Number of records in editorial history: 8969 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-08-02 22:08
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A boot of gold was hidden in John Murphy's land in Knocknaloman. Lights were seen there several times.
A pot of tallow was hidden in Inches opposite Crowleys house. Thieves lived in the neighbourhood. These thieves stole cattle, and left the skins and guts lying in the fields. The police heard of it. They tried the house several times, and in the end saw a heap of potatoes in a corner of the house. They threw the potatoes in a different corner. When the thieves saw them so they ran away and were never seen again. The police tried for them and could not find them. They found tubs of meat buried in a cellar under the ground. They distributed the meat among the people who's cattle were stolen.
senior member (history)
2020-08-02 22:05
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This story happened in the years of the famine when all the people were dying with hunger and all the crops failed. Some good people who had great faith in the Lord prayed to him to spare their lives and help them in their struggle for existence. The Lord came to their assistance in this way.
It happened in a valley to the east of Knock-na-gree in the direction of Kiskame where a small stream of water runs through a deep valley with the land on both sides very high. It started to rain one Monday morning. It continued to rain for five days and five nights and the stream filled up with water and it became like a sea.
On the fifth morning a large white ship appeared on this valley. All the people that were then alive gathered around the ship to see what it contained. It contained a large quantity of food for the hungry people. They unloaded the ship and distributed the food amongst them. That work they carried on until night and when night came the work of unloading the ship was accomplished and the lives of the people were spared. The following morning when the people awoke the water had gone and the ship disappeared. Where this took place there
senior member (history)
2020-08-02 22:02
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There are forts almost without number in this district. They are almost all within sight of each other. They are known as either rath or lios e.g. Rathmore, Rathbeig, Ratheen, and Rathduan. Lois-na-grave and Liseen. In some e.g. Knocknagree there is an underground cave. In every case they are circular in shape. The owners never interfere with them. One in the townland of Rathduane is partly levelled, when about half the work was done the owner died suddenly, and every workman got sick. The work has never since proceeded with. Lights have always been seen in the vicinity of the Rathduane forts, and are still sometimes seen.
senior member (history)
2020-08-02 21:56
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a Cásga buried a half-firkin of gold in the Cummars at Laca Knocknagree Co. Cork Dónal a Casga was an outlaw. (See the story of Dónal under Local Heroes)
senior member (history)
2020-08-02 10:55
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Solus na soillse agus radhairc na Trionóide
Agus grásta na Foidhne in-aghaidh na h-éagcórta
'Sí Muire Mháthair an Gárda comhathach
Cuire na Soillse agus na naoimh romham-sa
Beir leit (leat) m'anam go Cathair na Trionóide
D'árduigheadar leo Mac a' brat bóinne
Cun ár d'aon Mhac Rí uasal do chrádh
Do scroiseadar agus do stróiceadar 'raibh d'Fuil agus d'Fheóil ar [?]
'Sé dubhairt an Rí Mhór le na grasta
Nár admháfladh Sé an Páis a bheith a fhollmhuig
Ach E cur sa Crann in - áirde
Fághail bháis agus da follmhuigh (fullang = suffer)
Na tairngí trí na déarnacha
Agus go deimhin do cuirfeadh
A Mháthair a' feacaint Air
Ba céasa an gnó dí-se
Na basa aice á bpleáscadh
Agus na deoracha aice a sileadh
Cun gus shil sí na cúig ndéoracha
Agus iad 'na bhFuil ndeirg
Ag feúchaint ar a h-Aon Mhac
Agus an íde Aige a fhulang
'Caoghalach go n-éireóchaidh Sé
In-aidhmheoin an t-saoghul uile
Ní éireóchaidh in ao' chor
Níl anam ar A chumas
senior member (history)
2020-08-02 10:32
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1
On yonder hill, there lives a deer - with silver horns, bright and clear it is neither fish, flesh, feather nor bone - on yonder hill it lives alone. The Sun.
2
It comes with a coach, it goes with a coach, and a coach cannot go without it. Noise.
3.
Kitty inside the fence, Kitty outside the fence, and if you touch Kitty she'll bite you. A Nettle.
4
I have a little Kerry cow, she stands by the wall, she eats what she gets, but she drinks nothing at all. The fire.
5
Why is a black hen, smarter than a white hen? A Black hen can lay a white egg, & a white hen cannot lay a back egg.
6
It opens like a barn-door, it shuts like a trap, and whatever you will think of, you will never guess that. A Scissors.
7
When is the clock hungry? - When it goes to eight.
8
The man that made it never wore it, and the man that wore it never saw it. A death shroud. A coffin.
9
What is the most shy thing in the house?
The Clock - it always has its hands on its face.
10
Two dead men fighting, two blind men booking on, two cripples running for the priest, and two dummies shouting "Hurry on" - A lie.
11
What goes round the world, remaining at the same corner? A stamp.
12
A man gets sixpence for walking a mile, what does he get for walking ahundred miles - Sore feet.
13
What animal walks on four legs in the morning, two legs in the evening, and three legs at night? A man.
senior member (history)
2020-08-02 10:31
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1
On yonder hill, there lives a deer - with silver horns, bright and clear it is neither fish, flesh, feather nor bone - on yonder hill it lives alone. The Sun.
2
It comes with a coach, it goes with a coach, and a coach cannot go without it. Noise.
3.
Kitty inside the fence, Kitty outside the fence, and if you touch Kitty she'll bite you. A Nettle.
4
I have a little Kerry cow, she stands by the wall, she eats what she gets, but she drinks nothing at all. The fire.
5
Why is a black hen, smarter than a white hen? A Black hen can lay a white egg, & a white hen cannot lay a back egg.
6
It opens like a barn-door, it shuts like a trap, and whatever you will think of, you will never guess that. A Scissors.
7
When is the clock hungry? - When it goes to eight.
8
The man that made it never wore it, and the man that wore it never saw it. A death shroud. A coffin.
9
What is the most shy thing in the house?
The Clock - it always has its hands on its face.
10
Two dead men fighting, two blind men booking on, two cripples running for the priest, and two dummies shouting "Hurry on" - A lie.
11
What goes round the world, remaining at the same corner? A stamp.
12
A man gets sixpence for walking a mile, what does he get for walking ahundred miles - Sore feet.
13
What animal walks on four legs in the morning, two legs in the evening, and three legs at night? a man.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:40
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Many people in this parish, get married in Shrove, and June and July and in November. It is considered unlucky to get married in the months of May, August and during Lent and Advent, or on a Monday or Friday.
Matches are sometimes made, and money is given as fortune. Stock or goods are never given.
Scarcely any person living in this parish, remember marriages taking place in the houses.
It is customary of late years, to get married in the morning, with Nuptial Mass, and then a feast is held in the house.
Before, both parties met at the brides house, and held a dance until late in the afternoon, and then went to the Church and got married, and after that went to their future home, where there was a wedding feast held.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:38
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A very strange happening occured about fifteen years ago there was a terrible thunder storm. A flash of lightning came down a chimney in a house and tore out all the fireplace and scattered debris all over the house. It then made a hole in the wall and killed a good deal of fowl in the yard it then made a hole down in ground.
Another strange happening occured about thirty years ago, A dwelling house occupied by Mr. Mahoney was burned to ashes. The fire originated in a small house adjoining the dwelling house in which there were some pigs. An old man used to go to see the pigs every night after nightfall and he always took a small oil lamp with him. It appeared that the straw that was under the pigs caught fire soon it spread to the thatch of the dwelling house then the whole place was one mass of flames.
The fire might have done some great harm for the whole family were it not for a wake that was in the neighbourhood that night. Some persons going home from the wake saw the fire and went there they soon rescued the occupants and quenched the fire.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:35
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"The high field", because it is high ground.
"The three corner field", because there are three corners in it.
"The Cottage field", because there was a cottage built on it.
"The Cnoc Mór," is a very big field.
"Pairceen Andy", because it was owned by a man named Andrew O Connell.
"The half - acre", because it is a small field.
"The coarse meadow", because there is coarse grass there.
"The inch", because there is a stream running through it.
"The big field", because there is three acres in it.
"The clover field", because clover always grows in it.
-------------------------------------------------
There is a small well in one field and it is always called "The Tobareen".
One part of the road to Barrachauring is called "Droiceadín", because there is a gully under the road there.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:28
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house.
A. Because there is not a single person in it.
R. Two brothers born in March one had a birthday in June and the other in September one married his mother and the other died an old maid.
A. They were born in a town called March, one had a birthday in June and the other in September, one became a priest and married his Mother and the other died an old maids hair.
R. Four little bottles in top of a hill their goals turned down and they could not spill.
A. The Cows Paps.
R. What bleeds from the nose when you shake hands with it.
A. A pump.
R. What is marrying all his life and yet is single.
A. A priest.
R. What day can children talk the most.
A. The longest day.
R. What bawls out when it is caught by the tail.
A. A bell.
R. Two inn's two oo's an l and a D put them together and spell them for me.
A. London.
R. Why is an artists career a tragic one.
A. Because he makes faces and busts.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:25
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the ground likes hailstone.
A. A magpie.
R. Once in a minute twice in a moment and never in a thousand years.
A. The letter "M".
R. As I was going over a Slippery gap. I met a thing rolled up in a sop it had neither flesh, fish, feather or bone and in three weeks time it would walk alone,
A. An egg.
R. In a field there is a river in a river there is a boat in a boat there is a girl eve you don't know her name yourself is the blame in the middle of the riddle I told you her name.
A. Eve.
R. What do you see people drink soup with.
A. Yours eyes.
R. When do you expect a ship to be very clean.
A. When It leaves the wash,
R. What number is finished by adding one letter.
A. One, Add "D" and it is done.
R. Why are pancakes like umbrellas.
A. Because they are rarely seen after lent.
R. What is it that no one wishes to have and yet when he has it does not wish to lose it.
A. A bald head.
R. As I was going over a Slippery gap. I met my Auntie
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:21
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A. Death.
R. Why does a cock cross the road.
A. To get to the other side.
R. A red cap and a white apron.
A. A match.
R. I went to the wood and I found it. I sat down and I looked for it, If I found it I would leave it after me and if I did not I would bring it home with me.
A. A Thorn.
R. It is in the Boulster but not in the bed it is in the brain but not in the head it is in the Church but not in the people it is in the Priest But not in the People.
A. R.
R. Black and white and red all over.
A. A newspaper.
R. What walks on their heads.
A. The Nails of your boots.
R. A hard working father a Lazy old Mother and twelve sons all the same colour.
A. The face of the clock.
R. As I went through a field of wheat I picked up something that I could not eat it was neither flesh fish feather or bone and it had five fingers of its own.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:19
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R. As round as a marble, as flat as a pan, the whole of a woman the half of a man.
A. A penny.
R. As I was going up to St Ives I met three men and their wives. Each man had a cat and each cat had kitten how many were going to St. Ives.
A. One.
R. What goes with the train it is no use to it but still it cannot go without it.
A. Its Noise.
R. What is bigger the more you take from it.
A. A hole.
R. What goes up when the rain comes down.
A. An umbrella.
R. A flock of white sheep on a red hill here they go there they go but now they stand still.
A. Teeth in your gums.
R. Riddle me Riddle me that over the head and under the hat.
A. The hair of your head.
R. As long as my arm as deep as a pail it never balls out until Its caught by the tail.
A. A Church bell.
R. Behind the house there is a well and in the well there is a cup and in the cup there is a sup that every man must taste.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:10
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coat and thus preserve the more downy ones. The duck quack loudly before rain. Swallows fly low before rain.
The dogs "quit mutton bones on grass to feed". The cat sits on the hearth before rain, it is said that before rain we see "puss on the hearth with velvet paws sit wiping oer, her whiskered jaws". The frogs change their colour from yellow to russet. The hills appear much nearer than they really are. Old people have pains. The crickets sing loudly and spider's are seldom seen in their cobwebs. Before rain the soot is falling plentifully.
The winds are also taken as weather omens. It is said that "the north wind doth blow, and we shall have snow". The south west wind's bring's rain. The east wind is hard and cold.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 22:07
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There are many different forecasts, as regards the weather. One of the most common ways of predicting fine weather is, if the sun sets with a purplish red colour. A fine clear moon also predicts fine weather. The rainbow is a sign of good or bad weather, and there is an old proverb regarding it which is considered very accurate, as - "A rainbow in the morning is the shepherds warning, and a rainbow at night is the shepherds delight".
When the wind blows from the north, it foretells fine weather. The birds also are supposed to be good judges, for instance, when the swallows fly high, fine weather is near at hand.
All these signs predict fine weather, but there are many different ones, which predict wet weather, for instance, when the sun rises red in the morning or when there is a "halo" round the moon, and the stars are dim and dull.
The south, and south west winds are supposed to bring the rain, and the east winds to bring snow and cold weather. When the sea-gulls fly inland, it is a sure sign, we will have wet weather as they know, by their instinct when cold and wet weather is approaching.
The dog also eats grass when wet
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 20:24
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Most of the local fields have names. These names are, "Pairc an Easaigh", or "the field of the Waterfall". "Páirc Mháirtín", or "Martin's Field". "An mbán locha" or "The field where the flax was steeped", "An Cúl" or "The Back". "An Acra" or "The Acre". "An Leaca" was called so because it was on the side of a hill. "An Charragán" or "The Rocky Field".
In this parish there is a cross called "Clais an Phúca" or "The fairies Furrows. There is a local townland called "Clais an Aifreann", or "The furrow of the Mass."
There is a hill in Aherlamore called "Cnoc a Gruaigidh" or "The hairy hill.
There is a big rock called "The holy water stone". It is in
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 20:17
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My townland is Aherlamore. It is in the parish of Kilmurry, and it is in the barony of Muskerry.
There are eleven families in the townland. The population is fifty one. There are no people over seventy years in the townland.
There are two galvinised roofed houses in the townland. The other houses are slated. They are built of stone and mortar.
The word "Aherlamore" means "a big valley between hills". The land is very good. Some of the land is hilly. There are four streams in the townland. There are two hundred and ninety acres in the townland.
There are very old stones
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 20:15
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The local farmers made candles. They used kill a cow and take out the lard and fat. The lard and fat were put on the fire to melt. When melted they were put into a mould. Six candles were made together.
Baskets were made from long bamboos. They were woven tight.
All the old gates were made at the forge. Spades and other farming implements were made at the forge. Knives were made and sharpened at the forge.
About seventy years ago everybody had a spinning wheel. The people made thread and cloth. The spinning wheel was kept outside the door.
Stools, tables and chairs
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 20:13
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We wondered then if any land had been so sweet or fair,
So bright the life, so blue the sky, so true our hearts were there;
As the sun sank o'er the distant hill or that dark and dreary sky,
You, smiling, said what a glorious thing for such a land to die.
Oh, black that day when "doing your bit" along with comrades few
The cruel, deadly bullet sped and pierced your brave heart through;
The black hair that I loved so well grew clamy on your brow,
The dark eyes, bit by Freedom's fire are closed for ever now.
But weep not for him with useless tears we know it was his pride
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 20:11
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One cold March eve twelve months ago, we walked up by the glen,
And full of life and eager hope were you proud hero then;
Around us lay the heather scent which wafted with the wind,
And children merry voices rang from houses down behind.
Before us rose the green hills upstretching to the blue,
And on our left the "New Road" ran and vanished from the view;
We knew it ran from those green fields where you had often drilled,
For when you thought of Ireland and our hearts with hope you filled.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 20:09
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From all his rivals for the prize on our own lady's day.
For he who plucks the scarlet rose that grows on yon green tower,
Shall call Eileen Barry Óg his own before another hour"
The day has dawned which shall decide whose bride shall Eileen be,
And by the Bandon's pleasant side the sight was fair to see.
Five of Munster's greatest chiefs are climbing high the wall,
But ere one third its height is reached your Roche outspeed them all.
For love has nerved his arm as he seeks yon dizzy height,
And now his hand he has put forth to pluck the rose so bright.
But cruel fate has ordered that its touch he ne'er can feel,
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 11:06
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For a horse with hard hoofs, fresh wet turf cut out of a bog was kept under him in the stable.
KIDNEY TROUBLE was cured by giving water in which hurt bushes were boiled. Tea made from Fox Cabbage (London pride) was given to foals.
A horse that had a COUGH was given rain water which ran off an iron roof, or raw potatoes.
Tea made from bisom was given to a foal that had worms.
HENS. When hens were sick their food was wet with water in which SALLIES were boiled.
PIP. Chickens that had pip were put into a bag in which was a little lime and shaken around.
For MANGE, the affected part was bathed with tobacco water.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 11:02
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Barren earth was given to cattle that had eaten poison roots.
SCOUR in cattle was cured by giving yellow meal porridge. For calves, boiled milk sweetened with sugar, tanzy tea, or breadsoda were given.
When a cow had the "FOIR-LAOGH" she was rubbed with salt.
SORE UDDERS were rubbed with buttermilk
For a SICK CALF, "cleas na péiste" was done over his back nine times on each of nine mornings.
MAGGOTS in sheep. Salt, soot, and urine were given.
DISTEMPER. Cracked cream was given and the dog was kept warm and hungry.
STANGLES (in horses). The horse was poultices with boiled yellow turnips. A horse that had BAD WIND was given furze.
A mixture of sulphur and oats was given to a horse that had WORMS.
For JAW-BAGS, the affected parts were burned with a hot iron and then rubbed with salt.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:55
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BLAIN IN CATTLE was cured by burning straw and soot under the head.
WORM in a cow's tail. - soot, salt, and tobacco were mixed and put into the tail.
SORE HOOFS from walking on wet land were cured by drawing a hempen rope between the hoof until it bled.
CONSTIPATION in cattle - salt, soot and pennyworth were given. Garlic was given to a cow that had a SURFEIT.
For SCALE[?] on the eye, salt was spit from a person's mouth into the eye.
VERMIN in cattle. They were rubbed with ashes.
MANGE was a common disease. The animals were rubbed with tobacco-water.
FAREY in horses was cured by cutting the toe-vein and allowing the bad blood to run. Water from cow stall yard was thrown on them.
COLIC was cured by giving turpentine and whiskey. Sour cream was given to a horse
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:49
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ITCH was cured by rubbing with sulphur and fresh butter.
RINGWORM was rubbed with sulphur and fish oil.
BRUISES or soreness. These were bathed with camomile tea, or a piece of fresh raw meat was rubbed on. Sugar and soap mixture was also used.
BLEEDING was stopped by putting cobweb, ribleaf,, or grass (chewed) on the cut.
A BITE from a dog was rubbed at once with salt.
CARBUNCLES were bathed with water in which ragworth was boiled.
BLOODPOISONED fingers:- a snail was bruised and applied.
CHILBLAINS were cure by wearing new shoes. Rub with a raw onion dipped in salt.
POULTICES were made with potatoes, buttermilk, or cream; soap and sugar; linseed meal.
BACK-ACHE was rubbed with heron's fat, or boiled paraffin.
SUN BURN was rubbed with sour buttermilk.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:42
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RHEUMATISM was cured by boiling a heron for a week and rubbing the jelly to the affected part. Another remedy was to sting with a nettle. Rheumatic swellings were reduced by rubbing with ragworth.
BRONCHITIS was cured by putting wool of a black sheep on the chest.
CROUP was cured by splitting open a LIVE HEN and applying to the patient's chest.
For CHEST COLDS, drinks were made from the red Clover tops, Yarrow, Peppermint or tanzy.
CORNS were cured by applying Paraffin. Another remedy was to walk barefoot in a turf-bog, and the moisture of the newly cut turf would soften the corn.
People who were RUN-DOWN used to drink green cabbage water or eat beetroot.
CRACKED HANDS were rubbed with meal or goose grease, and wide cracks in fingers or toes were tied round with black sheep's wool.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:36
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A SPLINTER was extracted by applying a poultice of soap and brown sugar.
WARTS were tied round with a horse-hair until they fell off. Potato froth or suds was also rubbed on. Another remedy was to rub the wart with a snail, then stick the snail on a thorn bush and when the snail fell of the wart would disappear. Stagnant water found in a hole in a rock was also considered good.
SORE EYES were bathed in Holy Wells. For a STYE - rub it with a gold wedding ring nine mornings fasting. For swollen lids, rub them with a "fasting spit". Flaxseed was used to take dirt out of the eye.
THRUSH was a disease common to young children in those days. The remedy was to let a fasting gander screech into the baby's mouth on each of three mornings.
"CRAOS-GALAR" (got from putting brass in the mouth) was also a common ailment in children The father had to blow his breath into the child's mouth nine times on each of nine mornings.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:29
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For WHOOPING COUGH, the child was passed from the father to the mother under a mare donkey three times on each of three mornings. The parents should say "In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost"
For MEASLES, donkey's milk was given to a ferret, and whatever milk was left by the ferret, was given to the sick child to bring out the rash. Donkey's milk was also drunk.
HICCOUGHS were stopped by taking a lump of sugar soaked in vinegar.
DIARRHOEA was cured by eating dry flour, which had been browned on the pan.
For LUNG troubles, a glass of fresh cattle blood was drunk every morning.
For WORMS a pipe smoked first thing in the morning when fasting was the remedy.
INSECT bites were rubbed with bread soda. Stings stings were removed by pressing a watch key firmly on the spot.
A deeply embedded THORN was drawn out by applying a fox's tongue.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:21
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sometimes used.
The old people did not take kindly to the new houses, as they considered the old ones more comfortable and safer on a windy night. My grand-father has one of these old houses still and it was uses as a dwelling house until six years ago
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:19
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Long ago the houses in the district were covered with straw or rushes and were called "thatched" houses. The straw that had been threshed with a "flail" was supposed to be the best kind and was generally wheaten straw or as it is called "reed".
These houses generally contained but one room and so the bed was in the kitchen and was placed on the seat or settle; the floor was generally made of mud or earth which was tramped so hard as to resemble cement. A few of these floors remain in the locality even after thatched roofs have fallen into decay; the walls were made of mud and there were usually two one-paned windows.
Half doors, or as they were called "half hatches" were in all the old houses but are now a thing of the past. Turf was used for firing and sometimes wood. The houses were lighted by splinters made from fir, and home-made candles were
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:12
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There were a great many old cmarriage customs long ago. There were certain days that were counted unlucky for getting married. There was a poem published on this account.
"Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
and Saturday no day at all."
In these days the marriages were held in the marriageable girls house. Through superstition it was said whoever would be out of the house first would die first. It was also thought that whichever of the married couple got up first in the morning would have the trouble of life on them. If the girl had no clothes of her
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:07
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Páirc na Gábha.
There was a forge in this field once and there was a blacksmith working in it.
Dún Fúar.
In this field there is a cave and there is a cold high hill in it and hence it is called that name.
Páircin na Dobhách
In this field the soil is very dauby and for that reason the old people gave it that name.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 10:04
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In the year 1907 a French ship the name of which was the "Leon" was washed ashore on the rocks of Caherusk.
It was bound for Limerick from West America and carried a cargo of wheat, and had a crew of twenty-four sailors.
When it reached the Clare coast the sea was mountaneous high.
The captain was trying to steer it to the mouth of the Shannon but failed on each attempt.
Finally it was driven back by the storm and rough sea until it came to Caherusk where it was driven in on the rocks.
It stayed in a upright position for a part of the first day, but towards evening it began to list.
Nobody could approach them as the sea was so rough.
Two men were seen climbing down the ship and get
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 09:58
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awaiting decision
In the townland of Monasteraden there is but one tailor, he being sufficient to meet the needs of the surrounding villages. This tailor is an expert one and is never a week idle.
He stocks no cloth but when any person desires a suit of clothes it is usual to go to a shop and get a piece of material. This is brougham to the tailor who turns it into the garment required. When at work the tailor usually sits on a table.
Very little socks or stockings are knitted locally owing to the low cost of factory manufactured ones. but during the long winter's nights the women usually knit for pastime.
There is a considerable number of spinning wheels in the neighbourhood but many of them are not in working order and in fact parts of several of them are missing.
Usually on the death of a near relative people go in mourning by wearing black clothes. At weddings it is customary to wear some bright colour as blue or white. On St Patrick's Day some people like to dress in green.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 00:43
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time Saint Peter was on duty at the gates of Heaven and the souls were coming to him to gain admittance. There were all nationalties of the world their and amongst them was an Irishman named Paddy. Each one was obliged to have his own merits to get inside the gates. The Irishman threw in his hat meaning himself to follow after but St Peter said "Be easy now Pat how do you know that I am going to leave you in. But he answered "St Patrick invited me in". Next came a Jew and Peter asked him what did he do to merit Heaven. He said "I once gave two pennies to a poor woman. St Peter turned to the Irishman and said "Well Paddy what do you think we will do with him". He answered scornfully and said "Yerrah give him his twopence and leave him go to Hell.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 00:40
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though equally unfriendly touched him on the shoulder and said "William take my advice and get back quickly to your horse or if you do not you may find a Cork man in your job.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 00:38
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told me is about a young fellow who went to Derry to buy a suit of clothes. As he wanted to smuggle them in to the Free State all he was wearing was a suit of oul' done dungarees and an overcoat. He meant to change into his new clothes in the train, so he flung his dungarees out the window and opened the brown paper parcel the tailor had given him. What do you think - there was only a coat and waiscoat in the parcel.
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 00:36
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famous as a bee-keeper. In former years some of those families emigrated to America. Some of them were Scannells, Murphys and McCarthies. As far as I have heard "Coolacullig" means the "haunt of the boar".
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 00:36
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In the district there are about thirteen families dwelling. The approximate number of people being about 80. The family name most common in the vicinity is Murphy. Of the 13 families, three bear the name Murphy and the next most common is Twomey and Foley, two families of each bearing the same name. The most of the houses are slated except three or four which are either altogether or partly thatched. There are about eight people over seventy living in the district. The old people of the neighbourhood with whom I am acquainted cannot speak Irish. I know of two or three old ruins ruins in my district which were occupied many years ago. The old ruin which I am to describe fell in recent years, and was lastly occupied by a family named Murphy. It is situated at the western edge of the bog near my house. Some of the stones are still to be seen and others were carted away a few years ago for the building of a new house. Close by it are the remains of another old house which was owned by a man named Humphrey O Leary who died many years ago and he was at one time
senior member (history)
2020-08-01 00:27
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are alot of bright sparkling stars in the sky it is a sign of frost. When we see the clouds chasing one another it is a sign of rain and stormy weather.
"A rainbow in the morning is a shepherd's warning",
and "a rainbow at night is a shepherd's delight". If there is a rainbow in the morning it is a sign of wet weather.
The wind from the north denotes hard cold weather and sometimes snow. When the wind comes from the east it is a sign of dry hard weather. The wind from the south is a sign of soft mild warm weather and the wind from the west denotes rain. The wind from the the south or west brings most rain to our district.
When we are approaching rain and storms birds leave the coast and come inland. When the birds fly high it is a sign of fine weather but when the swallows fly low it denotes rain. The cat turns its back to the fire when we are approaching snowy weather. If the dog is seen eating grass the people expect bad weather. If we are to have bad weather the distant hills are looking nigh
senior member (history)
2020-07-31 22:21
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Cuas an Uisge.
There is a cave there ans the water runs in along ways in the land
Cuas na Madra
This cuas is frequented by otters or water-dogs
Cuas na Simhlé .
There is a hole down through the cliff and it resembles a chimney
Tralárach.
Means the middle strand
Cuas na Binne.
There is a promontory jutting out in the sea and binne means promontory
Tráigin =
means a small strand
Cuas Coinleán.
The field bordering this cave is very good for growing wheat and coinleán is what is left in the field after wheat.
senior member (history)
2020-07-31 22:17
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We have a lot of Irish names on our field and these are some of them Pairc a' Puill got its name because there is a big hole in it.
Poll Nora.
This place got its name because there was a woman supposed to be killed there long ago in the Famine times and lights were often seen there by night up to very lately. Nora was the name of the woman
Páirc Árd.
This field got its name because it is situated on very high ground
[?] na Gainimhe
This name is giver to the field because it is very sandy
Páirc an Tobhair
Long ago there was a well in this field and two families came to draw water from it The man that owned the field hindered the people of coming to the well and they had law and that is why the field is called that name.
Páirc na Slinne
In Olden times there was a lot of slate there
Talamh a' Lín
A lot of flax grew in this field years ago
senior member (history)
2020-07-31 22:10
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storm is brewing they can see from their boats the figure of a boy sitting on this stone playing a harp.
The name of the district in which I live is called LISSACAHA means the "fort of the Battle". It is so called because there was a battle fought there in olden times between the Danes and the Irish. It is said that in this war the Danes were defeated. The westerly part of Lissacaha is called the [?] because of the big wood that covered the northern portion of the land. The forts were used as a protection in time of war as the as the soldiers hid in them It is said that fairies lived in the forts long ago In olden times Dunmanus school was called CUM Í [?] meaning the valley of the Fairies. There is a cliff above this school and it is called FAIL NA GLÓRA because there is an echo in the rock. There is cave at the entrance but it cannot be seen now as it is covered with bushes and briars.
Dunmanus derives its name from the Dún or castle which is built there and Manus O Mahoney was in possession of the lands and hence it [?] the name Dún Maonais. Dunmanus has other townlands named FÁN MÓR means a big height because this land is at the bottom of the hill. STOUCK means a high point because the land is at the top of the hill CUMAR means a "glen" because the lands is surrounded
senior member (history)
2020-07-31 21:51
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from childhood were living in a cottage somewhere in the vicinity of this cave. One evening as the man was out in his boat fishing and his wife was saying her beads for his safety their son who was passionately devoted to music, took down his harp and began to play one of his favourite tunes, when all at once the sound of horses' hoofs were heard coming towards the cottage. The good woman thinking some party had lost their way (as there was a borheen[?] convenient to the place) went to open the door when the red coats - for it was they were there - seeing the beads in her hand, stabbed her through the heart and she fell dead in the doorstep. The son seeing his mother dead evaded the soldiers through some back[?] opening in the cottage and made the best haste he could to the shore to warn his father of the approaching danger; when the soldiers seeing his intentions quickly followed, and over took him at the summit of this precipitous cliff. The boy seeing no way of escape jumped over and his body was never found. Even up to this day the mark in the stone is quite plain although the sea washes over it constantly at high water. The people of the surrounding districts say that often when passing that way on or about twilight, they can hear the strains of music emerging from this little cave, always before a storm. Some fisher men go as far as to say that always when a
senior member (history)
2020-07-31 20:31
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Away down in the south coast of Ireland lies that sheltery bay of Dunmanus which presents in general the appearance of a wide spread lake girded by a zone of mountains of the boldest outline, it is up to twenty miles in length and from three to four miles in breadth and in some places fully forty fathoms deep. At the south side near the entrance the mountain barriers which confine it seem to start up abruptly from the waters edge and its northern shores are equally stern and precipitous. There are two islands of small dimensions in this large expanse of water the big one Carbery which stands farthest out lies about the centre of the bay and the second one Furze lies closer in to the south shore. A little farther inland from this island is the little inlet or cave called Tralára. The rocks enclosing this little cave are of the wildest character singularly broken and irregular in their outline. Rocks and stones, some of enormus demensions are flung together in strange confusion on one of those stones far up in the little strand is seen the print of a shoe and the ferule of a stick or crutch. This particular spot is known as the
"Cripples Leap"
(and [?] the old shannachies story goes) That at the time of the Penal days in Ireland a man and his wife with their son who was deformed
senior member (history)
2020-07-31 20:19
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Long ago there were many country people who seldom or never wore shoes or boots. In remote country places some of the women never wore any shoes, and those that did had them always for special occasions, such as for attending Mass. Some women walked to Mass barefoot, and then put on their boots near the Church.
Afterwards clogs came into use. Captain Somerville who lived in the Prairie was the first person who brought clogs to this district for his workmen. The clogs had timber heels and soles with cloth uppers and fastened with two straps on each side. The children growing up never got any shoes until they were
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 23:59
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páirc an aitinn; the Cumar; Meall an leasa; dreim téin; Currach; the graphs; Garráns.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 23:57
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The following are the names of fields in the townlands of :- Gunpoint, Schull, Coredaregan:- Gort-a-vallig; the lurrac[?]; the Drom; Cill; the Tower; the Mount; the Crúb; Brakeen; the Pound; Cnoc an bhóthair; Tráigh an Teampaill; Tráigh na h-aidhleann; Poítin; Cabhthán; Cuas gorm; Cuas an Phúca; Tráigh an anama; Faill na bhfiath; Cnoc na bpéicín; the Cross; Dub Carraig; Dealar Rocks; Barril Rocks; oiléan gar; the boilg mhór; Gort na ngé; Gort na eada; Cuas an mhuilinn; Codaig; Cnocán mór; Píosa na pállach; léisge; Páircín Gealbháin; páircín Demsey; Páirc an Tobair; Píosa an tíghe; Cúil an staidhre; Píosa an tréighe; Páircín an [?]; Faill leach; the migs; tráigh na sileach; the sgoonsa; Tráigh an tritheáin; Tráigh bhéag; Cuasa Mhuiris; Barleycove; Báinte; Gort na Rinnce; Bainseach; Gort an Leasa; the Gramps; the knobby-field; the mullachs; Páirc a h-oraigs; the Altar; Carraigín na ngabhar; Gort na gCaiseal; Páirc an locha; Rinn Ruadhas; Mór na ngabhann; the Babbit field; the Claisíns; the Glen; the Gorts; clais na gcuas; Clais an chapaill; Páirc an Tulacháin; Garraidhe Lancer; the Battle field; the [?]; Páirc an damhais; Portíns; the Faithches; the Sliabhs; Páirc gucman; Páirc na Cúaighthe;
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 23:38
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The following are the names of fields in the townland of Skehanore:- Cill na Reanna; Tráigh Bhléan; Sliabhs; Cúilin na hÚicire; Clais na Gainimhe; Faill an Líonáin; Clais Luch; Grafáin na h-Eirce; Tráigh na Róin; Puinnte Uí Ríogáin;
Garraidhe Mhaoghnuis; Gairdín Mór; Páircín na bPort; Garraidhe Glas; Ceann Árd; Guirtín na Gréiné; Garraidhe Flant; Gáirdín an Tuair; Coirríns; Pailís; Páirc an Leasa; Trágh na h-Inse; Gort na Lice; Carraig Mhaoghnuis; Tuairín Beag; Tráigh an Éadaig; coarse field; bog field; Calves' fieldin; the field of the well; brake; the big field; long garraidhe glas:
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 23:28
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The following names of fields are in the townland of Cuaileach.
claisín an phúca; the Priest's meadow; the magazine; the pound field; chúilín; Kit's garden; the guard's field; cnocán a'bhóthair; páirc mhór; páircín na leanna; páircín na gciúnleach; Johnson's field.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 23:28
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na rónta; Conolly's Rock;.
tráigh greanaighe; tráigh an rinn; tráigh an bháid; cúirín.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 23:26
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also found. They it to be a handle for some old stone weapon There is another Fort called Fortview. There is a wood near it. It is about two miles from Ballydehob.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 23:25
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There is a fort in a place called Ballycummisk. It is near the sea, and was first found about two years ago by people who were ploughing. It is a hole going down through the ground, with four stone walls. You could not see down now, beacuse it it filled in when they got too[?]. They could only see the walls. They dug down about a yard, and then drove down a ten foot crowbar, but the bottom could not be found. Very small pipes were found and shells This field is sloping to the sea. A stone about a yard long was
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 14:13
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Not so long ago the people of this district had recourse to their own cures for diseases and healing.
To cure the measles - a mouse was skinned, cleaned and boiled in a medium-sized saucepan and the soup was given to the patient.
An infected wound or sore was cured by a poultice of white-bread and boiling water.
Warts, boils etc. were cured by squeezing the juice of the bainnicín on them.
Nettle-Stings were and are still cured by squeezing the juice of the dock-leaf on them.
A sore corn was cured by scraping the back of a leaf like ivy on it. After a while the corn was easy to extract.
A mixture of soap and sugar was supposed to cure a boil.
Mac an Dá Abha - which is found at the junction of two big rivers or streams was the cure for the Yellow Jaundice
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 14:06
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There was a poor widow cottage woman long ago. She had one old cow. When the Winter came the cow got very thin and she had nothing to eat. But as soon as she saw April coming she screeched and was delighted. "Hurray" she said "here is Summer again" But March got three more days from April the first, second, and third and they were to be very cold and hard and they killed the old cow. This is called Seana Márta.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 14:03
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There is a fort in one of Mr. Collins' fields in Ballintubber Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. Long ago there was a woman and her son living near the fort. One
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 14:02
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his paws into it he will pull the snare and tighten it on himself and he cannot escape.
Turnips.
The people long ago used to scrape all the turnip inside and make a face and eyes of it and put a candle into it and put it outside the door and put a piece of silver paper to keep out the wind.
Whistlers.
They used to make whistlers from the skin of a sycamore tree. They used to make a whistler from a sop called a dubhán an gcaorach.
Bows and Arrows.
The boys long ago used to make bows and arrows and this is how they used to make them. They used to have a knife and a bent stick and they used to make the middle of the stick thin so as it would bend. They would then get a piece of twine and tie it at each end of the stick.
The arrow was made this way. A straight stick was got and a point made at the end of it and a bundle of feathers tied to the other end of it. There was a space left between the feathers so as to give room for the stick to rest against the twine.
"The days of the old Cow."
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 13:49
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would fly out. Matches are often played to see who would blow the haw the farthest.
Cribs.
Cribs were made from elder sticks. The elder are the best for it is hard to see them in the sun. The Crib is square with one small little door for the bird to go in. The door is held up with a small piece of stick. When the bird goes in she tips the stick and the door will fall down and catch the bird inside.
Bird Traps.
When a lark is rearing the young ones she is very often away getting food for them. If knitted wire is placed over the nest small enough not to let the young birds come out the mother bird will feed them in through the wire. When the birds are big enough they cannot go out. They can then be put into cages to sing.
Snares.
Snares are made of a piece of very fine wire and a stick. There is one small hole made at one end of the wire and the other end is put into the hole and a loop is made of it. The other end is tied to a stick. The stick is put down in the path of a rabbit. When a rabbit gets
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 13:42
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Catapults
Boys used Catapults to fire stones at birds. They were made of a gabhlóg and two pieces of elastic. The elastic was tied to the gabhlóg with two pieces of twines. A tongue of a boot was tied to each piece of elastic. A stone was put into the tongue. When the gabhlóg is pulled the elastic stretched and when you let the tongue go the stone flies off.
Tops.
Tops were made long ago from a reel and a nail. The reel is pared at one end and the head of a nail is put in at that side. The boys made lashers of a piece of stick and twine. Then the boys would spin the tops and hit them with the lashers and they used have races.
Pea Shooters.
Pea Shooters are made from an elder stick. The elder stick is soft in the centre and the hole can easily be made. When the hole is made a stone that is inside the skin of a haw is put into it and when you would blow your breath the haws
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 13:34
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There is a holy well in the Claidhe Reamhar in in Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. This well is in the Path called "The Rosary walk" It is up this path the monks passed going down from the monastery to the graveyard of Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork to the castle to say Mass. It is said that a monk had a relic of a saint and when he was passing the well the relic fell in.
The water turned brown and if you pour the water into your ear it will cure deafness.
There was another holy well in Mr. J. Shea's farm, Knockbrack, Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. The people used visit it long ago. There used be rags and Rosary Beads in the ash tree beside it. There was a holy well in Mr. Cotter's farm, Ballinakilla, Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. A woman washed her legs in it and it dried up.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 13:28
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there was a priest saying Mass there and the top of the well was for the altar. At this time there was not any water there. About twelve o'clock next day water sprung up and there was a small hole in the middle of the well like as if it was scooped with a finger.
At the eastern of Saleen there is another holy well. White well is the name of this place. In August the people visit this well usually about the 15th. and the week following. From time to time there were may cured in this well of sore eyes, pains and other different Ailments. Every one at this well says the Rosary. For every decade they kneel in different places and then when they finish with the Rosary they call to the well and get some of the well water to drink. Anyone suffering from sore eyes is washed with this water. In order to have full benefit of the well they usually make three visits or rounds in order to be cured. One leaving the well every one leaves something such as a Rosary beads or small statues. Others hang pieces of string off the branches of a tree that is at the well.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 13:19
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There are many holy wells in the parish of Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. There is one in Woodstock where the waterworks are. At this well there is a Cross but nobody seems to frequent it now.
Out in Ballycrana there is one. It is at the northern side of Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork.
The people go there every year on the 15th of August. The name of the well is B.V. Mary's Well. There was Mass said there long ago, and the top of the well was for the Altar. Three rosaries are said there and then the people drink a glass of water. There are Beads, a statue of the Blessed Virgin and medals as well as money at the well. There are bits of cloths and there is a cup to drink the water with. Lots of people were cured there and anything they used have in their pockets used to be left there. There is a fish in the well at Ballycrana and if a person sees it on an Easter Sunday morning it is supposed to cure that person of what disease he has. There is a bush beside the well and there is a lot of cloth on it. One time
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 09:18
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The road from the Blessed Well, Ballyhooly, to Ballyhooly Bridge is supposed to be haunted, and many people are afraid to pass there at night
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 09:17
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Long ago there was supposed to be a hole going from the house at Dromana to the river Blackwater. The house stands on a rock over the river. Any people whom the then owner thought objectionable were thrown into the hole and drowned. The hole was known as the "Murdering hole", on account of the numbers of people who were thrown in there and drowned.
There was a poor widow who had an only son, her sole support, and happened to get into bad favour with the owner of the great house. He ordered the boy to be taken and thrown into the "murdering hole".
The poor mother on finding out what was done with her son, (Áine was the mother's name) exclaimed in a heart-broken voice, "Do bhris san drom Áine", and ever since the house is known as Dromana.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 09:12
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certain gap in a certain field on a particular night, at midnight, and to carry a sgian coise duibhe in his right hand, and when the last horse and fair rider were coming out to make a thrust of the knife at the horse, and to pull the lady off the horse's back.
The husband was in the field at the time, and was ready at the gap, at the midnight hour. Suddenly he heard the sound of hoofs approaching, and got reddy. He did as he was instructed, pulled his wife off the horse's back, took her home, and they lived for many a year after happy and contented.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 09:08
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There lived in the neighbourhood of Áth na Cise, paróiste Cill a' Mhuilinn a young man, a labourer, many years ago. He married the most beautiful girl in the vicinity, and soon after her marriage, her husband and the neighbours noticed that she was beginning to pine away and look very bad in health.
At last she took to the bed, and changed so much in appearance, that her husband came to the conclusion that it was not his lovely wife at all but an "iarluis[?] left by the fairies.
After a short time the iarlis[?] died and was buried: but the husband was not satisfied at all that his wife was dead but was fully convinced that the fairies had taken her.
He consulted a "knowledgeable" woman in the neighbourhood, one who had the name of being friendly with the good people, and she advised him to be at a
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 08:53
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Half way between Castletownroche and Mallow is situated Carrig.
There is a demesne here owned by people of the name of Franks who were planters.
Somebody many years ago washed clothes here on a Sunday and spread them on the grass to dry.
A shower of blood came and soiled all the clothes.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 08:51
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There is an old mill at Rockvale Castletownroche on the left bank of the Abha Bheag opposite Red-Stone Well, which well supplies Castletownroche with water. This mill was half built many years ago, but whenever the masons attempted to proceed further with the building, their work was thrown down, and undone during the night by some mysterious agency.
If one stands on the road near the entrance to Red-Stone Well, and shouts, his words come echoing back to him from the direction of the old mill.
This echo is able to repeat whole sentences. The place to stand is at the bottom of Árd Caillichín
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 08:46
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Cliodhna has a residence near Glanworth over the Funcheon and one at Castletown Roche over the Aubeg or Abha Bheag.
When Cliodhna removed to the residence of her husband Ó Caoimh at Cuilinn, she lost her magic wand, and this prevented her from restoring her sister back to her original form.
Cliodhna had a son and heir one year after her marriage, and in two years more gave birth to two twin girls, as white as snow.
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 08:43
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would she give up Ó Caoimh and forget him She said she loved him too much, and could never give him up.
Cliodhna then struck the sister with a magic wand, and she was changed into a beautiful white cat, which still inhabits the caves at Castlecor.
Cliodhna married Ó Caoimh, but she lost her magic wand, and the sister still wanders about in the shape of a white cat, and can never regain her own shape except for the space of a week every year at Midsummer.
There is said to be an underground passage from Carrigcleena to the Caves of Castlecor.
The deep cave of Castle Cor (Castle Corith[?]) contains wonderful treasures, all under the control of the white cat mentioned in the story, but the cat regains her human shape for a week every year at Midsummer.
Whoever visits her during this time, and whose heart is not enamoured of wordly wealth, and prefers her, and her alone to her treasures, will be able to put an end to the enchantment
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 08:34
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There was a celebrated druid living near Mainistear Fhearmaighe, who had two daughters Cliodhnha and Aoibhill. He himself was called An Draoi Ruadh.
A chieftain in the neighbourhood named O'Caoimh used often visit them at their palace, and was very much in love with the younger daughter Aoibhill, who was very beautiful. Both daughters were comely, but the younger was the handsomer.
Cliodhna became jealous of her sister, and determined to get rid of her in some way. She consulted her nurse, and they made a fire in a remote part of the palace, and prepared a potion over a tripod. One of the ingredients was human hair. This was given in her food to the younger daughter and she at once began to pine away and get ugly.
At last she fell into a slumber resembling death, and her father and everyone mourned her as dead, and she was buried in a vault underneath the palace
That night the sister Cliodhna and the nurse opened the vault, and took the girl to the caves at Castlecor. They there asked her
senior member (history)
2020-07-30 08:32
approved
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On the road between Mallow and Fermoy is a very old graveyard - Carrig Graveyard. A good many years ago some say thirty years a Mrs Best of Carrig House was buried there. On the day of her burial - according to local tradition - two gold dogs gold rings and ear rings were buried with her. That night English soldiers came and opened the grave. It is not known whether they got the gold or not but next morning the grave was found open. It was afterwards closed by Mr Rea Killavullen.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:40
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The strongest man around Scartaglin was Dan Kearney. There was something famous about him. There was a gate his haggard and any man could not open it. There was a rock near it so that it could not be opened. Many a man came to see the rock and it failed them to move it. Dan put that rock into a car. These men did not believe that so Dan put that rock and another one into a car.
Michal Jones Cordal was the best runner known in Ireland. Thady Gallavan Castleisland had a saddlehorse, Maurice Kerin Scartaglin ran from Killsorcan he came the nearway and the horse came around the road. They had a bet[?] down, and Maurice won it. Dennis Cullinane Scartaglin walked to Cork in a day. James Leary Scart jumped the [?] glen, and he was the first one to do it. Another man came to see it, and he said he could not do it. So Con Thomase's father sent for James and he leaped it. His opponent tried to do it; he
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:30
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The potatoes are planted in January. First of all the ground must be ploughed in winter, and in January the ground is ploughed again, and then the field must be harrowed several times in order to break up the soil fine enough, because potatoes need very fine soil. Then it is drilled and manured. The seed is put down and the drills are closed. When the potatoes are about a foot high they are sprayed with bluestone and washing soda mixed together and are sprayed three times. When the stalks are withered out to a string, the potatoes are dug out of the ground and put into a pit in the field, and covered with earth, or rushes, or briars.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:26
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What goes to bed with his shoes on?
A horse.
What key cannot open the door?
The Donkey.
Why is the tip of a dog's tail like the heart of an oak?
Because it is farthest away from the bark.
What paper is hard to read?
Blotting paper.
It goes around the world and stops in the bed?
Sickness.
What is like a horseshoe?
His other shoes.
Why has a horse six legs?
Because he has fore in front and two behind.
Why is the sun cruel?
Because it burns people.
On which side of a jug is the handle?
On the outside.
How many peas are in a pint?
One.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:23
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In Castlebridge County Wexford there is a Martyr in the Church.
Long ago there was a man and his son living in a house by themselves, The boys' father was a robber, he tried to destroy the Blessed Eucharist, One of his sons tried to save it, but it was found, and the boys' father put him to death. He was embalmed in the church in a glass case, and the wound is to be seen in his forehead.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:20
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Near Ballineen Co. Cork there is a big rock in a field called the rock of the Mass. Long ago in Ireland in the Penal days the Priest used to say Mass on the rock. The Priest used to hide in the mountains. There was a reward of five pounds for anyone who would bring in the head of a Priest. The soldiers used to hunt the Priests and kill them. The Priests never said Mass in the houses, only out in the open field, or on a mountain.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:17
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In the year 1839 there was a hurricane. There was a terrible thunderstorm with great rainstorms and floods. All the crops were destroyed and the people were starving. The houses were flooded and several people lost their lives. The snow was falling thickly. Cattle, horses and sheep were lost, and buried under the snow.
Men were sent out to dig out the bodies of the people out of the snow. They piled up the snow in great heaps. All the animals were dug out of the snow, and others were perishing with the cold.
It was ten feet deep, any houses, birds, animals, or people could not be seen. About half the population died of the cold. Any person does not know the hardships the people went through during the year of 1839.
Collected by,
Betty Donovan,
Hill Villas,
Clonakilty
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:15
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When people do not keep their teeth clean they get very dirty. This is very bad for the teeth. The two front teeth are very sharp for cutting, and the next two are for tearing, and the back teeth are for chewing. If people do not masticate their food well they cannot digest it and it gives them a pain called indigestion, which is a very serious pain.
They should clean their teeth with a tooth-brush and paste, twice a day because it keeps them very clean.
If people do not keep their teeth clean an abscess forms in the tooth and the Dentist has to be visited.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:11
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Why is a beehive like a spectator?
Because it is a bee-holder.
What is it that a cat has which no other animal has ever had?
Kittens.
Why is a defeated army like wool?
Because it is worsted.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:09
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When is an artist a dangerous person.
When his designs are bad.
What is the difference between a pastry-cook and a bill poster?
One puffs up pastes and the other pastes up puffs.
What do you see people drink soup with?
Your eyes.
Why is coffee like an axe?
Because it must be ground before it is used.
What relation is the door-mat to the foot-scraper
A Step-father.
In which months do babies talk least?
February - the shortest.
When are the roads particularly greasy?
When the rain is dripping.
When would you expect to find a ship very clean?
When it leaves the wash.
What number is finished by adding one letter?
One - Add D and it is done.
What is the best way to make a cigarette light?
By pulling out half the tobacco.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 21:00
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A ship that was coming into Clonakilty with coal was torpedoed. Eight sailors were drowned. They were taken up to Clonakilty Courthouse where they were coffined and then they were taken to a private graveyard in Inchydoney where they were interred.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 20:58
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Out at the Red Strand Point near Castlefreke Rosscarbery Co. Cork, a ship called the Norwegian was torpedoed by a German ship and a number of people saw it sink from the Galley Head Lighthouse. For weeks after people were going out to see the wreck, and all the goods that were on the ship were seen floating in the sea, such as diamond rings, high-heel shoes, silk stockings, barrels of vaseline, and furs, and people from the district made them into fur coats.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 20:55
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On the 26th. December crowds of boys and men collect and go around from house to house in a procession and they have a holly bush decorated with all kinds of coloured papers.
They sing the Wren-song and whatever money they make during the day, they share it at the end of the day.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 20:53
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In the year 1875 there was a great snow in Ireland. The hills were covered with snow, and the ground was frozen.
A man, his wife, and their two children lived on a farm. The working men were gathering in all the sheep from the snow but one was missing.
They did not mind the loss of one.
That night when they were all sitting around the fire the woman told the girl to go upstairs to see if the baby was asleep. When she went upstairs the cot was empty. She came down and said that the baby was missing.
They said they would search for her. They carried lanterns and shovels, and three of them went in one direction and two others in another direction they returned home without finding it. one man said he would not go home without finding the child, he travelled all night and at last he saw footmarks. He followed them and he found the child laying down with the missing sheep. The child was frozen and the man
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 20:51
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On the road to Timoleague there was a house built in a field. The man that owned the house dug up the ground to sink a pump. When he dug six feet, there was some gold in the centre of stones and some of the stones were tinged with gold. He did not like to touch the stones and he filled in the hole again. He dug another hole but he did not find any gold in that hole.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 20:44
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It was late when John struck for the road.
The farmers do be very busy in Spring.
John brought the milk before him.
The man has three drills of thinning turnips from him.
How did it rise with you? John (succeed)
The hurry was on him.
Hit him with a kick
John was good to sing.
He didn't let the grass grow under his feet.
He had it done while the cat would be licking her ear.
If you fall don't wait to get up.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 15:34
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There was a man living in Knockmakilla and he had a black horse. There was a fort in his land and it was not far from the house. He was not long in bed one night when he saw a black horse outside the window and he thought he was his own horse. He got up and he went out to catch the horse but he would not wait for him. The horse went towards the fort and the man followed him and he never stopped until he disappeared into the fort but the man did not go any farther but he returned home.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 15:31
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One night Helen Kelleher and Gretta Barrett went to a wake back to Lackadol[?] After remaining for some time at the wake they were returning home. They did not know what time of the night it was. They came along until they came close to the school and then they heard all the breaking of timber and the galloping of horses about the school yard. They got a terrible fright and it continued until they went as far as the shop. When they were as far as the shop it vanished until they went up as far as the kiln. Then they heard it again until they went up home to Kellehers. When they went in home they could scarcely move with the fright and when they saw the time, it was 2 o'clock.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 15:26
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Cockhill is in the parish of Millstreet about 3 miles east of Millstreet.
There was a woman living in Cockhill about four years ago. The night she died a man came to see her. When he was coming to the yard he saw a donkey. When he came nearer, the donkey had horns. The man went into the dyke and passed on. When he went into the house the woman was dying. They asked him to go for the Priest for her. He went away and when he was going out of the yard he saw the donkey again. The man could not pass him out this time. The man took out his Rosary beads and Prayer Book and he went inside the ditch and he ran for the Priest. The Priest came and he was only just gone away again when she died.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 15:20
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(1) This poem is supposed to have been composed by a Travelling Shoemaker who was employed in Millstreet over 60 years ago. He seems to have come from Kerry and before he left Millstreet for the "States" He composed
This poem
I
Farewell to Millstreet - that dear little town
Of honour and beauty - of fame and renown
Of pleasure and pastime and sweet unity
Some distant fond objects will remind me of thee.
II
Farewell to the groves of sweet Coomlegane
And the pond and the Castle to the East of Drishane
And charming Mount Leader with its murmuring rills
And the tapering trees that grow tall on its hills
III
Farewell to Kilmeedy - that romantic place
That stands so attractive to the traveller's gaze
Its gigantic walls that were built days of yore.
By that famed Irish chieftain named McCarthy Mór.
(4)
Oft through each valley and cool summer shade
Between Clara and Mount Leader - I often times strayed
On the banks of the Finnow, that enhances the scene
Where it joins the Blackwater twixt Drishane and Dooneen."
---------------------------------------------
This was a favourite Song at all "American Wakes" in the neighbourhood of Millstreet about 40 years ago.
On the morning of the emigrant's departure for the Millstreet Railway Station the song was the final one given before leaving the home and I remember well how the people wept on hearing it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 15:15
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Millstreet, quaint and quiet village
Nestling mid your emerald hills
Though I see you but in memory
How my heart with rapture thrills
Gentle stream & busy mill-wheel
Smile beneath the summer sky
Church & convent calm & peaceful
Welcome still the passer by.
Friends the nearest, friends the dearest
I can see them now at will
And the sunshine of their kindness
Is abiding with me still
In the "Chapel Yard" are lying
Many kin now gone for aye,
And new faith came stealing o'er me
As I knelt beside their clay.
Something in the air of Ireland
Something in her churchyard green,
Some strange beauty fills the vision
In no other land is seen.
It may be the faith of ages
Sweeping downward through the years,
It may be that pearl so priceless
Shining through a nation's tears
For where'er I went in Ireland
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 15:04
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This poem entitled "Millstreet" was composed by an American lady named Julia A. Sullivan.
Her parents lived in Coolinarney which is a townland about 4 miles NW of Millstreet.
They emigrated to America some years after the Famine.
Julia became an American school Teacher in, I believe, New York.
She visited the "Old Land" in 1910 and visited all the numerous friends of her parents.
After returning to America she published several pretty poems among which is "Millstreet."
She sent a few copies of her book to her friends in Millstreet Parish and one of them kindly lent Mrs Riordan the book so that the poem may be included in this selection.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 15:01
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Júdeen Punk
Ellen the Clipper
Cáitín Strok.
"Castleblain"
Máire na gCat.
Taidhgín Mish Mash
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 14:59
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"Dan Queen Anne"
Ellenín Prod.
Nellie Shirt in the kettle - Nellie "Gray"
Corcín Tailor and Pegeen Plant
Big Ellen and Big Bill
Mág Bladder.
"Dan Bawlay" - Dan Blackie
Mickie Whiskers
Mike Courdroy.
PaddyO - the Hangman (so called because he had a favourite expression when vexed "I'll hang for you"
"Jack Coy"
Johnnie Peter - the 7 Years' sleeper (remained in bed 7 years - through nervousness.)
John Cussie
Johnnie Cabbage Stump (was tall and lanky)
Denisheen Cruardh
Tim Jelbo.
Conneen the Bown.
Daniel Sael
Dan Bowery (a returned Yank.)
Jack Slap.
Jeremeen Sal.
Mickeen Paraffin Oil
John Thor.
Mike "Fox".
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 14:55
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A herb called the elixir of life grows on poor land. It is said that any person, who drank the water of that herb when dying, that he wold get all right. A man named Tim Horgan, was dying, and a friend named Dan Horgan came to see him. The friend knew this herb and how to prepare it. The mother of the man that was dying was living, and Dan Horgan thought that she would no loss to die. He brought the old lady out in the field, and he pulled the grass around the herb, and told the old lady to pull it. She pretended to be blind, and that she could not see it, he caught her hand and told her to pull. All of a sudden she caught his hand and he pulled it. He knew that he was done, and he went and prepared the herb for the man that was dying. He was cured, and was mowing hay next day. It is said that anyone who knew this herb and pulled would die soon after. When Dan Horgan was going home someone asked him how Tim Horgan was. He said that he was alright, but I am done." He died on the way home. The old people long ago usually tied a cat to it and left him pull it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:31
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Long ago in the olden times a priest got a mass to say and he forgot to say it.
He died and every night he would go to the chapel and he got no one to answer the mass.
And he came this night. And on the altar about twelve o clock a drunken man came into the chapel and the priest asked was there anyone here to answer mass and the man answered that their was.
And the man answered the mass.
And the priest flew off to
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:28
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heaven and the man got a weakness and he was in the chapel until morning and he died at the fright of the priest saying mass.
The story was related to me by:
Mrs McDonnell,
Killeen,
Donoughmore,
Co Cork.
Age 47 years
(Writer)
Nell Barrett,
Killeen,
Aghabullogue,
Co Cork.
Age 14 years
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:27
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Long ago in the olden times a priest got a mass to say and he forgot to say it.
He died and every night he would go to the chapel and he got no one to answer the mass.
And he came this night. And on the altar about twelve o clock a drunken man came into the chapel and the priest asked was there anyone here to
answer mass and the man answered that their was.
And the man answered the mass.
And the priest flew off to
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:25
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because she would be mounted on a white horse's back.
And as soon as he saw her he snatched her from the horse and carried her home and so they lived happily ever after.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:24
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One night long ago at a wedding the fairies came and took the bride away.
In a few nights after she was met by another party on horse back.
She told one man to tell her husband to meet her on such a school cross and she told the man in Irish and to have a glass of holy water and a blessed candle in his pocket - a spear blessed by a priest and a cock to crow three times and when the crowd of fairies horses would be passing by he would know herself among the rest of them
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:22
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immovably in this church.
Long ago people used to take this
bowl as a cure for cattle.
One day a farmer took this precious bowl, to cure a sick cow.
He lost the precious bowl, and he confessed it to the nuns, The nuns found it.
One night Saint Abbey with God's help, built the church and Saint Abby put, the bowl between two enormous stones, so that any one might not take it.
There is the arm of a priest, in a hole in the shape of a well, this is also used as a cure.
When any one performs a "round", they leave some relices after them.
Some people leave, buttons, hair-pins, pennies, and other articles.
The history of this well was
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:19
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Abby's day, the eleventh of February. On the eleventh of February mass is offered up in honour of Saint Abby.
On that day the statue of Saint Abbey is presented in the, Sacristy long ago people used to bring a woollen thread,
and measure the length of the Saint and also around her neck. People used this woollen thread, as a cure when children would have the chin cough.
Long ago invalids used to come from Bantry, they would leave their crutches near the graveyard, and sleep in the graveyard Whit Saturday night, and perform a "round" on Whit Sunday, All the people that did this were cured.
People take the water home for cures.
There is a blessed bowl fixed
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:16
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There is a beautiful holy well in Ballyvourney, it is nicely situated in a piece of ground owned by Meiberrys (Protestants) About ten yards from this well there is a grave yard. There is the ruins of an old church, and a protestant church in this grave yard.
The patron Saint of Ballyvourney district is Saint Abby, when Saint Abby was going to Ballyvourney she stopped, at Henmount to take a drink there, was a stone near the well, and she knelt on the stone to take the drink, and the print
of her hands and feet are still to be seen there.
People perform "rounds" there on Whit Sunday, and on Saint
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:13
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Cabhair agus grastá agus cáird[?] ó Dhia cugainn. Cabhair gach lá is táim d'iarraidh. Sacraimint [?] agus neartuigh Dia sinn
Agus tugaim suas m'anam do Dhia agus o Mhaoidean Mhuire cun a shaobhail Tugaim suas m'anam do Mhiceal agus do Conchubhar gleigeal cun go saorofaí mé ó bás obann, ó teine, ó uisge, agus ó comdrach. Mhaoidhean Mhuire liom i luighe. Brigidh liom ag eirighe agus Padruig liom i ngach aith a gabaimh.
Gobnaith geal do brathnuigh Báíle Mhuirne Seachain mé ar mheileos,
Deirtear an Paidir seo nuair a bhíthear ag dul a codlad
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:10
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in the chapel there with
my Inchigeela lass
III
We fled through Inniscarra groves
Before the dawning of the day
We took passage in a yankee ship
That in Queenstown harbour lay
The captain being a fenian bold
Our safety to compass
And then I set sail, from Eire's lands to Grainnawails with my Inchigeela lass
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:08
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I
To greet you proud Eve Learys
sons and daughters
Fair and Pure
Assembled at the Southern club
all friendship to renew.
The annual opportunity allow
to let it pass
Ere I'll recite a tale to night
to my Inchigeela lass.
II
Eve Leary a how sweet thy name
Bring in the exiles years.
Though I have not seen the heath clad hills
Those five, and twenty years
And there I met my heart's delight
On a Sunday morning at Mass
I knelt and prayed in the
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:05
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stand out along the field. So people still like to kneel outside the door.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:04
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convenient to the house, where all the neighbours could plainly see it and it would not be removed for a week.
Then a sheet would be placed outside some other house in another district and so on so that all the people would know that when the sheet is out that Mass will be held in that house on that week.
The priest in those days used have to sleep and hide in caves. If they were captured by Cromwell's soldiers they were sure to be insulted, tortured and executed. When Cromwell left Ireland
the people began to build small churches in a V shape as they were very poor. The altar was placed at the narrow end, and then the people used
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 13:02
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Long ago in the time of Cromwell when priests were not allowed to say Mass, They had to say Mass in a cave. If they were found saying Mass they would be hung drawn and quartered. It was at
that time priests said Mass in houses and that was how the Stations came into being.
The people at that time, the neducated, were very clever in their own way. So the Stations for Christmas and Easter were held regularly. The people had an advertisement that was never detected by Cromwell's soldiers.
When a Station Mass was to be held in a house in the district or townland,
A white sheet would be placed on a high bush or brier
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 12:58
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She speaks co-equal to rich and poor
And when death will call her
May angels guard her,
Young lovely Mary from Barrackview.
III
This noble lady is educated,
She knows a deal of astronomy
Both navigation and mensuration
each book and page of Geometry
She is daily teaching through revelation
She writes dictation in Stenography
And without failure, she is truly faithful
She is well up reared in theology.
IV
She is a native of Toames near Gearagh
With generation longside the Lee
In golden ages where poets proclaimed
In the old Gaelic with Ireland free.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 10:04
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There are five graveyards in the parish of Millstreet. Some of these are very ancient. The names of the different graveyards are Drishane, Cullen, Nohival Millstreet and Keel. Drishane graveyard is in the townland of Drishane and Cullen graveyard is in the townland of Cullen and likewise with the graveyards of Nohival and Millstreet but Keel graveyard situated about three hundred yards from Millstreet is in the townland of Claramore, where the Hospital inmates are buried.
The oldest of these five graveyards are Drishane. Cullen and Nohival. There is an new graveyard also in Drishane and people are still buried in the old one. There is a tomb in Drishane and people are still buried there. We are told that this particular tomb is about ninety nine years old. This old graveyard in Drishane is about one hundred and twenty years old and the new graveyard is about twenty five years in use.
Some of the old people of this parish say that Drishane churchyard is undoubtly the most ancient graveyard we have here in
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 10:00
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There are two forts in the townland of Kippagh, one in Stephen Riordans farm and another in Tim Buckley's farm. There is a fort also in a field owned by John Long of Knocknalomon. This is known as "the Lios". In nearly all districts forts are to be found. They are dated back to the Danes in Ireland about 1014 A.D. These foreigners were supposed to have lived in these forts as they afforded protection to them from the Irish inhabitants which they regarded as enemies. The forts we have in this locality are usually round. They are surrounded by a large mould and these moulds are usually covered with trees.
People very seldom interfere with these forts because it is regarded as unlucky. Crops are never sown in forts on this account in this district. Forts are usually within view of one another and there is generally some underground passage leading from one to another
The old people tell us lots of stories regarding people making use of the land occupied by forts in this district. A man is supposed to have once
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:53
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nine days to three weeks. Each bird's nest is lined with hair, moss or feathers and they are protected by sticks and mud on the outside.
The eggs of the different birds are covered with spots which vary in colour. Some are brown and green while others are blue and brown.
Some of the old people firmly believe that the weather can be judged by the behaviour of certain birds. When the rooks are seen flying towards the woods early in the evening it is a sign of rain. Swallows fly low when wet weather is approaching and we can hear the curlew crying in the bogs and moors. When crows fly like a kite and seem to fall downwards as if they were shot it is a sure sign of rain. When the birds of the sea - known as seaguls fly inland to this district, it is regarded as a sure sign of bad weather, the reason being that these birds were compelled to come owning to bad weather along the coast and it is sure to come to us in a day or so.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:43
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The wild birds that are found in this district are:- the wren, thrush, blackbird, robin, lark, crow, sparrow, yellow-hammer, magpie, swallow, stair, tom-tit and jack-daw. The cuckoo who also spends the Summer months with us migrate when the Winter draws near.
The swallow and corncrake also leaves us when Summer is over. A bird known as the heron also visits us. This bird is commonly called the crane and is not so numerous in this country as the other birds.
The robin usually builds its nest in mossy ditches and fences; the wren usually finds a more concealed place for its nest such as on a bush or in a wall. The thrush and blackbird build their nests on the tops of trees and on hedges. The crows build their nests in the chimneys of houses. If they were allowed to do so. they build their nests on trees in the woods. The cuckoo never builds a nest of its own but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds The length of time it takes birds to hatch varies from
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:36
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Boots were not made locally but almost every man in the district was able to repair them. We are told that a shoe-maker named Dan Coffee lived in this district in former times but there is no shoe-maker here at present. In former times clogs were worn in this district, but they were never made here. There are seven shoe-makers in Millstreet. Some of their people were shoe-makers back to the third generation. There were more shoe-makers in Millstreet formerly than at present because there were more boots and shoes made locally. Leather was tanned in a place called "the Tanyard" in Millstreet. In former times some people used hides as footcoverings.
The old people at present advise us to keep our feet dry and warm because it is one of the best means of keeping in good health. An old man was once asked to what he attributed his long life and this is what he said - My head and feet I kept from cold which cause me to live so old.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:29
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awaiting decision
There is more care taken of the feet nowadays than formerly. In the olden days people used not wear boots until they were grown up men and women.
At present most of the children in this parish go barefoot during the Summer. We are told that a woman who lived in Caherbarnagh years ago never wore a boot or shoe except when she went to town.
There is an old saying "Dhá bhróig ort" which meant marriage to you. A story is told of a man, who carried his boots under his arm until nearing the town which he was visiting. On the way he hit his toe against a stone and hurt it badly. He remarked afterwards that it was lucky for him that he was not wearing his boots because he would have one of them destroyed.
When people washed their feet during the night, it was considered unlucky to leave the feet water inside during the night. "Uisce na gcos bhí amuig" the house-keeper would say.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:22
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awaiting decision
this parish and go as far as to say that there is a tomb in this old graveyard with glass pannels in which there is an inscription which states that it was built by a chieftain named Mac Carthy who built Drishane Castle in the 15th century.
There is a descendant of this chieftain buried in this graveyard also whose castle and lands were confiscated in the reign of Queen Elizabeth on account of his loyalty to the Catholic Religion. This is the best proof we can find that Drishane is one of the oldest graveyards to be had in the countryside. Some thirty years ago the local district council bought another acre of land for the purpose of adding it to this old graveyard as is was not large enough.
In western Caherbarnagh there was an old graveyard and it was known as "the mock". In the field in which this graveyard was there is still a stone standing upright in the shape of a cross. We are told that a chieftain was buried there and that this cross stands in memory of him.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:15
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awaiting decision
There are five graveyards in the parish of Millstreet. Some of these are very ancient. The names of the different graveyards are Drishane, Cullen, Nohival Millstreet and Keel. Drishane graveyard is in the townland of Drishane and Cullen graveyard is in the townland of Cullen an likewise with the graveyards of Nohival and Millstreet but Keel graveyard situated about three hundred yards from Millstreet is in the townland of Claramore, where the Hospital inmates are buried.
The oldest of these five graveyards are Drishane. Cullen and Nohival. There is an new graveyard also in Drishane and people are still buried in the old one. There is a tomb in Drishane and people are still buried there. We are told that this particular tomb is about ninety nine years old. This old graveyard in Drishane is about one hundred and twenty years old and the new graveyard is about twenty five years in use.
Some of the old people of this parish say that Drishane churchyard is undoubtly the most ancient graveyard we have here in
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:07
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awaiting decision
cursing his son she said "That you may be dead for Oidhche Samhna" when the man saw his son he said to him why did he do it and on Oidhche Samhna this young man died.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:06
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belonging to small farmers.
The Mc Carthy O'Learys had a private Chapel for their own use this was at the left side of the Parish Church.
There is a story told about one of them who filled the font in the sacristy of the Church with ink instead of holy water and when the priest who was afterwards Bishop of Kerry R.I. P. was vested to go on the altar to say Mass he dipped his finger in the font and instead of holy water he splashed himself with the ink. Of course the priest was very much annoyed and the result was that the O'Leary's Chapel was closed and they had to enter the Church like the rest of the people.
There is a story connected with one of the Wallaces.
One day a junior Wallace the son of the Landlord had evicted a family consisting of a poor widow and six children. Mr Wallace (Senior) was away but just as he was coming home he saw the evicted family standing at the door and he heard the woman
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 09:00
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The Wallaces of Drishane and the Mc Carthy O'Learys of Coomlogane were the landlords of the town of Millstreet and a large portion of the surrounding district.
Those landlords were very hard on their tenants and if the rent was not paid when it was due sometimes the tenants were evicted. The Mc Carthy's were so independent that they refused to allow the railway to be built through their estate which would bring the station right up to the town, instead the station was built a mile outside the town, where it still is, this is a great inconvenience to the people of Millstreet.
Mc Carthy O'Leary was a very hard landlord although they were Catholic they were worse then the Wallaces who were Protestants. How these landlords got into possession of their land was by taking possession of the land
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 08:54
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Long ago men was very strong. A man in Curraleigh whose name was John Ryan. His was a very strong and big man. He could throw very heavy weights and lift very heavy sacks of potatoes and other grain.
senior member (history)
2020-07-29 08:50
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First they gathered the milk in crocks, when it was ready they put it into a churn While they were churning they put boiling water in it. The people churned by hand. When they were finished they gathered it with a butter vessel. Then they put salt in it and fixed it in paperes prepared for it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 14:10
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awaiting decision
dissatisfied, being Commander and Chief of that Party.
Drishane Castle became in 1908 the property of a French Catholic Teaching sisterhood known as The Congregation of the "Holy Child Jesus"
It is recorded that from Dermot Mac Carthy who surrendered Cork to the English in the 12th. Century was descended Dermot More, ancestor of the branches of the Mac Carthys of Drishane and Dripsey and Carrignavar.
In 1450 Dermot Mac Carthy built the Castle of Drishane as shown in a monument in the ancient burial ground in its demesne on which is the inscription "Sacred to the Memory of Donagh Mac Carthy whose great grandfather - Dermot Mac Carthy, second son of Tadg Mac Carthy, Lord of Muskerry, built the Castle of Drishane in 1450.
In 1641 Drishane Castle was garrisoned in support of Charles I and it was also garrisoned during the Fenian outbreak in 1867. A great oak door, heavily sheeted with iron, situated on the lower tower and facing west, has several rents on it as if torn by bullets. About 1643 additions were made to this castle, several fireplaces with the monogram W, thus marking the time of its occupation by the Wallises whose motto "Fortis et Fidelis" is also to be seen in several places in it. The Wallises continued
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 14:07
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It is said that it is very little butter you would have & very little luck if you did not rub holy-water and salt to the cows udder. If a man came into where you be making the butter and if he lit his pipe and went out again without putting his hand on the churnstaff the butter would not gather together.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 14:04
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Formerly people had not as many meals a day as they have at the present day. The food used was both plain and simple They used to have two meals a day namely the breakfast and the supper. For the breakfast they used skimmed milk and potatoes and yellow gruel. They used eat at about ten o' clock in the morning and eight o' clock in the evening.
When the potato crop failed in 1847 the people lived mostly on oatmeal as the use of tea was altogether unknown. There was no such thing as evening tea, or a forth meal of any kind. The people worked about three hours every morning before their breakfast. We are told by the old people that potatoes were usually eaten for both meals and skim milk and butter milk were often used with the potatoes. The bread used was known as oat meal bread. This bread was made from oat meal and milk, but was first steeped in lukewarm water. After this it was put standing before the fire in the shape of a grid iron.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 14:02
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Formerly meat was very scarce and when the people used it they had salt meat principally. They used no fish or vegetables at that time. On Easter Sunday they eat a large quantity of eggs. Although a number of older people say that fish or vegetables were not used in their younger days, some others are of the opinion that ling fish was used to a great extent, and that the principal vegetables used then were cabbage, turnips and lettuce. The old people are said to have had no special foods in those olden days.
About fifty years ago tea is is said to have come first into use in my district.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:58
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awaiting decision
Formerly people had not as many meals a day as they have at the present day. The food used was both plain and simple They used to have two meals a day namely the breakfast and the supper. For the breakfast they used skimmed milk and potatoes and yellow gruel. They used eat at about ten o' clock in the morning and eight o' clock in the evening.
When the potato crop failed in 1847 the people lived mostly on oatmeal as the used of tea was altogether unknown. There was no such thing as evening tea, or a forth meal of any kind. The people worked about three hours every morning before their breakfast. We are told by the old people that potatoes were usually eaten for both meals and skim milk and butter milk were often used with the potatoes. The bread used was known as oat meal bread. This bread was made from oat meal and milk, but was first steeped in lukewarm water. After this it was put standing before the fire in the shape of a grid iron.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:45
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is a landmark in this part of the country.
Caherbarnagh is a large townland in this School district. It means the fortress of the gaps, as there are many gaps in the mountain - on its southern side. After the famine, numbers of people from my district emigrated to foreign countries, especially to England and America.
There is a lake in Caherbarnagh and it abounds with fish especially trout.
Gurtavehy lake, south of the school and near the mountain side, is very beautiful in Summer time. Numbers come long distances fishing for trout in this lake in Summer. A stream issues from the lake which divides Gurtavehy from Tourbonia.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:42
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In this School District the most usual names are Murphys, Sullivans Buckleys and Lynches. We live in North Cork, Parish of Millstreet three miles from the Kerry border and in the Barony of West Muskerry.
This district is not so thickly populated now as formerly. Only two persons in the district converse in Irish.
The majority of the district is hilly and bog land in places, therefore the land is not arable. Most of the houses are slated.
There are few woods in my district by there are shelter belts growing round most houses.
Some years ago there were many ruins of old houses but now there are not traces of many as the stones have been drawn away and the land levelled.
The Blackwater is the nearest river and it is noted for brown trout and spring salmon. Its tributary, the Araglin is noted for pike fishing. Men come a distance of fifty miles on Sundays fishing in those rivers.
The principal townland is Ballydaly where a new church has been erected some years ago. It can be seen for miles away and
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:36
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the country. Often straw boys visit the house on this occasion. The more humble the parties are the more welcome they give the straw boys.
There is not so much welcome for them as in the old days especially if they are anxious for drink.
After the marriage ceremony, rice is thrown on the parties for good luck. Another old custom in this district is throwing an old shoe after the married couple when leaving the church after the ceremony. They believe it is lucky to wear "something old, and something new, something borrowed and something blue".
It is often said "happy is the bride that the sun shines on"
The bride travels on the last car of the "coisire" going to the church to get wed but after the ceremony, the married couple leave the church and go away in the first car.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:32
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There are certain days and months thought unlucky to get married. As a rule few marriages take place in this parish in May or in August. Regarding the latter month, there is an old saying - "the sheaf that is bound in August is opened again in the spring".
Mondays and Fridays ar said to be unlucky days for marriages. The time of the year people usually get married in is Shrove. During late years many marriages take place during the year and fewer in the Shrove time in this district.
There is not so much matchmaking s formerly and marriages are less frequent.
The number attending weddings is not so large as formerly. Only the relatives are now invited and there is only a private party.
There are scarcely any night weddings now and the festivities are during the day.
The custom of eating the "Gander" is usual in Country places. That is - when the marriage arrangements have taken place a number of friends and relations are invited to the girl's house, some days before the marriage and there is feasting and dance carried on far into the night It resembles the weddings held formerly in
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:21
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owners of Drishane till the close of the 19th century.
The late Lady Beaumont, whose husband was a Wallis put the castle into perfect repair and it was well maintained by Mr. William Wallis who was a noted Agriculturalist and Cattle Breeder.
About 1882 Drishane estate went into Court of Chancery on the application of some Insurance Companies where it remained till 1912 when the property was sold before Judge Ross to Mr Stack of Fermoy, from whom through Mr Cornelius Duggan of Cork, Drishane Castle was purchased by the Nuns who are its present owners.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:17
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dissatisfied, being Commander and Chief of that Party.
Drishane Castle became in 1908 the property of a French Catholic Teaching sisterhood known as The Congregation of the "Holy Child Jesus"
It is recorded that from Dermot Mac Carthy who surrendered Cork to the English in the 12th. Century was descended Dermot More, ancestor of the branches of the Mac Carthys of Drishane and Dripsey and Carrignavar.
In 1450 Dermot Mac Carthy built the Castle of Drishane as shown in a monument in the ancient burial ground in its demesne on which is the inscription "Sacred to the Memory of Donagh Mac Carthy whose great grandfather - Dermot Mac Carthy, second son of Tadh Mac Carthy, Lord of Muskerry, built the Castle of Drishane in 1450.
In 1641 Drishane Castle was garrisoned in support of Charles I and it was also garrisoned during the Fenian outbreak in 1867. A great oak door, heavily sheeted with iron, situated on the lower tower and facing west, has several rents on it as if torn by bullets. About 1643 additions were made to this castle, several fireplaces with the monogram W, thus marking the time of its occupation by the Wallises whose motto "Fortis et Fidelis" is also to be seen in several places in it. The Wallises continued
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 13:08
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Kilmeedy and Drishane Castles are in the immediate vicinity of Millstreet. The former is a ruined Castle and Drishane Castle has been beautifully restored. Both are in the Parish of Drishane and situated on the boundaries of the baronies of West Muskerry and Duhallow. Kilmeedy Castle was erected by Dermot MacCarthy in 1436 and Drishane by his son in 1445. Some think that the latter date is not quite correct.
The original name of Millstreet town was Coomlegane. This town and Drishane lie quite close to the northern boundary of the barony of West Muskerry.
There were castles in Duhallow owned by the OKeeffes and Mac Auliffs, two once important septs now long fallen from their former greatness.
Early writers describe Kilmeedy as a small castle of the ODonoghue's, now in ruins and very likely it was built to command the wild mountain Pass form Macroom to Millstreet.
An episode in the history of Kilmeedy Castle was that Charles Mac Carthy of Kilmeedy, being in a party with Colonel Phayre at the gate of his castle, Colonel Ingoldsby rides up to the gate with a pistol in hand and shot him dead at which action the said Phayre was much
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 12:58
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There is a wood in our farm which is called O Learys wood and this wood is two miles long.
There was a man named Cashman stoned to death in this wood during the Fenian movement because the people were afraid to trust him, they thought he was giving away their secrets.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 12:56
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Our Land is situated in the townland of Coolemore which means the big corner.
The names of the fields in our farm are the (Cross-field) (Kiln-field) (big-field) and (sheep-field) and (pound-field)
Cross field
So called because there is a cross road near the field which is known as the cross-field.
Pound-field.
So called because it is the place where we Keep the cattle overnight which we intend taking to the fair next day.
Kiln-field.
So called because there is a kill there.
Big field.
So called because it is bigger than the others.
Sheep-field.
So called because it is a very good field for sheep.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 10:11
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There are many roads in our district. Some are called main roads and others by roads or bog roads. The principal roads now ar steam rolled. The one running through the village of Ballydesmond is a Cork Kerry road. It will take you to the principal towns in Kerry.
Before this road was made about sixty years ago there was an old road from Cork to Tralee which was commonly called the
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 10:07
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then, only a Sheebeen down O'Connell Street (formerly called the Lane) which was occupied by Owen Casey commonly known as Owen 'a Tábhairne. He was living in the house occupied by Mike Kelleher at present. There was no house in the eastern side of the village but there were workmen's houses in the western side. These workmen were working in the "great house" which was built where Tom Brosnan is living at present. The first licensed house was built by Owen Casey. That house is occupied by Denis Sheehan now. It was the first slated house in the Lane. Mr. Cronin Coltman collected the tolls then. Wool and skins and feathers were sold at the fair. Tolls were three pence, three-pence on a bag of wool and six-pence for a bag of feathers and a penny for a sheep skin, a goat-skin or a cow-skin
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:59
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It is unlucky to cut your hair on a Friday or to cut your nails on Sunday. On the first of May the people go the the *City" to cure cattle. They also go to *Dromtarbh to cure blindness and lameness. If a person stole the "spancel" of a cow he would be able to steal the butter. It is lucky to set cabbage and potatoes on Good Friday. It is a sign of bad luck to get eggs in a rick of hay.
Eggs found buried in a garden will bring sickness and death to the owner of the garden.
*Cathair Crobh Dhearg about 8 mls south west - at the foot of the 'Two Paps'
*6th. May is Pattern Day at Droumtariffe
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:54
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People never got married on a Monday (they wont break laws or make laws) because it is very unlucky. People never went to places on Monday, Wednesday, Friday because they were unlucky days to travel. They went Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday which were the lucky days. They paid rounds on Good Friday it they were sick.
Béal nó Fóghmhar na nGéana.
This was the name given to the time when the geese started to fly in the middle of September. They flew miles away and some of them never came back again.
The people set no potatoes, gave no milk or made no butter on May Day.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:50
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Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth.
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for Crosses, Friday for losses,
And Saturday no luck at all.
Still quoted on a person's marriage-day. - In this district Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday ONLY are the days for marriages.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:42
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As a boy we were fond of playing "Here's my daughter for you. Six or seven or more boys sat around the fire and the first took a lighting splinter from the fire saying to No. 2 on the line "Here's my daughter for you". No 2 asked "What fortune have you for her." No 1 said "If my daughter dies between your hands let all the weight be on you." Then No 2 took the lighting splinter and repeated (above) with No 3. And so on through the line until some poor fellow got caught (when the light died) and then he had to submit to all the weight described on Page 68. - pots, pans, Kettles, books, chairs etc etc. were used.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:39
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of the squares he makes a cross on one of the squares and that is called a "bed". Whoever has the most "beds" made wins the game.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:38
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Hide and go seek.
One person would close his eyes and the others would hide and after some time the one having his eyes closed should go looking for the others.
"I wont burn you."
One person would go around saying "I wont burn you or you" and then he would burn whom he pleased. Then the person he would burn would run after him and beat him.
The four corner fool.
They used to put four stones on the ground and one
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:36
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one after one they hit the ball, but if one hits the ball high and it is caught before it comes to the ground all who are in the ring are put out and their opponents get the ring and that is how it is played.
Pící -
First there are seven seven squares made on the ground They count up to twenty and the twentieth one starts the game. A small flat stone is got and he has to throw it into each of the squares. He throws it into the first square. If he puts it in he has to hop on one leg through all the squares and back again without touching the lines with his foot. When he comes to where he put the stone he has to pick it up while standing on one leg. If he stands on his two legs he is out and another tries it. When one had put the stone into every one
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:31
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Rounders.
The game is played in a field. Any number can play it. First of all all four stones are placed in the shape of a square and between some two of these there is a place called the "ring". They then toss a penny. The side that wins the toss go into the ring. Then
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:29
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High Gates
Two tall boys or girls catch hands and raise them up and all the others pass under them. The two who hold up their hands are called by two different names, for example, one is named Black and the other White. The one last in the line stops and is asked whether he would rather black or white. If he answers black he catches the lad named Black by the “tail”. It continues so until each one has a hold of each others “tails”. They make a mark on the ground between Black and White. They pull each other by the hands and if one succeeds in pulling the other across the line three times he wins the game.
Trom, trom, cad tá ós do chionn.*
This game was played in both Irish and English. It was played by counting up to twenty and the twentieth stoops
*See "Here's my daughter for you" at page 73. D.Ó M.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:27
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The ball used was made with cow's hair shaped in the form of a sphere and sewn to-gether.
Football.
The football used was a cow's bladder covered with a dog's hide tanned. It was kicked barefoot. It was played by putting the ball on the bounds between two parishes and the winners should kick the ball into their own chapel and neither of them should catch the ball. It sometimes took the whole year to finish the match.
(Revd W. Ferris now P.P. Allihies Co. Cork introduced this ancient game some 13 years ago in this parish - He called it "Caid" - Knocknagree beat the two other parishes)
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:18
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them again and this was repeated till all turned heads.
Fool a Phúicín.
Twenty would be counted and the twentieth person was blindfolded and whoever he caught was blindfolded and so on.
Carra Luascáin.
A rope was tied to a limb of a tree by its two ends. One person would sit on the rope and another would swing
Marbles
were played by making three holes in the ground and a person should pitch a marble in each hole three times. Then if that person hit another's marble with his own he could take both marbles.
Marbles
were played too by making a circle and putting a cotton standing in the middle. Each person tries to knock the button out with a marble and who-ever would could keep the button.
Hurling.
A furze root with a turn in it was used as a hurley.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:13
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Duck and Granny.
It was played by getting a flat stone which was called a granny, then twenty was counted and the twentieth would have to put a smaller stone called a duck on the granny and the rest fired at it with their ducks. If it was knocked off its owner should put it up again and in the meantime he would tip some other person and that person would have to put his duck on the granny.
Pitch and Toss.
It was played with buttons. A stone called a jack was got and buttons were pitched to it and who-ever owned the button that was nearest to the jack tossed all the buttons and he kept all that turned heads while he gave those that turned harps to the person next to him who tossed
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:08
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Answer : smiles, because there is a mile between the two "ss"
Why is Ireland like a bottle?
Answer : Because there is a Cork in one end of it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:06
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It flys high, flys low, wares boots and has not boots. What is it?
Answer : a football.
Once in a minute, twice in a moment, and never in a thousand years?
Answer : the letter m.
What fruit is in a penny?
Answer : the date.
What month do children eat least?
Answer : the month of February.
What is the difference between a station-master and a school-master?
Answer : A school-master trains the mind and a station-master minds the train
What runs but cannot walk?
Answer : a tap
What is the biggest word in the alphabet?
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:03
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 09:03
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Why does a donkey eat furze?
Answer : Because he is an ass.
What is it that is too small, take a bit off and it is big enough?
Answer : a grave
The man that made it never wore it, the person that wore it never saw it?
Answer : a coffin.
How can you take ten from nine and have one left?
Answer : by the clock IX - X = I.
It is black and white and red all over. What is it?
Answer : a newspaper.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 08:59
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Because it is full of bad soles.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 08:58
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 08:57
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Judges road or the Coach road. It was by this road that the Judges had to travel and the mails also. This road is no longer in use.
The roads we call by roads are running from one district to another and are principally used by farmers in these days going to the creameries and fairs and markets. Some of the by roads were made only a few years ago for the purpose of giving employment to labourers in the winter months when they cannot get any work from farmers.
senior member (history)
2020-07-28 08:54
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There are many roads in our district. Some are called main roads and others by roads or bog roads. The principal roads now ar steam rolled. The one running through the village of Ballydesmond is a cork Kerry road. It will take you to the principal towns in Kerry.
Before this road was made about sixty years ago there was an old road from Cork to Tralee which was commonly called the
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 21:52
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About sixteen years ago there lived a man from Listellick named Michael OBrien. He died in Dublin and he was buried in Rath Graveyard outside Tralee. He was a famous mower and he was known from Ballyheigue to Tralee. He used to mow an acre and a half in the day. He used to mow from eight-oclock in the morning until 9 at night.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 21:45
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Páirc na Claise - got its name from a hollow between two high patches of land.
"Cnoc Mór" - so called because of a height at the end of the field.
The Drom - is a field with a hollow at each end and a height in the middle.
Páirc a' Tighe - In this field are the ruins of an old house, from which it derived its name.
Páirc an Tuallacháin - derived its
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 21:42
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III
When Summer dons it's bridal robes,
To woo the smiles of May,
No magic brush nor fairy hand,
Could trace a scene more gay.
Ascend to "St John''s Holy Well" and view from there astore
This panorama rolling wide
Around old Musheramore.
IV
You'll see the Shournagh's daisied banks,
And where the Dripsey flows,
To Gearah where the "Baby Lee" in infancy repose.
The Fastnet Rocks and Hungry Hills
And Magillicuddy's reeks.
From Keimaneigh's wild rugged pass,
To Galtee's coldest peak.
V
Shall time untie affection's knot,
If distance intervene,
Between this trobbing heart of mine,
And Muskerry's fields of green,
Should my erring footsteps take me,
Where "Broadway;s" traffic roar,
Your chiding look would haunt me,
Beloved Old Musheramore.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 21:39
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How fancy's flight gives vain delight,
Fills pleasure's cup anew,
What blissful thoughts of filial hours,
When sorrow's pangs were few.
Of days when I, a carefree boy,
First scanned the mountain o'er.
That towers so high 'tween earth and sky,
Beloved old Musheramore.
II
When the fern, waves in splendour,
And the skylark plays his tune,
And the Laune's laughing waters,
Add enchantment to Macroom.
And Mount Massey's flowery bonnet,
To celestial heights doth soar,
Your satellite, dear potentate,
Beloved Old Musheramore.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 21:36
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Marriages take place in this district at all parts of the year, with the exception of Lent and Advent. On Shrove Tuesday, many get married as it is the last day of Shrove.
The months of May and August, as well as the days Monday, Wednesday and Friday are thought unlucky times
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 21:34
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Long ago, when doctors were scarce people had cures for nearly all kinds of diseases.
When anyone had thrush, it was believed that by putting a gander's head back the throat the patient was instantly cured.
A frog put into the mouth was supposed to be a good cure for a toothache.
If a person wanted to get a tooth out he would go to the forge. The smith would get a cord and tie one end of it to the anvil and the other to the patient's tooth. With a red hot iron the smith would rush towards the person and the latter getting a great fright would jerk backwards, leaving behind the extracted tooth.
The milk left, after a ferret feeding was supposed to cure whooping cough.
If a person with a child, sick of whooping cough, goes out early in the morning and meets a man with a white horse, and asks him for a
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 21:31
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Whooping-cough may be cured, if food left after a ferret, be eaten; or if the person goes under a donkey's legs a certain number of times.
Warts are cured by drinking lime-water or by rubbing washing soda to them.
Colds are cured by eating steeped oatmeal, or by inhaling the vapour produced by pouring peroxide on a red hot cover.
Steep an ivy leaf in vinegar for twelve hours. Then apply to a corn and bandage. The corn will be cured.
A rib leaf, chewed in the mouth and applied to a cut, will cure the latter.
A chicken, having the pip, can be cured, by putting a hair off a horse's tail down the bird's throat, and pulling up the pip.
Melted fresh butter, in an iron spoon, rubbed to "Wild Fire" will cure it. "Wild Fire" is also said to be cured if your name be written around the affected part.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 16:23
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Naomhtha seo. Nuair a ghaibh sí cuing an chrábhaigh uirthi féin agus ghéill sí do mhóid na geanmhnaidheachta ar nós a lán maighdean eile a thréigh aoibhneas agus sógh suarach an tsaoghail seo, d'fhonn Dia do rinridh, do stiúraidh a h-aingeal coimhdeachta í i dtreo Bhaile-Mhúirne, áit 'na bhfaghadh sí naoi gcinn d'fhiadhna bána 'na gcodladh roimpe. "Dein do bheannú as do lonnú 'san áit seo" ars' an t-Aingeal. "Toigh ionad do chille ann, mar is ann a bheidh t-aiseirighe". Is fonnmhar díoghraiseach a chómhlíon sí gach ar dúbhradh leí. Cuireadh suas an chill agus chaith sí deire a saoghail - deire a deóraidheachta ar talamh, ag cleachtadh na h-uile sobháilce is ag cómhlíonadh na h-uile h-aithne.
Is léir go raibh ainm Ghobnait i mbéal an tsluaigh mór thímcheall na h-Éireann in allód. Ní gábhadh d'om ach tagairt do'n stair a léightear a nAnnála Ríoghacht na h-Éireann do chuir na húghdair léigheannta san da ngairtear na Ceithre Máighistirí le chéile. San leabhar sin, léightear go dtug sluagh na nUlltach turus ar Bhaile Mhúirne ar son Gobnat ag dul fá dhein an tsluaigh Spáinig a bhí ag fitheamh leo i gCionn tSáile dóibh. Le n-ár linn féin téigheann na sluaighte daoine fá dhéin teampaill Ghobnait gach Domhnach Cingcíse agus ní hé sin amháin ach is bhéas ag a lán aca dul go dtí an teampaill an tráthnóna roimh an Domhnach sin agus faire oidhche do dhéanamh 'na h-onóir, agus má's fíor a gheibhid ndeintear ní folamh a thagann cuid aca abhaile. Mar is minic a gheibhid a nguidhe tré impidhe Ghobnat. Do b'iongantach íad na mirbhúiltí a cuirtear i leith an bhan-naomh seo agus ní h-aon iongnadh go maireann a cuimhne go bíth-bhuan i gcroidhthe Múirne
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 16:10
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dhein chonnaich sí fear mór caol árd agus é ag déanamh uirthe. Rith sí abhaile cómh tapaidh agus a bhí in a cosaibh agus d'innis sí an sgéal.
Tháinigh muinntir an tighe in aonfheacht léi annsan agus do chuarduigheadar an áit go léir ach mo léir! ní raibh taisc ná tuairsc de le feiscint.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 16:07
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Bhí líon tighe 'na chomhnuidhe uair amháin i gCúil Aodha i bparóiste Bhaile Mhúirne darbh ainm muinntir Duinnín. Bhídís ag déanamh páirceanna nuadh agus an talamh riaschach a bhí aca do thabhairt chun mín tíreachais.
Lá amháin bhíodar ag leagadh leasa agus ins an obair dóibh do fuaireadar leac mór. Thógadar an leac amach agus bhí poll 'na láir agus é lán d'óir bhreágh bhuidhe. Bhí beirt nó triúir aca le na chéile agus an duine do thóg an t-óir amach fuair sé bás go luath 'na dhiaidh sin ach bhí an t-ór go léir ag an gclann taréis báis dó.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 16:01
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Bhí sean-bhean 'na cómhnuidhe i mBaile Mhúirne. Chuaidh sí amach lá amháin chun píosaí fraoch do stathadh. Bhí sí á stathadh ar charraig agus d'eirigh[?] scraith in áirde le préamhacha an fhraoigh agus do chonnaich sí cróca breágh d'óir breágh buidhe. Ní raibh fhios aice cad ba cheart di a dhéanamh agus d'fhéach sí mór thímcheall uirthe, ach má
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 14:06
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an t-séipéal dubhart leis an sagart é fhógairt ón althóir. Cómh maith do dhein agus is orm a bhí an t-áthas nuair do fuaras amach gurb é an duine do chaill é ná sclábhaidhe bocht go raibh muirighean mhór air. An oidhche sin sa bhaile do ghlaoidh an seanduine seo chúghainn ag scoruidheacht
Do h-innseadh do chonus do fuaras an tairgead ag cailleamhaint agus do h-innseadh do chómh maith cad do dheineas leis. "Is baoghal liom a gharsúim" ar seisean "ná beidh aon seans ort do geó." "Ba ceart duit é choimeád. Tugadh seans duit" ar seisean "agus caithis uait é.
"Seo cómhairle do fuaras-sa aon uair amháin" ar seisean agus tabharfhad an cómhairle ceadna duit-se anaois": - "Coimead a bhfaigir"
D'fiafruidheas de cé thug an cómhairle dho agus d'innis sé dhom an sgéal so leanas:-
"Nuair do bhíos-sa im bhuacaill óg tímcheall fíche bliadhain nó mar sin do thug mo athair púnt dom" ar seisean. Bhí aonach mór an Fóghmhair ag teacht agus dubhairt sé liom trí no ceathair d'uanaibh buineanna do cheannac agus go dtabharfaidís chum mo dóthain mé.
Bhí na huain saor an uair úd agus b'furuistd[?] fórsg bhreágh laidir d'fagháil ar choróin nó sé sgillinge. Bhíodh an taonach san i mBeanntraí an uair úd ar an tarna lá fichead de
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 13:28
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During the Penal Laws a priest hid in deep woods 4 miles S.E. of the school in a place called Coolkilline. Name of Priest is forgotten. One day the priest was passing a prodestant's house near the place.
On seeing him the Prodestant said "Look at the Dancing Master" (Possibly the Priest was disguised). The story says that on hearing these words the priest turned and looked at the Prodestant.
Immediately the Prodestant commenced dancing and could not stop. People held him, but when he was left go he again resumed his vigorous dancing.
People usually had great compassion for the Prodestant but no one could cure his funny disease.
The Priest was at last sent for. He came and in 1 minute the Protestant was cured and never danced afterwards.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:42
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catastrophe, which was soon to darken the horizon.
The numerous friends and neighbours who were present settled down after the marriage ceremony for the enjoyment of the good things provided with true Irish hospitality for the occasion, casting all the troubles and cares incidental to Irish life behind them, and thinking only of the immediate present, with never a thought or anticipation of the ill-fortune which towards the break of a new day when the enjoyment was at its highest pitch of the terrible and unforseen development which converted in a moment or two a joyous happy wedding feast, into a heart-rending scene of grief and lamentation through some mistake due to want of presence of mind or possibly to some slight over-indulgence in alcolcholic stimulants on the part of some individual member of the wedding party in the early hours of the morning following. The OMahonys of Ballylough were very popular in the neighbourhood, and all the relatives and friends assembled at the wedding party, in response to the invitation issued, to show their respect and esteem for an old stock rooted in the soil for many generations. The head of the house "William OMahony" and his wife Mary, were very pleased over their daughters
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:38
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choice of a husband, and the marriage was a red-letter day in their lives. The bride and bride-groom were general favourites in the locality, and in accordance with an old custom which still survives showers of rice and cast away old "brogues" were hurled at the happy couple, with true Irish impetuosity. The dwelling house was a comfortable one storied thatched building, consisting of a kitchen and two rooms. As refreshments had to be served to the crowd in relays or batches, it was found that the space in the dwelling house was too small to permit of dancing, so that it was arranged to hold this very pleasing form of innocent recreation or amusement in the Barn a very commodious building, capable of comfortable accomadation for a large gathering. The dance held on until the early hours of the morning, with songs and jokes of various kinds. There were about thirty people in th kitchen some partaking of refreshments and others superintending the cooking and boiling which were essential requisites in the preparation of meals when the catastrophe occurred which converted a comfortable dwelling house, where pleasure reigned supreme into a blazing furnace of fire in which all the occupants were trapped through want for foresight and in which nearly every creature
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:28
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catastrophe, which was soon to darken th horizon.
The numerous friends and neighbours who were present settled down after the marriage ceremony for the enjoyment of the good things provide with true Irish hospitality for the occasion, casting all the troubles and cares incidental to Irish life behind them, and thinking only of the immediate resent, with never a thought or anticipation of the ill-fortune which towards the break of a new day when the enjoyment was at its highest pitch of the terrible and unforseen development which converted in a moment or two a joyous happy wedding feast, into a heart-rending scene fo grief and lamentation through some mistake due to want of presence of mind or possibly to some slight over-indulgence in alcolcholic stimulants on the part of some individual member of the wedding party in the early hours of the morning following. The OMahonys of Ballylough were very popular in the neighbourhood, and all the relatives and friends assembled at the wedding party, in response to the invitation issued, to show their respect and esteem for an old stock rooted in the soil for many generations. The head of the house "William OMahony" and his wife Mary, were very pleased over their daughters
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:17
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In the little cemetry at Killgullane, a few miles distant from the thriving and historic town of Mitchelstown, two headstones placed side by side in a cosy little niche, and in a conspicious position in the western wing of the churchyard, stands a silent memorial of a grim tragedy resulting from an outbreak of fire, which culminated in the loss of several lives at a feast in the immediate district on February the tenth 1816. It was a very sad event, all the more so, as it occurred on the occasion, when the friends and neighbours of the bride and bridegroom were assembled as customary to enjoy a nights fun and frolics. At all events coming to the point of our story with all its horrors, according to well authentic : tradition, the sun shone brightly and crisp on this memorable day in February 1816 and no evil portent of ill-omen cast its doleful shadow in the landscape over Ballylough to give warning of the impending
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:16
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1.
In the little cemetry at Killgullane, a few miles distant from the thriving and historic town of Mitchelstown, two headstones placed side by side in a cosy little niche, and in a conspicious position in the western wing of the churchyard, stands a silent memorial of a grim tragedy resulting from an outbreak of fire, which culminated in the loss of several lives at a feast in the immediate district on February the tenth 1816. It was a very sad event, all the more so, as it occurred on the occasion, when the friends and neighbours of the bride and bridegroom were assembled as customary to enjoy a nights fun and frolics. At all events coming to the point of our story with all its horrors, according to well authentic : tradition, the sun shone brightly and crisp on this memorable day in February 1816 and no evil portent of ill-omen cast its doleful shadow in the landscape over Ballylough to give warning of the impending
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:08
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His last dying words were pray for me and may God be with you all.
VII
The day of Crowley's funeral it was a glorious sight
The green flag flying before him the green was his delight.
He was buried at Ballymacoda with the shamrock at his side,
May the Lord have mercy on his soul, he proved a Fenian boy.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:06
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We are but three in number, on me you may rely
We never shall surrender, we'll fight or else we'll die.
IIII
The shots came from the soldiers at every degree
But Crowley and his comrades retired from tree to tree
They fired and wounded eighteen of them
And never missed their mark until Crowley's finger was shot off, all by a musket ball.
V
They travelled on together they knew their chance was small
Till Crowley received that fatal shot, which pierced him to the heart
He ran down to the river bank in agony and pain
Crying out unto his comrades revenge for '98.
VI
And as the soldiers followed, they fired on him again
He lay down on the river bank and for the priest did call
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 09:01
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I
My noble-hearted Irishmen of high and low degree
I hope you will pay attention and listen unto me
To a doleful lamentation I mean for to pen down
Concerning that great battle, that was fought near Mitchelstown.
II
It was on a Sunday morning between four and five o'clock
That the police and the soldiers around Kilcloon[?] flocked
With vengeance in their countenance, their orders being served
T'was informers' information that quickly brought them there.
III
Crowley stepped inside the wood and these words he then did say
May God direct us to the best, this day we will fight our way
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 08:56
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present he would tell him the exact place where the money was hid but nobody from the district was there.
There is a Lios in the farm of Mr. James Dwane, and gold is supposed to be hidden under a whitethorn bush in the Lios. Mrs Ahearne a native of Ahacross had a habit of going to the village of Kildorrery after nightfall, and she had to pass that Lios, and as she returned home one night, when she came to the Lios, the crock of gold came from the Lios, and stood on the ditch by her side. She was so scared, that the thought of taking it never came into her head.
senior member (history)
2020-07-27 08:51
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Make six middling pills of Cobweb: take one of them a little before the cold fit, take two pills before the second fit and three pills before the third fit comes on if need required. These Cobwebs must be rolled hard in little knobs and covered over with butter to make them easy in swallowing.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 21:22
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The local boy immediately ran back and called for help In a few minutes a large crowd had gathered and almost immediately they found the body where his companion saw him sinking and despite all their efforts to restore him to life the boy was dead. It was a strange coincidence that before he left to go for the mouth-organ he sang the song. "Good bye old ship of mine"
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 21:20
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one of the local boys accompanied him.
When they arrived at the pier he told the other boy to wait for him and himself would go in and get it. When the boy on the pier waited some time and as the other boy had not returned he called out to him but got no answer He got suspicious and went on board the ship, he looked for his companion but could not see him anywhere.
He was about to return thinking he had missed him in the dark when he heard some splashing in the water beside the ship and on looking closer he just saw him going down having slipped down between the ship and the pier
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 21:16
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About two years a very sad drowning took place at Oldcourt Creagh Skibbereen, and it happened in the following way. A cargo of coal had arrived at Oldcourt from Wales, and among the crew of the ship was a young Welshboy who was only seventeen. He was the only support of his widowed mother and he was a great favourite among his companions.
The ship was anchored at the pier for a few days while the coal was being discharged and the crew used come to a house nearby on the mainland for amusement On one of these occasions this young-fellow said he would go back for a mouth-organ which they had on the ship and as it was dark and he was a stranger
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:58
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say it is unlucky, and they say it is lucky to wear something borrowed on your wedding-day. It was another custom all the young people used be very anxious to get a piece of wedding-cake to put it under their pillow that they would dream of their future husband or wife as the case may be, but they must not taste the cake.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:54
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There are a great many pishogues connected with marriages. People do not like to get married on Friday they say it is unlucky and people like to get married in the month of June they say it is lucky Some people prefer to make their own matches and other people get their parents to make their matches for them.
There were no motor-cars at a wedding long ago. They used what they used call double saddled horses a man sitting in front and a woman sitting up behind him. It was a custom also to hang old boots and horse-shoes on to the car in which the newly-married pair were in, for luck.
Anyone do not like to get married wearing red or green, they
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:43
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We hear of several famous people who are noted for many things such as lifting heavy bags and throwing the sledge and numerous others. There is an old man named Pat Regan and he lives in the townland of Gurteenloman, Skibbereen Co. Cork
He is noted for his storytelling. He tells many fairy tales and stories of olden times since his youth. He is called "a great Seanachie. He can read very well and can explain every word he reads. He can speak the Irish language fairly well also. Long ago there were a great many Seanachies compare to those nowadays.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:32
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the sun good weather is expected and when rays appear up from the sun it is a sign of wind. It is a sign of good weather when the sky is clear and cloudless and is of a deep blue colour.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:31
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It is a sign of bad weather when the moon looks dim and there is a circle around it. It is a sign of bad weather when you would see a rainbow in the morning and it is a good sign when you would see it at night. There is an old proverb which says "A rainbow in the morning is the sailors warning and a rainbow at night is the sailors delight." It is a sign of rain when the wind is from the south. If the sun sets in a bank of clouds bad weather is expected. If swallows are flying low bad weather is expected also.
It is a sign of good weather when the sun sets with a golden colour and is very clear. When rays appear down from
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:15
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is called "Skeaghanore", or the land of the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:14
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I dreamed there was gold hidden under an Elder tree, outside a farmhouse in Skeaghanore, and I put some landmark on the place which I can't remember rightly.
The old man went off quite satisfied as the place mentioned happened to be near his own home. He dug away under the Elder tree and he found the gold in an old iron pot with printing on the cover which anyone couldn't read as few people in those days could read.
He got a poor scholar to read it for him. Translated it meant, "Where ever that was there was another like it" So he dug at the place again and he found another pot, and the man and all his descendants were wealthy ever after, and since then the place
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:09
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I have been told this story by an old man in my neighbourhood. The story goes how this old man from the townland of Skeaghanore dreamt three nights in succession that there was gold hidden somewhere in or around Cork.
He got ready the following night and went to Cork. He was walking around the place and he saw another man walking around like himself. Each one wondered what the others business was. They got into conversation and the man from Cork asked the man from Skeaghanore was it any harm to ask what he was looking for and he answered, and told him his dream. "Well now", said the Corkman "that's funny as
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 20:08
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I have been told this story by an old man in my neighbourhood. The story goes how this old man from the townland of Skeaghanore dreamt three nights in succession that there was gold hidden somewhere in or around Cork.
He got ready the following night and went to Cork. He was walking around the place and he saw another man walking around like himself. Each one wondered what the others business was. They got into conversation and the man from Cork asked the man from Skeghanore was it any harm to ask what he was looking for and he answered, and told him his dream. "Well now", said the Corkman "that's funny as
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 19:57
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ears with a rag and hang it on a bush over the well. The people did practise them some years ago and used practise them very often but they are giving them up now.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 19:56
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Cure for Rheumatism is [?]
Cure for Rheumatism is to wash your feet in salt water and in weeds.
Cure for toothaches the people used go to a tomb In Ross and scrape the earth off the tomb and rub it to their teeth
Cure for Headaches:- to rub vinegar to brown paper and to put it up to your forehead.
Cure for Thrush:- to rub honey to the roof of your mouth with a cloth.
Cure for Erysiplas, is to pull the Sweet Forget me not and roast it and mix flour through it and put it up to the plain.
Cure for deafness:- is to go to a holy well in the townland of Highfield and gather ten little stones and go around the well ten times and throw one stone into the well each time until the ten times is up and wash your
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 19:50
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he was taken home the next day.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 19:50
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Last Summer a cargo of coal arrived to Mr. Eduard Shipsey Oldcourt and a young boy named Welsh came with the rest of the men on the ship it was his first voyage. After two days the cargo was emptied and they all came up to the Public House for a little while. The only gang board they had was a ladder and that was hitched to the boat with a rope and the other end to the pier. Three of the men left early in the night, this boy remained a little while with his friend. He left the Public House intended to return again and he going down the ladder he missed his foot and the ladder swung sideways and he fell into the water and was drowned. The Skibbereen Guards were sent for and they were on the scene immediately and the body was found about an hour after and
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 19:43
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motor cars that the people usually have at the weddings. Blue or pink or white is the right colour to wear at the wedding. The people used go racing on horses after the wedding and the women use be behind the men on the horses. The people used throw an old boot and a packet of rice after them.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 19:42
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People mostly get married during January and February. Unlucky days for marriages are Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. Unlucky months are May. The people that are getting married make the marriage themselves and their parents make it for them also. Money is mostly given to the people that are getting married. The people remember the priest coming to the house. It is
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 19:37
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There is a Blessed Well in our land which is the townland of Barnagoulane in the parish of Aughadown. The name of the field in which the Blessed Well is "Páirc an Tobair Beannuighthe" which means the field of the Blessed Well. The well was Blessed by a saint some years ago. It is in a corner of the field about five or six feet from the ditch, and there are stepping stones going into it. Any person around that had any defect and that knew of the well went to it. Every person that came to the well left some token after him. There is a bush growing beside the well
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 15:27
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the Frenchmen were saying, so they took him to the Convent thinking the nuns might be able to understand them, but they were not. Someone told them that Sergeant Slone knew French, and they wired to Goleen immediately for him. When he came he understood what the Frenchmen were saying.
They wanted the very best coffin that could be made and they wanted the priest. They then got a habbit and put it on the dead man, and he was taken to the chapel, and all night through one of the Frenchmen remained with the dead man in turns.
Next day they ordered two men to dig the grave, and the funeral was supposed to be at two o' clock. As they were all waiting for the funeral a wire came to carry the body to France. They closed the grave again and a lead coffin was made and a big box put outside that again, and he was taken to an old coal store in Schull. The Frenchmen then set sail and about a week after the dead man's father and relatives came to Schull. They put the coffin into a horse and car which was led by Sergeant Sloan, and a great crowd followed to the pier. The priest and the Frenchmen were first, and the Frenchmen sang solemn hymns. About a month later, a sum of money came to all the men that had helped.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 15:25
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 15:24
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the Frenchmen were saying, so they took him to the Convent thinking the nuns might be able to understand them, but they were not. Someone told them that Sergeant Slone knew French, and they wire to Goleen immediately for him. When he came he understood what the Frenchmen were saying.
They wanted the very best coffin that could be made and they wanted the priest. They then got a habbit and put it on the dead man, and he was taken to the chapel, and all night through one of the Frenchmen remained with the dead man in turns.
Next day they ordered two men to dig the grave, and the funeral was supposed to be at two o' clock. As they were all waiting for the funeral a wire came to carry the body to France. They closed the grave again and a lead coffin was made and a big box put outside that again, and he was taken to an old coal store in Schull. The Frenchmen then set sail and about a week after the dead man's father and relatives came to Schull. They put the coffin into a horse and car which was led by Sergeant Sloan, and a great crowd followed to the pier. The priest and the Frenchmen were first, and the Frenchmen sang solemn hymns. About a month later, a sum of money came to all the men that had helped.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 15:15
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About the month of March 1934[?] a French boat was trawling outside the Fastnet and they got a great surprise when they brought up a dead man in their net. They then sent out a wireless message to all the French boats to find out was there any man missing. They then got back an answer saying that there was, so they decided to bring him into the nearest harbour which was Schull. In the middle of the day about twelve o' clock the boat was seen coming towards the harbour with its flag half-mast-high. A man that was coming to the pier mending nets, saw the boat and he decided to go out to see what was wrong.
He got his punt and went out immediately. He went on board the boat, but he was unable to understand what the Frenchmen were saying. At last he went into a room and he saw the dead man, and he knew then what they wanted. But while he was inside in the boat his punt overturned and sank and he was unable to take the Frenchman ashore. He whistled and another man heard him. This man and a few other boys got a big boat and going out brought the dead man ashore. When they reached the shore they carried the dead man to the town hall. They were puzzled because they did not understand what
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 15:06
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About the year 1920 Dreenlomane barytes mine was burned. It was burned by a candle that was left lighting by a rope which was covered with oil. Nearly all the building was burned but no life was lost.
Mr. Jeremiah Sullivan's house Coolagh, Ballydehob was burned by the English soldiers. The I.R.A. burned a house in Fortview, Ballybawun belonging to a landlord named Robert Wood. It was around the same time Schull Workhouse was burned and the Schull Barracks by the I.R.A. Around the year 1897 a house belonging to Johanna Sweeney of Rathravane was burned as a result of some firewood taking fire.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 15:02
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An old woman named Johanna Sweeney lived in a small house north of of Mr. O' Donovan's house of Rathravane. About the year 1897 her house was burned. The roof of the house was thatched, and she used to keep a lot of firewood inside. One day while she was at Ballydehob the wood took fire and the house was burned when she came home. All that she had in the house was burned. She had a lot of silver in a box and she spent two days searching the place where the silver was, and she found it all. The neighbours did their best to quench the fire but it was no use. Then all the people of the land made up a collection, and they bought slate and timber, and roofed the house again.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 14:57
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When Dreenlomane barytes mine was at work a man named Mr. William Connell of Dunbeacon was working about four fathoms under ground when a large stone fell on him. He was left under the stone and a priest was sent for immediately, because the people were afraid if they pulled him out and that he would die before the priest would reach him. When the priest came he went under ground and anointed him. He was then pulled out and he died immediately.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 14:53
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Caheragh.
Cáthrach is not the right name for Caheragh but Cathaoireach, which means a chair. Long ago there were two Bishops living in the centre of the Parish in Carrig Caislean, Bishop Kelly and Bishop Power. Bishop was the leading Bishop over all Ireland. It was in his residence the Bishops chair was, so that all the priests and people came to the Bishop's Chair. Ever since the Parish is called Paróiste na Cathaoireach which means the Parish of the Chair.
Bishopsland:-
It is so called because there was a Bishop living in it long ago. He was burned by Cromwell and his soldiers. This townland is situated in the Parish of Caheragh.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 08:56
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There are two forts in Mr Rooney's land. They are round in shape and there is a ditch all round them.
Once upon a time a boy was passing by the fort and he saw a pair of boots in it. He looked at them at and saw that they were new. He took them home and wore them the first day. That night everything that was in the house was thrown around the floor. When the boy's father called him to get up he was not able because his two legs were stiff and he was black and blue.
It is said the fairies beat him.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 08:53
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There is 'the forts', a fort about two miles from my house. Once there was a man drawing stones from the fort and a very small man appeared to him and told him not to draw any more stones. He was afraid of the little man and he drew all the stones back to the forts. Once some people were digging potatoes long side a fort. They had a lot dug before dinner. The woman of the house brought out the dinner to them.
They went to the ditch to eat their dinner and as they were eating six tiny women came out of the fort and they started picking the potatoes into the aprons. When they went back to their work they found not a single potato missing.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 08:49
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Boys make snares for catching rabbits. they buy some snare wire and make the snares. They put six wires in them and twist them
They tie them to pegs with bits of cords and put them up in rabbits' paths in furze brakes.
They go to see them very early in the morning before stray dogs would eat them. They sell them for sixpence each. Rabbits were very dear this year and it encouraged many boys to go snaring them.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 08:46
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If you had ringworm write your name around it and it would spread no farther.
If you had a burn cut a bit of fur of the cat and put it up close to it it would cure it. This cure is very old.
If a horse had greasy heels you could cure it with goose grease.
If you had a sore eye rub it with cold tea
If you got a sting of a nettle put a dock leaf up to it and it would cure it
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 08:43
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If you had a sore tongue lick a frog and it will get alright
If a sheep had magets throw a good deal of lime on them and it will get alright
Boil the roots of the Dandelions in water put it into a 'boo' bottle and drink a glass of if every day and it will cure a neglected cold
a person who never saw his father could cure the craos-galar
If you had a sore face rub it with your fasting spit
If you got a burn lick it with your tongue
If a honey bee stung you rub it with blue.
If you had a lump in your forehead put a cold penny or a 'gold' cold stone up to it
If your hand got sun burnt rub sour milk to it
If you got a cut from a rusty wire throw paraffin oil into it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 08:37
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he passed sentry after sentry until he came into the presence of Cromwell himself.
He was surprised to find that Cromwell treated him kindly and told him that Nagle and his family were quite safe in their lands, and needn't feat that he or his army would cause them any trouble.
Cromwell, there upon, surprised Nagle further by telling him that he was the person whom he befriended many years before in England. Of course, Nagle had forgotten all about this little incident.
senior member (history)
2020-07-26 08:34
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Richard OBrien of Ballygriffin gives me the following account.
Garrett Nagle of Ballygriffin went on a visit to a gentleman in Huntingdonshire, England. This gentleman also was a magistrate. On one occasion Nagle's host was to attend a Court and asked Mr.[?] Nagle to go along with him. This Mr.[?] Nagle did and was present during the hearing of a case against a young fellow for theft. A fine was imposed on the young fellow, who, being unable to pay, was being carried off to prison.
Mr.[?] Nagle, taking compassion on him paid the fine and he was immediately liberated.
Many years later, about thirty years, Cromwell and his army were at Athlone. Nagle receive a call from there asking him to appear before Cromwell at Athlone.
Nagle, thinking that he was in for trouble set out on his journey on horseback but before leaving bade good-bye to all his friends. Having reached Cromwell's camp
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 21:18
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The people long go could not get married unless it pleased their parents. They used to make matches. The father used to send a letter to the man and they would meet at some hotel in the town.
Another old custom was the newly married pair were not to go to Mass in their own parish the first Sunday nor to go to the girl's house on a visit for over three months. Shrove was a certain time for people to get married. Shrove Tuesday was the latest day for people to get married.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 21:09
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Many of the old marriage customs of years ago have now almost disappeared. Years ago all the marriages used to take place during Shrovetide and mostly on Shrove Tuesday. The matches were made after Christmas. It was customary that old people used go around from house to house speaking of matches. These people were always well paid if the parties in question get married.
The priest was interviewed a few days before the marriage. Then the intended couple used go to the City to buy the wedding rings and clothes.
On the wedding day the wedding party went to the
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 21:05
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In olden times people used to get married in Shrove. It was a custom to spend the morning in the girl's house and in the evening they used to get married. They used to go to the Church in side cars and they took the longest route home. That was called the drag.
Another old custom was the strawboys. They used to go to the house and they used to be covered with straw any one didn't know them. The Bride had to dance with all of them and then they would leave.
They never liked to get married on Monday Wednesday or Friday. They thought it was unlucky They never liked to get married in May and October.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 21:01
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One day as Bridget was in the school teaching she saw a blind girl in the school. Everytime she saw the girl she felt sorry for her. Bridget often prayed to God to give her sight. Bridget put her hand on her eyes one day and prayed to God that moment the girl saw. The girl told Bridget to close her eyes again for she said when she was able to see she would not think of God at all. Bridget closed her eyes and the girl was in darkness again.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 21:00
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One day St Brigid was walking along the road, and she met a man with a bag of salt on his back. Brigid asked him what he had and he fearing she might ask him for some it told her he had stones. Immediately the man fell as it was stones he now had on his back. Brigid again asked what he had and when he said 'salt' he found it was salt he had again. When he saw this he gave her some of it as he knew it was a miricle.
Another day a beggar came and asked for a sheep out of her flock She gave him one and he went away. Seven times he came and every time she gave him a sheep and then he went home. This man was rich and he had been under false pretence and he fooled St Brigid Next morning when he went out to look at the sheep, he found to his surprise they had disappeared leaving no trace or mark. St Brigid built a convent in Kildare and it was there she died. She was buried in Down Patrick.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 20:57
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One day Saint Brigid was walking along the road and she met a man with a bag of salt on his back. Brigid asked him what he had and he, fearing she might ask him for some of it, told her he had stones. Immediately the man fell as it was stones he now had on his back. Brigid again asked what he had and when he said 'salt' he found it was salt he had again. When he saw this he gave her some of it as he knew it was a mircle.
Another day a beggar came and asked for a sheep out of her flock. She gave him one and he went away. Seven times he came and every time she gave him a sheep and he went home. This man was rich and he had been under false pretence and he fooled St Brigid. That night he was laughing at Brigid and next morning when he went out to look at the sheep, he found to his surprise they had disappeared leaving no mark or trace. When she died she was buried in Down Patrick.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 20:54
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farm.
The tithes were also collected in this parish One tenth of all the farm produce was collected by the tithe proctors who were always of the people themselves. They were shunned and disliked by everyone and their descendants also. There is a story told of a seizure of cattle in the north of the parish by the proctors and as they were going away with them the neighbours congregated, attacked them and took the cattle from them. Many incidents such as this occurred during the tithe war.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 20:52
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The small birds are more careful about their nests than the larger birds. The snipe builds her nest in heath or in the rushes. The swallow builds her nest of mud and she lines it with moss When the swallow flies low it is a sign of rain. There is a story connected with the robin.
Once there lived in Norway a boy who was trying to keep a fire lighting. The boy fell asleep and a bear came and rolled himself on the fire and almost quenched it but a robin came and she kept blowing the fire until a blaze came and it burned her breast and that is how she got the red breast.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 20:48
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they ceased coming.
The tithes were collected also. One tenth of the value of the farm produce was collected by the tithe proctors and these were hated by everyone. There is a story told of a seizure which was made in the north of this Parish by the proctors and as they were leaving with some cattle they were attacked by the neighbours who took the cattle from them.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 20:46
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The name of the local landlords were Davis and General Raines and their father in law W. A. Rickson who preceeded them. They owned most of the land of Lisgoold North and held it until the land act of nineteen hundred and three was passed. These lands were bought from another family by the Rickson family. The landlord lived in England and his agents in Dublin.
One eviction took place and the evicted family were afterwards allowed in as caretakers. They were afterwards reinstated. Many others were evicted in this parish. A family in Lisgoold west was once evicted and another man took the farm and the Land League then in force boycotted them. The people did not speak to them or work for them. The horses had often to be taken to Cork to be shod. They were afterwards compelled to give over the
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 20:39
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The Smith's field we call one of the fields in our farm. It got its name from a family of the Smiths who lived there long ago. It is about seventy or eighty years ago since they lived there. The ruins of the walls of the dwelling house are there yet. There are some beech trees planted around the house and they are very old. There are also some apple trees and hedges there yet. There is a nice boreen leading in to where the house was.
The kiln field we call an other field because there is a kiln in it. This kiln was used for burning lime long ago. Páirc árd we call an other field. It is a very high field near the mountain. In the eastern corner of it there is the
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:50
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The lark is a small bird. It builds its nest in meadows and in cornfields. It is a very clever bird when it sees anyone coming near its nest it runs for some distance from its nest before it rises. In this way it fools the person who is trying for its nest.
An Naosgach:-
The snipe is a migratory bird. It is found in wet marshy places. The snipe is a game bird.
An Seabhach:-
The hawk is a fairly big bird. The hawk is of a brownish colour. The hawk is the only bird which can stand still in the air.
The Swallow:-
The swallow is a small bird. It builds its nest in hay-barns and in cow- heds. The swallow flys very swiftly through the air.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:48
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thrush is a very nice singer.
An Chuach:-
The cuckoo is a fairly big bird. It is said to be the largest bird in the world. It is a migratory bird. It comes back to Ireland from Africa the beginning of Summer. When the cuckoo is flying from place to place to there are usually a number of gobad[?] flying after it. These birds are supposed to be trying to imitate the cuckoo.
An Spideóg:-
The robin is a small bird. It has a red breast. There is a story told about the robin. When Our Lord was crowned with thorns. It is said that the robin tried to pull the thorns. While doing so the sacred blood is supposed to have spattered on its breast. Every robin since that day has a red breast.
An Fuiseóg:-
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:46
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[continued from page 19]
all the birds had gone some distance they could go no further. So they flew back down to earth again. Then the eagle saw that he had flown heigher than all the other birds. Then he said that he was king of the birds. Then the wren who had been ahide in the eagles tail jumped out and flew up above the eagle. Then it said that it was king of the birds. When the wren was flying down to land, the eagle tried to strike him with his wing. From that day to this the wren never flys higher than low bushes.
An Lon-Dubh:-
The black-bird is a fairly big bird. It has a yellow beak. It builds its nest in low furze bushes. It is a very sweet singer.
An Smólach:-
The thrush is a fairly big bird. It is of a brownish colour. The
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:42
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It is said that there were horse races in this field long ago.
Páirc na Seamróige:-
People say that the four leaved shamrock was found in this field.
Páirc na dTor:-
There are a lot of bushes growing in this field.
Páirc na Muc:-
It is said when the people in olden times used buy pigs in Tralee, they used drive them by road to Cork. The journey was too far so they used give the pigs a rest in that field.
Bóthair Fiolar:-
Lime was brought from the yellow quarry in Banteer to this district through bóthair fiolar. It is now disused and it is covered up with bushes.
Ruins:-
There are the ruins of an old house in my land and it is said a man named
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:39
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[Hand sketch of roads, houses, river, showing location of fields]
1. Páircín dubh
2. Páirc an chapaill
3. Páirc na seamróige
4. Páirc na dtor
5. Páirc na much
6. Bóthair fiolar
7. Bóthair na ndaoine mhaithe
1. Páircín Dubh
This field got its name because of the black earth it contains
2. Páirc an Chapaill
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:35
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There are lots of birds to be found in my district, namely An Dreólín, An lon-dubh, An Smólach, An Cuac, An Spideóg, an Fhuiseóg, An naosgach, An Seabhach, An préacán, an corr eísg, an Mairluín, The Jackdaw, The Magpie and The Crow.
An Dreólín
The wren is the smallest bird in the world. It builds its nest in furze. It builds its nest with a hole in the side through which it goes in. The wren is said to be king of the birds. The following story is told about the wren:-
Once the birds had no king. They came together one day and they said that the bird which would fly the highest would become king over all the other birds. The race began each bird flew as high as it could. When
(cont'd on page 23)
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:34
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[continued from page 19]
all the birds had gone some distance they could go no further. So they flew back down to earth again. Then the eagle saw that he had flown heigher than all the other birds. Then he said that he was king of the birds. Then the wren who had been ahide in the eagles tail jumped out and flew up above the eagle. Then it said that it was king of the birds. When the wren was flying down to land, the eagle tried to strike him with his wing. From that day to this the wren never flies higher than low bushes.
An lon dubh:-
The black bird is a fairly big bird. It has a yellow beak. It builds its nest in low furze bushes. It is a very sweet singer.
An Smólach:-
the thrush is a fairly big bird . It is of a brownish colour. The
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:32
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to foot with straw. They are usually welcome in most places and they get plenty of food and drink. They usually dance during the wedding feast. The bridegroom used to stay at the bride's house for a week after the marriage in former times.
Hauling home
The bride and bridegroom has a "night" at the hauling home. They has dance and music at this "night" and they finish up with eating and drinking. Long ago the guests who attended the wedding-feast used race home on horses. Wives used sit "culág", that means they used sit on the horses with their husbands.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:30
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Marriages most frequently take place in this district during Shrove. The harvest months are said to be unlucky for marriage. Long ago there were lists of unmarried people made called "Sceilg lists." They always caused a lot of quarrels and therefore they are now discontinued. Matches are still made in my district. Money is nearly always given as dowry. Cows were given as dowries in former times. Marriages used take place in houses up to one hundred years ago.
Customs:-
The bridegroom used visit the bride's house on the night before the marriage. Rice was thrown at the bride and the bridegroom when they leave the church A wedding-feast is usually held after the marriage and straw-boys also visit the wedding. Their faces are usually disguised and they are covered from head
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:26
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There was a "scoil scairte" (hedge school) in this district long ago at a place called Fionán Field. This school was held in an outhouse. The scholars who attended this school wrote on slates. These children sat on benches of stones which were covered by sods. In those days teachers continually travelled from place to place. The names of a few of the books which were used in this school were "Reading made easy". The arithmetic used was called "Tret and Tear". A spelling-book called "The Voster" was also used.
Two teachers by the names of John Shine and Jeremiah O' Sullivan used to teach in hedge-schools.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:24
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Boggeragh mountains. Long ago there was a mill in Carrigagulla for crushing oats. It belonged to the landlords who were called Horgans. There were more mills too, but that's the only one that I know of.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:23
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the wrong side. When they had it carded they spun it, and then the thread was made. They used also make woollen thread, and women used to go from house to house spinning thread.
Paddy Cooper was a very famous weaver who lived at Annaganihy long ago, and Stephen Kelleher was a very famous weaver who lived in Carrigagulla. Lime kilns were all over this district long ago, and there was a lime kiln in every farm almost, and lime kilns are to be seen in this district since that time. The people had to get the lime-stone at Aherla, about a distance of twenty miles, and they used also get it at Ballincollig. A man named Charley hatter who lived at Annaganihy ford, was very famous for making hats. He got the black colouring matter at a place called poll a duibh, out in the middle of the
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:20
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Candle making was carried on in this district long ago and coinneal muínlas were also made in this district. Dan Long, and Jack Long, and Peadar Looney were very good at basket making, and they used also make sciathóga. Long ago the people used to be spinning with a spinning wheel, or a túirne. At that time there used to be a túirne in every house. This is how they used to make the thread with the spinning wheel:-
First of all they used to wash the sheep. Then they used to shear her. then they got oil, and oiled the wool. Then they got cards, and carded the wool, and then made rolls of it. A card is two pieces of timber, with two ranges of teeth on
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:17
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in Cork. Dry snow began to fall in the evening and it continued snowing all night. No mass was celebrated on the following day. It continued snowing all Sunday and Sunday night. In one case a glen forty feet deep was full of snow. There were great drifts of snow. The roads had to be cleared for March fair in Millstreet. A lot of people ran short of food. That year the snow remained on top of Mushera until the 24th June.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 17:16
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Thunderstorm:-
The severest thunderstorm ever witnessed in this district occurred in August 1890. The weather was very warm and there was a hot wind. There was an odd flash of lightning about 10.30 A.M. After that there was continuous lightning and thunder, and all the countryside was lit up. A mountain flood broke into yards and in one case it took three days to draw away the debris. The horses and dogs ran wild and some dogs never returned. There was hailstone in some places, and in some places the grain crops were destroyed by hailstone. Some of the oats crop was shelled and it grew again Gardens were destroyed and ridges and potatoes were completely cleared away.
Snowfall:-
There was a severe snowfall in this district on the 9th February '94. The day on which the famous John Twiss was hanged
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 14:08
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Teachtaire beag ó theach go teach agus bíonn sé amhuigh san oidhche?
Freagra:- Cosáin.
Cé'n taobh chupán a bfhuil a lámh air?
Freagra:- An taobh amuigh.
Tá sé thoir is tá sé thiar is tá sé ingáidrín Bhaile Cliath is mó greim ná greim capaill agus ní itheann sé greim ar bith?
Freagra:- Speal
Sin é sa chlúid é agus dhá chéad súil aire?
Freagra:- Criathar
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 14:03
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13 Do tháinig sé isteach ar ghaailnibh na ndaoine agus do chuaidh sé amach mar snáithín síoda.
Freagra:- mhóin.
14. Céard a dhéananna suibhal ar a chloigeann.
Freagra:- tairgne bróg.
15. Thógfainn in mo ghlaic é is ní chuirfeadh an Rí gad air.
Freagra:- Gainimh
16. Céard é an rud is fearr amuigh.
Freagra:- droch fhiacal.
17. Céard tá níos duibhe ná an fiach dubh.
Freagra:- a chuid chlumhaigh
18 Súid thall ort é, ní trom leat é
Ní ball de bhaillibh do chuirp é is tá sé ort in a dhiaidh sin?
Freagra:- d'ainm
19 Ce'n taobh den chupán a bhfuil an
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Driscoll, Lether, Ballydehob, states that the snow remained until June 9th. There were men coming from Bantry fair on that date and they saw the snow on the north side of Bearna Gaoite. The day
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About the year 1897 a ship named the Memphis was wrecked in Dunloch Bay owing to a great fog on the sea. She struck on a rock and overturned. She was loaded with a general cargo - timber, cattle, meat, apples, flour and rum. There were only a few lives lost. The neighbours went and gathered up the goods and carried them away with them.
Some local poet composed the following poem:-
There were sandboats from Dunbeacon flowing up the bay
Loaded to the water's edge returning with their prey.
They brought lots of rum and leather and everything nice
And other new invented things to kill the rats and mice.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:53
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rejected
awaiting decision
previous was the finest day that came that Winter and the sun shone brightly all day.
Men working near the White Castle, Schull, noticed the unusually large numbers of birds taking shelter in the castle. One man remarked that probably there would be a great fall of snow. The birds were unable to leave the castle for some days.
At that time sheep were better cared and lambs were born earlier. The young lambs learned to eat oats and hay inside as no grass was available.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:50
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awaiting decision
ten feet because the snow was dry and light and the storm drifted it along. It was on a Sunday morning and the priests had great difficulty in travelling. Father Bernard was in Ballydehob at the time and he was going to say mass in Dunbeacon and he was unable to go beyond Dreenlomane School cross. The snow lasted for about a week on the ground and the birds all died with the hunger.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:47
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On the 16th of August in the year 1898 there came a great thunderstorm in this part of the country. It lasted for about ten or twelve hours, and it was accompanied by a great flood and lightning.
Water flowed into the houses and bridges were broken down, and the corn was swept out of the fields, and the turf was swept out of the bogs along the rivers. There were heavy showers of hailstone as large as marbles and the people stayed up the night praying.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:44
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rejected
awaiting decision
About the year 1892 there came a great snow in this part of the county. The snow was so great that it came in through the slate in some houses and in through the keyholes in the doors. The outhouses were filled with snow in the morning and the people had a great difficulty in finding their cattle. There were no lives lost in this locality but there were a lot of sheep lost on the hills.
The snow was about three feet high in the ground, and in some place it rose to
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1898 a great thunderstorm came in this district and it lasted nine or ten hours. It was accompanied by heavy rain. Water flowed into some houses, and the corn in the fields was swept into the gullies and they were all blocked. For weeks after turf was found in the fields and along the river banks.
The lightning was so severe that it killed cattle and other animals in Glaun. Sheep were also to be found dead at the bottom of hills and roadsides. Some said it was lightning killed them an others said they were swept off the hills by the flood. There were also heavy showers of hailstone and the people grew so frightened that they stayed up the night praying.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:36
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:36
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rejected
awaiting decision
If there is a circle around the moon it is a sign of rain. If the stars are shining brightly it is a sign of good weather. When the sheep come down from the highlands into the lowlands it is a sign of a storm. When there is a shine on the rocks it is a sign of bad weather. When the smoke is going north it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:34
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A ship with a general cargo was lost in Dunlough Bay off the Mizen Head in a thick fog. It struck a rock but all the crew were saved. All the crew got on the lifeboats except one man that got on a bullock's back which brought him safe to the shore. John Mc Gill was the captain's name. Memphis was the ship's name.
Some time later another ship was wrecked by Calf Island outside Schull Harbour. She was driven in by a storm on the rocks with a load of timber. All the crew were saved, but the ship became a complete reck.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:30
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The big snow occurred in February 1855. It was very deep and the weight of it threw in some old thatched houses. Cattle were smothered when the houses fell in. After snowing it hardened up and it was to be seen for seven weeks after.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
The big flood occurred on the night of 16th of August, 1898. It was expected that some change would come in the weather as there was dead heat on the evening before it occurred. It was accompanied by the severest thunderstorm that the old people ever witnessed.
[-]
P.S. The thunderstorm and lightning commenced about 12.30 a.m.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:24
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to live and the following day Kingston died.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 13:23
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awaiting decision
There lived in Cooraganive a man named Sir Beecher. He was a landlord and a cruel one. He made his tenants pay intolerable rents and was therefore hated by all.
The money he got falsely was buried under a tree called "Crann Crocth" which is still growing.
It was guarded by two armed men a white bull and three dogs. Any person found trespassing was either killed by the bull or seized by the dogs and taken and hanged on the tree hence the name "Crann Crocta".
One night a cousin of Beecher's named Kingston while searching for the gold shot the bull and some years later he was returning home from Drimoleague he passed this tree.
He saw the skeleton of a man he had helped to evict hanging from the tree.
He said he had not long
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:27
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If a cow had sickness boil nettles and give her the water to drink
If you had a cut on your finger or any other part of your rub parafine oil to it and it will heal in a short time
If you had a sore eye bathe it in cold black tea.
If you had a sore throat fry salt and rub it to it and it will heal it in a short time.
If your feet were timber tender wash them in water and rub a little oil to them, the water need not be boiling
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:23
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The people made cures themselves long ago. If a person got he craos galair and put a gander's beak into his mouth and make him screach it would go away. Or the seventh son or daughter could take it away. Or if a child's whose father died before he was born could take it away by spitting on it.
The person that would like an asluacra could cure a burn, but they should lick him twelve times before they have the cure.
If a person had a toothache to mix pepper, salt, salts, bread-soda, it would take it away, or best of all to smoke a cigarette the smoke of it is very good.
If you had a pain in your head put Saint Brigid's tile around it and it would leave.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:18
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There are alot of names on the fields around this district
The Well field is so called because there is a well in it
Páirc an Aitinn because there are bushes of furze growing in it.
The bridge field because there is a bridge in it.
The High Field is so called because there is a big hill in the middle of it.
The Black field is so called because there is black surface in it.
Páirc an Uisce is so called because it is very wet.
There is a big height between two fields known as Hickey's height. Once a man was cutting furze on top of it and he fell down and got killed.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:14
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About forty years ago there waur a great fall of snow. It covered many houses.
There was a terrible lot of sheep lost in it. The people had to throw boiling the snow to melt it. They had to get snow water to make the tea. The people could not go out to feed the cattle. When the snow was melted the cattle were nearly dead. My grandfather lost six sheep in the snow. The snow was twelve feet deep in places.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:11
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About forty five years ago there was a very big fall of snow.
It was in January 1893. It was about fourteen feet in height and the people could not go for water to the wells. They were afraid they would get smothered.
They had to boil the snow. There were about a hundred sheep killed. Very few people had their cattle in. There was lightning and thunder with it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:08
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There was some very bad weather about forty years ago. The storm felled several houses to the ground. The roads were blocaded with trees so that the people could not travel.
There was a man living near Burnfort and the storm felled one of his out houses and killed six cattle on him.
There was a great snow in 1897. There was not a bush nor a ditch to be seen. The snow was fourteen feet deep in places. Several sheep were smothered throughout the country. The snow was so long on the ground that the farmers had to shovel it away when the were planting the potatoes.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:04
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awaiting decision
put a layer of straw up on the roof. Then they would put the scollaps down on that and sew them together with a thatching needle.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 11:03
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Long ago all the women used spin the thread. It was alot better than the thread now and it used wear longer.
There was a tan-yard in Mallow some years ago but there is no trace of it now. It was there the people used get the leather tanned.
Every smith used make gates, ploughs, and firecranes.
The women used make their own candles. They used render the fat of cows or sheep in a pot and when it was melted, they used spill it into a mould and leave it there untill it was hardened.
Long ago, there were no slate houses only all thatched houses. The men used thatch them once a year. First they used gather sticks about three feet long and point the two ends. These were called "scollaps". They used
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 10:59
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There was a bad storm about forty years ago.
It was in the month of January we had it.
Alot of houses were felled to the ground.
The roads were blockaded with trees so that the people were unable to travel.
There was a man living near Glenville and his name was Simon Hegarty and one of his out-houses fell and it killed fifteen cattle on him. There were three boats going from Ireland of over to England with a thousand people in it and they were drowned.
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 10:56
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There was a hedge school below in Carthy's field, it is called "Croch". The school master lived in a house near the Brown Bridge.
One night about twelve o' clock he heard a loud knock at the door. He got up and went out to see who was there. But when he went to the door there was no one there. He went out and looked all round the house but he saw on one. It happened three nights in succession.
He went and told the priest what had happened. The priest told him to go and live in the "Plain of the Flowers."
senior member (history)
2020-07-25 10:51
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There is not any poet in this district now.
Long ago there was a poet named "Marcus" from Kerry. He used to go round from house to house making poetry and songs and then the people would give him money. This day he went to a big gentleman's place named Hyde and he sang songs. When he had finished Hyde gave Marcus no money. Then he went away and made a verse about him.
"In all my ranging and serenading
I found no "nager" but Humpy Hyde."
When Hyde heard of this he sent for him and paid him and Marcus made another verse
"In all my ranging and serenading
I found no equal with Humpy Hyde
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:45
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awaiting decision
Graveyards still in Use.
Glanworth Graveyard convenient to the village
Dunmahon Graveyard about two miles from the village
Graveyards now disused.
Monan Graveyard.
Laught Graveyard.
Killemra Graveyard.
Cill an Chrainn
Teampall na Lobhar
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:43
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Pools.
Poll Sheáin (convenient to Chronee Well)
Poll Gorm.
Poll Nash (1/2 mile below the bridge)
Bellows Hole (named from rock overlooking the hole - rock like a smith's bellows)
Poll Corann
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:42
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The following are the names of Fords and Pools on the R. Funcheon near Glanworth Village:-
Fords:-
Manning Ford (Battle Ford)
The White Knight's Ford
Ballinahown Ford
Clontinty Ford
Dunmahon Ford
The Rock Ford
Dempsey's Ford
Labbacalee Ford
Ballykinly Ford
Dilworth's Ford
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:37
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rejected
awaiting decision
Graveyards still in Use.
Glanworth Graveyard convenient to the village
Dunmahon Graveyard about two miles from the village
Graveyards now disused.
Monan Graveyard.
Laught Graveyard.
Killemra v
Cill an Chrainn
Teampall na Lobhar
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:35
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rejected
awaiting decision
Other Castles in the vicinity of Glanworth are:-
Ballinahown Castle
About 3 miles from Glanworth on the right bank of the River Funcheon
Caherdrinna Castle
On a hill about 5 miles from Glanworth.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:33
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awaiting decision
The follow.ing Local Castles are all situated in Glanworth Village or within two miles of it:-
NAME OF CASTLE ----- DETAILS
Glanworth Castle
In the village - on the right bank of the River Funcheon - partly in Ruins
Ballylegan Castle
In Ballylegan - on the right bank of the River Funcheon - Nearly all in Ruins.
Manning Castle
In Manning - on the left bank of the River Funcheon - only a small portion of the walls is now standing.
Dunmahon Castle
In Dunmahon - on the left bank of the R. Funcheon. In a fairly good state of preservation.
Curraghoe Castle
In Curraghoe - on the left bank of the R. Funcheon. Inner walls standing - outer walls demolished.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:28
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awaiting decision
TOWNLANDS. --- FIELDS ETC. IN TOWNLANDS.
Parkclough:-
Páirc na gCapall
Páirc na Cosse
Páirc Fhada
Rathdangan:
The Stone Field
The Liss Field
One Liss
Sandville
The "Pits" Field
String
--
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:26
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TOWNLANDS --- FIELDS ETC. IN TOWNLANDS
Manning
Driscoll's Field - A man named Driscoll was killed in this field while hunting.
The Two Liss Field.
The High Liss Field.
The Pits -. Clay was got in this field to manufacture Pottery.
One Castle,
One Cromlech,
Six Lisses,
One Sweating Cave,
Moneen.
Páric Chnoc,
The Carrigeen,
Páirc na hAltórach,
One Cromlech and Stone circle.
One Old Graveyard, (disused).
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:22
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NAME OF TOWNLAND --- NAMES OF FIELDS ETC. IN TOWNLAND.
Dunmahon.
"The Liss Field" In Mrs Dennehy's Farm.
Stone Circle in Mr. Daly's Farm.
One Castle. One Graveyard. One Liss. Hill on Road called "The Lackaroo".
Farranlashery. -
Johnstown.
"The Cloister "(Old Ruin).
"The Móin Dubh. (Field).
One Liss.
Killemra.
One Old Church and Graveyard (Now Disused)
Killeagh.
Two Lisses.
Laharn.
One Stone Circle and Liss. One Lime, Kiln.
Laught.
Old graveyard (No Disused).
"Páirc na gCloc" (Field) In Miss Sheehan's Farm. There are large stones in this field. It is said that the water that is in the holes of these rocks would cure warts. Páirc Cruaidh (Field.)
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 21:12
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awaiting decision
Bulán Ruadh - a cross roads about a mile south-west of Glanworth gets its name from The Foxy Bull.
A big faction fight took place there over this bull some people saying he was three years and others four years.
People in this and surrounding parishes took sides until there were two parties known as "Three year olds" and "Four Year olds", and these parties were very bitter and continued so for a long time - and so began the Faction Fights.
The army, under George Montgomery was called out, and many people were hurt, some being killed.
The fight was brought into the village and one of the "Three Year Olds" would drag his coat in the mud, so that "Four Year Old" would stand on it, and thus it would begin again.
The teller says her grandfather would not allow his people to bury him with his own people, as they were all
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 19:44
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awaiting decision
at night round the neck, the stocking worn during the day to help to cure it.
Poultices of linseed meal were often used to cure pneumonia and this remedy was also used for boils.
For wounds that did not bleed, leeches were often applied to draw the bad blood. Iodine was usually rubbed on to a cut.
When children had whooping cough, often donkey's milk was given them to drink as a cure.
The blossom of the furze was considered a good remedy for yellow jaundice.
A poultice of mustard was often applied to the chest for a bad cold.
If the eyes are sore, owning to a cold, a remedy was to bathe the eye with cold tea.
Chilblains should be rubbed over with turpentine often paraffin was used instead.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 19:40
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Goose grease was often used as a cure for a swelling. Flour was sprinkled on a burn and bread soda was often used also. For weakness it was recommended to squeeze the left wrist with the right hand tightly.
It was advised also to loosen the shirt collar at the neck.
For boils, a mixture of soap and sugar was made into a paste and some put on a cloth and applied to the boil. Poultice of linseed oil was used also.
For ring worm, fresh lard and sulphur were mixed and made into an ointment and applied with a brush to the part affected.
It was considered a good remedy for toothache to fill the hole or cavity of the tooth with tobacco.
The juice of a clove was often used also as a remedy.
When a person bled from the nose, often a piece of silver placed between the teeth stopped the bleeding. Often a cold substance, like a key, was moved down inside the shirt, below the neck.
If the ear was sore often cotton wool was dipped in olive oil and put into the cavity of the ear.
For a headache, if a person was within doors he would be removed out into the open to breathe the fresh air. For a sore throat a gargle of salt and water was often used to wash the throat. Persons having a sore throat used often to wear
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 19:32
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hour. The box churn, also mentioned before could produce butter in about a quarter of an hour. At the end of the staff churn we are told was an instrument made of heavy wood.
This instrument was in the form of a cross and it contained a number of holes to allow the cream to come up. This type of churn was known as "the standing churn".
These churns, if kept in use and cleaned regularly, used last upwards of twenty years. The box churn is still in use by people who have only one and two cows, but most of these churns were only used up to twenty years ago. Butter was made once in every ten days in Winter and in Summer once a week.
Women and girls usually did this work but if a stranger came into a house while the people were making the butter, he or she used usually lend a helping hand.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 19:28
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awaiting decision
At present there is scarcely any churning done in my district. Formerly staff churns were used to a great extent in my district. Large staff churns were used by those who had a large number of cattle. The largest of them was about three feet in height. The width of the bottom was about twenty two inches while the width across the top was about ten inches. There are three sides in the staff churn and we are told that it is about forty years old. The names of the various parts are the beaters, the staff and the lid.
Formerly the three chief kinds of churns used were the staff churn, the barrel and the box churn. Another churn used formerly was called the stand churn; it was shaped something like a ferkin, to which was attached a long piece of wood called the churn staff. By beating the cream with that staff, butter could be produced in about an hour. The barrel churn mentioned above was introduced afterwards. It was made round with a handle fitted on to both ends and it was worked by two persons turning the handles. By this process butter was made in about a half an
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:27
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Christmas and there are funny stories told of how it was cooked then.
They were a strong race then with frugal habits not like the race of to-day of whom three-fourths are depending on medicines for life. They worked from five a.m. until it was so dark that they could not find their coats and often went "sgoruidheachting" after and danced until morning. They danced fine old Irish jugs, reels and hornpipes not the trailing dismal, debased things that are called dances nowadays.
The Irish were then a race of splendid men and women of fine physique and although living in conditions of primitive simplicity they were independent-minded, long-living and care-free.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:23
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A great change has taken place in this country within last hundred years in the quality and quantity of food the people eat.
About seventy years ago people grew wheat and had it ground locally from which they made whole-wheat bread. White flour was a thing almost unknown.
The farmers skimmed their milk and made their own butter as creameries were unknown.
The skimmed milk and buttermilk were used at almost every meal. In Winter time the milk was boiled or they made curd and whey of it - a nourishing food and drink now almost unknown.
Potatoes were the staple food of the people at that time hence the failure of the potato crop brought the famine of 1846. People had not tea except
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:19
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compelled to admit that there was something supernatural in it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:18
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awaiting decision
There is only one holy well in this parish. It is dedicated to Saint Michael and is situated in the Townland of Cooldaniel.
Rounds are performed at this well all Sundays of the year but especially on Saint Michael's day the 29th of September. It is a fairly deep well and even in the dryest Summer it was never known to go dry. A little wall is built around it with an arched covering overhead. On the wall are crosses about three feet apart. At these, people kneel and pray while performing the rounds.
The old people tell a story about this well. A Protestant who lived in the district thought he would have a joke at the Catholics who honoured this well so much so he took some if it home for household purposes placing some of it in a kettle on a blazing fire to boil. He then awaited the result, and was amazed to see that after many hours it was as cold as ever. He was thus
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:13
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fairs are held only four times a year. When animals are sold a tax is to be paid to the Town Council. Different prices are paid as two shillings for a horse and six pence for a cow and a pig. In each town is a special field in which the fair takes place.
In the olden times fairs were held in all villages and on many hill-tops. At these fairs many challenges and fights took place between families and clans. It was more to right their wrongs they came to these centres than to sell their cattle. At this time intoxicating drink was cheap so they were always drunk.
It is nice to go to a cattle fair because all sorts of shopkeepers and pedlars come there and it is delightful to hear them advertising their articles.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:08
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produce. The fairs begin at a comparatively early hour in the morning and consequently farmers who live far away from the appointed market place have to get up very early in the morning if they wish to attend same. There is a great commotion for a few hours of the morning and with bargaining and hand-clapping a great number of beasts exchange owners. When the farmers receive the value of their beasts they leave a considerable amount to the merchants of the town for goods of all kinds.
When there is a patent taken our for a fair in a certain district or town no fair can be legally held within a radius of six or seven miles from this appointed spot.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:04
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Fairs are held in most towns and villages. There is not however any fair held in the village of Tarelton but they are held in the adjoining towns, Macroom Ballineen and Dunmanway. Each of these fairs is held monthly.
The pig fair precedes the cattle fair Horse
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 16:02
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awaiting decision
Fairs are of very ancient origin in Ireland and were held in the country long before the English captured it. In ancient times and up to a very late period they were principally held for amusement. Old people who live in the vicinity of my home have related to me that they journeyed long distances to fairs for nothing else but for amusement such as dancing and singing and looking at acrobatic performances. The ballad singer who was an outstanding personage at the fairs formerly is now scarcely recognized. He stood at a certain place with a crowd eagerly listening to him singing something usually in praise of some political hero.
The fairs nowadays have changed wonderfully as they are principally held for the sale of agricultural
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:23
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awaiting decision
the bad air once in every three or four turns.
Inside the barrel are three 'beaters', and through these, the cream goes when being churned.
At each end of the barrel is a handle by means of which it is turned. There is not any mark on the side or bottom of it.
Butter is made once a week in summer, and once a fortnight in winter. My mother and sister make the churn and sometimes my father. Any strangers who enter the house while this work is in progress assist at the churning. It is thought that the cream would not give sufficient yield if the stranger did not assist.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:20
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was called a "Gníomh". This was how the townland got its name.
There is only one old man living in Gneeves now. He is seventy-one years. He has a knowledge of Irish but he does not frequently speak it. He can tell stories in English about the past.
His name is -
Cornelius O'Brien,
Gneeves,
Kilmichael, Macroom.
Houses were more numerous in the locality in former times. There are a couple of ruins still to be seen, and others are completely knocked to the ground.
A few people emigrated to America from the townland, when they were unemployed at home.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:19
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The name of the townland in which I live is Gneeves.
It is situated in the parish of Kilmichael in the barony of West Muskerry. There are nine families in the townland. The approximate number of people is fifty. The family name most common is Kelly.
There are nine dwelling houses built, comprising of six farm-houses, two cottages and a carpenter's house.
All of those are slate-roofed houses and are of a rectangular shape. It is not exactly known how the townland got its name but we are informed that "Gníomh" meant a certain portion of land taken from other townlands and all these portions were joined together to make a townland which
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:15
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ed milk.
The only bread used was wheaten bread. From the wheaten flour, they baked bread without mixing any other flour through it.
About forty years ago, tea was drunk in the evenings, and so potatoes were again partaken of late at night before retiring to bead. Tea was drunk during Christmas, and other festive periods of the year. Poor people rarely drank it, because they could not afford to purchase it.
A special custom which the old people attached to Christmas Eve is the eating of a very late dinner. This dinner consisted of potatoes, hake fish
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:14
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heated. The poorer people, who were unable to afford this, used oaten meal porridge, or Indian-meal porridge, which was also boiled since the night before. Sometimes, those who had new milk to use, boiled it and put a little sour-milk through it. In this way, they made curds and whey.
Potatoes were again eaten for dinner, and bacon boiled with cabbage or turnips was used by farmers who were rich enough to afford them. A little sour skimmed milk was also drunk. The poorer folk, who had not even a drop of milk to use, were compelled to eat potatoes with salt.
The supper consisted generally of the same foodstuffs as breakfast - potatoes and skimm-
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:11
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is very lonesome leaving her old home.
The men who attended the wedding, often raced against each other on horses on the way home. Very frequently accidents occurred owing to this competition, because the men used to have some drink taken which made them jolly.
In former years the wives used to sit on the horses with their husbands.
This is a rhyme which old people have about marriage days-:
Marry on Monday for health
Marry on Tuesday for wealth
Marry on Wednesday the best day of all.
Marry on Thursday for losses.
Marry on Friday for crosses.
But marry on Saturday for no luck at all.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:09
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century ago the wedding used to take place at the girl's house, in the morning before the marriage. A great feast was held, to which all the friends and relations were invited. There was much fun and "jorum" and so everybody enjoyed himself.
Later on in the day the parties went to the chapel where they were married. Men on horse-back travelled first, and then side-cars and covered-cars followed, and last of all came the (future) bride sometimes in an enclosed car.
After the ceremony, the newly married couple leave the church and go to the bridegroom's house, followed by their friends and neighbours. This is known as the "hauling home" because naturally enough the bride
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:06
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arrange to meet in the nearest town, generally on a fair day. The parents of both the boy and girl meet in a private room of a public house. Here they discuss the matter. The man's father informs the girl's father the amount of fortune he wants, and if the latter is able to give his daughter such a fortune, they make some agreement before leaving the public house. Money is given as a fortune. It is seldom, stock or goods are given, but sometimes the girl may receive them as a present.
In this parish marriages generally take place in a chapel, but in some neighbouring parishes they still take place in the houses.
About a half a
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:05
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In this locality marriages do not take place in any certain part of the year. In former years many people used to get married during Shrove, and especially on Shrove Tuesday. The months of May and August and the days, Monday's Wednesday's and Fridays are thought unlucky for marriage. The custom of matchmaking is still carried on during Shrove.
When a girl attains a marriageable age, the parents are anxious to settle her down in a good suitable home. They send word to a certain man through a friend or neighbour, and if he is anxious to get married a match is drawn up between the two parties. On a certain day they
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:03
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go to the neighbouring houses to sell them, and to provide money and food to support the family. During the day the horses are let feed along the road-side, but during the night they are sometimes put to trespass on the farmers' fields. When day dawns they drive them out of the fields so that the farmer would not see them. This is one of the chief reasons why people do not like to see them come to the locality.
It is the general belief that travellers are no so welcomed at the present day as they were in former years.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:02
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ask. The people are very reluctant to give lodgings to them now, except to someone who is very well known. They are not kept in any house longer than one night. They do not carry food with them now, instead they beg for a meal.
They accept money as alms, and sometimes they take tea or sugar.
The travelling folk of ancient years travelled on foot, but recently bands of them travelled in caravans drawn by horses. The best known travellers in this district are Driscolls and Sheridans. They do not come at any special times. They do not tell any stories or bring any news to the local people.
These people camp in a shetery place by the side of the road. Usually they remain there for a week or so, and during that time the men are engaged in making tin vessels, while the women
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 13:00
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joyed when a beggar-man visited the home, as they knew what a lot of stories and fairy tales he had to tell them. On that night they were allowed to remain up by the kitchen fire listening to the funny stories the beggar-man related. Even the elder occupants of the house were loathe to go to bed, the old man was so amusing.
During the night he slept on a settle-bed. Straw was put under him, and a couple of blankets or quilts, which were always kept in reserved for the purpose, were put covering him. Now the travellers are not so heartily greeted by the people, because they visit the place too often and they are tired from giving alms to them. It is almost impossible to satisfy them, and the more they get the more they
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 12:58
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impossible to purchase anything from them, and then they leave the house very disappointed and very angry. They obtain their supplies of articles in a wholesale shop in the city of Cork.
The travelling folk of the present day are not so warmly welcomed in the district, as were the travellers of former times. We are informed by the old people who dwell here, that the travellers who lived about thirty years ago were hospitably entertained in every house to which they paid a visit. They were jovial and light-hearted and never grumbled.
Sometimes they were allowed to remain in a farmer's house for a few days and during this time they were as well entertained as anyone of the family. The children were over-
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 12:56
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Travelling folk still call to every house in the district. Most of those travellers have been wont to frequent this part of the country for a number of years, but recently strange people are seen travelling through the district. Every traveller pretends to be poor, but in many cases they are better off than the people who give alms to them.
Generally they sell small articles of use, such as brooches, studs, laces, combs and other things which would not burden them while carrying them around. People buy these articles from them, not because of their use, but just to satisfy the traveller. Sometimes they demand such a high price for those things that it is
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:31
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They have holly bushes decorated with coloured paper and on top of this bush they have a wren. When they come to the door the sing the "Wren Song".
The wren the wren the king of all birds
On St Stephen's day he was caught in the furze
Although he was little his family is great
Hold up, our lady and give us a treat.
When they finish this song the people of the house give them a few pence. Grown up men also go around, disguised. playing musical instruments, such as the mouth organ or the fiddle.
Shrove Tuesday is the last day of Shrove. Many weddings take place on that day. The night is called "Pancake Night" because it is customary to have pancakes on that night. The "Scellig List" is composed about all the marriagable men and women who did not marry during Shrove.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:26
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is that before the dawn. It is never too late to mend. Ill got goes bad. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. Least said soonest mended. A shut mouth catches no flies. Birds of a feather flock together. Too many cooks spoil the broth. Spare the rod and spoil the child. It is better to be idle than badly employed. The new brush sweeps clean. Never put off until tomorrow what you can do to-day. A bird in the hand is better than two in the hand.
None of these Sean-Fhocals relate to this district and there are no stories as to how they were formed.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:22
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There are several old customs combined with the feast days of the year. On St. Stephen's day, 26th of December, boys go around from house to house collecting money. They dress up in old tattered clothes and wear a "false-face" or mask.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:20
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from potatoes, but the present generation never saw that done. In the olden times when people used to plant potatoes in ridges the holes for the potatoes were very deep so the people used to close the holes with a kind of timber sledge called a "Fairihin"
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:19
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There are a lot of old sayings in this district some of which are as follows. Half a loaf is better than no bread. It is better to go to bed supperless than to rise in debt. The early bird catches the worm. Out of debt out of danger. Early to bed, early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise. A stitch in time saves nine. Two heads are better than one. The darkest hour is that before
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:16
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times the people had only timber ploughs but they are not used now. The local smyth made the spades for the people but they are now bought in the local shop. The potatoes intended for the early crop are sprouted in February and those intended for the later crop are cut into pieces, each piece having an eye and they are called Sgiolláns. The potatoes used by the people of the district are, Kerr Pinks, British Queens, Arran Banners, Epicures and Champions. After the potatoes are about a fortnight in ground the drills are partly levelled down by a chain harrow. They are left like that until the stalks appear over ground. Then they are scuffled and hoed. The earth must next be dug and after that the potatoes are earthed. After a time the potatoes are re-earthed and re-scuffled. Then they are sprayed for fear of blight. They are fit to dig in Autumn and are drawn in the haggard and are put into a hole about twelve feet long, two feet broad and two feet deep. About seventy years ago potato cakes and starch were made
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:08
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Nearly everyone in this district plants potatoes. They prepare the land previously by ploughing it in the Winter. Some people plough in the manure also and more people put it on before setting the potatoes. They use both farmyard and artificial manure.
In the Spring the ground is re-ploughed and harrowed and all weeds picked.
Then the field is drilled and the potatoes planted artificial manure spread, and the drills closed. All the farmers in this district plant the potatoes in the drills . in the olden
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 09:06
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The weeds which harm the crops are dockroot, corncale, spunk, nettles, thistles and Corrapréacháin. These weeds make the land poor and they also ruin the crops. Dockroot, Corkcale, spunk and thistles grow in rich land and nettles and Corrapréacáin grow in poor land. There is a green plant called wild sage which grows on the ditches and fields. This plant is supposed to be a great cure for a hurt or a sore throat. It is prepared for use by boiling it in water for about half an hour. The water is then strained and used as medicine. There is another wild plant called Foghrom which also grows on the ditches and fields. This plant is used for drawing matter out of boils.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 08:58
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Snow Storm of 1856 came on a Shrove Tuesday.
It lasted three weeks.
It was as high as the houses
People had to make passages to the well etc.
The snow was so firm and hard that people could walk on top of it & the beggars stayed for three weeks in houses.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 08:56
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1. Big Snow of about 85 years ago.
Our grandfathers and their contemporaries had to dig and delve under snow in search of sheep and cattle; they had to clear away the snow in search of water, turf and other necessaries; it lasted for weeks much hardship was experienced by all.
II Snow Storm of about 50 years.
A workman told the following tale of woe he lived at Derryduff.
Was a workman to Stephen Fitzpatrick. One night his wife fell ill and he sped in haste for a local nurse - Mrs Harold, he brought her along in a pannier until she fell through it and he arrived home with the nurse in good time to find his wife had given birth to twin girls.
senior member (history)
2020-07-24 08:50
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64.
The "Banshee" is still believed in.
She is an old, small woman crying and clapping her hands. She wears a black cloak, and is seen before some families die. She is always a sure sign of death.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 21:28
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ar 'Simpson' a cuir amach agus an feirmeoir a cuir i seilbh airís. D'imigh Simpson go dtí an bhearraic i dtheannta na bpíléirí agus chaith sé an oidhche ann agus do theich sé leis féin ar maidin. Bhí fhios ag cách ná raghadh na fir a dhein an gníomh misneamhail seo saor ó'n dlighe agus ní raibh iongnadh ortha nuair a tháinig tímpal leath-chéad píléirí ó Dún - Maonmhuighe ar an 16ad lá de Mhí na Lughnasa agus do gabhadar naonbhúr fear. Do rugadh iad ós chómhair na cúirte i Maghchromtha agus tar éis an sgéal do phlé do sgaoileadh amach ar bhannaí iad go dtí Seisíon an Geimhridh a bhí chúghainn.
I gcionn seachtmhaine na dhiaidh san tháinigh na báillí agus na píléirí airís agus chuireadar amach Diarmuid Ó Mathghamha airís agus cuireadh fear dárbh' ainm Mac Dáití i bhfeidhil na h-áite agus tugadh breis píléirí isteach san áit chun aire do thabhairt do. An Domhnach na dhiaidh san tionóladh cruinniú puiblidhe i bpáirc ar thaobh an bóthair taobh thoir do droichead Ínse an Fhosaidh agus tháinigh Ball de'n Phárlimint ann agus daoine cáileamhla eile cun labhairt i gcoinnibh an chur amach. 'Sé an cómhairle a ceapadh ná iarracht a dhéanamh ar an aodhaire do chur amach agus Diarmuid do chur isteach -
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 21:20
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Sa bhliadhain 1906 do bhí na feirmeóirí tímpal Béal-átha'n-Ghaorthaidh a d'iarraidh a gcuid talmhan do cheannach ós na Tighearnaí Talmhan ach an sochrú a thabharfhadh na Tighearnaí ní shásóchadh sé na daoine. Bhí feirmeóir amháin i mBéal-átha'n-Ghaorthaidh gurbh ainm do Diarmuid Ó Mathghamha ná díolfadh an cíos agus do chuir an Ghreathánach Tighearna Talmhan as a seilbh é an ceathramhadh lá de Mí Iúil agus do chuir sé fear dárbh' ainm do Simpson isteach 'na ionad. Ar Drom-an-Ailthigh i n-aice an tSráidín a bhí Diarmuid na chómhnuidhe. Oidhche an lae 'nar cuireadh amach é tháinigh laochra óga an cheanntair le chéile agus chuadar i gcomhairle na mac léighinn a bhí ag freastal ar an gColáiste Gaedhealach i mBéal-átha'n- Ghaorthaidh. Do shochruigh an dá dhream go ndhéanfhaidís iarracht
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 21:15
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Talmhan chun breis cíosa d'fhághail air.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 21:14
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Bhí tighearna tailimh i nDroichead na Banndan gur b'ainm do Liam Ó h-Uidhir. Bhí seo tineontaithe aige i mBéal átha-'n-Gaorthaidh. Bhí sé díon i dtaobh cíosa, mar a mbeadh an cíos ag duine an lá san áirithe bhí sé curtha a seilbh aige lar na mháireach. Bhí baile beag cómhgarach do Bhéal atha 'n Ghaorthaidh gur b'ainm do Cathair na Cátha go raibh seo tineontaithe ann - fiche duine nó mar sin. Bhí cuid aca ábalta ar díol agus cuid eile ná raibh ach pé scéal é thug sé órdughadh 'na gcoinnibh go léir agus chuir sé a seilbh iad aon lá amháin (muinntir Chathair na Cátha). Badh mhór an scannradh bheith ag féachaint ortha - iad curtha amach ar na bóithre a stoc agus a ngamhna agus gach rud a bhain leo, fiú amháin an bainne do cuireadh amac i n-áirde ar na cladhthachaibh é. Fuaireadar tighthe i mBallaibh eile; siar Paróiste Bheanntraighe a thug cuid aca aghaidh agus tuille aca soir go Paróiste Cill Mhicíl agus cuid eile aca nár adaigh teine i n-aon tig go bráth airís. D'imthigh cuid eile aca thar sáile agus beagán aca le fuacht agus le fán an tsaoghail. Bhí duine des na tineóntaithe 'na sheasamh sa doras agus an cíos na láimh aige. "Sin é an cíos agus cé thógfaidh é" ar seisean. Ach ní thógfaí uaidh é - an talamh a bhí ón dTigearna
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 16:21
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Níl aon mheadan againn sa bhaile anois ach bhí ceann ag mo shínsear ar feadh ceathrachad bliadhain Bhí sí trí troighthe ar aoirde agus troigh go leith na bun.
Do cuirtí an t-uachtar isteach san meidhin agus loinithe isteach ann leis. Bhíodh poll i gclúdach na meidre cun na loinithe do oibruighadh síos agus suas. Cuirtí poll an chlúdaigh tré cois na loinithe agus socruightí an clúdach i dtreó ná scaipfí an t-uachtar.
B'éigin do dhuine seasamh chun na loinithe do bhualadh síos suas le na dhá láimh i dtreo go mbrisfeadh sí an t-uachtar. Bailightí an t-im lé céile annsan leis an loinithe. Nuair a bhíodh sé baiighthe le céile chuiridís isteach i d-tubán uisce é chun é do nídh agus cun an bláthaigh do thógaint amach as. Dhá uair an t-seachtmhain a dheinidís an t-im sa Samhradh agus uair amháin an t-seachtmhain san Geimhreadh Tógadh sé leath-uair chun an t-im do dhéanamh sa Samhradh agus níos mó na san nuair a bhíonn an aimsear fuar.
Dá dtagadh stróinséar isteach le linn na cuiginne do dhéanamh bá maith le muinntir an tighe a lámh do chur sa loinithe agus greas a thabhairt ag bualadh agus "Rath Dhé" do rádh ag taisbeánt ná
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 16:00
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The following was told to me by my uncle, Patrick Sheeran.
"In November 1918 there was a terrible flu which caused many deaths. When taking this flu people felt very weak and tired, then they were obliged to go to bed. Soon their temperature rose to about a hundred degrees (Fahrenheit). The accompanying severe headache lasted for about three days during which period sleep was impossible almost. They could not taste solid food and drank nothing but water. On the fifth or sixth day they began to sweat and to recover somewhat. On the seventh they were able to take a cup of tea and a biscuit. On the following day they were able to get up for a few hours. Each day they were gaining energy and soon were fully recovered."

Kathleen May O'Dwyer
Daughloonagh
Keash
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 15:58
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sheets and dropped into the grave. It is told that a countryman who became infected with the terrible malady as he was mounting his horse at the foot of Knox's Street, fell down dead on reaching the head of Market Street. It lasted from the eighteenth of August until the sixteenth of October. A doctor came from Dublin to help the local doctors as they were unable to give the necessary attention to their numerous patients.
The people in Sligo would be in a worse plight were it nor for assistance of the priests. There is one priest in particular, a Father Gilleran from Riverstown who volunteered to work in the hospitals. The strange remains that not one of these priests never contracted the baneful disease.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:33
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Bhí gorta san tír seo, sa blían míle oct gcéad cearca a sé agus cearcadh a seacht. Do dhein sé alán diogbhála ins an gceanntar seo. Do bhí an daonnradh níos tuibhe roimn an
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:31
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"an flú". Dá mbeadh an breóidheacht sin ag duine ní bheadh sé abhaltá corruighe agus dá mbheadh gruaigh dubh aige thagadh dath liath air.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:29
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aosta ar na rudaí a thuit[?] amach san gorta.
Nuair a bhí an gorta ann ní raibh aon nidh ag na ndaoine á nithe. Bheireadar min agus [?] é. Tá na daoine aostá abalta seana tighthe a thasbhaint dos na ndaoine óga, agus tá síad leagtha anois, ach nuair a bhí an gorta ann do bhí daoine na chomhnuidhe ionnthu.
An bliadhan na dhiaidh an gorta do chuir na daoine na prátaí ins gach uile áit.
Fuair a lán daoine bás leis an ocras sa gorta. Taréis an gorta thaining bhreoiteacht darbh ainm
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:21
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Bhí gorta mhór ins an áit seo sa bliadhan mile ocht gceadh agus cearca sé agus cearca seacht. Tá sgéalta go leór ag na ndaoine
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:20
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gcéad agus a cearca seacht d'fás na prátaí arís agus bí athas ar na ndaoine. Indiadh an Gorta an méid dés na Gaedhal a bí béo bhíodar lag, bocht, agus gan aon airgeadh a bheith agu.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:18
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Bí Gorta in Éirinn sa bhliadan míle ochtó gceadh agus a cearca sé. Tháinig an Gorta go dtí an Paróisthe seo, agus fuaír a lán daoine bás. Roimh an Gorta bhí ná daoine go ana bhocht, ní bhíodh acu le n-ithe ach prátaí agus ní bhíodh acu le n-ól ac bhainné.
Nuair a tháinig an Gorta thainig an dubh ar na bprátaí ar fuaidh na tíre. Do loit an dubh na prátaí, agus bí ocras ar na ndaoine, ac ní loiteadh an dubh an barra go léir, agus ní raibh an sgéal go ró-holc.
Núair a tháinig an Gorta fuaír a lán dhe na daoine bochta bás. Chuaidh furmhór do na daoine bochta go dtí tír eile. Núair a bí an Gorta sa tír, an biadh a bí ag na ndaoine iseadh mhin buidhe.
Sa bliadhan míle octh
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:07
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They baked bread of Indian meal and a little flour and as hard as this was they had good sound teeth.
Tea was used by the old people in nineteenth century. At first, when tea was made, the way they made it was: they threw away the water and eat the leaves. Little Jugs and pint saucepans and ponnies were used before cups.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 12:04
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V
The old people had three meals a day. At eight o ' clock they had the breakfast, at twelve o ' clock they had the dinner, and before they went to bed they had the supper. They milked the cows and did all the morning's work before they eat their breakfast. Their principal meal was potatoes and stirabout. They placed the table in the middle of the floor.
Meat was not very often eaten, but fish was eaten on Sundays. At Christmas they had tea and white bread but they would not use tea for another year.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:37
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or eat two meals in one house until he got the water.
The man went off and when he got to the lake he was surrounded by soldiers and, taken prisoner, and brought before the king. The king said that he should get a bucket and dry out the lake, and if he wouldn't he should be beheaded.
He went to the lake and started at it and, for every bucket he took out two went in. When he saw this he gave up all hopes for he said that there was no chance for him but die. When dinner hour came he was brought his dinner and, he said he could not eat. She asked him why so and, he said because he couldn't dry out the lake. Then she said to him, "have sense"
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:31
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About a year ago there were two boys coming home from a dance along the Snámh road about four 'o clock in the morning. They had a box in their hands and when they came to the lonely part of the road the box was taken out of their hands. They got a great fright and they
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:28
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Long ago, when the English laws were in force in Ireland. there was a gang of young Irish men travelling through the country looking for people to join up with them. If any person refused to join them they would shoot him. These boys called themselves the, 'White Boys'.
One night, as they were passing through Inchaclough, they came to an old house where there was an old hag living. They knocked at the door and she peeped through a slit in the window to know
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:26
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in his mouth. He set the dogs after the cat and they caught him and killed him. When the man reached the spot, where the cat was killed, he could not see any thing, but the hare lying on the ground torn to pieces.
Then he continued on his journey until he reached home. When he arrived home he was telling his wife about the beggar man, that he met and what he said to him. There was a small delicate cat lying by the fire, and when he heard the man, talking about the cat, that the dogs killed, he put a big hump on his back. He made one leap from the hearth, and caught the man by the throat with his teeth. The man's wife caught the cat and pulled him. She gave the cat a sudden pull and she pulled a piece out of the man's
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:22
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Long ago there lived a farmer in the east of Bantry whose name was John Mc. Carthy. He was very poor and lived in a thatched house with his wife and family. There was a field in his farm called "Gleann na Sise" and a Leipreachán was supposed to be seen there every moonlight night at twelve o'clock. The farmer made up his mind to go to the field on the next night at twelve o'clock.
The next night he went and as he was coming near the field he heard the tapping of a hammer. He stole over to where the leipreachán was and caught him by the neck. He gave a roar and said, "Let me go" but the farmer said, "I will not let you go until you tell me where you have your gold." "It is under that tree over there," said the leipreachán. The farmer looked around and when he looked back the Leipreachán was gone.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:19
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One night a man from Durrus was going home from Bantry fair when he was stopped on the road by an old woman, who asked him would he carry her as far as Durrus grave yard. The man said he would, and the old woman stepped into the cart.
All along the way she kept silent until they came to Durrus graveyard, and then she said, "I am far enough now." The man stopped the cart and the old woman got down. The he saw a crowd of people on the road before him, and when they saw the man coming, they ran towards him and threw some stuff into his eyes and when they did that he got blind.
Then the person whom he had give the lift to, came, and drove the horse home for him but, he was blind ever after that.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night a man from Durrus was going home from a neighbour's house and it was very late. As he walked along the road, he saw a horse and cart coming towards him. Then he thought he heard people walking behind him and he looked back and there he saw a funeral about twelve yds behind him.
The man stepped over a ditch to let the funeral pass and, when it was gone, he came out on the road again, and there he saw a man with a cross look and red eyes who said to him. "The day is for the living and the night is for the dead. Go home and do not stay out late again."
The man ran home and he never stayed out late again.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some time ago Americans wishing to live in this country were motoring through west Cork looking for a suitable place to buy. One day they saw an old mansion and thought it just suitable.
They bought the mansion very cheaply and got it done up beautifully. One night one of the ladies was standing in the hall and was horrified to hear an awful laugh. She looked at the stairs, where the laugh came from, and saw a most awful man, just like a huge gorilla. She was frozen with fear and was amazed to see him vanish without ever moving.
She told her husband of her experience and he said "I
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
She was dressed in black and wearing a hooded cloak. The man went over to her and said "Is this the right road to Bantry?" He was only joking her because he knew that it was the right road.
The woman didn't answer him but she gave him an angry look. She took a bunch of quills from under her cloak and beat him with them. She kept beating him until he fell dazed on the road. When he got up from the road it was morning and he went at once and told a priest what had happened to him. The priest said to him that he had no right to ask the woman the right road to Bantry because she knew he was joking her. He also said that the woman was doing her penance near that gate.
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Many years ago there lived in Kealkil a man who had to stay seven years in bed. He had a great appetite, but he could not move a leg or hand, and he was very weak, although he used eat a lot of food every day.
One Sunday before the people of the house went to Mass, they gave the sick man a lot of food; and then they locked his door, and went away to Mass. When they were coming home they saw a great number of small men dancing and playing foot-ball in front of the house, and in their midst was the sick man,
senior member (history)
2020-07-23 09:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Barrels and churns were made extensively long ago. One of the best-known makers was a man named Peter Barry, who lived in Rathravane, about two miles north of Ballydehob. The implements in use were an adze, a plane, a hammer and chisel.
The making of churns and barrels is carried on at present in Ballydehob by John Daly.
The wood that suits best is that of the elm and ash.
Barrels of a large size and churns were bound by bands or hoops of iron, but smaller barrels were often bound with strong pliant twigs.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 21:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
spent the night near the stone watching for him.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 21:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
long twisted nose. He had two tiny shoes on his feet which were closed with silver buckles. He was working away on an other shoe with a beautiful hammer.
"Thanam-an-diocar" says Scannell "I have you now, give me out the crock of gold."
The leprechaun was startled, but he said "O my crock of gold, I will give it to you. But look at the mad bull tearing up the field." Scannell turned to run, but there was no bull.
He turned back again, but not a sign of the leprechaun was to be seen. He went home very cross, and did not sleep at all that night, only planning to catch the leprechaun.
Next day he put a mouse-trap on the stone ready to catch him. He went to the stone but there was nothing there but a dead mouse.
Scannell never again saw the leprechaun, even though he often
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 21:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once, a man by the name of Michael Scannell was coming home from Keelnahulla. near Boherbue, on a fence which is called "the long ditch". He heard a voice saying "Halo, Scannell how do you do"? "Troth! I'm all right" re[lied Scannell "but who are you?" "What does that matter." the voice again said "Where are you going." Scannell said "I am going home.
Scannell determined to find out who was speaking, so he got off the fence and walked on to where the voice came from, but he saw nothing. "Glory be to God" he said "What can it be." He walked on to where a large stone was stuck in the ground, and to his surprise, he saw a tiny little man sitting on it.
He has a pointed hat which was nearly as high as himself. He had a
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 21:35
approved
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awaiting decision
Water is never missed till the well runs dry.
One sense bought is better than two taught.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 21:34
approved
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awaiting decision
One per cent good is better than 99 per cent bad
One look before you is better than 2 looks behind you.
Wilful waste makes woeful want.
Don't spoil the ship for a ha porth of tar.
Judge the river before you go in the current.
A friend in need is a friend indeed.
You do not know a person until you live with him
The beginning of harm is the easiest to check.
When the giants' fight the dwarf is king.
A patch is always better than a hole.
Cleanliness is next to Godliness.
Far away grass is Emerald green.
The foul turns back upon the fouler.
A friend's fright is an enemy's chance.
A wedge of the elm splits itself
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 21:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A rub of a dead mans finger was supposed to cure a tooth ache.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 21:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In times gone by our Grand Fathers has a lot of different cures for diseases from what we now have. Doctors were very seldom called for sickness. There was always some old woman in the neighbourhood that gave them the simple home cures. Children having whooping cough the leavings of a fetter was supposed to be their cure. Measles were supposed to be cured by drinking donkeys milk.
Thrush was supposed to be cured by boiling wild woodbine and then wash down the throat of the patient with the water that boiled it.
The cure for ring worm was to cut the top of a black cat's ear and rub the blood to the ring worm.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The townland of Rathroe is between Boherbue and Millstreet. There lived there long ago a family of Mc Carthey's who were at this time very poor. One day they were setting "skealauns" in a field near the house.
The woman was drawing the skelauns in the bucket. One time she went out she struck against a rock she never saw before. She called her husband and said "Sure this rock was never here before" He said "Aru! I never saw it we must take it out of the way."
They tackled their horse to remove it, but when they came back there was a big hole in it and in it there was a jar of gold.
They took it home and soon afterwards they bought a lot of big farms & built a fine house. They also hired servants and gave them good wages. They became very rich people.
It is supposed that some of the gold is still by the Mc Cartheys who are yet living in Rathrow and are one of the richest families in the parish.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the white comb. When he went towards her she disappeared. This brother died shortly afterwards. In 7 years again the other brother saw her the same way, - combing her hair, but when he went towards her she again disappeared; but he did not know whether it was into the river or into the fort she went. It is supposed that the "good people" took her away, but every seventh year she is supposed to come back. It is said the if one touched her hair they would have great luck, but her coming often foretold trouble for some who saw her.
Some people say that the village of Meelin got its name for Meela Mc Auliffe.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are the ruins of an old castle near Meelin in County Cork. A family of the Mc Auliffes lived there many years ago. There were 2 brothers and a sister. The sister was very beautiful. Her name was Meela. She had many lovers but she herself wanted to marry a boy named O'Connor. But her brothers would not let her marry her own choice. They wanted her to marry one of the Mc Cartheys.
These Mc Carthey's were very rich people and had many castles all over the country. The Mc Auliffes were very harsh with their sister on her refusal to marry Mc Carthey and they never let her outside their own lands. There was a fort in their land near a river. It was a habit of Meela's to walk near it combing her beautiful hair with a white comb.
One day Meela Mc Auliffe disappeared and was not seen or heard of for 7 years. One day her brother saw her near the river, sitting on a stone combing her golden hair with
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the gravel he said "Why are you boiling the gravel." She said "Yerrah! I am only making plaster for our house. He walked out of the house for he knew what it meant. He went straight to the servant who was saying to another servant "I will soon be as rich as the landlord" The landlord walked up to him and said "I congratulate you, because you have found the secret of the gold but you have the wrong gravel, you will get the right stuff in the turn in front of Dan Mick's cottage.
Next day the landlord threw powder on top of the gravel. When the servant boiled the gravel it blew up the house and instead of becoming richer he became homeless.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago a lot of poor people lived in Doon and Islandbrack. In mud cabins they lived mostly.
A rich landlord came and lived in the place, and he built cottages for his tenants and hired almost every man in the neighbourhood and gave them good pay, but still he became richer and richer.
One of his servants became jealous of his master's riches, and made up his mind where all the money came from. Once when he slept by the River Araglen, and he dreamt that if the gravel from the river was put into a pot and boiled for 10 hours, the top skimmed off, and put into a bag and strained into an eartenware vessel what remained would be gold. When he awoke he told this to his wife and then said "When I come home from work have a bag of gold made."
It happened that on the same day the landlord visited this servant's house and when he saw the woman of the house boiling
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The lees of porter were used for ripening and drawing ulcers.
A sore eye cured by rubbing your fasting-spit to it or by rubbing a wedding-ring to it
The seventh son in a family was called the Doctor. He picked thorns, pared corns etc
It was considered wrong to pick a thorn in the finger, as it might cause blood poisoning. Evidently the people of those days didn't realize that the dirt which collected in the hand and got int the unprotected and disinfected sore that caused the blood poisoning
Torrentilla used for cuing tooth-ache.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 15:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Chick-weed used to cure swellings
Cobwebs were applied to cuts are were supposed to stop bleeding.
The Inner bark of the elder was used for burns
Worm-wood was used as a cure for worms in children.
Sheep's milk was used to cure measles
Eggs laid on Good Friday were preserved and used as cures. They were applied as poultices or rubbed to the wounds.
Dandelion roots and leaves were used for jaundice and liver trouble
Ivy grown on a bridge over a stream was used as a cure for swellings
Mac-an-Dá-Abha cured and ripened boils and ulcers.
Nettles eaten in May were supposed to cure diseases of the skin
Wood-sorrel applied with poultice was supposed to draw pus from sores. It should be picked by the mother of the person suffering from the sore
Lime-water given to children when fasting was supposed to be a cure for worms
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
aige ann. Do rith an buachaill cómh mear agus d'féadfhad sé é agus an sagart na dhiaidh. Do bhí an sean-duine díreach ag bruach na h-abhann chun na leanbhaí a chaitheamh isteach ann nuair a rug an buachaill greim dainghean ar agus do bhain sé a bódhrán dé agus na leanbhaí do.
Le na linn sin do tháinig an sagart suas agus dúbhairt an buachaill gur leanbhaí a bhí sa bódhran.
D'fhiafruig an sagart do'n sean-duine cad na thaobh go raibh sé dá mbághadh agus d'innis an sean-duine a cúrsa go léir do agus dubhairt sé go raibh náire ortha mar go raibh daoine go léir ag magadh fútha mar gheall ar bann óg a bheith acu agus iad cómh críonna agus [?] bé sin an chúis go raibh sé á mbághadh. Dubhairt an sagart leis dul abhaile agus na h-airióchad a thuille mar gheall arís.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 13:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dubhairt an sagart leis an mbuachaill rith na diaidh suas agus féachaint cad a bhí aige fé'n na chasóg mhór. Do tháinig an buachaill suas leis an sean-duine bocht.
Do tháinig sé thar-nais chun an sagart agus dubhairt sé leis an sagart go ndubhairt an sean-duine leis gur sean-choileán[?] a bhí aige istigh sa bodhrán aige go raibh sé ag dul chun an abha chun iad a bághad.
D'fhiafruig an sagart do'n buachaill an bfeacaidh sé iad agus dhubairt an buachaill leis ná feacaid sé iad in-aon-chor agus dubhairt sé nár taisbheáin sé do iad in-aon-chor mar go raibh an bodhrán istig fé na chasóg mór aige.
Dubhairt an sagart leis rith cómh mear agus d'fhéadfhad sé é agus dul 'na dhiaidh airís agus an bodhrán a bhaint de mar gur leanbhaí a bhí
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 12:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
seana lamhnú agus nuair a buaileadh breoidhte an seana-bhean.
Níor chuaidh sé id' iarracht dochtúir nó aon rud nuair a bhí na leanbhaí go léir tagaithe ar an saoghal. Dubhairt sé le na bhean go mbáthfhad sé iad.
Do bhí a leithéid do náire air mar do bhí eagla ortha go mbeadh na daoine go léir ag cainnt agus ag magadh futha. Do chuir sé an seana-chosóg air agus do fuair se bodhrán agus chuir sé na leanbhaí go léir isteach sa bhodhrán agus do ghluais sé leis ag déanamh ar an abha agus do bhí sé ag chur a bhóthair de cómh tuigh agus d'féadfhad sé é.
Cé mbuaileadh an treó rume ach an sagart agus a bhuachaill. Do bhí an[?] sagart tar-éis bheith ar cur ola ar[?] duine a bhí ag fághail bháis agus do bheannuigheadar dá chéile agus [?] do labhair sé leó.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 09:49
approved
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awaiting decision
Do thosnuigheadar ar an airgead do thógaint amach as an mála agus ar é do chur isteach sa bhosca agus ní raibh ach ceathramhadh den bosca acu nó mar sin. Do dhúnadar an bosca airís agus do chuireadar an glas air agus do chuadar síos airís.
Do fuair duine acu córda agus do chuir sí an eochair tímpeall a mhuineál ar eagla go gcaillfheadh sí é agus do choimead sí ann é go dtí gur theastuig sé uaithe airís chun tuille airgead do chur isteach sa bhosca.
Do bhídís ag déanamh airgead gach aon lá as san amach agus do chuiridís gach aon leath-phinginn de isteach sa bhosca go dtí go raibh an bosca lán go barra.
Do thosnuigheadar ag dhéanamh airgead airís ansan ag cniotáil stocaí agus ag déanamh léinteacha agus rudaí eile
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 09:40
approved
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awaiting decision
bosca mór iarrainn acu ach do bhí leabhair acu istig ann agus aon lá amháin do bhí Siobhán ag cainnt le Síle agus dubhairt sé léi go dtógfhaidís na leabhair amach as an bosca agus go gcuirfhidís an t-airgead a bhí acu isteach ann agus dubhairt an dune eile go ndéanfhaidís é.
Is shuas an staidhre a bhí an bosca acu agus do chuaidh an bheirt acu suas an staidhre agus do thosnuigheadar ar na leabhair do thógaint amach, agus do bhí alán díobh ann agus do thugadar leó síos an staidhre iad agus do chuireadar anáirde ar an driosúr beag iad agus do bhídís á léigheadh uaireannta nuair a bhíodh uain acu.
Nuair a bhíodar go léir shíos sa chistin agus anáirde ar an driosúr acu do fuaireadar an mála 'na raibh an airgead istig ann acu, agus ní raghadh feóirling ná leath-fheóirling eile isteach ann do bhí sé cómh lán san.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 09:27
approved
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awaiting decision
When a cat scrapes wood it is a sign of a storm. When the swallows are flying low it is a sign of rain. When a dog eats grass it is a sign of rain. When a cat has its back to the fire it is a sign of rain. If the sun is shining very early in the morning it is a sign of rain. during the day. If you stand on
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 09:23
approved
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awaiting decision
(3)
God the branch, God the flower. God be with me at my last hour.
As I lay down this night to sleep, I give my soul to God to keep, If any evil touches me, Oh Blessed Lady wake.
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4.
God bless the bed, God bless the flower, And God bless me, In my last hour. To be said three times in bed at night.
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5.
Four Great Angels around my bed, Two at the foot and two at the head, Mathew, Mark, Luke and John, Guard the bed that I lie on. To be said in bed at night.
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6.
Dear Angel keep me near thee, Beneath thy snow-white wing, And guard me form the evil ones, And teach me holy things. To be said night and morning.
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7.
Ere I lie down to sleep, I give my soul to God to take, And If I die before I wake, I pray that God my soul will keep. To be said in bed at night.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 09:14
approved
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awaiting decision
We have no churn at home, but I saw one in a neighbour's house. There are different sizes of churns. The one I saw was about 3 1/2 ft, in height and 14 ins. wider at the top. The sides are round. The owner of the churn says it it 41 years old.
The various parts are the churn-staff, and the churn-board and the churn cover, or lid and the cup.
The churning is done twice a week in the Summer and once a week in the Winter. The man and woman of the house make the churn.
The people who come in during the churning are supposed to take what they term "a greas" out of it, or as they say. They should put the big of their head in it". When the strangers take the churn staff they say "God Bless the work". The churning takes from 20 to 35 minutes in Summer, and about three quarters of an hour in Winter.
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 09:07
approved
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awaiting decision
The first National school was built here in the year 1854 and it was built by the people of the locality under the direction of Fr. Connery of Abbeyfeale. It was a long thatched house, and it was in use until 1915 when the new school was built. There were other teachers in the the school from time to time as assistants, such as Jerry Mc' Carthy, Julia Browne, Mary OConnell and after that Denis Fitzgibbon Mrs. Curtin. When Michael Curtin died 1895 David Ward was appointed principal Teacher until 1901. Then John Broderick was appointed a teacher in 1886 and was teaching until 1929
senior member (history)
2020-07-22 09:01
approved
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awaiting decision
1. Curtis of Kilnaboy has a cure for liver jaundice.
2. There is a well beyond the workhouse of Corofin and it has a cure for warts.
3. A son that never saw his father has a cure for Ring Worm.
4. Walshes blood has a cure for St Anthony's fire
5 The water that anyone named Cassidy would
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:22
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a great snow in October 1897. All the people in the country were snow bound for a fortnight. There were a terrible lot of sheep lost in it. The people had to throw boiling water on the snow to melt it. They had to get snow water to make the tea.
The people could not go out to feed the cattle When the snow was melted the cattle were nearly dead. My grand father lost six sheep in the snow. The snow in some place was twelve feet deep. There was snow in the "Cummars" for a month
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:19
approved
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awaiting decision
The house of John Lenihan in Ballyhooly was burnt.
There was an ambush in that locality and there were alot of soldiers shot and then the rest burned the houses for satisfaction. There was no harm don because the soldiers gave the people time to bring out the furniture.
There used to be a bonfire of tar barrells lit every year in honour of St John in Glenville.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:16
approved
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awaiting decision
Once a sergeant of Killavullen was drowned in the Blackwater near by.
Once a man named Roche native of Killavullen was hanged in the wrong, a false witness was brought against him, Saying that he cut trees in Murphy's wood without permission.
About forthy two years ago this place was covered with snow for three months. There was not a ditch nor a bush to be seen. It is said that the brown Bridge was broken down by the Black and Tans.
Once a bonefire was lit near Curtain's faichthe and in the morning it had reached Carthy's mountains
It burned every bush and every fern in the place
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:10
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awaiting decision
If there was a halo around the moon it would be a sign of bad weather.
When the stars are falling it is also a sigh of bad weather.
When you see the black birds picking closely around the door you are sure to get snow in a couple of days.
The surest sign that you are going to get rain is when you would see the fire turning blue or if the smoke was going straight up into the sky.
The south wind brings the most rain to this district.
Whenever the sea gulls are going north you are sure to get fine weather.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:07
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awaiting decision
The men long ago were alot stronger than the men now. They used to bring a half sack of flour on their shoulders from Killavullen but now they will have to take a horse and car for it The best mower around here was "Mick the Snipe" Why he was called that was because he used to go travelling around the bog very late at night looking for birds. He used to mow three acres every day His right name was Micheal O Connor.
The way they used to catch the rabbits is to shake a pinch of salt on their backs. Then they would turn back and lick themselves
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:04
approved
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awaiting decision
to put a half tierce up on the counter below at Mahoney's . First Dan tried and he put it up on the counter then Tom Walsh tried but he was not able to put it up, so Dan Driscoll won
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:03
approved
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awaiting decision
Once there was a man named Bill Dorgan who lived in Toureen walked to Macroom to a fair for cattle and walked home again with the cattle.
Tom Walsh native of Killavullen challenged Dan Driscoll
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 21:01
approved
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awaiting decision
There was once a man named Con Whibbs who liven in Ceim, beat a grey hound running, and he caught a fox.
Con Donoghue native of Island was once coming from Fermoy one day. a A man with a car passed him and Con thought the man would take him in but he did not. Then Con ran after the man and passed him out.
Then the man struck the horses but he was not able to pass him.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:57
approved
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awaiting decision
On St Stephen's day all the boys of a townland gather together and go all round the parish singing songs and they get money in every house This is the song they sing
The wren the wren the king of all birds
On St Stephen's day he was caught in the furze
From bush to bush
From tree to tree
At Toureen Bridge he broke his knee
Up with the kettle and down with the pot
Give us a penny to bury the wren
They divide all the money and if there is a penny left they buy sweets and divide them.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:45
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awaiting decision
Luighim insa leabaidh mar a luighfead san uaig
Deinim faoistin leat go cruaidh a Dhia
Táim ag lorg na h-asplóid ort ' Íosa Chríost
Pardún agus maitheamhnachas a thabhairt dom pheacaibh
Droch labharta no bhéil, droch smaointe ma chroidhe
Má dubhart rud ná raibh fíor
Má geallas rud ná coimhlíoneas
Cumaraí m'anam ort ' athair agus a Rí Comhachtach
Agus a Mhichíl Bheannuighthe an teachtaire Ro-glormhar
D'á bhfuil d'ainglibh agus d'aspolaibh i gCathair na Tríonóide
Míle fáilte romhat a Dhomhnaigh bheannuighthe
Thug lá agus oidhche dhúinn chun freagartha
Feúchaint suas ar Mhac an Bhanaltran
A Mhuire Beannuighthe agus a [?] Mhic Dé na nGrás
Beir m'anam leat go Parrathas cun suaimhneas d'fhághail
Ó bhriseas mo chroidhe le baois na h-óige
Ó dhul in aois dom níor stríocas fós duit
Cuirim ar mo dhá thaobh agus rompa
Dúiltuighim do'n diabhal agus d'á cómhachta
Ar eagla do dhul go dtí an corragaoile (corr= brink geimhleath = bondage)
'Muire 'gus Íosa glac mé, i d láimhaibh
Ar eagla na tuille tréana
A Mhuire feách agus ná fág.
A Mhuire Mhór mheidhrig 's a Mhaighdean Ro-glórmhar
Tabhair dom radharc ar do theighleach
Agus ar do thigheas glórmhar
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The nettle is used as a substitute for cabbage to be boiled with meat.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:26
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rejected
awaiting decision
The most harmful weeds in the farm are the thistle and dock leaf and the rush. The thistle is harmful because the seed is carried away the wind.
The dock-leaf produces an enormous abundance of seed and if not pulled up before it sheds this seed it increases at an alarming rate.
Of late years the rush can be found in almost all land under cultivation on the farm. Once it makes its appearances it is very to be done away with.
The only herbs I know are as follows:-
the Mach an Dhá Abha which grows by the bank of rivers and is used for whitlow It is uprooted, the roots washed and chopped small and rolled up in a leaf of cabbage and burned into a powder applied to the whitlow
Dandelion which grows in meadows is used as a cure for stomach trouble. The root is washed and drawn as tea and drunk in small quantities.
The root of the nettle is used for curing murrain in cattle.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:21
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had no butter spades at that time. They used have a wooden dish.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:20
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The churn is about 3 1/2 feet high. It is wider at the bottom than at the top. About a foot from the mouth it is narrowed. It is made of timber staves held together by hoops. A cover fits in the narrow part. The cover has a hole in the centre to allow the churn staff to pass through. On the cover to prevent the cream from leaping out when churning is a timber cup which has also a hole in the centre. The staff is worked up and down. When the butter is made it is gathered by twisting the staff around. The butter was made once a week in Summer and once a fortnight in Winter. It was a custum that every one that would come into a house where churning was going on should do their part of it. It was a certain belief in olden times that any one that wouldn't help with the work would take away the butter especially if it was on a May morning. The used know by the sound when it was made. They say the cream cracks. When it has cracked it is gathered. Then it is put into keelers and washed and salted. It is washed with a wooden dish. It was then packed into a firkin and taken to Cork by cart or to Banteer Station. They used drink some of the buttermilk and give the rest to the pigs. They
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:12
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The Angel says a colour and if any one of them has that colour she must go to the Angel.
This is continued until all the colours are guessed.
Then all the devils hunt the Angels and the first Angel that is caught must be the devil the next time.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:11
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[illustration in margin]
The principal game I play is called Apples and Oranges.
First, you should write down a few lines of noughts and a person's name at each line. Then you should say
Apples and Oranges two for a penny
who is the fool to give so many
While grass is green and rose is red
I'll fight for George's noble head
knock him down dead.
One figure is knocked out at the last word.
The line that remains the longest wins the game.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 20:06
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I play many games, such as, Hide and go seek, Puicin, High gates and Colours.
The game I like best is "Colours" and how it is played is.
First a devil and an Angel are chosen and put apart from each other.
Then one of the girls gives the others a colour, each in a whisper.
Then she says to the devil "Who comes here"
The devil answers "The devil with his long, long tail.
She asks him again "What do you want?
He says "A soul"
Then she asks him "What colour"
Then the devil says some colour and if any of her companions has the colour the devil says, she must go to the devil, and if they haven't that colour the girl says to the devil
"Go home and wash your dirty shirt"
Then she says to the Angel "Who comes here"
The Angel answers, "The Angel with its bright, bright wings.
She asks her "What do you want.
The Angel says "A soul"
Then she asks him what colour does she want.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 16:32
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awaiting decision
anuas den staidhre agus tháinig sé chun na cistine.
Do shuidh sé síos do féin agus ní raibh sé ann i bhfadh nuair a táinig Máire cuige agus í ag gáiríde agus ag magad fé.
Níor labhair sé in aon-chor ar feadh a bhfadh ach ansan dubhairt sí leis ‘táim go h-ana mhaith airís’ ar sise agus ansan d’fhreagair an fear í mar seo :- "ó ó twas yesterday" agus as an san amach níor tháinig aon breoideacht ortha.
Lá amháin do thuith Séan agus do gearr sé a cos ach do bhí sé álright airís i gcúpla laé.
Do mhaireadar go léir as san amach go seasgair cómpórdach.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 16:30
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rejected
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sgreadh aisti agus nuair a airig fear an tighe é do cheap sé go raibh sí ag fághail bháis agus do rit sé suas an staidhre agus baisín uisge aige.
Nuair a shrios sé an seómra i na raibh sí i na luighe dubhairt sé mar seo :- "ar son Dé - De May Whas [?] ‘’ I - I’’ agus ansan airís dubhairt sí go mear "the Sky".
Nuair a airig sé an rud a dubhairt sí do bhí sé ar buile mar ní fheadhfhadh [sé]? na focail ceart do rád mar do bhí leithídh sin do sgamhrad air nuair a airig sé ag sgreadaigh í. Siad seo na focail sa i ceart a bhí aige ghá rád:- ‘Ar son Dé Mary what up" ach ní fhéadhfhadh sé íad san do rád sa ceart ar dtúis mar do bhí sgamhradh air.
Do chuaidh sé go dtí a sheomra féin ansan agus do shuidh sé san leabaid agus ansan do tháinig sé
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 16:23
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Lá amháin do tháinig breóidheacht ar bhean an tighe agus do bhí eagla a chroidhe ar an bhfear agus ceap sé go bhfaghadh sí bás ach mar sin féin ní bhfuair an uair seo.
Cúpla lá i na dhiaidh san d’eirig sí as an leabaidh agus do bhí sí go h-ana mhaith airís agus do bhí áthas ortha go léir ansan.
Máire ab’ainm di agus Cáit agus Máire ab’ainm den beirt cailíní agus Séan an buachaill agus do bhíodar go h-ana dheas.
Do bhíodar i na chómuidhe ana chómpórdach ar fadh go ceann abhfhadh agus sa deire do fuair an bean breóidhte Máire agus do bhí ana bhrón ortha mar do bhí sí ana olc ar fadh agus do bhí fhios ag an t-athair go bhfaghadh sí bás.
Do cuireadh fios ar an sagart agus do tháinig sé agus nuair a bhí sé imthighthe airís do chuir Máire
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 12:17
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rejected
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Nuair a eirig an fear saidhbhir ar maidin do chuaidh sé go dtí an áit 'na raibh an chailín cheanguilthe agus leig sé saor í.
Ní raibh aoinne de'n bheirt acu ag caint le na chéile ar feadh tamaill.
Amach sa ló do thosnuigheadar ag caint agus bhíodar ana mhór le na chéile ar feadh tamaill eile.
Gach aon oidhche do dhéanfhadh sé an téad a chur uirthe agus do bhíodh sí ag chuimhneamh chúiche féin aon oidhche ná chuirfheadh sé an téad uirthi go n-imtheóthadh sí abhaile.
Aon oidhche amháin do dhearmhadh an fear saidhbhir an t-éad do chur ar an gcailín. D'imthig an cailín leí agus thainig sí thar-nais airís go dtí an doras
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 12:09
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awaiting decision
í agus dubhairt sé léi gur bréag a bhí aice dhá insint do agus dubhairt sí nár bheadh.
Ansan dubhairt sé léi muna neósadh sí an fhírinne dho go dtabharfhadh sé rud éigin do go gcuimhneóchadh sí air ar feadh tamaill.
Dubhairt an chailín leis gur ghoid an fear an dinnéar uaithe ach níor chreid sé in-aon-chor í.
Do bhí dhá bhata aige agus do chuir sé an dhá bhata mór-thímpeall a dhá chois agus so thug sé buille den bhata dhi ar a thóin agus do liúig sí.
Nuair a tháinig an oidhche dubhairt an fear saidhbhir leis an gcailín gan dul abhaile in-aon-chor an oidhche seo nó dá raghadh sí go ngeóbhadh sí rud níos measa ná mar a fuair sí cheana. Do cheangail sé an chailín le téad agus i lár na noidhche do bhí sí a d’iarraidh dul abhaile.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 12:06
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rejected
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Do bhí fear mór amuigh agus d’fhan sí amhuigh tamall ana mhór ag chainnt leis ar feadh uair a chloig nó mar sin.
Nuair a tháinig sí isteach ní raibh sí taréis an dínnéir d’ollamhúghadh in-aon-chor.
Fé dheire do tháinig an fear saidhbhir isteach i d’iarraidh an dinnéir ach ní raibh sé ollamh in-aon-chor roimis. D’fhiafhruig sé dhi cad a bhí aice a dhéanamh i gcaitheamh na h-aimsire agus dubhairt sí mar seo:-

Do bhíos ag caint le fear,
Ó Chorcaigh na gcleas,
Ach níor thug sé aon rud dom,
Ach do thóg sé a bhí agam.
Do bhí cleasa aige agus ghoid sé an dinnéir uaithe agus d'ith sé é. Níor chreid an fear saidhbhir in-aon-chor
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 12:02
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rejected
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léi go gcaithfheadh sí dul go tig an fhir shaidhbhir in-aonfheacht leis.
Do thóg sé in-aonfheacht leis agus do thosnuig sí ag gol agus ag sgreadaig.
Do chuadar go dtí tig an fhir shaidhbhir agus nuair a airig an fear saidhbhir an lúigh d’eirigh sé.
D’innis an fear mór do’n fear saidhbhir chad a thuit amach agus do thug an fear saidhbhir aon buille amháin den chailín agus di chuir sé isteach tríd an fhuinneog í.
Ansan do tháinig an fear saidhbhir isteach agus do bhíodar ag áiteamh ar feadh tamaill ana mhór agus tar-éis cúpla lá do bhíodar ana mhór le na chéile airís.
Gach aon lá do bhíodh an fear saidhbhir ag troid léi agus aon lá amháin do bhí troid mór acu mar gheall ar an dínnéir
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 11:57
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rejected
awaiting decision
nuair a éirig sé ar maidin do tháinig bachach isteach chuige agus d’iarr an bhacach ar an fear saidhbhir rud éigin do thabhairt do[?] agus dubhairt an fear saidhbhir ná raibh pioc aige le tabhairt do ach an breicfeast.
Dubhairt an bacach leis go raibh an breicfeast aige cheana i dtig éigin eile.
D’imthig an bachach leis go dtí áit éigin eile agus fuair sé a bhí uaidh. An oidhche na dhiaidh son do tháinig fear ag sgoruidheacht chúcha agus do bhí cailín in aonfheacht leis.
Do thosnuigheadar ag chainnt agus ag insint sgéala agus fé dheire dubhairt an fear saidhbhir an dtiocfhadh an cailín ag obair chuige agus do tháinig sí ag obair trí seachtmhaine na dhiaidh san agus cailín maith do beadh í.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:55
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awaiting decision
Where are redskins to be seen in Ireland?
Answer:- on tomatoes.
What part of you can travel faster than a train?
Answer: Your eyes
Why is aviation like a poisonous liquid?
Answer: One drop will kill you.
What part of the house is the sickest?
Answer: The window.
What is always behind time?
Answer: The back of a watch.
Why is a shoemaker's shop like hell?
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:52
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a bun?
Answer: One of them is a "conondrum" and the other is a "bunandrum".
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:51
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Do chuadhas suas an bóthairín agus do chuadhas síos an bóthairín agus thógas an bóthairín ar mo dhrom liom.
Freagra: Dréimire.
Teachtaire beag ó thig go tig is bíonn sé amuigh ist oidhche.
Freagra: Casán
Chím é is ní fheiceann tusa é agus is giorra duit-se na mise é.
Freagra: Cúl do chinn.
What is most like a horse shoe?
Answer: A mare's shoe
What is the difference between a good riddle and two cats sitting on
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:47
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scratch his back and he is no-body?
Answer:- a mirror
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:47
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awaiting decision
When was beef highest up?
Answer:- When the cow jumped over the moon
What is it that always walks with its head down?
Answer:- a nail in a boot.
What goes away between two woods and returns between two waters?
Answer:- A man fetching water in pails.
What is full and holds more?
Answer:- A pot full of potatoes when you put water in it.
If a fellow met a fellow in a field of beans could a fellow tell a fellow what a fellow means. How many "f"s in that?
Answer:- There is no "f" in that.
Use him well and he is every-body,
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:43
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:43
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awaiting decision
What pie can fly?
Answer:- a magpie.
Spell broken down fence in three letters?
Answer:- Gap
Spell black-water in three letters?
Answer:- ink
What key is poisonous?
Answer:- whiskey.
Why is a bar of chocolate like a race-horse?
Answer:- Because the more you lick it the faster it goes.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:41
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ate the white man. What was the number of the car?
Answer:- 281.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:40
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What is it that the more you take out of it the bigger it gets?
Answer:- a hole.
What turns without moving?
Answer:- milk.
What is it, that God never sees, the king seldom sees and we see every day?
Answer:- an equal.
What is the toughest key to move?
Answer:- the donkey.
What is it that goes up the road and down the road and yet stands still?
Answer:- a hill
Why does the hen cross the road?
Answer:- To get to the other side.
Three men went out motoring - two black men and a white man. The two black men
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:37
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:36
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Under fire, over fire and never touches the fire?
Answer:- a cake baking
Two brothers we are, great burdens we bear, we are full all day I am sorry to say and empty at night going to rest?
Answer:- two shoes.
Why does a horse look over a fence?
Answer: because he can't look under it.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:35
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awaiting decision
A man in Manchester sent to his sister a bottomless vessel for holding raw meat?
Answer:- a ring.
'Tis red and 'tis yellow and 'tis sparable green and the king can't come near it or neither the queen?
Answer:- the rainbow.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:33
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Long legs, crooked thighs, small head and no eyes?
Answer:- a tongs.
As black as ink, as white as milk and it hops on the road like hailstone?
Answer:- a magpie.
Jack's father was Paddy's brother, what relation had Jack's father to Paddy's mother?
Answer:- He was her son.
Though a rock, through a reel, through a new spinning wheel, through a horse's skin and bone; that is the riddle that is never known?
Answer:- thunder.
It is in the rock but not in the stone,
'tis in the marrow but not in the bone,
'tis in the brain but not in the head,
'tis in the bolster but not in the bed,
Answer:- the letter R
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:29
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:29
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awaiting decision
If a man got sixpence for walking thirty miles, what would he get for walking a hundred miles?
Answer:- Sore feet.
Why is a drawn tooth like something you have forgotten?
Answer:- Because it is gone out of your head.
What is it that has twelve black children a hard-working father and a lazy old mother?
Answer:- A clock.
Why does not a clock strike thirteen?
Answer:- Because it has not the face to do so.
What are three things you cannot find?
Answer:- A shoe for the foot of the hill, a towel to wipe the face of the earth and a sheet for the bed of the ocean
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:25
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half a minute too late.
Laziness is a heavy load
Do to others what you wish them to do to you
He that cannot bear a jest should not make one
By learning to obey we know how to command.
One thing at the time and that well done leads to excellence.
We know not the worth of water till the well runs dry.
Let your anger set with the sun but not rise with it.
He who hesitates is lost
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:22
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When the cat is out the mouse is dancing.
Far away cows wear long horns.
We cannot judge the book by the cover.
There is no luck where there is not control.
The world would not make a race-horse out of a donkey.
"Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue. If you have these when getting married you will have good luck.
Half an hour too soon is better than a
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:19
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the bush.
For want of a nail the shoe was lost,
For want of a shoe the horse was lost.
For want of a horse the rider was lost.
All for the want of a horse-shoe nail.
He who laughs last laughs best.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:17
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awaiting decision
folded. The one who tips the clean water will have the best wife. The one who tips the dirty water will have an ugly widow and the one who tips the empty plate will die a happy heath.
senior member (history)
2020-07-21 09:15
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I play snap-apple in many ways. I get a tub of water and I put an apple into it and I try to get it.
Another way is to hang an apple from the ceiling and try to bite it. A chair is laid on the ground and a person tries to get the apple. Three plates are placed in the floor, one full of clean water the second filled with dirty water and the third is left empty. Three men are then blind-
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:48
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awaiting decision
fee was two pence per pupil per week.
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:48
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awaiting decision
About eighty years ago, hedge schools existed in this locality. Hedge schools was the local name for them. One of the hedge schools existed in a house at the foot of the hill in Cahernacrine. It was held indoors. Teachers went from house to house teaching. Mr. Martin was the name of one of the teachers.
He was a stranger to the district. Sometimes school was carried on in farmers' houses. They were seated on large stones and on large sods of turf. There was another hedge school situated in Donemark in a thatched house near the grinding mill. A man named Thomas Burke taught in this school. He was from Kerry.
This house was very badly thatched and in the Winter, when the weather was bad, the rain used to come in through the thatch so that it was impossible for the pupils to remain there. The teacher used to go to one farmer's house each night and he used to teach the pupils of that house. There was a blackboard used also. The pupils
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:42
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a travelling woman. They were not strangers, but native of the place.
School was carried on in his house in Summer and Winter, but in Coomleigh the school was held in the open air, and in the farmer's houses in Winter time. The teachers were paid by subscriptions made up by the pupils they taught, and sometimes they would give the teachers a pair of home-spun and home-made woollen socks.
The subjects that were taught were, reading, writing, spelling, Arithmetic and Irish Catechism. Irish was spoken by all people especially those in the mountainous districts. Writing was done with slate-pencil on slate, and on paper with strong quills or a goose, pointed and made into pens and with ink.
They were seated on the floor or flag, or on clean straw and on large sods of turf. The teacher remained in the places according to the subscriptions they received from the people, sometimes they would remain only a week, sometimes a month. They they would go the next townland.
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:35
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the bread, the hook gets caught in his mouth.
They also make kites by getting two lats and making them in the form of a cross and covering them over with butter paper. Then a tail must be joined on, also a long string and when you run against the wind, the kite rises into the air.
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:32
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awaiting decision
necklace. Others get plants known as soldiers and they strike them in turn to see which of their heads would fall off first. Girls also make dolls with woollen thread and a crochet needle and they also make dolls dresses, socks and caps.
Boys also catch fish with a bag. In the Summer when the river is shallow, they place a row of stones across the river and leave a space wide enough for the bag. They put grass at the mouth of the bag and they rout the fish into it. Boys also make catapults.
They make them with two strips of rubber and a piece of leather used as a "pocket" into which they put the stone and a "Gabhlogue" made out of a piece of timber. They make slings with a piece of leather and two cords. They are used for throwing stones. They also make pistols out of hemlock and they are used for throwing water.
Fish were also caught by hanging a hamper to a water-fall. Birds were trapped with a fishing line and hook, by putting a piece of bread on to the hook, and when the bird comes to pick
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:27
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Boys also make whistles out of horse-chestnut by making a tiny hole in the nut and taking the inner substance out of it. Very often people got a swede and they take out the interior, and the skin remains. Then they put a lighted candle into it and a beautiful reddish glow would come from the swede.
Girls string daisies together and form a
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:22
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awaiting decision
Bhí an fear laistig den t-siopa agus thug sé cúig céád púnt di agus bhí ana áthas air mar gheall ar an marcaidheacht breagh a bheadh aige.
Do suidh an bheirt acu isteach sa trucaill agus do thug sí léi é go tig na buille agus bhí na fir agus na gárdaí ann agus rugadar air agus tugadar leó isteach é agus ní raibh aon rud ar an bhfear ach do bhí an cailín ag déanamh amadán díobh.
Dubhairt sí le buacaill an capall, dul abhaile dó féin agus thug sí púnt do. D'imthig an bhean go Sasana agus níor airig aoinne pioc uaithe ó shoin i leith.
Bhí an fear bocht istig agus cheapadar go raibh sé ar buille ar fad agus ní leigfhidís do labhairt in-aon-chor mar ní raibh aon splannc aige.
Dúradar tar-éis trí seachtmhaine nó mar sin bhí sé comh tanaidhe gur tháinig doctuír chuige agus ní raibh pioc buille ar an bhfear agus d'ínnseadar an sgéal
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 21:12
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awaiting decision
Bhí cailín dheas ann fadó agus raibh a dhóthain airgead aice chun í féin déanamh deas a ndóthain. Do chuimnig sí ar seift éigin agus do chuaidh sí go tig na [?] agus dubhairt sí go raibh fear fiadhain [?] agus go dtugadh sí isteach cúis é agus go dtabharfadh sí roinnt airgead dóibh.
Tá go maith ar siad. Do fuair sí [?] agus truchaill agus do bhí sí ag tiomáint tré na cathracha. Cuaidh sí isteach i siopa. Do bhí fear istig agus dubhairt sí le [?] an t-siopa an bpósadh sé í agus dubhairt ná pósfhadh.
Dubhairt sí leis "Téanam ort agus beidh marcuigheacht againn agus do chuir cailín a láimh na phóca agus dubhairt gur fhág sí dhá chead púnt sa bhaile ar[?]an mboórd na dhiaidh agus trom roinnt [?] agus raighmíd abhaile i gcóir mo [?] féin."
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 13:19
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awaiting decision
There was a celebrated druid living ner Mainistear Fhearmaighe, who had two daughters Cliodhnha and Aoibhill. He himself was called An Draoi Ruadh.
A chieftain in the neighbourhood named O'Caoimh used often visit them at their palace, and was very much in love with the younger daughter Aoibhill, who was very beautiful. Both daughters were comely, but the younger was the handsomer.
Cliodhna became jealous of her sister, and determined to get rid of her in some way. She consulted her nurse, and they made a fire in a remote part of the palace, and prepared a potion over a tripod. One of the ingredients was human hair. This was given in her food to the younger daughter and she at once began to pine away and get ugly.
At last she fell into a slumber resembling death, and her father and everyone mourned her as dead, and she was buried in a vault underneath the palace
That night the sister Cliodhna and the nurse opened the vault, and took the girl to the caves at Castlecor. They there asked her
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 13:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived a wicked woman who was greatly disliked by all her neighbours: She was so wicked during life that her ghost was to be seen when she died with her two favourite wolf-hounds. Her spirit is still supposed to be sen minding three crocks of gold which she buried some time before her death.
The neighbours believe to this day that the gold is still there and two men from the neighbourhood went digging for the gold. At midnight they imagined they heard a strange noise and they got so frightened that they ran home. The wicked woman's name was Mary Connell, and the gold was supposed to be hidden in the boundary of Quartertown and Mourneabbey near Mallow.
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 12:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
III
The graveyard removed from Courtbrack to Mathehy (Magh Teiche.) It moved about midnight.
In the penal days a Priest was saying Mass on the hill-side. A local informer brought the soldiers, one of whom cut off the priest's arm, while the priest was in the Act of raising the Sacred Host.
The informer was killed, and was to be buried in Court brack churchyard, but during the night the graveyard moved away – rather than bear the remains of the informer.
A man coming from Cork saw the churchyard going – one portion of it fell int o a river at his feet.
He lived to go home, and tell the tale.
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 12:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
II
One night an old man living in the village of Dromahane was returning from Mallow. It was near midnight when he reached a field near the village.
There was a fort in the field, and as he approached the field he heard cheering, and the noise of hurleys striking a ball. It was a bright moon-light night, and he looked over the hedge.
To his amazement he saw two teams playing a hurling match. The players were very small, and the ball went backwards, and forwards with great rapidity.
He found himself cheering with the men. He waited until the match was over, when the little men all disappeared into the fort.
He often went the same road, but never afterwards caught a glimpse of the fairy players.
senior member (history)
2020-07-20 12:55
approved