Number of records in editorial history: 735 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 18:16
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weather.
Collector Mary McLoughlin
Drumroosk South,
Foxfield P.O.
Ck-on-Shannon
Obtained from parents and neighbours.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 18:14
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235
Weather Lore
20th December 1937
There are many beliefs about the weather in this locality, if it rains on St. Swithen's day a bad summer is expected. People say that a new moon on Saturday is enough in seven years, because it brings rain. The wind that brings the most rain is the South West Wind. The north wind brings dry hard weather. At the approach of storm the crows are flying low and they are tame. The donkeys and the horses stand with their back to the ditch and the cows go for shelter. If the sky is red where the sun rises a wet day is expected. When there is a rainbow in the morning there will be a showery week. when there are many stars in the sky there will be frosty weather. When you think that a hill is near you, you may expect rain. When the dust rises off the road the rain is coming. When a big number of swans come to a lake there will be rain. The frogs also turn a black colour. If there is a blue blaze in the fire it is a sign of rain. When the smoke goes up straight out of the chimney, it is expected good
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 19:28
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Ainm and duine a bfuaras an sgeal uaid agus rl. Please turn to essay on Local Prayers
6:4:'38
Local Graveyards.
There are only two graveyards in the Parish of Mohill. One of these is the Catholic graveyard and it is situated alongside Saint Anne's Convent grounds. Part of it is old and part of it is new and it is said that the old Parish church of Mohill stood at or near the former portion. It is of angular shape and there are two entrances - one leading to the old portion and the other leading to the new portion. In the old part there are some ancient tombstones, monuments and slabs while those in the new part are of modern or semi-modern designs and as may be understood it is in this part most of the burials take place.
senior member (history)
2019-05-20 19:22
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272
Ainm and duine a bfuaras an sgeal agus rl. Please turn to essay "Local Forges"
The care of the feet.
10:5:'38.
Long ago some people went to their graves without ever putting a boot or shoe on their feet. In the end of the last century there were two noted men in this district who never wore boots and those were Pat Braiden of Springfield and Dr Shanley of Clonee.
Bog water is the best water for washing feet and after the washing of the feet sprinkle the water on the roots of apple trees to protect the frost from harming the blossoms.
There is one shoemaker in the town and he is Mr Ellis and there are two cobblers Mr Angers and Mr Burgess.
The
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 15:38
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7. Live Jesus live and let it be my life to die for Thee. immaculate Heart of Mary pray for us, dear Saint Joseph be our guide protector in thy Hold Church.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 15:36
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Luke and John, God bless the bed that I lie on. If any danger comes over me, Oh, Blessed Virgin waken me, If any danger comes over me Oh Blessed Virgin strengthen me.
2. Oh most pure Heart of Jesus and Immaculate heart of Mary obtain for us purity and sanctity of soul and body. Agonizing Heart of Jesus have pity on the dying and Oh, Eternal Father we offer Thee the precious Body and blood of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ in acknowledgement of all Thou hast done and suffered for us on the cross and in full satisfaction for all our sins and the wants of Thy Holy Church.
3. Merciful Jesus have mercy on me, my soul and my body. I resign unto Thee in honour of Thy five bleeding wounds I have nailed to a tree. Oh most merciful Jesus have mercy on me.
4. Heart of Jesus I adore Thee, Heart of Mary I implore Thee. Heart of Joseph most true and just, and in these three Hearts I place my trust.
5. May the most sweet Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary be known praised and glorified, and honoured for ever and ever. Amen.
6. Into Thy hands oh Lord I commend my spirit, Lord Jesus receive my soul.
senior member (history)
2019-05-14 15:22
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264
Ainm and duine a bhfuaras an sceal uaidh agus a sheoladh -
Micael O Channaigh, Maothail.
3. A aois - 42 bl.
4. A gairm bheatha - cleireach
5. Car togadh e agus car chaith se a shaoghal - Maothail.
6. Ainm and duine or chala se an sceal - Padhraig O Cannaig.
7. Ce mheadh bliadhain o shoin - Fice bliadhain o shoin.
8 Aois and duine eile fen tragh sin - 79 bl.
9. An ait a raibh an duine eile in a chomhnuidhe - Maothail.
10. An data ar sgriobhadh and sgeal seo - 1: 4: '38.
Local Prayers.
The following are a collection of local prayers which I learned at home -
1. God Grand me a good night's rest.
God Grant me a good night's sleep,
as I lay down my head to sleep I give my soul to God to keep. There are four angels round my bed, Matthew, Mark,
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:57
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out on May morning and wash your face in the dew on the grass you are supposed to keep your youthful appearance during life. On May day the old people used to make a ring of a rowan-berry branch and put it on the churn dash in order to keep the "Good People" from taking the butter as they believed.
On November night the door is left unlocked, and the hearth is sweept clean, a good fire left on, a candle left in one window and a dish of buttered bread left on the table for the Holy Souls who were released from Purgatory on that day. The same things are done on Christmas Eve for Our Lady and the Infant Jesus.
Monday and Thursday are the two days for making cures. Any cures made on these days are supposed to be made before sunset.
Cait Ni Gallchobhair.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:51
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262
day and Whit week is considered the unluckiest week in the year. An old saying is "A cup of water would almost drown you during Whit week.
Tuesday is considered a very lucky day for beginning business. After sunset on Wednesday evening is considered lucky for setting a hen but the eggs must be brown in order to have laying hens for the coming season.
Long ago the people of this district believed that any examination done on Wednesday would be successful but this tradition has faded away.
Good Friday is considered very lucky for setting Potatoes, Onions and Garlic. Saturday is considered unlucky for starting work and changing from one house to another. An old saying is "Saturdays flitting makes a short sitting."
May day is an unlucky day to lend anything and the fire should be lighted before you see smoke any place else. If you go
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 18:46
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261
1. Ainm and duine a bfuaras an sgeal uaidh agus rl. Please turn to essay on local Forges.
21: 3: '38.
The Lore of Certain days.
In this district the days that are counted lucky and unlucky.
There are two days in the week counted lucky to change into a new house and these are Monday and Friday. Monday is also considered a very lucky day for getting married. All male children born before twelve o'clock on Monday if born with a veil or covering on their heads are considered very lucky. A woman if first into a house on Monday morning is considered to leave bad luck for the rest of the week.
Whit Monday is the "cross day" in this district and it is forbidden to go near water on that
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 18:40
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Thistle grated and fried with unsalted lard and put as a poultice to broken chilblains will cure them. Cut onion or garlic rubbed to unbroken chilblains will cure them. Raw fat bacon is a cure for beeldings and if put to a thorn will draw it out. It also cures stone-bruises.
The cures for warts are - If you meet a black snail without looking for it pick it up and rub it to the wart and then put it on the thorn of a black-thorn bush accordiing as the snail withers the wart disappears. Another cure is a fasting spit put on the wart for nine mornings. These are the cures for whooping cough - Put a bumble-bee in a hole in the wall and drive a wooden peg in after it.
Ferrets leavings are also a cure for the whooping cough. Nettle tea is a cure for measles.
Garlic set before twelve o'clock on Good Friday cures any disease.
Cait Ni Gallcobhair.
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 18:33
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1. Ainm and duine a bfuaras an sgeal uaidh agus rl. Please turn to essay on local Forges. 11:3:'38.
Local Cures
There is a well which was once on a high hill outside Mohill. One day the well moved three hundred yards to Fannings field out in Tullybraden. After a few days it moved back fifty yards and it is still to be in Tullybraden. The name of this well is Tober
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 18:31
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three or four years it will celebrate its Centenary.
Old Breaden lived in a little stone built house. His hand weaver loom was a very old fashioned type and he used to work it with his bare feet. His home used to be visited by many lovers of good stories. One of these was our late Parish Priest Canon Donohue. After his death his house was demolished.
Caith Ni Gallcobhair.
senior member (history)
2019-05-09 18:27
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1. Ainm an duine a bfuaras an sgeal uaidh agus rl.
Please turn to essay on Local Forges.
9:3:'38.
From early in the last Century until the early years of the present Century there lived in Spring field Mohill an old linen weaver named Pat Breaden. He was the last of his trade in this part of the country.
He was also a great Connoisseur and could relate St. Colmcille's Prophecies. In addition he could relate about the Irish Rising of 1798 and how the English Forces marched over Mullaghrace hill on towards Ballinamuck.
Old Breaden had a clear recollection of the Famine in Ireland in 1846-47 and could give a good account of the sad scenes that accured locally in connection with deaths and burials. He also remembered when the Work house was built in Mohill in 1861. It was then the old Town clock in the Mohill Church Tower was erected and in
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 18:28
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all they have to do now is cut out the horse shoes.
The Smiths are finding it very hard to make their living now as iron is double the price that it was last year and four times the price that it was before the war.
There is another forge in Redhill owned by Patrick Murray and everyday people came miles to that Forge to hear that smith tell stories. This man used to make loys, slanes and mend ploughs.
Smiths are always very healthy men as the air in theforge is very healthy. The Smiths have not as much work to do now as in olden times; as there are not as many horses to be shod on account of all the Buses and Motor Cars.
____________________________________
Caith Ni Gallcobhair.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 18:23
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255 in Eslin owned by Frank Gallagher and another in Funchinagh owned by John O'Rourke.
Michael Coxes forge is the oldest. It was owned by his great-grand-father. About a hundred years ago there was a weekly paper, and on Saturday night the old people assembled there for the weeks news.
Forges are supposed to be left open at night and in this district even to the present day this old custom is still kept.
In each of the forges there is one fire-place, a great big bellows, and around the walls there are benches and on them are nails, horse shoes and other implements. In the middle of the floor there is an ash block on which the horse lays his foot when being shod.
Long ago the smiths used to make two new horse-shoes out of four old ones but nowadays the Smiths buy long bars of iron ready for turning on the anvil and
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 18:19
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Ainm an duine a bhfuaras an sceal uaid agus a sheoladh - Cait Ni Gallcobair Maothail.
3. A aois - 45 bl.
4. A gairm bheatha - Siopadhoir.
5. Car togadh e and car chaith se a shaoghal. Aughavas.
6. Ainm and duine o'r cuala seisean an sceal - Sean Mac Gabhrain
7. Ce mheadh bliathain o shoin - Fice bliadhain o shoin.
8. Aois an duine eild fe'n trath sin - 79 bl.
9. An ait a raibh an duine eile in a chomhnuidhe - Aughavas.
10. An data ar sgriobhadh an sgeal seo - 3adh Marta 1938.
Local Forges
There are three forges in Mohill one owned by Michael Cox, one by Felix Canning and the other by John Gilmartain. There are four forges outside Mohill one in Towneely owned by Edward Devine, one in Gorvagh owned by Thomas Reynolds, one
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 18:10
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greater one now.
The fare to Dublin in olden times was ninepence single on the tug-boat but "Shankey" used to save the fare by putting his brogues in the boat and trotting with the horses to Dublin.
Another famous man in those days lived in Drumcolligan. His name was "John Lamb. He was able to mow with a scythe a meadow called the "rocks of Cavan" the area of which is seven Irish acres in seven days. A relation of his from the same place and the same name was able to sack as much hay and oats on an asses back in one day as four men.
In this town land several boys have won medals and other prizes on account of their wonderful feats, such as high jumping, weight throwing, good runners.
Una Ni Ragnall.
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 16:11
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Local Heroes.
15-2-'38
Up to recently there were no such modes of conveyance, as horse carts, cars or motor power vehicles, but people had to carry all their packs either on their own backs or on horseback, and sometimes to travel long journies on foot.
There was great credit given to a famous man in any trade, such as a good reaper or a good mower and a good sacker. In the town-land of Drumdoo there lived a man called Pat Moran better known as "shankey." He used to go for the harvest to Dublin and his daily work there was cutting oats with a hook. He was able to cut a hundred stook per day, which was counted a great feat at that time and still a
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 16:06
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his carriage sent for the owner and asked who allowed him to do such a thing. He gave him a week to turn back every sod of his hard labour. The Irish got the name of been dirty by the English that compelled to to live in dirty houses but soap and water cleans the Irish.
Una Ni Cheallaigh
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 16:04
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by your parent from childhood you believe in it and does not wish to give it up, then he said "Consult your wife and come back to me, for long after he thought he would be evicted but granny says the Rosary saved them. If he found out that you whitewashed or papered your room there would be perhaps four or five pounds added to your rent. If your windows got broken you put a bag in it, if a tree fell the bailif came to see if it was cut down, or did it fall from age. If the tree was a certain quality he took it away, if not you were to let it rot and not to use it. I know a house he went into he smelt meat, he got the lid taken off to see what kind it was, he thought it might be rabbit that was in it. When paying rent you had to stand in the yard with your hat off, if sleet or snow was falling it dident matter and you couldent smoke. One day he was driving to Carrick. A short distance from the town he saw a field dug for potatoes to help the family, he stopped
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 15:58
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butter, She was quite happy and kept her house very clean, but one day the tyrant came and ordered her out, put a coal in the tatch and burned it down to the ground, the cries of that old was terrible.
My grannie told me her father went one day to pay the rent, it was a Holiday, he went to Mass in this town, then went out to Lough Rynn, his Lordship and agent was there, he handed the rent to the agent then he took out his prayer book where he had the last years receipt and bog tickets to show to his agent, but as soon as he saw the prayerbook he walked over to my Grandfather and said "well Beirne this is a Holiday you have your Bible with you," then he said "Im going to do you a good turn. I will lease you the townland of Cloonboney from North to South to to you and your family for ever if you and your family come over to my Church. My G.Father thanked him for his offer, but said the religion you are taught
senior member (history)
2019-04-29 15:52
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1. Ainm an duine a bfuaras an sgeal uaidh.
Mo Sean-mathair.
2. A Sheoladh. Shraid na H-Ide, Maothail.
3. A aois ..83 bl.
4. A gairm-beatha. Siophadoir
5. Car togadh I and car chaith si a saoghal - Cloonboney.
6. Ainm and duine or chala si an sgeal.
7. An data ara scriobadh and sgeal san leabar seo. 1/2/38.
Lord Leitrim.
Lord Leitrim or as he was generally called "the oul Devil" was a bad cruel man. He took cruel delight in knocking down small cabins and burning them down to the ground. The comfortable farmer that had a good dwelling house and farm he evicted him and put Protestants generally from the Co. Cavan in his place. My grannie remembers to see one small cabin burned in Cloonboney. An old woman lived there alone earned her living by spinning. The neighbours brought her milk and
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 16:29
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who made his escape under a tree and the greyhound insisted on scraping him out, so the owner got curious and made an examination of the tree, and after taking out dried leaves and plant-matter he found a steel safe containing four thousand sovereigns, believed to be the smaller of two stolen from a bank a hundred years ago.
Una Ni Ragnall.
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 16:27
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hold utensils were made of gold. All those wares remain to the present day, but are buried beneath the earth, and it is only during excavation work by the County Council and other local bodies during the course of their work that the are unearthed at all, and some of them are in a perfect state of preservation.
In the town-land of Cavan there is a mound or a Cairn and it is believed that there are either treasures or urn's containing human remains buried there. Near the edge of this mound is a building of the finest type of its size and it is thought to be a sweat house. People who got too heavy or stout were put into this until they reduced to normal.
A man named Moran during turf cuting operations came on a wooden firkin containing about thirty lbs. of butter well preserved but he was careless about it and left it on the surface until the sun destroyed both butter and firkin.
A man exercising a greyhound a short time ago in a wood came on a rabit
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 16:21
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1. Ainm and duine a bhfuaras and sceal uaidh. Mathair.
2. A Sheoladh. Druimdubh
3. A aois. 50
4. A gairm-bheatha. Feirmeoir.
5. Car togadh e agus car chaith se a shaoghal. Druimdubh.
6. Ainm and duine or chuala seisean an sceal.
7. An data ar a sciobadh an sceal san leabar seo.
26adh mi Eanair 1938
Hidden Treasure
There are a few families in this locality closely connected with the golden age when all drinking vessels and house-
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 16:16
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The buttermilk is used chiefly for the making of home made bread, and the surplus is given to calves and pigs.
The "horse churn" is simular to the "plunge" only it is worked by a horse instead of a person. The horse is attached to a machine out-side the Dairy. There is a connection from this machine that goes through the wall and works the dash. The horse walks round in a circle, and every step he gives causes the dash to move up and down.
Una Ni Raghnall
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 16:13
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and four times in Summer. My mother always does the churning. It is customary for strangers who come in during churning to give a hand even for a moment. It is an old saying that if they don't, they are supposed to take the butter with them. The churning generally takes three quarters of an hour. When butter collects in large quantities the work is done. In Winter boiling water is poured in and in Summer lukewarm water. This is done to bring the cream to a certain temperature. The butter is gathered together by moving the dash slowely round the top of the milk. It is then lifted out with a wooden butter cup on to a wooden dish made for the purpose. It is then washed with spring water using two butter spades until every drop of buttermilk is left it. This done it is salted and washed again. Now it is ready for use. It was an old saying that if you sprinkle May flowers round the cow-house on the first of May that by a stranger not taking the churn on coming in, the butter would not be lost on you during the year.
senior member (history)
2019-04-11 16:07
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1. Ainm and duine a bfuaras an sceal uaidh.
Mathaur,
2. A Sheoladh Druimdubh
3 A Aois. 50 bl.
4. A gairm-bheatha. Feirmeoir
5. Car togadh e agus car chaigh se a shaoghal.Druimdubh.
6. Ainm and duine or chuala seisean an sceal.
7. An data as a scriobhadh an sceal san leabhar seo.
18adh mi Eanair 1938
Churning
We have three churns at home. The oldest of them is about three foot tall. It is one foot and a half at the top, and about two foot three inches at the bottom. The sides of it are perfectly round. From the narrow part of the churn to the top is called the "peck" and from the narrow part to the bottom is called the "lagan." It is called the "plunge" or Upright churn which means it stands straight and is worked by hand. The parts are the joggler, the dash, and lid. There is no mark on side or bottom.
Butter is made twice a week in Winter
senior member (history)
2019-04-10 18:34
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Mass every morning.
In this district there were no churches and priests had to say Mass in forts and in lone places and there still remains Celtic crosses and lone bushes to mark spots where sacrifice celbrated and the people of the present would not interfere with those marks no matter what obstruction they cause. In the event of a priest caught saying Mass he was treated with awful cruelty. First they crowned him with what was called the pitch-cap. It was made of a piece of canvas shaped like a cap and then it was filled with boiling pitch and put on the priest's head and when it was set those cruel soldiers pulled it off and brought skin and hair of the head of the poor priest.
There was a priest caught saying Mass in a field in the townland of Drumhany and he was hanged drawn and
senior member (history)
2019-04-10 16:00
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on the water. The cloth is then put in the water and left in it for ten minutes. The water is kept stirred while the cloth is in it. Then the cloth is taken out and put into a basin of cold water washed out and left dry.
Spades and gates and ploughs are made in a forge. The carpenter makes the handles out of ash. When a animal was killed such as a horse or a cow was killed the skin was taken off it. Then the skin was covered with lime and left for a bout a fortnight. This removed the hair off the skin. The skin was covered with the out side of the oak tree. Then three or four skins were put together with a heavy roller. This made them into leather.
Maire Mic an Mhaigister
senior member (history)
2019-04-10 15:31
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Christmas night.
The old people make baskets from green sally rods. The rods are first cut and left in bundles to get hard. Then they are put in cold water to make them flexible. They are then made into baskets creels or birdcages. Sometimes the rods are boiled and then peeled. They are then made into square that are used for shopping. Long ago the women used to spin wool into thread. They used to spin it with a spinning machine or a spinning wheel. Before the wool is spun into thread there is oil put on it then it is made into rolls with a set of cards then those rolls are spun into thread. This thread is taken to the weaver and made into blankets or tweed.
Soap was made long ago from caustic soda and dripping the dripping was melted the caustic soda was added to the melted dripping and stirred with a stick. It was then poured into a wooden box and left to set in a dark cool place for a month. This soap was very good for scrubbing.
People dye woollen clothes with packest of dye the water is boiled and the dye is put
senior member (history)
2019-04-08 16:30
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On entering, the pupils and teacher had to stoop. The children were seated on slabs of timber with a long bench in front of them on which they left their slates when writing. In this bench there were holes the size of the slates to keep them in place. They used to write on these slates with slate pencils. The pupils had copies made from skins which when dressed were called vellum. They wrote on the vellum with pens made from goose quills. The ink which they used was made from the berries which grow on the privot. The people knew no Irish. Sometimes Latin was taught.
Maire Ni hAodha
senior member (history)
2019-04-08 16:26
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district. One in Cloonturk another in Tooman and the other one in Lough Rynn. The one in Cloonturk was situated not very far from where the national school now stands. The masters name was Michael Cannon he was a stranger and no one knew where he came from. This hedge teacher got no pay from the Government but each pupil brought him some present for his instruction. The subjects which were taught were English and Arithmetic.
In Tooman the teachers name was McCann, he came from Sligo and he was regarded by the pupils as a very popular man. He taught in a ruined house and the rain used to come down through the roof. The subjects taught were the same as in the former school, no books being used.
The School was someplace in the wood in Lough Rynn. It was a small hut built of sods held in place by daub mixed with rushes. Its height was about eight feet. The door being very low
senior member (history)
2019-04-08 16:20
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and small pieces of this were put through the ring by the bride and given to the unmarried ladies and gentlemen at the banquet who slept on it the following night and were supposed to see their future husbands or wives as the case might have been but of course the people are more modern and up to-date now and it is not a "Bonnac" of oaten bread but a decorated wedding cake.
On the night of the marriage it is the custom for "Bandbeggars" or "Straw boys" to call to the house where the bridal party are where there is usually a party and to take the bride out to dance but their conduct is usually good unless they are badly recieved by the people of the house who are expected to treat them to refreshments and then they go quietly away wishing the newly married couple many years of happiness and prosperity.
Cait Ni Gallchobhair
senior member (history)
2019-04-08 16:15
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losses. Friday for crosses and Saturday no luck at all. The bride never looks at herself in the mirror after final dressing and she never puts on her marriage ring until her future husband puts it on at the altar.
When she is going on her honeymoon she does not wear her marriage gown she wears an other new outfit. It is customery to tie an old shoe to the car in which the bridal party are taken off on their honeymoon. Confetti or rice is thrown at bride and groom for luck.
About fifty years ago it was customery when the bride returned from church to the house where the reception was given for the oldest married lady among the guests to break a "Bonnac" of oaten bread over the bride's head
senior member (history)
2019-04-08 16:08
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name most common is Hackett. There are two families of the same name.
Next the houses, there are four houses slated in the townland the rest are all thatched. Our house was built by my grandfather, and we have a dresser in it that was made two hundred years ago, but we are loath to part with it. Most of the houses are in backward places. My grand-father often told me the reason of this. All the land was given to a man named Major Jones and the people had to leave their homes and live in these backward places.
I never heard where the townland got its name but the word Drumard means high ridge. As there are a lot of hills in it the name must originally come from this fact.
In my opinion houses were more numerous years ago than they are now. I saw the ruins of three or four old houses. Many people emigrated to America years ago but nearly all of them were glad to return to the old homesteads again.
The land is hilly, boggy
senior member (history)
2019-04-06 12:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
he or she says: "You are as mean as dirt."
If a person is wearing a new thing he or she says: "You are sticking out a mile."
If a person wants to say you are verry pale he says: "You are very washy looking."
James Mc Cusker,
Sixth Standard.
senior member (history)
2019-04-05 14:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If you break a mirror you will have seven years' bad luck. If you see a new moon through glass it is unlucky. If you find a horseshoe it is a sign of good luck. Black cats are lucky. If you fall and cut yourself in a graveyard it is a sign that something bad is going to happen. Thirteen is an unlucky number especially if it is on a Friday. If you let money fall it is a sign that it is lucky. If you put your shirt on inside out without knowing it you will have very good luck that day. It is unlucky to hit anyone with a bott [?} tree stick. If you go into a like to swim on Whit Sunday you will be drowned. If there are tea leaves on top of your tea you will get a letter. If there are two spoons on your saucer it is a sign you are soon getting married. If there are two forks on your plate there is going to be a fight.
Robert Logan
Seventh Standard.
senior member (history)
2019-04-05 14:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
90
lump of jelly. This day would freeze.
Michael Casey.
Fifth Standard.
senior member (history)
2019-04-05 14:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local sayings.
You would make a cat laugh. "Did you go home yet? No, did you? You are as wet as a drowned rat. As dry as snuff. As cold as a frozen rat. You would make a funeral turn back. As black as soot. If you don't go near the water you will not fall in. As white as snow. As black as pitch. As clear as crystal. You have a face on you that would make a turkey-cock lay. As yellow as mustard. You have a mouth on you that would make an ass bray. Your face is like a kangaroo. You are as flabby as a
senior member (history)
2019-04-05 14:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
89
of your pipe as the narrow gauge. There is a much dirt in your ears as would set a plot of cabbage. There is as much dirt on your boots as would top-dress a meadow. You have a head on you like a whin bush. You are as wise as Solomon. You are as strong as Samson. You have brains like a hen. When you put your cap on you your house is thatched. Your absence is good company.
John Cumiskey,
Standard Sixth.
senior member (history)
2019-04-05 14:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
88
Local Sayings.
As black as a pot. As white as snow. As red as a coal. As grey as a badger. You have a face on you that would turn back a funeral. You have a mouth on you that would hold the county cess in coppers. You have eyes on you like two burned holes in a blanket. You are like what the cat would bring in on a frosty morning. You are like a turkey on stubbles. You have a hump on you like a camel. You are like a duck in thunder. You are a street angel and a house devil. You are like a wolf in sheep's clothing. You have a back on you like a herring.You have hands on you like crow's feet. You have feet on you like a duck. You have a neck on you like a gander. You have a heart like a stone. You are as thick as a bull. You are as light as a feather. You have teeth on you like a saw. You are as sour as a weasel. You are like a spitting weasel. You have ears on you like a mouse. You have eyes like a hawk. You have a mouth on you like a pike. There is as much smoke out
senior member (history)
2019-04-05 14:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Sayings.
The kettle calling the pot black bottom.
If you told that to an ass he would kick you. Shy but willing like an ass eating thistles. A fool and his money are soon parted. Rob Peter to pay Paul. Cloone gap like the roar of an ass. many a slip betwixt the cup and the lip. You are never sure of the bit you put in your mouth. All is not gold that glitters. Show me your company and I will tell you what what you are. That bangs Banagher and Banagher bangs the devil. Like Jack Nokes and Tom Stiles. Like Jack of all trades. As black as a crow. Time and tide wait for no man. As full as a tick. Run with the hare and bark with the hounds. Through the bog with an
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 18:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
52
never closes one door but He opens another. Sleep is the image of death. Four things that an Irishman cannot trust, a cow's horn, horse's hoof, a dog's snarl, or an Englishman's laugh. People meet, but hill never.
Charles Cumiskey,
Fifth Standard.
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 18:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
51
Proverbs
There is no feast till a roast, and no torment till marriage. An empty sack does not stand. Time is a good storyteller. Your son is your son to-day, as sons usually leave home, but your daughter is your daughter for ever. Work is better that talk. Do not praise or dispraise yourself. Lie with the lamb and rise with the bird. A new brush sweeps clean. Whatever is worth doing is worth doing well. Bad wind blows that does not do anyone good. He who fights and runs away shall live to fight another day. A friend in need is a friend indeed. If the cap suits you wear it. A friend is recognised in hardship. You would never know the good of a bush until it is cut. Never leave for to-morrow what you can do to-day. Time and tide wait for no one. The thing that is got easily, is spent easily. It is a long road that has no turning. A good word never broke a person's mouth. The truth never chokes a man. God made the back for the burden. A closed mouth and a wise head. It is difficult to cut wool off a goat. "Lying down without getting up to you" says the fox to the sheep. God
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 18:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
50
Proverbs.
The night is long that never finds the day.
An empty sack will not stand.
It is a long road that has no twin.
It is difficult to cut wool from a goat.
The man that does not sow does not reap.
The man who never made a mistake never made anything else.
A stitch in time saves nine.
Never leave off till to-morrow that which you can do to-day.
You can't hunt a bird out of a bush that she is not in.
A bird in your hand is worth two in a bush.
The early bird get the early worm.
Early to bed, and early to rise, make a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
It's a sad heart that never rejoices.
Leo Kenny,
Sixth Standard.
senior member (history)
2019-04-04 18:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
49
Proverbs
A bird in the hand is worth two in a bush. A rolling stone gathers no moss. Its a long road that has no turning. Bad news travels fast. A shut mouth catches no flies. Look after the pence and the pounds will look after themselves. A stitch in time saves nine. An empty sack can not stand. Never buy a pig in a bag. Never leave off till tomorrow what can be done to-day. Early to bed and early to rise make a man healthy and wealthy and wise. A red rosy apple is often bad at the core. Hear, see and say nothing. Never judge a book by the cover. He that laughs least laughs best. Waste not want not. There is an if where there is a want. Seldom seen the better liked. People in glass houses should not throw stones. Penny wise pound foolish. Look before you leap.
Robert Logan
Seventh Standard.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 15:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As I went out on yonder gap I saw a man giving a call his beard was red his mouth was born and such a man was never born (a cock)
As round as an apple as deep as a cup all the men in Derry would not lift it up (a well)
I have a gray goose she is of a great size the man that would buy her would need to be wise she has feet in her bellie and walks upon none she is far from her lodging and seldom comes home (a ship)
Black white blue and green the nicest sight that ever you seen (a mag)
Rita Hughes Breanrisk,
Drumlist P.O. Longford
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 15:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
346
world is different).
What is full in the day time and empty at night. (your boots)
Mary Hughes, Breanrisk,
Drumlish P.P.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 15:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
345
Riddles
What stands on one leg and has its heart in its head?
(A head of cabbage).
What goes round the house and round the house and drags a harrow after it? (A hen and a clutch of chickens.
At I went out on yonder gap I say a man giving a call. His beard was red his mouth was horn and such a man was never born? (a cock crowing).
Why does a chimney smoke?
(because it cannot chew).
A lepper of ditches, a cropper of thorns a little brown cow with two leather horns. (a hare)
If I built a wall from here to Donegal what height would it be.
(The height of nonsense).
What is the difference between the north and south pole. (The
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 16:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
331
Bird Lore.
There are numerous wild birds in this district such as the crow, the robin, the swallow, the wren, the magpie, the golfench, the starling, the seagull, the crain, the wildduck, the grouse, the corncrake the pidgeon the pheasant the curlew, the patridge, the philipine, the linnet, the cukoo, the yellow hammer, the water hen, the snipe, the swans, and the wagtail.
The crow builds her nest on the top of a very large tree, she builds her nest of pieces of sticks and twigs and lines it with hay and grass. The robin builds her nest at the back of a mossy ditch. The lark builds her nest in high grass mostly in meadows she builds. The sparrow builds her nest in the eve of a house. The blackbird builds her nest in a
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 15:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
39
Ballyforan G. N.S.
a lot of people make pancakes for that day.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 15:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ballyforan G. N.S.
Old Houses
There is not many old houses in my village. There is only the side walls and the stones of the old houses.
There was no slated houses in the older times there was a lot of thatched houses. They were built of clay. But now a days they are not built of clay.
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 18:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
17
and what we see every day.
An Equal.
As soft as silk, as white as milk, as bitter as gall, as strong as a wall, and a green coat covers me all. A walnut.
As high as a castle, as weak as a wastle and all the kings horses cannot pull it down. Smoke.
Long legs crooked thigs, little head and no eyes. A pair of tongs.
There was a girl in our town,
Silk an' satin was her gown,
silk an' satin gold an' velvet
guss he name three times Ive tell'd.
Ann.
Riddke me, riddle me, what is that over the hair and under the hat.
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 18:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16
Old mother Twitchet had but eye, and a long tail which she let fly and every time she went over the gap she left a bit of her tail in a trap.
A needle.
What is the difference between two and three. One.
Lives in winter, dies in summer and grows with its roots upwards.
An icicle.
Over the water and under the water and always with its head down.
A ships keel.
A riddle, a riddle, as I suppose a hundred eyes and never a nose.
A potato.
Read my riddle I pray, What God never the King seldom sees
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 18:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15.
Composition 16 ..7..38
Riddles
What is the favourite word with women. The last word.
What has no feet yet wears boots and shoes. A gravel path.
"Tewenty" four white cows tied in a stall and one red one licking them all.
Your tongue licking your teeth.
Whats full and holds more.
A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in.
Over the fire and under the and never touches the fire.
A cake in an oven.
What goes round the wood and round the wood and never enters the wood.
The bark of a tree.
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22
legs sitting on three legs, in comes four legs, snaps one leg, up gets two legs, fired three legs after four legs and made him leave down one leg.
A dog snapping a leg of mutton.
Dan Corbett
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 16:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
Headed like thimble, a tail like a rat, you may guess for ever but you will never guess that. A pipe. One half dead, the other half living and a tail wagging. A dog with his head in a pot.
What goes away between two woods and comes home between two waters? A man fetching water in pails.

What goes away above the ground and returns under it? A man with sods on his head. One leg sitting on two legs, two
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 16:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
20
What was the number of the car. 281
Patch upon patch with out any stitches. Riddle me that and I'll buy you a pair of breeches.
A cabbage. What is it always walks with its head down. A nail in your boot. Middy-noddy round body, three feet and a wooden hat. A pot.
What goes round the wood and round the wood and never enters the wood?
The bark of a tree.
What full and holds more. A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in.
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 16:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
19
I went out in the garden. I got something and in three weeks it walked. A chicken.
I know an article smaller that a mouse, it has more windows that King George's house. A thimble.
Why does the hen cross the road. Because she cannot go around it.
As round as an apple as plump as a ball, can climb over churches, over steeples and all.
The sun.
Two white men and one black man were out motoring. The two white men ate one black man.
senior member (history)
2019-03-29 16:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
18
Composition 16-2-38.
Riddles
Four legs up and four legs down and soft in middle and hard all round.
A bed.
Old Mrs. Clutcher has but one eye, has a long tail which she lets fly. Every time she goes over the leap she left a piece of her tail behind.
A needle and a thread.
Why does the chimney smoke? Because it cannot chew.
What part of the cow goes into the stable first?
Her breath.
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 18:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15
the number of the car. 281
If a man had a hundred patches in this trousers what time was it? Time to get a new one. Pieces and patches without any stitches, riddle me that and I will give you a pound. A head of cabbage.
Over the fire and under the fire and never touches the fire at all. A cake in an oven.
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 18:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14.
down. Smoke.
As round as an apple, as flat as a pan, the whole of a woman and the half of a man. A penny.
Long legs crooked the one little head and no eyes. A tongs.
Green coat outside, white coat inside and paddling in the water.
A bullrush.
As round as an apple as deep as a cup all the men in Derry could not pull it up. A well of water. What is this that goes up the stairs black and white and comes down red all over. A Newspaper. Two white men and a black man went driving in a car. The two white men eat the black man. What was
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 18:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
13
One little fellow turned round and asked the teacher suddenly.
Why am I like the Prince of Wales?" The teacher viewed him all over and taught for a few minutes. Upon my word my little fellow I dont know. If you give me a satifactory answer the money is yours. Well because teacher I am waiting for that crown.
Why does the chimney puff?
Because it cannot chew.
A round and round the wood and never enters the wood. The bark of a tree. What is that over the head and under the hat. Hair.
As a high as a castle as weak as a wastle and all the kings horse cannot pull it
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 18:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
12
Composition 16 .. 2 .. 38.
Riddles
It is standing when it is walking and it is lying when it is flying.
It is a "topping in a peawicks head.
What is it that has four legs, a head and a foot: A bed.
In comes two legs, sat upon three legs, one leg on two legs lap. In comes four legs, bought away one leg, up stands two legs followed him with three legs, knocked down four legs and brought back one leg. A leg of mutton.
A school-teacher once asked his pupils. If there was a boy in the school that would ask him a question which he was not able to answer, he would give him a crown, that is five shillings.
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 11:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
538
yourself" asked Tom. The priest didn't answer and they kept silence during the remaining part of the journey. On his return the cold beads of perspiration were on Tom'e forehead. When he come to the big ivy bush on the Raheen road terror seized him. A man and a boy were often seen standing under it but luckily for him there was nobody there the night. He arrived home safe enough, but he never went travelling at night again.
_____________________
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 11:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
537
A woman dressed in black wearing a shawl drawn tightly around her head keeps vigilance at Crossna crossroads on dark Winter nights. One night Thomas Carty of Cloonshanachie went to the Prysbetery on a sick call. Father Mannion came with him and as the priest was a bit nervous travelling on the lonely roads Tom had to accompany him back home. When they came to the crossroads a woman in a dark shroud paced behind them for a few yards. "Why didn't you speak?" asked the priest. "Why didn't you speak.
senior member (history)
2019-03-28 11:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
536
supposed to be seen around the house after the murder of Bridges. Maureen Mac Dermott's father bought the house and land and built barns where Bridges' old house was. While he was building people sent advice to him from districts for miles around to sprinkle holy water on every stone.
A hearse driven by a headless man passes from our small gate to Leydon's gate then comes back as far as the ivy bush on the Crossna road three times on a certain night every year.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 18:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
530
derful tales of the land of the Shee, but few believed them.

Found by Maire Ni Conghaile,
Augnasasurn, Corrigeenroe, Boyle.
She got it from her mother.
________________________
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 18:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
529
There was a man named John Mullany living in Kilmactranny one time. One night he heard a terrible noise outside. As he was getting up someone banged lustily on the door. He opened it and in walked a tiny man. He had a pan in his hand. He put the frying pan on the fire and it began to sizzle. The little man dipped his finger in the grease and a milk white steed stood outside the door. John did the same with the same result. The two of them mounted the steeds and galloped away. John was gone for three days and returned on the same hour that he left. He told won-
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
528
home, his dog - a fine Irish terrier - came meeting him. When the dog saw the pursuer he ran for him. Peter heard a scuffle, but was too excited to look back. Nest morning when he got home the dog was stretched out-side the door and he as cold as the clay. I'll go bail Peter Conlon was pretty slow in sitting at the gaming table again.
Found by Mairin Nic Diarmuda, Behy, Knockvicar, Boyle. She got if from Sean Mac Diarmuda of same place.
________________
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
527
He stooped to pick it up and the Lord between us and harm, what did he see under the table but, a giant of a fellow with two black eyes dancing in his head. Two long horns were sticking out of his forehead. The life nearly left poor Peter, he flung the cards all sides of him and started running like a deer. He banged a gate into the black fellow's face and when he got on a bit further he looked back and saw that he had a long tail with a nail in the top of it. Nothing could convince him that it was not old Nick himself from down below.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived beside the church in Geevagh about a hundred years ago a family named Devine. One night the father dreamed that there was a pot of gold under a rock behind his house.
The following
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old Martin the Miner, God rest his soul lived in a dug-out in the centre of a bleak wind-swept field just at the back of Terence Martin's house in Woodfield. One day Charlie and Joe Martin were playing in the field. Lucky enough Charlie fell across the
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One bright night a brave man, John Daly of who is now dead, went out hunting. He passed by a
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During Penal times there dwelt in Cootehall where Frank Lenehan lives now a man named Coote. He had a hanging place at a gateway leading to his house. He was always priest hunting and a priest who had escaped his hands fled to Ballyfermoyle and said daily Mass on the mountain for several years.
Found by May Molloy, Dereenargon, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:37
approved
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awaiting decision
483
of a dead child on the tooth which pains.
__________________________
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
482
and Buagleis.
Toothache. Carry a particle of the first candle lighted over a corpse for twelve months.
Carry the top of the first nail driven in a horse's hoof.
Reduce Fatness: Eat nettle seed.
Sore throat: Put a stocking full of hot bran around the neck.
Weak heart: Drink the juice of the dandelion every morning.
Measles: Roots of nettles boiled on milk.
Hiccough: Take ten pinches of salt without drawing your breath.
Weak heart: Boil berry of mistletoe and drink it.
Toothache: Rub little finger
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
444
Found by Mairin Nic Dhiarmuda, Behy, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:26
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rejected
awaiting decision
(94) White and black and read all over.
Answer: A newspaper.
(95) Up chip cherry, down chip cherry and all the men in Derry wouldn't put together chip cherry.
Answer: An egg.
(96) White and black went up the hill, black came down and white stayed above.
Answer: A black hen and an egg.
(97) Why do you go to bed.
Answer: Because the bed won't come to you.
(98) A bird flew without wings, Sat on a tree without leaves,
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:24
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awaiting decision
443
Answer: As many as you have dip for.
(92) Adam and Eve and "pinch me" went to the sea to bathe. Adam was drowned and Eve was drowned.
Which of them was saved.
Answer: "Pinch me."
(93) A donkey was tied with a rope to a pole in a file, one day. He was very thirsty and was trying to get a drink in a pond beside him but he was at linity [?] only to go very near its brink. He tried every plan he could think of. How did he get a drink.
Answer: Will you give it up ..... Well the ass give it up too.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
468
shining while it is raining it is a sign that the devil is whailing his wife.
When the sea-gulls appear it is a sign of a storm.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
467
When sheep come down to the valley for the night and when masses of flies collect in the air it is a sign of rain.
An inky northern sky is the sign of snow.
Birds singing late in the evening is a sign of good weather.
If the insects take wing in the evening there will be rain that night.
When there are currents on Lough Key it is a sign of very cold rain.
A blue blaze in the fire is a sign of rain.
When the "Rock of Doon" looks near us it is a sign of mild rain.
When the uin is
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
466
on the grass for a long time in the morning it is a sign of good weather.
You many expect storm when a seagull rests in a potato crop or when a snail creeps into a house.
It is a sign of rain if the dog sleeps during the day.
When the stars glitter or when there is a red scar in the west when the sun is sinking it is a sign of frost.
When the cat washes his face with his paws it is the sign of rain.
It is the sign of rain when the chimney puffs.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
465
When the soot falls it fortells rain.
When the crickets go through the house it is a sign of rain.
When the sky around the setting sun is gold or red there will be hot weather.
A mist in the hollows in the evening is a sign of heat.
If it rains on Friday people say that Sunday is sure to be wet.
It is a sign of storm when the rats draw near the house and when there is a long calmness.
The blue in the ashes is a sign of rain.
When the dew remains
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
464
come from Scotland.
When red or herring-bone clouds appear in the sky it is a sign of rain.
When the sheep come from the hill to the valley you may expect storm.
Rainbow at twilight is the shepherd's delight.
The North Wind fortells snow.
The South Wind fortells murky misty weather.
The East Wind fortells frost.
The West Wind fortells rain.
When salt gets damp and begins to scatter it is a sign of rain.
When the dog eats grass it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:06
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awaiting decision
463
is coming.
It is a sign of rain if you can hear the train or waterfall plainly and if the crane is resting near a river.
If the frog has on a russet coat or if the ducks quack loudly you may expect rain.
It is a sign of rain to see a crane flying with the wind.
If you hear a robin singing on a tree top it is a sing of good weather.
When the sky is coppery in the evening it is a sign of rain.
It is a sign of snow when the wild-geese
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 16:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
462
If the swallows are flying low it's the sign of rain. When a ring is round the moon it's a sign of rain.
When the clouds are heavy, the air low, the crows flying about, and the shadows of the island in Lough Key it's a sign of rain.
Its a sign of rain when the wind is blowing from Carrick.
It's a sign of rain if your corns pain you.
The robin comes to the door when it's going to snow.
People who are suffering from rheumatism begin to complain when the rain
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 15:59
approved
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awaiting decision
The chief landlord for Cleen was Lord Lurton who lived in Rockingham. During his life Rockingham became beautiful.. On his death bed his last words were "Oh, beautiful Rockingham how can I leave thee.
Lord Lurton was supposed to be the meanest type of landlord to be had for raising rents and evicting tenants, but this was not true as there was never an eviction on the Rockingham estate even though
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 15:58
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awaiting decision
563
the landlord and trotted wearily home.
______________________
Found by Maire Ni Laimhin,
Kilmactranny, Boyle.
______________________
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 15:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
563
related her story from start to finish. She told him that she hadn't a penny and that she had come to ask him for seven pounds. Before James could answer she said she would repay him the borrowed sum before that day twelve months. James gave her the money and she was very thankful. She returned to her little cabin. The next day was Monday and Kate went with the rent to the landlord. He did not take the money but pointing at a long narrow table he told her to leave it on it. Then Kate bowed before
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once there was a woman, named Kate Hogan who was unable to pay the rent. The landlord was a very wicked man and he commanded the woman to leave her house before the following Monday. At this time there was a wealthy farmer named James Cooney living near Kate. Kate was as busy as a bee endeavouring to beg borrow or steal the required money.
She went to Cooney's house and
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 15:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
562
man dismissed and prosecuted.
____________________________
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 15:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
561
it was the second largest "estate property" in Ireland. If the tenants had not the money to pay the rent they asked the agent to give them time to get it. He often gave them six months or a year in order to provide the rent.
A butler of Lord Lurton came out one Good Friday morning to where the men were working with a bone in his mouth to show the little respect he had for our Saviour. One of the men took up a stone and knocked the bone out of his mouth. The butler got the
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 15:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The chief landlord for Cleen was Lord Curton who lived in Rockingham. During his life Rockingham became beautiful.. On his death bed his last words were "Oh, beautiful Rockingham how can I leave thee.
Lord Curton was supposed to be the meanest type of landlord to be had for raising rents and evicting tenants, but this was not true as there was never an eviction on the Rockingham estate even though
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 16:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
597
Crossna, Knockvicar, Boyle.
Composed by Thomas Mac Cormack, Clarach, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
596
It was next to our Saviour on
Calvary.
So now my friends my song
is ended
With eyes full of tears I can
write no more
And while I was writing those
simple verses
I do declare it my heart was
sore.
Do my God have mercy on
their souls
I also comfort their parents
dear
I hope they are enjoying eternal happiness
With the Blessed Virgin in
the Heavenly Sphere.
Found by Tomas Mac Diarmuda
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 16:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
595
If those two girls are not happy
My heart does treble when I
think on more
For I believe our Saviour to be
the pilot
That will safely guide them
to that Heavenly shore.
He set his compas and never did vary
Until the Port he had safely
gained
When the Pilot saw they were
for His Harbour
He launched his boat and did
them claim.
But you must remember they
have left their parents
In a state of dispondency
To see the parting of the mother
and daughter
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 16:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
594
And so will you when you hear
those verses
From shedding tears you
cannot refrain.
As for myself I can never forget it
While grass does grow or
waters run
It is for their parents I had
most pity
That had to part with them,
and they so young.
One was sixteen and the
other eighteen
They both being innocent and
free from sin
I hope the Lord, will them
reward
So good christians all now
say Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 16:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
593
pride.
Their names to mention is
my intention
The two Miss Margins it was
their names
And for to write and sound
their praises
I hope that ye will not me blame.
It was in Crossna those two
young girls
In peace and happiness they
did reside
Until our Redeemer was pleased
to call them
With Him in Heaven to reside.
Sisters and brothers, friends
and relations
They all rejoin and share the
shame.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 16:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
570
____________________
Knockvicar is the name of a townland which meas "The Bishop's Hill. Long ago a bishop lived, and in a field there is a rock shaped like a chair, which is called the Bishop's Seat.
Mr. Moore's house was the home of the Peyton. family, During the famine years, it was used as a work-house. Underneath the house there are Subterranean passages. There is one passage which is safe enough to go into yet. They were used as cellars, and often as
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
571
a means of escape for soldiers who were stationed there, when surrounded by enemies. There is an old grave-yard in a field above the house, in which probably many paupers are buried as a result of the famine. There is a gallows tree in Knockvicar as well, and it is near the grave-yard.
There were two Knockvicar bridges. The old one was built by a contractor named Drury. It was built partly of stone and partly of wood. There was a slab of stone in it, telling all about the old bridge. When the new bridge was
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
572
erected, the slab was built into it, and it can be seen at the present day. O'Sullivan Beare passed over the old bridge, so, that shows that it is fairly old. The new bridge which is built with stone, was built by a man named L. Gisborne. His assistant engineer was M. Lyons. The same firm built the locks, which is correctly known as "The Clarendon Locks." Both the new bridge and the Locks were built in 1848. There was a new corn-mill by the old bridge long ago, because the now dried up
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Near Ardcarne is a field called Usna, which contains the grave of a Danish chief. Near the chapel of Toomna is a blessed well and on a certain day all the people of the district went there and prayed. Beside the well is a flag the shape of a saucer and the people who went to the wall used to drip a pebble, and around this flag to-day, you can
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
573
mill-race which can be seen faintly yet, passes by Mr. Moore's house.
Found by Matthew McKenna, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
575
historical place. Mass was often read there in Penal Times. There is a rock in Mohar, and it is said that if any man goes to it at mid-night, bringing a black cat with him, he will get some silver articles under it. If he tells anyone where he is going, he will never reach home.
Found by Millie Mac Dermott, Crossna, Knockvicar, Boyle
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Knockvicar, in Mr. Healy's field there is a well called "St. Patrick's Well." It is said that Saint Patrick passed by it, and blessed it. The water of this well is different to that of any other well. The water flows out of the ground like a river.
Found by Kate Bruen, Crossna, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
574
see thousands of little pebbles.
Found by Kathleen, Kelly,
Ardcarne, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A place called Mohar, which is situated about five or hundred yards east of Crossna Church, is a very
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 13:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
588
The Rosary was recited
in Irish
For the rest of young Marren
the brave.
And the numerous wreaths
from chief mourners
Were neatly placed o'er his grave
The parting volley was
fired 'mid silence
The Last Post was sounded
'mid tears
May the soul of the brave
rest in heaven,
Who commanded the bold
Volunteers.
Found by Maire Ni Gaoithin,
Blackfallow, Knockvicar, Boyle,
from her father.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 13:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
587
ors and cyclists
And horse drawn vehicles
also.
They assembled from all
parts of Connaught
From Sligo, Roscommon and Mayo.
In a quiet little spot in
Mount Irwin
We laid this young hero to
rest
The emblem of his dear
country
Was closely pent over his
breast
Many priests as they stood by
his graveside
Requested the people to pray.
While relating the tragic
occurrence
To him a high tribute did pay.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
586
Night and day they kept searching
the ocean
Till at last his dead body was
found.
Oh! the grief of his parents
and comrades.
As they stood on the Strand
on that day
When the remains were washed in by a spring
tide
In silence all bent to pray.
The day of the funeral "twas
touching
AS 600 marched all four men
deep.
The Dead March was played on
the brass band
It would make the hardest
heart weep.
There were hundreds of mot-
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 13:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
585
When the truce in old
Ireland was started
As a freeman to the sea-
side he bound,
And when out for a dip
in the briney
Alas! brave Marren was drowned.
When the news of the fate
circulated
It filled every heart with
dismay
Oh! to think that our brave
leader
Was cold 'neath the depths
of the sea (say)
Volunteers they came from all over,
When they heard their companion
was drowned.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
584
It was woe to the knave
that would slight them
Or the cause of his country
betray.
When in conflict he was
a brave soldier,
And no cowardice ever did
show.
For planning he could not
be equalled
For he always outwitted
his foe.
The Crown Forces anxiously
sought him,
But needless to say 'twas
in vain.
He was hidden from those
tyrant traitors
By the invisible band of
Sinn Fein.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 13:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
583
He was true to the cause till
the last.
And when of times out-
numbered in action,
He fought with a vigour so
bold.
That he conquered the vicious
Crown forces
By the men of the Green,
White and Gold.
As a leader no man could
surpass him,
For he acted with judgement
and skill
In the ranks, a place is
left vacant
That no one can ever fill.
The Green, White and Gold
were his colours,
In their aid he would fight
night and day
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 13:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
582
Poem.
The West is now eclipsed in
mourning
For the bravest is laid in
the tomb
The death Commandent Marren
has cast over Connaught
a gloom.
He fought for the cause of
old Ireland
And evaded arrest for five
years
Beloved by all his companions
and the pride of the
bold Volunteers.
Brave Marren loved his dear
country
With a love that ne'er be surpassed
A hero! also a brave leader
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 12:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
591
isle,
He looks around, what seeks he now?
One sweet, one sunny smile.
He searches through each favourite haunt.
Each greenwood, glade and
dell.
For the fairy queen, who round his heart
Has twined loves magic spell
The banquet rich is served, the
mirthful guests are placed.
But where is one, who oft, such
brilliant feast had graced
In Turough chamber all alone,
her blue eyes full of tears
She sits, the sweet one, musing
there of bypast years
She knows her father, well she
knows his desperate towering pride
His will is, that she should be
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 12:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
590
poet's vivid fire,
The poet's rapture brain to wake the soothing lyre.
II
Upon a bright Autumnal eve,
o'er boundless blue Lough Key.
Across the silvery waves, a skiff
speeds on its furrowed way.
It bears a young light hearted
knight from yonder rocky shore
Whilst in the breeze his
plumes so white play gaily
O'er and o'er.
Swift on that well known isle
he bounds
With all youth's boy and grace
And now the the aged chieftain
greets with friendships warm embrace
A welcome guest from child
-hood hours upon the castle
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 12:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
589
Legend of the Lake, Ruin of the Island Flower."
See the bright sunbeams, how they gild yon reverend ruined pile
And o'er its fading glory cast a sad though soothing smile.
In solemn grandeur there it stands memorial of the past
It seem to mock time withering power all ages to outlast.
Where now the chiefs who o'er Moylurg.
Once held their feudal sway
And girt this island portrait, with such proud, such bright array.
Oh! for the poet's heart, the
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 12:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
With the blessed Virgin in the Heavenly Spere.
You feeling Christians both male and female
I hope with me you will sympathise
And mourn the loss of of two young girls
Who have departed all in their
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 12:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
592
the Sasanach strangers bride.
Oh! sooner for would Una a hundred, a hundred deaths, have born.
Than be the bride, alas, have won her young, her true, her scorn.
Found by Gerald Mulhern,
Doogra, Knockvicar, Boyle from Mrs. Mac Cormack of the same place.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 12:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Goats.
It is lucky to get a present of a kid goat. It is unlucky for a goat to have three kids. It is unlucky for a goat to be abused.
________________________________________
Long ago Our Lord asked the goats, which were then covered with wool for shelter. They refused. He then asked the sheep, then covered with hair, to give him shelter. They gave it to him. He was so pleased that he took the hair off the sheep and put it on the goats and put the wool of the goats on the sheep.
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 12:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
612
If you drink sow's milk you can see the wind.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
James Mac Shera Dorothy Brady's grandfather in Fostra had a great crop of oats. He brought it to the mill and got oatmeal made from it. The people came from all directions for one meal a day. There was a big pot at Jim Martin's house in Fostragh and the people came there once a day for a good feed.
After a long fast the people ate an awful
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cat:-
If a cat dies in the house it is a sign of bad luck.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
460
Bad shoes and bad stockings and that's a poor life.
And the devil a much better was Biddy my wife.
Found by Doireann Ni Bhradaigh,
Cryanstown, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
457
88. Happy the bride the sun shines on and blessed the corpse the rain rains on.
89. An apple a day keeps the doctor away.
90. Let no one know your mind, and let wisdom guide you so, because he who is your friend to-day, to-morrow might be your foe.
91. It's not a secret if three know it.
92. As mean as the Crossna beggars.
93. As dark as pitch.
94. As thick as nine folds of boxty.
95. As dirty as ditch-water.
Found by Maire Ni Laimhin,
Kilmactranny, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
85. He who helps the poor shall never want.
86. When the old cock crows the young one learns.
87. Blood is thicker than water.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
81. Your health is your wealth.
82. The hungry dog never gets a bone to pick.
83. The early bird catches the most worms.
84. People in glass-houses should not throw stones.
Found by Proinnsias O Coiligh, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
458
his nose.
79. Nothing is important, but what is eternal.
80. Never throw out the dirty water 'till you get the clean.
Found by Mairin Nic Ghiolla Fhaolain, Woodfield, Knockvicar,
Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
73. Don't buy a pig in a sack.
74. Blood is thicker that water.
75. Don't sell your hen on a rainy day.
76. Never say boo to your dog 'til you are able to feed him.
77. Learning and manners are good companions.
78. A man's mouth often broke
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
457
69. You can't keep two irons in the fire.
70. There is many a slip between the cup and the lip.
71. Spare the rod and spoil the child.
72. Bend the sally while it is young.
Found by Aine Nic Charthaigh,
Cleen, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 14:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
456
63. Smooth waters run deep, but the dirt lies at the bottom.
64. Hard work was never easy not dry bread was never greasy.
65. He that would thrive must rise at five and he that has thriven can wait on until seven.
66. Larger vessels venture more. But, smaller vessels should keep near the shore.
67. A man without learning and wearing good clothes
Is like a gold ring
In a barrow pig's nose.
68. Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
Found by Nora Nic Ghloinn,
Cleen, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 13:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
59. Plough deep while sluggards sleep and you will have corn to sell and to keep.
60. Silks and satins often put out the kitchen fire.
61. As you make the bed, so must you lie.
62. Better to go to bed supperless than to rise in debt.
Found by Maire Ni Gaoithin,
Blackfallow, Knockvicar, Boyle
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 13:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
455
56. Your face is your fortune.
57. "Live horse and you'll get grass."
58. Too many cooks spoil the broth.
59. Found by Seamus O Ruairc,
Ballyfarnon, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-24 13:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
440
Answer that.
81. that is it that cant go up the chimney down and cant go down the chimney up.
Answer:- An umbrella.
82. How is the Main street of Boyle like the River Shannon.
Answer:- There is a bank on each side of it.
83. Long legged father, big bellied mother and three little children all like other.
Answer: A pot.
Found by Crios Ni Fhiaich, Smutternagh,
Corrigeenroe, Boyle.
84. What is it that God
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
442
(88) Forty eyes without a nose.
Answer: A thimble.
(89) As I was running about I found something and when I found it I looked for it and when I couldn't get it, I kept it for a day, but if I got it I'd surely throw it away.
Answer; A thorn.
(90) As I went out in yonder gap I met my Uncle Tom, with iron toes and a tea-pot nose and upon my word he frightens crows?
Answer: A gun.
(91) Riddle me, riddle me ruitin.
How many potatoes would make bruitin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
448
repeats it.
_____________
Found by Dorothy Brady,
Cryanstown, Knockvicar,
Boyle.
_____________
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
447
seven cats. And every cat had seven kits. Kits, cats, women, sacks and men.
How many went to to St. Ives.
Answer: One, myself. I "met" the others and they were going in the opposite direction.
(106) What is neither flesh nor bone but has four legs and a thumb.
Answer: A glove.
(107) I haven't got it, I dont want it and I wouldn't have it.
But if I had it I wouldn't take the old world for it.
Answer: A bald head.
(108) To whom can you most freely tell a secret.
Answer: To a liar, because he'll never be believed if he
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cat looking out of a window.
Answer: A cat looking in on a window.
(102) How is a little man like a good book.
Answer: Because he is often looked over.
(103) How is hope like an old shoe.
Answer: Because it makes people easy.
(104) Brothers and sisters I have none but this man's father is my father's son.
Answer: Myself.
(105) As I went on to St. Ives, I met seven men, and the seven men had seven wives, and the seven wives had seven sacks. And in those seven sacks were
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
445
There came a man without hands,
Climbed up without feet,
Cooked it without fire.,
Answer: A snowflake falls on a tree branch, and the sun comes up and melts it.
(99) A beautiful lady in a garden lived,
Her beauty was fair as the sun,
In one hour of her life she
became a man's wife,
And she died before she was born.
Answer: An Eve.
(100) Man what made it, don't use it, Man what use it, don't know it.
Answer: A coffin.
(101) What is most like a
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
444
Found by Mairin Nic Dhiarmuda, Behy, Knockvicar, Boyle.
(94) White and black and read all over.
Answer: A newspaper.
(95) Up chip cherry, down chip cherry and all the men in Derry wouldn't put together chip cherry.
Answer: An egg.
(96) White and black went up the hill, black came down and white stayed above.
Answer: A black hen and an egg.
(97) Why do you go to bed.
Answer: Because the bed won't come to you.
(98) A bird flew without wings, Sat on a tree without leaves,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
441
can't do?
Answer: He can't make two hills without a hollow.
(85) Ink, ank, under the bank,
Ten drawing four?
Answer: A girl milking a cow.
(86) I have a little cow and she lies again' the wall, and she'd eat all the "spadach" from here to Donegal.
Answer: A fire.
(87) " If a fellow met a fellow in a field of beans,
Says a fellow to a fellow
Could a fellow tell a fellow
What a fellow means,"
How many "fs" in that.
Answere: None.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
84 What is it that God
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
440
Answer that.
81. that is it that cant go up the chimney down and cant go down the chimney up.
Answer:- An umbrella.
82. How is the Main street of Boyle like the River Shannon.
Answer:- There is a bank on each side of it.
83. Long legged father, big bellied mother and three little children all like other.
Answer: A pot.
Found by Crios Ni Fhiaich, Smutternagh,
Corrigeenroe, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
303
and he said. Will you come with me to the church tonight and she agreed.
So both went and at the stroke of twelve o'clock the priest came out of the sacristy and again said. Is there anyone to serve Mass. there is said the other priest and he went up to the altar and served Mass
When Mass was over the priest went back into the sacristy and was never heard of or seen again.
Margaret O'Brien
Drumboylan
Teller of story
Mathew Kenny old age pensioner
Drumboylan
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
302
A Mass story.
This happened about fifty years ago. An old woman was living beside a Catholic church in the Parish of Kiltoghert and she made it a habit to go to the church every evening at dusk to say her rosary. One evening as she was praying at the altar the sexton came and locked the church thinking that here was no one inside and so the old woman had to stay there for the night.
She went up to the altar and sat down knowing well that she would have to stay there till morning. She was about to fall asleep at twelve o'clock when suddenly the sacristy door opened and a priest walked out on the altar and said. Is there anyone to serve Mass. The woman sat still and said nothing. the priest remained for some time on the altar and then went back into the sacristy.
the minute the sexton opened the church next morning the old woman went straight to the Parish priest to tell him what happened
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
292
An old story.
Once upon a time a man was building a house and he had to go ten miles for sand. One morning he said he would go two journeys so he started at four o'clock in the morning. When he was half way the wheel came off the cart. He looked around and he saw a man kneeling by a wall and he asked him to help to put on the wheel on the cart. The man said he was doing penance there and that they used not help him in their prayers at night and that he would not help him now.
The man said three Hail Marys in his mind and when he looked around him the wheel was on the cart so the the man continued his journey. This man never forgot the poor souls in his prayers afterwards.
Eileen O'Brien.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
293
A long walk.
About fifty years ago a girl named Anne Sweeny walked from Myoran to Roscommon and returned back the same day. She left home at two o'clock in the morning and came back that night. She was at law with her brother and she had to go to Roscommon for the trial.
Three other women walked to this town from this district on another occasion and returned the same day also, the distance being thirty miles each way. Their names were Mrs Kenny, Mrs Mac Loughlin, and Mrs Gallagher. When coming home one of those women fainted about two miles from home, and word had to be sent to her husband to come and take her home.
In those days there were no cars, motors, bicycles, or traps, so the poor man having no better mode of conveyance took a wheel barrow to take her home.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:56
approved
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294
A long walk, continued
When coming down Drumheirney hill beside Leitrim village the axle of the barrow broke and the man carried his wife home on the back the remainder of the journey.
One day I walked to Carrick-on-Shannon which is six miles from my home. I was very tired and footsore and making moans for myself, and a neighbouring old age pensioner told me what those women had done.
Eileen OBrien,
Drumboylan.
Teller of story
Terry Gaffney,
Drimbresna,
Leitrim.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:53
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295
A long walk.
In olden times people were great walkers. This is an account of a long walk which I heard:-
My grandfather's brother was sick in Roscommon hospital, My grandfather "Matt Crowley" got up one morning and walked to Roscommon which is thirty miles distant. On arriving there he saw his brother. He found him pretty well.
He then heard of Lenabane races, three miles outside the town. He went to the races and spent some time there. He walked home again that day thus covering sixty miles on foot in one day.
This an lived to be eighty-four years of age and has been dead now about six years.
Michael Crowley,
Corrigeen,
Ardcarne Parish,
Co. Roscommon.
Information received from
John Crowley,
Corrigeen.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:46
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296
A good runner.
There was once a great runner, who lived in Ardcarne. his name was James Quinn. One day his father and mother went to Boyle. When they came home he had a live hare under a creel. He told them he raced across the hill, and caught him. They would not believe his tale, so he let out the hare again and caught him. When he grew up he became a robber and he was so swift the police could never catch him. He was a very good jumper also.
He had a step at the Feorish River and used to jump across when followed by the police. This step was in a big bundle of rushes. The police dug the rushes and left it floating. When Quinn jumped in them he went down with the stream and was captured.
Tellor of story
John Crowley,
Corrigeen.
Michael Crowley
senior member (history)
2019-02-24 17:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9-12-'37
Seanfocla
Is bocht an sagart nach mbionn cleireach aige.
An ait i n-a mbionn na mna bionn cainnt.
Is minic bhaineas duine slat a bhuailfeas e fein.
An te nac n-olann acht uisge ni bionn se ar mesige.
Is beag an ghaoth nach lubfadh traithnin.
An te is mo cainnt se is lugha obair.
Is deacair ceann crionna a chur ar ghuailnigh oga.
Bionn adharca fada ar bhuaibh thar lear.
An te bhios 'na dhroch sheirbhiseach do fein bionn se 'na sheirbiseach mhaith do dhaoine eile.
Muna g-cuirfidh tu san Earrach, ni bhainfidh tu san b-Foghmhair.
Ceathrar cailleach gan a beith
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 14:18
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5
that hour. Shen he appeared they approached him and said "your life or your money." "A life will be lost" he replied "before i surrender." Then he disappeared.
No one ever interfered with the little man since although lights were seen on different occasions. It is considered as much a torment as a blessing.
Collected by Peter Carter.
Told by the late James Carter,
Gortinure House,
Keshcarrigan P.O.
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 14:14
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rejected
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4
Hidden Treasure.
I live in the Parish of Mohill and in the towland of Gortinure, Co. Leitrim.
In this townland there is a high hill, on the top of which is a fort. This fort was built by the early Gaels or Celts who were very rich in gold, gold ornaments and bronze weapons. Specimens of their pottery may still be seen in museums whilst a pot of gold lies hidden under a tree on the north-west side of Gortinure fort. The Cetls were a small race of people, some of them were but two feet in height, and they are known as Leprechauns. This pot of gold is guarded by one of these little men who only appears at midnight on All Hallow Eve. When it became known that he was to be seen on this night two men lay, in ambush until
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 14:07
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239
never agree, They always fight when they meet.
The implements that a tailor uses when he is working are, the scissors, the thimble, the sewing machine, the smoothing iron, the needle and the tape. Shirts were made from flax in the homes of the people about fifteen years ago. Socks and stocking are knitted locally from wool every winter.
There is one spinning wheel in the district. It is about fifty years old. It belongs to Patrick Regan of Powellshill, Cootehall, Co. Roscommon.
Wen the old people are going to a funeral or a wake the men wear a swallow tailed coat and a black hard hat, and the women wear a bonnet and a long black cloack and veil over their faces.
Collected by Patrick Lynch,
Annagh,
Cootehall,
Co Roscommon.
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 14:02
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238
Clothes made Locally.
In the district of Cootehall there are two tailors. Their names are John Mc Loughran and Patrick McCormack lives in Cootehall, Co. Roscommon, and Patrick McCormack lives in Annaghbeg, Cootehall, Co. Roscommon.
Patrick McCormack travels from house to house making suits of clothes. He also stocks cloth. In former times cloth was both spun and woven by the hands but it ceased to be done about forty years ago because at the present time it can be got cheaper in the shop. The cloth which was made locally was much better than the cloth which was bought in the shop. This cloth was called fleece cloth.
It is said that a tinker's wife and a tailor's wife
senior member (history)
2019-02-19 13:50
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98
Paidreacha
The people long ago used to have a lot of prayers. The people did not learn these prayers out of a book. Long ago when the people used to see a star falling they used to say mainm do dhia agus do Mhuire three times. When they used to see the new moon at first they used to bless themselves. When they used to be reaching the fire they used to say Coiglimid an teine seo mar coigleas Criosta cach. Muire ar bharr and tighe and Brighid i na lar and da aingeal deag ata i gcathair an ngras. Ag cumhdach and tighe seo agus na daoine slan. When the people used to be in danger they used to say Dia idir sinn agus an anachain. When a person used to escape a danger they used to say go dtarruighidh [?] Dia sinn. When they would see a person working they would say God bless the
senior member (history)
2019-02-18 15:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
CBES- 0271B-06
senior member (history)
2019-02-17 14:37
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awaiting decision
464
53. 40 sheep went out on a gap 40 more followed them 6,7,10,11,3 and two how many is that. Ans = 5.
54. What is that, that if it is too short by taking a bit off it I make it longer. Ans = A grave.
55. Which side of a house is the best to put a porch on. Ans = The outside.
56. What has two hands and never washes its face. And = A clock.
57. A leaper of ditches a cropper of corn. A pretty cow with two yellow horns. Ans = A rabbit.
Collected by:-
Annie Reilly, Annaghkeenty Kilnagross
Kathleen Casey, Corderry Kilnagross
Annie Tighe, Corderry Kilnagross
Annie McManus, Corderry Kilnagross.
Mary Gaffney, Lisdrumrea, Kilnagross.
Rose Ann Banaghan, Drumgowla, Kilnagross
Monica OHara, Mill Park, Drumsna.
senior member (history)
2019-02-17 14:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
463.
43. I went to the wood for brusna I brought no brusna. I brought no brusna home with me and I had brusna with me. Ans = The dogs name was Brusna.
44. As I looked out on my wonderful window, I saw a wonderful thing. I saw the dead carrying the living and wasn't that a wonderful thing. Ans = A motor car and people in it.
45. What has a foot but no toe or heel. Ans = a hill.
46. Spell the biggest rogue in the world in three letters. Ans= Fox.
47.Why is it a hen always picks a pot. Ans = because she cannot lick it.
48. How many hairs in a cats tail. Ans = none.
49. Why is dog like a tree, Ans = Because when he dies he loses his bark.
50. Eight arms but no hands a wooden leg but cannot stand. Often wet but cannot feel. Has no boots but shod with steel. Dressed in silk with a belt around the middle. Ans = Umbrella.
51. Luke has it before Paul has it behind and Micky Kelly has it twice in one place. Ans = the letter L.
52. Two brothers we are great burdens we bear. Heavily we are oppressed to my grief. I man say we are full all the day and empty when we go to rest. Ans = Your boots.
senior member (history)
2019-02-17 14:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
462
32. Three men went up the hill in a motor car. If two of the men ate the other what was the number of the car. Ans = 281
33. Long legs short thighs little head and no eyes. Ans = A tongs.
34. What always runs but never walk. Ans = a river.
35. Round the wood and never touches the wood. Ans = The bark of a tree.
36. The king of Morracco has a ship and in the ship his daughter sits and I'd be killed if I told her name but there's three times I've told it. Ans = Ann (And).
37. Four stick standers for diddlery anders two lookers. Two puckers a licker and a shaker. Ans = A cow.
38. As round as an apple as deep as a cup. All the men in Derry would not lift it up. Ans = A Spring well.
39. Little Jenny huddle sitting in a puddle with a green gown and white petticoat. And = Rushes.
40. What is in a car that there is no use for. Ans = Noise.
41. Timber, toes and iron nose and upon my word it would frighten the crows. And = Gun.
42. A little red man standing by the wall. He eats all he gets and drinks none atall. Ans = A fire.
43. That sleeps all night with it finger in its eye. Ans = the crook.
senior member (history)
2019-02-17 14:06
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rejected
awaiting decision
461
from her dwelling and seldom come home. Ans = A ship.
18. What has eyes but cannot see. Ans = A potatoe.
19. A houseful a roomful and cannot catch a spoonful.
Ans = Smoke.
20. What is brought to the table cut but never eaten. Ans = A pack of cards.
21. Three feet in the air two on the ground. A head of the living and a mouth of the dead. Ans = A pot on a man's head.
22. What eats out of four corners of the wood. Ans = A pig eating out of the four corners of a trough.
23. What makes a pair of boots. Ans = two boots.
24. What man wears the biggest hat. Ans = the man with the biggest head.
25. What has legs but cannot walk. Ans = A table.
26. What is always stirring and never stirs out of its place.
Ans = A pig's tail.
27. When is a door not a door. Ans = When it is a -jar.
28. Why is a drawn tooth like something forgotten. Ans = because it is gone out of your head.
29. What goes up when rain comes down. Ans = An Umbrella.
30. Flies high lights low cuts grass but never mows. Ans = Goose.
senior member (history)
2019-02-16 16:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
Ans = A brother and sister.
9. Twenty white horses up on a red hill. Picking and eating and lying there still. Ans = Teeth.
10. As I walked down the garden-side, I saw the live living in the dead. Six there were and seven there be. Guess that and then hang me. Ans = A nest of swallows in in a dead horse's ear.
11. What always walks with their head down. Ans = nails in a man's boots.
12. It grew in the wood. It works in the town. Many is, the crown it earns its master. Ans = A fiddle.
13. As black as ink as white as milk and hops on the road like a hailstone. Ans = A magpie.
14. Middy moddy mind body three feet and a hat. Ans = A pot.
15. What the poor man has the rich man wants what the miser spends the spendthrift keeps. Ans = Nothing.
16. When is a girls hair like the sea. Ans = When it is in waves.
17. I saw a great goose. She is a great size. The man that owns her needs to be wise. She has feet in her . belly and walk upon none. She goes far
senior member (history)
2019-02-16 16:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
459
Riddles
1. Spell broken down ditches in three letters. Ans = Gap
2. Useful useless instrument often bought but never lent. The men that buys it it is not his own and the man that borrows it never brings it home. And = Coffin.
3. I have an Aunt she has a red nose and the longer she sits the shorter she grows. Ans = Candle.
4. Under the fire and over the fire and never touches the fire.
Ans = A cake in an oven.
5. What is it that is black and white and read all over?
Ans = Newspaper.
6. Two legs sitting on three legs watching one leg. In comes four legs takes up one leg and goes out. Ans = a butcher sitting on a stool, watching a leg of mutton. A dog comes in and takes the mutton and goes out.
7. Why does a hen cross the road. And = to get to the other side.
8. There was a blind fiddler in Dublin and he had a brother, a blind fiddler in Cork and the fiddler in Cork had a brother a blind fiddler in Dublin.
senior member (history)
2019-02-16 15:58
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rejected
awaiting decision
Eibhlin Ni Conghaile. 19adh Bealtaine, 1938.
Rannta
1
Meig. Meig, arsa and gabhar. What. What arsa an caora. Bedad adeir an gabhar ta bearla ag an gcaora.
II
Is dana muc na an gabhar. Is dana bean na diabhal.
111
Ui Ghrian. Ui Ghrian, raigh tu ar aimsear. Thar raithe ta bliadhian ag
Maira Shean Liam rachadh siar in do cheanntair.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:00
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awaiting decision
37
knew of a woman who used to make poteen. He got three qarts from her. He spilled one of the qarts on his clothes and put the other two in his top coat pocket. He went back and got into the kings yard and lay in a drain. The men were watching for him to come. When the got the smell of the poteen they looked around and got the man in the drain. The took the two qarts off him and went into the corner of the stable and the drank away until the were drunk. While the were drunk he went into the stable and took one of the horses and brought him to the kings door and he had the king beggered out.
Annie May Lynch
Aughagrania
Drumshanbo
Mr. Rom Mannion
Aughagrania
Drumshanbo
Age 70 years Farmer
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 16:55
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rejected
awaiting decision
36
over the thief took his bag and gun and went to the mountain and shot seven or eight rabbit in the legs and put them into his bag. He came back and lay in a drain near where the kings men were ploughing. When the started to plough he let out one of the rabbits. It ran across the field and two of the men ran after it. A few minuts later he let go another one and two more of the men followed that one. When he saw that the were not able to shoot them he let go of the rest of the rabbits and the last two men followed them and when they were of sight the thief jumped out of the drain got his knife cut the traces got on the horses back and rode. When the king saw this he said he would give him his last trial he told the thief that he would have three horses in a stable a man at each of there heads two men standing in the door and two more walking through the yard and each of them had a gun. The thief had to bring one of the horses tot he kings palace and if he did he would give him a meather and a half of gold and If he did not he would be shot. The thief
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 16:48
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rejected
awaiting decision
35
Story
There was a farmer working with a king. The farmer had only one son. The king also had one son. The two boys were great friends. The king said that the farmers son would have to be sent away. So he gave him a hundred pounds to go across the sea to earn his living. After some years the boy came back. When he came home his father had a feast for him and the king and his son were invited to it. When the were a while talking the king asked the boy what trade he had learned since he went away. He said he had learned to be a thief. Alright said the king I will give you a trial for your life to morrow. The king said he would have four horses ploughing in a field and he said there would be two men at there heads with rifles and two more walking behing the horses and one on each side. If the thief was able to take the best horse out of the field and bring him to his fathers door he would give him 350 pounds. Alright said the thief. When the dinner was
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 16:42
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rejected
awaiting decision
38
Farm Animals
We have farm animals and domestic animals, at home. The farm animals are, cows asses calves and goates. The domestic animals are pigs hens ducks turkeys and cats.
When we are calling the hens we say chuck when calling the ducks we say wheet wheet. When we call the turkeys we say- biad biad. We say hurrish to the pig and when we are putting them sway we say ho muc. When we are calling the goates we say Kiddy. When we are calling the calves we say: Suck Suck. The house the cows are in is called a byre and the are tied to a stake by a chain. When we are driving away the ass we make a clacking noise against the roof, with our tongue against the roof of our mouth.
Annie May Lynch
Aughagrania
Drumshanbo
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
44
Teresa McCarron
Aughaguinea
Drumshanbo
Story got from Frank Mulvey
Aughakilbrack
Drumshanbo
Age 67 farmer
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 16:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
43
coin in his purse and returned home. When he went to bed that night he put the purse under his pillow. But the devil made such a commotion that Will could not sleep so he got up took the purse, put it on the anvil and beat it with the hammer until the devil begged for mercey. He promised to go away and never come near the place more if Will would only release him. Will agreed and let him go.
After some time Will died but when he tried to get into heaven the gates were barred against him. He would not be allowed into purgatory either and so he went down to hell. When he knocked the gate the devils wouldnt let him in there either as they were all afraid of him. He begged them to give him a light to light his way back to earth. The devils lit a wisp and passed it out through the bars and Will started back to earth. Ever since he has wandered about the earth carrying the lighted wisp. When people see a flickering light at night they say it is will 'o' the wisp.
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 16:21
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rejected
awaiting decision
41
of his purse. "Unfortunate wretch" said the little red man. Why didnt you wish for Heaven."
The little man went away and was never seen again. Will worked away in his forge but in spite of all his efforts he became poorer and poorer. One day a strange black-man came into the forge. He promised to make Will rich and prosperous on condition that he'd agree to go with him at the end of seven years. Will agreed and the man went away.
From that day forward the smith prospered. He became rich and powerful, and hardly felt the time passing till the seven years were past. Then one day the black man appeared in his forge and told him to get ready for the road. Will was making a plough-iron and he said to the black man, "Sit down in that chair and rest while I'm finishing this." The black-man did so, but when he tried to get up he was fastened to the chair.
Will promised to let hmi go on condition that he'd give him another seven years. The black man had to agree and so he was freed and he went
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 16:14
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rejected
awaiting decision
40
Will Cooper The Blacksmith
In olden times when pigs were swine
And turkeys smoked tobacco,
And swallows built their nest in old mens beards.
There lived a king and a queen, and many have been, but few of them we have seen except pictures.
In these old time theer lived a blacksmith named Will Cooper. Will was a very poor tradesman as he could make nothing in his forge except plough-irons.
On cold stormy day a little red man came into the forge shivering with cold. Will took pity on him and let him sit up on the hob beside the fire. Before leaving the little man told Will to any three wishes and he would get them. The blacksmith asked that anyone who sat in his chair would not be able to leave it without his permission. That anyone who took up his hammer would bot be able to leave it down without his leave. And last that no one only himself could take money out
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 19:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
488
not to be wondered at. 22 families, or 132 individuals were unhoused (evicted) on the 25th October, the houses or cabins destroyed, and the wretched inhabitants sent wandering through the Union, half-naked, whithout any means of subsistence, and not even a day's employment." - From Captain Wynne's Report.
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 19:01
approved
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awaiting decision
487
6th June 1849.
Number in Workhouse - . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 1,123
.. .. Temporary Sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
.. .. Fever .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
.. .. Jamestown Auxiliary . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
.. .. Carrick Auxiliary . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
.. .. .. School . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
12th February 1848.
"visited Kilmore Electoral Division. Found a fearful amount of suffering from want of shelter, and from fever among adults, and dysentry among children. The sufferers were all in reciept of outdoor relief. They were in the ditches, with a few sticks and a little straw thrown over them. In one of these abodes of misery, we found the mother dead, with five children around her. She had been dead some time, and no doubt would have remained unburied, but that Captain Routh and I gave money to procure a coffin. She had died of fever. The state of affairs in this townland was
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 18:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
486
given upon oath:
Proceedings of the Board of Guardians at Meeting on 1st January 1848.
Estimate of Provisions and necessaries
(1) for the ensuing week, as presented by Master.
408 lbs. bread.
2,278 lbs Indian Meal.
2,543 .. Rice.
2,220 quarts of sweet Milk.
2,041 .. .. Buttermilk.
150 boxes of Turf.
2 cwts. of Salt.
18 lbs. Candles.
4 .. supplemental.
56 .. Soap.
20 cwts. Straw.
26th February 1848.
(2) 20,600 in receipt of Relief, more than one-third of the entire population.
5,000 of these were children, rationed in 62 schools of the Union-bread ration.
Family of 5 would receive 32 lbs of meal weekly, worth 0..2..4. pounds or 4 2/3d. per day.
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 18:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
485
people out of the over-crowded workhouse. Persons on relief works were given a small amount of meal weekly, but no money was given for such work. Meal depots were opened in several centres, and the relieving officers attended at these once a week, and distributed about a stone and a half of meal to the starving family. Owing to the great cost of the outdoor relief, the rates became very high, and most of the poor farmers were quite unable to pay them. On farms of less that four pounds' valuation, the landlord had to pay the rates. To make up for this the landlords simply increased the rent on those farms by four pounds. When the farmers no longer could pay either rent or rates the landlords evicted them, and pulled down their poor cottages, so that the landlords would not be liable for the rates on such houses.
The Local Government Inspector, Captain Wynne, lived in Boyle, and visited the work-house in Carrick two or three times a week. He sent a Report to Dublin every week about his visits to the Carrick-on-Shannon workhouse. The following are some Extracts from these Reports, which were published in the year 1894 after an inquiry was held by the House of Lords and the evidence
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 18:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
485
people out of the over-crowded workhouse. Persons on relief works were given a small amount of meal weekly, but no money was given for such work. Meal depots were opened in several centres, and the relieving officers attended at these once a week, and distributed about a stone and a half of meal to the starving family. Owing to the great cost of the outdoor relief, the rates became very high, and most of the poor farmers were quite unable to pay them. On farms of less that four pounds' valuation, the landlord had to pay the rates. To make up for this the landlords simply increased the rent on those farms by four pounds. When the farmers no longer could pay either rent or rates the landlords evicted them, and pulled down their poor cottages, so that the landlords would not be liable for the rates on such houses.
The Local Government Inspector, Captain Wynne, lived in Boyle, and visited the work-house in Carrick two or three times a week. He sent a Report to Dublin every week about his visits to the Carrick-on-Shannon workhouse. The following are some Extracts from these Reports, which were published in the year 1894 after an inquiry was held by the House of Lords and the evidence
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 15:06
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awaiting decision
484
account of the terrible sufferings of the people in a Report on the Carrick-on-Shannon Workhouse written by a local Government Inspector in 1848. He says that at one period in 1848 there were more than twelve hundred people in the Workhouse, and that relief was given to between twelve and fifteen thousand persons weekly.
An auxiliary workhouse was opened in an old mill near Jamestown, and three hundred and fifty children were sent there from the Carrick workhouse. The conditions in the Carrick workhouse were terrible. Poor people were dying of Cholera and fever every day, and the staff were very careless. Two meals of stirabout were given daily. Often the dinner was not finished until ten o'clock at night. A local magistrate who visited the kitchen on morning, said he had to hurry away again owing to the disgusting smell of the boilers in which the stirabout was cooked. The milk contractor was supposed to send in, and was paid for, one thousand gallons of milk weekly. He had only seven or eight poorly-fed cows to do this. Various relief works were started to try to keep
senior member (history)
2019-02-12 14:59
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awaiting decision
483
Names of Pupils:- Mary Ryan, Leitrim, Co. Leitrim.
.. .. .. Eileen Eardley, Tullylannon .. ..
.. .. .. Muriel Benison, Derreen, Co.Roscommon
Information supplied, in part, by Charles Taylor, aged 86, of
Leitrim, Co. Leitrim.
Famine Times.
There are a few old persons in this locality who can recall many of the facts which they heard from their parents about the Great Famine of 1846 to 1848. This famine was caused by the almost complete failure of the potato crop. Blight set on in June 1846 and almost the entire crop rotted in the ground.
At that period the potato was the principal food of the country people, and as the country was then far more thickly populated than it is today, the poor people of Leitrim and North Roscommon were faced with starvation. There is a full
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 15:32
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awaiting decision
482
for the latest news. Such a lodging-house was kept by Mrs Kilcran, and another by a man nick-named "Gamby," in leitrim village. The strollers or travellers were sure of a full house each night, for many young and old people were sure to come to hear the news.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 15:30
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awaiting decision
481
with two horses pulling them, and they sleep in them at night. The pedlar has not any van, he has to take a night's lodging. Very few of the tinkers have vans, they make up tents, to sleep in. The tinkers sell tin-cans, porringers, scoops, boilers, artificial-flowers, and mats. The woman of the house does not like to see the tinkers coming.
The gipsies and tinkers travel in bands or groups. They have regular camping places, and generally spend two or three days wherever the camps are setup. There are two groups of tinkers who frequently visit this locality. They are the McDonoughs and the Reilley's. At sport meetings, races, regattas, and perhaps at football-matches, other travelling folks are always to be seen. They are the "three-card " man, the "trick-of-the-loop" man, the man with the "wheel--of-fortune," or the roulette tables, and of course the ballad-singer and strolling musician.
In former days when newspapers were scarce, and "wireless," and "broadcasting" unknown, these travelling folk were welcomed by the country people. They brought news from other districts, and when such a traveller took up lodging for the night in a particular house, many of the local people gathered to that house, eager
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 15:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
480
Name of Pupil:- Mary Ryan.
Address:- Leitrim, Co. Leitrim.
Travelling Folk.
In this district travelling folk still call to our homes. The same people call to our homes. two or three times a year. Gipsies, and pedlars, are not very poor. The gipsies, and pedlars, sell articles such as, pins, needles, spools of thread, collar-studs, shoe laces, brooches, pen-knives, scissors, combs, small prayer-books, holy-pictures, and tables. Sometimes when the woman of the lacks some small article, it is very convenient to buy from the pedlars, or from the gipsies.
The pedlar's wares are carried on his back in a pack, or also in a suit-case or bag. In this bag are his wonderful collection of cheap goods. The gipsies have a couple of wagons
senior member (history)
2019-02-09 19:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
479
sheep, and horses were left for a certain time. Oak-bark was also used to tan the hides, and also lime and other substances. This was a very slow process, as it required about six months to tan a hide properly. At the same time the quality of the leather turned out by the old tannery was excellent.
In primitive times our ancestors wore untanned hides on their feet. In the Gaedealtact such shoes are still worn. They are usually made of cow-skin with loops to fasten across the instep. They are called pampooties.
senior member (history)
2019-02-09 19:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
478
they wear pampooties. Pampooties are sandals made from the untanned hide of a cow or sheep, and of course are much softer that leather.
People who go barefoot in youth always have a better carriage and a sprightler step than those who have always their feet covered. There are three shoe-makers in Leitrim village, but there is not a single one in the surrounding district. This is easy to explain, as it is now possible to by factory-made boots and shoes very cheaply. This was not so formerly; almost all boots and shoes were hand-made by shoemakers, and every district had one or more shoemakers.
Twenty or thirty years ago many of our small farmers and labourers wore clogs. These were boots with a wooden sole. They were difficult to walk in, but kept the feet very dry. They have gone quite out of fashion. A few generations ago most of the leather was home-made, that is it was made in the local tanners or tan-yard. In the town of Carrick-on-Shannon there is a small back street, known as the "Tan-Yard." The tan-yard consisted of a deep pit of water in which the skins of cows,
senior member (history)
2019-02-09 19:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
477
Name of Pupil:- Eileen Eardley.
Address:- Tullylannon, Co Leitrim.
Care of The Feet.
Formerly country people did not wear boots or shoes except on special occasions. They preferred to go bare-foot for some kinds of work, such as cutting turf. Thirty or forty years ago country school-children went bare-foot for about half the year.
This was healthy, and kept the feet firm and free from corns and bunions and chilblains. Such children were much hardier that children are now.
Children's feet are often injured and miss-shapen through their wearing tight ill-fitting shoes in their school-days. The children in the Gaedealtact have well-shaped feet, because they go bare-foot during youth, and as they grow to manhood
senior member (history)
2019-02-09 19:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
476
field. A stream flows down from Carrowkeavy lake, a hundred and fifty-yards from the lake. This stream is beside the well. It is a beautiful well with a sandy-bottom in it. There is a white thorn bush over the well. There used to be paterons, held there up to thirty or forty years ago. It was stopped on account of the faction fighting, two families used to go there and fight, the names were Farrels and Gills. They used to beat other savagely. It was said that a man named Farrell, was killed there. People used to make stations there on Garland Sunday. There is another well near kedgue, called Lasser well. People go there yet to make stations.
senior member (history)
2019-02-09 19:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
475
Name of Pupil:- Mary Ryan.
Address:- Leitrim, Co Leitrim.
Our Holy Wells.
I heard from my mother that there was a hold well in Donegal called Saint Patrick's well, and people used to go there to make Stations the used to leave a ribbon on the bush behind them. One day a man came from Dublin and looked at the water. He said it would be good water for making minerals. When he went back to Dublin, he sent two men down for some of the water and when the men went to the well was white.
It was just the same as if you threw a couple of buckets of milk in to it. They went away and they came back again and the well was the same way. The two men went to the priest and he told them not to interfere with it. I heard also that there is a holy well in Tullylannon called tubarindonaig well. It is in Mrs. Reynolds
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 14:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
470
Mother has Wyandottes, Rhode-Island-Reds, Leghorns, and Minorcas.
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 14:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
469
His hair has to be clipped every year, and each day he has to be well brushed and curry-combed. He has to be taken to the farrier, or smith, for shoeing regularly. When a horse is kept continually in stable, he has to be given a mash of bran or meal and roots, once a week. To make his coat shine we sometimes give him a little crushed flax-seed.
Out pigs are kept in a "cro," or "sty." They have to be kept very clean, and their house should be cleaned out every day. To prevent their turning up of the "bed," put rings in the tip of the pigs' snouts. Pigs thrive best on cooked foods, such as potoes, roots, vegetables, and grain or meal. Different calls are used for the different animals, also for fowls. For the pigs he calls "Hurrish." Young horses come when a peculiar whistle is used. Hens and chickens are called by "Thuck" Turkeys by "Byib," Ducks by "Weet," Different calls are used for the different animals, also for fowls. When a hen or turkey or goose or duck is set to hatch, my mother puts a mark on each egg. She buys the eggs for hatching from the poultry-station. To prevent the young birds in the eggs from being killed by shock in a thunder-storm, she puts a piece of old iron at the bottom of the hatching-box. Thirteen eggs are usually put under the hen.
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 14:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
468
or byre. His byre has a concrete floor, and there is room for eight cows, four at each end. Each cow is tied to stake by a chain round the neck, though some farmers prefer to tie with a rope round the cow's horns.
The chain or rope is fastened to a ring, which can move freely up and down the stake. His stakes are round iron bars, about two inches in diameter. They are fastened into two beams which stretch from side to side of the byre into each wall. One of those beams near the ground serves as a rack or manger. He buys the "tyings." Some people hang a horse-shoe upside down for luck over the cow-house door, others hand up a sacred picture the place above the cows' heads.
When milking a cow the milker should sing or "croon," as this makes the cow yield her milk more freely. Another custom in this locality is to put a two-shilling piece in the milking vessel when a cow is being milked for the first time. Some people believe that if a person passes near the place where milking is going on and does not speak, such a person will steal the milk.
He keeps his horse in a stable. This stable is fitted with a manger and corn-box. A halter is used to tie the horse to a ring in the manger.
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 14:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
467
Name of Pupil:- Mary Ryan,
Address:- Leitrim, Co Leitrim
The Care of Our Farm Animals.
On my neighbour's farm, five cows, two year-and-a half-old bullocks, one two-year-old heifer, three yearling calves. He also has a seven-year-old mare. He has two pigs. His wife has one hundred hens, two ducks, and a goose, and one turkey-hen.
None of his stock is pedigree. He has none of the Aberdeen-Angus strain, the rest are Shorthorn breed, and he has not any of the Hereford breed. He has no cow of the great milking-strains, namely Frisian, Jersey, or Kerry. Three of the cows have names - "Spotty," "Polly," and "Magpie." His mare is called "Dolly-Grey." Sometimes when he drives the cows home to be milked, he shouts ":How," "How," and "Hup," to make them move on faster. To call the calves he shouts "Suck," "Suck." The house for the cows is called a "cow-house"
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
baking-soda it is used for cake-making. We can drink it, when it is fresh. It is also given to young calves and to pigs.
For small churnings the barrel-churn is very popular. This churn does not revolve, but is fitted with a four bladed "beater," worked by a cranked handle.
There is also a larger barrel-churn without any beater. This churn is pivoted at two points in a frame, and the churning is done by making the churn revolve in a circular direction.
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 13:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
452
seizing the handle of the churn-dash with both hands, and working vigorously up and down on the thick cream, so as to break up the latter with the wooden disc. Boiling water is added to the cream when churning in cold weather, while cold water may have to be added during very warm weather. After about twenty minutes or so of churning, the butter begins to form in the shape of small grains. When these grains become a certain size, neither too large nor too small, the churning is finished. Then a short piece of round wood is placed underneath the bottom edge of the churn, and the churn is "rocked" gently from side to side to collect the butter in a mass at the centre of the top of the buttermilk.
The butter is then lifted out with a strainer and placed in a wooden dish. Then the woman squeezes the buttermilk out with two wooden butter spades. When all the butter-milk has been removed she adds a little salt, and works it through the butter with the spades or with a shallow wooden bowl called a cooler. After this she shapes the butter into a roll or sometimes into tiny prints.
The buttermilk is very useful. Along with
senior member (history)
2019-02-02 12:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
513
be removed by trimming and the dripping grease soiled anything on which it fell. Of late years the candles used are paraffin wax, and are made in Dublin and Limerick. Paraffin are now the most common luminant in country houses, though during the last few years many houses have been equipped with "Calor" gas for lighting and heating. Several large houses and many shops now have their own Electric light. This is obtained by means of a dynamo and batteries charged by a small petrol or crude-oil engine.
senior member (history)
2019-02-02 12:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
512
Arigna mines. It has to be mixed with wet daub, and formed by hand into briquettes of a round or, oval shape. These need a little dry turf or wood underneath them to kindle them, and make a very warm and lasting fire.
The method of lighting the house at night was quite different in the old days from what it is today. Splinters of bog-deal were used by poor people living near bogs, where the old deal trunks were to found by digging in the peat. Rush candles were very common then, and the moulds for making them are still to be found in some houses in this locality. The freshly cut rushes were first peeled and dried, and this dried "pith," was dipped several times in a shallow dish or basin of melted fat, until the candle was of sufficient thickness. Candles were also made by dipping home-made wicks of wollen threads in a vessel of melted mutton fat. Such candles spluttered when burning, and the grease caused by the lighted wick kept dropping continually. These candles were not satisfactory, for the burnt portions of the wick had to
senior member (history)
2019-02-02 12:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
511
than a hundred years ago many of the huts or cabins did not have a chimney. The fire was kindled on the centre of the kitchen floor, and a hole was left in the roof directly above it to allow the smoke to escape. There are many descriptions of such huts in Isaac Weld's "Roscommon Survey," and also in Dr. McPartlan's "Leitrim Survey." These surveys were made more thatn a hundred and thirty years ago. Such houses had floors of pounded clay or "daub." Naturally these floors did not wear well. They ravelled readily, and holes were constantly forming in them. The windows were very small, often only a single pane
of glass, and were not made to open.
Several cottages in this locality have half-doors. With such a door the top half can be left open to allow air and light to enter, while the bottom half is shut to keep out fowl. There is usually a door in one piece inside this half-door. For fire the people in this district depend principally on turf. Wood is not too plentiful. People who haven ot turf, or whose turf has not been well saved have to use culm. This slack coal, called culm, is obtained at the
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 16:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
510
"thatcher" was to be found. He was a craftsman at his work, and spent the whole year going from farm-house to farm-house thatching for hire.
Mud-cabins were often seen formerly, especially near bogs. The sidewall of such cabins were usually about six feet high, and made of mud or dried peat. A sloping roof of rough timber, "scrans" and rushes completed the building. These were the houses of the very poor.
In many of the old houses there was a recess in the kitchen which contained a bed. This recess was something like the modern "bay-window." When planning the house, portion of the side-wall, usually about seven feet, was moved out about a yard and a half so that the side wall looked like this: _n_. The roof of thatch projected out beyond this recess. An old house in Leitrim village about forty years ago had two such recesses one in the kitchen, and one in the adjoining room. There was not any window in this recess. Some of the very old cabins had the fireplace in the corner of the kitchen, instead of in the side-wall or gable. More
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 16:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
502
many people regard them as a nuisance, and would prefer to be let enjoy their sleep. Christmas Day is a day of feasting and mirth. Houses, shops, and churches are decorated with holly and festoons of coloured paper. Many people have parties for their friends on that night, and all members of a family try to be together in the family home on that great day.
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 16:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
501
spiteful fairy called the Puca, goes through the country on that night and puts a blight on any fruit remaining on trees or bushes. Some people say that haws, sloes, blackberries, and any other berries should not be eaten after Hallow Eve.
Within doors, fun, frolic, and feasting are engaged in. Games or tricks of many kinds are played. In towns and villages groups of young people go about, knocking at doors and going away immediately. Other young people engage in mischief, such as tying a long string to a door-knocker, so that they may not be recognised after knocking:- putting red-pepper in through key-holes of doors:- stopping a chimney outside with a sack or a large sod:- arranaging "booby-traps" with buckets of water, and similar monkey-tricks.
Christmas week has festival proceedings of a special kind. Groups of persons, called "carol-singers," or "waits" go through the streets singing carols, and playing musical instruments. They are often quite anxious to get money for their singing. This should not be. As those carol-singers usually go round the towns at daylight
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 19:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
500
and rivers are very much afraid of boating or bathing on that day. On the 23rd of June, the Eve of Midsummers Day, or feast of Saint John, it is customary in every locality to light a bonfire. Young people gather round these bonfires, singing and dancing, often till very late at light. The bonfires, of turf or wood, are not kindled until sometime after sunset.
On the last Sunday of July, Garland Sunday, patterns were held formerly at holy wells in every district. This custom is kept up in many places yet. There is still a pattern at Lassar well, beside the ruined church of Kilronan, near Keadue. About thirty years agt the last pattern was held at a holy well beside Kiltoghert Cemetery.
The fifteenth of August, Lady Day, is another great day for patterns. In many districts processions are held on this date in honour of our Blessed Lady.
Hallow Ever has many strange customs. Old people are still to be found who are afraid to go out after dark on that night. Others believe that a sort of
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 18:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
499
musical instruments and asking for money to help them kill their old enemy, the wren. On Saint Brigid's Day in some localities of making a cross of plaited rushes and fastening ti to the door outside. This is to put the house under the protection of the Saint. Saint Brgdid's Day is the first of February. On Saint Patrick's Day Irish men and boys wear a sprig of Shamrock in their hats and caps. In some districts the local band turns out and plays national airs. Formerly many people got drunk on this day.. This evil practice was called "drowing the Shamrock," To-day the licensed houses are not allowed to open in Eire, and this barbarous custom of drinking is not permitted. On Shrove Tuesday people cook pancakes for tea. This may be on account of Lent, which starts on the next day and when people have to abstain from many kinds of food. On the last day of April, that is May Eve, children gather the butter-cups or May flowers, and strew them at the threshold as a mark of welcome to Mary's month.
On Whit Monday people avoid lakes
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 18:48
approved
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awaiting decision
498
Name of Pupil:- Muriel Benison,
Address:- Derreen, Co. Roscommon.
Festival Customs.
Most of the special feasts of the year are observed in a special manner, and some of them have many old customs which have come down to us from long ago.
The chief of these feasts are New Year's Day, Twelfth Night or Old Christmas, Shrove Tuesday, Patrick's Day, Saint Brigid's Day, Hallow-Eve, Christmas Day, and Saint Stephen's Day.
For instance on Saint Stephen's Day, groups of young men calling themselves Mummers or Wren-boys, disguise themselves and go from village to village and house to house, singing, dancing and playing
senior member (history)
2019-01-22 17:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
493
In the townland of Cre there is a fine sulphur spring, and in Diffier there is an iron spring. In the townland of Fawn at Carraceevagh bridge there is a fine spring of very cold water. This well known as "Tubber Donagh" was famous for its "pattern" on Garland Sunday. So many abuses crept in owing to faction-fights and drunkeness that the Parish Priest of Kiltoghert got an end put to the "patterns" about seventy years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-01-22 17:30
approved
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awaiting decision
492
got its name from Finn's famous wolf-hound, Bran.
At a distance of one mile and a half to the east of Leitrim village is seen the remarkable-looking hill of Sheemore. There is a cairn on the summit. This hill and one further to the north called Sheemore, are the subjects of a poem by the blind harper, Carolon, who is buried at Kilronan. An extension of Sheemore to the South is called the hill of Mong. There is the remains of a wind-mill on the highest part of Mong. On the hill also in olden times there was a "bruidhean" or guest-house for travellers. Being situated as it is, so high up, its lights were visible far off and were a glad sight for hungry travellers, who knew when they saw so many bright doors and windows, that food and shelter were waiting for them there.
In the townland of Mackan there is an old brickyard. One hundred years ago both bricks and tiles were made here.
senior member (history)
2019-01-22 17:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
491
ORuarchs wife was his aunt. Tradition says that when engaged in making raids into West Connacht, ODonnell usally called for a visit to his relationes in Leitrim castle.
The land to the south and east of Leitrim village is very good with a considerable amount of limestone. On the north and west of the village the soil is wet and dauby, and is difficult to cultivate. To the north-west of the village the large wood of Drumhierney is to seen. This wood consists of oak, chiefly, with a small amount of spruce, beech and horse-chestnut. There was s good number of ash trees in this wood about thirty years ago, but they have all been cut down and sold. In this wet dauby soil timber grows freely. Ash is very easy to grow in it, also horse-chestnut, oak, beech, poplar, spruce, and larch.
the river Shannon flows past Leitrim village where it is joined by the Ballinamore canal. About one mile to the south-east of the village is Lough Bran. Some people believe that the lake
senior member (history)
2019-01-20 16:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
490
map of the "Down" survey it is written "Kiltawhorke,"
The word "Leitrim" means the grey ridge or grey hill. "Mong" means the long grass. "Ballinwing" means the place of the sedgy morass or swamp. "Mackan" means parsnip land or land for root crops.
"Drumgeaglom" means the ridge of the bare branch. "Creagh" means the dauby place.
"Port" means a harbour or place for ships. "Drumhierney" is said to mean the ridge of Terman.
The ruins of many houses are still to seen in my townland. The owners died or emigrated after the terrible Famine of ninety years ago. My native village, Leitrim, which contains some ruins of one of Prince ORuarc's castles is mentioned in a song called "The Valley Lay Smiling Before Me." Several authorities maintain that the valley mentioned in the song is not the valley of Leitrim village, but the valley round O'Ruarc's castle in Dromahaire. The famous Red Hugh O'Donnell spent many a night in this castle of Leitrim.
senior member (history)
2019-01-20 16:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
489
Name of Pupil:- Margaret Keaveny,
Address:- Ballinwing, Col Leitrim
My Home District.
My home district is in the Townland of Ballinwing, in the Parish of Kiltoghert, in the Barony of Leitrim and in the County of Leitrim..
There are twelve families in the Townland of Ballinwing, and about sixty people. Of the dwelling houses in the Townland, five are slated, and seven are thatched. The most common family names are Farrell, Mulvey, and Lynch.
The word "Kiltoghert" means "The Church of the Scented Tufts." In a book called the "Composition of Connacht" which was written more than two hundred years ago, the name is written "Cilltawhorke." In the "Annals of the Four Masters" it is written "Ciltatharc" and Dr.O'Donovan says that an old native speaker of the district pronounced it "Cilltathccumarch," [?] In the Barony
senior member (history)
2019-01-20 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
465
animal with the end of his stick.. Should the purchaser be a cattle-dealer, the animal bought is marked by clipping some hair with a scissors from the flank, or by marking with a red material.
When a bull is sold the rope or chain by which he is led has to be given to the new owner.
Four of our Leitrim fairs are outstanding, namely the Spring fairs, held in March and April, and the Autumn fairs held in October and November.
Neither sheep nor horses are sold in Leitrim fair; they are sold in Boyle.
Sometimes a few carts of bonhams are sold in Leitrim fair; all horses from this locality have to be sold in Boyle fair, as there is not any other fair for horses.
senior member (history)
2019-01-20 15:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
464
Leitrim on fair days. Previous to that time, three banks came to Leitrim each fair day. This was of great assistance to cattle dealers who could thus pay cash for the animals bought. Nowadays the majority of the buyers pay by cheque. In spite of this handicap, the Leitrim fair continues to hold its own.
After an animal is sold the buyer has to be given a luck-penny by the seller. The money is usually called "luck," The amount of "luck" varies with the price of the beast or beasts sold. If the amount is large the luck may be a pound. Usually the luck given back to the purchaser of a single beast varies from a shilling to a crown.
When the bargain is agreed on, the seller slaps the open hand of the buyer with his own open hand, and says "Take Him," or, "Take Her."
Then the buyer, if a country-man, smears mud along the flank of the
senior member (history)
2019-01-20 15:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
463
fair-green, though of late there has been a tendency among several sellers to keep their cattle on the street. This is a very dangerous practice, and it is to be hoped that the Gardai will be given power to prevent this abuse.
Traffic is delayed, houses and walls are smeared with manure, and the street is left in a filthy condition, especially on wet days.
A toll is charged on all cattle sold at Leitrim fair. The present owner of the fair-green is the post-master, Mr. Black. He collects this toll. The toll varies from two pence to sixpence, according to the class of animal. There is no longer a pig fair in Leitrim. .The pig fair is held in Carrick-on-Shannon on the day before the Leitrim cattle fair. The people of Carrick-on-Shannon succeeded in taking the pig fair away from Leitrim, but so far they have not been able to take the cattle fair. They felt certain of doing so about five years ago when they succeeded in preventing the various banks from coming to
senior member (history)
2019-01-20 14:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
460
older people wear black or dark clothes, while the children very often wear white, especially for First Communion days, also for Confirmation.
For sports and picnics, boating, and other amusements, many people wear white. For tennis, badmington, and other games, ladies wear white clothes, and sometimes in cities and large towns, shorts are worn by the women taking part in these games. Special clothes, or uniforms, are worn by people to show their ocupation or calling. Thus soldiers, police, firemen, bus conductors, railway-officials, and postmen wear uniforms. Many of the professions too are distinguished by the robes worn. Thus judges, counsellors, and barristers, wear wigs and gowns when in court. University professors also wear gowns and special caps.
Women, whose profession is nursing, wear uniforms of white, grey, or blue. Certain classes of domestic servants wear special clothes, known as livery. Amongst the latter class are chauffeurs, footmen, butlers, and hotel waiters. Men employed as doorkeepers, or commissionaries, often wear a very showy livery, resembling a military uniform. Clergymen wear black clothes as a rule; when engaged in their church duties, robes are worn.
senior member (history)
2019-01-19 18:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
459
nice, stiff fronted white shirt for her husband's wear on Sunday.
Spinning-wheels are fairly numerous in this locality. There are about six houses within a radius of two miles round Leitrim village in which wool is spun. After the woman of the house spins the home-grown wool she dyes the thread any colour she likes. Suitable dyes are sold in the local shops. This home-made thread or "worsted," is then knit by the mother or daughters into socks, stockings, jumpers, jerseys, tam-o'-shanters or scarves.
For his work the tailor needs the following equipment. Needles, coarse and fine; a large scissors or shears, also a smaller one, a measuring tape, a thimble, chalk, white and coloured, reels of sewing-cotton: his "goose," or large smoothing iron, a board for inserting in the garment on which he is engaged, a sewing-machine; cards of buttons. If he stocks the cloth for his customers' convenience he will have all the "trimmings' such as materials for linings, pockets, strappings of breeches, and the like, in stock also.
Special types of clothes are worn on certain occasions, such as funerals, weddings, picnics, sports, feises, at Confirmation and other Church ceremonies. For mourning, or sorrowful occasions black or dark-coloured clothes are worn. For weddings, white or bright colours are chosen. For Church ceremonies,
senior member (history)
2019-01-19 18:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
458
flannel is still very much worn by the men in the Gaedealtact. Their white flannel coats are known as "bawneens."
Before making the suit the tailor takes the customer's measurements with his tape. He then cuts out the cloth and proceeds to sew it together. The first sewing is done with very long stitching called "tacking," or "basting." Then the suit is fitted on, and the alterations are marked with crosses of chalk at the the defective or ill-fitting parts. When country tailors start sewing they like to sit cross-legged on a table, first taking off their shoes but retaining their socks. To hold the material in position for sewing, the tailor uses his "board." This is a smooth piece of wood, about thirty inches long, six inches side and about three-quarter of an inch in thickness. The cloth is placed in position round this board, just like pulling on a glove.
About one hundred years ago Leitrim County was famous for flax-growing. This home-grown flax was scutched and worked at in the homes, and excellent linen was thus obtained. When this brown linen cloth had been well bleached it became snow-white. The woman of the house then made shirts, chemises and under-clothing for the whole family. She also made sheets and table-cloths. Every good house-keeper in those far-off days, tried to have a
senior member (history)
2019-01-19 18:37
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Name of Pupil:- Mary Ryan,
Address:- Leitrim, Co. Leitrim
Clothes Made Locally.
There are three men's tailors in this locality, and three women's tailors, or dressmakers. There is not any men's tailor in Leitrim Village today. Formerly there were two, but when these died a few years ago their sons did not carry on the tailoring. Today tailors work in their own homes. Sixty or seventy years ago this was not so.
Tailors in those days used to come to the house of their customers, and remain for a week or a fortnight, making suits for the whole family.
First the weaver came with his loom, and wove the wool into a coarse cloth called frieze. He also made flannel cloth from the wool. This home-made cloth was cut up and sewn by the tailor into clothes for the family. Home-made
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 12:05
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feet long, rounded, and pointed at the end.
There is a wooden peg, about eight inches from this point, on which the "setter" places his foot when making the hole in the sod.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 12:04
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essential for the work.
The best mixture is sulphate of copper (bluestone) and washing-soda.
Finally, the potatoes are lifted or dug out of the earth in October. Father and the boys do the digging with spades, and we, children, help with the picking.
The sound potatoes are stored in pits, locally known as "heaps." The potatoes are built up in a roof-shaped, or wedge-shaped, manner to a height of about two feet. The ground underneath is made level first, and the width of the "heap' of potatoes is also about two feet, and tapers gradually to a point like the "ridging" of a roof. On a dry day a covering of rushes is carefully laid against the sides and on the top of the potatoes, and this is then covered to a depth of three or four inches with earth, which is dug up all round the heap. The digging of this trench all round the pit or "heap," helps to remove the rain that falls, and runs down the sides of the pit.
The "scibhin."
This is a wooden shaft about four
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 11:56
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As few farmers in our locality have two farm-horses, it is usual to work in "co" when ploughing. This means that you borrow a horse to get your ploughing done, then lend your horse to the neighbour who obliged you with his. Many farmers also co-operate with their neighbours when digging with the loy. A large number working for the same person, without payment, is called a "meitheal."
Every member of this "meitheal" will have all the others to work for him on the day choses for his own "meitheal," until there have been as many meitheals as members.
When the young stalks are just about to burst up, the crop has to be moulded or "finished." This is done by digging the furrows to a depth of two or three inches and shovelling the mould on to the top of the ridge.
The next work is spraying. This needs to be done at least twice, and, in a wet Summer, three times. The first spraying should be done when the stalks are about nine inches tall.
The second spraying should be done about a fortnight or three week later. A spraying machine is
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 11:49
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451
Name of Pupil:- Eileen Easdley
Address:- Tullylannon, Leitrim
Churning
Our churn is an upright one, and is about sixteen years old. The top and bottom are circular, and it is about three feet in height. The sides taper from the bottom to about six inches from the top. This "top" or rim is splayed out slightly upwards. There is a circular hole in the centre of the round lid, through which the handle of the "churn-dash" passes. This '\churn-dash" consists of a wooden handle about six feet long, with a heavy disc of perforated wood, about twelve inches across, at the lower end. The churn is made, like a barrel, of oak staves, bound round with six strong iron hoops. The churning is done by
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:49
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a wooden "step" on the right just above the blade: there is also a rounded projection at the back, also just above the blade, to give leverage when turning the sod.
Before planting, the seed potatoes are cut by the woman of the house.
She cuts each potato taking care to leave an "eye" in each.
The "sllits" are planted in rows of three across. The rows are about nine inches apart. The setter makes three holes with the "scibhin" across the ridge, one hole in each outside sod, and the third in the centre of the ridge.
He wears a stout calico bag, like a wide deep pocket, tied round his waist.
The bag, which is called a "guggering" bag, holds about half a stone of "slits." As soon as the setter makes a hole with the "scibhin," he drops one "slit" with his left hand into the hole.
Towards evening he stops "setting" or planting and with a long-handled mallet or graipe closes the hole by striking the mould near the hole, until the latter is filled with the powered earth.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:42
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Spring is a rainy one.
Father prepares the ground for the crop. Farmyard manure is carted out to the field whenever the land is sufficiently dry for carting in January or February.
The potato field, if a lea one, is then "scored." Scoring mean that straight lines are cut, with the point of a loy or spade, three feet six inches apart, and running parallel. To ensure that the lines are quite parallel, a rope or chain is used to guide the "scorer." Manure is then spread between those scored lines, and the ground is ready for ploughing or digging.
These scored lines are a great help to both ploughman and digger, as they have no trouble in making a straight furrow, the outer edge of the sod being already cut.
The blade of the loy has a steel top. They are sold in hardware shops. The handle is made of ash.
The local carpenter, cooper, or wheelwright fashions them, and fits them to the blade. The loy has
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:36
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Name of Pupil: Margaret Smart
Address: Dergra, Co. Roscommon.
The Potato-Crop
We grow potatoes on our farm every year. The amount of land under this crop varies each year according to the weather in February and March. When these months, or the latter part of February at least, are dry, we usually plough about an acre of lea ground for potatoes. Our land is not limestone but it is easy to plough. Some of our neighbours' lands are dauby, and can only be dug with a loy when the
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 16:21
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foot. One of these is in Tullylannon, and it is a short cut from the new road to the Ballinwing road. The other is in Ballinwing, and runs north into the townland of Newbrook. The oldest road in this locality which is still used for vehicles is the old road leading from the New road to Kiltoghert graveyard. There is a reference in the "Annals of the Four Masters" to a quarrel, many hundred years ago in which several men were killed, on the "Green at Kiltoghert." As the old guest-house was near, the ruined church of Kiltoghert, it is likely that this is one of the oldest paved roads in our Parish.
There are three fords in the river Shannon near Leitrim village. One ford at Battlebridge, is less than a half a mile distant. A second is at Port, about three-quarters of a mile away, and the third, at Drumboylan, is about a mile and a half away. Tradition says that when Saint Patrick visited Connacht he crossed from Leitrim into Roscommon at the ford in Drumboylan.
The Ballinamore and Ballyconnell canal enters the Shannon about two hundred yards to the west of Leitrim village. This canal is not navigable now. It is choked with weeds; the locks have all rotted and fallen to pieces: but the
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 16:09
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started working, The man that came out of the cave came to him and asked him was in the cave. The man said "No." the man that came out of the cave said, "If you were, do not deny it." The other said, "Well I was." "Did you see all the treasures in the cave?" said the first man. "Yes I did," said the second man. "Did you take the key or any treasures?" said the man. "No I did not take anything." "Well," he said, "All that treasure was yours, if you took the key or any treasure. "I have been left guarding that treasure for five hundred years, and I get the privilege of coming out once every hundred years. I hope" he said, "that someone will have the luck of releasing me."
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 16:02
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Name of Pupil:- Margaret Keaveny,
Address:- Ballinwing, Co Leitrim
Story supplied by:- Mrs. Keaveny,
Address:- Sheemore, Co. Leitrim.
An Old Story.
I heard many old stories from my grandmother on winter nights, and this is one of them. She told me that there was once a man, working in a field at Sheemore. About twelve o'clock in the day there came an opening in the rock, in the face of Sheemore, and a door opened. There came out a man and locked the door. He left the key on a stone and went out through the wood. The man who was working went up to the rock, took up the key, opened the door, and went in. He found himself in a cave filled with gold, jewels, and diamonds.. He came out and locked the door, and left the key in the same place as he got it. He went to his work and
senior member (history)
2019-01-14 20:13
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Drumshanbo mill.
senior member (history)
2019-01-14 20:12
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magnificent cut-stone bridges and lock-chambers are still perfect. The canal was constructed during the Famine period. There is a wonderful cut-stone bridge over this canal at Newbrook, about two miles east from Leitrim.. It is called the "Skew" bridge. It got this name from the fact that the road crosses the canal obliquely, and not, as is usual, at right angles. This give the arch a twisted effect, when examined from underneath. It is said that after this canal was finished, goods were brought to Leitrim by horse-drawn barges from Enninkillen, and even from Belfast, to Leitrim. This Leitrim canal passed through Ballinamore and Belturbet and enters Upper Lough Erne. From this lake the Ulster canal leads through Clones and Monaghan and by Charlemont into Lough Neagh. Leaving Lough Neagh it flows past Lisburn on to Belfast. Goods are still sometimes brought by oil-driven barge to Leitrim quay from Dublin and Limerick. Maize was brought to Leitrim about ten years ago by water. This maize had come from South America on a large cargo vessel to Leitrim. Here it was transferred from the large ship to barges, a few of which came up to Leitrim quay with maize, to be ground in the
senior member (history)
2019-01-14 19:55
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Name of Pupil:- Mary Ryan
Address:- Leitrim, Co. Leitrim.
The Local Roads.
Four roads lead from Leitrim village to the North, South, East, and West. The road which runs North and South was made less than a hundred years ago, and is still called the "New Road" by old residents. The former road is still is still partly left, one portion of it, known as the "Old Road" passes through Deffier, over the Canal, and on to Drumkeeran. Another part leads through Port and Hartley, and joins the New Road near Carrick-on-Shannon.
The road West from Leitrim into County Roscommon is called the Battlebridge road by Leitrim people. The road, leading East from Leitrim through Keash, and Fenagh, and on to Ballinamore, is known as the Ballinwing road.
There are two very old roads in this district, which are used only by persons on
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 15:14
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expecially where the family was big and poor. These poor things could not buy coffins, and the dead were just rolled up in sheets, - I think the sheets got a kind of a sewing on them - and brought to the grave yard on a bier. A few were buried without going as far as the grave yard. The reason for this was, that they died from a terrible fever, and those who might be able to carry the remains for burial were afraid they might take the disease, while their own relatives were so weak from hunger, that they were not able.
Indian meal I heard the old people say was sent int this district but I dont remember whether it was the Government or some society sent it. I heard it was not divided honestly, and that some fairly well off people got it, and the very poor who had no one to plead on their behalf, got none.relief Work given.
Yes, there was Relief Work given to help the people over the bad times
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 15:08
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Collected form
Mickey Ward (Farmer age 94 yrs)
Rantogue
Drumshanbo
By Jos. Conifry N.T.
_________________________________________________
The Blight of 1864
I believe the potato crop looked healthy in July, and that after some bad weather in that month the crop that looked promising the day before was burnt black with the blight the next day. Some places, and spots in fields escaped. I heard John McGirl's father of Listermacrone, Drumcong was the only man in the parish of Kiltubrid that had a crop that came safe. I often heard it said that he sold potatoes that Winter and Spring of the following year, and that people from as far off as Co. Sligo came to buy from him. I dont know what price per stone or per Cwt. he got.
Yes, some people suffered terrible hardship. Many died of hunger
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 15:00
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I was young.
I dont know anything about the origin of the custom.
We made certain to have the last of the moor potatoes planted before the 16th May - the fair day in Drumshanbo (The moor potatoes are the latest to be planted)
Reabhog Days
Yes, every one knows of the Reabhog Days, and the Borrowing Days. The Reabhog Days are the 1st days of April that that month is supposed to borrow from March to skin the old cow. I can give no explanation for the name of these days or how the old cow comes into the thing.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 14:55
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13. What is it that stands outside the wood and eats inside the wood.
Ans A pig eating out of a trough.
14. What goes round the wood and round the wood and never gets into the wood.
Ans The bark of a tree.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 14:54
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Ans A Cabbage
7. What is the most peculiar animal on the farm yard.
Ans The pig because he is killed first and cured after.
8. I ran and I got it. I stood up and I looked for it, if I got it I could leave it after me and if I did not get it I would bring it with me.
Answer Thorn
9. What is the cleanest letter in the alfabet.
Ans "H" because it is always in the middle of washing.
10. What do you do before you get out of bed.
Ans Get in.
11. spell black water in three letters.
Ans Ink
12. What is it that always walks with its head down?
Ans An nail in a man's boot.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 14:47
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in the house that night.
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senior member (history)
2019-01-09 14:46
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This is called the brides drink. In times gone by they went for a drive on side-cars, but very only very old people remember when they went on horses backs. That was about 80 years ago.
The bride used to borrow a pair of shoes or some clothes from her friends because it would not be lucky for her to get married in her own. Then she would give them back next day.
About night fall the straw boys come to the wedding house. They are so called because they dress up with straw. They conceal themselves by old clothes. When they go into the house they ask the bride out to dance. They usually get treated before they leave the house. Each one of them get a mug of porter or a glass of whiskey. If the straw boys did not get whiskey they would do great damage about the house.
It was thought unlucky for the bride to go to her husbands for a month after the marriage. Then the groom's man would go for her, she would bring her chairs and tables and beds and bed clothes or fitting as it was called. This was called the Dragging home. There was another dance
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 14:39
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horses and asses. I dont think they ever made any kind of tools or even knew how to make any.
Candle Making
Yes, I saw the reisin candle used myself, and a dirty bad candle it was. I never made one, but I saw them made in the house. Im afraid I forget exactly how they were made. As well as I can remember a piece calico or cotton cloth was got and cut into narrow strips about 8 or 9 inches long. The reisin was melted over the fire in a vessel for the purpose called a grisset, and the strips were put in to the melted reisin. Then when it partly cooled each strip was taken up, and I think, but Im not sure, they were given a bit of a twist. They were then hung up from the loft to dry, and left there till they were required for use.
Light did you say? Well, it was only a poor excuse for light. That candle was spluttering and spitting from it was lighted till it was quenched, and it had the walls and everything near it covered with the spluttering reisin.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:22
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Weather Lore
1. If the cat when washing her face puts her paw across her ear, in the act of rubbing, it will rain soon after, and floods may be expected.
2. If the dog eats grass it is a sign of coming rain.
3. If the crane (heron) flies up the river (that is in the direction the stream is coming from ) it is a sign that good weather is coming. If it flies down bad weather soon follows.
4. When the swans cackle loudly that is the sign of approaching storm.
5. The coming of the wild geese tells us that bad weather will soon follow.
6. When the crows feed near the houses we expect cold wet weather.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:15
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old, and I said to her - "You were up very early this morning at the churning." She replied, "Did you hear us?"
"I did," I answered, and I heard the Boss coming in and asking you "Did you get it yet?" On hearing this she replied, "You know it all." I said, "I only know that ye were doing something funny, but what was it?" Her answer was, "Ill tell you if you promise, never to tell any one." I said, "Ill promise never to mention your name to any one." She there and then told me she was "taking the butter." I asked her how it was done, or had the devil anything to do with it. She said that it was quite simple to do it, and to use her own words, "the devil a devil, has anything to do with it."
At the moment I forget the "ins and outs" of doing the trick, but Ill try and get it for you, if I cannot bring it to 'mind." I will not give the person's name to any one. The thing took place, and I dont care whether its believed or not.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:08
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was in complete darkness. As I was wondering at the cause of the noise and darkness below I heard a step - a heavy step - going past my window, and shortly after, the outside kitchen door latch was raised. Then a man inquired, "Did you get it yet?" and I recognised the voice as that of the man-of-the -house. The wife who was in the kitchen replied, "No, not yet." Away he went again in the direction he came from, to return again in less that 5 minutes, Again he inquired, "Did it come?" This time the wife replied, "It's coming."
He then came in, and the noise which I heard at first I now recognised as that of churning. I was surprised to hear them at it so early, for up till then I never heard of "taking the butter" - up to that evening I should have said, I never heard of it.
That evening there was no one in the house but the woman-of-the-house who was then about 60 years
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:02
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Taking the Butter
I had another curious experience during the "Tan Days," but of a different kind though I suppose the devil himself had a good hand in this.
It was in the month of May this occurred, but I am not sure of the date. It might be the 1st. but for that matter it could be the 21st. or any other date as far as I know for dates were giving me little trouble at the time as I was "on the run."
Anyhow this particular morning I awoke before sun-rise, and shortly after the sun shot its beams into the room I occupied, I heard a noise in the kitchen. I sat up quickly in the bed, and listened for I thought it was a raid by the Tans. The door between my room and the kitchen was about half open, and I peered down into the kitchen, through the half open door which was directly opposite me.
I noticed then that the kitchen
senior member (history)
2019-01-05 15:25
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Rantogue cross-roads one night, and that his eyes were like two red coals. He lifted his rifle to fire at him and as soon as he did he disappeared.
It was not long after that, that I heard Johnnie Rourke of Rantogue saw the same dog come out of a pipe under the road near the same place; A few othere I believe have seen him since.
A White Woman
One night Patk Earley of Rantogue was coming home from Drumshanbo. It was only about 11 p.m. when he reached Rantogue, and the night was good and bright. As soon as he reached the Cross-roads beyond the chapel a very tall woman dressed in white stepped out beside him. He spoke to her, but she made no reply, and as soon as she came to Ferdy's lane she suddenly disappeared. (Ferdy's lane is only about 20 yards from the Cross roads).
senior member (history)
2019-01-05 15:20
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Old Mrs Gannon could give you a better account of this, than I can for she is old Mickey Earley's daughter.
Lights at Night
I often saw lights in unreasonable places at night. Almost every night some years ago - between 20 and 30 years ago -, and often even yet, a light travels over Mullawn hill, and comes out on the road this side of Pat McWeeneys. It comes up the road as far as Rourke's gate, and disappears suddenly there.
(Mullawn hill where the light is supposed to travel has no house on that side, any any one coming from Mullawn at night would not come out on the road at McWeeneys. I heard about this light from others in identical terms - J. Conifry.)
A Dog Ghost.
I also heard that Michl. Geoghegan who was "on the run" in the Black and Tan Days and is now dead met a very big dog at the Bridge below
senior member (history)
2019-01-05 15:13
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451
Collected by Kathleen Conifry
Aughacashel N.S.
From Mrs Patk Murray
Dereen, Aughacashel.
1. Boil bark of oak tree in water and it will dye dark brown.
2. Boil white crisp that grows on rock or tree.
This will dye light brown..
3. Heather when boiled will dye pink.
4. Onion skins boiled will give mustard colour.
5. Cut up and boil briar and it will dye red.
6. Whin blossoms boiled will give yellow.
7. Elder berries when boiled will give purple.
These are dyes for woollen cloth.
senior member (history)
2019-01-05 15:08
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awaiting decision
Local Poets
We never had a local poet in North Kiltubrid unless I'm greatly mistaken. Of course there was Reynolds of Letterfine in South Kiltubrid. He was a great poet. It was he who made the poem "The Exile of Erin." I heard of other poems he made but I forget them.
senior member (history)
2019-01-04 16:04
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443
Riddles
1. Head like a thimble tail like a rat you may guess for ever but you would not guess that.
Ans Pipe.
2. Why should a hen always be tidy?
And Because she carries a comb.
3. Niddy Noddy round body three feet and an iron hat.
Ans Pot
4. When was Adam born?
Ans Before Eve.
5. What runs never walks whistles but never talks.
Ans Train.
6. Patches upon patches without any stitches riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of britches.
senior member (history)
2019-01-04 16:00
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lot from the noise they were making. At last when they drew near he jumped up on the ditch to let them pass. As he did so he saw a troop of horse soldiers passing him at the same furious rate. He even saw their helmets.
There were no soldiers around here at that time, nor even in any part of Leitrim, particularly cavalry).
They might have been the ghosts of the priest hunters, or the ghosts of the soldiers the priest hunters sent out after the priest.
Lately, I heard one of the tinker Heaneys who was camped on that road heard a terrible galloping of horses, and he thought they would trample down his little tent. There are not a half-dozen horses in the whole of the Moher district to-day, and certainly when Conifry heard the noise there were not more that four in it then.
senior member (history)
2019-01-04 15:54
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439
Penal Times
The Mass Rock
I never heard tell of any happening around this district in the Penal Days.
Oh, yes of course there is the Mass Rock on the top of the mountain (Slieve-an-Iarainn). and I think it is in the townland of Mullaghgarve. I never heard who the priest was who said Mass there. All I know is that Mass was said there in the Penal Days at Teampall (pronounced locally camp-ell), and any one can point out the spot where it was said.
I'll tell you a story that might have some connection with the Mass Rock and the priest hunters.
One night about 40 years ago John Conifry of Mohercregg was going home late from his "Kaley" (a nightly visit to a house is given this name). When he came out of Kelly's land on to the old Moher road, he heard a lot of horses coming behind him galloping furiously. At fist he thought it might be Moran'a horses but then it struck him that there must be over 20 or more in this
senior member (history)
2019-01-04 15:48
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438
The Dragging Home
The "Dragging Home" took place a month after the marriage, and very often this was as great an event as the wedding itself. The Groom's man, and friends of the Groom went to the Bride's house on cars (horses and cars) and after partaking of some refreshments there, they set off for the Bride's new home. The drive home was a test of speed and endurance for the poor horses as well as a test of "good handling" on the driver's part. Often have I seen horses white with sweat at Weddings and at the "Dragging Home." Its a long time since I saw one now. There wasnt the like in Kiltubrid Parish I think since Dan McWeeney got married about 40 years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-01-03 18:47
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433
a five naggin bottle of whisky to treat all in the house. If the match-making takes place in a public house in a town several drinks are called for by each of the parties and a jolly evening it spent.
_________________________________________________
Long ago it was the custom for the bride and groom to invite all their friends to the wedding. The custom is still in vogue. The weddings about 60 years ago lasted for three days and three nights, but now weddings only last for one day and night. It was custom about that time for the people who were asked to the wedding to bring a bonach of oat bread and a roll of butter with them.
I heard my father say that about 60 years the wedding parties had a pot of boiling bacon and cabbage for the dinner. After that they ate the oat bread and butter and drank a cup of new milk. This practice has died out. It is unknown now-a-days.
Then the bride and groom and their friends used go for a drive in a motor car to the nearest town to treat the bride
senior member (history)
2019-01-03 18:41
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432
The lucky months of the year for getting married are June and April, while the unlucky months are March and May. The lucky days of the week are Monday,Wednesday and Thursday.
It is still the custom among the farming community to arrange marriages for their sons and daughters. This is called Match making. The match making is done in a business like way. The young or his father or both, bring a neighbour with them to the house of the bride, or an arrangement is made that both parties meet in a certian public house on a market or fair day. There the merits of the young man and woman are spoken of. The land which either the girl or boy is owner of, the stock on the land, the distance from town, chapel and school, the rents and the rates of the place, the b debt if any, and then the fortune required from the one entering the new home. If everything goes well up to this point the young couple are introduced to each other and then the date of the wedding is arranged.
The young man or his father when going to the bride's house brings
senior member (history)
2019-01-03 18:34
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431
Marriage Customs
Collected from Matthew Earley of
Bunreavagh, by Lillie Mahon.
About 50 or 60 years ago girls were stolen from their parents and made marry boys older than themselves. The poor girls could not say a word but were taken away by force and had to marry. Anyplace boys knew of a good looking girl they planned it between themselves to go to this particular house in the late hours of the night and demand her.
In this locality marriages take place in greater numbers before Shrive than at any other period. Puss Sunday is the name given locally to the first Sunday of Lent because marriageable people who were not married then were jokingly alluded to as having a "puss" or disappointed expression.
senior member (history)
2019-01-02 18:37
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leather" from the wedding house to the town. If the driving was furious going it was more so coming home, and it was not an uncommon thing for horses to fall from weakness and over-work on these occasions. The drivers were generally the worse of drink, and so was every man in the crowd as well. I remember once a couple of cars coming to grief coming round Doherty's turn. The belly-band of one outfit broke, and that car load was thrown on the road, the next party took a short turn to avoid those that had fallen, with the result that horse was thrown, and the car overturned. A couple of the party on each car got bad wounds.
senior member (history)
2019-01-02 18:32
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and had a small fortune. Sometimes instead of money she might get a cow or two and 10 pounds or 20 pounds and some furniture. The furniture was now new. It was part of the furniture of the old home. The girl brought with her to her new home, a tick and blankets, and proud she was of her fine feather bed that contained the feathers of the geese that were reared, killed, and then plucked by herself, and saved to make the bed.
Money is still given as a dowry, but now-a -days and for the past 30 years I never saw stock of any kind being given as a fortune or part of it.
Marriages in Houses
No, I never saw marriages taking place in houses, and unless Im greatly mistaken I never heard tell of the like.
Wedding feast
A wedding feast was always held in the house of the bride, and this custom still survives. After the wedding breakfast a "drive" used to be arranged to the nearest town or perhaps to a country public-house. The Bride and Groom with the Bride's maid, and Groom's man sat on the first and best car, and when the start was made it was "Hell for
senior member (history)
2019-01-02 18:23
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428
Collected from
Thomas Gallagher,
Bunrevagh,
Drumshanbo
By Jos, Conifry N.T., Aughacashel
Marriage Customs
Yes, some of the old marriage customs still live on in this district. Most marriages take place in these parts during Shrove, but for the last ten years I wouldnt be surprised if the priests forgot how to perform the marriage ceremony, marriages are so rare now-a-days.
I'm not far off 90 years now, and I was at many a good wedding and "Dragging" home. I took part in "Match-Making" often, and I had to do as much bargaining and bantering over the fortune the girl should get, or as the case might be, the father of the groom wanted, as I'd have to do at a fair when selling a cow I'd like to get rid of.
That time the people were easier to please than now. A boy married a girl then because she was a good house-keeper
senior member (history)
2019-01-02 18:17
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12th Night
I remember one curious custom in connection with the rush candles, but I'm not sure if it were a general custom in the parish or not. Here it is for what it is worth.
On the "12th Night" a dried cow-dung was procured. In it was placed standing 12 rush candles which were lighted in honour of the 12 Apostles. I dont remember if there were any prayers said on this occasion, but I distinctly remember the cow-dung being taken when the candles had burnt out and placed behind the couples of the kitchen roof. The cow-dung was supposed to be a cure for a cure for a pain in the back. I never saw it used to drive sway such a pain.
senior member (history)
2019-01-02 18:12
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making either reisin or rush candles. They were made by the people of every house.
senior member (history)
2019-01-02 18:11
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Collected from Michl. McKiernan
Mullaghgarve
Aughacashel
by Jos. Conifry, N.T. Aughacashel
Rush Candles
The rush candle was an improvement on the reisin candle. We cut the strongest and thickest rushes we could get on our own, or on a neighbours farm. We then peeled them, that is took off the green outside skin. Then we hung the white inside parts up to dry. In grease - I'm not sure of the kind or where it was got - that was melted in a grisset, the peeled rushes were placed. When they had absorbed some of the hot grease, and when it had cooled and a good quantity had stuck to them they were lifted, and tied in little bundles. Then they were hung up from the rafters till they were required for use. I may tell you they were sparingly used, much more so, than candles are to day. They gave a better, steadier, and cleaner light than the reisin candle. There were no tradesmen engaged in
senior member (history)
2018-12-11 16:11
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491
I think Mohercregg road was made the year after the destruction of the potatoes. The men working on it got, I often heard, only 4d per day, and had to support themselves. They had to work from 6 in the morning till 7 or 8 in the evening in Summer, and later in the year while they had light to work.
The oats crop was fair enough in this district that year - not that is ever much better than fair. Anyhow only for people, bad as they were, would be worse. That and the Indian meal, half-rotten potatoes turnips and cabbage helped to keep the life in those that lived through '46 and '47. Many a proud man and woman had to content themselves not only around Slieve-an-Iarainn with that food but on the good land in the other parts of the parish as well.
The Mullaghgarve (Mullachgarbh) road made about 100 years ago. I dont know how the people got to their homes on the mountain
senior member (history)
2018-12-11 16:03
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"The Big House"
I am not certain when Aughacashel House was built, but from what I used to hear the old people say I am sure it cannot be less than 200 years old. I believe it was a man the name of Johnston had it build. I dont know if he was an army man or not. He was a landlord
senior member (history)
2018-12-11 16:02
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before either of these roads were made. I might have heard, but I am getting forgetful. I remember to hear it said that the men making the Mullaghgarve road were paid 6d per day, but they too had to support themselves out of this. The food at that time and when I was a young lad, at any rate, was principally potatoes, oatmeal made into "stirabout" (porridge, oaten bannocks, made on a griddle, boxty, flummery, and "bull's milk" (the name given to oat shells or "shelling" steeped in water for a couple of days, The liquid was used as a drink at meals especially if milk was not plentiful).
senior member (history)
2018-12-11 15:57
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on a small scale. I dont know if he had property elsewhere. There were not many evictions around here at any time. We always had fairly good agents and bailiffs, and when these fellows were middling decent the landlord was good enough.
Yes, I heard the story often of Captain Johnston riding down to Drumcong Chapel while the people were attending Mass, and driving his horse on top of those who had to remain outside; the chapel then was too small to hold the big congregation. I dont know when this took place. i also heard Captain McNamara of Letterfine, who was a Catholic, came there specially to meet him on a Sunday, to stop his blackguardism. McNamara was a great man for duelling, and when Johnston came to the chapel, he did not see McNamara who was inside, but he was not long getting out, and he drew his pistol and told him never to return there, or if he did he would shoot
senior member (history)
2018-12-11 15:49
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Feast Days
Except Christmas Day, one holiday was the same as another when I was young. For Christmas the people brought flour from the shops in bigger quantities than at any other time of the year. They brought about two stone then, whereas any other time they might bring only one stone or a half stone, Yes, I think I remember to see raisins in cakes at Christmas when I was a lad of ten or twelve years, but that was the only time I saw them. An ounce of two of tea was bought at Christmas time, but it was great strong tea. A pinch of it would be as good as an ounce now. The children got none of it. It was used as sparingly as people would use brandy now. No, we never saw fruit at home then. There was no fruit sold even in shops. Hucksters in the summer time sold apples on the streets on Fair and market days. They sold dilisk and gooseberries too.
senior member (history)
2018-12-11 15:39
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him dead. Johnston never went to Druncong chapel again.
senior member (history)
2018-12-11 15:38
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495
Collected from
Matthew McCormack (age - 70 yrs)
(Farmer)
Drumbollogue, Drumcong,
Ck-on-Shannon
By Jos Conifry 11.7..
Cure of Worms
Yes, I have the cure of the worms and I got it from my grand-father. I never knew it to fail.
I made the cure on Mondays and Thursdays. I fold up a prayer that is in Latin, in a piece of linen, and I say five Our Fathers, and five Hail Marys, and ask God if it is pleasing to His Holy will to cure the child. The linen with the prayers enclosed, is worn, by the child around its neck. It is a Gospel
and is worn as an Agnus Dei is worn. While the linen is wearing away, the child is getting better, and finally when it is worn out, the child is completely cured.
No, I have no other cure.
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 17:11
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awaiting decision
Old Songs
I have not any old song that is not well known. There was never a poet around here.
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 17:10
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432
because I keep only four cows.
The small churns will churn about 15 r 16 gallons of milk, while the large one will hold from 20 to 24 gallons I believe.
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 17:09
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Churns
Churn-dash)
)
32" to 36" ) Diagram of Churn
)
Iron hoops )
I never saw any make of churn in the country houses around here except the dash churn. I never heard tell of any older kind
either. Some of them may be small and some are big. A man like Hugh McGovern who has ten or twelve cows will have a big churn while I have a smaller one
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 12:07
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501
a "cast" of potatoes. No, there was no butter used with them. That, in those days, had to be sold together with whatever eggs there were, to bring in Indian meal and a little flour, or to make the rent, for it was an awful task to make the same rent that time. My rent, or rather my father's, was 12 times what I am paying today.
Dinner
There was very little difference between the dinner and breakfast. It wasjfust a case that if we had boxty and flour brochan in the morning we'd have a "cast" and perhaps cabbage or turnips for the dinner. If the cabbage or turnips were scarce we'd have buttermilk with the potatoes. It was seldom we had bacon, and when we had I think it was either Russian or American.
God help your sense - we never ate a fowl. They had to be sold - we had to sell everything and starve to keep the rent paid.
Supper
The supper, when there was one, was Stirabout.
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 12:01
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the brochan was poured over them and they were eaten while hot.
I forgot to mention that about 14 or 15 boiled potatoes are mixed in, with about 20 of the grated and dry pulp, before the cakes are made and put in the pot.
Sometimes when more that enough boiled boxty was made for a meal what was left over was split the next morning, and cooked with dripping, butter, or some bacon, when the bacon was to be had, and this was a more tasty meal.
It was a great feed for fasting on. It is still made in the farmers houses, but not very often. I dont believe its made six times in the year in any house in the parish, and more's the pity.
"The Cast"
Another breakfast, that people had to do with then, was roasted potatoes, and buttermilk, or when milk was scarce, thin Indian gruel. The potatoes with their skins on were placed in the Griosach, and roasted there. This was called
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 11:55
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Grater Front View (diagram here)
Side view (diagram here)
that is rubbed against a grater (this article is made by the local tin-smith or travelling tinker, from tin which is perforated, and the potatoes are rubbed against the coarse or raised edges of the perforations) until they were a pulpy mass. This pulp was put into a strong linen bag and the bag was wrung until all the water in the contents was squeezed out. The dry pulp was then mixed with flour, and some salt was added. The whole mass was then thoroughly kneaded. This being done, a big handful of this dry mixture was taken, and worked with the hands into a cake about six inches in diameter and an inch thick. The same was done with the remaining mixture of pulp, flour, and salt. Then these cakes were put into a pot of boiling water, and allowed to boil for about an hour. During the boiling they had to get an odd stir of the pot-stick to keep them from sticking to the bottom of the pot. When they were lifted
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 11:46
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that name. That lassie wouldnt get a husband once that report got out, no more than a girl of to-day would get one if she had the name of being a "boozer."
Potatoes was the principal food then. They were boiled or roasted or made into boxty.
(Breakfast)
Stirabou
In the morning a man went out to work at 7 o'clock. When he came in at 9, he had a feed of stirabout, (porridge). The stirabout was sometimes made of Indian meal, but generally it was made from oat-meal. It was eaten cold and was so thick that it could be cut down with a knife, or a good strong iron spoon. It was eaten with buttermilk or thick milk. No nothing else was taken that day for breakfast.
Boxty
The next morning breakfast might be of boiled boxty, with thin flour brochan poured over it. The boxty was made in this way. The biggest potatoes were got, and mark this, the worst - those that were scabby or half-rotten, Then they were grated
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 11:39
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were many people then that could not afford to eat more than two meals a day. There was little or no tea used at that time except on "big' occasions such as Christmas and Easter. It was bought in very small quantities, not more I think, than an ounce at a time. Very few could afford to buy two ounces. Whatever was left when that "big day" was over was put away very carefully by the woman of the house and if a great friend happened to come on a visit it was used in his honour, and as a special treat, just as a man to-day might have a small drop of brandy in the house, left over perhaps from a sickness, and then when a visitor who seldom called to the house, arrived that precious drop might be produced. Very often the woman-of-the-house used to have a little drop "on the quiet" herself. But woe betide the young girl at that time that got the name of a tea-drinker, and remember, she wouldnt drink it often in the week, much less in the day, to get
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 11:32
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496
Collected from John Mulvey (age - 82 yrs) (Farmer)
Bunrevagh, Drumshanbo.
By Jos Conifry, N.T.
Festival Customs
Yes, when I was young St. Brigids Day was better observed than it is now. Many people used to go down to St Brigid's well in Uactarach outside Ballinamore to do Stations there. As well as I can remember before going into the grave-yard, which is almost a mile from the well, the complete Rosary of 15 decades is recited either together in groups or individually. Then one Pater and Ave is said in the Churchyard, and after this the complete Rosary if 15 decades is said between the churchyard and the holy well. The litany of the Blessed Virgin is said after the last decade.
senior member (history)
2018-11-29 11:27
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Food
When I was a young lad, about 18 or 20 years of age, the ordinary people then had a hard time. There
senior member (history)
2018-11-26 18:15
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425
Old Crafts
Rush candles were made in every house in my young days. Strong rushes were cut in October and hung up in the kitchen near the fire to dry them. When dry enough they were peeled except for a thin narrow-strip which was left to give strength and keep the rush from bending or breaking. Then unsalted butter was melted and the rushes were drawn through it. Then they were put on side till required. Sometimes bacon fat was used instead of butter.
Reisin candles. These came later. a gusset which was made by a local smith was necessary to make the reisin candles. The reisin was melted in the gusset and a piece of calico cloth the length of the required candle was pulled through it. The cloth absorbed
senior member (history)
2018-11-25 14:34
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Forts
In Bunreavagh there is a fort. I never heard or saw anything strange about it, and I never heard of any one who did. At present there is only a few bushes in the fort. One side of it is raised about 4' above the surrounding land and the North side is about 2' above it.
From this fort Dromod fort can be seen which lies south of it. There is another fort in Rantogue wast of this one but it cannot be seen from here.
senior member (history)
2018-11-25 14:30
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the Chapel. The curate lodged in Kelly's of Roscarbin as the priests had no residence of their own.
Mrs Flynn taught the girls in a barn of Peter Moran's of Bunreavagh. The writing was done on a slate on the children's knees. They had to sit on a flag or stone. When I was about to finish at school quill pens came into use.
senior member (history)
2018-11-25 14:27
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423
Schools
The old school for Aghacashel district was in Liscarbin. It was a one storey thatched house, and the teacher at that time was Master Cullen. He was paid school fees by the children, but I cannot say what the fee per pupil was. I know at any rate it was very small, The parish priest at that time was a Father Kennedy. During his time school was held on Saturdays and when Saturday was given a free day he appeared to be dissatisfied. The parish priest had the teachers teaching Catechism before last Mass and when he came out to examine the children, he also questioned the old people as well. Many of them who knew little Catechism took good care not to go in too soon fearing ordeal. Micky McHugh an old man of Derrien was asked by him on one occasion, could a priest forgive sin? The answer he gave was
"At his broad 'aise' father, at his broad 'aise." At that time the parish priest lived in Letterfine about a mile from
senior member (history)
2018-11-19 17:19
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421
Old Crafts
Thatching
Most people in this district did their own thatching. John Kelly of Mohercregg was the best thatcher in this locality. If a man wanted to get on a good coat of straw or rye thatch the year he was getting married John was sent for, and well he did his work. That coat would last for six or seven years at least. No, there wasnt a tradesman of any kind in this district.
Smith
There wasnt even a smith, because he'd have nothing to do, for there were not three donkeys on the mountain side, and there were only the horses in the "Big House" beyond at Aughacashel, and old James Doherty of Liscarbin who was a young man then, had a horse.
Whatever iron work was done, was small, and it was done by James Noone of Drumshanbo, or by old Reilly of Kiltubrid (now called Annadale). Both of these made gates, fire-cranes, pot-hooks, tongs put feet in pots, as well as shod
senior member (history)
2018-11-19 17:11
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most of it.
I remember hearing that we had sheep on the mountain that night, and most of them were killed. I believe a lot of cattle were killed in this and many other districts owing to the byres being blown in on them.
Cloud Burst
No, I never heard of a cloud burst on this side of the mountain. I often heard of ones on the other sides (north and west). The yellow river in Ballinaglera on these occasions, and the Stoney river between Ballinaglera and Drumshanbo parishes, burst their banks, and flooded hundreds of acres of pasture, meadow, and crop lands. I do not remember any dates in connection with these happenings.
senior member (history)
2018-11-19 17:07
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419
Storm
The Big Wind
I remember to hear my father and mother talking of the big Wind of '39. Almost every house on the side of this mountain was stripped of its roof. A couple of houses that had good shelter from the storm had their roofs so badly twisted that they were little better than those that were unroofed. Whatever hay and oats people had was carried away with the storm in every direction. People around here had to leave their homes and seek shelter in the "Alths" (a local term for a deep cutting made by a river in a sandy bank) and such places.
I heard my father say that the fish in Lough Scur (in the centre of Kiltubrid Parish) were blown up in hundreds out of the lake on to the surrounding country. He said that "Gowly shore was "bracket" with them.
I heard a good deal more about that wind, but I forget
senior member (history)
2018-11-17 16:32
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418
Singers etc.
this district was never noted for either good singers, musicians or dancers. The reason I think for this is that the people around here always got the times pretty hard, and they never went in much for these past-times. Another reason perhaps is, that a good many of them came from the North of Ireland, and I dont think the people up there are very fond of fun.
When I was young I had plenty of old stories, but I dont remember even one of them now. The young people now-a-days would laugh at the person who would tell them.
senior member (history)
2018-11-17 16:29
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417
Mower
John Kelly of Moher-Cregg was the best mower I ever knew, and I never heard tell of any one who could beat him at that work in Kiltubrid parish. John if he was alive now, would be about 108 years old. He could mow an Irish acre and a half in a day, but that was none of your eight hour days. He started to work at sun-rise, and worked as long as he had light. He could put an edge on a scythe, better that the edge a lot of the lads shave with to-day.
Lifting Weights
He was also a great man at lifting heavy weights, and carrying heavy loads. He was able to carry a 5 cwt bag of oats up 21 steps in the market yard in Drumshanbo, and place it in the granary there. On one occasion he bet he would carry 6 cwt up the steps but a bag could not be got to hold this weight of corn.
senior member (history)
2018-11-17 16:22
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416
Local Heroes
Jumper
I never knew any great men in this district, and I didn't hear tell of any. The best jumper ever I knew in Co. Leitrim was old Mickey Ward of Rangtogue. He jumped "Pulthy" several times on Garland Sundays long ago.
I'm not certain what width Pulthy was then, but I am positive it must be more than 21 feet. He was the only man of all the good jumpers that used to come there who was either man or fool enough to try this jump. A little slip would be certain death for him. He could always "clear" it at his ease, and a couple of feet beyond it. Mickey was a very small man. He was the smallest man, if not in the parish, at least in the mountain district. He was only about five feet six inches in height.
senior member (history)
2018-11-16 14:48
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415
the noise of carts coming up the mountain to us from the roads down the country we expect frost.
When we hear the steam-whistle from Ballinamore (to the east of this district) clearly in the mornings or evenings in March especially, and October and November we expect very cold weather to follow.
Whenever we see woodcock in the month of October in this locality we expect a hard and early winter.
If the day is very wet, and a robin sings from the top of a white-thorn bush, we expect the evening to be fine.
If the tongs, which is always near the fire, has an unusually cold feel it is a sign of frost or snow or both.
If the cat sits with her back to the fire it is a sign of coming bad weather.
The South West or Drumshanbo wind brings us most rain at any time of the year.
senior member (history)
2018-11-16 14:42
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414
Weather. If they come down from the "tops" it is a sure sign of coming storms.
When Drumshanbo church bell can be heard by us on the mountain, we know that its a sign of rain. (Drumshanbo is west of this district).
When we see the cows inclined to feed long in the evenings on the 'brays' especially in Spring or Autumn we look on that as a sign of good weather.
We have an old saying here on Slieve an Iarainn, "A haw year is a breagh year, and a sloe year is a woe year." A year that here is a plentious supply of sloes is one that a man would need to have plenty of fodder for his cattle in the following winter, because that winter is sure to be very cold with plenty of rain and frost. When we see plenty of haws we know it will be a year of good crops, and good weather.
In the Winter time when we hear
senior member (history)
2018-11-16 14:36
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413
Collected from Michael McKiernan,
Mullaghgarve,
Aughacashel.
Weather Lore
When a mist or fog rises from 'Pulthy" - a very deep hole of about 20 feet in diameter - it is a sign of good weather.
When the swallows fly low it is a sign that bad weather will soon come to us.
The starlings in flocks near the house is a sure sign of coming severe weather.
If that mist comes in across the mountain rain will soon follow.
If there is a fog on the country in the morning, and it lifts and goes up the mountain good weather will follow.
When the sheep go towards the "tops," that is the high points of the mountain, it is a sign that we are to have a "spell" of good
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 13:52
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379
Ceanabhan
An greach [?]
An Guirtin
An bainseog
An moinin
Cappaigin ban
The Tochar
The Port [?]
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 13:41
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One time the soldiers captured a priest and threw him into a burning lime kiln, thinking he should be burned to death.
When they came to look at him again they found that he was quite safe, not even his clothes singed and his hair moist as if with a dew.
They then pulled him out and tied his long hair to a young horse's tail. They then beat the horse and he ran off dragging the priest after him. When he had gone a few steps he gave a swing of his tail thus throwing the priest up on his back. Off he made then for the mountain bringing the priest with him out of the reach of the soldiers.
From Mrs O'Neill
in Derreen Upper
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 13:03
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356
20. It is unlucky to go on water on Whit Sunday.
29. If a small piece of food fall, bread, meat etc. do not lift it someone is wanting it.
30. If you are caorsed in going anywhere you should not go. Something might happen you.
31. It is counted unlucky to build to or extend on the west gable of a dwelling house.
32.
P.S, O'Rodachain
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 13:00
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13. It is a sign of good luck to get a horseshoe but you should take it with you.
14. It is unlucky to give away an edged tool without getting a copper for it.
15. It is unlucky to give away eggs or fowl without getting some trifle in exchange. You should never give away your luck.
16. If you borrow a pin you should stick it in wood. Else it will break friendship.
17. It is unlucky to spill salt at meals.
18. A spark in a candle means a letter.
19. It is not right to go near a fort at night.
20. The person who shoots a swan my expect misfortune.
21. If a person is "brought astray" he should turn his coat.
22 If your ears feel warm someone is talking of you.
23. If the palm of your right hand be itchy you will get a strange shakhands.
24. If you let a glove fall you should not pick it up yourself. It is a disappointment for you if you do. It is an introduction for another.
26. If your nose is itchy you will quarrel.
27. A hen coming into the house with a straw hanging out of her, signifies a stranger coming to the house.
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 12:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
354
Miscellaneous Customs and Beliefs.
1. A crowing hen or a whistling woman should be left at a four crossroads.
2. It is unlucky to cut a lone white thorn.
3. There will be no luck in a house for seven years if a mirror is broken.
4. When a coal falls some one is coming a ceilidhe. If it smokes he is a smoker.
5. When sparks fly into your face it means money is coming to you. Spit of them for luck.
6. Two people should not wash their hands in the same water or they will quarrel if they do not spit in it.
7. It is not right to throw out water at night especially soapy water. You should spit in it.
8. It is unlucky to raise an umbrella in a house.
9. It is unlucky to pass under a ladder. A child will not grow if he does so.
10. It is unlucky to go under a yew branch or a yew tree.
11. It is not good to begin work on a Saturday. It will not be finished.
12. You should not go t a new job on Saturday.
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
353
12. The cry of the banshee is a certain sign of death. It cries before any member of an old Irish family dies.
P. S. O'Rodachain
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 12:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
352
Customs and Belief regards death etc.
1. When a person dies the clock in the room should be stopped.
2. "Dead bell in the ear' means that you will hear of a death.
3. If a corpse remains limber and does not stiffen there will be another death in the family.
4. When bringing the coffin into a house the lid should be taken off outside and taken in afterwards. If it is left on there will be another death in the family.
5. When the coffin is taken out of the house it is left on chairs. These chairs should be knocked down when the coffin is lifted off them.
6. It is unlucky to wear anything new at a funeral.
7. It is very desirable that four of the same family name as the deceased should carry the coffin. ("Four Roddys should carry a Roddy).
8. Never wipe your shoes in a graveyard.
9. A wet day for a funeral. "Happy is the corpse that the rain falls on."
10. It is unlucky to fall in the graveyard.
11. A grave should not be left open overnight.
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Feeding Herbs
Dandeline is given to pigs when boiled with meal.
Nettles is given to turkeys when boiled.
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 12:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
261
woman's ring to it three times.
One May-Eve if you get a bottle of Spring water and leave it uncorked it is said to cure many diseases.
senior member (history)
2018-11-15 12:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
365
The care of the feet
Long ago people didnt begin to wear shoes until they were about sixteen or seventeen years. It was then the custom for people to go barefooted for about eight months of the year. In the winter time children had to be carried to school and home again. All middle aged people wore clogs and sometimes they might have a pair of heavy shoes for Sunday but the young people had always to go to mass barefooted. There were about six shoemakers in this district and nowadays there are only tow. Ward was the most common name of the shoemakers.
senior member (history)
2018-11-14 16:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Poisonious and Harmful herb's
Red Shank is a very poisonious herb, it grows in meadows and spreads very rapidly.
The yellow blossom of whins is poisonious in a certain time of the year.
Chicken-Weed is poisonious.
Black Berries which grow on Ivy are poisonious.
The Ferns that grow in ditches are poison.
"House leak is poison, it grows on the walls of houses.
there is a tree called the "Drooping Ash" and on it comes long, thin, green leaves. They are very poisonious.
Laurall leaf is poison.
Rita Mahon
senior member (history)
2018-11-14 16:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
362
3. Docking's are also given to pigs.
4. Comfry is given to hens and pigs.
5. Crow-Foot is also given to hens.
6. Clover is also a feeding herb.
senior member (history)
2018-11-14 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
364
Crummy
I live in the townland of Crummy, in the parish of Kiltubrid, in the Barony of Leitrim. There are eighty one people in it and twenty families. The most common name in it is McWeeney and Flynn. Most of the houses are one story thatched. Crummy is supposed to get its name from a crooket ridge. There are two rivers in it namely the Aghaslane river and the Crummy river. Both flow off Sliabh an Iarann mountain it to Lough Scur. There are a great deal of old ruins of houses in the district. In olden times a great many families emegrated from this townland to America. The town land is not mentioned in any song or story. The land in it is rough and hilly.
From Thomas W McWeeney
Crummy
senior member (history)
2018-11-13 11:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
366
Saint Cillain's bell.
There is an old story told about this bell that it was stolen and it came back ringing through the air and it lit on the alter. There was a second attempt made to steal it. A man was sent to steal it and when he went into the church it was on the alter but when he went as far as the alter it was no place to be seen.
Anne Reynolds,
From Hugh Reynolds, Cornabrone.
senior member (history)
2018-11-13 11:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
367
Foods in olden times
In olden times the people had not as many meals as nowadays, nor had they as good a meals.
Long ago every person got up about six oclock and did all their work before breakfast, which was about at nine oclock. They they ate potatoes and Butter-milk and if butter milk was not plentiful they took "Samhain" milk. This was made from oaten meal steeped in water for a couple of days.
At about two oclock they had their Dinner which consisted of potatoes and butter-milk also and for a novelty they might have a herring. If they happened to get a herring it would last them almost a week.
At six oclock they had their supper of oaten stirabout. Some times when the men were working late in the fields that used to make casts of roasted potatoes and eat them.
Tea never was used except at Christmas when a couple of ounces was
senior member (history)
2018-11-13 11:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
368
got. They took some of it for a novelty on Christmas night and the remainder
Rita Mahon Mullaun
senior member (history)
2018-11-13 11:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
369
Bonfire Customs
The Bonfire is held in this district on the 23rd and 29th of June. Long ago all the people of the town-land contributed to the Bonfire with either sticks, turf, or hay and on the night it was held both young and old gathered to it. There they danced and sung around it until midnight. It was also a custom to say the rosary at the Bonfire, When the Bonfire was burned out the people gathered they ashes and scattered it through their crops. This was supposed to bring good luck to their crops. for the next twelve months. Others drove the cattle through the ashes.
senior member (history)
2018-11-12 14:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
350
Marriage.
1. It is unlucky to get rain on the wedding day.
2. "Happy is the bride that the sun shines on."
3. When a girl is getting married she should wear something old, something new something borrowed something blue.
4. It is very unlucky to get married or to make a change on Saturday.
"Saturdays flittin 'a short sittin'."
5. Two spoons in a cup signify an invitation to a wedding.
6. If a person fall off a seat he wont be married that year.
7. To dream of a marriage is the sign of a death.
8. To dream of a death is the sign of a marriage.
9. P S O'Rodachain
senior member (history)
2018-11-12 14:20
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349
would go on with the building, but if they were not in the place.
31. On St. Martin's Day the people kill a fowl and make the sign of the cross on the four corners of the house with its blood.
32. Clean up the house and leave a bucket of water outside the door before you go to bed.
Mary McGovern
senior member (history)
2018-11-12 14:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
348
23. If you break a mirror you will have seven years bad luck.
24. If onions are stolen from you, they will not grow with you for seven years.
25. No bad luck will enter a house for twelve months if a man enters it first on New Year's day.
26. It is not lucky to have out-offices built at each end of the dwelling house, and it was often the means of breaking up a match.
27. When the bride's party went to look at the groom's house found fault with it on account of out-offices being built at each end.
28. If a man marries a widow woman he goes in on a different door to the door the first man wen in on, and if there was only one door on the house he would go in on the window.
29. It is unlucky to meet a red-haired woman when going on business, and you should turn back.
30. Long ago when people were going to a house they put the four corner stones in there places the first day and the next day, if the stones are in the same places they
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 15:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
347
16. If a man who is going to a fair meets a red haired woman he should turn back. as some bad luck is sure to befall him or his beast before night.
17. When you are going on business if you meet a man and he wishes you good-luck, you will be successful.
18. If a woman is the first to wish you good luck in new clothes you will not have luck while you wear them.
19. When you meet a funeral procession you should leave the road, or, turn and walk a few yards with it.
20. When sparks fly from the fire it is the sign of money. Who ever is the first to spit on them will get the money.
21. A crowing hen should be put on the four cross-roads as the are very unlucky.
22. If you see a straight pin turned towards you, on your path it is unlucky and you should not touch it, but if you see one turned from you it it lucky, and should pick it up and keep it.
Taken down by, Ita Flynn, Drumcarra.
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 15:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
346
have all your good luck during the year.
May
8. Flowers are gathered on May Eve and scattered before the doors and windows. This will keep all diseases out of the house till that day twelve months.
9. On May Eve some people clean up the house and leave two buckets of clean water outside the door, and leave the fire lighted, as they believe that the fairies come and have a feast, where ever they are welcome, on that night.
10. If you wash your face, on may morning in the dew, before sunrise, you will not have any skin disease till that day twelve months.
11. It is not lucky to put down the first fire on May morning.
Birds
12. If one mag crosses your path is the sign of sorrow. Two for joy. Three for a letter. Four for a boy. Five for silver. Six for gold, Seven for a story that never can be told.
13. If swans fly straight across the house it the sign of death in that house.
14. You should never harm a swan, or if you do you will always have bad luck.
15. If the cock crows between twelve o'clock and four o'clock at night it is very unlucky, and sometimes it is the sign of a death.
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 15:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
345
Pisreoga.
Butter.
1. If you go into a house when there is a churning a making you should take a breash and say, "God bless the cows."
2. You should not borrow any thing while a churning is going on, as the people of the house might think you were trying to take the butter.
3. Long ago when a woman wanted to take butter from a neighbour she used to go out on May morning an before sunrise and skim the top of a spring well and throw over her shoulder in the direction of house she wanted to take the butter from.
4. You could get back the butter by milking the person's cow whom you suspected took it, and putting a drop of it in each churning.
5. Another preventitive from you butter being taken is to put a branch of white-thorn in the churn on May Morning.
May Customs.
6. You should never put the ashes out on May day, as you would be putting out your luck for the year.
7. You should never give a coal to any-one on May-day, as the person who got the coal would
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 15:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
343
Black and white and red (read) all over? A letter.
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 15:37
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awaiting decision
342
As I went through yonder gap,
I met my Uncle Davy,
I picked him up, and sucked his blood,
And left him lying easy.
A black-berry.
What takes a mouthful of hay bigger that any horse, yet eats none of it?
A sycthe.
How many feet has forty sheep, a shepherd and his dog? Two.
What never was, or never will be look at your hand and you'll plainly see. That your fingers will be the same length.
My mother sent to your mother for the loan of the Hitty, the Hatty, the double Killaty, the thing with the hat on the top. A churn dash.
On yonder hill there stands a deer,
With silver belt and bandolier.
Its neither fish, flesh, feather or bone,
Yet on that hill it stands alone.
The moon.
What is it that's rounder than your head and longer that a hundred trees? A ball of wool.
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 15:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
342
12 What always stands on one leg, and has its heart in its Head? A head of Cabbage.
13. A gray goose, and a white goose which of them is the Gander? None of them.
14. Patch upon patch without any stiches, riddle me that and I'll buy you a pair of breeches.
A head of Cabbage.
15. I have a little Sister, she sits on the wall, she drinks all she gets and eats none atall? A lamp.
16. Long legs, short thighs, little head and no eyes? A thongs.
17. What goes round the wood, and never gets into the wood? the bark of a tree.
18. A man had three quarters of an apple left, How would you know what time was it?
A quarter to eight.
19. I seen a man crossing a bridge with twenty patches on his trouser. How would you know what time it was/ Time he would get a new pair.
Headed like a timble, tailed like a rat you may guess for ever, but you wouldnt guess that? A pipe.
May McGovern, Rantogue
senior member (history)
2018-11-07 18:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
340
Riddles 22-11-'37
1. What side of the Mug is the handle on?
On the outside.
2. Two ducks before a duck, two ducks behind a duck, and a duck in the middle. How many ducks? Three ducks.
3. As white as milk, as black as ink and its hops on the road before you? A mag.
4. Whats full and holds more? A pot of potatoes, when you pour water in.
5. What is it, the more you take out of it the bigger it gets? A Grave.
6. As round as apple, as deep as a cup, all the men in Derry wouldent lift it up? Well
7. As round as an apple, as flat as a pan, one side is a woman, and the other a man? An English penny.
8. As round as an apple, as plump as a ball, Can climb the Church, over steeple, and all.
Sun.
9. He that buys it, its not for himself, and man that wants it little cares? A Coffin.
10. What is the difference between a jewlar and a gailar? A Jewlar sells watches and a gailer watches cells.
11. What walks with its head down? A Nail in your boot.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 18:34
approved
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awaiting decision
370
Preparing the ground for the potato crop.
In this locality the first process in the putting in of the potato crop is drain the field and clear the grass and rushes off it, and if required to fence it.
The ground is cut three or four feet apart or the width the ridge is required with a loy or plough.
Farm-yard manure is then spread in the centre of those spaces and the sods are turned in to meet each other.
When the ground is fairly dry, and a growth in the weather the seeding is started. Potatoes are cut in pieces about the size of hen eggs. These are set into the ridges in rows, three in each row, and about nine inches apart. This process should be finished early in April to be sure of a good crop.
Early in May artificial
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 18:29
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371
manure is applied, it is spread over the ridges and the mould which remained in the furrow, is broken fine, and placed over it. If any weeds grow through the stalks they are picked out in early June, and spraying commencs. They spraying is done twice or three times.
When the stalks are withered, they are dug out, and stored in heaps, and used as required.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 18:26
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awaiting decision
372
Stories of Our Lord.
One time Our Lord and St Peter met two beggar men looking for alms. One was well dressed and the other was dressed in rags and almost starved. Our Lord gave the ragged man a halfpenny and gave the other man a sixpence.
St Peter wondered and asked Our Lord why he gave the poorer man only a halfpenny and the other man sixpence. "Go", said Our Lord to him "and see what they are doing."
St Peter followed them and found the man who got the sixpence eating and drinking and praying the Our Lord might be preserved from His enemies. He found the other man dead by the roadside and his pockets filled with money. Peter was about to take some of the money but Our Lord told him not to touch it. He then told him that they should go another way as their enemies were looking for them.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 18:15
approved
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awaiting decision
373
The Clock.
People kill the clock and throw it in the fire. By doind so they say that their sins will be taken away.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 18:14
approved
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awaiting decision
374
Priests in Penal Times.
Soldiers were once hunting for a priest who was celebrating mass on the mountain. They set out in two bands to surprise the people.
The priest had just finished mass when they saw the soldiers coming in the distance. He and the people made good their escape but he had to leave his vestments behind.
When the first band appeared they opened the box and one of the soldiers dressed himself in the vestments and pretended to celebrate mass. Just then the other band arrived in view and thinking it was the priest they saw one of them fired at him and shot him on the spot.
From Mrs O'Neill
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 18:09
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awaiting decision
376
What is seldom is wonderful.
I wont be "grate" with you.
Its a cure for sore eyes to see you.
You cant have your loaf and eat it.
A half a loaf is better than bread.
Smooth waters run deep.
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
339
Christmas Customs
1. It was an old custom to light twelve candles on Christmas Eve and every person own a candle, and the persons candle that would die first the person would be the first person to die in the house.
2. Long ago people used to make twelve rush candles for New Years Eve and put them on the table and when they would all be burnt out, there would be a cure in the stuff that remained. Rush candles were made from peeled rushes and candles.
3. If the flood is high on New Years Eve all good wil be dear during the year and if the flood is low all goods will be cheap during the year.
4. A green Christmas a fat graveyard.
5. On New Years Eve people stay up until twelve oclock to welcome in the New Year and to finish the old one.
6. If a girl goes in first to a house on New Years Day she brings bad luck to the house, and if a boy goes in first he brings good luck to the house.
Rita Mahon, Mullawn.
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Plucking the Yarrow.
One Hallow Eve a girl went out to pluck the yarrow to play a trick with it. She had to cut the herb with a black handled knife and have in the hour before sunset. She did so, and that night slept on so as to dream of her future husband,
She dreamt that a certain man whose land adjoined hers came and drove her cattle across the river from trespassing. As the man was married she was disappointed with her dream and did not tell anybody. In less that a year the mans wife died, and soon after the match was made between he and the woman who dreamed of him.
Ita Flynn
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:31
approved
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awaiting decision
338
2. On Hallew Eve a boy or girl goes out and takes a mouthful of water from a stream. They look around them then and the first house they see they go to it and listen at the door. If any name is mentioned while they are listening, that is the name of their future husband or wife.
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
337
12..11..1937 Hallow Eve Customs.
Raking the Stack.
1. At twelve o'clock on Hallow Eve night a boy goes to a stack of oats taking a rake with him. When he reaches the stack he rakes it in the name of the devil. The devil will then tell him the name of his future wife.
One Hallow Eve night two boys, Randall Slack of Drumhubrid, and Roger Mac Manus of Drumgood went out to play this trick. As Roger was the oldest he rakes it first, but instead of raking it in the name of the devil he blessed himself and said, "In the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost I rake this stack." When he came back Randall asked him did he see anything, and Roger said, "I seen or heard nothing even though I raked it in the name of the devil/" Randall went next and taking the rake he said, "In the name of devil I rake the stack." Immeadiately he heard a great noise, and a great balck mass came rolling down the stack. Randall fell unconcisus and when he came to he swore that he would never try that trick again.
Ita Flynn, Drumcarra.
From Willie Mac Weeney,
Crummy.
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:20
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awaiting decision
335
in good time, and dident feel the length.
May McGovern
From Patk McGovern, Rantogue
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
334
How Guban Saors Son shortened the road.
Once upon a time Guban Saor and his son set out to there work. As he was going along he asked his son, did he know any plan to shorten the road. The son proposed that they would run. They ran until they became exhausted, and then they had to rest along the road side. They got up and ran again. When they came to the end of their journey they were very tired and found that they were as long going as if they walked so this plan had failed. Next morning a fresh plan was tryed. The Son arranged that they would carry each other every other piece. This time it took them longer to go the journey, so his second plan had failed. The third morning the son had found out the secret and began to tell the father a good story. They arrived at the end
senior member (history)
2018-11-02 12:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
333
his plan and it was up to him to find awa escape. Guban (saor) sent for the noble man and this is the way he talked to him I have a tool at home in Ireland in the bottom of my trunk and i cannot finnish this house perfection without it so I must go over for it not a tall said the Noble man Ill send my son for it. Very well said the Guban Ill write to my wife to tell her the name of it and wher to find it Guban for his own good luck was a good Irish writer and the nobleman knew nothing about about is so he wrote home keep what you have till you get what you want so she told him to put down his and he would get the tool
She send a Message to his father telling him to send home Guban or that his son would be put to death he was glad to send home Guban and have his son home.
Shawn Mc Govern
Rantogue
From Patrick Mc Govern
Rantogue
senior member (history)
2018-11-02 12:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Guban Saor.
Goban Saor was one of the best trades men of his day and could build and finish a building better then any other trades men.
He was invited over to England to build a castle for a great noble man.
When the castle was near finished The oner was very Proud of it so much so that he thought there was no house as good as it. This Noble man was very vain and wellminded and he contrived a plan to take Guban seers life so that there would be no other Castle in the land to equal his won. Guban found out
senior member (history)
2018-11-01 15:52
approved
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awaiting decision
327
The Sleeping Army
It is said that Fionn Mac Cool and his men are asleep in a cave in Sheemore waiting to be called to free Ireland. One day a man was minding sheep in a field nearby. He saw a cave on the top of Sheemore and there was a door on it. He went in and turned the key in the door. He heard a strange noise within..He heard people snoring and wakening inside, and the hounds barking and the sounds of swords clattering. Suddenly he heard a voice saying, "Did the time come yet?" The man took to his heels and Fionn and the Fianna went to sleep again.
L. Mulvey, Drumaweel
senior member (history)
2018-11-01 15:48
approved
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awaiting decision
326
Dun a bhFeirin
In olden times the fairies had their home in this fort. It is said that there lived a man at the foot of this ancient place. One evening his wife was milking and one of the cows kicked and spilt the milk. She began to lament over the milk, and suddenly she heard a voice saying, "Do not cry over spilt milk." She looked around and saw a man sitting beside her. From that time she always left a gallon of milk in the fort every evening.
The man grew very poor and one day the sheriff came to take the cows away for the rent. The neighbours came to his assistance but they were not able to take back the cows. The man did not know what to do, so he called on the good people of the fort to help him. He said "Gentlemen of the rock come and help me." At this an army of little men came out of the rock, and fought with the sheriff. The sheriff succeeded in bringing the cattle as far as Battlebridge, and though they fought very hard, the little men succeeded in bringing back the cattle. From that day to this the bridge is called Battlebridge.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 12:22
approved
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awaiting decision
325
Sign of the Cross on the road with his stick. The hare could not cross it, and he ordered it in the Name of God to depart and never to interfere with him or with anyone belonging to him again. The hare then went back and disappeared up a side lane and then he heard three loud whistles coming through fields from the direction of the fort towards which it disappeared.
Mrs O'Neill, Derreen Upper.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 12:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
324
The Three Legged Hare.
One night Pat Kelly was going on a visit to his neighbour's near Aughlin Bridge. He brought a creel with him to take some turf home with him as he was coming home. His greyhound came with him.. When he came to the turf bank he went in to fill the creel. Looking around he saw a three legged hare, and he put the hound after it. But each time the hound attempted to follow it, it fell and bogged its nose in the ground. He filled his turf and went on his ceilidh.
When coming home he went into the bank and putting his creel of turf on his back came out on the road and continued his journey home. Looking round he saw the three legged hare after him. As it came on the road it made sound as if it was a horse trotting along. It continued to gain on him and in the end was jumping up on his back.. Exhausted with fear and the load, he left the creel down and cut the
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 12:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
323
The Black Man.
One night a girl was coming home off her rambles. As she was passing a thick ivy quick she got very much afraid. Suddenly this black man appeared before her. Soon it disappeared again. In a few moments she heard it playing music and dancing. Then all was quiet again, and after a while she saw the black man again, but soon disappeared like a flash of lightning. She continued on and saw an old black cow along the road. The cow come up to her and she fainted.
Andrew Rodican Crummy
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 12:10
approved
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awaiting decision
One night Pat Cullen was going on his rambles to Mick Dwyer's. He went along alright until he came to Conway's hill. There in a field he spent many long hours roaming up and down. He took off his cap and started to pray, and continued walking on his rambles as he thought himself. He saw a light and he thought it was in Mick Dwyer's so he kept making for it. He did not reach the house. Instead of that it was making him worse. He did not know what to do and after wandering around till he was tired he sat down under a bush and fell asleep. Paddy Conway found him there next morning as he was foddering the cattle.
Ellie Reynolds.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 12:06
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did he find himself but on the bank of Crummy River. He turned his coat and he got home alright after that.
Ellie Reynolds, Crummy.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 12:05
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321
A stray sod.
There is said to be a stray sod in Tom Lee's hill in Derreen. Several people went astray on it.
One night Mick Winters was coming home late and he went astray on it. After he had walked for hours he said to himself he would sit down.. And when he did so a crowd of little red men came and got him to play cards. At the dawn of day they all disappeared and he got home alright. He said he must have walked on a fairies pass.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 12:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Stray Sod.
One night William Reynolds was coming from his rambles in John McWeenys. He walked accross John's field humming as song, but before he crossed the whole field he got afraid that he was going astray. He continued walking but he was not getting a bit nearer to the house, only fields on every side. At last he got tired walking and where
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 12:31
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320
A Ghost story.
About ten ears ago a man from around Carrick on Shannon district was after coming out of the post office from drawing his first old age pension. He had the pension book in his hand and when he was a hundred yards on his way home he met a strange man who had a hound along side him. Is that your first pension, "says the man,". It is "says the pensioner." Well you will draw a good deal of it. "For how long will I draw it," he says. You will draw it for forty years, "says the man." At that moment a hare sprung up in a field beside them and away with the hound after it. When the pensioner looked round again there was no sight of man or hound to be seen.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 12:22
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319
A ghost story.
One night as Patrick Mulvey and Hugh Beirne was going on their ceiligh to Patrick Conboy's they heard some noise in Tim Mc Kiernan's meadow. As they went on further a barrel rolled after them from Patrick Gannon's meadow to Tom Cullen's. It stopped there and they went ahead on their journey.
They made their ceiligh until about twelve o'clock. As they were leaving a girl walked across the road. She was dressed in white. She walked on until she came to Bernard Slack's meadow and she turned down into it and disappeared. Whey they came to Michael Tighe's gate they began to talk about what the heard and saw. While they were talking they were turned upside down. They didn't know what happened to them and they were so weak that they were not able to go any further than Comings bridge.
Pat McSharry
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 12:15
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318
One night a man was coming from his ceilide, and when he was going through his own land near his own house he heard horses galloping a field beside him.. Thinking it was some horses that came in off the road he went in, he went around the field but each attempt he made to go in, he was put back. He went home and the next morning he went to the same field and he got in quiet easy, and the horses were gone and not a track was in the field.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 12:12
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317
Taking away people. The Blastman etc.
It was a common belief in the district that the fairies took children, mothers and other people away, and left some old aingireor [?] in their place. Many tales were told of this theme, and of the various cures applied also of attempts to take them back. After they taste of the 'fairies' food, they cannot come back. The 'being' left is often a 'scald' to the people of the house and was usually done away with by some means or other usually by burning.
A certain man known as a "blastman" was supposed to take back people or to drive away this "aingirior" [?]. To sprinkle the blood of a black hen on the person being taken would cure them. Instances are given where the blastmen told the person who went to him that the above cure had been made and the person was well again. There were often abuses and we hear where a poor innocent person was burned as something left by the fairies.
senior member (history)
2018-10-24 16:47
approved
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awaiting decision
The Fairies Tricked.
Two fairy women once planned to steal a child as the mother was out. One was to hand it out the window to the other. The mother came back too soon for them and took the child as it was being handed out the window. On going into the room she saw what looked to be her own child in the bed. She did not know what to do so she went to the priest. He told her to put down a good fire and burn what was left in the bed. She did so and her child was safe.
You should leave the tonges accross the cradle when going out
senior member (history)
2018-10-24 16:43
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something up his nose. The man started to sneeze and go off in a swoon. When she heard him sneeze she said "God bless us," and he came to.
The man seeing her and knowing what she did was angry. He came over to her and struck her in the eye she had rubbed the ointment to, and blinded her and said "You will never be able to give away any more secrets on us."
senior member (history)
2018-10-24 16:41
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315
The Fairy Ointment
One night a 'midwife' was called by a man to attend his wife. He took her behind him on a beautiful horse to a beautiful house. She remained there for a week. A few days after the child was born he gave her a special ointment to rub to one of the child's eyes, telling her be sure not to get it on her hands or any other part of her. But being used to rubbing on ointment with her hand she rubbed on the ointment with her hand, and rubbed her hand to her eye.
When she looked around with this eye everything was changed. Instead of a beautiful house she saw a wretched hut, and instead of a beautiful woman and child in the bed she saw a wrinkled old hag and a horrible looking child. When the week was up the man left her back. With her own eye she saw a beautiful horse and with the one on which she rubbed the ointment she saw only a cabbage stump.
Some time after as she was having her tea in a hotel she saw the same man come in. He walked over to another man and while talking to him he stuck
senior member (history)
2018-10-24 16:32
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314
Attempting to take back a person from fairies
Some time ago a man in this district lost his wife. Some time after she came back and told him she was not dead but that the fairies had taken her, and as she had not tasted their food he could could take her back from them. She would be going through the bog with them the next night and if he stood on a certain bank she would put out her hand as she was riding past. If he succeeded in drawing blood for her she would be 'free.' If he failed she would be put to death for attempting to escape. It would be difficult she warned him as they would be going very fast, and seeing him there they would raise a "fairy wind" and it would be difficult for him to even keep his feet.
Next night he went to the place appointed taking the knife with him. The fairy wind blew so strong that he did not succeed in drawing blood. He went home downhearted. Next morning all the mugs on the dresser were filled with blood. She paid the price.
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 16:36
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313
dance but he would not. Tea was given to him but he refused it also.
At about two oclock the two girls came to him to come home. So he did and they left him back in the same place where they met him. He the went home. Next day he felt very sick and his parents who were worried sent for the doctor. The doctor came and when he went to the sick room he could see no one there. The boy had disappeared and was never seen or heard of since. They say he was taken away by the fairies.
P. Rodohan
Mrs. O'Neill
Derreen Upper
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 16:32
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312
The Fairies' Dance
Once upon a time a man was coming from his work. On his way he had to pass a fort.. As he was passing by two girls came out and stood on the road before him, and asked him if he would like to come to a dance. "We will leave you back in the same place again," they said. The man did not like to refuse so he went. The girls were very much interested in him and told him he was a musican, which he was very surprised to hear them say. "The dance w ere are going to, will be held in a cave, and all the guests will be pleased to see you," they told him. "They will ask you to play the fiddle to dance and to have tea; but no matter what they want you do, you had better refuse" and you will come home again with us, when we come for you.
After some time they reached the cave and went in. All eyes were turned on the stranger and all made him welcome. The dancing started and two girls asked him to play the fiddle, but he refused. They asked him to
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 16:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ghost Story, The barrel
One night a man was coming from Drumshanbo at night and when he was about half of a mile outside the town a barrel started after him and kept to his heels until he came to a bridge. There he was stopped and could not go one way or the other. He was walking all the night and did not know where he was and when the dawn came he found himself in the same place as where the barrel started after him first.
Rita Mahon, Mullaun
J J Mahon Farmer
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 16:09
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311
Dead Coach
One time two men were coming from a fair about two o'clock at night and when the came to the "Galley Bridge" the met a "Dead Coach" drawn by two horses and no light on it, nor no driver, and it on the left-hand side of the road. They were very much scared in passing as they thought they would not get by. Every night after the same coach passed at the same time and it never was known where it went to.
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 16:06
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310
A
One time there was a widow and she had one cow. There was a man living beside her and had to build a castle. He took the blood of the cattle around to mix with the mortar. So he killed all the cows and bullocks about the place. Her one little cow was driven to the castle that day and killed. A traveller came to the house and asked for a drink, she gave him some and he asked for more. She told him she had gave him the last drop in the house. He thanked her and left. When he was going out he said, "May He send you milk and butter as long as you live." Next morning when the widow got up she had no little cow. But a strange thing happened, a big piece fell out of the side of the hill. A white cow came out of the hill. She ran quickly and stood by the widows door.. She gave her milk and butter all through her years. When the widow died the cow went in to the hill and was never seen again. But the opening is still to be seen.
Anne Kinsey, Drumaweel
Pat Kinsey Farmer
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 15:58
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309
One night a man was coming from his rambles, and he had to pass by a grave-yard, as he was walking by he could see a tall figure standing before him, and he became very frightened. As he was about to pass it by it caught him by the arm, and bade him turn back, he hesitated in doing so, and in a few moments the figure went up in a blaze.
When he arrived home he found it diffcult to open the door, but at last he succeeded in doing so, and the same figure appeared before him again, so he fainted and when he got over it he could see nothing, so he went to bed very much frightened and when he awoke in the morning and looked out he could see a large tree grown on the street.
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 15:53
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308
cut off and preserved in the house if not she haunt the place.
The sisters thinking her delirious agreed, but interred the body without carring out the promise. A few nights after loud crashes were heard in the house and servants searched every room and corner but could find nothing. People also complained to them when passing the graveyard loud shrieks and crys were heard and lights were also heard. So they at once thought of the girls request, and carried out their promise at once so everything was peaceful after.
Some years after a servant girl pitched the skull out to a passing cart, but neither horse nor cart could be moved until the relic was brought back to the house. it is still built in a niche in the wall.
Rita Mahon, Mullaun
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 15:48
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awaiting decision
A Ghost Story.
One time their lived a very rich man and he had three daughters. When he died the daughters rebuilt the house again so they were very rich.
One day the younger girl went out for a walk and she met two tramps on her way asking her for alms who on seeing her purse and noticing a valueable ring on her finger robbed her of both. The also struck her with a heavy stick and left her unconscious on the road. Some people came and carried her to her own home where she died a few days after. On her deathbed she made a request to have her head
senior member (history)
2018-10-22 15:44
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307
One night a man coming home from a fair. It was late at night and as he was crossing a certain bridge out hopped a terrible looking person. The man spoke to it but the ghost did not answer. They waked along a good piece together and when the man looked over at, it was changed into a lovely girl with ribbons flying from her. When they came to water the girl would not cross, but dissappeared there. The man ran home quickly to his own house and went to bed. So he was afraid ever after.
senior member (history)
2018-10-20 15:43
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306
He saw a light in it and he stole over to it and peeped in through the window. And he saw a man boxing a pack of cards and seemed to be expecting someone in to play. On they other side an empty chair was. Casey went in and said "Good Night" but got no reply. The stranger beckoned to him to sit down and he began to deal the cards. They played away for a good while and Casey never won a game. He had nearly lost all the money that he won that night, so he thought his luck was going to turn. He had six cards and tried to hide one and looked under the table for the first time that night. To his horror he saw his companion had cloven feet. He fainted and rembered no more. In the morning he was found half-dead with cold lying on the floor of the old house. He told them all the story and the said it was the Evil-One himself he had played cards with.
Ita Flynn
senior member (history)
2018-10-20 15:37
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awaiting decision
One night a few men went to play cards in a certain house and their was a man named Casey with them. No matter what was played this man won. They other men thought he used to cheat but the couldn't prove it. He could drop or lift a card without being noticed. When playing one man complained that Casey was not playing fair or he would not always win but he only laughed at this. They played away until twelve o'clock.. Casey had won every game. Then they went home and Casey had a few fields to cross and to pass an old deserted house
senior member (history)
2018-10-20 15:34
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305
One night some men went to the house to see what the lights were about, but when they went in no lights were to be seen. They looked about and here they found a pot of gold in one corner of the house. They took it with them and that night a voice came to the window of the house and told them to leave it back. Then they did so. There were never any lights to be seen in the house afterwards.
Tomas Liam Mach Mhaonigh. From my Father.
senior member (history)
2018-10-20 15:31
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awaiting decision
A Pot of Gold
Long ago there lived an old woman in a house alone. She lived to be about eighty years and when she died lights were seen in the house every night for about a week
senior member (history)
2018-10-20 15:30
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304
Long ago there lived a man and his mother in a small tatched house beside Slieve-an-Iarainn mountain. Ttere lived a shoe maker on the other side of the mountain. One evening says the man to his mother. I think I will go out for my shoes. "No she says" Its too late. He didn't take her advice and started off. He got the shoes and was coming home smoking his pipe. Then a man jumped out from under a clump of bushes and walked along with him and asked him for a smoke out of the pipe. He gave it to him and when he had enough smoked he gave it back and thanked him. Then he says I think this is my turn and he went in through the bogs again. It was late when the man got home that night with the shoes. The mother said to him. "You got home" "I did" he said. Well only for the man that took the smoke out of your pipe you wouldnt she said.
Tomas Liam Mach Mhaonigh. From my Father
William McWeeny, Crummy
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 14:16
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awaiting decision
Hugh Moran, Gortnawane, told me this story
About half a mile from Drumshambo
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 14:14
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132
Some people used to say that they used to see a fairy woman coming to the fort at a certain hour every evening.
There is another fort near our land. Mahon's fort it is called. A few years ago there were lights seen around it. There is a big bush growing up beside it and there is a big piece of grass beside the bush and many nice fine stones at it. It is a very lonely place. There is a certain hour of the night at which lights can be seen. Nobody ever passed that way because there are ghosts at it.
There are many stories told about these forts. Here is one which ........ told me. One evening when a woman was milking her cow beside Mahon's fort she heard a child cry in it, and immediately the cow kicked the bucket and spilled the milk. The woman becoming Aagry said. "ye can have the cow if ye want her and immediately the cow went off towards the for and disappeared,. Two years later she returned bringing with her two beautiful calves.
Marie Darcy
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 14:03
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127

the year except Lent and Advent - April May and June are regarded as unlucky months, and Thursday Friday and Saturday unlucky days. Pancake Tuesday is the last day of Shrovetide, and on that night pancakes are made for the tea.
Matchmaking is dying out, but money is still given as dowry.
Mary Gallagher
Cornaleck
Drumcong
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 14:01
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120
Weather Lore.
The following are signs of rain:-
When you hear sounds such as the roar of the river sounds of motors, bells, trains, ect. from a long distances.
When you see a Crane resting in a bog, or washing herself in the river.
When the wind blows from the East, it is a sure sign of rain.
When the stairs and plovers fly together or when the swallows fly low.
When you see a rainbow on Saturday.
When you see streamers from the sun.
When you see the mist coming down the mountain in the morning.
When the crickets sing in the hob.
When distain hill look near.
When the smoke puffs through the house.
When there is a ring round the moon.
The following are signs of storm.
When the act turns her back to the fire.
When the crows fly down low and shout.
When the sheep come near home.
When a cow turns her back to a hedge.
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 13:55
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119
As I went up corn hill,
Corn hill was shaking,
As I came down corn hill,
I saw three devils reaping.
Three mice in a field of corn.
As I went up the mountains
I saw a terrible wonder
Four and twenty wild geese
Tearing the world asunder.
A Harrow.
Tis in the mill, and it can't be ground
Tis in the shop and it can't be sold
Tis in lakes and rivers all
And it never can be drowned.
The Sun.
What goes up the chimney down
And can go down the chimney up.
An umbrella.
What is more plentiful in a riddle than holes.
Corners.
Black I am and read all over.
The Pater.
Mary Gallagher and Kathleen Farrell.
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 13:50
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118
One finger never will be taller than another.
What is the smallest country in Ireland.
Cork because it fits in a bottle.
Riddle me riddle me rant te ro.
My Grandfather gave me seed to sow
The seed was black and the ground was white
Riddle me that and I will give you a pint.
A man writing.
King Mor Ruch he built a ship an' in that ship his daughter sat, an' I would be blamed if I told her name an' there is three times I told her name.
"Ann" was her name.
What is it wee se every day, the King seldom sees and what God never sees.
An equal.
Black I am and much admired.
Men and horses I have hired.
Gold and silver I have made.
And in the old earth I am laid.
Coal.
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 12:54
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136
year the crops failed and decayed in the heaps and some decayed in the ground. We had lots of oat meal Thanks be to God and in Matthew Donnellys meadow, There lived a family, five of them died and were buried there. One of them was eating grass and when my father heard it he brought her over a noggin of oat porridge. As soon as the poor creature had it eaten She died.
Tom Doherty says that the country wasv ery thickley populated before the famine that there were three or four familys living where there is only one now. Some tracks of the houses where these people lived are still to be seen but for the most part there isnt a trace of them. One man in this district Micheal McGir's father set the few potatoes that remained after that year, and the next year people came from Sligo to buy them from him. I did not hear how other people got the seed for the next year, but I heard that they were set in the ordinary way - not broadcast like grain.
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 12:46
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Famine Times.
Some old people tell stories that they heard from their fathers and mothers about the Great Famine. Here is what Francis Conifry R.I.P. told me about it:- The year before the famine the people in this district had such a crop of potatoes that they would not carry them out of the field. The next
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 12:43
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135
her to her own house. At eight oclock there was an awful "whill a bull" at McCabes. Mary Doogan went over and Pat and Mrs McCabe were crying and saying their child was dead. Mary Doogan went up in the room and there, sure enough was the child dead. "Stop your crying" said Mary. "Thats not your child at all for I have your child beyond in the house," and there and then Mary told her story of what she had seen early in the morning. Mary brought back McCabes child then, and they took the "dead child" out of the bed, held it over the fire and "whoo" it went up the chimney in smoke It was a fairy child was left, and the woman was a fairy woman taking away McCabes child, and now that's the truth I'm telling you. I wouldn't believe poor Mary. "God rest her soul."
Mary Gallagher.
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 12:36
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Thomas Reilly, Drumgood told me the following story:- Beside Flynn's fort Lister.
"Beside Flynn's fotr Listermacrone, theer were two families living on the same street - McCabes and Doogans. In the McCabes lived Pat, his wife, and one child. In Doogans were Mary and her brother James both unmarried. One morning Mary was up very early as she was going on a visit to a cousin of hers that day, and she wanted to leave the turns done for James. When she opened the door to look out what was her surprise to see a woman standing outside McCabes window and McCabes child "a handing" out to her. Mary Doogan made some noise, and the woman dropped the child and ran towards the fotr - I forgot to tell you that there was a fort near by. Mary picked up the child and brought
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 12:30
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how did he injoy the night. So he said he never had a better night in all his life that the owner of the Castle sent out for a bullock and killed him.
When the man heard this he went away and counted his cattle and the best one of then was gone. This was the bullock the fairy men and the other man ate the night before.
Sean Mc Keon
senior member (history)
2018-10-19 12:28
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133
there is a real fort. It is a nice rock with all white thorns bushes around it. The owner of this for is Mr Gillooly. This man is afraid to take any of these trees untill they are knocked by wind.
In olden times there was a man coming to Drumshanbo for a fair. In Drumshanbo streets he met a man and he asked him where would get lodging for himself and his cattle until morning. This man directed him to go out a half a mile the mountain road.
He went out to the place he was directed to but in this place there was no house or place. When he went out as far as it, however he saw a beautiful Castle so he went into the Castle. He met the man at the hall door who asked him. "Who directed you here." He told the man's name saying ....." He is a neighbour you your own." He took him in, and put by his cattle for the night. He then sent two of his men out to bring in a bullock and kill him. They did so and this man had one of the best nights ever he had.
The man had to get up early to go to the fair next morning. When he went as far as Drumshambo he met the man who directed him to that place the night before. He asked him
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 16:58
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About half a mile from Drumshambo
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 16:51
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Fairy Forts
There is quite number of fairy forts in my district. Each for is surrouned by a number of small little bushes and inside there is a small patch of green grass. Nobody would cut a bush in a fort or a lone bush. If they did it would bring bad luck on them.
Fairies lived in it along time ago
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 16:49
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Local Cures.
Mrs Gilhooly has the cure of the sprain. She makes it on Mondays and Thursdays. She got that cure from her mother, She puts thread on the affected part and says some prayers.
Jimmy Cassels has a cure for a pain in the back. He walks on top of the person who has it. He is a posthumous child. He also has a cure for the chin cough. Get from him a piece of his hair and wear it. It will
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 16:46
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awaiting decision
Bird Lore.
Told by Dan Earley, Edanavow.
There are many wild birds around here - the crane, the black bird, thrush, robin, hawk, crow, mag-pie, willie-wagtail, sparrow, the yellow-hammer, wild geese, and swans.
When the swans roar on the loch it is the sign of storm. When the robins fly around the door-step a storm is approaching, when the willie-wagtail hops on the street, when the wild geese fly in the shape of the Alphabet a storm is approaching, when the crows flies low going home, when the crane goes to the bog it is a sign of rain, when the seagulls fly inland, when the black-bird chirp very loudly it is also a sign of rain. When the crane goes to the mountain it is a sign of good-weather.
A thrush builds in a white thorn bush. She
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 16:41
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to see if there were any priests hiding there. The soldier who went down lived to come up but died immediately after.
A field behind the school is called the "Dead man's field" because a man died there during the Famine and was buried there.
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 16:37
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Local Place Names.
On the top of Sliabh Anerin there is a rock called locally "Camp-pell." This may mean "Teampall" as on this rock priests said mass in Penal Times. On a flat on the mountain there is a big hole called "Poll a huggy." This hole goes along under ground for 1/4 mile and the other end is called Poll na gCat. Francis Conifry R.I.P. tried to walk through this hole, but the candle he had quenched and he had to come back.
A little stream comes down the mountain and goes into a hole called "Poll na Gullan" (Poll na gColm) and remains underneath for 500 yards or so and then comes out in little spots here and there in Richard Fees fort. Another stream goes in an immense hole called "Pulthy," This hole is about 21 feet wide and goes down far in the ground. It is so dangerous that the man who owns the field closed it with wire. There is a story told that in the Penal times, the "Red Coats" borrowed a ladder to go down that hole
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 16:27
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128
"Local Place Names" - told by Tom Doherty, Liscarbin.
rock over it to watch and see if there would be any "red coats" coming.
senior member (history)
2018-10-17 14:54
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The Penal Times
Told by Willie Moore, Mohercregg.
Long ago Mass was said in this district on Sliab Anerin mountain. There is a place near Rantogue where mass was said. It is a big rock which was cut out in the shape of an altar. It is said that there is a track of a table there yet where the priest used to say mass and a round stone with a little hole in the middle of it where the priest used to wash his hands. While the priest would be saying mass a man called a "sentinel" would have to stay on the
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2018-10-17 14:48
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danced on it.
Another woman told me that in those days, the guests at the weddings always brought presents - usually something to eat, and that the wedding lasted for four or five, and sometimes seven days. On the night of the wedding "strawboys" came and knocked at the door. They asked if they were welcome, and if they were they went in and danced with the bride and bridesmaid, and then went home. It was considered lucky if these "strawboys" came, or it showed that the bride and groom were popular in the district.
About 100 years ago, the bride remained for a month in her father's home and then the groom's man was sent to take her to her new home. He rode on horseback. When leaving the bride got up on the horse behind his back, and other couples came on horses as well. A race began, and whatever couple arrived first at the groom's house got a prize. The prize was usually a cake. A Mrs. Gallagher - grandmother to the family now living in Cornaleck came as a bride riding on horseback. She was the only one I heard of in this district and that would be almost 100 years ago.
Marriages take place now at any time of
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2018-10-17 14:42
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Mrs Mc Loughlin is now 79 years. She remembers the following distinctly. She does not remember the time that the bride remained in her home for a month, but an old woman (now dead) told her that she remembered it well.
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Marriage Customs
An old woman named Mrs McLoughlin told me that when a marriage took in her early days all would go to the chapel in the evening, when the ceremony would take place. The bride, groom, brides maid and groom's man would walk to the chapel, followed by a large crowd of people. The bride and bridesmaid would be dressed in white with white bonnets on their heads. If the day was wet, they wore a hooded cloak over this dress. All would walk in procession back to the bride's home where a wedding feast would be held. Lashings and leavings of potatoes, bacon and cabbage were there for everyone with sometimes fowl (if the people were "well off." The crowd would be so great that sometimes it was very late in the night before the last people were served, and they were often ready to faint. However, the fiddlers sometimes helped by pipers kept the music and dancing going. It was all step dancing in those days, and the door was taken off its hinges, and the best dancer
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2018-10-17 14:34
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A neighbour of ours - Mrs Conifry went to America and when leaving, she gave my mother a spinning wheel. When my father and brother shear the sheep, they wash the wool, and put it on the "Quick" to dry. When dry my mother card it with two cards. These are like the backs of hair brushes with wire attached to tear the wool asunder and make it fine. She rolls it into rolls and then spins it into a single thread. When she has two threads spun she twists them so as to make one strong thread.
No one but mother can spin, but we can knit socks jumpers and cardigans from the homespun wool. We colour the garments - a golden brown. We boil moss in a pot of water and put the garments into it.
Teresa Flynn
Gortnawane
Drumshanbo.
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2018-10-15 16:51
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there was a man named Peter Moran of Bunreavagh who was a very good basket Maker and he used to make small creels also. Some of his creels are up in Dublin in the "Irish Press" office and in all parts of Ireland. I have one of his creels too.
Jack Doherty.
Peter Moran died last year aged
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2018-10-15 16:49
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Rush Candles
Long ago there lived a woman in out districk who used to make rush candles. She went out to the field and cut thick rushes, brought them in and peeled them and put them in the hob to dry. When they were dry she melted lard and dipped them in it. Then she got a piece of a board and put clay on it and stuck the newly made candles into it and then lit them. They would not show good light but that was the only sort of light she had.
Brigid Agnes Earley.
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2018-10-15 16:45
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Resin Candles
Long ago in a district near the school there lived an old woman who made resin candles. She had a little iron vessel shaped like a boat. She used to put the boat shaped vessel beside the fire and melt the resin. Then she got pieces of rags about five inches long and pulled them through the resin. When these were hard she put one of them into a candle stick made specially to hold it. She then lit this and that was the light she had in her house.
My father told me yesterday that the boat shaped vessel that used to hold the resin, was called a "grisset."
resin
candle
candle
stick
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2018-10-15 16:39
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lodged in the houses around and entertained the people with stories, into which he introduced a number of big words, which the people did not understand and which he explained, so that they all looked on him as being a great genius.
Lizzie Mulvey,
Mohercregg.
Information of above school given by Mrs. Beirne now almost 100 years old.
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2018-10-15 16:37
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Old Schools
In the townland of Liscarbin in the place where Paddy Beirne's house now is there was an old school. Master Earley taught there. He was particularly good at teaching writing, and those who attended his school were "great writers."Writing was done on slates with pencils, and also on paper with quills pens. The children sat on large stones around the walls, and put the slates on their laps.
Master Earley also taught Latin.
Every Monday morning the scholars brought 1d. This was the only salary the teacher received. He
senior member (history)
2018-10-15 16:33
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When the hens run for shelter.
When the fog comes down the mountain.
When the robin comes in to the house.
When the hens can not be kept from the door.
When the ass turns his back to the ditch.
When the swans roar on Lough Allen
When wild geese fly from the mountain to the Lough.
When the dat tears a bush or any sort of wood.
Lena Moran Gortnawane (from her father Hugh Moran)
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2018-10-11 17:30
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Anyone was sick she would be asked to say that prayer for them. If she said it form beginning to end without a stop or stammer that person was sure to get better. But if she went astray in it the unfortunate person died shortly afterwards.
Angela Larkin,
Castleffrench,
Ballinasloe.
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2018-10-11 17:28
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A collection of prayers.
The old people had many beautiful prayers that were never written in books. My grandmother once told me that she said a short prayer every morning when she awoke. This was the prayer - "Oh Lord, lead me the right road this day."
When she was getting up out of bed she said another one which was, "Jesus Christ, help me to rise glorious from the dead on the last day."
When the people were starting work long ago they all said - "Oh my God, I offer to thee all my work.
Another small prayer was said at the beginning of a journey. It was like this - "Oh God bring me safely to my journey's end."
When the old people lit the first fire in the morning they said "Oh Mary, Queen of the Missions, help to kindle the fire of faith in pagan lands."
The last thing they said at night was - '"thanks be to God for all his gifts this day."
In this district there was an old woman who could say a great long prayer in Irish. She called it "Mathair Padhraig Naomtha" and no one knew it but herself. When
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2018-10-10 16:11
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Local Beliefs in Connection with Churning
(1) Certain people - (butter witches) believed to have power of taking other peoples butter from the milk so that when it was churned it yielded no butter. There are many old stories in connection with this. e.g. Mr Anderson of Leganomer, Carrigallen, was said to be a butter witch. There is a story that one night greyhounds pursued a hare and captured it just as it was going
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2018-10-10 16:06
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Cure for Burn
(1) A man, who got a mankeeper and licked it was able to cure a burn if he licked the burn.
(2) A hair from head of a posthumous child's head boiled in milk - cure for whooping cough.
(3) When a bee was found when not seeking fir it and brought home and closed up in a box or a hole in wall - was believed to cure whooping cough.
(4) A woman, who did not change her name in marriage. The food left behind by her was believed to cure whooping cough.
senior member (history)
2018-10-10 16:02
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of Carrigallen.
2. Eager was Rector of Carrigallen and lived at Druminchin at same time.
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2018-10-10 16:00
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Through the window of Mr Andersons house. It was believed that the hare was the butter witch, which went around sucking the cows. The butter witch was confined to be with a wounded leg, which was bitten by the hounds.
(2) A person, who was believed to be a butter witch and was supposed to have taken the butter from a person. When he entered that persons house if a piece was cut from the tail of his coat and burnt and put under the churn at next churning the butter was said to return.
(3) It was considered wrong for a person to come into a house, where churning was going on and ask for the loan of anything in case he would bring the butter.
Rhyme
The Madam's Ass.
The shades of night were stealing o're
The verdant planes of Beaghamore
The wind had risen to a gale
Which thickly fell both rain and hail
The stout oak trees with fear did shake
Their branches too did crack and break
On to the earth falls birch and larch
Which shows that Winter's on its march
The rest is needless for to tell
You all remember it quite well
senior member (history)
2018-10-09 14:10
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Riddles.
VIII. What is it that will go up the chimney down but can't come down the chimney up.
An umbrella.
IX. What is it that is higher and handsomer when the head is off it.
A Pillow.
X. Why is a crow a sensible bird.
Because he never complains without cows. (cause)
XI. Useful, useless instrument which oft was bought but never lent. The man who buys it, it is not his own and the man who gets it, it takes him home.
A Coffin.
XII. Riddle, me, riddle me roo, all full of holes and none of them through.
A thimble.
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2018-10-09 14:05
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Riddles.
I. Come, tell me ladies if you can, who is this highly honoured man who though he marries many a wife he still lives single all his life.
A Priest.
II. Patch upon patch without any stitches. Riddle me that and I will give you a pair of breeches.
A head of cabbage.
III. In the garden was laid a pretty fair Maid, as fair and as fresh as the morn. The first hour of her life she became a wife and she died before she was born.
Eve,
IV. I washed my face in water that never rained or ran. I dried it in a towel that never was woven or spun.
Dew and Sun.
V. How is Berlin like a drunken man?
It is on the Spree.
VI. Black and white and red all over.
A paper.
VII. When was beef the highest?
When the cow jumped over the moon.
senior member (history)
2018-10-07 14:36
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628
field, Knockvicar, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2018-10-06 18:19
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Sean-Phaidreacha Beannachtai 7rl
Gha n-aithris ag Padraic O Ceallachain Cul na Binne, Beal Atha an Fheada a fauair bas 1935 d'aois 88 mb. 13 bliathna o soin o chualas iad uaidh.
An schribhnoir: an Br. Angelo.
1. In ainm an athar agus an Mhic agus an Spioraid Naoimh. Amen. Tre eachta comhachta Caisreacain De 'rainn.
2. Going to sleep:
Four corners on my bed
Four angels and them spread
Mark and Michael Luke and John
God bless this bed that I lie on.
3. Going to sleep"
When I lie on my right-hand side
I give my soul up to God to guide,
And if any evil spirit comes,
The Blessed Virgin will come and 'waken me.
4. Ag dul a chodladh
Ceithre coirneal ar my leaba
Ceithre aingil 's iad ar sgartha
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
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2018-10-05 16:47
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"Na bac leis", says St Kevin
Ill soon settle these young urchins
And he turned the king and his six sons
Into the seven churches
Thus King OToole did suffer
For his dishonest doings
And he left the gandher there
For to guard about the ruins (?)
Chorus
If you go there on a Summer's day
Between 12 and 1 o'clock
Youll see the gandher flyin' round
The Glen of Glendalough
A poor man keeps his word
Much better that folks grander
For the King refused to pay the saint
For caring his ould dead gandher.
Chorus
Song. Peter Gilbane Aughrimin Jamestown
Pupil Kathleen Gilbane
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2018-10-05 16:42
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The King went to the parlour
To fetch him out the bird
With the very laste intention
Of sticking to his word.
\st Kevin took the gandher
From the arms of the King
He first began to 'twig' his beak
and then to stretch his wing
Chorus
He 'hushed' him up into the air
And he flew 30 miles around
"Im thankful to your majesty
For that little bit of ground
So the King to raise a "ruction"
He called the saint a witch
And he sent for his 6 sons
To heave him in the ditch.
Chorus
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 16:37
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419
Fol de dol etc.
III
Are you cryin' for the gandher?
You unfortunate ould goose
Dry up you tears, In frettin'
Sure sorra much the use.
Says the Saint "What will you give me
If the gandher I'll survive?"
Says the King "Ill be your servant
As long as Im alive"
Chorus
IV
"Ill cure him," says St Kevin
And Ill make him whole and sound
If you'll give me the taste of land
That the gandher will fly round"
"To be sure," says the King
Ill give you what you ask"
Altho' he hadnt the laste intention
Of sticking to the task
Chorus
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2018-10-05 16:19
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449
"Goodbye, may God be with my lad,
wherever he may roam
Let no false pride make you forget
Your loving friends at home
Goodbye, may God be with you lad,
too often she did cry
And whilr I breathe Ill ne'er forget,
my mother's last Goodbye"
Betty Mulvey
Drumsna
Sung by her mother
senior member (history)
2018-10-05 16:16
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An old song
When I was but a youngster lad,
I thought I'd like to roam,
Like many another foolish youth,
I lost my love for home
The good friends all around me,
they thought too much of me
So one fine day, I started away,
the wide world for to see.
My father at my parting, said
"Now lad be always true
My prayers for thee, will always be
That God will watch o'er you.
My mother hardly spoke a word
the day I went away
She flung her arms round my neck.
These words to me she did say,
senior member (history)
2018-10-04 12:16
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424
"Well," says Paddy McCabe, 'tis a very hard case.
With your Reverence and Heaven, I'm content to make 'pace,'
But with your Reverence and Heaven
I wonder ochon
Who'd think of comparing
that blackguard Malone.?
But since I'm hard pressed
and that I must forgive
I forgive if I die, but as
sure as I live!
That ugly blackguard I will surely surely destroy
And now for your blessing
sweet Father Molloy!
Mary Gorman (pupil)
Told by Mrs Hunt Jamestown (86)
senior member (history)
2018-10-04 12:11
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So Ill say, in a word "Im no very good boy"
And now for your blessin sweet Father Molloy.
"Well" says Father Molloy "if your sins I forgive
You must forgive your enemies truly
And promise me also, that if you should should love
Youll leave off your old tricks
And begin to live newly
"I forgive everybody," says Paddy with a groan
|"Except that great blackguard, Micky Malone
And him, I will murther, if ever I can"
"Tut-tut" says the priest "you're a very bad man
And without your Confession and likewise repentance
You won't go to Heaven, and that is my sentence"
senior member (history)
2018-10-04 12:06
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422
Another Song.
As Paddy McCabe was dying one day
Father Molloy came to confess him
And Paddy prayed hard, that he'd make no delay
Only just hear his sins
And make haste for to bless him.
2
Then tell me your sins, says Father Molloy
For I'm thinkin you've not been a very good boy
So late in the evening, says Paddy "I fear
It would trouble you such a long story to hear.
Besides you've 10 long miles over the mountain to go.
While the road I have to travel, is much longer you know.
So give me your blessin and get in the saddle
To tell all sins, my poor brain it would daddle
And the doctor gave orders to keep me so quiet
"Twould disturb me to tell all sins, if I try it"
senior member (history)
2018-10-04 12:00
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518
Where I ne'er was held in scorn.
So fare thee well to Erin's isle
Its hills and valley's green
For nevermore on Eiin's shore,
O'Donnell you'll be seen.
Adieu! Adieu! a long farewell
This is my parting day
I hear the death bell tolling now
Good Christians for me pray
Until the Blessed Virgin, when on
bended knees you fall.
For the soul of Patrick O Donnell
From the County Donegal.
Composed by P. O'Donnell while awaiting execution in London.
Sung by
Patrick Donaher
Clooneigh
Ck on Shannon
Betty Mulvey (pupil)
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2018-10-04 11:55
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For wilful murder I was tried
And "guilty' found at last
The jury gave their verdict
And the judge my sentence passed
For the shooting of James Carey
"Now my learned Judge did cry
"On the 17th day of December,
Patrick O Donnell you must die"
And if I was a free man
And to live another year
All traitors and informers
I would make them quake with fear
As St Patrick drove the serpents
From our sainted island ground
I'd make them run before me
Like the hare before the hound.
So fare thee well, sweet Donegal
The place where I was born
And likewise the United States
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2018-10-04 11:51
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576
I fired at him a second time
And pierced him thro' the heart,
And I gave him a third volley, boys
Before he did depart.
His wife and son came running down
To the cabin where he lay
And when they saw him in his gore
It filled them with dismay
"O Donnell you shot my husband"
Mrs Carey loud did cry
"Oh yes, I did, in my own defence,
Kind Madam" then said I
the Captain had me hand-cuffed
And in irons strongly bound
And gave me up as a prisoner
When we landed in Capetown
He brought me back to London
Where my trial day came on
The prosecutors for the Crown
Being Carey's wife and son.
senior member (history)
2018-10-04 11:46
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515
An old song
My name is Patrick ODonnell, and I came from Donegal
I am you know a deadly foe, to traitors one and all
For the shooting of informer Carey, I was tried in London town
And on that fatal scaffold high
My life I must lay down
We sailed on board the ship 'Melrose'
In August 83
And on my voyage to Capetown
He was u known to me
When I found out he was Carey
We had angry words and blows
The Villian swore he'd take my life
On board the Melrose.
My pocket pistol I drew forth
And at him I let it fly
senior member (history)
2018-10-03 16:32
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Chorus: 3 lines as before and repeat last line of verse for 4th line.
Sung at one time by my Grandfather
John Hunt
Portaneoght
Carrick on Shannon.....
Told by Mrs Hunt Jamestown
to
Mary Gorman (pupil)
senior member (history)
2018-10-03 16:30
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524
Chorus
3 lines as before.
Line 4. To bit the ould nose off McCarthy.
An' when he'd go out, to a market or fair
His big brawny chest was exposed to the air.
Sorra cravat he ever could wear.
'Twould smother ould Paddy McCarthy.
chorus 3 lines as before
Line 4. Twould smother ould Paddy McCarthy.
One night at a wake he got drunk as a beast
And who should he meet but his own Parish Priest
"Well Paddy,"says he "youll be damned now at least"
"Ill be damned, if I will, says Mc Carthy.