Number of records in editorial history: 32
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
church there and left it there half-finished. The reason why they [strikethrough] left it was because they had arranged among themselves that if the first person should pass without saying "God bless the work" they would leave it and go to Clonmacnoise.
And they did leave it and went to Clonmacnoise and succeeded in their work there. At Leamanaghan there is also an old graveyard a few fields in front of the school at Leamanaghan I did not hear anything about it, such as old churches being build there.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were several churchyards in this parish. In Gallen there is a famous churchyard where St Canoc built his monastery. People use it still; a few years ago there were people digging there
And dug up a number of crosses. And they also found a ruin of an old church. About a quarter of a mile outside this parish there is an old graveyard.
This old graveyard is in the townland of Glebe. Only very young children are buried there now. It is on the land owned by Michael [?] There are no grown-up people buried there now only children who are not to the use of reason. The churchyard is on a sort of a hill, but the field in which the graveyard is situated is level and some trees grow near it.
The churches of Clonmacnoise was to be built at that old graveyard at first. The name of that graveyard is Mullahakilla. The people were digging [?] out a foundation of a
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They said it would bake more quickly. Some people do it at present.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Across the Creggan road there is a bridge which is called "Cage's Bridge". The reason why it got that name was because a landlord named Mr Cage was shot a few perches away from it.
The townland of Creggan itself is called after rocks because it was a whole mass of rocks at one time, but most of them are not to be seen at [?] present.
On our own lands in Creggan there is a ruin of an old house. A named Robin Ruas lived in it, the field in which the old house is situated is called Robin Ruas's field.
On the western side of the Creggan road about two miles north-west of Ferbane an old bush is growing. It is called the Beggar's Bush. There is no account of how it got that name.
On the side of the road to Creggan there is an old borreen which is used by Thomas Bennett. That old boreen is called the "Black Boreen". The reason why it got that name was [?] because it was always dark and muddy and closed in with [?] bushes.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night a few years ago Mr John Dockery was sleeping in a room in Corcoran's. He was not very long in bed when he heard fairies leaping and beating the wall. He said that he thought every bit of mortar on the wall would be torn to bits before he would rise in next morning.
When he did get up next morning he found that the walls had been the same way as they were when he was going to bed.
In our own pasture there is a ring on which the grass is never green and mushrooms grow all round the ring. It is said that gold is hidden in such places.
My grand father Patrick Devery was going to mass one when he saw eight fairies kicking football in Peter Kilmartins scrub.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 10:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago bread was made from oats which was grown locally because there was not much wheat grown then.
The oats was made in to oatmeal but it was not made into flour. The people do not remember any grindstones being used in the district but they often heard tell of them.
The three kinds of bread made were "Potato bread" "oaten meal bread" and "Rasp".
When making "Potato bread" the potatoes were boiled, and peeled. They were then bruised up into a "chomp" or mash and a pinch of pepper and salt was added, together with a handful of flour and a little bit of butter. Then all was mixed up together and wetted with new milk.
The mixture was shaped into a flat cake about two inches thick and then put in the griddle and cut into squares. Potato bread is
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 10:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 10:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The leipreachán is the name which is given locally to the little man who lives in woods and glens. He is about one and a half feet high. He wears a green trousers, a red coat and a hat to match with long red tassels. On his feet he wears long pointed shoes. His principal occupation is cobbling.
Here is a local story about the leipreachán:– Once upon a time there was a leipreachán living among the glens of this district. He had plenty of gold.
One evening just a the shades of night were darkening the landscape two men went for a walk. Looking up in an ash tree they beheld a leipreachán cobbling. They stole up and caught him. They implored him to give them gold but he told them that there was another little man behind him who had more gold than he.
When they turned to get some from him there was nothing to be seen.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 09:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At the back of our house there is a high hill. It is surrounded by hawthorn bushes which the old folk of the locality call "fairy bushes". In their midst a huge rock standing on the summit of the hill covers a vast amount of gold which was hidden by the fairies in bygone days. My grandfather told me that anyone who dreamt about the gold three times in succession and who might care to dig for it would get it.
One night a friend of my grandfather's dreamt that he got the gold. He hoped to dream so for two night's more and fortunately he did so. The fourth night he set out accompanied by a party of his relations
The took also with them the tools which they needed. When they reached the spot where the fairies resided they became silent for fear their voices would be heard.
They kept digging laboriously until sunrise next morning and by that time the rock was dragged out of its place.
Then strange voices were heard and the men who were digging said "stand by
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They believe a Mass used be said under that bush on a Saturday long ago.
Nobody kills a pig on Good Friday
Nobody threshes on St Martin's Day.
Long ago before soap was made men shaved with a boiled potato
They looked into a bucket of water as there were no mirrors.
Jack Groome of Sallybog told us this. He is 73 or 74 years old now (Nov. 38)
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said the people of Knockdrin never work a horse on Saturday after dinner. One or two families never do. Mr Collins never does, if he did something would happen the horse. If they tried it they say when they would come to a certain bush a bell would ring and the horse would stop still
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Groome Mulligans
Nolan Treacy
Moore Callan
Darby Healy
Kenny Kellaghan
Monaghan Gunning
Taylor
Glennon
Smith
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Family names in Garr
Groome Mulligans
Nolan Treacy
Moore Callan
Darby Healy
Kenny Kellaghan
Monaghan Gunning
Taylor
Glennon
Smith
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marriages take place more frequently before Lent. Very frequently marriages take place on Shrove Tuesday. There is an old rhyme which says -
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday best of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
Saturday no luck at all.
There are no briefs or customs connected about Shrove that I know. The made matches are few and far between in my district. Money is, often given to people as dowry. Stock and goods are very seldom given. The straw boys wear kind of straw-hats. Nearly like the wren boys with skirts and jumpers on them and lot of other things. Some straw boys visit the marriage houses. They
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are a few round stones on the top of it. There is no entrance into this fort. There is a hollow on the top of it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fairy Forts
There is a fort in the townland of Killina in the parish of Rahan in the Barony of Ballycowhan and in the County of Offaly. It is called "Bierds Hill", and I do not know how it got that name.
It is a big round mound of clay with trees growing on it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the other. The people never cut bushes in the forts because they say it is unlucky and they believe their animals will die.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the other. The people never cut bushes in the forts because they say it is unlucky and they believe their animals will die.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fairy Forts
There is a fairy fort in the townland of Tully in the parish of Rahan in the barony of Ballycowhan and in the county of Offaly. The fort is situated in the centre of a field and it is surrounded with bushes.
In the centre of the fort the ground is high and there are stones in it.
Some nights about twelve o clock a great fire is seen in it. It is said fairies come out and sit around the fire. They play music and dance around the fire for a long time. There is another fort in the same townland.
There is a passage under the ground leading from one fort
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 13:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The local forge
There are two forges in Edenderry that I know of and an old one that is closed now.
Names
The names of the smiths are Jim Burn and Mr Tyrrell and the man who owned the closed forge was English.
Situated
The forges were usually situated at a cross-road. Jim Burns and English'es were near a (forge) cross-roads.
The Roof
The roof is made of wood and stone, and the wood lets in the rain and wind.
The Fireplace
The fire is a big fire built up with bricks in the front and the black smith blows it with a bellows.
Forge Water
There is a belief about forge water. Some people say there is a cure or wards in it, and when they go to the forge they bring home a bottle of it with them, and they say if you rub it on the warts they will disappear in a few days.
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 13:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bread.
Bread was made from wheat and oats grown in the district.
Flour mills.
There was a mill on a stream up mill Mount Lane about a mile from Edenderry.
There was another one on the Boyne near Glonkeen and it was owned by a Mr. James Yitzsimons. And there was another at the Garrick Road Gorner
Querns.
Querns or grindstones were used in this district long ago.
Bastables.
Bastables were sort of pots scooped out of stone and used for boiling or baking
Boxty.
Boxty was a bread made from grated potatoes and strained through a cloth, and fried on a griddle with some flour. In this district it was called rasp bread.
Special Bread.
This was made of oaten or wheaten meal with currants and honey and butter mixed with milk
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 13:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Festival customs
On festival days they had beef, mutton, a lamb, a kid or some rabbits. And on Easter Sunday they had eggs.
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 12:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Food In Olden times
Meals
They had three meals a day in olden times, breakfast, dinner, and supper.
What meals consisted of.
The meals consisted of, at breakfast, porridge made of oaten or wheaten meal and milk and homemade butter, and the poorer people had hot water and a spoonful of sugar on it and the richer people had rashers of bacon.
For dinner they had porridge or potatoes or turnips, and they made broth out of nettles and added oaten meal to it.
Table
The table was either in the middle of the floor or hanging from the wall.
Bread
The bread was made of oaten, wheaten, or Indian meal, and it was baked on a griddle. They made boxty from potatoes and they also made rasp loaves from them
senior member (history)
2019-05-12 12:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Family names in Garr
Groome Mulligans
Nolan Treacy
Moore Callan
Darby Healy
Kenny Kellaghan
Monaghan Gunning
Taylor
Glennon
Smith
Old Remarks.
It is said the people of Knockdrin never work a horse on Saturday after dinner. One or two families never do. Mr Collins never does, if he did something would happen the horse. If they tried it they say when they would come to a certain bush a bell would ring and the horse would stop still
senior member (history)
2019-05-12 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They believe a Mass used be said under that bush on a Saturday long ago.
Nobody kills a pig on Good Friday
Nobody threshes on St Martin's Day
Long ago before soap was made men shaved with a boiled potato
They looked into a bucket of water as there were no mirrors.
Jack Groome of Sallybog told us this. He is 73 or 74 years old now (Nov. 38)
senior member (history)
2019-05-12 12:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Family names in Garr
Groome Mulligans
Nolan Treacy
Moore Callan
Darby Healy
Kenny Kellaghan
Monaghan Gunning
Taylor
Glennon
Smith
Old Remanrks.
it is said the people of Knockdrin never work a horse on Saturday after dinner. One or two families never do. Mr Collins never does, if he did something would happen the horse. If they tried it they say when they would come to a certain bush a bell would ring and the horse would stop still
senior member (history)
2019-05-12 12:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
clothes with it.
Mrs Monahan Robertstown Castlejordan Edenderry makes this ointment.
Green-Ointment (cure for Erysipelas).
Ingredients: Stinking Roger
Ground ivy
Primrose leaf
Our Saviours Rib
Little daisy root
Briar leaf
Elder leaf
Plantain leaf
Rib grass
Lard or unsalted Butter
Boil all together over-night
Ointment for Burn.
Ingredients: Briar leaf
Primrose leaf
Rib grass
Plantain leaf
Little daisy root
Unsalted butter or lard, Bee's wax and suet
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 13:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The most harmful weeds are – docks, chicken-weed, praiseac, which grows in oats & wheat; thistles; cockles – with a thorny head which fastens itself of one's clothes, black-heads, & "[?]" or tall yellow weeds, & "red soldiers" or wild poppies which grow in cairn.
They are harmful both, because they spread rapidly & because they impoverish the soil.
Buttercups & clover grow where land is rich, and daisies where land is poor.
The Dandelion and Yarrow boiled together and made into a drink is a cure for the yellow jaundice.
Long ago they used to boil the heath and dye the
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 12:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dead – Murt Kavanagh. There are plenty of cobblers here. The cobbling or shoe making did not run in the family of each cobbler they only learned the trade. Long ago there was a tannery here they used get the skin of cows and get it tanned and made into leather in the tannery and give the leather to a shoemaker to make shoes and boots. People used to wear clogs long ago. There is an old proverb that March borrows three days days from April – one to skin the old cow, second to wake her, third to bury her. They are called the "three borrowed days."
Nancy Kavanagh
(from John Groome of Sally bog, who is 73 now (1938)
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some people did not wear boots until they were twenty years old. Some were forty, others were sixty, others never wore any at all. There was a girl living round here a good while ago, who never wore boots. Her name was Lizzie Smith. It is not more than fifteen years ago since she was living. Some children go barefoot now but only in the summer. The tinkers wear no boots winter or summer, but they would if they had them.
If you wash your feet on All Souls night you are not to throw out the water, because you are supposed to drown all the souls who are as thick as blades of grass.
When our boots get broken we can get them repaired by a cobbler. There was a shoe maker in our district, but he is
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 12:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hedge school
There was a hedge school at the bog boreen. Willie Kiernan was the name of the teacher. They learned in houses with mud walls, and thatched roof. Every child that could afford it brought three pence a week, and in winter a sod of turf for the fire. There were no blackboards. They sat on forms and they used a cane too.
Information from Matthew Moore
Garr aged 86 (in 1938)
The bog boreen is situated between the graveyard and Nolan's gate and leads off the main toad on to the bog.
Another old resident Peter Groome (76) agrees with this account of the hedge-school.