Number of records in editorial history: 738 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are the ruins of an old castle in Newstone the last person that lived there was Mr Mc Gourish it is built five hundred years and I do not know who built; It is in the Parish of Drumcondrath in the townland of Newstone and the Barony of Slane Lower and in Co. Meath.
There is a portion of an old castle at Magheracloy in the parish of Magheracloy and the Barony of Farney Co Monaghan,
Over the doors and windows of the castle, there is some very beautiful carving;
On the top of the castle there are two battle towers from which it could be defended in case of attack; There are also dungeons in which prisoners were kept, In Drumbridge graveyard there are the ruins of an old church; The holy water stones are there yet; and on them there are flowers carved. This church is about six hundred years old; The way it was destroyed was the time there were plunderers in the country and it was burned, it is in the Parish of Drumconrath and the Barony of Slane Lower in Meath, In the kitchen of Magheracloy castle there is a dresser which is three hundred years old. On the front of the dresser there are four lions beautifully
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old ruins
There are the ruins of an old monastery in the town Louth. Beside this monastery there is a little house and it was all made of stone; it was supposed to be for holding valuable belonging to the monastery and the monks; there is a legend about this house it is said there came a knock to the monastery door one night, and a monk asked lodging and they would not let him in, he lay down on the ground and in the morning he was dead and this house was found built over him; There are the ruins of an old castle in Nicholastown and the remains of it are to be seen yet it is in Ardee, Co. Louth and there was a dungeon in it for keeping prisoners;
There are some large stones there still and there is writing in Latin on them; The castle was built in the year 1816;
There are the ruins of an old castle in a field belonging to Jack Murphy it was knocked by a man name Cromwell and this happened in the year 1651.
Written by Angela Martin on th 5 May 1938
Told by Mrs Martin Reaghstown on 4th May 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 22:15
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rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times people used to see lights in those forts; there was a fort in Carrickrobin and years ago the old people then used to see lights especially if there were anyone going to die in the town land, One night there was a horse in the fort, a boy went to the fort for the horse as it was time to take her in and as it was late he was a good while away; two men went out to see was he coming with the horse and they saw the fort all lit up and the boy that went for the horse never saw the light at all; The next morning they went to see if the fire did any harm and they found every thing the way it was; The people say of the fort at Carrickrobin that a man named James Meegan heard churning going on in this fort at Carrickrobin; There was a wall built round this fort it was built by the Danes; There is a fort in the town-land of Big-Ash Knock-bridge; the fort itself is called mount the man that owned the farm that the fort is on said one day that would hack it up; Written by Rose Rooney on 10th February 1938
Told by Matt Mc Gee Reaghstown on th 9 Feb, 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
with O'Neill. There is a fort in Clarke's field of Edmondstown and it was said that fairies were seen dancing on it; There are trees growing on it and they are afraid to cut them as they might disturb the fairies.
There is another fort in Mc Hugh field and lights were seen often at it; There is a big hole in the middle of it; There is another fort in Reaghstown known as the Kesh it is owned by James Mc Connan; There is a path going over to it where the fairies used to walk, there was a shop on the path and the fairies used to come and buy their bread in it; These fairies used to come and leave the money on a stone outside the shop and the people would take the money of it and leave the bread on it and the fairies would come and take it away; Written by Annie Mohan on 9th Feb, 1938
Told by Michael Mohan on 9th Feb, 1938
Aclint,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 21:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old fort or mount in Cromartin, Ardee and it is said that there was gold hidden in it and that a wild cat was minding it;
There is another old fort in Campell's field in Annagh Co Louth it is round and covered with bushes. There is an old fort in Holland's field in Co. Monaghan and there is a mount in Aclint and it was that O'Neill's army was on Holland's fort and that the Earl of Essex was on the mount of Aclint and they rode their horses down to the river, till they touched their saddle girths together and held a conference there. Essex went back to England and was beheaded by Queen Elizabeth for making a treaty
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 21:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Darver Young Ireland's Victory Song
In Dromiskin there lives a popular figure named Larry Rogan. Though "cute" above the ordinary in many ways he is particularly "soft" in the belief that he is an athlete and singer above the average. He could, for instance hold his hearers spell bound recounting wonderful GAA games in which he played, wherein it was only some superhuman efforts on his behalf that turned defeat into victory but he never figured in a football game in his life. The "boys" unwisely perhaps encourage Larry to talk of his adventures and to sing and recite at local concerts with the results that he verily believes himself a "star". He has for years been following Darver Young Irelands GFC and his delight knew no bounds when they succeeded in winning the Louth 1938 Junior after one of the most exciting games played in this county for many years. To commemorate
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 20:41
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rejected
awaiting decision
The fairies come out of the mount and play music; The people say that on dark nights there is a light on it. The mount is now covered with bushes.
Written by Jane Clarke 10th Feb, 1938
told by John Clarke on 9th Feb, 1938
Crowmartin,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 20:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fairyforts
There is a fort in a field of Murrays in Crowmartin Co Louth and there is a lot of trees all round it and when the people used to be out at night looking at the sheep that were in the field, they used to see a light in the centre of; the people could find no entrance to it; and there is a noise heard often in it. There is another fort in McKeever's field in Crowmartin Co Louth in which there is said to be fairies this fort is called Cromartin mount, This mount is built with stones and there is an entrance to it mad with stones, when you go up on the top of it you can see the mount of Aclint; People say that Jane Martin from Greatwood saw a lot of little men making boots and there is a light often seen beside the mount and the top of it is covered with bushes. There is a graveyard beside the mount of Aclint in which the giants of long ago were buried and it is said that there are fairies in the mount and the people say that in the summer
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 20:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in some years hence a bigger rampart will be built farther out in order to obtain more land but it will not be considered such a great task as was done in building this smaller rampart because not with stones would it be built, but with cement which as we know is much stronger and powerful substance and it will set quickly which is a great advantage in such as business because if built after one tide it will be strong before the next.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 20:29
approved
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awaiting decision
farmers. It was not done without much labour and cost, in fact, it is said that it cost a guinea per foot.
It stands there now, defying all tides, even becoming larger with the seaweed and such that the tides wash up. In it there are two sluice gates, one of which was made recently, which allow drains to run into the sea and prevent the tides coming up.
It stands about twenty feet in height and the same in breadth at the bottom, but slopes away to about three feet of a path at the top. May people walk along this path in Summer enjoying the sweet sea breezes. The rampart itself is about two miles long, extending from White House to Lurgangreen. It is thought that
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 20:26
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quarry some distance from Lurgangreen where large stones can be got.
The making of this rampart gave great employment to the people of the district. Of course, they did not receive high wages, in fact it is said that each work man got four- pence per day, and for a horse and cart six pence per day. Four- pence or six- pence they could however could buy much more that it could nowadays. A traditional story tells us that in building the rampart a man was killed, and his ghost can still be seen walking along it wheeling a barrow.
After some time this great work was finished and no longer did the tide cross the Commons, but left a quite arable land to take
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 19:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Game I Play
Two of the games I play at school are "There is an old woman from Sandylane" and "Little Alie Sander".
There is a ring of children gather and one of the children has to be the old woman and three other children to be the babies.
The old woman has to say "There is an old woman from Sandylane with all her children in her hand, one can knit, and one can sew, and one can make a lily white grow and will you kindly take on of my orphans in"
Then they take one of her children in she says the same again until all of the three are gone.
That game is finished.
To play "Little Alie Sander" there has to be a ring of children, and a little girl in the middle of the ring. She is to be pretending to be crying and then the children in the ring say Little Alie Sander sitting on the sand "crying and weeping for a young man rise up Alie and dry away your tears and which of us do you love so dear".
Alie says none of you, you are all too black and ugly"
The one she chooses has to be Little Alie Sander the next.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 19:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Written by Jane Beylan on th 7 December 1938
Told by Mrs Beylan on 6th December 1938
Reaghstown,
Ardee.

Long ago there were Hedge school-master's as they were then called; they used to teach in a barn or out house the way they were paid was one penny per week from each scholar, and in some cases the Land-Lords used to helf to pay, there was one of those sclools in Carrickrobin near Dundalk and the teacher's name was Mullholand there would be over one hundred in the school, there were no desks or seats. They had seats made of straw, they wrote on slates with a frame of wood round them they used to write on slates on their knees, and that was in the year 1860.
Written by Rose Rooney on 7th Dec, 1938
told by Mrs Campbell on 6th Dec, 1938
Reaghstown,
Ardee
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 17:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Warts. To dip warts in water that was on top of a stone or on top of cowdung, to cure a wart?
Poultice. Ivy leaves were boiled and used as a poutice?
Chincough. A woman who was married to a man who had the same name as herself to tie a piece of red flannen round your neck, or give you a crust of bread is a cure for the chincough?
Warts. Get nine rushes, bless them and bury them, when they rot, the warts go away?
Sty. Get the oldest son in the house to get ten thorns of a gooseberry bush, and with the last thorn tip the eye, and say, In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost? Amen?
Dirt in a cut. Get some boiled Ivyleaves and put them on the cut to draw out any dirt?
Clilbains Rub onions on the chibanes?
Fits. Never eat bacon and you will not take the fits, if you do you may take the fits?
Warts Get some water that does not tip the ground and put it on the warts, and they will go away?
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 17:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What is it that can go up the chimney down, and wont come down the chimney up?
An umbrella.
Why does a hen pick a pot?
Because she can't lick it,
My father give me seed to sow the seed was black and the ground was white riddle me that and I will give you a pint?
Paper and Ink.
How many feet has forty sheep the shephard and his dog?
Two.
Two Americans sat on a bridge and one was the father of the other's son, what relation were they?
Husband and Wife.
A wooden back and a wooden belly, two leather aides, a hole and a brass nose, and that is the sine of cold weather?
A bellows.
In and out like a trout sugary, wet, and grasy?
Your tongue.
What is the centre of gravity?
The letter.
If your nose was twelve inches long what would it be?
A foot.
Little red Nancy stands by the wall she eats all I give her and drinks none at all? A fire.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 17:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What is the nicest vegetable that grows in Ireland without a green leaf?
A mushroom.
As black as ink as white as snow, hops on the street like hailstones?
A magpie.
It comes in on a man's back and goes out in smoke?
Coals.
It goes from town to town and never moves a foot?
A Road.
In came two legs sat down on three legs, with one leg in its arms, in came four legs picked up one leg, up jumped two legs, picked up three legs and threw it after four legs?
Answer, A man sitting on a stool with a leg of mutton in his arm, in came a dog and ran away with it, and the man threw the stool after him.
Made in the wood brought to the town and earns its master many a pound?
A fiddle.
Black and white went up the hill black came down and white stayed above?
A hen layed a white eff above and she came down herself.
Why does a lady look up at the moon?
Because there is a man in it.
What has two eyes and cannot see?
The Sissors.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 13:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As I was going to the fair of Ives I met seven men with their seven wives every wife had seven sacks, and every sack had seven cats every cat had seven kittens, how many were going to the fair of Ives?
One.
Little Jinnie Huddle sits in a puddle she wears a white petticoat and a green gown?
A rush.
As I went into the town I met a girl with a lot of geese I said good morning miss and your forty geese she said I have not forty but if I had as many more and half as many more I would have forty?
Sixteen.
As I looked out my grandfather's window I saw a little man with a stick in his hand and a stone in his belly riddle me that and I will give you a penny?
A haw.
As I went out my grandfather's gate I met my aunty Joney she had Iron toes and a timber nose and upon my word she would frighten the crows?
A gun.
How long did Cane hate his brother?
As long as he was Able.
Why does a cow look over the ditch?
Because he cannot look under
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 20:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
What part of the cow goes into the wood first?
Her breath.
Hairy all over rough in the skin two things shaken and one going in?
A pig eating.
Pull its nose and its tail will bleed?
A Pump.
There is a house over there and there is more windows on it than the Kings Palace?
A Thimble.
I boiled the kettle with truth and lies?
A Newspaper.
Kitchen full, a room full, and couldent catch a spoon full.
Smoke.
Twenty four white horses in a stall, up jumps a red one and licks them all?
Your tongue on your teeth.
Tink tank on the bank ten drawing four?
A woman milking a cow.
Brothers and sisters I have none but that man's father is my father's son?
Myself.
Through a rock, through a reel, through an old spinning wheel, through a bag of pepper, through an old horses shinbone?
A moth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:45
approved
rejected
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King Amarocar built a ship and in this ship his daughter sits and I am not ashamed to say her name and that is three times I have told you?
And.
As round as an apple as plump as a ball, can climb through the church over steeple and all?
The Sun.
What is it that walks with its head down?
A nail in your boot.
What is in an empty cart?
Plenty of room.
First it was green, then it was red, and then black?
A Blackberry.
Which part of the fish weighs the most?
The scales.
The longer it sits the shorter its gets?
A Candle.
Why is Ireland like a bottle?
Because there is a Cork in it.
Headed like timble, Tailed like a rat you may guess for ever but you couldn't guess that?
A Pipe.
If a man got a shilling for walking one mile what would he get for walking fifty miles?
Sore feet.
Put on the table and never cut?
A Deck of cards.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:40
approved
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awaiting decision
it is red then they begin churning and the butter comes on the milk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Churning
We have a churn at home. It is three feet tall, and it is sixteen inches at the top, and it is eighteen inches at the bottom. It is not round. It is eleven years old. There is no mark on the sides or bottom. Churning is done often in Summer than in Winter. Everyone helps to churn in our house. Strangers who come in help to churn. It is a custom to help, and if they don't help is a sign of bad luck. It takes an hour to do it. The churning is done by hand. The churning is done when the butter come out on the side. Water is poured in during the churning. Buttermilk is used for making bread, and for dringing, and for giving to the pigs, and for making whey. If the butter will not come on the milk, the people stop churning and the put a piece of the plough into the fire until
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:05
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Swan.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:05
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Gold finches.

Rooks.

Pheasant.

Green linet.

Wild hen

Water duck

Wild goos

King kisher

Wood cock
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Plover. gold, green,

Sea Gull.

Jackdaw.

Magpies.

Curlews.

Owl.

Snipe.

Patridge.

Crane.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 17:03
approved
rejected
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There is a stable beside our hose which was a school at on time. The Teacher taught more Irish than English to the children and he would write on a slate with a stone pencil; This school was in the year 1720. There was another local schoolhouse in Reaghstown it is now a farmer's house. The Teacher came from Lishrinny. The children were taught their letters and Writhing and Arithmetic on slates with stone pencils and the older girls were taught needle work and knitting in the evening; Her name was Miss Filgate; The house is now occupied by Christopher Keegan;
There was another Old Hedge School near Arthurstown it was a wayside shed and the Teacher came from Dromin; His name was Mr Butterly and he taught the children how to speak Irish and a lot of Geometry they would write on slates with stone pencils, he was lodged in the farmers house and was paid by the children a penny or two a day. The farmers could afford to give a little more,
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:48
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rejected
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[Flinge?]

Tomtit.

Yellow Hammer.

Ball Flinge.

Sparrow.

Linnet.

Stoney Chatter.

Wagtails.

Cuckoo.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The birds in this district.
Robin. She makes her nest in a bank, with hair, and she lines the inside with feathers. She lays five small eggs with brown dots on them.
Blackbird. She makes her nest in a bush, with moss, and hay, and she lines the inside with mud. She lays five blue eggs with brown dots on them.
Thrush. She makes her nest in ivy or in a bush, with hay and moss, and she lines the inside with mud. She lays four green eggs with brown dots on them.
Lark. She makes her nest on the ground, or in a bank, with moss, and she lines the inside with hair. She lays five black eggs.
Swallow. She makes her nest up high in a shed, with mud, and hay, and she lines the inside with feathers. She lays five white eggs with brown dots on them.
Crow. She makes her nest up high in a tree, with sticks and hay. She lays four big white eggs.
Wren. She makes her nest in a bush, with moss, and she lines the inside with hair. She lays twentyone white eggs with brown dots on them.
Starling. She builds her nest in any hole she can find, with sticks and hay, and hair, and she lines the inside with wool. She lays five blue eggs.
Pidgeon. She builds her nest up in a big tree where there is ivy, with sticks. She lays two big white eggs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 15:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and cooks his meals on it. Then he makes a little hut and sleeps in it. There is an old man called Mc Cable. He comes when there are sports held. He has a little table with colours on it and the man has a little box and a dice in it. If the dice falls on the colour you put the penny on you will win another penny. He sleeps in old stables about the village.
Written by Jane Beylan, on 4th Feb. 1938
Told by Mrs Beylan, on 3rd Feb. 1938
Reaghstown,
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 18:43
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rejected
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There is a lot of Travelling folk in this parish of Reaghstown. There is an old man called Morgan. He comes to out house and cooks his meals in it. He brings tea and sugar with him and we give him bread, he is not a poor man. He sells brooches and necklaces and a lot of other things like that.
Another very poor man comes round here also. His name is Mc Connon he does not sell anything but he stands at the Church Gate and sings one song and when he has it sung he goes round to all the houses and each person gives him a penny. The song that he sings is the "Old Rustic Bridge by the Mill". He lights a fire
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 17:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
round selling songs and he gets money from the people he stays in old sheds on the roadside.
Written by James Clarke 4th Feb. 1938
Told by John Clarke 2th Feb. 2938
Cromartin,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 17:25
approved
rejected
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Travelling Folk
The Tellings come to this district at Christmas and they have a horse van in which they sleep and travel, they sell delph and pictures and boot laces; when they come to the houses the people give them something to eat; these come in one family and they get their delph in the nearest town.
The Rooneys stay in Culderry, they put a camp up with a water proof sheet to sleep in; they have a horse and cart to travel in and they also sell and buy ponies and when they come to the people they get money and that is how they make their living.
James Molloy stays in Cunninghams in Ballyhoo and he sells bootlaces and pins and books; he comes to this district about every two or three months; he is not very poor but he is blind.
There comes another poor man
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 17:21
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rejected
awaiting decision
Told by Mrs Beylan 1st Feb, 1938
Reaghstown,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 17:20
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awaiting decision
If you earn money on Sunday it will do you no good or anybody else. It is on Friday that the farmer begins to plant his potatoes and sow his seeds as they consider that it is the luckiest day in the week.
A lot of people start their work on Monday because Our Lord made the world in six days and he rested on the seventh, and that is why we have Sunday and we should do no work on that day. It is lucky to go anywhere on the 12th of the month because Our Lord had 12 Apostles with him.
Written by Jane Beylan 4th Feb, 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 16:47
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rejected
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The people say it is very unlucky to get married on a Tuesday.
On the 13th of any month the people would not go any where or do and business on that account of there been 13 present at the Last Supper.
Written by James Osborne 2nd Feb, 1938
Told by Patrick Osborne 1st Feb, 1938
Lagan,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 16:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
They thought it very lucky to start a journey on a Friday because Our Lord was put to death on a Friday.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 16:38
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awaiting decision
Lore of certain Days.
People say that it is unlucky to take out potatoes or to reap on Saturday but it is very lucky to reap on Friday as they think it is the luckiest day in the week. Tuesday is another lucky day to get married on and a lot of people get married on that day. Thursday is another unlucky day to do anything on or to go anywhere. It is unlucky to put down a hatch of eggs on Saturday because there will be no birds in them but if you put them down on Monday there will be plenty of birds in them. Most people begin there week on Monday because our Lord began to make the world on that day he was six days making it and on the seventh day he rested and that is why we have Sunday.
Written by Bridie Sharkey 2nd Feb, 1938,
Told by Edward Sharkey 1st Feb, 1938,
Edmondstown,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 17:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Penal-times.
Here are some of the Penal laws of the district of Lagan Ardee. Long ago the people would'nt be let say mass on a Sunday or any day. The would be put into prison or put to death. In those days they had to say mass in secret places. One of the secret places which they used to say mass long ago was in Cool-Derry Plantation.
The name of the priest was Father Boylan. In those days if a priest was caught saying Mass he would be hanged or put into prison.
In those days there would be over 100 people to attend the Holy mass.
Written by James Osborne on 11th Jan. 1938
Told by Patrick Osborne on 10th Jan. 1938
Lagan, Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 17:46
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rejected
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roads and the man on guard had a great view of the country around.
There is the ruins of a castle at Lagan where the priests used to hide.
Written by James Clarkeown 11th Jan. 38
Told by John Clarkeown 10th Jan. 38
Cromartin.
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 17:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
Penal times.
In the Penal-times the priests were not allowed to say mass because they would be killed by the English soldiers.
But they used to say mass where the English would not catch them. The priests used to say mass in a cave under the ground in Cromartin. This cave was in Brady's and all the people in the district would go to mass there.
They used also say mass in Lagan in rock with a hole in the side of it and all the people from that district would go there to hear mass. It is also said that priests used to say mass in Drumbridge graveyard because it is very high up from the
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 17:40
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rejected
awaiting decision
the priest used to hide; these were called mass rocks these used to be in the year 1805.
Written by Bridie Sharkey 14th Jan. 1938
Told by Edward Sharkey 13th Jan. 38
Edmondstown.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 17:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
Penal times
In the penal days the priest used to day mass under the hedges;
There is an old cave at Crownmartin where the priest used to say mass in and all the people around about the district went to it and they used to be always watching to see would the English soldiers be coming as they would kill the priest is the caught him there is an old cave at Tullykeel where
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 17:36
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awaiting decision
key which he would put on the fourth finger of the bride and that would do instead of a ring. there were no cars and the people had to go walking to get married. These marriage customs used to be in the years 1826 and 1827, these were done in Reaghstown.
Written by Michael Boylan on 5th Jan. 38
Told by Mrs Boylan, on 4th Jan 38
Reaghstown.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 15:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
Marriage Customs
Long ago when men thought it time to get married or were in a suitable occupation to do so they would go to the house of the bride and bring a bottle of whiskey with them to the people of the house.
The old people used to say it was unlucky to get married on a Tuesday and that it was very lucky to get married on Wednesday and said it was the best day in the week in the year in which to marry.
There would be no marriage during Lent; Shrove Tuesday would be the last day, and a lot of people would take an advantage of this season; they would have no ring and the priest had a
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 18:20
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rejected
awaiting decision
used to be in the year 1819
Written by Bridie Sharkey
Told by Edward Sharkey, on 4th Jan. 38
Edmondstown
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2019-06-09 18:19
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Marriage Customs
Here are some old marriage customs of this district Edmondstown the people used to say that it was unlucky to be dressed in green when you are getting married.
When those who were getting married would go into the Church the people outside would throw an old boot after them and when they would be coming out; the would shake rice over the Bride. When the Bride came to her own home the people who would be waiting on her used to run and meet her with a bottle of whiskey she would throw it on a stone and if it broke it would be an unlucky marriage and if it did not break it would be a lucky marriage. The people said that it is unlucky to get married on Friday or Saturday; the people long ago used to have shawls on them getting married. The kind of marriage
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 18:14
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Chapel built and he had no ground, and he asked the Lord for ground, and the Lord would not give it to him. Then the Priest asked him where was his father, and the Lord told him he was dead. The priest told him he would see him tonight. Ill come to night at twelve o'clock said the Priest. So the Lord had a party that night and all the protestants were at it. Among them was one Catholic lady. So when it was twelve o'clock that night the Priest came and he told the Lord to put out all the lights. And to give him one. So the Lord did so, and the Priest had a server with him and the server held the light. And the Priest read the book and when he came to this part in the book. He told the server to lower the light and the Priest said lower it still and the Catholic lady went over and knelt beside the Priest. Then all the protestants began to shout they hear the chains rattling and they said to the Priest to stop reading and the Priest would not. And they saw the man coming up to the window and they said put him back. So the Priest put him back and the Lord got up and shook hands with the Prest and told him he would be a Catholic in the morning and he said he would build the Chapel.
Nancy Quigley,
Rathescar,
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 18:08
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A Story
Once upon a time there lived in Ireland a famous man named Finn Mac Cool. One time Finn had a row with a man in Dundalk and the man ran away. Finn threw two stones after him. Both stones landed on the north side of Mulacorry in Clark's fields and are standing straight in the same possession still. The backs of the stones are facing the south and the front to the north.
Angela Brennan,
Painstown,
Dromin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 18:06
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A Story
One time there was a house on the Mile Bush hill in which a woman lived. One day the woman was making pancakes and a [soldier?] came in and killed her. The house is down now, but it is said there is a stone on the side of the road and on this stone the woman used to cut the pancakes. On this stone there is a cross and a ring, and the people say that the ring is the track of the pan, and the cross is where she cut the pancakes.
Angela Brennan,
Painstown,
Dromin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 18:03
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A Story
Once upon a time there was a Priest and he wanted a
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 18:03
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Peter Flanagan,
Rathescar,
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 14:55
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A Hungry Spot
About six year ago Mrs Murphy and her husband went to Dundalk for groceries. When they were coming home they sat down to rest on the side of the road. Mrs Murphy sat down on the hungary spot. She felt herself getting weak and hungary. They were about half a mile from home. They went into a house and got a piece of bread and she was all right. It happened this side of the blue railway at Dundalk.
Mrs Murphy,
Rathescar,
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 14:53
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was sleeping. There was oats in the barn. He was about an hour in bed when the oats were thrown in on top of him. He had Holy water beside him and he was afraid to put out his hand to bless himself. The next morning when awoke there was not a grain of corn to be seen. He never slept in it again.
Mrs Halpenny,
Rathescar,
Dromin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 14:52
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A Stray Sod
One night Peter Flanagan was coming home from a house. He crossed the fields home. In this field there were a lot of cattle. He was walking for three miles of the field and could not find a gate. Every yard of the field he would walk he would see a big heap of bushes in front of him. He was there until morning.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 14:50
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A Ghost Story
One night John Taaffe and George Torris were coming home from John Gregory's funeral in Co. Meath. When they were on the top of Mullacurry hill, a big man came out of a field and he stopped them. Then he asked them where were they going at this hour of the night. They said they were going home. The ghost said you better go home quickly or someone will be after you. Then he disappeared.
John Taaffe,
Dromin,
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 14:48
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A Ghost Story
One night about a year ago, Jack Halpenny was working in a farmers house in Drumcar. He went to bed this night and it was about twelve o'clock at night. It was in the hay barn he
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 14:47
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A Stray Sod
One night Henry Holdcroft went into his field to count the sheep. It was a dark night and when he had his sheep counted he was going to the gate. There was a dog at the gate and he was barking. The man went round and round the field but he could not find the gate. He was in the field all night.
Moira Conalty,
Kings Cross,
Dromin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 15:03
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A Ghost Story
There was a man one time and he went into his neighbours house to play cards. When they were a while playing a knock came to the door. Then someone went to the door and let him in. The people kept on playing and after a while he asked for a hand. When he was a while playing the neighbour said he was going home, the ghost said to wait for another while. Then man played for another while and then he went out on the lane when he got out he shut the gate after him and the ghost went though the gate. In front of the gate there was a river and the ghost threw himself into it and he was drowned.
Mrs Halpenny,
Rathescar,
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 14:59
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rampart. It was not very hard until there was only a gap of about one hundred feet to be filled. When the big tides came (which was about every month) the tide went through the gap making a greater breach.
The last contractor on coming to the finish did a very wise thing. He asked the farmers of the district to take a bundle of straw each to the rampart and leave it convenient. Most of the farmers answered his request and took some straw, which, when the big tide came was packed well into the breach leaving it impossible for the tide to burst into the land.
It, the rampart, was made merely from clay and stones. The stones are supposed to have been taken from a
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 14:31
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The sea-wall or rampart
A great work of our fore-fathers was the constructing of the sea-wall or rampart in order to take from the sea some land which would be very useful to the farmers for growing crops. In fact, there is one beautiful farm called the "Marsh farm" which before the rampart was built (Which, by the way, was approximately one hundred years ago) was merely a strand.
The construction of this rampart was not an easy Business. Two contractors were bankrupt before finishing the work. The third time the matter was taken over by the Government, and this time it was finished. "Time and tide wait for no man"; this is very true proverb, and became evident to those who were building the
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 14:20
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advance it is quite possible they did build it. A very good view can be had from its top and another old castle, Dunmahon Castle which is invisible from the ground level can easily be seen from the battlements.
In seventeen seventy-four a historian named Isaac Butler mentioned the fact that a subterranean passage ran from Milltown Castle to the Round Tower of Dromiskin but this passage cannot now be discerned. Butler then wrote "At Milltown there is a wonderful cave which runs, the inhabitants say, for three miles to the old church of Clogher, but it is so choked up that it would take two men's work in one day to open it." The cave is still spoken of though there is no one now living in Milltown area with any but a hazy idea of its location.
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2019-06-08 14:16
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The people say that it is unlucky to be dressed in green getting married. It is also unlucky to be married in the month of May, or to be married on Friday or Saturday. In some parts men dressed with straw go to the house where the marriage is and they brought in and entertained.
In other parts the people run to the house of the bride and get a bottle of whiskey and give it to the bride and the bride throws the bottle on a stone and i it would break, it would be a lucky wedding and if it would not break it would not be a lucky marriage. When the bride is getting married her father would give her £50 and some cattle and if she had not that the man would not marry her.
Written by James Clarke on 5th Jan, 38
Told by John Clarke, Cromartin on 45th Jun, 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 14:12
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the rushes on top of that and so on till he he had it all finished. This was in the year 1837.
Long ago when there were no wax candles such as there are now there was a man by the name of Patrick Campell of Arthurstown; he used to go to the bogs and the green rushes and dry them, then he would get some of the fat of cattle and fry it, then he let it cool and twist it round the dry rushes and shape it in to candles, he also made shopping bags with the rushes also he plait them with small branches This was in the year 1826. There was another man by the name of John McKenna of Edmondstown would make baskets; then he would cut the green sallies tie them in bundles and dry them then he would steep them for about a week and then he would get them ready for use;
Written by Bridie Sharkey 14th Dec, 1937
Told by Edward Sharkey on 15th Dec, 1937
Edmondstown
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2019-06-07 16:12
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Last year a lot of men were working along the road at Colman's between Dromin and Ardee. When Mr Carolan was digging he saw a box but he did not pass any remarks of it. Mat Finnity who was keeping the men working saw the box and he went over and lifted it out, and opened it. There was a pound and a rusty six-pence in the box.
Winnie Mac Shane,
Ballymageera,
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 16:10
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A Story
One night at a mission a poor woman fell asleep and when the caretaker was going round the chapel she saw the woman asleep and she did not like to waken her. At twelve o'clock that night a priest came out on the altar and he said "Is there anyone here to serve mass". He said this three times. The woman was afraid and she did not answer him. The next day she told one of the Curate's and he asked her would she stay again that night ans she said, "No". Then the priest said he would stay with her. That night the priest stayed with the woman and at twelve o'clock the priest came out on the altar and said. Is there anyone here to serve mass? When the priest asked the third time the priest who was in the chapel said "Yes, Then the priest said it is time for someone to answer. He said I am dead these fifteen years and I cannot get into Heaven unless I say this one mass. The next morning the priest said the mass for him.
Winnie Mac Shane of Ballymageera told
Dunleer
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2019-06-07 16:05
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as Milltown Castle or to the local people as Byrne's Castle. The name Byrne is attributed to the fact that a man named Byrne is the present day owner of both it and its adjoining land. It is in a fine state of preservation and its preservation internally is due to the fact that until recently Mr Byrne's house (which adjoins the castle) was joined to the castle by a doorway and both were used as the one building. It is narrow in proportion to it's height and possesses round corner towers.
The shape of the castle suggests an Anglo-Norman Keep and as the Anglo-Normans passed in their
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 16:02
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Milltown Castle.
About a mile to the North West of Dromiskin is the quaint little halmet called Milltown. It derives it's name from the fact that at one time there was a mill for grinding corn in it, on the old Milltown River which flows close to the village. In Milltown forge there is an old grindstone which tradition tells us belonged to the old mill. The grindstone is the only evidence of the old mill as it has long since been demolished.
The mill is not the only historic thing in Milltown because standing in the centre of the village is a large castle. This castle is known
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 15:59
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Kinlan, who to our pride became Chief of the U.S.A fire brigade.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 15:59
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often do our pwn parents send us trembling to bed by telling us some of their fairy and ghost stories?
Another thing that made these people strong and energetic was the constant exercise of working on the soil and fishing in the sea. The farm work then was much harder than now, owing to the lack of implements and machinery. The fish they generally got were shell-fish, which, when they had a quantity of, they brought to the nearest marketing town or into the country and sold them. The same was done with the farm products, such as potatoes and cabbage.
When the emigrating to America began some of our citizens went there, seeking work. To their credit they succeeded, in fact some of them became famous one of them being Mr
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:30
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A Story.
One night my granduncle was coming home from Kings Cross across Byrne's hills and he walked on a stray sod. He went to the gap, he found he was at another ditch. He was going round the field for a long time but he could not find the gap. In the end he got tired and sat down. He got afraid and started to shout. One of his neighbours was passing and heard him shouting. He asked him why he was shouting, and he said he was lost. Then the other man told him to turn his coat. He did and found the gap.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:27
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Coming home he fell into the water. After a while three fairies came and took him out, and when he saw the fairies he got afraid and ran home. He never got drunk afterwards.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:27
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A Story.
One time a man whose name was Tom Stokes was coming home from working. Near his house was a pond of water. The moon was shining and he came over across the fields. When he stopped working he went into a shop and got drunk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:25
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A Story
One night Henry Holdcroft was watching his people coming home from the races in Mallacurry. He was walking up and down the road but they were not coming. He was standing on the side of the road and he heard someone singing, and he went up the road to see who was coming. It was the fairies that were singing out in a field.
James Corbally,
Crintown,
Dunleet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:23
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finished milking she could not find the gate. So she kept going round the field for four hours but she could not get out of the field. She kept on walking still and she saw the gate. Then she went home and the father asked her why was she so long. Then she told him about it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:22
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One night a woman had to milk cows in a field. It was a dark foggy night. When she had
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:22
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A field called "Crock Sidhe" - Cnoc Side
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:21
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At wakes all clocks are stopped from the times of death.
The body is washed and then dressed in brown habit.
A rosary beads or blessed candle being placed in the hands. The bed is covered with white sheets on which are black crosses.
The corpse is now usually kept in the house for one night only and is removed to the church the following day. The funeral taking place from the church. During the wake the neighbours from all around pay a visit and are given a pipe of tobacco, or cigarettes, Others are given a cup of tea, and a special few a glass of whiskey or a bottle of stout. During the night many stories are told, chiefly ghost stories, jokes are made, puzzles given and games played.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:05
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It is considered unlucky to walk under a ladder, or to see a single magpie first thing in the morning.
Many people still hang a horse-shoe in the houses and stable. It is supposed to be lucky. Others hang a piece of blessed palm.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:04
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Trinity Well - Paughnstown.
This well also is marked on Survey map sheet No.
It is a large circular well with stone facing, but no covering and is in a field called Trinity Green. The water from this well is used by the local people. It is supposed to have been visited by St. Patrick and a stone on which a person stands when filling a [vessel?] is supposed to have borne the marks of his feet.
Over 10 years ago a pilgrimage was made to this well every year on Christmas Eve. Very large numbers used to come and the road aide used to be lined with tents.
The land at that time belonged to a man called Guinness who objected to the trespass, and refused to allow any further ceremonies there.
An other account says that it was the parish priest who stopped the pilgrimages on account of abuses.
Many young people used however to visit the well on Christmas Eve, the one who drew the first water on that night would find it had turned to wine.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:46
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Crafts.
Thatching: There was a man by the name of Henry Gilmore from Edmondstown, he used to make small bundles of straw and wet it and leave them there for about a week. Then he use to start to thatching every line of straw that he would put on he would put on mud. He lived about the year 1897.
Spinning: There was a woman from Ballabonia by the name of Annie Caffery
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:43
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rub it on the wart and a while foam will for. Let it remain there and continue treatment until the wart is better.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:42
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Local Cures :-
(1) Cure for sty in the eye :-
Get 9 thrones from a gooseberry bush. Point 3 thorns to the sty: make the sign of the cross & say in the Name of the Father and of the son and of the Holy Ghost.
Do this on 3 successive days.
(2) Cure for warts :-
Get a snail. Rub it to the wart every day for 9 days in the name of the Father, son & Holy Ghost.
When the snail dies the wart will disappear.
Another cure for warts :-
Get a piece of washing soda; sip it in hot water
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:38
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Wild Birds seen locally,
Wild duck, Wild goose, shell duck curlew, sand lark, Widgeon, Crane, Cormorant, Swan
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:37
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There is a well in a rock at the back of the Post Office and the people say you get your wish if you drive a nail into the rock.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:33
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much finer teeth than we have now, which they got from eating the wholesome foods. This can be proved by the fact that when Digging old graves those teeth can be found; as good as the day they were made. This left one tradesman unnecessary; that is, the dentist.
It is not often that we think of it, but when we considered it we feel proud, that perhaps we are descendants of the learned and skillful man who built the round tower and monastery, which have watched over the village and on the people in it for centuries, and is still standing proudly.
The people then had many peculiar habits. They believed in fairies and ghosts, and were greatly afraid of meeting a ghost on a dark night, and hoping that they might meet a fairy in order to get gold from him. How
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:25
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Our forefathers of Dromiskin.
Great changes have been wrought in this parish during the past century or more, everything has become more modern, but there is one thing that has not become better and greater, that is the strength and vigour of the people. My father tells me that even when he was young the men of the district were all broad shouldered, lean men, and nearly all over six feet high. They did not use the dainty food that we use now, but they ate the wholesome oaten or wheaten meal bread, porridge and such.
Their dwelling places consisted of damp cold mud or sod wall cabins. It is hard to believe how these people lived in such places, with much more severe weather than we have nowadays, but nevertheless they became stronger and healthier than we have with our grander places. I should mention that these people had
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:19
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The cailin beag belongs to
The Bolies
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:18
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Superstitions. 17. 11. 38.
See a pin and pick it up.
Your sure that day to have good luck
See a pin and let it lie
You'll want a pin before you die
It is very unlucky to break a mirror if you break a mirror it means two years of sorrow. If sparks come out from the fire it means money for whoever they fall on. If a cock near the door it is a sign of bad luck. If he crows in the door it is a sign of good luck but if he crows out it is a sign of bad luck. It is very unlucky to go into a house with anything on your shoulder.
Ann J. Winters 12 years
Brownstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:15
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Superstitions 15. 11. '38
The people used to say that us was unlucky to see a new moon through a window and if a person looks at a new moon across his shoulder he can wish. If a young girl shows you a new moon it is a sign of bad luck. If you look at a new moon across your right shoulder you will get a disappointment. If a person falls in a graveyard he will be the next to be buried in it. If a knife falls on the ground and someone picks it up a gentleman will come that day. If a spoon falls a lady will come that day. If a (spoon) fork falls you will have a disappointment. If the fire lights brightly the furthest away from the door someone will come to the house and if it lights brightly nearest to the door someone will leave the house.
Kattie Lynn 13 years
Hamlinstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 12:20
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Old customs about wakes. 8. 11. 38.
Long ago there were many customs at wakes and funerals. Snuff was handed round usually by the woman of the house and each person took a pinch of snuff. The people used to sing and dance and play all sorts of games at wakes. The old people used to say that is a dead man's wishes were not carried he would appear to them in the night. When people are burying their dead they carry them round the church and back to the grave. The old saying is "Happy is the corpse that the rain pours on." When a person is being waked the clock is topped and the mirrors are turned.
Josie Winters 14 years
Hamlinstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 12:16
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Old customs. 27. 10. '38
The old people used to tie a string an the calves leg and they would let him out on a Sunday. It is also very lucky to begin any work on a Friday.
Cut your nails on Monday cut them for health.
Cut them on Tuesday cut them for wealth th
Cut them on Wednesday cut them for joy
Cut them on Thursday cut them and die
Cut them on Friday cut them for sorrow
Cut them on Saturday and see your love to-morrow
If you sneeze on a Friday you will have sorrow.
Josie Winters 14 years
Hamlinstown
Parish of Monasterboice
County Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 12:11
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Old customs for planting crops 25.10.38.
Long ago the people thought that some days and some months were unlucky for planting crops. Some people considered it unlucky to begin any work on a Friday because it would never be finished. The people did not sow crops after a certain day or date and they used to take out their potatoes on 31st October. There are three days in April that are called the borrowed days that skinned the old cow.
Anna Lambe 13 years
Riverstown
Pariah of Monasterboice
County Kouth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 12:08
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Old marriage customs. 19. 10. '38
It was considered very unlucky for the bride to be married on a Friday or Saturday or to be married in May. According to the old rhyme. "Marry in Mat and you'll the day."
"Monday for health"
"Teusday for wealth"
"Wednesday the best day of all"
"Thursday for losses"
"Friday for crosses"
"Saturday no day at all"
Other old customs were putting the cake through the bride's ring and breaking the cake over her head. It was considered unlucky for rain to come on the day of a wedding and it was considered very lucky for the sun to shine. The old saying is "Happy is the bride that the sun shines on.
Kattie Lynn 13 years
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 12:04
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Old marriage customs. 18. 10. '38.
There were a number of marrige customs long ago. It was considered unlucky for the wedding party to go to the church and come back the same road. It brought luck to the couple if rice was thrown at them leaving the church. There is and old saying about what the bride would have to wear.
"Something old and something new."
"Something borrowed and something blue."
Before the bride would go to her new home a man and a woman, relatives of the bride would go with what is called the "box" and in this were the brides clothes. Another custom is, the bride throws a shoe and whoever she hit that person will be married next.
Ann J. Winters 12 years
Brownstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:35
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rejected
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and Protestants are buried. Inside the graeyard there is an old castle. At present it is in a fairly good state of preservation. A short distance from it there is an artificial hill and it was thought at one time there was a watch tower built on it.
Josie Mc Keown,
The "Square".
Blackrock,
Dundalk,
Information received from Mr Ed Mc Keown,
Blackrock,
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:34
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Local Ruins.
In the pariah pf Haggardstown in the old graveyard there is an old ruined monastery which was built in the sixth century. Old people say that there is a tunnel leading from it to the sea. In the seventeenth century Cromwells soldiers came and blew it down with cannon. They placed the cannon on a hill called "Pentlands hill" which was convenient to the graveyard and blew it down.
In Millextown near Drogheda there is an old church called the "Jumping Church". It was said that at one time a Protestant man died and was buried there in side its walls, and the following day it was seen that the wall had moved in, and left him outside of it.
A few miles from Haggardstown graveyard there is another place called Haynestown in which Catholics
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:33
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rejected
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Local Ruins.
In the pariah pf Haggardstown in the old graveyard there is an old ruined monastery which was built in the sixth century. Old people say that there is a tunnel leading from it to the sea. In the seventeenth century Cromwells soldiers came and blew it down with cannon. They placed the cannon on a hill called "Pentlands hill" which was convenient to the graveyard and blew it down.
In Millextown near Drogheda there is an old church called the "Jumping Church". It was said that at one time a Protestant man died and was buried there in side its walls, and the following day it was seen that the wall had moved in, and left him outside of it.
A few miles from Haggardstown graveyard there is another place called Haynestown in which Catholic
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:27
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stronghold of Cuchulainn.
Castle Roche an extensive ruin was also connected with the Bellew family. It is situated about four miles away to the north-west of the town.
Myra Castle another ruin guarded the famous Myra pass about six miles north of Dundalk where many battles were fought.
Mena Gernon.
6 Seatown.
Dundalk.
Information received from Michael McArdle
5 Seatown.
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:25
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Castletown Castle is situated to the west of the town. It formerly belonged to the Bellew family. It was a place of great importance and commanded the pass to Dundalk during the wars fought here some hundreds of years ago. Spiral stone stairs lead to the top of the building from which there is an extensive view of the country around.
In Castletown Cemetery close by, there are the ruins of an old church, also connected with the Bellew family. This altar stone in this church with a latin inscription still exist.
A short distance away rises the hill of Dun Dealgan, on the summit of which is a remarkable mound of earth work which is said to have been the
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:22
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rejected
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Local Ruins.
In all inhabited countries we find the ruins of ancient buildings or castles that were formerly the scenes of notable events.
In Ireland those ruins are numerous all over the country. In this district there are several such places some in a very good state of presentation.
The nearest of those ruins is "Seatown Castle". This building once formed part of a large Fransiscan monastery founded by John De Verdon. This monastery occupied the greater part of what is now called Seatown. It in included the old Graveyard now closed which also contains the ruins of an old church which was probably part of the monastery
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:51
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him. In a few days after he was going to the fair wearing his new coat. He was passing a Fair-fort when he noticed wool flying in all directions around him and when he looked at his coat he found it had disappeared. This was the trick that the fairies played on him for not paying them for their work.
Josie Mc Keown,
The "Square",
Blackrock,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mr Ed Mc Keown,
Blackrock,
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
there until they had finished the bottle of whiskey.
Not far from this fort there is another hill called "Crockshea" where fairies were also seen and heard.
In some parts of the districts about one hundred years ago a man named Manus O'Mulligan lived alone in a house which was haunted by the fairies. One evening they came to him at Twylight and demanded from him "Meat or Work". So the first evening they came he gave them wool to card, they did so and left. They came again the second evening and again demanded "Meat or Work", so he told them to weave the wool which he had given the evening before: they did so and left. They came again the third evening and again demanded "Meat or Work", he told them to make a coat out of the wool they had woven they did so and left the coat with
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:36
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indicates coming storm.
When the wind comes from the South-East it generally brings rain in its train and stormy weather.
When the mountains look near rain is near at hand, or when a halo is seen around the moon it indicates rain also.
When the stars are shining and glittering it is a sign of frost.
Josie McKeown,
The "Square",
Blackrock,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mr Ed Mc Keown,
Blackrock,
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Weather Lore.
The insects and animals are very peculiar in their behaviour when rain or storm is coming.
The gnats for axample are always flying low and are very annoying when rain is coming. When the swallows are here in Summer they can be seen swooping low round farm buildings and trees and this also a sign that rain is approaching.
The sea fowl always come in over land when a storm is at sea, and the mournful cry of the Curlew flying over marsh-ground at night is another sign of rain. When on a fine day sea-weed is damp it indicates rain.
When the sun sets in a pale watery sky it predicts rain. When the sun sets in a red sky
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
be expected.
In the Spring the oak and the ash trees were watched closely, because it was said that the budding of the oak because the ash meant a fine Summer, where as if the ash budded first it was a bad sign.
In this district a south-west wind nearly always brings rain. A north-wind means dry weather or frost in Winter, where as the east-wind means bitter cold weather.
These signs were all well known to older people who always placed great faith in them.
Mena Gernon
6 Seatown
Dundalk
Information received from Michael McArdle
5 Seatown
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:27
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rejected
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Weather Lore
Long ago people depended upon the sun, the moon, stars, and planets to forecast the weather.
Such signs as a read sky in the evening meant fine weather next day. A ring round the moon at night was a sure sign of rain. High wind and fast moving clouds from the north-west meant a coming storm. Sailors feared a rainbow in the morning, where as one at night had the opposite meaning. The animals and birds were watched closely for signs of uneasiness which also denoted a storm.
The seasons too were forecasted by various signs such as a plentiful cop of berries which meant that a hard winter might
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 20:32
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2nd Nov. '38.
Local Forges.
There were two forges round here, long ago these two forges were in Jenkinstown. One of them was along a bye road. There is only one piece of this remaining now. The man who owned this forge was Patrick Rice.
The other forge was in Michael Mullhollands field. Who owned this forge I do not know. There is no remains of this forge except the well which the blacksmith used for cooling the hot iron.
There are two blacksmiths in the Parish now. One of them lives in Rockmarshall his name is James Smith. The other man lives in Lordship and his name is James Smith also. The blacksmith used these tools:- an anvil, a hammer, a sledge, a rasp, a vice and a tongs. He shod the horses, he fixes carts and ploughs. He makes spades and graips. When the blacksmith wants to bend iron he puts it in the fire and warms it. The blacksmith uses a special kind of coal for his fire. There is generally a stream outside of the forge.
This story was obtained by Patrick McGeown, Jenkinstown.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 20:27
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20 . Oct . 38
Potatoes
My Uncle has a good many fields and he puts potatoes in about half of them. He prepares the crop first by making drills. He makes the drills with an iron plough. Next he spreads the manure, and then he drops the potatoes. Some of the neighbour boys give him a hand to drop them. Sometimes the children of our school are kept at home for the setting of their own potatoes. Then the farmers covers the potatoes with a plough, sometimes he covers the top and bottom of the drills with a spade. Then leaves them till he starts to weed them. This is done very carefully as it is less troble when the gathering of them comes. When this time comes buys pelicks to gather the potatoes in. When he has them picked he puts them into pits. The pits are covered with straw and
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 19:42
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playing this and whoever gets ten games first wins the game.
Josie Winters 14 years
Hamlinstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 19:42
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rejected
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22. 9. '38
If they let one fall they are out of the game. Then the next girl leaves down two and throw up one and lift them two. Next she leaves down three and throw up one and catch them three. Then she leaves down four and throw up one and then catch them four. Then each gets her turn and they kept on
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 19:40
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Games. 20. 9. 38.
Many years ago the children at school used to play jack-stones. As many children as wished could play it. The player used to gather five jack-stones. These were white little stones like pebbles and one of the girls would place four on the ground and kept one in their hand. She threw up the one in her hand and while it was still in the air she had to snatch one of the ground and catch the one in the air and then She had two in her hand. If she makes and mistake or let one fall she is out of the game. Then they continue this until they have the five in their hands.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 19:36
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round the hearth would remark the moment he saw the little blue flame in the fire of turf that storm was at hand. The next thing the howling of the wind could be heard in the spacious chimney.
South-Westerly winds bring most rain to this district.
Information received from Mr. McGeary
Avenue Rd.
Dundalk.
Eleanor McGee,
7 St. Alphonsus Villas
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 19:34
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rejected
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The old Irish were very shrewd as regards the weather. A farmer in olden times could tell the kind of weather that was forth-coming by the signs he knew and understood.
Frost was heralded by the shooting of stars from one place to another. When the Northern Lights threw a reddish onto the sky rain and storm was expected. The ducks quacking loudly and presistantly was a sign of very stormy weather. One of most reliable forecasts of rain was when the cobble stones became moist. The midges and swallows flying low was a sign of heavy rain. The coming inland of the sea-gulls meant storm at sea. When the mountains disappeared in clouds and mist, rain was expected.
Someone in a group
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 18:28
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rejected
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Old houses. 5. 9. '38.
Long ago the people had different ways of building from what they have now. The walls of the old houses were usually made of mud. The chimney was a big open chimney built at the gable of the house. In these houses the people burned turf and wood. The wood roof was pointed on top and the floor was made of clay. There were small windows with bars in the middle on the outside. These windows are to be seen at the present day in old ruins. There are remains of old mud walled houses to be seen. The fire was a big open one whee the old people used to sit telling stories long ago.
Ann J. Winters 12 years.
Brownstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 16:44
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show. When the disease reached an advanced stage and when death was fast approaching a wire cage was made to be placed on the head of the afflicted person. An out-let was left about the upper lip, where a piece of sponge which was soaked in the essence of "Garlic", was placed, to be inhaled through the nostrils and mouth. This remedy prolonged life.
Sprains were cured by bathing the affected part in boiled "Marshmallows". Swellings were treated in the same manner.
Eleanor McGee
7 St Alphonsus Villas,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mrs. Eleanor McGee and Mr. McGeary, Aged 84,
Avenue Rd,
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 16:41
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rejected
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Local Cures
The old Irish were fond of believing in cures, both superstitious and effective ones for their various ailments and diseases.
Long ago people who suffered from coughs went in search of an herb named "Penny-cup". This green velvety leafed herb was to be found growing on a stone wall. The leaves were boiled with quanity of sugar cane, liquorice ball, and a lemon and then strained. The mixture was a most effective cure for the most obstinate cough.
Parsley boiled with new milk made a cure for kidney trouble. It was reckoned as unsurpassable for that disease.
The dreaded disease of Tuberculosis was treated when in its first stages by putting "Garlic" between the stocking foot and the sole of the
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 16:30
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the man puts his two horses in the plough and makes another drill between two lines and covers each line. When he has finished he leaves them there until they come up.
The way the people dig are the farmer prepares there digger and he digs out the potatoes and the neighbours helps him to gather them. When they are gathered they are put into a pit.
When the men are making a pit they have to have shovels and spades. They make a little hole then they dig round this little hole until they have it six feet long and four feet wide then the potatoes are put into it and covered with mould and strain.
The local names of the local potatoes are - Priddies, Pops, spuds and taties they call the little ones marbles and the ones with two heads are called dolly's.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 16:21
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There is a cromlech in Byrne's field on Fieldstown Hill. The field is called Lios Dubh. Fionn Mac Cumhaill is supposed to be buried there. The cromlech is on the top of the hill. There are some stones standing upright in the ground and a large flat stone on the top of them. The stones are almost covered with clay and the place is overgrown with briars. Within the grave are bones.
Ann J. Winters 12 years
I got this information from my father
James Winters (over 50 years)
Brownstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 16:20
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Giants 29. 6. 38
In this district there was a giant named Fionn mac Cumaill. There is a well in Brownstown still called Tobar Finn. The people use the water of this well for cattle. Fionn mac Cumaill is supposed to be buried in a field on Fieldstown Hill called Lios Dub. His grave is known as Fionn's Grave.
Anna Lambe 13 uears
Riverstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 16:18
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Long ago the people put up St Brigid's crosses in their houses. We have one still and it is 8 inches long and 4 across. Round it is a plait of rushes. It was made by Patrick Winters, Brownstown, my grandfather who died about 16 or 17 years ago. It is placed in the roof of the house.
Palm is put up the house and in the outhouses.
Ann J. Winters, Brownstown, Monasterboice
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 16:16
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rejected
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Emblems. 23.6.'38
Long ago the people had different emblems and objects which they hung up in the thatch on feast days. They hung up crosses on the feasts of St. Patrick and St. Brigid. Some people made these crosses of plaited draw and rushes. When they were made they were placed in a safe place in the thatch.
The May bush is hung up on May Eve. Flowers are tied in bunches And hung upon it.
Josie Winters 14 years.
Hamlinstown, Monasterboice.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 15:16
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rejected
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to advice him. James Devlin then made this poem :-
"Go you rake says Peggy",
Build it deep and wide
For if you don't you're sure to rue
And your hay will fall into the tide.
4.
On the eleventh of September,
In eighteen eighty two,
Their was heroes came undaunted,
Paddies harvest to go through.
There was Charlie Moore yo may be sure.
Beside some thirty more.
To have some fun when they begun,
To Hagan they sailed o'er.
The drink came in and the fun begin
Till ten o'clock or more.
When Peter he appeared saying the Sergent's up the road and its time to close the door.
The police took the most of them
And locked them up secured.
In order next morning to make an example of them along with
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:54
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rejected
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local Poets.
1.
Jemmy Hanlon of CastletownCobly is a poet. He composed a play for the Bellurgan A.O.H. hall and it was played, and he called it the Outlaws of Annaverna.
2.
James Devlin of Faughart was a poet. He made a verse of poetry about a football team from Dromintee. It went like this : -
With brakes and cars they did roll down,
Most glorious to be seen.
Each lad beside his sweetheart,
Dressed in jersey's red and green.
To kick the Grange fishackers,
Right into the tide,
And the girls thay day,
Looked so gay.
Most glorious to be seen.
3.
An old man called James Rimes from Ballymascanlon village was building a load of hay and his wife came out
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:49
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Herbs & Weeds 5.5.'38.
There are some sour and harmful weeds which cattle will not eat. One of these is buttercups. Thistles are very harmful to land. Hocas is an herb which cures pains. The [coltrans?] grow in green fields and [cuideans?] grow in meadows. Wild celery and chicken weed grow among turnips. Ox tongues grow along banks. Moss grows in fields that have not been tilled for a long time.
Josie Winters 14 years
Hamlinstown
Parish of Monasterboice
County Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:45
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a cure for sore eyes.
Cuts or wounds of any kind or swellings were treated with an ointment made from the Marshmallow.
Maureen Wilson,
13 St Mary's Rd.,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mr. C. Wilson.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:44
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When the juice of the Dandelion was forced out on a wart it was supposed to cure it.
The stem and flowers of the Rose Noble boiled like tea and about 1 glass drunk morning and night was supposed to be cure for boils.
The roots or the Bog Bean pulled out of stream, dried and boiled as tea, and a quantity drunk every morning fasting was supposed to be a cure for kidney trouble.
The leaves of the Plaintain pounded into a jelly and applied to sores was supposed to cure them.
Nettles boiled in soup, or in the freshleaeves mixed with salad was supposed to be a Blood Purifier.
House Leek pounded and made into juice and applied on cloth placed over eyes at night was supposed to be
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:41
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People long ago used to make use of herbs as a cure for their ailments. When they had Consumption they used to eat the root of the dandelion or drink the milk out of the leaves, the was supposed to be a remedy for that ailment.
When a person had cancer he used to eat the blackheads of a weed called Knapweed and which he believed would cure him. When an herb called Horehound tea and given to a person who had lung trouble it was supposed to cure him.
Camomile boiled was supposed to cure any swellings, if bathed in it.
Garlic bruised and put in ones shoe was supposed to be a cure for the flu.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:31
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As you have done before.
Shake hand with your lover (repeat three times_
As you have done before.
Then both start running in opposite directions and whoever is back first where the started has to go in and out. We do the actions as we sing the song.
Ring-a-ring-a-rosy.
This game is played by getting a lot of children and swinging round and while you are going round you say:-
Ring-a-ring-a-rosy,
A pocket full of posy,
Hush-ha-hush-ha,
We all fall down.
Leap the frog:-
It is played by putting twelve children on their knees and one girl is to jump across, you kneel down then another girl is to jump across and so on.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:27
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rejected
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Weeds & herbs 5.5.'38.
There are a lot of weeds and herbs which grow on the land in the district. Thistles do harm to land. The docken weed is harmful to land also. Its seeds when boiled will cure a cough. Pressiagh? is a weed with a yellow blossom and is grows in cornfields. Pressiagh? spreads very quickly. Cows will not eat the grass where moss grows.
Kattie Lynn 13 years.
Hamlinstown
Ballymakenny
Parish of Monasterboice
Co Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:22
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Weeds and herbs on the Farm 5.5.'38
Cows will not eat buttercups because they are sour. Hacus is another weed grown on our farm. It cures pains. There is a blessed thistle in our garden. It is used for curing the whooping cough when it is boiled in milk. Chalice is an herb which grows in moss and on trees and when boiled in milk is a cure for whooping cough. St Patrick leaf cures cuts. Nettles and dock leaves destroy land. Capog leaf is another herb which destroys land. Feanenn is a coarse white grass used for making grass ropes.
Ann J Winters 12 years.
Brownstown
Parish of Monasterboice
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:19
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When churning is being done, the churn is dragged into the middle of the floor and a horseshoe is sometimes placed under the churn "so as the fairies wil not run away with the butter" so the old people say. Another belief is, is a stranger comes into the house when churning is going on and is he or she does not take a turn at it, the butter will not come on. When the stranger is talking the churn dash he or she says "I will leave my weight on the butter". Yet another old belief is, a man should not light his pipe and leave the house while the churning is in progress or he will bring the butter away with him.
Hetty Cumiskey.
23 Seatown,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mr. J. Carrison, Edenappa, Jonesboro'
Newry.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 14:15
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and lid. Then cold water is poured into the churn and on the dash and lid in order to cool them. After that the milk is put into the churn.
The dash is put standing in the milk and the lid is fitted on. Soon afterwards warm water is poured in.
Farmer's wives know when the churning is finished when the dash is free from all traces of butter. The lid is taken off and the butter is gathered together with the dash. Then the hands are scalded and cooled. The butter is then lifted with the hands and it is put into what is known as the butter dish. This is also an oak vessel. It is round and hollow in the centre. This is also scalded then cooled. The butter is washed with clean cold water until the water runs clear. The butter is then put into lb. blocks ready for Monday's market.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 13:01
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Streams.
1.
"Big Post", is a stream in Jenkinstown it runs along a house where a man called Big Post used to live.
2.
"Larry's River", is only a stream but the people call it Larry's River because of a man called Larry Roddy who lived beside it.
3.
"Tippings Stream", a woman named Miss Tipping owns it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 13:01
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12.
"Trumpet Hill".
13.
"An Bruachan Brinn", is one of my uncles fields in Bellurgan. It is a hill covered with trees and furge bushes.
14.
"Hynes Hill", it got its name because a man named Patrick Hynes lived there.
15.
"Alice's Hill", It was called so because a woman called Alice Rice lives there.
16.
"Toner's Hill", is so called because a man named James Toner lives there.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 13:01
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would go in a trap. the breakfast would be in the brides house. That night threre would be a dancer in the brides house. Everyone that went to the house that night would bring a bottle of whiskey with them. They would start singing and dancing. The wedding cake would be brought to the chapel and the priest would sell a piece to any person who wanted it. Some people would give a shilling for a piece others two shillings.
Mary Rice obtained this information from her father: Mr Bernard Rise, Bellurgan Pt, Dundalk
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 13:00
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2.
Long ago when people were getting married they would go to the chapel in a carriage and others
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:59
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Local Marriage Customs.
1.
When two people wanted to get married against the will of their parents long ago they usually ran away in the middle of the night. They would go to the house of a neighbour where they would have everything ready beforehand. Some of the neighbours who were let into the secret were supposed to be gathered in the house with bottles of whiskey and they were then to drink the health of the runaways. The next morning the runaways would be married by the priest and only those who drunk their health the night before could attend they wedding. When the parents got to know about the runaways and consented to bring them home again, the father or brother of the bride would bring them home and that was called the "Drag Home ". Otherwise if tghe parents did not consent to bring them home the runaways would have to work and make a living for themselves.
Nora Dawe obtained the story from John Murphy Esq, Bellurgan, Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:58
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rejected
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20th December 1937.
Weather Lore.
I Sayings
1. A rainbow in the night is the shepherd's delight,
A rainbow in the morning is the shepherds-warning.
2. Frost in November to bear a duck
Nothing after but slush and much.
3. Wet Saturday - dry Sunday.
4. Wet Friday - wet Sunday.
5. Rain on St Swithin's Day means
rain for forty days afterwards.
6. Evening red and morning grey,
Are token of a bonny day.
II Good signs.
A red sunset
Mist on the river at evening time.
Swallows flying high.
Humming of a bee on a summer evening.
Clear sky.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:56
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rejected
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4.
In Bellurgan there is a p. wood called "Tippings wood" and in this wood there is a pond. About twenty years ago this pond was a lake. A man named Mr Tipping used to own this wood, but he is long since dead. It is now owned by his daughter Miss Tipping. The story goes that a man named James White better known as "The Lark" Whate lived in Dawestown nearby. This man used to boast that he was not afraid of ghosts. He laid a bet, that he would fish in the lake the next moonlight night, because it was said that whoever fished in this lake in the light of the moon would see ghosts and spirits. So one moonlight night he began to fish in lake. After a while he happened to look into the lake and saw his reflection He thought it was the devil and began to feel nervous, so he ran and ran till he reached the cottage. (The cottage was a house with six doors on it, and the workmen in Tipping's used to get their meals in this cottage.)
When he reached the cottage there were goats standing at every door, taking shelter. "The Lark" went to the first door, and the goats ran out past him. Then he went to the next door and the same thing happened. The story goes that the goats ran past him at every door. In the end he was so much frightened that he thought everything he met was a
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:39
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rejected
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48.
Churning
There are two kinds of churns one, a "Dash-churn" the other a Berrel-churn.
The dash-churn is made of oak. It is wide at the bottom narrowing as it comes towards the centre and gradually widening at the top. It is made in two pieces the halves being joyned by iron bolts. The churn is held together by several round iron hoops. The lid is also made of oak with a hole in the centre to allow the staff of the churn-dash to come through. The lid fits tightly into the churn to prevent milk or butter splashing out on the lid.
The farmer's wife collects all the surplus milk and she allows it to go very sour and thick. When the milk is ready for churning the churn is washed out with boiling water to scald it. The same is done with the dash
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:21
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rejected
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6. The people said that a ghost was seen on the Collon Road. The ghost was a dog and he used to walk the road with everyone. one night a priest saw the ghost and he hunted him and he was never seen since. One night the people of Sillogue saw a light in a field owned by Mr Carroll of Riverstown, Monasterboice. It was a fire and fairies were seen dancing round it. One night a light was seen on a hill at Barnattin and it was seen moving across the fields to Monasterboice.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:21
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rejected
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ghost. This story was given by Jackie Mullen who got it from
Mrs Mullen, Sillogue, Monasterboice. Farmer over 70 yrs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:20
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rejected
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5. One time people named Mc Quillan's lived in a house in Balgathern in the parish of Tullyallen. They got poor and they had to leave the house. When they left the house they had to stop in a neighbours house. One time the boy went out to the field to cut grass and the owner of the field caught him and gave him a good beating. Some time afterwards the boy died. Afterwards Mr Lynn the man who bought the farm when with his servant to live on it. The servant slept outside and the man slept within the house. During the night the man saw a ghost and he ran home. It is said that none of the people that bought the house could live in it because they would see a
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:20
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rejected
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lane. The man went over a few fields and went home. This information was given to me by Anna Lambe who got it from her father.
Michael Lambe, Monasterboice Co Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 12:19
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rejected
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Ghost Stories 7.7.38
1. Long ago there was a woman killed at Fieldstown cross. Her ghost was seen at the place where she was killed. One night two men were coming at the cross very late in the night. One of them saw a woman sitting on the side of the road where that woman was killed and the other man could not see her and then she disappeared. This story was told to me by Kattie Lynn who heard it from her father
Denis Lynn Hamlinstown Monasterboice, Farmer.
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2019-06-03 12:19
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2. Very long ago there was a ghost seen near the mill race at Ballymakenny. it was a tall girl dressed in black. Some evenings she used to come and walk the road along with people. She would walk a long distance on the road and then suddenly disappear. Many people saw this ghost. This story was to me by Kattie Lynn who heard it from her father.
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2019-06-03 12:18
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1. Long ago there was a woman killed at Fieldstown cross. Her ghost was seen at the place where she was killed. One night two men were coming at the cross very late in the night. One of them saw a woman sitting on the side of the road where that woman was killed and the other man could not see her and then she disappeared. This story was told to me by Kattie Lynn who heard it from her father
Denis Lynn Hamlinstown Monasterboice, Farmer.
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2019-06-03 12:17
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farmers to save their butter throughout the year, in wooden barrels commonly called "firkins" and sell it all on the same day. Salt was used as a preservative.
Churning is carried on extensively in Ireland, the fact being due to large numbers of cattle that are raised on the rich pasture lands of our country.
Eleanor McGee,
7 St. Alphonsus Villas,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mr. McGeary,
Avenue Road.
Dundalk.
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2019-06-03 12:15
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beam a long piece of wood extended across the ceiling, from which two long handles known as "glakes" were suspended. The "glakes" were moved to and fro and the piece of wood across the ceiling automatically worked the churn dash.
The next design of a churn brought into existence was the barrel churn. A handle was attached to the side of this churn, and when the handle was tuned the churn was set in rolling motion. Owing to the fact that pieces of wood sometimes called "wings" were projected from the insides no dash was needed. The motion of the churn dashed the milk against these "wings" and the butter was brought to the top in the same manner as when the dash was used. The barrel churn is in use to the present day.
It was not unusual for
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2019-06-03 12:04
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Lena Dullaghan, Jenkinstown, Dundalk from :-
Thomas White, Jenkinstown, Dundalk.
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2019-06-03 12:04
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3.
In Jenkinstown there lives a man whose name is Hugh Finnegan better known as "Hughy Peadair". One dat, when a little boy playing near his home he was surrounded by little men, The little men asked him to go away with them. HE did not want to go with them but he was swept off his feet. He was landed at the foot of the Cooley mountains where they began to play football. He was then taken to some other place where all the eatables that could be marked or made were laid down. The little men forced him to eat something but he would not touch anything. A voice kept telling him that if he would eat anything he would never see his home again. This voice is said to be that of an angel. This man is living still but he never speaks of this to anyone. This story is well known in out locality. Some people believe it was to his dead brother that this happened. Most people think it was Hugh it happened to. This story was obtained by :-
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2019-06-02 12:52
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This story is told about Barney by James Marron who was gardener in the mansion.
Telford head so many stories about Barney that he wished to get him out of sight. He made up his mind to send Marney to America and he sent a message for our poor friend, saying he wanted to see him. Barney arrived before the door of the mansion and walked up and down. The owner looked on wishing for Barney to speak, but in the end he said "McGeown what do you want". He answered back "I want nothing but what do you want Telford. You sent for me and I did not send for you".
Telford then made known his wishes to Barney. But our friend like a true son of the soil said "No. But watch yourself Telford I saw your bits of sticks of furniture out before the door and I may see them so again (He was referring to the sale of Sir John's (Telford's father) goods when he became bankrupt.
Strange to say this sale did not take place after Telford's death and his mansion his now a convent of the Francescan nuns.
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2019-06-02 12:48
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Barney made answer saying "Are you blind when you cannot see the clock on the mantle, (the clock was sitting on Barney's head on the box).
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2019-06-02 12:47
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little scut could you not wash your clothes in any other spot but where the people come for to draw water". He then went home and next morning he came riding to the sport to give his horse a drink. The horse bent down to drink but suddenly reared up throwing the rider off his back. The horse ten came down head foremost and killed both himself and his master. In this way the woman revenged herself for being called a "dirty scut".
1. Laurence Hughes of Proleek tells this story.
An old man named Bernard McGeown lived in a small cottage in Proleek which was presented to him by a charitable lady. He never paid rent for the cottage but when Telford McNeill (the local squire) returned from Torkey he bought back his father's mansion and property in Mount Pleasant.
He laid claim to poor Barney's house and wanted rent. Barney would not recognise the claim so the machinery of the law was brought into motion and our poor friend was evicted. He took up his few articles of furniture along the Colfure road and among them was a bacon box and a bucket. Well when night came poor Barney put his feet in the bucket and his head in the box and slept soundly. Well one night when Larry was passing he said "Barney what time is it"
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2019-06-02 12:40
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XII. He also tells this story.
A man who lived beside the rectory in Jenkinstown was coming home late in the morning when he observed a very small woman beside what is still called "the Spout". She had beside her a very large heap of clothes newly washed.
This man said to her "You clearly
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2019-06-02 12:38
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XI. James O'Hare tells this story also about John McArdle.
John kept a stallion horse and it seems that when "out of season" he always drove the local clergyman with this animal under a car belonging to the priest. Well one night when coming across Dawestown hill the horse suddenly stopped and no force or persuasion would move him onward. The priest then borrowed John's loaded whip and when on a distance in front reading. He then folded the lash of the whip would his hand and commenced to beat something with it towards the fence. John could see nothing but he heard a sound as if the priest was striking a very large sheet of iron with the loaded end of the whip. After a time the priest walked back and got up on the seat saying "John drive on, we are all right now." John did so once the horse walked quite readily past the spot. The priest would not explain what he saw or what he struck (This also happened about Gleann Dub)
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2019-06-02 12:30
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X. He says the following story was told by the late Felix? McGeown, (tailor) of Deerpark.
One late evening John McArdle was coming through Gleann Dub in Dowestown and he saw a young girl standing in the the middle of a field crying. He asked what was wrong and then she commenced to laugh. He slid down into the field with the intention of seeing what was the matter. When he came near to the girl she commenced to run and he followed her round the field. This race continued for three times without result. Just then the tailor was passing by and he saw John running but nothing else. He called out "John, what are you running for". Immediately John stood stock-still and in a moment he dropped in a faint. His friend tried to rouse him but after a ling period only did he succeed in bringing back to consciousness. He seemed to think that only for the arrival of a friend the race would have continued till John's death would result.
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2019-06-01 16:00
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the Bellurgan New road when he obesrved a man also walking on what is described as the old rampart. As the man on the road was walking along the other seemed to be doing the same until they reached the "Pound" when the stranger disappeared. The stranger was "Headless" all the time.
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2019-06-01 15:59
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became anxious and after a time they heard a noise of a pack of hounds approach the house. There was a pane missing from the back window of the house and what was the surprise of the children to see a man grasp the side of the window and put his head in. He was seized by forms outside and dragged back, still he tried to escape and got his shoulder in, the pull from without became greater and he was again dragged out. This time he was surrounded and carried off roaring for all that was in his power. Next morning it was found that the man of the house was drowned in the Blackoloie ford when returning from town and it was commonly believed that he was captured by the fairies and was trying to escape when the forms appeared at the window. If any person were to catch his arm he would probably escape.
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2019-06-01 15:54
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VIII. The same man says that once when a man was walking along Bellurgan pound he saw approaching him a gentleman wearing a dress suit. He did not know the stranger and in a short time he looked after the man and this time nothing was visible but a poor bent tramp with hardly a rag of clothes to cover him.
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2019-06-01 15:51
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IX. Paddy Hoey tells about a man walking the
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2019-06-01 15:51
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VI. Jame O'Hare tells his story also.
A man named McKenny and his family lived along Bellurgan road. Well one day the man and wife went to town leaving the children to look after the house. All went well till evening and there was no sign of their return the children
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2019-06-01 15:49
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VI. James O'Hare also says that in the penal days when Wolfe MacNeill was flogging all the poor of the district among the victims was a poor woman who lived on the estate of Mr Tipping. Well just so they were going to flog the woman her landlord arrived on the scene. He asked 'What was this about". And on being told he said they had no authority to carry out the sentence as she was one of his tenants. So she was set free and the "Landlord" was very well thanked by the peasantry for his timely aid.
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2019-06-01 15:46
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V. Along the Ballymascanlon shore is a small cove called "The Bishop's hole". It seems that in old times a bishop of the name of Donnelly had a hiding place in the sandy bank and he used this little cove as a bathing place. His fate is not known but some say he was captured and that his body was interred in Ballymascanlon churchyard. It is quite a common saying "Let us have a swim in the bishop's hole".
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2019-06-01 15:43
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He was again placed in his cell and next morning he again was taking his stroll in Crow Street. The tread mill was again brought into action and Larry enjoyed his four hours hopping. He got off smiling but still refused to tell how he escaped, all kind of locks were put on the door but with no result. The governor saut to smith and got a special lock mode for the door as he was ordered to do so by the visiting justices who described Larry as a dangerous character. This lock was put on in addition to the usual one and a double guard on the doors to prevent escape. Well in the morning Larry was as usual taking his constitutional in Crow street and of course he was enjoying his pipe. When again questioned by the visiting justices he would not disclose his secret so in the end the allowed him to take his usual walk in Crow-street and smoke the pipe of peace but of course they double locked him in the cell each night.
The month wore on and Larry was set at liberty much to the joy of the governor and he returned to the Deerpark. Traces of his home cow still be pointed out and his farm is in the possession of the Logan family.
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2019-06-01 13:58
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On New Years Day the daylight lengthens as much as a cocks crow carries.
If apples bloom in March, there will be a bad crop.
I would not trust him as far a I would throw him.
P. FLEMING.
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2019-06-01 13:57
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If April is a showery month,
Then May will be a flowery month.
A cold May makes no one richer.
Midsummer rain spoils hay and grain.
All the months of the year will curse a fair February.
May chickens never grow to full size.
If the cat lies in the Sun in February she will creep to the hearth stone in March.
A wet March makes a bad harvest.
Every day from St. Patrick's is fine.
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2019-06-01 13:55
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It was not on one foot that St. Patrick came to Ireland.
Ireland for a penny, but where is the penny.
Thats the hen's penny to Scotland.
The worst blast comes on the borrowed day
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2019-06-01 13:54
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A new broom sweeps clean.
No smoke without fire.
Fine feathers make fine birds.
You never miss the water till the well runs dry.
Don't throw out the stale water 'till you ake sure of the clean.
R. LANGAN.
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2019-06-01 13:51
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Many a kind heart beats under a ragged coat.
What you have not got you cannot lose.
One drop of ink makes a million think.
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2019-06-01 13:50
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Diligence is the mother of good luck.
One to-day is worth two to-morrows.
The eye of a master can do more work than both his hands.
We may give advice but we cannot give conduct.
OLIVER BRANIGAN.
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2019-06-01 13:49
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Proverbs.
Sloth like rust consumes faster than labour wears.
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2019-06-01 13:48
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There is a certain house which is situated about two miles from Drogheda. During the troublesome time of the Black and Tans a group of men went for safety to this house. They asked the people who occupied the house, to give them shelter in a certain room of the house. They thought that if an attack came they could get out safely.
They went asleep but soon they were all thrown out of bed and tumbled about. They had to take their clothes and run for their lives.
Joseph O'Neill.
Mary St.
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2019-06-01 13:42
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Once upon a time there lived a princess. She was to get married shortly so she went over to Platten.
Every man, before marrying her had to go through a test.
The test was to jump from one side of the rocks of platten to the other. Many men were killed trying to jump it. Not one in Ireland could do the jump.
A prince in Scotland heard about it and came over to Ireland. She, seeing him, wanted him to marry her without jumping, but he said he would do it. He tried once and succeeded.
The princess in her excitement fell off the rocks and was killed. Every night since she is to be seen walking about platten Rocks.
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2019-06-01 13:35
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him in and put the other man's hump on his back so that he had two. Then they sent him home.
Written by
Edward McEneaney.
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2019-06-01 13:34
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Once upon a time there was a man who had a lump. He had a friend who had a hump also. One day the man was employed in a field cutting thistles. He went up on a little hill for a rest and heard the fairies singing "May, June and July". He came nearer and began to say it also.
They heard him and welcomed him. Afterwards they took the hump off his back. Next day his friends, who also had a hump saw him and asked him where did he get rid of his hump.
He told him to go to the top of a hill and to say "May, June, July". The man did so, and when the fairies heard him they brought
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2019-06-01 12:58
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Continued
and said come up to the graveyard until you hear God and the Devil dividing the souls.
Sean McDermott
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2019-06-01 12:57
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2.
There is an old house near the post office in Jenkinstown. The story is that it was bought off a man named "Peter the Tailor". The man who bought it built a new house where the old one was. He got as far a the roof. Every day he put on the slates, but they would be pulled off that night. He began to think it was the neighbours who were pulling the slates off so he waited up one night to see who it was. To his surprise he saw the slates come rolling off themselves nd nobody near them. It was the "wee people" who were doing this. The old house is there still and nobody ever goes near it.
This story was obtained by:- Lena Dullaghan Jenkinstown, Dundalk. From:- Mrs Mary White, Jenkinstown, Dundalk.
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2019-06-01 12:54
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4.
Quite close to where I live there is an estate owned by an old lady called Miss Tipping. The Tipping Family have owned this lace for long and long. There is a high mound at one part of the estate and it is covered with trees. This place is known to everyone around as Tippings Wood. This mound is very historical and it is said that Cuchulainn used it in days gone by as a look-out when Maeve's army was marching to attack Ulster.
There is a part of Tippings Wood called the Horsepark. In this place there is a cave, and inside the cave there is supposed to be a crock of gold hidden. This gold is very valuable. It is supposed to be guarded by enchanted men who stand around it with swords in their hands. A man whose name I do not know, is supposed to have seen this treasure but he did not dare to touch it. This man was from Bellurgan.
This story was obtained by Nora Dawe, Old Road, Bellurgan, Dundalk from John Murphy, Old Road, Bellurgan, Dundalk.
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2019-06-01 12:54
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to me by my mother whose name and address are:- Mrs Dawe, Old Road, Bellurgan, Dundalk.
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2019-06-01 12:53
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3.
Two miles from Bellurgan School at a place called the Deerpark, there is a cromlech in a field, known as the "Big Stone Field". In this field there is supposed to be a treasure hidden but it is not known exactly where the spot is. It is said that a man named Mr Brush had a crop of mustard in the field one year. When he and his employed men were taking out the crop it is said that they found some kind of silver. Mr. Brush sent this silver to some place in Dublin. In return he was told that the silver was good. So he got his men to dig for more, but they took ill and he put a stop to the work. This happened about eighteen years ago. This story was told
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2019-06-01 12:53
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place. One night he was out after twelve o'clock. The night was very dark and he saw bright light shining round the place. He saw little men in green jackets and red caps dancing round a great big crock of gold. The man go very ill after this. Though he is still alive he does not of this happening to anyone. I got this story from my mother whose name and address are:- Mrs Dullagham, Jenkinstown, Dundalk.
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2019-06-01 12:53
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2.
A little more than a mile from Bellurgan School in a place called Rockmarshall there is an old fort. A man named Johnny Breen lives near the
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2019-06-01 12:53
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Hidden Treasures
Treasure is supposed to have been hidden at Bellurgan Point. It is not known who placed it there and no one ever tried to get at it. It is supposed to be gold that is hidden. It is said that whoever goes to look for it will have to fig for it at twelve o'clock at night. There is a with there who minds the treasure by day and night. The story goes whoever finds it will suffer the loss of a joint. People didn't want to lose an joint, and so no one ever looked for the treasure.
Mary Rice, Bellurgan N.S. Dundalk was told the story. She heard it from Mr Joseph O'Neill, Bellurgan Point, Dundalk.
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2019-06-01 12:52
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Once upon a time there lived a priest who was paid to say a mass, but he forgot and he died.
A little while after a man fell asleep in the chapel in which the dead priest used to say mass. He was locked in. At 12 oclock the priest came out of the vestry fully dressed in his vestments and he turned round and said "Is there any one to serve me"
The man did not answer. He told a priest and the next night both came to the chapel. The dead priest asked the same question which the priest answered.
He served him and the dead priest never seen again
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 16:19
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A Story About Karra Gubban
A few years ago I visited Karra Gubban in Donore in Co. Meath.
It is a high hill. When you would get to the top of the hill you would go into a cave.
It was said that this cave was the home of the fairies.
People say that they saw the fairies dressed in red suits. They were playing Football in the cave.
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2019-05-31 16:14
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to sleep.
All went well until twelve o;clock and then something came and tumbled the men about every which way. They all had to pack up their clothes and run for their lives.
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2019-05-31 16:13
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There is a certain house which is situated 2 miles from the town.
During the troublesome time of the I.R.A. a groop of men went for safety to this house. They asked the people who occupied it, to give them shelter in a certain room on the flat.
They thought that there would be an invasion, then they could get out safely.
The man knew the history of the room and advised them to go to another one but they objected and thought he was going to trap them.
They contented themselves, lay down and went
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 16:11
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A long time ago a man lived in a house by himself at Shallon.
The house was built on a lonely road out in the country.
The man of the house died. A couple of months after his death it was known that a big black dog used to jump across a stile that was built at the side of the house.
It came at the same time every year.
The People that lived around, and many others thought that the house was haunted and that the dog was a Ghost, and nobody would go near the house or
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2019-05-31 16:11
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live in it.
After a few years two men went out with guns late at night. They happened to pass down the road where the dog was known to be. Just as they were passing by the house out jumped the dog across the road.
The man got up the gun and fired at the dog and killed it. He shot him in the head and found out that it was some men behind the stile and that they let out the dog.
Ever since that nobody is afraid to pass that way no matter how late it is.
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2019-05-31 16:10
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in the District.
This is a true story told by my Great Grandmother 30 years ago, and she died when she was 100 years of age."
Kathrine Donnelly
Tullineskea
Bailieboro.
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2019-05-31 16:09
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lived close by, named Maura Gargan. St Patrick caught her eating blackberries going to Holy Communion.
She disappeared in three parts. One went up in the air, one went under the ground, The third into a lake close by, called Clugga Lake.
The part that went under the ground was to appear on the earth again he said when ninety nine thousand nine hundred and nine people, by the same name, would cross the spot where she disappeared.
For years and years anyone called Gargan would cross the field, rather than cross the place lest she might rise again. Now people have forgotten about it and there is no one of that name
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2019-05-31 13:15
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The Tale of Maura Gargan
In the parish of Tierwarker Co. Meath there is an old graveyard known as Mybloegue [Pron. 'Moybullog']. In it stands an old chapel of St. Patrick where we are told he used to say Mass. All of it that remains is the four walls and the highest wind that ever came never knocked it down. St Patrick told us so himself that it would remain.
He Blessed a well where many people got cured of sore eyes by using the water. He left the track of knee on a stone.
A Very bad girl
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2019-05-31 13:08
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4. One night a man went to a card play and when he was coming home it was twelve o'clock. On his way home he had to cross a field. When he was crossing it he saw an object running after him. He ran home and called together all the men of the neighbour-hood and they went over to see what it was and they found it was only a donkey.
Michael Lambe, Riverstown, Monasterboice, Postman. over 40 yrs.
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2019-05-30 20:56
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4. One night a man wen to a card play and when he was coming home it was twelve o'clock. On his way home he had to cross a field. When he was crossing it he saw an object running after him. He ran home and called together all the men of the neighbour-hood and they went over to see what it was and they found it was only a donkey.
Michael Lambe, Riverstown, Monasterboice, Postman. over 40 yrs.
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2019-05-30 20:55
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3. There was a man once and he went into a house. In this house there was an egg on the dresser. He asked her where did she get the egg. She told him that the white gennet layed it. One day he came into the house with the gennet to lay.
Mrs. Winters, Fieldstown, Monasterboice.
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2019-05-30 20:55
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2. One time there were three old men living together. They had a very big pot. They used to boil stirabout in the pot and they used to stir the stirabout with the handle of a spade. One of the men was very small and when he would be lifting the stirabout he would fall into the pot. One of them men said to put the little man down in the pot to lift up the stirabout. They used to catch birds and boil them and make soup of them and they used to stir the soup and the team with their fingers.
Mrs Winters, Fieldstown, Monasterboice 50 yrs.
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2019-05-30 20:53
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ed by Patrick Winters Fieldstown who got it from his mother and the last part from Kattie Lynn who got it from her father, Denis Lynn, Hamlinstown, Farmer.
over 50 yrs.
Josie Winters 14 years
Hamlinstown
Parish of Monasterboice.
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2019-05-30 20:50
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IV. This is the most amazing tale of all.
One day Larry pffended the dignity of the law by gathering firewood in a nearby plantation. He was seen with the result that he got the usual summons to appear before the J.P.s in the local court the next Saturday. Well the chairman was drunk as usual and when Larry's case was stated he gave his usual sentence of "a month in goal" Larry was seized and lodged in the old goal of Dundalk (a rather gloomy building in what is now Crow-street). He was put into his cell and the iron door slammed too. All was well until next morning when a warder observed Larry's cell door open. He rushed to see is the prisoner was there but there was no sign of Larry. The big bell was rung and of course there was a general search without result until a centry from the top of the gaol saw Larry sauntering up Crow street taking his leisure and smoking his pipe. A general run was made for him and he was dragged into the prison. A general courtmartial was held "for breaking prison" and Larry was sentenced to an hour on the "Tread mill". Many a poor fellow was broken on the mill but Larry was in his element and could hop until the end of the year without feeling in the least tired. He still refused to tell how he escaped.
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2019-05-29 20:10
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III James O'Hare now tried to bring to mind the story of how Larry interceded for a neighbour who was captured by the fairies and the man got free at our friends intercession, but he could not remember the details
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2019-05-29 20:08
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II Another night the lads from Proleek were playing cards in Higginson's house on the opposite side of the river from Larry's home. Well as usual Larry turned up for his game. (He was a usual visitor crossing the river on stepping stones.) They continued their game until eleven o'clock when one of the lads made the remark "Larry you must go round the road tonight as there is a roaring flood in the river". Larry laughed and they came outside. To the surprise of all our friend turned down the little road leading to the stepping stones. They all said "no man could cross to-night Larry and you will be drowned".
He again smiled and said "It was all right" Well off he went and the men heard in a few seconds the sound of Larry's boots on the road the other side of the river. "Of course he is off again with the boys agreed the whole company.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 18:37
approved
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awaiting decision
I James O'Hare of Deerpark tells some interesting stories about "Larry" the lad. Commonly he was called this name because of his intimacy with fairies (Some said he was one)
Well Larry was very fond of a game of cards and all the young lads used to collect to his house for a game. Well this night the game was in full swing when Larry thought of getting ready his supper. He put water in the pot and got meal from the bag but was surprised when he had no salt for the porridge.
Now boys he said when hanging on the pot over the fire I am short of salt and you can continue your game as I will be back when the water commences to boil. I have only to take a little run down to Newry and back. Well off he started a distance of 12 miles each way. His cardplayers kept an eye on the pot and what was their surprise to see Larry walking ni with a package of salt in his hand the moment they heard the first sound of boiling water in the pot. Well boys he said I was a bit longer then I expected as I met Paddy - in the town I had to stop and speak to him. The naighbours when questioned next day said he was speaking to Larry in the town just after seven o'clock showing clearly how quickly he travelled probably on a "[boltan?]"
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I James O'JHare of Deerpark tells some interesting stories about "Larry" the lad. Commonly he was called this name because of his intimacy with fairies (Some said he was one)
Well Larry was very fond of a game of cards and all the young lads used to collect to his house for a game. Well this night the game was in full swing when Larry thought of getting ready his supper. He put water in the pot and got meal from the bag but was surprised when he had no salt for the porridge.
Now boys he said when hanging on the pot over the fire I am short of salt and you can continue your game as I will be back when the water commences to boil. I have only to take a little run down to Newry and back. Well off he started a distance of 12 miles each way. His cardplayers kept an eye on the pot and what was their surprise to see Larry walking ni with a package of salt in his hand the moment they heard the first sound of boiling water in the pot. Well boys he said I was a bit longer then I expected as I met Paddy - in the town I had to stop and speak to him. The naighbours when questioned next day said he was speaking to Larry in the town just after seven o'clock showing clearly how quickly he travelled probably on a "[boltan?]"
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 13:28
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awaiting decision
The churn, the dash, and the lid were washed thoroughly in hot-water and moved into the open air to dry.
Churning with churn which was described in the preceding paragraph was very strenuous work, but matters were slightly improved when the following appliance was introduced. A strong spring was procured, one end of which was attached to a beam in the wall, and the other end was fixed to the churn dash. When the churned pushed down the dash it went up itself by means of the spring, consequently the churner was relieved of a great deal of labour and he was able to finish the work in a shorter space of time.
As time went on there was still another invention brought in. The handle of the dash was connected with a beam in the wall, from the
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 19:30
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diameter was attached to the churn so this handle passed through a hole in the lid. One or two persons pulled the handle up and down for some time then they were relieved by two more people, when the first two had rested they resumed their work. When the butter came to the top the lid was taken off the churn and any butter which had stuck to it in the course of the churning was washed off with butter milk. The dash was treated in the same manner. The butter was then taken out and put into a wooden basin for the purpose. When the milk was drained off it a certain amount of salt was added. It was made into "Golden Bricks" as they were called, each weighing a pound, a half pound or two pounds. The butter milk was taken from the churn and put in another large wooden vessel to be taken to town and sold next day.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 19:26
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According to Francis Hanlon of Doolargy some of the ancient tombstones were removed by families to Faughart Graveyard when the old one ceased to be used but no one is able to distinguish any marks on the stones now they are so old. but Mr McDermott's son says a great many stones were drawn from the fence to build a wall in Dundalk Harbour. No trace of tombstones are to be seen it at present.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 19:25
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According to Thomas McDermott of Ballymacallet thre is the remains of an ancient graveyard on his farm. This is a rough piece of ground in the northern end of a field. He says that his father had great veneration for this spot and when the field was being ploughed the son often wished to cease work early but the old man would not hear of this. Then the son would pretend he struck a stone with the plough and off he went for a spade to sink the stone. Well the old man on seeing this would order him to stop and put up the horses for the night. Quite an easy way of getting his wish.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 18:42
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Churning.
In recent years churning has been made less laborious owing to the introduction of modern churns.
In olden days the farm-folk were very a particular when making preparations for the churning. The milk was placed in crocks in the dairy until they had the required amount and they left it there until it reached a certain temperature. On the day of the churning in order to raise the temperature of the milk hot water was added. There is a description of a churn used in olden days. It was a large, round, wooden vessel, wide at the bottom and narrowing as it came to the top. The dash was a piece of wood circular in shape, with four holes in it. A long wooden about four inches in
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 18:38
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he is to get the crock of gold, but he does not say what is to be the result of failure. Apparently no one was successful up to the present.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 18:38
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According to Michael Doherty of Ballymacallet a little mound on the hillside has its own particular watch dog. This dog is only to be seen on Hallow-Eve. He sits on a flag guarding a crock of gold and the person who sees him is to try his luck and hit the dog with a sod of earth between the two eyes. If he succeeds
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 18:36
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Doolargy.
white calf grazing in the field. This will do as a horse for him, said the fairy. Well Larry was mounted and the calf easily kept up with the galloping horses. Across by the Cadger's pass they when and the horses jumped from rock to rock, the calf easily did the same and so on till they reached O'Meath.
What was Larry's astonishment when he saw them all heading for the strand and each horse gave a leap and landed in Warrenpoint. Larry's calf did likewise and immediately on landing Larry swore an oath "By the Eternal -". I never saw a finer leap in my life. Within a second all his friends disappeared and Larry stood in the centre of Warrenpoint holding on to his calf. Well he could not get the calf to come back in the same way so he had to trudge with his calf round by Newry and home to the Deerpark, (20 miles) so that was his punishment for swearing.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 18:30
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List of Principal Teachers
- 1859 Mrs. Breaky
1859 - 1894 Mrs. Nolan
1894 - 1917 Mrs. Harmon
1917 - 1937 Mrs. Belton
1937 Miss M Casey.
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 14:10
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Mayne and Bolies
(1) Holy Wells -
(2) Duns, Forts, raths -
(3) Souterrains, Caves:- In a field in Mayne known as the Green Meadow there is a cave which is supposed locally to be connected by an underground passage with Lis na Rann in Annagassan.
(4) Cromlechs, Standing Stones -
(5) Church Ruins
(6) Castles, Old Houses:- There is a field at Mayne Bridge, at the bottom of which stand two piers. This field is called the Pier Field, and it is said that one of the kings (?) of Leinster resided here, and that these two piers mark the entrance to the palace. It is also said that a great battle was fought here, and that at one time, when the river Glyde, which flows near this field, was being widened piles of bones and weapons of all sorts were found under the ground.
There is a cave beside a ditch near the river, believed to have been a Danish
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 14:04
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It is said that the bricks of which the houses in Kilsaran are built were made there/.
4. Place Names and Derivations.
There is a field called the "Graws", n Mrs. Chester Walshe's farm. There was a row of calrins (cro) on this hill in olden times and it is locally believed that there is coal underneath this mount. Another field on the same farm is called "Cloca Mora. Stones were got in this field in the Stone Age in Ireland.
"Carsir Beag", and
"Cuaire ban" are also names of fields in the same locality.
There is a hill on the outskirts of Castlebellingham Demense called "Cnoc Colm" and another called "Sraid Ruad" where fairies lived.
"Cnoc na Mona".
Continued on Page 17
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:19
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6. Castles, Old houses -
7. Old Paths and Roads. -
8. Old Trades and Customs.
Castlebellingham Fair
Long ago a fair was held in the village of Castlebellingham, twice every year, on Easter Tuesday and on 10th October.
For weeks before the children of the locality watched eagerly for its coming. At the fair not only animals were bought and sold but numerous other articles such as clothes etc. The village used to be crowded out. All day, the fair would be going on, and when evening would come, pipers and fiddlers would start their music for the dancing. There would be a dance in every house as well and everyone joined in the fun, which lasted until the following morning.
There is a field between Castlebellingham and Kilsaran called the "Brick Field
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:14
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Milestown and Castlebellingham
1. Holy Wells. -
2. Duns, Forts, Raths : -
There is a hill or mound north of Castlebellingham called Dromena hill. The fairies lied there and a lone bush is growing on it. IT is said that there was a racecourse around this hill long ago.
3.
Souterrains, Caves -
4. Cromlechs and Standing Stones. -
5. Church Ruins.
In a field in front of Morris' house there are the remains of an old monastery. The monks came to Mass in an old church, a crumbling wall of which remains in the present graveyard at Kilsaran. The path by which they came to Mass is named the Mass Path. It leads from Miss Anne's lane to the graveyard.
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:09
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Chilblains - A cure for these is to cut up an onion and rub the piece on the place where you feel the chilblain.
Joe Coyle.
Hill St.
Dundalk
Warts - To cure a wart, it is necessary to find a snail without looking for it. Then you must rub the snail on the wart. The snail is then nailed to wood and, as the snail withers so does the wart.
Sting from wasps - If a person is stung
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:08
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Chilblains - A cure for these is to cut up an onion and rub the piece on the place where you feel the chilblain.
Joe Coyle.
Hill St.
Dundalk
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:08
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water on the warts until they wear away.
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:07
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sting saying "Dalkin, dalkin, in and out, take the sting of the nettle out. "
Measles - Keep the patient in a very dark room for about two days. Sean McGarrity Westview Ter Dundalk
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:07
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Warts - After a shower of rain take some water from the hollow of a stone and rub it in on the warts and in a short time they will disappear.
Another cure is to wash your hands in the water a blacksmith dips the hotel iron in.
A third cure is to rub holy
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 00:04
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My Home District
The townland of Castletown Cooley is situated in the parish of Cooley and barony of Lower Dundalk. The townland of Castletown - Cooley has appropriately a population of two hundred and thirty. We have a variety of surnames, but White is the commonest, there being five families of that name. Most of the houses are slated, and about half of them are two-storey buildings. Castletown - Cooley is so called because it is stuated in the parish of Cooley and some time ago there was a castle in the townland. The site of this castle can still be seen beside the residence of Mr Thomas Woods. A man named Gyles was the last to occupy the castle, and he died over a hundred years ago. The Gyles family had a little pier for their own private use down at the sea, and it is this pier that gave it's name to Gyles's Quay. The townland extends from the Riverstown Inn to a short distance north of Mullaghbuoy Church. The Dundalk-Greenore road bounds the townland on the south side, and on the north side of the townland, and the mountains lie to the east. Before the great famine the number of houses was mush greater. There were a good many houses beside the school and this collection of houses was known as Ballinarourke, because of the number of people named
senior member (history)
2019-05-18 21:55
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There is an old ruin of a two roomed church in the graveyard at Dromin. This church is supposed to have been built by St. Fintan, but three other places are pointed to as having been the sites of churches. One of these places being called "Killslaughter[y?]", another "Killleedrim.

Near the schoolhouse is an earthen mound much like those seen in many other place. It is marked on Survey map.

On Survey Sheet No. can be seen a hill called Kill . The mass bell used to be rung on this hill until 90 or 100 years ago. The hill is supposed to have been the site of a church or monastry and a graveyard.
When a new fence was being erected across the top of the hill many bones were found. At present there is no trace of church or graveyard.
Children were forbidden to play on this hill in years gone by.
Some years ago the side of this hill was ploughed and the ploughman came across a very large stone on which he said were many curious markings. The stone was covered over and left untouched.
senior member (history)
2019-05-18 12:42
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44. St Brigid's Well - Cappog -
This well is on a farm belonging to a Miss Courtney in the townland of Cappog.
A bush growing over the well is laden with many pieces of cloth, iron nuts, nails etc.
The water in this well is supposed to rise at midnight on the 15th August, and many people still visit it ans recite the rosary etc. while waiting.
senior member (history)
2019-05-18 12:21
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The McGuines Forge, Ballabailie, on the Dundalk Road. All kinds of wood and iron work done. All kinds of machinery and farm implements are repaired there. Carts, wheelbarrows are made.
Gorman's Forge at Crois Cilis on the Dunleer Road.
Work same as McGuines, but specialise in making iron railings.
[Newspaper Clipping]
THEFTS DENIED
Girls Who Was Three Days "Missing"
(From Out Own Correspondent.)
Baillieborough, Tuesday.
Missing from her home at Aughakilmore since Thursday morning last and searched for by the Guards, a young girl named Margaret Leahy returned to her home yesterday, and was subsequently arrested and charged at Virginia District Court with the larceny of g[?] a silver watch value £1, and a deposit receipt for £15, all the property of her father, William Leahy, Aughakilmore.
Superindendent Dowd stated that the girl's father swore an information against her.
Deferndant- I only took £3 and I gave it back to my father. I was stopping with friends of my own.
William Leahy, the father, said he was a carpenter and small farmer. He had two sons and this girl living in the house with him. The girl had only left school. She was always an
"INNOCENT GAR-CULLAGH."
Superindendent- Where did you think she was gone?
senior member (history)
2019-05-18 12:20
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The McGuines Forge, Ballabailie, on the Dundalk Road. All kinds of wood and iron work done. All kinds of machinery and farm implements are repaired there. Carts, wheelbarrows are made.
Gorman's Forge at Crois Cilis on the Dunleer Road.
Work same as McGuines, but specialise in making iron railings.
[Newspaper Clipping]
THEFTS DENIED
Girls Who Was Three Days "Missing"
(From Out Own Correspondent.)
Baillieborough, Tuesday.
Missing from her home at Aughakilmore since Thursday morning last and searched for by the Guards, a young girl named Margaret Leahy returned to her home yesterday, and was subsequently arrested and charged at Virginia District Court with the larceny of g[?] a silver watch value £1, and a deposit receipt for £15, all the property of her father, William Leahy, Aughakilmore.
Superindendent Dowd stated that the girl's father swore an information against her.
Deferndant- I only took £3 and I gave it back to my father. I was stopping with friends of my own.
William Leahy, the father, said he was a carpenter and small farmer. He had two sons and this girl living in the house with him. The girl had only left school. She was always an
"INNOCENT GAR-CULLAGH."
Superindendent- Where did you think she was gone?
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 20:50
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In town of Ardee there are at present three forges in operation. Their work is almost completely confined to horse-shoeing. They also do other work of a light nature. Two of these are owned by men called Roe. The other smith is McEntegart.
Some years ago there were two other smiths called O Brien, one of whom died and his forge is now worked by McEntegart. The other OBrien went "out of business" as there are no longer many horses to be shod.
In the neighbourhood of Ardee are three very important forges worked in conjunction with carpentry. All three do a very big trade and all kinds of wood and iron goods necessary for the country people in houses and farms are made in them.
Paddy McCormack's forge on Bohernamise (or Silver Hill). Besides the usual wood and iron work, cranes for turf fires and slean for cutting turf are made there. This forge is beside the Ardee Bog. It is beside the Navan Road.
Carts made & all kinds of repairs done.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 20:31
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Old St Mary's Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 20:31
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Kildemoch (or Milloxtown)
Very old graveyard surrounds the ruin (very historic one) of the church.
Some very ancient stones. Earliest dated one is 1783. It is very little used at present except for burial of remains of "unclaimed" patients who die in Ardee Mental Hospital.
It slopes towards east. Trees growing round ruins of Church. Some simple iron and wooden crosses. A few plots nailed and chained off by certain families.
People buried with the ruin of church. For History of Ruin see Louth Archeological Journal.
Shanlis.
Shanlis graveyard surrounds the ruin of an old Church.
Earliest dated tombstone 1763.
At present used as a burial place for a few old families.
It is very much overgrown by bushes
Slopes towards east.
People buried within ruins of old Church.
At entrance of Lane to graveyard is a mound of clay. St Ptk. was supposed to have rested on it or said mass on it. Coffin was sometimes rested on it, and sometimes coffin bearers walked round it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 16:18
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56 Contd.
Our Lord to put him to death, they enquired of some men if he had passed that way. The men said no, but this insect is supposed to have said inde, inde, so that Our Lord was found.
Crosses and medals were inserted in the walls when houses were being built, in olden times.
Cross (nicely ornamented) found in very old building when being demolished. It is now in the possession of Mrs. Val. Kerr Mullamelia, Ardee.
Before building a house, local people stand four twigs where they mean to have the four corners of the house. If these remain undisturbed overnight they proceed to build on that site, but if the twigs are disturbed they choose some other site.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 16:15
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56 Contd.
Pulling the fingers one by one and counting the cracks tells you the number of children you shall have.
Rubbing white milky juice of "Deveil's meal" (Sunspurge) on warts cures them.
When stung by a nettle, rub the stung part with a dock-leaf and say "Capog, capog, in and out
Take the sting of the nettle out".
When butter does not come as a result of churning it is supposed to have been taken by fairies and salt was shaken round the churn to take them away.
Near Carraroe, Co Galway, a hot coal is placed under the churn before churning commences.
There is a kind of beetle which cocks it talk and when you see one you should kill him before he lifts the tail - otherwise you shall have bad luck.
It is believed that when the Jews were pursuing
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 16:11
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56 Contd.
It is unlucky to pass by a tree the trunk of which branches out in three.
If you break a mirror, break two jam-pots also and you avoid the bad luck.
Spilling cup of tea means bad luck for a week.
Touching flower of poppy brings warts.
Spider creeping on any of your garments means getting a new one.
Killing swan brings bad luck.
Tea-lef floating on tea means a stranger.
Killing a beetle takes a sin off your soul.
Dreaming of fire means hasty news.
Sod of turf falling from fire means visitor.
Unlucky to beat cows with blackthorn stick.
If you meet a black snail rub him to your warts and stick him to a thorn on a bush and as he withers your warts disappear.
If you break a fairy-cap, fairies take you to their lios.
When tooth falls out, bless yourself with it & throw over the shoulder. If you see where it falls you will have bad luck.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 14:27
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In Ballyvourney Co. Cork the following are supposed to cure certain diseases in childrens mouths
(1) Fuizleac Fioroide = milk left after ferret had taken his fill.
(2) A man, who was born after the death of his father could cure certain diseases in child's mouth by breathing into child's mouth.
(3).
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 14:26
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Cure for warts.
Take 9 pins. Offer three each morning to warts by throwing them over shoulder, for 3 mornings. A straw must be attached to last pin.
Cure for Sty (in eye).
A person whose parents are still living points nine gooseberry thorns to the eye of person who has the sty.
Cure for Toothache
Get a "God's horse" (ladybird) and put it in your mouth. For every step taken while you retain him in mouth you get a year free from toothache.
or
Do same with young frog.
Cure for cut.
Ivy leaf applied to cut.
Cure for whooping Cough.
Drunk water in which nettles of thistles one boiled.
Cure for mumps.
Walking in and out of pig-house nine times brings cures for mumps.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 14:13
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37 Contd.
Cure for warts
Three straws from "The Crib" (at Christmas)
Rub to warts and say a Hail Mary for each straw. Bury straws in manure and when they are rotten warts gone.
or
When you see new moon go outside and having knelt down and closed your eyes pick up the first thing you can find and rub to warts.
or.
Count the number of warts. Pick up the same number of pebbles an throw them over your shoulder (after having put them in a little bag). Whoever finds the bag is supposed to get warts.
or.
A stone taken from beside a pool and dipped into the pool to be rubbed to the wart for nine consecutive days.
or
Water from mouth after Holy Communion.
or
Cut potato, rub to wart and bury
or.
Rub flagger (feilistrum) to wart and bury flagger.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 14:09
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37.
Folk Cures and Charms
(1) Cure for Sciatica
Mrs Woods Stickillen got it from her grandfather (Andy Carrie of Duffy's Cross). He got it from his uncle (McCann) who in turn had got it from some person in Co. Meath whose forefathers had sheltered a priest in the time of the Reformation. The Priest is supposed to have rewarded them by giving them this cure.
The cure consists of
Prayers, water, and small stones.
The stones, having been dipped in water lifted between two townlands, are to be rubbed to the legs of the sufferer.
(2) Cure for Ringworm
Mr. Meade of Woodtown has cure for this. He must get "silver" before doing so.
(3) Cures for Ringworm & warts.
Frank Clarke Hunterstown and his brother Barney Clark Hoathstown
Sign of Cross on Forehead, same on wart.
While person returns home some chemicals are burnt.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:59
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children would know it.
Maggie McCann,
Ballybailie,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:59
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What is the Question
"Work while you work.
Play while you play.
That is the way to be happy and gay.
Afterally God has given to everyone leisure hours for their hobbies whether it be knitting, sewing, reading, or playing games, indoors or outdoor ones.
A receration once in a while means much pleasure to one, and especially if she has been indoor during her working hours.
One of the leisure hour games which is generally played by the children of the present day is- One of the opponent goes outside the door the rest of them stay inside. Later another opponent go outside and she tells the secret to girl which is:- "there will be anumber of questions asked to you the answer will be no! until I mention with four legs on it. The one after that will be the right one." This can be repeated several times without giving away secret. When the secret is told it is not very interesting to continue because all the
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:52
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This is a very popular game now a days and can be played by any number of people.
The person who is chosen to be the blind man gets a handkerchief and ties it over there eyes so that they cannot see.
Then he goes round and tries to catch hold of someone and when he succeeds the first person he catches must go into his place.
Veronica O Brien,
John St.,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:49
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room is to try to get into either of the chairs and if she does the other person has to stand in the middle.
The person who is standing in the middle can call out "General Post Office", which means every one has to change places.
The game goes on that way it is very enjoyable tryinng to get into a chair.
Mary Mc Cutcheon,
Castle Street,
Ardee
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:47
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Most children like to play games in leisure hours. There are many games which can be played indoor and outdoor. Here is one which I is generally played at parties. It is called "general Post office".
First some one gets a piece of paper and a pencil. Every one in the room is to tell the one with the paper in a whisper the name of some town. She writes it down and every one must have a different town. If there are six playing five chairs are put around the room the person who is left without a chair has to stand in the middle.
She calls out two town that are on the list and those two must change chairs. The person in the middle of the
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:15
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second player catches the first before twenty is counted he becomes leader and the first player rejoins the circle.
Maureen McGuinness,
The Glebe,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:14
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awaiting decision
A number of children get seated in a circle. One of them has a button. She keeps the button in her fist. She pretends to give it to every player, but she gives to a certain child without the others knowledge.
She then goes round and asks each player who got the button and whoever guesses wrong gets a slap. Whoever gets the button stands opposite the other player. The first player repeats these words. "Give me a loan of the kettle give me a loan of the pan and follow me round this way as fast as ever you can. If the second player does not catch the first before twenty is counted the first remains leader and begins the game again. If the
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:10
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then asks for a colour and if anyone has that colour he goes with the angel.
The game is played until all the children are gone. Then they see who goes with the angel and who goes with the devil.
Mary McDonnell,
Black Ridge,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:09
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Children of the present day love playing games. The game of "Coloutrs" is a very old game and it is still played.
A number of children are gathered together. Two children are picked out, one a devil, and one an angel. The oldest is picked to be the colour man.
The colour man gives each child a colour and says "Devil! Devil! Come" They then ask him what colour he wants and if anyone has the colour he wants he goes with the devil. Then the colour man says "Angel! Angel! Come" The angel
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:07
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with something with four feet in it, and that the one after that will be the right one.
Then when I have all that told to her I will go into the room and ask someone for a question and then call the child in, and keep asking her until I say something after the thing with the four legs and she will know it is the right one and she will say "Yes" and the people won't know how she knew it.
Kitty McEntegart,
Fair View,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:05
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The games that are played now are very different from the games that were played long ago. There is a saying, All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, and if we play we will be fit for any work after.
I am going to describe a game that used to be played long ago. It is called 'Finding the Question'. IT is played by sending a girl out of the room, privately beforehand, and telling her, privately beforehand, that she will know the Question that was asked when I ask a question
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:03
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When our ancestors were young the game called 'Pig' was very common.
A certain person draws four rings, one for the Pigs ears, one for his mouth, and another for his eyes, and one vacant for the tail.
There someone blindfolded he is given a pencil to draw the Pig's tail out of the vacant ring. The fun is when the person draws the tail out of the Pig's mouth or ear's or eye's
Nina Muldoon
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:01
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Cluichí
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:00
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He started out on his search, he eventually came upon
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 18:00
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There is a story told of a dog who once did a very noble act, of course it may not be true.
There was a farmer living in Co Louth who had a very wise old dog. It was said that every evening the dog would go the fields nearby to the house and bring home the cows for his master. The dog continued this for a very long time. One evening the dog came with one of the cows missing. The master noticing this was forced by his faithful dog to go and seek his lost animal
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 17:58
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to burn, when she felt the pain she tried to get her finger back from the heat of the candle but it was all in vain, her finger could not be taken away. They sent for a priest and when he came he had to pray for a day and a night before she could get back her hand from the candle, so this learned the three adults a lesson.
Tina Carry,
John St,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 17:57
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to burn, when she elt the pain she tried to get her finger back from the heat of the candle but it was all in vain, her finger could not be taken away. They sent for a priest and when he came he had to pray for a day and a night before she could get back her hand from the candle, so this learned the three adults a lesson.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 17:55
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One night a woman had to milk cows in a field. It was a dark foggy night. When she had
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 17:54
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Twenty years ago there was a house in Co West Meath. One day two men made up their minds to stop in the house. They packed food in baskets and left them in the house during the day. The two men did not come the same road to the house. During the day one of them got sick and could not come. The other man came, not knowing his companion was sick. After a time a ghost came in and he was the same sort of a man as the sick man. The man who gad not been sick thought the ghost was the sick man and he started talking to him. He said to him no ghost came to us yet. In the middle of the night the ghost killed the man.
Patrick Devlin,
30, Glenview,
Drogheda.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:45
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Long ago their lived three adults in a cottage by themselves and like most women are curious they were also curious.
One night they were sitting at the fire and had a candle lighting. The oldest of them said, "I would like to know what the pain of Purgatory is like", so she put her finger over the candle and it began
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:43
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Once upon a time there lived a woman and two sons and they were terrible drunkers and this night they put their mother out. She went down the town and when she reached the church hill she heard the coach coming after her. There were houses being built and she went in thinking the coach would go away, but it stayed there for an hour, and the woman died afterwards.
Veronica O'Brien,
John St,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:41
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since that.
Rose Devlin,
Hacklim,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:40
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bring her plentiness
"An old shoe tied to the carriage or car in which the married couple sit is lucky
The month of May is considered very unlucky and no marriages ever take place in this district then.
B. Callan
Dromin N.S.
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:39
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The bride should never wear her wedding dress before the day of her marriage after it had been finished by the dressmaker.
The bride should always wear at her marriage "Something old and something new
Something borrowed and something blue."
That the green was considered very unlucky. If at the wedding breakfast the bride took her ring and put a piece of the cake through it whoever she would give the piece to to eat would be soon married.
The bride should never see the groom on the morning of her wedding until she's see him in church.
A sunny day was considered very lucky - "Happy is the bride the sun shines on"
" " " corpse " rain falls on"
The best day for getting married is Wednesday.
"Monday for health, Tuesday for weath
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses, Friday for crosses
And Saturday no day at all." (or worst day of all)
A loaf of bread given to the bride when she enters her new home is supposed to
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:34
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1. door = pron. duur
four = " fluur
yellow = " yalla
hen = " hin
were = " war
engine = " ingin
mean = " main
yes = " yis
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:26
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Story
James McDdermott (deceased) tells this story.
A certain man named Larry the lad lived in the Deerpark and one night when coming home from town he had occasion to cross through the field in which stands the "Big stone of Proleek". Well he noticed a crowd in the field and a row of horses. He went over and discovered that they were fairies who gathered round him. They determined to carry Larry with them but the made one condition "If he swore an oath he would find it necessary to walk home. They gathered up the horses and found not one left for Poor Larry. There was a discussion as to what could be done when someone noticed a
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 12:23
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There is part of another lios in this townland and according to Thomas McDermott when the wall was being removed one of the old hand mills for grinding corn was turned up but I could find no trace of where it went.
Coming through Ball[?]acallet and Dulargy is a large cave which Thomas McDermott informed me ran from the mountain across to Proleek.
He said you can notice the run of the cave on a dry season, and that he once saw portion of it which fell in and that it was constructed of stone roofed with large flags.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 20:53
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Marriage Customs
Here are some old marriage customs of this district of Cromartin, Ardee
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 20:51
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The District known as Kilkerly lies to the North West end of the Parish and is roughly four mile in length (E.W.) and two miles in width (N.S.). The Eastern boundary is about one miles and a half from Dundalk Market Square. It comprises the following townlands: Thomastown, Donaghmore, Newtownbalregan, Greyacre, Tankardsrock[?], Kilkerly, Dunbin (2) Upper and Lower, Barnroe, Allardstown, Plaster, Rathmore, The Glebe lands, Belrobin, Ballinure, Magheragh, ,Carrickrobin, Milltown, Philipstown, Baronstown, Conacre, Derryfalone, Carrick-a-stuck
In 1937 part of the townland of Cortial[?] was added to the parish from Knockbridge Parish i.e. the part along the Cortial Road eastwards of the residence of Nicholas Brennan. In exchange for this part of the townland of Dunbin (Lower) was transferred to the Parish of Knockbridge.
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 20:05
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Eviction of Dunne. 1887.
Belpatrick lands are stiff and cold,
They can't be ploughed, they can't be sowed.
They can't be let, they can't be sold.
They're the worst beneath the sun.
'Twas there for years of slavish toil
In vain to coax the stubborn soil
To yieldsome fruit, with all his moil
Lived honest Johnny Dunne.
Although the lands are cold and poor
And all but worthless, to be sure
With might and main he did procure
His crust of honest bread.
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 20:03
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Lord Louth is our local landlord. They have been settled in the district about two hundred years.
He was a fairly good man.
There was one man evicted from part of Spring hill land.
His name was Colman? a man by the name of McMahon got the land after him.
Any people who were evicted went to America and other foreign contries.
The land was not divided into small farms.
The tenants were not punished for little things.
Collected by Katie Melia,
Charlestown,
Ardee.
Got from Mrs Roe,
Charlestown,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 19:59
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The Local Landlord.
The local landlord was called Sir Vere
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 19:57
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22-9-'38. A local stowstorm.
It is about five and a half years since we had the last severe storm. There was a snow blizard which lasted for a whole day.
This storm began earl in the morning and lasted till about six o'clock that evening. The snow was very deep and this made it impossible for cars to travel. All the cars that tried to travel got stuck in it, and a pass way ha to be dug to relieve them. Old houses were knocked down, and boats were lost.
People had to remain indoors for a few days, because the snow was piled against the doors, and it made it impossible for them to come out.
This storm occurred in February 1933.
Mary Callan.
Port.
Dunleer,
Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 19:42
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As round as an apple as flat as a pan one side a woman the other a man?
A Penny.
Light arms and a wooden leg, cannot stand and is often wet?
An umbrella.
What us full and holds more?
A pot of potatoes while you pour water in
Patches upon patches without any stitches riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of trousers?
A Cabbage.
I saw a man on the road one day and he had a hundred patches on his trousers what time was it?
Time to get a new pair.
What tune does everyone want?
Fortune.
What miss does nobody want?
Missfortune.
As I went into the garden I saw a table and in the table there was a drawer, and in the drawer there was a cup, and in the cup there was a sup and that everyone must taste?
Death.
What cure killed the cat?
Curiosity.
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 19:37
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Cures
A Sty. Get ten thorns and bless yourself with them at the top of your eye to cure a sty?
Nettle sting. Rub cappog leaves to you for curing a nettle sting?
Warts. Rub caster oil to you, for curing warts?
Corn. Put iodine on, to cure a corn?
Burn. Get a piece of soap and rub it to you and say St. Lagarns to cure a burn?
Mumps. Wash yourself in holywater and bless yourself three time, to cure the mumps?
Wart. Rub a snail to a wart and then hang it on a bush and while the snail is withering the wart will be withering?
Burns. Cowdung is a cure for burns?
Mumps. To put a donkey's winkers on you and drive yourself out and in nine times of a pig sty to cure the mumps?
Bleeding eyes. Cobwebs on cuts to keep them from bleeding?
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 19:33
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Why is a jail bird like a robin?
Because he has been robin.
Why is a boy with nobody like borrowed money?
Because he is alone (a lone)
As I went out my uncle Davis's gap I met my uncle Thomas I cut his trote I sucked his blood and I left his body easy?
A bottle of Stout.
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 19:29
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Fairy Forts, Mounds and Lios's
There was a lios at Dromin station long ago. It was taken away when the Ardee railway was being made. People used to hear horses galloping, and music playing in it. Lights were often seen on it. There was another lios in Cunningham's field, but it was also taken away. The fairies were seen going from the lios at the Stattion to the lios in Cunningham's field. There is a lios in John Gregory's field along the railway. A black figure is seen going from the railway to the lios. There is a mound at the back of Dromin chapel and at Dunleer school and another at Greenmound.
There is a mound in Clark's field where two giants were buried, Finn Mac Cual, and another giant. One day Michael Clarke started to dig it, and the next morning
senior member (history)
2019-04-19 19:22
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Ardee Road,
Dunleer.
He received the above information from -: Thomas King
Baile na [?]
Iann Iure
senior member (history)
2019-03-10 18:48
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In the parish of Haggardstown near the old graveyard there is a large round hill which used to be covered thickly with furze to it was considered by the old people to be a fairy fort. On one occasion about fifty years ago, a party of men who were coming from Blackrock sat down at the foot of the fort to have a drink from a quart bottle of whiskey which they had with them. Whilst they were sitting down enjoying themselves suddenly lovely music struck up behind them, and as the men were a bit elated with the whiskey they enjoyed the music and offered to give the musicians a drink. One of the men reached a glass of whiskey behind his back and it was taken from him, and the glass was handed back empty. So they remained
senior member (history)
2019-03-10 18:43
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Over 60 years ago a ship named the "Julia", which was laden with general good ran ashore at Blackrock and was dashed to pieces. Some parts of it still remain there.
Mona McArdle,
Rock Rd.,
Blackrock.
Information received from Peter McArdle
Rock Rd.
Blackrock
senior member (history)
2019-03-10 18:41
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In Carlingford Lough in the year 1826 a massive steamer was leaving Warrenpoint Dock for Liverpool. There were fifty passengers on board, some of whom were going to visit their frinds in Liverpool.
A terrible storm arose and the ski[ sank and many lives were lost. Ever since that it is said a Phantom shop appears on the Lough.
In the year 1918 a ship called "The Dundalk", and trading between Dundalk and Liverpool was sunk by a German Submarine, and several members of the crew were lost, which caused sorrow and grief in many homes.
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 17:46
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for holding smoothing ironing, and files of different sorts. Sometimes they would have lace, pins and needles. Although they were fairly poor, they would never accept any alms, except the money for their goods and an odd time they might take cake or some sweet food if it was bestowed on them as a gifted but not as alms. Their caravan was always, nicely painted in green and gold. Bridie [Cleary?] Green Gates Dundalk, Co Louth
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 17:43
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Travelling Folk
Travelling people, very seldom come now. Some years ago, the people used to look forward to their coming, because they used to bring news from the bigger places they had visited. Often they became a pest and the people had to lock their doors on them.
Until a few years ago, a family called the McWades used to come round. They sold large wicker chairs and tables and also straw mats and baskets. They made all these themselves getting the material whole sale, from some place in Cork. They also made little fancy things from wire such as brackets for holding flowers, grills
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 17:38
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Collected from Mrs John Lynch Oldtown
Navan

Her present residence was built in 1840.
Prior to that the family lived in a thatched house which is still used as an outhouse.
Once when the Connaught harvesters were in the place the house went on fire.
While the place was still smoking the monks from [?farnham] came to collect alms.
Mrs Brew gave cheerfully of what she had. The holy man blessed the place and saw that it would never again be destroyed by fire.
senior member (history)
2018-11-27 21:09
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The old people always spit on a Baby's face, and Said God Bless It or God Almighty bless it. This was to protect it from all evil influences. If the blessing was omitted it was considered a [?] offense, and some misfortune was sure to happen to the child.
Parents never liked to leave a baby in a cradle alone. If obliged to leave it for a short time they put the tongs across the cradle.
You should not buy a cradle for the first child and only the least possible amount of clothes should be made for it.
It is customary to take a present when going to see a newly born baby or to put a bit of silver into its hand for luck.
When a child is taken to the church to be baptised it is said you should give the Surname as well as the Christian name to the priest. This prevents the child from seeing the good people when it grows up.
A child's finger nails should not be cut until it is a year old.
senior member (history)
2018-11-27 21:01
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When a baby is born it is not christened until the following day. If it is a wet day or if the people are wealthy the baby is brought to the church in a motor car but if the day is fine the baby is brought to the church by the nurse who walks accompanied by the sponsors.
If the baby cries when the water is poured on its head it will die if not it will live. If a sponsor stands for two children in one year it is believed that one of them will die. Some of times the sponsors ask some request of God for the child and their request is certainly granted.
When the party returns from the church there is usually a feast and the people present drink the baby's health. When the neighbours come in to see the child. They bring presents such as coats caps and dresses. The sponsors put silver into the child's hand.
It is considered a very
senior member (history)
2018-11-27 15:27
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Legend.
Along the Castleblaney road there is a field in which there are a great number of large stones. In connection with this field we are told a wedding party was coming from Carrickmacross & the whole party were under the influence of drink. The party was travelling in a number of side-cars. When the cars were passing a dangerous bend on the road they were overturned into this field & were immediately turned into stones and will remain so till the last trumpet sounds. These stones are still to be seen to this very day.
Told by: - Mrs M. B. Sherry
[?].
Carrickmacross
senior member (history)
2018-11-27 14:41
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When a member of the Byrne family (Tullydonnell) is about to die a hare comes to the house. McCabes (Mount Doyle) are forewarned by the arrival of a pigeon.
You should not clean out a stable after sunset.
You should not walk across a plough except you were a ploughman.
When you cease working in the evening you should never leave the plough facing north.
You should never hit a beast with a branch of elder.
If you are going on a journey & forgot anything, you must not return for it.
senior member (history)
2018-11-27 14:35
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Death Omens
The Banshee is still believed in. She is supposed to herald the death of members of the Harmon family and other families connected with it - Heaney, Rogers, Osborne.
senior member (history)
2018-11-27 14:33
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There were night schools in this district. Schools were sometimes out door and sometimes in door. Writing was done on slates with slate pencils. Every child would pay a penny, or twopence, or turf. The teachers were not strangers. Night school took place in the farmers houses. There was a hedge school in Stabannon.
There was no blackboard used, when the children were inside they sat round a table.
senior member (history)
2018-09-19 00:32
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Beliefs: Descendants of a mermaid have shiny eyes
Finding a horse shoe is considered lucky: the more nails in it, the better.
If you spill salt you can avert the bad luck by throwing a pinch on the fire.
A lone bush is the abode of the fairies and should not be touched.
A man going to a fair to sell cattle meeting a red-haired woman, will sell nothing that day.
A Whitsuntide child is considered unlucky. He invariably hits any person or thing he fired at. A wound caused by a blow from such a person was difficult to heal.
Marriage in May is Taboo.
To ensure good luck a loaf of bread is broke over the head of a bride on the door-step of her new home.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 23:54
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Care of Feet
The people in former times were twenty one when they began to wear boots of any kind. The children don't go bare footed the whole year round but for two or three months in Summer. There are six men in my district who repair boots. There are more shoemakers now than in former times. Clogs are worn still in this district. George Brennan and Joe McCabe wore clogs when they were at school in Dunleer. Clogs are made in Dundalk still.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 23:50
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The Famine Times
The Famine so it was called happened in 1847 it was the result of the failure of the potatoes which the people of Ireland existed on, at that time. It lasted for three years they were 1847, 1848, 1849. It was said the year before then, the potatoes were a very heavy crop. The people though very little of them. In 1847 the spuds went black and the people dug the fields three times looking for some little ones that could be eaten. There was a great scarcity of flour, and Indian meal, and it cost a half-crown a stone. It had to be used for making bread. During that time, there was a big boiler put up at Dundalk and the people boiled Indian meal in it. All the people came to the boiled with a spoon and the people who owned it gave them their spoonful and they would go home.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 23:38
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before setting out on their journey again. Most of them travel on foot but some of them travel on donkey carts and in caravans. Very few of them travel in groops now but you will see an odd groop now and then. In this district the travelling folk are well known. The best known of them are, Charley Simpson Pat Connelly and the famlies of Gavans and Powers.
Bands of tinkers used to visit this district on patron days some years ago but that custom has died out. They used bring important news from all over the country and the local people used gather around them to hear it.
Teresa Heavey.
Dunanny.
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 23:35
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1- 3- '38.
The travelling folk.
Some of the old travellers still call to our home. Those same people have done so for many years. Some of them are really very poor other s are getting on fairly well. The poorer of these tale alms of money, food and clothes. Other generally wish to take only ( only) money alms.
The richer of those travellers sometimes sell small articles such as prayer books, rosary beads, needles, pins, studs, laces, and a lot of other little things and in this district they do very good trade. They buy their supplies in big towns where they get them at a cheap rate.
The people who need charity are always welcome in this district. In some places these people lodge, but no longer than one night. When people give them lodgings they allow them to sleep by the kitchen fire or in the barn. Although they have food with them they are generally given a good meal
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 23:26
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List of successive managers or Parish Priests in Parish of Dunleer
1715 - 1722 ... Fr P. Lawlor
1722 - 1766 ... Fr. L. Warren
1766 - 1772 ... Fr. L. Taaffe
1772 - 1779 ... Fr. J. Wall
1797 - 1823 ... Fr. J. Healy
1823 - 1831 ... Fr. Bannan
1832 - 1858 ... Fr. Magee
1858 - 1864 ... Fr. Pentony
1865 - 1872 ... Fr. J. Dooley
1872 - 1897 ... Canon Magee
1897 - 1937 ... Fr. J. Byrne
1937 - ------- ... Fr. L. Murray
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 23:18
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Local Marriage Customs
1. The people in olden times had different ways for getting married than now-a-days.
2. When a person would be getting married in olden times, it was a custom to go in a jaunt-car on their honey-moon. An old shoe used to be tied behind the car, this they say was for uck. But at present they go on motor-gars. There are generally blue and white ribbons tied in front of the car.
3. At present in Co. Louth when a person is married when they are coming out of the chapel door people throw confette and sometimes rice on the bride and bride-groom.
4. There is a cake sometimes in the church and the priest usually cuts it.
Paddy Molloy
Castletown
Dunleer
Co. Louth
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 23:17
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Local Marriage Customs
1. The people in olden times had different ways for getting married than now-a-days.
2. When a person would be getting married in olden times, it was a custom to go in a jaunt-car on their honey-moon. An old shoe used to be tied behind the car, this they say was for uck. But at present they go on motor-gars. There are generally blue and white ribbons tied in front of the car.
3. At present in Co. Louth when a person is married when they are coming out of the chapel door people throw confette and sometimes rice on the bride and bride-groom.
4. There is a cake sometimes in the church and the priest usually cuts it.
Paddy Molloy
Casteltown
Dunleer
Co. Louth
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:55
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rejected
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The "bull" is the name given to a group of 14 bright stars. When the "bull" is on its legs it is a sign of bad weather.
The "dog" is a group of stars which resemble a dog.
The "seven sisters" are seven bright stars seen in the southern sky.
The "Golden Rod is formed by three bright stars seen in the east
The "Soldiers Glove" is a group of stars resembling a glove. It is seen in the Northern skies.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:51
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Most of the marriage long ago were what were called run-away marriage. The girl would leave her home a certain evening + stay the night at the house of a friend or relation. Next day she went home to get permission to be married. By staying the night away she made sure of getting permission. It would never be refused. They parents could not say “no”. Then she would be married and the whole party would go for a drive through the country. The wedding did not as a rule take place in the morning but later in the day. The visitors would go home for dinner + come back after it. The barn would be cleaned by them and stools put round the walls. There would be plenty of beer + bread + butter. They danced + sang all night.
When Nick McOnillans great great grandfather was getting married he rode across the fields from Cartown, Ballymakenny to Collon (8 miles away) on horseback. When the marriage was over he took his bride in front of him on the saddle and rode home.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:50
approved
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awaiting decision
Famine Evictions :- After the famine and during it men and women were maintained by breaking stones for the County authorities. The food was their only wages and it consisted of Indian mash porridge twice daily [bribed?] on the roadside. Galroostown means the "town of the red headed foreigner namely the Names. The "Clough" - a corruption of the word Shieve is also included in the townland.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:50
approved
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awaiting decision
Pishouges :- When there is a new calf in the farm there is a horse
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:49
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awaiting decision
Famine Evictions :- After the famine and during it men and women were maintained by breaking stones for the County authorities. The food was their only wages and it consisted of Indian mash porridge twice daily [bribed?] on the roadside. [Gahroostown??] means the "town of the red haided foreigner namely the Names. The "Clough" - a corruption of the word Shieve is also included in the townland.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:43
approved
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awaiting decision
In Drumshallon there is a tombstone bearing the names of various members of a family called Eggleton. The earliest date is 1760.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:42
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awaiting decision
Religion - Nuns were supposed to have lived in Nunneryland near Termonfeckin. Oliver Plunkett sought refuge in Cartown House. Daniel O' Connell stayed in time at Walshestown House which then owned by Markeys but is now in the possession of Dolans.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:40
approved
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awaiting decision
better. The ceremony is quickly gone through. The piercing wail of the infant is a source of delight to the old woman who is waiting for her charge. That cry as the waters of Baptism flowed over its tiny head was a proof that the waters had touched the skin and that the child was baptised right.
The common belief that those whose Baptism was defective were under the 'good-people's' power still and that they saw the 'good people'.
Many stories are told of those who were in the fairies and went with them at night. Hence, the feeling of relief that the child cried - How the old woman told the tale afterwards and would invariably emphasise the fact that it was a good strong cry. The cry was always referred to by anybody in the church at the time. They should see the baby even though it belonged to strangers. The verdict was "A fine strong child God bless him, did I hear his strong cry."
Along the road home - when nearing the house the neighbours rush out to see the young Christian
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:34
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old days the common cart was used. The father and male sponsor sat or one on each setlock while an old woman - very often the grandmother, sat in the centre of the car - the usual bag of hay for a cushion and innumerable shawls and wraps about her and the child. By her side the godmother sat and thus they jogged along. A bottle of milk and water is taken ans some sugar, to feed the baby - the journey is long; in some cases 8 miles to the parish church and perhaps the priest would be late too. The Baptisms were done at 12 oclock on certain days and many a baby born at 6 or 7 oclock in the morning was baptised that day and had to do the long journey. The parents were never happy until that all important ceremony was over.
The Priest was there and so was the Clerk. The latter asked the old woman for "linen and tow" and after some fumbling it was produced. Today the sponsors would look askance if asked for "tow". It would be 'Greek' to them - they understand "cotton-wool"
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 22:28
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awaiting decision
were asked to undertake the honour or if Uncle Mick wasn't married he and a maternal Aunt would be called on. Often in bygone days according to the records only one sponsor - a woman - was present. That custom prevails today (if the officiating clergyman is known to permit it) and occasionally that clergyman will permit of the entering of a second name as sponsor in the records although the woman only is present. This second sponsor is invariably an uncle (perhaps in a foreign land) from whom the child gets his name. (That uncle may be a rich man in America & it is nice to be able to tell him that little Líamín is called after him and that he is Líamín's godfather).
(In the case of marriages I noted also that prior to 1870 the names of two male witness to the marriage were always entered into the Records.)
Having chosen the sponsors and settled on the name the child is taken to the church - in the
senior member (history)
2018-04-30 14:25
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father to perpetuate the family name. A com cliamain of my own who has five daughters and only one son refused to send that son to college although he was a very intelligent boy, because, the father said to me, "I'd have no one for the place." He did not recognise a daughter as a suitable person to inherit the old holding - the name would die.
The father's duties are not yet completed. He must invite a man and a woman to act as sponsers Here also there are certain recognised customs, old and new.
The very old ones laid down that the father's family had the sole right to sponser the first child either his father and mother if alive and able or the father and sister or brother and sister [?] while for the second child the mothers family have the right. For the other children both families were mixed according to the name of the child. e.g. the fifth child (Michael) named after his paternal uncle - that uncle and his wife
senior member (history)
2018-04-21 20:25
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bribe to poor grandmother, too. She will surely care and nurse the young chap all the better when ha has the old man's name. Now-a-days and for the past 30 years almost, since the Old Age Pension Act was passed the name - the old man's name has been the happy medium of extracting the extra pound (or two) from the old people. This old custom will never die I venture to say.
If a parent (the father) departs from the fixed code of rules cited above he is looked upon as being a queer man or a man who does not like his people-in-law.
Looking through Records of Baptisms for the past hundred years I was struck by the fact that only in a few isolated cases did the children get a second Christian name until about thirty years ago. Since then the fine custom has spread and today there is scarcely a child baptised who has not a second name.
Before departing from the question of names - I give a personal experience of the desire of a
senior member (history)
2018-04-21 20:20
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is, where a daughter has been assigned the land and the husband has come in, the first male child takes the maternal grandfather's name and similarly the first daughter, - the maternal grandmother's name. One might well ask "What's in a name?" but the old people knew the name was important and caused much friction and trouble if the customs were altered. The family name or the name of the old man who has handed over his property to his son or daughter must be renewed at the first opportunity. It often paid, too.
Take the case of an old man who had this only daughter or perhaps two daughters - one of whom has married years before. When the first daughter was already 'done for' (settled in life) the dowry the [cliamain isuac] has is now nestling in the Bank in the old man's name. The cliamain iszeac has his eye on it and what better incentive is there than to name his son 'after' the old man - there being no guarantee of a second male issue? It is a
senior member (history)
2018-04-16 15:54
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There is also an unwritten law as far a s the naming of the child goes i.e. the first boy is to be called the same name as his paternal grandfather, the first girl that of his paternal grandmother, the second son and the second daughter get their maternal grandfather's and grandmother's names respectively. There are variations occasionally but death in the father's or mother's family are the only legitimate excuses for such varying. If the father's brother Paddy died immediately prior to the birth, the father usually departs from the recognised rule and may name his child Paddy. Similarly with the mother's family. If the grandfather and father have the same name John (supposing), and if both are living under the same roof (even in two parts of the house) the male child will not be named John - and the name John will not be given while the grandfather is alive - or, of course, the father. The saying is "We won't have three Johns in the house. In cases where there is a [cliamoin iszeac?] - that
senior member (history)
2018-04-13 19:12
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4. If you look at the baby you must not say "God bless him" until he is baptised. You may say "he is a fine child Baptism to him" or as was said ["baisze lers"]
5. Whether the child is a son or a daughter you are expected to tell who he or she is like. But if it is the first child you must say "He is the dead spit of his father" or "she is like her father" whether you believe your own statement or not. This was and is the unwritten law.
The old people believed that by stating the fact that this first child was like the father they had succeeded in preventing jealousy on the part of the father, moreover if the young mother was known to have had any love-affairs in her maiden days, or if she was amorous disposition.
The old people's belief in the supernatural led them to think that this unbaptised mite was no child of God's while in the state of original sin and that God's blessing should not be invoked.
senior member (history)
2018-04-13 18:45
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but in such a half-hearted manner that there was no mistaking the disappointment - the saying was (and is) "Well! Thank God that she's alright". In the neighbourhood the news quickly spread and one woman could be heard shouting to another 'a fine stump of a son' or 'only a daughter'. Such was the eagerness of people to "Keep the place with the name" The neighbours gathered to enquire (by the way!) how 'they were' "Ye have great news thanks be to God" and so on. The young mother mist not be disturbed so things are kept as quiet as possible. From the midwife has to leave the room she makes sure that there is someone left with the patient - The 'good people' are about and the poor mother is in danger from them.
1. The mother must not be left alone
2. She must not be allowed to sleep (the midwife or some other women kept talking to her and they kept her awake for three days)
3. The baby is kept apart in the room
senior member (history)
2018-04-13 18:39
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Christenings
As at the wedding the christening was another occasion for rejoicing and merrymaking.
The young wife's mother was sent for or of she was dead or incapacitated an elder sister was summoned. The husband's people no matter how friendly they were with the wife would not hold themselves responsible. The mother arrived and on her devolved all responsibility for her daughter's welfare. She had the ordering of the "Midwife". The midwife was an unqualified person but she was very 'Knowing'. In this district there were two such women. Mrs Judy Sheehan and Mrs Peig Collins both of Scrahan. Peig was known as [Peig a Coic] - she was a bold brazen and quick-tempered woman but a very successful midwife. There was no question of a doctor and when a doctor was summoned among the fairly well-to-do in those days people threw up their heads - there was no hope. Often, indeed, in serious cases the priest was summoned before the doctor.
After the birth the glad news was soon circulated - if a son, there was general rejoicing and the father received hearty congratulations - if the 'weeney' one was a daughter - well 'I wish you joy' would be heard
senior member (history)
2018-04-02 13:56
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Birth - Lore Contd.
It (ins) isn;t for the mother to buy a new pram for her first born.
If a child comes into a house while food is being cooked (especially meat) the child should get a morsel of the food (lest he would long for it.)
It is supposed to be unlucky for the expectant mother to provide the clothes for the first baby, or even to see them. These should be provided by someone else and not seen by the Mother until they be required to dress the baby.
If a person is asked to become sponsor for a child it is unlucky to refuse.
If a girl is asked to stand sponsor for a girl first her match will be broken.
senior member (history)
2018-04-02 13:53
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Birth - Lore Contd.
It is supposed to be lucky to have two sponsors of the same name to stand for the child.
It is not right to stand for two children in the same year.
If a child is taken out at night (after sunset) A little piece of burnt coal, apinch of salt and holy water, tied in a corner of the child's clothes - saves child being taken by the fairies.
When a child is being baptised, it is lucky if the child cries, when the Holy Water is poured on its head. - If he does not cry - he will not have a long life.
It isn't lucky to buy a New Cradle for the first child. Get the loan of an old cradle.
senior member (history)
2018-04-02 13:50
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Birth - Lore
Sunday - lucky day.
Monday's Child is fair of face.
Tuesday's Child is full of grace.
Wednesday's Child is loving and forgiving
Thursday's Child has to work for his living
Friday's Child is full of woe.
Saturday's Child has far to go.
The child born on the Sabbath day is bonny, blithe, and gay.
It is supposed to be unlucky to leave a baby's clothes out on the line at night
The day of the christening they should be back from the Church before night fall.
senior member (history)
2018-03-19 13:07
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There are the ruins of a Church in Dromin graveyard.
There are about twelve trees growing in it.
It contains some very old tombstones. The following are some of them: Rev. John Wall, died on 1st April 1797. Elizabeth Taaffe, died 20th May 1776. Andrew Devin, died the 28th October 1797. Alice McCulogh, 4th, July 1795, and Thomas King 22nd June 1796.
There are about ten wooden crosses, but they are not ornamented.
There are a few people buried within the ruins. One is Rev Laurence Warren, who was parish priest of Dunleer, for 44 years, and died in the year 1750. The writing on that stone is very clear as it is cut in half an inch.
senior member (history)
2018-03-19 13:02
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Dromin Graveyard
Dromin graveyard square in shape, sloped towards the South.
senior member (history)
2018-02-22 14:11
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A Bean-side
"This is a true story it happened to my own Sister about fifty years ago at Old Hill in the Parish of St. Mary's Drogheda.
"The Lord have mercy on my Mother and Sister, and give them the peace and glory of Heaven, ans all the old people that is gone. I was at this time working in Belfast. I was told it when I came home.
"People called Mintoes lived next door to us, and a Banshee used to follow
senior member (history)
2018-02-17 21:00
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on the job and did not do it and every night from that [?] the stones were being fired in at the door of their house. At the months [mind?] the stones were being fired in too.
Eventually things got so bad that they sold the bit of ground and the house and cleared away to America. The house was knocked to the ground afterwards. On the top of Shanmullagh there are still a few stones to mark the place where the house stood.
senior member (history)
2018-02-17 20:56
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A man named Matthews , a native of Shanmullagh, Dundalk was a carter on the road. He was found dead on the road one night at a place called Ballyrush & when he was taken home they could not recognise him but, for one little mark on his jaw. The night before Hollow Eve after he was killed he came to the house at the dead of night and told them to take the [?] that were on the horse and put them round his neck the following night and that he would be on the third horse on right hand side coming down the hill on the road coming from Killa[?]y and that he would be back alive with them for four yrs, and that to do this all they would lose would be the foremost joints of their wee fingers. They "cowed"
senior member (history)
2018-02-16 15:21
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There is an ancient quarry three miles outside Dundalk. It is over a hundred feet deep and it contains water. The name of the owner was Captain Bell.
There was a girl living near
senior member (history)
2018-02-16 14:56
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Near Dundalk is an old ruin at Castletown where Cuchulainn was bron. After being idle a long time, the people began to explore it and saw a wise old rat running about. They saw him go into the ruins, carry out the full of his mouth of gold coins, leave them on the ground and sleep beside them. The people thought it a pity to lose the money and one day the soldiers took courage to watch the proceedings and stole the money. They got home, slept together and kept a great wolfhound in their bedroom. Next night started a great scraping at their door and soon at their window. The rat managed to get through the window and was attacked by the dog. A dreadful howling started up, the two men growing weak with fear. No matter how much the dog followed the rat, he could never touch him and at last the rat cleaned out the window and was never seen any more, and the two brave soldiers were very rich ever after.
A Nic Aonguis
senior member (history)
2018-02-16 14:47
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Our Lady's Well Dundalk.
is visited yearly on 13th August.
The well rises up at midnight. One of the priests recites the Rosary. Great numbers of people remain up all night making the station.
The station consists of nine rounds performed round the well. And the rosary is performed at every round.
There is a beautiful statue of Our Lady erected over the well and it is nicely decorated with flowers for the feast.
Various cures are reported from the Pilgrimage.
Everyone visiting the well brings home a little bottle of water to their friends at home.
senior member (history)
2018-02-16 14:45
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for the beautiful Shrine they had of St Brigid and how nicely it was kept.
senior member (history)
2017-12-08 00:08
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38
Local Happenings
One of the greatest disasters in this district occured some time about the years 1854 or 1855. During a storm a vessel was driven ashore in Dundalk Bay close to Blackrock. The crew took to the rigging of the ship. Several attempts were made to rescue them, and altohugh some of the crew were saved one of those attempts ended in loss of the lives of some of the rescuers. I believe that five or six of those brave men were drowned.
There is a monument erected by the people of the town opposite St. Patrick's Church to their memory. Their leader Captain Kelly is buried in the old disused Seatown Cemetry. It was said by people at the time that Captain
senior member (history)
2017-12-08 00:04
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ago, that there was another Blackbird to be seen with white parts also in Co Kildare.
Josie Mc Keown,
The "Square",
Blacrock,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mr Ed Mc Keown,
The "Square",
Blackrock,
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2017-12-08 00:02
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green eggs and is called the King of all song birds.
The Blackbirds build their nests the same way, but have a layer of withered grass over the clay; they lay five eggs of a very pale green speckled with dark spots.
When a storm is coming the Starlings cluster together and make a great noise chattering. In heavy wind the Crow flies very low to the ground so it is said it is easier to fly than higher up. The Cock Blackbird has a very dark plumage and a yellow beak. By a freak of nature sometimes they are seen with white parts through them. About five or six years ago there was a Blackbird seen several times on the Avenue Road Dundalk with a white head and neck and a yellow beak. I saw in the daily paper a few were
senior member (history)
2017-12-06 13:28
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29
pasted to the walls and lined inside with withered grass. The Swallows leave about the end of September for South Africa. On their flight home hundreds of them often alight on the decks of ships and are fed by the crew.
One species of the Swallow called the "Sandmartin" does not leave the country but makes a burrow in sand banks and remains there all Winter in a state of torpidity until the Spring of the year.
The Corncrake builds its nest in high grass or cornfields. On a nice Summer's evening one can hear the "Crake Crake". It is said that it lays up to a dozen of eggs.
The Blackbird's and Thrushe's generally start singing in March, they build their nests in hedges. The Thrushe's nest is made with withered grass and lined with clay, she lays four light
senior member (history)
2017-12-06 13:12
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28
Bird Lore.
The three principal migratory birds are the Swallow, the Cuckoo, and the Corn[?] which arrive about the end of April or the first week of May. The Cuckoo never builds a nest but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds and lays one egg in each nest. When the young birds are hatched the young Cuckoo, being stronger than the rest, shuffles them out of the nest on to the ground where they die of the cold. When the young Cuckoo grows and is ready to fly it takes about four or five little birds to [fly?] about with him and to feed him until he is able to provide for himself.
The old Cuckoo's generally leave about the middle of July when the corn begins to shoot.
The Swallows generally build their nests in stables and old barns. The nests are made of tough clay
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 13:44
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Bellurgan
I. On the grounds stands the remains of a pound into which all the cattle seized for rent [?] were driven. It is a monument of the land struggle.
Also in the field beside the orchard stands the remains of an old castle, which is said to have sheltered some locals in the 1798 period.
Through the park in former days a road lead from the Deerpark to what is still called the "old Road" in Bellurgan". Alongside this road stands the remains of one of the old lime kilns which were a common feature all over the district.
II. At the foot of the hill called "The mount" there is an artificial lake in which some fish are found. Alongside of this lakes cranes build in the trees of fir. This is the only place in the district where these birds are known to build
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 15:40
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32
Stories
They did not impress the soldier very much and he said "if he had money to go back to Dublin he would not trouble about the lands. Well Tipping being a man of business said "I have five pounds and this horse so "if you will tkae them in exchange for the deeds from Cromwell I will give them to you."
The soldier readily did so and so Mr Tipping became a landlord of Bellurgan and the surrounding district. (Easy way of getting [?]).
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 15:36
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Thomas [McGeown?] of the Deerpark told me this story about the elections in old days. Mr Tipping supported the unionist candidate and sent word to his tenants to vote for him. (These were the days of open voting)
Well the day came on and [?] Mc[?] and a few others voted against the lord of the soil. Well next day they got word to clear out and he was evicted from a holding at Ballymascanlon called Roe's field. This field is still in the possession of the Tipping family.
The Tipping family boast they are not planters but purchasers.
This story is told about that. Cromwell made a gift of the estate to one of his soldiers, who was coming to see it along the opposite shore and he met an ancestor of Tipping on the road who was selling milk. He asked this milkman did he know where "Bellurgan" was. He answered that he did and showed him the mountain on the opposite shore
senior member (history)
2017-02-08 15:29
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Stories
when he examined it he found no traces of the gate being injured. He also said he heard the noise in the yard.
(N.B. The lady of this mansion once gambled the carriage and estate in a game of cards).
senior member (history)
2017-02-08 15:28
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Another story is that when any deaths or other circumstances affecting the family is about to take place a coach is driven up the avenue leading to the mansion and that blacksmith is heard in the yard as if hammering with a sledge on a heavy anvil.
Michael Hanlon of Bellurgan told me he heard the coach coming up the avenue one night and he hid in the bushes. It seemed as if it when completely through a gate but
senior member (history)
2017-02-08 15:19
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Stories
the [Tipping?] family were notorious gamblers. Well on a particular night there was a great dinner in the mansion and one member of the company was about. After a time he apparently came in and the company commenced card playing. One card dropped on the ground and a member of the party stooped to pick it up. In doing so he noticed the "Cloven Hoof of the latest visitor". He jumped up and made for the door, all others followed his example upsetting chairs in the room. The visitor remained and the owner of the mansion sent for the Protestant clergyman to remove him. He failed to do so and the Priest was sent for who succeeded in removing this unwelcome visitor. However it is said that to this day "the room in question" is locked up leaving chairs and all other articles upset as they were on the night of the party.
senior member (history)
2017-01-15 15:43
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Mr James O'Hare of the Deerpark tells the following stories about Bellurgan Park once the residence of Drumgoole family until the time of Cromwell.
Along Bellurgan road a fine figure of a man is frequently seen. He is dressed in black but the remarkable thing about the spirit it is headless.
He also says that in forms [?]
senior member (history)
2017-01-15 15:37
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Miss Mary McGailey of Annaverna tells this story.
A resident of Annaverna was going down the road towards Ravensdale when he heard great noise behind him. On looking round he saw a number of fairies carrying a coffin followed a crowd. He hid till they passed round. When he went home he became suddenly ill and was dead the next day.
senior member (history)
2017-01-15 15:29
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Stories
quickly the car did the same, and when they went slowly the car after them did the same again. Well after some time the priest got down from the car and read some prayers, then he came back to his seat and there was no further trouble. This terrified Mr Moore, so much that when he went later to see a local doctor who did not return from another patient till late at night, he sat up in the doctor's kitchen till daylight and then returned home to his anxious friends.
senior member (history)
2017-01-15 01:11
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Stories
She tells a few stories also about Dromad road.
Her first one is about a man who was often seen on the road opposite the middle gate lodge of Ravensdale Park. This man always carried a bit of rope twisted upon his arm. He made as if he were going up the hills but when he reached a small stream he could never pass over it.
The second one is about an old man named Mc[Gaily?] of Feede who was fond of drink.
This particular night as usual he went to the pub at Jonesboro. A neighbour came in saying he was seen lying on the road. His family put the horse in the cart to bring him home, but when the reached Jordan's gate (the present nursery) something appeared on the road and the horse would not move.
All attempts at [?] were useless till they covered the horse's head, and then about a mile farther on the the found their father lying drunk and he would probably be dead next morning.
The belief is that some evil spirit wished to prevent them from saving him.
A third story is about Mr Moore, his duty was to drive the local priest. Well they were out late one night and all went well till they came to Dromad road and then it seemed as if a car was following them. When they went
senior member (history)
2017-01-13 18:12
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Local Marriages

There were many old marriage customs long ago. One of the customs was the straw boys. They would come to the house on the morning of the marriage they would get their breakfast there and some money also. They were dressed up with straw and when they would come out of the Chapel the straw boys would throw ashes at the bride and bridegroom. This was an old custom in the district of Ardee.
Moira Woods,
Stickillen,
Ardee,
Co. Louth.
Told by :- Sean Woods
Stickillen
Ardee
Co. Louth
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 19:40
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Freets:- especially is she is barefooted.
If you want to keep great with the fairies do not cut down the gentle bushes and don't build your house on their pads
Food long ago:- About fifty years ago the people had eaten meal porridge for their breakfast in the morning, potatoes for dinner and supper. They made oaten meal bread and hardened to the fire and that is what the children got to school. They took no tea that time but took milk instead.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 19:00
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Wakes - Clay pipes and tobacco.
Razor dead man shaved with always given to man who shaves him.
Any tobacco left is thrown out - considered unlucky to keep it.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 18:57
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Cromwell and this district
People often wonder how it happens that the land about this district is so un-evenly divided. There are several aristocrats in the neighbourhood each of them owning hundreds of acres of land and immense mansions to live in while the majority of the people do not possess an inch of the sod.
These landless people were glad to get menial jobs and poor wages from the Landlords whose ancestors had formerly come from England and were given large tracts of Irish land by Oliver Cromwell. Most of them had turned against their religion and their king and had taken sides with Cromwell during the civil war and as a reward for their services they were planted here in Ireland while their rightful owners were driven into the bogs.
Collected by Colman O Brien,
Tallanstown,
Ardee
Got from Mrs O Brien,
Tallanstown,
Ardee.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 18:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An old cure for Ring-worm
This is a cure the old people had for ring-worm. They got some straw and soot and placed it on a plate. The straw was lighted and burnt into ashes. This they put on every spot of ring-worm. This cured many people in anchient times.
Told by Mrs O' Brien,
Old Abbey,
Drogheda.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 15:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Plagues and Epidemics
There came a famine on the potatoes in 1847. About one hundred years ago there came a disease on the people called the Cholera. It swept the families in millions. Small Pox came over the (body) bodies of the people about a century ago and the eyes fell out of their heads.
Then their came the Pox Mark, it broke out over the bodies of the people, and they suffered desperately. Own Dooley of Drumcamill gave me that information.
Eveline Byrne,
Channonrock.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 15:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The lime Kiln
There is a great lime kiln in Sheephouse and most of the men who worked in this lime kiln are now dead. There is no lime made in it now. Some of the stone that is in St Peter's Church was got in this quarry. ^It was very good lime and very white. The stone was also used for making head stones.
Veronica Browne
Sheephouse
Drogheda.
The above was got from :-
Mr. J. Mc Grane
Sheephouse
Drogheda
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 15:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pipe Making in Drogheda
There was a family named Cahill living in the Potato Market in Drogheda who used to make clay pipes. When they had the pipe clay shaped into pipes they put them out on trays in the sun to harden. You would get a dozen pipes for three pence.
Some old men say they were the best pipes they ever smoked tobacco out of. There are no clay pipes to be made nowadays.
Mary Hurley
22 Georges Street
Mr's Hoey (42)
Gravel Walk
Drogheda
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Clothes made locally.
There is one dressmaker in the district whose name is Mrs; Reilly. The travels from house to house.
She uses all kinds of cloth. She uses the scissors, the needle, the thimble, the machine and the thread.
John Daly.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Marriage Customs
Marriages take place throughout the year except in Lent, Advent & the month of May.
Wednesday is considered the most lucky day. Matches are not made in the district. Up to fifty years ago it was customary to take the intended bride from her father's house and leave her in the house of a friendly neighbour for a day or two until the marriage took place.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
144

Old Crafts

Long years ago there were monks in Montgomery woods in Beaulieu Drogheda, who did their own spinning and weaving and dyed the goods a dark brown.
They lived in the darkest part of the wood beside a narrow little stream. They used the stream to work the little spinning mill.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
162
Old Crafts.
Rush and mould candles were made.
Ploughs and gates were made by John Callaghan, Mount Doyle
Nails were made by a man named Mac Clelland who lived beside the school.
Thatching was done by several men in the district, the thatched being tied by a cord or twine.
Lime was burned in a kiln at Annagassan.
Salmon are fished on the rivers Dee and Glyde with nets. Nets four hundred yards long are used in fishing salmon in the bay.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
went in to feed the dogs, as usual.
Later on in the day, the only things that were got of him were his boot, and his clothes. The dogs attacked him, and ate his whole body.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
34.
About sixty years ago, the only bellows maker in Drogheda, was a man called Myles Traynor, who lived at the top of Stockwell Street. He made them and sold them, also repaired them.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:37
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rejected
awaiting decision
35.
Farriers - old blacksmiths, who were skilled in the cure of horses and in horse medicine.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:36
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rejected
awaiting decision
36.
In Drogheda, horses used be bled in the Spring-time, to cool them down.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:36
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rejected
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37
About sixty years ago, [Code's] shop in Shop St. used sell paper collars which were only 1/2d each, and were usually worn by boys and men.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:35
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rejected
awaiting decision
38
Long ago, coal vessels, (masted) sold coal for £1 for 2 tons. If any person got forty
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:33
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rejected
awaiting decision
55.
Horses used be bled in Spring to cool them down.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:33
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rejected
awaiting decision
54.
Bellows' Making
Myles Traynor was the only bellow's maker in Drogheda. He made and sold them in a house in Stockwell St. Drogheda. He exhibited his bellows in a huge bay window which reached from the eave to the ground.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 14:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
53
Various old pictures, with a "hint or a moral" on them used be hung up in public houses such as-
"Old Trust - Bad Pay Killed You."
A picture of an old lady with a pint of stout in her hand, and an old man with his hand in his trousers pocket.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 15:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A prayer to stop Blood
Holy is the name of He who shed his pure blood good is the thing that come out of it. blood and wine and pure water In the name of the Father stop the blood holy saints come to on keep Holy spirit stop the blood coming so strong
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 15:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7. 7. 1938
Cure for a Burn
Put his spittle on the burn and say Holy Saint Lawrence I am burnt Holy St Lawrence I am burnt and you are to say it three times.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 15:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About a mile from Dundalk on the Ardee Road there is a place called Cambricville where there was a substance called Cambric made about 120 years ago. It has not been made since 1824
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 15:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pin Factory
In Dundalk on the sire which is occupied by Anne St. Barracks there was once a pin factory but it was closed in 1780.
Told by:- Mrs. Jane Copas (80)
61 Dublin St.,
Dundalk.
Oliver Crossan
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 15:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At a place called Fane Valley there is a (man) thatcher called Paddy Biggs and although
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 15:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Here is a rhyme concerning marriages.
Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth.
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
And Saturday no day at all.
Told by :- Mrs. Cooney,
16 Park Avenue,
Dundalk.
John Cooney.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Stories
Traditions . . Accounts given by Mrs McNamee. Annaverna (18 yrs)
A friend of hers going on a visit to a neighbours house heard great laughter come down the mountain road. Thinking it was some pilgrimage to Faughart he hid behind a fence and to his great surprise he beheld a crowd of fairies coming down the road. He watched closely and he saw that they were all small men and he had no knowledge of any person whom they were like
She also said that a Mrs McGailey of the same townland was sick. Some old woman came to the door and told the man on no account to leave the house as the fairies were coming round. The woman becoming worse required a doctor but the husband would not leave the house.
A neighbour went instead and after the doctor's visit the sick woman recovered somewhat. Then the husband was asked to go home with the doctor but still refused.
When the neighbours left the house with the doctor there was a great noise in the street and it seemed as if cows in the byre were being killed but still the man would not go out. Well when the neighbours returned they went to the cow house and found the cows as usual chewing their cud. The common belief is that if the man went out the fairies would come in and snatch up the sick woman after substituting another miserable one in her place
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 13:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Drumnacarra
This is a small townland adjoining Drumnasilla. The only ancient monument here is a rath with a cave in Mrs. Murphy's field. Her late husband had such a superstition about this rath that when a few stones were removed from it by his family he insisted on them being put back.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 13:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Drumnasilla
This means the sally-ridge but there is no traces of these trees in it at present.
It has [live?] fine raths. The one beside Mrs Dunnes house id a good specimen with a cave in the centre. Mrs Dunne's son told me he once entered it with a candle and that is built of sandstone roofed with flags. When you are a short distance there are side entrances containing little chambers but he was afraid to explore it to any considerable distance. Mrs Dunne and family have a great dislike to allowing anyone to interfere with the cave.
In Mr. Fagan's field a rath is also to be seen. this was explored some time ago but no trace of urns of bones was found. These also dislike entering into the cave.
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 23:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14
Local Heroes
One of the Local leaders of the United Irishmen rebellion of 1798 was named James Kelly of Blackrock Dundalk known by the nicknames of "Sledger Kelly" on account of his enormous size and strength. He never met his equal as a boxer. There was a very powerful man living in Co Tipperary, a tinsmith by trade and a powerful boxer. Having heard of Sledger Kelly he came from Tipperary to challenge him. When he came as far as Lurgangreen South of Blackrock, he made enquiries where the Sledger Kelly was. He happened to be in a tavern where the mail coaches used to stop so he was introduced to him. The tinsmith challenged him to box but Kelly soon put an end to his career.
The representatives of
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9
and of some the whole plant, of others the root, and of others the bark. For instance the leaves are used of Mint, Yarrow, Dandelion, and Ivy. Then again the flowers are gathered of Chamomile, Elder Berry, and Dandelion, and again the roots are used of Dandelion, Marshmallow, Nettle and Rhubarb.
An herb called "Yellow Dock", is used by people to rub on the part stung by a nettle, and strange to say the "Dock" and "Nettle" are commonly found together.
Mena Gernon,
6 Seatown,
Dundalk.
Information received from Michael McArdle
5 Seatown.
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 23:11
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rejected
awaiting decision
8
Herbs.
It is said that for every disease that afflicts mankind there is some particular herb that can cure it. This is probably true, because it is known that wild animals [when?] they are ill always look for, and find an herb that will cure them.
The flowers of the "Dandelion", can be gathered in Spring and the tea made from them is used for purifying the blood.
"Yarrow", is another common herb, and is used for chills and colds.
The parts of the herbs which are used differ. Of some the leaves are used,
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 14:41
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rejected
awaiting decision
boiled in fresh milk, strained and drunk by those who complained of the diseases mentioned.
Another popular herb named "Parsley" was also used for kidney trouble, a cure was prepared from it in the same manner as that which was made from the "Dandelion". The mixture was taked daily until the disease succumbed to the treatment.
To-day nettles are regarded as a nuisance as the people of the present generation do not known their value. In bygone days the people took boiled nettles three times a year for the enrichment of their blood. The nettle, then, may by termed an herb.
Eleanor McGee,
7 St. Alphonsus Villas,
Dundalk.
Information received from Mr. McGeary (aged 81)
Avenue Road.
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 14:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the nostrils, was attached a piece of "sponge" which had been dipped in the essence of "Garlic". The fact of the person inhaling the essence of "Garlic" was said to prolong life.
An herb, locally called "Pennycup" may be seen growing in the crevices of a stone wall in this district. The velvet leafed plant when boiled with lemons, sugar candy, and liquorice ball was said to effect a cure on the most obstinate cough.
That tall lofty plant known by the name of "Marshmallow," is declared by the old people of to-day to have been an unsurpassable cure for swellings and sprains. The affected part was bathed in boiled "marshmallow".
The "Dandelion" which may be found growing in sandy soil was widely used for tuberculosis and kidney trouble. This well known herb was
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 14:20
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rejected
awaiting decision
3
Herbs.
Before medical science reached its present stage, the Irish had resource in all their ailments to herbs that contained medicinal properties.
One of the most extensively used herbs, which was grown in this district, was "Garlic". Those in the early stages of tuberculosis and children afflicted with convulsions were treated with this herb. A piece of "Garlic" was placed between the stocking foot and the sole of the shoe of those who were affected by the former disease, while those who had the latter complaint had a poultice made from "Garlic" and bread placed on the sole of the foot.
When a person reached the advanced stages of the dreaded disease of tuberculosis, a cage was placed on his head, to which, on a space provided opposite
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 14:15
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rejected
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7
Better known as Elder, is a notable cure for sore feet caused by travelling. An old boltry tree or bush grows eight or nine feet with oval shaped leaves. It bears a white blossom which forms a blackberry afterwards. The wines from the berries is known as Elderberry wine.
Brutelime and Blackfoot
One of the best remedies for coughs and colds. The Herbs are boiled for two hours with sugary candy, liquorice balls and a drop of white vinegar. When boiled the mixture is bottled.
Julia Durkan,
The Square,
Blackrock, Dundalk.
Information received from Mr W. Durkan,
Blackrock,
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2016-11-20 14:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6
Herbs
Chicken Weed.- which grows in our fields is supposed to be a great cure for swelling. It spreads rapidly on poor land. Height three inches.
Dandelion.
A plant which grows four or five feet high is very good for colds when boiled with Ferns and sweet milk.
Marsh Mallow.
A purple flower which grows along old walls and the South side of fences. When boiled is very good for sprains and is a great blood purifier.
Ivy Leaves. -
When boiled in rattle snake oil and some fresh lard (unsalted) and drained becomes an ointment an is a cure for corns.
Boltry -
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 16:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thatchers
Thatchers are not common in Ireland now, because slate and tiles are mostly used. There are some thatchers in Ireland yet but they are old. When the thatchers start to thatch they make [wangles?] of the straw and put them in a loop and wet them well. He shoves them into the old thatch with his thatching fork. When he has the house finished he rakes it well, and throws water on it, then he puts sticks and wire on it. Thomas Sarsfield of [Clara?] thatches all the houses in this district. There is another thatcher in Mosstown and his name is Joe Farrely. James Randles, Dunleer. Willie Kells, Collon, James Morgan, Ardee.
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 13:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
33.
Along the banks of the Boyne, close to the town of Drogheda, there used be a dog kennel. One day the caretaker
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 13:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
32.
Butterley's boat- a little boat which crossed over to the other side of the river. It was very convenient, on market days, for women who had big baskets and parcels from the market, to cross over on it, and they only had to pay a halfpenny to cross over.
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 13:29
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rejected
awaiting decision
31.
Some years ago, the square outside the courthouse in Fair Street was paved with beautifully, - coloured stones. They were ripped up when the place was concreted.
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 13:28
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30
Long ago, when a poor person would die, a couple of old reliable neighbours would go around collecting, - for funeral and burial expenses - from house to house. This helped to pay for the use of the Bier-Tree which was always used at that time.
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 13:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago, when a poor person would die, a couple of old reliable neighbours would go around collecting, - for funeral and burial expenses - from house to house. This helped to pay for the use of the Bier-Tree which was always used at that time.
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 13:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Local Fairs
The fairs that the majority of the people of this district attend are held in Dundalk and Carlingford. Before the imposition of the tariffs Warrenpoint and Camlough fairs used to be attended by the Cooley people. In recent years farmers very often sell cattle to the dealers going around from house to house, and they get as much from them as they would get at the fair. Carlingford fair at one time was an important one, and it was discontinued up to ten or twelve years ago when it was re-established. The Dundalk fair takes place on every third Wednesday of the month, with the exception of the month of May, when it takes place on the seventeenth. There is also a special fair green for the fair in Dundalk. When making a bargain the buyer tells the seller to hold out his hand and buyer gives the seller a little slap on the hand, and the bargain is made. When the seller gets the money he gives back a luck-penny. The buyer puts a mark on the animal; he cuts some hair off cows and horses and he puts raddle on sheep and pigs. When the bargain is made the dirt is thrown up, that is, the buyer dips his stick in the mud and puts a cross on the animals back.
Evelyn M Burke
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 13:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Annaghskeagh.
caves were opened but nothing of note was found. (The people have a strong objection to opening these caves)
The Annaghskeagh lios is along the road leading past Mrs Sheridan's. Traces of three walls are still visible around the lios so it was one of importance. Mrs McNamee told me that when the road was being made though the town land the lios was interfered with and that those who were working on the road all met with some misfortune.
Annaghskeagh House the residence of Mrs Sheridan figured in the civil war of '23. The house was [entered?] by the irregulars and a mine was placed in the [drawing?] room. The family were ordered out and the mine exploded. It blew up portion of the house but it was later reconstructed.
At the watrworks corner there is said to be a ghost. John Rogers of Annaghskeagh decribs meeting with it in the form of a dog. Since then he says he has a great dislike [?] travelling by the corner at a late hour.
senior member (history)
2016-10-27 19:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Annaghskeagh
Aic-na-[sciaoa?]. The place of the white thorn bushes "or the battle of the shields."
In this townland stands [?] cromlechs. A small one is in a corner of Mrs Sheridan's field near the main Newry-Dundalk Road. The covering stone has fallen away but the three upright ones remain. It is situated in a very old cemetery (Probably Pagan) containing a few other stones which were probably grave stones. A small road passes along side which leads through the townland. Men wished to excavate here but Mrs Sheridan would not allow it to be touched.
The second Cromlech is very large but again the covering stone has fallen off but is still visible. It is in the small [lios?] near Keenan's house in Feede. (Here is said to reside the small [man?] who visits the neighbour).
This [lios?] was excavated in 1934, and the remains od a food vessel was unearthed from a cist. It was wonderfully well preserved. I was standing by when a man turned it up so I saw all its markings. Here also was found the remains of another vessel, some dried bones and a number of [flouts?]. Traces of charcoal was also visible and of some ancient form of cement.
Just a small distance off a few other
senior member (history)
2016-10-27 18:15
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awaiting decision
Told and written by Annie Mohan,
on 20th April 1938,
Aclinnt,
Ardee,
Co. Louth,
senior member (history)
2016-10-27 18:14
approved
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awaiting decision
When the soil is fine you open drills with a double-mould board plough and then you put farm yard manure in the drill and drop the potatoes about eighteen inches apart; the majority of the people shake artificial manure after being dropped (shuc) such as sulphate of Ammonia and sulphate of potash.
When coming up they require weeding and hoeing and when you have them weeded you mould them again.
When they are about four months in the ground you take them out and gather them and put them in a pit.
The people long ago used to have wooden ploughs. There was a man by the name of Philip Keelan who used to used a wooden plough about forty years ago. He lived in Colga, Ardee in the year 1937. Thre are several hinds of potatoes such as "Kerr's Pink" "Aran Banners" "British Queens" and "Sutton Abundance". The Kerr's Pink and Aran Banners are the ones that the farmers generally plant.
The "Epicure" is an early potato and people plant some of the because they are fit to be dug before the others.
It is my brother that ploughs the ground.
senior member (history)
2016-10-27 17:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The potato crop
The potato crop is one of which the farmers of this district plant; they are generally planted about the month of March or April Before you plant potatoes you must make the soil fine by ploughing it and then you harrow it; if it is not then you will have to cross plough it
senior member (history)
2016-10-27 16:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The black pig
There is a valley in Castleroach called the valley of the "black Pig" the black pig is supposed to be the orange men going round gathering men to fight the Irish. He ran round would from Fochairt to Castle-roach: and the clay of the field in which he was killed is red like blood. It is said that he ran round the walls of Laghn three times it is about four and a half miles from Ardee.
It s also said the black pig will run again at the end of the world.
Written by,
Annie Mohan,
Aclint,
Ardee,
Co. Louth,
Told on 10th April 1938,
by Maggie Mohan,
Aclint,
Ardee,
Co. Louth,
senior member (history)
2016-10-27 16:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Penal Days
There is in the grave-yard in Donore a little hut where mass was said in the Penal Days.
In the 1911 there was found in Sheephouse quarry a crucifix and a candlestick said to be hidden by a priest in the Penal Days. They are now in the National Museum in Dublin.
Written by
Nancy Cluskey
Duleek St.
Drogheda
Obtained from
Mrs. Mathews (45)
Rathmullen Rd.
Drogheda
senior member (history)
2016-10-27 15:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old varieties of potatoes
Red Rock
White Rock
Brown Rock
Champions
These planted in drills as they are now. You would see a bit planted here and there in plots.
Written by Val Brennan
Killencoole,
Readypenny.
Dundalk
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Grainne Uaile
Clare Island was the hoe & headquarters of Grainne Uaile - Grace O'Mally - sea queen of the West, whose daring exploits on sea figures so largely in papers & are still recorded by Islanders.
Her body lies in the Ancient Island Abbey. She was daughter of Owen O'Malley chief of Western Isles in the 16th century.
On his death Grainne ignoring the rule of tanistry delegated herself the ruler of that district which surrounds [Cew?] Beyond all its Islands.
Her determined character and daring exploits especially on sea won her the name of "Grainne of the Heroes"
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 16:45
approved
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awaiting decision
Grainne
Her first husband was O'Flaherty ruler of Connemara who died in a short time. She then married Sir Richard Bourke Mc William Oughter.
Tradition hands down a singular item of the contract & that was.
The alliance was to last for a year when it could be dissolved by either saying to the other 'I dismiss you'
Grainne took advantage of the years alliance to garrison all Mac Williams castles with her own followers.
At the end of the year as Mac William was entering one of his castles
Grainnes ended the alliance by saying "I dismiss you".
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 16:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Beliefs:-
12 (a) Giant believed buried in Eddie Maguire's garden (near Queen Maeve's Gap). Sword dug up some years ago by H. Quinn and others.
(b) Long Loch on Mountain, about 200 sq. yds, rises and falls with tide.
(c) Larkin's Field, beside Quay, said to be Skating Rink, in olden times.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Legends
(1) At Sunny Side of Golden River - Three Danes, a father and 2 sons were captured and were being pressed for secret of a lovely wine, known only to the 3. The father told their captors to kill his 2 sons first, and he would then give the secret. This was done, but he then refused, and was himself killed. By his ruse, he knew the secret would die with him.
(2) There is a Fairy Tree in Willie Donnelly's - said you will be haunted if you forget to bless yourself.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Continued
kill the fox but their dogs were killed too. In some of the neighbouring Parishes not one dog was left. The people did not know what to do. Some men who were fishing along the coast said that there was a tree in the place where the fox jumps out and that there were the tracks of the foxes teeth in it. Some people cut the tree and the next time the fox jumped out the bank of the sea he was killed that ended the foxes.
Told by
Neil Jackson
Owenirk
Linsfort P.O.
Buncrana
Written by
Edward Jackson
Owenkirk
Linsfort P.O.
Buncrana
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 16:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
Continued
and the flesh of the sheep to make food. At last they determined to kill the foxes. This effort was very succesful for the first week. Not one fox was left living except one clever old fox. Many efforts were made to capture and kill him but in vain. When dogs chased after him the fox ran to the bank of the sea and jumped out and the dogs after him. The dogs were killed but the fox was always seen again. A clever old dog lay in a ditch and caught him by the tail off the fox but was killed himself. The fox then went about without a tail. People boasted that their dog would
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 16:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Story
Fox
Long ago when the Gaels were evicted out of their lands, they had to go back to the hills and try to find a living because the Planters got their lands and they were left with none. They had little to live on. What they lived on most was sheep. To keep sheep they had to herd their sheep by day and they had to put them into a house at night. If they did not do so they would soon have no sheep for the foxes would kill and cat them. The people got tired sitting out in the cold but what were they to do for they needed the wool of the sheep to make clothes
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2016-10-26 12:56
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64. Fairies, The Banshee; Mermaids
There is very little of any belief in Fairies around this district.
The Banshee is still believed in - One was supposed to have been seen by a man who lived in [Betaghstown?]. A little woman in black an white was sitting at the side of a lane with a umbrella in her hand.
This man who was passing by said "Halloo" but got no answer. Shortly after that an Aunt of his died.
This incident happened about 18 years ago.
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2016-10-26 12:53
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take, but the lane is never used now. The lane meets the Richardstown Road and if when the little black pig runs across, he is killed, that time three days will be the end of the world.
Dympna Clarke,
Bornavedock,
Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:52
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The Race of the Black Pig
Some of the old people who live near us still believe in that rather queer superstition called the "Race of the Black Pig".
The White Stone Lane which runs through our yard is the route that he is supposed to
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:50
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Customs regarding the Dead
It is never right to have the clocks going when the corpse is in the house.
It is right to take the feet of the corpse out the door first.
It is right for all the mirrors to be turned while the corpse is in the house.
It is not right for the mother of the dead person to go to the funeral.
If anybody falls in the grave they will be the next to die.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:44
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28th Nov. 1938.
The Ghost in Ravensdale
In a house in Ravensdale owened by people called Keenans there was a ghost seen. About two weeks ago the man who was staying in the house at that time invited two friends out for a night. Mr Conroy was after hearing the noise in the house before that. The three men were at the fire talking, when the door was trown open, the furniture began to walk and the three men felt a clamey hand at their necks. They were very much afraid and they only stayed one night.
This story was obtained by Nora Dawe, Old Road, Bellurgan, Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:40
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"There is a well near Dundalk named Lady-well. It is dry all the year round and a story is told about it. At midnight every 14th August n Angel comes and moves the water and it rises up.
"People from all over the country come on the same night and kneel there to 12 o clock before 15 of August morning.
Anthony McDonnell
42 John Street
Drogheda
Told by Mrs McDonnell
42 John St
Drogheda
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:35
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The River Nanny
The River Nanny is in haytown, and it is said hat long ago it was filled with fish but there are no fish in it now. This is the reason.
One day when St. Patrick was passing by the river he saw two men fishing. St. Patrick asked them for a fish, and the men said "no". St. Patrick went away. The men caught no fish for not been charitable. from that day there is not another fish to be got in the River Nanny.
Bernadette Fairclough
Related by
Mrs. Fairclough (39)
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:32
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Lore Connected With St Patrick's Day
On St Patrick's (Day) Eve long ago the people made badges for the children, and on St Patricks Day the children wore them on their shoulders. All the shops were open and the men enjoyed themselves drinking in the public house. They would take the shamrock out of their hats, and drown it in the glass of stout. This was called drowning the shamrock. It was a great day for the (publication) publican and seed merchant. It was a custom for the farmer's to but all the seed they needed on St Patricks Day.
Nanjo Atkinson,
Channonrock
Louth
Dundalk.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:29
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Killclogher (about 500 A.D.)
There was a monastery at Clogherhead founded by St. Nectan whose feast was held on May 2nd. It was built on the eminence which gives its name to the place. Among its abbots was St. Donachad, of the race of Conall Gulban, who in 713 A.D. was transferred to the abbacy of Hy, and who died in 719 A.D. He was venerated as the patron saint of Clogherhead, and sailors, when in danger were accustomed to invoke him. His feast was held on May 25th.
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2016-10-26 12:25
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49.
Though the local graveyard is not modern there was supposed to be an older one between John St. & river
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2016-10-26 12:25
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47.
One May Eve - Buttercups or dandelions thrown on to roof of house are supposed to bring luck during year.
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2016-10-26 12:24
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46a see 37.
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2016-10-26 12:24
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45.
See Louth Archaeological Society
No 3 Vol. 2. October 1910
also enclosed note.
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2016-10-26 12:23
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44. None.
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2016-10-26 12:23
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43.
St. Mochta was a local saint
See "Innismocht" on Page 30 of the County Louth Archaeological Society. Vol.I. No.I. July '04.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:21
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The Black Pig ran down the Ardee Road on his way to the Boyne. There will be trouble on the [Race?] of the Black Pig. (Miss Annie Costello).
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:20
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Bonfire night: On St. John's eve 24th June fiddlers came and there was Irish dancing round the bonfire.
(Miss Annie Costello, Killally. 82 years of age).
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:19
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Bonfire night: On St. John's eve 24th June fiddlers came and there was Irish dancing round the bonfire.
(Miss Annie Costello, [Hilbally?] 82 years of age).
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:18
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Hallowe'en: The hearth was swept clean and a plate of champ was left for the poor souls.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:17
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Twelfth Night: On eve of twelfth night twelve blessed candles were lighted in honour of the twelve apostles, and the remains of the candles were put up over the stable door.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:16
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Hallowe'en Two basins - one of clean water and of dirty water. A girl was blindfolded, and if she selected the clean water she got a young man, and if the dirty water an old man.
A girl blindfolded goes out and pulls a cabbage stalk. If she gets a straight one she gets a nice man, and if a crooked one a bad man.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:14
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Travelling Folk
Many travelling folk come to this district. Some of these people are rich and some are poor.
When they come to a district they usually camp at a cross-road. The poor people sleep onder a cart while the richer folk sleep in caravans. These caravans are very useful to them because as well as being able to sleep in them they can travel about from place to place in them.
Very often a family of tinkers come to the district and stay in it for a few days. They go round from house to house selling many things. Sme of them buy them in the shops and more of them make them themselves. They sell tins, saucepans, cups and saucers, combs, lace, statues, brushes, rosary beads and prayer books.
The poorer of these go from house to house asking for things such as money, bread, tea, sugar, butter, eggs or sometimes old clothes.
Some people like to see the tinkers coming to the house but more people do not like to see them coming because sometimes the tinkers are not pleased with what they get.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 12:09
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Feede
a cow in the shed for a night ans that it was dead next morning. She also said the family were warned by an old woman against do so.
In the Feede wood stood a tree which was called the Hangman's tree because the old times (about 1850) a man who was a stranger was found hanging from it being there for several weeks without anyone taking notice of him.
In this wood also can be seen traces of the small holder's dwellings of those times. They were miserable shacks of one or two rooms surrounded by a few little gardens which they tilled for a living. From thses homes poor as they were they unhappy poor were driven as his lordship considered them a blot upon his mansion. So he pulled down and burned every one leaving the poor to starve or emigrate. These are the stories of Mrs McNamee who is close on 80 years.
On the other side of the hill is the famous Gap of the North with Mountjoys old castle to be seen in the distance. This was the scene of many famous battles in the time of Hugh O'Neill.
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2016-10-25 16:49
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5.
There is a local tradition that it was Cromwell who destroyed the old Church at Wysart the ruins of which stand till the present day.
It was said the soldiers pulled down the Church bell and threw it in the bog near the wood in Maguire's field where it still rang out at the usual hour 12 and 6.
Written by Evelyn Butterly,
Grangebellew
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2016-10-25 16:46
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4.
The time of Cromwell the government gave the land to his soldiers and made landlords of them, and then those landlords got rich with every farmer paying his rent to them.
It is said Cromwell went to Lord Gormanstown and asked him who he was. He said he was Lord Gormanstown to-day who every would be tomorrow.
Cromwell said he would be Lord Gormanstown to-morrow, because he had tables and food, ready for Cromwells army.
Written by Evelyn Butterly
Grangebellow.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:42
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The Red House
In sixteen forty two the Catholics of Clogherhead were massacred.
The red house is a cave underneath the head it is so called because of the slaughter of a great number of people some say clergy who attempted to conceal themselves in the time of Cromwell, but were betrayed by the barking of a little dog when he saw a vessel approaching the dry land. Outside the Red House in a pool there are two stones which turn every seven years.
Mary Treacy,
Glaspistol,
Clogherhead.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:38
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Scarlet Street
Long ago when Cromwell came to Drogheda, the inhabitants ran up Peter's Street. Cromwell's men however overtook them and slew many of them. Many of them sought refuge in the church on the top of the hill St Peter's Church but in vain. Cromwell;s men followed them and killed every man woman and child. He then marched on to Scarlet St. where he slew that many that the St. ran red with blood. From that day to this the people called Scarlet St.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:35
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Peter's Street
Peter's Street is one of the oldest streets in Drogheda. At the top of the street is the Protestant Church which was once Catholic. It is said that when Cromwell came to Drogheda he slaughtered all the Catholics in this Church and Peter's Street ran red with blood.
Told by Mr. John Connor,
Thomas St.,
Drogheda
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2016-10-25 16:33
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"In the year 1649 when Cromwell came to Ireland Drogheda was the first town to which he laid siege. Having blown up the walls he then marched with his powerful army towards millmount.
Inside the barracks a small garrison of soldiers held out against Cromwell's with the vain hope of defeating him.
"The captain of this Garrison had a wooden leg and an amasing story is told about him. Cromwells soldiers had been told before hand that this leg was made of gold and all were eager to get it.
"When the little garrison were defeated and all the soldiers were (defeated) (and all the) put to death Cromwells soldiers ran searching for the captain. A fierce dispute arose as to who would get the leg and many were killed. Cromwell then rode up and ordered them to disperce and the leg was revealed. But alas it was just an ordinary wooden leg and all the soldiers were bitterly disappointed."
Anthony McDonnell
Told by Mr McDonnell
[?] John St
Drogheda
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:27
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Old Times
In Cromwell's time Cromwell went around out the people from their castles. He went along until he came to Gormanstown he met a man putting out stones on the road and he asked him who lived here in this castle. He replied, "Lord Gormanstown".
Cromwell went up to the castle and knocked oat he door. Lord Gormanstown came and Cromwell asked who lives here. The Lord said, "Lord Gormanstown today but I don't know who tomorrow". Cromwell replied, "Lord Gormanstown today and Lord Gormanstown for ever."
Written by
Imelda Mooney
Mullateeling.
Obtained from
Mr Connor
Cushenstown
Garristown
Age 79
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:22
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Cromwell is supposed to have passed through Drumcar on his way to Annagassan. At the [Cloghare?]-bridge he encountered some of the locals, who gave him such a thrashing that he took care never to come this way again. His army is supposed to have gone towards the North by another road.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:12
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by some person as, if not, the dead person will have to walk this earth unclothed, I heard of a woman who died and whose clothes were all worn except the bonnet which could not be found. The dead woman was often seen walking afterwards without her bonnet.
I was at a wake in the bog of Ardee about 60 years ago. Clay pipes ad tobacco were given out to the people at the wake. There was a plate left on a table mixed with salt and ashes, I dont know what this plate was for.
When the coffin has been lowered into the grave the people standing round, or some of them, each throw a handful of Clay into the grave.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:07
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25th July 1938
Wakes and Funerals
Told by Bridget Byrne
CB.Ham. Co., Louth
Aged 71
Lived in Ardee & CB.Ham
About 60 years ago they had Customs about wakes and funerals that they have not now.
For instance if a person died say in Dundalk and his burial ground was in Drogheda and his home in Ardee. They would take the funeral past the home of the corpse.
A funeral is never taken by a short cut to the burial ground. When a person dies his or her clothes have to be worn
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:04
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Don't mix it with the Indian buck
In those days of Old Lang Syne.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 16:03
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children. The children sometimes attend the local school while they are in the place. They attend such meetings as the fair day in Ardee, Dundalk, or Dunleer but they may come at any time.
The people seem to give them a wide berth around here now, as they are not harmless like the old people who went round.
Long ago before the war there were much more travelling folk than nowadays. They would carry different bags. One for potatoes, one for oatsmeal, one for indian meal.
Here is a verse that Paddy Peadar is supposed to have made.
The champions they are bad the year
But I'll thank you for a few
And if you have none at hand
Why, a grain of meal will do
Go Bless You Mam
That's oaten meal
Wait till I open the twine
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2016-10-25 15:58
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and fibre matting, and small pictures beads etc. They obtain their supplies now n Woolworth's mostly. They are received indifferently now. People would as soon they wouldn't come as they are very persistent and annoying in pushing their wares. Some of them take bottles or rags and give some article instead of them. Some of them will sleep in an outhouse or in straw. People do not wish this as they may set the place on fire. Families go round sometimes having cars or caravans. They go into some sheltered byroad and light a fire where they cook the food they have brought with them. They rig up some sort of tent made of bags against the ditch or over the car. They stay around for a day and go around begging for old boots, coats or clothes of any kind, or they beg for food. Some travel singly. These are usually old men, but others travel in family groups, men, women, and
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 15:18
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Travelling Folk.
Travellers are not so numerous as they were long ago.
Long ago there were three kinds of travellers, gipsies travellers selling clothes, and musicians.
When weddings or feasts were held the musicians used go to the house and play the fiddle for the dancing and stay in the house that night.
Now there are only two kinds of travelling folk, tinkers and people selling clothes. Tinkers travel in caravans and in cart. They sell laces, safety pins and many other tings.
The tinkers that come most frequently to Dunleer are the Gaynors and the Powells.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 15:13
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Travelling Folk 16th July 1938
Travelling folk still call to the houses. They seem to be very poor. Some of the sell small articles such as delph, pins, thread
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 15:12
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Travelling Folk
In the times long ago any travelling men and women used to get lodging in the farmer's houses. For a man, a bed would be put up in the barn. On a bed of straw he would lie. Sometimes he would be kept for a week and sometimes only for a few days. A poor woman would be in and there would be a bed put up in the corner for her.
Winne Lennon,
Emlagh,
Louth
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2016-10-25 15:08
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with history attached to it.
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2016-10-25 15:08
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There is a large amount of ruins in Ireland, such as Cuchullain's mound. It is beleived that Cuchullain played there in childhood. Other historical places are at Faughart, where St. Brigid lived. Tara is also a place
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 15:06
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Folklore
Ireland in olden times had many fairies. Some of them were called the Celts, because they were small, and also because they were very old people.
They live in forts. The Leprechaun is the shoemaker of the fairies and besides, he is their leader. If a person went into a fairy-fort he could hear the dull thud of the hammer on the shoe.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 15:02
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Local Ruins.
There are three or four old ruins in this district. In [Barrleryfield?] there are of an old mill. Long ago when it was in use meal was made in it from oats and wheat. There are six storeys in it, one is under the ground, and the other are built up high. There are about sixteen or eighteen small windows on the front wall, and one gablend is covered with ivy,
There are ruins of an old chapel in Urnery graveyard in Dungooley, and it is believed that it was on of St. Patricks
In "Castletown mount" there are ruins of a castle where Cuchullian was [drowned?] on it, and he was born just beside this "Mounnt", and it is built up on very high ground.
Another ruined castle is situated in Castleroche, though there is not a big portion of it in ruins, long ago Lord Roche and his wife dwelt there. It is built on very high ground.
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 14:56
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Cuchulainn's pillar stone.
In a field, about two miles from Dundalk, and not far from Knockbridge, stands a pillar stone. We are told from local tradition that a giant died at this stone, and it is 'the; asserted that it is the death stone of Cuchulainn. The legend is that the hero having been fatally wounded would not give his enemies that satisfaction of seeing him fall, but bound himself by his girdle to a pillar stone and continued his last fight while life remained.
Rita Allen, 58 Trinity Street Drogheda
The above was got from:-
Mr. J. Allen (50)
trinity Street, Drogheda
senior member (history)
2016-10-25 14:53
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Cuchulainn's Mount

There is a cave in Cuchulainn mount and it is said that before Cuchulainn died he buried all his riches in that cave.
Many people went into the cave to look for the treasure but nobody found it so it there yet for anybody who finds it.
Told by:- Tom Kelly,
St. Alphonsus Villas
Dundalk
James Ballantine
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2016-10-25 14:50
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