Number of records in editorial history: 273
senior member (history)
2019-11-16 13:18
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he was compelled to leave his house and land, otherwise he would be shot. One day Murty was going to gather stones to build himself a house, but luckily enough he found a big stone up near the mountain, and so he said it would make a nice house for himself. He made a pathway into it and lived in his little house until he grew old, then he went and lived with his brother. Where the stone was now bears the name of Murty Clough.
Long ago there was a certain piece of land in New Quay always occupied by rabbits, this village now bears the name of Ballycunneen.
Stormy Hall is so called because it is subject to gales and storms. No matter how the wind blows it is always cold. There is a special spot in Flaggy Shore where there once was a quay. When the new quay was built it got the name of Old Quay.
There was an Irish
senior member (history)
2019-11-16 13:13
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priests were forbidden to read Mass and they were compelled to go to Connacht Clare or hell. Five or six monks were caught near the abbey reading pious books and worshipping God. Soldiers came, they gave two books to each of the soldiers order to let them free. They let them free and said if they caught them again they would burn them. The five monks went together, gathered the reckage (sic) for five days and set to work building a hut. They built the hut in a small patch of ground which was no occupied by nobody. They built the hot or little church. The place where it was built is now called Cillen. It is a burial ground at present.
Long ago it was said there lived in New Quay a man called Murty. Murray was very poor and was often evicted. He had for his possessions one acre of land. He always knew when the bailiffs were coming so
senior member (history)
2019-10-06 11:16
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he wanted cigarettes he asked his mother for them, but she always refused him and said "Where will the money be got"? The boy did without the cigarettes. One night the boy was splaying cards in a neighbouring house, and as he was coming home about eleven o clock he passed an old fort. He saw a great deal of small folk sitting around the fort and his mother in the middle. He ran home as fast a lightning and his mother was there before him and her hair was really white not as it was before. Three weeks afterwards his mother died and the people who waked her said they saw the window open by itself and they heard some queer noise going out through it. She was buried the next day and the people who brought out the coffin said it looked as if it was empty.
Long ago when the Penal laws were in Ireland
senior member (history)
2019-10-06 11:11
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Once upon a time two Protestant men were conversing about hell. "Indeed" said one man "Nothing is ever found in hell but the worsed". "Faith" said the other man "I hope there is bad turf there".
Long ago it was said the mermaid was often seen combing her hair on a certain rock near Flaggy Shore. One day a man from New Quay went driving cows, and as he was coming near Flaggy Shore he saw the beautiful maiden sitting on a rock and as he drew close to her she said "Who goes there"? the man said "Its I". "Who are you"? quoth the mermaid. The man was spellbound and did not answer. She vanished in a moment.
About fifteen years ago it was supposed that a certain women from Fraoc above Bellharbour had something to do with the fires. This women had a son. He laboured very hard to earn his living and to support his father and mother. When
senior member (history)
2019-10-06 11:04
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green road, there he rested.
Long ago when Minor Skerrett was the landlord of Burrin, there were certain pieces of land around Finavarra to be divided. The tenants each got an equal portion of the land. When the time came to pay the rent a certain poor man rebelled and said he could not afford to pay, and whether he was able or not he wouldn't, because apples were always left instead of the potatoes he had grown. The moonier put two of coachmen watching and they crept beside the wall. Suddenly a whistle was blown and a race was ran. An old man who was dead for years stood before them and said "Go over to that yellow horse you see winning, touch that line you see across the field and say "While a pound is paper". The man said these words and scarcely had they the words said when everything vanished. The man paid the rent and apples were never left instead of potatoes again.
senior member (history)
2019-09-19 15:30
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the subject of a very sarcastic rhyme called the "Spotting List" and also some year ago the youngsters of the town would take pieces of reposed all of a sudden they would come around the corner and drag them along much to the amusement of the onlooker. The poor victors got too smart and used to take out a pen knife and cut the rope that was the end of taking them to Skelligs.
Long ago there was a marriage in North Kerry, where two locals got married. Between "Soppers" and all the night was very gay. In the middle of all this excitement one of the very gayest women who was at the party gave birth to a child and with the excitement of all this the old woman who was housekeeping was very nervous and died with fright. Before morning all who were in the house were dancing singing snuffing drinking and crying and roaring all because they had a wedding, a birth and a wake together in one house and all in one night.
senior member (history)
2019-09-19 15:23
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present they dress in all imaginable things.
There is generally a Captain - a fellow with a hard neck and a lot of gab. When they enter the wedding house the Captain calls for the bride and dances with her in the place of honur (sic) (the flag of the hearth) generally. They sing a few songs, dance a single step, drink all the stout they can and if at all possible a few lumps of good fat bacon so as to give them a good thirst. There are six or seven batches of soppers all different districts and one batch will stay out-side until the other batch is done. God half help the wedding that does not treat the soppers decent - if any loose gates, or traces of cars, or or tackling are around they are hidden and the people of the house have to look for them.
In olden times the sixth of January was called "Spotting Day". All the young people of the parish would come to town then. Any old mold who would not marry would be made
senior member (history)
2019-09-19 15:14
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In the country when a person get married during Shrove a dance is generally held at the brides house. Then ten or twelve from the district gather together. They dress themselves in different costumes. Some dress in women's clothes and others like wren-boys Some of play banjoys banjo's and tamborines When they arrive at the bride's house they dance for about an hour and then they are suplied with refreshments. Then they sing a few songs and then return to their homes. These boys are called soppers.
Soppers so called because in olden days they used to wear a dress of straw. At the
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:24
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The reason why it is called the Clonmel road is because it leads to Clonmel. The road from Cloneen to Fethard is not so old. It was made the year of the famine 1847.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:23
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The road which leads from Cloneen to the foot of Slievenamon is called the mountain road because it runs along the foot of the mountain. It is not tarred because it is not very important. It is a very old road. About one mile from Cloneen there is a bridge crossing the river Anner. It is called Melbourne bridge. The bridge which spans the clodac at Peafield was put up bout 65 years ago. Before the bridge was made they used large stones called stepping stones. There is a mass path from Tubber to Cloneen. The owners of the land which the path is on couldn't stop anyone from going on this path. When you are going from Tubber to Cloneen you cross over the Anner by means of a stick or plank. The Clonmel road is the oldest road from Cloneen.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:18
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asses, making gates, and mending and making all kinds of farm implements. He has many different kinds of tools such as a hammer, and knives and pincers, and rasp, and nails and an anvil for working on.
It is said that the forge water would cure chilblans (sic), and corns and warts and sore legs, and sore hands, but it must be taken while the Smyth (sic) is not there.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:16
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There are two forges in Cloneen. One of them is a disused forge and the other is a newly made forge. It is the property of Ned Gleeson. It is situated a few hundred (sic) yards from the village on the Clonmel road. Ot is roofed with timber and covered with felt. There is one fire place in it and the coal is kept lighting with a big bellows which is worked with the hand. The smith does all his work in the forge, such as shoeing horses, and
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:28
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for about 1 1/2 years. He returned then owing to not agreeing with his authorities. His successor was was (sic) Mr Fleming he taught for 10 years. His successor was Mr O'Brien, he taught for 16 years. His successor was Mr O'Donnell.
There were no black-boards at this time. They had only slates which were selected from slig quarries. The pencil they used was of slig also.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:25
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The Misses Dwyer taught school on the old road near Kylenagranna Hill, which is about one mile north east of Cloneen. They taught in an old barn. They occupied a portion of land in Kylenagranna. About one mile as the crow flies to Preston another man taught called Mr. Quirke. He was such an excellent teacher that the boys who went to the Dwyers came to him when they got big. In vicinity of Drangan a man called Mr Cusack taught, father of the famous Michael Cusack. He had no settled place of teaching. He went from place to place teaching the children. A man called Mr Brennan taught at Ballyvadlea.
When National Schools were first established he was appointed teacher of Cloneen N.S. He continued teaching
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:17
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Long ago the people used to make tents on Sundays after mass. Near the chapel they used to make them. The buyers used to exchange goods, as they used not have much money. More people used to give a day's or a couple of days work for goods received. They used to hols bonham and pig markets and fairs at the cross of Bellharbour.
People do not like to buy or sell on a Sunday. Once upon a time a man bought a pig of a Sunday. The pig dies he was half way home. He asked Biddy Early why did the pig die. She said it was because he bought him on the Sabbath. From that on he never bought any thing on the Sabbath.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:12
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Long ago the people used to have bad houses. There used to be very crooked walls in them. They used never use a line but every mason should get one of his eyes out for he could see straight with his two eyes.
There were no slates then the houses were thatched with straw or rushes. The rushes were cut in the lakes with an old reaping hook.
The fire used to be in the corner of the house. There used to be no chimney but a hole in the thatch and an old bucket without a bottom stuck down in it. There used to be a hole in the wall for a window. The houses used to be very dark inside and they were also very unhealthy.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:11
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awaiting decision
Long ago the people used to have bad houses. There used to be very crooked walls in them. They used never use a line but every mason should get one of his eyes out for he could see straight with his two eyes.
There were no slates then the houses were thatched with straw or rushes. The rushes were cut in the lakes with an old reaping hook.
The fire used to be in the corner of the house.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:08
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There used to be a lot of houses around here long ago that are not in it now. There were sixteen above our house and there are only the ruins in it now. All the houses long ago were thatched. Some of them were thatched with "fraoch", others with sedge out of lakes and more with straw. The fire used to be at the side of the wall. Some of the houses used to have chimneys and some used not. Out the door the smoke used to come in the houses without chimneys. The majority of the houses used to have no windows. The beds used to be in the kitchen. Some people used to have a screen going across the kitchen and the beds inside it. All the houses nearby had only one room. The houses were very unhealthy those times and the people used to have very bad sight on account of the smoke.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:02
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Long ago the houses were a lot different to the houses now a days. They had no doors only a hole in the wall and a bush to keep out the fowl. They had no windows only holes to let in the air. They had no chimneys either only a hole in the roof and an old bucket turned upside down to draw the smoke. They had only hard clay floors. They used to thatch the houses with rushes. Long ago there was only the one room in the house. The beds used to be near the fire. They used to have lights in the nights called páideógs. A páideóg is a piece of cloth dipped in lard. They used faggot and heath for their fires.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 13:59
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In the old days people used to build their house in a hollow of shelter. They used to build them very small one room and a kitchen and they used to thatch them with straw as there were no slates in those days. They used to have no chimney or no windows in them. They used to have a bed in the kitchen and they also used to have a hens coop in it and the hens sleeping in it. The people long ago had very hard times. They used to build the the (sic) three foot wide without any mortar or cement.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 00:43
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During the time of the famine in Ireland, many people used to take cows from each other during the night. A man from Eyeries travelled from place to place and he used to take cattle and sell them at a very low price. One night he was passing a bridge and he saw a person sitting on a stone in the river. He held a large stick in his hand. The man asked him what was he doing in the river. The other answered and said that he was suffering purgatory in that place. He told the man who used to steal the cows that when himself lived in this earth he used to steal the animals also, and when he used to be passing the bridge he often sat in that stone. He also told him that he would have to remain there until white buds would grow on the stick and the ghost disappeared. This man never took cows after that. The bridge where the river is flowing is now called "Droicead na Gadhaidhe".
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 00:37
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The houses they had long ago were a lot different from the houses they have now. The walls of the old houses used to be made of stone sometimes and more times of clay. They used to have roofs made of sticks as rafters and sods of grass over that. There used to be a hole in the roof as a chimney. They used to have a bed in the kitchen called the "leabaidh bog" (?). The man and women of the house used to sleep in that bed. There used to be one door leading in to the house and they used to have pieces of cotton as doors leading into the rooms.The door used to be closed outside with a chain. Inside there used to be one hole in the wall on each side of the door and a stick stuck in in them, so as the door could not be shoved in.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 00:36
approved
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awaiting decision
The houses they had long ago were a lot different from the houses they have now. The walls of the old houses used to be made of stone sometimes and more times of clay. They used to have roofs made of sticks as rafters and sods of grass over that. There used to be a hole in the roof as a chimney. They used to have a bed in the kitchen called the "leabaidh bog" (?). The man and women of the house used to sleep in that bed. There used to be one door leading in to the house and they used to have pieces of cotton as doors leading into the rooms.The door used to be closed outside with a chain. Inside there used to be one hole in the wall on each side of the door and a stick stuck in in them, so as the door could not be shoved in.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 10:19
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which means:-
"Domnal Seal's head owned this sword"
We find that Greenmount was used in 1641 as a camp for Irish forces, and again during the Williamite wars as a camp for part of James' army.
Knights Templars and Hospitliers preceptory
5th April 1938
Canon J B. Leslie M.A.
Kilsaran
CB. Ham
Co. Louth
From various documents of state
There was a preceptory of the Knights Templars in Kilsaran. It was founded by Matilda De Lacy in the 12th Century. The ruins are marked on map of Kilsaran Farm property of Mrs
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 10:12
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In olden times shops were not as plentiful as they are now in country places. Some people used to have shops on a very small scale. No one would know from the outside that there was a shop within as there would be no goods displayed in the windows. It would be no use having a large shop then as the people would not buy as plentiful as they do now. Very little tea or sugar was then used in some homes only at Christmas. My mother told me she hears a very old woman to say that when she was young that the tea that would be left after Xmas would be put to keep until Xmas come again.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 10:10
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In olden times shops were not as plentiful as they are now in country places. Some people used to have shops on a very small scale. No one would know from the outside that there was a shop within as there would be no goods displayed in the windows. It would be no use having a large shop then as they do now. Very little tea or sugar was then used in some homes only at Christmas. My mother told me she hears a very old woman to say that when she was young that the tea that would be left after Xmas would be put to keep until Xmas came again.
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 13:20
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Bhí fear na cómnuidhe ins an áit seo fadó. Gach oidhche raghfadh sé go dtí tig puiblí chun uisce beatha d'fhághail . Aon oidhche amháin bhí boidéal uisce beatha ina phóca. Thuit sé ina chodladh cois teine. Thuit an boidéal amach agus briseadh é. Bhí trí poill beaga ins an úrláir agus do rith an uisce beatha isteach ann. Bhí an fear 'na chodhladh. Tháinig luch amach agus d'ól sé an chéad pholl uisce. Annsan chuaidh sé isteach agus taréis tamall tháinig sé amach agus d'ól sé an dara poll uisce beatha. Chuaidh sé isteach arís agus taréis cúpla neomat tháinig sé amach agus d'ól sé an tríomhadh poll d'uisce beatha. Annsan do sheas sé ina a dhá chois agus dúbhair sé. "Cá bhfuil an cat gur tug íarracht ar mise do marbhú aréir."
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 13:17
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Sa mblían 1847 bhí fear tréan-láidir timcheall na h-áite seo. Níl fios agam cad é an ainm ceart a bhí air, acht "breek" a tugtaí air mar leas-ainm. Sa bhlían sin, bhí na daoine go léir ag fághail báis in Éirinn leis an ocras. Pé sgéil é, tháinig an fear bocht seo go dtí tig éigin cun an féar do bhaint. B'é sin an slíghe beatha a bhí aige. Núair tháinig sé go moch ar maidin, ní raibh aon rud le n-ithe ag bean a tíghe dó, agus b'éigean do dul amach sa pháirc, agus an obair do thosnú gan aon breacfást.
I gceann tamall maith do ghlaoidh bean a thíghe air chun an bhreacfáise. An biadh seo a bhí le neithe san am san Deiridís císte crúaidh de phlúir dhuibh agus de saghas mine a bhí ann. Ní raibh aon té aige le n-ól ach uisge. Núair d'ith sé a bhreacfást, chúaidh sé amach sa pháirc, agus níor stad sé go dtí go raibh dhá acra dhon féar bainte aige. Ní raibh aon leabaidh aige chun codladh, acht amuigh i seómra éigin gan aon dínn tíghe. Taréis aimsir na dhiaidh sin, fúair an fear sin bás leis an ocras.
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 13:16
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awaiting decision
Sa mblían 1847 bhí fear tréan-láidir timcheall na h-áite seo. Níl fios agam cad é an ainm ceart a bhí air, acht "breek" a tugtaí air mar leas-ainm. Sa bhlían sin, bhí na daoine go léir ag fághail báis in Éirinn leis an ocras. Pé sgéil é, tháinig an fear bocht seo go dtí tig éigin cun an féar do bhaint. B'é sin an slíghe beatha a bhí aige. Núair tháinig sé go moch ar maidin, ní raibh aon rud le n-ithe ag bean a tíghe dó, agus b'éigean do dul amach sa pháirc, agus an obair do thosnú gan aon breacfást.
I gceann tamall maith do ghlaoidh bean a thíghe air chun an bhreacfáise. An biadh seo a bhí le neithe san am san Deiridís císte crúaidh de phlúir dhuibh agus de saghas mine a bhí ann. Ní raibh aon té aige le n-ól ach uisge. Núair d'ith sé a bhreacfást, chúaidh sé amach sa pháirc, agus níor stad sé go dtí go raibh dhá acra dhon féar bainte aige. Ní raibh aon leabaidh aige chun codladh, acht amuigh i seómra éigin gan aon dínn tíghe. Taréis aimsir na dhiaidh sin, fúair an fear sin bás leis an ocras.
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 13:11
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Long ago the people used to make tents on Sundays after mass. Near the chapel they used to make them. The buyers used to exchange goods, as they used not have much money. More people used to give a day's or a couple of days work for goods received. They used to hols bonham and pig markets and fairs at the cross of Bellharbour.
People do not like to buy or sell on a Sunday. Once upon a time a man bought a pig of a Sunday. The pig dies he was half way home. He asked Biddy Early why did the pig die. She said it was because he bought him on the Sabbath. From that on he never bought any thing on the Sabbath.
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 16:43
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The people used not be very rich long ago. They used to swop a lot those times. The rich people used to give tea and sugar and other things in payments for a days work.
Sometimes travellers who used to be selling along the roads used to stand near where there would be a meeting and the people used to buy all their goods from them.
It is said that on one occasion near a chapel in Dooras a women set up a tent on a Saturday evening to be selling on Sunday. During the night a tinker passed and went into the tent. When the woman came with the things for selling she found the tinker snoring. She was afraid to waken him so she had to go home again without selling anything. She said she would only make all the tinker had in his pocket, and he had only 3d.
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 16:40
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The people used not be very rich long ago. They used to swop a lot those times. The rich people used to give tea and sugar and other things in payments for a days work.
Sometimes travellers who used to be selling along the roads used to stand near where there would be a meeting and the people used to buy all their goods from them.
It is said that on one occasion near a chapel in Dooras a women set up a tent on a Saturday evening to be selling on Sunday. During the night a tinker passed and went into the tent. When the woman came with the things for selling she found the tinker snoring. She was afraid to waken him so she had to go home again without selling anything. She said she would only make all the tinker had in his pocket, and he had only 3d.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 09:14
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Shops were very scarce long ago. Shops were not much needed as the people had no money to buy anything. No goods were shown to tell whether it was a shop or not. The people used to make their own bread and used yo make their clothes. They wore no boots at all. The fairly rich people used to have boots but rich people were not very plentiful then. They shops were very small and they didn't keep much goods as the shopkeepers could not get enough of people to buy their goods. When the poor people worked for landlords they got a small amount of tea and sugar for their work. Some of the landlords would give no payment at all.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 09:13
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Shops were very scarce long ago. Shops were not much needed as the people had no money to buy anything. No goods were shown to tell whether it was a shop or not. The people used to make their own bread and used yo make their clothes. They wore no boots at all. The fairly rich people used to have boots but rich people were not very plentiful then. They shops were very small and they didn't keep much goods as the shopkeepers could not get enough of people to buy their goods.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 23:31
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There are not much crosses around here now. There used to be a lot of crosses in it before but people broke them. There is one above our house in the mountain. It is in a stripe called a "fideán". The place is called Fideán na Croise. Nobody knows what it is meant for.
There is another queer stone with markings on it in another mountain in a place called Carron a couple of miles from this. There is another in a place called Aughavanane. They are the same kind. There is one straight line going down trough (sic) the stone and some smaller ones branching away from it. There was another cross near our house where a king named Mana was buried but some people from Connemara who were passing it and they broke it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 11:15
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There are not many old signs around here. Some of the signs are very big. They were made by the people of olden days. There is a stone near Gortbeehen lake and it weighs about 40 tons. It is said that it was lifted off the ground by three giants and set upon three stones. It can be seen to day in the same posotion (sic). In the same place there are several other stones supposed to be split in two by a giants sword. There are many cahers around here supposed to be stores for stolen goods for men called the Terries (?). On one occassion (sic) a woman was dressing two small children, she had two in her mouth and she never felt until the Terries came in. She got such a fright that she swallowed the pins.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 11:12
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awaiting decision
There are not many old signs around here. Some of the signs are very big. They were made by the people of olden days. There is a stone near Gortbeehen lake and it weighs about 40 tons. It is said that it was lifted off the ground by three giants and set upon three stones. It can be seen to day in the same posotion (sic). In the same place there are several other stones supposed to be split in two by a giants sword. There are many cares around here supposed to be stores for stolen goods for men called the Ferries. On one occassion (sic) a woman was dressing two small children, she had two in her mouth and she never felt until the Ferries came in. She got such a fright that she swallowed the pins.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:05
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There are two heaps of stones in this parish called cairns. One of them is in a place called Mountcarron and the other one is on the Turlough Mountain. They are there in the memory of two old women, one of them was living in the Mountain of Turlough and the other one was living in Mountcarron. One day one of them was smoking and the other one asked a smoke of her and she would not give it to her. Then they started pelting stones at one another until they had thousands of tons of stones pelted which formed those two heaps. They are there still in memory of them.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 18:08
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There are not many relics in this place.There is one beyond at the seven churches in Geata Buidhe. It is an old cement stone and Colman written in Ogham on it. It is supposed to be put there by St. Colman. A person went digging for it once and a big cat jumped out and roared "Go! from my masters property Colmans". There is some kind of a valuable stone in it.There is another one at the abbey under the grave of a King of Burren but I do not know what kind it is.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 18:07
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awaiting decision
There are not many relics in this place.There is one beyond at the seven churches in Geata Buidhe. It is an old cement stone and Colman written in Ogham on it. It is supposed to be put there by St. Colman. A person went digging for it once and a big cat jumped out and roared "Go from my masters property Colmans". There is some kind of a valuable stone in it.There is another one at the abbey under the grave of a King of Burren but I do not know what kind it is.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 23:07
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pleading, Kevin lad, Heroes of old and martyrs of today.
How do wonder, boy, that our hearers are glad.
Author: Rev. D. A. Casey.
Kevin Barry was a young (sic) of 18 years of age from whom the tans thought to get information in the year 1916. But he preferred death rather than spy on his comrades.
So this was written in honour of him.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 23:03
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1.
Bitter the death they gave you soldier lad, you of the boyish heart and fair blue eyes. Hanged like a dog! Gods mercy it would be sad. Did we not know you lived beyond the skies. There nigh the Throne of Christ who died to save. There shall you plead for the land that claimed your love. Silent you sleep in your own lovely grave. Many shall plead with in (sic) the realms above.
2.
Mary, beloved Queen of this land of faith, Patrick who taught the truths for which you died. Calum who went into exile worst than death - every saints (sic) of Eireann stand by your side. See through the courts of heaven what an array. Munster to second your
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 23:00
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I.
Bitter the death they gave you soldier lad, you of the boyish heart and fair blue eyes. Hanged like a dog! Gods mercy it would be sad. Did we not know you lived beyond the skies. There nigh the Throne of Christ who died to save. There shall you plead for the land that claimed your love. Silent you sleep in your own lovely grave. Many shall plead with in (sic) the realms above.
II.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 15:43
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Long ago, when people were poor and there was no flour for it was very dear and scarce the bread they used to have was called Stampy or Boxty bread. It was made like this first they used to make a scraper or grater with a piece of tin holed with an awl.
Then they would wash potatoes and scrape them with the scraper.
Next they were squeezed through a piece of muslin. Out of that juice starch was made.
The potatoes were put into a basin and made into a cake with a grain of flour a pinch of salt and no soda.
It was then baked on a griddle and when eaten hot with plenty butter it was very nice.
Then there were potato cakes made of nice, good floury potatoes, a little flour, salt and made with new milk.
It was also baked on a griddle and like the stamp when eaten hot with lots of butter it is lovely.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 17:11
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Many stories are told in the long winter nights. It is about a man named Gobán Saor. On one occasion a king wanted to have the finest castle in the world so he got Gobán Saor to build it for him. Gobán went and had it nearly built when he found that he was going to be killed when the castle was finished. He said he couldn't finish the castle unless he had a certain instrument so the king sent his son for it. When he came he said he wanted a Turn against a turn and a turn against a turn. The son's wife said it was below in the bottom of a box. The king's son bent down looking in the box for the instrument and she shoved him into a big long bog and kept him there until the Gobán was let home again. The castle was never finished.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 17:04
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Some time ago people used to make bread out of barley. They used not buy any flour those times. They had grinding stones and ground the corn themselves. The grinding stones were called querns. Every old house has a quern now. They don't use them now because the mills are much quicker. On some occasions the people used to make bread out of potatoes. The bread which the barley makes is black. They used to bake it on griddles. The griddles used to be standing on brand irons. They used to put a cross on top of the cakes. It is said that the cross used to make it bigger and the crust wouldn't split when it was crossed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 17:04
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Some time ago people used to make bread out of barley. They used not buying flour those times. They had a grinding stone and ground the corn themselves. The grinding stones were called querns. Every old house has a quern now. They don't use them now because the mills are much quicker. On some occasions the people used to make bread out of potatoes. The bread which the barley makes is black. They used to bake it on griddles. The griddles used to be standing on brand irons. They used to put a cross on top of the cakes. It is said that the cross used to make it bigger and the crust wouldn't split when it was crossed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 22:54
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The people of long ago used to make bread alot differently to the people now a days. The (sic) used to grind the wheat with querns. First they put the wheat down in an oven to harden and it came out very white when ground. They baked the bread on a gridle (sic). They used to also make potato cakes and Indian meal cakes. When the cake was made they put a cross in it as a sign of good luck. They used also to put wheat in an oven with sugar and roast it for about and (sic) hour. It had to be stirred very often before it was ready to eat. Some of the poor people used to bake this bread on a flat stone and heat it over the fire before they put the cake down to bake.
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 10:53
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The poor people in olden times had not much choice in bread. Having a bad government more inclined to starve than to relieve them, they were not able to buy flour and they used to make bread of potatoes. Boxty they used to call him. They used to scrape the raw potatoes and work them together and bake it. It should be eaten when hot. They used always to grind their corn with two flat stones called quarns (sic). After working hard all days on the land, they had to grind the corn at nigh (sic) and make and bake the bread for the next day.
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 10:52
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The poor people in olden times had not much choice in bread. Having a bad government more inclined to starve than to relieve them, they were not able to buy flour and they used to make bread of potatoes. Boxty they used to call him. They used to scrape the raw potatoes and work them together and bake it. It should be eaten when hot. They used always to grind their corn with two flat stones called quarns (sic). After working hard all day on the land, they had to grind the corn at night and make and bake the bread for the next day.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 22:25
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Told to me by my grandfather
John Kerin
Dooneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Aged 89 years.
The houses in this parish long ago were made very quer (sic) and funny. There were no such thing as slates. It is how the houses used to be thatched with straw and rushes and kept tight by scallops from one end of the house to the other.
On the top of the house was a hole down (?) the roof and a piece of a bucket or a jam crock for the chimney. There was only one door and one window in the houses. The windows which were made very funny were made very small. It is how the glass (udes) used to be sunk in the morter (sic) and a little piece of a stick inside to keep it closed. It used to be very dark inside in the houses long ago because they used to have no light only the light of the door. Inside the door there used to be two sticks out in the wall and one across where all the hens used to sleep at night time. The people used to sleep in long beds called campbeds.
Chris Droney 25th Nov 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 22:24
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Told to me by my grandfather
John Kerin
Dooneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Aged 89 years.
The houses in this parish long ago were made very quer (sic) and funny. There were no such thing as slates. It is how the houses used to be thatched with straw and rushes and kept tight by scallops(?) from one end of the house to the other.
On the top of the house was a hole down (?) the roof and a piece of a bucket or a jam crock for the chimney. There was only one door and one window in the houses. The windows which were made very funny were made very small. It is how the glass (udes) used to be sunk in the morter (sic) and a little piece of a stick inside to keep it closed. It used to be very dark inside in the houses long ago because they used to have no light only the light of the door. Inside the door there used to be two sticks out in the wall and one across where all the hens used to sleep at night time. The people used to sleep in long beds called campbeds.
Chris Droney 25th Nov 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 22:20
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There were a lot of wicked giants long ago in Ireland. There was a very wicked one called Blue-Beard. He was enchanted and used to turn himself into an animal. He used to make a big bull of himself and used to go into peoples places. When the people would go to drive him away with a stick, the stick would tic (sic) to him and their hand tic (sic) to the stick and he would run away with them to his Castle and kill them. One day he brought a nice young girl she had two brothers Officers in the army. They followed him to his castle and arrived there just as he was going to kill their sister. They struck off his head with the swords and had his castle and all his wealth.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 22:17
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There were a lot of wicked giants long ago in Ireland. There was a very wicked one called Blue-Beard. he was enchanted and used to turn himself into an animal. he used to make a big bull of himself and used to go into peoples places. When the people would go to drive him away with a stick, the stick would tic (sic) to him and their hand tic to the stick and he would run away with them to his Castle and kill them. One day he brought a nice young girl she had two brothers Officers in the army.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 22:11
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In walking through Galway in the borders of Clare,
South west of Kinvara where houses are rare,
God who always was had directed my way
And put into my mind to go to those who are gay.
The house that I entered where John Purcell doth dwell
It was there I found kindness from a charming young (belle?)
She is the pride of her parents the truth I doth tell
She is every way decent and always well cared.
These verses were written by an old poet named Matt Mahon, a native of Duras, Kinvara. He was a very poor man and used to go around the country begging. One day he went into Miss Purcell's home. She was very agreeable to him and gave him money and food. Then he wrote these verses in gratitude. An other verse in the poem is as follows
There is an A with an N and an N with an A
Just what I have heard from her own dear Mama
There is an A with an N and an R with an I
And A the last letter
Young Hana Maria.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 19:43
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Our ancestors believed a lot of old silly fairy stories. We are much more enlightened than they were and we do not believe in their old stories. This is one of their stories.
If there were two people dead in the same district each of the dead person's relatives would be hurrying up the funeral so that they would get their own relative buried first. They believed that whoever was buried last would have to carry water to everyone else in the graveyard until another funeral would go in. I would not believe in this. Our forefathers were very superstitious. The people now-a-days are not so.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 19:38
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There was a man who knew where gold was hidden and went to dig for it. He dug for three days and found it. When he got it he hid it in a graveyard wall. The following night he went to get it, but there was a fairy minding it and would not let the man get it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 19:34
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On a cold November's evening as the wind did highly blow
I heard those Dooras lassies to Thonack (?) they did go
And they were invited for that night by the damsel Norah Mór
When I came there upon the scene in pardon to implore
I saw the Quins from Nogara and Rick Burke's two sons from Caher Mór
That white angel from Lough Corrough was plainly dressed in white
The most of my opinion she spread the gazers sight
That proudly Glynn and sisters that came from Nogara town
And that other subject Delegate who lived a bit further down
This verse was composed by the Sullivans from Chrushooha (?).
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 15:25
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Many songs are sung by the people in the winter nights. Matt Mahon of Duras used to compose many nice songs about those who gave him lodging. Here is one song he composed. It is known by most of the people in the parish.
Just in Winter before the Spring I went to Turlough there for to sing
And to take down notes of each place and thing,
I arrived in Turlough just after Mass
My mind at first being in great grief
knowing the night's repose would give relief
My feet were panting for alas I am lame
and to ask for lodging I felt great shame
Till I came to the house of a decent man whose name I'll now mention is Peter McGann
He felt me coming and heard my cry
and bid me welcome with exalting joy.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 15:07
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There is a song composed about Bellharbour.
1 Fare well to you O sweet Bellharbour,
My tears are falling for you like rain,
I can't forget from night till morning,
There's so many charms about the place.
2 The Burrin mountains they do surround us,
The christal (sic) fountains, they flow in streams,
In the fertile valley lies ancient abbey,
There lies thousand's (sic) of the roman creed.
3 There is the Blacksmith like-wise the tailor
To clothe the naked ...
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 15:01
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There were many great people in Ireland long ago. Finn Mac Cumhail and the Fianna were the best.
It is said that on one occasion the Fianna passed over a mountain in this (sic) called Sliabh Carron. It was late so they camped on a grassy place. Fionn was tired so he camped on a flat rock. He put two stones standing up straight and one on top and one at the side. He slept there for the night by himself. The tent is there yet.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 14:56
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devil go and when the other year was up the devil came again. Jack was eating his supper and he said to him he wouldn't go until he would tidy up the house. The devil was so impatient he couldn't wait until Jack was ready he went tiding (sic) the house himself. After a while Jack set the charm and the devil was tied to the table. He asked Jack to let him go and that he would give another year.
He let him off and when he came again he wouldn't pass the door. Jack wouldn't go with him until he would bring all the apples in the orchard. He had them all gone all to one when the devil jumped upon the tree. Jack set the charm again and left the devil hanging off the tree until morning. He begged to let him go and that he would never again come. Jack lived for a long time and when he died he went to hell. He would not be let in and he asked for a coal to light his (sic) he got it and they say he will have that coal around until the day of judgement.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 14:49
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Long years ago there lived in Corofin a man named John Thrench, whom the people call Jack the Lantern now. He was a shoe maker. He used to be always cursing. One day the devil came to him and asked him why he was always cursing. Being so pleased with him the devil gave him a charm so that when he would set the charm he could tie anything. The devil also told John that he would have to come with him after a year. When the year was up the devil came for him and he said to him I won't go until I eat some thing. While the devil was waiting for him jack set the charm and the devil was tied to the chair so Jack would not let him go and he told Jack if he let him go he would leave him for another year. He let the
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 15:56
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could be found in Heaven so the case was dismissed.
Long ago it was said there lived a great big man in Corkscrew Hill. He often hunted people from their homes in order to get some fixed abode for himself.
Long ago a certain man was going to Lisdoonvarna for the priest for his wife, when suddenly a great gust of wind came, and something very huge rolled before him in the road. Of coarse (sic) it was the old man who had changed himself into a fairy and wrapped himself into a calfes (sic) skin. Add the man was coming slowly along he saw the ump of skin on the road and put it into his coat. "It will make a fine coat for my wife" and he walked away very happily. Not long afterwards the lump began to stir under his arm and he cast his knife into the middle of the huge lump. It roared and said "Pull your knife again". "I wont" said the man. "You wont for your sake" said the big man. It is supposed he never stopped until he came to the old
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 15:48
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or do bad" and the man was buried a year and a day after that.
Long ago a great deal of poteen used to come from Conemara to the shores of New quay. Sergeant Brady who was stationed at New Quay at that time was very strict so he decided to catch them some way or another. Two badórs were coming in a little boat to New Quay. Brady saw them and went to Old Quay. When the little boat came the Sergeant said to one of the badórs "Will ye give me a bottle of poteen in private and I will not tell anybody in the world". "Indeed we will said the badors and they handed him the bottle, and when the sergeant smelled the bottle he found to his great surprise he had only a bottle of water.
Once upon a time a certain man from New Quay went to heaven, the man from New Quay was so big and awkward that he knocked a big stone of the floor of Heaven down to hell. Unluckily enough he struck the Prince of devils which caused much rage to all in hell. St Peter and the prince of devils went to law. No lawyer
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 15:45
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or do bad" and the man was buried a year and a day after that.
Long ago a great deal of potion used to come from Connemara to the shores of New quay. Sergeant Brady who was stationed at New Quay at that time was very strict so he decided to catch them some way or another. Two badórs were coming in a little boat to New Quay. Brady saw them and went to Old Quay. When the little boat came the Sergeant said to one of the badórs "Will ye give me a bottle of potion in private and I will not tell anybody in the world". "Indeed we will said the badors and they handed him the bottle, and when the sergeant smelled the bottle he found to his great surprise he had only a bottle of water.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 15:38
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started for his father's house. But alas when he arrived at his father's Dun there wasn't a bit to be seen, but nettles growing around the foundations of the house. Oisin started for the land of youth again but while he was on his way he met some men trying to lift a stone. They asked him to lift the stone with them and, as he stooped to lift it the girth broke and off went the white steed. Now Oisín was an old man not a youth like when he was in Tir na nÓg. He was blind and could not see anything. So the steed returned to Niamh without Oisín. But he never saw the land of youth again.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 15:34
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In olden times at the time of Cormac Mac Airt there lived in Ireland a band of warriors, named the Fianna. Their leader was a great warrior named Foinn Mac Cumhail. He had a son named Oisín who was a great warrior and also a poet. One morning as the Fianna were hunting near Loch Lein in Kerry a young maiden came riding towards them on a white steed. She saluted Fionnna d told him she was Niamh with the golden hair from Tir na nÓg. She also told him that she loved Oisín and she came to bring him to Tir na nÓg. Fionn was very upset when he heard this but he said nothing. She told Oisín that she was the Princess of Tir na nÓg and that the people who live there never die or grow old. The Oisin bade good bye to Fionn and his company and set out for Tir na nÓg with Niamh. After three hundred years in the land of youth Oisín said to Niamh one day that he would like to go to see his father and the Fianna. Niamh did not like to let him go at ll. She gave him the white steed and Oisín
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 15:28
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In olden times at the time of Cormac Mac Airt there lived in Ireland a band of warriors, named the Fianna. Their leader was a great warrior named Foinn Mac Cumhail. He had a son named Oisín who was a great warrior and also a poet. One morning as the Fianna were hunting near Loch Lein in Kerry a young maiden came riding towards them on a white steed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 17:38
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The best team of footballers around here was in New Quay and the best team of hurlers was in Ballinafad. New Quay came the second best in the All Ireland Championship once. There was eleven Fahys in the team of fifteen. A man named Jim Fahy was the captain.
The Turlough team played Kilfenora and Carron in Bellharbour and bet them. Their captain was a man named Patrick Burke. He now lives near Galway. The people around here were great for throwing weights also. Two brothers named Maley were the best in Turlough and Bellharbour.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 17:37
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The best team of footballers around here was in New Quay and the best team of hurlers was in Ballinafad. New Quay came the second best in the All Ireland Championship once. There were eleven Fahys in the team of fifteen. A man named Jim Fahy was the captain.
The Turlough team played Kilfenora and Carron in Bellharbour and bet them. Their captain was a man named Patrick Burke. He now lives near Galway. The people around here were great for throwing weights also. Two brothers names M were the best inTurlough and Bellharbour.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 17:30
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I was at a Folk Lore meeting in Mullingar in May. The speaker was a Mr. Sullivan. It was a great pity we had not this meeting in the beginning of the year as we would then have known better how to proceed with this work. However he assured us that the object of this book is to collect "Folk lore" & that so long as the book is filled with true facts of either present or past it doesn't really matter if the work here is not all done by the children.
The pupils here, about 50% of them are orphan girls living in seclusion and they have little chance of meeting with people who can give them much information about the country or people. I therefore their teacher, will write in this book anything of interest I can find out.
(Mrs) Elizabeth Payne
No (2) N.S.
Tyrrellspass
17.6.1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:33
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It was in New Quay the best football team was long ago. There were fifteen footballers in New Quay and out of the fifteen there were eleven Fahey's. The Captains name was Jim Fahey. They used to play against Mayo and Tipperary and Meath and to (sic) used to win without no bother. One year they made up their minds to go for the All Ireland Championship. They stayed playing against every county until at last they came against Wexford. It was their last match for the All Ireland Championships and they were beaten by one point. The best hurling team around here long ago were the Ballina-Fad hurling team. They used to play against North Clare and South Galway. They were the Championships (sic) of Clare and Galway two years after each other. They used have no jersey but short trousers.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:30
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It was in New Quay the best football team was long ago. There were fifteen footballers in New Quay and out of the fifteen there were eleven Fahey's. The Captains name was Jim Fahey. They used to play against Mayo and Tipperary and Meath and to (sic) used to win without no bother. One year they made up their minds to go for the All Ireland Championship. They stayed playing against every county until at last they came against Wexford. It was their last match for the All Ireland Championships and they were beaten by one point. The best hurling team around here long ago were the Ballina Fad hurling team.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:15
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Long ago football was differently (sic) to what it is now. They used to have 21 men on each side and they would put up a goal post about 1/2 a mile away from the other one and which ever side put out the first goal had the match won. The men used to be arranged as follows seven men at each goal post and seven more in the middle. The people of this parish and the people of Carron used to have very tough matches. There were three brothers in one team and they were able to put the ball in to one another hands. The names of the men Maleys.
Bowling matches was also a great pastime. They used to also play jack stones and cat. They used to arange (sic) great bowling matches between themselves. The people of Carron used to bowl with the people down here.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:14
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Long ago football was differently (sic) to what it is now. They used to have 21 men on each side and they would put up a goal post about 1/2 a mile away from the other one and which ever side put out the first goal had the match won. The men used to be arranged as follows seven men at each goal post and seven more in the middle. The people of this parish and the people of Carron used to have very tough matches. There were three bothers in one team and they were able to put the ball in to one another hands. The names of the men Maleys.
Bowling matches was also a great pastime. They used to also play back stones and cat. They used to arange (sic) great bowling matches between themselves. The people of Croon used to bowl with the people down here.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:13
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Long ago football was differently (sic) to what it is now. They used to have 21 men on each side and they would put up a goal post about 1/2 a mile away from the other one and which ever side put out the first goal had the match won. The men used to be arranged as follows seven men at each goal post and seven more in the middle. The people of this parish and the people of Carron used to have very tough matches. There were three bothers in one team and they were able to put the ball in to one another hands. The names of the men Maleys.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:11
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Long ago football was differently (sic) to what it is now. They used to have 21 men on each side and they would put up a goal post about 1/2 a mile away from the other one and which ever side put out the first goal had the match won. The men used to be arranged as follows
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 12:02
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Long ago about sixty years from now the people used to eat but two meals a day. The first in the morning about eleven o'clock. They used to have a lot of work done at that hour. They used to have the second meal about six o'clock. Potatoes and sour (sic) they used to have for both meals. They used to have fish regularly. They used to have meat only twice a year at Christmas and Easter. The richer people used to have meat every Sunday. They used to sow nothing but potatoes.
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 22:04
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The people who lived long ago used to do nearly half a days work before they ate their breakfast. They used to have potatoes and sour milk for their breakfast. Tea was unknown of in those days. The people used to but fresh meat for their dinner at Christmas and Easter.
On one occassion (sic) a woman bought a half pound of tea and it was explained to her how to use it. She did as she was told until it came to go drinking the tea. She drained the tea away and kept the leaves. She put sugar and milk and leaves together and mihed (?) them up and ate them. When the man came again he asked how she liked the tea and she said it was hard to eat it. When the man heard that he ran away.
senior member (history)
2019-05-19 21:55
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In the olden days the diet of the people was very poor. Their chief food was potatoes three times a day, and some fish because fish was very plentiful. Very few people used to kill pig that time. people used not to eat meat but on Christmas day and on Easter Sunday. They used to grind their own corn with a big flat stone called a quern. The old people was far healthier than the people nowadays. The old people used to do a half a days work before their breakfast. The people long ago were very happy.
senior member (history)
2019-05-18 11:38
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Long ago the population of Ireland was very large. The people used to eat potatoes and drink plenty of buttermilk for their breakfast. For the dinner and supper they used to have porridge made out of Indian meal. It was a very special treat for them to get oaten meal porridge. They used to sit on the floor and spread manure bags as a table cloth on a low table. Then they used to leave whatever food they had on the table. The people were very strong and very tasty. They used to hang up the tables after them. They used to do every thing with their hands. They used to have no meat but on Xmas Day and on Easter Sunday. Out of wooden mugs they used to drink. They barely ever had enough to eat and they used to have no feasts.
senior member (history)
2019-05-18 11:31
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Long ago there was a landlord living in Bellharbour. His name was Mr. Daly. He wa a very bad landlord. He had fifteen in family, eight girls and seven boys. The seven boys and one girl were Protestants as were their father and mother. The rest died very young.
There were more landlords in New Quay and Finavarra, the Browne's and Skerret's. The Browne's were vary bad. There was an old man in New Quay. He was fairly rich. He had no land. His rent was very high on the house as he kept it very tidy. It was £50 (?) a month. All his money went on the rent and he was thrown out on the road by the Browne's. Some family took him in & they were put out as well. They all died & all the Browne's died as well.
senior member (history)
2019-05-16 22:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
When England took over the country, they divided the land among men, whom they wanted to favour, especially those who were good leaders or officers in war. These men were called Land-Lords & the poor people who were tenants to them had hard times under their rule. If they were not able to pay the rents, that they were forced to pay they would be evicted, and then if they were not able to go to some foreign country they should go into the county home, or else starve on the road-side for all the land Lords cared. None of these land-Lords were Catholics. The people were so persecuted that they formed a league, called the Land-League. The leaders of this league were arrested & got long terms in jail. During this time, a Tipperary man named Michael Hayes shot dead a land-Lord who was going to evict him.
senior member (history)
2019-05-16 22:01
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rejected
awaiting decision
All the landlords are cleared out of Ireland now. They were very hard on the tenants. They evicted a lot of the tenants who were not able to pay their rent. Some of them had to go to the union hospital and some of them used to get a little house from other people.
The time the war was in Ireland the officers that fought and won the battle were made the landlords after that.
In those days the people were very poor and the rent was very high and they had no mercy to get from the landlords so they are much better off since the Land Commission took up the land.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 19:46
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was one land Lord in this district. His name was Mr. Skerrit. He lived Finnevara (sic) long ago. He was very severe on his tenants. He had eleven in family seven boys and four girls. There were two of them doctors, and two of them nuns, and one of them a priest.
He had a lovely mansion and a fine ochard (sic) also. He was a catholic. The ruins of his mansion is there yet. If ever he had any work to do his tenants had to do it for him.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 13:36
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rejected
awaiting decision
There are no fairs held around here now. There used to be fairs in Bellharbour long ago on the 7th November, on the 16th May. The fair used to be held at the cross of Bellharbour and the cattle and sheep used to be let wander along by the edge of the sea. There arose a great fight and the fairs were cancelled.
There was a man by the name of Seán an Gadaidhe living in Sgeach Bhríghde. He used to steal a lot of the sheep and cattle. One of the men identified his sheep with Seán. He caught Seán by the collar of the coat and threw him out with the tide. Seán was not able to swim and he was drowned.
There are special pig markets held in towns now, and special fairs. The fair is usually held in the square or in the green.
senior member (history)
2019-05-15 13:27
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is not much difference between the fairs of olden times, and the fairs of the present day. One time there were only very small fairs held in the local towns, such as Ennistymon, Ennis and Gort, where there are very large fairs held now. The principal fairs of the year used be then held in Ballinasloe. All the farmers from Co. Clare and Galway, used go there with cattle. They used be three or four days on the road, they used to have such long distances to travel.
There is a special field near all the towns it is called the fair green. In the buying of horses there is no marking. It is the custom for the man who sells the horse to give a halter with it. Some men that are superstitious keep the halter while they have the horse.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:34
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rejected
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Bread
They used different kinds of bread, long ago called 'Boxty cakes", potato cakes, Black bread and oaten cakes.
'Black bread' was made from rye. The old people say that rye was grown by nearly every family. This was ground into meal by means of grind stones. The meal was then mixed with buttermilk and baked on the griddle. Oats was ground in the same way as rye. This oaten meal was then mixed with hot water and left standing for an hour or so. It was then
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:34
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rejected
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the stirabout in a big wooden dish and the men all sat around it and had their meal. All the vessels used by the older people were made of wood. They had wooden plates, dishes and noggins. The latter were wide at the bottom and narrow at the top, having a handle on one side. Some of these old vessels are still preserved in a few houses in Rathcoffey. The old people don't know when tea was first used in this district, probably over a hundred years ago. They tell us that it was used only on Sundays and on special feast days. Buttermilk was used at all meals.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:33
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they would have bad luck for two years. Meat was used once a week only - on Sundays. Bacon was generally used. On Christmas Day and on Easter Sunday they considered it a great feast to have fresh meat, and on Easter Sunday they used a good many eggs for breakfast. Fish was used sometimes. People went around from door to door selling fish, principally pike. On St Patrick's Day old people made pancakes and this was considered a great feast. St Brigids Day was also kept as a great feast in this locality. They ate many eggs that day.
Supper:- For supper, the old people used potatoes and buttermilk and later on stirabout and buttermilk was used. They also used hard baked oaten cakes and rye bread along with buttermilk. These cakes were made a week before being used. This meal was taken about 6 o'c in the evening.
They sat around the table on big stones placed in the centre of the floor. Blocks of trees were also used as seats long ago.
In the harvest time when the men were busy in the fields, the women carried out
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:31
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People long ago had three meals a day, breakfast dinner and supper. For breakfast, they had potatoes and buttermilk. In latter years, they used oatmeal stirabout and buttermilk for breakfast. They grew their own oats and ground it by means of grind stones. Mallets were also used for this purpose. They boiled the oaten meal for a few hours. Then they put this food into noggins and used it with buttermilk. They usually worked for a few hours before having this meal which was eaten about 8 o clock.
Dinner: This meal was eaten about 12 or 1 o'c. It consisted of potatoes and buttermilk. They dipped the potatoes in salt and drank buttermilk.
People sat around the table which was usually placed near the wall. One end of the table was fastened to the wall by means of a fastener or hinge. When not in use this table was turned up and hung on the wall. They were called 'press tables'.
Some of the old people tell us that the table was placed in the centre of the floor for the Sunday meals, and on week days they left it by the wall. If they did not do this, they said,
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:30
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where he joined the army and was killed. The very night of his death a knock was heard at the same door where the bullets pierced their way when the soldiers fired on their enemy. When the porter opened, a man entered with a gun on his shoulder. He walked up the stairs and into a room he was in the habit of frequenting. The porter had not heard the report of Hamilton Rowans death at the time, but later on, the news spread and even afterwards this room was called the 'Ghosts room'. Some people say it is closed up altogether, but when we asked the Jesuit priests about it, they just laughed.
James Noonan, Rathcoffey NS who got these stories from his Grand-father who is 69 years of age. The latter lives at Rathcoffey, Donadea, Co Kildare.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:29
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A man named Fagan lived near Clane about 2 miles from here. He was a great sheaf thrower. He could throw a sheaf 22 feet high in the air and challenged several others, but always beat them. He could lift 6 stone weight over his head. He was a very stout man, being about 5 feet high and was almost as broad as he was long. My Grandfather who is 69 years of age remembers Fagan, who is dead for about 50 years.
A great Irish warrior lived in the old castle whose ruins are still to be seen on the top of Rathcoffey Hill, Donadea, Co Kildare.
His name was Hamilton Rowan. He was driven from his castle by English invaders and to escape he reversed the shoes on his horses. This plan baffled his pursuers for a time and he reached Castle Brown in safety. His friends lived there and the story is told that as he entered the castle (now known as Clongowes Wood College) the soldiers fired and Hamilton Rowan escaped out a window. The shots pierced a door and the marks are still to be seen this day on the doorway. My Daddy saw them a few years ago. Hamilton Rowan escaped to foreign countries.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:25
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awaiting decision
or do bad" and the man was buried a year and a day after that.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:22
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awaiting decision
Monday in the year a stare is found dead near steeple.
Long ago three men from New quay went milking cows near the Cillen (sic). They had to cross the Cillen and as one of the men were crossing he said "God be with the girl who was buried here the other day, if she was alive she would help me to milk these cows, the Lord have mercy on her soul". The voice came up very plain and said "The Lord have mercy on the dead".
Long ago when McNamara was alive he always was very kind to the poor and very bad to the rich. On the 12th of September he locked up his premises and went into the yard and had a fear breaga in the middle representing the pope. He fired and fired at the fear breaga until his eyes were attracted by a bright looking object. The image said to him "What are you doing". "Nothing" replied McNamara. "It would be no harm if you got rid of yourself. a year and a day is your limited time upon this world do good
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:13
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through the Gleninna mountains. It was composed of many small people dressed in black followed by a hearse. It came slowly and sadly until it came to a by-road near Ballyvaughan and vanished in a moment.
Before Jack the Lantern died he dreamt St. Peter was standing at the gate of Heaven preventing him from going into Heaven and the devils standing at the gates of Hell preventing him from going down to Hell. One of the devils took pity on him and handed him out a red coal to keep him warm. He said "To Heaven I know I never will go, But to be kicked out of Hell is the toughest yet".
When Saint Colman died a certain priest cursed him and said he wished one of his descendants would be found dead near the steeple of Kilmacduagh every Monday in the year. The people of the place asked another priest to lessen the spell and he said there would be a stare (= starling) killed every Monday in the year instead of the human being. Every
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 21:00
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There is never any fairs in this district. It is only in towns fairs are held, and there is a special field near the town for selling the stock called a fair green.
When people sell stock they give a luck penny to whoever buys them. They give one shilling for sheep and two shillings out of cattle.
Sometimes when stock is dear buyers go round from house to house buying them.
When a man buys stock he puts a mark of raddle on them as a sign that they are bought.
When a man buys a horse the man he buys him from gives him a hedd (sic) stall with him.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 20:55
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Saint Colman is the patron Saint of this place. There is a well named after him beyond in Geata Buidhe. There are seven churches also in it but they are only ruins now. The water in the well is a cure for sore eyes. People visit the place once a year in honour of St. Colman on the 5th of November. People are called after him yet in this place.
There is a rock in the middle of a field in Freagh called "Rock Colic" (?).
Once upon a time a women by the name of "Bríghidh na gCearc" lived in Geata Buidhe. She insulted St Colman. Colman said she was all right if God would ever forgive her. She died of cancer. Nearly every bit of her had decayed before she died.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 20:47
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The Patron Saint of this district was Saint ... Colman. He lived up in the mountain for a long time. There are many people named after him yet.
He built seven churches in this parish. The ruins are there yet. There is a blessed well there also, who ever washes his face in will never get sore every (sic). It is said that there was a door in the floor of every church. Many people sleep at the blessed well on the fifth 05th November.
senior member (history)
2019-05-13 11:48
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one day, snd one of the men got killed, so the Parish Priest cancelled the holiday after that.
senior member (history)
2019-05-13 11:47
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The Patron Saint of this district is St. Colman. He lived around here for a number of years in a lonely valley in a place called Ought-mama between the mountains of Burrin (sic). There is a well there called after him where people travel for miles to pray and give him honour on the 5th Nov & especially people who have weak sight, or sore eyes. There is no certainty about his birth place. The people of Gort claim he was born there, in a place called Kiltartan, but it is disputed. His burial place, is in Kilmacduagh, in the Parish of Gort. There is a church holiday kept there in his honour on the 29th October. The church in Gort is dedicated to his name, and his statue is over the door. There is a statue in the Tiernevan chapel also, kept in honour of him. We have no church holiday here in his honour, but the people living in Oughtmama do not work on Nov 5th, the day approved (?) to visit the well, and give him honour. There is an old story, that it was a church holiday around here one time. Two certain men had a fight at Colmans well
senior member (history)
2019-05-13 11:35
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The native saint of this place is St. Colman. He lived here long ago. He built seven churches near each other. They are in ruins now. It is said that there is a long cave under the churches. It is a passage saint colman used for passing from one church to the other. There was a door in the floor of every church.
Near the churches there is a well and whoever washes his face in it will never get sore eyes. The churches are overlooking Corcomruad Abbey.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 21:04
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People around here have many stories about the Blessed Virgin and St Joseph.
My grandfather told me that there was an old woman living in New Quay once. She was a very holy woman. One Christmas night as she was lighting the candle, "an old woman" came in for a drink. Mrs. O'Byrne gave her a drink. Mrs. O'Byrne started praying when "she" was going out. It was revealed to her that night that it was the Blessed Virgin. Mrs. O'Byrne prayed when she was young so that she might not die until she should see the Blessed Virgin. She was 125 years when she died. People used to say she was in the fairies.
People keep the lights lit & the door opened Christmas night to show the way to the blessed Virgin & St Joseph.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:55
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Ballinard
At a point about midway between Cloneen and Fethard the ground to the rises gradually untill the rise is crowned by one of those rare specimens of man's handiwork which actually heightens the interest of a natural view, a Castle of the olden times.
From the main road some little distance, the traveller may espy the ivy-mantled tower of Baile-an-Aird. The keep is very well preserved and brown with the rust of time.
The grant of the property was made by the crown in 1630 - the favourite being a scion of the House of Ormonde, Pierce Rua who succeeded Thomas in 1515. Pierce was the eldest son of Sir James Butler who founded Callan abbey in 1468 and where he is now buried.
Pierce Rua was married in 1485 to the Lady Margaret, daughter of Gerald - eight earl of Kildare. Such a marriage seems incongruous but might be explained as the policy of Kildare to divide the Butler House. This Piers[?] was now attached by Sir James Butler 1491 - 1497 who felt that his succession to the family estates was endangered by the insistence
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:53
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Kearneys were Mullahys of Cappa Cloneen and Lary Hanly was William T Mullaby, so you see, he tries to mix his characters somewhat.
I can well remember William Francis (he of the loud voice & awkward legs who gave such frights to Mrs Lloyd) He was a regular visitor to my home in Cloneen and was of the big open blustering type. He kept race horses and I will add a little poem written by my aunt.
Miss H. Noonan
Cloneen
Fetherd
who personally knew the families.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:36
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Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Once upon a time there was a man and he had a dog of which he was very proud. One time the man got a job. He did not get much money for the time he was working. His boss owed him one hundred and sixty pounds. One day his his (sic) boss sent another paying him. The man made off to the boss that he was not paid. The little dog darted to the mans pocket and got the purse in which the money was. Then he gave the purse to the man's boss.
When the man went home he shot the dog for spying on him.
John Kelly 31st Oct 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:30
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Told to me by my grandfather
Thomas Linnane
Ballyhehan
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
74 years of age.
There are no tailors in this parish now. There was one tailor in it long ago though. He was a very tasty tailor so they called him "O'Byrne the tailor of taste". He used to go around from house to house selling cotton and doing the work. He died a very old man. He was a very good man when he was young. He used not drink nor smoke. He was born a tinker.
He started drinking and he spent all his money. He used to say "A tinker I was born and a tinker I will die". He was a cousin to the blacksmith that was in Bellharbour, Peter O'Brien. He copied the smith's example.
There are no spinning wheels in the parish now. The people knit jumpers and stockings here. Most people buy the shop thread. Others send wool to a factory in Galway and get thread made out of it.
Maureen Linnane Oct ...
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:22
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Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The name of one man was Martin the tailor. He was a travelling tailor and used to go from one parish to another trying to make a living. He was not a good tailor but he was very cheap.
He used to drink a lot (sic). On one occasion (sic) he was crossing over a bridge and he got afraid when he was half way across. He couldn't go backwards nor forwards and he said God is good and the devil isn't too bad if the blackguard would let him alone. When he landed on the other side the thanked neither God nor the devil.
John P. Kerin 20 Oct 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:16
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Told to me by
Peter McGann
Turlough
Bellharbour
Co.Clare
60 years of age.
There are many ruins of old forges around here. The name of one smith was Peter O'Brien. He lived near Bellharbour. He was born a beggar man and he used to going (sic) from house to house. He set up a forge and his name became famous all over Ireland. He had to pay as (sic) man to work for him he had so much work to do. Horses and cars were scarce in Ireland but he bought one. He used to go driving to town every day. He started drinking and he said, A tinker I was born and a tinker I'll die. He sold everything and died a pauper. The stones of the forge are in the walls of the road now.
John P. Kerin 3rd Oct 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 09:57
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cách bríghid ar a bhunn agus Máiréad ar a bharr, ceithre n-aingeal agus Rí Na Grás agus fanaidh an teine seó go dtí lá amháin.
Paidir roimh dul a choladh
Ceirthe (sic) coirnéail ar mo leabaidh ceirthe (sic) n'aingealaibh orraibh sgarntha má fhághaim-sé (sic) bás shul mátigh (?) maidin i bhflaithis De go raibh m-anam.
Síghle Ní Dúbhlaigh
Fuair mé iad ó mo mháthair bean Uí Dhubhlaigh 10-12-37
(50 bld)
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 09:57
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cách bríghid ar a bhunn agus Máiréad ar a bharr, ceithre n-aingeal agus Rí Na Grás agus fanaidh an teine seó go dtí lá amháin.
Paidir roimh dul a choladh
Ceirthe (sic) coirnéail ar mo leabaidh ceirthe (sic) n'aingealaibh orraibh sgarntha má fhághaim-sé (sic) bás shul mátigh (?) maidin i bhflaithis De go raibh m-anam.
Síghle Ní Dúbhlaigh
Fuair mé iad ó mo mháthair bean Uí Dhubhlaigh 10-12-37
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 09:49
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Paidir nuair a dhuisighim ar maidin.
Míle buidheachas do Dhia thug slán ón oidhche mé go dtugtaí tú slán ón lae mé,
Paidir tar éis ár mbéilibh
Mile moladh mór agus buidheachas agus altú leat a Rí gheal na grásta
Ar son son na bheatha sin a thabhairt dúinn go dtugtaí tú an bheatha shíorruidhe d'ár n-anam agus Amen.
Paidir tar éis bheith ag caitheamh tobaic
Seacht lón reilc pádhruig túmba çhíosta brat brídhge go beannacht dílis dé le h-anam na marbh.
Na léachtaí gainimh ar an tráigh na ribe féir ag fás, go beannacht dílis Dé le h-anam na marbh,
Paidir ag coiglint an teine.
Coigíighim an teine seó
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 09:37
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Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The people used to wear no boots long ago. Some used to wear no boots in the winter. They had to buy the boots they wore. They never had corns. Some people used to take off their boots and go barefoot across the mountains in order to spare the boots.
On one occasion a woman was crossing a mountain. She had not gone very far when she hit her toe against a stone breaking it in pieces. She said, Míle buidhochas le Dia nach iad mo bróg atá orm they would be broken. There is an old rhyme, The people wore no boots before Adam was born and they had no corns.
John P. Kerin 21st Sept 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 17:09
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M'ainm féin:- Áine Ní Dhonnchadha
Gleann na gCarraig
An Tobar
Co. an Clair
An té a thug an t-ábhar sin dom:-
Thomas Lewis
Rockvale
Tubber
Co. Clare
Age: 67 years.
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 17:07
approved
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would take the pain of the sting out of it.
The skin of meacan na caorach is taken off. Then the interior of the plant is cut into small stripes (?) and put into a white cloth. Then it is put into the broken part of the bone. The bone will be mended in a week or so.
It is lucky to carry a hazel stick with you for protection. It is unlucky to carry a whitethorn stick with you because it was from that bush the crown of thorns were made for Our Lord. When people are going to Australia they carry with them a blackthorn stick, because a blow of a blackthorn stick would kill a snake.
Some of these weeds are used for food for beast. People boil nettles and give them to turkeys. Thistles are given to asses. Long ago the people boiled pribol (?) and mixed it through meal for pigs.
During the summer months when provision is scarce people give hazel leaves mixed with Indian meal to pigs also. Glorán is given to cows to increase the flow of milk
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:57
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Práiseach buidhe, glorán, neantóg, feóchadán, pribol (?), Carú Caorach, Croc Préachán, Cupóg sráide, Yarrow, Garlic, Robin run the hedge, Chicken weed, Scutch Grass, Dandelion.
The weeds harm the land a great deal. They take all the manure off the land and make it poor. Some of the weeds smother the crops also.
The weeds that grow in good land are - Dockleaves, práiseach buidhe and Carú Caorach. The weeds that grow in poor land are - feóchadán, Scutch Grass and neantóg.
The name of the weeds and plants that there are cures attached to are -
Yarrow, garlic, cupóg sráide and meacan na caorach.
Yarrow cures rheumatism. Garlic cures swelling of any description. Cupóg sráide cures the burn of a neantóg. Meagan na Caorach cures broken bones. To boil yarrow and drink the juice of it would cure rheumatism. To rub garlic to any swelling would cure it. Some people grow it for the purpose. To pull a cupóg sráide and rub it to the burn of a neantóg
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:56
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Práiseach buidhe, glorán, neantóg, feóchadán, pribol (?), Carú Caorach, Croc Préachán, Cupóg sráide, Yarrow, Garlic, Robin run the hedge, Chicken weed, Scutch Grass, Dandelion.
The weeds harm the land a great deal. They take all the manure off the land and make it poor. Some of the weeds smother the crops also.
The weeds that grow in good land are - Dockleaves, práiseach buidhe and Carú Caorach. The weeds that grow in poor land are - feóchadán, Scutch Grass and neantóg.
The name of the weeds and plants that there are cures attached to are -
Yarrow, garlic, cupóg sráide and meacan na caorach.
Yarrow cures rheumatism. Garlic cures swelling of any description. Cupóg sráide cures the burn of a neantóg. Meagan na Caorach cures broken bones. To boil yarrow and drink the juice of it would cure rheumatism. To run garlic to any swelling would cure it. Some people grow it for the purpose. To pull a cupóg sráide and rub it to the burn of a neantóg
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:41
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Told to me by my father
Michael McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The kind of a churn we have is one with beaters and twisted by handle. It is a ten gallon churn. We make a churn twice every week. It takes twenty five minutes or a half an hour to make butter with our churn. We make bread with the buttermilk and we give some of it to the pigs.
The churn we had before this one was a dash-churn but the body (?) of it is broken and we have the dash part of it yet.
Martin McGann 14th Sept
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:36
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Told to me by my mother
Mary Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
We have a churn at home. It is a round timber one. It has four legs under it to keep it steady. In churn are beaters, which as the handle of the churn is twisted the beaters go around very fast.
Some people make churns with tincans. They fill half the tincan with cream and put on the cover. Then they shake the can until the churn is made. Others make churns in jars.
We have our churn for seventeen years. Any stranger that comes into our house always makes a part of the churn so as not to take the butter.
Micko Linnane 14th September ...
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:30
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Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There are many Kileen's in this parish and there is one graveyard. It is surrounded with a big wall with a gate going in to it. There are head-stones in it. There are graves inside it and outside it. The graveyard is Corcomroe the famous abbey. It was a monastery long ago. the ruins are in it still. Unbaptised babies are buried in Kileens.
Maureen Linnane 28th June '38.
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Thomas McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There are two graveyards in use in this parish. They are Corcomroe Abbey and Killeen. Corcomroe Abbey is situated in Oughmama. It is about a quarter of a mile in from the road. There is an old road going into it.
There are a lot of headstones in in.
The Killeen is situated in Mortyclough very near the public road. There is a gate going into it, and there is a lot of grass growing in it. It has a square shape.
There is also an idle graveyard in Oughmama. There are clergymen buried there. There is another idle graveyard situated near the Aughavinane road. It is called Cilín a Curcha (?). Many years ago the young babies used to be buried there but there is no one buried in it nowadays.
Margaret McGann June 23rd 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There are only a few burying grounds around here. The principal one is Corcomroe Abbey. There is an old ruin in it. Outside there are stone crosses over the graves. People are buried inside too but it is all full now.
There is another old ruin about one mile away from Corcomroe. There is no one buried there yet. There is a burying ground in Kilwelran also. It is by the side of our house. As late as sixteen years there were two children buried in it. It is called the Cilleen.
John Kelly 23rd June 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The names of the animals we have at home are: cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, dogs and cats. The bedding which cattle, horses and pigs get is straw. When the people are driving cows they say "How". They put in the cows in stables in winter and the horses also. Then in the warm weather they let them out.
They let the goats into cahirs or cabins. When they are hunting the goats they say "hurra gabhair". The goats are kept only for a part of year then they are let out the mountains. The name of the places where cows are tied is stalls.
John Kelly 13th June 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Joe Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The name of the animals the has (sic) are- the cow, the horse, the sheep, the pig and the lamb. The farmers has great value on the (sic) because he gets milk from her. He puts her in a shed in the Winter and feeds her well. He puts straw and ferns under for her a bed. The farmers stalls the cow or ties them with a rope around the horns onto the wall.
When a person is milking a cow he milks her across and when she is milked he puts the sign of the cross on her with milk.
On May morning the people take the milk of other cows in some superstitious way. It is very seldom done.
Micko Linnane 13 June 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
themselves very well. They make sweet cakes and put a ring in the cake and who ever gets the ring will be married the first.
John P. Kerin 1st June 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 16:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
53 years of age
Long ago the people used to have great fun on feast days. On St Patrick's Day they used to enjoy themselves well. They used to wear shamrocks on their coats. They used also arrange bowling matches. All the people used to gather to the place appointed for the bowling match.
On Stephens Day the young men used to form bands of Mummers. They had many verses like this verse.
The Wren, the wren the king of all birds
On St Stephen's Day was caught in the furze
All though he is small his family is great
And I pray you good lady to give us a thrate (=treat?)
It is money we want, and money we will take
And if you havent any we will take sweet cake.
On St Brigids day they make crosses and put them up in the ceiling of the house. On Novembers night the people enjoy
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 15:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
53 years of age
Long ago the people used to have great fun on feast days. On St Patrick's Day they used to enjoy themselves well. They used to wear shamrocks on their coats. They used also arrange bowling matches. All the people used to gather to the place appointed for the bowling match.
On Stephens Day the young men used to form bands of Mummers. They had many verses like this verse.
The Wren, the wren the king of all birds
senior member (history)
2019-05-08 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Age 39 years
On Christmas night every house lights one big candle. It is the man of the house or else the youngest child of the house that should light the candle.
On Novembers night the women of the house should throw out a pancake to the fairies. The children have great sport that night.
On St Bridits (sic) day the people used to make crosses out of timber or scalips (?). On Shrove Tuesday a lot of people get married. Peopl (sic) make a lot of pancakes. On Stephens Day all the young boys of the parish go out having masks on their faces and some holly. This is one of the ranns (sic) they have.
The wren, the wren the king of all birds on St Stephens day he was caught in the furze up with the kettle and down with the pan give us some money and let us be gone.
Micko Linnane 1st June 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-08 23:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Thomas Bakey
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
(1) A stitch in time save (sic) nine.
(2) Charity begins at home.
(3) A man's word is his bond.
(4) None win success who do not strive.
(5) All light tasks were hard at first.
(6) Smooth water's (sic) run deep.
(7) Unless you strive you cannot win.
(8) Ecomony (sic) is half the battle of life.
(9) A good begining (sic) is half the work.
Mary Ann Bakey May 30th 19'38
senior member (history)
2019-05-08 22:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Every farmer sows potatoes now. It is very seldom they fail. The people around here eat a lot of potatoes.
This is the way they prepare the place.
First the place is ploughed then harrowed and after a while it is crossploughed. When that is done it is drilled. The farmer then draws sea weed or dung and spreads it along the dyke. When the sea weed or dung is dry the slit or scileán is spread upon it.
The farmer pinches them and after a while he closes them. He leaves them there for two months and then he cleans them and in a months time they are fit for eating.
The farmers use the timber ploughs around here as they are very light. It is used for drilling for closing potatoes and for ploughing soil. It is mainly boys and girls that spread the potatoes around here. They are hired for a day and get one or two shillings. It is men and women that cut the slits.
Micko Linnane 30 May 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-08 22:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Every farmer sows potatoes now. It is very seldom they fail. The people around here eat a lot of potatoes.
This is the way they prepare the place.
First the place is ploughed then harrowed and after a while it is crossploughed. When that is done it is drilled. The farmer then draws sea weed or dung and spreads it along the dyke. When the sea weed or dung is dry the slit or scileán (?) is spread upon it.
The farmer pinches them and after a while he closes them. He leaves them there for two months and then he cleans them and in a months time they are fit for eating.
The farmers use the timber ploughs around here as they are very light. It is used for drilling for closing potatoes and for ploughing soil. It is mainly boys and girls that spread the potatoes around here. They are hired for a day and get one or two shillings. It is men and women that cut the slits.
Micko Linnane 30 May 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-08 22:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Every farmer sows potatoes now. It is very seldom they fail. The people around here eat a lot of potatoes.
This is the way they prepare the place.
First the place is ploughed then harrowed and after a while it is crossploughed. When that is done it is drilled. The farmer then draws sea weed or dung and spreads it along the dyke. When the sea weed or dung is dry the slit or scrleán (?) is spread upon it.
The farmer pinches them and after a while he closes them. He leaves them there for two months and then he cleans them and in a months time they are fit for eating.
The farmers use the timber ploughs around here as they are very light. It is used for drilling for closing potatoes and for ploughing soil. It is mainly boys and girls that spread the potatoes around here. They are hired for a day and get one or two shillings. It is men and women that cut the slits.
Micko Linnane 30 May 1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-06 19:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old cures.
For sore throat.
Put some common salt on a plate in the oven till it gets very hot. Put the salt into an old woollen stocking and tie around the throat at night. Next day put a woollen bandage around the throat until it gets better.
For measles.
Saffron buns, or a little saffron in hot milk is a cure for measles.
Chest colds.
Hot camphorated oil rubbed on the chest and back, and then covered with flannel gives relief.
Una Kenny.
"Clifton"
Howth.
Mrs McNally
66, St Peter's Tce
Howth
senior member (history)
2019-05-06 19:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Thomas McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There are many varieties of potatoes sown around here namely, Champions, Kerrs Pinks, Aran Victors, Aran Banners, Epicures Dates, Irish Queens, Hibernians are the earliest for digging.
They are sown in the following way. First the land is ploughed and harrowed and made into drills. Then the potatoes are sown in the dikes. They are manured with seaweed or farmyard manure.
The ground is prepared by an iron plough, and sometimes by a timber plough. There are not many timber ploughs in the country now.
The timber plough is composed of two handles, a beam, two boards a small one and a big one, one pole, a cross board, a culter (?) and a sock.
Margaret McGann May 27th 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-06 19:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Pat Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There were many old houses long ago in this parish. My uncle told me there were over a hundred in a place called Ballina Fad. He said the people that were in them went away the time of the famine. The place is all ruins now. There is another place called Corcomroe Abbey. Tis said Red Hugh slept in it. People say Cisterians (sic) lived in it. It was built about the twelfth century. There is a beautiful arch in it and also a stone stairs going up to the top of it.
Most of the houses were thatched. Michael Linnane Shesha is able to tell stories.
Michael Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Fergus Linnane 27th May 38
senior member (history)
2019-05-06 18:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
63 years of age
There are many ruins of old houses around here. The houses were always thatched. The people were not very handy for building because they had not the proper tools. Many of the villages have very queer names such as Bellharbour. One day a man named Bell got drowned while bathing in Bellharbour and some one of his friends said Let it be called Bellharbour and so it was. Turlough is so called because there are many Turloughs around it.
There are many old people around here, some have reached the age of 90 years. Here is one person who is about 84 years of age. His name is Michael Nestor Gortaclare Bellharbour Co Clare. Though 84 years he is still very gay. My grandmother is 94 years and is in good health.
John P. Kerin 25th May 28.
senior member (history)
2019-05-06 18:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my grandfather
Thomas Linnane
Ballyhaehan
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The place I live in is called Sheshia. The name of it in Irish is Poll an Uisge. It is in the townland of Bellharbour. There are are (sic) many cowls around here. About a mile from our house there are the ruins of 44 houses.
There is the ruin of Corcamroe Abbey. It was built in the 12 Centuary (sic). It is in ruins now. Monks were living in it first.
My grandfather can speak Irish well. He is over seventy years. He remembers when there was 11 houses in Ballyhaehan and there are only five or six in it now.
Micko Linnane 25th May 38
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my grandfather
John Kerins
Doneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
age 89 years.
The houses in this parish long ago were made very funny. There were no such things as slates. It is how they used to be thatched with straw and sometimes the people would not have straw, they would have to tatch (sic) them with rushes. They used to be thatched half way down on the gable end also. For the chimney there used to be a hole down in the straw, and a bucket with the bottom off it tied over the hole. The old people in the houses were able to tell stories in English and in Irish. My grandfather is able to tell stories in Irish and in English. It was but a few people that was able.
This is my grandfathers address -
Mr John Kerins
Doneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Chris Droney 26th May 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Croney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
50 years of age.
There are a lot of old roads in this place.
Once upon a time all the land in New Quay was belonging to a man named Bendan. He hired a lot of people to make a road. It was going through his own land. He came to another farm belonging to Darcy. Darcy sent word to Bendan to stop the road. He wrote back and told him to come and fight with revolvers next day. They started fighting and Darcy was killed and the road was finished.
John Droney 25 May 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
53 years of age.
There are many old roads all over Ireland. Their ruins can be seen to day. There is a ruin of an old road at Letcher Sheanta. People used only get four pence a day. They used to have indian meal stirabout for their lunch. There is another ruin in Barr a Luasgán. One day a fine young man got killed in Barr a Luasgán. He was riding a horse and the horse shied at a black thorn bush and he fell off and got killed.
John P. Kerin 24 May 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my grandfather
John Kerins
Doneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
89 years of age
There are but a few old roads in this parish. There is one about a half a mile from our house. This old road is leading to a village named Ballana Fad. This is a story about what happened in the village. One day a man from the village was gone to town and when he came home one of his children was dead. He took the horse from the car and when he was letting the horse out in the field he heard the child crying overhead him. He threw the bridle up in the air and the child fell down on his arms. He brought the child in home and went to put it into the bed when he found a sheaf of straw. It was the fairies that had the child gone.
Chris Droney 24th May 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
39 years of age.
We play many games at school such as, Dan Dan, Blind Man's Buff, Hide and Seek, Frog in the middle, Tipping, Ghost in the Garden, C... (?), Around the green gravel, and Roses Gary.
Ghost in the Garden is the nicest game of all. This is how it is played. First the ghost is picked out of a group of children & then the mother. The ghost follows and catches all the children and pretends to eat them.
They used to play jackstones long ago but they do not play it al all now. Colour & B... (?) are more games we play too.
Maureen Linnane May 23rd
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
aged 53 years
The old people used to play a game called cat. A round stick with two pointed ends. It is played with a bat something like a hurley. The round stick was called cat. The cat was left flat on the ground and hit with the hurley. The cat would then jump up and would be hit with the hurley. At least two people are required to play cat and the one who put the cat that farthest would have the game won.
They used also be bowling.
Football was played differently long ago to what it is now. Long ago there used to be 21 each team. One goal poast (sic) was put up in a certain field and another about a mile away. Whichever team put the ball past the post first would have the match won.
John P. Kerin May 20th 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 09:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to my father (sic)
Michael McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
aged 65 years
The game we play most is pickery.
Pickery is played in the following way; There are beds made and the first person throws his slate into the first bed and tries to put it into all the beds with one hop but if he fails he is out and the next one plays.
Martin McGann May th
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 09:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tip is the nicest game of all. A big crowd make a circle and join hands. A boy (joe) goes around and tips a boy. The boy he tips follows him until he is caught.
Micko Linnane 19th May 38.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 09:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
aged 39 years.
The children around here are very fond of games. They play a lot of games. They play them at home and at school.
The chief games are football and hurling. The other games are The Hare, Ring a Rosy, Frog in the middle and Tip.
The way they The Hare is a good runner is picked out of a crowd of boys. He is given five minutes start. He can hide or go where he likes. When the five minutes are up the other boys follow the hare and try & catch him. When he is caught another runner is picked.
Ring a Rosy is a nice game. All the children join hand and make a circle. Then they start wheeling about then they sit down very fast on the floor. The one who was last would have to rub soot to his teeth.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 09:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Pat Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The famine did awful damage in this place. There is an old quary (sic) called Ballinafad and an old road leading down to it. The old people said there was 75 houses around there and there is not one in it now. Every morning when the potatoes were up the people got up a six o'clock and got potatoes and milk for breakfast. This place is full of ruins of old houses. The people long ago were far better than the people nowadays.
Fergus Linnane 26 April 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 09:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
52 years of age.
During the time of the famine many people died of hunger. One man died around here and when he was got he was found to have a green leaf in his mouth.
In the evening before the blight fell the potato stalks were in full bloom and the next morning nothing remained but the black stalks. Then the famine came.
In the year after the famine potatoes were so scarce that they used to take the bud off the potatoe (sic) and stick it in the ground. They still had the potatoes to eat after taking off the bud.
John P. Kerin 26 April 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 16:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
45 years of age
In the year 1847 the potatoes blackened and that was the year of the famine. The people had to live on Indian meal stirabout three times a day and their wages were 6d a day.
They used to have to steal the sheep and kill them and eat them with hunger.
Fever was very prevalent after the famine. They used to get a disease called the cholera and it killed a great many people.
At that time the men were far better then what they are now and healthy and stronger.
Before the famine they could dig a big garden every day.
Margaret McGann April 26th 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
45 years of age
There are many forts around here. There is one very nice one in it. There is a lot of trees growing around it. It is very big and there is a hole in the middle of it.
Long ago the fairies used to be living in those forts. The people who own those fields where the forts are situated never plough them because they would be afraid on account of the fairies living in them, There was often light seen around them. One night a man was crossing the fields and it was late. He saw a light at one of these forts. He got very frightened and he never went across by night after that.
Margaret McGann April 7th. 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 13:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Burke
Turlough
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Tinkers are poor people who have no homes, like every class of people. Some of them are better off than each other. Some of them has horses, and cars, some asses and some having neither horse or ass, have to walk wherever they travel. They beg their food and clothes from house to house as they travel from one county to another.
When people give them alms, they pray that God may increase you and they usually pray for the souls of the dead friends of the giver. They sleep at night in tents made of canvas & some sleep under their cars & in fine weather the young men often sleep out in the open air. I have heard it said how tinkers came to be first. When the Danes came to Ireland that killed all the people they met, but some escaped into the mountains and woods & when the time came that they could return, their homes were taken by others so they had to keep moving about, and beg for their own living.
May Burke 1st April 19,38
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Lord have mercy on the souls that left you,
God bless you Mam,
That you may be ten times better off this time again.
Margaret McGann 30th March 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Thomas McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
60 years of age.
Tinkers go around from house to house begging. They are always selling something because they would be summoned for begging. They sell saucepans, and combs and many other small things and they charge double the price for them.
The tinkers that come around here are from different places.
The Casey's and the Carty's and Sam Reilly are from Ennistymon and the Furey's are from Loughrea.
When they come around here they live in little huts made of canvas which they make up themselves. Most of them have a lot of children.
When they come into a house they ask flour, bread, tea, sugar and some of them ask money. When they get what they ask they say prayers.
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
A cradle bird. A spinning top. A boat. A hoop. A sling and a kite.
A cradle bird is made of sticks and cords. The sticks are placed over one another and brought to a point at the top. A top is made out of timber and then a whip for keeping it going round. A sling is made out of a piece of leather and cords. A kite is made of a cross like shape and strong paper pasted over it. Then there is a cord tied to it and it flies away. A catapult is made of a forked stick and rubber tied to it.
John Kelly 16th March 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Droney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
14th March
There are many wild animals in this place such as foxes, badgers, hares, rabbits, rats and many more also.
Foxes. Foxes are very clever animals. They live in dens in the mountains. They live on ducks, hens, lambs and many other kinds also.
Badgers. Badgers are very strong animals. They destroy meadows and root fields. They live in big burrows under bushes.
Hares. Hares are very swift animals. They can run at the rate 10 miles per hour. Their colour is brown and grey. A hare lives on the mountain under flags.
Rabbits. Rabbits are much the same size and colour as a hare, only that they are a little smaller. Rabbits live in burrows also.
Rats. Rats are very rude little animals. They steal eggs and meat and everything they can come up to. They make holes in the floor of a parlour and eat clothes also.
Chris Droney 14th March 38
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Michael McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The wild animals that are in this place are, foxes, badgers, martins, weasels, hares rabbits and squirrels.
The fox is very clever animals. He kills rabbits, hens and ducks and eats them. He lives in a burrow in the mountain. There is a cure in his tongue for taking out a thorn.
The badger is not as swift as a fox. He lives in a burrow in the mountain. The martin is like a cat. When lambs are young he makes a hole and drinks his blood. He lives in woods amoung (sic) the bushes.
The weasel is very small. He kills rabbits and drinks their blood.
Martin McGann 14th March ...
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my uncle
Michael Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There are many wild animals in this place such as rabbits, foxes, badgers, rats and mice. The cleverest of those animals is the fox, and the most destructive the rabbit. Rabbits are very plentiful in this place. They destroy gardens of corn on some people. I heard a story of how clever a fox was and yet got killed. One night a fox stole in through a narrow window in a hen house. When he had enough eaten he was thick fat and could not come out again. The people got him in the and killed him. There is a big fox den in a mountain belonging to Terence McGann. There are thousands of rabbit burrows.
Fergus Linnane 11th March 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my grandmother
Mrs. Burke
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
There are many wild animals around here such as the fox the badger the rabbits and the hares. There are two kinds of badgers, one of them is like a pig, and the other is like a dog. The dog badger is very wicked but the pig badger is not altogether as bad. The badger lives in holes down in the ground, and under stones.
There is a cure in a fox's tongue it would cure any cut, and it would also keep it from getting blood-poisoning.
The foxes and badgers kill most of the foul (sic).
Rita Burke 14th March 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There is not so may animals around here. Here are some of the name's. The fox the Badger the Rabbit, the Hare, the Martin or Poll Cat and the wild cat. The birds of prey are The Raven the Owl the Hawk and call crow.
There are many stories about foxs. One time a fox used to do great havoc in Ballyvaughan about five miles from here. He used to have a den in a mountain called Daingean. It was in a cave he had his den. He used to go down by swinging himself of a branch that was crossing the mouth of the cave. All the dogs who used to go after him used to get killed with the fall. At last after about 12 dogs being killed the young people went up to the cave one day. They saw how the fox used to do the trick.
They left the skin of the branch holding it. When the fox came the branch broke and he got killed.
John Kelly 15th March 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 12:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The old people used to spend some of the night at story telling and making useful articles for the house. They used to make ornaments and baskets. The ornaments were badly shaped because they had not the proper tools.
Baskets were troublesome to make and cost a lot of time and labour.
Snares. They made snares to catch rabbits. A snare is easily made. It is made with wire.
Straw mats. They used to make straw mats for their own use and sell some of them.
Grinding wheat was another pastime. They used to grind it with querns.
Nets. They used to make nets and catch fish and sell them. With the money they used to buy useful for the house.
The old women used to be always knitting and sewing.
John P. Kerin 16-3=38 (?)
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 11:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Linnane
The Lough House
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
33 years of age
In olden times people used to amuse themselves by making toys, The girls used to make dolls, things out of paper, and the boys used to make cradle birds, balls and other things. More girls make daisy chains and flower garlands. Men and women used to make baskets as a pastime. More women used to knit and sew. The old women used to be always knotting and more of them spinning and weaving.
Young men used to go out fouling (sic) on Sundays.
Maureen Linnane 15-3-37 (?)
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 10:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Droney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Cradle bird. When a boy wants to make a cradle bird he gets rods and he makes a frame. Then he gets tacks he tacks on the sticks on each side. He puts a stick around from side to side and another stick under it. When the bird comes he hops up on the stick and it falls and he is caught.
John Droney 15th March 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 10:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
The Lough House
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
The priests had hard times during the Penal Days. They were hunted from post to pillar. They took refuge in the mountains and in the caves.
About 2 1/2 miles from Bellharbour there is a place Poll Sagart. It is a small hollow in the mountain. It was there the people heard mass in the Penal Days. One Sunday the people were hearing mass the priest hunters rushed in on top of the people and and killed the priest and cut the head of him. They took the head with them and got paid for it. Whenever a bishop was killed the head was worth five times as much more money as that of a priest. The priest was buried there and Poll Sagart is the name of the place to this day.
Micko Linnane 8th March
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 10:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my grandfather
Thomas Linnane
Ballyhehan
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
8-3-38
In Penal times priests used to say Mass in caves, and in the open air. People used to follow the priest to hear Mass, and more people used to stay on guard so as to tell the priest if the enemy was coming.
One man named Tomás Mór lived in Deelin. He spied on Father Murphy and got £300 for his head. The priest was saying Mass opposite my grandfather's house up the mountain when the enemy killed him. The priest was buried where he was killed. Some people say the priest was not buried in it. Tomás Mór changed his name and went to America.
Maureen Linnane March 8th
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 10:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Long ago the old people used to have great fun at marriages. They used to be dancing a night and a day. During the night Straw Boys used to visit the house. The people used to light fires when the bride and bridegroom used to be coming home after marriage. They used to consider May and September to be unlucky for getting married. People used to come for miles and miles to a wedding. The bride and bridegroom used to receive small presents from the people around the house.
John P. Kerin 3rd March 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-28 10:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mary Linnane
The Lough House
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Some of the superstitions connected with marriage are that the bride should be dressed in something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue. Before motor cars were invented a man used to bring his wife behind him on horse back. An old shoe was always flung after the bride as a sign of luck. It was not lucky for the bridegroom to see the bride the night before the marriage. Rice was flung around the house of the bride while she was been (sic) married. It is lucky to break a dish that night.
Straw Boys often went to church although they were not asked. They shouted and danced their (sic) rough.
It is happy for the bride that the sun shines on
It is happy for the corpse that the rain falls on.
Thursday Friday Saturday are the unluckiest days.
Micko Linnane 3rd March 38
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 22:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my grandfather
Thomas Linnane
Ballyhehan
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
3-3-38
In olden times people used to get married in their own homes. The bridegroom would go to the bride's house in the morning. Sometimes there would be witnesses and more times there would not.
Most people get married during the Shrove which is from Christmas until Ash Wednesday. When the bride would be leaving she would take a glass and break it in three pieces for luck. An other person would fling an old shoe after the bride and the bridegroom for luck also.
People say Thursday, Friday and Saturday are unlucky days.
Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
And Saturday no luck at all.
Maureen Linnane 3-3-38
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 21:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Pat Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
3-3-38
Monday for health.
Tuesday for wealth.
Wednesday the best day of all.
Thursday for crosses.
Friday for losses.
Saturday no luck at all.
Long ago when people were getting married they used to have a party at the bride's house during the day. Then they would all go to the bridegroom's home. They would get married there and have an all night dance till morning. Years before that the men used to bring their wives behind them on horse back.
Fergus Linnane 3rd March 38.
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 21:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was an old woman living in Feakle long ago her name was Biddy Early She was married three times and had no children. She was a witch and she could cure people. She could then tell you about the person you wanted to be cured, whether he would live or die. It was how she had a bottle and she would shake the bottle and look into it. She could tell you if you were rich or. The people that would go to her would have to bring (them) her presents. She would not take any money.
Michael Davenport 25th Nov
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 21:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Pat Linnane,
Shesa,
Bellharbour,
Co Clare.
56 years of age.
There was once a young man in this parish. His name was Jim Whelan. He was a soldier and dispatch rider of the I.R.A. He got up one morning very early to deliver some despatches to his O.C. When he went out on his bicycle he found the whole place surrounded by Black and Tans.
He turned back again and hid the papers (?) carefully dressed in an old suit, took a tin can and went in pretence milking the ewes. The tans took no notice of him. When he was a safe distance away he went and informed his officer who immediatley sent his men to safe quarters. Next morning Whelan came back a very happy man because he had the lives of a good many saved.
Fergus Linnane 1st December 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 21:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father James Kelly.
People say that there is a large crock of gold hidden in a place in Ballyhehan called "Páirc na Squire" or the Squire's Park.
Once upon a time a man lived in that place. He was so rich that they called him the Squire. He was a very greedy man and when he died he buried a crock of gold under the fire place. The ruins of that castle are there still.
About a quarter of a mile from that place there is another place called Ail Buidhe. It was dug once but it closed in again. There are three veins in it, one of gold, one of silver and another of lead. One day some miners went digging for the gold. They had a good deal dug at dinner time.
When they were eating their dinner they heard a great noise.
When they went up it was knocked in. They never opened it since then.
John Kelly 18th November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by father
Pat Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
28-2-38
There is an old lime kiln near my home. I do not know who owned it but no lime was burned in it with ages. There is also a place near it were option was made long ago. They used draw clay up the mountains to make gardens. Mrs Carty used to wave blankets and linen and other clothes. Every house had its own spinning wheel and some have them yet but the people do not know how to use them. There is an old quern in the chapel of New Quay.
Fergus Linnane 28th Feb 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 18:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
28-2-38
The oldest trade around here was scutching flax. They used to prepare the place first. They used to sow the flax like corn. When it was ripe it was cut with a hook then the people bound it into small sheaves. It was flung into some water and left there for nine days. It was taken out of the water and dried. The flax was brought into the house and left on the table. The seed was knocked off with a beetle and the seed was left up for next year. The flax was ready for spinning. Every woman had a small spinning wheel. They used to make beautiful linens.
Micko Linnane 28th Feb 38
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 18:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co.Clare
Spinning was a great trade among the house keepers of this place about 80 or 90 years ago.
They used to shear the sheep and spin the wool with a spinning wheel. Then they used to send it to a weaver. He used to weave the oil into friezes and flannels. Some of the housekeepers used to go to the towns on the market days and sit at the corners with the spun wool. The people of the town used to buy the wool from them. Some women used to make riches out it (sic). They don't spin at all now because the clothes got very cheap and it would not be worth a person's while to be wasting time with it.
John Kelly 28th February 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There was an old school in Muckinish a place near Ballyvaughan. It is knocked down now. The ruins of it are there still.
It used to be a school in the weekends and a chapel on the Sundays. The fifteen nails where the stations used to be hung are to be seen there still. The holy water font is there also. They are there with ninty (sic) years.
The school master used to slap the scholars for talking Irish. He used to stay in every one of the pupils houses for a week. His name was Patrick O'Loughlen. The school is built for over one hundred years. It was only used as a chapel for the first few years. Then they started a school in it because the other schools were too far away from the children.
John Kelly 24th Feb 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 18:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father, Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
52 years of age
Many years ago schools were held in simple places. There is a ruin of an old school house in Gortaclare. A teacher used to teach in a barn. The name of the teacher was Miss O'Brien. She used to go from house to house and get small sums of money. The salary they used to get was one shilling a week per pupil. There also is another school house in Gortaclare. One of the teachers names was Mr. Burke and the other Mr. Donlannan. The scholars used to have books of their own.
John P. Kerin 24th Feb 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 18:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Sheshia
Bellharbour
Co. Clare.
There is the ruins of an old school two and a half miles from our house called Gortyclare National School. It was built many years ago.
It was built by the side of the pupelic (sic) road. It is a one storey building. It is situated in the middle of a small moher with high walls around it.
The first teacher was Mr. Edward Burke and the second was Mr. Donnellan and the third was Miss O'Brien. It was in her time the school was burnt. Mr. Burke was from Kinvara in the County Galway and Miss O'Brien was from Liken in Killfineora (sic).
It was all English the pupils were taught. Any person who had children going to school had to pay 7s - 6d in the end of the year.
Micko Linnane 24th Feb 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 17:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. P. Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
In the year 1912 my mother and her brother and sisters were sitting by the fire in the month of November. It was a very bad night and my mother's sister was sitting in the hob. A flash of lightning came down the chimney and burned the side of her face. The rest were thrown around the house but not much hurt. She recovered after two years and is in America now. The end of the house was knocked but no one was killed.
Fergus Linnane 15th Dec 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 17:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co Clare
In the year of 1912 there was a great fall of snow. It came on the 11th of November.
It covered all the mountains so that a person need never cross a wall. When the now was about two days on the ground it began to freeze. The frost made the snow so hard that it was impossible to walk.
A man named Pat Kerin lost nine sheep in the snow. The snow lasted three weeks on the land. It lasted for months on the mountains. The people used to make snow men. Some of them lasted until the 4th of January.
John Kelly 15th Dec 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 17:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Droney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
48 years of age.
About fourteen years ago there was a cargo of salt coming from Glasgow for McDonagh in Galway. Edward O'Laughlen Ballyvaughan was the pilot.
In the early hours of the morning a storm arose and the ship was blown into a place called "Barr an Ard" not very far from Aughinish. The ship was not much damaged.
At low water many horses and cars used to go out for for carloads of salt and sell it in Kinvarra for 2 1/2 d a lump. When the ship was emptied she floated and went into Galway to be repaired.
Chris Droney 6th Dec 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 17:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mary Burke
Turlough
Bell-Harbour
Co. Clare
39 years of age
Long long ago there lived big giants in Ireland, they were very wicked and did not hesitate to kill. There lived a very wicked one in a place called Glin in the Co. Limerick. His home was in a very lonely place. There was a robber called Gadhuidhe Dubh. One night the robber lost his way and came into the giant's house. The giant was out but there was a young girl house keeping. When she heard the giant coming in she put the robber in hide. The giant had an infant coming in and ordered the girl to kill and cook it for his supper. He fell asleep and when the Gadhuidhe got him asleep he killed him & went his way. The giant was very wealthy & the house-keeper had all his wealth. She cared up the child and made him her heir. When he grew to be a man that he was called the Knight of Glin.
Mary Burke 25th November 19,38
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 17:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told me by my father
Thomas McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co-Clare
Age 52 years.
There are many old sayings about the weather.
Old people that have most of the sayings.
When the swallows fly low it is a great sign of rain. They saw (sic) if the seagulls fly towards the land it is a great token of rain. If there is a ring around the moon it is a great sign of rain. When the cat puts his tail to the fire it is a great token of rain. When the first drop hits you on the eye you are very near rain.
John McGann 1st December 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 17:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
35 years of age.
There were many shipwrecks in the time of the trouble in 1916. The English used to set floating mines in the water for the Man-o-Wars of other countries. Those mines used to float very far away.
One day to Connemara boats were sailing outside Ballyvaughan. There were two men in each boat. As they were going out to Blackhead a 'mine' struck one of them and blew itself and the men into bits.
The other boatmen were so frightened that they sailed into Galway Bay and stayed there for some time.
John Kelly 6 Dec 1937.
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 12:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told tome by my mother
Mrs Bakey
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co.Clare
age 39 years
When St Brigits Day comes everyone makes a cross of timber and pit in the rafter. When St Patricks Day comes everyone wears a shamrock. The people visit St Colman's well, this well is far off in the mountain, it is between two mountains on the way to Tubber. Where this (noun) well is situated is called Kilala. St Colman spent many years there as a hermit and he worked many miracals (sic). St John's Day comes on the twenty ninth of June and most of the people light a bon fire.
Mary Ann Bakey June 1st 19'38
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 12:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Droney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
48 years of age.
About fourteen years ago there was a cargo of salt coming from Glasgow for McDonagh in Galway. Edward O'laughlin Ballyvaughan was the pilot.
In the early hours of the morning a storm arose and the ship was blown into a place called "Barr an Ard" not very far from Aughinish. The ship was not much damaged.
At low water many horses and cars used to go out for for carloads of salt and sell it in Kinvarra for 2 1/2 d a lump. When the ship was emptied she floated and went into Galway to be repaired.
Chris Droney 6th Dec 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 12:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Droney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
age 50 years
About 25 years ago Pat Kerins of New Quay, and Tom Fahy and Michael Ganor were going to Ballyvaughan in a sailing boat. It was a nice calm evening when they started. She was a centre keel boat, and they did not dip her enough for the strength of the wind.
The boat capsized and they were thrown out. Pat Kerins was the best swimmer. The three started to swim (?) for the shore. Pat Jerkins had his hands out to swim when they got cramped and he was drowned. The other two came in safe.
John Droney 3rd December 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 12:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by
John Nestor
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
age 42 years
Once upon a time there was a man named Johnny Burke. One day he went for a bathe and he got drowned. It was in the month of July 1925.
The people think that it was a cramp he got in his legs. They sent a diver to get him and when they found him he was drowned. It was in Turlough that he got drowned in a lake.
Frank Hawes 2nd Dec ...
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 12:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Droney
Bellharbour
Co Clare
48 years of age
Long ago the houses were very bad and queer looking.
They were small, in many of them only one room and a kitchen.
The doors were narrow and low only a hole and no glass for a window.
The roof was made of hazel or ash branches and and in top of them were scraws which were cut on coarse land. Outside the thatch was rushes which were fixed on with scallops and ropes made of hay called súgáns.
A hole in the gable and a broken bucket was all they had for a chimney.
On each side of the fire were two stone hobs for sitting on.
They had no chairs but stones and mats made of straw.
They used to sleep in the kitchen in a big
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 12:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Michael McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
56 years of age
The following denote rain.
If smoke comes down the chimney.
If wind comes down from the south.
If the swallow flies low. If the cricket is singing. A mackerel sky and the wind from Ballyvaughan are the best sign of good weather.
Martin McGann December 1st 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 12:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Linnane
Shisha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
32 years of age
There are many tokens by which we know whether the weather will be bad or good. If foxes bark much in October they are calling up a great fall of snow.
January 14th will be either the wettest or coldest day in the year. If smoke goes straight up the chimney rain may be expected.
If on the trees the leaves still hold,
The coming winter will be cold.
Maureen Linnane 24th November 1937 (?)
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 11:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co.Clare
50 years of age
There was once a man living in this. His name was seen Luachraíghe. He was very strong. He was hired at a mill in Doors near the town of Kinvara. It was about twenty miles from his house.
It i said he used to go that distance in three hours. He would pass a horse walking.
He would carry a bag of flour on his back from Doors to Tubber a distance of twelve miles in three ours and he used to pass a horse walking and the bag of flour on his back. The people used to say that he was enchanted.
John Kelly 24th November 1937.
senior member (history)
2019-04-27 11:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Michael McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
65 years of age
1) A man without eyes saw apples on a tree, he took no apples, he left no apples, and how can that be?
2) Black and white and read ll over? A newspaper.
3) What's cut, passed around and never eaten? A pack of cards.
4) If a ton of coal costs 50 s, what will a boat of turf come to? Ashes.
5) How many sticks go to a blackbird's nest? None but all he brings.
6) A man went into a public house for 4 gallons of whiskey. The man of the shop had only a 3, 5 and eight gallon measure. How did he give him correct measurement?
7) Long legs, crooked thighs, small head and no eyes? A tongs.
8) Once in a minute, twice in a moment, and never in a thousand years? M.
Nora McGann 30th November 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 21:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my uncle
Michael Linnane
Shesha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There are may wild animals in the place such as rabbits, foxes, badgers, rats and mice. The cleverest of those animals is the fox, and the most destructive the rabbit. Rabbits are very plentiful in this place. They destroy gardens of corn on some people. I heard a story of how clever a fox was and yet got killed. One night a fox stole in through a narrow window in a hen house. When he had enough eaten he was thick fat and could not come out again. The people got him in the and killed him. There is a big fox den in a mountain belonging to Terence McGann. There are thousands of rabbit burrows.
Fergus Linnane 11th March 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 20:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Kilwelran. Páirc na Srallach (?). Máám. Páirc na Squire. Móinín. Túrlach.
Kilwelran is names after a graveyard.
Páirc na Srallach (?) is named after a still and a place where they used to make poteen long ago.
Máám is named for the great hollow which is in it. There used to be great battles fought in it. The barricades are to be seen in it still.
Páirc na Squire is named after a very rich man who lived there once.
Móinín is a mountain over Bellharbour there are some great holes in. People say one of them is bottomless. There did a woman get killed in it once.
Túrlach is a place where a lake of water collects in the winter and dries in the summer. There were three men drowned in that lake. Their names were McGann and Linnane and Burke.
John Kelly 9th March 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by m father
James Kelly
Kilwelran
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Kilwelran. Páirc na Scallach (?). Máám. Páirc na Squire. Móinín Túrlach.
Kilwelran is names after a graveyard.
Páirc na Scallach (?) is named after a still and a place where they used to make poteen long ago.
Máám is named for the great hollow which is in it. There used to be great battles fought in it. The barricades are to be seen in it still.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 20:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
James Droney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
9th March 1938
There are many names of places in this parish. Here are some of them. The field of the streams. Gaire Árd. Gaire na feócadán. Poll na gcat. The lios. Gaire fada. Gaire táilliúir.
The field of the streams. There are little streams flowing from a wall through the field.
Gaire Árd. This garden is up on a hight (sic) with trees growing all round it.
Gaire na feócadán. There are always thistles growing in the field every year.
Poll na gcat. It is said that cats are heard every Tuesday and every Saturday night fighting and killing one another.
The lios. It is said that there are fairies in the lios. It is a round hollow in the fields with trees growing all round it.
Gaire fada. Gaire fada is a big long garden about five acres.
Gaire táilliúr. It is said that a tailor named Patch Hynes lived in a coul there long ago.
Chris Droney 10th March 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 20:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to my my father
Tim Kerins
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
9-3-1938
Turlough. Aill Buidhe. Poll Sagart. Poll a Phuca. Poll an adhmaid. Red hill. Coul Sally. Sgeach Bhrighde.
Turlough is so called because there are so many turloughs around it.
Aill Buidhe. Gold is hidden there.
Poll Sagart. The people say that priests used to hide there during the penal days.
Poll an Phuca. Fairies are said to be in Poll a Phuca.
Poll an adhmaid. Many years ago it was a great forest but is now cut.
Red hill is so called because it is covered with heath.
Could Sally. An old woman named Sally used to live there.
Sgeach Bhrighde. St Brigid visited Sgeach and it is called in honour of St Brigid.
John P. Kerins 9th March 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 19:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to my my father
Tim Kerins
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
9-3-1938
Turlough. Aill Buidhe. Poll Sagart. Poll an Phuca. Poll an adhmaid. Red hill. Coul Sally. Sgeach Bhrighde.
Turlough is so called because there are so many turloughs around it.
Aill Buidhe. Gold is hidden there.
Poll Sagart. The people say that priest used to hide there during the penal days.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 18:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Thomas Bakey
Aughavinane
Ballharbour
Co. Clare
age 60 years.
There are many roads around here under no particular name but deriving their names through the villages they pass. Turlough and Shisha and Bellharbour are on the main road, while Ballyphehan and Aughavinane are bye roads. There is also another road leading to the famous Abbey of Corcomroe or Cor-comh-Ruaidh: i.e. the the district of the red quarrel built by Donal Mór O'Brien in the twelfth century and was occupied by monks of the Cistercian Order until Cromwell's arrival. All those roads run through the southern part of Glannamanagh or Gleann na Manach i.e. the glen of the monks. In a secluded valley in those mountains known as the Burn (sic) mountains where St Colman lived as a hermit for years. There are several battles fought in these districts during the Anglo Irish family the Burkes of Clanricard and the O'Briens of Thomond. There is a pass in the mountains known as the Kyber (sic) pass or Scalp and is supposed to be given its name by the English, as been something like the Kyber pass in Afghanistan where was exterminated 3000 British soldiers by a horde of mountaineers.
Mary Ann Bakey May 27th 19'38
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to my my father
Thomas Bakey
Aughavinane
Ballharbour
Co. Clare
age 60 years.
There are many roads around here under no particular name but deriving their names through the villages they pass. Turlough and Shisha and Bellharbour are on the main road, while Ballyphehan and Aughavinane are bye roads. There is also another road leading to the famous Abbey of Corcomroe or Cor-comh-Ruaidh: i.e. the the district of the red quarrel built by Donal Mór O'Brien in the twelfth century and was occupied by monks of the Cistercian Order until Cromwell's arrival. All those roads run through the southern part of Glannamanagh or Gleann na Manach i.e. the glen of the monks. In a secluded valley in those mountains known as the Burn (sic) mountains where St Colman lived as a hermit for years.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 18:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
knives and stuck the sheep, the lamb, the calf the goat and the bull.
Well to begin with, in this city, We live content and
Pay o rent.
In Cregg na Vagabonds.
1-3-'38
Long, long ago when the famine was raging in this parish a great deal of people died and were buried in Cor Com Roe Abbey. They were all Catholics. It happened that a protestant man was buried among the Catholics and no person in the parish knew it. Missions were very common in those days and the missioners decided to go to Cor com Rue Abbey and see if all who were there, were in peace. The missioners called out three times to know were they in peace, and the third time they got an answer to say thy are disturbed by a protestant man that was buried amongst them. The protestant was brought away from the Abbey and was buried in his own grave-yard. It was said that he was a gunner that lived in the tower at Finnavara.
4-3-'38
Long ago there was a special field round New Quay alive with fairies. It could never
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 17:55
approved
rejected
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were of humble parents and were elected by the corporation to their royalty. Then urban council called on the corporation to leave the croning to the majority of the citizens. But before election day the famine appeared and swept urban council, corporation, lord and lady off the face of the earth. So the present day tenants of Patrick St are complete strangers to the city. But before all the inhabitants were swept away they erected a monument to the memory of the lord. A few verses were composed about the royalty. It started about a building the lord got up against the gable of Mayor the third's house.
It started thus:-
"The lord of the city,
He built a hotel
It being 3 ft high or four.
But soon came tumbling down again,
By the grand Old Sally Mór."
1/3/18
This city derived its name from a tribe that lived underground in the heart of the city. It was called the city of the tribes, and a bad tibe they were. Although they were courageous and plucky, when the bad times came, sooner than starve they took to the fields with bowie
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 17:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
were of humble parents and were elected by the corporation to their royalty. Then urban council called on the corporation to leave the croning to the majority of the citizens. But before election day the famine appeared and swept urban council, corporation, lord and lady off the face of the earth. So the present day tenants of Patrick St are complete strangers to the city. But before all the inhabitants were swept away they erected a monument to the memory of the lord. A few verses were composed about the royalty. It started about a building the lord got up against the gable of Mayor the third's house.
It started thus:-
"The lord of the city,
He built a hotel
It being 3 ft high or four.
But soon came tumbling down again,
By the grand Old Sally Mór."
1/3/18
This city derived its name from a tribe that lived underground in the heart of the city. It was called the city of the tribes, and a bad tibe they were. Although they were
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 17:36
approved
rejected
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could and suddenly he stopped. "By the powers of God what is that" said Jack. He saw a brilliant company of lovely little forms dancing under an oak tree. Never did man see anything more beautiful. They were not three inches high but they were white as the driven snow. They were numberless. By looking long at them, he soon saw objects which had not struck him at first. In the middle was a chief of superior stature, round whom the group appeared to move. He gazed so long that he was quite overcome with joy and could not help shouting out. "Bravo, little fellow" said he "Well kicked and strong". But the instant he uttered the words, the night was darkened and the fairies vanished with the speed of lightning.
Material supplied by Michael Jordan
Ballyvelaghan
Burrin, Co. Clare
Age 36.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 17:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
got an other coal and put it into his pipe and he went on his way. When the oner of the house looked into the tub there was no water in it but there remained three pieces of butter. In the bottom of the tub was written those words, "This butter wa got from your one three cows whom you have not milked for the past three months". The fellow went to look at his cows. He found the three of them with red milk flowing from them. He looked carefully and knew they were not his own cows. He went into his house for a pail to get the milk. When he came to h style he opened the door and found his own three cows safely back.
Once upon a time there lived a man in New Quay called Jack Mulligan. Jack believed devoutly in fries.The people used to say to him "Did you ever see fairies"? "Never" Jack would say. Well then until you do, do not be bothering us with any of you old fairy tales". Jack got into a passion and headed straight for home. He went on a quickly as he
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 17:23
approved
rejected
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lantern and he is going round the world ever since and he is called "Jack of the lantern" ever since.
When "Eileen Aronn" died it is said that she appeared to a certain man the day after her burial. He did not mind her as it was only about 12.30 in the afternoon. She did not say anything until she was past and then she cried out in a loud voice "Where, oh where, is the man I love, Carrol, oh where is your harp". Then she gave a loud mournful cry and vanished. People say that she is the "bean side" and she cries only after certain families.
It is said that in the olden times there lived in Finavara a man who always kept at least three or four cows. This special evening he was sitting alone by his fireside when another man came in to redden his pipe. He took one coal and put it into a tub of water that was near by. Then he took an other coal and did the same thing. He took a third coal and put it into the tub. He then
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 17:09
approved
rejected
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Told to me by my father
John Scully
Carron
Co. Clare
52 years of age.
1) What man in the army wears the biggest cap. Ans The with the biggest head.
2) What does a woman put up when the rain comes down. Ans. An umbrella.
3) Jenny red petticoat, Jenny red nose, the longer she lives the shorter she grows. Ans. A candle.
4) Where was Moses when he was smoking his pipe. Ans. Behind it.
5) Down under the valley there lives a deer, silver horns, and golden ears neither skin flesh feathers nor bones riddle me that or leave it alone. Ans. A snail.
6) If a hen and a half laid a egg and a half in a day and a half how many would she lay in a week. Ans. 7
Joseph Scully
24th November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 17:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7) London derry Cork and Kerry spell me that without a K.
Answer. THAT
8) What is half the moon like
Answer. The other half.
9) What has always pains
Answer. A window
10) Why is E a very cold letter
Answer. Because it is always in bed.
11) Black and white and read all over
Answer. A newspaper
12) Spell red rougue (sic) in three letters
Answer. FOX
13) Spell blackbird in four letters
Answer. CROW
14) What four letters would frighten a robber
Answer. O.I.C.U.
15) Where was uses when the light was out
Answer. In the dark.
Chris Droney 23rd November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 16:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Droney
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
There were not many giants around this place. There was one on New Quay. Every day he used to come and take sheep away with him.
The people gathered to fight him. When they went into he cave he shut all the doors. He had a big pipe and he lit it, and he took a big draw out of it and opened the door and blew it in and smothered all the people,
Then he challenged to see who would put a stone as high as him, and if he was beaten he would leave them alone and go away.
One man had a wild duck. He went off to meet the giant. The giant got a large stone and put it into the clouds and it fell a little away from them. The man said if I pelt the stone it will never come down. He pelted the duck and she flew up into he clouds and flew away so the giant had to leave.
John Droney 25th Nov 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Pat Linnane,
Shesha,
Bellharbour
Co Clare.
56 years of age
Lived in Shesha
Long ago there lived a man named Jack He was very poor and was married. He had one cow and he went to the fair to the fair to sell her. He sold the cow to three persons for £16. The three men started argueing for the cow. A policeman came up and told Jack to clear away with the cow.
The men brought Jack to court. He asked an atorney's advice. The atorney told him to say whist leave it so. He went into court and the judge asked him why did he sell the cow to three persons Jack said 'whist leave it so. The judge said take him away he is mad.
Jack met the atorney outside and the atorney asked him for £10 for giving him an advice. Jack said 'whist leave it so. Jack had £48 and his cow instead of £16 and no cow.
Fergus Linnane 30th November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 16:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
Shisha
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
39 years of age.
Lived in Shish all his life.
Once upon a time a man was going to a fair. When he was bout two miles away from home his pig lay down on the road and would not stir for him. Though he beat her she would not stir. He went in to Biddy Earley's house for two pills. He came out gave one to the pig and away she went out of his sight. When he could not keep up to het he took one of the pills himself. He came up to her but she was dead. He did not know what to do then so he went home. When his wife saw him coming without the pig she was very proud. But when he told her what had happened she called him a "dirty amadán". He said it was not for any good he got the pills.
Maureen Linnane 22nd November '37.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 16:40
approved
rejected
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Told to me by my father
John Droney
Nellharbour
Co. Clare
50 years of age.
There was once an old woman and she lived all alone. One stormy winter she got a very bad cold, and got a very bad pain in her chest. She tried a lot of cures to cure the cough. At last she called the doctor. He gave her a blister (sic), and told her to put it on her chest.
Next day the doctor called to see her. He met her at the door and said, How is your cold today". Ah sure said she not a bit better. I had no chest to put the blister on, only a box. Look it is sticking to it yet, and I am not a bit better.
John Droney 22nd Nov 1937.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 16:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
53 years of age
Old witches and giants were not very plentiful around here long ago.There was one woman in Feakle whose name was Biddy Early. Another old woman lived Biddy but her name is not known. Biddy Early was able to cure anyone she liked. The other old woman had a sone who was good at witchcraft.
There was a long drought and two farmers decided to ask the woman's son to bring rain and he said he would. He sat outside his house with a wife on each side of him. They were not long outside when rain fell on the two farms. All of a sudden a flash of lightning came and it killed the man. The two women escaped but died in a few days time with the shock.
John P. Kerin 25th Nov. 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:43
approved
rejected
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Told to me by my grandfather
John Kerin
Dooneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Aged 89 years.
The houses in this parish long ago were made very quer (sic) and funny. There were no such thing as slates. It is how the houses used to be thatched with straw and rushed and kept tight by scallops(?) from one end of the house to the other.
On the top of the house was a hole down (?) the roof and a piece of a bucket or a jam crock for the chimney. There was only one door and one window in the houses. The windows which were made very funny were made very small. It is how the glass (udes) used to be sunk in the morter (sic) and a little piece of a stick inside to keep it closed. It used to be very dark inside in the houses long ago because they used to have no light only the light of the door. Inside the door there used to be two sticks out in the wall and one across where all the hens used to sleep at night time. The people used to sleep in long beds called campbeds.
Chris Droney 25th Nov 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my grandfather
John Kerin
Dooneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Aged 89 years.
The houses in this parish long ago were made very quer (sic) and funny. There were no such thing as slates. It is how the houses used to be thatched with straw and rushed and kept tight by scallops(?) from one end of the house to the other.
On the top of the house was a hole down (?) the roof and a piece of a bucket or a jam crock for the chimney. There was only one door and one window in the houses. The windows which were made very funny were made very small. It is how the glass (udes) used to be sunk in the morter (sic) and a little piece of a stick inside to keep it closed. It used to be very dark inside in the houses long ago because they used to have no light only the light of the door. Inside the door there used to be two sticks out in the wall and one across where all the hens used to sleep at night time. The people used to sleep in long beds called camp beds.
Chris Droney 25th Nov 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:37
approved
rejected
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Told to me by my grandfather
John Kerin
Dooneen
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
Aged 89 years.
The houses in this parish long ago were made very quer (sic) and funny. There were no such thing as slates. It is how the houses used to be thatched with straw and rushed and kept tight by scallops(?) from one end of the house to the other.
On the top of the house was a hole down (?) the roof and a piece of a bucket or a jam crock for the chimney. There was only one door and one window in the houses. The windows which were made very funny were made very small. It is how the glass (udes) used to be sunk in the morter (sic) and a little piece of a stick inside to keep it closed.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Michael McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
65 years of age
On a mountain called "Sliabh a Túrlach" there is a pot of gold supposed to be hidden in a big cliff. A few years ago two men who had heard about the gold got two iron bars, and shovels and began to dig for it.
The men were digging for many months but they could not find anything. One day as they were digging one of them heard a great noise, and they got an awful fright.
The two men ran home for their lives and nobody ever tried to get the gold since. The rabbits have their burrows in the pit now.
Nora McGann 29th November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:24
approved
rejected
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Told to me by my father
John Linnane
The Lough House
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
45 years of age.
Three miles from Turlough School there is a small village called Oughtmama. A half a mile from the village up near a mounts there are seven churches.
At the base of the church it is said there is some gold. A man named Patrick Maher went looking for it. He kept digging until at last his spade struck by gold. It was a bar of gold; after a while he got 5 more bars. He got one big bar. He hid them and went home. Next morning he went up to get the gold but there were only six bars of the metal.
Micko Linnane 22nd November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Linnane
The Lough House
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
45 years of age.
Three miles from Turlough School there is a small village called Oughtmama. A half a mile from the village up near a mounts there are seven churches.
At the base of the church it is said there is some gold. A man named Patrick Maher went looking for it. He kept digging until at last his spade struck by gold. It was a bar of gold; after a while he got 5 more bars. He got one big bar. He hid them and went home. Next morning he went up to get the gold but there were only six bars of the metal.
Micko Linnane 22nd November 1939.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs Burke
Turlough
Bellharbour
Co Clare
38 years of age
Lived in Turlough all her life.
About three miles from the Turlough National School, there is a mountain called Aile Wee. There is a silver mine on the top of that mountain. It was worked long years ago. There is no road through this mountain, so that the minerals that they dug long ago had to be carried on the backs of donkeys.
About five years ago a strange may came here and took lodgings for a week. He visited this old mine for a week. There people were sure that it was going to be opened but it was not. There is also another mine in Aughavinnane mountain about a mile and a half from Ailwee. The mineral there, is converted into whiting. As late as a few years ago Judge Comyns took samples from there. The old people say that these mountains are full of minerals if they were worked.
Mary Burke 19th November 19,37
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
village to tell him where the opening was into the altar. They would not tell him, because they did not want an English man to get it.
The place where the opening is, is ploughed now, and the ploughman goes over the flag with the plough.
John Droney 19th November 19,37
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
John Droney
Bellharbour
Co Clare
50 years of age
About two miles from my home there is a large demesne. It belongs to a man named Skerrit. There are two lioses in it. It is said that there is a gold altar hidden in one of the lioses, and a pot of gold in the other.
One Sunday when mass was on, two men went to dig for the pot of gold. When they were awhile digging and had it nearly got, two big black cats came and sat on the flag that was over the pot. The two men ran away afraid, and left the spades after them. When they came next day for the spades, they closed the hole again.
About ten years ago an English man came and was looking for the old people of the
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs Burke
Turlough
Bellharbour
Co Clare
38 years of age
Lived in Turlough all her life.
About three miles from the Turlough National School, there is a mountain called Aile Wee. There is a silver mine on the top of that mountain. It was worked long years ago. There is no road through this mountain, so that the minerals that they dug long ago had to be carried on the backs of donkeys.
About five years ago a strange may came here and took lodgings for a week. He visited this old mine for a week. There people were sure that it was going to be opened but it was not. There is also another mine in Aughavinnane mountain about a mile and a half from Ailwee. The mineral there, is converted into whiting. As late as a few years ago Judge Comyns took samples from there. The old people say that these mountains are full of minerals if they were worked.
Mary Burke 19th November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs Burke
Turlough
Bellharbour
Co Clare
38 years of age
Lived in Turlough all her life.
About three miles from the Turlough National School, there is a mountain called Aile Wee. There is a silver mine on the top of that mountain. It was worked long years ago. There is no road through this mountain, so that the minerals that they dug long ago had to be carried on the backs of donkeys.
About five years ago a strange may came here and took lodgings for a week. He visited this old mine for a week. There people were sure that it was going to be opened but it was not.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father John Scully
Deelin
Carron
Co. Clare
age 52 years.
There is gold hidden in the lands of Mr. Corbett. It is hidden there for many a hear. No one ever tried to get it yet.
There is a big tree over it. This farm is in Deelin.
John Scully
Deelin
Carron
Co Clare
19th Nov. 1937
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Linnane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
32 years of age
Lived in Ballyhehan for 18 years, and lives in Sheshia since.
About three miles from here there is a place called Muckinish Castle, where there is gold hidden. There is a big case in it and underneath that castle the gold is hidden. No body has ever tried to get it, because it would be great trouble to knock the castle. There are fairies in the place as well, and people think it would not be safe to go looking for it. There is a house beside it.
The castle is beside the sea and can be seen from the church. Nobody knows who left the gold there.
Maureen Linnane 18th November '37.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 18:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Linnane
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
32 years of age
Lived in Ballyhehan for 18 years, and lives in Sheshia since.
About three miles from here there is a place called Muckinish Castle, where there is gold hidden. There is a big case in it and underneath that castle the gold is hidden. No body has ever tried to get it, because it would be great trouble to knock the castle. There are fairies in the place as well, and people think it would not be safe to go looking for it. There is a house beside it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 17:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Pat Linnane,
Shesha,
Bellharbour,
Co Clare.
57 years of age
Lived in Shesha all his life.
About one mile from my house which is situated in Burren Co Clare, there is an old road leading to a burial ground. My father told me a Story about it.
One night two men were coming from cuairt and they saw a black cat over a flagstone, and he held a crock of gold in its claws. They came next day with spades to dig up the gold. They went down about twenty feet and were just taking up the gold when a motor car drove up and took the gold from them. The gold was left in the same place next day and they covered it up again. No one ever opened it since.
Fergus Linnane 18th November 37
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co Clare.
Long ago travellers used to the houses and stay a few days in each house. When a man who used to compose songs came along great joy came in the village.
One mans name was Matt Mahon.
He used to compose nice songs about those who gave him lodging. No one ever used to refuse to give him lodging. In the nights all the people of the village would gather in order to hear him sing songs. When travellers came along they got no welcome in any house. They used to sell saucepans dishes and other useful articles. Tinkers stole some food and begged for more. There are many bands of tinkers such as the Caseys, the Furys, the Sweeneys.
John P. Kerin 29 March 1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Thomas McGann
Aughavinane
Bellharbour
Co Clare

Farmers do not like to start sowing the seeds any day but Friday. It is supposed to be a lucky day. They like to start ploughing and doing all their work on Friday.

It is said that the fourth day of the year is a cross day. Tuesday is the cross day of the year this year so nobody is getting married on that day.

Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays are unlucky day for marriages

Margaret McGann
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Tim Kerin
Gortaclare
Bellharbour
Co Clare
Saturday and Thursday are unlucky for starting work because the people say the work will never be finished.
Monday is unlucky for getting clipped.
Friday is lucky for starting any work except to get married.
Monday Tuesday and Wednsday (sic) are lucky for starting any work.
If people had a new house they like to go to live in it of a Friday.
Friday is lucky for sowing new potatoes.
John P. Kerin 22 march 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told to me by my father
Mr James Kelly
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
People say that Friday's and Monday's are the best days for biginning (sic) work. If a person wants to go ploughing he waits until Friday.
People don't make crosses for Saint Briged (sic) until St Brigeds (sic) Eve.
The eleven first days of April are called The Old March. It is dangerous to leave off any clothes for those eleven days.
John Kelly 22nd March 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 17:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If you see the dog eating grass it is a sure sign of rain also.
Sean Gill
Standard VI.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 17:36
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I visited my grandfather a few days ago. His name is John Gill, of Drumaweir. He has a lot of folklore. He told me some signs of the weather. Here are some of them. If the stars are shining very brightly it is a sign of frost. If the sun is red when she is going down in the evening it is a sign of frost also. When you see the birds flying very low about the fields it is a sign of a storm. If you take a stone out of the sea and leave it lying on the ground and if it gets damp it is a sign of rain. When there is a blue blaze in the fire it is a sign of rain. If you see no stars out it is a sign of rain. If the sky is dark and cloudy it is a sign of rain or if there is a ring around the moon. If the mountains and sea are very close, it is a sign of rain or of a storm. If the smoke goes up to the sky very calmly it is a sign of rain. If there is a strong gale of wind there is going to be a storm of thunder and lightning. If you see the cat washing her face it is a sure sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 17:25
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I looked through a pane of glass and I saw the dead carrying the living.
A ship.
It was a month old when Moses was born and it is a month today.
The moon.
As round as an apple, as flat as a pan, the half of a woman and the whole of a man.
A penny.
Annie McCole
Standard VI.
7-1-35
I went up the road and I went down the road and I took the road on my back.
A ladder.
A hard working father, an easy going mother, and twelve sons.
A clock.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 17:21
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A violin.
What is the difference between a stamp and a schoolmaster?
One sticks with a lick and the other licks with a stick.
Why is Ireland the richest country in the world?
Because its capital is always Dublin (doubling).
What is it was made to day, no one likes to keep and no one likes to give away?
One's bed.
What is it goes round and round the house and rests in a corner at night?
The broom.
I know a house; it would not hold a mouse and it has as many windows as are in the king's house.
A thimble.
Patrick Kealey,
Standard VI
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 21:03
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CURES The most famous "curers" in the district were the Barnes family and one person in each generation held the gift. It was passed on from parent to child. The present holder, Mr James Barnes, does not make use of his gift and has to be coaxed to perform a cure. Yet many cures are attributed to him especially diseases of the skin. Herbs he uses but never tells that they are.
His mother, though, was famous. People came from far and near to have their ailments cured and 'tis said she never failed. She, too, used herbs from which she made ointments given to the sufferer. If one person had a complaint a loan of "Mrs Barnes ointment" from another was a sure cure or a drink from a bottle mixed by her.
The present holder has no descendants (children of his own) and we often wonder who will be the lucky one after him The family live on a farmers place in the middle of Barnes' Lane a short cut to the Burrow. It branches off the Portrane - Donabate road about half
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 21:02
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way between the Mental Hospital front and back gates. The lane is the private property of the Barnes who allow it to be used as a right of way. On one day in the year - Christmas Day - the gate at either end is closed to assert the owner's rights.
It is firmly believed in this district that a woman, marrying a man with the same name, gets the power of curing. Consequently Mrs O'Callaghan who lives in Portrane Demesne and was formerly Miss O'Callaghan is credited with the gift. At any rate she is famous as a curer of whooping cough. The treatment consists of a mixture of jam and sugar administered by her and is thought to be infallible. I never heard that she cured anything but Whooping Cough. Many people, however out more faith in Chink[?] Well Water
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 21:01
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ROLLING BARRELS Some years ago the people of Ballisk, a little townland just beside the railway station were troubled at night by a queer sound which resembled barrels being rolled along the road. The sound began at "the Hand" and went on to what is called the Commons' Gate - a gate about thirty yards farther down on the Portrane road. There the sound stopped and travelled back to the Hand again. The mystery was never solved.
THE SOUL"S GRIDDLE In the olden days when the poor were very poor - a kind lady thought to be a relative of the Cobb's of Newbridge House, bought a griddle and gave it to the people of Ballisk. Anyone could use it on condition that it was left outside the door after use ready for the next borrower. Once however a women kept the griddle in the house all night. Next morning it had disappeared and was afterwards spoken of as "the soul's griddle".
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 20:59
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Rolling Barrels: Some years ago the people of Ballisk, a little townland just beside the railway station were troubled at night by a queer sound which resembled barrels being rolled along the road. The sound began at "the Hand" and went on to what is called the Commons' Gate - a gate about thirty yards farther down on the Portrane road. There the sound stopped and travelled back to the Hand again. The mystery was never solved.
The Soul's Griddle: In the olden days when the poor were very poor - a kind lady thought to be a relative of the Cobb's of Newbridge House, bought a griddle and gave it to the people of Ballisk. Anyone could use it on condition that it was left outside the door after use ready for the next borrower. Once however a women kept the griddle in the house all night. Next morning it had disappeared and was afterwards spoken of as "the soul's griddle".
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 20:52
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At the end of the sixteenth century there lived in Portrane Castle an officer of the English army whose name was Adam Linn. His duty was to try and stop the smuggling so very prevalent along the coast at this time.
He ca,me, one night, on a party of smugglers, between Portrane and Donabate on their way to Dublin with their smuggled goods. The smugglers knew, that if arrested, the penalty was death so they killed Adam Linn and he is buried in the old graveyard in Portrane. Even now the tombstone that marks his grave is pointed out.
Llamas (sic) Sunday, in olden times, was a great day in this district. Then the Pattern was held. Young and old from far and near attended this great event although it was held far down the Burrow near St Maccudics (?), (or St Cudochs) well. When the gaiety was over all went to drink the water of this well to cure their many and varied diseases.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 20:44
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One night some men from the Burrow went out fishing in the direction of Lambay. Previously a man named Shortrobin had been drowned some distance from the coast. As they passed over the spot one of the fishermen shouted "Where are you now, Shortrobin"? Immediately a big black ball descended from the sky and almost sank the boat. After that the fishermen avoided the spot.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 20:41
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Smuggling was carried on to a large extent along the coast in ancient times. The caves afforded a safe place & it easy to land there. On dark nights ships stole into "Tower Bay" and soon all the caves nearby were filled with costly wines, brandies & tobacco. This smuggling gave rise to the need for secret tunnels to the "big house" near by.
Banshee is often heard in the district and is supposed to "follow" certain Burrow families and is heard crying when a member of the family is about to die.
The Burrow people are great believers in fairies too.
Once - a man on a journey from the Burrow to the Windmill along the Marsh - that is by the Sea, heard a sound behind him It appeared to be funeral escorted by fairies. As they drew near he heard them say - "Who will carry the corpse". One answered "Who but Pat Lionnane (?) and they made him carry it till he fainted.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 18:02
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The field in which the mound is situated on Mr. J. Doyle's land is known as "Luglass". This means the green or grey hollow. Some years ago close to the mound Mr. Doyle ploughed up the parts of a flint-lock gun, he also ploughed up in the same field a cannon ball Several similar cannon balls were ploughed up in Coolnakilly, the adjoining downland of Ballymacsimon. There are also on Ballymacsimon old trenches, similar trenches are in the adjoining part of Ballymanus wood. No one can throw any light on the period of the trenches, or by whom they were made, but taken in conjunction with the finding of the cannon balls, and the parts of the old gun, it is rather clear that there was a battle all along this slope, and that cannon were used.
At one time there was in Coolnakilly a very large stone having a basin shaped cavity it was known as the "Holy Stone: It cannot now be traced. One of the first flint axe heads found in Co. Wicklow, was ploughed up by Mr. J. Whitty on his farm at Ballysimon on about 50 yrs ago it is now in the National Museum Dublin About 50 yrs
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 17:54
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On Mr J Doyle's land at Ballymacsimon, there is a mound, which is said to be a burial mound, it is also said to have been merely an oramental knoll trimmed up and planted by Madame Tighe an ancestor of Mr Wilfred Tighe of Rosannagh. She had an avenue though (sic) Ballymacsimon to a delightful cottage in Ballymanus wood. There was a lovely pond at the cottage, pleasant gardens and everything which nature or man's labour could do to beautify it was done. A scrap of the ruin is yet there, some mischievious persons broke the dam and let the pond run away.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 17:53
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Carrigmacreilly at the North end of the hill is said to have been occupied by a cobbler about one-hundred years ago. Part of the cave fell in about fifteen years ago. At the back of Carrigmacreilly is a large and excellent natural Ball Alley in olden times players came from all over the country to play matches there, it is yet fit for playing, it is a splendid cliff.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 17:47
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buried them there.
My father, E. Farrell, the R.O. and a guard were all that were at the funeral.
(Maureen Mullen, Newcastle)
There was a young man named Daniel Walsh, and he lived in the village of Shanwalla. He was working in the Mental Hospital in Ballinasloe, repairing clocks. Every morning on his way to his work, he used to visit his married sister, who lived in Caher on the way to Ballinasloe.
One morning, as he was going to his work, he met with a terrible accident at the cross roads of Craugh. There is a steep hill leading to the cross roads, and on this particular morning, he came down the hill at full speed on his bicycle with a repaired clock under his arm.
When he was passing the cross roads, there was a motor passing; he couldn't avoid it, and he rode into it. He was dashed against the wall and left unconscious.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 15:53
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Patrick Higgins also called "Poet Higgins" & "Pat the Poet", was born, reared and died in the townland of Cloncoose. This is in the parish of Gortletteragh and on the border of South Leitrim and North Longford being about 1 1/2 miles from Ballinamuck Co. Longford.
The Poet undoubtedly seems to have been a man of exceptional rhyming abilities. The old neighbours claim he could not write his name and never went to school. Nevertheless we can see from his works he had a very wide and detailed knowledge of the history of his country. "To meet him on the road you wouldn't believe there was a word in his head" one old man told me. "He was the calmest & quietest man you could meet in a day's walk. It was long he always wore his hair too, and he was as tall and straight as a fishin' rod and man alive! it was him was the hardy man".
He owned a small farm in Cloncoose of about fix or six acres. He had a son who went to America. He, too, possessed the father's abilities for rhymes. A man named Dominick Higgins owns "the Poets" land today.
He was bot one of those poet's who made verses about the
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 15:50
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Part of verse (X)
I saw from where I took my stand
A sight extremely great & grand
The Land League force was come in view
& in hot haste advancing too
To encounter their unGodly foes
Of what I saw I now disclose.
Equipped & furnished in the van
With scythes & forks with every man
With courage & determination
They supplied the want of organization.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 15:47
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(XX)
Remember it's decreed on high
That you have only once to die
And if in freedom's cause you're slain
Eternal life you will maintain
So let your valued merit praise
Like the immortal Marchieneze (?)
Here turning to the other side
Says he :From either force or pride
Shall we this day like sneakers bow?
The word is Fág a'bealach now
So prepared we are to do & dar'
So now let loose your dogs of war.
But no response to these last words
Had either come from tongues or words
It ached much like claps of thunder
That in its course spread awe & wonder
And fills all creatures with surprise
That live beneath the vaulted skies.
The process-server &n his fry
Apparently grew pale & shy
They moved but it was retrograde
And "Harry Duff" was loudly played.
The planders (?) of these dauntless men
Are worthy of a better pen
Than I can flourish or command
By mental power or slight of hand
P.T.O.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 15:31
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And when the trumpet calls to life
The men of peace & men of strife
Each contrusion (sic), skelp & scar
Shall shine bright as the morning star.
(XVII)
Think on Dundalk where the Irish clans
Caught the invaders in their lands
And with a furious head-long sweep
Submerged them in the ocean deep
Remember brave & loyal Brian
Whose courage did forever shine
Remember how he crushed the Danes
With all his might on Clontarf plains.
(XVIII)
Remember how he fought & spoke
And the God of battle did evoke (sic)
With a shining sword in one hand seized
And a crucifixion in the other raised
And rid us of a dangerous foe
In out-manoeuvering the Great Munroe.
(XIX)
Remember Limerick where the women stood
Upon the breach with courage good
And fought like the .(?)..assan train
That fell the Grecians on the Trojan plain
Remember too and imitate
The Wexford men of ninety eight
That in triumph their colours bore
On twenty battle fields & more.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 15:19
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"We shall not fly or disappear
Till the process-server goes from here".
(XIV)
Once more this high official said
"From duties (sic) course I can't recede"
And turning fiercely to the crowd
The riot-act he read loud
Which runs as follows as I suspect
As far as I can recollect
Riot Act
Her sovereign lady the Queen charges & commands all persons being assembled, immediately to disperse themselves, to depart peacefully to their own homes & to their own habitations under an act of King George for tumultuous & riotous assemblies. God save the Queen".
(XV)
Scarcely these words had died away
Before I heard a Leaguer say
"Crouch not beneath the tyrants rod
Retain your posts & trust in God
And if it is your lot to fall
By either buckshot, sword or ball
Your bodies shall not be like knave's
Interred in disrespected graves.
(XVI)
For he who here defends the weak
And fights for holy justice sake
Be now courageous stout & bold
And firm to your colours hold
And success shall your efforts crown
This day before the sun goes down.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 15:09
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The near approach of Land League men
("see the finish")
Both parties with unslackened pace
Proceeded on till face to face
And then with deadly weapons raised
Upon each other fearlessly gazed.
(XI)
Now these were moments you may learn
Of a very grave & deep concern
And I thought when there these lines I wrote
I heard the battle bugle note
Commingling with the might cheers reverberating far & near.
(XII)
I thought I heard the clash of deadly battle
Did like a tempest rage & rattle
And that the earth o'er capped with core
Got crimson-dyed in human more
And that I heard the fearful tones
Of maddened shrieks & dying grones (sic)
But my impressions now again
Were but delusions false & rain
For certainly the heat (?) was nigh
As eager eyes could well discry.
(XIII)
I saw from there I took my stand
A man approach that held command
And told the people to withdraw
And render homeward to the law
And that they should retrace their course
Before they'd be expelled by force
But these commands were received at once
With a very stern & strict response.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 14:58
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(VII)
I asked him was there any chance
Of curbing the police advance
Or were they going to domineer
Without check or obstruction here
He says "That question all depends
Upon the strength of Land League friends
And if they come prepared & strong
We WILL resist the men of wrong".
(VIII)
We were discussing this allow
When the common harbinger of woe
The process server - did appear
(en) Compassed with bobbies front & rear
In close compact columns were these
All led by subs & C.P.T's
To have the work of evil done
Before the setting of the sun
Because the law (God bless the mark)
Forbids such business after dark.
(IX)
I saw these fell-besiegers now
With fury pictured on each brow
And fabres (sic) fixed in battle style
Advancing onward rank & file
Their steady independent gait
Showed power and discipline great
And in discharge of their foul mission
They disregarded opposition.
(X)
But their conjectures were not sound
For hills & glens did all resound
With shouts & cheers denoting then
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 14:28
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Again astonished & amazed
Upon their "seeried" (?) lines I gazed
My feelings I did scrutinise
To see could I believe my eyes.
(IV)
I thought, perhaps, that I might be
Deluded thus by energy
Or some shy maiden much the same
As what they call "McKenna's drame"
But quite contrary to my wish
The strong were there the weak to crush
With rifle & buckshot supplied
Which they received with brutish pride.
(V)
To carry out the bloody game
Of making law-transgressions tame
'Twas after a long & silent pause
I asked a man what was the cause
Of this commotion & display
Or would it be a battle-day.
(VI)
The answer you may understand
"We're occupiers of the land
And on this day alas!" quoth he
"Served with ejectment we will be
To have us from our homes expelled
Where hitherto our fathers dwelled
And where in infancy we were
The objects of parental care"
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 14:20
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trivial themes. He wrote practically all about political activities in the Land League days.
The following is typical of Higgins' efforts.
"The Rise (also Riots) of Drumlish" as taken down from John Duignan, Kiltycreeragh, Ballinamuck, Co. Longford.
I
January the eleventh day eighteen eighty one (1881).
From home, I recollect, did stray
And onward I did travel on
As southward I did advance
A morning crowd had met my glance
I gazed upon them close & long
Their march was quick their number strong.
II
Of course I did myself bestir
To see what was going to occur
And took no time my steps to choose
Till I reached the place of rendesvous (sic)
Drumlish, it was, I may remark
And now I pray with patience hark!
Of what I saw and heard that day I will endeavour to portray.
III
Those staunch supporters of the crown
With "Royal Irish" filled the town
And armed to the teeth were they
To strike civilians with dismay
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 14:05
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Plásaí: - a fellow who is all "rubbing up" to you. He says everything to please you & agrees with you in everything. He generally is looking forward to some gains from his praise.
Slusaí: a meaner fellow again than the plásaí. It is generally used to describe a male who "makes mean" of himself with a member of the other sex.
Pleidhce:- a big foolish fellow who does and says very ridiculous things in all sincerity.
Scríl:- a girl who would be very untidy in her dress & in her work.
Péacóg:- a conceited stylish girl or woman.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 16:25
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Fitzherberts 1719 Dr Thos Kirwin 1765
Js Murphy 1708 Patk Farrell 1793
Alias Kelly 1792 Jos Sweetman 1992 (sic)
Thos Andrews 1004 John Larkin 1933
Anne Martin 1724 Anne Moore 1811
The Protestant Minister from Balbriggan came out here once a year for prayers in the ruins up to about 70 years ago. There was only one Protestant family buried here named Woods from Whitestown. They took up their remains and buried them in Balrothery.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 13:02
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along with bare stumps - to show that there once flourished a fine wood there.
Fionn's Ridge separates Glaun from Gubbeen. It is a ridge of rock with seams resembling the furrows made by a plough and it is said that Fionn Mac Cumhail ploughed it with two rams and a wooden plough.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 12:59
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And when it comes it brings good cheer.
And you Mr.O being a worthy man,.
'Tis to your house we brought our "wran";
We brought our "ran" for to visit you here,
Not for a taste of your liquour (sic) or a drink of your beer,
But to wish you a merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.
With your pockets full of money and your cellars full of beer.
VII
Here is our "wran" you may plainly see,
He is mounted high on a holly tree,
With a bunch of ribbons by his side;
And the Glaun boys to be his guide,
So up with the kettle and down with the pan,
Give us our answer and let us be gone.
senior member (history)
2019-04-13 20:55
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Townland The houses have slatted roofs The Irish for Ballycorus is An Bhaile Mic-feorais which means the town of the Berminghams There is one man and one old woman over seventy living in the district They do not know Irish The old man's name and adress is
Peter Brack
Ballycorus
Kilternan
He can tell stories in English Houses were much more numerous in former times There are ruins of numerous houses now to be seen The inhabitans of these houses worked in the Ballycorus Lead Smelting Work whic are now completely closed for abot thirty years The smelting houses and factory is now in ruins The land in the district is hilly and the senery is very beautiful as it is situated on the borders of Co Wicklow the land is not very good as there is not a great depth of soil Excellent dry potatoes are grown locally There are no woods and the hillside is quite bare A rarrow river flows from Three-Rock Mountain known as the Ballycorus River It has no particular name but is given the name of the district through which it flows Farther down where it enters the sea it is known as the Loughlinstown River There is a very pretty lake which owes its origan to the Smelting Works as it was origanilly a reservoir for the water
senior member (history)
2019-04-13 20:52
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The Fire Brigade was sent for, but before it reached Brownes Hill there was a lot of damage done. There was much damage done to the sheds. In 1933 the stewards son was out one night. He was smoking a cigarette. When he was finished smoking he threw away the cigarette. There was a petrol tank near,and the petrol went on fire. No one could do anything and all the petrol was burnt.
John Norris
Browns Hill
Carlow
Feb 21st 1938
In 1920 when the Black and Tans were in Ireland they were on the look out for a volunteer in Tallow whose name was O Dea. He was a shop Attendant in Murphys in Tallow. They went there to raid the shop for him, but he was gone on the run. So they burned down the shop. There were two men burned.
Paddy Rossiter
Johnstown
Benekerry
Carlow
Feb 23rd 1938
About three years a fire broke out in Ducketts Grove it was noticed first by Mr. Shiel, who was caretaking it. He went to bed as usual. About
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:59
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There were no giants in the district about here but Mr Patrick Mulhall has told us that there is a giants grave in Mr Hannons (?) bog & there are three tomb stones over it.
A giant was supposed to roll (?) stone Avoca to its present position.
It is said anyone walking on the tomb stones you will find sharp thorns in your bed that night.
Obtained from
Kevin O'Neill aged 50 years
Clon ...
Clash
Rathdrum
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:53
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Long ago houses here in this district of Ballinacarrig were made of mud and thatched with heather, rushes and straw.
In the old houses they had a settle bed in the kitchen.The fireplace was in the middle of the floor. The front of the chimney was made of stone and wattles. There was no glass in the windows but there were little boards. The floors were made of clay. The half doors were for keeping out the hens. Candles were made locally and people gathered rushes, peeled them and left one peel on them (?). They dipped them in grease and then dried them and used them like candles. They had an instrument for extinguishing them, called a snuffers.
They used turf sticks and cow dung for fires.
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:42
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In the County Meath a few miles from the town of Navan. There is an old Fort, beside the Fort there is a large stone weighing about 5 cwt. with the mark of a huge hand. It is told by the old people around. That it was thrown by a giant from the hill of Tara which is a distants of about 15 mile.
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:31
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To break a mirror is a sign of seven years bad luck.
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:31
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someone going to come in.
12. A cat with its back to the fire is a sign of a storm.
13.If the wick of a candle is red its a sign there's a person or a letter comming (sic).
14. If a person put on his stockings in side out its a sign of good luck.
15. It is a sign of death in the family if a picture from the wall (sic).
16. If a black cat comes into your house it brings good luck with it.
17. To find a horse shoe is a sign of good luck.
18.
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:27
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luck all that day.
7. To find a horseshoe is a sign of good luck.
8. If you see magpies.
One is for good luck.
Two is for bad luck.
Three for a wedding.
Four for a wake.
Five for silver.
Six for gold.
And seven for a secret that never should be told.
9. To see a star falling is a sign there's a soul going to heaven.
10.If the fire sparks out it's a sign you will be getting money.
11. If the fire falls it's a sign there's
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:24
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1. To meet a red haired women first thing in the morning is supposed to be a sing (sic) of bad luck.
2. If a black cat comes into your house it bring (sic) good luck with it.
3. To break a mirror is a sing (sic) of seven years bad luck.
4. If you spill salt its a sign you will be crying.
5. If your elbow is itchy rub it on wood for its a sign theres a stranger coming.
6. If you were going anywhere and you forget anything you should not turn back for it if you do you'll not have a bit of
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:20
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Patsy was very much terrified at first and stood looking in amazement.
After a while he saw a white figure coming towards him. It seemed to be very small at first but as it came nearer it seemed to be very small at frostbit as it came nearer it seemed to get bigger and bigger.
Patsy thinking it was a ghost turned and ran home as fast as he was able.
When he went into his house he sat down thinking what could it be.
After some time he heard some noise like what he heard as he was passing the wood.
He lit a lamp and went outside and what do you think did he see? Mr Reilly's old white ass with a chain hanging around his neck
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:16
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awaiting decision
It was a dark night. The wind howled dismally through the tree tops.
Old Patsy Murphy was making the best of his way home from Mrs Mulligan's wake house. He dodged along the road with his head down and his hands thrust deeply in his pockets when suddenly he heard a loud noise in the mood which he was passing.
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The nurse wants a dog.
The dog wants a bone.
The bone wants to be eat.
They keep playing this game until they get tired of it.