Number of records in editorial history: 206
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Her name was Collagh Liragh and she had frieze to spin. One night she got up with the light of the moon as she thought it was day. There were no clocks in those days. She put down a fire and she was not very long up until she heard a loud knock at the door. She though ti was her sister as she promised to help her spin. So she open the door and in came a man with one horn, and in came another with two horns and they kept coming in until there was not standing room in the house for them and them all h ad wheels to spin. So they started to spin until they had all the frieze spun. Then she had no bread or water
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a hedge school held in Cormick some time ago. The hedge school was held weekly in Donohue's field. It was a little house with no roof. The teacher's name was Frances Martin. This teacher had no pay, but she used to be kept in a different house every night. She used to teach reading and writing and Arithmetic. The had no seats at that time. The used to stand on the ground. There was a black board at that time; they had to write on slates. There was a hedgeschool in Abbeygormican. It was a little cabin in the village of Ballyrahan. When they would get holidays she would go
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
going to be hanged the ghost appeared and clapped his hands and said "Now my boys hadn't I my revenge"
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
His name was Burke, he taught in the house on the brow of the hill over looking Reilly's Cottage, he was the grandfather of Michial and Thomas Burke, n ow living at Ballybunion where the master also lived.
He taught in a farmhouse in winter but in Summer he taught in the open air.
He was not a stranger, he came from the other side of the district of Collon.
He was paid sometimes by a dozen of eggs or small sums of money, like a penny or twopence and sometimes got nothing at all
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When a person enters a house on the churning day he should always help with the work for some time on if not he will take the
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the years 1846 and 1847 a terrible famine occurred in Ireland, owing to the failure of the potato crop, which was the principal food of the Irish people. Of course there were rich people who were not depending on the crops, but it meant starvation for the poorer or farming class.
The was a population of eight millions and after two years of famine there were only four millions left, the others had died of starvation or gone to America. To this day we can see the ruins of their houses, and old people can tell us how they had to leave their houses and lands there in the bad times. They had not the seed to put in the land, nor the strength to sow it. Famine and fever raged all over the country. The
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I remember a few years ago a woman who travelled through this part of the village and a part of the country. We did not know here name but we called her the "Gypsy". She wore a green coat and she had dark hair and yellow skin and she was about thirty three years of age. She went around from village to village in a van.
She carried a folding tent strapped on her back and shoulders and when she came to this place all the boys and girls and children gathered around her to listen to her playing her violin and singing songs. She could dance too.
She sold lovely brooches, necklaces, watches, chains, and she also sold lace ties, cloth and embroidery which she knit herself
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are several wild birds in this district. They are the lark, the swallow, the robin, the wren, the blackbird, the thrush, the starling, the yellow-hammer, the sparrow, the linnet, the jay, the partridge, the plover, the cuckoo, the corn-crake, the whimbrel, the curlew, the wild-goose, the magpie, the gray plover, the pigeon, the tomtit, the stone chatter, the willy on water wagtail, the seagull, the heron, the crow and the wild-duck.
Some of them migrate like the cuckoo and swallow and corncrake who go to Africa. The wildgoose and the whimbrel go to the North in Summer.
The crow builds its nest on the top of the trees. She builds it of brambles and
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are certain beliefs connected with certain days in Ireland. There is a belief that it is dangerous to go on water in whit week. It is also believed that it is unlucky to leave cows out at night in May. The days begin to get long in February. There are two hours and a half on the day at the fair of Lanesboro which falls on the 12th of February. Some people believe it is not right to throw water out on the First of November without saying "make place" for fear the fairies would be outside and be wet with the water that would be thrown out. Some of those beliefs are true. It is also believed that if you are going to a fair and meet a red haired woman you should turn back because you would have no luck that
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were a lot of old cures out long ago and some of them survive yet. The cure long ago for yellow jaundice was to put a spider in a lump of butter and the person that would have the jaundice swallow it. When a person has yellow jaundice the liver is covered with a scum and if that scum is not taken off inside of nine days the person would die. That is why a person with jaundice would have to swallow a spider. The spider would lick the scum off the liver and that would cure the person. The doctors have meddicine now that can cure yellow jaundice. The cure for measles is to stay in bed for a week and take a hot drink often. Some people who have the measles
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is the track of a horse's hoofs in Tonlagee. This horse was a water horse and lived in the Shadlough. A man by the name of Genoy caught him one evening when he was returning to the lake. He trained him and he turned out to be the best horse known in the country. The only trouble was that his legs had to be greased with a firkin of butter every day.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My father told me about a man who made baskets and cleeves and in that way he made his living. I heard also of a man who
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
so the scholars sat on a few benches or stones, or blocks of wood which they brought themselves.
The children learned very quickly because they knew when the teacher left they had no other opportunity of learning again. The pupils were so bright that some of them used to write poems. The following is a poem which one of the pupils wrote:-
"Still crouching beneath the sheltering hedge
Or stretched on mountain fern
The master and his pupils met
Feloniously to learn"
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In a field of ours there is the foundations of a school-house or hedge-school. It looks to be the size of a farmer's house, and the floor is paved with stones.
The master was very cross, and used a stick on his scholars. The attendance was good, as high as eighty as there was no other school about. The master taught in the farmers houses at night, and he kept a mule tied in the end of the school to carry him around.
When the boys used to get him occupied, they would pull a hair out of the mule's tail. He used to kick up his heels. The master whacked them for all this. There were no
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A long distance down at the back of Mr O'Malleys house is an old ruin called the Abbey. Here the people say there was a building where monks lived until Cromwells soldiers burned it. The gable-ends are there yet and here the priest used to say mass in Penal Days. He was dressed in layman's clothes, but it is so remote off the road that he was never disturbed by the soldiers.
My mother remembers being told the following story of a Mass Rock some miles from her home. This rock was in the middle of a wood standing alone, bare, upright, point to the skies. It was called in Irish "Carraig an Aifrinn". This was one of the places where Mass was celebrated in Penal Times. In those times Catholics were not allowed to assist at Mass, priests not allowed to celebrate the Holy Sacrifice. It was a treasonable offence to do so
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In our district there are more marriages during Shrove which occurs between Christmas and Lent. Shrove Tuesday is the last day of Shrove and on that night pancakes and tea-parties are the rule.
I don't know if matches are made as a lot of them run away but the wise men take their time and settle their matches, and look for fortunes and no matter how good looking the girl is she will not be married without a fortune. I did not hear from any person who remembered marriages being held in the houses. There is an old rhyme about the days of the week.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During the Winter nights my father often tells us, all the stories he heard about the Big Wind of 1839. The farmers had their crops in their haggards and the weather was very bad.
The sea-gulls were to be seen in large flocks in the fields. The wind had blown a gale all day, and as night came on it seemed to gather all its power.
Any person who ventured out that night was blown about like a ball and the doors had to be locked and barred or the roof of the house would be blown off. As morning dawned the wind calmed down and what a scene of devastation they beheld. Roofs off houses were blown out in the fields sheep were dead by the ditches, woods had big gaps cut through them
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We hear more about the weather, that we do son any other subject. For instance when we hear the wild geese screeching we know we are in for hard weather. When the crows fly high, and swoop up and down old people tell us we are going to have a storm.Again when the pilibins and sea-gulls appear on the land cold weather and storms are in store for us. When we see crows perched in a row along on a wall, or swallows flying low, we can expect rain. When the sun rises red we can expect high wind and sailors dread a red sun-rise.
When the sheep and cattle gather along by the walls and ditches, bad weather is approaching. When the sky is high and cloudless we can expect good weather to come and also when the smoke
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live in the parish of Kilbride. Saint Bridget is its patron saint. It is from her the parish gets its name. There is an old ruined church in Ballinderry and it is said that was Saint Bridget that founded it.
She was very king to the poor and to every beggar she met on her travels she gave something. She used to travel around this district on a donkey.
She was travelling through this district one day. It was a very find day and she became very tired and thirsty. Just as she was passing through Grange she saw a spring well. She dismounted from her donkey and sat down by the well and satisfied her thirst. This sell is dedicated to her honour ever since. But there does not many people visit it on account of it being so backward. There are a few
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. The cruckan is the name of a small hill situated in Newtown.
2. The Garden is the name of a small field with ridges in it and is situated in Newtown.
3. Resh is the name of a small meadow field situated in the townland of Stream.
4. Asleir is a very large three cornered field situated in the townland of Shelborne.
5. The lius is a small tillage field with a large hedge of ivy around it.
6. The gurauns is the name of a small
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 16:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden days when a man went to matchmake he stood out side the door and threw in his hat and asked the man of the house was (if it) that welcome and if it was he would answer yes to come in. In those days a man always brought a bottle of whiskey and if there was a couple of girls in the house the boss would always try to pawn off the ugliest on who ever
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 15:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. If you get oil of wheat and put it on Ringworm it will cure it.
2. If you put a frog in your mouth when you have a tooth ache it will cure it.
3. If you were making a grave and if you found a skull and rub a tooth from the skull across your own teeth you would never have a bad tooth.
4. If you lick a lizard you will have a cure for a burn on your tong.
5. Drink asses milk will cure a sick child.
6. The seventh son of the family has a cure for wild fire.
7. If you go under an asses
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 15:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. The cure for black leg is to cut the skin and put in a piece of garlic.
2. If you are walking and to get water in a rock rub the water on the (rack) wart.
3. If you want to keep off flys of a horse is to get leaves of a wallnut tree and give them a boil and juice of the put it on the horse.
4. Goose greace is good for cramps in a pig.
5. If you have a headache drink black tea and it will be cure.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 15:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. If you get the jaw bone of a hedge-hog and carry it in your pocket it would cure a tooth-ache.
2. If you put sheep-dung on a wart it would cure it.
3. If you got a snail and rub it on a wart and then put him on a thorn bush according as the snail is dying away the wart will be going away.
4. If you rub a gold ring on a sty on your eye three times and it will cure it.
5. If a person has rheumatism and carry a potato in his pocket and it would cure it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 14:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Birds commonly found in Lusmagh are the wild duck water hen plover and swan.
The wild duck builds her nest in heath and lays ten eggs. The colour of the eggs are bluesh. The water hen builds her next in a swampy place where rushes grow. She lays six eggs and hatches them for three weeks. The plover builds her next on a hill. She lays two eggs and it is very hard to see them because they are the colour of the grass. She hatches for to weeks. The swan builds her nest on the brink of the Shannon she gets about a donkey load of rushes and builds her nest. She lays from two to five eggs and hatches for to weeks.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. It is not lucky to churn on a Monday.
2. You should never get married on a Saturday.
3. It is not lucky to change from one house to another on a Friday.
4. Monday is a unlucky day to give credit for the first time.
5. It is not lucky to cry on sweedens day or you will be crying all your life.
6. If you are born on foolsday you would a fool all your life.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 13:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Móinín: A grazing pasture with a hill in it.
Gort a sgibol: A tillage field.
Gravakee: A tillage field.
Kruck: A grazing field with a hill in the middle of it.
Lios: A grazing field.
Aishlear: A tillage field.
Gort a baile: A field half tillage and half meadow.
Gort an uisge: A small field with a well in it.
Long Garb: A tillage field.
Casior: A meadow field.
Parcin mor: About an acor of small pasture.
Affig: A tillage field.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 12:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Strong men
Bernard Gallagher used to carry forty stone of wheat on his back up steps to a loft.
2. Quick walkers
Paddy Kelly walked to Nenagh a distant of 20 miles for a grey-hound and was back that night at 12 o clock. He did it about 30 years ago.
3. An old woman Mrs Martin used to go milk her cows two miles across the bog over near All-Saints and carry home a can of milk on her head and she niting a sock on her way home.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 11:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. When the sparks flys up the chimney at night it is the sign of rain.
2. When there is a halo and a mist round the moon rain is sure to follow.
3. When the sun sets behind a black cloud it is the sign of rain.
4. When the crows flys around a house it is the sign of a storm.
5. When the robins come into the house it is the sign of rain.
6. When the cat scrapes it is the sign of rain.
7. When the wagtail comes near the door it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 10:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. When the swallows fly low it is the sign of rain.
2. When the clouds move along quickly it is the sign of rain.
3. When soot comes down the chimney it is the sign of rain.
4. When the birds sing in the trees and not on the branches, it is the sign of rain.
5. If you see one magpie in the morning it is the sign of rain.
6. When a cat scrapes timber with its claws it is the sign of a storm.
7. When the robins come
senior member (history)
2020-05-13 10:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Blacksmith always has his forge at a cross roads. The tulls he uses are a hammer, a pincers, a tongs, a vice, a shuning knife, a nippers and anvil and a bellows. The nearest blacksmith we have is John Gibbons. He is a good blacksmith for shuning horses and for mendind pot and plows.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tradition says that there is hidden treasure in this parish in the townland of "Páirc Áine" in a field called the "Dranair".
It is supposed that a number of men were working in this field about one hundred years ago and at that time the people had a habit of working before their breakfast. It happened that these men were just called to their breakfast and there was one man among them who was just turning the last sod when he saw a lump of gold underneath it. He turned back the sod again so as that his comrade would not see the gold and he stuck his spade beside it and he went into his breakfast. When the breakfast was over he came out before the others to get the gold but there was neither
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Farewell! Coole West within my breast
My love is there for you.
To your valleys fair & mountains rare
I now must bid adieu
Beneath Columbus starry skies
My weary head I'll rest
My longing eyes no more behold
You lovely Sweet Coole West
I see the morning's silvery dawn
Right up the eastern sky
Which tells me that the hour has come
When I must say Good bye.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The bread used here was wheaten bread, brown bread, potato bread and stampy.
Wheaten bread was made of crushed wheat. The farmers used grow their own wheat and crush it with a quern.
Brown bread was made of crushed wheat mixed with white flour.
Potato bread was made of crushed boiled potatoes mixed and kneaded with flour and salt and soda mixed with them also. Baked in a "bastable" or in a griddle.
Stampy was made by grating potatoes with a grater into a very clean basket. First the potatoes should be cleaned thoroughly and the eyes scraped out but the potatoes should not be peeled. When there are enough of potatoes grated put the grated stuff into
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The potatoes set in this parish are all alike and are set in the same way. The names of them are kerspink, queens dates, shamrock and arran banners.
In our farm at home the land under potatoes every year is from half an acre to an acre.
Sometimes the land is made into ridges with a plough and then the seed is laid on each side of the ridge. The manure is put on the seed then and after that the whole ridge is covered with earth.
Sometimes bawn is turned with a spade. First the ground is manured and the manure is spread on the land in the width of a ridge. When one ridge of manure is spread the two side seeds are put down and the "tásbód" is turned on the seeds.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In every parish long ago there was some witty person who cold make a poem about an important thing that would happen in the parish.
Some years ago there was a person in this parish who was good for making poetry. His name was Michael Taylor. He lived in Upper Athea. He composed a song called "The Barns by the Galey". There is another man in this parish who is good for making rhymes. He composed a song called "Maggie from the Lots". His name is Michael Drury. The following is the song he composed.
In the banks of Scrahan river
There dwelt a comely maid
And many the young and foolish youth
This fair one has betrayed
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The fairies people believe in are-:
Jack-o- the lantern -: this fairy is supposed to lead people astray on dark nights.
Banshee -: This fairy woman is supposed to be heard crying near the house where a person is going to die.
The Leipreacán -: this fairy in the farm of an old man is to be seen on bright moonlight nights mending shoes. If he is caught and held fast he would tell where a pot of gold is to be found.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Our farm animals at home are - cow, calf, goat, pig, horse and donkey.
When driving the cows we say "How How" and when callings the calves we say "Sue Sue".
The house for the cows is a long oblong house made of stones and covered with thatch. The cows are tied to stakes by the horns with ropes each about two yards long.
The house for the horse is a long oblong house and is called a stable. The horse is tied around the neck with
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ring worm -: Cover over with car-grease.
Blast -: Bathe udder with warm water and salt.
Scour -: Bottle with soda-water.
Rúad (?) -: Make nine knots over calfs back.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sore throat = gargle with hot water and salt. Let the juice of the stem of a nóinín in the nostrils and down to the throat.
Sty = Rub with a marriage ring. Bathe in black tea.
Warts = Rub with water found in the hollow of a stone.
Whooping cough = drink ferrets leavings.
Toothache = Break the tigh of a clog between the teeth.
Boils = mix sugar and soap together and put them to the boil.
Sore leg = Rub butter to it and let a dog lick it.
Burns = When you get burned immediately put your leg into
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The birds common in this district are, the robin, wren, black-bird, thrush, mag-pie, jack-daw, swallow, and lark.
Robin - Builds her nest in a hole in the ditch, made with moss, hay ad feathers, lays five white eggs with brown spots.
Black-bird - Builds her nest in a white thorn bush with sticks moss and puddle lays four blue eggs with brown spots. Sits on the eggs for two weeks.
Thrush - Builds her nest in a white thorn bush of sticks and moss and lines it with mud lays four or five green
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Jack o' the Lantern -:
This fairy is supposed to lead people astray at night. He is specially believed to be in bogs or in marshy places.
The "bean-side" -:
This is a fairy which is said to be heard crying when peoples' friends die and it is believed that is is only when certain families die this fairy is heard.
The "leipreacán" -:
This little fairy is believed to have his residence under a dock leaf and he is supposed to be a shoemaker. It is said that if a person has the good luck of meeting this fairy and catching him that he would tell the person where a pot of gold
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 18:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Jack o' the Lantern -:
This fairy is supposed to lead people astray at night. He is specially believed to be in bogs or in marshy places.
The "bean-side" -:
This is a fairy which is said to be heard crying when peoples' friends die and it is believed that is is only when certain families die this fairy is heard.
The "leipreacán" -:
This little fairy is believed to have his residence under a dock leaf and he is supposed to be a shoemaker. It is said that if a person has the good luck of meeting this fairy and catching him that he would tell the person where a pot of gold
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 17:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived a man in Glentogher who was a great fiddler.
One day he left his home and went away and no one knew where he was but the people were thinking that he was taken by the fairies.
His brother was going to get married and he had his guests asked to the wedding before the fiddler went away. The day of the wedding came and the fiddler had not returned. The people gathered into the wedding house and began to dance and sing. About eight o'clock at night, in came the fiddler and he was very well dressed and he began to dance with the rest of the girls. His married brother asked him where he had been and he told him that he had been away with very nice people as a fiddler. He also told him that they had given him leave to come to the wedding but not to stay long at it. Shortly afterwards he told his brother that he was going now and his brother asked when he would be back and the fiddler told him that he would never get back, but if you want me back I'll tell you what to do - A funeral will pass by this door
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 15:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When Bridget McDaid was a small girl she was down by the river herself.
A fairy bush was growing by the river's bank and she sat under it, and she never heard or seen anything after that till she found herself at a strange man's door.
Her father and mother had been out all day and night searching for her but they couldn't get her.
News was not long spreading and it was heard at the Fore Side that she was lost.
Bridget went into the house that she was left at. There was no one in the house but a man when she went in. The man asked her who she was and all she could say was "a daughter of Daddy's", "a daughter of Mammy's" so the man didn't know who she was and he didn't know what to do with her.
Shortly some neighbours came in and told that a little girl ahd been lost from the Illies. So the man left and took the girl with him to her house and when she came into the house all she could say was that a nice wee wane dressed in red took her away.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 15:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the fairies were very common it was said that a girl from Ballymagan was preparing to get married. She left her home one day to get a dress made for the wedding by a dress-maker who was some distance away and she had to cross a river to get there. When she was crossing the river there came down what was called a "dry flood" and swept her away. A number of people went to look for her and at the end they go her by the river's bank and her own people took her home and waked he thinking it was her all the time and when they were about to coffin her it was only an oak stick that was in the bed. The fairies had taken her away and left this as her image. A short time after-wards she appeared to the man she was to get married to and told him that the fairies had her and warned him to be here at this same place the next evening for the fairies and I will come riding on white horses and will pass here one after another, have a hatchet with you in your hand and I will be on the third horse. She told him when she would be passing to hit her with the hatchet. He had the hatchet over his head when she came and failed to hit her and she passed on. The fairies knew she told him and when they got her away behind Kinnego hill they killed her and the
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 15:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the home of where I now live, my grand-Aunts lived in it long ago when the fairies were very common.
One day one of my grand-aunts was in the house by herself when a beggar woman came into the house and asked for some milk. At the same time my grand-aunts were very scarce of milk and they had only as much as would cream their tea in the evening. One of my grand-aunts told the beggar of her scarcity of milk but she said she would give the beggar what she had, and she would milk what would do for the cream in the evening. My grand-aunt got a bottle and filled it with milk and as she was giving the bottle to the beggar it fell on the floor and broke and the milk flowed out the door. My grand-aunt didn't know what was the matter and she thought something was going to happen.
She told the beggar to sit down and she would go out and bring in a cow from the field and milk her. The beggar did as she was told and when my grand-aunt milked the cow she filled another bottle of milk and gave it to the beggar.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A number of children gather together in a house at night and they take off their boots.
One of them puts a cloth on his eyes and the others hide, and the one with the cloth on, tries to catch them. If he catches one he has to call him by name and if he does not call the right name he has to let him go and then try to catch one whose name he knows.
If he knew the name of the first one he caught he takes the cloth off his own eyes and puts it on the eyes of the one he caught and that one tries to catch some of the others & he must call out the name of the one he catches before he can take the cloth off his own eyes & put it on the eyes of the one he caught.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A number of girls form a ring and one girl begins with some other girl in the ring and says, one two, sky blue (& points to a different girl as she says each word) all out-but-you, & when she comes to the girl that "you" falls on that girl is said to have the Tig. The rest of the girls in the ring then scatter through the play ground and the girl that has the Tig follows them & when she catches a girl that girl has the "Tig", and she follows them till she catches one & so on.
If any of them get tired they call "Pardon" and they are allowed to rest and the girl with the Tig follows the remainder, till she catches one.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We play different games during the year and the following is how we play marbles. We draw a square on the ground and if there are four playing each one puts a marble in the square. We next draw a line on the ground about three yards behind the square. We stand behind this line and one boy shoots a marble and tries to knock one out of the square. If he knocks one out he keeps it and shoots again to knock out another & if he doesn't do so the next boy shoots & tries to knock a marble out of the square & if he does so he next shoots at the first boys marble & if he hits it, he takes the marble the first boy won & keeps it then he shoots again to knock a marble out of the square. If he does not do so the next boy shoots at the remaining marbles in the square and carried on like the second boy. When all the marbles have been knocked out of the square the game is finished & they start again.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When a number of boys gather together, they divide themselves into two divisions; one calling themselves guards and the other stillers. The stillers hide behind a ditch and begin to still but they leave some boy to watch for the guards.
When he sees the guards coming he tells the stillers and they all run with the guards after them. If the guards catch all the stillers and get their names they take them to a boy that is called a judge and whatever penalty the judge puts on them they have to bear it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If a married couple are of the same name, the woman bakes pan-cakes and gives them to those who have the whooping-cough and these are said to cure them.
or
If a person who has the whooping-cough is put under a donkey three times he will be cured.
or
If you give bread to a donkey to eat and give the crumbs that drop from the donkey, to the person who has thew whooping cough, to eat, he will be cured.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a lake in Meenaharnish near the Illies and it is said that St Patrick banished a snake into it. One time the farmers started to drain the lake, and while they were at it, a mad bull came out of the lake and ran round around it. The men ran to the road and when they got there and looked back they saw the bull going in to the lake again and he was never seen again.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is supposed to be a hidden treasure in Meenaharnish hill. Some say it is a cheese store and that the cows from Tyrone were driven to Meenaharnish and milked and cheese was made from the milk and stored in a room and the old building is to be seen yet.
Gold is supposed to have been burned in a hill in Glenard by the Dunes and it is supposed to have been burned under the spot where the sum just shines in the morning on the 1st day of Summer. It is said that on stormy nights men were seen walking around the place with lights.
senior member (history)
2020-05-11 14:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A man builds a round kiln six feet in diameter and five fee high, he then builds two little walls in the centre of the kiln at the bottom (about 2ft high). After that he gets flat stones and he covers the two walls with the stones and he leaves a space of two inches between every stone.
He leaves a hole in the front of the kiln two feet high and one and a half feet broad.
After that he goes to a quarry and he digs out some of the lime stone and takes it up to the kiln and he breaks it into small pieces.
When he has the stones broken he gets turf and he puts a layer of the turf on the top of the stones in the bottom of the kilns the then puts a layer of the broken lime-stone on the top of the turf, he puts a layer of turf on the top of the layer of stones and he does the same until the kiln is full. When it is full he puts a fire in the hold he left in the front, and then the turf burns and burns the lime-stone into lime.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Q. What tree grows in the palm of your hand.
A. A palm tree.
Q. Why are deaf people like Swiss clocks.
A. Because we cannot make them here. (hear)
Q. What is the difference between a hungry boy and a glutton.
A. One longs to eat and the other eats too long.
Q. What's one half of the moon like.
A. The other half of it.
Q. What part of a train comes to the station first.
A. The noise.
Q. How long did Cain hate his brother.
A. As long as he was able. (Abel)
Q. What has an eye but cannot see.
A. A needle.
Q. When is a trunk like two letters of the Alphabet.
A. When it is empty (MT).
Q. Why does a hen pick a pot.
A. Because she can't lick it.
Q. What dog is a yard long.
A. A yard dog.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 12:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Turf making is one of the principal occupations of the farmer.
When the farmer is going to cut turf, the first thing he has to is to clean the bank with a sharp instrument called a bog-knife. When he has that done he cleans off the bank with a spade and shovel, and the employs a few men to help him to cut the turf.
The he starts to cut the turf with a very sharp instrument called a "sleán". One of the men he employs catches the turf and puts it on a turf-barrow, and when the turf-barrow is full another man wheels it out and throws it on the spreading-bank.
This continues until all the turf has been cut. When the turf has been three weeks cut, the farmer makes it into small heaps called footings, using eight or nine sods placing them in such a way, as to let the air into it to dry it. Then when the turf is fairly well dried in the footings, it is made into small ricks, each of these when dry, weight about a ton. These small ricks are called clamps.
Clamping consists of gathering the footings and making it into a big heap.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 12:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All is not gold that glitters. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
A good dinner is better than a fine coat. A rolling stone gathers no moss. He that goes aborrowing goes assorrowing. Wide will wear, but tight will tear. The juice of a cow is good alive or dead. Empty vessels make most sound.
Too far east is west.
If you don't sow in spring you won't reap in Autumn.
When the cat it out the mice can play.
There is no help or cure against death.
Hills are green far away.
A borrowed horse had hard hooves.
A tinker's wife and a tailor's wife are two that never agreed.
A stitch in time saves nine.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 12:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What tree grows in the palm of your hand? Palm tree.
If a shovel and a tongs come to £1-18-6 what would a ton of coal come to? Ashes.
Why is there never a whole day? Every day begins breaking.
What burns to keep a secret? Sealing wax.
What tree is liked in Summer? The beech.
What runs fast but has no legs? The tap.
The man that made it did not want it, the man that want it did not use it, the man that used it did not see it? A coffin.
If it takes two and a half yards to make a waist coat what will it take to make a coat? A tailor.
What king of a dog in three feet long? A yard dog.
Why should you not tell a secret in a corn field? Because there are too many ears to hear it.
What is bought by the yard and worn by the foot? A carpet.
What turns without moving? Milk.
Why is an empty purse always the same? Because there is no change in it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 12:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was in this district a fort.
One day a neighbour was coming home from Mass and he was met by a very strange man whom he had never saw before.
The stranger said to the man is your name Dowling, the man replied yes. The stranger then said you have a black cat and a black cock at home, the man said he had.
Then you are the man I was dreaming about for three nights.
I will go home with your and tonight we will go to a fort where there is a crock of gold hid.
So they ate their dinner and rested, and that night they made their way to the fort and brought the black cat and the black cock and a candle with them.
They came to the fort and it was very dark.
They lit the candle and started to dig when they were some
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 12:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Time is a good storyteller. The juice of a cow is good alive or dead. Work is better than talk. There is no feast till a roast and no torment till marriage. your pocket is your friend. Lie with the lamb and rise with the bird. A full purse makes a light heart. An empty sack doesn't stand. It is a long road that has no turning. It is often a person's mouth broke his nose. A good word never broke his mouth. The truth never choked a man. It is difficult to cut the wool of a goat. A good beginning is half the work. A windy day is not a day for thatching. The thing that is bought dear is often sold cheap.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 11:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Many years ago farmers found it very hard to make oats, as they had no machinery.
They had to cut the oats with hooks or scythes and this was very tedious as well as tiresome.
Many farmers gathered together to cut each others oats.
When the oats was cut it was bound in sheaves.
Women used to do most of the binging.
Then it was put into sticks and when it was dry enough it was put into stacks.
Then it is left in the field for about a month.
In the late Autumn it is brought into the barn then they thrashed it with a tool called a flail.
Then they brought it to a mill and had it ground into meal.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 11:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When rain is coming the winds have a hollow sound.
The sky darkens up and the clouds have a black colour.
If we watch the sun setting in the evening it has a pale yellow colour when it is going to rain.
If we also watch the moon at night it has a bright circle or a halo around it. It is an old remark that when soot fall from the chimney it is a sign or rain. If the rooks fly higher then usual when returning to the rookery fine weather will follow but if they fly low and return earlier than usual bad weather is coming.
They usually tumble about in the air before wind.
If the farmer's ducks are found searching for snails far into the fields in the daytime rain is coming.
The coming of wild swans to lakes also indicated bad weather.
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 11:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many varieties of games played in this district.
The boys generally play football, handball, hurling, tennis and golf. During the summer when the weather is fine there are teams picked out to play against each other and when the teams selected win a certain number of games they receive medals or a gold or silver cup.
When the are playing football each team have a certain different coloured jerseys which is selected by the team.
In Winter they don't play football, because the weather is too bad and the fields are too wet and slippy.
They have ballalleys erected and they play handball. The girls play camogie in Summer and other games. The games long ago were hurling and football.
During the winter nights they
senior member (history)
2020-05-07 11:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All the houses in olden times were thatched with straw either wheaten or oaten and rushes got from the bogs. the walls were made of yellow clay mixed with chopped straw. This was kept continually walled whilst building and the cut to the required thickness. All the old houses had a "Settlebed" in the kitchen. Used as a seat during the day and then pulled out and made into a bed for the night. They are still used and are to be seen in some of the local houses. The fire place was generally at the gable end wall or in the centre wall. About 35 years ago, there was a house built against the ditch at Burkes of the Hill, Clerihan, which had no chimney. The fire used to be in the centre of the floor and the smoke escaped through a hole in the roof. Inhabited by a family named Slattery. Their descendants are still alive named Donnells of Darcy's Cross. The chimneys were made of wattles or sallies covered over with clay called "switch chimneys".
After the night of the "Big Wind" most of the houses were knocked down, so people had to build their houses of mud as quickly as possible.
Many of these houses had no glass windows. These were made of sheep skin.
The old floors were made of yellow clay. After a new floor being put down, a dance was held for the purpose of binding the clay.
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 10:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of the landlord that lived in this place long ago was Lord Wallscourt. He lived in Ardfry about twenty years ago. He had a large house built there. His wife is living still in London. Mostly all the people of this place were tenants of his.
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 10:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A dead woman or a dead pig is money any day. Do not believe the story which a woman tells you she has heard from another woman. Drunkards make comfortless homes. A guilty mind tortures the owner. A rolling stone gathers no moss. An old sow is no mutton and
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 10:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were two blacksmiths in this district long ago but there is only one in it now. The name of the blacksmith that is living here now is Thomas Madden. His forge is situated in the village of Killcamen. It is a very large forge. It is roofed with timber and the timber is painted black. He works very hard in the forge making gates, and shoes for horses and fixing ploughs and harrows and iron implements. He generally charges five shillings for making and putting on a set of shoes on a horse but if a person brings him the iron he will make the shoes and put them on for three shillings and sixpence. Long ago the blacksmiths of this district used charge six shillings for making and putting on a set of shoes. He also makes socks and colters for ploughs. He has a bellows and an anvil and lots of other irons in his forge. He does not be always in the forge. The
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 09:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Every farmer in this district sows about an acre or an acre and a half of potatoes every year. In this district the people sow the potatoes in drills. They plough the land first in the month of March. When they have it ploughed they harrow it. Then they plough it the second time and when they have it finished they harrow it again and then they make the drills. Then they cut the slits and when they are a few days cut someone spreads them on the drills. Some other person comes after them and covers the slits with clay. The farmer cuts seaweed and he spreads it on the drills. After a week he closes the drills with a plough. When the stalks are about a week over the ground he harrows the ground. In the month of
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 09:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are not many herbs in this district. The name of an herb which grows very plentifully in this district is garlic. It is very good for cattle but if cows eat it, it will put an ugly taste on their milk and it could not be drank. The people do not let their cows graze where it is growing. It grows plentifully in Ardfry. There is another herb
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 09:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of the village in which I live is Gurrane. There are twelve houses in it. Most of the houses are thatched. There are only two people over seventy years of age in my village. The names of them are John Donellan, and Mrs Carrick. They tell stories in Irish. There were twenty two houses in the village of Gurrane long ago. There was also a chapel in the village of Gurrane long ago. It was situated about a hundred yards from the cross-roads. It fell the night of the high wind.
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 09:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago four roads were made from Tara. One of these roads passes through this district. It is called the old road. This road is still in use and it is repaired a few times every year. There is also a road in Gurrane and it is called "bóirín burde". There is a road near Prospect and it is leading to the sea. It is
senior member (history)
2020-05-06 09:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The first feast day of the year is New Year's Day. The next feast is held on the sixth of January. It is called the Twelvth Day. On that Twelvth Night the people light twelve small candles. St Patricks Day is celebrated on the seventeenth of March. The people wear shamrock on their coats on that day in honour of St.Patrick. The feast of St.Bridget is held on the first of February. Candlemas Day is celebrated on the second of February. On that day the priest bless candles. On St.Bridgets night the people make crosses of straw in honour of St.Bridget and they hang it on the wall. On that night also the young children go around from house to house with the "bridgeog". Palm Sunday is the next feast day after St.Patricks Day.
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My grandmother kept her cows far away from her house. One evening late she sent her son for them. He was a long time gone and she went after him to see what happened to him. When she reached the field she could not see any of them because the cows had got out on the road. But in a little while she saw him driving the cows home another way. She then started home across the fields. It was dark by this time. When she came to the road she was astray, she didn't know where she was and thought the road was a river. She wandered up and down and couldn't cross it, at last she saw the family coming to look for her, and not until one of the crossed the road towards her could she be convinced that it wasn't a river.
Charles Carroll
Ballysokeery
Aged 44 years
Cecil Carroll
Ballysokeery
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 17:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Forty years ago Thomas Gardiner who lived in Newtownwhite sold a horse to a man in Coolaney Co Sligo. This man hadn't enough money with him at the fair, but he said he would surely turn up with the balance. They gave him the horse and left him the saddle and bridle to take it home. He promised "Living or dead I'll return this saddle and bridle". He got drunk on the way home, the horse threw him and killed him. At 11.30 pm that night Thomas Gardiner's son Arthur went out to fodder the cattle for the night. There standing in the stable door with the saddle and bridle on his arm stood Willie Lighter the man to whom they sold the horse. He spoke to him, getting no answer he turned into the house and called his father, when the father came out the man, saddle and bridle and all had vanished. Next day the Gardiners heard the new of the accident.
Obtained from :- Foster Gardiner, Newtownwhite, Aged 58 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 16:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Buacalán is a big plant. There comes a yellow flower on it. Gloserlane grows on bad land and it is poison. Hemlock grows along ditches, it is a green plant and has a white flower, it will poison the young goslings. Chickenweed is found in the potato drills, it is sometimes used to feed pigs. They put water in a big pot, when it is boiling meal is added and then the chickenwee is mixed through the gruel. Nettles are boiled and given to young turkeys and ducks, nettle tea is a cure for Rheumatic. Ferabawn mixed with fresh butter and boiled is used as a cure for the "Rose". Robin-run-the-Hedge grows in the hedge, it is also used in the curer for the "Rose". Cowfoot grows in the potatoe drills. Farian grows along ditches. Dandelions have a yellow flower, the white staff which comes out of the stem will cure warts. Dockins cure the nettle sting, children rub a dockin leave to the sting and say "Dockin in, and nettle out". They grow everywhere.
Sam Jackson
Newtownwhite
Aged 53 years
William Jackson
Newtownwhite
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of my townland is Derreens. The name of my parish is Ballysakeery and the name of Barony is Tyrawley. The number of families is eight, and the number of people is thirty five. The most common name is Walsh.
Five of the houses are thatched and two slated. In former times five other houses were in this townland. There is one in ruins now. Five families emigrated.
The land is good but parts of it is boggy.
Robert Fair
Derreens
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 16:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On New Year's day the people make resolutions and try to keep them throughout the year.
On St Brigids day the people dress up as bridgeogs and go from house to house. They put on old clothes and false faces at night. In each house one person plays an instrument and the rest dances. They get money in each house they go. They are supposed to gather it for some poor person around the place.
On St Patrick's day the people wear a shamrock. It is lucky to get a four leaf shamrock on this day.
The first day of April is called April fool's day. On this day one person tries to fool another. They also write April fool on paper and pin it on another person's back.
On Hallow E'en we eat apples and nuts. There is also a ring in the
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 16:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The fairs are held in town. The buyers go to the houses when they want to buy anything in between the fairs. In former times there was a fair in Moyne held twice a year. It is now disused because it is to far away from the stations.
The cattle fairs are mostly held in fairgreens. The horse fairs are mostly held on the street in the towns.
Toll is paid on sold beasts by the buyer. There is a man at each gate and to him toll is paid. The toll that is paid is twopence on bonhams, sixpence on small cattle and one shilling on big ones.
When a beast is sold luck money is given by the seller to the buyer when paid.
When people are selling their animals at
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 16:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are three forges in this parish, one in Rosserk, one in Lisglennon and one in Derreens. Patrick Walsh owns the forge in Derreens, his people have been smiths as far back as anyone here can remember. His father who died about three years ago was a smith and his father again was also a smith. Riley Hughes as he is commonly called owns the forge in Lisglennon, his proper name is Michael Hughes. His father was also a blacksmith. The other forge is in a house belonging to Mrs Robert Petrie of Rosserk House, the smith at present working it is the name of Michael Carden, he came about five years ago from Moylaw beyond Crossmolina. Previously the forge was a private one kept by the master of Rosserk House George Petrie for showing his own farm horses. Watt McAndrew worked in the forge for George Petrie. This old smith still lives convenient to the forge in a farm of his own, he is 81 years of age.
Riley Hughes still works his forge in Lisglennon, it is convenient to a cross-roads.
A custom prevailed some sixty years ago of giving the smith farm produce each year, each
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 16:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Rosserk near to the Abbey there a great standing stone. The story goes that a giant flung it from Neiphin, others say it was placed there. People visit this stone very often, but there are no carvings or writings on it. It is said there is a grave to the bottom of it. In Crosspatrick graveyard there is a monument in memory of Tom Molloy a man who lived near the graveyard gate. He carved this monument himself a couple of years before he died, it is shaped like a man. Two or three years ago it fell down and the parish priest in Killala had it erected again.
Obtained from
Charles Carroll
Ballysokeery
Cecil Carroll
Ballysokeery
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 16:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One of the famous round towers built during the period of Danish Invasions stands in Killala near to the church of Ireland Cathedral. A tunnel underground connects the Cathedral graveyard with the tower. A story is circulated in this district concerning the building of this tower. The people of Killala wished it to be a unique building, they didn't want another such tower to be built in all Ireland. When the mason who built it had placed the cross on top they quickly tore down the scaffolding and left him hanging to the top of it to die. They wanted to prevent him building another like it. As he was in this sore plight an amadán chanced to pass by, looking up he saw the mason and asked his trouble. "Well" said the amadán "isn't it easier to throw down two stones than to put up one". The mason quickly set to work, first he fired down the cross. They rushed along begging him to stop and the scaffold was quickly raised to take him down again.
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fifty years oaten bread was the staple food of the people of this district. The griddle cake as it was called was made with oatmeal and milk mixed. It was baked in front of the fire on a griddle. Sometimes the slab of oaten cake was baked leant up against the hob, hobs are common in many of the houses here. Boxty Bread is still made here. Raw potatoes grated and mixed with flour and salt then baked on the pan like a pancake is the Boxty cake. Bread was also made out of rye meal, it was black bread. They ground their own flour from wheat by means of little hard querns, these consisted of two grinding stones with a handle attached to the top stone. There was a hole right through the top stone, into this the wheat was emptied as the handle was turned the floured came out between the grinding stones. One of these flour querns is still to be seen at Thomas McKinley's house, The Shore, Ballylsokeery.
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
First a hoop is found generally the rim of an old bicycle wheel. Then a thick sally rod is placed in the hoop, each end is tied to the rim and the rod bent down in the middle. Four more
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thatching is still carried on in this district. First they get straw and draw it then put it on the house. Then get a small bit of straw and double in two. Then they tie it where it was doubled and put it on rods on the to of the roof. These are called bobbins. They put rods on the end of the thatch to stop it from falling off. These rods are called scollops.
Obtained fro Patrick Walsh
Aged 60 years
Derreens
Ballina
Co Mayo
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About fifty years ago the people here used "Paurdogs" for putting out manure on the land.
Making a "Paurdog". First cut a green sod and leave it on the ground, then put the standards upright in the sod. Wind small rods through the standards. When about 2 feet high is made they leave a row of holes for lifting it. The "Paurdog" is about four feet high and it has a false bottom. A thick stick is left across the bottom and when they are manuring the land they pull out the stick and the manure drops out easily. This stick is called a sughan.
Obtained from Sam Jackson
Aged 52 years
Newtown
Ballina
Co Mayo
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kit Hannick's Field - Owner Mrs Fair Derreens
The Sheep Hill - Owner Mrs Fair Derreens
The Bog Garden - Owner Mrs Fair Derreens
Gollmor Field - Owner Eddie Ennis Derreens
The Fort Field - Owner Eddie Ennis Derreens
The Road Field - Owner Eddie Ennis Derreens
Peggy's House - old broken down house on Pat Lawlor's property in Derreens so called because an old woman named Peggy Foy lived there.
Jack Lavens - Owner Pat Walsh Derreens
Cnoc Aniar - Owner Pat Walsh Derreens
Cnoc An Aifrinn - Owner Pat Walsh Derreens
Teangaire - Owner Pat McHale Coonca....
Leargann's Hill - Owner John Tighe Coonca....
Deicimid - Owner Robert Petrie Ross...
Poll mór - Owner Robert Petrie Ross.....
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
A stitch in time saves nine.
One flower never made a garden.
Don't count your chickens before they are hatched.
Look before you leap.
Don't judge the book by its cover.
Make hay while the sun shines.
More haste, less speed.
A watched kettle never boils.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
Its an ill wind that doesn't blow somebody fair.
What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time a man named John Walsh living in Carrowkelly when he had his supper eaten went out to the field tieing his horse. The faries came to him and said for to tie the horse to a buacalán and he did so. Then the faries went away again and brought the man with them.
All night he was going in and out in his neighbours key-holes and in the morning he found himself untieing the horse from the buacalán.
Obrained from Cecil Carroll, Charles Carroll, Ballysakeery,
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An old woman here about 80 years ago, her name is not remembered, used turn into a hare and suck other people's cows. This is how she too the butter. No man could shoot her except he had a piece of silver in the gun. One night a man watched for her, he had a sixpenny bit in his gun, as the hare was going out the cow house door he fired and hit her. He rushed off after the wounded hare and made straight for this old woman's house, when he went in the old dame sat in the corner with her arm broken. (Her name was Ann Lamb)
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 15:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When going out working in the field nearby the mother places the tongs across the cradle to guard against the fairies bringing the child.
When going out at night they put a piece of iron the their pocket to prevent the fairies from bringing them.
It is not right to throw dirty water out the door at night, because you are destroying the fairies linen.
One day a lady came into a house in Ballysakeery and asked the woman of the house for the loan of some meal. A few days after she came back with the meal and said "Don't be afraid to use this meal its the same as what I got from you, and stop throwing water out your back door at night, you have our linen all destroyed".
If you throw out cold water at night you must first shout "Cold water" or you will drown the fairies.
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 11:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During the years of the famine, many people died of hunger in Dreenlomane. It is said that the people ate raw swedes and when they got a substantial meal, they died of a choking disease.
A woman who had not eaten a meal of bread for four days, died of hunger in the vicinity of the barytes mines, Dreenlomane. She was dead a week, and still no attempts were made to bury her. The body was now in a state of corruption, and four neighbours, who had drunk enough whiskey, undertook to bury the body. Having procured a coffin, they shouldered the
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 11:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
inferior quality Lord Bandon afterwards sold it for a large sum.
In the same town land, the coins which were supposed to be used by the Danes were found in a field known as the "liosarán". It is said that the coins were as large as half a crown, in English money.
Written by Teresa Coughlan, Dreenlomane
Told by Mr J.Burke, Dreenlomane 70 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About eighty years ago a great snowstorm which lasted over a week caused much destruction. The snow rose higher than the houses, so that for a few days nobody ventured out. Everything was in a pitable condition. The people could not get water, fuel, or any eatables so that when the snow melted, the people were almost dying from cold and hunger. The animals also suffered immensely. The could not be attended to, and my grandfather said that about twenty animals died in our townland.
Great was the number of birds which perished, on the roads, and fields. An island south of Carbery Island in Dunmanus Bay, called "Bird Island" is said to derive its name from the numerous amount of birds which were found dead on it after this snowstorm.
Written by:- Mary J. Moynihan, Drishane
Told by:- Richard Moynihan, Drishane, 58 yrs
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A great number of "cablacs" and ruined houses which are to be seen in the townlands of Drishane and Cashelane are said to have contained large families before the Famine days. It is said that in every thirty acres of land no less than eight families inhabited it. All these died of hunger, some are said to die by the fences and in a field just on the boundary of Drishane and Cashelane owned by Hegarty about one and a quarter miles from the school it is said that about forty persons died there and were eaten by the dogs.
But most of the people were buried and their burying grounds are still to be seen in my locality. In Cashelane there is a field always called "The Cill Field" which is believed to be the burying place of about two thousand people. Cart-loads of corpses were drawn there day after day by two
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An English target which they had at Castletown Berehaven about twenty five yeas ago floated from them and floated into Dunmanus Bay. It was found on the strand by Denis O'Neill, Drishane. It was said that eight horses could not pull its contents. He used it as roofing and it is still to be seen as the roofing of his shed and out-houses.
Written by:- Mary Josephine Moynihan, Drishane
Told by:- Richard Moyniha, Drishane, 58 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An English target which they had at Castletown Berehaven about twenty five yeas ago floated from them and floated into Dunmanus Bay. It was found on the strand by Denis O'Neill, Drishane. It was said that eight horses could not pull its contents. He used it as roofing and it is still to be seen as the roofing of his shed and out-houses.
Writtend by:- Mary Josephine Moynihan, Drishane
Told by:- Richard Moyniha, Drishane, 58 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
valiant efforts to save themselves, but despite that four of them sank. Her cargo floated all along the shore. Numerous barrels of oranges, apples and other fruits besides tons of mean and butter were wrecked in on the strands of Dunmanus Bay.
Written by Mary Josephine Moynihan
Told by Richard Moynihan, Drishane, 58 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One day a boy was left in charge of the house while his mother was visiting. They had two pit bonhams and the boy told his mother he would take great care of them. When evening came the boy wanting to go for a walk fed his pets but he had not place to put them.
He hung a bastible over the fire and put them into it. They were nice and cosy and the boy fearing that they would come out over the bastible put on the cover. Then he went away and when he returned he found the pets roasted in the pot.
Mary Cleary
Cahiroleckna, Goleen
Told by Mrs Cleary
Aged 50 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One there was an old man who wanted to go on a journey by train. He went to the ticket office but did not know how to ask for the ticket. He listened for a while to know what others were saying.
An old woman came along and said "Mary Hill, single" which meant a single ticket for Mary Hill. "Now, I have it" said the old man going to the window of the ticket (and) office and shouting "Pad Murphy, married".
Nobody knew what he wanted but after questioning him they knew what he wanted and gave him a ticket. He went into the train and when the train moved off, thinking that his ticket was useless he threw it out the window. The Conductor came along and when he found out what happened the put the old man off at the next station and he had to walk home.
He started off again next day and when he had got his ticket he went into the train he said to the man next to him, "The put me off yesterday but now I will have it out of them instead". "How" said the other man. "Because" he said "I have bought a return ticket and I'm not returning".
Helen Shanahan
Dunbeacon
Schull
Told by John Shanahan
45 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the devil was flying over Mount Gabriel and he was flying so low that he hit his wring against a rock. He got so cross that he took a bite out of the rock. When he had gone eight or nine miles from Mount Gabriel, he left the rock fall into the sea. The rock was so large that a part of it remained over the water and it is on that rock the lighthouse is built on now and it is known as the Fastnet Rock.
There is a large lake where he took the bite and the water in that lake is of a black colour.
Josephine O'Mahony
Dreenlomane
Told by Patrick O'Mahony
Dreenlomane
Ballydehob
60 years
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 10:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About a hundred years ago there lived near Goleen a man whose name was Glaven and who had a small farm. He was also engaged in the fishing industry.
One day in early summer he went out to fish but having caught nothing he decided to return home. Just as he was about to go back to the shore the saw rising from the water a short distance away a figure which he recognised to be that of a young and beautiful woman. He at once turned back and rowed towards her and he was just in time to catch her before she sank under the water. It was against her will that she went into the boat, and while he rowed back to the shore she told him that she was a mermaid who had never before been out of the sea and that she would curse him for taking her home with him. She also told him that while she lived with him if he ever once, happened to offend her, in any way, she would shake the bridle which she carried in her hand and a huge steed would come and take her back to her home in the sea.
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 09:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Captain's garden so called because a captain of a mine, Catain Wilson lived there.
The Drain field so called because it was very wet and the people drained it.
The White field so called because it was full of white clover.
Páirc an Aiá This field is full of furze.
Páirc na dTrí Gcúinne The reason it is called this is because there are three
senior member (history)
2020-05-01 09:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Róisín is a wet marsh field in the eastern side of Kilthomane about a quarter of a mile from my house.
Written by Mary Josephine Moynihan, Drishane.
Told by Richard Moynihan Drishane Aged 58
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 17:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At the Restoration some of the Burkes must have returned from Connaught to this district and from the following story it would seem they took the side of the English, or were, perhaps, neutral during the Williamite War.
At Glanmore about four miles from here was the home from which Galloping O'Hogan was driven and which when William came was in the hands of Cromwellian settler named Baker.
The old story tellers were fond of telling the exploits of this famour Rapparee and especially of how, after the battle of Aughrim, he crossed the Shannon at O'Brien's Bridge and swooped down on the castles of William's supporters in North Tipperary. Among those which he is said to have destroyed during this foray were the Burkes' castles at Culloghill and Pallas.
During this raid he is said to have seized a large amount of treasure and fearing he would be cut off from Limerick by William's troopers he is said to have buried it either under or near a large rock in the townland of Cronovone and which is still called Sarsfield's Rock.
Told by Patrick Mahon Aged 65 years
Main St
Borrisoleigh
Philip Dwyer
Borrisoleigh
October 28, 1938
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We are told that seventy or eighty years ago, and perhaps later, when an epidemic of the chin cough, as it was called, occurred in this neighbourhood, it was attempted to effect a cure in the following manner.
The father or mother of the affected child waited by the roadside for the chance passing of a rider on a grey horse. Should he happen along, the parent stopped him and asked "Man on the grey horse have you any cure for the chin-cough?". Should he pass without answering or give a gruff one, he was understood to refuse his aid; but should he reply "Put your trust in God, and all will be well", a quick passing of the disease was expected.
(Common in this neighbourhood)
Thomas Gleeson
Knockinure
Borrisoleigh
October 28 1938
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times a man named Liam went out to plough on a Sunday. The horses ran away, pulled plough and man into Inch lake, and they were all drowned.
Ever since, if you are over the place where they were lost, on a bright day you can see the horses shoes shining at the bottom of the water.
Told by Tobias Tynan Aged 25 years
Rathmoyne
Borrisoleigh
William Connors
Castlequarter
Borrisoleigh
October 5 1938
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1) When a person hears the cuckoo for the first time in the season if he strikes his right foot against the ground three times and then looks under it he will get a hair. If it is a black one he will die before his hair turns grey, but if the hair be white he will live to be old and grey.
(2) It is lucky to see a new moon over your right shoulder and it is unlucky to see it over the left shoulder.
(3) On new year's eve people used to mark a stone on the side of a well at the water level and go to it next day to see if the spring rose during the night and if it did prices would rise for that year but if it fell prices would fall also.
(4) When a girl wanted to know to whom she would be married all she had to do was to get a brush and sweep a path around the stacks of corn and when she had it finished, turn round, and he would be standing in front of her.
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 15:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Johny Ryan used to tell about his grandfather. He lived in County Limerick. Cow keeping was their way of living. Something began to appear among the cows and they began to find it hard to make butter. Finally they could make not butter.
One night his grandfather lay in wait and the Thing came on. He flung a stick at it and struck it. It made off and he pursued it.
From this on he suffered great annoyance. He was attacked and beaten several times by an unknown agent. All his stock went against him. Finally he sold his farm and came to live in Cooleen near here. Even it used to attack him then occasionally. He could not make butter still. Then someone told him to put a dead man's hand under the churn and say some words. He did this and the butter came back. Up to the time of his death the Thing haunted him. After his death it was never seen again.
Told by Tobias Tynan Aged 25 years
Rathmoyne
Borrisoleigh
Michael Prior
St Brigids Terrace
Borrisoleigh
September 2 1938
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 15:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During the "bad times" there was a woman living near here and she had a big family of small children. One day they had nothing to eat and the wheat was not ripe. The poor woman did not know what to do.
While she was saying her prayers a thought came to her. She went out to the corn field and cut off some of the ripest heads of wheat she could get, winnowed off the chaff in the wind, ground the grain with a quern stone, and made a cake of bread. It was the turning point of the famine for they were never hungry again.
Told by Tobias Fynan Aged 25 years
Rathmoyne
Borrisoleigh
Thomas Gleeson
Knockinure
Borrisoleigh
October 4 1938
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 15:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This story comes from The Ragg.
There was a woman who had a child very sick and she was up at night nursing it. One night at twelve o'clock she heard a voice at the window saying "Get Church ivy and (?) ham water". The woman got ivy at the church yard and water of "(?) ham" and made a poultice of them for the child and before the cocks crew that morning the child was well.
Told by Tobias Tynan Aged 25 years
Rathmoyne
Borrisoleigh
Michael Prior
St Brigids Terrace
Borrisoleigh
October 3 1938
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 13:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One time there was a woman who gave the loan of her churn to a person who was living near her. When she got it back she could not make butter in it. So she tried it with large and small quantities of cream but it was no use; there would no butter come.
One day the priest was passing and he called for a drink. the woman gave him a cup of milk and when he had it drunk, he said "My God bless your cows and your butter". The woman at that time was making a vain attempt to make butter and when the priest went she put the few drops that were in his cup into the churn and it filled with butter on the spot.
Told by Tobian Tynan, aged 25 years
Rathmoyne
Borrisoleigh
William Connors
Castlequarter
Borrisoleigh
September 23, 1938
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 13:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ned of the Hill or Eamon an Cnoic as he was called was born in the Parish of Upperchurch. He was of well off people and was sent to Louvain in Belgium to be educated. When he came home he threw in his lot with Sarsfield and fought with him at Limerick. He was in love with a girl from his own parish and when he came home after Limerick he asked her to marry him but she refused on account of the side he took in the war. Ned took this to heart; so he went on the run and became a Rapparee, with the result that there was a price put on his head.
After many years of daring deeds and narrow escapes he was one day travelling along a road in South Tipperary when he came on a band of robbers attacking a young girl. he at once went to her rescue and drove off the robbers. "You were only just in time", said the girl, "Ned of the Hill and his gang were attacking me". Ned explained to her that he her rescuer was Ned of the Hill and that he was no robber. The girl had influence with Maude of Dundrum, so she said she would get his pardon granted and true to her word she did.
Ned then came back to Upperchurch and when he was coming home a man by the name of Ryan saw him and went off to tell Maude. Ned went to stop the night with a man named Dwyer and when he was asleep
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 13:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there lived a rich lady named Athais. She was very rich and had several servants and had hundreds of cattle and houses. She lent a house to two missioners and these gave a cup of oatmeal to her to make a pot of porridge but she gave them only a cup of porridge. The young missioner asked the old missioner what was he thinking of and he said he was thinking of God and of his own sins "that is not what I am thinking of, I am thinking to kill Athais's cattle" and so he did and he kept on killing them until he had about five of them killed and eaten. Athais missed her cattle and she thought that the missioners might steal them. So she thought of a plan her mother lived but she was very old, so she put her into a chest and gave her plenty of food and she then cut a hole in the side of the chest to give her air. She asked the missioners if they could keep the chest as she had no room for it. They agreed to keep it. As the two
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 13:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the people considered Friday a very lucky day to start sowing the potatoes. Other people thought that Monday was a very unlucky day for clipping horses or shearing sheep, or for hair cutting. The people say that the hair would not grow again. All people are indoors at an early hour, not later than ten on the last night of April as it is said that the fallen angels are out that night. Others would not tend a spark of fire on May day.
Story teller Mr Jermiah Shea
Kells Station
Co Kerry
Age 50
Tomy Shea
Kells Station
Co Kerry
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 13:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many home-made toys which children still make, namely, rabbit snares, hare snares, bows and arrows, kites and traps.
People long ago made a lot of things for amusement.
The children long ago made lanterns from turnips. They also made birds cages.
The article I am going to describe is a bow and arrow. When you are going to make a bow and arrow, first of all, get a cord and tie it to both ends of a sally rod. Then get a stick, shape it into an arrow. When you want to shoot the arrow from the bow, catch the end of the arrow and pull the arrow towards you and then let go.
James Garvey, Baltray, Drogheda
Material from my father.
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 13:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marriages may take place at any time of the year except in Lent or in Advent. Most marriages take place from after Christmas to Shrove Tuesday and from after Lent to Whit. There is an old saying about the days of the week which are luckiest to be married on, "Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth, Wednesday the best day of all, Thursday for losses, Friday for crosses and Saturday is no day at all". It is said that August and November are the two luckiest months to be married in.
About sixty years ago on the night before the marriage would take place the grooms father would go to the brides house and he would bring a bottle of whiskey. He would treat the bride's father and mother. Then he would ask the bride's parents for her hand in marriage with his son.
On the day of the marriage they would walk to the church and after the sermony the priest would cut the bride's cake in the church. When they would be leaving the church the people would throw bags of rice on
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 13:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We keep twenty hens and eight chickens at home. The hen house is large. It has a cement floor and three roosts. The roosts are made of wood. The food
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night Tomm Heneghan of Currdaragh was working for Pat Malone of Lanmore. He left Pat Malone's house at twelve o'clock in the night and started his journey home. Just when he came near a white thorn bush east of our house he saw lights. When he was passing the bush a big man walked out. He appeared to be as high as the moon.
The fairy man kept with him until he came to Derrig's house at the quarry road and then he changed to a black fairy dog. The dog kept with Tom Heneghan until he came near his own house and
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night about twelve o'clock William Walsh of Lanmore was coming from Aughagower. He was a courageous man and he pretended to be afraid of nothing. He was coming at the bog road at Ballygorman when a black barrel came after him. He ran and the barrel rolled after him until he came to Jack Kerrigan's and then he went into the house. Then he said the barrel ran into a bush at the back of Jack Kerrigans house and disappeared. When he was going in Jack Kerrigan's door he fainted. When he recovered he came up to the fire and told his story. He did not go home that night but slept in Jack Kerrigan's house. Then he went home in the morning. He never remained out until twelve o'clock after that.
I heard this story from Briget Walsh Lanmore
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort in Michael Scahill's field in Carramore. There is a ring of bushs all around the fort. Michael Scahill himself would not cut the osier rods at the fort for making baskets because he would be afraid anything would happen him. Many a long night they spend looking at the lights running around the fort. A bean sidhe used to be heard crying there regularly. They say she cries after certain families.
One night a few lads were coming from a dance and the stood at Rookan road listening to her for about two hours. She used to be hear there
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Patrick started his journey for the Reek at Augagower. On the way he passed by a large stone in Lanmore. The people say St Patrick put that stone standing himself. It is not far from our house only about two fields. We often went over to see it. There are long strokes written on it but we nowadays do not understand those old signs. Anyhow he followed on. After that he went through Liscarney hills and back through Owenwee until finally he reached Croagh Patrick. St Patrick passed many places like this. Father O'Toole came to see that stone often. It is still there and is is very big.
Eileen King, Lanmore
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A good many years ago a family named Hobans lived in Liscarney. One day a boy of them saw a water horse at Carramore lake and her foal. So he went down and caught the foal and brought her home. After some years he had the foal trained and he brought turf with her for about four or five years. When she would be drinking in a stream she would like to put her ear down in it. One day when he was going to draw turf with her and he had the straddle on her she took a notion and ran off to the lake with the straddle still on her. When she arrived at the lake she shook herself and knocked the straddle off and jumped into the lake. She was never heard of after.
Then a man had her foal after that. One day he had the straddle and cliabhs on him ready to go to a fair. So he took the same notion as his mother and ran away.
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort in Islandeady. The people down there call it Cannon's fort. It is in the shape of a circle in a field and there are bushes around the outside of the fort. There is a hole in the middle of it but no one ever ventured to go down. The people near that fort see fairies going down and coming up out of the hole. Lights of different colours are seen there every wintery night and the people are afraid passing it. There is a hollow inside and nothing grows there but briars and ferns.
I heard this story from Sarah Kerrigan, Knappa Beg, Westport, Co Mayo
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night John Kerrigan was coming from visiting at about twelve o'clock. When he was just passing a holly bush what ran out before him but a fairy dog. The colour of the dog was black. The dog began snarling as if to bit him. He was very much afraid that night so he began whistling. The dog kept before him until he came to a small road and then he disappeared. The bush that fairy dog came out of is still there on Michael Kerrigan's lane way. Lights are often seen there. People are afraid passing that bush ever since that night although the dog never appeared to anyone after that.
I hear this story from Sarah Kerrigan, Knappa Beg, Westport
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort in John Tunney's field in Knappa-Manach. There is a ring of stones all around the fort and there is a cave in the middle of the fort. Briars grow around the cave. There are stones paved around the cave also. Anthony Gallagher went down in this cave or hole. He told the story himself. He said it was very dark at first until he came to a passage. This passage was very long. There were six rooms in it. He said he went through all these rooms. There were lights in every room but the sixth room. He turned then because that was the end of the fort and he got up safe. But he was very much afraid afterwards
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night a man was coming from a party. The same night there was snow. He started his journey and when he was about a half a mile from his own house he heard a step after him and he looked around him but he could not see anything. He followed on and he could hear a noise after him always. It was about half three in the night so he was very much afraid. After a while he heard the noise again. This time he thought it might be his coat striking against his heels as it was very long. He took off his coat then and put it on his shoulder but the step continued after him all the time. He continued at any rate but when he came to his own (?) he heard the step again and now he blessed himself and turned around. Now he saw a big dog with a big white head and the dog began snarling as if to bit him. Then the dog disappeared. He was
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time a diver went down into "Poll na gcapall" and he brought a hatchet with him. This diver wanted to know where this hole ended. When he came to the bottom he saw a door and written on it was "Go no further". He broke the door open with his hatchet and went on. When he came to the surface he was dumb. He never spoke after that to anybody, and he died a few weeks later. No one went down since because they would be afraid some thing would happen them. Poll na gcapall is situated below Westport town.
I hear this story from Mary McGing, Lammore, Liscarney Post Office, Westport, Co Mayo
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fairy bush east of our house on the road side. It is a white thorn bush. People can see lights of many colours jumping around that bush at about twelve o'clock.
One time a man passed that bush when he was coming from town and he saw a small man sitting on the bush. He walked quickly passing the bush and the man disappeared. When he looked behind he saw a few lights like candles running across the road after one another. He walked quickly home that night and he is afraid passing that bush ever since. The bush is still there. Lights were seen there last winter by a girl named Annie
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort above Derrig's old house in Autawalla. There are a ring of stones all around the fort. When Mick Derrig and Patrick Derrig used to be coming from visiting they used to see fairies dancing around the fort. Every night when they would look out the door they would see lights jumping in and out of the fort. They would be afraid to go out at night without a light. But after a while they got used to the lights and they used to go out regularly then. No one ever see lights there nowadays.
I heard this story from Anne King, Lammore, Liscarney Post Office, Westport
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort on Sidhean hill two miles from Westport on the Castlebar side. There is a bank in the slope of a circle all around the outside of the fort. Lights are seen there on very dark nights. One evening at about dusk a boy was going to the well which was just below the fort when the fairies came out and started talking to him. After a while they brought the boy into the fort and kept him there all the night until next morning. They told him if he told at home what they gave him that they would keep him for two nights when he would come again. It was all right
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a big stone in Joyce's field in Liscarney and the people say there is gold underneath it. The people who went near that stone once never went near it a second time. Tomy Joyce of Liscarney dug a bush out of that field and sowed it beside his new house. A few days afterwards the people of the house noticed something wrong with him. He was in an awful way so he had to stay inside in the house for some time. When at last he went out he met a man named Murphy of Bohea who told him to leave back the bush again and that he would be all right. he did so and he got all right.
I heard this story from James Schaill Kimmen
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some year ago Mary Kate Walsh told h er brothers to dig up the white thorn tree that was at the back of the house and that they would find a pot of gold. her brothers did not believe that there was any gold under the tree. But a last they said they would dig up the tree and that it would be great if they found the gold. They started to dig the gold. At the same time she was doing something at the fire and she fell in and was burned to death. The brothers stopped their digging and rushed in. There are lights of many colours seen there often but no one ever bothered with the gold since. Red and blue lights dance around the tree
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some year ago Mary Kate Walsh told h er brothers to dig up the white thorn tree that was at the back of the house and that they would find a pot of gold. her brothers did not believe that there was any gold under the tree. But a last they said they would dig up the tree and that ti would be great if they found the gold. They started to dig the gold. At the same time she was doing something at the fire and she fell in and was burned to death. The brothers stopped their digging and rushed in. There are lights of many colours seen there often but no one ever bothered with the gold since. Red and blue lights dance around the tree
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 16:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One evening at about dusk two priests were coming from town in the same motorcar. Just at the crossroads two little men ran out from a white thorn bush and started dancing on the road before them. They drove right through them. The priest who was not driving asked the other did he see the two little men and the other priest said he did not. Lights are seen at that white thorn bush often generally on a wintery night. There was formerly a house where that white thorn bush is now. The bush is situated inside a field at Pat Kanes.
I hear this story from Austin McGing.
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 16:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long long ago when people were getting married there would be seventeen or eighteen horses in a line and that would be called the drag. Six horses would be in front of the seventeen or eighteen horses and the bride would be on one of those six horses and the bridesmaid on another horse and the bridegroom on another horse. Four cooks were left at home to cook and when the man and woman would arrive home after their marriage it would be eight or nine o'clock. Then they would have a feast and their friends would be in one room and the man and bride in another room.m
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
big one and a trough of water for cooling hot irons. The smith is always looked upon as being strong because he has very hard work to do.
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Moss is applied to wounds to stop bleeding. Anyone having a bad toothache the best remedy I know is to make a station at St Patricks well Cavan Co Leitrim. A greyish mossy substance that grows on the stem of the slowbush mixed with tobacco and butter is boiled for about ten or fifteen minutes and then it is set aside to cool. This substance is used for sore eyes. Soft water from a running stream is used for swellings. Children having the whooping cough are cured by having some hair of a child born after its fathers death; or two married
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
butter come on top of the milk. During the process hot and cold water are poured into the milk. The water is put in in order to bring the milk to a certain temperature. After the butter is taken out of the churn it is salted and placed in a pail and made into bars. It is said that if a man came in during the churning and put a piece of a coal in his pipe he would bring the butter with him. In order to get the butter back a coal must taken from the fire of him who took the butter, by the person from whom the butter was taken.
John Doorigan
Camber age 50 years
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have a churn at home. It is three feet high. The bottom is two feet in circumference. it is about twenty years old. There are three parts in it. The bottom, peck, and lid.
In the Summer we churn twice a week. In Winter we churn once a week. We send to the creamery every day in Summer. In the Winter we don't send at all. We keep half the milk at home to churn. My father and mother do the churning. Any stranger who comes in during the churning helps at the work. The turn they take is called a "brash". This "brash" is taken for fear that when the person would be going out they would bring the butter with them. The churning lasts for about three quarters of an hour. The work is done by hand. The churn-dash is moved up and down until the little lumps of
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
used vegetables. The vessels they used before cups became common were called "Noggins".
Lawrence O'Donnell
Corriga 66 years
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lord Harlech was the landlord of Leganomer, Bundara, Corduff and Aughavas; he was looked upon as a very cruel man. He evicted several families, amongst them the Reillys of Aughavas. They had to go and live in a little sod-house erected about three hundred yards north from the graveyard gate at Aughavas on lands now owned by James McGovern, Coroneary. They lived in this sod-house twenty two years until they were re-instated.
A man named Sam Evans took over
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In those days a young man named McAliney lived in the townland of Leganomer and who desperate from hunger ran from Leganomer to Aughavass where there was placed a boiler making stirabout for the hungry ones. The food was served out in large and small quantities according to the size of the family. McAliney being there first that day placed himself on top of the boiler and when others came as desperate as he was they threw him into the boiler where where he was scalded to death.
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In those days a young man named McAliney lived in the townland of Leganomer and who desperate from hunger ran from Leganomer to Aughavass where there was placed a boiler making stirabout for the hungry ones. The food was served out in large and small quantities according to the size of the family. McAliney being there first that day placed himself on top of the boiler and when others came as desperate as he was they threw him into the boiler where where he was scalded to death.
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 12:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The great famine occurred in the year 1846-47 and was caused by the blight that destroyed the potato crop in the summer of 1845. There was a stirabout station about 200 yards from the present Aughavas P.O. in the townland of Aughavas and 400 yards east of Corduff N.S. on the road to Carrigallen. The people of the district assembled here occasionally for their supplies of Indian meal. The allowance for each family was one stone.
In the townland of Corroneary fifteen families perished during The Famine period. There was one man in particular who had three daughters and all three died of hunger. The father buried them in a graveyard at Kilafee now called Cavan. In those days the people used slip coffins in order to economise, one coffin doing duty for several.
Mary Lee owned a farm in Corroneary in those days. The farm surrounded the present public house. In a field of this farm, last of the public house turnips were extensively grown. Mary Lee did a "roaring" trade in those turnips during the famine period because being of a rather generous nature she always gave full weight. There were other turnips factors who were not as honest and believed in exacting the last half penny from the poverty stricken people.
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 11:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Clog na Fuile" was a bell that belonged to a Breffni Chieftain. It was brought to Corduff by one of the O'Rourkes and was used for swearing purposes. It was said that anybody swearing falsely over the bell caused it to ring. Wherever the bell was kept it brought strife and dissension in its train. Whilst preserved in the house of a particular family in Corduff the father was at variance with the sons and the mother with her daughters so much so that the rows got the father arrested and consigned to jail. At last through the intervention of the parish priest the bell was buried in the garden surrounding the house of Thomas O'Rourke now in the possession of the McNamee family in the townland of Corduff.
In those days the people believed very much in "taking the letter", anybody accused had to assent his innocence on oath over "Clog na Fuile". It was also used for swearing in members of a secret organisation. It was brought to Corduff about 200 year ago and was buried about 70 years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 10:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During the Confederate wars one of the British generals, who was a powerful warrior and who had heard of Myles the Slasher and of his valour and also that none of the British soldiers was able to face him in single combat boasted that he would beat Myles any day and furthermore offered £100 as a reward to anybody who would direct him to the abode of Myles. Myles learning this at once set out to intercept his adversary. Myles was accompanied by one attendant and he rode his faithful steed. They met the challenge outside Dublin near the village of Chapelizod and knowing this Englishman they informed him that for the sum of £100 the reward offered they could direct him to the home of Myles The Slasher. The Englishman was on the eve of handing over the money to Myles but the latter requested him to give it to his attendant and exclaimed "I am Myles the Slasher and prepare"
senior member (history)
2020-04-29 10:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Myles "The Slasher" fought in The Cromwellian wars of 1641-49. he defended the historic bridge of Finea against Monroe. He held the bridge against great odds, about twenty to one, until the arrival of Castlehaven. Then it is stated Myles was slain. But an historian formerly of this parish, who claims to be a descendant of the family to which Myles belonged, a Mr O'Reilly retired teacher tells us that Myles cleaned the battlements on horseback and swam the river to a place of safety. He then fought at Ballyconnell in 1642 and cut his way through the British soldiers but left his horse behind. The following day he went back to the British lines dressed as a beggar where he heard that several soldiers had failed to ride a horse that was captured from the rebels. the beggar stated that he could ride any horse; after some consultations they agreed to let Myles ride. When Myles got on his favourite steed he whispered into the horse's ear. The horse made a dash and took Myles far beyond the British lines.
Later Myles went to Flanders to solicit help for the Irish cause. On his way he called at a monastery where a monk asked Myles if he would grant him a favour. Myles listened
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 18:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When we are going to have a change in the weather the sky changes. If we are going to have bad weather the sky darkens and clouds come to it. If we are going to have find weather the sky brightens and the clouds leave it. The sky turns very white if we are going to have rain. It turns red if we are going to have fine weather or frost. If we have a bad day and if the sun shines very warm after a shower it is a sign that we are going to have another shower.
If there is a rainbow around the moon it is a sign that we will have a big flood. When the wind blows from the we will have cold dry weather. There is a rime about the north wind.
When the north winds blow we will surely have snow And what will poor robin do then
When the wind blows from the south we will get rain. When the wind blow from the east we will have fine weather. We will have rain and bad weather when the wind blows from the west.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 18:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
You should never start a new work on Saturday or if you do you will never finish it.
If you put eggs under an other person's hay you will bring bad luck on that person.
One magpie is for bad luck, two for good luck, three for a wedding, four for a wake, five for silver, six for gold, seven for something you never saw before.
If you cut your hair on a Sunday it will never grow again.
It is not lucky to get married on Monday, Wednesday or Friday.
If a person came in to a house with a spade or shovel on his shoulder he would be made back out again and take it off outside or he would not grow anymore.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man who left his home to go to his uncles in Bealna Stroghera. he knew the path thoroughly well. he could find out the way with his eyes closed. But this night something came over him and he saw a faint little light and followed it. It kept leading him astray. At last he remembered that this little light was what they called (Jackie the Lantern). He remembered hearing his grandmother saying that the best thing to do when you see that is to take off your coat and turn it inside out and he did it. The path became visible to him and he was able to find his way without any difficulty.
Maureen Healy Aneebeg age 13 1/2 years
Story told by Humphrey Healy Aneebeg Age 38 years
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 18:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is situated in a small corner near a quarry. There is a wide path going into it. There are two high banks on each side of it. The London pride grows very plentifully there in the Summer time. it is only one field away from our house. That is about a quarter of a mile. you should go up the quarry to it. The path is covered with slates all the way in. Strawberries and sloes and hurts also grow near it. As you would enter into it closed up in the inside. There is a big tree growing near the top of it. On the inside in the furdest back and there is a very deep hollow. Many people never went into it. If you went near the furdest back end you would hear a clatter noising in the tree. Some say there were fairies seen there long ago. Some say it is connected with another one bout a quarter of a mile above it. The other one is not a fort exactly but there is a wide path going up to the top of the hill. This
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 18:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there lived a poor widow who had three sons. After many years struggling with poverty the eldest son decided to go and seek his fortune. In order to furnish himself for the journey he took the best clothes and started off towards midday. He sat down to eat his dinner and a robin came up and asked him for the crumbs. Shortly after he was employed by a magician to a field and a big serpent devoured him.
A year after the other boy had to go and he was cowardly and selfish like his brother and took everything he could lay hands on to make his journey easy. he insulted he robin in the same way and he met the same bad end. After another year the third boy whose name was John had to go and provide for his poor mother. There was very little clothes left after the two big boys and the took his old every day clothes. There was very little food int eh house and John
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 18:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived two men in Ireland whose names were John Conn and Ned Flynn. They had small farms of land but the were very poor. One day the both went to (try) their fortune. They travelled all day untill nighfall, as they were strangers the did not know where to find lodgings, the saw a light at a distance and the made for it. It was a great mansion and it was all lighted up, the could see no one about and the just walked in on there own authority. They went into a great hall and there was all kinds of food on the table seeing no one about the sat down and ate a hearty meal. So being tired
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name Donegal has always been connected with legends, and folklore, and certainly the district of Burt holds a high place in the county.
When the Kings of Ulster lived in Grianan Aileach many stories has been told about them, and the fort.
There is a tunnel connected from Grianan to Inch Castle, and this tunnel runs through a house owned by William Gallagher. The spot where the house is build is supposed to be a secret to the fairies. They where supposed to have their means there. I saw the forks and knives supposed to be used by the fairies. They are supposed to play their at night.
Another historic spot is the old graveyard at the Glebe Burt.
Once upon a time there was an old Protestant Church, where now
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many roads about my district. Here are the names of some of them.
Letterkenny road is called so because it leads to Letterkenny.
Newtown road is the road that leads from Burt to Newtown.
Barrowen brae is the road that leads from Barrowen to Ballymoney.
Shore road is the road that leads from Bohillion to Newtown.
Bridgend road is the road that leads fro Burt to Bridgend.
Moss road is the road leading from Bohillion to the Rock.
Green road is the road leading from the Burt road to Grianan.
Hill road is the road leading from Burt to Derry.
Middle road is the road that
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many heroes in past history, such as Fionn Mac Cumhal, Oisin and Oscar etc.
When we speak of heroes we always think of those or some like them; why it looks as there will be no more heroes. This is not the case, the source of great men or heroes run like the babbling brook forever.
Today we have in our own parish people worthy of the name of heroes. These are great and muscular men, who have won fame and honour on account of their boxing; jumping; running; football and hurley feats. These are men who defended their own honour and the honour of the
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My home is situated on level ground a bout a mile from Grianan castle. I live in Bohillion. The name of my parish is Fahan. All the ground round about it is very fertile and has always good crops.
There is a hold well in the district also it is Saint Patricks well. It is situated on the top of Grianan hill beside the castle. There are about (?) of the houses Government houses they are building Government houses at the present day. There are about twenty farms of land in it. There are not many
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is nessasary for the people to take care of the feet.
When you first start to walk you need to get a pair of boots for your feet and keep wearing boots till you die.
In olden times people went on there bare feet, but they don't do that now. It is only the children who are going to school in the Summer time that go on their bare feet.
There is only two people in my district that make boots. One of them lives in Newton, and the other in Bridgend.
In olden times people made boots out of timber, but now they make them out of leather.
Some people before they go to ed they wash their feet in hot water. people say it is not right
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Adjacent to the Grange shore lie the ruins of an ancient Catholic Church wrested from the Irish Catholics by the planters during the persecutions. Surrounding those ruins is an extensive consecrated graveyard in which both Catholics and Presbyterian bury their dead.
Not very far from this there is the ruins of a castle connected with an under ground tunnel to Grianan castle.
About a mile from
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there lived an old witch close to the Deerpark. It was a very lonely place and she lived in a little cabin alone and there was not a house near her. Her house was almost under a rock which was in the wood. One evening as it was getting dark there came a big wild cat into her. It sat down at the fire beside her. It spat up in her face and it said "My dear you have a very dirty face". Don't say that again or I'll break your nose. The cat said it again and the old woman lifted the tongs and broke its nose. Then the cat ran away and
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I have a churn at home. It is about four feet in height. The churn is a round shape, and there is a lid for it. My mother does the churning, and it takes her an hour to do it. When she is going to churn the first thing she does is, she starts to clean the churn. Then she puts the milk into the churn. She then gets the churn-staff and starts churning. Sometimes when my mother is doing the churning some kind people come into the house and they help her with the work.
She keeps churning and churning until the butter comes on the top of the milk. She then takes the butter off the milk and prints it, and the milk which is left in the churn then is called butter
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During the penal days when the priests could not get saying Mass in the chapels they went to the hillsides and lanes and the places where they said Mass are still to be seen. I know of a place where Father Hegarty of Buncrana said Mass during the penal days. One day as he was saying Mass along Buncrana shore the soldiers came on him. They killed him and there is a rock there still which is called Father Hegarty's rock. On top of his grave there is a heap of sods where people come and leave something on top of the sods.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Every year we sow about four or five acres of potatoes. Potatoes is the chief food used in Ireland and no one knows how we could do without them. The are the common feeding for man and beast alike.
In Spring the ground is ploughed and farrowed. Then drills are made with an iron plough which can be made at any size suitable. On the bottom of those drills the manure is spread. Then the cuts
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
door. He rose and went into the house and as long as he lived he never left the house on a Hallowe'en night after that or never stayed too late in his neighbour's house ever since.
Philomena McGrath, Castlecooly
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The birds which are common in my district are:- blackbird, thrush, robin, swallow, yellow hammer, cuckoo, magpie, crow, lark, pigeon, hawk, grouse, sea-gull, green linet, grey linet, bats, owl, water-hen, corn-crake and the wren.
The robin builds its nest in a low bush or ditch, so does the wren. The corncrake builds its nest in the corn or hayfields. The pigeon builds its nest in the tree-tops, the sea-gull in the sea-cliffs, the lark flat on the ground, the hawk hatches its young up on the high mountain cliffs, the grouse in the heather etc.
Towards the end of November
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 17:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mist on the river is a sign of good weather. Mist on the mountain is a sign of rain. Wherever there is a smoke there is a fire, and wherever there is a fire there is a heat.
It is bad the wind that does not blow some person good.
Never take the book by the cover.
Smooth water runs deep.
It is good the horse that draws his own cart.
A fool often gives a good advice.
The three best friends, and the three worst enemies, are the fire, the wind, and the water.
Put silk on a goat, but it is always a goat.
A sloe year is a sorrowful year.
You never know the want of water til the well runs dry.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Manachan is the Saint connected with this district. There are Churches and ruins left in the district.
The Protestant Church was built with the stones that were in the Abbey that St Manachan built.
There are some ruins left also of a Monastery. There is a big high tower left. This Abbey was built in 608 and it was used until 1621. Then it was destroyed when all of the monasteries were being knocked.
There was a abbey built in Farnaught by St Morris. Clon Morris is called after St Morris.
St Killian built an Abbey in
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Information supplied by
John H Duke age 50 years
Taulaught
Mohill
Written by
Mauris Boddy
Tawlaughtmore
Mohill
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago people never wore boots nor shoes until they were a great age. It was all brogue shoes which were worn long ago. There was a woman called Biddy Kelleher, who lived where Mrs Bohan lives now in Glebe St. She never wore boots nor shoes only when she was going to Mass. Some children go bare footed in the summer and winter. After washing your feet you throw out the water, and if you are throwing your feet water out after twelve o'clock, you should say "Sooka" that is to tell the spirits to keep away in case you might throw the water on them. When you are throwing out feet water at night you should never throw the water higher than yourself the people say you will never grow any bigger. The boots and shoes are prepared and made locally. There are two shoe-makers in the town. Leo Agnew was the first shoe-maker in his family, Joe Ellis's father was a shoe-maker. James Mills was a shoe-maker and his father also was one. Frances McCabe who lived in Glebe St was a shoe-maker. He had two sons also shoe-makers.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
funeral, even as far as Granard. She used to pick up dead men's bones in the graveyards, put some spell on them and place them in byres and in fields belonging to neighbours she did not like. Ill luck followed the placing of any of these bones around a mans place.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The landlord on this estate was Major White. He was fair to his tenants unlike this neighbouring landlord, Lord Leitrim who was a tyrant. In those by gone days there was no security for the tenant who after paying his rent got a notice to stop at any time. Wholesale evictions were carried out in some districts. The occupants were thrown on the roadside to die of want or look for charity to their more fortunate neighbours. The evicted people were shipped to the British Colonies and to the United States in what were them called coffin ships which were not fit to convey pigs and hundreds of them died from
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the grave and slide the end out of it and go for another dead person. Some people were not buried in consecrated graveyards at all. I know where two graves re in a field and there are two whins growing over them now. It was two little children were buried there.
Information supplied by James Mee, Drumbore
Written by John H.Mee
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nearly every one over seventy or eighty years of age is able to give a description of what the famine was like. Before the famine there were three times as many people in the district. There were more houses also because the ruins are to be seen yet. When the potato stalks were about one foot high the blight came and cut them from the ground then the new potatoes were only like marbles. When everyone was starving the people would go to potato fields searching for poiteens and eating them as they got them. The year after the famine there were no potatoes in the country so they had to import them from England. I hear of some family who riddled real small poiteens and soured them and they grew as good as if they were big ones. The people used to eat horse flesh and rats. Also they used to bleed the cattle and
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Information supplied by James Mee and Mick Reynolds, Drumbore
Written by J Henry Mee, Drumbore
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times there were very few shops except where there was a crossroads or near a Chapel or at a ford. The reason they were there is that there were a lot of people at the Chapel and passing the crossroads. A ford was a shallow place in the river where the people
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Then he brought the workman along with him up to the fort and the workman was falling across ditches every step he went because he did not believe in fairies. He died in a cople of days and the fairies took his master. There is a fort in Farnaught at Mr Murrays and it is a round for and it is called a ring.
Information supplied by
Tom Kelly age 76
Trean
Mohill
Written by
Mauris Boddy
Tawlaughtmore
Mohill
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the most common food was boxie and flummery and home made soda bread. There were no such things as currants or fruit put in a cake. This is the way they used to make the boxtie. First thing they peeled raw potatoes and then grated them, strained the water off them, and mixed it with flour, salt and boiled potatoes. Then they made round dumplings and then put them into a pot of oiling water for a hour or two.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is the story.
One day when a Saint was waling along the road she lost the pin that was tying clothes around the Hold Infant. On the roadside there was a blacksmiths shop. She asked him to make her a brooch.
The blacksmith at one took out a piece of money out of his pocket and made the finest brooch ever was made.
After he gave it to her, she blessed the blacksmith and enchanted the water that cooled the iron.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 14:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tawlaught is the name of my home district. Iit is a fairly big districkt, and there is a large number of families in it.
There are twenty-five families in Tawlaught and also one hundred and five people in it.
Duke is the most common name in Tawlaught now, and it was also the most common name long ago.
There are twelve slated houses and thirteen thatched ones in it. Four of these are labourers cottages.
Long ago Tawlaught was used as a graveyard because during the famine years all the people around that died were buried in it, and it was known as a "plague cemetry".
There are some people in Tawlaught over seventy, and these are their names:-
Mrs F Duke, Mrs J Duke, Mrs W Duke, Mrs Kilkenny, Mrs Simmons, Mrs Gallagher, Mrs Mulvey, Mr Mulvey, Mr Wynne, and Mr Murphy. None of these old people speak the "Irish Language", but they can tell plenty of old fashioned stories in the "English Language". There were twenty two houses long ago that are not in Tawlaught now. The names of the families were:-
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are a number of fairy forts in the district. Around this part of the country they are just called forts. The forts are round and they are all covered in with trees. Fairies were supposed to be living in these forts. I know of two forts. They are Kildoo and Burnee. There is no entrance hole in either of these forts. Lights have always been seen around them. You can see one fort from the other. At Sheemore there is a fort. If you go to Scots fort at twelve o'clock in the night you will see all the fairies around the fort. A fort was a fortification years ago for the fairies. I heard of people who were out late at night in the forts and they were brought astray. Jimmy Murphy was put astray one night passing burnee fort. Then he turned his coat inside out and started to say his prayers and he got home safely afterwards. When he got past he looked back and he saw a number of lights around the fort. There is a fairy fort on my Uncles hill and another in Cloonee. A fort is generally called a fort on a rath. A fort is round and there is a big ditch of clay round the whole thing.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 12:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We always sow potatoes at home. We generally sow between two and three acres and it is generally sown in this locality. It is generally the man of the house who prepares the ground. Nearly every man who has not two horses of his own goes in partnership with his neigh
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 12:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When you are making butter you get all the vessels and wash them with boiling water. When you have the butter churned you take it out of the churn and put it into the cool with some cold water and then is is washed properly out of the cool. It is then salted and mixed up well and then it is taken out and shaped with the butter spades in pound bars and two pound bars, and some in prints and is then left in clean cold water to make it firm.
Information supplied by William Henry Hale
Written by Martha Haslip
Chapel Hill
Mohill
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 12:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the people used to get married much the same as they do now-a-days.
At first a couple of old men and women used to meet together at a market. Then they went into a public house generally and drank as much as they could. Then they began praising the sons and daughters that were going to be married. They did not get married around Lent or Advent, because it was not the custom at that time.
Matches were always made. They used to have a big basket of potatoes, a large pot of cabbage and a big bit of fat bacon, and it was very seldom they had beef or mutton. That night straw boys came. If they were not received welcome they would do a lot of damage. There was no wedding procession held. When they were drunk they used to get their horses and saddle them. Then they
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
red it was for danger and if she wore green is was for trouble.
Information supplied by James Mee
Written by John Henry Mee, Drumbore, Cloone
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 12:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marriages mostly take place before Lent. Some people say it is unlucky to get married on Shrove Tuesday. Iit is lucky to get married in June and it is unlucky to married in May. It is an old proverb "Marry in May and you'll rue the day". It is unlucky to get married in March. There are days which people think are unlucky to married on. There is a rhyme about it. Monday for wealth, Tuesday for health and Wednesday the best day of all, Thursday for losses and Friday for crosses ad Saturday there is no luck at all. There are customs which people had long ago. They used to throw an old shoe after the bride for luck. Some years ago matches took place more frequently than now. Money is mostly given as a fortune nowadays. In every brides house a feast is generally held after they come from the Church or Chapel. In our district Bawn, beggars generally come. Those boys dress in bags and feathers stuck in their clothes. They also wear straw bundled on their backs, and masks on their faces. Most people like o see those boys coming because it makes it look like a marriage. Those boys are sometimes very bold.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 12:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago before the Chemists shops were opened the people had to make their own cures.
The cures they had for a burn were as follows:-
A bark of an elder, the heart of a daisy, the stem of a dockin, some goats droppings, and unsalted butter all boiled together. When it was boiled they put it on a clean piece of cloth and put it on the burn. This cure used to leave no mark whatsoever.
Another cure they had was to get pure pigs manure and put it on the burn. When it was on the burn there was a cloth tied around it so that it would not fall off. This cure did not leave any marks.
Another cure they had in olden times was to shake cold tea leaved on it and rub them in lightly. This used to leave a mark.
These were the cures the old people had for warts. There was a well out at Tubberonan and its there yet and if you wash your warts in it they will leave you.
Another cure was if they found a black snail without looking for it and rubbed it on the warts they would go. When they rubbed it on the warts they had to hang it on a white thorn. As the snail melted
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 11:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was an old school in Taulaught Valley. The name of the master who used to teach there was Arthur Doyle.
The school was in a farmers barn, and it was also near many houses, and the children had not far to go.
The children had no desks like what they have now-a-days. They used to sit on stools with three legs while listening to the master. They used to write on the bark of trees and when they were writing, they used to use the stool as a desk, and the floor was their seat
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 11:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The teacher who taught here was Mrs Johnston and after wards Mrs Kelly.
Information supplied by Mick Reynolds and James Mee aged 56.
Written by John Mee
Drumbore
Cloone
Co Leitrim
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 11:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I have heard of some old schools which were in Ireland long ago before any National schools were established. I know of a school held in our barn long ago. This was about fifty years ago. This school was attended by a large number of children, and they were fairly good scholars. The teacher who taught here was Miss Dogue. I also know of another old school down Drumbore road. This was about fifty or fifty four years ago. this was also attended by a large number of children. Miss Dogue also taught here. I know of a few old men who went there. There was another old hedge school in a field at Annaughmore. There was a shed for them to teach in in the winter
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 11:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
burning proceeds the material sinks and the kiln filled as it goes down. The bottom material is burned to a proper lime condition and it is drawn out through the tunnel with a shovel. As burnt lime is well down more stones and fuel are added to the top and so the work goes on. One ton of limestone rock makes about eighteen hundred weight of well burned lime.
Patricia Devine
"The Chalet"
Mohill
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 11:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times the people used to make their own candles.
There were two sorts of candles called the rush candle and the resin candle.
The people used to go out into the fields and gather very thick rushes. They would peel off all the green skin except one strip, and this strip was left on so as to keep the candle together. They would hang the rushes at the side of the chimney until they were dry.
They used to get sheeps fat and melt it in a grisset. When the fat was melted they would put in the rush and leave it in the grisset for about a minute, then take it out and cool it. When it was cool they dipped it in again. This was done several times until the candle was as thick as the ordinary candle we have now.
They were put into a big tall candle-stick made of wood. Some of the poor people used to make candles-sticks out of cow manure mixed with ashes. This used to get very hard, and the people used to bore a hole in it just the right size for the candle. these candles were called half-penny dips.
senior member (history)
2020-04-28 10:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Douglas Castle, in the townland of Carrowcashel, was inhabited by the Douglas family about two centuries ago. The river between Carrowcashel and Riverstown is called the Douglas River. It is related that a strange lady came to visit Mr Douglas and both of them were seen
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 18:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About the year 1100 the Normans invaded Ireland. They took possession of the land and built castles. The ruins of one of them is to be seen at Donamona. it is about seventy feet high. It is situated in a beautiful green field. A family of Burkes lived in it. People say that there was a dungeon in it and many a foul murder was committed in it. In the morning early several people have seen rings of lucksmans dancing around it. There is also a story told how Grainni Uaile and her army had a battle with the Burkes. She brought her soldiers to Donamona to fire on the castle. As a result of the battle there is a hole to be seen in the upper part of the castle to the present day.
Charles A Daly
Belcarra
Castlebar
Co Mayo
Donamona Castle is situated in the townland of Donamona, near Belcarra.
This was told to me by my grandfather, Charles Daly, age 84 years
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 18:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago if you went into a house and a churning to be going on you should put a coal under it and a grain of salt into it, and if you did not that person would never have a bit of butter out of it. It happened that a red haired woman went into this house, while a woman was churning and took all the butter on her. For months she had no butter until at last one day a priest, having come into the house, and she told him of how she had been churning for months and never got a bit of butter. He told her to go to the red haired woman and tell her she was down and out and would she kindly spare a bit of butter. She having done as he had commanded her and she always had enough of butter from that day forth
Charles A Daly
Belcarra
Castlebar
Co Mayo
This was told to me by my mother Mrs Daly Age 35 years
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that if you meet a man with a white horse and to ask a cure off him for the chin cough anything he would tell you would cure you. If you had a sore throat and to boil the tops of seven nettles and to drink the juice the sore throat would go. If you had warts on your hand and to get a snail and to rub him of them. Then to leave him on a white thorn bush and according to how the snail would be weathering the wart would be going. If you make a worm knot over a calf that is sick he would get cured. If you get a stone in the wood and water in it and to wash you hand in it, if you had warts on your hand they would go. If you had a cold and to let a frog down your back the cold will go. Some people say that ferrets leavings is good for the chin cough. If you have the chin cough and to go under an ass three times and then to drink her milk the chin cough would go.
J Joyce
Belcarra
Castlebar
This was told to me by my mother Mrs Joyce Age 45 years
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 18:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They say that if the sun goes down behind a bank of clouds it is the sign of rain. If you see streaks across a lake that looks like roads it is the sign of dry weather. If the sky is very red at sunset it is the sign of storm. Iif the train makes a louder noise than usual it is the sign of frost. If you can see a ring around the moon at night it is the sign of rain. If you see the cat with her back to the fire it is the sign of rain. If you see a cat scraping a tree if is the sign of storm. If you see the swallows flying very high it is the sign of fine weather. If you see the dust rising off the road it is the sign of a storm.
James Mac Donnell
Ballinlassa
Belcarra
Castlebar
Co Mayo
This was told to me by my father, Patrick Mac Donnell age 40 years
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 18:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort in the townland of Carryjames. It is made of earth. It is situated on the top of a big hill. you can see three more forts from it. The people used to build the forts to protect themselves from the Danes long ago. The people say that the forts houses in our fort were made of wood. There is remains of two old banks in the fort that is in our village. The people never till a fort, because the old people say that the fairies would wish them bad luck. A man went digging the fort in our village and when he would have about ten sods dug they would all turn back to there own places again. It is not right to cut bushes in a fort, because the fairies would wish you bad luck. There is an under ground passage going through the fort in our village. The old people say that there is a half a tongs and pothooks in this fort.
John Joyce
Belcarra
Castlebar
Co Mayo
This was told to me by my mother, Mrs Joyce, 45 years.
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 18:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If a hen and a half laid an egg and a half in a day and a half how much would she lay in a week (7). If I had money I would be willing to spend it if I had as much and half as much I would have an even shilling (8 and 4). In came two legs sat on three legs took one leg in his lap. In came four legs snapped up one leg, up jumped two legs and fired three legs at four legs and got one leg back. A man came in and sat on a three leged stool, and took a leg of mutton in his hand and a dog came in and snapped it. It opens like a barn door, it shuts like a trap, you may think of every thing before you think of that (An umbrella). As I went over a london bridge I met a London scholar, I took a pen and drew his name and what was the name of the scholar (Andrew). As I went out in the garden I met my uncel David. I cut his head off and left his body easy (A head of cabbage)
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 17:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If you see the sun going down red in the evening it is the sign of good weather. If it goes down in the middle of clouds it is the sign of rain. If you see a ring around the moon it is the sign of rain. If you see a lot of stars in the sky dim and sickly looking it is the sign of rain. If you see a blue light in the fire it is the sign of rain. if the smoke goes up straight from a chimney in the morning it is the sign of good weather. if you see a cat and his back to the fire it is the sign of rain or if you see him scraping a tree if is the sign of rain. If the dust rises up off the road and white around it is the sign of rain. If you see long streaks in the lake it is the sign of good weather and if you see dark holes in it, it is the sign of rain. If the smoke of the train goes up in curls it is the sign of rain also if the train
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 17:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were three old country fairs in our district long ago. Donamona and Manulla and Keelogues and Ballyheane. Manulla died out altogether, all the rest did not die out. Now all the fairs are held in towns. Now all the people go to the fairs in the towns. When the railways were made the country fairs died out because the country fairs were not near the railways. The farmer that buys the cattle puts a mark of dirt on the cattle over their tails. The people used to pay custom at the fair. They used to put a mark of cart grease on pigs. they used to a mark on the sheeps neck. They also give luck money at the fairs. The luck money is given because if it was not given the people say that the beast would not be lucky. When a man sells a beast he also gives the halter to the man that buys him. When a man sells a cow or a calf the jobber puts earnest on them so that a man can not sell him over again to another man. One time it was an old custom with the people to fight at the fairs. They used to cut sticks and have them for the fairs
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 17:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
not far from my home is a fort. It is situated in Will Browne's farm. It occupied a quarter of an acre of land. It is intact except that the stairs are fallen in. It has always been believed that a great deal of gold was hidden there. In the days of the Geraldines a convoy of soldiers travelling from Cork to the Castle in Castleisland were attacked near Glountane and was robbed of the gold which they possessed. The saddles were also taken off the horses. All the treasure was buried in Browne's fort. This treasure was guarded by a white hare which lived within the fort. This hare appeared before sunrise every morning. Many people tried to shoot this hare but failed. A man named Ned Browne about fifty years old went to dig for the treasure. He found a saddle which when touched fell to pieces and a chest which was found to be empty when burst open. It did not contain the gold which has not yet been found. I heard this story from John Kearney who is now 72 years. It is said that there is as much gold buried
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 17:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tis supposed that a very rich man dwelt in Ceanguilla a century ago. He was a very selfish man and would not like to see anyone prospering. Even he would go out by night to injure other people's properties. He lived to be a very old man. About a week before he died he was very sick, and all his neighbours came to see him. They all thought he would divide his money between them, as he had no wife, or children, or relations of any kind, known to be in the county. But he had his money secured. He killed a horse foal and skinned it and twised the skin around his gold. It was one John Whelan. he told a near friend of his that if he had the luck of getting his money he need never again work. He gave him directions how to find it. He said that he had it put under the ground, and that it was under a white thorn tree. The man whom he told this to was a Talbert. Talbert made several attempt to find it but they were all in vain. The sum of money was
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 17:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived a strong man named Samson. He was once inside in a big strong powerful mansion. There was a big crowd of people joking and mocking him how he had no more strength than any other man. He said he had, and that he would prove it to them and so he did. he put his two hands around two big pillars and shook them down to the ground. All the crowd that were inside were all killed. It was supposed that he had all his strength in the hair of his head. There was an old saying among the people that they were as strong as Samson. Maurice Horan Dromulton was a great runner. He ran from Kilsarcon school to his own house in twenty minutes. It is the distance of four miles. It was a big record and he was also a good jumper. He could jump a distance of twenty four feet long. Maurice Reidy Glenlarn walked from Cordal chapel to Tralee, a distance of sixteen miles. It took him about three hours and a half to do it. Clifford of Seralan mowed six acres of hay in one day for a neighbour by the name of Riordan. He started early in the morning and had finished early.
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 13:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Blind Man's Buff is played in this way. A lot of girls get in a ring and catch hands. Some
senior member (history)
2020-04-24 12:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There came an old woman from Sandy's Line who played in the following way. One girl stands before a row of others and calls herself the mother. The one in the middle of the other row also calls herself the mother. Then the row come up to the mother who is by herself singing "There come an old woman from Sandy's Line, Sandy's Line, Sandy's Line. There came an old woman from Sandy's Line with all her children by the hand. One can knit, another can sew, another can make a lily white bow, another can make the bed of the Queen please take one out". The other mother then sings "I'll not take, or I'll not take two, but I'll take teh faired in the crew the very fairest I can see is bonny (here mention who you are going to take out) come on to me." Then the row go away singing. Now past (suppose the name of the one taken out was Mary) Mary she is gone she is gone, she is gone, now past Mary she is gone without a farthing in her hand, nothing but the Gillago Ring Good Bye Mary good Bye. Then they do the same again and so on till the old woman is rid of all her children.