Number of records in editorial history: 1618 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:42
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baker than told the father that it was only the other day that a Gentleman came in and gave the money to him, to give to the most needy, and honest man in the parish. "I told a man the whole story" added the baker "and he directed you to me." Then the little boy put his hands round his fathers neck, and told him that he would be always truthful and honest.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:40
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Tom Lane was a very needy man, when he and his son sat under a tree along the roadside, to eat a loaf of bread, which they had bought in the village close by. It was a very small loaf to divide between two. As the father cut it in halves, he found several pieces of gold inside. The boy was in great joy, when he saw the gold, and said to his father that it was theirs. The father put up his hand and told him that the gold was not theirs. "Whose is it then" said the boy "if it does not belong to is." The father said "it belongs to the baker, and it must have fallen in by mistake, so I will send for him." The son said "the baker may tell a lie." The baker having come to see about the gold the father said to him. "Does this money belong to you, if so take it with you." Then the son said to the baker. "We are very needy." The father told his son not to speak like that, or make him ashamed of him. The
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:35
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About the year 1828 the old Hibernian School at Farranadooney near Moynalty in County Meath, was the property of the poet Tevlin. He was evicted out of it during the Famine years. About the year 1850 there was a Protestant school at Loughan, between Moynalty and Carnaross. The children were evicted from Loughan school, and so they started a Protestant school at Farranadooney. The names of the first school-masters were William Whyte, and Londy Thornton. After them, the next to teach in it were Miss MacWhorter, and Miss Lee. The last teachers who taught in that school were Miss Owan and Miss Cowan. The school was closed then because a new school was built at Westland, beside Moynalty. The old School was converted into a dwelling house and is now owned by a man named Dolan.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:31
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Chaloner and Graham tried to get the two men executed. Cuffe was at school with George the Fourth King of England. He set sail to see him at Windsor Castle, and success-fully got the reprieve. Cuffe lived at Williamstown about a mile North of Kells in Co Meath and Graham lived at Larinstown Kells now Oakley Park Kells and Chaloner lived at Rathinree. Cuffe prided on the victory and said he would let all the old weavers from the North of Ireland know that he was John Otaway Cuffe.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:30
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About the year 1751 the mail car from Bailieborough in Cavan to Kells in Meath passed by Dulane (two miles North of Kells) and through Williamstown and Mullaghea on its journey. The reason for this was that where the present Mabes Bridge on the Blackwater is, there was only a fort. That same year two armed men robbed the Post car at Dulane Church-yard. When the driver reached Kells he reported the Matter at the old Bridewell in Kells. Military forces searched the Country around Carlanstown and Dulane and made arrests and reviews them with all Crown forces, and suspected two men at the Bridewell in Kells. It was a hanging matter in them days. The two men who raided the car went into the house of a Gentleman named John Otaway Cuffe who took sides with them. John Otaway Cuffe was one of the highest Gentlemen in this country in those days. He told them not to fear as he would free them the day of the trial. The trial went on in Trim and then Cuffe got a stay on the trial. Two Gentlemen named
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:26
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devour all the people on the earth.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:26
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Moybullogue graveyard situated in Tierworker parish about four miles north of Moynalty in Co. Meath is very ancient, and some strange happenings are supposed to have occurred there.
One time a woman called Golliwog was driving in a carriage to mass to Tierworker. She was fasting as she was going to receive Communion. On the way saw some black berries and she ordered her driver to pick them for her. The man picked them for her and she ate them. She went to Mass and committed sacrilege by receiving Holy Communion. When she came out of the Chapel she started to eat the people. She ate the driver and the horses. St Patrick happened to come on the scene and he hit her with a stick, and she divided into four parts. One of the parts fell under a stone on the road at the entrance to Moybullogue graveyard. The stone is still there. Another part fell into Cluggah lake nearby. It is said that St Patrick said that the four parts will re-unite when nine hundred generations of red haired Gargans cross over this stone on the road and the body will
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:39
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Once upon a time there was seven men drawing home turf from a bog with asses. Among these seven men there were two who never agreed. Their names were Curran and Sorachan. Their was a nick-name on Sorachan's mother. The name was Silver-tongue. Towards night Curran started calling Silver-tongue to Sorachan and boxing him. Sorachan started to cry and ran across the fields. When the rest of the men saw this they ran after him to see where he was going. After a time they saw him sitting in a small gap whistling. When they heard him whistling they thought he was calling the fairies and they ran back to tell Curran. When Curran heard this he ran home with fear.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:34
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About four years ago there lived a man called "Gentleman Reilly. He got sick and went to hospital. The day after he came home from hospital he was sitting beside the fire and he fell asleep. His son was out in the fields and when he came in he found his father in the fire, and he died shortly afterwards. Some days after his death his son saw lights beside the house and went over to where they were. Suddenly the lights disappeared and he saw his father in the darkness. Every night after that he saw the ghost. After a while he sold the house to another man. This man also saw the ghost and went mad. Every night the ghost is said to go down a lane which leads to the house. This happened at Leitrim about three miles from Moynalty in the County Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:29
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There were two travellers going through Garryard Wood one night. Garryard is a little wood in Walterstown, Moynalty in County Meath. The old people are of the opinion that a tunnel leads from Garryard Wood to Kingsfort on the opposite side of Moynalty village. The two travellers mentioned above have more or less proved the existence of the tunnel because when going through the wood they heard a fiddle being played underneath the ground, while the unseen player seemed to go in the direction of Moynalty. The men followed the sound to Moynalty. When they came to the Bridge over the Abhainn Ruadh the sounds faded away. Some say that the tunnel is stopped somewhere about here owing to the earth having caved in and thereby interupting the original passage from Garryard to Kingsfort.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 13:23
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It is about seventy years ago since rush candles were used. They were very common then. Long green rushes were used. When the men brought them home they were peeled immediately. They were peeled with fingers. Melted lard was the sort of grease used. They were greased in a little dish. Each rush was three feet in length. They had a Candlestick with a wooden stand under it. The stand was a thick square bit of wood. It had an iron bar out of it about as thick as a walking stick and a pincers on the top of it. They were used all through the dark evenings. The girls of the house used to make them.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:30
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There once lived a man near Moynalty in County Meath, and he did not believe in fairies. One night he was crossing a field near Mullagh about two miles away. He saw a lot of tiny men playing football in the field, and thinking they were children he joined in the game. The fairies wanted someone for one of the goals and they put the man in them. It was about eleven o clock at night and they played until it was midnight. Every time the man missed the ball one of the teams got around him and nearly killed him. The same thing happened every time he stopped the ball. At twelve o clock he saved a goal and both teams beat him. When they had finished beating him he still had the ball. Then all the fairies disappeared, and the man took the football and left the field. Then the ball changed into a lump of cow dung.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:25
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Long ago the tailors had no sewing machine - they had to sew all with their hands. Some years ago fleas was grown around here. The remains of a Flax pond is still at Farrandooney near Moynalty, Co. Meath. The flax was spun and woven into linen and shirts were made from it. There is one old spinning wheel in the possession of a man named Mc. Cartney at Moynalty but I think it is not in working order. No thread is spun now, but stockings are knitted in the homes from thread bought in the shops. At the death of a relative black clothes are worn by those who can afford it. Those who cannot wear a black armlet. In the old days the men wore knee breeches and stockings and swallow tail coats made of frieze (all woven locally). The women wore thick and flannel petticoats also woven locally, stockings knitted in the home and coloured shawls.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:16
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There is only one tailor in Moynalty district now and he does very little at his trade. Any work done by him is done in his own home. Formerly tailors travelled from house to house as required. The people usually spun and wove their own cloth and then called in a tailor who often stayed in the house for the month, until he had clothes made for the whole family. There is no cloth spun or woven in this district now but a good deal of this work was done formerly.
Of course, local people wear some of this kind of cloth still for Overcoats. It is called Homespun and is usually got from Donegal or Connemara. The tailor's gear consists of a measuring tape, a scissors for cutting out, a "tailor's goose" or smoothing iron, a needle sewing machine, and a thimble - a tailor's thimble has no bottom.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:11
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again and asked him what he did to his mare to make her blind. The stranger answered "it was you that was blind instead of the mare." He bought the mare off him at a big price and the stranger led the mare into the moat and the man went home satisfied.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 16:10
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There is a tradition that there are fairies in the moat of Kilbeg. It is a large mound of earth about a hundred feet high and there is a door leading into it. There is a flaged passage that leads to a fort in Dulane. Once upon a time there was a farmer from Nobber going to the fair of Kells with a very valuable mare to sell. As he was passing the moat of Kilbeg a man came out from the moat and started to buy the mare, but he would not sell to him. When he arrived at the fair all the buyers in turn came up to him saying "how much do you want for the blind mare" so the poor man could not get to sell her. As he was passing by the moat of Kilbeg coming home that night the same man came out of the moat again and asked him why he did not sell at the fair. The man was very angry when he met him
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
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Kells, Mullagh and Nobber are the local fairs. In several cases dealings were made at cross roads or at the houses. The best fair in days gone by was the fair of Carlanstown bridge. Mullagh being more of a centre for store cattle the buyers patronised it. It is one of the best fair of store cattle held in Meath at present. There used to be tents and dancing and singing carried on in them. The dealer always bids a few pounds less than the beast is worth and the seller asks a few pounds more than the beast is worth. The dealer keeps advancing and the keeps dropping so in this way they clench the bargain. Some mark the cattle with keel while others clip them with a scissors. Luck money is generally given. It is called a luck penny. The amount of money that is given depends on the price of the beast. The big fairs are the 9th Sept
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
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and the 16th October. The noted fairs for horses are the 9th September and the 16th October.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
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awaiting decision
Kells, Mullagh and Nobber are the local fairs. In several cases dealings were made at cross roads or at the houses. The best fair in days gone by was the fair of Carlanstown bridge. Mullagh being more of a centre for store cattle the buyers patronised it. It is one of the best fair of store cattle held in Meath at present. There used to be tents and dancing and singing carried on in them. The dealer always bids a few pounds less than the beast is worth and the seller asks a few pounds more than the beast is worth. The dealer keeps advancing and the keeps dropping so in this way they clench the bargain. Some mark the cattle with keel while others clip them with a scissors. Luck money is generally given. It is called a luck penny. The amount of money that is given depends on the price of the beast. The big fairs are the 9th Sept.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:13
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There is an old fort in Williamstown in the parish of Carnaross, about two miles from Kells in the County Meath. There was a family of Danes reared in this old fort, and it is said that they died there also. There is a tunnel leading from this fort to Dulane graveyard, about one mile in distance. This fort is on the estates of Stole Garret who is dead about fifty years. It is now on the lands of Patrick Carpenter. This fort is on the road side. It is a mound of earth and it is circular in shape. The entrance to this fort is now blocked by fallen earth. There is also two more forts quite near this one.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 12:09
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St Bridgets Cross are made on St Bridgets Eve as a rule in this district. First of all the maker gets two pieces of stick and nails them together in the form of a cross. Then he gets straw and clips of the ears. He next plaits the straw diagonally around the Cross starting at the centre and working outwards. When finished the Crosses are hung over the Kitchen door and over the front door of the house in honour of St Bridget. By so doing he places the house and all the family under the Protection of St Bridget. The people believe the Saint will keep away evil spirits and sickness. Crosses are also on roofs of the houses, usually on the Rafters. These are never taken down. In some old houses there are rows of these Crosses to be seen on the Rafters. The Cross when finished is about seven inches by five inches cord is often used instead of straw for plaiting.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 11:52
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no markets held there nowadays. Long ago pedlars used to go from house to house selling goods and some of them still come. A halpenny was called a "make" and a penny was called a "wing." A threepenny bit was known as a "kids eye" and a sixpence was called a "tanner." A "bob" was the name given to a shilling. The old fourpenny and tenpenny and four shilling coins are now gone out of use.
senior member (history)
2019-05-21 11:40
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In olden times shops were not as common as they are nowadays. There was only one shop in Moynalty about fifty years ago. The people had to go to Moynalty village to purchase their goods. After Mass a travelling shop would come and set up a tent in which buying and selling would be carried on. This does not happen now. Butter and Eggs were often exchanged for other goods and are still exchanged. Goods were often bartered or exchanged in this district in olden times. Sometimes labour was given in exchange for goods. Words such as "tick" and "earnest" were connected with buying and selling.
When a person gets goods without paying for them, it is said that he got them on "tick." When a person bought anything the seller makes him pay a little of the money to be sure that the buyer was in "earnest." This money was called "earnest." It was considered unlucky to do business on a Monday long ago. The market was held in front of a shop owned by a man named Gargan in the village of Moynalty. There are
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:56
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names are Matthew Smyth and Michael Mallon. The Smyth family have been at the trade for a few generations. Clogs were much worn some years ago, but they are not worn now. They were never made locally. There is an old saying that if a persons shoes creak that it is a sign that they are not paid for.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 13:55
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In former times it was unusual for young people to wear boots or shoes until they reached the age of twenty years or so. Even then they only wore them in Winter time, while some people were supposed to go barefoot all the year around. At the present time the children of this district go barefoot in Summer, but not in Winter. In the old days the people seldom suffered from Corns or Bunions because they did not wear boots or shoes. Corns are caused by wearing footwear that is too tight. The working men have a means of getting rid of Corns each Summer at the turf-cutting time. They walk about in the soft-peat barefooted and after they have worked for a week in this manner they can pick out the corns easily. Boots and shoes are repaired locally. Not many boots are made in the district now. The reason for this is the large number of Boot Factories at work in the country. The local shoe makers are not able to compete with them. The showmakers'
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 11:59
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water helps to collect the butter in Summer time. The cream is fully churned when little particles of butter stick to the dash and lid. If not fully churned, cream collects on both of these. After this the churn is rocked from side to side to collect the butter in a mass on top of the Buttermilk. The butter is then taken out with a wooden bowl called a Trencher. Then the Butter is washed in water and squeezed with a wooden Butter spade to take out all the Buttermilk. It is then salted ad made into rolls. Buttermilk is used principally in making bread. It is also given as food to calves - pigs, etc.
It is often used as a cure when persons are suffering from colds. The Buttermilk is scalded and often drunk in gruel.
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 11:53
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to prevent the cream dashing up. When the churning is in process.
Churning takes about an hour if the quantity of cream is large. Before starting to churn the housewife shakes a grain of salt over the lid of the churn so as to keep the fairies from taking the butter. If anybody enters the house during the time she is churning they have to take a hand in the work. This is to ensure that they will not bring any of the butter off the churning. If a person tried to take a light from the fire during the process the owner forbids it, in case the butter might be taken by him. In some places a horse-shoe or piece of iron is put under the churn to keep away fairies or evil spirits. During the churning, water is poured into the churn. Boiling water in Winter, and cold water in Summer. The boiling water speeds the churning in Winter, and the cold
senior member (history)
2019-05-17 11:47
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Churning is part of the work done in most farm-houses in the country. The churn used at home is a wooden vessel of the old type about three feet in height. It is about two and half feet wide at the bottom. There is a curve inwards of the sides, and they widen again at the top. The top is slightly narrower than the bottom. The churn is made of wood and bound by iron hoops. It was a customary thing and is still in parts of the country to see the churn out on the hedge airing after being scalded with boiling water. The other parts used are the dash, the lid, the "scup." The dash is a flat circular price of wood about nine inches in diameter and having a long handle in the middle of it. It is lifted up and down perpendicularly in the churn. In this way the cream is churned or broken. The "scup" is a circular wooden washer put on the handle of the dash at the lid
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 12:13
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said "you are finished now." The fairies left him in the drain for three days and three nights. The Leipreachan is supposed to be friendly with those who are friendly with him. He takes revenge on those who harm or interfere with him.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 12:12
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The Leipreachan is known locally as the Geanncanach and he is said to be about six inches in height. He is supposed to be dressed in a green jacket and a red cap. He lives in a fort or a rath. His usual occupation is shoemaking and he works under a mushroom. There are a lot of stories told about Leipreachans. One of them is told about a man named Carolan who was going home from work one moonlight night. He looked into a field and he saw a number of fairies playing in a field. They called him into the field and told him that they were going to hunt. One of them said that they had not any horse for him. Another said to give him the black bullock. The black bullock was brought and the man got up on him. One of the fairies told him to say nothing no matter what he saw. After a while he came to a drain and the bullock jumped it. Then the man said "that was a good jump." Then one of the fairies
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 11:58
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Once upon a time there was a man living in Co Louth and he had a dream one night. That there was Gold hidden in Billywood bog near Moynalty in Co Meath. He was also told in the dream to go there and bring four black horses without one white hair in them with him to Billywood bog. He was told that if he heard any noises when he was passing by Stirabout Hill, (about a mile to the South West of Moynalty) not to pass any notice of it. He went to the bog and found the Gold and as he was passing Stirabout Hill on his way home, he heard weird noises on the Hill. He forgot the warning he had received, however, and looked around him, with the object of discovering what was making the noise. When he looked in front again he saw the Gold roll back into the bog and in its place was a huge fish covering half the road.
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:45
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is called the "Valley of the Black Pig."
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:45
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There was a School Master living in Co Antrim long ago and he had the power of magic. He was very fond of coursing with greyhounds and hares and rabbits. Every day at playtime he would change the children into hares and greyhounds. He would have the children running up and down the yard until play time was over and then he would change them back again so that the children used to go home exhausted every evening. One mother got very angry at this and she also had the power of magic. She went to him and changed him into a black Pig and she told him that he would run until he would cut his own throat with his two front paws. He started to run and ran down through Antrim, Down, Louth, and Meath until he came to the Boyne and he jumped into the Boyne and kept swimming until he cut his own throat with his two front paws. They Valley of the black pig runs from Antrim, Down, Louth and through various parts of Meath. It runs through Walterstown and Moynalty and leads on to the Boyne at Navan and that is why it
senior member (history)
2019-05-03 10:39
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Years ago in the Penal days, a priest was saying Mass in the hollow under Screebogue hill near Moynalty in Co. Meath. Suddenly the priest hunters came on to prevent the priest from saying Mass. Immediately the priest saw them he ran away and the priest hunters ran after him. Just as the priest hunter's horse was jumping the drain where the priest was saying Mass it struck its foot on a stone and broke its leg and they were not able to chase the priest any further. There was a bridge built at the spot and it got the name of Cloch an TSagairt.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:31
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The woods make a great noise before a storm is coming.
When soot falls down the chimney it is a sign of rain.
When a dog is seen eating grass it is a sign of rain.
When smoke is going straight from the chimney it is a sign of good weather.
When far off hills seem very near it is a sign of rain.
When they seem far away it is a sign of a warm day.
When slates are wet after a rainfall it is a sign of more rain.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:29
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When there is a ring around the moon it is a sign of a storm.
When swallows are flying low it is a sign of rain and when they are flying high it is a sign of good weather.
When the Seagulls are seen flying inland it is a sign of a storm.
When sheep are eating early in the morning it is a sign of a bad day.
When they are seen resting in the morning it is a sign of a good day.
When a cat sits with its back to the fire it is a sign of a storm.
"A rainbow in the morning is a sailors sad warning and a rainbow at night is a sailors delight."
When Curlews are heard whistling it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:23
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Once upon a time there was a woman living near a fort and she had a small baby. One day she went to the well and when she came home the child was crying. It happened that it was not her own child, but a different child that the fairies had left in instead of her own. The next day she went to a neighbour's house for buttermilk and she got none. When she came home the child said the could give you buttermilk if they wanted they churned to-day. The next day the woman went to the priest and told him about the child. He told her that when she would be crossing the river to throw the child in and she did so. He put his toe in his mouth and swam off playing music. When she came home her own child was in the cradle.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:15
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horse." He bought the horse off him at a big price and the stranger led the horse into the moate, and the man went home satisfied.
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:15
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There is a tradition that there are fairies in the moate of Kilbeg. It is a mound of earth about one hundred feet high, and there is a door leading into it. Once upon a time there was a farmer going to the fair of Kells with a horse to sell. As he was passing this moate a man walked out of it and started to buy. But the man would not sell the horse to him. When he arrived at the fair all the buyers in turn came up to him saying how much do you want for the blind horse, so the poor man could not sell him. As he was passing by the moate of Kilbeg coming home that night the same man came out of the fort again and asked why he did not sell at the fair. The man was very angry, when he met him again and asked him what he did to his horse to make him blind. The stranger answered and said "It was you that was blind instead of the
senior member (history)
2019-05-02 16:10
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Once upon a time when St Patrick was in Ireland he was going through the County Meath one day. When he was near Navan a man saw him coming and he let out his two dogs and they were very wicked and he set them on St Patrick. When they saw St Patrick coming towards them they came up to him and he rubbed them down and he made the hair lie on them and the dogs never tuched the Saint. To the present day there is a pond where the ground opened and swallowed the man. It is said that ever since the the hair is lying on a dog.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 16:25
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cut. The old people long ago baked bread on a Saturday, and that would do them for the whole week.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 16:24
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The bread that was made in this district long ago was oaten bread. This bread was made from oats grown locally. The old people in this district remember querns being used. The quern was an article made from two flat stones one revolving on the other and a hole in the middle, to let the meal that was grinded fall out. There was alot of different kinds of bread made long ago, such as Potato-cake Boxty-bread and oaten-meal bread. The Potato-cake was made from champed potatoes with flour and salt mixed through it, and baked on a pan over the fire. The oaten-bread was made from oaten-meal with salt and water mixed through it in the kneading of it, and baked before the fire standing against a support called a griddle. The Boxty-bread was made from grated potatoes. The potatoes were grated into a dish, and then they were put into a cloth and squeezed. When they are squeezed, there is a little flour and salt added to it and baked before the fire standing against a support called a grid-iron. There is a cross cut on the top of every cake, this is to keep it together when it is being
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 16:19
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It is said that long ago two Giants were fighting near Mullagh hill. The weapons they used were stones. Some of the stones with which they fought rested on a small hill near Mullagh. The place is still known as the gates of Mullagh. These ancient stones are so heavy that no ten men nowadays would move them.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 12:02
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scholar had gone the man dug at the other side of the bush and found another crock gold much larger than before and he and his family lived happily for the rest of their lives.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 12:01
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Once upon a time there lived a man and his wife in this district. They were very poor and they had a number of children to support. One night the man dreamt that he saw a bridge in England where he could get gold. The next day he sailed to England. He walked through the land and after a time he came to a bridge that was like the bridge of his dream. There was a man standing by the bridge. The man that was at the bridge said "I had a dream and I saw a field in Ireland and there is a crock of gold buried under a hazel bush in the middle of it." There was a hazel bush in the mans field and when he came home he dug at one side of it. After a time his spade struck a stone and under the stone he found a crock of gold. There were some strange words written on the stone and they were not English or Irish. One day a scholar came to the house and the man showed him the stone. The scholar said that the words were foolish words and that they meant "the same at the other side." When the
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 11:48
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awaiting decision
pig are called "muc", "muc" or "hurish". The geese are called by the name of "bio." The horse shed is the same as the cowshed. The horses are shoed by a blacksmith.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 11:48
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awaiting decision
The farm animals we have at home are the cow, the horse, the sheep, the pig, the dog and the fowl such as hens, ducks, geese, and turkeys. The cows have got names such as "Polly" because she is a polly cow, and "Kitty" because she is quiet. When driving the cows in or out of a field a person says "how", "how." When a person wants a cow to stand he says "terish." The house in which the cows are kept is called a cowshed. It is a long stone building about thirty feet long and ten feet high and has an zinc roof. There is a window on it to give light. The floor is a paved floor made of stone and clay. The manger is made of poles and is three feet from the gable wall and it is two feet high. There are chains tied to upright stakes and the cows are tied to these by the neck. Some cows are tied by roops made of hay and others are tied by a roop called a "spancel." A piece of palm is hung in the cows shed to bring luck on the cows. The hens are called by "tuk", "tuk" and the
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 10:41
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awaiting decision
these pieces "Bobbins." When the whole roof is thatched, the eaves are trimmed and made tidy looking.
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 10:41
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awaiting decision
and he doubles back one end of it, and sticks this end under the old thatch until he has one layer across the bear strip. This layer is kept in position by means of scallops (scolb). Scallops are hazel rods about two feet long and pointed at both ends. The thatcher lays one of these rods flat on the thatch in a horizontal position. Then he bends two other rods into a staple-like position, and drives them into the thatch with a mallet, catching the flat one. It must be from this work we got the old Irish saying "Ni he la gaoice, la na scolb." When laying the last layer of straw he covers the scallops just a slater does when slating a house. He does the same with each succeeding layer until he reaches the top. Many ornamentations are put on the comb. The thatcher makes little bugle-shaped pieces for the comb. He calls
senior member (history)
2019-05-01 10:12
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awaiting decision
Thatching is a trade that is fast dying out in this district. There is only a few thatched houses around Moynalty now, while there were dozens of them long ago. Like the thatched houses, thatchers are also disserpearing. In the old days men specialised in this trade just like carpenters or any tradesmen. The best type of thatch is wheaten straw that has been scutched - that is the sheaf of wheat is taken unopened and beaten against a stone to remove the grain. The thatcher clears off the old thatch first in strips. He clears a strip about eighteen inches wide from the top of the roof or "comb" to the eaves. The straw is "pulled" or fixed for him. This is taken up to the thatcher and he fills in the cleared strip with fresh thatch, starting at the eaves and going upwards. He takes the straw in small pieces
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 16:19
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awaiting decision
During the Penal days the Priest's had to hide from the soldiers while Mass was going on or they would kill them. There was always a boy on guard to watch and see if the soldiers were coming near them while Mass was going on. One day while he was watching as Mass was going on he found that the soldiers were coming near them. So he went and told the Priest that the soldiers would be there in five minutes but the Priest said that they would not be there for an hour. Now it so happened that when one of the horses were crossing a bridge it broke its leg and that delayed them an hour or more. So that the Priest got to finish Mass and the people and the Priest got away safely before the soldiers came along. This happened near Nobber in Co Meath.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 16:14
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eyes. When cut they are often rolled in lime before sowing. The idea of this is to prevent slugs from attacking the seeds before the new potatoes have formed.
senior member (history)
2019-04-30 16:14
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awaiting decision
My father plants about two acres of potatoes each year. The amount depends on the acreage under corn the previous year, because he plants the potatoes on the stubble land. He prepares the ground himself in the following manner. First of all he ploughs the stubbles with a wheel plough, about the month of March. Then he harrows it with a wooden harrow. If the ground has alot of weeds he harrows it a couple of times. Then he harrows it with a spring-tooth harrow. This harrow goes deeper and cultivates the soil better. Then he makes drills with a double moulded plough. Then he puts manure into the alley with a horse and cart. He leaves the manure in little heaps in the alleys. Then it is spread with forks and when all this is done the ground is prepared. The sowing of the potatoes is done by splitting each drill with a double moulded plough. The best kind of potatoes to sow in my district are "Kerrs pink" and "Aran Victors." The preparation of the seed potatoes requires care also. Firstly my father picks the best shaped potatoes making sure that each potatoe has at least one "eye" or bud. Sometimes he cuts the larger ones that have several
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 16:05
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awaiting decision
There is a very ancient fort in Baltrasna. It is situated beside the avenue leading to Baltrasna house, and about one mile from Moynalty in the Co Meath. It is a great big fort and there are trees growing round it. There is supposed to be in this fort a tunnel leading to Crocka Wellea and there are branches of it leading in the direction of the Bush field fort over at Cherrymount about a half a mile West of the Baltrasna fort, and there is another branch of it leading to Rathbawn about two miles from Baltrasna fort. It is supposed that men went down to explore this tunnel, and they had to light a candle but they did not go very far until the candle quenched and they had to light matches to get out again. There is an entrance to this tunnel at Rathbawn. There is a great big stone in the centre of this fort at Baltrasna and it is supposed that fairies danced around it because little clay pipes about a finger length long used to be found on the stone in the morning.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 13:41
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was eaten very sparingly and when it was eaten it usually was salt meat. Certain kinds of food were ate on special occasions. These occasions were Shrove Tuesday, Easter Sunday, and Hollow Eve night. On Shrove Tuesday boxty bread was eaten by the old people and on Hallow Eve colcannon was used. Eggs were eaten on Easter Sunday and it was a custom to gather the egg-shells to decorate the May bush. Colcannon is made by peeling and boiling potatoes. When they were boiled they were mashed with a pot stick and milk and salt was added with them. Then it was ready for use. The first tea used in this district was used about eighty years ago. Before cups became common mugs were used. The earliest drinking vessels were called noggins. They were made of wood and were round in shape with a handle in the side of it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 13:31
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awaiting decision
The people in olden times did not enjoy the luxuries which we enjoy nowadays. They lived mostly on what they grew in their own little farms. The principal food consisted of potatoes and milk. They only took two meals a day in olden times. These meals were the breakfast and the supper. The breakfast was taken at about ten o'clock in the morning after the people had worked for three hours. It consisted of oaten bread and butter-milk and after that a noggin of porridge. Then they would return to work and work until it was dark. When they came home they had a meal of potatoes and buttermilk. The potatoes were poured into a basket called a scib which was placed over a pot on the middle of the floor. Potatoes were only ate at one meal and that was the supper. The bread used was called oaten cake. Oaten meal was mixed with water and salt and put on it. Then it was made level and put standing before a fire on a griddle. A griddle is a round iron with a handle on the side of it. Meat
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:39
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angry when he heard this, and, gathering his army, he routed the other king and his army,
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:38
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awaiting decision
There once lived a king whose kingdom was taken by another king. This king had a large number of soldiers but he was always defeated in battle. One night, as he lay awake, thinking of the next days battle, the devil appeared to him, and gave him a wand. He told him that all of his soldiers that fell in battle, would be entered by spirits, who would fight as well as the dead soldiers did. Next day the king gathered his army and marched to meet his enemy. As usual the king was defeated, but the other king wondered to see the soldiers get alive again. As the king was retreating the spirits left the dead bodies, and they fell on the ground. Next day the spirits entered the dead bodies once more, and in the evening they left them. When the other king saw this he set a guard on the battle-field. He told them to break sticks and put them through the bodies. They did this and to their surprise the bodies turned into heaps of dust. The king was very
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:30
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awaiting decision
supposed to have been used during the Danish times. Mass was said in this tunnel during the Penal Times. Cherry-mount graveyard is not far from this tunnel.
senior member (history)
2019-04-26 10:29
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awaiting decision
There are several old forts in this district. One of these forts is situated in the parish of Moynalty and about one furlong west of Loughan crossroads in the County Meath. The townland in which it is situated is called Rathinree or Kingsfort and is about two miles from Moynalty village. This fort is a circular mound of earth and there are trees growing around it. The peculiar feature about it is that the opening which leads to the cave is on top of the mound. The opening is closed by a large stone which is covered with clay or moss. The old people believe that there are three tunnels leading from this fort. One tunnel leads eastwards to a fort in Baltrasna about a mile away. Another leads in a north-westerly direction to Rathban fort. The other leads in a north-easterly direction to Garryand fort about two and half miles away. These tunnels are supposed to have been used as places of refuge or escape by Catholics when they were persecuted during the Penal Days. They are also
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 11:09
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sod measured about three feet by two feet. The house was then thatched with sedge which was gathered on marshes. Some had chimneys and some had none at all. Any chimneys there were, were made of wattles and clay. Sometimes an opening was made in the roof to let out the smoke. The roofs inside these houses were black and shiny with soot and smoke. There was often an old bucket put in a hole on the top of the house over the fire-place to draw the smoke. A fire-place was very seldom placed in the centre of the floor. The floors in these old houses were made of clay. Turf a wood was always burned in the old houses. The only method that the old people had of getting light at night long ago was by means of rush-candles.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:57
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awaiting decision
The old houses long ago were made of mud or red clay with thatched roofs. These were known as the old mud-walls cabins. The walls were very thick, and were made of a mixture of mud and yellow clay called "adobe." This mixture when dry was quite solid, and lasted for years. Even to this day the remains of some of these dwellings are to be seen in Moynalty parish in Co Meath. Small holes about five inches wide, and seven inches long were left in the walls to let in light. As a rule there was no glass in these holes. A bag of straw or hay was stuffed into each of them at night, to keep out the cold, and taken out in the morning to let in the light. The roof was a crude affair. First of all thick boughs of oak were put up for rafters. The rafters on the front and back of the roof were held in position by shorter oak sticks called "Collar-Ties."Over the rafters lighter oak poles were spread at right angles to the rafters. Over these poles Beech branches often with the leaves on, were spread. On top of all this was put a covering of sods called "Scraws," usually got in a bog. Each
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:36
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awaiting decision
The only big wind that is remembered took place in the year 1903. It swept over all Ireland but it did the most harm around Kells and Carlanstown. All the woods in the country were levelled and several houses were burnt and knocked down. There was a beautiful grove around the spire of Loyd (of ever green trees) and in the morning they were all levelled. All the roads were blocked with trees. Fire wood was very plentiful. It was a matter of getting the roads clear. There was a poem made about the big wind. In one of the verses was,
The two public houses were,
shut sharp at ten,
But before three in the morning they were opened again,
The wine and whiskey was there in galore,
They could not be touched till the storm was o'er.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 10:12
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awaiting decision
The local landlord was John Arthur Farrell. His ancestors lived in Moynalty for over a hundred and fifty years. He was looked upon as a bad landlord because he was cruel. The landlord had the houses knocked down and by doing this he got the nickname "Jack the Leveller." Many stories are told about the landlord.
In this parish there lived a priest named Fr. Mullen. His house was opposite the landlord's. When the Priest's house was being built the landlord would not allow it to be on a level with his own. There was a basement under the Priest's house. So Fr. Mullen had to remove the clay from around the basement. This is why the Priest's house is in a hollow. Fr. Mullen said "The Priest's house will be here when the grass grows round the landlord's door."
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 09:56
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time a number of men were working in a field, reaping corn. They took with them a drink, made up of water and oaten-meal. They put the drink under a heap of bushes for fear the sun would damage it. After a time they came to a weasel's nest and young ones in it. One of the men lifted the nest very carefully and left it down on a sheaf of oats. The old weasel was looking on. She thought the men were killing the young ones, so she went and spat into the drink the men had. The people believe that a weasel's spit contains poison. Then the old weasel went to see if the little ones were dead, but when she reached the nest she found them safely. Then the old weasel seeing that they were safe, went and did her best to spill the drink, for fear the men would drink it.
senior member (history)
2019-04-25 09:49
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awaiting decision
There is an ancient Castle at Robertstown on the land of Mr. C. O Reilly, Kilbeg. In this Castle lived a wretch named "Gutters" who was in the habit of sitting at a window and shooting at passers-by. Several attempts were made to catch him. In the same parish there remains of another Castle on the top of Ardamagh Hill or Castle Hill as it is called. In this castle the parish Priest watched for weeks to see if "Gutters" would leave his Castle. At last one morning early, he saw "Gutters" in a field. The Priest got his horse and gun and approached "Gutters" and shot him dead. The spot can still be seen where "Gutters" fell. People passing by, throw a stone on the spot where Gutters fell. A very remarkable thing is that the Castle is good repair. The Castle is now covered with ivy. The blood of his victims is still on the stairs. Some people say that he was killed in the Castle.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:49
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The people went into the house to dance and the Ghost appeared and chased them from the house and followed them up the road. About thirty years after a woman named Mrs Carrick who died about four years ago was sitting by the fire at twelve o clock. The Ghost then appeared and told her that the house was his and ordered her to get out. She went out and waited until Mr Carrick came home. The two of them went into the house and they saw the Ghost disappearing into the ground. After that he was not seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:46
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awaiting decision
In a house at Ballinacleva about a mile from Moynalty, and at present occupied by a family named Carrick, strange happenings are supposed to have occured about fifty years ago and further strange nocturnal incidents are supposed to have happened there recently.
About fifty years ago the present house was then a ruin. One day a number of children where playing around the ruined house. Suddenly they heard a noise. Some of them got afraid and ran away, while the others went around to the back of the house to see what had happened. Then they heard the sound of horses at the back of the house. When they went round they saw a number of huntsmen on horseback. They had a pack of hounds with them. As soon as the children saw them they disappeared. Then the house began to shake and lights were seen in one room. The children ran away and did not come back for a long time. About a year after that the children were playing there again. They were throwing stones in through a window and they heard a voice telling them not to throw any more stones. Then they went over to the window and they saw a black figure in the room. Another night there was a bonfire lighted beside the house which was then occupied by a family named O Brien.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:35
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became stronger. If he hit the anvil strong, it is said: He would make the devil appear. If the water that the smith used was sprinkled in a haunted house it would hunt the ghost.
senior member (history)
2019-04-24 10:34
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awaiting decision
There are three forges in the parish of Moynalty. The smiths are John Bell, Jack Reilly and Edward Farrelly.
Edward Farrelly's ancestors were always known to be smiths. His forge is situated at a crossroad called Maxwell's Cross at Feagh. The forge is a small dark house beside a stream. Generally like the shape of the door is like a horse-shoe. There is only one fire inside. The bellows is shaped like a pear. It is made of leather. The smith uses an anvil, sledge, hammer, chisel and tonges. He also use a file. He shoes horses and asses any makes farm machinery, such as ploughs, harrows. A turf fire is lit in the open air to shoe wheels. It is usually done along a stream. Card playing took place in Jack Reilly's forge during winter nights.
An old story is that every time the blacksmith washed his hands he
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:30
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James Farelly.
The rich children brought 5/= every month, and the poor children brought sods of turf every day. The master and pupils used lead for writing on their slates.
There were no seats in the school, but there were four square stones and they placed a board over the stones and sat on the ground and wrote.
The teacher stayed three months in the same place, and if there was any danger he would only stay a week.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:28
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There was an old hedge school on the top of Rose hill. It was all Irish that was spoken in it.
The name of the maser was Master Dowd. This is the way he taught the pupils to write; he had only one book in the school, and whatever was in the book he wrote on a slate and the pupils wrote it on their slates.
The school was built in Reyond's field, and the townland was Arche-stown. The master taught the children indoor. Master Dowd was from Rosmead.
The master lodged in a farmer's house, about a mile from the school. The farmer was
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:26
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awaiting decision
When the mountains are a purple colour it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:25
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awaiting decision
There are a few fairy Forts about our district. I know one which is in Killallon. There is a fairly big field and this fort is in one corner of it. There is a house in front of it. On the other side of the road there is a grave-yard.
Some people say when a funeral goes into this grave-yard that in the night about 12 o'clock a white woman is seen coming out of the fort and going across into the grave-yard. It is so told by the people of the district.
This fort is fairly big and on the top of it there is a big block of a stick and a few stones.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:22
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awaiting decision
An old thatched house was found on top of a hill near Frayne with an old man holding on to the rafters. The man died from shock, and wounds.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:21
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awaiting decision
Fifteen years ago a terrible wind storm occurred. It blew the roof off Kilskyre Chapel. Some slates of the chapel were found 3 miles away from the place.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:21
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awaiting decision
In about the year 1903 the big wind arose. That night huge trees were uprooted; houses unroofed, and birds killed.
It took place during the night and before morning it ended. People could not travel on account of all the things that fell during the night because they were laid in their path.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:18
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over for a visit and was in the shop when the incident happened. When we were looking out the window at the lightning some of us thought they saw a thunder-bolt and a moment later a fearful crash was heard and when we looked out we saw a big hole in our roof.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:17
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One day about four years ago we were looking out of the window at the dreadful lightning that was darting across the sky and some of us were playing cards at the table. My Granny had come
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:16
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awaiting decision
Once there lived a man there named Mr Herbert who was very great in growing Herbs, and ever since it was called Herberts town. He is dead now.
There is a hollow in our district called Bradlies hollow there is supposed to be a ghost in it.
There is a place called Pigotstown. A man named Mr Conall shot 100 wild boards in the woods long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-04-18 10:15
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awaiting decision
There is a holy well at a place named Kiaram. Each year the people go to worship there and they have stalls and other things there. They have these prayers in the day time and at midnight some of the people gather together again at the well, to see the trout, which is supposed to rise at twelve o'clock.
There is also a well near Clonmellon which cures warts.
It is called a "Wartie Well" and is very small with a little drop of water in it. There is a bush beside the well and when a person wants a wart cured they rub the water on the wart and then tie a rag on the bush. When the rag rots, the warts go away.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 12:01
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awaiting decision
Two skulls are to be seen on the stones of the collapsed vault in the centre of the graveyard.
Miss Kelly says that they often pushed them far in through the stones and covered them.
However, they would be on the surface again and nobody could account for how they got there.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 12:00
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awaiting decision
Mrs Kelly says that there was some curse on the Butler family.
The maternal grandmother of the last occupant told that there be no heir to the property. That the larks would not sing near during their residence. Both prophecies turned out to be true as the last owner was childless and sold the property about 16 years ago to the present owner Mr Roantree.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:51
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awaiting decision
and marigolds were very much used as food. In this District Mrs. Naper grandmother of the present captain Naper contributed a large herd of Deer and other animals to feed the starving people.In the year before the famine the potatoes were so plent-ful in this District that a man took two barrels of potatoes to a local inn and only received a naggin of Whiskey for them. They were also thrown in the ditches as there was scarcely any use for them owing to the vast crop of the year.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:49
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awaiting decision
half of the crop was lost or rotted in the ground. At least 1/4 of what was left was required for seed for the coming (year) Spring. In the Spring of 1846 and 1847 the potatoes planted as seed were very small many of which failed to grow or what did grow produced a very weak crop. The corn which was grown by the Irish people of this age was aquired by the Land Lord as rent and sold in the English markets; thus leaving the potatoes as the food on which the people depended. When the potato crops were consumed turnips
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:46
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November 1938.
The famine was the chief cause of the reduction of the Population of County Meath. During these years people left County Meath abandoning their property and flying to places over the sea. Many of those who were unable to get away died in their hundreds for want of food. The chief cause was the failure of the potato crop upon which the bulk of the Irish people depended for their subsistence. About
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:39
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awaiting decision
the Protestants thought he was listening to what they were saying.
Some people say a fork was driven through his heart and he was hung in the barn.
Other people say his body was thrown in a stream and people going to mas found him.
Other people say he was thrown under a whin bush and a boy found him next evening.
On the next page is a poem written by a Mrs McEnroe about the Tragedy.
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:37
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October 1938.
There is a house called Strongs which is haunted and the reason why it is haunted is because murder was commited there about 35 years ago.
One night as there was a Protestant meeting being held one of the Workmen whose name was John Sheridan came into the barn and
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:21
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awaiting decision
to get some one to carry her in. The woman died the following day. When Spring came the people had no seed potatoes to set. A man by the name of Hugh O'Reilly went to Longford town and bought a consignment of them. He brought them to Oldcastle and sold them to the people. When Hugh O'Reilly died the priests said "He was an instrument between God and man for the benefit of the people."
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:20
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indian porridge and sour milk. There was a place for boiling this meal in the Tan Yard in Oldcastle, another in the place where the market house now is and there was also one in Chapel St. Boilers of porridge would be boiled in those three placed. The people around the parish who would have milk brought in the milk to the boiling places. They would get a can of bread in exchange for the milk. On Bolie Bridge a woman named Smith was one day crossing the bridge with a bucket of water. She fainted and the people got it hard
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 11:18
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Farmer.
October 1938.
In the year of 1848 there was a great famine. Many people died in this famine. All the people died of Cholera during this time. The potatoes failed failed in 1847. The blight came on the 24th June 1847. After a few days there was not a potato to be seen. The few that were left were bad so that any one who ate them took that disease. The milk also was very scarce so the people were starved to death. There was a lot of
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 10:25
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awaiting decision
Farrell's land and on to the Black water. He swam the river as far as the Boyne at Navan in County Meath. There he cut his throat with his fore paws and died. Where he ran is now called "The Valley of the Black Pig."
senior member (history)
2019-04-17 10:23
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awaiting decision
There was once a School Master in Tyrone who had the power of magic. He was also very fond of hunting. At play-time every day he would change the children into Hares and Hounds. He would have them chasing around the playground. In the evening they would go home exhausted. One day a woman whose child went home exhausted got angry and came to the master.
She also had the power of magic also. The master ignored her. She got furious and turned him into a Black Pig. She then said that he would cut his throat with his fore paws. he started running he ran down through Tyrone into Armagh from Armagh into Louth. He ran through this corner of Meath. He ran at the back of Moynalty through
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 16:20
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awaiting decision
Not so many years ago the Protestants used to be buried in the Catholic Church of Temple Kiernan. Any time, any time a person was buried in it, on the night of the burial. the coffin would be lifted and left outside the gate of the church. One night the "Police" were put to watch who it was who was bringing out the corpse. So they stayed there all night and when they were going home in the morning, they saw the corpse outside the gate. They never saw anyone bringing it out. (7th January 1938).
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 16:14
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very close grown hedge of about 15 ft high. It had full grown thorns on it.
2nd February 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 16:14
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a lot of men. They had music and they hustled him off towards the Danestown "crooked meadows." He kept pushing against them and kept making for Pat Byrds house. There was a very very high thick hedge between The Moate Field and Pat Byrds house. Mulligan jumped across the hedge and down into a dung-heap. He sank to his knees in the dung. He rushed to the door of Byrds house and asked "For God's sake to be let in or else he would be killed." Pat Byrd told him to go off to this own house as it was only a couple of hundred yards away. He would not go but pleaded to be let in. Pat arose and opened the door and Jonny fell in on the floor and lay at the back of the door. Jonny fell down and told Pat Byrd that a lot of men wanted to push him off for the Crooked Meadows and that he pushed against them and then jumped the hedge. (People don't understand how he jumped the hedge that was in it). "I'll tell the rest in the morning," says Jonny. But ever afterwards when Pat mentioned the event Jonny moved away. Jonny was never known to speak of that night's happenings during the rest of his life and he never went to ceilidhe in Runahan again. (He'd hardly have been 30 years when this happened). The hedge was a very
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:55
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Johnny Mulligan used to be ceilidhing up about Runahan. He came home along the Glonya and out into the Moate Field. (There is a little Moate in this field not as big as Dainestown One). On a path on one side of the Moate he saw what was like a lump of hay until he got near it. Then it opened out and turned into
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:53
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cattle sold out of it. Another man, P. Donnelly of Danestown built a house from those stones and he never lived in it.
In the vicinity of Skryne there is supposed to be a deLacy Castle. That Castle is supposed by some people to be the Castle of Walterstown. (7 February 1938).
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:46
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Long ago Verse Coyle, used to come down from Dublin to collect the rent for the landlord around here. he had a certain day for collecting it. On that day all the people who had to pay rents had to meet him at Peter Butterlys house.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:44
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If you suffer from "pains" and if you go to the mearing of two parishes nine times and get water there nine times you can get cured. Some one must go with you to get up the water. Christy Reynolds was once "bet up with pains" and he used to have a stick helping him to walk. He and his wife went to the mearing of Kentstown and Walterstown and the wife got up the water for him there. When he went home he rubbed the water to the places where the pains were. He went to the mearing nine times and got the water nine times. When he had it done six times, he was able to throw away the stick and at the ninth time he was as good as if he had never a pain in his life.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:40
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Johnnie up to the shop and up to to the church-yard. Johnnie got afraid and did not stop to rest or did he say a prayer passing. The black dog went into the churchyard and while Johnnie was passing he heard three loud cried. He ran home.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:39
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Johnny Boyle who lived at Cross a Greallaig used to go to Darby's shop every night for things. When going home he used to sit on the steps of the Church-yard to rest. He always said a prayer. This night he was going to the shop as usual and near the shop a black dog jumped out from the butt of a tree. It followed
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:37
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Sixty or seventy years ago when the Austin's were in Slanduff. One evening a fairy woman came in and warmed herself at the fire. Patrick Reilly saw the fairy afterwards up in the fields.
One evening Mrs Gaffney went out to get water. This happened in the harvest-time. She did not know anything until she landed at a field beside Reilly's of Rock. At that time there was a wake in White's and two men heard her screeching and they got her standing in a ditch of mud.
senior member (history)
2019-04-16 15:35
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Many years ago there was a mine-hole in front of George Clarke's house, and one day while the people were at dinner the mine-hole fell in and all the tools were buried. The mine-hole was covered in and has never been re-opened.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 16:33
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A very recent event in our locality was the unearthing of a corpse near an old quarry in the Rathcarne Gaeltacht. The skeleton was found to be human when the jaws of a man with a set of most perfect teeth were found amongst the bones. A pure gold Tara brooch was also found amongst them and it was about the same size and in the same shape of a horseshoe. These have been removed to the Dublin museum and investigations are already being made.
In the district of Stonestown there is a field which is called "The Bush Field." There is a mound in the centre of the field and it is overgrown with bushes. Tradition tells us that one day in the sixteenth century there were men harvesting in this field and Cromwell's men came the way and seeing the men they shot them dead. The victims fell in the spot where the mound lies and the bushes grow to-day.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 16:30
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and he died there about twenty-three years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 11:50
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A man was working with 2 or 3 other men at Cloncullen and they were coming home after working in the evening, I suppose in the Springtime of the year and the young fellows began to go trick, funning about behind walking after the old men. When they came into one field there
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 11:43
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That road (Knocknagurneen) was supposed to come on down and up that laneway of this road (the Giltown Road).
This lane was the old road to Dublin one time and it went on to Clady Bridge on to a Ford at the Abbey of Bective across the Boyne.
There was a house where this old road crossed this Present road that we are living on now and they had to move the house out of it or build a new one. They couldent live in it, all the cattle died, the stable was lying in the way of the Fairy Pass.
senior member (history)
2019-04-15 11:19
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The Irish Soldiers were on the summit of the Hill. The Trenches are there yet and when the English were coming up the slope its across them the shot would go and they captured an English Soldier and the Englishman told them to aim at the Buckles of their shoes and not at their heads, this they did with good effect and they went to make their way off the hill down and they were very nearly clear of the English when they were overpowered.
(An account current is that a considerable quantity of Whiskey was consumed by the Insurgents which was either sent them by Murphys the Distillers in Navan or else seized while in transit to Dublin, some would have it that they knew quite well it would fall into the hands of the '98 men. Informant had this traditions as well as had others whom I was speaking to).
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 16:12
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I hope once more to see,
The verdant shades and flowery vales,
Round lovely Moy-nal-ty.
The Hawthorn time and Woodbine,
All natures are in bloom,
The Blackbird, thrush, and Linnet
Their notes do sweetly tune,
The buck and doe are sporting,
But it's not so with me
For the day I spent I'll never forget,
Round lovely Moy-nal-ty.
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 16:11
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Come all ye gentle Muses,
Before I bid adieu,
Another while in Ireland,
I'd like to spend with you,
It grieves my heart from you to part,
But here I cannot stay,
For I must go a roaming,
To rich America.
Farewell a while to sweet Westland,
Where often I did rove,
To spend my time in pleasure,
Down by each silent grove,
To hear the Thrushes warble,
And the Blackbird on each tree,
Through each silent grove as I did rove
Round lovely Moy-nal-ty.
Scriebogue Hill and New-catle,
Shall often cross my mind,
Sweet Salford shades and Walterstown,
That I must leave behind
The flowery dells that I love well,
senior member (history)
2019-04-12 11:52
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I live in Corballis. It is in the parish of Ballivor. There are six families in it. They are nearly all young people. All the houses are thatched. There were more houses in it long ago, but they are all knocked, and overgrown with weeds and nettles. Six people emigrated from my district to America. The land is very high and good for crops. There are two rivers in my district, "Stoneyford," and the "Black Lake." There is no songs or stories connected with my district. All the houses are fairly old.
senior member (history)
2019-04-03 10:10
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The following inscription is on the back of the above:-
"Pray for the soul
Patrick Leonard, Colonel, U.S.A.
Who died
September 18th 1873 aged 52 years."
He believed that his country was never intended to be merely a province. He freely risked his life for her freedom and died happy in the confidence of her final triumph. R.I.P.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:38
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and no one ever visits the grave now. The people of the parish put up the cross to his memory. A drawing of the cross and the inscription appear on the next page, because the inscription is now getting obliterated.
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:37
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There is a churchyard in Monknewtown. The runs of the monastery that gave the name to the parish is still to be seen in the churchyard. All that is still there is the west wall with two oblong windows on it. It was built by some of the monks when they came from Mellefont.
Colonel Leonard is buried in the grave yard. My grandfather told me he was a Colonel of the Feinans. He lived about Meelek out side Drogheda. He was forced to leave Ireland by the English and went to America. When he came back from America he lived at the black Bull outside Drogheda. He died a poor man in the Drogheda workhouse. He was buried in Monknewtown Churchyard. For years there was an anniversity held at Monknewtown and hundreds of people and bands attended. This was suppressed by the government
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:31
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If a girl went out to a barn to riddle corn at twelve o'clock on Hallow Eve night, her future husband would appear to her and take the riddle out of her hands. Another custom was if a person took a ball of yarn to a kiln and unbind it to the bottom and hold one end in their hand, when he would say who is there a voise wold would answer "I am."
senior member (history)
2019-04-02 16:30
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Long ago there was a custom of making colcannon on Hallow Eve night. It used to be called colcannon night. Everyone used to make it, both rich and poor. It was made from potatoes masked up and milk and butter put on it. The farmers used to give their workmen a quart of milk and a pound of butter on Hallow Eve night for the colcannon.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 10:58
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were on one side of the street hence the popular saying: - "All to one side like Moynalty." On the opposite side of the street was a row of lovely lime trees and from that a green lawn sloped to the Borora, the far bank of which was beautifully wooded. It was quaint and lovely now all that has been changed. The trees have been cut down to make place for four new houses, and the sloping lawn has been divided into allotments to provide the new comers with gardens. So, that the present period of progress while providing better housing conditions has gone a long way towards converting a once lovely village into just a village street.
senior member (history)
2019-03-27 10:29
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The present village was built by the Farrell as was also Moynalty Hse. The old village was higher up and ran down to the river - at a point where the old coach road crossed the river. A corn mill stood at the river end of the village. The remains of houses were levelled by the Farrell family who built present village. The windows in all the houses of the village (except those newly built or those which have been renovated) are all alike in shape and have diamond-shaped panes of glass. The walls are immensely thick and the buildings quite ancient-looking. In some of the buildings are open shelter still remains in front and most of them have sky-lights in the roofs. From the old village the road ran at the back of the present village and round by the door of what is now Moynalty Hse (then a small one-story thatched house). When Farrells built the new house they had the road changed out some distance to the present place and built a boundary wall between. The old cemetry which has been long closed extended farther towards the North West - extending about half-way over the garden now owned by J. Bell.
All the houses of Moynalty
senior member (history)
2019-03-26 17:02
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Dec 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 10:49
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of good weather. Here are the signs of bad weather. When the fog is on the hill. When you see a dark brown frog. When you hear the weir at "the cotton mill" it is a sign of bad rainy weather and when you hear the weir at Slane Castle it is a sign of good weather. When the smoke goes down to the ground it is a sign of bad rainy weather. When you see the crows going back home and one turns back it is a sign of bad rainy weather. When the cattle and sheep are lying together it is a sign of bad weather.
The Cotton Mill lies about 2 miles directly south from here and the other weir is about three miles southeast of here. It is seldom heard because Barristown hill is in the way.
senior member (history)
2019-03-25 10:40
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The people used to say that the weather would get like winter after the fair of Skreen. That used to be a very big fair long ago and it used to be held on the 12th of October. When the swans come out of the river it is a sign of heavy frost. When there is a lot of stars in the sky it is a sign of frost. Here are signs of a storm that I heard of: When the wild geese fly to the south it is a sign of a storm. When the dog comes into the house and does not want to go out, it is a sign of a thunder storm. When the dog comes into the house and does not want to go out, it is a sign of a thunder storm. When the crows go up high in the air and come down turning and diving and cawing; when the sun goes down a very wicked red.
When you see a yellow frog it is a sign of good weather. When the fog is in the hollow it is a sign of good weather. When the crows fly high it is a sign
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:15
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The Trim Assizes brought a change for the worse in the weather. An execution always brought bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:15
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The Trim (?) brought a change for the worse in the weather. An execution always brought bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:14
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building. The people around here say that if you sell anything to a protestant the money you get is supposed to be very lucky. A man called Tol Lol used to come round this district up to about twelve years ago. He used to sell and exchange delph for rags and bottles and rabbit skins. That was the last man that used to come round this district. The word "wing" is often used for a penny. The word "tanner" and "kick" is used for sixpence. The word "Bob" is used for a shilling.
The word a "half doller" is used for a half crown and the word "doller" is used for five shillings.
The word a "half note" or a "half quid" is used for ten shillings and the word "quid" is used for a pound and the word "note" is used for a pound also. The market towns of this district are Navan and Drogheda, where people sell eggs, butter, turkeys and fowl and some people that have customers and send eggs to Dublin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:05
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few shops along this road because they would want a lot of groceries for the travellers that would be stopping at the inns. There used to be a shop owned by people named mac Quail, who used to make wooden shovels, beside this school. There was another shop about a quarter of a mile from this school. About three hundred yards south of this school there used to be a bakery owned by people named Murray. About three hundred yards to the east of this school a man named Robert Mullen used to make tops and other toys and he used to sell them. Buying and selling might be carried on after Mass if a man had cattle or sheep for sale and if he saw a man that would buy them hr would tell him to come and look at them, and if the man had seen them before they might make a bargain after Mass. Sunday is supposed to be an unlucky day for selling or buying and Saturday is a bad day to start any business such as
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:57
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The shops as far as I know were just as common a hundred years ago as they are now as they are now, so the people had not to go to the towns to make purchases. There were two inns on the road along here where people travelling to Cavan and districts in that direction from Drogheda would stop for the night and people going from there to Drogheda would stop. The inns were owned by people the name of Brownell and Crinion. Brownell's inn was about two hundred yards from this school and Crinon's inn was about three quarters of a mile from this school. All the produce of Cavan and parts of Westmeath would go this road and the goods that would come into the port of Drogheda for Cavan would come this road, so that this was a very important road before the the railway was built from Drogheda to Oldcastle in the year 1847 and for some years after that. Those inns were called a carman's stage. There were a good
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 17:00
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whistling in the evening it is a sign of rain. Another sign of bad weather is when you see the hens standing round the door and they picking their feathers. When white stripes are seen in the sky it is a sign of showery weather. They are called "Goat hair clouds." Here is an old saying that is often heard in this district "Goat haired sky neighter wet nor dry." When there are a good many stars in the sky shinning very bright it is a sign of frost. When the wind is blowing from the north it is a sign that snow will follow. When the sun goes down dull it is a sign of bad weather. When a fog rises it is a sign of fine weather. Another sign of wet weather is when you see black clouds in the sky. When the crows fly low it is a sign of rain. A sign of good weather is when the smoke goes up straight from the chimney.
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 16:57
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from the west it is a sign of showers and when the wind is from the south it is a sign of continual rain. There is another saying about the sun and the wind. When farmers are making their hay and the wind from the southwest at twelve o clock in the day, they say that "it will be fine until the sun comes round with the wind in the evening." When the stars are in a cluster and when they are shinning very bright it is a sign of rain. Here are a few more signs of bad weather. A cat sitting with her back to the fire; a dog eating grass; sheep grazing together in a field; and when the soot falls down the chimney. When you see a blue flame in the fire it is a sign of a storm. When the sea-gulls come in on the land it is a sign of a storm on the sea and when they are at the sea it is a sign of a storm on the land. When the crows are flying low it is a sign of rain. People who suffer from rheumatism get much worse when it is going to rain. When peoples' corns are paining them they say that it will rain. When beetles run across the floor it is a sign of rain. When the curlew is heard
senior member (history)
2019-03-14 15:52
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There are a great many remarks made as to the signs of the weather by the people of this district. When there are rays out of the sun when setting it is a sign of rain. When the sun goes down real red it is a sign of frost and wind. When the sun is misty or when it sets behind a big cloud it is a sign that rain will follow. When the sun meets the wind at twelve o clock in the day it is said that it will rain at three or six o clock in the evening.
When there is a circle round the moon it is a sign of bad weather. It is said that the nearer the circle the farther the storm or the farther the circle the nearer the storm. When the new moon is on its back as it is said, it will hold rain and it is a sign of a wet month. When "weather galls" appear in the sky it is a sign of rain. "Weather galls" are the name that is given by the people around here to small green lights or small pieces of a rainbow that are seen in the sky on the horizon. When the sky is high that is when clouds are high it is a sure sign of good weather. The far off hills look very plain when there is going to be rain. When the wind is coming
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 11:08
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Long ago, before money came into use the people used to exchange their goods. The words that were used when buying and selling were boot, tick and luckpenny. Boot means if a person bought a cow and gave money and a calf for payment the calf would be called boot. It is mostly tinkers that use boot around here. When they are selling a thing they say "What boot will you give me." Tick means if a person bought something and had no money to pay for it until some other time, it would be said that "he got it on tick." When the people sell cattle or sheep round here they give money called luckpenny.
Luckpenny is money the people give to the man that buys the sheep or cattle for luck. The people give this money out of their pockets and if they have not any in their pockets they take it of the price of the beast. The people usually give two shillings to five shillings on cattle and threepence to a shilling on sheep and lambs,
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 11:02
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more. Only for The Puck the man's mother would have died.
Another story I heard about The Puck is one time a man was going to Dublin with a few loads of hay. He said he would not be home until dark the next night. Someone asked him if he ever saw The Puck and he said he didn't but if he did he would cut the two eyes out of him with the whip. The next night the man was coming home in the cart and The Puck ran after him. He struck The Puck on the head with the whip. The Puck ran under the cart and threw it over to the other side of the road. The Puck came out from under the cart and ran across the road towards Slane Castle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-12 10:54
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The Puck is the shape of a black dog. He used to be around Slane Castle. There was a little man living in Slane. His mother was dying, and the little man was crying because she couldn't be cured owing to he not having enough money to pay a great doctor that was in Dublin at the time. He went on wondering what he ought to do. He went out into the field that was beside his house and he thought he saw a big goat beside the far ditch of the field. He went over to the far ditch and he saw the animal and he did not know whether it was a goat or a dog. He got up on its back and he saw it was The Puck. The Puck started to run and came to a hill and rolled down it. The man was afraid to get off the Puck's back. The Puck ran to a wall and a stone fell off the top of it. The man looked into the spot out of which the stone fell and saw a piece of cloth in which he found a big sum of gold. He went home and his mother was still alive. He went to Dublin and told the doctor that his mother was sick. The doctor came and cured the man's mother. The man and his mother never wanted money any
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 12:10
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he used in the cure which are broom, golden rod and bulltran. Long ago the people used to say that the fairies used to ride on the bulltrans. Some people call bulltrans the "Fairies Horses." Garlic is supposed to cure the black leg in cattle. Mrs Brien from Gernonstown has a cure for the kidneys. She makes the cure out of the following herbs broom, sweet may, golden rod and saurel. The roots of crain's-bill is a cure for red murran in cattle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 12:08
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In this part of the country there are various kinds of herbs growing, and more than probable they grow every where in Ireland. Different kinds of ointement are made of those herbs which cure all kinds of diseases. I will now describe some of the ointments, what they are made off, what diseases they cure and also some of the people who make it.
About two mile from my home a woman named Mrs. Brien lives. She makes ointment for burns or sores out of the following herbs, Lady's mantle, plantin leaf, briar leaf, daisy leaves and primrose leaves. When she is making it she melts butter in a pot and puts the herbs in it and boils them slowly. Then she takes the pot off the fire and pounds the herbs into an ointment. Those receipts are usually handed down from one generation to another. The dandelion is also known to cure consumption. It is eaten as it grows. A cure for piles is to boil the roots of butter-cups in milk in summer and drink the milk and roots and eat the leaves of the butter cups in winter.
The Ladies five fingers is supposed to be a cure for "wilefire." There is a man named James Downes that lives in Rochestown who has a cure for the "Farcie." I could only find out three of the herbs
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 11:35
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and it helps also to strengthen the bones. She has another great cure for the kidneys. She makes it from broom, sweet may and golden rod. They ivy leaf and the primrose leaf boiled together wold cure a sore on a cow's udder. She can also make a cure for "farsic" which is a disease on horses. I do not know how she makes up the cure but I know some of the herbs she uses. They are bulltrans, lady's five fingers, marrow-roodle, primrose and daisy roots. She can make an ointment for healing cuts and sores from carpenters leaf and rose-mantle and bag bane. Long ago the people used no other medicine or ointment except that made from herbs and a lot of them were relieved.
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 11:30
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The most harmful weeds growing on the land around here are dockons, nettles, thistles, chicken weed, bishop weed, and grouncil. The dockons; nettles and bishop weeds spread rapidly and the thistles and grouncil and also the dockons take away the good food the crops should get and so make the land poor. The yarrow, shamrock, dandelion, plantain leaf are always found where there is good land and rushes only grow where there is bad land. The following are the name of herbs I know of, the yarrow, dandelion, scotch, hemlock, foxglove, sweet may, freehogs, plantain leaf, carpenters leaf, primrose leaf, roots of daisies, lady's five fingers, lady's mantle, broom, golden rod, Marrow Boodle, cats paws, Fairy furze, bag bane and rose noble. The yarrow used to be used for playing tricks on Hallow Eve night. The yarrow is also made into medicine. Mrs Brien of Gernonstown knows how to make a lot of ointment and medicine out of herbs. She can take the white stuff that comes out of the dandelion and if you drink it is supposed to cure consumption
senior member (history)
2019-03-08 11:30
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awaiting decision
The most harmful weeds growing on the land around here are dockons, nettles, thistles, chicken weed, bishop weed, and grouncil. The dockons; nettles and bishop weeds spread rapidly and the thistles and grouncil and also the dockons take away the good food the crops should get and so make the land poor. The yarrow, shamrock, dandelion, plantain leaf are always found where there is good land and rushes only grow where there is bad land. The following are the name of herbs I know of, the yarrow, dandelion, scotch, hemlock, foxglove, sweet may, freehogs, plantain leaf, carpenters leaf, primrose leaf, roots of daisies, lady's five fingers, lady's mantle, broom, golden rod, Marrow Boodle, cats paws, Fairy furze, bag bane and rose noble. The yarrow used to be used for playing tricks on Hallow Eve night. The yarrow is also made into medicine. Mrs Brien of Gernonstown knows how to make a lot of ointment and medicine out of herbs. She can take the white stuff that comes out of the dandelion and if you drink it is supposed to cure consumption.
senior member (history)
2019-03-07 11:57
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The people long ago used to eat young nettles boiled with gruel for their health. They used to eat them on the fast days of Lent and in the spring time of the year. They would eat the nettles to purify their blood.
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 12:37
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Some of them travel on foot and more of them travel in vans and carts. Some of them travel single and more of them travel in families and in bands. The best know of them around here are Powers and Teilans and Whites. The Powers and Whites visit this district often. They generally come round for the Confirmations and Processions and for pattern days. They come round for the Confirmations because their children get confirmed. The Whites generally come round for the fairs because they sell horses. Conors are "travelling people" that go round making tin saucepans and cans and they fix things for people. An old woman used to go round on an ass and cart selling mats. She would stay one day making the mats and go round and sell them the next day. Her name was Mrs Donoughue.
senior member (history)
2019-03-06 12:35
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Some "travelling people" call to our home. Some of them have been travelling for many years round different districts and come round here for pattern days such as Lady Well Day. Some of them are poor beggars and more of them only go round camping. They go round with small things in a basket such as broaches and prayer-books and sell them to people to earn their living. People buy some of the small articles from them. The "travelling people" buy the small things in shops and some of them make them themselves. They are not welcomed around this district generally. When they come round this district they stay for a week or more sometimes. They sleep in vans. If they haven't any with them they sleep on straw in tents. They make the tent of long ash sticks and throw the cover over the sticks. The poor "travelling people" beg the food of the people of the district and the richer "travelling people" have their own food.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 10:46
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A Funny Story
Here are the funny stories I heard of the long ago some people use to steal dead bodies from the graveyards and sell them to doctors for to experiment with them. There is a graveyard about three miles from this school. One dark night two robbers took a dead man out of this grave-yard. They had a real good horse and carriage and they put the dead man in a sack in the carriage. They were coming along a road called the New Line when a man heard them coming and he hid in the ditch.
They stopped near where the man was hid and they went out into a field along the road.
The man went over the carriage and he saw the sack with the dead man in it. He took out the dead man and he left him on the side of the road and went into the sack himself. The robbers
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 10:46
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galvanised roofs. A manger runs the whole length of the shed and in to that the food is put. It is only in winter that cows are kept in a shed at night.
We have about forty hens and about thirty small chickens at home and we have two settings of eggs under hens. We also have ten turkey eggs under a hen. When people are calling their hens they say "tchuck, tchuck" and when they are calling their turkeys they say "bee bee." People give boiled eggs and boiled nettles to young turkeys. A crowing hen is supposed to bring bad luck to a place.
There was a man living in Gernonstown and he had a crowing hen and he thought she would bring him bad luck. She used to follow him to work every day. One morning he got up early and he brought her to four cross-roads and left her at them. He never thought of the hen any more for about five or six weeks, but one morning he met her and he going to work on Barrestown mountain and she crowed right into his face. He got a hold of her and the threw her as far as he could throw her. One say there was an old woman named Mary Cusack gathering sticks on the mountain and she saw the crowing hen hatching eggs under a bush.
senior member (history)
2019-02-21 10:41
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The domestic animals we have at home are two cows, four big cattle and two small calves and a pony and a dog. We call two of the big cattle "patsy and Butson." The pony's name is Kitty and the dog's name is 'Ginger Dick.' The people around here say "How-up" to the cows and calves when they are driving them. Long ago the cow-sheds were mud-walled buildings with thatched roofs. Very few of those remain now. Nearly all are made of concrete or stone with slated or
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:32
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young man ever you have seen so he brought her out to the yard to a row of green stones and tipped them with his wand and they turned into young girls and her one sister came out of a green stone and she was delighted to see her.
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:31
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"Take the lid of me, take the lid of me take the lid of me" "lie down said the girl or I will put twice as much weight on you" and the corpse jumped up and struck her with a wand and turned her into a green stone. So the second daughter went to look for her sister in one year and one day and the mother prepared the bonach of bread and the bonny fat hen. "Which will I give you the half of it with my blessing or the whole of it with my curse." "Keep it all" she says here it is all for you says her mother and my and God's blessing be with you. So she went on until she came to a house and the woman of the house gave her a corpse to mind so at twelve o'clock the corpse said. "Take the lid of me take the lid of me take the lid of me." Indeed I will you are long enough there so he jumped up and out stepped the nicest
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:28
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Once upon a time there lived a poor old woman that had two daughters. One day the eldest daughter said she would go to a service. "Very well a cailin I'll take you a bonach of bread and a bonny fat hen." "Very well" said the daughter "It will lighten the road for me." She gave the hen and the bread to the daughter and said which will I give the half of it with my blessing or the whole of it with my curse. "Give me the whole of it with my curse." So she went off and her mother cursed her until she was out of sight. So the girl went on until it was dark night and she came to a house and she went in ad asked "bean a tig" had she a job for her "Yes my poor creature would you mind a corpse until morning" "very well" said the girl "give me a dog and a cat a book to read and nuts to crack." So at twelve o'clock the corpse spoke and said
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:22
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gold. The shoe-maker went back with the spade and kept digging under the tree. He was digging for a long time until the tree was shaking and he kept digging until the tree fell on him and killed him. It is said that his ghost comes back every night and haunts that place.
senior member (history)
2019-02-15 13:21
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Long ago people believed that if you caught a Leipreachan and asked him where gold was hidden he would tell you. There was once a shoe-maker in Barristown named John Burke. He was very fond of money and he was never contented with his trade. One night when he and some neighbours were sitting at the fire, One of the men said that there was a Leipreachan in the rath at the river Boyne. That night when all the neighbours went home the shoe-maker went down to the rath and the Boyne and he saw a little man under a tree. He was dressed in red and he had a big tossel on his cap. The shoe-maker went over to him and caught him and asked him where the gold was hidden and the Leipreachan said that it was hidden under the big tree in the rath. The shoe-maker went home and came back with a spade and he began to dig for the gold. When he was digging for a long time he found a little box full of gold. Then he went home to his wife and she was not satisfied. So she sent him back and told him to keep digging until he would find a crock of
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:22
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and is used for curing pains. Some people keep clay and moss from the old well beside Lady Well for the same reason.
Holy ashes are got by some women from the priest on Ash Wednesday and kept in their prayer books.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:21
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Up to a few years ago the little children used to wear Saint Patrick's Crosses on Saint Patrick's Day. Their mothers made these crosses for them with papers and ribbons. They pinned a bunch of shamrock to the cross and wore it on their coats. Very few people have St. Brigid's cross in their houses.
The holly and ivy which is put up at Christmas is not taken down until Pancake Night to cook the pan-cakes. Most people take it down after Little Christmas.
Flowers are brought in before May Day and put before the statue of the Blessed Virgin. The flowers are usually primroses.
The Palm which is got on Palm Sunday is usually stuck behind a holy picture in the house.
The candle which is got on Candlemas Sunday is lighted when the person comes home from mass and three drops of the grease are put on the person's clothes, in some place where it would not do the clothes any harm.
The water from Lady Well in Slane is kept in people's houses around here
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:05
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and brought out their child. He was never seen or heard of again.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 17:05
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Most of the people in this district call the leipreachan a geanncanach. The leipreachan wears black shoes with buckles on them, white stockings and white trousers, a green vest, a red coat and a red cap with a big long tossel on it. The charm is supposed to be in the cap. It is said that if anyone could get the cap of the leipreachan and keep his eyes on the leipreachan that he could make him give up his gold, but he would have to keep the cap till he would get the gold.
Long ago there was a man and a woman living near a moat who had an only child. One day the woman went out and she left the child in the cradle and when she came back the child was crying and neither herself or her husband could stop it from crying. A few days after an old woman came around and the woman told the old woman about the child. The old woman said "while you were out the other day the fairies came and put that geanncanach in the cradle and took your child. If you want your child back you will put the griddle on the fire and put the geanncanagh on the griddle and he will tell you where your child is." After the old woman went the woman of the house put the griddle on the fire and had it red when the geanncanach saw what she was at and he said "I'll tell you where your child is." He brought the woman and man to a moat and he went into the moat
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 16:36
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Kate Hoey told me this story.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 16:36
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Long ago people used to take up dead bodies out of grave-yards to give to doctors. One night a man was taking up a corpse out of a grave in Slane Church yard. He took the dead body out of the coffin. It was the custom to tie the persons big toes together. When he losened the toes he got a hold of each foot and threw him across his shoulders. When they were crossing out to the field the man threw the dead body across the wall and the dead man got his toes tangled round the live man. He could not get them from one another and the live man was choked. In the morning there was a man going up the field and he got the two men dead. One hanging on the side of the wall facing the Church yard and the other hanging on the side facing the field.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 11:01
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got a bell and put it in the belfry and the bell would not ring. They took it down and put it on a tree and it did ring, and when they saw it rang on the tree they thought it would ring in the belfry. So they tried it again in the belfry and it would not ring and it didn't ring to this day.
Long ago a minister lived in Stackallen and he had a wife and she died. She had a lot of jewellery on her and it all was put into the coffin with her. She was buried on that day. The butler was there when she was put into the coffin and he saw all the jewellery on her. When midnight came the butler went to Stackallen graveyard and took up the coffin and opened it. He began to cut off the finger with the rings on it and just as he drew blood the minister's wife sat up and away ran the butler and he was never heard off again. The minister's wife walked to the house and knocked at the door. The minister was sitting in the room when he heard the knock and he said "only my wife is dead I would say that was her knock" and he went to the door and opened it and let his wife in and he was delighted to see her. She told him what had happened and she said she knew the butler. The minister said he would give 300 pound to the butler if he came back for saving his wife's life as she was only in a trance.
senior member (history)
2019-02-14 10:52
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The graveyards that are nearest to this district are Rathkenny graveyard, Gernonstown, Stackallen, Killberry and Grangegeeth, and the Hill of Slane and Stackallen graveyard was a catholic graveyard before the protestants took it over. Lady Barnwall got the church built for the catholics. The holy water fonts can be seen outside the church. There are catholics and protestants buried in Stackallen graveyard now.
There is a catholic graveyard in a townland called Melixtown in County Louth. The people call it "The jumping graveyard of Melixtown." This is the story that I was told why the graveyard is called by that name. Long ago there was a protestant buried in the graveyard against the catholic people's wishes. During the night the wall jumped the protestant's grave and left it outside in the field, and the grave is to be seen outside the wall to this day.
There is a protestant church near Screen named "Temple Kiernan." Long ago before that church was built there was a catholic church near where the protestant church stands now. The Protestants took stones out of the Catholic Church to build the belfry for the Protestant Church and every morning some of the stones would be gone and back in the Catholic Church and it took them years to build the belfry. Then they
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 13:03
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Long ago there was a hedge-school in a field in Gernonstown. Marquess Cunningham was the owner of the field long ago. The field was divided and people of the name of Flood got some of it and the school was in the piece of the field that Floods got. The school was an old shed. The teacher's name was "The (?) Manta." Each of the children used to bring a penny a week to the schoolmaster. The school master used to teach English, Irish and Latin. There was another hedge-school in Gernonstown. The school was an old thatched house. The ruins of it can be seen yet. The teacher's name was Powderly. He was a great grand uncle of Michael Creegan from College-Hill. The school teacher used to teach Irish and the children used to speak Irish. There was a hedge-school in Crinion's glen in Fynan's house. The school master used to teach Irish. There is not a trace of the school in the glen at the present day.
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:55
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him go, telling him to come another night, but the man got such a fright that he never came again or never went to another dance.
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:54
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Here is a story I heard from my father. Long ago there was a man who was very fond of going to dances. One night he was at a dance about two miles from his home. He left to go home at about two o'clock and he went across the fields. On his way he had to pass a quarry. When he had just passed it he met a fairy who asked him where he had been and he told him he had been at a dance. "Well," said the fairy, "come with me and I will bring you to a far better dance." The fairy took out a key and opened a door in a rock that was beside them. They both went in to a big room that was full of fairies and there was music and dancing going on inside.
The man never heard such music in his live. Each fairy danced with him, so after awhile he got tired and he asked the fairy man who brought him in to let him out. The fairy brought him along in a tunnel underneath the ground for a long distance and then asked him if he knew where he was and the man said he did not know. Then the fairy told him that he was within a field of his own house. The fairy opened a door there and let
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:46
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put the crocks of milk beside the fire the way the heat would help to sower the milk and so it takes the milk far longer to churn in the winter than in the Summer. The churning around here is done by hand and the butter-milk is used for making bread and for feeding pigs and calves.
The two wooden things that the people make the butter with are called butter spades. The thing that turns round inside the churn is called a threncher and the wooden spade with the hollow for lifting up the butter is called
senior member (history)
2019-02-13 12:45
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We have no churn at home but the farmers beside us have. It is a little round one and it stands on the table. The top of it is curved in and a little lid fits on top of it. They have it about six years and there is no mark on it that I know of. They make butter twice a week in Summer and they make it once a week in Winter.
The woman of the house does the churning herself. It is the custom around this part of the country when a stranger comes in to a house and a person churning to take the handle or the dash off the person and give a helping hand in the churning.
The old people say that if a stranger comes in and does not give a help in the churning that they would take the butter off the milk and bring it with them. Other people say when you are churning to keep the door closed.
In Summer the milk gets sower very quickly and so it does not take long to churn but in Winter it is far different it takes the milk very long to get sower and some times the people
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 11:52
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Eve children and grown-up men play a lot of tricks. Children get a lot of nuts and put them in the fire and when they would crack the children would take them out and eat them. There is another game which they play. They would hang a cord on the ceiling with an apple on the end of it so that they could barely tip it with their mouths and the one that would have an apple eaten first would get another apple. They would get a dish of water and put a shilling in it and the person that could get the shilling in their mouth could keep it. After that they would eat a lot of nuts and apples. Men steal things and hide them for fun. They steal carts, gates and a lot of things like that. Long ago people used to send Valentine cards to one another on the 14th of February. Very few people send them now.
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 11:49
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make a picnic every Easter Sunday round here. They usually make it on a hill or in a liss. Long ago they used to be beating one another out in eating the most eggs at this picnic. Children from about 5 years to seventeen or eighteen years used to go to it. The first of April is called "April Fool Day" in this district because people make April fools of one another. If someone said to a person that there were a lot of parcels in a room for her, and if she did not think of the first of April and she to go to the room and no parcels in it, the other person would say "April fool go to school and kiss the leg of the black stool." Children and grown-up people cod one another for fun. Children make a May-bush on the last day of April for the first of May round here. They put primroses and a lot of other wild flowers on it and leave it in a steady place for that night. Most people in this district make a little altar with the statue of the Blessed Virgin on it in the month of May in their homes, flowers and a Sacred Heart Lamp is usually put opposite the statue. Long ago a bon-fire used to be lit in this district on St. John's night. St John's night was called "Bon-fire Night." The 15th of August is called "Lady Well Day." A lot of people go down to "Lady Well" beside Slane on that day. On Hollow
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 10:32
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We dipped his wing in a barrel of beer and we wish you a Happy Christmas and a Bright New Year."
The custom of the signs of magpies are kept up yet by the old people and here they are
"One for sorrow two for joy,
Three for a wedding and four for a boy."
"One for bad luck two for good luck,
Three for a wedding and four for a wake."
On Christmas Eve most of the people around here put a christmas candle on every window of the house. People make pancakes for their tea on Shrove Tuesday. It is usually called "Pancake Night." People get pieces of paper and put pins in them and put them on somebody's back unknown to the person. The pieces of paper are called ashy-bags. Children going to school do that for fun when people would not be looking on Ash Wednesday. Children wear St. Patrick's Cross on St. Patrick's Day in this district. People used to fast harder long ago than people fast now, on the Black-fast days). They wouldn't take anything till dinner time. Even men working hard in the fields would wait till then, and then they would make gruel and mix young nettles in it and boil it and eat it. They used to say it was good for their health. Children
senior member (history)
2019-02-11 10:22
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On St. Stephen's Day boys and grown-up men gather together and go in procession from house to house singing the wren-song. The people round here call the wren "the wran and also the scut." Long ago people used to go "round with the wran" on St Stephen's Day. They go round yet but they do not have the wran with them. They used to kill the wran and put him in a bundle of straw and bring him from house to house on their backs. If the people would not give them a penny or twopence they would throw some of the wran's feathers at the door and say that they would have the wran's curse on them the whole year. Then the people would not let them in until they would stop killing the wran because it was cruel. This is the poem that they used to sing when they ere going "round with the wran."
"The wran the wran the king of the all birds,
Saint Stephen's Day he was caught in the furze,
Although he is small his family is great,
Rise up gentle lady and give us a trate,
Up with the kettle and down with the pan and
give us some money to bury the wran,
My shoes are worn my coat is torn following the
wran for three days and more,
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 16:49
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Hansel Monday - the first Monday of the New year. What ever you get on that day you will be getting the whole year.
There are certain days of the year that are looked upon as being unlucky. This is an old saying that is said when people are getting married.
"Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
Saturday no day at all."
It is said that anybody who is starting a new business or going to a new house should start on a Friday. There is an old saying about people that go to their new house on Saturday. "Saturday's flitting is short sitting."
Some old people believed that if you got a blow or a box or a kick from a person born on Whit Monday the hurt would never get better. These people were called Kinkisheens. Others thought that Kinkisheens were born on the 15th July.
Some old people went so far as to kill an animal such as a calf or a foal that was born on that day because they might get a puck or a kick and think they would never get better.
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 16:35
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"Thread, thread the needle and sew." It is a nice game. Two people are picked out to name places and things. They pick three places out and they put Hell, Heaven and Purgatory on them and name three things for each such as "oranges for Hell, apples for Heaven and sweets for Purgatory. While they were at that the rest were forming a big line with one after another catching their hands but they did not hear what the two said. Then the two people would hold each others hands and call the others. The two people would keep the last one and ask her which of the things would she say and which ever of them she would say opposite the places they would send her to it and while they are at that the other are saying "Thread, thread the needle and sew breaking off and of we go" and that is the way it is played till it is finished and the people that are in Heaven and in Purgatory cheer and laugh at the people that are in Hell and if there is time the game is begun again. Shipping is another game we play. It is just a rope that people ship over. There are many ways of shipping. Long ago the boys used to play marbles and tops. They used to buy the tops from Robert Mullen.
Robert Mullen made tops about 60 years ago. He lived alone in a little mud cabin on the side of the road about 200 yds from the school.
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 16:25
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are cold. The boys play "Fox and hounds" more than the girls. Some girl is chosen to be a "fox" and rest of us pretend to be hounds and we shout after the fox. We give her time to hid and then we follow her. If we cannot catch her before we come back she might be in the yard. The school yard is the den; and someone else would be the fix then. About seventeen years ago they used to call "Fox and hounds" "Tallaho" because the person that would be the fox used to say tallaho. Another game we play when the days are very hot and we don't be able to run with the heat is "Colours." A lot of us stand in a row and one person gives colours to each of us and while she is giving colours two is chosen to go away and one of them is called an angel and the other is called a devil. When the person is finished giving colours, the devil and angel are called over. Then the colourer says "All the birds in the air all the fishes of the sea point me out blue" or some colour. The person that acts as an angel gets the first chance and if gets anyone she is called an angel too and then the devil gets her chance and the children that she gets are called devils. Sometimes none of the two gets anyone and the colourer gets them and they are called queens. The children that the pretended devil gets does not like it because the children that the angel gets cheers at them. Sometimes we play a game named
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 16:03
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place. We often play "Tig" at school. There is a den, and the den is usually a wall a tree. A big crowd stands in a row and one stands out and counts a rime. Here is a rhyme that is mostly said . "Inty binty banty bay ile dile damin aye ulca bulka stony rock an dan dush." The ones that "dush" is said to it out and the last one that was not "dush" is it. The one that is it tries to stop any of the others from tipping the wall. If the person that was 'it' was able to tig one of the others he would be 'it.' Sometimes he would not be able to tig any of them and the same person would be 'it' again. Hop scotch is another game we play, there are two ways of playing hop scotch. This is one of them. In playing hop scotch we mark out a big square and mark four corners, each of us pick a flat stone. We have to hop on one foot and kick the stone in to each corner. If one of us put down two feet on the ground she would be out and the next would be in. When a person walks on a line she would be out and another would get in. If a person kicks the stone and the stone falls on a line she would be put out. We would want to be always minding for fear of walking on a line because we might not get in again if there were a lot playing or if there were good players at it. We do not play camogie often, only when the days
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 15:53
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During our play-time at school we play a lot of games. We play rounders, hop scotch, tig, camogie and fox and hounds. In rounders four stones are placed a certain distance apart to form four corners. Two teams can play and they draw lots or toss a coin to see which team will get in. The team that wins the toss stands in a row at one of the corners and the other team get someone to fling the ball to the team that is in. The team that has won the toss hit the ball with their hands and run round to the other corners. If the person that hits the ball was able to get round to the corner facing the one he left without being hit by the ball it is a rounder. If she was hit by the ball her team would be out and others would be in. If the team that was in struck the ball and the other team caught it before it hit the ground the team that caught it would be in. If the team that was in took up the ball in their hands they would be put out. The team that is in has to be very careful to keep in their corners for if the others get their feet in the corner they would get in the other's
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 12:08
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the others from getting to the tree. If the person that was "it" was able to tig any of them before they tipped the tree the person that he was able to tig would be "it" and the game would start again. We used to go up beside the person that was it to "dar" him and usually he would run after some of them to "tig" them and the rest would get to the corner. Sometimes he used not be able to tig him and the same person would be "it" again.
Long ago they used to play marbles round here, and they used to play tops as well. They used to play handball round here and there is a wall about a hundred yards from this school and it is called "the ball-alley" because they used to play handball at it.
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 12:05
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struck with the ball while running his team would be out and the other team would get in. If the team that was in gave a hit to the ball and the other team caught it before it hit the ground the team that caught it would be in. If the team that was in took up the ball in their hands they would get themselves out. If the team that was in left the corner they were standing at and one of the other team was able to get his foot on it his team would get in. Another game I use to play when I came to school first was Tig. One person would say "Inte binte banty bay ile dile dam an aye ilca bulka stony rock and dun dush." The person who "dush" was said to would be "it" and he would stay at the corner which is generally a tree and try to keep
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 11:58
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We play football in this school, and hurling is never played round here. One of the games I play is "fox." Some lad is chosen to be a fox and the rest of us follow him through the fields until we catch him. Another game we play is "rounders." Here is the way we play it. There are four stones or corners a certain distance away from each other. There are two teams and they toss a penny to see which is in. The team that is in stands in row at one of the corners and the other team selects someone to bowl or to throw a ball to the team that is in. The team that is in hits the ball with their hands and run round to the other corners. If the person that hits the ball was able to get round to the corner opposite the one he left without being struck with the ball it would be a rounder. If the person was
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 11:40
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know which thistle was the right one. There is a cave in a field belonging to Mr Rock and there is supposed to be hidden treasure there. Once upon a time a man went and tried to get this treasure. When he came to the cave a dazzling light met his eyes and so he could not get down to get the treasure. This certain cave contains a boot of gold.
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 11:35
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get to the end of the rain-bow he would get a pot of gold. He ran and he ran as fast as his legs could carry him and at last he found the crock of gold at the end of the rain-bow. When he came home with the pot of gold his wife and his three children had him annoyed to get some of the gold. The miser ran out of the house in an awful rage with the croc of gold. He ran over the fields and he buried it in the ground and he sowed a chestnut tree on top of it. This tree is still to be seen and it is very old." Here is another story I heard about another hidden treasure.
One day a man was ploughing a field in my townland a long while ago.
When he was ploughing for about an hour he came across a big flat stone. He saw under the stone a big heap of gold. He put a big thistle beside it because he could not stop the horses. When he went to the ditch he turned round to see the thistle but when he turned round the whole field was covered with thistles and so he didn't
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 11:29
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it and they were not long at the work when a little rabbit (when a little rabbit) went before them. They kept on working, but still the little rabbit continued to stop the spades from working, but the men would not stop working. In a few moments one of the men dropped dead, which frightened the rest of them. This did not frighten the farmer, but he started to work himself but the same thing happened with the rabbit. He still continued to work until he was left paralysed. Not until then did he become aware of the wrong he had done, to this lonely and to be left alone moat. The treasures that this moat contains are some sacred vessels that a priest hid there during the penal days in Ireland.
Here is another story I heard about another hidden treasure. The treasure is under a big chestnut which lies between Bolton's Cross and the Castle Gates. Here is the story as it was told to me.
"Once upon a time there was an old blacksmith and he was a miser and he had three children. One day the miser saw a rainbow. He thought when he would
senior member (history)
2019-02-08 11:00
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Well in my townland there is a moat. I have heard many different stories about that moat. It is not a very big moat and it is in Mr Dean's field. There are threnches around this moat and it is near Gernonstown river. Here is one of the stories I heard about it.
I heard it from a very old man and his name is Paddy Springon. Here is the story as I heard it. He said, "this moate was once the site of a lone bush, which seemed to guard this moate of clay and earth, which was no doubt the work of human hands away in the far off ages. He said that more than two hundred years ago that field that contained this moat was about to be tilled for wheat, and the farmer that owned this farm was a very covetous man. The first thing he ordered was to get this moate levelled and he said it was a nuisance in the field. One day an old man told him not to interfere with it as it contained a treasure at which many men lost their lives in trying to seek it. The man that owned the field then ordered his men to get it levelled out without any further delay. The men started to level
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 12:13
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the milk had something to do with the pot.
There was a man living in Stackallen that used to make dash churns. His named was Joe McGuinness. There are few of those old churns still. There are people named Duffs who live in Rochestown that have a dash churn.
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 12:13
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happened a few times, and they heard of a woman that lived near Drogheda that could tell them who was taking the butter off the milk. One of the men went to see what she would say. When he told her the story, she told him not to stay in Slane after dark and for he not to go across the fields. When he came to Slane he went in to a public house to have a drink and he forgot all about what the woman told him. So when he went across one of the fields he saw hundreds of little men. He had bearly time to see them when they kicked him and beat him and he got it hard to go home. He never left the bed again after the beating he got that night. A brother of his went another day to see the woman and the minute she saw him she said "Didn't I tell your brother not to stay out after dark and not to go across the fields." She told him the same thing as she told his brother and she said that if he looked in the little pot full of water outside the door of his house he would see the person who was taking the butter off the milk, and that it would break the spell to look into the little pot full of water. It seemed that who ever took the butter off
senior member (history)
2019-02-07 11:31
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Nearly all the people around here have churns. We have an end over end churn at home. It is on a stand and it is round shaped in length and flat on top and bottom. It is about three and a half feet in length and about 2 feet on top and bottom. On the side of the churn the name is written and it is "The Daisy." We bought it about fifteen years ago. We churn twice a week winter and summer.
Long ago the people used to keep the butter in firkins in summer to keep the butter from getting bad. A firkin is like a small tub. The people used to wash it in boiling water and salt and put the butter in it and keep the firkin of butter till winter when it would be scarce. Some people used to bury a firkin of butter in a bank of turf in a bog and it would keep good for hundreds of years. My mother knew people that used to have a red thread tied on each of their cow's tails to keep anyone from taking the butter off the churn.
Here is a story which my mother told me about people taking butter off the milk.
Long ago there were people living near Slane. They were churning one day and they could not get any butter to come on the milk. That
senior member (history)
2019-02-06 11:44
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A cure for the whooping cough is to drink holy water from a skull in a graveyard.
Forge water is a cure for warts and a cure for mange in horses and cattle.
There are people in this district that have a lot of local cures made from herbs.
senior member (history)
2019-02-06 11:43
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stone in one of the fields and there are five holes in it which are the shape of five fingers. Fionn Mccool was supposed to throw the stone from Tara Hill to the field and the finger marks are supposed to be his. There is always water in each of the holes and if anyone had warts and he to wash the warts in the water it would cure them. There is a disease called mumps and the cure for it is to go into a pig house and say,
"Hugna mugna
pig take this."
"Mucna, Mucna, sin agar do leacnac,"
senior member (history)
2019-02-06 11:26
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Some people around this part of the country believe in local cures for diseases. Here are some of the cures I know. If a person had a sore knee and a dog to lick it, it would get better. People say around here that if anyone got a sty in the eye and if he pointed nine gooseberry dalks at it and he to bless himself each time each time that it would get better. Another cure for sore eyes is to bathe them in cold tea. If a person got a sting of a nettle and rubbed a docken leaf to it the sting would go away. Some of the cures for tooth aches are, to dip a piece of wadding in iodine and put it in your tooth. Other cures for tooth aches are, to put mustard in your tooth or to put ginger or breadsoda in it. A cure for whopping cough is to cut up onions and put brown sugar through them and drink the juice. The cure for the sting of a bee is to rub ink or blue on it. The cure for people that have pains is to put goose-grease on the place where they have the pain. There is a farm of land which is about a mile from where I live. It was owned by people named Carneys about fifty years ago, and the fields are called Carney's fields since. There is a big
senior member (history)
2019-02-05 16:21
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you are coming after me. Collier got to the fair an hour before his master.
Collier the robber was a noted robber in his time. He robbed the rich and gave it to the poor. There was a story told about a poor woman whom he used to lodge with. She was crying this night when he went in and she told him that it would be the last night that she could keep him because the landlord was coming for the rent and she hadn't it and he would evict her. He asked her how much was the rent and he gave it to her and she said she would never be able to pay it back. He said he would get it himself if she could tell him which road the landlord would go home and she told him and he watched him on that road when he thought he had all the rent collected and he held him up and took all the money off him.
Collier only shot one man in all his career of robbery and that was because the man robbed in his name. One evening when Collier was in this house an old man came in crying saying that Collier robbed him. Collier got a description of the robber and he went to the place pretending he was under the influence of drink and the man ran out and began to rob Collier. Collier rook out a revolver and shot him dead saying you will never rob in my name again.
senior member (history)
2019-02-05 16:11
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There was a man named Collier the Racer. He was a famous long distant runner and he was a first cousin of Collier the robber. He used to stop round this locality for a considerable time every year. He was stopping this time with a gentleman named Morrisey of Mullagha. This Monday Mr Morrisey told him to go to the fair of Ballinasloe, Co. Galway, which was coming off on the following Wednesday and he had to walk to it. Mr Morrisey was going the next day himself to the fair on horseback. Mr Morrisey was gone a few hours to the fair when his wife heard hammering in the barn and she looked in and saw Collier soleing his boots and she told him the master would be vexed when he did not go to the fair when he was told. He said, "It is all right I will be there as soon as him." So he put on his boots and started for the road and withing some miles of Ballinasloe a neighbouring farmer named Mr Tiernan riding a horse over took him so they chatted for a time on the road and Mr Tiernan putting his horse to a trot told him I will tell your master you are coming after me. Collier let him go for a considerable distance when he started to run and overtaking him and passing him said I will tell your men
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 16:51
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and two windows on the back. There is a settle bed in that house which can be changed into a bed at night and a place for sitting on during the day. The tables and chairs and beds are made of rough timber.
senior member (history)
2019-02-04 16:51
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The houses long ago were made of mud and thatched with straw. They were looked upon as being very healthy houses because the people lived to be very old in them. The mud was made of yellow clay wetted and short straw mixed through it and then it was put on the wall and left there to dry. There used to be flag stones which would be got on the land put under and over the windows which were very small and the floors were made of clay. The roof or covering was made of rough timber cut in the woods and the straw tied on in bales or wangles as it is called. There is a house not far from where I live and it is one of the old make as you can see the thatch on the inside of the roof when you are standing in the kitchen. The fire place is on the hearth and they burn big logs of sticks on the hearth and instead of the mantel pieces used in the later day houses there is a big piece of rough stick supporting the chimney and over that there is an iron bar with crocks hanging from it for hanging on cooking utensils. There are two half doors on the outside
senior member (history)
2019-02-01 15:37
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army came and hunted him out of it. It is said that after that he went to the cave at New-grange and he stayed there until he died and it is said that the people put his body into a stone cup and burned it. The cup that he giant body was burned in is in the cave at New-grange yet.
senior member (history)
2019-02-01 15:36
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Long ago people believed that there were men in this country who were called giants. There was one of these men in the cave at the river Boyne and he had magic power. One day as he was in the cave he leaned up against the wall and the shape of his body is in the wall still. It is said that he used to go around every night and lift people out of bed and leave them lying on the floor. One night as two men were fishing on the river Boyne they saw the giant coming out of the cave and they fainted when they saw him and the boat turned over and the two men were drowned.
It is also said that one day a man was riding a horse along the river and when he came to the place where the cave was the horse would not go by. The next day the man went the same way and when he came to the cave the horse would not go by and the man kept beating him and after some time the horse threw the man and broke his neck.
The giants name was "Crucket Legs." The reason he was called that is because he had legs as thick as a tree and they were "crucket" and bent. The giant lived in the cave at the river Boyne for a long time until an
senior member (history)
2019-01-29 11:42
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going towards the river. The moate field is the name of a field O often went through. It is a big field with a mound in the middle of it. The Crocken is the name of another field I know. It is an old bottoms with the Gernonstown river flowing through it. The following is a story I heard about that field. One night after twelve o'clock in the night a man was going home from Rushwee.
When he was in the middle of the field the Devil appeared to him. The Devil is supposed to be a black man with horns like a ram. When the Devil met the man he said "When you go home you are to cut your wife's throat." When the man went home there was a razor on the dresser so he got the razor and was about to cut his wife's throat when somebody ran in and stopped him. Next morning when the people were coming to mass the shoulders of the man's coat were seen in the bushes.
senior member (history)
2019-01-29 11:39
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There is a field that I go through every evening and I going home from school and the name of is Cora-Drum. It is a long wide field with a big hill all through it. The Bawn is another field I know. Long ago there used to be a village there and the houses used to be white-washed and that is how it got its name the Bawn. Tom-mors field is another field I know. It is a big field with a hollow in the middle of it. The Kittlie is a field I often heard of. It is a little square field. The Pulla - (?) is the name of a field I heard about. It is a big field with a slope in it
senior member (history)
2019-01-29 09:55
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There are three fields situated about half a mile from where I live which are called the "Fairy Fields." I have often wondered why and how they got that name and if there were really such things as fairies in which our forefathers believed. I have made many inquiries of the old people I thought would know about things which occured in the older time, and here is a story which my father told me, not why they got that name, but of a very strange thing which happened to him on one of these fields, and here it is as he told it to me. "One evening when I came home from work I put my hand in my pocket and found I had no tobacco so I decided to go to the shop for a smoke. The shop was about two miles when going round the road and about half the journey across the fields so I strolled down across the fields. After having a treat and a chat with some old friends I came out to make my return journey home. At about nine o clock I strolled up across the fields and when I came to the middle of one of the Fairy Fields my coat became as heavy as lead and the hair stood on my head with fear. After that I must have lost my senses. I thought every hedge
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 16:39
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Mullagha. The Skeeog is a road leading from Creewood to Hernonstown.
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 16:39
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There are roads in this district that have names on them. The road on which I come to school is called the Mill Road. It is called that because there used to be a corn mill on it about fifty or sixty years ago. The mill belonged to people of the name of Andersons. The ruins of the mill remain still. There is another name on part of that road called Altonroy. There are rocky hills called The Alts on one side of the road there. There is a road going off that road to Rochestown called the Bullock Field Road. The New Line is the name of a road near where I live. It was called that because part of it was made during the time of the mail-coaches. There is a road leading from this school to the Navan road. Part of that road is called the French Lane. There are two turns on that road one is called the Ring and the other is called Sam's turn. A man named Sam is supposed to appear at that turn at midnight. It is said that if anyone were passing by that turn at that hour, with a light, the light would go out. (?) a puca or "Barnafooka" is the name of a lane in
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 16:18
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Her name was Mrs Carry and she lived near Rossin, Slane. There is a house along the Boyne near Slane bridge and a man named Gibbons lives in it. One night when his father was dead he went out along the Boyne and he saw a thing like a white cat sitting in one of the boats and he began to call it for the cat. He was calling it for a long while and after a time it rose up and the he saw it was the Bean Si.
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 16:17
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The old people around here call the Bean Si. There are some families and when they die the Bean Si laments over them. One night a man was coming to the shop in Rushwee for some whiskey because his uncle was sick and when he was coming back with the whiskey at Rushwee cross he saw the Bean Si crying and sitting on the iron gate. She was dressed in a white cloak and she had red shoes and long white hair and she was combing her hair with a red comb. When he went home his uncle was dead and all that night the Bean Si kept on crying in the chimney.
Another night a woman was coming from milking late on a Summer's night and when she was about to get out the gap she saw the Bean Si dressed in red and she was coming her hair. When the woman had gone a little bit from her the Bean Si began to cry sadly.
When she got up the next morning her next-door neighbour was dead.
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 13:29
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if a cow had a start and a person to milk her on a stone or bathe the udder with potato water when it is boiling it would cure it. We have a medal hanging in our cow shed. A woman got a lot of St. Benedicts medals from a priest because her cattle were dying. She gave one to my father to keep the cattle from harm and it is in the cow-shed since. That was about ten years ago. We have no names on our cows now. We had a cow that was eighteen years of age and we sold her about a month ago, and we used to call her "The Old Lady." There are people named Mongeys that have a white faced cow called "baldy."
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 13:27
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Racehorses and hunters were reared in several placed round here up to some years ago at Leahy's of Stackallen, Slane Castle and Castle park, Sullivans of Killbarry and Collins-Gerrard of Gibstown. This industry has nearly died out but Sullivan's of Kilbarry rear them still.
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 12:30
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The domestic animals we have at home are three cats and one dog and one old goat. The dog's name is Jip. When we are calling the goat we say Jinny! Jinny!
The cows around here are tied with a chain. They are tied by their necks to the manger. The people buy the chains mostly in a hardware shop. In a place not far from here called Gibstown the people there tie the cows and cattle by the horns.
Gogans in Roachestown have a dried leg of a young calf hanging up in the cow-shed. It is supposed to bring luck on the stock. Most of the cow-sheds around here are made of concrete and some of them have galvanized rooks and others have slated roofs. The cow-sheds are nearly all white-washed inside. Sometimes people hang up branches and emblems in the sheds
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 12:29
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to bring luck. In certain farm houses people hang up the palm they get in the chapel on Palm Sunday. When people have finished milking they dip their finger in the milk and make the sign of the cross on the cow with the milk.
senior member (history)
2019-01-28 12:29
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awaiting decision
The domestic animals we have at home are three cats and one dog and one old goat. The dog's name is Jip. When we are calling the goat we say Jinny! Jinny!
The cows around here are tied with a chain. They are tied by their necks to the manger. The people buy the chains mostly in a hardware shop. In a place not far from here called Gibstown the people there tie the cows and cattle by the horns.
Gogans in Roachestown have a dried leg of a young calf hanging up in the cow-shed. It is supposed to bring luck on the stock. Most of the cow-sheds around here are made of concrete and some of them have galvanized rooks and others have slated roofs. The cow-sheds are nearly all white-washed inside. Sometimes people hang up branches and emblems in the sheds.
senior member (history)
2019-01-25 16:37
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farm are thistles, nettles, scutch, common dock, crowfoot, rushes and planting leaf. They made the land poor because they eat all the food that the crops should get. The land that thistles and nettles grow on is looked upon as being good land. There was an old man whose eye sight had failed and his two sons were talking about buying a farm. He told them to go and have a look at it. When they returned from looking at it, they were delighted and told him that they would not have any cutting of thistles or nettles, when he heard this he said you will not buy it because it is no good without thistles or nettles. Long ago people used to make dye for clothes out of bulltrans and buttercups.
senior member (history)
2019-01-25 16:35
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There were people named Keegans living in Mullaghcource who used to make a lot of cures out of herbs. There is a descendant of their living in Gernonstown named Mrs Brien who has a lot of them. She has a cure for the kidneys. When she is making it she gets a certain quantity of broom and sweet-may and golden-rod. Then she boils the broom and takes the flowers of the sweet-may and golden-rod. Then she boils all together and strains them into a jar. Another cure she has is to drink the white stuff like milk that comes out of a dandelion and it is supposed to cure consumption. There was a woman named Mrs Brownell who lived not far from this school. He had a cure for sore fingers and cancer. I could not find out what she used to cure them with because she didn't want anybody else to know it. There is a man named James Downes who had a cure for a disease in horses called "Farcie." I could only find out two of the herbs he makes the cure of, and they are bulltrans and Ladies five fingers.
The harmful weeds that grow on our
senior member (history)
2019-01-25 16:07
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The old people tell us that bread in the olden times was made from oaten meal, indian meal, barly and rye. Flour mills were plentiful and people had no trouble in getting flour made. The grind-stones were out of use in this district before the time of the oldest person living now. The kinds of bread that were used long ago were, Boxty-bread and Barn-bread. The people in this district make potato-cakes yet. In making a potato-cake a person puts flour in a dish and peels some very dry boiled potatoes and mixes them through the floor with milk. It was usual to bake bread daily long ago. The cakes are marked with a cross on top. The griddle was the usual article for baking bread. Oaten bread used to be baked before the fire on a three legged iron support.
senior member (history)
2019-01-25 16:04
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leven bread out of leven and sower milk. When people would make leven bread they would keep some of the dough of the bread and when they would be making the next cake they would put that dough into hot water and wet the cake with the water instead of butter-milk.
senior member (history)
2019-01-25 16:03
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Long ago people ground their own corn and made their own bread. They ground their corn with two stones. Long ago there lived a man named (?) in Rushwee, and he was noted for making grinding stones and for grinding corn. There is one of these grinding stones in this district yet. It is owned by a man named Patrick Springion. Long ago people made indian bread during Lent. The old people say that long ago people brought oaten bread with them when they would be going to America. The reason why they would bring oaten bread with them is because it would keep and it is said that the longer oaten bread is made the softer and fresher it will get. The old people used to make as much oaten bread as would do them for the week. Oaten bread was made and baked before the fire in a griddle with three legs. The fuel people used baking bread was "pest." Pest is in the shells that leave the corn after it been ground. When people would be grinding corn they would gather the corn into one bag for making bread and they would gather the pest into another bag for baking the bread. People also made
senior member (history)
2019-01-25 15:52
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Long ago the people used to make bread from oaten meal. The bread was made from oats grown locally. There were people living on the Mill road and they had grind-stones and they made the meal for the whole district. Potato-cake and oaten meal bread was the most popular bread with the people of that time. They used to take enough to do them for the week. They used potatoes and flour for a potato cake and they mixed it with butter-milk. When they had the raw cake ready for baking the cut the shape of a cross on top of it. They baked the bread in pot-ovens and on griddles and some of them baked the bread in front of the fire standing against a thing called a grid-iron. Long ago the people made indian bread in Lent.
senior member (history)
2019-01-25 10:41
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I live in the townland of Stackallen in the protestant parish of Stackallen and in the catholic parish of Rathkenny and in the Barony of Upper Slane. I live in north of Stackallen. I do not know how Stackallen got its name. Stackallen is in the shape of the letter Z. It is more than four miles long. Curnanstown is on the north of Stackallen, Caucestown and Harmonstown on the west, Beauparc on the south and Barristown and Rushwee on the east. The Boyne passes through a little over two miles from this school. I do not know the people that live in the part of Stackallen that is beyond the Boyne. The biggest part of Stackallen is on the north side of the Boyne and the rivers are flowing into the Boyne, so Stackallen is facing the south and storms never come too bad. There are several small hills in Stackallen and the
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 16:14
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was in the act of stealing the turnips the Puck came and lifted him on his back and carried him all round the whole estate crossing the river Boyne and going up on top of a rock called the Maiden-rock opposite the castle and shaking him down over the river several times saying "In you go, In you go." He left the half-dead man about four miles away from where he took him.
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 16:13
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The Puck is a thing like a dog that roams about this district at night. It is told that in Slane castle, not far from here, there was a special house made for the Puck and it was the custom of the people of the castle to leave a dinner in it every night. It happened that a new maid came to the castle and she was told to leave the dinner in the house for the Puck and she asked what kind the Puck was and being told that the Puck was a large dog she said to herself that it was a shame to see such a grand dinner going to a dog so she changed meat for potato-skins and herring-bones and left the dish for the Puck. When the Puck came and found the dinner he got vexed and went to where the maid was sleeping and got her buy the heels and puller her down a long flight of stone steps saying as he pulled her,
Mollie Jones, Mollie Jones, pratie skins and herring-bones.
I'll dash your head upon the stones.
Mollie Jones, Mollie Jones.
At the same castle, one night a man went to steal a bag of turnips. When he
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 15:56
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Blackburne of Tankardstown was on what was called the Grand Jury the time of the famine. He got the road changed from the front of his house to the back so as not to have the people passing the door. The men that would have a horse and cart would get sixpence a day for bringing stones to the road. There was a man living beside this school who was working in a place not far from here. One day when he got the people of the house away, he went into the house and he got a few handfuls of meal and wetted it with water. He made a cake of that and brought it down the fields and buried it. He used to be glad to get a bit of it at dinner time.
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 15:54
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There were people living in Mullagha called Maurices during a famine before the big famine. They used to boil a big boiler of stirabout for the people of the district.
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 15:33
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died with the Cholera. America sent relief meal to the country and a depot was formed in every parish. The depot in this parish was ran by a man named Mr. Kannagh of Stackallen. He used to wet the indian meal like mortar before he would give it out afraid the people would sell it.
Beauparc station was built during the famine. The date that is on the bridge is 1847.
senior member (history)
2019-01-24 15:32
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The famine did not affect this part of the country much. There were only two sorts of potatoes in the country at the time of the famine called Lumpers and Cups. The first year the famine did not affect the country much as the people had money and meal to fall back on. The potato crop failed again in '47 with the result that thousands died throughout the country. In this district, Stackallen, the relief works that were started were lowering the steep hills of the roads and filling the hollows. There were three hills lowered in this district, in Faganstown, Shalvenstown and Gernonstown. The work lasted for two years. The wages the men got was ten pence a day. The price of a stone of indian meal in the shops was 2/8/1/2 so that a man could not get two stone for his weeks wages. The men were so exhausted that a number of them died at their work. One man died working at Faganstown from the effects of hunger and another man died at Gernonstown from the same cause. The famine continued on until '48 and the affects of it were in the country for many years after. All that did not die with hunger
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the cows would be dry.
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The domestic animals we have at home are two cats two dogs and a cow. The cow's name is Daisy. The people around here when they are driving cows or calves say "How How-up." Our cowhouse is made of wood and it has a galvanized roof. The inside of it is white-washed. The cow is tied to the manger by a chain. The people around here tie the cows by the neck. Long ago people tied the cows to the roof of the shed by the horns. The tyings are made by a black-smith in Slane Castle. Sometimes people hang branches and emblems in the cowhouse to bring luck on the stock. Some people hang the palm they get on Palm Sunday in the cowhouse to keep away diseases. People also hang dwarf elder and mistle-toe in the cowhouse to bring luck on the stock. People also hang St. Christopher's medal in the cowhouse to protect the stock. Long ago hedge-hogs used to suck cows and when the people would come to milk them
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 16:26
approved
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awaiting decision
The small farmers round here have one horse. Farmers of fifty acres or more have about three horses. Some of them that send hay to Dublin have four horses. The small farmers that have one horse join together to do work that takes two horses. The small farmers that have one horse draw gravel and stones for the County Council and for new houses. Some farmers that do not have much hay or tillage have a heavy horse and a strong pony. Most of the farmers round here keep mares because they rare foals. When the people are driving a horse in a trap or a cart they put their tongues against the roof of their mouths and make a sound like "tch." When the horses are working in the fields or pulling heavy loads they say "hep back" "hep on" "Wo here" "come out" and "come on" and "hop off."
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 12:09
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago when people had sore eyes they used to go to Tubbersool Well and bathe their eyes in it and they would be cured, that is why it is called Tubbersool, which means the well of the eyes.
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 12:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was a church in that graveyard and when Cromwell came over here he knocked the church and the ruins of it are there still. The church was in the shape of an L and the vestery was made of stone and it had a stone roof on it also. There are people buried inside the ruins of the church. The ruins of the priest's house is near the graveyard also.
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 12:07
approved
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awaiting decision
There are two graveyards in this district. The names of them are Gernonstown graveyard and Stackallen graveyard. Gernonstown is the nearest graveyard to us. The old people say that when one person is buried in that graveyard that two more will be buried in it within six months. It is also said that there was a bishop hiding in that graveyard the time of the Penal Days and that the hunters caught him and killed him. The next morning some Catholics found him and buried him in the graveyard and it is said that for three years after he had been buried his coffin and the four candles could be seen in the sky every night. The old people also say that the time when the croppies were in this country a croppy was buried out side the wall of Gernonstown graveyard and the next morning the wall was moved out and the grave was inside the wall. One night a man was coming home from work and as he was passing by the graveyard he saw a coach and two horses running round the graves. The old people say that before Cromwell came to Ireland there
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 11:56
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awaiting decision
Long ago people wore different clothes than they do at the present day. Long ago people wore cordary knee breeches and a frize coat and waist-coat and a half tall hat. Long ago people had a spinning wheel for spinning the wool. There is one of these spinning wheels in this district yet. It is owned by a man named Rowntree. The old people say that long ago there was a tailor in every townland. It was the law at that time that a tailor could only make clothes for the people of this own townland. There was a tailor in Avelstown called Carty. He lived along the stream that runs through Avelstown and ruins of his house are there still. Long ago people called the needle the tailor sews with a wart lance because they believed that it would cure warts. They also believed that if two people were going to get marries and if they went into a tailor and leaned over the tailors goose with their eyes shut and wished for a certain thing that after three days their wish would come true.
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 11:48
approved
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awaiting decision
The tenants of Rathkenny lived in great fear of their landlord. He was a cruel hard man to the poor tenants. Some men whose names are unknown plotted to murder him. So one day the landlord went somewhere on business and he told the coach-man to meet him. When evening came the coach-man went to Wilkinstown to meet the landlord. Whatever happened the landlord didn't turn up. On the coach-man's return home he carried a man, and neither of them thought of anyone going to shoot them on the quiet road. When the coach came along the road, and the culprits waiting for their victim behind the ditch let fire their guns and shot the two occupants. One of the men who was the landlord's coach-man was named Bunn and the other man's name was Curron. So after the attempted murder on the landlord's life he became the most generous landlord in this country. I have not mentioned so far that the landlord's name was Hussey.
senior member (history)
2019-01-23 11:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the time of the Penal times a priest used to hide in a ditch near the river Boyne and ever since that time the people call that place the "Priests Leap." There is also a "Mass Rock" near the river Boyne. The old people say that one day a priest was reading mass on that rock and when he was blessing the people he saw two priest hunters coming along the river and they were loading their muskets and as the priest made the sign of the cross the ground opened and swallowed the two men. People also say that a priest hunter lived along the Boyne near Stackallen bridge and one day as he was watching a priest he fell asleep and fell into the water and was drowned.
Long ago there lived a farmer in the wood on the Hill of Slane and he sheltered the priest and let him say mass in his barn and it is said that he "Mass Stone" is in the wood yet.
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 12:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
here gather their potatoes in baskets or in buckets and leave them in pits in the fields for a few weeks. Then they bring them home and put them in pits in the haggards. I have never heard of potatoes been put in sheds in this district.
Long ago potatoes were used instead of starch. There are people who live in Tankerstown who starch their clothes with potatoes. They get a raw potato and steep it in boiling water. Then they get some kind of stuff and mix it through the boiling water and potato. Then they leave it to cool and when it gets cool they take out the potato and the water will get thick. Most of the people long ago used to make it. Maguire's are the only people round here that make it now since the starch got cheap.
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 12:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is mostly in "Lay-ground" that ridges are put. The men plant potatoes in ridges with spades. Sometimes the furrows for the ridges are raised with a plough and the men throw the clay on the ridges with shovels. There is a lot of labour with ridges. The spades are not made locally they are bought in shops. There are malt shovels made in Stackallen. Some of the neighbours help each other planting potatoes in this district. Most of the people around
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 12:17
approved
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awaiting decision
About fifty years ago there was a travelling woman named Kitty Cooney who used to go from house to house through the country mending bellows. She always went on foot. The people in this district used to call her "Kitty the bellows." Here is a verse which was made by her.
"My name is Kate Cooney I live by my trade,
I know all about leather and how it is made,
I can earn a fine shilling and spend it as fast
And a wind broken bellows I'll bring to its blast.
And here's to the tinkers that cobble the tin,
And here's to the women that's fond of the min,
And here's to myself sure as long as I last
And a wind-broken bellows I'll bring to its blast."
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 12:11
approved
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awaiting decision
handle and shake it and say "this is for what you know." There was a man named Weldon that lived in Horstown road that used to make geranium pots with holes on the bottom. There was a wheel write in Gernonstown and his name was Wall and he used to make a lot of wheels. Among the other crafts of the country was a nailer. The nearest one to this part of Meath was in Navan whose name was Lowe. He used to have three lengths of nailrod in the fire at the same time and when he would have a nail made from one, the others would be at the right heat for working, so he would be kept very busy going from one to the other. That is how the old saying "As busy as a nailer," came to be.
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 11:54
approved
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awaiting decision
there were no other candles to be had. They used to peel the skin of a rush and dip the white inside in grease. They used to have big, high candle-sticks that would stand on the floor. There was a square piece of wood for the bottom and a stick nailed to that and there is a hole on one side of the stick for a real candle and a pinchers on the other side for the rush-candle and as the rush would be burning it would have to be kept up. There was a man named John Feely from Donaghmore who used to make a lot of wooden things. He used to make Dash-Churns, handles, butter-dishes, Trenches, prints for butter, little stools, churn cups and wooden strainers. He had a wife called Kitty Feely. She used to go to all the markets around, with the things John would make. The time of the Fenians she used to bring a great many things to the markets as she used to get great trade for the things. When she would be in the town she would hold-out the handle and anyone that would ask her what the handle was for she would hold out the
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 11:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were wooden ploughs made by a man named Owen Bannon who lived in Dundirk. The last plough he made he could not sell it and he raffled it in Ryans of Gormonlough and a man named Edward Heally won it and he was the last man that had a wooden plough in this District. A man named John Duff from Rochestown said he ploughed with one of the ploughs Owen Bannon made. A man named Robert Mullen from Rushwee made tops long ago. He lived in a little thatched house now owned by people named Barnes. I know some men that bought tops from him when they were little boys and they saw him making them. He used to make half-penny and penny tops and he used to sell a lot to shops. There is a man named Dick Rochford from Stackallen who makes malt shovels. He sells them throughout Ireland. There are very few men in Ireland that can make malt shovels. The tools that he has are old. They are his fathers tools. Another old craft is the rush candles. Nearly everyone long ago used to make rush candles as
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 10:50
approved
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awaiting decision
Gutter that lived in Robertstown House and he used to get people hanged for any little thing they would do. One day he was riding on horse-back and the horse stumbled and the man broke his neck and died and he was burried beside the gate. For a long time after that everyone that would pass would throw a stone on the place that he was burried to keep him down. One day there was a man going to be hanged and he was brought on a horse and cart. Gutter had a very ugly daughter and as the man was passing by he saw her looking out the window and she saw him and she said she would marry him. He saw how ugly she was and he said.
"The bargain's bad at any start,
The wife's the worst drive on the cart."
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 10:43
approved
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awaiting decision
Sally Gardens. The road from Slane to the Sally Gardens is called the New Line by the people. When my father was a boy it used to be called the Derry Coach Road. The Mail Coach used to go from Dublin to Derry long ago by that route. There are some mile-stones still left on this road from Dublin to Derry. There is an old road called Horistown Road and Collier the Robber used to stay mostly on that road long ago when he used to go round. He stopped the mail coach one day and put three sticks on the middle of the road and put hats and coats on them and when the mail coach came he stopped it and told the men made of sticks to fire and the man in the coach gave him the bag of letters at once. There is a road which passes Horistown Road called Rathkenny Road. At the second town of the road from Horistown there is a big corner covered with small black thorn bushes and they were not touched until lately by anyone. The corner is called "The Croppies Grave." There were croppies burried there in '98. There was a man named
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 10:37
approved
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awaiting decision
The road on which I come to school is called the Mill Road. There was a mill in the Townland which is called Roestown and it stopped work about sixty years ago. There is a house in Roestown and the people that live in it are called "Crinions of the Mill." It was people named Andersons that lived in it long ago and it was they that worked the mill. The ruins of the mill are there yet. Since that the road from Collegehill to Rushwee is called the Mill Road. There is an old road that goes from Rochestown Cross to Roestown Cross which is called the Bullock Field Road. The fields on the left hand side coming from Rochestown to Roestown are called the Bullock fields. There is a road that goes from Dublin through Slane and on to the
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 10:08
approved
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awaiting decision
other one is the mass path from Barristown to Rushwee chapel.
senior member (history)
2019-01-21 10:08
approved
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awaiting decision
This school is situated at a cross roads. The road going to the south is called the French lane. Long ago French people lived on it. There is a turn on it called Sam's turn. People say that if anyone passed that turn at mid-night with a light that Sam's ghost would put out the light. There is also a grove on that road which is called Charlie's Grove. People say that if anyone went into that grove after twelve o'clock at night that Charlie's ghost would appear. I live on the Rushwee road. There is a lane branching off that road which is called Avelstown Lane. There is also another lane branching off that road which is called Bovcrin a puca. It is two miles long and it crosses Barristown Hill and goes down to the ford at the river Boyne. People say that long ago those lanes were part of the Dublin-Derry-coach-road. There is also another lane branching off the Barristown road which is called the Cruca. There are two Mass Paths which I know of. One of them is the mass path from Gernonstown to Rushwee chapel and the
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 16:42
approved
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awaiting decision
seen. Ever since, a smith, who washes his hands in the water in which he has cooled his iorns finds him self refreshed and stronger.
He has two big benches on which are his tools. The anvil is beside the fire.
Jonnie Haw was in the Great war and he tells great stories and acts.
I like to see a blacksmith at work.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 16:40
approved
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awaiting decision
There is only one forge in my parish. It is situated one and a half miles south of Oldcastle. The smiths in it are Jack Fox, who owns it, and Jonnie Haw his assistant. The man who owns it lives beside it. The door is in the shape of a horse shoe. There is only one fireplace but long ago there used to be two.
There is a big bellows in the forge; to work it you pull the chain and the fire will blaze. The implements he used are: hammers, pinchers, nippers, rasp, file, blacksmith's knife, clincher and a lot of others. They shoe horses and asses. They do some of the work outside such as shoeing cart-wheels.
It is said, that , when the Virgin Mary was out on a walk, she lost her brooch that she had in her cloak that Jesus was wrapped in. As she went past a forge the smith came out and said "Let me make one for you." He took a piece of money from his pocket and made it into the finest brooch that ever was
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 16:36
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awaiting decision
catch the best fish would get £100 for himself, bu no-one got the prize, because no one could catch the big fish.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 16:36
approved
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awaiting decision
I live near Daily's Bridge which is now called Mount-Nugent. There are fourteen families in my district. The name of the river that flows through our district is the Inny. In Summer I love to go fishing. The name of the lake near our place is Lough Sheelin. There are many people fishing in it at present. We are living near the church. There are two grocer's shops two draper's and a post-office.
Most of the houses in my district are slated and tatched and a few are white-washed.
Once upon a time an aeorplane landed at Lough - Sheelin, telling the fishers that who ever would
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 16:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live near Daily's Bridge which is now called Mount-Nugent. There are fourteen families in my district. The name of the river that flows through our district is the Inny. In Summer I love to go fishing. The name of the lake near our place is Lough Sheelin. There are many people fishing in it at present. We are living near the church. There are two grocer's shops two draper's and a post-office.
Most of the houses in my district are slated and tatched and a few are white-washed.
Once upon a time an aeorplane landed at Lough - Sheelin, telling the fishes that who ever would
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 12:37
approved
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awaiting decision
ruin stands on another hill about 50 yards from the other. The ruins are situated quarter of a mile from Moylough chapel.
For signs of the weather we in this district, look in the direction of these ruins, for behind them, the sun sets and when the clouds gather black behind them, we know the rain is coming. When we see a bright streak coming along the horizon at the back of them, we are glad for we know the weather is going to clear.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 12:35
approved
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awaiting decision
There is an old ruined castle about 1 1/2 miles west of this school. It was built by the Fitzgeralds in olden times, they lived in it. It was a very big castle. It was Cromwell who attacked it and knocked it.
There are a lot of holes in the ruin and it is said that it was Cromwell's guns that made them. There is an old grave-yard just outside the castle.
There is just one round part of the castle left and there is no roof on it, there was a stone roof but it fell in. There were steps up to the door, but now they are all covered with grass and nettles. There are stone steps up to the top of the castle and you could see all round the country side in olden times from the top. An old man told me that old records of the place were lost and have never been recovered.
The ruins can be seen for miles around; one wall still stands on one hill and the larger portion of the
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 10:35
approved
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awaiting decision
along with Mary Boylan and Mary Flood, two very good dancers.
Peter Sheridan was a good hand at the "Jog." When a part would be going on he would jump up and start doing the "Jig" by himself. He was very quick on his feet and the "Jig" was his favourite step.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 10:34
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awaiting decision
There were many good dancers in Baltray long ago. Some of them danced "The Sailors Hornpipe" others The Jog and others "The Reel." The names of those dancers were William Leavens, Thomas Sweeney, Patrick Smith, Peter Sheridan, Patrick King and Thomas McGuirk.
These dancers did not learn the steps from anybody they picked them up themselves. These dancers never went on the stage to dance but danced at parties and at dances.
When at a party William Leavens would jump up and do the Sailors Hornpipe. Sometimes Patrick Smith and Thomas McGuirk would challenge each other to see who would do it the best. Each of the mentioned dancers could do each different step. When doing the "Reel" perhaps Thomas Sweeney and Patrick King would dance
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 10:19
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toes.
There is a man named Pat Moore from Blackhall. He jumped off a rick of straw with a lot of hen's tied to him. He threw a weight four stone twenty yards. One day a man named Paddy Connly challenged him in a race and he beat him.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 10:18
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awaiting decision
Long ago there was a man named Jim Briscoe from Blackhall. He could throw four stone weights twenty yards. He could throw a barrel of wheat over his head. He stood on his head on Termonfeckin castle. He hung from the top of the castle with his
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 10:16
approved
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awaiting decision
There were great walkers in this district long ago. These old people used to walk long journeys because there was no other way of travelling in olden times.
There was a man living in Blackhall about sixty years ago and he was a great walker. This man's name was Thomas Daly. It is said that he walked to Dundalk and back. This journey is fifteen miles and he completed it both ways in seven hours. His business to Dundalk was to pay his rent and he went to a fair which was in Dundalk on that day.
This man was also a great mower. It is said that he could mow two acres of corn or meadow in six hours with a raping hook. It is said that this man moved twelve acres of corn in three days.
senior member (history)
2019-01-18 10:05
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago the danes built a castle in the centre of Termonfeckin. There is a cave running from the castle to the castle well. In this cave they hid all their gold and valuable vessels. The village people made many attempts to get the hidden treasure but failed to find it. This treasure is there still. The castle also stands.
Many hidden treasures have been found in this district. The treasures consisted of gold and silver.
Fairy people have been seen at this cave. People have been able to see the treasure after eating a meal of "water cress" or after drinking goat's milk. These people see the treasure in their sleep.
Ghosts of animals are supposed to guard this treasure. Red lights are seen at this treasure three times a year at midnight. The time of the year nobody knows.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 16:38
approved
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awaiting decision
Stephen Fleming, Ballyfaddock, Queensborough, Drogheda. Material collected from Katey Quail Ballyfaddock, Queensborough, Drogheda, Co. Louth.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 16:38
approved
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awaiting decision
There are many old ruins in this district. There is an old castle in this district. The castle was built by the Normans. It is on the top of a hill in a field beside the strand road. The castle is in Termonfeckin Parish and in the barony of Fethered and in Co. Louth.
This castle was never attacked. It is said that long ago a Witch lived in it. There is a dungeon in it where they kept prisoners. The prisoners were killed in it. It is about 600 years old. It is 80 1/2 miles ffrom the sea. It is about 370 years in ruins. This castle was built on this high hill because the Normans wanted to see the ships coming in on the sea. When they would see a ship they would light a fire on the top of the castle to warn other Normans.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 16:34
approved
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awaiting decision
In nort Louth, during the famine times, at a place now called Hospital Point, there stood a hospital, and any person who come to it was given a vessel of porridge.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 16:34
approved
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awaiting decision
In north Louth the famine was very great. At a point at Carlingford known as Hospital Point there was a hospital where a vessel of porridge was given to all those who called during the famine years.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 16:33
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worths, at that time as they could not afford any more for it.
There is a road running through North Louth, called the Famine Rd. It is so called because during the famine, the men were paid twopence or threepence a day, for making it.
senior member (history)
2019-01-17 16:32
approved
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awaiting decision
During the famine the people ate the black potatoes, and Indian gruel, and stole turnips out of the fields, if they were caught, they were put to prison for seven years.
They bought the meal in penny
senior member (history)
2019-01-16 11:03
approved
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awaiting decision
A he dog, a Ho dog, a three legged mad dog, a drummer, a drawer, a little thread after it? A woman spinning (wheel).
Round the house and round the house and sleeps in the corner at night. A bush.
Riddles.
Why is the figure nine like a peacock?
Because it would be no good without a tail.
What fish should be glad when there is ice?
The skate.
When is a newspaper like a delicate child?
When it appears weekly.
What time in the day was Adam born?
Before Eve.
What word produces chair and table?
Charitable.
What tree is nearest to you?
The palm.
What had a bed but never sleeps in it?
senior member (history)
2019-01-14 16:09
approved
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awaiting decision
of starch. There was a woman living in Mullagha named Mrs. Mongey that used to starch her clothes with potatoes. She used to get a raw potato and steep it in boiling water. Then she would get some sort of stuff and mix it through the boiling water and potato. Then she would leave it to cool for a while and when it would cool she would take out the potato and the water would get thick. Most of the people long ago used to make it that way.
senior member (history)
2019-01-14 16:06
approved
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awaiting decision
taking Blight, because it was the blight that caused the famine. Some of the neighbours from around our house help us to plane our potatoes because we give them a few drills of potatoes. A lot of the farmers around here give a few drills or ridges to their neighbours. The people they give the drills or ridges to bring their own manure and potatoes. The people around here when digging their potatoes use a potato-digger or a plough or a spade. Some people gather their potatoes in buckets and spill them in a pit in the field. Then they are left in the field for about a forthnight and then they are brought into the haggard on carts and stored in pits or in sheds. It is mostly in pits they are stored in this district.
There are different varieties of potatoes planted in this district. Here are the names of them Aran banners, Aran chiefs, British Queens, Epicures, Shamrocks, Presidence, Champion Puritans, Kers pinks, Black bulls, Aran "victors," Leinster wonders and Sharps express. The potatoes that grow best in this district are Epicures, British Queens and Kers pinks.
Long ago potatoes were used instead
senior member (history)
2019-01-14 15:50
approved
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awaiting decision
Every year there is a big amount of potatoes grown on our farm. We sow about three roods of potatoes each year. The amount seldom varies. My father prepares the ground always. The land is not manured till it is turned up. When it is ploughed several times and then harrowed and crushed. The ground is ploughed with a single board plough and then the drills are raised with a double mould board plough. The manure is then put out and scattered along in the new made drills. Then the potatoes are cut in pieces with one or two eyes in each piece. Then they are dropped in the drills, leaving about twelve inches between each piece, and after that the drills are closed and left for awhile. Then they are second covered. The ridges are done much the same way only it is with a spade they are made. The potatoes are manured with artificial manure when they are getting second covered. The stalks of the potatoes have to be sprayed with "Bluestone" and "Washing Soda" so as to prevent the potatoes from
senior member (history)
2019-01-11 12:00
approved
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awaiting decision
There are often lovely white birds seen around here in the spring time of the year and the name for them is sea-gulls. The little sea-gulls come here when the farmers are ploughing the land and when they are cutting their meadows. The big sea-gulls come here when the other birds have their nests built. They then go round and rob the nests. The water-hens are birds that live in the water. They are black birds with red beaks and yellow feet. They build their nests over the water and they lay seven eggs. When the young water-hens come out of the eggs they leave the nests very soon after and go into the water to swim. The hawk and the owl are common birds around this district.
senior member (history)
2019-01-11 11:50
approved
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awaiting decision
saw her afterwards. She was about the size of a blackbird.
senior member (history)
2019-01-11 11:50
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awaiting decision
One summer morning and we coming to school I saw a little bird standing on a stone in the river in Mr Rocheford's bottoms.
The bird had a fairly long bill and she had a snow-white breast. Her wings were of a slated colour and her legs were of a faded black colour. When I saw this queer bird I tried to catch her. She swam down the river very fast and she hid under the bank and so I never
senior member (history)
2019-01-11 11:41
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My mother told me this old saying when babies are born.
"Born on Monday fair a face,
Born on Tuesday full of grace,
Born on Wednesday merry and glad,
Born on Thursday far to go,
Born on Friday loving and giving,
Born on Saturday work for a living,
Born on Sunday never shall want."
Friday is looked upon as a lucky day.
Saturday is looked upon as an unlucky day.
senior member (history)
2019-01-11 10:09
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to carry a coffin to the grave-yard across the hedges and ditches after a big snow-storm.The snow was so deep that the tops of the hedges could only be seen in places. I do not know what year it was. It must have been after the Famine.
There are stories told of men driving a horse and cart on the ice on the canal at the Boyne.
senior member (history)
2019-01-11 10:07
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When the Old Age Pension came out first the old people around this district who were looking for the Pension used to say that they were born on the night of the Big Wind. There are not many stories of the Big Wind now. The wind blew the thatch off the houses in Gernonstown and swept the straws across Rushwee for more than a mile. People named Madden who lived at Sally Gardens near this place went out with a ladder to tie a roof on a shed. They found the shed had disappeared. The shed was blown three fields away. A boy in this school said that his great-grandmother was blown from the door of the house across the yard.
An old man named Pat Finegan who died nearly twenty years ago used to tell how he helped
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 16:47
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Poor Tite let a groan.
And he kicked up the lid in a minute,
And the grave-diggers ran.
Away every man
For they swore that the divil was in it."
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 16:46
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In 1849 the plague of the cholera broke out in Drogheda. In a very short time it had spread over a very wide area and people were dying in thousands every where. Hospitals were erected here and there about the country to deal with those effected. One was built on Barristown Mountain situated between Slane and here and the other on on the Furzy Hill near Grangegeeth, Slane. The danger of infection was so great that the dead had to be buried within three hours. The Government paid squads of men to bury the dead. A man in Knockerc near Slane named Tommy Tite was struck down by the plague and the burial squad thinking he was dead brought him to the graveyard of Grangegeeth and lowered him in the grave. The grave-diggers were throwing the clay in and a stone was knocked from the grave-side and it fell on the lid of the coffin and it seemed to wake Tite from his trance and he leapt from the coffin and seized a spade and started to run after the grave-diggers. The grave-diggers leapt the wall and ran for their life. The man recovered and lived for over forty years after. A local poet composed a verse called "Tites Resurection" and here it is.
"When they flung down the stone,
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 16:32
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is stronger. People use the buttermilk for making bread and for feeding calves. Long ago there were men who were able to make dash churns. There are about twelve people around here who have dash churns. Long ago there was a man who lived near this school and he was able to make dash churns. His name was Joe Mac Guinneas. There was also another man who lived at Rushwee named Paddy Mongey he used to make churns also. People preserve butter in a covered crock and the people who are beside the bog preserve it in the bog water.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 16:24
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Most of the people around here that have cows keep their own milk and churn it. There are also a few people around here that send milk to Dublin. Those people also keep some milk for churning. We have a churn at home. It is one of the modern churns that is worked by a handle. We generally churn once a week. In hot weather the churning does not take as much time as in cold weather. In hot weather the milk gets sour quickly and it is easily churned. In cold weather people put the milk beside the fire the way it will get sour. Long ago if a stranger came in and the people churning they would give him the handle of the churn to twist round. If the stranger went out without twisting the churn no butter would come on the milk. Some people skim the milk and other people churn the milk along with the cream. People say that when the milk and cream is churned together the butter is sweeter and the butter-milk
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:10
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This is a prayer that is said when people bless themselves with holy water:-
God wash me clean and help me to keep the graces Thou hast given me through the water of Baptism.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:09
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Here is a prayer which my mother told me. It is said when going to bed.
As I lie on my bed to sleep. I give my soul to God to keep. If any evil thing happens me the Blessed Virgin waken me. There are four corners round my bed; there are four angels over spread. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, God bless this bed that I lie on. And if I die before I wake the Lord in heaven give my soul to God to keep. O mercyful Jesus have mercy on me, my soul and my body resign unto thee. O Jesus of Madrid the king of the Jews, Save us from a sudden and an unprepared death. Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 14:06
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In Gernonstown graveyard there is a nitch in the wall and there are two heads in it. They are supposed to be two bishop's heads. Long ago the people used to bring holy water to the churchyards and put it in the heads. When they used to have the whooping cough they used to drink that water.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 13:51
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and there was a great welcome and his father promised never to harm a lone bush and always be in good graces with the fairies. This is a story my Uncle told me.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 13:50
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again. That night the neighbour came round to tell the woman what he saw and the little lad in the cradle covered his head with the clothes and was looking with one eye at the man and he grinning at him. After the mother hearing the story she went to the priest and told him what had happened. The priest came and once he looked at the child he knew it was a fairy. He told the man to get a bit of a rope and take the lad out of the cradle and take him to a lone bush in another field and tie him to the bush and to go out the next morning between day and dark and he'd get his own child back again. He did as the priest told him and when he went out the next morning there was the field full of fairies on little white horses and they galloping round the lone bush and when daylight came they were all gone. And there was his own little boy sitting under the lone bush fresh and well and delighted to see his own father again. So he brought him home to his mother
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 11:55
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the good people in the bad weather. He payed no heed only cut the bush. In about a week after, one night there was a terrible noise in the room and the child started crying. He got up to try and pacify the child and between day and dark he seen a shadow going out the window. The child still kept crying and had the mother nearly distracted. In fact it was always crying nothing would please it. It was eating and drinking as much as two children and not getting a bit bigger. At three year old it was the same size as it was at six months. It never walked or talked or left the cradle. When the mother would g out, the bread and butter would be gone again she would come back. She could not tell what was happening it. Till one day a neighbour came for the loan of a fork and the door was shut. He looked in the window to see was there any one there and there was the little lad above on the dresser and he eating all before him. When he saw the man he jumped down off the dresser and into the cradle
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 11:55
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the good people in the bad weather. He payed no heed only cut the bush. In about a week after, one night there was a terrible noise in the room and the child started crying. He got up to try and pacify the child and between day and dark he seen a shadow going out the window. The child still kept crying and had the mother nearly distracted. In fact it was always crying nothing would please it. It was eating and drinking as much as two children and not getting a bit bigger. At three year old it was the same size as it was at six months. It never walked or talked or left the cradle. When the mother would g out, the bread and butter would be gone again she would come back. She could not tell what was happening it. Till one day a neighbour came for the loan of a fork and the door was shut. He looked in the window to see was there any one there and there was the little lad above on the dresser and he eating all before him. When he saw the man he jumped down off the dresser and into the cradle.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 11:30
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standing outside the door. She asked him had he an old scarf that he would give her and he said "no." She then asked for a copper and he said he had none. He turned round to his wife and asked her had she a copper. The little woman answered instead of his wife and said "Where would she get it when you never gave her any." She came closer to the door and said not to deny God's goodness. She said "you have three scarfs in a box in the room and four and eightpence in the salt box on the dresser and you may keep it. You never saw me before or never will again so mind your self now for there is trouble before you." She then walked out to the gate and he went out after her to see where she went but she disappeared. No trace of her was to be seen. He retired to bed and got up early next morning taking the saw with him. His wife asked him what he was going to do with the saw and he said he was going to cut the lone bush. The wife begged him not to cut the bush. She said that is sheltered the fairies and
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 11:18
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Once upon a time there was a small farmer who lived not far from Navan. He had a field called the Bultran field, or the fairies glen. In the centre of the field there was a lone bush. This field had not been ploughed for years. One morning the farmer got up early and and yoked his horses and started to plough the field. After a few days ploughing he came to where the the lone bush was. From where he was ploughing he could see his house. All day long there was a row of little women up and down to the house. When he went in that night he made inquiries what they were doing and the wife told him they were looking for a grain of meal. He got into a rage for she giving all the meal away. He went up to the bin expecting it to be empty instead of that it was full up to the brim. After settling his horses that evening he sat down at the fire with his wife and a little baby six months old. He was not long sitting when a knock came to the door and going out there was a little woman with a green shawl
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 10:53
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because it is closed. Some people say that sheep used to go into it and never come out again and that, that was the reason why it was closed. Others say that the people from around used to dispose of dead carcases in it and that was another reason why it was closed.
There are a lot of placed called after Rath's such as Rathkenny, Ladyrath, Newrath and Rathcoon. There are also places called after Dun's such as Dunmoe and Dunderk.
senior member (history)
2019-01-10 10:36
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There is a lios near this school. It is situated in the parish of Stackallen. Long ago it was owned by the name of Ryans. It is shaped like a saucer. The sides of it are high and there is a big hollow in the middle of it. There are caves in it and there are supposed to be fairies in them. The people say you could walk under the ground from those caves to Mullagha. There are never any sheep or cattle in the lios because there is no way of getting them into it. There is another lios near my home. It is owned by people named Maguires. There are supposed to be fairies in that one also. One night a man was coming home from work and he found two rings. He brought them home and he hung them on the wall and they started dancing and leaping and they disappeared of the wall. They were supposed to be fairies rings.
There is a cave in Gernonstown. It is said that you could walk under the ground from that cave to the Hill of Slane. You could not go into it now
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 12:34
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nest and there were four eggs in it. The young lark's left the nest soon after they coming out. In this district the small wren is called a scut or a "skotty wran." The yellow hammer is supposed to say a "little bit of bread and no cheese." Another bird that I know of is a little grey bird with a yellow stripe on his head. He comes here in April and is called a Golden Crested wren.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 12:33
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eggs. There were very few of them birds round this district a few years ago but they are getting more plentiful. Another bird I know of is a blue tit. The common name for him in this district is a Stony Chatter. He is also called a Judy Blackhead. They build their nests in walls and under the roof of a house. Another common bird of this district is a snipe. Some people call the snipe a manana. Another common bird of this district is a crane. There is a river down in the fields a short distance from this school and there is some swampy land along it and the cranes and snipes are plentiful in it. This time of year the snipe be flying around and they make noise like a goat and that must be why the people call him a man-an-aa. Another bird that is common is the lark. He lives in the meadows around here. My brother found a lark's
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 12:06
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crows are birds that are often seen in this district. They do not build their nests around here. The Bull finch is scarce in this district. A few years ago they were fairly plentiful but they got scarce lately as they do much damage to fruit trees and they are killed. Another bird that is scarce in this district is a gray linnet. They are getting more plentiful as they are not hunted now for to cage them. They are good singers and that is why they got so scarce. They build in bushes and in small stout trees. Another bird I know is a White throat. He is called a White bellied wran or wren. They build their nest in a bank and they make it of feathers and moss and hair and some grass. It is nearly like a robin's nest. My brother found one. It was built on a bank that was sloping down to a little stream. There were seven eggs in it like robin's
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 12:02
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Here are birds that are not already mentioned that I know of. Some of them are not very common. The jackdaw is a fairly common bird of this district. The Jackdaw builds his nest in the holes in a tree or in a chimney. The nest is made of sprigs, roots, scutch and strong grass. Scald-
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 11:57
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a field near where I live. About three or four philibins build their nests at the chapel of Rushwee. They do not build any place else around only there. There are two kinds of Willie-wag-tails one is yellow and the other is black and white. They build their nests in thatch and in the walls of old houses.
There is a big number of songbirds in this district. Gold-finches and green linnets are not as plentiful as they used to be. A lot of Tom-tits build around here. There are big ones with black heads and little ones with blue heads.
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 11:51
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earlier. I saw one on Friday the eight of April. There were big numbers of them yesterday the 11th flying around. A boy said he heard the corn-crake on the 9th of April. They usually come here the last week of April. When there is enough grass to cover him he comes. I do not know why he was called the corn-crake. He does not live in the corn, he lives in the meadows but when the meadows are cut he goes into the corn.
The big thrushes have gone away that lived in big flocks in the fields. They went away with the stares and red-wings and philibins about a month ago. Some big thrushes build their nests in the tress and woods around here. The people call them jay thrushes. They build their nests like the blackbird only they build up in high trees. They lay eggs like the blackbird also. The small thrush makes a nest in a place that is not hard to find. She lines it with mud and she lays small blue eggs with black spots. Snipe is plentiful around the little rivers and in wet rushy land. Nearly every morning and evening he is heard in
senior member (history)
2019-01-09 11:41
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The common birds in this district in April are crows, rooks, sparrows, robins, blackbirds, chaffinches, pigeons, jackdaws, thrushes, Willie wag-tails, yellow hammers, gold-finches, little-wrens, black-wrens. The crows are the first birds to build their nests. They start to build their nests on the first of March and the people say if the first of March falls on a Sunday they will not begin until the following day.
The sparrows build their nests in the trees around this school as well as in the gutters and in holes under the slates. In the end of April birds come here called swifts and hunt the sparrows out of their nests. No swallows build under the roof of this school and it must be on account of the swifts. A big number of swallows come to this district every year. They usually come about the twenty-fourth of April. The old people used to say that they came on the Pattern day of Nobber which is on the twenty-fourth of April. As this year is so very fine and warm they have come much
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 16:48
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There is a story told about the wall that is round the demesne. the story goes that every night a certain piece of the wall was knocked down and every time it was built up it was knocked down again. At last the people of the castle got a paling put up about 30 feet long and it was not disturbed. It is said that it was the Puck who knocked down the wall because it was in his way as it was his pass every night.
The paling is made of iron and can be seen in the demesne wall a quarter of a mile from the village of Slane. The Boyne can be seen through the paling.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 16:24
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Fr. O Brien. The man said you may go away I do not want you and he got quite vexed and turned his face next the wall. The priest told Mrs White to offer the rosary for him and that he would go into the next shed to pray for him. So after some time the little man turned round in the bed and asked Mrs White, "Where is the gentleman that was here awhile ago. I saw him in my dreams." Mrs White ran to call the priest and she told him that the man was calling for him. "I was just thinking it was his time" said the priest and he went in and baptized him and asked him his name and he told him it was Jeremiah Brimmet. The priest said "Jeremiah Brimmet I never heard your name on cat or dog before, so let me put my hand under your head that I can say I witnessed the death of one saint." He died in a few minutes.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 16:18
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This is a story I heard my father telling about people of the name of White who lived on a small farm with a lane leading to the house in Ardcalf near my home. They were very poor at this time and one evening at six o'clock a poor old man came to the house for a night's lodging. They gave him something to eat and settled a bed in the barn for him. Some time after they heard him moaning so they went into the barn and he told them he was dying and he wanted to see a minister from Banbridge. They sent a messenger on horseback for the priest. The priest got up on his horse and came with the messenger and when they were going over the old lane to the house the two horses were thrown into the gripe. When the priest got out of the gripe he asked the messenger was this man a catholic and he told him he was calling for a minister from Banbridge. The priest told the messenger to take the horse out of the gripe and he would go on walking. When he went into the barn the dying man asked him who he was and the priest said he was
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 16:06
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would see him. He put the stone back on top of the gold and let the little man go. The little man was a fairy. The man returned that night to bring home the gold and when he lifted the stone the crock was there full of rusty nails instead of sovereigns. And that's how the clever farmer was fooled by not bringing home the money in the daylight.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 16:05
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This is a story my Uncle told me about a Leipreachan. Longago in a local farm there was a man ploughing "lay-ground" in the neighbourhood of Proudstown. Coming on evening it began to rain and he pulled the horses over to the hedge for shelter. He was not long in shelter when a little red man was standing beside him. The man made a grab to catch the little man but he got away. He snapped his cap before he let him go. The little man began to cry for his cap and said he dared not go home to his people without it. The man held the cap in his hand and said that he would give him his cap if he told him where he'd get money. The little man agreed and brought him over to a mound in the field and he pulled back a big stone and there before his eyes was the full up of a crock of gold sovereign. The man would not take them away in the daylight in case the neighbours
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 15:55
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so much you can go and roof it." From that day to this the crow's nest is never roofed.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 15:55
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The most common birds in this district are crows, sparrows, jackdaws, podgeon, blackbirds and robins. There is a big difference between a magpie's and a crow's nest. The magpie's nest is roofed and the crow's is not. I have heard many stories about crows and magpies and this is the only one I can remember.
"The crow asked the magpie how to build his nest and the magpie said that he would show him how to build it. They gathered some sprigs and the magpie got one in his claw and put it down on a branch of a tree and he said "Do you see" to the crow and the crow said "I know." Everything that the magpie would tell the crow, the crow would say "I know." After a little while the magpie got tired telling him and he "he said to him, "When you know
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 11:45
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kill or hurt them. There is also a dungeon in Carrick-Dexter castle and it is also closed up by the stones that fell from the walls or by stones that were put there by people. Carrick-Dexter castle is south east of here and is built on a big rock along the banks of the Boyne. The castle of Dunmoe is south west of here and it was owned by people called De Lacy. It is along the banks of the river Boyne also.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 11:43
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There is the ruins of an old castle in Dunmoe and there is the ruins of an old castle in Carrick-Dexter. Those two castles were left in ruins by Cromwell's cannon. There was a cannon ball stuck in one of the windows or openings in Dunmoe Castle up to nearly a hundred years ago when it was taken out and used in a nearby flour mill that used to work on the River Boyne, for a weight. In Carrick-Dexter castle there is a stairs winding round and round the walls of the castle till it comes up to the top. There is a passage from Carrick-Dexter castle up to the hill of Slane where there are old ruins also. That passage or tunnel is closed up because cattle or sheep that might go into it would get stuck or they might not be able to turn back and they would die of hunger. The ruins are also closed up because of cattle or sheep went into it the loose stones that are on the top of the castle might fall down on them and
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 10:53
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The people looked everywhere near the house but they could not find the money. So there is money somewhere about the place where the old house stood then.
Marquess Cunningham was Land lord of Rochestown whose descendants still live in the Castle of Slane. Marquess Cunningham was William's planter. The land Grabbers of this district were worse than the two Land lords I have mentioned. People of the name of Gannons and Carneys who lived in Rochestown were evicted about the year 1886. Richard Gannon went to live in a house of James Rochfords in Gernonstown and took with him his two daughters. Carney lived after his eviction with some friends in Mullahadillon Slane where he stayed till he died.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 10:43
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Many changes have taken place in Ireland since the land lord was in power. Lord Boyne was the land lord from Stackallen to Mullaha. He was a high office in King William's army, his name then being Hamilton Russel.
The Parliament got Stackallen House built in the the year 1712, and presented it to Hamilton Russel who then got the title of Lord Boyne. When Lord Boyne died he was buried in Stackallen church-yard. A man named Sam Prestage who then lived in a house now occupied by Mrs Shalvey Stackallen, was a priest hunter for Lord Boyne. Priests suffered a lot during the time of the Land lords. It is said while a priest was saying mass beside Barristown mountain that Lord Boyne and his servant Prestage were seen going towards them by the people, listening to the mass and the priest and the people had to run away. People named Bramwells owned Stackallen estates before Lord Boyne for them. The man that lived in the old house in Stackallen hid his wealth near the house and no one knew it only himself. One day he was riding on horse-back and he fell off his horse and died, while he was dying he told the people that his wealth was hid near the house.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 10:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
Many changes have taken place in Ireland since the land lord was in power. Lord Boyne was the land lord from Stackallen to Mullaha. He was a high office in King William's army, his name then being Hamilton Russel.
The Parliament got Stackallen House built in the the year 1712, and presented it to Hamilton Russel who then got the title of Lord Boyne. When Lord Boyne died he was buried in Stackallen church-yard. A man named Sam Prestage who then lived in a house now occupied by Mrs Shalvey Stackallen, was a priest hunter for Lord Boyne. Priests suffered a lot during the time of the Land lords. It is said while a priest was saying mass beside Barristown mountain that Lord Boyne and his servant Prestage were seen going towards them by the people, listening to the mass and the priest and the people had to run away. People named Bramwells owned Stackallen estates before Lord Boyne for them. The man that lived in the old house in Stackallen hid his wealth near the house and no one knew it only himself. One day he was riding on horse-back and he fell off his horse and died, while he was dying he told the people that his wealth was hid near the house
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 10:26
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The large sea-gulls very seldom light on the land except when they see a bird's (nest) and then they come down and rob it. The small sea-gulls come here in large numbers when the farmers are ploughing the fields and when they are cutting the meadows. The little sea gulls come down from the air and rob bee's nests and eat the honey and young bees. They stay there in the field along with the crows until the hay is turned and put into little cocks. The swan is a large white bird and is not seen very often around here. I saw a swan's nest once and it was built in the big rushes in the Boyne at Kilcarne. It was made of hay and dry rushes and wool. There were two large eggs in it. The people say around here that if anybody robbed a swan's nest the cock and hen swan would watch a small relation of the person who robbed the nest and when the swans would get the baby alone they would bring it with them until they would come to water. Then they would get the baby by the back of the neck and they would hold its head under the water until it was drowned.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 10:17
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The time of the penal days priests were hunted by priest hunters and soldiers. There were houses built over the country for priest hunters. There is one near this school. The priest hunter that lived in it was killed and the house is supposed to be haunted by his ghost. It is said that anybody that lived in it will not die a natural death. In a place called Ballinlough near Kells soldiers were following a priest and he climbed an ash tree. The soldiers saw the track of his foot on the tree and they caught him and hung him on the tree. Afterwards some person got a bit of the tree to put in the fire and it would not burn only get black. The tree is supposed to be there still and the track of the priest's foot is there on the tree still.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 09:48
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There is a mass rock in a field belonging to Richard Guinnion of Roestown, Stackallen, named "Corrick an Aifran." It is not known rightly where the mass rock is situated in the field. In one corner of the field next Kealy's Mollies there are steps and it is believed that the rock is there.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 09:16
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it. It is almost five miles away from here. There is another old church like these in Kilbarry churchyard. There is a very old vault in Rathkenny churchyard. It is full of skulls and bones and bits of old coffins.
Donaghmore round tower was supposed to be built in the course of the night.
senior member (history)
2019-01-08 09:15
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There is the ruins of a church and a monastery on the Hill of Slane. King Henry VIII closed the monastery and took the land off the monks. There is a cave in the monastery. A passage is supposed to go from that cave to St. Erk's Hermitage near the Boyne. There is the story of another underground passage from Carrick Dexter castle to this monastery. There is a deep well with no water in it near the monastery. There is a ruined church in Gernonstown grave-yard. It is much older than the church on the Hill of Slane. Nobody knows anything about it. It is very small compared to the churches they have now. The vestry has a stone roof. There is a stone shelf in the wall of the church and there are two bishop's skulls on the shelf. There is too much ivy on the walls to see any carved or inscribed stones. There is another ruined church in Donaghmore beside the round tower. The people round here do not know anything about
senior member (history)
2019-01-07 16:49
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the shape of a horse shoe.
Hammer - It is used to beat the iron on the anvil.
The blacksmith shoes cart wheels in the open air. He makes a ring of turf outside about the size of the wheel he leave it there for a while. When it is ready he puts it on the wooden part of the wheel which is called the fellowes.
He mends ploughs, harrows, and all farm implements. He makes gates grates etc. In olden times a blacksmith was thought very important because he made implements of iron. Long ago when news papers were scarce the people brought the papers to the forge. At certain times the blacksmith was invited to a feast in the King's Palace.
Forge water is supposed to cure warts. A child with rickets is brought round the anvil sometime before dawn to be cured.
senior member (history)
2019-01-07 16:44
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There are not many forges in the parish of Moynalty. There are four in use and two disused. In the village of Moynalty Mr. J. Reilly, Mr. J. Bell also in the village. Outside the village about one mile and 1/2. Mr C Bell owns another at Lacan. Mr Farrelly at Shancarnan. There are two disused ones at Newtown and another at (?).
The forge is made of stone and the roof is slated. In Moynalty there is a door in the shape of a horse shoe. Outside over the window there is a sign of three horse shoes.
Inside the forge a great big fire. Beside the fire is the bellows. The bellows is in another room at the back of the fire a big long stick comes out in a hole in the wall. This is moved up and down to bring the draught to the fire.
The anvil is used to shape the iron into
senior member (history)
2019-01-04 10:44
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Years ago Saint Patrick's Day was held in a very stiring mood. All the people went in the evening to drown their Shamrock. All the beer shops were thronged with visitors. They sang Irish song and dances. The local fiddler was always there + sometimes the bagpipes were at the front. All came home at night cheering and shouting.
senior member (history)
2019-01-04 10:42
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roads to see the young people dancing around the bon-fire. Music and merry making is carried on till mid-night.
On Easter Sunday we hold a feast. Nine or ten boys go round gathering sticks to light a fire and boil eggs. We call it a cludoz.
On April fool's day (The first of April) people are made fools of.
There are funny things done on Hallow Eve, parties are held all over the country. Music and dancing, tea and all sorts of fancy bread is served. Games are played and all sorts of tricks are carried on. Nuts are roasted, led is melted, ducking in a crock with your teeth and sometimes silver is ducked for. Hanging an apple from the ceiling and trying to catch it in your mouth + your hands tied behind your back, is another popular game. While all this is going on inside there are other folks carrying on all sorts of tricks outside, taking down gates and hanging them on trees, tying latches of doors and stealing white cabbage.
senior member (history)
2019-01-04 10:35
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Saint Stephen's Day is the funniest of all festivals days. We dress our selves up in all sorts of fancy dress, tall hats with feathers, false faces flowered dresses carrying a spray of holly and a melodien. We go about the country dancing and singing. Everybody has a welcome for us and gives us coppers which we divide evenly, when we arrive home that night. Grown up wren boys as they are called travel long distances on bicycles and motors. This is an old Irish custom and people think it unlucky to get the wren burned outside their gate, which is done if they refuse to give money.
The Eve of Saint John's Days is 24th June is another jolly time. For weeks before all the children of the district collect furze bushes and sticks to make a big bon-fire. Even the old people like to assemble at the cross-
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 16:07
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at that time but in four months they found him.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 16:07
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There lived a landlord in the townland of Glackinstown. His name was Mr. Weldon. He had a man appointed to gather the rent for him. His name was James Devlin. He went up to a house in the Parish of Rathkenny to warn them about the rent and to have it for him when he would come again. The woman was churning and she struck him with the dash on the head. He fell on the floor and her husband stuck a fork through the top of his head. There was a man passing by whose name was John Balin. He looked in the window and said "Dirty Work." They had a grey horse in the cart and drove him up to a field in Parsonstown and trew him at the back of a ditch along the road. In a few days later the landlord was missed and the Police went to see would they find him. They could not find him
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:12
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own out to all the roads yet. The Donegans and Currans got to know about it and they went down to the Blighs and he said that it would not happen and it did not happen.
One day when one of the Blighs was being buried Mary Campbells granfather went to the buriel service and he was that much some with grief that he cried out
O Bligh Bligh
Why did you die.
The landlord of Leggagh evicted Miss Kieran in the year 1888 and Samual Mc Kiever got it after her. Lord Howth that evicted her. Patrick Farrelly and Silvester Gaughran are living in the house now. Another family named Naulty were evicted from Leggagh to the Borcora but they got the land in Leggah again and got back to their old house again.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 12:08
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Bligh was the local landlord in years gone by. He was a good considerate agent. It was the English Government that made him landlord. This landlord lives in Brittas. A lot of evictions took place but it was Mr Pollock who got leave from the landlord who evicted them. All the people were evicted except the Currans and the Donegans. One day Mr Pollock was walking through the fields and he said that he would
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 11:55
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fifty eight years.
Paul Reid.
senior member (history)
2018-12-19 11:55
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We have five milk cows at home, eight calves seventy cattle sixty sheep and a hundred lambs and the domestic animals are a hundred hens five ducks, two turkeys a dog and two cats.
One of the cows names is Maoilin. When we are driving out the cows or calves we say "How How Suck Suck." We churn the cream every week and any one comes into the house while we are churning and lights a pipe and does not take a brash they take the butter.
When a calf is a year old he is called a yearling. The dogs name is Topsey we feed him on bread and milk and he sleeps in the barn.
The two turkeys are a year old. They lay about fifteen eggs and then hatch. While we are collecting the eggs we keep them in Brine to keep them fresh.
When people are putting down a hens eggs if they have not good hatching eggs of their own they get a sitting and bring them to a neighbours house and get them exchanged.
senior member (history)
2018-12-18 12:14
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in Leggah aged about forty four years.
senior member (history)
2018-12-18 12:13
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Long ago it was a common thing for butter to be taking from churns and milk from cows by witch-craft especially if neighbours were not in good term. One time the cows of one farmer named Mr Brien of Castletown were going dry and he did not know what was the cause of it, until one morning the farmer got up early and he saw a hare sucking the cow the next morning he brought out his shot-gun he put a piece of silver on the top of the cartridge and wounded the hare which ran limping to a neighbour's house and went in the window, the farmer followed it, and found the old woman lying wounded in bed the old woman died and the farmers cows gave plenty of milk ever after. The hare was the old woman who used witch craft and changed herself into a hare.
senior member (history)
2018-12-18 12:01
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sing.
The wren the wren
The king of all birds
St Stephen's day day he was caught in the furze
Up with the kettle
And down with the pan
Give me some money to bury the wren.
On ash Wednesday ash bags would be tied on the people.
On the first of April April fools do be made of the people such as telling them that another man wanted them and when they would go to the man he would shout at them "April Fool."
On May day we make a May bush we get a branch of a bush and decorate it with all colours of ribbons and wild flowers.
On St Bridget's night crosses are made of rushes and straw and hung up on the roof. Twelve candles are lighted in honour of the twelve apostles and all in the house kneels down and the head of the house gives out the
senior member (history)
2018-12-18 11:55
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On Easter Sunday we light a bon fire. About eight or nine gather a lot of sticks. When we light the fire we make tea and boil eggs there does be music at the bon-fire. On St Stephens day we go with the wren. We go round dancing and playing music at every house we get some coppers at each house until we have eight or nine shillings which we divide among us. We
senior member (history)
2018-12-18 11:53
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brack with a ring in it. They cut the brack and each one takes a piece and who ever gets the ring will be marries before next Hallow Eve.
Long ago the people used to get up before sunrise on Easter Sunday to see the sun dancing and if you see it dancing you will have luck the whole year round.
The first Monday in January is called hansel Monday and if you get a present on that day you will be getting presents all the year round.
senior member (history)
2018-12-18 11:42
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It is a custom to light a fire on the top of a hill on Easter Sunday and boil eggs. The fire is not supposed to be put out. It is to go out itself. On Hallow eve night people take gates and other articles and change them. On Christmas day people kill the wren and bury him the next day in front of the door.
senior member (history)
2018-12-18 11:41
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others would sing Nancy Coughlan would dance and a hooped gallon of porter on her head. Police men out of Mountainstown used to come to it. There used to be a stage along the round. It would open at seven o'clock each night. People used to come from Newtown Kells and other places to it. It would last for a week each year. It would open the first Sunday in August.
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 16:09
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agent. This is called the murder of Rathkenny. To this day the field is called the Blunderbuss field as this was the name of the fire arm they used. All this planning and shooting went on as there was evictions to take place before he returned to England.
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 16:08
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still to be seen. This same Dyas also ruled over a townland called Staholmog. Our neighbours the Naultys were evicted off this estate as a kind of compensation. He took them up here to this estate. They were even poorer here and could not pay their rent so he evicted them secondly. A few years ago the land organisation gave them back their farm but they paid dear for it. Mr Hussey was the landlord of Rathkenny. He lived in England and very seldom came to Ireland.His agent Mr Bunn collected the rent every half year. He was a harsh landlord. In the year 1798 there was an attempt made on this landlords life. He was expected to arrive at Rathkenny on a certain night. Parties watched out for him at ten o'clock that night. A trap was heard approaching with two mean talking. Two men lay in ambush at "The Millers Cross." They were fired on as they passed on man was shot dead. Instead of it being the landlord it was Mr Bunn the
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 16:05
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The landlord of the townland of Leggagh where my home is was Mr Dyas. He was a second Jack the (?). He evicted ten families of the Crockan one of them was Mr Brien. The remains of their homesteads are
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 15:37
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There were never any evictions and they got from May till August to pay the rent. Anyone that did not pay the tithes got six months in jail. There was another landlord called Mr De Bath. He owned Knightstown part of Ladyrath and Rathkenny. He had two thousand acres. There were five or six evictions. The rents were collected in May and December and the tithes in October. This man lived in Dundalk and had a man to collect the rent and he was the cause of the evictions. His name was Mr Bullock.
senior member (history)
2018-12-06 15:36
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Long ago there was a landlord in this district called Mr Longfield. His family owned it for about two hundred years and they got it the time of the plantation. This man lived in Dublin and had a man named Tomas Donegan to collect the rent. They owned eight hundred acres. All the people had to pay tithes for the support of the Protestant clergy. The tithe procter went round every October and the rent was about one pound per acre. This landlord had thirty tenants. The tenants got anywhere from a half an acre to one hundred and thirty. The tithes were collected up until 1829. The landlord owned this until 1923 and then the landlord was paid.
senior member (history)
2018-12-05 15:35
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to their homestead in Leggagh. The people used to pay tithes to this man. The man that collected this money was Arther Hamilton from Dublin. He was called an agent.
senior member (history)
2018-12-05 15:35
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A man named Mr Bligh was the landlord of Castletown many years ago. The man lived in Britas. The people say he was a fairly good landlord. Not many families were evicted of the land. A family named Naulty were evicted from Leggagh tot he Borcora, but when the land was divided they got back
senior member (history)
2018-12-05 11:00
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Long ago there were men called landlords. The most that was known in the district were the Blighs and Mr Gerrard who was the landlord over Headstown and Raffin. The other land lord Mr Bligh was over Mr Pollocks land Mr Meades and Mr Beggys.
Some landlords were very hard with the people that would not pay the tithes. They knocked their houses and put them out on the road. It is said that this happened when there was a great famine and that many died of want and starvation. It is over thirty years ago. Not many were evicted round Castletown, but in other places there was. Mr Gerrard put out
senior member (history)
2018-12-05 10:53
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a few years after the sisters death and then went to her nephew Dr W.P Timmon of Navan and remained there till her death. She is buried in Knock churchyard.
senior member (history)
2018-12-05 10:52
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Convenient to where I live there is a joining of three estates. Lord Howths, Mr Longfield and De Bath. The joining is marked by a number of trees growing in a circle called the clump. The tenants on De Baths estate are nearly all poor with a few acres of reclaimed bog. On Lord Howths estate beside where we live on Nora Kieran was evicted about fifty years ago. The farm was given to Sam McKeever of the Yellow Leas. He kept it until eight years ago when it was divided by the Land Commission. Nora Kieran had an invalid sister at the time a Mrs Tiernan that could not be removed. The people used to send the rent to the land-lord. Nora Kieran remained in Leggagh
senior member (history)
2018-12-05 10:47
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at that time but in four months they found him.
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 11:43
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is a pailing round about a perch out from the door and the space inside is called the pen. We let the pigs out in this pen. We feed them three times a day.
The above is supplied by Mr Patrick Smith aged about sixty one years lives in Grange. Peggie Smith.
Our cow is tied by the neck to a chain that runs up and down on a post. The chain is about two foot long. My Mother milks the cow and when she wants to get the cow's foot out of the way she says cos a foot a caile. The way we call the cow is caile, caile, caile.
The cure for pip in the chickens is get a feather and dip it into turpentine and put it down their windpipe and take out the pest. When this is done we give the chickens a drink of water.
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 11:39
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If a chicken is not able to come out of the shell, + the shell is chipped, some people take them out of the shell.
If you are not sure whether an egg is birded, get luke-warm water and put the egg into it. If the egg goes down it is rotten + if it floats it is birded. The call for the turkeys is "Yib Yib Yib." The call for the horse is you rattle a bucket, and the horse will think you have oats and he will come for the rattle.
The call for the ducks is "Weet, weet." The little basket or sauspan that would be put on a young calf's mouth is called a musle.
The above is supplied by Mr John Reilly lives in Leggah aged about fourty-four. James Reilly.
When we are driving the horses we say "Hee-up" or "Gwan" ("Go on"). There is a place for letting out the pigs outside our pighouse. There
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 11:32
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To put a grain of salt in the bottom of the milck can going out to milk is counted lucky. To make the sign of the cross on the cows back when finished milking is for luck.
June is supposed to be an unlucky month for hatching eggs, it is also unlucky to take a setting of eggs without giving something back in return.
When a sitting of eggs we put down the last egg is marked so as to show what day it went down
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 11:30
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Some people put a lanit on a goat that strays away. It is put from the fore leg to the back one, More puts a swivel on them. You will put a rope round each goats neck and then put a bit of wire between the two.
The way we call the hens is "Guck Guck."
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 11:29
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The names of the farm animals are hens, pigs, goats, ducks. We feed them three times a day, in the morning, at dinner time, and in the evening. It is said that it is not right to feed them in the night.
When the goats kid we give the milk to the young ones. We don't use the milk until they are three days old. They say that goat's milk is good for people in tea.
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 11:25
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them any food for forty eight hours then we feed them with oatmeal and bread crumbs, and we gave them sweet milk to drink. When they reached twenty one days they took a nasty disease called pip or gapes. This is in the windpipe.
senior member (history)
2018-11-21 11:24
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We have two cows at home. Their names are "Bessie" and the Heifer. The place where the cows sleep is called the "Byre." There are four divisions in our cow-shed. One of the cows is tied with a chain about three yds long and the other is loose. When I am driving them in at night I say "Ho Ho." The place where the milk is in the cow is called the udder.
We have eight calves at home. Two of them are baby calves, we give them three sauspans of sweetmilk morning and evening. We keep a Gubbien on them till they are three weeks, to keep them from picking up straws.
We hatched five settings of hen eggs. We hatched them in boxes, the first thing we did was to fill the boxes with hay, and made the nest in it. We then put thirteen eggs under the hen. We put an iron under the hay to keep the noise away. Then we put a cover over they box to keep the light away. After three weeks careful hatching there came out (?) chickens. We did not give
senior member (history)
2018-11-20 11:59
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Then we get thirteen or fifteen eggs, according to the size of the "hatcher." Then we put the hatching-hen in on them. Then we put a sack on across the box to keep the light from her. Each day we let her out for a quarter of an hour, and feed her. While she is eating we turn the eggs. When the eggs are a week set, we see are they birded. One person holds a candle, and another person puts the side of her hand over the egg and holds it near the candle. If there is white space on the top of the egg it is birded + if not it is a glog. In three weeks the chickens come out. At first they start to chip the shell according as the chickens come out you take out the shells according as the chickens come out you keep the shells till they all out. The way to call the hens in "Tuk, Tuck."
senior member (history)
2018-11-20 11:46
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We have four cows at home. There names are Darkey Cockhorn, maoilin, and the red one.
The place where the milk is got from the cow is called the udder. The cow-shed is about eighteen feet high with a thatched roof. The walls are mud walls. There are three divisions in it. The place where the manure and water is, is called the channel. The cows are tied by the neck with a chain.The chain is tied to the manger.
The first milk that is got from the cow is called the fore milk. The last milk is called striging. The fore milk is given to the calves and the strigins are used for the house.
We have one horse at home we call him Murphy. We keep her in a small shed we call this shed the horse stable.
This is how we set eggs, we get a box and we put a horse shoe in it. Then we put straw over that, then we put a fistful of hay over the straw, and make a nice round nest in the centre
senior member (history)
2018-11-19 11:27
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There was an old forge in the townland of Clontail. It was owned by Mr. McKeever. A man of the name of Mr Fitzpatrick. The forge is now used as a dairy. Some of the impliments are there still. Mr Patrick Ball got the bellows. The bellows was ten years old when Mr Ball got it.
senior member (history)
2018-11-19 11:20
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the coal. There is also a square stone trough for holding the water, the shoes horses and asses. He makes gates, harrows, axes and most other farm implements. It is very seldom that he works in the open air, except when he is fixing a mowing-machine or anything like that.
senior member (history)
2018-11-19 11:19
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There are two forges in the parish of Castletown. The blacksmith's names are Mr. Donegan and Mr. Pat Ball. Mr. Donegan's forge is situated beside Castletown Cross, and Mr Ball's forge is beside Clooney Cross. Mr Ball's father and grandfather were smiths and worked in this forge. It is a very old looking forge and is thatched. The thatch can be seen from the inside and the wall seem to be built of lime and clay. There is a big half door on this forge and one window. There is only one fireplace in it. There is a big hole in the ground for holding
senior member (history)
2018-11-16 11:21
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Dongan. Fourteen men were paid at the rate of 4d per day. Some more were employed at taking out the hill at Mr. J. Weldon's, others at the sharp turn a little further down called Dick's Turn and others at taking out Ballinascarry Hill. All these works were in charge of a man whose name was Muldoon. The earth removed from these hills was carted to fill up the chapel yard which leaves it so high of the road and adjoining fields. The carting was done by a man whose name was Rogers. John O Brien and Own Donegan were two of the workmen. Their two sons are still alive and both are over seventy years of age. The hours worked were from 4 o clock in the morning until seven in the evening. That time there were no clocks and the people went by cock crow which meant 4 o clock.
There used to be an old road connecting the by-road near Castletown village and the main Kingscourt-Navan road. It commenced at a place locally known as "the Doctor's Lane" and continued on through Mr. McKeevers land
senior member (history)
2018-11-16 11:13
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The Knock road leads from Castletown to Knock. The school road leads from Castletown to Mullen's cross. The old road is a road leading from Headstown to Cross Guns through the fields. This is a very old road. It is not used now except by people walking from Headstown to Cross Guns.
The New Line leading from Kells to Ardee was made in the time of the famine.
The was a path leading from Biggy's bog to the church.
The road leading leading from Mullen's cross to the New Line is called the coach road.
The road leading from Mullens cross to Georges Cross is called the Muhall (?). This road is very old.
The road leading through Leggah is called the Leggah Road. This road is not long made and does come out altogether on to the main road.
The year after the Famine in '48 the British Government started relief here. The first job to be done was to remove the hill between the School and Mr. Curran's house. The wall on Curran's side of the road was built by a mason whose name was
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 16:51
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air. If they fail it is counted one for the striker but if they do catch it the striker has to take their place and the others strike it. Two or four generally play this game.
Two teams of four generally play "Four jolly tradesmen looking for work." They all do different jobs (pretend to do) that are done in this work and the other team has to try and guess what they are doing. If they are not correct they have to tig the other team. For instance the first team might be imitating a laundry. Player no 1 might pretend she was stirring clothes in the boiler, player no. 2 might be wringing out the clothes, player no. 3 might be ironing them and player no. 4 might be parceling them up for delivery. When the other team tigs them they have to change places and the others do the guessing.
During the Autumn months, mushroom-picking, blackberry picking are greatly indulged in by children.
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 16:48
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gravel the grass grows green, many's a lady is fit to be seen, washed in milk, dressed in silk and all pops down. Then they start again and continue on like that.
This is how 'wall flowers' is played. The children hold hands in a ring and say "Wall flowers, wall flowers, growing up so high for she and her children shall never never die, so its (whoever it may be) such as May Smyth she can dance and she can sing and she can show her wedding ring Hi! Ho! Paddys! turn your back to Paddys!" Then the girl turns her back and the song is started again. This time her neighbours whoever she may be is mentioned and so on until each one has his back turned.
Cat and dog is played in this way. You get one large stone and two sticks one large and one small. You place the stone on the ground and the small stick called the cat on top of it. Two of the players stand some distance off and the striker gets the long stick called the dog and strikes the end of the cat with it. The other players try to catch the cat as it is in the
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 16:26
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The children that are going to play here's peas as they grow up make a ring. Then one of the players go into the ring and puts on "Here peas as they grow up some in a dish more in a cup, here's bacon, here's beef, here's the miller and here's the thief." Whoever thief falls on has to follow the one that put in and if she crosscuts (which means to go anywhere only where the first player goes) she is called Goosie.
The way to play the farmer wants a wife is the farmer goes into the middle of the ring of other players and they say "The farmer wants a wife" so he has to shut his eyes and pick one. The wife then has to go into the ring and they say "The wife wants a child" and she picks one for the child. Then the child goes into the ring and they say "The child wants a dog" and then the dog is slapped on the head.
Five play corners, one in each of the four corners and the fool in the middle. He has to try to get into one of the corners while the others are running into another if he gets in the one who looses his corner is the fool and so on.
Round the green gravel is played in this way. A ring of children hold hands and keep going round and round saying "Round the green
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 16:16
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of gate and both of them have some-thing nice. Then the rest form a line + pass out under the gate saying "Thread thread the needle and sew." The last man has to guess one thing and whoever he guesses she must go behind them, and so on till they are all finished. Then both sides pull against each other and whoever falls first then the other half of players win.
The way to play towball is, you have a ball. And the players at the bottom throw the ball to the ones in town and if they do not catch it the others are one. But if they do catch it they run down to the bottom and so on till the get the number required.
Two even numbers play flowers of May. One side will say "Who will you have for flowers of May, flowers of May on a cold and frosty morning". Then the other side will say "We'll have so + so for flowers of May, flowers of May on a cold and frosty morning." Then whoever they say, one of their side must pull her over to their side and if she is able to pull the other one over on to her side so you keep like that until they are all on one side.
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 15:54
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awaiting decision
it is to put on, saying Ichalakil Black bottle Ichalakil out. You keep putting this on + whoever is the last is the tigger. Then they follow all till they catch one and tig them and so on like that.
Four is all that can play catch-stick. You make two rings about two yards apart, then, two with sticks stand each at one ring. Then one of the others have a small stick called a cat + they throw it at one of the people in the rings and if they are able to strike the cat away, the other girls will have to run after it. While they are away the ones in the rings keep running from ring to ring and every time they run to a ring it is counted one. But if the ones that are away getting the cat, gets the cat into the ring and no one in it, then they lose their sticks and the others gets them. If the girls out of the ring catch the cat the other ones loses the sticks also. Then if she strikes it somewhere where you can't get it you must shout "lost cat."
The way to play thread thread the needle and sew, is two make a kind
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 15:48
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Other games played are tig, catch-stick, thread the needle and sew, Townball, Who will you have for flowers of May, Here is peas as they grow up, Four jolly tradesmen looking for work, the farmer wants a wife, cat and dog, Round the green gravel Wall flowers, corners.
In summer we gather daisies and make daisie chains. This is the way we make them, we get one daisy and make a hole in the stalk, and stick the head of another daisy into it, and so on till you have a big chain made.
Sometimes we get ferns and take the top of them and say see when we will be married, we say "This year, next year, sometime, now or never." Then we begin again and see who we will be married to. We say "Tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor, rich man, poor man, blind man, thief." Then we see how we will be dressed and we say "Silk, satin, cotton, velvet, muslin rags." Then we see what kind of a house we will live in, we say "Little house, big house, pig-sty." Then we see how we will go to the wedding saying "Wheelbarrow, coach, carriage, motor car." Then we see what kind of ring we will have and we say "Gold, silver, brass."
As many as that like can play 'tig.' The way to play
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 15:42
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player takes a small stone in his hand and calls it the "Duck." A few yards away from the granny a mark is placed for the stand. Each player throws his "duck" at the "granny" + which ever duck is nearest to the "granny" is placed on top of it and the players take their ducks and try to knock it off.
The way to play cat in the hole is to make two rings. We call this the hole. Then we get two sticks and a cat. The cat is a stick about three inches long. Four is all that can play this game. Two boys will hide the cat. When they come back to the holes they sit down one at each hole. The boys with the sticks will say "put him in if you have him." He says these words every time he takes the stick out of the hole. If they saw that he was not putting the cat in the hole, they would go from one hole to another. The boy with the stick (the cat) would put him in the hole.
Pinkings are caught on a fine sunny day. When you see a lot together you dip down your gallon and take it up. You can then catch the pinkings in the gallon with a fine net.
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 12:55
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Hide and seek is played with any number. They count twenty one and whoever twenty-one falls on has to shut his eyes while the rest hide. When they are hid they say 'Right' and the seeker goes to look for them. Whoever he sees first is called the seeker next time.
Ghost in the garden is played with six or seven. One goes into the 'garden' and one pretends he is the mother of the next and sends one of the rest out for his fathers shirt and he comes back and says there is a ghost in the garden and they go out to the garden and asks the ghost what does he want. He says a needle and thread. They say what for he says "To sew my bag." They say "What do you want the bag for." He says "To carry sand". They say "What do you want the sand for." He says "To sharpen my knife." They say "What do you want the knife for and he says "To cut the heads off your children and the ghost runs after the children and pretends to kill them all.
Any number can play "duck down." A large stone is got and placed in the centre of the playground. This stone is called the "granny." Each
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 12:31
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and if the dont hit it he will have to roll the ball first next time.
Catching butter flies is done in Summer when you see a butter fly, throw a cap on him and put him in a matchbox.
The way to play skittles is cut five little sticks about two inches wide and three high and put numbers on them. On the first one you put the figure one on it + on the next two and so on till you have the five marked. Then you make a ring and put the sticks in it. Then you get three other sticks about nine inches long and mark seven yards from the ring. Then one boy will name any number and two boys will play against each other. Then the first boy will throw the long sticks at the ones in the ring and see will he knock out any number and the next boy does the same and so on and whoever first gets the number called out by the boy wins the game.
Frog in the well is played with five or six. They stand round in a ring and hold each others hands and one goes into the middle and shuts his eyes and the rest say frog in the well and cant get out, and they keep going round until the frog gets out.
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 11:50
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The games mostly played are jump the frog, ball in the hat, catching butter flies, frog in the well, hide and seek, ghost in the garden, duck down and blind mans buff, cat in the hole, hop + step and jump, nut-cracking, wheelbarrows, catching pinkings, catching eels, catching birds in Winter making snow men, or sliding.
In playing jump the frog all the players go down on their knees and the person at the end of the line gets up and jumps across all the rest and then the next does the same until all in turn jump the whole line of players.
Ball in the hat is played with seven players. Every one must have a cap + the call them after the days of the week. Then the first gets a ball and rolls it into one of the caps and whatever cap it goes into a stone is put into it. Then the second player rolls the ball + a stone is put in the cap it does into. Then all the players roll in turn until there are seven stones in one cap + who ever owns the cap will have to put his head against the wall. All the rest of the players throw the ball at his hand
senior member (history)
2018-11-09 11:37
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Thomas Price of Knock was also a noted poet. Many of his poems are still well known. There was an old man named Denis Flood in the district of Knock. He lived in a thatched house. He was a good hand at making up songs. He is a long time dead. Peggie Smyth.
There was an old poet in Knock name Michael McGil. He was blind from his birth. He was a great musician and would play at the crossroads and the people used to give him money. He also compose songs and his sister wrote them down and sold them at a penny each. Jerry Donegan of Mitchelstown also writes poems.
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 16:16
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awaiting decision
in the ear people heat olive oil and pour it into the ear. The old people used to melt a tallow candle and put it on brown paper and put it on their chest for a cold. To stop bleeding people put a cob-web on it. To purify the blood the old people used to take three feeds of nettles on the borrowing days every year. The cure for to stop blood is to hold a mushroom to it. People say if you sprain your foot to go and pump water on it. It is said the way to get a thorn is to get the dog to lick it. Some people say that the cure for ring-worm is to mix hold water + yellow clay and put it on the place affected. The cure for a bleeding nose is to put a cold stone at the back of the neck. The cure for a burn is to put Parrafin Oil on it. The cure for rheumatism is to get two little and keep them in your pocket. Goose grease is the cure for a sprain or stiff joints. Near the railway there is a small river the water is of a red rusty colour. The old people say that's iron or copper ore that causes this colour. It is supposed that people suffering from stomach disease should take a drink of this water first thing in the morning. A cure for the whooping cough is to boil a leaf of the Scottish thistle in milk and then drink the milk. Sea water is the cure for sore feet. A cure for chillblains is
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 16:02
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and when the salt melts put it on the wart. The cure for the hic-cough is to drink out of the wrong side of a cup. The milk of a sow thistle is supposed to cure a wart. Cure for the Whooping Cough is to take one large spanish and a half pound of sugar of candy. Cut up the onion in small pieces. Also the candy. Put it into a saucepan + just cover it with water. Boil all down to half. Take a half spoonful when the cough is troublesome. Ripe alder berries boiled in lard; cures hacks on the hands, foot. Sulphur mixed is a good ointment for ringworm. A cure for the measels is to put the person into a warm bed with a hot bottle at their feet. Then get a half pint of butter milk and a half pint of new milk, boil both together. Separate the curds from the whey take a cupful of the whey mix with half glass of whiskey take this as often as you can. The old people used to have a potato and rub it to their feet for a cure of chilblains. If you broke an absess on your face the old people used to roast a pig and put it on it. For a sprain or swelling the people used to put vinegar + bran on the place affected. For a sore throat people roast salt till its brown + put it on their necks. To cure a wart people to the forge + bless themselves + lips, their fingers three times in the water the blacksmith cools the iron in it. For a pain
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 15:47
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If you meet a black snail on a wet day and if you have any warts + rub it on them and he is supposed to cure them. If you get a sting of a nettle a dockin is supposed to cure it. These are the words you say when rubbing it on. "Dockin, Dockin stiff + stout take the sting of the nettle out." The cure for the trush is to get a man that never saw his father he will say some prayers. To put a stop to bleeding is to wash your eyes in cold tea. The cure for Chilblains is to rub Parafin Oil on them. The cure for a sty in your eye is to get nine gooseberry thorns and point them at the eye and say " A sty in your eye, it's a lie it's a lie." The cure for the toothache is to put tobacco into the tooth. The cure for the heartburn is to take breadsoda + water. The cure for the Hic-cough is to get a good fright. The cure for a burn is to put breadsoda on it + keep it from blistering. The cure of the toothache is to go into the blacksmiths shop and put a red iron to the tooth + you will never have the toothache again. The cure for a wart is to put a hole in a turnip + put salt into it
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 13:31
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son (?) himself he went to live in Navan from where he used to attend Castletown Dispensary. At Painstown there was on old Protestant School and reference is made to it in present History of Meath. The families were more numerous in former years. A family of the name of Gibney emigrated to Australia about 50 years. Another family by the name of Rourke who lived near the village emigrated to America about forty years ago. My townland is mentioned in an old song entitles "The Boys of Castletown." It was composed by a man of the name of Seamus O Brien in the year 1967. It was about a great football team that existed then. When there was no railway there was an old road that lead from McGawleys garden up to the main road from Navan to Kingscourt. The ruins of the Doctors house are still to be seen. One of the walls is still standing. It is built of stone. The house was built in the Bligh Estate. Dr Hamilton was the tenant. It is now owned by Mr McKeever of Dublin. There are some of the Hamiltons buried in Castletown cemetery. On the Northern side of the townland there is a Protestant Church. It was at one time in the hands of the Catholics and it was a chapel. This was before the time of Cromwell. When Cromwell came he knocked the chapel. It was then confiscated along with the burial ground on which the chapel was built by English Government. It was then rebuilt and and made a place of Protestant worship.
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 12:03
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three roods in it. Duffy is the most common name. There is very little Irish spoken in this townland. There is the ruins of an old house near our house. My uncle James Reilly lived in it long ago. This house fell and he had to leave. He is now working on the railway and is living along it. There are the ruins of another house near this one. A man named Micky Ryan lived in this house. This man met with a sad death in 1932. One night he was going to Wilkinstown ad he had his cat with him. This cat was his only company and he liked the cat. The cat was with him and a lorry owned by Mr McEnteggart came along. The car ran out in front of the lorry and in order to save the cat he ran out in front of it and the lorry struck him and killed him. There is an old woman named Mrs Morre who lived near our house. Although very old she can carry a big handle of sticks. James Reilly.
Supplied bu Mr W. Donegan Castletown, aged 45 years.
The name of my townland is Castletown, Kilpatrick. It got this name because St Patrick is supposed to have passed through this Parish. Castletown chapel is dedicated to him. Castletown is in the barony of Morgallion. There are about eighteen families in this townland and about 122 people. The houses are mostly slated. There is an old woman named Mrs Brien who is the oldest in the townland also Thomas Brien aged 74. The doctor's residence in former years was a short distance from the village. His name was Mr. Hamilton. When he
senior member (history)
2018-11-08 11:35
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My home townland is Leggah it is in the parish of Castletown. There are about twenty four families living in it. The most common type of houses in this townland are slated ones. Long ago there were more houses in this townland. There were three more old houses in this townland. One was built in a field called Tukerstown and occupied by a man named Pora Fada. There is another old house about a half mile from our house. There are about six people over seventy years living in this townland. There is good level fertile land in it. There are about
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 12:39
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butter.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 12:38
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If strangers come in while we are churning and does not say "God bless the work" or take a brash it is said that they take the butter. The churn is often given a rolling motion to gather the butter. It is said that butter-milk is very healthy to drink.
It is said that it is not right to milk a cow on the ground when she is going dry. It would interfere with the churning.
Once upon a time when Mrs Naulty was churning She stayed at the churning for about an hour and she could get no butter on the milk. There was an old woman in the house with her, and she said we will see now who took the butter. So she went over to the fire and put the tongs into it. Then the door opened and a neighbouring woman came in and (?) the said that it was her that took the butter. They went and told the parish priest about it. He told them to go home and put salt on a head of cabbage and give it to the cows, so the did as they were told and soon after they had the supply of
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 12:19
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Once upon a time there was a girl working with a priest in Castletown. This day she was going to churn and she was going to the well for water and when she was going she got tangled up in yarn and went for the water. And when she came home she put the yarn into a drawer and got ready the churn. When she began to churn, she could not move it with butter, so she told the priest, when the priest came in he threw the yarn into the fire and said "Now every one will have their own butter." After that she had the usual supply of butter.
If you are the first to get water out of a well or pump on May Day and put it in the churn, you will have butter all the year round.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 12:17
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two years.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 12:16
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It is said that if you throw out the milk the cow will go dry.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 12:09
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If strangers come in while we are churning they say give me a dash. We don't know why they ask for the dash. The way we know when the butter is done is, there comes bubbles on the milk. We put luke warm water on it when we begin to churn, and towards the end we put cold water on it. My mother lifts the butter out of the churn with a strainer.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 11:50
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he could not churn. Next morning he got up at four o clock and watched the cows. Suddenly he saw a hare running to the cows and standing up on his hind legs and drinking the cows. So then he saw who was taking the milk on him. This happened in the milking field at Harlins Cross.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 11:49
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We have a silender churn at home. It was bought seventeen years ago in Carrickmacross. My mother does the churning. The parts of the churn are the lid, the dash, the spades, the handle and screws. This is the way the churning is done. The milk is skimmed every day, and the cream is stored in a crock, till the crock is full. Then it is churned. At first it is churned quickly and towards the end it is churned slowly. When the cream in the churn is cold, hot water is added to it, and when it gets hot cold water is added to it. The way we know when the churning is done is by the noise of it. When the butter is gathered on the butter milk, it is taken up with the spades on to a butter plate and salt is mixed with it. Bread is made with the butter-milk + it is also given to the pigs.
Once upon a time there lived a man in this district names Red Johnie from the cross. He had a few cows but in the morning they would have no milk. He knew that somebody was taking the milk on him. He said he would have to do something about the matter for he had to buy all the butter, because
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 11:32
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who used to give no milk. There used to be a white hare every morning in the field when he would go out to milk. No dog could catch her. She would always escape into a house and when they would go in, they would find no one only an old woman. This day as she was escaping into the house a dog got a bite it her and when they went in they found the old woman dead on the ground. It was said that it was her that drank the cow.
Once upon a time there was a woman who used to churn, and when she would have done churning she would have no butter. So she told a friend of hers about it. He asked her was there any one coming in when she would be churning, she said "Yes". He said the next time she would come in to put a red coal in the fire she did so + the next time she churned she did not know what to do with all the butter.
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 11:26
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two rinsings. Then we get the sieve and take the butter on to it with the scup and then take it over to the butter-worker which should be prepared before hand. Then we add 1/4 oz of salt to every lb of butter. Then we roll it with the roller for about ten times, when all the water is out of it. Then we get the scotch-hands and makes it into nice bricks. Old people would not let you bring a gallon with a track of milk to the well, it is supposed that your good luck flows from you, when the milk flows away with the stream.
Once upon a time simple Kate used to go over to her neighbours house (Mrs Blacks of Bellville) when Mrs Black would be churning, and take a lighted sod out of the fire + bring it home to light her own fire. It was not really the sod she was taking, it was the butter. So a friend told Mrs Black that the next time she would be churning to put a horse-shoe under the churn. So that when the other woman would come in she would have no effect on the butter.
There was another man who had a big herd of cows. But there was one cow
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 10:57
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churn. It is seventeen years of age. The parts are called, the stand, the barrel, lid, and plug. Wade and Sons Ltd is written on the bottom and side and no 4 is written on the lid. We churn every second day in Summer and twice a week in Winter. My mother and I do the churning. Strangers who come in don't do the churning now. It takes about twenty minutes to do the churning. It is done by the hand. The churning is done when the glass is clear or when the grain is a nice small even grain.
First we damp the churn with cold water. Scrub with salt, then rinse it with cold water using two or three lots in Summer. Then we thin out the cream to the right consistency. Then we have to either heat it or cool it to the right temperature according to the time of the year. When the glass is clear + the butter is in good grain then we add the breaking water. A quart of cold water in Summer time. When the butter is done we draw of the butter-milk and then give it
senior member (history)
2018-11-06 10:34
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We have a churn at home. It is about two feet high and fifteen inches wide. The stand is about three feet high. It is an oval shaped
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:11
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in Staholmoc with been friendly to Dyas. After a time peace was restored and all went to a pub then Histy. After an evenings drinking the Bohermeen folk returned home taking the "hero" McDermot with them.
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 14:10
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miles of Castletown and about 12 miles from Bohermeen. Apparently a number of the evicted tenants from Staholmoc went to live on the poor land of Bohermeen. They had been put out by the landlord Dyas. It was one of these people was been buried Hence their remains were brought back to Staholmoc their native place. The coffin was brought in a crib. The people traveled in carts. When they reached Oristown they went to the local public house now owned by Mr Coldwell and had some refreshments. All this time McDermot was hid in the cart with the coffin. When going in to drink they took out the coffin and placed it on two stools at the door. They discovered McDermot. They were going to send him back but were afraid he would loose his way so they took him to Staholmoc. There they met their friends. An argument arose between the Bohermeen folk and Stoholmoc party. The evicted charged there friends who were left undisturbed
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 13:47
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When the (old McDermot) was a gosoon his people lived over at Bohermeen. Some person died at Bohermeen + there remains was being brought to Staholmog graveyard for buriel. Staholmoc is within 3
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 13:46
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Another landlord by the name of Dyas evicted a lot of people at Histy. In the time of the landlords nobody dare cross the land. A woman used to wash for the barrick she was in the habit of putting the wash on Leggah ditch. The herd saw them and there was cow manure on them and told her not to put them there any more.
senior member (history)
2018-11-05 13:45
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The above is supplied by Mr Patrick Smith aged about sixty one lives in Grange. William Smith.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 11:58
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In olden days there was one great Landlord named Mr Dyas he owned nearly all the land around this district. He evicted many poor people out of their houses and land even if they had their rent and rates paid. The people never liked to see the landlord coming round the place. My father is the son of an evicted tenant. He was put out in the road and his house pulled down.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 11:53
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used to come lorries from Dublin for the crocks.
There is always an old fair held in Nobber in the month of April. It is always held on a Monday. Long ago it was held on a Tuesday. One time there was a big fight at the old fair and a man was near killed and he went up the street and said "Nobber no more on a Monday" so the fair day was changed to Tuesday. At this fair all sorts of tricks are played. The tinkers always go there with gallons and saucepans. It was an old custom to buy a gallon at the old fair of Nobber. A woman named Campbell used to walk from Knock to the fair for a gallon. Long ago there was a hotel in Nobber owned by a man named Mr Connell. At the old fair there used to be dancing in this hotel from morning until night.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 11:40
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Long ago there used to be a fair on the top of the hill near our house. It was a wide level space on the side of the road. There used to be crocks made in Knock and sold here. A man named Mr Kelly of Knock was the head of this works. There used to be men employed at the making of the crocks. On the fair day there
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 10:56
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of ground on Reillys hill. The chief things that were sold were flowers, pots, pitchers and crocks. The market was held every year about the month of May. The people responsible for the arrangements were Hugh Markey James Hughes and Brian Reilly.
There was a fair held in Nobber on a Monday but it was changed to Tuesday because at one of these fairs a man was killed and before he died he went up the street saying "Nobber no more on a Monday" and so the fair day was changed to Tuesday.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 10:52
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When Knock Pottery was in progress the market for the sale of the potteryware was a wide level piece
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 10:19
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of May. One day a man went to this fair and was killed by accident and when he was dying he said "Nobber no more on a Monday." The fair green was changed in a few weeks after. Every year on the 1st of November there is a fair held in Ardee. People that have turkeys to sell go to this fair. At that fair every year there was a toll on certain beasts. The toll paid on each calf was three pence and on sheep two pence. About twenty years ago there was a fair held in Carlonstown. This fair was known as the patron fair. There was a toll paid on certain beasts. The Toll paid on certain beasts called calfs and sheep was a penny and two pence. This toll was gathered for the upkeep of the fair green.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 10:07
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The local fairs are held in Navan, Nobber, Slane and Ardee. There is one principal fair held in Nobber on the 25th
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 10:06
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The local fairs are held in Navan, Kells, Ardee and Nobber. The fair in Nobber used to be held on a Monday. A lot of people began to fight and a man with a slashing hook cut the head of another man. The next fair that was held the head danced on the fair green and said "Nobber no more on a Monday." It is held on a Tuesday instead. Every month it is held in Nobber.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 09:54
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when she was half dead he went up the street and said Nobber no more on a Saturday and since that the fair is held on Tuesday.
senior member (history)
2018-10-31 09:53
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There are local fairs held in Navan Nobber Kingscourt and Ardee. Navan fair is held every second Monday. It is a great polly fair in the Autumn. Once there was a big fight at Nobber fair. This fair used to be held on Saturday. A man was near killed and
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 16:36
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cattle are sold their hair is cut and some others are marked with a letter. Sometimes a piece would be cut out of their ear. Fairs are held in Nobber, Slane and Ardee. Every three weeks the fair is held in Slane. It is held in Ardee every November. The fair is held in Nobber every third Tuesday. Sometimes ago the fair in Nobber used to be held on a Saturday but one Saturday there was a big fight with two men one of them was very near killed and he said "Nobber no more on a Saturday" and since that it is held on a Tuesday.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 16:33
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Long ago on a hill beside Reilly's house a market used to be held every Wednesday. Every body from about used to be at the fair. Crocks flower pots and other things would be sold. Mrs Reilly of Knock used to take charge at the fair. When the people would be buying they would strike hands.
The fair that is held in Navan is held in a special fair place. When
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 16:26
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Drogheda market toll is paid one penny a basket. It is collected at the market gate. When a bargain is made they show their agreement by one clapping the other's hand. There is a red mark put on the cattle sold. Sometimes there is a bit cut out of their ear other times they are marked by letters. When cattle are sold luck money is always given. In most cases a half a crown is given to the buyer. People often spit on the luck-money. This money is called luck penny.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 16:24
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The local fairs are held in Navan and Ardee. They are held in a special fair place. Buyers never transact business in the country. At
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 15:58
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is a big fair in Ardee every November. All the people that have turkeys or any kind of fowl to sell be there on that day. At the pattern fair there used to be ribbon men. They were a sort of political parties and at the dances the fights used to commence. At the pay day in Carlanstown the best cattle in the country would be shown and tolls were paid on every bullock sold. This fair was held on the 1st of May. When a man has to go far to a fair he must start early. When a man sells cattle and gets paid he gives the byer a few shillings as a luck penny. To make the cattle lucky.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 15:54
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The local fairs are held in Navan, Kells, Slane, Nobber and Ardee. There used to be a fair in Nobber on the Saturday nearest 25th of April called the patter fair of Nobber. Once there was a big fight at this fair in this fight there was a man half killed and when he was half dead he went up the street and said "Nobber no more on a Saturday" and since that the fair is held on Tuesday.
The fair in Navan is held on Monday. This fair is held on a fair green. There used to be a fair in Carlanstown on the 1st of May called pay day. The people used to pay tools on the cattle and 1d for sheep. This money went to pay the fair green. The cattle and sheep are marked with raddle. When a bargain is made the people strike hands. There is a fat stock show in Navan every November. There
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 15:47
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Smith aged about 61 years. Lives in Grange.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 15:45
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The fair in Nobber is held every first Tuesday of the month. A number of years ago the fair used to be held on Monday. Once the fair was being held on Monday and there was men fighting and one man was badly hurt. He was dying and was shouting "Nobber no more on a Monday." The man died and the fair day was changed to Tuesday the way it is at present.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 12:31
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another good town for fairs. This fair falls on the second Tuesday of the month and the last Wednesday. It is a great pig fair. A great number of Northern buyers attend, the northern station is so convenient. Nobber fair is held every third Tuesday of the month. Not much business is done except for small pigs. A great number of these come from Cavan and are the best breed in Ireland.
senior member (history)
2018-10-30 12:26
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There are local fairs held in Navan, Nobber, Kingscourt and Ardee. Navan fair is held every second Monday. There is a great (?) fair in the Autumn. Noted English buyers come there and buy train fulls of cattle and rails them at seven o'clock in the morning from the Great Northern Station. It is not much of a sheep or pig fair as sheep are seldom brought into the town. Sometimes the buyers go out the roads and meet the cattle coming in. This happens when there is a good demand for cattle. Ii is only the local graziers who call round the country and visit farms for the sake of buying up stores. Ardee is
senior member (history)
2018-10-26 12:49
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of wooden vessels called noggins. The people long ago would get up early in the morning and do some work before their breakfast. There was a boy long ago who was red and when the other boys would meet him they would say "Poor little Johnnie his eyes are red blowing up the fire to the boxty head." Miss R A Beggy and Miss Markey of Knock both posses nogans.
senior member (history)
2018-10-26 11:19
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Long ago the people ate three meals a day, the breakfast, the dinner and supper. Sometimes they are potatoes, eggs and butter milk for the dinner and often they had colcannon and point. For the breakfast they would Indian stirrabout and for the supper boxty bread. The boxty bread was a cake made from potatoes. Buttermilk was drunk at all the meals. It is sixty years ago since tea was first used in this district. Before cups were in use the people drank out
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 15:22
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Tea was not as common as it is now long ago. It was only taken once a day by the people long ago. Potatoes and porridge were the most common food. They would not take any supper going to bed but the porridge would be boiled for the next morning. Wheaten bread and oaten that was mostly baked long ago. The old people were very fond of vegetables along with potatoes and fresh buttermilk. Very few delph vessels were out. Tin saucepans were most common.
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 15:20
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Long ago the people did not eat as much as they ate now. There custom was to take three meals a day. The men that were working would be up at six o'clock in the morning and go to work without any breakfast. At eight o'clock the women would meet them with their breakfast. Their breakfast would consist of a can of porridge and plenty of new milk.
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 15:20
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Long ago the people did not eat as much as they ate now. There custom was to take three meals a day. The men that were working would be up at six o'clock in the morning and go to work without any breakfast. At eight o'clock the women would meet them with their breakfast. Their breakfast would consist of a can of porridge and plenty of new milk
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 11:48
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Sunday they eat eggs. On Shrove Tuesday the people make pan cakes. Tea is in use in this district about one hundred years. When the people first got tea they drank it black then they got to know that sugar and milk were used. There was a man in Mitchelstown and they called him the "Blackie" every house he went to he wanted to get some tea. The day he went to Donegans and asked for tea the maid got ready the tea and left it on the table and the man put the sugar and milk into the tea pot and began to drink out of the spout.
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 11:26
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People long ago eat potatoes three times a day. Sometimes for breakfast they had porridge and new milk at the second meal potatoes and butter milk and potatoes for the third. The people used to eat the porridge out of noggins with wooden spoons. These noggins were made by a carpenter. They were made six inches high and four inches wide at the top and bottom. The table they had was a leaf hinged to the wall with one leg and when they had finished eaten they lifted up the leg and let the leaf fall in.
On the 25th of March the people used to eat boxty bread and on Easter
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 10:39
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porridge. They used to be out working in the bog at three o clock in the morning before they tasted any food. Goats milk was mostly drunk by the people in olden times. Potatoes were eaten three times a day with butter milk.
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 10:38
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In olden times people used to drink goat's milk and eat oaten bread and oaten
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 10:38
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of spuds as they were called. It was a great treat to get a cup of some sort of tea at Christmas. The bread mostly eaten was oaten. It was baked standing before the fire against a few sods of turf. Leven bread was also a great favourite. It was baked with barm. Some years ago people made a beverage called Flummery or mock milk. Fireseeds fresh from the corn mill was stept in soft water for five or six days. It was then strained through straw into a crock. This liquid was left over for six more days. It is then fit for use and great stuff for taking away thirst on account of its acid taste. For dinner they usually took cabbage, and bacon and plenty of flowery potatoes. They very seldom took a sweet after it. This dainty was reserved for great Feast days such as Christmas and Easter Sunday.
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 10:05
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People long ago eat potatoes three times a day. Sometimes for breakfast they had Indian stirabout with buttermilk. Their miday meal consisted of boiled potatoes salt and butter-milk. Those potatoes were put into a flat basket placed in the centre of the floor every member of the family sat around this basket. They peeled the jackets off the potatoes with their fingers. Of course the potatoes in olden times were like balls of flour. Again at night time they had another meal
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 10:01
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around Christmas. Fish was eaten. Long ago ling was the most common fish used then. On Shrove Tuesday pan-cakes were eaten. On Easter Sunday a fire would be lit and eggs would be boiled outside. The vessels they used to drink out of were called Noggins this was before cups were in use. On a fast gruel and nettles would be eaten.
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 10:00
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The people long ago would have four meals a day. The names of them were their breakfast, dinner, tea and supper. They would eat the breakfast at eight o'clock. At twelve oclock the dinner and at four oclock the tea and about nine at night the supper. Some people would do the work before their breakfast. The morning meal was tea bread and butter. Pots of potatoes were boiled for the dinner and also for the tea. Porridge for the supper. Butter-milk would be drunk at dinner with the potatoes.
In Summer the table would be on the middle of the floor and in Winter it would be near the fire. Oaten-bread and wheaten bread was eaten. Very little meat was used. The poor people would not get any meat only
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 09:52
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on Hallow'een and pan-cakes on Shrove Tuesday, Nogons were used before cups came in fashon.
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 09:51
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in the night. The breakfast consisted of Indian porridge. The dinner of potatoes and the supper of potatoes. When men would be working in the fields the potatoes would be boiled in a pot there would be a sally basket got and the potatoes and water turned in to it then two people would hold it up and let it drain. They would then tumble them into a tub and make a hole in the middle and put butter in it. They would get wooden spoons and stick a spoon for each man round in the potatoes they would cut the oaten bread in quarters and put it beside each spoon. They would get a gallon of butter milk and nogans to drink it out off. There were no tables so they would have to sit round the tub. Meat was seldom eaten. Fish was eaten very much. They had no clocks and they would keep ruster specially to crow to tell them the time in the morning. They would eat culcannon
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 09:14
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The people used to eat three meals long ago. At seven in the morning twelve o'clock in the day and eight
senior member (history)
2018-10-25 09:14
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The people long ago lived on much different food to what we live on now. The chief foods they used were, Oaten meal bread, Wheaten bread, porridge, butter milk, flummery and cabbage and bacon. Meat was a thing which only the well to do could afford, and sweets and dainties, which are so much used nowadays were things almost unheard of. Breakfast was a very early meal then. It usually consisted of oaten bread, butter, eggs, milk. Tea had not been heard of. For dinner they usually took cabbage and bacon and plenty of flowery potatoes. They very seldom took a sweet they kept it for a holiday or a feast day. They took another meal at three o'clock. They took milk for this meal. For supper they had buttermilk and porridge. This was a very healthy meal. It was easy to know this to see the long lives people lived then.
senior member (history)
2018-10-24 11:30
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the year. We call one of them "The Butly" and we call the rest of them by their colour.
The cow shed is constructed of concrete and an zinc roof. There is a head walk at the back of the manger, this is used for keeping the hay in. There are three doors on it + two windows. The cows are tied with chains, they are attached to the manger with a round ring. The chain is tied round their neck. If a cow is "Badagh" there is a cloth tied round her horns + let hang down on her eyes.
When you are done milking you make the sign of the cross on the udder and say "God Bless You."
On Saint Brigid's night wooden crosses are nailed at the back of the cowshed door for luck.
senior member (history)
2018-10-24 11:26
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We have six milk cows at home. They give a lot of milk. We have the fore milk, to the calves, and the strigins we keep for the use of the house. When the cow is after calving the milk she gives, we call is beastons. There is sugar put n the beastons and given to the cow, the way she will milk well through
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 16:38
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The best known landlord is this district were Mr De Batha, Bligh, Gainsfort, St Lawrence Longfield and Gerrard. Mr Debath was the worse of them all. He evicted a lot of people of Knightstown. His agent was responsible
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 16:37
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a poor old man because he would not pay the tithes. He was living over at Raffin and he died in a few days after he being put out. Mr Gerrard was going to build a castle at Headstown but then he changed his mind and built it in Gibstown.
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 16:36
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Major Bligh was the landlord in years gone by of this district. He had a man employed for collecting the rent. He used to collect it every half year. If anyone had not the rent they would not be evicted.
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 12:49
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We have a racing plate at home that was made by my granfather (Mr Donegan) in this forge many years ago. The cure for a wart is to dip the place affected into the blacksmiths trough.
A few years ago there was a man named Kelly who owned a forge beyond beside Leggah. He had a house taken from Mr Lambe for the purpose. He does not work in it now.
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 12:44
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and another in Ardee and the other in Tallenstown. He won a silver cup in Newtown. This man was the best footballer in Meath and he played in the Syddan team.
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 12:43
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About thirty five years ago there was a football match in Rathkenny between Castletown and the Navan Pearse Mahonys team. Castletown won by a goal and a point. The scores were two goals and two points. There were twenty one men on each side and the goals were one hundred and fifty yards apart. The Navan team had blue and white jerseys and Castletown had green and gold. Weight trowing and a hop step and a lep. Brian Reilly was a great weight trower and he won two sets of medals one in Rathkenny and the other in Navan. There was a man in Castletown about forty years ago called the runner Reilly. He won three two mile races one at a sports in Newtown
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 12:21
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was an old saying
Early to bed and early to rise
Makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise
senior member (history)
2018-10-23 12:20
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James Grimes, Pat Clarke, Mick Cassidy, Willie Cassidy, Pat Cassidy and James McGlew and Tom Finnegan. At that time there used to be four goal posts. Two for the goals and to each side for the points. There used to be one man in each goal. And two each side for the points. It was a hard struggle. Castletown won the game. They beat their opponents by a big score. This team was the first of the old Castletown team. On the following Sunday they went to Rathkenny to play the famous Pierce Mahoneys. These were supposed to be the all Ireland Champions. The captain said at the beginning of the g