Number of records in editorial history: 2537 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2021-07-27 15:17
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The subjects taught in those schools were reading, writing, geography, grammar, sums, and drawing. The teachers didn't know Irish in those days and so it wasn't spoken in the schools.
The scholars had reading books but it was usually on slates they wrote. The scholars had planks for seats but the master had a chair to sit on.
They were very good scholars for the chance of attendance they got.
They seldom got to school unless during the Winter months. During the other seasons the boys especially had to say at home to work on the farm.
There was another school in Cosia (sp) and there was another in the Mullinrow.
It was in the Mullinfow that my grandfather Johnnie McKerney attended. The school was held on a loft in a farm house belonging to Billy Dougherty.
senior member (history)
2021-07-27 15:17
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He was an uncle of the present Lizzie and Willie McNutt. He was a deformed man and his brother Robert McNutt left him over and took him back from the school in a course and cart.
There was an old school over in the town land of Ballyhurin. The school was held in a dwelling house and it was a man named Doughtery who taught in it. He came from the town land of Glenvar. Master Dougherty was a very good teacher and he made splendid scholars.
The teacher didn't go a week to more to each pupil's home around this district as they did in other districts.
There was another old school in the town land of Tullybonner and there was another old school in Cruchnagerragh. The one in Cruchnagerrah still gets the name of the old school house.
senior member (history)
2021-07-27 15:17
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Leatbeg National school was built twenty eight years ago. It was built in the year nineteen hundred and ten and it was opened on the 1st December nineteen hundred and eleven.
Before this school was built there was another school about two hundred years over the road from this present building and it is known now as the Old School. This is the school that my father attended but the roof is off it now and the walls are standing yet. It was opened as a National School on the 13th November in the year eighteen seventy six.
Before that it was a dwelling house belonging to a man named Mickey Griffen.
The building now known as the Chapel of Ease or the small church in Leatbeg was in former days a school house. A man named William McNutt taught in it.
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:10
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In former times people used different bread than of now-a-days. They usually made the bread from corn or wheat. They also made boxty bread, oaten meal bread and potato cake. This kind of bread is also made in the district to-day, as they require little flour.
The boxty bread was made by scraping the washed and peeled potatoes into a linen cloth. This was then squeezed into a basin and substance which was known as the starch of the potato was kept. A pound of flour was then mixed along with it and also salt and soda and buttermilk. All these were mixed and then baked.
The potato cake was made from cooked potatoes peeled and this also required a pound of flour and a little salt. They were then mixed and in former times the people had an implement for making the cake flat and to-day they do that with a bottle.
The oaten cake was made of about two ounces of oat meal and a little flour and about an cup of milk and sometimes water. The bread was very seldom baked in an oven. The people in olden
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:09
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Long ago there were no doctors but the people knew more about sickness than they do now. When people get sick now they would be removed to hospitals or a doctor is brought to them.
Long ago people used to boil dock-roots and sugar and that was supposed to cure chin-cough. When people would sprain their feet they would go to a weaver for a spraining thread. If the thread was asked for there would be no cure in in that they would only say they sprained their foot.
There used to be a cure also in the seventh child. People used to go to where there were would be seven sons and if they had luck the seventh son would rub his hand across them and they would be a little better. Then he would tell them when to come again and he would do the same thing.
People that used to have tooth ache used to carry an abscess tooth in their pocket with them. Some people in olden times used to know certain herbs for curing ailments. To cure a head-ache people used to go to some old woman in the village: This old woman
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:08
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Usually there are many signs observed in the sky, as to the coming good or bad weather. Faoileanswhen they leave the river and fly inland in a bad weather omen and wet weather is expected. When the spider comes out from his cob-web, it is the sign of approaching bad weather. When bad weather is at hand, flies usually fly low. When the sun goes down red in the evening, a long spell of fine weather is then supposed to be coming. When smoke ascends up in a straight line, fine weather is promised. When the distant hills look near, it is a sure sign of rain. Generally soot falls from the chimney when wet weather is at hand. Usually a dog sleeps during the day when some wet weather is approaching. A cat scraping at (a) the leg of a chair is also another bad weather omen, and when being done some cold wet weather is supposed to be coming. When a dog is seen eating grass, a long period of wet weather is
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:08
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In olden times the people had cures for curing ailments. There were no doctors, no hospitals in that time and they had to make their own cures. Now-a-day if people get sick they are moved to hospital in a short time. The cures were better than the cures nowadays.
They cured ailments in this way. If a person sprained his foot, the foot was held under a waterfall and it was supposed to be cured. They also cured the chin cough by boiling dock leaves and sugar. When it was boiled they drank it, and that was supposed to be cured.
To cure the tooth-ache, they carried an asses tooth in their pockets and it was cured. Some people had flowers to cure any ailment by herbs and poultices. When a person got dust in his eye, a mouth-full of water was taken and held in his mouth until he had said a prayer in Irish. Then he would throw the water into the plate and the dust was supposed to be in the water.
Certain people had healing cures and other people came fame far off to cure whatever ailment they had and they were supposed to be cured.
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:08
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In olden times the people had cures for curing ailments. There were no doctors, no hospitals in that time and they had to make their own cures. Now-a-day if people get sick they are moved to hospital in a short time. The cures were better than the cures nowadays.
They cured ailments in this way. If a person sprained his foot, the foot was held under a waterfall and it was supposed to be cured. They also cured the chin cough by boiling dock leaves and sugar. When it was boiled they drank it, and that was supposed to be cured.
To cure the tooth-ache, they carried an asses tooth in their pockets and it was cured. Some people had flowers to cure any ailment by herbs and poultices. When a person got dust in his eye, a mouth-full of water was taken and held in his mouth until he had said a prayer in Irish. Then he would throw the water into the plate and the dust was supposed to be in the water.
Certain people had healing cures and other people came fame far off to cure whatever ailment they had and they were supposed to be cured.
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:06
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In former times the people made their own houses from stone. These houses were very low and untidy because hens and cows are often kept in them.
All the old houses were thatched and roofed with bog-deal and straws. More of them were roofed with flags and then thatched was put over the flags, to keep them from being blown away if a storm would come. They were thatched with ry-straw, oats straw and rushes which they had sown and saved themselves. In this way they roofed their houses. A common thing in the old houses was a bed in the kitchen known as the "hag" or the "outchat". This bed was made of bog-deal and straw or feathers if there was any to be got, and was usually placed at the side wall. These beds were very common and one of them were found in every old house. The fire was always in the gable wall and is still but the old people never heard of the fire been in the centre of the house on the floor. There are many accounts of houses having no chimney only a hole in the roof for the smoke to go out. Those that had chimneys, the front of them were made with mortar and stone and also of clay and wattles.
There are also accounts of houses having no glass for their windows. In the daytime they left the window open but
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:04
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became Sister Marcella of the Mercy Under was equally good as regards poetry. She once made a song on a neighbour of hers, and, when finished with it, mailed it to the man on whom she composed it. No sooner had he got it than he went to her father for an explanation as his vocabulary did not contain explanations of some of the words.She was in the field and the two sat down by a hay-cock to try and read it over "As good as you are" said the man "the writer of this is better," and she all the time was listening to the conversation. Little thinking Anne was the composer her father called her to have a look at it, and to help him give explanations. She could do so with the greatest of ease. Later she joined the Mercy Under and went to the United States. Some four years ago she was killed though not instantly with a truck.
In the next generation some of the members could also make songs. Carrolls cousins of my grandfathers were also able to make songs.
The songs were sometimes made in praise of persons while others were satire. "Jacob Carnew" was made by Patrick Collins. One satirising the Protestants was made by Paddy Collins, and the "Bachelors o Bendoo", and one on a match-making business on Peter Lynch or "Pringle" of Rathrusson and one on the "Land League Mare". He also
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 10:02
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Long ago people did not wear any boots until they were eighteen or nineteen years of age and when they did wear boots they were buttoned. Country children go barefooted in the summer and some of the towns children go barefooted too. There are three shoemakers in this country. These shoemakers make clogs and some make boots. Long ago some people made slippers with the hides of animals and they put the hairy side of the hide in. These slippers were made at home. These people got the leather tanned. There were two tan yards in Castleblayney long ago and now there are boot factories. There are twenty nine boot factories in the States. Some people wear clogs. They have wooden soles. In America the people their wees toes cut off to make their shoes narrow. The water in which the blacksmith fits the red iron to cool is good for chilblains and many people take it home to bathe their feet. People's feet which are very big and long are
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 09:59
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the third night. The Prince danced with her all night and when the clock struck twelve Cinderella got ready to go home and the Prince stood at the door before her, and he tried to catch her. He caught her by the foot and the glass shoe fell off, and Cinderella went home without it. There was no dance any other night. The Prince sent two men all over the country with the glass shoe to see who it might fit. If he found a person whom the shoe would fit he intended to marry that person. When they came to the house where the two girls lived their mother had them prepared and she did not tell Cinderella atall . The two girls tried to put on the glass shoe but it would not go on. The men asked was there any other girl in the house and the girls mother said there was not except an old maid. “O we must see her [“] they said. Cinderella tried it on and it was just her fit. She went with the men in the carriage and got married to the Prince and lived happily ever afterwards.
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senior member (history)
2021-06-30 09:55
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kitchen all the cooks and servants who were asleep with her awoke. Immediately there was got ready a beautiful dinner and the Prince and Princess dined together. After a few days the Wedding took place and the feasting and rejoicement held for twelve days.
Written by
Peggy Hannah
Graigue
Shanballymore
Co. Cork
Obtained From
Mrs. Hannah
Graigue
Shanballymore
Co. Cork
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 09:55
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346
people say it was a haunted place some say it was a place where the fairies used to sleep by night but she told him that she could not tell him the right story about it. He said that he would venture to try and go in to see what it was. He went back to his Palace for his army to go in to it. When he came back again himself lead the way. He started to go in and the trees opened to let him pass through and they closed in again so that none could go in. He went on and at last he came to a place where there stood a beautiful palace. As he went in all the doors flew wide open. The first place he went into was the kitchen and he wondered much when he saw all the servants some lying on the floor and others standing everybodies around. He then went into a room when he found a beautiful lady lying down in a golden bed waiting for her hour to awake. When he went in he knelt down beside her and kissed the golden ring which she wore on her finger. She arose immediately and shook hands with him and thanked him for having come to take her up. The minute she landed in the
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 09:53
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345
kissed the princess and went away and they were never again to come back. They were very upset about her but still they knew that she was not dead for they could hear her breathe heavily. Immediately the king and queen left the palace the whole place covered in with trees and only the top of the tower was to be seen. As years went on the people did’nt [sic] know what it was all about and their fathers and forefathers told them stories about it but none of them had the correct story about it. At last one day the king of Edgyls son was touring that country and he came to this shot and wondered much when he saw the big wood of trees around the palace and thought to himself that it might be some haunted place. He kept on riding on his horse until he met an old woman with a bart[sic] of sticks on her back. He uncounted his house and began to question the old woman about the palace which was hid in the midst of the big wood. The old woman could not give him any right account about it the hidden palace. She said that some
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 09:44
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343
Wit or an angel; the third that she would be graceful in all ways. The fourth said that she would be a lovely dancer. The fifth said that she would sing like an nightingale and the sixth said that she would be able to play upon all kinds of instruments. It was now the old ladys turn and she came out from behind the door with her shaking with spite and said that the Princess would have her hand pierced with a spinng wheel and that she would die from the wound. Now this wish made all the people very unhappy. Then a young fairy appeared before them all and said “Be assured O King and Queen that your daughter shall not die from the wound. The Princess will undoubtedly pierce her hand but instead of dying she shall fall into a sleep which last [sic] for a hundred years then a Kings son shall come and awaken her.” Now it happ-ened one day when the princess was about sixteen years old that she took her dogs for a long walk. She came to a very old tower and she went in. At the top of the tower she went into a very small little
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 09:43
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344
room where there was an old woman spinning her spindle. “What are you doing my good woman” asked the princess.
“I am spinning my child” said the old woman.
“Ah” said the princess “it it hard? How do you do it. Let me try it please.”
She had no sooner started than when the point of it pierced her finger and she fell into a sleep. The old woman was very frightened and cried for help and people came from the palace running. They threw water on her face they threw lavender water on her temp-les but nothing would wake her. The king and queen ordered her to be taken to the palace and she was laid in a golden bed in one of the finest rooms in the palace. Now the fairy who appeared to them before came to the king and queen and told them that she would put everyone in the palace asleep so that when the princess would awaken she would have all those servants to tend to her and the fairy put everyone asleep. Now the king and queen knew that it was no good for them to stay in the palace and they
senior member (history)
2021-06-30 09:41
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A Story..
Not long ago in the Annalee river there were animals called water-horses. One moonlight night a man was out finishing stooking a field of corn. He saw six or seven of these water-horses coming out of the river. The man was afraid and ran home. They began to eat the grass that was between the stubble. Several people have seen them sinse. They haven’t been seen this last twenty years or more.
Dreams.
Long ago people believed in their dreams. If you dreamt about blood someone belonging to you would die.
If you dreamt about clear water you would hear good news.
If you dreamt about dirty water you would have trouble.
If you dreamt about fire it was hasty news.
If you dreamt about raw meat it was supposed that you would hear that someone belonging to you was ill.
If you dreamt about removal it denoted trouble over money.
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 09:46
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the olden times for cattle scour or swell.
Frog oil was considered one of the best remedies for a contracted sinew or where any limb stiffens after receiving a hurt. Frog oil when rubbed constantly lengthens the sinew. Frog oil is made by collecting a number of frogs and placing them in an earthen jar corked tightly. This jar is placed in a large pot filled with water + then put on the fire until it boils for some hours. The contents of the earthen jar inside is in jelly and ready for use when cooled.
Eel oil or oil extracted from the eel is a cure for deafness. Years ago all the skins of eels caught were preserved. A "teadhallach" or strain of the muscle of the wrist was quite common in the old times when men cut the oats with a hook. A portion of an eel skin tied round the wrist cured anyone affected with a swollen muscle. It was supposed that the oil in the skin exuded out with the heat of the hand.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 12:27
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side a woman, and the other a man.
"A Penny"
Through the wood, and through the wood, and never touches the wood.
"A knife in a man's pocket"
Black, and white, and read all over.
"The News Paper."
Three feet two ears a big mouth and no eyes
"A Pot"
Up the ladder, and down the ladder with the heads down. "Nails in a Boot"
Round, the house, and round the house, and leaves a loaf on every window. "Snow"
As I went out on yonder gap I met my Uncle Davit. I took off his cap, and sucked his blood, and left him lying east.
"A Blackberry"
Round the house, and round the house dragging its puddings after it?
"A hen with a clutch of chickens"
What is not fair? "A hair in a [...] head"
A Bonnack of bread, and a sheet ful of crumbs Riddle me that, and I will give you my two thumbs. "The Moon, and Stars"
Why is T the wettest letter in the Alphabet?
"Because it is in the middle of water"
senior member (history)
2021-02-24 11:56
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Once upon a time there were two men who had "terrible" humps. One night one of the men was passing the fairies lios, and he heard them singing "Dia lúin - Dia Máirt Dia lúain - Dia Máirt Dia luain - An Máirt is Dia Ceadaon. He began to sing too. When the fairies heard him they brought him in
senior member (history)
2021-02-23 10:03
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son of Dunlaing to request that he would come, bringing the Danes with him, and the rising out of Osraighe to assist and relieve them against the Northmen who were harassing and plundering them at that time. Now, Cearbhall responded to this and he commanded the Danes and the Osraigh's to proceed fully to Relieve the men of Munster, and this was accordingly done at the summons. Cearbhall afterwards came forward to attack the Lochlanns with a great host of Danes and Gaeidhils. When the Lochlanns saw Cearbhall with his host, or people, they were seized with great fear and dread. Cearbhall went to a high place and he began to address
senior member (history)
2021-02-01 12:14
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Téigheann siad thart leis an mbrídeóg lá 'le Brighde.
Is ceart coinnle a bheith agat lá 'le Brighde
Bíonn crosóga dhá ndeanamh oidhche 'le Brighde

Bíonn daoine ag dul tart agus sean-channa aca agus iad ag bualadh air ag baint cheoil as.

Is ceart an doras a fágáil oscailte agus tiochfaidh Bríd isteach
Is é lá 'le Brighde an chéad lá d'Earrach

Bíonn uair ar maidin agus uair tráthnóna de fhaid ar an lá ó lá 'le Brighde.

Tosuigheann na feilméaraí ag reidhteach i gcoinnibh an Earraigh nuair a thagan lá 'le Brighde

Is í naomh Brighde patrún an fheilméarachta

Gach dara lá o mó lá-sa Pádruigh
Oidhche 'le Brighde gan bruitheachán
Oidhche Nodlag gan im
Oidhche Inide gan feoil
O Dhia nach suarac an teach é seo

Nós eile déanann fear an tighe cros de tighe agus maide. Crocann sé ar an taobh theas do'n teach é.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 14:46
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349
but the strange thing was that they couldn't see anybody. The crowd passed by and went down towards the lough, and they heard a woman scream and voices shouted three times "She's a drowning". They were real afraid then but they said they'd bring the stone if all the devils in the country came at them. So they stated and they heard nothing more and brought the stone home. The next morning they were telling their mother about their experience the night before, and she told them to leave back the stone, that they had no right to take it. They went out to bring back the stone. They left it in a cart house the night before, but what was their surprise to find when they went out that the stone was gone, no2 and they never saw it afterwards
The following story has been told to me by several people who witnessed it. My father witnessed it, and Revd. Michael M Kiernan P.P. Gresford, New South Wales also witnessed it and told it to me the last time he was home in Ireland on holidays from Australia.
It happened about 55 years ago on a Christmas morning. In those times people had to walk to mass as there were not many horses and cars and the by-roads were
senior member (history)
2020-11-18 09:32
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Sean Amhran Gaedhilge
I
Chuaidh mé 'na rosaibh ar chuairt
gur bhreathnuigh mé uam an spéir
amach síos fa na h-oilein ó thuaidh
mar eileit agus cú na diaidh
II
Casadh damh cailín deas óg
'S ma casadh 'sí labhair go géar
'Cén áit seo 'a mbíonn uí do chomhnuidh
Nó 'n gcoinnigheann tú cró duit féin?
III
Ó, bíomsa seal i dtig 'n óil
'gus ní dheánam a'n lón den phighinn
Ach an mhéid adaí shaoiruighim sa ló
A chaitheadh le spóirt na h-oidhche
IV
Mas duine iú ' leanas den ól
Ní mhiolasm ro mhóir de thrade
Sé bhreathnuighim go bhfuil tú ro óg
le do cheangal do chéile go fóill
V
Dimig fear as tír mór
Ar maidin indé gan bróg
Chán féidir gir tusa 'n fear óg
A bhfuil siad sa tóir na dhiaidh
senior member (history)
2020-11-12 15:14
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A crowing hen and a whistling woman are believed to be unlucky.
It is unlucky to keep a crowning hen about the house.
It is unlucky to throw out water after night you might throw it on the fairies passing by.
It is unlucky to go to bed without leaving clean water in the house or the good people might want some.
It is very unlucky to cut a lone bush or tree especially a lone white thorn.
It is unlucky to strike an animal with a bore tree because Judas hanged himself on that tree.
It is not lucky to close up a spring water.
A person who starts on a journey is considered unlucky if he turns back.
senior member (history)
2020-11-03 09:57
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Jack-stones were played by school children in this parish till at least 25 years ago. I have not seen the game played now for a number of years and I think it has died out.
I don't think there were any varieties of the game but some times the children used the two hands when playing and sometimes only one hand.
Sometimes the stones were gathered up singly and sometimes two at a time.
Hop Scotch is still played on the footpaths in the village.
School children still play "Fox and Goose" whenever they can steal an opportunity in school. This game is played with noughts and crosses placed around a roughly-drawn square drawn on paper or slate.
The following rhyme may be heard with children
Heéna, sheána, mína, mó,
atch a [...] by' the toé
If' he squeáls, let him gó.
This rhyme is used when making a choice between tow or more objects of almost equal value. At the accented syllable the finger is pointed to each object in turn, and the object in which the last syllable falls is selected.
senior member (history)
2020-11-02 13:08
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A particular custom is observed in this locality especially among members of the Roe family and their connection. No meat is taken on St. Stephen's day and there is a pious belief that anyone who observes the fast will be saved from all contagious disease throughout the year. The origin of the fact is obscure but it is very faithfully kept by members of the above family.
senior member (history)
2020-11-02 12:56
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GOOD FRIDAY
Most of this day is spent at Church. Many services being held during the day. Work however proceeds between times.
EASTER SUNDAY
A day of joy. People rise early to see the sun and all repair to church. The custom of eating eggs at breakfast is observed. Easter Cards and greetings are exchanged. People take to wear something new.
WHIT SUNDAY
Special church services.
WHIT MONDAY
A holiday is observed and most people look forward to an enjoyable day.
MAY DAY
On May Eve, May flowers are strewn at the doors & put in the grates to chase away the Bad Fairies for the year.
ST JOHN'S DAY
This day is observed as a Holy Day.
S.S. PETER & PAUL
This day is observed as a Holy Day and no work is done on the farm.
FEAST OF THE ASSUMPTION
- A Holy Day
HALLOW EVE
Parties are held. Apples are eaten
senior member (history)
2020-10-20 10:33
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My Home District
I live in the townland of Lorganboys. There are six houses in my townland. Our house is an old house, there is another old house also. The rest of the houses are new and slated. Our house is thatched and the other old house is galvanized. The names of the houses are Martins (8) Callans (1) MacDermots (7) Duffys. Carraghers house is empty the people who lived in it left it and went to live in Boltons of Donaghmoyne.
There is one house in our farm. From it you can see Collon grove and Carricklick rock in Co Meath.
There is a lake situated on our land. There is an
senior member (history)
2020-10-07 12:25
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when strained, make a great ointment for sprains or stiffness of joints.
Spunk is a weed, and it is a great food for pigs, as it is said to contain milk and iron.
Broom which grows in hedges a [...] brown dye and a poison.
Heather dyes a lilac colour.
The bark of oak dyes black and also cleans dark clothes.
Elder berries make a good wine, also ink and also dye a maroon colour.
Dry leaves boiled for two hours with a little salt added makes a great clothes cleaner for dark colours.
Thistles, docks and buachalans are the most harmful weeds on farms as they spread and poison the land and the Law compels the farmers to cut them down every year.
Roasted turnips mixed with buttermilk is found to be an
senior member (history)
2020-10-05 10:59
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A most regrettable incident happened in the year 1918, when Glenart Castle was burned. There was a tremendous amount of damage done at that time throughout the country. This castle was the property of the late Colonel Proby. The fire occurred on Saturday night, and the Stewart of Glenart Estate at that time was Mr. Cunningham. He was the first person who noticed it and he gave the alarm to all his workmen to come to his assistance.
They arrived on the scene is a short time. By this time the fire was spreading very rapidly, and the men had to work very hard all that night and the following Sunday before they could quench the fire.
The blazes were like a bon-fire, and they attracted the people from the town, and the country places around. There were no guards or fire brigade at that time, and the only people who worked at it
senior member (history)
2020-09-23 08:01
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3
He'd rise upon his heel a bit -
His cudgel thin he'd wheel a bit -
Like a doctor with a lancet, he would decorate yer crown;
If yer head wor like a [...]
Be me word, twould get the "jiggers",
Oh! a caution wud a kippin, is a boy
From Hugginstown.
4
An' see him at the hurlin;
Amid camann a-curlin',
The ball he sends it whirlin', like a bird before a gale;
The hills they shake with shoutin',
While the boys that ball are cloutin',
Thro' goal 'gainst all he sends it a shot
That cannot cannot fail.
5
See his thatchin, an' his sowin',
His cradlin', an' his sowin',
Sure, the sods he turns upwards are a
senior member (history)
2020-09-23 08:00
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Said the sergeant "Im sorry had this dance at all"
Oh bad luck from these women melodeon and all
But one day we will repay them with power and ball
For the trick they have played on us to-day in Lickbla.
The ladies made answer you [...]-faced [...]
You fat-headed gobeens you thick-headed loons
You think t'was your beauty attracted us there
But we have come to detain yous and let the lads clear
All the vermin that pestered the plains of Lickbla.
For these were the lands that our fore-fathers tilled
Where the homeless were sheltered the homeless were filled
Where the golden grain glistened in sunshine and breeze
And the rosy-cheeked apples adorned the trees
Around those beautiful homes that were once in Lickbla.
Names of person who told poem John O Reilly
senior member (history)
2020-09-23 08:00
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Hide and Go Seek. To play this game and number of girls may enter. I point to each girl while I am saying each work of this
Eena Meena
Myna Mo
Catch a [...]
By the toe
When he screeches
senior member (history)
2020-09-23 08:00
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The Care of our Farm Animals
We have several animals at home. Cows, Pigs, Calves, a horse, Hens, Chickens and Cats.
The cows names are "[...]", she is a black brown, "Spot", who is red and white, and "Baby". When we want to bring them in, we just call them by their names.
The cows are the nicest creatures I think. They are tied in cowhouse with a chain and hook and attached to a pole. There is a manger in front of each. The chain is tied around each cows neck.
We give cows turnips
senior member (history)
2020-09-23 07:59
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The Dog.
We always keep a dog at home. The dog we have at present is a cocker spaniel. His name is "[...]".
Although he is a cocker-spaniel he is the best dog we ever had to drive cattle and sheep. My Uncle goes out fowling during the shooting season and he needs him.
The lambs play with him and the sheep are never afraid of him. He is well able to bully the cattle.
He is very well minded. He is fed on porridge, bones, meat
senior member (history)
2020-09-23 07:59
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followed after him and when he overtook him outside said to him "That was a cleverly done as I ever saw." So there and then they formed their partnership. Their first venture was a failure. As they were going along the road they overtook a man driving a cow from the fair to his home. This man was carrying an overcoat, and the day being very hot he was perspiring freely. Murt Finnegan said to him "You are very warm. I will carry your coat for you as you are so warm." When they went together for a short distance Murt Finnegan dropped behind and fell on the road by the way, and began to tumble with the man's coat on him. The "[...]" Flynn looked back and exclaimed to the man "The fever hasn't left him yet". He went back, lifted him up, and brought him on again. The man who was driving the cow had great pity for him. The first cross-roads they came to they halted, and Murt Finnegan was giving him back the coat but the man refused to take it as he greatly feared the fever. When the man
senior member (history)
2020-09-23 07:59
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When calling cats "Pussy Pussy". Dogs are always called by their names "Bran" "Dano" "Shep" "[...]" "Spot" etc. When calling hens to their feed "Chuck Chuck" is said and for chickens "chick, chick, chick" is said. for ducks "feenie feenie" is used and for turkeys bee, bee is said. When people round the district are setting eggs they usually set their own, or eschange them for other eggs with the neighbours. A cross with a pencil is usually put on the eggs before setting them and a piece of iron is put under the straw in the nest to prevent the eggs being destroyed by lightning should a thunder storm occur. Eggs are rarely set in June as a June bird is said to be very weakly.
senior member (history)
2020-09-04 12:23
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Hundreds of people from all parts of north Cork and west Limerick visited the ancient abbey at Tullylease Co. Cork, on the occasion of the feast-day of the founder, St. Bericheart
According to tradition Berichert was the son of the Saxon Prince Cusper who
senior member (history)
2020-09-02 13:54
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in tallow made from fat, and when this tallow hardened around the rush it made what was called a candle. They were strong candles, but only showed a faint light. Candles are made in a different manner nowadays
Basket making.
Basket making is carried on in this district at the present time, and fine rods are needed for the making of baskets. These rods are halved, and from them are made the ribs first. Then the rods are worked over and under every other rib until the basket is completed. These baskets are very useful for carrying articles.
Shoemaking.
The most famous shoemaker of this district long ago was a man named Hughie Dorrian a native of Cashel.
He used to buy the leather in the tanneries in Ballyshannon, and then made the shoes in his own house.
The implements he used when making them were a hammer, last, awl, sprigs, wax and hemp.
Kelp making.
In olden times kelp was made in this district, but there is none made about these
senior member (history)
2020-08-28 14:42
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3
Oh, my rosy sweet blushes she answered,
I humbly excuse you beware,
Do not be led on by a chance sir,
When you meet one that's burdened with care,
At this moment I am not light-hearted,
I am burdened with sorrow & fear,
For oh! I'm a maid broken-hearted
That will shortly die in Dunleer,
4
Not sure of this one
He asked her cuase of her trouble in 1st 4 lines
He's joined in the bold Connaught Rangers,
No word from him e'er do I hear,
Alas! he's exposed to all dangers
And he left me to pine in Dunleer.
senior member (history)
2020-08-26 12:36
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-08-24 09:57
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Thosuigh an fear ag dul amach dhá thómhais, acht chas sé isteach dhá uair agus dubhairt an bhean leis coinneál air, acht an darna babtha a chuaidh sé amach thuit sé agus marbhuigheadh é. Tá Olán Craigh na Molc ann freisin, acht a mbíonn siad ag iasacht. Tá leic an Túrlaigh, barr an leath-chartúbhair, An Spoilleán, Carraig Míchíl Seaom Fhuara, Dinne ghlais, leic an tsalainn, Carraig an Cmáil, Poll an Dúin Bhig, An t-ulán leathan, Carraig an Tobach agus an lochán ar thalamh Chillmhuirbhigh. Tá aill igCillmhuirbhigh ar a dtugtar Gleann Dinne an Tairbh, mar thuit bó agus tarbh síos ann agus marbhuigheadh iad, agus tá aill eile ann ar a dtugtar Gleainnnín an Tairbh. Tá aill ann freisin ar an taobh shoir de'n Dún Aonghusa ar a dtugtar Carraig an Phoill. Thuit fear darbh'ainm Colm ó flaithbhearta síos ann agus marbhuigheadh é. Tá aill i nGort na gCapall ar a dtugtar Carraig an Iascaigh; mar bhí fear ag iascach ann trí scóir blidhan ó shoin darbh' ainm Pádrig Mach Ghiolla Phádraig agus thuit sé san bhfarraige agus badhadh é, agus frítheadh é lá'r na bhárach míle go leith soir ón áit ar thuit sé. Tá poll i gCillrónáin ar a dtugtar Poll na Brioscarnach, mar tháinig bairillí brioscaí i deír ann. Tá aill igCilléinde ar dtugtar Aill na nGlasóg, mar bhí leath-chéad daoine ag iascach ann Iá'l Muire, agus tháinig taoidin Bháidhte agus scuab sé chúig dhuine dhéag aca ar siubhal gur bádhadh iad. Tháinig an chuid eile acu saor as. Tá Súnda an Ghríotóir
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2020-08-05 09:33
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A long time ago the blackentans came into this country. They put up their camps in a village called Cloonkeen. They were English and they were very cruel.
There is a very large wall about two miles from our village where the boys used to hide when they saw the blackentans coming near them in lorries. The had holes bored
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2020-08-05 09:33
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the market of Castlebar every Saturday.
That same man also made baskets. He would pare the rods and wave them threw the other rods. He could make lovely baskets. When the baskets would be finished they were (would) be a lovely seight to see. People used to come from far and near to buy some of the baskets from him. He made a great deal of money on baskets.
senior member (history)
2020-08-05 09:32
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roof of a house and try to catch it in their mouth. Blackberries and sloes are out of season after November Night. People used to throw a couple of apple into a tub of water and some one used to try to take them up one by one out of the water. The person who takes them all up out of the water would get all the apples to eat. The young people have great fun on November's Night ducking apples in tubs of water. After November's
senior member (history)
2020-08-04 09:13
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If the order had been carried out as the captain meant it, the ship's course would have been E.S>E., a course that would have taken her safely up channel, but the chief officer altered the course to E.N. E.], with the result that the steamship "Bohemian", under a full press of canvas and a full heed of steam, struck the cliffs in Dunlough Bay, one mile north of Mizen Head. She quickly went to pieces on the rocks, but not before one lifeboat with seventeen men succeeded in getting away. They got around Three Castle Head, a distance of two miles north of them, and gained the comparative shelter of Dunmanus Bay, where they were able to land. Another boat was capsized, and all the occupants drowned, except the boatswain who had a marvellous escape. He grasped a floating bale of cotton, a part of his ships cargo, and hanging on to it, he was taken by the tide. south to the point of the Mizen. Here the tide turned, brought him back past the scene of the shipwreck, and deposited him in a little cove under Three Castle Head. He had drifted four miles while on the bale of cotton, and when found at daylight by the late Peter Sheehan of Dunlough, the poor
senior member (history)
2020-06-29 16:01
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When butterflies fly high in the air it is a sign of heat. When Curran's (na Currachiní) Point is dark and cloudy it is a sign of of rain. Currans or (na Curraichíní) is a parish South East of Tralee When the midges are biting people it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-06-08 12:49
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Years ago there lived at Ardara a Protestant settler named General Tredenick. He was extremely bitter towards the catholics of the district but always pretended he was their best friend.
He kept two catholic maids and every Sunday when they returned from the chapel he would inquire as to what the priest had to say.
It happened at one time that the priest denounced the protestants for the manner in which the had distributed relief some time previously and in the course of his sermon said "they were all in hell for their actions" in connection therewith.
When the general heard this he pretended to be extremely great with the clergyman and even asked him to dinner; but his object was to murder him.
He issued an invitation to the priest and the priest accepted. While that dinner was in progress, the general there and then asked the priest if he made use of this language.
The priest said "he did" and that he only said the truth and that he was prepared to proved it. The general agreed to pardon him if he did so and the priest put on his stole and
senior member (history)
2020-06-05 12:33
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Beliefs connected with animals
Goats
1. Most farmers keep a goat with their cows because it is considered lucky to do so.
(2) Goats milk is said to be more nourishing than cows milk because the goat feeds on herbs.
(3) It is said to be unlucky to beat a pig or an ass on the head.
(4) Every ass has a black cross on its back because it was an ass that carried the Child Jesus safely into Egypt.
(5) When an ass roars it is a sign a tinker has died.
(6) If you find a four-leaved shamrock where the more stands the foal will be a filly
senior member (history)
2020-06-05 12:33
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For the calf = "Suck Suck"
Call for the geese = Cuddie Cuddie
senior member (history)
2020-05-08 15:05
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baby’s tounge.
XXXVI. ‘‘Tis a lucky sign to have the first baby born in a new house a son.
XXXVII. ‘Tis right to strew a room with the flowers and beaches of white thorn when a baby is to be born.
XXXIV (XXXVIII). Old women around here believe that a green scrath has a cure for women who develop complications after childbirth, for example hemorrhage.
senior member (history)
2020-05-08 14:58
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Story on opposite page was given
To Eileen O'Brien,
Moyleroe,
Delvin
Westmeath
By Mrs Gilmore
Moyleroe
Delvin
senior member (history)
2020-05-08 14:58
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Churning
maker. Rince out grains which remain in churn with fresh cold water into sieve and turn them on to the butter-maker. Cover butter over with gauze cloth and leave it there untill churn etc is cleaned. Then return and put salt on butter and make it with the butter-maker untill the salt is well mixed and water completly gone. Make the butter into shape and wash the butter-maker.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 16:04
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On the twenty-eight of October in 1928 there were nine men drowned in Lacken. The night being very fine they thought of no harm, so they set out to danger.
Their names are Anthony Gouldrick, Thomas Goludrick, Thomas Lynnot, Anthony Kearney, Patrick Kearney, Anthony Collickan, Michael Kearney, and two other Gouldrick's.
They were about a mile out to sea when the wind rose of a sudden. They did not heed it at first because they they thought that it was a fairy breeze, but they were wondered when it did not cease so they began to pull towards home, but the wind instead of blowing them toward
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:24
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-04-15 16:16
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Lá amháin chuaidh an fiach amach ar thóir an maidrín ruadh. D’eirigh an maidrín ruadh i bportach, agus rith sé agus an fiach ina dhiadh go dti coill ina raibh fear ag obair, ag gearradh bataí le teine a dhéanamh.
Dubhairt an mhaidrín ruadh leis an bhfear a bhí san gcoill, “bfhuil cead agam mé fhéin a chur i bfolach annseo ar feadh cúpla noíméad, mar tá an fiadhach ar mo thóir, más é do thoil é.” Dubhairt an fear oibre, “go raibh cead aige a dhul i bfolach ann, ach gan aon rud a dheanaimh as an mbealach ann”.
Chuaidh an maidrín ruadh i bhfolach in áit eicint san gcoill, agus tháinig an fiadhach. Dubhairt sé leis an fear oibre, “An bhfacha tú aon maidrín
senior member (history)
2020-04-15 14:42
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blowing out the wadding which makes a loud report. This is called a gun.
One end of a thread-spool is pointed and a head is taken off a nail. The nail is driven down towards the point of the spool to make the spear of the top.
The girls make daisy-chains and dolls' dresses and belts from sweet papers.
A hole is made in the stem of a daisy and the stem of another is put through to start the chain. This continues until it is long enough.
A sweet paper is folded from left to right making a crease. Then it is opened and the left and right sides are folded in to the crease, then it is closed in. After this it is folded in to make another crease and then the two sides are folded in to this. Many papers are folded thus and inserted one in the other allowing the ends to protrude. When the belt is finished it looks like a series of letter 'V' s.
Nina Holland
Gurthnagranaher
senior member (history)
2020-04-15 14:41
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Golliwogs are made by filling asmall bag with sawdust for the body, a tiny one is filled similarly for the head and sticks are used for the legs
senior member (history)
2020-04-06 11:19
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There are some clothes made locally in this district.
There are two factories in this district. One of them is owned by a man called McIvor. The Rock, Muff Co. Donegal. The other one is in Ture, owned by a man called Byrne who lives in Derry. In the Ture factory, the cutter cuts the cloth and divides it among the girls who take it home to sew together. In the other factory the work is done on the premises. Long ago the sewing was all done in the houses. There is also a factory in Ture where shrouds are made. It is owned by a man called Lynch. Ture, Co. Donegal. This man has had the factory for about two years. Girls are employed to sew the shrouds together on machines, some of the work has to be done by hand. The shrouds are made from silk and cotton.
Jerry McConnell 20th May 1938
Ardmore Muff. Co. Donegal
senior member (history)
2020-03-23 12:38
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People say if you see a "sidhe ghaoth" you should bless yourself and say "God save all travellers."
It is said that if you see a red-haired person early in the morning you should bless yourself or you will have bad luck.
It is said if you kill a robin you will get a sore on your foot.
People say that if a spark out of the fire struck you it is a sign you are getting money.
It is said if you meet one magpie you will have bad luck. If you meet two good luck, three a wedding, four a wake, five a funeral, six a christening
senior member (history)
2020-03-12 10:38
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A man seemingly full of sorrow for his sins knelt before the priest in confession . He told a few small sins at first and then said ."Father I once stole a straw rope " "What harm is that?" said the priest. "But it is "said the man. "No said the priest "Your sins are forgiven" 'But there was a pig tied at the end of it ' said the man.
senior member (history)
2020-03-04 15:43
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Ere life hath well begun.
Now heaven has gained a saint so bright, but Erin lost a son.
His sorrow stricken parishioners, his absence sorely feel.
So when he preached the gospel with fervour and zeal.
He was a great home ruler, was known both near and far
Unto the people of Donard, he was thin guiding star.
Our heartfelt grief, finds no relief, since out good priest is gone
Like St. Peter for his flock, tis by us he did stand
Night or day to come away, he was ready at our call
But no more he'll roam those lonesome roads that leads through Imaal.
senior member (history)
2020-03-04 15:42
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In pious institutions our good priest did us uphold.
And well he done his duty by instructing young and old.
For to love one God alone and Him for to adore
But those kind words we never will hear from Fr. Lynch no more.
Alas! he is gone and time rolls on but yet there can be seen.
The noble works that he has done still keep his memory green
A holy church he did erect in fame and high renown.
To his memory shines that Holy shrine in grand old Davidstown.
Alas! within its sacred walls no more we all hear his voice
That gladsome tone which bid all hearts young and old rejoice.
That noble heart has ceased to beat
senior member (history)
2020-02-07 10:01
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an chúig is dhá fichid is leis an chluiche. Is é an t-am is mó a imrightear na cártaí seo, agus is mó a chaithter aimsear leo na h-oidhcheanta fada san nGeimhreadh.
Tá cluiche ann ar a dtugtar "Jackstones". Ní imrightear ar scoil í le suim bliadhanta ná san mbaile. Sé an chaoi a n-imrightear í.
Tógtar chúig clocha beaga agus cuirtear cuma cosamhail le ciúb ortha acht nach mbíonn na h-imilleacha chomh géar.
Nuair a tosuightear ag imirt na screaga déireann an duine a bhíonns ag imirt "Blood" agus iad a chaitheadh suad, agus iad a leigint anuas ar dhruim na láimhe, agus dá dtuiteadh aon cheann iad a thógáil ó cheann go ceann go mbeidís uilig in do láimh.
An chéad roinn eile iseadh "Scóid": iad a chaitheadh suas a leigint dóibh tuitim ar dhruim na láimhe agus dá dtuitidís uilig ar dhruim na láimhe b'amhlaidh b'fhearr é, agus caithfear chuile cheann acu a thabhairt ar ais in do láimh, agus dá dtuitfeadh aon cheann nuair a bheidteá dhá dtógáil o'n talamh ní bhuaidhfeá agus chaithfeá tosughadh ar an gceann sin aríst.
Sé an chéad roinn eile "onesills": iad
senior member (history)
2020-02-05 10:14
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It was Abram Jagoe who built the Grove Hotel. His son lived in it until he removed to Killarney last year.
The landlord who owned Schull, etc, was called Mr Swanton, a native of "Gort na gCruach", north of Ballydehob. One of his eyes were knocked out once, when a shot was fired at him.
He then ordered that, from Bantry north, and Skibbereen east, west to the Mizen Head, every house should pay a shilling in damages.
His son, George Swanton, was a landlord also, and was more commonly known as "Yellow George". The parish priest of Schull at the time, whose name was Father Murphy spoke very hard against the landlords, at the time of the Land League.
George Swanton, signed a warrant for the arrest of Father Murphy. When he had the priest's name written on the warrant he suddenly got palsy in his hand, which deprived him of the use of his hand for ever.
He then sent a thousand soldiers under the command of a man called Mr Hamilton to help the peelers to arrest the
senior member (history)
2019-12-20 08:53
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 08:17
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When the seagulls fly inland it is sign of wet weather.
When your corns are sore it's a sign that the weather is broken and that there will be rain.
When there's a lot of stars in the sky it is a sign of frost.
When the cat turns his tail to the fire it's a sign of rain.
When there's a puff down in a range it is a sure sign of rain.
When the wirless is creaking it's sign that there is a storm at sea.
When the curlews are screeching it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 12:31
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Cad é an rud a bhíonns agat i gcómhnuidhe, acht nach féidri a choinneál ar feadh deich nóiméad?
Freagra: D'anáil.
Súid é shios sa gclúid é agus dhá chéad súil air.
Freagra: Pota anbhruithe.
Fear beag dubh agus bolg mór, trí cosa anairde is a bhéal ar lár.
Freagra: Pota.
Teach beag gan doras air lán de bhiadh, agus gan salann ann.
Freagra: ubh.
Chuaidh mé suas an bóithrín. Casadh mo mham dom. Bhí srón iarrainn uirthi, agus méireacha airgid. Sí chuireadh ruag ar na préacháiníbh.
Freagra: Gunna.
Capaillín sa stápla, agus é na cosaibh in-airde.
Freagra: túirne.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 11:36
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Labour was sometimes given in exchange for goods.
The following words were used, "boot" (in case of exchange - generally in exchange of horses,) "tick" - used when goods were sold on credit - "He got it on "tick". "Change" - this meant the amount overpaid - "Here is your change". "Cant" - the word "auction" is now used instead of this. "Will you come to the "cant?" His cows were "canted".
It was not considered unlucky to transact business on any particular day - not even on Sunday. In former times markets were held in Killarney and in the other towns of the county. They are still held there.
Up to fifty years ago women selling fish used come to this district (Ballinslane, parish of Ballyhar, Co. Kerry.) from Cromane (near Killorglin.) They brought the fish in a basket on the back. Pedlars used buy rags. These were placed
senior member (history)
2019-09-16 08:40
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40
My townland.
The name of my townland is Slievean Iubhar which means ,the mountain of the yew tree.There are two houses which nobody dwells in.There are 22 houses in it all the time.
John O Connor
Con Tully
Billy Glynn
Thos Mc Mahon.
Thos Lennin
Thos Couniham
Peter Black -a story teller
Thos Rogers
Bernard Mc Mahon drawing a pension
Edward : drawing a pension :
Martin Kiely
Michael :
Paddy :
senior member (history)
2019-09-16 08:37
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There is only one forge in this parish. It is owned by Pat Donnelly and is situated at the place where the old turn pike stood which was demolished in 1936 by order of the Co Council.
Pat Donnelly has been the owner of the forge for thirty one years. He married Margaret Tracey in the year 1907. Her father James Tracey owned the forge in Ashbourne. He died in the year 1918 and then he left the forge to Pat Donnelly. His father owned a forge in Oldtown which is now owned by his brother Michal [sic] Donnelly.
The forge is sixteen feet by twelve in extent. It has a flat roof which is made of boards and felt. It has a square door on it and one fireplace in it. He has six hammers, three or four pincers buffers, pokers, tongs, knives, rasps, a vice, an anvil, a bellows made of cow's hide which
senior member (history)
2019-09-16 08:36
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Local Traditions of Famine Period.
Townlands of Clounleharde and Baranigue.
--
Fuaireas an an t-eolas seo ó Mháiréad Ní Chonghalaig, Barr na nGéag, Carraig Ciarraidhe, Co Luimnighe, 95 bliana d'aois, a chaith a saoghal go léis san áit sin. Scriobhadh é 11/11/34
--
I remember my mother used to tell us about the bad times. I was only a young little girl growing up that time when the right bad times were in Baranigue, but tis well I remember a woman, that lived in Leahy's place now, and she used go to Kilcolman for the meal that was given out to people who were badly off. Her name was Biddy McGrath, and sometimes, faith, they would'nt have the meal to give them and they used to give them biscuits; kind of little cakes. When Biddy used come home with some of the biscuits usen't we go back to her and she used give us some of them. But, thank God we weren't badly off, but tis to get these little cakes we'd go to her. We were little girls growing up at that time and tis how we used steal over to Biddy's for the biscuits.
But 'tis often i heard from my mother, and old Granny, that was my grandmother, the light of Heaven to them all, how old Morgan, that
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 12:15
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The Landlord
About the year 1855 there was great excitement round Castleblayney and the police were very busy. Templeton was the landlord and his agent resided in Coratanty on the Moded [?Model?] farm now owned by Mr. James McBennett (by the tenants) and about two miles from the town. He was not very well liked by the tenants and although he had often promised to lower their rents yet he had never done anything to relieve them one dark Winter night as he was going to his home from town he was waylaid by three or four men. He always wore a coat of mail but these men had a huge iron bar and they battered his head with it until they killed him. Bateson pleaded for mercy and said if they spared him, he would do much for them but they did not heed his cries. When they had him killed (him) they exchanged coats to prevent their being known and they ran off. The bar with which they killed the
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 12:14
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The Landlord [2]
Up to the years nineteen hundred and twenty three the local landlord was Lord Templeton and the estate is yet known [in 1937] as the Templeton estate. In 1923 the estate like many others were sold over to the Land Commissioner so taht we have no landlords now. The Templeton family had been settled in this country from about 1650 when the Cromwellian reign began [sic, 1649-1650 he came to Ireland] and when the last of the MacMahons, the native tribe of Monaghan was put to death. Lord Templeton did not always reside in Ireland but he had agents who always did the business and collected the rents from the tenants for him. Some of these agents were very cruel tyrants and many of the poor people suffered much hardship because of their poverty and not being able to pay their rents when they became due. Evictions were common in this locality and many poor people had to leave their homes to secure shelterer wherever they could find anyone willing to keep them. Many a time they had to sleep outside with their families when the weather was wet and cold. Many little children died with cold and hunger. Farms long ago were sub-divided among members of families on their marriage, and this accounts for the number of small farms which are to be found in Co. Monaghan. The landlord exercised complete control over the tenant. He lived in dread of offending the landlord in any way and he was punished severely. He was liable to be driven away from his land or put in prison. Tithes were collected by the agents long ago and these were collected both in cash and in kind. Corn when it was threshed was collected as title [tithe?] money. Often when the agents sent round their men to collect the goods the unfortunate men were attacked and cruelly beaten. The people greatly resented the giving of these tithes. Until 1921 many of the landlords lived in England came twice yearly to collect their rents. They came to their Estate residences and them all the tenan
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 12:12
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A live in a village called Magheramore in the parish of Oughterard and in the barony of Moycullen. There are twenty five houses in it; some are slated and some are thatched.
The most common name is "Darcy". The palce got its name because it is a plain. There are eight people over seventy years. Their names are Mrs Darcy, Pat Darcy, Martin Maloney, Tom Maloney, Bartley Ruttledge, Mark Ruttledge, Mrs Ruttledge., Mrs Gavin. Some of them have Irish. A lot of people went to America out of the village. There is very good land in it and there is only one small wood in it. There are no rivers in the village only small srutháin.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 12:11
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A. One cuts dresses and the other dresses cuts.
Q. What fish do birds rest on?
A. The perch.
Q. What wets and dries at the same time?
A. A towel.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 12:11
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A. One cuts dresses and the other dresses cuts.
Q. What fish do birds rest on?
A. The perch.
Q. What wets and dries at the same time?
A. A towel.
18-XI-'37
Q. What is on you that you can't see?
A. Your name.
Q. Why did Mrs. Sipson not buy golden Millar?
A. Because she got Windsor Lad [the king] for nothing.
Q. Why were hens dear in Dec. 1936?
A. Because the King gave a crown for an old hen.
Q. What is the difference between a half crown with a cross on it and a threepenny bit with a hole in it?
A. Two shillings and three pence.
Q. Why is Athens like the wick of a cande?
A. Because it is in the middle of Greece.
Q. Riddle me riddle me randy row, my father gave me seed to sow, the seed was black, and the ground was white riddle me that and I'll give you a pipe?
A. The newspaper.
Q. In and out of hairy hole goes bunty?
A. A clay pipe in an old man's mouth.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 12:10
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"There was a a shoemaker the name of Deby Williams who lived in Drumbagh. He could also make spades, shovels and
'' laidles ''
Bisoms were made by people in Corlough.
They earned their living by making bisoms and selling them at a penny each. Their name was Moore.
People in olden times used to make big 'buts' of butter and bring it down to Enniskillen and sell it.
A man named Pat Melanphy used to make ploughs, gates and spades.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 12:09
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on there was no "Weeping John".
One summer evening as he and his wife sat before the door, a stranger came up the pathway and begged for food. They gave him a satisfying meal and he thanked them heartily. John then told him about the bar of gold and he went and fetched it and handed it to the stranger.
The stranger took the bar of gold and when he perceived it more closely exclaimed "you have made a mistake the bar is not as it is supposed to be. It is not heavy enough for gold." The wife was surprised and taking it rubbed it with her apron and noticed some strange (inscription) writing she asked them to read it and the inscription he read was "It is want of confidence in the future that brings unhappiness to the poor"
When he finished there was silence then John said he believed it to be pure gold. Then the stranger said "This bar of gold shall like it gave to you, give me also courage I shall make a new start in life and try to be successfull."
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 12:03
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When Fionn Mac Cooil was growing up a boy, his nurse took him away to the O'Neills in Tipperary. He was there till he grew up a man. One day they had a conquering goal. Fionn beat them all so they got jealous of him, he was too good for them. He and his nurse said that they would come back to Kerry again. They started off for home, and up Killarney woods, his nurse was getting tired. He caught the two legs of his nurse, and put her on his back. He travelled through Killarney. When he came to Moll's gap he had nothing but the two legs of his nurse. He ran away to Lackeen. There he met the Gruagac leah caoc ruadh. He was fishing for the brudán Feasa for seven years. He had a big salmon roasting on a spit, so he told Fionn that he was going to
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:33
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this school which is occupied by a man named John Johnston but he died after a short time. There was another man Jack Byrne who drowned in Lough Doon. One morning he went out in a boat on the lake with one oar and when he in the middle of the lake he threw himself in the water and he was drowned. He was in the water for three weeks and when he was found he was almost unrecognisable.
There was a man named Mc Ternan to manorhamilton driving a cow. A short distance from where Gortnaskeagh school at present he was killed by a motor car. This accident occured abou the year ninteen twenty eight. There was a priest drowned in Lough Gill one day. He was out in a boat on the lake fishing and he was drowned. A woman named Mrs Reynolds was going home from mass and she fell from her bicyle and she was badly hurt she was carried home but she died shortly after.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:33
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Local happenings long ago.
Doon Lake is supposed by many to be very unlucky because many accidents occurred at it. A man named John Kelly was killed at this lake one time he was coming home from sligo with a load of timber and when he was passing Lough Doon his horse went into the water to get a drink. The mans foot got caught in the wheel of the cart and he shouted for help but nobody came to his assist. Once for a long time. A man from ‘Drumkeerin’ was passing by and he cut the rope that was the tying the timber and the timber fell down and killed him. When two men came to his assistance he was dead.
One night in the year nighteen hundred a man named John Boylan who lived in the townsland of Cornalaughta was coming from Sligo with a donkey and cart and at Lough Doon he fell from the cart and he was badly injured. He was carrie dto a house beside
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:31
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The ancient Irish people were experts in making all sorts of family toys. They often made dolls houses with wood and carved them beautifully also all sorts of animals. The dolls they made out of wood and painted were very picturesque.
In the winter time they made ‘clavans’ out of sally rods for catching birds. They also made pretty crosses out of varnished rods and tinsel.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:28
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through Carrigtwohill Co Cork when he saw the castle on fire.
David Barry was said to be the cleverest man in Munster. He asked Queen Elizabeth to let him rebuild his castle and the Queen did so. Then O'Neill came and he burnt the village of Ballintubber which was in David Barrys land. Cromwell came and he fired a cannon ball at (?) it. The castle is empty for the last two hundred years.
There is a dungeon in this castle and any person who would come into the castle and start fighting would be thrown into the dungeon and would be murdered. Inside the door of the castle at the right side there is a hole and it would bring you out in one of Jame's fields in Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork.
About thirty years ago the slates were taken off the castle and new slates were put on by Lord Barrymore's men.
In the castle there is a chapel and monks used celebrate mass in it in times of danger. The monks lived in a monastery in Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 10:23
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XI
One day there was a fight in Knocknaboola between two men, "Knock" was the name of one of then. Knock was getting the better of the other man and the referee said; "Knock ná buail é." and ever since the place is called "Knocknaboola
XII
One night a man was coming home from town about twelve o'clock at night, and at his own gate entering the house he saw a woman; she had grey hair down to her toes, and she was bended in two, and just as he was going in home he saw a big black dog.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 14:41
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Local Song
Fair Sligo town I now must leave
To part it's beauty I do grieve
But not for ever I do believe
I'll call again to Sligo
Chorus
To Hollywell I bid adieu
To Hazelwood and Cairns too
And Tobernault that splendid view
Which adorns the lake of Sligo
When I think of Knocknarea
It's rugged cliffs hang over the sea
It's deep glens where woodbines creep
The sunbeams through the bushes peep
I've tried to climb its hills so steep
Out from dear old Sligo
Chorus
On that lake we often spent
Some happy hours in sweet content
And from out boats sweet music went
Across the Lake of Sligo
Chorus
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 14:28
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Only, Only, only, only, the fine fat fellow
This is the rhyme of thread the needle and sew.
'How many miles from this to LondonDerry'
Three score and ten
Will we be there in candle light
Yes and back again
Open the gates and let us go
Not without your barn and bow.
Here is out barn , here is our bow
Thread, thread, the needle and sew
When we are swinging, each girl get her turn while she is swinging we say
'A tilly; a tally, a pipe of tobacco
A penny to put in the nurses purse
I found a little awl
I stuck it in the wall
And that was the end of St Peter and Paul
With a high swing and a low swing
And a swing to get off the swing swang'
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 14:27
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heavy and his knees grew so wake with terror and fear that me poor Girridhe had grate difficulty to make his own dur at all no atall. Howsonevir he just manged to open the cabin dur and he collapsed in wan hape in the middle of the flur. Poor Manie the creatur almost lost her sinses with the scar and thought it was the divil himself was in it for the Girridhe was all mud from head to feet and beyond all recognition. After the shock was cleared off, Manie rubber her eyes to stale another peep at the monster on the flur, but to her horror didn't she disarn that it was none other but her own darlin man the Girride. "Get up out of that you drunken blagard," scramed Manie who was in a thunderin rage. The poor Girride couldn't move either hand nor fut. At last when Manie's timper cooled she took the Girride by the arm and with her assistance he struggled to the settlebed in the corner. The drops of cowld sweat rolled down his face and after he
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 14:26
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About the toime of the big wind, and its well I remember it, big Marie and her gossun, Paidin lived all alone in a mudwall cabin ablant there at the butt of the big bra. Paidin never seen his father, who was known far and wide by the nickname the girride an well he desarved the name for there wasn't a furze or fince within twinty miles of him that the girride hadn't snared a hare or rabbit. Wan cruel pitch dark night as the girridhe was making his way home by the short cut and just as he was goin to cross the stile what did he hear but a murderin groan in the bottom of the shough. "Who's that," said the girride. "It's me, Jimmy the Brag and I'm doin pinnance down here for all the lies and boastin ever I done" came the unearthly voice in answer. With that the girridhe took to his heels home. His feet got so
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 15:19
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Nora Clancy, Lavally, Ballintogher, Co. Sligo.
Local Hero
A man named Taddy Taheny of Bulford Riverstown, Co. Sligo used to cut one cwt. of turf in the day for a barrel of potatoes. He used to carry the potatoes home on his back the same evening.
My father told me this.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 11:31
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When he arrived there the chief devil asked "Who was there" and Willie answered "Will O the Wisp" Close the gates at wanst and don't let him in,," said the chief devil, "or he'll destroy all that sin the pits.
Poor Willie could neither get into Heaven nor into Hell and so he is going about from that day to this with a lighted candle in his hand setting everybody astray and this he'll continue to do until the Day of Judgement.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 11:31
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his purse closed down the clasp, stuck the purse in his pocket and turned for home and slept on the purse that night. A few days after he went to another blacksmith and he bet twenty pounds that he wouldn't cut his purse open with his sledge. For two hours the devil within the purse got a hammering of the sledge but Willie won the twenty pounds. Next day he went to the fitting -shop and bet fifty pounds with the boss that he wouldn’t cut his purse open with a machine sledge a ten weight at each stroke. He won his money as before and the devil again got a good hammering inside the purse. When Willie left the forge the devil spoke to him out of the purse and says he "Willie let me go and I’ll never trouble you again during the world: Willie never mended his life but carried on the same career as before and after three years he died but had nothing done for his soul When he went to the gates of heaven St Peter asked him what he had done for his soul. He had nothing done and so was too bad to let him in He ordered him down to the gates of hell.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 11:31
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you another seven years to live and as much money as ever you want. “I’m at an awful loss to be so long here" He released the Devil took the money and had a great time of it drinking and gambling for the next seven years When the last morning of the seven years were up Willie went out to his forge again to make more shoes The devil landed in and says he " I have given you lots of money for the last fourteen years now come with me.' Sit down in that chair until I finish this shoe I’m making " "No" said the devil "come along with me you have got long enough" Willie obeyed and the devil and himself started up the town until they came fornint a pub. "I must have one drink," said Will "before I go to hell for they say its a hot place, but what am I to do I have no money.” "I have no money either,” says the devil. "Can't you make a half crown of yourself" said Willie and I’ll put you into my purse" The devil did so and Willie put him in
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 11:30
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it and that all the blacksmiths' hammers or machine hammers wouldn’t cut it "Oh Willie you didn’t wish for something good" said the stranger Willie got all he asked for.
The morning he was expecting the devil he went out to his forge to have two horse shoes made before the devil would come and to have his armchair set in the forge The devil came in at last and said to Willie " The seven years are up now, you get all the money you wanted , you had a good time so you must come with me now. I'm making a set of shoes for an eminent friend of mine I have two of them made so will you sit down until I make the other two. I'll go with you then and throth. I'll be long enough with you still" The devil sat down in the arm chair and was held there. Willie threw down the shoes walked out and left the devil alone for a whole month. One morning he went into the forge and says he to the devil" Are you long enough there.” He answered "I am" and if you let me out of this chair now I’ll give
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 11:30
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himself. The first crossroads he came to he met an angel in the appearance of a beggerman and the Angel asked alms of him. Willie handed him a half -crown. Then Willie travelled ahead until he met the next crossroads and the same beggarman was at it but in a different apparel. He again asked alms of Wille and Willie gave him a half-crown. Will travelled ahead until he came to the third crossraods. The beggarman was there again and asked alms of him as before. Willie again handed him another half crown.
Then the beggarman said" Willie I'll give you three requests only to name them, so be sure and ask for something good. The first one said Willie, is I want an armchair that anyone I put sitting in it cant leave it until I let them go." "Willie you have two requests more so be sure and ask for something good" "Well the other two request said Willie I want to put in one" I want a purse so that every time I put my hand into it I’ll have a shilling in
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 11:30
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Willie, a blacksmith by trade spent all his time drinking and gambling and so he was always at a great short for money. This night he was talking to himself going along the road when lo! the devil walked up to him and said" Willie, what's wrong with you ?" There's a whole lot wrong with me" said Willie. I'm at a great short for money" " Well," says the Devil, " if you agree to come with me at the end of seven years I'll give you now as much money as ever you can spend during the seven years
Willie agreed and took the money and had a fine time drinking and gambling with all his comrade boys. When it came within a few days of the last of the seven years he began to get troubled and to think to himself and he used to walk out along the roads trying to console
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:11
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About half a mile from the Village of Kilnaleck in the townland of Toneylion Drum Buidhe in Andrew Galligan's field there is a conspicuos lofty-headed ash tree.
Of the many traveller who pass by very few would make inquiries of its history.
It is one of the line of trees which in ancient days marked the route for funeral processions to the cemetary at Kill.
In ancient days when roads were not so common these monument trees were planted in such positions that the funeral procession could see from one tree to the next.
When the funeral procession came to one of these Monument trees the corpse would be rested and the rosary recited and the "caoin" would be raised.
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 14:57
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Taken down from my father John Kilkenny who heard it from the old people.
Very long ago they used to have great fun and diversion on Easter Sunday evening. All the lads and lassies, pipers, fiddlers and flute players used to gather together in an open field.
senior member (history)
2019-04-09 08:29
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It is believed that there is treasure hidden in the ground in a moate i Snugburrow. It was hidden in the twelfth century by Franciscan monks because attempts had been made to rob them.
On April 9th 1927 Mr. O'Brien of Lizard, Mr. Allen and Mr. Fogarty of Ballywire made an attempt to dig the treasure. They reached the moate at ten oclock in the night. They began digging until they were nine feet down. A man appeared to them, dressed in white[?] and he told them not to attempt to try to get the treasure and that if they dug another sod they would drop dead.
The value of the treasure is supposed to be £ 9,000. A bull is supposed to safeguard it. Lights are said to have been seen there by night.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 08:22
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By Denis Bowler, Coolroemore

Bíonn mór-chuid feirmeóirí leibideacha ann nach mbíonn dóthain an Earraig féin de'n bhféur tirm acu dos na buaibh, agus go mbíd ar tógáil sar a mbeireann an raidhre amuigh ortha.
Bhí sean-bhó i n-áit éigin agus bhí droch-bhail uirthe le linn an Mhárta. Bhí eagla uirthi go marbhóchadh fuacht agus feannaid an Mhárta í, mar a marbhuigheann sé na sean-daoine. Seadh, dob'fhada léi go raibh an Márta imtighthe, agus nuair a tháinig an lá deirionnach de, bhí eirighe croidhe uirthe agus ars ise,
" Bíodh an diabhal agat anois, a Mhárta, táím annso it aimhdheoín "
Cad a dhein an Márta acht iasacht trí lá d'fhagháil ó'n Aibreán. Thosnuig an chéad lá le gaoith adtuaidh - gaoth dubh nimhneach, agus sioc istoidhche. An tarna lá, do chaith flich-shneachta agus cloo-shneachta anuas, go ndeachaidh an fuacht go smior sa bhudóig bhoicht. Tháinig séideán sneachtaidh an oidhche sin a líon gach poll is páirse agus d'fhág coinnle reódha ar sileadh le díon is fál. Bhí carnáin sneachtaidh is leach-oidhre ins gach áit an tríomhadh lá agus fuacht ann a raghdh trí cláir déil. Bhí an bhó bhocht ar a tárr i n-áirde marbh roimh oidhche an tríomhadh lá.
Tugtar laetheannta na bó riabhaiche ar thrí lá tosaigh an Aibreáin, ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 10:36
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concave on one side and convex on the other, are regarded as being elf-stones.
(Although my own opinions recorded here can hardly be termed folklore, I give them, as they may form a basis of investigation later on for others better fitted to make definite statements on the subject than I.)
Of course it must be understood that some of the elf-stones are flint arrow heads or other flint implements, but as far as I can learn these are usually picked up in the soil. Those bearing the "track of a thumb" are the ones people are generally struck with.
When a person sneezes somebody says "God Bless Us" or "Dia linn": if he sneezes a second time "Dia as Muire Linn," a third time "Dia as Muire as Padraig linn" and a fourth time "Dia as Muire linn as Padraig as a Da Aspoil Déag."
If a person sneezes while eating somebody else throws a piece of bread on the floor. The fairies are supposed to be connected with sneezing.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 10:27
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concave on one side and convex on the other, are regarded as being elf-stones.
(Although my own opinions recorded here can hardly be termed folklore, I give them, as they may form a basis of investigation later on for others better fitted to make definite statements on the subject than I.)
Of course it must be understood that some of the elf-stones are flint arrow heads or other flint implements, but as far as I can learn these are usually picked up in the soil. Those bearing the "track of a thumb" are the ones people are generally struck with.
When a person sneezes somebody says "God Bless Us" of "Dia linn": if he sneezes a second time "Dia as Muire Linn," a third time "Did as Muire as Padraig linn" and a fourth time "Dia as Muire linn as Padraig as a Da Aspoil Déag."
If a person sneezes while eating somebody else throws a piece of bread on the floor. The fairies are supposed to be connected with sneezing.
senior member (history)
2019-02-28 15:58
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with great alarm as it is a sign of continuous rain, but a rainbow in the evening is not looked upon with any alarm as the spell of bad weather is not to (^) continue. The wind blowing from the east and south-east is a sign of good weather. The wind blowing from the north is a sign of cold weather, sometimes bringing frost and snow.
When the seagulls come inland it is a sign of storm. If the swallows fly high it is a sign of fine weather but if they fly low it is looked upon as a sure sign of rain. The robin is looked upon as being the best weather prophet of all. He becomes so bold as to come into the house to you looking for something to eat at the approach of snow.
The sheep are also good weather prophets as they will
senior member (history)
2019-02-28 14:28
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Ainm an aithriseóra: Máire bean Uí Riordáin.
A Seoladh: Cill na mBreac.
A Aois: 50 bl.
Tugtar an Inid ar an aimsear ó Lá le Stiopháin go Céadaoin na Luaithridh.
Le linn an ama sin deintear na cleamhnais, go mór mhór fé an dtuaith.
'S é Máirt na h-Inide an lá déanach cun pósta roimh an gCarghaos.
Bíonn fleadh ins gach tig. Deintear pancóga mar ní bhíonn sodhlaistí againn ó Máirt na h-Inide go Domhnach Cásga.
Tugtar Oidhche na Sgeilge ar an oidhche sin. Deintear dánta i dtaobh na ndaoine ionphósta agus gheibhtear mórán spóirt asta.
Deineann muinntir na tuaithe cleamhnaisí i rith na h-Inide.
Buachaill a bhíonn cun pósta, gheibheann sé cara nó gaol de féin - cainteóir maith cun an cleamhnais d'eunamh.
Stócach a glaodhtar ar an bhfear san.
Téigheann siad go tig an chailín agus buidéal 'na phóca ag an mbuachaill óg. Bíonn siad go grádhmar agus go gealgáireach i dtig an chailín.
senior member (history)
2019-02-22 11:12
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are numerous sea caverns, one of which extends far inland under Slieve Donard. In the mountain streams of Slieve Donard specimens of Topaz, Beryl, Amethyst and Emerald are frequently found.
Violet J Armstrong
Hootha Lodge
Carlingford
21.12.38
senior member (history)
2019-02-18 08:20
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awaiting decision
"Cloonahee House", which is a few miles from Elphin, is at present occupied by Patrick Callery, Solicitor. He bought it from the Land Commission after the Hagues left it. The Hagues were planted there and the dispossessed Irish were the Conreys From this family in the sixteenth century, two renowned Irishmen
senior member (history)
2019-02-18 08:20
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well. According to local tradition, it was at this spot the incident happened to Oisín about the stone which he lifted after his return from Tír na nÓg. He came there in search of the Conn. Fianna.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 13:58
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rejected
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Local Historical Landmark
In a place near the cliffs three fields from our school there is a mound of earth which is locally called "Darby's Bed" [insert] Leaba Diarmada. It is said that Fionn expected Grania's hand in marriage but instead of she marrying Fionn she married Dermot. Dermot and Grania had to fly from the wrath of Fionn. They travelled round the cliffs from Ballybunion and they crossed a chasm on a pig's back. This place is called Léim na muice as is stated before. On their travels they rested on a place only three fields from this school and ever since this lump of earth is locally called "Darby's Bed". We find on the Sopers' and Miners' maps that the right name for this place is "Diarmuid and Grania's bed". This place is in the townland of Kilconly.
Michael Lynch, VII, Doon, Ballybunion
June 27 1938
Information from people at home.
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 08:53
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Is maith le gach cailín agus gach buachaill a bheith ag déanamh bréagán mar chaitheamh aimsire mar bíonn an-spraoidh aca. Deineann muid go leor bláith-fhleascanna agus slabhraidhe de nóiníní agus bíonn siad an-deas. Cuireann muid na blátha geala atá ar an nóinín isteach ar shnáithe agus cuireann muid faoi nár muineál é agus taithnuigheann sé le gach duine. Corr-uair eile is amhlaidh a chruinnigheann muid a lán páipéar agus éadaighe le chéile agus deineann muid bábóg deas. Rud eile a dheineann na garsúin seadh topaí agus is as adhmad a dheintear iad agus cuirtear cos adhmaid ann agus bíonn sé go h-an deas ar fad. Rud eile a dheineann na buachaillí freisin seadh ciseog agus cuir i gcás go bhfuil lá sneachta ann, leagann siad amach ins an bpáirc an
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 08:33
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Is maith le gach cailín agus gach buachaill a bheith ag déanamh bréagán mar chaitheamh aimsire mar bíonn an-spraoidh aca. Deineann muid go leor bláith-fhleascanna agus slabhraidhe de nóiníní agus bíonn siad an-deas. Cuireann muid na blátha geala atá ar an nóinín isteach ar shnáithe agus cuireann muid faoi nár muineál é agus taithnuigheann sé le gach duine. Corr-uair eile is amhlaidh a chruinnigheann muid a lán páipéar agus éadaighe le chéile agus deineann muid bábóg deas. Rud eile a dheineann na garsúin seadh topaí agus is as adhmad a dheintear iad agus cuirtear cos adhmaid ann agus bíonn sé go h-an deas ar fad. Rud eile a dheineann na buachaillí freisin seadh ciseog agus cuir i gcás go bhfuil lá sneachta ann, leagann siad amach ins an bpáirc an
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 07:57
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Prophecy in connection with the Holy Well in the townland of Shancor parish of Kilmainhamwood.
This prophecy was familiar with the old people that lived in that neighbourhood fifty of sixty years ago.
Namely "that the waggons of war would pass by within a pistol shot of the Holy Well, known then as Tobar an Easa. There was then no road in the locality when that prophecy was made but it was verified during the Black & Tan War when the lorries were passing that way night and day.
Read by Padraig Kangley, Hermitage, Moynalty.
senior member (history)
2019-01-22 11:12
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rejected
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10. Sruthán - on farm of Wm. Kilroy because of a small stream flowing along fence.
11. Macairelar - a field of 70 acres in Quigabar divided between several tenants in rundale.
12. Macaireoirte - also in Quigabar in rundale
13. Croiceen - in farm of John Mullany Quigaboy - a little hill.
14. Macairecruise also in Quigabar in rundale.
15. Larkhill in farm of P. Mullany Quigaboy.
16. Garraphunta a small garden belonging to A. Mullany Quigaboy.
Lacken:-
17. Croc ruadh - on farm of J. Tuffy Lacken - reddish clay.
18. Castleparke - . Tuffy Lacken contains ruins of McFirbis' castle.
19. Boirin Uisge - a big road in Lacken nearly always covered with water.
20. Puce mór - on farm of P. Melvin Lacken is largest field he has.
21. Marl field - on farm of M. McCann Lacken on account of marl being in it.
22. The Cumming - on farm of P. Kelly Lacken contains St. Patrick's Well.
23. Rath (or Sraith) Glas - a farm of F. L. Rouse in Lacken contains a large almost square fort about 15 yds by 13 yds. 2 large embankments.
senior member (history)
2019-01-22 11:12
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10. Sruthán - on farm of Wm. Kilroy because of a small stream flowing along fence.
11. Macairelar - a field of 70 acres in Quigabar divided between several tenants in rundale.
12. Macaireoirte - also in Quigabar in rundale
13. Croiceen - in farm of John Mullany Quigaboy - a little hill.
14. Macairecruise also in Quigabar in rundale.
15. Larkhill in farm of P. Mullany Quigaboy.
16. Garraphunta a small garden belonging to A. Mullany Quigaboy.
Lacken:-
17. Croc ruadh - on farm of J. Tuffy Lacken - reddish clay.
18. Castleparke - . Tuffy Lacken contains ruins of McFirbis' castle.
19. Boirin Uisge - a big road in Lacken nearly always covered with water.
20. Puce mór - on farm of P. Melvin Lacken is largest field he has.
21. Marl field - on farm of M. McCann Lacken on account of marl being in it.
22. The Cumming - on farm of P. Kelly Lacken contains St. Patrick's Well.
23. Rath (or Sprait) Glas - a farm of F. L. Rouse in Lacken contains a large almost square fort about 15 yds by 13 yds. 2 large embankments.
senior member (history)
2019-01-14 09:31
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day, days that destroy the blackbird.
33. When the birds go ahide, it is a sign that we shall have great wind.
34. On New Year's Day, the Daylight lengthens as far as a Cock's Crow carries. There is a cock's step of daylight on the 6th Jan.
35. January 14th will be either the coldest or wettest day of the year.
36. If the cat lies in the sun in Feb. She'll creep to the hearth in March.
37. If February brings no rain.
There'll be neither hay nor grain.
38. When a man is dying he sleeps much, but a woman watches by her own corpse.
39. Drunkness comes not without
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 08:02
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damhsa beidh mé ag duidhe orth go breatach. Nuair a fuair an sagart an tairgead chuir sé ceist air an duine tinn an maith leas sgeala ar bith a chuir chuig a mháthair. Scríobh nóta beag chuici agus abair leithe go bhfuair mé bás idir dhá gaduidhe.
Mairéad Breathnach 21 Iúil 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 08:01
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first wife on his knee and was playing with them and having lots of fun. At last the children were tired and one of them said "I wish I had my feet washed and my slate licked until I go to bed" and the other child said the same thing. The father looked at them in astonishment & asked them what they meant. They told him what they meant by having the slate licked. When he questioned them he found out what they got for their supper. The second wife had been pretending all the time that she was feeding the step-children the same as she was feeding her own and she was always saying there must be a "goillseac" (as pronounced) in their insides & that was eating the flesh off them & that was why they were so thin. The man now knew the truth & he drove her and her children out of the house & never left them in any more.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 08:00
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St Ita is the saint traditionally connected with this district. Cill Ide Church about eight miles from here is in ruins.

Story
She had an ass and she used milk the cows in Builead (This Buileadh is one quarter of a mile from this school) and the ass used carry the milk from Buileadh to Cill Ide without any guide. One day he was going through Tournafulla, a man set his dog after him and he ran back the way he came and jumped over a glen. Where he landed the print of his hoofs were to be seen on the stone. (This stone on which the prints were was broken and put in the New Road in Serbhán about three years ago and there used be light then there while the road was being made) When the ass went home to the saint there was a thorn in his leg and St Ita pulled it out and she stuck i in the ground and a bush grew there and the thorns were turned downwards towards the earth.
Sh cursed Tournafulla and she said it would never be without a dwarf (and at present there is a dwarf there). She said that Tournafulla would never be without a smoky-house
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 07:54
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This is the verse sung by the wren boys on St Stephen's Day
The wren, the wren the King of all birds
St Stephen's Day she was caught in the furze
Dreoilín, Dreoílín where's your nest
Tis in the bush that I love best
Between the holly & ivy tree
Where all the birds do follow me
Although she was little her honour was great
Tunip up my lads & give us a treat
Up with the kettle & down with the pan
Give us our answer & let us be gone
We followed the wren three miles & more three miles & more, three miles & more
We followed the wren three miles on a cold & frosty morning
**
We up with a stick & hit her a lick & knocked her into a brandy-ball shop
*Mr ____ is a gentleman, a gentleman, a gentleman
Mr ____ is gentlemen, tis for his sake we followed the wren
We wish you all a happy New Year a happy New Year
Plenty of money & barrels of beer.
* If the owner of the house is a lady Mrs or Miss is substituted for Mr.
** Few extra lines put her by some
Here she comes through the strand
She's the best lady in the land
Open your purse put down your hand
And give us the money to bury the wren (variation ***)
*** Variation (four lines used at the end)
I happed the wren upon a plate
I brought her to, I brought her to
so if you please to give anything, anything anything
On a cold and frosty morning
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 07:53
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The Thrush, Blackirds, crow, sparrow, robin, finches; Bullfinch, chaffinch, Goldfinch, the wren, the blue, tit, the tromáisín, stony picker, the mudlark, the fieldlark, seagull, hawk, jackday, heron, wood-pecker; magpie; woodquest, starling, yellow-hammer, Tweed, Golden-crested wren, owl, wag-tail, Kingfisher, gray linnet, green-linnet, water-hen (coote)
Migratory birds
swallow, cockoo, corncrake, wild-geese, plover, Fieldfare
Swallow come towards end of April & begin to leave about September. They have been seen here up to the end of first week in October.
The cuckoo comes about the middle of May & leaves us about July. Corncrake comes about the beginning of May & leaves in August. Wild geese come to us in Winter in Nov. or Dec. especially if the weather is rough or very cold & leaves us in the soft spring weather.
The Thrush builds in the hedges, or in the ivy on a wall, or in the fork of a tree.
The blackbird in the bushes or beside a
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 07:51
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a rocky ledge or high in an old ruin.
The jackdaw in chimneys, or in trees.
The heron builds her nest or the very top of a high tree near a river or stream
The wood-pecker builds in a hole in a tree
The magpie builds in a tree
The woodquest " " "
The starling in the eaves of houses
The yellow-hammer in walls (holes or crevices)
The Tweed (probably so called from its cry) in ditches
The white owl in an old ruin, in a chimney
The brown owl builds in the woods
The wagtail builds in walls
The Kingfisher builds under the roots of a tree on the bank of a river generally near its source & in lonely places.
The linnets in furze bushes
The water hen in reeds & also in a fork of a tree low near the water.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 08:00
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Áine Ní Fhatharta (13 1/2) do chuir síos.
Gach aon seachtmhadh bliain Oidhche Chinn A Dhá Lá Dhéag bíonn oileán draoidheachta le feiceál amach ins an bhfarraige mhór in aice le Inis Mhór in Árainn.
Anuraidh (5-1-'38) chonnaic mé féin an t-oileán. Bhíos fhéin is gach duine againn sa teach thíos ar an ngardha Árd, garraidhe é seo atá an-árd is bíonn amharc breágh le feiceál uaidh ins gach áit thar timcheall air agus dhá bhrígh sin bhí amharc breágh le feiceál againn ar an oileán.
Mé fhéin an chéad dhuine a chonnaic an t-Oileán. Bhreathnuigh mé ar an bfharaige is shíleas gur tré lasadh abhí sí, bhí an oireadh sin soillse le feiceál amach ar an bhfaraige.
B’iongantach an t-amharc é bhí sé mar bheadh na milliún coinnle lasta amháin de'n fharaige. Ní raibh duine ar an mbaile nach ndeachaidh ag breathnú ar na soillse an oidhche sin.
Chuala mé na seandaoine ag rádh go ndeachaidh triúr fear as an gCaorán amach i gcurrach oidhche dhá bfhaca siad an t-oileán le súil is go bhféadfhadh siad é a choinneál i mbarr uisge i comhnuidhe mar deirtear dá gcaithfeá bróg nó caipín nó rud ar bith isteach ar an oileán go bfanfhadh sé tirm.
Bhí go maith agus ní raibh go h-olc nuair a chonnaic an triúr seo é dubhairt siad go ngabhfadh siad amach go dtí é. Nuair a cheap siad a bheith in aice leis shíl duine aca a hata a chaitheamh isteach air acht bhí an t-oileán imighthe is ní fhaca siad ní ba mhó é.
senior member (history)
2019-01-07 08:43
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LOCAL ROADS
There is an old road commencing in the eastern quarter of Ballybahallow, called the boirin dubh. It is finished at Costello’s in Kilberrihert. It is no longer used. The road from Liscarroll to Tralee runs through this townland. It was built in the time of King James “Seamus ar Caca”. There were milestones on this road. There is one at the western quarter of the townland marked with the figure 3. It is three miles from Liscarroll. There is another milestone marked 2 built into Keane’s gate piers.
A part of this road about 150 yards long at the western quarter of the townland called Raon a Cuarra”. There is also a part o an old road made in the famine times when the men only received two pence a day and died of hunger. Before John’s Bridge was built huge blocks of limestone were used as stepping stones to cross the ford. One
senior member (history)
2019-01-07 08:33
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In former times the people did not begin to wear boots until they were about eighteen or twenty years of age. It was a custom then to see young boys going to the bog or any other place barefooted.
At the present day some children go barefooted in Summertime, but it is going out now, they nearly all wear shoes. Boots are repaired and made locally, but long ago there were far more shoes made by the shoemakers at home. It is cheaper now to buy them in the shop. there is one shoemaker in the district but he only repairs shoes and boots. His name is Thomas Whyte.
Long ago there were other foot coverings called clogs. They were far cheaper than shoes and most of the old people used to wear them.The price of them was only a half a crown and the price of the shoes was seven or ten shillings.
Margaret Gunning,Lisaneena, Collooney, Co. Sligo.
The above information was given to me by my father, Thomas Gunning.
senior member (history)
2019-01-07 08:33
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When children were six years old they began to wear boots. Nearly all the children of the present day go barefoot in summer.
It is said that after a person has washed her feet she should not throw out the water, if there is any one of the family out, she has to wait till they come home and then she can throw out the water.
There is one bootmaker in Collooney whom I know named Jim Doyle. He only repairs boots and shoes.
Pheny Power, Collooney, Co. Sligo.
This information was given to me by my father Sergt. Power.
senior member (history)
2019-01-07 08:32
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greater part of the day and sometimes bring the hay a half a mile outside the city and come back again before they were paid. People bought fowl to Callan and Mullinahone. They started out at two or three oclock in the morning and sometimes would not reach home until dark in the evening.
senior member (history)
2019-01-07 08:32
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Our farm and farm work (May '38)
Obtained from : Oliver Fitzgerald, Ballintaggart, Callan, Co Kilkenny
Obtained by : Ena Fitzgerald, Ballintaggart, Callan, Co Kilkenny
Our farm consists of one hundred and thirty-five acres and is run on a mixed system. About ten acres is under tillage but this varies from year to year. The remaining portion is pasture - meadowing and grass. We have a dairy of twenty cows from which the milk is sent to the creamery, the cream of which is made into butter. From the creamery, butter is sold direct to the inhabitants of the district and large quantities if it are bought by shop owers for retail purposes. When the home demands have been attended to the remainder is exported. This is how one produce of the farm is disposed of.
Another branch of the dairying industry is the rearing of young calves. There require careful attention in the beginning and for several weeks are fed on milk. When they become more hardy they are capable of living on grass supplimented by other nutritious foods until the winter months arrive when once again they require careful management. In due course these cattle gain in substance and condition and they arrive
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:16
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Food of the people long ago
The food and work of the people were different now in comparison with some fifty years ago. When the men were going to work they went out at seven and then they were called at eight for the breakfasst and it was porridge and butter-milk.
About twelve o'clock they got the dinner and it was potatoes, bacon and cabbage. The men sat at the table and the wormen and children sat round the basked and there was a plate with salt and pepper and they dipped and ate away and the basked sat on the potatoes pot.
Oaten bread was eaten every day and now only some people eat it and this is how it is made. Oaten meal is put in a baisin and it is wet with water and salt is added. Then it is mixed until it is a thick paste and then it is flattened with a roller and put beside the fire on a griddle to bake.
I often heard the old people talking about sowans but I do not know how they are made.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:11
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Name of Field
Owner’s Name, Address of Owner,
Side of Field
Derivation of Name
Bár-na-Bín
Owned by Lady Athlumney Somerville, Balrath. It is about eight acres in area.
Origin of name Unknown.
Pairc na Tige
This field is owned by Mr. Eugene Byrne, Ashfield, Beauparc. It consists of about six acres.
Got its name because Mr. Byrne House is build on it
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:09
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Bean Sidhe
When Tom O'Brien was going home from work He saw the Bean Sidhe behind a ditch up Clonard road. She was moaning and combing her hair. When Tom saw her he took to his heels and never stopped till he reached home.
His mother met him at the gate and told him that his cousin Mary O'Brien was dead. Then he understood why he met the Bean Sidhe.
Told to me by,
Mrs. Compton
St Johns Rd.
Wexford
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:04
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Féilí na Bliadna
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 13:46
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Any number of players can play this game.
The players all stand round in a ring an done player gets a bottle with a long neck, and spins it in the middle of the ring, who ever the neck of the bottle points to when it stops, the player in the middle has to kiss that person and then he or she becomes the spinner.
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 14:31
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In the vicinity of Clogheen and in the towns land of Killcaroon an old white thorn tree stands alone overlooking the main road from Clogheen to Ballyforteen. It is known locally as the fairy tree. Tradition maintains that long ago men were hanged from its branches and buried at its roots and further tradition assents that these men were sworn before execution to guard during all time the treasure deposited there by the fleeing Danes from the onward and victorious march of Brian Boris army.
At night young and old people would not go near this tree lest they should encounter the eerie folk who guard its treasure.
Quite recently the legend associated with it has acquired an almost international fame, owing to the song known as the fairy tree of Clogheen, composed by a well known author and sung by the famous tenor Count John McCormac to American and British audiences
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 11:36
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again in the air and then pick up the other three catching the down coming stonebefore it touches the ground. The throw the stone up as before and drip the other four on the ground. Now catch two stones from the ground and quickly catch he down coming stone. Then do the same with the other two stones.
Now throw the one stone in the air and drop the four others on the ground then catch three of the stones, on the ground in your hand and then turn your hand and catch the down coming stone. Now catch the remaining stone that is on the ground twist your hand and catch the down coming one. Then throw the stone in the air and drip the four pebbles on the ground. Quick a lightning catch up the four stones turn your hand and catch the down coming stone.
Whoever fails to catch the stones up on the stone coming down is out of the game.
I played these games frequently in my childhood days.
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 11:35
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A Story about a Priest
There was a priest in Killala namely Father Roache. This priest was addicted to drink and used to go about almost barefooted. He was going down the street one day and a Protestant man who he was I do not know put his head out the window and he began criticizing and laughing about the poor priest
When the Protestant man was tired criticizing and laughing he went to pull in his head but to his grief he could not move it.
The priest passed up the street again and the panic stricken man imploring beseeched the priest to free him but the priest payed
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 11:32
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hand the pipes on sgib to each one who would call in and as each took the pipe he said, "The lord have mercy on the dead" hence the name on tobacco.
Death
Long ago when a person was going to die he was taken from his bed and left on a bed of straw in a corner of the house for a few hours after death. After being washed he was left a day and a night or perhaps two days and two nights overboard. The water in which the corpse is washed is always thrown under a hedge. Claypipes were given to all men who attended the funeral. A man was appointed for this job.
He would have a sgib of pipes at the door and hand one to each person as they would enter Any that is left over would be carried by a man in charge who would follow up the funeral and give one to anyone who was coming to the funeral. Tobacco used was called "Lord a mercy tobacco. When the corpse is leaving or just gone out the door all the tables and chairs that are in the house are burned upsidedown. Brushes and combs are thrown out under a bush.
Coffins:
Long ago coffins were carried with two sheets. These were strong, homespun sheets. Underneath, the sheets were caught
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 10:43
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hand the pipes on [?] to each one who would call in and as each took the pipe he said, "The lord have mercy on the dead" hence the name on tobacco.
Death
Long ago when a person was going to die he was taken from his bed and left on a bed of straw in a corner of the house for a few hours after death. After being washed he was left a day and a night or perhaps two days and two nights overboard. The water in which the corpse is washed is always thrown under a hedge. Claypipes were given to all men who attended the funeral. A man was appointed for this job.
He would have a [?] of pipes at the door and hand one to each person as they would enter Any that is left over would be carried by a man in charge who would follow [?] the funeral and give one to anyone who was coming to the funeral. Tobacco used was called "Lord a mercy tobacco. When the corpse is leaving or just gone out the door all the tables and chairs that are in the house are burned upsidedown. Brushes and combs are thrown out under a bush.
Coffins:
Long ago coffins were carried with two sheets. These were strong, homespun sheets. Underneath, the sheets were caught
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 10:42
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Illness, Death, Funerals etc.
Long ago when people were very sick a loaf of bread was sent for and offered to them to eat. If they failed or were not able to eat it, the priest was sent for at once.
Superstition
Never right to let milk out of a house without putting a little drop of water in it.
hen crowing
Sign of ill luck, death or misfortune People who have a crowing hen, kill it at once.
Wakes
Three men need to go and do go up to the present day for a hurrying charge that is necessaries for the wake and funeral, refreshment coffin etc. There was no coffin as there is not, but they brought timber and plates instead, instead. Then they got a carpenter, treated him with poitin, put him into a barn to remain there all night and put the coffin together. A school master was then brought to print the breast plates. Pipes and Lord of Mercy Tobacco are part of the burying charge.
Pipes are filled and left in a sgib outside the door of the house for the people. Anything remaining over is brought back to the shop.
Lord of Mercy Tobacco a man would be told to
senior member (history)
2018-10-03 15:38
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was heard. The roof of the cave fell in and the soldiers were blocked in forever
senior member (history)
2018-10-03 15:36
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Mindoran Age 70 yor rushes. The old men made a trahook. This was a long rod with a nice round head at one end and the other end turned like a hook. The grass was twisted round the hook end and the rope was twisted in this way.
Some men build their wee houses beside a bank or rock. The bank or rock did as a wall. Most houses has only one room. All the family lay in beds on the floor others made them with sticks. The people were as happy and healthy as they are now.
senior member (history)
2018-10-03 15:34
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daughter of Brian Boru who marrian Cian and lived there. Subdivisions of it are - Cúine na Mna Mairbhainghe - farmer of the dead woman.
Cúinne na Spride - Ghosts Corner.
Both these names are applied to the road corners.
Uisce [?] trí teórann - water of the three Borders. This name is applied to the water obtained when the three parishes of Murragh, Kilbrogan and Templemartin meet.
Páirc na bhRainir - Fallowfield
Páirc na Lein' Aoil [?] - Lime Kiln field
Guirtín - An Goirtín - The Little Falla Where now is Crowleys farmyard a thatched Catholic Church formerly stood.
The farm is still known as Chapel Farm.
Subdivisions - Ballygarvey Bridge - beál Átha on Gáirbhéith - Garvey's Mouth Ford.
senior member (history)
2018-10-03 08:53
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Tá cloch ogham le feiscint ann leis. Cloch cuibhseach mór isea é. Tá líntí beaga le feiscint ann.
Lag na Dhá Sídhe
Tá baile fearann gairid dúinn ar a dtugtar "lag na dhá sídhe". De an mbaile sin tá abha ag eirighe i lios ann. S'é an cúis go bhfuair an baile seo a ainm noch deirtear go raibh troid idir beirt fathach ann in aimsir Fionn Mach Cumhal. Deirtear marthuigheadh an beirt acu agus go bhfuil siad curtha san lios ina bhfuil an abha ag eirighe. Deireann na seandaoine go raibh beirt sidhe le feiscint ann ó am go h-am ina dhiaidh san. Sin é an cúis go bhfuil ainm "Lag na dhá sidhe" ar an áit.
Na fir bréige
Thimpeall míle om thgh tá sliabh mór. Ar an sliabh san tá trí clocha móra ina sheasamh suas díreach ann. Tá ceann mór ina lár agus tá dhéanamh uaig gairid don ceann mór. Deirtear gur chorp Fionn Mach Cumhal na trí clocha san ó Bhaile Átha Cliath.
Deirtear nach ceart d'aoinne aon baint a bheith acu leis na clocha sin agus níor bhac aoinne ríomh leo. Thimpeall blian ó shin leag an stoirm an chlcoh mór agus tá sé caite trasna an uaigh ann. Tá poll sa cloch mór agus dén teas nó dén teodhacht a beidh ann beidh uisce sa pholl i gcomhnuidhe.
senior member (history)
2018-10-02 08:11
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Giants Grave,
Lisronagh,
Clonmel.
Giants Grave is called "Bearna-Dhearg" or the "Bloody pass". It is situated on the left hand side of the road running from Clonmel to Cashel. It is about three miles to the north of Clonmel and about nine miles to te south of Cashel and is in the parish of Lisronagh.
The Grave is marked by a large standing stone. It is called "Bearna Dearg" because of the fierce battle fought there between some of Hugh O'Neills army who were defending Clonmel and Iretons army which were marching from Lisronagh to help the army of his uncle, Cromwell, who was laying siege on the town of Clonmel. The Irish soldiers that were killed on that day were buried there.
Another account about Giants-Grave is that Fionn was throwing a stone
senior member (history)
2018-10-01 15:49
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In olden times very few people wore shoes. Instead the women wore "lóipíns". These "lópíns" were knitted by themselves and were not extra warm. The people wore no shoes
senior member (history)
2018-09-28 08:31
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In my father's farm of forty six acres there are fifteen field. To distinguish the different fields we call each by a name. Some of the names are, - The house field, the calf field, the forge field, the fort field, the paddock, the close field, the valley, the well field, the long field, Balangers field, the ray, the limekiln field, the milking lawn and the green. All of these fileds are called after something which is in or near them. We call one the well field because here are five springs in it, another, the house field, because there was a house built in it once. Balangers field is so called because a man by the name of Balanger lived near it. Another is known as the forge field because Mr Meaney's forge is near it, and so on. A river which comes from Kilmaley lake flows through the most of it and supplies
senior member (history)
2018-09-28 08:30
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"Boxty Bread" - Local Recipe !!
A basket of the best potatoes is got. These are washed and peeled raw; then is procured a tiny grater, on which they are grated. The water is then (shired ?) off them and the grated mass is put into a clean sheet, table - cloth, or bolster - cover. This is caught at each end by two strong men, who twist it in opposite directions, until the contortions drive up the substance into the middle of the sheet etc.; this of course expels the water also; but lest the twisting should be insufficient for that purpose, it is placed, like a cheese - cake, under a heavy weight, until it is properly dried.
It is then kneaded into cakes and baked upon a pan or griddle.
senior member (history)
2018-09-26 08:21
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the farmer is usually ready to give in or at least to split the difference. "Jobbers" may go out to meet late comers and work the same trick.
The mark is made with mud, though some buyers have special coloured marking stuff called radal [?]
The four yearly Tarbert fairs are held in October, November, December and January. All the prices given for cattle are taken from Ballinsloe fair.
There is a pig market in Tarbert every Monday; T. M. OConnor buys pigs according to weight.
Long ago the buyers had to come into the town the night before, and now they need not come in until morning because they have quick ways of travelling
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2018-09-26 08:21
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How sugans are made
An arm full of straw or strong hay is got, also a twisting bow to twist the sugan. The twisting bow is made by putting a bow at one end (as shown in diagram). Then put a piece of strong rope from a to b. The twisting bow is now made.
One man sits on the chair to feed the sugan. The man feeding the sugan damps his hasid to prevent the sugan from slipping.
Another person twists the twisting bow. A long "masg" of hay is got, and put around "a" . A pull must be kept on the sugan to prevent it from "costrime".
senior member (history)
2018-09-24 15:57
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If you looked at Mount Leinster from Garryhill you would see a long white mark down the side of the mountain that looks just like a mark made by a person's foot slipping down the hill.
At Ballinahill also there is a large stone to be seen around this is the legend that accounts for the origin of the mark and the stone.
Once upon a time there was an old woman who lived on Main Leinster and who
senior member (history)
2018-09-24 15:56
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if you have had a cut let a dog lick it and it will heal.
senior member (history)
2018-09-24 15:54
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Ballysteen cross is the center of four of the most important roads. One leads to Askeaton and no one can recollect when it was made. Another leading to Pallaskenry is one of the oldest in the district. The third called Naughtons road, ends at Ballysteen quay. The fourth called Ballinvoker road leads to Beigh Castle. It was made about sixty years ^ago by the brother. Patrick Neville, Drominuna and John Neville Ballinacourty, both deceased, and a cousin, James Culhane, still living, at Mictchelstown. These men took a contract at the rate of ten shillings per perch and their employees were paid ten pence per day. Among these were Two Russel brothers Beigh Castle, and Tom Tierney and John Shaughnessy of Ballinvoker. Two Kenricks of Ballinvoker rolled the road for two days with a stone roller drawn by horse. From Beigh Castle the contracters continued the road, past Shiers farm from which it gets its name, to Duopes
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2018-09-24 15:54
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his eyes was another pot of gold. He never had any need to work again as he had plenty of money for ever afterwards.
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2018-09-24 15:53
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On the third day as he was admiring the place around him, he was suddenly disturbed by a man standing beside him. This man was a shoemaker, he asked John if it was any harm to ask him why he was walking back and over on the bridge for the last two days. John Murphy told him about the dream he had. The shoemaker told him that he ought to have some sense and that he should go home again for the shoemaker said that he dreamt the same thing and it was told to him in his dream that there was gold hidden in a bush called Sgeachóigín árd meagh".
When John heard this he went home immediately because that bush was in his garden. When he got home he started digging as fast as he could until he got out a pot of gold. He started to dig the other side of it and there before
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2018-09-24 15:53
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Hidden Treasure
Many years ago there lived a man in lonnemara a man named John Murphy. He was a poor man, and he had a very large family. He had a small piece of mountainy land which wasn’t of much use to him. All the money he could make of the land could hardly feed himself and his children.
One night while he was asleep he dreamt of that if he went to the bridge of Athlone he would get his fortune which could make him rich for his lifetime. He dreamt of that three nights in succession. On the fourth day he went to Athlone and he kept walking back and over the bridge all the day but nothing happened. He got his lodgings for that night in a house that was very near the bridge. On the next morning, he awoke very early and he kept walking on the bridge just the same as he did the day before but nothing happened.
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2018-09-24 15:53
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On the third day as he was admiring the place around him, he was suddenly disturbed by a man standing beside him. This man was a shoemaker, he asked John if it was any harm to ask him why he was walking back and over on the bridge for the last two days. John Murphy told him about the dream he had. The shoemaker told him that he ought to have some sense and that he should go home again for the shoemaker said that he dreamt the same thing and it was told to him in his dream that there was gold hidden in a bush called Sjeacóvjín árd meaj (?).
When John heard this he went home immediately because that bush was in his garden. When he got home he started digging as fast as he could until he got out a pot of gold. He started to dig the other side of it and there before his eyes was another pot of gold. He never had any need to work again as he had plenty of money for ever afterwards.
senior member (history)
2018-09-24 15:52
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an chruach agus bhí rínnce in a thigh an oidhche sin .Bhí an cruach tamall ó'n dtigh agus níor mhothaigh muinntir an tíghe puinn go dtí go bhféachadar an chruach tre theine. Do fuaradh buidéal go raibh íle ann inaice na h-áitear maidin.Níor fuaradh amach riamh cé dhein an dóighteán.Fuar muinntie na h-Éigeartaigh dachad púnt mar chúiteamh.
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2018-09-24 15:51
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Travelling Men and Women
Collected by Margret Rabbet from my mother Mrs Rabbet Inch Road, Burnfoot, Barony of Innis Again. lo Donegal.
Philip and Denis Mac burden were travellers. They went about. One played the fiddle and the other the bagpipes. They went around from town to town attending fairs and nobbles.
The Mac Cools Katie and Paddy. The were tramps they earned their living by making tins.
A deaf and dumb woman used to go about called (mrs Burns) she had a son called joe. She earned her living by making paper flowers and telling fortunes. The son told the people the meaning of her signs. So she travelled over Ireland and fomerly come from Dubbin.
Paddy Dunniece. He wore funny clotches and never wore boots. He went around from house to house and slept in caves at night. If he met you on the road he would lie down on the road and start rolling and turning over on the road. Everybody was afraid of him
senior member (history)
2018-09-24 15:49
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“Tuigeann go maith, a cháilín ó Chiarraidhe.”
“Tá salann ar do leitin.” and she ment by this that there was poison in Daniel O' Connell's glass. It is said that he changed glasses with the man next to him and it is said that it was that man who put the poison in his glass. Daniel O' Connell did not get poisoned. It is not known whether the other man got poisoned or not.
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2018-09-24 15:48
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ing out in the harbour. He sent a messenger after her to tell her come back, but she said she wouldn’t because she wanted it more than her did. She came back to Ireland and she and her husband lived happily. Until he went to see this two sisters again. They told him when he was leaving, that the king in the eastern counyty had a shawl called, an brar alws. That shawl when worn, even the coldest day, would make the icabert sweat. When the king went home he said to his wife, “when I was coming home, it suggested itself in my mind, to ask you, to get me the brar alws, by the king in the eastern country. She began to get suspicious about her sisters, but the next morning she began her journey in her boat. As before when she was entering the castle the door said “gíoscán, gíoscán, bí dána is ná bí dána.” She got the shawl and as before her robbery was discovered whem the king got up. She returned to Ireland with it, and the two of them were very happy, until the next time her went to see the two sisters again. The next thing they told him was that, by the same king was a craob ciol, and that instrument would play when touched. It played the sweetest music ever heard and it was highlt valued by the king. Mora refused to go, but her husband kept begging and threatning her until at last she consented to go. The next day she began her journey and as before when she
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2018-09-24 15:47
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was going in the door it said, “gíoscán, gíoscán, bí dána is ná bí dána". She was filled with fear, at the thought of the fate she would meet if she was caught. She searched the house, and at the dawn, she found the room where the musicial instrument was kept. When she touched it, it began to play and it woke up all in the house, the king someone is at it. It would not play without being touched, so I will go and see who is there. He went down and when he saw who was there he was delighted, he called out and he called his soldiers. They surrounded the house and they captured Mora. The punishment used be given to thieves at that time was, a a big fire would be made and they would be thrown into it and burned alive. The king said he would give her that punishment and she said that she deserved it for taking what belonged to another. She then told him, that she should get even greater punishment then burning to death. She told him, that he should go the forge and bring home all the flails he could get. When he would come then to put her into a bag and beat her to death. Well “I think it would be safer to put you in the bag first” said he, so he put her in, and them he started his journey. Mora was left in the kitchen with the old queen who was making grand cakes for the king and his
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2018-09-24 15:46
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257
"Leighiseanna"
fúirthiní = ma gheibheann tú braon uisge i bpoll beag i carraig deirtear go leigheasann an t-uisge seo fáirthiní má deintear é do chimilt díobh.
Infleuenza = is cured by the
maidenhairfern.
Rheumatism= is cured by ashleaves.
Insomnia = ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;cowslips.
Sciaticapains are;;;;;;;;;;;goutwork
Epilepsy =is ;;;;;;;elderleaves.
Lung troubles are are cured by
elecampane.
A Weak heart ;;;;;casarabhán .
Bleeding -is stopped by by blood grass.
Bloodpressure is cured by nettles.
Chin-cough is cured by mouse-ear
1Another cure for the chin-cough is to let a fasting gander screech three times into your mouth.
11 if you met a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure for the chin-cough ,anything
senior member (history)
2018-09-21 15:18
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There is a large house in Tavrane known as the "Tavrane House". At present it is owned by Mrs. Patrick Walsh but long ago it was owned by a family of the O'Gradys. This family owned much land and therefore they had a number of cattle.
One morning as the man who was in charge of the cattle was going to the field to drive them in for milking, he heard the cries of a child. He listened for a while and found that the cries came from a fort which was near the house. Thinking that it was one of the neighborring children who had strayed from his home he went to the fort and there he saw a beautiful lady and a child. They did not see him and he kept quite. The little one was still crying and he heard his mother saying "don't cry". The cow will soon be milked
senior member (history)
2018-09-21 15:18
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There is a large house in Tavrane known as the "Tavrane House". At present it is owned by Mrs. Patrick Walsh but long ago it was owned by a family of the O'Gradys. This family owned much land and therefore they had a number of cattle.
One morning as the man who was in charge of the cattle was going to the field to drive them in for milking, he heard the cries of a child. He listened for a while and found that the cries came from a fort which was near the house. Thinking that it was one of the neighboring children who had strayed from his home he went to the fort and there he saw a beautiful lady and a child. They did not see him and he kept quite. The little one was still crying and he heard his mother saying "don't cry". The cow will seeon be milked
senior member (history)
2018-09-20 08:44
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also put them on tthe top of the houses. Any family that did not carry out the custom bad luck would be on them and sickness, because it was said that Our Blessed Lady would not give them her blessing. This old custom is still kept up.
On Christmas they put holly up. This was an old custom that the old peple did long ago. They do it yet. They put it up for ten days and when the time is over they take it down and burn it.
When people have finished cutting the corn they make a plait from the straw called the " Cailleach". This they would put round the Landlady's neck. This was done so as the woman would give a treat. Even to this day people say "have you got the "cailleach" yet, meaning of course was the corn finished.
senior member (history)
2018-09-20 08:09
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Once upon a time there was a house in Burren owned by Mulavey in which there was supposed to be a ghost
There were many funny stories told about it including this one. One night the boss was in the mill, his wife was getting his dinner ready when suddenly the door was opened and the lamp blown out. When the man came home with the meal he had a terrible job trying to get it in. When he would go to carry in the meal it would be pulled off his back.
One night they proposed to fight the ghost. When they went to bed the ghost pulled all the clothes off them but the sheet. They fought up and down the room for the sheet but the lad beat the ghost.
Then the priest came and he got the ghost under a thimble on the dresser. He is supposed to be
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 15:49
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léis an clóicín deas do dhearcas air,
Mo Róis Geal Fáin.
(vi)
Trí conntaé na Gaillimhe,
'S as súd go Conntaé an Cláir,
Sheolfad soir a tuairisc
'S á cuardach anns gach áit.
Ar shogh ná a suain ní bheadsa buan,
Go bpósfad i go slán.
Is go mbead fe mheas, na clóicín deas,
Mo R. Gh. Fáin.
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2018-09-18 15:49
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Bhí baintreach ann fadó agus bhí seisear cloinne aici, beirt mhac agus ceatharar iníghean. Bhiodar ana bhocht. Lá amhain dúbhairt an mac ba shine aca go raghadh a dreabtháir agus é féin tímcheall na condaé ag lorg oibre.
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2018-09-18 15:46
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Riddles
When is a rock, not a rock
Answer When it's a shamrock
When is a black dog not a black dog
Answer When it's a greyhound
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 15:45
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Warts
Slice a potato into nine pieces and rub each piece on the warts then wrap them in a piece of paper and throw them on the road and the person that picks them up the warts from your hand goes on to his.
A sprain
Rub goose grease on the place where the sprain is
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 15:45
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Cloths
Long ago used to wear red petticoats and check shawls and no hats.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 15:45
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Food
On a fast day long ago they used to eat toast bread and red tea.
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2018-09-18 15:45
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Story
Once upon a time there was a man and woman living near Finglas and the woman died. When the woman died the man took the ring off her finger and put it on his own and the woman buried. That night the man was in bed, there was a knock at the door about four o clock in the moring. He opened the door and his wife was at it and he said come in and go to bed. She said I will not but give me my ring. He said here it is and she wood not take it. She told him to put it on a shovel and he did she took it and went off.
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2018-09-18 15:45
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180
There were no clocks long ago and they had to look up at the sun to know the time. The men went to work at sunrise and he came home at sunset.
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2018-09-18 15:44
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Long ago three acres of potatoes were sown in ridges on our farm.
Spades with timber handles were used to dig them. Potatoes were eaten by the people, given to cattle and for eight pence a weight. About twenty years ago timber ploughs were made and cattle were used to pull them.
The scollan were cut in the houses by women. While the men dug up the soil with spades to make it fine the seed was being prepared. Then holes were put in the soil and the scollans were put down.
The people helped each other setting and digging them until one farmer had his work done.
senior member (history)
2018-09-18 15:43
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Story about a church
Long ago bolumcille and his men was building a church in Carndonagh. They started building it three times. Each time they built it when they came back it was tossed. One night he left a man to watch it and a dove came and lifted something belonging to it and carried it to Roshenney. So bolumcille and his men proceeded to building the
senior member (history)
2018-09-17 07:59
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362
"I will shoot him," said the land lord then the other man lifted his own gun and aimed for the landlord, "If you will shoot it I will shoot you," said the huntsman. The landlord lowered his gun, and walked away.
Frankie Coughlan, Ballydehob,
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2018-09-17 07:58
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Years ago, a man named Bill McElligott of Duagh North Kerry, dreamt that crocks of gold were hidden near the old Castle at Purt, Abbeyfeale. After dreaming several nights about the gold, he determined to go and seek it. When he arrived he started to dig and after some time he came to a large flag. When he tried to lift it, he found that it shook a large
senior member (history)
2018-09-14 14:10
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Béal Átha dTúis (?)
Tá an abha atá ag eirighe i "lag na dhá sidhe" ag dul treasna bóire.
Níl aon droichead ann. Tugtar "Béal Átha Dlúis" ar an áit sin. Ta sean-fothrach gairid den áit. Bhí Máirghead O Keohan ina connuidhe ann de oidhche amháin chuaidh sí amach fé dhéin uisce go dtí ann ói. Bhí tuillle mór so abhainn agus s domhan sí agus thuit sí isteach. Bhí sí báidhte ann ar nothain.
An Maoilinn
Timpeall míle slighe ó séipéil an t-sean pobail atá an achar talamh ar a dtugtar an Maoilinn. Tá sean bóthar ag dul tríd an talamh sléibhteach luacrac atá ann. Bhí duine de treabh na Condúnaig 'na cónnuidhe ann fadó agus bhí an Maoilinn go léir fé agus tugadh Rí an Maoilinn ar.
Tá moran sgealta ag muintir na h-áite mar gheall ar an duine sin. Tá baile fearann eile ar a dtugtar an Maoilinn ar leis timpeall ocht míle ó'n áit sin i paróiste na hÁirde Mhóire.
Móin na mbráthar
Tá timpeall 180 de thalamh sléibhteach gan aon teorann atá ann. Níl aon ceart ag aoinne thar an duine eile leis an dtalamh sin. Baineann na daoine timpeall ar an móin ann. Tá cuid maith cearca fraoigh maireachtaint ann.
senior member (history)
2018-09-14 14:09
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The following are the names of farm animals in my district -
The horse; the cow; the pig; the sheep; the goat; the hen; the duck; the goose; the cat; the dog;
Some of the cows have got names, such as Bawng
senior member (history)
2018-09-14 14:09
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are tied around the neck, they are tied with a chain. There is a channel in the house. When milking the milkers sit on a stool. The milking is done with a bucket.
Dermot Daly,
Ballydehob,
Co. Cork
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2018-09-14 14:08
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Games played.
The following are the games I play.
The winter games are four-corner-fool, blind man's buff, making snares for catching hares and rabbits, pitching with money, bird basket making, and splintering. The summer games are bowling, pitching quoits,
senior member (history)
2018-09-14 14:08
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fields, and if they saw a bird they would dazzle it with the light and while it is dazzled they kill it.
Michael O'Regan
Ballydehob
Co. Cork
senior member (history)
2018-09-14 14:07
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There was a grave made in Tavnghabeg fort and no one ever saw the people who put the coffin in it.
The 'Caoineadh' was heard in Tavnghabeg fort.
In the middle of the fort there is a hole which the people call a cave.
Annie J. Finn,Tavnghabeg, Cloontia
Annie J. Finn got the information from Celia O'Hara
Annaghin, Gurteen, Co. Sligo.
senior member (history)
2018-09-14 08:40
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107 Cha dtig ciall roimh aois.
108 Caidé dhéanfadh mac a'chait ach luchóg a mharbhadh.
109 Cuir síoda ar ghabhar agus is gabhar i gcomhnaidhe é.
110 Castar na daoine ar a chéile ach ní chastar na cnuic ná na sléibhte.
111 Cha déan breaghta brachán.
112 Cuirfidh sí dealán ar a' phíopa dó.
113 Cuirfidh a shrón fhéin comhairle air.
114 Cothughadh na doininne soineann na hoidhche.
115 Cuireadh lasóg sa bharrach.
116 Chan 'achan lá a mhuirbhfeas Mac Giolla Bhríghde bulóg.
117 Cha dtig leis an ghobadán an dá thráigh a fhreasdal.
118 Chead aige fuaradh sa choiceann ar théidh sé ann.
119 Cam díreach an ród sé an bealach mór an aithghiorra.
120 Cuireann duine snaidhm le n-a theangaidh nach scaoileann sé le n-a fhiaclaibh.
senior member (history)
2018-09-13 15:56
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The Races of Belmullet
Long ago there was a Jew living in Bellmullet and he did not like cats. He told people that he would give them a half crown for every live cat they would bring to him. They all brought in their cats to him, and so
senior member (history)
2018-09-13 15:56
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The Races of Belmulet.
Luarabóg, larabóg, buidhe Ó Néill,
Néill a pribeán, pribeán sualach, sualac seág, seág mineán.
Dá cois plúbán, lomán lachaigh, cuir na gallaigh isteach i bhplaitheas.
Lural, laral, limeral lock,
Five miles, its ten o'clock, I sat too soon, I nailed spoon.
I lent the spear to write to the King.
Hickidy, Hackidy, black put in.
Lural, laral, limeral lock,
Five miles, I sat in a block,
Please give me the lend of your spear to kill a fat deer.
White cow, black cow, follow to the rock tail, heckler.
senior member (history)
2018-09-13 15:56
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The Races of Belmulet.
Luarabóg, larabóg, buidhe Ó Néill,
Néill a pribeán, pribeán sualach, sualac seág, seág mineán.
Dá cois plúbán, lomán lachaigh, cuir na gallaigh isteach i bhplaitheas.
Lural, laral, limeral lock,
Five miles, its ten o'clock, I sat too soon, I nailed spoon.
I lent the spear to write to the King.
Hickidy, Hackidy, black put in.
Lural, laral, limeral lock,
Five miles, I sat in a block,
Please give me the lend of your spear to kill a fat deer.
White cow, black cow, follow to the rock tail, heckler.
The Races of Belmullet
Long ago there was a Jew living in Bellmullet and he did not like cats. He told people that he would give them a half crown for every live cat they would bring to him. They all brought in their cats to him, and so
senior member (history)
2018-09-13 15:55
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There was a lot of gold buried in the castle at Shrule and it was suppose that there was an enchanted rat in charge of it. One day Joe Golding went to dig for it, and he came to a big stone flag, which was about the size of a table. He struggles to lift the flag and out jumped the enchanted rat, and it followed him. He went away and he returned the next day with another man, but they could see no trace of the flag. It was supposed the rat had covered it again and they did not find the gold.
Máire Ní Longáin, Shrule. From father, Paddy Langan Shrule, Aged 65yrs
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2018-09-13 15:55
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Cístí Óir i bhFodhlach
Dubhai sí leis sicín a thabhairt don easóig, buidéal bainne a habhairt don cha agus uisge don iasg. Thug sí na udaí sin dó, ach nuair a chonnaic an far an easóg, an cat agus an iasg ins an dún, rith sé amach agus faitchíos air, agus níos tháinig sé ar ais arí go deo.
(it is said that the name of the old woman who knew about the gold was Mary Beatty.)
(Story from father, Hugh Cahill, Carramore, 50yrs)
Mary Cahill, Carramore
Síos ins an tsean Roilg, i gCille tá pota óir curtha ann, agus duine a bheadh ag iarraidh an pota óir d'fágail, sé an chéad rud a bheadh le déanamh aige ná suibhal thart san Roilg trí uaire i ndeaidh a chéile agus a phaidreacha a rádh, agus má thosuigheann sé annsin ag baint leis an óir d'fágáil, gheobhaidh sé é gan móran moille! ............
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2018-09-13 15:55
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Tá cloch againn le feiscint ann leis. Cloch cuibhseach mór isea é. Tá lítí beaga le feiscint ann.
Lag na Dhá Sídhe
Tá baile fearann gairid dúinn ar a dtugtar "lag na dhá sídhe". De an mbaile sin tá abha ag eirighe i lios ann. S'é an cúis go bhfuair an baile seo a ainm noch deirtear go raibh troid idir beirt fathach ann in aimsir Fionn Mach Cumhal. Deirtear marthuigheadh an beirt acu agus go bhfuil siad curtha san lios ina bhfuil an abha ag eirighe. Deireann na seandaoine go raibh beirt sidhe le feiscint ann ó am go h-am ina dhiaidh san. Sin é an cúis go bhfuil ainm "Lag na dhá sidhe" ar an áit.
Na fir bréige
Thimpeall míle im éigh tá sliabh mór. Ar an sliabh san tá trí clocha móra ina sheasamh suas díreach ann. Tá ceann mór ina lár agus tá dhéanamh uaig gairid don ceann mór. Deirtear gur chorp Fionn Mach Cumhal na tríclocha san ó Bhaile Átha Cliath.
Deirtear nach ceart d'aoinne aon baint a bheith acu leis na clocha sin agus níor bhac aoinne ríomh leo. Thimpeall blian ó shin leag an stoirm an clioch mór agus tá sé caite trasna an uaigh ann. Tá poll sa cloch mór agus dén teas nó dén teodhacht a beidh ann beidh uisce sa pholl i gcomhnuidhe.
senior member (history)
2018-09-13 15:54
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Seana Ráite
1. Duine i mbaile nó baile i bparóiste (is fuairiste iad so a cuir síos)
2. Seana bhríste
" Bhásta
" Bháille
Capall bán agus píobaire
3. Cailín Domhnaigh, Gamhain Samhraig, Agus capall aonaig. Ní trí rudaí ná feadarís ciaca olc nó maith a bhéidír.
4. Is minic a chonac drius gan deilgne
Madra gan cluas gan eirball
Mactíre agus ag ól bainne beirbhthe
An eas cú ar a leath glúin agus í ag óg Snaoire
An gealún go flaitheamhail ag ól píopa
An teampall ar fuaid gleanta a geitilig
Cioca is mó an céad bhréag nó an bréag deireannach
5. Ní biadh bainne agus ní bainne bláthac
Ní feóil putóga
Agus mar sin féin bíonn daoine sásta.
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2018-09-13 15:51
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Nuair a bhuail na Sasanaigh ar na Gaéidhil i gcath Cionn tSáile cúiadh na Gaédhil go léir ar theithe leó féin. Níor stop ceann acu gur tháinig sé go Meall a tSruthán i bparóiste na Léime. Mac Córcadán ab ainm do, agus bhí sé cómh threithe tuirseach gur chuir sé a codhladh cois claídhe fé sgocán. Do bhí an grían ag go hárd sa spéir sar a dhúisigh sé agus é in a ana ocrach. Nuair d'éirigh sé d'fhéach sé mór thímpal air agus ní raibh radharc ar aon aige. Do bhúail sé roimis agus casadh tig air cúaidh sé isteach agus dinnis sé an sgéal dóibh agus iad dimug air agus bhí an fáilte roimis. Do cuir sé fé ann agus bhí mach amhain aige a bhí ana láidir. Nuair a fúair a Máthair bás lá'n socruidhe ní loigfeadh sé aon duine ina goire. Bhí sé cómh ceannamhail bhí cóta bréade air agus thóg sé Cóimre fé na oscail agus do rug sé ar arbaill an chóta agus do rug sé go dtí an uaigh é. Do chúaidh sé ceithre míle go dtí an uaigh agus tá a sinnsear san áit fós.
Told by John Hurley (Age 60)
Ciarán Nolan, Gurranes, Caheragh, Drimoleague, Co. Cork
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2018-09-13 15:46
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Tá tobar a' Aifrinn ar thalamh Liam Uí Loinsigh. Tá sé thíos sa ghleann agus i lár an ghleanna atá log agus ba mhaith an áit í cun aifrinn a léitheamh aimsear na ndlighte bpianna.
Tá sé i mbéalaibh na ndaoine gur léifeadh na h-aifreanntí ann go minic le linn na h-uaire úd.
Baile fearainn
Cúlruadh is ainm den baile fearann ina bhfuil mé im chomhnuidhe. 'Sé an chúis go bhfuiar sé an ainm sin ná go bhfuil talamh ruadh ann.
Talamh ruadh seo in gach aon áit thimpeall ann agus baintear a lán móna ann.
Ainmeacha na bpáirce
Seo iad cuid des na hainmeacha áta arna bpáirceanna-
Páirc a' tobair, Páirc na fathaighe, Pairc a' trí cúine, an curroch báidhte, páirc a' cluiche, páirc cionn tumhal a' gheata, an píosa beag siar sin de.
Rian na h-Ársíochta
Tá rian na h-ársíochta ag cúpla áit. Tá lios gairid den tigh.
Deireann cuid des na daoine go bhfuil na daoine maithe ina gcónnuidhe ann ach ní mar sin atá an scéal.
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2018-09-13 15:45
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Bhí fear na cómnuidhe ins an áit seo fadó. Gach oidhche raghfadh sé go dtí tig puiblí chun uisce beatha d'fhághail . Aon oidhche amháin bhí boidéal isce beatha ina phóca. Thuit sé ina chodladh cois teine. Chuir an boidéal amach agus briseadh é. Bhí trí poill beaga ins an úrláir agus do rith an uisce beatha isteach ann. Bhí an fear 'na chodhladh. Tháinig luch amach agus d'ól sé an chéad pholl uisce. Annsan chuaidh sé isteach agus taréis tamall tháinig sé amach agus d'ól sé an dara poll uisce beatha. Chuaidh sé isteach arís agus taréis cúpla neomat tháinig sé amach agus d'ól sé an tríomhadh poll d'uisce beatha. Annsan do sheas sé ina a dhá chois agus dúbhair sé. "Cá bhfuil an cat gur tug íarracht ar mise do marbhú aréir."
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2018-09-13 15:43
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Piantaí ar cnámha sean daoine.
Mairéad Ní Seacnasaigh
Cathair-na-Siliní
Baile an Cláir
An duine gur uaidh a fuair mé na comharthaí
Tomás Ó Seacnasaigh
Comharthaí báistighe:-
Dá mbeadh an cat agus a cúl leis an teine
Dá mbeadh an mada ag ithe féir.
An teine gorm.
An gaoth ag seidheadh andheas
An sugh ag tuirim
Bíonn codhlad ar an mada.
An t-aer trom.
An asal agus a dhroim leis an gclaidhe.
Tagann na dubáin-alla amach.
An cat ag sgriobadh adhmaid.
Máire C. Seóige,
Móinruad,
Turlocmór.
An duine gur uaidh a fúair mé na comharthaí:-
Padraig Ó Seóige (60bl)
senior member (history)
2018-09-13 15:41
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The Holy Well in the graveyard at Ballylanders
The following was told to me by the old woman Mrs. Noonan - who looks after the well and hands out the water to those making their rounds.
An old woman was bedridden for several years and one day calling her son to her she told him to go down to the graveyard in Ballylanders and go to the haw bush near one corner and with a spade dig three sods there and to bring her some of the water he would find there. When he told the others they said not to put any suim in her talk that she must be draming or raving. After a few days she called him again and begged him to go and dig the sods and she would be cured by the water he'd find. She was so much in earnest that to please her he took his spade and came to the graveyard. He had a search for the haw bush but at last he guessed this one. When he had the three sods dug as she told him the water spurted up. He brought it home to his mother and after using it she got her walk. Mrs. Noonan says the signs where the three sod were dug are easily seen in the middle of the well at the present day. An account of some of the cures there I have already given in an earlier part of this book.
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2018-09-13 15:41
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The author of the following verses was D. J. Kilmartin of Ballylanders. He taught school in Glenbrohane and Ballylanders, was a great scholar and gifted poet. He used to write for the Fenian paper - The Nation - and some priest home from America at one time collected his poems and had them published in America. He was a personal friend of Mr. D. Joyce of Glenanaar and Glenasheen. He wrote anonymously.
the verses were taken down by me from a copy of his poems in the possession of (Miss) (?) (about 32 years)
Ballylanders
Co. Limerick
who took them from her aunt a granddaughter of the poet Kilmartin.
senior member (history)
2018-09-13 15:39
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A Hedge-School.
In this neighbourhood there is a ruin of a hedge-school to be seen.In olden days there were no schools throughout the country and the people used to be taught in cabins or by the walls and ditches.In these hedge-schools there was no such education as is in this present day.The ruin which I have mentioned Master Hogan was teaching in it .he was a very educated man and was born in "Gort an Uisce" near Gort in the year 1836 A.D. He lived to 90 years and he died in 1926 A.D.There were forty scholars going to this school and every morning at the beginning of the week they gave a half-crown to the teacher to teach them during the week.Those that gave no money were let stand up all day as there were no seats in the school.In slate they used to write and do their arithmetic .During the day the teachers used to show them how to read,write and spell and do other things.In the evenings when he was about to let them out he gave them their slate and chalk and a headline to copy out on them just as it was written.On the following morning when they came to school if they had not it written they would be slapped.master Hogan had no fixed abode as he used to get food
and lodging from the people in the
neighbouring houses.the people of the house where the teacher used to be staying need not go to school but give "so much "money to him to teach them.There was a day school for
senior member (history)
2018-09-12 09:24
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Meig, meig, a deir an gabhar. What what a deir an chaora, By dad a deir an gabhar, tá béarla ag an gcaora.
senior member (history)
2018-09-12 08:14
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If a picture drops from the wall the inhabitants of the house expect something
senior member (history)
2018-09-12 08:14
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If a person let a spoon fall people would say that a gentleman visitor was coming to see them. If a picture fell it was a sign of seven years bad luck. If a person kills a swallow their cow will yield (give) blood instead of milk.
If a person was sweeping the floor the dirt should never be swept out because it is said that the luck goes along with it.
William Ward
Whitestown
Oldtown
Co. Dublin
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2018-09-12 08:14
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It is unlucky for a person to lay his knife and fork crosswise at a meal.
To give a friend a pair of scissors is said to part friendship unless she gives you a farthing or some small coin in return. It is said to be very unlucky to open an umbrella in the house.
Maureen Kearns
Newtown
The Ward
Co. Dublin
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2018-09-12 08:10
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to the home and are then entertained sumptuously to the supper.
The order of the day is - first the wedding service at the church then a long drive around the country - first the car with the bridal pair then the other cars follow - then all go home and lunch - later they have drink and dancing.
The "hauling home" took place any time from a few days to three weeks after the wedding day. The night of the wedding the bride went home and later her husband came with a long retinue "to haul" her home. The men and their wives rode on horse back and they often ran races when going to the brides place then they all followed the bridal pair home. Later music dance and feasting followed. Then all went home next morning. A certain woman boasted that she had "40 dibbles" (40 doubles) at her wedding.
senior member (history)
2018-09-11 11:33
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Priest's Leap.
In the Penal Times mass was said on the side of Cnoc Buide in west Cork. On one occasion, while mass was going on, the call came that the soldiers were coming. The priest took the Blessed Sacrament and leaped on his horse at one and ran. He found the soldiers were closing in on him, and he faced his horse towards a big cliff on the Leap road. The priest thought that he would be killed and he said that if the soldiers were to take the Blessed Sacrament they would take it over his own dead body. But to his surprise instead of falling down the cliff, the horse went through the air, like a bird, and landed on a stone at Newtown about half a mile outside the town of Bantry. That stone is there on the side of the public road still, and nobody dared to touch it.
senior member (history)
2018-09-11 11:28
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there was no flesh or blood scattered around. Thant instant by God's will the flenty rock became like wax or clay so that the horse left the imprints of his shoes on it. The priest's whip fell on the stone and it also left its print on it. To this day the stone can be seen on the side of the public road at Newtown. There is a cross on the top of the Cnoc Buidhe on the spot from where the priest leaped.
senior member (history)
2018-09-11 08:16
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Famine Times
During he famine of 1846-67 The townland of Ballybeg was very thickly populated. Hunger and disease prevailed to extremes. My great grand father had the seed potatoes and fearing they would be taken for food he hid them in the turf clamps. Putting the turf securley outside. When the potatoes were fairly well grown they had to be guarded at night time. As there was no food in the district at the time and only the Govenment gae out indian meal which was made into porridge twice a week and given out at Mr Acres house at Ballybeg. when the potatoe crop failed they became bad for food and fever followed people died in great numbers and that year has been remembered since as black 47. There are no sites of houses remaining but several fields bear the names of their former owners. Such as Prollicks field, Rushans field Lynans field and other. Oat meal was used by any people fortunate to have it with new milk and sometimes buttermilk. It has been related in the district that a man worked for three days without food and able bodied young men volunteered to walk from Shinrone a distance of four miles to mow all day if they could be afforded a meal
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2018-09-10 15:51
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225
Landlords.
There were four or five landlords in this district about fifty years. (There) Their names were Arthur Creagh from Carahan and the Butlers came as landlords in that district.Joseph Hall from Clooney Big House and Pearse O Brien from Derrymore.Arthur Creagh had not many tenants.he evicted a man named Brian Kearney in Carrahan and Brian went to the Castle in Rathclooney and lived there.
Joseph Hall had two tenants.The McMahons and the Meades. but when de died they got back their lands again.
senior member (history)
2018-09-10 15:51
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There is only one holy well in Beare-Island which is situated in Ballinekilla Mountain and a great number of people go there on St. Michaels Day to pay some visits to get relief from any troubles they would have. In the Olden times they came in from all parishes and made a great day of dancing there. woman from Castletown came in to sell apples and biscuits and after it was a place for selling drink. this was stopped by a priest called Fr. Sheehy. and now the people do their visits In a much quieter and religious way. This well is situated between two hills on a small height called "Cnoc an Aillaigh", and in the olden times when the priest were forbidden to say mass they used to celebrate it near this well and its waters
senior member (history)
2018-09-10 15:49
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were used for mass purposes so some of the old people tell us. it stands to reason because history tells us that there was a church to be built a 400 yards away from the well about seven hundred years ago. The stones were collected in a place well known to everybody as "Lathar Séipeal". This well and church must be very ancient as it would be very likely that it was from this well our church long ago derived its name St. Michael's Church.
senior member (history)
2018-09-10 15:47
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Holy Well
Part 1
At this well, rounds are performed and decades of Rosary and prayers are said. There is a story told that a ship came into the harbour and there was a blind sailor on board. As he slept that night he had a dream that if he went this well which was in the mountain that he would be cured. guided by another in the morning he went ashore and found the well and at that moment his sight was restored.
senior member (history)
2018-09-07 13:48
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Ainm an té de thugh.
Seán Ó Conncubar.
Imleach.
Ainm an té do bhailigh.
Pádraig Ó Muircheartaigh.
Dún Síon.
Tá cloch in Dún Síon go glaodhtar cloch an t-Sagairt air. Is é an fáth go glaodhtar an t-ainm sin air mar deirtear go bhfuair sagart bás agus ná leigeadh an tiagharna talmhan dos na daoine é do cuir gan cúig púnt. Ní raibh an cúig púnt ag na daoine agus 'sé an rud a dheineadar ná é do cur ar an dtráigh. Do fuaireadar cloch mór agus cuireadar ós cionn na h-umha é. Tá ainm an tsagairt le feiscint sgribhte ar an gcloich in Ógham Craobh.
senior member (history)
2018-09-06 15:46
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24th March
Fairy Forts
There are a lot of ratheens in this district. There are two in John Elliott’s fields in Tonagh. The big ratheen is on a big hill. It surrounded half way
senior member (history)
2018-09-06 15:46
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On Hansel Monday the first Monday of the year no one will change or give the loan of anything because what ever you do on that day you will be doing it the whole year.
No one should begin any work on a Saturday because it is said to be an unlucky day
Collected by
Pat Nolan
Lowpark Glasson
Aged 13 3/4
Told by Judy Nolan Lowpark Aged 82
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:51
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Stars twinkling
usually follows hailstones at daytime
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:49
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A family a few miles away are well known for miles around as carers of the disease peculiar to horses known as "Farcy". This disease affects the feet.
The care consists of ground garlic poultice put into the ear and some other remedy [?].
The horses are swam against a stream but only on a Sunday or Wednesday.
The local farmers believe absolutely in these peoples power to cure and many proofs of such are available.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:48
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A handful of March dust is worth a kings ransom.
When we see a small mushroom pick it at once as it will not grow any larger once looked at.
A January [?] is worthless.
Unlucky to transplant parsley.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:48
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If apple trees blossom in March we may search for apples in Autumn.
When the cockles of Larch tree roughen out it is a sign of fine weather.
Plentiful Blackberry [?] a sign of bad winter.
OnSt Patricks Day the cold stone leaves the river, the fishes get lively and the [?] widgers in the brook show themselves.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:44
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There is a Holy Well in "Cnoc a Tighe". There is one in Conwall and if you are angry and wash your hands in it, the anger will leave you. There is Doon Well and also an old well in Templedouglas, that was closed up. The time it was open there was a public house near, and when the men were coming from the "turas" they would get drunk. So, when the Bishop heard he ordered it to be closed.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:42
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1. water from St. Mogues well
2."rub sheep droppings three or four times to them"
3." the cure to warts is the milk of the big yellow flower that grows in the field. we call it wart weed"
4."if a person has warts, for every wart they have put a stone in a match box and throw it away. The first person that picks it up will get the warts"
5." tie a piece of twine to a black snail and drag the snail across the wart.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:39
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Get three double-jointed "thraithneems" plait them together and rub them on the wart, then bury them in the manure heap and as they wither the wart will wither. If you meet a black slug on the way, rub it on the wart three times in the name of the father etc. then out it on a white thorn bush and as the slug withers the wart will wither.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:36
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There is a man in Derora named Peter Murray who has the cure for "the Evil".
There is a woman in Letterkenny who has the cure for "the Rose".
Charlie Doherty of Fahykeen has the cure for "the mumps".
There is a man in Glendowan who has the cure for "sprains". His name is Jimmy Callaghan.
Cure for mote in eye.
There is a woman in Tullnacreen who'se name is Biddy O'Donnell. She has a cure to remove a "mote" that would happen to get into your eye.
There is a cure in the fox's tongue for blood-poison.
There is a cure in a hare's brain for Toothache.
A "dog's lick" is a cure. Salt
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:33
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The greatest storm the people of this district can remember was in the year 1839.
The storm arose while the people were in bed and when they got up they went out through the windows and lid down by the ditches.
It lasted twenty four hours and it mocked trees, houses and walls. It swept tin from sheds and drove it into vallies .
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:32
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Biddy Early was a witch who lived near Feakle. It was believed she was with the Fairies.
She cured all kinds of diseases. She had a magic bottle and she'd look through it and she'd see the person who wished to be cured inside it. If the person was standing inside in it he would be cured and if he wouldn't the person would die.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:32
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The most harmful weeds growing on my farm are, the chickweed, the groundsel, the dock, the nettle, the thistle, and the "geobhsadán". The chickweed and the groundsel are harmful because they spread rapidly. The dock, the nettle and the "geobhsadán" impoverish the soil. The thistle makes the handling of hay and oats unpleasant.
The clover and the thistle are
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:31
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recently in the system of "Mocking" when cattle were kept during the night in a field called a "Macha". Farmers used get up about four o'clock in the morning to drive the cattle out of the "macha", so that they could graze until milking time about nine o'clock.
Blackthorn trees and hazel trees grew in these forts. Birds used perch and rest on these trees. Bats, when prowling, used delay in the fort watching their prey - birds and rabbits. There is a fort in Knockanolort (Ballyhar parish, Co. Kerry). About sixty years ago a little boy going home from school thought he heard churning in this fort.
Many forts have now been tilled and the rings levelled. Some people believed that the Danes compelled the Irish that they had conquered to build these forts. If a worker collapsed through fatigue or hunger he was cast into the ditch of the fort and buried there. For this reason people thought it improper to till or to interfere in any way with a fort.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:31
approved
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recently in the system of "Mocking" when cattle were kept during the night in a field called a "Macha". Farmers used get up about four o'clock in the morning to drive the cattle out of the "[?]", so that they could graze until milking time about nine o'clock.
Blackthorn trees and hazel trees grew in these forts. Birds used perch and rest on these trees. Bats, when prowling, used delay in the fort watching their prey - birds and rabbits. There is a fort in Knockanolort (Ballyhar parish, Co. Kerry). About sixty years ago a little boy going home from school thought he heard churning in this fort.
Many forts have now been tilled and the rings levelled. Some people believed that the Danes compelled the Irish that they had conquered to build these forts. If a worker collapsed through fatigue or hunger he was cast into the ditch of the fort and buried there. For this reason people thought it improper to till or to interfere in any way with a fort.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:30
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cutting hay.
Monday was considered an unlucky day to leave home. Up to the present day many parents do not send their children to school for the first time on Monday.
If a person got unwell on Friday it was deemed a bad omen for his recovery. At the present time in this parish (Ballyahr, Co. Kerry) people do not get married on Monday, on Wednesday, or on Friday. The days from the 1st to the 12th April were called "LAethanta na Bó Riabhaiche in (Ballyhar parish Co. Kerry). This period was a trying one on old cows because they were "run down" as a result of the severity of the winter and the early spring.
Rabharta na hinide was the name given to a break in the weather which occurred towards the end of Shrove. It was a spell of rainy and windy weather combined.
Rabharta na Cásga was the name given to a similar spell which occurred towards the end of Lent.
senior member (history)
2018-09-05 15:29
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the earth. The flying inland of the sea-gulls indicates forthcoming rain. Snow usually falls when wild geese are seen. Little boys are seen hunting the wren on St. Stephen's Day because it is said that St. Stephen would have escaped death if not for the chirping of the wren. As a rule a number of small birds follow the cuckoo. There is an old saying - "Tá tú ar nós gobadáin ar bheal cuaiche". This is said of a person who is seen aping his betters.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 14:15
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2018-09-04 14:13
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2018-09-04 14:08
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Signs of rain
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2018-09-04 14:08
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signs of rain.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 14:08
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Signs of rain.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 14:07
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Pat and His wife
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 14:07
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Michael Hanrahan.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 14:06
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cures
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2018-09-04 14:05
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Bridie Halpin.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 14:05
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[]
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2018-09-04 14:05
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Golden Treasure
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2018-09-04 14:04
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2018-09-04 14:04
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2018-09-04 14:03
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2018-09-04 14:03
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2018-09-04 14:02
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Donal O'Brien
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2018-09-04 14:02
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2018-09-04 14:02
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2018-09-04 14:01
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2018-09-04 14:01
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2018-09-04 14:01
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2018-09-04 14:00
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2018-09-04 13:59
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The Golden Treasure Series
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2018-09-04 13:59
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2018-09-04 13:59
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The Golden Treasure Series
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 13:58
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vere foster's ruled exercise books.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 13:57
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Freda Walsh
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2018-09-04 13:57
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2018-09-04 13:57
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[]
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 09:43
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Where there's a will there's a way.
Its easy to walk in the right way if your head is screwed on the right way.
Out of sight out of mind.
Two many cooks spoil the broth.
No one knows so well whether the shoe pinches as he who wears it.
What the heart thinks the mouth speaks.
Ill gotten wealth never prospers.
If common sense rules from your head to your foot you never can go astray.
Experience makes a man wise.
After a storm comes a clam.
Poverty is no disgrace.
Birds of a feather flock together.
A little pot is soon hot.
A burnt child dreads the fire.
Misfortunes never come alone.
Show me your company and I will tell you what you are.
Shut mouth makes a wise head.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 09:43
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fat
3. There is also a cure for burns.
4. A Lizard is an animal not unlike a frog, but with more legs; a person who licks him will be able to cure burns, they have to lick the burns with their tongue.
5. There is a old saying about the seventh son in a family who can cure ringworm.
6. There is a cure for sore eyes too. Nine pricks of a gooseberry will cure, if rubbed on the eye for nine days
7. There is a well in Clonaltar which Saint Patrick visited, and if people put water from the well on sore eyes they are cured.
8. They believe in washing soda to soften corns.
9. They always go "cob-webs" to put on a cut.
10. They used to soak oaten meal in buttermilk to cure a whittle.
11. They used to cure eyes also with black cold tea left over night, and bathe them in the morning.
12. Wild fire is cured with a solid gold ring.
13. They cured several sores to with a fasting spit.
14. Forge water cured boils that is the water
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 09:42
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If you have warts on your hands spit on them for nine mornings before you eat your breakfast and soon the warts will disappear.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 09:41
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Local cures
Warts.
In the case of warts there are many remedies:-
First it is said that if one accidentally comes across a small hole of water in a rock and washes the warts with the water the warts will disappear. Again if one rubs pigs blood on the wart each morning until they get black they will die away.
Rose. B. Doherty
Jellydish.
It is said that warts can also be cured by selling them to a friend for money but when they leave the person they appear on the buyers hand.
R.B.D
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 09:41
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Warts
A fasting spit rubbed on a wart for consecutive mornings.
A raw potato rubbed on a wart and the potato is buried and as it is the wart will be disappearing.
A wart washed with water which is in a hollow stone will in the of time disappear.
A piece of thread is tied round a wart in time it withers and falls off.
A wart washed water in which soda has been dissolved disappears degrees.
The milk of the dandelion rubbed on warts wears it away in the course of time.
A piece of fat meat rubbed on a in the early morning when no one is looking.
senior member (history)
2018-09-04 09:32
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15
side without touching any-thing.
8)
Get a knife and let a person hide it in the turf or hay stack bet with them that you could find it.When they would come back you can.
senior member (history)
2018-08-30 15:10
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two tons of eve-stones. At the creation of the world God made two animals of every sort which created all the animals in the world. When you are calling the hens to feed them you saiy Tuk: Tuk: Tuk. When you are setting eggs for hatching you ark them with a pencil. You also stir them hear, and there to keep the birds from dying in the shells. While hens are hatching they must be kept in darkness. Hens rest at night on a ruast.
senior member (history)
2018-08-30 15:10
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The Potato Crop
We grow an acre of potatoes every year on our farm. My Uncle prepares the ground. The ground is manured with dung before the ground is turned up. The potatoes are sown in drills. Teh ground is ploughed in Winter and it is left there until the Spring. Then it is ploughed again and harrowed. The drills are opeened with a chill plough. Yes I know a Man in this District who had a wooden plough. He had a small farm and he used have a jennet under it. The remains are still there. He is dead now.
senior member (history)
2018-08-30 15:09
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2018-08-30 15:01
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a bottle
senior member (history)
2018-08-30 08:28
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2018-08-30 08:28
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2018-08-30 08:28
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2018-08-30 08:28
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2018-08-30 08:28
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2018-08-30 08:27
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2018-08-30 08:27
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2018-08-30 08:27
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2018-08-30 08:26
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2018-08-30 08:26
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2018-08-30 08:26
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2018-08-30 08:26
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2018-08-30 08:26
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2018-08-30 08:25
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2018-08-30 08:25
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2018-08-30 08:25
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2018-08-30 08:25
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senior member (history)
2018-08-30 08:21
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There is a field called "Páirc na Cille" in Gowlane, parish of Firies Co Kerry. In this field nine or ten stones are seen standing obliquely. They enclose a space of about one hundred square yards. The space enclosed is not circular. It is no regular figure. It is thought people were buried there long ago. An old disused road runs by the place, which is a proof that the place referred to was a burial ground.
senior member (history)
2018-08-28 15:53
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2018-08-28 15:53
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2018-08-28 15:52
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2018-08-28 15:52
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2018-08-28 15:52
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senior member (history)
2018-08-27 15:50
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is only a small field. It is only about one sixth the size of "Píosa Mor "
The next field we have is called "Garra Fíorach". There are no bushes around this field and it is on a kind of a hill.
This field is very cold. We have another field called "Marva-Lochain"
This field got this name because it is a sort of a hill with a lake at the bottom of it. Another one of our fields is called "Molly Yar". This field is called "Molly Yar" , because long ago there was water at the bottom of it. The next one of our fields is called the " hill".
We have a few other fields, but they have English names. One of these fields is called the "cows "field. This field wasn't tilled with
senior member (history)
2018-08-27 15:48
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Strong Men
Captain Gallagher was a highwayman. When rich people used to be going through the Gap in the Ox Mountains he used to rob them. He would not rob poor people.
One day the police were after him. They ran him nto a house. There was only one door in this house and the police came to to this door. They ordered him to open the door.
Now there used to be a flat stone left over the bed in these days. He jumped into the bed and shoved this stone out. He jumped up on the roof and went out. Then he ran away
senior member (history)
2018-08-27 15:45
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some years there was a gold helmet got on kannys yard about a hundred yards from the place where the battle was fought.At that time there was a quarry in Canny's yard,and the men got the helmet and the rising stone-s.They sold it for a very small sum of money after.
Mr James Miciners
Knockjames,
Tulla,
Co.Clare.
senior member (history)
2018-08-27 12:25
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Thinking he would play a joke on her, he got off his horse and saluted her and said.
Young maid said he,
With the yellow fell
Can you tell me the road to
St Catherine’s well
(The young girl replied)
Young man said she,
Upon that white horse
If you get down and eat some grass,
Then you will know by its taste and smell
Which is the road to St Catherine’s well
senior member (history)
2018-08-24 15:33
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to the conclusion that he was till asking too much.
Very soon the first man that asked him the price in the morning had another look at the bullock and asked him "How much now?" adding that the bullock suited him and that if he would reduce the price he would bid for him, so my father asked £11-10s.
The buyer offered him £10 saying that was a fair offer and that cattle were not selling well in England as there was very little grass there owing to the very dry weather. My father would not accept his price and the dealer was about to go when another man came on and said "Well are ye having a deal?" The buyer said "No, we cannot agree on the prices".
The new man asked how matters were going and was told. "Well I can't say fairer between you than that you both cut the 30/- that is between you. he said after a little arguing
senior member (history)
2018-08-23 15:55
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were strewn on the floor and a twenty stone bag was spread on top of them. Old coats were used as a blanket. This was the bed provided for the unfortunate creatures. They often had to wrap their heads in rags to prevent the cockroaches, which swarmed the floor at night, from creeping into their ears.
Turf and brosna were used to make fires, but in order to spare the turf they took in dried cow manure and burned it. The fire-place was called the teinteán. On one side of the hop there was a hole, where the fear-a-tighe kept his dúidín.
senior member (history)
2018-08-23 15:54
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For a lamp an ink-bottle was used, in which a strip of corduroy was burned as a wick. A pint of oil lasted for the winter, but the ink bottle was hidden on Candlemas Day.
There was an old house in Annagh, Corrigeenroe which consisted of one rickety room, where a man, his wife and eleven children lived. All the children slept in a shake-down. Some of them slept at one end and the others slept at the other end of this miserable bed. This was called "heads and points". There was no chimney, just a "Poll deataigh, and when the door was opened the evil smell
senior member (history)
2018-08-22 15:54
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Biadh
Proinsimín: De chruithneacht a dheintí é. Cuirtí ar an frying pan ar an dtine é go dtí go mbíodh sé aruaidh. Chuirtí im agus súcra ann.
Gráinseachán: Cruithneacht beirbhighte. D'ithidís é sa bhfóghmhar.
Riobún- Deintí cruithneacht do mheilt le bró. Measgtaí le beamhnacht é.
Sceaimpí: Ciste déanta le phrataí amha. Deintí iad do sgríobad (grate). Do thriomú agus do mheascadh le salann. (uaireanta cuirtí uachtar agus plúr ann) Deintí iad do bhácáil ar griodal nó grioscán.
Griodal = píosa iarainn agus bíodh seastán trí chosach ag gabháil leis.
senior member (history)
2018-08-22 15:52
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About eighty yrs ago a farmer lived convenient to my home. He owned a large field which never yielded any crop save weeds. One spring morning he set out to plough the field with the intention of sowing corn in it.
He brought to the field two horses, a plough & a scythe. First he set about cutting the benweeds with the scythe. He was not long cutting when a strange thing happened. His scythe was swept from him & he was left powerless, not able to move a limb.
He saw a little man with
senior member (history)
2018-08-22 15:51
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At Christmas time they used to have currant cakes, potato bread, oatmeal bread, and boxty. The people long ago used to put a cross on the the cake. The reason that the cross is put on the cake is that it would bake quicker.
senior member (history)
2018-08-22 15:51
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A Funny Story
There was a man in Elemore once whose name was Ned Munnelly. He used to go visiting on nights. There were men in the houses he used to go to telling about the great wonders they saw in
senior member (history)
2018-08-22 15:49
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The name of some of the domestic animals are, the cow, the horse, the pigs, the bulls, the goats, the calf, the dog.
The name of some of the cows are, Polly, black Bessey, Pet. When driving the cows into house we say bail up, bail, and when driving the cows out we say, hour, hour, similarly with the calves.
The cowhouse is called the cowshed, the roof is made with galvinised, and the walls are cemented and windows in it the floor is cemented and a shore at each side for the water to run through. The cows are tied in bails, and
senior member (history)
2018-08-22 08:45
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long ago and are still worm by a few old people here yet because they are considered to be very warm. They were never made here but were always bought in the shops. There is no account of leather being made in Curreeny.
There were coverings for the shins made from the hides of cows, and worn like leggings tied with strings. They were used when feeding the cattle up the mountain or in snowy or very wet weather.
There are no sayings or proverbs about the above.
senior member (history)
2018-08-21 09:16
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Sliabh brónach go bara ha hEisge ar a glaodhtar casán na naomh.
senior member (history)
2018-08-21 09:16
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Sé Naomh Breanndán patrún Naomhtha sa paróiste seo. Do rugadh é i Fenit. An oidhche a rugady é, do las solas mór timcheall an Fénit. Tá alán áiteanna ainmnidhthe i ndiaidh Naomh Breanndáin. Siad seo na h-áiteanna. Cnoch Breanndáin i Fatha, Tobar Breandáin, Pointe Breandáin. Tá an tobar i gCloch inaice tigh Thomáis Uí Néill. Deirtear go raibh Naomh Breanndán ag dul ó bhaile Bhreanndáin go dtí Cnoch Bhréanainn agus bhí sé ag teacht isteach an bhóthar go Clochán chun dul suas ann. Ag teacht inaice an tobair do
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 15:30
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One time a poor farmer named James had two sons who never knew anything. James and his sons lived in a wee house and it had only one little window. One day a priest was out hiking and he entered this little house. He asked James used he go to mass and James said he used sometimes. The priest then asked him who was God and when did Christ die. "Oh! is he dead" says James, "if I knew that I'd have gone to the funeral.""Oh! my poor man you're in terrible darkness here." said the priest. "If you saw the way we were in before we got in the wee window, you wouldn't say that," says James.
senior member (history)
2018-07-30 07:56
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chase used to cook the flesh of the animals they had killed. The following is a rough diagram of this ruin.

The Gods of the Neale. Inside the demesne wall and lying directly north of the Neale national school is to be found this structure which is a Druidic Monument of which the following is a rough sketch.
senior member (history)
2018-07-25 09:36
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Local Roads
There are several roads in this district each leading to a particular place, also their names are derived from particular places.
The old Bog road is through the bog.
The Carrick road leads to Carrick Hill
The Coneboro road leads to Dublin it got its name from the number of rabbits that were in the sand puts at one time.
The Tullamore road leads to Tullamore.
The Tunnel road leads to Kildare, Rathangan and the Curragh.
The New Row leads to Rhode.
senior member (history)
2018-07-25 09:33
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snail and rub him on it.
57. The cure for inflamed eyes was to get unsalted butter and melt it in a lamp without a globe. it was burned and a vessel put over it to catch the soot. The soot was rubbed on the eyes.
58. The old people took nettle-broth three times in March because they believed they would have good health if they did.
59.They also took water-cress fifteen mornings in May and if they did they would have good health for the year.
60. If a person had a cramp in his leg he would tie an eel skin round it.
61. If a person had a tálach in his hand he would put an eel skin round it.
senior member (history)
2018-06-22 09:32
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Weather Lore
1)The swallows flying low is the sign of bad weather and flying hig is the sign of fine weather.
2) When one magpie flies alone it is the sign of
senior member (history)
2018-06-22 09:31
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Weather Lore
1)The swallows flying low is the sign of bad weather and flying hig is the sign of fine weather.
2) When one magpie flies alone it is the sign of
senior member (history)
2018-06-22 09:30
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Weather Lore
1) When a ring is seen around the moon at night it is a sign of rain.
2) When the sky is cloudy and not many stars seen it is another bad sign.
3) When theswallows fly low it is the sign of rain.
4) When the wild geese fly south it is the sign of snow.
5) When the seagulls fly inland is another belief of
senior member (history)
2018-06-22 09:30
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1) When is a watch hungry.
Answer When it is going to eight o'clock (eat a clock).
2) Two thirds of a cross and a circle complete two semi-circles a perpindicular meet a right-angled triangle standing on two feet two semi-circle and a circle complete.
Answer TOBACCO
3) When is a gander called a goose?
Answer When he is in the pot.
4) If you got up on an ass, what would you get down off.
Answer A goose.
5) What is it that has eyes and it cannot see, ears and it can't hear, feet and it can't walk and yet it can jump as high as Nelson's Pillar.
Answer A dead ass.
senior member (history)
2018-06-22 09:10
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See Fane and Nagun, and his friend the "Breac Corrig,"
Grace the grand coronation of "Corrig-mo Clear."
What a blending of colours twixt moon, sky and mountain:
The pearl, the azure and the purple combined.
I doubt that in searching thro' the city's tumultuous whirl;
Their gods are not mine, and I envy them not.
Sufficient for me of that great world of fashion
To learn all that books and the press have to say,
While contented I live the free life of the peasant
Thanking God for the good things he strews in my way.
senior member (history)
2018-06-21 16:43
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aaaa
senior member (history)
2018-06-15 08:30
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and four men of the same name should take out the corpse. Neither was it reckoned right for the ashes to be removed from the house of the dead person or the clothes off the bed where the corpse was laid out for three days after the death.
Loud cries were heard as the person was laid in the hearse for he was now about to be carried from his own home to which he would never return. Then the funeral procession started. After the hearse, which headed the procession, came the male relations of the dead person, followed by the women raltions seated in what was known as a mourning carriage. After all relations the general public came, some on foot, while others were seated comfortably on side-cars discussing the good and the bad points of the dead person.
It was reckoned lucky if the rain fell on the funeral day as an old proverb says “Happy the bride the sun shines on, happy the corpse the rain rains on.” On the other hand if a person happened to fall in the graveyard on the funeral day, it was said that he should be next into it, unless he tasted the clay exactly where he fell.
It was always customary in this district to take the longest route to the graveyard as an old Irish proverb is constantly recalled “An timcheall chun an teampuill is congar ċun an Aifrinn.” When the coffin was laid in the grave a priest of the parish prayed over it
senior member (history)
2018-06-14 15:56
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houses and every morning and evening the poor people came for their portion. In the next townsland there was a big protestant landowner and he paid servants night and day to protect his turnips for fear the poor people would take a turnip out of it.

Nowadays we have the expression of "Clonakilty God help us" and very few know how it came to be called this. During the time of the famine food was more plentiful in the country around Clonakilty when other parts were in dire distress. Several people were making their way to Clonakilty
senior member (history)
2018-06-14 15:53
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end might be fruitful.
Long ago on St. Patrick's morning the father of every household used to burn a hazel stick in the fire and then make a cross on the left shoulder of every one of the family before they went to Mass. Then the hazel stick was put up in the rafters and kept there until they would be setting the geese-eggs and then they used to make a cross on every egg

During the Elizabethan Plantation a certain Raleigh - cousins of Sir Walter - family came over from Devonshire to avoid
senior member (history)
2018-06-14 15:50
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Hidden Treasure
The story was told by Mrs Ellen Long Coolmeen

Near the 'red welll' in Coolmeen it is said that a treasure was hidden. Many, many years ago some children were playing with stones near the well. One of the stones fell down in a little round hole and made what the children thought was a lovely noise. They continued throwing them down for some time. When they went home they told what had happened and some people thought of the old story of the treasure and there was a lot of talk about it. Three men from Thomastown heard the story and they came out to Coolmee. One of them had often heard his grandmother talk of the treasure hidden in three pans - one, full of gold, one of silver and one of copper. They decided to search for the treasure and started digging at the spot. They dug for a long time. Then they heard a voice say "Go away". They paid no attention to
senior member (history)
2018-06-14 15:48
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Long ago a labourer who lived in Lyre was obliged to go "down the country" (probably to Limerick) to earn his living. His sleeping place was in a corner of a cow-shed. One night as he lay asleep he was roused up by a loud noise outside the door and a voice called him by name, Seán-Óg, and askdd him to put on his clothes and come out to the yard. He did as he was asked. An old man was outside and he asked Seán if he knew a place called Carraigín a' Cheoil. He said he did ans well "you must go there", said he, "and no doubt about it an take this message handing him a letter. "Put this bugle in your pocket", said he, "and when you reach Carraigín a' Cheoil. go to the mouth if the lis and blow the little bugle. A black cat will come out to you and give him that letter." Seán took to the road at once and not a soul did he meet until he arrived at the lis in Carraigín a' Cheoil. but he could never understand why he was able to go do fast and why the journey took such a short time. He blew his bugle and in a second there was a terrible rumbling and shouting and the black cat stood before Seán. When the cat got the letter from Seán he disappeared into the lis but cautioned Seán not to move until he hot z message for the old man. Seán waited and after a time the cat again came out bringing with him a large, strange, musical instrument
senior member (history)
2018-06-14 15:46
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It is considered unlucky here about to start out on a journey on Monday or to go to a foreign country or to any place else where you should remain for any tamall. Nobody likes to let a child start going to school on Monday, or to tackle a colt or take a new car on the road. No farmer would think of breaking up a bawn field on Monday, and a grave is not opened on that day, excepting a few sods have been taken off it on Sunday previous. In my youth we would not think of having our heads clipped on Monday, and I heard it was unlucky to shave on Monday either. If you are troubled with a toothache and make a promise not to shave on Sunday the toothache will go. I know a great many who never broke that promise, and are free from toothache.
Persons are not married here on Mondays, Wednesdays, or Fridays, they are unlucky days
senior member (history)
2018-06-14 14:21
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There was a hedge-school in the Black-Cellar 100 years ago before any of the National Schools were built. All the people round about used to go to school there and each one would pay the master or give him potatoes.
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:48
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People light a fire on St. Johns Eve outside the houses in their (the Woodlawn School) district with sticks and turf and they never neglect to put pieces of furze in it. They also throw a bone into it. This is done in honour of St. John.
Some of the fire is thrown over the ditch into fields and gardens where there are crops so that St.John will send abundant crops in the harvest.
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:47
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The Mutton Park, is so called, because there was a robber who used rob sheep and park them in this field.
Robins Acre, is so called because a man whose name was Jack Robin lived in it, there is only one acre in the field.
Pigeon meadow, is so called because there was a pigeon house in it.
The long pepper bush.
Durrouge
The Ladderry, is so called, because there was a house in it, [?] a barber lived in it, all the men from about used go to him to be shaved.
The Mad Fields, is so called because an ass went mad in it
The three Cornered field, is so called because there are only three corners in the field.
The Stone wall field, is so called, because there is a stone wall all round it.
The Wandering Hills, is so called because if anyone went into it on a dark night, it is said that the won't come out of it.
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:45
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history of Clonmacnois
Maurice Whyms.
Told by the master -
Mr. Molloy
Clonmacnois School.
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:45
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141

Round Towers
The monks had round towers for defensive purposes. In Clonmacnois are two round towers - St Finian's and O Rourke's towers.
When the monks saw the enemy coming it is said that they used to boil big pots of water and bring the pots into the towers. The monks had a wooden floor at the top of the tower and used to go up a ladder to the floor. Then they would throw down the
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:43
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The Parish Priest, years ago, had come to Blanchardstown to say mass. At that time the priest always rode horseback. He tied his horse and foal to a railing out side the church and he went in to say mass.
While he was in, saying mass, his horse and foal was stolen. When the man, the horse and the foal was crossing the rocky field, they got stuck in a rock and couldn't get out. The priest heard of this and when he came to the rock he said "God amend thee."
That is how the place got its name. The mark of the horse's hoof is still there. "God amend thee" is on the outskirts of Mulhuddart.
The present Sandpitt houses weren't always slated, they were thatched. When Collin's barracks was getting built the sand was got from behind the old thatch houses. That is how it got it's name "Sandpitts".
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:42
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had one pound and ten shillings and he would not give it to them before he went asleep they searched him they could not find the money and they thought he swallowed it he hadent swallowed it because they found it in the asses' nose bag the son got three years and the man got two years.
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:41
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They employed a good staff of men and it was worked for a year or so. They sank shafts in Mr Larry Wolohan's fields, also in Mr Hurley's fields - along the bank of the river. Mr Dan Breen, Mr Briscoe and Mr Cummins were over it. They found a lot of gold, it is said. But owing to it not paying, it fell through again, and now we hear nothing more of it.
Lead:
Lead was found in Mr James Doyle's (Ballintemple) brow.It was opened long ago, but now it is closed up.
Tin:
Long ago there was a tin mines in Ballykillageer and Ballinasillogue hills. It was worked about a 100 years ago.
Coal:
There was a coal mines in Ballycoogue Hill long ago. Only a little coal aws found.
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:38
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Piseoga
1. The people around this place believe that you should not visit the sick on Friday or do any removal of any kind. 2/ On leaving a house going on a journey the people say it is not lucky to go back but if it was necessary you would have no luck for that day.
3/ If a wedding meet a funeral or if there was an accident in a wedding the married couple would have no luck
4/ If you broke a mirror you would have seven years misfortune
5/ If a frog or robin came in someone would die in the house
6/ if a picture fell off the wall some one would leave the house
7/ If a fork fell a gentleman would come to the house if a knife fell a lady would come and if a spoon fell a child would come.
8/ If you saw a wad hanging to a hen you would hear of a funeral
9/ If the cock crows a nine o clock in the night you'll hear of a death
10/ If you hear the death clock you'll hear of a death. If you meet a black cat in the morning you'll have luck and if you meet a woman with a red cap you would have misfortune
11/ You should never take a dog with you fishing
senior member (history)
2018-06-13 15:38
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a person milking a cow
79. Under water long I lay never drownded or cast away by experience I can tell water made my body swell a float
senior member (history)
2018-06-12 12:30
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Máire Ní Dubháin
a sgríobh
“Superstitions”
We are not quite certain when superstitions originated, but the general belief is that we inherited them from our pagan ancestors. Superstitions are better known as “Pisreogs” and although it is sinful to credit them people seem to believe in the old proverb, “Do not break a custom and do not make a custom”.
It is believed to be unlucky to see one mag-pie on the road. To meet a red haired woman when going to the fair is supposed to be unlucky, people say it brings ill luck to carry a pack of cards at night. Hens fighting are a sign of strangers coming. It is said to be unlucky if crosses are not made and put up on the ceiling on Saint Brigid’s Eve.
On May Eve maypoles are cut and stuck in the tillage to ensure the crops would be a success. If a rainbow starts in one end of a village and finishes in the other it is a sign of death in that village. It is said to be unlucky to break a mirror. Brickets are supposed to be lucky in a house, and should not be molested, for it is believed they bring the luck with them when they leave a house.
It is unlucky to plough on Easter Monday. To drop a knife or fork at a table is a sign of a disappointment for that person. Salt or flour should not be given to a passing traveller on May Eve, as it is said to bring ill luck. When the churning is being done in a house and a person comes in to light his pipe, he should assist at the
senior member (history)
2018-06-12 12:29
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Féile na bliana
Oíche Nollag - Bíonn teine mór gach uile Oíche Nollag. Bíonn coinneal ag lasadh i gach tig agus bíonn eidhean mórthimpeall gach tig Oíche Nollag
Lá Pádraig - Bíonn seamróg ag gach duine Lá Pádraig. Tagann an lá ar an seachtdéag lá de mí an Márta
Domhnach Cásca - Bíonn na daoine níos mó ubh san lá sin. Tá feasta acu sa lá sin.
Domhnach Cailce - Bíonn cailce ag na páistí óige san lá sin agus bíónn siad ag cuir cailc ar na daoine móra agus bíonn alán spórt acu san rud sin.
senior member (history)
2018-06-12 12:25
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of money to the Landlord was common too. This was known as undermining your neighbour. A case of this kind Martin has made a song about. The two brothers that were sold out of their home were hanged in Trim jail because they murdered the new tenant.
Martins poem ran thus:
"In Tubrid near Loughcrew for centuries nearly two,
There lived upright and true in peace and unity
A family I'll name
Except from blotter stain
Off a true Milesian strain
And sound integrity
Till the agent of the land
As you may understand
He bartered underhand
And drove them from their home
To exult in their distress
Their lands for to possess
The Almighty did not bless
Or let them long enjoy
They met a worthy doom
Well merited full soon
And not one for him to moan
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 12:26
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Nicholas White of the slate quarries cured toothache, ringworm, evils, wildfire, cancer and ganders
He should have the herbs he'd use pulled between 10pm and 12 pm.
Local cures. RIngworm. Get a red furze cipin and make a ring around it nine times.
Chin cough. Get a cut of bread, let suffering child take a bit ouy of it, give remainder to a black ass. Then let child walk across under the ass three times and ass would take the Chin cough.
Wild fire. Cahills bloods locally. two persons of the same name married their blood could cure it.
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 12:25
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lines of it now as follows.
"Seamus O Neill of óg na bhfarraige
Ní tiochfaidh sé abhaile go deo."
Pád Duggan had nothing to do with the burning. He was a cute sort of a fellow. Some men told the Sgts wife they saw P. around the place at time of burning consequently arrest and sentence.
Irish was the spoken language of the district until about that time. This was about the time the old traditions were lost as next generation spoke English. Some of the old people I met now say "I used to hear the old people telling stories etc. in Irish but we could not understand them."
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 12:25
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all the houses (especially Protestants) the night before, she asked him was he in a certain house. He said he was and in a joke added the servants were eating "stir about" when he went in. As luck had it this woman (Kineally) told Lady Cox and the servants were eating stirabout when the raiders called. She got Quinlans name and he was informed on, flogged and hung on the famous "Sceach" tree in Scough. The Kineallys were afterwards called "pointers." "Stir about" was served in every house at night that time.
This Scough was cut down in the big snow storm of 1867 by the Reddy familyt for firewood now the next child born to the Reddy family had a small right hand. The local people say it was a curse on a/c of cutting the scough. Anyway the Reddy family were evicted and emigrated to the States in 1885.
The famous "Sceach" tree was on the same side of the road as Flemings about 100 yards up further the hill.
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 12:17
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Greenane Bridge.
Two wheelers were piked under Greenane bridge '98. Dixon, Doyle, Toole, Davis and Paddy Byrne (Carpenter) who were informers were shot in '98.
Rathdrum yeos posted in Allen's burnt walls, were routed by rebels under General Holt, Dwyer & J. Doyle of Ballinacor by a ruse de guerre. There was a man maned Cosker shot under the eye.
In Baravore is the house of Pierce Harvey, where Dockrell Rathdrum was shot by the rebels when they were hunted from the glen. Harvey's grandfather's thigh was broken by a shot of one of the yeoman.
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 12:07
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Nóra ní Chualain () an seanchaidhe is fearr san gceantar seo acht tá an aois ag goilleamhaint uirthi anois agus ní a cuimhneiomh maith is bhíodh. Ach ta a beirt mhac Colm () agus Tomás (63) (Maidhcín) go rí mhaith. Tá cuid mór de sheanchas na máthar acu agus chuid mór dá cuid scéalta fiannaíochta freisin. Ar bhaile na hAbhann dóibh. Fatharta an tsloinne a bhí ar Nóra sul phós sí.
Togha seanchaidhe agus togha cainteora é "learaí ó Biath ( Labhras Ó Conghaile) go leor den seachas atá sa leabhar seo agus go mór mór gach a bhfuil curtha síos in ainm mhuintir Fhátharta is ó Learaí a foghluimigheadh é. B'fhiú don Chumann le Béaloideas feara chur chuige agus chuig teach Nóra ní Chualáin.
Tá Nóra ní Shabnáin (74), Indreabhán , go maith nuair bhíonn sí ina sláinte. Tá seanchas aici agus sean-scéalta, agus sean- phaidreacha.
Tá roinnt seanchaidhe maithe ar an gCaoran c.i scar an bherit Phádraig 'ac Con Faola. Ta seanchais chuid mhaith ag Máire Ní Fhátharta (72), Baile an tSléibhe.
Leis an fhírinne rádh ta an áit lán de sheanchas dá mbeadh am ag duine le na bhailiú.
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 12:06
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Nóra ní Chualain () an seanchaidhe is fearr san gceantar seo acht tá an aois ag goilleamhaint uirthi anois agus ní a cuimhneiomh maith is bhíodh. Ach ta a beirt mhac Colm () agus Tomás (63) (Maidhcín) go rí mhaith. Tá cuid mór de sheanchas na máthar acu agus chuid mór dá cuid scéalta fiannaíochta freisin. Ar bhaile na hAbhann dóibh. Fatharta an tsloinne a bhí ar Nóra sul phós sí.
Togha seanchaidhe agus togha cainteora é "learaí ó Biath ( Labhras Ó Conghaile) go leor den seachas atá sa leabhar seo agus go mór mór gach a bhfuil curtha síos in ainm mhuintir Fhátharta is ó Learaí a foghluimigheadh é. B'fhiú don Chumann le Béaloideas feara chur chuige agus chuig teach Nóra ní Chualáin.
Tá Nóra ní Shabnáin (74), Indreabhán , go maith nuair bhíonn sí ina sláinte. Tá seanchas aici agus sean-scéalta, agus sean- phaidreacha.
Tá roinnt seanchaidhe maithear an gCaoran c.i scar an bherit Phádraig 'ac Con Faola. Ta seanchais chuid mhaith ag Máire Ní Fhátharta (72), Baile an tSléibhe.
Leis an fhírinne rádh ta an áit lán de sheanchas dá mbeadh am ag duine le na bhailiú.
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 12:06
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Nóra ní Chualain () an seanchaidhe is fearr san gceantar seo acht tá an aois ag goilleamhaint uirthi anois agus ní a cuimhneiomh maith is bhíodh. Ach ta a beirt mhac Colm () agus Tomás (63) (Maidhcín) go rí mhaith. Tá cuid mór de sheanchas na máthar acu agus chuid mór dá cuid scéalta fiannaíochta freisin. Ar bhaile na hAbhann dóibh. Fatharta an tsloinne a bhí ar Nóra sul phós sí.
Togha seanchaidhe agus togha cainteora é "learaí ó Biath ( Labhras Ó Conghaile) go leor den seachas atá sa leabhar seo agus go mór mór gach a bhfuil curtha síos in ainm mhuintir Fhátharta is ó Learaí a foghluimigheadh é. B'fhiú don Chumann le Béaloideas feara chur chuige agus chuig teach Nóra ní Chualáin.
Tá Nóra ní Shabnáin (74), Indreabhán , go maith nuair bhíonn sí ina sláinte. Tá seanchas aici agus sean-scéalta, agus sean- phaidreacha.
Tá roinnt seanchaidhe maithear an gCaoran c.i scar an bherit Phádraig 'ac Con Faola. Ta seanchais chuid mhaith ag Máire Ní Fhátharta (72), Baile an tSléibhe.
Leis an fhírinne rádh ta an áit lán de sheanchas dá mbeadh am ag duine le na bhailiú.
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 10:26
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On the right hand side of the road about a half mile this side of the graveyard of Faughalstown there stands the remains of an old limestone cross called the "Cres Bhan".
It was over five feet in height and the letters I.H.S. were insribed on it as shown in the accompanying sketch
senior member (history)
2018-06-01 10:26
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On the right hand side of the road about a half mile this side of the graveyard of Faughalstown there stands the remains of an old limestone cross called the "Cris Bhan".
It was over five feet in height and the letters I.H.S. were insribed on it as shown in the accompanying sketch
senior member (history)
2018-05-22 15:35
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About 60 years ago there was an old custom in the part of the country among the people who used to attend wakes at night. Some used to play games as "Hiving the Bees" "The Flower" "Selling the Oats" "The Badger" Riddles and rhymes were also given out. The following is an example.
Here's to the ship that sailed from Flanders
That carried the blacksmith, hammer, tongs and anvils
That made the spade both stiff and strong
That dug the grave both wide and long
That buried the huntsman hounds and horn
That hunted the fox from under the thorn
That killed the hen that hatched the cock
That crew early in the morning
That wakened the priest all shaved and shorn
That married the lad all tattered and torn
To the made that was left forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumbly horn
That tossed the dog right over the barn
That killed the cat that worried the rat
That cut the string that tied the sack
That lay in the house that Jack built
senior member (history)
2018-05-22 15:34
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About 60 years ago there was an old custom in the part of the country among the people who used to attend wakes at night. Some used to play games as "Hiving the Bees" "The Flower" "Selling the Oats" "The Badger" Riddles and rhymes were also given out. The following is an example.
Here's to the ship that sailed from Flanders
That carried the blacksmith, hammer, tongs and ...
That made the spade both stiff and strong
That dug the grave both wide and long
That buried the huntsman hounds and horn
That hunted the fox from under the thorn
That killed the hen that hatched the cock
That crew early in the morning
That wakened the priest all shaved and shorn
That married the lad all tattered and torn
To the made that was left forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumbly horn
That tossed the dog right over the barn
That killed the cat that worried the rat
That cut the string that tied the sack
That lay in the house that Jack built
senior member (history)
2018-05-14 11:52
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An Cheisneach Chreideadh Cruaidh
Tháinigh an t-aingeal anuas le cogar i gcluais mná. Is beannaithe and cigar é. Trí ráithe ón oíche sin, rugadh Mac Dé o stábla na n-asal.Tháinig na trí ríthe leis na trú droma diollas. Caithidh díobh na sriantacha. Ní ann le cách a bhfeiceáil oraí. Mac a Rí a cuireadh sa gcré chuaigh suas ar dheis láimh Dé. Níor thug sé greim i mbéal na mná go dtug sé an t-uisce tríd a mhéar.
Is beannaithe an sagart é Mac Dé. Bhaist sé uan agus Bhaist uan É. Níl aon duine a déarfas an cheineach Creideadh chrua trí h-uaire ar an trá nach bhfeicfidh an Mhaighdean ghlórmhar trí h-uaire roimhe n -a bhás.
senior member (history)
2018-05-14 11:50
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Long long ago a cow went around to all the poor people. She would fill a bucket of milk morning and evening. Her colours were black and white. She was not an ordinary cow. She had long brown and white horns, and was very fat and big.
She usually fed by the mountain near a stream which flows from the top of the mountain, and drank from a pure spring well. Lyre well,
A women once bet another that she would give her a vessel which the cow would not fill
The woman fetched a sand screen and put it under the cow, and began to milk her into this vessel for hours, The cow died before the woman had finished milking her,
senior member (history)
2018-05-14 11:45
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The Potato crop
The people in this district sow a big crop of potatoes each year, but we sow about an acre, and we sow the same amount every year.
My father prepares the ground. Some people put out the manure (the) ^with^ asses and creels, and others put it out with carts, and it is always put out before the ground is ploughed.
In this district the potatoes are sown in ridges. The farmers help each other at the Spring’s work in every way they can, because they need horses and ploughs to prepare the ground. The first thing they do is to cut the field, and then they turn[ed] in two sods which form a ridge. Then they plough the furrows and the farmer gets a spade and throws the clay into the middle of the ridge.
Some people use the log but the people who sow a lot of potatoes use the plough.
The people sow the potatoes by the means of a “sctíbhín.” The “stíbhín” is a piece of (stic) wood about 4 ft long with a “pin” about ½ ft from the bottom. When you put your foot on the pin and press it into the ground it will leave a hole and then the potatoes are put down and the
senior member (history)
2018-05-14 08:07
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or leader.
The last encounter between a 'Shanavest' and a 'Caravat' took place in Barrack St. Cappoquin. A 'Caravat' named Donovan had come to live in Barrack St. and one night a Shanavest named OMeara was passing the house when he called out to Donovan 'Caravat'. Donovan was in bed but upon hearing the shout he jumped out of bed snatched up the cudgel he had used in fights years before and clad only in his shirt ran after OMeara. A fierce fight followed but they were separated by onlookers.
Other well-known factions were the 'Polleens'and the 'Gows'. These were connections of the 'Shanavests and the 'Caravats' and they used to meet at the annual fair of Affane (May 14th)
The police were usually loath to interfere because if they did the two factions (united) would unite and attack the police.
[Mr. Owen Keefe gave these particulars to my father]
Carl OLeary
senior member (history)
2018-05-14 08:06
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or leader.
The last encounter between a 'Shanavest' and a 'Caravat' took place in Barrack St. Cappoquin. A 'Caravat' named Donovan had come to live in Barrack St. and one night a Shanavest named OMeara was passing the house when he called out to Donovan 'Caravat'. Donovan was in bed but upon hearing the shout he jumped out of bed snatched up the cudgel he had used in fights years before and clad only in his shirt ran after OMeara. A fierce fight followed but they were separated by onlookers.
Other well-known factions were the 'Polleens'and the 'Gows'. These were connections of the 'Skanavests and the 'Caravats' and they used to meet at the annual fair of Affane (May 14th)
The police were usually loath to interfere because if they did the two factions (united) would unite and attack the police.
[Mr. Owen Keefe gave these particulars to my father]
Carl OLeary
senior member (history)
2018-05-11 08:22
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About 400 years to the south of the Sonnagh School there is a bush on the roadside known as Phelim's Bush. This bush at first was growing about 500 yards father back to the west. Tradition rolls as that the bush was abased by cutting some of its branches vikat a well which stored near was interfered with + the following morning the bush had moved to the roadside. If a bunch happenes to be broken no blossoms would come on the side of the following year. There is a cure for Warts attached to it. You have to come three Sunday mornings before sunrise walk round the bush three times, wash the warts with water from the stream running behind it, then tie a piece to white tape to one of the branches and the warts begin to wither immediately. Many local inhabitants were cured of warts in this way. God help the man caught cutting branches of this bush or interfering with it in any way.
senior member (history)
2018-05-11 08:21
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About 400 years to the south of the Sonnagh School there is a bush on the roadside known as Phelim's Bush. This bush at first was growing about 500 yards father back to the west. Tradition rolls as that the bush was abased by cutting some of its branches vikat a well which stored near was interfered with + the following morning the bush had moved to the roadside. If a bunch happenes to be broken no blossoms would come on the side of the following year. There is a cure for Warts attached to it. You have to come three Sunday mornings before sunrise walk round the bush three times, wash the warts with water from the stream running behind it, then tie a piece to wittier immediately. Many local inhabitants were cured of warts in this way. God help the man caught cutting branches of this bush or interfering with it in any way.
senior member (history)
2018-05-08 08:28
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An old man named Terry Keany started off one 8th of May with an old cow to sell her in the fair of Manorhamilton. He started at dawn across Thur mountain. After a while he sat down to rest and before long fell asleep. He woke up after some time and there beside him was a fine young cow feeding on the heather. He drove her off to the fair and sold her for a fine price. The buyer put her into a yard until he should be ready to go home. When he went to the yard in the evening, all he saw was an old cow only fit for skinning. The fairies had changed the cow for Keany and taken her away again after he sold her, replacing her by the cow he had started off with.
senior member (history)
2018-05-08 08:20
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An old man named Terry Keany started off one 8th of May with an old cow to sell her in the fair of Manorhamilton. He started at dawn across Thur] mountain. After a while he sat down to rest and before long fell asleep. He woke up after some time and there beside him was a fine young cow feeding on the heather. He drove her off to the fair and sold her for a fine price. The buyer put her into a yard until he should be ready to go home. When he went to the yard in the evening, all he saw was an old cow only fit for skinning. The fairies had changed the cow for Keany and taken her away again after he sold her, replacing her by the cow he had started off with.
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 13:58
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A fair is held in Roscrea once a month. It is held in the streets as there is
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 13:58
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out, but in some places a potato digger drawn by one horse is used. The boys pick the potatoes after the machine.
When all are picked they are put into a pit. "Golden Wonders" and "Skerries" are the potatoes mostly sown around Roscrea.
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 13:51
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ahaha
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 13:50
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there
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 13:50
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Marrriages
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 13:50
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Marriages
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 13:49
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awaiting decision
What pen...
senior member (history)
2018-05-01 07:58
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May Customs
On May Day the people of this locality do not lend or borrow anything from their neighbour because it is said they were giving away their luck.
People do not usually clean out byres on May Day. They do not like to churn on that day either. Long ago certain people made a hay rope on May morning at sun-rise and went around their neighbours fields pulling the rope after, and any field they passed through the people who owned the field said if they churned, no butter would come on the churn. For it is said that the rope brought all the butter with it. This custom of taking the butter from the neighbours cows was the cause of many bitter quarrels and of much ill-feeling among.
senior member (history)
2018-04-20 08:57
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Fairy Forts. 271
There is another remarkable old Fort called the "Moat Of Diamor".
It is situated on the left-hand side of the road as you go from Crossakiel to Oldcastle. It is behind the house of the late James Lynch's.
It is said that a witch was seen crossing from "Diamor Moat"to a mountain called 'Sliabh na Calaig" in the Loughcrew Mountains. She was carrying a heap of stones in her apron. The heap which can be seen on "Sliabh na Calaig"is said to be carried by the witch from "Diamor Moate."
Those two fairy Forts are in view of each other and both are circular in shape.There said to be no fence round any of them.
A wood is said to be round "Diamor Moate"There is a cave on "Sliabh Calaig" and a hag's chair made from a heap of stones
senior member (history)
2018-04-19 14:48
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May Customs
On May Day the people of this locality do not lend of borrow anything from their neighbour because it is said they were giving away their luck.
People do not usually clean out byres on May Day. They do not like to churn on that day either. Long ago certain people made a hay rope on May morning at sun-rise and went around their neighbours fields pulling the rope after, and any field they passed through the people who owned the field said if they churned, no butter would come on the churn. For it is said that the rope brought all the butter with it. This custom of taking the butter from the neighbours cows was the cause of many bitter quarrels and of much ill-feeling among.
senior member (history)
2018-04-19 14:48
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rejected
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May Customs
On May Day the people of this locality do not lend of borrow anything from their neighbour because it is said they were giving away their luck.
People do not usually clean out byres on May Day. They do not like to churn on that day either. Long ago certain people made a hay rope on May morning at sun-rise and went around their neighbours fields pulling the rope after, and any field they passed through the people who owned the field said if they churned, no butter would con on the churn. For it is said that the rope brought all the butter with it. This custom of taking the butter from the neighbours cows was the cause of many bitter quarrels and of much ill-feeling among.
senior member (history)
2018-04-16 12:24
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An Erish in the Crell. a straw or rope handle to bring in a bukogue of turf - an armful.
I have to get a back-awn or buck-awn for that door - a kind of hinge.
So and so went footy.
So and so went donnie or dunnie.
What own the cow. She has the Glose a rue or Glosh-er-oo. oo as in too.
Ah ye Bull-yawn ye - meaning foolish or [?].
Who is that Backa - meaning beggar bachach
In the mell-ee. Mel-ee. ee as in we meaning in the scuffle.
Here's one I got from Thos Gilroy but he heard it from old people and does not know its application although he could translate it.
Gur-ee gan kluaish
Árd Barra gan feoil
Madah gan fee-kal
Dav-ague gan keoil
His translation
A hare hairless
A table bareless
Dog toothless
Eating careless
Another he gave but could not apply it
Furus fin-ye in ake min e
senior member (history)
2018-04-16 12:24
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An Erish in the Crell. a straw or rope handle to bring in a bukogue of turf - an armful.
I have to get a back-awn or buck-awn for that door - a kind of hinge.
So and so went footy.
So and so went donnie or dunnie.
What own the cow. She has the Glose a rue or Glosh-er-oo. oo as in too.
Ah ye Bull-yawn ye - meaning foolish or [?].
Who is that Backa - meaning beggar bachach
In the mell-ee. Mel-ee. ee as in we meaning in the scuffle.
Here's one I got from Thos Gilroy but he heard it from old people and does not know its application although he could translate it.
Gur-ee gan kluaish
Árd Barra gan feoil
Madah gan fee-kal
Dav-ague gan keoil
His translation
A hare hairless
A table bareless
Dog toothless
Eating careless
Another he gave but could not apply it
Furus fin-ye in acke min e
senior member (history)
2018-04-13 08:42
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as she comes rolling by.
So now that i am dying and one request I crave,
take me from the water,
and bury me in a grave,
The sympathisers gathered round,
Barney Tom began to swear,
he never will see Donley,
The man he did adore
senior member (history)
2018-04-13 08:41
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and the gently laid poor paddy in the hole.
Pat could see just as well as you or me.
There was going to be no sorrow for his end.
So when the clods began to hop
Pat broke up the coffin top and quickly to the bank he did ascend.
He made an awful blunder,
He went very near been under
Only just like you or me he was not dead.
senior member (history)
2018-04-13 08:41
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cows, and not say "God Bless them" to say it herself. This never happened afterwards.
senior member (history)
2018-04-13 08:41
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cows, and not say "God Bless them" to say it herself. This never happened afterwards.
senior member (history)
2018-04-11 15:26
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Loon,
Sraid Ultach,
Boher Kyle,
Ballylinnen,
Crutt,
Moyhora,
Skehana,
Ardra,
Coolbawn,
Monteen,
Gurteen,
Coolade,
Firoda,
Cloneen,
Clogh,
Chatsworth,
Cappagh.
senior member (history)
2018-04-11 10:25
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páirc a lún Aughacillmore
Balbhán " (Family of dummies owned this place)
Scar a bán near Lough Gowna
bearna Gaotce Killeen
Mórin
Móinín Granard (lane)
Ard [?] Ballamore
Caíseac feíreac Dring
Locán Cranally
Loc tíbín
Gránias Cave near Granard
The Mescán in Cairn Hill. -
(Carn Clanhugh)
Cor na gCos Clonfin (near scene of ambush 1921)
Sliab bán Killeen
páirc a locaín near L. Gowna.
Glas carraig Muilleann a Leacta
senior member (history)
2018-04-11 10:22
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Seana Chleas Páistí
Cúigear nó seisear a bhíonn sna imirt agus gach re dorn aca anuas ar dhruim a chéile. An té go mbeadh a dhorn anáirde ar fad aige déarfaidh an fear a bheidh féna bhun san le na dhorn, "Cé sin anáirde?" "Ceann an stáca " déarfaidh an fear a bheidh anáirde. "Leag ar lár é, go n-íosam práta agus greim cabáiste" Tógfaidh an chéad fhear a dhorn anuas annsan. An tríomhadh dorn annsan fiafróchaidh sé "Cé sin anairde?" agus déarfaidh agus déar faidh an fear anairde go bé ceann an stáca é agus mar sin dóibh go mbeidh a ndoirne go léir leagaithe anuas.
senior member (history)
2018-04-10 08:13
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Russagh : (Roseach meaning wood of the steed)
In Russagh there is a very ancient cemetery. There was a Catholic church there also, and another one where Rathowen school now stands, there was an under-ground passage from Russagh to Rathowen church, under which the priests used to travel in order to say mass during the Penal Laws.
The Abbot of Russagh church was Mr Rustin. His brother was a jester, "Cornan Breac", he is buried in Russagh, and if any woman stands on his grave she is supposed to utter a folish laugh. There
senior member (history)
2018-04-10 08:11
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Russagh : (Roseach meaning wood of the steed)
In Russagh there is a very ancient cemetery. There was a Catholic church there also, and another one where Rathowen school now stands, there was an under-ground passage from Russagh to Rathowen church, under which the priests used to travel in order to say mass during the Penal Laws.
The Abbot of Russagh church was Mr Rustin. His brother was a jester, "Cornan Breac", he is buried in Russagh, and if any woman stands on his grave she is supposed to utter a folish [foolish] laugh. There
senior member (history)
2018-04-04 15:40
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They believed if they threw out dirt or ashes that they threw away their luck.
If they threw out water they threw out the fairy or some mysterious person that kept the money in the house.
The people always like to go into a new house and to commence building a house also on that day because it was thought it was the luckiest day in the week.
The three first days of April people take extra care of themselves. They believed if an old or delicate person passed they three (lá na riabach) that they would live for another year.
senior member (history)
2018-03-27 08:19
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A water Horse
One day a man was working in a field near Cama Lough. This Lough is situated in the townland of Drumbad, near Ballinamore. He saw a water horse coming out of the Lough and grazing on the pasture field near the edge of the Lough. That night he called on some neighbours to come with him next day and when the horse would come out to surround him and catch him if possible. The neighbours gathered next day and lay in hiding for the animal. They were not very long there until the horse came out. They surrounded it and succeeded in catching it. This man spent some time training and breaking this horse. One day when he was carting out manure with the water horse to a tillage field along the edge of the Lough a strange thing happened. When he had his load empty and was retur-ning home and he was getting his rains, another water horse neighed in the Lough, and before he could wink an eye the trained water horse ran away as quick as
senior member (history)
2018-03-26 10:23
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53. Is fearr an sláinte no an tainte.
54. Is fearr teangaidh gan tír na tír gan teangaidh.
55. Aithnigheann cioróg cioróg eile.
56. Muna nglacaidh tú comhairle glacfaidh tú troid.
57. Éist le fuaim na h-abhna agus gheobhaidh tú breac.
58. Níor dhruid Dia doras nar fhosgail sé ceann eile.
59. Muna gcuiridh tú san Earrach ní bhainfidh tú san Fhoghmhair.
60. I ndiaidh na míonna is fearr na mná.
61. Ní scéal rúin é os cluineas triúr é.
62. An rud atá sa chnámh is doiligh a bhaint as an fheoil.
63. Is glas na cnuic i bhfad uainn ach má's glas ní fearamhail.
64. Gheibh cos ar dhiubhal rud nach bhfuigheann cós 'na comhnuidhe muna bhfágaidh sí acht dealg.
65. Tabhair do chóta leat lá maith agus do rogha rud an droch lá.
66. Tá súil le fear na fairrge acht níl súil le fear na h-uaighe.
senior member (history)
2018-03-20 14:42
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The shoemaker is still a part of our rural life but we can no longer call him a shoemaker except by courtesy. He is simply a cobbler or mender of old shoes.
We can no more give him the title than we can give the name Wireless constructor to the boy who builds his own Receiving Set.
In the latter case the youth follows a Blue Print. He buys all the parts ready made; everything is done for him and he need only bend a few wires together and lo! his set is made.
With the modern shoemaker it is similar; he buys a suitable pair of uppers. All that he requires is to build a sole and heel on to this factory stitched upper.
In the old days the shoemaker began with a large sheet of upper leather. From this with a light cardboard pattern he cut out his upper parts and stitched them together by hand.
A job of this kind lasted for years.
Nowadays the shoemaker employs a machine for patching uppers.
senior member (history)
2018-03-09 08:15
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she felt her hand very sore so it was sore for a long time afterward till someone gave her something that cured it.
There are a great many forts around here, namely, Lios a Damh Dearg below Pat Dunne's house in his field. This is that fort that Fionn and the giant pulled the red bullock in two halves, when the giant was stealing the bullock. There are two caves in that fort and a ditch of earth around it.
Lios a Bhrannair. In the 'but' of our field below the new road called brann there is a cave going from one fort to the other. There is no cave opening in the fort, but when that field was
senior member (history)
2018-03-06 08:09
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Uair amháín bhí sgata ban ag faireadh a gcuid bó ar an mbuaile. Lá breágh gréine a bhí ann agus níorbh fhada go bhfacadar girrfhiadh ag teacht agus ag dul treasna tríd na beithidhigh. Thoisig an girrfhiadh ag diúl ar na ba. Thuit an lug ar an lag ar na mnaibh agus do rith cuid aca leo agus a gcroidhe in a mbeal. Níorbh fhada go raibh sgéál an ghirrfhiadh in a ráfla ar fud na h-áite.
An lá dár gcionn chuaidh na fir go dtí an buaile agus na beithidhigh leo. Tháinig an girrfhiadh agus thoisigh sé ag dúil ar na ba díreach mar rinne sé an lá roimhe sin. Chuaidh na fir chomh fada leis ach níor chorruigh sé go raibh siad i bhfoisgeacht trí nó ceithre de shlataibh do. Annsin d'imthigh an girrfhiadh leis agus shuidh sé síos ar chnochán ar a chorra geábh. Chaith duine de na fir maide leis. D'imthigh an girrfhiadh i ndiaidh an mhaide agus rug sé in a bhéal é agus as go bráthach leis. Ansin shocruigh na fir go dtiocfadh siad
senior member (history)
2018-02-19 08:09
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by the Irish people as the patron of animals. I heard the story of Saint Ciaran and his dum cow.
There is a holy well at Manullo which is about three miles south of this school. It is one of Saint Patrick's wells. We are told in history that St. Patrick uncovered a dolmen built over the holy well at Manulla in presence of a crowd of Druids. It was called "Slán" or the well of the healer and the church and parish were called Slanpatrick down to the 16th century.
Seán Mac Naoclárs
Danganmór
Béal Átha Bhearraigh
Co. Muigheó
senior member (history)
2018-02-19 08:05
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The bride and groom would sit on the same side on the car, the bridesmaid and groomsman would also sit on the same side of the car.
When they would arrive back they would have a big dinner and after that there would be a dance and after that the bride and groom would leave for their home.
It was always an old custom for a gang of “strawboys” as they are called, to gather to the bride’s house and dance and make fun. The chief time of the year for getting married is called Shrove Tide. It is forbidden to get married in Lent or Advent.
It was always an old custom for a fear to make it up, and block the road upon the bride and groom, after they left the church, and the groom would have to give them some money before they would let him pass by.
senior member (history)
2018-02-19 08:04
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Long ago when a man was about to be married, he and a friend would go to the home of the intended bride and ask her from her father.
The custom was to bring a bottle of whiskey to treat all in the house and they would arrange about the marriage and name the day they would be married.
Long ago they used to say the month of May was an unlucky month to get married in. There was also unlucky days named out.
Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth, Wednesday the best day of all, Thursday for losses and Friday for crosses and Saturday no day at all.
On the morning of the marriage all their invited friends would gather to the church, after the couple would be married the people would have rice to throw on them.
After this they would all return to the house of the bride, where there would be a wedding feast, plenty of whiskey and wine and other drinks.
Then they would go for a drive on the jaunting cars that were out in their days. The bride-and-grooms’ car would be first
senior member (history)
2018-02-19 08:04
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permanently. No one has ever interfered with this fish. The pilgrimage to this holy well has never been suppressed. Some ailments have been cures at the well. A cripple and also a blind person are all that I heard of being cured.
senior member (history)
2018-02-19 08:04
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15th of August. There are three rounds performed. The prayers said are five Our Fathers, five Hail Marys and five Glorys on each round for three rounds. Then at the altar is said fifteen decades of the rosary. Then you are supposed to walk round in the well saying one Our fathers, one Hail Mary and one Glory for three times. Then that is one station performed. The well is visited for the purpose of cure of ailments such as blindness, deafness, back aches, cripples etc. The water of the well is applied to the affected parts and it is also drunk. Different offerings are made such as money, beads, etc. When money is given it is put into a box beside the well which is left there for that purpose. It is the general belief that if this holy well were closed that it would spring up in another place. In the well there is a trout which stays there
senior member (history)
2018-02-19 08:03
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Holy Wells
There is one holy well in this locality and St Patricko well is the name of it. It is situated near an old church which is still in use and beside the mountain. Situated also beside the well is a large sycamore tree and it is said that there was another tree beside this one with holy water in it and some person cut it and when they did that the holy water came into this sycamore tree which is still to be seen. The altar is mounted on a large cairn of stone walls. There is a pilgrimage to the well each year which begins on the 29th of June and ends on the 15th of August. The well is visited for nine days after the 29th of June and then it is visited for the last time on the
senior member (history)
2018-02-12 09:02
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She lived beloved and died lamented.
The tomb of the noble family of De Burgh- This tomb containing the remains of the noble family of De Burgh was repaired by Ulick John Marquis of Clanricarde. An Dom. Mdcccxxxv.
Inscribed on Sir John Byrke's Tomb- Here lies the body of Sir John Byrke of Derbimacka. Deceased in the 36th year of his age 1666. This tomb was errected for him and his Posterity by his widow the Lady Mary Byrke now Barroness of Athenry in 1683.
senior member (history)
2018-02-12 09:01
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happy days gone by.
Stand for Finnegan who keeps the best of sweets They also keep the "[?]" so tidy and so neat.
Stands for o'Grady, the highest house of all That in many years gone by it got a dreadful fall.
Stands for Hallinan who keep the white-head bull It also stands for Homes upon the little hill.
Stands for Jennings- it is there you can buy a coat, a hat, a shoe, a cap, a collar, or a tie.
Stands for Potter who keeps the best of meat It also stands for the "Police" who guard the little street.
senior member (history)
2018-02-12 09:00
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"Craughwell" is a village of credit and renown, To view it in the distance, You'd swear it were a town.
Stands for Ann Buckley, that maiden young and fair, It also stands for Allen who is constant there.
Stand for Brougham, who keeps his cottage neat With blooming flowers, and shady lowers, And sweet confusions meet.
Stands for banley and buniff as well, It also stands for [?] who keeps the Hotel.
Stands for the dispensary, where patients wait in vain, To get their teeth distracted, and to relieve them from their pain.
Stands for Engineering works, at the bridge as you pass by, Where Tienney loned for water in the
senior member (history)
2018-02-08 15:43
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Athenry was a town of importance.
At the time Brian Boru was Ard-Ri,
But it met with a lot of misfortunes,
If you look at the wins you will see,
There once were two beautiful churches,
Built right in the heart of the town,
'Till Cromwell whom every one curses],
Come over and bumed them down.
He killed all the men and the women
And he said "he would wipe out us all",
But in spite of the wick of the old devil,
We have still two "T. Ds", in the Dail.
senior member (history)
2018-02-08 10:01
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kept after the hares however, one half of him after one hare and the other half after the other hare. The hound returned home that night with the two hares. Kelly went to bed that night and when he got up the next morning he found the hound lying dead in the yard. He thought so much of the hound that he skinned hi and his wife made a waistcoat out of the skin for him. A few days after while Kelly was cutting furze on the hill he rose another hare. The waistcoat was lying on the ground and up it jumped and ran across the hill after the hare. Kelly never saw or never heard of the waistcoat after.
senior member (history)
2018-02-06 11:36
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A well in Armagh just over the border has water which when boiled turns red and cures warts.
senior member (history)
2018-02-05 14:14
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There are two grave yards in the parish of Gurteen. One is Cloonkeen Kerril, and the other is in Killuane. The people are buried in them yet. The grave yards are square. There are ruins of a church in Killuane and the people are buried within the ruins. there are no crosses in the grave yards. The place where unbaptised children are buried is called a "cilleachán"
senior member (history)
2018-01-26 09:07
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The old people did not think it right to let a person die on a feather-bed. Before a person died, they placed some straw on the hearth near the fire. They then took the person out of the bed, and put him lying on the straw. They believed that the person died peacefully then.
when a person died, the people of the house stopped the clock.
It was a general custom at wakes to give a clay pipe and some tobacco to every man that would attend the wake.
A cart was the general means of transporting the coffin to the church or cemetery.
Two women would be appointed to sit on the coffin in the cart and cry on the way to the graveyard. These women would be called ''caoiners''.
When a person is brought to the church, the people of the house turn the chairs up-side down.
People believed its not to be ught to bury a persons on New years Day.
senior member (history)
2018-01-26 09:06
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The games I play are, in Summer picking nuts, picking black-berries and picking flowers.
At school we can play a big number of games because there are a lot of children then we play "Blind mans Buff" one girl puts a cover on her eyes and try to catch the other little girls.
Four corner fool, five girls go together and get four corner an equal distance apart while the other stands in the center tries to get a coiner while the others jumps from around
hide and go seek a few girls
senior member (history)
2018-01-26 09:05
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from Keelogues to Greggs. One little bush grows on the side of the road and is called Sgeachach Máirín Ní Cháca where an old woman was buried. She was found dead on the side of the road. Some neighbors buried her and planted a little bush on the grave. A young boy who was cutting a hedge about a year ago cut the hedge not knowing the story.
So great was the hunger of the people that they stole food to try to live. Their food consisted Indian-meal "stirabout" One man who was very hungry boiled some Indian meal stirabout and when boiled left it outside on the window-sill to cool. After a few minutes he went outside to eat but it was gone.
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:32
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road was never finished. The bye-road past Lacys was made at that time also.
Many countries sent relief. Money was sent from Turkey, but was kept by the English Government. A cargo of yellow corn was sent by the Russian Government from Archangel in Russia on the shores of the White Sea. That cargo landed on the west coast of Ireland near Sligo and was distributed all over the country. Some of it came to Ross and was distributed round to the people. The ship was driven off its course by a strong easterly wind, it was brought around by the coast of Donegal and was sailed into Sligo bay. The ship was bound for some fort in the south of Ireland, when it was driven off its course.
Many people died of hunger and sickness others left the country and went to America and never came back any more. So after 1848 very few people were in Ireland.
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:31
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The famine did affect this district very much. There were three times as many people in this district then, as is in it now. The potatoes became black the first year of the Famine. The buds were cut off the potatoes that were left in the barns in the year 1845, the rest of the potato was eaten. The next year the buds were sowed very deep, and when they came above the ground they were cut off, and covered up again with a timber plough. This plan was not successful.
They ate a food called "Slyber" made from barley-meal and turnips. A big pot was put on the fire, and filled halfway with milk. When the milk was boiling the meal was put into the pot and stirred well. The turnips were sliced in small pieces and cooked in the porridge.
Roads were made to give employment to the people. The road past John Whelans in Boley at the time of the Famine was a great rock. The Government employed many to cut a road through the rock. They slept in huts in a field now owned by Mrs. DevruxT. he rest of the family left their homes and lived in the huts also. The men recieved sixpence a day and their dinner. There was a dispute among the men for the
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:30
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[?] and heal any kind of sore of cut. Nettles are boiled and given to turkeys and other fowl as food, and they are also given to sick calves as a good cure for mourn.
The great majority pf people nowadays fail to realise the importance of a knowledge of the laws of good health, and of an knowledge of simple remedies to restore the sick body to health again. These remedies can be obtained from our herbs if properly used.
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:29
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is a wonderful cure for all blood impurities. The cultivated celery which is often used as a vegetable is also most helpful for rheumatic sufferers; it should be stewed well in a little water and taken in doses of two of three tablespoonfuls three times a day.
The common dandelion has also great healing virtues, the plant is of medicinal value and has wonderful purifying properties. It is infused and taken like ordinary coffee with milk and sugar and is a very good cure for kidney and liver disease. Local herbs are used extensively in the cure or alleviation of diseases. In ancient times they were used by the people throughout the country for curing the ills of both people and animals. The dock-leaf is commonly used to cure the sting of a nettle. There is also another leaf called the mason-leaf it is a very good cure both to
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:29
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In the famine times this district was thickly populated. This is how people got seed potatoes for the year 1849. When the potatoes came up first over the ground, the people cut off the stalks and earthed them when the stalks came up they cut them off again and earthed them, this went on until all the clay was in the drills. The potatoes were very small but however they managed to get seed for next year.
The people were not paid that time as they are paid now. The men worked for a penny a day in making roads, some of those are the roads from the cross up to the post box, and the Cloonagh lane Siobháns corner to the school. Every member of a family got a pound of meal everyday. The people in this district went to Meehan's for it, them Cadogans.
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:27
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The Famine
The Famine started in the year 1845. The people were very poor. The people that had turnips used to eat them and people used boil nettles and put a drop of milk through them. The English used not give any food to them. There was a woman in Coulagh, her name was Máire Ni Leamhna. Her son died and she had no one to bury him. He was dead in the house for three days. She used be looking at the Cillíneach to see if anyone would be burying people there. One day she saw a funeral below and she put the boy across her shoulder and brought him down and they buried him. They used shake hay down on the body and then throw earth down on that. There was a man buried in the comar the west of our house. He was taking a rest
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:25
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In ancient times when doctors werre so few the people had recourse to medicines made from certain herbs to cure their ills. The weeds most harmful on the farm, are the thistle, the fern, the bráiste the chicken weed, the nettle and the dock-leaf those impoverish the land. The thistle the most harmful weed because it grows only on good land and it spreads through the land more than any other weed. The fern also is supposed to grow only on land that produces good potatoe crops. Certain herbs have medicinal properties.
The elderflower and peppermint, taken in hot infusions frequently, is a great remedy for colds and influenza. This infusion is also used as a gargle for sore throats. The watercress when eaten
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:24
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In the townland of Lugdoon crowds were employed building fences at four pence per day. Their sole food was their oatmeal porridge. A man named Golden who had no food to eat worked there and his fellow men shared their scanty meals with him while at work. When it was finished he had nothing to eat and died after a few days from hunger. His neighbors buried him in a rough box.
A man named McDonagh who had a wife and few children lived in the same district. The[y?] all died from hunger and the neighbours
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:24
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The hunger was so great in the famine times in this district that people often ate grass. A man named Golden of Dunowla was working in this field when he died from hunger. His people could not buy a coffee they were so poor so he was buried in a large box in a field owned by a man named Kilgaller of the same place.
Sixteen families left Dunowla and Dunbakin in the famine period.
Told by: Stephen Tempany
Barnacoghill
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:23
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Famine Times-Blight
There was a great famine in this country from 1846 to 1867. The blight came from a heavy Fog and fire going with it. It was in the pits that the potatoes decayed. The union supplied the people with seed potatoes for the following year. A man by the name of Muttay fed the people in this district, as he used get yellow meal from the union and he used distribute it amount the people. No farmers got the meal but the poor peoples.
Rita Cahill, Droms, Thurles, Co, Tipperary. Material obtained from:-
Con Murrary, Drom, Thurles,Co, Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:22
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sung by the people in this district.
About one hundred years ago a man by the name of John Bourke who was a poet lived in the parish of Drom, Bo.Tipperary. He tried to banish talo from a house by singing a song, but failed.
Una Costello, kilvilcorris, Drom, Thurles, Co. Tipper.
Material obtained from:-
James Kennedy, Kilvilcorris, Drom, Thurles. Co. Tipper.
senior member (history)
2018-01-25 09:19
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There was born at the Bridge of Bellewstown in the latter part of the 18th century a man names Christy Kane. When he reached the years of manhood he was employed by the Gargan family of Cromwell's Bush. He was a man of extraordinary strength and agility. He left a task on Cromwell's Bush by flinging the 56 lb weight over the collar blades of the farm. He was a champion wrestler. At that time there worked on the Quays of Drogheda, a Louth man names Bolton - a man possessed of marvellous strength - another famous wrestler. He carried 56 stone of sand from the Quays to the
senior member (history)
2018-01-24 08:16
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Told by John Ferris, labourer, aged 46 years. He heard it from his grandfather.
A Hidden Treasure.
An old church stands in Cluen. In this church there was a hidden treasure. Long ago soldiers hid gold in it. One day a crowd of people went up to it. There was ivy growing up on this church. These people lighted a fire near it. The ivy took fire and the roaring of the fire was terrible. The people ran away in great fright. When the people who lived near the church saw the fire they went over. They waited there for a while. Then they heard pots falling and they knew there was gold there. They said they would come next morning at four o'clock. Next morning they all came when they reached the church they saw a man with two pots of gold. This man's name was Mr Dalton; he said they were late that this was his second time going over. After a time men came from Tipperary searching for gold. It was dark that night and they saw turkeys. They took no heed of them and kept on searching. After a while they saw bulls running madly about
senior member (history)
2018-01-24 08:09
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IV
Na labhair liom fá'n tír seo a fhágail
A's imeacht thar saile anonn,
No b'fhearr liom béith beo bocht in Éirinn
Le mo chailín beag deas doigheamhail donn
'S cha dtig liom umhaladh Dia Domhnaigh
As paidir a chuir ó mó chroidhe
Le hanam mo shinnsear a thóg é
Mo chró beag ag bun Chnoc a Tighe.
V
Tóg suas do cheann alúinn a Éire
béidh bláth ort 's [rachmas] go foill
Na pilidh do chlann atá díbeartha
'S béidh siad ar ball ag gabhail cheoil,
Fríd ghleanntaí 's bantaibh na tíre
Le haoibhne 's luthghair a gcroidhe
Mar tá mé anocht i dTír Chonaill
In mo chró beag ag Bun Chnoc a' Tighe.
Sgéalaidhe. Neil McBride 81 yrs
Feymore,
Creeslough
Co. Don[egal]
Sgríbhneoir. Brian Ó Duibhne
An Cnoc
Bealach Fe[ich]
Co. [Dhún na nGall]
senior member (history)
2018-01-23 08:02
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that long a little boy was left to mind a fire and to (kep) keep it lighting, the boy fell asleep the fire was about to go out when a robin came and kept flapping his wings until the fire lit up, and the heat singed his breast.
senior member (history)
2018-01-22 09:35
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Donóg and Dómnaill
Long ago there lived a man and his wife named Dómnaill and Donóg. Donóg had no sense and she always did everything wrong. Dómnaill had nothing but a cow and a little garden of cabbage. When all there food was gone Dómnaill decided to kill the cow. When the cow was killed, Dómnaill cut it up and said, "Now, we will have a piece of meat to put along with every head of cabbage". He meant, when she was boiling the cabbage she could put a piece of meat along with it, but she misunderstood him. As soon as he went out to work, she went to the garden and left a piece of meat on every head of cabbage. When Dómnaill came home from his worl in the evening he said, "What are all the dogs doing out a the back of the house?" "Oh, they are [always] out there all day, eating the meat", said Donóg. "What meat?" said Dómnaill
senior member (history)
2018-01-17 11:16
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so much money according to the amount of land the boy has. The girls father and the match maker goes to the boy's house and walks the land He may notice that the land is well stocked with cattle and horses, This evidence of prosperity impresses him, but when he departs several of those animals are driven back to his obliging neighbour who lent them only for the day The day at the boys house there is feasting, eating and drinking, they generally get whiskey
Everything now is nearly ready, but there is one more question to be answered yet wheather they will meet at the church in the morning or wheather they will meet each other before they go to this church Some people
senior member (history)
2018-01-15 08:28
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The ass jumped the river and jumped upon a big rock. The sign of the donkey's hoofs are still to be seen in the rock. There is always water on the two foot-prints of the ass in the rock. It is said if you washed your teeth in the holes made by the donkey's hoofs you would never get a tooth ache. This rock is in the Parish of Harnett Tournafulla. Saint Ita cursed Tournamulla then and said that it would never be without a fool a widower or a blackguard.
There are many other stories told about Saint Ita. Saint Itas parents were very rich. When Ita was very young her mother died. She had a ring, and she left the ring to Ita's father. ita got the ring from her father, and she and her servants came to Killeedy and then she came to ''Buaile''. With the ring she used to cure people.
She had two trained donkeys to carry
senior member (history)
2018-01-15 08:26
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The ass jumped the river and jumped upon a big rock. The sign of the donkey's hoofs are still to be seen in the rock. There is always water on the two foot-prints of the ass in the rock. It is said if you washed your teeth in the holes made by the donkey's hoofs you would never get a tooth ache. This rock is in the Parish of Harnett Tournafulla. Saint Ita cursed Tournamulla then and said that it would never be without a fool a widower or a blackguard.
There are many other stories told about Saint Ita. Saint Itas parents were very rich. When Ita was very young her mother died. She had a ring, and she left the ring to Ita's father. ita got the ring from her father, and she and her servants came to Killeedy and then she came to ''Buaile''. With the ring she used to cure people.
She had two trained donkeys to carry
senior member (history)
2018-01-15 08:25
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The local Patron Saint.
The local patron saint here was St Ita. There is the ruin of an old monastery in Killeedy. There is also a graveyard there , and a blessed well. This well is called Saint Ita's well. Many people pay rounds at this well on the fifteenth day of January. This day is also a holiday in Killeedy. High mass is also said in Raheenah on that day. Many people with different diseases who went to this well were cursed.
There are many stories told about Saint Ita. About half a mile from my school there is a place called ''Buaile' which means a milking field. Saint Ita had cows there, and when she used to milk the cows, she used send the milk to the monastery in Killeedy. She had a trained donkey to carry the milk. One day when the donkey was going with the milk the blackgaurds of Tournafulla set dogs at the ass.
senior member (history)
2018-01-10 12:04
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Is leir scriosta daor gorta duairc
An scéal so do chuala idir tháint
Gur éag an fear eagnaidhe gan gruaim
Dob'feile na guaire le rádh
Is méala ar feadh Eireann is is truagh
An laoch leabhar uasail dfaghail bháis,
Ár bhfeinics, is ar gCaesar i dtuadh-Mhumhain
Is ár Searlus do scuabadh o mná.
senior member (history)
2018-01-05 11:00
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an rann seo.
"Nodhlaig na bhfear an Nodhlaig mhór mhaith,
Nodhlaig na mban an Nodhlaig gan mhaith". (nó "a mheath").
Sé an chiall é seo ná go mbíonn formhúr na sólaistí dheasa ithte.
Oidhche na dtrí rí:
Bíonn trí coinnle ar lasadh ar fhuinneóig na cistineach an oidhche seo. Deirtear go ndeintear fíon de'n uisge agus síoda de'n bhféar bán agus arán bán des na clocha an oidhche seo.
Oidhche na "chuide móire":
Is mór an spórt a bhíonn aige leanbhaí an oidhche seo. Gaibheann an té is óige san tig bullóg aráin gan an oiread agus greim amháin aiste, agus buaileann ar an doras í leis an rann seo.
"An donas amach, an sonas isteach, anocht bliadhain ó anocht agus anocht féin."
senior member (history)
2018-01-05 08:54
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Sruthán na bhFíon:
This stream is situated in the Gortnamona mountains, Kilchreest, Loughrea, Co. Galway. It is so called because every year on the 6th of January the waters of this stream are changed into wine, when the clocks strike twelve at midnight.
Kyle Baohin:
This district got its name from St. Baohin. It is in the Gortnamona mountains, Kilchreest, Loughrea, Co. Galway. It is sometimes called Cros Baohin
senior member (history)
2018-01-04 14:10
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Metadata
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2018-01-04 14:10
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A certain hermit looked out the door of his hut one night "It is a bad night" he said. This hermit got all his food from Heaven. For days after that no food came. At last he asked of God what sin did he commit, and how he would get remission. He heard a voice from Heaven saying "That bad
senior member (history)
2018-01-04 14:10
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A kindhearted woman lived in Kilballyowen. Unknown to her husband she gave all their wheat away in charity. One day her husband asked her for the key of the barn where the wheat was kept. She gave it to him. She being afraid that he would kill her wished that the ground would open up and swallow her. When he opened the barn door the wheat fell out as there was not room enough for it in the barn. This was God's reward for her charity.
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2018-01-04 14:10
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Metadata
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2018-01-04 14:09
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the tide got rough and he could not come in. That night the people lit fires to give him courage. He shouted back to them that if he would live till morning he would have a strange story to tell them but when the morning came he was n't to be found.
It is very noticable that all sea-birds rise out of the island before midnight.
senior member (history)
2018-01-04 14:09
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There was a man living in Ross long ago. One night when he was fishing a mermaid got entangled in his net. He took her home with him. He threw her cloak up in the loft with the nets. One day as he was throwing down nets he threw down the cloak. She snapped it up and ran out the door. He never saw her afterwards.
senior member (history)
2018-01-04 14:08
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paralized. He was taken on board where he died and he was not long dead when his body rotted and he had to be thrown into the sea. Next morning another tree had grown up in its place.
senior member (history)
2018-01-04 14:08
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Long ago it was the custom for boys and girls of Kilfearagh to go to a fort in the district dancing. One Sunday evening when they were dancing there was a girl by the name of Mary Houlihan swallowed up in the fort and she was never seen or heard of since and since that day out it was called Houlihan's fort.
senior member (history)
2018-01-04 14:08
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Long ago there was an Elm tree growing over the grave of St. Senan. One day a boat anchored near his grave. There was a small Elm tree growing over his grave. One of them tried to cut the tree with a knife but could not. He then pulled it out of the ground and tried to break it across his leg but immediately it touched his leg it became
senior member (history)
2018-01-04 14:08
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Long ago St. Senan's Well was in a field which belonged to Eileen O'Brien. She objected to the people going in and out to the well and she ordered men to close it. In a few days the well sprung up again in the field next to it. When she saw this she got sorry and she told the men to open it again but when they did there was nothing to be found but pebbles.
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2018-01-04 14:08
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couldnt. He became as stiff as a brick. The other man went to the nearest house for help and when they returned they succeeded in getting him away. The next morning the well had disappeared from the field and sprung up again in the place it now is.
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2018-01-04 14:08
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