Number of records in editorial history: 482
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 12:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the clouds are going fast, we will have showery weather.
When the sun rises red in the East, it is a good sign of rain: when it sinks red in the west, it is a good sign.
There is a ring around the moon before it rains.
When the rainbow is only half way in the sky, it is a sign of showery weather.
When it is full across the sky, good weather follows.
When the stars come out in the sky, it is the sign of frost.
When the wind is from the southwest, it is the sign of rain, and from the North it is the sign of hard dry weather, and from the East it is a sign of cold wet weather.
When the swallows fly low it is the sign of rain. When the curlews start calling is a sign of rain. Also when the soot falls down is a sign of rain. When the crickets sing is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 12:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Poulnangid lived a man Desmond by name. He went to Australia years ago and came home after 35 years. Ever since his name was Coolgardie (mining town where he worked). Died last year. 70 years old.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 12:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When you see the swallows flying low in the evening you will have rain in a few days.
At night if you watch the moon sometimes it has a ring round it and we will have rain in three or four days.
When you see the geese flying in the air and they hissing it is a sign that we will have rain.
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 18:31
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rejected
awaiting decision
there are no hills. There are no rivers no lakes or no streams.
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 18:31
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rejected
awaiting decision
The name of the place in which I live is Clonfane. It is a cottage I live in and it is a slated house. There are about nine families in Clonfane. There are three slated houses which are cottages and six thatched houses. There are about thirty two people in the townland and they are all in the parish of Kilbride. There are only two people in Clonfane that are over seventy. Miss Rooney and Mr Rooney. I never heard of them telling any stories. There is one old house in Moymet where people lived long ago and the name was Pointys. The land is good but
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 18:29
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Willie Gorey Kilbride, Irma and Patrick Fay Kilbride, Trim who is nearly eighty.
They can tell stories about the cricket they used to play in the old times.
There were a lot more houses in times gone by.
Very few people went to America or elsewhere.
The Priory land is very hilly and good. There is a wood in it and its name is the Priory wood. It is about a 100 yards long and 50 yards wide. There is one river coming from the well in Joyces and its name is the Drakeen river. There are no Lakes. There is a bridge over the Drakeen river and it is said that the black and tans used to watch the people under it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 18:27
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awaiting decision
I live in Kilbride. There are twelve families in the townland. There are fourty four people in it. Monaghan is the most common name. There are five or six houses slated and the name number thatched.
There are two people over seventy in the townland.
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 18:26
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awaiting decision
I live in Trimblestown. There are not many people living in it. The families are Martins, Mooneys, Caseys, Traynors, Doggetts, Kennedys, Larisseys and Cusicks. There are about forty people altogether. Kennedys is the most common name.
The most of the houses are slated except a few farmers houses. There are only two people over seventy. Alot of people went to America long ago.
The land is very good and there are no big hills in it. There are two rivers the name of one of the rivers is the big river
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 18:24
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awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Moymet which is in the parish of Kilbride.
There are sixteen houses with a population of forty one. The most of the houses are slated but others are thatched. There are not very many old people on Moymet there are only five over seventy.
Long ago there more houses but now the half of them are old ruins. The people long ago used to go to America to earn their money.
The land is very fertile in Moymet but the most of it is tilled. There is only one wood in Moymet.
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 18:23
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Clonmór river and the big river. It is very woody. The Lake wood, the long wood, and the black wood are the woods.
Clifton and formely owned by Lord Arnely who built all the houses
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 10:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sage and drink the water in which it is boiled.
The ancient cure for obliterating boils was to get "meacain dathóga" from beside a river, boil it and then apply it to the boils. This was also a cure for ringworm.
A drink of cammomile tea was the cure for a gumboil.
When stung by a nettle, if one rubbed the dock-leaf, the sting came out.
For extracting thorns, the fox's tongue was the old cure.
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 10:23
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the ear was a cure for an earache. Milk and onions was also a good cure as was olive oil..
The old cure for the stoppage of profusion of blood flow from a cut was, to rub a cob-web to the cut. The juice of a rib leaf mixed with cream was a good cure for cuts, also another cure was to rub a pullet's first egg laid on Good Friday.
For sprains the old remedy was to boil the seeds of bisim and the juice which is left after boiling, to rub it on the sprains.
The juice of the dandelions was a cure for warts. Another cure for warts was, to get the same number of stones as there were warts. Then to touch each wart with a stone. The stones should be put in a bag and brought to four cross-roads. Here the bag should be dropped. The wart-weed and boiled potato-water were also good cures.
For chilblains forge-water and pickle were the cures.
The supposed cure for diphtheria was to jump out of a window, run under a briar, and between the four legs of a horse.
Boiled ivy-leaves was the cure for corns.
For loss of appetite the cure was to boil wild
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 10:20
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awaiting decision
the same way is also a cure. Another cure also is red onions or roasted figs. Red flannel tied around the persons head is a popular cure.
Sore eyes were cured by rubbing cold tea leaves to them. Fasting spittle rubbed to them was also a cure. By putting one's face into clear water, and opening the eyes inside in it, was supposed to be good. A woman's wedding ring was a good cure for a wisp in the eye.
The old cure for a headache was to dip cold boiled potatoes in cold water, and to place them in a cloth and apply they to the forehead.
For sore throat the cure was to boil the fox-glove and drink the broth.
The cure for a bad cold was to eat nine pennyleaves for nine mornings, and to pull the tenth and throw it away.
For burns, sugar and soap mixed together and rubbed to the burns was supposed to be good. Oil from a train was also good. Breadsoda moistened with paraffin oil and applied to the burns, was very much recommended. The juice of the bark of the elm steeped in water was a popular cure for burns, also the juice of the bark of the oak tree. The green grass growing on top of a well was another cure.
Black wool dipped in whiskey and put into
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 10:16
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awaiting decision
further cure was to give milk to a ferret, and what remained after him, to give it to the person who was suffering, to drink.
When a person suffered from a toothache, the cure, though not a very nice one was, to put a frog in the mouth of the patient, and not let the frog out till the patient screeched. Another cure was to redden a knitting needle and put it into the painful tooth. Salt and pepper was also a good cure. A further cure was to tough the cheek with the first tooth that fell from a young horse's mouth. The horse raddish was also used as a cure for toothache.
For the disease of thrush, the goose or gander was made scream three times into the person's mouth. Another cure was to get the father of the child to breath into the child's mouth three mornings in succession while fasting. A further cure was to get a woman who was born on Good Friday to breathe into the child's mouth for nine successive days, at the end of which the disease was supposed to be cured. A more modern cure for this disease is to mix honey and borax and apply it to the person's mouth.
For the mumps, the cure was to get a while turnip, roast it, and put it into a stocking and then place it round the neck. Hot bran used in
senior member (history)
2019-12-03 10:13
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awaiting decision
There is in every man of culture a certain eagerness to know how his forefathers lived, and to learn their various customs and beliefs. The belief of our fore-fathers in cures for remedying different diseases was a firm one, as in those times doctors did not exist. For nearly every disease practically they had some cure or other which when applied always gave ease.
For instance if a person suffered from bronchitis, the cure was to boil the dandelion, and drink the water.
For rheumatism, a person used to put two potatoes into his vest pocket and leave them there for about six weeks, after which time his rheumatism would leave him.
For the whooping cough, there was a special old cure. A black donkey was procured and a person placed on either side of him. Then the body who was suffering from the disease was passed from one person to the other under and over the donkey. This performance was carried out several times at the end of which the disease was supposed to be cured. Another cure for whopping cough was to get an insect and place it in a bottle. If the insect died, the disease was cured, but if the insect lived, the disease remained. A
senior member (history)
2019-11-28 13:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the top of the hill at Ballinrick there used to be a Slate Factory. There is a pile of Slates in a part of the yard taken off a house called Lees house it was six foot higher then
senior member (history)
2019-11-28 13:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Years ago there was a marriage in Mt Nugent. The bride was a Miss MacCabe of Crosira and the groom was Mick Farnan from Ballymanus. The marrige took place at about twelve o'clock. It was the custom at that time of having a race on horse back for the bottle. They were going at high speed when the horse fell and killed a brother of the brother of brides about six feet from the house where the bride was going to live. When the rest of the wedding party came along it was a great surprise to them to see him killed. So that ended the wedding.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 18:41
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rejected
awaiting decision
mín réidh agus fágtar clais chaol taobh thiar den pholl cun nach dtiocfaidh an t-uisge isteach sa bpoll. Caithtear na fátaí isteach ann ansin agus cuirtear sgraitheaca ós a gcionn agus cré ós a cíonn sin arís.
De réir mara theasthuigheann siad annsin tugtar abhaile iad. Na fátaí a bhíonn fágtha sa bpoll ionntuightear iad a fhaitíos go dtiocfadh baclóga amach orra.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 18:40
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awaiting decision
duine eile ina dhiaidh le sluasad agus cairteann sé suas an fóid, leath ar gach taobh den iomaire. Nuair a bhíonns siad fódhuighthe deirtear go mbíonn siad curtha.
Bíonn siad réidh annsin leis na fátaí go dtagann na dasacha aníos. Annsin craithtear diubhan orra agus baintear lán isa na claiseacha agus caithtear suas ar thaobh na ndaos é. Nuair a bhíonn sé sin déanta deirtear go mbíonn siad lanuighthe.
Nuair a thagann das fada ar na fátaí cuirtear spré orra. Má cuirtear an spré orra trí h-uaire ní thuitfidh an diubhcain orra ar feadh acar mhaith den bhlian.
Baineann cuid mhaith de na daoine béile dhe na fátaí lá fhéil San Seán sin é an 24ú Mheitheamh go bhfeicfidh siad an bhfuil siad go maith.
Sa bhFoghmhair a thosnuightear ag baint na bhfátaí as éadan a chéile.
Cuirtear na fátaí móra i bpoll leo féin agus na fátaí beaga i bpoll eile. Déantar an poill i náit tirim. Gheibhtear sluasad agus déantar an áit faoi na fátaí
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 18:36
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awaiting decision
Sé an áit is fearr le Hepeccures a chur ná i dtalamh móna nach mbeadh rud ar bith curtha ann le cúpla blian roimhe sin.
Sé an talamh is fearr lé haghaidh Fátaí Dearg-Bán a chur ná i dtalmh bán nó cunnlach.
I dtalamh bán castar fóidín i dtosach timceall sé orlaigh ar leithead nó mar sin. Boir gach iomaire bíonn píosa beag de'n talkmh ghlas fágtha ar a dtugtar an fóidín glas. Baintear é sin agus caithtear isteach ar thaobh amháin den dá iomaire i n-aice leis. Cuirtear aoileach air annsi. Craithtear na scioláin ós cionn an aoilighe agus cuirtear tí sciolán ar leithead an iomaire - timcheall troigh idir gach sgiolán.
Uaireanta ní craithtear na sgioláin go mbíon na fátaí fóidhtuighte agus annsin sáidhtear síos sa gcré iad. Fágann na daoine cuid de na scioláin gan sáthabh go dtí Aoinne Céasta mar deirtear na fátaí a cuirtear an lá sin nach glisfidh siad.
Seasann duine síos san iomaire annsin agus baineann sé an fóid agus tagann
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 18:32
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awaiting decision
Is iombha cineál fátaí ann agus ní h-é an bhlas céadhna atá ar chineál ar bith acú. Tá ainm fá leith ag gach cineál acú mar "Hepecures" Fataí Dearg Bán nó Pinks, Banners agus Champions.
Fáta mór bog iseadh an Hepecure. Sé an fáta is lugha a cuirtear agus freisin an fata is lugha a baintear. Bíonn sé go deas le n-ithe i dtosach ach de réir mar theigheann sé i ndeirneanaigh sa blian bíonn sé ag éirígh níos buige.
Fáta tirim agus blas milis le n-ithe air iseadh an Pink má bhíonn an talamh feileamhnach dhó.
Fáta buidhe ar nós an Champion iseadh an Banner. Fáta mór bog iseadh é agus do bheithbhighe agus do mhuca is mó a chuirtear é
Sé an Champion an fáta is tirme ar fad acú agus freisin an fáta is milse le n-ithe é.
Fásann Hepecures, Fátaí Dearg Bán, Banners agus Champions san áit a bhfuil mise i mo choinuibhe.
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 18:14
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In the Name of the Father for success
And of the Son who suffered pain
May Mary and her Son be with me on my way
Oh Mary meet me at the shore
Let not my soul go by thee
Great is my fear of thy son
In the Communion of Saints may we be
Listening to the voices of the Angels and praising the Son of God world without end.
Amen
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 18:13
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awaiting decision
cattle and piles of money. Their cattle were dying one by one. Money and cattle were going, so in an year the crows were in and out the window.
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 18:12
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awaiting decision
was a priest and he had to go out late. He ordered his boy to get ready his horse. There was a pot in his way and he hit his foot and hurt it. He was vexed and he said he wished the pot was in a hundred pieces. The boy said he was going to leave and he would not tell the priest why. The priest said to him "Kneel down to confession and tell me why". The boy said I saw what you did to the pot and you'd do the same to me if I vexed you.
In the olden times they used have great marriages and they used invite priests. So at this wedding the people vexed the priest. He left the house angry. He shook the dust of his shoes on the threshold. They were very rich people. They had fields of
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 18:10
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a very holy man but he never went to Mass. Every day when the sun would come in through the house and make a shadow opposite the window the man would throw his coat across it and it would hold it up. This day he went to Mass and the day after that he threw his coat on the sunbeam but it would not hold it up. The reason was because he did not listen to Mass and it was better for him to stay at home. There is another story connected with a priest.
Once upon a time there
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 18:09
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On St. John's Day the people gather a lot of turf on the road and make a big bone-fire.
When St Martin's Day comes every person kills a fowl in order to spill the blood in honour of St Martin
There is a custom connected with May Day the people never put out the ashes or the dust.
On Shrove Tuesday pancakes are made. It is called "Pancake Night".
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 18:00
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awaiting decision
A Dhia atá thuas ar Neamh líon mé le gean orth féin. Cuir séim chroidhe do grádh. Is na leig ar an bFan mé.
A Mhuire a Mháthair an Aon mhic do bheirim duit féin anoir Iarr sé na grásta go léir domh is cosain mé ar bhaoghal go deo.
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 17:58
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awaiting decision
Annsan do thriomaidís é le túaille. Do chuiridís isteach i dtúaille é. D'fasgaidís an túaille tré bheithin casadh. An tuirsge a thagadh amach as tuigtí stáirse air.
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 17:57
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awaiting decision
Fadó do dheinidís stáirse ós na prátaí. Seo mar a dheinidís é. Do dheinidís gráta de píosa iarainn agus to tharraingidís prátaí fan gráta.
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 17:57
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awaiting decision
Do dheinidís gallúnach cóin maith. Do ghéibhidís blonaigh agus súigh feola, aol agus uibhe agus do bhéirbhidís i gcorchan i dteanntha a chéile iad. Annsan do chuiridís in ártach éigin é chun go mbeadh sé fuar. Annsan ghearraidís suas é i mblochaibh móra agus annsan bhíodh sé críóchnuighthe.
senior member (history)
2019-10-29 17:44
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Fadó nuair a dheineadh na daoine coinnlí agus a lán rudaí eile dóibh féin. Ar dtús do ghéibhróis géin bóg agus annsan do churidís ós cionn na teine é chun go leaghadh sé. Annsan do ghéibhrdís píosa téide agus chuiridís isteach i múnla é agus chuiridís an géir isteach timcheall na téide ar gach taobh agus bhíodh se déanta.
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 16:36
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4. There was a priest who was sentenced to death during the time of the Penal Laws. He was given one chance of his life if he were able to give a riddle that could not be solved, by anyone but himself.
The riddle he gave them was this, "Under the earth I lay, on an ivy leaf I stand, I rode the mare that was never foaled, and held the dam in my hand"
5 If a fellow met a fellow in a fellow's field, if a fellow asked a fellow what a fellow means, how many f's in that?
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 16:33
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got on the horse, and rode away.
The people in the neighbourhood firmly believe that that really happened.
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 13:03
approved
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awaiting decision
le h-éigean cumman buan di.
III
Na haice nuair ba léir dom féinig druidim
Ba mhéinn liom fios d'fághail uaithe
A h-ainm, a thréad, a haon agus a sloinne
Ní cé do cuir ar chuiard í
An tú an ainnir ón ngréig dona traé gur tugadh
Len ar traochadh iomarc sluaighte
Nú an fhinne bhean céarnaith do chéad chur muillean
Go héasca an uise ag luaith meil
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 13:02
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I
Maidin an lae ghli gréine nóir
Gan éinne um chur ar buaidhreamh
Fé dhuilleabhar na graobh na géige glase
Tráth ar iomarc fuair dím
Do dhearcas an spéir bhean bhéasach mhiochair
Go héascha teacht faoim thuairim
Is gur ghile ar a gnénan ghéise ná'n
Faoi scéimh an bhruit ghlais uaithne
II
Ba bhacallach béarlach dréimreach luighte
A craobh fhaoi cuthmhar dualach
Ó bháthas go féir ag teacht 'na mullaibh
Agos gaogadh ar gach dual dí
A mala ba chlaon agus a déid ba ghile
Agus a béal ba mhilis suairceas
Gur bé an dartaire caoch do thréith-lag mise
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:59
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awaiting decision
Mrs Green's mother I can't
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:59
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I
When I come home at night
My poor wife is in tears
Her mother being telling her
Things that she hears
She hears that I gamble
She hears that I drink
And at all the good-looking girls I wink
II
She hears that I wear a big flower in in my coat
And go down to the Quay with a girl in a boat
I can tolerate her uncle and tolerate her aunt
But I can't stand Mrs Green's mother, I can't
III
I'll kill her some day and I'm damned if I don't
For I can't sand Mrs Green's Mother I can't
I can time with her uncle and time with her aunt
But I can't stand
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:55
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When I am Dead
When I am dead my dearest,
Sing no sad songs for me;
Plant thou no roses at my head
Nor shady cypress tree
Be the green grass above me
With showers and dewdrops wet;
And if thou wilt, remember,
And if thou wilt, forget.
I shall not see the shadows,
I shall not feel the rain,
I shall not hear the nightingale,
Sing on as if in pain
And dreaming through the twilight;
That doth not rise nor set,
Happy I may remember
And happy I may forget.
Nora De Burca
Maulatrahane
29-4-38
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:54
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awaiting decision
They are men of lofty intellect, they are nearer to the moon
That shines o're Inchigeela near the town of Sweet Macroom
IV
I have travelled Gougane-Barra and around by Ceim-an-eigh
From Cork to Queenstown harbour and around by Bantry Bay
The hills of Conenmara, Galtee Mountains and Slieve Bloom
None can equal Inchigeela near the town of Sweet Macroom
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:52
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II have travelled wide across the tide
In many the clime I've been
Both Switzerland, Australia and America I have seen
But the dearest spot in all this earth, when clad in Summer bloom
Is around my native Inchigeela, near the town of sweet Macroom.
II
It is there the birds sing sweeter than in any place I know
It's castle gravers are charmign in the warm sunny glow
It's people's hearts are lighter than that place dispels of bloom
Around my native Inchigeela, near the town of sweet Macroom.
III
Now the tallest giants of Ichigeela we can boast of half a score
But the tallest men among them are the O'Leary's of Rosmore
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:37
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Because he was a fenian boy
And fought for Liberty
IV
Oer the grave where Peter Crowley lies
The grass is growing keen,
And underneath Poor Peter sleeps
Because he loved the green,
Oer his grave the Shamrock grows,
The Emerald Green likewise
And say a prayer as you pass by
For it's here young Crowley lies
V
Now fare thee well young Crowley
Fare thee well I saw
But don't forget on that same grave,
Your Poor Old father lay
It grieves my heart to see you there
A hero once in bloom
But then you died a rebel
And fills that silent tomb
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:35
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I
As I roved out one evening
It was in the month of June
I strolled into an old churchyard
For to view a new built tomb
I overheard an old man say
As the tears fell from his eyes
Its underneath the tall green shade
Poor Peter Crowley lies
II
Come tell me of young Crowley
Come tell me if you could,
Who went one night along with him
To Cill Clooney's lonely wood,
Who stood beside that tall old oak,
Who fired the signal gun,
Who fought and died for Eire's right
Bill Crowley's only son
III
The hand that fired the signal gun
Is marked down Clanna Gaedhil
For many a mile we shouldered him
Through many a rugged dale
But lifeless cold Poor Peter lay
A stóirín Geal mo chroidhe
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:32
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awaiting decision
Three brave blacksmiths heard with grateful pride,
From the wives and little ones how they were supplied,
Kept in every comfort by the neighbours far and wide,
And in the fullness of their hears with joy they nearly cried.
V
Blacksmiths, whitesmiths, tradesmen everywhere,
Farmers, labourers, seek our model there,
Be you all as ready for the cause to do and dare,
As the three brave blacksmiths down in County Clare
senior member (history)
2019-10-25 12:31
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Three brave blacksmiths down in Co. Clare
Wouldn't shoe a grabber's horse, wouldn't shoe his mare
They wouldnt' take his money for his threats they didn't care
They'd rather go unshod themselves than shame the Co. Clare
II
Three brave blacksmiths were marched away to jail,
Off they went, quite content, their spirits didn't fail,
They wouldn't make apologies, they wouldn't offer bail,
And so they got their punishment a week for every nail.
III
Three brave blacksmiths, coming home once more,
Met a crowd of loving friends, at the prison door,
The people cheered behind them, and the music played before,
Until each blacksmith stood again upon his cabin floor
IV
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:44
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to be able to catch a hare.
In recent years one of the most famous runners in the lower end of this parish of Ballinaglera was "Hugh Darcy" of Upper Annagh. He was so nimble that he could put his leg behind his head and wind it round his neck. He could run with either a hourse or a bicycle. He was also a great jumper and it is said that once when going on a very urgent message he leaped hedges and "ditches" and angles of Loughs. This man Darcy is still alive.
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:43
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In olden times there were many famous runners in this parish. Some of the men were so swift that they were known
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:42
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About fifty years ago there was a name named John McWeeney who carried a sack of meal in his mouth about the distance of one hundred yards.
About forty years ago a man named Thomas Gilchrist who is still living in the townland of Cultha in Ballinaglera carried three and a half cwts of potatoes on his back, a mile, without resting.
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:41
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age. The journey was about a quarter of a mile mostly through fields and against a steep hill.
He used to carry out creels of manure on his back and many other things.
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:41
approved
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awaiting decision
curlews are flying low, it is a sign of rain. When a horse gallops wild through the fields it is a sign of storm. When the wind from he north it is a sign of hard dry weather.
"Local Heros"
One of the strongest men of the Parish of Ballinaghera in recent years was John McPartlin in the townland of Cultha. He was a great traveller and a very strong man. He is only about two years dead.
He would not look for any more of conveyance no matter what journey was before him. He travelled all of Ireland without paying one penny to the driver of any vehicle to take him from one place to another.
It was no trouble to him to walk at least thirty miles in a day. He walked to Sligo and back in one day and a load on his back, several times. Sligo is about thirty miles of Ballinaglera.
He lived to be eighty one years of age. He was strong and healthy until he died.
He could carry a cwt of meal or a cwt of flour on his back from the local shop to his friend's house, and he eighty years of
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:34
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fly low it is a bad sign. If the shadows the rocks or the mountains can be see in the lake it is a bad sign. If the smoke from the chimneys touch the ground it is a sign of rain. If there is a rainbow seen in the morning it is a sign that there will rain that day. A mist on the mountain in the morning is a sign of rain. Red in the sky in the east before and at sun-rise is a sign of rain. When there is a noise in the lake it is a sign of rain. If the wild geese come to this country it is a sign of bad weather in Scotland and that it will soon be here. If there is a ring round the moon it is the sign of a storm. When the soot falls down the chimney, and the spaniels sleep and spiders from their cobwebs creep, and the crows downstairs seem to fall as if they felt the piercing ball, the moon in hallows hides its head. The cricket too how sharp he sings, the ducks and peacocks how the quack. If the cat scrapes a laddie it is a sign of high wind. If the crane goes to the lake it is a sign of rain. If the cat turns his back to the fire or washes his face it is a sign of a flood. When the
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:30
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If the mountains look near it is a bad sign. If the dog eats the grass it is a sign of rain. Whe the robin comes near the door it is a sign of snow. When you see a rainbow on Saturday it will be showery the next week. When the cat washes his face it is a sign of rain. If the swallows
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:29
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If the swallow flies high it is not a good sign. If the robin is on the top of the tree in the morning it is a sign that the day will be good. If there is a rainbow in the evening it is a good sign. If the beams go up from the sun when setting it is a good sign. If there is no mist on the mountains in the morning it is a good sign. If the frog is yellow it is a good sign. A starry sky in the Harvest is a sign that the next day will be good. When the crane flies to the mountain it is a good sign.
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:28
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awaiting decision
the door it meant a death in the family.
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:28
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awaiting decision
In olden times there were many customs connected with Halloween which have now died out.
One of these consisted of sweeping the floor clean, especially the hearth, before going to bed. On November morning the people of the house used to examine the floor carefully for a footstep. If the supposed footstep was pointing towards the fire it meant a coming marriage in the family, if the footstep was pointing towards
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:17
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townland of Greaghnafarna named John Creamer and Thomas Creamer dreamt that in the (town)land of Thomas Belford int he townland of Cornamuckle North, Ballinaglera Co Leitrim there was a pot of gold hidden at the roots of a larch tree, and a white horse guarding it. But the horse had to be killed or some of the men had to lose their lives.
Next morning at dawn one of the men came to the spot and every branch of the tree was covered with wrens, so the men got afraid and the treasure was never found.
senior member (history)
2019-10-23 17:15
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Names of them
Horse, cow, sheep, donkey, dog, cat, pig, goat
Fowls:
The then, the ducks
Names of horses
Nancy, Peggy, Diamond, Blossom, Jazz, Galbraith, Black, Bess, Kitty, Tommy
Names of cows
Nancy, Fanny, Haunty, Freezy, Betty, Pollie, Dublin, Cherry
Names of ponies
Pattan, Bobbie, Dollie, Paddy, Jacksie Brady, Austin, Venus
Names of lambs
Paddy, Nellie
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 17:03
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Silks and satins put out the kitchen fire.
Don't put of until to-morrow what can be done to-day
He who give a burrowing goes a sorrowing
Look before you leap
If a jest you cannot take,
Then a jest you shouldn't make
To many cooks spoils the broth.
A stitch in time saves nine.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
A crown that hurts is not worth having.
Neccessity is the mother of invention invention,
It's better to go to bed supperless than to go to bed in debt.
Better late than never.
To-morrow is Sunday to thee may
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 12:22
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There is another forge in my district and it is a man called Patrick Lowther who is the smith. This man is better known as "Guiste" and his forge is fairly big is situated at a cross roads not very far from here. This man is a very good smith and he is a very popular man. His forge is not very clean. There is no window or chimney in it but one common door which is of no special shame or make. The forge is filled with old shoes and scrap iron with the bellows which is an old one at the head of it near the fire. His knew dwelling house is close by the forge.
There is another forge near the River Moy owned by Mr. Petrie and it is a man called "Carden" who works in it. The forge is in a very backward place and is a very old and untidy forge. The smith does a great trade between Mr Petries farm and the neighbours.
There is a fourth smith in my district named George Mash. This man learned the trade from his father who was a smith in Belleek for years. His forge is in a back ward place but it clean and tidy. He is a very good
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 14:33
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Cafógaí is druideacha
Gá stroice is gá reabadh
Tháinic Iolrach as na h-ionnachaibh
Is sguab sé leis san aer í
Le h-aghaidh rasher saighdiúiri
Sháll san Aibseana
15
Tá na comharsana dá aithris
Go bfaca siad in an mbruinn í
Is ní deanfainn féin aon iongantas de
Mar is máthair fice laog í
Chonnaic Larry Currain í
Lá agus é ag iarraidh móna
óAgus tarbh draoideacht o albain
Ag iarraidh í a chur i gciunne
16
Dimthigh Séamús Ceanndubáin
Lá agus é ag toruigeacht caoire
Is ag dul soir thar bhalla addly
Seadh casadh ar an sídeóg
Ceist a chuirim ort
Gan tú a cigeacht in mo gaobhar
Cé as a ghluais tú taise
Nó an tú spiorad na caoise caoile
17
Anois lé na críochnugadh
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 14:29
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or a spade. The people pick the potatoes from the earth with their hands.
During the winter months the potatoes are stored in pits or on lofts.
The names of potatoes which grow in this district are Kerr-pinks, Arran-Baners, Champion Epricures and Puritans.
I got this information from my father who is.
Mr C Shekleton
Maio
Teirworker
Co. Meath
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 14:27
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My father plants about two acres of potatoes on his farm. Each year the amount varies.
My father prepares the ground himself, first he covers the ground with farm-yard manure and ploughs it.
Then he harrow's it and cultivates it, then he cross-ploughs it and harrow's it again.
Then he opens the drills in it with a plough.
Some people plant the potatoes in ridges. The ridges are made with a plough, or they can also be made with a spade.
Wooden ploughs were used long ago but there are none used now. The spades used for planting potatoes are bought in a shop. The way potatoes are prepared for sowing is, first all the bad potatoes are picked out. Then the good ones are split to make the seed. The local people help one another in planting the potatoes.
A farmer who has only one horse joins with another for the preparing of the ground. During the summer months the potatoes are weeded and sprayed to save them from the failure. The potatoes are dug with a digger
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 14:25
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At that time the blight fell one night.
The most of the potatoes decayed in the ground and what did not decay in the ground decayed in the pits.
The next year people got it very hard to get seed potatoes and very few people got any at all.
A great many people took a disease called "Cholera" and other diseases from the queer things they ate to stay their hunger.
I got this information from my father Mr. W Ormiston
"The Laurels"
Mullagh
Co Cavan
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 14:23
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The greatest Famine time that ever came to Ireland was in 1846 and 1847.
The potatoes failed and the other crops were very scarce. A great many people died of hunger. The only food to be got was turnips and mangolds, and they were very hard to get also.
It was only a very rich man could get tobacco.
It was known of ten men to get a smoke out of one pipe at the one time. They put the man with the pipe in the middle of them and four sat one side and five the other side. They got nine straws that were burst in the heart, and they man with the pipe pulled it, and they had a straw from each other's mouth and then they all pulled and the smoke went round from one to the other till they all got a smoke.
The district was very largely populated and those that got away with their lives thought themselves very lucky. There came relief from the Government but it was very hard to supply every one's need.
There was a man named Cole who had fifteen children. They had to go to bed two nights running without a bit to eat, but the relief came the next morning and he got four stone of Indian meal, and himself and his family lived. Some of his sons are very rich today.
There are a lot of houses now in ruins that were then occupied.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:13
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We have a field at home called "garraí Riada". It is not a very large field where there is a but of an old house. Long ago there was a dwelling house built in the field it is said that a family of Riedy's lived in the house and made a garden of the field and since then it has got the name of "Garraí Riada"
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:12
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The parish of Crusheen got its name from the graveyard that is near it called the Island. Long ago when a person was going to be buried they would rest the coffin for a few minutes on a stone cross that is near the grave-yard and all the people would kneel down and say prayers for the dead person, before burying them, and that is how Crusheen got its name from the little cross.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:11
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great night, a crowd of the local boys would come in "dressed in straw" and dance a few sets and go away.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:10
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awaiting decision
Marriages are most common in our district during Shrove. The people say that Thursdays and Fridays are unlucky days to get married. There are a good deal of matches made in this district during Shrove. The people also say it is not right for the bride to sing the night of her marriage. The usual fortune given is money, but stock are sometimes given.
It is few people in the parish remember marriages being held in the houses. On the night of the wedding the parish priest would be present and they would have a
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 17:14
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Bhí fear in a chonnaidhe i nGort a Creachair fadó shoin lá amháin bhí sé ag teacht anall fearaidh agus bhí ciste óir leis. Bhí sé ag eirigh tuirseach dá iomhcar. Leag sé ar an talamh é agus dubhairis sé go bhfaghfhadh sé annsin é go dtí lá ar na mhaireach. Thóg sé marc ar an áit ar cur sé é agus ba é an marc a thóg sé na comhartha an gealaigh.
Nuair a thaining sé faoi na dhén la ar na mhaireach ní thiocfhadh leis fhaghail g dtí é mar bhí péiste mór dá faire. Chuaidh sé go dtí feasadóir go bhfeichfheadh sé éin dus báis a chuirfheadh sé ar an bpéiste. Dubhairt an feasadóir leis go raibh tarbh sa domhan thoir agus é a mharbh agus a thabhairt anoir agus teine a pad odh le taobh an eiste óir ags an tarbh a chaitheamh isteach an. Rinne sé sin agus nuair a fuair an péiste boladh an tairbh tháinig sé chomh fada leis an teine agus thosauigh sé ag ithe an tairbh. d'foir an fear an péiste ar feadh tamaill. Annsin rug sé treim air agus ceangal sé é do crann agus thosuigh sé dá bualadh nár gur marbhuigh sé é.
Thug sé leis an ciste óir abhaile annsin chuig a bhean.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 17:09
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lus agus bhí sé saidhbhir ó shin amach.
Chreid na daoine gur biad na daoine maire a cur ann é agus b'fhéidir gur bhiad.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 13:02
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high stone gable - no account of its origin. Yew trees grown in that graveyard. An old tradition connected with it is that when one funeral goes there two more follow within a week.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 13:01
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The graveyard in which the will is is a very old one but is still in use. Trees grow in the churchyard mostly whitethorn - and there is the ruins of an ancient monastery. People are buried within the ruins as there are many headstones there. A bush stands near the well and on that bush coloured pieces of rags were tied after making the rounds. After finishing the rounds to complete them a visit to the old monastery is made and five Our Fathers and five Hail Marys and five Glory's are said.
There was a belief that people were at one time buried on Corraturk hill, near Ballylanders. No signs are there now of a former grave yard.
People always are taken to their own graveyards not necessarily the parish one - it may be the place where that person's ancestors have been buried for hundreds of years, and it may be several miles distant.
A common belief in former times was that when Irish men and women were buried in foreign countries, that their spirits were released from the other world to bring back the remains to the person's own family burial ground, and that the funerals (could not be seen) but heard coming at the dead hour of night to that person's own grave. Ballingarrey (about 1 1/2 miles from Ballylanders) and the grave yard in the district. There is a ruin there also - a
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 12:24
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In Bruree long ago there was a famous dog that acted as a messenger from castle to castle. One Summer's morning as the dog was going from the castle in the burial ground to the castle on the river bank she fell sick on the way and had pups. When the King heard this he ordered the image of the dog and her pups to be hued out on the large flag stone, on which the pups were born.
The dog and her pups are to be seen plainly, hued out on a stone at the back of the old Mill near a part of the river which is called the "Lep"
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 12:22
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The Iver's story:- Mrs. Joyce heard from her mother who was born in 1840 and lived in Clogher Bruree
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 12:22
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There was a tyrant by the name of Ivers living in Castle-Ivers near Athlacca long ago. He was very cruel. The neighbouring people used cross his estate shortcutting to Mass on Sundays; and he determined to put a stop to it. He got a very wicked bull and put in into the field used by the people so as to keep them away from Mass. The journey around the road was very long it seems. The people told their priest about it and he told them to come along the shortcut as usual. They came long. The priest met them and all entered together. The buss attacked them, but at the priest's order the bull was set upon and killed. The priest was arrested and got jail. On the dock he said "that the crows would yet fly through the windows of Iver's mansion" Another curse was "That an Ivers or the name of Ivers would never again be heard of in Athlacca.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:43
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the young pigs are small. They eat out of a tray which is laid on the floor, and all the pigs eat out of the same tray. They have to get a nice straw bed under them occasionally.
Goats are kept much in the same way as pigs. Sometimes goats are tied in the byre with the cows. Some goats stay out at night. They drink bran, and sometimes they eat turnips and other goats eat straw.
Sheep do not have a house to stay in only in cold winter nights. They have a house like the pigs and goats. They are not tied.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:41
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Our cows have got no names. The byres are built of stone with a boarded roof. There are places for each cow. They are separated with a very think board, and some others are built with cement. The cows are tied with chains and sometimes strong ropes. If a stranger milks the cows they do not give all their milk.
The stables for the horses are built in the same way. We have one horse and it is called Johnny. The horses have a manger in which they use for eating purposes. The horses are tied with a rope and sometimes with a chain. Some people put up horse shoes to bring good luck.
Pig houses are also built with a stone with a wooden roof and a wooden floor. The pigs do not be tied, and there is no separation between them, except when
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:38
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wash your hands in boiling water, and rub hard with salt also. Then lift the butter off from the churn, into the wooden dish, and make it up with wooden spades. All the strangers that come in while churning say "Good luck to your work". The buttermilk is used for baking bread, and is also used for drinking. You also give some to the neighbors, and the rest to animals.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:37
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I have a churn at home. It is two feet six inches tall, and 16 inches wide at the top and 19 inches wide at the bottom. The sides are round. It is about 15 years old. The parts of the churn are the saves and hoops and bottom, and staff. We churn every other day in Summer, and once a week in Winter. My father and mother do the churning. The strangers who come in do not help to churn. It takes about one hours to churn. Th churning is done by hand. The people use their own judgement for making the butter and when it comes to the top they take it off. The way the butter is lifted make ready a wooden dish, well washed with boiling water, and rubbed hard with salt, so that the butter does not stick to the dish. Then
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:35
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the salmon he lifted a spade and killed the salmon.
This story was obtained from Mr. J Black Muinagh, Buncrana, Co. Donegal, Ireland Aged 42 years.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:34
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Once upon a time in a place called Miltown, beside Dunree, a man had his cow house along the brink of the river. Every morning when the old housewife went out to milk the cows she could not get any milk, but she could always get it in the evening. This went on for some time but at last her husband thought he would find out where the milk was going to. So he went into the cow house and lay down in a corner where there was straw and covered himself up, and waited for the results. There was a big space between the door and the ground. It was not long before two big salmon came in and started to take away the milk. When the man saw
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:32
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The people in olden times had three meals a day. These were taken at Morning, middle of the day, and at night. People usually worked in the morning before meals. Each meal consisted of tea, and oat bread. Sowns for dinner, and oaten porridge for supper. Potatoes were not eaten at every meal. Milk was drunk often. Butter-milk was usually drunk. They used oaten bread. It was made on what is called a griddle, set in front of the fire and cooked nice and crisp. Meat was not eaten except at set times. Fish was eaten at any time the people could catch them. They did not get vegetables.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:25
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awaiting decision
revels and parades in the adjoining fields and on the banks of the stream which flows past.
The man who claims to have last seen these fairies is Neal McGrorry of Shanagre. This was at six o'clock on a fine summer morning, when the fairies were playing games on the bridge of the Castleross stream near the fairy fort.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:24
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On Roddy's farm in the townland of Barra and Parish of Desertegney there is a fairy-fort underneath the ground. It is supposed to have been constructed by the Danes, and afterwards to have become a home of the fairies. There is a large stone guarding the entrance, which however is now filled up. Many years ago when it was open people counted seven rooms in it. There is a passage running back for more than a quarter of a mile and the floor and roof are greatly flagged. Old people tell that in days gone by they many a time could hear the fairies dancing and singing inside this fort. The story is also gold that long ago at the full of the moon the fairies could be seen holding midnight
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 15:54
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awaiting decision
Siúd ins an gclúid e 's dhá chéad sul ann?
Criathar
Cé'n mí is lugha a ghní mná cainnt?
Mí Feabhra
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:26
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awaiting decision
uisge ins an bpota, agus glaice salann. Annsin théighfeadh sí amach 'sa ngarrda agus thugfadh sí isteach cúpla crann cabáiste. Ghlanfadh sí iad agus cuirfeadh sí sa bpota nuair a bhéadh an t-uisge a fiuchadh. Nuair a cheapfadh sí go mbéadh an cabáiste bruitte thógfadh sí anuas é agus cuirfeadh sí amach ar an míos é do Éoin. Sé an t-ainm a thiubhrfad siad ar an bídh sin ná Gáisín Sodair. Sin a gheobhfadh Éoin le n-ithe ag na fataí.
Nuair a bhéadh sé i Maighean leis an t-ualach ní bhéadh tuirseach ar bith air. Malaí móra fada a bhíodh acú an t-am sin. Rachadh seacht gcéad meadhchon i chuile mála. D'iompróchadh Éoin gach ceann acú isteach ar a dhruim agus chaith sé blianta dhá dhéanamh sin. B'in é an fear ba láidre a chuala mé go minic a bhí thart annseo le cúpla céad blian.
Bríghid Ní Conriogh as Athcloigín a fúar na sceala seo shuas.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:22
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Bhí fear na chomhnuidhe i gCarráin roimhe seo a dtugaidís Éoin Ó Floinn air. Bhí sé i n a fhear an-láidir. Bhí muileann an Creige ag meilt plúr an uair sin. Bhí muileann eile ag muinntir Wade a meilt plúr i Maigheann. Bhíodh Éoin Ó Floinn ag carréaracht an uair sin do mhuinntir Wade. Bhíodh sé ag tabhairt tonna cruithneachta soir go Maigheann. Ní raibh aige ach droch chapaillín. Nuair a chasfadh cnoc leis ar an mbóthar ní bhíodh an capaillín i ndon an cárr a tharraingt. Bhainfeadh Éoin amach an capaillín ón gcárr agus thairngneochadh sé féin an cárr aníos an cnoc. Chuirfeadhsé an capaillín faoi'n gcárr arís agus thairngneóchadh sé é in áit a mbíodh an talamh cothrom.
Is minic a chuala mé na sean-daoine ag rádh nach mbéadh aon ceó le n-ithe ag Éoin ach Gaisin Sodair. Nuair a thógadh a bhean an pota fataí ghlanfadh sé an pota. Chuirfeadh sí braoin
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:11
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Fuaras an faisnéis seo ó Seán De Búrca as Áthcloigin Baile Cláir Co. na Gaillimhe. Aois 82,
Cailleadh é i mí Márta 1938
Timcheall trí sgór blian ó shoin bhíodh aonach an Torlach Mhór lán linncéirí. Bhíodh síad ag díol agus ag ceannach asal ann. Bhíodh chomh maith le fiche cárr tinncéirí ann.
Bhí ceann de na tinncéirí ar meisge lá amháin. Bhí clais mhór uisge i lár na páirce agus tá sé ann fós. Thuic sé isteach ann, Tharraing beirt de na fir a bhí ag feachaint air isteach é. Nuair a sheas an tinncéir suas thosuigh sé ag bualadh na bhfear. Annsin thosaigh lucht na tíre ag bualadh na dtinncéir. Bhí chomh maith le céad bean tinncéirí ann agus maide agus buideál ag gach duine acú. Gach dá raibh san aonach chruinnigh siad thart ortha ghá mbualadh. Chaith siad uair a'chluig ag troid. Ach sa deireadh chuireadar ruaig ar na tinncéirí. Ní raibh aon troid mhór i dTorlach Mór ó shoin agus ní dheachaidh aon tinncéir ag díol asal ann.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:05
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Cad a dhéanfadh mac an chait ach luch a mharbhuigheadh.
Deanbhrathair do Tadhg Domhnaill ádhbhar an mhagaidh ag déanamh magaidh
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:04
approved
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awaiting decision
leap once.
New brooms sweep clean.
Age is honourable.
Divide small and serve all.
A bright heart lives long.
This saying is said when a fire is put down. If the fire lights the one who put the fire down is said to have a bright heart. If it does not light the one who put it down is said to be black-hearted.
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 17:38
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The house the horse is in is called a stable.
The food the horse gets is corn and hay.
When the horse's shoes get worn you need to go to the blacksmith to get new shoes on you need to clip them very often.
You need to clip the tail and mane.
When you are calling the hens
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 16:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the O'Dowds but the Coolican's who live in a house along the River Moy, Ballina.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 16:06
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The ruins of an old castle stand on a hill at Ininscrone overlooking the Bay and the Moy. Some of the chimneys are still to be seen and the windowplaces and doorplaces. The castle is about seven hundred years old. If the castle could open its mouth and talk it would have a lot of things to tell us. The walls are about two feet in thickness. Some of the rooms were round. It has a beautiful appearance.
People named Kavanaghs lived in it about five hundred years ago. After that the O'Dowds lived in it. They were very wealthy. One of the O'Dowds spent his money on the erection of Abbeys and monasteries. He built a beautiful Abbey at Ardnaree, Ballina. A family of Bourkes lived in Ballina. They were very quarrelsome. They went to war and they took the Abbey from O'Dowds and lived in it. A proverb at that time was "You'll get it when the O'Dowds get back the Abbey at Ardnaree". When they had the Abbey taken they thought they would take the Castle as they had a better army than the O'Dowds. O'Dowd heard they were coming to take the Castle. He knew he would be defeated so in the year 1512 he burned the Castle.
Donell O'Dowd was a great fighter. He sailed from Éire to Scotland and fought the king of Scotland and defeated him.
We know of no living relations of
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 17:12
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Is iomdha scéal atá ar bhéal na sean-daoine faoi distheacht an mhadaidh. Tá saghas dadradh ann a thimbhreadh na ba isteach - ceann i ndiadh ceann agus is minic a chonnaic me iad dá dhéanamh. Chonnaic mé madadh a d'fhosglóchadh an doras nuair a bheadh an laiste nó an glas air. Is iomda uair freisin a sábháil madadh fear ó bheith marbh le tarbh nó bó nó aon rud eile. Seo scéal faoi madadh.
Bhí fear agus bhean uair amháin agus chuaidh siad ar chuairt go dtí teach carad agus d'fhag siad na páistíbh agus cúpla duine eile i na ndiaidh i na gcodladh go sámh. Ní raibh siad i bhfad ag teacht na carad go dtáicin an madadh agus é ag caoineadh agus ag tafann. Do chuir sé a dhá chois thart ar mhuinéal an fhir agus do dhírigh chun an dorais é.
Thuig an fear agus an bhean annsin go raibh rud eicínt as bealach agus chuaigh said abhaile go scifreach. Nuair a tháinig siad go dtí sin céard a d'fheicfeadh siad ach an teach ag lasadh agus gan aoinne de'm mhuinntir a bhí istigh i na dhúiseacht. Ní raibh an tine i bhfad tosuighthe agus dá bháirgh sin bhí chuile rud sábhailte mar gheall ar chomh chríonna is a bhí an madadh sin.
Seo scéal faoi easóg. Bhí bean ann uair amháíg agus bhí sí ag ag iompódh fataí amuigh ins na páirceanna. fuair ní nead easóige istigh ann agus
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 17:06
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Famous men and women
Jerh Neill is a great weight thrower. He is the best in the distrect. Teddy Sullivan of Ceapa is a great swimmer. He swam the lake. It is a half a mile long and a quarter mile wide. Dan Breen is a famous walker, he walked from Home to Cork in a day with a ferkin of butter.
John Egan is a good runner and jumper. He use to win prizes. My father is a good mower. He could mow a big field of hay in a day. John Jonse is a good step dancer. My father is a basket maker, he could make three baskets in a day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 17:21
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Shrove:
"Matches" were made (described elsewhere in this book)
Ash Wednesday:
Everybody wears a spot of ashes on the forehead. In former times, the fast on that day was very severe.
"Black" Sunday
Youths collect in groups at the church-gate each armed with a piece of chalk. Unmarried people were "chalked" and held up to ridicule for the whole congregation.
Easter Saturday
On this day little children generally go from farmer's house to farmer's house, as they say, "gathering eggs" in preparation for Easter Sunday
Easter Sunday
At three am on this morning the sun is believed to dance with joy at Our Lord's Resurrection. This is believed to be the hour, Mary Magdalen visited the Tomob. Having eaten a lot of eggs for breakfast, children go out into a corner of a field for a "feast". They boil eggs and eat them in large quantities.
May Day
On May Eve no old person will go out at night fearing to meat the "Good People". If you go into a farmer's pump for water, the farmer will refuse.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 16:59
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On the evening of Xmas Day the local youths go "hunting the wran" with short stout sticks, called "nutties". The wren is brought home, hung on a bush decorated with holly, ivy, and ribbon. Early on St. Stephen's Day, they set off in groups and sing the Wren-Song from door to door. Great rivalry exists between different groups and each group tries to be ahead of the next in visiting houses. They travel up to 20 miles and at night-fall they count the money and divide it. A Football or something connected with some form of sport is generally bought with part of the money, and the rest is spent on refreshments.
St. Brigid's Day
The Brat Bríde is described elsewhere in this book
St. Patrick's Day
Shamrock is worn. In former times, little girls wore crosses of burned sallies, covered with green ribbon on their shoulder. Boys wore badges. After Mass, the men used drink "Patrick's Pot" (a half-gallon of stout).
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 12:19
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méire don fhathach.
Bhuail dá oiread eagla anois é agus dubhairt se má bhí an leanabh go láidir seo, cinnte go raibh a athair na fear iontantach. Theich sé go gearr gasta agus annsin lean Fionn é gur chuir sé an tóir air.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 12:18
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chuir sé ceist ar bhean Fhinn cá raibh Fionn é féin. Dubhairt sise go raibh sé amuig ag seilg ach go mbíodh sé isteach gan mhoill. Annsin chuir sé ceist cé bhí sa chliamhan agus dubhairt a bhean gur bhé mac Fhinn a bhí ann. Bhual eagla an fathach nuair a chonnaic sé go mór agus bhí an leanbh. Chuir sé ceist cén aois a bhí aige agus dubhairt sise go raibh sé se mhí. Chuir an fathach a láimh i n mbéal an leinibh agus bhain an leanbh greim as agus bhí barr na
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 12:10
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Nuair a mhair Fionn Mac Cumhail annseo in Éirinn Bhí fáthach in Albain agus chuir fáthach na h-Alban troid ar Fhinn. Dubhairt Fionn go raibh seisean sásta go leór agus phioc siad lá na troda. Bhí eagla mhór ar Fionn agus smaointeadh siaid gur cheart cliamhan a dhéanamh do.
Rinneadh cliamhan do agus nuair a tháinig lá na tróda, chuaidh Fionn isteach ann. Níor b'fhada go bhfaca siad an fháthach ag teacht. Luighe Fionn go suaimhneach agus nuair a tháinig a fhathach isteach
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 11:50
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Casadh Pádraich Ruadh O'Boileain ar Micheál O Gadhra la amháin. "Móra dhuit a choileáin" arsa Mhicheal. "Mór is Muire dhuit a ghadhair" arsa Phádraich.
Bhí Padraich Ruadh na bomhnuidhe inOileán a'tSamha agus Micheál O Gadhra i Lios Uí Cathasaigh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 11:48
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Casadh fear darbh ain Seán Riabhach O Tailtigh ar mnaoi darbh ainm Mór Garbh Uí Bhriain. Ceap sé beith ag maghadh fuithí.
"Nach garbh an lá é a Mhóir" ar seisean.
Muise is garbh's is riabhach é a Sheáin" ar sise.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 11:42
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Fear a bhí amuigh an-deidheanach oidhche amháin. Tháinig sé go tigh ná raibh solus ar lasadh. Cailín a bhí istigh sa tigh. Bhuail an fear cnag ar an doras. "Cé sin" ars an cailín. Dfreaghair an fear.
"Is file bocht fann mé gur abannsa liom bheith imeasg na ndaoine"
Do labhair an cailín arís agus ar sise
"Sílim gur file go bhfuil breath orth tú bheith amuig an ta seo istoidhche"
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:08
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miles and at a cross roads had their second battle. The third fight took place at the village of Ballymurphy in Sth Co. Carlow and the fourth and last after the burial at Glynn. This was the dead fighter honoured.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:08
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of the women-folk and shouted "Who'll come with me to Graigue" One of the ladies jumped on to the seat exclaiming "Right you are - I'm with you". Off they went and according to the story, got married.
In some districts however fights took place without the men having "the sup" beforehand. A story which John Redmond told me was to the effect that a noted faction fighter formerly of Glynn, in the parish of St. Mullins, died near Kiltealy, Co. Wexford where he had been residing for some time.
The funeral, from Kiltealy to his native Glynn a distance of about 12 miles, was attended by huge numbers including hundreds drawn from several factions around Glynn. These men though that as a departing tribute to the deceased nothing better could be thought of than to have several fights during the course of the funeral. On the road outside the deceased's house in Kiltealy they placed the coffin and fought fiercely round the remains. They then proceeded in an orderly and friendly manner for about 3
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:04
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of police used be drafted into the village on that day to try and preserve order. The police used often be roughly handled as many countrymen used have private bets on the number of peelers it would take to bring him to the barracks next day. I have often heard the people tell how men and women used save-up for months previously for the fair and farmers not intent on selling stock would bring a sheep, or calf in creels as to get enough cash to have a good day. Squads of men from the Ridge of Old Leighlin, Raheendoran and Nurney used march with their strong sticks under their arms to engage in combat. These would divide up amongst the different parts and have a good few, so as not to start the fight "in cold blood" Gruesom tales of broken heads, bleeding hands and bruised bodies were told for many weeks following each fair. The women-folk cheered on the men of their district and used attach each other taking off a shoe and using the heel of it to advantage. People seemed to lose all restraint and did the most outlandish things. It is said that during one fight a driver of a side-car from Graiguecullen dashed up on his "drive" to a group
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:00
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Until a few years prior to the Great War faction fights were prevalent in Co. Carlow. The fair of Leighlin held on may 14th each year was regarded as pattern & fair combined and extra forces
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 10:59
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Mr Vigors, Bungage, Leighlinbridge but it has no such fame as St. Lazerian's well though formerly old people regarded it as blessed but the nearness of the fairies in Dinn Righ discounted all claims to holiness possessed by the well.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 10:59
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Is a granite stone about 2 1/2 ft square sloping inwards and having a square hole on top. This is on the main Carlow - Kilkenny road 1/4 mile from Leighlin. It really makes one corner of a triangular territory, which in older times could elect a member for Parliament. The other stone is at Wells near Royal Oak and the third in the hills beyond Old Leighlin. Written in Latin on the stone are the words "Burgens Leighlinensis hic lapis est" It got the name wart stone because it used contain in the hole at the top a green slimy water said by old people to be capable of curing warts.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 15:26
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Signs of the Weather
Pádraig Ó hIarlatha, Cnog Glas, Mór An Cam Tráighlí. Aos 48 Bliadhain
Slighe Beatha Feirmeoir
If the points are high at Kerry Heat it is a sign of bad weather, that means if the waves are rising high.
If the smoke is puffing down it is a sign of rain.
If Caolfhód tide is noising it is a sign of a change in the weather.
If the swallows are flying low it is a sign of a change in the weather.
If there is a circle around the moon, it is a sign of rain.
If it does not rain when the tide is full, it will not rain afterwards.
If the cat's poll is to the fire it is a sign of rain.
If Brandon point is clear it is a sign that we will (have) not have rain.
A red sunset is a sign of fine weather.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 11:00
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The fairs used be held in Quin Spancillhill and Ardsollus. The old fairs are still held in Quin on the 7th of July and the first of November and in Spancillhill on the 23th and 24th of June. There is no fair held now in Ardsollus nor for the last sixty years. They say the building of the Railway put a stop to the fairs.
There is a special field in Quin and Spanchillhill called the fair-green. There is money called toll on every beast by the owner to the toll collector. When the buyer is paying for the beasts he gets a small sum of money back from the seller which is called a luck-penny. When they are making the bargain the buyer spits on his hand and strikes the seller's hand.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:58
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Long ago a fair was held in Quin on the 1st of November and is still held. Years ago this fair mainly of black cattle, used to gold for a week. This fair was so well known, that buyers came from, all over the country.
Long ago it was the scene of faction fights and even to the present day November fair never passes without a row. They used to have fifty tents in the fair-green selling liquor and food. The tolls are collected at the gate, when the cattle are coming out of the fair-green. The people give a luck penny when they sell a beast
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:56
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There are fairs held twice in the year in Clare-Castle. One on the 30th of May and one on the 11th of November.
The fair in Clare-Castle on 11th of Nov. is the principal fair of the year. It is supposed to be held in the fair-green but it us usually held on the street. Schools are closed on fair-days, as children are not able to walk through the afraid of animals knocking or injuring them.
There is always a large crowd at the fairs an equal number of buyers and sellers. Sometimes the sellers get good prices for their animals at the fairs.
The bargain is made by the buyer spilting on his own hand and then the seller and buyer hit their two hands together. They put mud on the beasts' backs to show that they are sold
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:53
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The biggest horse fairs used be held in Spacillhill on the 24th of June. When the used go to the fair they used have to pay for a drink of water, and ever since the fair of Spancillhill is on a rainy day. The people coming to the fair used lodge in Quin.
There is a fair-green in Quin where the fairs are held. The toll-collecter is Dennis Hassett. There are four fairs held in Quin every year. The 1st of November and the 7th of July are the old fairs, and the 15th of January and the 19th of February are the new fairs.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 15:03
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mbó roimh an am. Chaill sí a cuid bainne faoi sin. FUair an laoigh bás freisin. Bhí bó ag fear eile agus lá amháin bhí sí ag ithe barr crainn óig. Chuaidh géag isteach na shúil. Chaill an bó an súil faoi sin.
D'innis mo athair an bealóideas seo dhom. Seaghán Ó Téadair
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 15:01
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Tá bó amháin againn sa mbaile. Sé an t-ainm ata uirri "Bhóin". Deireann mé "sabha" nuair a bhíonn mé ag tiomáint na bó. Tá trí gamhna againn ach ní thugann muid aon ainm ar bith orra.
Tugann muid "An Stábla Dearg" ar stábla 'na mbíonn na ba. Cuireann muid tuighe mar easair faoin mbó. Ceanglann muid na ghamhna le slabhraí. Tá crúdh capaill ar an doras i dteach na mbó sa gcaoi nach dtiocfaidh an mí-ádh ar na mbó.
Bhí bó ag fear i Srutar uair amháin. Bhí laogh ag an
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 14:58
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part of the day playing this top with a whip. My father taught me how to make a top with a spool.
senior member (history)
2019-05-10 14:58
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I have many passtimes by which I pass the time on Sundays. I often pass the time by making a top. First of all I get a used up spool and a sharp knife. I pare one end of the spool till it is fairly sharp. Then I stick a sharp (stick) pointed stick through in the spool. Then I have a lovely top and spend
senior member (history)
2019-05-08 17:28
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So have the cash before me.
John Connor, Brosna
From Jack Collins, Derragh, Aged 72 years
senior member (history)
2019-05-08 17:28
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Druim an Carraigh, an Craos-loch Thír Chonaill
70 Bliadhna. 4, Feirmeóir
Togadh é i nDrum na Carraigh, An Craos-lochTír Chonaill. Chaith sé a shaoghal i nDruim na Carraigh.
Chuala sé n scéal ón a athair
60 Bliadhna ó shoin
50 bliadhna
i nDruim na Carraigh, An Craos-loch
Scríobhadh an t-amhran seo san leabhar so Eanair 35
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:16
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Then he sat by the fire.
A knock came to the door and all the buckets outside were knocked. The father went to the door but there was no one there. He saw something going up the garden. He closed the door and said nothing.
After a short time he came again to the door. This time the knocking lasted a long time but nobody went to the door. At last it stopped.
Since then there is no trace of the ghost. It is supposed that he was vexed when his bush was cut down.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:15
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There was a fairy bush in Dalystown wood. Martin Costelloe was ordered to cut it. In the evening when he was going home by Fahy's Lough he saw a ghost. Himself and the bicycle were thrown into the river.
After a time he got out of the water and took out the bicycle. When he had it out he was thrown in again. When he got out the ghost had disappeared.
He went home and had his tea.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:14
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saw a man walking around a tree. When she came near him he was walking towards her. She lighted a match and he disappeared.
As she was going over a style she saw the ghost again. She began to get afraid. She kept going and the ghost kept before her. Every time she stood he stood.
After awhile he disappeared. When the woman came to her own door she saw the ghost again. There were five or six people within before her. She told them her story.
While she was telling it the ghost appeared again. Three of the people saw him. They closed their eyes and after awhile when they opened them and there was no trace of the ghost.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:12
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There was a woman one time coming home by the chapel of Leitrim one night. She
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:11
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A certain man was coming home from a fair in Loughrea. It was about three o'clock in the morning when he was passing Berney Reardon's gate. He was riding on a horse. When he was passing the gate the horse slipped and the man got killed.
Every night after that it was said that a big black dog was seen at the spot where the man was killed. Anyone who passed there late at night was not allowed to pass.
One night a priest was held up. He was stopped by the dog. He was there from mid-night until cocks began to crow in the morning. Then the dog disappeared and the priest continued his journey.
The dog was never seen again. The priest hunted it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:09
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Then he married the lady's daughter and the lived happy together.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:09
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"You won't go like the one last night" said he.
The man in the coffin spoke and said, "You are the best man I ever met. I cannot go to heaven because I have gold and jewels hidden at the threshold of the door". He told him where to get a bar of iron to raise the boards and get the gold and jewels and to give them to the lady of the house who was his wife. Then the man slept again.
The women came in the morning and knocked at the window and got no reply for awhile. At last he jumped up and answered the call. She asked him was he afraid and he said "Is it your little spirit of a husband to make me afraid"
He gave her the gold and jewels. She asked him to stay and marry her daughter and she would give him her house and all she possessed. He refused and said that he would go until he knew what it was to be afraid. She told him to go back to bed and rest for a while and he did so.
She sent the servant-boy with a net to the river to catch a dish of eels. She put the eels in under the blankets. They crept all over him. He jumped and screamed and said all the devils in hell were around him. She asked him was he afraid then and he said he was.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:06
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Once upon a time there was a man who did not know what fear was. One night his horse strayed into a graveyard. None of the family would go for him. The man had to go himse.f
There were two fairies standing on the piers of the gate. He could not get out the horse. He started swearing and they disappeared. He then took out the horse.
Then he began to know what it was to be afraid. As he was going through he was so tired that he sat down to rest and soon fell asleep. When he awoke there was a coffin by his side. He took it and put it under his head and slept again. When he awoke in the morning the coffin was gone.
So he started off again until he met a lady and her servants coming out from her house. He asked her for a night's lodging. She told him the house was haunted and that she could not stay in it herself. He said he would not be afraid. She turned back and let him in and locked the doors again.
He was not long in bed when another coffin came in through the window and into the bed beside him. He tied the sheet around himself and the coffin
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:03
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Some years ago the people were very supersticious, but now these superstitions are dying away, and the people know little about them.
Long ago, on New Year's Day the people would not throw out any water. If they did they said that they would have no luck for the year. They would give nothing away on that day either for fear they would be giving away for the whole year.
if they had any special work on hands they always did their best to start it on a Friday. If they were going to live in a new house they would be sure to go on that day. Friday was said to be a lucky day
On May day nobody would give any milk away on May Day for fear he would be left without butter until May Day would come again. Up to the present some still continue to do that. On May morning the butter used to be "brought". Nobody knows how that was done. Crops were often "brought" too but perhaps it might have been imagination. Sometimes crops are bad.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:00
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Over a century ago most of the houses of the village of Kilmacragh were on the north side of the road. Bowes Daly, the landlord raised the rent on all his tenants.
The people on the north side of the road refused to pay the rent. Bowes Daly got some of the army to avict them. There was a fight between them. All the people were killed and their houses were knocked to the ground. The few people who lived on the other side of the road paid the rent and were saved.
Now all traces of those poor people's houses have disappeared but a new village grew up on the other side.
The landlord built houses on the other side and got other tenants to live in them.
At this time the name of the village was changed from Kilmacragh to Newtown Daly. Dalystown and Newtowndaly are both called after Bowes Daly
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:23
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the owner might be identified.
I entered the store about 10am and missed the purse about 11am when I required it to pay for my purchases. During the hour I visited almost every department in the shop and have no recollection of leaving it behind at any one counter. The manager of the Store is aware of my loss, and will I feel sure give you every assistance in your enquiries.
I shall be deeply obliged if you can give this matter your immediate attention,
I am,
Yours faithfully,
Kathleen McGing
Dereendafderg
Drah
Claremorris
Co. Mayo
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:20
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Dereendaferg,
Srah,
Claremorris,
24/2/'38
Sergeant Griffith
Garda Síothchána Barracks
Church Street
Ballinrobe
Dear Sergeant Griffith,
While shopping this morning in Mr. Callaghan's, Bridge Street, I lost my purse and I should be grateful if you would make enquirers about it.
It was a small brown leather envelope-shaped bag with my initials stamped on the flap and contained two five pound notes, three one pound notes, and some loose change. There was nothing inside by which
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:18
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had taken the shape of turtle doves and found happiness at last.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:18
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Long ago there lived an illustrious Chinese Mandarin, who had a beautiful daughter named Li-Chi. He shut her up in the garden as he wished her to marry some noble. However she fell in love with the gardener and they both ran away bringing with them a box of jewels so that they might live in comfort. But the Mandarin saw them and followed them with a big whip.
He caught Chang by his pig-tail. He beat him senseless and then flung him into the river. Poor Li Chi sprang in after him and shared his fate. Their bodies could not be found but a willow tree sprung up in the place and sighed a mournful dirge for the departed lovers. In its branches a pair of turtle doves built their nest and they lived and cooed all day. It was said that the souls of the lovers
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:15
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I often remember studying the cups and saucers trying to find out what the pictures on them meant. I remember one special picture and it depicts a lordly Mandarin's house in the garden by the side of a river. In a garden is a tree with mulberries and another tree laden with oranges to show how beautiful the garden is.
The story of the picture is as follows.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:13
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Nuair a bhíonn lánamhna le pósadh déantar cleamhnas eanorra. i dteach ósta a ndéantar an cleamhnas agus a rinnear an tairgead. An oidhce sin bhíonn an bainis ann agus bíonn an fhéasta achu. Uaireannta bíonn na buachaillaí óga ann.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:12
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Nuair a bhí an stoirm ann in 1848 bhí stoirm an-mhór ar an bhfarraige. Bhí an gaoth ag caitheamh uisce na farrige cúpla míle isteach ar an talamh. An t-uisce a bhí thart ar cuan modh bhí sé ag teacht isteach cúpla míle ó Tuar Mhíc Éadaigh. Nuair a d'eirigh na daoine ar maidin bhí bhrat salainn ar an cabaiste mar bhí a lán cabaiste san áit.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:10
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ina talamh agus imharbhuigh duine achu an duine eile. Bhí an áit go léir ag an duine eile annsin. Tugtar Doirín dá dheirg ar an áit ó shoin agus i leith.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:09
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for money and potatoes. If she got some potatoes she would give three back to the person that gave them to her. She was from Kilmurry.
Nell Faulkner is from Kilrush, she sells saucepans and rosary beads and holy pictures.
Mick Leur used to stay at O'Donnells and he used to tell stories about his father and mother how they travelled through the country and how they lived.
There was another travelling family called the Brandons. They travelled on foot through the country repairing tacklings. Somethings they would have more than a day's work in a house and they would stay for the night.
A man named John Burke goes around from place to place; he mends umbrellas for the people. He travels on an ass and car. He wants a lot of money when he does any job.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 13:07
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There was a family known as the Delanys; they stayed at Greenes Moyralla and the people came from far away to hear them. they were good story tellers and singers. they came from Co. Tipperary. They made their living by selling lace, tarpaulin, tie pins, camphor and buckets made of tine. They took anything they would get.
There was also another family known as the Carthy's; they stayed at Hennessy's Coolmeen and people came to listen to them tell stories. They came from Ennis. They made their living by selling tins, camphor, and tie pins.
The Casey's also stayed at Henessy's Coolmeen and told stories. They made their living by selling tie pins and studs and camphor and they mended umbrellas.
John Casey is from Kilrush. He goes around to the houses selling holy pictures and statues.
There was a woman going around known as Nell op: she was asking
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 18:11
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Shops were not as common in olden times as they are now. People had to go to the nearest towns to make purchases. Buying and selling was carried on, after Mass, and is also to the present day. Sometimes cattle are bought and sold after Mass in this district.
Money was not always given for goods. Sometimes work was given instead. Sometimes goods were exchanged in this district long ago. Labour was exchanged for goods a long time ago, and is still to the present day.
There were several words connected with buying and selling such as "boot", "tick", "change" and "cant".
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 17:58
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supposed that there were people living there whose name was Lawson.
Long ago in County Down, there was a blacksmith who lived beside a ford. His name was Gill, and the ford was called Gill's ford. And the town was first known as Gill's ford but afterwards it was shortened go Gillford.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 17:57
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The local roads are known as by-roads and the larger ones are known as main-roads. They lead to Cootehill. And from Cootehill they lead to Cavan, Ballybay, Clones, Bailieborough, Shercock and Ballyjamesduff. There are some very old roads in this district, and they are still used. There are no local accounts as to when they were made. There are some old paths and by-ways in teh school district. There are some mountain passes also in this district.
Before bridges were made, rivers were crossed by means of fords at shallow places. There was a ford near Cootehill called Lawson's ford. It is
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 17:54
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Sticks, sods, turf, and heather were burnt long ago. Rozen candles, and also tallow candles were used for giving light at night. Sometimes people sat in the dark except for the light of the fire.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 18:08
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1. If a person is asleep and if the heart and the right leg of an owl is left on his breast he will answer any question that he is asked.
2. If a person has nightmares and if he places his shoes under the bed with their toes out he will have no nightmare that night.
3. If you want to dream of the person you will be married to boil an egg, take out the yoke and fill it up with salt and swallow it. Then go to bed and during the night your intended will come with a drink of water to you.
4. When a young couple are after being married whichever of them walks out the door first will be the first to die.
5. If you put a bit of a wedding cake through a marriage ring and dream of it then you'll dream of who you'll be married to.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 17:59
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Tá cuigeóg againn sa mbaile. Tí cuigeóg mór í mar níl ann ach thoigh ar leithead agus trí troighthe ar fhaid. Is féidir ceithre galúin bainne a chur ann. Bíonn sé púint ime ar líon na cuigeóige. Ceannuigh m'athair ó Mhícheál Mac an Bháirt é. Thóg sé púnt agus sé scilling uirrí. 'Siad an Iomithe, an láimhín agus an chlár gléasanna na meidre. 'Sí mo mháthair an dhéananns an cuigeann. Nuair a bhíos an chuigeann déanta baintear amach an loimithe agus tógtar amach an t-im le sórt cupán déanta as adhmad. Annsin cuirtear i mbóla é agus níghtear é. Nuair a mbíonn sé nighte cuirtear salann air.
Má thagann stróinséir isteach le linn na cuiginne buaileann sé greas uirrí ionnus nach dtógadh sé an t-im leis. Deirtear nach ceart
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 17:52
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There was a man in Belclare one time and he was a shoemaker. One day a man called to him and asked him to make a pair of boots. This he did and when the man asked him how much they were the shoemaker wrote something on a piece of paper and gave it to the man, who went away. Some years later the man came again and brought the shoemaker to the top of a hill and gave him as much land as he could see. This man (as per story) was Cromwell
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 17:52
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There was a man in Belclare one time and he was a shoemaker. One day a man called to him and asked him to make a pair of boots. This he did and when the man asked him how much they were the shoemaker wrote something on a piece of paper and gave it to the man, who went away. Some years later the man came again and brought the shoemaker to the top of a hill and gave him as much land as he could see. This man (as per story) was Cromwe;;.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 17:39
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wear. The boys of my district go barefoot during the Summer months. This is a very healthy habit and it hardens the feed and makes them in such a way to endure labour. When people wash their feed by night it is hindred to keep the water inside by night they are obliged to throw it out.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 17:38
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In olden times people did not wear shoes for they were not able to afford them and only the very rich people used to wear them and they were but few. The majority of the people of the present day wear shoes. In far off days it was a very rare thing to wear shoes.
All the people used to go barefoot both young and old. After many years people began to manufacture shoes called clogs with timber soles and leather uppers. These home manufactured shoes were liable to give good
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 17:37
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I will now give you an account of the industries carried on in this district in former times. Thatching was a great craft, as it was nearly all thatched houses they had in those days. This was done with reed or straw, and kept on with "sparo" suitably dressed and pointed for the purpose. It was then pared off nicely, and it looked very comfortable.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 17:35
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the shape of a black pig. A combat began between the black pig and the Saint in which the Saint killed the pig. He then changed the pig into stone, and it can still be seen carved in the walls of the Monastery.
There is another interesting story told in connection with the Monastery at Fenagh.
Tradition has it that there is an underground passage leading from the Abbey down to the lower one. It is said that there is a pot of gold hidden in this channel between the two Abbeys.
The local landlord heard this story from the old people. He decided to investigate it. He sent some workmen to open the passage. The first man that went in did not return, another man entered and found the first man dead.
This happened on three occasions at least they closed the passage again and it has not been opened interfered with for fifty or sixty years.
Another story is told that a son of the King of Spain is buried in Fenagh Cemetry. The above information was given to me by JAmes Teague, Aughnaglace, Cloone, Mohill age 60 years
Written by Kathleen Keegan, Cankeel, Cloone
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 17:31
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A Saint names Cillian came to Cloone to build a Monastery. He carried a little bell with him, and standing on the hill of Cloone, he threw his bell a long distance from him. It rang in the townland of Tooma.
When St. Cillian arrived at Tooma, he asked the owner of the land whose name was Guckian, could he build a Monastery on his land. Guckian refused the Saint's request, and so the Saint cursed him and said tha tnever would a Guckian family live in either of the three parishes Cloone, Aughavas or Gortleteragh. At that time the three parishes went under the name of Cloone.
St. Cillian decided to build another Monastery. He threw his bell a second time, and it rang at Fenagh. He started his Monastery there, but the amount of work done each day by the monks, that night it was knocked. This continued for some time. At last the Saint decided to sit up and see who was interfering with his work.
About midnight a form appeared in
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 17:28
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Mairtín Ó Cuinn as Baile na Móna de scriobhaois.
Sé Baile na Móna an t-ainm atá ar mo bhaile. Tugadh an t-ainm sin air mar bhí portach ann fado. Tá aon teach deag ann. Ta cuig tighthe an agus tuighe atá ortha. Tá sé cinn ann agus slinn atá ortha. Tá go leor scealta ag muintir na h-áite faoi Baile na Móna
Timhceall fiche bliadhain ó shoin bé tuighe a bhí ortha uigil. Tá dhá sean daoine ós cionn 70 mbliadhna d'aois in a gcomhnuidhe ann. Tá gaedhilg acu agus tá siad in ann scéalta a innsheact i nGaedhilg. Tá a lán foghrach tighthe ann. Tá talamh mhaith i guid de agus tá an cuid eile go dona. Fadó ní raibh ann ach raithneach agus driesacha. Tá carraigreachta le feiceál ann fós.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 15:05
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On St. Stephen's Day boys and sometimes men go round with the wren. They play music and sign songs at each house. This is the song that they usually sing: -
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds
St. Stephen's Day he was caught in the furze.
Up with the kettle and down with the pan
Give us a penny to bury the "wran"
The men usually divide the money and spend it on drink and the young people buy sweets and cakes.
Shrove Tuesday is sometimes called Pancake Day. It is called so because people make pancakes and eat them with their tea on that evening. Sometimes a ring is put in them and whoever gets it while eating them it is said they will be maried before that day twelve month. Some years ago a number of marriages were carried out on this day. Shrove Tuesday is often called by the old people "Shraff" Tuesday. Some say it is unlucky to cut your hand on Good Friday. The eggs that are laid on Good Friday are usually marked to be eaten on Easter Sunday. Some people cut their nails and their hair on this day
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 15:01
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1. Caitlín Nic Gearailt
Baile na hAbhann, Baile na nGall
2. Eibhlís Bean Mhic Gearailt, seoladh thuas
3. 19/11/38
1. Deirtear nár cheart pósadh do dhéanamh ar an luan ná ar an Aoine ná i mí Bealtaine ná Lughnasa mar go mbeithfí caillte seacht mbliadhan ó'n lá shan.
2. Deirtear rís a chrothadh ag dorur an Sáipéil an mhaidean a phósann an lánamha chun go mbeadh an rath ortha i rith a saoghail.
3. Ní ceart culaith uaithne a chaitheamh mar tá an droch rath á leanamhaint.
4. Is ceart ball-eadach éigin le duine eile do chaitheamh lá an phósta
5. Nuair a bhíonn an cailín nó an buachaill ag fágaint an tighe gur ceart braon uisge coisreacan do chaitheamh a an aistruichán
6. Sean bhróg do chaitheamh leo nuair a bheidís ag gabháilt an docus amach ionnus go leanfadh an rath iad
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 14:52
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There is a double door on the forge with a horse-shoe printed outside.
People used to tell stories in forges long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-04-01 14:51
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There is a forge in the village of Creeher it belongs to Tom Reilly. It has a borded roof. There is a bellows, a anvil a sledge, hammers, horse shoes, and a big coal fire inside the forge. It is near a stream on the side of the road. The water the smith uses washes the irons with is good for curing warts. It is a very old forge.
When a blacksmith is shoeing a horse, if a spark flies at him he will be getting money soon.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:50
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Seo iadh na n-ainmheacha atá ar na h-ainmhidhthe allta atá i mo baile fearinn i mbaile na leacan.
An madhra ruadh, an broch, an coinín, an girrfid agus an easóg. Déineann an madhra ruadh a leabha i bplús nó síos fé cairrigh mór.
An broch. Déineann an broch a leabha i bplús nó uaireannta déineann sé poll ins an dtalamh. Ainmhidhthe
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:48
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agus an tíogharna. An aithnighneann tú é arsa fear leis an spailpín. O! arsa an spailpín de geit. 'Is mise nó eisean an dtighearna"
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:47
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Mr Furlong of Ballyvaldon (noted already) tells me how the game of "buttons" was played. To begin with he said every boy in the old times carried marbles and buttons in a purse tied with a running string. This purse was often carried by a string around the neck.
To play buttons: There was a circle drawn on the plásán of about 3' diameter and each player stood his "stake" of buttons within the circle. Then there was a line drawn say 10' away behind which the players stood to 'pink for 1st shot'/ the throw nearest the circumference was first. An important feature of the game was the maneuvering for position so as to be able to drive out more than one button outside the circle with the one shot. Anyone attempting this had to cry 'slapoo' before attempting. If he succeeded he naturally got the buttons if he failed he had to 'stand' another button in the ring. If his throw remained inside the circle he was 'fat' and had to go back to line. To strike your opponents than gave you a button.
The exchange in this locality of those days was 1 thaw = 3 buttons but I suppose it varied.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 17:53
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us all the year round. The Cuckoo and the swallow leaves this country about the middle of April. We have the Corncrake the Tom tit and the chirping sparrow the Crane and Willie Wag tail. The crow builds her nest on a tree. She lays two eggs. Her nest is made of sticks between two forks. A thrush builds her nest with sops and mud. She builds her nest in bushes. She lays five eggs the colour of the eggs are white with brown spots. A crow builds her nest with cippons and lines it with mud. She lays two eggs. She builds her nest in the tip of a tree. The pigeon builds her nest with cippons. She lays two eggs ofa white colour. A Cuckoo builds no nest only lays the eggs and when the Cuckoos have hatched she throws them out of the nest. She lets the other bird hatch the eggs in order she would get all the food herself.
senior member (history)
2019-03-11 17:50
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The pheasant is a wild bird. They generally build their nests in woods. There are pheasants in Florry Healy's wood. The pheasant makes his nest on the ground. It is a very simple nest. The bird just makes her form in the dry grass. She only hatches a small clutch. She lays only four or five eggs. The eggs are fair sized and light brown in colour. Birds nests are often robbed of their eggs by young - lands and when the poor bird returns to her little home and finds her nest robbed she becomes very angry and she curses those bad boys that robbed her nest and they generally get a dose of scabs or itch. The blackbird builds her nest in a ditch it is made of mud and hay. She lays five eggs they are blue spotted in colour. The robin builds her nest in the side of a ditch in a hole. This bird stays with
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 16:04
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There were Protestants in this parish and this day they killed a cock and when the cock was down boiling in the pot all of a sudden the cock stood up on the edge of the pot and flapped his wings and said "Mac mo thúan slán" This sign showed that the cock did not want the Protestants to be boiling him.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 16:03
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at a shop in the form of a robin and he sung so beautifully that they asked him to sing again and he said I can't be singing for nothing and they gave him a pair of shoes. Then he went along and said the same and he got a bag of gold and he went on in the same way and he got a mill-stone. This day he appeared at his own house and the girl ran out and he gave her the shoes. Then the father ran out and he gave him the bag of gold. Then the mother ran out and he threw the mill-stone on top of her and killed her. then he changed into a boy and went in with his father and lived happily ever after.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:47
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Once upon a time their were two children a girl and a boy and their mother died and their father married again but the stepmother did not like the boy but this day she called in the little girl and gold her take an apple out of a trunk. The girl went out and told the boy to go in and when he went in she told him to take an apple out of a trunk and he had his head in the trunk taking the apple and she slapped the lit of the trunk down on top of him and cut off his head. Then she took him outside the back door and put him standing and then put on his head. After a while the little girl was coming in past the boy and he had an apple in his hand and she asked him for it. Then she went in and told the stepmother that he would not give it to her. She said "Go out and hit him a slap" and the girl went out and hit him and his head fell off. Then she went in crying to the stepmother and the two of them went down the field and buried him. The father came in and he asked where was the boy and she said he was gone to his aunt on a holiday and he said "I thought I told you not to let him there" and they said no more about him. One day this little boy appeared
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:21
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The headless coach is a big carriage. The people around here don't know whether tis horses or what is under it. This was in Ballagh in olden times. It is said that it used start at the new stile in Cappamurra and on through Ballagh, Clonoulty and in through Marlow to Pennafeather's halldoor. This carriage when it used to pass the houses it used to shake the delph on the dressers.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:20
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Their was a big black god seen beyond at Cappamurra bridge and the people said that it was a soldier that was buried their. This dog was seen by a great number of people around here.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:19
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Once upon a time a woman and her husband lived below in the house where Michael Kearney lives now and this man was working at Catpain Manger's in Cappamurra where Mr Greene lives now and it used be very late when they used stop working those times and they used get their hire every Saturday night and this woman used to wait for her husband's hire to go for messages. This night she went up to Ballagh for messages and when she was coming home near the stile where we are living now a monk stepped out to her and asked her why she was out so late and then handled one of the message bags that she carried and said that he would help her to carry it and just as they came near Cappamurra bridge he parted with her and told her if she could manage not to be ever out later again and that he was only for her good.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:16
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Moses riding on an ass was passing a quarry. The stonecutters threw spalls at him. He turned round and cursed them saying "A penny will never overtake a penny with ye". On that account stone-cutters are always poor.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:15
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tail and said "They went by yesterday" but even the soldiers did not belive him.
If you crack a darrige Daol's tail three times with your thumb you will gain and indulgence
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:14
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As the Blessed Virgin and St Joseph and the Child were fleeing into Egypt they saw men sowing corn and they went in and said "If any soldiers ask you have you seen a man, a woman, a child and an ass pass this way, say you saw them going by when you were sowing this crop". The crop grew overnight and the next day the soldiers came and asked the men had they seen a man, a woman, a child and an ass and they said they saw them going by when they were sowing the crop and the soldiers said it was no use following them because it was no they would be gone too far. As they were about to turn back the darrige daol cocked up his
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 15:12
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when a big red dog came up and pushed them off the road and then a headless coach passed by and away they ran
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:52
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Story told about a fort on the land of Mr Furlong in Carhue
This fort is full of rabbits, grey, black, brown and white and black ones.
A great many people try to catch them, but they never can because they belong to the fairies who live in the fort.
A fort near Tipperary town.
There is a fort near Tipperary and a man used to sleep in it every night. One night at twelve o'clock he heard a bell ringing. When he got up next morning he told the owner of the field. The farmer told him that he was going to die. He died a couple of days after.
Nov 1937
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:50
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returned home. The rest were never seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:49
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We live in Toureen. There is a fort on the other side of the wood on Kelly's farm, the townland of Knocklass.
A family once lived near this fort. Every evening some of them used to go gathering sticks in the fort. One evening late as they were leaving the fort they heard their names called out. One of them made answer but the others did not. He was the only one who
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:48
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This continued for a month or more.
He went to a window who lived near by and told her his story. She asked him if he had taken anything out of the fort, and he said that he had taken a bottle off the branch of the tree growing in it. She told him to take it back and put it in the same place. He did and then his cows gave him their milk just as well as before.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:47
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There was once a farmer who had a lot of cows. One morning all the cows suddenly refused to give a drop of milk.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:47
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around he found that he couldn't find his way out. The place seemed to get bigger and bigger, and he couldn't get to the end of it.
After some hours, he got out of the fort, but then he got lost in the fields surrounding it, and couldn't find the road, Search as he would.
he could find nothing but fields all round
Not till it was getting bright in the morning did he find his way home.
If anybody planted anything in this fort it would be waste of time for nothing would grow.
A girl went through the fort on her way to the well. On her way home she was caught and held by the fairies and she lost her bucket.
A foal board in the fort suddenly disappeared, but after a time came back again.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:45
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At about eight o'clock one night a man named Phil Dwyer went into the fort to look for his donkey. After looking
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:45
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Once a man was going to look for his cows. He went along the road but couldn't find them. Then he went into Mr. Robert Graves' field in Ballintemple where the fort is. He looked all round but couldn't mind the cows so he decided that he would stay there till morning.
At midnight he saw heaps of fairies dancing round.
When they saw him they stopped for a while. He went near to them and again them commenced dancing. At the first peep of day they all went away.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 17:43
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Once upon a time a tailor had a terrible lot of suits to make. He said to himself he would never have them all made. Just then a little man appeared and sat on the table in front of him. He was a fairy, and he told the tailor to go to bed. The tailor went to bed, and all night long he could hear the sound of the machine.
Next morning when he got up all the suits were made, and all piled neatly one upon the other on the table.
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 17:57
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is held each year on the 11th August to commemorate her feast day. The local priest preforms the "Stations of the Cross" and recites the Rosary.
Every child looks forward to Hallow-Eve night. This night a tub of water is placed in the centre of the floor and an apple is put lfoating on it. The apple is won by the person who succeeds in catching the apple in the mouth without touching it with the hands.
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 17:56
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Many old customs are connected with the festival days throughout the year. On St. Stephen's Day - which is the 26th December, boys, and sometimes men, dress in peculiar cloths and travel around from house to house collecting money. They are titled "Wren Boys" and they usually travel in groups of five, or six. They wear false faces or any other covering on the face to prevent them from being known. At each house they sing and dance and play some musical instruments. These boys are always given a little money in every house and at the end of the day they divide the money equally among themselves.
In the local town it is customary on Shrove Tuesday - which is the Tuesday before Lent - to skatter salt on those who were expected to marry during "Shrove" but did not do so. The salt is shaken to keep them fresh till next year.
On St. John's night, the 24th June, a bon-fire is held in each village. The young boys and girls collect sticks and turf from every house in the neighbourhood and make a big fire. They dance and play around this fire till the early hours of the next morning.
At St. Attracta's well in this locality a pattern
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 17:51
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When they are fully grown they are sprayed. The spray is a mixture of blue stones, washing sods and water. This mixture is placed in a spraying machine and taken through the furrows so as to allow the spray to come in contact with every stalk and so prevent the blight from attacking them before they have reached maturity. If the weather is foggy or damp the stalks are usually sprayed a second time as it is believed that in foggy or damp weather the blight will effect them quicker and more severely.
Lastly they are dug, picked and placed in a hole where they remain until they are used.
The drawing below is a rough sketch of the type of spade locally used.
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 17:31
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An average of about three roads of potatoes is sown each year on our farm. In preparation for these my father puts a considerable quantity of farmyard manure on the land. He next ploughs the land and digs the furrows. The field is now ready for the seed, which is prepared in the following manner. The potatoes are first taken from the place in which they had been stored for the winter season, which is generally in a pit in the field wherein the potatoes were grown the previous year. These potatoes are then cut, care being taken that each part contains at least one eye. When planting these "splits" holes are made in the ridges with a spade. The "splits" are next placed in the holes, which are in rows, each row consisting of three holes. There is usually a distance of about ten or twelve inches between every two holes, likewise between the rows. The holes are next closed.
The potatoes are then moulded for the first time. When moulding them the clay, which is in the furrows, is put on the ridges. This is done when the stalks begin to peep over the ridges. They are moulded secondly when half grown.
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 17:26
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their houses are in ruins. The scenery of this townland is beautiful. There is a lake and many streams there, a hill and a wild bog, but the rest of the land is very fertile.
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 17:25
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The townland in which I live, is called "Townlamuckla". It is situated in the centre of Kilcolman parish and in the barony of Coolavin.
Townamuckla, is so called, because in those years, large herds of swine were kept at each house and thus the townland got its name.
This townland is inhabited by about thirty six families and eight of these have the family name "Sharkey". On an average there are about two hundred and twenty occupants in the townland. Most of the houses are thatched, some are slated, a few are tiled and others are galvanised. Very few are two storey houses.
Old people are now very scarce in the townland. All that are still to be got are great storytellers. The following are the names of the best
Mr. Coleman, Mrs. McHugh Mr Doohan, Mr. Flannery, Mr. Helly and Mrs O'Hara
In years gone by, houses were far more numerous and their ruins are now everywhere to be seen. Most of the occupants emmigrated to America as they could not make a living at home and now
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 15:21
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How he crossed the Shannon:-
The difficulty seemed nisurmountable. Dermot Ó Halloran, a famous Curragh maker, and the O'Malleys were with Ó Sullivan Beare in his remarkable retreat. Dermot O'Sullivan, Donalí kinsman in his 10 years proposed the making of Curraghs. O'Halloran and O Malley set to work. Dermot Ó Sullivan took an active part in their construction. One Curragh was capable of holding 30 armed men. Ó MAlleys accomadated ten, this was pushed out into the water and sank in mid-stream. It appears all ten were lost. The large one was more successful thus regarding their great labour in constructing it they were obliged to swim across the river.
(12 horses killed for the making of the Curraghs)
John O Mally called Seán na Seolta from the number of Curraghs he made. The O Mallys are celebrated by the Irish as the most expert mariners in all Ireland.
The Sliabh Sachairghe mountains extend from near Limerick to Loughrea and rise to a height of from 1000 to 1200 feet.
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 15:18
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English, - son of Captain Mally, and then routed the enemy. After this great victory at Aughrim they proceeded to Ulster. Marchy through Roscommon - then Curlew Hill. Then they came in sight of O'Rourkes Castle. Arrived 35 Number 18 armed, one woman. All the rest perished on the way.
How he crossed the Shannon:-
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 17:59
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are two ornamented stones on the pillars of the gateway. There is a round tower in my district. It was built by the men who built Cloyne Church. No one know the right year when it was built, some say it was built eleven hundred years ago and others say it was built fourteen hundred years ago. An old story about it is, it was supposed to be built in one night by a "devil"
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 17:58
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There is a great many ruined castles in my district. The oldest one of them is called "Bar na Brough". It was supposed to be built by a rich man in Ireland long ago. It is eight hundred years old. It is on the top of a hill about two miles from the town of Cloyne.
This Castle was never attached but much of it was broken down one night by a gale. There is an old story attached to it, which is, who ever would pull a stone out of it would die. It has no dungeon. People were not foully put to death in it.
There is no ruined Church in my district. But there is an old burned down building which is supposed to be a monastry. There is no old story about it.
The Castle contains some carvings on one doorway. The carvings are shaped like a shamrock. There
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 17:56
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a scissors, and sometimes by clipping the hair on the side. When an animal is sold the rope or halter is kept, except when a horse is sold, the halter is given away. The great fairs of the year are May fair, and August fair. there are no special fairs held for sheep or bonhams, but there is a special fair for horses in Midleton twice a year.
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 17:44
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The local fairs are held in Killeagh, Youghal and Midleton. There are generally held in town. Buyers generally go around to farmers houses looking for sheep and other animals to buy.
About twenty or thirty years ago there used to be fairs held in Castlemartyr every month but now it has been discontinued, because first it was too far away from the railway station and there was no fair field.
The Midleton fair is held in a fair field. The pigs are left in carts and the cattle are put in the field.
Toll is always paid on cattle sold sometimes it is 5/11 and sometimes only 1s/"
When a bargain has been made, the party show their agreement by striking hands. The animals are marked by red paint
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 17:41
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The Milford Dairy Factory Co. Ltd (the local creamery) was established in 1887. A ball of hair (human) clippings and toe and fingernails was found in a hole in the wall of the creamery.
The aim of the individual who placed the above in the wall was to derive the benefit of the fat of the milk
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 17:40
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Catapults, cribs (for catching birds) swings, see saws and blow pipes were made in Milford. Catapults are used in throwing stones at birds or certain objects. Cribs are used for catching birds and they are made of sticks in the form of a box.
To make a "swing" two rope are tied to a tree and a board is tied to the ends. Small stones are used for a blow pipe. By blowing in to one end they come out quickly and the other.
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 17:38
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Níl bliadhain ar bith nach dtig scaoth bacaigh thart fríd an tír seo agus tig an chuid is mó acu go teacht sagainne. Mac Ruaidhrí cuid aca agus Mac Fhionntairch an chuid eile. Tá fear eile thigh thart bhfuil Ua & Máiligh air, as an Chonndae seo an dá chéad dhream agus as Chonnachta Na Máiligh. Ní this an dá dhream le chéile am ar bith agus nuair a chastar ar i chéile iad bíonn marbhthach ann.
Nuair a fuair sean Simon Na Fhionntaith bás bhí cúigear mac aige. Roinn sé an Co Chonndae seo idir ceathrar aca. Níor fhág sé ag an cúigeadh mac ach oileán Thoraigh mar bhí an mac seo amaideach agus ní dhearn sé dhath dó'n athair ariamh.
senior member (history)
2019-02-01 10:53
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The majority of the industries that were carried on in my district long ago have now discontinued.
Candle making was done in every house long ago. The candles were generally made from rushes. Soap making is still carried on in some of the houses.
All the people around my district made their own baskets and "eleeves". They make those articles from scollops. Every person span his or own wool long ago. They made their own rugs and clothes from the wool. Linen was made in some districts also. There was a linen industry in Rathmore about thirty years ago but it has now discontinued. The flax was grown around this district. Each farmer knew how to thatch his own house long ago but now very few farmers know how to thatch.
Long ago the farmers used to burn their own supplies of lime in kilns and some of them sold it at the markets. The used the lime principally for building houses.
senior member (history)
2019-02-01 10:50
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The local fairs are held in Strokestown and Roscommon.
They are always held in the town. The buyers transact business in the county yet. They buy the cattle or sheep at the farmers' houses. There are no fairs abolished except on in the townland of Ballinafad which is now held in Strokestown.
The townland fair is held in a field away from the town called the "fair Green". The cattle are sometimes bought or sold on the streets. When the cattle are sold to England the buyers have to pay money on them called a tarrif. This is paid to the English government. When an animal(s) is sold there is usually luck money given called a "Luck penny". There is about a half a crown given on every £10. The "Luck penny" depend on the price that is got for the beast. When a bargain is made the parties concerned show their agreement by spitting on their hands and striking them. The seller often brings in the buyer and treats him. When animals are sold they are marked with raddle on the flank and the hair is sometimes clipped on the side. When an animal is sold the halter is given away for luck.
The great fairs of the year are as follows:
The 9th Jan, 31 March, 23rd April and the 11th November
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 18:07
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Long ago the people made all their own bread with oatmeal and flour made of wheat.
The cakes that they made were pan cakes, potato cakes and oatmeal cakes and "bocstaí".
When the people wanted to make a potato cake, they first got boiled potatoes and mashed them very fine and mixed them with flour and made it into a cake. Then they got a piece of tin like a plate and put the cake on it and left the piece of tin on the "bearer" to bake.
When it was baked it was cut up in small pieces and everyone got a bit of it.
When a person was married an oatmeal cake was made for the wedding and when a child was born a pancake was made and everyone in the house got a bit of the cake.
A week before November's night all the people of the village would make pancakes and on November's night a prize would be given to the people who made the best pancakes.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 18:05
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People in olden times had three means a day, namely breakfast, dinner and supper. Breakfast generally consisted of oatmeal porridge or stirabout and buttermilk. The houses of the richer usually had oatmeal bread, eggs and newmilk. This batter was considered a luxury and only in the houses of the very well-to-do people was it given.
Dinner consisted of potatoes, cabbage and bacon. All bacon used in olden times was home-cured. Supper mostly consisted of potatoes and milk with salt herring or eel. The people seldom or never partook of more than three meals per day. The time for supper varied. In the busy working season supper was served soon after quitting work; in the winter they were not exact what time supper was served up to 12 pm. People worked sometimes for 2 hours in the morning before having food. Breakfast was taken about 10am, dinner at 2pm and supper time varied as stated above. Milk was drunk in plenty including buttermilk, mixed milk, which was a blend of buttermilk and new-milk, and new milk.
The people sat around on the middle of the floor and ate their meals of a losstt (losad). The lossett was made of wicker work like a basket
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:39
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I live in the townland of Carntulla in the parish of Ballinaglera in the Barony of Dromahair. There are eleven families in the townland of Carntulla. There are forty one people in the townland. Flynn is the most common name in this townland. Thatched houses are the types of houses in this district. There are four old people over seventy in this townland. Their names are Mrs. Bridget McGovern, Mr. John McKeon, Mrs John McKeon and Mr. Tom Flynn. There are two ruins of old houses in the townland. Houses were more numerous in former times. There is a ruin of an old house on Dan Flynn's land. Molly Loughlin lived in it. There is another old house on Tom Flynn's land. Matthew Feehily lived in it. There is a lake on the Carntulla Mountain called Loc na mBreac. Poll Sean river flows through the townland.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:36
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Mc. Gourty, Owen Gilchrist and his wife, Terence Forde and Mrs. Pat Forde. They can tell stories in English. The houses were more numerous locally in former times. There are twelve houses in this townland in ruins. The people emigrated from there to America in former years
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:35
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I live in the townland of Tullynaha in the Parish of Ballinaglena in the Barony of Dromahair. There are fifteen families in this townland. McGourty is the most common name in this townland. All the houses in Tullynaha are thatched. The cause that it was called "Tulach na h-Áithe" was that when the people were driven from the north and east into this part of the country this district was all covered with heather until they found lime-stone and burned it in kilns, and put it out on the land. That was the cause that it got the name "Tulach na h-Áithe" means the land of the kilns. There are many people over seventy living in this townland, namely Mrs. Charles
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:32
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Easter Sunday. On St. Martin's Day a fowl was killed to commemorate the martyrdom of the Saint. Tea was first used in this district about 100 years ago. Before the introduction of cups and saucers people used noggins. They were vessels made of wood staves with wooden hoops and bottoms and one stave was left three inches over the mouth of the vessel. This stave served as a handle when in use. Bread was made from oatmeal and wheatmeal which were gown locally and ground in mills locally. Boxty was made from potatoes and flummery was made from oatmeal which was allowed to ferment. Potato-cake was much in use and is used to the present day. Water is added for kneeding oatbread and milk is used for kneading flour.
In small families bread was baked every day; in a house where there was a large family there was enough baked in one day to last for a week. Bread was baked in an oven, the lid of which was covered with hot coals. Bread was also baked before the fire standing against a flag stone. Bread was also baked on a griddle. A fruit cake was always baked for festive times such as Christmas and Halloween and many other occasions. Querns were used in olden times in this district. I have
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 12:10
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but it was square in shape. Others took their meals off a table hung on the wall and when the table was not in use it was put up against the wall in its frame. The bread generally eaten was oatmeal break and boxty. The bread was made by mixing the meal in lukewarm water and when worked into the consistency of dough it was formed into a large square piece and backed before the fire being placed against a light flag stone whilst baking. The meal was ground from oats grown locally. Boxty was made from grated potatoes.
Corn mills were numerous in this parish 100 years ago. People used a considerable amount of meat especially pork, bacon and veal. Fish was used abundantly and consisted of salt herring, fresh herring, eel and codfish. After the famine of 1846 and 1847 the use of oatmeal almost disappeared. It was only then the Indian meal was introduced into this district and the most of the inhabitants had Indian meal stirabout for their three daily meals.
Cabbages and turnips are the principal vegetables in use in this district. A very old custom was the use of pork or bacon on Shrove Tuesday night and eating eggs on
senior member (history)
2019-01-16 16:05
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Turn to the west Sally
Turn to the one that you love best Sally"
Then she will choose someone and the person that was in the ring first leaves and the one she chooses stays in it.
Jordy and Jack
Two people catch hands behind their backs and they run saying the rhyme
"Jordy and Jack were dressed in black
Buckils and swords behind their back
Foot for food and knee for knee
Turn about Jordy and come with me"
Then they twist hands and turn back saying the rhyme.
"Fox and Chicken"
Any number can play "Fox and Chicken". They will gather behind one another. The fox will come along and start to blow the fire. The hen will ask him what are you blowing the fire for? He will say to boil a pot of water. What do you want with the pot of water? To wash knives and forks? To kill your chickens. Then he will try to kill them. He will rund after them and the two second last that he catches will be fox and mother the next time.
senior member (history)
2019-01-16 16:02
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"Down on the carpet we shall kneel
Where the grass grows round our feet,
Stand up straight upon your feet
And choose the one that you love sweet"
Then she will stand up and choose someone. The others continue saying
"Now ye are married life and joy
First a girl and second a boy
Seven years old and seven years young
For joy for joy to kiss and run"
The person that went into the ring first leaves it and the other person stays in it.
"Granny's Big Needle"
Any number can play "Granny's Big Needle". They make a circle and one goes inside and says
"I lost my Granny's big needle
And I don't no who to leave it upon"
Then she will leave it on someone. She will follow her in and out through the ring until she catches her inside.
"Little Sally Saucer"
Any number can play "Little Sally Saucer". They make a circle and one goes inside. They go round saying
"Little Sally Saucer sat upon a saucer
Rise Sally Rise Sally
Weep away your tears Sally
Turn to the east Sally,
senior member (history)
2019-01-16 15:58
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Girls amuse themselves in many ways. They play many games such as "Round the Green Grass" "Down on the Carpet" "Granny's Big Needle", "Little Sally Saucer", "Fox and chicken", "Jordy and Jack", "Mother", "Mrs McGee", "Draw, draw bucket of water", "Sea Saw", "Wall flowers", "Wringing the dish cloth", "Dallóg", "Hide and go seek", and "Ittle Ottle Black Bottle".
"Round the Green Grass"
Any number of girls can play "Round the Green Grass". They make a circle and go round repeating the rhyme
"Round the Green Grass
The grass grows green
Many a lady is fit to be sure
Washed in buttermilk
Dressed in silk
Who pops down?"
The last one that is down has to tell the person next to her who she will marry. That person brings her aside and then she tells her. They come back and they say please open the gate and let in who ever says she says she'll marry.
Any number can play "Down on the Carpet" The make a circle and one goes down on her knees inside the circle. The others go round and
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 18:14
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door you would find the mark where there was a round town. At the back of the church there is a hollow in the field. It is said that the monks kept fish there to supply their needs. There was also a church in Sean-a-Cill and another in John Coady's land where there is a Holy well called Tobar na heen. In Drangan there is a ruin of an old church and it is said that Cromwell knocked the church on his way to Fethard.
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 18:13
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There are a lot of old church-yards in the parish of Drangan and there are ruins of churches in some of them. They are in Newtown and Ballylusky. Cill Domhnaigh is the name of one of them in Michael Hall's in Newtown, there was a bell in it and it used often ring. There was a schoolmaster in Moyglass and he used to pass by the bell every day when going to school and one evening he took the bell home. After that his calves died and many other things happened to him so he brought back the bell and hung it on the tree but it never rang again. There is a churchyard on our farm in Kyle and there is a small well near it and it is thought that the monks used it. There is a field near the church called Cor na Cille. There is a ruin of an old church in Michael Hall's farm in Magoury. If you walked seven paces north east from the
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 18:11
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Long, long ago Tadg O Meacair went to the battle of Aughrim on horse back. He went into the battle field and after a long time fighting his head got cut off. The horse left the battle field and found his way home to Drangan. When he reached the village he was recognised by the people who took him off his horse and buried him in the old church yard in Drangan and on his headstone is written Hic iacet Thaddeus I Meacair, which means here lies the body of Tadg O Meacair.
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 18:09
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In years gone by there was no bridge on the Mullinahone road, only stepping stones. One day when there was a funeral coming from Mullinahone to Drangan, and there was a flood in the river, the horse would not go through the river because it was too deep. So six men put the coffin on their shoulders and started to walk through the river. The water swept the coffin out of their hands and brought it down the river. The coffin hit the trunk of a tree and was badly broken. The corpse was swept away with the water. Lady Butler saw all that had happened so she got a bridge built there. It is now called Cahill's bridge. There is a stone on the bridge and the history of the bridge is written on it
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 18:07
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getting to Heaven than the water out in that river has of running up the hill. The Bishop burst in tears and the tears ran up his forehead which was a sure sign he was sorry. He gave money to Maynooth College which is called the Dunboyne trust.
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 18:06
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There once lived in Shangarry a few miles from Drangan a Bishop. He was one of the Butler's. He became Lord Dunboyle as he was the last of that family. He decided to marry so that there would be a son to carry on the name. He got married to a Protestant lady and he lived in Co. Cork. His wife used not let him go to Mass or anything. He was beginning to get sorry as he got old and he wondered how he would go before God on his Judgement day. He fell ill and he sent for a very dear friend of his. He was a doctor and monk named Graham from Fethard Monastery. He came dressed as a doctor and asked to see Lord Dunboyne. He was admitted and went to the Bishop. They were talking and the Bishop said "How will I get to Heaven" The monk said "You have no more chance of
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 18:03
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An Caisleán
Níl aon rian den Caiseán le feiscint anois.
Timpeall caoga nó seasca bliadhan ó shoin bhí fear oibre ag obair chun na fallaí do bhriseadh síos. Sar i bhfad do tháinig cuir? air agus cuimhnigh sé ar sheift. Bhí leach shaibhrín aige agus rith sé suas go dtí an sráid bhaile a cum? in a dhá lein ag rádh le ha-aonne a bhuail leis gur fuair sé é shíos ins an gCaisleán. Sar i bhfad bhí seasca daoine cruinnithe timcheall an Chaisleáin agus ní raibh sé fada go raibh na fallaí go léir leabhéalta aca ach ní raibh pingin nó leathphingin le fághail aca.
"Táim an bhuídheach díobh" arsa sé i ndeireadh na h-oibre agus thosaigh sé ag gáire.
An Reilg
Tá sean reilg ins an mbaile seo agus tá an scéal seo leanas mar gheall uirte gur a b'ainm dó Tadhg Ó Meachair. Bhí sé i na shaidiúir i n-airm Rí Shéamuis nuair a bhí sé ag troid le Liam Oráiste. I nath Dhruim tar éis Aire Luain do tharla go baineadh a cheann de le claidheamh agus ansan imtheacht leis a chapall chomh tapaidh ar a bhí i na chosaibh agus níor stad sé go raibh sé sa bhaile agus an fear gan cheann ag marcuigheacht air. Ar an sloinne ós chionn a uaimh tá sé scríobhta i laidean
"Luigheann annya Thaddeus Geargach O'Meachair a fuair bás 19ú lá de Mhí na Nodhlag 1627
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 17:54
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That marks the fair course of my own Drangan river
Without place on the map that was made by the stranger
Engraved on my heart thou endurest for ever
Tho far far away o'er the billowy ocean
I hear in soft murmurings strange thy emotion
And yield thee the measure of one heart's devotion
Yes yes gentle stream whereso'er on this planet
I shall ever so gladly recall in my summit
The blessed days of boyhood, the times without meausre
Nor strained with allow was the season of pleasure
I spent of the banks of my own Drangan river
1848
P Skehan
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 17:52
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"Drangan River"
In my own beloved isle of the shamrock and the daisy
Through one of the vales of far-famed Tipperary
A rivulet flows that I love to remember
From Tubber-daheen I can trace every quiver
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 17:51
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Pierce Skehan was born at Knockura, Drangan at the end of the eighteenth century (His nephew lived there until quite recently (RIP))
He emigrated to New York and was head of the Fenians in Long Island. He married a Jewess named Maryanne Dunbar. This is the only poem of his which I have come across in a girl's school copy book who has now emigrated.
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 17:49
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Bhí sean scoil i maile Cnocnacassa naice le gairraide Mici Peadar agus sé an tainm a air an féar a bhí ag munad scoile an.Nangel Bíodh go leor paiste ag dul aige agus bíodh sé ag tabhairt brothan tabac bíod sé ag dul thart ag iarraidh na daoine a leantadh in a Protastana agus annsin taimc go leor daoine agus beag siad ar scoil
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 17:47
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awaiting decision
Ní bhíodh siopaí go fluirseach sá ceanntear seo sa sean aimsir. Bhí siopaí ag Micheál Ó Gllcobhair agus ag Cathal Ó Gallcobhair. Ní raibh móran le dios ins na siopaí agus subhail na sean daoine suas go dtí na baile móra a beis snaice an baile. Ní raibh móran bidh na ceannack seo sa sean aimsear. Ní raibh acu amanta ach fataí. Siopaí Cathal Ó Gallcobhair an ceann is mó a bhí sa ceanntar seo sa sean aimsear. Bhí go leor ruddaí lé díol sa siopaí Micheal Ó Gallcobair. Do cuaidh cuid gan na daoine suas go mBaile Atha Cliatha agus beidh go leor ruddaí ag an daoine sin go mbeidh sé a leig caite agus leis a dul suas arais.
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 14:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and went away. Denis Collins said to Murphy that the girl had no talk and he said that some of them had too much talk. He went home, and the next night he went to the fort again.
He was dancing again, and he went near the old woman, and stole the saucepan, and took it home. He gave a drink out of the saucepan to her, and then she was able to talk. He got married to the girl, and they live happily together. Their great grandchildren live in Milleen still. One man is called Patrick Body.
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 14:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
him, she was taken away from her parents, and she said if he could do anything for her she would be all right.
She could not speak a word when she would go outside the door, until she would take a drink out of the saucepan. Patrick Murphy told her he was going to Cork with butter, and he would call again when he would be coming home. Then he went out to Denis Collins and he did not say anything to him, and they went to Cork with the butter.
When they were coming home he went into the fort again, and he danced to the girl. The door was closed, and after a while Murphy said that it was very close, and to open the door.
He danced away until he wheeled the girl out the door. When he went out to Collins, and the girl with him Collins was surprised.
They sat into the car
senior member (history)
2019-01-15 14:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man here long ago called Denis Collins. He had a work man called Patrick Murphy. They were going to Cork one night with firkins of butter. They were crossing a fort near Newmarket, and they heard the music, and dancing in the fort.
Murphy said he would go in, and see see what was going on inside. Denis Collins told him not to go in, because any person that ever went into the fort, was never seen any more. Murphy went in, and the farmer was afraid that he would never again see him.
All the fairies were dancing inside in the fort except an old woman, and a girl. The girl was very sorrowful, and the old woman had a saucepan behind her.
Murphy went up to the girl, and he asked why she wasn't dancing, and she told
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Our cows are tied round the neck. Our cow-house is about twelve feet wide and sixteen feet in length. There is a manger in it for the hay and the chains hanging from the manger. Every farmer's wife has plenty of fowl. She has hens
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. A rooling stone gathers no moss
2. One that rises late must gallop all day
3. Early bird will catch the early worm
4. No news is good news
5. New brooms sweep clean
6. A stitch in time saves nine
7. Those that less say best
8. What you practice you will preach.
9. More haste less speed
10. Night falls like a stone in a boghole.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St. Stephen's day the boys dress up in old clothes and go round from house to house gathering money and singing the wren song. On St Brigids day the children dress up in white and go round from one house to an other gathering money in honour of St. Brigid. On St. Patrick's Day the people wear shamrock in their coats. On Ash Wednesday ashes are blessed, and put on the forehead of the people. On Good Friday all the people kiss the cross. On Whit Monday, if you go boating you would be downed. On Hallowe'en they duck for apples and a brack is cut up to see who would get a ring.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
one an other when sowing potatoes. The types of potatoes are: Kerrs pink, aran banner's, aran cairn, aran chief, up-to-date, british queen, great scots, Aran pilot, Champions Magiesty.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following were collected by Lillie Dillion.
We generally sow five acres of potatoes. If they grow good we would have about eighteen tons to the acre. My father prepares the ground. The potatoes are sown both in ridges and drills. Teh spade is used in ridges for sticking them. The people help
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My Father sow's potatoes every year. He sows about an acre and a half, he sows the potatoes in ridges. My father ploughs first and then harrows. Seed potatoes are cut in slits and then they are put in ridges. In summer the people spray the potatoes.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(return) The Cuckoo and swallow return to Ireland in May and go away in August. The swallow builds its in a shed. The robin got its red breast when our Lord was being crucified. The above were collected by Marie Donnelly, Curnsur, Kiltoom
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the people made candles out of rushes. They used to put them down on the pan in dripping and then take them up and roll them together. The people roll wax around them and light then. The people used to make baskets for carrying turnips in. The people made soap out of frog-spawn and butter.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 18:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in each of the others.
The bellows are very big, and made of timber and worked with a handle and chain.
Some implements used by the smith are hammer, rasp, buffer, prither, pincers, anvil, drilling machine, sledge, poker, tongs, and knives. Horses and donkeys are shod there.
Farm implements namely harrows are made at Paddy Harte's. Wheels are shod in the open air.
There is no belief with regard to forge water, or the sparks which fly.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are three forges in this district. The names of the smiths are Denis O#Brien and Paddy Harte and Jack Healy. Denis O'Brien's people have been smiths for two generations or more.
The three forges are situated by the side of the road. Denis O'Brien's forge is also situated near a stream Jack Healy's forge is situated near the station.
The three forges have roofs of timer and felt. There are two fireplaces in Paddy Harte's forge and one
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Banding wheels is the part of his work done in the open air. It is not a centre for storytelling.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Smith in Ahadillane is Cristie Sullican. His forefathers were not smiths before him.
It is situated near a cross road and by a stream. he kind of roof that is on it is iron.
The implements he has are hammers, sledge, pinchers, files, knifes and a buffer. He shoes horses and donkeys but never shoes cattle.
He makes farm implements such as ploughs and parts of a reaper and binder parts of a hay cutter gates and many other iron implements.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The local forge that I know of is Ahadillane. There is another forge there too called Rockhill forge.
The name of the
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Deisuigheann sé rothair amuigh agus bíonn teine mhór aige chun an iaraiin do theigheadh. Níl aon sgéalta ag baint leis.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá aon ceárchdha ins an bparóiste sin. Tá sé in aice grianach, ar thaobh an bhóthair, agus in aice ccrois bothair, agus in aice le abhann. An gabha isteadh Pádraig Ua hAirt. Tá an cearcdha mór.
Tá sé déanta de cloch. Tá díon peilte agus adhmadh ar an dtigh. Tá an teine ar thaobh an bhfalla. Tá an teine curtha ar hob mór.
Deineann a gabha crúidhre. Cuireann a gabha crúidhte fé chapaill agus asail.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tongs, nails and bellows and many other things.
These men can make ploughs and harrows and many other farm implements. These smiths show horses, donkeys, and poneys. They never shoe cattle in this part of the country.
They bind wheels in the open air, that is if a band fell off a wheel they would put it on. There is no belief with regard to the forge water or sparks. There is no story told in connection with the forges. There are no disused forges in this parish.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The are only three forges in this parish. The names of the smiths are Mr. Jack Healy, Mr. Paddy Harte and Mr. Denis O Brien. The forefathers of these men have been smiths for many years.
Mr Healy's forge is situated near a cross. Mr Harte's forge is near a stream and Mr. O Brien's forge is on the side of the road.
The roof of these forges is of galvanized iron. There is only one fireplace in these forges. The implements these men use are a hammer, sledge, pincers
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
call goats I would saw "bet bet". If I wanted to call hens I would say "tuck tuck".
Long ago when the people used to be hatching eggs, they would put a cross on the eggs with a burned cipín to bring luck on the eggs.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
but long ago the people got rushes and plaited them. This is called spancelling. Long ago the people were very careful lest any one would work charm on the cows and take away the butter, especially in the month of May. Then the people would hang branches or emblems in the cowhouse, to bring luck on the stock or the people would get a Mass said.
When I would be calling a cow I would say "Sup Sup". If I wanted to call a sow I would say "Hursh Hursh". If I wanted to call a bonham I would say "Bon Bon". If I wanted to
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are alot of animals on a farm such as cows, horses, sheep, pigs, goats, donkeys, cats and dogs. The cows have got names. The names of them are Bunny, White legs, Rose, Rita, Kitty, Curly tail and Blue bell.
When I am driving cows in or out of a field I would saw "how, how". The cows are put in stalls in the cow house. Cows are sometimes tied by the legs when they are cross for milking the. The tying is made of rope
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 17:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Siad na n-ainmhithe allta atá san áit seo na madraí ruad, bruic, girrfhiaidhre, coiníní, franncaigh, lucaigh, madraí uisge agus easa luacra.
Is i bpluais a bhíonn an madra ruadh agus an broc. Istigh idir dhá earraigh cloiche a bhíonn an pluais. Bíonn an choinín agus an girrfhiadh i bpoll fé thalamh ar a dtugtar coinnigéar. Is san uisge a bhíonn an madra uisge.
Itheann an madra ruadh agus an broc cearca, lachain, géanna agus uain. Itheann an coinín agus an geamar agus fear glas.
Itheann na franncaigh coirce agus arán dá bhféadfaidís teaacht suas lus.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
duithe go raibh cos tinn aici. "Ó, fan ord bomaite arsa Mháire, "tusa an bhean atá muid ag cruinnúighadh fa do choinne. Siud Maire suas go dtí an seomra agus bheireann sí an stocach lás airgead do bean na coise tinne. Bí go maith a's ní raibh go h-old nuair a tháinig Pádruig isteach an trathnóna sin. D'fhobair gur mhairbh sé Máire bocht nuair a chualaidh sé an acéal Ach ball níl rud ar bith againn le déanamh anois ach imeacht linn" arsa'n fearr nuair a d'éirigh sé lán thar na barach. Indiaidh grita bead bidh a ithe d'imigh seisean ar thoiseach agus dubhairt sé Márie an doras a tharraingt na diaidh. Nuair a d'amharch Padraig thart siud Máire bocht ag teacht na dhiaidh agus í ag briseadh a croidhe ag tarraingt an doras na dhiaidh.
Chuir sé leaghair amach uirthi agus dubhairt sé leithe ciall a bheith aici agus an doras a chaitheamh ansin.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
damhsa beidh mé ag duidhe orth go breatach. Nuair a fuair an sagart an tairgead chuir sé ceist air an duine tinn an maith leas sgeala ar bith a chuir chuig a mháthair. Scríobh nóta beag chuici agus abair leithe go bhfuair mé bás idir dhá gaduidhe.
Mairéad Breathnach 21 Iúil 1938.
Scéal na Coiste Tinne
Bhí fear ann fado shoin agus phós sé bhean a shaoil sé fhéin a rabh crionna ach nuair a bhí sí posta aige tamall bhí airughadh baramhla aige. Fear iontach cruaidh a bhí san fhear agus sabhladh sé achán piginn a bhfaca sé ariamh.
Bhí stocaí mór acu agus nuair a thigeadh an fear isteach achán tráthnóna Sathaird tabhaireadh sé an t-airgead do'n bhean agus deireadh sé "Nois cuir isteach sa stocaí agus sabhail é fa coinne na coise tinne". Máire a b'ainm do'n bhean. Bhí sí ag deanamh seo achán Sathairn indiaidh a cheile agus ní raibh fhios ag an creatúir caide'n coise tinn a bhí i gceist agus níor mhaith leithe ceist a chur in a thaobh.
Ach ar scór ar bith suid bean a rabh cos tinn aicí isteach chuici lá. Bhí Pádruig amuig san phairc ag obair go cruaidh dhichilleach agus ní fhaca sé an bhean ag gabhail isteach. D'iarr an bhean bhreach rud éigin teacht ar Máire agus innse
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What is it you cut a bit off to make it long
Ans A well
What was never nor will ever be put out your hand and then you'll see. Ans your fingers not the same length
What is it that I can see and you cant see and yet its nearer to you than me. Ans the back of your head
Through the woods and through the woods and their heads down. Ans nails in a man's boot
Long leg legless came to the door footless keep in your ducks for your dogs do not fear them
Ans a snail.
What has a bed and never lies in it Ans a river
As round as an apple as sharp as a lance if you were on top of it twould carry you to France
A flock of white sheep on a red hill, here they go, there they go, now they stand still.
Ans your teeth.
I have a little sister called peep peep, she goes over the sea without wetting her feet Ans a star
Riddle me, riddle me what's that over the head and under the hat. Ans the hair
What goes up when the rain comes down. Ans an umbrella.
What is it that has its finger in its eye
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 18:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What is it that goes from Boston to New York without once moving. Answer The railway track
What is it that God never saw George Washington seldom saw, but you and I see every day
Ans. Your equal
Black and white went up the hill. Black came down and white stood still. Ans. A hend and an egg
Black and white and read all over. Ans. Newspaper
As round as an apple as flat as a pan one side a woman and the other side a man. Ans A penny
Over the fire and under the fire and never touches the fire. Ans a cake in an oven
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When wind blows South West there will be rain. If the far hills and mountains look near it is the sign of bad weather. If the wind blows north there will be snow. If it blows east there will be dry weather. If the birds fly low it is a bad sign and if they fly high it is a good sign. If the cattle are grazing upon the hill the day will be good. If they are grazing in the hollow the day will be bad. A rainbow in the morning is a shepherds warning and a rainbow in the night is a shepherds delight. When the goat makes for her house it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When heavy clouds are seen in the sky it is a sign of rain.
When the sun looks pale it is a sign of rain.
When stars are seen falling at night it is a sign of a break in the weather.
The greatest sign of bad weather is to see the ring round the moon,.
A rainbow in the morning is a shepherds warning and a rainbow at night is a shepherds delight.
When the wind blows south in my district it is a great sign of bad weather.
When the cat sits with her back to the fire it is a sign of storms.
When the dot eats grass it is a sign of rain.
When the crane flows near the river it is a sign of rain.
When the swallows fly near the land it is a sign of rain. When a rain bow is seen in the sky it is the
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 18:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the frog is of a black colour it is a sure sign of rain.
When the soot falls down the chimney there will be rain.
When the smoke goes up straight in the air there will be good weather and when it turns down there will be rain
When the worms come above the ground there will be rain and storms
The curlew whistling at night is a very sure sign of bad weather
When the water gets soft in the river its a sign of storm, and when it is cold the weather will be good.
A mackerel sky is said never to be 24 hours dry
When the cuban na dtonn is heard it is a sign of storm
When the hills look black it is a sign of rain
When the north-wind blows it is a sign of snow.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 18:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
can in aghaidh an chaim an t-ainm atá ar an úirlis sin" adeir an Gobán Saor le mhac Mhic Lingel. Nuair a tháinigseo go hÉireann tháinig sé go dtí teach Gobán Saor. D'innis sé do mhnaoi Gobáin Saor an t-ainm a bhí ar an rud. Chuir sí stól leis an mbosca a bhí ins an gcistin. "Seas ar an stól seo & féach isteach isn an mbosca & fagh é" adeir sí. Nuair a féach sé isteach isn an mbosca, caith sí é ins an mbosca & dún sí an doras air. Nuair a chuala Mac Lingel nach leighfeadh bean an Gobán Saor a mhac abhaile & annsin bhí ar Mac Lingel an Gobán Saor a leigint abhaile
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 18:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí an Gobán Saor in a chomhnuidhe in aice na h-áite seo céad bliadhna ó shoin. Théigheadh sé ar fud an domhain ag déanamh séipéal & chathedirals. Bhí sé an-chliste & bhí a chlinn mar sin freisin. Bhéadh áras aige dá mbeadh mac aige ins an dteach.
Lá amháin chuaidh sé go Sasana chun séipéal an-mhór a dhéanamh i Chesterfield. Seán Mac Lingel an t-ainm a bhí ar an bhfear ós cionn an Gobán Saor. Bhí faoi an Gobán Saor a mhabhú nuair a bheadh an séipéal críochnuighthe. Nuair a bhí an séipéal beagnach críochnuighthe, chuala sé an seift a bhí faoi chun é féin a mharbhú. Bhí faoi Mac Lingel an Gobán Saor a mharbhú mar cheap sé go mbeadh a shéipéal níos áilne ná aon cheann eile sa domhan. Cheap sé nuair a bheadh an Gobán Saor marbhuighthe nách bhead aoinne sa domhan aon séipéal níos áilne ná a séipéa a dhéanamh.
Dubhairn sé le Mac Lingel go raibh úirlíse ar iarraidh & go mbeadh air dul abhaile chun é a fhághail. Ní bhead Mac Lingil sásta le sin ach dubhairt sé go leigfeadh sé a mhac go hÉireann. cor in aghaidh a choir
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 18:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
peile.
Amannta nuair a bhíodh na h-oidhcheannta fada do théighidís isteach go dtí teach, agus do bhíodh siad ag imirt lúrabóg lárabóg. Amannta eile do théighidís amach do bhíodh coinnle á lasadh aca, agus do bhíodh siad ag marbú éan ar bhárr crann le cloich nó le crannrabhail.
Do théighidís abhaile ar an h-aon a chlog nó mar sin, agus go leór éan aca. Do bhíodh dinnéar mór aca an lá n na dhiaidh sin.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 17:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a bhíodh na laethannta fada Samhraidh ag na sean-daoine fadó, do bhíodh siad ag déanamh gach sórt spóirt. Gach Domhnach nuair a bhíodh na laethannta go breágh.
Do theighidís amach ins na páirceanna ag caitheamh cnapaí nó airgid. Annsin do théighidís go dtí áit go raibh fhios aca go raibh cóinín le fághail agus do chuiridís súil rioba ins an chun an cóinín a fhágháil.
Annsin do théighidís go dtí abhann agus do bhíodh rubán mór aca do théigheadh chuid aca isteach ins an rubán agus do bhíodh an cuid eile árgh dtairringt iad suas síos an abhainn. Nuair a bhíodh an chuid eile tuirseach do déirgheadh an chuid eile isteach ins an druibán
Nuair a bhíodh siad óg do bhíodh siad ag déanamh bábóg as nóiníní agus as go leór bláth eile.
Nuair a bhíodh an Gheimhreadh aca do théighidís go dtí teach mór agus do bhíodh siad ag imirt cartaí. Amannta, do bhíodh siad ag imirt
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 16:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cailíní ag déanamh sleamhraí de nóiníní agus ag cur na sleamhraí thart thimcheall a muinéal agus bíonn na cailíní eile ag dul in áit eicínt agus bíonn an cailín eile ag rith in a ndiaidh agus nuair a bheireann sí ar chailín agus coscuigeann sí a buaiséad.
Bíonn go leór spóirt eile againn. Bíonn siad ag déanamh go leór rudaí le a chuid bábóige. Bíonn siad ag déanamh go leór rudaí le bláthana agus bíonn siad ag déanamh bábóg agus bíonn siad ag súgradh leis na bábóga.
Nuair a bhíonn siad ag déanamh rudaí eicint le bhláthanna bíonn go leór spóirt acu. Bíonn na buachaillí ag déanamh gunnaí le chrann chruim ag bíonn go leór spóirt againn.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 16:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Déanann na páistí óga go leor rudaí chun an t-am a chaitheamh. Déanann na buachaillí óga go leór rudaí, déanann siad gunnaí de chrann chruim agus déanann siad cliathbhán chun bhreith ar éan dheas.
Déanann siad a lán rudaí eile. Déanann siad bábóga agus bíonn siad ag súgradh leis an mbábóig agus ag caitheamh na mbábóg suas ins an air agus beireann siad ortha arís.
Bíonn siad ag imirt peile le liathróid agus go leór mbuachaill eile leis. Déanann siad fir beaga agus cuireann siad culaith éadaigh thart thimcheall an fhir agus bíonn spórt mór ag na buachaillí annsin ag súgradh leis an bhfear mbeag.
Nuair a bhíonn sneachta anuas amuigh ins an ngeimhreadh. Bíonn siad ag súgradh agus ag caitheamh na liathróid sneachta le na buachaillí óga. Déanann siad fir sneachta agus déanann siad é go h-an árd ar fad agus annsin tosuigheann siad ag caitheamh leis an bhfear agus leagann siad é arís. Bíonn go leór spóirt acu agus bíonn siad ag déanamh a lán rudaí eile.
Bíonn go leór spóirt ag na
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
easy
A Bee
X Black and white and read all over:-
A newspaper
XI How long did Moses lie in the rushes
His full length
XII Under the fire and over the fire and never touches the fire
A cake in an oven
XIII What walks with its head down
A nail in your boot
XIV Why is a shoe
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
man
A Penny
VI All patches no stitches riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of breeches:
A Head of cabbage
VII Why is your nose like to a butchers showboard
Because it hangs over your meatshop
VIII Black and white and hops on the road like hailstones
A Mag
IX As I went out on a yonder gap I cut off his head and drank his blood and left him lying
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I. A house full, a room full, and can't get a spoon-full :-
Smoke
II From house to house and lies out at night
A path
III Round the house, and round the house, and like at the back door:-
Snow
IV Ink and under the bank, ten drawing four
A woman milking a cow
V As round as an apple as flat as a pan one side a woman and the other side a
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:52
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The people were falling according as they were going out. The lads had a rope tied from the pipers leg to the dead mans legs in the bed. When the Priest hit the piper he ran and pulled the dead man with him by the leg. The Priest thought the lifeless man must have liked the music greatly when he followed the piper to the kitchen.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:35
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There lived long ago, an old man named Leydon, in the parish of Killmore County Westmeath. The people round there liked him greatly. Immediately when he died, the people got a blind piper and had him playing at the dead man's head. They had to much mischief and a few men decided to go and tell the Priest who lived nearby. After a while he came to the house and into the sandpit, which was outside the house.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:34
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the man that buys it, it is not his own, but the man that wants it, it carries him home
A coffin
19. What is it that belongs to yourself but is used by your friends
Your name
Tom McManus
Derrynadoey
Barryfarnon
Boyle
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:33
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A grave
13. Father and mother brother and sister running together and can reach other
Wheels of a motor
14. There was a fiddler in Clare had a bother a fiddler in Kildare, but the fiddler in Kildare had no brother at all
It was a sister
15. How many feet has fourty sheep a shepperd and his dog
Two
16. What small animal makes a big one when beheaded
Fox
17. What is the longest word in the English language
Smiles
18. Useful, useful, instrument often bought but never lent
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:31
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The one with the biggest head.
8. Headed like a timble, tailed like a rat you may guess forever but you will never guess that
A pipe
9. What goes up the ladder with its head down
A nail in a man's boot
10. As I went up a hill I met my Uncle Sam, he had iron nose and wooden toes as upon my word he would frighten the crows
A gun
11. Two underneath, three overhead, the head of the living in the mouth of the dead
A pot on a man's head
12. What is that is too short, and when you take a bit off it's long enough
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:29
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1. I heard something this morning that opened my eyes: -
An alarm clock
2. Long legs, short thighs, small head and no eyes.
Tongs
3. Through the wood and through the wood and never touches the wood.
A knife in a man's pocket
4. Spell broken down ditch in three letters:-
Gap
5. What is the highest figure on a two foot rule:-
Nine
6. What burns from one end of the wick to the other
Candle
7. Which of the twelve apostles wore the biggest hat
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:27
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through which a man could not go, or else had them barred. The door was secured by a big oak beam sunk in two sockets inside the door. At the end of the house there was a special room for the cows (usually one) as she would be milked or stolen if left out. The calf and pig had to be kept inside.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:26
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Domnic Conlon Cleragh gives following explanation for prevalence of small windows and absence until recently of outoffices in country farmhouses.
Houseraiding was pretty general until some 70 years ago when the last and fatal raid took place on the house of one Horan in Cleargh - one of the raiders being killed. Practically every family has its own raiding story. The raiders usually came from a distance and stole meal, pork, cows or calves. To protect this property farmers usually used one house for storing meal and left some men on guard.
The individual had to make his house as impregnable as possible - small windows
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:23
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Ireland. Another custom was to get a barn-brack and a ring in it.
May-eve :- It was a custom in olden times to shake May flowers round the houses, for luck for the year. On May morning the old people used to go out and wash their faces in the dew. It was also a custom not to give away anything on May day or you would have no luck for the year. The old people used not throw out any dirty water with the ashes on May morning.
Maureen McKeon
Deereenaseer,
Ballyfarnon
Boyle
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:21
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Hollow-eve :- It was a custom in olden times to put an apple in a tub of water, and duck for it. Another custom was to put a string on an apple and hang it from the roof of the house. Then all the people try to catch it in their mouth. The people used to get three saucers, and put clay on one blue water on the other, and spring water on the other. If you put your hand in the clay you will die before the year is over. If you put your hand in the blue-water, you will go across the sea and if you put your hand in the spring water you will remain in
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:18
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olden times. In olden times the people used to wear wooden shoes, and some of the old people still wear them.
Leather was never made in this district at any time. Wool was spun and home made socks, and stockings were made from it for foot coverings. There was no kind of leather made from sheep-skins, or untanned hide ever worn in this district.
Maureen McKeon
Derreenaseer
Ballyfarnon
Boyle
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:17
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In former times the people did not begin to wear shoes until they were full-grown. There are still pictured to be seen of people who seemed very advanced in years, and no shoes on them. The children at present only go bare-footed in the Summer months. The water used for washing the children's feet, is thrown away. Almost all boots are bought in the shop, but they are repaired locally.
There is only one shoe-maker living in this district. His name is Nickloson, it is a tradition in his family for a great many years. There were three shoe-makers in this district in
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:15
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up and down, and by degrees the butter comes on. When it is a certain time churning the little lumps of butter appear. If the butter does not appear quickly hot water is poured on it.
Cold water is poured on it to gather the butter together. The butter is taken off by a wooden dish and made into tolls or prints with little wooden spades. It is also given to young calves and pigs. In the Summer months when the men are working they get a drink of buttermilk.
Maureen McKeon
Derreenaseer
Ballyfarnon
Boyle
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:13
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Our church is made from timber, with iron whoops round it, to make it strong. It is shaped like a barell only that the churn is widder on the top. There is a lid for it, and a churn-dash for churning the milk. We have it about ten years. The butter is got according to the quantity of milk that's churned. Strangers that call in when there is a churning making. According to old customs they are always supposed to help for a few minutes.
If they didn't help it is supposed there would be no butter on that milk. The churn-dash beats the cream
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:28
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A good deal of old talk was round a family called Manning who lived in a lane now called "Glenlion" about 35 or 40 years ago.
The father died and it is said that at his death great disturbance was felt around the place like a small earth quake in fact.
It was also said that the Rosary in the house was a very lengthy proceeding because as the members of the family were all deaf no one knew what any one else was saying and so the same prayers were repeated many times.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:26
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"Hailstone Jack" was not at all liked by the people in this parish for he was an orange man and hated the Pope.
"Red Paddy" got his name from his red hair and was of a very reserved disposition.
He was a beautiful whistler and was always whistling a tune which he called "Brian Boru's March"
He used to do stone-breaking in the local quarries.
Since I wrote about above I heard another interesting little story about "Hailstone Jack".
Once in the Summer a farmer required an extra labouring-man so he asked Jack would he hire with him but Jack replied "I am a hailstone maker by trade and I cannot afford to give you assistance"
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:24
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giving him a half-crown he thanked him in this way
"I have travelled East
I have travelled West
And I've travelled all Dungannon
But I never met a decenter man
that Fr. James Buchanan."
"Stack'o Rags was to be seen very regularly in this locality (in this Co) about 40 or 45 years ago.
He carried at least 6 over-coats on his back as well as numerous other articles of clothing.
On his head he wore about 4 tall hats, one on top of the other.
On the extreme top a bunch of spools hung from a piece of cord which put a most peculiar appearance on the strange old man.
"Paddy Whack" was another well known traveller in the place about 30 years ago and got his name from his habit of whacking or hitting the daisies with an ash plant which he always carried in his hand.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:21
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Perhaps it would be interesting to hear something about a most peculiar old man called "John the Shell" by nickname who often visited this locality about 40 years ago.
He travelled all over Ireland and he said himself that Galtrim in our own Co. Meath was his favourite place.
He was well known and liked by nearly every priest in the country.
He always wore priest's clothes and had a beautiful head of long wavy brown hair hanging down his back.
He always carried 5 or 6 bundles of Hazel sticks in his arms and across his back, and he imagined that the marks on the skin of those sticks were ladies' faces.
Fr. Buchanan who is buried in the Church yard in Navan was his most intimate friend and once when the kind-hearted priest was
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:16
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60 years ago a well known Irish boxer.
An old woman who was commonly known as the "Rucky Woman" was born on a ship on the Atlantic Ocean.
She had 9 children who unfortunately all lost their faith and died except her youngest daughter whom she put into a convent.
She became a nun and went out foreign and after some time became a Rev. Mother.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:15
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they always found good friends in the people of Yellow Furze.
Mathew Creegan was very popular in the locality and the children looked forward to his visit as he had a great sense of humour and was never happy except while amusing children by his with.
"Black Jo" was a more recent one and he died about 16 years ago in the Trim Home.
Phelim McGuiness was a most remarkable traveller and people said that he was a schoolmaster about 80 years ago and there must be some truth in this for he was seen several times with a cane and book in his hands teaching and slapping the bushes generally along the Priest's Road and he said himself that this very old road was his favourite one in Ireland
"Jack Byrne" was to be seen in the district very often and was a close relative of Simon Byrne who was about
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:11
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who was about 4 years old came into the house after playing outside and the instant the strange old lady saw him she took up her travelling bag and ran out of the house as fast as she was able.
No one ever knew the reason of her strange notion.
"Little Katty" was another visitor who came to the place occasionally.
She was a very holy person and always carried her beads and was remarkably fond of little children.
Another old woman was called the "Lady Bán".
"Paddy the Dandy" was a well known and popular traveller too.
He was a native of Louth and originated from a very old family who were evicted the time of the "Wrack Rents"
Paddy and his mother were obliged to take to the roads, and
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:09
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It was taught in Johnstown school by this old teacher long before there was any talk of an Irish Revival.
The following are a few of the travellers who paid frequent visits to this locality about 50 years ago.
The "Priest's Sister" was perhaps the most well known.
She was really a priest's sister who had "come down in the world" through no fault of her own she said herself.
She was a most peculiar person and would not sleep in a house in which there was a male person and when meeting one on the road she would either cross the ditch into the field or cover her face with a cloth which she always carried in her hand for the purpose.
Once about 40 year ago she came into the house of my grandmother and asked her to make a cup of tea for her and while drinking it my grandmother's small son who
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:08
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It was taught in Johnstown school by this old teacher long before there was any talk of an Irish Revival.
The following are a few of the travellers who paid frequent visits to this locality about 50 years ago.
The "Priest's Sister" was perhaps the most well known.
She was really a priest's sister who had "come down in the world" through no fault of her own she said herself.
She was a most peculiar person and would not sleep in a house in which there was a male person and when meeting one on the road she would either cross the ditch into the field or cover her face with a cloth which she always carried in her hand for the purpose.
Once about 40 year ago she came into the house of my grandmother and asked her to make a cup of tea for her and while drinking it my grandmother's small son was
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:06
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About 70 years ago I hear that certain people made use of some "travellers" to teach them Irish.
One who availed of this opportunity was a teacher in the next parish - Mr. Sheridan.
He found out that several of the poor men who used to come to his door for alms were native Irish Speakers, and so he always addressed a "caller" in Irish.
If he answered in the old tongue he was brought in, tea or dinner was put before him and when he left his host accompanied him for miles talking Irish and getting the "Blás" from the poor man whose only possession was the native tongue of the Gael.
The teacher became very proficient because he studied Irish from books in his spare time and got the spoken language from his poor visitors.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:04
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Aunty to make her a cup of tea.
She was most particular and asked for a clean white tablecloth and china cup.
She said she saw the day when she had two maids to attend on her and that she descended from a very old Irish family who lost their house and property during the famine.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:03
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clothing and she is dry again.
Once around Christmas this year - she got a bad cold. The P.P. sympathised with her when she called to his house but she said in a voice hoarse with sore throat "I'll get rid if it where I got it - on the road" and she did.
It is said she was a teacher in her early days.
She shows little sign of her education if so, except in her apt sagings. For example, one day a little girl, named Power annoyed her and she said at once "It is not the first time a "Baby Power" caused trouble.
I have often heard that she trades in clothes which she gets from kind friends and disposes of again to poorer people.
She carries them all on her person so that the purchaser has the advantage of seeing the coat on a "mannequin" as well as of having it "ready aired" and comfortable.
(by my house) Once while passing by my house she came in and asked my
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 17:00
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Among all the "travellers" who visit this place the most famous and the best known is "Mary Blue Ribbon"
No one knows her real name. She is known far and wide by this title.
She must be between 70 & 80 years of age and still her energy seems to be as good as ever for she travels miles and miles - always walking.
She thinks nothing of the journey to Navan from this - 5 good miles - and when seen entering the town she is walking with head erect and quick step as if she had only just set out.
She often returns here again to her favourite lodging place the same day and never seems tired.
The strange part is that she seems to wear 3 times the amount of clothing worn by the ordinary person.
When it rains heavily on her she can take off one or two layers of
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 16:57
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This is a piece taken from a home-woven linen sheet - one of a set given to Mrs. Sheridan when she went to teach in Mt. Hanover about 72 years ago.
The sheets were woven by her mother Mrs. McCabe, Castle Park, Slane and were not new when given as a parting gift to her. They must be nearing, if not over, their century and are quite sound yet.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 16:56
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"Lady Ahern"
This was a familiar figure around Beauparc and Stackallen about 50 years ago. She was so called because of her gentle refined ways and accent. She was one day in the Church at Rushwee during the celebration of Mass and was distracting the Priest - Fr. Rooney by carrying on private devotions of her own. He shouted down "Put that woman out".
This was done and after a few minutes the new silence was broken by a rough country man's voice saying "She's gone in d'other doore now Father".
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 16:54
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Mrs. Tully at home.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 16:48
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Mrs. Tully Johnstown who was married about the year 1870 had her wedding dress copied from a picture of a dress same as that worn by the middle lady above.
She afterwards made two Confirmation dresses for her daughters from the skirt alone and had plenty of material over. Before her marriage she was known as "the beautiful Catherine Brannigan"
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 16:46
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dress stand out behind.
The hats were works of art and carried on them ribbons, feathers, bows and ornaments of every description.
In these days a plain hat was unknown.
*PAGE CONTAINS IMAGES*
Hats and Bonnets of 1888 Mid-Winter
This shows the "Bustle" effect without which no girl felt "all dressed up". 50 years ago in Yellow Furze.
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 16:45
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People around this locality all followed the same style of dress in the olden days.
The dresses were all made from very generous supplies of material sometimes taking 10 yards.
Yards of this went into the sleeves which were always very full around the upper arm while the lower part of the arm was encased in a tight sleeve.
The skirt was of the most extravagant width with a train generally, which had to be held up while the owner walked.
Everyone's hand instinctively went to the dress to lift it out of the mud when walking across the street.
I have seen to-day a contrivance like a clip which was used for this purpose by the great grandmother of one of the girls.
Nearly every woman wore at her waist in the back a "bustle" that is a padded wire contrivance which made the
senior member (history)
2018-12-14 16:42
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There are many old names of fields still existing in my locality.
There is a field which is called the "covert field" and probably (c) it got its name from a covert which was there.
There is another field which is called "Clough Lea".
This one (is) got its name from a quarry that is in it.
Another field called the "deer park" is owned by Mrs. Ross and many deer were in this 60 acred field about a century ago.
A field belonging to Mr. Farrell Ralthogue is called still "Raheen" from an old mound that is in it.
senior member (history)
2018-10-18 22:24
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There are all ruins in the townland of Readuff which belong to Francis Deery, Aghmakerr, Loughmourne P.O., Castleblayney, County Monaghan.
Long ago there lived there a family called McNallys. When they all died a small stocking about the size of the little finger of the hand was found in the house. When anyone went to touch it, it jumped away and went from the fire to the dresser and from the dresser to the fire. The people did not go near it any more when they saw what was happening. It lay at the fire for a long time and it is said a fairy woman took it away.
senior member (history)
2018-09-12 23:03
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It is said that if you have a toothache and put a pin in the Moy well the toothache would go. Others say if you tie garlic on your wrist it would go. Washing soda is also a cure for toothache.
A spoonful of sweet oil heated on a spoon is good for an ear ache. The juice of an ash stick is also a cure.
A cure for a sty is to get a gooseberry thorn and put it to the eye three times
senior member (history)
2018-09-12 23:01
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There is a well called St. John's Well and every year, anyone who goes to the well, will be cured of pains. But on that night the well springs up at twelve o'clock in the night and flows out and anyone who is there when it flows up will be cured of their pains or diseases.
Rosalun Hughes
From
Margaret Duffy
Summerhill
Enfield
Co. Meath
senior member (history)
2018-08-20 13:01
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Duine ar bith a thiocfaidh isteach sa dteach fiafraigh dó mar seo:
A ghiolla an eich báin, céard a leigisfidh an triuch. Cé bé céard a dhéarfad sé sin a thabhairt de'n duine a mbeadh an triuch air agus bigisfidh sé é.
No dá gcastadh fear ar an mbóthar dúirt a mbeadh capall bán aige ce'be ce' leigheas a dearfad sé duit nuair a diarfa air é leighisfidh sé an triuch.
Dá nóladh duine buailte leis an triuch fuighealach an bainne a dfágadh feirid ina dhiadh leighifeadh an bainne sin an triuch.
senior member (history)
2018-08-20 12:56
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fígheadóirí san paróiste seo darbh ainm "Sing agus Mórán". I gcuid den na tighthe go fóill tá éadaigh déanta de'n lín.
senior member (history)
2018-08-20 12:55
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Níl ach triúr tailliúir sa paróiste seo anois ach bhí uair ann agus bhí níos mó aca ann. Bhí triúr no ceathrar díóbh i muillin Máighin ag muilteóir darbh ainm Dómhnaill Ó Feargail. Gnící gach saghas éadaigh olna san muilleann sin. Le cumhacht uisce cuirthí an muilleann sin ag obair.
An t-am sin théigheadh na táilliúirí thart ó theach go teach ag déanamh cultacha do mhuinntir an tight. Cóta bréidín agus bríste córd a bhíodh gá chaitheamh aca agus bhíodh báinín gá chaitheamh ag gach fear agus malreach fear freisin. Ní bhíodh cultacha le fágháil ins na siopa mar atá anois ach ceanneóchaidís an bréidín agus an córd agus gníodh na táilliúirí chulaithe de. Ní chaithfidh na buachaillí oga bríste go dtí go mbíodh siad deich bliadhna nó mar sin.
Cuirtí lín sa pharóiste seo an t-am sin agus gníodh na fighadóirí lín éadaigh de. Bhí beirt
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:34
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Layne went back to journalism when he was released and in 1854 withdrew from the staff of the Nation to edit the "Tipperary Leader" a journal founded by the advanced priests of Tipp.
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:33
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placed his name and an apt quotation "He whose virtues deserved a temple, scare now commands a stone"
When the curtain fell at the Commons and the forces were scattered, Leyne and a few others enjoyed the hospitality of Clononlty people and their clergy and when in 1848 (May) they attempted to escape they fell into a trap. Making for Cashel but not knowing the country they went astray and found themselves before day break held up by a police patrol at Rathcannon Barracks. They were arrested, sent to Kilmainham and late to Clonmel for trial.
Leyne was released following the trial - there not being sufficient evidence against him but his two comrades were transported for life - O'Donohue & F Francis Mahir - neither ever seeing again the island of their dreams. O'Donoghue died in New York in 1864 and Meagher was drowned in the Missouri in 1861, both having escaped to America from their Convict Settlement.
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:29
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In St. Mary's Church yard, Thurlas, to the left as you approach the Protestant Church, stands a little stone some three feet from the clay, with a six inch iron cross on its apex, now rusting to decay. The only evidence to give you the identity of the sleeper is the inscription "In this grave are deposited the remains of Maurice Richard Leyne who died Aug 29th 1854"
Lane who was grandson of Dan O'Connell was born in Tralee and was educated in Carlow College where he had a class mate Richard D'alton Williams and James Fintan Lawlor.
In early manhood he became tired and weary of the ceaseless torrents of ineffective talk of the Liberators and sided against his relative by joining the Young Ireland Movement. For Leyne this was a heroic sacrifice. He was all through the '48 trouble round the hills of Ballingarry. Over his grave in St. Mary's 1875 was according to HM Sullivan a simple slab on which some kindly hand had
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:25
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the Mullauns.
Towards the middle of the 14th Century the Native Irish of Northern [?] - the O'Carrolls and O'Kennedys - reconquered their land from the A Normans. The Butlers had to abandon Nenagh to O'Kennedy and to withdraw from their possessions in N [?]
Thurles now became the northern limit of Anglo Norman influence in Tipperary and became subject to the raids of the Irish chieftains. This probably explains the anxiety of the inhabitants of Thurles to wall in the town in 1356
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:23
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In 1856 the inhabitants of Thurlas were granted the right to levy tolls for the walling of the town. The houses of the inhabitants were situated around the market square. This constituted the old town to which there were two entrances, one at the Eastern end, the other at the Western. One of the towers at the Eastern gate remain still at the Bridge. It retains the [?] stone of the arch over the gate.
The Western Gate tower and arch have entirely disappeared only the name West Gate remaining to perpetuate its memory. The local name 100 years ago was Geata na gCoileach acc to Donovan.
The town was the centre of the Manor of Thurlas, which comprised the land within an approximate radius of 2 miles of the town. In the manorial area the Normans erected castles at convenient points for the protection of its inhabitants.
One of these castles still remain on the Western side of the Square. The Manor Court existed till the beginning of the last century. The Manor also had its mill situated on the river Drish at the
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:18
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The town of Thurles owes its origin to the Anglo-Normans. One of the adventurers, Theobald Walter, was granted large territories in Eire by King John. He succeeded in driving out the native chiefs, the O'Fogarty's and the O'Carrols and at his death in 1206 Anglo Norman colonies had been established in Thurles and at Nenagh in N [?] Theobald was appointed chief butler in Ireland by the King. His descendants adopted the name Butler as a surname and received the title of Earls of Ormond in the 14th Century.
The Colony of Thurles was granted the usual privileges of a Norman Municipality. They got power to select their own Councils and Magistrates, establish their own Courts of Law, levy, customs and fairs and market tolls and send representatives to the Anglo Norman Par.
For the better protection of the inhabitants the Anglo Norman towns were walled in
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:14
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This Nicholas was MP JP for Tipperary in 1944 - 1852 and as above died in 1872. It was the Mahers rebuilt Turtulla House which in its heyday was a magnificent mansion. People remember the later Nicholas receiving rent with pistols beside him on the table.
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:13
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awaiting decision
Likely succeeding the Nicholsons there John Maher of Tullamacjames married a Lanigan from Co. Kilkenny who had issue 3 sons and a daughter. The sons were Nicholas of Turtulla, Gilbert of Loughmore and Matt. The daughter Margaret married a Thomas Maher of Cashel and had a son Nicholas whose wife was a daughter of Walter Otway Herbert of Pill House, Co. Tipp. They had no children. Nick died in 1872. Nicholas of Turtulla married a Miss SMyth of Callan and had 2 sons. John of Tullamaine Castle who married a daughter of Whey Prendergast of Greenmount and died without her in 1850. The second son Val of Turtulla born 1780 TP and MP for Tipperary and tied unmarried in 1884.
Charles O'Keeffe, his agent, evicted 180 persons. For it he was shot dead on the streets of Thurles in October 1838 and the murderer was never discovered. Wm Maher bequeathed a considerable amount of his property to his nephew Nicholas the son of his sister Margaret
senior member (history)
2018-08-15 00:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ryan had a mass house out in Rahealty.
senior member (history)
2018-08-12 00:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs Shannon = 4
Mrs Kelly = 10
Mrs Brogan = 5
Kate McMahon = 2
Mrs Morgan = 4
James Clancy = 5
James Driscoll = 5
Albert Donnelly = 8
Michael Mulqueen NJ = 4
Mrs Ayres = 6
Pat Keogh = 1
John Flanigan = 2
John Stacpoole = 2
Penders = 1
Jim Hehir = 3
Mick Hehir = 8
Mick McGrath = 8
Pat Clancy = 3
Pat Frawley = 4
Rev J Kenny CC = 2
Ann Browne = 4
Bidy McInerney = 2
Tomas Hane = 9
Total = 108
Old age pensioners
Mick Shannon
senior member (history)
2018-08-12 00:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Carrowreagh East in the parish of Kilfiddane in the barony of Cluainderlaw. Number of houses, No of people
Mary Clancy = 1
Mrs Browne = 5
senior member (history)
2018-08-12 00:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ty eight feet.
Martin Halloran, Moyralla, was good to take a high jump. When he was eighteen years he could jump six feet. When he was sixty five years he walked to Ennis to a horse show.
John McInerney, Granny, was good to run a flat rae and he often won at sports. He put out his ankle practicing running at home.
senior member (history)
2018-08-12 00:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tom Walsh, Bolougheva often walked from his own house to Lisdoonvarna. He used leave his own house in the morning after his breakfast. He used put four cuts of bread with pieces of fat meat between them in his pocket. He used be back in time to milk the cows. He was also a great jumper but he never competed at sports because his parents would not allow him. He used to jump a horse forwards and backwards. He could take a long jump of twen
senior member (history)
2018-08-12 00:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
saw her since.
The Danes used to live there in time of war, and it was they who hid the gold.
senior member (history)
2018-08-12 00:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a castle in Ballynacally, in which there is gold hidden. It is situated to the north of the little village near the school. The old people say that it is built of bullocks' blood and skin. It is very high and the gold is supposed to be hidden right on top of the castle.
One Sunday while all the people were gone to Mass, it happened that a very old woman with long golden hair came into a house where a man was housekeeping, his name was Mr. O'Grady.
The woman asked Mr. O'Grady to go with her, and he would get the gold that was hidden in the castle, but she also told him that he should lose one of his eyes when he would be looking for the gold. But Mr. O'Grady said that he would not lose his eye if he got all the money in Ballynacally. The woman then told him that it should stay there. She also told him that it was a man by the name of O'Grady that would get the gold but he should lose one eye.
When the woman had that much said she vanished and the man never
senior member (history)
2018-08-11 13:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is said to have been an old school in the field of Laurenees of Ballymaghroe known as the Schoolhouse field
senior member (history)
2018-08-11 13:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs O'Reilly says there was also a school at Kilamoat situated opposite the chapel where Miss Twist taught but she had never heard any other particulars about it
senior member (history)
2018-08-11 13:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs O'Reilly says there was an old school at Rasheenmore which was directed by Mr Cootes. It was in a hole in the ditch while the fire was in a hole in the floor. One of the boys had always to be on the look out to see if the yeoman were coming. The time table was as follows. First class, First sequel, second class, second sequel. The children brought one penny per week
senior member (history)
2018-08-11 13:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This school was situated on the right hand side of the road above 100 yards away from the Chapel. The teacher was Pat Byrne who taught calculations, writing, geography and signing just as in Knockananna while the pupils had to bring their penny and sod of turf. They sat in holes in the clay floor. Judy, who was Pat's sister, brought him dinner every day and while Pat devoured this Judy gave religious instruction.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
southerly wind.
If there is a blue flame in the fire we usually have rain.
When the waters of Clonderlaw bay are dirty we usually have rain
When Siongáns are seen on the road we usually have bad weather
When the waves of the Atlantic are heard in Coolmeen we usually have bad weather
When the sun shines after a shower you will get more rain
When the sun or moon is suck in the sky you usually get rain
When there is reddening from the sun in the morning you will get rain
When a robin goes into a cabin you will get frost
When Corry's cascade is noising you usually get rain
When McMahons cascade is noising you usually get frost
When a flood goes down quickly you will get more rain.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the frog has changed his yellow vest
And in a russet is coat is dressed" we usually have bad weather
If you have a rainbow in the morning we usually have rain
When you have a rainbow in the evening we usually have good weather.
When the sun goes down red we usually have good weather
When the sun goes down pale we usually have bad weather
When there are rings round the moon we usually have bad weather
When the sky is red to the west we usually have a storm
When there are black clouds in the sky we usually have rain
When rocks shine we usually have rain
We usually have rain from the western wind
We usually have snow from the north ill wind
We usually have fine weather from the north west wind
We usually have frost and hailstones from the eastern wind
We usually have fine weather from the
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When wild geese are see we usually have hard dry weather.
When swans are seen we usually have fine weather.
When plover are seen we usually have frosty weather.
When sea gulls are seen we usually have bad rough weather.
When swallows are seen flying low we have usually bad weather.
When swallows are seen flying high we usually have sunny weather
When the crow headlong seems to fall, as if he felt the fireing [?] ball" we usually have bad weather
When curlews are seen we usually have fog.
When cows go seeking shelter we usually have bad weather.
When the dog eats grass we usually have rain
When the cat sits by the fire, we usually have rain
When goats and sheep come down fro the lofty peaks of the mountains we usually have storm
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
parts of trousers.
Four legs up, four legs down, soft in the middle and hard all round (Answer) A bed
What is the difference between a bottle of medicine and a heart rug (Answer) One is shaken up and taken and the other is taken up and shaken
Which is the right side of a wedding cake (Answer) The side that has been eaten because the other side is left
On which side of a jug is the handle (Answer) on the outside.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
or be blind.
Chriss Brody, Killanena
Story teller: Mr Michael Brody
Killanena
Faction fighting
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fair usually held in Gort every month ,and very often in olden times fights took place at these fairs.
The argument usually arose between two parties, over the price of cattle. It often led to a faction fight in which the backers of both parties engaged.
These faction fights were most common when the split took place between the Mc Carthy-ites and the Parnellitis.
In the olden times the people used to be very careful that the cattle would not have a bad leg
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
seasning about a year before the fair.
Chriss Brody Killanena
Story Teller - Mr. John Moloney
Killanena
Fighting at Fairs
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago when people went to fair they took a big stick with them.
When an argument arose between parties over the price of the cattle it often led to a faction fight in which the backers of both parties were engaged.
These fights were most common when the split took place between the McCarthyites and the Parnellites.
They used to have a big bundle of ash-plants and the one the best top they would bring to the fair with them.
They used to have the plants
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and could never be captured so the huntsmen found out about the money
Chriss Brody, Killanena
Story Teller - Mr Fred Brody Killanena
Gold
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 23:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Since olden times there are still some remains of gold in this district.
It is said that there is a shoe of gold hid in the Glen in Martin Moloney's farm. it is said it was put there by an old Jew who came to this district some year ago, and had no friends to will it to.
There is a good sum of money supposed to be in it. It is also said their (sic) is a lump of gold in John Moloney's farm and a black hare is minding it, this hare was often hunted
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to begin work.
Chriss Brody, Killanena
Story Teller, Mr. John Burke
Killanena
Lucky and unlucky days
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are certain days during the year which are considered lucky a unlucky. On New Years day it is considered unlucky for a red haired person of either sex to enter a house first. There is also objection to any woman.
On May Eve people stick quick beam in the garden to preserve their crops lest other people would interfere with them. On May day there is an objection to ploughing or digging in their garden that it wouldn't be lucky.
Wednesday is the lucky day for marrages and Friday is a lucky
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the safest as it was like a box and they could not roll out.
Chriss Brody Killanena
Story teller Mr. Thomas McMahon
Corbeha
Old Houses
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old thatched houses of long ago generally consisted of a kitchen and room.
The light was admitted by small windows with four panes about 4ins square
The chimney was in one end very seldom it was placed in the centre and often it was only a hole in the roof.
The kitchen furniture consisted of a table, dresser, press bed and bed.
The younger of the family generally slept in the settle-bed it was considered
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to eat grass and wild animals.
Chris Brody
Killanena
Story Teller
Mr. Fred Brody
Killanena
The Great Famine.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The great famine occurred in the year 1846 and continued during the year '47
The cause of the famine was the failure of the potato crop which provided the main food of the old Irish people.
About one million people are supposed to have died of hunger in the famine years and about another million are supposed to have emigrated from Ireland to America Canada and England.
The hunger was so great in Ireland that the people used
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Story Teller - Mr John Burke
Killanena
Clogs
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The boots the people used wear long were called clogs.
The clog had soles made of timber and the uppers were made of leather.
There once lived a man that never wore a shoe and his name was Timmy Casey he could go a long distance and carry a weight bag and his feet would not get hurt
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Story teller Mr. John Moloney
Killanena
Faction Fighting
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are special beliefs attached to horses when being sold
If grey horses haven't a dark spot in part of their body's it is said they carry a man's life.
One day a farmer was buying a grey horse and he searched all over the horse for a dark spot but he got no trace of it and he shook his head and said he would buy it for any money.
The owner of the hores (sic) knew what was troubling the buyer and he "you need not be afraid of her she has done her work already" meaning the horse had already killed a man
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
centre hole was value for 9 and the others for 8, 7, 6 etc. Each bowler got three bowls and he who made the highest score was winner
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bowling was a favourite pastime with the people of this district about thirty five years ago.
It was played generally during the Summer and especially on Sundays when boys came a distance of six miles. The cross roads at Knockanena was the centre for the bowling.
In bowling a round stone about the size of two closed fists was used and this stone was kept in a house near the Cross roads
There were nine holes about the size of the mouth of a bowl. One hole was the centre of the dyke and it was surrounded by eight others. The
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to stay at these games until night
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 22:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The principal game which was played in Ireland long is bolling.
It was played by men and women and children but principally by men and boys.
It was played by digging nine holes in the ground and you should have a stone as big as your two fists and whoever would put the stone into number 9 hole they would win the game.
There were numbers on the holes 6, 7, 8, 9 ect
The people used to come to certain places such as cross roads and public houses and they used
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 21:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The names of diseases are tooth-ache, head-ache, cancer, newritis [?], chil-blain, appendix and abcess.
The best cure for tooth ache is to have it drawn or to pain the gum with Iodine
There are many reasons for head-ache, if a person had bad eye sight he would suffer from a head.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 21:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
find her out and then the next and so on.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 21:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5th April 1938
The games we children play at the present day are principally hide and seek, blind mans buff, Kitty lick the dish, high gates, colours and corners.
All these games are mostly played by girls. Boys play handball, jumping, weight throwing and running and on rainey (sic) day they play card games, namely 45 25 Old maid, poor house, old batchlor, and many others of that kind.
Hide and seek is played between 3 or 4, one goes into a hide and leaves the others to
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 21:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Story teller: Mr. John burke
Killanena
Lucky and unlucky days
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 21:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are certain days in the year that are considered lucky and unlucky.
On New Year's day it is considered unlucky for a red haired person of either sex to be the first visitor to a house.
There is a greater objection to the red haired visitor, all the misfortune which occurs during the year in that house is attributed to the red haired visitor.
On May Eve, the people stick quickbeam in the gardens to preserve their crops lest other people interfere with them.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 21:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
fields on fine summer days. Other games that used be played were hand ball and bowling.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 21:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The favourite pastimes of long ago were hurling, tug-o-war, jumping, stone throwing and pithing money.
The big boy used to play these games the same as they are played now a day.
Boys going to school used in indulge in spinning tops and pitching buttons.
Girls in the olden times used to play jackstones, three or four girls used to play and the game used to be played with five small round stones, generally sitting out in the
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Road Station in the townland of Lismagoneway. It is beside a cross-roads called Swan's Cross.
The roof is usually made of galvanized iron or zinc. The bellows blows up and down. They have a long shaft out of them and there is a cow's horn out of them to blow.
The implements the smith uses a hammer, a knife, a vice, a sledge and a pair of tongs. The smith shoes asses and horses. The forge water is supposed to be a cure for warts. The sparks be a cure for warts. The sparks that fly from the red iron is a cure for rickets.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The smiths name is Pat Kiernan. Their people have been smiths for generations. The forge is situated up at the Monaghan
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The smiths have the cure of the rickets. If there were any rickets long ago the people would go to the forge with their children and put them under the anvil.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Connolly's forge. Ned Connolly was very good for shoeing horses. he was very quick at the shoeing.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The smiths had power for the rickets. Every night people used to ceilidhe in Ned
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and different sorts of files and water in a hole for cooling hot irons.
A blacksmith is supposed to be a very strong man. There is not as many blacksmith now as there was long ago. My father says there used to be three or four smiths in this parish. Now there is only about one.
The blacksmith does not make any ploughs harrows or grubbers, but if they are broken he mends them.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ned Connolly was blacksmith for this parish to about a year ago. He was there for about thirty years and there was six generations there before him. He was the seventh and he had the cure of the rickets. People went to him and were cured.
People used to ceilidhe in the forges long ago. Every blacksmith has in their forge anvil bellows, tongs, iron of all sorts, knives for dressing hooves, hammers for driving nails, rice for holding hot irons,
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bardogs (bardóga) and bellows and many other things.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is only one forge round here. The smith is Clerkin of Three-mile-house. They live at a cross roads. The people have kept the forge for a long time.
The forge is a wee house with a galvanized roof on it and there is also a wee chimney on it. The smith makes farm implements and he fires them also such as harrows and ploughs. There is a fire in the forge too and beside it there is a big hole for water so that he can cool any iron he wants.
There used to be a forget at Deighan's Cross long ago owned by Mick Deighan. He used to make all the implements such as
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The water is thrown out after washing the ft but not after night. It is supposed that there is a cure in it for certain ailments to wash their feet before they go to bed.
To cure warts on the feet people wash them in a blacksmith's trough.
There was a clog-maker name Rocks and he lived beside Mullagreenan school. He made clogs about twenty years ago. Nearly everyone wears clogs in the winter. An old proverb the people had was "Shod in the cradle and barefoot in the stubble"
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
now than long ago. People wear clogs in this district yet. The clogs are far warmer than boots. The clogs wear longer than boots. My grand father used to wear clogs in the winter. The clogs are hard and the leather of the boots softer. There is a wee piece of tin on the toe of the clog to not let it wear away quick and there are two pieces of tin on the sole to save it. People put whango in the clogs because they are stronger than laces. When you would walk the laces would break and you would want to be getting new laces every day.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Several people long ago went barefooted. My grandmother used to go barefooted every summer. Most of the children go barefooted from the first of May until the end of September.
Boots are repaired in this district. When the soles are worn people get new soles. There is a shoe maker the name of McEntee who lives in the townland of Togan. His father was also a shoemaker.
There are more shoe makers.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
round the toes and there was iron rims round them. The clogs were very worn.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
washed in is thrown out. The children go only barefooted now adays in the summer time. Long ago the people had only the one pair of shoes for Sundays and every day. They used to get their shoes at Hollen-tide or the first of November.
There are more shoe-makers nowadays that there were long ago, because there were better shoes long ago and they would do for a long time, and when they would be done they would get another pair - because they would get a pair of any kind of shoes for four or five shillings.
Many people wore clogs long ago but not many wear them nowadays. The clogs were like boots only there was tin
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago people's feet were very hardy compared to now, as they had no corns or aches of any sort.
Whatever journey they had to go they went bare footed and often they were barefooted on Confirmation day. They would rather go barefooted then wear shoes and often they men would carry their shoes and when they would reach their journey's end they would put them on them.
There are two people who mend shoes about here. One is a man named Cook and he lives in Seacart. The other man is the name of Kierans who lives near Three-Mile-house. The water that the feet is
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Children began to wear shoes long ago at the age of ten or twelve
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was supposed that the donkey was the first animal came into the world. Horses is supposed to have wing and that the fairies used to ride them, and them flying
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
called a trencher. Some people make porridge of the buttermilk and others make bread of it.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
they would get a print of butter in (along with it). The people consider it very unlucky to be quarreling or fighting while churning.
We churn once a week in winter time and in the summer we churn twice a week. The churning takes about an hour. The people know when the churning is finished because the staff gets clean and because the butter gathers on top.
Water is poured in during the churning to warm the cream up and make it into butter. The butter is lifted out of the churn with a strainer and then it is put in a deep wooded dish and the milk is washed out of it and salt put in it. Then it is taken out and put on a plate
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Strangers who come in during the churning help at the work. They say "I'll leave the weight of myself of butter on it" If a person came to a neighbour's house long ago for a small can of buttermilk
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The way the people would know when the butter was made is: they would lift up the dash and if they was not any butter on it, it would be made. When a stranger comes in they take the dash, and churn for a while for good luck, and if they did not it would be for bad luck. The way they lift the butter is they wash their hands =. Then they get a basin of cold water and put the butter into it.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have a churn at home. It is made out of wood. We used to churn every week. We churned by hand. The way the dash went was up and down. We would churn until the butter would come on the milk.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the butter is made.
When the butter is made they take it out of the churn and put it into water. They let it stay in the water for about then minutes. They they take it out and put it on the lid of the churn and put salt in it and make it up in [?]
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The people put the sweet milk into a crock and let it stay in the crock for four or five days, till it gets thick. Then they put the cream into the churn and put the churn-staff into the churn. Before the staff is put into the churn it is scalded with hot water to not let the butter stick to it. There is water put in the milk for the butter to be made quicker.
When they want to know if the butter is made, they lift up the staff and see is there any pieces of butter on it. If you you look at the milk and see any wee pieces of butter on it, the butter is not made, and if there are no pieces of butter on it
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
up and down. Some people have no lid for their churn and they have to put the staff round and round, because if they put it up and down the milk would go out.
If you churned constant it would be done in twenty minutes. You would know when it is done when you get a spoon and take a spoonful of it out and if it stays on the spoon when you put it sideways it is done, and if it goes down with the milk it is not done.
If any person would come in when you are churning they would have to take a brash. A brash is to take the staff and churn a wee while
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The way people churned long ago is different to the way people churn now. Only few people now a days churn at all.
The people long ago had a churn and a staff. It is a wooden thing with holes in it and a wooden handle on it. There was a lid on the churn with a whole in the middle of it. The lit is on the churn to keep the milk from splashing out. The hole is in it to let the staff go up and down.
When the milk is think and ready for churning you put it in the churn and put the handle of the staff up through the hole in the lid and then put the staff
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:06
approved
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awaiting decision
We call our cow Blackie. When you are driving cows say "haw haw": when calling them towards you say "chey chey". When you are driving hens, say "shuck" when calling them "chucky". When driving geese say "seleg" when calling them "goosey, goosey". When calling ducks say "weet weet"
An emblem is hung in the cowhouse on the first of May to bring good luck. When anybody is milking you should say "Good luck to your work". It was supposed the animals could talk in the time of Tír na nÓg,
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:03
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There is a piece of palm usually put in the byre. The horse is tied with a rope round the head. The people give him hay for fodder and straw for bedding. They clop a horse with a horse-clippers. They clip round the sides and wherever the hair is long on him.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 14:02
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awaiting decision
We have a horse, two cows, three goats, a calf, two pigs and a dog. The way we call the horse is "foaly, foaly"
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:15
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We have goats, ass, turkeys, ducks and hens. When you are driving the cows you say "Chey chey". When you are calling the turkeys, you say "pee pee"
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:15
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The animals we have at home are turkeys, hens, chickens. The way we call the hens: we say tucky tucky: to the turkeys, py py py. To the chickens: birdy birdy.
To the goat people say "kiddy, kiddy" to a calf "sucky sucky" to the pigs "hurrish, hurrish"
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:12
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of our cows are the Scotch-town cow, the moiley cow, the bishop cow and the wee gray cow. We say to them "Go on there out o' that". We say to the horse "hauf". We say to the calves "Suckey". We say to the hens "Chucky" to the geese "shu-leg"
The cows' house is called the byre. There is in it a stick or a post and a chain to go round the cow's neck to tie her. The people buy the chains in town. Sometimes the cows are tied with a rope and sometimes with a halter. The halter is put under its chin and on the middle of his face and under its ears.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:10
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Our animals are cows, horses, dog, donkey and cat. The names
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:10
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awaiting decision
Lamma's day comes the begging of August. It is supposed that there is no potatoes or no crops at Lammas. It is supposed that whatever the twelve days of Christmas is, the winter will be the same weather.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:09
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spring. Another proverb: A green Christmas leaves a fat church yard
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:08
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On St. Brigid's Day people gather snowdrops and put them up in jugs and vases and leave them there till they decay.
It is said that anyone that is born on Whit Sunday is supposed to be unlucky to themselves or to others.
The twelve days after Christmas are supposed to tell the weather of the twelve months of the year.
The people say that if Candlemas is fair it will leave two winters in the year.
After Easter the people always put in an early crop (potatoes) because it is supposed that there is a good growth in the weather.
An old proverb the people had was: An early Easter leaves an early
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:06
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If anything happens to you through Whit week you would have it all through your life. If you cut your foot that week it will always be sore
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:05
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On Whit Sunday people would not go near any water of any kind.
If you were first at a spring well on New Year's morning and take the first of the water you would have good luck for the whole year round.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:04
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awaiting decision
On midsummer night the people light fires in the fields. The way they light them is: they get sticks and hay and put a match to the hay. Then they stay there to it goes out and then they go home.
Shrove Tuesday is the day before Ash Wednesday. The people make pancakes that night. On May Day they put rags on the ditches and they say if you done that you would not get a cold to the next May Day.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:03
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their own well first. They would give nothing away on that day because they would give all their luck away.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:02
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On St. Patrick's Day every man drinks some whiskey to have it to say that they drowned their shamrocks.
Every May Eve everybody gathers May flowers and put them at every door. On May Day morning everyone ties to go to
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:02
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shamrocks some of them keep them to that night and then drown them in water for them to have good luck until that time next year.
On May Day the people scatter May flowers at the door for to have good luck. On May Day people also hang a horse shoe up over the door for good luck
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:01
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The people have different customs on saints' days and on other days as well. On St. Patrick's Day when the people have their
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 13:00
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awaiting decision
Long ago a man was getting married. When they were married the priest asked the man for money. The man said he had none so he gave him none. The bridge told him he should have given him some money. The man said "No" that he would have to kill a pig to pay him and that they would kill the pig for themselves and if they would not have luck they would have grease.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:59
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The Banners grow well and the Pinks. The Banners are usually given to pigs and other animals. Potatoes were used for starch long ago. Grease and potatoes boiled together made soap. The people gather the potatoes into buckets or sometimes bags. The shape of the pit is long like a house.
The way the people dig a ridge of potatoes: they leave the potatoes on the ridge and throw the stalks into the alley. All the people used to have spades long ago before they got diggers. They dig two or three drills at a time up the field and down it.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:57
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The potatoes are dug out by a digger. A boon of people gather and lift the potatoes after the digger with three a-breast. Men and women and children pick the potatoes.
The names of the different kinds of potatoes are Banners, Kerr's Pinks, Epicures, Arran Victors, British Queens, Sutens (?) cups (?) and Champions.
They are gathered up in a heap. Rushes are put over them and then clay and they stay dry during the winter.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:55
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to one another. They dig them with a spade.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:55
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to one another. They dig them with a spade.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:55
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Weeds grow on the potatoes. The farmer pulls them so that they would not choke up. When they are near blossoms he sprays them with a machine. Long ago the people used to spray them with broom. He sprays to keep the blight off them. They go
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:54
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The farmers plough the ground with a plough. Then they spread the stuff (manure) that they get in the bures and in the streets. They used to put ashes on the potatoes. The people long ago would set their potatoes in ridges because spades were easy used.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:52
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In Autumn the people pick the potatoes. They put them in a heap and then put rushes over them. Then they put clay over them. There are potatoes called blues and they are very good.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:38
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long ago. The mould the potatoes to keep down the weeks and to put fresh clay up on the potatoes for them to root. If there is too much clay took off them then they would not grow because the roots would be bare and the wee potatoes would die.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:37
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The farmers put salt on the corn if there is a worm in it. They get a bag of salt and put some of it into a bucket and sow it like corn. It is sowed when it is not coming on.
When the potatoes come up they grub them and then they mould them. They let them grow for a while, then they grub them and mould them again, and hoe them and take the weeds out of the drills.
Then they get ready to spray. They put the blue-stone into a barrel and put water on it and let it melt. They get the sprays and put the stuff into it. They spray secondly and thirdly to keep the blight away.
The people sprayed more
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:33
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The people help one another to get in the crops. It is called swopping. The farmers put bone manure on the potatoes to make them grow.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:32
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between them.
The way the potatoes are put in pits: they are gathered up on other in a long line and covered with rushes and clay. When you put potatoes in a house you must not leave them packed up on other because they would rot. Potatoes would do better at the back of some ditch where the air would get at them than to be in a close house.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:30
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After the potatoes are dug out of the ground by the men, whoever is gathering puts the big potatoes into a pit, and then go back where they gathered the big potatoes, and gather the wee ones and put them into bags and then they are drawn to the house for feeding.
The big potatoes are put into pits and covered with clay. The best potatoes are put into pits and covered with clay. The best potatoes for growing in this part of the country are the Blue Arran Banners, and the Pink potatoes.
Most times it is children that pick the potatoes after the diggers. They do have little tubs between them and every two of them carry it
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:28
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was finished would help the other men. They would all work till they would have the field all set. Then they would take their share until every man got what he wanted.
They put the potatoes in ridges all that time. They would gather together in summer time and mould them twice. They would pull the weeds out of them be fore the would mould them. The way they moulded the potatoes was: they dug a deep furrow on each side of every ridge and made the clay fine by hitting it with the back of a spade until it was very fine. Then a man would come with a shovel and shovel the clay through the stalks of the potatoes.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:26
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Some people help each other in sowing potatoes. They helped each other very much long ago. Three or four men used to join and take one field between them. One would help the other until that man was finished and then the man that
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:26
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seed on the manure and then you make a farrow on each side of the ridge and cover the seed with clay. Then you have a ridge made.
The seed potatoes are called sets. They are called this because when the potato is cut it is set down on the manure.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:25
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on the field then it is ploughed. After three weeks it is harrowed and cultivated until the ground is fine enough for the drills to be opened. Then the drills are made.
The way the drills are made is you get a drill-plough and two horses and you drive the horses down the field straight and the drill-plough throws the earth to both sides and then he comes up the other side and puts the earth up on that side. Then the drill is made.
Some people set their potatoes in ridges. The way this is done - you turn a bit of soil up, on down the field to the foot, and you turn up another bit up the other side. Then you put the manure on it and put the
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:23
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About an acre and a half of potatoes are sown on our farm at home each yea. My father prepares the ground for them. Sometimes the field is manured before it is ploughed. If there is a brae on the field it is manured because when the drills are up you could not get the manure down.
When the manure is put
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:21
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go into the hole. He stood on the edge of the hole and read his prayer book. When he was finished reading the lightning came and it fell into the hole and he was not killed.
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:20
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Long ago it was said that a boy would be killed by lightning on a certain day. His parents sent him to school to become a priest. the day on which he was to be killed came. The father had a hole dug for him. The boy had holidays at the time. The father told him to go into it. The boy would not
senior member (history)
2018-07-23 12:19
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There is a holy well in Doollagh. It is in a meadow of Tom McMahon's. Nobody goes to it because most people in that townland are Protestants.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:38
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15. As I went out yonder gap, I met my mammy hocken coming trip trap trokeeen up the botreen with silver heels and copper toes and upon my word she would frighten the crows
Answer - A gun
16. Four stick standers, four lily landers, two crookers, two peeners and a whip-a-bout
Answer - a cow
17. There is a table in my father's garden neither ash, elm, oak nor yew nor any kind of wood that gre
A sheet of ice.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:36
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8. What is the difference between and acid drop and a horse
Answer - the faster you lick them the faster they go
9. As round as an apple as flat as a pan, one side a woman and the other a man
Answer - a penny
10. Four cats sitting in four corners and four cats sitting on four cats tails. How many cats is that
Answer - four cats
11. I have a little red cow at home. She eats all I give her and drinks none.
Answer - a fire
12. As I went up corn hill. Corn hill was shaking. I saw four and twenty little devils breaking their hearts reaping.
Answer - Mice at a stack of oats
13. As I was going out on yonder gap I met my uncle Davy. I cut off his head and sucked his blood and left him lying easy.
Answer - A bee
14. My mother sent me for the gurageen the ganageen the long thing at the short thing and the thing she sits upon
Answer - a spinning wheel
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:32
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1. Round the house and round the house and drags the harrow after her
Answer - A hen and chickens
2. I have a little sister. She has a red nose. The longer she lives the shorter she grows.
Answer - A candle
3. If a man gets sixpence for walking a mile. What will he get for walking thirty miles?
Answer - Sore feet
4. How many cuts of a knife would a well pointed scollip want
Answer - none because if it is pointed it has not to be pointed again
5. Headed like a thimble. Tailed like a rat. You may guess for ever and you won't guess that.
Answer - a pipe
6. What is it that goes up the chimney down (the chimney) and down the chimney up?
Answer - an umbrella
7. What is alike about a fisherman and a beggar
Answer - both are looking for a bite
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:28
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"Sorens" oatenmeal seeds are put in a crock of soft water, and left to one side. After a couple of days used as a drink. Stirred and strained. A tart taste "Boxty Bread" and "blook puddings" still used.
Sweat House
In the townland of Newtownashel, little house once used as a sweat house. People came from Roscommon, Westmeath etc to it up to thirty years ago. There was a flag on the roof and floor. A turf fire was put on the floor. A turf fire was put on the floor. When the house was heated up, the fire was swept out and the straw put on the floor to prevent a person from getting burnt. Person would undress outside and remain in the house till he had sweated sufficiently. Good for pains i the bones.
Cure for burn.
A sheep's tallow and daisies and bark of the buail tree and goat's manure all put together and boiled and strained through a fine cloth.
A. McGarry's ointment made by by McGarry family in Moydow - specially for a burn
b. cure for cancer in Burke family Clondra
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:22
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There is a stone in Killashee on a wall outside a house which was an old barracks at once. There are the words that are written on it. Tom Wilkson, Tom Donnelly, Tom Keally, Bernard Brady, Michael Brown. There is a big stone in Pat Beltons field. It is called the giants stone. The tracks of his heel and hand are on it. The giant is supposed to be buried under this stone.
There is another stone on the shore of Lough Ree in Derry. The track of the giants hand is on it.
Told by Tom Fallon age 58 years
Derryadd
Killashee
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:20
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A cow that has two calves three years after others is not lucky to keep.
If you sell a cow after calving you should also sell the calf as it is not.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:18
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It is lucky to put out on odd number of eggs under a hen.
A certain woman always brought the eggs, she was going to sit under a hen, in the petticoat rather than her apron as it was lucky.
It is lucky for a hen to bring in her chicken that she hatched out, not lucky for a duck.
Lucky for a cock to fly up on the half-door and crow with its head turned in towards the kitchen.
It is lucky to tie a red rag on a cow's tail time of calving with a bit of blessed candle in it. This should be allowed to fall off.
It is not lucky to bring out fire when churning is going on.
It is not lucky to lend a clocking hen.
It is not lucky to wash eggs before you put them under a clocking hen
June chickens are supposed not to be lucky.
If chickens come out in May they will never grow full size
It is lucky to put down hatching hens in July
Good Friday is a lucky day to put down a turkey to hatch
It is said that no rats will come near a house where a Guiney hen is.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:14
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1. Long ago the girls used to have different pastimes from what they have now. They used to make bracelets from daisies and haws. First they would gather daisies in the fields. Then they would get a needle and thread and put the daisies in on the thread with the needle. After that they would break off the thread at the needles and then tie the two ends together and they would have it made.
2. Another game is making "May bushes" in the month of May. They get a long pole and cover it with bunches of flowers. Then they put it up outside the house.
3. A pastime for boys is making bird cribs.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:11
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the effected part.
16. A cure for a burn is goats marble boiled in new milk
17. Another cure for rheumatism is ash leaves picked in spring and boiled and strained and some of it taken every day.
18. Cows water is a cure for a weak stomach
19. Francis Toher Kilmore Killashee has a cure for ringworm.
A cure for chincough is to go out and the first person you meet ask them for a cure and whatever they tell you to do will be a cure.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:09
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1. A cure for warts is to dip them in forge water.
Another cure is to rub the milk of the seven sisters on them.
Another cure is to pull a straw out of the thatch and throw it on the road and whoever picks up the straw will take the warts.
2. A cure for a swoolen face is cammomile flowers streamed and poultice the sore part with it.
3. A cure for chincough is to out under and asses belly three times.
4. A cure for a cold is flax-seed and garlick mixed.
5. A cure for sore eyes is calmnata supliment and white coppers and unsalted butter
6. A cure for biles is to tar with water and take a glass of it every morning
7. A cure for toothache is to put tobacco into it
8. A cure for an ear ache is to put a roast turnip at the back of the ear
9. Breams grease is a cure for pains
10. Ferrets milk is a cure for whooping cough
11. A cure for a burn is to rub soda on it
12. There is a cure for consumption in donkeys milk
13. There is a cure for a swelling in hemlock
14. Planten leaf is a cure for a cut
15. A cure for rheumatism is frogs spawn buried for a year in a bottle and then rubbed on
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:04
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Once upon a time there was a married couple and they had a baby in the cradle. It happened that the mother disappeared to the great distress of the husband. However,he wanted to see her come in to the house every night and go and caress the infant in the cradle. But she used not speak. At last the husband picked up courage and caught her and asked her where she was gone to and why does she not come back. Oh says she don't you know I am gone with the fairies and if you want me back you will have to take an oatcake one in each hand and go to the corner of a certain field at a certain time. You will see horses racing past and you must aim at the third one. I will be riding the third one and if you hit it you will get me back again. The man did so and got back his wife.
Told by Mrs. Josie Burke
Killashee
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 18:00
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Derrygacreen - a part of a bog near Woodlawn, Killashee
Shinanagire - a field near Mulbihill ag Grillagh, Killashee
Cooleens - at the back of Grillagh mill - field
Shaw Garden - a field in Moydear
Camóg - in Derryshanogue
Crown - a little field in Derrygowna
Mullinlather - applied to a ditch in the acres Derrgadd
Askey - a way leading from Derrygadd to Woodlawn
Derryflisk - a place in Corlea
Crannagh - a hill on the road between Corlea and Derrygadd
Tobarawran - a field in Corlea belonging to James Lennon
The Callachies - rocks in Pat Belton's field of Corlea
Bara a bile - is between Derrylawn and Derrygadd
Croc - a place in Derrygadd
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 17:56
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There is the ruin of an old castle belonging to the O'Farrell's in Ballyclare on the Longford - Roscommon road. It is in the lands of one John Wilson.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 17:55
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A good horse races used to be held at Killeeny adjoining Jimmy Skelly's farm. A great number of Connaughtmen used to be present. After the races there used to be wrestling competitions.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:39
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name Ryan Figheadóra still exists in Nicker.
Basket making was carried on in Bilboa by the Laffans. The baskets were made from willows or weak sallies. The people used large baskets (for bringing turf) which were called the Hish.
Nail making was carried on in Cappamore by the Connerys and Waver.
There is a man in Cappamore called Willie the nailer.
Top making was also carried on in Cappamore by Martin Friend. The tops were called Martin Friends.
Person from whom I received story - Thomas Power
Approximate age - sixty four
Address - Bilboa, Cappamore
How long residing here - thirty years
Paddy Power
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:36
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In ancient days people were very skillful. They learned to make things which are used in every day life. The people sheared the wool of the sheep and spinned it with a spinning wheel. There it was handed over to the weaver who weaved it with his hand loom. Then the wool was dyed in different colours. The Irish name for a weaver is Figheadóir, the
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:34
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visit the wedding. Straw-boys were not invited to the wedding. Their heads and arms were tied with straw súgáns. They usually visited the houses at night and were invited in by the "Fean a-tighe". They got plenty to eat and drink, they took part in the dancing and after a few hours they went home.
Person from whom I received story - Thomas Power
Approximate Age - Sixty Four years
Address - Bilboa, Cappamore
How long residing here - thirty years
Paddy Power
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:32
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married and people believed it long ago.
"Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth, Wednesday the best day of all. Thursday for losses, Friday for crosses and Saturday the worst day of all."
There are local beliefs connected with Shrove. It is lucky to get married on Shrove Tuesday. Monday is given as a dowry. Also stock and goods are given in my district. When a person got married a wedding feast was held in the house.
On the wedding day the Bridegroom and the Bride do not travel to the Chapel together. The Bride reaches the Chapel first. The Bridegroom goes to the alter the first, then the Bride is given away by one of her friends. After the ceremony, the two married people go around to the Sacristy to Register the marriage. It is said that the first to leave the Sacristy would die first.
A month after the marriage, the two married people come back to the Bride's house for a feast, it is called the "hauling home"
It was customary for Straw-boys to
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:26
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In olden times people did not believe in getting married at any time of the year, only on Shrove Tuesday. St. Patrick's day us thought unlucky for getting married. Also Saturdays are thought unlucky. May is the most unlucky month of the year to get married. June is the luckiest month, people get married very plentifully in June. There is an old saying about getting
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:24
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The only seats they had were a few big stones and a rough plank placed across them. The pupils paid the teacher by the quarter. The teacher was kept in the pupils' houses. The subjects that were taught were English, Latin and Greek. There was no Irish taught because the Irish people were afraid of the English to speak Irish.
Person from whom I received story - Thomas Power
Approximate age - Sixty Four Years
Address - Bilboa, Cappamore
How long residing here - thirty years
Paddy Power
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:22
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About ninety years ago, the last hedge schools existed in this district. To the knowledge of the old people, there were three hedge schools in the district. They were within easy reach of the present Bilboa Boy's National School. There was one at Farnane Cross, near the present Mr Thomas Naughton's hous. There was another one near the site of Portnard Bridge, and there was also one at Bilboa Cross. Mrs Hillard taught in Portnard School. The teacher who taught in Farnane school was a stranger. The people do not remember his name. Mr Lonergan taught at Bilboa school.
The school at Farnane Cross was held in an old thatched cabin also. The school at Bilboa Cross was held in the corner of a field now owned by Mr John Walshe.
senior member (history)
2018-07-22 14:19
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Approximate age - sixty four years
Address - Bilboa, Cappamore
How long residing here - thirty years
Paddy Power
senior member (history)
2018-06-03 22:21
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Beagh and the people were very glad to hear the great news.
Collected by Rose Mary Moore (Aged 60) Loughfad
Aged 12 years
Told by her mother, whose grandmother was the woman mentioned in the story.
Date 1.10.38
senior member (history)
2018-06-03 22:20
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awaiting decision
10.1.'38
About a century ago it was said that a ghost was to be seen every moonlight night near Beagh. This ghost could be seen spreading a white sheet. One night a woman from Ballykilduff named Mary Boyle happened to be coming from Ardara at a late hour. This woman was very jolly and she laughed to herself as she was coming near the spot where the ghost was to be seen and she said "I'll see the ghost making his bed to night." She stood and looked all around her but she could see or hear nothing so she walked on. Suddenly she saw a sheet spread and disappear again. She wondered what it could be. She walked back and forward a few times and she noticed that at one certain spot the sheet would appear and disappear. Then she crossed the fence and into the field. She saw it was a pool of water on which the moon would cast its reflection as anyone went by on the road. She laughed to herself again and said "Ha, I found out what the ghost is at last. She went home that night and told everyone that the moon was the ghost that was to be seen at
senior member (history)
2018-06-03 22:16
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rejected
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106 years when he also died.
Collected y Francis John Gallagher Narin
Aged 12 years
Told by Peter McHearne, Narin
Aged 60 years
Date 1 Sept '38
senior member (history)
2018-06-03 21:59
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man named Tommy Moore locally known as king Moore who lived in Loughfad. He was very popular in this district as a religious man. One day as he was crossing Clooney hill he met a man whom he knew to be dead. With the shock of meeting the dead man he fell into a trance and when he awoke he found himself in an old church ruins in Inniskeel island. While there a man and woman appeared before the altar in the old ruin to be married and a clergyman with them. The clergyman asked them had they a witness and they said that they had king Moore to witness the marriage. When they were married the man spoke to Moore and told him who he was and that he was dead for so many years. He hold him that his present wife had died also a short time ago and before either died they were engaged and they never could rest until they were married. The clergyman blessed them and bade them go and rest. They disappeared and king Moore lived happily until he was
senior member (history)
2018-06-03 21:54
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a woman living in Ballybofey. She was not a Catholic. One night, when the snow was on the ground a beggar woman came to her door and asked her for the Mother of God's sake to give her shelter. She said to herself that she would let her in for the Mother of God's sake. She kept her for three days, on account of the snow. When the beggar was leaving the woman gave her a shawl. The beggar woman went down on her knees and prayed that God would help her if she would be in trouble.
Soon after this the protestant woman died. On the last day of the wake she awoke. All the people ran out. At last one woman went over to the bed side. The woman who had come to life told them not to fear, that she would be in hell if she had not given shelter to the beggar-woman and that God put her back to this world for 16 years to do penance. She went about begging for those years. She told them that her brother would die in six months and he would go to hell. This was true.
senior member (history)
2018-05-13 19:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
A stór - you're tired asthore
A leanbh alannah (muise don't cry alannah)
A mhuirnín You'll be all right in a minute a mhuirniín
A mhic A mhic mo chroidhe
A chroidhe Don't be afraid a chroidhe
Meitheal We had a meitheal at the turf to day
Pusachán
Plamás Too much plamás he has
Bán A little green field near the house
Cruiscín There's more in the cruiscín
Stuachán Oh! the stuachán
Gabhlóg
Fág a' bealach
Lios an Iarainn (ainm aite é seo)
Clon mór (ainm pairce)
Siym He put no suím in me
Stoilín Sit on teh stoilín near the fire
Srunáin
Buachaill Indeed he's a nice bouchal
Bulabhán balbhán
O chón o!
Cead míle fáilte
Cúb
Gom gomlathán - That gomlathán!
Tigín
Clabhe a clout of his fist
senior member (history)
2018-05-13 19:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is in Derrbeg, not far from the ruins of a priests house. Father Kelly was the last priest to live there. He was PP of Kinnitty parish as well as Leirkiernan. Near it is the ruins of the school house and a couple of fields away on the bank of the river the chapel stood. There are cherry trees and gooseberry bushes growing all around the place. Frank Carroll was the teacher, and his house was the school as well. The last person to live in the priest's house was Betty Maher. She was better known by her maiden name, Betty Cleary. She died about the year 1896 and was over ninety years old. Betty had a great many Irish words through her conversation.
When Betty Maher was dying the bells of Benediction were ringing in the house and were heard by all who were there.
Betty made over her farm to Big Ned Kinivan and he got it after her death. When Ned died his nephew Larry Maher inherited it (Larry was no relation to Betty Maher) When Michael Carroll died in the old school house the bit of land attached was sold and Larry Maher bought it. The chapel was on "The Strand" and the road does not pass it but it can be reached by a pass way along the river starting from H Connors' house and ending at Aghagusty Bridge.
senior member (history)
2018-05-13 19:02
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was two public houses one in [?] owned by Mrs Tooher and one by Mr Johnny Edgill at Longford cross
There was a Police Barracks on Oakley where John Kinaghan lives presently
the old Cross of Clareen was on the lane near Joe Kennedy's gate, at the style leading to the river. A road led up through Kennedy's yard. The mark of the road can be seen through little Churchland. The road to Clareen to chapel was made about the time of the Famine.
There was a road, a continuation of "the lane" up behind priests garden that came out through Coughlan's yard to Loftus' Bridge
senior member (history)
2018-05-13 18:59
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rejected
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The site of a church is marked on Ordnance map. The walls no longer stand nor any trace of the church, but on very dry weather its outline can be traced in the withered grass.
senior member (history)
2018-05-13 18:58
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rejected
awaiting decision
Land was divided in recent years by the Land Commission in
Derrykeel
Kilmaine
Breaghmore
Ballygaddy
Clonlee
senior member (history)
2018-05-12 13:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
man who has the curse.
He pubs some of his own blood on the object and sends it back.
It is then rubbed on the affected part.
A person named "Hugh Kelli