Number of records in editorial history: 31
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 16:23
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father reached for the gun which was over the fireplace. The son made for the door and succeeded in getting clear and closing the door after him. The father and mother then had some words, and the mother screamed, and the son who was outside thinking that something awful was happening inside open the door, and immediately the father fired and shot the son in the head.
A neighbour by the name of McInerney rushed to Sixmilebridge for Fr. Frawley the priest of the parish. The messenger told the priest that the man was dying but did not mention what had happened to him. After attending to the dying man and administering the Last Sacraments the priest went to go home. To do so he could make a short cut which was well known by the
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:53
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This is true story, and as some of the descendants of the people principally concerned are still alive the author wishes to have the family name not mentioned.
About seventy or eighty years ago a certain man. who was the father of a family residing in a district not two miles from went to Kilkishen for a creel of turf, which he brought, not home but to another place, and sold it and drank the money. When he returned home, somewhat the worse for the wear, his son spoke to him about the matter. One word borrowed another and both became angry. Then the
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:42
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Both of these places are situated in Mr. Studdert's demesne not far from Bunratty. The story is told of a boy of about 12 years of age, who was one day very tired after a long journey, and on his way home he saw some donkeys in the Lisin. He got up on one to carry him home, and as he crossed the field he heard the sweet music of the pipes. He looked in the direction from which the music came, but saw nothing. Suddenly the donkey bolted, and knocked the boy. While he lay on the ground in pain, for he had hurt his knee in the fall, he heard laughter and clapping of hands. He looked but still saw
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:38
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quickly only to see the Coiste bodhar going away on its outward journey.
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:35
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Ballycuneen House, now the property of Michael O'Brien, Ballycasey, is situated about three-quarters of a mile from the Hurler's Cross, Clonmoney. Twenty years ago it was the residence of the O'Halloran family, and when any member of the family dies the Coiste Bodhar always paid a visit.
On one occasion when a member of the family had died, the gate-keeper got orders to have the gates open at a certain hour for the hearse, and the funeral was to be private. During the night he heard the sound of trotting horses, and thinking that he had slept out, he jumped up
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:26
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the beansidhe only laughed and did not believed but that they were joking her.
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:24
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A family of Frosts lived lived where Mr. Thomas Melody now resides in Clonmoney. One of the family named Bob and last of that family to occupy the place was Coroner for Co. Clare. He was a good employer and had an important industry of hay-grass.
The beansidhe followed the family, and when this man's wife was dying the beansidhe was distinctly heard by at least three people who are still
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:23
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alive. Miss O'Halloran , who formerly taught in Clonmoney School, John McInerney, who resided near her; and another neighbour, a farmer named Pat O'Brien.
Miss O'Halloran had occasion to send a young girl named Mary McInerney who was living with her up to Frosts' house on a message of enquiry, at about 10 or 11 at night.
While she was on her way up these three people already mentioned heard the cries of the beansidhe. Miss O'Halloran was naturally upset fearing the little girl would be terrified. When the girl returned she had the sad news that Mrs Frost had just died, but when questioned if she had heard any cries, she said she had not, and when told about
senior member (history)
2020-07-02 15:11
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A family of Frosts lived lived where Mr. Thomas Melody now resides in Clonmoney. One of the family named Bob and last of that family to occupy the place was Coroner for Co. Clare. He was a good employer and had an important industry of hay-grass.
The beanside followed the family, and when this man's wife was dying the beanside was distinctly heard by at least three people who are still
senior member (history)
2020-06-18 16:46
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beanside was from Kelly's Crag to the Lishin, roughly a distance of about one mile.
senior member (history)
2020-06-18 16:44
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And talking of the Lishin reminded the teller of the foregoing story that the cause generally following by the
senior member (history)
2020-06-18 16:42
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nothing. When the laughter and merriment ceased he got up, and though badly hurt he limped home. After some months' treatment the knee was not improving or getting well, so he decided to go to Biddy Early. When he arrived at he cabin, she gave him some cure, and told him all that had happened, and that it was the music of the Fair Piper he heard. The cure was only partly effective, and until the end of his day he walked and moved with a halt, and finally it was the cause of his early death.
senior member (history)
2020-06-18 16:36
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Both of these places are situated in Mr. Studdert's demesne no5 far from Bunratty. The story is told of a boy of about 1 years of age, who was one day very tired after a long journey, and on his way home he saw somedonkeys in the Lisin. He got up on one to carry him home, and as he crossed the field he heard the sweet music of the pipes. He looked in the direction from which the music came, but saw nothing. Suddenly the donkey bolted, and knocked the boy. While he lay on the ground in pain, for he had hurt his knee in the fall, he heard laughter and clapping of hands. He looked but still saw
senior member (history)
2020-06-18 16:21
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search has ever since been made.
senior member (history)
2020-06-18 16:20
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there is supposed to b gold in the foundations or close by. The site of the hidden gold can only be ascertained when snow has fallen, for the ground where the gold is always remains uncovered by snow. The castle was for many years in the possession of a great industrialist named Storey. [?] kept a big staff of workers, and one snowy night they determined to find the gold.
They began to excavate at the likely spot, and had gone down a good distance when they came upon a great wooden object like the trunk of a tree, with a big hole scooped half-way into it.
Suddenly the workmen were terrified by some unearthly noises within the castle, and that put an end to the operations, and no
senior member (history)
2020-06-18 16:05
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There is in the neighbourhood of Ralahine House, a castle of which very little is known in history.. But
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:43
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There are five or six forts near my house. There is no particular name on any fort. There are two forts in Shureeney one near Castle brinn one in Mr . Fitzgerald's land and one in Ballysheen in James Keogh's land. He cuts hay within the ring of earth each year with a mowing machine.
A ghost was seen near Kilkishen by some of the neighbours of the place. It appeared near a fort called ''The Lissahan.'' It appeared first like a statue then it got bigger and went up into the clouds.
senior member (history)
2020-05-19 16:51
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A soft plant which was thick and juicy, having a sword shaped leaf called ''mullin'' was picked. It grew wild in some places, and was cultivated. The leaves were dried in the sun and later hung up in the kitchen. Then it was made into powder and smoked like tobacco. Mr MacNamara Ardane, Sixmlebridge, cultivated it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-19 16:35
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strictly observed. The wedding was held in the brides house which continued all day and all night. The bride did not go to her new home that night but stayed in her father's house, for a few days. Then the groom makes a party for his friends and brought home the bride this was called the ''Bringing home'' and it was just as big a party as the wedding.
senior member (history)
2020-05-19 16:30
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Very many of the celebrations and customs which took place at a marriage in the olden days have now passed away.
A marriage nowadays is a very quiet event compared with the feasting and merriment in the olden days. In those tImes a marriage was a great event and marriages then were more numerous than nowadays.
First of all the match was settled between the parents of the contracting parties and the wedding day generally took place about a week after the parties met, thus the marriages were often times unexpected which made them more enjoyable.
In the olden days there were many customs for a marriage which were
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:29
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in potato and turnip fields. It sends up a stem (6 or 7 inches) with crown on top. Break this stem and apply white juice to wart.
The house-[?] leek that grows sometimes on eaves of thatched houses, or on borders near gable. Press out juice and apply.
Cut a [?] out of a corn straw- one for every wart- tie them up in a little packet. If any person picks up packet, he will have the misfortune of taking the warts.
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:27
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in potato and turnip fields. It sends up a stem (6 or 7 inches) with crown on top. Break this stem and apply white juice to wart.
The house-[?] leek that grows sometimes on eaves of thatched houses, or on borders near gable. Press out juice and apply.
Cut a [?] out of a corn straw- one for every wart- tie them p in a little packet. If any person picks up packet, he will have the misfortune of taking the warts.
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:17
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water out of a hollow stone. Go fasting and rub water for 3 mornings.
There's a plant that grows
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:15
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dandelion as above.
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:15
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dandelion drink. or eat it raw. Boil marsh-mallow and rub on juice.
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:13
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Use [?] - a green leaf somewhat like that of a dock but longer and narrower and a much deeper green, with brown lines at the back [?] from centre rib. It is probably a sort of fern. Heat the leaf to the line and lay it to the burn.
senior member (history)
2020-04-30 16:08
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put in frog to suck tooth
senior member (history)
2020-04-27 15:55
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nothing but put his finger in that eye and blinded her so that she could not see fairies anymore. This woman had charms.
One day she was going to town. Just at the Hang-man's bridge in Knappa-Beg there was a horse lying on the road with a pain. She spat three times on the horse and he got up and the people that owned the horse went on him and galloped into town.
senior member (history)
2020-04-27 15:43
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There was once a woman named Collins and she used to be brought by the fairies very often. They used to want her for certain jobs. She was kept with the fairies for two nights once bt she knew she was in a queer place. one night but she knew she was in a queer place. One night anyhow she saw the fairies dipping their fingers in water that was in the side of the wall and putting it on their eyes. When she followed them out she did the same. One day this woman was at a fair in Partry. She saw a fairy in Partry and she went up to the fairy. He asked her what eye did she see out of and she told him. He did
senior member (history)
2020-04-09 15:32
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shilling or one and six pence for a pig or a calf, two shillings or half a crown for big strong cattle. Toll or custom is paid on sold cattle, two pence for a sheep, six pence or a shilling for strong cattle. When a buyer buys an animal he puts a red or blue mark on their backs or he clips the hair off their backs with a scissors. When a bargain is made the two engaged make an agreement by striking hands. There were more fairs held long ago than there are now. There was a fair held in Templehouse. The fair was held on a hill. There is a special fair held at Carragnagat for horses.
senior member (history)
2020-04-09 15:24
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The local fairs.
There are seven fairs held in the district, Coolaney fair, Collooney, Ballymote fair, [?] fair, Tubbercurry fair, [?] horse fair and Larkhill fair. Coolaney fair is held on the twenty ninth of each month and if the twenty ninth falls on a Sunday the fair is held on the following Monday. There is a fairgreen for the cattle. The sheep and the pigs are sold on the street. The sheep pig and cattle fairs are held on the one day. Buyers come from all Ireland to Coolaney fair. The biggest fairs are held in August and September. It is mostly sheep and cattle that are seen in it. Any man that sells a beast gives the buyer luck, sixpence or a shilling for a sheep or a lamb, a