Number of records in editorial history: 111
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 17:37
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awaiting decision
There is a field in the Parish of Killusty called Ballin - Clare, and in some part of that field, there is supposed to be a spring well, which was closed some time ago, and several attempts were made to find it, and if it could be found it would be a grand benefit to its surroundings, and there is a sum of money hidden near the well belonging to the people who were exiled from that farm in olden times.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 17:34
approved
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awaiting decision
There is a white - thorn bush up in the Corrigeen. In the olden days in the time of the war, someone buried money under the bush, after a few years a woman went digging for it, after a few hours digging she heard some noise behind her, she looked to see what it was, and when she turned round to dig again, the hole was covered in, and a crowd of birds flew over her head and frightened her.
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 21:10
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awaiting decision
A man was bringing stones out of Tlaharty's castle near blonmet. He heard of gold being in it, so he dug, and got more gold than he was able to carry. The farmer went to call him to his dinner, but he could not find (it) him, all he found was a few pieces of gold. The other lad was gone off with the gold.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 20:54
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on it for him, and what it was is
"Near this, there is twice as much."
He went on and dug again, until he found two more crocks of gold, and that was the hidden treasure of the dream of the white cow.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 20:53
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time a Tipperary Farmer dreamt that a certain man in bounty Warterford had a white cow, and if he could get that cow by any means, it would make him a rich man, so he went to buy or to barter for her, and by no means would the (owner) part with her, he told the man about the dream. "Well" he said, "I had a stranger dream last night, I dreamt (they) that there was a lot of golf in your garden"; so the Farmer came home again, and began to dig his garden, he found a large flag, under this flag he got a crock of gold, he took it in, and took in the flag aslo; he put the flag behind the fire, thinking it was no good, there were some words written on it, which he could not understand. One day a hedge school Master came in and he noticed the flag, he said to the farmer, "this is a valuable flag, so he read what was
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 20:45
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time a man was cleaning a ditch at the side of a fort. A small man appreared to him and said, the rising of the world (was in) is in Raheen Rogue. The man turned round where he he heard the talk, then the (other) man was gone. Then turning round, the workman took his coat and left his work there.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 19:14
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a man that had sheep out on the mountain, and he went to look at them one day and the fog arose and he didn't know where to go, and he was wandering about on the mountain, and he came upon a cabin, and he found out a door on it, and he went in and there was a fire lighting inside, and a big dog at one side and a man at the other side, and a crock of gold between them, and when the man was going down for the gold the dog snarled at him, and he ran out the door again and he came the next day with some of his friends, but there was no sign of the cabin or anything there.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:07
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awaiting decision
terribly afraid, but Harry Kane gave them a bottle of whiskey and told them to dig away, so they dug away, but then the spirit had chains and two blazing sods of turf in his hands, and he started to strike them together and came nearer to them and flung one of the sods of turf into the hole, and the two men fled for their lives, and that ended the digging (the digging) for the gold.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:04
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago there lived in the castle around a large number of men called clansmen. In the olden days the men of every Province used to go to fight with another Province, and the great clans used to take a man out because when the were going to fight they used to put a man minding their gold. Then he would have to take an oath, and say that he would mind the gold dead or alive; then they would shoot him and his spirit would be there to mind it, they said. My uncle James told me that there is gold hidden in Clare. Castle, and that an old (man) c(a)lled Harry Kane dreamt that there was money in it. So he took two very plucky men with him one night to dig for the gold. They dug for some time, till at last they came to a slab and just then a spirit dressed in white came and stood before them. The two men with the pick and shovel were
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:56
approved
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awaiting decision
I got this story from,
James Ryan, (48)
Walsh Bog,
Fethard,
Co Tipp.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:56
approved
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awaiting decision
A man was sitting on a bridge one bright Summer's evening close by Clare - Castle, reading a newspaper when a weasel sat on the opposite side. She went back to the Castle and brought out a gold coin in her mouth, she came before the man again, leaving down the coin, so that he would see it, taking it up again she went back to the castle, looking back several times, to see was he following her, so that she would show him where the money was, but he had not the courage to follow her. A short time after, a few people went to dig for it. They said whatever would happen they would not leave the castle. They were down fairly deep, when they saw a white man rattling chains passing the castle. They did not mind that, but he came back again with fire flying from his hands so they left everything after them and got no gold.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:46
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awaiting decision
lanthern and scattering everything about, even filling up the hole he was digging. When he came to himself after the shock of the storm, and regained his lanthern he found himself far from where he was digging, and could never again find the exact place.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:44
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time, a man dreamt that a crock of gold was hidden below in Flarthey's Fort. He dreamt of this three times in succession which was supposed to be a sure sign that he would be successful if he went to search for it. So he made up his mind to go and try and get the gold without telling anyone. One dark night he went to the place shown in his dreams, bringing a spade to dig the treasure, and a lanthern to show him the exact place where he was to dig. He arranged to be at the place just at midnight as this has the tradition of being the most lucky hour to search for treasure. Coming to the exact place, he worked hard for about an hour, and then he came to a large flat stone under which the gold was supposed to be hidden; but just as he was about to remove it a terrible whirlwind arose blowing out the
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:38
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awaiting decision
On top of Slieve - na - mon there is supposed to be a treasure hidden. Two men who heard of this set out to find it. They brought with them a pick and a spade. When they reached the top they began to dig, when they had dug some distance, they heard a great noise and looking around they beheld a pide gaovie[?]. A pide gaovie[?] is a fairy wind, and if it struck you it would kill you. The men were frightened and ran away leaving behind them the spade and pick. A few days later they went to look for them, but to their surprise the fairies had built a great heap of stones where they had been digging, and that heap can be seen today.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:28
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awaiting decision
Long ago it was said that some gold vessels were buried in a big box in the "Church Field". One night two men went to dig for the box. After digging down about three feet, they heard a noise like a little bell, and thinking they had the gold vessels, they began to dig twice as hard, but to their disappointment they found nothing only a big box of clay.
I got this story from,
Patrick Davis, (45)
Killusty,
Fethard,
Co Tipp.
There is a field just a little below Killusty village, named the Church Field, it got this name, because the old Church was built there.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:23
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awaiting decision
In olden times the people of this country had a belief that gold was hidden in different places and especially in Forts, but it is supposed to be guarded by the good people, or fairies, ad they are commonly called. A woman heard that in Ballin - Clare there was sure to be gold hidden under a whitethorn tree in the center of the field, so one day she went to the place and began digging. After some time she came to a stone with a ring in the center, so catching the ring, she lifted the stone and found underneath a large pot of gold; while the woman was admiring the gold, she heard her name called, and looking around, she could see no one, and turning to her new - found treasure, what was her disappointment, to find that the treasure had completely vanished.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 07:44
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awaiting decision
In days gone by, when the Normans came over and robbed and plundered the country, the people hid their treasures on the mountains and in other places. My grandfather told me about one part of the mountain where gold is supposed to be hidden. This part of the mountain is called Corraig - mo - Cleir [?]. One day two men set out determined to dig and get the gold. When they reached the spot where it was, they began to dig, after about an hour digging, they met a hard thing like a rock, all at once they heard a bark like a dog, looking around they saw two big animals like geese, they flew away and that ended their digging.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 07:35
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awaiting decision
Under a castle near here called Clare castle, there is supposed to be some money hidden. One night a crowd of men with spades and shovels went there, and said no matter what happened, they wouldn't go away till they had the money. After digging for about a quarter of an hour, one of them was surprised to see a very tall woman, dressed in white and making a terrible noise, walking slowly towards them, he then showed her to the rest of the men, and forgetting their promise not to leave without getting the money, they fled away as quickly that they forgot the spades and shovels. Two of men were passing that way to their work in the morning, and to their surprise the hole which they had dug was filled up again, but they found the spades and shovels and brought them home that evening. I got this story from [?] Patrick Davis, Killusty.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 20:33
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and go seek". This game is played by one of the gorls running away for a distance and then hiding in some place where it would be very hard to find her out. All the others go ahide like that until all are gone except one, who is to look for them. Of course the one who is left to look for the others is not supposed to see where they are gone. When they are all ahide they say "cuck" from their hiding places. It often takes many minutes before all are discovered. Then there is great fun bringing them back as they are found and the game starts all over again.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 20:29
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awaiting decision
One of the games we play, is "Colours". The game is played by putting a number of girls standing against a wall and another girl would give each of them a different colour to remember one "white" one "pink" one "blue" and so on. Then there must be two more girls, one to be an "angel" and the other the "devil" and the girl who gave out the colours must go to these at the wall had, and if the "devil" found out any of these colours, the girl that he got would have to be a "devil" as well and the "angel" would have to do the same thing until they were all gone from the wall. Then we should have a race to see is it the "devils" or the "angels" would win. The "angels" always get a little bit in front of the "devils" and if they reach the "angels" before the latter go as far as they are allowed to go they would all have to be "devils" and so the game starts all over again.
"Hide and go seek"
Another of the games I like to play is "hide -
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 20:19
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Says the shan van vocht.
We killed Gorman on the floor,
And a peeler at the door,
And we thought we had killed more,
Says the shan van vocht.
After a time Seully was shot dead at another eviction.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 20:17
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awaiting decision
In a townland named Ballyeookey near Tipperary town a terrible tyrant named William Seully was landlord. He demanded a very high rent of his tenants and if they could not pay it, he levelled the house to the ground with a "battering ram". One day he came to evict a family and brought a number of police (with) and his agent with him. As soon as they entered the house, some of the people opened fire on them, from an outhouse killing Gorman, the agent, and one of the police. They had intended to kill Seully but he wore a coat of mail always, so they could not kill him. The police were so surprised, that they forgot the shooters and they all escaped. From that attack these verses were made:-
Did you fear of William Seully,
Says the shan van vocht,
He had steel upon his belly,
Says the shan can vocht.
O' twas there we had the fun,
With our double - barrelled gun,
And we made the bobbies run,
senior member (history)
2019-07-30 21:09
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awaiting decision
Our Blessed Mother and the Divine Infant, went out to meet St. Joseph coming from work one evening, He jumped out of Her arms with joy, as He was running He stood on a thorn and His foot was bleeding. It happened to be in a field of wheat, so every place a drop of his blood fell, a red flower sprung up in the field, and can be seen from that day to this.
senior member (history)
2019-07-30 21:06
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Quinns of Walsh-Bog, they have a part of a tobacco press there yet.
senior member (history)
2019-07-30 21:04
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Long ago they used to have pipes made from a briar, but it would get burned with the tobaeco very quickli. This is the way they used to make these pipes, they used to get a thick briar and burn the centre out of it, with a piece of wire, because the centre of a briar is soft. Often they used to get an alder stick, and make a pipe out of it, because it has a soft centre too. When they would have the centre taken out they used to hole the part of the pipe that is going to be the head, and put in a small piece of a stick with a hole in it, for a stem, and if they could get a small bone it would do for a (bor)[?] stem too. Then the trouble was to get tobacco, it being very scarce then, and the leaves that would be left over after the tea, used to be dried and smoked in the pipes. Tobacco named "pigtail" used to be smoked, it was made into rolls, you would get a pennyworth of it if you liked. Tobacco used to be made at Mr.
senior member (history)
2019-07-28 18:41
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awaiting decision
Kiltinan Castle is built near the Clashauley, on a rock about two hundred feet high, over the river bed.There is a grand straight avenue leading to it, from the road, with huge oak trees on each side. In olden times we are told, there used to be a court martail held in some part of the castle. A few people were hanged there; one poor woman had a boy whom she could not control, and to her sad grief she brought him there to be corrected, and he was hanged from the bough of a big tree; this bough no one would cut for years, but lately it was causing an obstruction, as it was hanging down over the bye-road and had to be cut. This road is known to this day as "Goiap na zepoiee"[?]
senior member (history)
2019-07-28 18:29
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awaiting decision
A great sickness, called "farcy", comes on horses sometimes. Veterinary surgeons are not able to cures the disease, but quack doctors have a remedy for it. They pull doek roots and boil them for a certain time in water, and put some new milk through it. Give the horses three pints daily for three days and this will cure them completely.
In summer time cattle suffer from "murrin", a dry and red one. To cure this, give the beast one pint of linseed oil, two pounds of salts, a tin of treacle and half an ounce of sweet spirits of nitre - all mixed together - and in bad cases in addition two or three pounds of lard should be given.
senior member (history)
2019-07-28 18:00
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When a turkey has all her eggs laid, we set her in a box, and she hatches the eggs for four weeks; we put a bit of iron under the box to save the eggs from thunder, which would kill the young birds in the eggs. When they are "down" a fortnight, the eggs can be tested with a lighting candle in a very dark place. There would be a round empty circle in the top of the egg, if there is a bird in it; and if it is bright all through it is a bad one and should be removed. When the young ones come out great care should be taken of them. They should be fed with eggs, loaf bread, and new milk boiled together, they should be kept in out of the rain. When about a month old they should get plenty of stirabout and nettles.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 20:35
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In Kiltinan Castle, in the parish of Killusty there lived about three generations of the Cooke[?] and they owned a big property, and had a lot of tenanted land. They were very harsh landlords, having evicted a big number of families, now living on Slievenamon, are those whose ancestors were evicted from their homes in Kiltinan property and put to live on the mountain and had to reclaim the land they now own.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 21:24
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Before you sow mangels you must make drills. Then you must put manure on them, then roll them well with a roller, then close them in, and make little holes along the top of them, and put five or six seeds in each hole. When all are sown, you should cover them in lightly with a shovel or a roller.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 21:22
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In olden times, people could cure most ailments at home; for instance, an abcees when broken, they put a withered oak leaf to it, to draw out the matter changing the leaf daily until all the badness was drawn out. To cure sprains or bruises, they used a leaf called "March Malis". This they boiled and mixed with hog's lard, and applied it to the injured part. For chest trouble, they got a blue sugar bag, and made into a square, which they soaked with whiskey, and applied then to the persons chest. To cure a toothache they mixed equal quantities of soot and salt, and applied the mixture to a toothache. A cure for warts was to rub the first white snail they met to (the) wart and then stick the snail on a whitethorn bush. As the (snail) decayed, so the wart diminished.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 19:32
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awaiting decision
The farmer cannot carry on business, without having impliments. For tilling, he must have a plough, harrow, roller, crusher and grubber. He must have the plough to break the (sods) surface, the harrow to break the sods into clay, the crusher to break knobs, the grubber to clean drills, and the roller to roll them. Then to sow grain seed, he must have a machine for the purpose called a seed - sower.
Then for hay and corn saving, (and corn saving) he must have machines to cut, rakes to rake up, and forks to rick up.
If he were knocking a ditch he must have a pickaxe and shovel, and if he was digging, a shovel, sprong and spade is necessary.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 19:24
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Before the potatoes are set, the ground must be ploughed, harrowed, and crushed well. When the ground is ploughed, the surface is broken, and then the harrow makes clay. Then the drills are opened with a double board plough, and the manure is spread in them. Then the potatoes are laid, each about a foot apart. Then the drills are closed with a double board plough, and well rolled to prevent the crows from taking the seed.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 18:42
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From Joseph Keane (49)
Killusty
TS Fethard
Co. Tipp.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 18:41
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a man in olden times, who had no horse to set his wheat, and he had to sow it with a skiver; he had a pocket full of wheat, and he would throw grain by grain into every hole, and in the end of the year, the crop was a right succees.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 18:32
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The turnip is the last crop to be sown, and the best time to sow it, would be the last week in May or the first week in June. The first part of the work is to plough the land well. After that we harrow it, and crush it, then if the clay is not fine enough, we plough the land again, we need very fine clay to sow the turnips. When the land is well tilled, we open the drills, and then we put the farmyard manure in the furrows. To obtain a good crop, we put about four cut to the acre of artificial manure. We close the drills with horses and a plough, and then sow with turnip sower. We leave the crop grow away, for about a month, we then grub the furrows, and gap the furrows with a hoe. Then we thin them out to one, leaving each one about nine inches apart (from the other). We leave them grow on, and then pull them in November. Then we put them in to a pit to feed the cattle for the winter.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 18:20
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One of the most important crops at the presant time is beet. It is grown for the last four or five years, owing to the stack on the cattle trade, the farmers had to grow the beet to pay their way. First of all, they put on the farmyard manure on the land and then plough very deeply, they leave the land rest then, until about March; then they till it well and shake artificial manure, about eight cut to the acre; after that they open the drills and sow the beet. During its growth, it must be kept clean, and free from weeds, then the crop is thinned out, leaving the plants about sex inches apart, it is left rest until about June, then it is earthed up. It is pulled in the month of November and put into small heaps until dry, and then they crown it, and it is carted away to the beet factory to be manufactured into sugar.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 18:06
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Thatched houses are very hard to keep in order, you must grow wheat every year to have straw to thatch them. The straw has to be drawn through a rake to clean the dirt from it, and then it is made into bundles. Then you must get hazel switched and cut them in lengths about two feet long and point the two ends. When you have both ready you must get a ladder, and put it up on the house, and thatch in streaks about two feet (long) wide, and stitch the straw with the hazel pointed lengths, and pare down the thatch with a knife to finish it nicely.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 18:00
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There was a very big fall of snow about sixty years ago, and my Uncle, James Ryan and two other men were working at Killusty Castle, where there were about one hundred sheep. My Uncle and two other men were sent to find the sheep. They were given three shovels with which to dig out the sheep. It was about twelve o'clock when they found the first sheep, and they dug away until they got all the sheep safely out of the snow.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 21:36
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churn - barrel is fashioned like any other barrel, wide in the middle and narrow at both ends. In the centre of it there is an opening in which the cream is put. When there is enough of cream in the barrel, it is closed up by a shutter and fastened into its place by means of screws, so that the air could not get into the cream. Then the barrel is placed on a frame, this is done by means of an axle being attached to both ends of the barrel. There is a handle attached to one end of the barrel, which is used to twist the barrel round until the butter is made, which will take two hours hard work, as the barrel must be kept constantly going. Then when the butter is made it is taken out and placed on a table, and washed well, until all particles of milk are washed out, this is called butter milk. The butter is then salted and placed in wooden vessels for future use or sale.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 21:29
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In olden times the people of this country made their butter, at home on the farm, they had a house laid out specially for a dairy. When the milk was taken from the cows, it was placed in low round wooden vessels called tubs, in the dairy, it was allowed to remain in those vessels for about forty - eight hours, this was done by means of pieces of wood which were specially made for that purpose. The cream was then transferred to the churn - barrel to be made into butter. The
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 21:26
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In the Penal times, when priests were not allowed to say Mass, they used to go out on the mountains to say it. On the hill over Kylotlea near Mullinahone, a big rock is still to be seen where Mass was said in the olden times. Near it stands a big cross, made out of a tree which grew there, and Mass is celebrated at that cross and rock every ten years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 20:56
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In olden times when the people had no tea, their food consisted of oaten bread, skimmed milk, potatoes and oatmeal stirabout. Their first meal in the morning, consisted of oaten bread and skimmed milk. Then for dinner, about one o'clock, they used have potatoes and skimmed milk, and for supper, stirabout and milk. They very seldom had meat, only when they killed rabbits or hares.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 20:52
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was clinched and the stock driven away.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 20:52
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In the olden times fairs were held in a great many places in the district; there used to be one held in Cloneen - Clainin [?] - the little meadow, where the fairs were held. Another was held in Cloran in a field still known as the "fair green". These fairs were held in the month of May. This is how they made the deal; the prospective buyer would ask the seller how much he wanted, and when the latter stated his price, the buyer might not be satisfied to give that much. Then a few friends of the seller would step in and help to make the deal, and when made, the farmers and the seller would strike each others hands and the bargain
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 20:46
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lands. It is according to the amount of money paid for the animal, that "luck" is rated, and it means a good deal to big cattle buyers.There is a ticket given to the owner of the cattle when bought, and it must be produced before payment; an old custom was throwing some mud on the animal as a token when sold. When a bargain is being made, the buyer would strike the seller on the hand and as they say, "clinch the agreement" about the price.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 20:43
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On the third Tuesday of wach month the fair is held in the town of Fethard. A few years ago the April fair was held on the twentieth of that month, and the November fair, on the twentieth of November, these were called "old fairs". After the sales on those days when the animals were being driven to the station, either the seller or the buyer should pay fourpence, or sixpence on the beast leaving the town. On each outlet, there were men appointed to collect these "tolls". A few fairs used be held in Kilnochin, a townland outside Fethard, in fact there is a tune called, The Fair of Kilnochin. In several cases cattle buyers visit farmer's houses and buy the cattle on the
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 02:04
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The landlord of this property namely, Kylevalla, Grangebeg and Kilurney was Lord Ormonde Butler. He was one of the best land lords of his time and had the rupation of never evicting a Widow for non payment of rent on his property. When the time came for purchase which meant reducing the rent, he was one of the first to settle with his tenants, under what was called the Ashbourne Act at the time, and what is still known to be the best.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 01:58
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There is a season of the year after Christmas called Shrove, which lasts till Ash Wednesday, it is a time when most marriages take place. Wednesday is nearly always chosen as the luckiest day of the week. May is considered to be an unlucky month. It is an old saying, "Mary in May and you'll rue the day". The custom was when a match was made about sixty years ago, money being not as plentiful as it is today, as regards a fortune, to give instead a cow or a yearling calf or two. Another custom was a great night's dance, the night they were married.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 01:53
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If you had a wart on your finger, to dip it in a lough on the top of a bridge is said to cure it.
The doc root when cut into slices, and left in milk for one night would cure rash.
To cure a boil the old people used to melt wax and put it on the boil.
Switch grass boiled in water and then drink the water is supposed to be very good for kidney trouble.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 01:50
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The people long ago lived principally on potatoes which they had herrings and skimmed milk for dinner. They had porridge made either of Indian meal or oaten meal for breakfast and supper, with this they had sour milk and sometimes new milk. Bread was made with pea meal. The peas when ripe were treated like oats or wheat. They were ground either in a mill or a quern. All the vessels in the kitchen and dairy were made of timber.
The workmen had three meals, one early in the morning and one late in the evening and one about twelve or one o'clock.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 00:00
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awaiting decision
About seventy years ago, tea, white bread and many foods in use now were then unknown. The food of the people consisted of potatoes and porridge, the latter (consisted) was used for breakfast and supper, with skimmed milk. Potatoes and salt with skimmed milk, and sometimes eggs and butter, were taken for dinner. Meat was scarcely ever used except at Christmas. Bread was made with oaten meal and water, and people drank cider with it for the evening meal. There was a large table in the kitchen, which when not in use could be hung up against the wall.
senior member (history)
2019-07-24 23:53
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awaiting decision
The most usual time of the year that marriages take place here especially in the country districts is between Christmas and Shrove Tuesday. Wednesday is considered a lucky day on which to be marries. May is not considered a lucky month, an old saying is "Marry in May you'll rue the day". Marriages are generally made in this country by the parents or guardian of the young people. As a dowry the bride used to give her husband horses or other stock instead of money. About sixty years ago, marriages took place at the home of the bride. Now marriages take place in the Church.
senior member (history)
2019-07-24 22:51
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awaiting decision
In olden times when people were not allowed to educate their children, the people had hedge - schools. The teachers used to come from other places, and every scholar had to pay one penny per week. My mother's Great Grandfather was a hedge - schoolmaster. He taught in a school in Priestown near Drangan. There was another school in Cloran, which the scholars used attend by night. The girls used to wear pieces around their heads.
senior member (history)
2019-07-24 21:11
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Here I lay down to sleep,
To God I give my soul to keep
And if I die before I wake
I pray to God my soul to take.
If any evil passes by
O blessed Lady awaken me.
There are four corners on this bed,
There are four Angels on them spread.
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Bless this bed that I lie on.
God bless it within and God bless it without
God bless the house all round about,
And if I die before I wake
I pray to God my soul to take.
senior member (history)
2019-07-24 20:13
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awaiting decision
Cows are housed for five months and fed with hay and turnips or mangolds, and for the remainder of the year they live on grass. Ther are milked for nine months and for the other three months they are "dry". Cows calf nearly always early in Spring, only a few which have been kept for Winter dairying, the calf is fed with milk from the cow for the first month and "separated" milk from the creamery after that. When the Winter comes they are fed with hay mixed with oats for the first year and they are fed on the land after that.
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 06:05
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awaiting decision
[6]
Sweet ancient vale of Killusty,
Thrice loveliest dost thou be,
For thou has lost thy fairy spell
That once had charmed me.
For low that star of splendour
That illumed our home so long,
Haws set on freedom's ruins
Far away from Sliab - na - mban.
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 06:02
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[3]
So fair sequestered valley,
How oft at evening tide
I have wandered through thy lonely dells,
Sweet Anner stream beside.
Whilst the gloomy shades of evening
In a Herculean throng
Start up their yellow swards
On the breast of Sliab - na - mban.
[4]
O how I love to linger
"neath that lone sky serene,
Or leave me when weary
Amid the bowers and colours green.
For memory's dearest ties
Twine around that vale of song,
And there are hearts in exile
Far away from Sliab - na - mban.
[5]
Oh saddening recollections
Man that thrice lovely scene,
Or tell of Sunday ties,
Because we love the green.
Likewise of wailing mothers,
Poor Erins injured wrong,
And there are hopes for Ireland
At the foot of Sliab - na - mban.
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 05:50
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awaiting decision
[1]
As I stood on Coppiz - mo - Cleip [?],
And gazed along that vale,
With its golden coloured copious,
And emerald - tinted dale.
Such various scenes of beauty,
My eyes have ne'er looked on,
As those which I have met with
At the foot of Sliab - na - mban
[2]
The sun with lustrous softness
'Shone on the evening air,
Pouring its lightning floods
Along that valley fair.
Its rays like golden arrows
Their rapid flight winged on,
And spread a sparkling lustre
Oer the breast of Sliab - na - mban.
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 05:41
approved
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awaiting decision
There are two fields in locality called "baytens" (baocin'). The fields were skinned with a plough very lightly, crossing over hither and thither, until it was all ploughed into square sods. There were put standing on end like turf to dry, for burning in the house. It made a very nice fire, much like turf. Then the ground from which these sods were taken was ploughed, and the ashes of the sods mixed through it for manure. The best potatoes ever grown were produced in the "baytens"
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 05:42
approved
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awaiting decision
In olden times people could cure most ailments at home:- for instance (an) an abscess when broken they would put a withered leaf to it to draw out the matter, changing the leaf daily until all the badness was drawn out.
To cure sprains or bruises, they used a weed called "March- Malis". This was boiled and mixed with hog's lard and applied to the injured part.
For chest trouble they got a blue sugar bag and made it into a square which the soaked in whiskey and applied to the person's chest.
To cure a toothache they mixed equal quantities of soot and salt and wet them with water and applied this mixture to the toothache.
A cure for warts was to rub the first white snail they met to the wart, and then stick the snail on
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 05:24
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a whitethorn bush. As the snail decayed so the wart diminished.
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 04:49
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awaiting decision
In those days there were no goal posts, they played from ditch to ditch. One time Killusty played Kilcash at a place mid- way between the two parishes. Killusty were too fast for their opponents, for one of them put the ball under his arm and ran away with it from one ditch to the other and so won the match for Killusty.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 21:17
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awaiting decision
May God grant me grace and make a good boy of me. Holy Mary queen of charity pray for me that I may not die in the state of mortal sin. Amen.
Here I lie on my right side,
Jesus and Mary to be my guide,
Jesus the branch, Mary the flower,
Jesus and Mary be with me at my dying hour. Amen
There are four corners on my bed,
There are four Angels on them spread,
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,
God bless this bed that I lie on,
And if I die before I wake,
To God I give to God my soul to take
I trace the letters with my finger I.N.R.I
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 21:12
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on my forehead I go to sleep every night.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 21:12
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awaiting decision
As I lie down this night to rest,
I pray to God my soul to bless.
There are four corners to my bed
There are four Angels overhead
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Bless this bed that I lie on
And if I die before I wake
To God I give my soul to take
If any evil touches me
Holy Mary save me.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 21:09
approved
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awaiting decision
As I lie down to sleep,
To God I give my sould to keep.
And if I die before I wake
To God I give my soul to take.
There are four corners on my bed,
There are four Angels overhead,
That the four may be carrying
My soul up to heaven.
Saints Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Bless this bed that I lie on.
On Good Friday our Saviour died
On Good Friday our Saviour was crusified
They nailed a cap of thorns
On His Sacred Head.
Up came the Jews with a long spear,
They pierced him through the head.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 21:04
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awaiting decision
From His heart to His head,
The blood began to flow.
His tender mother standing by,
With her heavy heart and pitiful cry.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 20:28
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awaiting decision
Bathing the eyes with salt and water is considered a cure for eye strain.
A pinch of salt placed on the tongue followed by a glass of cold water will cure a headache.
A gargle of salt and water, a teaspoon to a pint is an excellent cure for a cold or swollen tonsils.
Breadsoda is the old- fashioned cure for a burn; another cure is the juice of a raw potato. The milk in which leeks are boiled is a for anaemia.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 20:19
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awaiting decision
There was a man long ago who always had a pain in his head. He got several cures and none of them did him any good. So one day he thought of a plan and said he would try it - to go out under a calf's belly would cure him. He did this and never got the pain again.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 20:06
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awaiting decision
A woman was dying and she asked her son to say a prayer for her and this is what he said:-
May the Lord in His mercy
Take you Mrs Percy
Up to His heavenly throne
And comfort poor Ned
Who is here in your stead
And leave him live happy at home.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 20:04
approved
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awaiting decision
A man had a racehorse and he could not get him to win a race. He mentioned the matter to another man and the latter said, "Plant the fort you cut down". So he did and his horse won the next race.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 20:03
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awaiting decision
About one mile from here there is a very old churchyard. It is hundreds of years since anyone was buried there and only one headstone remains. On this headstone is a small stone the shape of a loaf and if you take down that "loaf" in the night it would be up again in the morning. There are some words on the large stone, which cannot be made out.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 19:56
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awaiting decision
When people are about to set potatoes they say "We will set them in the name of God" and when they were planted they would say "Thanks be to God". If an accident happened or if they met with a loss, they would say "Welcome be the will of God". When people go where others are working they say "God bless the work" and the answering salutation is "God save you kindly". When people are leaving home their friends say "God be with you".
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 06:14
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awaiting decision
Long ago there were no goals in the football field, they played from ditch to ditch. Killusty played Mullinahone - a neighbouring parish, one time. They met at a convenient place. When the teams assembled the ball was thrown in by an outsider. If a Killusty man got it, he should run to his side of the field and if he were able to do that Killusty would win the match. They could foul all they liked.
When hurling they made use of handles of brushes, pitchforks etc, and had to hurdle from one townland to another.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 06:07
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awaiting decision
There is a big fort in Bannixtown, a townland between Cloneen and Killusty. A man went down through the opening in the center, and was never seen again. Every Christmas Eve night all the animals gather into it for shelter. Once a poor man passing the way, took shelter for the night in the fort, and in the morning found himself miles away from it. It is said that forts were kings homes long ago, and afterwards used by the fairies.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 05:54
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awaiting decision
Long ago people used get up at five o'clock every morning and have an hour's work done before breakfast. Their food was principally potatoes and thick milk, which was so sour that it would draw tears from their eyes. On a Sunday they used get a little bit of meat. They often had barley bread too.
Before tea was much used, people drank coffee and after a while tea became known. People then worked from light to light. The old people say "we have Christmas everyday now".
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 05:37
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awaiting decision
Food in the olden times consisted of potatoes and porridge. Potatoes were used for dinner with milk from which the cream had been removed; with this and a little butter and salt a good dinner was made. Meat was very little used then. For breakfast they had porridge and skimmed milk, and the same for supper. Eggs and meat were only used on special occasions, such as Christmas and Easter. On the latter feast day, people used consume a lot of eggs for breakfast, sometimes up to twelve without any ill effects.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:42
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awaiting decision
In those old days the principal food consisted of stirabout and skimmed milk for breakfast, at six o'clock; potatoes and milk for dinner, the evening meal was the same as the breakfast, and was taken at seven o'clock.
The table in the Kitchen could be turned up on one end against the wall, and the frame underneath used as a seat, when the table was not in use. Cabbage dressed with lard was often used at dinner; dried ling fish was a great treat in the Lenten season. Easter Sunday was a great feastday, people in some cases, eating up to a dozen eggs at one meal.
Tea was not used to any great extent in the district, before fifty years ago. People were puzzled how to use it,
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:37
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awaiting decision
Sometimes using the leaves. They used pewter mugs for drinking purposes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:36
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awaiting decision
A sow when rearing bonhams, should be cared and well fed. The floor should be cemented and swept out every day, and a dry bed of straw put under them to keep them warm. When the bonhams are taken from the sow, they should be left out occasionally to pick up some food that would suit them.
If a cow calved early in the year she should be kept in and well fed and well bedded; combing with a curry comb now and then will help to keep her clean,
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:32
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awaiting decision
There are many forts in this locality. I know five of them, two are in Kylevalla, two in Killusty South and one in Killusty. Some time ago a local farmer trying to defy superstition said he would cut one of them himself. So he hired a poor labourer who knew nothing about forts or fairies, to cut it down. So the man did as he was told and the farmer paid him, thinking that nothing would happen himself, but he was mistaken, for when he got up neat morning he found all his hair on the pillow. From that day to this a bit of hair never grew on his head.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:24
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awaiting decision
About one hundred years ago, poor scholars used to stay in the houses around, Crehans of Knockellry, a townland near Fethard, and the people who wanted to get educated collected there. Even the famous C.J. Kickham often visited these places. In this way a lot of people got their education.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:21
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awaiting decision
There was a cooper living near the railway in Fethard, about three miles from here, who used to make baskets for all the farmers around. These baskets were used for picking potatoes in. He earned from six to eight shillings a week on baskets alone. He used to sell them at three pence a basket. He often made egg coops. This is how he got his name "Cooper Cummins".
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:18
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awaiting decision
Marriages usually take place between Christmas and Shrove Tuesday. A lot of people get married during that time. In olden times horses and cattle were given as a dowry, but now a days, it is seldom stock is given, but money instead. In olden times marriages were sometimes celebrated in the houses. Sometimes now when the couple come out of the chapel, they find an old boot tied on to the motor for luck. Wednesday is supposed to be the luckiest day to get married on.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:08
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awaiting decision
When a couple gets married, and are living in a different house from the parents of the bride, a "hauling -home" takes place about a month after the parties have been married.
Usually a party or dance is given to celebrate the "hauling - home".
About sixty years ago when people would be getting married, the bridegroom would ride to the chapel, and the bride would ride in a carriage, but when they were married the bride got up behind her husband on the horse, and then both went to the bride's home for breakfast.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:02
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awaiting decision
In olden days in Ireland the priests had to take to the hills, to escape the "Red Coats". The rocks on which the priest said mass were called "Mass Rocks".
At the presant day one can be seen about seven miles from here at Corriag-Mo-Cleip [?].
The people used to attend from all over the neighbourhood, while others would act as scouts, in case there would be an invasion of the "Red Coats".
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:58
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awaiting decision
In olden times when there were no roads, people always had a right of way through their neighbour's land. One can still be seen, starting in Clarebeg, running through Keane's and Purcell's land and joining the Cloneen road for Fethard. All the people from Cloran and Walshbog used this path as a short cut to Fethard Mass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:54
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awaiting decision
People in olden days used to cure warts with a snail, simply by rubbing the snail over the wart, then placing the snail on a bush to die, and by the time the snail would have died, the wart would have vanished. A cure for corns was to go out in the morning bare-foot and run around in the dew, for about ten minutes, and after a week the corns would be cured
For bleeding cuts the cure was to place a cobweb over the cut and it was supposed to stop the blood from coming.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:50
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awaiting decision
People in olden days had no food like we have now. For their breakfast they had oatenmeal bread and buttermilk. For dinner, potatoes, milk, salt, and sometimes red herrings, and for supper Indian meal porridge. This was the principal food the people of that day had. When the men would be working, often they lit a fire on the headland and roasted the stalks of the potatoes and ate them. From this kind of food they usually got a pain, and as there were no doctors here at that time many of the poor people died.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:42
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awaiting decision
There was a ballalley where the green now is. Many people used to play in that alley every day. There was also a football team in Shrule long ago and there was another in Kinlough. Every month the two teams would play
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 06:14
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awaiting decision
to him but the man did not answer. The man on the horse was the spirit of Major Kirwan. When he was at "The Chestnuts" he saw a little woman standing on the stump of an old tree combing her hair and Tom asked her what time it was and she said it was the time for the living to be in and the dead to be out.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 06:11
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Tom o Hara was once coming home one night very late from cutting wood in the Dalgan woods for Lord de Clifford. He had [?] to delay at the big house putting the timber into heaps. As he was coming home he heard the noise of hooves coming after him. He met a man on a white horse and he spoke
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 06:09
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awaiting decision
never grew and the man died without being hanged.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:26
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awaiting decision
Riddle me that and Ill give in. The judge said that would not do and that and that he was to be hanged. The man explained the riddle and this was it. The man was going into a churchyard and he saw a skull of a person and a birds nest in it. The mother bird flew out and four young ones remained and thats the meaning of the riddle. The judge said that he would give him and wish that he wanted. The man saw a small gooseberry bush near him and said he wanted to be hanged on that bush when it grew up. The judge granted his wish but the bush
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:29
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The cat scrapes his feet when it is going to rain. Under the water and over the water but never touches the water. The ass rises his tail when it is going to rain. A colour is seen on the fire when it is going to rain.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:27
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awaiting decision
There was once a man and his name was Turk and he lived in Shrule. He was very rich and he had a lot of stock and land. He had very bad luck during his life. He lost all his stock and money and the land was no good. He had two sons and when he died he left a curse on the mill and every night there are seen three lights two for his sons and one for himself.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:02
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awaiting decision
There was once a man and his son and they had a wild horse. They went to Confession once with the horse. The father stayed outside to mind the horse and the son went to the chapel. Went he began confession he said "Son and the Holy Ghost" and the priest asked him why he left out "The Father". He said he was out minding the horse. The father then went in and began Confession by saying Father Holy Ghost. The priest asked him why he left out "Son" and he said he was out minding the horse.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:57
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awaiting decision
There was once a giant in Dalgan and he used to live near the fourteen weavers. He used to ask the fourteen weavers to make a suit for him every years and if they refused he would kill them. Every year he would ask a weaver in turn to make a suit for him and he used to give them so long to make the suit. He had seven when himself was killed and the rest of the weavers were put out of their homes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:54
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awaiting decision
There was once a man and a priest talking to one another. The man did not believe in God. The man said he would believe in God if he would quench a candle by standing a few yards away. The priest stood at the door and he made the sign of the cross and he quenches the candle without a bit of trouble. He then made the sign of the cross again and it lit. The man then believed in God.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:29
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awaiting decision
There is a pot of gold hidden in the Shrule castle. It is said that one of the De Burca's hid the gold there in a cellar in the castle before he died. The people of Shrule once dug for this gold and when they came to did, it there was a big weasel on top of the gold. The people of Shrule say that this weasel was the person who hid the gold. They also say that if you shake holy water on him he will go.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:22
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awaiting decision
There are the ruins of a Monastery at the back of Mullin's garden. It is over two hundred years old. This can be proved because there is a tree growing on top of it. There is a big square hole in the ground about the size of three coffins. The hole itself is like a tomb.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:20
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awaiting decision
Once there were three houses where Myre Hill now stands. The people in these three houses were very rich. Once their crops failed and at the time they had to pay the rent and rates they were poor and they were not able to pay. Their houses fell in. There is a hill now where the houses were and these people are still going around from place to place. Their names were Myers.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:16
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awaiting decision
There was once a man named Mr Bleak in the time if De Burca and he owned the Galway house. De Burca took over the Galway house. De Burca took all the good places around Shrule. There used to be races in Shrule. There was a man named Kirwan in Dalgan. This man was very rich. Kirwan and De Burca met at the races. De Burca bet all his land and money that this certain horse would win. Kirwan won the bet and Kirwan grew better and better and ruled the land around Shrule.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:57
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awaiting decision
There was a candlemaker around Shrule. First of all he would put down a pot of tallow. He had wicks and he would dip the wicks into the tallow and it would freeze. There was an underground passage from the castle and to the churchyard and Cnoc na [?] . There is a lime kiln in another at Cnoc [?] .
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:53
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"at the bottom of the river". They told him to put them in the river and he did.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:50
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awaiting decision
legs passed the way. They followed the hare until the brother could not see them through the hole in the bag. Soon he saw a man with forty cattle coming the way. The man with the cattle asked what he was doing in the bag and he said that he would be going to Heavin in a bag. The man said that if he would let him into the bag he would give him the forty cattle. He got out of the bag and he put him in the river. The other sons were suprised to see the cattle and they asked him where he got them and he said
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:46
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and the cow to the second and the calf to the youngest son. The two elder sons were able to make a living but the calf was no good to the younger son so he decided to kill the calf. He then brought the skin to the fair to sell. As he was going along the wood he saw a magpie. He caught the magpie by chance. At the time magpies were very dear. He got 40 pound's for the magpie. He went home and he showed the money to his brothers and he said he got it for the skins. The other brothers killed the horse and the cow and they only got a few shillings. They came home and they put brother in a bag to be fired into the river when a hare with three
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:56
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awaiting decision
There was a metal worker in Shrule long ago. He used to go around Shrule gathering
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:56
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awaiting decision
east and west until he came to Boston town. He asked a man did he see his daughter and he said that he bought a girl off a man from Limerick town. The lord gave a big reward to the man and afterw- ards they married
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:46
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awaiting decision
There was once a lord from Galway and he married secondly. The lord himself was very rich and old and his wife was very young. His wife was very wicked and she would not give anything to the poor. The lord had a daughter. The daughter was very handsome and much like the wife that died. The father liked his daughter very much. The other wife did not like her at all. The wife clipped off her hair once and sent her off to Limerick town and sold her there. That night the bean side[?] came and haunted the wife. The Lord set out in search of his daughter. He sailed