Number of records in editorial history: 692 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:17
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My granny told me this story.
Not far from my house there is a field and in the middle of it htere is a tree which people say that every morning long ago there was mass said at. The tree is there still but no blossoms grow on it. It is rotton but it has never fallen. Many beads were found at it. There is a very large stone in the same field which it is said that fairies used to dance and play about.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:15
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is built with the stones from the castle. The name of the house is Belvin and it is the property of Mrs J. Lindstone.
There is supposed to be a cave under the island on which the castle was.
On a smaller island on the same lake there is a stone shaped like a chain. It is called the wishing chain and the people used to believe that if they got on the chain and wished their wish would be granted. This lake is sometimes called Lough Veagh which is wrong. Lough Veagh is the lake in Glen Veagh, almost seven miles from the place.
The right name for Lough Veagh is Lough Bheathach which means the lake of the Silver Birch. On this lake there is an island and there is supposed to be a cave under it, the entrance to which is covered by a large round stone.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 08:10
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Marriages take place mostly in Spring and Summer. Marriages don’t often take place at Shrove. The month of May is said to be an unlucky month for a marriage. Tuesday is also an unlucky day for a wedding. There are no matches made in the district now but long ago the used to be made. Money is not given as dowry nor is cattle or goods ever given. Long ago marriages took place in the house of the boy or girl who is getting married this was done for a good many years. When two people come out of church the people throw rice on them. A wedding feast is always held in the house of the bride. Straw boys do not visit the house now. The people do not go home on horseback.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 08:24
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“Trinity Well” is situated in a field beside the cross roads about 2 miles from school to S.E. Trinity Graveyard is at the opposite side of the road from the well. There is a brie growing beside the well.
An annual pattern is held there every Trinity Sunday, but it is a custom that is dying out of later years. Up to ten years ago it was frequented to cure ailments – but that custom is dying out too. People who want to be cured, usually knelt at the well to pray (and their friends did the same). They drank of the water and usually took some away with them. And it was very necessary that some offering should be left behind. I saw a lot of medals there in 1916 and the people tied pieces of cloth on the bush – usually some portion of a garment which is being work at the time by the person seeking the cure – or perhaps praying for some intention. All the year round the water is used for domestic purposes.
Up to 5 or 6 years ago the people danced and sang until 3 or 4 in the morning when the Pallern was being held.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 08:23
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The blackbird makes her nest in a sgeach.
The crow makes her nest very high up in a tree.
The magpie builds her nest high up in a tree too. She lays about two eggs.
The birds that migrate are the cuckoo and the swallow. When the cuckoo comes she brings a storm.
The swallows build their nests in the eves of houses.
The cuckoo builds no nest.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 08:22
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There are two "Fairy Forts" in the Ballyduff school district. Their names are, Dunnan and Rathmore. They are not within view of each other.
There is a raheen in Bolinass. There is a fence of sceac trees round it. The entrance into this raheen is an open gap. I never heard of anyone going down the hole within this raheen.
There is another raheen down near the river on Mr. Pearse's farm, and Mr. Toole's (the man who lived in this farm before Mr. Pearse) was going to Mr. Kane's of Bolinass one night, and a ball of fire hit him in the head, just as he was passing by the raheen.
There are rocks in Mr. Beltons farm in Killiskey, known as the holly rocks. Long ago the people of Killiskey were afraid to go out at night for fear the fairies would take them, and on no account would they go near the holly rocks. Many people saw the fairies there. They usually sang and danced and sometimes played music on pipes. They nearly always rode on white horses flying through the air. A plant which is called the ragweed used
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 08:19
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In the field near Ballyduff new school, there is a lonely sceac tree and through fear of the fairies the people called it the "Good peoples tree" Our forefathers thought that somewhere round it was the home of the fairies. The reason why is because the fairies always dwelt under it.
When this tree would come in blossom, the inhabitants round would not dare to touch as much as one flower on it. Later on of course a time would come when the haws would come on this sceach. Beautiful ripe haws they were. No matter how ripe this fruit was the people would do no more than look at them.
However strange to say the Winter before last the wind blew the sceach down. Shortly after some of the inhabitants gathered together and put it up again. Strong wire was caught around its bark and fastened it tightly in the ground. Today that lonely sceach tree is its nicest in Mr. Thunder's field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 08:40
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lake. There were twelve sons of Eldwards in the castle. On the other side of the lake in Claideach there was a party. The twelve went to the party. There was dancing and singing all night until daybreak. Then they set out for home. When they were near the castle the boat broke and it sank. They all had hold of the piper and they brought him to the bottom. Some people say the piper was saved. Some nights after that lights were seen round the castle. The Elwards left the castle after that. After they left lights were seen and music was heard. There was a canal cut and the water went to Lough Corrib.
End.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 08:36
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There was a forge near Bally Bacaugh long ago. It was in the parish of Kilmaine. It was built in a road behind the village. The road is called “borheen na Ceardrain.” It was a small thatched house. The Heneghans that built the forge. There is a small well near the the forge and it is called “Tobar Éanachain.” In that well they used to tighten the tyres for the neighbours.
Críoch.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 08:34
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In the village of Greenan there is a place called Carraig an Aifrinn or the Mass Rock. It is said by the old people that a priest used to say mass on that rock in the Penal days.
It is a flat rock on a little height, & underneath it is a lovely green field. It is said that the people used to kneel down in that field, while mass was going on.
Lots of people go to see that place as it is very remarkable and when they are coming home they take of bit of the rock with them as it is
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 08:30
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This is a large village situated along the side of Crimlin hill. It consists of twenty three houses, sixteen slated houses, and six thatched ones. The land is fairly good, and the bog is convenient, but there are scarcely any trees. The Village got its name from a crooked stream that runs through it.
The sirnames in the Village are Hopkins (5) Grimes (4) Jennings (3) Blaine (3) O'Connor (1) Harte (1) O'Hora (1) Philbin (1) Kenny (1) Henry (1) Gillan (1) McNicholas (1).
Of these Blaines, Philbin, Harte, O'Connor, Henry are not original inhabitants. The great Archbishop John McHale lived for some years in Crimlin, and some of his relatives live there yet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 08:28
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This is the half parish of Crimlin. It is situated between Castlebar and Lough Cullen. It is about seven miles wide and three miles in length.
It is bounded on the North by Lough Conn, on the South by the Parish of Aglish or Castlebar, on the East, the half parish of Parke, and on the West is Burren.
The surface of this district is level enough, but on the West it is very rugged and mountainous.
The land is good in some places, but in others it is very wet, and swampy there is also a lot of bog in this place.
There are twenty-four townlands in this district namely,: Ross, Crimlin, Conloon, Shranalee, Garryhill, Cunnagher, Tawneykinaffe, Greenauns, Tawnyshane, Spink, Derreen, Pontoon, Crillane, Laragin, Gort, Sallagher Sheeaun, Derrylahen, Shanvalley, Crimlin Lower, Derrylahen Lower, Ross East, Cunnagher South, Sheeaun Dhubh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 08:24
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beating the tailor with it. After a while the tailor asked him to stop and he would cut some of the length and sew it on the weadth. He cut a big piece of it and it was too short then he served another piece and it was too long. At last the new one was worse than the old one. The man made the tailor buy a new one for him.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 08:47
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(a eleven foot) As soon as he could he went home and went to bed resolving that he would never play cards again. In the his face altogether disfigured.
Long ago there was an old woman living near Killimor Churchyard. One night she was spinning flannel when suddenly a crowd of fairies come in. They said they would help her to spin. Some of them began to spin and the others began to weave and within a few hours they had the flannel woven.
The woman was anxious to get rid of the fairies. So she went to the door and after looking out for a few minutes she shouted, "Cnoc Sidhe Gabhann is on fire." Immediately the fairies jumped up and ran out. Some shouted "my child will be burned."
When the woman got them out she threw out the spinning wheel and the flannel and then locked the door. Soon the fairies came back, and finding the door locked they shouted "Spinning wheel let us in!" I cannot said the wheel for I am out as yourself. Then they shouted, "Let us in flannel" but the flannel couldn't since it was also outside. As there was nothing else in the house that they had touched they knew they could not get in. Up to a few years ago there [?] was in the Churchyard.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 08:46
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in Jack Richard's garden under a gooseberry bush." Jack went home and began to dig and was rewarded for his trouble by finding a box of gold under the bush.
A short time after a tinker came in to Jack's house, and asked for the lid of the box which he saw thrown aside. Jack gave it to him. The tinker rubbed it on his sleeve to see what (was) it was made of and discovered writing on it. Not being able to read he handed it back to Jack. To Jack's surprise he read that there was twice as large a box of gold on the other side of garden. He went to dig again -- and sure enough he found another box of gold twice as large as the first. From that day neither himself nor his family were short of money.
One night a man who was fond of card playing was returning home from a house where he had been playing cards. He had to cross a stile and at the stile he met a man who asked him to have a game of cards.
The two men sat down and began to play. During the game a card fell. the man stooped down to pick it up and while doing so he noticed with a shock that the other man had crubeens
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 08:28
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Signs of the weather
Long ago in Ireland they had signs by which they could know when there was going to be rain. It is a sign of rain to see the frog change his colour from a bright yellow to a dark brown. It is also a sign of rain to see the crane flying to the lake, but if she is flying to the mountain it is a sign of good weather. If the mountains would be so clear that you count the fences on them it was a sign of wet weather, but if a thick blue mist covered the horizon there would be very dry weather. When the cat scrapes a piece of wood and washes (her) at the back of her (ears) it was one sign, or if you saw the swallows flying very low it was another.
If the crows circled overhead in the air when going home to the rookery it was another. If there was a ring close round the moon it was a sign of rain, and if it was far out there was good weather coming. When the rain is coming the sun sinks with a watery appearance. When the frost was going to set in, the moon rose with a red colour. When the ass stood with his back to a bush it was a sign of rain and when the dog ate grass it was
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 08:28
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Another cure for heart burn is to go to south running water and obtain 3 jack stones. You must go before sun set. Place them in the fire until they are red, remove and place on the window sill outside and leave there during the night. Rise before sun rise and place them into a basin of water.
(These two cures were collected by MIss Flynn from Mr Wales, Crappagh.)
Many people don't eat mean on Wednesday. This is a cure for toothache. Another cure is to get a horse snail and put it in your mouth and keep it there for a few minutes. Ginger is also a cure for tooth ache and also is iodine.
Garlic will cure throat and head ache.
Warts are another disfigurement. To wash them with froth from a lake is supposed to cure them. Also to obtain a snail, put it on the warts and then hang the snail on a thorn bush. As the body of the snail withers away so will the warts. Some poeple tie a silken threat tightly round the warts and cut them off. Still another cure is to
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 08:23
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Churning
We have a churn at home and it is 3 feet tall. We have it for about 15 years. The different parts are - the dash, the mercher, the clappers and the cappin and the lid and moulder. We churn twice a week in summer and once a week in winter because milk is scarce then. It takes us an hour to churn it and it is done by hand.
When strangers come in and while we are churning they help or "take a bash" as they say. This is supposed to bring "good luck." If they didn't we would think that they didn't wish us well and it is supposed that the butter would not come on the milk. When they come in they say "good luck to the work."
My aunt, Mrs. O'Rourke of Durmary, Newbliss, told me that long ago churning was done in her county by "glakes". This was a
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:38
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She discovered also that one was leading the other.
Both of them rested near a well. One of the doves washed the other in the well three times and then they flew high into the air screaming and whirling with delight.
Immediately, she came to the conclusion that one of the doves was blind and after being washed in the well was restored to its sight.
She led her husband down to the well and after washing him three times in the well he was restored to his former sight sight
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:38
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One beautiful summer's day they went up and sat down on a pinnacle. She looked round about for some time.
Then she began telling her husband how beautiful she was with dark curls and rosy cheeks and brown penetrating eyes and he was so lonely when he could not see her and share in her happiness.
He too thought of his mother the mother he loved with such deep love for to have played such (deep) a threachous deed on him.
Presently she saw two birds flying in the distance when they came nearer she found out that they were doves
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:36
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steed were nearly killed.
The girl's father banished him then and rebuked his daughter for committing a rash act and especially for refusing so many fine men when the sought her hand in marriage.
She followed him but he persuaded her to go back to her father's home again but she insisted on accompanying him where ever he should roam. Both of them wandered about through the wood killing wild fowl, and eating them, as he and (eating) his mother had so often done before.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:35
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He was walking on and on until one day he met a girl in the forst.
She fell in love immediately with him. He himself was attracted to her lovely voice. She led him to her father's house. The girl's father willingly consented to this marriage on account of his being such a lovely boy boy.
Then the girls father purchased a stately steed for the young man. He mounted on the steed not seeing where he was going he dashed into the wall both himself and his
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:35
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said she was afraid of her son getting angry. The man suggested to do away with him but she would not allow this either.
However, they decided to injure him in some way whilst he slept they poured boiling tar into his eyes.
They then led him outside and hunted him off and got married. He was poking his way to the forest for a few days and he was fairly exhausted from hunger as he was not able to find any food for himself being blind.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:34
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more rooms. Some of them being bedrooms. They decided to stop the night.
Nothing unusual happened or nobody disturbed their slumber. So the following morning the boy went out rambling and left his mother behind him.
Whilst he was out a man came and stayed conversing with the woman when the boy was about to return the man went away again.
He came back the next day and delayed a long time conversing with both of them.
Secretly, he asked the woman to marry him, but
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:32
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a son was born to the Princess. When the King visited the crags the next time and saw the child he was overcome with anger. So he took his daughter inland and threathened her not to come near his palace again.
With a sad heart she wandered about through the wilderness. The little boy grew up to be a fine man. When he was eighteen years of age, he was wandering about one day as was usual for him to do when he spied a hole op underground.
He ventured in until he came to a little room
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:32
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During the summer months clay is thrown up out of the shoughs or the drills or ridges before the stalks come up. This is called setting the potatoes. Then a wooden roller is run over them. More clay is thrown up on them when they [?] are just over the ground. This is called moulding the potatoes. When they are about six inches long the stalks are sprayed. This is done by spraying a mixture of bluestone, washing soda and water over them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:30
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The Potatoe Crop
We grow potatoes on our farm. We grow about two acres every year. We do not grow the same amount of potatoes every year. Some years we grow more potatoes than we grow other years. The ground is not manured in any way before turned up. Sometimes the potatoes are grown in ridges other times they are sown in drills. In Ireland where it would be hard to make drills ridges are made always. The men of the house plough and harrow the ground first. If they make drills they make them with a plough. If they make ridges they make ridges they make. The people help each other by ploughing and by leaving and pitching the potatoes in drills or ridges.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:29
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Wild duck's nest
On[e] evening I got a Wild duck's nest. There were ten eggs in it. It was with moss and feathers. The eggs were about the size of a duckegg, and light blue in colour.
The Nest was in a mossy bank at the side of a little stream running through a valley. You could not see the nest nest unless you saw the Wild duck going out, because she had it covered in with heather, that grew about it.
Picked from Copies of Schoolchildren
Cuilagurrane
Castlehill
Ballina
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 08:24
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Some thirty years ago there lived in Kilconlea a man named Seán Mór. He spoke Irish fluently but as his wife Kate used to say he made a mess of the English.
They hadn't in family but Seánín Becamie(?) who of course was his mothers pet. Seánín Becamie(?) a source of trouble to his father who generally had to accompany him to the school-door every morning. On one occasion he got away from his father and ran in the opposite direction where the river Feale flows. Kate rebukes her poor man and orders him to go straight towards the river and bring home the child lest he might drown himself. Seán's reply was "He might do worse nor it"
This proverb is still used locally by way of correction or fun.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 09:06
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A Custom
There is another custom in West Cork. It is usual when anyone is dead, for his people to get a quantity of pipes, tobacco, and whiskey to be used at the wake.
The owner of the house usually gets one or two of those who are present at the wake to cut up the tobacco into small pieces, and with it to fill the pipes.
Then everyone present is asked and expected to take a pipe, no matter whether he smokes or not.
It is considered an insult to refuse to accept one. The pipes are usually white “clay” pipes made in Ireland especially in Knockerockery.
After some time, all those who can take intoxicating liquid are presented with a glass of whiskey while everyone
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 09:13
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There was a house not far from Dunne's and there was an old man living in it. This man had four cows and he had them in a field near where Dunne's lived. The cows were very good and they gave good milk and butter. After a short time the cows milk was bad and he knew that someone was taking the good from the cows so he said he would watch, and the next night and he went to hide behind a low bush. After a long time a big hare came up and went to where the cows were and said "All for me" three times. The man had his dog with him and he set the dog after the hare. The hare ran and went in through a window and the man went in and saw Mrs. Dunne with a sun bonnet on her and she sitting up in bed.
Told by: Mrs Sullivan to Peg Regan, aged 11 years, Allenwood N.S., Co. Kildare.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 08:32
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My great grandfather was very strong. He carried a sack containing seven cuts of oat meal on his back from one room to another for a bet.
He also jumped across a sythe which was stuck in the ground which was a very dangerious thing to do because the blade of the sythe was stuck high in the air. His name was Micky Healy.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 08:32
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My story is about a farmer who lived in the townland of Fawnlion named Pat Healy and he reared sheep. One day one of his sheep fell down a rock which was thirty feet and remained on another ledge of the rock of which she could not move. He knew no way of by which he could get her up again. So he asked a young man named Michael Lee to take her up again. They tied him with ropes and he then went down the thirty feed of the rock. He tied the sheep and brought her up the rock again. The farmer was very thankful and he gave the boy who rescued the sheep, ten shillings.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 08:31
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My story is about a man named Kerrigan who lived in Glencar. One day four people, two boys and two girls were traveling on a mountain beside Glencar. There is a place on this mountain called "teampuill teinnrig" and the people said they would go to see it. When they reached the place they saw it was a very deep cave or hole in the ground. They were walking along a narrow path at the mouth of the cave when suddenly one of the girls slipped and fell into the cave. her companions were horrified and and they sent
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 08:43
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out of the rock. So he started to fill his pockets. When he had his pockets filled there was more coming out of the rock and he then tied the bottom of his trousers and filled them up too. When he had his trousers filled he could not walk and so he thought he would sit down. When he was sitting for a while he could not get up, so he loosened the bottom of his trousers. When the gold was all out of his trousers he could get up still and he could not get up till he left the last coin on the ground and when he left down the last coin they vanished, and he heard the fairies laughing at him, and he had to go home without any gold at all.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 08:41
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I got this story from Paddy Rawdon. He lives in Ballybrack. His age is 36 years. I asked him if he knew any local happenings. He said he could tell me a little. He told me there was spot in their field where there was a stone. They made a quarry there. His father had seen shoes there. They tried to quarry the stone out of it but they could not do it. Everytime they struck the stone the sledge jumped off it. They were not long sledging till they saw a little man dressed
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 08:41
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I got this story from Paddy Rawdon. He lives in Ballybrack. His age is 36 years. I asked him if he knew any local happenings. He said he could tell me a little. He told me there was [a] spot in their field where there was a stone. They made a quarry there. His father had seen shoes there. They tried to quarry the stone out of it but they could not do it. Everytime they struck the stone the sledge jumped off it. They were not long sledging till they saw a little man dressed...
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 08:40
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People who study the habits of birds get much useful information as to weather conditions. If the swallows fly low it is a sure sign of rain but when they fly high good weather is not far off. When the curfew call shrilly it is a sign of rain. The robin sing in the center of the brush if the day is likely to be wet but when fine he sings on the topmost branch. When the wild geese come early we can expect an early and a severe winter.
People in this part of the country have many superstition about birds. When one magpie is seen it means that bad luck is coming but when there are two it means good luck.
One for sorrow, two for joy, three for a marriage, four for death, five for a funeral, six for gold, seven for silver, and eight for a story that never was told. There is another version of this. One for a letter, two for a cheque, Three for a marriage, four for a birth, five for silver, six for and seven for a story that never was told.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 08:32
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Seo dhá chlóich atá shuas le taobh a chéile, agus tá bárr géarr ortha. Tá na clocha seo bórdháil ceithre troigh ar aoirdhe. Tá siad ceithre troigh ar leitheadh ina mbun. Tá na clochaí seo suidhte i mbárr bheinn chorraigh suas dírach ó theach Phádraich Uí Cithbhain.
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 08:58
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“ Tá ars an Ríogh,” acht is beag le rádh é.” Tabhair isteach é.
“Tughad isteach é” agus sheas sé o’s a chomhair.“ An tusa [”ar sise.“] a bhí ag Tobhar na Beithilhe arsa an bainríoghan leis.
“Is mé ar seisean.“ An tusa a bhí ag Caislheán an Uaighnis” ar sise.“ “Is mé,” arsa mach an Ríogh. Nuair a chuala an t-athair é seo thairg sé a ríoghacht féin go leír dhó. Acht níor leig an bainríoghan dhó é do ghlachadh. Tugh sí leithí mach an Ríogh go dtí “Oilheaín an Uaighnis” agus mair siad ann go suaimhneach sásta na dhiaidh sin.
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 08:56
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Bhí Rí ann fadó. Bhí sé pósta agus cailleadh a bhean agus ní raibh aige acht mach amháin. Phós sé aríst agus bhí triúr mac eile agie. Níor thaithnigh an mach ba shine leis leasmháthair ar chor ar bhith. Céard a rinne sí lá acht leigint orra féin go raibh sí tinn. Chuaidh sí ar an leabhaidh agus thosuigh sí ag chur amach fola, mar dheadh. — D’fhiafruigh an Rí dhi céard a leigheasfadh í.“ Níl aon rud chun mise a leigheas acht trí bhuideálh uisce as tobhar na beithile.” Ní féidir é sin d’fhághailh dhuit ”arsa an Rí.“ Is féidir” ar sise.“ Ní dheachaidh aon duine ariamh ag trialhlh ar an tobar sin a thiocfadh as slhán” ar san Rí.“ Nach bhfuilh mach agatsa a rachas ann.” ar sise.“ Ní
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 08:56
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“Molaomaoid Íosa Críost
Molamaoid Dia de síor a’s de gnáth
Ó, a Tigearna, go molaidh Tú sinn
Is go ngabaidh Tú sinn it lámhaibbh
Mar níl toradh le maoidheamh againn
Acht toradh an Ríogh d’Fuiling a pháis.”
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 08:52
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Many stories are told in the long winter nights. It is about a man named Gobán Saor. On one occasion a king wanted to have the finest castle in the world so he got Gobán Saor to build it for him. Goblin went and had it nearly built when he found that he was going to be killed when the castle was finished. He said he couldn't finish the castle unless he had a certain instrument so the king sent his son for it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
30
Old Ruins
The nearest Castles to me are Lick Castle, Beale Castle, and Ballybunion Castle. There are a lot of other ruins along the bank of the Shannon but these three are the nearest to me. There is an old ruin opposite this school and it is said that there was mass said there in days gone by but it was burned down. The castles round here were important strongholds in ancient times but there is very little of them to be seen at present. Those cases belonged to O'Connor Kerry lived in Beale Castle and it is said that a man named Stack was invited to the Castle and that a quarrel arose and he was murdered. O'Connors wife was a sister to Dermot Mór O'Brien Prince of Thomond, and it is said that he never spoke to her after the sad event in Beale. All that can be seen of Ballybunion Castle is a wall standing abut twenty feet high. Those castles were built in Norman times and Ballybunion Castle was destroyed in 1582. rather than let it fall into the hands of the English. This was about the time of the downfall of the Geraldines
Lick 1382 to 1582
Michael Lynch, 15-7-'38
Doon, Ballybunion
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
004
The patron saint the well is Molaoghaire .The words Tobar Molaoghaire are printed with chips of white marble stuck or embedded in cement.There is a concrete cross in the centre of the arch overspreads the well.
There is no local knowledge as far as the writer can ascertain ,as to the date of the Annual Pattern .it is most frequently visited on Sundays and days of special devotion .it is frequented in particular for for the cure of eyes ,or defective vision or any ocular ailment.No rounds are performed or set prayers prescribed .This is a matter for the pilgrim .The water is drunk and is also applied to the eyes.
Some holy object ,medal,beads,tiny statues,using holy water fonts,ivory crosses,etc are left in thanksgiving at or near the well.There is a local tradition that whatever water is taken from the well ,it will never run dry.Even in very fine Summers and after periods of protracted drought ,the well still retains a goodly supply of water which is always pure ,cool and refreshing .
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 08:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were several churchyards in this parish. In Gallen there is a famous churchyard where St Canoc built his monastery. People use it still; a few years ago there were people digging there
And dug up a number of crosses. And they also found a ruin of an old church. About a quarter of a mile outside this parish there is an old graveyard.
This old graveyard is in the townland of Glebe. Only very young children are buried there now. It is on the land owned by Michael Moore. There are no grown-up people buried there now only children who are not to the use of reason. The churchyard is on a sort of a hill, but the field in which the graveyard is situated is level and some trees grow near it.
The churches of Clonmacnoise was to be built at that old graveyard at first. The name of that graveyard is Mullahakilla. The people were digging (ot) out a foundation of a
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 08:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is one historical old on the farm owned Mrs. Guider of Lisanure. It is known as the "Spirit bush". It was said that in ancient times a man was seen there. He was said to have left the mark of his arms and head
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 08:44
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rejected
awaiting decision
fios a bheith aca ar cad a bhí ar a n-athair.
Chuadar go dtí an leabaidh agus d'fhiafhruigheadar de cad a bhí air. D'innis sé dóibh cad d'imigh air.
Bog is briathar orm adúbhairt an Mac Críona ná h-íosfadsa dhá béile bídh ar aon bórd. Is ná tuighfeadh dhá oidhche ar aon leabaidh chun go dtabharfaidh mé t'fhiacla chúghat tar nais. "Raghad-sa in éinfeacht leat", arsa an tarna driotháir. "Tá go maith", arsa an Mac Críona.
D'eirigheadar ar maidin, agus d'imígheadar chun bóthair. Amach san lá so chonnacadar an driotháir óg 'na ndiaidh, agus dúbhradar le na chéile go raibh sé chómh maith aca é scaoileadh in éinfeacht leotha.
Do ghluaiseadar a'dtriúr le cois a chéile annsan, agus bhíadar ag imtheacht tre choill mhóir, agus bhí an choill sin ar bhruach na fairrge. Agus an oidhche teacht bíodar traochta agus shuidheadar síos ar feadh tamall.
"Cad a dhéanfaimís anois", ar siad le na chéile. "Tá sé chómh maith ag duine againn dul anáirde ar chrann féuchaint an mbeadh tig nó solas in aon áit".
Seo leis an driotháir críona anáirde
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 08:42
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Sean scéal "Ubhall Ríog Gréag"
Do bhí Ríg ar an nGréig fadó. Bhí triúr mac aige, agus móran fear 'na sheirbhís, agus go dtí so ní dheaghaidh sé riamh ag féuchaint ortha ag obair. Lá amháin dúbhairt sé leis féin go n-eireóchadh sé agus go raghadh sé amach chun iad d'fheiscint. Chómh maith do dhein. Bhí an lá go breagh brothallach, agus nuair bhí sé ag teacht abhaile do shuig sé síos ar charraig mhóir mar bhí tuirse air ó'n dteas. Ní fada bhí sé 'na shuidhe ar an gcarraig nuair a thug sé fé ndeara scamall mór dubh ag bun na spéire agus é a deanamh air anoir ndeas, agus níor stad an scamall go dtáinig sé ó's a chómhair amach, agus do buailead isteach ins na fiacla é le pléasc a bhain trí cinn de's na fiacla amach as tosach a bhéil; agus d'imigh an scamall an bóthar céadna thar nais gan aon fhocal do labhairt.
Do tháinig bochtanacht 's náire ar an Ríg an luath is bhraith sé a fhiacla imighthe. Do chuaidh sé abhaile 's luig sé ar a leabáidh, 's ní raibh a fhios ag éinne cad a bhí air. Dúbhairt na mic, an bhéirt chríona, te na chéile go gcaithfidís
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 08:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
135
Ballynakill
The great portion of the ancient district of Ballynakill is in the union of Clonbullogue, the remainder being in Edenderry. An old church in ruins surrounded by a graveyard is found here and is called Ballintampull - another form of Ballynakill i e the "townsland of the church"
This church dates from 15th century and is of small dimensions; a window in the east gable having a stone-moulding of an Ogee Gothic pattern. The west end is quite ruinous, but an arch is visible which ran across from side to side. This was probably either a mortuary vault or else it formed portion of a stronghold connected with the Church. Amongst the graves within the ruins of the Church is a stone having a floreated double cross in the centre, down each side runs an inscription in relief, in Latin, The Latin being interpreted would seem to indicate that it was (A) in memory of Eileen Mac Dermott died 6th March 1603, placed over her grave by the husband. Lysagh O'More. A branch of this family was established in this neighbourhood.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 08:38
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rejected
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131
How the Boyne got its Name (sean-sjéad)
The Boyne River, which rises in [?], Well near Carbury Co. Kildare some three miles distant from Edenderry flows within a few hundred yds of the town and here divided the (King's Co.) Offaly from Co. Kildare. About five miles from Edenderry at the junction of the Boyne and the Clongal rivers, the counties Kildare, Meath and Offaly meet. Along the course of the Boyne are many interesting ruins among which stands out prominently Carbury Castle. Here, lived King Carbury, this life, and three sons Flesk, Nesk and Lune. About a mile from (?) the Castle is situated Trinity well beside which grew an apple tree. There was supposed to be some magic spell around the tree. Kind Carbury was very insistent that no one would walk around the tree three times even though Bon and his sons were daily craving him for permission.
However one day Bon went off
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 09:26
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rejected
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Thomas Reilly, Drumgood told me the following story:- Beside Flynn's fort Lister.
"Beside Flynn's fort Listermacrone, theer were two families living on the same street - McCabes and Doogans. In the McCabes lived Pat, his wife, and one child. In Doogans were Mary and her brother James both unmarried. One morning Mary was up very early as she was going on a visit to a cousin of hers that day, and she wanted to leave the turns done for James. When she opened the door to look out what was her surprise to see a woman standing outside McCabes window and McCabes child "a handing" out to her. Mary Doogan made some noise, and the woman dropped the child and ran towards the fotr - I forgot to tell you that there was a fort near by. Mary picked up the child and brought
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 08:58
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rejected
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No 2) St .Senan
St Senan was born in a place near Kilrush.There are a lot of stories told about him and here is one of them.
One day Senan was told to mind the crows out of the garden.it was a day for going to mass,so his father and mother went off to mass and left him at home to mind the garden from the crows.
Senan said that it would
senior member (history)
2019-05-13 08:33
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rejected
awaiting decision
A lot of people are afraid to pass by the liosanna at a late hour. It is said that fairies used to dwell in them.
Once upon a time, there was a man digging a fort and as he dug the last sod, smoke came up. The man went away, and he never visited that fort again. It is said that there were houses built in them so as to protect them from the robbers. No one likes to interfere with them, as they say that fairies live in them. Long ago there
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 08:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
392
In 1838 When Drumkeeran Protestant Church was a building, Maclusgar the miller, from Shena mill, was in the village of Drumkeeran one night. Few houses were in the same town that time. Maybe he was bringing in meal from the mill. On his return at night , maybe he had drink taken he was challenged by the Yeoman guard at the church and whatever passed between them the Yeoman drew his gun and shot Maclusgar dead. He was buried on the road-side at Tom Kelly's fence in Shena townland. The mound can still be seen on the road side.
In 1798 the french passed along this old road going from Drumkeerin to Drumshanbo. The Frenchmens' grave is in a field near the road in Shena, Drumkeerin. Johnny Cullen's grandfather from Geeva was kelled at the battle of Lavagh, Drumkeerin. Seamuisin Kelleher, Tullycurca, Tarmon, was at the battle of Ballinamuc and returned to Tarmon after it. In Mullach Cashel are the remains of an old fort. Trees grow there and there is an old paving round the place and the pass into it is paved. You'd know there is something strange about the place.
In Drummonds on the lake shore there's the remains of an old Church..
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 08:43
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Mo chodhlad dhuit a Mháthair, Do Mhach na Paise crochtá ar chrann Céasta. A chuidh fola naomhta doirtthe ar an talamh mar gheall ar chlann nímh.
Is fíor sin a Mháthair aon duine a deireas an paidir seo trí h-uaire roimh tuitim a chodhlad do ní baoghal do splanc h-Ifrinn a fheiceál go deo.
Mary Evangeline Caron,
Castlemore Ho.
Ballaghaderreen
from Mary O'Donnell Inishmaine, Aran Isles
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:17
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rejected
awaiting decision
vault was used as a "prison" in the "Black & Tan" days, & housed many a spy and criminal, & it was never discovered and was well known to all the East Cork Companies of Volunteers as "Sing Sing".
Another matter in connection with the cemetery of Kilquane is that there is not a Protestant buried there, as is usual in grave-yards of this kind all over the country.
This then is the old church in Ballivinny cemetery, and I could get no authentic account of anything connected with it. It is only separated from Kilquane by about two miles, & contains many beautiful tombs and is a mixed burial ground, that is Catholics & Protestants are buried there. It contains a number of beautiful tombs as I mentioned before, belonging to the Land-lords class, and incidentally not one from the Knockraha side of the parish is buried there, even the farmers whose land surround it are not buried there. This is situated at the end of the parish, & on the side of the road, & not approached by an avenue as was the case of Kilquane.
Now there was another church or chapel
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:16
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1. There is an old Lios in the village of Ballinlass.
2. It is round in shape and high.
3. Is it said that the old people saw lights near them, and heard music.
4. Some people call them old raths, and some lioses.
5. They are not to be ploughed or touched only for the purpose of a small grave.
6. They were made for the children who were not baptized in the church.
7. It is said that the fairies live in them.
8. They were in Ireland when the Danes came.
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:15
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** ENTER AS TITLE
A Happiness I Found
1. When the rooks are flying homewards
And the evening shadows come
After my hard day’s labour
Within my humble home
I sit beside the blazing fire
And children flock around
And in the cheery hours then
A happiness I found
2. When friends ‘twere dear have passed away
And faded one by one.
We can’t undo the parting
When the sands of life are run
The strong, the weak, the kindliest
Death’s cruel sickle downed
‘Twas in the thought that you were spared
A happiness, I found.
3. And now old age has come along
And I have feeble grown
Beside me in my sinking years
As one who was my own.
That joined me in my greatest joys
My greatest sorrows drowned.
And pulled the oar, out from the shore
A Happiness, I found.
4. And hand in hand, in light or gloom
Step by step we tread
Till in the place beyond the tomb
We'll mingle with the dead
When dewy tears shall fill the eyes
Of loved ones standing round
God grant in mercy from on high
A Happiness, I found.
FINIS
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:13
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There wasn’t me there ants her would speak
But on horned bullock that came from Beleek.
X. He told her his history, and she did the same.
Then with a hiccup, she fell into a dream
She dreamed she was grazing ‘way down in the bog
And that she heard Kennedy calling the dog.
XI. The moorcocks were crowing, a cleg at her flank
She dreamt she was grazing down on Shannon’s bank
And when she woke she felt mighty cold
“No wonder” said the bullock, “for you’re in the Black Hole.
XII. When she heard this, she commenced for to rale
Saying, “If I had my will, these cold walls I would scale.”
“Hold your tongue,” says the bullock,” say nothing
For since you were drunk, you must abide by the law.
XIII. Before the magistrate, she appeared the next day
A cloth on her horn, as I had heard them say,
A split on her tail, a scrape on her face
Saying, “your worship, I’m not fit to explain the case
XIV. When the magistrate saw her, he commenced for to laugh.
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:12
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I. you tender-hearted Christians, I hope you will draw near,
I claim your kind attention, and I won’t detain you long.
It’s all about a foul murder that took place some years ago.
And how the crime was perpetrated I mean to let you know.
II. It was about three miles from Castlefin in the County Donegal
There lived a farmer’s daughter, handsome, young and tall
She had received some visits from another farmer’s son
But he was sly and cunning too and soon her favour won.
III. He took her to his father’s home, a while there for to keep,
One night he gave her chloroform which caused her for to sleep
And when he got her sleeping, he went to his servant man.
They hurried off to execute their wild and wicked plan.
IV. But to continue some wicked deed, this fair maid to destroy
To steal her out alone at night between him and his servant boy.
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
Mr. James Scott, Bealalt Castlefinn. Co. Donegal found this upper stone of a hand-quern (for grinding corn into oaten meal) in his house. He states that it was never in use in his father’s time. The lower stone he states is missing and he remembers that it was left at the door as a step. It is now missing. The above is a drawing of the portion now in his possession.
It measures 17 inches in diameter, and weighs approximately 36 lbs.
Since I have written the above, Mr. James Scott (see above) has discovered the under-portion of the quern. He found it in a ditch on the farm.
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:11
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made by John Norden between 1609 and 1611 Preserved in State Paper Office, London.
This map was presented to me by Mr. Patrick Mortland a few years ago. He found it amongst old papers and books in his home in Ballygonnigan, Castlefin. It is almost entire, the piece representing the south west having been torn away and lost. It measures 27” by 20”
I have endeavoured to trace out that part of it, that represents “Tirconaill.” The red and black inks are as shown in the copy.
The map, on the whole, is a totally different shape in comparison with what we have now and is practically shown as a complete oblong – Tirconaill Connaught and South West headlands on the same line of Longtitude.
The original is in my possession, and I have pasted it on a sheet of cardboard, in order to preserve it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:11
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Lifford end which he was contending to know if the Gallaghers needed re-inforcements. The Gallagher chieftain said that “he needed no one except the Gallaghers” to disperse them, and forth with in an onslaught, sent the O'Neill warriors in headlong flight over the Alt, Kilcleen, Pollyarney and well back into their own territory.”
The story of the Gray-stone is to be seen in his poem page 125. I attempted to photograph the ‘coffin stone,’ and the ‘seat,’ but unfortunately my amateur efforts in photography failed here. I shall endeavour to sketch their appearance instead.
I have tried to find etchings or inscriptions but as far as I can see none are visible These are about two miles above Doherty’s house of Cornashesk, on the top of the hill where one can get a fine view of six counties.
senior member (history)
2019-05-07 09:09
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Sheila Reddan, Feigh, Eglish, Borrisokane.
All the oldest headstones are small and have round tops, or they have hips at each side and round middles. Some of the writing is covered by earth and clay so that it is hard to read the inscriptions. At the western side of the churchyard a lot of headstones are dated 1772, 1776 and 1777 such as the one inscribed, "Elinor Currane departed this life the 4th February 1776 aged 17 years. Gentle reader let fall a tear, virtue and beauty both lie here", and another near it, "This monument was erected in memory of John Scully who died the 24th December 1776 aged 20 years. Lord receive his soul. His brother Patrick Scully died in July 1786 aged 22 years" About the centre of the churchyard there is a stone dated 1753 belonging to one William Lacey, near it one owned by the Daughters. The word 'here' is spelled heare and the dates are 1750 and 1772. At the eastern side there are not many old headstones but there is one erected to the memory of Wenish Coulahan and this is dated 1753. At the side of the abbey
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 08:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
079
The Potatoes.
Everyone sows potatoes here in our district at present .First of all the garden is dug with a digger and the lumps of earth broken with a harrow.Then drills are made of it with a timber plough.The toptress is put out on the drills with a barrow .it is cows manure that's used.Sometimes the drills are made with a shovel.
Long ago the people used their own spades with an old iron and edge it.When they would be finished with it they would bring it in and leave it up very carefully.They used to stick a turnip in the edge of them in order it would not cut anyone.
Some people sew potatoes on red ground but it is nearly all black ground that is
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 08:38
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9. If you write a letter, and dry it to the fire, you'll be sure to be disappointed re contents of the letter.
If you put on a stamp crooked, you'll never get an answer to it.
10. Don't write a letter with red ink - it's considered very unlucky.
11. Avoiding meeting a person on the stairs, or you'll have a row with them.
12. Don't wash your hands in the same water as anybody else, or look into a mirror with them. It foretells a row
with them.
13. It is not right to have a light at the same time in a room
it's a sign of death
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 08:29
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Told to me by my mother
Mrs. Burke
Turlough
Bellharbour
Co. Clare
39 years of age
My mother tells me the only poet she know personally, was an old man, names Matthew Mahon. He lived near Kinvara in a village called Durras. When she first saw him, he was a very old man, and he was lame from his birth. He was very poor. He used to travel around the country on foot, taking notes of rivers and lakes, or any thing of note.
He would then go home and shut himself in for weeks, composing verses in thanks and praise of those who would be good to him or give him lodging's. A few of these verses are the only ones she remembers of the poems -:
Just in winter before the spring
I went to Turlough there for to sing,
To take down notes of each place I pass,
I arrived in Turlough just after Mass.
My mind at first was in great grief
Knowing they might repose it would give relief,
My feet were panting, for alas I'm lame
and to ask for lodging's I felt great shame.
May Burke 21st April 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:26
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rejected
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tháinic fear siubhal ann agus nuair a chaith an fear suas a chuid plátaí fhéin dubhairt an fear siubhal níl mise sáthach fós adeir sé agus ní fhaca mé seo nó go mbeidh mé sáthach dfan sé ann nó gur ith sé a dhothain agus annsin shuidh sé ag an teine. Nuair a bhí sé i deich a chlog chuaigh siad i chodhladh. agus dfan an fear siúbhal ar an tealach. I lár na hoidhche béigin don fear tíghe eirge mar bhí ocras air agus chuir sé cáca síos sa luatha agus dfan sé na hoidhche ag fanacht go mbruigheadh
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:25
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Ins an ám fadó bhí go leor straínseara ag dul thart ó theac go teach agus bhí aon theach amháin ann agus is ann a bhí siad ag fás cruinnigthe. Suite oisce nuair a bhíodh an suipéir reidh suite ní bhíodh dhá ghrún ithte ag fear an tíghe nuair a chaitfeadh sé suas na plátaí agus dearfeadh sé "tá mé fhéin réidh agus tá mó bhean réidh agus duine gan náire nach mbeadh réidh." annsin bhíodh naíre air na daoine fanacht ag iththe agus scopfhad siad agus ní bheadh teach a ndóthan itthe acu. Oidhche amháin
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:23
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aige dfiafhruigh sé go mac na baintrí i bfhior sin. Is fior sin adeir mac na baintrigh. Ghléaseadar suas iad fhéin agus thaíniceadar go teach na hiníne. Nuair a connaic an ingnín i teacht iad rith sí faoí na gcionne. Bhí ann athas orthú í fheiceál. Bhíodhar ag iarraidh í a thabhairt leobhtha na go bpósach sí an fear a bhí sí a dhul a pósadh cheana. Dubhairt sí go bpósach sé an fear a bfearr a shíorthuigh í.
Sin é mac na baintrigh.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:22
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Níor tugadh aon ainm nuá ar an aít acht do bára seachtimhar daoine ó Gaillimh cúpla bliain ó shoin ar an céad lá dhé Meitheamh.
Oidhche amháin do dhógadh go talamh an Pictiúrlinn Bheactória atá suidhte in-aice na duiganna ins an gcathair seo.Tá na muintir pbgeanach i gceannas air anois agus díoleann siad ghluastéain ann.
Do bí fear 'na chomhnaidhe ins an gcathair seo uair amháin agus bí an "leperos" air. Fuair sé bhaís agus bhí bhrón ar a mhuintir. bhí ospidéal ann i mbothar na Trágha le h-aghaidh na lepereí.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:21
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talaimh leis an luas an bhíos sé ag rith agus as sin freisin bhí sé caileamhail in Eireann.
Pádraig Ó Coisrealbha
Fuair mé é seo o'n mo athair
Mr. Coisrealbha,
22 Baile an Beathaidhdigh,
Gaillimh
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:21
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rejected
awaiting decision
Ba é Fionn Mac Cumhail an fear ba caileamhla bhí sé go maith ag rith i rásaí agus bhí sé go maith ag léimnigh.
Do leimeadh sé suas níos airde na é féin léimeadh sé gleanta ins na sliabhribh agus léimeadh sé abha mhóra agus léimeadh sé go leor rudaí eile abhí an ard s-an aer agus as sin bhaneadh sé caileamhla.
Bhí sé in ann rith freisin. Rithead sé go tapaidh agus ní dhéanadh sé aon torann agus ní briseadh sé caipiní dar
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:20
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rejected
awaiting decision
Deir na sean daoine go bhfuil na fir o menlo [?] an laidír. Dubhairt na san daoine fadó freisin go raibh fir ón Chladaig an laidir. Bhí féar in-a chómhnaidhe i Cno A Diollan fadó agus bhí sé inn ann rith go h-ann tapaidh. O'Ratallaig an tainm a bhí air. Chuaidh sé amach go dtí America agus bhí meas mór ag na daoine air. Bhí sé in ann rith feichid nua feichid cuige mile a rith sa lo.
Máirtín de Brún
Fuair mé an sgéal seo
Uision de Burca
Ait Naom Shéain
Gaillimh
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:20
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awaiting decision
Bhí na Fianna af cosaint na h-Eireann fadó. Bhíodh siad ag fiadhach ó Samhain go Nodhlaig. Bhíodh siad ag saighdiúireacht ó Nodhlag go Samhain. Bhíodh siad ina gcómhnuidhe a measg na daoine. Ins an oidhche innseóchaidh siad sgéalta do'sna daoine. Tá na sgéalta sin beó i measg na daoine fós "Sgóalta Fiannaidheactha". Tugtar
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 09:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear ann fadó agus bhí sé an-bhocht. Bhí sé lá amháin ag iasgach agus chonnaic sé Maighdean-mhara ag teacht aníos as an uisge agus gan cochall ar bith uirthi. Bhreathnuigh sé isteach ar an dúirling agus chonnaic sé an cochall agus é leagtha ar chloich ann. Isteach leis agus d'árduigh sé leis an cochall uaithi. Nuair a chonnaic sí ag imtheacht é agus an cochall aige d'iarr sí air é a thabhairt di ach ní thiubharfadh. Lean sí abhaile annsin é ach ní thiubharfadh sé di an cochall. D'fhan sí sa teach annsin aige agus ní raibh sí ag labhairt focal ar bith leis.
Aon lá amháin nuair a bhí an fear ag tuigheadóireacht chuir sé an cochall i bfolach sa díon. D'fhan sí sa teach annsin aige ar feadh seacht mbliadhna gan focal a labhairt ach i gcómhnaidhe i gcómhnaidhe ag iarraidh an chochaill air. Faoi cheann seacht mbliadhna tháinig bean isteach ar cuairt aige agus bhí an fear seo ag ithe a bhéile roimpi agus thainig sé cuid
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 09:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man digging potatoes in a field in Ballygeeher. He was wearing a bad pair of boots and were in need of being mended. After a while he thought he heard a voice saying "I will mend your boots". He looked up and a leprechaun sitting on the ridge beside him mending boots.
The man asked the leprechaun to mend his boots and the leprechaun said he would. The man took off his boot and gave them to the Leprechaun. The Leprechaun said he would have the boots for him in the evening. When evening came the man went to the place he had given the Leprechaun his boots, but the leprechaun was gone and had the man's boots away with him.
There was a Leprechaun living between Cloonart and Anacullen. He was a small man about 18 inches in height. He wore a tight dress and red cap on him. He was seen by several people about 50 years ago. He was a very cunning little man and very smart. No one could ever catch him. There was also a Leprechaun in Cloonen. He was about 18 inches in height and he was a shoe-maker. He used to be seen
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 09:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cure for "scurvy". This plant grows in abundance in bogs and fens and in marshy places. When a child has the whooping cough, the only cure is go early in the morning and the first man you meet ask him for some remedy. Whatever the man tells you to do, do it and it will cure the child.
1-2-38
Long ago a poor woman in our village died with the cholera, when the famine was raging in this parish. Her sister had to go to a carpentar at "Bridgets Bush" and he had to make a coffin of straw matting for her, because timber was very scarce in those days. She had to carry the coffin on her back. It was twisted round her with a "suagán" of hay. When she came home she had to put her sister into it as nobody would assist her afraid of the disease. Then she had to put a "suagán" of straw round the coffin and carry it on her back to the grave-yard and bury it herself. This old women is not long dead, but she died at the age of 105 years.
1-2-38
Once upon a time that little ancient villiage down by the lake called Patrick St had the honour of having a lord and a queen. But I am sorry to say they were never crowned. They
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 09:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
To help the starving people during this awful time, meal was procured and porridge in large quantities was made. The fire was made and the food prepared on the side of a sloping field beside the road. This portion of the road is now known locally as “The Brathan Bré” and is within five minutes walk from the school. The huge pot is said to have been brought down to the castle yard.
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 09:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Games we play inside.
In long winter nights I have games to play in the Kitchen. I play with my brother or sister or someone else. We play fox and geese. We get a piece of paper and two pencils and draw two lines across and two down through them so that there are nine places to write a figure in. Some one of us then put an X in the middle square and the other puts an O in another square and so on till the nine spaces are filled. One tries to keep the other from getting a straight line of O's or X's. Whoever gets a straight line wins. Sometimes we play cards and sometimes we play draughts. With have a square board with numbers on it from 1 to 13. There is an article like a bended nail at every number. There are two rubber rings with the board. The board hangs on the wall. We stand back a piece and throw the rings at the board time about. Whatever numbers the rings are at are added up and whoever has a certain number first wins the game. We set up a target and shoot darts at it with an air gun.
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 09:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wanderers are not as plentiful now-adays as they were long ago.They old people had great welcome for the tinkers and beggars because they get alot of funny stories from them both lies and truth.The old people used to give them lodgings for the night in cabins .When they used be going the people used give them alot of provisions such as bread ,milk,sugar,tea and
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 08:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a moat or mound in the townland of Cullion where a woman named Sabina did penance on the way to Lough Derg. She used to sleep on this mound the night before she went no matter whether the weather was wet or dry. It is still called Sibby's moat.
Fields.—In the townland of Cullion.—
The “Mullen,” (a wet meadow) “Crocamarry Height.” “Monaghan’s knowe,” (a little hill once belonging to a man named Monaghan) “Scabby.” (A field in which are a number of stones, supposed to be an ancient graveyard.) “The Bush Park.” “The Sprout Park.” “Long More.” “Moorehen’s Knowe.”
In the townland of Drumawark.—Fields.—Level dale. Subsoil. Nancy’s Park (so called because Nancy Burnside lived in it.)
In the townland of Tievemore Fields.—Stillhouse Meadow (so called because there was poteen distilled in it). In Sessaskielty. Tory Whistle. Jinken-loop
In the townland of Innisclin.—
Trees.—“Molly’s bush so called because a girl named Molly
Gowdy used to go and meet her sweetheart there.
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 08:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The 13th day of a month is said to be unlucky for marrying. Monday and Saturday are also supposed to be unlucky days.
There is usually money given to the girl who is about to be married. People were not married in their own houses.
The people had a white suit for being married in. There were only a few people in the district who had this suit and other people who had none borrowed it from them. There is always a wedding feast. There were parties of “strawboys” in this district.
The people went on horse-back to the wedding and the wide sat behind the husband.
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 08:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fields.—In the townland of Cullion.—
The “Mullen,” (a wet meadow) “Crocamarry Height.” “Monaghan’s knowe,” (a little hill once belonging to a man named Monaghan) “Scabby.” (A field in which are a number of stones, supposed to be an ancient graveyard.) “The Bush Park.” “The Sprout Park.” “Long More.” “Moorehen’s Knowe.”
In the townland of Drumawark.—Fields.—Level dale. Subsoil. Nancy’s Park (so called because Nancy Burnside lived in it.)
In the townland of Tievemore Fields.—Stillhouse Meadow (so called because there was poteen distilled in it). In Sessaskielty. Tory Whistle. Jinken-loop
In the townland of Innisclin.—
Trees.—“Molly’s bush so called because a girl named Molly
Gowdy used to go and meet her sweetheart there.
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 08:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The 13th day of a month is said to be unlucky for marrying. Monday and Saturday are also supposed to be unlucky days.
There is usually money given to the girl who is about to be married. People were not married in their own houses.
The people had a white suit for being married in. There were only a few people in the district who had this suit and other people who had none borrowed it from them. There is always a wedding feast. There were parties of “strawboys” in this district.
The people went on horse-back to the wedding and the wide sat behind the husband.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 08:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
104
Ball Eagan. A field belonging to a man called Eagan.
An páirc mhór.The big field.
An Ray Bog. The soft ray.
Gáirdín an Treabhadh.Because it is always dug with a plough.
Ray Corran.Nobody knows why it is called that name.
Móin-féir a ghlanna.it is not known.
Páirc an oileán.The field of the Island.
Cruich Neilín .it is called after a man called Neilín who lived near that place.
Lug a mhíle.A lake by the side of the road and it is a mile from Connolly.
Páirc an Sean Droicheadh.means the field of the old bridge.
Páirc an bhóthair.A meadow with a road running through it.
The forth.A field full of
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 08:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Coolderry- Coill Dearg- nearby is the small field known as the Caldragh, where in olden times was an old church and we are told St Daig had a monastery here.
Those lands belonged to the Kiltybegs Ranch, formerly in the hands of the Filgates of Louth, but changed owners several times and were finally taken over by the Land Commission about 1928. When the lands were being tilled, a small tombstone bearing an unlegible ?inscription was unearthed, also a small stone with groove equivalent to a holy -water font. In it are also some v. small ridges, remains of graves and in a corner some human bones were unearthed.
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heard music near him. The music moved on the road and Cormac followed it. Soon they had him dancing for the first time in his life, and he danced until he wore the soles of his boots. When they were leaving , they all started to cheer and shout " Bravo Mac Cormac, Bravo Mac Cormac "
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 08:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Coolderry- Coill Dearg- nearby is the small field known as the Caldragh, where in olden times was an old church and we are told St Daig had a monastery here.
Those lands belonged to the Kiltybegs Ranch, formerly in the hands of the Filgates of Louth, but changed owners several times and were finally taken over by the Land Commission about 1928. When the lands were being tilled, a small tombstone bearing an unlegible ?inscription was unearthed, also a small stone with groove equivalent to a holy -water font. In it are also some v. small ridges, remains of graves and in a corner some human bones were unearthed.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 08:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a ford near our house where Mass used to be celebrated long ago. There is a big high stone of limestone in the middle of the ford. There is a shallow hole in the middle of the stone and the old people said it was in that hole the holy water used to be kept. Any one would not know the place now only there is a wide deep hole there. When a person would pass the place they would see small children with white clothes but when they would see you they would disappear
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 08:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Penal Days
During the penal days a priest was saying Mass at a place called tobar na Molt Near Bradfert about three miles west of Tralee.
One day as he was saying Mass there, the British soldiers came on him unexpectedly. As they were coming he prepared to gather up all the Holy vessels and as they were about to capture him three golden sheep sprung up out of the ground. The soldiers stood in amazement looking at them and while they were looking at them the priest escaped, and the three golden sheep had disappeared and a well sprung up tere.
In the present day the peple do rounds especially during
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 08:56
approved
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awaiting decision
home from the fair of Tinnehinch and one said to the other "Ar Cualaís aon trábh ar an tác san" "Cualas" arsan b'fear eile agus tá péint de im phócs agam. Lághimís laistig d'on gclaide ar siad. Dheineadar aínlaid agus d'iteador an paipear taé ar fad. Mhuise ar síad mas é sin an taé go bfuil an saoghal ag trácht air ní mór é. Others thought it it should be boiled for hours. At Xmas and Easter a large boiler was set beside the fire and the tea was stewed for hours. A bucket of milk, and ½ st of sugar was thrown in, and everyone took a wooden mug and went to the boiler as he needed it. Perhaps this is the reason that very old people even to the present day think that tea is no good unless it gets a good boil. I know a woman in the school district, and she always leaves the tea to boil strongly for about 10 minutes.
The table was placed against the wall, and when the meal was over it was raised up against the wall and used as a seat or couch. It was called a Settle Table. Several of such tables are still to be seen
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 08:52
approved
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awaiting decision
List of riddles I have heard locally.
No.1 As round as an apple, as flat as a pan, one side a woman and the other a man.
Answer: A Penny
No.2: Why does a hen pick a pot?
Answer: Because she cannot lick it.
No. 3: When did Moses sleep with fire in a bed?
Answer: When he slept with his forefathers.
No.4: Out of a roomful, you cannot take a spoonful.
Answer: Smoke
No.5: Why is the summer sun like a silver sixpence
Answer: Because it is a tanner.
No.6: As I went up a hill, I met my uncle Davy. I cut off his head and it left his body easy.
Answer: A head of cabbage.
7. Which is the white goose or the grey goose the gander?
Answer: Neither of them.
8. Why does a cow jump over the fence.
Answer: Because she cannot go under it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 08:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
among the Ox Mountains. There are mountains all round about it and through it runs the main road from Tubbercurry to Dromore West. Two rivers flow through it also. One of those rivers is called Owen Aar which means the river of slaughter.
In the centre of the glen there stands out National School.
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:43
approved
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awaiting decision
the old people.
There was a man living in Shudane some years ago named Michael Forde he was watching wild-geese himself and his nephew Martin Forde up in the Shudane bogs one night when suddenly a little man in a red cloak appeared to them. Michael Forde aimed one eye to put up his gun to fire a shot at the little man that appeared to him in the water when in an instant he got an awful pain in the eye which he aimed with and he suffered great pain with it for a couple of days and it was a man named Thomas Heavey of Cloonkeen that made up a bottle of medicine out of a herb he got in the field.
Every year the "bráiste" and the Chicken Weed do a great lot of damage to the farmers. They make the crops poor and prevent them from growing. Only the red weed grows in rich lands and the other weeds attack the oats and wheat. Long ago when there were no doctors the people had cures themselves it is said that if you had some sore limbs you would have to drink the
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:36
approved
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awaiting decision
ancient church. The outline of the foundation alone remains. The church was used when Kilnasoolagh was closed by the English in Penal times. Not far from the church is Glen an Aiffrinn where the hunted priests said Mass. In the valley are two Mass Rocks and about twenty feet away is a blessed well which is now nearly chocked up. An old man named Riedy used come frequently and pray at this well.
Rev. Father Hayes CC. told me that he heard the day of the dead stashing in connection with this old church. A quarrel arose here once, and a priest enraged by the thought of sacrilege said "may there be a corpse here every morning!" "May it be the corpse of a starling!" said another priest who stood nearby. The dead starling is supposed to be found here. I heard this story in connection with Teampall na Déirce near Tubber, Co. Galway.
Mr Murray told me that the tide came up as far as ballysallagh before the banks were built by the river Fergus. This would be a distance of nearly three miles. He also pointed out to me a hollow near the site of the old church where bricks were formerly made. I should not be surprised at the discovery of some ancient buriels at Gleann an Aiffrinn
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:30
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as well as in English. Most of the land is good for tillage. There is a hole in one of the fields belonging to Mr. Francis Finnerty and it is called "Poll na h-iasc mór". About 40 years ago in 1898 a monstrous eel lived in the hole. He used to come up and kill the cattle on the farmers around. On the 4th May at 1.p.m. In the year 1898 all the men of the village went to kill the eel. He rushed from the hole went down into the river and was never seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:26
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awaiting decision
Mr Richardson before he reached Oran Mor with a letter to tell him not to go any farther because he would be murdered. Mr O'Connor went from Athenry to Oran Mor a distance of seven miles in twenty minutes and over took Mr Richardson as he was within half a mile of where the murderers were in ambush.

In the village of Attymon long ago there lived a great dancer named Mr Burke. All Ireland knew about him. He used to dance on every stage where a play took place. His chief step was "Heel-and-toe" barn dance sets". He was noted for all these.
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
Five pounds was given for the head of a priest or the head of a wolf. The Parish Priests were registered and allowed to remain at home. The other priests were cleared away. The most of them stayed around the glens and fences. They ministered to the people whom they loved. By the sides of fences they said Mass and they had spies placed around ti warn them if enemies were coming. It was supposed that Mass used be said up in the mountains in Buaile an tSagairt. It is in the parish of Lyssycsey. There is another place not far from that called cabhail a paidrín. Cabhail means an old cabin. The people gathered together and said the Rosary. Mass celebrated up in the wild mountain in a place called glean an Aifrinn. Mass used be celebrated in the Burren. The priest was killed and after four days he was found hanging from a tree in the wood
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:11
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awaiting decision
Craw-dawn.
A gossoon or grown child that constantly plucking after grown up people an old fashioined cur of a gossoon is often called a Craw-dawn.
It also is applied to the sticky seeds of a certain weed or coarse grass. those that stick to your clothes when passing through.
Shoughrawn
A man hard-up or broke is said to on the shough-rawn.
It's a poor cishte "Kishtah" meaning It's a poor state of affairs.
There was neither yig naw yow of him.
He made a foo-faw of it - fho as sounded who.
A lisper - You old manntach ye.
He went down as a bohereen.
There were streaks of sweat on him.
He only a gub-bawn = a poor tradesman.
He was lying on a purlogue or purh-logue of rushes (a clump of growing rushes = purr logue)
Don't he floughyule = princely or generous.
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Craw-dawn.
A gossoon or grown child that constantly sticking[?] after grown up people an old fashioined cur of a gossoon is often called a Craw-dawn.
It also is applied to the sticky seeds of a certain weed or coarse grass. those that stick to your clothes when passing through.
Shoughrawn
A man hard-up or broke is said to on the shough-rawn.
It's a poor cishte "Kishtah" meaning It's a poor state of affairs.
There was neither yig naw yow of him.
He made a foo-faw of it - fho as sounded who.
A lisper - You old manntach ye.
He went down as a bohereen.
There were streaks of sweat on him.
He only a gub-bawn = a poor tradesman.
He was lying on a purlogue or purh-logue of rushes (a clump of growing rushes = purr logue)
Don't he floughyule = princely or generous.
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 09:03
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rejected
awaiting decision
The Leipreacain.
Long ago the leipreacain was supposed to be everywhere. The name the people used to call him in this district was the "grescaide". It was was said that once a leipreacain lived in a small wood somewhere round Tyaquin. There was a man in Tyaquin who worked for the Richardsons of Tyaquinn.
senior member (history)
2019-04-23 08:38
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awaiting decision
Sláinte na finne agus na gile
Sláinte an tsaidhbhris agus na bochtaine
Sláinte na bhfear bhfóganta
Do dheasdhe dúinn agus ná feabhsadh orainn.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 08:54
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awaiting decision
If anyone would come in for iron or anything made of iron when the woman an would be making the churning, if he would help her or not he would not get what he would want. The people be thought that anyone who would give iron while they would be making the churning for anyone who would iron while they would be making it the one that would get thereon if he intended he could bring the butter. Then she would take out the butter and the first one that would go making the churning he would have to drink the first erin koi the new buttermilk. The woman would wash the dash and she would wave it three time around the churn and she would say "i n-ainm an athar agus an Mhic agus an Spioraid Naomh" he would say that three times so that the fairies couldn't bring the milk. Before she would put salt in the butter she would put some wee bit of it over the door so that anyone couldn't bring the butter. Long ago certain people had power to take britter and milk of the
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 08:52
approved
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awaiting decision
144
Béaloideas Place names
Our farm Páirc an Carn
The meaning of Páirc an Carn is the field of the heap.There is a heap of stones there .Long ago some people were living and they died ,so the house fell.
Gaire na h-abhann.
The meaning of Gaire na h-abhann is the field of the river .It is a small green field and is surrounded by a small river.
Páirc a tor.
The meaning of Páirc a tor is the field of the tree .it is a small green field .with a big tree (growing)at the field.
An réigh mhór .The meaning of the
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 08:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
Tá mé in mo comhnuidhe i gCathair Gamhann. Tá dá cheann déag de thighthibh ann. Tá trí ann de thighthibh ceann rlnne ann. Bhí ragapt ma comhnuidhe ann atá trí reóin bliadhan ó rhoin. Tá lorg a tighe ann fór agus tá rgeach ag fás i mbéal an dorais. Bhí teach mór ann ag na Blácaighibh agus tá na sean-bhallaí ann fós. Bhí dúthaigh talmhan
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 08:50
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awaiting decision
páipéir, agus stocaí fínnáin agus nuair a chuadas i n-aice na teine thóg na bróga teine agus dóghadh mo luirgne mar bhárr ar an sgéal.
Fuair Dómhnall Ó Suilleabháin an sgéal so ó Pádruig Ó Súilleabháin Imealláis.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 08:50
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awaiting decision
Bhréag. ‘Nis sí dhóibh annsan connas a ghuid na sídheógha í. Scríbh sí litir agus dúbhairt lé Seán pé pinginí beag airgid a bhí aige a bhailiúghadh agus dul go tigh a hathar agus an litir do shíneadh chuige.
B’seo leis agus thóg sé seachtmhain ó Sheán dul síos go dtí sráid bhaile i gCo. Mhuigheo. Bhí tigh breágh annsan roimis agus bhíodar ana dúbhach indiaidh cailín Sheáin Mháire Thaidhg. Thug Seán leitir an chailín do na h-athair. Sé a bhí sa litir ná go raibh sí beó beathaidheach thiar i n-iarthair Chiarraighe. Ghléasadar capaill agus seo leo - cúigear nú seisear aca – nú go dtánghadhar go dtí an ‘ngurrán fóchtarach’. Annsan d’aithn an cailín a h-athair agus rith sí na gcoinne agus a leithéid do ‘shéaceansaí’ a bhí aca agus iad ag ínnsint sgéalta dá chéile.
Pósadh an cailín agus Seán Mháire Thaidhg agus fuair sí dhá mhíle púnt spré i dteanta ‘Léim thar Léith’ a bheith ar fad aca. Sé bhuadhasa dá mbarra ná bróga
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 08:49
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awaiting decision
Móin a’ Rí chualaidh sé an gháirí istigh. Dúbhairt duine istigh le buachaill a bhí suidhte ar chathaoir i n-aice leis: - “Bliain agus an oidhche anocht a baineadh do chailín díot”. “Ná bac san” ars an buachaill “Ní h-aon mhaith d’aoinne í mar ná féadfaidh sí labhairt go brách”.
“D’féadfadh” ars an fear eile “dá bhfaigheadh sí deoch as an gcorn atá ar an mbórd agus an biorán atá na cúl do tharraing as”. “Am briathar féin” arsa Seán Mháire Thaidhg “má leigheasfadh san í”, ag breith ar an gcorn agus ‘á ardúghadh leis gan braon a dhortadh do go gcuaidh sé go tigh a mháthar.
Nuair a chuaidh sé isteach thug sé deoch ón gcorn don gcailín agus do chuardaigh sé féin agus a mháthair cúl a cínn féuch a bhfaighfidís an biorán. Do fuaireadar an biorán agus do tharraingheadar é.
Ní túisge san ná leag sí scarta gáire aisti agus is aici a bhí an chainnt
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 08:48
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awaiting decision
beirbiúghadh dhuith muna bhfaighfead mo ghé is mo ghanndal”.
Chuadar ag cuardach agus fuaireadar iad istig i ndíg an bhóthair. Do rug sé ortha agus bhuail fé’n ascaill iad. D’imigh sé féin agus an cailín go dtí “Léim thar Lé” agus chnag sé i dtigín a mháthair.
“Ariú a Sheáin” ar sise nách déanach ataoí . Tháinig Seán isteach, an ghé is an ganndal aige agus an cailín i n-aon-fheacht leis. “Ara a Sheáin” ars a mháthair “cá bhfuairis an cailín”?. D’innis Seán an sgéal dá mháthair. “O mo ghraidin í” ars an t-sean-bhean “tá sí caillte de’n ocras”.
Bheirbhig sí an gé is an ganndal agus bhí fióil a ndóthain aca an oidhche sin. D’fhan an cailín annsan i bhfocair na seana-mhná ag obair is ag gnó agus [gan] fochal cainnte aici.
Bliain ón lá sin chualaidh Seán go raibh géana ‘á d’imirt theas i “Móin a’ Rí” agus d’imigh sé ag imirt. Bhuaidh sé ganndal agus d’imigh abhaile ar a doh dhéag a chlog istoidhche.
Nuair a bhí Seán ag gábhail thar lios
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2019-04-18 08:48
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“Is mór an truagh gan cabhair a thabhairt díobh a fheara”
Chaith sé uaidh an ghé agus an ganndal agus chuaidh fé’n gcómhartha mar ceathramhadh fear. Chómh luath is chuir sé a láimh ar a gcómhrainn leag an triúr fear uatha é agus d’fágadar aige í i lár a’ bhóthair. “Bí gor” arsa Seán Mháire Thaidhg “is ait an rud é sin nú cad a dhéanfadh mé anois”.
Is geárr go gcuala sé scríobáil bheag sa chómhra. Chuir Seán “ cluas ar féin agus chualaidh sé arís é. “Ar m’anam” ar seisean “ach go bhfuil” rud éigean innti; agus is geárr go mbeidh fhios agam-sa é”.
Rug sé ar chloch agus do bhuail sé stiall ar chlúdach na cómhrann. Is amhlaidh a bhí cailín istigh agus í na beathaidh. D’éirig sí aniar agus do bhain crothadh as láimh Sheán Mháire Thaidhg; ach n’déadfadh sí labhairt.
“Mhuise” arsa Seán “béarfaidh mé abhaile tú seo ach níl aon nídh agam lé chur ag
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2019-04-18 08:47
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An Ghé agus an Ghanndal
Bhí baintreach fadó i 'Léim thar Lé' agus do bhí aon mhac amháin aici dárb ainm do Seán Mháire Thaidhg. Nuair d'éirigh sé suas i n-aois a seacht mbliana déag tháinig ana éilim air chun cártaí d'imirt agus d'fhanadh sé amuigh ana dhéanach san oidhche.
Do bhíodh a mháthair ag gábhail do i gcómhnaidhe i dtaobh a bheith chómh déanach. Aon oidhche amháin do chualaidh sé go raibh géana 'á imirt theas i Móin a' Rí. Chuaidh sé ag imirt an oidhche sin agus do bhuaidh sé gé agus ganndal. D'iompuigh Seán Mháire Thaidhg abhaile agus bhí sé ana dhéanach san oidhche.
Bhí sé ag gábhail i leith díreach bóthair an aitinn agus é ag dul abhaile nuair a chonnaic sé chuige aníos triúr fear agus cómhartha cómhra ar a ngualainn aca.
“Bí gor” arsa Seán Mháire Thaidhg leis féin
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2019-04-18 08:46
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057
Old Forths and Raths.
There are not many forts round here.In John T Boland's Land there is a great hole.There are steps down to it.The old people say it was made during Penal Times for to hide Priest's and Teachers.When the soldiers used to be passing the Priests used to go down there .of course they could not remain below long, because they had no air.Some old people say fairies are seen down there. Once an old man said a man went down the steps to see what was there and he saw a fairy-house.People are afraid to go down since.They say it is only a round hole for Priests to go down there and room for them to stop there .There is an old fort over in Connolly. People call it Jim O Malleys fort.Those forts are supposed to be built by the Danes in early ages.it is said if you stand
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2019-04-17 08:30
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Duínín
Tá an áit seo suidhte ar taobh ó dheas don baile mór. Cipéa é agus tú ag dul tré an sean -bóthar ón gClochán go Gaillimh. Ritheann an sean-bhóthar sin díreach comh fada le Baile na hInse - sé míle ar fad.
Tá "Carraig an Aifreann" le feiceál ar criarrac ar taoibh do láimhe dheise agus tú ag dul soir inaice le loch doire Niacha. Lá dá rabhas amhuigh bíos ag breathnugadh ar an gcarraig sin agus connacas ne ceimeanna agus gac rud a baineas le altóir. Deirtear gurb é an áit a leighead an t-Athar Maoleonair Prendergast aifreann nuair a bhí sé ar a réicheadh. Tá cailís a bhí aige agus an dáta 1825 sgríobhtha air, amuigh san séipéal in Erús Mór go foill.
Áine Ní Mhuiris
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2019-04-17 08:28
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are now in ruins. All those family names are now extinct in the downland.
There were certain circular holes in rocks on the side of Mount Gabriel called the "Danes' Mines". They were supposed to be cut out by the Danes in seams of copper. It was thought they used to burst the rock with lime by putting it into the hole and spilling water on it and and then covering it closely by which way the lime swelled and burst the rock and then they could extract the copper. But these were researched and blasted out by the English mining companies who found a little copper there. Stone hammers were found supposed to belong to the Danes also.
There is a kind of cromlech or dolmen on the top of the Rathura mountain, formed of four stones or flags - one on each side one at the head, and supporting a large flag on top. It is about 6 or 7 feet long and about two high. The stones are in their rough state without being hammered or chiselled into shape. The
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 08:27
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005
Daoine Cáiliúla an Cheantair.
William Reidy of Kanturk was a very good jumper .he jumped an iron gate that is near his own house .
Denis Sullivan went three miles to Lisroe for a half sack of flower .He came back with the flour and walked all the way with it on his back.He also went to Galway walking and came back again in two days .Thomas Walle of Slieve loughane walked five miles with a sewing machine under his arm .he did a day's work and came home again with it under his arm.
James and John Reidy of Glannletterfinny mowed an Irish acre in one day with a scythe .John Mongovan of Kanturk also mowed an Irish acre in a day.
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2019-04-17 08:26
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Graves are also in fields of Patrick Lucey - bounding Glaun.
There is a little lake on the top of Mount Gabriel called Poll an Oighin. There is a saying that Fionn Mac Cumhail took a handful of rock and threw it out into the Atlantic Ocean where it is now as the Fastnet Rock or Carraig Aonair - leaving the hole of Poll an Oighin. Another saying is that if a stick was thrown into Poll an Oighin it would come out in Schull harbour. There is a kind of a "Poll Talmhan" in one of Stephen Sullivan's fields.
There were families living in Glaun who emigrated, as the Harte family who lived in one of the houses, now in ruins down back of the National School. There was a Brien family living in west Glaun on a rock called "Brien's Rock". The all of the house is still to be seen. There was a Cunningham family living on the side of the Glaun hill - one of whom was a noted fenian - who emigrated. A Leahy family lived in south Glaun who emigrated to California. The houses
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 08:22
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middle, and one smaller on each side, to represet the three wise kings.
a "little xmas rhyme : Nodlaig na mban,
Nodlaig gan mhaith
[New Year]
Have seen my father (R.I.P) going out at midnight to observe direction of the wind. if it blew from the west the coming year favoured the Irish, uf from the east the Sassanach would get the upper hand during the following year.

[St. John's Day}]
A big bonfire is still erected in favourable spots in different parts of the town on St John's eve. All the neighbours young and old gather round and there is dancing for a considerable time.
A custom obtained of jumping across portions of the fire, and a great many tale with them for luck a portion of the buring stich or forget to carry home.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 08:20
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St Brigid's Eve.
The Brat Bríghdhe - A white cloth is got and hung out overnight. This will cure headaches and is efficacious as effective for a year. Can be repeated at subsequent anniversary. Prayers are supposed to be said to St Brigid. *(druid version given at end of book)
This is not uncommon still, I am a personal witness to the hanging out of the Brat Bríghdhe by a neighbour in 1936 - Mrs. Vaughan, New St, Macroom (aged 72).
______________________
Up to a dozen years ago, I have seen a doll dressed up and taken around the tow from house to house by young girls with the request "something for the Brigid".
Christmas Eve.
Candles in every window, the (?)are dressed up and lighted by the youngest member of family.
At Little Xmas eve, three candles are lighted, one large in the
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:59
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made of timber usually seasoned lder with a hole made through the centre of it. Through this hole wire is put with a piece of tin at one end to keep the wire from falling out. On the other end go the wire a bend is put and the top of it is pointed so that it can be easily used. The handle is made to turn around with the person working it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:58
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O'Flynn were the ruling Irish family in Macroom and Muskerry barony. Museraide ui Floinn still the Irish name of barony and district. Mc Carthy's suceeded O' Flunns and were owners led property in Cromwells time , regained CHas 2nd and finally died at Battle of Boyne. Not remembered now locally, except the tradition that they built the local castles
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2019-04-16 08:56
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Strange Animals.
In Glenade lake there were two domharcha. They had a body of a hound or wolf but a long sharp nose. On the Northest shore there lived two McGloughlin brother. The wife of one of them Grace Connoly while washing clothes at the lake was killed by one of them. The brothers thought she was a long time washing the clothes and they went to see what happened to her. When they reached the lake they saw the half eaten remains besides the lake. her husband shot the dom[h]archa but it gave a dying screech which was answered by its mate and the mate came out. The brothers run home and the neighbor told them to get two horses and go to Finner Tomp and so they did. The domharcha followed them and at last got up to them. He ran out through the first horse and on to the second. But before he ran through the second the brother behind shot him and that finished the Domharchas.
By
Kathleen A McPartlin
Meenymore N.S.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:53
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015
that's near Kanturk school."Gleann a bhótháin" the cabin was called.
Long ago the scholars paid a fee of one shilling a month to the teacher.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:52
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Seán:-
Conus a bheithfá annsan a Shaidhbh Ní Mhaonais
Agus mí 's lá indiu do chuireadh sa chré thú
Fuaireas bás 's tá do ghnó-sa déanata
Agus tá bolaith na h-úire ó chiumhais do bhéal tais.
Sadhbh:-
Má fuaireas-sa bás níor fhágas an saoghal so
Is do thánag chúgat-sa go lúthmhar éadtrom
Chun tú bhreith liom mar chiú mar chéile
Mar d'fhágais mo mhuinntir go dubhach 'na n-aonar.
Seán:- Mar a d'fháfair an áit sin a Shaidhbh Ní Mhaonais
Cuirfead-sa an cuaille cuillinn seo, tré'd chroidhe i n-aonacht
Tríd an gcroidhe 's tríd na h-aedhanna
'Sa chás ná tiocfair go lá an chéadair.
Nó go dtiocfaidh an Eaglais bheannuighthe [ath?] fhéuchaint,
[Is go 'néosfair dom mhuinntir brígh do scéala?]
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:51
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Field Names
We have many fields with Irish and English names. One of them is called "Inse Beag" because it is a small rushy field near the river. "Páircín a' Weevil" is another so called because there is an insect in it that injures grain. Another is called the "Cillín" because long ago the little children that were not baptised
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:50
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This is how you would play "Burn the Biscuit":-
An number of girls or boys must stand against a wall and one must count up to the number twenty must go to hide the "biscuit" and the others must try to find it. If anyone of the players is near to the place where the biscuit is, the one who put the biscuit is the in the hiding must say "Burn the Biscuit", and then all the others will go to that place to find it. Whoever will find it
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:49
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108
C Cu
Ó Freeda Woolley,
Langford St.,
Cill Orglan.
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2019-04-16 08:49
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XXIX "Burn the Biscuit"
This is how you would play "Burn the Biscuit":-
An number of girls or boys must stand against a wall and one must count up to the number twenty must go to hide the "biscuit" and the others must try to find it. If anyone of the players is near to the place where the biscuit is, the one who put the biscuit is the in the hiding must say "Burn the Biscuit", and then all the others will go to that place to find it. Whoever will find it
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2019-04-16 08:47
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356
Taking the Butter.
A friend of mine told me the following story-
"One day I began to churn and I thought I found a smell off the milk, but I kept on churning.
For about half an hour I churned and then I lifted the lid off the churn to see how the butter was doing. I saw that there was no butter coming on the milk so I churned for about an hour and still no butter was coming on. There was froth on it and I could not stand the smell that was on it.
I thought I did not "gather" it right or that the wind got at it so I gave it to the calves that evening.
I began to "gather" it again to churn again, and I took all care that I did it right this time.
I began to churn but with the same result as the previous time.
I decided to take a sample of it to the priest, Fr -. He blessed it and read prayers over it. The next time I churned the butter came on all right.
I was told by a neighbour to whom I told
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2019-04-16 08:46
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(1)
Folklore
There is a small well in Sheskin called "Tobairín an Duine bhoct".
Long ago a blind man dreamt he saw the little well on the side of the road, he thought someone said to him "Bathe your eyes in the well and you will be cured".
The next morning he came and bathed his eyes and he got back his sight. People do rounds there during the month of May.
It was believed that diseases were cured there.
Kitty Leahy
Ballybehy.
This story was told to one by my grandmother. Mrs Mary Leahy
Ballybehy, aged 91 years.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:34
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Times ago people got their shoes made by the cobbler so that the shoes would fit them.
In old times people only wore shoes when they were going to a funeral or going to do their shoping.
The shoes were far cheaper than what they are now, and it was very seldom to see anyone wearing shoes until the were big men and women.
This cobbler lived in Ballintra. He was a tall dark man with grey hair and a long beard. The men then did not cut their hair because there were no barbares.
The shoes that he made was of leather, with brass eyes. There were no shop shoes and so everyone had to get their shoes made by the cobbler, and he made plenty of money.
26-5-1938
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:30
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There were no giants in the district about here but Mr Patrick Mulhall has told us that there is a giants grave in Mr Hannons bog & there are three tomb stones over it.
A giant was supposed to roll stone Avoca to its present position.
It is said anyone walking on the tomb stones you will find sharp thorns in your bed that night.
Obtained from
Kevin O'Neill aged 50 years
?
Clash
Rathdrum
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2019-04-16 08:29
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Long ago houses here in this district of Ballinacarrig were made of mud and thatched with heather, rushes and straw.
In the old houses they had a settle bed in the kitchen.The fireplace was in the middle of the floor. The front of the chimney was made of stone and wattles. There was no glass in the windows but there were little boards. The floors were made of clay. The half doors were for keeping out the hens. Candles were made locally and people gathered rushes, peeled them and left one peel on them (?). They dipped them in grease and then dried them and used them like candles. They had an instrument for extinguishing them, called a snuffers.
They used turf sticks and cow dung for fires.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 08:25
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someone going to come in.
12. A cat with its back to the fire is a sign of a storm.
13.If the wick of a candle is red its a sign there's a person or a letter comming.
14. If a person put on his stockings in side out its a sign of good luck.
15. It is a sign of death in the family if a picture from the wall.
16. If a black cat comes into your house it brings good luck with it.
17. To find a horse shoe is a sign of good luck.
18.
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2019-04-16 08:23
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1. To meet a red haired women first thing in the morning is supposed to be a sing of bad luck.
2. If a black cat comes into your house it bring good luck with it.
3. To break a mirror is a sing of seven years bad luck.
4. If you spill salt its a sign you will be crying.
5. If your elbow is itchy rub it on wood for its a sign theres a stranger coming.
6. If you were going anywhere and you forget anything you should not turn back for it if you do you'll not have a bit of
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 09:01
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We are told that fifty or
sixty years ago children did not
wear boots or shoes until they
were full-grown, and some did
not wear boots until they were
getting married.
They water used for washing feet
is thrown out.
Boots and shoes are repaired in
this district but few are made
newly.
There is one shoemaker in this district
It is a tradition of his family
for three generations.
Shoemakers were more numerous
formerly than they are now
Most boots are made by machinery
now, and can be sold cheaper
blogs were worn in this parish
formerly and old people who
complain of cold feet wear them
at the present day.
They are not made in the parish
now but perhaps they were made
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 09:00
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There is a treasure hidden in the
bhurch Well in Iisrara. There is a
pot of gold in the well and there
is a flat stone over it. There is
an eel minding it.
Before this treasure can be got
three men must dream of it the same
night. They must go together the
next day day and bring with them
a red culture. They must cut
the eel on two with the iron.
If they do not succeed one of them
will be killed. People often went to
get the treasure but when they came
to the well they got afraid.
It is said the treasure was hidden
by the danes.
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 08:59
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We have one field called Cnocán Mór.
It got it name from a big hill.
The Fort field. It got its name because their there is a big fort in it.
We have the big garden, the hill fields
the pen field and the Sleibhin.
The Sleibhin got its name from a small
hill.
There are no streams in my district.
I do not know of any heights.
I only know the name of one rock. It is
on the roadside in my village. It
is called the Sappers Rock.
I don't know of any old buskets.
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 08:57
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Elizabeth's brutal and bloodthirsty governor of Connaught. But it was recaptured soon after by Red Hugh O'Donnell who, legend says, hung the English garrison from its walls and got rid of the English in Connaught by hanging every man who could not speak Irish - a sure mark of the Cassenach in those days. To prevent it from being retaken and reoccupied by the English, and becoming a thorn in the side of the Irish armies, Red Hugh mined it and blew it up with its own supply of gun-powder. It is said that the then chief of the Mac Costellos applied with his own hand the torch to the powder train that destroyed his ancient home, rather than see it fall into the power of the English.
In it's day, the castle withstood many sieges and assaults, sometimes by the O' Garas whom the De Nangles had dispossessed of what is now the Barony of Costello, but was then know as gallen, sometimes by the O'Haras of Leyney and Tineragh, sometimes by the Mac Dermots of Moyling, sometimes by the royal O'Conors of Ballintubber, and more often by the English in their various campaigns in Connaught. The Mac Costello were staunch patriots and fought bravely against
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 08:56
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Long ago a man from Garryland, Killmacduagh, Co. Galway went to Scotland. Before he went he cut a stick in Garryland wood brought it with him. One day as he roaming about a big wood in Scotland he saw a little bothán and he went into it. Sitting at the fire he saw an old man smoking an old clay pipe. When he saw him he said I know where you got that stick, you cut it in Garryland wood and how I know is that my two sons are there minding a pot of gold that is hiden at the cathair and here is the key of the door and while the people are gone to Mass go to the cathair and you will find the door and you can open it with this key. There my sons are and they are tied to the pot of gold with chains and they are in the shape of two hounds. When they
senior member (history)
2019-04-09 09:28
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Every stream, rock, harbour and Island has a name of its own. Mostly all the names are in Irish. That shows us that it was Irish was spoken at that time. Mostly all the names came from the shape of the rock or the harbour itself or from something that happened there. Some are hard to explain because with the passing of time the first names and reasons for the names are now lost.
Oileán na gCaorach, is situated in Derrycreeveen. Long ago, the sheep used stay there all the time. There is a road running straight down to it and there is a slip near it and the tide does not cover it because it is a big island.
Another island is Oileán na Yard that is also situated in Derrycreeveen at the west end, it is very near to the lighthouse and it is a very high island. Tráig Gallda is situated in Ballinakilla, there is a slip there too. Some say that long ago the French, others say that the English landed there on their way to Comb Dunboy. Tráig Chiaráin is situated in Ballinakilla also, long ago St
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2019-04-09 09:25
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astounded to see a man with a blackened face. He had a hatchet in his hand & was attempting to force his way into the Bishop's room. The Bishop remonstrated, threatened but to no purpose. The robber supported on the shoulders of his companions, continued to force his way through the window. In the room was a rusty old gun in which there was an old "charge" which , the Bishop had repeatedly attempted without success to fire off. His Lordship presented the old gun at the robber. He placed his finger on the trigger, when to his Lordship's surprise the "charge" went and "Allard" fell from the window - a corpse. To prevent recognition his companions cut off Allard's head and took it with them to the bog of Killahugh. It was buried there.
The Bishop never recovered from the effect of the accident. He fretted and died in 1778 & was buried with his relatives in Kilcomrer. The Bishop was attacked by the Rathconrath freebooters, the people became indignant. The robbers were attacked in Loughan & forced to fly from there.
Afterwards they lived in Raeenmore - between Churchtown & Loughnavalley & were for years the terror ? on their way to the West of Ireland. The barony Constables, the peace officers of the district were in league with the robbers. The robbers shared in their spoils with the Constables. .
senior member (history)
2019-04-09 09:21
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There is only one mass rock of the penal times that we know of in this area. This rock is situated in Dan Byrne's wood in Clenleduffys. It is situated about a quarter of a mile from the public road and it is in a very lonesome part of the wood.
There is another mass rock in Rathieve but this one is not of the penal times. It was St Patrick who used this one when he was preaching the faith in Ireland.
senior member (history)
2019-04-09 09:20
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Tree forges in the bis 1. (a Aghold Mr William Myers
(A KilKilguiggan Mr James Neill
Killinure Mr R. Byrne
Derelict Forge's Aghold Hill: Rath; Killinure.
These are old forges handed down from father to son.
All are near cross roads.
Tools ( Anvil, bellows, fire hammer pincers sledge rasp, knife, rule vice.
"Caltymeran" aold name for foot stool.
Forge water used as a drink a cure for broken wind in horses
senior member (history)
2019-04-09 09:16
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with sweat & white with foam.
A protestant made some slanderous accusations against Fr. Hickey. The good priest, whose character was above reproach in every relation of life, brought the offender into court. The case came off in Cork, & the slanderer was fined 200 Pounds. This money Fr, Hickey distributed among the poor of Cork before leaving the city,
A station was fixed to be held at a house in the parish. The owner discovered that the bigots had planned to shoot Fr. Hickey & the man himself. He went to inform the priest. The latter heard the the story & asked: "What are we to do now?". To this question the man resolutely answered: "Come & say Mass. I am ready to die in so good a cause."
senior member (history)
2019-04-09 09:12
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"I did not pretend to be dead too soon" he said, in giving an account of the occurence, "I've dread they'd know I was scheming, but when one of them gave me a tremendous crack on the head I turned up my eyes, & 'Och, dia le m'anam' (God take my soul),' says I. & I stiffened my legs & arms, & they were full sure I was dead entirely." This man had long experience as a fighter in the faction fights which were then frequent on that part of Limerick, & he was no mean strategist. O'Connell & his associates put an end to there foolish encounters by often remind the opposing parties that the policy of their common enemy was divide et impena. Public reconciliations were witnessed when noted leader marched at the head of supporters to the church on an appointed Sunday & cordially shook hands in token of perpetual peace, amidst general rejoicing. Loyally, too did there honest fellows honour their bond & faction fights became but a memory in the locality.
A more tragic fate nearly befell Mr. Coote as he was returning home on horseback from church on Sunday. As was his custom on sad occasions, he stopped as a little stream
senior member (history)
2019-04-09 09:09
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And a threepenny loaf sure that was their pay
The gangsters to mention, I think its no sin
Armstrong Robert I'm going to begin.
He is the hero that does them adore,
He never goes with them, with less than a score
And when he goes out to warn his men
He'll tell them old stories or otherwise sing
He'll tell them old stories about this and that
And the best of all stories, about an 'auld' cat.
From Gort-a-more comes another old gleak
With a stick in his hand that would make a cow's stake.
His men in number never beat three
And he goes by the name of old Paddy Bree.
Red Ezel Mac Morrow, he comes with such force
If you heard him speaking you'd think he was hoarse
Its on all our heroes, he throws a great slur
But the devil may take him to Ballin-na-gore (near Killargus)
At Lackey Trowers there is a great rock
One day to the bishop it gave a great shock
He stumbled and fell, and he rolled pretty well
And says he to John Frier "We'll blast it to hell".
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 08:28
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The only local poet I knew was Patrick O' Connor. His birthplace is not around was that he was training horses for Mr Hewson and during this time he composed many poems. All the poems Patrick O' Connor wrote were in English. One of the poems he made was "The Bobbed Haired Lassies" which held in the paper for several weeks. The reason he made this poem because he did not like the idea of girls bobbing their hair. A Mrs McCarthy from Killarney and himself had a long argument in potry she backing the girls and he opposed to it. He was a noted horse trainer through out the country and he rode after the hounds in Kildame. He mede this poem in the Spring of 1930. Patrick O' Connor was a very intelligent man. Everybody was anxious every Friday to get the "Kerryman" to see the poems for and against the bobbed hair. No one of these poems are heard in
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 08:26
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Eanair 23ú
Daoine Caileamhla
Do chómhnuigh an bhean seo atá luaidhte thíos in Alt Dearg, baile beag suidhte ar na sléibhte, agus timpeall dhá mhíle o'n scoil seo. Fuair sí bás deich bliadhain ó shoin. Bean Uí hÉigceartaigh a b'ainm dí.
An oidhche roimh Dómhnach Crom Dubh rinne sí an turas seo ag coisidheacht. D'fhág sí an baile ar a dó dheag agus shiubhail sí go Cruach Phádraig. Rinne sí "Turas na Croise" ar bharr an ? agus shiubhail sí abhaile arís gan rud d'ithe nó deoch d'ól.
Bhí mac ag an mhnaoí sin darab ainm Séamus Ohéigceartaigh agus shiubhail sé ó "Alt Dearg" go "Béal Dearg" , seacht míle, i seachtmhó is a cuig noiméad.
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 08:25
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and his wife went home and thought the matter over. At last they decided to have a fine castle and plenty of wealth. They went and threw three stones into the water and the fish appeared and the fisherman told him what he wished for. So he went home to find a beautiful instead of his hut and when he went inside he found plenty of food on the table and plenty of money on the press. But the fisherman when he saw all he had he became greedy and laughed at the poor beggars who came to his door. He was so greedy that no one liked him. But his wealth did not last long and at last he had no money left. He got poorer every day until one night his castle was burned down and he had to go back to his hut again and earn his living by fishing. All because he was greedy.
Collected by Aidan Kellehan 5th
Woodbrine
Ballina
Co Mayo
Told by Aurther O Boyle
Quignaleckas
Ballina
Co Mayo
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 08:24
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One night long ago some of the Murriak fishing boats were out fishing in Clew Bay. The night was very dark. The sea was very rough. Just as they were making for the harbour, they saw a small boat going to an Island.
She was so small that the waves used to put her down under the water. The men in the
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 08:21
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Place names:
Dauris is the name of the village in which i live. There is a field in the village called cos A' Gharraidhe. It was all one field first and they cut out a bit of it for a garden. They put a hedge around the bit that they cut out to be the garden. They called the rest of it cos A' Gharraidhe. It is very rough land.
There are hollows in it. It is a very wide field. It is not a very long field. At the end of it there is a small well. It is not a spring well.
There is another place still called bárr a'Gharraidhe. It is one side of the bog. It is very rough land. There are rushes growing in it. One side of it there is a bank of turf cut. There grows a meadow in it
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 08:12
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1. The people say that if a cat sits with its back turned towards the fire it is a sign of bad weather also if a cat starts scraping the door.
2. If the soot falls it is a sign of rain.
3. When a person sees the blue blazes in the the fire this indicates big wind.
4. A ring around the moon is a sign of rain.
5. If the swallows fly low and the curlews start whistling it is a sign of rain.
6. The crickets begin to sing and fly through the house as a sign of rain.
7. All ailments begin to get worse when the weather is going to break.
8. If a person can see Cróc Patrick clear it is a sign of rain.,
9. If the smoke from the chimney blows about in various directions instead of going up straight it is a sign of rain.
10. When Seagulls come inland it is a sign
senior member (history)
2019-04-03 09:11
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There is a story told about a lake in the town land of Drumboat. The time the protestants were in Ireland almost all the people in Drumboat were Protestants and the Protestants almost intended to get Catholics banished out of it altogether. The Protestants away down in the North held a meeting and planned to come up to Drumboat on a certain night.
Now it happened that there was a girl from Drumboat working away down in the North and she happened to hear their planning up to alarm the Drumboat people.
When they heard the news the gathered Catholics from miles around and prepared for a battle when the Protestants came up. They started to fight and the Catholics were able to defeat them.
They fought a fierce battle and the Catholics got the victory. They surrounded the Protestants and drove them into the lake. After that there were no Protestants in Drumboat. Then they made a song about the battle. In some years after the lake turned into a swamp. The people tried to clear it but they got bones and they stopped clearing it.
The people of this district had a lot of customs some of them were- On St Patricks day a band of young girls would go around a cross decorated with ribbons and shranogs
senior member (history)
2019-04-03 09:06
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Achonry
There are four provinces ulster munster leinster and connacht in ireland and each convince is divided into parishes and each parish has a name.
the parish of achonry is situated in the borony of leyny and has the honour of being called after the diocese yo which it belongs it is a very large district and owing to its dimensions it is divided into three sub-parishes. Achonry got its name from an old chieftain who lived there long go and also because the land is very flat and good pasture land. the ruins f an old monastry thar was founded by st.finan and still to be sun.
Achonry has a very fine protestant church a beautiful catholic and one of the best creameries in the county. it also has a good school close to the ruins of the old monestery lies a holy wall people come from every part of the country on the 15th of august every year to preform stations.
Nora Gormanly 26-11-37
senior member (history)
2019-04-03 09:04
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Achonry
There are four convices ulster munster leinster n connacht in ireland and each convince is divided into parishes and each parish has a name.
the parish of achonry is situated in the borony of leyney and has the honour of being called after the diocese yo which it belongs it is a very large district and owing to its dimenisions it is divided into three sub-parishes. Achonry gt its name from an old chieftain who lived there long go aan also because the land is very flat and good pasture land. the ruins f an old monastry thar was founded by st.finan and still to be sun.
Achonry has a very fine protestant church a beautiful catholic and one of the best ceanmeris in the county. it also has a good school close to the ruins of the old monestry lies a holy wall people come from evey part of the country on th 15th of august every yeat to preform stations.
Nora Gormanly 26-11-37
senior member (history)
2019-04-03 09:02
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on ridges usually. It has small little queer leaves and spreads all over the land quickly.
Micheál Ó Mearain
Cluangamhnach
Tuarloiscreain
om mháthair
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:36
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St Brigids Day:. young men dress up and go in procession to the houses at night. They wear feásóga or masks, and one carries the brideóg, or a sort of wooden doll.
They dance and sing and play melodies mostly, and in this way they gather some few shillings. This they spend on some entertainment or dance.
St Patricks Day:. Men wear shamrock sprigs in their hats or caps. Ladies wear it in their coats. Little boys wear green rosettes, or little harps. Girls wear green ribbons tied in bows on their hair.
In older times people went to the public houses and got drunk.
If a fair was held in any place on a St. Patricks Day, men came home staggering from the effects of drink. This was called "Drowning the Shamrock". The pubs are all closed now on St Patricks Day, so there is no Drowning of the
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:30
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Duiring the retreat fearful slaughter took place at Washford. The place was called Ath na Bháis or the Ford of Death corrupted to Washford
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:30
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about 1 1/2 miles north of this school. He suffered from wounds received during his encounter with Ferdind and bound with hoops. clasps and ropes to prevent him joining in the battle. With Maeve was Fergus of Ulster with his mighty sword called "Calad Colg" or the hard blade. Held in both hands the sword cut off 100 heads at each blow. After the battle of Garech the heads were piled together and buried in the mound called Cruac (or cnoc na Gan (na gceann). It is in Mr Ham's field in Halston. When Cuchulainn heard of Fergus's feats against the men of Ulster he gave a mighty spring and broke his bindings and joined in the battle. Cuchulainn was weak and bleeding from his wounds as he faced Fergus in battle. Fergus refused to fight a weak man and retreated in sooner than do so.
Fergus turned in flight from him. When Fergus retreated the warriors of Munster. of Leinster and all the men of Erin turned with him. They broke their ranks and fled westward over the hill of Clare on to the Shannon at Athlone. This the battle of Garech was lost Maeve through the generosity of Fergus who preferred defeat rather than fight a wounded man.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:28
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The battle of Garech
The Cattle Raid of Cooley (or Táin Bó Cualainge) is not alone the queen of Irish Epics. It is the most fascinating saga tale not alone of the Celtic world but of all Western Europe. The last of the series of battles between King Conor of Ulster and Queen Maeve of Connacht was called the battle of Garech. Where Garech is is not definitely known but it is thought to be in the district that stretches from Loughan to Glascorn and on to Halston in the vicinity of New Bristy.
The hosting of the men of Ulster. an overwhelming body of champtions and battle warriors encamped before the battle at the "Slane of Meath". that is on the hill of Slanmoare between Ballynacargy and Mullingar. Maeve's army awaited them in Glencarra (Corr) and stretched westwards towards Halston and Clare hill. WIth Maeve were the men of Leinster and of Munster and the people of Tara. During the beginning of the battle Cuchulainn was lying sick at Fort Sciath (Thorn Mound) doubtless the hill of Skeagh
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:27
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rejected
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The battle of Garech
The Cattle Raid of Cooley (or Táin Bó Cualainge) is not alone the queen of Irish Epics. It is the most fascinating saga tale not alone of the Celtic world but of all Western Europe. The last of the series of battles between King Conor of Ulster and Queen Maeve of Connacht was called the battle of Garech. Where Garech is is not definitely known but it is thought to be in the district that stretches from Loughan to Glascorn and on to Halston in the vicinity of New Bristy.
The hosting of the men of Ulster. an overwhelming body of champtions and battle warriors encamped before the battle at the "Slane of Meath". that is on the hill of Slanmoare between Ballynacargy and Mullingar. Maeve's army awaited them in Glencarra (Corr) and stretched westwards towards Halston and Clare hill. WIth Maeve were the men of Leinster and of Munster and the people of Tara. During the beginning of the battle Cuchulainn was lying sick at Fort Sciath (Thorn Mound) doubtless the hill of Skeagh about 11/2 miles north of this school. He suffered from wounds received during his encounter with Ferdind and bound with hoops. clasps and ropes to prevent him joining in the battle. With Maeve was Fergus of Ulster with his mighty sword called "Calas Colg" or the hard blade. Held in both hands the sword cut off 100 heads at each blow. After the battle of Garech the heads were piled together and buried in the moung calle Cruac (or cnoc na Gan (na gceann). It is in Mr Ham's field in Halston. When Cuchulainn heard of Fergus's feats against the men of Ulster he gave a mighty spring and broke his bindings and joined in the battle. Cuchulainn was weak and bleeding from his wounds as he faced Fergus in battle. Fergus refused to fight a weak man and retreated in sooner than do so.
Fergus turned in flight from him. When Fergus retreatd the warriors of Munster. of Leinster and all the men of Erin turned with him. They broke their ranks and fled westward over the hill of Clare on to the
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:25
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rejected
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There are two different types of mummers. One of these types was very common in my father's youth but it is not to be seen nowadays. Mumming is indeed a very old Irish custom. The mummers go around from house to house in the country. They receive a warm welcome from the household who have invited them to act their interesting play. The captain enters, taps the door with his sword as a warning to the quests that the mummers are about to begin. They march around in a circle first. Then they form a figure. Captain says.
I hope you will good order keep.
And strict attention pay.
And listen to those heroes.
And what they have got to say.
The first he is the bold Prince George Great fortune on him smile.
The next he is Saint Patrick. The patron of our Isle.
Next comes Boneparte,
Lord Wellington comes next
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:22
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As told by a little girl Bridget Neary. Once upon a time a man had two sons. One evening as they went outside the door they suddenly disappeared . The father ,doubting , that the fairies must have brought them went towards the fort, which was nearby. He threatened to dig out the fort to the ground , if his sons were not returned to him. A fairy called out, that if he went home . He would find both his sons under the bed. He went home then and found that the fairy had spoken the truth. They were ??? quite ill and never fully recovered . Both were lame after their illnesses. One went to america and the other remained at home on the farm in Ireland.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 09:21
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Carrowrile School.
After many long year subsequent to the relaxation to the penal lawsthe people of this area had a very poor chance of education. There was no schools except Protestant schools. One was in Templehouse demesne the Principal teacher who was a Mr. Egan. There was a large number of Catholics attending the school, one of the conditions was that they had to learn the Protestant Bible. There was another one on the top of Blaragh along the road in charge of a lady named, Miss Sprole, there also a large number of Catholics attended this school. There were a few occasional schools for short periods one in Rinbane in an old barn the teacher of whom was a Mr. Mannion one at Ropefield by a Mr. Henry. One at Tullyhugh by a Mr. Byrne and one at Carrowrile crossroads by a Mr. Oates. The latter school was the best of them all, as the name of Larry Oates as a teacher was a household word everywhere one went in them days. Some of the pupils attending his school travelled 5 miles to
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:15
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wet that person will go to heaven.
When a person is dead it is right to put three pieces of black cloth over the person in honor of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:15
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coffin.
coffin resting on any place once they take it out of the house until they put it in the car.
If they met a red haired woman when they ar going with the person to the graveyard that person will go to heaven.
If the day is dry when they are burrying a person it is seaid that person will go to hell.
If they play 'thart a bhróg when the person is over board and the day that ar burying him to
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:14
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smother the cat
to put three pice of black cloth over the person in honour of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost.
When they have the coffin shut it is not right to leave it on the floor to rest but on two chairs and as soon as it is lifted the two chairs should be left up aginest each other until the people of the house come home.
It is not right to have the
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:14
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flock."
If the bat strecks the door in the night some person will soon die in that house.
Corrections
the priest lag Mór as he was coming up a t lag Mór but the man made the horse go fast there was no one sick
a wisp
she brings
If the cat goses across him when he is over board they will have to
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:13
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that a man in Cregganbane was sick and when he got ready and went out he could not see any-one. He told the man that was driving him to get ready his trap and he went driving him to Cregganbane. As they was coming pu at 'lag-mór' the priest got a hold of the man and and the man sed "Let me go and have corrage" and the priest sead "It is hard to have corrage for when the Shepard is gone it is easy to scatter the
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:12
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of black cloth over the person in honer of the father and the son and the holy Ghost.
When a person out of the house dies the bed he was over in a boad should be let fall.
When a person put of the house dies as soon as he is taken out of bed the teck
should be turned over.
At night a priest was weakent and told
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:11
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person to the grave-yard that person will go to heaven.
If the day is dry when they are brying a person that person is going to hell.
If they play 'thart a bróg' when the person is over bord and the day that they ar brying him (to be) wet that is a sine that person is going to heaven.
When a person is dead it is right to but three peces
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:09
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437
32.
Tuar a' toileáin in Knockatona, Kilmaley Co. Clare land owned by Griffey family ,used to used the land in common -meadowing in strips ,every second year,a nmae for evry strip.place enclosed by rivers at each side (oileán).Tuar= mac.They used to let out the land in macs.
Steang a'leacht -one of the strips in Tuar a' Toileáin.
Gleann blonoige west of Letteragh ,Kilmaley.
Gleann na Gamhnaí west of Buaile na gCléireach in parish of Lissycasey.
Ráth Cróna -townland in Kilmaley.
Ré Claidhe -a division of Kyleatunna ,Kilmaley place occupied by Griffey's -last portion of Kilmaley next to Lissycasey.
Ráth Gabhar ,another portion of Kyleatunna
Cabhail Mholly .Cabhail Shúilleabháin.
Casaoireach-a field in Kyleatunna -a stream runs down by the wall.
Buaile na gCleireach -a townland in Kilmaley ,when the Church was burned down the Friars lived there and used to say Mass there- a mountainy place .
Crag na n-asal.All the people used to have asses going to Ennis selling turf.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:08
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marabhoilín moravólyeen large flat fish; uncommon, with very large mouth.
Person with 'a mouth like a maravólyeen'.
Boats coming into the bay when tide low. Advised not to go too "bare" on the Point. (near) (lom).
sleamhac slowk (-án) kind of seaweed.
gansey always used instead of jersey.
Gallases used for trousers - braces (Gallows?)
eyefiddle (aghidh fidal) always used in Fethard of mask
quid a quid of tobacco, a bit to chew.
shin to 'shin' up a pole or bare tree-trunk.
slug a slug of milk, out of a mug.
sleamhac a sleawk of buttermilk
pleithóg gift of eggs from neighbour Shrove Tues.
sgolleeps sgolb. sticks used like hairpins, at thatching.
aingich aindheireór, poorly, a sprusán, weakling
sprusáns weak crop or small potatoes
trí-na-chéile topsyturvy
buachallán big yellow flowering weed, is pastures.
Bulán open space or commons, (At Kerrylock).
rib a rib of hair
Rabuis rawbush, rank weed, wild parsnips.
dúidín a doodyeen, Clay pipe, short broken stem.
reídhteach I must 'ready'my pipe. Translated
tráithnín I don't care a thrawnyeen.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:03
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we're killed. They caught trout and eels in the Glen River and Laughlown Glasha by searn-Fhárc-ing
They were the terror of the farmers living in the lowlands and with the robbers of Cumar-na-mbo, barrahmurm, they mad frequent raids on cattle and sheep. The lowland people were afraid to pursue them into the wood and mountains
Cooking Food
They cooked their food in the open air beside a spring well, on a fire made of timber and brush wood. Heaps of ashes and burned stones may be seen in many town lands even to the present day and indicate the spots where the Fiolach Fiadh were Fiollach-ing the game.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 09:01
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Local Industries that have disappeared
Edward Kavanagh
Brackna, Rathangan, Offaly
58 yrs
July 17, 1934
People used grind their own corn long ago by means of querns--some of them still to be seen, but not used now.
A family named Darrow lived in Cappagh ([Ballynowlart Offaly) about 80 years ago. they used make cheese there and send it to Dublin. Foundation of house still to be seen.
There was a flour mill at the mill bridge (near Mr Wynne's forge) long ago. (Situated in Ballynowlart Offaly).
A grandard was used for grinding corn--not used now.
Words in sketch, top to bottom:
two round querns
handle
ground corn comes out here
Granard
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 08:56
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Ancient roads
Ainn an aithriseora:- Edward kavanagh
A sheoladh :- Brackna, Rathangan, Offaly
A aois (His age) ; - 58 years
An dáta ar a sgriobhadh é seo:- 16th July 1934
St Brochan's road from his church in Clonshannon, to Bog of Allen. It is supposed it was built by unknown people in one night. It was made of blocks of wood. It cannot be seen now, but people found some of the blocks when cutting turf.
Old road Nahana Cross to Parkmeen (Offaly) and from Nahana Cross to Kildrumminup to Clomcassan. (Offaly) River crosses it at Kildrummin & there is a ford built across it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 08:53
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nothing but the peel of briars would stitch on the skin again. The briars were got and peeled and the skin stitched on the mare and she was soon going about as good as ever but the following spring the briars started to grow and soon bunches of blossoms appeared on the mare and in the autumn a fully ripe crop of blackberries were plucked off her and every year while she lived the briars grew and blossomed and the berries ripened and that's how she got the name of the blackberry mare.
Cáit Ní Muineacháin
Ath Buidhe
Co. na Midhe
Mr. B Monaghan,
Glenidan, collinstown,
Co. W Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 08:47
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Page 22
Composition 13 - 10-38
Local Cures
To cure a toothache, to rub bread soda to the tooth.
To cure the mumps, wrap a stocking around the child’s neck before going to bed.
To cure sore eyes, bathe them in cold tea.
To cure sore lips, rub on thick cream before going to bed.
To cure boils (make) a linseed poultice, and drink sulphur in milk.
To cure chilblaines, rub a raw potato or an onion to them.
To keep hair from getting gray, rub it every
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 08:45
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Page 410
Collected By : -Máiread Ni Gallachobhair Rathnamag. Crossmolina, Entered on: -9 ádh lá mí Eanair 1939
1. Why is the letter “U” the gayest letter in the world?
Because it is in the middle of “fun.”
2. What is black and white and read all over?
The newspaper.
3. It goes in dry and it comes up wet, and the longer within, the stronger it gets?
Tea.
4. As round as and apple and as deep as a cup, and all the King’s horses could
not pull it up?
A well.
5. Brought to the table, cut, and cannot be eaten?
A pack of cards.
6. It has no feet, and yet can run?
A river.
7. As high as the wall, as red as blood, as white as milk and as sweet as honey?
An apple.
8. Round the house, and round the house, and all heads under?
The nails in your shoes.
9. It goes with the cart, and comes with the cart, and the cart doesn’t want it, and it cannot go without it?
The noise.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 08:45
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Page 410
Collected By : -Máiread Ni Gallachobhair Rathnamag. Brossmolina, Entered on: -9 ádh lá mí Eanair 1939
1. Why is the letter “U” the gayest letter in the world?
Because it is in the middle of “fun.”
2. What is black and white and read all over?
The newspaper.
3. It goes in dry and it comes up wet, and the longer within, the stronger it gets?
Tea.
4. As round as and apple and as deep as a cup, and all the King’s horses could
not pull it up?
A well.
5. Brought to the table, cut, and cannot be eaten?
A pack of cards.
6. It has no feet, and yet can run?
A river.
7. As high as the wall, as red as blood, as white as milk and as sweet as honey?
An apple.
8. Round the house, and round the house, and all heads under?
The nails in your shoes.
9. It goes with the cart, and comes with the cart, and the cart doesn’t want it, and it cannot go without it?
The noise.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 08:38
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Page 409
Proveils
Collected By : -Maireat Ni Jallacobair Rathnamag. Brossmolina, Entered on: -9 at la mi Canar 1939
One bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
A stich in time saves nine.
It is not off the wind he took it
Better late than never
The day of the wind is not the day to be putting
on the scollops
silk and satin put out the kitchen fire
the longest way round is the nearest way home
many hands make light work
when you get an inch you want a mile
it is a long road that has not a turn
a friend in court is better than money in your purse
people with glass house should not throw stones
look before you leap
spare the rod and spoil the child
A rolling stone gathers no moss
Constant dropping wears the stone
When cat is out the mice can play.
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 08:55
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In the townland of Shanbally there is a about half an acre of land encircled by a stone wall about six feet high and six feet wide. It is called Caher Cealtrac. inside there are the remains of an old church where mass was said in the time of Cromwell. Portion on an old cross still markes where the alter was. Inside these walls there were several people buried as Head stones and Food stones still mark their graves. In those days there was also a castle in Shanbally over looking the lake. The remains of the castle is yet to be seen. But is converted into a field and it stands about six feet above the level of the ground. It is said a king lived there who had two sons. One killed the other. He was buried in Crocain Creise. But later the corpse was changed to Caher Cealtrac.
Told by William Cahill, Shanbally, Craughwell, Co Galway
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 08:44
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A Plague on the stock in Killeeneen
In the year 1890 a plague came in the village of Killeeneen and all the stock died. There were three families and no stock died in them but the three owners of the houses died shortly after. There were four masses offered in the village to try and prevent the plague but it still continued. One night Father Fitzgerald was going through the village and he saw a spirit. The priest thought that the spirit was the cause of the plague. He prayed to try and put the spirit away. A few weeks after he told the people of Killeeneen to buy what ever stock they wanted that the plague was gone across the water. The next thing was the stock began to die in Rahsin but it did not last long there. Several times cow doctors came from Dublin to see the stock but they could not find out what was wrong.
Austin Newell, Caherdine, Craughwell, Co Galway
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 08:29
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Ní shínfhead mo thaobh dheas le h-aon fear go deó
Go bhfeicfhead mo chéile ag teacht marbh nú beó.
7.
Is a bhuachaillín marann, leig seasda dod' ghlór,
Téigir uaim abhaile is tabhair aire dod' ghnó
Ní thirmeóchaidh mo leaca is ní stadfaidh mo dheoir,
Go niompóchaidh an dubh dearg, nó go gcasfaidh mo stór.
8.
Dá mbeinn-se sa bhaile nó i bhfochair mo ghrádh,
Dheánfainn rómhar di is grafadh le hallus mo chnámh,
Ba, caoire ná capaill ní chuirfinn aon trácht,
Is ar an gcúis ní daorfhad tú, is mé (tú) Liam Taylor do (mo) ghrádh (adier daoine)
9.
Bhí gruaig ar mo bhuachaill go raibh finne na lár,
Ní raibh gruaim air, ó'n sluasaid, ná mairg ó'n rámhainn,
Bhí buaidhreamh ró mhór air, do deascaibh a mhná,
A's ar an adhmhar sin, go bhfuasglaidhidh Mac Muire ár gcás
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 08:30
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Nóta: As Muiginis an fear a chum é seo. Bád as an áit a bhí ag rásaí i gCloch na Rón agus bhuach sí. Ní raibh súil ag aoinne leis mar bhí bád maith eile a bhí molta na bád seoil. Cuireadh i bhfadh amach iad agus bhí an lá an-gharbh. Bhuach "Púcán Mhicil Pháidín" sar a rabhadar istigh agus choinnigh sí an tosach annsin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 08:32
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Once upon a time a man was going to a fair early in the morning. As he was passing by a stream he saw a woman sitting on the bank gathering froth from the water. "I cry half llolly" the man said jokingly and went on his way. A few days afterwards his people were churning. To their surprise the churn became filled with butter. It was then he remembered what had happened.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 08:24
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Momps. In the Rosses and the Point, there is a cure for the momps. If a person has the momps they may go to a certain Gillen family who will bring them by a halter to Tobair Thorann in Punti Bog field and they have to drink three times In the name of the (fall) Father and of the Son and the holy ghost. The people who have the power, Thier parents must be of the same name and thier people must have been always belonged to the place or the townland, which the well is in. Gillans for the Upper and Rosses Point. Gileranes? in the Lower Rosses. The well in the Lower Rosses is called Tobair bleagh.
Straining Threads
A man in Cregg has a cure for a strain on the ankle, he
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:39
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this is a story about a man that was coming from castle town. when he was near a place called besl a laps le he was made foolish and he tossed from one side to the other side of the road. he did not know then where he was then he saw a light and went to it. what did he see but a big mansion, he stood near the door, and there was a lot of people inside. There was a small man sitting near the fire with a baby in his lap. there was a women in the house also, and she went to Seánín and she asked him did he know her . he said he did not know her, and she said that she was his daughter . she told him not to eat anything they would give him. his daughter was dead years before. when the dawn
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:37
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this is a story about a man that was coming from castle town. when he was near a place called besl a laps le he was made foolish and he tossed from one side to the other side of the road. he did not know then where he was then he saw a light and went to it. what did he see but a big mansion, he stood near the door, and there was a lot of people inside. There was a small man sitting near the fire with a baby in his lap. there was a women in the house also, and she went to "?" and she asked him did he know her . he said he did not know her, and she said that she was his daughter . she told him not to eat anything they would give him. his daughter was dead years before. when the dawn
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:36
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the river and beat her across it with sticks and stones. when she reached the other side she was so frightened she wouldnt go back, so she went to a neighbors house. when they saw her there, they hunted her back again she got pneumonia, and her people thought the fairies mistreated her and they were cursing them. after a while she got worse and in the end she died.
my mother told me this story
Eileen Leary
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:36
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the chimney in a blaze. John did not return with the whiskey. he went with the man to the liss when he went there the small man was gone away and he went into a liss. he saw a great number of lights. no one one of the fairies seemed to notice. john was just going away, when suddenly a door opened . the Little man brought his wife out to him. john put her up on his shoulders and he went away the fairies followed him until he came to a drain in a field the did not follow him any further he went home safe with his wife. when john went home, the witch screamed. he caught the witch and through her into the fire, and she went up the chimney in a blaze. john went out for his wife, and he brought in his wife by the hand , and they the live quiet together afterwards
My mother told me this story
Eileen sullivan.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:33
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There was once a man who had a tenent in a house. He put them out of the house because they had no money to pay the rent. He had three milch cows. One morning his servant went out to milk the cows. She saw a hare beside the cows. She did not need her and she could get only a quart of milk from the three cows. When her master heard this he said it must be the hare that sucked the milk from the cows.The same thing happened the next morning and the farmer said that he would write to a man who had a lot of beagles and tell him to come and kill the hare. The man came and he and the farmer went out to look for the hare. They saw the hare but she was not near the cattle. When he let the beagles loose they chased the hare out of the house. The hare jumped to a window that was in the gable. When she was jumping one of he beagles took a bite out of her. They could not get into the house only by knocking down a piece of the wall. They did so and when they went in they saw an old witch spinning wool. The farmer said did you see any hare.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:31
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As he was going towards his own house he heard a voice saying. Ná bí amuigh mall. The boy went inside the ditch to search for the voice but could not find anyone.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:28
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they mixed it in the palms of their hands until they had it made into whatever article they wished and then they left it out in the sun to harden.
In summer girls made chains from daisies and put different flowers in the centre for an ornament , and this was the way they did it. They put a hole in the end of each flower, and put a stem into the hole and so on until they had it finished, and they dressed themselves with the chains.
Boys made spinning tops from wood, and put a spike in the centre of it and left it on a chair or on something, and twisted it and they had a tiny whip to keep it going.
They had a sling make from a piece of leather which was tied in both ends , and a hole in the centre of it, for the stone and a string from it, which they twisted round their hands , and gave it a fling to see which would send it the greatest distance or the greatest height .
They made pipes from spools, and a stem from another piece of wood, and put tobac-mána in it for tobacco and smoked it.
Another pastimes boys had was to make bubbles and this was the way they did it. They filled a clay pipe with dissolved soap
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:24
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Turf baskets for bringing home turf and manure baskets for putting out manure on the land, were make by mostly all the small farmers as were also scions for holding potatoes after being boiled .They also make white clothes baskets of the yellow osier. These are nearly all dead out.
Formerly all the spinning, carding and dying of wool for the making of flannels and friezes and stockings were done in all the homes in this locality , as also was the scutching of flax , and the preparing of it for the making of linen sheets and towels.
In olden times ploughs , spades as also were goats and hayforks make by blacksmiths , but these are all dead out with the exception of gates.
There were about a dozen weavers in this Parish. They used the handloom and changed about three pence a yard for weaving and the woman who bought yarn
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:14
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1/
Seo paidir a deirtí ag éirigh dóibh ar maidin.
Eirighim suas lé dia go n-éirigh dia liam láin dé in mo timcheall ag suidhe is luighe is ag éirigh dom.
2/
Paidir ag cogail teine dóibh
Cogluighim an teine seo már cogluigheas Críost cá Brighid in a bian is Muire na lár, Seacht n-aingil fichid ag flitheas ma nGrást seo cuidado ach na tigre seo is na daoine go lá.
Dá mbéinn-se = Mana na gamin Dubhach is paipéa bheith agam ann.
Is deas a scriobhfiain duit .
Aníos n mbán an moadh áluinn.
A bhí ar an gleánn.
'Sé d'iarrfainn ariompuigh dhomsa ar Rí na nGrást
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:12
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Home-Made Toys
Nearly every person could make some kind of an home-made toy.
Sometimes a necklace of daisy's. They get a needle and thread and gather the heads of daisies and sew them all together, and then the necklace is made.
People often make a home-made ball for children, by getting many pieces of wool and joining them, and leaving them very loose.
Sometimes people make a rag doll, by cutting a piece of cloth the shape of a doll, and sewing it except at one end. From this end it is filled with sawdust and then a face is made by painting eyes a nose a mouth and ears on it.
People sometimes knit a teddy bear. A person should knit a piece the shape of a teddy bear, fill it with sawdust, and put a bead for each eye and some red wool for the mouth.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:12
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see cabbage like that before?" asked the king. "Indeed I did" said Jack. "Do you remember the time we had the snow and frost for three weeks?" "I do said the king." "Well" said Jack, "my father drove three hundred sheep into our own garden, and after the three weeks you would'nt miss what they ate out of one head." "That must have been wonderful cabbage" said the king.
Then the king brought him into a field of turnips, and asked him did he ever see better ones, and Jack said he did. "My father had turnips sown one time" said Jack "and one of them bursted the ditches of a four acre field." "It must have been a large turnip" said the king.
Then the king brought him into a wood and asked him did he ever see a wood like that before. "O" said Jack "My father had a wood one time and he hired all the men from the South to the North of Ireland to cut the trees, and it took them four years to cut them." The king knew that Jack had beaten him, and he asked him what way he came.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:10
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There was once a lazy man in a field and a few other men with him so they told him that if he would dig under this bótholán he would get a pot of gold. Well I have no shade to dig the bóthlán now. If I go home for the shade I wont know the bótholán to dig. So he tied a red tape on the bótholán the way he would know it when he would come back. When he came back they were all tied with red tapes and he did not know what one to start at, so he started at the first and he kept diffing until he was black in the face. When he came to this bótholán there came from under the bótholán a little red man and said to him, if you would dig that good for yourself there would be gold on the shade for you.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:03
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"Fairy Forts"
In the district in and around Bilboa there are not many fairy forts. There is a "Liss" in Mr Willie Bourke's field in Bilboa. The liss is surrounded by blackthorn bushes. It is said that horses have been seen at night there. Tom Moloney Bilboa cut a blackthorn stick out of the liss and got a Féirín and was lame until he died.
There is another liss in Mr Lloyd's field. It is said that a man was passing by the liss one night and he heard fairies singing. He stood listening for a moment and he began to sing, and when the fairies heard him they came out and took him in. After a while they asked him would like anything to be done for him so he said "Take that lump off my back".
Person from whom
I received story Laurence Hogan
Address Ballyvoreen Murroe
What Barony Owneybeg
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 09:02
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A funny story.
Once there were an old man and an old woman living in Bilboa. They had a shop, and whenever they wanted things for the shop, one of the old couple was obliged to walk to Limerick. One night a neighbour was in on his cuaird. The woman was going to Limerick the following morning, and the neighbour knew what time she would be going and when she would be due back. He made up his mind that he would wait for her and rob her.
During the night the woman got sick, and she said she was not able to go to town. Her husband went to town instead. It was dark when the man was coming home from Limerick. The neighbour was waiting at a lonely part of the road, withe a white sheet about him. He thought the woman would think it was a ghost, and leave what ever goods she had, on the road and run away. Suddenly the neighbour heard a step coming along and thinking it was the woman, he stepped out on the road but to his surprise it was the man that was there. The man stood out from him and hit him down on the head with a stick and knocked him down on the road. Then he pulled off the sheet and found out who it was,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:57
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Between Clonascra and Ballinahown there is a motor car to be seen. Every night about twelve o'clock a ghost motor car and a man and lights come into Clonascra turn at a gate and go back to Ballinahown. Any one who meets it can hear the noise and see the lights, but when it comes near them the lights turn like a bicycle light. Then when passing them they can see no lights not hear nothing only an awful freeze of wind. Then when that is over they can see no lights, and hear the noise again be-hind them. The motor never he harms any-one.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:56
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the father sold the house and left the place.
The man who bought the house, went to live there after a while. The first night he went there, he heard the noise, but thinking it was rats that were there, he took no notice of it. The second nightie heard the crying, and it frightened him very much, to hear that lonely cry.
The next night he got a friend to sleep with him, who did not know the houses haunted. The second night he was there he heard the noise, and wo-uld not stay there any longer. The man had an other friend, who said, he didn't believe in ghosts, or wasn't afraid of them.
That man stayed with him for a week, and one night, he got a very bad too-th ache. He told the man, that he would go down to the fire, and smoke a while, see would it ease the pain. His companion told him not to, said he, "you know the story of his house, and I warn you not to go" When he saw how usless it was {Insert [to argue,]} he said he would go down with him.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:55
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This story is about a man, and his wife, and son, who were supposed to be living near Kenmare, nearly two hundred years ago. One day the father and the son were fighting. The son was accused of being careless, but he said he was not, the father then said he would put him out of the house, and it was then the son hit him. No more was said until that nigh, whenever one was in bed. The father got up, and taking a big iron bat with him, he went to the son's room. He was asleep when he went in, and he hit him across the head with it, and kill'ed him. After a while the house became haunted. Every night a terrible noise would be heard and then after a while the noise would stop. Then moan-ing would be heard then the sound of footsteps from the murdered boy's room and then silence. After a while
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:46
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There was once a woman coming up from knockmore and when she was passing by a limekilns a horse came out and put his two feet up on her shoulders and she had to drag him to the top of the hill and he came off there and the woman fainted.
senior member (history)
2019-03-21 09:14
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There was once a giant in this country. One day this girl was spreading out clothes. The giant came and brought the girl. The people saw the giant bringing the girl. The mother of the girl sent her two sons after her and the young brother wanted to go with them. They did not want to let him go so he followed them and they tied him to a bush in a wood when they were at the hole where the giant went down with the girl. They saw the young brother coming after them and the bush with him. When he came to the top of the hole they tied a rope to the oldest boy and let him go down in the hole. When he went a bit he shouted to pull him up. They put the rope on the second boy and let him down. When he went a bit further he shouted to pull him up. He put the rope on the third boy and they let him down. He went down to the bottom. He went and went
senior member (history)
2019-03-21 09:14
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Buried in Goulánes and a few stones in an upright position are placed over his grave. A man and his dog were buried new a bridge about three quarters of a mile from the school. The bridge is built over a road which leads from the main road to Bahirolickna. It is known as The Flat Cross.” A stone marks the spot where the man lies buried. It is said that a man named Tom Yearn was buried alive in Skibbereen. He was taken to the graveyard with many others who died of hunger and fever. He broke his two legs trying to come out and from that out he had to walk with crutches.
Written by Mary O’Sullivan
Told by Helen Mobarthy
senior member (history)
2019-03-21 09:10
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A Story
There is a palace in Boonamona called Pollá Puća. It is said that there was a ghost there some time ago. When the people used to be coming home from visiting at late hours. They used to hear laughing some nights and crying other nights. Other nights they used to hear noise like if a lot of cattle were running through water.
One night a man was coming home alone and it was about twelve o clock. He saw a man standing along the dite. He spoke to him and he got no answer. He
senior member (history)
2019-03-21 09:09
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the door. When the first Sunday after the marriage would come the married couple and the sponsors would go to Mass and after Mass they would go into a public house and they would have a few drinks. A lot of men and women would be wishing them their joy. Another old custom was when the girl would be getting married her mother would give a few sheep for good luck. The people used to say that it was "happy for the bride the sun falls on and happy for the corpse the rain falls on". "Lá breágh 'dhul chun do phosadh; lá dósta 'dul chun na cille".
Written by Edward Whyte, Pollea. I got the information from my parents.
senior member (history)
2019-03-21 09:06
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go to the town on them and the girl would have the same. When they would reach the town the man and girl would go into the church to be married and they would have a spanner each. When they would be going to the town the man and the girl would not be coming home they would sit beside each other. They used to say that it was not right to have a mare that would be in foal under the ear and it wasn't lucky to meet another marriage or to see a corpse in the church. Sometimes when the people would be going to the church they would go on horse-back and when they would be coming home they would be racing to see who would be the first at the man's house and the first one would get a can of porter. When the wedding would be coming the people would have bonfires made on the side of the road and lighted sods of turf steeped in oil. When they would reach the house there would be great joy on everybody. Then they would get down off the ears and the married couple would kneel down at the door and the girl's mother-in-law would break an oaten meal cake on the girl's head and if it
senior member (history)
2019-03-21 08:56
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456
and she brought it home again, James Sullivan's wife Knockatona Biddy Mór Sullivan brought 20 stone of oats on her back from Ballyea to Kilmaley.Thomas Costello,Cahermore ,Kilmaley afterwards living in Darragh brought 30 stone of oats on his back upstairs.
There was a woman working for James Lynch ,Cahermore Kilmaley and she used to go from Cahermore to Ballymacooda (2miles) milking the cows.Once she tackled herself to the car and brought home the milk of 19 cows. She put the back band across her shoulder and pulled the car (the ass being taken from her)
John Mc Mahon wrote the "Hills of Clare" in English -(copy of song enclosed). I think this John Mc Mahon is now living in Belfast.
senior member (history)
2019-03-21 08:46
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In olden times there lived in Wilton a man whose name was Mr William Nicholas. He was a very good smith. He used to make gates, ploughs, horse shoes and fire cranes. Spinning, weaving and dyeing were done by Mr Paul Flynn of Clare Mills. Thatching was also carried on by Mr William Clohessy of Ragroad. There lived in Rath one Mr OBrien who used to tan leather. Barrels were made by Mr Maloney the Cooper of Murroe. Wheel-making was done by Mr James Rainsford of Cappanahanna. In olden times lime burning was done by all the farmers, they all had lime kilns of their own.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:27
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would not do this that the person would back again and sleep in the bed. They fold these sheets up and they do not use them again. If there is straw in the bed they put it our under a bush.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:27
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lifted others take their place but when they are exchanging they never leave the coffin on the ground. It is said that if they did a light would be seen their and it would not be right to walk over that place.
When the funeral reaches the graveyard gate the priest walks in before it. He says some prayer and then he blesses the grave. The coffin is lowered into it and the priest throws on the first three shovel full of clay. Then the men close the grave all the people leave except the relatives and they wait for a while and say prayers for the dead.
When they come home the fold up the sheets if they cannot wash them before nine days they dip the continents in water They say that if they
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:27
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The young boys and girls into the wake at night and all the old people go home during the night rosary is repeated many times. They get some king o refreshment before they leave the wake.
On the second day of at its commencement the remains are taken to the church and they are left there for the night. The next morning there is a solemn requiem mass said for the deceased then the funeral procession takes place the coffin is carted out with the feet first and it is put into the hearse. If it is a young person all the young people wear sashes and they carry the coffin part of the way on their shoulders. When the boys who are carrying the coffin get
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:26
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habit is put on and if it is a young person a white habit is put on. If the deceased belonged to some order he is dressed in the cloth of that order. Then, the bed is dressed in white sheets and the body is laid on it. There are three candles left burning on a little table outside the bed.
Then the neighbors and friends come in to he corpse house. They first say a prayer for the deceased and then they express their sympathy with the people of the house. Then some one gives out pipes and tobacco to the people and before they leave the men light the pipes because they believe that they would have had luck if they brought them with them and smoked them in their own house.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:25
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When a person dies in this district his eyes are closed and the “mayorle pours” is put on to keep the mouth closed. The clock is stopped and the dog and cat are put out of the house. The cat is put out in case he might jump into the bed and jump across the corpse. If this happened the dead would be displeased.
After a few hours some of the relations wash the body. When they have finished they throw the water in some place it will not be walked on. This shows great respect to the dead person. When they body is washed they put habit if the person is old a brown
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:24
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as a precaution, against spring rashes, and blood heats.
Sore Eyes. The juice of a houseleek a wild herb which grows in the thatch is indicated for sore eyes, 4 roasted onions for poultices.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:23
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In olden times the ancient people used herbs very frequently. One of these cures was for a felon or whitlow on the finger. It is said a felon is very painful and also very dangerous. Nowadays people often loose their fingers with it. The old peoples cure for this was felon herbs and rue which go together to form a poultice. Another cure was for the jaunders worms were pounded up and boiled in milk they were then taken as a drink. Worm fever was cured by a herb called “Cannabhán beg". This was rubbed on the patient. A fig heated very hot and placed on the jaw is said to be a cure for the tooth-ache. If a person walks under a donkeys legs he will be cured of the whooping cough. Many miles outside Baltinglass in a place called Blessington Lacain well is situated. Numberless cures took place at this well
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:20
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Most marriages take place during Shrove and especially on Shrove Tuesday in this district May and November. Monday Friday and Saturday are believed to be unlucky times for marriages. Monday for health. Tuesday for wealth. Wednesday the best day of all. Thursday for losses. Friday for crosses. Saturday no luck at all. Matches are made in this district and money is given as a dowry. Stock such as cows or calves are sometimes given. The marriages were held in the houses up to about sixty years ago. The marriage was usually celebrated in the
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:13
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as she is. Then the ther party praise the boy. He is a fine man and a good safe place and he could have plenty of girls but he liked this one better than any of them.
They get married then on the day appointed. All friends are invited a plentiful supper of whiskey, porter, and all kinds of eatables are got. When they come home from the Church they kneel at the door and the wedding cake is cut over their heads.
After this they all have supper then the music and dance starts. Some-times the young boys around the place dress up in old clothes and straw and go to the wedding house they all dance a round one of them dance with the Bride then they get porter.
Lucy Gunning,
Derrywode, Williamstown.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:13
approved
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as she is. Then the ther party praise the boy. He is a fine man and a good safe place and he could have plenty of girlsbut he liked this one better than any of them.
They get married then on the day appointed. All friends are invited a plentiful supper of whiskey, porter, and all kinds of eatables are got. When they comehome from the Church they kneel at the door and the wedding cake is cut over their heads.
After this they all have supper then the music and dance starts. Some-times the young boys around the place dress up in old clothes and straw and go to the wedding house they all dance a round one of them dance with the Bride then they get porter.
Lucy Gunning,
Derrywode, Williamstown.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:12
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until the next year.
There were not many marriages in this place yet there is some match making going on. Match making is started at some fair or market or sometimes after Mass on Sunday.
The man throws his eyes on some nice girl. He gets two men to ask her. They are armed with two sticks and a bottle of whiskey they stick the sticks up in the thatch and go in to ask the girl. If all goes well they drink the whiskey and then they start praising the boy and the girl. They appoint a night to meet in the town.
The man asks so much money sometimes two-hundred more then expects to get. And the dividing and the splicing begins until they settle all. Off course there is a lot of talk one party praising the girl. There is no girl in the parish as good as a working girl
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:10
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whooping cough.
Mary Naughton, Cloon-Line, Kilconly, Tuam
The Storyteller, Michael Quinn (age 43 years), Cloon-Line, Kilconly, Tuam
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:09
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Long ago when the people were sick or had any diseases they had cures of their own as they had no Doctor. When the people had the whooping cough long ago they thought it was a cure to ask any man they would see riding on a white horse what would be the best for the whooping cough and what ever the man on the white horse would say they would do it as they believed in it as a cure. There was a woman long ago who was good for cures whose name was Carney. She lived in Cloon-Line, Kilconly, Tuam, and there was a little child living near her who had a sore foot and she could not walk, so the old woman told her to put oatmeal porridge on the sore and what ever would fall from her foot to gather it up and eat it and the child did as she was told and she was cured. The old woman did not believe in waste. The people had another cure for the whooping cough. Long ago the people who lived in Cloon-Line, Kilconly, Tuam, often went to Dalgan and brought milk with them and gave it to the ferreto to dry and the milk they would leave after them they would bring it home again and drink it themselves as there was a cure in it for the...
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:07
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There are no real holy wells in the parish, but there are "spas" and other wells which were supposed to be blessed by priests long ago. On our farms about eighty years ago, there was a spring well at the foot of a rock. This well was thought to be blessed by a priest a long time ago. Doctors said that the water was the purest in the district, and that it was very healthy to drink a glass of it daily. Below the well, in the stream that went from it, there grew beautiful sweet, green watergrass. It was very healthy to eat some of this grass in the morning. When the sportsmen used to be hunting on the mountains they used to fill their handkerchiefs with this grass and bring it away. It is still growing in the stream, but is not as sweet as it was then.
At this time, there was a man and a woman living in a cabin in the rock. One evening after sunset the woman washed clothes in the well. Next morning she went out for water, but there was no water to be got. After some years, the man noticed the ground getting wet around the "mearing" between Burnynflynn and Legnagrow. he looked at the side of the fence of Legnagrow, and saw a springwell similar to the one on his own land. There was nothing left there only a deep hole, and that same hole is there yet. The green path on which the water flowed to the other side of the ditch is to seen also.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:04
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other trees and bushes growing beside the well. The well is very small but it is pure and clean fit to drink not like other holy wells. But the people never use it because it is said that holy water would not boil. There are pictures, statues, and fancy bottles left beside the well. There are three rocks a little distance from the well and when a person goes to the well to be cured they have to do three rounds and kneel beside the rocks and say some prayers. The man's field that the well is in knows all about the well and he knows the prayers to be said. The man's name is Edward Nelly. A man came a few years ago to this well with a sore hand. He came from Ennis. When a person washes a sore hand in the well a little fish comes up.
Maureen Nelly Told locally
Ashfield, by P.Nolan Ashfield, Tubber
Tubber, 4th May 1938
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 09:04
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In the year of 1846 a terrible famine swept all over the country. Heavy blight fell on the crops and destroyed them. no person could get food and most of them died from hunger. What ever place they would happen to die they would be buried in that spot. They used to put marks with a stone over the grave so that they would know where they would be buried. Near Mr. Garin's house in Kinnoch there is a grave. There is another in Justin Gradys field. On the top of the bray of Boreen Johnston a lot of people were buried. They died on their way going to Leenane for food. They were all buried in that place together.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 08:51
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A runaway marriage was a common thing long ago. If a man had "his eye" on a young girl he went by night to his window and asked her to marry him. If she consented, he took her out the window and brought her to some neighbor’s house until he made arrangements with the priest to be married. When all was over they came to the groom’s home. When the married couple came into the house they knelt down and someone broke the marriage cake on the woman’s head. The married couple danced first and they were dancing, singing, merrymaking for others during the night. The last dance was called “Cailleac An Túsa.” They stayed dancing and singing until everyone in the house was out dancing and singing. Everyone who was dancing had to pay the piper. When there were many dancing, one man shouted “stack” the piper stopped until every man had to pay him again. They were all dancing round the kitchen and the nearest man to the fire shouted, “hi for luck.” Another came down and paid the
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 08:49
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account of this that all the bad customs are held at wakes.
One of those customs is singing and dancing. When the people heard of somebody being ill they all look forward to the wake. Another custom is playing games.
One of those games is a game called "oats." A perosn would ask who was selling oats and if all people in the house did not answer together the person could get a stick and beat them all.
Another game is one called "The priest of the parish," and "harrow" and many others. All those games were played in Irish long ago.
Clare Ward, Ballacurra, Kilcherst.
John Ward, Ballacurra.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 08:49
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days and two nights. Drink and food were supplied to all those who attended. A few local old women were generally hired for the purpose of crying for the deceased. This “crying” was done at intervals and all the family joined in the lamentation. These women were known as “caoiners."
Bag pipes and tobacco were supplied to all male mourners and snuff was offered to female mourners. On the third day when the coffin was ready the body was removed on the shoulders of men to the family burial ground. When the corpse left the house all chairs and tables were turned upside down and remained so until the chief mourners arrived back from the graveyard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-20 08:22
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In a place called Corramannen a few miles from Braughwell there is a well called Tobar Cronan. There is a wall going right across the well. The wall is built of stones and the water is flowing through the wall. On one side of this wall the water in it would not boil. People often tried to boil the water but no one ever could boil it. It would not even get hot not matter how long you would have it down. On the other side of the wall the water would boil although the water is flowing from the other side through the wall. There are no Pilgrims to this well but is is thought that it must be holy when no body ever could boil it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 09:34
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between one in a family the seventh boy is called a doctor and he can cure any disease. If a person is suffering from teeth ache and if he or she pulled one and to throw it over their heads they will never get teeth ache again. This is a cure for ringworm to put unsalted butter through sulphur and to put it on the place where the ringworm is and after a while it will go. My own name and address is:- Cllartin Smyth,
Borrolaugh,
Williamstown.
I got these local cures from my father:- to Galway about sixty years.
Mr. Edward Smyth,
Traveling Folk, 8-3-38
There are a lot of tinkers and they do a lot of traveling. They also buy bottles and old rags as I myself got branches and flowers for them. They also buy horsehair and broken wool.
The best of them that I know for buying things are the Mac Donagh and the Reillys and the Quinns and the Maguires and Tom Hurles. They give a good price for bad old rags, at least some of them do: Tom Hurles goes [forth?] at first with his bicycles and tells the people to bring the old rags and horsehair out on the side of the road. Then he goes back to his tamp. He brings his pony and calf and gathers them and pays for them. Jack Sweeney is another man that is in the tinkers. He was in the war and he got out of it safely. He has pencion
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 09:23
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My father was telling me that when he was baout 12 years old - that would be about 92 years old a man was sick above in Cappagh, and 'Comen' on night he took a 'turn for the worse'. A neighbour was sent for the priest - and a bad journey he had 'between rain and high wind'. He 'toul' the priest, an I go bail he wasn't long saddlin the mare and heading for the mountain. He had to cross the river at the fourd in Carrowgavreen, but when the mare came that far she 'stud' as stiff as a stake and wouldn't budge. The priest was 'stuetified' and coaxed the mare first and then 'bet' him, but it was no use. Across the river the mare wouldn't go only 'sulkin' and 'reavin'
The priest took off his hat and shouted 'be gone Satan' and with that he fired his silver-mounted ridin across the river. After that the mare quietened down and crossed the found. The priest was just in time to anoint the man 'after' he died. In the morning the priest sent the boy up for the stick, and the silver part of it was burned 'pure' black. The priest toul the boy to burn
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 09:22
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could cure this by measuring the head first with a tape to see if it was twisted in any way and then with nine different nuns saying some prayer at the same time.
Whooping cough: People who had this went out between a white horse's legs and then asked the man who rode him for a cure. The them told them to do some simple thing each as to drink a little water or eat a piece of butter and when they did that they were cured. There was a white horse at Marble Hill House and every day when the groom rode it out for exercise, the laundress, old Naney Gurley, used say "Remember you have the cure for the whooping cough."
Thrush: A posthumous child could cure this by blowing his breath into the mouth of the child who had it and saying "In the Name of the Father and of the son and of the Holy Ghost."
Ringworm: The seventh son could also cure thrush and ringworm in the same was People did not think this was any harm in those charms since the prayers were used.
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 09:20
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had this cure and she gave it to someone belonging to her who gave it to the Dolfhius in Drim who know it hit do not work it as people are now afraid to work it for fear harm would come to them. If a man taught this charm to a woman it was said to be more effective.
Wildfire: Mrs Donoqhue Drim has a charm for curing this. The person who has wildfire brings unsalted butter to her on certain days Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays. She sets the charm and the sufferer brings back the butter and rubs it on the sore spots which disappear. It is usual to bring some present (not money) to the person who works the charm.
Fallen Palate: Mrs Kennedy, Drim used to cure the by catching the hair or the top of the head with a pineens or with her teeth. She used to stand on a table over the patients and lift him causing him great pain. She used roast an egg afterwards and clap the egg on the top of the scalp and leave it for a day and a night on so there.
Headache: Michael Fanell's grandmother, Drimheeny
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 09:18
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That oatmeal was then made into a cake with water by either the person who worked the charm on the patient, and was baked standing in front of the fire with a sod at the back. The sufferer ate this cake and came again to the charm worker who repeated the performance. The person was supposed to be cured then.
Symptoms of heart fever: Palpitations, breathlessness and difficulty in walking, especially up hills.
Nancy Gurkey a laundress in Marble Hill House who is dead for 35 years worked this charm.
Cleithín: This ailment was supposed to be caused by lifting heavy articles and the person found it hard to walk.
Cure: The patient was laid flat on a table with a lighted candle on it and a thick common strong tumbler was placed mouth downwards on the place where the cleithín was (The breast bone was supposed to fall in). If the flesh moved up into the tumbler the person had the disease and, if not, he had not. The tumbler was left in that position for 1/4 hour and this charm was set 5 or 6 times and according as the tumbler became easy to lift the person was getting cured.
A very old woman in Knockmoyle named Mrs
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 09:05
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boots for ten shillings. When the boots were ready Martin returned and gave to the young shoemaker three pounds. The young shoemaker did not want to take that money. Martin told him take the money and asked for his name and adress. He told him his name was Olivert Cromwell. Martin proffesised to him and told him that he would rise to great fame in the British army and that you may do me a good turn yet and don't mind about the price of the boots.
After that Cromwell joined the British Army and rose to be a General. He was sent over to Ireland and improved himself to be one of the worst Generals that ever came to Ireland. When he had all knocked down in North, South, East and West until he came to the Burren mountains in the hills of Clare in a place called Corker hill. He fired a shot and knocked down Churches in the parrish of Drumacoo. Martin sent out a man in dispack rider with a white flag waving in his hand to invite Cromwell and his army to the cashel of Tuloighre. Martin sent his servant and killed twenty bulloks and prepared a great
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 09:04
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walked about a mile to Cathair Druacap. There he knelt and bowed down on a Aoch éimis stone and prayed and thanked the Lord.
Why do the people say to hell or to Connacht?
About there and a half mile from Gort and two mile from Ardrathan. There is one of the most beautiful cashels and manshens in the bounty Galway. Formerly a wonderful estate attached to it. It is called Tuloighre. Why it was called Tuloighre, because the hair was found under the bush. It around St. Martin's day and they called him Martin of Tuloighre. This man grew in to be one of the most noblest gentlemen in Ireland. He used to visit England very often. He had a lot of knowledge witchcraft about him. One day as he was passing through the streets of London. He spotted a young Shoemaker through a window. By his conuntments he judged him. He left him an order for a good pair of boots. At that time you could get a good pair of
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:55
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Bhí an tráth seo réidh idir an aon agus an dó a chlog. Go minic bhíodh préataí dá mbeadh siad fairsin. Bhéadh "scadán caoch" sin leasainm ar salainn agus piobar measgtha le chéile ag na daoine bochta leis na préataí. Corr-uair bhéadh an salann agus piobar tirim, agus i n-amannaibh bhéadh braon beag uisce fríd.
Ins an fhoghmhar agus i d-tús an gheimhridh a ba mhinice préataí ag daoinibh. Bhíodh na préataí i gcomhnuidhe gann ó thoisigheadh na daoine ag cur an bhéirr. Bhí iasg de chineál éiginteacht go measardha fairsing mar tá an ceanntar seo cois fairrge.
Anlas a bheirtí ar bhainne ar bith a bheadh aca le hothe le brachán. I n-am suipéara ag an h-ocht nó an naoi a chlog. Bheadh ag fear le bheith ag obair a fhad is bhí solus lae ann.
I n-amannaibh speisialta bhíodh arán préataí, boxty agus cáithbhruith ag na daoinibh. Gnithear aran préataí leis na préataí a bhruith. An croiceann a bhaint dóibh annsin iad a chur isteach i méis ní i
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:43
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374
43. Máille.
A useful suggestion would be to look up the Ordinance Survey letters for Clare in the Academy, Dawson St.Dublin.O'Donovan and O Curry did not solve the question of who Máille was as most of those who have written on Clare antiquities since that time (1839)would have used that information but they have not T.J Westropp did not know who he was or was he a saint at all .The Protestant Canon O Dwyer in his history of the Diocese of Killaloe and he used the survey letters>In his short account of Kilmaley he does not tell us who Máille was ,but there is one thing he does say and that is:that the vicarage of Kilmaley was united to Drumcliff until 1832.Of course he is speaking of the Protestant arrangement but there might be something in it .They might be perpetuating some old catholic tradition .Who founded Drumcliff ?It is the parish church and the oldest in the Drumcliff or Ennis parish .Kilbricken in Doora we know something about .Professor O' Looney (uncle of Thomas O'Looney who wrote about Mt Callan ,and whose mother is Maley
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:42
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The most harmful weeds growing in the farms in this district are thistles, crowsfoot, nettles, procick, bráiste, chicken weed, brislán and dockleaf. Chicken weed, crowsfoot, and thistles spread rapidly. Nettles grow in good and bad land. The procick weed impoverishes the soil.
Many of these herbs are said to cure certain diseases and complaints. Dockleaf cures a sting of a nettle, by rubbing it on the sting. It also cures sunburn. Dandelion is used as a cure
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:36
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from which the people emigrated to America. At the back of it is an old fort. In the middle of the fort stands an old tree with three limbs growing on it. It is said that in bygone days some people went searching for a pot of gold which is supposed to be hidden under the tree. They had all sorts of implements. As they were digging down under the tree a big greyhound appeared from under the ground with glaring eyes. The people sprinkled holy water around and the hound vanished out of their sight. The next thing that came into view was a black polly bull roaring furiously. They did the same as before and the bull disappeared. This did not discourage the brave people. They dug on never tiring or desparing, until at last the three limbs of the tree began to cry and moan. They lost their courage and ran as quickly as they could out of the place. One of them looked back and to his surprise, he could not turn out again. From that day onwards, his face was where the back of his head was where ought to have been.
A road runs from North to South of Cloncon called the new road. It was built about the year 1910.
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:29
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ringworm. A cure for a wart is to get a snail and rub him of the wart and throw him on a whitethorn bush and as the snail will wither the want will wither. Another cure is to boil house leeks and put it to the wart. A cure for a corn is to put boiled ivy leaves to it. A cure for a sore is to put St Patricks Cabbage to it. St Patricks Cabbage is a leaf about six inches wide. A cure for a sore eye is to wash it with tea. Another cure for a slantuin is to get ten gooseberry thorns and point nine and throw away one on three days. Monday Thursday and Monday or Thursday Monday and Thursday. There is a woman in bloomers who has a cure for the jaundice it is made up of herbs
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:29
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Some people in this locality have cures, It is said if a child had the chin-cough and you put him out three times under an ass and give his ass’s milk to drink he will be cured. Another cure is the “leavings of Ferrets” or two people that were married and never changed their names can give a cure for the chin-cough. If you had a sprain on your hand or foot and hold it under a stream and let the water pour over it, it will be cured. A postumous child has a cure for a sore mouth. A severenth son without any daughter in between has a cure for
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:28
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ringworm. A cure for a wart is to get a snail and rub him of the wart and throw him on a whitethorn bush and as the snail will wither the want will wither. Another cure is to boil house leeks and put it to the wart. A cure for a corn is to put boiled ivy leaves to it. A cure for a sore is to put St Patricks Cabbage to it. St Patricks Cabbage is a leaf about six inches wide. A cure for a sore eye is to wash it with tea. Another cure for a ?? is to get ten gooseberry thorns and point nine and throw away one on three days. Monday Thursday and Monday or Thursday Monday and Thursday. There is a woman in bloomers who has a cure for the jaundice it is made up of herbs
senior member (history)
2019-03-19 08:28
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but no one knows how it is made up. It is a secret. A cure for the calaic is to get a bit of black silk and tie it around your wrist. A cure for a cold is to boil butter-milk and butter and sugar and drink it. A cure for any part where hair has fallen off is to get leather and roast it until it comes into dust and mix it with butter and put it on the part the hair has fallen off and it will grow.
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 08:44
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Bí fear ann uair amháin agus Páidín Ruad Ó Ceallaigh an tainm a bí air. Bí sé leis na sideog. Oidhche amháin bhí sé ag siubhal thart agus chonnaic sé fear suas ar chrann árdh. Bí faitcios ar Páidín nuair a connaich sé an fear. Dubhairt an fear leis. "Ná bíodh faitcios ort" a Páidín agus ní raibh faitcios air. Táinic an fear anuas ó chrann agus chuir sé Páidín ar a dhruim agus chuaidh sé faoi thalamh. Sé oidhche a bí ann oidhche bealtaine. Tháinic go leor sideóg an oidhche sin agus thosuigh siadh ag imirt. Bhí aithne ag Páidín ar na sideógaibh agus thosuigh siadh ag imirt. Bhí Páidín ag thaobh amháin agus bhí daoine eile ag an thaoibh amháin agus bhí daoine eile ag an taobh eile.
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 08:44
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Toomey's farm Drumcliffe, parish of Tipperary is a very large farm. It was once sludded with happy homesteads. But the great Willie Scully the landlord laid them low with his battering ram. It was predicted at that time that it would be easy to find out where those houses were situatid as the foundations again of their own accord. That prediction seems to be fuefilled as the foundation of the battered houses are appearing again over the ground. At that time Scully had his workmen. They were the brothers Toomey. The went with him everywhere and did all he asked then to do. As as a reward he gave them the farm now known as Toomey's Dromcliffe House Tipperary.
Paddy Power, Rachsasseragh, Tipperary
age 13 years
Heard from Dick Power Rathsasseragh Tipperary age 47 yr
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 08:41
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200
is a house in the parish of Kilfeacle owned by Laurence Forgarty. Their house was burnt but the parlour was saved which still remains.
Peter Ryan Ballyhurst Tipperary aged 12
Heard from David Ryan Kilfeacle Age 50 yrs
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 08:38
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strainsear annsin agus a chuid gleasaí leis. Chuaidh bean aca ionnsann agus d'iarr a 2/6 air. Sé an freag air a tug sé uirthi ceann a ceanna indiú agus gurbh ann a bheadh an tás uilig. Sul ar mothuigh sé thog bean aca bacan cloc agus thusaigh air. O'fhear do dhá péire bonn no trí péire uachtar.
Is giorrá cabhair de ná an doras. Ce thainic abhaile as an oilean Úr acht Eilis Dhomhnaill Áig agus thug sí £20 do'n dearthair Domhnaill. D'innis Domhnaill do Roise é a dheirbhshúir agus d'innis Roise do Mháire beag ar cleamhais é. Roimhe seachtmhain bhí Roise agus Domhnall agus an seactar aca pósta Domhnall Óg an fear deireannach.
An mhaidin a thug sé na bhaile a bhrideógh, cas a deirbsiúr an tairseach an doras. In áit fáilte a cur romh sé an rud a mhionnuigh sí comh dubh is
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 09:24
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An tarhair agus suibhal an bhochar oidhche amháin agus cosadh rud bán leis achc ní dhéarna an rud ar buch air. Cuaidh sé abhaile agus fearg mór air agus d’innis sé an sgéal dá bhean achc níor chur sí aon áird air.
Chuaidh said ina gcodhladh agus nuair bhí sé í lár an oidhche, chualaidh said corn mór. D’fhéach an bhean tharc agus chonnaic sí cailín bán ina seasamh sa doras. Chonnaic an fear í freisin agus do bhí an rud céandhra a chonnaic an fear. Bhí sí ag teacht gach oidhche agus bhí sí ag eirghe níos mó gach oidhche a dtáinig sí.
Seán Ó Fearchair a scríobh é seo ar an 25 lá de Bealtaine 1938. Marhair Seán Ó Fearchair a dinnis as baile an Ruiséala.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 09:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that it would get filled with salt. When the man got to Galway he bought a boat and employed a boy to help him to bring in the fish. One day the boy got a box in his father house. It was the salt box the fairies gave to his mother. He put the box swimming on the sea and it started to get filled with salt. They boy getting afraid sunk the box. The water was said to be pure water before the box was sunk and that the box is still pumping salt.
Dinnis Seaghán Ó Teabair
an sgéal seo do Seaghán Ó Teabair
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 09:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
béid sé ann i na ndiadh annsin chuaidh siad isteac agus dith siad a ndeannar agus nuair a bhí siad sait dubairt sí leo a gabail ag iarraid uisge bfeicead sí cé aca a bfearr bheir an fearan beag ar láise cá bhfuil tú ag gabail leis an laide tiabfead mé aniar an tobhar luig cugad na cabair adeir an tsean-bean bhí sé sin annsin o na gcead sinnsear agus bheid sé ann i na ndiad bhí an méid sin buartha aga an bfearrín beag.
Annsin chuaidh siad ag [?] deith siad oiread is nach raibh siad indon cadan a déanam chuaidh an fearin beag is cuir se
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 09:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bic é sin arsa an fatac acht fear mait breatnu ar a cladama. Cuaid an beirt aca amac ag feactaint cé aca a bfearr cuaid siad ag catu iarran bfeicead siar ce aca a bfearr bheir an fatac agus cuir thar an teac e deir sé seo air agus ní raib sé insan é a crocad agus thosuig sé ag feadail cen faigh a bfuil tú ag feadail adeir an fathac mar tá dearbratair dom sa domain toir agus ba mhait liom é a chaithe soir aige o na caith adeir an fthac bhí sé sin againn o bhí muid i na gasúir agus
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar an gcuid eile é agus is beag nár mharbhuigh sé iad. Sheol sé roinne iad annsin go dtí pálás an Ríogh, Nuair a bhí sé ag dul thar theach cailleadh cearc. Bhí bean óg ' na suidhe ag an teine. F'fhuagair Conchubar uirthi a dhul amach agus an geata oscailt do na chuilm. Nuair a chonnaic rí rin na Cuilm tháinig faithíos uirthi agus rith sí isteach abhaile. "Ní bhfuair an sionnach ariamh aon theachtaire a b'fhearr dó nó é féin" ar seisean. D'fhág sé na cuilm annsin agus d'oscail sé an geata. Chuaidh sé abhaile annsin, agus nuair a tháinig sé, Dubhairt an rí go raibh an madra allta ag marbú na gcaorach agus dúbhairt Conchubhar go ngabhfad sé féin ag faire na gcaorach. Chuaidh agus mharbhuigh sé an madra allta. Tháinig sé abhaile go dtí an rú agus dúbhairt sé go mhurbhócadh sé an rí mara mbáitfeadh sé a bhean agus go bpórfadh sé a mháthair. Chuaigh an rí ag báitheadh a miné agus choinnigh an bhean greim air agus baítheadh an beirt.
An leasmháthair
Bhí fear ann fadó a bhí inghean agus mac aige. Cailleadh an bhean agus phós an t - athair arís. Bhí an leas - mháiuir an - olc leis na gasúir agus oidche amháin d'fhiafruig sí de'n fhear cé'n t - slighe mharbhta a gcuirfidís ar na gasúir. Dúbhairt an fear nách raibh fíor aige. la. Lá amháin chuaidh an fear agus an bhean agus na paistí isteach sa
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Chloisfeadh cuid eile an píobaire sídhe a seinnimh ar a chuid píopai. An te a thosóchadh a damhsa ceól sídhe ní fhéadfhadh sé stopadh go dtuigfeadh an t-ainm as mar a nordaighadh stoppadh (an ceol uilig. An té a dhaimseóchadh le ceól sídhe) sí an port atrú. Dá norduigheadh stoppadh an ceol uilig. An té a dhaimhseochadh le ceól sídhe ins beadh rí ar bith ina dhaimhseóir leis. Cloisfé tú sgéalta aisteaca eile fá a casfaidhe isteac sa mbruighin nó san lios. Ar a chuairt a beadh sí ar dtús. Béad an oidhche an dubh. Cuirfide amú é. Beadh sé dá thrisleáil as dá treasgairt. Dá cuir anon is análl. Ag dul síos agus bpaill agus a bpruchógai. Ag dul tríd sgeaca agus trí tomhachai agus trí dhriseachai. Bhéadh sé an cinnte ar an bhealach a déanamh sa deire casfaide cúirtbhríagh ar a bheadh fá fuinneóga agus fá doras. Gairdíní breá in a timceall (timceall). Beadh an doras fosgailte. Racadh sé isteac má bolc maith leis bheadh air ag fóghnadh istigh roime galántacht, áillneacht, agus bríaghacht. Dhuirt i lár an úrláir. Braith breag alluinn orta fa’n na gcuid sgotogai óir. Cuile chineál biadh agus cuile cineál óil leagtha anuas ar an buird sin. Sluaighte daoine ann idir mná agus fir. Ach dá bréagtha an lios bfearr leis an baile ná í.
Creidfear annseo freisin go bhfuil na daoine maithe indon daoine saoghalta agus beithighe a thabhairt leo. Ní h-iad na daoine is dona á na beithighe is dona ac an sgoth agus an togha. Cuir i gcás dhá mbeadh fear sondasach mait ann ar bealach ar bith. Cuir i gcás fear maith farraige no badóir maith nó talmhaidhe maith nó ceolteóir mait nó daímseóir ar fóghnodh nó é a beith ‘n fear. Bhréagh dáthamhail nó ‘n fear luat láidir agus ‘n fear mhaith le cuile-rud bíonn cuile duine a fhágail caidéis dó agus dhá mholadh agus annsin deir siad go gcuireann na daoine maithe spéis mór ann agus go n-arduigheann siad leó.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An bhfuil fios agat m’ainm adeir sí, ag caitheamh an t-snátha go t-agdach mí-chéadthach ar an urlár. Céád míle fáilte romhat a sníomh ar búndún adier an bean.
Mo beannacht duit adeir an bhean shídhe ar mo mallacht do béal do mhúinte agus amach lei an doras go feargach. Bhí an ollainn sníomhfá dí gan tríoblóid dí. An cead lá eile táinig figheadhóir isteac chuigh an mbean chéadhna. Figheadhóir mise a deir sé agus fighfe mé do bhreibín dhuit gan aon luach saotair ach fios m’ainm a bheith agat nuair a tiocfaidh mé arís. Tá go maith adeir a bean béas agam é. Tug sé leis na ceirtíní snátha. An céad lá eile bhí an bhean a seóladh a cuid beithigheach arís agus í ag dul tar an gcnocháin ceadna cuala sí an ram[?] ag teact cuigi as an gcnocán. Is beag a cuimhnigheas bean an amhras gur Midiltí Rabhlau m’ainm insui. Lean dá rádh sin go ceann tamhaill. Is gearr gur cuimnigh an bean go bfeidir gurb é an figheadóir é a bhí ag figheadán an bréidín dhi. Cuimnigh sí go maith ar an ainm. Midiltí Rabhlau. Chuaidh sí abhaile. An lá céadhna táinig an figheadóir. Chaith sí an bréidín fighte ar an urlár. Sead a deir sí a bhfuil fios m-ainm agat. Dubhairt sí cead míle fáilte romhat a Midiltí Rabhlau. Beannacht (leat) duit a deir sé ach mallact do bhéal do múinte bú é féin béal a múinte. Bhí an breidín sníomhfa fighthe gan call di blas a chailleadh. Bíonn na sgéalta sin agus go leor sgéalta aisteaca eile dá n-insint oidhcheannta fada úrláin aois na teine anseo. Go deimhin chuirfeadh cuid aca gruaig do cinn na seasamh ag cuir síos ar thaidhbsidhse agus ar dhaoine mhaithe gach lá le sgéal is uathbhásaighe agus is aistighe ná a céile. Chloisfeadh cuid do na daoine an mhaighistir dhá déanamh istig in áill agus lár an lae ghil ghréine.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mo teac as m’arus a deireadh duine acu. M’fear as mo páiste adeireadh duine eile, agus caon duine ag déanamh a giorfaín féin ac nuair abhí an bean deireannac amuig do chaith an bean mar adubrad lei an sguab amach in a dhiaidh agus dúin an doras agus bhí sí astasach go leor iad a bheith bailighthe uata ac nior maith leó san fághail réidh leiti chomh easghaidh sin gur d’filligeadar arís act bhí an doras dúnta in aghaidh. Sguab an tSathairn adeir duine leig isteac mé. Dhá bhfágadhmuid istigh an dara uair tarraingeóchadh muid óna céile tú, ac bhí buidheac don té a cuir ar an eolas tú. Bhí a dóthain uathbhais agus faitchís goidhte thrídh ag an mbean bhocht an oidhche sin.
Cuala mé sgéal eile fá bean a raib go leor ollain le sníomh aici. Tigheadh bean isteac cuici. Sníomhfa mise do chuid ollain duit a deir sí acht fios m’ainm a bheith agath nuair a diocfaidh mé dhá éilúghadh ort.
Dubhairt an bean léithi go mbead nár cuma léithi é ac an ollain a sníomh di. Mar a mbeid fios m’ainm (turti) agus an ollain aici. Annsin go ceann cúpla lá bhí an bean seo ag séolad a cuid (beidid) beidthi-gheach. Ac bhí sí ag dul thar chnocán árd in a salmana féin. Is fearr go gcuala sí an glór a teact amac as an gcnoc. Mise a deir an glór snaoidimh ar bundún ag sníomh amhras mná dona lean an glór dhá rád go ceann fada. Sa deire cuimigh an bean uirthi féin. Bainfidh a dier sí in a h-intinn féin béidir gur tú an bean atá ag sníomh mo ollan. Má tá bheidh fhios t-ainm agam nuair a tiocfaid tú dá éilúighadh orm. Cuimnig sí go maith ar an ainm. Sníomh ar búndún. As sin go ceann seactmaine ce a tiocfaid ac í agus an ollainn sníomhta dí.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Indonac is fada cheana adeir sí. Bí searmad beánta agam ar sin. Fuair sí fa réir le rud len ithe fhaghail dhóibh ac thracthamhail go leor ní raibh aon uisge istigh aici le tae ná aran a bruith. Thug sí cana léithi amac cun an tobhair ag iarraidh uisge. Bhí bean ag an tobhair roimpe. Sead a bean [?] adeir a bhean ag a tobhar tá fuighilleach le déanamh agat anocht. Tá a dá bean beag istigh agat ag obair maith duit (leat) ac ní ar mhaith leat é. Creideamh nac iad adeir sí ach céard tá le déanamh agam.
Bhí bidheach adeir a bean ag a tobar nac raibh aon uisge istigh ann. Dá mbéad ní tiocfá le go bhfeictheá mise agus ní raibh fios cén bás a gheobhfhá. Le do mharb a tháinig na mná sin cugath agus mar a ndéanfa tú mar ordóchas mise duit marbhóchadh siad thú. Ach ní raibh aon call duit a beit do suidhe chomh fhada san oidhche ná bhí tú agus an doras a bheith osgluighthe béal inairde mar bhí sé. Anois nuair a racfhas tú isteach fiafróchaidh siad díot céard tá bhí a coinnéal moille ort. Abair tusa gurb é Cnoc na mban agus cnoc atá os a cionn atá thrí lasadh. Chomh luath is déarfas tusa sin imeóchád siadsan amach mar is na cnuic udaím a chomhnuigheann siad. Nuair a bhéas an duine deireannach aca amuigh caith an sguab amac ina dhiaidh agus duin an doras agus beid leath. Bhí an bean a dul isteac leis an uisge agus a breathnú ar rud éigin a raibh sí ag déanamh iongad ar se.
Tuigthe nac ndéanann tú deifir ar na mná nó cé ar a bfuil ag breathnú. Tá mé ag breathnú adeir sise ar Cnoc na mBan fionn agus ar an gcnoc eile atá os a cionn atá trí lasadh.
Aoa buna [?] mise a bhfuil ar se siadsan, ag rith amach go sgaippuigh.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
easgainí ná gáirseamhlacht leóbhtha agus nach maithe leó brocamas ná sallachar agus deir siad nac ndéanann siad aon tathaigh in áit ar bith nac mbéad glan.
Chualadh mé sgéal mar gheall ar bhean a bhídh a’ cárdáil agus a sniomhachán i dteach leite féin agus dfanad sí an fhada oidhche. Ba oidhche Satairn a bhí ann agus deir siad na bfuil sé ceart ag duine a bheith rófhada in a shuidhe oidhche Satairn go mór mor ag déanamh aon obair. Ba ghearr go dtainig bean isteach agus túirne agus cárdai aici.
An glacfa tú mise mo thúirne agus mo chárdai adeir sí le bean a’ thighe. (Mise) muise glacfadh adheir bean a’ tighe. Is gearr go dtáinig bean eile isteach agus túirne agus cárdai aici féin. An glacfa tú mise mo thúirne agus mo chárdai adheir sí. Glacfadh adeir bean a’ tigh. Thoshaigh ar an mbeirt a cardáil agus a shníomhachán. Is gearr go dtáinig bean eile agus túirne agus chárdlaí aci féin agus d’fiafraigh sí an rud céadhna do bhean a’ tig.
Glac bean a’ tighe í mar a cuid eile. Is gearr go dtáinig bean eile agus bean eile agus bean eile go go raibh 8á bean déag aca ann. Túirne agus cárdai ag chuile bean aca. Chaon duine acu a fiafraigh do bean a’ tig an glacfadh sí féin a túirne agus a chárdalaí. Bean a tig a’ rádh go nglacfadh. Doibre orra ar a starradh cuid acu ag cardáil an cuid eile ag sníomhachaín. Níor moill orra cuid mait ollaine sníomh agus a cardáil. Ní raibh fhios ag bean a’ tig an ar maith no an olc leite a tháinig an dhá rang cuici san meadhan oidhche ac bfearr leite nácuid ag féachaint orra go faiteach. Is gearr gur breathnaigh duine acu uirthi go feargach. Nac fada adeir sí go bfuil tú ag fágháil rud len ithe fá rúr bhúinn.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sean Scéal
Bí fear an fadó agus bhí sé ag fiadhach sa fásac. Sé an t-ainm a bhí air Oisin bí beirt nó triur ag fiadhach leis bhí trí madra acú agus bhí siad ag dul thar cnoic agus táinich siad go doc mhór agus bhí siad ag siubhal thar ar an gcloc agus tuic beirt acú isteach san bpoll a bhí faoi an gcloc.
D'fhan na madrí taobh amuig toinic trí sídheoga amach as an bpoll agus thosaigh siad ag troid leis an mhadra.
Táinig Oisin cuig an bpoll agus marbhuig sé beirt de na sidéoga dúbairt an sideog le Oisin go ligfead sí an beirt fhear slán lig sí amach an beirt fhear agus bhí siad slán.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
darbh ainm bóithrín Ceallaighe. Tá bóithrín eile i nGort Rua an t-ainm atá ar ná bóithrín Chúach. Is é an fáth a dtugtar bóithrín an tobair ar na cinn atá i nDún na Gurran mar tá toibreacha ina ann. Tugtar bóithrín Gort an Gheasa ar an bóithrín seo mar tá geasa ann ag dul isteach i ngorth. Tugtar bóithrín Gort na Sidheóga ar an mbóithrín seo. Mar bhí sidheóga le feiceáil ann fadó. Tugtar bóithrín Ceallaighe ar an mbóithrín seo. Mar ba le mhuintir Ceallaighe é. Tugtar bóithrín Chúach ar an mbóithrín seo mar bhíonn an Chúach le feiceáil ann go minic.
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá go leor bóithre thart timpeall na háite seo. Seo chuid de na hainmneacha atá orra tá cúpla cinn ann darbh ainm bóithrín an tobair. Ceann darbh ainm bóithrín gort an geata. Ceann eile bóithrín Gort na Sidheóga. Bóithrín eile
senior member (history)
2019-03-13 08:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An t-am a bhí an téirghe amach sa bhliain 1876 chuaigh gach fear óg as Baile an Róba agus Cill Mheáin isteach sna Fianna. An t-am seo bhí siad ag troid i gcoinne na Sasanaigh, mar bhí siad dhá chur na daoine bochta amach as a seilbh agus na feilmeacha a bhaint díobh freisin. Do thabharfadh siad na feilmeacha ansin do na daoine uaisle. Ní raibh aon airgead ag na Fianna ach an oiread. Aon airgead a bhí acu, do thabharfadh siad é óna daoine bochta é.
Deirtear go raibh pota óir ag na Fianna. Do chuir siad i bhfolach é, i bpáirc in aice le Cill Mheáin Is é an fáth gur chuir siad i bhfolach é ná, go raibh fhios ag na Sasanaigh go raibh an pota óir sin acu. Do chur siad i bhfolach é, agus ní raibh na Sasanaigh in ann é a fhágáil.
Deirtear gur mharaíodh na daoine do chur i bhfolach é. Ní raibh aon duine in ann an pota óir sin a fhágáil riamh ó shin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
“Éirighim ar son Dé cun tosnú oibre an lae go bhfaca dia mé. I ngach rud I rith an lae.” Dhíodh an paidir seo aca nuair a bhíodh ag cur a gcuid éadach orra. “Clúduighim mé féin le h-éadach, mar a clúduigeann Críost m’anam le na ghrásta diadha naomhtha gach uair a dhéanaim a thoil.
Thomás Ó Madaím.
Déal an Átha Duide,
An clocán (50) a thug na paidreacha seo dhom Mo cheanntar féin. Sé doire- gimlach mo cheanntar fhéin. Is cheanntar deas é. Tá timpeall le fiche chighthe ann. Tighte ceann (tighthe) tuighe is eadh an cuid is mó aca. Tá go leo sean daoine ins an gceanntar. Tá cúigeadh daoine I na gcomnuidhe ins an gceanntar. Is féidir leis na sean daoine scéalta a inseacht I ngaeilge agus I mbéarla. Is féidir le Máire ní cheallaigh Sean Ó Conghaile agus bridgid ní laoidhe scéalta a inneseacht. Sé conghaile an tshomadh is coinceannta ins an gceanntar.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sagart agus ar an doctúir agus dubhairt siad beirt go raibh an bas ar láimh. Dubhairt Tomás go raibh brón air núair nach raibh aon duine leis chun fios a chur ar a dhearthrathair Sean go raibh sé ag dul chun báis. Bhí comarád aige, agus dubhairt Tomás leis da rachad go dtí a dearthrathair agus a radh leis go raibh se tinn. Do thiubhadh sé airgead dhó núair a thiocfad sé ar ais. Ní bhfuighfhinn mé mo bhealach go dtí Cill Cloch, ars an fear ar Cuige Laighean dubhairt Tomás “Teigh go Diá Luain, agus annsin go Ballyforan. Fiafruigh annsin cá bhfuil baile Geann. Núair a thiocfaidh tu go baile Geann teigh isteach go teach ósta, agus fiafiuigh ar aon duine cá bhfuil Cill Cloch. Chuaidh sé isteach go dtí teach Robert Ward agus d’fiafraigh sé dé an raibh aithne aige ar aon fhear darbh ainm Séan O Gaffey. Cad é an bhealach as seo go dtí Cill Cloch a déir sé “Teigh ar do láimh clé agus ansin siubhail go dtí Cill mór. Núair a sriocheann
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fagaim mo roighain ar mnáibh Chríche Fódhla, is tú chógfainm se mar mná
Bí a cúl ar dhath an ómraidh, lag-radharcadh's deas- glonnrach, bí a gruadh ar dhath an rósa a mbead clúamach an lile tríd.
Nac fada ó bheadh na sluaigte lag marbh anois le comhrach, mar ba é an áit a ceaphadh dá lóistín i dteorainn Inis- Niadh. (Feidhlim Mac Dhubhgaill do cum é)
I Bean ghránda Una Ní Néidh a raibh siopa aici i n Innis Niadh roimh an drochshaogal. Cáinigh Féidhlimid chuig an siopa cuici ag iarraidh tobaic ar cairde, bí ainm na filideachra ar féidhlimid. dubhairt sí go dtubhrfad sí an tobac do i n-a aisce dá neanadh se amrán a moloa. rinne.
Brighid Ní Linneán.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leis. Ansann dubhairt sé tá mé ag tabhairt cómhairle dhuit anois. Dá bhí amuigh ag ana m seo d'oichdhe an fhaid is a bheas tú beo arís, agus ná téig ar cuairt cuigh an teach sin ná ag imirt cártaí a thuille. Má ghlachfaidh tú mo comhairle-sé bheidh leath act mura ghlacfaidh - agus le sin bhí sé imigthe. Chuaidh an fear abhaile agus bhí faithchíos air. Bhí dheachaidh sé amach san oidhche go ceann seachtmhaine nó mar sin. Act ní fheadhfadh sé fanacht sa mbaile, agus oidhche amháin rinne sé dhearmad ar an gcómhairle agus ghread leis áris go dtí an teach ceadhna.
Nuair a bhí sé ag teacht abhaile i dtráith na meadhon oidhche díreach ar an bpoinnte ceadhna casad an fiadhach leis aris.Acht an t-am seo bhí péire sgiatáin ar gach capall agus thosuig siad dhá bhualadh agus é ag suibal le na cúl roimhe go raibh sé thar n-ais aris ag an teach in a raibh sé ar chúirt. Fríth ar maidin é taobh amuigh den doras agus é leath mairbh. Tughadh isteach é agus i gceann tamall tháinic sé cuighe féin agus d'innis sé an sgéil. Mhair sé go ceann leath bliadhan acht is ar éigin a bhí sé coiscéim a suibhal. Gach oidhche go ceann seachtmain tar éis é a chur, cuala go leor daoine an an baile fiadhach ag dul thart.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí sin ann agus mas fad ó bhí, bhí Baintreach mná ‘ná comnaidhe san áit seo agus ní rabh aici act aon mhach amháin. Séan a bh’ainm dó. Duine fállsa gan maith a bhí í Séan agus ar an adbhar sín is beo bocht an dóigh a bhí ar an bhurt acu.
Lá amhain dubhairt an mháthair leis nac rabh leith-pighinn ruadh fágtha aice anóis agus go gcaithfiadh sí dul ar siubhal agus saothruighadh a fhághail i n-áit éiginteach.
Ar maidin lá ar ná bhárach rinne an mhathair rúd oiread bidh agus bhí san teach fá na coinne agus ar siubhal leis. Cuaidh sé siar go Connachta an áit a bhfuair sé obair mar fiar aimseardha ag féirmeóir mhór saidhbhir agus i gcionn sé mhí bhí sé ábalta culaith úr a cheannacht
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Scéal Grinn:
Uair amháin cuairim is leasch ehéaso bhlíasháin ó shorn bhí sionnsach ar oileaán Árann bhíodh sé ag marbhugeash siciní agus lichan. Tá amháin bearrhaing na daoine é an leanamhainc le marhaogh thosaigh stard. Tá leansmhathre go ‘ort go orcáinig staid go ort agus ansin chuir na marara tsreach san bfairrge agus marbhuigear dh. Ansin iháinic an dara buoshean agus marbhuigearsh taro freisin. Ansin subhairic na daoine go bhfuighearsh stad stonnach ar chuma ar bic. I gcéann dhá lá sochruigheaíoar duthe a chur go ort an ailt agus b’éigin dó é féin a chomnéart as smharc an cstonnaigh. San ordhche a bhí sé le. Bhí sé ag fonaodhar leis an sionnach go ociocfaidh sé ort an airt mar bhí gunna aige chun é do mharburgeardh. Súil a oráthang an sionnach chuir an fear in a ehoalais. D’imchigh an stonnach agus nuair dhúisigh an fear bhí an ghrian in a surishe. An dara _____ níor thuisc sé in a chalaradh. Ansin thámic an stonnach agus bheir sé ar sgeic a bhí ag dul síos leis an sull. Ansin leig sé dó féin dul síos agus síos go díainie sé go ort cloich mhór a bhí ag síthearadh amach as taoibh na haille. Ansin tosuigh an fear ag breachuigheardh go féar go ort go bhfaca sé an sionnach ag dul isteach in a uachas mar sin air sin, a bí sé in a chomnuista. Ansin bhí fhios ag an bhfear cén fásh a raibh na maidardh ag fághul bháis. Do fhearr an fear an sgeach agus fuair an sionnshe bás I greann cúpla mí leis an ocras. Bhí áthas mór ar na
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are weeds called Crowfoot and Tansy, which are very harmful to land, and they spread rapidly. They are bad for cows, when milking. Thistles and nettles grow on good land, and are given to pigs. There are herbs called 'self heal' When stewed the liquid is used to cure a pain in the back
The wild carrot is used to cure diseases in horse's
The mullen plant is used to cure chest trouble
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
gabháil ceóil, ag damsú, agus ag amhránuigheacht. Sa deire thiar thall, dubhairt ceann de’s na sídheóga go raibh síad ar tí an cleas a dhéanamh; dubhairt sé leis an nogadóir gan focal a rádh, nuair a chloisfheadh sé an brígh-nua-pósta ag leigheadh sró, ma dá bhrócadh Aoine. “Dia is Muire linn,” nuair a leig an brígh sró nach mbeadh siad in-don í a thógáil leóbhra.
Leis sin, tháinig sé anuas as na maide-cheangail, agus chuir sé coinilín suas i srón an bhrígh nua-phósta, agus do leig sí sró “Dia is Muire linn.” ar-san Nogadóir suas san maide. Do leig an bhrígh sró arís, agus dúbhairt an nogadóir an rud chéadhna, agus an tríomhadh úair, nuair a leig sí sró, “Dia is Muire linn” arsa an nogadóir, agus bhuail an sídheóg é, agus thuit sé anuas ar an mbor é féin agus na noganna. Rith gach duine amach agus iadh sganruighthe.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 09:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
San tseanaimsir deirthear go mbíodh na sídheóga ag dul thart san oídhthe ag déanamh díogbháil ar na daoine. Dream go raibh cómhacht draoidheachra acú do bheadh na sídheóga, do bheadh na sídheóga do cómhnuigh síad ins na liosanna. D’innis mo athair sgéal dom agus dtaobh cleasa a d’imrigh na sídheóga ar lanamháin-nua-phósta, mar deirthear go mbiodh dearg-ghráin ag na sídheóga ar an mbrigh-nua phósta. San am sin bhíodh na daoine ag déanamh soithigh ar a tugtai noganna, agus bhí síad dhá dhíol iadh. Oidhthe amháin bhí fear dén t-sórt seo ag teacht abhaile ón mbaile Mór, agus cúpla noganna aige. Bhí a sháith ólta aige, agus thuit sé ina chodhladh. I gceann tamaill tháinig sídheóga slighe, agus dhúsaigh síad an nogadóir. D’innis síad dhó go raibh síad ag dul chuig bhainfhéis a bhí san áit an oidhce sin, chun an bhrigh-núa phósta a thabhairt ar siúbhal leo. Dubhairt siad leis nach mbeidh siad in-don an deas agus gabháil gan duine beo a bheith leóbhia, agus nach leighfeadh síad abhaile é, agus go mbeadh air teacht chuig an mbainfhéis leóbhra. Bhí triobhlóid mór ar an bhfear bocht ach ní raibh-aon dul as. D’imthigheadhar leóbhra go dtí teach an bhainfhéis, agus an nogadóir bocht leobhra. Suas leo go léir ar na maidí-ceangail san tíg. Cuaidh gach rud ar aghaidh go maith go ceann tamaill. Bhí an teach lán le daoine agus siamsa mór acú, ag
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 08:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
céard a bíodh orta. Nuair a tháinig an fear isteach dubhairt sí leis imeacht agus gan abheith ag magadh fuaithi nó go mbeadh sí in n-aifeala.
Bí bean amhain uair amháin, agus bhí sí sna coinníde ag an gCúilín. Nuair a bhíodh daoine go dona teighead siad go dtí í, agus bhi na daoine ag rá go raibh droideach aice. Ón mbeadh aon duine ag rá aon blas leire bhíodhaice nuair a caradh siad go dtí í lá amháin bhí beirt mná ag dul dti í, agus bhí páistí ag duine acu. agus bhí sé go dona. Go bhíodarag eascrainne uirre, agus nuair a tháinig siad go dtí í dúinn sa scoil gach peacháil dá mbéinn siad liche. Ní raibh sí ag dul ar déanam aon mar don páistí i dtosach. rinne sí mar san deire dó. Ach gur cailleadh le cáil í.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 08:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If a person has a sty on the eye, and if he gets a gooseberry thorn, and points it at his eye three times and makes the sign of the cross each time he will be cured. Another old cure for the whooping cough is to walk under an ass three times. A story is told of a boy who did this, and when he was passing the third time the ass kicked him and injured his leg
Patrick McGill
Palatine
Co. Carlow
June 14th 1038
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A bharraigh; tainich Seoirse aníos agus tarraingh sé amach an capall agus chuaid ag mara iuteacht air acht bhimthigh an capall fiadhain agus mharbhiugh sé Seoirse I gcrois a bharraigh san mbhán Mór. Cuireadh suas crois san air ar marbuigheadh é agus sin é an fáth go bhfuil an t-ainm sin ar Crois a Bharraigh ó shoin. Bhí cos Seoirse i bhfastodh sa stiaraip agus tharraingh an capall é chomh fada le leacht Seoirse agus chuile duine a théigheadh an beaslach na dhiaidh sin chaitheadh siad cloch áith sin go raibh leact mór ann agus sin é an fáth go bhfuil leacht Seoirse ar an áith sin o shion. Dhimthig an capall draoidheachta isteach sa loch aríst agus níor fhachas o shoin é.
Mairead Ní Nualláin
Cathair na Seilíní
Baile Áth an Ríogh
Brighid Ní Fhathaigh
Gráinseach
Baile Áth an Ríogh
Scéal
Bhí bean uair amháin agus bhí gaírdín cnó aici agus ceann ní thíbhradh sí d’aoine. Acht nuair a bhí sí ag fághail bháis dúbhairt sí leis an mbeirt mban a bhí ag túbhairt aire dí na
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hurley
Hurling was the chief game played. All the young men gather together in the evening and they played Hurley on a flat space on the burragh more and in barrs field this was sixty years ago.They picked sides and played with whitethorn sticks which they made specially for this occasion and used high sticks supported with stones for posts.sometimes there would be 30 or more on each side. When they were tossing up they would throw up the stick and shout “buss or buss”, another way was whoever said Buail na Morth or Leigin Leath. Their was know special time limited for the match sometimes it would last for five hours.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dúbhairt sé leis an fear. Cá bhfuil tú ag dul. Dúbhairt an fear go raibh sé ag imeacht as an tír ar faddúbhairt sé gur iarr an Rí air imar agus éisg a chur ar bárr an tíghe dó agus níl mise indonn rud mar sin a dhéanamh. Gabh abhaie agus bíodh ag teach an Ríogh ar maidin go moch. Rinne sé mar a dúbhairt an firín beag leis. Núair shroich sé teach an Ríogh, bhí an imar ar bárr an tíghe agus bhí go leor íasc ins an umar. Cúaidh sé isteach chuig an Rí agus bhí an Rí ag búideach dó. Chuaidh an fear abhailem agus tháinic an bean chuig an Rí arist. Dúbhairt an rí léithí go mbeadh féasta mór aca, acht tá fear atá indonn spóirt a dhéanamh ag teastáilt.
Má tá fear ag teastáilt cun spóirt a dhéanamh "sé seáinín an duine." Chuir sé fios ar seáinín agus dúbhairt sé, caithfidh tú spóirt a dhéanamh dúinn lá an féasta. Níl mé indonn spóirt a dhéanamh cor ar bith. Crochfaidh mé thú muna ndéantha tú spóirt dúinn. Chuaidh sé abhaile agus fúair sé an caca beag, agus d'imthigh sé leis agus casadh an firín céadhna air aris.
Dúbhairt sé leis gabh abhaile agus gabh suas ar bhárr an t-simléara agus núair atá siad imthighthe amach ag bailuí na gabhair, caith go leór salainn sa leithe, agus caith gach braon
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear de na Ó'Concubhair ina comhnuidhe, bparáiste Anach Cúan, lios and Oráinn. Thainig neach ag an bfuinneóg san oidhche agus é ina codhladh. Dubhairt sé (an beach) leis dá dtreighead sé amach go Condae an Chláir, bí droichead ann agus gheobfad sé pota óir ó fear annsin ar an droichead.
Nuair a deirigh sé ar maidin bhí sé dáinnseacht dá bhean.
Ní raibh fhios aige an ag briongloid a bhí sé no an fear a bhí ag cainnt leis, ach ar son nós d'imigh sé amach go Condae an Chláir. Bhí sé amuigh ann annsin le cotaraí an trathnona. Bhí sé amuigh ag suibhal siar is aniar leis an droichead go raibh sé deireanach. Ní fhaca sé an fear ann.
Bhí teach ag tailluir in aice an droichid. Bhí an taillúir ag feachaint ar an bfear ag suibhal. Chuaidh sé amach. D'iarraidh sé de'n fear ceard a bhí sé a déanamh ann. "Bhí mé ag briongloidigh aréir" a deir an fear "dá dteighfinn amach annseo go bfuighfinn pota óir". "Go bfeachaid dia ort" a deir an tailluír. Tá mise ag brionglóidigh le blian dá dteighfinn go Anach Chuan go bhfuighfinn pota óir faoi sgeach i mbaile a dtugann siad lios an Orainn air istigh i ngort fear de na Ó'Conchubhair. Chuaigh an fear isteach in éinfeachtleis an tailluír. D'fhan sé annsin go maidin. Tháinig sé abhaile ar maidin. Bhí sé sa mbaile sa trathnona agus bhí sé ag innseacht dá bhean faoi na rudaí a tharla. Nuair a deirigh sé ar maidin chuaidh sé amach sa ngarrdha ag romhar
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
núair atá an gaoth an-dheas ann. Is comhartha sneachta núair atá an gaoth (an-nthaor) [?] an nthoir ann.
Núair atá ceol agus bpoll na h-eochrach san doras sin comhartha báistighe.
Is comhartha báistighe núair atá an sioc go trom agus dtús na h-oidhche.
Úair atá lascóg gorm ar an teinead sin droch-chomhartha.
Comhartha báistighe núair atá an suighe ag tuitimanúas an seimléar.
Is droch-chomartha núair atá an fhairrge corruighthe.
Núair a bíonn na sleibhte le feicéal a bheirth agus bhfad uait sin comhartha maith agus núáir atá stad lé feiceal agus ngár duit sin droch-chomartha.
Núair a bhíonn go leór míoltógaí amuigh sin droch-chomartha agus núair nach mbíonn sin
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cluain Mór:
Fuair sé an t-ainm seo msr bhí cluain mór annsin fadó.
Cill Beinneáin:
Bhí scoil annsin ag Naomh Beinín.
Poll Darac:
Bhí a lán crann oarac annsin fadó.
Cluain Tuag:
Bhí troid annsin fadó agus bhí go leor tuaganna annsin tar éis an catha agus fuair sé an t-ainm Cluain Tuag.
Cluain Dár Rón:
Fuai5r sé an t-ainm sin mar Cluain idir dá móin sead Cluain.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cúl Páirc:
Bhí gríasaidhe le ferscál annsin fadó agus bhi cábán aige ann. Tá an páirc sin i suaidhe i calamh Micíl Uí Cuinn.
Gort Bán
Ní fhásann aon rud annsin áit fúir bán agus nóiníní tá sé ag suaidte i dtalamh é bhaldraiche.
Páirc an Mhuillinn:
Bhí mhuilinn annsin fadó agus tá na ballóga annsin fós.
An Lisín:
Mar is ann a cuirtear na daoine nach mbaistear. Tá an dhá pháirc sin idir lámh ainmneach.
Máirtín Ó Grádaig
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
i dteach. Ní raibh sé i bhfad istigh gur eirigh bean a' tige agus chraith sé láimh leis agus dubairt sé "céad míle fáilte rómhat a Pádraig Mac Muirige as Baile na hAille". An braon a bhí i mbun a'coise chuaidh sé go mullach a chinn le teann fairchíosa. "Fan anuas ag a' teine" a deir sí '"na bíodh tú cumhal mar sin, is doiche nach miste dom fiafruighe díor cé tug an bealach seo thú" adeir sí "Ní miste adeir seisean "Mo capall a goideadh uaim". "Is deacair dhuit í fhagháil ach déanfa mise mo chuid féin dhuit. Tá sí goidte agus gadaidhe atá ar oileán annseo" adeir sí. Cóirigh sí leaba san gcúidh dhó. Ní raibh sé i bhfad na chaoladh go bhfaca sé cú ag teacht anior as seomra agus (seomra) srian ina béal aice agus d'imthigh sí amach. Níor thuit méal ar Pádraig i gcaiteann an scaip. Bhí sé i ngar do'n maidhneachan nuair a d'airigh sé an
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bhíos go maith ag an bfear go gcaithfeas dhó a deanamh chroch sé a claidheamh óg a cíonn ach thuit sgáile an claidheamh ar chloch mhór amach ós cíonn an cailín agus rith sí ar leath-taobh go luach. Thuit an claidheamh ab laímh an fhir agus dubhairt sé go beo nó gá bfaghadh an leas-maáthair grím uirthí go marbhóchadh sí í. Rith an cailín beag suas an cnoc agus fatchíos an domhain uirthí bhí sí ag suibhal nó go bfaca sí (solas) dearach as teachín beag. Rith sí nó go dtánnic sí go dtí
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
an domhain air an mbanrioghan agus mharbhuigheadh sí an cailín. Lá amháin diarfhuigh an bainríoghan den sgathán cé ba deise sa ríoghachth dubhairt an sgathán go bí an cailín beag. annsin chuimnigh an leas mháthair ar plan a dheanfhadh sí ag glanadh scairigh agus ag glanas somra í agus ní fhághadh sí éadhach deas chor ar bith. Lá amháin bhí an cailín amuigh agus bhí sí i na seasamh ós cionn tobar agus chula sí n héin ag rád go raibh sí ina seasamh ós cóirtobar draochtach agus rud ar bith a dearfhaigh si gheobhfhadh sí é. Diar an cailín
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Patrick Bohan's grandfather "Paidin" Herlihy Nohoval Upper Knocknagree who died only 20 years ago at the age of 86 remembered the Famine and often spoke of his (Paidín's) youth.
Paidin worked for Mick Audy O'Sullivan of Novohal for the princely wage of a half- a- crown for the year. At that time, Mick Audy, whose grandson Mick Andy Mick owns the farm, had nine cows and a horse. They had no hay and 'Padeen' as an ógánach cut furze every day with a reaping hook and gabhhlóg for the stock. At night he had to chop up the furze with a feorze knife all for a half- a- crown. It is interesting to note also that in all farmer's houses, at least, in those days there was a special corner of the house set aside for the chopping of furze. It was a square hole sunk about 6 inches below the surface of the mud floor. A board was placed underneath the furze to save the edge of the knife and to prevent the hole getting deeper.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 15:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An Leas-máthair
Bhí Rí i nÉireann fadó agus bhí aon inghin amháin aici ní raibh an inghin ach ina cailín bheag nuair a fuair a máthair bás agus pós an Rí aríst. Bhí áthas ar an gcailín nuair a bhí máthair eile aici ach is geárr nó go raibh a mhalairt de mharamaí aici mar bhí an leas-máthair an droch-mhúinte leíthe agus chuireach sí catlach uirthí a bheith ag obair go cruath. Bhí sgathán draochtach ag an leas-máththair agus nuair a diarfhaigh sí dhí cé ba breághtha sa ár dinnis sé dhi é dhá ndeireach sé asnsin go mo cailín éigin eile ba deise bhead fearg
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá cuigeann again sa mbaile. Soitheac adhmaid seadh í a bhfuil cúig fionnfaí thart timcheall uirthi, trí cinn sa leart thíos agus dhá cheann sa leart thuas. Nuair a bhíos maiscreadh dhá dhéanadh bíonn na rudaí seo in úsáid, clár na cuiginne, claibín agus an lointhe.
Blightear an bhó dhá uair sa bó, ar maidin agus sa tráthnóna agus má blihtear níos minice í imthigheann an bainne uaithi. Nuair a bhíonn bean a’ tighe a dul amach le bó a bhleághan, tugann sí stóilín i láimh amháin agus canna sa láimh eile agus de ghnáth beireann sí leithe chomh maith sáuspan le h-aghaidh climirí nab ó, sé sin an chuid is fear den bhainne. Coinnigheann sí í seo i gcóir an taé.
Muna mbíonn sí indhon dul go h-éasgaidh ag na sinneacha tugann sí bosóg bheag dohn bhó len a cois deireadh do chus siar agus annsin suidheann sí go compóir-teamhail ar an stóilín ag bleághan ar a mine géire agus ag gabhair fhuinn de ghnáth san am céadhna.
Ar bheirt críochnuighthe di cuireann sí crosóg leis an mbainne ar dhruim nab ó chun í a bheanní. Tugann sí an bainne go teach an bhainne agus séaluigheann sí é, tíre shiolthán, ar fhaithios go mbeadh deanach, nó ribeacha fionaidh na bó ann. Leamhnacht a tugtar ar an mbainne úr sin. Annsin cuireann sí an leamhnacht i gcíléaraí móra leathana, fágann sí annsin é ar feadh dhá uair déag a’chluig. Annsin
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Murchadh beag agus Murchadh Mór.
Chuaidh Murcadh beag aug murchadh mór amach ag baint sméar dubh lá amháin, An méid a bhain Murchadh mór thug sé do Mhurcadh beag iad le cur i dtaisge dhó. Nuair a bhí a chuid fhéín ar fad baince agus Murchadh mór tháinig sé go dtí Murchadh beag leis an mé a thug sé dó d'fághail ar ais uaidh. "Tá siad ar fad ithe agam" arsa Murchadh beag. "Má Tá" adeir Murchadh mór "buailfíd mé tú" Cuaidh Murchadh mór isteach san gcoill annsin le slar a bhaint. "Céard atá uait" adeir an tslat. "tá slat a bhualfeas Murchadh beag mar d'ith sé mo chuid sméar." Ní rachaidh mise leat" adeir an sgian "go bhfághaidh tú cloch a ghéaróchas mé." Chuaidh Murchadh Mór leis
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
san oidce agus bhí an trag an agus buail an bád ar cloc agus brideadh í
Tomás Ó Móraín
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An t-Aonach:-
Bíodh na haontaighe fadó ann ins na páirc – eannáibh ní h-iad amháin ins na bailte móra. Tá cnoc an ins an gceanntair seo agus tugtar Cnoca’ Díoláin air. Tá páirc na h-aontaighe ann in-aice leis an bhfairrge ins an áit seo. Bhíodh na h-aontaighe ann fadó ach ní bhíonn siad anois ann.
Théideadh na ceanniughtheóirí ó theach go teach ag ceannacht stuic, mar capaill is ba. Bhíodh aontaighe ann fadó amuigh faoi'n dtuaith ins na páirceannáibh is cois cáisleán nó rátha, acht bhíodar ar droch-bháite le na síopadóirí insan gcathair. Cuireadh cosg leó mar badh mhaith le na síopadóirí tráchtáil mhaith a fhágháil ins na síopaí leó. Tá páirc insan áit seo, tugtar Céarnóg na Cathrach air; bíonn sé le h-aghaidh capaill is ba is muca is caoragh a dhíol isa cheannacht ann.
Íochtar paidhe ar gach beithidheach a dhíoltar san t-aonach ann. Tugtar an t-airgead do'n bhfear a bhíonn 'ná sheasamh ar chúl bhóthair. Tugtar trí pingne ar gcaoragh ceithre pingne ar muc, sé pingne ar bh úin, sgilling ar chapaill. Cuireadh an cleachtadh sin ar bhun, i dtreo's
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pharróstaigh, Teampall Naomh Niocháláis Phrotástúnaigh; níl aon tobar beannuighthe thar an Naomh.
Pádraig Ó Dubhghaill.
Fiaras scéal ó bhean Uí Dhubhghaill, 39 d’aois.
Na Duganna,
Gaillimh.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Naomh Phátrún an Cheantair.
‘Sé Naomh Niochálas an t-ainm atá ar Naomh Phatrúin an cheanntair seo. Ní raibh mainistir ná cill ná teampall ag an Naomh nó ag a chuid manach san áit.
Tá scéalta deas chun cúntas ar an Naomh san againn. Tugtar Santa Claus air sin athrú ar Naomh Niochálas. Bhí croidhe ag an naomh sin agus bhí sé lán de mhaitheas do na daoine bochta. Théigheadh sé ó theach go teach agus bíadh is féiríní aige chun cur fé na doirséibh. Creidtear innte ó am sin go dtí seo.
Níor chualas trácht fé’n míorbhaitrí a dhéineadh sé ach tharraing sé a lán daoine don Chreideamh Chríostaidhe. Chualamar gur cuireadh Naomh Niochálás i dtír ina dtugtar Myra san Sicléibh; níl muid chinnte go mór fé’n áit a chuireadh é, ach bhéadh sé mhaith chomhnaidhe san Myra. Tá áiteanna ann agus tá siad ainmneacha thar an Naomh. Seo iad anois:- Sráid bhalla Naomh Niocháláis, Sráid Naomh Niocháláis, Séipéal Naomh Niocháláis
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
D’fhéach sé chun na tairnghí a tharraingt amach ó chóirp Íosa ach bhíodar ró-mhór agus ró-láidir ar a ghob. Chinn air mar ní raibh a ghob sáthach láidir chun é do dhéanamh.
Ins an gcaoi san cham sé a ghob agus mar a gheall tug-tar an “Cros-Ghob” mar ainm air. Ainm eile an “Spideóg bhrollaigh Dheirg”, mar gheall gur chuir fuil dearg Íosa air in am a bhí an fuil ag tuitheamh go talamh.
Pádraig Ó Dubhghaill.
8.3.1938:-
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Scéal ó bhean Uí Dubhghaill, ‘naois 39,
Na Duganna,
Gaillimh.
Scéalta Crábhaidh:-
Nuair a bhí Muire Máthair agus Naomh Sheosamh ag teitheadh ón Aigipt le Íosa do thug fir oibre a bhí ag cur síl bíadh agus cabhair dóibh. D’fhás an síol láithreach agus d’aibidh agus thosaigh na fir oibre a’bhaint lá ar na bháireach. Tháinig saighdiúirí Herod chuca ag cuardach do’ triur.
Dubhairt na fir oibre le fírinne gur gabh a leithéid do thriur an t-slithe an lá bhí an barra a chur aca. Cheap na saighdiúirí annsin raithe roimis sin é agus nar’bh iad an triur céart iad. Bhíodar ar tí iompadh abhaile arís nuair a labhair an Dearg-Daol ó’n bhféar do ghlór lag, “Indhe, Indhe!” arsa sé; thug na saighdiúirí chionnas do tharla agus leanadar ortha sa thóir. “Ní maith le éinne an Dearg-Daol ó shin amach”.
An Cros-Ghob.
Chéas na Giúdaigh Íosa Críost ar Aoine Chéasta. Nuair a bhí ár Slánuightheóir táirnighthe ar an gcoich d’im – thuigh said abhaile. D’fhág said an croc in a sheasamh agus Íosa céasta uirrí. Tháinig an t-éan agus bhí aige le rádh dhó – “Saorfaidh mé thú, a Íosa.” Bhí truaigh mór aige dhó.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 14:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Daoine Laídír
12-5-1938
Pádraig Ó Phiocan Crocnecasa Currán Acaíll Co Muigeo bhí sé chomh laídir go dearrnocad sé an bad aníos as an cladac leis fein tar eis teaci i isteac on bhannc.
Seán Ó Caircin, Pádraig Ó Cairrean crocnecasa Currain Acaill Co Muigeo bhí sé chomh maith go snamaig sé o clochan go drí clearla agus isteac aris e Tomas Ó Morain.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 13:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ós íseal sin é ceimhartha go bhfuil droch-aimsear ag teacht.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 13:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ní bhíonn áinle an chuach agus an traena againn acht amháin sa tsamhraidh. Ní bhíonn an lacha fhiain, an gé fiain, an naosgach, an chearc fhraoigh an phitrisg, an creabhar agus an pilibín againn acht amháin sa gheimreadh.
Do deanann an mheaigh a nead i dtam árd. Bíonn dath bán ar a uibheacha agus spotaí gorma ortha. Deanann sí gor ar na uibheacha annsin ar feadh trí seachtamhain annsin bhíonn gearrcaigh aici. Bhíonn sí ana-ghnótach annsin ag soláthar dóibh féin. San earrach is eadh a deanann na h-éin a neadracha.
Sin é an fath go bhfuil brollach déarg ag an dreóilín ná go bfaca sé ár slánuigtheóir ag fhágail báis ar an geais aoine an ceásda. Nuair a bhíonn na fainléoga ag eitilt
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 13:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Níl aon tir sa dhomhain nach bhfuil aon éann ann. Tá a lán éan sa áit seo. Sé an faoileán an éan is ciotcionta san áit seo mar tá an fhairrge in-aice na h-áite. Deanann sí a nead ar na oileanaibh uaignige. Beireann sí a cuid annsin agus déanann sí gor ortha ar feadh cúpla seachtámhain. Bíonn an faoileán san áit seo gach aon uair sa mblian. Ní téigeann sí tar lear. Bíonn a lán spotaí ar na uibheacha.
Bíonn an lon dubh an preáchan agus an cág ins an óir seo freisiu. Déanann an préachan a nead ar bhárr na gerann. Bhíonn spotaí ar a uibheacha freisin ar nos uibhe an fhaoileáin. Déanann an lon dubh a nead ins na crannaibh freisin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 13:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
comhartha go bhfuil báistreach ag teacht. Má’s rud é go gcuimhnuigeann duine go bhfuil an spear iseal sin é comhartha go bhfuil báisteach ag teacht. Má’s rud é go bhfeiceann duine na caoraig suas ar dh-rulm cnuic sin é comhartha go bhfuil aimsear bréag ag teacht. Má bhíonn siad thios ar an dtalamh sin é comhartha go bhfuil storm ag teacht.
Padráig Ó laoghaire Cáitlín ní fhollamhain
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 13:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
eiteall íseal sin é comhartha go bhfuil báisteach ag teacht. Ma’s rud é go bhfeiceann duine na foilléain ag eiteall os cionn na talmhan sin é comhartha go bhfuil stoirm ag teacht acht ma bhíonn siad ag eiteall go h-árd ins an spéir sin e comharthe go bhfuil aimsear breágh ag teacht.
Ma’s fud é go gcuimhnuigeann duine go bhfuil na sléibhte ana gairid dó sin é comhartha go bhfuil báisteach ag teacht. Nuair a bhíonn an fhairrge dubh sin é comhartha go bhfuil báisteach ag teacht agus ma’s rud é go bhfuil sí gorm sín é comhartha go bhfuil aimsear ag teacht. Nuair a bhíonn snas ar na clocaibh agus deanach ar na bóthribh sin é
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 13:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá a lán sean-focail i dtreabh na h-aimsire tus an aith seo. Ma’s rud é go bhfeiceann duine cíorcle timpeall na Gealaighe sín é comhartha go bhfuil báisteach ag teacht. Ma’s rud é go bhfeich eann duine tur cheatha san spéir sa maidin sin é comartha go bhfuil báisteach ag teacht agus nuair a bíonn tur cheathre san spéir sa trathnona sin é comhartha go mbeid aimsear bréag again. Nuair a bhíonn na realta in-aice na gealaighe sin é comhartha go bhfuil báisteach ag teacht. Ma’s rud é go bhfeiceann duine na lasracha gorma sa dreine sin é comhartha go bhfuil storm ag teacht agus nuair a bhíonn na lasracha corcor san dteine go mbeidh sioch again.
Nuair a bhíonn na n-éin ag
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 13:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An Phaidirín
i) Comhartha na Croise. In ainm an Athair agus a Mhic agus a Spioraid Naomh Amén.
ii) An confitéor anseo: Creidmuid a Dhia go bhfuil tú anseo i lathair, go bhfuil tú ag féachaint orainn go bhfuil tú ag éisteacht linn, go bhfuil fhíos agat ar an uile smuintú adhraimud agus onóraimud thú admhuighmuid gur tú ar gcruthuightheóir ‘s ar n-árdthighearma agus i slighimid sinn féin go h-iomlán faoi do smacht.
iii) Cuirimid sinn fein i bhfiadnaise dé bheirimid moladh mór agus buidheachas duit faoi gach tiodlacadh agus grásta dá dtug tú dhuinn ó oidhche ar mbeirthe go dtí seo cláthair agus go speisíalta ar dtabhairt slán ó chodladh na hoiche aréir. Ofráilimid duit a thighearna ag gcorp ar n-ainm. Ar gcoidhte ar n-intinn agus ar n-uile smaointú a n-oileann do ghlór is d’onórachaí féin agus tá siul again le congna an Aoin Mhic Iosa Críosta gan aon nidh a déanamh ar an saoghal seo a chuireas fearg ort arís go bráth.
iv) Ó áthigearna mar nach b’fuil fhios again dul ag codladh dunn a n-eireodh muist aríst go bráth. Tabhair dhúinn ó ghrásta a sinn féin do mhion-scrudu.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 09:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Annsin a bheireanns an Mananáin greim bárr láimhe ar Conán Maol agus múinenn sé do ceádhtar (líot) nach raibh ag aon fear eile fón ngréin.
Mo crádh go mo Mananáin a ráidteas Conán gur tú an fearr is fearr ceádtar is bhfaca mé ach a múinfeá aon tsodar beag amháin don a dhfágfadh ar deire thiar tú féin.
Ó a Conán a ráidteas an Mananáin an máigisur sgoile is foghlumtha a bhfaca tú sa tsaoighal céin milleán a thubhartá dó faoin taisbeantas grinn a fuair sí féin.
Leagadh na buird go cumir síos fá comh gheall uilig nabh fiann soléir ach suidh Mac Móirne mór síos in ionad óil i gcoirnéal go réin.
Nuair a chuaidh muid aon tEanainn soir cuaid muid as deánamh spóirt is grinn a Ghoill a driotháir a ráidteas Conán bíud aireachas báis agat ar mo sgian druinn.
Ag Teamhair
Leagadh na buird go cuimir síos fá comh gheall uilig na bFhiann go léir ach suidh Mac Móirne Mór síos in ionad óil i gcoirnéal do séin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 09:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Annsin a bheireanns an Mananáin greim bárr láimhe ar Conán Maol agus múinenn sé do ceádhtar (líot) nach raibh ag aon fear eile fón ngréin.
Mo crádh go mo Mananáin a ráidteas Conán gur tú an fearr is fearr ceádtar is bhfaca mé ach a múinfeá aon tsodar beag amháin don a dhfágfadh ar deire thiar tú féin.
Ó a Conán a ráidteas an Mananáin an máigisur sgoile is foghlumtha a bhfaca tú sa tsaoighal céin milleán a thubhartá dó faoin taisbeantas grinn a fuair sí féin.
Leagadh na buird go cumir síos fá comh gheall uilig nabh fiann soléir ach suidh Mac Móirne mór síos in ionad óil i gcoirnéal go réin.
Nuair a chuaidh muid aon tEanainn soir cuaid muid as deánamh spóirt is grinn a Ghoill a driotháir a ráidteas Conán bíud aireachas báis agat ar mo sgian druinn.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 09:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
an chuid a bfhearr nó d’innis an t-éan dó é. D’imithigh an waiter annsin agus thug gloinne de’n chuid a b’fhearr dó. Thiompuigh an waiter agus dubhairt go gceannocadh sé an t-éan sin uaidh, nó go mbéadh an t-éan úsáideach aice nó go n-innseochadh sí gach a’n rud a ndéanfaidhe fá’n teach. “Bheirfidh mé stocaí óir agus stocaí airgid ar an éan sin.” “Maith go leor,” arsa Domhnall beag, “tá ceann eile agam sa bhaile.
Chuaidh Domhnall beag ‘na bhaile agus stocaí oir agus stocaí airgid leis. Bí sé á gcunntas ar an tábla. Chuaidh mac Dhomhnall mhóir thart fa’n fhuinneóig agus connaic sé é a’ chunntas an airgid.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 08:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
anonn agus thug Domhnall mór push léithe amach ins an ceasaigh. Bhí an bhó báidhte annsin agus thoisigh Domhnall beag ag caoineadh. Cha rabh a dhath aige annsin ach a mháthair.
Bhain sé an croiceann den bó; tháinig sé aniar ‘na bhaile mhór go ndíolfadh sé croiceann na bó. D’fhág sé síos an croiceann ar an bhealach mór go lasfadh sé a phíopa. Tháinig éan beag agus luigh sí ar an chroiceann. Bheir sé gréim ar an éan agus chuir sé ina phóca í. Dhíol sé an croiceann ar an bhaile mhór agus chuaidh sé isteach I dteach na tábhairne agus d’iarr sé deoch de’n chuid a b’fhearr de’n uisce beatha. Tháinig an waiter isteach agus d’fhág an t-uisce beatha isteach ar an tábla. Theann Domhnall beag ar an éan agus rinne an t-éan agus dubhairt Domhnall beag narbhé sin
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 08:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Domhnall Mór agus Domhnall Beag
Bhí Domhnall mór agus Domhnall beag ann a’n am amháin. Bhí dhá bhó dhéag ag Domhnall Mór agus cha rabh ag Domhnall beag ach a’n bhó amháin. Dubhairt Domhnall mór go ndéanfadh sé ceasaigh fá choinne a chuid eallaigh a chur anonn air. Rinne sé an ceasaigh agus chuir Domhnall mór a chuid eallaig anonn an chéad uair. Chuir Domhnall beag an bhó ‘saige fhéin
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 08:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tailte agus ór dóibh ach an gasúr a thabhairt dó, agus thug siad dó é.
D'imthigh sn rí agus an fear óg annsoin. D'sgríobh an rí leithir annsoin agus thug sé don bhuachaill í agus dubhairt sé leis an bóthair oireach a chointbeáil o gcómhnuidhe go sroicfeadh sé an pálás, annsoin an leitir a tabhairt don bhainrioghan. Bhí an gasúr ag imtheacht agus ag síor imtheacht agus chuaidh sé amú ins an gceó. Cuireadh isteach sa gcoill é agus chonnaic sé teach beag ins an gcoill. Robálacohthe a bhí ins an tigh agus nuair a chuaidh an gasúr isteach ann bhí na robálacohthe ag dul dá mhartú ach dubhairt an gasúr leo gan é a mharbú agus nach bhfeicfeadh siad lá bocht nó brónach achoidhche. Annsoin d'fiafrauigh an caiptín de cad a bhí leis in a láimh agus dubhairt sé gurab í leitir í. D'léigh sé an leitir annsoin agus chaith sé sa teinidh í. D'sgríobh sé ceann eile annsoin é féin agus dubhairt sé leis agus a bheith ag dul abaile. D'imithigh an gasúr annsoin
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 08:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bhí Rí, bainrioghan ann uair amhaín, agus an lá seo chuaidh siad amach ag siubhal ins na coilltibh. Casadh ortha teach beag istigh ins an gcoill. Chuaidh siad isteach ann, budh an dall glic a bhí in a chómhnuidhe ann. D'fiafruigh an Rí de cén áit sa domhan a raibh an fear ina chómhnuidhe a bheith pósta ag a inghín. Dubhairt an dall glic go raibh sé taobh thall den loch. Annsoin chuaidh an rí abhaile agus an lá in a dhiaidh chuaidh sé feín, agus a chuid fear anonn treasna an locha go dtí an teach. Chuaidh siad isteach ann, agus chonnaic siad an páiste san gcliabhán, agus an bhean ag nígheadh eádaigh. D'fiafruigh sé den mhnaol cá raibh máthair an páiste. Dubhairt sí go raibh sí féin in a mháthair, agus d'iarr sé uirri ansoin é a dhiól ohó. Shocruigh siad an margadh. Thug seisean mála oír di, agus thug sise an leanbh dó. Tug an rí abhaile leis, an páiste. Chuir sé iallach ar an árs. Shluinéir cómhra a dhéanú dó. Nuair a bhí an cómhra déanta aige chuir an rí an páiste isteach ann, agus leig sé amach ar an bhfairrge é.
Thainic an cómhra i dtír in aice muilinn
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 08:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On steady pinion she will glide
Unto the seat of war:-
So Tonry from his airy height,
Glides to the Cullagh shore,
On a bridge of mist ten thousand sprites,
Are rount his azure car
Simon Hanly from Kilfegin; who
Has been kind and good,
As wrath with some folks who're aboard.
For their ingratitude.
With close-kint brows, he sternly vows
To make thim pay their price;
causing their hopes to pelf run off
As melts the Winter's ice.
From crest of Slieve Bawn where he sits,
Not far from the, Three Rosses
Neath a veil of fog, thro marsh and bog,
To Ballyleague he crosses.
As a hay maker doth with his rake,
Draw rakings in his train:-
So Hanly elves of every ilk.
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 08:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Impatient with desire
On some ungrateful folks who're
To wreck his vengenance dire:-
Simon Tonry o'er the Cullagh bog,
Besrides the cloudy air,
Eident intent to interfere,
And block the Rathcline fair.
While Dun Bingham at Rathcline doth wait,
With feline hungry maw
To gather all unto hmself,
He can with drenching flaw
So that my dear, we will stay here,
While fairies fret and rave,
Nor wet our churns, hoops or pails,
This day in Shannons wave,
"Good lack" quoth she, "Tis sorry me,
To be by marriage tie
Obliged to share life debonair
With a man of prophecy.
It has been mine thro' thick and thin,
To push along the wain
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 08:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí rí in Éirinn fadó, gur b'ainm do 'Rí na Searrach'. Bhí aon mhac amháin aige gur b'ainm do 'Céarach'. Nuair bhí sé eirighte na aosánach do chuir a athair é go dtí 'Máighistir Pionnsa' ag foghluim lúth 's gaisce. Do cailleadh bean an Rí go h-óg, agus do chuimhnig sé ar hósadh arís. D'imigh sé lá, é féin 'sa dhaitine mhúinnteartha, chun bainrioghan do gholathar agus gcleamhnas do féin; agus ins an t-slighe dhóibh do casadh oria an bhean ba ghráinne dá bhfaca súil duine riamh. Tháinig sí i láthair an Rí, agus d'fhiarr sí air- an bpósfadh sé í, ach dábhairs sé ná déanfadh. Do ghlac ramharsa feirge í dá deasca san, agus chuir sí sneachta is sioc ar an dtalamh chóin trom san go rabhasar annsan ceangailte den sioc is den sneachta ar feadh trí lá 's trí n-oiche. Tháinig sí chuige arís, an tríomhadh lá
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About 90 years ago when the famine was in the country and the food was very scarce. The people were in the habit of stealing cattle. There was a man that used always steal cattle and sometime after his death he was seen standing in a river near the bridge called Droichead na Ghadaidhe.
It happened that another man who used also steal cattle was passing along and he saw the man standing in the river with a stick in his hand. He asked the man why was he standing in the river with a stick in his hand. The other man told him that he was suffering his Purgatory and that he should stay there till green buds would come on his stick.
Then the other man asked him what did he do and he told him that he used steal cattle, Then the other man jumped into the river and said he would asso stay till his stick would sprout. That is the reason why the bridge is called Droichead na Ghadaidhe
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the people used not use any candles or oil like now. They used touse rushes instead. This is the way they used to use them. They used to go out and gather a bundle of rushes and peel them and leave on slip of green on them to keep them firm. They used put a tin vessel like the shape of a boat called a slighire on the fire. They used to put lard into it and leave it melt. Then they used to take it up and dip the rushes on by one into the lard and take them out and leave them dry.
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago before paraffen oil was in use and the people were very poor. The only light they used have by night was a lighted rush.
First they used gather a bundle of rushes and let them wither. Then they used get a piece of tin which they called a slighire, and melt lard and dip a rush into it according as they needed it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dí teach scoile siar i gCragach fadó. Tá sé céad bhliana ó bhí sé ann. Tomás Ó Dannabáin an t-aimn a bhí air, maistear scoile. Sé sisar mór Tomás O Dannabáin atá siar i Béal Easa é. Bhí na cailíní ‘s na buscáillí o Rinn Aine ag dul go dtí an scoid sin. Ní raibh aca acht leabhar learpingne an céad bliadan agus leabhar pinge an dara bliadan. Cleache a tarraingt as an ngé. Déanfadh siad peann as sin le scríobh ar na sláta. Dá fhód móra le cuile buachaill acu cun teine mhaír a beith acu dóibh féin. Clocha leargas tarc fán bhfalla agus píosa mór admhaid ar agus iád ina suidhe air. Déadh an maighistear in a chómhnuidhe i mbothán mbeag insice leis an scoil. Ní raibh
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
agus luigh siad síos agus chuadar in-a gcodladh.
Rinne an buachaill mada ruadh de féin agus bhain se na cinn díobh. B'shin é an cleas a mhúin an Gruagach don buachaill nach raibh aige féín in aon chor.
Chuir sin deire leis an nGruagach na gCleas agus a dhá réag fear.
17341713
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
deich an chluig. Fuair sé fiche púnt mar gheall air.
Bhí Gearóid Ó Cheallairh an chliste. Bhí sé indon an ard bo chaitheamh i bhfad níos fuide ná an mharc. Bhí sé indon léim an leathan a léimnigh agus i bhfad níos fuide ná é. Tá sé beó fós ach tá sé an-shean.
Máire Ní Ciaráin. Cnocán. Cluain Mionda. Caisleán Riabac. 17. 1 1938
Fuaireas ó Cairclín Ní Ciaráin Cnocán Cluain Mionda Caisleán Riobach.
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá go leor sean scéalta ann i dtaobh daoine cáiliúla. Tá sean fhear ann anois agus fuair sé gradam agus onóir mar gheall ar buachaill beag do shábháil ó bheic báidre i loch.
Pádhraig Ó Bhrian an t-ainm atá ar an caiscidheach úd do shábháil Pádhraig Ó Ciaráin ó bheir báidre. Fuair Micheál ó Domhnalláin an céad duais mar gheall ar an órd do caireamh.
Tá gach uile duine buisheach do Thomás Ó Mhuireargáin mar gheall ar an slabhra do briseadh uair amháin nuair mach raibh aon duine eile iníon é do shéanamh.
Fuair Tomás Ciaráin an céad duais i mBéal Ára na Sluagha nuair a bhí sé ag bainc na móna. Fuair lúcás O Mí an " sweefu stake" agus chuig sé fiche púnc dom.
Ruch Micheál Ó Bhrian ó an mBaile liaim go Gaillimh agus ar ais i drcrí uair go
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 09:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sé síos agus do leig sé air go raibh sé mín marbh. Tháinig an mac simptide isteach agus chonna sé an sionnach. “Ó an duine boche” an seisean. “Is dócha gur marbhuigh an coiteach é agus gur scannán ruigeadh na cearca ha-há. Maich an buchaill rhú a choiligh.” Leis sin, fuair sé an píce agus caic an sionnach amach ar an tsráid.
Ach, ní raibh an sionnach marbh. Glan sé as a amharc agus amarc ní bhfuair sé ar na cearaibh ná ar an sionnach uaidh sin amach.
Ar an 27 lá de mí na Bealtaine a scríobhas é seo.
M’achair Tomás Ó Grádaigh a d’inis é.
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 09:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the world was full of all sorts of enchantment, so that a decent man could hardly show his nose out of doors with the good people, spirits and phookas. If a man vexed one of these he might as well throw himself at once into the middle of poll an ifrinn.
About the time the world was so full of spirits there lived in the village of Breevagh a strong farmer by name Jimmy ---. He was a decent man, but everything was going wrong with him, and more was the pity as he was a real good fellow.
He couldn't put a cow or a sheep on his farm, but he would find them in the morning all torn and smashed to bits. Jimmy was terribly upset and wondered what was doing so much mischief on him as he didn't think there was a creature in the world owed him the least grudge in life.
He made up his mind to watch the farm for one night through, though he was mighty frightened at the thought of the good people and the spirits. Seeing there was no help for it, out he went at the dead hour of the night. he wasn't long walking about the fields when what should he see but a man standing close behind him. this took a great start out of him because he didn't know how the man came to be there all at once. However he gathered courage and began to talk to the man. Just as they were talking together the man vanished away and a
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 09:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Our Holy Wells
5-4-38
Ireland is noted for its holy wells. There are a lot of holy wells around this district but the two holy wells that are best known are St. Patrick’s and St. Colman’s.
St. Patrick’s well is situated about three and a half miles from Kinvara. The story og how it got its name is One day a woman was walking up Corker hill and she was fainting for the want of a drink of water. She searched for a long time to see if she could find a well to get a drink. At last she gave up the search in despair. She sat down on a rock and started to cry. Suddenly she heard someone walking towards her, looking up she saw St. Patrick and he asked her why she was crying. The woman told him that she was fainting for want of water and that she could not find any. St. Patrick told her to follow him and he took her into a field where there was a rock. Kneeling down beside the rock he prayed to God that a well would spring up and it did. St. Patrick then blessed the well and that is how the well got its name.
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 09:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About 120 years ago Mrs. McGovern Cornalon washing to first Mass, twas morning. AS she was passing a lane near a fort she saw something shining in the moon light. She stooped and lifted it and discovered it was a wonderful bar of gold about a foot long. She carried it a distance and it seemed very heavy so she decided to hide it. She put it very carefully into the hedge and covered it with grass and moss ('fog")
But when she returned for mass and searched the place the grass and "fog" was there but the gold was gone.
About 100 years ago Pat Maguire Gubrawoolly went for cattle out to the Claddagh River. The place where the cows were grazing was very lonely, full of rocks and "sgreags".
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 09:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Edenville N. School is in the Parish of Kinlough. This Parish is the most northerly part of Co. Leitrim and of Connaught and forms part of the Diocese of Kilmore, where it touches the sea, as every Diocese in Ireland is said to have a sea board at some part.
Kinlough Parish originally formed part of the Parish of Rossinvee and is referred to in old writings as Rossinvee. It was formed into a separate Parish later on, the adjoining parish being called Rossinver.
The Patron saint of Kinlough is St. Aiden, Irish form of which is St. Moch or St. Mogue. This Saint belonged to the O Ruarc family who ruled Breffni in Uí Ruairc. He was Bishop of Wexford.
The name of the townland in which the school is situated seems to mean the hill brow of the old tree. An old man, who has since died (John Mc Gowan, Agharroo Kinlough) told me that it was named after St. Aiden, who came to reside there when he retired and who blessed a holy well (bile, also) but nobody knows now where this well was. St. Aiden is buried in Rossinver Graveyard on
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 09:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Mar-dhead
2. Imbriarsa-féin
3. Imbeersa
4. A vic ó
5. Imboosa
6. Suddert
7. Omadain
8. Onsioc
9. Brotolac
10. Naire
11. leanb
12. gob
13. Meireol
14. leirceamhail
15. Am briathar féin
16. A garsuin
17. A bhuacaill
18. Suddert
19. ró go breag
20. Raiméis
21. bhagabone
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 09:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a Giant called at the at time Lick Mollasey. He also had a brother living on the Benn Hill. This Giant's height was 11' 11'' as his brother was also as tall. This Giant's brother came down from the Benn Hill to try which of them was the better man.
They picked out two of biggest stones. The bigger giant threw his stone first and then the smaller giant threw his then and the two stones fell in the one field in now John Brobericks and it is in the village of boolnageragh. Then the giant from the Benn Hill went home. The other giant went to his house also. When he went in to his house there was a man there before him. When the giant saw him he said "Fe fá fúm,
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 09:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In older times they had no flour so the people had to use wheaten bread baked on a griddle. If they had visitors they would make boxty of potatoes scraped into a very fine pulp and mixed with wheaten flour and baked between two cabbage leaved beside the fire.
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 09:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Before throwing out the water in which a person washes his feet a split is put into in an these words are said 'go soirbighidh Dia díbh'. The used spill the water gently down on the threshold for fear any spirit would be sheltering out side the door. Long ago the women used never wear shoes only going to Mass. When going to a fair or market they would carry their shoes under their arms. There lived in Lisduff Long ago a man names Patrick borcoran he used make clogs and shoes he used cover them with a kind of skin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 09:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
so he told them. They cut him up into forty parts and hung each part up. When the other brother came he saw the forty bits. He brought them to a shoe maker to sew so that he would be able to bury him. The thieves saw the light this night so they went to it. When he heard them coming he hid the dead man. When they came in they asked him what he was doing. He had to tell them the truth. They asked him where was the dead man's brother's house. The boss of the forty thieves went in and asked lodgings. The thieves were in the yard in forty barrels. The man of the house asked him what was in the barrels. He said "tar". He knew well what was in the barrels. When he got the boss in bed that night and asleep he went out and set fire to the barrels. When the boss got up the next morning he asked who burned them. The man of the house said he did not know. That evening the boss of the thieves asked the man of the house to go for a walk. They kept going until they came to a big fire. The man of the house knew what he was going to do with him. Before he could get time to do anything the man of the house knocked him into the fire and burned him. He had all the money
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 08:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tuirseac agus ag casad no go raibh an t-iolar ar an éan abaoirde d’fúgair sé amac is mise rí na n-éan. Act déirigh an dreóilín amac on a sgiathán (an) agus dfuagair sé is mise rí na h-éan. Ní raibh an t-iolar indon a dhul ní bfuide. O sin bíonn gasúir ag imteact leis an dreóilín Lá Féile Stiopáin.
Tomás Breathnac, Calladhmhuighinse, Cárna.
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 08:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Baile Dóighte
I bparáiste an Chumair, Barúntacht an Cláir ata mé féin ag cur fúm. Oir dtighthe atá sa mbaile acht fadó bhí chomh maith le 20 teach ann. Díon slanne atá ar a bhfurmór anois mar tá na daoine annso ag cirghe árdnósach go leor agus ní bheidís a dtaobh le cuighe.
Oisín an slionne is coitcheannta. Ainm Mar a dúbhras cheana bhí anall le fice teach san bhaile so fadó agus ár ndoigh ní raibh ag chaon teach acú siúd ach cúpla garrdha. Tháinic an bhlian nár fhéad siad aon cíos a íoc leis an Tighearna Talmhan (Mac Dónhnaill). Tháinic báillí agus Idórlíní le barraí iarainn.Tugad an bóthar do bhocht ahs nocht agus ceine do dhá bhothán déag ó mo theacht sa go ceann an bhóithrín siar amach. An íognadh ar bith gur thúg siad so a bhí ag dul thar brághaid "baile doígthe" ar na haitneacha a fágad'.
Baile an bhile a bhí ar an áit roime so ach chinn orm Fhághail ó dhuine ar bith cá raibh an bile sonnradach so ag fás. Tá na seandaoine ar shlighe na Fírinn anois ce's moite ó Aodh Ó Bruadair, ach tá daoine ann seachas iad go bhfuil an tuathbhás go deo..
senior member (history)
2019-03-05 08:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Stradbally Parish is under the patronage of the Holy Cross and on the Pattern Day 14th Sept. the fair was held. It was called "Aonac na Croise Naomhtha".
The fair was held in a field near the cove called "The Fair Inch" & was a day of merry making for the country folk. Nearly 40 tents were erected & the day ended up with music & song & dance.
The religious part of the festival consisted of High Mass in the Parish Church - a special sermon was preached & most of the congregation went to Holy Communion.
The fair was boycotted because a Mr Dormor who was not liked by the people -
senior member (history)
2019-03-04 10:06
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awaiting decision
There was once a very wise man called Gobán Saor. He was a very good tradesman and built many fine buildings. He had a son and he was no clever. He sent him one day to the market and told him to bring the skin and the price of it all the people of the market laughed at him and called him a fool when they heard him asking the skin and price of it. At last a young girl came up and said she would give him the skin and the price of it. When he
senior member (history)
2019-03-04 09:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Folklore Contd
The name of our animals is cows sheep pigs horses. The cattle is brought in every night and mud and straw put under them for bedding. The sheep are fed in the field with cabbage and turnip and hay when the people are driving the cattle they say [?] and Hurth. When they are calling the sheep they say chuff when they are calling the pigs they say furrahin.
Writer: Bridie Power
Teller: Pat Power
Same place
senior member (history)
2019-03-04 09:29
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awaiting decision
A great many people wear home-made clothes. The people themselves knit home-made stockings and shirts. Before the women make the stocking the thread is spun. First the wool is prepared for spinning. It is oiled and teased out and then it is carded with a pair cards and it is made into rolls. After that it is spun with a spinning wheel. There is a band going round the spinning wheel and it is joined to the spinnle and she starts spinning. When she has a few pairs of stockings knitted she colours them. When she has the stockings made she makes more thread. All the spinning wheel is made
senior member (history)
2019-03-04 09:28
approved
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awaiting decision
she goes?
A candle.
It falls but it does not break and it breaks but it does not fall.
Night falling and day breaking.
It is inside and outside and it is neither in or out?
A Window.
As I went up the boitrin I met my Auntie Noreen I cut her head off drank her blood and left her body there?
A bottle of whiskey.
Father long legs big stomached mother, three children like one another?
A pot.
Chuaidh mé suas an bóithrín, tháinig mé anuas an bóithrín agus thug mé an bóithrín ar mo druim liom!
Dreamaire.
senior member (history)
2019-03-04 09:26
approved
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awaiting decision
Place-Names
1. Black wire island
2. The old mill
3. Nogra
4. Trellick
5. New line
6. North ampton
7. Cappamore
8. Kinturla
9. Leeha
10. Crushoa
11. Kinvara
12. Dungora
13, Parkmore
14. Traught
15. Towna
16. Prospect
17. Mountscribe
18. Corranmore
19. Rue Desmence
20. Irish Rue
21. Rue
22. Greenroad
23. Carnamadra
24. Funshine
25. Cregg
26. Moy
senior member (history)
2019-03-04 09:24
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rejected
awaiting decision
When a crow lies on a persons shoulder it is the sign of a death in the house. If crying is heard around a house at night it is the sign of a death in the village. If a funeral is scattered it is the sign of another death in the village. When a frog comes in the door it is a sign of death in the house. When the priest is anointing a person if the wool and cotton goes up in a blaze it is a sure sign that the person is going to love. When a number of rats are seen in the house one of the family is going to ( illegible ). When the farmer leaves a ridge of potatoes the length of a coffin it is the sign of a death in the family. When mags are seen flying together a death will occur in the village. When a crowd of crows are seen flying on a church is the sign of a funeral. When a wisp is caught on to hens tail it is a sign of a death in the family. If there a person such in the house and if the dog crys at night that person is going to die soon.
Gathered by Éamonn ó Ceallaig from my grandmother aged 72 Mary Birmingham, Kalgamff, Charlestown, Co Mary.
senior member (history)
2019-02-28 08:46
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rejected
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great sympathy was accorded to the poor teacher. The remaining parents of the children were distracted. The cause of the fire was unknown. It was surmised that a leaking oil lamp had saturated the timer of the partition wall in which it hung. Beneath this was a cushioned chair seat, and a spark from the fire in all probability set this going.
II
A man named James McGuiness of Boston returned home from America. He was a fun active man. He built a nice little house, and was just settling down when one day he went down the school boreen got weak and died. The verdict was heart failure.
III On the same boreen stands a little small cabin. Its owner Mrs. Cullen died suddenly about ten years ago. During Xmas week 1936 her son Jack Cullen was found dead in his bed. Heart failure was the verdict in both cases.
senior member (history)
2019-02-28 08:46
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rejected
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with a [?] stock of eatables, as she always left on Friday to go home. On Sunday she made her way to a near by house, hungry + pervoked just as her husband arrived. He got somehow to Naas from Dublin, + walked the greater part of the way 12 miles, in deep drifts to Boston.
[-]
About 20 or 25 yrs ago, a teacher named Lawlor afterwards Mrs. Conaidire + dead since mid-Summer 1936, taught in the nearest school to this, that is Barnaran N.S. She kept and reared three orphaned children, with her. She was their Aunt. They were cousins, not brothers + sisters. They lived in the little residence attached to the school. She could not afford to keep a housekeeper so one evening had to go to Rathaugare for groceres. She left them asleep + went off. During her absence, the place went on fire and the children were smothered in their sleep. The whole building was damaged. The event excited the deepest interest, +
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 09:01
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awaiting decision
In olden times some houses were built of earthen sods. They were called mud houses. These houses had no chimney. They were very rare. Others were built of stone and mortar. The mortar was a mixture of white sand and lime. The thatch used in these houses was rushes or wheaten straw, in some places called reeds. They grew in bogs.
The old houses were small, with the result a bed was placed in the kitchen. This was called a settlebed. It was placed by the sidewall.
Half-doors were very common about this time.
Turf and timber were used for fuel. Rushes dipped in tallow were used for light at night: and candles made of tallow also. These were called "Pádóig." The wick used was a piece of waste cloth, placed in the centre of the tallow. Bog deal was also used. The candles were made locally.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 09:01
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Long ago they made bread named Boxty and this is how it was made. They grated potatoes with graters they made themselves, with a piece of [?] which they bored with nails. They mixed flour with the potatoes and they baked it on a griddle or on a lid of a pot on the hearth with red [?] all around.
I often heard that they made soap this way they mixed ashes of wood and lard together and then boiled them well together.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 09:00
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a man going around at night time carrying a light through the lakes and marshes. He was called Willie the wisp. I had one uncle called Thomas Killeen. When he was a little boy, it was near xmas and his mother was talking about going to the shop to buy the xmas things and he went before her to the shop and the night came so bad that his mother did not go to get late in the night he began to get uneasy and the people of the shop said they would leave him at home.
He said he was not afraid so
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:59
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There is a fort at the end of our village. One night as a man called Tom, and his wife were passing this fort on their way home from town they heard strange music, and as they looked in towards the fort they saw fairies playing inside in it. They got very much afraid, and hurried home as fast as they could. They were only just inside and had the bolt on the door when they heard strange sounds outside. They shook holy water all round the house, and sometime afterwards the sounds ceased. After that people of the neighbourhood were afraid to pass by that after midnight.
Old Prayers
O True Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world by thy mercy which is infinite preserve me form sin and evil. I carry about me the Holy Agnes Dei in thy name as a preservative
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:57
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One Hallow Eve night, a man was coming home from a neighboring house. This man was coming back from a raffle. He had just won a goat and he was bringing it home. On his way home; he had to pass through the fort. The fairies said they would exchange the goat for bagpipes. The man took the bagpipes and, when he was near home, he began playing the bagpipes. To his surprise, nine of the fairies walked out of the pipes and followed him home. He threw out the bagpipes and told them to give him back the goat. They gave him back the goat; and told him to never be out gambling again.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:57
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rejected
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Incidents of the Famine
There was a man living in the Quay during the time of the Famine, and he had a large family. One night two of his children died, and the mother and the father carried them in a sack to the Famine Pit in the Abby and threw them into the pit. When they returned home, they ound that three more of the children had died.
During the time of the Famine there lived in a Bantry a boy named Tom Yearns. One night he fainted with hunger in a street, and next morning the car, which was collecting the dead bodies, was going around, and he was thrown into the car, and he was thrown into the Famine Pit. His legs were broken by the fall but after a while he regained consciousness, and he got out of the pit and crawled home, and during his life afterwards his legs were crooked.
Written by - John Murphy
Got from - Mr. John Holland
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:56
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Long, long ago there lived in a remote district in the west of Ireland an old man and his wife, having no cow. One day both of them set out for the fair next day.
The old woman having a large oaten cake under her shawl to eat on their way.
Having walked all night and day they were nearing the town by morning. They sat down on the road-side to rest themselves.
The old lady drew out her oaten
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:54
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rejected
awaiting decision
The mad dog point is situated in the townland of Kimacatan. There is a narrow piece of land stretching out in Lough Sillan known as the mad dog point.
It is a very (beautiful) beautiful place and it is noted to be a great fishing place. Some time ago the landlord Mr. Singleton ordered fish to be put in the lake and got houses erected for the accommodation of the fisher-men who came there from different parts of Ireland.
It is said that one time a man had a dog that went mad. He was followed through the country by men on horse-back with guns and pitch-forks until they hunted him to this point where he was killed. Everafterwards it got the name of the mad dog point.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:53
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awaiting decision
A relative of mine rented a sea side cottage at Port na blagh for the Summer. But the holiday was quite a failure because the place was haunted. Doors creaked and slammed in an alarming way.
Some years passed and a number of our boys were walking by the house in the twilight. They had some friends with them. The friends were not aware of the reputation of the house.
But one of the friends remarked "I had a very queer creepy feeling passing that house"
All the young fellows had in fact the same feeling.
This cottage is in fact a most forbidding place. Nobody know why
During the troubled times some I.R.A. men "on the run" were obliged to leave a Donegal house in the middle of the night. They were not raided but the pace was haunted.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:45
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a woman who had a young child. Every day the woman used to go out working. One day she went out and she left her other son minding the house and a little man came to the door and he said to the little boy would he give him a bit of food. He said had nothing to eat. "ah put down a hen. You have plenty there" he said. "My mother would kill me if I did" said the boy. "Ah put it down any way.(So) she wont." So he did, and when it was cooked he gave it to the little man to eat. He went up to the little child in the cradle and said "You'l be me and I'll be you." So he took out a little wand and tipped him with it and sent him to the fort. And when the woman came back she asked the other little son what was wrong with the child "I do not know why he is crying all the day. I cannot stop him." She asked the tailor who was lodging in the house did he know. The tailor said the woman "I peeped out the key hole of the door and saw a little man and he changed places with the child and sent the child to the fort. And I have a magic purse here and put that fairy into this purse and bring him to the blacksmith. And tell him give the purse a slap of (of) (of) the sledge hammer and flatten him out.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:39
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awaiting decision
About a hundred years ago, a man went on his ceilidhe to his sister's house. This man had to pass old wall-stales.
On his way pass them, he thought he saw something. At that moment all the wall-stales fell to the ground.
When he reached his sister house, he told of the sad happening. His sister told him that a person convenient to them was about to die.
Next night the man went to the old stales to see if he would see anything. But, to his utter amazement the house had been as big as ever it was.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:38
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awaiting decision
What belongs to you but everyone else uses it. (your name)
When is your pocket empty yet there is something in it. (a hole)
Why is an empty match-box superior to any other box. (because it is match-less)
What had teeth but never eats with them. (a comb)
My first is in toffee, and after in tart.
My second in parcel and also in part.
My third and fourth are in sure you'd agree.
My third and fourth are in reason you see.
When you find my seventh in rose you can guess.
That my eight in in somethingI was to possess.
(a treasure)
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:37
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Years ago, there came a great "Famine" to Ireland. The people as you know were in great distress at having nothing to eat.
One day a woman and man came into a house in Meenamallagh known as "paddy M'Cays" They had just the cabbage and turnips cut in tubs on the floor, for the cows. The man and woman sat round the tubs and ate them every bit, and left content and filled. The people were awful hungry.
Meenamallagh lies west on the way to Barndonagh.
senior member (history)
2019-02-27 08:35
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357
farmer whose cows were milked could not make any butter during that year,because the person who milked his cows, took the butter fat from the milk by the power of the devil.
Sometimes when coming to milk the cows people turned themselves into rabbits or hares so as to disguise thmselves. There is an old story told about a man who went out on a May morning and saw a rabbit near his cows. His dog followed the rabbit.and bit its leg. The man saw the rabbit run into a neighbouring house and later that day he heard of a woman there being seriously wounded but nobody knew what had happened her. The man himself thought she was the rabbit he saw near his cows, and that the wound was the bite she got from the dog.
I received this information from my father John Falvey ,
Ballycooney
senior member (history)
2019-02-26 08:56
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that he had seen his first wife and that she was not dead.
When the night came his second wife locked the door and would not let him out. The fairies found out that she was talking to her husband and when the night came she came through the gap and there was no one there.
The horse dashed on till he came to her own house. Her head was dashed against her own porch and her brains were knocked out, and that was the end of her. It was fairies that had done it.
senior member (history)
2019-02-26 08:55
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Once upon a time there was a man living in the townland of Cavanmore in the district of Ballyroan. He was a married man.
One morning he found his wife dead in the bed but she was not dead, it was the fairies or the "wee folk" had taken her and left a dead body in the bed like his wife.
After a few years he married again. One time his first wife came back to him and had a talk with him.
She told him that he could take her from the fairies, and if he would she would not trouble him any longer, but she would go and earn her own living.
This is the way that she told him to free her from the fairies.
He was to take the pothooks with and throw them round her neck and that the iron would save her.
Another thing she told him, that the fairies would try to scare him with lights.
Then he told his second wife
senior member (history)
2019-02-26 08:54
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Long ago, about three hundred years ago, there was a good deal of money hid on a hill in Killaslavin. The hill belonged to a man called Devlin.
There was a big day's sporting there on a certain day every year. There were a lot of rich people at it.
One day an invasion came on, and all the rich people were going to be raided. So they dug a deep hole and put their money in it and closed it in.
They did not look for their money for a few years. The man that owned the field did not know about the treasure and ploughed the field.
So, when the people came back to look for their money they could not find it. All that money is supposed to be lying buried some where in that field to this very day.
senior member (history)
2019-02-26 08:51
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awaiting decision
There are few today living who remember the great famine of 47 which really began in 45. That terrible famine was the most stunning blow that ever Ireland got. It is said that about one million people died of direct starvation or of disease brought on by the famine. There was scarcely any food. I know one field in the townland where I live that used grow the weed, bluscan, which was dug over and over again and again by people seeking that weed to keep them alive, my father told me. He also told me of a man named Ned Conolly who died on the streets with his head resting on a stone and froth from his mouth and of many others whose coffins were a mat of straw, of others dying the work-house and of others, certified by doctors to be dead and ordered to be buried immediately, who were not dead at-al. Then to ad more to the torture of the Irish people the British Government brought in a new coercion Bill under which, anybody found outside his own house from sunset to sunrise next morning would be guilty of treason, the penalty not to exceed fourteen years transportation
senior member (history)
2019-02-26 08:31
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Bhí fear i mBaile na Páirce uair amháin agus bhí gunna aige. Ní raibh ag an bhfear seo acht páirc bheag amháin. Gach lá théigeadh sé amach sa páirc agus nuair a bhíodh sé i lár na páirce léimeadh girrfiadh suas. An lá seo thógh sé amach amach an gunna agus chaith sé dhá úrchar leis an girrfiadh. Rinne sé é seo ar feadh seachtmhaine agus míor marbhuig sé an girrfiadh. D'innis sé an sgéal seo raon, do fhear eile. An lá ar an bháireach chuaidh an bheirt acha go dtí an pháirc. Thóg an fear éile an gunna agus chuir sé leath ..óin faoí an mbairille agus léig sé urchar leis an girrfiadh acht ní raibh sé in ann é a thógáil abhaile. An lá ar na baireac cuaid sé ann arís acht ní raibh cnámh ná píosa feóla fághtha ann.
D'innis Stíophán Ó Murcadha as Dealgan,
an sgeal seo dom,
Domhnaill Ó Ceallaigh,
Dealgán
Beal, Tomhaiseanna
[Ce]itre cósa ag siubhal, dhá ceann, dhá cóis anuas agus dá [c]orp. Ceard é sin. Freagra. Sin fear ag marcuigheacht ar capall. [N]uair a bíonn tú ag dúl i do leabhaidh ceard é an rud deireannac a dhéanann tú. Do cósa a tógháil on urlár. Faoi an uisce os cionn an cionn an uisce agus ní buaileann sé an t-uisge [?] scaile na gealaige ar an uisge. Bolg reamhar, trí cósa agus háta. Pota.
senior member (history)
2019-02-26 08:26
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rejected
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Once upon a time in the townland of Knockranne my father used to live there.
There was a man named James Toole who used to have sheeps grazing on my father's land.
One night he came to look at the sheep.
My father's mother had planned it up to go out to frighten him when he was coming back.
She put a white sheet around her and went out to frighten him. As she got up on the ditch she saw a vision a banshee combing her hair. It frightened her so much that she got down quickly and came home. When she came in she looked ghostly. As she was coming into the house the cock crowed and the hens began to cackle.
She is now dead about thirty years. This happened about forty years ago
This story was told to me by my father last night.
senior member (history)
2019-02-26 08:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sgéal ghreannmhar
Ins an t-sean am bhí easgaire bocht in á chómnuidhe í gConndae Dúin na nGall. Fearr ana-bhocht do bhí aann. Dhí mach amháin aige.
Dedhee amháin núair do bhí an t-iasgaire agus á bhean is á mhac in á suidhe cois na teineadh thánaigh bean- súimbhail isteach. D'iarr sí lóisdín na h-oidhche ortha. Fúair sí an lóisdín uatha. Ar mhaidin la'r na mhárach núair do bhí an bhean ag imtheacht labhair sí le fear an tighe agus sí "A shéamus, an Didhche samhna seo chughainn fáigh seamróg na gceithre nduille agus cuir fá do chéann é núair á bheidh tú ag dul á chodhadh. Beidh taidhbhreamh agat agus beidh an taidhbhreamh sin í dtaobh an óir atá í bhfholach timcheall na h- áite so." Bhí muintear an tighe ana- bhuidheach dí.
An tráthnóna roimh Didhche Shamhna bhí Séamus amuigh ar log na seamróige. Fúair sé í ar bharr charraige mhóire Thug sé abhaile í agus an oidhche sin bhí taibhreamh aige. Bhí an taidhbhreamh í dtaobh seacht bpotaí óir curtha fá crann in á pháirch féin. Nuair thánaigh Didhche Nodhlag d'imtigh Séamus agus á mhach ar lor an óir. Nuair shroiseadar an chrann eógadar amach leach. Líonadar mála leis an ór. Ar chasadh na lá
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 09:01
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awaiting decision
the grave with the letters U. N. carved on it which means Uaigh na Naoín. Nowadays unbaptised children are nearly always brought to the graveyard, but there is not special place for burying them.
The graves around here are kept very untidily. They are covered over with grass and weeds and are a disgrace to the people. Lately Father Gilden and Canon Higgins have ordered the people to clean the graves and this is done by nearly most of the people around her. There was a procession to the graveyards of Midfield and Swinford last year and there will be another procession next Sunday. At the graveyard the Rosary and the litany of the B.V.M are recited for the dead.
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 09:00
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There are three graveyards in the district one in Midfield, Swinford and Meelick. Midfield graveyard is on the side of a hill about a quarter of a mile from Midfield church. This grave-yard is only there about ten years. Before that the people in this district used to bury the dead in Killconduff which is about a half a mile from Swinford. It is on the side of a hill and there are crosses and tomb-stones in it.
Long ago unbaptised chil-dren were never brought to the [?] except on very rare occasions. They used to be usually buried at the bottom of a field where there was no traffic. They used to put a stone on top of
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:59
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awaiting decision
and a plate of tobacco left over the corpse. Everybody who came in lit his pipe for it was said it was right do so in honor of the dead person.
When it was time for the funeri to leave all the old women of the vill and the relatives would gather around the coffin and cry out loudly. They would be heard a half of mile from that place. When this was done the men would put the women back and put the lid on the coffin. Then four men of the same sirname would put the coffin on their shoulders and carry it out. It was left on four chairs outside the door.
After the funeral was gone [?] were knocked and remained down till they came home from the funeral. If this was not done it was said that another person or persons of that house would die before a year. The old women always cried going through a town, to let the
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:57
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A lady that got three lives in this world. "Thug sí trí saoghail ar an saoghal seo." She always said it was harvest till Xmas each year + I found she was correct. (as the day lengthens, the cold strengthens)-- as the English man said.)
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:57
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Potatoes are set every year in this district. We set about an acre and a half every year.
The land is top-dressed with manure. There are two horses joined in ploughing. The team of horses plough the field with an iron plough. When there are five sods turned there is a furrow made. Then another ridge is made until the field is made into ridges with a furrow between each ridge There are holes made with a "Súbín." Three holes are made across every ridge. Then the children come along with cans and buckets of splits. They put a split in every hole. This is called "Dibbling." The woman cut the splits. There are a few eyes left in every split. The split is useless if there
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:56
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awaiting decision
It is supposed to be lucky for a child especially a boy to wear a red tie or bow--(supposed to keep off the evil eye.)
I often saw an only son wearing red garters
No one should ever say, "That is a fine child" etc. without saying, God bless him or "Dail ó Dia sin" or Dia Dhá.
If a child falls he should be given a pinch of salt on the tongue and the remainder is thrown in the fire--saying-- Gorm is coisgrigheadh thú.
The tongs was left across the cradle while the child was asleep--lest the fairies would bring it.
The cap should not be washed off a baby's head.
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:54
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1) His first resting place was Glengarriff, here he spent the Xmas holidays. First day's march Ballyvourney. (Cork)
2) Second day he reached the O'Keefe country nt. Cork.
3) He reached Ardpatrick, Limerick (fight [?])
4) He reached Sulchoid (lordes of Limerick and Tipperary)
5 + 6 he remained at Baile na Coille - in Tipperary
7) he remained at Latteragh (Tipperary) South of Kenagh.
8) At Loughkeen.
9) Arrived at a wood called Coill Fhinne.
10) They crossed the shannon at Athenry baille ruaidhne and landed on the side of Sil-Aninchadha N.B. Athenry-coille. (ford of Redwood) opposite the MacEgon Castle in the Parish of Lorcha.
11) They arrived at Aughrim. The inhabitants cheered and shouted them. Among the gentlemen who welcomed them were Thomas son of Ulick (Earl of Clonard.) Mac Coghlan O'Maddens and O'Kelly. They were ihusued by the English and forced to fight; so the little band about (300) in all O Sullivan with rage, heroism and fury rushed to the battle field against the English, beheaded the leader of the
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:51
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awaiting decision
no glass. The people put a bundle of hay or heath in the window instead. This was also done in the bog houses. The old floors were always made from big flags which were procured in the district. In former times, turf and bog dale? sticks were used for the fire.
Bog deal splinters were used for giving lights during the night. The people also had rush lights. First, the rushes were pulled and left on the hob to dry. They were then peeled except one little bit on the end. This was then dipped in butter (of) or fat, and afterwards it was lighted. Somebody then held it in his hand while the people were reading.
Half doors were very common in the district in former times. In olden times all the people in the district used to have their cattle tied at the far end of the kitchen.
Máire Nic Aodhagáin
12th February 1935
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:50
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There lived an old man some hundred years ago in the old castle that part of it still stands in Castlemagee. A man named Bourke lived in it and herring fishing was very good at the time and boats very plentiful. A woman from Coolcarney was in Ballina and she saw a lot of herrings selling in Ballina Market. When she returned home, she told her son of all the herring she saw in Ballina and she said she knew of a place that if he was there, he would be brought fishing. He, being only sixteen years old, he wore no shoes. She told him it was Rathfran in the parish of Killala and he came direct to the place when all
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:49
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but leave your two hands on two shoulders and I will leave you back at Westport" said the little man. "Oh wait until I go in and tell my wife," said Jack "you cannot" said the man we must to straight away now." So jack left his hands on the man shoulders who left him back at Westport. The little man left a block of wood in the field instead of Jack. When Jack was not returning his wife went to look for him and when she found the block she thought it was Jack that was dead. So she called the neighbours and they buried him. Jack waited in Westport for a few days at his brother in law. At the same time there was a priest in Kiltimagh named Father Leonard who had a servant boy. He told Jacks wife it was best for her to marry his boy
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:48
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into my purse until I have a drink. The devil made a soverign of himself and humped into Willie's purse. Willie went home again with the devil in the purse until next morning.He left the purse on the anvil, and he got the two best sledgers in the village.They sledged with the two sledgers while they wee able. The devil told Willie that if he would let him go that he would not troubled him ever again. Willie died. Willie went tot the gates of Hell and was wrapped at them. The devil asked him who was there and Willie said "you old friend Willie." O said the devil let us bar the door or he will kill all of us. They handed him a wisp and lit it and say "Go with this we will not let you in here" He is going around the world ever since with the wisp in the his hand, and this is the light we often
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:47
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All alone all alone by the wave washing strand.
All alone in the crowded hall.
The hall it is gay and the waves are grand.
But my heart isnt here at all and
It flies far away by night and by day to the times and the days that are gone
But I never will forget the maiden that I met in the valley below Sliab na mban.
It was not the grace of her Queenly air nor the cheek nor the Roses glow
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:46
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There is a cromlech situated about four hundreds yeards from Dromandoora N.S.
It is about ten feet in length and four feet in breadth.
There are four stones standing on the ground one at each side and one at each end and there is a large stone resting on the top of them and it is about fifty tons in weight.
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:45
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Biddy Early was a witch who lived near Feakle. It was believed that she was with the Faires.
She cured all kinds of diseases. She had a magic bottle and she'd look through it and she's see the person who wished to be cured inside in it. If the person was standing inside in it he would be cured + if he was lying down he would not be cured.
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:45
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I heard a good deal of old stories which my grandfather told me.
He said a white woman very often appeared in Lough Feagh lake + she was always crying and one nigh and lad's coming home from cuaird she was still crying + one boy cursed her.
So every night afterwards the white woman came screaming to his bed side and the boy hung himself .
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:44
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Long ago people young and old were buried in Kyles and now adays children who died soon after baptism are buried in them.
There is a grave yard in Kilmacduagh in the Co. galway with beautiful vaults in it and there is a big tower in it and coffins are put into the those vaults. It is said that it was a Saint build that tower. A Saint said that there should be a funeral there every Monday morning and another Saint said if
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:43
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people stick quick Bame to preserve their crops from witchery
On St. Martins day no cars travel no mills work-people kill cocks and spill blood. On St. Colmans day people do not work in galway.
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:42
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There are special days during the year to which there is luck or misfortune attached according to people. Among those days the most common are the 1st Monday in January 1st May Whit Monday St. Martins day and St. Colmans day.
On the first 1st Monday in January people dont dig ground of work in the garden
On the 1st May farmers do not do any work with a horse + car. Fencing is the work that is left out specially for that day. On Hallow Een
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:41
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The great famine started started in the year 1846 and continued during the year 1847.
The cause of the famine was the falour of the potato crop which the old Irish people lived on.
About one million people have left Ireland, and gone to Foreign lands in search of food such as England, america, and astralia, while another million have died of hunger + starvation.
The hunger was so great in Ireland that the people used to eat grass which was only fit for animals. They also used
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:39
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In Ireland long ago there was a great famine and a lot of people died with the want of food.
The people used to steal the potatoes and other vegetables from the farm of there neighbours, not alone used they steal the crops but they used also kill their own children to get food to eat
In those year people were dying in thousands, and more of them was emigrated to America and other countries.
senior member (history)
2019-02-25 08:34
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There was once a man named Paddy Travers or Paddy Eoin who lived in the townland of Greagh-Barr.
He was a hard working man. He had four sons and two daughters.
Once day Paddy went out to make ready some new land to put potatoes in. Horses manure were thrown at him and no one to be seen. There were no horse[s] nearer than Laghey three miles away. He worked until dinner time. The manure kept coming all the time. He then went into the house for his dinner.
When he came out again the ruts were filled in again. He left the field and no one ever dug a sod in that field since.
That night when he was milking horse manure was jumping into the pail. The next night the milk was alright.
senior member (history)
2019-02-22 08:55
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awaiting decision
to persuade him to accompany his mother home but all to no purpose, he would not pass the haunted tree. He remained in the wake-house till morning.
No one since then, and that is fifty five years ago, has seen this lady in white, although many have stayed up till (morning) after midnight and watched at this tree. Tom, now a man of about seventy claims to this day to have seen the lady in every detail. He describes as more beautiful than even the poets have Maeve of the Golden Hair. He has not seen her since as he never passed the 'monument' late as night and would not for all the wealth in the world.
senior member (history)
2019-02-22 08:54
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veil covered her golden hair that hung down to her waist. Tom halted and pointed out the strange sight to his mother. The mother saw nothing and informed him to this effect. On hearing this Ton lost his senses. He yelled in terror and turning tail fled back as fast as his legs could carry him, back the whole journey to the wake-house. The mother unable to take up the pursuit stood as if rooted to the ground. Tom was just able to mutter 'Ghost' when he fell in against on the kitchen floor.
The men from the wake house set out at a run to overtake the mother and learn from her what had happened. When they reached the tree the light was suddenly switched off and they heard sounds like light foot-steps and the rustling of silk. Going to a neighboring house they procured holy-water which they sprinkled about the place.
Accompanied by Tom's mother they returned to the wake-house to hear a full description of what had appeared to Tom. They all endeavored
senior member (history)
2019-02-22 08:52
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About fourteen years ago Mrs Walsh of Foghill (Annie Loughney) and her two daughters Kathleen and Mary were going down to the sea gathering crusac. On their way they sat down to take a rest. Mary looked out at the sea and was surprised to see a coffin and a person beside swimming in the water. She told her mother and sister to look out and they did. They saw the coffin and the mermaid too. They were afraid and returned home. That day week following their grandmother Kate Hogan died, and everybody said that the coffin was a sign of her death.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 09:23
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And sent them to damnation. The catholic church we do beleive For its built on a true foundation.
III
Tá sean séipéal i mBothar buidhe. Deirtear gue léigh Naomh Pádhraigh Aifreann ann nuair a bhí sé ag dul go cruach Pádhraigh.
IV
Tháinigh sidheóga cúide laighin go Cnoch Mágha le sidheóga Cnuich Mágha a mharbhadh. Bhí féasta mór roimh angeath agus i lár an fhéasta léim sidheóga Cnuich Mhágha ar sidheógha cúige laighin agus mharbuighcadar iad.
Dinnis Máire Ní Cnámhtáin liom
Tomás Ó Cnámhtáin
Sgéal.
Fadó bhí fear in a chomhnuidhe ins an gcaisleán i Sruthar da'r b'ainm dó "h-Iobard na Gliogar". Bhí féasta mór ins an gcaisleán lá amháin. Tháinig bean bocht go dtí an doras ag iarraidh rudaí. Chuaidh bean "h-Iobard na Gliogar" amach. Chas sí an bhean bocht ón doras acht dfhan an bhean bocht thart ar an áit. Chuir sí fear amach leis an mbean bhocht a ruaigeadh ón a theacht [?]. Glaoidh sí cróin agus agus muca óga ar an mbean bocht agus aolan. An céad inghean a rugadh ag bean "h-Iobard" Bhí ceann muice uirri. Nuair a dfás sí suas bhearfadh a h-athair pota óir agus an méid a bhí aige d'aon fhear a posadh a
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 09:19
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Bhí sé á dtiomáint leis ansan, an ministir agus an bhean agus iad araon lom-nochtaithe, mar is amach as a leaba thángadar.
Dúirt an gréasaí go dtiomáinfeadh sé trígach aon baile mór in Éire iad.
Bhíodar ag imeacht leo agus an chéad duine a bhuail ortha ná fear a bhí ag scrois na mbóithre.
"Caith sluaradh den pluide sin thiar orm" arsa bean an ghréasaí leis "chun go mbeinn go léir nochtaithe".
Caith sé thiar sa caorthán uirti é. Cgeangail an t-sluarad dá caorthán. Cheangail a lámha de bhata na sluairte agus chimil an gréasaí an t-slaitín da thóin.
Bhí sé sin sa liúirig chun maith le duine cu.
Thiomáin sé leis iad go brách gur theangaigh siúnéir ortha a bhí ag dul ag obair go tigh sagairt.
"Buail buille den tuaigh as a sluarad so. Leig ós na diabhail seo mé" arsa fear a bhóthair leis.
Strac sé an tuaigh amach as a cuid úrlisí. Bhuail sé bata na slusluairte de iarracht den tuagh.
Cheangail an tuagh de bacha na sluairte. Cheangail a lámha de bhata na tuaighe agus chimil an gréasaí an t-slaitín dá thóin.
Bhí sé sa liúirigh chun maith leis a gcura eile chu. Thiomáin sé leis iad agus níor bhfada go raibh sagart a teacht na gcoinne.
"Ansan atá tú" arsa sé leis an siúinéir
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 09:12
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Sgéal.
Tá sean sgoil cois claidhe i "Gort na bPiseán" in aice le "Dreac Cluain". Sé ainm an mháigistir a a bhí ann "Ó Fathaigh" Bhí Ó Reachtabhra an file ag an sgoil uair ámháin nuair a bhí sé thart annseo.
II
Bhí sgoil anbhruith in nDealgan ag aimsear an "Gortadh Mhóir". Aon Caitliceach a d'iompóchadh a creidheamh gheobhfadh sé anbhruith. Bhí sagart i Sruthar agus ruaig sé na Protusdúnaigh as an áit. Rinneadh amhrán faoi'n sagart agus seo píosa de'n amhrán. Three cheers for Father John The jumpers will be soon all gone. Powder and shot will shoot them all
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2019-02-21 09:04
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Folklore 14-7-38
Holy Man
My grandfather was a very holy man. He was always seen with his beads in his hands saying the rosary, when he used be going to work and coming from it. About six months before his death it is said that the Blessed Virgin appeared to him. The evening before his death he was seen coming home from Belmont mills with his hat under his arm his rosary beads in his hands and he saying the rosary. He never used a prayer. About four o clock next morning he died suddenly.
Written by Edward Cassidy. Killygally,
Belmont, Offaly. I heard this from my mother Mrs Elizbeth Cassidy, Killygally,
Belmont Offaly.
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2019-02-21 08:48
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Grange is a large townland in the North-West of the County Wexford under the shadow of the Blackstairs mountains.
It derives it's name from the Irish word "Gráinseach" which means a granary.
The following information concerning this townland I have received from Mr Walter Furlong, Grange, Rathnure, who is a farmer and about 68 years of age and he got the information from his Father, who died about 40 years ago at the age of 80.
Grange was formerly the "grange" or "Granary" of the monks of (?) Co Kilkenny, whose ancient abbey was founded in (?) for the (?) monks by William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke.
"There are many interesting incidents connected with Grange. It is here the river (Boro?) rises from a very small spring which becomes a large river before it
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2019-02-21 08:48
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312
Corough-a townnland in Kilmaley, Liosbigín-a townland in Kilmaley having a lios.
Cluain Leithín --a townland in Kilmaley near a river -only three families live in this townland. Baile an Oileáin a townland in Kilmaley .There is an island in the lake on the townland.Leathisle or leath h- isle a valley near a wood.Leathfhaill -side of a hill
Leath a Chnuic -a townland
Móinfhéar a'tsléibhe =a reclaimed field
Garraidhe na gráighe or Garraidhe na gree -a townland in Kilmaley
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2019-02-20 08:49
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A burn is cured by black tea or the root of the Comfrey when the root is scraped and washed and boiled and made into a pulp and put a poultice of it on the burn. Or get a mankeeper or newt and lick him him and then lick the burn.
The rose or crysipelus is a very bad disease and many a person died from it. The cure for rose is fresh butter and the clippings of a horse's hoof. Many people know the cure for it but they keep it secret.
Warts are cured by rubbing the milk which is in chicken-weed to them or rub a black snail to them and then put a thread through his eyes and hang him on a sloe brush and as the snail is dying your warts are getting better.
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2019-02-20 08:47
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with the parish Priest. Mike pays the marriage fee before it takes place. The amount is estimated on the means of the man. The match is usually made at the girl's house or in a public house sometimes.
senior member (history)
2019-02-20 08:46
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"Domhnac Féach Suas" is the first Sunday of Shrove. Shrovetime usual brings about match-making. The man who wishes to get married sends "account of a match" to a certain girl. We will suppose the man is Mike Murphy and the girl is K. Driscoll. Then Mike chooses a good speaker and takes him with him the girl's house, along with a stick and a bottle of whiskey.
They generally choose a dark night for this business, so that nobody will know what they are doing untill the match is made. Then the "speaker" asks Kate's father would he be satisfied to give his daughter to Mike in marriage. After hearing of the matter the father makes inquiries about the stock and land and the "speaker" praises everything- how the boy is good steady hard-working fellow and
senior member (history)
2019-02-20 08:44
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sé agus bullán goidhte aige. "Cá tá an diabhal sin ag déanadh annsin agat?" a deir sé. Sean bhean bhocht í atá ag iarraidh loisdín agus ní innséotha sí sin tada ort arae ní feice sí tada annseo ach ár gcuid ce, cneasta féin. Marbhuig sé an bullán agus chuip sé lán poca de síos a bruith . Nuair a bhí sé níos thug sé tada dá máithair ná don bean bocht. Ach ghoid an máthair píosa uaidh agus rhug sí ruainne,rúinne dón bhean bhocht.
Nuair a bhí sé ina lá d'imigh leí go ifir teach an fhir araibh an culaith bpéidín air. Tháinic sí isteach san teach agus bhí bean an tíghe an fháilceainail roimpi. Dubhairt sí nach bfaca sí aon bhean bhocht le fada an lá cheana. Nuair a táinic an mac isteach dubhairt sé " céad míle fáilte roimat, teigi teirgh síos 'cuig a' teine agus téith tú féin tá d tú dállruigte. A mathair tabair neart le n-ithe agus le n-óldon créatúr " Nuair a bí sé ag imtheacht lár na...
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2019-02-20 08:36
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About one mile and a half from Riverstown in Co sligo there is a large building called Cooperhill House. When bromwell was dividing land into lots he gave one of the lots to a man named Cooper. When this man was building a house it took a tub of gold to build the foundation.
When he was at the fifth storey he had no money to, finish it, so he built the fifth storey half-way to show that he had no money to complete the building.
On the entrance to the house there is a bridge, the foundation of which was built of wool becuase the foundation otherwise was not found firm enough.
One day there was a man working at a stone that he was building with. He saw a man going from Cooperhill house with a basket of apples. He then asked the
senior member (history)
2019-02-20 08:36
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Long ago there were lakes and ponds in the country that are not in it now. One of those ponds was near the top of he hill at Clochán na gCaomhána
This pond was so deep that people thought it had no bottom . In it dwelt a monster . Some people said it was a large eel and others called it an ollpheist.
Benjamin Whittaker of Rathlee was the owner of the land at that time and he made up his mind to dig a deep drain and let it go. He walked round among his neighbours to gather a meitheal to do the work. On the appointed day not half of the men who promised to come to him
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2019-02-19 09:05
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quite a member of them. Then he would get his mill into working order he would have so many men carrying water then the mill would take fire. The miller would call out water, water, like the mill is on fire. Then the two men would come forward with the water and throw it on the men that the were making the corn bags of the people would get all drenched to the skin the owners of the house would put them out then the would go outside and stop the chimney on tie the doors.
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2019-02-19 09:04
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Amusement at Wakes
One of the old games some forty or fifty years ago was what they called (Ride the gully). The gully was a pocket knife or a short piece of a stick so they would sit all around the kitchen in a row on the floor there would be one person appointed for searching them so one in the now would have the (gully) but the searcher would not know who had it so he would start at one end of the row and search trying to find it they would pass it from one to another in the row under their laps all calling out (hide the gully, hide the gully, hide the gully well) and whatever person the gully would be found with the penalty was a number of strokes of soot from the chimney put on his cheek. The would carry on at that game until they would be as black as nigers.
Another game they played at wakes was the miller grinding the corn into meal. One of the strongest men at the wake would be appointed for carrying the corn bags. He would carry the men or boys that were at the wake on his back and place them in a row sitting on the floor until he would have
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 09:03
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Holly Wells
When you first go there to make the Turas you take off your shoes and stockings. Then you begin the first part of the prayer at the well I ken you go on to the next station and pray there you repeat this three times and every time you go round you throw a stone into the heap that has accumulated since the well was first discovered. Then when you you have the Turas made each person leaves on a little piece of the garment they wear. There is a story told about two girls that went to make the Turas. When they had the Turas made they had nothing to leave each one of them had a broach. They thought it was too much to leave the broaches so when the got home the broaches were gone. Every one that makes the Turas takes a quantity of the water in little bottles and takes it home with them and drinks it whenever they are sick for a cure.
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 09:00
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Holy Wells
There are not many holly wells in our district. There are a holy well over at Warden shore a beautiful round well about the breadth of a wee tub it is as round as a wheel and it is about a foot and a half deep. There are some inscriptions written on the bottom of the well about himself. It was St. Columcille that found it and blessed it and wrote the inscriptions on it. Some person found it later on and saw all. It is still there and it is full up of water.
Kitty McBride
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2019-02-19 08:58
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St. Bernard's Well
This well is situated about five miles from Juam on the Dublin Rd on the side of Knockro hill which is near Abbeyknockmoy.
There is a story told about this well. There was a blind man rambling round the hill and he got lost. He knelt down and begged that he would regain his sight. Having finished his prayer and ready to stand up he clutched the heather to aid him and the heather being weak in the roots came up from the ground. Just then water splashed the man in the face and his sight was restored at once and he asked the people to call it St. Bernard's Well.
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 08:57
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