Number of records in editorial history: 8190 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2021-06-12 18:45
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Michael Healy's father conveyed "Sceach", a neighbour, home part of the way one night. The moment he left Sceach in Srán Bearráin a big white dog appeared at Sceach's side. Whenever Sceach raised his stick to strike the dog the latter swelled + grew large. Sceach lowered his stick each time. The dog accompanied him all the way home.
Michael Healy's father was a fisherman in Kenmare Bay. One night when going home with his fish from Góilín na Staice he was held up on the road by some invisible force + prevented from going further for half-an-hour. He saw nothing + heard no strange or unusual sound.
Another night he heard a loud sound tearing through the wood behind him while he was on his way home. It was like an explosion + it made its way through the wood + disappeared to the west.
senior member (history)
2021-06-12 18:36
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the mine-shaft in Allihies. "Why didn't you save the woman?" the judge asked him. "If you were in my place, too, 'tis farther in under the cliff you'd draw (hide)", said Scíolach. Had Cruhhor seen him he would have killed him too.
A girl, Kate Hanly, who was very young at the time Cruhoor killed the Cuimín woman was in Rábach's house at the time of the deed. She it was who found the body. So she told Michael Healy's people years afterwards. She acted under Cruhoor's instructions. The people of all the neighbouring townlands were searching for the missing woman. Cruhoor took one direction + told the girl to go a certain way. She did + found the body.
Cruhoor's body was brought home from Tralee, blood dripping from the coffin, and buried in Kilmackilloge.
senior member (history)
2021-06-12 18:28
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in Cruhoor's house in Cuimín Gadhra on one occasion + Cruhoor, when paying him his dues (it was a Station-Mass, presumably) went to the room + produced a mug of gold. "I wouldn't be so rich", he remarked, "or have such good luck if I was such a bad character as they say". "Oh!" said the priest, "if you want luck to come in through both doors kill someone".
Cruhoor was one Sunday morning near his house when he saw coming over the brow of the hill from the west a man whom he did not like, a Sullivan man from the east. The latter was a carpenter on his way home from Glenbeag where he had been working + had with him his saw, adze + c. Cruhoor raced up the slope to attack him. The other ran but later stood his ground + got ready to defend himself with adze in one hand + saw in the other. Cruhoor, thinking discretion the better part of valour, turned homewards + let the other go his way.
The Scíolach who witnessed the murder of the woman gave evidence against Cruhoor at Tralee. He had survived the fall down
senior member (history)
2021-06-12 18:14
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Michael Healy, 64, postman, referred to on the previous page, talked much of Cruhoor Ráib, who lived in Cuimín Gadhra in Tuosist about 100 years ago. His exploits, concerning the murder of a sailor or pedlar or a woman, his aunt, have been already set down in another Ms. so the further facts gleaned from Healy are written here indifferently of their chronological position in the story.
Cruhoor's wife was in bed having given birth to a child the night he was 'taken' by the yeomen. He went to the room to her to say goodbye but she refused to shake hands with him remarking that she had married a dead man and not a live one - referring probably to his being doomed to the gallows ever since he had committed the crimes. She was a Murphy girl from Árd a' Truise, near Bantry.
Cruhoor was well-off and "greased the palms" of the yeomen who were ostensibly trying to catch him. One of them lived at Feoramoor near where "Stretton" now lives. A priest, Fr. Donnelly probably, was saying Mass
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 08:11
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of people that were long dead and that he knew well. The fairies put a great welcome before James and they all came up and said: - "Arah! James McKiernan you are welcome. We are a long time waiting for you". Dun Binne came up and he said: "Get something to eat quickly for this decent man, James McKiernan of Sunnaghmore". And all the fairies shouted, "Shure we have nothing for him to east here" "Why wouldn't there" said Dun Binne, can't yis bring in Pat Mulligan's cow". Just as soon as the words were out of his mouth, a man came in hauling Mulligan's cow by the tail. James McKiernan was standing beside a neighbour that was dead about seven years, and he spoke to him and said, "What will I do now?" "No matter what you do, don't eat anything here anyway" said the man. So when the cow was cooked James said that he was too full and that he couldn't eat anything. They forced him high up and low down
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 07:59
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Once when a young man James Curran went to a protestant wake in Corriga, parish of Augharas.At that time there were a good many protestants in Corriga and they were all of Scotch descent. The wake was in a house named McClennan's. Coming on to midnight all the Protestants wanted Curran to go home, but he said he'd stay. (He was the only catholic in the wake). Just at twelve o'clock a cry and moans and great wind and noise swept round and round the house, and every protestant in the house became as silent as the grave. Each man rested his left elbow
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 07:55
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of the big house. They were a lot of workmen and some of them were married and had families. This night there were six cows sick a-calving and they people were sitting up. They were in a big room and there was a fire in it. A very nice girl named Kean walked down from the fire to where there was a creel of turf to bring some up to put on the fire. When she was midway down the room, a great wind blew and there was great 'hurley lurley' and the door was burst open and the girl was swept off her feet and out through a little window that was opposite the door. One boy sitting beside the fire had just time to take up the tongs and "peg" it after her, and it just hit her heel as she was going out through the window. There was a cry as the tongs hit her. The thing swept over the country and the girl was taken in through the front door and out through the back door of a neighbouring house. And when the people of that house ran out, they found the Kean girl lying on the back street. You see the stroke of the tongs saved her for the fairies hate iron, and if you can
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 07:43
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milking the cows and one cow kicked and knocked her off the milking stool, and when the people heard she was dead, the neighbours said she was taken away with the fairies. So the father went for a famous man named Jimmy Smyth that could bring back people. Smyth was clamping turf on the bog when McGuire came for him. The minute McGuire put his foot on Smyth's bank, a wind blew and seven clamps of turf tumbled to the last sod. Smyth put up his hand and stopped McGuire and said: - "You may go home, I can't do anything for your daughter, didn't you see the clamps falling". So McGuire had to go home, and everyone wondered how Smyth knew what McGuire's business was.
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 07:34
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Once upon a time there lived a young couple and the woman was taken away with the fairies. The man went to a man that could bring back people. The man told him to go to a certain crossroads on a certain night at midnight and he added: -
"First let by the blaney black,
And then let by the fiery brown
Then comes on the milkwhite steed
And pull the rider down".
He went to the crossroads as directed, and let by the blaney black, and then the blaney brown, and he grabbed at the rider on the milkwhite steed but he missed his hold and the milkwhite steed flung his heels and knocked out his eyes and he went home blind.
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 07:28
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Old Mick Brady of Sunnaghmore was one night coming from Cloone. Several horses + cars and crowds of people passed and when the last car was passing it haulted and they said they'd give him a lift home. He said it wasn't worth his while, as he was near home, but they forced him up. He got up and began to talk about the weather and things, but the crowd on the car kept dead silent. When he came to his own turn, he wanted to get down but they drove on, and never let on they heard him. He knew them they were the fairies so he put his hand in
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 07:22
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Well Owen did you get your cow and they laughed and began to fight among each other and Owen got several strokes of sticks and he saw men that he knew were long dead. After a long time he got away & another piece up the road he met the same crowd and he got another beating. At the next cross roads he met them again and got another beating. He got away from them at last and at Gabbs' crossroads near his own house he found his own cow grazing along the side of the road.
senior member (history)
2021-06-11 07:18
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One day old Owen Mullegan went to the fair of Arva (Co. Cavan) to buy a cow. He bought the cow and was coming home. When he was a bit outside the town, a man caught up with him driving a horse and cart. He asked Owen up on the cart and that they would drive the cow in front. Owen got up and the minute he sat on the cart the horse ran away and he never cried halt till he came to the next crossroads. Owen jumped off and started back to look for the cow, but he could not see any sign of her. It was dark by this time and he saw a light in a house, so he went up to inquire but their people wouldn't let him in as they said there was a sick man in the house. So he went on another piece and he saw another light and he knocked, but he got the same answer. He saw another light, and when he came as far as it it was a little fire under a lush at the side of the road. Owen got afraid and said he would go home. So he started off and he didn't go far till he met a crowd of men, and they said
senior member (history)
2021-06-09 08:07
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bed or settle be not in this position already it should be placed so for the 'wake'. This rule is more or less rigidly observed still.
Wake-games, played in other counties, are unknown here. Storytelling in former times + talk on current topics, tales of the fairies + c, in more recent times, form the sole entertainment.
senior member (history)
2021-06-09 08:04
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cases where clothes, boots + c which had been worn on a few occasions by the dead person prior to his death were pressed into service + worn for the dead person's soul subsequent to his death. This, in this district at least, is tabu, and signs were not long absent to show that the dead person was in want in that particular respect "on the other side". New clothes were then got + worn as prescribed + all was well.
In Dingle district, I believe, the clothes are sometimes taken in a bundle to the church for Mass during three consecutive Sundays, instead of being worn.
Again, in other districts, clothes already worn take the place of the new ones considered necessary in this parish.
Crepes are worn by relatives of the dead person, usually on the cap or hat, for some time after his decease. They are distributed prior to the funeral.
Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, 76, Doire Locha, Tuaith OSiosta, informed me that the proper orientation of the bed or settle on which a corpse is laid out is: feet towards the south-east. Similarly with the grave. He said that should the
senior member (history)
2021-06-09 07:54
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house + put aside until morning. The person who is to wear them to Mass that day may be a member of the household, or else a relative, or merely a neighbour. He comes to the house on the morning of the first Sunday, wears the clothes to Mass and appears among the congregation as the dead one was wont to do. A young man is often thus seen, wearing the suit of a very elderly person. The clothes are returned to the house when Mass is over and they are thus worn in public for two further Sundays. The obligations of the family towards the dead person are now fulfilled. * Similarly when a female dies.
The clothes are then either given to some poor person who passes the way or else are left to be worn in the ordinary way by the person who first donned them. The belief is current, however, that be the price paid for éadach na marbh great or small ní bhíonn aon chaitheamh ionnta - they give no wear.
Many stories are available in this district (and have been recorded) of
senior member (history)
2021-06-09 07:38
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done so.
An elaborate rite is carried out in the house of the dead person on the Saturday evening prior to the first Sunday. A neighbour, usually of the female sex, is the chief player. All in the house are sent outside as night falls, nobody remaining within save the woman already mentioned. A chair is placed in the centre of the floor and on this the outfit for the dead man is laid out in such a way that the garments may be put on beginning with the shirt + ending with the coat (just as a priest's vestments are laid out before he puts them on for Mass). This done the woman calls the dead person by name telling him that "here are his (your) clothes + that he (you) may wear them in eternity as they are being worn in this life". This call is repeated when the chair with clothes is placed at the threshold + again in the yard in front of the house.
The clothes + chair bearing them are then left outside in this latter position for a period while darkness sets in, the woman supervisor remaining within the house. The clothes are then taken in to the
senior member (history)
2021-06-09 07:25
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household dies, is waked & interred, his relations give the tailor instructions to make a new suit of clothes to fit the dead person. Boots, stockings, hat or cap, shirt + c are newly bought to complete the outfit. The tailor relies on his memory of the dead person's stature or else on measurements taken for some earlier suit worn by him, and never measures the corpse for the purpose.
The outfit when complete arrives at the house of the dead one in time for being worn on the first Sunday after the internment. On no account is any garment to be tried on prior to its being worn to Mass on that Sunday. Tales are told of this rule being broken + indication afterwards being given by dream, medium or return of the dead one, to show that the latter is living in the next world denuded of that particular garment. The warning received, the relatives hasten to make good the deficit and procure a new garment to replace the one misused + have it worn for 3 Sundays to Mass by the relative who had formerly
senior member (history)
2021-06-08 08:10
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These farms had rack-rents on them. It was amazing to hear the old people count the numbers of families who occupied these farms in a short space of time. After a year or two each family had been 'broken-up' and had to clear to America.
I think the tenants secured these lands at last under the Encumbered Estates' Act, and they have remained in the families of these latter tenants ever since.
The tenants could scarcely believe that they should be left in undisturbed possession as long as they held to the agreement. So much so that Michael OLeary the tenant who secured the lodge and its field levelled the lodge immediately lest the former owner should return to claim it.
senior member (history)
2021-06-08 08:04
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appointed agent. He was a man who never pressed for rent. Many farmers remained (through inability) six and even seven years without paying rent and were never brought to account during the "Captain's" time. Often on "rent collecting" day no people answered the summons except the "pensioners".
About 1895, the Captain was replaced by Robert McLure of Plenhazel, Kenmare, who seemed to be able to get the rent without much trouble.
The writer remembers altogether between 1887 & 1900. Something about twelve evictions. In every case except two the people managed to come to terms after a few days and had their holdings restored to them. When McLure arrived the people groaned that the "Captain" had ruined them by not demanding rent. So they got into expensive habits using tea and white bread. Now they were in debt.
In one of the above mentioned exceptions the man took his sister's holding, and had the latter evicted. The evictions created no stir in the district. In one case alone had police protection to be secured for the man who took his neighbour's farm.
The 'process' server Piles Ray an old man and a protestant who had only one hand, had his ear cut off one night by moonlighters in the early eighties I think.
There were three large farms at Killiney as well as a shooting lodge surrounded by a few acres of ground which were the property of Thomas Blenner Hassel, Tralee (Thomaisín he was called)
senior member (history)
2021-06-08 07:48
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Another of my grandmothers is, who was bred and born in Glenmore, Tuosist. At that time they used walk to Kenmare which is now over seventy years ago. One night as her father was coming home from town after walking over twenty miles. It was midnight when he reached a dark hallow near Sauragh Cross. It was a moonlight night and soon he saw something in the form of a dog coming up to him and rubbed itself against him. He knew it was no ordinary dog and he began to sweat and to be lonesome. It disappeared and soon again it came up to him in the form of a donkey. At that time they had great faith in a black handled knife, so fortunately he had one and he drew it. He made the sign of the Cross but all was no good. He thrust the knife at it but he himself fell and cut his hand, he kept struggling onward till he reached a stream so then it could not pursue him any longer. It was believed that there was a spirit at this cross but was never seen after that. The
senior member (history)
2021-06-08 07:39
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A woman lived in Cloherane about forty five years ago and her little daughter had a very sore knee. Every day the mother used go picking herbs to apply to the knee for a cure. A woman of the neighbourhood who was thought to be in the fairies told her not to pick any more so then she used bring a little dog and tie a cord to his neck and then to the herb so he used to pull it but soon after the woman pined away and died and the daughter got well. The woman was Mrs Healy and my grandmother. Mrs Sheu, Ardea, knew her well. A few years after her death the daughter being inside alone and her father and brother were gone out walking. It was yet early in the night when a woman walked in and sat in the seat. The girl made tea and they were chatting together but when the girl offered her the tea the stranger told her to spill it and then she would take it. The girl then got afraid so the stranger saw then and told her she was her own mother, but to tell her father to buy her a new shawl, and she went and was never heard of again.
senior member (history)
2021-06-08 07:30
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To show how "piseóga" still live here in Tuosist a man lost his second son and only one then and the neighbours immediately began to say within themselves that the Father brought the mí ad on himself when he passed the nearest graveyard with the first child that died at age of two years to bring it to the family grave, the rule being to bury the first child who died in the nearest grave yard of the religion of the child.
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 08:09
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The Borcerach mentioned lies in the western part of Bonane Parish adjoining Glengarriffe but the river is lying near the Kerry hills which if crossed brings one to Gleninchaquin of Pádraig Concordha fame beannacht Dé le na anamh.
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 08:04
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An old lady named Mrs Palmer now living at Mr Godfrey's, the Canteen, Bonane who is the author of many old stories here and who is between eighty and ninety years is a living store of folk lore especially piseóga. She happened to be suffering from diarrhaoea in a friend's house here in Deirinid my townland and when boiled milk was being given to her as a cure she asked for a beaten up egg in it but says she if you don't beat the egg the wrong way + the milk too when it is being got ready there is no cure at all in it. I am sorry she has left here for I could have filled my book long since if she had stayed.
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 07:55
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way + the match was broken.
After trying here + there + not succeeded in setting a wife he came back to the original lady in question who was still single + hard to satisfy too.
On entering her house the man shook hands with her but she looked at him in amazement. Do you not remember the man who fell in love with you here three years ago and asked you to be his wife he said in surprise. "No" she said I do not recognize you at all, you must be making a mistake sir". Can that be so that you do not know or love me anymore he asked "I am the man with whom all was arranged for our wedding three years ago but your Father broke it for a mere trifle.
Oh, now, I think I can remember all, are you not the man that fell in love with my Father's grey mare. Exit.
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 07:48
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In the olden days I often heard my grandmother (who was buried New Years day 1901 aged then over seventy (R. I. P.) tell of a certain man who was looking for a wife and at the same time bargaining very hard for the spré.
During his search he called at this certain house where a nice girl with the name of wealth lived.
He succeeded in captivating all and when matters were settled the father-in law to be took the young man for a walk around his farm, while the girl soon to be a bride was cooking a dinner worthy of the match-making occasion.
On his travels he spied a lovely grey mare which he admired + praised highly and at last he said the "grey mare" should be added to the dowry already mentioned, but the Father strongly refused + so the young man went his
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 07:41
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born. The baby is a 1936 one and we hope it will recover though the common belief here is that birth-marks cannot be cure by human aid.
In Youghal in a certain house in which a married pair have an only son whose two hands are fingerless (slán mar n-innstear é) the following weird story is told: -
The Father of this child was said to have hacked off the fingers of a Statue of the Sacred Heart in his youth when some Church or other was being converted into a barrack for English soldiers.
I heard this lately but on saying thats a folk tale for me I got no names and even the teller would not allow me to give the name but any body who visits Youghal will I have no doubt be able to verify this story which is so modern
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 07:32
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knudging each other and pointing across the car to the one man who was glum looking and then the men would look towards her again. One of them pulled down the hat in his eyes + began to laugh loudly as if speaking about her. The car passed on a little + when the woman lifted her head all had vanished. She was greatly amazed and it made very lonely homeway still she said to herself she'd make inquiries at a house on the road named Healys and they said the likes could not pass "unknownst" to them.
Then Mrs Moriarty got lonely in earnest and she began to say to herself that the sad looking man was her nephew who died the day before.
The story spread around + it was said that this man acting on orders shot a woman who was supposed to be "a spy" but this again was doubtful.
The "smilers" were soon located by the neighbours who thought that it was not a good omen to see the nephew so glum looking + the
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 07:22
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Mrs Moriarty's nephew died in Ardgroom at the time she told the story about 1822 or around that. She went to the wake the previous day to which the story relates. And as she had to go to this shop of Mrs Susan's for meal + flour she came home from the wake early so as to be fresh next day to start "to the shop" which is 15 miles at least from Mrs Moriarty's house in Glenmore. A donkey and cart she drove in and on going home she met a side-car on the road above in Carraig ai Nine near a little glaise where a bridge stands at present. This spot is only a stone-throw from Sean OSullivan's (Archivist) house in Dirreloughy.
Well she saw the side-car coming down the hill and nearing her and she drew her donkey into the dyke to let it pass. There she saw two or three men
senior member (history)
2021-06-07 07:10
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They are all within easy reach of each other. They are all circular in shape. There is a passage under-ground from the Ballantourigh to the Glounlea fort.
A man by the name of Willie Twiss ploughed the Ballahantourigh fort, because it was in his own land, and he knocked the ditch and rooted a white-thorn tree that was growing in it, and when he got up in the morning the fort was there again and the ditch was built around it and the tree was there, and then he thought it was the fairies that put them there again.
The Glounlea fort is in two parts, with a white thorn tree growing in each side, and a car-passage between the two trees. There is a passage underground from the Kilsarcon to the Conguilla fort. Light used to be seen in the Kilsarcon fort.
There is an entrance in the centre of the Conguilla fort, with stone steps going down into it. A few years ago a couple of men went into the Conguilla fort and they took a lighting candle down with them, and they travelled around it and they got into something like rooms. A woman used be seen in the Conguilla fort.
senior member (history)
2021-06-06 18:28
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Three young men - a son of my own, one Dan Shea from Glenmore and Peter Paul O' Sullivan of Clonee, Tuosist were sitting on the fence chatting at Clonee where two roads meet. They never felt the night slipping by till about 1 o'clock or so when they heard a terrible noise right over the fence and when asked to describe the noise they said "the most awful tramping and marching as it were of a large company of soldiers". They were quite fearless + they went to investigate matters but there was no explanation forthcoming. So all three got "lonesome" and each ran to his respective home. My boy had the longer distance and he felt so "lonesome" (+ it was no harm to make them lonesome for nothing would frighten them) that he took a Civic Guard's bike out of this house where Dan Shea slept that night + rode home all "out of breath quicker than any Sídhe Gaoithe". He was as pale as death when he came into my bed-room to rest because he was stunned.
He returned some time after to his own + gave up night-walking till he got over that fright.
senior member (history)
2021-06-06 18:19
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My son had a habit of remaining up reading novels till the small hours of the morning + this certain night he was engaged at a Detective story when about two o'clock he suddenly heard three knocks on the window near him. Being very unafraid he opened the door + went out + examined high + low without result. He came in + began reading again + after some time the three knocks were repeated. He was certain now somebody was playing a trick on him + he brought out a flash lamp + dog + searched dóigh & andóigh but no account of the knocker was to be found. Still confident that it could be explained away he came in + began to read once more. The three knocks came again + louder than before. He got lonesome at last + was hardly able to walk up-stairs + get into bed + when inside the three knocks were again repeated on the window of his bed-room.
After that he heard no more though he slept no wink till morning but perspiring heavily. He firmly believe in the super natural after that.
senior member (history)
2021-06-06 18:10
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Mass. So at the third appeal the man took courage and replied saying "I can Father". So he went + answered the Mass thinking that perhaps the Priest was some very holy old man saying an extra Mass at the dead hour of night.
The Mass in the usual time was finished + the Priest turned to him saying. When on earth I forgot to say this Mass for a poor soul who is still in Purgatory through my omission + I have come here every night for the last three hundred years + have asked the self-same question in vain till to night.
I am now free to go to Heaven + to bring that Poor Soul with me and when your day comes [?] I hope + pray + will continue to pray that your own soul may meet us and that a happy trio will enjoy the Beatific Vision there together.
senior member (history)
2021-06-06 18:01
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This Flor used to tell a story about a certain man who went into a chapel after night-fall to pray & he fell asleep and never felt the doors being closed on him from the outside.
When he woke about 2 o' clock or so he was surprised to hear a bell ringing and to see a priest standing on the altar robed for Mass. At each peal of the bell the Priest used turn and say "Is there any one there to answer
senior member (history)
2021-06-06 18:01
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Once my Mother told him to bring her the Weekly Herald from town and to her dismay he landed home with a red herrin.
Mary his wife used say: -
Good morning Mary how hether you're early
I bet the day before the house and closed the door before me out.
senior member (history)
2021-06-06 17:58
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I was told off to count the notches on the score stick then and there was never a shilling difference between them in all their forty years' dealings between them with each other.
senior member (history)
2021-06-06 17:56
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"Flor Caoc" O Sullivan was a workman of my father's for years. He was quite illiterate but otherwise intelligent. He kept a scorse stick as an account of the number of days work he gave each week + so on. He cut a hazel stick New Year's day + split it right through the middle. Then he put the two parts together when the day's work was over and cut a notch off with a pen-knife which left a mark on each side of the stick. My Mother kept her own side as payee and he kept his own side as a demand note. She kept a note-book in which she entered the earned (a shilling for a day of 12 hours)
senior member (history)
2021-06-04 08:39
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druid, who taught him. In the river near the house there was a salmon, known as the "fish of knowledge" which nobody could catch. Several anxious people tried to, but in vain, and one day the druid succeeded. Full of joy, he brought the fish to Fionn to cook it, but he warned him not to touch it.
Fionn promised, but when he was turning it, it burned his finger. He quickly put the burned finger in his mouth, to soothe it. When the druid heard this, he was very angry because he knew that this deprived him of the knowledge he intended to obtain when he ate the fish. From that time onwards Fionn, when in need of wisdom, had only to put his thumb in his mouth and he obtained it.
The knowledge, which he got thus, found for him his wife, who was stolen by Diarmuid O Duibne, and who was taken by him to a cave in Eaghain Hill, known as "Leaba Dhiarmuda". Long ago, it was the custom of the people to steal each other's wives. On one occasion, however, it happened that Diarmuid O' Duibne stole Fionn's wife, who was supposed to be very beautiful, and then he drew sand in bags
senior member (history)
2021-06-04 08:24
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The Fianna was a party of men, who lived in Ireland in the second and third century. They were soldiers paid by the High King to fight for him and to protect the country against invaders. Like their leader, Fionn Mac Cool, they did much hunting and fishing. One of the Fianna named Conán Maol, while hunting with his comrades, threw a rock, a distance of two miles. It landed in Donemark where it is still to be seen. It is known as Carraig-a-roan.
Fionn Mac Cool lived for some time with an old
senior member (history)
2021-06-04 08:19
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but when the people of the near by house went out to work in the field, they were surprised to find a large well. Long ago many people assembled there, and made rounds, on the twenty-third of August, each year.
senior member (history)
2021-06-04 08:16
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him from inside, and said, "Master! "Sam of the White Face", is gone up on "cock of the high mountain" with "cockalorum" on his back, and for the want of "absolution" we'll be all lost. "Cockalorum" was the fire, "absolution" was the water. They had no water in the house to quench the fire, so that they were all in danger of being burned, for the want of water.
senior member (history)
2021-06-04 08:12
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About twenty years ago, there lived a woman, named Mrs Cotter. Her daughter was living in the house with her. They were dressmakers. They lived in a small slate house, and the field behind the house was as high as the chimney of the house. She was a very historical friendly woman and all the neighbours used to assemble in her house every night card-playing. The old widow and her daughter used to sew on a table near the
senior member (history)
2021-06-04 08:08
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a poor man who took the pig home, and killed it. A few days after the minister was standing at his own gate when he saw the man's son go past. He heard the boy saying. "My father stole the minister's saw, and we'll have some pies and puddings now". The minister said to the boy that he would give him a new suit and a shilling if he would say that in Court.
When court day came, the boy went up on the witness box and said, "As I was passing the minister gate" "I saw the minister kissing his maid" "He gave me a shilling not to tell" "And a suit of clothes which fits me well".
One night a man was returning home from the fair, and heard a person walking after him, and as he was walking the person was getting up to him. At last he looked back, and what was behind him, but a donkey. And he said, "the curse of Moll Kelly upon you".
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 08:15
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Only two of the walls now remain. It was occupied by an agent, Captain Gethens who exacted forced labour from the tenants. It was round the sides the hill of Knocklane that a daughter of Sir Robert Gore Booth compelled her coachman to drive her. At first he refused to undertake such a perilous task as the hill rose sheer out of the sea on one side. Seeing that he wavered she suddenly drew fort a pistol and threatened to shoot him if he did not comply with her wish. He then asked her to allow him to take off the hind wheels and put them on the lower side of the coach in order to balance it. She agreed and in spite of the terrible danger drove her round safely.
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:58
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4. There was a farmer in Donegal and he had a lot of cows and there was two neighbours and they had only a couple of cows each. One of them went out a May morning and he looked from him to see if there was any smoke from the houses and seeing none he said, "All to me!"
The other man came along and he said "Half to me! Half to me!" they wanted to get the farmer's butter.
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:55
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can't get any butter on and we're churning all morning". "Well, do ye know what ye'll do" says she, "get irons and put them in the fire and close the two doors and let nobody in no matter who comes to the door. Keep the irons in the fire and you'll know who has your butter".
She did as she had been told and they were churning away and no butter coming. There came a knock to the door. "Don't let no one in yet", says the strange woman, and the knock came to the door again and the woman outside shouted to let her in that the irons were burning her.
"Let her in now", says the strange woman, and who was it but her next-door neighbour.
The strange woman went away and she was never heard of again and the butter came back to the churn.
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:49
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he see smoke out of anyone chimney. Seeing the coast clear he would go to where he saw the cow's tracks in the gap going to the field and he would take some of the mud up in his hand and put it into a little bag and would put it under the churn when they'd be churning and they'd have the cow's butter with their own. When the owner of the cow made the churning there would be no butter only froth. This happened on several occasions and he told the priest about it and the priest brought back the butter".
3. A woman started churning and she could not get any butter on. There came a woman in and she didn't know the woman. She was a stranger and she asked them "Are you getting no butter on?" "No", said she, "we
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:49
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he see smoke out of anyone chimney. Seeing the coast clear he would go to where he saw the cow's tracks in the gap going to the field and he would take some of the mud up in his hand and put it into a little bag and would put it under the churn when they'd be churning and they'd have the cow's butter with their own. When the owner of the cow made the churning there would be no butter only froth. This happened on several occasions and he told the priest about it and the priest brought back the butter".
3. A woman started churning and she could not get any butter on. There came a woman in and she didn't know the woman. She was a stranger and she asked them "Are you getting no butter on?" "No", said she, "me
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:43
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"Droch-bheart", says he, "sure I haven't the butter in my pipe. I have no cow that I want your butter you foolish man".
It is customary ever since to put a coal under the churn "lest the fairies should take away the butter".
1. Another story is related of a neighbouring woman who knowing that her neighbour was churning picked up a fistful of clabber out of the cow's track and put it into her apron and was taking it home when her neighbour saw her and said "Is it "sthalin" me butter ye are?" and the woman could hardly speak for having been found out.
2. Another story is related of a man who had but one cow. "Every morning before the sun would rise a neighbour would go out and up on top of the house and look from him to see if there was anyone watching (en) and he looking around every place to see would
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:35
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Churning was done by means of the dash churn, and some of these churns are still in use. They were round in shape and wider at the bottom than at the top, e. g.
The churning was usually done before breakfast. Anyone who came in during the churning was expected "to take a dreas", lest he should "take away the butter with him".
A story is told of two brothers and a sister who were making a churning when a neighbour came in and put a coal in his pipe and went out again without "taking a dreas". One of the brothers followed him out and says he "Now Jimmy I know you meant no harm by putting the coal in your pipe, but come back now and throw that coal behind the fire".
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:29
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"The Mass Rock"
This is situated in Raughly in a field belonging to Michael Mannion. It is said that priests read Mass there in the penal times.
There is another in Cartron.
"The Mass Path"
This is in Ballyweelen in a field belonging to Mrs. Boyle. It is said the priest and people used to steal along the path when going to Mass.
"The Mass Garden"
This is in Ardtrasna. It is said that the priest said mass in secret there in the penal times.
senior member (history)
2021-06-03 07:23
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The Sidhe's Lios
This fort is situated in the village of Cartron. It is said that the built it. There is a long underground passage leading to it. The walls of this passage are of stone. There are stone tables and door-frames in it.
"On Hallowe'en, before midnight if you stand six yards from the fort you will see the fairies dancing and after midnight the fort vanishes for two hours".
Dunfore - Dún Fuare.
This fort is situated on a hill in the townland of Dunfore. It is circular in shape and is surrounded by a deep mound.
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 08:05
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Once upon a time a man named James lived near the village of Ballynoe. One Christmas Eve he went into his stable where two horses were kept so that he could hear the horses talking because it is said that all animals can speak on Christmas Eve in honour of Our Saviour's birth.
As the stroke of mid-night chimed out, one of the horses spoke to the other and said. "This day fortnight we shall have a heavy load". The other horse said that they would. The man went home and he related his adventure to his wife and then he went to bed. He could not rise next morning and he died ten days afterwards and his own horses carried him to the Church.
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 08:00
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In the townland of Britway there is a Catholic graveyard, and it is a very old one, but it is still used.
It is said that no Protestant could be buried there, because if one was buried there, the coffin would be over-ground next morning. Not so long ago a Protestant was buried there, and some soldiers volunteered to guard the grave, because the Protestants believed that the Catholics used come in the night and place the coffin over-ground. At about twelve o'clock, the soldiers were surprised to see the coffin being brought over-ground by unseen hands. The soldiers were terrified and they fled, and since then no Protestant was buried there.
There is another graveyard near Ballynoe village. It is also a very old one. There is a ruin of an old Abbey
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:54
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The Leprechaun which it is called in this district, is about two feet in height. It is usually dressed in scarlet cap and coat of green and a little breeches. He usually had an old-fashioned jug. His usual occupation is shoe-making.
In this parish, there was an under-ground cave in Cnoc-an-Ceoigh. Under the shade of a spreading tree, it worked by the light of the moon.
Once upon a time there lived a family who always endeavoured to get him to give up his gold. One member of that family went for water, and she knew the usual residence of the Leprechaun. She stole softly up behind the spreading branches. As she approached him, he did not see her. She, now seeing her only opportunity seized him by the neck. She demanded his
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:43
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In Winter time, when the family are seated around the blazing fire, their usual pastime is story-telling, which all children love.
They tell many various tales.
Long ago, there lived in this parish a poor man, who worked for a neighbouring farmer. One night as he returned home from work, he went astray in the darkness. He remained walking about for some time and at length he went into a field in which there was a plough. The plough was in the middle of the field, and it so happened that he got entangled in the plough.
He remained walking about the field with the plough entangled in his legs. He could not find his way out of the field. Afterwards, when he related the tale, he said that Jackie the Lantern was putting him astray. At last he sat
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:38
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In this parish there are many stories told of "Leprechauns". I heard one story told of a Leprechaun. This little fellow usually worked beside a river, and he was known to have an amount of gold and treasures. Many people tried to catch this little fairy, but they never succeeded.
One evening, a young lady, named Miss O Riordan, came to the well to fetch a pail of water, when she espied the little imp mending old shoes. She stole behind him, and caught him, and he said to him. "Hand out to me your gold". He answered, I have no money, as I am a poor cobbler". She held him tightly during this conversation, and then she put him into her apron and went homewards. He remained quite still for a few moments, and as they crossed a stile, he shouted, and said, "Oh run quickly there is a
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:30
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There are many old graveyards in this locality. There is a grave-yard in the town-land of Ballynoe, Tallow, Co Waterford. There are also many old stories told about grave-yards.
Once upon a time, there lived an old woman, and she pretended to be lame all her life time, but she did not want to go to Mass, and she did not want to do the house-work.
There were many boys in that locality, and the boys did not like this woman by any means. So this night, all the boys met together, and they planned to do something to the old woman.
So it was late in the night, about eleven o'clock, and it was very very dark. So the boys took the old woman to the grave-yard and they tied her with ropes of every description.
So the boys ran away as fast as ever they could,
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:23
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In olden times the tenant farmers were persecuted severely by landlords.
Some of them were very cruel, and would evict the farmers out of their houses, and lands, if they did not pay the rent it would be due.
The most noticeable evicting landlords in the south were Ponsonby and Lord Barrymore.
The landlords of this district were the late Duke of Devonshire and Mr. Nason. They were not very severe, and did not evict many tenants.
The first relief the farmers got from landlordism was when the Government passed a Land-Act.
The landlords got money, and the tenant farmers had to pay it in small terms, and they became owners of their farms.
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:17
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how the people explored the interior. They raised the flag and then they could travel through the long passage. The passage extends from Glentrasna fort to Rathdrum fort.
Long ago small tiny men were seen there by night in the fort. They wore red coats and green caps. It is said that they stored pots of gold in the passages. These were often looked for, but the labour was in vain.
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:15
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asseragh. There is a great wide gap on one side of it. This is the only means of entrance. It is a large circular space, perfectly flat and it is generally covered with rich green grass. Round about it, is a high mound of earth.
Our ancestors say that this was built by the Irish. In olden times, people in Ireland had to protect themselves and their houses. There were a great number of princes and chiefs among them, and these frequently waged war on one another. To be prepared against attacks, the chiefs surrounded their houses with these mounds, and the ditches were not easily crossed by the enemies. In the townland of Glentrasna there is a fairy fort erected. There are two ramparts in it; there is a large flag in the centre of the fort. This is
senior member (history)
2021-06-02 07:08
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In my districts fairy-forts are common. They were erected four or five years ago. It is not known who erected them, but some of our predecessors say that they were built by the Danes.
In the townland of Garryduff a fairy fort is built. It is surrounded by extraordinary high fences. It is visible for many miles around, and it is about forty feet over the level of the land. A beautiful view can be obtained by standing on one of the fences. Some years ago it was opened and a ring and some bones were found. There is a flag in the centre of the fort; it is round and very heavy. When it was opened by four men they were hardly able to raise it from its position. There is a fort in Kill-
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:35
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Cromwell and his army came to Killconnell in the sixteenth century. He put up his heavy guns on the Moor hill on the roof and shatter it in pieces.
There is a under ground passage from the abbey in Kilconnell to a place called Manabrahen and another under ground passage leading out under the town to a village called Fahey. In the first passage the Friars took away the gold in a pot. A man called Joe Page lived them. Twelve months after, the abbot came back to bring away the gold and he told page that night that the gold was hidden by the side of the third lake from Hillswood.
In the morning he went out to read his office and he sat under a tree. When Page called him to his breakfast he was dead. Now the lake is situated in the late Michael Mullin's land. Now tradition that is from father to son says that about fifty years ago there was a man called Brodrick from Athenry and Michael Mullin told him about the gold and also told him that there was cross money near where the gold was hidden. Mr Brodrick then asked Michael Mullen would he let him look for it. He said he would.
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:25
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In the townland of Cloonacalleen there are the remains of a church. It is said to have been a Catholic Church which was knocked by Cromwells soldiers. The foundation is still there + most of the stones which formed the walls. No-one ever carried away the stones for any building purpose as people would not think it right to use the walls of a Church for any profane purpose.
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:22
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Long ago lived a man by the side of the lake in Loughrea. He got up early every morning to give a drink to his horses. One morning he saw a lovely foal grazing by the lake. The man tried to catch him but he jumped into the lake. The next morning he came again and the foal was there and the man stole up and caught him and brought him home. In time he grew to be a lovely race horse, and the man ran him at the races of Knockbarren and he won every time. When the man was taking him how he saw the lake and he pulled his head out of the bridle. He took seven springs to the lake and jumped in. There are seven spring wells everywhere he hit the ground between Knockbarren and Loughrea.
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:17
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Micheal O Grady of Calter Brady a brother in law of My Mother was coming over one night to see her in the month of February. The night was dark + he took a lantern with him. When he was within two hundred yards of the house he saw a mouse on the road before him. He went astray + couldn't find his way. He was all night walking from seven o'clock till ten + the mouse was all the time going before him + at last he found out the house. He did not remain long until he went home. Two men went to leave him a part of the way home when they went to where he first saw him, he was there on the road before them again. They crossed over a stream + he went no further, as the two men were returning they saw the mouse on the path before them. One of the men thought to strike him with a stick + they began to curse him. He went off the path into a sand pit + people said it was the Gentleman who lived in Greenhills long ago, who appeared in the form of a mouse.
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:08
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There is a man living in Kelmalawu and his brother lived in Gurthymadden. He used to come down every year for the big October fair in Ballynasloe. One night during the fair week he left his brother's house in Kelmalawu at twelve o'clock to go home a journey of twenty miles. When he had travelled three miles of the road he saw a dog standing on the road before him. When he came to where the dog was standing he thought to pass him by but the dog travelled by his side for twelve miles of the road and as he was passing a Graveyard the dog disappeared
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:03
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gun and went toward's the garden wall and he saw her their on the wall again. He fired a shot at her and did not strike her. He fired the second time but it took no effect on her. He fired the third shot and (it) he saw her falling of the wall. Next morning he went to the place where he saw her falling. He found nothing their but froth or foam.
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:02
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There was a man named Kelly who lived in Cloncha. He worked for a gentleman named Mr Galway. He went for a message to Loughrea one day and when he returned in the evening he was under the influence of drink. He asked the gun of Mr Galway's coachman and told him he was going to shoot the Banshe that he saw her standing on the Garden wall. He took the
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 08:00
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the girl where was St Martin she said he was watering the crops and Our Lord said he had no right to that, that he should leave it under the mercy of God. When Martin came in the girl told him about it so St Martin went after Our Lord and he took two lumps of lard out of his side and he got up to Our Lord and he fell on his knees before him and said his sin was very great to be forgiven. So Our Lord told him to take the too lumps of lard with him and put them under a dish for a few hours but the girl had not the patience to wait and she lifted up the dish, and mice and rats came forth. That is how the rats and mice came into Ireland.
senior member (history)
2021-06-01 07:54
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There is a forth just behind our house and there were two bands of people fighting and everyone that was killed in the battle were burried and a tree planted over them, so one day two men went out to cut a tree and they were about half way in the tree when a voice said Don't cut this tree and they said if there was any objections of cutting the tree they would not cut it. The voice said for his sake not to cut the tree so when heard this they did not cut the tree.
During the time Martin was in Ireland there came a very warm summer and the crops began to fail so one day St Martin went out to water the crops and left his servant girl in the house. While he was out Our Lord came in to the servant girl and asked
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 07:48
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"All gone", says he.
"The Sore Foot came in", says she "and I gave it to him to the last penny".
Now there's manys a man would have twined his tongue on the Trollop, but he only hung his head like a hen in the wind, and he pondered with his left foot in the Greesagh, and he pondered again with his right foot in the Greesagh, and, Sheela", says he, "By the Man in the Moon I have it. "We'll kill the pig", says he, "for he's fat and cosy this minute, and while he lasts we'll never die of hunger". So they killed the pig on the mortal spot, and they cured it, boxed it, and pickled it to the best of their ability.
"And now Sheela", says he, "we'll be very careful of the bacon. He was a fine pig in life, but he's a gentleman in death, and gentlemen Sheela, must be well treated. So if we put a slice of the Crayther", says he, "to every head o' cabbage in the garden, a juicy slice that would bring the water to your teeth and the tears to your eyes, I'm thinking that we'll know no want till the swallows come again, and the wild ducks take to laying in the Curragh Bog. And that's more", says he, "that can be said by many
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 07:37
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right foot in the Greesagh, and then she pondered again with her left foot in the Greesagh, and finally she reached in the chimney, and took down the trifle o' silver that was over, and above, and beyond all. "And my blessing on you", says Sheela, says She, "and this money I've been hiding is yours. 'For we'll lay it by', says my man home from the fair, 'against the coming of the Sore Foot'. And now you've come" says she, "over the seven wide roads of the world, from city to town, from the east to the west, from the north to the south, and may your journey be happy and your heart as light as a Gowan on the way that's before you".
So the lame man pocketed the silver, he did, and 'twas short the delay he made till he was out over the hill and away.
Well the husband came in with his back-load o' Scollops, and he dressed them and skimmed them, and enquired for the money in the chimney for he was in need of tobacco from the shop, and a new clay pipe that he fancied. And Sheela, the Gam spoke out of the ashes.
"Its all gone", says she.
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 07:26
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come it will Sheela", says he, "be it sooner or later; so let you hide the money in the chimney and by the Waves of the Sea and the Winds of the World, will sleep in contentment this night".
It was good that, and it wasn't had either. But it happened the rent morning, that the poor Crawl of a man was on the back mountain cutting Scollops, and Sheela, the Oinseach, was making a Greesein of herself in the ash-corner, when a travelling-man that was lame in the leg, put his head and his whiskers in over the half-door.
"God save you, woman of the house", said the lame man, "and your fill of good eating and drinking to you for the nine ages of an elephant. May your summers be long, and your summers as short as a happy marriage. May your pipe never Wheezle and your tobacco be sweet to the tongue. May your giving hand never fail, and may I, who have walked the seven wide roads o' the world, who have trailed my lame foot from city to town, from the east to the west, from the north to the south, be this morning the receiver of your generosity and hospitality".
And Sheela she pondered a while with her
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 07:17
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stranger, and he paid the rent, and he tightened his belt, over hedges and ditches, till he came to his home on the lonely corner of the mountain.
"And Sheela", says he, "there's a black cloud off my mind this minute, and a lightness in my heart". "For the rent", says he "is paid to the last farthing o' the law, and that's more than can be said by many a poor man this day. And much good may it do to black Snawee of a landlord that has it piled up in his room o' riches with the gold of the whole world to keep it company. "For they do tell me", says he, "that if the horses of Mananann were loaded to the ground with the weight of his money, and if the stars of the sky were blinded with his guinea pieces, there would still be as much and to spare as would spangle the rainbow of heaven, and roof to castle of the Kings. And a blessing on the wee black cow for she has provided us and well. There's a clear score in the rent, a clear conscience with the landlord, and by the Man in the Moon, there's a trifle o' silver in my pocket, over and above and beyond all, that we'll strive and lay by in a safe place against the coming of the "Sore Foot". For
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 07:17
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he pondered again with his left foot in the Greesagh, and "Sheela", says he, "By the Man in the Moon, I have it. We'll sell the wee black cow in the fair, and there'll be money" says he, "to pay the rent when that ould Gammerlhe of a landlord comes looking for it".
So he ups on the mortal minute and he throws a wee Suddog on the wee Rannaidh of a cow; and with a witch-hazel in his hand for luck sets out for the fair. On and on he went over mountains and bogs and floes, through forests and fires, up hill and down dale, across rivers and lakes and heavy swamps, till he came to the five crossroads, and the green where the cattle of the whole world were gathered together. And there were buyers there from the four corners of the earth, big men and little men, long men and short men, hoarse men + men that weren't hoarse atal. And there was a good trade on the wee black cow, for she had a heavy bag to the milking, and a wide horn, and two rows of teeth that were whiter than sea-shells in a spring well. And more-the-token, she was the only cow since or before that had the second row. So in the heel of the evening he sold her for a decent penny to a dark
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 07:06
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Long, long ago, before the salt got in the sea - when there were Kings in Ireland and princes in every barony, when the birds sang in the night-time and slept by day-light, when the maidens spoke truth like a lesson and knew only of their own affairs, - there lived a poor man + his wife, Sheela, on a lonely corner of the mountain, were as happy as the day was long, had a wee black cow with a heavy hag to the milking, had turf and to spare for the burning, and never felt the pinch of the empty stomach. But Sheela, the Clart, was a bad manager, and so one morning bright and early when the rent-day was at hand, they found that a single solitary penny was not in the four walls of the house.
Now there's many's the man would have turned his tongue on the Trollop, with her smoking in the ash corner, and the ducks puddlin' on the floor; but he was a harmless, good-for-nothing sort of a Lingle, and the thought never entered his head. But he pondered a while with his right foot in the Greesagh, and then
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 07:06
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Long, long ago, before the salt got in the sea - when there were Kings in Ireland and princes in every barony, when the birds sang in the night-time and slept by day-light, when the maidens spoke truth like a lesson and knew only of their own affairs, - there lived a poor man + his wife, Sheela, on a lonely corner of the mountain, were as happy as the day was long, had a wee black cow with a heavy hag to the milking, had turf and to spare for the burning, and never felt the pinch of the empty stomach. But Sheela, the Clart, was a bad manager, and so one morning bright and early when the rent-day was at hand, they found that a single solitary penny was not in the four walls of the house.
Now there's many's the man would have turned his tongue on the Trollop, with her smoking in the ash corner, and the ducks puddlin' on the floor; but he was a harmless, good-for-nothing sort of a Lingle, and the thought never entered his head. But he pondered a while with his right foot in the Greecagh, and then
senior member (history)
2021-05-31 06:57
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stranger, and he paid the rent, and he tightened his belt, over hedges and ditches, till he came to his home on the lonely corner of the mountain.
"And Sheela", says he, "there's a black cloud off my mind this minute, and alightness in my heart". "For the rent", says he "is paid to the last farthing o' the law, and that's more than can be said by many a poor man this day. And much good may it do to black Snawee of a landlord that has it piled up in his room o' riches with the gold of the whole world to keep it company. "For they do tell me", says he, "that if the horses of Mananann were loaded to the ground with the weight of his money, and if the stars of the sky were blinded with his guinea pieces, there would still be as much and to spare as would spangle the rainbow of heaven, and roof to castle of the Kings. And a blessing on the wee black cow for she has provided us and well. There's a clear score in the rent, a clear conscience with the landlord, and by the Man in the Moon, there's a trifle o' silver in my pocket, over and above and beyond all, that we'll strive and lay by in a safe place against the coming of the "Sore Foot". For
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 16:33
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write her life because hers was one of prayer + penance.
Her husband had a very affectionate dog who loved him dearly + he followed his master's footsteps till he could walk no longer. The when the master was on his death-bed the dog pined away too + when the Master died, the dog refused food and drink + died of grief a short time after.
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 16:30
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She was left a widow at the age of 38 & with three boys + two girls all dead except by Father who is in his ninetieth year.
Her lot was a hard one and my Father her eldest was only 14 years at the time so she had to do a man's work out in the fields with him after school + the girls do the best they could indoors. She worked cutting sea weeds in the strand on the sea-shore during the greater part of Lent + fasted the 40 days on one meal - the dinner + that consisted of "whistlers and sharedeens". No tea or delicacies then 75 or 76 years ago but she never broke that Lenten Fast even when I knew her in 1900 + 1901.
On a small impoverished farm she educated one of the boys for the Priesthood + sent one of the girls to Loretto Convent Killarney.
The Adhbhan Sagairt broke her heart for in his last year on his vacation, he said "Mother it would be better to be gathering rags than be a bad Priest. "Why do you say that" says she because I have lost my vocation he said. Her one prayer afterwards was that this boy would never marry + that at least was heard. I wish I could
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 16:19
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This old revered "Nana" of mine always said it was better to have one mass offered for your soul before death than three afterwards.
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 16:18
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My Grandmother who would be now 117 or 118 years had a little brother who died at the age of 5 as I often heard her tell and in the evening about 7 or 8 in Winter he was dying and she + another sister of hers saw a beautiful bright blue light as if held in a candlestick stationary outside the little window of their house in Rath, Bonane, Kenmare, and the child's Mother being told about it she got perfectly reconciled to the loss of her boy because she said he would be to meet her when she would die with that light to show her the way through the dark + evil spots + to guide her safely home.
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 16:14
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bull of his own. Slán mar a n-instear é.
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 16:12
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A Glenmore farmer was walking to the fair of Kenmare 23 of 24 miles distant and as he went he grazed his cattle on the commonages so plentiful then as the road sides were not fenced then as now.
About 12 o'clock or one he arrived at what was called the Black Sate in Dirreloughy wood midway between his house & Kenmare. A very deep wood lay here then and this particular spot had the name of being very "lonesome". Here three men dressed in a post peculiar blood like clothes came up & looked at him and pointed to the crimson colour of their clothing but said nothing.
The hair stood on the top of his head but he had to keep on his way to the fair. In three weeks' time when (he was beginning to think of the weird happening as only a dream) he was gored to death by a
senior member (history)
2021-05-29 16:04
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A son and daughter with their mother and father lived in Lauragh, Tuosist and the mother died young. About twelve months after the girl was at home one night while the two others were out walking when a woman came in and after some time talking, the girl made tea for her which she gave her in a basin. The woman told her to spill it and then she would take it but the girl then got afraid and began to shake and shiver. Then the woman told her she was her mother and to tell her father to buy a shawl for her that she had only a very worn one and then she vanished as quickly as she came and was never seen afterwards. The daughter got a fit of sickness but the priest cured her and she was never afraid again.
senior member (history)
2021-05-28 08:16
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Stories are told about the Mass. I never heard tell of a person asking the priest a question during Mass. There is a place in Matthew Larkin's bog at Aclamon Co. Wexford called the Priest's Cave. In penal day a priest said Mass in a Cave that was there. One Sunday while he was saying Mass he was beheaded by the Red Coats. It was on the 7th May. Every year even up to the present day bells are heard ringing on the 7th May. In olden times if a person did a wrong deed he would have to fast three days or maybe a week. I don't know of any stories about Bishops or priests.
About fifty years ago
senior member (history)
2021-05-28 08:10
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named Martin Cullen, Kilbraney, Co. Wexford, passing by this rath, and he saw two great big black dogs, as big as an ass tied together with chains, and the chains were making great noise. You would hear them two or three miles away.
An other night a man was passing by the rath, and something flew out of it. It was like a pig.
The owner of those raths never interfered with them, but one time a man in Cushinstown, Co. Wexford went into a rath and cut the grass off it with a scythe. He brought it home and gave some of it to a sick horse. In the morning he was giving him the rest of it. A little fairy jumped out of the
senior member (history)
2021-05-28 08:04
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The ditches were levelled out by men who worked with the owner of this rath and there is an old gateway going into the one in Burkestown.
It is said by the old people that the rath in Ballytarsna which at that time was owned by Mr. Power Ballytarsna, Ballycullane, Co. Wexford was full of fairies they say that one year this man Mr. Power sent out his employers to level down the ditches of this rath and before the next year was out every animal on the farm had died. Ever since this happened even up to this day the field the rath is on was never tilled or touched. There is no story that the old people know of connected with the rath in Rathimney but the one in Burkestown there is supposed to be an old woman sitting inside the rath
senior member (history)
2021-05-28 07:59
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There are only three fairy raths in my district, one on Rathimney, Gusserane, New Ross, one in Ballytarsna, Ballycullane, Co. Wexford, and one in Burkestown my own district. The one in Ballytarsna is called a "Ring Rath" but as far as old people can remember the other two were never known by any other name "a rath".
The one in Rathimney and the one in Ballytarsna are circular in shape, but the one in Burkestown is three-cornered shape. There is a fence of trees around the rath in Burkestown and there is a fence about the one in Rathimney, but the one in Ballytarsna there is no fence of any kind around it. There is an entrance going into the rath in Ballytarsna, because
senior member (history)
2021-05-28 07:52
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up minding her all night. When he returned to the stable the animal had disappeared. They were in search of her. At day break next morning they found her in the rath. The fairies were supposed to have taken her away.
One night at twelve o'clock a man was passing by this same rath as he was passing by a drove of cats came out of the rath and went across the road to the other side. The man stopped for a few minutes while they were crossing the road.
It was said that a great big black dog nearly as big as a calf was often seen passing through this rath at night time. This dog came from Slieve Coile[?] and travelled to the Tower Hooh. I was said a priest put him
senior member (history)
2021-05-28 07:45
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There are four fairy forts in the school districts. The fairy forts are known locally as raths. They are situated in the townland of Nash New-Ross Co. Wexford. Two of these are in view of one another. There is only a road dividing them. They are all circular in shape. There is a fence of stones and trees surrounding them. It was said that light was often seen and music often heard there.
There was a man named Michael Busher, Cassagh, New-Ross, Co. Wexford who had a rath on his farm. He reclaimed it. About a year afterwards one of his horses that had helped to till the rath got a pain one night. He stayed
senior member (history)
2021-05-27 08:18
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Confession. Fearing she would be hungry she brought some potato cake with her. At Confession the priest said "Now take the load of your heart". She got the potato threw it on the floor saying "it's well you knew I had it".
There was once a Minister who was very sick. He told the clerk to say to the people "Moses was an ostier man". The clerk said "Moses was an ister man". The Minister said "He made atonement for the sins of the people". The clerk said "He made an ointment for the shinns of the people". The Minister said "Ah you fool you spoiled it all". The clerk said "But the fools spilled it all".
senior member (history)
2021-05-27 08:11
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One day a girl was going to
senior member (history)
2021-05-27 08:11
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There lived a woman and her son in a large house.Before going to Church she put a sheep's head into a pot to be ready when she would come home. She also put dumplings into it. When she had gone the boy looked into the pot and he saw the dumplings swimming on the top of the soup and and the sheep's head swimming after them. He ran to the Church and made signs to her to come home. He was trying to make him wait until the sermon was over. At last being tired waiting he interrupted by saying "No more of your winking or splinking but If you don't hurry on home the sheep's head will have all the dumplings eaten.
senior member (history)
2021-05-27 07:55
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because she had rubbed the magic water on her eyes. After a while this woman went up to one of the fairies and asked him how was the baby since she had left in the morning. The fairy said "with what eye do you see me", and she said "with this eye", leaving the hand on her left eye. The fairy just left his hand on her eye and immediately she was blind in that eye. She went home, having sight in only one eye. Then she told the neighbours of her happenings. It appears that if the woman had not touched the water she would not have seen the fairies and would have her own sight.
senior member (history)
2021-05-27 07:48
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Long ago a woman was going to a market, and she passed by a 'lios' on her way. A wee man came out of this 'lios' and told her to go in, and nurse the baby. This the woman did. When she went into the 'lios' there was a coat of straw on the floor. It seemed to her as a house built of mushrooms. She nursed the baby, and then went out the tiny door. When she went outside, she saw a great many fairies, and they dipped their fingers in water that was in a tub nearby, and rubbed it on their eyes. The woman rubbed some water on her eyes also. Then she went her way to the market. When she reached the market, she saw the fairies that she had seen in the 'lios'. Those fairies were going around the town eating crakers and stealing the people away, and leaving others in their places. Not another one saw the fairies only this woman.
senior member (history)
2021-05-27 07:22
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There is another well about five or six miles from our school called Cloonoran. There are three trees in it and in the middle tree there is holy water to be found. The people who make the stations go around seven times and three times on their knees. Long ago people got cured from warts sores and headaches there. People who get cured leave a safety pin or a strip of cloth beside the tree. There seems to be a connection between Knockcroagh and Cloonoran as when the pilgrimage is in Knockcroagh the water leaves Cloonoran and goes to Knockcroagh well, and the day after it returns again to Cloonoran.
There is a well in Moylough and it is beside a hill and there is a river running from it. If a person had boils or warts and they to wash them in it they would get cured.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 08:12
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My father tells this tale of a man who was anxious to buy this certain farm for his son of which the latter did not approve. How is this the father said what's up with you or do you want a farm at all. I do said the son but not that one if I got it for a song.
What fault do you find with it asked the father.
Well answered the son: -
Tá bascadh na barr,
Agus báthadh na bun.
A cúl leis an ngéan
Agus a aghaidh leis an sioc.
Ní raibh an margadh deanta.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 08:02
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An old woman now dead and a Grand Uncle's wife of my own had for neighbours a Lánamha Pósta, pósta deic mblíadna is dóca agus gan aon leanbh acu. A grandchild was born to the old lady and she recommended that "the pair" should be sponsors and she told the baby's parents that when a childless couple would each & both be sponsors for the same child that with God's help you wouldn't know what it would bring.
Well and good they were made sponsors of the baby and in two years after a baby girl was born to now lucky pair who acted as sponsors quite
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:55
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No important work is done on Monday or journey started and if one must catch a boat or train by so doing he leaves his own home Sunday evening and stay at a neighbours over night. This happened when boys or girls were going to America and it still happens when they are going to England.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:55
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A policeman home on leave shocked his Mother by shaving himself Monday & if the sky fell no local would kill a pig or a cow or skin the latter on Monday. Children from the Glens here do not come to school for the first time until Tuesday.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:55
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In this district when a boat is made it is never launched in the day time fearing a woman might be on the road by those carrying the boat. At Bunaw some thirty or 40 years ago a new boat was being carefully brought to the sea through the fields at 1 o'clock in the midnight so as to avoid all chances of the appearance of any woman. But a voice spoke "Seadh Tá bád Agaibh" & they had like to drop dead. It happened however that she was a harmless demented creature walking about, but the custom is still alive.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:53
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In this district when a boat is made it is never launched in the day time fearing a woman might be on the road by those carrying the boat. At Bunaw some thirty or 40 years ago a new boat was being carefully brought to the sea through the fields at 1 o'clock in the midnight so as to avoid all chances of the appearance of any woman. But a voice spoke "Seadh Tá bád Agaibh" & they had like to drop dead. It happened however that she was a harmless demented creature walking about, but the custom is still alive. No important work is done on Monday or journey started and if one must catch a boat or train by so doing he leaves his own home Sunday evening & stays in a neighbours over night. This happened when boys or girls were going to America & it still happens when they are going to England.
A policeman home on leave shocked his Mother by shaving himself Monday & if the sky fell no local would kill a pig or a cow or skin the latter on Monday. Children from the Glens here do not come to school for the first time until Tuesday.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:44
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our former dormitory after Xmas vacation when poor little May Cotter's place & bed (No 7 she was) was filled. The new girl was in blissful ignorance of the dread happening & went to bed much happier than of us did as we could not put our former friend out of our heads. But with good feeling for the newcomer everything was kept dark from her. To our dismay she called out in the middle of the night saying Oh! Lord! what's that. She kept on shouting to one & all telling them of this ghost she saw sitting on her bed. And it was only in a few days when the secret leaked out that she was filled with terror & fear. However from that night off she was left undisturbed & any of us never saw or heard anything weird at all after.
This happened & I remember every detail clearly as I was never contented there after.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:37
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About the 1899 or 1900 when in school in Carysfort Park already alluded to the death of a companion of ours took place suddenly in October (May Cotter of Youghal she was). We were all so frightened that we were transferred to a spare dormitory until Xmas. I never shall forget our terror in returning to
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:35
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The widow's daughter was married in Clan Laurence, Adrigole Co Cork and in the morning an account came that she was very ill. A still-born babe was born and a six months birth it was too. The mother never got better but died in a few days and it was then the poor widowed mother thought of the gleóirthe her labouring man heard the night previous to the arrival of the still-born baby which caused the young mother's death she having been married only ten months in full.
Jamesy Browne and his mistress have long since gone to Glory but the story of his adventures that night am marbh na oidhche is well known hereabouts.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:30
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"Querns" can still be seen here with which enough oatmeal for to-morrow was ground to night by the fear a tíghe no a bhean and the smollán de gúimhaise in the fire was most suitable for this work too.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:25
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The Keller witnessed this herself and performed the ceremony and certifies to the joy of the child & of the other members of the family observing the child's following the movements of the snuff. These plans were thought off to take the place of children's toys as the splinters themselves took the place of the electric lights of to day.
Can you picture the red snuff of the splinter being held running horizontally before the child's eyes & the child following the dark red light backwards & forwards & for a change it is swept around forming a bough of red and bough after bough is made. The holder is on his peril to keep the Haddedí away from the child & he must also snuff it at intervals fearing danger.
senior member (history)
2021-05-26 07:18
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"umar" as this job was done when supper was over Winter nights and usually in the kitchen with the light of the splinter or the smollán. Men, boys, women & girls were doing some críc at night - making spars, & ciseáin, pounding the furze & by the sea beating nets & trammels and the women folk carding, spinning and knitting and the old Seanacaidhe enlivening it all with his fine old Irish folk tales and ballads and the cailí gearra.
When winding the spindles the children gathered around the splinter light, they read & learned their "tasks" for school to-morrow and as they watched they snuff of the top of the splinter blown away by the human holder or candlesticks they had their own caitheamh aimsire and rí rá as the splinter served another very useful purpose. When the baby awakened and was ill-at-ease the quenched splinter with a good snuff was swung back & forth before his eyes (but a few feet distant) several times to the accompaniment of the well known rhyme: -
Had iddy, had iddy, brindle me & saddle me
And carry me to the king's white hall
Where there's sticks & stones & dead men's bones
And old sheep's trotters & horses' jaw bones
All that over was & will be found & got
Will be laid down on my poor back
If I let [?] my had iddy fall, fall
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:36
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of 400 families where there are only 80 families now. Ruins of old houses are very plentiful.
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:35
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In the village of Ballinalug - (the town in the hollow) it is in a hollow under the Deerpark hill were 35 houses according to John Redden an old age pensioner. In it lived a carpenter, tailor, weaver, shoemaker, blacksmith - The Hogan are still tailors, The Convays are still smiths, the Ryan who still live there had a shop. In the village now there are only six houses.
In Tirnaseragh there were up to eighty houses before the Famine there are only ten now.
In the small parish there must have been upwards
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:30
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comes again. What the monk meant was that the next day was Palm Sunday which that year came before St Patrick's Day - i. e. the palm before the Shamrock. This did not happen again till 1913 and will not happen again for 4000 year.
The monk also said that the officer would be dead before sunset. That evening at Esker near Banagher the officer's horse lost a shoe and when the officer was showing a black smith the foot that wanted a shoe the horse kicked the officer on the head and killed him.
Continued after Care of the Feet.
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:26
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When Cromwell's soldiers were in Ireland they came to Meelick (which had a France monastry - to this day a Fran comes to Meelick on August every year and says Mass in the chapel there). All the monk fled except one very old monk who was not able to go. The officer in charge of the soldiers offered his life to the old monk if he could tell how long England would rule in Ireland and also if he could tell when the officer himself would die.
The monk told him England would rule in Ireland until tomorrow
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:22
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St Kieran and the monk then journeyed on further. They came to Lissanacody near Eyrecourt and there they also found a graveyard in the Lios. Then St Kieran said "We will have to cross the Shannon" and he and the monk kept going till they arrived and settled down in Seven Churches in Clonamacnoise. In Lisanacody some stones that St Kieran got drawn are still to be seen in the field on Quinn's farm.
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:18
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The tombstones were also used in building Longford Lodge.
Once upon a time St. Kieran and another monk were travelling looking for a place to build a monastery. They came to Kill at night time and rested there. In the morning they found they were at a graveyard and St Kieran being disappointed because he meant to build his monastery there said "May this place never be without a corpse". The other monk said. If that is so may it be the corpse of a seocóg (a stare or starling) and every Monday from that day to this the dead body of a starling is found in the graveyard.
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:08
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In the townland of Kill is a graveyard not used now. The landlord of the place was a Captain Kelly. He afterwards built ( on the otherside of the road leading to Killimor) Longford Lodge which still stands - the Kellys sold it about 25 years ago.
The gate piers of Longford lodge is built of tombstones taken from Kill graveyard. The stones in the piers look like tombstones - being about 4 1/2 ins thick. If any names are on the tombstones the names are turned in as they cannot be seen on the outside.
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:04
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told him that the very minute the cow calved he was to bring the milk to the gentleman. The man who was put to mind the cow was simple. When the cow calved he looked around for a vessel to milk this cow in but he could find none so he milked the cow into his hand. As he was harrying to the gentleman the milk was leaking through his fingers, so he licked his hand. It was the simple man who got the faculties but as he was always a bit of a fool no one gave him any heed. It was only long afterwards they found out how wise he had become.
senior member (history)
2021-05-25 08:00
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A well to-do man in Clonfert dreamt that he would get a bull and if he drank the milk of the first cow that would have a calf from this bull that he would have great faculties and great knowledge but he must be the first to taste the milk.
One very stormy day a bull seemed to come from the heavens. When the first cow was near calving this gentleman put a man to mind the cow and
senior member (history)
2021-05-24 08:00
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I won't give the game away. "Come now" said the J. P. "I must see what you have in that bag, because I'm very suspicious that you are carrying poteen in that sack" whereupon he pulls the bag off Tom's shoulder and rips it open. Out jumps the cat and away like a streak of lightning followed by the dogs. Up jumps Tom behind on the J. P.'s horse and across hill, dale and bog after the cat. After two hours' chase the cat heads for an old house in a lonely part of the bog and as the dogs are closing on her she jumps for the open window. However, one of the dogs managed to give her a nip on the back of the leg going in the window.
When the party entered the house they saw nothing but an old woman sitting in a corner and they asked if she saw a cat enter the window, to which she replies that she saw no cat and she asked them would they clear out and leave her alone.
Just then the J. P. notices a stream of blood flowing down the old hag's leg and he pulls her off the stool saying "You damn old witch I'll have you burned, so I will".
Whereupon the old hag turns into a cat before their very eyes and jumps out the back door, but the dogs were waiting outside and the cat was immediately caught and torn by the hounds. When the J. P. and Tom reach the spot they find the old woman lying dying and covered with wounds and the dogs all gone for their lives.
"There's the end of your cat Tom, so you may go home to your missus. Now", said the Sheriff "I'll get this old witch buried". "God be praised" said Tom
senior member (history)
2021-05-24 07:48
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Once upon a time there lived a man named Tom Connor. He was a hard working industrious farmer with a wife and six children. Now, Tom had a cat, a large black animal and so fierce that not one of the children could go near it.
One day, Tom was going to town to purchase boots for his two eldest "gossoons" and he was measuring their feet in order to get the proper sizes from the shoemaker. Now, in comes the cat and watches this performance very closely. "Begorra" said Tom "the old is watching us as she watches a mouse". "You would imagine she was going to speak to you" said his missus and no sooner were the words out of her mouth than Tom hears the words "Tom Connor" shouted at him in a piercing voice.
"God bless us, who said that?" said he looking round at the cat. "Tom Connor", said the cat. Yes ma'am said Tom, blessing himself.
"Tom Connor" she said "I want a pair of boots too". Ah the Lord protect us!" said Tom and is it the devil himself that's in it. "Tom Connor" said the cat again "I want a pair of boots and if I don't get them", said she, looking very fiercely, "I'll tear the eyes out of every one of your children before tomorrow morning".
"Oh 'begob' then you'll get the boots ma'am never fear" said Tom and he rushed from the house as quickly as ever he could, but instead of going to town he made straight for the police barracks and told his tale to the Sergeant. At first
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2021-05-24 07:35
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One day long ago a man and his son were out fishing in a boat in Garadice Lough. When they were some minutes fishing a large fish leaped into the boat. The father told the son to kill the fish with his knife. Then the fish leaped out of the boat.
In some minutes after, the fish leaped into the boat again. This time the son was quick enough to stick the knife in the fish's neck, but the fish went out of the boat with the knife in his neck.
When the father and son were going home they met a man on a horse who asked the father to let his son go with him. The father let him go. When they came to the lough the horse and the two men disappeared under the water. They came to a lovely castle. There the son saw a lovely lady with a knife in her neck. It was in her the son stuck the knife.
Then the man asked the son to take the knife out of her neck. He took it out and when he was putting it into his pocket the man asked him would he like to marry her. He said he would. "Well", said the man, "if a certain battle is won you may marry her and if it's not you cannot. The sign that the battle is lost is that there will be blood in the well at your house, and if it is
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2021-05-24 07:27
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When Elizabeth was Queen of England she had amongst her servants an Irishman named Shaun Agan na gCeann a renegade to his country and faith. One day he failed to carry out a command of the Queen and she was so angry she threatened to have him hanged.
True to his nature he in turn threatened to publish a certain secret he had come to know about her. She was so annoyed by this that she granted him pardon and an estate in Ireland where he could help to hunt the priests and still be in her service.
After some time he crossed to Ireland and settled in a castle on the banks of Lough Scur about half-way between Ballinamore and Carrick-on-Shannon, Co Leitrim. Here he became such a tyrant that people were in fear of their lives. They had to obtain his leave to do their work. One time when he happened to be away some people drew their turf from the bog. On his return he made them draw them back again and leave them as they were before.
He invited priests to his castle while pretending to be a good catholic gentleman. When they arrived he had them hanged on a big whitethorn tree at his castle. It is said that he hanged so many priests and that their bones are to be seen to this day
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2021-05-24 07:16
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Night after night the fairy Queen would bob up before the lonely herdsman trying to frighten him by taking different shapes. Sometimes she would be a great horse with eagle's wings, then quick as thought she would turn into a little lame man with a bull's head. Again she would be a terrible ape with a turkey's tail. But all this took no effect on Larry. He still continuing his herding and piping. Many a time he'd say "Whist now", wouldn't I be a queer "amadhaun" if I were to get frightened by these wee creatures.
Well, one night when Larry was piping away to his heart's content he heard the fairies flying past his face like a swarm of midges, and all at once a big black cat appeared before him with a pair of new top boots.
"Aisy now", said Larry. Dance and I''ll pipe for you. So he began to play as well as he knew while the fairy Queen changed from one shape to another.
Losing patience she changed herself into a calf, snow white and mild. She came up friendly and gently to Larry, but he, like the cute boy, was ready to jump. Throwing down his pipes he landed on her back and with one spring from the hill top he bounded over the waters of the river Shannon ten miles away from the foot of the hill.
A second after she kicked up her heels and landed Larry on his back. "Arrah but that was well done said Larry".
The calf looked at him and turned into the fairy Queen again.
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2021-05-21 08:55
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of water. After that he climbed up on the top of a tree. After a short time his would-be murderers came in hot pursuit of him. They stood under the tree where the man was. The water was dropping from his clothes on the hands of the three men below, but one of them said to the other it was the dew was falling off the tree. They then returned to the dead body and carried it still farther till they placed it in the village of Garrane. After a week the body was found and a search was made for the murderers. Now the man who made his escape was getting very uneasy and could not eat or sleep. His wife became suspicious and reported the matter to the police who came and arrested him. After his arrest he divulged the whole story, and the three culprits where they arrested. They were tried in Galway and sentenced to be hanged in Tynagh. Their coffins were made in Galway and placed in three horses's cars and the three men were compelled to sit on their own coffins till they reached till village of Tynagh. A scaffold was erected in the fair green to hang them. The father was the first man to be hanged, then one of his sons. The third man was put up to be hanged but the rope broke twice. He said "my life is my own", but the hangman
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2021-05-21 08:46
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said "if a rope cannot be found in Tynagh, your life will be spared". A third rope was procured but this time it did not break, and the three bodies were buried outside the church-yard wall.
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2021-05-21 08:45
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In olden times there lived in Springgarden a gentleman by the name of Mr Burke. He employed a large staff of servants, both indoor and outdoor. Among the out-door staff was a herd named Hynes. This herd found out that the gentleman had a large sum of money in his house on a particular night. On this night there was a ball or party given to all his servants in one of his farm houses and the herd and his two sons secretly planned to put the gentleman to death and rob him. After carefully planning the deed, they asked two other fellow servants to assist them in carrying it out. One of them agreed but the other refused. Fearing that the man would divulge the secret they shot him instantly. They carried the body across the fields for some distance but the other man who assisted them decided to slip off one of his boots quietly. After they had gone some distance farther he said he lost one of his boots and should go back for it. Fearing that it would be found. When he got away from the herd and his two sons he decided to run for his life. They waited for a time but when he did not return they decided to go and look for him and to murder him also. In his terror, he ran through a deep drain
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2021-05-21 08:36
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said he would. Then a young woman came in after a few minutes and he did not stay any longer because he thought of the advise that was given to him before he started. Then he went out into the yard and he went in where there were cows. He looked up into the loft and he saw hay in it. He went up to sleep for the night. After a few minutes he heard the woman and a young man coming out to milk the cows. The woman told the man that they had a visitor tonight. They made up a plan to kill the husband and they killed him. The man that went up in the loft and heard them saying that he went away and went to the farmer's house. When he landed the farmer gave him the breakfast and he asked him was he able to plough and he said he was. Then the farmer got him a pair of horses and he showed him where he had to plough. He was not long ploughing when two guards came and brought him to the barracks. They asked him did he kill a man and he said he did not. He told them that it was the wife and the man that killed him and the two of them were hanged.
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2021-05-21 08:28
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first advise she gave him was not to take a shortcut and the second not to cut the cake she was giving him in the presence of anyone and the third was not to sleep in a house where an old man is married to a young woman. After having received the three advises he started on his journey. He was not gone far when he met two men on the road. They asked him where he was going and he said he was going to Cork. They said to him to go in this stile and he would take two miles off his journey. He had his foot left on the stile when he thought of the advises. He went along the road for some distance until he came to a quiet place. Then he took out his cake and cut a slice of it and to his great surprise a sovereign rolled out of it. He then travelled along for another long distance and he got hungry again. Then he took out his cake and he cut another slice of it and another sovereign fell out of it. Night coming upon him he went into a house to look for lodging. When he went in there was an old man sitting by the fire. He asked him would he give him lodgings for the night and he
senior member (history)
2021-05-21 08:20
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him thus - "you are welcome John Mc Loughlin of Newbridge next the old bridge and your brother's waistcoat on you. Go home and remove the little cabin between yourself and Heagney and all your stock will live". He did so and he had no more losses.
About ninety years ago a man named Tim Clancy went to service to a farmer in the County Tipperary. He was only one year in his employment when he heard of another position in County Cork and knowing he would get better wages he decided to go. This night he told the farmer's wife what he intended doing. She asked him why he was going to leave and he told her he was offered a better pay. As he had not up to that time got any money from her she asked him which he would rather - his year's wages or three good advises. He told her he was young and that he would take the three advises. She arose early next morning and made a cake which he was to bring with him so that he would not have any trouble in getting food and before he started she gave him the three advises. The
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2021-05-20 08:11
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There is a story of a poor woman, who went to Middleton, and deliberately broke a pane of glass in a shop window, so that she would be put in prison, her hunger was so great.
Another man, driven, during the Famine Period, by hunger to accept the hospitality of the "Soupers", had to pass The Catholic Church on his way there. He turned back, took off his "caubeen", and said, "Goodbye, Almighty God, till the praties grow".
Carrigane, a townland in this parish, was said to have 100 families before Famine period. Now only 9 houses are inhabited.
Soup was given out in the house in which Mrs Manning live in the Village. Indian Meal was sold there also to the poor for porridge.
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2021-05-20 08:03
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There was a hospital during the Famine period in a house called "The Three Chimney House" in Gibbotstown on Jago's land. Coppingers lived there. A road from the house to the road is still called "Bóithrín an Aifrinn" or "Bóithrín na bPaidreacha" because mass was said there in the penal days. Local tradition has it that the house is haunted.
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2021-05-20 08:01
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daughter Anne.
Rapparees. My informant has no information on this point.
United Irishmen - Nil.
Fenians.
Mrs Mahony's brother, John Lehane and his first cousin John Lehane, were suspected of being Fenians, and fled to England. Police searched the house, and found the children playing with empty powder tins, which they carried away. It happened that John Lehane worked for the gamekeeper in Fota, and brought those tins home to make "cabby houses" for the children.
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2021-05-20 08:00
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was called Crioc Ui Liatain and the island itself "Ui Liatain" from the family.
Nothing remembered locally, and there is no popular sentiment regarding it, so far as I know.
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2021-05-20 07:59
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Giraldus Cambrensis. It is said that Giraldus Cambrensis wrote a portion of his account of the Norman conquest of Barryscourt Castle, but it is thought that it was in a former structure, perhaps on this site.
Hugh O'Neill, tradition says that when on his way to Kinsale in 1601, asked de Barra of Barrycourt to help him against the enemy. This he refused to do.
Patrick Sarsfield, Mr Coppinger says, passed through Carrigtwohill once. He points out the path where he rode. It is called "Well Lane" now, a laneway leading from the village to the old castle which in later years was called "The Rosary Walk".
James II visited and slept in a house in the north of the parish (in baile na Speire) owned by Timothy O'Shea. It was then owned by Sir James Cotter, and re-named by him - Anngrove - the name by which it has since been known - after James's
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2021-05-20 07:58
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"All together, like Browne's cows" (He had only one)
"As happy as Larry" (No one seems to know who Larry was)
senior member (history)
2021-05-20 07:56
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No 15. The O'Lehanes! Tradition says that the now ruined castle of Barryscourt was erected on a more ancient structure belonging to the Lyons or Lehanes of Castlelyons, and that a stone was found among rubbish with the inscription O Liatain. Hoc FACIT M.C III.
There is however, no account of this stone to be had now, if it ever existed.
The O'Lehanes (according to tradition) owned Gt. Island and the adjacent parts (including Carrigtwohill) long before the dawn of Christianity - the belt of land lying between Caiplean Ui Liatain (Castlelyons) and Gt Island
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2021-05-20 07:55
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Also a history of the Coppingers, which states that the Coppingers originally came from Denmark, and settled probably as early as the tenth century in the Co. of Cork.
In 1319, Stephen Coppinger was Lord Mayor of Cork and from 1791 - 1830 Dr. Coppinger was Lord Bishop of the Diocese of Cloyne. He was a determined opponent of the Veto. It was his hand drew up the resolution against the measure adopted in the Synod of 1808 by 23 Prelates - 3 dissenting.
(See no. 16)
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2021-05-20 07:53
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There is a lane in the Barryscourt village and at the end of this lane there is a holy well. The old people say that this well was blessed by the monks long ago and that there was a cure in the water. It is also said that people with bad sight would be cured if they saw a trout in it. The name of the well is "Tobar na Daibhche" - Well of the Vat.
In Ballynoe townland there is a well called St. David's Well. Rounds used be made on St. John's day but not at the present time. Overshadowing the well is an old willow tree.
In the townland of Woodstock is another called "Little Easter Well" Tobairín na Cásca. A Pattern was formally held there but it was suppressed by the clergy because of drunkenness and faction fighting.
In the townland of Ballinbrittig are two holy wells one on Walsh's farm and the other on Murphy's farm (now the property of a man named Quill). Rounds and votive of offerings used be made at both wells. Of the two the one on Murphy's land is the
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2021-05-20 07:52
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There is a lane in the village and at the end of this lane there is a holy well. The old people say that this well was blessed by the monks long ago and that there was a cure in the water. It is also said that people with bad sight would be cured if they saw a trout in it. The name of the well is "Tobar na Daibhche" - Well of the Vat.
In Ballynoe townland there is a well called St. David's Well. Rounds used be made on St. John's day but not at the present time. Overshadowing the well is an old willow tree.
In the townland of Woodstock is another called "Little Easter Well" Tobairín na Cásca. A Pattern was formally held there but it was suppressed by the clergy because of drunkenness and faction fighting.
In the townland of Ballinbrittig are two holy wells one on Walsh's farm and the other on Murphy's farm (now the property of a man named Quill). Rounds and votive of offerings used be made at both wells. Of the two the one on Murphy's land is the
senior member (history)
2021-05-20 07:41
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One day two boys from Carrigtwohill went into Barry's Lodge field to cut a tree to make hurleys at twelve o'clock at night. They had it cut and when about to remove it they could not do so. They saw old Mr. Barry who had died some years previously sitting on it. They waited until daybreak until he disappeared and then they brought it home.
Some boys went to Barry's Lodge garden to steal some apples which they had seen earlier in the day on the trees. They climbed in over the wall but they failed to find an apple on the tree. They shook it vigorously and not one apple fell. While on the tree they saw light approaching from the old great-house which was unoccupied for some years. They concluded that it was old Mr. Barry who was dead and who was minding the apples. They jumped over the wall and ran home. When they came to see the tree on the following day it was laden with apples.
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2021-05-20 07:34
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When Uncle John was coming along the road near Spring Hill a queer feeling came over him, and when he came to a white house he saw a black dog standing in front of him. He took no notice of him, but when he came along a small bit farther he saw him again, and the light of his eyes dazzled him, so that he could not see where he was going. In the end he had to stop up. When he was stopped for a while he could not see the dog at all. Then when he began to drive, he thought he saw the shadow of him sitting by his side in the car. He looked around and saw nothing. After that he was all right and he did not know where he was, until he reached Carrigane cross.
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2021-05-20 07:28
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appeared before him.
He spoke to him and the black man who was supposed to be the devil asked him did he win or lose at the cardplaying.
The man told him that he had lost all his money. The devil then made a bargain with him and gave him money on condition that he would meet him at the same place that night twelve months. The man promised him that he would and then the devil disappeared.
Every night after that the man had great luck and he won a lot of money. However as the twelve months were coming to an end the man began to get frightened and he told the priest all about it. The priest told him that he had given his soul to the devil but if he made a good confession and promised to give up gambling that he would help to release him from the devil's bond. The man agreed to this.
When the night came on which he was to meet the devil the priest went with him to the place and he carried holy water and a Crucifix with him. He made two circles around the place where the devil appeared, he placed the man between the circles and he stood outside them praying. After a while the devil appeared inside the circles and he tried to get at the man but the priest
senior member (history)
2021-05-20 07:20
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My mother was born in Donegal and she told me this story.
Once upon a time two brothers and a sister lived together in an Island called Ory Island off the west coast of Donegal.
Their parents were dead and as the children grew up they became very careless about their religion so after a time they disagreed with the priest because he threatened them that he would turn them into rocks if they did not attend Mass so they made up their minds to have revenge and one night they set out in a boat to burn the priest's house.
However they were not gone very far when the boat overturned and they were changed into three rocks.
It is supposed that they sail every seven years in the direction of the Island where the priest lived and unless they are seen while sailing by someone on that Island it would be destroyed.
An other story.
My Aunt told me this story and it happened outside Tralee. She saw the field herself.
One night a man was going home through a field after being cardplaying in a neighbour's house and suddenly a strange looking man dressed in black
senior member (history)
2021-05-20 07:12
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The belief in fairies is common enough in the rural portions of the parish, but all else concerning them is dying out.
The "Banshee" is still believed in and she is said to follow two families - the Coppingers and MacDonnells.
An old tree in Barryscourt is pointed out still, where the "Banshee" sits and wails.This tree has no foliage.
The last member of the Coppinger family - James - who died this year (Jan. 1938) is said to have been warned by the "Banshee" a fortnight before his death.
Several people declare that they heard this "Banshee" wailing on the night of his death.
The caretaker (Kelleher) says that on the night following his funeral, an electric bell which was attached to Mr. Coppinger's bed, and which he used to call the waiting man continued to ring without ceasing and the wire had to be cut before Kelleher could get to sleep!!!
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2021-05-19 08:04
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One of his neighbours the most noted trout-fisher in the parish then my own husband soon died R. I. P. but no skeleton boat was ever seen since.
Peter told me this story which every one has in the top of his tongue though he kept it a secret as long as he could.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 08:01
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Peter O'Shea Lake Hotel Clonee, Tuosist Kenmare is very fond of going out after nightfall (moonlight Summer nights) with his boat & rod & line fishing for trout, in the Cloner Lakes near by. Two other neighbours watched him this certain night when he landed home for a sup of tea, as he says himself, his boat was gone by the others who wanted to have an hour too - all were great fishermen but the boats were Peters. Peter got another old boat & followed them & was fishing after they left for hours till he saw a boat with one on board (& a rod as it seemed in his hand) making towards him. He still thought the lads were there & he called them by name & asked them how they fared.
To his great surprise the boat with its white occupant sailed from him now & no motor that ever raced went quicker out of his sight but Peter's midnight revels on the lake were finished. He pulled instantly to the shore and every drop of his sweat was as big as a fraochán
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:50
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round & round & as he went to a gap to see had the dog the hare there he saw a small little dwarfed woman & the hair stood in his head. The hound was terrified & hid in against him & Batt couldn't take his eyes of her with fright. He hadn't far to go home but he was not able to rip his laces or speak with terror. He kept this silent for years but it leaked out & he acknowledges that he nearly died with fright.
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2021-05-19 07:45
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We had once a servant maid here named Chris Casey who was asked by a certain priest to leave and go to him instead. She did and she returned in a months time again to me. One night while there she heard she said "saddle horses and cars passing and she got up to cook out and there sure enough she says the funeral passing through the backyard. Next morning she got a letter from her home in Caherdaniel in a place called the Black Shop saying her sisters funeral was coming into Kenmore from the Midlands where she was in service.
She kept the priests house that evening and asked me to take her back which I did willingly as she was a very good servant. This happened about 10 years ago.
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2021-05-19 07:45
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Batt O' Sullivan says he was out late and early and he never saw anything except one bright moonlight night she was out waking and on his way home at 11 or 12 he went hunting hares with his hound. The hound coursed the bog
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:43
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We had once a servant maid here named Chris Casey who was asked by a certain priest to leave and go to him instead. She did and she returned in a months time again to me. One night while there she heard she said "saddle horses and cars passing and she got up to cook out and there sure enough she says the funeral passing through the backyard. Next morning she got a letter from her home in Caherdaniel in a place called the Black Shop saying her sisters funeral was coming into Kenmore from the Midlands where she was in service.
She kept the priests house that evening and asked me to take her back which I did willingly as she was a very good servant. This happened about 10 years ago.
Batt O' Sullivan says he was out late and early and he never say anything or except one bright moonlight night she was out waking and on his way home at 11 or 12 he went hunting hares with his hound. The hound coursed the bog
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:42
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The first time you cross the threshold of a house on a message you will get your wish & three wishes on first visit to a Church.
An old workman named Ter Terry worked in my Father's house about 50 years ago or less who used to see funerals with headless coaches passing down the back of the house at a certain hour every night for five nights but whether he noticed anything else mysterious or not I have forgotten as I was only a child then but I have a clear recollection of the story as told to me by my Grandmother often.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:37
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A grave should not be opened Monday nor a person should not be buried New Years day. The parish gathered around a man who buried his Mother about thirty years ago on New Years Day & three lovely young women of the neighbourhood died that same year of 1900 too by the same token & he was blamed for all.
The woman in question was my own Grandmother.
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2021-05-19 07:34
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A certain man now dead called James Browne labourer who lived at Lohart of this parish was working with a widow all his life here in Lohart.
This particular night she was impatiently waiting up for him til halfpast 12 or so & at last he arrived & was saluted with Wisha you soon won't come home at all how late you are out.
Why then says he as late as I am so & so & so & so (a pair who were keeping company) are out later.
Just & I coming along from the east I could hear them giggling & laughing beside me somewhere & how they crossed the gate down to the Reek (about 20 perches from road) I don't know but the laughing out loud the d-l such hullabuloo this hour of night I never heard.
"You're in the fairies boy she said & you can't keep it from your late hours. Of course, I can verify that the couple mentioned were not out later than 10 & they were never where he heard:
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:26
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"Gamhshnáth" has passed into the daily life as béurla.
Airiú Mhaise is dóca, toice, slibire,
Ceartuig to the cow where she is being milked.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:17
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5th Story.
An old man of the Kings lived at Ballybrenagh 2 mls N. of School. He had a hump and when he died had to be tied on the bed.
There was a man at the wake who was very fond of drink, and was not getting any. So he thought of a plan and he cut the rope. The room was full of women. The dead man jumped up, and they were sure he was alive again. In the melee the man made his way quietly to the barrel.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:14
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Your loving brother,
Tomica".
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2021-05-19 07:14
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4th Story.
A story is told of a young lady who just went to a boarding-school. At home in the country she was known as "Jessie," but after writing the third letter home she signed herself "Jessica." Her brother Tom replied to her letter as follows:-
"Dear Jessica,
Daddica and mammica have gone to visit aunt Lizzica.
Uncle Sammica is talking of buying a new machinica, but does not know whether to buy a Fordica or a Chevica.
The old cowica had a calfica - I was going to call it Nellica, but I changed it to Jimica, because it was a bullica.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:13
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to his mouth and said "Um! Um" "Begobs", said the other fellow - "if he made a dummy of you, 'tis how he'll make a cripple of me." So he did not go to confession at all.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:12
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3rd Story.
Two boys were a long time without going to confession. One was five years away and the other was ten. They settled between them, that the one who was five years from confession should go in to the box first. He did so and the penance that the priest gave him was not to speak a word for ten minutes after going out. The boy that was ten years away was outside, and he asked him what penance he got. But there was no response. He put up his finger
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2021-05-19 07:12
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He met another old man with a hump and he told him his story. Off went the lad with the hump to the fort to get his hump removed. The fairy was again singing. "Dia Luain, Dia Mairt, Dia Céadaoin," and he replied "Dia Daoin". She asked "who spoiled the song". She again told her companion to place the spared hump on his back. So the old man went home sadly with a pair of humps.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:11
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"Twas that ass that killed my man"
At his wake she made a poem
"Mo chreach, 's mo mháchaill, a Mhártainr,
Tú sínte ar chlár, 'sí do chráidh mé
beart sgolb giúise, ba mhaith leat thabhairt chúgham
Ó bhaile Áice na món' a's na mór-chruach"
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:10
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2nd Story.
Once upon a time an old man was passing by a fort and he overheard a fairy chanting a song within entitled "Dia Luain! Dia Máirt!". Immediately he returned home, and related the story to an old man that lived near by - who wore a hump on his back. The following day the Sean Duine with the hump went to hear the fairy singing her favourite song "Dia Luain, Dia Máirt" he added "Dia Céadaoin". She asked who chorussed me? "Hunch-back!" Hunch-back!. She said to a comrade fairy "Remove the hump from him, and let me have it". The Sean-Duine came home delighted
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:08
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7th Story.
Hannah Rahilly of Tonreigh also tells that a field in the vicinity of Chute Hall is known as the "Plate field". This "plate" consisted of valuable vessels of silver which were stolen out of Chute Hall House probably by the servants and buried in this particular field N. of the Great House. This plate was recovered in the time of the Chutes who have now left Chute Hall. The farm and house are now in possession of Mr. John Hickey.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:08
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8th Story.
Aine Lynch says she heard a story from Thos. McQuinn of Fiddane Gortatlea about crocks of gold which are supposed to be buried underneath two Gállan stones in his field. One gallán stone is 8 ft in height and the other 7 ft. They are 10 ft apart - (ref. page 8)
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:07
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owing to the general belief that you should not interfere with forts or dúns as they were occupied by the "fairies". Tradition has it she says that lights and weird cries were seen and heard there.
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:07
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6th Story.
Hannah Rahilly, Tonreigh, says that gold was supposed to be found in Ml. Rahilly's farm in the townland of Tonreigh, Rathanny. It was supposed to have been put there hundreds of years before by people who were afraid that war would break out in the locality. All the neighbours gathered one day to look for the gold and after digging 15 feet deep they came to a flag and on lifting it they found an empty crock as if the
senior member (history)
2021-05-19 07:06
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awaiting decision
5th Story.
Michael Scanlon of Clogherclemin says that his father told him a "gold pig" was buried in a field of his farm - in the "big paddock". This "pig" he says was brought from Crosbie's of Ballyheigue and that it was buried under a stone. No attempt has been made to unearth it. Lights have often been seen there.
senior member (history)
2021-05-18 08:00
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Here in my own house my Mother-in-law R.I.P was ever so fond of using holy water for every pain and ache with as much devotion as Lourdes Water is used to day. The poor woman sickened and soon it was evident that holy water nor Lourdes nor Doctors aid could prolong her life here any longer (she was only 60 years but she was on her death-bed 23 years ago and the women present saw her die & one ordered the eyes to be closed. I was for waiting a while & after 15 minutes laying with her last breath drawn as it were she woke up & called her son (who is dead now R. I. P.) Terry a croidhe "Sprinkle the Holy Water over every bit of the house now". She stretched back & never her opened her mouth in this world after.
The Holy Water was sprinkled as she desired & I believe myself that she got this power to banish the evil spirits from her at the Particular Judgement on account of her great love for the holy water during her life on earth.
senior member (history)
2021-05-18 07:51
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If a girl marries in Advent she can visit her old home next day if she wishes and she can visit it everyday in Lent too. But suppose she marries Shrove Tuesday unless she goes home that day or Shrove Tuesday night before 12 she dare not go home until the seven weeks of Lent are over on the principle ná dein nós agus ná bris nós. This custom is still very much alive in this part of the country.
senior member (history)
2021-05-18 07:45
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Mrs S O' Sullivan Derrinid tells of a girl who was at school with herself about sixty years ago now named Máire Bhán Ní Dhonacú who used to visit a lios near their own home but she would always maintain it was a wonderful place & she used be there from time to time minding a child for the daoine maithe.
Finally she got epileptic fits and her hands turned it and her speech left her & she spoke only Foota Fatha talk for a long time till the Parish Priest cured her with prayers & Masses and she went to America afterwards.
But before the Priests visit her Mother thinking she was an Íarlais placed her on a shovel of red hot gríosach. When this suffering was over she said "Mama you'll pay for that".
And all the neighbours knew Máire kept company with the daoine maithe when Mama died in a few weeks' time.
This happened near Gortnabina Bonane, Kenmare Kerry School 6 decades ago.
senior member (history)
2021-05-18 07:37
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When Dan Riney John's (of Lehelaun) son Tim was born his Grandfather after viewing the outside world said "that baby boy will comb grey hairs if he isn't very badly wronged" & one of the women present said she often heard the likes said (good & bad) at such a time by old wise heads & that she never saw but that they came true. This child grew up to be about two or three or perhaps four years & his eldest brother say eight or so never had any sense at all then or now & as he & Tim were playing near a steep cliff 20 ft high, he pushed Tim off downwards into the sea. It was the will of Providence that there was not enough water to drown him so he began to creep & creep up this cliff that no human being could climb but he succeeded in reaching the top with all his skin peeled off & he like a drowned rat. Well he was tended & cared by his grandmother & got allright again & is a fear óg to day.
Whether this is folk lore or not his Father says the grandfathers words came true & that only a miracle saved Tim from an early grave.
senior member (history)
2021-05-18 07:27
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Father got ill about this certain time her husband heard in town that he was anointed & wouldn't live more than a few days, so she said to her husband we'll both go to see my Father in the morning when the cows are milked & it was arranged so. They went to bed & out in the night she heard the mighty tramp of horses outside the house. She called her husband she told him her Father was surely dead & she told him what she heard & she maintains it to this day. Sure enough she never saw her Father alive again for he did die that night she got her warning.
Her brother buried a child in Bonane but as they were up the night before the child died the Mother heard as if a good number of little children singing merrily & laughing outside in the yard. She opened the door but saw nobody but she believes they were welcoming her child who died soon after.
senior member (history)
2021-05-18 07:20
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Mrs Moynahan Bonane dead for the past two years or so told this story to Ms S. O' Sullivan Derrinid, Tuosist on a certain night that they both were up at night caring Mrs Monaghans daughter who was also Mrs O'Sullivan's brother's wife. She told her that on a certain year she found all her milk in the pans sprinkled with blood every morning when she'd go into her dairy. She described it as if a person got a brush & sprinkled all the milk with blood. This happened for a long while & at last she told the Priest Professor Dr Mc Carthy then in Maynooth her story and she go him to say a Mass asking him to pray that this would cease & that she could see her pans of milk normal once more & she'd have butter as before this awful visitation of misfortune on her milk & butter.
The Mass was said & she had no cause of complaint about her milk or butter ever after.
Mrs O'Sullivan was married in Tuosist but her parents lived in the adjacent parish of Bonane. Her
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 08:18
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She got frightened & ran down to the room to my mother & hers and my Mother told her she was only dreaming. Well sometime after the woman who used see the good people came into my Mother & faix she asked her could a man be there that night & she said he was there & that he was Ter Mor An Púint (he owned the house when alive) & says the woman because your Father & Mother always prayed for his soul he didn't do your daughter any harm.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 08:12
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Her sister and herself were stretched on the seat waiting up for their Father who was very late in coming home and their Mother was in the bed in the room with the baby. Of course they had no light but the sister saw the pup leaving his place and barking and on raising herself up she saw this tall man with an oil hat standing sideways near the fireplace
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 08:07
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but Mrs Palmer maintains that this old woman wore a frilled white cape with ribbon outside the border. She tells this to her own grandchildren to day & she cannot bear to think they don't believe her.
Oh! Yes & she says they didn't believe her at home either until years after wards when a dudheen was found in a crack in the wall by the left side of the hearth & as no one ever in the house had anything like that old pipe maybe they believed my story from me then she says.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 08:03
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Another event that happened to herself when she was about 12 years or so. She was sleeping with her grandmother in a settle bed near the fire & out in the night she wanted to get out & she saw the red woman bent down near the fire & a bog deal splinter in her hand & she poking the cinders with it as if she was about to light the dudheen she had in her mouth. She called her grandmother but she saw nothing.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 07:57
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Mrs Palmer herself says she was awakened one night about 60 years ago by the trampling & pranting of many pairs of horses and she never slept at all. When morning came she went out to see the "graupping" the horses had done around the year but it was just the same as ever. She told the Priest her story. "Some great loss belonging to you that's going to die says he. "True for him a laog ghil my brothers wife died that very month having a lot of orphans motherless on the floor mo ghraidhn iad.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 07:49
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Time passed for a year and a baby was expected soon. She (Mary) went home to see her Mother this day and on going home she passed by a lios and she found the most beautiful smell out of lios that ever she felt like fresh fish frying. She went on home & she never shut an eye that night but the smell haunting her. Next day she told her Mother-in-law her story & how she couldn't put the thought of the fine smell out of the lios out of her head & her mother-in-law was troubled that something bad was going to happen the young wife. In a few days a still-born baby was born fully developed & all but dead & the Mother fainted & the Priest was sent for. She told him she was in the finest placed that ever was seen since her baby was born. "Don't tell that to everyone" says he. From that day off she had no luck in her confinements every second baby being dead & she died in her confinement herself too. This is vouched to as true.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 07:42
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Mrs Palmer aged 85 now living in Upper Derrinid Tuosist but who has had great losses lately as Sean O'Sullivan will know told me all the following stories evening after evening some time ago.
Her own sister Mary she said was a fine tall handsome girl and their Father put his eye on a certain man whom he intended to be Mary's husband and as there was a fine farm of land by this man he was very anxious to match make for Mary Faix (Mary does not seem to have any say in the matter for or against). There was one hindrance to their marriage & that was that they were second cousins but the land blinded the Father to this objection.
He went to the ten Priest dead almost 80 years ago now & and he said so the story goes as the girls Father had fortune for her & all that it was a pity that the marriage shouldn't go on & will plan some excuse for the Bishop says he & so they did & the marriage came off and everybody was satisfied
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 07:32
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At the Present Lake Hotel now (of course there was no hotel there then but a bóthan let to a dairy-man long since dead (up to 50 years ago) it happened about 80 or 90 years ago so the story goes.
A hare was seen at midnight & at dawn milking the poor dairy-mans cows. The Parish Priest had greyhounds then & he was sent for to kill the hare. He came and after a long chase the hare escaped. The hounds followed in full chase & as the hare was disappearing through the window of the dairy-mans house the hounds caught & bit her but she escaped. The Priest said the hare was in the house & he searched & searched & there in bed he saw a pool of blood near this old woman who lived in the house with the dairy man & his mother.
The Priest knew she was the hare & this is explained by saying she was a witch & could take any shape she liked. The Priest sprinkled Holy Water on the poor witch & she died soon after an honest woman.
senior member (history)
2021-05-17 07:22
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"Mary are you willing that your clothes be given to this person called by name, three times & then holy water is sprinkled on the clothes and given to the said person who must wear them (full rig) for three successive Sundays during Holy Mass & then worn on state occasions as needed but never changed or altered made longer or shorter etc nor even patched but hung on a crook or nail till they decay with time & melt away.
If pipes are spared after a wake they should never be returned but they should be placed in the walls of the house where the dead of the family can come for a smoke later on.
Or if medicine or ointment is being used by a sick person they should not be kept after the death nor dare be used.
The bed or settled where the corpse is laid out should immediately that the corpse is removed (to pence it in the coffin) should be changed from its present position.
If a baby is born in a "caul" it is a very lucky sign and sailors take or took such cauls to sea to preserve them from shipwreck.
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 09:50
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If a grave is opened by mistake by somebody for a corpse which has no claim to be buried there & if this is found out in time to enable those belonging to the dead to open the proper grave, before closing the other (opened in mistake) a scothán off a furze bush should be placed in the wrong grave before closing it in.
No relative of corpse should open grave for it but four or six of same clan should take the corpse out of the house for interment. Often a funeral is kept late waiting until the tribe be gathered together as pall-bearers.
A Mother should not go to her first child's funeral but neither should she be present at the marriage of her first-born.
A woman pregnant should not go out after dark for the daoine maith are on the watch for the babe & the Mother. Nor should she bring meat in her hand or in her possession at all from a friend or from the market. & everybody knows she should go out same door as she came in
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 09:24
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She lived for several years after and enjoyed good health and better than all next year after her return home a son was born who afterwards became the best oarsman in Co. Kerry. He made his living lobster-fishing in Kenmare Bay after.
This story is known all over Sth Kerry and I heard it as a child from an old workman of ours now dead who would swear to this version of the story. Jeremiah Jer Owen O'Sullivan aged 60 or so retold this to me word for word a few nights ago and he also told me the following. He lives now in Coornagillagh of this parish.
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 09:19
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across the bay by boat and to bring six of the best oarsmen in Ardgroom along with him, and to wait at Black Water Bridge on this certain night. (This is between Westcove & Kenmare on the north side of the Bay and about 20 miles from Westcove). He and six noted oarsmen set out as directed and he was also told that there would be numbers of white horses with their riders riding along here & the husband was ordered to make a ring around the last horse & shake holy water on this ring & that she would be riding on the last horse & if he would succeed in snatching her off while in the ring to run with his life & hers towards the boat. This was done successfully & as soon as she got on board she ordered them to pull with all their might and main towards the south shore homewards to Ardgroom. A mighty storm arose, but the oarsmen battled with it and reached home safely but they were scarcely out on the land when she (the boat) was blown against the rocks and made into smidiríní.
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 09:09
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were. She listened carefully & woke her husband to listen too & sure enough they both heard distinctly the cover being taken off & placed on the seat near by & next the cupán inside in the milk was shaken under the milk & around as one would do when about to take a drink of buttermilk out of the churn. And then the fine drink was taken & the swallowing was heard as naturally as if anybody was taking the drink & then a sigh or two were heaved & heard after.
The Grandmother slept in the room downstairs & they wondered at her to leave her bed & go to the Churn for a drink & she heard all that happened in the kitchen & she was sure that the man of the house (her son who had a bad toothache) was in the kitchen & at the churn.
In the morning when the Mother Father & Nan met they began questioning each other about the churn last night. And then & only then did they know & feel that it was a mysterious happening & they thought that it must have been the Seana Daid finishing his Purgatory with the drink & the fine sigh.
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 08:58
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A certain Mother whose day's work was over went to hatch & sew the children's clothes when they & their Father had gone to bed after the rosary & night prayers were over. She drew up her chair & work to the front of the fire & started to with a will. Time stole on her & she never felt it passing till as if a chair were lifted & placed beside her. (No chair was placed of course but a noise similar to the placing of it was heard up close to her own. She got lonely & she said to herself this is high time for me to be leaving the hearth & away with her up stairs & as she went to examine the children's beds & found everything to her satisfaction.
Just as she was stretching on her pillow the watch told her it was one o'clock but as this was not an uncommon hour with her leaving her sewing behind her she said "now for a sleep.
To her surprise she heard in the kitchen the walking from the fireplace towards the back door where the churn & churned milk
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 08:49
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About eighty years ago or more a woman - one Mrs Shea of Ardgroom Castletown Bere, Co. Cork was married there and she was a fine healthy bouncing woman for a dozen years or thereabouts. She seemed to get old and very old before her time & to pine away & sicken and get into decline as it seemed.
But some one of the good people informed him that this creature was not his wife but an iarlais left by those who stole his wife away and she told him that his own wife was taken & lived in a rock with the fairies for six weeks there in a place called then & now "Beal na Leapa" and then that she was taken to Westcove in West Kerry across Kenmare Bay riding on a white horse. The husband got some gríosach on a shovel & threatened to burn the iarlays who flew up the chimney without delay.
The man evidently had some true friend amongst the fairy sluagh for word was sent him one night three weeks after to go to meet
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 08:39
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of the King who was both vexed & annoyed at seeing them back so soon again and the signs of disturbed minds showing clearly on their faces & they were quite as unreasonable as before. When he heard their tale of woe he told them to clear out of his sight & not to come in his presence with any more such tales but to go home like steady women & to divide their stooks into sheaves & then an odd sheaf wouldn't matter. True they did as they were bade but they returned the day after tomorrow asking his Majesty's pardon & begging him to listen to them. Though he felt very angry with them he ordered them home & told them to divide the odd sheaf into blades & to make the division evenly between them.
This they did but back they went as brazen as ever with the odd blade asking him for advice for the last time. The palace was situated on the sea-shore and casting the blade on the sea he said. Ye have enough without it & before he was able to finish his angry speech lo & behold the five old Caileach swam out to fetch the blade & they were all drowned.
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 08:31
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Caileach a Rúin, indeed then you won't says Caileach a Purpoon but it is mine says Caileach a Thána. They failed to come to any terms and they spent a very uneasy night and break of day they got ready by consent to go and lay their case before the King. After much deliberation these five old hags were received into his presence and they told him their troubles. He advised them go home united and settle about dividing the odd stack into stooks. They were delighted and they thanked the King over & over for solving this riddle of theirs. They became fast friends and slept soundly that night but next day they began at their stacks and divided them into stooks and a hard day's work it was but finally they did the work but however they tried they had a stook over and the quarrel began as fresh as ever there & then.
The very same dispute arose one word borrowing another until once again they went in the presence
senior member (history)
2021-05-15 08:22
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Five old women lived happily together long ago named Purtam Portam, Caileach a Thartom, Caileach a Rúin, Caileach a Purpoon & Caileach a Thána.
Well once upon a time when they had their grain cut saved & made into stacks it happened that there were six stacks one for each & they fell out & began to quarrel for the first time over the ownership of the 6th stack.
I'll have this says Partam Portam, no, you won't says Caileach a Thartom, I'll have it says
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 09:14
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One night this same labouring man was going to Castletown Bere fair with his Master as was their wont and as they lived here in Coornagillagh, Tuosist they had to leave the house in the dead of night to travel this distance of 25 miles to the fair.
Side cars were uncommon then in this parish & this particular side car I believe was the very first in the possession of any man in this parish & by the same token it was second hand having been belonged to the late Doctor Geoffrey who lived in Kenmare forty years ago.
Well this was a pitch dark night and they went out to tackle the horse to their side-car & all was well & good till they got hold of the shafts to pull them down to get it tackled. On placing their hands on them & moving them with a jerk they both heard a loud moan like Ohóóó Óh ó ó & the Master said to the boy whats
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 09:06
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that at all but the boy didn't answer. He had a lantern & searched everywhere for the cause & being a man who did not believe in ghosts or goblins he sat into the car & the boy sat in on the opposite side. But it is said by the boy to day that they travelled in silence for ten miles when it began to dawn and then the first word he spoke was Begor! I suppose we disturbed poor Doctor Geoffrey this morning when we raised the shafts.
I got these three fairy tales most unexpectedly from this labouring boy who lives in a bothán that any folk-lore collector would not be welcome to visit they having known better days.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:59
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A man named Bernard Shea had a bakery in Kenmare long ago 70 years ago perhaps. The bakers used come in to the bakery late at night or rather in the small hours of the morning and this night in question his Mother said is there water in for the bakers, Bernard? They found there was not not and she sent himself and the maid across the street to the pump for a bath of water. The streets were then in complete darkness with no living soul abroad and to their dismay they saw what appeared to be a woman almost flying down street towards them and where did she fall into but into their bath of water. Oh! then she said as they stood there dumbfounded "how late ye waited to bring in the water, the like of this didn't happen me since I left New York". Needless to say they ran home for their lives & told their story leaving bath & water behind.
It seemed quite incredible until a man in Market St. Kenmare got a message from Queenstown that his daughter who was on her way
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:52
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home from the States died on board ship and had to be thrown over board slán mar a n-innstear é.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:49
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A little pupil of mine went home from school as well as ever and did jobs like little ones in the country do in the evening. She was about 8 or 9 years and she sickened that night & her disease developed into meningitis; she suffered agonies so patiently & nothing seemed to please her more than holy pictures, Lourdes Water etc. On the ninth or tenth dawn she passed away after a most edifying illness saying "isn't this a lovely time to be going to Heaven, Mama". The mother told me she called her husband in his sleep to listen to a noise as of a clock ticking in the little child's room beside her bed but the Father heard nothing.
The Mother called it the "death watch" and she scrubbed the boards with boiling water but there it ticked & ticked out its weird warning till the child passed away to God when the Mother heard it no more.
And a neighbour another Mother heard the evening before she sickened as if many children say crowds together were laughing to their hearts' content.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:40
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Two women were minding my grandmother on her deathbed and in the middle of the night one stooped down to give her a drop of whiskey. At the same moment the latch was raised three times & one of the women said to the sick woman Did you hear the latch, Ma'am, I did says she and my husband's voice called my name three times Ellen Ellen Ellen. The husband left her a widow 40 years before & she never forgot to get a Mass said on the anniversary of his death & oftener. So the women were frightened out of their lives but she told them he was only calling her home. She died next day. Both women are now dead but I remember the whole affair myself.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:35
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The pig sees the new moon the first night, the horse the second & the human being the third. Common belief about the moon here.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:34
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This is a prayer I learned from my Grand Mother 40 years ago when sleeping with her at night.
Anna Máthair Mhuire
Muire Máthair Críost
Elizabeth máthair Éoin Baiste
An triúr san bí mar scáth ós mo leabaidh
Agus an Crann gur céasadh Críost
Idir mé agus an trom luighe anocht
Ainm an Áthar, agus an Mic, agus an
Sprid Naomh Amen a tíghearna trocaireacht Anocht.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:24
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A spinning woman used to go about from house to house spinning about 50 yeard ago & she used boast of spinning a pound of wool every day & a pound every night. Of course she used be ag airneáin cois na teine every night & story telling with the sewant man. This certain night the cock jumped off the coop (they used be kept in the kitchen then) & began to crow & crow & flap his wings about 12 o'clock.
The man said Peg you or I will go soon & to morrow morning when the woman of the house went to call her she got no answer.
Alarmed at this they called again & again & at last they opened the door & poor Peg na mBí (for that was what she was known by) was dead.
The cock was true & this happened when I was a young girl every word of which I clearly remember.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:23
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awaiting decision
A spinning woman used to go about from house to house spinning about 50 yeard ago & she used boast of spinning a pound of wool every day & a pound every night. Of course she used be ag airneáin cois na teine every night & story telling with the sewant man. This certain night the cock jumped off the coop (they used be kept in the kitchen then) & began to crow & crow & flap his wings about 12 o'clock.
The man said Peg you or I will go soon & to morrow morning when the woman of the house went to call her she got no answer.
Alarmed at this they called again & again & at last they opened the door & poor Peg na mbí (for that was what she was known by) was dead.
The cock was true & this happened when I was a young girl every word of which I clearly remember.
senior member (history)
2021-05-14 08:14
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As A poor old Grandmother was dying she thought she had a very thin worn petticoat for the long journey and with her dying breath she begged of her daughter in-law to make one good [-] one for her out of the first flannel & give it away for God sake & the daughter-in-law promised faithfully she would do this & intended to do so at the time.
When the flannel was made however her little children were in want of clothes and as the dead didn't speak or remind her, Nanny was forgotten.
Some time afterwards it happened that the daughter-in-law went out to the well for water (timceall meadhon oidhche) and she thought she felt as if something made her very lonesome. She was just stooping down to get the water when she heard this feeble voice "Ailliliú a laogh táim bactha
" " "
" " "
The petticoat was then provide & the voice was heard no more.
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 09:17
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About 150 years ago the English were hunting down our Irish heroes and hanging them when ever they could catch them. In the parish of Tralee to the north side of the town on the top of Rock Street on the right side of the road from Tralee to Abbeydorney by Listellick and just west of the New Burying Ground there is a little patch of land called Gallow's Green (Páirc na Croiche). Here many of the White-Boys were hanged in public. At that time there was a large hole of water in the centre of the field and into this hole of water the English executioners used throw the body of the poor executed Irish man.
One day as a man by the name of Pat Barry of Lisanerla (Lios-an-Iarla) was going home from Tralee with his horse and car (the road called the New Line now going from Tralee to Listowel was not then made) and as he was approaching Gallow Green (Páirc na Croiche) he got word that the English soldiers were waiting for a cart to hang a White Boy from. Pat Barry immediately turned back and he went around by the old Ardfert Abbeydorney way and so reached his native townland of Lisnearla (Lios-an-Iarla) by doing a big circle.
But it is told that they hanged this poor White Boy afterwards. All the landlords, big gentry, their agents etc used to bring their relatives to [?] on at the public hangings - even their women folk and children were present.
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 08:56
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are bought in a shop.
The names of potatoes sown in our district are Irish Champions, Up-to-dates, British Queen's, Kerr's Pinks, Presidents, Arran Wonders, Arran Banners, Spies Abundance, Arran Comforts, Flounders, Shamrocks, Old Champions, Irish Queens, Arran Victors, American Roses, and Garden Pillars.
The local people help each other to sow their potatoes.
The potatoes are moulded and sprayed in the summer months to keep away the blight.
Some people plough out their potatoes, and others dug them out with a spade in Autumn. The children of the house usually pick the potatoes off the land. We put the póiríns into a bucket for the pigs, and put the dinner potatoes into a bag.
Some people store potatoes in lofts and others in pits.
A hole is dug in the ground and the potatoes are put in and piled up into a heap, then some straw is put over them and then they are well covered with clay.
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 08:48
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There are potatoes growing on our farm. There is one acre of potatoes sown on our land every year. The amount of our potatoes varies some years though not very much. We hire a man who lives near by to prepare our ground. It is not manured in any way before being turned up.
The potatoes are sown both in ridges and in drills. The drills are ploughed first then harrowed, then cultivated and ploughed a second time and then they are harrowed and cultivated again and then the drills are opened. The ridges are marked out first and then made with a plough. The manure is then drawn out, spread on the ridge and the potatoes are dropped. The furrow is dug and then the seed is covered with what is dug up out of the furrow.
Wooden ploughs were often used in olden times. There are some wooden ploughs left.
The spades are not made locally, they
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 08:41
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It was said in olden times that the bride should wear "something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue".
The bridegroom should be in the church for a while before the bride.
The following verse is often quoted when choosing the day.
"Monday for health.
Tuesday for wealth.
Wednesday the best day of all.
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses,
Saturday no day at all".
It is an old custom to tie an old pair of shoes to the car in which the bride and bridegroom are. This is supposed to bring them good luck. There is an old superstition that the bride should not return to her own home for a month
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 08:36
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 08:35
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the slates were got in Kilkenny.
The old houses usually had a bed in the kitchen. The beds were put beside the fire. The bed was called a settle bed.
The fire was always at the gable wall but never in the corner or against the side wall. The front of the chimney was made of mortar and stones sometimes and of clay and wattle in some houses. The old people never heard of houses having no chimneys or of houses having the fire in the centre of the floor.
There no accounts of the houses which had no glass for the windows. The old floors were made of clay.
Half doors were common and are still used in the district. Wood and turf were used for the fire. The lights used were dips. rush lights and candles. Candles were made locally. The people used to make them, themselves by dipping a rush into grease and letting the grease dry hard on it. They used to dry a blackthorn stick in the chimney and put grease on it and let it dry hard on it then it would light.
senior member (history)
2021-05-13 08:28
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Most of the old houses in the district are farmers' houses. Some of them are slated but most are thatched. The straw for the thatch was grown on their own farms and
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:48
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On Edward Traynor's farm in the townland of Lemgare there were three old houses owned by Ned Mc Guinness, Mary Ann Daly, and James Carragher. Ned Mc Guinness made the nailes and he was called Ned the Nailer. He had one daughter called Mary Mc Guinness. Mary Ann Daly scutched flax at the time of the hand scutching. James Carragher spent most of his time in England and he came home occasionally. He owned the land that Edward Traynor, Lemgare has now. He built a house on it and the walls of it are there yet. He had one son called James who died in Liverpool.
On Dan Hughes farm in Coolartra there was two old houses
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:41
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Barkers: In James Ronnyhans farm in Coolartra there lived two people called Barkers. The brother's name was Peter and the sister's name was Rosy. Peter died and Rosy had the place to herself. The kitchen roof fell in and she lived in the barn. She was a good singer, and the people used to go to hear her singing, and telling old stories.
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:37
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1. Once there was a man living in Crossbane whose name was James woods. One early morning he was going to Keady fair to buy horses, for he was a horse-dealer, and he saw a woman sweeping the dew with her long mantle. He said "half-mine" to her and went on to the fair.
In a few days afterwards he was churning and when he was finished he saw that the churn was full up of butter. Woods then went to the priest about it, and after that it came back to its regular quantity.
2. There is a 'standing-stone' over in Derrynoose, and no one is supposed to break or take a chip off it. One day a policeman was walking on a road near to it and he thought he would fire a shot at it. He did so and took a piece out of the stone and that night he died.
3. There was a man named James Hasty who was born in an old house where Paddy Mc Quaide of Lemgare, now lives. His mother used
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:27
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say that he was not her real son, but that he was a fairy child who was left in place of her own by the fairies. The mother always disowned him. When James grew into manhood if he "cast" his eye on any beast it would do no good after that unless one would get a piece of his coat and burn it under the beast's nose.
4. One night my father and some of his companions were playing cards in an old house in Derrynouse. There was a fire in the house and a candle to show them light. They used to go to the house every night. On this particular night they were playing as usual and about one o'clock they heard the rumble of a coach going down the lane. There never was a coach or even a cart on it because the lane was too narrow. They never went back to the house afterwards.
5. One time a man stole a chalice from Derrynoose old chapel. When he died he was turned into stone. If a person wanted to curse anybody all they did was to kneel on
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:20
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There are a lot of strange stories told about the fort of Lisdungormal. There is a pad from the fort to a well at the foot of the field. Some time ago the owner of this field - Peter Mc Mahon ploughed it and the following morning found the scores turned back into their places. The next day he ploughed the pad again but with the same result. Ever since when the field is cultivated for crop the pad is never touched.
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:16
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the stone. Some time later the priest of the parish had the stone removed and buried near where the "Standing-stone" is now.
6. One May eve a hare ran into my grand-fathers byre. He took out his gun and shot the hare through the leg but it escaped. Next morning a stream of blood was seen from the byre to a man's house in the lower end of Derrynooce. This man had come in the form of a hare and was lame until he died.
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:12
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In the townland of Lisdungormal there is a fairy fort. Once a man named Brennan lived near the fort. He was married to a lovely young
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:11
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girl. In those days the people were in dread of the fairies. It happened that the young woman went out one night for the cows and did not return. The husband and neighbours searched everywhere but could not trace her. Sometime after appeared to him in a dream. She told him that she would be passing by the door on a certain night at twelve o'clock on a white horse with five others. She told if that if he succeeded in putting the pot-hooks round her neck she would get back to him, but if not that she would be killed. The man was ready on that night but failed to put the pot-hooks round her neck and she fell from the horse and was killed.
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:06
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A long time ago there lived a landlord at Castleshane whose name was Lucas. He wanted his men to plant timber in all the waste land and old forths on his estate. He asked them to go to Drumgollet forth and cut all the old trees off it and lone bushes. None of the men wanted to go near it because they thought it was enchanted. So he said to use his horse first and if there was any bad luck in it that it would come to him. When they started the horse to pull some of the timber he dropped dead and the men
senior member (history)
2021-05-12 07:02
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There is a vault in the grave-yard at Clontibret Protestant church belonging to a family called Fitzgerald. In a public house nearby a few men were talking about the vault. There was a wager laid that one of the party named Bob Brown who never knew what fear was would not enter the vault and bring back a school. Brown accepted the wager. While he was getting the key from the sexton another of the party named George Grimes got into the vault and hid in a dark corner behind some coffins. When Brown arrived he lifted the first skull he came to. At that Grimes called out in a hoarse voice "That's mine". Brown lifted another but
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 13:56
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carrying torches across to Drumbo hill. A person was coming home one night, as he was crossing the road, he saw a great light in Drumgolet fort, he saw a lot of little people dancing on the fort and the music was charming, he thought it was neighbours dancing, so he hurried quick to the fort thinking he was missing a great nights fun. He never stopped till he was in the middle of the fort. Looking around he saw that everything was in darkness and not a thing to be seen. He went back quicker than he came. As he was going down the last ring of the fort he heard great laughter behind his back which helped him to increase his speed.
There were fairies lived in a cave in a rock in Mr. Rices field. They went in bands singing and they were called singing fairies. They had pads and any child who went on them were taken by the fairies. Mrs. Rice said that a neighbours child was taken by the fairies and was not found for a day until the priest got it back. There were seen in some meadows near here dancing and riding on rag-weeds for horses.
Freets: - People used to tie red rags on cows tails to keep the fairies away.
It is counted unlucky to meet a red haired woman
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 13:47
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anything that was on it and left it beside her master.
The young lady knew the dogs at once and declared she'd never marry anyone unless he'd get her one of these dogs.
When the butler heard this he went to John O'Neill and said to him:
"What will you take for one of your dogs?'
"Oh", says he, "All you're worth in the world would not buy one of my dogs".
On hearing this all the other beggarmen who were along with John O'Neill got angry with him for having the impudence to insult the butler and they feared the wedding would be prevented. They gathered round him and were going to hunt him out of the place.
John O'Neill dressed himself in his own clothes and went over to the young lady. She recognised him, and got up and shook hands with him. He then pulled the lion's tongue out of his pocket and showed it to her and told her it was Strength that killed the lion. The young lady said she would never marry anyone but himself.
So they got ready and drove away and got married that day.
That night when they were all asleep in the castle the butler stole into John O'Neill's room and drew a knife across his throat and
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 13:38
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cut it. He then called the young lady and said to her: "You cut his throat and the sooner he's got away out of this and buried the better. You can marry me then who was entitled to you from the first".
The butler then took the corpse and put it in a coffin and went away to a graveyard to bury it.
That night Guess told the two other dogs what had happened their master. So the three agreed to go to the giant's well and get some of the oil and try to bring him back to life again.
As the funeral went on towards the graveyard what did they see coming towards them but Swift. He was the best runner of the three and he came up to them like lightning after going to the giant's well and rolling himself in the oil till it was running down in drops off him.
"Oh!" says the young lady, "lay down the corpse till Swift gets the last farewell of his master". They left it down and lifted the lid off the coffin and Swift went into it and rubbed himself well to where his master's throat was cut. As soon as he had done so John O'Neill moved in the coffin.
The butler seemed to be very angry and ordered the lid to be put on the coffin again and hurried on the funeral.
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 13:28
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But they didn't go far, till they met Guess coming running her best, & all covered with oil, too. "Oh!" says the young lady, "Lay down the coffin till Guess take the last farewell of her master".
They left it down and took the lid off the coffin and Guess went in and rubbed herself well to where her master's throat was cut, & when she came out he sat up & began to sneeze.
The butler was very angry and ordered the funeral on & every step they went he was hurrying them. But they did not go very far till they met Strength coming running up to them. He was bigger and heavier than the other two and it took him longer to come, but he took far more of the oil with him as he was covered with long curly hair.
"Oh!" says the young lady, "Lay down the coffin till Strength takes the last farewell of his master".
They left it down and Strength went into it & rubbed himself well to his master's wound & John O'Neill got up and walked out of the coffin as well as ever he was in his life.
Then Strength made a spring at the butler and caught him by the back of the neck and threw him into a drain & broke his back.
So John O'Neill and the young lady & the three dogs went home to the castle.
senior member (history)
2021-05-11 13:18
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One day when they were out walking they came to a place in the garden where there was a block and a hatchet. Guess said to her master: "I'll leave my head down here now & let you cut it off".
"Oh", says John O'Neill, "I'd sooner get my own head cut off than cut off the head of one of my dogs that served me so faithfully".
"Well if you don't cut the head off me I'll cut the head off you", says Guess.
So with that her master left down his head on the block for Guess to cut it off, but every time she'd lift the hatchet Strength would put over his paw on the block.
Then Guess said to her master: "Cut the head off me till you see what I'll turn into".
So John O'Neill took the hatchet in his hand and cut the head off her and she turned into a lovely young princess.
Then he cut the head off Swift & he turned into a lovely young prince & then off Strength who also turned into a young prince.
Then they told their master how the giant he killed struck them with his enchanting rod and changed them into three dogs. "Now", said they, "we did well for you and we'll go home to our father".
So they bade John O'Neill and the young lady good-bye and started for their own home.
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 20:41
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not go far until he met a beggarman on the road and he said to him: "How much will you take for your suit of clothes and crutches?"
"Oh!", said the beggarman, "they're not worth much, indeed".
"Will you take five pounds for them?"
"Indeed I will, and be very glad to get it".
John O'Neill gave him the £5, and another suit of clothes, and dressed himself in the beggarman's suit and went on as before. It was not long until they reached the place where the wedding was held, which was in the middle of a green meadow. There were three miles of gentlemen, three miles of farmers and three miles of beggarmen at it.
When all was ready and the dinner left on the tables, John O'Neill said to Strength, "Go up and bring me down one of the dishes from before the bride". Strength went up and carried down the dish without touching one bit of what was on it and left it beside his master. Then he said to Swift, "Go up and take me down one of the dishes from before the bride". Swift went up and brought it down without touching one bit of what was on it and left it beside his master.
Then he said to Guess, "Go up and bring me down one of the dishes from before the bride". She went up and brought it down without spelling or touching
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 20:30
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the air and devour the young lady".
"Do you think we can do anything for her?" said John O'Neill.
"Perhaps we can, but we'll try in any case" says Guess.
So off they started and travelled on and on until they came to a great green field where a great crowd of people were gathered. There was a chair in the middle of the field, and sitting on the chair was the young lady. They were not long arrived when the sky opened and a fierce lion came down straight over the young lady's head. Strength jumped up and with one spring broke the lion's back. John O'Neill walked over and cut out the lion's tongue and put it in his pocket.
The butler, belonging to the young lady's family fired a shot just as the lion fell and he said that he killed the lion and that he'd have to get the young lady in marriage.
John O'Neill started home with his three dogs, while all preparations were made in the young lady's castle for the wedding.
On the wedding morning Guess said to her master, "The young lady is to be married today".
So John O'Neill got ready and with his three dogs went off to the wedding. He did
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 20:17
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appeared to him hundreds of little men pulling on his coat-tail. They were all the time adding to their numbers and the pull became so great in the end that he fell on side of the road, and had to creep along till he came to a cross-road which brought him near home. The fairies never left him and he was so weak that he was hardly able to finish his journey.
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 20:14
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and did not return until almost day-break. This went on for quite a long time until one night he decided to follow his companion in order to see where he went. He followed him on, and on till he found him doing referee in a foot-ball match between two teams of fairies. The story goes that the fairies saw the other man, and chased the referee for his life.
We have already told the story of the little woman meeting the men ploughing below the fort and looking for tools wherewith to fix her churn. Tradition does not name the fort at which this took place.
A man in this district once told me the following story as having happened to himself - firmly believes it to be the truth, and no amount of persuasion or argument could chase him from the belief. He was going home one night and his road passed near to where there was a fort - that is Lisnadarra. When he passed a certain spot he found as he thought a very heavy pull on his coat tail - much like as if the coat had got so heavy that he could not carry it. This became so heavy as to become unbearable and he could not move a step.
He looked around and there were what
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 20:05
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A The outside ring - a bank or fence
B Second ring - a ditch presumably a water ditch to the mound in many of the local forts one has to use stepping stones across this ditch of water
C The circular mound
These forts were supposed to have been built by the Ancient Irish as places of refuge from the Danish invader, and later were used according to the older generations by the fairies as hiding places. Many stories are told or left to us by these old people whose firm belief in fairies could not be shaken. Stories are told of foot-ball matches been played around these forts; light been seen at them at night, and of the sound of music played on pipes, sounding into the night air from these same places. So great was the old people's dread of fairy power that no man even to the present day ever dared molest these forts.
An interesting story is told of two men who were hired on a farm not far from the fort of Liserrill. They both slept together and one man noticed that his companion would steal out of bed at the dead-hour of night
senior member (history)
2021-05-10 18:28
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If there two things in which the district is not scarce they are fairy forts, and lakes. Many town-lands in the district bear the name Liss, eg. Liss-na-Tarach (Lisnadarra)
Lisiniskey, Liserrille etc.
In each of these town-lands there are of course forts, but there are also forts in a great many other town-lands which do not bear the name Lis. These forts are of course situated on the tops of hills and as is said in the district "When you are standing on one fort you always sure to see another". The word is pronounced "forta" locally.
All of the local forts have the following shape
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:52
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Once upon a time a poor scholar was travelling on the road. He met a ragman and the ragman asked him which would the lie or the truth go the longest. The poor scholar said that the truth went the longest. I bet five pounds that the lie goes the longer said the ragman. We will give it the next man we meet on the road said he. The first man they met on the road was the parish priest. I beg your pardon, Father. Will you tell us if you please which goes the longest, the truth or the lie. The priest said that the lie went the longest and the ragman won five pounds from the poor scholar. I will bet again said the ragman, so the poor scholar bet the last five pounds he had. The next man they met said the lie goes the longest and the ragman won the money again. Will you bet again said the ragman. I have no more to bet but my suit of clothes and my two eyes. The ragman won his suit of clothes and his two eyes and he threw him into a heap of bushes. When the night came a lot of cats came and they had a sheep. When they had the sheep eaten one of them told a story. The woman of the house threw me out of the house, and I came in again
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:43
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him never to tell anyone. The man went away and sometimes after that the man that shaved the king went to Confession. He told the priest that there was one thing in his mind that he could not tell or if he did his head would be cut off by the King. Well said the priest I cannot give you absolution until you tell it. After a while the priest told the man to go to the place where the thing had happened and to make his confession there. He went to the oak tree, made his confession there and then he came back and got absolution from the priest. Some time later this King was getting married and his people didn't know where they would get music for the wedding. So they were going along and they hit upon the oak tree and they said they would make a harp out of it for the wedding. When they had it finished they invited all the people to the palace. All the friends were gathered that and the first tune the harp played was in Irish and it said tá dhá chluas chapall ar Rí láidir ó luirc. When the King heard this he got mad and he went and cut the head off himself for he now knew that the the people knew he had horses' ears.
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:40
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look around. The shopkeeper asked him what he wanted. The man said what ever I want you haven't it. I bet £500 said the shopkeeper I have it. Have you a piece of tobacco that will go from the top of my toe to the top of my ear. The shopkeeper took out a piece of tobacco and it went up past his ear. Now said the shopkeeper. But the tops of my ears are beyond in Connemara said the Connemara man, and then the Connemara man won the money.
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:35
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Once upon a time a man left Connemara and went to Dublin. One day he went into a shop and started to look about. The shopkeeper asked him what he wanted. What ever I want you haven't it said the man. I bet you a £100. I have. I bet a £100 you haven't. What is it? said the shopkeeper. The man took out a hook. You have not a case for that said he. The shopkeeper went upstairs and brought down a cow's horn and put the hook into it. It fitted it nicely and the shopkeeper won the £100. He was going out the door crying when he met Daniel O'Connell and he told him his story. Never mind that said O'Connell I will make that all right. When you go home cut off the tops of your ears and leave them in Connemara after you and meet me here this day twelve months at twelve o'clock. The man was there Daniel gave him a £500 and told him to bet £500 with the shopkeeper. The man went into the shop and started to
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:25
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Once upon a time there was a lord and his wife. One evening the Lord was going for a walk and he saw a building and it was not finished all out. He went into the house there were Monks in it and he asked the monks how much money would finish the house. The monks said about a hundred pounds. Then the Lord put his Land down into his pocket and gave it to the monks. The monks said to the Lord you will have a young son and the Mermaid has to get him. After a week or two the Lord had a young son. When the son was twenty years old. His father told him to go to England and when he was going the road he saw a hound and a bear and a hawk. They had a beast killed. They began quarrelling about the beast and the lad took out his pinknife. He gave the head of the beast to the hawk and the rest to the hound and the bear and the lad went away. He had not gone far away when he heard a big noise and he looked behind him and he saw the
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:17
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There are many fairy forts in some districts. A fort is a very interesting place to look at. It is beautiful to look at the perfectly round wall and one place open for people to go inside. Long ago people built every fort on a high hill so that the people could see their enemies in time of attack and signal to the other forts.
I was often at a fort at Knockdruma. It is situated on the top of a high hill, overlooking Castletownsend Bay. Long ago the fairies lived in that fort, and every night they all used to come out and all join hands in a circle and dance around the fort. And ever since there is a path around the fort, because the grass never grew. There is a tunell underground where the people long ago went down to the bay. It starts in the middle of the fort.
There was another fort in one of our fields at Carhue, but it was filled in long ago.
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:10
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In some parts of Ireland there are many forts. In other parts there are not very many. There is a Lis in my district. There are a few names which mean the same thing such as Lis, Fort, Rath and Dun.
In my district it is called a Lis, because the townland on which it is, is called Lisaphooca, which means fairies or pookas, on the place where the fairies lived.
There is a couple of banks of earth, and inside there is a large circular space, perfectly flat, and covered with rich, green grass. Round this there was a deep ditch; then a great mound or bank of earth forming a large ring. Then another big circular rampart.
Some people say it was the Danes made them. When the Danes invaded Ireland long ago they built these Lisses all over the country to protect themselves against the Irish.
But others say they were made by the Irish themselves. In olden times people in Ireland had to protect themselves against the Danes. There were a great number of princes and chiefs among them,
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:10
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and these frequently made war on one another. To be protected against attacks, the chiefs surrounded their houses with these mounds and ditches, and an enemy could not easily cross. In some places, where they had plenty of stones, they surrounded themselves with walls of stones.
The great chiefs lived in these lisses with many ramparts and very strong forts too. But the smaller chiefs had only two ramparts, and sometimes only one.
Long ago all the churches and castles were built of wood or clay, but the earthworks were very strong and have remained. They have been standing here for about 2,000 years.
There are a few places on which there are Lisses, Duns or Raths and their name is got from this fairy dwelling, such as: - Rathmore, Lisaphooca, Dunmore a Lislavane. Most people say it is unlucky to interfere with a Lis, so it is very seldom we hear of anybody doing anything to them.
senior member (history)
2021-05-09 16:03
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In some parts of Ireland there are many forts. In other parts there are not very many. There is a Lis in my district. There are a few names which mean the same thing such as Lis, Fort, Rath and Dun.
In my district it is called a Lis, because the townland on which it is, is called Lisaphooka, which means fairies or pookas, on the place where the fairies lived.
There is a couple of banks of earth, and inside there is a large circular space, perfectly flat, and covered with rich, green grass. Round this there was a deep ditch; then a great mound or bank of earth forming a large ring. Then another big circular rampart.
Some people say it was the Danes made them. When the Danes invaded Ireland long ago they built these Lisses all over the country to protect themselves against the Irish.
But others say they were made by the Irish themselves. In olden times people in Ireland had to protect themselves against the Danes. There were a great number of princes and chiefs among them,
senior member (history)
2021-05-06 22:15
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There are many people who believe in ghost stories, and many others who do not, but when we listen to the people talk of ghosts around the fireside on winter nights, most of us believe in them and are afraid to go outside the door on dark nights.
(I). "There was a man one time who used to stay out late every night playing cards. One night he was coming home very late and he had a set of cards in his pocket. On his way home he met a man by the roadside. The man asked him where he had been. He told him he was playing cards. He then asked him to sit down by the roadside and have a game. The man was very fond of card-playing, and he sat down and began to play. The strange man was always winning. At length the other man had some suspicion about him and he took out his beads, and blessed himself. The moment he did so, the strange man disappeared in a ball of flame, and the man saw him no more".
(II). "There was once a priest and his maid living in the priest's house. Every night when the priest went to bed he got no rest, as he could hear chairs rattle, and other noises in the kitchen about twelve o'clock. One day he asked the maid, was it she who was making the noise. She said that she never heard any noise. So, the priest said that he would sit up some night and see who it was.
"One night the priest was out on a sick call, and
senior member (history)
2021-05-06 22:02
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I
I am a true born Irishman John Mitchell is my name.
And for to join my countrymen, from Newry first I came.
I struggled hard both day and night to free my native land,
For which I was transported into a foreign land.
II
When first I joined the Irish ranks it was in '42
And what did follow after, I'll not relate to you,
I raised the standard of repeal and gloried in the deed,
And vowed to Heaven I ne'er would rest till Ireland would be free.
III
Farewell my gallant comrades, it grieves my heart full sore,
To think that I must part from you, perhaps from evermore,
The love I bear my native land, I know no other crime,
That is the reason I must go into a foreign clime.
IV
When in the prison, close confined, before my trial day,
My loving wife she came to me and thus to me did say,
"John, my dear, cheer up your heart, and daunted never be,
For 'tis better to die for Ireland's rights than live in slavery.
senior member (history)
2021-05-06 21:52
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cut about one foot in diameter. Into this hole, is fitted, tightly with paste, what is called the still head. The still head is made of block tin or strong zinc and is, in shape, like a large oil tin, but without a bottom and a foot in diameter to fit exactly into the hole of the cover.
The top outlet of the head is about three inches in diameter and turns off, at right angles from the head itself, for about three or four feet and tapers to about three quarters of an inch so as to connect with the worm. Now a second stone platform is built about four feet from the pot and to the right side, when facing it. This stand is about one foot high from the ground. Another empty barrel is procured with an inch auger hole about a couple of inches from the bottom. The worm, which is a tubing about an inch in diameter, sometimes half an inch, is about twenty feet long is made of copper and sometimes of lead when copper cannot be had. This worm is shaped in a circular coil and fastened to the inside of the barrel a gentle and even fall until it reaches the bottom of the barrel when about three inches is allowed to protrude through the auger hole, already prepared for it. Around this hole is firmly caulked with tow so as to make sure that it will not leak the water, with which the barrel will later be filled.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 22:40
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Cleeve-making
Cleeve making has been carried on in my district from olden times.
To make a cleeve leave down a frame and square it. Stick thirty six rods inn the ground. Weave eighteen for the first row and by weaving the same amount three times you reach the bottom. Knot sixteen rods across for the bottom. Weave the end rods in for the bottom. Cut off all the waste rods. The cleeve is then drawn out of the ground. Cut off the ends of the rods that were stuck in the ground leaving two inches over the rim. Sally and golden osiers are used in making cleeves.
Mills
There was a mill in Ballymoe in which oats and wheat were ground and flax prepared. It was driven by water power. Later it became a ruin and the stones were used as road material. There was also an Oat-Meal Mill in Snipehill near Ballintubber and the sinking of the River Suck dried the Mill race and work was stopped. But the owner of the mill had to be compensated.
Spades
Long ago the people brought stone turf to
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 22:12
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the smith and two pounds of iron and a half pound of steel. With these materials the smith made a spade. He also made slanes in the same way.
Ploughs
Once there was a man named Gúbbán who spent seven years making a wooden plough that could plough without a guide. The first day he ploughed seven acres and he told his wife the good day's work he had done. The wife said it was a small seven year's work and he broke the plough in bits. The same pattern could never be found since. Ever since that iron ploughs with a steel sock are used. There are two kinds of ploughs. A two-wheel plough can plough a sod nine inches wide and four inches deep leaving a pull of nine cwt. on the horses all day. There is also a swing plough which is much easier for the horses to work.
Thatching
The thatcher gets straw, pegs, a ladder and a mallet. He leaves on some straw at the eve about a foot-and-a-half wide an places pegs every foot across to the top. He then puts on the bobbons at the top. He continues in this
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 22:02
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way until he has finished. Then he cuts the edge at the eve with a knife to make it look tidy.
Whip-making
Whips were made from the skin of the horse. Four long pieces of skin were plaited together. A keeper was put on the end of the whip and tied on the end of the handle with a wax-end. A small piece of the whip-cord was put on the other end so as to make a loud lash. Car whips were joined on with quills and a wax-end so as to give it a shape.
Fishing
In this district there have been many anglers at all times. When the wind blows from the south it blows the bait into the fish's mouth. A Wag-tail with one side yellow and the other brown is best to catch a pike. A red worm is best for a perch. A May-fly for a trout and a "collagh" for an eel.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 21:54
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Names of fields on my father's farm -
Gort-na-Seamróg so called because there is so much shamrock is growing there. This field is situated in Cornamuckla on the borders of the New Village.
The Barley Garden is situated in Cornamuckla. This garden got its name from the barley which the old people grew there. Nothing but green grass is growing there now.
Paddy's Field in Cornamuckla is a field where a man named Patrick lived and who had a little house beside a well. Neither the house nor the well can be seen now.
Other fields near by are Lios-a-choin in Cloonruff. This is a fort. They say the fairies live there.
The sraith is a field in Cornamuckla on the borders of the New Village.
The Wood Bog is in Ussey where all the people of the townland cut their turf.
Clais-na-h-Altóra is situated in Cloonruff. This is so called because when the schools and churches were closed this was a place where the priests said Mass.
senior member (history)
2021-05-05 21:43
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Tradition says that Nuala was the owner of the castle in Castletogher which is about two miles to the south of Williamstown.
She was a sister to Liam Garbh but afterwards became his enemy because he married one of the Burkes of Glinsk.
She was supposed by the people to be an enchantress who made her raids on the flocks of her neighbours. She generally made them at night and carried a dagger or Miadóg with which she killed the lambs of her neighbours and carried them to the castle for her own use.
The people feared so much that they offered her little or no opposition. She was ready to use her knife on anyone who tried to prevent her from killing the lambs.
From the castle of Castletogher she caused a road to be made through the bogs in order to reach the flocks grazing on that farm which was divided in recent years. The remains of the road were discovered by the people cutting turf in Ballaghayegue bog Ballymoe Co Galway.
Her name was Nuala but nobody
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 20:56
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some lime on the first day, he got hungry and going to the well at the end of the field where he left his lunch in a tree that grew by the side of the well, he found on taking it down that the lunch was gone, all but the breadth of a crown of a crumb in it. He left it there and went on working again. After he went deeper in he got a big flag, he went to turn it and a light flashed by him but he was fearless and turned the flag and got some fine clay and bones. He then turned the second flag and there was more clay and bones. He then became afraid to turn the third flag, he put back the other stones and went home. After this his cattle died and he went to visit a schoolmaster and he told him about it. "Now" said the schoolmaster "if you make me a promise I will give you an advice". "I will" said he. "Well" said the schoolmaster. "Never polish your shoes on a Sunday". "Never" said the man and his cattle never died afterwards.
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 20:47
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In [?] in the barony of [?], there is a fort about one mile from Ballintogher. This fort is surrounded by trees, and deep earth inside the trees. It is situated in a field of about six acres and the fort takes up the room of a half rood. It was not a very high fort, it has a flat top upon it. The field mentioned belonged to Mr. Mc Guier of Ballintogher and he was once giving it out in conacre and a man named took it. He started to take away the fort and after he had been working for
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 20:39
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Some few forts are to be seen in my district. Forts they are usually called. In Doorla, Barony of Corran and Parish of Ballysodare and in Lisbanagher, Parish of Riverstown the ones nearest my townland are situated and they are all in view of each other.
All are of a circular shape. Each is surrounded by a fence of earth which sometimes has a row of trees, mostly whitethorns.
There so no entrance hole in any and therefore nobody ever ventured to explore the interior.
In the fort of Doorla a pot of gold is supposed to be hidden and guarded by a black cat. It is believed that was in forts the fairy people always lived. In bygone days lights were seen and music heard and horsemen were seen leaving the forts at night.
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 20:32
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The name of the school my father attended was Lackagh in the barony of Dorran and in the parish of Ballysodare. It was a lady teacher named Mrs. Tondra who lived in the locality that was teaching in it; about thirty five pupils attended.
She taught no Irish because she knew none and there was nothing about Irish at that time. All the pupils wrote with a slate pencil on a slate until they reached second or third class. Then they got a headline copy and a pen. The teacher put the sums or headline on the blackboard which was placed in the middle of the room. This board was very large. At ten o'clock they commenced work and were let out at 3 p. m.
The Inspector Mr. O'Connor from Sligo visited the school every year and examined the children. Before the scholars could sit for the examination they had to be present a certain number of days and if they did pass they were promoted to a higher class and the more of the scholars passed the teacher was given a higher salary.
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 20:24
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the Catholics were not allowed to send their children to foreign schools, but they were allowed to send them to Protestant schools.
Although the Irish were tired out with trouble they would not agree to this. They paid a little money to Masters to educate their children under hedges.
This is a story my father told me about a hedge school in my district. About a hundred years ago there was a hedge-school about a half-mile to the north of my dwelling. It was under a hedge in a field called Gilmartin's.
The children came from far and near to it, but it shows how they appreciated learning. There were two masters teaching in it named Peter Taheny and Patrick Quinn. Taheny was from Ballygawley he was about forty-six old and Quinn was from Castledargen he was about fifty-three years old. They are both dead now.
senior member (history)
2021-05-04 20:17
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About forty-five years ago when my father was going to school, schools were much different to what they are now. He went to Kilross school but the building is in ruins now. A few yards to the south of this ruin, the new school is built.
They had to be at school at nine o'clock and were home at four. At twelve o'clock they got an hour for lunch.
The teacher's name was Roger Mc Goldrick, a native of Gadden in the parish of Riverstown Co. Sligo, he was supposed to be the best teacher of any in the districts round about. He was a tall man about five feet and a half in height; as a rule he was quiet but sometimes he was very cross.
The pupils of those days paid a half-penny for their copy-books and a penny for the first-class book. According as they were promoting the classes the books rose a penny.
In the month of January an inspector named Mr. Rowantree came to the school to promote the pupils from class to class. He examined the pupils in Arithmetic, English, English Grammar, English Spelling and English dictation. Unless they had five copy-books finished in the year they would not be promoted.
In the middle of the floor the blackboard was set up. Around the walls there were big maps of each country. It was a sally rod the teacher used for punishing.
This is what my Father told me that
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 22:38
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An old man living near to his home employed him to cut his bank of turf. The old man made a bargain with him to get another man to spread the turf. He told him he would pay him when the job was finished.
So James and his partner went to the bog one morning in the month of May to start cutting the turf. At dinner time the old man's daughter went to the bog with the dinner to the men. She was a good looking girl with brown hair and blue eyes. When the dinner was over she went home and told her father that they had a good start made that they were two good workers. There happened to be a fare-well dance given that night for a young girl who was going to America. At four P. M. the girl went to the men with the tea and while the men were having their tea the girl told them all about the dance. Then the fun started to see which of the two boys would take the girl to the dance. She told them to cast lots and the one that would have the longest blade of grass would be the lucky one. So James drew the longest blade. Then the girl went home and the boy went to work. And James made the spreader step
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 22:29
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lively until eight p. m. When the bank was finished twenty horse carts of good turf was turned out on the spread ground. The boys were tired and they went to get a drink to the public house. Then James took with him a pint of whiskey and got ready for the dance. Then he went to Paddy's house to take the daughter to the dance. When he got there the old man greeted him with a smile. Well my boy you are a good turf cutter I am proud of you. James said nothing only he put his hand in his pocket and gave the old man the bottle of whiskey and then the both had a glass of the whiskey. Then James asked Paddy if he could take his daughter for his life's partener and the answer he got was "Yes". So that was the end of it all.
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 22:23
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Once upon a time there was a man who lived in Mountirvin Gurteen Co Sligo. He had a very beautiful daughter. The daughter died when she was a young girl.
She went to bed in good health and when the man got up in the morning she was dead. He was very lonely after her.
One night a lot of lovely girls came on horse-back and told the man to come to a party. They brought the man with them and brought him into a beautiful hall. A lot of people were eating at a table.
The man sat at the table and they got a lovely meal for him. Just when he had the knife and fork in his hand, his daughter passed by and struck him on the face and told him not to eat. So he did not. If he tasted the food he would become a fairy.
It was they that brought the
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 22:17
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said he would but he had no horse. They told him to go inside the fence and pull a rush, which he did. They told him to throw his leg across it and as soon as he did so it was changed into a horse. They rode on for a while and "Tomás" asked them where they were going. They said they were going to steal a young lady who was getting married. They also said that the lady would sneeze three times and the third time she sneezed they would have her. They told "Tomás" that he must not speak. He promised not to speak. At last they drew up outside a large house. "Tomás" followed the fairies up to a big window by which they entered. They settled on the collar ties of the roof to await their opportunity of snatching the lady. Shortly afterwards the wedding party entered the room for supper. The clergyman was amongst the party. In those days the feast always took place before the marriage. The party seated themselves round the table. Suddenly the lady sneezed. Nobody spoke. She sneezed a second time. One of the fairies said in a whisper
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 22:09
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There lived in the little village of Fauleens which is about five miles from Ballaghadereen an old woman named "Cáith" and her son "Tomás". One Hallowe'en "Tomas" got up from his comfortable seat at the fire and walked to the end of the house where he got a big blackthorn stick. He spat on his stick and said "Mother I'm going to seek my fortune". "O a stór mo croidhe a cúisle bocht" said the old woman "don't go out tonight, it's Hallowe'en". However he went out and walked down the road. He had not gone far when he heard a troop of horses coming behind him. On looking round he saw on the back of each horse a fairy. Their leader was a woman dressed in red. They spoke to "Tomás" and said, "will you come with us?" "Tomás"
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 22:00
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Once upon a time there was a man and his wife and they had a lot of children. One night his wife was taken by the fairies. He was very lonely after her. He cried three times a day after her. And the children were very lonely after her too. One day an old beggar-man came in and the man of the house was crying. He said "Why are you crying. The man said "My wife is gone and what will I do now". The beggar-man said "Go down to that gap and stand there". "Go about twelve o'clock to-morrow. A Man on
senior member (history)
2021-05-03 21:57
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girl at night and made up out of rags a girl like her. He thought she was dead and the rags were buried instead of her. She had eaten the food and she could not leave.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 21:56
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of the date of the church or of its founder.
On the hillside to the south and over a mile away is a holy well called Loch Cuinnleáin, not to be confused, however, with the well of the same name at Cill Maceallóg over 10 miles to the west. A turas is performed at this well on the 7th & 8th July, but its patronage is dwindling. I believe a church-site exists near the well, but of this I have no personal proof & merely rely on the statement of O'Sullivan on whose land the church-site and holy-water trough described above are.
On Sunday, Dec. 29th 1935, I attended Mass at Dawros chapel. While waiting outside the chapel for Mass to begin I saw a young man in the crowd wearing a suit of clothes for the soul of his father who had been buried during the previous week. This custom is religiously observed in this district to the present day and follows the lines hereafter indicated:
When a male member of the
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 21:38
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the church-site is a large rectangular stone, overgrown with lichen and much weatherbeaten. It is of the red sandstone common to the district and weighs about 3 cwts. Its interest centres in the rectangular trough-like cavity c. 17"*12" cut into its upper surface with a chisel or some such sharp implement. This, we are told, was used as a holy-water font when the church served as a place of worship. Whether it had a position within or without the church at that period nobody can say, but it is more than probable that its present position on the lane-fence is of more or less recent date. The cavity neatly & symmetrically hewn in the stone is about 2 1/2" - 3" deep & when seen on December 29th, 1935 was partly filled with rainwater coated with ice which had formed overnight.
The man on whose land these remains are located is named Florence Sullivan (Dan Owen). His father died about ten years ago (1925) at the age of 73 and his son, the present occupier, says that his father had no account
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 21:25
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Fourteen or fifteen years ago I was living at Carhoomeengar. One day a neighbour's child came to the house to ask me to go to see her mother who was sick in bed. I went and when I went in the woman's husband was just taking the butter from a churn that he was after making. He was ashamed when he saw me - not being a man's job. I took the butter from the churn and was as careful about it as I would of my own.
The woman of the house was very ignorant and was jealous of me. After that day I noticed that my own quantity of butter became less. I was going to market one day with my husband and we met that woman on the Courthouse Bridge. She then told me that another neighbouring woman had twice as much butter as she used to have. She meant of course that that woman took the butter from me. I believe that she was lying and that it was herself who took it, by her evil wishes.
After five or six years I had the usual amount of butter.
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 21:14
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A few hundred yards to the west of Séipéal na gCearc (Dawros Chapel) in the Parish of Tuosist, a laneway leads down towards the sea Kenmare Bay, passing by a house which was a tavern in days gone by. The lane is uneven and winding. About eighty yards from the main road the lane turns abruptly to the left at the site of what we are told was an old church. It is now in ruins, nothing remaining to signify its position save a few yards of wall-base on either side and steps of stone & mortar, which probably led to or served as the altar, built against a stone ledge at the southern end. To the west & adjoining the church site is the space enclosed by what was at one time, apparently, a second chamber but of this nothing now remains. The church site first mentioned was small, extending probably 25'*18'.
The lane winds down to the sea leaving this ruined site on its immediate left. On the fence of the lane just at the side of it opposite
senior member (history)
2021-05-02 20:54
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Tobar an Ráthaigh - is a holy well in Dromore, is at Funds point to the west of the Castle between the castle and entrance getting out at Blackwater. I know several people who were cured there. The Mahoneys deprived the people of the right of going there to perform "rounds".
The Mahoneys would not allow the Templenoe Church to be built on their property. It was originally intended to be built at Ceapach na Cos, but on that account it had to be built at Templenoe.
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:44
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Why the people call that bridge the Hang-man's Bridge is because there was a man hanged there years ago. He was a Lankill man. The old people say his ghost was often seen on the bridge. One night a man and a woman were passing this bridge about twelve o'clock and they saw the ghost of the man standing at the place where he was hanged with a rope in his hand. One night also a man was passing that bridge at about half-eleven and he heard great roaring. He got very much afraid and he ran home as quickly as he could. People are always afraid passing that bridge.
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:40
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:39
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About a hundred years ago there were twice as many marriages as there are now. When the man and woman would be for getting married, the man would come first to the girl's house. He would bring two other men along with him. Then the girl's father or brother would go with the man to his house and they walk every sod of the man's land. Then if all went right the girl would get a fortune of thirty-six pounds. Nearly everyone that time got married on Sundays and Wednesdays. They counted
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:25
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those two days the luckiest. They never liked to get married in the month of May. They said it was an awfully unlucky month. They liked to get married in the months of January, February, and March. They counted those three months the luckiest months in the year to get married. They would have the wedding the night before the man and woman would get married. The day of the wedding there would be up to thirty or forty horsemen. All the horsemen would come to the woman's house, and then all would stand there until the woman would
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:21
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be ready and then they would start galloping all of them together and they would never stop until they would reach the man's house. They would try to see who would be at the house first but they usually let the man and woman get first to the house, and everyone at that village would be out when they would see the horsemen coming and they would start cheering and shouting. When the man and woman would come and all the rest of horsemen, there would be a big line of straw-boys before them about
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:17
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then the people would be in order for dancing and singing. Every one that could sing and dance would go out on the floor. When they would have sang or danced all the people would cheer and clap hands for them. Then they would all depart. The usual days for getting married on were on Sundays and on Wednesdays and Friday. Some thought Friday an unlucky day. The old people used to say sour Monday, bitter Tuesday and Wednesday the middle of the week, long-legged Thursday, hungry Friday and sweet Saturday.
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:13
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they would have a great laugh to see the horses racing and knocking people off the cars. They would always have a certain man with a good horse and car in front and when ever there would be a marriage on they would send for that man.
When they would go home the cook would have a big pot of potatoes boiled and a pot of cabbage at the fire and meat also. Before the people that were at the marriage would get their dinner they would get a glass of whiskey each and then they would go out and dance step dances. Then they would be fit for a dinner. When dinner would be over the cook would clean the vessels and
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:09
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About sixty years ago people used to come home on horse-back after being married. Then all the horses used to be racing home trying to be the first. It's not long since the people used to have eighteen or nineteen side-cars at their marriages. The people used to call it the drag. All the young people would be watching and waiting until the drag would pass by. They used to go up on hills and burn whins and have straw for burning. When they would see the drag passing by they would cheer and shout and put up their handkerchiefs in the air. Some used to have fires at cross-roads for the purpose of frightening the horses and then
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:05
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senior member (history)
2021-05-01 16:04
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One night about a hundred years ago, Pat Collins of Ballinlough was coming home from visiting. When he was coming across the field he heard a droning noise. He was getting more frightened as the slow sound was coming nearer. As he drew nearer he could see a big bright star out in front of something. He did not know whether he would pass it or not. He took courage and he said he would pass it. When he came nearer he could see the horses without any heads.
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 15:59
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get on your body again", said the man and he gave the head one clip of the sword and killed it. He went home then to his mother and she gave him a great supper and put him to bed. Some time afterwards he went to town and he had his big horse with him that he brought from the war. When he was coming home he had to pass by a bridge. When he came as far as the bridge he heard
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 15:57
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kill the eel that night. His mother started crying and said that the eel would eat him. He went to the channel and he barricaded the channel with big rocks and then he sat down. It was not long until he heard the eel coming whistling. When he came as far as the rocks he was rolling the rocks out of his way. When he put up his head the soldier clipped the head off him with his sword. The head flew up into the air and it came down again, and it said "if I get on my body again I will pay you for this". "But I will not let you
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 15:32
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make revenge on you dead or alive". He said "I don't care" and he took the head off her. He went home and told his mother the story and she said that the old lady would revenge him dead or alive. He said that he didn't care. His mother told him then that his father was buried only a week before and that every corpse that is buried in that graveyard is taken away by a big eel that comes in a channel that is under the ground. He said that the eel would not take his father's corpse that he would
senior member (history)
2021-05-01 15:29
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there were many people that could pick knowledge out of a breast bone of a beef. "Well", the other giant said to him, "can you pick knowledge out of it". He took the bone from him and he said "the knowledge I can pick is that we will never eat another bit of this cow". and the others started laughing at him. The man that was looking at them from behind the bush came out and took the heads off the three of them. Then he came to the mother of the giants and she said "don't kill me" and he said he would that she was worst of them. She said "I will
senior member (history)
2021-04-30 08:16
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1. A family lived at Banteer West, and the woman of the house died. Next day she was buried, and in that night some roast potatoes were left in the kitchen by the house-hold. The husband saw his wife quite plainly eating the potatoes. He was afraid to touch her. The following night, the husband saw his wife again, and he picked up courage, and caught hold of her. "It is no good for you to hold me, for I must go away again" she said. "The only way you can get me back, is to do as I tell you. Tomorrow night men will pass here on horseback, and each man will have a woman seated behind him. I shall be on the last horse, and if you stand on the road within a ring of Holy Water, and succeed in getting me into that ring, I will come back here again, and live as usual". The husband did as he was told taking with him his son, and his brother-in-law. They made three concentric rings of Holy Water, and each stood within his own ring. At last the horses came, and the husband recognized his wife, but hadn't the courage to snap her. Neither had the son the courage to do so. The brother-in-law however succeeded in snapping her, and pulled her within the ring. Then arose great cheering for the man, whose partner was snapped from the horse. The woman
senior member (history)
2021-04-30 08:06
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3. My father told me a story about a fort on his lands at Lacklown, in the "Lisheen Field". About twenty-two years ago, every evening, about eight or nine o'clock, a strange crying could be heard around the place. This continued for about a fortnight, and nobody could make out where it came from. Even the farmers living in the neighbourhood could hear the crying in their own yards. My father, and his men kept watch near the place. One evening, as they were watching in the field next to the fort, they could see something running around the fort several times. They thought, it looked like some small animal, such as a kid. They did not go near enough, to make sure of what it was.
senior member (history)
2021-04-30 08:01
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were coming home from school. She would then send the little girl home, and warn her not to tell where she was. This went on until the teacher asked about the child. When her parents found it out they kept her at home from school, but she then became a cripple, and never ate or drank anything for twenty-one years afterwards. Her name was "Mary Boles", and she lived in a little house at "Coolroemore", Banteer. The fort is situated between this house, and Lyre School. It is square in shape and surrounded by trees.
senior member (history)
2021-04-30 07:57
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1. Not far from my home at Lacklown, Banteer, there is a large "lios", or "fort", surrounded by a double ring, or embankment of earth and stones. In the centre there is a large, flat stone covering an opening, with stone steps leading down to underground rooms and passages. Some years ago two Englishmen made an attempt to enter this place, and find out its secrets. They got candles, and rope, and went down the steps by crawling on their hands and knees, as the opening is very narrow at the surface. After some distance they could stand upright, and soon found themselves in a large, square room. In this room they found two rusted and broken swords of a very old pattern, also stirrup irons, and the iron parts of bridles of a shape they had never seen before. They saw another passage leading from this room, but could not examine it, as they had great difficulty in keeping their candles alight, owing to the foul air, and were afraid that they could not find their way out, if the light failed.
2. My father also told me about a "fort" at "Lyre", Banteer, where long ago a well dressed woman used to meet a little girl on her way to school every morning. She used to take the little girl into the fort, and make her work until the other children
senior member (history)
2021-04-30 07:45
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In the parish of Glantane, on the Banks of the Blackwater 5 miles west of Mallow, stands "Dromineers Castle". A chest of gold is believed to be hidden under the castle beneath the wall, which rises up from the river. Divers went down, but were met beneath, by a man with several eyes, sitting on the chest containing the treasure, which remains thus still.
senior member (history)
2021-04-30 07:42
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In the townland of Sean-Bhóthar at Glantane, adjoining the lands of Daniel Ryan, a fort locally known as "Lios-an-Airgid" is situated. Some treasures are supposed to be hidden there, and the old people used to say, that one fairy only, had charge of the lios on "New Year's Eve". It was believed, that if you took with you a black-handled knife, a March cock, and a bottle of Holy Water, that you'd succeed in frightening the fairy, and perhaps get the gold, or treasures. Many people tried, but a strange un-natural feeling always came over them, as they approached the lios, thus preventing them from searching.
senior member (history)
2021-04-29 07:58
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Long ago the people always kept their potatoes on the loaft over the fire. In all the kitchen houses that time, there was always a loaft - much like a ceiling in shake, but not so close to the rafters, so that you could keep things on them. And you were also able to get up on the loafts for anything you would want off them. The old people always put their potatoes on them.
When they would draw them off the bags they pople always put them in barns now, or have houses for them, but that time they did not think that was good enough.
They also thought the potatoes would be bad for eating if they were not what the
senior member (history)
2021-04-29 07:52
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old people say yet "seasoned". They thought in the hot dry house took all the gas out of them, and made them much better. When the young people hear of that nowadays they only laugh at the idea.
Another great custom of the people long ago, and one that is yet kept up by the people of to-day is to get a horse's shoe and cover it with silver paper and hang it over the kitchen door, or over some door in the house. And that if you continue to leave it there, it will keep out all diseases. They say it will not let any strange disease, or anything like that come into your house, or near your four walls. Everyone does that even yet.
senior member (history)
2021-04-29 07:46
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There was an Irishman, an English man and a Scotchman, having a conversation, and they were three tailors. So they made a bet to see which of them was the best tailor.
The Englishman said he would be able to make a suit for a man if he saw him standing at the corner. The Scotchman said he would make a suit for a man if he saw only going around the corner. But the Irishman always last and comes out the best said "He would make a suit for a man if he saw the corner he went around or turned out.
This is told by many Irishmen and women and is a great costume of the people at the long winter nights.
senior member (history)
2021-04-29 07:39
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a few of the neighbouring cows and take a small soup of milk from each of them. Then if there was not much milk for the tea suppose in winter time they would beat up an egg - the yoke of an egg and put in a grain of soda in it to keep it from curdling and put that in the tea. Those Balls only took place a few times.
There was no jazz long ago. When they would be dancing the Sets in a country home instead of waltzing around the house they would stand at their right places and doing every part and time out the bar of the music - they would do it like they would call step dancing now. Sometimes instead of the Sets they would dance the Lancers - something like the Sets and the [?] nearly like the Sets also. They used to time
senior member (history)
2021-04-29 07:32
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they would dance there for a few hours every Sunday evening. Then an odd time there would come off a Ball in some country house and everyone be invited, and everyone would pay a couple of coppers for the night. They would dance there all night. They used to get tea at the Balls and the way they would make it was in a big pot boiling it all the side of the fire all night.
When the people of the house would be expecting a very big crowd of boys and that it would be too expensive to give right bought tea to them they would put down a big pot of hay and have it boiling the whole evening and at night it would be the same as tea. Everyone would be satisfied with that. Then the way they used to set the milk was - if it was plentiful they would go around on
senior member (history)
2021-04-29 07:26
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young boys of the countryside go out hunting the "Rann" and beating all the hedges around. They usually gather a lot of money. They carry a box and dance and every one gives them a few coppers, & then that night they have a great feast in some house, and a bit of a dance.
Nowadays there is a great difference in the way they dance and where they dance compared with long ago. Long ago there was no such a thing as a hall dance at all. There were no bands either. There was a dance at a cross roads in the evening or at a [?] alley and be home about night fall. There was also a churn dash and some one would give the churn dash and a cake upon the top of it to the best looking girl or what was called that time "the Belle of the Ball". Some one would be there playing a flute or perhaps a fiddle and
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:51
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to see to it, that Mickey again came to the well minus dog and whistle that night, and he'd give her ₤500 extra. The girl promised to do so, and that night she again blackened Mickey's face and neck. He took off his coat and vest and was about to start his ablutions, when he found there was no water in the house. He proceeded to the well and was on his return journey when his enemy appeared.
"No dog no whistle no safeguard this time", mocked the stranger, "away you come young fellow". But the youth had a card up his sleeve. He placed his fingers in his mouth, gave three short whistles, and the terrier came on the run. The stranger yelled when he saw the dog and cursed and said he was finally beaten. He disappeared in a fire-ball for the last time.
In this story, the old little man at the crossroads is given to represent Our Saviour. The dog is our Guardian Angel. The whistle and whistle blasts represents different forms of prayer, to help us against the Stranger who is Satan, the money and worldly goods and the devil's angels represented by the traitorous servant maid.
Thirty-five years ago, I heard this story related by a casual labourer who worked in Kilmoyler Parish at that time. His name was Johnny Summers. He walked so fast, he was nicknamed Johnny the Walker.
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:43
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There was no water in the house, and Mickey took hold of a pail and set out for some. He was just about to dip the pail in the well when a hand was laid on his shoulder, and on looking up, found himself face to face with a complete stranger. "Come on", said the man, "you are mine". "Your mother promised you to me at the age of twenty one. You were twenty one last night and I have come to claim you". He snatched at Mickey's coat, but the terrier which had accompanied Mickey, attacked the stranger and he vanished in a ball of fire. Next day the stranger met the girl at the well, and promised to increase the reward if she sent out Mickey that night and got the terrier locked up at the same time. That night when the maid had the dog locked up, she asked Mickey was he afraid to go for water. Not wishing to be accused of cowardice, he once more went for the water. He had filled the pail and was about to return when the stranger appeared. "You must come now", he told Mickey, "your time is up". No dog to save you to-night. Mickey dived one hand into his pocket, drew out the whistle, and blew long and hard. The dog came running to the spot. And attacked the stranger who again vanished in flames. The third day when all was quiet at the farmhouse the stranger again interviewed the servant maid. He told her
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:42
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and trap with the farmer. At Tumbridge crossroads a little man with auburn hair and whiskers was seated. Between his legs stood a fierce terrier. When the farmers horse and trap came to the crossroads, the little man called Mickey to him. Our boy friend stayed for some time in consultation with the little man, and then he rejoined the farmer he carried with him the terrier and a little whistle given him by the old man. "Whenever you are in danger", the old man said, "this little dog will drive off your enemies. And if the dog is absent, one blast of the whistle will bring him to your side no matter how tightly he is held". Afterwards he told Mickey another secret.
Next day, Mickey started to help on the farm and all went well for some time. One day in August, when the men were at work in the fields, and the farmers wife away in town, a stranger called and interviewed the farmers servant maid. He promised her a substantial present if she arranged to send Mickey to the well for water at nine o'clock that night. The offer of money tempted the girl and she readily consented. That night as Mickey was seated in the kitchen the maid pretended to be playful and rubbed her blackened hands to his face. Mickey protested and looked for water to wash away the stains.
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:40
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was he afraid to go for water. Not wishing to be accused of cowardice, he once more went for the water. He had filled the pail and was about to return when the stranger appeared. "You must come now", he told Mickey, "your time is up". No dog to save you to-night. Mickey dived one hand into his pocket, drew out the whistle, and blew long and hard. The dog came running to the spot. And attacked the stranger who again vanished in flames. The third day when all was quiet at the farmhouse the stranger again interviewed the servant maid. He told her to see to it, that Mickey again came to the well minus dog and whistle that night, and he'd give her ₤500 extra. The girl promised to do so, and that night she again blackened Mickey's face and neck. He took off his coat and vest and was about to start his ablutions, when he found there was no water in the house. He proceeded to the well and was on his return journey when his enemy appeared.
"No dog no whistle no safeguard this time", mocked the stranger, "away you come young fellow". But the youth had a card up his sleeve. He placed his fingers in his mouth, gave three short whistles, and the terrier came on the run. The stranger yelled when he saw the dog and cursed and said he was finally beaten. He disappeared in a fire-ball for the last time.
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:28
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Mickey to the well for water at nine o'clock that night. The offer of money tempted the girl and she readily consented. That night as Mickey was seated in the kitchen the maid pretended to be playful and rubbed her blackened hands to his face. Mickey protested and looked for water to wash away the stains. There was no water in the house, and Mickey took hold of a pail and set out for some. He was just about to dip the pail in the well when a hand was laid on his shoulder, and on looking up, found himself face to face with a complete stranger. "Come on", said the man, "you are mine". "Your mother promised you to me at the age of twenty one. You were twenty one last night and I have come to claim you". He snatched at Mickey's coat, but the terrier which had accompanied Mickey, attacked the stranger and he vanished in a ball of fire. Next day the stranger met the girl at the well, and promised to increase the reward if she sent out Mickey that night and got the terrier locked up at the same time. That night when the maid had the dog locked up, she asked Mickey
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:20
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go. She agreed after some time, and when farewells had been taken, Mickey set out in the horse and trap with the farmer. At Tumbridge crossroads a little man with auburn hair and whiskers was seated. Between his legs stood a fierce terrier. When the farmers horse and trap came to the crossroads, the little man called Mickey to him. Our boy friend stayed for some time in consultation with the little man, and then he rejoined the farmer he carried with him the terrier and a little whistle given him by the old man. "Whenever you are in danger", the old man said, "this little dog will drive off your enemies. And if the dog is absent, one blast of the whistle will bring him to your side no matter how tightly he is held". Afterwards he told Mickey another secret.
Next day, Mickey started to help on the farm and all went well for some time. One day in August, when the men were at work in the fields, and the farmers wife away in town, a stranger called and interviewed the farmers servant maid. He promised her a substantial present if she arranged to send
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:11
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Original copy - are interesting note at end.
On a cold winter's day a woman with a baby boy in her arms stared hungrily at cakes and jam rolls in a shop window in the town of W -. She was penniless, and she could not remember when last she had partaken of a square meal. Turning away with a sob in her throat, she was accosted by a stranger, fashionably dressed, who asked her why she was so disconsolate. She told him of her want, and he replied, that if she gave him charge of her son at the age of twenty one, body and soul, she might never again want for food and the good things of this world. The poor woman (desperately hungry) promised. Her baby was now only twelve months, and twenty years seemed a long time. All went well with her from that day onwards, but she often thought of the stranger and her promise. When her son, - Mickey had attained manhood, a farmer from over the hills, came and asked if the mother would allow Mickey to go with him to his place, and help at gathering the harvest. Mickey was desirous of seeing life, and he persuaded his mother to allow him to go. She agreed after some time, and when farewells had been taken, Mickey set out in the horse
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 07:06
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On a cold winter's day a woman with a baby boy in her arms stared hungrily at cakes and jam rolls in a shop window in the town of W -. She was penniless, and she could not remember when last she had partaken of a square meal. Turning away with a sob in her throat, she was accosted by a stranger, fashionably dressed, who asked her why she was so disconsolate. She told him of her want, and he replied, that if she gave him charge of her son at the age of twenty one, body and soul, she might never again want for food and the good things of this world. The poor woman (desperately hungry) promised. Her baby was now only twelve months, and twenty years seemed a long time. All went well with her from that day onwards, but she often thought of the stranger and her promise. When her son, - Mickey had attained manhood, a farmer from over the hills, came and asked if the mother would allow Mickey to go with him to his place, and help at gathering the harvest.
Mickey was desirous of seeing life, and he persuaded his mother to allow him to
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 06:58
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ed were extinguished again. Then it was that a panic arose among the congregation, some of whom declared a black dog had rushed through the Church. They made for the windows to try to get out and women and children were injured in the scuffle and confusion that followed.
For long afterwards and even among the old people of the last generation the story of the "Black Mass" was told. The people believed that the congregation had seen the devil in the shape of a black dog.
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 06:58
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About 1800 the Parish Priest of Bansha was Fr. Byrne - a man of peace in these troubled times. His curate was a young priest who was in sympathy with the "98" rebels.
On the Sunday following the shooting of Baker at Massey's Corner, the Parish Priest held a solemn ceremony excommunicating the unknown persons who were guilty of his death. The old people called this ceremony "coinneal bháthadh" but the more common name for it was the "Black Mass".
The Church was in total darkness the windows being draped with black curtains. The altar was draped likewise. The altar candles were lit and as the ceremony proceed-
senior member (history)
2021-04-28 06:51
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A very old mass path still exists from the Brown Bog road to Bansha. It starts at a turn of the road and it finishes at Bansha river bridge. It had been known for well over a hundred years, to the old people of the district and can be seen to the present day. It is still used by some people coming to Mass from the neighbourhood from whence it starts. About half of this path extends along the top of a very large fence and on either side, there are growing holly and hawthorn bushes. There is also a stream of water flowing along each side of the fence through which the mass path runs. It then leads you through an open field from which you can see the church spire although it is stili half a mile away. It is an ideal way to go to Mass in the Summer.
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 07:44
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back next morning St Bridget's head was gone back to the graveyard. Each time they brought it down it went back. Once one of the men said he would make it stay in the wall with cement. He brought it down and put it in the wall and he put cement all around it. Then he hit St Bridget's head a crack of his hammer and a bit of it fell on his foot and his foot never got better and you can see the bit gone off her face all the time. The man's foot never got better and he had to get it off.
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 07:40
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one our Father and five Hail-Marys. Then you go up to the first tree in the graveyard and say one our Father and three Hail-Marys. And then you go round the tree three times and say the creed each time and then you say one our Father and three Hail-Marys. Then you go to the second tree and you go round it three times and you must say the creed each time. Then you say one our Father and three Hail-Marys. Then you go to the next tree and say the same thing. Then you go down to St Bridget's head and you kiss it. St Bridget's head is made of stone. Then you go down to the Well and go round it three times and say the creed each time and then you take a drink out of the Well.
A story is told about St Bridget's head. When the Ballinamore Protestant Church was being built the people who were building it brought St Bridget's head down to the Protestant Church to put it in the wall. When they came
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 07:32
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back into the bottle. Next day the farmer went to the Land Lord and told him he got another bottle that he would sell him so the Land Lord agreed to buy the bottle. They placed it on the table and said "bottle do your duty" and the two men with the stick hopped out and began to break [?] and to get rid of the farmer the Land Lord gave back the first bottle. So they lived happy together after with plenty of riches.
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 07:29
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She set the table with the bottle on it. And said "bottle do your duty" and two men jumped out of it and filled the room with all kinds of good things and plenty of gold and silver and went back into the bottle again.
The man and woman were very rich after that until one day the Land Lord came in and bought the bottle for a big sum of money and in a very short time after the farmer was as poor as ever and again he had only one cow. So he set out to the fair to sell her. On his way to the fair the little man came out again and asked him where was he going. He said to the fair and then he asked the little man to give him another bottle for the cow so the little man gave him another bottle and told him to do as he did before. So the farmer went home contented. The wife prepared the table as before and set the bottle on it and said "bottle do your duty". Two little men jumped out with sticks and broke all in the room and beat the farmer and his wife and went
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 07:22
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said to herself that she would set her again and see what would come out of the nobs. It took the nobs still longer than the eggs but what came out of them was better still. There came chairs and tables and armchairs and whatnots. Accordingly as the things came out the girl took them and put them into her house until she had it furnished with fine furniture. So the girl was quite happy and if that hen was not worth keeping no hen is. Put on the kettle and make tea if that girl did not live happy that we may.
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 07:18
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tell Kitty that he was in the habit of taking fits and the only thing that would cure him was a glass of Whiskey.
Peter went to Kitty and told her that Pat was a great singer. "The only pity is" Peter said "that he takes fits. The only thing that would cure him is to throw a bucket of water on him.
The next night they had it arranged and went to see them. When they were in a little while Peter said give us a song. He began to sing "The Mountain Dew". In the middle of the song he began to take the fits and fell off the stool and threw his heels up in the air. Kitty jumped up and went down to the dresser. Pat was sure he heard her pulling the cork out of the bottle. To his great surprise she ran up with a bucket of water and threw it on him. Peter is laughing still at the joke. If they don't live happy then we may.
senior member (history)
2021-04-27 07:10
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He asked Will to come along with him and he would give him a good living. Will said I am doing a little job for a neighbour and if you take a sledge and strike for me for a few minutes I'll go then". Then he took the sledge and when the job was done Will walked out and said "Come on now" and when the man went to leave down the sledge he could not as it was stuck to his hands so he said "If you let me go this time I will not come back for seven years more". He took the sledge and "be off now he said".
At the end of seven years he came back again and said "Will you come now" Will said "I will when I make a will to my wife, sit down on the chair until I come back". Down he sat. When Will came back he said "are you coming now" and when he went to get up off the chair he could not, so he said to Will. "If you let me go this time I will never come back again". "With all my heart" said Will. Off he went and he never came back. Will died after some time and after death he went to the wrong place. He went to the gates of hell and when he was
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:51
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There was a man and a woman and they lived alone. A wee woman came into them one night and she told them that she would give them any three wishes they liked and she would give them an hour to think.
The man put on a big fire and sat down to think. When the fire began to blaze the woman said she would like to have a puddin' to put on the fire. The puddin' came down the chimney and the man said that was one of their wishes away and he would like that the puddin would jump up and stick to her nose. Then the puddin jumped up and stuck to her nose and that was two of their wishes away. The woman said to the man that if he would not wish for the puddin to go off her nose that she would go and drown herself and he wished for the puddin to go off her nose. That was the three wishes away and they got nothing for them.
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:44
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There is a well on "Snieve Snacht" called the holy well. It was said that if this well was dirtied it would not clear.
My father went up to this well one day long ago and the man that was at the well said that the story about the well not clearing if it was dirtied, was not true, and that he would destroy the well. Then he threw a stone into the well and the dirt rose in the well and it never cleared. When he was going home the mist rose and he lost his way. He fell into a hole and was never heard of again.
Note: Snieve Snacht is the local name of the hill Sliabh Sneacht about 6 miles to the North
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:39
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When the "spay" woman came into his home, he saw her looking at the pot. She asked him where he got it. He did not tell her the truth at first, but he asked her would she read what was written on the pot. She asked him what would he give her if she told him. He promised to reward her. She then told him that the writing on the pot was, "The same on the other side of the tree". The man then started to dig at the other side of the tree and he found another treasure the same as the one he had found the first time. Nobody ever heard how much was in the pot.
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:34
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Arrah why did you die
With my Drimin dubh dilis
an céad mile slan
And its home and rome
my poor Drimin Dubh
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:34
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A story a story I'll tell you just now.
It's of a poor man and he had but one cow
to give him sweetmilk
To take to his bread.
He rose in the morning
and found his cow dead.
And it's aw my cow
Arrah why did you die
with my Drimin dubh dilis
an céad míle slan.
And its home and rome
my poor drimin dubh.
When I go to Derry
I'll buy a new still.
And I'll set it a working
At the foot of the hill.
And I'll drink from the morning
Till I go to bed
And I don't give a ring
If my old cow be dead.
And it's aw my cow
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:27
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hawk when he would be in trouble. Sarawad told his sister that he wanted to go to the great palace. She told him not to go because the giant would kill him, but he said he would go. He went to the palace and the giant's wife told him to hide because the giant would kill him if he found him. Sarawad went out to the horse and the horse took him up on a tooth in his head. The giant went out to search for him and could not find him. Sarawad went out to hide and the horse took him up on a hair of its tail. The giant went out to search for him and could not get him. Sarawad went out the third day to hide and the horse took him up on a nail in its shoe and the giant could not get him. Sarawad then came to him.
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:20
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"I was under the table the night you were born and I was under the table the night you were christened". She told him not to be afraid of her man if he would come in the shape of a fish. Her man came and gave him a piece of his tail and told him when he would be in trouble to call on the fish.
Then he went to find his youngest sister. He saw another light and went to it and there was his youngest sister counting money. "You're welcome Sarawad", she said. "I was under the table the night you were born and I was under the table the night you were christened". She told him not to be afraid of her man when he would come in the shape of a hawk. Her man came in and gave him a feather and told him to call on the
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:15
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would say he was like the man's oldest daughter and some would say he was like the man's youngest daughter. So he made up his mind he would go in search of his three sisters.
He tramped all day till at night he saw a light on the top of a hill. So he went to this light and he found his oldest sister spinning yarn. "You're welcome Sarawad", she said. "I was under the table the night you were born and I was under the table the night you were christened". He stayed all night. She told him not to be afraid of her man if he would come in the shape of a ram. Her man came and gave him a bit of horn and told him to call on the ram if he was in trouble.
He went the next day to find his second sister. He saw another light and went to it. He found his second sister. "You're welcome Sarawad", she said.
senior member (history)
2021-04-26 07:10
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and told his wife what he had done and she was very sad. He went out another day to gather another creel of sticks, and there came another man to him and said he would fill his creel twice with gold if he would give him his second oldest daughter. He said he would and went home again and told his wife what had happened and she was sadder still. He went out another day to gather a creel of sticks, and there came another man to him and said he would fill his creel three times with gold if he would give his youngest daughter. But he did not know what to do this time. at last he said he would. He went up home again and told what he had done. His wife was very angry.
As time went on they had a young son and called him Sarawad. Sarawad, when he became a man, went out to his neighbours' houses and some
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:33
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The wind from the south denotes rain but when the wind blows from the north it is a sign of dry weather. The south-west wind brings our prevailing winds as these come from the Atlantic they are moisture laden and so are our "rainy" winds. When the wild geese are flying towards Ballyallinan rain is expected, when they are flying from Ballyallinan it is a sign of dry weather. When the smoke goes straight up out of the chimney it is a sign of dry weather but if it turns to the ground after coming out it is a sign of rain. It soot falls from the chimney it is a sign of rain. If sea-gulls are seen perched on wynds, their bills turned towards the south, rain is sure to come, and crows cawing in a
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:27
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About 70 years ago a woman was coming from Limerick. She was walking. She was accustomed to shorten the Journey by crossing through a gentlemans "great" house. As she approached the house a woman in white reached three apples to her over the closed gate. Believing that the woman was "one of the good people". She pretended not to notice the apples or the woman. Continuing her Journey on the road she saw another woman on before her and walking in the same direction, anxious for a companion and feeling nervous she tried to overtake her but it was no use. A stream of water crossed the road some distance ahead of them. When the first woman reached it she disappeared as if the ground swallowed her. On reaching home the woman told her story. Only in
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:21
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William Fitzgerald of Ardgoul was on a visit to Newcastle West. When returning home, as it was very late, he considered the Elm Hill Road would be the shortest. The pony was travelling very fast and as he was approaching the Elm Hill Gate the pony stopped and would not pass. He tried to lead him across but could not, so he said to himself that the pony saw something that he could not see. Although very nervous himself he thought of a plan, he put the rug he had in the car over the pony's head so that he could not see where he was going. About twenty yards from the Gate he took off the rug and sat up and drove home and the pony went away the same as he was
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:15
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One night while three men of the O Connors were torching in their own fort in Duxtown they saw a large white animal dashing through the fort. All the birds that were there, flew out. This animal kept running before the men until it disappeared. The old people of the OConnors used tell of many strange tales of this fort. Strange music was suppose to be heard there at night and the figure of a man clothed in black was supposed to haunt it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:15
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There is a passage called the Dead Passage leading from Hartnett's fort in Ballyea to OGrady's rock and back to Bourke's and O'Connors fort in Duxtown. Long ago people who were long dead were seen walking along this passage during the night. This passage is going through OConnor's land in Ballyea, and is one of the ditches where it is going through, no tree ever grew.
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:11
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One night while three men of the O Connors were torching in their own fort in Quxtown they saw a large white animal dashing through the fort. All the birds that were there, flew out. This animal kept running before the men until it disappeared. The old people of the OConnors used tell of many strange tales of this fort. Strange music was suppose to be heard there at night and the figure of a man clothed in black was supposed to haunt it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:07
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Boys. They had a barrel of lime hidden and meant to give him the same death as he gave the Croppy Boys. The Major escaped by the back door, but the following Sunday he was shot near the five cross roads. A reward was offered for information. A spy named Donovan informed on a young man who had no part in the shooting. At the trial this young man was found guilty and sentenced to death. Some days before the sentence could be carried out a man named Trawley nicknamed 'Mickie cut the soil' was troubled in mind as he knew the whiteboy who shot Going and as he could not see an innocent man hanged he publicly informed the military. The whiteboy was arrested and hanged. Trawley is said to have slept with his eyes open ever after the execution. A woman named Margaret Keating who did his laundry told Martin Moylan that she saw him on several nights sound asleep yet open-eyed.
senior member (history)
2021-04-25 17:01
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There is a cross erected to the memory of the Croppy Boys who were executed at Rathkeale. This is the story of their death. The man who sentenced the Croppy Boys at Rathkeale, Major Going was in charge of the military at Rathkeale. He was the officer who sentenced the Croppy Boys to death. He stood on the bridge and witnessed the execution. The three victims were hanged near where the power house new stands. Impatient to get away, he ordered the bodies to be cut down quickly. One of the unfortunate lads was not dead and as his body was dropped into the grave the dying lad coughed. "Salt him well", ordered the Major and the soldiers emptied a bag of lime over the three bodies.
A few nights later the major's house in Abbeyview was attacked by White
senior member (history)
2021-04-24 15:04
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On certain feasts and days the Irish people use certain kinds of emblems and leaves. On St Patrick's day, they wear a shamrock in honour of him. At Christmas they decorate their houses with holly. Some people put it in the sheds also. On Palm Sunday people bring home palm which is blessed, and they often put it up under the thatch. It is said that if a person eat three leaves of palm on palm Sunday, they will not get any sickness during that year. Blessed ashes is got in every church on ash Wednesday. The sign of the cross is made with it on everyones forehead to remind them that they will return to ashes again.
Easter Water: Easter Water is specially blessed on easter Sunday on every church. Every one brings home a bottle of it. Some takes three sups of it, and others shake it on the crops. Some farmers wait till Mayday to shake it.
May Morning. On May morning some people
senior member (history)
2021-04-24 14:07
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accompanied by the Papal Legate landed in Kerry. All Munster was soon in full rebellion. The strife continued until at length "Good Queen Bess" sent word to Desmond, that if he would deliver Dr Saunders the Legate, to her he would be restored to all his honours and possessions. To those who brought the message the pious Earl replied that he would never give up the priest although his foes were hourly multiplying round him.
"Tell the queen that though my friends should desert my standard, and a price be set on my head, for refusing to do her bidding, yet I will never give her possession of this man's person".
When this answer was delivered, Desmond give orders to his people to make ready for battle, and having collected numbers he marched from Limerick into Tipperary to procure food and provision.
And now the tide of war, creeps close to the walls of Ballinard. Desmond route lay along by the castle of Ballinard which he passed without being molested and he halted his troops in Peafield, two miles away from Ballinard. The Earl of
senior member (history)
2021-04-24 13:58
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After the Bloody battle of Affane, 1565 in Cappoquin the captured Geraldine leader was being borne away on the backs of four Butler soldiers when an Ormonde follower taunted him "where now is the Earl of Desmond" and the answer came - on the Butlers necks". The Geraldines and Butlers were bitter enemies the root cause, racial ideals. The Geraldines were Irish to the hearts core. He was at home among the clan, and the head of the house was a great nature chief.
Butlers were in their element when in the King's Court; they were English at heart and for their chief, a foreign satrap. With the extinction of the former family Ireland's hope of an native distinct Culture vanished, as Scotlands did at Culloden.
At this time a new element was present, to emphasize the difference between the two great families.
The Butlers never bit the royal hand that fed them and had duly embraced the state religion while the Geraldines clung fast to the Catholic religion.
The crisis in this prolonged feud came in 1579 when a Geraldine officer
senior member (history)
2021-04-24 13:46
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that the man saw something supernatural but he did not tell anyone as to what he saw.
senior member (history)
2021-04-24 13:44
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This happened in Moyglass a couple of years ago. One night there was a tinker sleeping in a tent by the roadside near Mrs Tynan's shop on the road to Fethard about a quarter of a mile from Moyglass village. The man had a white ass which he had tied to his car outside the tent. About midnight the man awoke and saw through the tent and something white moving outside. He thought it was his ass, that had got loose and was going away. He looked out and saw that it was the figure of a man dressed in white. He had no legs, but was gliding along.
Three times he went up and down the road for a few yards, and when he passed the tent, balls of fire came out of his mouth. The third time he disappeared. Next morning my brother was going to the shop, and the man told him the story. It was from my brother I heard it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-24 13:36
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The country-side teems with old stories, etc. and in the beginning of this thesis I mean to concentrate upon items which really happened within living memory, and I will conclude with some of the famous ghost stories, I will give the facts, as I got them, but unlike Ripley's "Believe it or not" can give no proofs, other than the authors statements.
Reading some few nights ago, "St Johns Eve", I inquired from a local acquaintance, as to who was the particular wayside shepherd mentioned, who was so well versed in past and present history and who was then, about 55 yrs ago such a famous character.
Proud as an earl yet simple as a child, he came of a family, whose hearts, bigger then their purses left this man, Philip O' Dwyre, with a barren patrimony. Deeply versed one of C. J. Kickhan's poems.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 08:06
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rolling motion which gathers it into larger lumps and makes it easy to take off. Cold water is added now to facilitate the collecting of the butter into larger lumps. The butter is gathered round from the sides of the churn & collected in the centre.
The lid and dash are washed with cold water into the churn. The butter is lifted with a scoop and put into a sieve to drain the milk off the butter. The butter is now washed and pressed to take all the milk out of it before the salt is added. The salt must be thoroughly mixed with the butter and allowed to stand before finishing. It is made into pound rolls as a rule as these are the most popular in the market.
The butter milk is used for domestic uses and is given with meal to calves & pigs.
There are some Irish names still in use in connection with churning.
Capán - a cup inverted over the dash & having a hole in the centre to let the dash pass through.
Another capán is used to take milk out of the churn . It floats in the milk when not in use.
Bainne reamhar - the thick milk - particularly after the cream is taken off.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 07:53
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anyone happens to drop in he is supposed to say, "God bless the work", and to take the dash in his hand if only for a second. This practice is in connection with the old belief that the butter could be taken off the churn by witchcraft.
The churning takes about three-quarters of an hour, but if a separator is used the work can be done in 15 or 30 minutes.
The milk after milking is allowed to thicken in crocks or enamelled dishes. Tubs used to be used but they are generally discarded now, as they are so much more difficult to wash. In warm weather the milk thickens in about twenty-four hours but in winter it takes far longer. To hasten the thickening in cold weather the crocks containing the milk are placed in other vessels containing hot water.
When the churning is about to take place the churn is cleaned and scalded with boiling water. The milk is turned into the churn and tested with a thermometer. If it is too cold it is warmed up to the required degree by adding boiling water. The churning is then started by moving the dash up and down by the hands.
When the grains of butter become as large as grains of wheat the dash is given a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 07:43
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The churn most commonly used in this district is the dash churn. It is about 1 1/2 feet in height and 2 feet wide at the top, and somewhat wider at the bottom. About a foot from the top it is drawn in a couple of motes. The lower portion is called the body and the upper portion the crib. It has a round-shaped lid with a hole for the dash in the centre, and this lid is fixed in position about three inches from the top. It is made of oak and remains in use for a great many years. Some churns in the district are upwards of 50 years in use and are still quite good.
Other churns in use are the end-over-end churn, the horse driven churn, the spring-pole churn. The latter has the dash attached to a pole which is secured at the other end to a beam in the roof or overhead. In churning it is only necessary to apply force to pull down the dash-end of the opening pole, as on release the pole will spring backwards pulling the dash up with it.
Churning is usually done twice a week in summer and once a week in winter. It is done by the people of the house but if
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 08:45
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"Well", said she, "the king will be walking to-morrow morning along the shore of this lake. Let you be fishing when he is going past. Let you stand in the water and have the line on the land. Keep your eyes fixing on the line when he is passing. He will ask you how could you catch fish on the land while you are yourself in the water. Let you tell him that it would be no greater wonder to catch fish on the land than for an old horse to have a young foal".
The next morning the poor man arose early and went to the edge of the lake. He went into the water and commenced fishing on the land. He was not long there when the king came walking past. The man stood still with his eyes fixed steadily on the line.
The king stopped when he came to where the poor man was and spoke to him.
"My good man", said he, "what are you doing here?"
"I am fishing", said the man.
"And how do you expect to catch fish on the land while you yourself are standing in the water?" said the king.
"That wouldn't be a greater wonder", replied the man, "than for an old horse to have a young foal".
As soon as he heard this the king rushed home
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 08:03
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to give up the foal and claimed him as his own. The owner of the foal had to go home without him.
He appealed to the king and asked him to decide the case. The king's decision was to have the horse, the mare and the foal brought into the same stable with two doors on it. The horse was to be brought out on one door and the mare on the other door. "And", said the king, "the man who owns the horse will get the foal if it follows the horse and the man who owns the mare will get the foal if it follows the mare".
The horse, the mare and the foal were put into the same stable. The horse was taken out on one door and the mare on the other door. The foal followed the horse and went home with him. The man who owned the foal had to go home without it.
When the king's wife heard all this she was very sorry but she could not interfere in the king's business & could do nothing for the poor man who owned the foal.
At any rate one day she was walking near the castle and she happened to meet with the owner of the foal.
"My poor man", said she, "I am very sorry that you have lost your foal, but perhaps I may be able to do something for you. Do you fish in this lake?"
"I do", said the man.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 07:54
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"I will and welcome", said the girl. "You are thinking of marrying me but you are afraid I am too clever for you".
"You are right", said the king "and if I marry you you will have no leave to interfere with my business".
"I am satisfied", said the girl.
Then the king gave a rich present of gold and silver to the girl's father and he told the girl to be ready at the end of a week and that he would send a new coach with four horses to take her to the castle and that they would be married.
At the end of the week the coach was sent to the girl's house and she was brought to the castle. They were married and the wedding lasted for seven days and seven nights and the last day was as good as the first.
They lived very happily together with music and dancing until they were two years married. It happened that there were two old men living near the castle and one of them had an old horse and the other had an old mare. The old mare had a foal and the old mare & horse and foal used to be often in the same field and in the end the foal preferred the old horse to the mare, its own mother.
One day the horse was brought home and the foal followed him. When the owner of the foal went to the other man to bring the foal home the man refused
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 08:08
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"Did I not tell you", said he to his wife, "that you were not to interfere in my business? You are to leave the castle to-morrow morning and I am never to see you again".
"Very well", said she, "but you are to give me as much as I can carry three times out of the castle when I am leaving".
"I will, and welcome", said the king.
On the next morning when the coach was waiting at the door the king said to his wife, "Are you ready?"
"I am", replied his wife, and she took hold of a small bag of gold and carried it to the coach.
"That's the first thing I am taking", said she.
They had a young child in the cradle and she went over & carried it out to the coach.
"That's the second thing" said she as she came back. The king was dumbfounded when he saw what she had done.
She then went over to the king & looked at him and said, "You are the third. Get ready".
The king burst out laughing when heard this and said "Well indeed you were ever sensible and clever and it's cleverer you are getting every day. You have full permission to remain in the castle and you can do and say whatever you wish from this day forward".
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:59
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The king & his wife lived in the castle ever afterwards and she gave wise advice to the king and the kingdom was prosperous and happy while they continued to rule over it, and there was great mourning and sorrow amongst their people when they died at a great old age.
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:55
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"Good girl" said the man.
They then went to bed.
On the next morning all the men were working and the king came out to them. He asked had any of them the answer to his question. They said they had not.
With that the old man walked up to him and said: "You saw an old worn-out horse on one side of the road and a field of rich grass on the other side. You put the horse into the field and he ate the grass. The old horse got fat and the grass got poor".
"You are right", said the king. "Who told you the answer?" said he.
"My daughter told it to me", said the old man.
"She is a clever girl", said the king, "and I would like to see her. I will be here to-morrow morning and bring your daughter here with you".
On the next morning the old man brought his daughter with him until they were in front of the castle. They were not long there until the king came out to them.
Then the king spoke and he said to the girl:
"Are you the girl that guessed the answers to the three questions that I asked my servants and attendants?"
"I am", said the girl.
"I have another question to ask you", said the king. "Will you tell me what I am now thinking of?"
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:49
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"She is a clever girl", said the king.
Then the king spoke: "Here is the last question. One day I was walking on the road. I saw poverty on one side of the road and riches on the other side. I put the poverty on the riches and the poverty got rich and the riches got poor".
With that the king went into his castle.
If the servants and attendants were in wonder the first two days at the questions the king asked them, they were far worse now. They began talking and guessing as before, but all was no use, and they had to go home in the evening without finding out the correct answer.
When the old man went home he said to his daughter: "You guessed correctly the answers to the two questions the king asked before this but I'm afraid you'll not guess this one. The king said this morning:
"One day I was walking on the road and I saw poverty on one side of the road and riches on the other side. I put the poverty on the riches and the poverty got rich and the riches got poor".
"Well", said the girl, "that isn't hard to guess. He saw an old worn-out horse on one side of the road and a rich field of grass on the other side. He put the horse into the field and he ate the grass. The old horse got fat and the grass got poor".
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:46
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"She is a clever girl", said the king.
Then the king spoke: "Here is the last question. One day I was walking on the road. I saw poverty on one side of the road and riches on the other side. I put the poverty on the riches and the poverty got rich and the riches got poor".
With that the king went into his castle.
If the servants and attendants were in wonder the first two days at the questions the king asked them, they were far worse now. They began talking and guessing as before, but all was no use, and they had to go home in the evening without finding out the correct answer.
When the old man went home he said to his daughter: "You guessed correctly the answers to the two questions the king asked before this but I'm afraid you'll not guess this one. The king said this morning:
"One day I was walking on the road and I saw poverty on one side of the road and riches on the other side. I put the poverty on the riches and the poverty got rich and the riches got poor".
"Well", said the girl, "that isn't hard to guess. We saw an old worn-out horse on one side of the road and a rich field of grass on the other side. He put the horse into the field and he ate the grass. The old horse got fat and the grass got poor".
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:45
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"She is a clever girl", said the king.
Then the king spoke: "Here is the last question. One day I was walking on the road. I saw poverty on one said of the road and riches on the other side. I put the poverty on the riches and the poverty got rich and the riches got poor".
With that the king went into his castle.
If the servants and attendants were in wonder the first two days at the questions the king asked them, they were far worse now. They began talking and guessing as before, but all was no use, and they had to go home in the evening without finding out the correct answer.
When the old man went home he said to his daughter: "You guessed correctly the answers to the two questions the king asked before this but I'm afraid you'll not guess this one. The king said this morning:
"One day I was walking on the road and I saw poverty on one side of the road and riches on the other side. I put the poverty on the riches and the poverty got rich and the riches got poor".
"Well", said the girl, "that isn't hard to guess. We saw an old worn-out horse on one side of the road and a rich field of grass on the other side. He put the horse into the field and he ate the grass. The old horse got fat and the grass got poor".
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:34
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question. I was hunting in the wood yesterday, and I met an old woman in a hut in the wood. She had a pot boiling on the fire and the fire under the pot was made from the lies and truth of the world. What had she under the pot? Whoever tells me the answer to-morrow morning will get a great reward. With that the king went into his castle.
If the servants and attendants were in wonder the first day they were worse now. They began talking, and guessing & arguing, each man questioning the others to see if he could find out the correct answer. They were this way until night-fall when they had to go home without finding out the correct answer.
When they went home they told the question the king asked to their wives and children who could no more answer the question than they could themselves.
The old man told his daughter the question the king asked. "Well", said she, "it's easy answering that. It's newspapers that the woman had as firewood".
On the next morning the king came out. He asked them had they the correct answer. They said they had not. With that the old man walked up to the king & said: "It's newspapers the woman was boiling the pot with".
"You are right", said the king. "Who told you the answer?" said he.
"My daughter told me", said the old man.
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:33
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any of you tell me is there anything else just as crooked as it is?
With that he went into the castle again.
They all began talking & guessing, each one questioning the others to see if he could find the correct answer. In the evening they were just as far on as in the morning and they had to go home without knowing the correct answer. When they went home they told their wives and children the question the king asked them but those were no better in guessing the correct answer to the question.
There was an old man amongst them and when he went home he told the question to his daughter. "Well", said she, "it's easy guessing that. The bank of the river is as crooked as the river itself".
On the next morning the king came out. He asked them had any of them the correct answer. They all said they had not. With that the old man walked up to the king & said:
"The bank of the river is as crooked as the river itself".
"You are right", said the king. "Who told you the answer?"
"My daughter told it to me", said the old man.
"She is a clever girl", said the king.
Then the king said: "Here is the second
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:26
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any of you tell me is there anything else just as crooked as it is?
With that he went into the castle again.
They all began talking & guessing, each one questioning the others to see if he could find the correct answer. In the evening they were just as far on as in the morning and they had to go home without knowing the correct answer. When they went home they told their wives and children the question the king asked them but those were no better in guessing the correct answer to the question.
There was an old man amongst them and when he went home he told the question to his daughter. "Well", said she, "it's easy guessing that. The bank of the river is as crooked as the river itself".
On the next morning the king came out. He asked them had any of them the correct answer. They all said they had not. With that the old man walked up to the king & said:
"The bank of the river is as crooked as the river itself".
"you are right", said the king. "Who told you the answer?"
"My daughter told it to me", said the old man.
"She is a clever girl", said the king.
Then the king said: "Here is the second
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:21
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never agree to that. His business in here now was to ask me, when you'd cut his head off to go out to the well in the garden and bring in some of the oil out of it and to rub it to the place where his head and body were separated and then to leave the head on the body again, and that he'd get up as well as ever in his life. But that I'll never do".
So then John O'Neill and the young lady had the whole castle to themselves.
One day her master asked Guess did she think could she find out the young lady's people. Guess said she thought she could and that they'd try in any case. So they all prepared and rode off and in a long time they came to the castle where her people lived.
John O'Neill and the dogs stood outside while the young lady went in. As she was going in on the gate Guess warned her not to let anyone kiss her or that she'd forget all about them.
When she went into the castle Guess said to her master, "We may go home. Her lap-dog is after kissing her and she remembers no more about us".
They went back again to the castle and lived there till one day Guess said to her master:
"There is a great lion to come down out of
senior member (history)
2021-04-21 07:11
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any of you tell me is there anything else just as crooked as it is?
With that he went into the castle again.
They all began talking & guessing, each one questioning the other to see if he could find the correct answer. In the evening they were just as far on as in the morning and they had to go home without knowing the correct answer. When they went home they told their wives and children the question the king asked them but those were no better in guessing the correct answer to the question.
There was an old man amongst them and when he went home he told the question to his daughter. "Well", said she, "it's easy guessing that. The bank of the river is as crooked as the river itself".
On the next morning the king came out. He asked them had any of them the correct answer. They all said they had not. With that the old man walked up to the king & said:
"The bank of the river is as crooked as the river itself".
"you are right", said the king. "Who told you the answer?"
"My daughter told it to me", said the old man.
"She is a clever girl", said the king.
Then the king said: "Here is the second
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 08:02
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There is one very old liss or fort situated in Carrigeen. It is built on a hill in the lands of Mrs Casey.
This liss is said to have belonged to the fairies and to the present day it is very unlucky to do anything there.
Once a farmer cut hay there and a young horse died the following day. Another day somebody cut timber there and that night he died.
The fort is built in the middle of a small field and is surrounded by black thorn and white-thorn bushes. It is composed of a number of
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:58
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At the same time the child was at home, and she died the next morning.
There is a story told about a fort on the farm of Michael Connor, Carrigeen 3 mls. east of Doneraile. It is said that there is a saddle and bridle under the ground. One day a man dug in the earth. It is said he saw them under the earth, but he was afraid to take them, because no person put them there.
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:55
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There is an old story told about Cotter's fort. One evening Mr Evans of Newtown house was passing by this fort. It was surrounded by water. He saw a fair-haired child of three years standing by it. He knew the child to be Mary Murphy of Newtown, daughter of a labourer who lived on Cotter's land. He sent word to her parents to take her home fearing she would be drowned.
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:51
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As he approached the fort he saw bright lights shining within and heard beautiful singing. He entered the fort and found it occupied by a band of fairies. On seeing his violin they asked him to play for them promising to pay him well for his labours.
The man agreed and sat down and played his violin while the fairies danced. When they had finished dancing they paid the musician - in what he thought were pound notes. When he came out on the road again he looked at the money intending to count it. But alas! all he possessed were a few withered leaves. He ran back to the fort to demand proper money from the fairies, but they had all vanished. Not a sign of the bright lights or the fairy dancers remained, and so the poor man had to go home without his money.
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:45
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There is only one liss in the vicinity of Doneraile though they are very numerous in other parts of Ireland. This liss is locally known by the name of "The Fairy Fort". It lies in a field by the roadside about half a mile outside the town. This field is owned by Miss Roche who lives in a newly built house in the adjoining field.
The liss is circular in shape and is arranged thus: - On the outside is a shallow dyke inside which a bank about six feet high encloses a circle of level ground. On the bank brambles and weeds grow in abundance. There is a gap in the bank by which the centre of the fort can be reached. This gap is not however visible from the road.
There is a story told about this fort but it is supposed to have happened many years ago. A musician was once passing by at about midnight on a certain Mid-summer's Eve. He had his violin in a case in his hand and was whistling a lively tune as he walked along.
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:38
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There is a fort in the townland of Sycamore on Micheal O'Connor's land and it is said that every night in winter time when it gets dark, fairy music and beautiful singing and tolling of bells are heard there. White rabbits are also seen there.
There is a moat in Connor's land in the townland of Sycamore and at twelve o'clock every night the fairies come to Tom Roche's fort in the townland of Scardgannon and go back again to Connor's fort. If there was anyone walking on the path at that time the fairies would take him away and there would be no more heard of him.
In Connor's land also a coach and four horses is seen. There is a gate that could never be opened and that gate springs open and the coach passes through. Mr O'Connor was a very rich man and had only one daughter and he built a beautiful house for her. One day he sent one of his servants on a message. There is a quarry on the farm and the servant had to pass by this quarry. He fell into it on his head. Afterwards this boy's sister was coming home from town
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:28
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There is always a queer coloured fox in the "Fairy Liss", which only appears out at night and cannot ever be killed. People have tried to catch him with dogs but in vain.
The owners never ploughed or planted the forts. People say that it is not right to disturb even a foot of ground belonging to the "lisses".
There were numerous lights seen there by people travelling to and fro across the lisses. The people could not explain what held the lights, because they vanished too quickly. As each light flashed, there was heard a sound of sweet music like the sound of a war pipe.
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:23
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him who he was, and from whence he came. The leprecaun answered in a sweet enticing voice that he was a fairy and had come from a beautiful land flowing with milk and honey. The man anxious to get a crock of gold from him asked him very politely from it, and after some hesitation, the leprecaun handed him a beautiful crock full of gold, but as the man was about to depart for him, the leprecaun invited him to come to "the liss" on the following night at the same hour so that he would receive and crock of gold. The man consented to come but he had no notion of keeping his promise. He had the crock of gold now, and he never thought of what the leprecaun said to him when he was about to depart from him. He had no luck with the gold but sank to the depths of misery on account of disobeying the "magic one".
The Danes are said to have built the lisses for protection. The Danes were hiding in the "Fairy Liss" in some underground passage in which nobody could harm them, but there is no entrance hole to be seen there now. Fairies were supposed to be living there, because there was a house built on "the liss". The priest blessed the house before the occupants lived in it, for fear the occupants might go insane.
senior member (history)
2021-04-20 07:12
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When we hear the word "liss" or fort we know that some fairy tale is attached to it which suits us all. There are many lisses or forts in Ireland remnants of some early episode in Irish history.
There are two fairy forts in my district. One of them is called the "Fairy Liss". It is situated in the townland of Clogher, half mile north of the village of Shanballymore. The name of the other liss is the "Fairy Den" situated in the townland of Carrigaunroe. The two lisses are within view of each other. They are circular in shape.
On a Sunday night at the hour of twelve a man was walking through the "Fairy Liss" on his way home from a neighbour's house. When gone half way through the liss out came a leaprecaun wearing a red hat and a white coat. They saluted each other. In surprise the man asked
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 08:25
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About seventy years ago there were no slated houses in this district. The first house that was slated around here was that of Denis Mc Grath in Dunmanus. All the houses were thatched and were one storied for the most part. Those that were two-storied had no stairs but a ladder from the floor to the loft.
In the mud cabins there were no windows but slits to leave in the air. In the thatched houses there were not more than two windows which were not made to open as the people did not realize the good of the sun and air then as they do now.
The doors were made of fir plank and rush and straw mats were made and put against the doors at night to protect the people from the draught. The walls were very thick and they used mud mortar. The chimney was made of wild rods worked like a basket and lined with mud so as to prevent it from burning. At that time oil lamps were not in general use among the people. They used fir splinters to give them light. They also made candles from tallow.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 08:17
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In every house long ago there was a quern for making "reboon". Firstly the wheat was well dried in a bastable over the fire and then ground with a quern into very fine flour. It can then be eaten with sweet milk and is very palatable.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 08:17
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The chief bread long ago was made from potatoes. The people used peel the potatoes and grate them into pulp, and squeeze them dry and work this with milk and a little salt, and bake it on a griddle. In the very early times the people used no flour in making this but nowadays they do. This bread was called stampy. The griddle was flat with a handle on each end, and they used bake the stampy on this in front of the fire. Very few people have griddles now but I have seen one in my grandfather's house. In later times the people used bastibles and ovens. Later on they used make bread from wheat, oats, and barley. This used to be ground in the local water mills, the querns used in these mills were made of cut stone. They had a spindle attached from
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 08:15
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Brings it clanging on the stonewall
Rising sparks that madly flashed
Just as round the bend, the great man
On his prancing hunter dashed.
"Ho there, rascal! what the duce then
Are you doing to my wall?"
Feigning wonderment, the schemer
Quickly lets the crowbar fall.
"Top-o-the-morning, to your honour, sir,
And faith, you're looking fine!
There's no gentleman in Cork, Sir,
That could cut so grand a shine!"
And says Batty, "By your lave sire,
All about it, I will tell
How I went to Skibbereen yesterday
A thing or two to sell.
Now the rent was due to-day, sir,
And I am in duty bound,
To square matters with yer honour,
For that little bit of ground.
But last night when stepping homewards
Faith a thought came to my mind,
That if Peggy trucked my guineas
They would scatter with the wind.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 08:06
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Now, as ever, man's resourcefulness
So sorely tried as that
He straightway must shoot the landlord,
He must rob a bank or what?
Yerra no! behold that twinkling
Brightening up the roguish eye!
And how cleverly he'll manage
You will learn by and by.
For a ride, used go the landlord
Every morning just at nine.
In that circumstance and moment
Batty's plot must fall in line.
Out of doors betimes he sallied
And he slyly took his stand
By the landlord's flanking stonewall
With the crowbar in his hand.
There he waits in expectation,
Whether will he win or fail?
Meeting with opposing forces
Batty ne'er was known to quail.
When at last it is the landlord, -
Hear his horse's hoofs to sing -
Up jumps Batty, grips his crowbar
Wields it with a mighty swing.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 07:59
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And he lorded in his hey-day,
O'er that smiling country side
Sloping down in hills and pastures
To the Roaring-water tide.
'Mongst his goodly host of tenants,
Batty Hegarty was one
Whom it would be hard to beat
For pure Irish wit and fun.
But the pity was that hard times
Came to steal in at the door
And his cares and disappointments
Seemed to deepen more and more.
As the gale-day drew near quickly
In the stealthy flight of time
And he lacked the landlord's money
Then as now, the heinous crime.
He was upright and hard-working,
His intentions all were bent
To be fair and square in dealing,
But intentions are not rent.
Let that fail to be [?]
On the next accounting day
And adieu to merry Batty
He must bundle and away.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 07:51
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had they reached shore than a terrible gale blew and they felt they had only barely escaped with their lives.
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 07:50
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One day four men left Dunmanus pier to spend a week away bobster fishing. They were two Driscolls and two McCarthys. They shot their pots near Dhurode and when they had the work done they put down the anchor and three of them went asleep and one man put a coat over his head in the stern of the boat. He was the watchman and did not go asleep. After a while a man stood up to his waist in the water he was alive and wore a black jersey but he did not speak. The man awakened his companions and when they had all seen him he disappeared. They hauled their pots immediately and made for home. No sooner
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 07:44
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(as there was a boreen convenient to the place) went to open the door, when the red coats - for it was they, seeing the beads in her hand, stabbed her through the heart and she fell dead at the doorstep.
The son seeing his mother dead, evaded the soldiers through some back opening in the cottage and made the best haste he could to the shore, to warn his father of the approaching danger. The soldiers seeing his intentions, quickly followed and over-took him at the summit of this precipitate cliff, and the boy seeing no way of escape jumped over and his body was never found. And even up to this day the marks in the stone are quite plain, although the sea washes over it constantly at high water, and the people of the surrounding districts will tell you that often when passing that way on or about twilight, they can hear the strains of music emerging from this little cave, always before a storm. And some fisher-men go as far as to say that always when a storm is brewing, they can see from their boats the figure of a boy sitting
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 07:35
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in th the south shore.
A little farther inland from this Island is the little inlet or cave called Irálára, the rocks enclosing this little cave are of the wildest character, singularly broken and irregular in their outline, rocks and stones some of enormous dimensions are flung together in strange confusion. On one of those stones far up in the little strand is seen the print of a shoe and the ferule of a stick or crutch, and so the old shannachie's story goes on: -
That in the time of the Penal days in Ireland, a man and his wife and their only son who was deformed from childhood were living in a cottage somewhere in the vicinity of this little cave, and one evening as the man was out in his boat fishing, and his wife was telling her beads for his safety, their son who was passionately devoted to music, took down his harp and began to play one of his favourite tunes; when all at once the sound of horse's hoofs were heard coming towards the cottage. The good woman, thinking some party had lost their way,
senior member (history)
2021-04-19 07:26
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Away down in the south coast of Ireland, lies that sheltery bay of Dunmanus, which presents in general the appearance of a wide spread lake girded by a zone of mountains of the boldest outline, it is up to twenty miles in length, and from three to four miles in breadth, and in some places fully forty fathoms deep. At the south side near the entrance the mountain barriers which confine it seem to start up abruptly from the water's edge, and its northern shores are equally stern and precipitous.
There are two Islands of small dimension in this large expanse of water, the first which stands farthest out to seaward lies about the centre of the bay and the second lies closer
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:42
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Long ago bread was made from oats and in recent years it is made from wheat. The flour was imported from foreign countries and the people bought it in the large shops. Patrick Mc Cabe, Tattygar, Castleblayney, says he remembers querns or grinding stones but he says it's over seventy years ago since they were used. They were used by the people of partly every county in Ireland.
In olden times different kinds of bread was made. Boxty was one of the most common kinds of these different breads. Raw potatoes were peeled, grated, mixed with flour and salt and baked on a griddle. When it was baked it was of a black colour.
Another very prevalent kind of bread was oat-meal bread. It was made like this: - the oat-meal was put in the baking dish, it was then with boiling water until it was a dough. It was rolled with a rolling pin and
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:41
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then stood on a grid-iron in front of the fire.
Potato-cake was also made on state occasions. It was made in the following manner - the potatoes were peeled, boiled, bruised, mixed with flour and salt, rolled with a rolling pin, and baked on a griddle.
Water or milk is used in none of the above breads except the oat-meal-cake to which water is added. The only ingredients used in boxty and potato-cake are salt and potatoes. No salt is added in kneading the oat-meal cakes.
Bread was baked every other day long ago. Marks in the shapes of a "cross" or an "X" were put on the top of the cakes. Then when the bread was baked it was cut in four farls. The names of vessels in which bread is baked is the oven or the griddle. Oat bread was made standing at the fire against a grid-iron. The grid-iron was made of iron.
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:35
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Long ago bread was made from oats and in recent years it is made from wheat. The flour was imported from foreign countries and the people bought it in the large shops. Patrick Mc Cabe, Tatbygar, Castleblayney, says he remembers querns or grinding stones but he says it's over seventy years ago since they were used. They were used by the people of partly every county in Ireland.
In olden times different kinds of bread was made. Boxty was one of the most common kinds of these different breads. Raw potatoes were peeled, grated, mixed with flour and salt and baked on a griddle. When it was baked it was of a black colour.
Another very prevalent kind of bread was oat-meal bread. It was made like this: - the oat-meal was put in the baking dish, it was then with boiling water until it was a dough. It was rolled with a rolling pin and
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:27
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The name of the land who received the rent from the people in Sheetrim was Tomas Henry of Derry-island. His house is to be seen to the present day on Derry-island hill. There are hiding places for guns in the walls. The name of Toma's agent was John Anderson Strand-townd Street Bellfast. This land-lord was nothing to brag about. The Henrys were of Cromwellion decent. This land-lord evicted many people in this district but I can not find out their names.
My rent and taxes were to pay,
And them I could not redeem,
And thats another cruel reason why
I left old Skibbereen.
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:21
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all the fairies disappeared. The man attempted to go home and he could not find a gap to get out. He wandered about the place all night and the next morning he found himself in the middle of a fairy rath and when he reached home he put his hand in his pocket and in it he found a piece of paper instead of a pound note. After that he did not go often to play cards and whenever he went he never cheated.
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:18
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One night a man was returning home from playing cards and he had been cheating all night. As he was coming up the road past Hoghe's gate he saw a light coming towards him and he then heard the noise of a horse trotting. As it came near him he saw a man riding a headless horse. He jumped across the ditch in order to avoid meeting it. When he jumped the ditch he jumped on something which appeared to him to be a goat but to his surprise is turned into a big black man. The black man asked him to play a game of cards and out of his pocket he took a small table an it commenced to grow bigger until it was as big as any table. The black man played until he had all the money won. When he had all the money won he disappeared and the man found himself surrounded by fairies who were playing cards and they asked him to join. He was not long playing the cards until he won one pound. When he won one pound
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:10
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two thousand pounds. Other treasures may have been found, but not to my knowledge. This crock of gold was supposed to be guarded by fairies. Lights have often been seen about this rath. The old people say that anything belonging to fairies should not be touched.
The man who looked for this treasure once, found a little box, which contained a piece of papar, telling him to work for his money.
senior member (history)
2021-04-16 07:07
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There was a treasure hidden many years ago in an old rath in the townland of Formill. It was supposed to have been placed there by some rich person hundreds of years ago when the country was under the English. It was hidden here because the person who owned it chose this spot as a place of safety.
Attempts were made to find it, several times and at length it was discovered. The man who got the treasure, brought it home with him, but had not been more than three hours in his house when he died.
The treasure consisted of a crock of gold. It was valued at about
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:55
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Mickey Mc. Kenna of Drumskelt - Newbliss says that he often saw a light on the Drumskelt Rd. late at night. It would go for a distance along the road and then go across the fields down to Corlougharoo Lake where it would disappear.
There is a light seen on Kilmore Rd. very often at night. Many people have seen it. It goes along the road for about half a mile and then disappears. If any-one is coming meeting it, it turns into a field before they come near it. Mrs. Morton of Crappagh Newbliss, who was born and reared in Kilmore says they often watched it nights from her house. One night after eleven o'clock she and her daughter Nellie, were coming from Kilmore - her old home-place - they were cycling and saw a great light coming along behind them. The road being very narrow, they dismounted thinking it was the headlights of a car they saw.
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:48
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They continued walking in single file for a good distance, thinking every minute that the car would soon pass. They could "pick pins" on the road the light was so great.
Suddenly it disappeared just as Mrs. Morton was sure it was beside them. She then thought of the Shange light which she used to watch when she was a young girl at home in Kilmore.
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:45
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he heard a voice which called out - "Would you rather stop where you are or play us a tune?" So he agreed to play. The donkey stopped. Pat took out his violin, tuned it up, and started Mc. Cloud's Reel. Before he had finished he found himself in his own lane & beside his house. The fairies advised him never to refuse the "wee people" again.
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:42
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There once lived a fiddler in Cordoo named Pat Farmer. He was coming home from a dance one night with his fiddle-case under his arm. He had to go up Allan's Lane (Cordoo) and when he got to the middle of the Lane he met a crowd of fairies. [There is a fort at the top of this lane]
They asked him to play them a tune. "Well, the divil a tune or tune I'll play the night more", says Pat. "You must", insisted the wee folk. "Well, divil a one" says he. The first thing he found he was sitting on a little black donkey of Allan's. Off it went like the wind and never cried halt till it landed on the fort. Round & round the fort it flew with Pat on its back, holding on for dear life & screaming on the donkey to stop. But it never heeded him.
When his head was quite dizzy & he thought he wouldn't be able to remain on the donkey's back any longer
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:35
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There is a fort in Crappagh on Mr. Thompson's land. From it three other forts can be seen. It is circular and there are trees growing on it. The forts seen from it are Cordoo Fort, on Mr. Allen's land, Newhlis's Fort on Mr. Landy's land and Coraven Fort on Mr. Wylie's land.
A family named Mc. Phillips, lived beside Crappagh fort. They are all now dead. They wouldn't even walk on the Fort. One day James was going to a fair and for a short cut he went across the fort. Before he had gone very far he was crossing a ditch to get to the road when he fell & sprained his ankle. He was sure that this happened as a result of crossing the Fort. They wouldn't cut a branch or interfere in any way with anything growing on the Fort.
John Allen is supposed to have cut a tree on Cordoo Fort, and before a year, all his cattle & stock died.
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:26
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There was a woman once who used to boil a pot of potatoes every night. She lived near Crappagh Fort. One evening a knock came to the door just after she had drained the potatoes at the door. Going out she saw a wee woman standing at the door looking very miserable. The wee woman asked her why she drained the water off the potatoes there every night and asked her to come along and she'd show her the harm she was doing. The woman went and it seemed only a few yards away they came to a table laden with lovely food on gold & silver dishes. All the fairies were seated around but the water from the potatoes had flowed down on the table & destroyed their supper. "Look at that", said the wee woman, "that's what you do to our supper every night". The woman promised not to do it any more.She kept her promise & in return everything flourished with her.
It was an old man, named Willie Daley, who died about 8 years ago & was then aged 90, who told Mrs. Morton that story.
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:26
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There was a woman once who used to boil a pot of potatoes every night. She lived near Cappagh Fort. One evening a knock came to the door just after she had drained the potatoes at the door. Going out she saw a wee woman standing at the door looking very miserable. The wee woman asked her why she drained the water off the potatoes there every night and asked her to come along and she'd show her the harm she was doing. The woman went and it seemed only a few yards away they came to a table laden with lovely food on gold & silver dishes. All the fairies were seated around but the water from the potatoes had flowed down on the table & destroyed their supper. "Look at that", said the wee woman, "that's what you do to our supper every night". The woman promised not to do it any more.She kept her promise & in return everything flourished with her.
It was an old man, named Willie Daley, who died about 8 years ago & was then aged 90, who told Mrs. Morton that story.
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:17
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When going to bed and old custom was to say some prayers.
One was: -
1. "There are four corners on my bed,
There are four angels over-spread,
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,
God bless the bed that I lie on".
Another bed-time prayer was.
2. "O most merciful Jesus - have mercy on me,
My soul and my body I resign unto Thee,
These five bleeding wounds that were nailed to the tree,
O most merciful Jesus - have mercy on me.
Another prayer at bedtime -
3. "God the Father, bless me.
Jesus Christ, defend and keep me,
The virtue of the Holy Ghost enlighten and sanctify me this night & forever. Amen.
Another bedtime prayer: -
4. In the name of the Lord Jesus Christ cruci-
senior member (history)
2021-04-15 07:11
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1. Procure a "horse-stump" (a worn horse-shoe nail) and tie it to the cow's tail by means of a piece of red flannel, before the first milking when she has calved. For first time milk her over copper & silver. Collect the first three milkings and churn. When the first butter appears, collect it and peace it in a bottle. The bottle is placed over the byre door. So long as it remains there, no one can take away the good of that cow's milk.
2. Put branches of "rowan-tree" around the byre on May-Eve for good luck.
3. Put the "couter" or sock of plough in the fire and close all the holes in the house. Start to churn in the name of the Devil. The devil will appear in the form of the person who is taking away the good of the milk and take a "brash".
senior member (history)
2021-04-14 07:58
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dressed with cream.
Supper at 10 p. m. "pot of potatoes" and sour milk.
You could eat as many eggs as you like - a pot put down Easter only.
Xmas Eve - black fast - black tea - herring.
"If I got a sup of tea I'd plough the hills" said narrator.
Tea first used here about 60 years ago.
"Piggins used instead of cups. Made of timber by cooper. Handle one side [?] twice. As big as egg saucer an.
senior member (history)
2021-04-14 07:52
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She drank it up in tea
Cheer boys cheer
The stirabout is boiling
Cheer boys cheer
The milk is very hot
Cheer boys cheer
The spoons are on the table
And cheer boys cheer
For the [?] of the pot.
tea 1d oz, sugar 1 1/2 lb.
bread 2 1/2 loaf.
Later on brown bread or white bread "as black as the hub" baked on a griddle
Made of wheaten flour, undressed, sour skimmed milk
You might see meat once in 10 days. Salt meat. Never saw fresh meat. Salted herring seldom eaten - only as a luxury thrown across a tongs and roasted. Sometimes eaten raw.
Vegetables - turnips boiled in salt coating, cabbage
senior member (history)
2021-04-14 07:45
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3 meals potatoes and sour milk. Up at 6 a. m. to boil them. 6/30 - 12 noon. 6/30 "Dip the dry one in the wet one".
Work before eating in Summer.
Eat before work in Winter.
" - " a day hire.
Table in middle of floor - family and servants all at one table. Tables put one up on another when not in use.
Often a family sat around a pot - [?] of stirabout with a basin in hand of each - basin full of sour milk, and each dipped spoon in stirabout.
Cheer boys cheer
My mother bought a blanket
Cheer boys cheer
She sold it back again
Cheer boys cheer
She got a penny profit
Cheer boys cheer
senior member (history)
2021-04-14 07:37
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We have a dresser at home. It belonged to a Aunt of my grand-mothers. It is about a hundred and twenty years old.
We also have a eight day clock it is over a hundred years old.
We have two american trunks belong to my grandmother and grandfather. They are seventy years old. We have an american pipe belonging to to my grandfather. It is fortyfive years old.
We also have a pot rack it is eighty years old.
We have a cup and saucer. They are sixty years old.
We also have an earthenware sugar crock. It is about fifty year's old.
senior member (history)
2021-04-14 07:32
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him and everywhere he ran the cow ran after him. Next thing there appeared coming out of the fort the finest huntsmen and the grandest horses those people ever saw. They galloped two or three rounds around there field and into the fort again and then disappeared.
senior member (history)
2021-04-14 07:30
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There is a fort about a mile from Borien-na-gragh. Tradition tells us that there did a lot of strange things happen in this fort from time to time. On one occasion the people of the place were milking the cows in the fort field. One woman heard music in the fort. She got nervous and told it to the boss who didn't believe her. So next evening to prove she was telling lies he turned his own cow into the fort to milk her, to prove the great man he was. He wasn't long there when he heard a voice saying move in off the way yourself and your cow. So he got a lot more frightened that the woman got and he quickly complied with the order and ran out of the fort. No sooner was he out than the cow ran after
senior member (history)
2021-04-13 09:19
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surprise met Sutton. A dead wolf lay there. Then all was clear. The wolf had come into the castle to carry off the child. The good hound had moved the infant boy and had killed the wolf in a great battle. Instead of rewarding the poor dog his master was sorry to find that he had killed him.
senior member (history)
2021-04-13 09:17
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Once upon a time there lived in Ireland a wealthy man named Sutton. Sutton kept a fine hound, a famous dog. Master and dog loved each other very much. One day Sutton was out riding, and when he reached his castle he was met at the door by the hound. He was shocked to see that the dog had blood upon his nose and paws.
Nowhere could Sutton's baby boy be seen but the cot lay tumbled in the room with blood all over the linen. Sutton thought the hound must have killed and eaten the child. In his wild anger he drew his sword and struck the animal a deadly blow. The dog died, and as he did he looked on his master with a look of wonder. The man entered the child's room again and gathered up the tumbled cot. Beneath it he found his little son safe and sound. Another
senior member (history)
2021-04-13 08:27
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There was once a poor little girl whose name was Cinderella. She had three step-sisters and each of them hated her, because she always sat with her toes in the ashes and they called her cinder-girl. Whenever they had any hard work to do she always had to do it for them and they never let her go anywhere. One night there was a party to which the three sisters were invited. They told Cinderella to mind the house and to do the work.
They were gone only a short while when a knock came to the door and a fairy God-mother came in. She hit the girl with her wand and at once she was clothed in beautiful clothes and a pair of glass-slippers on her feet. The fairy drove her to the party and told her to leave before twelve o'clock. Cinderella danced all night at the party and her sisters did not know her. The clock was striking twelve and when running from the party she lost one
senior member (history)
2021-04-13 08:21
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Once upon a time all the little birds used to talk. A poor little wren lost all her feathers one day and she was very sad. She asked all the other birds to give her some of their feathers.
They were all willing to give them except the Owl, who said "I cannot give any, for there will soon be snow and I shall want them to keep me warm. When the king of birds heard this he was very angry and he said he would punish the owl severely.
"From this day" said the Eagle "you shall be cold, and you shall never leave your nest only by night. If you fly by day the other birds will peck you". From that day to this the owl has never left off crying "Whoo! Whoo", as if he were dying of cold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-13 08:12
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boats to order. He had a few of his own home made boats on Shadlock Lake during his own life time. Also in this village a relative of his made clogs for the people of the locality.
In most of the villages around here the women carded wool and made it into thread. A few weavers were in the district & they made it into flannel.
In the village of Kilbridge the women and girls sprigged linen with their needles for Caps and petticoats.
senior member (history)
2021-04-13 08:08
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In our grandfather's days: the people of this locality worked at different occupations trades or crafts which enabled them to support their wives and families.
In the village of Ballymacnoly there was a nailer - Ned Connor. This man made slating nails, tongs, hammers and pot hooks which he sold to people in the district and to local shop keepers in the surrounding villages and towns.
Malachy Gannon a blacksmith made horse shoes, spades and shovels.
Patk Raftery wove wheaten straw into baskets, hampers, bee-hives and arm chairs.
Katie Courtney was a "mankie" maker.
Patk Gilleraw was a skilled house carpenter and painter.
In the next village of Ballymacnoly there lived a family of three brothers, named ODowd, who were known throughout three counties as "Master Coopers". Their dash and churn were made to order.
The Dowd Brothers frequently sold their churns at the markets of Roscommon, Castlerea, Williamstown and Tuam.
Jas Connaughhan of Shadlock made
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 08:29
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Old tailor dead and gone
His silent vigil kept
And now with fiery eyes
Close to the tree he stepped
Once more the axe is raised
But now before the blade
With movements light and swift
The bony hand is laid
The steel defied the Ghost.
The poteen steeled the two
Each time the blade came down
The Ghost his hand withdrew.
The tree soon creaked and fell
They looked again to see
The Ghost with eyes like fire
Seated upon the tree.
They tugged and pulled and strained
An inch it would not go
Until to their relief
Mike Barry's Cock did crow.
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 08:25
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The brake beside the lake
The forge beside the wood
Mike Barry's cot beside the lake
As tidy as it could
The midnight moon has set
the [?] dong is still
Two stately forms emerge
From the still beside the rill
With spirits warm and high
Towards the wood they go
Their axe and saw are bright
They dread not Ghost or foe.
Into the wood they step
Where fir loomed straight & high
Upon the choicest spars
Their axe & saw they ply
The work is stayed awhile
The dew is handed round
And now in one deep draught
The men new courage found.
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 08:00
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My mother remembered seeing a woman riding a white horse coming from the north, going south to Jerh for a herb cure for some disease. It was believed that she came from the land of the "gile is the Caol fear" (Limerick).
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 07:56
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In days gone by when a Mare was about to foal she was taken into the kitchen to do so. Jerh arrived at some house and the mare was inside before him. He sat beside the foal and seemed very uncomfortable. The seat began to sway and Jerh fell off. He struggled to get up and in a very excited manner shouted that the evil spirit could never be kept out that night. The foal was bound to go. Jerh was paid to remain until the foul arrived. He always fixed his prices for such work.
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 07:55
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tap was heard on the window pane. Jerh stood up to go and in a sorrowful tone said. "Go bhfoirith Dia orainn, caithfidh mé bheith ag imtheacht is garbh an bóthar atá romham-sa anocht. He went leaving the occupants of the house so scared that bed was never thought of. Nobody dared to venture out. Next morning when some did go, the hedge was bared of the clothes and the pit was opened and a quantity of potatoes stolen. At the first opportunity the story of the clothes and etc. was told to Jerh and his advice was not to [?] such a small loss on the poor souls for they were badly in need of them.
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 07:44
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One the eastern side close to the residence of the Saintly Father John Power there lived a family by the name of Donovan. The father's name was Jeremiah. They were very poor and the mother had to resort to begging. The father pretended that he was compelled by the fairies to be their servant. He also pretended that through the fairies he had obtained knowledge of cunning diseases and he was believed to be famous at the mixing of herbs. Hence his new name Fairy Doctor. Many stories are told of his behaviour.
In my Grandfather's house more than once he scared himself and the occupants of the house. On one occasion he was ag scoraidheacht. He remained late. It was just near twelve, a
senior member (history)
2021-04-12 07:42
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fallen in so that the holes are not visible. There are stories connected with two of these lisses - Ombris situated on the farm of Mr Denis O Brien which was formerly in the possession of Mr Samuel Kingston who emigrated to New Zealand about ten years ago with his whole family and he died there recently. One day while the farm was in his possession he went to the lis and without thinking of any danger he began to cut down the bushes which were growing on the fence and he almost lost the use of his hand. He took no notice of it because he thought it was through his own neglect that his hand got poisoned. However he went to the Lis again and this time he had it in his mind to level the fence and till all the field together.
He took a spade and began to dig the fences. As he had no use for the sods in the field he drew them home with a horse and cart, and he threw them in a great heap in the yard at the front of his dwelling. Towards the close of the day he came home well pleased with his day's work. It was late when he started milking and when he had his last task performed, he took the lantern in his hand and went towards the house, but as he was passing the heap of sods he was struck