Number of records in editorial history: 2871 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2022-04-04 16:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pains or Rheumatism
1 Put frog spawn in a jam jar or similar pot. Bury this in clay for nine days; it will turn into "oil". Rub the affected part with this "oil".
2 Beat the affected part with nettles until you raise blisters.
3 Get stung by bees.
Sprain 1 Beat a sprain with nettle for cure.
2 Apply cow - dung to the affected part
3 Get "straining threads" from certain
person
Warts
1. Bud of elder-bush - rub on warts once every morning 9 days or 3 times for 3 mornings
In the name + F - S -HG.
Warts
- 2 Rub with elder leaves, bury leaves and wart will decay.
3 Rub with "black snail" & put on thorn.
When snail dies wart dies.
Warts
4 Put juice from flower - stalk of dandelion on wart.
5 Put juice from spurge on wart.
6 Cross corn-stalks bearing nodes over wart saying "In the name of the Father etc."
7 Rub a snail (the exposed part of snail's body) on the wart. Stick snail & shell on a thorn and as snail dies the work dies.
8. Pick small pebbles one for each wart, rub on put in a little bag, tie up and cast on the road unknown to anyone. Whoever picks up the bag gets the warts.
9 Rub on common washing soda
10 Scoop Aberdeen? turnip, fill with salt, replace top, leave overnight, apply juice 9 mornings
senior member (history)
2022-03-12 17:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Furniture -
1.
A great big table, scoured regularly and kept shining, under the window at front wall.
2. Settle - bed at back wall near the fire
3. Bin (for holding flour & meal with shelf for smaller things) near back-door at end of settle-bed / Dresser stood at cross wall opp. fireplace.
4. Dresser with four open shelves on top.
Filled with pewter plates & noggins.
Delph plates - a dozen or so - laid at end.
A couple of delph dishes were left at side of bin or maybe inside it.
Four brass candlesticks stood on board over fireplace.
Delph cups, saucers, mugs & jugs kept on bed of dresser.
Bottom of dresser was open at both sides and you could put in a pot or things like that.
Long ago the geese or hens used to be put hatching in this part of the dresser, and was done at this time - 50 years ago.
No drawers in dresser only mock - drawers.
A little board stretched down the centre of this bottom part of dresser but there was no press or shelf behind it - it was quite open.
Knives & forks were kept in a knife - box on top of bin. Spoons were slipped into a special groove made by nailing a band of leather to shelf of dresser.
senior member (history)
2022-03-10 17:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Parlour - Walls papered.
In the parlour a table stood in middle of the floor, a plain little sideboard at one side, the press-bed and good chairs, black-horse-hair seats (six) usually covered with white lawn edged with red tape. In one corner was a little three-cornered press with glass shutters on top half - this was for china & glass. There was a nice fireplace with mantel-piece over it and a small mirror over that. The floor was cement.
A couple of pots with geraniums stood in window.
Kitchen
Earthen floor with a big stone flag in the middle for the churn.
Fireplace a big wide grate with a large hob each side used as seat. In wall between kitchen & parlour.
See diagram
Front door near wall separating bed-room & kitchen
Back door from kitchen open ?? parlour & kitchen wall but not quite at wall, it was near centre of back wall.
Chimney sloping up with hurdle on farther side. Side nearest parlour door was boarded up.
Rafters plainly visible and the scraws under thatch.
All sorts of old rubbish was stored on the hurdle.
senior member (history)
2022-03-06 14:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The breakfast would be at 7 not later
Dinner 12 noon
Boiled potatoes, American bacon boiled and cabbage with a drink of water or buttermilk.
Tea 5 p. m. sometimes taken out to the field, sometimes taken in the house.
Supper - Potatoes, salt & skim milk, as for breakfast.
This was the last meal for the men 6 p.m.
After the Rosary about 9 or 10 p.m. a saucepan of new milk was put down and the master or mistress and myself got a sup.
Johnny Lalor this farmer, farmed 20 Irish acres occupied long thatched house - parlour, bed-room and kitchen. Man & wife occupied the bedroom, "the girl" slept in a press - bed in the parlour. The workman slept in the settle bed on a straw - bed Straw put in a canvas cover with bits of poor blankets and a couple of old coats thrown over him. I had a nice little feather bed and fairly good shelter. I had two sheets, a blanket and a druggel? quilt.
The man & wife had a good wooden four-poster bed with sheets, blankets & druggel quilts. There was a plain table, a looking - glass and towel - no jug or basin though, you'd take in your tin basin and water to wash.
Then there was a big press for clothes. No fireplace.
senior member (history)
2022-03-06 14:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The breakfast would be at 7 not later
Dinner 12 noon
Boiled potatoes, American bacon boiled and cabbage with a drink of water or buttermilk.
Tea 5 p. m. sometimes taken out to the field, sometimes taken in the house.
Supper - Potatoes, salt & skim milk, as for breakfast.
This was the last meal for the men 6 p.m.
After the Rosary about 9 or 10 p.m. a saucepan of new milk was put down and the master or mistress and myself got a sup.
Johnny Lalor this farmer, farmed 20 Irish acres occupied long thatched house - parlour, bed-room and kitchen. Man & wife occupied the bedroom, "the girl" slept in a press - bed in the parlour. The workman slept in the settle bed on a straw - bed Straw put in a canvas cover with bits of poor blankets and a couple of old coats thrown over him. I had a nice little feather bed and fairly good shelter. I had two sheets, a blanket and a druggel? quilt.
The man & wife had a good wooden four-poster bed with sheets, blankets & druggel quilts. There was a plain table, a looking - glass and towel - no jug or basin though, you'd take in your tin basin and water to wash.
Then there was a big press for clothes. No fireplace.
senior member (history)
2022-03-06 14:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fifty years ago or so in say 1887 - 1885 I was at Lalor's of Ballymacken for 9 hard months.
I got up at 5am never later than 6am lighted hard coal fire (anthracite or Kilkenny coal) put down a big pot of potatoes (about a stone) come on then and put a piece of canvas that came round a tea chest, she used to have that washed clean, and put it on the table then I put a salt cellar of salt and a big mug of last night's milk (skimmed of course) then a knife was handed heel out the potatoes when boiled and teemed, right out on the table, no dish or skib or vessel of any kind used to hold then. Everyone sat down. Farmer, wife, and workman and myself (the "girl" - I was then between 11 or 12 years) and we ate our fill. No butter - no plates. After this "Herself" and "Himself" stood up and went into the so-called parlour and sat down to their tay and bread and butter. The workman and myself got a sup when they had done, often last night's tay would be put down in a saucepan and left sitting beside the fire and then handed to the workman when he had taken his potatoes and salt and skim-milk.
The meal was scarce at that time of the year and the potatoes were more plentiful and handiest.
senior member (history)
2022-03-03 15:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pains or Rheumatism
1 Put frog spawn in a jam jar or similar pot. Bury this in clay for nine days; it will turn into "oil". Rub the affected part with this "oil".
2 Beat the affected part with nettles until you raise blisters.
3 Get stung by bees.
Sprain 1 Beat a sprain with nettle for cure.
2 Apply cow - dung to the affected part
3 Get "straining threads" from certain
person
senior member (history)
2022-02-28 16:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Back - Haggard
House
Gravelled Yard
Barn and Stables
Haggard

Entrance door in centre of house.
Boarded partition between that & fire - place.
Entrance to kitchen on left then open, now closed by door to form wee hall.
Fireplace in centre of house.
Grate for Kilkenny coal.
Large hob on each side. Crane overhead. Some pots left on hob. Alcove on far side of fire - place for sticks rodds. Now curtained off. Dresser at cross wall opp. fire.
Settle - bed 3 at back wall of k.
Flour & meal bags are kept on a bench at far side of fire - place in the above.
senior member (history)
2022-02-27 17:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Put salt in baby's sleeve to save it from harm if you are taking it out. I always did it. Put in the salt when the baby is going to be baptised and same if you are bringing away from the house.
senior member (history)
2022-02-27 17:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
OGHAM STONE
It is said that there is an Ogham Stone resting on the bed of the "Closh" on Keegan's land. (eastern slope of Dysart hill)
This closh or pool is oval - shaped about 50'x30' where cattle drink. Some years ago a big sally tree (willow tree) fell right across the pool over the Ogham Stone. From the trunk numerous young shoots sprang up which have developed into trees. At present it would be impossible to reach the stone without removing the growth.
Another informant says the stone is a Dolmen.
STONE COFFIN found nearby by Murt Lalor, grandfather of Miss Keegan present owner of this farm.
Miss Keegan is now over 80 years old (Feb. 1942)
STONE COFFIN was sent to the National Museum, Dublin, which had been ploughed up by Jas. LALOR Aughnahila.
Another stone coffin used as a drinking trough in Stradbally.
A bit of porphyry was dug up by men working near Miss Keegan's house quite recently.
m
Empey's Rath in field of Loughehoe mearing Keegan's land.
Money - Pit - a little corner at roadside on Loughehoe? - Grange boundary.
senior member (history)
2022-02-27 17:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
OGHAM STONE
It is said that there is an Ogham Stone resting on the bed of the "Closh" on Keegan's land. (eastern slope of Dysart hill)
This closh or pool is oval - shaped about 50'x30' where cattle drink. Some years ago a big sally tree (willow tree) fell right across the pool over the Ogham Stone. From the trunk numerous young shoots sprang up which have developed into trees. At present it would be impossible to reach the stone without removing the growth.
Another informant says the stone is a Dolmen.
STONE COFFIN found nearby by Murt Lalor, grandfather of Miss Keegan present owner of this farm.
Miss Keegan is now over 80 years old (Feb. 1942)
STONE COFFIN was sent to the National Museum, Dublin, which had been ploughed up by Jas. LALOR Aughnahila.
Another stone coffin used as a drinking trough in Stradbally.
senior member (history)
2022-02-27 17:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
See table .
First two columns are for Laoighis.
Last ,, ,, ,, ,, Offaly.
senior member (history)
2022-02-27 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs. Dunne gave many instances of one of the children dying if a sponsor had already stood for another.
Dan Brennan of Grange {still alive, about 60 yrs of age) stood first for Alice Kennedy who died young and later in same year for Maggie Dunne {dau of this Mrs Foreman? Dunne)
Maggie died aged about 35 or so.

0
senior member (history)
2022-02-27 16:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Immemorial custom to call the first child after the Father's Father or Mother and the second after the Mother's Father or Mother . After that there is no rule.
Call a child after a child who has died if you have a fancy for it. [Mrs Dunne]
Don't ever call a child after a child who dies young. [Mrs. Henry Drennan - bornin 1863 or so]
This latter lost a little boy 51/2 years old but she would not call any of the four boys subsequently born to her by name of the dead child.
Old Mrs. Dunne's mother said "don't give name of child who died young to another bro. or sister.
senior member (history)
2022-02-27 16:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nurse or anyone at all that knows the catechism can baptise baby in danger.
senior member (history)
2022-02-26 18:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Little garden at back of house enclosed by a clipped hedge with a few wild damsons rising above hedge. This reserved for vegetables, cabbage chiefly , a row of rhubarb and a bed of onions. A few clumps of daffodils flourish at end.
Crops raised - oats, barley, wheat potatoes, turnips, mangolds in proper rotation.
The cow (or cows) was often grazed in Hargrove's pasture for which Con paid in money or kind.
Though this holding seems so small and poor, the McEvoys were always able to make a decent living out of it. Old Davy McEvoy was married in 75 or so. He was a terribly hard working little man. Of his four chn. the eldest girl went to U. S.A. when young. Con remained on the farm with the younger sister, the second boy being apprenticed to a Baker in Maryboro'. Con and his sister worked hard, the sister helping in the fields at all seasons, on the bog rearing turf and drawing it home while she kept a large flock of hens and turkeys and was never without eggs for the weekly market or clutches of chickens for sale all the year round. She fattened 20 - 25 turkeys for Xmas.
They kept two cows, reared two calves which were sold off when weaned but no older cattle. About 30 years ago Con was willed 3 Ir. acres adjoining his own land which increased his farm to 8 acres of arable land. This extra bit had been given as "her part" to a great-aunt of Con's ( a McEvoy girl) on her marriage to a Bergin man.
senior member (history)
2022-02-26 18:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Little garden at back of house enclosed by a clipped hedge with a few wild damsons rising above hedge. This reserved for vegetables, cabbage chiefly , a row of rhubarb and a bed of onions. A few clumps of daffodils flourish at end.
Crops raised - oats, barley, wheat potatoes, turnips, mangolds in proper rotation.
The cow (or cows) was often grazed in Hargrove's pasture for which Con paid in money or kind.
Though this holding seems so small and poor, the McEvoys were always able to make a decent living out of it. Old Davy McEvoy was married in 75 or so. He was a terribly hard working little man. Of his four chn. the eldest girl went to U. S.A. when young. Con remained on the farm with the younger sister, the second boy being apprenticed to a Baker in Maryboro'. Con and his sister worked hard, the sister helping in the fields at all seasons, on the bog rearing turf and drawing it home while she kept a large flock of hens and turkeys and was never without eggs for the weekly market or clutches of chickens for sale all the year round. She fattened 20 - 25 turkeys for Xmas.
senior member (history)
2022-02-26 17:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Little garden at back of house enclosed by a clipped hedge with a few wild damsons rising above hedge. This reserved for vegetables, cabbage chiefly , a row of rhubarb and a bed of onions. A few clumps of daffodils flourish at end.
Crops raised - oats, barley, wheat potatoes, turnips, mangolds in proper rotation.
The cow (or cows) was often grazed in Hargrove's pasture for which Con paid in money or kind.
t
senior member (history)
2022-02-14 18:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fifty years ago or so in say 1887 - 1885 I was at Lalor's of Ballymacken for 9 hard months.
I got up at 5am never later than 6am lighted hard coal fire (anthracite or Kilkenny coal) put down a big pot of potatoes (about a stone) come on then and put a piece of canvas that came round a tea chest, she used to have that washed clean, and put it on the table then I put a salt cellar of salt and a big mug of last night's milk (skimmed of course) then a knife was handed heel out the potatoes when boiled and teemed, right out on the table, no dish or skib or vessel of any kind used to hold then. Everyone sat down. Farmer, wife, and workman and myself (the "girl" - I was then between 11 or 12 years) and we ate our fill. No butter - no plates. After this "Herself" and "Himself" stood up and went into the so-called parlour and sat down to their tay and bread and butter. The workman and myself got a sup when they had done, often last night's tay would be put down in a saucepan and left sitting beside the fire and then handed to the workman when he had taken his potatoes and salt and skim-milk.
The meal was scarce at that time of the year and the potatoes were more plentiful and handiest
senior member (history)
2022-02-14 18:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Cookes were counted as the oldest residents in this locality. They were ranked as "Strong Farmers". and were always very comfortably off until last generation when a long spell of illness & medical expenses weakened them.
Old Edward Cooke, the last male owner of this place, was highly respected by everyone
being "gay" and kind - hearted and upright. He acted as arbitrator for the farmers in all discussions or settlements between landlord & tenants. On his death in 1897 the place passed to his widow who was to provide for his ten surviving children. She sold the farm in Aug 1918 and bought a farm which was less difficult to till.
senior member (history)
2022-02-03 18:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Spy" or "Hide and go Seek": "Tig"; "Frog in the Pen"
"My Lord Luke and my Lord John let everyone pass to the vey last man" (or " Oranges and Lemons")
"heigh - ho Tippety toe" ; "Shake the blankets";
"High - Gates" ; "Pancake stiuck is the Baker";
"Chucky - chucky Four Corners" or "Four - cornered Fool"; Hop - Scotch (introduced from Stradbally 5 or 6 years ago)
"Hold the Button Fast"; Birds Fly;
"Dan, Dan thread the needle: Dan, Dan, sew"
Spinning Tops Leap - Frog.
Marbles. Skipping - for girls only.
senior member (history)
2022-02-01 17:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Threshing machines - steam thresher drawn along the road by horses - was in use here 70 years ago.
Mowing machines in use then.
The "combined" machines i.e. a mowing machine with a reaper attachment in use too.
The Reaper - and - Binder - self-tying - was in 50 or 60 yrs ago but only a few farmers owned a Reaper - & - Binder, the "Combined" being more generally used. After this machine a man went along "sheafing" the corn which was then tied by hand.
A workman named Tindall brought out the first Reaper - and - Binder ever seen in this part of the country. He was taking it to his employer Mr. Tarleton, near Stradbally. When he appeared on the streets he was mobbed and had to get the police to save him. At that time cartloads of harvesters used to come out from the town to help at the corn, getting 3/- per day when an ordinary workman in constant employment only got 10/- a week. Those workers became angry because the new machine was likely to deprive them of work. This happened in Maryboro' between 50 & 60 years ago.
Reaping - hooks have not been in use for corn - reaping for generations though an old one may be got here and there in the parish.
The scythe is only used in opening the field or on small bits of grass.
Poor people in Bauleogue & Big - Bog often yoked cow and horse together for ploughing etc. within living memory.
senior member (history)
2022-01-31 15:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
COOKE'S HOUSE & FARM - BUILDINGS
DYSART (or COOLNACARRICK)
The farm-house is said to be the oldest in the parish being nearly 200 years built and still fairly sound 1942? though unoccupied - except for very brief periods - since around 1918?.
The house is 64ft x 20ft with stone foundation set at earth level with mud walls. It contains four apartments as shown having one window only set in front wall. There is no door or window at back of house. The inner doors all open flat against the front wall so that you can see from end to end of house when they are open. All windows splayed beneath
senior member (history)
2022-01-31 15:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
PLAN OF COOKE'S HOUSE DYSART-ENOS
senior member (history)
2022-01-31 15:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Boils -
1. Leave "sponnc" leaves on bar of grate or hob till they are warm and then apply to the boil. Renew frequently.
2. Boil "Robin - run - the Hedge" (goose - grass or cleavers) in water and drink the water.
3. Apply plaster of soap & sugar.
4. Have a bottle roasting hot put the round bottom of the bottle to the boil.
5. Heat a laurel leaf before fire till it is "roasting hot" rub a little thick cream over it and apply to the boil.
6. Heat plantain leaf and apply in same way.
Lumps in throat -
Rub cabbage leaf with salted & unsalted butter. Heat very thoroughly before fire. Apply. Gives instant relief.
Abscess on Face -
Apply cow - dung to the affected part.

Chilblains : -
1. Dip chilblain forge - water.
2. Rub onion (raw) & fat bacon on chilbain.
3. Rub pariffin.
4. Hot water and salt.
Birth mark -
Rub the mark with the hand of corpse.
senior member (history)
2022-01-30 17:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
room have one window each. The end bedroom has two windows one at the gable and one on the front.
The floor in the kitchen and in the two end bedrooms were earthing/en floors but about seventy years ago my Great Grandfather flagged the kitchen floor and cemented the bedrooms. The parlour and two upper rooms have boarded floors.
The kitchen fire used to be on the hearth as turf was burned in those days. The back of the fire - place is built of bricks; there is a hollow in one of the walls in which are kept irons and soap. My Grandfather put up the grate and he put two hobs each side when coal came iinnto use. There are four bars in the front of the grate and an iron crane over the fire on which are kept the pot hooks, tongs and power.
The chimney breast slopes upward from the chimney and is probably a settled structure, there was a hurdle each side of chimney but as the kitchen is now ceiled over it no longer exists.
senior member (history)
2022-01-30 17:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
room have one window each. The end bedroom has two windows one at the gable and one on the front.
The floor in the kitchen and in the two end bedrooms were earthing/en floors but about seventy years ago my Great Grandfather flagged the kitchen floor and cemented the bedrooms. The parlour and two upper rooms have boarded floors.
The kitchen fire used to be on the hearth as turf was burned in those days. The back of the fire - place is built of bricks; there is a hollow in one of the walls in which are kept irons and soap. My Grandfather put up the grate and he put two hobs each side when coal came iinnto use.There are four bars in the front of the grate and an iron crane over the fire on which are kept the pot hooks, tongs and power.
senior member (history)
2022-01-26 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner - John Drennan
Family - Mrs. Drennan (his wife) and six children
Miss Conran aunt to Mr. James
Drennan
Townland - Cartnacarrick, Stradbally, Leix near
Ratheniska chapel
until recently this place was called Dysart.
Our House: By Maureen Drennan
Our house was built by Great - Great - Grandfather's uncle, John Cooke. It is an old fashioned thatched house. When it was thatched first it was thatched with rushes and was made of mud walls. At that time it contained four rooms - sitting room, two bed rooms and kitchen, but later when my Great - Grandfather, James Conran succeeded him he added two more rooms. Those are built of stone and have one window each. The window of the back room has four panes of glass in it and the front window has twelve panes. The parlour had only one window on the front but my Grandfather put one on the back.
The kitchen and the small back
senior member (history)
2022-01-26 17:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A short time after this accident to Mrs. Weldon another accident occurred in the same place on the Rock - hill and it might have turned out just as bad only for the courage of a poor working man.
Two Miss Tarletons (cousins of Empeys of Loughehoe? were driving in a phaeton along the same route to Maryboro and at the very same spot on the Rock hill the horse bolted. The man who sat behind at once jumped to his feet put his arms round the two ladies and grabbed the reins.
He held the reins with all his strength while the horse tore along like mad and the man managed to save the ladies himself and the horse & phaeton.
He told afterwards that never in his life had he prayed so fervently that he might meet nothing on the road.
senior member (history)
2022-01-26 17:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I was coming along that same piece of road in the broad day - light when suddenly the front wheel of the bike stood right up in the air and I slid off the saddle onto the road. I looked all around for trace of stick or stone which might have lifted the bicycle but there was no sign of anything to interfere with it, yet it had risen suddenly right up in the air as if lifted by invisible hands.
This happened near "Burtons' old house" (now in ruins)
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 18:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner - John Drennan
Family - Mrs. Drennan (his wife) and six children
Miss Conran aunt to Mr. James
Drennan
Townland - Cartnacarrick, Stradbally, Leix near
Ratheniska chapel
until recently this place was called Dysart.
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 18:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I was coming along that same piece of road in the broad day-light cycling when suddenly the front wheel of the bike stood right up in the air and I slid off the saddle onto the ground. I looked all around for trace of dirt or stone which might have lifted the bicycle but there was no sign of anything to interfere with it, yet it had risen suddenly right up in the air as if lifted by invisible hands.
This happened near "Burton's old house. (now in ruins)
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 18:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Near Knocknambrather outside Stradbally there is a haunted house on the side of the road.
The people of the house were getting a lot of trouble from noises at night. The furniture of the room used to be thrown around and even broken. Then they took out anything that was useful and threw in harness and the like but that was thrown out of the room too.
At last the people were so annoyed they asked the Stradbally priest to settle the ghost. He did so but only for fifty years. The ghost was settled under a little bridge quite near. After that the people were not disturbed.
Six or seven years ago the noises commenced again and the dwellers were tormented out of their lives as they could get no peace at night. They went to Fr. L. O@Neiill then C.C. in Stradbally and asked him to put an end to the annoyance as they could not live in the house. He told them if they couldn't they had better leave it - he refused to have anything to do wit it.
The people left and the house stood empty.
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 17:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Near Knocknambrather outside Stradbally theere is a haunted house on the side of the road.
The people of the house were getting a lot of trouble from noises at night. The furniture of the
senior member (history)
2022-01-21 17:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The road between Maryboro & Stradbally was always unlucky until Fr. Callagan of Stradbally settled it. "Something" used to trouble that road. Accidents fatal or nearly fatal, run-a -ways and the like were of constant occurrence. Not a week passed without some ugly accident happening.
In the year 1867 or 68 a fever broke out in Athy. Until then the mails had been taken from Stradbally to Athy. Then the route was changed to Maryboro. Fr. Callagan gave the money to a man named Flanagan to purchase a pony and cart to carry the mails. Flanagan hadn't been three weeks on the road when the pony, xar and himself were pitched headlong in the ditch at Bloomfield. After that Fr. Callagan walked the road from Strad. to Maaryboro wearing his stole and reading prayers every inch of the way. From that day to this no fatal accidents have happened.
senior member (history)
2022-01-19 16:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
You should always leave the fireplace tidy before going to bed or you'll vex the fairies.
You should always have fresh water laid in before retiring for the night - same reason.
People who shave or cut hair on Sunday will suffer from toothache.
Don't carry any kind of stick or wood on your shoulder when entering or leaving a house. Same applies to any implement with a wooden handle e. g. spade, sprong etc. Very unlucky.
Always say "God bless it" when you see a baby for the first time : say the same to a new born animal or an animal brought home from fair - otherwise the baby or animal might be "overlooked" and it would not thrive.
Some people have "the evil eye" and never say "God bless it".
The good people will gain power if you don't say this.
If a hare sucks your cow the cow will milk blood.
A goat? born on Whit Sunday or Whit Monday will be wicked. A child born on Whit will grow up wild or be difficult to manage.
If you handle frog - spawn you will get warts on your hands.
Some old -a fashioned women put a rod of mountain - ash or rowan - tree around the churn - dash when churning so that their butter may not be taken. They twist a slender rod round in a circle and just drop it over.
Always throw an old boot after a boy or girl going off to be married or going to their own home after the marriage. Some tie an old boot to the car conveying the bridal pair.
senior member (history)
2022-01-19 16:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some old people wouldn't allow a man to redden his pipe with a live coal on May - Day or allow anyone to remove a red coal from the house.
If you had left your house on some business you shouldn't turn back even if you forget something you wanted badly. You should sit down before returning or you will meet trouble? or ill - luck.
Some people would turn back on the road if they met a red - haired woman the first thing after setting out.
If you happen to put on a garment "inside - out" you should leave it so saying "It's all for luck".
Some say you should always leave a house by the door you entered or you'll take the luck with you.
It is lucky to meet a white horse or a grey horse the first thing when you are setting out on a journey. It is lucky to meet sheep first: pigs are unlucky.
Some women put on a man's hat when they are setting eggs so that they may have male birds on clutch.
Some say it is not right to throw out ashes on Monday.
Always give a hand at churning if you enter a house when the churning is going on: otherwise there will be no butter.
If a spider goes over your clothes it means you are going to have a new garment of that kind soon.
It is unlucky to put new boots on a table.
When a child loses a tooth he should throw it over his left shoulder and not look after it.
senior member (history)
2022-01-09 16:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The site was at the foot of the Rock a bit higher up than the present school. The men dug out a large cavity, levelled it and built up a mud structure. The back wall was the solid earth and rock to a height of 4 or 41/2 feet. It was up a week and the Catholics got the grant but the building was always dark and damp.
The stone building starte still standsd by the Protestants was finished and made into the sexton's house when the new Protestant church was built at Dunamaise after 1839.
In 1839 the Protestant church of Dysart - Enos? (erected 1782) was unroofed by the "Big Wind". The shell of the church still stands on west slope of Dysart hills. The slates of this building were used on new church.
The graveyard surrounding the ruins of old church is still in use. Protestants and Catholics are buried there. Vaults belonging to Budds and Baldwins lie beneath.
Inscriptions on tombstones are generally in English, a few are in Latin but there is no Irish inscriptions.
The "Teacher's Residence" adjoining Loughteague N.S. is 21' by 13' outside 6' to eave, slated, ceiled ? up 4 "slates". Walls 18', Windows one 18'' x 18''; one 24'' x 18''.
Lach-r? partition inside cutting off room 11' x 7'. This was occupied by teacher and his family up to 1889.
The walls are of stone bound with mortir of ?? sand in lower part of walls and round door and windows but filled up with yellow clay at upper part.
senior member (history)
2022-01-09 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The site was at the foot of the Rock a bit higher up than the present school. The men dug out a large cavity, levelled it and built up a mud structure. The back wall was the solid earth and rock to a height of 4 or 41/2 feet. It was up a week and the Catholics got the grant but the building was always dark and damp.
The stone building starte still standsd by the Protestants was finished and made into the sexton's house when the new Protestant church was built at Dunamaise after 1839.
In 1839 the Protestant church of Dysart - Enos? (erected 1782) was unroofed by the "Big Wind". The shell of the church still stands on west slope of Dysart hills. The slates of this building were used on new church.
The graveyard surrounding the ruins of old church is still in use. Protestants and Catholics are buried there. Vaults belonging to Budds and Baldwins lie beneath.
Inscriptions on tombstones are generally in English, a few are in Latin but there is no Irish inscriptions.
The "Teacher's Residence" adjoining Loughteague N.S. is 21' by 13' outside 6' to eave, slated
senior member (history)
2022-01-08 16:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The site was at the foot of the Rock a bit higher up than the present school. The men dug out a large cavity, levelled it and built up a mud structure. The back wall was the solid earth and rock to a height of 4 or 41/2 feet. It was up a week and the Catholics got the grant but the building was always dark and damp.
senior member (history)
2022-01-08 16:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Situated in Ratheniska townland, Bar. Stradbally
The building was erected by the parishioners and is built of stone mortar. Walls are two feet thick, built from ground level with no sand foundation. It is a simple brick-shaped apartment standing on right side of the road. It is 321/2 ft. long 16 ft. wide and 8 ft. high to eaves. Roof slated originally had clay floor and one door. Floor is now boarded and a small passage between graveyard and school has been roofed over to form a porch & cloak-room. The sanitary arrangements until about 40 years ago when late Mons Murphy had out - offices made.
An old school is said to have been in Loughteague before this present structure was built, hence name.
Aughnahile old N.S at foot of Dunamaise Rock was built about the same time - 1832 - 1833.
At the time there was a large Protestant population around the Rock and there were all better off than the Catholics. The Protestant applied to the Board of Education for a grant and the Catholics did the same, and word came back that whichever school was put up first would get paid. The Protestants began to draw stones and set to up the building.
The Catholics gathered together and Fr. O'Connor P.P. of Maryboro got a site from his nephew Nicholas Lalor.
senior member (history)
2022-01-07 16:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Situated in Ratheniska townland, Bar. Stradbally
The building was erected by the parishioners and is built of stone mortar. Walls are two feet thick, built from ground level with no sand foundation. It is a simple brick-shaped apartment standing on right side of the road. It is 321/2 ft. long 16 ft. wide and 8 ft. high to eaves. Roof slated originally had clay floor and one door. Floor is now boarded and a small passage between graveyard and school has been roofed over to form a porch & cloak-room. The sanitary arrangements until about 40 years ago when late Mons Murphy had out - offices made.
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
153.
Where there's a will there's a way.
154.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
155.
When you play take care that your play hurts no one.
156.
If the hat doesn't fit don't wear it.
157.
Nothing bad but could be worse.
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
132.
No morning sun lasts a whole day.
133.
Strike the iron while it is hot.
134.
He who slings mud is losing ground.
135.
The longest way round is the longest way home.
136.
There are none so wild as those who will not see.
137.
Lions ought to have good memories.
138.
She watches him as a cat would watch a mouse.
139.
What is worth doing at all is worth doing well.
140.
To err is human, to forgive divine.
141.
After a storm there comes a calm.
142.
Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast.
143.
Set a beggar on horseback and he'll ride to the devil.
144.
Saying and doing are two different things.
145.
On their merits modest men are dumb.
146.
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
147.
Well begun is half done.
148.
Soft April showers bring forth May flowers.
149.
Time enough means little enough.
150.
Pride will have to fall.
151.
Judge nothing by outward show the feather floats the heart lies low.
152.
If the hat fits you wear it.
153.
The early bird catches the early worm.
senior member (history)
2021-12-05 17:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
132.
No morning sun lasts a whole day.
133.
Strike the iron while it is hot.
134.
He who slings mud is losing ground.
135.
The longest way round is the longest way home.
136.
There are none so wild as those who will not see.
137.
Lions ought to have good memories.
138.
She watches him as a cat would watch a mouse.
139.
What is worth doing at all is worth doing well.
140.
To err is human, to forgive divine.
141.
After a storm there comes a calm.
142.
Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast.
143.
Set a beggar on horseback and he'll ride to the devil.
144.
Saying and doing are two different things.
145.
On their merits modest men are dumb.
146.
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
147.
Well begun is half done.
148.
Soft April showers bring forth May flowers.
149.
Time enough means little enough.
150.
Pride will have to fall.
senior member (history)
2021-12-02 16:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
132.
No morning sun lasts a whole day.
133.
Strike the iron while it is hot.
134.
He who slings mud is losing ground.
135.
The longest way round is the longest way home.
136.
There are none so wild as those who will not see.
137.
Lions ought to have good memories.
138.
She watches him as a cat would watch a mouse.
139.
What is worth doing at all is worth doing well.
140.
To err is human, to forgive divine.
senior member (history)
2021-12-02 16:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
112.
The man who drifts with the tide lands on the rocks.
113.
The only way to have a friend is to be one.
114.
A full purse makes a light heart.
115.
Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
116.
Out of sight, out of mind.
117.
Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.
118.
Marry in haste and repent at leisure.
119.
Ill begun is never well done.
120.
A good name is better than riches.
121.
Sorrow seldom comes too late, happiness too swiftly flies.
122.
Charity begins at home.
123.
Time & tide wait for no man.
124.
Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
125.
When wine is in wit is out.
126.
Take care of the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves.
127.
All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
128.
Let very well alone.
129.
A closed mouth catches no flies.
130.
The more hurry the less speed.
131.
Time enough lost the ducks and walking easy found them.
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 17:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As blind as a bat. As deaf as a stone. As stiff as a poker. As grey as a goat. As grey as a badger.
As tall as a steeple. As strong as a bull.
As strong as a horse. As supple as a dog. As fat as a fool. As cute as a fox. As black as soot. As white as snow. As red as blood. As crooked as a ram's horn. As even as a dye?. As good as gold. As wicked as sin. As fine as silk. As black as the hob. As black as the sole of your shoe. As yellow as a duck's foot. As rotten as dirt. As hard as a stone. As hard as the hob of hell. (said about a miser.) As clear as crystal. As thin as a wisp. As soft as putty. As clean as a new pin. As tough as was. As black as jet. As straight as a rush. As straight as a needle. As thick (ignorant) as a double ditch. As bold as brass. As warm as wool. As sweet as honey. As heavy as lead. As light as a feather. As stupid as an ass. As wise as the bees. As wild as a deer. As green as grass. As weak as a cat - a chicken. As dark as pitch. As green as a leek. As dry as a bone - as snuff. As drunk as a lord. As sober as a judge. As limber as a
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 10:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As blind as a bat. As deaf as a stone. As stiff as a poker. As grey as a goat. As grey as a badger.
As tall as a steeple. As strong as a bull.
As strong as a horse. As supple as a dog. As fat as a fool. As cute as a fox. As black as soot. As white as snow. As red as blood. As crooked as a ram's horn. As even as a dye?. As good as gold. As wicked as sin. As fine as silk. As black as the hob. As black as the sole of your shoe. As yellow as a duck's foot. As rotten as dirt.
senior member (history)
2021-11-17 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
62
More die from over eating than hunger.
63
A chain is as strong as its weakest link.
64.
Between two stools you come to the ground.
65.
It left him going by the stools (said of a great misfortune that leaves a man helpless and in great poverty.)
66.
It was like a red rag to a bull.
67.
That put a halt to his gallop.
68.
They would not let the smoke from the fire near him (her) (said of over indulgent parents.)
69.
He's looking out of the smoke. (exceptionally well.)
70.
When you burned the candle you may as well burn the inch.
71.
You wouldn't put a ladder on a night like this. (said by ramblers who over stay their visit on account of bad weather.)
72.
It wouldn't let a hen from under a bunch. (said of heavy rain.)
73.
Every dog is stiff at his own door.
74.
Many hands make light work.
75.
Time and patience would bring a snail to America.
76.
If this is rain-down that it may never be thatched. ( a tippler's toast.)
77.
Its from the frying pan into the fire (Going from bad to worse.)
78.
Dont judge the book by the cover,
senior member (history)
2021-11-15 17:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
115
Money is made to go (a)round.
116.
Money makes the old mare go.
117.
Where's there's women there's talk.
118.
A woman, a goose and a hen make a market.
119.
Every old stocking finds an old shoe. (Said when an unlikely pair marry.)
120.
He hadn't the place of the cat in the ashes.
(Said of a person whose life was made difficult by the other members of the household.)
121.
Too big for his boots. (Said of a proud boastful person.
122
He is going out of his skin. (that is full of animal spirits.)
123.
The devil is only a poor scholar to him. (said of a great trickster.)
124.
Here's Tod's bless us. :- a drinking toast.
125.
He'd drink Loc Erne dry. ( said of a drunkard.)
126.
I never told the face of clay about it.
( i.e. kept the secret.)
127.
You might as well be whistling against the wind.
128.
He could whistle the fourth of August. (he was late and out-witted.)
129.
He's as full as a tick. (said of a drunken man.)
130.
As light as tow. ( said of a quick tempered person.)
131.
Hard upon hard makes a bad stone wall. But soft upon soft makes no one at all.)
132.
You never know the shelter of the bush until it is cut.
133.Sticks and stone will break your bones but
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 16:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
62
More die from over eating than hunger.
63
A chain is as strong as its weakest link.
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 17:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
for the same reason.
Everybody present during the operation is expected to take part - however slight - in the work.
A churning of the above kind takes from 40 to 60 minutes to make.
When the butter is made it comes up on the dash. Sometimes water is poured in during the process. Hot water is poured in to hurry it and when it is made, cold water is poured in to gather the butter. The butter is made up in a lump, and then taken out and put in a wooden dish and rinsed or washed until the water comes clear from it. Then all the buttermilk from it. It is then salted and made into prints, or rolls, or packed in a crack.
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When lighting the lamp or candle for the night the people of the house say :- "God give us the light and glory of Heaven". When lying down to sleep some local people :- "God bless this house from thatch to floor: the twelve Apostles guard the door: four good angels watch my bed - two at the foot and two at the head".
Another prayer said after going into bed is as follows :-
"When I lie down to sleep,
To God I give my soul to keep
There are four corners on my bed
And four angels on them spread
Sts. Matthew, Mark Sts. Luke and John,
God bless the bed that I lie on".
When one person obliges another by doing something that takes a very short time to do the other person says : -
"That you may be that length sick".
When a local person received a drink of milk he always says : -
"God bless the cows".
senior member (history)
2021-10-16 17:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When lighting the lamp or candle for the night the people of the house say :- "God give us the light and glory of Heaven". When lying down to sleep some local people :- "God bless this house from thatch to floor: the twelve Apostles guard the door: four good angels watch my bed - two at the foot and two at the head".
Another prayer said after going into bed is as follows :-
"When I lie down to sleep,
To God I give my soul to keep
There are four corners on my bed
And four angels on them spread
Sts. Matthew, Mark Sts. Luke and John,
God bless the bed that I lie on".
senior member (history)
2021-10-10 15:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
made to grow timber there.
Therefore while the weight of evidence goes to show that eastern Fairymount was a permanent or principal residence of Simaal and his people it is highly probable that some of them occasionally if not permanently resided here also. The distance between the two hills is exactly 18 English miles as the crow flies, and such a distance to persons accustomed to the chase would not be an obstacle to close association between both places. Further more there was a necessity for keeping a force of men acccustomed to the use of arms on this hill and in the surrounding raths or forts as the hatred and hostility of the Firbolgs towards their former conquerors never ceased or diminished and raids and incursions became as numerous as formerly.
All this goes to show that the Danaans at this period were obliged to reside here and that Simaal, as their chief and leader must have frequently visited and occasionally resided in it if only for the purpose of directing operations. This duty would fall to him rather than to any other of his fellow chieftains as his "selected place" appears to have been the most westerly
senior member (history)
2021-10-10 15:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
made to grow timber there.
Therefore while the weight of evidence goes to show that eastern Fairymount was a permanent or principal residence of Simaal and his people it is highly probable that some of them occasionally if not permanently resided here also. The distance between the two hills is exactly 18 English miles as the crow flies, and such a distance to persons accustomed to the chase would not be an obstacle to close association between both places. Further more there was a necessity for keeping a force of men acccustomed to the use of arms on this hill and in the surrounding raths or forts as the hatred and hostility of the Firbolgs towards their former conquerors never ceased or diminished and raids and incursions became as numerous as formerly.
senior member (history)
2021-10-08 17:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
for the same reason.
Everybody present during the operation is expected to take part - however slight - in the work.
A churning of the above kind takes from 40 to 60 minutes to make.
When the butter is made it comes up on the dash. Sometimes water is poured in during the process. Hot water is poured in to hurry it and when it is made, cold water is poured in to gather the butter.
senior member (history)
2021-10-08 17:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have a churn at home. It is about three feet and a half feet in height. It's breadth in the top is about twenty inches and in the bottom about thirty inches. The sides of the churn are round. It is about twenty years old. The different parts of the churn are, the dash, peck and joggler.
A churning is made at least twice a week in our home. All the members of the family attend at each churning. Any stranger who comes in while the churning is being made takes a "drass".(as it is called). The people believe that any person who comes in while the churning is being made and who does not take a "drass" brings the butter off the milk, and this is a story which some old people tell concerning the bringing of butter off milk.
One day there was a man mowing on the brink of a river. He went in to his house one time during the day, the people of the house were making a churning while he was inside, he was in a hurry and he did not take any "drass". When he reached the river
senior member (history)
2021-10-08 17:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
made to grow timber there.
senior member (history)
2021-10-08 17:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of a large number of people as the land was rich and at least partically free from forest, to judge by the absence of bogs. For this reason it must have been particularly suitable for the raising of flocks and heards as well as for cultivation although it is questionable if this was carried on to any great extent at that remote period. But western Fairymount must also have had strong attractions for people devoted to the chase, as the Danaans undoubtedly were partially as a means of livelihood but principably owing to the love engendered in human nature for such an exciting occupation. There is abundant evidence that the whole country surrounding this hill was formerly one dence unbroken frost extending eastward to the plains of Cruachan northward to the shores of Lough Gara southward to Lough O'Flynn and westward into the County Mayo. The extent and depth of the bogs over this area at the present time rendered this contention almost indisputable. The hill itself must have been at all times an open space. There is no trace of bog or moor on its rocky surface and the scanty soil with which it is covered was never favourable to frost growth as was proved recently when an unsuccessful attempt was
senior member (history)
2021-10-06 17:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two or three tailors in the place. They work at their homes nowadays. The people that want clothes bring the cloth to the tailor's home and clothes are made for them by the tailor and they come to fit them once or twice during the making of the clothes. Some women make the shirts of the family yet at home, and some of them buy them in the shops. The socks and stockings are made at home also by the women and girls who have nothing else to do during the long winter nights. Very few spinning wheels are to be had now. Some people wear black coats and caps on the occasion of funerals, and for a year afterwards or so.
senior member (history)
2021-10-06 17:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two or three tailors in the place. They work at their homes nowadays. The people that want clothes bring the cloth to the tailor's home and clothes are made for them by the tailor and they come to fit them once or twice during the making of the clothes.
senior member (history)
2021-10-06 17:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times people never wore boots or shoes until they came to the age of thirty and forty. Even then they seldom wore boots, except to the church, or to markets. They usually went barefoot carrying their boots in a bag or basket until they came near the church or market town. Then they put on their boots, and took them off again at the same place on the return journey.
The custom has been discontinued in this district for the past fifty or sixty years.
Still, children go barefoot in Summer. The old people say not to throw out water at night but to put a coal in it and leave it there until morning. Feet-water is used for putting on flower - beds. There are two shoemakers in the district who repair and make shoes. Their fathers and grandfathers have been shoemakers before them. Clogs were worn in olden times and are still worn. When the soles would be worn off the shoes bought in the shops, in olden times, the people would bring the upper part to the clogmaker, and he would put soles on them and the they would be called clogs.
senior member (history)
2021-10-06 17:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times people never wore boots or shoes until they came to the age of thirty and forty. Even then they seldom wore boots, except to the church, or to markets. They usually went barefoot carrying their boots in a bag or basket until they came near the church or market town. Then they put on their boots, and took them off again at the same place on the return journey.
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 16:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
44
Everyone to his trade as the tramp said.
45
You cant whistle and eat meal.
46
You might as well be whistling a jig to a milestone.
47
He's a chip off the same block.
48
That's a horse of another colour.
49
"The Lazy Man's load" - said to a person who overloads himself to avoid a second journey.
50
What good is a cow that fills the pail -then kicks and spills it.
51
Hard work isn't easy,
Dry bread isn't greasy.
52
It's hard to pay for a dead horse(meaning an old debt).
53
Eaten bread is soon forgotten.
54
He has a dog tied there.
55
His "kitchen" was the big one with me little one.( meaning he lived on potatoes alone).
56
Dont believe all you see, or half what you hear.
57
Ditches and hedges have ears.
58
Dont judge the first story till you hear the second one.
59
Many a person cuts a rod to beat himself.
60
He who hides usually finds.
61
It's like looking for the Grace off God in a preaching house, said when attempting, or trying for the impossible)
senior member (history)
2021-10-04 16:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of a large number of people as the land was rich and at least partically free from forest, to judge by the absence of bogs. For this reason it must have been particularly suitable for the raising of flocks and heards as well as for cultivation although it is questionable if this was carried on to any great extent at that remote period. But western Fairymount must also have had strong attractions for people devoted to the chase, as the Danaans undoubtedly were partially as a means of livelihood but principably owing to the love engendered in human nature for such an exciting occupation.
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 18:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
money for it.
"I say " says the Devil "that the man who paid earnest money for it first ought to get it".
"Ans now," says Friar Brian, "the Son of God paid earnest for this man before you bought him."
The Devil had to go away then. Friar Brian asked what would be done to him now when he had not got the man.
"I shall be put into the chamber which is for Friar Brian" says the Devil.
"And now" says Friar Brian to the man he had saved, "I saved you now," says he "and do you save me."
"What will I be able to do for you to save you?"
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
money for it.
"I say " says the Devil "that the man who paid earnest money for it first ought to get it".
"Ans now," says Friar Brian, "the Son of God paid earnest for this man before you bought him."
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 18:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
not up. He cut a ring around himself with the stick which Fr Brian had given him. Well then says the man "we'll leave it to the judgement of the first person who shall come past us". "I am satisfied" said The Devil. Friar Brian came to the place where they were.
"What is it all about" says he. The Devil told him he had this man bought for twenty years, and he had to come with him today; "it is left to you to judge the case".
"Now", says Friar Brian "if you were to to a fair to buy a cow or a horse and if you gave earnest money for it wouldn't you say that it was more just for you to have him than a man who would come in the evening and who would buy it without paying any earnest
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 18:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and twenty years were all but up by this time. "Here is a stick for you" says Fr Brian. "Cut a ring with the stick round about where you stand. The Devil will not be able to come inside the place which you will cut out by the stick and do you be argueing and I will be watching you both" says he. "Tell him that there must be some judgement on the case before you depart with him". Very well" says the man." When the appointed hour came the man was standing in the place he said. The devil came to him. He told the man that the time was up and that he had to come along with him. The man began to say the time was
senior member (history)
2021-09-25 18:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of a man. He gave it to him written with his share of blood that he would be his at the end of twenty one years. He had money then every time he wanted it until the twenty one years were almost out. Then fear came on him. He went to the priest and told the story to him. "I could not do any good for you" says the priest. "You must go to such and such man who is going into Ellasthaum. He has so much of the devil's influence that he does be able to change round the castle door any time the wind is blowing too hard on it." He went to this man and told him his story. That man told him to go to Friar Brian. He went to Friar Brian and told him his story. The one
senior member (history)
2021-09-21 18:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of opinion amongst historians as to the location of the Fairymount referred to Father Sharkey recently published an interesting history entitled "The Heart of Ireland" in which he maintained that Mullaghnashee to the North of Loughlynn was the "selected place" and in support of his argument refers to the cairn on the hill as the last resting place of Simaal or Sigmal; others writers also share this view. There is, however, more voluminous and more important evidence by numerous distinguished writers in favour of Fairymount near Lanesboro as the "selected place".
The Parish Priest of Clontuskert recently published in the "Roscommon Herald" a long history of that parish in which this Eastern Fairymount is situated and does not mention even the possibility of Simaal ever having lived elsewhere the great wealth of detail concerning this chieftain and his followers and the numerous authorities quoted in this history with descriptions of the hill and it's surroundings would seem to be conclusive evidence that this was indeed the "selected place". There can be no doubt that the locality was the more suitable for the support
senior member (history)
2021-09-21 18:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of opinion amongst historians as to the location of the Fairymount referred to Father Sharkey recently published an interesting history entitled "The Heart of Ireland" in which he maintained that Mullaghnashee to the North of Loughlynn was the "selected place" and in support of his argument refers to the cairn on the hill as the last resting place of Simaal or Sigmal; others writers also share this view. There is, however, more voluminous and more important evidence by numerous distinguished writers in favour of Fairymount near Lanesboro as the "selected place".
The Parish Priest of Clontuskert recently published in the "Roscommon Herald" a long history of that parish in which this Eastern Fairymount is situated and does not mention even the possibility of Simaal ever having lived elsewhere the great wealth of detail concerning this chieftain and his followers and the numerous authorities quoted in this history with descriptions of the hill and it's surroundings would seem to be conclusive evidence that this was indeed the "selected place". There can be no doubt that the locality was the more suitable for the support.
senior member (history)
2021-09-21 17:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of opinion amongst historians as to the location of the Fairymount referred to Father Sharkey recently published an interesting history entitled "The Heart of Ireland" in which he maintained that Mullaghnashee to the North of Loughlynn was the "selected place" and in support of his argument refers to the cairn on the hill as the last resting place of Simaal or Sigmal; others writers also share this view. There is, however, more voluminous and more important evidence by numerous distinguished writers in favour of Fairymount near Lanesboro as the "selected place".
senior member (history)
2021-09-19 16:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
Its only labour in vain.
22
Fair and easy goes far in the day.
23
You can guess eggs where you see shells.
24
Tell me your company and I'll tell you who you are.
25
Sow the wind and reap the whirlwind.
26.
Scatter the feathers and bring them back.
27.
A nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse.
28.One year's seeding is nine years' weeding.
29.
Wide will wear, but tight will tear.
30.
Dont look for a needle in a haystack.
31.
The older the crab-tree the more fruit it bears.
32.
Man proposes but God disposes.
33.
Long runs the fox but he's caught at last.
34.
Dont put things on the long finger.
35.
Kind father for him to be as he is.
36.
Dont Spur a free horse.
37.
Dont throw water on a drowned rat.
38
Thinking is bad wit.
39.
A lying man tempts the devil.
40.
Children and fools should not handle edged tools.
41.
A burnt child dreads the fire.
42.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
43.
Bend the rod while it is weak.
senior member (history)
2021-09-19 16:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
Its only labour in vain.
22
Fair and easy goes far in the day.
23
You can guess eggs where you see shells.
24
Tell me your company and I'll tell you who you are.
25
Sow the wind and reap the whirlwind.
26.
Scatter the feathers and bring them back.
senior member (history)
2021-09-19 16:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On our farm at home we have cows, calves, a horse, pigs, a dog, a cat, hens, ducks and turkeys.
When driving the cows the people say, "How, How," when calling them the people say, "Prug, Prug, Prug," and when telling them to stand up they say "Hersh anois".
Our cowhouse is a stonewall, whitewashed, thatched house. There is a partition between every two cows, and there are also air slits in the walls. The cows are tied with chains around the neck, to stakes. Some cows are tied by the feet to keep them from kicking, the tyings on the feet are sometimes called "spanchels" and other times called "strampins". The neck tying is called a "breidin". The people never milk a cow on the left - hand side. It is a general custom among the country - folk to make the sign of the cross with the froth of the milk on the right leg of the cow, when they have finished milking. Another very old custom is to tie a piece of bright red woollen cloth on the tail of the cow when she is about to calve, and it is left on her tail till it wears off.
senior member (history)
2021-09-19 15:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On our farm at home we have cows, calves, a horse, pigs, a dog, a cat, hens, ducks and turkeys.
When driving the cows the people say, "How, How," when calling them the people say, "Prug, Prug, Prug," and when telling them to stand up they say "Hersh anois".
Our cowhouse is a stonewall, whitewashed, thatched house. There is a partition between every two cows, and there are also air slits in the walls. The cows are tied with chains around the neck, to stakes. Some cows are tied by the feet to keep them from kicking, the tyings on the feet are sometimes called "spanchels" and other times called "strampins". The neck tying is called a "breidin". The people never milk a cow on the left - hand side.
senior member (history)
2021-09-19 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Milesians as they did not appose it in any way and were apparently glad of the assistance of such a useful race in the colonisation of their new country. More over with that political prudence and foresight which at this time at least distinguished them, they foresaw that the Danaans in settling towards the West would be useful in curbing any hostile inclinations by the Firbolgs in whow they (the Milesians) had no confidence. From this period never again were the Danaans mentioned in hostile as taking part in the government or distinies of the Irish race. Not so with the Firbolgs, who, although always trusted by the Milesians as a subject and servile race, continued down the centuries to assert themselves, and with such good effect that even after the commencement of the christian era one of their race attained to the dignity of Ard Righ or High King. The Danaans moved to their "selected places" with all possible expedition - Lir and Boderg to eminces over looking the River Shannon other chieftans to places farther South, and Simaal (who will be hence forward) to Fairymount or Mullaghnashee. There is a difference
senior member (history)
2021-09-19 15:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Milesians as they did not appose it in any way and were apparently glad of the assistance of such a useful race in the colonisation of their new country. More over with that political prudence and foresight which at this time at least distinguished them, they foresaw that the Danaans in settling towards the West would be useful in curbing any hostile inclinations by the Firbolgs in whow they (the Milesians) had no confidence. From this period never again were the Danaans mentioned in hostile as taking part in the government or distinies of the Irish race. Not so with the Firbolgs, who, although always trusted by the Milesians as a subject and servile race, continued down the centuries to assert themselves, and with such good effect that even after the commncement of the christian era one of their race attained to the dignity of Ard Righ or High King. The Danaans moved to their "selected places" with all possible expedition - Lir and Boderg to eminces over looking the River Shannon other chieftans to places farther South, and Simaal (who will be hence forward) to Fairymount or Mullaghnashee. There is a difference
senior member (history)
2021-09-15 15:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
for the same reason.
Everybody present during the operation is expected to take part - however slight - in the work.
A churning of the above kind takes from 40 to 60 minutes to make.
When the butter is made it comes up on the dash. Sometimes water is poured in to hurry it and when it is made, cold water is poured in to gather the butter.
senior member (history)
2021-09-14 17:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
Its only labour in vain.
22
Fair and easy goes far in the day.
23
You can guess eggs where you see shells.
24
Tell me your company and I'll tell you who you are.
25
Sow the wind and reap the whirlwind.
senior member (history)
2021-09-14 16:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Milesians as they did not appose it in any way and were apparently glad of the assistance of such a useful race in the colonisation of their new country. More over with that political prudence and foresight which at this time at least distinguished them, they foresaw that the Danaans in settling towards the West would be useful in curbing any hostile inclinations by the Firbolgs in whow they (the Milesians) had no confidence.
senior member (history)
2021-09-14 16:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
Céad slán don bhliain sa t-samhradh seo,
Ba dheas an buachaill mé
A' cúairtéireacht le na cailíníbh
'gus a'déanú spóirt is pléidhe
Cé casadh orm ach an pluindeóigín
Gus a gruag de dhath an óir
A béilín binn a'déanú liom
Is phóg sí mé pá? bhrón
Sí na mna na rogairí
na cráva h? le'n chroidhe
Séard dubhairt sí liom go bpósfadh sí mé
Gus sin ar bheagán spré
Ú Rí na ndeór go mbasgaibh an triúr
A chuir eadar mé gus sí.
11
Bhí mise lá a' baint móna
Ag Móirín Uí Giobláin
Thug sí fataí is feola duinn
Gur de go leór leór dhe leann is feárr
senior member (history)
2021-09-14 16:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
Céad slán don bhliain sa t-samhradh seo,
Ba dheas an buachaill mé
A' cúairtéireacht le na cailíníbh
'gus a'déanú spóirt is pléidhe
Cé casadh orm ach an pluindeóigín
Gus a gruag de dhath an óir
A béilín binn a'déanú liom
Is phóg sí mé pá? bhrón
Sí na mna na rogairí
na cráva h? le'n chroidhe
Séard dubhairt sí liom go bpósfadh sí mé
Gus sin ar bheagán spré
Ú Rí na ndeór go mbasgaibh an triúr
A chuir eadar mé gus sí.
11
senior member (history)
2021-09-14 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Céad slán don bhliain sa t-samhradh seo,
Ba dheas an buachaill mé
A' cúairtéireacht le na cailíníbh
'gus a'déanú spóirt is pléidhe
Cé casadh orm ach an pluindeóigín
Gus a gruag de dhath an óir
A béilín binn a'déanú liom
Is phóg sí mé pá? bhrón
Sí na mna na rogairí
na cráva h? le'n chroidhe
Séard dubhairt sí liom go bpósfadh sí mé
senior member (history)
2021-09-09 18:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
money. The grandmother did not get up any more but the poor brother was as rich as ever the other brother was.
senior member (history)
2021-09-09 18:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to light the pipe. She did so but said no prayer. He went out again and asked the angel was there any hope for them. The angel said "If your mother is prepared to have herself cut up as fine as sugar all will be saved.
He went into the house looking very downcast. He asked his mother to light the pipe and smoke it. She did so but said no prayer. When he saw this he told her his story. She said she was prepared and told him to go out in the garden while she was getting ready. He went out and when he was coming up again to do his sorrowful task the same angel appeared to him and told him that they were saved without killing his mother because she was satisfied to be killed. When he went into the house he saw his mother stretched on the table and one sheet over
senior member (history)
2021-09-09 18:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to light the pipe. She did so but said no prayer. He went out again and asked the angel was there any hope for them. The angel said "If your mother is prepared to have herself cut up as fine as sugar all will be saved.
He went into the house looking very downcast. He asked his mother to light the pipe and smoke it. She did so but said no prayer. When he saw this he told her his story. She said she was prepared and told him to go out in the garden while she was getting ready.
senior member (history)
2021-09-09 18:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a woman once and she had a son and he was about to be ordained a priest. This woman was very fond of smoking. She had a clay pipe in a hole in the wall. Every half-hour in the day she might be seen with a pipe in her mouth. She never used say the prayer after tobacco. Her son came home on a holiday and one day he was walking in the garden when an angel appeared to him and told him that everyone belonging to him would be lost. The priest asked why and the angel told him that his mother was a heavy smoker and that she never yet said the prayer after tobacco.
He asked his mother when he reached home if she had any tobacco in the house and she said she had. He told her
senior member (history)
2021-09-09 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a woman once and she had a son and he was about to be ordained a priest. This woman was very fond of smoking. She had a clay pipe in a hole in the wall. Every half-hour in the day she might be seen with a pipe in her mouth. She never used say the prayer after tobacco. Her son came home on a holiday and one day he was walking in the garden when an angel appeared to him and told him that everyone belonging to him would be lost. The priest asked why and the angel told him that his mother was a heavy smoker and that she never yet said the prayer after tobacco.
senior member (history)
2021-09-08 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
western division which had now become known as the Connaught Fifth and taking up residence under their king in the Wicklow mountains and adjoining districts. Their descendants are there to the present day and may be identified with their Connaught kinsmen by their swarthy complexion high cheek bones hollow eyes lank black hair growing low over their forehead a tendency towards warping or bandiness in the nether limbs, all of which were physical characteristics of this aggleasive and implacable race.
After these events the surviving chiefs and elders of the Danaans assembled in Council to dtermine their future conduct and existence and they decided on moving westward and south-westward with their people and followers and taking residence in uninhabited "high places" where they would be completely removed as they hoped from all contact and intercourse with their conquerors and enemies. They also agreed never again to to interfere in anything pertaining to the social or political life of the country, further than to protect themselves from aggression. This plan appears to have met with the approval of the
senior member (history)
2021-09-08 16:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
western division which had now become known as the Connaught Fifth and taking up residence under their king in the Wicklow mountains and adjoining districts. Their descendants are there to the present day and may be identified with their Connaught kinsmen by their swarthy complexion high cheek bones hollow eyes lank black hair growing low over their forehead a tendency towards warping or bandiness in the nether limbs, all of which were physical characteristics of this aggleasive and implacable race.
After these events the surviving chiefs and elders of the Danaans assembled in Council to dtermine their future conduct and existence and they decided on moving westward and south-westward with their people and followers and taking residence in uninhabited "high places" where they would be completely removed as they hoped from all contact and intercourse with their conquerors and enemies.
senior member (history)
2021-09-08 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
western division which had now become known as the Connaught Fifth and taking up residence under their king in the Wicklow mountains and adjoining districts. Their descendants are there to the present day and may be identified with their Connaught kinsmen by their swarthy complexion high cheek bones hollow eyes lank black hair growing low over their forehead a tendency towards warping or bandiness in the nether limbs, all of which were physical characteristics of this aggleasive and implacable race.
senior member (history)
2021-09-04 16:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a Mass Stone supposed to be in one of the fields in Erritt - probably in Michael Morris' near Gortaganny chapel. Mass was read there in the Penal Days. One day a priest was reading Mass and the soldiers came upon him. He turned round and asked them to wait until he had received the Host. They waited and when he had finished he told them to shoot him.
When they saw how brave he was they told him to go home, and that they would not shoot him. There is a hill in Michael Morris' field which is know as "Cnoc an t-Sagairt". I do not know if the Mass Stone referred to is on this hill or not. Mass used to be read here in the penal days by a friar from the Augustinian Friary in Ballyhaunis. The soldiers were after him and he knew it. He used drive the car and the driver used sit in the priest's place. One Sunday they were watching for the priest. When the soldiers saw them coming they walked up and took the one in the priest's place. When they got to the Barracks they
senior member (history)
2021-09-04 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a Mass Stone supposed to be in one of the fields in Erritt - probably in Michael Morris' near Gortaganny chapel. Mass was read there in the Penal Days. One day a priest was reading Mass and the soldiers came upon him. He turned round and asked them to wait until he had received the Host. They waited and when he had finished he told them to shoot him.
senior member (history)
2021-09-04 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the table and knocked everything down.
The same thing happened for three times. Her husband was ever so angry with her. He would not walk home with her. She knew that it was Tim that was cause of it. She told the priest to go to him. The priest went to the field and found him under a furze and hawthorn bush. The priest said "Hallo, my boy. Come out here to me." Tim said "Come in here Fr. John".
The priest made his way into Jim and started asking questions. Jim took out his tin flute and began playing and the priest began dancing on the ditch.
He asked to be let go and when he was down off the ditch he was all stabbed with thorns. Two policemen came another day and the same thing happened. They brought Tim to court and the judge said he would let him off free. The boy began playing and everybody started dancing. When Tim came home, his step-mother was up stairs and he went up and began playing and she fell down and was killed. Tim and his father had the place to themselves then.
senior member (history)
2021-09-04 16:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a rich couple and their only son Tim in a large house in the country. When the boy was about ten years old his mother died and the father married a lady from the town. This lady was very haughty and peevish. She had a settled dislike of Tim and meant to kill him if she could. One day an old lady came to the house. She asked what would be the best way to kill her stepson. The lady suggested putting him in a room and giving him nothing but boiled eggs. Then the step-mother put Tim into the room and gave him the eggs but they did not kill him. Then one day a gentleman called to the house and when he was leaving she asked about the son. He told her to give the child plenty of milk and put a lot of butter in the eggs. She did this but it did not kill the child. It only made the boy strong as the gentleman intended when he gave the instructions. The old lady called again and the step-mother told her about the child and how the eggs did not kill him. She told her to put him out minding cows and give him nothing
senior member (history)
2021-09-04 16:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a rich couple and their only son Tim in a large house in the country. When the boy was about ten years old his mother died and the father married a lady from the town. This lady was very haughty and peevish. She had a settled dislike of Tim and meant to kill him if she could. One day an old lady came to the house. She asked what would be the best way to kill her stepson. The lady suggested putting him in a room and giving him nothing but boiled eggs. Then the step-mother put Tim into the room and gave him the eggs but they did not kill him. Then one day a gentleman called to the house and when he was leaving she asked about the son. He told her to give the child plenty of milk and put a lot of butter in the eggs. She did this but it did not kill the child. It only made the boy strong as the gentleman intended when he gave the instructions. The old lady called again and the step-mother told her about the child and how the eggs did not kill him. She told her to put him out minding cows and give him nothing.
senior member (history)
2021-09-04 16:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a rich couple and their only son Tim in a large house in the country. When the boy was about ten years old his mother died and the father married a lady from the town. This lady was very haughty and peevish. She had a settled dislike of Tim and meant to kill him if she could. One day an old lady came to the house. She asked what would be the best way to kill her stepson. The lady suggested putting him in a room and giving him nothing but boiled eggs. Then the step-mother put Tim into the room and gave him the eggs but they did not kill him. Then one day a gentleman called to the house and when he was leaving she asked about the son. He told her to give the child plenty of milk and put a lot of butter in the eggs.
senior member (history)
2021-09-02 17:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
- fall as jealousy, rivalry and disunion would result from such an arrangement and then there could be no real union of power to resist a common enemy when the necessity arose.
The first clash with the Milesians occured in the Slieve Mish mountains to the south of Tralee. This was somewhat in the nature of a trial of strength. The Danaans were defeated and retired northwards to Tailtean pursued by the Milesians who were joined on route by the Firbolgs who were only too anxious to assist in any thing likely to bring about the defeat of their hated enemies. The Danaans were defeated with great slaughter and although they made a subsequent stand in Ailleach on the shores of Lough Swilly, that? was only in the nature of a forlorn hope as with their depleted forces and owing to the disunion referred to, they had no possible chance of retrieving their fallen fortune.
For the assistance rendered at Tailtean the Firbolgs were rewarded with territory in the Leinster fifth with permission to appoint their own king. This arrangement resulted in large numbers of the Firbolgs moving from
senior member (history)
2021-09-02 17:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
- fall as jealousy, rivalry and disunion would result from such an arrangement and then there could be no real union of power to resist a common enemy when the necessity arose.
The first clash with the Milesians occured in the Slieve Mish mountains to the south of Tralee. This was somewhat in the nature of a trial of strength. The Danaans were defeated and retired northwards to Tailtean pursued by the Milesians who were joined on route by the Firbolgs who were only too anxious to assist in any thing likely to bring about the defeat of their hated enemies. The Danaans were defeated with great slaughter and although they made a subsequent stand in Ailleach on the shores of Lough Swilly, that? was only in the nature of a forlorn hope as with their depleted forces and owing to the disunion referred to, they had no possible chance of retrieving their fallen fortune.
senior member (history)
2021-09-02 17:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
- fall as jealousy, rivalry and disunion would result from such an arrangement and then there could be no real union of power to resist a common enemy when the necessity arose.
The first clash with the Milesians occured in the Slieve Mish mountains to the south of Tralee. This was somewhat in the nature of a trial of strength. The Danaans were defeated and retired northwards to Tailtean pursued by the Milesians who were joined on route by the Firbolgs who were only too anxious to assist in any thing likely to bring about the defeat of their hated enemies.
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 16:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the animals turn their backs to the wind it is a sign of a storm, or if the cat or dog turns his back to the fire it is a sign of rain. When the birds, swallows etc. fly low it is the sign of rain. If the western sky is red as the sun sinks to rest it is the sign of good weather.
When there is a white ring round the moon it is the sign of broken weather or when the air is full of flies. A rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight but a rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's warning. If a rainbow is seen on a Saturday evening it is the sign of a bad week. If the wind is from the south it is the sign of sunshine. The clouds moving in the air is the sign of unsettled weather.
If the stars are seen glittering or falling it is sure to rain. If you see a dog eating grass look out for a downpour. If the dust on the road is flying it is a sign of showery weather. The seas, lakes and streams are very rough when it is going to rain. If see a brown snail crossing the road is a sure sign of rain. When the huge bird,
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the animals turn their backs to the wind it is a sign of a storm, or if the cat or dog turns his back to the fire it is a sign of rain. When the birds, swallows etc. fly low it is the sign of rain. If the western sky is red as the sun sinks to rest it is the sign of good weather.
When there is a white ring round the moon it is the sign of broken weather or when the air is full of flies. A rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight but a rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's warning. If a rainbow is seen on a Saturday evening it is the sign of a bad week. If the wind is from the south it is the sign of sunshine. The clouds moving in the air is the sign of unsettled weather.
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 16:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the animals turn their backs to the wind it is a sign of a storm, or if the cat or dog turns his back to the fire it is a sign of rain. When the birds, swallows etc. fly low it is the sign of rain. If the western sky is red as the sun sinks to rest it is the sign of good weather.
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 16:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
when the people timerously[?] approached the place there were not the least signs that anything unusual had happened. They fully expected to find dead men and lots of blood but the grass was not even flattened down and the stone limp was as clean and cold as it was before.
There was one thing however that caused them further terror and that was to see the cabin of the man who had taken away the stones of the pillar burned to the ground and as there were no signs of the family about, they searched the ruins and discovered their burned and blackened bones and not far away found the dead body of the cow.
There the old lady paused and when asked about the cures attributed to the stone continued :-
At one time it had the power of almost anything. This was because the stuff used in the well of the lamp to cure the wounded giants soaked into the stone but the heat of the sun from time to time drew some of this out and got mixed with the water. After hundreds of nearly all the stuff
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 16:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
when the people timerously[?] approached the place there were not the least signs that anything unusual had happened. They fully expected to find dead men and lots of blood but the grass was not even flattened down and the stone limp was as clean and cold as it was before.
There was one thing however that caused them further terror and that was to see the cabin of the man who had taken away the stones of the pillar burned to the ground and as there were no signs of the family about, they searched the ruins and discovered their burned and blackened bones and not far away found the dead body of the cow.
There the old lady paused and when asked about the cures attributed to the stone continued :-
At one time it had the power of almost anything. This was because the stuff used in the well of the lamp to cure the wounded giants soaked into the stone but the heat of the sun from time to time drew some of this out and got mixed with the water. After hundreds of nearlu all the stuff
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 15:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
particularly skilled in medicine the use of herbs and the art of healing. They were also great magicians as was instanced when they caused the shores of Ireland with mountains and all of the land that was visible from the sea to disappear as if they were non-existent with the object of preventing the landing of the Milesians.
Their healing powers were demonstrated at the battle of Moytura Conga, when they healed and made whole all their wounded by immersing them in baths of warm milk mixed with certain herbs and these operations by preserving their mane power contributed largely to their victory in that battle which lasted four days.
They reigned for a period of about sixty years, and their dynasty consisted of eight kings the first of whom was Nuada of the Silver Hand and the last the tripartite rulers Micoll McCeght and McGrane with their three wives Eire, Banba and Fodhla. It is not certain whether these reigned conjointly or separately for certain agreed periods but what appears fairly certain of their ultimate down
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 15:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
particularly skilled in medicine the use of herbs and the art of healing. They were also great magicians as was instanced when they caused the shores of Ireland with mountains and all of the land that was visible from the sea to disappear as if they were non-existent with the object of preventing the landing of the Milesians.
Their healing powers were demonstrated at the battle of Moytura Conga, when they healed and made whole all their wounded by immersing them in baths of warm milk mixed with certain herbs and these operations by preserving their mane power contributed largely to their victory in that battle which lasted four days.
senior member (history)
2021-08-29 15:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
particularly skilled in medicine the use of herbs and the art of healing. They were also great magicians as was instanced when they caused the shores of Ireland with mountains and all of the land that was visible from the sea to disappear as if they were non-existent with the object of preventing the landing of the Milesians.
senior member (history)
2021-08-22 16:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
names will never hurt you.
144
A woman has no secret.
145
Don't put all your eggs in the one basket.
senior member (history)
2021-08-22 16:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
A Shut mouth catches no flies.
2
Don't lose a sheep for a ha'porth of tar.
3
One foolish person can ask more questions than five wise men could answer.
4
The darkest hour is before the dawn.
5
Fools make feasts and wise men eat them.
6
Don't look for wool in a goat house.
7
Its a long lane that has no turning.
8
One swallow never makes a summer.
9
Quenched coals are easy to kindle.
10
Like father like son.
11
It is not from the wind he took it.
12
What comes by nature costs nothing.
13
What's bred in the marrow comes out through the bone.
14
Fool me once - shame on you. Fool me twice - shame on me.
15
It's a bad wind that blows nobody good.
16
You can't have your loaf and eat it.
17
Robbing Peter to pay Paul.
18
Strength is no burden.
19
Learning is no load.
20
Better the Devil you know than the Devil you don't know.
senior member (history)
2021-08-22 16:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
between the hours of twelve noon and one in the afternoon and then he does not go far - only across the hills. He will be out in a short time now". It was not long until they saw him coming across the hill. "Now is your time" said the old man "if you want to see him" as he does not go far till he returns.
Young McDermott got up on his horse again and thanking the old man for his information, galloped after McDermott who was just starting to go back to the castle, who, when he saw the man on horseback, was quickly ttrying to make his escape but he soon overtook him and said to him "Are you McDermott of the Bawn"? and the other said he was. "Was it you killed my father and all belonging to me", he said to McDermott of the Bawn" and so saying he drew his sword and cut off his brother's head. Sticking his sword in the head he turned his horse and galloped away to the place he came from.
When his fosterfather met him at the gate he congratulated him for having put an end to the tyrant. So ends the sad story of, "McDermott of the Bawn".
senior member (history)
2021-08-22 15:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
between the hours of twelve noon and one in the afternoon and then he does not go far - only across the hills. He will be out in a short time now". It was not long until they saw him coming across the hill. "Now is your time" said the old man "if you want to see him" as he does not go far till he returns.
Young McDermott got up on his horse again and thanking the old man for his information, galloped after McDermott who was just starting to go back to the castle, who, when he saw the man on horseback, was quickly ttrying to make his escape but he soon overtook him and said to him "Are you McDermott of the Bawn"? and the other said he was.
senior member (history)
2021-08-21 17:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In former times no young person wore boots until they were getting married which was generally between the ages of seventeen and twenty one. Many people in the past never wore boots or shoes. All the children from ten or eleven years down, go barefoot during the Summer months, but no people go barefoot all the year round nowadays.
senior member (history)
2021-08-21 17:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
111.
A Sheáin Uí Grianna
Ar chuala tú an t-iongansas
A Rinne shiar ar a'mullach mór
A' tsean bho bhuile bhí tigheach ón aonach
Gur d'ith sí an gréasaidhe 'gus alasga bróg.
D'ith sí pota cum a bhruighfeadh céad duine
Cráin mór gé 'gus a h-ál
craiceann fataí gus ní fiú an méid sin,
Gur ith sí ropar Éirlís 'gus cósa Sheáin.
senior member (history)
2021-08-20 19:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
went in the two boys told their father of the strange wish which McDermott made. Then he went to the old nurse and told her about the wish as he thought there was something remarkable about him. The he asked her to tell him who he was for as of yet he did not know his history nor did the young fellow himself know it. So she called in the young lad and she told the story. "Well," said the old gentleman when she had all told to him, "I will give you all the help I can if you intend to take your father's rights". McDermott said, "that would be a big thing to do but he would never rest until he had revenge some way." The old gentleman said he would give him the best horse in the stable if he intended to go. Then he got his sword and got up on the horse and set out for Callow. When he came to Rathcroghan there was a foxhunt in progress and all admired the young man on horseback. Many asked him if he were going to the hunt and he said he had other business to do and he continued his journey to Callow. He arrived at the end of a boreen which is yet to be seen at the end of Patrick Cunningham's garden. There he met an old man by the name of Conor Warde. "Where does "McDermott of the Bawn " live here" he said to the old man. "Just across the hill" said the old man pointing to the castle. McDermott asked the old man what sort of man was "McDermott of the Bawn". "Well to tell you the truth," said Conor Ward, he is not much liked about this part of the country because of his tyranny towards the people. It is said that he killed his own brother and all his family many years ago." "Does he go out much?" asked the young man. "No, only once a day
senior member (history)
2021-08-20 19:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
went in the two boys told their father of the strange wish which McDermott made. Then he went to the old nurse and told her about the wish as he thought there was something remarkable about him. The he asked her to tell him who he was for as of yet he did not know his history nor did the young fellow himself know it. So she called in the young lad and she told the story. "Well," said the old gentleman when she had all told to him, "I will give you all the help I can if you intend to take your father's rights". McDermott said, "that would be a big thing to do but he would never rest until he had revenge some way." The old gentleman said he would give him the best horse in the stable if he intended to go. Then he got his sword and got up on the horse and set out for Callow. When he came to Rathcroghan there was a foxhunt in progress and all admired the young man on horseback. Many asked him if he were going to the hunt and he said he had other business to do and he continued his journey to Callow. He arrived at the end of a boreen which is yet to be seen at the end of Patrick Cunningham's garden.
senior member (history)
2021-08-19 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Milesians, divided the country amongst themselves, but did not long reign in peace with each other and when their kingdom became divided and sub-divided amongst their descendants in accordance with the custom gavelkind (or distribution of property amongst members of a family) the whole country, in course of time was governed or misgoverned by an number of petty kings all aiming towards ascendancy or high Kingship.
It was in this way with each petty king following the example of he predecessors building forts on the lines of those originally constructed for the protection, and probably the extension of his own particular territory, that the whole country eventually became covered with these seemingly everlasting memorials of our warlike ancestors, it is now necessary for the purpose of the narrative, to revert to the Danaans and what befell them after their defeat at Tailtean and the causes that lead to that defeat.
They have been described as a brave chivalrous and highly cultured race,
senior member (history)
2021-08-19 19:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Milesians, divided the country amongst themselves, but did not long reign in peace with each other and when their kingdom became divided and sub-divided amongst their descendants in accordance with the custom gavelkind (or distribution of property amongst members of a family) the whole country, in course of time was governed or misgoverned by an number of petty kings all aiming towards ascendancy or high Kingship.
It was in this way with each petty king following the example of he predecessors building forts on the lines of those originally constructed for the protection, and probably the extension of his own particular territory, that the whole country eventually became covered with these seemingly everlasting memorials of our warlike ancestors, it is now necessary for the purpose of the narrative, to revert to the Danaans and what befell them after their defeat at Tailtean and the causes that lead to that defeat.
They have been described as a brave chivalrous and highly cultured race.
senior member (history)
2021-08-19 19:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Milesians, divided the country amongst themselves, but did not long reign in peace with each other and when their kingdom became divided and sub-divided amongst their descendants in accordance with the custom gavelkind (or distribution of property amongst members of a family) the whole country, in course of time was governed or misgoverned by an number of petty kings all aiming towards ascendancy or high Kingship.
senior member (history)
2021-08-19 19:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11
Cé h-é atá na luighe ins a'gceó
Is mise sgá? an sí nach maireann beo
Tabhair sgéal abhaile ag mráoí (mnaoi)
Mur leigfidh sí leis an tús níos feárr
beidh sí ag íocah na bpianta
Mur tá mace anocht i mbéal an pheaita.
Tháinig mé aniar ar splincí luinge
Satharn na Gaoithe Móire
D'ól mé an fhíon agus níor ?? an scór
Ach tá mé a'íocadh anocht i mBéal an Fhearta
Tá mé anocht i mBéal an Fhearta
Gan fáisgeadh ón ngaoith
Gus is fuar é an tráth é.
senior member (history)
2021-08-18 20:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the table and knocked everything down.
The same thing happened for three times. Her husband was ever so angry with her. He would not walk home with her. She knew that it was Jim that was cause of it. She told the priest to go to him. The priest went to the field and found him under a furze and hawthorn bush. The priest said "Hallo, my boy. Come out here to me." Jim said "Come in here Fr. John".
The priest made his way into Jim and started asking questions. Jim took out his tin flute and began playing and the priest began dancing on the ditch.
He asked to be let go and when he was down off the ditch he was all stabbed with thorns. Two policemen came another day and the same thing happened. They brought Jim to court and the judge said he would let him off free. The boy began playing and everybody started dancing. When Jim came home, his step-mother was up stairs and he went up and began playing and she fell down and was killed. Jim and his father had the place to themselves then.
senior member (history)
2021-08-18 20:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the table and knocked everything down.
The same thing happened for three times. Her husband was ever so angry with her. He would not walk home with her. She knew that it was Jim that was cause of it. She told the priest to go to him. The priest went to the field and found him under a furze and hawthorn bush. The priest said "Hallo, my boy. Come out here to me." Jim said "Come in here Fr. John".
senior member (history)
2021-08-13 18:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a wild animal seen in Erritt lake, Loughglynn, Co. Roscommon. One wet evening when men were returning from work they first saw the animal. This animal had a round shape and it was lying on the top of the water. The men went into the lake and the animal disappeared. When the men left the lake the animal again appeared on the surface of the water. It began to walk on the water and made its way for the edge of the lake. Now and again it disappeared and
senior member (history)
2021-08-13 18:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to draw the axe the fairy suddenly appeared and said "Arise and come home." The cow arose and all her calves arose into the air. One white calf, not hearing the fairy's call did not go. When the people looked, to their great surprise the animal had turned into a black cow.
senior member (history)
2021-08-13 18:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
went in the two boys told their father of the strange wish which McDermott made. Then he went to the old nurse and told her about the wish as he thought there was something remarkable about him. The he asked her to tell him who he was for as of yet he did not know his history nor did the young fellow himself know it. So she called in the young lad and she told the story. "Well," said the old gentleman when she had all told to him, "I will give you all the help I can if you intend to take your father's rights".
senior member (history)
2021-08-09 16:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the lands of Michael Dowd in the townland of Dovet? there is a place called "The Bawn". Here stands the ruins of a castle which once belonged to a man called Mc.Dermott who was known as "McDermott of the Bawn". This castle was surrounded by a moat. At a certain point there was a drawbridge and by means of a pulley this could be taken up at night. McDermott of the Bawn had a brother in Caolavin who was a very good and generous man while McDermott of the Bawn was very wicked and hard - hearted. McDermott of Coolavin had a large family but McDermott of the Bawn had no child. McDermott of the Bawn was not satisfied with his own territory: he wished to have his brother's lands too. So one night he gathered all his men and they went in boats across Lough Gara to Coolavin. Taking all the household by surprise he killed all except the faithful nurse who escaped with the youngest of the family - a baby boy whom she carried in her arms. She kept walking till she arrived in the south of Galway where she got employment with a gentleman. She also kept the boy with her and the man treated him as if he were his own until he came to manhood. This man had two sons about the same age as young McDermott. One frosty night they were outside the house. Said the man's eldest son, "Well, I wish I had as many sheep as there are stars in the sky and I would be a rich man." "Well" said the second son, "I wish I had as many fat cattle as there are stars in the sky and I would be rich." Said young McDermott "I wish I had as many men at my command as there stars in the sky and I would be content." So when they
senior member (history)
2021-08-09 16:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the lands of Michael Dowd in the townland of Dovet? there is a place called "The Bawn". Here stands the ruins of a castle which once belonged to a man called Mc.Dermott who was known as "McDermott of the Bawn". This castle was surrounded by a moat. At a certain point there was a drawbridge and by means of a pulley this could be taken up at night. McDermott of the Bawn had a brother in Caolavin who was a very good and generous man while McDermott of the Bawn was very wicked and hard - hearted. McDermott of Coolavin had a large family but McDermott of the Bawn had no child. McDermott of the Bawn was not satisfied with his own territory: he wished to have his brother's lands too. So one night he gathered all his men and they went in boats across Lough Gara to Coolavin. Taking all the household by surprise he killed all except the faithful nurse who escaped with the youngest of the family - a baby boy whom she carried in her arms. She kept walking till she arrived in the south of Galway where she got employment with a gentleman. She also kept the boy with her and the man treated him as if he were his own until he came to manhood.
senior member (history)
2021-08-08 20:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the lands of Michael Dowd in the townland of Dovet? there is a place called "The Bawn". Here stands the ruins of a castle which once belonged to a man called Mc.Dermott who was known as "McDermott of the Bawn". This castle was surrounded by a moat. At a certain point there was a drawbridge and by means of a pulley this could be taken up at night. McDermott of the Bawn had a brother in Caolavin who was a very good and generous man while McDermott of the Bawn was very wicked and hard - hearted.
senior member (history)
2021-08-08 20:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All these with others I can't remember, were honoured members of great fame
They were the brave sons of Miletius whose great ancestors arrived from Spain
They were the old stock of the country, and swayed with dignity in wealth and fame
Their patrimony were used with bounty, and which established their worthy name
My mother was from famed Rath croughan; where regal honour were once proclaimed
And where resided the Kings of Connaught; when the old Monarch in Ireland reigned
And next in order was Relic - na -- ree where these said princes were entered
On their green sward as you may see are trodden over with flocks of herd
Tho she been rural and rudely brought up, she was posessed with great retention
She had great talent to think and treat of in all these events that I have mentioned
Her Father was the great salemaster in all quarters of the land.
For the noble family of antient Cargans in whose service he held command
(Her information was from her father.)
Her information was from her father which she imbibed from early youth.
And would recount without a falter all she had learned with perfect - truth.
There was no family of distinction in the whole country that she did know not
And all around again to Linster, and thence along to Ballymoe.
In those days there arose a quarrel between Lord Bingan and Ignacius Kelly
Which almost ended in sad disaster which I am now disposed to tell thee
Their landed properties ran just convenient, and the Lord suspected he was decieved
That a large portion was falsely taken by Ignacios of his estate.
senior member (history)
2021-08-06 10:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
by which they could be identified with Tavanagh. Some of the names of the school children show Norman ancestry.
Morgan ( Ir Muireágan)
A family of this name had extensive districts in south Wexford
Butler (Ir Buitléir) This clan was either of the Leinster family of that name or were an Irish family who were forced by the Act of Parliament in 1465 to take the name Butler
senior member (history)
2021-08-06 10:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
by which they could be identified with Tavanagh .Some of the names of the school children show Norman ancestry.
Morgan ( Ir Muireágan)
A family of this name had extensive districts in south Wexford
Butler (Ir Buitléir) This clan was either of the Leinster family of that name or were an Irish family who were forced by the Act of Parliament in 1465 to take the name Butler
senior member (history)
2021-08-05 20:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All these with others I can't remember, were honoured members of great fame
They were the brave sons of Miletius whose great ancestors arrived from Spain
They were the old stock of the country, and swayed with dignity in wealth and fame
Their patrimony were used with bounty, and which established their worthy name
My mother was from famed Rath croughan; where regal honour were once proclaimed
And where resided the Kings of Connaught; when the old Monarch in Ireland reigned
And next in order was Relic - na -- ree where these said princes were entered
On their green sward as you may see are trodden over with flocks of herd
Tho she been rural and rudely brought up, she was posessed with great retention
She had great talent to think and treat of in all these events that I have mentioned
Her Father was the great salemaster in all quarters of the land.
For the noble family of antient Cargans in whose service he held command
(Her information was from her father.)
Her information was from her father which she imbibed from early youth.
And would recount without a falter all she had learned with perfect - truth.
There was no family of distinction in the whole country that she did know not
And all around again to Linster, and thence along to Ballymoe.
senior member (history)
2021-08-04 17:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The most harmful weeds growing on the farm are, the nettle, the boocoolaun, the dock, the thistle, the cat - tail, the chicken - weed, the ketlock, the fuaran, and many more. They are called because the spread rapidly and because they make the land poor. The thistle is supposed to grow on good land and all the rest grow on poor land.
(2)
Certain plants contain medicine and cures. A dock leaf warmed over the fire and left on a cut is supposed to be very good. There is a round leaf and there is a cure in it for a b
senior member (history)
2021-08-04 17:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The most harmful weeds growing on the farm are, the nettle, the boocoolaun, the dock, the thistle, the cat - tail, the chicken - weed, the ketlock, the fuaran, and many more. They are called because the spread rapidly and because they make the land poor. The thistle is supposed to grow on good land and all the rest grow on poor land.
senior member (history)
2021-08-04 16:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The children all join hands, one goes in the middle and closes her eyes. The other children dance around her in a ring and they recite the following rhyme: -
Sally in the water
Sprinkle in the pan
Jump up Sally
And chose to your man
Chose to the East
And chose to the West
And chose to the very man you love best
senior member (history)
2021-08-04 16:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This game is played at the fireside on long winter nights when all the children are comfortably seated in a circle. One child passes round the ring three times and he says "it is in the fire". Of course he pretends that he throws it in the fire. He tries by every means in his power to deceive his onlookers. He asks each child who has the ring, and when all have answered he tells who has it. He then proceeds to inflict punishment. He names out all who were correct. Then the possessor of the ring starts the same procedure and so the game goes on.
senior member (history)
2021-08-03 21:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14, Black and white and read all over
The Newspaper.
15, Cut, handed round and never eaten.
Ans = a pack of Cards.
16. A head like a thimble, a tail like a rat, You may guess for ever, but you would not guess that.
Ans - a pipe
17. The more you take out of it the larger it gets.
Ans = a hole
18. Why does a cow look over a ditch?
Ans = because she cannot look under it.
19. As I went up to London I saw a great wonder. Four and twenty wild geese tearing up the ground.
Ans = a harrow.
senior member (history)
2021-08-03 21:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was drawn out in this way and at the present time it is only strong enough to cure warts on the hands.
There the old lady took her pipe from the hob lit it and lapsed into a reminisent mood.
senior member (history)
2021-08-03 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All these with others I can't remember, were honoured members of great fame
They were the brave sons of Miletius whose great ancestors arrived from Spain
They were the old stock of the country, and swayed with dignity in wealth and fame
Their patrimony were used with bounty, and which established their worthy name
My mother was from famed Rath croughan; where regal honour were once proclaimed
And where resided the Kings of Connaught; when the old Monarch in Ireland reigned
And next in order was Relic - na -- ree where these said princes were entered
On their green sward as you may see are trodden over with flocks of herd
senior member (history)
2021-08-03 20:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All these with others I can't remember, were honoured members of great fame
They were the brave sons of Miletius whose great ancestors arrived from Spain
They were the old stock of the country, and swayed with dignity in wealth and fame
Their patrimony were used with bounty, and which established their worthy name
senior member (history)
2021-08-02 18:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Foremost in the ranks of those who took an active part in every movement for their independence of their native country as well as for termination of landlordism here were the people of my district. Staunch Fenians, Home Rulers, Landleaguers were to be found in every townland and in the recent struggle for self government they played no mean part.
Their land was their life and when Tenant League was formed it is not surprising that the organisation had strong supporters in this district. The land was their sole means of living and nearly all of them had uneconomic holdings and for these they were forced to pay rack rents and in their midst was a large ranch containing some hundreds of acres and the best land in the county. Over these broad acres roamed the cattle and sheep of an absentee landlord and when their cry "Pay no Rent" was raised, threats of imprisonment and even eviction did not deter them from their purpose.
senior member (history)
2021-08-02 18:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
forefathers was rightly theirs and the war between the landlords and tenants continued and when the "Purchase Acts" were pasted the landlord found it to his advantage to avail of "Land Purchase".
senior member (history)
2021-08-02 18:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
These ruling members left their descendants which they enjoyed from their forefathers
Their lands and livings and costly dwellings; and I'll begin with noble Arthur
Who owned the palace of old Elphin, fit for a King in noble order
Until his life were at an end; and did attend his lord who called on
Next to Dundermot I proceed where lived the Noble Mr. Patrick
To praise his sons I shall indeed; their names is Nicholis and young Patrick
They are bright models in the land, And gentlemen of high renown
Both wealth and riches they command, and with felicity they are crowned
Up to spring garden I will go where I shall meet the Valiant Roderick
Who is always kind to friend and foe, and for his valour he is recorded
Next to old Willsbrook I'l repair where Michael lived in wealth and splendor
All those my fond heart held in care and all the rest I cant remember.
Had I the talent of great Homer, or learned Ovid of mighty fame
I would record with pride and honour, these worthy memebers I have named
They are the bulwork of the land, and the great descendants of the old Monarch
With gentle rule they do command, the ancient tribes of the O Conors
Great Bishop French of these large dioces and his brother Christopher of old Frenchlawn
And Ancient Geofry who won great prizes, their near relation I must recall
The great George French of regal parents, the great proprietor of Cloonyquin
And his old friend and near relation, the brave John French of old Elphin
senior member (history)
2021-08-02 17:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
These ruling members left their descendants which they enjoyed from their forefathers
Their lands and livings and costly dwellings; and I'll begin with noble Arthur
Who owned the palace of old Elphin, fit for a King in noble order
Until his life were at an end; and did attend his lord who called on
Next to Dundermot I proceed where lived the Noble Mr. Patrick
To praise his sons I shall indeed; their names is Nicholis and young Patrick
They are bright models in the land, And gentlemen of high renown
Both wealth and riches they command, and with felicity they are crowned
Up to spring garden I will go where I shall meet the Valiant Roderick
Who is always kind to friend and foe, and for his valour he is recorded
Next to old Willsbrook I'l repair where Michael lived in wealth and splendor
All those my fond heart held in care and all the rest I cant remember.
senior member (history)
2021-08-01 17:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As blind as a bat. As deaf as a stone. As stiff as a poker. As grey as a goat. As grey as a badger.
As tall as a steeple. As strong as a bull.
As strong as a horse. As supple as a dog.
senior member (history)
2021-08-01 17:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
These ruling members left their descendants which they enjoyed from their forefathers
Their lands and livings and costly dwellings; and I'll begin with noble Arthur
Who owned the palace of old Elphin, fit for a King in noble order
Until his life were at an end; and did attend his lord who called on
senior member (history)
2021-08-01 17:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Memoirs of the descendants of Roderick O Connor king of Connaught - and monarch of Ireland -
In the eightieth year of my old age I undertook this little treatise
That when I'm dead it might presage how past events were related
And when I'm laid up in my grave, and my humble name will be forgotten
It might recount from age to age,, the ancient tribes of old Roscommon.
I was informed by tradition, how great families of this county
Sprung up with honour and high position and lavised riches with great bounty
The great O Conors of Ballingar; and the decendants of the old Monarch
They were brave men in peace or war, and ruled with justice over connought.
The ancient Sandy of Clonalis and his brother Domnick of Cloonfowir
The great fair Thomas of ancient Milltown who was posessed of wealth and power
The brave old Bryan of Killinerty and his friend Thomas of Ballcaher
They were posessed of wealth in plenty and were renowned for fame and honour.
There was in Miltown in my days Three Noble Rodericks in succession,
They were deserved of worthy praise and in all quarters held posessions
Within the province they held command; and ruled alternate in this county
They were admired throughout the land, and their noble hands we streched with bounty.
The ancient Denis of old Willsbrook, and his son Daniel of Ballymoe
And many others I cannot think of were the ruling members of days of old,
If I had known I'dhave to mention, these ancient tribes of this great county
I would adhere with strict attention, and from tradition I could recount them.
senior member (history)
2021-07-30 15:50
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neamhspleádhchas aigne do dhuine.
Is luachmhaire i bhfad é nós an choigiltis ná seód ar bith, mar an té a chleachtann é ní chaillfear go deo air.
Tagann feabhas ar a shaoghal, árdach ar a thuilleamh, agus misneach ina chroidhe.
Bíonn sé galánta, deagh - ghléasta; tigh deas slachtmhar aige, agus cóir mhaith bhídh.
Bíonn rud i gcoimeád aige le haghaidh an ghanntannais, agus bíonn sé saor ó bhuaidhirt.
An té bhíonn thíos, agus a choigleann, árduighthear é, agus an té bhíonn thuas, agus a bhíonn coimeádthach, is fearrde é an nós sin.
Ní oireann airgead mór chun dul ag coigilt. Ní ghádh ach an iarracht do dhéanamh agus leanamhaint de.
Bainfidh sé sochar as fhad is beo é.
senior member (history)
2021-07-30 15:41
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rejected
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neamhspleádhchas aigne do dhuine.
Is luachmhaire i bhfad é nós an choigiltis ná seód ar bith, mar an té a chleachtann é ní chaillfear go deo air.
Tagann feabhas ar a shaoghal, árdach ar a thuilleamh, agus misneach ina chroidhe.
Bíonn sé galánta, deagh - ghléasta; tigh deas slachtmhar aige, agus cóir mhaith bhídh.
senior member (history)
2021-07-27 12:50
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"As red as a turkey - cock's comb".
Anything vey crooked is said to be,
"As crooked as a ram's horn".
Anything very hard is said to be,
"As hard as the hob of hell", or, As hard as a stone.
Anything very green is said to be,
"As green as grass.
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 18:23
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rejected
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visit to a giant's palace. When the giant saw him coming he went to meet him. When he came near him he knocked him. Connor said, "If you are a fair man you will let me up again. When he got up he knocked the giant. The giant said, "You are either Connor from Ireland or the devil from hell". Connor said "I am Connor from Ireland". Then the giant brought Connor into the castle and prepared a great feast for him.
The giant told Connor that there was a fort convenient to the castle and that the fairies dwelt there. They had everything taken belonging to the castle. Connor said he would get them all back.
Off he went to the fort. The fairies refused to give them up. Connor gave each of them a tip of the iron stick. Then came the giant to the fort. The fairies changed the giant's nose to the back of his head. Connor told the fairies, that if they did not change the giant's nose to it's former place he would kill them. They did so.
Then they gave back to Connor
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 18:16
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rejected
awaiting decision
visit to a giant's palace. When the giant saw him coming he went to meet him. When he came near him he knocked him. Connor said, "If you are a fair man you will let me up again. When he got up he knocked the giant. The giant said, "You are either Connor from Ireland or the devil from hell". Connor said "I am Connor from Ireland". Then the giant brought Connor into the castle and prepared a great feast for him.
The giant told Connor that there was a fort convenient to the castle and that the fairies dwelt there. They had everything taken belonging to the castle. Connor said he would get them all back.
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 18:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
visit to a giant's palace. When the giant saw him coming he went to meet him. When he came near him he knocked him. Connor said, "If you are a fair man you will let me up again. When he got up he knocked the giant. The giant said, "You are either Connor from Ireland or the devil from hell". Connor said "I am Connor from Ireland". Then the giant brought Connor into the castle and prepared a great feast for him.
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 17:59
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rejected
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When the giant awoke he ordered Connor away. Connor said he would not go until he had got the slates. The giant got angry and killed Connor's horse.
When Connor came down the giant attempted to kill him. Connor hit him with the iron stick and knocked him. Connor put the giant under the cart and made him draw home the slates.
When the king saw him he could not believe his eyes. The king told him to let back the giant. So he did.
Then he thought of another trick. The next day he told Connor to go down to hell for his rent - books. So he did. When he got there the devils would not give them up. So he gave each of them a blow of the iron stick. They became afraid of him. So they gave up the books.
The king wondered when he saw him coming. All of his plans had failed. So he gave it up.
The next day Connor went on a
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 17:48
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When the giant awoke he ordered Connor away. Connor said he would not go until he had got the slates. The giant got angry and killed Connor's horse.
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 17:42
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rejected
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An té thaithigheann an choigilt, beidh sé saor ó aindeis agus ó anacair.
Mairg an té bíonn scaiptheacht.
Pláigh mharbhthach is eadh an scaiptheacht,
Is mó agus is measa an díoghbháil a dheineann sé ná mar a dheineann airm agus cogaí an domhain le chéile.
Cailltear na milliúin mhóra airgid i nÉirinn, gach bliain, dá dheascaibh.
Tá óg agus críonna tugtha dhó;
Tá íseal agus uasal, tá lag agus láidir.
Tá a rian le feiscint i ngach áit agus i ngach saghas gnótha.
Bíonn an aindeis ar na mílte móra dá bharr, sa bhaile, sa tsráid, san áit gnótha.
Gabhann buaidhirt agus breóiteacht agus bás leis. Ach, féach is beag duine a shéanann ná a sheachnuigheann é.
Is é an námhaid is measa amuigh é.
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 17:31
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rejected
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An té thaithigheann an choigilt, beidh sé saor ó aindeis agus ó anacair.
Mairg an té bíonn scaiptheacht.
Pláigh mharbhthach is eadh an scaiptheacht,
Is mó agus is measa an díoghbháil a dheineann sé ná mar a dheineann airm agus cogaí an domhain le chéile.
senior member (history)
2021-07-26 17:31
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rejected
awaiting decision
An té thaithigheann an choigilt, beidh sé saor ó aindeis agus ó anacair.
Mairg an té bíonn scaiptheacht.
Pláigh mharbhthach is eadh an scaiptheacht,
Is mó agus is measa an díoghbháil a dheineann sé ná mar a dheineann airm agus cogaí an domhain le chéile.
senior member (history)
2021-07-19 17:56
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rejected
awaiting decision
agus na dtrean. Nuair a bhíonn éileamh maith ann deireann m'athair gur beag beithideach a bhíos ann nach mbíonn díolta ag a h-ocht a clog.
Is mór an caitheamh aimsire a bheith ag féachaint ar na daoine agus Éirinn. Bíonn aonach muc ann gach mí freisin agus is beag uair a bhíonn na feirmeóirí ag clamhan faoin luach.
Gan na h-aontaighe áiteamhla ní bheadh na feirmeóirí ábalta slighe maireachtáil a baint amach.
senior member (history)
2021-07-19 17:45
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rejected
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agus na dtrean. Nuair a bhíonn éileamh maith ann deireann m'athair gur beag beithideach a bhíos ann nach mbíonn díolta ag a h-ocht a clog.
Is mór an caitheamh aimsire a bheith ag féachaint ar na daoine agus iad ag déanamh margadh.
Bíonn siad ag argúint agus ag arguint annsin tagann cara, agus bíonn sé bog agus go cruaidh ortha an difríocht a roinnt. Nuair a déantar margadh maith is minic a bhíos sé ar mhaithe tighe tabhairne éigin.
senior member (history)
2021-07-19 17:29
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rejected
awaiting decision
agus na dtrean. Nuair a bhíonn éileamh maith ann deireann m'athair gur beag beithideach a bhíos ann nach mbíonn díolta ag a h-ocht a clog.
senior member (history)
2021-07-19 17:22
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rejected
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That night the king said to Connor "There's a small bag of wheat in the store." Will you go to the mill with it". "I will" said Connor and he went. When he went in he saw the devil there. He walked towards him, "Go out said the devil or I'll have your life," "You won't" said Connor. "Come out of my way" and he gave him a tip of the stick. "Come away I tell you" said Connor or I'll make short work of you". So they had an argument.
Connor said the king had no flour and he had to grind this wheat. Still the devil would not let him. Connor got angry and he took the devil and he ground one of his legs off and then he left him there. Then he ground his bag of wheat and went home.
The king was surprised when he saw him coming. He knew that trick had failed.
Yet he thought of another one. The next day the king sent Connor to a giant's palace for a load of golden slates. Away he went. When he arrived there he went up on the roof of the castle and began taking the slates, and do you think, he started but right over the giant's head.
senior member (history)
2021-07-19 17:16
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rejected
awaiting decision
That night the king said to Connor "There's a small bag of wheat in the store." Will you go to the mill with it". "I will" said Connor and he went. When he went in he saw the devil there. He walked towards him, "Go out said the devil or I'll have your life," "You won't" said Connor. "Come out of my way" and he gave him a tip of the stick. "Come away I tell you" said Connor or I'll make short work of you". So they had an argument.
Connor said the king had no flour and he had to grind this wheat. Still the devil would not let him. Connor got angry and he took the devil and he ground one of his legs off and then he left him there. Then he ground his bag of wheat and went home.
senior member (history)
2021-07-19 17:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
That night the king said to Connor "There's a small bag of wheat in the store." Will you go to the mill with it". "I will" said Connor and he went. When he went in he saw the devil there. He walked towards him, "Go out said the devil or I'll have your life," "You won't" said Connor. "Come out of my way" and he gave him a tip of the stick. "Come away I tell you" said Connor or I'll make short work of you". So they had an argument.
senior member (history)
2021-07-16 12:07
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the owner of the Dundonnell home was insulted by a man named Kelly. he was an old man and unable to avenge the insult. His kinsman ,Keogh of Keoghville resolved to do so. A duel was to be fought near Bridge outside Athlone. Keogh got a pair of pistols which had belonged to a relation of his by marriage - Fallon. This Fallon had used those same pistols in a duel with one of the Bellews of Mount Bellew.
Keogh set out to meet his opponent. All his tenants armed with sticks joined him. When they arrived the formidable appearance of Keogh and his followers frightened Kelly and the dispute was settled amicably, Kelly apologising to Keogh for the insult offered his kinsman
senior member (history)
2021-07-16 12:06
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rejected
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the owner of the Dundonnell home was insulted by a man named Kelly. he was an old man and unable to avenge the insult. His kinsman ,Keogh of Keoghville resolved to do so. A duel was to be fought near Bridge outside Athlone. Keogh got a pair of pistols which had belonged to a relation of his by marriage - Fallon. This Fallon had used those same pistols in a duel with one of the Bellews of Mount Bellew.
Keogh set out to meet his opponent. All his tenants armed with sticks joined him. When they arrived the formidable appearance of Keogh and his followers frightened Kelly and the dispute was settled amicably,Kelly apologising to Keogh for the insult offered his kinsman
senior member (history)
2021-07-16 12:04
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Taghmaconnell was formerly known as Tuaith Keogh or Keogh’s countly. The chief family in this district was Keogh and long ago it was ruled by five families of that name.
Castlesamson was their chief castle. It was owned by Samson Keogh, who was so nicknamed because of his great strength. When the O’ Kellys were hunted from other parts by the Cromwellians they wished to take his land and he was murdered by a certain O’Kelly. At first they could not take Castlesamson and they sent an envoy to Samson. Keogh was asleep upstairs and a servant went up to
senior member (history)
2021-07-16 11:58
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ingean amháin i gclann na n-Eocach. Cuaidh siad sios go pátrún Tobar Brighde uair amháin ar fiche is a h-aon capall bán & deirtear nár tháinig siad arais.
Tá páirc na bhfiadh i mBaile na n-Eocach agus bhí fiadh ann uair. Tá balla mór taobh thiar de atá 10 troighte ar aoirde. Tá deich acraí talmhan ins ann bpáirc sin. Tá cloch ann os cionn Mrs Elizabeth Keogh" a bhí na comnuidhe sa caisleán mór.
senior member (history)
2021-07-16 11:57
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seo ceaduighthe d'aoinne dul isteach ann. In am Crombhell mharbhuigeadh éinne a chuaidh isteach ann.
Cuireadh bean de muintir Eocach ann. Tá cloch mór ós a cionn & litreacha sgriobhta air.
Eílis Nic Eocaidh
Fuair bás 1739.

Baile na n-Eocach.
Cuireadh an t-ainm sin air mar bhí clann tabhachtach darbh ainm dóibh Clann na n-Eacach 'na gcomhnuidhe san áit seo uair amhái . Tá cúig tighthe ann, ceithre cinn slinne & aon cheann tuighe.
Tá píosa de'n tsean caisleán le feiscint anois. Tá sé cúigeadh slait ar fhaid agus deich dtroighthe ar leitheád agus 35 slait ar aoird é.
Deirtear go raibh fiche dearbrataracha agus duine agus aon
senior member (history)
2021-07-16 11:55
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rejected
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is mó cáil ann. Níl aoinne ann a labhrann an Ghaedhilg.
Níl an talamh saidhbhir agus níl sliabh ann ach cnocháin. Fásann coirce eorna fataí agus roinnt cruithneacht ann.
Tá cnoch ann - sé an t - ainm atá air - "Chip Hill" . Tá Easbog curtha ann - Duine de mhuintir Eocach.
Ar bharr an chnuic tá lios. Chuaidh sagart thar an áit seo. Chuir sé balla beag thart ar an gcnoch agus cuireadh blátha ag fás ann. Tá siad ag fás ann fós.
In aice an sráid-bhaile seo tá sráid bhaile eile. Sé an t - ainm atá air ná Tobar Maoilsheaclain. Chuaidh Naomh Maoil sheaclain tar an áit tráth. Bhí seipéal ann uair. Deirtear go bfuil cailís ón seipéal i seipéal Teach Mhic Connaill. Tá pluais ann freisin.
Tá sean fhothracha le feiceáil i Sceach - Bhealaigh (Skyvalley) - Sean fhotracha mainistreach seadh iad. Bhí páirc mór in aice leo agus ní raibh
senior member (history)
2021-07-16 11:54
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ann - na coirce agus fataí.
Tá timcheall caogadh acra ag gach feirmeoir ann -
Muinntir Cuanaigh - 54 ac.
Muinntir Mich Domhnaill - 50 ac.
Muinntir Cuanaigh (Tomás) 100 ac.
Muinntir Neachtáin 101 ac.
Abhnach (Oonagh)
Tá Abhnach suidhthe timcheall leath mhíle ón sgoil. Tá dhá chuid ann
Abhnach Uachtar agus Abhnach Íochtar.
(1) Abhnach Íochtar tugadh an t-ainm sin dó mar téigheann abha gach geimhreadh tríd go Cluain na Caltrach go tobar. Ins an tobar sin tá altóir agus deirtear gur léigh sagart an t - Aifreann ann uair amháin.
Tá cúig tighthe ann acht uair amháin ní raibh ach trí cinn. Tá beirt daoine is ficheadh ina gcoinnuidhe ann. Sé Mac Loineann (Glennon) an clann
senior member (history)
2021-07-15 21:34
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Woe to him who is wasteful.
Wastefulness is a deadly plague.
It has caused more destruction than all the wars of history.
Through it many millions of pounds are lost in Ireland, yearly.
Young and old are its victims, high and low, the strong and the weak.
On every place and on every activity it casts its shadow.
You will find countless thousands of its miserable victims - note them in their homes, or in public or at their work.
It brings sickness, degradation and death, yet few seek to avoid it.
It is your worst enemy.
It goes on its way, crushing and destroying, and leaving nothing in its tracks.
senior member (history)
2021-07-15 21:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Woe to him who is wasteful.
Wastefulness is a deadly plague.
It has caused more destruction than all the wars of history.
Through it many millions of pounds are lost in Ireland, yearly.
Young and old are its victims, high and low, the strong and the weak.
On every place and on every activity it casts its shadow.
You will find countless thousands of its miserable victims - note them in their homes, or in public or at their work.
senior member (history)
2021-07-15 21:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Woe to him who is wasteful.
Wastefulness is a deadly plague.
It has caused more destruction than all the wars of history.
Through it many millions of pounds are lost in Ireland, yearly.
Young and old are its victims, high and low, the strong and the weak.
senior member (history)
2021-07-15 21:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Memoirs of the descendants of Roderick O Connor king of Connaught - and monarch of Ireland -
In the eightieth year of my old age I undertook this little treatise
That when I'm dead it might presage how past events were related
And when I'm laid up in my grave, and my humble name will be forgotten
It might recount from age to age,, the ancient tribes of old Roscommon.
I was informed by tradition, how great families of this county
Sprung up with honour and high position and lavised riches with great bounty
The great O Conors of Ballingar; and the decendants of the old Monarch
They were brave men in peace or war, and ruled with justice over connought.
senior member (history)
2021-07-15 21:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Memoirs of the descendants of Roderick O Connor king of Connaught - and monarch of Ireland -
In the eightieth year of my old age I undertook this little treatise
That when I'm dead it might presage how past events were related
And when I'm laid up in my grave, and my humble name will be forgotten
It might recount from age to age,, the ancient tribes of old Roscommon.
senior member (history)
2021-07-15 21:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and the lip.
Its two late to spare when all is spent.
A place for everything and everything in its proper place.
As you brew you must bake.
As you sow you must reap.
Do not spur a willing horse.
Half a loaf is better than no bread.
Look before you leap.
If you loose an hour in the morning you will be all the day hunting it.
He who can't take a joke should not make a joke.
Man proposes but God disposes.
Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tea.
Don't count the chickens until they are hatched.
When a person is very fat he is said to be,
"As fat as a fool".
When a person is contrary he is said to be
"As contrary as a weasel.
If a man is is in difficulties he is said to be
"between the devil and the deep sea".
Anything very red is said to be
senior member (history)
2021-07-15 21:01
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rejected
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and the lip.
Its two late to spare when all is spent.
A place for everything and everything in its proper place.
As you brew you must bake.
As you sow you must reap.
Do not spur a willing horse.
Half a loaf is better than no bread.
Look before you leap.
If you loose an hour in the morning you will be all the day hunting it.
He who can't take a joke should not make a joke.
Man proposes but God disposes.
Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tea.
Don't count the chickens until they are hatched.
senior member (history)
2021-07-14 18:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and the lip.
senior member (history)
2021-07-14 18:35
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awaiting decision
It's an ill wind that does not blow any good.
A green Christmas makes a fat graveyard.
He who laughs last laughs loudest.
There no loaf without a knife to cut it.
Necessity is the mother of invention.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
A straight tree may have crooked roots.
Practice what you preach.
Silks and satins often put out the kitchen fire.
Praise the fine day at night.
Little dogs start the hare and big ones catch him.
The old dog for the long road and the pup for the boireen.
Never send a pup on a dog's message.
A bird in the hand is worth two on the bush.
A penny wise and pound foolish.
A lie has no legs.
The last straw breaks the horse's back.
Between two stools you come to the ground.
If you do not bend the tree when its young you won't it when its old.
Strick the iron when its hot.
You cannot bleed a turnip.
There's many a slip between the cup
senior member (history)
2021-07-14 18:29
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rejected
awaiting decision
It's an ill wind that does not blow any good.
A green Christmas makes a fat graveyard.
He who laughs last laughs loudest.
There no loaf without a knife to cut it.
Necessity is the mother of invention.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
A straight tree may have crooked roots.
Practice what you preach.
Silks and satins often put out the kitchen fire.
Praise the fine day at night.
Little dogs start the hare and big ones catch him.
The old dog for the long road and the pup for the boireen.
Never send a pup on a dog's message.
A bird in the hand is worth two on the bush.
senior member (history)
2021-07-14 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mother out of the clíabh, and put her sitting on a chair. Very soon they got a good dinner. Connor was very happy.
The next day Connor was sent out in the yard doing little jobs. His mother had a fine time inside in a lovely room, all by herself.
Now the king had two wolfhounds that no body ever went into and the king told Connor to go in and to clean out the kennel as it was a bit dirty. Connor took his walking stick and went in. The hounds started to grin, and tried to bite him. He gave them a blow each of the stick and out they ran. When the king saw this, he said to Connor "If you don't get the hounds in they will eat everyone in the country" Connor ran after them and ran them in again.
Now when the king saw that this trick had failed, he thought of another one. Next day Connor was walking round doing nothing until evening. The king was in company with the devil in a flour mill. The king worked the mill in the day and the devil worked it by day.
senior member (history)
2021-07-14 18:14
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rejected
awaiting decision
mother out of the clíabh, and put her sitting on a chair. Very soon they got a good dinner. Connor was very happy.
The next day Connor was sent out in the yard doing little jobs. His mother had a fine time inside in a lovely room, all by herself.
Now the king had two wolfhounds that no body ever went into and the king told Connor to go in and to clean out the kennel as it was a bit dirty. Connor took his walking stick and went in. The hounds started to grin, and tried to bite him. He gave them a blow each of the stick and out they ran. When the king saw this, he said to Connor "If you don't get the hounds in they will eat everyone in the country" Connor ran after them and ran them in again.
senior member (history)
2021-07-12 21:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bíonn na h-aontaighe áiteamhla ar siubhail imBéal Átha -na- mBuill agus Roscamán. Is ins na sráideanna a bhíd in ionad i bpáirc an aonaigh mar ní bhíonn mórán stuic ann.
Ceannuightear an chuid is mó des na beithidigh is feárr sa mbaile ar an bhfeirm agus céim ar siar" seadh é seo dos na siopadóirí. An lá aonaigh i mBéal Átha na -mBuillí caithfidh na daoine a bheith ar an aonach go moch mar níl bóthar iarrainn níos giorra don baile ná Roscomáin. I Roscomáin féin 'sé nós atá ag na feirmeóirí ná na beithigidh a bheith ar na sráideanna timcheall a trí a clog ar maidin. Ní cloistear o'n am sin amach ach géimnigh na n-ainmhidhe
senior member (history)
2021-07-12 21:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bíonn na h-aontaighe áiteamhla ar siubhail imBéal Átha -na- mBuill agus Roscamán. Is ins na sráideanna a bhíd in ionad i bpáirc an aonaigh mar ní bhíonn mórán stuic ann.
Ceannuightear an chuid is mó des na beithidigh is feárr sa mbaile ar an bhfeirm agus céim ar siar" seadh é seo dos na siopadóirí. An lá aonaigh i mBéal Átha na -mBuillí caithfidh na daoine a bheith ar an aonach go moch mar níl bóthar iarrainn níos giorra don baile ná Roscomáin.
senior member (history)
2021-07-12 20:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mother out of the clíabh, and put her sitting on a chair. Very soon they got a good dinner. Connor was very happy.
senior member (history)
2021-07-12 20:49
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rejected
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as soon and as quietly as you can or he will kill you. A few days later this man arrived. When he came near the kings palace there was a guard of soldiers to guard the entrance.
When they saw Connor they tried to stop him from entering. They began to abuse him. He hit one of them with the iron stick, knocked him against him against another, killed both of them, and broke another man's leg. He ran and picked up the leg, and knocked down four more with it. Then the king ran out and told them to let that man pass. So they did. Up he went to the king's palace door. The king asked him what did he want. Well he said "I heard you got married" I had two sheep when I heard of your marriage. I killed one of them in honour of you and your wife, and now I have nothing to live on. I want you to do something for me. I have my old mother here also pointing at the clíabh. "Very well" said the king "can you work" "I can said Connor". "Come in and sit down, said the king and I will get your dinner". Connor went in and sat down, and took his
senior member (history)
2021-07-12 20:37
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rejected
awaiting decision
as soon and as quietly as you can or he will kill you. A few days later this man arrived. When he came near the kings palace there was a guard of soldiers to guard the entrance.
When they saw Connor they tried to stop him from entering. They began to abuse him. He hit one of them with the iron stick, knocked him against him against another, killed both of them, and broke another man's leg. He ran and picked up the leg, and knocked down four more with it. Then the king ran out and told them to let that man pass.
senior member (history)
2021-07-12 20:31
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rejected
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Once upon a time there was a widow and her son living together in a small mudwall cabin at the foot of a big hill. They had two sheep. The widow was very lonely, for a long time, because her son never walked until he was twenty-one years of age. One day when he was twenty-one years he stretched himself and he became so tall that his mother had to knock the end out of the house before he could stretch himself to his full length.
The next morning there was a great snow on the ground. The widow thought it would be a good thing to have her son Baptized. So she went for the priest as she was afraid her son would not be able to walk to where he lived. Away she went and whilst she was away her son walked out and looked around him. He saw two sheep above on top of the big hill. He said to himself "I'll run up and bring them down". There was so much snow on the ground that they could
senior member (history)
2021-07-11 17:25
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rejected
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as soon and as quietly as you can or he will kill you. A few days later this man arrived. When he came near the kings palace there was a guard of soldiers to guard the entrance.
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 21:00
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rejected
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Dont put new wine into old bottles,
The cock crows but the hens deliver the goods,
There is no place like home,
A closed mouth makes a wise head,
Play the game and fear not,
Too far East is West,
Have it yourself or be without it,
Small leaks sink big ships,
There is so much bad in the best of us, and so much good in the worst of us, that it ill behoves any of us to say anything bad about the rest of us.
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 20:51
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Anything very white is said to be
"As white as a hound's tooth"
or
"As white as snow".
Anything very flat is said to be
"As flat as a pan-cake".
Anything very small is said to be
"As small as a wren's egg
Anything very long is said to be
"As long as a wet week
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 17:25
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rejected
awaiting decision
duine ar bith annseo le Aifreann a fhreastáil". Tháinig an sagart síos go dtí an Seipéal agus arsa sé "Tá mise annseo. Cérbhh é an duine ach an t-Athair De Róiste a tháinig arais chun an t-Aifreann a léigheamh. Leigh sé an Aifreann agus nuair a raibh sé críocnuighthe chuaidh sé amach tré bárr an Teach agus ní fhacha an sagart é arís.
Bhí beirt fear ag dul chuig aonach maidin amháin. Nuair a bhíodar ag dul thar an teach seo tháinig cáirt amach tré geata an tighe. Bhí capaill faoi. Ní raibh aon ceann air agus ní raibh ceann ar an tiomanaidhe ach an oiread. Chuaidh an cáirt as radarc an beirt agus cúpla la ina diaidh sin fuair duine aca bas. Deirtear ina dhiaidh gur comharla dá bas a b'eadh sin.
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 17:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
duine ar bith annseo le Aifreann a fhreastáil". Tháinig an sagart síos go dtí an Seipéal agus arsa sé "Tá mise annseo. Cérbhh é an duine ach an t-Athair De Róiste a tháinig arais chun an t-Aifreann a léigheamh. Leigh sé an Aifreann agus nuair a raibh sé críocnuighthe chuaidh sé amach tré bárr an Teach agus ní fhacha an sagart é arís.
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 17:09
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rejected
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na leacracha agus cuirtear isteach na comhra, annsan cuirtear na leacracha ar ais airís chun na comhranna do chlúduigheadh.
Tá páirc in - aice na roilige ar a dtugtar "Páirc na Mainistreach" lán de thaidhsíbh; má labhrann aoinne ós árd téighid ag amharc ar ball.
Tá roilig cúpla míle slighe ó gCill Trustán ar a dtugtar Cill Bhendán, agus san t-sean aimsear cuirtí sagairt clumhala annsin, agus mar gheall ar seo ófráiltí an t-Aifreann Naomhtha uair sa bliadhain i gCathair na Róimhe ar son na n-anam? go léir a bhain le Cill Bhendán.
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 17:04
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rejected
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na leacracha agus cuirtear isteach na comhra, annsan cuirtear na leacracha ar ais airís chun na comhranna do chlúduigheadh.
Tá páirc in - aice na roilige ar a dtugtar "Páirc na Mainistreach" lán de thaidhsíbh; má labhrann aoinne ós árd téighid ag amharc ar ball.
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 17:01
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rejected
awaiting decision
na leacracha agus cuirtear isteach na comhra, annsan cuirtear na leacracha ar ais airís chun na comhranna do chlúduigheadh.
senior member (history)
2021-07-08 16:58
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rejected
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Tá fothracha sean mainistreach i roilg Cluain Tuaiscirt. Sean bhallaí ar a bhfuil eidheann ag fás atá le feiceál. Tá cosamhlacht orra gur foirghniamh an-mhór a bhí ann uair amháin. Tá gairéid ann in a gcuirtear na marbh, leacracha móra atá mar clár ar na gairéidibh seo, agus táid tuairim ocht nó naoi dtroighthe ar fhaid agus ceithre troighthe ar leithead. Tógtar
senior member (history)
2021-07-07 20:06
approved
rejected
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and get him to make one". Away she went, and when she came back with it Connor took it by both ends and left the middle upon his knee and he broke it. "Here " he said "Go back and tell him this one is no good". Tell him to make another one and to put 1lb to every oz. of steel that's in this one". Away she went and got him to do so. Home she came with it and got it very hard to carry it. Connor took it as before left it against his knee and bent it. " This one is all right", he said, "We will start tomorrow".
Next morning very early the both arose. "Where shall we go" said the mother. "To the king's palace" answered Connor. "I killed my two sheep in honour of him and his wife, and its the least he may do something for me now". So he put his mother into the cliabh, put the cliabh on his back and set off for the king's palace.
The king had a grand advise/or and he told the king that there was a very dangerous man coming to the palace, and to be very nice to him. "Kill him
senior member (history)
2021-07-06 20:54
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rejected
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As we stated on Page Michael Hyland had a Hedge School in Ballymoe and as we have found a manuscript of his we will give a portion of it. He seemed afraid to tell all the truth as the landlords were very powerful then. The following verses are useful only as they give the names of the O'Connor families throughout Co Roscommon and where they lived.
From a number of loose leaves we have tried to get the correct order of the stangas. In the 20th verse one would imagine it was Michael Coffey wrote it but at the finish it is plain that it was Hyland. Coffey was a friend of his evidently or another scribe. It is not written but printed neatly with what was probably a goose quill. The tone of servility to the ruling classes of the time is very evident. As we stated previously Hyland taught in Ballymoe about 90 years ago.
N.B.
Although it was all written by the one hand, the last nine verses are of different metre - one freer and more modern style.
Perhaps Coffey and Hyland were writing verses for each other.
Many leaves are lost.
senior member (history)
2021-07-06 20:46
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rejected
awaiting decision
As we stated on Page Michael Hyland had a Hedge School in Ballymoe and as we have found a manuscript of his we will give a portion of it. He seemed afraid to tell all the truth as the landlords were very powerful then. The following verses are useful only as they give the names of the O'Connor families throughout Co Roscommon and where they lived.
From a number of loose leaves we have tried to get the correct order of the stangas. In the 20th verse one would imagine it was Michael Coffey wrote it but at the finish it is plain that it was Hyland. Coffey was a friend of his evidently or another scribe.
senior member (history)
2021-07-06 20:34
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Oat-meal potatoe-cake, was made by boiling potatoes and peeling and blending them and then adding a pinch of salt.
Afterwards adding some oat-meal according to the size of the cake, and kneading out into a flat cake. Then cutting it into four parts called parleys and baking them on a pan without a lid. Flour potatoe cake was made in the same way. The only difference being that flour was used instead of oat-meal.
Oat-meal bread and oaten gruel. Oat-meal bread was made in the ordinary way, and allowed to stiffen. The gruel was then made. The parleys of bread were put into it and boiled for some time, and then left to cool and eaten with the gruel. This was called Cáca pota.
Boxty Making. Some large raw potatoes were washed and the eyes taken out of them. Then a piece of tin was bored with a large nail. It was then nailed to a piece of board its own size, with the smooth side facing the board and the rough side out.
This was called a scraper. The potatoes were scraped on this. When scraped the produce was
senior member (history)
2021-07-06 20:27
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Oat-meal potatoe-cake, was made by boiling potatoes and peeling and blending them and then adding a pinch of salt.
Afterwards adding some oat-meal according to the size of the cake, and kneading out into a flat cake. Then cutting it into four parts called parleys and baking them on a pan without a lid. Flour potatoe cake was made in the same way. The only difference being that flour was used instead of oat-meal.
Oat-meal bread and oaten gruel. Oat-meal bread was made in the ordinary way, and allowed to stiffen. The gruel was then made. The parleys of bread were put into it and boiled for some time, and then left to cool and eaten with the gruel. This was called Cáca pota.
senior member (history)
2021-07-06 20:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Oat-meal potatoe-cake, was made by boiling potatoes and peeling and blending them and then adding a pinch of salt.
Afterwards adding some oat-meal according to the size of the cake, and kneading out into a flat cake. Then cutting it into four parts called parleys and baking them on a pan without a lid. Flour potatoe cake was made in the same way. The only difference being that flour was used instead of oat-meal.
senior member (history)
2021-07-06 17:24
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Bailigh chugat i n-aghaidh na bruide.
Is fearr coigile ar dtúis ná ar deireadh
Is fearr coigile ná scaipeadh
Cnuasuigheann triopall beart.
An beagán go minic a líonann an sparán
Gheibheann pingin pingin eile.
Coigil chugat, a chara
An duine ná coigleann, ní éireóiaidh leis puinn sa tsaoghal. Agus is é an sgéal céadna ag aí bhíonn an náisiún
Éinne a gheibheann clú sa tsaoghal, bíonn sé cionnsclach, coimeádthach.
Ní bhíonn an rath ach mar a mbíonn an coigilt, ach is féidir le gach éinne, idir bocht agus saidhbhir, rud beag a choigilt ó uair go chéile.
Níl teóra le na mhaitheasaí a gabhann leis. Tugann sé suaimhneas agus
senior member (history)
2021-07-04 17:12
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William Burke, Cloonee, carried five cwt. weight of stuff a distance of five miles from Castlerea.
William Burke of Cloonee also used to mow up to five roods of meadow in one day. He used to go out on hire.
John Cunneely of Cloonadaragh used to mow an acre in one day. He also went out on hire.
James Skeffington of Cloonadaragh was a good turf cutter. He cut about five clamps a day. William Burke was a good turf cutter also.
Johnny Brennan of Tobar cut 15 score of stooks in one day. Long ago people used to do much more work than now. They ate oat meal bread and were stronger.
William Burke of Cloonee lifted five cwt. weight of oilcake off the ground on to his back.
William Giblin carried five cwt. of lead up three flights of stairs in Castlerea about fifty years ago. The old people had contests at throwing weights, mowing, jumping and other feats.
senior member (history)
2021-07-04 17:08
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rejected
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William Burke, Cloonee, carried five cwt. weight of stuff a distance of five miles from Castlerea.
William Burke of Cloonee also used to mow up to five roods of meadow in one day. He used to go out on hire.
John Cunneely of Cloonadaragh used to mow an acre in one day. He also went out on hire.
James Skeffington of Cloonadaragh was a good turf cutter. He cut about five clamps a day. William Burke was a good turf cutter also.
Johnny Brennan of Tobar cut 15 score of stooks in one day. Long ago people used to do much more work than now. They ate oat meal bread and were stronger.
senior member (history)
2021-07-04 17:06
approved
rejected
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William Burke, Cloonee, carried five cwt. weight of stuff a distance of five miles from Castlerea.
William Burke of Cloonee also used to mow up to five roods of meadow in one day. He used to go out on hire.
John Cunneely of Cloonadaragh used to mow an acre in one day. He also went out on hire.
James Skeffington of Cloonadaragh was a good turf cutter. He cut about five clamps a day. William Burke was a good turf cutter also.
senior member (history)
2021-07-04 16:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Johnny Brennan of Tobar cut fifteen score of stooks in one day.
William Burke of Cloonee carried five cwt weight of stuff a distance of five miles.
James Skeffington of Cloonadarragh was a good turf cutter. He cut about five clamps in a day.William Burke used to mow about five roods of meadow in a day.
John Cunneely used to mow an acre in the day.
William Giblin carried five cwt. of lead up three
flights of stairs.
Malachy Lee of Durrow carried 1 cwt of meal five miles without resting.
senior member (history)
2021-07-04 15:50
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A goat's remains he found
Which was greatly mutilated
with a leg and horn gone
and brought to Ballintubber for her post-mortum. Mr. Byrne out district Veterary Surgeon was wired for in haste,
To have a post-mortum
on the remains of the late goat diceased.
The verdict, "Her body was battered and bruised. Of a leg and horn she was deprived
Death was due to suffocation,
after injury or else she was buried alive."
The facts would not satisfy Railway Officals
as Legal Proceedings were their aim
against the Ros. Co. Council for a malicious claim.
The Railway Company Officals were defeated.
Their action not worth a goat
Nor sued for their admired Officals.
The legal owner of the goat.
On the trial day in Roscommon you
could plainly see,
the Railway Company Officals were
senior member (history)
2021-07-04 15:43
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rejected
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A goat's remains he found
Which was greatly mutilated
with a leg and horn gone
and brought to Ballintubber for her post-mortum. Mr. Byrne out district Veterary Surgeon was wired for in haste,
To have a post-mortum
on the remains of the late goat diceased.
The verdict, "Her body was battered and bruised. Of a leg and horn she was deprived
Death was due to suffocation,
after injury or else she was buried alive."
The facts would not satisfy Railway Officials
as Legal Proceedings were their aim
against the Ros. Co. Council for a malicious claim.
senior member (history)
2021-07-04 15:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A goat's remains he found
Which was greatly mutilated
with a leg and horn gone
and brought to Ballintubber for her post-mortum. Mr. Byrne out district Veterary Surgeon was wired for in haste,
To have a post-mortum
on the remains of the late goat diceased.
The verdict, "Her body was battered and bruised.
senior member (history)
2021-06-28 19:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
precious than jewels, for he who makes a practise of it will never know defeat.
It will lift its possessor to higher planes of living, increase his earning power and inspire him with courage.
It makes a man well dressed, well housed and well fed.
It insures against the rainy day and drives away care.
It exalts those of low degree and helps those of high degree.
To practise thrift, no capital is needed, but only effort and perseverance.
It will pay dividends that last through life.
The practise of thrift will free you from stress and misery.
senior member (history)
2021-06-28 19:53
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rejected
awaiting decision
precious than jewels, for he who makes a practise of it will never know defeat.
It will lift its possessor to higher planes of living, increase his earning power and inspire him with courage.
senior member (history)
2021-06-28 19:50
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rejected
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Gather to you to meet scarcity.
It's better to save early than late.
Saving is better than spending.
Wisps make a bundle.
A little often fills the purse.
One penny gets another.
Be provident, my friend.
Without thrift, no man can achieve any great measure of success and so, too, with nations.
Whoever would win note, must be industrious and frugal.
There cannot be prosperity where thrift is not; yet everyone, poor as well as rich, can save something from time to time.
The benefits of thrift are boundless: among its gifts are independence and peace of mind.
The habit of thrift is more
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 20:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
Dubhairt bean an tighe gurb é an cara ba mhó atá agam. "Tá breall ort" arsan sagart, sin é an námha is mó atá agat. Sin í an bhean atá ag bacadh leis an im.
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 20:08
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awaiting decision
Céad go leith bliadhain ó shoin, bhí bean in-a cómhnuidhe tamaillín ón mbaile mór. Bhí féar agus bó aici. Bean Uí Corcoráin an t-ainm a bhí uirri.
Ghníodh sí maistreadh gach Shatharn ach dá mbéadh sí ag maistreadh go dtí an lá atá indiu ann, ní bhfuigheadh bluire ime. Bhí sí chomh cráidhte sin gur chuir sí fios ar an sagart. Nuair a tháinig an sagart agus dubhairt sé paidreacha, agus sa deire dubhairt sé léithí an bainne a chur san gcuinneog.
Thosnuigh sé ag paidreóracht airís, agus seo chuige isteach bean a bhí ag cíoradh a cuid gruaige agus dubhairt sé leithí imtheacht
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 20:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Céad go leith bliadhain ó shoin, bhí bean in-a cómhnuidhe tamaillín ón mbaile mór. Bhí féar agus bó aici. Bean Uí Corcoráin an t-ainm a bhí uirri.
Ghníodh sí maistreadh gach Shatharn ach dá mbéadh sí ag maistreadh go dtí an lá atá indiu ann, ní bhfuigheadh bluire ime. Bhí sí chomh cráidhte sin gur chuir sí fios ar an sagart. Nuair a tháinig an sagart agus dubhairt sé paidreacha, agus sa deire dubhairt sé léithí an bainne a chur san gcuinneog.
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 20:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Céad go leith bliadhain ó shoin, bhí bean in-a cómhnuidhe tamaillín ón mbaile mór. Bhí féar agus bó aici. Bean Uí Corcoráin an t-ainm a bhí uirri.
Ghníodh sí maistreadh gach Shatharn ach dá mbéadh sí ag maistreadh go dtí an lá atá indiu ann, ní bhfuigheadh bluire ime.
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 19:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Céad go leith bliadhain ó shoin, bhí bean in-a cómhnuidhe tamaillín ón mbaile mór. Bhí féar agus bó aici. Bean Uí Corcoráin an t-ainm a bhí uirri.
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I now will quickly state,
A pair of bogey wheels,
about 1 cwt weight,
And a starved old goat being tied to them
for an unknown time, And in pursuit of food she went,
With the wheels along the line,
The night of the wreck
no cause of it to hand.
But next morning early were the marks
Done by two malicious hands.
Long since secrets were made known
Those secrets now I quote.
The perpetrator of the crime
was a dam old half-starved goat.
Now Sgt P. MacNelty,
endeavoured with great main,
To make public what caused
The obstruction to the train,
And a long and tedious search,
Succeeded true and brave,
Finding for posterity, The disaster to a newly made grave, Soon taking fast his pick and and spade,
To ascertain the ground ,
and in opening up the new made grave,
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 19:35
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rejected
awaiting decision
About the year 1900 there was a railway accident at Frenchlawn crossing on the west side of Ballymoe Station. A man named Michael Kenny lived at the crossing and he used to have his goat tied to a bogey.
Some said it was the goat pulled out the bogey in front of the train and others said it was the people. The passenger train coming from Castlerea at 1 o'clock ran up on it and was derailed. It was knocked down the siding into the bog.
There was a dentist killed who was going to Dublin but the other people escaped. The next day was Sunday and a train came came with cranes to pull out the derailed train and all the milesmen gathered to help. There was law over it and Michael Kenny was changed out of the crossing and was sent to County Down.
The dentist who was killed was a Mr. Millar. A brother of his was shot dead in Westport. He was a District Inspector of police. The first year we had Summer time, he was putting on the hands of his clock at midnight, when he was shot dead through the window.
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 19:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About the year 1900 there was a railway accident at Frenchlawn crossing on the west side of Ballymoe Station. A man named Michael Kenny lived at the crossing and he used to have his goat tied to a bogey.
Some said it was the goat pulled out the bogey in front of the train and others said it was the people. The passenger train coming from Castlerea at 1 o'clock ran up on it and was derailed. It was knocked down the siding into the bog.
There was a dentist killed who was going to Dublin but the other people escaped. The next day was Sunday and a train came came with cranes to pull out the derailed train and all the milesmen gathered to help. There was law over it and Michael Kenny was changed out of the crossing and was sent to County Down.
senior member (history)
2021-06-25 19:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About the year 1900 there was a railway accident at Frenchlawn crossing on the west side of Ballymoe Station. A man named Michael Kenny lived at the crossing and he used to have his goat tied to a bogey.
Some said it was the goat pulled out the bogey in front of the train and others said it was the people. The passenger train coming from Castlerea at 1 o'clock ran up on it and was derailed. It was knocked down the siding into the bog.
senior member (history)
2021-06-24 21:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sergeant McNelty R.I.C. of Ballintubber was first to render assistance. The Station Master in Ballymoe was a Mr. Judge. The old goat was buried alive it is said.
Here is a very crude song which was composed at the time. It was taken down by Peter Govern of Clooneygrasson from his father Thomas Govern. The author is unknown.
It was in the Spring time of the year,
I hear the people say.
A sad disaster had occurred,
On the midland Great Railway And within one mile of Ballymoe,
To quote it I won't fail.
At the level crossing nigh Snipehill,
the mail train was derailed,
The scene of this occurence,
was hearting for to see.
One promising young Gentleman,
Went to Eternity.
The dying dead and wounded,
On the turf they helpless lay,
Awaiting medical Assistance,
until the dawn of day. The cause of this disaster.
senior member (history)
2021-06-24 21:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sergeant McNelty R.I.C. of Ballintubber was first to render assistance. The Station Master in Ballymoe was a Mr. Judge. The old goat was buried alive it is said.
Here is a very crude song which was composed at the time. It was taken down by Peter Govern of Clooneygrasson from his father Thomas Govern. The author is unknown.
senior member (history)
2021-06-24 21:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
all the things belonging to the castle. Then Connor gave them to the giant. The giant was very pleased and he asked Connor to come and live with him. Connor said he could not, as his mother was living in the king's palace. Connor went back to the palace. The king asked him why he did not remain with the giant. Connor replied he would if he would marry his mother. The king would not. Connor killed the king and took the throne himself.
He and his mother lived happily ever afterwards.
senior member (history)
2021-06-24 19:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Late one night a young man was crossing his field near home. Right in the middle, he came upon an open grave newly made and in perfect shape. He was not frightened, just felt puzzled and took a stick to measure the depth which was quite correct. In order to satisfy himself that he was not dreaming he got four sticks and placed them vertically at the four corners of the open grave and then went home to bed.
The next morning the man got up early and went out to inspect the new grave. What was his surprise - when he went over to the four sticks which marked the spot - to find that there was not a trace of freshly dug earth, but, the grass growing with daisies nodding their heads, not even the track of a person's boot nor a sign of anything unusual in the field - only the four branches which he left as a mark the night before.
senior member (history)
2021-06-24 19:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
those horseshoes" and the next minute a horseshoe was embedded in the wall right over his head. The next morning both men were found in a dazed and frightened condition and no amount of persuasion would get them stay up a night again in the mill.

An old man about ninety years, living at present in the village od Aughagad, went to the neighbouring little town of Creggs in his young days. He went across the fields for a short cut, did his business, and set out for home at night. He expected to arrive home before ten o'clock. He found himself in the middle of a large field but could not reach the gate which opened out to the roadeen.
After travelling round the fields for hours he lay down exhausted. When daylight came he recognised all the familiar fields and paths and arrived home weary and tired after his strange experience.
senior member (history)
2021-06-24 18:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
those horseshoes" and the next minute a horseshoe was embedded in the wall right over his head. The next morning both men were found in a dazed and frightened condition and no amount of persuasion would get them stay up a night again in the mill.
senior member (history)
2021-06-22 17:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The wonderful Mills of Castlecoote, famous for their flour and meal were burned over 70 years ago. Later on they were re-built, but the luck left them. The River Suck was drained and interfered with the wheel power and today can be seen the remains of three storey Mill, right beside the bridge of Castlecoote.
Old people tell of the great fire which could be seen for miles round the countryside.
"You could pick pins miles away that night".
The usual ghost story is connected with the old mill. Two workmen whose duty it was to stay up all night and keep the fires going, were usually locked in, and released at daylight by two others who came on duty.
One night as Tom and Mick were engaged with their usual duties and chatting about their work they heard strange noises but thought they might be rats. Suddenly Tom looked at Mick and said "If you do that again I'll give you something you won't like". "Do what?" said Mick "Didn't you give me a blow on the back" said Tom. "Faix I did no such thing".
Both looked around and saw nothing yet each felt the presence of a third party. After another while Tom shouted "Don't be firing
senior member (history)
2021-06-22 17:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The wonderful Mills of Castlecoote, famous for their flour and meal were burned over 70 years ago. Later on they were re-built, but the luck left them. The River Suck was drained and interfered with the wheel power and today can be seen the remains of three storey Mill, right beside the bridge of Castlecoote.
Old people tell of the great fire which could be seen for miles round the countryside.
"You could pick pins miles away that night".
The usual ghost story is connected with the old mill. Two workmen whose duty it was to stay up all night and keep the fires going, were usually locked in, and released at daylight by two others who came on duty.
senior member (history)
2021-06-22 17:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The wonderful Mills of Castlecoote, famous for their flour and meal were burned over 70 years ago. Later on they were re-built, but the luck left them. The River Suck was drained and interfered with the wheel power and today can be seen the remains of three storey Mill, right beside the bridge of Castlecoote.
Old people tell of the great fire which could be seen for miles round the countryside.
"You could pick pins miles away that night".
senior member (history)
2021-06-22 17:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The wonderful Mills of Castlecoote, famous for their flour and meal were burned over 70 years ago. Later on they were re-built, but the luck left them. The River Suck was drained and interfered with the wheel power and today can be seen the remains of three storey Mill, right beside the bridge of Castlecoote.
senior member (history)
2021-06-21 20:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and the doors to be locked while the churning was in progress. After a short time a knock came to the door and the voice of another neighbouring woman was heard asking for admittance. The bean a tighe kept on churning at the request of the person in charge of the red hot coulter. At last the knocking got louder and finally the woman outside gave a frightful scream and said "I'm burning let me in." There never such a lot of butter as came that day in the churn. The door was then opened and a very timid, frightened woman came into the house.
7
An old woman was known to spit into the milk before giving a "drop" to a neighbour - lest her cow would go dry.
8
When going to churn she took a coal, out of the fire with the tongs, went round the churn three times, saying some prayer and finally put the coal under the churn and began her churning.
senior member (history)
2021-06-21 20:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and the doors to be locked while the churning was in progress. After a short time a knock came to the door and the voice of another neighbouring woman was heard asking for admittance. The bean a tighe kept on churning at the request of the person in charge of the red hot coulter. At last the knocking got louder and finally the woman outside gave a frightful scream and said "I'm burning let me in." There never such a lot of butter as came that day in the churn. The door was then opened and a very timid, frightened woman came into the house.
senior member (history)
2021-06-21 20:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and the doors to be locked while the churning was in progress. After a short time a knock came to the door and the voice of another neighbouring woman was heard asking for admittance. The bean a tighe kept on churning at the request of the person in charge of the red hot coulter. At last the knocking got louder and finally the woman outside gave a frightful scream and said "I'm burning let me in."
senior member (history)
2021-06-18 16:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lawrence Edwards
Cloonruff
senior member (history)
2021-06-18 16:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Johnny Brennan of Tobar cut fifteen score of stooks in one day.
William Burke of Cloonee carried five cwt weight of stuff a distance of five miles.
senior member (history)
2021-06-18 16:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mary Peighton knitted socks for the people.
Katherine Taffee used to travel round on foot. She stole geese and turkeys.
Mary the Broom used to pull heathers and make brooms. She gave them to the people and they gave her food. If you gave her tea she would sing a song for you.
Mary Kenny was always trotting and she was called 2the Totter". She went begging and the people gave her lodgings.
Maria Connor washed for all the rich people. Before she began to wash, you would have to give her a pint of porter. She was called "Lid of the Kettle".
Peggy Cawley used to beg and if you gave her a night's lodgings she would sing for you.
Mickleen Flemming used to go barefooted. He had a bag for begging. Some nights he slept by the cock of hay.
Joeeen Burns is not long dead. He used to attend every pattern and sports. He was a trick of the loop. He had a pack of cards and the people bet on them. He got twopence every time they'd bet.
senior member (history)
2021-06-18 16:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Jimeen Montgomery was a Trick of the loop also. When he wanted to call the people round him he said "sguaibín here."
Alfien Price was a Trick of the Loop also. He lived in Ballygar.
Mike Beirne used to sing and the people gave him food. He travelled on foot. "L
"Lady Fallon" went begging and he had always his hand over his eyes. He travelled on foot.
senior member (history)
2021-06-18 16:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mary Peighton knitted socks for the people.
Katherine Taffee used to travel round on foot. She stole geese and turkeys.
Mary the Broom used to pull heathers and make brooms. She gave them to the people and they gave her food. If you gave her tea she would sing a song for you.
Mary Kenny was always trotting and she was called 2the Totter". She went begging and the people gave her lodgings.
Maria Connor washed for all the rich people. Before she began to wash, you would have to give her a pint of porter. She was called "Lid of the Kettle".
Peggy Cawley used to beg and if you gave her a night's lodgings she would sing for you.
Mickleen Flemming used to go barefooted. He had a bag for begging. Some nights he slept by the cock of hay.
Joeeen Burns is not long dead. He used to attend every pattern and sports. He was a trick of the loop. He had a pack of cards and the people bet on them. He got twopence every time they'd bet
senior member (history)
2021-06-18 15:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mary Peighton knitted socks for the people.
Katherine Taffee used to travel round on foot. She stole geese and turkeys.
Mary the Broom used to pull heathers and make brooms. She gave them to the people and they gave her food. If you gave her tea she would sing a song for you.
Mary Kenny was always trotting and she was called 2the Totter". She went begging and the people gave her lodgings.
Maria Connor washed for all the rich people. Before she began to wash, you would have to give her a pint of porter. She was called "Lid of the Kettle".
senior member (history)
2021-06-18 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mary Peighton knitted socks for the people.
Katherine Taffee used to travel round on foot. She stole geese and turkeys.
Mary the Broom used to pull heathers and make brooms. She gave them to the people and they gave her food. If you gave her tea she would sing a song for you.
senior member (history)
2021-06-17 20:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tailor and made clothes for the people. They gave him food in exchange. He was left to sleep in the house he was sewing in. He had a very long beard.
John Sampy used to frighten the children and run after them. They were very much afraid of him.
Johnny Griffen used to go round gathering bottles. He gave pins, needles, and hairpins in exchange for them. He sold the bottles for them.
Mickie Coaams used to go gat hering skins of kids. He gave pins in exchange for them.
Nancy Grinnley was a small woman and travelled on foot. If you vexed her she would kneel down and curse you. The children were very much afraid of her.
Bessie Moran was very poor and the people fed her. She got a Shake Down in every house and got her breakfast. She would give necklaces to the children.
Biddy Mesckel used to get a shake Down in some houses. If you did not give her a charity she would abuse you.
senior member (history)
2021-06-17 20:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tailor and made clothes for the people. They gave him food in exchange. He was left to sleep in the house he was sewing in. He had a very long beard.
John Sampy used to frighten the children and run after them. They were very much afraid of him.
Johnny Griffen used to go round gathering bottles. He gave pins, needles, and hairpins in exchange for them. He sold the bottles for them.
Mickie Coaams used to go gat hering skins of kids. He gave pins in exchange for them.
Nancy Grinnley was a small woman and travelled on foot. If you vexed her she would kneel down and curse you. The children were very much afraid of her.
senior member (history)
2021-06-17 19:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tailor and made clothes for the people. They gave him food in exchange. He was left to sleep in the house he was sewing in. He had a very long beard.
John Sampy used to frighten the children and run after them. They were very much afraid of him.
Johnny Griffen used to go round gathering bottles. He gave pins, needles, and hairpins in exchange for them. He sold the bottles for them.
senior member (history)
2021-06-17 19:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tailor and made clothes for the people. They gave him food in exchange. He was left to sleep in the house he was sewing in. He had a very long beard.
senior member (history)
2021-06-16 19:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
In olden times when people were churning milk they invited any visitors who dropped in to take a turn with the dash.
The visitors always said "God bless the work". If anyone failed to comply with the custom he or she was supposed to have taken the butter.
2
Often when a person who failed to get any butter after churning for hours he left the blame on some innocent person who had visited the house.
3
An old woman put the milk into the churn. She then got a coal out of the fire, went round the churn three times, with the coal of fire and finally placed it under the churn.
4
You shouldn't throw out water or anything else out of the house while a person is churning or you throw out the butter.
5
If a cow's tail is cut, no butter comes on her milk.
6
On one occasion a woman found it impossible to get butter. She tried every means - scrubbed and aired the churn and milking vessels, looked after the cream and was most particular about all details. At last a neighbour came to her rescue. She ordered the coulter of a plough to be put in the fire
senior member (history)
2021-06-16 19:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
In olden times when people were churning milk they invited any visitors who dropped in to take a turn with the dash.
The visitors always said "God bless the work". If anyone failed to comply with the custom he or she was supposed to have taken the butter.
2
Often when a person who failed to get any butter after churning for hours he left the blame on some innocent person who had visited the house.
3
An old woman put the milk into the churn. She then got a coal out of the fire, went round the churn three times, with the coal of fire and finally placed it under the churn.
4
You shouldn't throw out water or anything else out of the house while a person is churning or you throw out the butter.
senior member (history)
2021-06-16 19:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
In olden times when people were churning milk they invited any visitors who dropped in to take a turn with the dash.
The visitors always said "God bless the work". If anyone failed to comply with the custom he or she was supposed to have taken the butter.
2
Often when a person who failed to get any butter after churning for hours he left the blame on some innocent person who had visited the house.
senior member (history)
2021-06-14 20:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was always in a valley they said Mass at this time because if the priests were caught they would be put to death.
A piece of land in the shape of a parley is situated in Tubber and is called The "Parley". The i "Parley" is like the quadrant of a circle and the oat cakes were cut in this shape.
Shameen's Garden is in Knockadonnell?. A man named Seamus lived there long ago. He had only this garden of about a half-an-acre on which he had to make a living.
Patrick's is a field in Cornamuckla in the Old Village.
Henegan's in Tubber is a field where the Henegan's lived many years ago.
"Biddies" is a garden where a woman named Bridget lived long ago.
The Paddock is a very level field in Cnoc-A-Dhomhnaill with a hedge all round it.
Tobar Fhearthainne is on the borders of Cloonruff. It is a spring well where people get water.
senior member (history)
2021-06-14 20:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was always in a valley they said Mass at this time because if the priests were caught they would be put to death.
A piece of land in the shape of a parley is situated in Tubber and is called The "Parley". The i "Parley" is like the quadrant of a circle and the oat cakes were cut in this shape.
Shameen's Garden is in Knockadonnell?. A man named Seamus lived there long ago. He had only this garden of about a half-an-acre on which he had to make a living.
Patrick's is a field in Cornamuckin? in the Old Village.
Henegan's in Tubber is a field where the Henegan's lived many years ago.
"Biddies" is a garden where a woman named Bridget lived long ago.
The Paddock is a very level field in Cnoc-A-Dhomhnaill with a hedge all round it.
Tobar Fhearthainne is on the borders of Cloonruff. It is a spring well where people get water.
senior member (history)
2021-06-14 20:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was always in a valley they said Mass at this time because if the priests were caught they would be put to death.
A piece of land in the shape of a parley is situated in Tubber and is called The "Parley". The i "Parley" is like the quadrant of a circle and the oat cakes were cut in this shape.
Shameen's Garden is in Knockadonnell?.
senior member (history)
2021-06-10 19:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
who was a very great mower. He was able to mow two acres of meadow in one day.
There was also another man named Larkin who lived at Frenchlawn who was able to carry nine hundred weight.
There was another man named McDonnell of Legmore who was very strong at lifting weights. One day in Ballintubber he threw a stone five hundred weight over a six foot wall. Another man named Hopkins, from the parish of Ballintubber, who was also very strong jumped over the wall and threw the stone back again over the wall.
A woman from Killsallagh was bringing home a two hundred bag of meal on a donkey's back. The bag fell on the road and the donkey ran away. The woman carried the bag of meal half a mile until she caught the donkey. She then placed it on the donkey's back and took it home.
A man named John Doyle from Corliskea was a great jumper. He jumped twenty - one feet and the mark he stood behind was the blade of a scythe.
senior member (history)
2021-06-10 18:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
who was a very great mower. He was able to mow two acres of meadow in one day.
There was also another man named Larkin who lived at Frenchlawn who was able to carry nine hundred weight.
There was another man named McDonnell of Legmore who was very strong at lifting weights. One day in Ballintubber he threw a stone five hundred weight over a six foot wall. Another man named Hopkins, from the parish of Ballintubber, who was also very strong jumped over the wall and threw the stone back again over the wall.
senior member (history)
2021-06-10 18:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
who was a very great mower. He was able to mow two acres of meadow in one day.
There was also another man named Larkin who lived at Frenchlawn who was able to carry nine hundred weight.
senior member (history)
2021-06-10 18:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times there were very strong men and women in the districts of Ballymoe and Ballintubber.
A man named William Burke who lived in Cloonee turned a rood of lealand in one day. He could also carry seven hundred weight on his back.
There was another man named McLoughlin
senior member (history)
2021-06-08 19:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
were also made from dóib buidhe.
Bricks were also made from dóib buidhe. Paint was mixed with the dóib buidhe to colour it.
Thatching is done with straw or rushes. The straw or rushes have to be drawn or straightened and tied into bundles. Rods have to be cut and made into scallops. When the thatcher starts work he puts on a layer of straw about two feet under which he fastens tightly with scollaps. He then puts on another layer which covers the scollaps which he also fastens tightly with scollaps and continues in the same way until the streak is finished.
He then puts on a layer of bobbins on the top which he also securely fastens. He then brushes down the straw and where it is uneven he cuts it off with a knife. He then changes his ladder and starts another streak and continues on until the house is thatched.
senior member (history)
2021-06-08 19:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
were also made from dóib buidhe.
Bricks were also made from dóib buidhe. Paint was mixed with the dóib buidhe to colour it.
Thatching is done with straw or rushes. The straw or rushes have to be drawn or straightened and tied into bundles. Rods have to be cut and made into scallops. When the thatcher starts work he puts on a layer of straw about two feet under which he fastens tightly with scollaps. He then puts on another layer which covers the scollaps which he also fastens tightly with scollaps and continues in the same way until the streak is finished.
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Frieze, tweeds and bed quilts were also woven. The threads used were dyed in different colours. Chip log-wood was used for brown Chio log-wood and copperas were for Black. Indigo was used for Blue, Green or red.
The candles that were used in the olden times were made from rushes. The rushes were peeled and hung up to dry. When dry they were dipped in melted butter.
Baskets were made from rods called Golden Osiers. The rods had to be boiled and the skin peeled off them to make them white.
Spades, gates, shovels, ploughs and fire cranes were made from iron by the blacksmith.
Ropes were made from hay and straw. They were twisted into thumb ropes and then plaited together. Ropes were also made from ass skins. These were called tugs and were used for traces for ploughing.
Whips were made from horse skin cut in strips and plaited together.
Crocks were made from yellow clay called dóib buidhe. It was put in a mould and baked over a fire. Pots, noggins and pitchers
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 18:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
as he gallops he swallows the rope?
A spinning wheel.
Why is a dead ass like Nelson's Pillar ?
Because neither can move.
What is the best key for unlocking the tongue?
Whiskey.
What is the highest building in the world?
A library, because it has thousands and thousands of stories.
Why is the letter "F" like a banana skin?
Because they both make all fall.
What coin is doubled when you take its half?
A half-penny.
What county in Ireland is like a candle nearly burned out?
Wick-low.
What is the shyest thing in the world?
A clock because it always has it's hands on it's face
A man in the garden and four hundred coats on him?
A head of cabbage.
What dead buries the live?
A fire racked
What is the wettest letter in the alphabet?
"T" because it is in the middle of water
If I was in the sun and out of it what would the sun be then?
Sin
Why is a mouse like grass?
Because the cat will eat it
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 18:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
as he gallops he swallows the rope?
A spinning wheel.
Why is a dead ass like Nelson's Pillar ?
Because neither can move.
What is the best key for unlocking the tongue?
Whiskey.
What is the highest building in the world?
A library, because it has thousands and thousands of stories.
Why is the letter "F" like a banana skin?
Because they both make all fall.
What coin is doubled when you take its half?
A half-penny.
What county in Ireland is like a candle nearly burned out?
Wick-low.
What is the shyest thing in the world?
A clock because it always has it's hands on it's face
A man in the garden and four hundred coats on him?
A head of cabbage.
What dead buries the live?
A fire racked
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 19:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Frieze, tweeds and bed quilts were also woven. The threads used were dyed in different colours. Chip log-wood was used for brown Chio log-wood and copperas were for Black. Indigo was used for Blue, Green or red.
The candles that were used in the olden times were made from rushes. The rushes were peeled and hung up to dry. When dry they were dipped in melted butter.
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 19:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Why are sugar lumps like horse?
The longer you lick them the faster they go.
As I went up the hill I met my Uncle Bill he had long legs crooked thighs a small head and no eyes?
Tongs.
Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall Humpty Dumpty got a great fall all the king's horses and all the kings men could not put Humpty Dumpty together again?
An egg.
As I went up a hill I met my uncle Davy I cut off his head and drank his blood and left him lying lasy?
A bottle of whiskey.
As I went up the hill I saw a thing lying by the hedge It was neither flesh nor bone it had four fingers and a thumb?
A glove.
Deep and damp and fit for any lord?
A grave.
The man that made it did not want it and the man that wore it did not see it?
A coffin.
What is it that has two legs and yet it cannot walk?
A tongs.
Why is Westminster Abbey like the ashes on the hearth?
Because they both hold the ashes of the grate (Great)
Why does a hen pick the pot?
Because she cannot lick it
I have a little horse with an iron throat as quick
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 19:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Why are sugar lumps like horse?
The longer you lick them the faster they go.
As I went up the hill I met my Uncle Bill he had long legs crooked thighs a small head and no eyes?
Tongs.
Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall Humpty Dumpty got a great fall all the king's horses and all the kings men could not put Humpty Dumpty together again?
An egg.
As I went up a hill I met my uncle Davy I cut off his head and drank his blood and left him lying lasy?
A bottle of whiskey.
As I went up the hill I saw a thing lying by the hedge It was neither flesh nor bone it had four fingers and a thumb?
A glove.
Deep and damp and fit for any lord?
A grave.
The man that made it did not want it and the man that wore it did not see it?
A coffin.
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 19:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A treasure consisting of sacred vessels made of gold (chalices etc.) is supposed to be buried near the ruins of Cottage -(A farm lately divided). It is said the Danes ravaged this district after plundering the Roscommon Abbey. An old bishop who lived near the Suck hid the treasure which has never yet been located.
senior member (history)
2021-05-24 18:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times a man lived in Cloonee who carried seven cwt weight on his back.
Another man lived in Curlishea who walked from Ballymoe to Tuam and back again the same day, and carried two chairs on his back.
Another man lived in Durrow. He went from Durrow to Marnellsgrove and carried a plough home on his back.
A man still lives in Tubber who cut fifteen score stooks of oats in the day. His name is John Brennan.
senior member (history)
2021-05-24 17:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Round the house, round the house and their heads down ?
The nails in your shoes.
Patch upon patch and no stitches?
A head of cabbage
I went to the wood and got it, I sat down and looked at it, and hardly home I brought it?
A thorn.
What's full and holds more?
A pot of potatoes
What has eyes but cannot see?
A blind man
I sat on my haunches and looked through my winkers and saw the dead burying?
A man raking a fire.
Under the fire and over the fire and cannot touch the fire?
A cake in an oven.
What bow can you not untie?
The Rainbow.
What are the four letters that would frighten a robber?
O. I. G. U.
It comes in on people's arms and goes out as fine as silk?
Turf.
What is cut but never eaten?
Cards.
I have a roomful and cannot take a spoonful?
Smoke.
Twenty -six cats on a wall, What time is it?
Twenty-five after one.
Why is the letter K like a pig's tail?
Because it is at the end of pork.
What is it that is growing old at the same time?
People.
What has eyes and cannot see?
A needle.
I threw it up white and it came down yellow?
An egg.
senior member (history)
2021-05-21 17:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Round the house, round the house and their heads down ?
The nails in your shoes.
Patch upon patch and no stitches?
A head of cabbage
I went to the wood and got it, I sat down and looked at it, and hardly home I brought it?
A thorn.
What's full and holds more?
A pot of potatoes
What has eyes but cannot see?
A blind man
I sat on my haunches and looked through my winkers and saw the dead burying?
A man raking a fire
Under the fire and over the fire and cannot touch the fire?
A cake in the oven.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 21:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
until sold because their owners hadn't money to pay the rent.
The Fort Field is said to have belonged to the fairies long ago and a big fort is to be seen there.
In the Race Course Field races were carried on long ago.
In Miss Madden's land there is a well named Tobar -a Chorad. In the year 1800 it was closed down by Mr Baggot the landlord but it sprang up again.
Poll an Aifrinn which is to be seen in Kilcooley in the east side of the village and in the townland of Ballymoe, is where Mass was said in the Penal Days.
Dolly's Bush is to be seen in Roseberry. It was said long ago that a ghost was seen there.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 21:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
until sold because their owners hadn't money to pay the rent.
The Fort Field is said to have belonged to the fairies long ago and a big fort is to be seen there.
In the Race Course Field races were carried on long ago.
In Miss Madden's land there is a well named Tobar -a Chorad. In the year 1800 it was closed down by Mr Baggot the landlord but it sprang up again.
senior member (history)
2021-05-16 17:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times all the clothes of the people needed had to be woven by hand. People who required clothes had to get wool. The wool had to be washed and left out to dry. It was then greased and carded and made into rolls of thread. It was then rolled into balls, two of which were for for the warp, and one for the woof. It was then taken to the Weaver who got it warped on what was called the bars, to what ever length was required. When the thread was warped it was taken off the bars and rolled on a beam in the loom. It was then drawn through the gears and woven. Eleven yards was the length required for a blanket to allow for thickening. The thickening was done at a mill called the Jack mill. Five pence per yard was the charge for weaving a blanket. Flannel was woven into webs up to fifty yards in length at four pence per yard.
Flax was used for making linen. It first had to be steeped in water. It was then scutched into tow, spun into thread and warped and woven into webs for sheets, towels, and tablecloths. The charge for weaving it was sixpence per yard.
senior member (history)
2021-05-16 17:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times all the clothes of the people needed had to be woven by hand. People who required clothes had to get wool. The wool had to be washed and left out to dry. It was then greased and carded and made into rolls of thread. It was then rolled into balls, two of which were for for the warp, and one for the woof. It was then taken to the Weaver who got it warped on what was called the bars, to what ever length was required. When the thread was warped it was taken off the bars and rolled on a beam in the loom. It was then drawn through the gears and woven. Eleven yards was the length required for a blanket to allow for thickening. The thickening was done at a mill called the Jack mill. Five pence per yard was the charge for weaving a blanket. Flannel was woven into webs up to fifty yards in length at four pence per yard.
senior member (history)
2021-05-16 17:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times all the clothes of the people needed had to be woven by hand. People who required clothes had to get wool. The wool had to be washed and left out to dry. It was then greased and carded and made into rolls of thread. It was then rolled into balls, two of which were for for the warp, and one for the woof. It was then taken to the Weaver who got it warped on what was called the bars, to what ever length was required. When the thread was warped it was taken off the bars and rolled on a beam in the loom. It was then drawn through the gears and woven.
senior member (history)
2021-05-16 16:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The games I generally play are Hide and Seek, Tig, Fox and Chickens and several other games. I also play hurly sometimes in the Summer, but it costs more than any other game because you have to buy the hurls, and a hurly ball which is fairly dear. No other ball would do for hurly because the hurls would cut it. I like it very much because it is an Irish game.
For Hide and Seek nothing is wanted except to have a large crowd to play, therefore everybody likes it but nobody likes to have to seek. Hide and Seek is great pastime and I always like to play it.
Tig is not as nice as Hide and Seek and I do not play it much, but Fox and Chickens is another favourite game of mine, and I think everybody enjoys it too. This is how to play it. Nine or ten are wanted to play it. The hen
senior member (history)
2021-05-16 16:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The games I generally play are Hide and Seek, Tig, Fox and Chickens and several other games. I also play hurly sometimes in the Summer, but it costs more than any other game because you have to buy the hurls, and a hurly ball which is fairly dear. No other ball would do for hurly because the hurls would cut it. I like it very much because it is an Irish game.
senior member (history)
2021-05-16 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The games I generally play are Hide and Seek, Tig, Fox and Chickens and several other games. I also play hurly sometimes in the Summer, but it costs more than any other game because you have to buy the hurls, and a hurly ball which is fairly dear.
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 18:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
filled with mirth and glee,
There too could see the bogey wheels.
I am certain they were in loath.
For to bring the perpetrator.
That dead and damned old goat,
The chairman of the Roscommon County Council.
Long life to him I say.
John FitsGibbon and his witness appeared in splender and array.
Clancy King's Counsellor. A member of Parliament,
defeated them and vigoursly did quote
My Lord the sad disaster , Was maliciously caused by a goat.
At Ros. Summer Assizes.
On July the 11th Day.
On the evi/endence given the Judge did say.
"A goat has caused a sad disaster on the Midland Great Western Line.
On the evidence given I dismiss.
The case dismissed a second time.
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 17:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are a good many animals on the farm and everyone of them gets a certain amount of care and attention. For instance the cow which is the most useful of them.
The care she gets is to feed her well on pasture land during the Summer months. In late Autumn she is put in every night to her shed and given hay and sometimes roots and crushed corn. She is milked twice daily and her house is kept very clean and a good bed of straw under her.
The horse which is the strongest of the farm animals gets much the same care as the cow. He is fed well on pasture land during the Summer and on the approach of winter he is put in every night in his house called a stable and given nice hay and a good bed. The hay is put in a manger and he is tied by means of a rope. Some good farmers that take an interest in horses give them
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 17:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are a good many animals on the farm and everyone of them gets a certain amount of care and attention. For instance the cow which is the most useful of them.
The care she gets is to feed her well on pasture land during the Summer months. In late Autumn she is put in every night to her shed and given hay and sometimes roots and crushed corn. She is milked twice daily and her house is kept very clean and a good bed of straw under her.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 17:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a woman an the other a man?
A penny.
As round as an apple a deep as a cup all the men in Derry would not lift it up?
A well.
Ink ank under the bank ten drawing four?
A woman milking a cow.
The more you take from it the bigger it gets?
A hole.
Little white nancy, a red little nose the longer she stands the shorter she grows?
A candle.
Who wears the biggest hat in the world?
The man with the bigger head.
A leaper of ditches a clipper of thorns a little brown cow with two leather horns?
A hare.
It is neither inside nor outside and shows light all over the house?
A window.
Twenty sheep went out a gap twenty more after that then the shepherd and his dog how many feet was that?
Two.
A cailleact in the ashes and a hundred eyes on her?
A pot of soup.
Forty sheep went out a gap forty more after that, five, six, seven, eleven, to and three how many is that?
Five.
Twenty four white heifers standing by the wall up came the red one and licked them all?
The tongue licks the teeth.
It come in black and goes out white?
The turf.
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 20:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stands in front and all the chickens go behind her, then the fox comes and tries to take the chickens and the hen tries not to let them go and then there is great fun.
Status is a very nice game too. One person is picked out, and that person swings the rest around one by one and what-ever way they are left they are to stand there like statues. Then the one that gave the status comes on and tries to make them laugh and the ones that laugh and the ones that did not laugh pull against each other.
Then if the ones that laughed pulled the others about six feet from where they first started pulling they would win. That is how it is played. We like the pulling of each other and that is the reason we play it so often.
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 20:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stands in front and all the chickens go behind her, then the fox comes and tries to take the chickens and the hen tries not to let them go and then there is great fun.
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 21:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Avoid it, then, for it it is a mortal enemy.
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 21:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort in Bushfield not far from our house, where the fairies are supposed to live. There are lights seen in and around the fort nearly every night until the break of day. People passing by hear noise and very often music.
It happened one night that two young girls were going through the field in the fort is and they went astray on their way home. When passing by the fort they met two fairies and the fairies invited them to see the fort. When they got inside the music was as wonderful that they danced all night long, without ceasing. When day-break came the fort fairies vanished. The girls made their way home, and it is said that they were never the same after that. Some say that they were in the fairies.
The lights and music are still to be seen & heard & very few people in the village would dare to pass that way after night fall.
It is said a cow, horse or an ass would not rest near the fort at night. Long ago they tied a horse to an old bush in the fort but it worked so hard with fright that it managed to break the rope that held it.
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 21:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort in Bushfield not far from our house, where the fairies are supposed to live. There are lights seen in and around the fort nearly every night until the break of day. People passing by hear noise and very often music.
It happened one night that two young girls were going through the field in the fort is and they went astray on their way home. When passing by the fort they met two fairies and the fairies invited them to see the fort. When they got inside the music was as wonderful that they danced all night long, without ceasing. When day-break came the fort fairies vanished. The girls made their way home, and it is said that they were never the same after that. Some say that they were in the fairies.
The lights and music are still to be seen & heard & very few people in the village would dare to pass that way after night fall.
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 20:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a well in the roadside in the village of Ballyglass. The people got spring water out of it when they needed it. One day an old woman named Mrs Reynolds went for a can of water. When she had lifted the can of water she heard an unearthly noise behind her. She looked around sharply and she saw a coach drawn by two horses. It drew up near her and a man came out and asked her if she would come and cure his wife who was ill. The kind woman went with him and cured his wife. When she had his wife cured the man brought her back to the well again. He told her not to tell anyone about what happened to her and he paid her for her kind deed.
She went home very happy. Next day there were races in the village and Mrs Reynolds was at them. Coming home she met the same man again. She said to him "How is your wife?" He did not answer her but said "Which eye did you see me first with" She said the right one. He struck her a blow of his whip on the right eye and it was blind ever afterwards.
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a well in the roadside in the village of Ballyglass. The people got spring water out of it when they needed it. One day an old woman named Mrs Reynolds went for a can of water. When she had lifted the can of water she heard an unearthly noise behind her. She looked around sharply and she saw a coach drawn by two horses. It drew up near her and a man came out and asked her if she would come and cure his wife who was ill. The kind woman went with him and cured his wife. When she had his wife cured the man brought her back to the well again. He told her not to tell anyone about what happened to her and he paid her for her kind deed.
She went home very happy. Next day there were races in the village and Mrs Reynolds was at them. Coming home she met the same man again. She said to him "How is your wife?" He did not answer her but said "Which eye did you see me first with" She said the right one. He struck her a blow of his whip on the right eye and it was blind ever afterwards.

long ago there was
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 20:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a well in the roadside in the village of Ballyglass. The people got spring water out of it when they needed it. One day an old woman named Mrs Reynolds went for a can of water. When she had lifted the can of water she heard an unearthly noise behind her. She looked around sharply and she saw a coach drawn by two horses. It drew up near her and a man came out and asked her if she would come and cure his wife who was ill. The kind woman went with him and cured his wife. When she had his wife cured the man brought her back to the well again. He told her not to tell anyone about what happened to her and he paid her for her kind deed.

long ago there was
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 20:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a well in the roadside in the village of Ballyglass. The people got spring water out of it when they needed it. One day an old woman named Mrs Reynolds went for a can of water. When she had lifted the can of water she heard an unearthly noise behind her. She looked around sharply and she saw a coach drawn by two horses. It drew up near her and a man came out and asked her if she would come and cure his wife who was ill. The kind woman

long ago there was
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 21:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Why does a duck cross the road?
Because she wants to get to the other side.
What has ears and cannot hear?
A pot.
What is it that is bought by the yard and worn by the foot?
A carpet
Why does an ass look over the ditch?
Because he cannot look under it
What is it that carries its house on its back?
A snail
It is in the meadows and you don't cut it. It is in the shop and dont sell?
The light of the sun
Why does a donkey like thistles better corn?
Because he is an ass
As black as ink and ink it isnt,as white as milk and milk it isnt, it hops on the road like hailstones and hailstones it isnt?
A magpie
Black and white and read all over?
The newspaper
From house to house in the day and sleeps out at night?
A path
What part of a cow goes out a gate first?
Her breath
Round the house and round the house and lay in the corner?
The broom
London, Derry, Cork and Kerry spell me that without a K?
That
As round as an apple as flat as a pan one side
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 20:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a story told about Kilglass how there was a house out there. It was called the dark house. St Barry is said to lie interred in the door-way, half in and half out. The clay in the door - way is taken up and used as the cure of a toothache, headache and several other maladies. Within the house is a litter of straw like a pig-stye in which if insane people would sleep with a pious intention for three nights Thursday, Friday and Saturday and hear Mass on Sunday they would get the gift of reason before a week.
There is a stump in the ground of a tower between 4 feet and 11 feet in diameter. It is not far from Kilglass chapel. The stump is in the ground yet. It was levelled many years ago for materials for building a wall which now encloses the church-yard.
It was a great high tower hundreds
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 17:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Why is a pepper box like a saint?
Because it is holy.
What is it that goes up the hill and down the hill and yet does not move?
The road.
What is that never asks and questions but requires many answers?
The street door.
When is a boat like a heap of snow?
When it is adrift.
Why is an adjective like a drunken man?
Because it cannot stand alone.
As I went up the hill I saw twenty little divels scraping?
A harrow.
As I looked out the window I saw a dead thing carrying live thing?
People in a motor car.
Little thing little thing as small as a mouse and has as many windows as king George's house?
A thimble.
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 17:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the roads to Cloonmurray on a cod frosty day,
I heard a poor donkey bewailing,
Greatly he moaned as he walked all alone,
And his moans were most penetrating.
II
I am a poor ass starving for grass,
To travel through the snow I am scarce able,
Drawing black mud and stones without a bit on my bones,
And at night the high road for my stable.
III
Early next morning my master will come,
And drive me right home in a gallop,
And if I dare stand, with a large stick in hand,
He will give my poor bones a big wallop.
IV
Sad is my fate and my hardship is great,
To be battered and beaten through the country,
Drawing black mud and stones without a bit on my bones,
And cannot make moans that I am hungry.
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 17:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
another she borrowed three things from them and never gave them back. Each of these women got their churns blessed by the priest and they got back the butter. After that the woman sold no more butter. It was believed she was talking it.
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 17:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If a stranger came in and a woman churning the stranger would take the dash and churn for a few minutes. If he did not it would be believed he took the butter. There is a story told of a man who went into a house one day to light his pipe and the woman was churning but he did not take the dash only took a coal to light his pipe and he brought the coal with him. After a time the woman could not get any butter and she sent one of her children to get back the coal and they did. When she got it she put it under the churn and she got the butter back.
There is another story told of a woman who churned one day and could not get any butter and the third time she tried the milk became frothy. She sent for the priest and he blessed the churn and she got back the butter. At the same time nine of her neighbours were churning every day and could not get any butter. There was woman in the village who had only one cow and she was selling pounds of butter every week and each of these nine neighbours noticed that at one time or
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If a stranger came in and a woman churning the stranger would take the dash and churn for a few minutes. If he did not it would be believed he took the butter. There is a story told of a man who went into a house one day to light his pipe and the woman was churning but he did not take the dash only took a coal to light his pipe and he brought the coal with him. After a time the woman could not get any butter and she sent one of her children to get back the coal and they did. When she got it she put it under the churn and she got the butter back.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 18:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Strokestown long ago there used to be a lot of goods made such as rope, nails, buckets, iron, pots and pans. Nails were very cheap. The cost of a cut of nails was three pence and a man would only get 11/2 d for his days work and a man would be at his work at six o'clock in the morning. There was also a brewery in Strokestown down in the Demesne. There is a river which to Bumblin. In the demesne there is the ruins of malt houses and the brewery was out at Bumblin.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the roads to Cloonmurray on a cod frosty day,
I heard a poor donkey bewailing,
Greatly he moaned as he walked all alone,
And his moans were most penetrating.
II
I am a poor ass starving for grass,
To travel through the snow I am scarce able,
Drawing black mud and stones without a bit on my bones,
And at night the high road for my stable.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the roads to Cloonmurray on a cod frosty day,
I heard a poor donkey bewailing,
Greatly he moaned as he walked all alone,
And his moans were most penetrating.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
name was Brady. The dying man said "Here is the money for you, you acted nobly now you are paid for all, so Good bye and don't forget me."
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a rich man, and he had thousands of pounds. He never would put it in the bank, he used to say, "I have my bank in the ground". The people used to call him "The Miser". He slept on a little bed of straw. He used to drink black tea with no sugar, and dry bread. He stole they money and he wanted to pretend he was poor so the people would not doubt it.
One day a man found his money in a rubber case, and it left down in a hole in the ground. He told the guards about the money, and the guards knew it was the stolen money. They found out who stole it. The guards were to have him executed on the 9th July, and when he was dying they gave him the money to do what he liked with it. The man who found it was there, thinking he would get it. But no. There was one man there from Roscommon who knew he had the money, his
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a rich man, and he had thousands of pounds. He never would put it in the bank, he used to say, "I have my bank in the ground". The people used to call him "The Miser". He slept on a little bed of straw. He used to drink black tea with no sugar, and dry bread. He stole they money and he wanted to pretend he was poor so the people would not doubt it.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Creel -Making
Creels were greatly used. In fact they were the only means they had of carrying anything. These creels had handles made of straw or hay ropes. Every man could make his own creel.
When the man was going to make a creel, he had to go around and search through the bogs fot the sally rods. He had to secure them fairly long and straight. He then sorted them out. He put the strong ones in one bundle and the fine ones in another, as he needed both.
These were then put up on the kitchen loft and left there to season and dry for a few days. When he began the creel he took out twenty eight of the strong rods. These he pointed. Then he stuck them in the ground about two inches apart. He set them eight on each side and six on each end. Then he started at the earth with what is called the Crow lath. This was the rim around the mouth of the creel. This was counted the hardest part. When that was done the rest of the creel was easy.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Creel -Making
Creels were greatly used. In fact they were the only means they had of carrying anything. These creels had handles made of straw or hay ropes. Every man could make his own creel.
When the man was going to make a creel, he had to go around and search through the bogs fot the sally rods. He had to secure them fairly long and straight. He then sorted them out. He put the strong ones in one bundle and the fine ones in another, as he needed both.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the candle was put and so held in position.
[ drawing of candlestick]
The drawing gives an idea of the kind of Candlestick in use.
On the eve of the twelfth Day or 6th of January, twelve rush candles were made all of equal size and thickness When hard and stiff enough to stand upright there was a cake of cow's manure and ashes made very stiff. This was placed on box or chair. Into this cake the twelve little candles were fixed. All were lighted and the family knelt around and recited the Rosary. The lights were supposed the Apostles twelve carrying the lights of the faith, into every land. I have seen those candles made used and burned. What was left was parcelled and placed safely behind a rib of the house.
M.J. Gilchrest (Principal Teacher)
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 17:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the candle was put and so held in position.
[ drawing of candlestick]
The drawing gives an idea of the kind of Candlestick in use.
On the eve of the twelfth Day or 6th of January, twelve rush candles were made all of equal size and thickness When hard and stiff enough to stand upright there was a cake of cow's manure and ashes made very stiff. This was placed on box or chair. Into this cake the twelve little candles were fixed.
senior member (history)
2021-05-08 16:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the candle was put and so held in position.
[ drawing of candlestick]
The drawing gives an idea of the kind of Candlestick in use.
On the eve of the twelfth Day or 6th of January, twelve rush candles were made all of equal size and thickness.
senior member (history)
2021-05-06 17:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"A pinch a day keeps flu away".
"Liars need to have good memory".
"Self praise is no praise".
"A shut mouth catches no flies".
"He who says less says best".
"Empty vessels make the greatest sound".
"A cat in gloves catches no mice".
"Sweet Friday evening sour Monday morning".
"Laziness is a heavy load".
"He who sows in Spring will reap in the Autumn".
"When the Great writer comes,
To write against my name
He'll write not what I've won or lost
But how I played the game".
"Silence is golden".
"Speech is silver - Silence is golden".
"A rambling mare has a rambling foal".
"A stirring foot always gets something - if only a thorn".
"A penny after your death is lost money".
senior member (history)
2021-05-06 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
its time to leave off".
"God is nearer than the door".
"He would hear the grass growing".
"Health is better than wealth".
"It is easier to fall than to rise".
"What the pooka writes he reads".
"A rolling stone gathers no moss ".
"He comes without asking like the bad weather".
"Dont be swift to speak nor slow to learn".
"A friend's eye is a good mirror".
"He that hides will find".
"It is a small wind that would'nt bend a blade of grass".
"Four hags who are not gap toothed
Four Frenchmen who are not yellow,
Four cobblers who are not untruthful
That is a dozen who are not in the country".
"If you knew the disease you would have the cure".
"Cows across the sea have long horns".
"An apple a day keeps the doctor away".
senior member (history)
2021-05-06 17:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
its time to leave off".
"God is nearer than the door".
"He would hear the grass growing".
"Health is better than wealth".
"It is easier to fall than to rise".
"What the pooka writes he reads".
"A rolling stone gathers no moss ".
"He comes without asking like the bad weather".
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 20:23
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rejected
awaiting decision
Some years ago there was a man and his name was Brennan, the highway man. He stole from the rich and gave to the poor. In later years he was captured and hanged in Roscommon town, and the place where he was executed can be seen to this day.
The day of his excution he asked was there anybody there from Kiltrustan parish for if there was he would make them rich, as he had a lot of gold hidden in a foal skin not far from Cregga caves. It is believed to be hidden there yet.
Cregga caves are about two miles from Strokestown. Many people were searching for the gold but there was never any found. Some old people say it is still there, but nobody knows where it is exactly hidden.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 20:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
were poor and they had no money to give as fortunes. They thought it a very large fortune if one or two cattle and some corn, such as oats and potatoes were given. The match was usually made in the districts by some of the friends and neighbours.
When the penal Laws were in force in Ireland the people sometimes had to get married in the house of the bride because they were afraid of the English. That is 100 years ago.
The customs which are observed in the parishes of Roscommon are different from that of other counties. The usual custom is the throwing of rice after the bridal party.
Sometimes an old shoe is tied on the car of the bride and bridegroom. The wedding breakfast is very often held in the house of the bride. When it is over they go for a drive and sometimes they had no motors cars only horses and side cars.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 20:09
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rejected
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were poor and they had no money to give as fortunes. They thought it a very large fortune if one or two cattle and some corn, such as oats and potatoes were given. The match was usually made in the districts by some of the friends and neighbours.
When the penal Laws were in force in Ireland the people sometimes had to get married in the house of the bride because they were afraid of the English. That is 100 years ago.
The customs which are observed in the parishes of Roscommon are different from that of other counties. The usual custom is the throwing of rice after the bridal party. Sometimes an old shoe is tied on the car of the bride and bridegroom. The wedding breakfast is very often held in the house of the bride.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 19:40
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rejected
awaiting decision
were poor and they had no money to give as fortunes. They thought it a very large fortune if one or two cattle and some corn, such as oats and potatoes were given. The match was usually made in the districts by some of the friends and neighbours.
When the penal Laws were in force in Ireland the people sometimes had to get married in the house of the bride because they were afraid of the English. That is 100 years ago.
The customs which are observed in the parishes of Roscommon are different from that of other counties. The usual custom is the throwing of rice after the bridal party. Sometimes an old shoe is tied on the car of the bride and bridegroom. The wedding breakfast is very often held in the house of the bride.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 19:27
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rejected
awaiting decision
were poor and they had no money to give as fortunes. They thought it a very large fortune if one or two cattle and some corn, such as oats and potatoes were given. The match was usually made in the districts by some of the friends and neighbours.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 17:17
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XIV
She insisted that we'd store them
But to her I didn't agree
We scattered off in odd ones
And so many treated me.
XV
With my "Leagueing" and my loafing
The value I forgot
And to tell exactly how I lost them
I cannot.
XVI
In the morning I was sober
I was thinking of a plan
To keep Mama from knowing
I was such a stupid man.
XVII
Little dreaming I had told her all the night before
When she found me cutting capers?
With the gennet at the door.
XVIII
Mama she lost her temper
She gave me dog's abuse
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 18:19
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as few shillings for a cwt
And with that he smacked his thumb.
X
The evening it was chilly
I was sitting on the sacks
When a couple of "Swells"
Invited me across to Mrs. Macks.
XI
The drink went pretty freely
But for none I asked to pay
I said a friend was waiting
And I coolly slipped away.
XII
I always thought a woman twice?
Was better than a man
I left the sacks with Beny's wife
While I was in Mc Canns.
XIII
The good advice she gave me
While across the sacks she leaned
If I heeded what she told me
I wouldn't lose my little means.
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 18:08
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I sacked them up and tied them
With little knots of straw
Two neater bags of potato seeds
You'd swear you never saw.
V1
The gennet I got ready
And packed my little load
You'd imagine she was dancing
From the way she tripped the road.
VII
Quickly we passed out both mules and asses,
Soon arrived in town
Took my station in the shambles
And threw the burden down.
VIII
I vainly thought I'd sell them
Though the potatoes they were nice
The buyers rudely stared me
When I named the lowest price.
IX
Said one You think we're blockheads
I'll give you no such sum
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 17:49
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"Honesty is the best policy but he who dwells in that principle is not an honest man".
"All work and no play makes Tom a dull boy".
"A bird in the handle is worth two on a bush". "Truth can be blamed but not shamed".
"Its too late to save when all is spent".
"Its never too late to mend".
"Every cloud has a silver lining".
"Better to be born lucky than rich".
"He who grasps at too much loses all".
"Make hay while sun shines".
"Plough deep while sluggers sleep and you will find corn to reap".
"The early bird has the early word".
When the fun is at its height
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 17:39
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"When your neighbours house is on fir take care of your own".
"Hear, see and say nothing".
"One good trick is worth ten bad ones".
"There are good goods in small parcels".
"You should never get into a pit until you have well decided how to get out of it".
"The proof of the pudding is in the eating of it".
"A Good beginning and a bad end".
"Marry a mountain woman and you marry the mountain".
"Too many cooks spoil the broth".
"Many hands make light work".
"Time and tide wait for nobody".
"It's better to live in hopes than die in despair".
"Fools make feasts for wise people to ate them".
"A lean kitchen makes a fat purse".
"Children and fools should not handle edge tools".
"A wet and windy May fills the haggard with corn and hay".
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 17:25
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The local fairs are always held in town. Buyers sometimes transact business at farmers houses. This is still done. Fairs were held formerly which have been discontinued. There used to be a fair held at a place called Ballinafad which has been discontinued. This was done because the place was too backward. The town fair is held in the streets. Toll is paid at certain fairs known as the old fairs. When an animal is sold luck money is given. When an animal is sold the halter is detained. The great fairs locally are the October and November fairs.
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 17:13
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There is an old grave-yard on the left hand side of the road from Simpsons to Clashaganny witch contains about an acre and a half of land. There are three graves in it, the are covered with stones there is no one buried in it in living memory.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 17:27
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(By Walter Jones PH.D.)
Several collections of bardic verse now in existence preserve two curious compositions on a house erected in Cloonfree by Hugh, son of Owen, son of Rory O'Connor. This chieftain was inaugurated as O'Connor Connacht in 1293, and was killed, after a boisterous reign, in 1809. The poem is noticed by O'Grady in his catalouge (p 353). It is one of the most difficult bardic compositions of its period and consists of an address to the stronghold of Cloonfree in County Roscommon, the residence of Aed O'Conner. A long poem of thirty-eight quatrains it may be considered a miracle of technical skill, as in addition to the obligatory end rhymes and alliteration, each line contains two, and often three, internal rhymes. The other composition on the same subject is contained in the Book of the Dean of Lismore, and is owing to its elaborate structure and the details it enumerates, the most formidable specimen of bardic worksmanship with which I am familiar. The author of this poem is styled Aengus Ruadh O Dalaigh. The site of the Palis is easy
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 17:19
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(By Walter Jones PH.D.)
Several collections of bardic verse now in existence preserve two curious compositions on a house erected in Cloonfree by Hugh, son of Owen, son of Rory O'Connor. This chieftain was inaugurated as O'Connor Connacht in 1293, and was killed, after a boisterous reign, in 1809. The poem is noticed by O'Grady in his catalouge (p 353). It is one of the most difficult bardic compositions of its period and consists of an address to the stronghold of Cloonfree in County Roscommon, the residence of Aed O'Conner. A long poem of thirty-eight quatrains it may be considered a miracle of technical skill, as in addition to the obligatory end rhymes and alliteration, each line contains two, and often three, internal rhymes.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 17:15
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rejected
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(By Walter Jones PH.D.)
Several collections of bardic verse now in existence preserve two curious compositions on a house erected in Cloonfree by Hugh, son of Owen, son of Rory O'Connor. This chieftain was inaugurated as O'Connor Connacht in 1293, and was killed, after a boisterous reign, in 1809. The poem is noticed by O'Grady in his catalouge (p 353). It is one of the most difficult bardic compositions of its period and consists of an address to the stronghold of Cloonfree in County Roscommon, the residence of Aed O'Conner.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 17:10
approved
rejected
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(By Walter Jones PH.D.)
Several collections of bardic verse now in existence preserve two curious compositions on a house erected in Cloonfree by Hugh, son of Owen, son of Rory O'Connor. This chieftain was inaugurated as O'Connor Connacht in 1293, and was killed, after a boisterous reign, in 1809.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 17:01
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rejected
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Once upon a time there lived an old witch Jenny:- And she lived in a small old hut on the western side of the Caslin Hills, who was famous for her charms and cures. Once an old man whose cow was sick sought help from "Jenny. On entering the hut he saw he saw the old witch sitting on a stool leaning on a broom stick and a hare beside her. On hearing the noise she pulled her white hair from oer her withered face and eyeing him cautiously said, Ida, there's trouble on you, Your cow is sick indeed she is, the man said, this is the fourth day now, trothin? It is said the man "And what's on her" her foot is sore. She listened awhile and then into a pot and took a string out of it and spat on it three times then she turned her back to him and put three knots on it one in the middle and one on each end. Then she said "Rub that on her leg three times and I'll bet you shiil get up and walk. So begad the old man took the old string and set of for his house when he reached the house he lost no time in going in to see the cow. When he went didn't
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 16:56
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived an old witch Jenny:- And she lived in a small old hut on the western side of the Caslin Hills, who was famous for her charms and cures. Once an old man whose cow was sick sought help from "Jenny. On entering the hut he saw he saw the old witch sitting on a stool leaning on a broom stick and a hare beside her. On hearing the noise she pulled her white hair from oer her withered face and eyeing him cautiously said, Ida, there's trouble on you, Your cow is sick indeed she is, the man said, this is the fourth day now, trothin? It is said the man "And what's on her" her foot is sore. She listened awhile and then into a pot and took a string out of it and spat on it three times then she turned her back to him and put three knots on it one in the middle and one on each end.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 16:51
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rejected
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Once upon a time there lived an old witch Jenny:- And she lived in a small old hut on the western side of the Caslin Hills, who was famous for her charms and cures. Once an old man whose cow was sick sought help from "Jenny. On entering the hut he saw he saw the old witch sitting on a stool leaning on a broom stick and a hare beside her. On hearing the noise she pulled her white hair from oer her withered face and eyeing him cautiously said, Ida, there's trouble on you, Your cow is sick indeed she is, the man said, this is the fourth day now, trothin? It is said the man
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 16:46
approved
rejected
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Once upon a time there lived an old witch Jenny:- And she lived in a small old hut on the western side of the Caslin Hills, who was famous for her charms and cures. Once an old man whose cow was sick sought help from "Jenny. On entering the hut he saw he saw the old witch sitting on a stool leaning on a broom stick and a hare beside her.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 16:42
approved
rejected
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he rub it on her leg and didn't the cow sneeze three times and shook herself got up and walked arround the barn when he came out of the barn he looked up to Jenny who was standing the doorway ha" ha" she said.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 16:30
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Once upon a time there lived an old witch Jenny:- And she lived in a small old hut on the western side of the Caslin Hills, who was famous for her charms and cures.
senior member (history)
2021-04-29 10:24
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And she said for fair or market
Bernard was no use.
XIX
Several days I made enquiries
Gave number weight and size
But I never got tale or tidings
Of my mother's merchantise.
The "Bernard" referred to in the foregoing was Bernard Quinn, Cloonfad (near Dangan N.S.) now deceased, a member of the old Guardians' Board, Carrick -on- Shannon and a well-known local agitator during the time of the "Land League".
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 21:05
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This was repeated until the candles were the required thickness. Each time they were laid aside separately to cool. Then they were used when required but very sparingly.
Rush Candles
These were made from the rushes that grow in the field. The strongest ones were called bulrushes. They were cut and left for a day to season. Then the women peeled all the skin almost of the rushes. They left one little strip of the outside skin on. These were then cut into the required lengths. The grisset with some fat or lard was got. Then the bosses of the tongs were put in the fire. The fat was squeezed with the red tongs and melted.
The peeled rushes were pulled through the hot fat, and then left aside separately to cool. The rush was then covered with a thin coating of tallow. Rush candles got one dipping only. They were then used as required but only very sparingly.
There was a special kind of candlestick to hold those candles. It had a very high stand and big boss, and was made of wood. On top of the wood was a slit. Into this
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 18:16
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V
When Summer will come I will have a large run,
Along by Tom Kearn's garden,
Where I can stand at my ease and feed when I please,
And I hope that his grace will me pardon.
VI
When he was at law with O'Neill I did not fail,
For I did a great deal to assist him,
For his wrongs I explained and his rights I maintained,
And O'Neill I completely dismissed him.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 18:08
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múchadh na soillse. Chuaidh sé chun luighthe. Níor chuala sé an taidhbhse an oidhche sin. Thárla do's na soillse bheith 'sna fuinneogaibh gach aon oidhche go bhfaca na comhursanna iad.
Dubhrathas annsin gur chomhnuig an sean-fhear uair i mbóthan i ngáirdín Sheáin gur thuit an bóthan air, is go raibh sé ar fán 'sa gceanntar gur casadh Seán leis an oidhche úd.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 17:59
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Bhí fear óg 'na chomhnuidhe 'na aonar i dtigh ar thaobh an bhóthair, uair. Seán a b'ainm dó. Lá fuar gheimhridh ar imtheacht amach ins na páirceannaibh dó casadh sean-fhear leis nach bhfaca sé riamh cheana. Bhí an fear préachta leis an bhfuacht agus d'iarr Seán air a dtiocfadh isteach 'sa dtigh le'n é féin a théidheamh. Lean an fear é. Níor bhfada dó 'sa dtigh gur thuig Seán gur taidhbhse a bhí ann.
I rith an tráthnóna bhí an sean - fhear ana-chiúin. Bhí eagla ar Sheán an ruaig do chur air agus leig sé leis fanacht go socair. An oidhche sin, mar ba ghnách leis, d'imthigh Seán leis go tigh a chomhursanach. Ar a fhilleadh abhaile dhó chonnach sé go raibh solus i ngach fuinneoigg de'n dtigh. Chomh - luath is a osgail sé an geata beag ar dhul isteach 'san ngáirdín dó
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:25
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filling a grave with spades and he knew it was his neighbour's grave.
He was in great fear. When the women had the grave filled in it happened they just came to the spot where he was. They were very vexed when they saw him as their business was for the hand of a dead person. In that time women used to have the hand of a dead person and used put it under the churn when churning and they used to have rolls of butter then, but only a few women had the secret.
They followed the man and he ran as fast as he could but if they struck him with the dead hand he would surely have died. So they threw it at him but he escaped by a few inches. The place is haunted to this day.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:22
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filling a grave with spades and he knew it was his neighbour's grave.
He was in great fear. When the women had the grave filled in it happened they just came to the spot where he was. They were very vexed when they saw him as their business was for the hand of a dead person. In that time women used to have the hand of a dead person and used put it under the churn when churning and they used to have rolls of butter then, but only a few women had the secret.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:14
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There is an old graveyard about one mile from where I live. It is there since the famine. The people were buried there at that time. There are old headstones there, most of them are made of stone and some of iron. It is situated at Killcooly. It is still in use. It is a hilly graveyard and is in the shape of a square.
About one hundred years ago there was a man named Kelly herding his sheep outside the graveyard. It was the middle of the night. A neighbour of his had bee buried there about three weeks before. He heard digging inside in the graveyard and the breaking of a coffin.
He looked in and saw two women
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:08
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There is an old graveyard about one mile from where I live. It is there since the famine. The people were buried there at that time. There are old headstones there, most of them are made of stone and some of iron. It is situated at Killcooly. It is still in use. It is a hilly graveyard and is in the shape of a square.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 18:29
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to have people in and out. There was an old man in our district and all the people around the people bought their goods from him.
In a townsland called Ballinafad there were races long ago and all the travelling people used to come to it and they used to come to it and they used set up stalls with sweets and cakes. It used be going on for two days. They camps were covered with straw. At one races a young girl remarked to a gentleman "Here comes a great sportsman." "We will soon see if he is a sportsman or not" said another man. As the latter approached the gentleman put up his hand and pulled down a few ribs of straw and said to the other man, "Odds or evens for a £100" and the other man walked away.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 18:16
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rejected
awaiting decision
to have people in and out. There was an old man in our district and all the people around the people bought their goods from him.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 18:13
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rejected
awaiting decision
A posthumous child is supposed to have a cure for the chincough. Any food they leave after their meals if that is given to persons suffering with the chincough they will be cured.
The seventh son or daughter has the cure for Ringworm and in order that they may possess this power there are certain preparations to be made. When the child is born there are two worm put into the child's hands and left there until they are dead and while they are dying there are some prayers to be said also.
Not very far away from my district there lived a man who hated his neighbour very much and wanted to get him done away with. One day he thought of a plan and this was to go to a woman who lived near him and was supposed to have great power. He went to her and told her the story. At first she refused
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 18:00
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A posthumous child is supposed to have a cure for the chincough. Any food they leave after their meals if that is given to persons suffering with the chincough they will be cured.
senior member (history)
2021-04-18 16:49
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Bread was made in olden times of wheat.
Grindstones are two big stones one of which turns by means of a wheel. The corn was put on one stone, then the wheel was turned and the overhead stone ground the corn.
The kinds of bread made were, boxty bread, potato bread and wholemeal bread.
The ingredients for boxty were - raw potatoes grated and flour, a pinch of salt and a half-spoon of breadsoda. A cross is sometimes made on the cake or it is cut into squares. The cake is baked in an oven and in the country they sometimes bake
senior member (history)
2021-04-18 16:38
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Bread was made in olden times of wheat.
Grindstones are two big stones
senior member (history)
2021-04-18 16:35
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The name of my district is Carroward it is situated in the Four-Mile-Parish and in the Ballintubber barony.
There are about fifty living in it and the family name most common is Brennan.
senior member (history)
2021-04-18 16:35
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Bhí fear óg 'na chomhnuidhe 'na aonar i dtigh ar thaobh an bhóthair, uair. Seán a b'ainm dó. Lá fuar gheimhridh ar imtheacht amach ins na páirceannaibh dó casadh sean-fhear leis nach bhfaca sé riamh cheana. Bhí an fear préachta leis an bhfuacht agus d'iarr Seán air a dtiocfadh isteach 'sa dtigh le'n é féin a théidheamh. Lean an fear é. Níor bhfada dó 'sa dtigh gur thuig Seán gur taidhbhse a bhí ann.
senior member (history)
2021-04-18 16:25
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear óg 'na chomhn
senior member (history)
2021-04-18 16:24
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awaiting decision
of, ash, oak, birch, pine, chesnut and larch trees.
The public are allowed to use the demesne at will, a privilege that many take advantage of.
Strokestown had a stout and ale brewery factory about one hundred years ago and as late as seventy years ago it possessed a distillery, the stones and malt houses are still to be seen at the rere of Mrs. Kelly's hotel in Bawn Street. There was also a soap and tan yard in Church Street and up to very recently there was a rope and twine factory held at the premises of Paddy Kenny in Church Street.
There was also a corn mill in Church Street at the back of J. Brennan's old garage Strokestown.
senior member (history)
2021-04-18 16:12
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of, ash, oak, birch, pine, chesnut and larch trees.
The public are allowed to use the demesne
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 18:21
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rejected
awaiting decision
was appointed for the girl's people to see the prospictive bride's home to be, walk the land. All parties being satisfied a day was appointed for the marriage which in those times generally took place at Shrove tide that is after Christmas and before Lent. The neighbours and friends of both partes were invited to the wedding, often times up to one hundred people being invited to the event which was held at the girl's home. All the parties assembled at the bride's home, about an hour or two before the started out for the marriage ceremony which at about two o clock. Horse cars not being very common in those times the parties walked to the chapel. The marriage ceremony performed the wedding party set out for the nearest public house where a big room was in readiness. Dancing and drinking were indulged in for a couple of hours to give the cooks at home time to prepare the wedding feast. The cooks in the meantime are having a busy time at the bride's late home,
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 18:08
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rejected
awaiting decision
was appointed for the girl's people to see the prospictive bride's home to be, walk the land. All parties being satisfied a day was appointed for the marriage which in those times generally took place at Shrove tide that is after Christmas and before Lent.
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 18:02
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rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times when a man was thinking about getting married, he generally looked about for a girl or woman who had money. It did not matter so much about her age. He got some man to apropose a match. A night was appointed for the match making. He armed himself with a bottle of whiskey and set out for the home of his bride to be. After some preliminaries the proposed match was drewn down. A certain sum of money was demanded by the man according to the amount of land and stock he had. The amount claimed often varied from fifty to a hundred pounds more than he expected. The girl's family offered so much then the bargain making started somethings after the custom carried on at the fairs of the present day. After a lot of dividing and re dividing of the money interspersed by whiskey drinking the match was settled or often times, broken off over a paltry sum of £5. If the match was settled, a day
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 18:30
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There are three roads in this district. Their names are Mount brown road, the Tulsk road and the Old Road. The Mount brown road begins about half a mile from Strokestown and joins the Tulsk road about three and a half miles from Strokestown. The Tulsk road leads to Castlerea and Claremorris and then to Ballina. It used to be known as the Mail Coach road because long ago the Biaconi's cars used to pass that way on their way back to Ballina.
During the Famine Period men used to be employed making roads as relief work and part of the Tulsk road and another borreen were supposed to be made then. The men used to be paid badly , sometimes as low twopence or threepence per day. Long ago before there were any bridges the people used to cross at shallow places on stepping stones and used to ride across on horse - back.
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 18:23
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rejected
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There are three roads in this district. Their names are Mount brown road, the Tulsk road and the Old Road. The Mount brown road begins about half a mile from Strokestown and joins the Tulsk road about three and a half miles from Strokestown. The Tulsk road leads to Castlerea and Claremorris and then to Ballina. It used to be known as the Mail Coach road because long ago the Biaconi's cars used to pass that way on their way back to Ballina.
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 18:13
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The old houses were thatched. The thatch was reeds. The old houses had a bed in the kitchen. The bed was placed at the wall beside the fire; it was called a settle bed. The fireplace was at the gable wall when there was no room. When there was a room it was in the middle. The front of the chimney was made of clay and wattles. Some of the old houses had no chimneys they had only a hole in the roof and a tin can left on it for a chimney. The fire was always on the floor. The old houses had no window: they had a hole in the wall to let in air. Half doors are not so common in the district now but they were common long ago. Turf was used for the fire. Rush candles were used for showing light at night and tallow candles were made locally.
senior member (history)
2021-04-11 16:04
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Strokestown is a fairly ancient town and is principally noted for its large markets and fairs. For the most part it is well built, containing some very fine shops and private houses.
The entrance to Pakenham Mahon's Demesne at the end of Bawn Street, attracts much attention, the huge central gates being hung from a lofty Gothic arch of finely chiselled limestone which is now partly clothed in ivy adds much to its beauty.
The mansion, or, as it is called, Strokestown House, is a splendid building of more or less Norman style of Architecture with wings of design, the demesne is laid out in shaded and neatly kept walks and the park contains splendid woods and plantations containing the finest
senior member (history)
2021-04-11 15:52
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Strokestown is a fairly ancient town and is principally noted for its large markets and fairs. For the most part it is well built, containing some very fine shops and private houses.
The entrance to Pakenham Mahon's Demesne at the end of Bawn Street, attracts much attention, the huge central gates being hung from a lofty Gothic arch of finely chiselled limestone which is now partly clothed in ivy adds much to its beauty.
senior member (history)
2021-04-11 15:47
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Strokestown is a fairly ancient town and is principally noted for its large markets and fairs. For the most part it is well built, containing some very fine shops and private houses.
senior member (history)
2021-04-11 15:44
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rejected
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In olden times they had no weather guide such as we have now. They could foretell the weather by means of signs in the sky. If there was a blue blaze in the fire it was a sign of rain or if the smoke did not go up the chimney straight it was a sign of frost or rain. If the sun set very red the next day would be warm. A fog on the river was also a sign of good weather.
If there were red stripes in the sky it was a sign of rain. In the end of March the people always scattered the wet turf so that the three days which March borrows from April would dry it. The wind from the North in winter time is a sign of snow.
The people also believed that the whole year depends on the twelve days of Christmas. If the twelve days were bad ones the whole year would be bad. The swallows flying low is a sign of wet weather. If clocks are crawling on the ground at night it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2021-04-11 15:39
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rejected
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In olden times they had no weather guide such as we have now. They could foretell the weather by means of signs in the sky. If there was a blue blaze in the fire it was a sign of rain or if the smoke did not go up the chimney straight it was a sign of frost or rain. If the sun set very red the next day would be warm. A fog on the river was also a sign of good weather.
If there were red stripes in the sky it was a sign of rain. In the end of March the people always scattered the wet turf so that the three days which March borrows from April would dry it. The wind from the North in winter time is a sign of snow.
senior member (history)
2021-04-11 15:31
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In olden times they had no weather guide such as we have now. They could foretell the weather by means of signs in the sky. If there was a blue blaze in the fire it was a sign of rain or if the smoke did not go up the chimney straight it was a sign of frost or rain. If the sun set very red the next day would be warm. A fog on the river was also a sign of good weather.
senior member (history)
2021-04-09 17:25
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I
Twas early on a Thursday
I got orders to prepare
For the market some good flounders
That my mother had to spare.
II
The Season of the planting of potatoes drawing Nigh
She made up her mind to sell them
While the prices were so high.
III
It so happened that my guardian
Was so busy on that day
For once she said she'd trust me
And she let me peg away.
IV
I promised ere I started
That no company I'd join
Nor be drunk nor in Barrack
Nor be fooled with the coins.
V
So the flounders well I sorted
From a very decent crop
Put the small ones on the bottom
And big ones on the top.
senior member (history)
2021-04-09 17:13
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"Half a loaf is better than no bread".
"Things easily got are lightly valued".
"An inch of an escape is as good as a mile".
"People in glasshouses should not throw stones".
"A watched kettle never boiled".
"Still waters run deep".
"The last straw never broke the camel's back".
"An opportunity once lost can never be recalled".
"The early bird catches the worm".
"Ten swallows never made a summer".
"Don't shout till you are out of the wood".
"A shut mouth wont catch any flies".
"He didn't take it from the wind".
"Any mode of carriage is better than walking".
"Hills are green far away".
senior member (history)
2021-04-08 17:40
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Once upon a time there was a man who put a stone in a box for every Mass he attended. One day he went to count them but there was only one in it. So then he knew that was the only one he heard right.
There was once a priest and he promised to say a Mass for a certain person, but after a while he forgot all about it. One night he went to the chapel and he saw the woman there and several nights after. He asked her what she wanted and she said that she would be heaven if he had said the Mass for her.
There was once a house and all the pictures used to fall off the wall if any one went in to a certain room in it. They
senior member (history)
2021-04-08 17:36
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rejected
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Once upon a time there was a man who put a stone in a box for every Mass he attended. One day he went to count them but there was only one in it. So then he knew that was the only one he heard right.
There was once a priest and he promised to say a Mass for a certain person, but after a while he forgot all about it. One night he went to the chapel and he saw the woman there and several nights after. He asked her what she wanted and she said that she would be heaven if he had said the Mass for her.
senior member (history)
2021-04-08 17:31
approved
rejected
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Once upon a time there was a man who put a stone in a box for every Mass he attended. One day he went to count them but there was only one in it. So then he knew that was the only one he heard right.
senior member (history)
2021-04-08 17:26
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There was once a man who lived in the County Roscommon & he stole a lot of money from people and was giving it to his friends, and he also hid some of it under big stones and rocks in backward places where very few people were travelling. He went on very well for some time, and he had a lot of money left by among the money was a lot of gold. Well, this man would never be found out but when he was stealing the money he told one man, but this man was not to tell anybody about it.
After some time the man whom he told about the stolen money wanted some of it from him, the man who had stolen the money delayed in giving it to him. Then the other man was very angry when he did not get the money at once, so he told the story around to everybody. The man was got and was taken to court, and was found guilty and he was to be hanged, before he died he was asked where the money but he refused to tell them. As he was about to die, he called one man and said, that there was about five hundred pounds hidden under the biggest stone on the Caslin Hills. Many people have searched since, and are searching even to this day but have failed to find the money.
senior member (history)
2021-04-08 17:18
approved
rejected
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There was once a man who lived in the County Roscommon & he stole a lot of money from people and was giving it to his friends, and he also hid some of it under big stones and rocks in backward places where very few people were travelling. He went on very well for some time, and he had a lot of money left by among the money was a lot of gold. Well, this man would never be found out but when he was stealing the money he told one man, but this man was not to tell anybody about it.
After some time the man whom he told about the stolen money wanted some of it from him, the man who had stolen the money delayed in giving it to him. Then the other man was very angry when he did not get the money at once, so he told the story around to everybody.
senior member (history)
2021-04-08 17:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man who lived in the County Roscommon & he stole a lot of money from people and was giving it to his friends, and he also hid some of it under big stones and rocks in backward places where very few people were travelling. He went on very well for some time, and he had a lot of money left by among the money was a lot of gold. Well, this man would never be found out but when he was stealing the money he told one man, but this man was not to tell anybody about it.
After some time the man whom he told about the stolen money wanted some of it from him, the man who had stolen the money delayed in giving it to him. Then the other man was very angry when he did not get the money at once, so he told the story around to everybody.
senior member (history)
2021-04-08 17:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man who lived in the County Roscommon & he stole a lot of money from people and was giving it to his friends, and he also hid some of it under big stones and rocks in backward places where very few people were travelling. He went on very well for some time, and he had a lot of money left by among the money was a lot of gold. Well, this man would never be found out but when he was stealing the money he told one man, but this man was not to tell anybody about it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-07 17:05
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rejected
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There are several old sayings and proverbs handed down to us from the old people, with regard to signs of good weather, a few of which are quoted below.
For instance when the sun goes down sparkling it is a sign of rain, also when a ring encircles the moon rain follows, numerous stars in the sky at night sparkling brightly is a sign of frost, and a rainbow betoken to sunny showery weather. Now when the wind blows from the south west rain follows as a general rule, and from that point most rain comes. North wind brings frost and snow. Some animals give signs of the weather for instance sheep and goats look for shelter, before rain, also ducks shout for rain.
When the sky appears red at sunset, rain is supposed to follow, and
senior member (history)
2021-04-07 16:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are several old sayings and proverbs handed down to us from the old people, with regard to signs of good weather, a few of which are quoted below.
For instance when the sun goes down sparkling it is a sign of rain, also when a ring encircles the moon rain follows, numerous stars in the sky at night sparkling brightly is a sign of frost, and a rainbow betoken to sunny showery weather. Now when the wind blows from the south west rain follows as a general rule, and from that most rain comes.
senior member (history)
2021-04-07 16:51
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rejected
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There are several old sayings and proverbs handed down to us from the old people, with regard to signs of good weather, a few of which are quoted below.
senior member (history)
2021-04-07 16:47
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Another cure is the leavings of a husband and wife of the same name before they were married.
A cure for small sores was to put a fasting spittle on the hearth for nine mornings and rub it on the sore. Walsh's blood was a cure for wildfire. This was the blood of a person whose father's and mother's name was Walsh.
For burns people went to a person who had a cure for burns. This cure was got by licking a man-keeper and the man who licked the man-keeper had only to lick the burn.
One cure for mumps was to go to the piggery and rub each side of the face against the door and say "hurrais the much tigheadh do leicnese". Another cure was to put the pot-hooks around the neck and go to a stream dividing two villages and rub three drops of water and three stones and say, "leicneach leicneach sin agat a leicneach"
For boils, a cure was to go to a place where four streams and on three consecutive Sundays before the sun rose and rub three drops of the water
senior member (history)
2021-04-07 16:45
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rejected
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Another cure is the leavings of a husband and wife of the same name before they were married.
A cure for small sores was to put a fasting spittle on the hearth for nine mornings and rub it on the sore. Walsh's blood was a cure for wildfire. This was the blood of a person whose father's and mother's name was Walsh.
For burns people went to a person who had a cure for burns. This cure was got by licking a man-keeper and the man who licked the man-keeper had only to lick the burn.
One cure for mumps was to go to the piggery and rub each side of the face against the door and say "hurrais the much tigheadh do leicnese". Another cure was to put the pot-hooks around the neck and go to a stream dividing two villages and rub three drops of water and three stones and say, "leicneach leicneach sin agat a leicneach"
senior member (history)
2021-04-07 16:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Another cure is the leavings of a husband and wife of the same name before they were married.
A cure for small sores was to put a fasting spittle on the hearth for nine mornings and rub it on the sore. Walsh's blood was a cure for wildfire. This was the blood of a person whose father's and mother's name was Walsh.
For burns people went to a person who had a cure for burns. This cure was got by licking a man-keeper and the man who licked the man-keeper had only to lick the burn.
senior member (history)
2021-04-07 16:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Another cure is the leavings of a husband and wife of the same name before they were married.
A cure for small sores was to put a fasting spittle on the hearth for nine mornings and rub it on the sore. Walsh's blood was a cure for wildfire. This was the blood of a person whose father's and mother's name was Walsh.
senior member (history)
2021-04-05 18:34
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rejected
awaiting decision
The people began to wear boots at 20 years or there abouts. There are no accounts of people who never wore boots or shoes. The children go bare footed in Summer but not the year round.
The water for washing the feet is spilled away. Boots are repared locally but not made locally. There are no shoemakers in the district. Clogs are worn but not made locally. There are no sayings or proverbs connected with the above. Clogs are worn in Winter but not in Summer. Leather was never made in the district.
senior member (history)
2021-04-05 18:22
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{{?}
senior member (history)
2021-04-05 18:21
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There was once a widow's son who was going to visit his uncle in the North of Ireland. There was no means of travelling in those days except by foot. He used to stay in a farmer's house at night. Once he came to a friend's house and he stayed in it for the night. In the morning they had "deer meat" for the breakfast. The boy had made a vow never to eat "deer meat". But he did not know it as it was made up in a sandwich. He eat the "deer meat" and contined on his journey. At last he reached his uncle's. He stayed in it for three years. When he was coming home he stayed in the same house. They had "deer meat" for the breakfast. But the boy said he had made a vow never to eat "deer meat". But, said the man of the house, you ate it here three years ago. At that the boy fell dead.
senior member (history)
2021-04-05 18:15
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rejected
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There was once a widow's son who was going to visit his uncle in the North of Ireland. There was no means of travelling in those days except by foot. He used to stay in a farmer's house at night. Once he came to a friend's house and he stayed in it for the night. In the morning they had "deer meat" for the breakfast. The boy had made a vow never to eat "deer meat". But he did not know it as it was made up in a sandwich. He eat the "deer meat" and contined on his journey. At last he reached his uncle's.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 17:33
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Q. Under the water, over the water and never touches the water.
A. (A duck having an egg and she diving in a pond.)
Q. Ceann m-aghaidh tóin agus tóin m-aghaidh talamh riddle me that and I will give you a banbh.
A. (A man milking a goat.)
Q. My father gave me seed to sow. When the seed began to grow, Like a garden full of snow. When the snow began to melt. Like a ship without a belt. When the ship began to sail. Like a bird without a tail. When the bird begane to fly. Like an eagle in the sky. When the sky began to fall. Lord have mercy on us all.
A. (A ship drounwing.)
Q. Four feet hanging, four feet ganging, four feet lying in the press
A. A cow in calf.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 17:31
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rejected
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Q. Under the water, over the water and never touches the water.
A. (A duck having an egg and she diving in a pond.)
Q. Ceann m-aghaidh tóin agus tóin m-aghaidh talamh riddle me that and I will give you a banbh.
A. (A man milking a goat.)
Q. My father gave me seed to sow. When the seed began to grow, Like a garden full of snow. When the snow began to melt.Like a ship without a belt. When the ship began to sail. Like a bird without a tail. When the bird begane to fly. Like an eagle in the sky. When the sky began to fall. Lord have mercy on us all.
A. (A ship drounwing.)
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 16:18
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or a gun to protect himself. He (River) always brought his servant with him and when he was coming from Dublin one day he asked his servant had the blacksmith a curse. So the servant said he had. The gentleman said he intended to find out.
When they came to the forge the man asked the smith if he had the curse. The blacksmith said he did not know. The man asked if he ever used the curse. The smith replied that he had no occasion as he was on good terms with all his neighbours. The man said he would ride down as far as a hill that was near and that if he was not killed that he would come back and kill him with his sword.
The blacksmith began striking the anvil with a big sledge and began cursing. He took of his coat and waistcoat and kept on cursing until he began to sweat. He sent out his servant to see if the man
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 16:14
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rejected
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or a gun to protect himself. He (River) always brought his servant with him and when he was coming from Dublin one day he asked his servant had the blacksmith a curse. So the servant said he had. The gentleman said he intended to find out.
When they came to the forge the man asked the smith if he had the curse. The blacksmith said he did not know. The man asked if he ever used the curse. The smith replied that he had no occasion as he was on good terms with all his neighbours. The man said he would ride down as far as a hill that was near and that if he was not killed that he would come back and kill him with his sword.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 16:11
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rejected
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or a gun to protect himself. He (River) always brought his servant with him and when he was coming from Dublin one day he asked his servant had the blacksmith a curse. So the servant said he had. The gentleman said he intended to find out.
When they came to the forge the man asked the smith if he had the curse. The blacksmith said he did not know. The man asked if he ever used the curse.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 16:08
approved
rejected
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or a gun to protect himself. He (River) always brought his servant with him and when he was coming from Dublin one day he asked his servant had the blacksmith a curse. So the servant said he had. The gentleman said he intended to find out.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 16:02
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rejected
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The potatoes must be weeded before the stalks get too big, and then they are sprayed. When the digging comes the farmer gets a big "meitheal" and this shortens the work to a week or so. Some of the younger crowd pick them. The best potatoes are the Kerr Pinks and Champions.
The potatoes are stored in heaps and covered with clay.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:53
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The houses were much more numerous in former days and the ruins of some of them can still be seen.
It is counted a very healthy district as the land is very elevated.
There are two or three very old people living in it still. There is one old man 95 years and his name is Michael Neary, Carroward, Four-Mile-House, Roscommon
and another 75 years. His name is Pat Brennan.
There is a blessed well convenient to the district called "St. Patrick's Well". It is very remarkable and there never is more than a foot of water in depth in it. It is said that some people took water out of it for use and that no matter what amount of heat or (water) fire they put to it, it will not boil.
There are several heaps of stones around it where pilgrims carried them there in by-gone days. There is also a large ash-tree growing in bush shape on the brink of the well and the roots are entwined in the wall around it and it looks as if it were centuries old.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:49
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rejected
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The houses were much more numerous in former days and the ruins of some of them can still be seen.
It is counted a very healthy district as the land is very elevated.
There are two or three very old people living in it still. There is one old man 95 years and his name is Michael Neary, Carroward, Four-Mile-House, Roscommon
and another 75 years. His name is Pat Brennan.
There is a blessed well convenient to the district called "St. Patrick's Well". It is very remarkable and there never is more than a foot of water in depth in it. It is said that some people took water out of it for use and that no matter what amount of heat or (water) fire they put to it, it will not boil.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:44
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The name of my district is Carroward it is situated in the Four-Mile-Parish and in the Bsllintubber barony.
There are about fifty living in it and the family name most common is Brennan.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:40
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhíodh saoghal na ndaoine ana dheacair fadó i gcomparad leis an am faoi lathair. Fadó bhí ar na daoine arán dubh déanta as seagal is coirce a ith.
Bhíodh bró no bróinte muilinn chun an arbhar a mheilt ag cách, beagnach. Deireann sean daoine na haimsire seo go raibh orra pota arbhair a thriumú agus a mheilt ar maidin i gcóir an bhricfeasta.
Bhíodh a lán aráin aca, cáca fátaí, bacsti agus arán coirce. Uaireannta nuair a bhíodh an bainne ar an nganncuid do fuinntí an t-aran le h-uisce. Nuair a bhíodh an cáca déanta dheineadh comhartha na Croise. ar a bharr. Fadó do bacáilti an t-arán os comhair na teineadh ar taca. As craoibh agus trí cosa fuithi a déantai an taca seo. Tugtaoi "traiste" ar seo. Déantai arán
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:38
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhíodh saoghal na ndaoine ana dheacair fadó i gcomparad leis an am faoi lathair. Fadó bhí ar na daoine arán dubh déanta as seagal is coirce a ith.
Bhíodh bró no bróinte muilinn chun an arbhar a mheilt ag cách, beagnach. Deireann sean daoine na haimsire seo go raibh orra pota arbhair a thriumú agus a mheilt ar maidin i gcóir an bhricfeasta.
Bhíodh a lán aráin aca, cáca fátaí, bacsti agus arán coirce. Uaireannta nuair a bhíodh an bainne ar an nganncuid do fuinntí an t-aran le h-uisce. Nuair a bhíodh an cáca déanta dheineadh comhartha na Croise. ar a bharr. Fadó do bacáilti an t-arán os comhair na teineadh ar taca. As craoibh agus trí cosa fuithi a déantai an taca seo.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhíodh saoghal na ndaoine ana dheacair fadó i gcomparad leis an am faoi lathair. Fadó bhí ar na daoine arán dubh déanta as seagal is coirce a ith.
Bhíodh bró no bróinte muilinn chun an arbhar a mheilt ag cách, beagnach. Deireann sean daoine na haimsire seo go raibh orra pota arbhair a thriumú agus a mheilt ar maidin i gcóir an bhricfeasta.
Bhíodh a lán aráin aca, cáca fátaí, bacsti agus arán coirce. Uaireannta nuair a bhíodh an bainne ar an nganncuid do fuinntí an t-aran le h-uisce. Nuair a bhíodh an cáca déanta dheineadh comhartha na Croise. ar a bharr.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhíodh saoghal na ndaoine ana dheacair fadó i gcomparad leis an am faoi lathair. Fadó bhí ar na daoine arán dubh déanta as seagal is coirce a ith.
Bhíodh bró no bróinte muilinn chun an arbhar a mheilt ag cách, beagnach. Deireann sean daoine na haimsire seo go raibh orra pota arbhair a thriumú agus a mheilt ar maidin i gcóir an bhricfeasta.
ca déanta dheineadh comhartha na Croise. ar a bharr.
senior member (history)
2021-04-02 15:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhíodh saoghal na ndaoine ana dheacair fadó i gcomparad leis an am faoi lathair. Fadó bhí ar na daoine arán dubh déanta as seagal is coirce a ith.
ca déanta dheineadh comhartha na Croise. ar a bharr.
senior member (history)
2021-04-01 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The houses were much more numerous in former days and the ruins of some of them can still be seen.
It is counted a very healthy district as the land is very elevated.
There are two or three very old people living in it still. There is one old man 95 years and his name is Michael Neary, Carroward, Four-Mile-House, Roscommon
and another 75 years. His name is Pat Brennan.
senior member (history)
2021-04-01 17:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ca déanta dheineadh comhartha na Croise. ar a bharr.
senior member (history)
2021-04-01 17:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhíodh saoghal na ndaoine ana dheacair fadó i gcomparad leis an am faoi lathair. Fadó bhí ar na daoine arán dubh déanta as seagal is coirce a ith.
Bhíodh bró no bróinte muilinn chun an arbhar a mheilt ag các, beagnach. Deireann sean daoine na haimsire seo go raibh orra pota arbhair a thriumú agus a mheilt ar maidin i gcóir an bhricfeasta.
senior member (history)
2021-03-31 17:46
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rejected
awaiting decision
At first the rods are pointed and then stuck down in a rectangular shape. There are thirty six rods stuck down now in the ground. There has to be a bunion put on it first two rods stuck in and out through the ribs for the bunion. Then the weaving goes on again plainly till he comes to where the eyes should be put. Then he puts on another bunion and curves one of the two rods and sticks it down beside the other one. He does that with each one of the two rods that are standing up.
senior member (history)
2021-03-31 17:33
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rejected
awaiting decision
róistín corr uair freisin.
senior member (history)
2021-03-31 17:32
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rejected
awaiting decision
Tá difriocht mór eadar arán an lae indiu agus arán an tsean-aimsir. D'ithidís arán déanta as coirce is seagal agus nuair an bainne gann fuinidís le h-uisge é.
Gnití "bacsti" as fataí. Baineadh an craiceann díobh ar dtúis agus annsin do scríobadh iad. Measguidheadh plúr i measg na fátaí agus bacáileadh ar roistín iad.
Déantar arán as turnaipí fado. Ar dtuis bheirbhuigheadh an turnap i bpota gan uisce agus a bheadh sé bog tógtaí anuas é agus plúr measguithe leis.
Gnithear comhartha na Croise ar bharr chácha i gcomhnuidhe, mar ceaptar go gcuiduigheann é seo leis an mbacáil.
Déantar arán-fátaí fos leis na fátaí do lomaradh agus iad a beirbhiughadh agus plúr a measgadh leo.
senior member (history)
2021-03-31 17:15
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rejected
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Saint Brigid's feast day falls on the first of February. The people of the country make crosses in honour of her. The cross is made of two bits of sticks and Rushes. Long ago the people used make it with this as they had nothing, this custom is kept up still. The cross is blessed by the priest and put at back of the doors in the home, this is to prevent sickness coming into the house throughout the year through the intercession of Saint Brigid.
Saint Patrick who brought the faith to this country told them the meaning of the cross he had such love for both the people and the cross. The Irish people make it every year in honour of him.
Flowers are put outside the door on May day to honour our Blessed Lady. Long ago they used to have on May Eve what they call the May Pole. They used
senior member (history)
2021-03-31 17:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Brigid's feast day falls on the first of February. The people of the country make crosses in honour of her. The cross is made of two bits of sticks and Rushes. Long ago the people used make it with this as they had nothing, this custom is kept up still. The cross is blessed by the priest and put at back of the doors in the home, this is to prevent sickness coming into the house throughout the year through the intercession of Saint Brigid.
Saint Patrick who brought the faith to this country told them the meaning of the cross he had such love for both the people and the cross. The Irish people make it every year in honour of him.
senior member (history)
2021-03-31 17:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Brigid's feast day falls on the first of February. The people of the country make crosses in honour of her. The cross is made of two bits of sticks and Rushes. Long ago the people used make it with this as they had nothing, this custom is kept up still. The cross is blessed by the priest and put at back of the doors in the home, this is to prevent sickness coming into the house throughout the year through the intercession of Saint Brigid.
senior member (history)
2021-03-30 18:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Local Fairs of long ago were generally held in fairgreens but it was more beneficial to both buyer and seller. If it were held in the town on a very cold morning men who were up very early needed some warm food and drink, which cannot be availed of when in a fairgreen. It also suited the publican and hotels the more. Sometimes the buyer would come to farms where a large number of stock were to be sold and buy them, and take them away from there, this was of great benefit to the farmer. Also stock were disposed of to and from the fair.
Some fairs of this town were discontinued although for instance the "Ballinafad Fair" which was held on the 27th August at the town of Ballinafad. This was a noted day for fighting and at the present day day there are some sighns up where some men are buried. At those fairs "toll" was paid by the buyer of the cattle
senior member (history)
2021-03-30 17:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Local Fairs of long ago were generally held in fairgreens but it was more beneficial to both buyer and seller. If it were held in the town on a very cold morning men who were up very early needed some warm food and drink, which cannot be availed of when in a fairgreen. It also suited the publican and hotels the more. Sometimes the buyer would come to farms where a large number of stock were to be sold and buy them, and take them away from there, this was of great benefit to the farmer. Also stock were disposed of to and from the fair.
senior member (history)
2021-03-30 17:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Local Fairs of long ago were generally held in fairgreens but it was more beneficial to both buyer and seller. If it were held in the town on a very cold morning men who were up very early needed some warm food and drink, which cannot be availed of when in a fairgreen. It also suited the publican and hotels the more.
senior member (history)
2021-03-29 18:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago when there were no doctors in this country, people relied on what they called "Country Quacks". Those "country quacks" had cures confined to their own families and handed down to them by their forefathers. They depended alot on herbs that grew in the land. They had different herbs to cure different diseases.
For a burn they would make ointment from the roots of daisies, and likewise for other more serious diseases. To cure a bad cold a person would go under the treatment known as "sweating" and to cure a pleurisy this so called doctor would extract what they called "bad blood" from their veins. To cure the whooping cough people had several remedies, such as, the leavings of two people married of the same name, another was to tie a red tape round the child's neck, by either of the God - parents without speaking.
There were several holy wells throughout the country, which were supposed to be visited by Saint Patrick, and the water from any
senior member (history)
2021-03-29 17:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago when there were no doctors in this country, people relied on what they called "Country Quacks". Those "country quacks" had cures confined to their own families and handed down to them by their forefathers. They depended alot on herbs that grew in the land. They had different herbs to cure different diseases.
For a burn they would make ointment from the roots of daisies, and likewise for other more serious diseases. To cure a bad cold a person would go under the treatment known as "sweating" and to cure a pleurisy this so called doctor would extract what they called "bad blood" from their veins.
senior member (history)
2021-03-29 17:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago when there were no doctors in this country, people relied on what they called "Country Quacks". Those "country quacks" had cures confined to their own families and handed down to them by their forefathers. They depended alot on herbs that grew in the land. They had different herbs to cure different diseases.
senior member (history)
2021-03-29 17:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
you were churning when you tried to kill the clock with your foot well that was me".
The husband and sons came in and the man had to fight hard to save his life.
He never went that road after.
senior member (history)
2021-03-29 17:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision