servant and told him to hide it and asked the servant if he were willing to guard it living or dead.
Then he took his sword and killed him and buried him with the treasure. The servant's spirit guards it ever since. A neighbour had a dream about the treasure. He dreamt that the treasure was buried beneath a large stone. Then the man who dreamt about the treasure asked a neighbour would he go with him to look for the treasure and the man said he would.
When they took up the large stone
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 02:09
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and when it is going to be fine they will all come out and the cock would begin to crow.
senior member (history)
2019-10-13 02:08
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The following is a list of Gaelic place-names in the Ballykelly division of Horeswood parish or of townlands adjacent to Ballykelly school district.
Bánafaira (bán a' féire), probably the Grassy Field, situated in Strokestown.
Bánaheencha, (Bán na hInnse) probably the Island Field, situated in Strokestown.
Ballmeen - (Ball Meadhon) probably the middle district, situated on top of Camblin Hill.
Carrigaloo - (Carraig a' lúigh) probably the Rock of the Shouts) situated in Dunganstown.
Tubbernakirka, (Tobar na Circe), (Tobar Coirce) either the Well of the Hen, or The Well of Oats, probably the former.
The Crickeen - (An Cruicín) - probably a corruption of An Cruicín, situated in Camblin.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:59
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Don't put out the people of Toore they will pay. "I will" said the landlord and he went out. When he was out he took a pain in his his stomack and died going home. So the people were not evicted.
Father Moore was the priests name and when the curate came he was vexed because meat was fried on Friday. Mind you business says he "I am Parish Priest and I can do what I like.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:58
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In olden times a cure for whooping cough was a piece of dry bread two married people of the same name surname. Also a hair from the head of a boy that was not born for some time after his father died. The seventh son had the cure of worms in children. There is a well not far from here called Tubber-Ann it is a holy well and people come on May Eve and say prayers in honour of it and to optain cures of different kinds. Its water is a real cure of warts.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:55
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In Clonfad near Rattan there were seven Bishops buried. When the seventh Bishop was in the hearse to be buried a little woman ran out of an old castle that is near the graveyard and asked was that place going to be as holy as Rome and the horses stopped immediately and would not go on. So they had to bury him on the side of the road. Now when anyone has a disease he is told to get a bit of the clay of the grave and replace it with other clay. Then to boil the clay in milk and eat it and it is said it will cure the disease.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cream and table turning over on top of her.
The whole house and floors seemed shaking and she begged of them to help her get up but they only shouted at her and told her to have patience till the house go steady. After some time she got to her feet drenched through with cream and by this time some of the neighbours arrived.
She asked one of them to leave her at home til she would change her clothes but at the same time she had her mind fully made up not to come back any more. When she and her companion had gone out they passed through the haggard and the moment they entered it a large cock of hay started blowing in all directions although there was not a breeze of wind.
Next day there was hay found on hedges and trees two miles away but not a particle of the cock remained in the haggard. All the people in the locality remained silent as to the happenings of that night. Two years ago this house fell and is now in ruins. It is said that if a cock of hay is put there in the night it will be gone in the morning.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
but the dough left on it could almost feed a pig. He gave it to the horse and the man went to the next house and asked for a white drink for his horse. The girl asked what was she to put into it. He said "Oh the dough on the breadboard will do". "Well" she says, "if it does you it will do me" and she ran for it but it was scrubbed as white as snow. So this is the woman he chose and they were married and lived happily ever afterwards.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is beag sean duine a chífeá gan caipín ar a cheann mar deireann siad ná fanfadh an t-innleacht acu mara gcoiméadfaidh na caipíní ar a gceannaibh.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Amhsuideóir i ngáirdín leasadóra = Muc i ngarrdín feirmeóra = Pig in a china shop i.e. dhéanfad siad díoghbháil mhór de bárr tuathalachta.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following are some local place names.

Sligo or Sligeac means the Shelly river.

Tirerach or Tír Fíacra takes its name from Fiachra Ealgach son of Dathí and great grand son of Eochy Moyvane, King of Ireland 358 to 365.

Dromard or Drom Árd which means high ridge takes its name from the elevated position of its old church on the slope of the Ox mountains.

Skreen or Scrín (Colm Cille) gets its name from the latin word Scrinium which (a) means a shrine because St Adaman's shrine was deposited in the church there.

Ballinlig or Baile an Luig which means the village of the hollow because the houses are built in a hollow beside the sea.

Beltra or Béal Trága which means the mouth of the strand because formerly the sea came up much further than it does now. They built a big embankment which now keeps back the sea.

Lugawarry or Lug an Mhara which means the hollow of the sea because the sea came up there and the embankment keeps it out from Lugawarry and Beltry.

Carrownacreeva or An Ceathramha Craobhach which means the leafy village because it is
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair d'aireóchtá duine ar siubhal le siabhrachas i.e. nuair a d'aireochta duine i sgéal suarach dá ríomadh aige, déarfá "Uch! mo chrádh, thuit an t-im is dh'éirigh an bláthach
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 23:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sin cailín cruinn canamháil, tá óg aontamhail, lán de réasúin, deagh-thuithe, deagh-múinte, soirgeach, sughach milis plúrach, stacalach, náireach, sé-grianmhar, bogarthach, bagarthach, ceol-mhalaighthe agus gach fáilte léi tuitim go béal a bróige.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Here in Ireland there are many old sayings about the seasons and also about the weather.
We are told that we should never bathe in the open sea in the month of May for it is said that 'He who bathes in May will soon be laid in the clay'.
It was always believed and is still, that if it rains on St. Swithin's Day that we will have forty days rain.
If a cool August follows a hot July it betokens a hard Winter.
We are advised to lay in a good store of fuel for the Winter if the hare wears a thick coat in October.
If the leaves remain on the trees until November the coming Winter will be cold.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
picking.
Nowadays the farmer can get an acre dug in one day by means of a potato digger. If the farmer wishes he can buy a machine for his own private use but in almost all cases the machine is got on hire for the time required. This method saves time, labour and money for the farmer.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Don't put out the people of Toore they will pay. "I will" said the landlord and he went out. When he was out he took a pain in his his stomack and died going home. So the people were not evicted.
Father Moore was the priests name and when the curate came he was vexed because meat was fried on Friday. Mind you business says he "I am Parish Priest and I can do what I like".
Lizzie Coyne, Kildangan, from my father Thomas Coyne, July 1938. Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co. Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following are some local place names.

Sligo or Sligeac means the Shelly river.

Tirerach or Tír Fíacra takes its name from Fiachra Ealgach son of Dathí and great grand son365 of Eochy Moyvane, King of Ireland 358 to 365.

Dromard or Drom Árd which means high ridge takes its name from the elevated position of its old church on the slope of the Ox mountains.

Skreen or Scrín (Colm Cille) gets its name from the latin word Scrinium which (a) means a shrine because St Adaman's shrine was deposited in the church there.

Ballinlig or Baile an Luig which means the village of the hollow because the houses are built in a hollow beside the sea.

Beltra or Béal Trága which means the mouth of the strand because formerly the sea came up much further than it does now. They built a big embankment which now keeps back the sea.

Lugawarry or Lug an Mhara which means the hollow of the sea because the sea came up there and the embankment keeps it out from Lugawarry and Beltry.

Carrownacreeva or An Ceathramha Craobhach which means the leafy village because it is
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following are some local place names.

Sligo or Sligeac means the Shelly river.

Tirerach or Tír Fíacra takes its name from Fiachra Ealgach son of Dathí and great grand son365 of Eochy Moyvane, King of Ireland 358 to 365.

Dromard or Drom Árd which means high ridge takes its name from the elevated position of its old church on the slope of the Ox mountains.

Skreen or Scrín (Colm Cille) gets its name from the latin word Scrinium which (a) means a shrine because St Adaman's shrine was deposited in the church there.

Ballinlig or Baile an Luig which means the village of the hollow because the houses are built in a hollow beside the sea.

Beltra or Béal Trága which means the mouth of the strand because formerly the sea came up much further than it does now. They built a big embankment which now keeps back the sea.

Lugawarry or Lug an Mhara which means the hollow of the sea because the sea came up there and the embankment keeps it out from Lugawarry and Beltry.

Carrownacreeva or An Ceathramha Craobhach which means the leafy village because it is
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the parish of Windgap there are the ruins of many castles.
In thw townland of Ballyclough on the east side of the Suir Valley is a round castle almost perfect.
It is 91 feet in circumference, three stories high and the walls are 8 feet thick and 45 feet high. The third floor rested on a stone arch which still remains. There is a doorway on the west side and a spiral staircase leading to the top.
There are 8 narrow round-topped windows of chiselled stone and in the upper storey there is one chimney piece.
This castle which is on Mrs. cusack's farm is said to have been erected by the Butler family.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Landlords
There was an eviction in Clomore in this parish one time and Mr Tyrell was the Landlord. Father Kealy the parish priest of Ballinbrackey was at it.
Father Kealy and Tyrell were walking up and down during the time of the eviction. Tyrell insulted the priest and the priest said "The back of my hand on you Tyrell". In five minutes three bells began to ring in Tyrells ears and he cried out "Kealy, Kealy take your hands off me". The eviction was stopped and Tyrell was carried away in his motor car and died the next day.
Ever since the Tyrells are afraid of a priest.
Hamilton was another Landlord and he was going to Toure in this parish to put out the people there. He went up to the priests house and asked the priest for for his dinner. It was Friday and he asked for meat and when he had finished he said to the landlord I gave you your wish so you give me mine. What is it he said.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Family Names in the District
Anderson
Birmingham
Bracken
Brennan
Cooley
Conlon
Coyne
Clabby
Coonet
Carew
Carroll
Daly
Dempsey
Dalton
Duignan
Dunne
Darby
Ennis
Froye
Glennon
Gill
Geoghegan
Haughton
Hickey
Hogan
Hackett
Kavanagh
Kelly
Keena
Leech
Logan
Lynam
Lynch
McNamee
Mitchell
McCann
McNamara
Moore
McCabe
Murphy
Mulvin
Monahan
McCormack
Neary
Nugent
Nangle
O'Mara
O'Connor
Pettit
Quinn
Smith
Tyrrell
Wyer
Walsh
Carr
Groome
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:31
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rejected
awaiting decision
The Patron Saint of Carrickbeg is Saint Molleran.
The belfry and tower and almost all the northern side of the parochial church, Carrickbeg, are the remains of the Franciscan Friary erected in 1336 upon a site granted by James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond. This ancient Friary was surrended on the suppression of the monasteries in 1540 (Henry VIII).
The ancient Franciscan church was restored to Catholic usage by the Rev. Michael Power, P.P. 1827. At the time of the restoration of this ancient church of Carrickbeg the Protestant Rector of the parish threatened to take possession of it when repaired. The case was submitted to Daniel O' Connell who advised that the Protestant Rector had no right whatsoever to take possession of the church. It is ever since used as the Parish Church of Carrickbeg.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
but the dough left on it could almost feed a pig. He gave it to the horse and the man went to the next house and asked for a white drink for his horse. The girl asked what was she to put into it. He said "Oh the dough on the breadboard will do". "Well" she says, "if it does you it will do me" and she ran for it but it was scrubbed as white as snow. So this is the woman he chose and they were married and lived happily ever afterwards.
Lizzie Boyne, Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co.Meath.
From my father Thomas Coyne.
September 20th 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Story.
One time a young gentle man lived in Navan and he had three sweethearts and he did not know which to take.
He knew a very clever old woman and he went to her and asked her to advice him what to do.
She did so and told him to go out riding the next day on his horse and to go to the first girld he was in love with and to say to her "My horse is sick he wants a white drink and the dought left on the breadboard will do". He did so and came to the first girls house and said "My horse is sick would you kindly give him a white drink". She asked him was it flour she had to give him. Oh no the bread board will do. She ran for it and was cleaning it for half and hour. Well it could feed two pigs.
The man went away on his horse and he went to the next girls house and asked the same thing. Her bread board was not as bad
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
Herbs.
The most harmful weeds growing on our farm are the buscaillean and the dockleaf. The former has a yellow top, and it is poisonous to animals.
The yarrow has a white top and it is boiled, and the juice is used for rheumatism.
The dandelion is used for the health. Bluebells are put to a burn.
Blacktops are put down to boil, and are then rubbed to cows teats for the pock.
The dockleaf is put on to the part burned by nettles.
The chicken weed is chopped with butter and given to the chickens.
The peppermint is given to cattle with the gripe.
The butter gets a strong taste when cows eat butter-cups.

Nina Holland,
Gurthnagranagher
From John Holland,
60
Moig.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:19
approved
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awaiting decision
and eaten hot.
From my mother, age 50.
Kathleen Gorman, Harristown, Kinnegad.
September 16th 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs. Kennedy of Curraheen, Rathgormack, Co. Waterford who is about eighty years old told me how she used to make candles. She made them from tallow which is got from skins of goats, mole, which is got from the
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The different types of Bread
Oaten Bread:
This bread was made from fine oatmeal, a little salt and sufficient water to make it into a stiff paste about an inch thick.
This paste was cut into convenient squares and they were placed before the fire standing on end and usually sods of turf supporting them.
This method seemed to make the lightest bread, it was usually eaten cold with a plentiful supply of butter on it and milk to drink with it.
Potato Cake:
Pick out the best boiled potatoes first peel them then mash them finely.
The way the old people used to mash them was to put the potatoes on the and press them out with a quart tin saucepan after sprinkling them with salt.
This done flour is added to the potatoes and the more flour that can be mixed to the potato the better and lighter the cake.
Then it is cut into quarters and eighths and baked on a very hot griddle, when baked they would be buttered immediately.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:14
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was a woman named Margaret Maguire in Park, Rathgormack, Co. Waterford and she knew how to make candles. Her house is there still and her daughter is living in it now. She made candles from fat called tallow which was got from goats and sheep. This is the way she made them - she melted the tallow and put it in a shallow dish. Then she got five threads of hemp and dipped them up and down in the tallow and left them to dry. She did this three times and the candles were made. Tallow candles they were called.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Farthings are never used nowadays.
Bridie Neville.
Drominana.
From Patrick Neville,
Drominoona,
Age 50.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and tailors worked in it.
In Ballycana were two shops belonging to two MacNamara cousins and near Culhane's cross, there was a public house. Hamnantan lived in it, and kept a large room for dancers who frequented the place generally. Opposite the house there was a ball alley, where long ago hand ball was a prominent game. The losing people had to stand a drink to their contestants when the game was completed.
Mrs. Gallagher of Ballinvoher had a shop about seventy years ago. It revived and after a few years, and is now discontinued. Mr. James MacKnight started a shop about a hundred years ago, and his son still carries on the business.
A man came round every Saturday with tea to supply the shops. He was called the "tea man". Long ago purchases were made after mass, and sometimes work was given as payment. Rag dealers and hucksters went from house to house in the district, and bought up rags. Many names are given to the different coins - a pound is called a "quid", the shilling s "bob" the sixpence a "tanner"
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 22:00
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rejected
awaiting decision
My mother sent a letter to post in the lane. I dropped it once. I dropped it twice. I dropped it three times over. Then she dips the handkerchief and the girl nearest it has to catch her. The game is continued like that until every person gets her turn.
Kitty Kenirck,
Ballycanana.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 21:58
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rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1916 we had very heavy snow. My father said that a funeral left the work-house of Carrick-on-Suir to come to Mothel. The corpse had to be brought by Mill Vale in a cart. People had to go before the horse and cart with shovels to make room for it. The snow was as high as themselves. It was a sight to see and especially as he was an old resident of Rathgormack. The wind blew the snow in drifts as high as the house.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 21:53
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is a farm belonging to Mrs. Whelan in Glenpatrick, Co. Waterford and a terrible burning took place in it about thirty years ago. Mrs. Whelan is still alive. There was a crowd of men playing football about a half-mile from the place and they heard the roaring and they ran down. When they reached the house three calves and a shed were burned. They were not sure what happened it but the cattle were in a thatched shed and it was a very hot day and the thatch was very dry and it is thought that it was a spark out of the dwelling house burned it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 21:47
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awaiting decision
hay-barn and two carts got burned also. All the neighbours rushed to the scene of the fire and helped to quench it. The damage done was estimated at about fifty pounds.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 21:46
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rejected
awaiting decision
A fire occurred in mr. Green's hay-barn in Knocknacreha, Rathgormack, Co. Waterford about eighteen years ago. It was late in the Spring in the month of April. There was not much hay and straw in it but all was there was burned. The flames rose to a great height and singed the rafters and the roof of the
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 21:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1917 there was a terrible snow storm in Ireland. All the roads to the towns were blocked. The people had to make paths through the snow so that they could go to town for feed and they had to carry it on their backs. They could not bring out any animal, not even a donkey. Mr. John Walsh of Ballinafina, Co. Waterford died at that time and he could not be buried for four or five days after. Lots of cattle and sheep died from hunger.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 21:38
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was a shoemaker living near the village of Ballythomas, Co. Waterford about fifty years ago. His name was Paddy Fitzgerald. There was a patch on some part of his face and he was known as Paddy the Patch. it was said about him that he never made a pair of boots or shoes big enough for anybody and so all who went to have their measure taken wore two pairs of stockings so that Paddy would think they had bigger feet. The ruins of his house are on Martin Walshe's farm, Ballythomas.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 21:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Warts
1. If you had a wart on your hand and washed it in water which you found accidentally in a stone it would cure it.
2. If you had warts on your hands and put as many stones into a paper bag as you had warts and left them at the crossroads, the first person to find the stones would take your warts.
3. If a person rubbed an apple to warts and buried it secretly the warts withered according as the apple decayed on the ground.
4. Get an elder stick and cut as many notches on the stick as you have warts. Then rub a notch to each wart and bury it secretly.
Wildfire
1. The blood of a person named Cahil is a cure for this ailment.
2. If two people of the same name got married the blood of their children would cure wildfire.
Cramps
These were cured and kept away by wearing an eel's skin round the naked leg.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 20:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
When Very Revd. Canon McSweeney (later Dean) was appointed to the Pastorship of Bandon he took up his abode in the Devonshire Arms Hotel, Bandon as the Parochial House was undergoing repairs. The proprietor of the said hotel at the time was a Mr. Loane. His wife Mrs Loane and the Revd. Canon had many discourses regarding their respective creeds. (Mr & Mrs Loane were Protestants) Some time later the Canon having taken up his abode in the Parochial House Mrs Loane got dangerously ill and asked her husband to bring Canon McSweeney to her. He expostulated with her and pointed out that it would be more proper for her to request the presence of her own clergyman a Mr. Darling. She refused to listen to his pleadings and insisted that an invitation be sent to the Canon to call to her death-bed. Finally the husband did as requested and the Canon duly arrived and received the dying lady into the Catholic Church. The Protestant clergyman hearing of Mrs Loane's condition paid a visit to the hotel with the intention of interviewing her but she refused
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 20:03
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awaiting decision
Here four families named Bird lived.
They were hatters.
The old station of West Cork Railway was near the Parish Priest's house at Bandon.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 20:02
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awaiting decision
grazing on a farm without the owner's permission were also put here. Sometimes these animals were auctioned when owners did not claim them. The Pound was situated in Kilbrogan Hill.
There were three breweries in Bandon.
Cornwall's was situated at the top left hand side of Kilbrogan Hill.
Sealy's was in Weir Street where Mr. Fullam has a coach factory.
Hunt was the owner of the third one.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 19:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí sé uair dá uaireannta chomh Gallda gur shíl an sagart go raibh sé comh dubh comh damarta comh buí is gur chuir sé fé slua maireacht é ar séipéal.
I gceann roinnt beag aimsire ina dhiaidh sin ránaigh an sagairt bheith ag gabháilt an bhóthair agus ráinigh an ministéar air. Pá ainm a bhí ar an sagart, Pól an ainm a bhí
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 19:34
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rejected
awaiting decision
Tá an lón sa smóilín binn ann
'B'fhuil se shórta eile ann d'admhadh
Nach chuimhin liom ar trácht
Tá an láir go modhmarach aoilann
Tréithibh uiane 'ge caoire, cráinse de gnáth gá gillí ann in aghaidh mí bíonn dáil.
Sé Pádraig Laoi é de rogha is togha na tíre
Go bhfuil grámhar suainte gcroidhir gan liomhtha ar a cháil
Tá bochtaibh Dé is Dia linn
Fáil uchrach lae is n-oíche
Sa cuirricín cois na Brighde
Óin laoitheach geal gan cháim
Tá an girrfiadh sa scairt fé dheighlean
Is mó coinín luathmhar bríomhar
Sin cuirricín cois Bríghde
'ge laoitheach geal gan cháim.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 19:32
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí beirt mná in Eirris fadó. Chuaidh siad go Béal-Átha-Fheadha ag ceannuigh lín. Peggie Ní Chuinn agus Bríghid Ní Glucán an t-ainim a bhí uirri. Ní fhaca siad gráinne té ariamh, acht chualaidh siad cainnt air. Nuair a bhí siad i mBéal-Átha-Fheadha deir siad gur gheobhaidh siad dínnear té. Chuaidh siad isteach i dteach agus dubhairt siad le bean an tighe púnta té d'fhághail dóibh. Cuir siad an púnta té síos i bpota mór agus nuair a bhí an té bruithte fuair siad báisin agus choinnig sí na duilleóga ann, agus do mheasg sí na duilleoga agus siúcra le chéile. Annsin fuair siad dhá spúneog agus d'ith siad a ndinnear. Nuair a shroich siad a mbaile, deir siad gur d'ith siad dínnear breágh té, agus bhí sé an dheas.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 19:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí beirt mná in Eirris fadó. Chuaidh siad go Béal-Átha-Fheadha ag ceannuigh lín. Peggie Ní Chuinn agus Bríghid Ní Glucán an t-ainim a bhí uirri. Ní fhaca siad gráinne té ariamh, acht chualaidh siad cainnt air. Nuair a bhí siad i mBéal-Átha-Fheadha deir siad gur gheobhaidh siad dínnear té. Chuaidh siad isteach i dteach agus dubhairt siad le bean an tighe púnta té d'fhághail dóibh. Cuir siad an púnta té síos i bpota mór agus nuair a bhí an té bruithte fuair siad báisin agus choinnig sí na duilleóga ann, agus do mheasg sí na duillegoa agus siúcra le chéile. Annsin fuair siad dhá spúneog agus d'ith siad a ndinnear. Nuair a shroich siad a mbaile, deir siad gur d'ith siad dínnear breágh té, agus bhí sé an dheas.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 19:23
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rejected
awaiting decision
'Sé an fonn tá ag an dán son ná An Londubh.
Seán Laoi ab ainm don poet seo a mhair i bPáirt i mBaile an Sagart i bParóiste na Leasa Móire, áit go dtugtar mar ainm uirthi Tír a' Ceoil. Bhí gaol dó sa cuirricín cois na Brighde gurab ainm dó Pádraig Laoi - dhein sé an t-amhrán seo dá mholadh a áite agus a choda.
Níl an té a thug an dán seo dom, Pádraig Ó Muirgheasa lán cinnte go bhfuil an dán go léir aige i gceart. Tá mé leagan eile af a deirfiúr.
Is fada mé ag gabhailt timpeall
Siúl dúhaigh cúige is tíortha
Ba leo Caisil go Beanntraí
'Gus dhein scríobh sin cois trá
Nó gur sheól an tóg - Mhac Naomhtha
Insan róid aréir chun tighe mé
Do thug bárr ó áilne tíortha bhí gríte le fáil
Tá cuan chun snámh go h-aoibhinn
Agus an long thar sáile tigheacht ann
Árdaigh cumhra líonta ann d'fhíon geal ón Spáinn
Thá an bán bruach clúthmhair díonmar
Thá foscadh ós gach síon ann
Thá an ceileabhar éin ar chrainn ann
Tá an lon sa smóilín binn ann
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 19:05
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agus ansan d'fhiafruigheadar dhe cá raibh a bhróga. Do chuaidh sé anoon go dtí an áit a raibh na bróga agus do thaisbeáin sé dhóibh iad. Do cheap na fir go raibh sé ar tí na bróga a thógaint agus ba bheag nár mharbhuigheadar é mar gheall air.
Nuair a bhí a cuid éadaigh scrúduighthe go maith aca do thugadar ar ais dó iad agus dubhradar leis imtheacht féin. D'éirigh an fear agus níor bhfhada uaidh imtheacht leis. Bhí an-áthas air bheith saor airís agus rith sé chómh tapaidh is do bhí 'na chosaibh. Ní raibh sé indán an bóthar abhaile d'fhághail amach agus shocruigh sé 'na aigne go bhfanfadh sé sa tír iasachta sin. D'fhan agus do bhíodh sé ag obair timcheall ó áit go h-áit. Do dhein sé mórán airgid agus níor bhfhada go raibh sé 'na fhear saidhbhir. Ansan bhí áthas air gur casadh na fir air mar murach iad do bheadh sé tréis dul abhaile 'na fhear bocht. Sé rud a deireadh sé leis féin i ngcumhnuidhe 'na dhiaidh sin "An rud is measa le duine ná a bhás, ní fheadar sé ná gurab é bárr a leasa é."
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 18:52
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Uair amháin bhí Éireannach ag teacht abhaile ón Aifric. Sa tslighe dhó do casadh sluagh mór fear air agus dubhradar leis gur theastuigh ó Rí na Tíre é d'fheicsint agus go ndubhairt an Rí leó an fear, a chapall agus gach rud a bhí ag an bhfear a thabhairt leó. Dubhairt an fear leis féin go gcaithfeadh sé rud a dhéanamh ar an Rí.
Chuaidh sé in-éinfeacht leis an fearaibh agus nuair a bhí timcheall leath-mhíle curtha aca do stadadar agus dubhradar len'a chéile i dteangain nár thuig an fear "Déanfaidh an áit seo an gnó"! Gan focal eile do rádh do bhaineadar a hata dhe agus do chaitheadar ar an dtalamh é. Do ghearradar na cnaipí a bhí ar chóta an fhir agus chuireadar 'na bpócaí iad. Ansan do thógadar gach rud a bhí 'na phócaí ón bhfear agus chuireadar 'na bpócaí féin iad.
Tháinig scannradh mór ar an bhfear ansan agus d'iarr sé ortha é do leigint saor acht níor thugadar aon fhreagra air. Tar éis tamaill dubhradar leis a chóta a bhaint de. Dhiúltuigh an fear dhóibh. Dubhairt na fir ansin go gcrochfaidís é. Nuair a chualaidh an fear é sin dubhairt sé leis féin go ndéanfadh sé mar a dubhradh leis. Ansan do bhain sé dhe a chuid éadaigh go léir agus do luigh sé síos ar an dtalamh. Thosnuigh sé ag creathadh leis an bhfuacht.
Do dhein na fir géar-scrúdú ar a chuid éadaigh
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 17:35
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The Devil continued.
The boys were gone. Carroll caught the puck by the horns and gave him a kick out the door, and then went to revive his wife which he had to do for many hours, before she came to herself.
Written by Mary Gleeson, Rapla, Nenagh.
Told by my parents age 60.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 17:33
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and took chains down with him into it. He said when he would hear the man coming he could shake the chains to frighten him. He was not long waiting when he heard footsteps coming. He began to shake the chains and to his surprise he saw a white woman standing over the hole. The man was frightened and when the woman disappeared he ran home as fast as he could. He never went to frighten anyone after that.
Written by Mary Ryan, Beechwood, Nenagh.
Told by my parents age 55
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 17:30
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A ghost story
On the old road between Nenagh and Birr there is a cross called Rapla Cross. This is supposed to be a haunted place because there was a man named Clarke shot there. Here is a story about it.
One night a man was walking along home from Nenagh. It was a dark night. When he came to the cross he felt very nervous. He was walking along and just as he came to the cross and was about to pass it when suddenly a big lake appeared before him.
The man was frightened and turned back and to his surprise the lake was still before him. All night long he wandered about the cross and no matter where we went the lake was still before him. When the morning came the lake vanished and the man came on home.
(2)
There was once a man who was very much afraid when out int he night. He used to go rambling every night. Another man lived near him and knew very well that he used to be afraid.
This night he made up his mind to frighten the cowardly man. He made a big hole inside the ditch
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 17:23
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Páirc ns Cille
Páirc í seo atá i seilbh Bean Ui Gadhra i gCnoc an Aifrinn. De réir na sean daoine bhí cill nó eaglais anseo timpeall sé chéad bliain ó shoin. De réir gach cúntas do tógadh an chéad eaglais sa paróiste seo i lár an oirthear, áit an-iargculda. Ansin do tógadh ceann eile i gCnoc an Aifrinn. Le h-imeacht aimsire do thit an séipéil agus do deineadh na h-Aifrinn a léamh sa pháirc. Tugtar Páirc na Cille air ó shoin agus Cloch an Altóra ar an gcloic a bhíodh mar altóir ann.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 17:10
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Toothache
This complaint was cured by biting from the ground the first fern seen in Spring.
Wildfire
Burn a green furze-bush and hold an iron over the smoke. Then rub the iron to the sore.
Ringworm
1. Good black ink rubber around ringworm will prevent spreading and also cure it.
2. Burn green rushes and mix the ash with butter and rub it to the ringworm. It cures it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 17:07
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Warts
1. If you had a wart on your hand and washed it in water which your friend accidentally in a stone it would cure it.
2. If you had warts on your hands and put as many stones into a paper bag as you had warts and left them at the crossroads. The first person to find the stones would take your warts.
3. If a person rubbed an apple to warts and buried it secretly the warts wither according as the apple decays on the ground.
4. Get an elder stick and cut as many notches on the stick as you have warts. Then rub a notch to each wart and bury it secretly.
Wildfire
1. The blood of a person named Cahill is a cure for this ailment.
2. If two people of the same name got married the blood of their children would cure wildfire.
Cramps
These were cured and kept away by wearing an eel's skin around the naked leg.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:42
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The flu was in this country about nineteen years ago. The people were very much afraid of it. About two thousand people died in this parish. The people were hungry because they could not go to the town for food. The people died by the roadside with it. It was a terribly hard time for the people.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:39
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A great singer
There was a great singer in the Parish of Clonea in the Co. Waterford. Tom Mooney was his name. He was noted as a great singer. He is dead more than three years. The name of one song he sang was "Come home Paddy Reilly to Ballyjamesduff".
Told by - Mrs Roche,
Monadiha,
Co. Waterford
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:39
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There are many stories told of him. He jumped over a very high mountain. He was living in a small cottage. He was very tall and handsome. He jumped a big river twice the size of the river Clodagh. He is dead six years.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:38
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There was a strong man named Patrick Walsh living in Ballingarra in the Co. Waterford. He did many brave deeds.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:37
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He eats porridge for his breakfast. He has a straw bed.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:37
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James Fitzgerald, better known as Laken Darra, is a fine singer and story-teller. He is very old. He lives under a rock at the foot of the Comeragh Mountains in the townland of Kilclooney. He is a fine dancer and a fine intelligent man for chatting on any subject. His home is two very large rocks leaning against each other. He goes in between the two. He does his cooking outside.He has the stones white-washed. He has fifteen shillings a week, army pension.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:33
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week.
He then told the strange news he got. He heard it on his way home when coming through Borrisokane that the devil was appearing on the Nenagh Borrisokane road in the shape of a puck goat, and that he was seen by several people the night before and they were all terrified and would not leave their homes since for love or money.
He then put hand in his pocket and brought up a clay pipe and said to his wife that he never got a decent smoke since he left home as he forgot his timber pipe. "It is on top of the press in the room, will you bring it out to me", said he. Mrs. Carroll stood up on the minute and went in through a small hall which led to the room. When she opened the door the puck stood up on his hind legs and made a drive at her. The poor woman let a terrifying road out of her and fell back in the hall and fainted. All the boys stood up at once and went to see what had happened to Mrs. Carroll. They saw the devil standing over her. They all made for the kitchen door and in hurry to get out they all tumbled over one another. They ran to the nearest house and did not leave till morning. These boys got suck a fright that night that they did not leave their homes for many a month. When
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:32
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There was once a man whose name was Pat Cleary. He lived in Curraghkiely in the parish of Kilsheelan and in the Co. Waterford. He taught dancing to the people. He won competitions and he got medals. He was a great music-player. His house is still where he lived and there are people living in it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:30
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A Great Reaper
There was a great reaper in Park, Rathgormack, Co. Waterford. His name was James Roche. He is buried six years but the house is still there and there are people living in it. he was one of the best reapers and he used always follow it up. He used cut an acre each day with a scythe.
A Story-teller.
There was a good story-teller in Clondonnell, Co. Waterford. His name was John Halpin. He is dead about thirty-four years. He was great for telling stories. He had no word of English and all Irish stories he told.
A Great Singer
There was a singer living in Windgap, Co. Waterford. He was the best that was around the place. He made a song by the name of The Rose of Augh na Broon. He is dead about seven years.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:28
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The Devil
About fifty years ago in the townsland of Ballinmurra there lived a man and his wife by the name of O Carrol who went by the name of Carrol the "Clipper". He used to earn his living by clipping horses and that is why he was called "The Clipper". He also was a horse blocker and a great judge of horses.
His house was a great place for the young men of the locality to go for a ramble to play a game of cards and to hear the latest news, as Carrol used to go to all the leading horse fairs of Ireland to spot out horses for horse dealers.
Coming home one year from the great horse of Banagher on the 15th of September, he overtook on the road near his own house a puck goat. When he came up to his house he caught it by the horns, and led it in by the back of the house. There was a large window in his own room which could be let up and down. He put the puck in through this window and closed it down.
He then went in by the front way, and as usual all the boys were there and in great glee. After the usual chat the boys asked him to tell them all the strange news he got as he was away for a
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:24
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from the mountains to the houses it is a sign of rain.
If laurel berries are very plentiful we look out for a bad Winter.
If there is a black cloud in the sky it is a sign of frost.
It is a sign of rain to see soot fall down the chimney.
The horses come near the gate when they know the rain is coming.
If the turkeys feel sleepy in the morning it is a sign of rain.
If the cat turns his back to the fire you may expect rain.
A mackerel sky is a sign of a storm.
A leaden sky is a sign of snow.
When people who have rheumatism feel their pains worst they know rain is near at hand.
When salt is damp it is a sure sign of rain.
It is a sign of frosty weather when we hear the train clearly.
It is a sign of a storm when crows are calling up high in the sky.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:17
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Because she could not lick it.
What part of the cow goes over the ditch first?
Her breath.
Betty inside the ditch and Betty outside the ditch and if you will go near Betty she will bite you.
A nettle.
Over the water and under the water and never tips the water?
A person carrying a pail of water over the bridge.
What is it often comes to the table, always cut but never eaten?
A pack of cards.
What is it that has an eye and cannot see?
A needle.
What is it that is in the ear and not wanted?
The noise.
The little red heifer she stands by the wall
She eats all she gets and drinks none at all?
A fire.
Bog long Tommy with the big red nose
The quicker he is put there the quicker he is gone.
A candle.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 15:09
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What would make more noise at a gate than a pig?
Two pigs.
What is like half the moon?
The other half.
When was beef the highest?
When the cow jumped over the moon.
I have a little cow by the side of the wall
She eats all she gets but drinks none at all.
A fire.
I have a little brother, his name is Ned
He travels all on the top of his head?
A nail in your boot.
Little Jenny with a red nose
The longer she lives the shorter it grows?
A lighted candle.
As round as a marble, as flat as a pan
The half of a woman, the whole of a man?
An English penny.
Twenty sick sheep went out a gap
One of them perished, how many came back?
Nineteen.
Why does a hen pick the pot?
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 14:59
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One day two men were having a chat.One said to the other,"How quickly the days pass by." "yes said the other man," They have nothing else to do."
An old man went to sell a calf skin. He carried it in a sack on his back, and as he was going through the town, he met a man, who asked him if it was a hide he had. He said it is not ahide I have it.
Told by-Mr.Phelan,
Carrowleigh,
Rathgormack,
Co.Waterford.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 14:58
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There was once a man at the fair and he had a cow and another man said to him" How much for the old frame, handle-bars and all."
Told by-Mrs. Power,
Kilbrack,
Co.Waterford.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 14:57
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were to stay with her always and they never came near her again.
Told by-Mrs McGrath,
Monadiha,
Co.Waterford.

There was once a woman who advertised for a man to work in her garden. Two men applied for the job. While she was examining them on the lawn she noticed her mother in the porch making signs to her to choose the smaller man, which she did. When they were alone the daughter asked her mother why she told her to choose the smaller man because the other man had a nicer face. The woman told her that whenever she wanted to choose a man she should go by his trousers. If the trousers was patched on the knees he was the man to take and if it was patched on the seat she should not take him.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 14:52
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There was once a woman who had two diviners working for her every day and they were two Protestants. When night would come they would not wait to say the Rosary. One night she kept them to say the Rosary and when they had it said, one said to another "Did you hear her saying 'May the Divine Assistance remain always with us'?" And they thought she meant that they
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 13:19
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Tá cnoc i gCluain Eascra, agus Cnuiceán na Tincéirí a tigtar air. Cnoc mór 'seadh é, agus tá sgéal deas agam faoi. is ó m'athair a cuala me an sgéal seo.
Ins an am fadó agus is fadó bhí, bhí a lan tinceirí ag obair. Ag déanamh bóthair a bhíodar, agus bhíodar ag obair go dían. Dhá dream bhí ann, agus bhí easaontas eatra le fada an lá.
Tráthnón amháin do thosuigh an spórt má's spórt é. Thosuiogh an marbhadh agus an sléacht.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 13:05
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One night there were two women coming back from a wake and they had a small dog with them. On their way home they had to cross a mountain with a wood nearby and suddenly they heard a great noise and the dog barked.
The women ran as fast as they could for they thought the fairies were after them and that they would overtake them before they reached home. As they were going in home they thought that the noise was coming nearer and they shut the door and sat by the fire as they could hear the dog barking the whole time. In the space of half an hour the dog came to the door and by this time the noise had ceased and they let in the dog who did nothing but run around the house three times and fell down and died. On the third night after that the noise was heard again and the little dog ran in the direction from which it came and was never seen again.
One night two men were going to the fair with cattle to be sold. As they were going along the road beside a wood the cattle suddenly got frightened and ran over the wall into the wood until they went out of the mens sight. The two men went after them but the former had gone out of sight without much delay.
They were not long in the wood when a little man dressed in green came out of a tree through a small door. He told them to come in and have something to eat and when they did they got meat and cabbage and ate enough. As they were going the little man came in with a basin of gold and
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:52
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Years ago a man lived in Gort named Michael Power. He was a great basket maker and he could make nearly every sort of basket. First he would make a number of them and then go out to the market or out the country and sell them. From sally rods he made them. For certain kinds of basket he peeled the rods and for other he would not. The he dried the rods and when they would be dry he made them into whatever size wanted. He now lives in Loughrea and he still makes baskets.
A man named Rock living near Peterswell is famous for making turf-baskets. He makes them from hazel rods. He
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:47
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makes them certain sizes. First he measures a square on the ground and then he sticks down a number of rods for each side of the basket. Then he gets weaker rods and and puts them across. When this is done he turns the basket upside down and puts the bottom in it.
In Skehana there is a woman named Mrs. Carew. She is a great spinner and does much spinning for herself and her family. She oils the wool first and then she gets it carded and made into rolls. Then she spins it and makes it into balls.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:44
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A woman named Mrs. Kearns was coming home from Gort on a horse and cart one evening and as it was getting very late she thought it too late to go around the road so she crossed a river. There was a great flood in the river that evening and when she was just out in the middle of it the flood brought herself and the horse and cart with it. It is said that she said a little aspiration as she went along and that it was it that saved her. Not long after, she clung on to a branch which was leaning out over the river and she started to baul so loudly that she was heard in Peterswell. A great crowd gathered to her and Martin McCarty was the only man who would go out for her. A rope was tied around his waist and he brought her in safely. He was later awarded a leather medal for his courage.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:42
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About twenty years ago there was a woman named Maura Sexton living in a little house in Skehana. She made candles from tallow and rushes and she made an other sort of candle from tallow and cords. First she melted the tallow in a pot by the fireside. Then she had a candle-stick and she put the cord down in the middle of the candle-stick and poured the tallow down around the cord. When it would be solid she would take it out. When she was making the other sort of candles she melted the tallow. Then she dipped the rush in the tallow and when it was there a while she put it in a candle stick like a tongs. Another woman from Skehana named Mrs. Helly made them the same way.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:40
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shared it with them both, walked with them out into the wood and then disappeared and was never seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:39
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A man lived in Coxtown about thirty years ago named Martin Linnane, who was well able to make candles. He used to warm the lard of animals and get a few wisps of hay and put them together and stick them down in the tallow. Then he would leave it up to set, and when night would come he would light it, and it would last for three hours.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:38
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It is said that there is a crock of gold hidden in a little hazel wood in Skehana. The people of the village suppose that there lived in Skehana about one hundred years ago a magician and that he had much money. He hid gold under a rock in this little wood and when he was dying he told the people that he had gold hidden. He told them where it was and he said anyone who would go digging for it would come home would come home wounded.
One man went digging up the rock and a big black dog ran towards him. The dog bit him on the legs and hands and he had to stay in bed for three months. No body went digging since.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:36
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If the sky is red in the morning it is a sign that the day will come wet. When there are many black clouds in the sky it shows that we will have rain before long. In the night if there is a halo around the moon the next day is sure to be wet. A rainbow in the morning is the sailor's warning. A rain-bow in the night is the shepherd's delight.
In summer when the swallows fly very low it is a sign that it will rain before long and if the fly high it is a sign that the weather will be fine. Animals are always very drowsy when it is going to rain.
When the mountains and hills look far away there is fine weather before us, but when they seem to be near it shows that we will get bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:31
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The land in which this battle was fought belonged to Mr Taylor and when it was divided some years ago the people who got it were making fences and they dug up bones and teeth of people and it (was) it supposed that these are the bones of the soldiers who were killed there.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:30
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It is said that long ago the Connaught soldiers fought a battle in Limerick. The Connaught soldiers won and they took gold and golden vessels from their enemies.
When they came to Kilmacdaugh a row arose among themselves trying who would get the gold. The person who was in charge of it hid it in a hazel wood called Bun a Cipéan over near Gort na Coille. There are several caves there near the ruins of an old castle and it is said that in one of these caves there are seven pots of gold hanging from the roof and several golden vessels.
Some years ago a man named Mr O Hynes heard about it and went to look for it but he could not find it. He went in a little bit in each cave but he could not see any sign of it.
When the person who was in charge of the gold had it hidden, he was killed himself and it is supposed that this soldier is guarding it still.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:23
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Once upon a time there was always a long black hand seen near Ballindereen.
It appeared always in the same place.
Anybody that tried to pass the hand would surely be killed.
One night there was a dance not far from the place. At the dance they were talking about the strange hand. They said it was the hand of a priest who was murdered there in the penal times.
The owner of the house told them that he would give his daughter to whoever would go and fight with the hand.
For a long time there was silence. At last one brave fellow plucked up his spirits and volunteered to go and fight.
The other people advised him not to go that it was not safe to go and fight with such a mysterious hand. But he was a courageous fellow and nothing would prevent him from going. So he went.
When he reached his destination the black hand was still there. He stood there for a moment looking at the object
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:17
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He struck one blow on the hand and it said "if strike again I will get back my power and you will (k) get killed."
He struck no more but ran home as fast as he could, and related his story.
Next morning the people went to the place and saw nothing but a heap of clay. The hand was never seen by anybody ever after.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 12:15
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grave-yard. He started digging and digging until he found the bones of the skeleton that they burried some weeks before that. He brought it back to the house and let it down through the roof and as it was falling it said "no-one dare to enter the roof of this house again.
Ned went of and it is not know what happened to him but the house is haunted ever after.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 11:22
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timceall a muinéal é agus thiomáin sé abhaile í. Chuir sé isteach í stabla í 'gus chuir sé ceithe cruithe uirthi. Bhí an-áthas ar an bhfear í a fhághail mar bhí sí in a togha capall rása; gach lá a mbéadh rás in aon áit, rachadh sé ann le na capaill rása agus gheabhfadh sí an buadh gach lá. Bhí an fear ag eirght an-saidhbhir agus an-bródamhail asta. Dubhairt se leis féin an lá seo gur ceart dó í a beith gléasta níos fearr; chuir sé cruithe óra annsin uirthí agus nuair a bhí sé ag teache abhaile bhí áthas an domhain air mar gheall ar an gcapall a bheith gléasta le cruithe óra. Bhíadar ag teacht an ghar do
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 11:14
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rejected
awaiting decision
mara san uisge agus is cosamhail lé bean í.
Bhí each uisge i dtobharloch tamall ó shoin, agus nhíodh sí ag déanamh go leor díoghbhála do na barraí. Thagadh sé aníos as an loch gach oidche ag ithe a 'choirce agus ní raibh fhios ag aoinne céard a bhí fhá n-ithe. Aon oidhche amháin d;fhan fear ar a dtugtaí an "Túchaille ag fairiú ar na barraí. Faoí mheadhon oidhche chonnaic sé capall ban ag teacht aníos as an loch agus isteach dhe léim leí thar a gclaidhe gur thosuigh sí ag ithe a choirce. I gcionn tamaill shiubhail an "Túchaille anonn cuice agus rug sé greim air. Síl an each uisge imtheacht uaidh acht bhí an fear an-láidir agus
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 11:08
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thug sé leis abhaile é.
Fuair sé céad punt ar an each ó fhearr saidhbhear a bhí sa gceanntar a chuir bannaigh leis nach mbéarfadh sé air.
Bhí fear ag dul amach ar an sliabh le bó uair amháin mar bhí tarbh amuigh ann. Ar a bhealach dhó tháinig tarbh aníos as loch an Airm agus tháinig sé abhaile arís. Nuair a bhí laoi ag an mbó sin; lá amháin d'imtigh sé amach ar an sliabh arís agus síos leis sa loch arís.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 11:03
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awaiting decision
Deirtear go bhfeicfidhe each uisge gach seacht mbliain thíos í loch na Rosa.
Aon uair amháín chonnaic fear é go h-an mhac ar maidein agus é ar bhruach an locha, dath bán do bhí uirthí. D'fhéach an fear tríd an gclaidhe mar deirtear dá bhfeifeadh an each-uisghe thú í dtosach go gcaillfidhe thú sul dá mbéadh seacht mbliain eile caithte.
Tráthamhail go leor chonnaic an fear seo í dtosach í agus b'éigin dí fannacht 'san ait céadhna go mbéarfadh an fear uirthi le rud iarann. Cuaidh an fear abhaile agus séard a thug sé leis ach an tlú; chuir sé
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:55
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awaiting decision
I am asked to write about Flax grow some years ago. Flax was much growing in this district, an old woman, named, Mary Hynes, grew Flax in a little garden beside, Thomas Whytes she used to bleach and spin it into thread. She had a brother a very big man, he once was asked by the good people to go for a nights sport and he went, and they landed in the Kings cellar in England, and they drank a lot of Whiskey, and when leaving, Hynes, forgot the pass word, he was found there in the morning, he was found there sentenced to be hanged, he was on the scaffold and the rope around his neck, when he remembered the pass word the pass word was hiaway home to Ireland, having his black cap on the rope around his neck, he says hiaway home to Ireland himself and the scaffold raised high in the air and in crossing Dublin he knocked the chimneys of a lot of houses, he landed on Creg Hill the sticks of the scaffold made three waving Loonis and he wove that years flax for; Mary the web so good that some of the people in Knockadrum is wearing it yet, some of the flax tackle is yet in that little house at the back of Mick Hayeses.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:33
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awaiting decision
In spring the farmers plough and till the land for the crops. The potato crop is sown, and is raised in Autumn. When the seed is preparing for sowing, first the potatoes are cut into a cuple of halfs, and their are too eyes left in each piece, and it is called a scoiléan. These scoiléans are put into turf-moul to make them dry for sowing.
The first earlies:- Arran Pilot, Dunbar, yeoman, Di Vernon, Arran Crest, Nintyfold, Early Rose, Beauty of Hebron, Duke of York, May Queen, Sharpes Express, Eclipse, Puritan. Second Earlies:- Great Scot, Gardenfiller, Flounder, British Queen, and Catriona. Main crop:- Dunbar Cavilier, Majestic, Red King, Arran Consul, Golden Wonder, King Edward, Arran banner, Champion Skerry, Champion, Irish Queen, Kerr's pink, Arran Cairn, Up to daye.
Early potatoes are sometimes sown in riges, most of them are sown in drills. Long ago the people used to have timber ploughs, but there are none in the vicinity now. Sometimes the people get starch out of potatoes for ironing. Long ago the potatoes were sown in with spades.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:22
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awaiting decision
The people practise another old custom on the first of May. They call this day May Day. On this day the people cut a bush and stick it in the ground. Then they decorate it with rags, eggshells, old shoes and boots, etc, and then they leave the bush there for about a month. But long ago when May Night would come, the boys out of the town would go around the country and burn all the May bushes on the people.
On Christmas Eve, the people decorate their houses with holly and it is taken down on Shrove Tuesday and it used to cook the pancakes.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:18
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air therein. All the party saw a large dog which is supposed to guard the treasure night and day and it is believed will not allow anyone to touch it, so they all fled in terror.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:18
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of O'Toole decided to unearth it being half way in the tunnel he was eaten by the big black wolf.
Some years after another man by the name of Ryan made up his mind to explore the tunnel this time with success he emerged from the tunnel it is believed with a handful of precious jewels which weighed 3 lbs. The Danes are believed to have taken the sacred vessels which were thrown into the river Shannon
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:16
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awaiting decision
In the year one thousand nine hundred and eighteen the disease known as the flu spread over the whole country. Unfortunately it reached the townland of Corrobuggy. For days and weeks families lay sick in bed.
On the boundary between Corrobuggy and Maio a family of the name of Shekalton live. This family escaped the flu for a number of weeks, and they thought that they would escape it altogether.
One day after dinner, the youngest member of the family mamed Charles got very sick. He went to bed, and before night, every one of the children accompanied by the father were in bed. The doctor was called at once, and on the following day two of them were removed to hospital.
A few days later, the eldest died, and he had to be buried at once, lest he should turn black.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:10
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treasures they could find.
If a priest was caught saying Mass at that time he would be killed. The people would be also killed if they were caught.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:09
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Long ago the country was in a bad state. The priests used to say Mass under hedges. All they people used to go to the place where they used to say the Mass.
The churches were knocked down by the savages. They brought all the
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:07
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salt on the churn-dash to keep the fairies away from the butter. Then they make the sign of the cross with the churn-dash on the churn.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:06
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under the churn that any bad minded person would not be able to bring the butter when churning.
In summer-time the churning is made twice a week, but in winter it is only made once. In summer it is very easy to make it, but in winter it is very hard made.
Some people put
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:06
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These he interwove to form the seat. he made the baskets with twigs. He brought them in to Mallow and sold them.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:03
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the town and left hundreds of pounds weekly to the shop-keepers. But there came a day during the Anglo Irish Trouble when it was used as a reprisal for the shooting of a soldier at Mallow Barracks and was burned to the ground by his comrades. It was a great blow to its employees who were knocked out of work for years. The owner Mr Cleeves of Limerick claimed compensation for it but owing to a misunderstanding between himself and the workers he never re-built it; much to the sorrow of the town which will mourn its loss for ever.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:03
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Long ago when the people used to be churning if a person came into the house, while the people would be churning they would not let him out unless he would strike three blows on the churn.
Some people believe that if you put a quenched coal
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 10:00
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Up to 1920 there was a very extensive and flourishing condensed milk factory in the town of Mallow. it gave employment to six hundred people mostly men. There were two kinds of condensed milk made there, the "Goat Brand" and the "Cow Brand". Those tins were different sizes and were filled, labelled and packed by girls and consigned to different parts of the world. During the Great European War there was a great demand for this milk owing to the great scarcity of sugar, as this milk sweetened and coloured tea, coffee and cocoa the same as milk and sugar. In another part of the factory butter was made which was sold at cost price. This factory was a great boon to
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:57
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church there also and the old ruin is still to be seen. It lies along the road.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:57
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but as he was on his way home the woman ran after him and killed him with a hatchet. Then she went and when she was alone in the house she killed herself. It was said ever after that if any one went into the house he would see a picture on the wall of the woman killing the priest with the hatchet.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:56
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There is an old graveyard in the village of Graffy.
It is there about a hundred years.
This where the young and unbaptised children were buried.
It is surrounded by a high wall and there are trees growing round it. There was an old
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:55
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Once there was a woman named Annabella. It was said she committed a mortal sin and never told it in Confession. The priest heard about it and one night came to the house and begged her to tell it in Confession and she promised. The sin was that she stole a hundred pounds. She was sorry for stealing it, but she made up her mind that she would not give it back. When she went into confession and told the priest the sin he refused her Absolution. Then she got very angry and determined to kill the priest. One night the priest was coming out of the Church and he saw the woman waiting outside the door. He took no notice of her
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:55
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:54
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when passing by it.
People often go down into it. The floor is made of flags and there are three rooms in it. The roof is very strong.
Some people say they seen lights in it at night time.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:54
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the skin over our left shoulder and the letter it would make on the floor would be the initial of the man one would marry.
We get two nuts and put them on the fire. If the nuts jump together the man one will marrie will be faithful, and if they jump apart man will not be faithful.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:53
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sometimes almost unbreakable, but usually when it was hot a great amount of butter was put on it. This softened it very much but sometimes this could not be afforded and the people had to eat it hard.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:52
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There is a fort in the village of Curnageltha. It is on top of a hill. It has a round top and two big holes leading into it. It is roofed with strong flags and covered with grass and clay
Fires have been seen in it. people were often frightened at night
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:52
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Long ago when the potato was the principal food and bread was a novelty the people had a griddle on which they used to make what they called "Hard Oat Bread". The griddle was made of six bars and one bar going across, and what was called a "pin" sticking out of the bottom to keep the cake on it from burning. The cake was placed in this and when one side was baked they turned the other side.
How the bread was made:- Oat meal was mixed with boiling water, a spoonful of salt was added and the dough was rolled out on a board very thinly. Then it was put on the griddle in front of the fire. When it was baked it was very hard -
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:52
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of punch he told them the story and he got another glass.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:48
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There is a story told locally around Mallow that Sir Walter Raleigh who came home from America to his home in Youghal was the first man to be seen smoking a timber pipe in Ireland. As he was walking along his kitchen garden smoking his pipe, his wife seeing smoke, thought he was on fire and threw buckets of water to quench him.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:46
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neither were the teachers in favour of it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:45
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Some sixty years ago a school was conducted by Michael O Connor, a native of Mallow, at the Spa Square. It was known locally as the Long Room. There was no Irish taught but the teachers were in favour of Irish culture. The old national school books were used. Writing was taught and pencil and slate were used. The teacher died in the district. Pupils contributed to the support of the teachers.
There was another National School in Mallow. It was built in the year 1825. It ceased to be used as a school in 1877. It was a mixed school and the last teachers were Mr. and Mrs Tyner. There is a daughter of the aforesaid still resident in Bank Place Mallow. Irish was not taught there,
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:41
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The O'Keeffes ruled all the lands west of Mallow long ago. They had a very high opinion of themselves because when they used to go to Mass at Cullen the priest could not start Mass until they arrived in the Church.
One day the priest could have patience to wait any longer for the O'Keeffe's so that the Mass was almost over when the O'Keeffe's came in. When they saw that the priest had begun Mass they were filled with rage and anger. They came and stood outside the Church door for they intended to injure the priest in some way.
The people knew what they were up to so they waited too to see what would happen. The priest rode out on a horse and there was such a crowd there that the O'Keeffe's did not
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:40
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something to eat for I am so hungry.
"Pray give
Immediately she offered him some bread and went away, saying "Heaven has sent it to you".
Presently she saw a child sitting by the road-side crying, and as she passed the child exclaimed, "Oh, my head is cold, do give me something to cover it.
Instantly the poor maiden
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:37
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look after her own cap and gave it to her. A little further she met another child who said he was freezing for want of a jacket.
At last she entered a wood where it was dark and here she intended to sleep. But she found another child with scarcely any clothes. The child thought to herself "It is dark now no one will see me.
So she took off all her clothes she had and covered
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:35
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all birds,
Saint Stephen's day he was caught in the furze,
Up with the kettle and down with the pot,
Give us our answer and let us be off"
These "wren boys" collect a fair share of money. They usually divide it and amuse themselves for the evening by going to the pictures or by having a little party amongst themselves.
Hallow E'en:-
Many old customs are still observed at Hallow E'en. This night is called "Snap-apple night" by the majority of Irish people. Some keep the custom of cracking and burning the various kinds of nuts. Others have "Snap-apple":- A tub of water is placed in the middle of the floor, and there are several apples put into it. Each person dives down under the water and whoever is up first with an apple in his mouth wins, and also gets the apple to eat.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:34
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kind heart. Still she was good and pious and although forsaken by all the world, and she knew that God would take care of her. She went out into the fields, and prayed to him to help her.
On the day when the kind-hearted person had given her the piece of bread, she was walking along the road, when she met a poor man who said to her."Pray give me
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:31
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Once upon a time there lived a poor maiden whose parents were dead, and the child was so poor that she had no little house to live in. At last all her clothes were gone except those she wore and she had nothing to eat but a piece of bread given to her by some one who had a
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:29
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tinker to be off. The tinker uttered a strange language, and walked out.
Shortly afterwards a hen came in, and she walked on the flag where the tin-smith was standing. When she stood on the spot she fell dead.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:27
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Long ago there lived in the village of Graffy an old man and an old woman. One day a tin-smith came into the house and he asked a charity in the honour of God.
The old man showed him the door, but still he continued to ask. At last the old woman told the
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:24
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Whiskey and all sorts of drink were given at the wedding. Sometimes "straw boys" come to visit the wedding house. Long ago there was a special time of the year which was called Shrove. This was from the 6th of January to ash Wednesday.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:23
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After the Christmas is the special time of the year that marriages take place. It is unlucky to get married in the month of May. Stock and goods are given when people get married. Long ago the wives sat behind their husbands on horses after getting married. Some of the people used to gather and make a big wedding.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:19
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it's in the shop and it do not sell it.
The light of the sun.
There's a well of clear spring water under the ground a wooden coffin under and four golden trees around.
A woman milking a cow.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:17
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As round as an apple
As flat as a pan
Te shape of a woman
The shape of a man.
A penny.
It's in mountain not in valley it's in Mayo not in Sligo.
The letter m.
There's a man in the garden and he has a hundred coats on him.
A head of cabbage.
It's in the meadow and it do not cut it
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:15
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A little white and round house,
And it is full of meat.
But it has no doors or windows,
To let me in to eat.
An egg.
It goes from house to house, and it stays out at night.
The road.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:14
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:14
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When the car bits at the timber there is going to be wet weather.
When the seagulls and crows fly about the air screaming there is a storm coming.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:13
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\When you see a blue light in the fire it is the sign of rain.
When the goats come down from the mountain there is going to be a storm.
When the crows fly high it is the sign of good weather.
When they fly low there is going to be bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:11
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for it to get hard. Then they would get the oaten meal cake and leave it on the hearth flag until it would bake. They used to turn it very often and it used to have a hard crust.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:10
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The people used to have no flour long ago. They used to live on oaten meal and yellow meal.
When the people used to be making a cake long ago they would get oaten meal and mix it together with milk and water. Then they would flatten it out on the table
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:08
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have caravans. Tinker have horses and a great deal of asses. In the night-time they let their horses and asses into an other persons land and leave them their until morning.
Some of these tinker are very fond of stealing, and they throw bottles at each other.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:07
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Thousands of people are going around Ireland. These are known as tinkers and gypsies.
Some of them are very useful. The men make cans and saucepans and they also fixes pots.
The women make flower and they also sell carpets and stools. They go from place to place and some of them
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:05
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bring it to the weaver and then they would bring it to the tailor to get it made. It was the same way when they would want a shirt.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:04
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Long ago the people had not much money. Nearly all the farmers in Ireland had a flock of sheep. When the people used to want a suit of clothes they would not get it at once. They had to wait until it would come off the sheeps back. Then they would spin it and
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:02
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After the people were an hour churning there was no sign of the butter. They sent out for the man and the man brought in the coal, and as soon as he did this the butter came back.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:01
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following day.
Once it happened that a man working on a farm near a farm-house came in when the people of the house were making a churning. He asked for a coal to light his pipe and they gave it to him. The man brought it in a saucepan to the field where he was working.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 09:00
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Long ago when the people used to go churning if a man came in for a coal they would not give him any. The used to put a rowan berry gad on the churn-dash to stop the faries from bringing the butter.
The butter they would churn on May-day would not be tasted until the
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:58
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be eating their supper. The people used to knit and sow with the light of the fire.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:57
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awaiting decision
Long ago the people used to have no oil or candles. They would spend one or two days out in a srait pulling rushes for to make rush-lights.
Then they would peal them all but one stripe down the middle. They would dip them in grease and light them when they would
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:55
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the people gathered it. Soon after that it was frozen and the frost lasted for six weeks.
They used to shake straw under the horses feet to stop them from slipping. When the people used to be bringing a corpse to the graveyard at that time they would put straw ropes under the coffin and bring it to the graveyard on the top of the ice.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:53
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About forty years ago the river Moy was flooded. Many people had acres of potatoes during that year along the river and they were left without one. They pigs died of hunger because they had nothing to eat. The hay was taken away also, but some of it got caught in the hedges, and
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:51
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marries many a wife and still lives single all his life?
A priest.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:50
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between two ducks? How many dicks.
Three.
What has an eye and cannot see?
A needle.
What has two lugs and a cannot hear?
A pot.
How many buckets of water in Callow lake?
Two, if the bucket was half the size of the lake.
Who is the man that
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:49
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Because it's capital is always doubling.
Why is Cork the smallest city in Ireland?
Because it fits in a bottle.
Who can win races?
The Aga Khan.
When is a man thinner than a ladder?
When he is a shaving.
A duck before a duck a duck behind a duck and a duck in the middle
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:46
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There is a fort in the town land of Gurtacrissane. There is one at Jer Driscoll's in Dirha, there is one at Dan Tracies in Finuge. There are lights seen in Tracies fort. There is also a hole there where a man dreamt there was gold. He told two more men of his dream so the three of them made up their minds to come on the following night which they did and brought with them their spades and shovels and started to dig a hole in the particular spot. They worked hard for an hour or so till they came to a square flag so they said to themselves we have the gold and just as they were about to
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:39
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rise the flag they were attacked by four huge savage hounds so the three men had to flee with their lives and never returned since for the Gold and the hole still remains to be seen.
There is generally a fort closed in by a ditch with a fine growth of white thorn bushes. People don't ever use forts nor till them nor cut hay out of them.
The inclosure of Gurtacrissane well is different to any other well that I know of. The earthen ditch is the same as any other fort but the hedge is black thorn and sallies but a fine spring well near by. It is said that this well was ten yards from the fort until some misunderstanding woman came one morning and washed her
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:34
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clothes in it and the well removed about four yards nearer to the fort where it was
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:33
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Clothes on the side of the road also They go from house to house looking for food.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:32
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the rubber the stick will go through the hole and shoot out the stone.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:30
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Our local fishermen start to prepare for the fishing season on March 1st. They have to repair their boats and tar them to prevent any leak. They also have to repair their nets and tar them. A day or so before the season opens each man loads his net into the boat and then sails on to the appointed spot for fishing. Then the first man landed is entitled to the first haul and so on till each man gets his turn. The way they fish is that two men go in the boat, one man oars or guides, the second man leaves
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:26
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before May Day is considered lucky for cures. People pay rounds at Blessed Wells for cures on that day. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays are supposed to be lucky days.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:25
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People are slow to begin work on Mondays and Fridays or to remove from one house to another.
Black oats is sown in February, White oats and potato oats sown in March. Early potatoes are generally set for the seventeenth of March and the late potatoes are set in April. Parsnip, carrots, onions, lettuce are also sown in March. Mangolds, turnip and common carrots and yellow bullock turnips are set in April.
The Reehy days are the last three days of March and the first few days of April. May Eve and November Night are both nights for unlucky omens. May day is also an unlucky day. The Saturday
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:16
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flails.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:15
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Soap is made from fat or vegetable matter. There are several varieties of soap, some of which are most injurious to the skin and are only used for washing clothes. Toilet class being used for the skin cleaning. Soap is a very necessary ingredient when giving an injection to man. Spinning and weaving are unknown in this part of Kerry. It is an industry almost extinct except in Caherciveen district and Donegal. Dyeing is a lost industry in Eire. Mr Troy, Church St, Listowel was dyeing years ago, but few of Listowel's present generation are possessed of the art. Seemingly it was a most unwholesome trade. Wheels are made at Mahony's forge and he makes gates and repairs ploughs. People thresh oats with
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:08
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had three able reformers John Calvin John Knox and a priest named Martin Luther. If you travel Eire you can see Mass Rocks in several Parishes. The Chapel of the pit is outside Kilkenny City.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 08:06
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Penal laws are such enactments as impose a penalty for certain acts of omission or commission by persons of a different faith from that which is established. Penal laws were originally directed against Roman Catholics and under Elizabeth, James I and William III were repeatedly enforced with great injustice. At one period Roman Catholics were deprived of many important civil rights, and it was not until 1829 that their emancipation from these laws was fully carried out.
A price was placed on every priest's head. This continued until the Catholic emancipation act was passed. This act gave Catholics equality in every position in life with Protestants. Our great Kerry man Daniel O Connell can be thanked for this act. England experienced her share of the hardships and several Priests were put to death. King Henry the eight
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 04:24
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Local Prayers. not found in print.
To be said before getting up in the morning
At morn where wouldst thou rise?
With Patrick to the skies

To be said before eating your supper at night
What God gives me and what we take
'Tis a gift for Christ - His sake
Be the meal of beans and peas
God be thanked for those and these

Getting into bed at night
I lay myself down with God
May He rest here also
His guarding arms about my head.
His cross my limbs below

Going to bed at night
Four great angels around my bed
Two at my feet and two at my head
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 04:19
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Candles were made in this district by the foll :-
1.
Ned. Daly.
Yoletown Ballycullane, Co Wexford.
This man made tallow and dale candles.

x 2.
Catherine Deegan
Garryduff, Campile, via Waterford
This woman made taller candles and resin ones.
3.
Mary Browne.
Taylorstown, Ballycullane Co Wexford
This woman made tallow candles.
x
Resin candles were made after the manner of tallow candles. The resin was bought + sometimes gathered from the cherry tree. etc
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 04:08
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 04:07
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Candle Making
About eighty years ago a certain man named Ned Daly lived where Grigory Furlong is living now. He was a relation of Luke Daly the hedge school-master who taught at Katty's Rock Boley. He was a tallow-candle maker by trade he made them for people of the district.
He made two sorts of candles one sort was made from bog-dale and the other was made from tallow liquid which was got from the fat of the sheep. This was boiled in a large pot then the pot was taken up he cut thin cord in foot lengths and dipped them in the pot of tallow one at a time and let them dry. He repeated this until the candles were think enough then he sold them to the people
Bog-Dale - Candles.
The dale was taken out of the bog and cut into lengths which were left by the fire until they were seasoned.
Then they were cut into thin foot lengths. They used flint and steel and brown paper steeped in salt-petre to light them. They struck the flint and steel together and lit the brown paper. It was from this the dale candles were lit
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 03:51
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Basket - making.
In olden times Francie Kehoe of Rathimney, Gusserane, New Ross, Co Wexford, who was my grandfather, made baskets and bee-hive's. He made the baskets out of sallies. He put the sallies in and out through each other. He had smaller sallies for the middle of the basket and one big sally for the mouth of the basket. He put two handles in it he did this by getting a few thin sallies and twisting them around each other.
Then he fastened them to the big sally at the mouth and the basket was complete.
All the farmers in the district bought baskets from him. They used them for carrying the lime to the kiln to be burned and for gathering potatoes.
He made the bee-hives out of wheaten straw.
He got bunches of straw and arranged them then he sewed them together. Briars cut in two were used for sewing them this was done like daring.
He continued that until he had all the bunches's of straw and he sowed it around the top
Then the bee-hive was complete.
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 03:33
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Churn - making.
James Kehoe and Paddy Kehoe of Rathimney made churns and keelers out of wood
They earned their living by making these because very few could make these in olden times.
These two men were called "The Coopers"
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 03:24
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v
The barley was bad and the grain it was small
And the "blockers" from Guinness would not buy it at all
I went into the pawn and I popped my old shawl
Four shillings he'd write on it, Harley
vi
Now I went down to Larkin's below in the lane
To get some refreshments and have a small drain
Whom did I meet but the Landlord again
Demanding the price of my barley
vii
That day in my hand I had a nice bit of ash
I cut from the ditch between Cassagh and Nash
I was fully determined his beaver to smash
If he'd give me much more of his parley
viii
I was a short time in Spain and I learned to say
The spanish of what was a letter called K.
I gave him a tip in his dhudeen of clay
If you saw how he hooked it from Carley
ix
I gave him a tip and I cut off his wig
He tripped and fell over a run away pig
A little dog passing by that did not care a fig
But picked up the article snarling
x
Last year the corn came from Russia and Spain
It was no good for malting so Guinness was saying
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 03:04
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About the year 1894, Guinness firm the principal buyer of barley in Ireland got in a lot of foreign barley for malting, this was ruinous to the Co. Wexford as barley was the principal cash crop the farmers raised. The price of barley fell from 15s/6d to 7s/= per barrel hence the following song was composed.

Song
One evening last week into Ross I did go
I came from the Hook and I passed by Coolroe
I met an old farmer named Maurkeen Kehoe
Going to town with a sample of barley
ii
Passing Pat Sullivans at the cross of Dunmain
We went into see Mary and have a small drain
An old woman inside they called Johanna Kane
She was arguing with Catherine Carley
iii
With sighing and sobbing you think she would choke
Saying Johanna honey last year I was broke
I went into town for to auction the yoke
And the landlord came up to me snarling
iv
On the last fair of Ross, I was selling a foal
To buy a new pair of buskens," provisions and coal
He came up to my daughter and swore by his soul
That he should gey the price of my barley
v
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 02:44
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The flying sparks did glow
I wish to God it was a pike,
Says Bartle of Coolroe.
iv
They tried the scaling ladders
And the battering ram likewise
Jim Ryan was leaguing to himself
Soon the ram he espied
The ram says Jim has got the fluke
Some sheep-dip on him throw
And twill deluge all the worms boys
This morning in Coolroe
v
The peelers fixed their bayonets
Far flashing in the sun
And climbed the steep embankments
And thought the Fort was won
But how soon they found out
That no coward was their foe
That sent them reeling back again,
That morning in Coolroe
vi
Then to the front the Canon stepped,
And says brave boys attend
For I have always been to you
A father and a friend,
We have done enough for Wexford
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 02:31
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The Coolroe Evictions
i
Up spoke Thomas Somers,
He says "Now Wexford boys,
To do a deed I'm willing,
Which will your heart rejoice,
If you will lend a hand with me
The bailiffs we'll outhrow.
And prove the fire of '98"
Still burns in Coolroe."
ii
Up spoke Bartle Rochford "saying
A smith I am by trade.
My father was a farmer, long
In his grave low laid.
The house that he was born in
The bailiffs they laid low
You'll never want Batt Rochford's hand
Until the battle in Coolroe.
iii
Into the forge then Bartle went
The anvil loud did ring,
And with his strong stout arm
The heavy sledge did swing,
And as he shaped the iron
senior member (history)
2019-10-12 00:01
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There were three brothers living together and one day they were going to seek a fortune. They met a man dead on the road. They had no English but "I did", "For certain" and "For money". A guard came to them and asked them who killed the man. The first one said "I did", the second said "For money" and the third said "For certain". "For certain" said the guard and he brought the three brothers away and hanged them.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:55
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William Crotty was a highwayman who lived in the Comeragh Mountains about two hundred years ago. Before he died he threw a shoe of gold into a river in Kilballyquilty. He said the person who would live the longest would get it. It is said that a ghost is minding it. Nobody looked for it.
Told by-Mrs Power,
Ballythomas,
Co.Waterford.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:54
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put a heap of earth over it and no one can remove it. A man living in Feddins once thought to dig it up but failed, because as he dug the earth kept falling in so he gave up.
Told by-Mr. Pat McGrath,
Feddins,
Co.Waterford.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:53
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There is a mote in Feddins and under this is a crock of gold. It was buried by the Danes to keep it safe until they needed it. They
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:51
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There is gold hidden in Clondonnell in the County Waterford. It is said to be in Murray's field. There was a bull minding it and he had a gold ring on his nose. Some people went to look for the gold. They were digging one night and they heard some noise and they did not look for it anymore.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:46
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There was a Protestant church in Mothel in Co. Waterford. There are vessels hidden in the churchyard. It is said that a Minister hid them there. He hid them there because he did not want any of the people to get them. The vessels were never found. The people of the place looked for them but they could not find them. They are supposed to be in it all the time.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:45
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beside a wood.

Larkhill or Lár Coille which means the middle of the wood. It is supposed that it was surrounded by woods in former times.

Carrownaglouch or Ceathramha na gCloc which means the village of the stones because the land is very stoney.

Carrowgarry or An Cathramha Garbh which means the rough land because there are a lot of hills and hollows in it.

Lisnarower or Lios na Reamhair which means the fort of the ploughed field.

Buninid or Bun Fhinne which means the bottom of the Finn stream

Cloonakeemoge means the meadow of the hurleys because the men used to be hurling there long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:29
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This school is situated in the district formerly known as Coillte Luighne. It is in the parish of Collooney, on the northern slope of the Ox mountains and farthest west from the village of Ballysodare.
It is well known to the local people and the name Coillte Luighne is used as a postal address by a lady living in the vicinity. It is said to consist of three townlands Lugnadiffa, Mullinashee, and Crockacullion, but it is believed to be formerly more extensive as the next townland is Larkhill (Lár Choill) or middle wood. Mullinashee originally consisted of a village of 18 houses high upon the mountain side and did not include the lowland as it does at present. In this townland there is a rath or cashel 25 yards in diameter where unbaptised children used until
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:29
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recently be buried. It is still called Lios na bPáiste or "The Children's Fort".
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:21
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This strand is frequently mentioned in Irish History and to historians is as familiar as the strand of Malahide in Clontarf. It is quite adjacent to this school and in fact we have a good view of it from our doors.
It is three miles west of Ballisodare.
Until about 80 years ago it was a square mile in extent at low tide and the regular roads both East and West and North and South crossed this strand.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:21
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In 1858 a rampart was constructed which shut out the sea, so that this famous strand is now a swamp covered with rushes and other water plants.
When building the rampart the Cairns, Eochaide and the three sons Nemidh were destroyed the large stones being used to build the rampart and only a couple of little heaps of small stones at present mark these ancient graves.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:13
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There were three large "fairs" held in this district in the old times. They were:
At Crosshue near Blackwater village
At Kilmuckridge Hill near Kilmuckridge
At Oulart

These fairs were geat occasions of faction fights especially the ones at Crosshue and Oulart. Both sexes attended these fairs and then at evening they went to drink punch. The old people here tell me that young maidens who wern't invited into the public houses felt it very much.
At Kilmuckridge fair A. Parker of Ballinadrissogue tells me he remembers tents erected on the fair green selling all kinds of intoxicants. Where this fair used be there is now at the head of what was once the fair green a rough stone cross. I have heard that justice was dispensed here around this cross but I could get no details.
I have referred to these fairs as being scenes of faction fights: Crosshue was notorious in this. Two stalwarts
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:13
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Darby Brenann of Kilnew and Denis Kavanagh Killincooley "fell out" at this fair and both agreed to fight the matter out the succeeding Sunday evening. They were to meet at a little stream at Ballinalask the boundary of their respective parishes.
They met but behind each were the young bloods of his whole parish.
The "Cuirim ort" was one to cross the stream into the other's territory. None crossed and so there was no fight. The Blackwater people tell me they overawed their enemies by their numbers and determination but I havn't heard the other side.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 23:01
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Both J. Belvin and Stephen Furlong told me that Kilmuckridge village was practically wiped out by the Cholera that followed the famine
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 22:53
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Patk. Parker's father Hugh Parker was born in 1814, the year of the Big Snow. The storm came on 6th January it seems. He told me a rather interesting item bearing on the reaction of animals to weather conditions. Hugh Parker had four young horses that winter and as the district is low lying and sheltered they were kept out night and day. But the evening before the storm he was surprised to see four animals trying to force the yard gate going for shelter. He, suspecting nothing turned them back and then a fortnight after found the poor animals bunched together under a snow drift, smothered.
He says they had to tunnel under the snow to leave the houses which were almost completely covered.
He agrees with another Sgealaidhe mentioned already that the snow came from the South and the day before the storm people coming from Oulart Fair took off their coats they felt so warm.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 22:44
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Stories of the "Dead Coach" are quite common in Kilmuckridge. They were very much in evidence during the war. The "Coach" is supposed to be a "Hearse" sometimes HORSELESS, and anyone that tells the story of having heard or seen it generally agree as to the route it takes. The noise of its wheels is described as "enough to shake the nerves of a bull".
The "Coach" route in this district is round the road at Tinnaberna and on to Killincooley. One thing about all these dead Coach stories, is that they all more or less agree as to description time of travel and route covered.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 21:28
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There was a schoolmaster in this school and he used to give my grandfather a pipe of tobbaco. He asked him one day for a smoke and he gave him two pipes of tobbaco and he said "how can I be giving it to you always". 'God will give him enough' said my grandfather. 'Why dont he give it to you', the master said, 'sure He does, there it is'. Some time after that my grandfather was at a wedding. There was a doctor there and the master had told him about my grandfather. And he told the man of the house, to night he is in the house, and the said he'd wish to see him and the to his sister to call him up. She did, and she said the doctor and the man wanted him and he went. The man said 'is it a fact that you are getting tobbaco from God.' He said 'I suppose it is the doctor told you he said, yes'. He got a glass
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 21:27
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There was a schoolmaster in this school and he used to give my grandfather a pipe of tobbaco. He asked him one day for a smoke and he gave him two pipes of tobbaco and he said "how can I be giving it to you always". 'God will give him enough' said my grandfather. 'Why dont he give it to you', the master said, 'sure he does, there it is'. Some time after that my grandfather was at a wedding. There was a doctor there and the master had told him about my grandfather. And he told the man of the house, to night he is in the house, and the said he'd wish to see him and the to his sister to call him up. She did, and she said the doctor and the man wanted him and he went. The man said 'is it a fact that you are getting tobbaco from God.' He said 'I suppose it is the doctor told you he said, yes'. He got a glass
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 21:02
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and I believe you reported it. It may be said the priest. If you don't prive it I shall kill you Immediately the priest took out his stole and book and went to the fire and knelt down. After some time his father appeared and the priest said to the young man is that your father. Yes. Which will I leave him here or put him back where I got him, for if I leave him here, you shall be annoyed with him. O Put him back. After that they all passed away and the mansion mouldered away. At this very moment the track of the cloven foot is to be seen on the door step in Joe Murrays.
Agnes Clarke.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 20:59
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could not get it and many of them were drowned. The girl is said to appear every night.
Mary Nelson,
from
John Nelson,
Summerhill,
Enfield,
Co. Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 20:58
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Long ago when the English came to Ireland they sought all the treasures. On coming to the Bell Hill they went to a Norman Castle in which a man named Lynch lived.
When one of the servants saw them coming she ran and got a crock of gold which was stored away. Before she had time to hide it the English captured her and demanded the gold. But she refused it and said she would be shot before she would give it. There was a hole of water nearby and she threw the pot of gold into it. She was then shot and the soldiers thought it was easily found but when they looked for it they
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 20:55
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it was the dead priest that they saw because he could not rest when they were dancing upon him. The priest had to be taken up and buried someplace else.
Rosaleen Hughes,
From:-
Margaret Duffy,
Summerhill,
Enfield,
Co. Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 20:54
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There was a dance in a house one night on that same night many years before that a man died in that house. At about mid-night a relation of the dead man was standing on the road. She saw a ball of fire a few yards away it was rolling very fast. She called out all the others out of the house. No on could see it only the dead man's relations. I seemed to be rolling towards them very fast but still it did not move. The next year on the same night they had another dance and all who were present at the dance saw the ball of fire. It is seen every year in the same place.
Ellen Nugent,
From,
Christopher Dowd,
Killnagrass,
Trim,
Co. Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 20:50
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and they got into a conversation about hunting. They came to the village and had chats with their friends but the gentleman and devil hunted all day together, and they came to a fork tree and the devil cut right through, but the other tried and he failed.
After their long days hunting they returned to Brem Hall and they had a banquet. After the banquet they had card playing and this stranger got in for a game of cards and he won every game. Among the guests was one Roman Catholic, a card fell and he stooped to pick it up and he saw the cloven foot and after some time he informed the lady of the house and she broke the news to the others without he hearing. The Roman Catholic made his was out, and he went for the priest and the C.C. came and he could not banish the devil. They went back to see if P.P. had come home an he had, and he came to the castle and all the people had to walk behind him, and he asked the devil where would he put him and mentioned several places in the house. But the priest said I will put you under the hearth stone he took out his stole and book and started to read and immediately he disappeared. After that the boss of the house died and his son came on for the owner of the mansion he used to have banquets and he invited all his guests including the C.C. after the dinner been over the owner of the house said to C.C. there is a report about, that my father is in hell
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 20:48
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and they got into a conversation about hunting. They came to the village and had chats with their friends but the gentleman and devil hunted all day together, and they came to a fork tree and the devil cut right through, but the other tried and he failed.
After their long days hunting they returned to Brem Hall and they had a banquet. After the banquet they had card playing and this stranger got in for a game of cards and he won everey game. Among the guests was one Roman Catholic, a card fell and he stooped to pick it up and he saw the cloven foot and after some time he informed the lady of the house and she broke the news to the others without he hearing. The Roman Catholic made his was out, and he went for the priest and the C.C. came and he could not banish the devil. They went back to see if P.P. had come home an he had, and he came to the castle and all the people had to walk behind him, and he asked the devil where would he put him and mentioned several places in the house. But the priest said I will put you under the hearth stone he took out his stole and book and started to read and immediately he disappeared. After that the boss of the house died and his son came on for the owner of the mansion he used to have banquets and he invited all his guests including the C.C. after the dinner been over the owner of the house said to C.C. there is a report about, that my father is in hell
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 19:29
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middle.
A. A plough.
Q. Little thing, Little thing less than a mouse has more windows than any king's house.
A. A thimble.
Q. Long legs, short thighs, little head, and no eyes.
A. A tongs.
Q. What bed is made and yet not made to lie on?
A. A flower bed.
Q. As I went out in a gap I my uncle Davy. He had two black eye a broken nose and upon my word he would he would frighten the crows.
A. A gun.
Q. I saw death that life was in; six sat and the seventh went free, riddle me that and a genius you will be.
A. A bird's nest in a dead horse's skull.
Q. I ran and got it I sat down to look for it and when I could not get it I brought it with me.
A. A thorn in my foot.
Q. How many ladders would reach to the sky?
A. One if it was long enough.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 17:45
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Paidir le rá ag tobar an Domhnaigh :
Go mbeannaigh Dia dhuit agus Rí an Domhnaigh naomhtha
Go mbeannaigh Muire dhuit agus beannaím féin duit
Is chughat thánag-sa dom gearán féineach
Ag iarradh cabhair in onóir ort.
Paidir Beag
Flaitheas Dé go bhfeicimíd
Glór na naomh go gcloisimíd
A Thiarna go dtugaidh tú na grásta dúinn
Agus grásta na foighne agus na h-aithrighe
Agus go gcoinnidh tú ar stáid na grásta sinn. Amen.
Paidir le rá ag dul isteach i dteampall :
Beannaím duit a theampall naomhtha
Beannaím duit a chrois, a chrainn, an duilleabhair glas, an crann ar crusadh tú. Cuirim mo chás deas fúm ar úrlár do tigh féin. Go dtugaidh tú maitheamhnachas dom i bpeacaí mo shaol.
Paidir le rá ar éirí ar maidin :
Éirím ar maidin in ainm an aon-mhic
In ainm an té a cheannaigh go daor sinn
Cuirim coimirce m'anama fá bhrátha do sgéithe
Mo choinnsíos do ghlanadh ón uile smúit pheaca
Agus do bheith síochánach carthanach i measc na gcomharsan.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 17:31
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An comhartha-sin dár naomhughadh.
3. Do phléasc na carrigeacha
Do dhuibh an ghrian
Do chruith an domhan go h-euchtach
Nuair d'árduigheadh suas ár Slánaithóir
Ar dhruim na Croise naomhtha.
4. Fairíor dá bhrí sin an té
Ná bheadh a chroí ag a raobadh
Agus na deora áirithe
Ag sileadh uaidh go flúirseach
Os choinne na Croise naomhtha.

Paidir le rá ar coigilt tine :- Coigilim mo tine mar choigleas Críost. Muire ina dhá cheann agus Bríd ina lár. An dá aspal déag agus Athair na Grásta coiméad an tigh seo agus ár ndaoine go bráth.
Paidir le rá ar fáfhbháil an teampaill -
Guidhim chughat a Thiarna agus screadaim ort a Íosa
Agus cuirim comaraithe m'anama ort
Go gcasaidh mé arís chughat.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 17:30
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Clenor
Crann na h-Ola (Crann na hulla)
The Crann na h-Ola Stands on the back of a fence on the roadside in the townland of Annakissa (Áth na Cise) about 2 miles south-East of Doneraile. It is a rather stunted ash, and is in a bleak situation.
The 'legend regarding the tree is as follows:-
In early Christian times a holy family lived in Clenor. One of them in particular Craibhnat (Cranat) {pronounced "Crawnat" by the old people} was singularly beautiful and although she sought retirement her beauty was spoken of far and near. At last it reached the ears of the young Prince of Munster, and he in order to satisfy himself as to the truth of the rumours, having disguised himself came and watched the maiden, as she went to pray in the neighbouring church at Clenor. He then felt that her beauty exceeded all the description he had heard of it.
He suddenly felt he was her slave, and wished above all things to gain her love. He approached her, but she avoided him. He sent her presents, but they were returned. He tried diplomacy but it failed. He then tried threatening
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 17:22
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Abairimís. Paidir agus Abhe Maria in onóir do Dhia agus don Mhaighdin Muire; an onóir Naomh Iosaph agus Naomh Peadair agus Póil, Naomh Pádraig agus Naomh Máirtín, Naomh Mícheul agus Eoin, an dá aspal déag agus an Tiarna tróchairigh chun maitheamachas do thabhairt dúinn i bpeacaí ár saol. Iarraimíd ar Dhia agus ar an Maighdin Muire gan bás do thabhairt dúinn ach bás naomhtha i staid na ngrás, le h-ola agus le h-aithrighe, lenár gciall agus lenár gcuimhnaimh, sa chaoi go bhfágaimís glaodhadh ar an Maighdin Muire. Amen.
Fíor na Croise.
1. O namhaid mo-chriedimh
O namhaid mo thíre
O namhaid mo chloinne agus mo chéile
A Thiarna déan mo choimiriche
Le Fíor do Chroise naomhtha.
2. Le Fíor na Croise cheannaigh tú
Sliocht mí-fhortúnach Éabha
O shoin anuas is beannaithe
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 17:21
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"Matches" generally confined to farming class. Rich usually get married in city. Rice thrown after married couple, often an old shoe.
"Hauling home" altogether abolished
Bride does not visit ancestral home for a month.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 17:19
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Corpse untouched for at least a quarter of an hour. Then washed and habited. Candles lighted. Water used in Washing Corpse kept under the bed till after the funeral. Then thrown out. Prayers by visitors. Pipes and tobacco rarely given out now. Snuff is still. Rosary at Midnight. 2nd night (if any.) Corpse in Church. Funeral - Clergy. Blessed before leaving church.
Further ceremonies at grave side.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 17:12
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No. 54.
Lios na nGearóid - 13 Fitzgeralds buried there
Cairn - Joyce - Robber buried there. Every passer-by used to place a stone on it.
No 56
Marriage. No Marriage on Monday, Wednesday or Friday, or in May or Harvest.
A bit of old, and a bit of new.
Death - No Grave opened on Monday. Three funerals to follow.
May Eve. Crosses made with cow-dung on [?].
Holy water sprinkled on Cattle.
Hallow Eve. Snap apple. Burning nuts
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:54
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and if they had no money to pay him, he would throw the house to the ground and put them out in the road.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:53
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a pound of meal in the day. They would make the _"stirabout"_ in the night how it would be set in the morning. Then, when the people would get up they used to milk the cow, and every one would get a saucepan of milk and -"stirabout"-. When it would be time for the dinner they would only get half as much.
If the landlord came
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:51
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In the year 1847 the potato-crop failed on the people. They were only as big as marbles. The people had no food because it was the potatoes they had for their breakfast dinner and supper. They were dying of hunger on the road-side.
Then they began to get relief which was
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:26
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Long ago the houses were made from clay and stones. They were thatched. Always the windows were protected by iron bars because beggars would break them in if there was nothing to keep them out. The houses were built down in boreens. The floor was made from clay and there was a fire on the hearth in them. There was also a half-door in them to keep out the hens. Locks were not in use at that time but at night-time the door was fastened up inside by a bolt. Rush candles were used by all the people and they had no matches so they used flint and steel and touch.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:21
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There were three shops in this district long ago. There was one in Lisnakil, another in Mount Congreve and another at the Headoff. They bought their goods in town and carried them on their backs. The money was not very plentiful and people exchanged a day's work for goods. People never bought or sold goods on Sunday. Friday was supposed to be the luckiest day of the week to change from house to house. An old woman used sell sugar sticks outside the church gate on Sunday. Pedlars went around from house to house gathering rags and bottles. They gave pins and needles and thread in exchange. Leather money was made in Portlaw. It was of no value anyplace only in Waterford, Portlaw and Carrick-on-Suir.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:14
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Long ago the people ate oaten-meal bread made out of barley. The old people used send the oats and barley to Paul's Mills to be ground. Some of the farmers kept a bró for grinding the meal. They baked the bread on a griddle and they had a fire of wheaten straw. When they were baking the cake they put the griddle on a brand. When they were putting down the cake they put a cross on it and then it was made into four quarters. Then when they were turning it they turned it in quarters.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:10
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To cure stomach trouble and hurts inside:- boil wild sage and drink the juice
To cure pains, sprains and stiff joints:- rub goose - grease to them
To cure rheumatism: - boil bisom and drink the juice
To cure warts: - rub with dissolved bluestone, rub them with water found in a rock or stone. Put an ivy leaf under manure and when the leaf will have decayed the warts will have gone. When potatoes are boiling froth comes on the water, rub this froth to the warts and they will gradually disappear. Count the number of warts and for each put a stone into a paper bag, put the bag on the road, the person who will take the bag will take the warts. Rub the water of a holy well to them.
To cure children troubled with worms: - boil tansy and give them the juice to drink. Wet a lump of lime and give them the water to drink.
To cure chilblains: - wash in cold pickle, rub with the juice of a raw potatoe, rub goose - grease to them, . rub a roasted onion
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 16:01
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When the Holy Family were flying into Egypt they came to a place where men were sowing corn, from whom they got food. The corn grew and ripened in a day. On the following day King Herod and his soldiers came in search of the Holy Family. They asked the men had they seen anyone passing by that day or the day before. They said they saw them the day the corn was set. Herod thought that was a long time ago, when it was only one day. Herod was about to turn around to go home when a dearg-a-daol put up his head and said "Yesterday, yesterday". Herod heard him and he went in search of the Holy Family. From that day to this the dearg-a-daol is disliked.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:52
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There is only one smith in this parish. His name is Ned Kenny. His forge is situated on the side of the road in Lisnakill. It is slated. He had an anvil to hammer the iron on, a sledge to hammer it, and nails. The smith shoes horses, ponies, donkeys and jinnets. The bellows is made of wood and leather. First he puts a bar of iron into the fire and blows it until it is hot enough. Then he takes it out with a tongs and lays it in a basin of water to cool. Then he hammers it to whatever shape he wants it. The water out of which he takes the iron is good for chilblains. The smith mends all the broken farm implements.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:43
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now. Wooden clogs were made in the Ballinamona Woods.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:42
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Blessed Eucharist.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:41
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On St. Stephen's Day, or the day following Christmas day, boys go around to all the houses dressed in rags and paper frocks. Those are called Wren Boys. They carry a stick of holly or ivy in their hands. When they go to the houses they sing and dance. The night before St. Brigid's Day we hang out ribbons as St. Brigid goes around to bless them so that they could cure a headache. On St. Patrick's Day we wear the shamrock in honour of St. Patrick explaining the True Faith in Ireland with a shamrock. On Holy Thursday we celebrate the Feast Of the Blessed Eucharist. In all the churches we have exposition in honour or Our Lord. Corpus Christi is also a feast of the
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:34
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Lisnakill churches and Oldcourt in Mount Congreve. The land is very fertile and has very good production. Most of people went to America during the Bad Times but now they go to England.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:31
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The name of my parish is Butlerstown. It is situated in the Barony of Middlethird. There are about two hundred houses in this district. Long ago there were more houses in it. They were all made of bricks and mortar and white-washed every Spring. Most of the houses are slated but long ago they were thatched.
Butlerstown was once called Kilburn. When the Butlers came to Ireland they built a castle in Kilburn and ever since it is called Butlerstown. There is a part of the parish near Kilbride still called Kilburn. Big Ned, Daddy Jim, Mr. and Mrs. Carey Holycross, Anne Dolan, Kate Finnucane and Mrs. Walshe, The Avenue are over seventy. Some of them are over eighty. Daddy Jim is an Irish speaker. There are some old ruins around - Butlerstown Castle, Knockeen and
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:22
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The fox does the most harm. He takes away chickens, hens and turkeys. He also bore holes into the crops. The pole-cat kills dogs, rats and hares.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:20
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The wild animals are very rare around this parish, such as the fox. hare, ferrets, pole-cat, lizards and the badger. Foxes, hares and rabbits are found in Carraig Eotal. There are pole-cats in Mount Congreve. The foxes, hares and rabbits are found in furze bushes. The badgers and ferrets live in the ditches. If you licked a lizard under that would be a cure for a burn. Another old cure was for the whooping cough to give an ass a piece of bread and boil the crumbs he dropped on the new milk and give it to the sick person. The old people had great cures for every sickness. They never sent for a doctor or nurse.
There is a cure for the kidneys in a flower called gill-cock. All these animals are very wild. They live on clover, grass, turnips and mangolds. Some of them do a great deal of damage on the farmers.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 15:01
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Many ships were wrecked around Dunworley and Travarra each about five miles from Timoleague.
In 1924 an English ship the "Cardiff Hall" was wrecked at Travarra. She was bringing a cargo of maize, she struck the rocks and all the crew were lost. It was a dark November night and the crew could not be saved. The captain's body was washed into the land and it was buried in Lislee. Wreaths were thrown into the water by the Captain's wife who came over from England a few days after the wreck.
The people came from all the parish of Barryroe to gather the maize washed in by the tide. The keel of the ship was embedded in the rocks and it is still to be seen.
In sunshine or storm it will ever be
A place with a spirit of destiny
For there, flung high where the sea mews call
Lies the twisted keep of the "Cardiff Hall."
A ship the "Norwegian" was wrecked at Red Strand near Muckross; it had a general cargo; some of the stuffs were taken to a
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 14:52
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Another man of Fame in the athletic world was WILLIAM O'CONNOR died about yrs ago. He was an "all Ireland" man on "the track" or "on his feet". Wm O'Connor lived and died at Tinnaberna Kilmuckridge, but he died at an early age.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 14:50
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Dempsey was - he was known and is still remembered by "Paddy Big John" or Big Paddy. His feats and experiences alone would easily fill this Book but more of him anon.
From right here in the spot went forth one "Michel" Donohoe to fight in the Battle of Arklow. He was most severely wounded in the leg by a bullet wound.
He was brought home to Killencooley (about a mile from here) and nursed in a cabin in a field that then as now was known as Biddy Wall's field.
He was afterwards attended by a Dr Greene of Ballinclash Blackwater. The Dr. used to keep his wound clean by running a clean silk cloth through the wound.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 14:43
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The Ford be it known is another and the now common name for our village of Kilmuckridge here. There IS a stream which is rather wide and swollen in wet and wintry weather, and which had to be "Forded" before the construction of the bridge at Mr W Boggan's (Dorans') establishment.
The Ford can boast of its Feats and Heroes; it had its share of great men, memories of whom still live on quite fresh in the minds of those who still are with us.
On other pages I have written of the great John Mangan and of his two giant brothers, all three, names to conjure with in the world of sport and athletics.
I have also written of Paddy
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 14:42
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Scéal ar na Slúagh Sidhe. Bhí feirmeóir na cómhnuidhe in Oileán Curraighe. Bhí fear oibre aige. Do bhí sé ag dul go portach maidin amháin in éineacht le daoine eile. Chuaidh sé óna thig féin díreach go dtí an portach. Do chonnaich sé chailín i dtig beag a bhí i naice an bhóthair. D'fiafruig an fear de'n cailaín an raibh a bhricfeast ullamh "Níl sé ullamh fós" a dúbhairt sí, "glaodhfaidh mé ort nuair a bheidh sé ullamh" "Tá go maith" arsan fear do chuaidh sé go dtí an portach in éineacht le na daoine eile. Tar éis tamaill do chualaidh na daoine an glór a rádh
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 14:26
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St Sornian's Well is situated in the townland of Ballynacloghy about three miles from the village of Clarinbridge.
This well has virtue on Friday but the old people say that the principal day is Garlic Sunday.
Devotees pass from the well to St Sornian's Cell. There are small cairns which must have been stations in the pilgrimage which ends at Skincholla a mound near the shore.
It is said that people who were subject to bad sight, headaches or such like used go there to be cured and some of them used to be cured.

Obtained from John Lynskey Ballinamana aged 65 years
Mícheál O Fiaich
Clarinbridge
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 14:22
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piseóga. He's full of piseógs pisreógs.
cuirliúin The cuirliúins are crying for rain.
pincín He got pinkeens in the stream.
bodach
stroail He got a straoil of a wife
praisech The corn is full of praiseach
cóta mór Put the cóta mór on you
giob geab childish talk
liomsa leat staying a while at home and then a while with an aunt then home again VC
tré na chéile The kitchen was tre na chéile
laghar 'The laghar' is a place name
raiméis Stop talking raméis.
smut. I got a smut in my eye.
Faill. Name of a field next Loftus's River
scoth. He's a great scoth in his new suit.
duidín Give me the duidín till I have a smoke.
bean an tíghe. Is the vanithee inside?
seachrán He is always on the seachrán
'crabbet' old or old-fashioned for his or her age. She's purty crabbit now.
biadh, biadh biadh (Calling turkeys)
ria rá There was ria rá at the dance.
buisín (a part of the flail)
fraochán berries that grow on a mountain plant
spailpín a labouring man on a farm
fuarán name of river.
seoinín The mean little seoinín !
bostún. A tactless man. "The big bosthoon !" when he bungles something.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 14:01
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the child with them. This pious child had now nothing and she was turning to go into the wood and cover herself with leaves. At first she thought that the stars which look like golden money in the heavens were falling, but when the drops reached the ground the were real golden dollars. As she stood still under the golden shower she found herself covered from head to foot
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 13:59
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with clothes. She gathered the golden dollars carried them away and was rich all her life.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 13:58
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The letter M.
Why is cabbage generous.?
Because it had a big heart.
How is a sailor like a blindman.?
One cannot see to go, and the other has to go to sea.
Why does a chicken cross the road.?
Because its a fowl proceeding.
Why does a cow look over the ditch.?
Because she cannot
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 13:56
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look over it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 13:55
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Old Mrs Simson had but one eye, and a long tail that she let fly, and every time she went over the gap she left a piece of her tail in the trap?
A needle and thread.
What is that, that occurs once in every minute, twice in every moment, but never once in a year.?
senior member (history)
2019-10-11 13:55
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they may have to put the churn beside the fire before they churn the milk.
If a man comes into the house when the people are churning and goes out again without churning they say he will have the butter with him. If a coal is put under the churn before the people start churning anybody cannot bring the butter.
If a person let a piece of butter fall
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