Number of records in editorial history: 1117 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2017-10-16 21:55
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Place Names
Silver Sticks
It is so called because it is said that fairies turned the sticks there into silver.Other people say that one night a man saw the woods shining like gold and there were fairies dancing there at the same time.
The Bleach Field
It is
senior member (history)
2017-10-16 21:48
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very near the Old Bridge. Every Monday night people hung the week's washing there. because they said that the sun was stronger there. Each person paid a penny each.
Gallow's Hill
It is leading to the railway. It was so called because there was a public gallows there
senior member (history)
2017-10-16 21:41
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Place Name
Silver Sticks
It is so called because it is said that fairies turned the sticks there into silver.Other people say that one night a man saw the woods shining like gold and there were fairies dancing there at the same time.
The Bleach Field
It is
senior member (history)
2017-10-02 22:37
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Scurvy
They had a great cure for scurvy. My fatherr told me that it is a true cure because his father had a girl who was dying in this way. They used get water lilies in the river Anner. These lilies do not grow in any place only in the Anner.They used boil the lilies and leave them cool then when they were cool they used put a pound of sasafrang and a pound of sasafraile in with the leaves and one glass of first shot whiskey. The three things were then mixed together and drunk every morning until they were cured.
senior member (history)
2017-10-02 22:31
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Scurvy
They had a great curefor scurvy. My fatherr told me that it is a true cure because his father had a girl who was dying in this way. They used get water lilies in the river Anner These liliesdo not grow in any place only in the Anner.They used boil the lilies and leave them cool then when they were cool they usedput a pound of sasafrang and a pound of sasafraile in with the leaves and one glass of first shot whiskey. The three things were then mixed together and drunk every morming until they were cured.
senior member (history)
2017-10-02 22:17
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Burns
One of the ways they cured a burn was by boiling hart's thngue ferns and leavung them on te burn for
senior member (history)
2017-10-02 22:14
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Burns
One of the ways they cured a burn was by boiing hart's tongue ferns and leaving them on the burn for
senior member (history)
2017-10-01 20:36
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about three or four days until it disappeared.
senior member (history)
2017-10-01 20:30
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A Sty
If they had a sty they got a red cloth and asked the priest to bless it. Then put it to the sty and it was cured.
Burns
One of the ways the cured a burn was by boiling hart's tongue ferns and leaving them on the burn for
senior member (history)
2017-10-01 20:29
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A Sty
If they had a sty they got a red cloth and asked the priest to bless it. Then put it to the sty and it was cured.
Burns
One of the ways the cured a burn was by boiling hart's tongue ferns and leaving them on the burnfor
senior member (history)
2017-10-01 20:21
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and your rheumatism would be cured.
Rheumatism
If you put a nutmeg into your pocket you would get better from rheumatism.
senior member (history)
2017-10-01 20:13
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Chilblains
If you had a chilblain to rub methylatrd spirits. It will harden the skin and the chilblain would go away.
Rheumatism
For Rheumatism you should eat the leaves of dandelion
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 21:38
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Sore Eyes
Once my uncle got sore eyes and he made a pilgrimage to St Patrick's Well and bathed them with the water from the well. His eyes got better.
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 21:38
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Sore Eyes
Once my uncle gotsore eyes and he made a pilgrimage to St Patrick's Well and bathed them with the water from the well. His eyes got better.
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 21:30
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Sore Eyes
They cured sore eyes by bathing them with cold tea.
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 21:26
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morning early and went through the fields when the dew was on the ground and they rubbed the dew on their eyes and after a while they would be healed.
Boils
The cure for boils was fresh cow dung.
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 21:20
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Measles
To cure measles they got saffron and boiled it in milk and they gave the milk to the sick person.
Sore Eyes
For sore eyes they got up every
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 21:11
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Yellow Jaundice
A cure for yellow jaundice was the bark of the logan tree which was to be boiled down and drained and the water left to be taken daily.
Whitlows
To cure a whitlow they filled a bottle with very hot water and placed the finger on which the whitlow was in the neck of the bottle until the whitlow was drown.
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 21:02
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Sprains
To cure sprains they used to get a plant named Marsh Mallow. This should be boiled down and when strained put into a cloth with fresh lard and placed over the sprain.
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 20:56
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the water in which they were boiled and should drink two tea spoons every day;
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 20:55
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the waterin which they were boiled and should drink two tea spoons every day;
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 20:49
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be melted they would take it out and divide it into two parts. Then they would get caterpillars and put them in between the two pieces of soap. Then they got a cloth and rolled the soap in it and put it around their necks. They should do this every day until cured.
Coughing up Blood
For people who coughed up blood they would gather dog roots and was them well and boil them ; they would drink
senior member (history)
2017-09-29 20:36
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Consumption
To cure consumption they would collect black snails then they would cut them up and get about a pint of milk and put them into it. They would put them on the fire to boil. when they would be boiled they would drink the milk and throw away the snails.
Diphtheria
Diphtheria was cured by putting soap in hot water to melt. When it would
senior member (history)
2017-09-22 22:24
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root and robin-run-the-hedge and drink once a day
Kidneys
Golden rod and wild parsnip were boiled together and taken when necessary for the kidneys.
Yellow jaundice
Bay leaf boiled inporter for a few hours and taken when suffering from the jaundice was suppose to cure it.
Helen Dillon, 3 Rock Field, Heywood Rd
Informant Mrs O'Dwyer
senior member (history)
2017-09-22 22:12
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Blood Purifier
Anorher purifier for the blood was to boil together cuppole-
senior member (history)
2017-09-22 22:10
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Ringworm
A child suffering from ring worm was cured by one of her parents writing the child's namearound it with ink with the beginning of the Christian name meeting the last letter of the Surname. After being done three times in succession the ringworm would disappear
Blood Purifier
To purify the blood people pulled young nettles and boiled them well and ate them at the beginning of Spring and the beginning of Autumn.
Information re above 3 cures received from Mrs M Dillon, 3 Rock Field.
senior member (history)
2017-09-22 21:56
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A Sty
To cure a sty they made the Sign of the Cross with a widow's wedding ring and at the same time utter some prayer.
senior member (history)
2017-09-22 21:54
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St Anthony's Fire.
If a woman who did not change her surname in marriage pricked her finger and let the blood fall on the part affected it would cure St Anthony's Fire
Information from Mr Michael Dillon, 3 Rock Field, Heywood Rd.
senior member (history)
2017-09-22 21:49
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Information on previous page got from Mrs Dillon 48 Garrymore 81 years and Mrs Moroney 62 Garrymore
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:59
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the sore.
My mother told me when she was young she got sored on her head. My Granny got three wide leaves of cabbage and put them on the fire and when they were brown she took them out. She put the three leaves on her head when she was going to bed. In the morning when she got up she took them off and there was not a sign on her head.
Kathleen Moroney, 62 Garrymore
Informant: Mrs Dillon 48 Garrymore
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:54
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the sore.
My mother told me when she was young she got sored on her head. My Granny got three wide leaves of cabbage and put them on the fire and when they were brown she took them out. She put the three leaves on her head when she was going to bed. In the morning when she got up she took them off and there was not a sign on her head.
Kathleen Moroney, 62 Garrymore
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:46
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Sores
Mrs Dillon an old woman living near me told me some of the old cures.
To cure a sore let a dog lick
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:41
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kind of grass called sparrow grass and they used it to cure cuts from glas
Angela Birmingham, 95 Ard na Greine
Informant: Mrs Ed Birmingham
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:36
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Cuts from Glass
The people long ago used to get a certain
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:34
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Sores
Apply a poultice of Linseed Meal to the sore.
Anna Fleming, Ard na Greine
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:26
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roll a piece of silk thread around the wart and it would cure it.
Biddy Tobin, 82 Garrymore
Informant: Mr James Burke, Glenary Hill.
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:21
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To cure warts they would dip the had of a burned match into ink and rub it round the wart and it would be cured.
Another way they cured their warts was to
senior member (history)
2017-09-19 21:15
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To cure warts they should gather dandelion and take the milk out of it and put it on the wart. They should do this every day until cured.
Kathleen Moroney,62 Garrymore
Informant:Mrs Dillon, 48 Garrymore, Age 81
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 21:17
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and put the snail on again. When they would lift it off the wart would come off.
Molly Berkery, North Field Clonmel
Informant: Mr James Berkery
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 21:13
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Warts were cured by going out in the morning and getting the fresh water off cow dung and putting it on the wart every morning until cured
Eily McCormack, 42 Dillon St
Informant: Mr Robert McCormack
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 21:07
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and put the snail on again. When they would lift it off the wart would come off.
Molly Berkery, North Field Clonmel
Informanr: Mr James Berkery
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 21:03
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They had a cure for warts long ago. They used to get a snail with no shell and put it on the wart. Then they took it off again and put some lime on the wart
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:59
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on his finger and when he was going to bed he put a grey hair from a grey horse's tail on it and in the morning it had disappeared.
Helen Dillon, 3 Rock Field, Heywood Rd.
Informant: Mr Dillon
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:55
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on his finger and when he was going to bed he put a grey hair from a grey horse's tail on it and in the morning it had disappeared.
Helen Dillon, 3 Rock Field, Heywood Rd.
Informant: Mr Dillon
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:50
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My Daddy told me when he was young he had a wart
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:49
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My Daddy told me when he waqs young he had a wart
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:45
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the tree, three times for a few days and then the wart would disappear.
Mammy told me the water is there a long, long time and she knows many people who got cured.
Eily Mcormack, 42 William St
Informant: Mrs R. McCormack, 42 William St
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:39
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There is a tree in St Mary's Protestant Churchyard. If you wanted any kind of a wart to be cured you dip the wart in a hole of water at the bottom of
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:35
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Warts were cured by putting a person's fasting spit on them every morning for a while and then they would be cured.
Nan Roche, 25 O'Neill St
Informant: Mrs C Roche, 25 O'Neill St
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:27
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I heard this cure for warts from my grandmother.They used to pick some kind of weed called chicken weed. Then they squeezed the white juice out of it and put it on.
Chicken weed, really Spurge but called Chichen weed by Mrs Maber and identified bb her as the plant to cure warts.
Eily Hogan, 34 Kichham St
Informant: Mrs Maber, (60 yrs) 1 James' St
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 20:06
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I was told a good way for curing warts. If by accident you passed a stone with a hole and water in the hole, you were required to return to this stone, fasting and dip the waty into the water and you would be cured.
Sarah McDonnell, St Michael's T.S.
Informant: Mrs Houlihan, (over 60yrs) Lower Scrothea.
senior member (history)
2017-09-18 19:56
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Old Cures and Remedies
Warts
To cure a wart got a piece of fat off a rasher and rubbed it on the wart. Then when this was donethey buried the fat. It was said that according as the bacon decayed the wart would disappear.
May Mc Evilly, Ard na Greine
Informant: James McEvilly
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 21:47
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in the Irishtown who died not so long ago and who used to make tallow candles to serve them as light.
Eily McCormack, 42 William St
Informant: Mrs Fitzgerald (Age in Seventies) 2 Glenagad Rd.
To make candles last longer people used to paint the outer part of the candle.
Teresa Maher, 2 William St
Informant: Mrs R Maher
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 21:42
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in the Irishtown who died not so long ago and who used to make tallow candles to serve them as light.
Eily McCormack, 42 William St
Informant: Mrs Fitzgerald (Age in Seventies) 2 Glenagad Rd.
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 21:37
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My grandmother told me that there lived very old people
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 21:33
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Candles were made in Clonmel long ago, beside Sutton's coal yard but now the place is knocked down. Theywere made in Main Street also.
May Mackey, 75 Ard na Greine
Informant: Mr Frederick Mackey
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 21:32
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Candles were made in Clonmel where where Mr Quirke's shop is and there was another chandlery in Gladstone Street.
Agnes O'Brien, 20 O'Neill St
Informant: Mr James O'Brien
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 21:19
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for a while.Then they peeled them and dipped them into the bath of tallow.
When we were going out the country for a walk last summer we saw a man making tallow candles in a bath. We were too late. He was taking the last candle out of the tallow. He took it out of the bath and rolled it on a board; then he left it up on the turf with the other candles. It was near the Nire, just at the end of the turf bogs, we saw the man making the candles.
Peggy O'Brien, 1 Bank Lane
Informant: Mr Michael O'Brien
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 21:08
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into the tallow.
After that they used to double wicks and dip them into the bath of tallow and it would stick to the wicks. Then they used to hang them up to dry. After that they would take them down and dip them into the tallow again and again until they would be as thick as a Christmas candle.
Some people used to make them in moulds and others with rushes. Rush lights were made the same way as tallow candles but they were only given one coat of tallow. First they cut rushes and left them up to dry
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 20:40
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Candle Making in Olden Times.
In the olden times people used to make their own candles with tallow. They used to kill sheep and take the fat off the meat and melt it on the fire. When it was melted they used to leave it cool, then put it into a bath andpour hot water
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 20:32
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that they would look in the mirror at twelve o'clock on Hallow'een Night. But when the time came they were afriad so they told their sister to do it . She did it and she saw a man with cloven feet. It was the devil.
Maggie McNamara, 53 Thomas St
Informant: Mrs Jenkins, grandparent, Tipperary, Co Tipperary
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 20:24
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This is a true story told to me by my grand-mother. A crowd of girls in the house where she was working said
senior member (history)
2017-09-17 20:16
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My daddy was telling me that in old times people used to get a ball of yarn and go to a quarry and tie the yarn to a bush and wind it off. Then at twelve in the night they used to go to where the yarn was and wind it up again and when they got to the quarry they would see their future husband.
Maura Hackett 20 Davis Road
Informant: Mr Patrick Hackett, parent
senior member (history)
2017-09-16 21:56
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We also roast nuts. We put friends' names on the nuts and if the nuts jump off the fire they are not our friends.
Veronica Byrne, 10 Glenconnor
senior member (history)
2017-09-16 21:48
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they used to put two rows of nuts on the grate of the fire. One row of nuts were supposed to be boys and the other row girls. Which ever of the nuts on the girls row would fly off that girl would be married to the boy represented by the nut that would fly off the boys' row
Maggie Duggan, 15 Glenconnor
Informant: Mrs J Duggan
senior member (history)
2017-09-16 21:41
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My daddy told me that
senior member (history)
2017-09-16 21:38
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We celebrate it by putting a line of twine from one corner of the room to the other. Then we get apples with stems and tie the smsll pieces of twine to them and tie the apples with the twine on to the line. We try to catch the apples with our mouths but they swing and it is hard to get them.
Ruby Millett, 14 Ard na Greine
senior member (history)
2017-09-16 21:29
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that you will be poor; and if youget the bean that you will be wealthy.
May McEvilly, Ard na greine
senior member (history)
2017-09-16 21:26
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Kneel down and get the apple without falling.
May Mackey 75 Ard na Greine
senior member (history)
2017-09-16 21:21
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Last Hallow Eve my sister and I had a basin of water on the floor and my mother and father put some money for us to get out. We had our hands tied behind our backs and we had to put in our heads into the water to get the money out. It was who get the ring that was in the barm brack. Evelyn got the pea and Frankie got the bean. It is said that if you get the ring that you will be married; if you get the pea
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 20:53
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Kneel down and get the apple without falling.
Mary Mackey 75 Ard na Greine
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 20:49
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My father puts an apple on the ground and the person who goes first to get the apple off the ground must put his hands behind his back and
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 20:43
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We put twine across the ceiling and have another piece hanging out of it, with an apple on the end of it. Then we turn a chair up side down with a board on it and you must try and catch the apple in your mouth and if you fall off the chair you are out.
Maura Coughlan, 45 Cashel Rd
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 20:27
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able age to go into the garden at mid-night and procure a good fat black snail and bring it carefully into the kitchen. The table was dusted over with flower and the snail was put in position on the left hand corner. If the girl was to be married within a year the snail was suppose to crawl around the table and trace the initials of her future husband.
If no initials were formed shecould give up hopes of marriage for the following year.
Helen Dillon, 3 Rock Field, Heywood Road
Informant: Mr M Dillon, 3 Rock Field
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 19:14
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able age to go into the garden at mid-night and procure a good fat black snail and bring it carefully into the kitchen. The table was dusted over with flower and the snail was put in position on the left hand corner. If the girl was to be married within a year the snail was suppose to crawl around the table and trace the initials of her future husband.
If no initials were formed shecould give up hopes of marriage for the following year.
Helen Dillon, 3 Rck Field, Heywood Road
Informant: Mr M Dillon, 3 Rock Field
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 19:03
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to see her future husband looking over her shoulder.
Another practice was to light a bonfire and when the fire was out theashes were carefully collected and placed in the shape of a circle. Then each person present would place a stone in the magic circle if by morning any stone was removed it meant harm to the owner.
Eileen Richardson, 92 Ard na Greine
Informant: Mrs Lynch, 4 Queen St Age 90.
Many years ago it was a custom for girls of marriage-
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 18:53
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a big blazing fire and place all the chairs around the table and put hot food on the bare table for the Poor Souls. She also said they would leave the door open a little for the Poor Souls to come in and eat the food.
She told me they used break the whites of eggs into tumblers and draw them into pictures of the future.Another thing she did was to go into a room by herself, lock the door behind her stand and peel an apple in front of a looking-glass and eat the apple and she was supposed
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 18:36
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ceiling and cross two sticke at the bottom of the twine. Then she put an apple on one end of the stick , a potato on another and a piece of soap and a candle on the other two ends.Then she twisted around the stick and tried to get the apple but sometimes she would bite the soap.
Informant: Mrs M Millett
Collector: Ruby Millett, 14 Ard na Greine
My great-grandaunt told me about how they used to spend Snap-Apple-Night.She said that the poorSouls are supposed to be in all the houses on that night and long ago before the people would go to bedthey would make
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 18:22
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person would cross the ocean. Other times it formed like a man with a bag on his back and they said the person would marry a tinker.
Another way she celebrated it was by getting three saucers abd putting clay in one, water in another and a ring in another. Then she blindfolded somebody and that person must touch a saucer. If the person touched the one with clay it was said she would die, and if she touched the one with water she would cross the ocean and if she touched the one with the ring she would be married.
Mrs Morrisey that is living next door to us she used to hang a piece of twine from the
senior member (history)
2017-09-15 18:12
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Hallow Eve Customs
My mother told me this is how she celebrated Hallow Eve.
She got lead and meltrd it over the fire and then dropped it through a hoe in a key and into a basin of water. Whatever shape the lead came into was supposed to tell something of the future. Sometimes it turned into a shape like a ship and they said the
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:52
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clear daylight in the morning, the good old Irish dances.
2. On St Martin's day no mills are working because St Martin was killed in a mill. The people spill blood at the door on that day,
3. St John's Night
It was an old custom here in Ballytarsna for people to light a bonfire on St John's Night. All the young people assembled and there was always a dance which lasted till midnight. The custom is fast dying out here.
4. St Bridget's Night
On St Bridget's Night some people hang a ribbon or a piece of cloth outsidr the door. On that night the people believe that St Bridget passes by every door. She blesses the ribbon as she passes by. This ribbon is kept by the people and it is supposed to cure any sickness. The sick person puts it on his shoulder. People also put a handful of straw on the dooratep for her to kneel on.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:52
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Clear daylight in the morning, the good old Irish dances.
2. On St Martin's day no mills are working because St Martin was killed in a mill. The people spill blood at the door on that day,
3. St John's Night
It was an old custom here in Ballytarsna for people to light a bonfire on St John's Night. All the young people assembled and there was always a dance which lasted till midnight. The custom is fast dying out here.
4. St Bridget's Night
On St Bridget's Night some people hang a ribbon or a piece of cloth outsidr the door. On that night the people believe that St Bridget passes by every door. She blesses the ribbon as she passes by. This ribbon is kept by the people and it is supposed to cure any sickness. The sick person puts it on his shoulder. People also put a handful of straw on the dooratep for her to kneel on.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:35
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Festival Costums
St Stephen's day is a day in which a number of young boys go hunting the wren. Nine or ten would gather together and dress up in dresses, skirts and paper hats. They get pans, old kettles and sticks and they start beating them. Their favourite song is,
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds, St Stephens Day he was caught in the furze, although he was little, his honour was great, get up Harry, Larry and give us a treat.
When the day is over they will count their money and see if they have the price of a half barrel of porter. and some lemonade and tea, sugar and sweet cake. If so they will have a house appointed to hold an all night dance. They invite about a dozen ladies and they sing and dance until
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 20:50
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Proverbs
1. He that goes to see his wheat in May comes weeping away.
2. March winds and showers bring forth May flowers.
3. March will search you, April will try you, May will tell you, if ye'll live or die.
4. An April flood carries away the frog and his brood.
5. In July some reap rye. In August jf one will not the other must.
6. Dry August and warm
Don't harvest no harm.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 20:39
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The Forge
1. There is a forge in our district. It is situated on the side ofthe main road. It is built a long time and roofed with timber. He shoes all the horses and is able to mend ploughs and harrows and other implements.
All the forge men are strong and well built. He is sick at present and is not able to work. There were many stories told there in days gone by.
There are forges in this parish, Hogans, Flannagans, Morrisseys and Stacks
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 20:24
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the drills. Then he rolls them and when they get weedy he harrows them and grubs them and hoes them. They dig them in August and pick them and put them in pits. They never dig them with a spade.
Diagram 1, Fork
Diagram 2, Drill stone
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 20:16
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The Potato Crop
1. My father has a hundred acres of land. He has about 18 acres under tillage. We sow one acre of potatoes.
Before setting, the ground has to be ploughed and rolled. The drills have to be opened and dung has to be put in them and broken and the drills are closed. The potatoes are cut in two halves and are brought out to the garden and then they are sown.
When the stalks come over ground they are earthed and grubbed and hoed. In October they are picked and put in pits.
2. My father has a farm of land. He sets potatoes around the 17th of March. He harrows the stubble, then ploughs and rolls it. Then he puts out the manure and breaks it along the drills and lays the potatoes about a foot apart and closes
senior member (history)
2017-02-10 20:55
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Fairy Forts
1. On our farm there is a fort. It was thought in olden days, fairies used to be in it whict made young boys and girls afriad to pass by it. It was made of clay with white thorn bushes sown around. People would not venture to cut them down fearing something might happen them. There is also a fort in Cahills, Harringtons and Fogartys. They were used in olden days for fighting.
2. There is a fort in front of our house. There are trees growing in it. A ditch is all around it and there is a hollow surrounding it. There is a stone in it which is always very hot. It is said that if you pulled primroses you would die in less than a week.
senior member (history)
2017-02-08 21:04
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No fire should be put to light until the smoke comes out of the priest's house.
2. The people of long ago shook Easter water on their cattle and cows.
Taking the first bucket of water out of the well in case another person would take their luck.
Skimming the milk thinking they would have the good of their neighbour's cows.
3. In olden days the people went to their neighbours garden and put bad eggs in it , it is said that they took their neighbours crop in that garden for that year but the man that did it would have a good crop.
No one would not lend any thing on May morning.
4. Sometimes they would gather primroses and put them in the dung hill.
5. They took the dew off the grass to have a good return of butter when churning.
senior member (history)
2017-02-08 20:44
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May Day Customs
1. On May Eve the fairies used come and steal the children and bewitch the cattle if they could get them and therefore no door should be left open after sunset.
Young people should not go out on the hills, nor listen to singing or girls dancing in tne night for they are fairies in disguise and will work harm and above all there should be no fire lighting, for fire is the life of man.
If any food is left from May Eve to May Day it should not be eaten but buried in the garden or thrown over the bounds of the townland for the
dogs.
On May morning the peasant girls delight in gathering May dew from sunrise to beautiful their faces, they believed that the sun would spoil their complexion.
senior member (history)
2017-02-07 21:28
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minutes.
6. My nose began to bleed. I got a piece of moss and put it to my nose and it stopped at once.
7. Four spoons of red pepper in a bottle of porter the 1st March is a cure for pleurisy.
8. To cure a tooth ache is to put a frog in your mouth and when the frog jumps the tooth ache will leave you.
9. For a sty on your eye, when you wake in the morning to rub your fasting spit to it for three mornings, the sty will leave you.
10. A cure for a wart, rub your hand to a stone with dew on it.
11. If any bad thing was happening to anyone, it was said the seventh son could cure it.
12. Long ago people had a feast on Shrove Tuesday night. Bacon was always eaten at this feast. A piece of fat bacon was always kept over. This fat bacon was kept as a cure for rheumatism and other ailments. The piece was called a spórtín.
senior member (history)
2017-02-07 21:08
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Cures
1. In olden days the way people cured Anthony's fire was by putting black cat's blood on it. Also Cahill's blood was another cure for it.
2. The way they cured Yellow Jaundice was by boiling dandelion and storing it in a jar and drinking a glass of the liquid every morning before breakfast. This remedy was also used for weak nerves.
3. The way they cured a sore throat was by taking off the patient's own stocking and putting salt on a pot lid on a fire until it became very hot. Then put it on the throat.
4. I know several good cures, such as for a wart. Get a snail and put it to the wart and it will be all right in a few days.
5. I often got a sting of a nettle on the leg and it burned me. I got a dock leaf and put it to it and it was all right in a few
senior member (history)
2017-02-07 20:47
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A Local Happening
1. I saw an accident at the bridge of Grange. It was a very frosty morning. The motor was coming down the hill and it skidded and struck the wall at one side of the bridge and turned upside down.
I ran to his assistance, I tried to open the door and I could not. I broke the glass and the man got out. The motor went on fire and we could not quench it because it was gone too far.
2. There was a great burning a few years ago near our house. It was a kind of a store house with sheds attached. There were cattle tied in the shed , a donkey and a sow and bonhams in another portion of it. It was awful to hear the poor aimals moan when the roof fell upon them. They were all burned to cinders. It was impossible to save them.
senior member (history)
2017-02-06 18:39
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A Local Hero
1. In this locality we have a great many heroes, great hurlers, fine footballers and a good number of patriots.
Foremost among the heroes who suffered and died for his country, is Pierce McCann.
He was born in Balyowen, Cashel in about 1883 and during the rising of 1916, he was arrested and put in gaol, where he died of hunger strike.
He is buried in Dualla churchyard where an imposing monument is erected in his memory.
2. The only hero I know is Daniel Corcoran. He was supposed to be a great hurler. About thirty years ago he lost one of his eyes, hurling a match with Moycarkey against Boherlahan. That was the finish of his hurling but at any other work he said he cared nothing about any man.
He is sixty years old. He boasts he would be able for a man of thirty, jumping or boxing and he says he could do as much work as two.
senior member (history)
2017-02-06 18:19
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in brown paper in the sacristy.
2. One beautiful day in Spring a young girl went with her eggs to the market to sell them. She carried them in a basket on her head. Her thoughts were pleasant as she went along. She was planning what she would do with the money she would get for the eggs.
She said to herself, "I will buy a dozen of eggs and bring them home and hatch them and feed the little chicks well and when they are big and fat I will get a good price for them.
With the money I will buy a lovely dress and hat and get my hair waved, won't I look lovely. All the lads and lassies will envy me but I will pass them by"
With that she shook her head, the basket fell to the ground and all the eggs were broken.
senior member (history)
2017-02-06 17:50
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A Funny Story
1. Father Burke was sick and could not celebratemass so he called in Pat the clerk of the Church, "Now Pat" said Father Burke, " will you go out and tell the congregation that I am very sick this morning, there will be no mass but that will be no sin on their part and you you may as well make a few announcements also. Tell thepeople that next Friday will be the first Friday of the month, next Thursday is the feast of St Peter and Paul. Next Wednesday Sara Malone andJonnie Casey will be married here at nine o'clock and if there are any reasons why they shouldn't , let me know in the meantime. A sum of money was found during the week and same can be had in the sacristy rolled up in brown paper"
"Right Father" said Pat as he left on his way to the Church.
" My dearly beloved bteathern" commenced Pat, "Father Burke is sick this morning and that's no sin, next Thursday will be the first Friday of the month and next Wednesday is the feast of Sara Malone and Jonnie Casey and next Thursday Saint Peter and Paul will be married here at nine o'clock and the reasons why they shouldn't is rolled up
senior member (history)
2017-02-06 16:57
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treasure was hidden.
It is down in a hollow beside a ditch with a furze bush growing over it. They began digging for it at about 11 o'clock in the night. When they were digging one of the men saw something appearing on the top of the hill. They continued digging away and the person approached them. When he came near them they went away. The thing they saw stood and looked down in the hole where they were digging. The men thought the person whom they saw changed into lights. They told the story to many others and they tried for it but all failed to find it. The people who searched for this treasure are living yet.
Walter Dunne, Ballinree dreamt about it. Timothy Kennedy,Arthur Donnelly, Patrick Wade, and six others were those who tried for the treasure
senior member (history)
2017-02-06 16:37
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Hidden Treasure
1. It is said that there was a hidden treasure, hidden below in the Golden Corner bounds between Kerwicks and Kirwans.; It is said that it was a crock of gold that was hidden there, that is the reason it is called the Golden Corner. The people often went looking for it and every time they went to dig for it, something always appeared such as ghosts or a spirit to frighten them away. Hidden treasure is said to be in many places.
2. It has been said that there is a treasure hidden in Price's Hill formerly the Barrymore Estate. A good many years ago a certain person had a dream where this treasure was hidden. So one night nine men decided they would go and try the place and find the treasure. The man that had the dream about it told them the place where he dreamt the
senior member (history)
2017-01-31 19:38
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Religious Stories
There was once a man who was always thinking about his animals when saying his prayers. He told the priest about it. The priest gave him a certain amount of prayers to say and he said he would give him his race horse if he would say them without getting distracted. He started to say them and when he was half way through them he said, "Father, will you give me the saddle"
Once upon a time there was a man who attended mass very badly. The priest heard this and he came to the man and he told him to put a stone in a box every day he would go to mass. After about three years he opened the box and found one stone in it. When he told the priest he said he only attended mass right once in the whole three years.
senior member (history)
2017-01-31 19:28
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Religious Stories
There was once a man who was always thinking about his animals when saying his prayers. He told the priest about it. The priest gave him a certain amount of prayers to say and he said he would give him his race horse if he would say them without getting distracted. He started to say them and when he was half way through them he said, "Father, will you give me the saddle"
Once upon a time there was a man who attended mass very badly. The priest heard this and he came to the man and he told him to put a stone in a box every day he would go to mass. After about three years he opened the box and found one stone in it. When he told the priest he said he only attended mas right once in the whole three years.
senior member (history)
2017-01-31 19:12
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A Story
One night in Penal times a priest was going on a sick call. When he was passing an old wood he heard someone singing a song so sweetly that he got off his horse and listened to the song. When the song was finished he went to the house of the sick person and when he reached the bed the sick person was dead. The singer he heard was the devil and the sick person was in the state of mortal sin and the devil wanted the soul of the sick person
senior member (history)
2017-01-31 19:02
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a week, on Monday and Thursday or Friday. A cross was made on the top of the cake with a knife to let out the steam. Bread was baked in front of the fire on a griddle.
senior member (history)
2017-01-31 18:57
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Bread
Tom Leahy used grind flour during the war times. The people used supply him with wheat and he used grind it. It was not really white but it was the next best stuff to the ordinary flour. Potatoe cakes were eaten for the afternoon tea. First a few boiled potatoes were got and mixed with a quantity of flour. Next they were cut into squares and baked. They used bake about twice
senior member (history)
2017-01-31 18:27
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To put me on the storm
Twas by Ballysheen I ran very keen
And down by Johnson's paling
Twas by the moate I ran very cute
To pt them off my trailing
At Longfield den where I called in
Sure twas there I was kindly treated
What had they there but a turkey rare
That they stole from poor John Carey
Twas by Killeen I ran very keen
And on by Aughnageara
Down and out by John Nances house
And home by the Féar Breagar
senior member (history)
2017-01-30 21:52
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Song
On Killough hill I built my den
Free from all strife and danger
Till that young clown
Called young Ryan Going
Disturbed by habitation
With horns in and horns out
He woke me up quite early
I bade adieu to all my friends
Not forgetting poor Bowes Daly
Twas on the hill I started then
And on by the Spring Garden
By Phillip's Lodge it was my dodge
And on by Mase's farm
Twas by Cooleagh I took my way
The day being very warm
What did I see but Dan Cummin's geese
And they flying into Gerald Ryan's farm
They let a shout as I passed them
out
Which filled me with vexation
I swore an oath
That I would cut their throat
Or some of their relations
At Fethard town where I sat down
Twas there I heard the cry of a horn
I went into Paddy Pinn's shop
To take a drop
senior member (history)
2017-01-30 21:29
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There was a boy in Thurles named Jimmy Kelly. One night when he was going up to the station at twelve o'clock he saw this girl in front of him. He had a bicycle and he got off it and he said , "Good night" to her and she did not speak to him. He got up on his bicycle and passed her out. When he passed her out she called him and asked him to do a turn for her and he said he would. She said it would get her out of Purgatory if he did it for her and she told him not to tell the secret to anyone and that she would never appear to him again if he did it for her. He kept the secret always.
senior member (history)
2017-01-30 21:14
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When the witch got up all the stone was all blood. The man went away then, he knew what it was. When the man was going away the witch said to him, "you fitter be in bed than out hunting in the morning" When the man went home he went to bed and he never got out of bed until he died.
senior member (history)
2017-01-30 21:06
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Once upon a time a man used to go out hunting. This morning as he went out he saw a hare and she milking a cow in a field. He set the dogs after her. One of the dogs tore her going out a gap. There was an old house close by and into this house she went. When the man went in it was a witch sitting on a stone in the corner. The man asked if a hare passed in through this house and the witch said "no". The man said, "where ever she is she is here, get up until I see is she under you"
senior member (history)
2017-01-30 20:52
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by the side of the boreen going into Monamoe. He left the roof of it up against the hedge at the back of the house. It was half out on the boreen. During the night it was hit by thw "headless coach" and hurled into a sand pit at the back of the house. It is said that the "headless coach" passes on that boreen at certain times. The men and the horses are supposed to have no heads.
senior member (history)
2017-01-08 22:15
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American meat was eaten. The vegetables were mostly cabbage. Now more or less cups are mostly used for drinking out of. The people did not eat late at night. ( They would eat up as far as seven eggs on Easter Sunday)
senior member (history)
2017-01-08 22:13
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American meat was eaten. The vegetables were mostly cabbage. Now more or less cups are mostly used for drinking out of. The people did not eat late at night. ( They would eat up as far as seven eggs on Eastr Sunday)
senior member (history)
2017-01-08 22:02
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The people in olden times had three meals a day. The meals were breakfast dinner and supper. The times were morning mid-day and night. The people that were working at Phillip's worked in the morning before having food. They used potatoes for two meals and meal porridge for supper. Milk was drank at dinner and supper. The milk was butter milk. The table was left near the wall when eating. They used wheaten bread. Meat was eaten a few times a year.
senior member (history)
2017-01-08 21:51
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The people in olden times used to eat two meals in the day, their breakfast and dinner. The people worked in the morning before their breakfast. They used to use porridge and butter milk and potatoes. Potatoes were eaten at nearly every meal because some people had nothing else to use. The people eat around the table. The table was placed near the wall. The bread was potatoe cakes and yellow meal cakes and pollan cakes. The used to bake it on a griddle and not in an oven. They use not eat meat from Easter to Christmas. They generally used to eat American bacon. Before cups came in they used to use jam-crocks.
senior member (history)
2017-01-08 21:35
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In olden times people used only eat two meals, breakfast and supper. Most of the people used work in the morning before eating any food. The meals consisted of stirabout for their breakfast and often potatoes. Butter milk was drank. Oatmeal bread was mostly used. The bread was baked on a griddle. Meat was only eaten once a year at Christmas. Jam mugs were mostly used before cups came into fashion.
senior member (history)
2017-01-05 21:19
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In olden times people had only three meals in the day. One at seven o'clock in the morning, another at mid-day and another at seven in the evening. The foods were porridge and milk for breakfast, potatoes and salt for dinner and potatoes and salt and milk sometimes for supper. People worked for about an hour in the morning before breakfast. When people were eating their meals the table was pulled out in the middle ofthe floor. Fresh meat was eaten for Christmas and eggs were eaten for Easter Sunday. Timber vessels and jam jars were used before cups came into fashion.
senior member (history)
2017-01-05 21:07
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always eaten. It was baked in an oven. As many eggs as they would get they would eat them on Easter Sunday. They used drink out of wooden vessels called "noggins"
senior member (history)
2017-01-05 21:02
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Food in Olden Times
The people in olden times used to have three meals a day consisting of potatoes and milk and porriage. Breakfast, dinner and supper were the names of the meals. They used to eat them at seven in the morning , twelve in the day and seven in the evening. The people used to work about an hour before breakfast. New milk and butter milk were the milk they drank. They used pull out the table on the centre of the floor and all sit around it. Whole meal bread was
senior member (history)
2017-01-05 20:40
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The local fairs are held in Cashel and Thurles. One time there was a fair in Holycross. Some buyers come to the farmers houses to buy cattle. The town fairs are held on the streets. When an animal is sold money is given as a
senior member (history)
2017-01-02 22:08
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riperd, a punch, a sledge, a rasp, an anvil, a vice.
senior member (history)
2017-01-02 22:03
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The Local Forge
There are four forges in my parish. The are owned by Peter Flanagan, Paddy Reilly, Jack Hogan and Danny Morrissey. Peter Flanagan's is situated in Tubberadora. Paddy Reilly's forge is situated in Ballinree. Jack Hogan's forge is situated in Ballinree and Danny Morrissey's forge is situated in Gaile. All of them are near cross roads. The forge has a timber roof with felt over it. There is only one fire place in every forge in the parish. The smiths work these implements when making anything: a hammer, a
senior member (history)
2017-01-02 21:47
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The Care of Feet
Very few people go bare footed now because it is wearing out of fashion. Children used to go barefooted up to a couple of years ago in Summer. It is said the water used during washing should be thrown out because it is said it is not lucky to have it in the house. Clogs were worn very commonly in former times. They used walk to Mullinahone bare footed for to get a pair of clogs and carry them home under their arms because they used be ashamed to wear them.The clogs used be made in Mullinahone.
senior member (history)
2017-01-01 21:34
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We have a churn at home. It is one foot and a half high and one foot, two inches in breath. It is a twisting churn and it is worked by hand, It is a year old. The butter is made once each week in winter and twice each week in summer. My mother mostly does the churning. People that come in during churning take a twist. The churning takes about a quarter of an hour before the butter is made. When the butter is made you could not twist the handle of the churn. Often water is thrown in to the churn to make the butter gather quickly. Some of the buttermilk is drank and bread is made of more of it.
senior member (history)
2017-01-01 21:22
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churn. The buttermilk is usd for baking and it is used for drinking.
senior member (history)
2017-01-01 21:18
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Churning
We have a churn at home and it is a foot and a half in height. It is a half a foot at the bottom and top. The sides are round. It is three years old and we bought it in Holy Cross from the Cooper. In summer we make butter once a week and in winter once a fortnight. My mother makes the butter. It takes three quarters of an hour to do the churning. The churning is done by hand. When the butter is made it is heard rattling in the
senior member (history)
2017-01-01 21:06
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Churning
We have a churn at home. It is about a foot and a half tall and it is about a foot wide at the top and the bottom. The sides are round and it is about twelve years old. Butter is made once a week in the winter and twice a week in the summer. My mother does the churning always.The churning takes about an hour and the churning is done by hand. When the butter is made it is very hard to twist the handle, then a pint of spring water is poured in to clear the butter. Then the butter is taken out by bats and washed and salted.
senior member (history)
2016-12-29 21:02
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putting a strainer under the hole and a bucket under that and let it into the bucket. Then the churn was given a few more turns to make lumps of it . Then a big pan was put under the barrel and the lid was taken off and one person put his hand into the barrel and drew it out. Then it was taken off and put into a cool and a bucket of spring water thrown in on top of it and it was turned twice in little bits by means of a wooden plate called a skimmer. It was turned twice in the cool and then the water was let off by means of a "spicked". This was done until the water was as clean going out as going in. Then it was salted to taste by means of sprinkling it with salt and working it from side to side Until the salt was perfectly disolved through it. Then it was packed into butter boxes whick were carefully with salt before hand. The churn was rinsed with boiling water and salt. The butter milk was used for making bread and for giving it to pigs or calves.
senior member (history)
2016-12-29 20:40
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Churning
My grandfather has a churn. It is about four feet high. The sides of it are round and it is about forty years old. They used to churn once a week in Summer except it was very hot weather, then they would churn twice a week and they used to churn once a week in Winter. It used to be worked by a gear in Summer and two people twisting it in Winter with a handle at each end. Every person that would come in would have to give it a twist except it was working by the gear then the people would only leave their hand on the churn. This was done because people might "take" the butter. The churning took about an hour and was according to the amount of cream. There is a little timber plug in the side of the barrel which is called a "spicked". When you would think the butter was made you would stop and pull out that and if the butter was made you would see the grains of butter on it. When the butter was near made about one pint of water was put in to clean the butter. The butter milk was taken out by means of drawing the "spicked" and
senior member (history)
2016-12-29 20:08
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Saint Patrick's Day is a great festival day in Ireland. People wear a piece of shamrock or a harp made of green ribbon and gold threadon that day in honour of Saint Patrick. Shrove is from Little Christmas to Ash Wednesday. Most people get married during Shrove. On May Day people go to the well and skim it and take people's butter. People throw a grain of salt into a churn of milk and they "take" the milk. Ash Wednesday people go to mass for Blessed Ashes. The Stations of the Cross is said in evening's church on Good Friday. Lent is over on Holy Saturday at twelve o'clock. People eat more than the usual number of eggs on Easter Sunday. On November night sixpence is thrown into a pan of water and to see who could take it out with their mouths. Two people throw a nut each into the fire to see which of them will live the longest and which ever of them burns away first the person who threw that nut will die first.
senior member (history)
2016-12-28 21:54
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get horse hair and make moustaches and more blacken theit faces with polish. The song they sing is :-
The wren the wren the king of all birds etc.
They go around from house to house singing this song. They get a penny or more in nearly every house. When the day is over some batches get a dance in some house and bring all the messages for the dance that is if they have enough money to rise the dance. Other batches divide the money between them. In Shrove a lot of people get married. It is the time for marriages. Shrove Tuesday is the last day in Shrove. More people get married that day. On Ash Wednesday, Mass is said in all the Catholic Churches and Blessed Ashes is given out. The Ashes that is given out is the ashes of an ash tree that has been burned. On Saint John's night fires are lit in memory of him. On Saint Martin's Day hens are killed and the blood of the hen is spilt in the four corners of the house in memory of Saint Martin.
senior member (history)
2016-12-28 21:28
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On the Wren's Day four or five boys or less or more get together and dress themselves up in girl's old dresses and shirts. They turn their coats inside out and they get old worn hats and stick holly in them.Some of them
senior member (history)
2016-12-28 21:19
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On Saint Patrick's Day people wear a shamrock and a harp. The harp is made of green and gold ribbon is put around it. Some years ago people used "to drown" the shamrock by getting drunk but drink may not be sold now according to law. Shrove begins on Little Christmas Day and ends on Ash Wednesday. On Shrove Tuesday a lot of people get married. On Ash Wednesday people go to the Church for Blessed Ashes. On Chalk Sunday boys chalk the old maids. On Good Friday the Stations of the Cross are performed in the churches. On Saint Martin's Day people kill a hen.
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 21:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Church on Ash Wednesday. Young people chalk all the old bachelors and maids.
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 21:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Church on Ash Wednesday. Young people chalk all the old bachalorsand maids.
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 21:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
person to whom it is given could take the giver's milk fot the year.
On the 31st October people make fun by putting pence into pans of bran or polla? and others try to get them out with their mouths. Also they put silver coins into tubs of water and people try to get them out with their mouths.
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 21:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On Saint Stephen's Day a crowd of boys gather together and dress themselves in old bad cloths and decorate bushes with coloured ribbons and travel from house to house collecting money.
Their favourite song is:-
The wren the wren the king of all birds etc.
When they have the money gathered they share it between themselves. If the money was plentiful they might set up a dance.
On Saint Bridgit's Night people dress themselves up in old cloths and gather money from house to house.
During Shrove marriages and making matches mostly take place. Shrove Tuesday is the last day in Shrove. Ashes are blessed in the Holy Catholic
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 21:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
person to whom it is given could take the giver's milk fot the year.
On the 31st October people make fun by putting pence into pans of bran or polla? and others try to get them out with their mouths. Also they put silver coins into tubs of water and people try to get them out with their mouths.
On Saint Stephen's Day a crowd of boys gather together and dress themselves in old bad cloths and decorate bushes with coloured ribbons and travel from house to house collecting money.
Their favourite song is:-
The wren the wren the king of all birds etc.
When they have the money gathered they share it between themselves. If the money was plentiful they might set up a dance.
On Saint Bridgit's Night people dress themselves up in old cloths and gather money from house to house.
During Shrove marriages and making matches mostly take place. Shrove Tuesday is the last day in Shrove. Ashes are blessed in the Holy Catholic
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 21:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
person to whom it is given could take the giver's milk fot the year.
On the 31st October people make fun by putting pence into pans of bran or polla? and others try to get them out with their mouths. Also they put silver coins into tubs of water and people try to get them out with their mouths.
On Saint Stephen's Day a crowd of boys gather together and dress themselves in old bad cloths and decorate bushes with coloured ribbons and travel from house to house collecting money.
Their favourite song is:-
The wren the wren the king of all birds etc.
When they have the money gathered they share it between themselves. If the money was plentiful they might set up a dance.
On Saint Bridgit's Night people dress themselves up in old cloths and gather money from house to house.
During Shrove marriages and making matches mostly take place. Shrove Tuesday is the last day in Shrove. Ashes are blessed in the Holy Catholic
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 20:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Brought her into Cashel town
And sold her for a half a crown.
Marriages take place during Shrove, particurlarly on Shrove Tuesday. On Chalk Sunday young people chalk all the old bacholars and old maids. Chalk Sunday occurs on the first Sunday in Lent.
Michaelmas Day is kept a holiday in Holycross. Most of the people do not work but go to mass. There are two masses said there, an early and a high mass last. A procession goes to the Abbey and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament is given there. The festival occurs on the twenty ninth of September.
On the 1st of May it is said if you skimmed a well on a person's farm and have a "sugán" tied on to your leg and it "strealing" along the ground after you it is said you would have the best of that man's crops for theyear. If you put an egg or eggs into potatoe drills it is said you could "take" the person's potatoes. A remedy for this is to burn the eggs. By doing this it is said you would make the person suffer. By ravelling a ball of thread on a person's farm and saying , "half the milk of this land for me" it is said you would have half the benefit of that man's cows. Some people would not give away milk on that day because the
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 20:15
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rejected
awaiting decision
Festival Customs
Wren boys visit our home on Saint Stephen's Day every year. Different numbers of them come together. They dress in rags and sometimes polish their faces. They play music and sing songs and then they get money.
The songs they sing is :-
The wren, the wren
The king of all birds
Saint Stephen's Day
She was caught in the furze
So up with the kettle and
Down with the pan
So give us a penny
To bury the wren.
The wren the wren
That you may see
Hanging on a holly tree
So up with the kettle and
Down with the pan and
Give us a penny
To bury the wren.
As I was going to Killanaule
I saw a wren upon the wall
So I up with my stick
And I knocked her down and
senior member (history)
2016-12-27 19:59
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rejected
awaiting decision
While grass will grow water will flow.
Just going to do it like the priest's girl.
Every crow thinks her own crow the whitest.
Smooth water runs deep.
A new broom sweeps clean.
As long as the picther keeps going to the well it will get broken in the long run.
Never take the book by the cover.
There is never an old stocking that does not meet an old shoe.
Constant dropping wears a stone.
Like a cow milking a bucket of milk and spilling it again.
Where there is life there is hope.
When the old cock crows the young cock learns.
A nod is as good as a wink for a blind horse.
Honesty is the best policy.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:58
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awaiting decision
You're too slow for your own funeral.
Live in hope and die in want.
No clay too hard for try to plough.
What goes by nature costs no money.
Shake before taking like a doctors bottle
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:52
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awaiting decision
Far away cows wear long horns.
Tis betterto be sure than sorry.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:47
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awaiting decision
Slow but sure like the tinker's ass.
There's never smoke without fire.
Time and tide wait for no man
"Before you came up" said the crow to the aeroplane.
Many a cute hen laid out.
Fool me once shame on you. Fool me twice shame on me.
One good turn deserves another.
Sticks and stone will break my bones but names will never hurt me.
Eggs and rashers for the Gaile slashers and the leavings of the pan for the Galberstown clan.
"I see" said the blind man and he could not see at all.
You can bring a horse to water but you cannot make him drink.
An apple a day keeps the doctor away.
No hill too steep for try to climb.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:34
approved
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awaiting decision
warning and a rainbow in the night is a sailor's delight.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:32
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rejected
awaiting decision
warning and a rainbow in the night is a sailor's delight.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:26
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awaiting decision
Far away hill are green.
Where ever there's an "if" there's a want.
Time enough lost the ducks.
A rainbow in the morning is a sailors
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:16
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What ever is worth doing at all is worth doing well.
The old dog for the hard road and the pup for the path.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
"Strength" said the wren when he pulled the worm out of the ditch.
You should never send a chap in a man's place.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:10
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rejected
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God increase your store in your heart to give me more.
A castle of bones is better than a castle of stones.
You will never miss the water until the well goes dry.
There is nothing true but Heaven.
Never put off till to morrow what you can do today.
Tis a drole world where no one lives.
To late to spare when all is spent.
What ever you do do it well.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Many hands make light work.
senior member (history)
2016-12-21 20:58
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awaiting decision
Many hands make light worl
senior member (history)
2016-12-19 21:27
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awaiting decision
"Hold your hold" said the"Mickey Man" "there is a bad man on the ladder.
The old dog for the long run, the puppy for the puddle.
What ever you pay for a garsún a man is the cheapest in the long run.
The day for the wind is not the day for the "scol?
"Hard lines" said the dog and he sitting on the tram lines.
The best of goods are rolled up in small parcels.
senior member (history)
2016-12-19 21:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Proverbs
Plough deep while slugs are asleep and then you will have corn to sow and reap.
Rome was not built in a day.
A good run is better than a bad stand.
It is a long lane that has no turn.
It is a bad wind that does not blow good for someone.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Birds of a feather flock together.
Children and fools should not go near edgy tools.
A stitch in time saves nine.
He who rises late never does a good day's work.
Wilful waste makes woeful want.
Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
One natural tooth is worth twenty false ones.
Silks and satins put out the kitchen fire.
The early bird catches the worm.
More power said old Power when young Power was born.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
Tell me your company and I will tell you what you are.
The best hurler is always on the ditch.
It's hard to get wool from a goat.
Wise men learn from fools.
senior member (history)
2016-12-17 21:09
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rejected
awaiting decision
Digging of the Potato Crop
First the furrows are grubbed and the drills are split open with a drill plough.
Most of the potatoes may then be seen and picked. Then the sides of the drills are knocked down to get any that may be covered with clay. The potatoes are picked into buckets or baskets. The baskets are called "cishes". Some people tie pieces of bags around their knees and crawl along while picking. The baskets and brickets are emptied into a cart which when full is taken in and emptied into a pit. Sometimes people put them in several places in the garden and later on they are choosen and brought in to the haggard. Here they are pitted properly and the pit is thatched with straw. The small potatoes and the black ones are boiled for the pigs. When all the drills have been finished the ground is harrowed and all the scattered potatoes are picked. The harrow also gathers the stalks and weeds which are used for covering mangles and turnips. A potato which is left out and becomes frosted is called "stog".
senior member (history)
2016-12-16 20:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
Care of the Growing Crop
Potatoes are grown on our farm every year. There is about three quarters of an acre of ground sown under potatoes every year. Sometimes the amount varies. My father prepares the ground every year. The potatoes are sown in drills. A plough is used for opening the drills. The spades are bought in shops. When the potatoes are over ground the furrows are grubbed and flagged. Then the potatoes are earthed. Then they are hoed in a few weeks after and earthed up again. Then they are sprayed when the stalks are fairly high to keep away the blight.
senior member (history)
2016-12-16 20:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
the others. First the seed is cut leaving one, two or three "eyes" in each scíolán. Scíoláns they are called when they are cut. The medium sized potatoes are chosen for the seed. They are then brought to the garden and each person gets a bucket or práscín and lays each scíolán in the centre of the furrow about one foot apart. Then the drills are closed by means of a pair of horses and a drill plough
senior member (history)
2016-12-15 20:40
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rejected
awaiting decision
Choice and Preparation of Seed.
We sow about one statute acre of potatoes each year. The most common potatoe we sow is the "Old Champion". We sow a little of Epicures and Kers-Pinks. We buy the seed for the Epicures and we save it for
senior member (history)
2016-12-15 20:20
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awaiting decision
The Potatoe Crop
Preparation of the Soil.
First of all the ground is ploughed, then it is spring harrowed and then it is grubbed and crushed. Next the drill plough is got and drills are opened. When the drills are opened farmyard manure is put out in the furrows. Then the manure is broken in the furrows by means of forks. Then the people who are sowing put on práisgíns. The drills are rolled before sowing. Then they get the seed and go sowing. Scioláns are to be left twelve inches apart. When the seed is sown the drills are closed by means of the drill plough. One man gets a shovel and finishes out the ends of the drills. People help one another by breaking the manure and sowing the seed. The spades are bought in the shop.
senior member (history)
2016-12-15 20:03
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people in it. Jack Bannon, Mrs. Noony and James McGrath. Most of the land is good for tillage and grazing. The river Suir is running on the north and west side of it.
senior member (history)
2016-12-15 19:56
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rejected
awaiting decision
My Home District Cashel
The name of my home district is Glenbane. It is in the parish of Holycross and in the barony of Middlethird. There is about twenty families in it and about eighty five people in it. The Kennedys and Bannons are the most common. There are only two thatched houses in the district. The Irish name for Glenbane is Gleann Bán which means a white glen. Three are thre old
senior member (history)
2016-12-15 19:45
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My Home District
Gaile is my home district and it is in the parish of Boherlahan and in the barony of Middlethird. There are about twenty famiies in the townland. The numbe of people is about ninty seven. Maher is the most common name. All the houses are old. The oldest men are Philip Ryan, Mathew Costigan, Michael Fahy, Thomas Shanahan, Gaile, Cashel. They do not know Irish but they can all tell stories in English. There are only two houses that people lived in now in ruins. Fahy's, Tuohy's, Maher's emigrated from here to America in former years. The land is neither hilly nor boggy. There is a wood in the townland and it is about two hundred yards long.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 20:57
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awaiting decision
How I play Trance
The first thing to do is to make five "beds" on the ground., put a line in the second and fourth bed. Then get a little flat stone and stand at the end of the beds and pelt it into the first bed. Then walk through the bed and pelt the stone into the second bed until you come to the last bed. If the stone goes outside the line you are out. When you are finished pelting the stone into the beds you must put it on your head and then on your shoulder and then on your thumb and on the back of your hand. If it falls off while you are walking through the beds you are out. Then put the stone on your toe and walk through the beds. Then get a bigger stone and kick it into the first bed keeping one foot off the ground and kick it on through the beds. If the stone lodges on the line you are out. If you do not let the stone stay on the line you have the game won.
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 20:37
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awaiting decision
ever gets out of all the cards first wins and the person that has the cards last is "Donkey"
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 20:32
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awaiting decision
How I play Donkey
First of all I deal the cards and give them out between the players. Then the next person to me is to lay. The person that lays the card is to leave the card at the side of her cards. If the card was seven of anything and if the next person has an eight he could put it on the other person's seven.The higher card covers the lower one. If an ace is got it is put out and the the deuce and so on up as far as the king. Who
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 20:21
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In and out the Windows.
A crowd of boys gather in a ring and one stays in the middle. All in the ring go around with their eyes closed and the person in the middle throws a paper at someone's feet and he follows the person. The others hold up their hands and the other two run in and out through them. If the person that was following caught the other he would be in the middle and so on. That is why it is called in and out the windows
senior member (history)
2016-12-14 20:05
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Games I Play
Diagram
The way I play skittles is. First I make a circle about three feet in diameter. Then there are five skittles put down which are made from a piece of timber about an inch and a half in diameter and each skittle is left about four inches long. Then number one is put in front, number five in the middle and four at the back, number three at the right hand side and two at the left. A briar is put afew feet away from the front of the ring. Then three "pelters" are got which are about nine inches long and the players must go back seven yards and throw the pelters at the skittles and try to put them outside the ring. If some of them are outside and more of them inside nothing can be got and supposing one pelter tips the ground before it comes to the briar the player is not allowed to throw any of the other pelters he has left. One mat play up to any number.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 21:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
The nearst fort to my house is Breen's fort. There is another fort in McKeogh's. These two forts are in the townland of Boherlahan. They are in view of one another. They are round in shape and are planted. One of them is planted with trees all round. There is no entrance hole in either of those two. Fairy people are suppose to have lived in them some time ago.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 21:19
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with white thorn growing around them. There is a story about Mr Tom Dwyer's fort. In this fort there is one ash tree standing. When that tree falls the fairies will take a possession of this same fort. The priest in Holycross Abbey banished them while this tree stands. The Danes built the forts in view of one another the way they could see their enemies. They were supposed to live with them. The squirrel was the Danes cat.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 21:17
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rejected
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with white thorn growing around them. There is a story about Mr Tom Dwyer's fort. In this fort there is one ash tree standing. When that tree falls the fairies will take a possession of this same fort. The priest in Holycross Abbey banished them while this tree stands. The Danes built the forts in view of one another the way they could see their enemies. They were supposed to live with them. The squirrel was the Danes cat.
The nearst fort to my house is Breen's fort. There is another fort in McKeogh's. These two forts are in the townland of Boherlahan. They are in view of one another. They are round in shape and are planted. One of them is planted with trees all round. There is no entrance hole in either of those two. Fairy people are suppose to have lived in them some time ago.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 20:52
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is one fort in Mr Tom Dwyer's and there is another one in Mr O Meara's. they are called forts. There is a fort in the townland of Clahague. There is a green path from Mr Tom Dwyer's fort to Mr O Meara's.They are round and shape with
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 20:42
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rejected
awaiting decision
Fairy Forts
There is a fairy fort in our farm in the townland of Glenbane. One night Tom Doyle was passing at about half past twelve. He heard a lovely fiddle the nicest music he ever heard. He lisened. He kept walking because he thought of a story about a man that heard and listened and was taken by the fairies. Another night two men named Mick and Ned Brennan were cutting a hurley. They cut it several times but they could not knock it but when they went out the next morning it was on the ground.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 20:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bird Lore
The most common birds in our district are: the crow, the black bird, the magpie, the trush, the robin red breast, the sparrow, the bullfinch, the gold finch, the yellow hammer, the wren, the swallow, the sky lark, the jack daw, the chaffinch, the wood pidgeon. The black bird and magpie and trush build their nests in bushes. The sparrow builds his nest in the eve of a house. The bullfinch and goldfinch build their nests in oak trees. The yellow hammer builds its nest in a bush. The wren builds its nest in bushes. The swallow builds its nest inold ruins and the jack daw builds in chimneys. The sky lark builds in ditches. The wood pigeon builds its nest in a tree. The nests ate made of moss and hair. The eggs are small and are spotted. Every bird only sit on the eggs a month. If boys rob birds nests it is said they will get a bound lock.
senior member (history)
2016-12-13 20:07
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Fairy Forts
There is one fort on our farm, it is called a fort. One night John Doyle and another person were out dark fowling. The lamp that they had quenched as a result of sods being fired at them. Then the man that was with John Doyle was away. When he was gone John Doyle saw a great number of little men hurling in a field one side of the fort. They had about fifty balls and they never let one lodge, they used meet them coming out of the air. The man that ran away went to bed and never got out of it until he was buried.
senior member (history)
2016-12-12 21:11
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Home Made Toys: A Whistle
Fig. 1
Fig. 2
To make a whistle like this first a bit of an ash stick in which the sap is., is to be got. Then a bit is to be cut out of it like what is shown at A. Next a bit is to be cut like B. Then the skin is to be cut all round like C.The skin is then tipped around with the back of a penknife or some thing like it from C to the other end at A, taking care not to burst the skin. When the skin rises up from
senior member (history)
2016-12-12 20:57
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some but as soon as he did and stuck his beak and feet in it fire came out of the bag and burned all his feathers black and so he remained black with gold beak and feet.
senior member (history)
2016-12-12 20:51
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Bird-lore
The most common birds found around here are : Magpie, Jackdaw, Waterhen, Grouse, Thrush, Owl, Starling, Swallow, Wood Pidgeon, Cuckoo, Wren, Seagull, Lark, Yellow Hammer, Chaffinch, Bulfinch, Sparrow, Blackbird, Robin, Corncrake, Crow, and Willie Wag Tail. Some of them migrate such as the Cuckoo, Corncrake and Swallow.Boys are told they will get a "bound lock" if they rob birds nests. It is said when the swallow flys high there is going to be fine weather. When they fly low it is said rainy weather is approaching. When the robin comes to the door it is said hard rough weather is approaching. It is said one time the blackbird wasas white as snow and that one day he saw a magpie hiding gold in its nest. The blackbird asked her where did she get the gold and she told him in the king's palace. Then the blackbird said he would go and get some as well. The magpie told him not to get it out of the first bag but to go to the last. The blackbird flew away and when he saw yhe first bag of gold he flew to get
senior member (history)
2016-12-12 20:25
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When the"cooraloons" have a double whistle it is a sign of rain. When the wildgeese are flying it denotes rain. When the hens are picking themselves it is a sign of rain. If there is a thunder storm it is said that hens can hear it long before we can hear it and they run into the fowl house when they hear it. When the cocks begin to crow during the storm it is coming to an end. When the frogs come in jumping around the house it is a sign of rain and when the snails come crawling and when the crickets are singing it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2016-12-12 20:10
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Weather Omens
The swallow is one bird that is used for weather sign. It is said when the swallow is flying low it is a sign of wet weather. People say crows are also weather signs. It is said when the robin comes hopping to the door it is the sign of hard wet weather
senior member (history)
2016-12-12 20:00
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Weather Lore
Some people can foretell the weather. If the sun is red going down in the evening it is the sign of frost that night. When there is a ring around the moon some people say it is the sign of rain and other people say it is the sign of fine weather. When we have a Saturday moon it is the sign of bad weather and when the moon is on its back it is the sign of fine weather approaching. When the stars are shining brightly it is a sign of frost. When there is a star falling it is the sign of a soul going to heaven. When the smoke is going straight fron a chimney it is the sign of fine weather
senior member (history)
2016-12-10 20:41
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in the air it is the sign of bad weather. When the stairs are lodged on the telegraph wires it is the sign of wet stormy weather. When the hens are picking themselves it is a sign of rain. When the cock crows in the door it is the sign of good news and when he crows out it is the sign of bad news. When the dog sits by the fire all day it is the sign of rain. When a cat sits with her back to the fire it is the sign of hard weather. When the sheep are lying down in the field it is the sign of fine weather. When we are going to have bad weather the cattle go under the trees for shelter. When the snails are creeoing on the road it is the sign of a change in the weather. When the crickets are heard on the hearth it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2016-12-10 20:25
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Birds and Animals as Weather Omens
When the swallow flys high in the air it is a sign of rain. When we hear a "Corra loon" whistle it is a sign of rain. When a crowd of wild geese are flying
senior member (history)
2016-12-10 20:18
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rejected
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Birds and Animals as Weather Omens
When the swallows are flying high it is a sign of fine weather and when the swallows are flying low it is a sign that wet weather is coming. When we hear the corraloon whistling it is a sign of bad weather. When a hen is looking for shelter and shaking herself it is a sign of rain. When a dog is eating grass it is a sign of rain. When a cat turns her back to the fire it is a sign of snow. When a sheep goes grazing early in the morning it is the sign of rain. When a frog creeps into the house it is the sign of wet weather approaching. When the crickets are squeaking it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2016-12-10 20:01
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Local Marriage Customs
During Shrove, making matches and marriages mostly take place. May and June are thought to be unlucky months for marriages and Thursday, Friday and Saturday are unlucky days for marriage. The custom was to have meat for the supper and they would put up a bit of it on Shrove Tuesday night. They called that "Tadhgiara". Matches are made in every district during Shrove. Money is given as dowry when marriage takes place in the houses. Goods are given as presents. My father remembers marriages taking place in the houses but very seldom. Some people have a wedding feast and more eat their breakfast at a Hotel and then they go off on their honey moon. Straw boys visit the houses for money and food. When the wedding party is going away the people throw old shoes after them and tie old cans to the car.
senior member (history)
2016-12-09 20:39
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awaiting decision
drove horses mad through the country. We had a great deal of rain fall in the year 1930 and every place was flooded. Pigs were flooded and poultry were drowned. Mrs Walsh who lives near the school had to leave her house on account of that flood. As far as I hear there were no lives lost in this flood. We had a great snow storm in Febuary 1932. Sheep and lambs were covered in the snow and people had to give days digging for them. It varied from two to nine feet high.
senior member (history)
2016-12-09 20:26
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rejected
awaiting decision
Severe Weather
About thirty years ago a terrible storm occurred in this district. It knocked about half a mile of a wood. This occurred in the year 1907 in the month of March.
If the clouds are very bright and moving quickly it is a sign of a coming storm.
There were many houses damaged in the locality. We had a great thunder storm aout twelve years ago in this district. It killed horses and cows and it
senior member (history)
2016-12-09 20:15
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Severe Weather
It is said there was a terrible wind storm in the Febuary of the year 1906.
It blew down terrible big trees and roads were blocked. There was six weeks of hard frost 1n 1917. It was so bad that could not travel the roads . It was very hard to fodder cattle and if root crops were given to them they had to be boiled
senior member (history)
2016-12-09 20:00
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Clonmel to Rathcannon. The priest had him told to tell his relatives not to take revenge. While they were erecting the scaffold he made hisspeech but it was all to no use. It is said Paddy Grace used to take bread off the windows of our house in which Pollards were living. It used to be left on the windows for him.
senior member (history)
2016-12-09 19:51
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Local Heroes
Patrick Grace was born in Ballytarsna.
A land lord named Chadwick had it settled that all his tenants were to be evicted one morning. Patrick Grace heard this and he made an attempt to stop it. One day while Chadwick was out driving, Patrick Grace and one of his companions named Barry shot him. Barry wanted to shoot the coachman and he had his pistol pointed at him several times. He said "a dead cock never crew" but Grace would not let him. Barry took off his boots then and tan across to Clonolty to Confession and when he went in he said to the priest "what time is it, I thought I would be late" that was to have the priest and the people in the
chapel witnesses that he was not at the murder. This murder happened at the bridge in Rathcannon and it is still known as Chadwick's Bridge. O'Meara the coachman for Chadwick informed on Grace. Grace was captured or else he gave himself up and after a trial in Clonmel with a packed jury he was sentenced to be hanged where the murder was committed. He had to walk from
senior member (history)
2016-12-09 19:27
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moon is on its back it is the sign of bad weather. When the rainbow is in the sky it is the sign of showery weather. The East wind is neither good for man or beast
senior member (history)
2016-12-09 19:19
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When a crowd of wild geese are in the sky it is the sign of bad weather. When the smoke is going up the chimney and coming down again it is the sign of good weather. When we are going to have bad weather the cranes lodge in the field with the cows.
The south wind brings the most rain to our district. When the moon is clouded it is a sign of rain. When the
senior member (history)
2016-12-08 21:34
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Weather Lore
People sometimes in the country are very good judges of the weather. They are able to foretell the weather by all the signs. When the sun appears early in the morning it is a sign of a bad day. When the sun is red in the evening it is a sign of fine weather the following day. People get up early Easter Sunday morning to see the sun dancing. When the moon is turned on its back it is the
senior member (history)
2016-12-08 21:23
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Weather Lore
Some people in the country are good judges of the weather. They use the sun, the moon, the clouds, the sky, the birds, the stars, the wind and the animals to guide them. In the winter when the sky is very red at sunset it is a sign of frost and in summer it is a sign of a fine warm day, the day after. When the clouds are going against the wind it is a sign of very bad weather. When the stars in the sky it is a sign of frost. The south west wind brings most rain to the district. When the birds are flying high it is a sign of fine weather and when they are flying low it is a sign of bad weather.
senior member (history)
2016-12-07 20:48
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in it. A. A thimble
Q. We all have what the kettle have and what have the kettle.
A. A name.
Q. Long and white
Suits the ladies in the night
Not a lady in the land
Refuses to take it in their hand
senior member (history)
2016-12-07 20:36
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A. Time for him to get a new one.
Q. Under the fire and over the fire and never touches the fire.
A. A cake of bread in an oven.
Q. What is it that cannot walk though it has four legs, a head and foot.
A. A bed
Q. What is it that turns without moving. A. Milk
Q. What is it that has twelve wings but cannot fly. A. A shilling
Q. Father and mother sister and brother running all day and cannot catch up to each other.
A. The four wheels of a motor car.
Q. How many sides to a bucket.
A. Two, inside and outside
Q. Twenty sick sheep went out a gap one died. How many came back.
A. Ninteen
Q. There is a little house and a mouse could not fit in it and all the men in Derry could not count the windows
senior member (history)
2016-12-07 20:14
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Q. As round as an egg, As deep as a cup, all the men in Derry, Could not draw it up.
A. A well
Q. How many cow's tails could reach the sky. A. One if it were long enough.
Q. If I built a wall from here to Dublin what height would it be.
A. The height of nonsence.
Q. Hazy face Mary, father and mother, twelve little children and theyall the same colour. A. A clock.
Q. Why does a dog shake his tail. . A. Because his tail could not shake him.
Q. What are the people doing in this world this minute.
A.Drawing their breath.
Q. What is that is always going and never moves out of the one spot.
A. A clock
Q. Four legs up and four legs down, soft in the middle and hard all round.
A. A bed
Q. If a man's coat was all patches what time would it be.
senior member (history)
2016-12-07 19:53
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Q. Why does a hen cross the road.
A. To go to the other side.
Q. What makes a pair of boots. A. Two
Q. What does not a train want and cannot run without it. A. Noise
Q. Once in a minute, twice in a moment and never in a thousand years. A. The letter M
Q. What is it that has a tongue and cannot speak. A. Boot.
Q. Why do we buy cloths.
A. Because we cannot get them for nothing.
Q. When is a trunk like two letters of the alphabet. A. When it is M T
Q. How many peas in a pint. A. One P
Q. Why is a tight shoe like a fine Summer. A. Because it makes the corn grow.
Q. Why does a lady look at the moon. A, Because she sees a man in it.
senior member (history)
2016-12-07 19:35
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has no boots but shod with steel, has a coat of silk with a belt around the middle, now can you guess this silly riddle. A, An Umbrella
Q. Where was Moses when the light was quenched. A. In the dark.
Q. Ink , ank under the bank, ten drawing four. A. A woman milking a cow.
Q. What's the shyest thing in the house. A. A clock because it always has its hands up to its face.
Q. How many feet have forty sheep, a shepard and his dog. A.Two
Q. Where was God while the heavens were making. A. In his glory.
Q. What part of a cow gets over the ditch first. A. Her breath.
Q. What town can get in a bottle. A Cork
senior member (history)
2016-12-06 21:04
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A. Time
Q. What is it that dies when it drinks and lives when it eats. A. A fire
Q. What does an artist like to draw.
A. His pay
Riddles
Q. A head and foot and four feet
A. A bed
Q. Why does a cow look over a ditch.
A. Because she cannot look under it.
Q. Why does a bull dribble.
A. Besause he cannot spit.
Q. 'Tis in the timber but not in the wood. 'Tis in the river but not in the flood. 'Tis in the rock but not in the stone. 'Tis in the marrow but not in the bone.
A. The letter R
Q. Why does a hen pick a pot.
A. Because she cannot lick it.
Q. Eight arms but no hand, a wooden leg but cannot stand, is often wet but cannot feel
senior member (history)
2016-12-06 20:45
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Riddles
Q. What has a neck and a body and nothing else. A. A bottle
Q. What ship do we all like to avoid.
A. Hardship
Q. It has two feet but cannot walk, it has two hands but cannot work.
A. An alarm clock
Q. The beginning of entry, the end of space and time, the beginning of every end and the end of evety race.
A. The letter "E"
Q. Tom Tom tiddle walking in the puddle with a pair of yellow legs and a green green cap. A. A drake.
Q. As round as a marble as flat as a pan, one side a woman and the other side a man. A. A penny.
Q. What has legs but cannot run.
A. A chair.
Q. What never stops to eat or drink, never goes to bed or sleep, is too fast for some and too slow for others.
senior member (history)
2016-12-06 20:26
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There was a boy working with a farmer one time. This day he was eating his dinner, he had a big plate of turnips and only a little piece of meat. When he had the piece of meat eaten he called for more meat. When he had it the woman said, "The bull will be roaring in you all night". "If he will " said the boy "it will not be for want of turnips he will be roaring"
One night when Tom Scanlon was in bed, after the old Major dying, he heard a noise at Phillips green door. He lit the candle and got up and went down into the yard to see who it was . He thought it was the old Major. He picked up courage and went over to see what it was and what was it but an ass rubbing against the green door.
senior member (history)
2016-12-05 21:09
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lot of monkeys above and night caps on their heads and when they saw the man throwhis cap off they flung their caps on the ground too.
At the time all the men were working at Philiphs. The steward was coming up one morning. The men were in the barn winnowing corn. The steward came up to the big door. He put in his hand to open the bolt. One of the men was waiting for him inside and when he put in his hand the man caught him by the finger with his mouth. The steward let out a roar, "get out of that dog"
senior member (history)
2016-12-05 20:54
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Once a man was travelling along a road selling night caps. According as he was going along the road he was shouting, "night caps a shilling each"
It was getting very dark and he went into a forest where monkeys were. He fell asleep and when he awoke in the morning all his night caps were gone. He was so angry that the night cap he had on his head he flung it on the ground. He looked up in the tree and he saw a
senior member (history)
2016-12-05 20:39
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One day a tall man named Tom Scanlon was feeding calves with hay and turnips outside the gate of the field. He called the calves. The calves ran very quickly. One of the calves ran in between the man's legs. The calf carried him four times around the field and the man could not get off until the calf ran in against a wall and knocked him off. The calf ran to the hay and the man got up and walked home.
senior member (history)
2016-12-05 20:28
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Funny Stories
One night a party of men were playing cards in the dairy. It is called the dairy because in the time of Clark it was used as a dairy. It is not far from Juley's Hill. There was another man in a room overhead and he was sick. The sick man got a sudden change and the men went up to see him. They left the cards on the table and the money again. When they were above they could hear money gingling and chairs moving and some one thumping the table. One of them came for a drink of water and everything was the same as they had left it. When he went up they could hear the same thing going on. They came down again and put up the cards and sat at the fire until morning.
senior member (history)
2016-12-05 18:30
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Hidden Treasure
The treasure is supposed to be hidden in Ballinree underneath the butt of a ditch. The ditch is in Hooley's Farm. The treasure was put there for safe keeping in olden times. Attempts have been made to dig it up several times. A crowd of boys around the district went one night to dig it up and while they were digging a very tall man appeared and as he was coming nearer to them, taller he was getting. One of the men had a gun and he fired it at the man but it took no affect on him. They had to gather up their hacks and shovels and go home. The buried treasure consists of gold. It is suppose to be a crock of gold. A very tall man is suppose to guard the treasure. Lights have never been seen where this treasure is hidden.
senior member (history)
2016-12-05 18:04
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Hidden Treasure
It is locally discussed among the people that there is a crock of gold hidden on Juley's Hill. It is said to be hidden in a spring. Juley's Hill is situated on the left hand side of the river Suir about one mile and a half past Holycross. Attempts have been made to dig up the gold but to no use. A couple of men went one night to dig it up. They brought a bottle of Holy water with them to keep away bad spirits. When they were down a bit the water began to come in on them. Then a sow and litter of bonhams came from the direction of Miltown Castle and hunted them. A second attempt was made and when they had dug a bit they began to throw up white bones of a goose. they kept digging and when they went further down they heard a child crying under them. Then the sow and bonhams came again and hunted them.
senior member (history)
2016-12-05 17:47
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Hidden Treasure
It is locally discussed among the people that there is a crock of gold hidden in Juley's Hill. It is said to be hidden in a spring. Juley's Hill is situated on the left hand side of the river Suir about one mile and a half past Holycross. Attempts have been made to dig up the gold but to no use. A couple of men went one night to dig it up. they brought a bottle of Holy water with them to keep away bad spirits. When they were down a bit the water began to come in on them. Then a sow and litter of bonhams came from the direction of Milltown Castle and hunted them. A second attempt was made and when they had dug a bit they began to throw up whie bones of a goose. They kept digging and when they went further down they heard a child crying under them. Then the sow and bonhams came again and hunted them.
senior member (history)
2016-11-19 20:40
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Farm Animals
We have sixteen cows at home and each one has a name of her own. the names are:- The Big Red Cow, The Big Heifer, The Curly, Ally, Máire, Kitty, Sruck, The White Cow, Dolly, Polly. The cows are put in a house at night.
This house is called a cow-house. In the cowhouse there is a stall for each cow and a manger for the food. Each cow is tied to a ring in the manger. Some of them are tied with a chain around the neck and the restof them with a rope around the horns. The chains are bought in the shop. When driving the cows to the field we say, "How, How". When calling the calves we say,"Sook. Sook". When calling the hens we say "Tehuk, Tehuk". When setting eggs for hatching across is made on them
senior member (history)
2016-11-17 18:52
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time and when they went out she bundled the blankets about her and followed them. They went across the field to the fort and on to the spot where the gold was supposed to be. The woman followed them but when she came to the fort she did not know where they were gone. The men were digging away very fast when all at once a big white thing came around the turn towards them. They ran away at once very frightened and terrified and they never went to look for it again.
senior member (history)
2016-11-15 17:16
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The following will put a player out:
1. More than one hop or one push of the "vetch" in any bed.
2. Standing on line.
3. Vetch stopping on line.
4. When throwing vetch into bed from X If vetch goes outside bed or rests on line.
Note: Players always move counter - sun - wise. Game never called "Hop-scotch". Word never used.
senior member (history)
2016-11-15 17:02
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Trance
A game played by school girls.
Diagram
"Beds" are drawm on road. Each "bed" roughly 3' square. A flat stone about about 3 or 4 inches square called a "vetch"is used. Player stands at X and shoves vetch into bed No 1. Then she hops on one leg and moves vetch with foot into No 2 and from that to No 3 and No 4. No 4 is called the resting bed and she can stand on both feet and rest if she wishes. She then continues through beds 5 & 6. Then she stands at X ad throws the vetch into bed No 2 and hops into No 1 and to No 2 and so on as before. Next time vetch is put into bed No 3. Next bed No 4 and so on. Player who succeeds in going through all six beds thus "brings" the game.
senior member (history)
2016-11-14 21:30
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Fish-spear used by Poachers in spearing Salmon in the Suir and Tar at southern end of Parish.

( SEE DIAGRAM )
Called "A THROY" (traighe)
made by local blacksmiths.
Generally 9 teeth
Teeth about 9" long and 2 1/2 " apart
Handle about 8 feet long.
"Cró" like a shovel

Handle and teeth in the same plane.
senior member (history)
2016-11-14 21:07
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When funeral arrived at graveyard coffin was taken on men's shoulders around the graveyard or around church or old ruin if such was there to the grave
The grave should not be dug on a Monday.
If this had to be done care was taken to dig a sod or"redden" the place the previous day.
When coffin arrived at house the lid was left standing against the wall beside the door until the personed was coffined. The coffin was then taken out preceded by two candles.
A mare should never be put under a car carring a coffin as she would never have a foal after,
Note: Most of these customs are being forgotten. It is only some old fashioned families that carry them out in their entirety.
senior member (history)
2016-11-14 20:52
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Wake and Funeral Customs.
When a person died in a house the clock was immediately stopped. There was to be no crying or lamenting until the person was dead three quarters of an hour. The water used to wash dead person was thrown on a boundary fence. Once a person left a wake-house it was not right for him to go back there again. If he did he might "see something".
When coffin was brought the lid was left outside the door until the person was coffined. Then the coffin was brought out preceded by two candles and laid on two chairs outside the door. There was generally an old route for all funerals from a district to a graveyard. This was often the longest way. According to my observation funerals did not did not go the long way because it was the long way. They followed the traditional route from such and such a townland to the graveyard.
It was not "right" to wear a new garment for the first time at a funeral.
If one met a funeral one should walk three steps with it.
If one died in a townland all in the townland suspended work until after the funeral.
senior member (history)
2016-11-12 21:18
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How cows are tied in Cow-House
A. In the great majority of farms the cows are tied in "bails" made of wood.
One side of bail is hinged at bottom on an iron pin which passes through a hole in the lower end of it. When cows head is put through it, it is clamped on top by an ellipse shaped ring of iron.
Diagram
Rough drawing of a bail open and closed.
B. In many small farms cows are fastened with chains around their necks.
C. In a few cases cows are tied with rope tied around base of horns.
Cattle were tied along one side of cow house.
senior member (history)
2016-11-12 21:01
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Sowing of Cabbage
Drills are made and manure put in the furrows. The drills are then closed over the manure with plough. The plants are "slude" in the drills with a spade.
When cabbage is sown in a garden this is the method adopted: A furrow is dug with a spade and the earth turned over to the left and levelled.
The plants are laid along this furrow . Farmyard manure is then placed along the furrow. Aother sod is now dug similar to the first covering the manure. A second sod is then turned over on this furrow. The second row of plants is then laid and manured and covered asd the first row was done.
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-11-11 20:37
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Some typical names of Horses.
Paddy
Moll
Dollsy
Charley
Seán
The Chestnut
Darky
Marlfield (Place where bought)
Billy
Fanny
The Bay
Dolly
The Giraffe (A tall long necked horse)
senior member (history)
2016-11-11 20:30
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Some Names of Cows.
The Black Cow
Old Gleeson (Person from whom the cow was bought)
Old MacIniry ( do.)
Crippled Kate
Bare Bones
Long Horns
Tankerstown Milker
Simple Simon
Rosy
Long Hoofs (pr. Huffs)
The Polly
Bottle Teats (Pr. Tits)
The Kicker
The "maol" cow
Lily's Cow
The Smith Cow
The Roan Cow
Lame Leg
The Polly Cow
senior member (history)
2016-11-10 20:41
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Names of Fields etc.
Only a small percentage of fields in the Parish have Irish Names. The following are the only names I could find:
The Caol
The Bán Rálach
Páirc an Fhásaigh
The Ceann Árd
The Crosógs
Páirc na dTrí gCúinne
Garra Mhichíl
Poll an Airgid
Clais an Airgid
The Ráth Árd
The Clais field
The Scéithín Field
The Crockters, evidently "Crofters" - crochta
The "Carragán"
Clais Coinín
The Garraidhe Cain
Páirc na Ruadh (?)
The Cillíneach
The Lochán
Páisc an Bhig, "Páisc" evidently "Páirc"
The Múgnéirín
senior member (history)
2016-11-10 20:13
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handles were shown at opposite end.
The "cover" was held on by a brass chain and was usually the old cover of a cruet or of a pepper-caster. Sometimes shop sold covers made of tin were used.
My grandfather had one of these pipes and the skull he used instead of the skull of clay pipe was a piece of old gun barrell cut to suitable length.
Diagram
Rough drawing of pipe described above as made like bellows.
Bellows was in exact proportion. Even clapper hole was shown underneath.
The man who used to make those pipes used also make SCIACHs and straw hives.
His name was Pad Dwyer and he died only about 10 years ago. I can't saw was the art of making of those pipes handed down or was it his own invention. He was very "handy".
Note: Local name for Spindle tree = "peg-wood"
senior member (history)
2016-11-10 19:50
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Pipes
In Croan, Parish of Newcastle, 40 years ago I used to know a man who made ornamental pipes. I think it was the wood of the Spindle tree that he used. It was this wood that was used in making the stem certainly but I am not sure about the "skull"
Diagram
Above is rough drawing of one of those pipes. The skull "S" was usually the skull of a clay pipe cut to fit something like outline X. It was let into wooden skull and cemented with a cement made of lime and some milk. The spirals show where brass wire was inlaid into wood as ornamentation. This was done in various patterns. The outline of wooden skull too was made in variety of shapes. I saw one in the shape of a minature bellows. The pipe of bellows was the stem. The wrinkles in leather were carved in wood and even minature
senior member (history)
2016-11-09 20:43
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Surnames in Grange N School June 1st 1938.
ODonnell 1 English 4
Sheehan 1 Butler 4
Costigan 2 Heffernan 2
Peters 4 Hamilton 1
Kiely 2 Hanrahan 2
Guidera 2 Foran 1
Keating 3 Corbett 1
Mulcahy 3 Gearon 1
Dillon 2 Kelly 2
Looby 1 Cullinan 2
Dower 3 Fraughan 2
Sargent 1 Gorman 2
Boyle 1 MacEniry 1
Whelan 4 Murphy 3
Moore 3 Lonergan 2
Crotty 1
Total 64
Number having brown eyes 11
Other shades of blue and grey 53
Red Hair 8
Fair Hair 31
Dark 19
Very Dark 6
Total 64
senior member (history)
2016-11-09 20:24
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Spade (Baisín)
Rough drawing of type of spade called a "baisín" used for cutting "scraths" for fuel on mountain south of Newcastle. I saw them 40 years ago. I can't say are they in use now.
See page 89 "baisín" in Parish of Grange.
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-11-09 20:08
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Animal Calls
Cows: Pú-ín! Pú-ín! Pú-ín
Pigs: bach! bach! Bach!
Ducks: fíní" fíní! fíní!
Hens: Diuc! Diuc! Diuc!
Geese: Párick! Parick! Parick!
Turkeys: bí! bí! bí!
Horse: Cóibí! Cóibí! Cóibí!
Goat: Gin! Gin! Gin!
Cat: Pish! Pish! Pish!
Driving cows: How! How!
Driving Horse: Hub off! G'wan
senior member (history)
2016-11-08 20:18
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Irish Phrases etc.
Dia Linn
A Mhic Ó
A mhaoineach
A mhaoineach na gcarad
Ó dhé mhaise
tamam 'n diabhal
bana liom (banamh liom)
dúr sé dár sé
dar muige !
A ghilín
maiste !
maisge !
"your-ee your-ee"= hubub. noise of many talking together
"kip o the reel" = Fun
bualadh amach = noisy sport
Tabhairt amach = "giving out" of refreshments at wake etc. e.g.There was great "t--a--" there.
trí na chéile: some times pronounced "trí na héile"
senior member (history)
2016-11-08 19:55
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*sciortán:
"skra": sod
*scraba: grab. He made a s-- at me.
seibineach:
"seartiúir": a wise acre (probably sean- andúir)
scrab: scrape
*scailp: e.g. A s-- of briars, a clump
*sceach (sometimes with s leath): a thorney bush
*snaidhm: e.g. I hit him a s--
snaidhm-póg: ditto.
*scríb (sometimes with s leath): e.g. a s-- of a harrow
*smithereens":
stracaire: a farmer "on the drag"
*slug: drink
*slogaire: swallow hole, x slacht
stiall: "piece" "stiall o' male
*seancuis: we had a great s--
seaga: craw
sciuirse: "whisper of a woman
*síobhra: some very small animal or person
*"slook"a sly person
*"Tilly"something extra given in.
*"Tilly": "step" of a spade *taoibhín: ar bróig
*táinthín:"crisha dogstail", a single stalk of grass
troighthín: An old worn stocking. He had only old t--s on.
*tuplais: mistake generally when card playing
*taoscán: fair quantity e.g. "taoscán of hay"= a small load. "taoscán of whiskey" = a fairly large drink.
Note: words marked x in rather common use. * very common, dictionary meaning when no meaning is given.
senior member (history)
2016-11-07 21:35
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"sighle": e.g. "a s--" , "a molly"
*síol dearmhad: a miss in seed sowing.
*scar-ing dung: dividing it up in forkfuls.
*sciolán:
sciológ: the "heel" of potato that is left after cutting for seed.
*searbhas:
searbh(s): a bitter sweet kind of crab-apple.
*"stara": long look
*straml: untidy woman.
*scib: bold girl, sometimes said of a fellow.
*sciach: potato picking basket.
sciotarálaí: one who is always laughing.
scithire: do.
*suggan: súgán
smeig: used as nickname e.g. "Smeig English"
*stuacán(aí): used of a stubborn fellow
*seift:
*steall: e.g. he gave me a s-- of whiskey.
*sucaí: young calf
stéigín: poor little farm
*smugaí: child with dirty nose.
smugairle: "snot" from nose.
siúnán: seed sowing basket made from straw.
*"shillikie-bookee": snail
*sidhe-gaoithe: whirlwind - not natural w-- (good people)
*"sook": of a plough
seanndraí: boy too old for his years.
*suartach: small, miserable
*sáilín: "heel" of car
*spailpín:
senior member (history)
2016-11-07 21:01
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*meiscáil: mixing or pouring liquids. Said of child playing with water.
*meas: He had no m-- on him.
*nadúir: i.e. the bad n-- was in him.
*oighear: chaffing of skin.
*úinseach: (óinseach)
*pur-seach: charlock.
*pallacán: bag of money. He got a p--
púirín: pebble
pisimín: a small dwarfish thing: He is only a little p--
*pus:
*puisín: young cat.
plucaí: a chld with fat cheeks.
pilibín: lap-wing
piast: a thin weak fellow
*plamás:
*poc: goat
pindy: musty. e.g. a'pindy' smell
*riast: mask for seed sowing. "riasc-ing"
réabóiseáil: a mixture (not nice) in way of food or drink.
prock: for crock
*ráig: a fit of temper
*rail: he was on the r-- on the spree.
*ráideach: "wild", a r-- fellow, rakish
"rúille": a half fool.
*rib: a single hair
senior member (history)
2016-11-06 21:11
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*goic: bend or crook.
*gabháil: armful
gaillsceach: earwig.
gaiscídheach: champion, "great fellow".
*gaisce: something done as a "show off"
*gob: bill, mouth.
*gobán: Put in kids mouth so that it could not drink mothers
*gob lachan: sheep whose teeth do not meet and consequently can't eat grass very well. Also said of person.
*giorrach: short drill or sod in ploughing.
*"glook"(gliuic): glimpse, I got a g-- at him.
**glawm": catching a prson roughly, He made a g--at me.
*grafán: used for rooting up furze.
*gradh:
*glib: unkempt hair.
*iarsma: a weakling, a good for nothing.
ladús: pretending, looking for undeserved sympathy.
liobar(s): rag, rags.
liobarsach: untidy.
leibínleathair: brat
"le-áchaí"(laghach): friendly, civil
*"lang-ar": a long fellow
*loúdar: a "welt", a blow, I hit him a l--
*luchán: a small "banbh" in a litter.
*lochaire: a swampy place.
*lúidín: leipreachán.
*maol: a male goat or cow.
senior member (history)
2016-11-06 20:30
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deirc: "pot-hole" in road
druing: hump on person with cold etc. There was a d-- on him.
*draid: sneering mouth
*dradaire:one who is always sneering or with a cunning smile.
driódar: dregs
draoidheacht:
fannc: He didn't take a f-- out of him.=He didn't take a "shake" out of him.
"foirincul": small egg, flathamhail- fústar.
fogha: he made a "fogha" at him to try and catch him.
*feirc: a f-- on him. shaping with his head up.
*gamhain garraidhe: late calf.
"grúidil": little lump of something e.g "gruidils of male".
"greabhailín: small "butt"of wheat or oats, farmer's son used to steal from his father and sell for pocket money.
*"gag": a swankey fellow.
grobal-s: rags, torn cloths.
giobalach: ragged.
*glabhánaí: one who is always complaining or lamenting.
*gabhalog: fork of tree etc.
gabal: fork (personal)
*"giobrais": nonsensical talk, (gibberish)
*glugar: rotten egg.
*"guraí hen: a hatching hen
*geilt: unfortunate poor devil.
*gleo: sport, noisy sport
*geab: talk.
*"gob": mouth, "pus".
gigilis:
giodam:
Glingín: a featherhead, a silly person
senior member (history)
2016-11-05 22:25
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"card: He is a quare c-- (ceárd) ?
*cleibhí: litte dresser for jugs etc.- hanging dresser.
*criochán: small potato.
*cuaird(s): run of plough in furrow.
caistín: wizened old fashioned little person.
*cnap: bold girl.
crúb: big fist, take your crubs out of my way.
cruach: put a "cruach" on it - in filling some vessel.
*ciothóg:
*cliach: anything twisted together like roots of tree etc.
"cin-úg": farthing, he hadn't a c--
*cáibín:
carabhat: old fashioned tie.
*croisín: stick wth knob on end for washing potatoes.
clabhan: beam supporting chimney.
cirín: red face e.g. after drinking. there ws a c- on him.
caillithín: an old womanish little girl.
ceolán: a person with a lot of senseless talk.
*clip: a "wild" fellow or girl.
cráidhte: she is a poor c-- thing i.e. worried with the world.
*cábóg: an ignorant man.
cis: a big basket. A heap of a woman.
*cruibín: of a pig.
castóir: suggan twister
*dallacáil: doing a thing awkwardly.
*dallacalaidhe: one doing a thing awkwardly.
*dailcín: an impertinent young fellow.
*dúidín: short stemmed pipe.
*dromach: back strap on horse in ploughing.
duiricín: something small.
*deallradh: "ll" silent = (deallramh) There is no d--on it.
senior member (history)
2016-11-05 20:29
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*buinneán: "ash plant" as a walking
stick
*buailteán: Stick for hitting from flail-no flails used now
bocán: hook of common hinge.
*bogán: shell-less egg.
*buachalán: yellow ragwort.
*pilibín: green plover or lapwing.
"bin-úg": a jump. he gave a bin-úg,
baisín: a worn shovel, Note: In parish of Newcastle a "baisín" was a special kind of spade for digging "scrath's" of peat on mountain.
banndún (bundún): I'll break your b- with a kick.
*brosna:
*bádh: I have an oul "bádh" for him.
*bacach: a mean fellow, a tramp.
*boithreán: dried cow dung used as fuel.
*bóithrín:
*badhb: banshee
*coileán: a cunning fellow, he is a clever c--
crochaire: a small wizened person or animal.
*ciaróg: bettle.
*caointeacán: wailing, lamenting.
*cruit: hump.
cruit: "stump" of cabbage or core of an apple uneaten.
*cluais: one who has "ear" on him listening. used as nickname e.g. "Cluais Hogan"
* cuardáidheacht (sometimes cuard-í
*"cáinín": something in the eye.
codam: growth in horses mouth. E called locally "lampers"
senior member (history)
2016-11-04 21:41
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in either English or Irish letters, which ever comes.nearest to local pronciation.
*Aingiseoir:
abhac:
*áileán:
anglais: milk with water mxed in it.
airc luachra: newt
*amalach: awkward
balbh:
*balbhánaí: a person with a stammer
*bodach: surly fellow
"Bine-lock" (boinn-leac):sore
on childs foot, threatened with this if they robbed a robin's nest.
*béiceachánaí: one who cries for little reason.
*bastún: a vulgar ignorant man.
*beart:
* bais: of a hurley. I hit him a bais.
buailim sciath: a noisy person
buaireach (sometimes "boar-ach"): spancel for kicking cow.
*breall: half fool
breallsún: do.
breillice: do.
*bothán: old house, hovel
*banbh(s): young pig
* buaic (sometimes pr. bóók: ridge of thatched house.
senior member (history)
2016-11-04 20:58
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Irish in Parish of Grange
No Irish is spoken in the parish. When I came to the parish 30 years ago a few of the old people* knew some of the Irish salutations. Those people are all gone now and no native of the parish can speak Irish ó dhúthchas. William Carrigan the local clerk of the church who is 70 years old told me that his grandmother was able to read and wrire Irish. Where she learned to read and write it, I could get no clue to.
There is no tradition that I could find out as to anything like a "hedge-school".
The national school was opened in 1857. Before that there was a school held for a while in the local vestry. Before that again there was a school at the spot where the Glin bóithrín joins the Newcastle road. Some remains of the walls are still to be seen there. I could get no account of who was the teacher there or what was taught.
The following is a list of Irish words I found in use in the parish. The words marked with a * are common, the others are words I heard occassionaly among persons.
The words are spelt phonetically as pronounced.
*A few know them still and many words are current in E speech.
See page 88
senior member (history)
2016-11-04 20:30
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A Banshee Story
One night when Jack Brabston was coming home from work he was crossing a field called the "Killeneac"*
He was walking on a path and the Banshee came along and he stepped out of her way and she was combing her hair.W hen she was gone some yards beyond him she began to cry and Jack ran to Going's house and he got a few weaknesses.
*See page 25 Lios na Muice
Note: I know for a fact that Jack Brabston mentioned above gave weeks in bad health after above occurence. Whether he imagined it all or not, I can't say. It was not night - only late of a Summer's evening
senior member (history)
2016-11-03 21:35
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since.
A Banshee Story
One night about twelve o'clock as a man was crossing home from Ardfinnan he heard something moaning but he could not see any thing. He walked on for some distance and then he was in another field when he saw something in the corner of the field wearing a long white dress. He walked over towards it and it kept standing still and it was a woman combing her hair. He ran after her and she dropped the comb and he took it up. That night when he was in bed he heard knocks at the window and he also heard moaning. He slept for a while and then he woke and saw something at the window. He got up and he put the comb into a tongs and he gave it out the window to her and when she was taking it she took half the tongs with her.
senior member (history)
2016-11-03 21:20
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A Banshee Story
A Banshee is supposed to be an Irish Fairy or Ghost. She is only seen or heard on very rare occasions and is said to be an omen of death to certain families. She moves around crying mournfully and combing her hair.
I remember a story told once by my grandfather and this is it. One night as he was crossing the fields from his own house to Carrigan's in Moancrea to see how was Mrs Carrigan who was dying. When he came close to the house he saw a person dressed in white sitting on the stile and crying very loud. He could not go in by the stile so he went in by the bohereen. When he entered the house the woman was dead and all the household were gathered around her death bed reciting the Rosary. When they were finished he told them all about what he had heard and seen. While he was talking they heard some noise outside in the yard and opening the door they they saw it was the Banshee walking through the yard crying and combing her hair. When she got outside the gate she disappeared and was not seen
senior member (history)
2016-11-03 20:58
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finished No 3 was turned back on No 2 and threshers took up positions a2, b2 and so on. When No 6 was turned over No 1 was placed opposite and turned upside down.
There was some way that three men used to thresh. It was called "bualadh an triúir but I can't remember ever having seen it done or of learning how exactly it used to be done.
senior member (history)
2016-11-02 21:13
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was uppermost it was "wound" towards the right. Threshers were able to change hands without losing a stroke.The premliminary strokes at starting was struck lightly and in a reverse way from usual way buailteán was "wound"
In fig 2 threshers did not have to stand on "easair". When first "sraith" was threshed No 2 was turned back on No 1 and threshers took up position at
a1 b1 and threshed this sraith. When
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2016-11-02 20:48
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How "gad" was put on.
The strip of horseskin was "wetted" and twisted. A hole was put in the wide end and narrow end was put through it. See fig 1. It was now twisted round head of "colpa" as in fig 2 and free end was plaited in and out as in fig 3 until there was just room for end of buailteán. The baulteán was held in place by winding wide end around free end of "gad" and also by a small leather strap looped through end of "gad" and lashed onto buailteán by a string waxed thread.
Threshing was generally done in barn. If it was done outside the place was called a "láthair".
The corn was laid on the floor in two lines with seed ends of sheaves overlapping each other. There were usually two threshers. One stood on floor at end of "easair" - (the corn on floor to be threshed was so called)
the other stood on easair. They began threshing stricking every second strike. Thresher No 2 moved backwards and No 1 advanced after him until whole easair was threshed. I was then turned and all threshed again as before.
Threshers were able to work flail left or right . When right hand was uppermost on colpa, buailteán was "wound" towards the left and when left hand
senior member (history)
2016-11-02 20:11
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Threshing with a Flail
(Parish of Newcastle 40 years ago)
The Flail.
The handle was called "The colpa"
The "gad" was generally an ash sapling of suitable length and thickness. A supply of these saplings for "buailteáns" were cut beforehand and seasoned.
I was told that in old times a tough "sally" was used as a "gad".
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-10-31 21:25
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I saw this addition to the game in my young days in the Parish of Newcastle - it is not known in Grange. When all were "out" the player left had the privilege of hitting each of the other players with three stroke of the ball on the palm of the hand. The hand was laid on a cap which was laid under it on the ground. This penalty was very seldom more than a matter of form - the strokes were very seldom or ever hit with any desire to hurt.
senior member (history)
2016-10-31 21:15
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The Game of "Burn Ball"
Those who were to play "called", "First", "Second",
"Third" etc.
Then they laid their caps or hats on the ground in a row, no. one's first etc.
Sometimes instead of putting down hats or caps each made a little enclosure of single stones about the size of the fist - called a "cabby".
All stood about a yard back from the line of caps. No. one had the ball and he threw it into any cap he wished. All except the person into whose cap the ball was thrown then ran. He picked up the ball and threw it to hit one of the others. The player hit then picked up the ball and tried to hit somebody else and so on. The player who missed had "one in him"
i.e. a small stone or a daisy was put in his cap. When a player had "three in him" he was "out". The game continued until only one was left.
Each player had to throw the ball from where he picked it up.
If number one missed putting the ball into a cap three times in succession he lost his "hand" and number two did the throwing.
senior member (history)
2016-10-31 20:47
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A Ghost Story
Willie my brother was coming from Ardfinan one night late. He came up the park by the old churchyard and just as he was passing the churchyard something stopped him. He could see nothing yet there was something before him keeping him back and he couldn't stir or take a step forward. He gave a shout "Is there any of the Guideras there to take my part ?" he said.
No sooner were the words out of his mouth than whatever was stopping him was gone and he was able to walk away.
Note: The Guideras were friends and neighbours of the Morrisseys whose family burial ground was the old churchyard in Ardfinan.
senior member (history)
2016-10-30 21:37
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above. Some of the family are still alive. All are Catholics.]
The "Curreens" (Cuirín, Curran) were a great family here long ago. They were genry. They lived in the place where the Sargents were. (The last house occupied by the Sargents-above)
The last of them lived near Dorneyswell in a small farm of about 20 acres. It was in this place Sargents lived first. When the "Cureens" got broke in their farm, the Sargents got it and the "Cureens" went to live in the little place that Sargents left. The last of the "Cureens" died in Kilmanahan some years ago.
senior member (history)
2016-10-30 21:20
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People used to be buried where the old Monastery was in Kilmalogue. There was a boreen going up to the place from above Patsy Walsh's. This boreen was called "Boithirín Ceann Daoine"
[Note: Site of Monastery or Church is impossible to trace . No local tradition. No sign of a graveyard. The Cillíneach for burying unbaptisd children (see page 25) is not far from this Mr Walsh's house and in the Kilmaloge direction. Could Denis Walsh be mixing the two things up ?]
On the south side of the road a little to the East from Ballindoney Castle there are many large trees and what appears to be traces of an avenue but no remains of a house. Denis Walsh (above) told me that when he was a boy going to school the "butts" of the walls of a house were there. He used to go picking wild rasberries in the place where the old garden was. He heard it was one of Cromwell's officers lived there first. He never heard his name.
The Sargents, another Protestant family came after. One of the Sargents married a woman of the Briens of Ballindoney. She was a strong minded woman and reared the children Catholics.
[Note: The Sargents were living until 25 years ago in a house about 150 yards east of the site mentioned
senior member (history)
2016-10-28 22:06
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survived.
One man told me that there was a similar large rock in the next field and although it was in the way no one of the owners would touch it. One son of the family who was in the Christian Brothers paid no heed to the superstition and broke it up. And said my informant, "nothing happened to him"
I was also told that it was said that coins and other things "like small ?" were found near these rocks long ago.
Diagram
Front and side elevation of spade used in this parish.
senior member (history)
2016-10-28 21:49
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Glennaclohlea (See Page 28)
"Gleann na gCloch Liat" or "Gleann na Cloiche Léithe". Local pronounciation "Gleann na Cloha Lay" approx.
The townland gets its name from a group of limestone rocks on the west edge of a little valley running south-east.
There are four rocks in the group. The two lowest are two large rocks close together. The largest is 7 feet above the ground, 6 feet wide at the base and 7 feet thick. The other is close up to this and is 6 feet high, 6 feet thick and 4 feet wide. The front faces of the rocks are in a line. Behind those are two smaller rocks which project about 3 feet above the surface. There is a space of about six feet between the two rocks in front and the two behind.
The rock look very like a cromlech with the covering stone missing.
My own opinion is that they are outcroppings of the natural limestone rock which is near the surface in this locality. In an open quarry within a couple of hundred yards of these rocks the strata are vertical.The strata of these rocks appear vertical also. It is only by digging that the truth or otherwise could be seen.
That these rocks were associated with superstition can be seen from the few remnants of tradition that have
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 22:04
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generally scraped down with a spade. (scriosta - scrios na gclas). The furrows were made finer for the second clay (an t-ath chác) than for the first and the clay was made run off the shovel through the stalks.
Small cottiers did the work of softening the furrows with a spade.
If weeds were plentyful they were pulled by hand before moulding the second time.
Note: In the mountain parts of the parish potatoes are still sown as above in all other parts drills are the common custom.
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 21:50
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around the waist like an apron with a strap over the left shoulder. The sower took out as many sciolán-s as the right hand could conveniently hold - 4 or 5 - and making a hole with the spade flung the sciolán into it. Great skill was shown during this. Experts could set with extraordinary quickness, and never missed the holes.
The scioláns were set three across the ridge and about a foot between every two lines. They were then"racked" i.e. the holes were closed by beating them with an implement like a rake without teeth. (ag racáil)
Before the potatoes came over ground the dung was put out in"rays" along every seventh ridge or evety fifth ridge (ré seacht n-iomaire). It was then "scar-ed" that is thrown in forkfuls on all the ridges. It was then spread evenly on the ridges (ag leathadh aoilig). The furrows were "softened" by a single horse and a light plough with the mould board taken off. Three or four cuairds were made in each furrow. The furrows were then "stored" and another cuaird of the plough was made in each. The clay was now shovelled on the ridges on both sides on both sides of the furrow (ag caitheamh chlas).
When te stalks (na crainn) were five or six inches high clay was put to them the second time. Before "softening" the furrows of the ridges were
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 21:18
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How Potatoes were set in bán ridges.
Parish of Newcastle, 40 years ago.
The bán field was ploughed in ridges. The ridge consisted of five sods about 7 inches by 2 1/2 or so inches deep. The plough used was what was called a No 7 and had no wheels. It was the great test of the ploughman's skill to make ridges well. The ridges were then "settled" (socruighthe) with an adze shaped implement called a Grafán i.e. the edges were levelled down. The sciolán-s were set with a spade. They were carried in a máilín. The máilín was tied
senior member (history)
2016-10-26 20:43
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Crop Rotation
This was the rotation in general use in this parish about 60 years ago. When a bán was broken lea oats was sown. Next year potatoes and root crops was sown and manured. The third year wheat. The fourth year oats with seeds. Fifth year hay and the field was left in grass. It depended on size of a man's farm how soon that field was broken again. In some cases it was broken after a few years
senior member (history)
2016-10-23 21:54
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Micil Riobárd was a great wrestler. No one ever knocked him. Mulcahys of Corabella had a meithiol reaping. some man in the meithiol was boasting about how good he was for wrestling. Didn't they send up to Flemingstown in the middle of the harvest day (about 2 miles) for Micil Riobárd to come down and wrestle him. Micil came down and he knocked him.
There was a chapel long ago in the field where Mrs Ahern's cottage is in Clocully. It was called the chapel of Bally Gilibert.
Note: The field is in the north west of the townland of Clocully.
Thomas Walsh can speak Irish fairly well. No one else in the locality can speak it - even people of 70 years of age. He was born and lived all his life in the place.
* He pronounced it "Roibeárd"
See page 32
senior member (history)
2016-10-23 21:25
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Moincrea
On the south side of the road he remembered a lot of people living there long ago. He remembered Goings, Shanahans, Dalys, and O'Briens. (There are some of those surnames in the locality now) A hole of water there was called Poll Phadraig Mhór. Padraig's name was Going. There were two orchards there and they used to bring apples to the Pattern of Cnoc Buidhe in Co Waterford.
The Cóiste gan Cheann used to pass the Moincrea road in those times and it used to stop at the bóithrín going into the place where the people I was talking about lived. Paddy 'Léan (Lonergan was his name) saw it one night. He was drunk and he shouted after it "Hé Seana Neddy" says he. Seana Neddy Prendergast used to be going in the Cóiste gan Cheann. He threw his stick after it. The stick hit the Cóiste gan Cheann and hopped back and nearly hit himself. The Cóiste gan Cheann made back towards Paddy 'Léan and it filled the whole breath of the road and he was barely able to drag himself over the ditch from it.
senior member (history)
2016-10-23 20:57
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During the Famine
In the time of the famine the farmers used to have men minding the turnips night and day or they would all be stole. My grandfather was working at Donoughmore's at the time and he was minding the turnips in the Brick Field. One day a woman and a child two or three years old with her passed in the headland. She was gathering "kippens" and the child took a small turnip. My grandfather didn't let on to see them.
Wasn't Adams the steward told the whole thing and he was going to sack my grandfather. The excuse my grandfather had was that the woman appeared to be very near her confinement and that he was afriad to frifgten her by saying anything to her. Right enought she had a baby the day after. That's what saved my grandfather from getting the sack.
senior member (history)
2016-10-23 20:42
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Pot-crooks
In old houses in this parish the pot crooks were hung in this manner. Two short pieces of timber - pieces of a tree of suitable thickness were put into the work when chimney was being built. These were put in about 7" above level of fireplace lying from front to back across chimney and about 2 1/2' to 3' apart. Another piece of sound wood was laid across these and from this the pot-crook was hung.
Diagram
Common type of Pot-Crooks
senior member (history)
2016-10-22 21:51
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to keep it up and the other end was placed inside the "bow". The tension kept the "baitín bardach" in place and so kept the "crib" up. When bird hopped on the "bow" to get to bait which was placed on ground inside crib, it's weight pressed down the "bow" and so released baitín which jumped out of gablóg and so let crib fall.
To take out bird when caught under crib a few of the twigs were moved to one side and the hand inserted.
senior member (history)
2016-10-22 21:51
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Pot-crooks
In old houses in this parish the pot crooks were hung in this manner. Two short pieces of timber - pieces of a tree of suitable thickness were put into the work when chimney was being built. These were put in about 7" above level of fireplace lying from front to back across chimney and about 2 1/2' to 3' apart. Another piece of sound wood was laid across these and from this the pot-crook was hung.
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-10-22 21:44
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to keep it up and the other end was placed inside the "bow". The tension kept the "baitín bardach" in place and so kept the "crib" up. When bird hopped on the "bow" to get to bait which was placed on ground inside crib, it's weight pressed down the "bow" and so released baitín which jumped out of gablóg and so let crib fall.
To take out bird when caught under crib a few of the twigs were moved to one side and the hand inserted.
Pot-crooks
In old houses in this parish the pot crooks were hung in this manner. Two short pieces of timber - pieces of a tree of suitable thickness were put into the work when chimney was being built. These were put in about 7" above level of fireplace lying from front to back across chimney and about 2 1/2' to 3' apart. Another piece of sound wood was laid across these and from this the pot-crook was hung.
senior member (history)
2016-10-22 21:17
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A piece of bramble or "sally" of suitable length was now got and bent in the form of a "bow" (rhyming with "row")
The two ends were firmly fixed to two adjacent corners of frame so that curve of bow came just within the side of bow opposite those two corners.
A "gabhlóg" about 9 inches to the point of fork was now got and a piece of sally about a foot long. A twist was put in this piece of sally about two inches from one end.
This piece of sally with the twist was called "baitín bardach"
Setting the Crib
The crib was lifted from ground, the two corners where end of "bow"was tied resting on ground. The gabhlóg was now set on ground with the fork outside the middle of side of frame which was lifted. The short end of "baitín bardach"was put through the gabhlóg under frame
senior member (history)
2016-10-21 22:46
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Four pieces of bramble about 3 feet or more in length are now got and stripped of thorns. "Sallies"were used instead if they could be got of suitable length. The brambles were bent if cut for some time. A "twist" was put in the middle of each piece and one was looped around each corner of the frame and the 8 ends were brought together and tied. Each was also tied above the corner of the frame around which it was looped in order to keep it in place.
A supply of straight twigs was got and placed through the brambles horizontally over the frame all round. One was placed at back and front at first and one was placed at each side over thes and so on until the four sides were complete to the top.
Rought sketch of frame with two of brambles in position.
senior member (history)
2016-10-21 22:13
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"Crib" for catching Birds (Cleibhín)
As made by boys in Croan, Parish of Newcastle, 40 years ago.
The Frame
Two pieces of straight elder about 2 1/2 feet long and 1 1/2 inches in diameter, notched to the pith on opposite sides at X a couple of inches from end and pith forced out.
Diagram
Two pieces of any suitable wood same length and trimmed at ends A so as to fit tightly inton holes X.
Diagram
Frame Assembled
Tied with string at four corners to make firm
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-10-19 21:40
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any particular number of mornings. His eyes never troubled him since.
The last time I examined these holes each contained 3 inches of water although the weather had been dry for weeks before that.
A rather large stone was stuck into A and when I took it up the lower half that was in the water had a peculiar purple shade. This came from the water as it was a piece of ordinary limestone.
This "colour" might have come from excrement of birds eating blackberries although when I observed it, it was in the month of April when there are no blackberries.
senior member (history)
2016-10-19 21:22
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A and B are bowl shaped depressions. A at the north is 16 inches deep at centre. B is a similar bowl shaped depression and is 17 inches deep at tte centre. The space C beween these two depressions is 12 inches deep. The whole has the appearance of a small "trough" cut in the rock.
Diagram
The above is an imaginary "section" through centre of "trough"
The "holes" have the appearance of being artificial. My own theory is that it is natural and of similiar formation to those prints of St Patrick's "knees" that are to be seen in many parts of the country.
The water which is found in these holes is, or rather was suppose to be a cure for sore eyes. No one ever uses the water for that purpose now.
Joseph Morrissey (Thomastown farmer age 70 years) told me that he had week eyes when about 10 or 12 years of age and that he went to this place before sunrise and washed them in the water. He went a good many mornings but he could not think had he to go
senior member (history)
2016-10-18 22:43
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Peculiar Rock Hollows
In a field about 300 yards south west of Nicholastown Castle there are two peculiar "holes" in the limestone rock which here shows through the surface of the ground. The rock where they are is bare for about a square yard and its surface is uneven and a few inches above the surface of the field. The whole rock formation where these "holes" are is abour three feet above the surrounding ground level and somewhat resembles an ordinary ring fort in size and shape. It is sward covered except here and there where rock shows.
Rough Outline of "Holes"
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-10-18 22:30
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Forbe's Fort Monksgrange
This fort is in a farm that was being worked by Lord Donoughmore, the landlord. His steward gave orders to his workmen to go and level the fort. They said they did not like the job as it was very unlucky having anything to do with these old forts and something might happen to them. The steward asked them would they be willing to do it if he turned the first sod. They said they were. tThe steward was to go with them next morning. But before next day a man named David Forbes had the farm bought from Lord Donoughmore and the fort was never leveled since. This was about 60 years ago.
See page 27
William Carrigan above said that David Forbes above mentioned told him that people were buried in that part of the field that is beside the fort immediately to the west of it. I heard this from no other source.
senior member (history)
2016-10-18 22:26
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Forbe's Fort Monksgrange
This fort is in a farm that was being worked by Lord Donoughmore, the landlord. His steward gave orders to his workmen to go and level the fort. They said they did not like the job as it was very unlucky having anything to do with these old forts and something might happen to them. The steward asked them would they be willing to do it if he turned the first sod. They said they were. tThe steward was to go with them next morning. But before next day a man named David Forbes had the farm bought from Lord Donoughmore and the fort was never leveled since. This was about 60 years ago.
See page 27
William Carrigan, Grange, 70 years, Cottier
William Carrigan above said that David Forbes above mentioned told him that people were buried in that part of the field that is beside the fort immediately to the west of it. I heard this from no other source.
senior member (history)
2016-10-18 21:55
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Chopping Furze for Horses etc.
I often saw furze chopper for horses etc. by a chaff-cutting machine in Croan, Parish of Newcastle, over 40 years ago.
This is how I saw furze chopped by a man who had no machine.
A kind of box about 2 feet square made of larch poles about 2 inches in diameter and undressed was sunk in the ground and flush with the surface. It was about 1 foot in depth. The young furze was packed into this and chopped by a knife called a furze knife.
Diagram
Irish Terms
Furze knife: Scian aitinn
Chopping furze: Ag brughadh aitinn.
The "box": An t-umar.
senior member (history)
2016-10-18 21:33
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into your hand. In "taking" the top with the left hand you had to tip it up with the second finger.
Some could put the string on left-ways and spin the top you had to peg it with a swing towards the right to do this.
Some players could spin the top in the air and "take" it in the hand as top fell.
I never heard them called "castle tops". Even in speaking Irish the word "top" was used. I knew a man who was nicknamed "caincín top" on account of the shape of his nose.
The top season opened on the first of March.
Pegging tops was a "rage" in my school days. Even the master used to take part in game at play-time.
Diagram
Type of top used in above game.
Actual size.
senior member (history)
2016-10-17 21:08
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tops were placed spike to spike on the edge of the big ring and the other players pegged to drive out one of them. The other top then remained "down". When a top was driven out of the big ring three times it was put down for "Lannels". It was driven down flush with the ground and each player catching his own top in the heel of his fist struck it three blows with the spike. These Lannels were usually only a matter of form and the top was not injured. It was only when some unpopular player's was for "Lannels" that each player did his best to knock "skelps" out of it or split it.
The player who knocked the top out of the ring the third time had to "cant" and so the game went on.
Sometimes in pegging, the marline stirred the top that was down without the pegging top touching it.
Marline saving was not enough.
Tricks with Tops.
Expert could take up the top with the left hand when spun with the right. This was not easily done. In taking up the top with the right hand you opened your fist and second finger from each other and got the top spinning into this opening. A tip up with the first finger made the top jump
senior member (history)
2016-10-17 20:42
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"spikes down" - the player just spun his top took it up on his hand and catching the spike ofthe top down between his first two fingers of the hand on which the top was spinning and took it with him to the ring and laying it down in the little ring in the centre "saved". If his own top "died" i.e. ceased spinning before he had time to get to the ring and "save" he was down himself.
I forgot mentioning that a small ring about 8" in diameter was made in the middle of the large ring .
When the top "down" was brought to the ring it was placed in the centre of the small ring and the object was to drive it outside the large ring three times. The player "pegging" at it had to "peg" inside the small ring and his top had to come outside the big ring spinning or "kick" out when it "died" or he was down himself. While his top was spinning in the ring he could be relieved by another player driving it outside but this other player's top was subject to the same rule of coming outside the big ring or he was down. If the first player whose top remained spinning inside the big ring had grabbed the top originally "down" before its owner had time to do so and that his own top "died" in the ring the two
senior member (history)
2016-10-17 20:05
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some rough place generally in the"dike" some 7 or 8 yds from the"ring".
The object of the players now was to take the top "down" to the "ring" Each pegged at it in turn. He had to hit the top "down" with the "peg" and if he did not he had to take up his top spinning on his hand and hit the top that was "down" with it. This was called "saving". One had to "save" in the "peg" or in this manner or one could "save" twice until "top" "down" was within "cords length" of ring. Then if the owner of the "top" which was down cried "cord's length" just as a player "pegged" that player could only save once. If the player "pegging" had cried "cord's length" first he could save more than once.
Any player who failed to "save" or whose top did not " spin" was "down" and the other player who curbed took up his top.
When the top "down" was in some rough place some players might try and delay pegging at it until it was out on the road. They used try and waste the time putting on and taking off the "marlins". This was called "making buttons"
If dueing the play the spike of the "top" which was down turned up and if the player pegging cried "spikes up" before the owner of the top cried
senior member (history)
2016-10-16 23:14
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left shoulder.
The Game of "Pegging a Ring"
A ring was drawn on a level patch of ground about 7 feet in diameter or so - there was no fixed size. A "marline" was generally used as radius and the spike of the top made a line on the ground. The ring being made somebody "cried", First peg at the spit", somebody else said "second" another "third" and so on according to the number of players.
Somebody then spat on the ground as a "mark"; but the general "mark" was a pebble placed on the intersection of two lines drawn on the ground at right angles with the spear of a "top".
Each then "pegged" at the mark in turn according as they "called". He "marked" his "peg" by drawing two lines away from the "mark".
Diagram
After 5 "pegging" this is gow itwould appear. "C" would have to "cant"(short "a")
What ever payer was farthest away from the mark had to "cant" i.e. he threw his top in
senior member (history)
2016-10-16 22:47
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The Game of Pegging Tops as played in Newcastle, Co. Tipperary, 40 years ago.
The "Top".
"Heads" often home made. "Head" made from wood of crab-apple tree considered best. Steel "spear" or "spike" made by local blacksmith. An old three cornered file the ideal material. "Turned" "heads" could be bought for a penny. Crab "head" and steel "spear" ideal "top". "Top" was "heavy" or "light" according to how it "felt" on the palm of hand when taken up. "Top" was a "sleeper" or "gleoisín" if it spun so smoothly that it appeared motionless. If not a "sleeper" it was called a "giggler". Putting a straw in with the spear was supposed to make it "light". If a top travelled when spinning it was called a "slinger". The string was called a "marline" and was made of two pieces of twine platted together. A "whipcord marline" was the ideal one. The leather at the end of the "marline" was called a Leidhbín Leathair.
Pulling the marline directly towards one was considered illegitamite when "pegging a ring" This method of spinning ws called a "pull-cord".
One was supposed to swing marline towards
senior member (history)
2016-10-15 21:44
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w, w, w, = windows.Originally hadfour small panes
Diagram: End Elevation
Diagram Rough elevationof fire place: (mud and stones)
Note: No stone or wooden permanent seat in fireplace. Fireplace 2 1/2 feet deep.
senior member (history)
2016-10-15 21:29
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An Old Farm House
Moloney's house Moncrea is a very old house according to the present occupiers although they could give me no idea of the number of years it is built. It is built facing the road and about 25 feet from it, The walls are made of mud with stones through it just as stones are put into concrete walls. William Maloney told me he discovered this when enlarging door going into room. No "coursing" in stones.
Dimensions of house.
Length outside 54 feet
Width outside 21 feet
Height to eave 9 feet
Heigth to ridge outside 20 feet
Thickness of walls 2 1/2 feet
Roof- thatched No Upstairs
Floors orginally clay.
Diagram:
Rough plan of house as it was originally (House remodelled in recent years - windows enlarged etc.
senior member (history)
2016-10-14 21:15
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waist coats" (They were never called "báiníns") and drawers. The Irish speakers called the "white waistcoats" Vest Bán ("s" broad)
When one wanted to be tidy when working one knotted the two ends in front.
I knew one old man who used to wear an extra short "white waistcoat" and with a tab and white button about midways in front to close it.
The wheel of the spinning wheel was made of wood. The "band" was made of one piece of wood about 4 inches wide and a quarter of an inch thick. The spokes - I think there are about 16 - were "turned" as was the "stock". The spokes were mortised into the "stock" but were only nailed to the band.
Séamus Ó Maolcathaigh, O.S., Grange N.S.
Note: Ir. for spinning-wheel pronounced "túrthan"
senior member (history)
2016-10-13 22:10
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Spinning
Croan: Parish of Newcastle, 40 years ago.
My grandmother had a spinning wheel. The stand was similar to but higher than a stool, about 4 feet long.
The uprights which supported the axle on which the wheel turned and on which the spindle was fixed were mortised into the stand and inclined outwards at an angle of about 30 degrees from the vertical. The axle on which the wheel turned would be about as high as spinner's shoulder.
Diagram 1. Holes (1,2,3,4)about 3/4"
Two "ears" made of triple platted straw from holes 1 to 2 and from 3 to 4, spindle spin on these.
Spindle support 6" wide 2" thick(ab0ut)
Diagram 2. Wheel suppor tabout 4" by 3"
Diagram 3. Section of spindle. Wood about 12" long (fearsad)
senior member (history)
2016-10-13 21:47
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Quilting.
Nell Ní Bhriain in Croan used to make quilts. She had a frame like a table without a leaf. The quilt was made of two pieces of heavy flannel, the upper one dyed red or blue and the underneath one undyed. A layer of wool was put between the two pieces of flannel. The stitches were in a sort of series of spirals. There was a stitch every half inch square or so. It was simply sewn through straight up and down, each stitch about a quarter of an inch long. The finished quilt had a surface appearance like the skin of an orange. These quilts were very stiff and oppressively heavy. I would imagine they should last for generations.
Collector: Seamus Ó Maolcathaigh O.S., Grange N.S.
senior member (history)
2016-10-13 21:31
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who was with her stole away and did not claim the cow at all and left her there.
Con Looby from the parish of Newcastle and who was an old man when I was a boy told a story about Lisnamuck Fort when he was working at Hally's long ago.
He was working in the field where the fort was and he noticed a hen used come out of the fort picking every day. He thought there might be a nest and eggs there and he searched the fort. There were no bushes in the fort and nothing that could hide her yet he did not see a trace of the hen anywhere. She came out again next day as usual. He searched the fort again but got no trace of her. He did not mind her after that.
Informant: Joseph Morrissey, 70 years, Thomastown, Farmer
senior member (history)
2016-10-13 21:28
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who was with her stole away and did not claim the cow at all and left her there.
Con Looby from the parish of Newcastle and who was an old man when I was a boy told a story about Lisnamuck Fort when he was working at Hally's long ago.
He was working in the field where the fort was and he noticed a hen used come out of the fort picking every day. He thought there might be a nest and eggs there and he searched the fort. There were no bushes in the fort and nothing that could hide her yet he did not see a trace of the hen anywhere. She came out again next day as usual. He searched the fort again but got no trace of her. He did not mind her after that,
Informant: Joseph Morrissey, 70 years, Thomastown, Farmer
senior member (history)
2016-10-13 21:07
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Lisnamuck Fort
There is no sign of the Lios which gave this townland its name. It was leveled by two grand uncles of the present proprietor of the farm on which it was. This happened before the railway which passes quite near was made. (The railway was opened in 1853)
At the time they had a lot of cattle on the farm. One night they heard a noise like thunder and in the morning there was not a beast on the land. They jumped an iron gate and bent it. This gate was in use up to a few years ago. It was the present owner that replaced it.
They found some of the cattle at Quinn's Cross a few miles away, more of them at Kenl's Cross (three miles beyond Cahir) and the rest of them were got at Golden. They broght the cattle back and what were not injured were blind, every beast had something the matter with it. All died in a short time except one cow. This cow was taken to Clonmel fair to sell her. At that time people used live in cellars at the side of the main street. The cow jumped down into a cellar where a tinker lived, she broke all was there and Mrs Hally and the workman
senior member (history)
2016-10-12 22:59
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and faced away from the public road. The door faced south. was about 5 1/2 feet high and of the usual width. Wooden frame across the bottom making door airtight underneath when closed. Clay floor in both room and kitchen.
Diagram
Rough elevation of fire place. Note: no seat beside the fire.
a. wicker work plastered with mud outside-not plastered inside the chimney.
b. Those spaces boarded in front and underneath, a hole "X" into ceiling on right.
Pole about 3 feet from side wall and from wall behind fire.
Pot crook hung from iron pin driven into wall of back of chimney.
senior member (history)
2016-10-12 22:41
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The House.
Except for an iron roof being put on over the thatch the house is much as it was when made. The windows also were changed and the door was changed from the end wall to one of the side walls.
Dimensions.
Length Outside 30 feet
Witdth Outside 20 feet
Height to Eave 6 1/2 feet
Height to Ridge 12 feet
Walls are made of mud about 2 feet thick. There are no gables - a sort of a hip roof. I could not see how timber was put on as it is ceiled inside. There are no wall plates. The chimney is made of wicker work. Only about a foot of it projected beyond the roof. The wckler work was plastered with mud. There is only one room with the kitchen. Kitchen and room are about the same size. The beam under the chimney rests on one side wall and on a pole about three feet from the other side wall - pole 5 1/2 feet high. Depth of fire place 3 feet. Pole on room- door side of kitchen. The original windows contained four panes, each about 5 inches square. The two windows were on the west side of the house
senior member (history)
2016-10-12 22:12
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A Pre-Famine House.
Before the famine the Donoughmore Estate in this parish was divided into all small farms of not more than 7 acres each. Then a lot of evictions took place and several of the small farms were given to one tenant. There was a lot of underhand work among the tenants trying to get each others land.
William Carrigan's little farm near Grange Church is the only one of these little farms which has remained. It contains only about 4 acres Irish. He says his grandfather used to work at Donoughmore's Knocklofty and that one of his neighbours tried his best to get him evicted. Donoughmore's steward offered him the passage to America to himself and his wife and children. He would not accept. Then this neighbour who was trying to get inside him - a thing which William Carrigan's grandfather then knew nothing of - gave him a lift from the fair in his dray car. When they were in a lonely part of the road he unexpectedly threw him off the car and the wheel went over his legs but did not break them. This neighbour then put a story going about how drunk Jack Carrigan was at the fair etc. When the steward heard the truth of the story he was very angry and he told old Corrigan that as long as he paid his rent he'd never be stirred.
senior member (history)
2016-10-12 22:10
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A Pre-Famine House.
Before the famine the Donoughmore Estate in this parish was divided into all small farms of not more than 7 acres each. Then a lotof evictions took place and weveral of the small farms were given to one tenant. There was a lot of underhand work among the tenants trying to get each others land.
William Carrigan's little farm near Grange Church is the only one of these little farms which has remained. It contains only about 4 acres Irish. He says his grandfather used to work at Donoughmore's Knocklofty and that one of his neighbours tried his best to get hom evicted. Donoughmore's steward offered him the passage to America to himself and his wife and children. He would not accept. Then this neighbour who was trying to get inside him - a thing which William Carrigan's grandfather then knew nothing of - gave him a lift from the fair in his dray car. When they were in a lonely part of the road he unexpectedly threw him off the car and the wheel went over his legs but did not break them. This neighbour then put a story going about how drunk Jack Carrigan was at the fair etc. When the steward heard the truth of the story he was very angry and he told old Corrigan that as long as he paid his rent he'd never be stirred.
senior member (history)
2016-10-11 22:47
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5. Piece of fork handle 6" long. Two wires firmly embedded in it. Can't revolve. Bull wire
Diagram
6. Pliable twig, couple of feet long and half inch in diameter at thick end.
Piece of string,one foot long.
Diagram.
7. Piece of stick with gablóg 1 1/2 inches long cut as shown.
Note: Called "castóir" by a few old people.
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-10-11 22:10
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3. Hollow elder: wire revolving freely 6". Bull wire
A variation of No. 1 but with a larger crank in the middle
Diagram
4. Bull wire revolving freely.
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-10-11 21:57
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Sugan Twisters in use in this Parish.
Irish name used by some: "Castóir"
1. Hollow elder 6",Wire (Bull wire)revolving freely
Total Length 17"
A: is held stationary in left hand while B is revolved like a handle Diagram
2. Hollow - bored with hot iron. Wire revolving freely.
9" total length
Bull wire used.
Diagram
senior member (history)
2016-10-11 21:30
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way and that of the guilty man in the opposite direction.
The plot to kill John Barry is said to have been hatched in the house in Clonacody at present occupied by Hanrahans, not the Hanrahans at Lough Ryan.
A mark on the wall in Reidy's parlour is said to be a mark of one of the bullets that was fired at John Barry.
It is said that the corpses of the five men hanged were taken to Cashel. When they arrived in Cashel one was found to be still breathing but the doctor opened a vein and let him bleed to death.
Lord Donoughmore was chiefly instrumental in having the five men hanged. It is said that some time after that Mrs Barry met him and said that she knew the right men now. He was angry and said that if he knew as much then as he did now no one would be hanged.
About 20 years ago the grandson of Mrs Barry's baby, a priest came from America to see the house where John Barry was killed.
senior member (history)
2016-10-09 23:03
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Local Tradition of John Barry's Murder.
There is a field near the school called "Páirc an Fhásaigh" which belongs to Mr Keating. There is a large hollow with bushes around it in the north-east corner of this field. It is locally called a "clais".
On the Sunday evening that John Barry was murdered a woman of the Sweeney's of Park was crossing this field going milking a cow. she passed very near the"clash" and she saw a number of men as if they were hiding there. It appears some of the men wanted to kill her as they were afriad she might tell. However they let her go. They were waiting there for the dusk to go over and shoot Barry whose house was only about 300 yards away.
The following harvest the Sweeneys hired some men in Clonmel to cut the corn. They came on Sunday night and Mrs Sweeney recognised one of them as one of the men she saw in the clash the evening of Barry's murder. She let on nothing. The men went to bed in the barn but in the morning this man was gone.
There is another local tradition that after the five men were dead on the gallows on Ardfinnan Green, the corpses of the innocent men were faced on
senior member (history)
2016-10-09 22:38
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A Local Murder.
Over a hundred years ago a man named John Barry lived in a house which is within a couple of hundred yards of Grange School. It is now occupied by a family named Reidy.
In the year 1826 this man Barry who was from Co Cork took a farm in "The Sceach Ruadh" near Ballineaty. The farm was situated around where the doctor's house is now. A widow named Lonergan had been evicted from the farm. Barry's life was threatened over grabbing the farm and it is said that but for his wife he would have given it up.
On Sunday evening the 11th of Febuary 1827 a number of men entered Barry's house and shot him dead in his own parlour. His wife had to run upstairs with her baby. Although Barry usually went around armed it appears he was not able to get his arms before he was shot.
His wife swore on five men and they were hanged on the Green in Ardfinnan on the 9th April 1827. The men's names were: James Byrne, Philip Lonergan, Thomas Brien, John Green and John Lonergan.
On the gallows John Lonergan confessed his own guilt and said the others were innocent.This was locally believed to be true.
senior member (history)
2016-10-08 22:29
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Knockeen: An Cnuicín Loiscithe in Down Survey a name which suits as the rock is only a few inches under the surface in the hilly part of it and it turns brown in dry summer weather.
Flemingstown: Baile an Phléamonn. I heard from old Irish speakers in Newcastle. No Flemings there now. A small well called "Tobar na Leathphinge" . No tradition.
Ballindoney(See page ?) I was told by Joseph Morrissey, farmer, Thomastown, age 70 years that when he was a boy unbaptised children used to be buried in the "Kyle"
Denis Walsh, Lough Ryan (farmer over 80 years) told me that he remembered when a boy, there were foundations in the "Kyle". The O'Briens of the Castle took the stones away to make ditches with them. (See page 25)
Park: (see page 27}
Near the far in Park there is a sort of cave in the limestone rock which outcrops there. This hole is called "Nead na Circe" and "Nead na Circe Frangh" (Nead sometimes pronounced "Nad") It is strange for there is no mountain or heather within miles of the place.
senior member (history)
2016-10-08 21:54
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Keal: Called locally "The Caol". Near it is a townland called "Knocknakillardy"
Cnoc na Coille Áirde. There is a local tradition that "The Caol" and most of "Knocknakillardy" was once covered with a wood. It is remarkable how many oak trees are found growing on the fences there still. The famer who owns The Caol told me that there is a remarkable patch of very black earth in part of two fields altogether different from the soil in the remainder of the townland.
Ballyneety: Baile an Fhaoithigh. No "Whites" there now. Two ring-forts.
Old Grange: Not touching "Monksgrange".A bóithrín called "Bóithrín na Linne" leading into a large pond. A fort on the western boundary called "The Ráth Árd"
Ballymorris: A small townland of one farm.
Ballybeg: An Baile Beag. The Protestant church of the parish of Tullaghmelan is in Ballybeg, not in the present townland of Tullaghmelan.
senior member (history)
2016-10-07 23:14
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Roxborough: I could not find the origin of name. In census of 1659 a townland called "Corrig Heartry" is mentioned which must have been what is called "Roxborough" now. No tradition of "Corrig Heartry" Also Corrigtearhy in Down Survey.
Ballynamuddagh: Baile na mBodach. In the west of this townland there is a large rath and surrounding it what appears to be another rath which would be over a couple of hundred yards in diameter. In the field within this there is a souterrain which was opened on top over which is a large stone. Probably there are more than one as in a fort about a mile directly west of it there are three souterrains one after another. About a mile directly north of the rath in Bailenambodach in the townland of Old Grange there is another large ring fort called "The Ráth Árd". On the boundary between Baile na mBodach and Moinerea there is about a hundred yards of a very big "ditch" called locally "The Tún Claidhe" (Dún Claidhe). It must have been over ten feet high originally and is 20' wide approxomately. (parts of it are about 8' above field level). There is a hollow along the northern side a couple of feet below the level of the field. There is a sort of a "bay" about six feet wide and five feet deep on the northen side of it. It appears that within
senior member (history)
2016-10-06 21:57
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except after heavy rains. Two families lived there, "The Hally's of Glen". Old
road running E&W now only a very narrow "bóithrín"
Rathwalter: One farm of about 30 acres. No remains of "rath"
Tullaghmelan: "Tulla Mhaoláin" contains ruins of old parish church with graveyard which is still used for burials. I do not know whether "Maolán" was founder or patron or not. If he was why was it not called Cill Mhaoláin. the name "Tulla" suits the situation. A figure of a head in stone over one of the doorways in the old is said to have received a blow of a sword from one of Cromwell's soldiers. According to local tradition mass used to be said outside the western gable during penal times. A stile in the old mass path near is still called "The Strapa Bán" Part of old road which appears to have run N&S in parish is near the old graveyard. A little well on side of road - a narrow bóithrín now is called "Tobar Ún"- (that is how it sounds). It might be"Eoghan"as in Irish in this district Ó near N or M has a Ú sound.
senior member (history)
2016-10-06 21:19
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Brick: A field in townland called "The Brick Field" where "brick" used to be made 60 or 70 years ago. A big number of small fields in townland. I was told that long time ago there were 27 houses from "Sullivan's Hill" to top of Knocklofty Hill, long ago before the famine. Three are only three now. Several signs of old dwelling places.
Remains of a road run east and west and almost parallel to present main road although only one field away from it. Present main road about 140 years made.
Knocklofty: Cnoc Lochta. I think it should be Cnoc Leachta as in Down Survey a "leacht deargáin"*is mentioned which would be somewhere near. Could find no trace of it. "Knocklofty Bridge" used to be called "Droichead Áih na Scairighe (by Irish speakers in Newcastle). It appears as if "Áth na Scairighe" was so called because the river spread out at this place.
Moanmore: Móin Mhór.A large swamp in townland which gave it its name. No turf ever cut there. "The Glen" a narrow valley with a quarry runs N&S. No stream.
*(I have changed my mind re this - "Leacht Deargáin" would be too far north for any ?)
senior member (history)
2016-10-06 21:16
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Brick: A field in townland called "The Brick Field" where "brick" used to be made 60 or 70 years ago. A big number of small fields in townland. I was told that long time ago there were 27 houses from "Sullivan's Hill" to top of Knocklofty Hill, long ago before the famine. Three are only three now. Several signs of old dwelling places.
Remains of a road run east and west and almost parallel to present main road although only one field away from it. Present main road about 140 years made.
Knocklofty: Cnoc Lochta. I think it should be Cnoc Leachta as in Down Survey a "leacht deargáin"*is mentioned which would be somewhere near. Could find no trace of it. "Knocklofty Bridge" used to be called "Droichead Áih na Scairighe (by Irish speakers in Newcastle). It appears as if "Áth na Scairighe" was so called because the river spread out at this place.
Moanmore: Móin Mhór.A large swamp in townland which gave it its name. No turf ever cut there. "The Glen" a narrow valley with a quarry runs N&S. No stream.
*(I have changed my ind re this - "Leacht Deargáin" would be too far north for any ?
senior member (history)
2016-10-04 21:47
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Cloghanacody: pronounced locally "Clonacody". Probably Clochán Chóide, Cody's stony place. Limestone sticking up through soil in some acres of lower end of townland. Fr Power in "Place names of the Decies" says it means ""stepping stones". This cannot be as there is no water within an Irish mile of the boundaries of townland.
Glennaclohlea: Gleann na Cloich Láithe.
A large rock in middle of field in a little valley (see page 73)
Knocnaskearoe: Cnoc na Sceice Ruaidhe. Locally known as "The Sceach Ruadh"
Ballyhickey: Baile Uí Icidhe. No Hickeys there now. "Lough Ryan" a large "lough" on roadside. No tradition of why it is so named.
Knocknagree: Consisting of only one farm of 40 acres. Not sure of meaning. I think it is Cnoc a' Ghirrfidh.
senior member (history)
2016-10-04 21:22
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Garryroe: An Garrdha Ruadh.
Crutta South: Small townland consisting of one farm of 50 acres. Not touching Crutta North. About a half-mile between their boundaries. One rath.
Park: Triangular in shape with road all round it. No tradition of it being a deer park. A large ring fort on highest point of townland (see page 34)
Monksgrange: This townland is not within the bounds of Grange parish although it comes within a quarter mile of Grange church. Probably it was from it, it got its name - The Grange - An Ghráinseach. No trace or tradition where "grange" was. Three ring forts (see page 59}
Dorney's Well: Tobar Uí Dhornaig.
No Dorneys there now. One of the few wells found locally.
Knockeen Richard: Name applied to two fields on Ordinance map. Not used now.
senior member (history)
2016-10-04 21:01
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in any skirmishes at the castle two hundred yards away. Part of townland - three or four fields called "The Crossoges". Could not find out why. Pool on roadside near castle called "The Puillín"
Raheen Ballindoney: Raithín Baile an Duna. No sign of any rath (See page)
Crutta North: A small townland consisting of only one farm of 20 St. Acres.
Markhamstown: Although on ordinance map the name is not used now. A small townland. A cross-road near is called by old people Ballyvarkin Cross.
Nicholastown: Keating's chief castle, a total ruin. A good part of the bailey wall still standing. Tradition of a well in field beside the castle. No sign of it now. Heard from some old people years ago that there was a tradition that it was in Nicholastown Castle that Geoffry Keating was born.
senior member (history)
2016-10-03 21:08
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very large fields were evidently common land . No tradition as to when they were fenced in.
Liosnamuck: Lios na muc. An old man told me it should be Lios na Muice. No tradition as to why it got its name. Two raths. A place called the "Cillíneach" was a burial place for unbaptised children. Is in two fields from the road. Old road into it went through a pond. The "Cillíneach" is a three cornered field about a quarter of an acre in area (See page 44)
Killmaloge: Cill Mocheallóg. Church founded by St Patrick's desciple. No tradition of this. No sign of old church. Fr. Power identified the probable site.
Ballindoney: Baile an Duna (short u)
A very large scaltered townland. Ruin of a fine Norman castle (Butlers) no tradition about it. Near the castle is a piece of broken uneven gound with irregular mounds and overgrown with bushes called locally the "Kyle". Local people say there are people buried there. I could trace remains of circular fort - larger than usual. In my opinon this was the old "dún" that gave the townland its name. Probably was used as a burial place for those who were killed . Rev Professor Power says it is an old church site. (see Page 34)
senior member (history)
2016-10-03 21:05
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very large fields were evidently common land . No tradition asto when they were fenced in.
Liosnamuck: Lios na muc. An old man told me it should be Lios na Muice. No tradition as to why it got its name. Two raths. Aplace called the "Cillíneach" was a burial place for unbaptised children. Is in two fields from the road. Old road into it went through a pond. The "Cillíneach" is a three cornered field about a quarter of an acre in area (See page 44)
Killmaloge: Cill Moch eallóg. Church founded by St Patrick's desiple. No tradioion of this. No sign of old church. Fr. Power identified the probable site.
Ballindoney: Baile an Duna (short u)
A very large scaltered townland. Ruin of a fine Norman castle (Butlers) no tradition about it. Near the castle is a piece of broken uneven gound with irregular mounds and overgrown with bushes called locally the "Kyle". Local people say there are people buried there. I could trace remains of circular fort - larger than usual. In my opinon this was the old "dún" that gave the townland its name. Probably was used as a burial place for those who were killed . Rev Professor Power says it is an old church site. (see Page 34)
senior member (history)
2016-10-01 21:52
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Townlands in Grange Parish.
Derrygrath.
Dearg-Ráth: Pronounced "Dearg Rath" by the uneducated people. Old parish church in ruins and graveyard.
Two Raths. Lughaidh Mac Con was murdered in Dearg Rath (See Foras Feasa Vol II, page 286). The pillar stone against which he stood when struck by the spear was still in position in 1847 according to O'Donovan. It has since disappeared. I got no account of it from any one in the neighourhood. There is no tradition about it. Keating says the field where Lughaidh Mac Con was killed was called Gort an Óir. That name is no longer used or remembered, but a man named Con Commins who lived near and who said about 20 years ago, aged 90, said he remembered the name being called on the "Raw" field long ago.
Cuckoo Hill: Cnoc na Cailighe
Carragaun: Carragán
Commonsentire: Irish doubtful: Three or four
senior member (history)
2016-09-28 22:58
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broke the lock. The south gallery in the present church is still called the Tullaghmelan gallery and the north gallery is called the Derrygrath gallery.
The parish is still divided into two electoral divisions Derrygrath and Tullaghmelan.
There is a Protestant church in each of the old parishes. Tullaghmelan church is still in use. The Protestant church near Derrygrath was in use until recently.
Although called Grange there is no townland of that name in the parish. There is a townland of Old Grange and there is a townland of Monksgrange on the boundary in the parish of St Mary's, Clonmel.
The original "grange" probably belonged to the Cistercian monastery of Innisleamhnachta.
senior member (history)
2016-09-28 22:42
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Parish of Grange
Part of the united parishes of Ardfinnan, Grange and Ballybacon, situated west of St Mary's Parish, Clonmel
In olden times the present parish of Grange was made up of two parishes Tullaghmelan and Derrygrath. The ruin of an old church with graveyard in which burials are still made in each of these places. The two old churches were about 3 Irish miles apart. The townlands in which the ruins of the old churches are situated are still called the old parish names, Derrygrath and Tullaghmelan.
The original thatched chapel in Grange was built about half-way between the old churches. The present church was built i 1829 and local tradition has it that the old chapel was left standing inside the present church until the roof was on it.
There was a strong tradition of the two old parishes in Grange until recent times. There were two gates going into he chapel yard, one on the North and the other on the South side. About 50 years ago the parish priest ordered the south gate to be locked on Sundays to facilitate the penny collection and some of the parishioners
senior member (history)
2016-09-27 20:31
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Ghost Story
A very short time ago a big farmer died near the village of Ardfinnan and who several times after his death used appear driving a pony and trap around the road. One night there was a crowd of men at the cross of Neddins and they heard the trap coming along. They never minded it at all until it came close to them they saw that there was no one driving the pony. It passed up and down for a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes and they said it was a run away pony so one of the men walked across the road to stop the pony. They were surprised when it passed through them, they said then that it was the headless coach.They tried once more to stop the horse but it still went beyond them. They got afraid and they all went home and they did not se it since.
senior member (history)
2016-09-27 20:14
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the person was not coming in as one of the men went to the door and they saw nothing, almost three hours after the girl died.
senior member (history)
2016-09-27 20:11
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the person was not coming in as one of the menwent to the door and they saw nothing, almost three hours after the girl died.
senior member (history)
2016-09-27 20:09
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Ghost Story
Not long ago there lived a young girl in Moanerea who died with fever and a few hours before her death her sisters and brothers heard a noise around the yard. They were sitting around the fire and they heard the trotting of a pony coming up the bohereen. They never minded it at all and when the horse came to the gate which is leading to the yard they heard the jump to the ground like the rider dismounting. The next noise they heard was the gate opening and the horse walking through the yard. After a few minutes they heard the walk of a person in the footpath. They were wondering why the
senior member (history)
2016-09-27 19:55
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with her eyes fixed in the direction she was going. When she got beond a turn in the road, the man followed her to know what would she go as there was a cross nearby but the minute he laid his eyes on her again she disappeared and he never saw her afterwards.
senior member (history)
2016-09-27 19:37
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Ghost Story
A long time ago a man went into Neddins orchard for apples and when he came out he saw a womwn walking along the road and he had no idea who she was . He looked and looked at her and still he could not make out who she was. The woman wore a long brown dress and she was bare footed. She did not speak, she walked along the road
senior member (history)
2016-09-26 22:02
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him be buried in their grave yards. Although he was a Protestant he was not practising his religion. After great bother about his burial they buried hm in the Protestant Church in Ardfinnan. He was neither a Catholic or a Protestant.
People say that his people were coming for him and giving his people a token for death. Since the horse was thrown at the door the mistress of the house (the Protestant's wife) was struck by a painn her leg which lasted until she died. There was no talk of any noise since the old Protestant died.
senior member (history)
2016-09-26 21:49
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A Ghost Story
Some time ago there lived a big farmer in Gormanstown who was a Catholic and he turned a Protastant. He was very old when he died and a short time before his death his house was haunted. He had three or four men employed in his farm some of whom used sleep in outside houses. Every night there was a noise of a horse trotting around the yard which used continue for several hours. The last night the noise was heard the horse was put in through the hall door. The old man got up from his bed and he saw his white horse half way in the hall and the door was made in bits. The horse which his men had tied up in the stable in the evening. The farmer called his men who were sleeping in the barn to release the horse. They also heard the noise of the horse around the yard and dashing against the door. The men released the horse after great labour and they put him into the stable again. The trotting of the horse was finished after that night but every night after stones were heard fired on the slates of the dwelling house until the old man died. When he died the Protestants would not let
senior member (history)
2016-09-26 21:22
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Buried Gold
There is a field near Tubrid Church and it is said that there is gold buried there. Some years ago the people that knew the exact spot went digging for the gold but they had only a few sods dug when a number of weasels followed them and they never looked for it afterwards
senior member (history)
2016-09-26 21:13
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His wife went and told the parish priest what appeared to her brother and she also told him about hias cloths and cap. The priest told her to pay for the cloths and to get a cap blessed for him and to leave it on his grave. She did as the priest told her and they never saw the dead man after.
Buried Gold
Long ago the people had no banks to keep their money so the used to bury a lot of gold and keep pots of it in their housrs.
During thoes a man near Newcastle was charged with stealing a pot of gold. Before he was arrested he hid the gold in a field near Clocully. He was sent to jail for some time and when he came out he went to look for the gold and he did not find it . He said that he buried it three feet from the ditch at the end of the field and he put it down the length of his arm. He searched several times for the gold and he never found it. Later this field was ploughed up by the owner and the workman ploughed near the spot where the gold is said
senior member (history)
2016-09-26 21:08
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to be buried and when he was just thinking about the buried gold the plough struck against something under the sod which nearly stopped the horses but his boss was in the field looking at him plouging and only for that he would have stopped.
When his boss was gone he came back to look for the gold but there was no sign of it. This gold was never looked for afterwards.
senior member (history)
2016-09-09 22:00
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Clogheen.
When he was outside the town of Clogheen he saw a man walking bare-footed and dressed in shabby cloths and his hair blowing about him. The brother-in-law nearly fainted as he knew who it was the minute he saw him and the first house he met he went in. He was not able to speak when he went in he got a weakness. The people in the house wondered what was wrong with him until the man of the house came in from the town and as he came near the gate leading to his house he saw a man standing against the gate like as if waiting for somebody. When he went in he told the man that there was a man bare footed standing outside at the gate and he looks like to be waiting for you. The brother-in-law fell off in a weakness again and he slept that night in the cottage. When he went home the next morning he told all to his sister, she guessed at once what was wrong with her husband. The new cloths he had before he died were not paid for and the cap he used to wear was not his own, it was one he got in a haggard after some thrashing.
senior member (history)
2016-09-09 21:39
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Ghost Story
A short time ago there lived a man near Castlegrace, a small farmer who was a great drunkard.
One night he saw his neighbour's hay burning and he rushed to quench the flames. The only passage that brought him quickly to the fire was a field at the back of his own house and after crossing this field he had to pass through a wide but shallow stream.
Most of the hay was saved by the help of the neighbours and when all the crowd were gone this man got some drink from the owner of the hay. They stayed talking until late that night and when he was leaving he was drunk. His passage now was dangerous and when he was crossing the stream he fell into it and could not get up. They made no alarm at his house that night until late the next day they went looking for him, the first place they went was dowm to the stream and there they found him on his two knees in the stream. They took him home and got ready for the funeral and they had an inquest on him the next evening. Three months after the funeral he appeared to his brother-in-law one nght coming from
senior member (history)
2016-09-07 21:08
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potatoes and one day a poor scholar walked in and sat down by the fire. There was printing on the side of the pot but no one could read it. The poor scholar was looking at the pot over the fire. "Be gor " says he, that's a very quare thing that's written on the pot". "What does it mean", says the man of the house. "What's on it is", says the poor scholar, " the other side of the tree is as good as this side" The man didn't say a word but when it was night he went out and dug at the other side of the tree and didn't he find another pot of gold the same as the first one.
senior member (history)
2016-09-07 20:49
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Buried Gold.
There was a man once and he dreamt that he'd get his fortune on London Bridge. He didn't mind his dream but he dreamt the same thing again and again. In the end he made up his mind that he'd go to London Bridge to see would he find anything there. So he did. He was walking up and down London Bridge for nearly a week and he didn't find anything. One day a man came over to talk to him. "Goodmorrow me good man", says he, " I see you here every day and would it be any harm to ask you what brings you here" So the Irishman up and told him his story. The other man laughed when he heard the story. "Dreams is only nonsense" he said,. "Sure didn't I dream I'd get a pot of gold under an apple tree in a garden in Ireland" and be the description he gave of the garden didn't the Irishman know it was his garden at home he was describing.
He said nothing but home with him as quick as he could and he dug near the apple tree and found a pot full of gold.
His wife used to use the pot for boiling the
senior member (history)
2016-09-07 20:24
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sugar and rub it to the boil.
senior member (history)
2016-09-07 20:21
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A cure for a sore throat isto put a black rag on the window on St. Brigid's night.
A cure for a sty is to get cold tea and leave it for a night and to rub it to the sty the first thing in the morning.
Cure for a boil is to put salt in hot water and leave it for a night cooling and to rub it to the boil next morning.
Cure for chilblains is to get a turnip and put a hole in it and put salt into he hole and leav it for a few days till the salt melts abd then pour it on the chilblains.
A cure for nettle rash - Rub a Dog-Leaf to it.
A cure for a boil is to mix soap and
senior member (history)
2016-09-05 21:52
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would blow their breath in the child's mouth three times for three mornings.
For Rickets the person should carry the child three mornings to a forge before sunrise and put the child sitting on the anvil.
For warts get a snail and rub it on the wart and hang it on a thorn. Another cure for warts is to wash the warts in forge water three times.
Cure for Kidney Disease. Boil a hay mouse in milk and drink the milk.
Cure for a sty is to make the sign of the cross with a gold ring on it.
A cure for warts. Is to get a stone with a hole in it and leave it for a day and then rub it to each wart.
A cure for a sty, is to make the sign of the cross with a gooseberry thorn on it.
A cure for a wart is to put your fasting spit on it every morning for nine days.
senior member (history)
2016-09-05 21:31
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I also heard that if you have warts on your hands to get chickenweed. It is a little weed that grows wild and you would often get it in gardens. When you break the stem off it, a kind of milkey juice flows out of it and to rub the juice on to the warts two or three times for four or five mornings.
"Sinnerymush" is another cure for nervousness. It is a kind of wild flower that grows in gardens and a little white daisy comes on it when it is in bloom. You should boil it well for a couple of hours and when 'tis boiled to strain the water from it and put the water into a bottle and take half of a wine glass full every morning.
For worms in children. Take the bark off a blackthorn tree. Then boil it up for about two hours. when it is boiled strain it and put the water into a bottle and take a teaspoon or two fasting every morning.
For a sore throat. Put salt in a pan dry and fry it until it turns brown. then put it into a stocking and tie it around your throat and leave it until morning. Given by Mrs P Kiely, Knocklofty, Clonmel, a native of Co Waterford.
Cahill's Blood for Anthony's Fire.
For"Thrush" a person who was born after their father dying
senior member (history)
2016-09-02 23:44
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Cures
If you have exzema on your face or anyplace they say if you cut a cock's comb and leave all the blood flow into a glass and rub it once every morning for three mornings they say it will cure it.
They say another cure if you get what is called "Kilcock", it is a kind of a little tree that grows wild. You should break it and boil it for about a couple of hours. They say it will cure rash.
There is another cure for whooping cough. They say to give the ferret more milk than he can drink and whatever he leaves after him to give it to the person to drink.
I often heard that if you get burned to get laurel leaves and white lard and to boil them together for about two hours until it is in an oinment. Make it in a plaster and put it on the burn every morning.
senior member (history)
2016-09-02 23:29
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back, though he searched ever so long he could not find them. The master was saying that very probably there was a "cog" of these gold rings somewhere in the field.
senior member (history)
2016-09-02 23:25
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Old Irish Ring Money.
Thomas McNamara was plouging in one of his fields just beside the school here and the plough turned up a ring about half an inch across, made of metal about as thick as the handle of a pen bent around but not joined. It was black. He showed it to the master who told him it might be gold. The master bought it from him. He cleaned it and showed it to the jeweller who tested it and said it was almost pure gold, The master showed it to us in school and said it was the sort of money they had in Ireland 2,ooo years ago. A few days after finding this ring, Thomas McNamara was ploughing in the same field and he saw the coulter turn up another ring like the first one. His horses were going quickly in "red" ground he was ploughing and he couldn't stop them for four or five yards. When he went
senior member (history)
2016-09-02 23:06
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Buried Gold
When a highwayman used to be hiding his gold long ago he used to make one of his gang swear an oath that he would mind the gold "dead and alive". The highwayman used then shoot him and his ghost would let no one get the gold.
Often when a person found a vessel full of gold the gold was in the form of snail shells. If the vessel full of snail shells was taken home it would take its own form of gold at 12 o'clock that night.
senior member (history)
2016-08-31 22:59
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Clais an Airgid
There is a field in North Ballindoney called "Clais an Airgid" and it is believed that there is gold buried there. About fifty years ago a man named Morrissey who owned the field went to a wise woman who lived near Fethard to get advice as to finding the money. I do not know what advice she gave him but he and some friends
senior member (history)
2016-08-31 22:49
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Story of a Highwayman
Long ago highwaymen were common. They used to hold up people on the roads and rob them of what they had. If caught they were hanged. A highway man from the parish of Newcastle was being hanged in Waterford long ago. When on the gallows he asked was there anyone present from Co. Tipperary. The only Tipperary man there was the hangman and he did not want to give him an exact account of where the money was hid. All he said was "Tá uball óir i ngort Uí Inidhe agus butais óir i gCrom Oileán"
Ever since people have been digging under white thorn bushes etc. for this gold. It was said of a local farmer who got very wealthy in a short time that he found the pot of gold.
senior member (history)
2016-08-31 22:29
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went to the place about midnight. They were accompanied by a silenced priest who lived in the neighborhood. They werw digging away for some time with the light of a lantern and all of a sudden they were surrounded by a whole pack of big dogs like foxhounds. They ran away and the priest called them to come back but they would not. The money was never dug up since and it is there yet.
senior member (history)
2016-08-31 22:23
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Clais an Airgid
There is a field in North Ballindoney called "Clais an Airgid" and it is believed that there is gold buried there. About fifty years ago a man named Morrissey who owned the field went to a wise woman who lived near Fethard to get advice as to finding the money. I do not know what advive she gave him but he and some friends
senior member (history)
2016-08-31 22:16
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rejected
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Buried Gold 1
There was a man ploughing for Paddy Myres out in a field and found a pot of gold. Immediately he heard a voice say "Will youshare it" the man said "No". He pulled a stick and stuck it down where he got the gold and went away. That night the man came for the pot of gold but when he came he found that the whole place was all sticks and he could not find the one he stuck down.
senior member (history)
2016-08-31 22:15
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Buried Gold 2
There was a man one time ploughing in Sargent's and he new that there was gold in some of the farm. As he was ploughing one sod he saw a big flag under the sod. He said that that is the place where the gold was. He drove the horses up to the ditch and tied them and came down to the place where he saw the flag and he tried every place and he could not find it. It was always said that gold was buried in the same place.
senior member (history)
2016-08-31 22:02
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Buried Gold
There was a man ploughing for Paddy Myres out in a field and found a pot of gold. Immediately he heard a voice say "Will youshare it" the man said "No". He pulled a stick and stuck it down where he got the gold and went away. That night the man came for the pot of gold but when he came he found that the whole place was all sticks and he could not find the one he stuck down.
senior member (history)
2016-08-28 22:24
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blind. Bill Carrigan himself remembers him going around begging with a bag.
He was once going to see a patient back beyond Clogheen some where. He took John Sweeney's father with him. Horses an saddles they had. He told John Sweeney's father, " If I'm knocked off the horse be ready to jump down as quick as you can and put me up again" Right over at "lag na circe" he was knocked off the horse and John Sweeney's father jumped down and put him up. He said when he was up again " you did that well I only got one "bais" of a kick.
The priests were up against him at first but did not mind him after.
Mrs Phelan N.T. says she heard Mick Davin say that when he was considering about going to Confession a white bird hopped on his shoulder and said "go". She says that she heard Mick say that a woman once came to him from beyond Cashel whose head was almost turned backwards and he cured her.
Aggie Carrigan tells that John Connors did not live at Glen Boreen but near their house. A pier is still standing that was to his yard gate.
She heard her grandmother say that she often saw a string of asses and cars outside their gate. People who came for cures.
senior member (history)
2016-08-28 21:52
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"Colum box"
He would never go out after dark except accompanied by someone.He used to be drinking in the public house that was near Bill Carrigan's grandfather's house here in Grange and one night about 12 he asked Bill's grandfather to go home with him. When he left him at his own door he made the sign of the cross on him and said to him "The devils in the hill wont be able to touch you now"
Two men named Laffert were drinking in the public house with him one night. They were working in Knocklofty and as the doors and gates were to be locked at a certain hour they said it was time for them to be going or they would be locked out. John Connors assured them hat the gates or doors would not be locked before them and they stayed on much after the time. Sure enough they found that neither gates nor doors were locked and they went in and went to bed. The man whose business it was to lock up the place was very much surprised in the morning to find all the doors and gates unlocked and he was certain he locked them.
John Connors was bald and a labouring man named Mickil Burke called him "platainn" Mickil was a course, rough, big strong man. John Connors said to him "You'll be a bigger "platainn" than me before morning" When Mickil awoke in the morning there was not even a "rib" of hair on his head or on his eye brows. John Connors said to him, "I'll leave you so you can beg
your bit" Mickil also got almost
senior member (history)
2016-08-28 21:16
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John Connors
This man appears according to tradition to have the gift of healing by expressing the wish by word of mouth. He lived in Glen Boreen in the life time of Bill Carrigan's grandfather. Bill is now approacing 70 years. He was a very devout man and a weekly communicant.
This is how he first came to know of his power. He was of a Saturday out in the field and he sropped with his chin on his spade handle thinking would he go to Confession or not. He decided on going. It appears his brother's wife said something to him over leaving his work and he said "That you may not have a tooth in your head before morning" Next morning when she awoke every one of her teeth were on the pillow.
People used to come from far and near to him for cures. He used no charms or medicine. A child whose toes were made into "mummy" by a horse standing on it, he made it perfectly all right again.
He used take nothing in payment for his cures except drink. Once he took a pair of stockings and they had to be cut off him they tightened so much on his feet.
The day he was dead a patient came to him all the way from Co. Limerick in blankets in a
senior member (history)
2016-08-27 21:40
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Fairy Animals
A long time ago there lived in Clogheen a gentle-man who owned greyhounds. He had some fine dogs. After some time this gentleman died and he loved one of the dogs so much, that before his death he ordered it to be shot on the day of his burial and to have this dog and himself buried near Bay Lough. From that day forth people used hear a dog keening in the same spot where they were buried and they say he used to spit fire from his mouth.
One night a poor man was travelling from Lismore and when he came near the spot he noticed fire and waited some time looking on.
When he continued on his journey the hound jumpted before him on the road and the man said, "In the name of God let me home". His words had no effect on the dog, so he then said, "In the name of the devil let me home". It is then the hound
senior member (history)
2016-08-27 21:35
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jumpted the glen is called to this day "Leim an Iarla"
senior member (history)
2016-08-20 22:01
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Herbs
Long ago the old people were able to make medicine out of weeds. There are different weeds to cure every disease. Long ago the people used to till a garden and set every kind of weed for their owm purpose and use.
There are weeds and leaves to remove stains from cloths. the elder berries make black ink and when the leaves are boiled and the water strained, it will clean a stained frock or a serge suit.
There are certain leaves that grow in gardens, one is St Patrick's leaf, this stops bleeding.There are some weeds that are the farmers foes, they grow in his oats, potato field and turnips and spoil the crop.
The "Crob Dearg" is a herb that is found on fences. It is a kind of reddish plant. It is a cure for rheumatic pains.
Nettles grow very thickly around the ditches. You couldb poil them with meat inMay, it is the best thing to purify the blood. Nettles are used too for
senior member (history)
2016-08-20 21:19
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Wild Animals
Once upon a time there was some men making hay and a weasel had her nest of young ones in the cock of hay. The old weasel ran out of the nest, she thought they would kill the young ones.
She went to the bucket of milk that the men had for their dinner and she spat into it for about half an hour. After a while the men went to another cock, she went back to the nest and found her young ones safe and sound for the men did not touch them.
She went off to the bucket and dug around it with her paws until she overturned it. It seems she poisoned the bucket of milk and when the men did not kill the young ones she done her best to save them.
senior member (history)
2016-08-19 22:45
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Names of places, fields etc
There is a furze field in Lacken and the name of it is "Ray na Gowlóg"and this is how it got its name.
one day a man was cutting furze on it and a little man appeared to him and the workman caught him and asked him for the gold.
the fairy told him that it was in a certain place in the field, the workman stuck the "gowlog" (a stick with a fork on it) in the place the gold was supposed to be and ran home for help to bring home the gold.
When he came back the field was covered with "gowlogs" the same as he had. There is a village near this ray and it is also called "Ré na Gabalogs".
This story was told by
Patrick Halley
Lackin
Ballinamult
Co. Waterford
senior member (history)
2016-08-08 20:44
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Games we play in Newcastle
We play the following games in Newcastle:
Trance, Football, Hurling, Handball, Hop-Scotch, Four Corners, Tug-of-War, Blind-man's-Buff, Hop-Step and Jump, Hide-and-go-seek, Frog-in-the-iddle, "Keels"(Skittles), "Tig" In and out through Windows, There-was-an-old-girl-in-our, Robbers-coming-through, Leap-Frog, Burn-Ball.
senior member (history)
2016-08-08 20:06
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Story St Patrick's Ass
St Patrick had an ass and one night when he was lodging in a house he left his ass out in a field. After a while the ass began to do mischief and the farmer who owned the field began to complain. So St Patrick said that the ass would do no harm but where ever the print of his leg would be there would a lot of grass grow growing. So one night the farmer put one of his men walking all around the field with the ass but St Patrick knew what was on and he put a stop to it.
senior member (history)
2016-08-08 19:47
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Scéal
Chuaidh an madra ruadh isteac i dtig beag. Bhí an falla ana íseal san taobh amuigh agis bhí sé ana árd istig agus níor fhéad sé dul amac. Mhairbh sé na h-aillig abhí istig. Shín sé siar, leig sé
air go raibh sé caillte. Chuaidh bean an tighe amac ar maidin. Chuaidh sí isteac go dtí a fear. Dubhairt sí go raibh na cearca go léir marbh ag an madra ruadh agus é féin caillte. "An ndhún tú an dorus" ar seisean. "Dhún" ar'san bean.Chuaidh fear an tighe amac agus tug sé a sprainn leis cun é shádh. Chuir sé an sprainn fé agus chaith sé amac é." Muise rud gránda thú chuir tú do shuile thar do cuid" ar seisean.
Nuair a chaith sé amac é rith sé leis. Nuair a chonnaic an fear é ag dul, dubhairt sé, Is fada go mbhéadh aon mhaith ionnam nuair nacSháid mé é"
Fuaireas an scéal seo thuas ó m'athair, Seamas Ó Néill, sclábmaidhe i naois a 58 blian dó.
Fuair sé an scéal ón athair Tomás Ó Néill, an ceanntar céana.
senior member (history)
2016-08-01 19:36
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Scéal
Chuaidh an madra ruadh isteac i dtig beag. Bhí an falla ana íseal san taobh amuigh agis bhí sé ana árd istig agus níor fhéad sé dul amac. Mhairbh sé na h-aillig abhí istig. Shín sé siar, leig sé
air go raibh sé caillte. Chuaidh bean an tighe amac ar maidin. Chuaidh sí isteac go dtí a fear. Dubhairt sí go raibh na cearca go léir marbh ag an madra ruadh agus é féin caillte. "An ndhún tú an dorus" ar seisean. "Dhún" ar'san bean.Chuaidh fear an tighe amac agus tug sé a sprainn leis cun é shádh. Chuir sé an sprainn fé agus chaith sé amac é." Muisevrud gránda thú chuir tú do shuile thar do cuid" ar seisean.
Nuair a chaith sé amac é rith sé leis. Nuair a chonnaic an fear é ag dul, dubhairt sé, Is fada go mbhéadh aon mhaith ionnam nuair nacSháid mé é"
Fuaireas an scéal seo thuas ó m'athair, Seamas Ó Néill, sclábmaidhe i naois a 58 blian dó.
Fuair sé an scéal ón athair Tomás Ó Néill, an ceanntar céana.
senior member (history)
2016-07-31 22:38
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Those are the cures that the people around here have for the whooping cough, measles and rickets.
Whooping Cough:-
Dip a ferrets head in milk and give the milk to the child who has the cough.
2. Put the child under an ass's stomach three times.
3. Peel a raw turnip boil it and give the juice of the turnip to the child.
Measles:-
Boil goats leavings in milk and ivy leaves. strain the milk then and give it to the child.
Rickets
Bring the person who has it to a forge before the sun rises and wash his feet in the water left after banding wheels in it.
senior member (history)
2016-07-31 22:24
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Aimsir na Géirleanamhna.
Do cuireadh an t-ainm "Pluaisc an tSagairt" ar an bpluaisc i gClais an Mhaca mar do rith sagart isteach ann dárbh ainm dó an tAthair Ó Riain ó saighdiúirí a bhí ar a thóir. Ní fheaca aoinne ó shóin é. Is amhlaidh a bhí sé ag dul i bhfolach ann. Baisteach an t-ainm "Cnoc Reamhar" ar an gnoc sin mar deirtear gur ceap na daoine go raibh cuma muiche reamhra air in aimsir na bpéin dlighthe. Fadó do léighead na sagairt an tAifreann istigh ins na tighthe ach uaireannta do bhíodh tighthe speisialta achu chun é do léigheamh. Tá ceann des na sean fotracha de ceann des na tighthibh sinn i bpáirc Muinntir Maolcathaigh i Ros Mhór. Níor scéith aoinne riamh sa Cheanntar ar sagart mar sin. Do rith sagart isteach sa lios atá i bpáirc Murchadha i mBán Árd ach níor cuireadh aon ainm speisialta riamh air in a dhiaidh. Tá tigh mór eile im ceanntar agus comhnuigh sagart ann uair amháin. Is le
senior member (history)
2016-07-30 22:14
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Báthadh fear dárbh ainm Séamus Ó Noonan san tSiúir timcheall dachadh bliadhan ó shoin. Tugadh an ainm Poll Noonan ar an áit ó shoin. Báthadh fear darbh ainm Liam Prendergast a comhnuigh i Corabella.
Dóighteán:-
Dóghadh tigh Liam Uí Broin i mBaile Burges timcheall na bliadhna 1869. Doghadh tigh Captáin Perry i gCaisleán Nua timcheall na bliadhna 1918.
Tuille:-
Bhí tuille mór san tSiúir uair amhain agus ní raibh aon droichead ann an uair sin. Bhí fear darbh ainm Pádraig de bPuitléir ag teacht abhaile ó Caisleán Nua agus bhí sé go dorcha. Tuit sé isteach san abhainn acht do coiméad sé greim maith ar crann beag a bhí ag fás ann. D'airigh fir é ag béirig agus sábhaladh é.
senior member (history)
2016-07-30 21:40
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(d) An deatach dul suas ón seimné.
Faisnéis Stuirme.
(a) Na préacháin agus na géanna fiadhna eitilt le chéile go h-árd sa spéir.
(b) Na fáinleóga eitilt go h-ísil.
(c) Na crowl-caocha bheith ag seinim.
Faisnéis Sioc.
(a) Na realta bheith go geal san oidhche.
(b) An ghrian dul fégo dearg sa Geimhridh.
Faisnéis Sneacta.
(a) An gaoth bheith ag séideadh ón taibh thoir.
senior member (history)
2016-07-30 21:24
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In a field now the property of James English in Ballybeg, it was said that a crock of gold was hidden under the ground. A long stone flag was supposed to be covering this crock.
About one hundred years ago a man to whom this field belonged tried to find the gold. One day as he was ploughing the field the plough slipped along a flag and as he did not want to tell anybody that he found the gold he went to the ditch, got a long stick and stuck it in the clay. that night he and another man came back to the place to dig up the gold but all the field was covered with switches like the one he stuck in the ground. The man went home very disappointed and nothing was heard of the gold ever since.
Long ago there lived in a little house under the Knockmealdown mountains a man and
senior member (history)
2016-07-21 21:07
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A Cure.
If people in olden times saw a man riding a white horse passingby they would run after him calling out:-
"Oh man on a white horse what would cure Thrush"
senior member (history)
2016-07-21 21:03
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this game. He was famous for his strength and speed and he brought the ball away before him from all opponents for two or three fields from the playing field. This was a feat very rarely accomplished and is still told about with pride by those who witnessed it.
senior member (history)
2016-07-21 20:59
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At first these were all local games but they gradually developed into games between two townlands or two parishes. One such game is still talked about. It was played in Killballygorman in the year 1883 and it arose out of previous inter parish games. It was a challenge game between picked teams from Co Cork and Co Tipperary. It is said to have been a very rough game each player trying to defeat his opponent in boxing or wrestling. There were men on both sides who were the champions of their districts in boxing and wrestling and these were anxious to add to their laurels by overcoming all who came before them. One Tipperary player and who is still alive was engaged in a wrestling bout with an opponent and those who were looking on still tell how he lifted his opponent and flung him bodily over the fence and on to the road. Another Tipperay player named St. John and who is said to have come from near Carrick-on-Suir, performed another remarkable feat in
senior member (history)
2016-07-21 20:41
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both sides claiming the victory. Very often this led to bad feeling between the teams, the result being a further challange and another game, more bitter and rougher than the first.
When a friendly game was being arranged among a number of men or boys, two leaders or captains were chosen. Thse two stood aside and picked one player in turn, the one having the first call naming the best player in the crowd for his side. This player came and stood beside his captain. The other captain then called out the next best player who came to his side and so on till the two teams were completed. Sometimes the two captains tossed a coin for first call. Usually one would try to have the first of the other by saying, "Cuirim ort". The other would answer something like this, "Mickle mé leat". They would then call the players one by one as above.
Many famous games were played in a large field at Killballygorman a townland about a mile westof the village of Ardfinnan in South Tipp.
senior member (history)
2016-07-21 20:20
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An umpire was appointed but all he had to do usually was to start the game and call half time and full time. At half time the teams changed sides as now. Football togs were unknown. The two teams lined out as now in the centre of the field, the umpire threw in the ball and all the players charged for the ball in a body. There was a goal mindef or goal keeper but he was about the only player that kept his place as all the others followed the ball in a body all over the field and sometimes into an adjoining field. These games, especially inter parish or inter county were very rough. They often develped into a series of free fights or wrestling matches and the player who could "down" or defeat his opponent in a fight or wrestling match was regarded as a hero and his deeds of strenght or speed or dexterity spoken of for a long time afterwards at the fireside or at the forge or wherever men met for business or amusement. Frequently the game was left unfinished owing to fighting or dispute
senior member (history)
2016-07-21 20:16
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An umpire was appointed but all he hadto do usually was to start the game and call half time and full time. At half time the teams changed sides as now. Football togs were unknown. The two teams lined out as now in the centre of the field, the umpire threw in the ball and all the players charged for the ball in a body. There wasa goal mindef or goal keeper but he was about the only player that kept his place as all the others followed the ball ina body all over the field and sometimes into an adjoining field. These games, especially inter parish or inter county were vety rough. They often develped into a series of free fights or wrestling matches and the player who could "down" or defeat his opponent in a fight or wrestling match was regarded as a hero and his deeds of strenght or speed or dexterity spocken of for a long time afterwards at the fireside or at the forge or wherever men met
senior member (history)
2016-07-21 19:57
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Football.
The game of football has always been the favourite game among the young men of South Tipperary just as hurling has been the favourite game in Mid and north Tipp. The ball used long ago was a cover stuffed with grass or hay. The playing pitch was not marked out as now. At first the game was from fence to fence and it was regarded as a great feat for a player to bring the ball into the adjoining field from his opponents. Later on goals were set up. These were simply two coats or two bushes or perhaps two poles placed at each end of the field. The teams consisted of twenty one players each. The game was played under what was called "Rough and Tumble" rules. The rules were very few. A player could tackle an opponent in any way
senior member (history)
2016-07-20 22:37
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This was done and a monument erected over the grave. This monument is not far from the famous V-road from Clogheen to Lismore and can be plainly seen from a great distance from the plain below.
senior member (history)
2016-07-20 22:34
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these people were very wealthy and some of them had very fine estates and residences. In the town of Clogheen alone there were four or five flour mills besides a brewery. The population of Clogheen was then about two thousand though at the present time it is hardly five hundred. All these mills were owned by the Grubbs, Fennells, and Malcomsons. On the adoption of Free Trade in England the price of wheat fell very low and the farmers gave up growing the crop. As a consequence the mills had to close down and have been idle ever since. Many of the Quaker families have died out.
The family of Fennell had a private burial ground of their own at a place called Kilcommon between Cahir and Ardfinnan. This little cemetery is called Garreenalive locally.
The late Mr. Samuel Grubb of Castlegrace, Clogheen, willed on his death bed to be buried on the side of Knockmealdown Mountain overlooking his residence at Castlegrace.
senior member (history)
2016-07-20 22:14
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The Quakers.
At one time there were a great many Quaker families living in South Tipp.
The principal families were the Grubbs, the Fennells, the Malcomsons, besides many others. All these families were engaged in the flour milling business. At this time, before the adoption of the Free Trade in England, there was a good price for home grown wheat and very large quantities of this crop were grown in South Tipp. The banks of the Suir and its tributaries were dotted with flour mills, most of which were owned and worked by members of the Society of Friends or Quakers, as they were called locally. These Quakers were a kindly, charitable people and were very popular. They owned and worked flour mills in Clonmel, Cahir, Clogheen, Castlegrace, Carrick-on-Suir and many other places. Many of
senior member (history)
2016-07-19 22:56
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The story of this lady's dream is generally believed by the people of the locality and is said to be the origin of th4e name Lady Abbey. A small cemetery is now attached to this ruin and many families buried therein. There is a strong belief among the people of the locality that the dream of the strange lady interred here is quite true. That those buried here will not have to spend any time in Purgatory but go straight to heaven.
In the time of the Great Famine and fever a woman named Mary Twomey lived for a few years in a small cell in the ruin. The poor people seemed to have a great hatred for the Fever Hospital and Workhouse. How this poor woman managed to exist it is hard to say but she lived to be a very old age and died in the village of Ardfinnan
senior member (history)
2016-07-19 22:43
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Abbey lands granted to the Duke of York and Bishop of Waterford.
It is difficult to trace the origin of the name Lady Abbey. Some say it is a corruption of Our Lady's Abbey.
But a popular local tradition gives the following account of the origin of the name. A lady(it is said) from some foreign land or at any rate from some distant place is buried here. This lady, when dying, dreamt that if she were buried in this ruin she would not have to spend any time in Purgatory but go striaght to heaven. The dream made such a strong impression on her mind that she willed to be taken here for burial. Her wishes were carried out.
Her remains were conveyed to this ruin and buried within the walls of the monastery chapel. A headstone was erected over her grave bears the following inscription:-
Here lies ye remains
of Sarah Maguire who
departed life February 1st
1780 age 22 years.
Pray for her.
senior member (history)
2016-07-19 22:25
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Lady Abbey
On a by-road about a mile to the south of the village of Ardfinnan there are the ruins of what once must have been a very beautiful monastery. This by-road is now little used but it must have been an important highway at one time. The ruin is now lonely and neglected and very little can be ascertained of its history. There are some very beautiful stone work doorways and windows in the building. There is a square tower in the centre. The walls and windows are now covered with ivy. The building is facing west and from it a splendid view of the Knockmealdown Mountains can be had. The style of the building is said to belong to the twelfth century and the design of Benedictine or Carmelite origin. The Abbey was closed down at the Reformation and the
senior member (history)
2016-07-18 22:24
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the scaffold. But the other four, it is maintained locally, were innocent.
It is local tradition that when the five were dead on the gallows, the guilty man was facing in one direction while the faces of the four innocent men were turned in the opposite direction.
The local landlord , Lord Donoughmore, was the most active agent in the prosecution and execution of these men.
The house in which Barry was shot is now owned by a Mrs. Reidy. The mark of one of the bullets is still pointed out on the parlour wall.
The farm known as the Sceach Ruadh is now in the possession of Mr. John Murphy, Ballyneety.
senior member (history)
2016-07-18 22:13
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awaiting decision
in this particular instance is stated to have been a widow named Lonergan and naturally she had the full sympathy of the people. One Sunday evening in February 1827, Barry was shot dead in the parlour of his own house at Grange. In April following five men were arrested for the murder and brought to trial. Barry's wife swore she saw and recognised the men - a rather difficult thing at night fall inthe month of February. Mrs Barry seems to have been a strong-minded determined woman. It is said that Barry himself would have given up the farm on account of the local agitation but his wife would not let him do so. The five men were found guilty and sentenced to be publicly hanged on the Green of Ardfinnan.
Their names were: James Byrne, Phillip Lonergan, Thomas Byran, John Green and John Lonergan. The sentence was duly carried out and it is said that John Lonergan confessed his guilt on
senior member (history)
2016-07-18 21:57
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rejected
awaiting decision
A Public Hanging.
In 1827 five men were publily hanged on the Green of Ardfinnan, a village in South Tipperary. The following account is given locally of this public hanging and the events leading up to it.
In the year 1826 a road contractor named John Barry from Co. Cork grabbed a farm at Ballyneety, near Ardfinnan, from which a widow named Lonergan had been evicted. This farm was known as the Sceach Ruadh (a name still used locally pretty geneally) and was on the estate of Lord Donoughmore whose residence was at Knocklofty, a few mile away. It is said that on this estate no widows were allowed to hold farms at this time. When a tennant died his widow had to give up the farm or be evicted. Whether this is correct or not the tennant
senior member (history)
2016-07-18 21:44
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awaiting decision
but again the people came and levelled it to the ground. He made no further attempt to claim the Green or enclose it.
In 1827 five men were publicly hanged on the Green of Ardfinnan. They had beeb convicted of murder but it is said that three of them had no part in the crime.
senior member (history)
2016-07-18 21:39
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land dividing it into two parts. On the side farthest from the river many buildings have been erected.
Between the road and the river there is a fine level field of three or four acres. This field is called the Green of Ardfinnan and is used as a playground by the young people of the neighbourhood. Many years ago a local Landlord named Prendergast who lived in Ardfinnan Castle at the time tried to claim the green as his property. He sent men to build a wall enclosing it and he sent other men to plough it up. When the wall was built the people of the locality assenbled and tore it down . The landlord had the wall built again
senior member (history)
2016-07-18 21:28
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awaiting decision
The "Green" of Ardfinnan.
Ardfinnan is a large village on the banks of the Suir between Cahir and Clonmel. It is well known for the splendid tweeds manufactured in the wollen mill there. At this particular point there is a large level stretch of land between the cliffs and the river containing about twelve or fifteen acres. All this is commons land and is said to have been the property ofthe Clonel Corporation though that body never laid claim to the land.At some time long ago this land is said to have been used as a racecourse. The road now crosses this stretch of
senior member (history)
2016-07-17 21:54
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time the furze plant was unknown in this district. It is said the furze plant grew from seed in the droppings of the cattle brought from the Power's country in Co. Waterford. And this is how the furze first came to Ballyporeen.
senior member (history)
2016-07-17 21:50
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awaiting decision
Another Cattle Raid
On another occassion the White Knight made a raid into the Power country in Co. Waterford. Here he and his followers seized another great number of cattle and proceeded to drive them towards Kilbehenny. They were pursued by Lord Power and his followers. In a skirmish Lord Power was killed and his followers put to flight.
The cattle were turned out to graze at Cooladerry, a townland in the parish of Ballyporeen. In time a brake of furze grew up in the fields where these cattle were grazing. Up to this
senior member (history)
2016-07-17 21:41
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fights followed until the White Knight contrived to reach his reserves at Garrangibbon. Being still hotly pursued by the Butlers, he made a stand at Garrangibbon with the whole body of is followers and made such a display of strength that the Butlers prudently but reluctantly decided to give up the pursuit and return home.
The place where the White Knight left his reserves was part of the lands of Killballygorman. It contained at this time a thick copse or wood and since then the place has been called Garrangibbon which means Gibbon's Grove.
senior member (history)
2016-07-17 21:29
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A Cattle Raid.
Edmund Fitzgibbon, the White Knight of Kilbehenny died in 1608. He was at war with the Butlers and made many encursions into the Butler country. Leaving Kilbehenny on one ocassion he came to Ardfinnan. Here he left one half of his followers on the western side of Ardfinnan bridge and proceeded with the remainder of his party to Knocklofty. He then seized a considerable number of cattle belonging to the Butlers and set out again for Kilbehenny driving the cattle before them. As quickly as possible as many men in the Butler country as could arm and make ready for the purpose set out in pursuit of the White Knight with a view to recovering the stolen cattle. A series of running
senior member (history)
2016-07-16 21:57
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awaiting decision
Military Camp at Ardfinnan.
In the year 1747 another large army was camped at Ardfinnan by order of the Commander - in - Chief, the Earl of Carthampton. This army consisted of the Northumberland Fencibles, the Wexford, Louth and Drogheda Regiments of Militia.
There was also another army encamped at Ardfinnan 1n 1798.
senior member (history)
2016-07-16 21:48
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Mr Stephen Moore of Marlfield was the contractor for the supply of forage, bread etc. to the troops.
Mr J. M. McCarthy
Office of National Education
Marlborough St.
Dublin
1938
senior member (history)
2016-07-16 21:44
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awaiting decision
The Camp Road.
About a mile to the south of Ardfinnan there is a district called Neddans. It is beside the River Suir and there is a ford here crossing the river. Neddans was once a parish but is not now. The remains of the old parish church can still be seen. In Neddans there is a very large field close to the river and known locally as the Camp Field. The road leading from Ardfinnan to Neddans is called the Camp Road. In the year 1779 a large English army was camped in this field at Neddans for a lengthy period and this is the explanation of the names given to the field and the road. The following regiments were in camp here at the time:-
19th, 30th, 32nd, 36th, 66th and 67th, Regiments of Foot and 2nd, 3rd, 9th, 13th, 14th, and 18th Regiments of Dragoons.
senior member (history)
2016-07-15 22:08
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awaiting decision
farm. These schools were opened in 1853. In 1854 the Commissioners purchase a futther plot of 28 acres from Mr. Bagwell for the purpose of the school. The senior boys of the National School were also taught farming and farming methods at his school. The first manager of this Agricultural School was a Mr. Lindsay; the next was a Mr.Tierney; the next a Mr. Manley; the next a Mr. McCabe; the next a Mr.O'Brien; the next a Mr. Smith; and the last a Mr. Duffy. in 1876 the school was discontinued. It is still called the Model Farm by the people in the locality.
senior member (history)
2016-07-15 21:50
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awaiting decision
Gormanstown Model Farm.
In Gormanstown there is a farm called the Model Farm. On this farm there was once an agricultural school called The Ardfinnan Agricultural School. This school was established in 1847 by the Commissioners of National Education. In that year the Commissioners purchased a farm of 20 acres in Gormanstown from the landlord, Mr John Bagwell of Marlfield.
On this farm a residence was built for the Manager. Some young men came to learn the best farming methods and these lived with the manager in the residence. Fine out offices were also built on the farm. Two National Schools, one for boys and another for girls were also built on this
senior member (history)
2016-07-15 21:38
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awaiting decision
of his coat beside the body of the murdered manprovided sufficiebt evidence to procure his condemnation and execution.
senior member (history)
2016-07-15 21:35
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lodging and a quarrel with the proprietor followed. In the course of the struggle Rylands received a kick which left a deep mark on his leg. A portion of his coat was torn away by the highwayman who then made off. On his way towards Clogheen, Hopkins met a traveller whom he robbed and murdered. He left the fragment of Ryland's coat near the body of his victim and then he lodged information against Rylands and accused him of the robbery and the murder. At the trial of Rylands the mark on his leg made in the struggle with the highwayman and the discovery o fthe fragment
senior member (history)
2016-07-15 21:23
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awaiting decision
An Ardfinnan Tomb.
Under a flat tombstone in the churchyard of Ardfinnan lie the remains of John Rylands of Ardfinnan, who was hanged on the 17th of February 1714. In the early years of the 18th century John Ryland was proprietor of the principal inn at Ardfinnan. At that time Ardfinnan was an important station on the Dublin and Cork coach route. At this time there was a noted highwayman named Hopkins in the neighbourhood. Hopkins came and stayed at Rylands Inn for some time. When leaving he refused to pay for his board and
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 22:31
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to be very skillful at their work. Some families of carpenters were noted for wheel making and others for making the old timber winnowing machines. Long ago there was a great many coopers in these districts but there is none at all now.
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 22:27
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and sometimes as much as 3s/- or 4s/- a stone was paid for it and the poor people made a tidy sum by the work. The people, men, women and children used to enjoy the work greatly as the weather was usually very fine and it was like a holiday for them in the fields. Very often the children used to return to school at the end of the season with new cloths and new boots all due to the thrawneen money. It is said the thrawneen used to be sent to foreign countries and sold as hay seed. But all this work has now been discontinued for a great many years.
Carpenters etc.
There were many carpenters, masons, thatchers, tailors and coopers localy also and they were said
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 22:14
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has a long hard stem and a long thick seed stem. Farmers say that animals do not care much for this plant and so they allowed whoever wished to come into theit fields and cut it. The seeds usually get ripe in June and July and then all the poor people of the town and village and country set out thrawneen cutting. Whole families, men, women and children used to engage in the work while the season lasted and the school used to have only half the usual attendance. The thrawneens were cut with reaping hooks and carted home. They were then threshed with a flail on the ktchen floor and the seed was sold in the local town. Sometimes a very good price was obtained. It was bought by weight
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 22:02
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after pressing was called critool. It was regarded as being of no use and was thrown away. Some farmers gave up making cider but many of them still make it.
Smithwork.
Long ago there were a great many forges in these districts but there only a few of them left now. The blacksmiths it is said were very skillful at their work. They used to make spades and other farming implements and could make and repair almost all the machines used on the farms at that time.
Thrawneen Cutting.
Another very profitable and popular industry here was thrawneen cutting in summer. Thrawneen is a kind of grass that still grows plentifully in the fields here. It
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 21:42
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awaiting decision
Cider Making.
Cider making was carried on extensively in these districts many years ago. The soil and climate seemed to suit fruit growing, for almost every farm had its own orchard of apples and plums and fine crops of both were obtained. Wild apples or crab apples grow plentifully also. Much of the fruit was sold and the remainder made into cider. The cider press used was a clumsy wooden affair but later modern machinery was introduced. Some of this cider was sold but much of it was kept and used locally. A person calling to a farmers house was always treated to a drink of cider. It was also given as a drink to the workers in the field in summer. What was left of the apples
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 21:28
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awaiting decision
on extensively in these districts. In the townland od Graigue there was a family named Lonergan who are called "The Weavers". In Ardfinnan a large village near Gormanstown, there is a hill called the"Factory Hill". At one time there were houses along both sides of this road and all were occupied by handloom weavers. There is no trace of these houses now, though the name "Factory Hill" is still in use. At the same time long ago there was a small wollen mill in Clogheen but it has been idle now for a long time.
About eighty years ago a wollen factorty was established in Ardfinnan and this continues in existence and now employs about 120 people.
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 21:15
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of the Society of Friends or Quakers as they were called locally. The wheat was carted to the mills from all sides and from far off places to be sold and ground into flour. At that time Clogheen was a very busy and prosperous town. Besides the flour mills it also had a brewery. On the introduction of Free Trade in England the farmers gave up growing wheat as it became too cheap and it would not pay to grow it. The corn ills closed down and have been idle ever since. One corn mill at Cahir kept on working and is now doing better than ever. Of late years the farmers have taken to growing wheat again as a good price can be got for it.
Weaving.
About the same time weaving was carried
senior member (history)
2016-07-14 21:04
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awaiting decision
District - Gormanstown
Parish - Ballybacon
Co - Tipperary S.R.
Barony - Iffa and Offa
Industries
Wheat and Flour.
In Gormanstown and surrounding districts wheat was intensively grown many years ago. The soil suited the crop and very good crops were obtained. As a result of this the land was very highly valued under Griffith's Valuation and has remained so ever since. At that time there were many flour mills working nearby. There were three flour mills in the town of Clogheen, about three miles away, one at Castlegrace, about a mile away, another at . Ardfinnan, about a mile away, besides others in the towns of Cahir and Clonmel. These were all owned and worked by members
senior member (history)
2016-07-13 21:59
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out-offices in many cases. The dwelling houses are old with mud walls and thatched roofs while the outoffices are of stone and mortar with slate roofs. The explation of this seems to be that many years ago the landlord gave the tenants roofing materials free to encourage them to build new houses. The tenants took advantage of this offer and built new outoffices but left the dwelling houses as they were. In this district limestone is abundant and on almost every farm there was at that time a limestone quarry and a limekiln for burning lime. And so the new houses were built of stone and mortar and roofed with slates.
senior member (history)
2016-07-13 21:48
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be used as a bedroom. On the other side of the entrance is the parlour and beyond this two other bedrooms.
On the larger farms the houses are two storied and with slate roofs.
Diagram
Ground plan of dwelling houses.
Outoffices. In most cases these are newer than the dwelling houses. They are built mostly of stone and mortar and with slate roofs. It is rather strange to note the difference between the dwelling houses and the
senior member (history)
2016-07-13 21:36
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on the ground and there is a fire machine for blowing the fire. In olden tmes a bellows was used for this purpose. There is a big iron affair called a crane for holding big pots over the fire. This can swing in and out as desired. There is an iron bar with holes in it hanging on the crane for the pot hooks. By means of these holes the pots can be raised or lowered.
Diagram
The crane with pot.
At the end of the kitchen is a room used as a bedroom and sometimes divided into two. Over this there is usually a loft which can also
senior member (history)
2016-07-13 21:26
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Gormanstown, Co. Tipperary S.R.
Barony of Iffa and Offa,
Parish of Ballybacon.
Gormanstown is a large townland about one mile west of Ardfinnan and close to the foot of the Knockmealdown Mountains. The land is good and a mixed system of farming is carried on, grazing, tillage, and dairying. The farm houses are nearly all alike and seem to have been built on the same plan. They are long and low, one storied and roofed with thatch. The walls are of clay and stone and are very thick. There is only one door in front and no door at the back. The door is in the middle and on one side inside is the kitchen. The kitchen is very large with a high, wide, open fireplace. The fire is
senior member (history)
2016-07-13 21:13
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and in these mills the wheat was ground into flour. All but one of these mills are idle now and in ruins.
senior member (history)
2016-07-13 21:11
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awaiting decision
Wheat Growing Long Ago.
Wheat was extensively grown in this district years ago. It was sown in wide ridges with a wide furrow between them. The ground was ploughed and ridges were first made. Fourteen sods went to make a ridge. Next the ridges were harrowed and the clay made fine. The seeds were then sown by hand. Lime was often put on the land as manure. Lime was plentiful as almost every large farmer had a lime-kiln. Next the furrows were ploughed. A heavy stone was then drawn by a horse over the furrows to make the clay fine. The clay from the furrows was then shoveled over the ridges by workmen. At that time there were a great many corn mills in this neighbourhood.
senior member (history)
2016-07-12 21:36
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The furrows were then ploughed. A heavy flat stone was drawn along the furrows by a horse to break up the lumps of clay. The man driving the horse stood on the stone to make it heavier. Next the clay in the furrows was spread over the manure by means of a shovel. When the stalks were a few inches high the furrows were again ploughed and the clay put between the stalks with shovels.
senior member (history)
2016-07-12 21:29
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awaiting decision
Setting Potatoes Long Ago.
Potatoes were set in ridges long ago. They were usually set in grass land or stubble land. The field was ploughed and ridges made. Six sods went to make a ridge. Each ridge was about three feet wide and about a foot high. Between each ridge there was a deep furrow. At first the ridges were very rough but the sods were broken up and made fine by means of an implement called a griffawn. The potatoes were then set. Holes were made in the ridges by means of a spade and the sciollawns dropped into them. The holes were then closed by means of a kind of mallet with a long handle. Three rows of potatoes were set along each ridge.Next the dung was put out incarts and spread along the ridges. The
senior member (history)
2016-07-12 21:06
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Counting Eggs etc.
Eggs are counted in threes. Three eggs are taken in each hand when counting. Eggs are reckoned in hundreds, 120 eggs make a hundred.
Cabbage plants are also reckoned in hundreds. 120 plants make a hundred.
When a large number of sheep have to be counted they are driven slowly, one by one, out a narrow gap. A man stands outside the gap with a large number of small pebbles or haws or other small objects, near him. As eachsheep passes out the gap he puts one of the small objects in the cap or hat. When all the sheep had passed out the number of objects in the hat or cap was counted.
senior member (history)
2016-07-12 21:05
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awaiting decision
Counting.
Eggs are counted in threes. Three eggs are taken in each hand when counting. Eggs are reckoned in hundreds, 120 eggs make a hundred.
Cabbage plants are also reckoned in hundreds. 120 plants make a hundred.
When a large number of sheep have to be counted they are driven slowly, one by one, out a narrow gap. A man stands outside the gap with a large number of small pebbles or haws or other small objects, near him. As eachsheep passes out the gap he puts one of the small objects in the cap or hat. When all the sheep had passed out the number of objects in the hat or cap was counted.
senior member (history)
2016-07-12 20:54
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awaiting decision
by the priest and the grave closed in. When the grave was covered the men laid the shovels across one another like a cross and all knelt down and said a prayer before leaving. Before the coffin was lowered into the grave the screws were loosened in the cover. Wake are seldom hed now as very bad conduct was very often carried on. Instead the coffin is now brought to the church and left there for the night.
senior member (history)
2016-07-12 20:45
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awaiting decision
Sometimes a vessel containing holy water was placed near the corpse with a few straws tied together in it. Each person as he came into the wakeroom took the straws and dipped them in the holy water and sprinkled the corpse with it.
The funeral took place the following day. Long ago a great many people attended funerals on horse-back. When the funeral was over these used often race one another home. When the funeral reached the graveyard the coffin was carried on men's shoulders into the graveyard. They used to walk with the coffin on their shoulders all round the graveyard before coming to the grave. When the coffin was lowered into the grave, blessed clay was put on it. Prayers were then said
senior member (history)
2016-07-11 22:56
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awaiting decision
Wakes and Funerals.
When a person dies a wake is held. The corpse is prepared at once. This is called laying out the corpse. A brown garment is put on the corpse. This is called a habbit. This habbit is blessed before it is put on the corpse. Some clay is blessed at the same time.
All the neighbours come to the wake. When they come into the room where the corpse is they kneel down and say prayers for the dead person. A pipe and tobacco used to be given to every man in the wake room. Snuff also was handed round several times during the night. This was done so that each person might say a prayer for the dead person. The rosary also was recited several times during the night.
senior member (history)
2016-07-11 22:44
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awaiting decision
Farm Implements.
The following implements were used on the farms in this in this district long ago:-
spade
shovel
pitchfork
griffawn
scythe
reaping hook
flail
timber plough
billhook
tomber roller
bush harrow
timber harrow
senior member (history)
2016-07-11 22:44
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rejected
awaiting decision
Farm Implements.
The following implements are used on the farm at the present time:-
spade thistle cutter
shovel cabbage machine
pitchfork horse rake
scythe
billhook
drill plough
chill plough
four sod plough
timber roller
cement roller
corn drill
potato digger
spring harrow
iron harrow
turnip machine
pulper
grubber
mowing machine
reaper and binder
horse hoe
senior member (history)
2016-07-11 22:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Farm Implements.
The following implements are used on the farms in this in this district long ago:-
spade
shovel
pitchfork
griffawn
scythe
reaping hook
flail
timber plough
billhook
tomber roller
bush harrow
timber harrow
senior member (history)
2016-07-11 22:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Green Gravel
Any number of girls can play this game. All the girls stand round in a ring with hands joined . One girl stands in the ring facing outwards. She recites this verse:-
Green Gravel, Green Gravel,
The grass is so green,
The fairest young lady
That ever was seen,
I washed her and dried her,
And rolled her in silk
And I wrote down her name
With a gold pen and ink.
I wrote her a letter
And it is content,
For please Maureen
To turn back your head.
The girl called on turns round and the both recite the same verse as before. They continue like this till all are turned round.
senior member (history)
2016-07-10 23:02
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awaiting decision
Breaking Bottles
Any number of girls can play this game. All the girls stand around in a ring about four yards apart. They have a ball and they throw the ball to one another.If a girl misses the ball she has to go down on one knee. If she misses a second time she has to go down on her two knees. If she misses a third time she has to catch it with one hand only. If she misses it again she has to try to catch it with her mouth. If she misses it again she has to try to hit it with her head. If she misses it again she is out.
senior member (history)
2016-07-10 22:53
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awaiting decision
Orange and Lemon
Any number of girls canplay this game. The girls stand one behind the other and each girl catches hold of the girl in front. Two other girls catch hands and raise them up high. The girls in line pass under their hands. The two girls lower their hands and catch the last girl in the line. They ask her which of some two things she would prefer. Each of the two girls stand for one of those two things. The girl answers and she then goes and stands beside the girl standing for the thing she prefers. The game continues like this till the whole line is finished.
The two sides then pull to see who wins.
senior member (history)
2016-07-10 22:42
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awaiting decision
Trance
Trance is played like this. A large square is marked on the ground and is divided into four equal squares. A girl gets a flat stone and puts it in one square. She has to put the stone from one square into another by means of one foot while standing on that foot alone. If she stands on the stone or if she leaves the stone on a line or if she touches the line with her foot or if she puts down her other foot she is out.
Figure of "bed" for playing Trance
senior member (history)
2016-07-09 22:11
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awaiting decision
High Gates
Any number of girls can play this game. All the girls stand around in a ring with hands joined. one girl stands outside the ring. This girl asks some girl in the ring where is the key. She answers it is gone to Cork. Then the girl beside this girl runs after the girl outside the ring and tries to catch her. When she catches her she takes her place outside the ring and the game begins again.
senior member (history)
2016-07-09 21:50
approved
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awaiting decision
sing this song:-
Sally Sally Water, sprinkle in the pan,
I cry Sally a nice young man,
Choose to the east and choose to the west,
And choose to the pretty girl you love best.
The girl in the centre calls one girl in to wheel with her. While they are wheeling the rest of the girls sing this song:-
This young couple marry in joy,
First to the girl and then to the boy,
Seven years after, seven years to come
Kiss to the girl and then your done.
The Game of Tig. Any number of girls can play this game. One girls counts the number of girls playing. The last girl has to hunt the rest. If she catches one that girl has to hunt the others to catch one. The one caught has to hunt the others. and so on to the end.
senior member (history)
2016-07-09 21:37
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awaiting decision
Games
The girls of Gormanstown district usually play the following games:-
Trance
Hide and go seek
Fox and chickens
High Gates
Orange and lemon
Sally, Sally Water
Tig
Rounders
Breaking Bottles
Hop-Scotch
Green Gravel
Blind Man's Bluff
Ring a Rosy
Draw Bucket of Water
Swing Swong
Colours
Skipping
Sally Sally Water. Any number of girls can play this game. All the girls stand around in a ring with hands joined. One girl stands in the middle of the circle. The girls in the ring
senior member (history)
2016-07-08 21:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old Cures
A child that would have whooping cough it is said that it would be cured by going under a white horse's belly three times.
It is said that forge water would cure a child suffering from rickets.
It is said that boiled nettles are good for the blood.
It is said that machine oil is good for a burn.
It was an old cure for cuts to put a spiders web to it
senior member (history)
2016-07-08 21:53
approved
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Old Cures
Long ago people believed the blood of a person named Cahill would cure ring worm if it were rubbed on it.
Cold tea is said to cure a burn.
Flax seed is said to cuer a cough.
Celery if taken in time is said to cure reumatism.
Forge water is said to cure rickets.
A smith whose father and grandfather were smiths is said to be able to cure a person suffering from chin-cough.
Lemon juice is said to cure a head ache.
The seventh son or daughter is said to be able to cure a sore mouth.
Onions are said to cure bad nerves.
Cobwebs are said to be good for cuts.
A poultice of cow dung is said to cure swelling.
senior member (history)
2016-07-08 21:41
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Old Cures
If you run on wet grass in the morning without any boots it is said to be good for bad feet.
To hold your leg under a pump or a running stream and to pump water down on it is said to be good for a sprain.
Any oil is said to be good for a burn.
senior member (history)
2016-07-08 21:36
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Old Cures
March-Mallow is said to cure pains.
Forge water is said to cure children suffering from rickets.
Dandelion is said to cure warts.
Boiled nettles are said to be good for the blood.
Boiled flax seed water is said to cure people suffering from coughs.
Cold tea is said to be good for any weak eyes.
A fasting spit is said to be good for anything.
Bread soda is said to be good for any itchy thing and also for a toothache.
senior member (history)
2016-07-07 22:01
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Riddles
What part of a cow goes out over the fence first. Answer. Her breath.
As I went up a slippery gap, I met my uncle David. I cut off his head and left his body easy. Answer. A head of cabbage.
As I went into a corn field,
I picked up something that you could eat. It was neither fish, flesh or bone.
Answer. An egg.
Niddy, Noddy , round body,
three feet and a wooden hat.
Answer. A Pot
senior member (history)
2016-07-07 21:53
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It is black it is white and it is read all over. Answer. A newspaper.
What is it that is brought to the table but never eaten. Answer. A pack of cards.
What weight is there in the moon.
Answer. Four quarters
senior member (history)
2016-07-07 21:49
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Riddles
Four flippers, two flappers and a wagger. Answer. A dog.
What day would you say is best for soldiers to march forth. Answer. March the 4th
The beginning of eternity, the end of time and place, the beginning of every end and the end of every place. Answer. The letter e.
Two n's, two o's, anl and a d, put them together and spell them for me. Answer. London.
What chins are never shaved.
Answer. Urchins
senior member (history)
2016-07-07 21:39
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Riddles
What goes round the wood and round the wood and never goes into the wood. Answer, the bark of a tree
As round as a marble
As plump as a ball
can climb over churches
steeple and all.
Answer, The sun
What is full and yet holds more ?
Answer,. A pot of potatoes.
Ink Ank undrt the bank
ten drawing four. Answer. A man milking a cow.
Head like a thimble
tail like a rat
You may guess for ever
But you cannot guess that.
Answer. A pipe
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 23:09
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Long Legs
crocked thighs
Little head
and no eyes.
Answer, a thongs
It is in the corner and a hundred eyes in it. Answer, a pot of soup.
It is as round as a marble, as flat as a pan, the head of a woman and the whole of a man. Answer, a penny.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 23:09
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Answer, a brush.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 23:04
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Answer, a brush.
Long Legs
crocked thighs
Little head
and no eyes.
Answer, a thongs
It is in the corner and a hundred eyes in it. Answer, a pot of soup.
It is as round as a marble, as flat as a pan, the head of a woman and the whole of a man. Answer, a penny.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 22:58
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As I went into a garden of wheat, I picked up a thing that you could eat, it was neither fish, flesh, nor bone.
What was it. Answer, an egg
What is it that is full of holes yet holds water. Answer, a sponge.
It is black and it is white and it hops on the road like hailstones.
Answer, a magpie.
Kitty's white apron had a red nose, the longer she lives the smaller she grows. Answer, a candle.
What is it that goes from house to house without moving. Ans. a grave.
It goes rouund the house all day and sits in the corner at night.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 22:46
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I went up the boreen
I came down the boreen
I carried the boreen on my back
Answer, a ladder
Niddy, Noddy, round body
three fet and an iron hat.
Answer, a pot.
What goes over the water without making any noise. Ans. your shadow.
What is full of holes yet holds water.
Answer, a sponge.
I have a little house and a mouse could not fit in it, all the men in the town could not count all the windows in it, Answer, a thimble.
A houseful, a roomful and you could not catch a spoonful. Ans. smoke.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 22:34
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What is it that has eyes but cannot see ? Answer, a potato.
What side of the cup is the handle,
Answer, the outside.
Little red Nanny
With a little red nose
The longer she lives
The smaller she grows ?
Answer, a candle
What is it that is under the fire and over the fire and never touches the fire ? Answer, A cake in an oven.
Why does a clock stop when it falls on the floor ? Answer, because it cannot go any further.
What goes up a ladder with its head down. Answer, a nail in your boot.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 22:25
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What is it that has a head but no eyes,
Answer, a match.
Why does a hen cross the road,
Answer, because she wants to get to the other side.
What goes up a ladder with its head down. Answer, A nail in your boot.
What is it that ? wears out boots and shoes and yet has none. Ans. dust.
What is it that is full of holes and yet holds water. Answer, a sponge
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 22:13
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It is under the water and itis over the water and yet it nevertouches the water. Answer, the sun.
An old man standing in the glen and nothing on his head but the devil and the world. Answer, A thistle.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 22:08
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What is it that would fill a house and yet you could not catch a fist full.
Answer, A house full of smoke.
As round as a marble as flat as a pan
The half of a woman The whole of a man. Answer, A penny
Head like a timble, tail like a rat.
You may guess for ever but you wont guess that. Answer, A pipe
Patch upon patch without any stitches,
Riddle me that and I will buy you a britches. Answer, A head of cabbage.
As round as an apple, as plump as a ball, can climb over chalel and all.
Answer, the sun.
Ink ank under a bank, ten drawing four. Ans. Woman milking cow.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 18:27
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470
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 18:26
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and pick out their eyes while the are asleep in bed.
When one magpie is seen it is a sign of bad weather coming. When two magpies are seen together it is said to be a sign of good weather coming.
When swallows are seen flying low it is said to be a sign of bad weather coming. When they are seen flying high it is said to be a sign of good weather coming.
When the crows are seen as if they are falling down it is said to be a sign of bad weather coming.
When seagulls come inland it is said to be a sign of bad weather coming.
It is said that the robin wiped the Lords and that is why he has a red breast.
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 18:16
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the hawk
the linnet
the bull finch
The following birds build their nests on the ground:-
the skylark
the pheasant
the partridge
the corncrake
the snipe
The swallow makes its nest under the eves of the houses.
The sparrow makes its nest in the thatch or in holes in the walls.
The robin builds its nest in a mossy bank.
The hen bird sits on the eggs for about three weeks to hatch.
If boys rob a birds nest they are told that their hands will get covered with boils. They are also told that the bird will come that night
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 18:06
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The following birds migrate:-
the cuckoo
the swallow
the coencrake
the plover
the wild goose
The cuckoo comes here at the end of April or the beginning of May. The old cuckoo leave here in August and the young ones about a month later. The swallow and corncrake come here in April and leave again at the end of September.
The following birds build their nests in the trees or bushes:-
the wren
the crow
the blackbird
the woodquest
the magpie
the thrush
the gold finch
senior member (history)
2016-07-06 17:58
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Birds
The following birds are tobe found in the district of Gormanstown in the parish of Ballybacon, Co. Tipperary and in the Barony of Iffa and Offa:-
the wren the thrush
the crow the seagull
the swallow the robin
the blackbird the plover
the woodquest the pigeon
the magpie the starling
the curlow the tom-tit
the wild duck the cage bird
the lark the corncrake
the swan the hawk
the cuckoo the owl
the willywagtail the bat
the yellowhamer the partridge
the gold finch the pheasant
the wild goose
senior member (history)
2016-07-05 21:21
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Bohernamasawn,the road of the masons
Bohernagore, the road of the goats
Boherawahig
Bohereenvangour, the little road of the woman of the goats.
Names of Wells, Pools etc
St Ciarans Well: a holy well in Tubrid
Poulataar and Poulalee, near the river Taar
Poulacaora, a pond in the river Taar
Poulbec, a pond in the field of Rd. Doherty's farm
Poulanairgid, a pond near Gormanstown School
senior member (history)
2016-07-05 21:11
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Ballyhistbeg
Lograwnacuirc
Garryduff
Kilgrogy
Tullow
Kildanouge
Raheen
Poulataar
Ballyknockane
Gortacullan
Graigue
Names of Fields
Páirc na Colúir, The field of
the Pigeons
Paircín Fiarais
The Bawboon, taken from people named Bawgoon
The Rock Forest
Tuirleac
Names of Roads
Boreenahown, The Little Road of the River
Boreenliosnagearc
senior member (history)
2016-07-05 21:02
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