Number of records in editorial history: 1882 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Has sent to school for inspection:-
An Iron Grisset - which she says must be 200 (two hundred) years old. It is in a splendid state of preservation).
It is of oblong shape - about ten inches by four with a handle at right angles to the length and itself about nine inches long.
It is supported by three legs each about two inches long.
It was used for making old rush-candles.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Has seen about a dozen small willow-pattern plates and a few large ones which are over 100 years old at the residence of Mr. Patrick Kealy, Newtown, Collon.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:16
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rejected
awaiting decision
at
Ned Drew's, Grangegeith, Slane;
William Doggett's, Grangegeith, Slane.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:16
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rejected
awaiting decision
Has three Willow-pattern dishes which are over 100 years old.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:15
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awaiting decision
Has an old iron griddle, which was in the house when he came there 60 years ago.
A wooden strainer - used for straining goat's milk. Shaped round with a hole in the centre of the bottom. Diameter of strainer - 6 inches.
Of hole - 3 inches.
A cloth was tied outside the strainer and a ridge held the cord in place.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wooden strainers also in possession of
Miss Bridget Dunne, Grangegeith, Cullen. and Mrs. Sillery, Grangegeith, Slane, Co. Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
She has seen at the residence of Meades of Manning Hill-
One pewter jug
Glass bowl and jug, remains of a set kept specially for the priest's visit long ago for Stations, etc.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
Has two old brass fire-iron holders.
Has two old brass candlesticks which she says are at least 102 years old.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
William Doggett still possesses a spinning wheel, which belonged to his wife's mother.
It is three-legged and worked by the foot.
It is not now in use - but was used up to two years ago.
Only one "card" remains, made of wood and wire.
He also has part of the Ram-rod of an old gun. It is made of wood.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
William Doggett still possesses a spinning wheel, which belonged to his wife's mother.
It is three-legged and worked by the foot.
It is not now in use - but was used up to two years ago.
Only one "card" remains, made of wood and wire.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
Cutting Sticks.-
It is unlucky to cut sticks on Sunday, and some say it was for doing so, the man was put up in the moon.
Cutting Hair.-
It is lucky to cut hair on Friday. Very unlucky to do so on Sunday as the devil will have you all the week. All hair cut must be gathered and put under a stone - if scattered one must come back from the next world to collect it!
Drawing of Teeth.-
No special days, but when the tooth is drawn it must be thrown towards your burial ground.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:08
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rejected
awaiting decision
Changing House.-
"Saturday's flitting makes a short sitting."
It is considered very unlucky to change house on Saturday. Wednesday and Friday are lucky days to do so.
Making of Graves.-
It is unlucky to make a grave on Tuesday or Thursday. If one is needed on either of those days a sod is removed the evening before. They call this "reddening the grave."
Monday Morning.-
Often referred to a "Sour Monday morning.
"Borrowed Days".-
The first three (3) days only of April are here called "Borrowed Days."
"Friday wet, Sunday wet."
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
Peg (Wood)
Cord 4 ins.
STANDARD (Wood)
Wire Snare 1 ft of wire.
senior member (history)
2019-12-05 15:04
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awaiting decision
"Beds" used for play as below.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 15:25
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awaiting decision
Mrs Sillery has two pewter jugs which are at least 70 years old.
Also a willow-pattern jug in the shape of a swan and only about 4" high.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 15:22
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awaiting decision
One evening Patrick Conlon was coming home from sports and a fog fell before his eyes as he was crossing the fields. He crossed hedges and ditches and couldn't get out. At last he found himself in a field beside the road.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 15:21
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rejected
awaiting decision
As Minnie Ward was coming from Katie Reilly's one night at Kellystown across the Galdra, at a gate all of a sudden she couldn't see the gate at all. She could not get across walls or gate and she used to hear her father saying that if you turned anything inside out you could see the way. She turned her coat inside out and got home alright after two hours delay.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 15:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
One night as James Russell was going to look at cattle, and as he was coming through Carney's field, he stepped on a stray sod, and as he couldn't get the gap to get out in another field. He went round and round the field and still couldn't get the gap. At last he thought he felt the gap, but still he went on. At last he felt the iron bars of the gap and he got out in the other field. He was out from half-past nine till five past-three.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 15:17
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other towns.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 15:16
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awaiting decision
many flies about it.
In a curious and comical way the people lived. Their gardens surrounded the village. Their gardens were small and they could not afford a ditch to separate their gardens and they divided their gardens by rows of gooseberry bushes. There are a few of them there still to remind the old people of that day.
As time wore on the population grew greater and greater until at length it grew so thick that the people could not make their living. So most of the people went to other towns. As time wore on still a few houses only were inhabited so that ivy grew not merely from the ground but through the walls of the house.
It was not checked in time and it grew and grew and those houses fell. These matters were not looked forward to so that the inhabitants came one by one to grief. As it was falling a man named Rogers built the graneries. As he was wealthy he traded a lot with
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 15:13
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One quarter of a mile north of Grangegeeth National School there was once a village called Newtown. Nothing now remains of it but two houses, (occupied by the Dillon and Flynn families) and the ruined walls of a few others, as well as the remains of the old Granary from which Grainseac (?) got its name.
The foundation was very wel owing to the houses being built of yellow clay and stones. The streets are paved with stones which cost time to do. Its sitation was anything but sheltery for it is said that from olden times to our days from the hottest day in summer to the coldest day in winter there were never
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 11:51
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awaiting decision
Shrove is a usual time for weddings in this district.
From Little Christmas to Shrove Tuesday is here called Shrove.
Most weddings take place on Shrove Tuesday.
Shrove Tuesday is also called Pancake night.
Pancakes are made in nearly every house for tea. Rings are sometimes rolled in the pancakes. Whoever gets the ring will be first to be married.
Colcannon is made for supper. This consists of boiled mashed potatoes, onions, pepper and salt and sometimes new milk to moisten it. It is eaten with butter.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 11:49
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awaiting decision
The custom of attending at Mass on Ash Wednesday to receive blessed ashes from the priest is observed by almost everyone. For those who cannot attend Mass ashes are taken home.
People say you shouldn't throw out ashes on Ash Wednesday.
Sometimes children tie or pin paper bags of ashes on people's backs on the eve of Ash Wednesday.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 11:47
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awaiting decision
As Mrs. Madden was coming from Heronstown to her home she carried a hatch of eggs. Twilight fell as she went into the fields. She stepped on a stray sod and went round and round the field. She thought the ditches were mountains and that she had not left the field, but she found herself about four miles from home at Joe Halton's of Newtown.
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 14:09
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awaiting decision
There was a house on the Grange road, and one night the woman of the house went into a room for meal, and she brought no light with her.
The fairies came and took her and she was not seen for seven years. After the seven years she was left back in her own house and she was told not to go anywhere without a light after dusk. One night she went into the room and forgot the fairies command and she was taken away and was not seen any more.
senior member (history)
2019-11-28 09:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
year.
New Year's night is a usual time for parties and dances.
The large candle is lit again on New Year's night.
On that day people form their good resolutions for the year.
senior member (history)
2019-11-28 09:42
approved
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awaiting decision
A large candle is lit on New Years Eve. Anyone can light it. It is placed in the centre of a room on a table.
The older people remain up until after midnight. No bell is rung here but it is rung on the Parish Church at Rathkenny. The bells in Drogheda can be heard here and the people go out of doors to listen to them.
On New Year's Day the people offer Good Wishes to those they meet.
It is said that if you do anything wrong on New Year's Day you will be doing it all the
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 10:21
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awaiting decision
Oh my what a fuss
Pon my word 'tis shockin' O!
No one would wed the pretty lass
The hole was on her stockin' O!
Take my advice and you'll have luck
Don't think it is a bold one O!
If you can't afford to buy the new
Sit down and mend the old one O!
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 10:20
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awaiting decision
Roche, the old cleaver,
Pulled the wrong leaver,
And killed the poor sheep in a rally,
Sure, we'll have mutton to eat
And that up-to-date,
And Dick will get fat at the Sally.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 09:50
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awaiting decision
Two children join hands and the others march underneath singing:- Here's the robbers coming through, coming through, coming through.
Here's the robbers " " my fair lady.
What did the robber do to you, do to you, do to you.
" " " " " " ", my fair lady.
Chip, Chop, the last man's head off.
Boxes, fox and geese, and Nine holes are played on paper.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 09:49
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awaiting decision
Piece inserted in middle.
This end closed - knot.
Stem of Hemlock or Yarrow.
OPENING CUT + sloping towards the slit.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 09:39
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a magic man down in Ardee and one day a man came in to buy a horse from him. There were a sword and a horn on the mantlepiece and he pulled the sword out of a little bag and he could see men's heads and horse's heads rising out of it.
The man who was selling the horse said "Why didn't you blow the horn and Ireland was free," and says he "Leave down your hat on the floor." He did and the man put three shovelsfuls of gold into the hat and there were only three pounds in it still. At night when they would go out to feed the calves they would see Garry Giarlog (Earl of Leinster) training his soldiers and ever since there was some mark on the man's children. Garry Giarlog said the millwheel would turn round three times with blood before Ireland would be free.
senior member (history)
2019-11-22 14:57
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awaiting decision
Friday." The man said "rale wuick" "Saturday and Sunday."
What will we do with that man said the Queen Fairy. He broke the 'Sabbath Day.' "What kind of a man is he said the fairy." Another fairy answered "He is a small butt of a man and a hump on him." "We'll put the hump that's on that tree on him" said the Queen and they did and he had two humps on him going home.
senior member (history)
2019-11-22 14:55
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awaiting decision
One night a man was walking home on the Grange road and he saw a Queen fairy and five small fairies on the road. They were singing "Monday Tuesday and Wednesday." The man said "Thursday Friday."
"What kind of a man is it" said the Queen fairy. "A small butt of a man and a hump on him said one fairy. Another of the fairies said "We'll take the hump off him and put it on that tree."
When he went home his people wondered how he got so straight. A man living near him asked him how he got so straight and he told him all about it.
The other man was a hunchback alas and he told him to go and see would the fairies be there that night. He went and the fairies were there singing "Monday Tuesday and Wednesday." Thursday and
senior member (history)
2019-11-22 14:51
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a woman in Broomfield who had a small baby in a cradle. One evening she left the child and went into the garden after six o clock. When she came in, the baby was crying and she could not stop her. She was up for several nights with the child and she was still crying. One day a neighbor woman came in to see the child. She looked at her and said "that child is not your own but was left instead of yours." The woman did not believe it. The other woman told her to redden the poker and to burn the child and she helped her to do so. Immediately they were going to do so the child jumped out of the cradle and ran away. After a few days her own child was left back.
senior member (history)
2019-11-22 14:45
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awaiting decision
thatched again before winter. The thatcher wears a sacking apron to carry the straw.
Thatching fork
Iron Prongs, not very sharp
Wooden Handle
Not made locally.
"Scallops" inserted to form pattern + finish.
senior member (history)
2019-11-22 14:44
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awaiting decision
Thatching was a great trade at one time. Long ago all the houses were thatched with wheaten or oaten straw. The thatchers would thatch the houses every spring. They used thatching forks and ladders. They pulled bundles of the long straw and made wangles of handfuls of it. They would lift up the last wangle and put in the next under it. Then, they push it in with the thatching fork and beat it down in place. When the thatching is finished they spill buckets of water on the thatch to level it down. Then they cut the eave with an eave knife. They run wires along the eave of the house and stick pegs in the thatch. Peter Dunne of Newtown is the only thatcher around here. A thatching fork is made up of a wooden handle and two iron prongs. It is said that the wheaten straw is the best to thatch a house. The houses that are thatched with the oaten straw would have to be
senior member (history)
2019-11-22 14:40
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awaiting decision
There was a man one time who lived on the Grange road and he was sold to the devil.
One day the devil came to him and told him that in a year's time he would take him away to hell. When the year was up the devil came for the man and the man was going in to a public house. The ruins of this old public house is still to be seen on Neddy Connolly's land.
The devil asked the man to put him into his purse. He did so and the man took out his purse and put it on the counter and he got a hammer and he gave a blow to the purse and the devil roared and said "Let me out let me out." When the man died he would not get into Hell or Heaven so he remained between Hell and Heaven.
senior member (history)
2019-11-22 14:38
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awaiting decision
One day a man was shooting a rabbit in Carrigarath and there was a little rock beside a tuff of furze and a black pony came up out of the rock and went round him about twenty times.
The pony went down on his knees to see would he get up on his back and he went back over again to the rock and went down again like a shadow into the rock.
He could hear him galloping under the ground over to Master Goodwins. There was a stone gap there and the next day he saw half the pony there and a shinning bible on him and another day he was seen there whole.
senior member (history)
2019-11-20 11:12
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awaiting decision
and she went up the chimney again. The next morning the farmer came expecting to find the soldier dead. "Well, what happened said the farmer?" "Nothing much" said the soldier "only a cat came down the chimney and two kittens after her.
She sat in a corner and snarled and growled at me and she made a jump at me and I cut the two front paws off her. They went round the back of the house and traced the blood across three fields to the other house and when they came in they saw two children sitting at the fire one at each side. They asked where was their mother and the two children laughed at them. They asked again and the children said "She is above in the bed." When they went up they saw the two hands cut off the woman.
senior member (history)
2019-11-20 11:09
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time a witch lived in a house in Grangegeith and she had two children. There was another house about three fields away in which a farmer lived.
One night a deserted soldier came to the farmers house and asked for lodgings. The farmers said "I will put you in a house where all the men ever put were killed." The soldier asked him for a sword and in the middle of the night the soldier was dozing at the fire a big cat came down the chimney and two kittens after her.
The big cat sat in the corner and growled and snarled at the soldier and the soldier put his hand behind his back and caught a "hoult" of the hilt of the sword. The cat made a "lep" at the soldier and the soldier cut off her two front paws with the sword
senior member (history)
2019-11-20 11:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time a witch lived in a house in Grangegeith and she had two children. There was another house about three fields away in which a farmer lived.
One night a deserted soldier came to the farmers house and asked for lodgings. The farmers said "I will put you in a house where all the men ever put were killed." The soldier asked him for a sword and in the middle of the night the soldier was dozing at the fire a big cat came down the chimney and two kittens after her.
The big cat sat in the corner and growled and snarled at the soldier and the soldier put his hand behind his back and caught a "hoult" of the hilt of the sword. The cat made a "lep" at the soldier and the soldier cut off her two front paws with the sword.
senior member (history)
2019-11-20 10:53
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awaiting decision
There was a witch one time in Grangegeith and she used to come into a house on the Grange road. Every time she would come in they would have no butter on the milk. They put a cross of sticks under the churn and when she came in she had to go out again as she could not take the butter.
senior member (history)
2019-11-20 10:52
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awaiting decision
Another version of the foregoing story is that the farmer watched his cows and he saw the hare. He hunted it and the black dog bit the leg of it as it was going in the window and they traced the blood to where she was in bed.
senior member (history)
2019-11-20 10:51
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awaiting decision
There was once upon a time an old woman named Connolly who was a witch. She lived alone in Balrenny in Lower Grange. She was supposed to turn herself into a hare and she used drink the cows on people in the morning.
One day several men came from Drogheda to hunt and they asked her where would they get the run of a hare. She said to them to go down to that little field and they would get a hare. They did so and they saw a hare and the black dog took a bit off the hare's leg and when they came back they traced the blood through the window to where she was in bed. She had a cow and always had lots of butter to sell.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:42
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awaiting decision
the woman answered and said "Yes." Then she stepped outside the door to the priest and the priest went in and served mass for him. When the mass was finished the priest spoke to him. He told him he was coming on that altar for fifty years and he could not get anyone to serve mass for him. He told him he was paid for a mass from a person and that he forgot to read it before he died. The person that the mass was paid for was in Purgatory and he would be relieved to Heaven when the mass would be said.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:32
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awaiting decision
the woman answered and said "Yes." Then she stepped outside the door to the priest and the priest went in and served mass for him. When the mass was finished the priest spoke to him. She told him he was coming on that altar for fifty years and he could not get anyone to serve mass for him. He told him he was paid for a mass from a person and that he forgot to read it before he died. The person that the mass was paid for was in Purgatory and he would be relieved to Heaven when the mass would be said.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:29
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awaiting decision
There was a woman who used to take care of Grangegeith chapel in this district. Every morning she used to open the chapel at six o'clock. This morning when she went in, there was a priest standing on the altar and he spoke to her. He asked was there anyone there that would serve mass but she was frightened and ran out of the chapel. The next morning she went to the chapel as usual to open it and the priest came out on the altar again and he asked the same thing, but she ran out of the chapel again. That day she told the priest and the priest told her he would go with her the next morning and if the priest came out again and asked the same question as before she was to say "Yes." The next morning the priest went with the woman and he stood outside, and the woman went in. The priest came out as usual and asked the same question and
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man coming from work one night and he met a swarm of cats on the road. One of them said "Grimes" and another one said "Title him" and another one said "Mr Grimes" "Tell him that Miram is dead" and when the man went home he told his wife that he got an awful fright and she asked him what was it.
He said "I met a swarm of cats on the road and one of them said "Grimes" and another of them said "Title him" and another of them said "Mr Grimes." There was a young cat sitting at the fire and he said "Why didn't you tell me that when you came in now. I'll be late for the funeral."
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 11:07
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awaiting decision
The graveyard contains headstones of all shapes - some flat on the ground, some slabs standing, crosses of different shapes in stone and a few celtic crosses. Their dates show of burials from 1407 to the present day.
There are some "unknown graves" - no exhumations have been remembered - except one. The body of Leo McDonnell was changed from one grave to another about 1924 owing to disagreement among relatives.
An iron frame of great strength covers the grave of John Devlin. This was placed to prevent the stealing of the body after burial for medical purposes. A car known as the "Dead Coach" visited cemeteries here + a watch was kept over graves for about three weeks, usually by near relatives, so that their friend's bodies would not be stolen away.
Near the Cemetery are crab trees. These are said to have been apple trees n the garden of the Priest's residence at one time. No trace of the residence now remains + the present residence is two miles away.
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 11:02
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awaiting decision
He was a curate under Rev. Christopher Chevers for several years in Grangegeith. Rev. Christopher Chevers was born at Kilbeg in the 17th century. He was a curate for a time in Grangegeith. In 1767 he was made P.P. of Kilbeg and he became V.G. of the Diocese. He was known as "Thar Chevers Mor" to distinguish him from his cousin. He was buried in Staholmok. On the headstone of Rev. Laurance Chevers is written "Beneath this monument lie the remains of Rev. Laurance Chevers, Parish priest of Grangegeith and Monknewtown for 55 years. He departed this life on July 3rd 1818 in the 73rd year of his life." Rev. Thomas Finnegan was P.P. of Grangegeith in 1842. He completed the schools and chapel of Grangegeith. He purchased a bell in Grange and made it a present to the parish. He died in 1862 and he was buried in Nobber. Rev. Patrick Kealy was born in the parish of Grangegeith. He studied in Navan and Maynooth. He was ordained in 1831. He was a Curate in Kells, Navan and Mullingar and he was A.D.M. in Castletown from 1844 to 1846, then he was the P.P. of Castlejordan.
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 11:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He was a curate under Rev. Christopher Chevers for several years in Grangegeith. Rev. Christopher Chevers was born at Kilbeg in the 17th century. He was a curate for a time in Grangegeith. In 1767 he was made P.P. of Kilbeg and he became V.G. of the Diocese. He was known as "Thar Chevers Mor" to distinguish him from his cousin. He was buried in Staholmok. On the headstone of Rev. Laurance Chevers is written "Beneath this monument lie the remains of Rev. Laurance Chevers, Parish priest of Grangegeith and Monknewtown for 55 years. He departed this life on July 3rd 1818 in the 73rd year of his life." Rev. Thomas Finnegan was P.P. of Grangegeith in 1842. He completed the schools and chapel of Grangegeith. He purchased a bell in Grange and made it a present to the parish. He died in 1862 and he was buried in Nobber. Rev. Patrick Kealy was born in the parish of Grangegeith. He studied in Navan and Maynooth. He was ordained in 1831. He was a Curate in Kells, Navan and Mullingar and he was A.D.M. in Castletown from 1844 to 1846, then he was the P.P. of Castlejordan
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 10:42
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awaiting decision
There are three graveyards in this parish:- Rathkenny, Stackallen and Grangegeith. Grangegeith graveyard is in the townland of Grangegeith. They are all still in use. There is a laneway leading into Grangegeith graveyard about three hundred yards long. It is situated in a valley. A wall of the old church remained there until lately and then some of the stones were taken to build a wall round the cemetery. Thus through ignorance the ancient sanctuary has almost disappeared. The old church measured sixty three yards by sixteen and a half yds. There are a few big trees round the graveyard. There is a stone wall around it also. The churchyard is level and three are paths through it. There are many people buried in it. In it lie the remains of four priests:- Rev. Thomas Boyle, Pastor of Skryne, Rev. Fr. Johnson, P.P. of Donore, Rev. Fr. Keighan, P.P. of Grange, Rev. Laurence Chevers was born near Navan in 1785.
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 10:36
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awaiting decision
I.
The Yankee's fat bacon
If I'm not mistaken
Is fit for no man
But a wild mountaineer,
And less for Pat Markey
Or the old Benix Bartle,
Or the Parnellites,
It would just them in cheer.
II.
When Markey McGuire
Clapped the pan on the fire,
In walks Benix Bartle
Saying "that's my delight."
When in comes Para Ruadh (Padraig),
The old wirre-sthruggh
Saying dip in the gravy
My gay Parnellite.
III.
Well now Micky Reilly,
I will warn you highly,
Though your head is as big
As a steeple,
For I'm told of late
You made wooden weights
For the Yankee to
Baffle the people.
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 10:21
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awaiting decision
The Cross field,
The yellow field,
The rotten field,
The flax field,
The kilnfield
The coalfield,
The panfield,
The crosspark,
The redbarn field,
The Drombuidhe,
The Burrow,
The Basket field,
The Crock Mainntac,
The Well field,
The quarry field,
The shop field,
Tenant's House field,
Glenageag,
Bawn Hill.
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 10:19
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awaiting decision
The Island field
The Rubble
Shreag- (sleeping flax)
Croppinger
Cloughrea
Parknaleen (flax)
Kingearth
Longishthan
Relongishehan
The Drain field
The Black field
The Garryagh
The Garrybeg
The Molly
The Commons
The Crogh
The Bunfield
The Forge field
The Curragh
Paircanaoidh
The Bleach
The Planting
The Angle
The Slang
The Lane
senior member (history)
2019-11-15 10:15
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The Paddock
The Forest field
The Aule field
The Moate field (moat)
THe Turnpike field
The Crooked Corner
Cup + Saucer Hill (shape)
Millrace field
Turn field
Orchard field
Night field (sheds)
The twelve acres
Loughandubh
Parkaform
Shraghwee
Tubbarlubbar
Growbeg
Crockgarroch
Reask
Lugadhor
Sasan
Cloverhill field
Paircnapisha (vetches)
Ballinacreag
Splinknacuarca
Ganderfield
Gattymore
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 14:46
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sheets, quilts, and long stripes of linen for underwear. The linen at first was a bad colour but when it was washed and blacked it would be white. Neddy Carolan's trade was weaving the flax into coloured materials. He lived on McGuinness's lane about a quarter of a mile from our school.
The linen from this district was sent to The Linen Hall at Drogheda and when that was closed down the industry ceased to be carried on in Grangegeeth.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 14:45
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Flax growing and weaving was an extensive industry carried on in this district long ago. The flax was grown in several farms in this district. It was put through several processes, before it was linen. The flax would be fit for pulling in August or September. There was a flax hole on every farm and when they pulled it they threw it in and left it there for a certain number of days. Then they took it out and spread it to dry. When it was dry they beatled it with beatlers that is to beat it to and fro with long sticks and flat sides on them. Then they hackled it with hacklers. The hackler is an iron grating which the flax is pulled through to break the knots and fine it. Then it was put through a spinning machine and the threads came out wound round on spools. They bought the dyeing and they dyed each spool of thread any colour they liked. Then they wove it into tablecloths
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 14:39
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Noggins were mostly used as eating vessels long ago. They were made of wood, and some of them were scooped from the wood into shape. Others were made in parts, one part for the sides, and one for the bottom, and one for the handle. These were joined by stays. We cannot find any noggin in this district now as the last we heard of at the home of Mr. Jow Halton of Phoenixtown, were taken by American visitors only a few years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 14:36
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Some people had forges in earlier days. There was one of the oldest of them used by Richard Farrell until lately in Grangegeeth. He used to make all form of utensils. He would make spears, gates, ploughs, horse-shoes and fire-cranes. He had a fire, a large bellows, an anvil, a vice, shovels, hammers, punches, pincers, and a drill in the forge.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 14:08
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This poem was written by Richard Halligan:-
You feeling creatures as you draw near,
All my story I will let you hear
About a phantom that appeared to me
From thy dark tomb of eternity.
The other night and I going home
I met the spectre as he did roam,
It is the eleventh hour the spirit said
When all are silent and long in bed.
And you are a rambler without a cause
Don't fear coercion or martial laws.
He stood before me with fiery glare,
And with blood shed eyes at me did stare
I grasped my cudgel and held it tight
For I was intended to have a fight,
My guardian Angel stood by my side
To win the battle once more I tried.
But I bid farewell to the fairy ghost
And never again shall I bray or boast.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 14:05
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Once upon a time there was a man named Richard Halligan who lived on the blaidhe Stoca. He was a blind man and was a basket-maker by trade. He would make fancy baskets and pelicks for feeding cattle. He was a gifted man at poetry also. He could find his way anywhere around the country and carry baskets with him. The people used to bring him sally rods of which he made them. The baskets he made were very big, they were two feet by one and a half. He found out even a lark's nest which he showed to another man. He would carry water from a deep well twice a day and never miss his step and had to cross a stile and walk on top of a ditch for about one hundred yards.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 14:00
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Long ago the people had no lamps but they made their own candles. The way they made the candles was to get some rushes and take the green skin off them. Then they would dip the white part of the rush into resin or tallow. They would leave it out to dry for some time and when it would be dry they would take it in and they would have candles. They would go round selling them at 4d per dozen. The candles showed very little light. The people would hang them in bundles beside the fire. They were called rush candles.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 11:23
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And in a letter he sent to her
These are the words he said
Farewell, Farewell my own true love
On earth we will meet no more.
But I hope to meet you in that land
The land beyond the sky
Where we will never be parted from
Your faithful sailor boy.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 11:22
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On a cold and stormy winter's night.
As the snow lay on the ground
A sailor boy stood on the deck
His ship was outward bound
His true love standing by his side
Shed manys the bitter tear
And as he clasped her to his heart
He whispered in her ear.
Fare-well, fare-well my own true love
This parting gives me pain
You'll be my hope and guiding star
Till I return again.
My thoughts will be upon you my love
When the storms are raging high
Farewell my love remember me
Your faithful sailor boy.
The ship returned twas sad to say
Without the sailor boy
For he died at sea all on his way
When the flag was half mast high.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:41
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His is dead this two and
twenty years said the
Turf man from Ardee.
VI.
He spoke about his country cause
And how we were oppressed
We have learned men in
Parlement
Our wrongs to redress
But they are all a blumen
hum bog said the
Turf man from Ardee.
VII.
I heard a cheery voice which
I knew very well
Asking this old man his load of turf to sell.
I shook this noble hand of his
Then bowed respectfully
For I hoped to meet some future day with
The turf man from Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:39
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III
Your cart is wreat and worn friend
Your ass seems very old
It must be twenty summers
since the animal was fooled
Yoked in a trap when I was
born in September forty three
He canted for the midwife said
The Turf man from Ardee.
IV.
My cart must be made
out of the best of wood
I'm sure it must be in use
at the time of Noes flood
The axle never wanted grease
Save one year out of two
Its a real old Carrack
Axle said the turf man from Ardee.
V.
In truth I never drove
old Jack unshod.
Though oft I did abuse him
with this old hasel rod.
The harness upon his neck
was made by John Magee.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:35
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There is another poet living in Slane called John Gallaher. He is a labourer and works with the minster in Slane. He write poems about fairies and fairy-land. His poems be often in the Drogheda Independent.
There was another man that used to make songs called (?). He made the song "The turf man from Ardee." This is the song.
For sake of health I took a walk at early dawn
I meet a jolly gentle man as both we walked along
The greatest conversation passed between himself and me
And at last I was acquainted with the Turf man from Ardee.
II
We chatted very freely as we walked along the road
He said my ass is tired and I want to sell my load,
And we were weary of our journey said
The Turf man from Ardee.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:31
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it would kill all the young birds in the eggs. The pheasant is mostly used as food.
The sparrow builds in the eaves of houses. She builds with hay mud and feathers. The sparrow is a small bird and she lays about five eggs. She stays mostly around the houses. If you robbed her nest she would forsake it and never build there again.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:30
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one could get up to it. If the crow builds her nest on the second of March their is going to be good weather that year.
The pigeon is of a brighter colour than the hawk. She lays two eggs. It is said that the crow showed the pigeon how to build a nest, she put a few sticks across and the pigeon put a few more on it. Ever since she has a flat nest.
The hawk is a slate gray bird. She kills chicken a wild birds she flys suddenly down on their backs and takes them away and kills them when she is far off. It is said that it is unlucky to kill a hawk.
The pheasant is a very big bird. She builds in a tuft of rushes. She lays fifteen eggs. The cock has lovely coloured feathers. It is said that if the cock crowed beside the nest
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:27
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be wet that year.
The thrush is a very useful bird to the farmers because she eats the snails and worms that eat his crops. Once upon a time there was a thunder storm and all the birds hid themselves with fear. The thrush went out in the middle of the storm and started singing. When the other birds heard him they were not afraid and went out and praised the thrush.
The crow is a common bird. The farmer could not do without the crow because he kills the wineworms and the worms that eats his crops. One time the farmers shot all the crows because they taught the crows were eating there crops. Then when they had them shot there crops were all eaten. They had to get the crows back again to kill the worms. She is a black bird and she builds her nest in a high tree in the way no
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:05
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48. Do not throw good money after bad money.
49. You cannot take feathers off a frog.
50. It is too late to save when all is spent.
51. Too far east is west.
52. If you do not sow you will not reap.
53. Rise with the lark and with him to bed.
54. Necessity is the mother of invention.
55. The boy of to day is the man of to morrow.
56. Cold hands make a warm heart.
57. A little tastes sweet.
58. Do not put an old head on young shoulders.
59. Your pocket is your friend.
60. Always be honest in they work and word.
61. A trade is not hard to carry.
62. Manners make a man.
63. Idleness is the parent of all mischief.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:03
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23. Hunger is the best sauce.
24. There is no fire-side like your own.
25. Too many cooks spoil the broth.
26. When there is a will there is a way.
27. Always be true to your work and word.
28. Think before you act.
29. Waste not golden hours.
30. Smooth water runs deep.
31. A half a loaf is better than no bread.
32. Laziness is a heavy load.
33. A heavy purse makes a light heart.
34. When wine is in wit is out.
35. Kind hearts are better than crowns.
36. Work is better than talk.
37. A new brush sweeps clean.
38. When it rains it pores.
39. A change of work is as good as a rest.
40. Many hands makes light work.
41. There is no time like the present.
42. A good beginning is half the work.
43. Sense does not come before age.
44. The weaker goes to the wall.
45. Small leaks sink great ships.
46. No pains, no gains.
47. A light heart lives long.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 10:00
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1. A stitch in time saves nine.
2. A friend in need is a friend indeed.
3. An hour in the morning is worth two at night.
4. A wise head keeps a quiet tongue.
5. A good name is better than riches.
6. A rolling stone gathers no moss.
7. An empty barrell makes the most sound.
8. Never put off until to morrow what you can do to day.
9. It is never too late to learn.
10. Better late than never.
11. Better be sure than sorry.
12. If you want a thing done right do it yourself.
13. Two heads are better than one.
14. One good trick is better than two bad ones.
15. Look before you leap.
16. Never give advice until you are asked for it.
17. Do not believe all you hear.
18. Never count your chickens until they are hatched.
19. It is a long road that has no turn.
20. It is an ill wind that does not blow somebody good.
21. The more hurry the less speed.
22. A hungry eye sees far.
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 14:49
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I also made a skipping rope. Then I got a piece of a thick stick and made a hole up the middle off the stick to make a handle for it.
We also make daisy chains. First we pick a lot of daisies and take the stalks off them. Then we get a needle and thread and put all the heads of the daisies on the thread.
We also make paper balls. The way to make them is to get a paper bag and put papers in it and tie a cord around it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 14:48
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cut a nick in the stick and tie a cord in the nick. The nick is to keep the cord fro slipping down of the end of the stick. The arrow is made from a thinner piece of stick than the bow. We cut a sharp point on it.
They made kites out of two pieces of sticks. Two sticks were nailed together in the shape of a cross. One of the sticks must be two feet long and the other one a foot and a half. The sticks must be crossed two inches from the top. Then paper is glued to the sticks. There must be think pieces of sticks glued to the edge of the paper to keep it from tearing. A long piece of thread is tied to the kite for the children to hold.
I also made trucks. The way to make them is to get two wheels and a box and nail two shafts to the box.
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 14:44
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the leather and tied them.
I often made a buzzer. First I got a button and put a long piece of thread through the hole and tied the two ends of the thread then I got my fingers in through the thread and pulled it and it buzzed.
Long ago the children made marbles out of clay. They got yellow clay along the bank of a river. The water dashing on the clay made it yellow. When they got the clay if it was dry they wet it and rolled it into a marble and put it on the hob of the fire. They left it on the hob for about an hour until it got hard enough not to brake when they played with them.
The way to make a bow and arrow is to cut an ash stick about 2 ft in length. Then we bend the stick and
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 14:39
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I often make home made toys. One of the toys I made at home was a whistle. I first got an ash stick and bored a hole in it with a thin piece of wire and I cut a little hole in the top of it and it was made.
I also made a catapult. The way I made it was I got a stick in the shape of a fork and two pieces of rubber and a thin piece of leather. I tied the two pieces of rubber on to the two ends of the stick. Then I got a scissors and bored two holes in the leather and put the rubber through them and tied both of them on the other side with cords.
I also made a sling first I got an old tongue out of a boot and cut two holes on each end of it and I got two pieces of cord about a yard long and I put them through
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 11:15
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39. When are two apples like bells? [When they are peeled]
40. What comes after cheese? [A mouse]
41. When does a chair resemble a ladies dress? [When it is sat-in]
42. Why are ripe apples lying on the ground like thieves? [Because they ought to be taken up]
43. What is the worst weather for rats and mice? [When it rains cats and dogs]
44. Why is a police man strong? [Because he holds up the traffic]
45. What has a tongue and cannot talk? [A boot]
46. Under the and over the fire and never tips the fire? [A cake in an oven}.
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 11:13
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[Europe]
29. What is the biggest hey in the world? [A donkey]
30. Once there was a ship and it was full of people and there was not a single person in it? [They were all married]
31. Why are tall people the laziest? [Because they are longest in bed]
32. Black and white and read all over? [A newspaper]
33. What is half of the moon like? [The other half]
34. What ship do we all try to avoid? [Hardship]
35. What part of a shoe is used to trim a dress? [The lace]
36. If a man got sixpence for walking a mile what would he get for walking a hundred miles? [Sore feet]
37. If a horse's head points to the east where does his tail point? [Down]
38. What is the difference between one yard and two yards? [A fence]
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 11:07
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[One goes up and other goes down]
19. What is the greatest wonder on the map of Europe? [That Hungary did not eat Turkey]
20. Jenny in the ditch Jenny out of the ditch if you go near her she will bite you? [A nettle]
21. What has a head and no face? [A match]
22. What has a face and no head? [A clock]
23. What has a trunk and no ribs? [A tree]
24. What city would fit in a bottle? [Cork]
25. What has ribs and no trunk? [An umbrella]
26. When was beef the highest? [When the cow jumped over the moon]
27. What is the longest night in the year? [A fortnight]
28. What is the longest rope in the world?
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 11:04
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Would not pull it up? [A well]
10. What is as big as a fly's eye? [His other eye]
11. Round the wood and round the wood and never tips the wood? [A dish cloth]
12. Londonderry, Cork and Kerry spell that without a K? [T, h, a, t]
13. What tree puts us in mind of the sea? [The beech]
14. What is taken from you before you get it? [Your photo]
15. Why is a vain young lady like a drunkard? [Because they are both fond of a glass]
16. When is a shoemaker dying? [When he is preparing his sole for the last]
17. What is it we often return but never borrow? [Thanks]
18. What is the difference between a pill and a hill?
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 10:54
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1. What has teeth and cannot bite? [A comb]
2. Spell black water in three letters? [Ink]
3. Round and round the house and sleeps in the corner at night? [A brush]
4. What has four legs and cannot walk? [A bed]
5. Spell red rogue of the world in three letters? [A fox]
6. What part of a cow goes into the wood first? [Her breath]
7. What has two eyes and cannot see? [A scissors]
8. What goes up a ladder with its head down? [A nail in a boot]
9. As round as a marble
As deep as a cup
All the king's horses
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 10:51
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and keeps jumping across the rope.
We also play "four cornered fool." We put four stones in the form of a square. One child stands at each stone and another stands in the middle. The one in the middle is called a fool. The other four children change places with each other and the fool tries to run into one of their places. The child who should be in the place she runs into has to be the fool the next time.
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 10:49
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awaiting decision
girl chooses a colour. The other children form a line and go in under their hands. When they come to the last child they close hands on her and asks her which colour she would rather which ever colour she says she goes behind the girl and that has that colour. At the end they pull and which ever side pulls the other wins.
We also play "frog in the well." We all catch hands in the form of a ring one has to be the frog. The frog goes into the ring and tries to get out. The ones that are in the ring goes round saying "frog in the well and can't get out." Whoever lets him out has to be the frog for the next game.
Skipping is a summer game. We get a skipping rope and two girls hold each end of the rope. They wind it round and one girl gets into the middle
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 10:48
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girl chooses a colour. The other children form a line and go in under their hands. When they come to the last child they close hands on her and asks her which colour she would rather which ever colour she says she goes behind the girl and that has that colour. At the end they pull and which ever side pulls the other wins.
We also play "frog in the well." We all catch hands in the form of a ring one has to be the frog. The frog goes into the ring and tries to get out. The ones that are in the ring goes round saying "frog in the well and can't get out." Whoever lets him out has to be the frog for the next game.
Skipping is a summer game. We get a skipping rope and two girls hold each end of the rope. They wind it round nd one girl gets into the middle
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 10:43
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ever side pulls the other, that side wins.
In playing "high gates" the children form a ring and one child goes round and tips one of the children. Then the other children hold up their hands and the two run after one another til one of them is caught. The child that is following has to go everywhere the other child goes. If she goes wrong she is called a "goose" then she is out and the other child has to round again and tip another one.
We play "the farmer wants a wife" in summer. The children form a ring and one girl goes into the middle she is called the farmer. She closes her eyes and takes in another girl. Each girl in turn takes in another. The last one to be taken in is the farmer for the next time.
The way we play "follow on Jack to the very last man" two girls join hands and each
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 10:37
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pocket and I will not give it to you nor to you and she goes on like this until she tips one of the children. The child she tips runs and tries to get into the other girl's place. If she gets the into it she gets the bird and if she does not get into it the other girl keeps it. "I have a bird in my pocket" is a summer game.
"Colours" is a summer game. One girl is called a devil and another is called an angel. The rest of the children sit in a row and the angel gives each of them a colour. Then she calls the devil and says "all the birds in the air and all the fishes in the sea cannot find me out "black." Then the devil says the name of the girl she thinks is black, if she says right she gets that girl and if she says wrong the angel gets that girl and so on until all the girls are got. Then the girls that are with the angel pulls the girls that are with the devil and which
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 10:16
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The games I play are "catching hand" "tig" "gathering nuts in May" and "I have a bird in my pocket." We also play "colours", high gates", "the farmer wants a wife" "follow on Jack" "frog in the well" and "skipping."
Tig is a Winter game. There are always two children the tiggers for catching hand tig. All the other children run off and if the tiggers tip any one of them that person has to go into the ring. The last two children that are not caught are the tiggers for the next game of tig. "Nuts in May" is a summer game. The children form two lines and one line advances towards the other saying "here we come gathering nuts in May." Then the other line says "who will you have for nuts in May." One of the girls from the other line chooses a girl to pull her across. They put a mark on the road and if the other girl pulls her across that mark she has to go to the other side. The side that has the most wins.
This is the way we play "I have a bird in my pocket," a number of children form a ring, then one of the children get a piece of paper and goes round saying "I have a bird in my
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 08:55
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fire it is a sign of a storm.
23. When the crickets sing beside the fire it is also a sign of a storm.
24. The hens go into the hen house when it is going to rain.
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 08:54
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sign of rain.
11. If there is a rainbow in the sky it is a sign of rain.
12. If a river fills quickly and does down quickly it is a sign of rain.
13. When the crows fly low it is a sign of rain and when they fly high it is a sign of good weather.
14. When the frogs change their colour it is a sign of rain.
15. When the north wind blows it is a sign of snow.
16. If the train is heard from the south it is a sign of rain.
17. If a robin comes into the house it is a sign of snow.
18. When the stars move in the sky it is a sign of frost.
19. If the moon looks red it is a sign of wind.
20. If a herd of cattle gather together in a corner of a field it is a sign of a storm.
21. When soot falls down the chimney it is a sign of rain.
22. When the fire irons are cold beside the
senior member (history)
2019-11-13 08:50
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There are many local beliefs with regard to the weather:-
1. It is said when you see a dog drinking water that it is a sign of rain.
2. If the swallows fly low it is also a sign of rain.
3. When the seagulls fly around it is a sign of bad weather.
4. When the sky is white it is a sign of snow.
5. When the sky is red in the evening it is a sign that the next day is going to be fine.
6. If there is a blue blaze in the fire it is the sign of a storm.
7. When the smoke coming from a chimney goes up straight it is a sign of fine weather, if it blows down towards the ground it is a sign of bad weather.
8. If the wild geese fly in from the coast and shriek wildly it is a sign that there is going to be a storm.
9. When the cat sits with her back to the fire it is also a sign of a storm.
10. When the curlew whistles loudly it is a
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 14:33
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Number four knock at the door
Number five we are all alive.
Number six chop sticks.
Number seven we are all in heaven.
Number eight hold your prate.
Number nine a bottle of wine.
Number ten a big fat hen.
Number eleven catch a crow.
Number twelve let him go.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 14:32
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My father told me the following rhymes:-
I. Christmas is coming near
And the goose is getting fat.
Please put a penny
In the poor man's hat.
If you have'nt got a penny
A half-penny will do
If you have'nt got a half-penny
Then God bless you.
II. When I was young
And had no sense
I bought a fiddle
For eighteen pence
And all the tunes
That I could play
Was bread and butter
And eat away.
III. Number one buckle my tongue.
Number two button my shoe.
Number three my coat is tore.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 13:59
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Lurabog lurabog limber lock
Five miles 10 o'clock
I sat I sung while daylight sprung
Come Nellis my dear
Give me the lone of a spear
To go to the wood
To kill a fat deer.
Beetle a bo
Bottle a show
Little white dog with his mouth in a cut
Black foot in.
The way to play the above game is already described under heading Lurabog Lorabog.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 13:55
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My mother told me the following:-
On Easter Sunday the people used eat eggs. It was usual for every member of the family for to get an egg at each meal. The people used give eggs to those who had no hens as presents and that was called "Easter Gludack."
Xmas Eve was always a fast day and the people used eat ling-fish on that day.
On Shrove Tuesday the people used eat pancakes and cabbage and bacon. Shrove Tuesday is the day before Ash wednesday.
On Hallow Eve colcannon was usually eaten. The farmer used give his work men a quart of milk and a pound or a half-pound of butter for the colcannon on Hallow Eve.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 10:14
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stick fell and the person who knocked it had to be blindfolded and something but on top of him. If he guessed what was on top of him they would let him go.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 10:13
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She also told us the following:-
2. People sat round the fire. One took the tongs and drew strokes in the ashes of the open fireplace for each of the company. In his own mind he put a name on each stroke of persons who may not be present at all. He then pointed to one of the strokes and asked one of the company "what will you put this one doing?"
The person replied for instance "making a cake." Then the leader gave the name he had in his for the stroke. It might be a man. The next in the row was asked about the second stroke "What will you put this one doing": Very often a woman was put doing a man's work and there was great fun.
My grandmother told me the following. The people played a game long ago called shave the friar. A little heap of ashes was made on the hearth-stone and a stick was put standing in it. Each person took some of the ashes away until the
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 10:01
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The teacher told us the following games:-
1. Long ago the people sat in a semicircle round the fire with their two feet together placed well in front. The one sitting in the middle was appointed to take the tongs or perhaps a stick. He started at either end and went round touching a foot at each word of the following rhyme:-
Lurabog, larabog, bee, onale,
name, aprebawn, prebawn, suile....
[Unfinished]
The foot on which the last word fell was drawn in to be omitted next round and he started the rhyme again on the next foot. This continued until all the feet were drawn in. She does not know what happens when the last foot in or whether he had to pay a forfeit or had the privilege of starting the next game.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 09:34
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13. Another harmful weed on the farm is the "wild ivy." It climbs up on walls and dampens them. It then buds and a white flower comes out it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 09:33
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8. There is a purple berry which grows in woods. The people used it for dyeing clothes long ago.
9. There does be nettles in good land. They are harmful to the soil because they keep the grass from growing. The nettles are very good for turkeys and ducks.
10. There is a leaf called the "healing leaf." It grows in fields. It cures a sore finger. When you rub it to a finger that is bleeding, it stops the blood.
11. Buttercups are a cure for the heart burn. They grow in fields.
12. Bulterans grow in good land. When you see a field covered with bulterans, that is a sign that, that field is good for butter.
13. Dandelion grows along hedges. The leaves of the dandelion is very good as food for turkeys.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 09:30
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1. The most harmful weed on our farm is the docken, the seeds spread out and falls and destroys the soil. Although the seed of it is good for curing cough in horses.
2. There is a weed which grows in streams called "chicken weed." It cures a swelling.
3. There is a leaf which cures a bruise. It is said to have been growing under the cross when Christ was dying and some of the drops fell on it. The stains are on it yet.
4. The "she thistle" cures the whooping cough.
5. There is a plant which the people used to make tea out off long ago, called "hore hound." Then when tea came into use the people used to eat the tea-leaves of a plate and throw the water away.
6. There was another plant the people used for flavouring soup. It was called "time."
7. They also used "ment" for flavouring soup.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 09:08
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10. People get married on Wednesday because it is said to be a lucky day.
11. The people used to get up early on Hansel Monday and go out early to work on that morning because it used to be said that if they got up early on that morning they would be getting up early the whole year. Hansel Monday used be the first Monday n the new year.
senior member (history)
2019-11-12 09:07
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1. Some people say that anything born on whit week is false.
2. It is said that if it rains on St. Swithin's day it will rain for forty days after.
3. People usually go to new houses on Friday if they can because that day is said to be lucky.
4. It is said that March borrows tree days from April to skin the old cow. That means that the first tree days of April are cold. These days are called the tree borrowed days.
5. It is said that anyone that is born on Christmas day will see a ghost.
6. It is said that it it keeps mild on Candlemas day we will have two winters.
7. It is said that if it is wet on Friday it will be wet on Sunday.
8. Long ago it was the custom to light a bonefire on the before St John's day on the 23rd June.
9. Long ago the people said that if it rained on New year's night the cattle, oats and potatoes would be dear that year.
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:53
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the pig we say "Gurry Gurry." When the pig is fat he is kill, sold in the Market. Hens are very useful for laying eggs. They lay them in the hen-house. There is a roost in the hen-house for the hens to sleep on. The roost is made of long boards which are stretched across the hen-house. The hens lay in boxes and the boxes are nailed up on the wall. In Spring there are sets of eggs put down to hatch. There are thirteen eggs put under each hen. There is a mark put on each egg. It takes three weeks to hatch hen eggs. Then the little chickens come out of the shells. When we are calling the hens we say "Tiocad tiocad." When we are calling the ducks we say "Liat liat." When we are calling the turkeys we say "Bia, bia."
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:48
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after they are milked.
The horse does all the farm work. My neighbour has two horses. Their names are Billy and Daisy. Each horse has a stable of its own. It is called a horse-stable. Each stable has a stall. The horse's food is put in the stall. There is also a place to hold a bucket of water. Each horse is put in a different stable because they kick each other if they were together. They are tied were a strap around their neck. The horse is clipped once each year in the spring. They owner of the horse clips him himself. He is clipped with a clippers.
The horse is shod every month. The blacksmith shoes them. It costs six shillings for a set of shoes. The shoes are made of iron. There are seven nails put in each shoe.
Pigs are farm animals. We have one pig. The place in which he is kept is called a pig-sty. There is a wooden trough out of which they eat their food. Pigs are fed three times each day. They are fed with boiled turnips, potatoes and meal. When we are calling
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:43
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There are many farm animals such as the cow, the horse, the sheep, the goat and the donkey. Cows have several names such as the Kerry cow, the Roan, the Bracket, the Longhorn and the Jersey cow. We have two cows. Their names are Bluebell and Betty. They are milked twice a day in the morning and in the evening. It is a custom to make a cross on the cow's back after milking her to make her give more milk. In the summer the cows are milked out in the fields. In the winter they are brought in and milked in the cowshed.
They are kept in at night in the winter. They are fastened to the manger with chains. The chains are put around their necks. There are posts attached to the manger and the nailed on to the manger. The manger is a long narrow through out of which the cows eat their food. It is made of wood. The cows are fed twice each day in the morning and in the evening. The eat hay, chrushed oats and turnips. The turnips are cut up with a machine. The cows are fed
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:30
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eaten she eat him and the horse and trap and all she eat she met on the road.
St. Patrick knelt down on a stone and shot her. The track of where he knelt down stayed on the stone. He said "if 199 Gargans crossed where she was buried, she would rise up and eat up the whole world." Her name was Gargain. She lived in Tyworker in Co. Cavan.
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:28
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said she would count how many Masses she had heard and to her great surprise she only found on bean in the box. That was the day she was a little late for Mass, but she heard Mass right. Every other day she was looking round her and not praying.
She also told me the following religious story -:
A woman and her son were going to Mass and Holy Communion one Sunday on their trap. The woman said to her son to "pull over the trap to the ditch until she got a blackberry to eat."
He said to her "arent you going" to Holy Communion. She made him pull it over and she eat the blackberry. When she had it
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:25
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My grandmother told me the following religious story. She heard it from a woman in Magheracloone, Co. Cavan where we came from-:
There was a woman one time who used to go to mass very often. One day she was trying to count all the Masses she had heard and she could not.
Then she thought of a plan. She got a box and made a little hole on the top of it. She said she would put a bean in for every mass she heard. She used to go to mass every morning and each morning she put in a bean. This morning she was a little late for Mass. She prayed very fervently to pull in for her loss.
At the end of a long time she broke the box, she
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:18
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There is very few dash-churns in the district now they are all twisters. Long ago there was nothing but dash churns. When the butter is taken of the churn the buttermilk is used for making bread, and for feeding pigs and calves.
It is usual for everyone to take a turn of the churning if they are in a house where churning is going on and if they did not no butter would on the churn.
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:16
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the cream of the milk while others churn the cream and the bottoms.
The people wash the churn and leave it out for to get air on the day before a churning.They wash it with a scrubing brush and cold water. Before the put the milk into it they rinse it with boiling water. If too much water is put on the churn that will scald it. When it is scalded it is very hard for to get the butter a yellow colour. It is a pale colour when it is scalded. When the butter is scalded the people leave the butter in buttermilk in the dish for a few hours for to get it a yellow colour.
A butterdish, a clapper and two little spades are used when butter making is going on. The butterdish is made of wood, and the clapper is a little wooden plate. The spades are also of wood. The butter is lifted up out of the churn with the clapper and it is shaped with the spades.
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 14:04
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We have a churn at home. It is a dash churn. It is made out of a barrell. First it was only a barrell, then it was sent to the man that makes the churns out of barrells. He lives in Drogheda. He made the wood smooth and made a lid to fit it. He made a hole in the lid for the dash to go through. The churn is about four feet high. There is hoops around it.
We churn on Fridays. It takes a half-hour for to churn in summer and about three quarters of an hour in the winter. More water has to be used for churning in winter than in summer, because when it is cold it is hard for to get the milk. Long ago the people used to put the crock of milk on a pot of feeding for pigs or hens for to get it thick. They put it on the hob also for to get thick.
Some people only churn
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 13:59
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hard to sell the goods he says "it is very hard to live." He is also called "God's truth" he is called this because when a person was buying anything and she wanted something taken off he would say "god's truth I am not making a penny on anything I sell."
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 13:58
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Shops were not common long ago. There was only one shop in this district Mr Birrell was the name of the man that owned it. The people went to Drogheda after mass on Sundays long ago to sell butter and eggs they also bought their groceries on Sundays. They went on horse-back.
Any one that wanted work done and was not able to pay with money for getting it done gave butter and eggs in exchange. An old man went around the houses on a horse and cart and sold delph and other things for horse-hair, jam-pots, bottles and rabbits' skins. This custom is carried on still an old man goes around this district once a month selling things. The people call him "Long Larry" because he is very tall. They also call him "hard to live" they call him this because if he is getting
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 12:25
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Drogheda. There is only one spinning wheel in this district. Mrs Crilly was the name of the woman that owned it, she lived in Kellystown. She died last year. She used gather the sheep's wool and steep it in oil. Then she took it out and carded it, then she spun it into woolen thread.
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 12:24
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There is only one tailor in this district. He lives in Slane his name is Paddy McGuinness. He is a doum man, he works in his own house. It takes him about a fourtnight to make a suit of clothes. When a person goes in to get clothes made, they have to write what they want made down on a slate. He does not stock clothes.
Cloth is not spun or woven locally. The people used grow flax in this district long ago, and sell it to the miller that was in Rossin mill. The miller scutched it and sent it to England in the form of tow in order to make linen from it.
There is a mill in Navan. Claytons is the name of it. Some people send in sheep's wool, in return they receive a few yards f tweed. A lot of people knit socks and jumpers in this district. The thread is not spun locally, it is bought in
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 10:44
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shoes, and many other things.
Paddy the farmer is an old man that comes nearly every Monday. He was a very rich farmer long ago and he sold all his property and drank all his money.
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 10:43
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There used to be a lot of travellers in this district long ago. There was an old man his name was Joe the "Rag". He used to go from house to house with an old basket on his arm. He used to be selling things, he would want old boots for the things. He carried the things in an old basket on his arm.
There was another old man his name was "Jack the Sailor" he used to go from house to house looking for milk. He used always go to the houses early in the mornings because he liked the fresh milk. He was a sailor when he was a young man.
The present day travellers that comes to our district now are - Mary Ann Dowling and Paddy the farmer. Mary Ann Dowling is an old woman who comes to this district very often. She was a school teacher in Navan long ago. She is supposed to be of a very decent family. The people of this district call her "mad Mary." She does be looking for old
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 09:12
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the web and they thought that they were not in the tree and they went on.
When our Lord was dying on the cross the robin tried to pull the nails out of his hands. A drop of blood fell on his breast and he has a red breast ever since.
senior member (history)
2019-11-11 09:10
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When our Lord and the Blessed Virgin and St Joseph were flying into Egipt they passed men sowing oats in a field. The next morning the oats were ripe and the men were cutting it and Herods solders were looking for the Holy Family and the told them that they went by and they sowing the oats. The solders though that it was a long time since they sowed the oats but the jet told them that it was yesterday they passed. It is said that if you kill the jet before he cocks his tail you will get seven sins off your soul.
It is said that when the Holy Family were going through the desert they saw Herods soldiers coming after them and they had no place to hide. They saw a trunk of a tree and they got into it. When they were in the spider wove a web on the open of the tree. When the soldiers came up and looked at the tree they saw
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:44
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it into another birds nest. the bird has no doubts about the egg and hatches it out. The cuckoo calls out her own name "cuckoo, cuckoo."
The cuckoo comes in April.
She sings her song in May.
She whistles her tune in the middle of June.
And then she flies away.
The wagtail is generally to be seen around the farmyard, and in tilled fields. She builds her nest in wrecked walls. She lays three white eggs. She is called that name because when the Holy family were flying into Egypt the wagtail went after them and shook the dust over their footsteps with his tail.
The water-hen builds her nest along a river. It is said that if a water-hen builds near the water that the weather will be dry that year and if she builds high over it the weather will
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:40
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that whichever of them would fly the highest that one would be king. Before they started the wren hid himself under the eagles wing. The eagle flew higher than all the other birds and cried out "I am the king of all birds." Then the wren flew out from the eagle's wing and cried out "I am the king of all birds." Then the birds made the wren their king. The wren builds her nest in a bank and the top covered over with moss. The wren is the first and last bird to hatch, she builds two nests and lays twice in the year. She lays eighteen eggs the first time and twelve the last time.
The cuckoo comes to this district in April. She is a large bird about the size of a pigeon. Her back is blueish grey and her wings and tail are black. The cuckoo builds no nest for herself. She lays her egg on the ground then she takes it in her mouth and drops
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:35
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The swallow is a very wild bird. She is one of the seven sleepers. There is a rhime made up about the seven sleepers it is-
The bee, the bat the butterfly,
The cuckoo and the swallow.
The corncrake the weather-drake,
We will all be home to morrow.
The robin builds her nest in a mossy bank with moss and feathers. She lays five brown eggs. She hatches for three weeks before the young birds come out. The robin has a red breast. It is said that the robin tried to take the nails from Our Lord's hands when he was dying on the Cross and that he got the stain of blood on his breast ever since he is called "Robin Red breast."
The wren is the smallest of all the birds. The wren is called the king of the birds. When the birds were choosing a king they said
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:29
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Long ago the clothes brushes and polishing brushes was made from horse hair.
The people made beehives out of a straw rope twisted in an oval shape. They put this on the bees when a swarm of them would light. They would go up into it and they would get them and kept them in the hive.
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:28
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into them. No nails were used.
Long ago there were no iron ploughs as we have now, they were all wooden ploughs.
The men used to thatch their own houses, they used pull the straw and wet it. They used have little forks for putting in the straw. There are a few men about this district that can thatch yet.
The people used to burn lime in Sheephouse in a kiln. They burned it out of big stones. They used to light a fire of turf and burn the big stones into lime.
The people used to make whips out of rushes. They used to get three rushes and plait them together. When used to have them plaited they used to tie them to a stick.
Long ago the people used to bake their bread on a flat iron with two handles. This was called a griddle and the cake was called a griddle cake.
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:23
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dug dry clay and shaped it into the shape of a pipe and put it an oven to harden. When they took it out, they scraped a hole in the head of it and reddened a darning needle and made a hole in the shank.
Long ago the people used to make cups and saucers. They used to cut little blocks of wood and scrape a hole in it and shape a handle on it with a little saw. They smoothened the wood with a plane. The cups were called luggets.
They also made walking sticks. They got a straight hazel or sally stick and bent the top of it into the shape of the top of a walking stick. They they tied a cord round it and put it in boiling water and left it there for about two hours. When they took the cord of it, it stood crooked.
Long ago gates were made by making holes in some sticks and by putting other sticks
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:17
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from sally rods that still grow in marshy ditchs, they used to cut the rods a year before they wanted them, so as to let them dry all summer. They would also turn brown with the heat. When they were quite dry, they plaited the rods together to make the baskets.
Long ago the people used to spin their wool themselves. They spun it with a spinning wheel. They washed the wool and dried it. Then they carded it. They put it on the spinning wheel and kept drawing the thread towards themselves then they went back toward the wheel and the thread was made into a yarn.
Long ago the people used to dye the wool and clothes with coloured flowers. They used to dye with the heather and the roses and the blossoms of the furze bush. First they boiled the flowers and got the water of them and dipped the clothes in it.
They used to make clay pipes out of yellow clay. They
senior member (history)
2019-11-08 14:09
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There used to be candles made here, about sixty years ago. The people cut strong rushes and peeled them. They had a grised for melting the tallow. They used to run the rushes through the melted tallow. Then they tied them in bundles to dry. They used to have a big candlestick standing in the middle of the floor with a pincers on top of it to hold the candle.
Long ago the people got light from flint and touch. The touch was made of sulphur on paper and a spark from the flint would light it.
The people also made different kinds of mats, such as mats made from flaggers that grow along the rivers and mats made from straw. They used to cut the flaggers and let them dry, then they platted them together. The straw mats were made the same as the flagger mats, only a lot straw than flagger were used.
The people made baskets
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 14:52
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So fill your glasses to the brim,
And let the toast go merry around,
And here is a health to every labouring boy,
That ploughs and sows the ground.
When his days' work is over
It is home he will cheer with joy
And happy is the girl
That get a bony (that get a bonny) labouring boy.
That ploughs and sows the ground,
His face is like the roses red
His eyes as black as sloes.
He is meek in his behavour,
No matter where he goes.
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 14:46
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met a man and told him that God and the devil were halving the souls between them. The two of them came back again to the grave-yard gate and heard the two lads counting the nuts and were they were God and the Devil counting the souls. They were a while there and the talk stopped and the next thing they heard was "What about the two at the gate" and the man and woman thought it was them and they ran as hard as they could home. It was round the country side the next day that God and the Devil were counting the souls in the grave-yard.
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 14:44
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My father told me the following story:-
One morning two boys went to gather nuts. They brought a bag with them and filled it up. It was dark and they coming home. They went into a graveyard to count the nuts and as they were getting in over the wall they lost two nuts and they said they would get them coming out.
They sat down to count the nuts and they were saying theres one for you and one for me and so on. As they were counting them a woman passed by the grave-yard and heard them saying theres one for you and one for me.
She waited a while and they were counting away. She went on down the road and she
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 14:41
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and it must be at least two owls. It is said that St Patrick prayed on this stone and the marks of his knees can be seen plainly on it.
Several times this stone was carried away from the cottage and each time it was found back again in the same place. No one ever thinks of taking it away now.
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 14:37
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St. Patrick is the patron saint of this parish. My grandmother told me the following story:-
Their is a wall called St. Patrick's well in the field that Dowth moat is in. People used to get the water for cures. There was an ash tree growing over it.
One time a woman washed clothes in it and it dried up. Their was a house near the place and the people wanted to build a new one and the water was too far away to carry to wet the mud. So one night the well filled up again and they got the water there.
The teacher told us the following story:-
On the right hand side of the road from Grangegeeth to Drogheda about a mile from that town there is an ancient stone in front of a cottage. This stone is called Clough Patrik and gives its name to the townland.
It is a large broad irregular shaped stone about 2 feet high
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 14:34
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feet long ago they used throw a piece of red fire into the water. It is also said that they would not throw out the water without saying "take care of the feet."
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 14:33
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Long ago children did not wear boots until they were five years of age. Now they wear them at two years of age. The people wash their feet in salty water, it is believed to harden them. The children at the present day go bare footed in the summer. There is only one man living in this district who soles boots for the people. His name is James Smyth. He is living in Dowth. Some of the people buy the leather and sole them themselves. Others bring them to the shoemaker and pay the shoe maker for doing them.
There were four tanneries in Drogheda at one time. There are boot factories there now. Long ago a few boys named Lynchs used come to school all the year round in their bare feet. They lived on Parabrocks hill on the Slane Drogheda road. An old man named Paddy Carlan lived on the Dowth road and he used mend the boots for the people long ago. When the people washed their
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 14:18
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names were Nicholas, Jemmy and Jack McWuillian. Nicholas lived in Dowth, he is dead now he died a few years ago. Jemmy McQuillian is still living, he is in Australia. Jack is also dead. Paddy Mooney was the principal goal-keeper in the Rossin team. He was very good. He is still living in Dowth.
Tom Marry and John Marry also played in the Rossin team. Tom Marry is living still in Kellystown. John Marry is also living still. he lives outside Drogheda. He was one of the best on the team. Tommie Marten also played in this team, he was not much good. Willie Mongey played on this team also, he is living still in Kellystown, he was very good. They travelled on hakney cars. The Coalpits team wore green and black jerseys, and the Rossin team wore green and yellow jerseys.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 14:11
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The men played nearly as much football long ago as they play at the present day. There was a team in Rossin and also another in the Coalpits, the Coalpits' team were called "Knock a Mooneys."
They had two point posts that we have not now. These posts were outside the goal-posts, one each side, they were called point-posts. They also had the cross-bar. If the ball went between the goal-post and the point-post, it was a point. If it went over the cross-bar it was also a point. Long ago they could have as many goal-men as they liked. There was a man named Ned McQuail that played in the Coalpits team. He is dead now, he died a few years ago. Pat Crinion also played in the Coalpits team.
There were three McQuillian brothers playing in the Rossin team, their
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 13:36
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that if it rains on New Years night the markets will be dear that year.
It is said that if you go to a well on May day before the dawn and wash your face you will not be rich during the year.
It is said that if you brake a mirror you will have seven years bad luck.
It is said that it is unlucky to spill salt and if you spilled any you should trow a grain of it across your shoulder.
It is said that if there is a piece of tea leaves floating on your tea there is a stranger coming.
It is said that if one person hits another with an elder stick he will grow no bigger.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 13:33
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My grandmother told me:-
that if a hen crows you will have bad luck. Long ago if a hen crew the person would bring him to a cross-roads and which ever road the took there would be bad luck on it.
If you found a piece of coal on the road and put it in your pocket it is said you would get money if you kept it.
If you saw two magpies on the road you would have good luck and if you saw one you would have bad luck.
It is said that if a knife fell there is a man coming to visit you.
It is said that if you keep a piece of blessed palm in the cowshed the milk will be good during the year.
If a black cat came and stayed in a house it is said you would have good luck.
It is said
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 08:58
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a man watching it but even then it would be stolen on them.
The palm which we get on Palm Sunday a bit of it is put in every shed as well as in the house.
The people long ago used make a cross on St Patrick day out of ribbon. They called them St Patricks crosses.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 08:57
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A candle is lit and placed in the window on Christmas Eve night. Long ago the people left the door open and decorated the house with holly and ivy.
They also used lit twelve candels on the Twelfth day one in houner of each day and placed them in the windows. They called the Twelfth day Little Christmas.
Long ago the people used make a may-bush on May Eve and stick it in the street in front of the door. First they used go about looking for a green bush. When they got one they brought it home and decorated it with flowers. Some people kept the shells of the eggs from Easter Sunday and hung them on the may-bush too. A crowd of boys used go round in the night and steal the may-bush from one door and put it at another. The farmers tied a rope from the may-bush to a wheel of a cart and put
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 08:31
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of thee.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 08:30
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My grandmother told me some of the following prayers -: May the Divine Heart of Jeasus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary, be known, praised, blessed, loved, worshipped, glorified, always and in all places Amen.
1. Show us O Lord thy ways and teach us thy paths. Direct my steps according to thy word that no injustice may rule over me. Make perfect my walking paths that my steps may not be moved into danger.
2. Just one hour with thee O Lord. Just one hour with thee. I know that I shall soon depart. Hide me in they Sacret Heart.
3. Infant Jesus meek and mild
Take Oh take me for Thy child
All my life oh let it be
my best joy to think
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 08:25
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was the man came in the night to the girls house and kidnapped her and ran away and got married. Runway marriages were mostly the custom long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 08:24
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Married in green you are ashamed to be seen.
Married in red you wish yourself dead,
Married in black you wish yourself back.
The people used to be hurrying to get married before Shrove Tuesday long ago, because Lent was very hard on the people that time. If the parties had no ring long ago, the priest married them with the key of the door. They went home on side cars when the ceremony was over. When they were near the brids house four men used to get out of the side car and run for a bottle of whisky. When everyone had a sup taken out of the bottle it was given to the bride to brake it.
It was a custom to tie old boots to the side cars. It was the alter boys that usually did this when the parties that were getting married gave them no money for serving. Another custom was to get up on the top of the chapel and let down an old sack on the parties when they came out.
Another custom
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 07:59
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to be seen yet. There was a acre of land with the house and Miss Elcock has it. There is the ruins of another house on "Crag lane" near Rossin bridge. The land is good. There is a bridge on "Crag lane" and it is called "Cockle bridge."
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 07:58
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two acres of with the house and my grandmother bought it.
There is another old house that is now in ruins on Crag lane. Boylans was the name of the people that lived there. The house was thatched and the walls were made of mud. The people left the house and after some time the house fell. There is nothing to be seen of the home house now only a part of one of the walls.
There is the ruins of another old house in our field. Michael Smyth was the name of the man that lived in it. The walls were mud walls and the roof was a thatched one. He left the house and went to live with his cousins and after some years the house fell. There is a part of the walls
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 07:57
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The name of my home district is Elland. The old name for it was Dillon. It is in the townland of Dowth. It is in the parish of Monknewtown. There are three families living in Elland. Smyth is the most common name in the parish. There is no old people living there.
Two of the houses in Elland is slated and the other house is thatched. There is the ruins of an old house in my home district. Daniel Hoey was the name of the person that lived in that house. There is nothing to be seen of the house now only some of the walls. The house was thatched and the walls were made of mud. Daniel Hoey lived with himself. He was an old man when he died. He died in Hoshital. He had
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 14:29
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The following place names are in this district:-
Rossin is the general name given to part of Balfaddock and part of Monknewtown adjoining. The school and the mill are often called Rossin school and Rossin mill. Some people say Rossin was the owner of the mill, but my grandmother said Rossin was a wicked caretaker who lived in the mill yard and used prevent the people from going to mass.
Dillon is the name called to the town-land of Rolland (?). That name appeared on the rates demand notes up to a few years ago. It never appeared on the rent demands.
Bro is the name given to part of Newgrange joining the river the tumulus. There are two families living in it Smyths and Galvins.
Crockaharna is the name given to a portion of Monknewtown adjoining Mooretown.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 14:11
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My uncle told me the following:- One day there was a man fishing on the river Nanny and Saint Patrick asked him for a salmon. He did not give him one. There was no salmon ever seen in the river Nanny after that.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 14:09
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While Saint Patrick was in Ireland he had a man with him carring his vestments. One night while Saint Patrick was asleep on the bank of a river he said two curses and these are on the water and the rushes. That is why the top of the rushes are withered and the froth on the water.
From my grandmother I got the above legend.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 14:08
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About the year 1868 every body in this parish were suffering from scarlatina. Almost two out of every family died with it. There were people living where Doggetts of Monknewtown live now and three of them died the same day with it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 14:07
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the last student and he was leaving the monastery and he brought the book.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 14:07
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It was on Slane hill St Patrick lit the paschal fire. My aunt told me that the stone on the lane going down to Lady well was carried three times up to Slane hill. Every time it was carried up on to the hill it disappeared and went back to the lane going down to Lady well. It is there ever since that.
St Patrick built his monastery on Slane hill and also a school for learning. That monastery was known over all Europe and also the school for for its learning. It is said that when the students were leaving that monastery one day that one of the students in one of the front rows near Drogheda forgot a book. He told the other students behind him that he forgot a book. They told the other students behind them and they told each other untill it came to
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 15:50
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Long ago if any one came into a house and a churning on the person would help at it.
If you spilled salt you should always how a grain of it across your left shoulder.
Long ago it was the custom to carry the corps three times round the grave yard before it was buried.
It is said that a funeral should take the longest way to the grave yard.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 15:43
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Some people dig them with a spade, while others ploughs them out with a plough. The children pick the potatoes. They picks them with their hands. The potatoes are stored in pits in the field. The local names for potatoes are "Kerrs pink," "British Queens," "Great Scots," "Arnbanners," "Shamrocks," and "Moors Fancy." The "Kerrs pinks" grow best in the district. Long ago potatoes were used instead of starch. The people used to slice the potatoes. They they used grate them on a grater and strain them. The flour that came out of the potatoes, they made starch out of it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 15:40
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Potatoes are grown on our farm. There is about an acre of land sown under them each year. My father prepares the ground. Sometimes manure is put on the land before it is turned up. The potatoes are sown in drills. The land is first ploughed and then harrowed and then the drills are opened with a plough, and that plough is called a double-mould-board plough. Wooden ploughs were used long ago. There is none of them in the district now. Spades are not made locally they are bought in a shop.
The potatoes for sowing must be sound and have a good many eyes on them. The potatoes for sowing are sometimes cut in the middle. The people help each other in sowing the potatoes, sometimes they help with their horses by ploughing the ground, other-times they drop the potatoes for one another. The people weed and mould the potatoes in the summer months. They dig them in the Autumn with a digger.
senior member (history)
2019-10-24 10:59
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there was no open only under his chin. There was a soldier of King James hid on the other side of the river. When the horse held down his head to drink Somberg held up his head and the man shot him on the neck and he fell into the Boyne. There is a stone there to mark the place where he fell.
senior member (history)
2019-10-24 10:58
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The battle of the Boyne was fought along the Boyne near Drogheda. The place is called Old Bridge where it was fought. When King William won the fight an Obelisk was built in honour of him. It was blew up about ten years ago.
There is a story about King James and it is said that he had a gun-man in his army and he wanted to kill King William and he would not let him because King William was his son in law. The man said he would have a shot at him so he fired one and struck him on the shoulder and wounded him. His men thought was killed and he had to side out on a horse to show them that he was not killed.
King William had a leader called Scomberg in his army and he went down to the river to give his horse a drink. He had clothes of mail on him and
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 14:41
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class. They used slates mostly. They had no pens. They got quill pens which they made out of feathers. They had little pencils which they called cutties, that they wrote on slates with. The children used to bring turf for the fire in the school every morning. There was a blackboard in the school and they had a bunch of feathers for cleaning it.
There were a few of these schools about here. There were about ten pupils in each school. There were scholars in it called poor scholars. Each scholar used to bring the poor people home in turns every day and give them their dinner and keep them for a night. The way the master used to be paid was that every one that could, would bring a penny. A penny was a lot of money that time.
There was an old hedge-school over at Sheephouse long ago. The name of the master that taught in it was Phil McKeown and he lived in Donore in a little thatched house.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 14:38
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Long ago there were no national schools as there is to day. The master used to teach the children in an old house called a hedge-school. The pupils had to bring old pictures to hand on the walls.
All that was taught in the hedge schools was spelling and sums. The pupils had only three books for their time at school. There was no Irish spoken by the pupils or by the master. The master never went from one school to another. The writing was done on a slate with piece of a sharp stone.
There was a hedgeschool in Monknewtown long ago. The master that taught in it his name was Luke Dunne. He lived in an old thatched house where Mr. Tully's cottage is now. He was a cripple and he could not do anything only teaching. The place where the school was is where Monknewtown school is now. The children got no copies until they reached fourth
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 14:01
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The customs long ago at a wake were very different from what the people do at the present day. When a person died the people hired a piper for the night to play in the room the corpse was in. They threw straw on the floor of the room.
About fifty years ago an old man died in Tullyallen, he was very humpy as he was very old. When he died they had to tie him down on the bed with a cord so there was a terrible strain on the cord. The piper was playing and the cord went and the man jumped up. All the people ran out of the room and as the piper was running out, he dropped the bag-pipes at the door. They thought the old man had come to life again.
A priest lived very near that house and they went over for
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 13:58
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taken out.
The corpse was never taken to the church it was brought to the grave-yard from the house. When a person died a few women were hired to cry the corpse to the grave. These women were called keeners, they were payed for the purpose.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 13:57
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him. He knew the man was not alive, but he went over with them. When he was going in the door he stood on the bag-pipes and they let a squeal. He got such a fright that he also ran out, and did not come in until the next day.
The offering for the dead was held in the houses long ago. When they went up to the room with their offerings they got whiskey. The people had whiskey, snuff and clay-pipes and tobacco for the people at the wake. The men got the clay pipes and tobacco and the women got the snuff.
It was a custom when the corpse was a taken out the chairs, stools and the chairs were turned up-side down until the corpse was taken out. They used stick forks in the roof of the house when the corpse was a
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 11:42
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Flour was ground in Rossin mills. That was the only flour mill in this district. The Rossin mills was first a flour mill and then a flax mill. It is nearly fifty years since flour was ground in Rossin mills. Withsell was the owner of the mills at that time.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 11:40
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Leven bread was the bread that was eaten locally. It was baked on a griddle. The people got a piece of a leven cake and steep it and then they mixed the piece of leven with the wheaten meal. Then they left in basin for five or six hours for to rise. The griddle used to be hot before they put on the cake and if it was not hot the cake would stick to the griddle. It took a half-hour for to bake a cake. The griddle was a round flat iron with two handles on it.
It was said that it was unlucky for any person to break bread on the griddle and if they did the horses would get weak in the plough.
Long ago the people used to make potatoes cakes. They boiled the potatoes first and then they sliced them and put them between two light covers and put it on the griddle for to bake.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 11:19
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people that sell it always give the halter or rope away with the horse. The big fairs of the year is always horse fairs.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 11:19
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The local fairs are held in Slane and Drogheda. The most important fairs held in Drogheda are on the 12th May, the 22nd June, the 26th August and 29th October. Long ago people to the fairs walking. They used to have a rope on their leg to keep them from running away. There was never any horse fairs held in Slane. The fairs held in Slane are always on on the first Friday of each month. It does not be a big fair.
When men sell cattle they always give money for luck that money is called luck penny. Buyers sometimes transact business at farmers places. The people that bring cattle to the fairs has to pay toll. When a bargain is made the men that makes it always strike hands. When an animal is sold there is a mark put on the cattle. The mark is put on the cattles side. They make the mark with a scissors or with a cattle marker. When a horse is sold the
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 10:05
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The priest asked her what did she do with the water. She said that she through it out. He said he would rather the water after that she learned how to make tea.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 10:04
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The people long ago used to eat three meals a day. They use to eat Indian meal for there brekfast they took there breakfast at eight o'clock in the morning. The people got up at six o'clock and worked till eight without getting any food. Long ago the people eat the green seeds that were on the storks instead of potatoes. People drank the milk that they got from the dandelion. The people sat around the tables on rushes. Long ago the people made bread out of nuts the got nuts and broke them into pieces and made a cake out of it then they put it on the griddle and put it on the fire to bake.
The people eat their last meal at six in the evening. When the tea came out first the people use to eat the leaves and throw the water. There was a priest in our parish near Dundalk before we came here. One morning he went to a womans house to say mass when he was finished the woman presented a plate of tea leaves for his breakfast.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 10:04
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The people long ago used to eat three meals a day. They use to eat Indian meal for there brekfast they took there breakfast at eight o'clock in the morning. The people got up at six o'clock and worked till eight without getting any food. Long ago the people eat the green seeds that were on the storks instead of potatoes. People drank the milk that they got from the dandelion. The people sat around the tables on rushes. Long ago the people made bread out of nuts the got nuts and broke them into pieces and made a cake out of it then they put it on the griddle and put it on the fire to bake.
The people eat their last meal at six in the evening. When the tea came out first the people use to eat the leaves and throw the water. There was a priest in our parish near Dundalk before we came here. One morning he went to a womans house to say mass when he was finished the woman presented a plate of tea leaves for his breakfast,
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 09:48
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was Lord of the Balfaddock. He was a good man. He did not evict anyone.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 09:47
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The local landlords were Lord Conyngham, Lord Sheffield, Lord Masserene and Lord Nethervile, Lord Conyngham was landlord over Slane. They are there since the time of Cromel. He was a good man. He did not evict anyone. He got the land from Cromel. The land was divided into farms from 10 acrs to 100 acrs. No one could kill a hare or any game or they would get jail. When the farmers used be cutting the corn the Protestant minister used send a man to take one sheaf out of every ten. Them that had no corn used have to give money.
Lord Sheffield was Lord of Monknewtown. He was good he let the people drain his land and pay them for it. Lord Masserene was Lord of Collan. He evicted the whole estate because they would not pay the rent. They wanted a lower rent. Lord Nether-
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 09:36
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have books with old home cures in the house as there were very few doctors at that time.
Donore Hill where James sat to watch the Battle of the Boyne can be seen easily from the Hall. She said that some of the trees there have been cut down recently and the people resented it very much.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 09:35
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Mrs Balfour of Townley Hall told the teacher:-
That they had no relics of the Battle of the Boyne in the house, but a sword belonging to King William which is lent to the Museum in Dublin and can be seen there.
She said that at that time the present Slane Drogheda road was not constructed where it is now. It ran through her demesne entering in at the gate opposite Oldbridge.
One of the work men told the teacher that the old track of it could be traced through her demesne out to the Bailehaska road.
She also said that the economic condition of the country had changed very much since she was young. They people then required very little money as they made their own clothes and dyed them at home and produced all their own food and supplied their own light. They
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 09:24
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a smith washes in the water which has cooled his irons he is made fresher and stronger.
senior member (history)
2019-10-22 09:24
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There is a black smith in this parish. His name is Taffee. He lives on at a crossroads on the main road from Drogheda to Slane. The crossroads is called Callans. It is about a half a mile from here. He shoes horses and asses and fixes implements. There is one fire place in it.
It is said that if a spark of iron lights on your hand and you away from the iron that you will money. One day our lady lost her brooch and she came to a smiths forge and the smith came out and said he would make a brooch for her. Then he a piece of silver from his pocket and beat it in to the shape of a brooch and give it to her. Then the Lady give him her blessing and went. Ever since that it is said that if
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 14:42
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branches off to the right and about half a mile from the school there is a cross road. One road branches off to the left called the Tailors Lane and it leads out on the main road. The other road leads to the right it is called the old road and it crosses the river Mattock about half a mile from the cross and about a mile from the river it meets the Garen Ban at Wood Mill.
Another road branches off to left called the Ballfadoc road and then the Knowth road. Not far from the Knowth road there is a road called the Crewbawn road. Long ago it was the road to Slane and it was not fixed till a year ago. There is a hill called Gallows hill near Slane.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 14:39
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There is a road that leads from Drogheda to Slane it is called the main road. There are many roads branching off it. The first road branches off at Mell near Drogheda to Tullyallen on the right hand side. There is a hill called Taffes hill next and then a cross-road one road leads to Mellifont on the right it is called the Glen road. There is a road leading to the left called the Donore road which crosses the Boyne at the obelisk. There is a hill called Laylens hill near the obelisk.
Then after he hill there is a ditch called the crab ditch. A road called the Garen Ban branches off to the right. Garen Ban means white horse because King William rode a white horse down it. It has another name Beall Haska. Not. The Garen Ban leads to Wood Mill.
Not far from the Garen Ban there is a hill call Parabrocks hill. The river Mattock runs under the road near the hill. The Monknewtown road
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 14:15
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My aunt told me the following:-
There was a well in Dowth called St Shanaghan's well. It was near Dowth Moat in the same field.
One day there was a woman washing tripe in the well and it disappeared and went down to the Boyne. A tree that was beside it also disappeared.It is leaning across the bank of the Boyne now. There is only a track of the well to be seen now.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 14:08
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On the Drogheda road travelling in the direction from the school about half way between Callan's cross and the Townly Hall gates there is a very narrow old lane. The other end of it comes out on the Dowth road nearly opposite the Institution gates. This is said to have been the old Dublin to Belfast coach road.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 14:06
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The well in Monknewtown is used as a spring well. It is not known locally if it had been a holy well, but Mrs McArdle of Monknewtown said that before Mrs Crilly of Kellystown died she told her that it was a holy well but she gave her no name for it. Nobody in the district knows any name for it or any thing about it.
Mrs McQuillan of Dowth said that the first Sunday in August long ago was a Pattern day in Monknewtown, but she does not know if that had any connection with the well.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 14:00
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across. He was seen at the Mattock River in Rossin that day. He always wore knee trousers. He was able to button them without bending.
The teacher told us the following:-
One of his most daring feats was the robbery of the mail coach at Balrenny crossroads. He had a number of scarecrows standing at Mrs Mc Donagh's gate. When the coach came near Collier shouted to the driver to halt and then shouted at the dummies "Do not fire till I tell you." The driver and passengers thought there was a crowd and allowed themselves to be robbed.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 13:58
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Collier was a great highwayman in Meath in the last century. He took money from the rich and gave to the poor. My aunt told me the following about him :-
One day he went into a house and asked for a cup of tea. The woman said she would give it to him in welcome. He gave her money that she could live on for her life time.
One day the guards were after him trying to catch him. He went into a field where there was men digging potatoes. The men put him in a bag and covered him up. They hardly had him covered when the guards were in field. They did not notice him under the sacks. They taught it was a sack of potatoes. He gave them money for hiding him.
One day the police were after him and he jumped into the Boyne and swam
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 13:53
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Most of the houses long ago were thatched. They all had a bed in the kitchen it was called the settle-bed. It used to be placed at the fire place. Some of the people always slept in it as it was the custom then. The fire-place was generally against the middle wall on the floor. The people had bars in front of the glass to protect the glass from been broken.
The floors were all made of clay or bricks. Most of the houses had half doors, these were to made to keep the children from running out on the road and been killed. They also had light and fresh air from the half door. The chimneys they had on the houses long ago were not as high as the ones at the present day. It was nearly all coal or wood they burned long ago. A lot of men used to go out wood every Saturday.
The light they had long ago was candles made out rushes.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 13:53
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They used to take the green of the rush and leave the inside in greace for a few hours, when they took it out it would be very thin but it would last for a long time.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 13:52
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Most of the houses long ago were thatched. They all had a bed in the kitchen it was called the settle-bed. It used to be placed at the fire place. Some of the people always slept in it as it was the custom then. The fire-place was generally against the middle wall on the floor. The people had bars in front of the glass to protect the glass from been broken.
The floors were all made of clay or bricks. Most of the houses had half doors, these were to made to keep the children from running out on the road and been killed. They also had light and fresh air from the half door. The chimneys they had on the houses long ago were not as high as the ones at the present day. It was nearly all coal or wood they burned long ago. A lot of men used to go out wood every Saturday.
The light they had long ago was candles made out rushes
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 10:07
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he died in the year 520, there was great sorrow on the rest of the monks. They cried and prayed for three days that God might give them back their good monk. On the fifth day they were out in the garden of the monastery and they saw St Buite in the garden. He seemed to be covered all over with glass so that he could not tip the ground. He continued his teaching and preaching again for six months.
One day they saw a golden ladder coming down from the sky. Buite started going up the steps and as he would go up the step would also disappear. When he went up a few steps he blessed the monks, he also told them for they not to fret after him, that a child was born that would preach to them. St. Colmcille was born that day.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 10:04
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Malachy. He was going to France and on his way he left irish monks in Clairvous to be trained. When he was returning he brought back the monks and placed them in this school in Mellifont. It was the first cistercian school in Ireland. In the year 1539 the monks were driven out of the abbey by Henry VIII. Dermot Mac Murrough stole the wife of O'Rorke, Dervorgilla was her name. It is said in the end of her days she came back to do penance in Mellifont and was buried there.
There are the ruins of a monastery in Monasterboice. It was founded by St. Buite. One of the greatest towers in Ireland is to be seen there to day. There are also to famous crosses in it. They are two of the best high crosses in Ireland.
The following story was told about St. Buite. He was a very great monk, he was liked very well by the rest of the monks. When
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 10:00
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It was Erc's hermitage.
There are the ruins of a Franciscan monastery on Slane hill. It was built on the same site as St Patricks. It was plundered in the 16th century. The tower that is still to be seen is 80 feet high. There is a stone on the hill and the marks of St. Patrick's knees are in it, where he knelt in prayer. St. Patrick lit the paschal fir on this hill.
There is another ruins of a monastery in Monknewtown where the grave yard is now. It was built by the monks. There is supposed to be a passage under ground from Mellifont to Monknewtown. There is a head of one of the monks carved on a stone in the side wall of the monastery which still remains. There are two oblong windows in the side wall.
The are also the ruins of a school in Mellifont. It was founded by St.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:55
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There are the ruins of a monastery on Slane hill, they are not the ruins of the school St. Patrick built. It was a very famout school. The king of France was educated in this school, there were also a great number of students in it. It is said that when the students were leaving the school, when one of the first few were in Drogheda they missed a book, he told the one behind him and so on until the ones that were leaving the school were able to get the book. This school was plundered by the Danes first, it was completely plundered by the Anglo Normans about the year 1175.
On the bank of the river Boyne there are the ruins of Erc's hermitage. Erc was the first bishop of Slane. After many years of teaching and preaching he retired and went down to the mouth of the river Boyne and built a house there to die.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:46
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There is a holy well in Slane situated on Lady Conyngham's demesne. People go to visit it every 15th August. It is called "Lady Well." The Conyngham's covered it because they were Protestants but it gushed up in another part of the avenue. Some people say that it gushed up in their parlour so they had to take the stone off the well and let the people go to it.
There was a big stone with the mysterys carved out on it at the well. They tackled six horses in it and they refused to (?) it when they came to the middle of the hill. The stone is there still.
There does be a little water in the well always. On the 15th August the night before it gushes up again.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:42
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Long ago when the famine was in the year 1846 the people had no food. The potatoe crop failed that year they turned black in the ground. The people were trying to eat grass for food. Some of them were got dead in the fields trying to eat grass. They use to eat raw turnips as well.
Ever since the year of the famine that is called the black "46. The year after that there came a great sickness called colera. The people were afraid to the houses to bury the people.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:35
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in every house on Hallow Eve. There is a ring put in it and it is said that the person who gets it will be married soon. There is always a piece of paper rolled around the ring and sometimes there is a writting on it.
Another custom is peeling an apple and not breaking the skin and to throw it across your shoulders and see whose initials it would form. Another custom is putting two nuts on the bar of the grate and giving them names. If the two nuts shot off together they would be married but if only one shot off they would not be married. Another custom is to melt lead and drop it on the floor to see whose initials it would form.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:33
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and his wife came along with a brick and threw it at the man thinking it was one of the lads stealing the cabbage and instead of hitting one of the lads she struck her own husband with the brick. He would not go out again to mind the cabbage.
At the present day the game most played is ducking for apples in a basin of water and sometimes a (?) is put down in the water and who ever gets it keeps it. An apple is suspended from the ceiling and each person tries to take a bite from it without touching it with their hands. Another custom is, put three saucers on a table, clay in one, a ring on another and water on the third. The person is blind-folded and if he put his hand on the clay it is said that he will die soon. If he puts his hand on the ring it is said that he will soon get married. If he puts his hand on the water it is said he will go across water soon. There is a brack
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:16
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There is a lot of difference between the games played on Hallow Eve now and long ago. My mother told me that when she was young the people would not throw water and after dark on November night for fear they would throw it on the good people.
There was another old custom. In every house before the people went to bed there would be a clean hearth-stone and a little grescia left in the fire grate and a crock of clean spring water left on the floor. That was for the souls that were out on November night. There was another custom. Young people went around stealing heads of cabbage and hanging them on the latches of the doors and they went to the family they knew was most easily aggravated. The people would be out in the garden watching the lads taking the cabbage. A few lads went to a garden one night and the old man was sitting down watching the cabbage
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:08
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still standing. There is a stone staircase inside the old walls. This is the old castle in which John Boyle O'Reilly was born.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:08
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Dowth was once a parish in itself. In 1857 the Bishop made a change and Dowth and Monknewtown were joined together. Previous to that Monknewtown was a branch of Grangegeith. The old church was in Dowth at that time and the ruins of it are still to be seen in the grave-yard.
The old Dowth Castle belonged to Lord Neterville. He had two sons jesuit priests and one of them was buried in the chancel of the old church along with his father. There is a slab inside the walls of the church in memory of the Netervilles. One of the jesuit Neterville priests was dragged out of his bed, kicked and dragged along the road for his faith by Cromwell and his soldiers and died a few days later. The last viscount Neterville bequeathed money for a home for the widows and orphans of the country and this home is to be seen there now called the institution. It was build about the year 1874. The four walls of the old castle are
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 09:03
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John Boyle O'Reilly Born at Dowth 28th of June 1844. Died at Hull near Boston Mass. U.S.A. 10th of Aug 1890.
R.I.P.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 08:58
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the army. He was arrested and put into prison in Arbour hill for being a Fenian. It was there he wrote one of his best pieces of poetry called the "Old School Clock." While in the army he was home on leave, he missed the clock out of his father's school; he was reminded of it that morning on looking at the prison clock and it was then he wrote the piece of poetry on it.
senior member (history)
2019-10-21 08:57
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John Boyle O Reilly was born at Dowth Castle on 28th June 1844, and died at Hull near Boston Mass U.S.A. on 10th August 1890. There was nine in family and he was the second eldest. His father's christian name was William David. Both his father and mother were teachers in the Dowth National School, situated west of the castle. There is no ruins of the castle school there now.
William the eldest boy was a printer in the "Argus" office Drogheda and he had to give it up through ill-health. His brother John took up the job and got on rapidly and after four years the proprietor died and John also lost his possission. He was idle for a while and he paid a visit to his Aunt in England. Then he came home and listed as a soldier in the British army in the Regement tenth hussans. The Fenian movement was established in Ireland at that time and his desire was to recrute men into
senior member (history)
2019-10-18 15:07
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spinning wheels.
Nail-making(?) - At slimber-Hall Kells workers wore paper hats.
Burn-lime - Lime kiln at Maberath. Lime still burning there. Many disused lime kilns in district of Maberath, Westland, Baltrasna, Ballinsleva and Avondale Moynalty.
senior member (history)
2019-10-18 14:55
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to come to these parts examining whiskey and looking poteen bought large supplies of yarn cheaply and made a fortune by the sale. It is said that he met his death in Kells by an accident caused by wrangling with a woman to force her to sell her yarn.
Weaver - The yarn when spun was sent to a weaver who lived at Turkstown. The cloth when made was returned to the owner who had it made into clothes. When frieze was made it was sent to Mr Mahon of Feagh who mapped it with a mapping machine.
Dying - Blue dyers lived in Mullagh.
Thatching - O Brien of Carlanstown now the only thatcher in the district now.
Woodwork - Churns and barrels cooper named Gilsenan who made barrels and churns lived at Tieworker. Family now live at Drumlane.
Wheelwright - Micky Muckian who lived at Baltrasna made wheels moo for
senior member (history)
2019-10-18 14:50
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Candle-making - From rushes Children gather and peeled the rushes leaving a little skin on one side. These were dipped in melted tallow. A certain candlestick was necessary to hold it. The candlestick was of wood stood on the floor about four feet high. Candle was held clip which would be opened and closed by a screw.
Basket-making - Every family made its own baskets + hampers creels bardogs for sally rods woven into a stout foundation. A supply was sent into Kells market for sale just as farm produce is low. These were made at Billywood and Ballinslive.
Fire canes gates - made in the various forges. The forge still does that work as well as mending ploughs and harrows.
Spinning - Was carried in almost every home. The yarn spun was knitted in socks and stockings. Much of the yarn was sold often under compulsion and cheaply. An English Excise Officer named Breakey used
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 17:00
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"Take two cows Taffey." So he turned and fled.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 16:59
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nails out of our Lord hands and feet a drop of blood fell on her breast and ever since the robin has a red breast.
Why the wren is hunted on St Stephen's day - At the time when the Danes were in Ireland the story of the wren was known. It is said that when the Danes were fighting against Ireland all fell asleep. The wren came and picked the night soldiers ear. When he awakened he saw the Irish coming he called all his men to fight so that is why she is chased on St Stephens day.
What the birds are supposed to say.
The Corncrake says "Atin Atin cabbage and (?)
The Curlew says "More rain poor Judy."
The Blackbird says "The devil a bit to-day (?)"
The Pigeon says "Take two cows Taffey."
A man named Taffey went into a field late in the evening to steal a cow. Just as he was about to drive out the cow. He heard the boo-coo-coo-coo-coo of the pigeon near by. He thought the pigeon was saying
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 16:51
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rushes beside river - hatching two weeks - eggs white with light brown spots.
Starling - Nest small - in hollow tree - very fierce bird.
Snipe - Only to be found in marshy waste land. Probably she builds her nest there.
Sparrow - Nest small - in eaves of houses - of moss lined with hair. eggs blue with brown spots.
Stone Chat - Nest small - in wall.
Bullfinch - in bush - of moss and hay - lined with feathers.
Plover - Nest large - of scutch grass - in marshy land - egg green three in number.
When you see a swallow flying low it is the sign of rain.
When crows fly with the wind it is sign of a storm.
When blackbirds gather around a house it is a sign of snow.
When a robin comes into a house it is a sign of bad weather.
How the robin got her red breast - When Jesus Christ was nailed to the cross the robin tried to pull the
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 16:39
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Robin - Nest small - of moss and leaves - lined with feathers and hair - in bush - hatching eight to ten days - eggs speckled brown.
Crow - Nest large - of twigs - in tree tops - hatching two weeks.
Wren - Nest very small - in bush - of moss - hatching eight to ten days - eggs white with streaks of brown.
Jackdaw - Nest large - in chimney - of twigs - hatching two weeks.
Thrush - Nest small - of mud lined with hay - eggs light blue with black spots - hatching ten days.
Pigeon - Nest large - of twigs - in Ivy or tree - hatching two weeks - eggs white.
Hawk - Nest large - of sticks - in tree tops - hatching two weeks - Nest is generally destroyed because Hawk is so destructive to young chickens.
Blackbird - Nest small - of mud lined with feathers - in bush - eggs green with brown spots - hatching ten days.
Partridges - Nest large - in long grass - hatching two weeks.
Water hen - Nest large - of mud and hay -
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 16:19
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Lark
Swallow
Robin
Sparrow
Pigeon
Magpie
Wren
Crows
Jackdaw
Bullfinch
Chaffinch
Thrush
Cuckoo
Corncrake
Yellowhammer
Snipe
Woodcock
Curlew
Plover
Hawk
Blackbird
Pheasant
Gold Finch
Starling
Stone Chat
Blue Tit
Gulls
Stork
Grouse
Partridge
Water hen
The Birds which migrate
Cuckoo
Swallow
Swift
Corncrake though some think that the Corncrake hides in old walls during the winter.
Lark - Nest small - on grass - hatching ten days. eggs speckled brown.
Swallow - Nest small of mud. lined with feathers - in eaves of house hatching ten days - eggs white with shade of brown.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 12:46
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Toys can be bought so cheaply now and they are so varied and interesting that there is seldom any necessity for children to make these for themselves yet me often see children amusing themselves for hours with the crude productions of their own hands.
Girls-Daisy-Chain.
The making of the daisy chain gives pleasure. A apron full of daisies are gathered and a shady seat is chosen and the making of the chain begins. A hole is made in the daisy-stalk through which another stalk is passed. A hole is made in the second stalk and a third daisy is passed through. The third is treated like the second and the work continues until a garland or necklace is made.
Hip Necklace.
In Autumn when rose hips are a bright red numbers are gathered. A threaded darning needle is passed through and so a necklace is made.
Coloured Beads.
The making of necklaces from coloured beads never fail to give pleasure. The beads are matched
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 11:57
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St. Patrick's day - On St Patrick's day it is custom to wear a bunch of Shamrock in honour of St. Patrick. Generally there are Celidce and concerts in Irish. The people of Ireland send shamrock to friends in America for it is only in Ireland that it grows.
Shrove Tuesday. The custom of Shrove Tuesday was to eat pancakes for supper to prepare for Lent.
Ash Wednesday. Holy ashes is blessed and distributed before Mass.
All Fool's days - The 1st April is called All fool's days because the people tell
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 11:06
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the crib is erected at Christmas people often bring away a bit of straw and keep it as an emblem.
Blessed Palm is distributed on Palm Sunday to the people. The people keep it till it is withered then it is left in the cow house.
The May bush is made on the first of May. It is placed in a heap outside and the children decorate it by getting all kinds of flowers and ribbons and eggshells. When it is decorated the children carry it in procession or sometimes leave it in the ground and dance round it.
The nearest holy well is St Kieran's well at Carnaross. People go there on the first Sunday of August and bring water from it.
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 11:04
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In this part of the country a Sacred Heart is placed on the back of the door. It is to protect the people of the house from illness and trouble.
In some houses a small picture of the Blessed Virgin with a prayer under it is also placed on the back of the door to protect the people of the house from illness thunderstorms etc.
Saint Brigid crosses are made by some of the people who have a thatched house. The cross is made by getting to small pieces of light board and a cross is made out of this. When the cross is made straw is woven round it. If it is put in the tatch of a cow house it is to protect the animals from any harm or diseases.
Holly is put in the house at Christmas to decorate it. This is the only use the people make of it.
When
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 10:55
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just like a Mouse's ear. It is found growing near manure heaps. Bishops weed. Another common weed is picked and equal quantities of each pounded together between two stones. The pulp and juice obtained is used as a poultice for a Whitlow. (Thomas Smyth, Ballincleva).
Nettle.
A tall green plant with a sting. It is boiled in water and the juice given to children who have Measles.
Fox Tongue.
A long green leaf of fern class. It is boiled and used as a poultice for a sprain. (C Clarke, Baltrasna).
Burdock.
Burdock leaves are boiled and placed on a burn. (T Smyth).
Sow thistle.
The juice obtained by boiling sow thistle in water is used as a cure for Whooping Cough. (Mrs Govern, Moynalty).
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 10:49
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Speedwell.
Grows on old walls. Boiled and eaten for Kidney trouble.
Dock leaf.
A weed. Very plentiful around these parts. The juice is used for the sting of a nettle.
St Peter's leaf.
A small green leaf very plentiful in these parts. Place the right side of the leaf on inflammation to reduce it. (J. Govern, Donore).
Mouse's Ear.
A small green plant. Its leaves are
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 10:46
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run around and pick grass.
Dock leaf.
Boiled and given to pigs when potatoes are scarce. Juice cures nettle sting.
Water Cress.
A tall leafy plant which is to be found in places where water is. Sometimes is is boiled and it is eaten by people. Other times it used in sandwiches raw.
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 10:45
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Nettle.
A green plant found very plentifully in these parts. It is pulled and boiled with thin porridge That is used for feeding turkeys and chickens. Other times it is chopped finely and some hot thin porridge for chickens and turkeys.
Everan.
Used for feeding pigs when potatoes are scarce.
Mint.
A tall green plant used for flavouring soup.
Groundsel.
Groundsel is used for feeding birds in cages.
Dandelion.
For feeding chickens who cannot
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 13:25
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Mint.
Saint Peter's leaf.
Water weed.
Daho.
Smear Mint.
Yarrow.
Scutch.
Thistle.
Birds foot.
Buideann.
Buacalan.
Dandelion.
Cruba Crice.
The Yellow Daisy.
Water Cress.
Speedwell.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 13:24
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Mouses Ear.
Dock leaf.
Sow thistle.
Chick weed.
Evern.
Nettle.
Blind nettle.
Ground sell.
Robin run the hedge.
The Devils Garter.
Scarlet Pimpernell.
Burdock.
Fox's tongue.
Knap Weed.
Butter cup.
Clover.
Sorrel.
Reeds.
Flaggers.
Trefoil.
Vetches.
Bishop weed.
Lamb's quarter.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 11:02
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also held on 1st May and there were two others. A fair was also held in Ardamagh 4 times yearly. One which was on 19th July was called "Gooseberry Fair" because the gooseberries were ripe at that time.
The Fair was held on Monday in olden times. Those intending to go to the fair cut sticks on Sunday in preparation. The Fair always ended in a Party Fight, and many were injured and sometimes people were killed. On one occasion when a death occurred the head of the slain man hopped three times on the green and shouted:- "but your sticks for Nobber Fair on Monday." Ever since the Fair has never been held on Monday and even if the date of an old Fair falls on a Monday the Fair is not held.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 10:57
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marked by a cut of a scissors on the hip or by a mark of "raddle" or often a mud mark is made on the hip.
Animals except horses are haltered at the fairs. The halter is given away with the animal bought.
Mullagh Fair is held on the last Friday of the month. Cattle, sheep, lambs and young calves are sold. It is a very good fair for small stock.
Kells Fairs are held on two days monthly - Pigs and bonhams are sold on 2nd Thursday of the month. Cattle, sheep, and horses are sold on 2nd Friday of the month. The two old fairs are 9th September and 16th October. These are very large fairs.
Buyers now often come around and buy animals at the Fair. This is very convenient for the farmer and it is becoming more common.
Toll was paid when cattle were sold. Each person had to swear as to whether he sold or not by holding a board. If cattle were sold toll was paid.
Toll fairs were held 4 times a year. 19th November was one of the dates. It was called the first day of winter. A fair was
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 10:50
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The local Fairs for Moynalty district are Mullagh and Kells. The stock sold in Mullagh is more the "store" type. Kells has the fatter cattle. The Fairs are held on the Fair Green, but towards midday the unsold animals are brought to the street where they are generally sold off. When demand is good buyers often meet sellers on their way to the fairs and beasts are often sold before reaching the town.
When a bargain is being made the seller always asks more than he expects to get and the buyer offers less than he means to pay. While a bargain is in progress a third party known as a "whacker" often comes on the scene and helps to make the bargain by "dividing the difference." There is much h and slapping while the deal is being made and also plenty of loud talk. Payment is made by Cheque or Cash and then the recipient of the money gives back a "luck penny." This varies in amount in proportion to the money that changes hands.
The purchased animals are
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 09:59
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married pair go away for a few days and give a dance or other feast on the night of their return.
"Straw boys" visit the house on this night and are treated with refreshments and invited to join in the fun. If they are denied they often give trouble and cause unpleasantness. When the pair do not go away the wedding takes place at the bridegroom's house on the night of the marriage. It is thought unlucky for a wife to return to her old house for a month after marriage. When this month is past she goes home for the month's visit. On Wedding day a bride is supposed to wear "Something old, Something new, Something borrowed and Something blue."
For luck an old shoe is tied to or thrown after the car in which bridal pair drive away.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 09:54
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Marriages in recent times take place at rare intervals throughout the year. The months most favoured are February, April, June and September. May is said to be an unlucky month. Wednesday is the day on which most marriages take place. A few take place on Monday.
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
Saturday no luck at all.
Matches are made in the district and money is given as a dowry.
On the wedding day a wedding breakfast at which the wedding cake is cut is given by the bride's parents at her home. Afterwards the newly
senior member (history)
2019-07-31 16:46
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A king at one time resided there. He lived first at Ballincleva and the traces of the house where he is said to have lived may still be seen. It is also said that it was when knocking down the walls of that house and a large sum of gold was found by James Reilly now owner of Moynalty House and about 200 acres of land around it. Later this King lived at Kingsfort House and that he is buried in a fort there. There are three circular mounds in the fort. The lower is the widest, a second somewhat narrower, and the topmost mound the smallest. It is here he is said to have been buried.
senior member (history)
2019-07-31 16:24
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Another account says that it was a very valuable bull named "Royal Sovereign" that is buried there and that a sovereign is buried with him. This comes from Thomas Smyth.
senior member (history)
2019-07-31 16:11
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should meet. So evictions were carried out for little or no cause. "Gale Day" was the day appointed for receiving the Rents. If every tenant could not pay his rent it would not be accepted from any, and that broke the lease for all and they at once became liable to eviction. Farrell extended the property as far as Staholmog which is 5 miles from Moynalty.
Chalones of Kingsfort.
He bought his estates in Kingsfort too and his agent "Bob of the Lodge" had his ears cut off one night for the part he played in evictions. He is the "Bob" referred to in Tevlins poem on Daniel O'Connell. Chalones was known as "Dick of the Glen" and his wife was a proselytiser. They kept a "soup kitchen" where meat and soup were supplied on fast days. The attempt and its failure is the subject of the rhyme still recited.
Arra McGrath did you hear the news
O, jewel, I hardly knew it
The quality are going to save our souls,
And pay us for letting them do it etc
Also they'd damn our souls for penny rowls (rolls)
For Soup and Lairy bacon.
senior member (history)
2019-07-31 16:04
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The landlord of Moynalty up to about eight years ago was always a member of the Farrell family. From very early times it appears that a great part of Meath belonged to the Plunkett family. After the reformation only two branches of the family. Lords Dunsany and Fingal were allowed to retain their estates. The estates of all the other branches of the family were taken from them. When these were subsequently sold the Maxwells appears to have purchases an area extending from Headfort Kells almost to Newcastle on the Bailieboro Road. A crossroad on that road about 1 1/2 miles fro Moynalty is still known as Maxwell's Cross.
Later when the Maxwells disposed of the property it was purchased by different families. Farrells' had about 5000 acres finally when the evictions finished. Mr Farrell was said to be a Manager in Black Pitts Brewery Dublin, and got a keg of coppers to pay the men each week. It is said that one time in mistake he got a keg of gold which enabled him to buy Moynalty. He paid £4000 for it. He is always referred to a "Jack the Leveller." A cousin of his Jenico Preston lived at Gormanston and it is said they planned to extend their estates until they
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 12:36
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because he cut a lot of trees. Long ago it was the biggest wood for miles round.
The Barora is the only river that runs through Shancarnan. It is not deep it is very shallow.
No one from our district went to America.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 12:35
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My home district is Shancarnan. There are twenty families in it and ninety people. All the names of the people are difference. The houses are slated and are not very old. There are no old ruins in it. We do not know how it got that name. All the people are under seventy because there are very few old houses. Some of the houses are cottages and some two storied house put there are three storied ones. The old people know no Irish and can not tell stories in English or Irish. There were no other houses long ago.
The land is good fertile land and there are not very many hills in any place but at Red-bog it is wet bad bog land. It is good for grazing cattle.
There are not many woods only three woods. Red-bog wood and one in Shancarnan and one in Mr Fox's along the Barora. It is not a very big wood at present
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 12:35
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My home district is Shancarnan. There are twenty families in it and ninety people. All the names of the people are difference. The houses are slated and are not very old. There are no old ruins in it. We do not know how it got that name. All the people are under seventy because there are very few old houses. Some of the houses are cottages and some two storied house put there are three storied ones. The old people know no Irish and can not tell stories in English or Irish. There were no other houses long ago.
The land is good fertile land and there are not very many hills in any place but at Red-bog it is wet bad bog land. It is good for grazing cattle.
There are not many woods only three woods. Red-bog wood and one in Shancarnan and one in Mr Fox's along the Barora. It is not a very big wood at present.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 12:34
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My home district is Shancarnan. There are twenty families in it and ninety people. All the names of the people are difference. The houses are slated and are not very old. There are no old ruins in it. We do not know how it got that name. All the people are under seventy because there are very few old houses. Some of the houses are cottages and some two storied house put there are three storied ones. The old people know no Irish and can not tell stories in English or Irish. There were no other houses long ago.
The land is good fertile land and there are not very many hills in any place but at Red-bog it is wet bad bog land. It is good for grazing cattle.
There are not many woods only three woods. Red-bog wood and one in Shancarnan and one in Mr Fox's along the Barora. It is not a very big wood at presents.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 10:53
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Indian porridge was eaten by the poorer classes and was known as indian buck.
"Boxty Bread" was made from grated potatoes mixed with flour.
When a cow calved the milk was used to make pancakes or bread this was called "Boxty bread."
Often food was so scarce that turnips were eaten raw.
A drink was made by pouring boiling water over oaten meal and the water taken. That same water was often boiled and eaten. It was jelly like and was called Flummary.
A cake of oaten bread was called a bannock. A story is told about a certain man who came to house looking for alms. The woman of the house gave him a bannock of oaten bread with some butter on it he licked the butter off and gave back the bannock saying "There's your card and thank you ma'am."
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 10:50
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They drank buttermilk and sometimes they ate Indian bread, potatoe bread.
Oaten bread was made by mixing oaten meal with butter milk and baking it. It was baked by putting it standing against a sod of turf or some other thing before the fire.
Potatoe Bread was made by mixing boiled potatoes with some and baking them. The bread was baked in a hot oven or on a griddle.
In Lent people never ate anything till after twelve o'clock in the day that was the people who were twenty-one years of age.
On certain feast people used to eat special food.
Easter Sunday - they ate eggs on Easter Sunday and the person who ate the most eggs was considered the best.
Shrove Tuesday - pancakes were eaten on Shrove Tuesday and St John's day. (It was a custom to eat cul).
Colcannon was eaten on Hallowe'en and when supper was over a plateful was left out-side on the window this was left to appease bad and wicked faries.
senior member (history)
2019-07-26 10:35
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The greater part of the people ate potatoes at their meals. In the morning the poorer people had Indian Porridge. The richer people had oaten-meal porridge bread and butter and they drank butter-milk out of a nogin.
All the people had wheat. The rich people kept it but the poor people sold it to pay rent to the landlords.
People used to eat three meals a day. At the second meal they ate potatoes and salt and sometimes butter. They sat around a basket on a pot of hot water and the steam of the water kept the potatoes warm.
They sat round the basket and peeled the potatoes and put salt on them and ate them. On Sunday's they ate bacon. They ate fresh meat once a year on Christmas Day.
In the evening they ate potatoes and sometimes cabbage.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 16:52
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Shrove was from the 6th January to Ash Wednesday. In olden times matches were made and that is the time when there were most marriages.
Ash Wednesday - Long ago people used to tie Ash Bags to one another. If the person did not see it the joke would be greater.
St Valentine's Day. St Valentine's day young people would send Valentines from one to another.
Easter Sunday - There are many old customs attached to Easter Sunday, the cludog is Children go from house to house, the woman of the house gives them some eggs which is called a cludog. In olden times on Easter Sunday children would dye eggs with herbs. The eggs would be boiled hard. The children would set them at the top of the hill and roll them down they would roll down after them and whoever got the first egg would eat it.
May day - Old people wash their faces in dew.
Halloween. On Halloween long ago it was a custom that the people would not throw out water after night because the Holy Souls were supposed to be about. They would also leave some colcannon a plate and it would be gone in the morning.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 16:06
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St Patrick's Day - In olden times people thought it right to drown the Shamrock so they used to take intoxicating drink.
Shrove.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 16:04
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apparently turned and instead of going towards the house he bent back towards the river. No one knew of the occurance and quite by chance Mr Smyth publican was standing at his own door and thought he heard some splashing.
It happened that his son just then came in from Kells and he asked him if he had met the van and driver. He had not met it and the people were informed. A search was made and the van and horse were found in the river but the driver was not found.
Later in the night his body was found a few hundred yds down the river.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 16:02
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Drownings
About 35 years ago two drownings occurred in the district within a short time.
A man named John Fox was going home from Moynalty to Ballincleva. It is believed that he tried to cross the river just at the bridge to take a short cut home.
Whatever may have happened a splash was heard by Mr J Reilly who still lives at Bawn. A search was made all through the night but the body was not found. It was found a fortnight later about half mile from the bridge with the clothing caught in some bushes.
Shortly afterwards a bread man driver from Kells was returning to the town about 6 o'clock one winter evening. Just beyond the bridge there is a short avenue leading to the house and the driver of the van used to go to that house to deliver bread.
The horse
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 11:54
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I raise my head from this bed of sleep
To adore my God and labour for the salvation of my soul.
Oh may I rise at the last day to life everlasting Amen.
It is an old to trace the following letters I N R I on forehead and say the following prayer
Jesus of Nazarath King of Jews bless me and save me and preserve me from a sudden and unprovided death.
Another prayer for sleeping
The hands crossed on breast to say
I must die I know not when or how or where but if I die in mortal sin I am lost for ever.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 11:51
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I lay my body down to sleep
I pray to God my soul to keep
If any evil spirit come to trouble me
May the Blessed Virgin Mary come and wake me.
There are four corners on my bed,
There are four angels over it spread,
Mathew, Mark, Luke and John,
God bless the bed that I lie on.
I lie on my bed as I lie on my grave
Begging of Jesus my soul to receive
May the bright star of heaven be my guardian flower
And may it be with me at my dying hour
Jesus son of the living God
His blessed body nail to the cross
Nail my heart to that same cross
With these three nails Faith Hope and Charity.
Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 11:35
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Some forts are in the district.
One of them is in Kingsfort. A fort is a high mound of earth with trees growing on the outer side. There was a bull buried there called Royal Sovereign and there was a sovereign buried with him. In the field where the fort is it was seen lighted up lately. One is in Balltrasna. In this fort clay pipes are found.
There are two forts in Billywood, one of them have trees on the inner side.
There is a small one in Avondale.
There is also a fort in Rat Cumaskey with trees scattered on it.
Large numbers of clay pipes are said to be found in the fort and are supposed to belong to leipreacains or geanncanass as they are called locally.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 10:36
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"These people would ate the devil."
Fr Ginty answered that perhaps for himself might eat the devil before long.
The story goes that he met a turkey on the road on his way home and devoured it and that he ate bullock after bullock till he died finally eating the flesh of his own arms.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 10:35
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victims. Evictions followed too as it was impossible to pay the rents.
In same cases the unfortunate people just got enough money to pay their passage to America as compensation.
A sort of relief work was given by the Government. IN the kitchens of the gentry there were huge boilers. Indian porridge was made and doled out in noggins to the people. There was also soup made and served to the people.
Two of the boilers used in the distribution of soup and porridge can still be seen quite near the school. They are now used to supply cattle with a drink. In fields which there is not a supply of running water.
The soup kitchen which the people of Moynalty went to was at Mr Chaloners. Fr Ginty the PP of Moynalty used to go over to see that his parishioners got fair play. A man named Louth who used to superintend the distribution of the soup is alleged to have said to P.P.
senior member (history)
2019-07-25 10:28
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The district suffered very much during the famine times and the population was very much reduced owing to the famine and the sickness, emigration and evictions which followed it.
In Reillystown there were 45 homes - where now there are only three. There were 10 houses in Donore where there is now only one and at Knockareny beside Donore there were two other houses.
Until cottages were built there within the last year there were no homes at all in Knockarenny.
The potatoes rotted in the ground from blight and as potato formed the main food of the people here the people were very hard hit.
There was wheat and oats but these had to be sold to try and meet the rents. The famine was followed by an outbreak of cholera which also claimed many
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:44
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Loughan. The cemetery is still open. It is circular in shape and contains the ruin of a church. St Kieran of Carnaross was a native of Loughan. He was engaged to keep crows out of corn. While at his work the Mass Bell rang in this Church, and as he wanted to go to Mass, he threw his coat on the hedge in the field and went into the Church. Not a crow came near the corn in his absence but even so, his master heard what he had done and dismissed him. It was then he made up his mind to become a priest and he afterwards founded a Church at Carnaross.
It used to be a common belief that in Loughan graveyard the dead always rose for a while each night at midnight. In order to disprove this a girl kept vigil in the graveyard one night and brought some special piece of a plant which grew in the Cemetery to support her story.
Newtown. Newtown graveyard has also a ruin. Here as in Loughan it is raised in the centre and sloped outwards.
Unbaptised children are always buried outside the pathway which runs round the cemetery. Many people bring their dead long journeys to bury them with their ancestors and many stories are told of the dead coming back to the earth and appearing to their relatives when buried in wrong graves.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:38
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There are four grave-yards in the school district. Moynalty New Cemetery - Opened about 35 years.
Moynalty Old Cemetery - surrounding the Protestant Church. It is now closed and no one has been buried there for the past 35 years. There was a good deal of opposition to its closing and a violent protest was made in (?). The last man buried there was Conlon, and the first man buried in the New Cemetery was also Conlon. They were not relatives.
The grave-yard was circular in shape at first and extended beyond where the road now runs. It has a vault in which members of the Kellett family were buried. It was searched many times by the "Black and Tans" when looking for firearms.
After the old cemetery had been closed officially a few people insisted of having their dead interred there. These were heavily fined.
The New Cemetery is almost square in shape and is quite level. The graves are also quite level. It contains a number of beautiful ornamental crosses, and tomb stones and the plots are arranged in rows.
The Old Cemetery is high in the centre and slopes to the boundary walls. Mounds were made over graves and there are many plain limestone crosses, slabs and tombstones. Most of them bear inscriptions.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 15:41
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Bread was used largely for food long ago in these parts. The commonest kind of bread used was Oaten bread. It was made by mixing oat meal with water and a little salt and cooked by standing it before the fire against a sod of turf or on a griddle. It was eaten with butter.
Boxty was made from wet potatoes grated and mixed with flour. It was tolled flat with a bottle and baked on a pan. Indian Meal was made into bread and baked on a pan.
Potatoes were made into cakes also. Potato cakes were eaten hot, spread with butter. A potato cake was always eaten with eggs on Easter Sunday.
Pancakes were made by mixing flour to a batter with milk or buttermilk or goats' milk. They were always made for Shrove Tuesday which is still known as "pancake night." The first milk after a cow calves is known as beastings. This was often cooked until it became curd and then baked on a frying pan. Rye bread was also used. It was quite black in colour and very hard.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:36
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A tailor was living at Westland. He was called Barney the tailor but his name was Barney Lynch. His son is living in Newtown. He used to go from house to house and make clothes for the people of the district his son is alive yet and living at Newtown.
Stockings and socks are knitted locally. Some are made by hand, but most are made by knitting machines of which there are many in the district.
Miss Brogan Billywood has a spinning wheel but cannot use it. The last spinning wheel worked in the school district was used by Mrs Tyrell of Shancarnan. She spun wool into thread and knitted socks by hand. These socks were white. Since her death about five years ago the spinning wheel has not been used.
The spinning of wool into thread formed an important means of income long ago. No special clothes are worn on special feastdays but black is worn for the death of a relative.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:50
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In this district one tailor is all there is namely James Nevins. At present he is working in his own home but if a person wants to be measured he comes and takes their measurements. He does not keep any cloth but the person brings his own.
Wool is not worn in the district now but when the sheep are sheared the wool is sent to Navan woollen mill and it is made into blankets etc.
When the tailor is at work he sits cross-legged and stockinged-feet on the table.
Long ago the tailor went from house to house and stayed there till his work is done.
The implements used are
Sewing Machine - for sewing the cloth
Scissors - for cutting cloth
An Iron - called a tailor's goose for pressing clothes
Chalk - is used for marking
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:46
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There is a field in Billywood near Moynalty it is now called River Field but in olden times it was called Stony Carroll. In that field there is a hollow stone. On this stone there is a man's head carved and it is called the White Man's grave.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 11:15
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It is said that gold is hidden on Stirabout hill. A big black dog is guarding this gold. To get the gold you must catch a live rabbit and set it free. The dog chases the rabbit and if he catches the rabbit it will be in the spot in which the gold is hidden. As soon as the rabbit is seized the dog will drop dead and the person is free to get the hidden treasure. If the rabbit escapes the dog will be able to overcome and drive the treasure seeker away.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 11:13
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About two miles from the Village of Moynalty there is a Crannog in the town-land of Petersville. It was probably a lake dwelling. It is called Nona Loca. It is a marshy boggey land. This Crannog was discovered about two or three years ago. From it was taken many bones such as Elks horn's and human bones. There are zig-zag paths leading to it. It is said that golf is hidden there. A big black dog with one white spot is minding this gold. To get the gold the dog must be stabbed in the white. If he is not stabbed in this spot you cannot get the gold for the dog will be able to overcome you. If he is stabbed in the spot he will die you will be able to get the gold.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 16:11
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the dancer's feet as they kept time to the lively jigs, Reels and Hornpipes played in good old traditional style on flute, fiddle or Accordion or Irish pipes.
Songs and Recitations were rendered in traditional style during intervals, and "Uisce beatha" and other refreshments, helped to keep the flame of jollity alive until the early hours of the morning. Then as the cocks began to proclaim another day, farewells were taken and guests departed to their different homes, offering a prayer as they left that God would help and lead aright the newly-weds on their journey through life.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 16:07
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witnessed. Her mother usually cried copiously at the thoughts of losing one of her offspring. One would think she was about to leave for a far-off land, and often she might be going to reside in the next Parish or townland.
The wailings and farewells spoken the party started to the accompaniment of cheering and whip-cracking. A long row of side-cars followed by men on horse-back made up the Procession (of course the bride and groom travelled on different cars when going to the Church, but as "man and wife" they returned on the same car).
The Procession from the Church to the house of the bridegroom was called the "Hauling Home." This was a spectacular affair. The horses had to travel at their greatest speed - often for a distance of six or seven miles. The neighbours as a rule waited along the route to cheer the happy couple along. It was a usual thing to see "bonfires" say at intervals of mile or so along the road.
On reaching the groom's house, the feasting began afresh. The newly-married couple occupied a place of honour at the table. When all the guests had an ample supply of food, dancing commenced, and the earthen floor resounded to the sounds of
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 15:58
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accuracy how much money or stock was likely to be given to the girl by her Father. Armed with this knowledge the prospective bridegroom and match-maker report for the ladies' home. Before going there however they made sure to take with them a substantial quantity of the "crathur" with the sole purpose of "softening" the man of the house (It must be remembered it was the Father not the girl who had to be satisfied). When all was finally arranged they usually imbibed freely. A night was arranged when the groom came and collected the Dowry. This night usually preceded the wedding day.
Wedding Day:- This was a great day. The bride and her friends were astir early and busied themselves preparing for the arrival of the groom. Certainly "Sean zac bid agus nua zac dig" was to be found in abundance. The bridegroom and his friends came to the house of the bride. There they feasted and made merry, while fiddlers played their sweetest, and songsters sang their best songs. The merriment lasted well into the afternoon. Then the procession to the Church for the marriage ceremony took place. Before the Bride left her parents' house however, pathetic scenes were
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 15:57
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accuracy how much money or stock was likely to be given to the girl by her Father. Armed with this knowledge the prospective bridegroom and match-maker report for the ladies' home. Before going there however they made sure to take with them a substantial quantity of the "crathur" with the sole purpose of "softening" the man of the house (It must be remembered it was the Father not the girl who had to be satisfied). When all was finally arranged they usually imbibed freely. A night was arranged when the groom came and collected the Dowry. This night usually preceded the wedding day.
Wedding Day:- This was a great day. The bride and her friends were astir early and busied themselves preparing for the arrival of the groom. Certainly "Sean zac bid agus nua zac dig" was to be found in abundance. The bridegroom and his friends came to the house of the bride. There they feasted and made merry, while fiddlers played their sweetest, and songsters sang their best songs. The merriment lasted well into the afternoon. Then the procession to the Church for the marriage ceremony took place. Before the Bride left her parents' house however, pathetic scones were
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 15:46
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a wife during the previous Shrove. Of course abuses crept in - Married men as well as bachelors suffered from the scrawls of some of these irresponsible wielders of chalk. Clothes were often badly disfigured, and one occasion the writer was a spectator at a free fight which was the outcome of a too liberal use of chalk. In latter years the custom seems to have died out.
Match Making: As already mentioned match-making was very common. It was a usual thing to find professional match-makers in most districts. These (men mostly) had a happy knack of acquiring a knowledge of all Bachelors and Spinsters within a radius of 20 miles or so. Not alone that, but they also seemed to have intimate relationships with them, and a first class idea of their affairs in general. When an eligible bachelor was contemplating marriage he often consulted one of these matchmakers, and without hesitation an equally eligible Spinster would be recommended. Everything depended on Dowry and of course the professional matchmaker was not wanting in this information. He was always able to suggest with a good degree of
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 15:32
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As a general rule marriages most frequently take place during Shrove. In olden days people would not dream of getting married during Lent or Advent.
In the West of Ireland - where the writer was raised - the system known as "Matchmaking" was very common up till quite recently. Most marriages which took place were due to Matchmaking. Occasionally young couples incurring parental wrath, stole away and married secretly. Marriages of this kind were known as "runaway" marriages and they usually took place on the evening of Shrove Tuesday. It was quite a common thing to hear gossipers enquire from various sources about the number of a "runaways."
"Chalk Sunday" The first Sunday in Lent was officially reserved for the set of people who wished to play jokes on some of their ill-humoured neighbours. On this particular Sunday, the young fellows provided themselves with a goodly supply of White Chalk and while sitting in the Church promptly branded the backs of all the unfortunate bachelors who failed to secure
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:25
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morning. There is a Midnight mass in some Churches. Every one that is away from home comes homes at Christmas and no one cares to go visiting on Christmas day. Every one stays at home and there is a great feast. Turkey and plum pudding are ate at dinner on Christmas day. The day after Christmas day is called St. Stephen's day. On that day about six or seven young meet and hunt a small bird called the Wren. When they have the Wren caught they put him in a box and disguise themselves. When they are disguised they go from house to house singing and dancing and playing music. They collect money and and have a feast that night. One of the Poems they recite is:-
"The wren, the wren, the king of all birds.
Although he is little his family are great.
Rise up Gentlemen and Ladies and give him a treat.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:25
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morning. There is a Midnight mass in some Churches. Every one that is away from home comes homes at Christmas and no one cares to go visiting on Christmas day. Every one stays at home and there is a great feast. Turkey and plum pudding are ate at dinner on Christmas day. The day after Christmas day is called St. Stephen's day. On that day about six or seven young meet and hunt a small bird called the Wren. When they have the Wren caught they put him in a box and disguise themselves. When they are disguised they go from house to house singing and dancing and playing music. They collect money and and have a feast that night. One of the Poems they recite is:-
"The wren, the wren, the king of all birds.
Although he is little his family are great.
Rise up Gentlemen and Ladies and give him a treat."
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:19
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"Christmas comes but once a year and when it comes it brings good cheer."
"Christmas is coming and the geese are getting fat. Please put a penny in the poor man's hat."
The feast of Christmas occurs on the twenty fifth of December. The word Christmas means the coming of Christ. Christmas is a very busy time for housewives. First of all they go to the nearest town and buy lots of goodly things for the feast. Then a plum pudding is made and the house is prepared. It is decorated with holly and ivy. They yard is swept and cleaned and everything is made ready for the feast. A turkey is killed and prepared for dinner on Christmas day. On Christmas eve lighted candles are put in all the windows of the houses to give light to Jesus Christ. It is believed that all the farm animals go down on their knees at midnight on that night. The young people gather together and blow bugles on that night. Usually there are three Masses said in every Catholic Church on Christmas
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:42
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baker than told the father that it was only the other day that a Gentleman came in and gave the money to him, to give to the most needy, and honest man in the parish. "I told a man the whole story" added the baker "and he directed you to me." Then the little boy put his hands round his fathers neck, and told him that he would be always truthful and honest.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:40
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Tom Lane was a very needy man, when he and his son sat under a tree along the roadside, to eat a loaf of bread, which they had bought in the village close by. It was a very small loaf to divide between two. As the father cut it in halves, he found several pieces of gold inside. The boy was in great joy, when he saw the gold, and said to his father that it was theirs. The father put up his hand and told him that the gold was not theirs. "Whose is it then" said the boy "if it does not belong to is." The father said "it belongs to the baker, and it must have fallen in by mistake, so I will send for him." The son said "the baker may tell a lie." The baker having come to see about the gold the father said to him. "Does this money belong to you, if so take it with you." Then the son said to the baker. "We are very needy." The father told his son not to speak like that, or make him ashamed of him. The
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:35
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About the year 1828 the old Hibernian School at Farranadooney near Moynalty in County Meath, was the property of the poet Tevlin. He was evicted out of it during the Famine years. About the year 1850 there was a Protestant school at Loughan, between Moynalty and Carnaross. The children were evicted from Loughan school, and so they started a Protestant school at Farranadooney. The names of the first school-masters were William Whyte, and Londy Thornton. After them, the next to teach in it were Miss MacWhorter, and Miss Lee. The last teachers who taught in that school were Miss Owan and Miss Cowan. The school was closed then because a new school was built at Westland, beside Moynalty. The old School was converted into a dwelling house and is now owned by a man named Dolan.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:31
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Chaloner and Graham tried to get the two men executed. Cuffe was at school with George the Fourth King of England. He set sail to see him at Windsor Castle, and success-fully got the reprieve. Cuffe lived at Williamstown about a mile North of Kells in Co Meath and Graham lived at Larinstown Kells now Oakley Park Kells and Chaloner lived at Rathinree. Cuffe prided on the victory and said he would let all the old weavers from the North of Ireland know that he was John Otaway Cuffe.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:30
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About the year 1751 the mail car from Bailieborough in Cavan to Kells in Meath passed by Dulane (two miles North of Kells) and through Williamstown and Mullaghea on its journey. The reason for this was that where the present Mabes Bridge on the Blackwater is, there was only a fort. That same year two armed men robbed the Post car at Dulane Church-yard. When the driver reached Kells he reported the Matter at the old Bridewell in Kells. Military forces searched the Country around Carlanstown and Dulane and made arrests and reviews them with all Crown forces, and suspected two men at the Bridewell in Kells. It was a hanging matter in them days. The two men who raided the car went into the house of a Gentleman named John Otaway Cuffe who took sides with them. John Otaway Cuffe was one of the highest Gentlemen in this country in those days. He told them not to fear as he would free them the day of the trial. The trial went on in Trim and then Cuffe got a stay on the trial. Two Gentlemen named
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:26
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awaiting decision
devour all the people on the earth.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Moybullogue graveyard situated in Tierworker parish about four miles north of Moynalty in Co. Meath is very ancient, and some strange happenings are supposed to have occurred there.
One time a woman called Golliwog was driving in a carriage to mass to Tierworker. She was fasting as she was going to receive Communion. On the way saw some black berries and she ordered her driver to pick them for her. The man picked them for her and she ate them. She went to Mass and committed sacrilege by receiving Holy Communion. When she came out of the Chapel she started to eat the people. She ate the driver and the horses. St Patrick happened to come on the scene and he hit her with a stick, and she divided into four parts. One of the parts fell under a stone on the road at the entrance to Moybullogue graveyard. The stone is still there. Another part fell into Cluggah lake nearby. It is said that St Patrick said that the four parts will re-unite when nine hundred generations of red haired Gargans cross over this stone on the road and the body will
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:39
approved
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was seven men drawing home turf from a bog with asses. Among these seven men there were two who never agreed. Their names were Curran and Sorachan. Their was a nick-name on Sorachan's mother. The name was Silver-tongue. Towards night Curran started calling Silver-tongue to Sorachan and boxing him. Sorachan started to cry and ran across the fields. When the rest of the men saw this they ran after him to see where he was going. After a time they saw him sitting in a small gap whistling. When they heard him whistling they thought he was calling the fairies and they ran back to tell Curran. When Curran heard this he ran home with fear.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:34
approved
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awaiting decision
About four years ago there lived a man called "Gentleman Reilly. He got sick and went to hospital. The day after he came home from hospital he was sitting beside the fire and he fell asleep. His son was out in the fields and when he came in he found his father in the fire, and he died shortly afterwards. Some days after his death his son saw lights beside the house and went over to where they were. Suddenly the lights disappeared and he saw his father in the darkness. Every night after that he saw the ghost. After a while he sold the house to another man. This man also saw the ghost and went mad. Every night the ghost is said to go down a lane which leads to the house. This happened at Leitrim about three miles from Moynalty in the County Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:29
approved
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awaiting decision
There were two travellers going through Garryard Wood one night. Garryard is a little wood in Walterstown, Moynalty in County Meath. The old people are of the opinion that a tunnel leads from Garryard Wood to Kingsfort on the opposite side of Moynalty village. The two travellers mentioned above have more or less proved the existence of the tunnel because when going through the wood they heard a fiddle being played underneath the ground, while the unseen player seemed to go in the direction of Moynalty. The men followed the sound to Moynalty. When they came to the Bridge over the Abhainn Ruadh the sounds faded away. Some say that the tunnel is stopped somewhere about here owing to the earth having caved in and thereby interupting the original passage from Garryard to Kingsfort.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:23
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awaiting decision
It is about seventy years ago since rush candles were used. They were very common then. Long green rushes were used. When the men brought them home they were peeled immediately. They were peeled with fingers. Melted lard was the sort of grease used. They were greased in a little dish. Each rush was three feet in length. They had a Candlestick with a wooden stand under it. The stand was a thick square bit of wood. It had an iron bar out of it about as thick as a walking stick and a pincers on the top of it. They were used all through the dark evenings. The girls of the house used to make them.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There once lived a man near Moynalty in County Meath, and he did not believe in fairies. One night he was crossing a field near Mullagh about two miles away. He saw a lot of tiny men playing football in the field, and thinking they were children he joined in the game. The fairies wanted someone for one of the goals and they put the man in them. It was about eleven o clock at night and they played until it was midnight. Every time the man missed the ball one of the teams got around him and nearly killed him. The same thing happened every time he stopped the ball. At twelve o clock he saved a goal and both teams beat him. When they had finished beating him he still had the ball. Then all the fairies disappeared, and the man took the football and left the field. Then the ball changed into a lump of cow dung.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:25
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago the tailors had no sewing machine - they had to sew all with their hands. Some years ago fleas was grown around here. The remains of a Flax pond is still at Farrandooney near Moynalty, Co. Meath. The flax was spun and woven into linen and shirts were made from it. There is one old spinning wheel in the possession of a man named Mc. Cartney at Moynalty but I think it is not in working order. No thread is spun now, but stockings are knitted in the homes from thread bought in the shops. At the death of a relative black clothes are worn by those who can afford it. Those who cannot wear a black armlet. In the old days the men wore knee breeches and stockings and swallow tail coats made of frieze (all woven locally). The women wore thick and flannel petticoats also woven locally, stockings knitted in the home and coloured shawls.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:16
approved
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awaiting decision
There is only one tailor in Moynalty district now and he does very little at his trade. Any work done by him is done in his own home. Formerly tailors travelled from house to house as required. The people usually spun and wove their own cloth and then called in a tailor who often stayed in the house for the month, until he had clothes made for the whole family. There is no cloth spun or woven in this district now but a good deal of this work was done formerly.
Of course, local people wear some of this kind of cloth still for Overcoats. It is called Homespun and is usually got from Donegal or Connemara. The tailor's gear consists of a measuring tape, a scissors for cutting out, a "tailor's goose" or smoothing iron, a needle sewing machine, and a thimble - a tailor's thimble has no bottom.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:11
approved
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awaiting decision
again and asked him what he did to his mare to make her blind. The stranger answered "it was you that was blind instead of the mare." He bought the mare off him at a big price and the stranger led the mare into the moat and the man went home satisfied.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a tradition that there are fairies in the moat of Kilbeg. It is a large mound of earth about a hundred feet high and there is a door leading into it. There is a flaged passage that leads to a fort in Dulane. Once upon a time there was a farmer from Nobber going to the fair of Kells with a very valuable mare to sell. As he was passing the moat of Kilbeg a man came out from the moat and started to buy the mare, but he would not sell to him. When he arrived at the fair all the buyers in turn came up to him saying "how much do you want for the blind mare" so the poor man could not get to sell her. As he was passing by the moat of Kilbeg coming home that night the same man came out of the moat again and asked him why he did not sell at the fair. The man was very angry when he met him
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
approved
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awaiting decision
Kells, Mullagh and Nobber are the local fairs. In several cases dealings were made at cross roads or at the houses. The best fair in days gone by was the fair of Carlanstown bridge. Mullagh being more of a centre for store cattle the buyers patronised it. It is one of the best fair of store cattle held in Meath at present. There used to be tents and dancing and singing carried on in them. The dealer always bids a few pounds less than the beast is worth and the seller asks a few pounds more than the beast is worth. The dealer keeps advancing and the keeps dropping so in this way they clench the bargain. Some mark the cattle with keel while others clip them with a scissors. Luck money is generally given. It is called a luck penny. The amount of money that is given depends on the price of the beast. The big fairs are the 9th Sept
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
approved
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awaiting decision
and the 16th October. The noted fairs for horses are the 9th September and the 16th October.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kells, Mullagh and Nobber are the local fairs. In several cases dealings were made at cross roads or at the houses. The best fair in days gone by was the fair of Carlanstown bridge. Mullagh being more of a centre for store cattle the buyers patronised it. It is one of the best fair of store cattle held in Meath at present. There used to be tents and dancing and singing carried on in them. The dealer always bids a few pounds less than the beast is worth and the seller asks a few pounds more than the beast is worth. The dealer keeps advancing and the keeps dropping so in this way they clench the bargain. Some mark the cattle with keel while others clip them with a scissors. Luck money is generally given. It is called a luck penny. The amount of money that is given depends on the price of the beast. The big fairs are the 9th Sept.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old fort in Williamstown in the parish of Carnaross, about two miles from Kells in the County Meath. There was a family of Danes reared in this old fort, and it is said that they died there also. There is a tunnel leading from this fort to Dulane graveyard, about one mile in distance. This fort is on the estates of Stole Garret who is dead about fifty years. It is now on the lands of Patrick Carpenter. This fort is on the road side. It is a mound of earth and it is circular in shape. The entrance to this fort is now blocked by fallen earth. There is also two more forts quite near this one.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 12:09
approved
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awaiting decision
St Bridgets Cross are made on St Bridgets Eve as a rule in this district. First of all the maker gets two pieces of stick and nails them together in the form of a cross. Then he gets straw and clips of the ears. He next plaits the straw diagonally around the Cross starting at the centre and working outwards. When finished the Crosses are hung over the Kitchen door and over the front door of the house in honour of St Bridget. By so doing he places the house and all the family under the Protection of St Bridget. The people believe the Saint will keep away evil spirits and sickness. Crosses are also on roofs of the houses, usually on the Rafters. These are never taken down. In some old houses there are rows of these Crosses to be seen on the Rafters. The Cross when finished is about seven inches by five inches cord is often used instead of straw for plaiting.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 11:52
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awaiting decision
no markets held there nowadays. Long ago pedlars used to go from house to house selling goods and some of them still come. A halpenny was called a "make" and a penny was called a "wing." A threepenny bit was known as a "kids eye" and a sixpence was called a "tanner." A "bob" was the name given to a shilling. The old fourpenny and tenpenny and four shilling coins are now gone out of use.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 11:40
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awaiting decision
In olden times shops were not as common as they are nowadays. There was only one shop in Moynalty about fifty years ago. The people had to go to Moynalty village to purchase their goods. After Mass a travelling shop would come and set up a tent in which buying and selling would be carried on. This does not happen now. Butter and Eggs were often exchanged for other goods and are still exchanged. Goods were often bartered or exchanged in this district in olden times. Sometimes labour was given in exchange for goods. Words such as "tick" and "earnest" were connected with buying and selling.
When a person gets goods without paying for them, it is said that he got them on "tick." When a person bought anything the seller makes him pay a little of the money to be sure that the buyer was in "earnest." This money was called "earnest." It was considered unlucky to do business on a Monday long ago. The market was held in front of a shop owned by a man named Gargan in the village of Moynalty. There are
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:56
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awaiting decision
names are Matthew Smyth and Michael Mallon. The Smyth family have been at the trade for a few generations. Clogs were much worn some years ago, but they are not worn now. They were never made locally. There is an old saying that if a persons shoes creak that it is a sign that they are not paid for.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:55
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awaiting decision
In former times it was unusual for young people to wear boots or shoes until they reached the age of twenty years or so. Even then they only wore them in Winter time, while some people were supposed to go barefoot all the year around. At the present time the children of this district go barefoot in Summer, but not in Winter. In the old days the people seldom suffered from Corns or Bunions because they did not wear boots or shoes. Corns are caused by wearing footwear that is too tight. The working men have a means of getting rid of Corns each Summer at the turf-cutting time. They walk about in the soft-peat barefooted and after they have worked for a week in this manner they can pick out the corns easily. Boots and shoes are repaired locally. Not many boots are made in the district now. The reason for this is the large number of Boot Factories at work in the country. The local shoe makers are not able to compete with them. The showmakers'
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 11:59
approved
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awaiting decision
water helps to collect the butter in Summer time. The cream is fully churned when little particles of butter stick to the dash and lid. If not fully churned, cream collects on both of these. After this the churn is rocked from side to side to collect the butter in a mass on top of the Buttermilk. The butter is then taken out with a wooden bowl called a Trencher. Then the Butter is washed in water and squeezed with a wooden Butter spade to take out all the Buttermilk. It is then salted ad made into rolls. Buttermilk is used principally in making bread. It is also given as food to calves - pigs, etc.
It is often used as a cure when persons are suffering from colds. The Buttermilk is scalded and often drunk in gruel.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 11:53
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awaiting decision
to prevent the cream dashing up. When the churning is in process.
Churning takes about an hour if the quantity of cream is large. Before starting to churn the housewife shakes a grain of salt over the lid of the churn so as to keep the fairies from taking the butter. If anybody enters the house during the time she is churning they have to take a hand in the work. This is to ensure that they will not bring any of the butter off the churning. If a person tried to take a light from the fire during the process the owner forbids it, in case the butter might be taken by him. In some places a horse-shoe or piece of iron is put under the churn to keep away fairies or evil spirits. During the churning, water is poured into the churn. Boiling water in Winter, and cold water in Summer. The boiling water speeds the churning in Winter, and the cold
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 11:47
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awaiting decision
Churning is part of the work done in most farm-houses in the country. The churn used at home is a wooden vessel of the old type about three feet in height. It is about two and half feet wide at the bottom. There is a curve inwards of the sides, and they widen again at the top. The top is slightly narrower than the bottom. The churn is made of wood and bound by iron hoops. It was a customary thing and is still in parts of the country to see the churn out on the hedge airing after being scalded with boiling water. The other parts used are the dash, the lid, the "scup." The dash is a flat circular price of wood about nine inches in diameter and having a long handle in the middle of it. It is lifted up and down perpendicularly in the churn. In this way the cream is churned or broken. The "scup" is a circular wooden washer put on the handle of the dash at the lid
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 12:13
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awaiting decision
said "you are finished now." The fairies left him in the drain for three days and three nights. The Leipreachan is supposed to be friendly with those who are friendly with him. He takes revenge on those who harm or interfere with him.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 12:12
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awaiting decision
The Leipreachan is known locally as the Geanncanach and he is said to be about six inches in height. He is supposed to be dressed in a green jacket and a red cap. He lives in a fort or a rath. His usual occupation is shoemaking and he works under a mushroom. There are a lot of stories told about Leipreachans. One of them is told about a man named Carolan who was going home from work one moonlight night. He looked into a field and he saw a number of fairies playing in a field. They called him into the field and told him that they were going to hunt. One of them said that they had not any horse for him. Another said to give him the black bullock. The black bullock was brought and the man got up on him. One of the fairies told him to say nothing no matter what he saw. After a while he came to a drain and the bullock jumped it. Then the man said "that was a good jump." Then one of the fairies
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:58
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a man living in Co Louth and he had a dream one night. That there was Gold hidden in Billywood bog near Moynalty in Co Meath. He was also told in the dream to go there and bring four black horses without one white hair in them with him to Billywood bog. He was told that if he heard any noises when he was passing by Stirabout Hill, (about a mile to the South West of Moynalty) not to pass any notice of it. He went to the bog and found the Gold and as he was passing Stirabout Hill on his way home, he heard weird noises on the Hill. He forgot the warning he had received, however, and looked around him, with the object of discovering what was making the noise. When he looked in front again he saw the Gold roll back into the bog and in its place was a huge fish covering half the road.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:45
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awaiting decision
is called the "Valley of the Black Pig."
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:45
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a School Master living in Co Antrim long ago and he had the power of magic. He was very fond of coursing with greyhounds and hares and rabbits. Every day at playtime he would change the children into hares and greyhounds. He would have the children running up and down the yard until play time was over and then he would change them back again so that the children used to go home exhausted every evening. One mother got very angry at this and she also had the power of magic. She went to him and changed him into a black Pig and she told him that he would run until he would cut his own throat with his two front paws. He started to run and ran down through Antrim, Down, Louth, and Meath until he came to the Boyne and he jumped into the Boyne and kept swimming until he cut his own throat with his two front paws. They Valley of the black pig runs from Antrim, Down, Louth and through various parts of Meath. It runs through Walterstown and Moynalty and leads on to the Boyne at Navan and that is why it
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:39
approved
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awaiting decision
Years ago in the Penal days, a priest was saying Mass in the hollow under Screebogue hill near Moynalty in Co. Meath. Suddenly the priest hunters came on to prevent the priest from saying Mass. Immediately the priest saw them he ran away and the priest hunters ran after him. Just as the priest hunter's horse was jumping the drain where the priest was saying Mass it struck its foot on a stone and broke its leg and they were not able to chase the priest any further. There was a bridge built at the spot and it got the name of Cloch an TSagairt.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:31
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awaiting decision
The woods make a great noise before a storm is coming.
When soot falls down the chimney it is a sign of rain.
When a dog is seen eating grass it is a sign of rain.
When smoke is going straight from the chimney it is a sign of good weather.
When far off hills seem very near it is a sign of rain.
When they seem far away it is a sign of a warm day.
When slates are wet after a rainfall it is a sign of more rain.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:29
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awaiting decision
When there is a ring around the moon it is a sign of a storm.
When swallows are flying low it is a sign of rain and when they are flying high it is a sign of good weather.
When the Seagulls are seen flying inland it is a sign of a storm.
When sheep are eating early in the morning it is a sign of a bad day.
When they are seen resting in the morning it is a sign of a good day.
When a cat sits with its back to the fire it is a sign of a storm.
"A rainbow in the morning is a sailors sad warning and a rainbow at night is a sailors delight."
When Curlews are heard whistling it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:23
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a woman living near a fort and she had a small baby. One day she went to the well and when she came home the child was crying. It happened that it was not her own child, but a different child that the fairies had left in instead of her own. The next day she went to a neighbour's house for buttermilk and she got none. When she came home the child said the could give you buttermilk if they wanted they churned to-day. The next day the woman went to the priest and told him about the child. He told her that when she would be crossing the river to throw the child in and she did so. He put his toe in his mouth and swam off playing music. When she came home her own child was in the cradle.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:15
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awaiting decision
horse." He bought the horse off him at a big price and the stranger led the horse into the moate, and the man went home satisfied.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:15
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awaiting decision
There is a tradition that there are fairies in the moate of Kilbeg. It is a mound of earth about one hundred feet high, and there is a door leading into it. Once upon a time there was a farmer going to the fair of Kells with a horse to sell. As he was passing this moate a man walked out of it and started to buy. But the man would not sell the horse to him. When he arrived at the fair all the buyers in turn came up to him saying how much do you want for the blind horse, so the poor man could not sell him. As he was passing by the moate of Kilbeg coming home that night the same man came out of the fort again and asked why he did not sell at the fair. The man was very angry, when he met him again and asked him what he did to his horse to make him blind. The stranger answered and said "It was you that was blind instead of the
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:10
approved
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time when St Patrick was in Ireland he was going through the County Meath one day. When he was near Navan a man saw him coming and he let out his two dogs and they were very wicked and he set them on St Patrick. When they saw St Patrick coming towards them they came up to him and he rubbed them down and he made the hair lie on them and the dogs never tuched the Saint. To the present day there is a pond where the ground opened and swallowed the man. It is said that ever since the the hair is lying on a dog.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 16:25
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awaiting decision
cut. The old people long ago baked bread on a Saturday, and that would do them for the whole week.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 16:24
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awaiting decision
The bread that was made in this district long ago was oaten bread. This bread was made from oats grown locally. The old people in this district remember querns being used. The quern was an article made from two flat stones one revolving on the other and a hole in the middle, to let the meal that was grinded fall out. There was alot of different kinds of bread made long ago, such as Potato-cake Boxty-bread and oaten-meal bread. The Potato-cake was made from champed potatoes with flour and salt mixed through it, and baked on a pan over the fire. The oaten-bread was made from oaten-meal with salt and water mixed through it in the kneading of it, and baked before the fire standing against a support called a griddle. The Boxty-bread was made from grated potatoes. The potatoes were grated into a dish, and then they were put into a cloth and squeezed. When they are squeezed, there is a little flour and salt added to it and baked before the fire standing against a support called a grid-iron. There is a cross cut on the top of every cake, this is to keep it together when it is being
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 16:19
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awaiting decision
It is said that long ago two Giants were fighting near Mullagh hill. The weapons they used were stones. Some of the stones with which they fought rested on a small hill near Mullagh. The place is still known as the gates of Mullagh. These ancient stones are so heavy that no ten men nowadays would move them.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 12:02
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scholar had gone the man dug at the other side of the bush and found another crock gold much larger than before and he and his family lived happily for the rest of their lives.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 12:01
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived a man and his wife in this district. They were very poor and they had a number of children to support. One night the man dreamt that he saw a bridge in England where he could get gold. The next day he sailed to England. He walked through the land and after a time he came to a bridge that was like the bridge of his dream. There was a man standing by the bridge. The man that was at the bridge said "I had a dream and I saw a field in Ireland and there is a crock of gold buried under a hazel bush in the middle of it." There was a hazel bush in the mans field and when he came home he dug at one side of it. After a time his spade struck a stone and under the stone he found a crock of gold. There were some strange words written on the stone and they were not English or Irish. One day a scholar came to the house and the man showed him the stone. The scholar said that the words were foolish words and that they meant "the same at the other side." When the
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 11:48
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awaiting decision
pig are called "muc", "muc" or "hurish". The geese are called by the name of "bio." The horse shed is the same as the cowshed. The horses are shoed by a blacksmith.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 11:48
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awaiting decision
The farm animals we have at home are the cow, the horse, the sheep, the pig, the dog and the fowl such as hens, ducks, geese, and turkeys. The cows have got names such as "Polly" because she is a polly cow, and "Kitty" because she is quiet. When driving the cows in or out of a field a person says "how", "how." When a person wants a cow to stand he says "terish." The house in which the cows are kept is called a cowshed. It is a long stone building about thirty feet long and ten feet high and has an zinc roof. There is a window on it to give light. The floor is a paved floor made of stone and clay. The manger is made of poles and is three feet from the gable wall and it is two feet high. There are chains tied to upright stakes and the cows are tied to these by the neck. Some cows are tied by roops made of hay and others are tied by a roop called a "spancel." A piece of palm is hung in the cows shed to bring luck on the cows. The hens are called by "tuk", "tuk" and the
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 10:41
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awaiting decision
these pieces "Bobbins." When the whole roof is thatched, the eaves are trimmed and made tidy looking.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 10:41
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awaiting decision
and he doubles back one end of it, and sticks this end under the old thatch until he has one layer across the bear strip. This layer is kept in position by means of scallops (scolb). Scallops are hazel rods about two feet long and pointed at both ends. The thatcher lays one of these rods flat on the thatch in a horizontal position. Then he bends two other rods into a staple-like position, and drives them into the thatch with a mallet, catching the flat one. It must be from this work we got the old Irish saying "Ni he la gaoice, la na scolb." When laying the last layer of straw he covers the scallops just a slater does when slating a house. He does the same with each succeeding layer until he reaches the top. Many ornamentations are put on the comb. The thatcher makes little bugle-shaped pieces for the comb. He calls
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 10:12
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awaiting decision
Thatching is a trade that is fast dying out in this district. There is only a few thatched houses around Moynalty now, while there were dozens of them long ago. Like the thatched houses, thatchers are also disserpearing. In the old days men specialised in this trade just like carpenters or any tradesmen. The best type of thatch is wheaten straw that has been scutched - that is the sheaf of wheat is taken unopened and beaten against a stone to remove the grain. The thatcher clears off the old thatch first in strips. He clears a strip about eighteen inches wide from the top of the roof or "comb" to the eaves. The straw is "pulled" or fixed for him. This is taken up to the thatcher and he fills in the cleared strip with fresh thatch, starting at the eaves and going upwards. He takes the straw in small pieces
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 16:19
approved
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awaiting decision
During the Penal days the Priest's had to hide from the soldiers while Mass was going on or they would kill them. There was always a boy on guard to watch and see if the soldiers were coming near them while Mass was going on. One day while he was watching as Mass was going on he found that the soldiers were coming near them. So he went and told the Priest that the soldiers would be there in five minutes but the Priest said that they would not be there for an hour. Now it so happened that when one of the horses were crossing a bridge it broke its leg and that delayed them an hour or more. So that the Priest got to finish Mass and the people and the Priest got away safely before the soldiers came along. This happened near Nobber in Co Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 16:14
approved
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awaiting decision
eyes. When cut they are often rolled in lime before sowing. The idea of this is to prevent slugs from attacking the seeds before the new potatoes have formed.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 16:14
approved
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awaiting decision
My father plants about two acres of potatoes each year. The amount depends on the acreage under corn the previous year, because he plants the potatoes on the stubble land. He prepares the ground himself in the following manner. First of all he ploughs the stubbles with a wheel plough, about the month of March. Then he harrows it with a wooden harrow. If the ground has alot of weeds he harrows it a couple of times. Then he harrows it with a spring-tooth harrow. This harrow goes deeper and cultivates the soil better. Then he makes drills with a double moulded plough. Then he puts manure into the alley with a horse and cart. He leaves the manure in little heaps in the alleys. Then it is spread with forks and when all this is done the ground is prepared. The sowing of the potatoes is done by splitting each drill with a double moulded plough. The best kind of potatoes to sow in my district are "Kerrs pink" and "Aran Victors." The preparation of the seed potatoes requires care also. Firstly my father picks the best shaped potatoes making sure that each potatoe has at least one "eye" or bud. Sometimes he cuts the larger ones that have several
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 16:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a very ancient fort in Baltrasna. It is situated beside the avenue leading to Baltrasna house, and about one mile from Moynalty in the Co Meath. It is a great big fort and there are trees growing round it. There is supposed to be in this fort a tunnel leading to Crocka Wellea and there are branches of it leading in the direction of the Bush field fort over at Cherrymount about a half a mile West of the Baltrasna fort, and there is another branch of it leading to Rathbawn about two miles from Baltrasna fort. It is supposed that men went down to explore this tunnel, and they had to light a candle but they did not go very far until the candle quenched and they had to light matches to get out again. There is an entrance to this tunnel at Rathbawn. There is a great big stone in the centre of this fort at Baltrasna and it is supposed that fairies danced around it because little clay pipes about a finger length long used to be found on the stone in the morning.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 13:41
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awaiting decision
was eaten very sparingly and when it was eaten it usually was salt meat. Certain kinds of food were ate on special occasions. These occasions were Shrove Tuesday, Easter Sunday, and Hollow Eve night. On Shrove Tuesday boxty bread was eaten by the old people and on Hallow Eve colcannon was used. Eggs were eaten on Easter Sunday and it was a custom to gather the egg-shells to decorate the May bush. Colcannon is made by peeling and boiling potatoes. When they were boiled they were mashed with a pot stick and milk and salt was added with them. Then it was ready for use. The first tea used in this district was used about eighty years ago. Before cups became common mugs were used. The earliest drinking vessels were called noggins. They were made of wood and were round in shape with a handle in the side of it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 13:31
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awaiting decision
The people in olden times did not enjoy the luxuries which we enjoy nowadays. They lived mostly on what they grew in their own little farms. The principal food consisted of potatoes and milk. They only took two meals a day in olden times. These meals were the breakfast and the supper. The breakfast was taken at about ten o'clock in the morning after the people had worked for three hours. It consisted of oaten bread and butter-milk and after that a noggin of porridge. Then they would return to work and work until it was dark. When they came home they had a meal of potatoes and buttermilk. The potatoes were poured into a basket called a scib which was placed over a pot on the middle of the floor. Potatoes were only ate at one meal and that was the supper. The bread used was called oaten cake. Oaten meal was mixed with water and salt and put on it. Then it was made level and put standing before a fire on a griddle. A griddle is a round iron with a handle on the side of it. Meat
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:39
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awaiting decision
angry when he heard this, and, gathering his army, he routed the other king and his army,
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:38
approved
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awaiting decision
There once lived a king whose kingdom was taken by another king. This king had a large number of soldiers but he was always defeated in battle. One night, as he lay awake, thinking of the next days battle, the devil appeared to him, and gave him a wand. He told him that all of his soldiers that fell in battle, would be entered by spirits, who would fight as well as the dead soldiers did. Next day the king gathered his army and marched to meet his enemy. As usual the king was defeated, but the other king wondered to see the soldiers get alive again. As the king was retreating the spirits left the dead bodies, and they fell on the ground. Next day the spirits entered the dead bodies once more, and in the evening they left them. When the other king saw this he set a guard on the battle-field. He told them to break sticks and put them through the bodies. They did this and to their surprise the bodies turned into heaps of dust. The king was very
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:30
approved
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awaiting decision
supposed to have been used during the Danish times. Mass was said in this tunnel during the Penal Times. Cherry-mount graveyard is not far from this tunnel.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are several old forts in this district. One of these forts is situated in the parish of Moynalty and about one furlong west of Loughan crossroads in the County Meath. The townland in which it is situated is called Rathinree or Kingsfort and is about two miles from Moynalty village. This fort is a circular mound of earth and there are trees growing around it. The peculiar feature about it is that the opening which leads to the cave is on top of the mound. The opening is closed by a large stone which is covered with clay or moss. The old people believe that there are three tunnels leading from this fort. One tunnel leads eastwards to a fort in Baltrasna about a mile away. Another leads in a north-westerly direction to Rathban fort. The other leads in a north-easterly direction to Garryand fort about two and half miles away. These tunnels are supposed to have been used as places of refuge or escape by Catholics when they were persecuted during the Penal Days. They are also
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 11:09
approved
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awaiting decision
sod measured about three feet by two feet. The house was then thatched with sedge which was gathered on marshes. Some had chimneys and some had none at all. Any chimneys there were, were made of wattles and clay. Sometimes an opening was made in the roof to let out the smoke. The roofs inside these houses were black and shiny with soot and smoke. There was often an old bucket put in a hole on the top of the house over the fire-place to draw the smoke. A fire-place was very seldom placed in the centre of the floor. The floors in these old houses were made of clay. Turf a wood was always burned in the old houses. The only method that the old people had of getting light at night long ago was by means of rush-candles.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:57
approved
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awaiting decision
The old houses long ago were made of mud or red clay with thatched roofs. These were known as the old mud-walls cabins. The walls were very thick, and were made of a mixture of mud and yellow clay called "adobe." This mixture when dry was quite solid, and lasted for years. Even to this day the remains of some of these dwellings are to be seen in Moynalty parish in Co Meath. Small holes about five inches wide, and seven inches long were left in the walls to let in light. As a rule there was no glass in these holes. A bag of straw or hay was stuffed into each of them at night, to keep out the cold, and taken out in the morning to let in the light. The roof was a crude affair. First of all thick boughs of oak were put up for rafters. The rafters on the front and back of the roof were held in position by shorter oak sticks called "Collar-Ties."Over the rafters lighter oak poles were spread at right angles to the rafters. Over these poles Beech branches often with the leaves on, were spread. On top of all this was put a covering of sods called "Scraws," usually got in a bog. Each
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:36
approved
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awaiting decision
The only big wind that is remembered took place in the year 1903. It swept over all Ireland but it did the most harm around Kells and Carlanstown. All the woods in the country were levelled and several houses were burnt and knocked down. There was a beautiful grove around the spire of Loyd (of ever green trees) and in the morning they were all levelled. All the roads were blocked with trees. Fire wood was very plentiful. It was a matter of getting the roads clear. There was a poem made about the big wind. In one of the verses was,
The two public houses were,
shut sharp at ten,
But before three in the morning they were opened again,
The wine and whiskey was there in galore,
They could not be touched till the storm was o'er.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:12
approved
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awaiting decision
The local landlord was John Arthur Farrell. His ancestors lived in Moynalty for over a hundred and fifty years. He was looked upon as a bad landlord because he was cruel. The landlord had the houses knocked down and by doing this he got the nickname "Jack the Leveller." Many stories are told about the landlord.
In this parish there lived a priest named Fr. Mullen. His house was opposite the landlord's. When the Priest's house was being built the landlord would not allow it to be on a level with his own. There was a basement under the Priest's house. So Fr. Mullen had to remove the clay from around the basement. This is why the Priest's house is in a hollow. Fr. Mullen said "The Priest's house will be here when the grass grows round the landlord's door."
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 09:56
approved
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time a number of men were working in a field, reaping corn. They took with them a drink, made up of water and oaten-meal. They put the drink under a heap of bushes for fear the sun would damage it. After a time they came to a weasel's nest and young ones in it. One of the men lifted the nest very carefully and left it down on a sheaf of oats. The old weasel was looking on. She thought the men were killing the young ones, so she went and spat into the drink the men had. The people believe that a weasel's spit contains poison. Then the old weasel went to see if the little ones were dead, but when she reached the nest she found them safely. Then the old weasel seeing that they were safe, went and did her best to spill the drink, for fear the men would drink it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 09:49
approved
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awaiting decision
There is an ancient Castle at Robertstown on the land of Mr. C. O Reilly, Kilbeg. In this Castle lived a wretch named "Gutters" who was in the habit of sitting at a window and shooting at passers-by. Several attempts were made to catch him. In the same parish there remains of another Castle on the top of Ardamagh Hill or Castle Hill as it is called. In this castle the parish Priest watched for weeks to see if "Gutters" would leave his Castle. At last one morning early, he saw "Gutters" in a field. The Priest got his horse and gun and approached "Gutters" and shot him dead. The spot can still be seen where "Gutters" fell. People passing by, throw a stone on the spot where Gutters fell. A very remarkable thing is that the Castle is good repair. The Castle is now covered with ivy. The blood of his victims is still on the stairs. Some people say that he was killed in the Castle.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:49
approved
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awaiting decision
The people went into the house to dance and the Ghost appeared and chased them from the house and followed them up the road. About thirty years after a woman named Mrs Carrick who died about four years ago was sitting by the fire at twelve o clock. The Ghost then appeared and told her that the house was his and ordered her to get out. She went out and waited until Mr Carrick came home. The two of them went into the house and they saw the Ghost disappearing into the ground. After that he was not seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In a house at Ballinacleva about a mile from Moynalty, and at present occupied by a family named Carrick, strange happenings are supposed to have occured about fifty years ago and further strange nocturnal incidents are supposed to have happened there recently.
About fifty years ago the present house was then a ruin. One day a number of children where playing around the ruined house. Suddenly they heard a noise. Some of them got afraid and ran away, while the others went around to the back of the house to see what had happened. Then they heard the sound of horses at the back of the house. When they went round they saw a number of huntsmen on horseback. They had a pack of hounds with them. As soon as the children saw them they disappeared. Then the house began to shake and lights were seen in one room. The children ran away and did not come back for a long time. About a year after that the children were playing there again. They were throwing stones in through a window and they heard a voice telling them not to throw any more stones. Then they went over to the window and they saw a black figure in the room. Another night there was a bonfire lighted beside the house which was then occupied by a family named O Brien.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:35
approved
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awaiting decision
became stronger. If he hit the anvil strong, it is said: He would make the devil appear. If the water that the smith used was sprinkled in a haunted house it would hunt the ghost.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:34
approved
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awaiting decision
There are three forges in the parish of Moynalty. The smiths are John Bell, Jack Reilly and Edward Farrelly.
Edward Farrelly's ancestors were always known to be smiths. His forge is situated at a crossroad called Maxwell's Cross at Feagh. The forge is a small dark house beside a stream. Generally like the shape of the door is like a horse-shoe. There is only one fire inside. The bellows is shaped like a pear. It is made of leather. The smith uses an anvil, sledge, hammer, chisel and tonges. He also use a file. He shoes horses and asses any makes farm machinery, such as ploughs, harrows. A turf fire is lit in the open air to shoe wheels. It is usually done along a stream. Card playing took place in Jack Reilly's forge during winter nights.
An old story is that every time the blacksmith washed his hands he
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:30
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awaiting decision
James Farelly.
The rich children brought 5/= every month, and the poor children brought sods of turf every day. The master and pupils used lead for writing on their slates.
There were no seats in the school, but there were four square stones and they placed a board over the stones and sat on the ground and wrote.
The teacher stayed three months in the same place, and if there was any danger he would only stay a week.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:28
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awaiting decision
There was an old hedge school on the top of Rose hill. It was all Irish that was spoken in it.
The name of the maser was Master Dowd. This is the way he taught the pupils to write; he had only one book in the school, and whatever was in the book he wrote on a slate and the pupils wrote it on their slates.
The school was built in Reyond's field, and the townland was Arche-stown. The master taught the children indoor. Master Dowd was from Rosmead.
The master lodged in a farmer's house, about a mile from the school. The farmer was
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:26
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awaiting decision
When the mountains are a purple colour it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:25
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awaiting decision
There are a few fairy Forts about our district. I know one which is in Killallon. There is a fairly big field and this fort is in one corner of it. There is a house in front of it. On the other side of the road there is a grave-yard.
Some people say when a funeral goes into this grave-yard that in the night about 12 o'clock a white woman is seen coming out of the fort and going across into the grave-yard. It is so told by the people of the district.
This fort is fairly big and on the top of it there is a big block of a stick and a few stones.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:22
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awaiting decision
An old thatched house was found on top of a hill near Frayne with an old man holding on to the rafters. The man died from shock, and wounds.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:21
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awaiting decision
Fifteen years ago a terrible wind storm occurred. It blew the roof off Kilskyre Chapel. Some slates of the chapel were found 3 miles away from the place.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:21
approved
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awaiting decision
In about the year 1903 the big wind arose. That night huge trees were uprooted; houses unroofed, and birds killed.
It took place during the night and before morning it ended. People could not travel on account of all the things that fell during the night because they were laid in their path.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:18
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over for a visit and was in the shop when the incident happened. When we were looking out the window at the lightning some of us thought they saw a thunder-bolt and a moment later a fearful crash was heard and when we looked out we saw a big hole in our roof.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:17
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awaiting decision
One day about four years ago we were looking out of the window at the dreadful lightning that was darting across the sky and some of us were playing cards at the table. My Granny had come
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:16
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awaiting decision
Once there lived a man there named Mr Herbert who was very great in growing Herbs, and ever since it was called Herberts town. He is dead now.
There is a hollow in our district called Bradlies hollow there is supposed to be a ghost in it.
There is a place called Pigotstown. A man named Mr Conall shot 100 wild boards in the woods long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:15
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awaiting decision
There is a holy well at a place named Kiaram. Each year the people go to worship there and they have stalls and other things there. They have these prayers in the day time and at midnight some of the people gather together again at the well, to see the trout, which is supposed to rise at twelve o'clock.
There is also a well near Clonmellon which cures warts.
It is called a "Wartie Well" and is very small with a little drop of water in it. There is a bush beside the well and when a person wants a wart cured they rub the water on the wart and then tie a rag on the bush. When the rag rots, the warts go away.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 12:01
approved
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awaiting decision
Two skulls are to be seen on the stones of the collapsed vault in the centre of the graveyard.
Miss Kelly says that they often pushed them far in through the stones and covered them.
However, they would be on the surface again and nobody could account for how they got there.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 12:00
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awaiting decision
Mrs Kelly says that there was some curse on the Butler family.
The maternal grandmother of the last occupant told that there be no heir to the property. That the larks would not sing near during their residence. Both prophecies turned out to be true as the last owner was childless and sold the property about 16 years ago to the present owner Mr Roantree.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:51
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awaiting decision
and marigolds were very much used as food. In this District Mrs. Naper grandmother of the present captain Naper contributed a large herd of Deer and other animals to feed the starving people.In the year before the famine the potatoes were so plent-ful in this District that a man took two barrels of potatoes to a local inn and only received a naggin of Whiskey for them. They were also thrown in the ditches as there was scarcely any use for them owing to the vast crop of the year.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:49
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awaiting decision
half of the crop was lost or rotted in the ground. At least 1/4 of what was left was required for seed for the coming (year) Spring. In the Spring of 1846 and 1847 the potatoes planted as seed were very small many of which failed to grow or what did grow produced a very weak crop. The corn which was grown by the Irish people of this age was aquired by the Land Lord as rent and sold in the English markets; thus leaving the potatoes as the food on which the people depended. When the potato crops were consumed turnips
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:46
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awaiting decision
November 1938.
The famine was the chief cause of the reduction of the Population of County Meath. During these years people left County Meath abandoning their property and flying to places over the sea. Many of those who were unable to get away died in their hundreds for want of food. The chief cause was the failure of the potato crop upon which the bulk of the Irish people depended for their subsistence. About
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:39
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awaiting decision
the Protestants thought he was listening to what they were saying.
Some people say a fork was driven through his heart and he was hung in the barn.
Other people say his body was thrown in a stream and people going to mas found him.
Other people say he was thrown under a whin bush and a boy found him next evening.
On the next page is a poem written by a Mrs McEnroe about the Tragedy.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:37
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awaiting decision
October 1938.
There is a house called Strongs which is haunted and the reason why it is haunted is because murder was commited there about 35 years ago.
One night as there was a Protestant meeting being held one of the Workmen whose name was John Sheridan came into the barn and
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:21
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awaiting decision
to get some one to carry her in. The woman died the following day. When Spring came the people had no seed potatoes to set. A man by the name of Hugh O'Reilly went to Longford town and bought a consignment of them. He brought them to Oldcastle and sold them to the people. When Hugh O'Reilly died the priests said "He was an instrument between God and man for the benefit of the people."
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:20
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awaiting decision
indian porridge and sour milk. There was a place for boiling this meal in the Tan Yard in Oldcastle, another in the place where the market house now is and there was also one in Chapel St. Boilers of porridge would be boiled in those three placed. The people around the parish who would have milk brought in the milk to the boiling places. They would get a can of bread in exchange for the milk. On Bolie Bridge a woman named Smith was one day crossing the bridge with a bucket of water. She fainted and the people got it hard
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:18
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Farmer.
October 1938.
In the year of 1848 there was a great famine. Many people died in this famine. All the people died of Cholera during this time. The potatoes failed failed in 1847. The blight came on the 24th June 1847. After a few days there was not a potato to be seen. The few that were left were bad so that any one who ate them took that disease. The milk also was very scarce so the people were starved to death. There was a lot of
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 10:25
approved
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awaiting decision
Farrell's land and on to the Black water. He swam the river as far as the Boyne at Navan in County Meath. There he cut his throat with his fore paws and died. Where he ran is now called "The Valley of the Black Pig."
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 10:23
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awaiting decision
There was once a School Master in Tyrone who had the power of magic. He was also very fond of hunting. At play-time every day he would change the children into Hares and Hounds. He would have them chasing around the playground. In the evening they would go home exhausted. One day a woman whose child went home exhausted got angry and came to the master.
She also had the power of magic also. The master ignored her. She got furious and turned him into a Black Pig. She then said that he would cut his throat with his fore paws. he started running he ran down through Tyrone into Armagh from Armagh into Louth. He ran through this corner of Meath. He ran at the back of Moynalty through
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 16:20
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awaiting decision
Not so many years ago the Protestants used to be buried in the Catholic Church of Temple Kiernan. Any time, any time a person was buried in it, on the night of the burial. the coffin would be lifted and left outside the gate of the church. One night the "Police" were put to watch who it was who was bringing out the corpse. So they stayed there all night and when they were going home in the morning, they saw the corpse outside the gate. They never saw anyone bringing it out. (7th January 1938).
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 16:14
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very close grown hedge of about 15 ft high. It had full grown thorns on it.
2nd February 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 16:14
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awaiting decision
a lot of men. They had music and they hustled him off towards the Danestown "crooked meadows." He kept pushing against them and kept making for Pat Byrds house. There was a very very high thick hedge between The Moate Field and Pat Byrds house. Mulligan jumped across the hedge and down into a dung-heap. He sank to his knees in the dung. He rushed to the door of Byrds house and asked "For God's sake to be let in or else he would be killed." Pat Byrd told him to go off to this own house as it was only a couple of hundred yards away. He would not go but pleaded to be let in. Pat arose and opened the door and Jonny fell in on the floor and lay at the back of the door. Jonny fell down and told Pat Byrd that a lot of men wanted to push him off for the Crooked Meadows and that he pushed against them and then jumped the hedge. (People don't understand how he jumped the hedge that was in it). "I'll tell the rest in the morning," says Jonny. But ever afterwards when Pat mentioned the event Jonny moved away. Jonny was never known to speak of that night's happenings during the rest of his life and he never went to ceilidhe in Runahan again. (He'd hardly have been 30 years when this happened). The hedge was a very
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:55
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awaiting decision
Johnny Mulligan used to be ceilidhing up about Runahan. He came home along the Glonya and out into the Moate Field. (There is a little Moate in this field not as big as Dainestown One). On a path on one side of the Moate he saw what was like a lump of hay until he got near it. Then it opened out and turned into
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:53
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awaiting decision
cattle sold out of it. Another man, P. Donnelly of Danestown built a house from those stones and he never lived in it.
In the vicinity of Skryne there is supposed to be a deLacy Castle. That Castle is supposed by some people to be the Castle of Walterstown. (7 February 1938).
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:46
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awaiting decision
Long ago Verse Coyle, used to come down from Dublin to collect the rent for the landlord around here. he had a certain day for collecting it. On that day all the people who had to pay rents had to meet him at Peter Butterlys house.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:44
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awaiting decision
If you suffer from "pains" and if you go to the mearing of two parishes nine times and get water there nine times you can get cured. Some one must go with you to get up the water. Christy Reynolds was once "bet up with pains" and he used to have a stick helping him to walk. He and his wife went to the mearing of Kentstown and Walterstown and the wife got up the water for him there. When he went home he rubbed the water to the places where the pains were. He went to the mearing nine times and got the water nine times. When he had it done six times, he was able to throw away the stick and at the ninth time he was as good as if he had never a pain in his life.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:40
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awaiting decision
Johnnie up to the shop and up to to the church-yard. Johnnie got afraid and did not stop to rest or did he say a prayer passing. The black dog went into the churchyard and while Johnnie was passing he heard three loud cried. He ran home.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:39
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Johnny Boyle who lived at Cross a Greallaig used to go to Darby's shop every night for things. When going home he used to sit on the steps of the Church-yard to rest. He always said a prayer. This night he was going to the shop as usual and near the shop a black dog jumped out from the butt of a tree. It followed
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:37
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Sixty or seventy years ago when the Austin's were in Slanduff. One evening a fairy woman came in and warmed herself at the fire. Patrick Reilly saw the fairy afterwards up in the fields.
One evening Mrs Gaffney went out to get water. This happened in the harvest-time. She did not know anything until she landed at a field beside Reilly's of Rock. At that time there was a wake in White's and two men heard her screeching and they got her standing in a ditch of mud.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:35
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Many years ago there was a mine-hole in front of George Clarke's house, and one day while the people were at dinner the mine-hole fell in and all the tools were buried. The mine-hole was covered in and has never been re-opened.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 16:33
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A very recent event in our locality was the unearthing of a corpse near an old quarry in the Rathcarne Gaeltacht. The skeleton was found to be human when the jaws of a man with a set of most perfect teeth were found amongst the bones. A pure gold Tara brooch was also found amongst them and it was about the same size and in the same shape of a horseshoe. These have been removed to the Dublin museum and investigations are already being made.
In the district of Stonestown there is a field which is called "The Bush Field." There is a mound in the centre of the field and it is overgrown with bushes. Tradition tells us that one day in the sixteenth century there were men harvesting in this field and Cromwell's men came the way and seeing the men they shot them dead. The victims fell in the spot where the mound lies and the bushes grow to-day.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 16:30
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and he died there about twenty-three years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 11:50
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A man was working with 2 or 3 other men at Cloncullen and they were coming home after working in the evening, I suppose in the Springtime of the year and the young fellows began to go trick, funning about behind walking after the old men. When they came into one field there
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 11:43
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That road (Knocknagurneen) was supposed to come on down and up that laneway of this road (the Giltown Road).
This lane was the old road to Dublin one time and it went on to Clady Bridge on to a Ford at the Abbey of Bective across the Boyne.
There was a house where this old road crossed this Present road that we are living on now and they had to move the house out of it or build a new one. They couldent live in it, all the cattle died, the stable was lying in the way of the Fairy Pass.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 11:19
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The Irish Soldiers were on the summit of the Hill. The Trenches are there yet and when the English were coming up the slope its across them the shot would go and they captured an English Soldier and the Englishman told them to aim at the Buckles of their shoes and not at their heads, this they did with good effect and they went to make their way off the hill down and they were very nearly clear of the English when they were overpowered.
(An account current is that a considerable quantity of Whiskey was consumed by the Insurgents which was either sent them by Murphys the Distillers in Navan or else seized while in transit to Dublin, some would have it that they knew quite well it would fall into the hands of the '98 men. Informant had this traditions as well as had others whom I was speaking to).
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 16:12
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I hope once more to see,
The verdant shades and flowery vales,
Round lovely Moy-nal-ty.
The Hawthorn time and Woodbine,
All natures are in bloom,
The Blackbird, thrush, and Linnet
Their notes do sweetly tune,
The buck and doe are sporting,
But it's not so with me
For the day I spent I'll never forget,
Round lovely Moy-nal-ty.
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 16:11
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Come all ye gentle Muses,
Before I bid adieu,
Another while in Ireland,
I'd like to spend with you,
It grieves my heart from you to part,
But here I cannot stay,
For I must go a roaming,
To rich America.
Farewell a while to sweet Westland,
Where often I did rove,
To spend my time in pleasure,
Down by each silent grove,
To hear the Thrushes warble,
And the Blackbird on each tree,
Through each silent grove as I did rove
Round lovely Moy-nal-ty.
Scriebogue Hill and New-catle,
Shall often cross my mind,
Sweet Salford shades and Walterstown,
That I must leave behind
The flowery dells that I love well,
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 11:52
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I live in Corballis. It is in the parish of Ballivor. There are six families in it. They are nearly all young people. All the houses are thatched. There were more houses in it long ago, but they are all knocked, and overgrown with weeds and nettles. Six people emigrated from my district to America. The land is very high and good for crops. There are two rivers in my district, "Stoneyford," and the "Black Lake." There is no songs or stories connected with my district. All the houses are fairly old.
senior member (history)
2019-04-03 10:10
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The following inscription is on the back of the above:-
"Pray for the soul
Patrick Leonard, Colonel, U.S.A.
Who died
September 18th 1873 aged 52 years."
He believed that his country was never intended to be merely a province. He freely risked his life for her freedom and died happy in the confidence of her final triumph. R.I.P.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:38
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and no one ever visits the grave now. The people of the parish put up the cross to his memory. A drawing of the cross and the inscription appear on the next page, because the inscription is now getting obliterated.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:37
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There is a churchyard in Monknewtown. The runs of the monastery that gave the name to the parish is still to be seen in the churchyard. All that is still there is the west wall with two oblong windows on it. It was built by some of the monks when they came from Mellefont.
Colonel Leonard is buried in the grave yard. My grandfather told me he was a Colonel of the Feinans. He lived about Meelek out side Drogheda. He was forced to leave Ireland by the English and went to America. When he came back from America he lived at the black Bull outside Drogheda. He died a poor man in the Drogheda workhouse. He was buried in Monknewtown Churchyard. For years there was an anniversity held at Monknewtown and hundreds of people and bands attended. This was suppressed by the government
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:31
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If a girl went out to a barn to riddle corn at twelve o'clock on Hallow Eve night, her future husband would appear to her and take the riddle out of her hands. Another custom was if a person took a ball of yarn to a kiln and unbind it to the bottom and hold one end in their hand, when he would say who is there a voise wold would answer "I am."
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:30
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Long ago there was a custom of making colcannon on Hallow Eve night. It used to be called colcannon night. Everyone used to make it, both rich and poor. It was made from potatoes masked up and milk and butter put on it. The farmers used to give their workmen a quart of milk and a pound of butter on Hallow Eve night for the colcannon.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 10:58
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were on one side of the street hence the popular saying: - "All to one side like Moynalty." On the opposite side of the street was a row of lovely lime trees and from that a green lawn sloped to the Borora, the far bank of which was beautifully wooded. It was quaint and lovely now all that has been changed. The trees have been cut down to make place for four new houses, and the sloping lawn has been divided into allotments to provide the new comers with gardens. So, that the present period of progress while providing better housing conditions has gone a long way towards converting a once lovely village into just a village street.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 10:29
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The present village was built by the Farrell as was also Moynalty Hse. The old village was higher up and ran down to the river - at a point where the old coach road crossed the river. A corn mill stood at the river end of the village. The remains of houses were levelled by the Farrell family who built present village. The windows in all the houses of the village (except those newly built or those which have been renovated) are all alike in shape and have diamond-shaped panes of glass. The walls are immensely thick and the buildings quite ancient-looking. In some of the buildings are open shelter still remains in front and most of them have sky-lights in the roofs. From the old village the road ran at the back of the present village and round by the door of what is now Moynalty Hse (then a small one-story thatched house). When Farrells built the new house they had the road changed out some distance to the present place and built a boundary wall between. The old cemetry which has been long closed extended farther towards the North West - extending about half-way over the garden now owned by J. Bell.
All the houses of Moynalty
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 17:02
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Dec 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 10:49
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of good weather. Here are the signs of bad weather. When the fog is on the hill. When you see a dark brown frog. When you hear the weir at "the cotton mill" it is a sign of bad rainy weather and when you hear the weir at Slane Castle it is a sign of good weather. When the smoke goes down to the ground it is a sign of bad rainy weather. When you see the crows going back home and one turns back it is a sign of bad rainy weather. When the cattle and sheep are lying together it is a sign of bad weather.
The Cotton Mill lies about 2 miles directly south from here and the other weir is about three miles southeast of here. It is seldom heard because Barristown hill is in the way.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 10:40
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The people used to say that the weather would get like winter after the fair of Skreen. That used to be a very big fair long ago and it used to be held on the 12th of October. When the swans come out of the river it is a sign of heavy frost. When there is a lot of stars in the sky it is a sign of frost. Here are signs of a storm that I heard of: When the wild geese fly to the south it is a sign of a storm. When the dog comes into the house and does not want to go out, it is a sign of a thunder storm. When the dog comes into the house and does not want to go out, it is a sign of a thunder storm. When the crows go up high in the air and come down turning and diving and cawing; when the sun goes down a very wicked red.
When you see a yellow frog it is a sign of good weather. When the fog is in the hollow it is a sign of good weather. When the crows fly high it is a sign
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:15
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The Trim Assizes brought a change for the worse in the weather. An execution always brought bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:15
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The Trim (?) brought a change for the worse in the weather. An execution always brought bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:14
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building. The people around here say that if you sell anything to a protestant the money you get is supposed to be very lucky. A man called Tol Lol used to come round this district up to about twelve years ago. He used to sell and exchange delph for rags and bottles and rabbit skins. That was the last man that used to come round this district. The word "wing" is often used for a penny. The word "tanner" and "kick" is used for sixpence. The word "Bob" is used for a shilling.
The word a "half doller" is used for a half crown and the word "doller" is used for five shillings.
The word a "half note" or a "half quid" is used for ten shillings and the word "quid" is used for a pound and the word "note" is used for a pound also. The market towns of this district are Navan and Drogheda, where people sell eggs, butter, turkeys and fowl and some people that have customers and send eggs to Dublin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:05
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few shops along this road because they would want a lot of groceries for the travellers that would be stopping at the inns. There used to be a shop owned by people named mac Quail, who used to make wooden shovels, beside this school. There was another shop about a quarter of a mile from this school. About three hundred yards south of this school there used to be a bakery owned by people named Murray. About three hundred yards to the east of this school a man named Robert Mullen used to make tops and other toys and he used to sell them. Buying and selling might be carried on after Mass if a man had cattle or sheep for sale and if he saw a man that would buy them hr would tell him to come and look at them, and if the man had seen them before they might make a bargain after Mass. Sunday is supposed to be an unlucky day for selling or buying and Saturday is a bad day to start any business such as
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:57
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The shops as far as I know were just as common a hundred years ago as they are now as they are now, so the people had not to go to the towns to make purchases. There were two inns on the road along here where people travelling to Cavan and districts in that direction from Drogheda would stop for the night and people going from there to Drogheda would stop. The inns were owned by people the name of Brownell and Crinion. Brownell's inn was about two hundred yards from this school and Crinon's inn was about three quarters of a mile from this school. All the produce of Cavan and parts of Westmeath would go this road and the goods that would come into the port of Drogheda for Cavan would come this road, so that this was a very important road before the the railway was built from Drogheda to Oldcastle in the year 1847 and for some years after that. Those inns were called a carman's stage. There were a good
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 17:00
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whistling in the evening it is a sign of rain. Another sign of bad weather is when you see the hens standing round the door and they picking their feathers. When white stripes are seen in the sky it is a sign of showery weather. They are called "Goat hair clouds." Here is an old saying that is often heard in this district "Goat haired sky neighter wet nor dry." When there are a good many stars in the sky shinning very bright it is a sign of frost. When the wind is blowing from the north it is a sign that snow will follow. When the sun goes down dull it is a sign of bad weather. When a fog rises it is a sign of fine weather. Another sign of wet weather is when you see black clouds in the sky. When the crows fly low it is a sign of rain. A sign of good weather is when the smoke goes up straight from the chimney.
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 16:57
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from the west it is a sign of showers and when the wind is from the south it is a sign of continual rain. There is another saying about the sun and the wind. When farmers are making their hay and the wind from the southwest at twelve o clock in the day, they say that "it will be fine until the sun comes round with the wind in the evening." When the stars are in a cluster and when they are shinning very bright it is a sign of rain. Here are a few more signs of bad weather. A cat sitting with her back to the fire; a dog eating grass; sheep grazing together in a field; and when the soot falls down the chimney. When you see a blue flame in the fire it is a sign of a storm. When the sea-gulls come in on the land it is a sign of a storm on the sea and when they are at the sea it is a sign of a storm on the land. When the crows are flying low it is a sign of rain. People who suffer from rheumatism get much worse when it is going to rain. When peoples' corns are paining them they say that it will rain. When beetles run across the floor it is a sign of rain. When the curlew is heard
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 15:52
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There are a great many remarks made as to the signs of the weather by the people of this district. When there are rays out of the sun when setting it is a sign of rain. When the sun goes down real red it is a sign of frost and wind. When the sun is misty or when it sets behind a big cloud it is a sign that rain will follow. When the sun meets the wind at twelve o clock in the day it is said that it will rain at three or six o clock in the evening.
When there is a circle round the moon it is a sign of bad weather. It is said that the nearer the circle the farther the storm or the farther the circle the nearer the storm. When the new moon is on its back as it is said, it will hold rain and it is a sign of a wet month. When "weather galls" appear in the sky it is a sign of rain. "Weather galls" are the name that is given by the people around here to small green lights or small pieces of a rainbow that are seen in the sky on the horizon. When the sky is high that is when clouds are high it is a sure sign of good weather. The far off hills look very plain when there is going to be rain. When the wind is coming
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 11:08
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Long ago, before money came into use the people used to exchange their goods. The words that were used when buying and selling were boot, tick and luckpenny. Boot means if a person bought a cow and gave money and a calf for payment the calf would be called boot. It is mostly tinkers that use boot around here. When they are selling a thing they say "What boot will you give me." Tick means if a person bought something and had no money to pay for it until some other time, it would be said that "he got it on tick." When the people sell cattle or sheep round here they give money called luckpenny.
Luckpenny is money the people give to the man that buys the sheep or cattle for luck. The people give this money out of their pockets and if they have not any in their pockets they take it of the price of the beast. The people usually give two shillings to five shillings on cattle and threepence to a shilling on sheep and lambs,
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 11:02
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more. Only for The Puck the man's mother would have died.
Another story I heard about The Puck is one time a man was going to Dublin with a few loads of hay. He said he would not be home until dark the next night. Someone asked him if he ever saw The Puck and he said he didn't but if he did he would cut the two eyes out of him with the whip. The next night the man was coming home in the cart and The Puck ran after him. He struck The Puck on the head with the whip. The Puck ran under the cart and threw it over to the other side of the road. The Puck came out from under the cart and ran across the road towards Slane Castle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 10:54
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The Puck is the shape of a black dog. He used to be around Slane Castle. There was a little man living in Slane. His mother was dying, and the little man was crying because she couldn't be cured owing to he not having enough money to pay a great doctor that was in Dublin at the time. He went on wondering what he ought to do. He went out into the field that was beside his house and he thought he saw a big goat beside the far ditch of the field. He went over to the far ditch and he saw the animal and he did not know whether it was a goat or a dog. He got up on its back and he saw it was The Puck. The Puck started to run and came to a hill and rolled down it. The man was afraid to get off the Puck's back. The Puck ran to a wall and a stone fell off the top of it. The man looked into the spot out of which the stone fell and saw a piece of cloth in which he found a big sum of gold. He went home and his mother was still alive. He went to Dublin and told the doctor that his mother was sick. The doctor came and cured the man's mother. The man and his mother never wanted money any
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 12:10
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he used in the cure which are broom, golden rod and bulltran. Long ago the people used to say that the fairies used to ride on the bulltrans. Some people call bulltrans the "Fairies Horses." Garlic is supposed to cure the black leg in cattle. Mrs Brien from Gernonstown has a cure for the kidneys. She makes the cure out of the following herbs broom, sweet may, golden rod and saurel. The roots of crain's-bill is a cure for red murran in cattle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 12:08
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In this part of the country there are various kinds of herbs growing, and more than probable they grow every where in Ireland. Different kinds of ointement are made of those herbs which cure all kinds of diseases. I will now describe some of the ointments, what they are made off, what diseases they cure and also some of the people who make it.
About two mile from my home a woman named Mrs. Brien lives. She makes ointment for burns or sores out of the following herbs, Lady's mantle, plantin leaf, briar leaf, daisy leaves and primrose leaves. When she is making it she melts butter in a pot and puts the herbs in it and boils them slowly. Then she takes the pot off the fire and pounds the herbs into an ointment. Those receipts are usually handed down from one generation to another. The dandelion is also known to cure consumption. It is eaten as it grows. A cure for piles is to boil the roots of butter-cups in milk in summer and drink the milk and roots and eat the leaves of the butter cups in winter.
The Ladies five fingers is supposed to be a cure for "wilefire." There is a man named James Downes that lives in Rochestown who has a cure for the "Farcie." I could only find out three of the herbs
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 11:35
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and it helps also to strengthen the bones. She has another great cure for the kidneys. She makes it from broom, sweet may and golden rod. They ivy leaf and the primrose leaf boiled together wold cure a sore on a cow's udder. She can also make a cure for "farsic" which is a disease on horses. I do not know how she makes up the cure but I know some of the herbs she uses. They are bulltrans, lady's five fingers, marrow-roodle, primrose and daisy roots. She can make an ointment for healing cuts and sores from carpenters leaf and rose-mantle and bag bane. Long ago the people used no other medicine or ointment except that made from herbs and a lot of them were relieved.
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 11:30
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The most harmful weeds growing on the land around here are dockons, nettles, thistles, chicken weed, bishop weed, and grouncil. The dockons; nettles and bishop weeds spread rapidly and the thistles and grouncil and also the dockons take away the good food the crops should get and so make the land poor. The yarrow, shamrock, dandelion, plantain leaf are always found where there is good land and rushes only grow where there is bad land. The following are the name of herbs I know of, the yarrow, dandelion, scotch, hemlock, foxglove, sweet may, freehogs, plantain leaf, carpenters leaf, primrose leaf, roots of daisies, lady's five fingers, lady's mantle, broom, golden rod, Marrow Boodle, cats paws, Fairy furze, bag bane and rose noble. The yarrow used to be used for playing tricks on Hallow Eve night. The yarrow is also made into medicine. Mrs Brien of Gernonstown knows how to make a lot of ointment and medicine out of herbs. She can take the white stuff that comes out of the dandelion and if you drink it is supposed to cure consumption
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 11:30
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awaiting decision
The most harmful weeds growing on the land around here are dockons, nettles, thistles, chicken weed, bishop weed, and grouncil. The dockons; nettles and bishop weeds spread rapidly and the thistles and grouncil and also the dockons take away the good food the crops should get and so make the land poor. The yarrow, shamrock, dandelion, plantain leaf are always found where there is good land and rushes only grow where there is bad land. The following are the name of herbs I know of, the yarrow, dandelion, scotch, hemlock, foxglove, sweet may, freehogs, plantain leaf, carpenters leaf, primrose leaf, roots of daisies, lady's five fingers, lady's mantle, broom, golden rod, Marrow Boodle, cats paws, Fairy furze, bag bane and rose noble. The yarrow used to be used for playing tricks on Hallow Eve night. The yarrow is also made into medicine. Mrs Brien of Gernonstown knows how to make a lot of ointment and medicine out of herbs. She can take the white stuff that comes out of the dandelion and if you drink it is supposed to cure consumption.
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 11:57
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The people long ago used to eat young nettles boiled with gruel for their health. They used to eat them on the fast days of Lent and in the spring time of the year. They would eat the nettles to purify their blood.
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 12:37
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Some of them travel on foot and more of them travel in vans and carts. Some of them travel single and more of them travel in families and in bands. The best know of them around here are Powers and Teilans and Whites. The Powers and Whites visit this district often. They generally come round for the Confirmations and Processions and for pattern days. They come round for the Confirmations because their children get confirmed. The Whites generally come round for the fairs because they sell horses. Conors are "travelling people" that go round making tin saucepans and cans and they fix things for people. An old woman used to go round on an ass and cart selling mats. She would stay one day making the mats and go round and sell them the next day. Her name was Mrs Donoughue.
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 12:35
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Some "travelling people" call to our home. Some of them have been travelling for many years round different districts and come round here for pattern days such as Lady Well Day. Some of them are poor beggars and more of them only go round camping. They go round with small things in a basket such as broaches and prayer-books and sell them to people to earn their living. People buy some of the small articles from them. The "travelling people" buy the small things in shops and some of them make them themselves. They are not welcomed around this district generally. When they come round this district they stay for a week or more sometimes. They sleep in vans. If they haven't any with them they sleep on straw in tents. They make the tent of long ash sticks and throw the cover over the sticks. The poor "travelling people" beg the food of the people of the district and the richer "travelling people" have their own food.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 10:46
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A Funny Story
Here are the funny stories I heard of the long ago some people use to steal dead bodies from the graveyards and sell them to doctors for to experiment with them. There is a graveyard about three miles from this school. One dark night two robbers took a dead man out of this grave-yard. They had a real good horse and carriage and they put the dead man in a sack in the carriage. They were coming along a road called the New Line when a man heard them coming and he hid in the ditch.
They stopped near where the man was hid and they went out into a field along the road.
The man went over the carriage and he saw the sack with the dead man in it. He took out the dead man and he left him on the side of the road and went into the sack himself. The robbers
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 10:46
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galvanised roofs. A manger runs the whole length of the shed and in to that the food is put. It is only in winter that cows are kept in a shed at night.
We have about forty hens and about thirty small chickens at home and we have two settings of eggs under hens. We also have ten turkey eggs under a hen. When people are calling their hens they say "tchuck, tchuck" and when they are calling their turkeys they say "bee bee." People give boiled eggs and boiled nettles to young turkeys. A crowing hen is supposed to bring bad luck to a place.
There was a man living in Gernonstown and he had a crowing hen and he thought she would bring him bad luck. She used to follow him to work every day. One morning he got up early and he brought her to four cross-roads and left her at them. He never thought of the hen any more for about five or six weeks, but one morning he met her and he going to work on Barrestown mountain and she crowed right into his face. He got a hold of her and the threw her as far as he could throw her. One say there was an old woman named Mary Cusack gathering sticks on the mountain and she saw the crowing hen hatching eggs under a bush.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 10:41
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The domestic animals we have at home are two cows, four big cattle and two small calves and a pony and a dog. We call two of the big cattle "patsy and Butson." The pony's name is Kitty and the dog's name is 'Ginger Dick.' The people around here say "How-up" to the cows and calves when they are driving them. Long ago the cow-sheds were mud-walled buildings with thatched roofs. Very few of those remain now. Nearly all are made of concrete or stone with slated or
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:32
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young man ever you have seen so he brought her out to the yard to a row of green stones and tipped them with his wand and they turned into young girls and her one sister came out of a green stone and she was delighted to see her.
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:31
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"Take the lid of me, take the lid of me take the lid of me" "lie down said the girl or I will put twice as much weight on you" and the corpse jumped up and struck her with a wand and turned her into a green stone. So the second daughter went to look for her sister in one year and one day and the mother prepared the bonach of bread and the bonny fat hen. "Which will I give you the half of it with my blessing or the whole of it with my curse." "Keep it all" she says here it is all for you says her mother and my and God's blessing be with you. So she went on until she came to a house and the woman of the house gave her a corpse to mind so at twelve o'clock the corpse said. "Take the lid of me take the lid of me take the lid of me." Indeed I will you are long enough there so he jumped up and out stepped the nicest
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:28
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Once upon a time there lived a poor old woman that had two daughters. One day the eldest daughter said she would go to a service. "Very well a cailin I'll take you a bonach of bread and a bonny fat hen." "Very well" said the daughter "It will lighten the road for me." She gave the hen and the bread to the daughter and said which will I give the half of it with my blessing or the whole of it with my curse. "Give me the whole of it with my curse." So she went off and her mother cursed her until she was out of sight. So the girl went on until it was dark night and she came to a house and she went in ad asked "bean a tig" had she a job for her "Yes my poor creature would you mind a corpse until morning" "very well" said the girl "give me a dog and a cat a book to read and nuts to crack." So at twelve o'clock the corpse spoke and said
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:22
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gold. The shoe-maker went back with the spade and kept digging under the tree. He was digging for a long time until the tree was shaking and he kept digging until the tree fell on him and killed him. It is said that his ghost comes back every night and haunts that place.
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:21
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Long ago people believed that if you caught a Leipreachan and asked him where gold was hidden he would tell you. There was once a shoe-maker in Barristown named John Burke. He was very fond of money and he was never contented with his trade. One night when he and some neighbours were sitting at the fire, One of the men said that there was a Leipreachan in the rath at the river Boyne. That night when all the neighbours went home the shoe-maker went down to the rath and the Boyne and he saw a little man under a tree. He was dressed in red and he had a big tossel on his cap. The shoe-maker went over to him and caught him and asked him where the gold was hidden and the Leipreachan said that it was hidden under the big tree in the rath. The shoe-maker went home and came back with a spade and he began to dig for the gold. When he was digging for a long time he found a little box full of gold. Then he went home to his wife and she was not satisfied. So she sent him back and told him to keep digging until he would find a crock of
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:22
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and is used for curing pains. Some people keep clay and moss from the old well beside Lady Well for the same reason.
Holy ashes are got by some women from the priest on Ash Wednesday and kept in their prayer books.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:21
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Up to a few years ago the little children used to wear Saint Patrick's Crosses on Saint Patrick's Day. Their mothers made these crosses for them with papers and ribbons. They pinned a bunch of shamrock to the cross and wore it on their coats. Very few people have St. Brigid's cross in their houses.
The holly and ivy which is put up at Christmas is not taken down until Pancake Night to cook the pan-cakes. Most people take it down after Little Christmas.
Flowers are brought in before May Day and put before the statue of the Blessed Virgin. The flowers are usually primroses.
The Palm which is got on Palm Sunday is usually stuck behind a holy picture in the house.
The candle which is got on Candlemas Sunday is lighted when the person comes home from mass and three drops of the grease are put on the person's clothes, in some place where it would not do the clothes any harm.
The water from Lady Well in Slane is kept in people's houses around here
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:05
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and brought out their child. He was never seen or heard of again.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:05
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Most of the people in this district call the leipreachan a geanncanach. The leipreachan wears black shoes with buckles on them, white stockings and white trousers, a green vest, a red coat and a red cap with a big long tossel on it. The charm is supposed to be in the cap. It is said that if anyone could get the cap of the leipreachan and keep his eyes on the leipreachan that he could make him give up his gold, but he would have to keep the cap till he would get the gold.
Long ago there was a man and a woman living near a moat who had an only child. One day the woman went out and she left the child in the cradle and when she came back the child was crying and neither herself or her husband could stop it from crying. A few days after an old woman came around and the woman told the old woman about the child. The old woman said "while you were out the other day the fairies came and put that geanncanach in the cradle and took your child. If you want your child back you will put the griddle on the fire and put the geanncanagh on the griddle and he will tell you where your child is." After the old woman went the woman of the house put the griddle on the fire and had it red when the geanncanach saw what she was at and he said "I'll tell you where your child is." He brought the woman and man to a moat and he went into the moat
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 16:36
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Kate Hoey told me this story.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 16:36
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Long ago people used to take up dead bodies out of grave-yards to give to doctors. One night a man was taking up a corpse out of a grave in Slane Church yard. He took the dead body out of the coffin. It was the custom to tie the persons big toes together. When he losened the toes he got a hold of each foot and threw him across his shoulders. When they were crossing out to the field the man threw the dead body across the wall and the dead man got his toes tangled round the live man. He could not get them from one another and the live man was choked. In the morning there was a man going up the field and he got the two men dead. One hanging on the side of the wall facing the Church yard and the other hanging on the side facing the field.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 11:01
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got a bell and put it in the belfry and the bell would not ring. They took it down and put it on a tree and it did ring, and when they saw it rang on the tree they thought it would ring in the belfry. So they tried it again in the belfry and it would not ring and it didn't ring to this day.
Long ago a minister lived in Stackallen and he had a wife and she died. She had a lot of jewellery on her and it all was put into the coffin with her. She was buried on that day. The butler was there when she was put into the coffin and he saw all the jewellery on her. When midnight came the butler went to Stackallen graveyard and took up the coffin and opened it. He began to cut off the finger with the rings on it and just as he drew blood the minister's wife sat up and away ran the butler and he was never heard off again. The minister's wife walked to the house and knocked at the door. The minister was sitting in the room when he heard the knock and he said "only my wife is dead I would say that was her knock" and he went to the door and opened it and let his wife in and he was delighted to see her. She told him what had happened and she said she knew the butler. The minister said he would give 300 pound to the butler if he came back for saving his wife's life as she was only in a trance.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 10:52
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The graveyards that are nearest to this district are Rathkenny graveyard, Gernonstown, Stackallen, Killberry and Grangegeeth, and the Hill of Slane and Stackallen graveyard was a catholic graveyard before the protestants took it over. Lady Barnwall got the church built for the catholics. The holy water fonts can be seen outside the church. There are catholics and protestants buried in Stackallen graveyard now.
There is a catholic graveyard in a townland called Melixtown in County Louth. The people call it "The jumping graveyard of Melixtown." This is the story that I was told why the graveyard is called by that name. Long ago there was a protestant buried in the graveyard against the catholic people's wishes. During the night the wall jumped the protestant's grave and left it outside in the field, and the grave is to be seen outside the wall to this day.
There is a protestant church near Screen named "Temple Kiernan." Long ago before that church was built there was a catholic church near where the protestant church stands now. The Protestants took stones out of the Catholic Church to build the belfry for the Protestant Church and every morning some of the stones would be gone and back in the Catholic Church and it took them years to build the belfry. Then they
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 13:03
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Long ago there was a hedge-school in a field in Gernonstown. Marquess Cunningham was the owner of the field long ago. The field was divided and people of the name of Flood got some of it and the school was in the piece of the field that Floods got. The school was an old shed. The teacher's name was "The (?) Manta." Each of the children used to bring a penny a week to the schoolmaster. The school master used to teach English, Irish and Latin. There was another hedge-school in Gernonstown. The school was an old thatched house. The ruins of it can be seen yet. The teacher's name was Powderly. He was a great grand uncle of Michael Creegan from College-Hill. The school teacher used to teach Irish and the children used to speak Irish. There was a hedge-school in Crinion's glen in Fynan's house. The school master used to teach Irish. There is not a trace of the school in the glen at the present day.
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:55
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him go, telling him to come another night, but the man got such a fright that he never came again or never went to another dance.
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:54
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Here is a story I heard from my father. Long ago there was a man who was very fond of going to dances. One night he was at a dance about two miles from his home. He left to go home at about two o'clock and he went across the fields. On his way he had to pass a quarry. When he had just passed it he met a fairy who asked him where he had been and he told him he had been at a dance. "Well," said the fairy, "come with me and I will bring you to a far better dance." The fairy took out a key and opened a door in a rock that was beside them. They both went in to a big room that was full of fairies and there was music and dancing going on inside.
The man never heard such music in his live. Each fairy danced with him, so after awhile he got tired and he asked the fairy man who brought him in to let him out. The fairy brought him along in a tunnel underneath the ground for a long distance and then asked him if he knew where he was and the man said he did not know. Then the fairy told him that he was within a field of his own house. The fairy opened a door there and let
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:46
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put the crocks of milk beside the fire the way the heat would help to sower the milk and so it takes the milk far longer to churn in the winter than in the Summer. The churning around here is done by hand and the butter-milk is used for making bread and for feeding pigs and calves.
The two wooden things that the people make the butter with are called butter spades. The thing that turns round inside the churn is called a threncher and the wooden spade with the hollow for lifting up the butter is called
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:45
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We have no churn at home but the farmers beside us have. It is a little round one and it stands on the table. The top of it is curved in and a little lid fits on top of it. They have it about six years and there is no mark on it that I know of. They make butter twice a week in Summer and they make it once a week in Winter.
The woman of the house does the churning herself. It is the custom around this part of the country when a stranger comes in to a house and a person churning to take the handle or the dash off the person and give a helping hand in the churning.
The old people say that if a stranger comes in and does not give a help in the churning that they would take the butter off the milk and bring it with them. Other people say when you are churning to keep the door closed.
In Summer the milk gets sower very quickly and so it does not take long to churn but in Winter it is far different it takes the milk very long to get sower and some times the people
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 11:52
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Eve children and grown-up men play a lot of tricks. Children get a lot of nuts and put them in the fire and when they would crack the children would take them out and eat them. There is another game which they play. They would hang a cord on the ceiling with an apple on the end of it so that they could barely tip it with their mouths and the one that would have an apple eaten first would get another apple. They would get a dish of water and put a shilling in it and the person that could get the shilling in their mouth could keep it. After that they would eat a lot of nuts and apples. Men steal things and hide them for fun. They steal carts, gates and a lot of things like that. Long ago people used to send Valentine cards to one another on the 14th of February. Very few people send them now.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 11:49
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make a picnic every Easter Sunday round here. They usually make it on a hill or in a liss. Long ago they used to be beating one another out in eating the most eggs at this picnic. Children from about 5 years to seventeen or eighteen years used to go to it. The first of April is called "April Fool Day" in this district because people make April fools of one another. If someone said to a person that there were a lot of parcels in a room for her, and if she did not think of the first of April and she to go to the room and no parcels in it, the other person would say "April fool go to school and kiss the leg of the black stool." Children and grown-up people cod one another for fun. Children make a May-bush on the last day of April for the first of May round here. They put primroses and a lot of other wild flowers on it and leave it in a steady place for that night. Most people in this district make a little altar with the statue of the Blessed Virgin on it in the month of May in their homes, flowers and a Sacred Heart Lamp is usually put opposite the statue. Long ago a bon-fire used to be lit in this district on St. John's night. St John's night was called "Bon-fire Night." The 15th of August is called "Lady Well Day." A lot of people go down to "Lady Well" beside Slane on that day. On Hollow
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