Number of records in editorial history: 28336 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2022-01-26 13:17
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all the buttons which he knew to be in the church. He had no sooner got outside the door of the ruin, than every button in his clothing came out.
Under a mass of earth, in the portion of the church which still has a roof - church is the reality another floor - there is a stone which a crucifix in relief carved on it. This stone is lying in the soil; I cannot recall that there were any words chiselled on it. I found it, when I was about 13 years of age, while poking about the ruin. There was also a portion of a headstone. on which the words "Here lieth ye bod-" were most beautifully and elaborately cut. The letters were so curiously bound together that it was only by copying them carefully on paper that, as a boy, I could read them. This stone was within the church also. At the springing of the chancel arch, which had fallen long before my time, there was an inset in the wall a stone with a carved figure of a lion, but it was turned upside down! There was some talk at that time of the place having once been plagued with a great wolf and I accordingly made this lion into the wolf in question, and I accordingly made this lion into the wolf in question, as an explanation of its presence there! The walls of one part of the church were of double thickness, with a space large enough for a hand - for mine anyhow - in between. This slit at one doorway - the west? - because a rabbit one took refuge from me in that slit and I was barely able to bring him out, but I did.
[Note] The church referred to in this [?] was a Franciscan foundation upon the site of the ancient monetary D. OC.
senior member (history)
2022-01-26 12:56
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There was a stone of peculiar shape resting horizontally on the top of two vertical ones in a field near Killusty (Fethard, Co Tipp.) If you took up the horizontal stone, and having turned it upside down, replaced it on the vertical ones, it would, if you turned your back assume its original position while you were turned away from it. It would not change its position, however, while anyone continued to look at it.
When seated at the (turf) fire you are not to be pulling the tongs through the ashes. If you do you are washing the devil's shirt. Pulling or interfering with the crane was equivalent to the same laundrying process. (Kerry - Rathmore - and Tipp.)
You must not use the word "Arrah" (addressed to a boy or girl, who, objecting to doing some task, uses the word as an introductory remark) "Arrah was the devil's mother." (Kerry and Tipp.)
Into the ruin of the Church in Liath mór Mochaomhóg you must not go unless you are prepared to make some offering, a button, a rag or anything of a similar nature. When the collector was a child this rule was rigidly observed and accordingly the nicely-carved Holy-water font hald a great mess of miscellaneous
offerings at that time. It used to be related that a certain youth in the neighbourhood, much given to "pitching" buttons, having lost his store of them, visited the church in question and abstracted
Add: The offering in the Church ruin was supposed to be sufficient to ward off headaches for the rest of your life
senior member (history)
2022-01-26 12:35
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The last item on the preceding page should not have been entered under this heading. It very probably serves no useful purpose under any section but I recorded it solely as marking the end of a series of interments that must have begun about the middle or last quarter of the seventh century.
In Loughcapall near Clonmel, from which my paternal grandmother, Bridget Lonergan, came, a monster with a horse's head used to come out of the river to graze.
In Liath mór Mochaomhóg it was asserted, and I am certain, believed, that all you had to do to get a good water-dog (retriever type), was to mate a wheaten terrier bitch with a dog otter. This it would appear, held out no difficulties to the dog-fanciers in my native area; they need only bring a slut to the part of the river where the otters were known to frequent and tie her there. The dog otter discovered her and that was the beginning of the end of the matter. I never saw, however, a result of the cross.
My mother used tell of a certain man whom "they" called Nero. He was, as well as I remember, a kind of highwayman and Kilkenny County, about Freshford, was his native place. He jumped over three horse placed side by side at the Turnpike (in the parish of Twomile Borris.) He was a small hardy man. The people had a great admiration and respect for him.
senior member (history)
2022-01-26 12:21
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he preached a sermon on intemperance and on pishogues and charms. As the Twomile Borris people were to a great extent guilty of this offending hilarity they knew where the cap fitted and wore it accordingly. But Ryan when he heard it kept silent. A short time afterwards, the priests fine black horse took the farcy and he promptly despatched his boy with the horse to Ryan to be cured. No sooner did the boy arrive at Ryan's than he was as promptly despatched back to the P.P. fort the customary tribute of whiskey and just as promptly did the priest respond with the required virtuous liquor. Ryan cured the horse and then having sampled the whiskey told the boy to tell his master that the drop was alright before it was christened. (diluted). The Ryans still live in Forgestown.
The last two people to be buried in the church of Liath món Mochaomhóg (Twomile Borris Tipp.) were Seán Hehir and Nance Párdhán. I myself was at their funeral. I cannot now say if they were man and wife or brother and sister, but the two were buried the same evening. They lived in an "island" in the bog in the Dherrigeen (Cuid I). It was, I think, just before the Boer war because I remember reading some time after the funeral, on the Weekly Freeman, a heading in big letters: "Chamberlain's Immoral War" which meant very little to me but which stuck in me.
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 14:15
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"black art." They met, with some others, in Maher's kitchen one evening and before long their powers of diablaidheacht were in competition. After some preliminary passages, one of them made the tongs dance a hornpipe, and when the dance was over, elated by the effect of his art on those present, he challenged his opponent in these words "Now Lahy the poet, that made the poker p---s are you beaten?" Lahy was silent for a while, and the other mistaking his silence for an admission of defeat began to crow. "Oh look, Miss Mary" he said addressing the young lady of the house "you'll break the eggs." "What eggs" said Miss Mary. "The eggs there under you" said he, and half startled, she rose from her chair, to find to her own discomfiture and the amusement of all present that she had been sitting on a sieve of eggs. "Get out of the house" she exclaimed in anger. "Wait Miss Mary, wait a minute" says Lahy "and Ill put him out." "I defy you," says the other. "Alright" says Lahy, "broom, do your duty" says he, addressing himself to a long handled besom that stood behind the door. No sooner had he spoken that the besom got to work and in a very short space of time "---- bowled for the door" which was opened for him and out the broom swept him. (I cannot remember the name of the second magician above.)
Only one out of two people - who travel together can see the good people.
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 13:53
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[Continued from page 29]
Near the bridge in Clooneen and in the River bed is a large rock which Finn Mac Cool threw from Slieve-namon. The print of his five fingers is on the rock.
The graveyard of Red City - 3 or 4 miles from Clonmel - moved across the road one night. There were two people buried in the graveyard, who evidently were not personnue gratae with either the living or the dead. The following day the graveyard had risen, ruin, headstones graves, dead and all and moved to the other side of the road leaving the two unwelcome visitors alone at the other side and there they remain to this day.
There is a rock on Slievenamon (unfortunately I have forgotten the name) and the print of a horse's hoofs knees and "puss", together with the imprint of a man's two hands, wide open, are on it. A priest was being chased by the priest-hunters and he jumped his horse over the "Cló-dhack" (the name of a stream that flows down the mountain on the west side). There was a large rock where the horse landed and he fell and pitched the priest over his head. That's what caused the marks to remain on the rock
I think it was at Mahers of Kilburry that the following - very imperfect because very ill-remembered-incident is supposed to have taken place: There were two characters in the district who were able to work the
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 13:43
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voice "Amach leat a bhitheamhnaigh" (in Irish) and swept the ugly mass out the door with her broom.
Again: Near Kilburry a man named Power who had been evited ty Clettherbook or his agent, as talking one evening to the priest. A shot , followed by a scream rang out. "that would be -----'s death" said Power, "and I'll be hanged for it" (I forgot the name of the agent). The poor man got into a state of panic, which the priest tried his best to allay, assuring him, that even if the shot and the scream did mean that the agent had been shot, that his evidence would be quite sufficient to save him. Sure enough, the agent had been shot and as surely was Power charged, arrested, tried and in spite of all the priest could do to save him, found guilty of the agent's murder and condemned to be hanged in Clonmel gaol. When the day of his execution came Power, protesting his innocence was led to the scaffold. Three times the "gallows refused to hang him" a nd then among the people who were present arose a cry of appeal for mercy on the man. Clettherbook's reply to the appeal was that if there was no tree in demesne fit to hang him, the man could have his life. He was brought to Kilburry demesne and there hanged from an ----- tree. (I now forgot what sort of tree it was, but I think, oak). The tree was dead within twelve months, and the ground about sank down, where his body lay when they cut him down.
[Continued on page 32]
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 13:19
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Mrs. Burdett Moroney was the Landlady of these lands. She gave sites to Lords and Protestant Gentlemen in Spanish Point and they built nice lodges and houses. But she was very hard on the tenant-farmers and some of them were evicted and she was boycotted about 50 years ago.
The shop-keepers of Miltown would not supply her servants with goods and about twenty of them got a month in jail. The tree blacksmiths of the town would hot shoe her horses and they were sent to prision.
T. D Sullivan M. P composed a song about them.-
I
Three brave blacksmiths down in the County Clare,
They wouldn't shoe the grabber's horse, they would'nt shoe his mare,
They would'nt take his money, for his threats they didnt care,
Those three brave blacksmiths down in the County Clare,
II
Three brave blacksmiths coming home once more,
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 13:14
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Long ago the farmers made a lot of butter from their cows, and they were anxious to increase it.
An herb called traenloch grew in Knockanalban Lake, about three miles north-east of Mullagh. This herb when shaken under the cows caused them to have more milk. The boys and girls of the district assembled to this lake to pick the traenloch to bring home. They spent the night dancing and enjoying themselves. Sometimes they had a concertina, but when this failed "puss" music answered quite well. The boys had no dancing shoes but hob-nailed heavy boots, and the girls home-made flannel skirts, but they enjoyed themselves and laughed as heartily as those who attend the present-day dance-halls.
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 13:07
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dog, that he could not go home until the lump would be gone. The names of the three dogs were Swift, Heavenside and Hearwell.
The next day he saw a castle in the wood and he went in and there was a young lady inside. He remained with her in the castle that night. At mid-night the black dog came to devour him and he was attacked by the three small dogs and they tore his clothes to pieces. When the King's son got up in the morning the lump was gone. He went home and as he was coming near a river the dogs asked him to cut off their heads and throw them with the river. He could not refuse and so he cut off their heads and threw them with the river.
He was very sorry for what he had done after the dogs saving his life. When he passed the bridge there were two men and a young lady standing near it. They asked him why he was crying and he told them, and the said "Stop," as we are the three dogs that were bound by enchantment and now we are all right." He came home himself and the young lady and they got married.
"They were drinking bog-water when we were drinking tay,"
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 13:01
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Once upon a time there was a King's son who had a lump on his neck.
The was writing in the lump and he was very troubled about it. He went to travel to find out what was the writing, and would never come back until he found it out. In the evening he came to a little cottage and there was a very feeble old woman in it. He asked for lodging and the old woman said to go away, that his equals would not stay with an old hag like me. But he remained with her that night and she gave him a small dog in the morning.
He travelled the next day and he saw another cottage and he asked for lodging. There was a feeble old woman and she gave him a little dog.
He went on the third day and in the evening he met an old beggar-man with a bag on his back. He showed him the lump and he asked him could he rad the writing and he did. He told him he was to be devoured by the black dog in the wild forest to-morrow night and he gave him another dog. He told the beggar man to go home, that he was just making for the black
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 12:49
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Long ago flour was scarce and the country people lived mostly on potatoes. They made a kind of potato-cake called stampy. It was used a good deal when digging the potatoes in harvest.
Large potatoes were selected and carefully washed, and the skin scraped off with a knife. Each potato was rubbed on a grater, or sheet of tin holed from one side, and the pulp collected into a basin. The boys generally did the grating and often they scratched their fingers.
The soft pulp was put into a clean white cloth and the water squeezed out. It was then mixed with a little flour, salt and soda and baked in a griddle. When baked, stampy has a lovely flavour, and used hot with butter rubbed of it, it was food fit for a King. The old people used to say, "You would ate your fingers after it."
Stampy was generally made in the evening when the farmer had a "mihul" digging potatoes and the boys were very glad to get a stiall of it. After that they had a dance when the boys "flinged" around the flour in their nailed boots, corduroy breeches, and frieze coats, and the girls in their heavy flannel dresses and
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 12:42
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IV
My father too I'm much afraid, must sacrafice his ears,
When Daniel Barry makes a move, to use the threatened shears,
Altho my Dad he ne'er believed a word of Columcille,
He said the train would never run as far as Hynes's Hill.
V
The Stalworth sons of gallant Clare came in their might arrayed,
To see "our chief"* begin this work, which was so long delayed,
The band struck up the Parnell March, and arose a wild Hurragh,
That echoed loud and long and drowned the roaring of Malbay.
VI
And dear O'Brien e'er many a day, we'll be flying like the wind,
As far as steam can carry us, leaving Dublin far behind,
And though I'm yearning for that day with longing I've a pain,
To take a trip to Wild West Clare in the Miltown Malbay train.
* C. S. Parnell
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 12:36
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I
O'Brien dear just listen here, I'll tell to you some news,
Although you're at the breakfast now, the treat you wont refuse,
It's nothing bad, dont stare like that, my good fellow eat away,
The West Clare Line is finished now, the train runs to Malbay.
II
No more we'll face the cutting winds, in Patsey Gorman's car,
Or pass through bleak Mt Callan when the elements are at war,
But snugly sit and gaze abroad, in sunshine or in rain,
While we are swiftly borne along by the Miltown Malbay train.
III
Old Robert Cummins shakes his head, and says "Tis very quare,
That all the fine old prophecy should melt away in air,
For old Shawn Rynne oft said to him, the smoke would ne'er be seen,
Arising from the engine, as it rolled down from Rineen."
senior member (history)
2022-01-25 12:30
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I'll tell you as I heard, and I'll tell you no lie. It was about a giant that was travelling through a wood. He met a little wooden house with a gate as a door and no windows. He went in and there was a turkey boiling in a pot be-side the fire. He took up the turkey and began to eat, and as he was eating, a very feeble, old woman came outside the gate and asked him to let her in, and he said "Let all that is outside stay outside." "For God's sake" said she "let me in." When you ask me like that I'll let you in" and he let her in and she sat near the fire and she asked him for a bit of the turkey and he threw her a piece. She asked him for another piece and she was twice as big, and he got up and began to fight her before she would get any bigger. They fought around the house and she had a stone of steel on each finger and in a very short time she had the skin and flesh torn off his bones. He threw himself on the floor and managed to get out.
It was dark and he was running around the trees and the old hag after him untill the break of day. He managed to go into a hole in the trunk of a tree and the old hag passed him out and he jumped out after her and caught her by the hair of the head
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 14:27
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VI
Well you do look like a foreigner, and that you can't deny,
With your various peculiarities, likewise your foreign eye,
Perhaps you were out at Babylon to cure some slow decline,
Or with the Turks at mecca, to see that old ancient shrine.
VII
Well then boys, I can assure you that I never left my home,
And if ever I get back again abroad I will not [?]
O' to think that I'm a foreigner, 'tis all a deceit,
But I wonder what keeps the Clerk with my rent receipt."
Poor Paddy waited all day long to get back his commands,
But the corner-boys soon tricked him as they disappeared in bands,
He shouts up to O'Connell, "Send me down my rent receipt,
Or 'pon my soul tils very soon I'll face to face you meet.
VIII
I met a Peeler on his beat, I told him I pair my rent
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 14:16
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The son of a widow went to pay the rent for his mother and was robbed in the town. He wanted to become the tenant in preference to his brothers by putting his name in the book (Landlord's)
I
My name is Paddy Leary when to Ennis first I went,
On that abominable errand for to pay my mother's rent,
I borrowed a short-knee breeches and a Caroline hat,
A pair of pumps and a black thorn,
to meet John W. Scott. (Agent)
II
When I arrived in Ennis boys they thought me very "raw",
But I'm sure I will surprise you with the noble sights I saw,
They had night-caps to their candles in every thoroughfare,
But what surprised me most of all was a man up in the air. (O'Connell's monument)
III
I saw a band of corners-boys and towards them I went,
Saying, "Gentlemen will ye inform me where I can pay my rent,
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 14:09
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Some years ago in our mothers' time there used to be played a game called "Jack" stones. It used to be played by girls and sometimes the boys would join in the game; they were commonly called "dack" stones.
the dacks were small round stones picked off the road or street about the size of marbles, Two, three, four or more could play at the game.
There were conditions or rules laid down before the game started, such as - "No cross dacks, settles, or stirs."
There were 12 or more parts in the game, and if the player did No. 6 instead of No 5 the other players cried "cross your dacks" and she had to hand the dacks to the next player.
The games were, Back of the hand, ones, twos, threes, fours, Back of the hand of Noi-gob-anáirde, a bhfeaca tú thios é, a bhfeaca tú thuas é, Buttermilk, crowsnest, lay an egg, leap the gap, and snap.
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 13:54
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A tailor in Miltown Malbay bought a bonamh from a farmer named Larry "Una". The pig got crippled and was nearly always screeching. The pig was driven to the fair and sold to a jobber who had no money. When the tailor's wife heard of the transaction she and her "simple" boy, "Jumbo", went off to help her husband. The local feather-monger, Barret, who was a great boxer, also came to assist. The "prime" boys had a great laugh and compose the following verses.
I
Now boys stop that laughing till you hear my sad story,
And when you have heard it you'll pity my case,
On the ninth of December I long will remember
How a jobbar from Ennis "done" me up to my face.
I had but one pig which they call Larry "Una",
The crippled bitheamhnach could sing a good song
I brought him out to the fair, he looked very well there,
And Paddy Coffey, he bought him before it was long.
II
There were thirty-six fools and each fool had a pig,
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 13:38
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Be Irish ever more.
Sure well you know dear mother,
Although I'm going away,
I'll not disown my native land,
Not to my dying day.
A leanbh bocht, a grádh mo chroidhe,
How noble is your heart,
In days to come, a leanbh bocht,
I hope you'll take your part.
Your father is above in bed,
From him go take your leave,
For his days are nearly over now,
He's trembling on the grave.
Alas! my poor old father,
I'll kiss him 'ere I go,
Slán leat a mháthair dílis
Agus mo bheannacht leat go deó.
Since that bitter parting came,
A dreary year has fled,
Old Máire is a widow now,
her poor old Pat is dead.
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 13:18
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Through out Columba's shore
A Frenchman of great honour that saw what they could do
He said I will protect you
From those yankee crumbing crew
Ill take you to a hire where I have Authority
And keep you to my service While in this country.
(6)
You'd think it was a slaughter house
Where in the yankees lay
The officer and all his men
in carts were drawn away
With bloody heads and broken bones
to remind us for evermore
(7)
Now before those lines I do conclude
Let young and old unite
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 13:14
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As seven of our Irish boys were going through George's street
When one of those yankee gentlemen they happened for to meet
He brought them into an ale house
And called for drinks "galore"
(iiii)
And when he thought he had them drunk
He unto them did say you are listed now brave soldiers
To defend our Country.
Our Irish boys got to their feet
Which made the yankees frown
As fast as they could strike a blow
They knocked the soldiers down.
(5)
The officer and all his men were left in crimson gore
They proved themselves Saint Patrick's sons.
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 13:10
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All you that love the shamrock
Attend both young and old,
I feel it is my duty those lines for to enfold.
Concerning those young emigrants
That lately sailed away to seek and honest livelihood.
In the lands of America
ii
On the eighteenth day of April
Our gallant ship set sail, with forty five young Irish men.
Sons of our Grainuaile.
They landed safe all in New York.
On the eighteenth day of May
To meet their friends and relatives all in America
iii
Some of them met with acquaintances as soon as they did land
With flowing glasses drank a health
To dear old Ireland
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 13:03
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Will back your own again
Tear off the thraldom chain
On! On! the war cry
Sinn Féin amháin
Men from Mayo to the plain of Lóc Garman.
Seed of the Gael and the Dane and the Norman
Join hands for Ireland
For Ireland alone
Win back your own again
Tear off the thraldom chain
On! On! the war cry
Sinn Féin Amháin
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 13:00
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Awake men of Éirinn
The long night is ending
The first golden gleam of the morning has come
Voices long sundered in concord are blending
High hopes are surging
One for a nation's right
On for a noble fight
Leap from your sleep at the call of the dawn
Win back your own again
Tear off the thraldom chain
On! On! the war cry
Sinn Féin amháin
Why should we sleep
While our land is in danger
Why should we crave in the halls of a stranger
Only the Gael can make lays for the Gael
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 12:52
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The ships out on the ocean they moved their ships ashore.
They assembled - thousands from Sligo and Knocknarea
But the pride of all our County were the Leyney boys that day.
May the shamrock wane o'er Allen's grave that in Manchester lay,
Likewise Larkin's and O'Brien's that are sleeping in their graves
The British crown, we will pull down,
And tryrants we will run
A nd our rifles yet will revenge the day.
That Manchester boys were hung
Unite my boys we'll burst their chains off Erin's liberty.
We'll write our names in Scripture when Old Erin will be free
We'll write o'er the graves of the heroes,
Who died for Erin's cause
And I long to see at liberty our faithful Fenian boys.
senior member (history)
2022-01-24 12:48
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Cheer up my boys with heart and hand and think of New Year's Day.
We'll raise the flag of freedom with our banners bright and gay as we marched through Sekreen we wore the green and cheered every one
To give freedom to old Ireland and a happy New Year's Day.
2
The mountains below us they smiled with joy
As we crossed o'er the moor
As we went down the ladies' brae.
We viewed Tír Éirigh's shore
The boys they came to meet us,
As we marched in ranks so gay and the harp of Erin's freedom it was sounded on New Year's Day.
The Collooney boys all came there from Easkey and Dromore.
senior member (history)
2022-01-11 17:58
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For you'll not get a screw
For your poor marshy land is no bargain
Bless Fr. O'Leary he's the pride of our Isle
He's the man that can title the landlords in style
Next Fr. Mulcahy he's ranked in the file
Take care, he don't tread on your corns.
To sweet Tubbercurry he's brought to free fairs
The buyers of Ulster and Leinster come there
So, believe in my word you'll get nothing to spare
That's as true as the day I was born."
senior member (history)
2022-01-11 17:55
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Agus fágaidh an sgéal mar atá sé!
When she spoke of the Land League his lips turned pale,
"What good have they done us, sure they're stuck into jail.
All the rates that you owe you must clear it neat ale
For indeed it will give you no Quarters.
Your husband I saw in the town, the other night
Drinking and shouting - "we'll have tenant's right" -
But the month of October
We will send you to flight
To follow your friends over the water"
"If my husband was drinking what's that to you?
I would rather he'd drink it
Than give it to you
So make up your mind
senior member (history)
2022-01-11 17:18
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And the wife of a bold tenant farmer.
"Oh!" he says "since the devil has cove over us all,
Not one penny rent at this time we can call
But the month of October we will settle you all
And you will have the high road for your garden"
"Oh! you Kaffir" the bold tenant's wife, she replied
"Our National Land League
It will pull down your pride
You're as bad as your old Dad, that lived the other side,
We are able to breathe each storm since we joined
The National Land League on Last New Year's day
I know in my heart we're not going astray
As the clergy are with us we will carry the day"
senior member (history)
2022-01-11 17:11
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and cause such damage to his wares. Then the judge, turning to Paddy said "what did you say to the as"? To this he cooly replied "the owner of the ass told me to speak to my brother and I did." "And what did you say?" asked the judge.
"I told the ass" said Paddy,
That we had our wrongs redressed,
That noble, wealthy Irish men
Were now no longer oppressed
We got rid of all the landlords,
And Ireland to ourselves we had,
And when the donkey heard the news
By "Japus" he went mad."
The judge and the audience went in roars of laughter and let Paddy free. The Englishman was ashamed of himself and never made fun of an Irishman again.
senior member (history)
2022-01-11 17:06
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A poor simple Irishman went to England "helping with the hay." One day as he was tramping through the country with his bundle on his shoulder, he reached a little town, where a market was being held. An Englishman was selling delph which he had left on the street.
He had a donkey and cart for the purpose of carrying the delph from town to town. The English man saw the "spailín" and in order to hurt his feelings said "Paddy speak to your brother" and he pointed to his ass. The Irishman who was chewing tobacco, walked to the ass and threw a tobacco spit into his ear. The animal went nearly mad. He lashed, kicked, threw up his heels and rushed through the delph, dragging the cart with him.
A big crowd gathered to see the fun as the delph dealer furiously saw his own ass smash the delph. The guards came on the scene and Paddy was brought to jail for causing the offence. A court was held and crowds gathered to listen to the case. The delph man swore angrily that the "spalpeen" whispered something in the ass's ear which made the animal gallop through the delph
senior member (history)
2022-01-11 16:59
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great feast and the King said whichever one of them would eat a cow that he'd be the best. The boy put a goatskin on him and when they were eating, the boy put the meat inside the goat's skin instead of down in his belly and when they had done eating they said that whichever of them would cut his stomach and wouldn't die, that he'd be the best.
The boy cut the goatskin and the King cut his stomach and died. The boy went back to the man and got all the riches he had.
senior member (history)
2022-01-11 16:57
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Once upon a time there was a king and his two sons and they used to go out for a walk every evening. They used to pass by a house and they used to throw a piece of it every time they passed it. One day the man of the house met a boy and he said he'd give him all the riches he had if he'd kill the king and his two sons.
So one night the boy went up on a tree and started pelting down stones on the King. The King said to his son that if he would not give over pelting stones down on them and he killed one of the King's sons. When he had the boy killed another stone hit him on the head and he said "it was you that was pelting the stones all the time and I killed by other son for you," so he killed his other son and all. So when he had his other son killed, he looked up to the tree and he saw the boy above and he told him to come down and the boy said he wouldnt that he'd kill him if he came down.
He said he'd do nothing to him and then they had a
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 14:32
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To mount the Block more for a quarter
My friends and my neighbours would be absence bewail
And my beloved wife would neer at me rail
But as Im a Duack Doctor of Female complaints
I pity your case in the morning
VII
Before I conclude or else finish my tale
I will unite you now inform
How I from this damsel did myself extricate
By bidding her kindly good morning
I made her a promise that Id meet her next day
And then went on quickly to the Butter Exchange
So all you young men going to Cork
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 14:27
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V
Indeed that reflection to me you relate
And the same I can prove by your answer.
You ne'er wed a damsel in what came of your days
You are scarcely in age yet at all sir.
So I'll give you a lodging in a very near place
Where I have an establishment held by a long lease
Andy many a customer for I sell by retail
In contentment I'd have with a partner.
VI
I may consent miss to what you now say
But Bigamy it is very unlawful.
for the same I'd be sentenced by the justice of peace
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 14:11
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For here is a firm where liquor is made
Step forward young man and we'll both have a treat
In hopes that I may be your partner.
IV
Excuse me at present at what you now say
And indeed miss will you I wont plaver
From your teetotalism Im bound to refrain
Therefore Ill not go by your orders
Tis scarcely six months since I wed a fair maid
In presence of Clergy who witnessed the same
Till death from my body will the soul separate
Im bound for to live with my partner.
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 14:06
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what to say.
Or how would I answer that charmer
Twas just like a spirit would enter my brain.
A thought unto you Ill inform
I thought she was a girl possessed of a trade
Unless Ill be witty she will me ensnare
Reply as follows I unto her made
Indeed miss I dont want a partner.
III
Young man she replied dont it seem very strange
How you object to a girl this morning
If you dont accept me in the youth of your days
I dare say you'll not want her hereafter
so cheer up your courage and dont be afraid
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:58
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in which he got rid or the Virago is explained in the following song which was composed by himself about the event.
I
One day to Cork City I started by train
It was on a fine summer's morning
When out of the carriage at the terminus came
I travelled straight away towards the draw-bridge
Twas not a long distance just at the Tramway
When across came a damsel and welcomed me there
In politeness of language she said without shame
Kind Sir do you want any partner.
II
I stood for a moment not knowing
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:55
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softened. When soft enough some of the boiling water was poured on it and it was all mixed up together. The water mixed with the soft butter and so greatly increased the quantity. This was then firkined and sold immediately.
It was only the very worst of the butter used be Slashed, and the firkins in every case used be Soaked in water for a week.
In this district the Forbes family of Cnoc Buidhe were noted butter buyers. Every three months they had loads on the Cork Road. On one occasion when one member of the family arrived in Cork he was met by a fair damsel who asked him if he wanted a partner. He was only shortly married and the manner
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:48
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When there were no markets long ago the butter was bought and put into Firkins. These firkins were made of the best oak and in very district there was a man or maybe two of the same family who bought all the butter, salted it, put it into firkins and took it to Cork to the Butter Exchange.
About every three months they used take the butter there and at that time some of the buyers were good hands at "Slashing" the Butter. This was how the Slashing as it was called was done Mr O Driscoll told me.
First of all a big pot of water would be boiled. Then the butter would be spread out on a big table made for the purpose and
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:19
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his soul relate that one night as his father was returning from a Machine (a Threshing of Corn) on passing by the Hurling Field he saw the people playing in the field and heard the shouts.
That dear old game once more they play in the light of the golden moon
As they were wont to do in days of yore on Sunday afternoon.
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:08
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them and from the eastern lake to the end of the Gleann (Gleann dawh) it is know as the "Mill Stream". Very near the place in a length of the road is a spot locally known as Carraig a' Mullen
An inhabitant of Knockbue (Cnoc Buidhe) so called an account of the blossomed furze, relates that on one moonlit night when he was a boy in his teens he heard as he stood in the door way of his home and gazed eastwards in the direction of the "Hurling Field" a sudden outburst of cheering similar to that which comes from the winning party of a hurling or Football match. There were many repititions of the jubilation during the ensuing half hour.
I often heard my father God rest
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 13:00
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In Clashnacrona a township situated between the Parishes of Drimoleague and Dunmanway is a large level field close to cross roads locally known as the Hurling Field" where on Sunday afternoon in bygone days many matches of hurling and football were played.
From this field the ground slopes downwards to the Ahane, a river which rises to the north of Clashnacrona in a place called Milane Hill. this river flows southwards to enter the lakes of Gunane and later eastwards through the valley of Gloundawh to join the Ban don. There are three beautiful lakes situated in Gunane known as the Western, Middle and Eastern Lake. The Ahane river draws the three of
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 12:39
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then in wealth content and mirth
A nation us to equal will not be upon the earth.
Then for the kind attention which unto him they gave
He did then thank and vanished to that land beyond the grave.
Four statesmen were now silent as four corpses in the tomb
They looked impressed as up they got and slowly left the room.
I wonder had they realised eve they their speed regained
How well the fact had been to them by Owen's Ghost explained.
senior member (history)
2022-01-03 12:33
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the Normans oer the sea
With whom for seven centuries we battled gallantly.
At length they called for peace with us, and after did consent
To grant to us a measure of Self Government
But all our rights they have not handed over to us yet
And that they will not dream of if their way from us they'll get
Some with being British subjects seem quit thoroughly satisfied
More to be so most unwilling are and henceforth we divide
But a change will come for better this emerald island oer.
If once again to [?] you a monarch shall restore.
Our rights we'll claim and win and
senior member (history)
2022-01-02 17:00
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how we divide
Let us strive to get united William Cosgrove quickly cried
Very long said William Norton, that to do in vain weve tried.
Dont despair we will succeed yet Alfie Byrne next replied
They they found themselves confronted with the Ghost of Owen Ruadh
Whose mighty hand wrought havoc oft upon the Saxon crew
Fellow countrymen said he I will be thankful if you pay
Attention for awhile unto some words I have to say.
[?] we were quite independent, happy prosperous and grand.
Four provincial Kings an Áidh Rígh and great chieftains ruled the land.
Till the infamous Mac Murrough brought
senior member (history)
2022-01-02 16:43
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The following poem was composed a few months ago by Timothy Mc Carthy Collins of Derrygris East Drimoleague, from whom I received the words. He pictures four of the present day leading statesmens seated in a bar in Dublin, when suddenly the Ghost of Owen Ruadh appears and he explains some plain facts to them.
Seated at a bar in Dublin were four statesmen of the land,
Highly learned and concerned in the work they had in hand.
Andy they chatted thus together while they waited patiently
Leinster House to enter when the gates would open be
Said Eamon De Valera Sad it is
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 14:18
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and Sergeant Brett inside fell mortally wounded. Some female prisoners in the van screamed and were heard to exclaim "He's killed, Hes killed." They lifted him up, took the keys and handed them out through the ventilator. The Bandon man Allen quickly entered, unlocked the compartments and soon Kelly and Deasy were set free.
The rescuers and prisoners now quickly dispersed in all directions, but the police and people followed in pursuit and some of the attackers were seized and severely beaten by the crowd. Allen especially was very cruelly handled by the mob.
The sequel is well know Allen, Larkin and O Brien, Condon and Maguire were arrested, tried and found
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 14:17
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and Sergeant Brett inside fell mortally wounded. Some female prisoners in the van screamed and were heard to exclaim "He's killed, Hes killed." They lifted him up, took the keys and handed them out through the ventilator. The Bandon man Allen quickly entered, unlocked the compartments and soon Kelly and Deasy were set free.
The rescuers and prisoners now quickly dispersed in all directions, but the police and people followed in pursuit and some of the attackers were seized and severely beaten by the crowd. Allen especially was very cruelly handled by the mob.
The sequel is well know Allen, Larkin and O Brien, Cordon and Maguire were arrested, tried and found
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 14:12
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magistrate as a precaution ordered the prisoners to be handcuffed and locked in separate compartments in the prison van
The "Black Maria" then began its tragic journey back to Salford County Jail, policemen actin as an escort. It was not long when a man darted into the road before the van and presenting a pistol ordered the drivers to pull up. At the same time a party of men armed with revolvers appeared on the scene and seized the horses.
The police being unarmed fled. Hatchets, hammers and crowbars were now used on the van, but the work of bursting it open was tougher than had been anticipated and the police too returned reinforced. "Blow it open, put a shot through the key hole" ordered one of the leaders. This was done
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 14:05
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When James Stephens lost the leadership of the Fenian movement he was succeeded by Colonel T. J. Kelly After the failure of the rising Colonel Kelly remained about six months in Dublin and then crossed over to Manchester to attend the I. R. B council meeting.
On the morning of the 11th of September in a Manchester street the police noticed four strange men; they became suspicious and attempted to arrest the strangers as vagrants. Two of the suspects got away, the other two were arrested and brought next day before the magistrates. They were Colonel Kelly and Captain Deasy.
On Wednesday the 18th of September they were again brought up and identified and remanded once more. The
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 13:58
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high for the smashing of the van.
VII
So now - kind friends I will conclude I think it would be right
That all true hearted Irishmen together should unite
Together should all sympathise and do the best we can
To Keep the memory ever green of the Boys that smashed the van.
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 13:55
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In that glorious liberation and the smashing of the van.
V
In Manchester one morning our heroes did agree
Their leader Colonel Kelly and Deasy must be free
They drank a health to Ireland and soon made up a plan
To meet the prisoners on the road and take and smash the van
IV
With courage bold those heroes went and soon the van did stop
They cleaved the guards from back and front and then smashed in the top.
But blowing open of the locks they chanced to kill a man
So three must die on the scaffold
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 13:50
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At a gathering of the Irish boys they volunteered each man
To release those Irish prisoners from out the prison van.
III
Kelly and Deasy were their names of course you knew them well.
Remain did for a week they were in Bellevue gaol to dwell
When taking of the prisoners back their trail for to stand
To make a safe deliverance they locked them in a van
IV
William Deasy was a hearty man of good and noted fame
Likewise Michael Larkin we'll ne'er forget his name
Well young Allen and O Brien they took [?] hart so grand
senior member (history)
2021-12-30 13:43
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I
Attend you gallant Irishmen and listen for awhile
Ill sing to you the praises of the sons of Erins' Isle
It's of those gallant heroes who voluntary ran
To release our Irish Fenians from the English Prison Van.
Chorus
Hurrah my lads for freedom let all join heart and hand
May the Lord have mercy on the boys that helped to smash the van
II
On the eighteenth of September it was a dreadful year
For sorrow and excitement ran throughout all Lancashire
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 15:15
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for use.
All shirts were made at home long ago but there are scarcely any made now.
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 15:14
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loom or mill where it is put on a round block or roller with another similar one about a quarter of an inch away from this. Over these rollers is a water tap in order to turn on the water. Next the rollers begin to move and the water flows over the woven threads as they are dragged through between the rollers. This process goes on till the thread or frieze as it could then be called is fit of any use it is wanted.
To make it very thick any number of the sheets of woven thread can be put on this roller till it is several inches thick then the rollers move again and the water turned on. Hence packing one sheet into another till it only seems there was but one sheet. It is then ready
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 15:14
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loom or mill where it is put on a round block or roller with another similar one about a quarter of an inch away from this. Over these rollers is a water tap in order to turn on the water. Next the rollers begin to move and the water flows over the woven threads as they are dragged through between the rollers. This process goes on till the thread or frieze as it could then be called is fit of any use it is wanted.
To make it very thick any number of the sheets of woven thread can be put on this roller till it is several inches thick then the rollers move again and the water turned on. Hench packing one sheet into another till it only seems there was but one sheet. It is then ready
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 15:10
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made into big rolls and then it was spun.
That was to catch the rolls one after another and attach the end to a spool on the spindle of the spinning wheel. Then turn the wheel at the same time keeping the wheel at the same time keeping the wool in place. It winds on the spool till there are two or three ounces in each spool. Next it was taken off the spool and put in balls and taken to the weaver to get it warped., which meant that the weaver fixes up a frame with movable cross bars which when worked from a certain corner with the end of the wool attached will weave the wool one strand up and down and the next strand from left to right and so on at the same time keeping it so tight as to make what appears to be a piece of stuff or cloth. Next it is taken to the
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 15:07
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There are lots of tailors in this district. Now all the tailors work at their own home but ling ago they travelled frim house to house and were called travelling tailors. All frieze clothes that were worn long ago
They always had lots of sheep on the farm and they sheared or cut off the wool with a big scissors or shears. When it was cut off it was taken to the river to be washed. When it was washed it was spread in the field to dry. When it was dry the dirt was picked out of it. It was then taken to the mill to be carded or it was carded at home. This meant pulling the wool along a board with little wire teeth until it was quite smooth. When it was drawn through this it was
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 15:03
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Our jaunt must be put off tomorrow.
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 15:02
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And nimbly catch the uncautious flies,
The glowworm innumerous and bright,
Illumed the dewy dwell last night,
At dusk the squallid toad was seen,
Hopping and crawling o'er the green,
The whirling wind the dust obeys,
And in its rapid eddy plays,
The frog has changed his yellow vest,
And in a russet coat is dressed,
Though June the air is cold and still,
The mellow blackbirds voice is shrill,
My dog so altered in his taste,
Quite mutton bones and grass to feast,
And see yon rook how odd their flight,
They imitate the gliding Kite,
With head downward seem to fall,
As If they felt the pierhing ball,
Twill surely rain I see with sorrow.
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 14:58
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The soot falls down, the spaniel sleep,
And spiders from their cobwebs creep,
Last night the sun went pale to bed,
The moon in halo hid her head,
The boading shepherd leaves a sigh,
To see a rainbow span the sky,
The walls damp the ditches smell,
Close is the pink eyed pinper knell,
Hark how the chairs and tables crack,
Old Betty joints are on the rack,
Loud quack the ducks the peacocks cry,
The distant hill are looking nigh,
How restless are the snorting swine,
The busy fly disturbs the kine,
Low o'er the grass the swallows wing,
The cricket too how sharp he sings,
Puss on the hearth with velvet paws,
Sits wiping o'er her whiskered jaws,
Through the clear stream the fishes rise,
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 14:56
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Last night the sun went pale to bed,
The moon and haloes hid their heads:
The boading shepherd heaves a sigh,
To see a rainbow spand the sky.
The walls are damp the ditches swell,
Closed is pinkedeyed pimple nell,
Loud quack the ducks, the peacocks cry,
The distant hills are looking nigh.
The old people in my district guide themselves by sayings, which were handed down to them from their father and Grandfathers, regarding the approaching weather.
Here are some their sayings
The seagulls are to be seen inland, the stars begin to fall, the birds fly low, haloes appear in
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 14:53
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The moon in Halo hides her head.
My father often heaves a sigh
When he sees the rainbow span the sky.
The walls are damp, the ditches smell,
Close are the pink eyed pinper Nel
Through the clear stream the fishes rise
And nimbly catch the ineatious fly.
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 14:46
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Question - What City fits in a bottle.
Answer - Cork.
Question - What town is spelled backwards and forwards the same.
Answer - Navan
Question - Why is a shoemaker shop hell.
Answer - Because all the bad soles go in there.
Question - Spell red rogue with three letters.
Answer - Fox.
Question - Black and white and read all over.
Answer - A Newspaper.
Question - What is it that a woman often looks for but never wishes to find.
Answer - A Hole in her stocking.
Question - What turns but never turns round.
Answer - Milk turning sour.
Question - Why does a hen cross the road.
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 14:18
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holding the iron fast while the smith has to remove bolts rivets, nuts, etc.
The smiths of this parish shoe horses, asses, colts, jennets, mules but no cattle.
At present they make no ploughs, harrows, or any other farm implements, but they repair all farm implements and weld those that are broken. What is called the "shoeing of wheels" is done in the open air. For this purpose a large turf fire is made in the open air - near a river. The band of the wheel is placed on the fire and left there until it is red hot. It is then taken out, cut, and rejoined and placed round the felloes - while still hot. What is poured quickly on it to cool it, & it is hammered in, fitting the wheel tightly. Several wheels may be done in this way. When the operation is over the smith pours water on the fire to quench it.
some people say that "Forge water" is useful as a cure for cattle suffering from "red murrain"
My father never heard that smiths of this locality had any privileges nor did they receive gifts from any source nor did he hear that they had power to banish rats.
Smiths were looked upon as being strong and brawny. Thos. Brosnan of Ballynahinch who owned a forge was a great lock-smith. He used to make locks and keys for the gaol, Tralee - during the British Regime
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 14:07
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the opening into the hearth in which the fire is placed. This lights the fire.
Besides the bellows which is used for lighting a fire, the smith uses other implements. The principal one of these is the anvil which is a large block of iron having a flat upper surface on which the red iron is beaten. The anvil has a projecting nose - where the iron is twisted, shaped and rounded. On the upper surface of the anvil is a hole into which is placed a chisel-shaped bit of steel called a "cleft" which is used for cutting the red iron.
The smith also uses different kinds of hammers and sledges. The heavy hammers are used for beating iron, and the small hammers are used for driving nails, rivets and bolts.
The smith also has a kind of circular knife which he uses for paring the hoofs of horses, asses, colts &c. He also has a rasp and and a file which he uses for a similar purpose. He uses a punch for making holes in hot iron and a drill for making holes in cold iron. He also has a pincers, a tongs, for removing hot iron from the fire. He keeps horse-shoe nails in a box. In that box he also has the rasp and knife, and hammer.
A Vice is also used in a forge for gripping or
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 14:01
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"There are four forges in this parish, but not long ago there were six. The owners of the present forges are : Dick Gorhan, (Springhill, Rathanny) who was a famous athlete, Pat O Connor (Carrignafeela, Rathanny), Joseph Reidy (Ballymacelligott) and John Twomey (Maglass, Gortatlea).
John Twomey's and Joseph Reidy's ancestors were smiths, but Pat O Connor & Dick Gorham learned their trades from James Cournane, of Tonreigh. Pat O Connor's & John Twomey's forges are situated at Cross Roads and Joe Reidy's & Dick Gorham's forges are on the roadside.
The forge I know best is Pat O Connor's. It has a felt roof which is tarred. The walls are of concrete The door is a large one and moves on rollers. There are two windows - one in the back wall & one in front.
The bellows consist of two flat boards joined together by strips of leather. These boards converge to a hole hear the hearth or fireplace. The lower board is connected by means of a chain with the end of a handle which rests on a horizontal beam By pulling down the handle the lower board of the bellows is raised, and a gush of air is forced through
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:52
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pupil has the following account:-
"The plough is the most common method of digging the potatoes in my townland. My father says that the "digger" harms the potatoes very much, so he began using the plough. We have enough help on our own so we do not employ any outside help to dig and pick our potatoes. My father tackles a pair of horses to the double-board plough and he makes two parts of each drill Then we pick them into buckets and make the pits or heaps near us. After a few days we draw them all to one big pit. We always put the "eating potatoes" into a house. The different kinds of potatoes grown in this district are:- Kerr's Pinks, Arran Banners, Champions, Epicures, British Queens, American Pintons
The small potatoes & bad ones are boiled for hens or pigs or given to cows or calves in their raw state."
N.B. The foregoing accounts are typical of others which I have received on this subject: Ridges are also made instead of Drills by ploughing 4 sods together. The sgioltháin are then stuck with spades in the ridge covered with manure and then earthed. Afterwards they are treated as the drills (above). When storing time comes round they are dug with spades, &. potatoes are picked & stored as above. The "Digger" is generally used in the lowlands of this parish
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:44
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"My father is a farmer, and he plants about an acre of potatoes each year. His method of planting these may be different from that of other farmers.
The plot in which he sows them, is surely a place where mangolds and turnips grew the previous year. He ploughs the earth and harrows it. He then makes it into drills - with a double-board plough - and then spreads the manure between the drills. He closes the drills, after planting the seeds about a foot apart on the manure, the earth covers up the seeds and he then gets a roller and rolls the drills to make the earth firm about the seeds. Sometimes bag manure is spread down on the dung or farm yard manure. (The seeds or sgioltháin as they are called have been cut beforehand In doing this "eyes" are left in each cutting or selt as it is from the "eyes" that the stalks spring up.).
The drills are left thus until the stalks come up. Then fresh earth is raised up against the stalks by using a plough. Then the potatoes are weeded. Some time afterwards in June or perhaps July they are sprayed with a solution of Blue stone & Washing soda to prevent attacks of "blight" "
As regards storing of potatoes the above
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:37
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He removed the splashers from the old barrel, and put them into the new one, and removed the handles also
Butter is made once a week always. Before putting in the cream the barrel is carefully scaled with boiling water. It takes about 10 mins. or a quarter of an hour to scald the barrel
The cream is then put in, and new milk is warmed in a bucket and the cream tub is rinsed with the warm milk which is then thrown into the barrel. The bucket which contains the milk is put into a pot of boiling water and left them until it is warm. The cover is then put on the barrel, with a cloth inside it to make it watertight so that the cream cannot come out. Two people then commence twisting the barrel and they frequently have to let out the air through a plug (on the barrel) They continue twisting until the butter is made. It takes more than half-an-hour sometimes to make the butter.
The buttermilk is drunk usually & the butter made up into pounds & sold in Tralee."
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:32
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on which the axles of the barrel rest.
There is a splasher on the inside of the barrel which breaks up the cream in the barrel.
Butter is made twice a week in Summer and one a week in Winter. If anyone comes in while they are making the butter, he (or she) is supposed to take a twist out of it, as it is said that the butter would not make if he did not do so.
The iron handle is at the side of the barrel and is twisted when making the butter.
In summer cold water is poured into the barrel to help make the butter more quickly. In winter warm water is poured in.
The butter is taken out of the barrel with the hands, and is washed two or three times in cold water and then salted. The buttermilk is drunk by the people of the house."
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:26
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The milk of this district is conveyed to the 3 creameries of Killduff, Ballydwyer, and Gortatlea,
Killduff is now a sub-creamery of the Lee Strand Tralee with which it was amalgamated (or by which it was taken over) in 1938. The cream is conveyed by cart from Killduff to the Lee Stand Creamery where it is made into butter. No churning is done at Killduff Creamery. Since the amalgamation of Ballydwyer & Gortatlea with Dicksgrove (Currow) in 1937 No butter was made since in Ballydwyer though it was the central creamery of this parish at one time. We can see therefore that the churning has been taken out of the creameries of this parish - as no butter is made in the creameries of the parish. This does not however prevent the making of home-made butter in many parts of the parish. Some people have churns in their homes & some of the children are therefore familiar with the making of butter at home.
Here is Peggy Dorgan's (Gortnaleha Rathanny) account of this chapter:-
"We have a churn at home. Its right name is a "barrel" It is about 3 feet high and 3½ ft wide. We have this barrel for the past three years. There is no mark on it. There is a stand under the barrel - fitted with two hooks
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:15
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swept clean with branches of the green elder. Then sticks were laid all round on top of a large stone. Then the children got bags and collected bags of turf from every householder. At least 12 large sacks of turf were brought to the bonfire. The fire was then lit & when the villagers were through with their work & the supper was over in each house they all collected around the fire. Almost the whole population of the village - old & young - assembled around the fire Tales were tole & past actions of fact o fiction were recounted Pooka stories which had a great attraction o fascination for the young were also told by some man of the village.
These stories were made so real and life-like that they became impressed on young minds. Children, if not listening to the conversation or stories often played games - principally "ducks" or bunting.
When the fire had practically died out at a very late hour, the people on leaving always carried a lighted sod (or burning brand) home with them from that fire.
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:09
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She put down the fire for the people of the house. Of course nobody had any idea that she would do such a thing. She then made breakfast for herself & went to the bog "footing" & did not return to the house that evening but whatever charm she used on the fire or whatever use she made of her evil intentions the people of the house found that year a very bad one - for their cattle were "dying on them" seemingly without cause."
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:06
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St John's eve was another festival in olden times where certain customs were observed. "My father told me" says Aine Lynch - "that in his native village of Cappa, West Kerry, a large bonfire was lit in the centre of the village. This was a village of about 12 houses which were situated almost adjacent to one another A level patch of ground in the centre of the village, known as the "street" was cleared by the children after school, and
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:03
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"Chalk Sunday" according to Michael Scanlon (Clogherclemin) is the 1st Sunday after Ash Wednesday and the people who got married during Shrove are chalked
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:02
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but Peggy Dorgan of Gortnaleha, Rathanny says that "Chalk Sunday"
senior member (history)
2021-12-28 13:00
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St Patrick's Day falls on the 17th March. That day is a national holiday as well as being a holyday, and everybody goes to Mass. Shamrock is gathered and worn by people on their coats and caps - in honour of St Patrick and to remind us of the old tradition of St Patrick's explanation of the Trinity by means of the Shamrock. Badges in the form of harps, crosses, etc are worn by the children.
Micky Reidy ( of Kilmore, Rathanny ) says that long ago the people used to go to town to drink " their Patrick's pot ". When the old people were drunk on St Patrick's day they used say:-
" St Patrick's day we'll dance a jig
With the hat my father wore"
senior member (history)
2021-12-21 16:54
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"My grandfather told me that he remembers seven football matches to be played. These matches were as follows:-
(a) Ballymacelligott v Listowel venue Kilflynn
(b) Ballymacelligott v Ballyvourney " Ballyvourney
(c) Ballymacelligott v Laune " Tralee Sports field.
(d) Clogher v Tralee Clerks " Tom Slattery's field
(e) The men above Clogher v Boys below " Francy Connors' Field.
(f) Ballymacelligott v Currow " Mr Bucklay's Farm.
(g) Ballymacelligott v Cork " Tralee Sports field
The Old Team of Ballymacelligott were as follows:-
Tom and Dan Curtain, Mick & Tim Collins, Harry Brean, Two John Savages, Ned Leen (Tailor), Mick and Tom Brosnan, James & Jerry Gorham, Charlie Irwin, Bill Bán Irwin, "Free" Mahoney, Terence Mahoney, John Mahony, Dan Kirby, Tim Ruairc, Humphrey Ruairc, Tom Mc Elligott, Dick Mc Elligott, Tom Connor, Denis Costello, Tom & Dan Dunne.
They used play 21 men at each side.
The Ballymacelligott young Team were:-
Jer Clifford, Tom Irwin, Dick Gorham, Pirian Connor, Pat Sugrue (sidecar), Jon Cororan, Ml. Hanefin, John Reidy, John Sullivan, Richard Mahony, Tim & Ml. Lynch, &c
They used to play 16 men at each side The football was made of tanned dog skin & a cow's bladder or horse bladder.
senior member (history)
2021-12-21 16:44
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This match was played between the Laune Rangers and Ballymcelligott at Castlefarm. There were fifteen on either side. A man from Tralee that refereed the match. It was played about the year eighteen ninty two. The Laune Rangers won and the field in which they played still bears the name the Ranger's Field. this is in the farm of Tim Mc Mahon, Castlefarm, Firies, J.P. O'Sullivan Firies who was the captain of the Laune Rangers played the best man in the field. Brian Connor who played with Ballymcelligott played very well also. Jerry Clifford was captain of the Ballymcelligott team. Most of the players are dead now. The two captains are dead with years. Other players that played are Maurice Moynihan Tralee and Michael Daly. Both teams wore togs. The colour the Laune Rangers had on the togs was the green and gold. The football was size six.
senior member (history)
2021-12-21 16:20
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of yellow clay - pounded very hard like the walls.
Half-doors were very common in old houses and were also very useful as they kept out the pigs and kept in the children.
The fire was placed on the flag of the hearth under the chimney, and there was often much smoke.
The light was a splinter of bog deal."
I take the above as a standard of the composition I got on "Old Houses"
The Poles or rafters were tied together by means of wooden "brads". Rushes were used with the clay to prevent splitting & cracking.
Floors were hard to be kept clean and therefore clean sand was often spread over it.
In the windows you had a frame and shutters, but no glass. The shutters were shut at night to keep out cats and other animals but were open by day to let in light and let out the smoke.
The old houses were therefore badly ventilated and badly lighted.
senior member (history)
2021-12-21 16:16
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The houses that were made long ago in this country were made of mud. They were much different to the modern houses. Now we make houses of concrete or stones and mortar.
The people long ago were very poor, and owing to lack of materials and apparatus they took the easiest way of doing things - even though they got much trouble with the methods they used. They first went to the "coldest" land, and dug out the yellow clay. they mixed the clay and rushes with water Then they pounded the mixture, and made very think walls of this material. Then they got straight pine rafters from the wood, and after very little preparation placed them as rafters using crossbeams of lighter material - uncut and tied by means of wooden oak nails. Scraws were placed down on these and then thatch was placed in layers over these The thatch was often strong green rushes tied down with ropes, stones, and scallops. They tied stones to the ends of the hempen ropes, and placed the ropes across the top of the house. Pointed scallops were driven in through the thatch and ropes keeping them in place.
No glass was used in the windows, only pieces of wood know as "cóilíní". Floors were made
senior member (history)
2021-12-20 14:33
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"It is said if you get married on Shrove Tuesday that you cannot go visiting anywhere until the 40 days of Lent are over."
Those who go as strawboys are known as "sur-sups" or "soppers" and the custom is know as "sopping".
senior member (history)
2021-12-20 14:32
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"The young couple must be gone into their new home before 12 o clock on Shrove Tuesday night as anyone would not remove during Lent. May & Sept are regarded as unlucky months for marriage. About Sept. it is said "What is tied in the harvest is ripped in Sprint"
Nts. In the parish of Ballymacelligott a transfer of the land & means made & drawn up by a lawyer) is made by the farmer to his son in the form of transfer deed. But if a girl from near the Killarney or say eat of the Maine River marries one in this parish - her people insist that a joint deed (in her name & her husband's) be drawn up - so that she may have equal claim with he husband to the land & means. In case of the husband's death - the land is of course hers even though there is no progeny.
senior member (history)
2021-12-20 14:24
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the bride's house. Drink was supplied plentifully. After supper the kitchen table was cleared and the "fiddler" got busy. He sat in the corner near the kitchen fire, and the best step-dancer got on the table and was called on to dance "the blackbird". Other competitors also danced and each was applauded in turn while many shouts of "chúgham aniar thú" and "mo ghraidhn do dhá chois" were heard from every side.
Rounds of drink were given out - the ladies getting ginger wine and hot claret.
(When leaving the house in the morning the usual "old shoe" had been thrown after the bride-to-be for luck.)
Strawboys come to the local weddings in this locality. They dress as "wren boys" do - but sometimes in coats made of straw. They have always a leader who conducts the show. They dance and sing or recite and when they have got a few drinks they then depart quietly.
Sometimes another "night" is held when the bride comes to her new home. This is called the "Drag home" This occurs when the married pair come home from the honeymoon.
In weddings some time ago and especially when there was a distance between the bride's house and the bridegroom's there was usually a marriage procession when parties on horseback raced against one another - on the way home. Saddle horses & sidecars were used in this procession. Motor-cars ware used mostly now
senior member (history)
2021-12-20 14:13
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People remember marriages taking place in the houses long ago.
My father told me that "wedding feasts were the usual custom in W. Kerry, his his young days. He says that often as many as 30 sheep were killed for a wedding. Some of these were accepted as wedding present of course - given by friends of bride and bridegroom. Besides these, geese were killed, and plenty bread was bought. Potatoes were boiled during the wedding day and supper tables were laid for the night of the wedding, and people ate plenty potatoes, and meat, and drank mutton broth go leór. He told me of a funny incident of a wedding which he attended, when a person ,who was slightly inebriated after his day's outing sat down at table near him. The first thing he got was a bowl of mutton broth which was at boiling point, and being thirsty this poor may unconsciously put the bowl to his mouth taking a big gulp. The boiling broth scaled his tongue & throat. He dropped the bowl with a yell. spilling it all over himself and he had unfortunately to get up from the table and afterwards was "the show of the house" applying draughts of cold water to his tongue which he could not keep in. He spent the latter portion of the night showing his tongue to everybody in the house and asking every few minutes "Is there a blister on it"?
Invitations were sent out, my father says, to everybody especially villagers and cousins. Friends and everybody up to 3rd cousins were invited to the wedding feast which was held in
senior member (history)
2021-12-15 15:43
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"Long ago, (Aine Lynch, Ballynahinch, says) people made many things themselves that are now turned out in thousands in factories, workshops etc.
If we take the lighting of a house in county districts at the present time we have the paraffin lamp as an example. We buy the glass or brass bowl in a shop. This was not made locally. Neither was the wick or globe. Noe in olden times before paraffin was introduced as a medium for lighting people used a simpler form of lighting viz:- the bog deal splinter This was produced from bog deal found deep in the bog afterwards dried and split into splinters with a hatchet These were dried carefully and hung near the hob. When the family were eating supper - one member held a splinter lighting for the others while they ate the meal of "praties & milk" The splinters of bog deal gave way to the Rush lights Strong rushes were peeled & the pith was drawn through heated goats' tallow to form what was called "a páideóg" These páideóga were used to supplement the splinter lights Later on cotton threads or cords were treated in the same way as the "páideóg" and used in the same way. Later on, people got into the way of making candle with moulds, held form in a sod of turf round the wick or cord which was held in an upright position The tallow was allowed to cool & thus candles were made
[?] Jerry Reidy told Mr P. Flahive about the foregoing matters & Mr. P. Flahive told me,"
senior member (history)
2021-12-15 15:31
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Basket making was an old craft that has practically disappeared from this parish of recent years. Nancy Mahony (Carrignafeela) says that "This craft was very much practised by Denis O Sullivan of Ashill. They used to go miles away gathering twigs through the week, and leave them seasoning for a month. Then they would make the baskets and take them to the nearest markets of Tralee & Castleisland where they used sell them at 3 or 4 shillings each." The craft is still carried on in the same district through the artistic skill of the people and the knowledge of intertwining by patterns has been last. In connection with basket making night be mentioned hamper making, & other wicker-work such as the wicker work cradle.
Bridie Moloney says that there were several varieties of baskets of wickerwork. You had the (a) chiabh or common hamper and the (b) sgiath or shallow basket (c) egg baskets (d) bread baskets. The "cliabh" was used for drawing potatoes and also for removing turf in a bog. The sgiath might be used for picking potatoes after differs and removing them to a pit or in washing potatoes in a stream. In this sgiath you had two handles. The cliabh and the sgiath were made on rough line but you had also high class ones made of peeled twigs & the egg basket and bread baskets were made of variegated twigs. The Sullivans and Mac Quinns of Gortaleen were baskets makers
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 12:33
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Bread was made every day. An oven and a griddle were used in baking. Most of the bread long ago was baked in a griddle.
If any visitor came to the house - they used make cream cakes.
4. Peggy Savage of Kilquane heard from her grandmother that "Boxty" bread was made from meat mixed with cold water and then taken in an oven. She says that yellow bread ("yellow back") was the general food of the people during early summer when there were no potatoes Mixed bread (yellow bread) made of a mixture of meat and flour was used with cold sour or thick milk 3 times a day.
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 12:32
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5. Lily Rose Leen (Ballincollig, Rathanny) says that Pancakes are still made on Shrove Tues. night. These cakes are made with flour, milk, eggs sugar, soda & salt. Flour sugar soda & salt are mixed first and then wetted with beaten-up eggs & milk until the whole is reduced to a paste. Then pieces of this thick paste are poured into a hot pan over the fire & allowed to remain there until a brown crust is formed. Then they are turned on the other side to form a brown crust & when baked fully are taken up & eaten hot.
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 12:24
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The people in olden times milled the flour themselves with querns. Querns and grinding stones can be seen to the present day. I have heard that a quern stone can be seen in Mr O Connell's of Kilmore.
Bread was baked on a griddle - a circular sheet of iron - which was placed over a a slow fire on a stand of three legs. Cuts were made on a griddle cakes to make squares. Stampy bread was also made of grated potatoes mixed with flour - This was generally used when potatoes were dug.
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 12:21
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"The only corn that bread was made from was wheat. They made oaten meal out of oats. The wheat was first ground by a quern or grindstone. My grandfather told me there is a quern stone in Mcl 0 Connell's of Kilmore.
Potato cake was made from boiled potatoes, broken up or mashed, and mixed with flour and butter and then baked. "Stampy" bread was made out of peeled raw potatoes. When peeled they were washed again and then grated in a "grater", and put into muslin and squeezed. (The water which they used take out was converted into starch.) Then it was kneaded with flour and butter and baked in a griddle.
The oaten meal bread was made out of oaten meal flour - mixed with a pinch of wheaten flour
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 12:05
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"In olden times there was a grindstone in every farmer's house - which was made of sandstone bought for the purpose. This consisted of one fair-sized stone, and a smaller one. There was a handle in it, and when you twisted the handle, you would also twist the small stone, and the wheat or oats - which were the two principal grain-crops used - were between the stones, and grinding took place between these and in that manner you would make the flour for bread. This grind-stone was sometimes called a quern, or "quurn".
"Stampy bread", Potato Cake, griddle bread were made. Stampy bread (cake_ was made from raw potatoes which were grated. The potatoes were skinned before grating. The "grater" was made from a piece of tin - Flour was added & milk very gradually but soda was never added. A cross was cut upon the bread, and a dab of the knife in every quarter. This was done principally to leave out the gas. Bread was baked in an oven and also on a griddle
Mr J. Geaney (Riamore Rathanny) (from whom I got most of my accounts) saw bread baked on a flag-stone.
A cross is sometimes put on a loaf to show the faith of the people.
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 11:41
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2. Referring to the same snowstorm which he says occurred in 1900, Donal Leen of Ballincullig was that "a terrible snow storm occurred. The valleys between every two mountains "was level with snow." All the Glen west of Ml. O Connor's Reamore was level with the road in such a way that you could walk across from the hill to the road. The Glen is at least 50 feet deep. The people had to shovel the snow from the doors to make a path - & boiled the snow for water."
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 11:41
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1. This is an account of a great snowfall given by Timothy Leen, Kilquane who heard the story from his grandfather John Leen Kilquare (ageed 78)
"About 50 years ago (?) so much snow fell that it covered all the trees, and the people had to walk over the trees on their way to town. My grandfather happened to be on his was to town and near Jack Dunne's house the snow fell under him and he fell with it. After much trouble he released himself and proceeded on his way. He says that the snow was as high as the trees in Barry's wood of Barracoilla."
senior member (history)
2021-12-01 11:38
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"In the year 1913 in the month of September, of an evening which was cold and wet - a great storm of lightning occurred which did a great amount of damage. Denis Moynihan (R. I. P.), a farmer, who lived at Tylough went out to a field about 400 yards away from his house to feed his heifers. He had a "beart" of hay in a rope, and he emptied it near a ditch - so that the heifers would have shelter from the rain. He went away & left the heifers eating the hay. When he went up the field a little bit, he saw a flash of lightning & then heard "a clap of thunder down on the flash "& he looked around to find his "fine five heifers" dead - near the ditch"
senior member (history)
2021-11-25 14:25
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covered over. When the snow ceased falling, he went out to look for them. He searched for a whole day and in the evening they found the sheep covered with snow, but they were still living because their breath had made a hole in the snow & therefore they could not smother."
senior member (history)
2021-11-25 14:23
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1. This is an account of a great snowfall given by Timothy Leen, Kilquane who heard the story from his grandfather John Leen Kilquare (ageed 78)
"About 50 years ago (?) so much snow fell that it covered all the trees, and the people had to walk over the trees on their way to town. My grandfather happened to be on his was to town and near Jack Dunne's house the snow fell under him and he fell with it. After much trouble he released himself and proceeded on his way. He says that the snow was as high as the trees in Barry's wood of Barracoilla."
2. Referring to the same snowstorm which he says occurred in 1900, Donal Leen of Ballincullig was that "a terrible snow storm occurred. The valleys between every tow mountains "was level with snow." All the Glen west of Ml. O Connor's Reamore was level with the road in such a way that you could walk across from the hill to the road. The Glen is at least 50 feet deep. The people had to shovel the snow from the doors to make a path - & boiled the snow for water."
3. Sheila Collins Reamore Rathanny says "that a snow storm occurred in 1898 or 1900 & a number of sheep were lost in the mountain. Wm. Moore - a poor man who lived at Reamore - had 4 or 5 sheep in the mountain. When the snow began to fall, they were
senior member (history)
2021-11-25 14:04
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for his weekly hire, and was employed by farmers during the morning season often mowed an Irish acre of hay in the day.
ii) Jer Hogan. Tylough. a labourer or spailpín who worked also with farmers during the mowing season often mowed an Irish acre in the day.
iii) Tadhg Sheahan of Ballincullig - the owner of a small farm was also a great mower - often cutting slightly more than an Irish acre in the day,
senior member (history)
2021-11-25 14:03
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Michael Reidy - a pupil of this school - has heard from his grandfather, Jer Reidy (Kilmore), that in his young days the reaping hook was the common implement used for cutting the oats. He says that it was not used for cutting hay in his youth.
Scythes were used for that purpose. Later on he remembers the introduction of the mowing machine
There were only two mowing machines in this parish at first and these were lent or hire to cut the hay of the big farmers.
Mowing was done generally then with scythes and we had great mowers in this parish as it is a parish for great crops of hay.
Not very many accounts are to be had however of mowing contests - thought such must have been common.
Among the mowers given us by Jer Reidy are the following:
(i) John Leen, Tylough, a labourer, who worked
senior member (history)
2021-11-25 13:54
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It is paradoxical to have to record that tradition is altogether absent concerning the long journeys that had necessarily to be performed on foot in those far off days before the introduction of the railway. It is a well-known fact that cattle for instance were driven to Abbeyfeale fairs - a town some 14 Irish mls. distant and if not disposed of, to be driven back again the same day. The only logical reason that could be assigned for the absence of this information is that the people of those days were so accustomed to endure the privations so prevalent at the time that they minimised the hardships of long journeys on foot, and looked upon them as a matter of routine.
In recent years viz: 1906 we had a walking match - the result of a challenge between Tom Prendeville, Rathanny and Ulick Roche of Tralee. Prendeville - a man of average stature but of quick and nimble step was a fruiterer and a
senior member (history)
2021-11-25 13:49
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John Reidy - the son of Phil Reidy - lived at Rathanny Cross
On May Sunday (1878) when the usual crowd of this parish and a large crowd from Tralee usually congregated at Ballyseedy pattern - he was seen to jump a height of 6' - 1" It seems that Dan Kirby of Maglass was also present. He being a very tall boy at the time (6' - 1") was told to stand in the field & then the people placed a rope on the level with the top of his head. This rope was therefore 6' - 1" in height. John Reidy then jumped over the rope "with the Hollow", and Dan Kirby jumped it "against the hill"
Dan Kirby also jumped Currens River on Fair Day - 6th May 1878. And John Sullivan of Killfalleny (91) tried to jump it after him but fell into it. The river at this point was 20' in width. So that Kirby must have jumped at least 24' - long jump
senior member (history)
2021-11-25 13:46
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John Reidy - the son of Phil Reidy - lived at Rathanny Cross
On May Sunday (1878) when the usual crowd of this parish and a large crowd from Tralee usually congregated at Ballyseedy pattern - he was seen to jump a height of 6' - 1" It seems that Dan Kirby of Maglass was also present. He being a very tall boy at the time (6' - 1") was told to stand in the field & then the people placed a rope on the level with the top of his head. This rope was therefore 6' - 1" in height. John Reidy then jumped over the rope "with the Hollow", and Dan Kirby jumped it "against the hill"
Dan Kirby also jumped Currens River on Fair Day - 6th May 1878. And John Sullivan of killfalleny tried to jump it after him but fell into it. The river at this point was 20' in width. So that Kirby must have jumped at least 24' - long jump
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 12:12
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familiar figure at all sports, and football meetings in Munster. He was a first rate raconteur, and as such enjoyed a large patronage for his wares.
Mr. Jerry Reidy (aged 89) of Kilmore; Rathanny says that Tom Prendeville and Ml. Scanlon (Kilmore) were the only "good walkers" of this parish.
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 12:09
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(e) Before this narrative on running is concluded mention should be made of an incident of an unusual if not unique character - relative to a race between a woman and a fox - It occurred about the year 1852. In those days large numbers of fowl were kept on the farms. At this period foxes were very numerous and their predatory habits were well known. They would stealthily enter the farmyard, and carry off a turkey or any other fowl they could take hold of & on this particular occasion, Reynard was seen by Mrs. Flahive, Potally - to seize one of her geese by the neck sling it on its back and make off at a tangent in the direction of its den. She instantly gave chase, and a neck to neck race ensued through an open field for about 260 yds. She made a few unsuccessful attempts to snatch the goose until the nearest fence was reached, when Reynard encumbered by its burden had to relinquish its hold
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 12:02
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(d) Another great long distance runner was John O Sullivan - better known as John A. Young Sullivan practised running on his father's farm at Barrakilla when his day's work at agricultural labour was over. He was scarcely 20 years of age in 1907 when he won the mile race of Tralee sports. Sullivan was also a good half-miler but he eclipsed all rivals in the "Marathon" race. He won this event in two successive years at Tralee - over a distance of 10 mls - coming second on another occasion. This trying event invariably attracted a big number of competitors including the "cracks" from all over Munster. Sullivan's outstanding - characteristic, - which always excited the admiration of the spectators - was his strong finish.
He emigrated to Australia in 1910.
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:57
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him was his total disregard for that care and attention so essential to physical fitness. It was a well-known fact that Gorkam on several occasions and particularly on the eve of sports fixtures indulged in an orgy of "booze". He returned from America some years ago and is still with us hale & hearty - the crescendo ring of his anvil proclaiming as it were - the virility of his still brawny arm.
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:54
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awaiting decision
(C) In more recent years a prominent figure at champion-ship sports was Dick Gorham of Chutehall.
Gorkam competed in several events against such well-know athletes as the Leahy Brothers of Charleville.
He followed the calling of Blacksmith and it would be fitting to describe him as a versatile athlete in as much as he took part in such varied events as running, jumping, weight throwing, and also played good football. He made his debut in 1920 and attended the principal sports in his own, and adjoining counties for a few years, when the lure of foreign travel captivated him.
He was successful in winning the mile, and also the halfmile race on two occasions from some "crack" rivals. "He was out on his own" in the 440 yrds hurdle race which he won several times.
One factor that militated against
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:46
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awaiting decision
(b) We cannot omit to make mention of the performances of Tom Flahive - Potally. He was a contemporary of Hussey's and as a result of a challenge drew level with him at County Sports Tralee in the ½ ml. race. The event, however, in which he excelled was the 200 yards race. It is authoritatively
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:44
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awaiting decision
able to state the "times" as I understand the records of those far off days are not available and for minute details tradition is either absent or unreliable. It should also be mentioned that Hussey was in the front rank for weight throwing and the high jump (His performances in the latter will be dealt with in a subsequent chapter in the series.) It might be mentioned in passing that Jack Hussey - known locally as Master John was the son of the famous (or infamous) land agent and landowner - Sam Hussey - of Edenburn, who owned lands and a "big house" in that locality - where a sanatorium is now built. Sam Hussey wrote "Reflections of an Irish land agent. Jack Hussey afterwards was killed accidentally at Inch (Aunascawl) where he fell and broke his neck.
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:39
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awaiting decision
(a) It has been attempted, in the preceding pages to show by general reflection - Avoiding mere speculation - the prowess of our athletes, ancient and modern in feats which made heavier demands on the muscles than the one we are about to narrate viz:- running.
In this domain of athletics the performances of Jack Hussey of Edenburn - an all round athlete - are of outstanding merit. The chief events he competed in were the mile race, the ½ race, ¼ mile and the 120 yds hurdle race. He attended the principal sports in Munster for a number of years in the early 80's) and it is averred by several who witnessed them that he was unbeatable in these events. Unfortunately however I am not
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:15
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Competitors were numerous and included championship holders from two provinces. Reidy competed in 2 events viz:- throwing the 56 lbs weight "over the bar and slinging the 56 lbs weight" without follow.
In the 1st mentioned he tied with with Ned Walsh of Kilflynn for 1st place. Ned Walsh was a stalwart veteran and reputed champion of Munster. The "over the bar" height was 12½ feet. In the latter he came second being beaten by the narrow margin of 6" by Walsh who had a throw of 28 feet. Reidy - yet in his 'teens lacked physical culture, though it will be conceded that these achievements were remarkable ones not withstanding - For two successive years he competed in various parts of the county and improved somewhat on his previous performances. At this juncture he Anglo-Irish conflict which was in progress for some time to "restore law and order" was assuming warlike proportions & all outdoor sports had perforce to be suspended. It may safely be assumed that had Reidy survived the "Black & Tan" regime, he would be a sharer of Olympic honours. But Fate would have it otherwise for on Xmas night 1920 while visiting some friends at Ballydwyer Creamery he was mortally wounded
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:07
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and with one outstretched are taking hold of the weight, then raising the weight clear of the body until it is chest high when the hand is to be raised quite vertical to its full height (the wt. still held) above the head. O Leary cocked 12 stone weight in this manner as a result of a challenge. The venue was a quarry adjacent to the parish church and the contest was witnessed by at least 100 men who had attended Mass on this Holyday. There were 9 men engaged in the challenge - all of powerful physique. O Leary's nearest rival was John Reidy, Ballymacelligott, who "cocked" 9 stone. The weight was 2 crowbars and one "lifter" lashed together tightly by ropes. These are but a few of the performances of those men who have since passed away - O Leary in 1936, was predeceased by O Neill some 30 years earlier.
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 11:03
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(c) References to strong men would not be complete without mentioning the performances of Mic. Reidy. Reidy who livid with his widowed mother on her holding at Knockavinane and followed farming pursuits. At the age of 19, in 1914 he entered the Athletic arena in weight-throwing events. The venue was Tralee sportsfield where the annual county championship sports were held
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 10:59
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awaiting decision
readily be admitted, was an astounding feat of strength and stamina and was testified by a number of his neighbours on whom he called for aid to replace the fallen wheel.
Another feat of O'Neills and not less astounding was to take hold of a rolling stone of about 7cwt by the gudgeons on either ends lift it clear above his chest, and place it in his cart for removal. This was a performance of his on many occasions.
O Neill it should be mentioned was not a tall man - in height about 5.'-9" - square shouldered, and well propositioned. He was shy and retiring in disposition and wholly averse to public display
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 10:58
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awaiting decision
To enumerate all the feats of strength performed by men in this parish would if recorded - fill many pages, and would seem to be almost incredible were it not for the vast numbers who were onlookers - many of whom are still living and attest as to their genuineness.
(a) The performances of Dan O Neill - a farmer, who resided on his holding at Magh, Ballymacelligott, are worthy of precedence.
O Neill had to cart provisions from Tralee - a town some six miles distant. One one occasion he was bringing home a ton of meal in his cart and when crossing a river - that flowed between the county road and his house - one of the wheels of the cart became detached, and fell out leaving the cart on its side in the centre of the river.
O Neill seeing his load in imminent danger of being immersed had to act instantly. Standing in the water he managed to wedge his shoulder under the side rail from where the wheel had fallen, lifted the contents clear, at the same time urging his horse on, kept pace with the horse for a distance of 8 feet until he had his load clear of the river. This, it will
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 10:50
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awaiting decision
87. What is it that God can't see and we can see and he is supposed to know and see everything
Answer - his own equal
88. where was Moses when the light went out
Answer - In the dark
89. How would you spell blind pig in two letters
Answer - pig without the "i" - pg.
89. In through the wall out through the wall and never tips the wall.
Answer - A voice.
90. A steel horse with a flaxy reins going over a bony bridge and a brass man driving him.
Answer - Sewing with a needle and thread, thimble and finger
91. There is a town in Ireland, five letters its name proclaims, you can spell it backwards and forwards the same
Answer - Navan
92. What has got its foot and can't walk.
Answer - Turf.
93. Spell haggard scraper in three letters
Answer - Hen.
94. Black and white and hops on the road like snow balls
Answer - A Magpie
senior member (history)
2021-11-22 10:45
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awaiting decision
95. Spell ditch in three letters
Answer - Gap
96. What can water wash and fire can't dry.
Answer - Butter
97. What is it the more you take from it the bigger it gets.
Answer - A hole.
98. Four sticks standing, four low hangers, two lookers, two crookers and a whip about.
Answer - A cow.
99. What is always behind time
Answer - The back of a clock
100. What wave does the ship never cross.
Answer - The wave in your hair.
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 14:06
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rejected
awaiting decision
71. What is it. "It was never heard felt or seen and still it's got a name."
Answer - Nothing
72. What is the difference between a schoolmaster and a stamp
Answer - One likes with a stick and the other sticks with a lick.
73. One half dead, the other half living And a tail wagging
Answer - A dog with it's head in a pot.
74. How would you spell bling pig in two letters
Answer - pig without the i = pg
75. What word is a mile between the first and last letter.
Answer - smiles
76. Why is a black hen prouder than a white hen.
Answer - Because a black hen can lay a white egg, and a white hen can't lay a black egg.
77. I went up a boraheen and down a boraheen and carried the boraheen on my back.
Answer - A ladder.
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 14:02
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rejected
awaiting decision
63. The man that made it, never wore it, the man that wore it never saw it
Answer - A coffin
64. What is always behind time.
Answer - The back of a clock.
65. Twice in a moment, once in a minute, and never in a thousands years.
Answer - The letter "M".
66. Two n's two o's and l and a d. Put them together and spell them for me
Answer - London.
67. I have a little man above in the field, if you pulled his leg, his nose would bleed.
Answer - A pump.
68. I ran and took it, I sat down and looked for it. If I got it I would throw it away, and if I did not I would bring it with me
Answer - A thorn in your leg.
69. I in the sun, and you "u" out of it
Answer - Sin
70. What is the best key for unlocking the tongue.
Answer - Whiskey.
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:57
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56. Riddle me riddle me anky o my father gave me seed to sow, the seed was black, the ground was white, riddle me riddle me anky o.
Answer - pen, ink and paper
57. In Amsterdam it is common in Germany it is still it is always in the mountain, but never in a hill
Answer - The letter "M"
58. When is it most dangerous to go into the wood
Answer - When the trees are shooting
59. A steel horse and brass bridle
Answer - a needle and thimble.
60. How many feet have forty sheep, a shepherd and his dog.
Answer - two feet.
61. What is it that you can see and I cannot see, it is nearer to me, than to you
Answer - The back of your head.
62. From house to house and out all night.
Answer - The road.
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:49
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49. Why does a hen pick a pot
Answer - Because she can't lick it.
50. As I was going to St. Ives I met seven men and their wives. Each wife had a child, each child had a cat, each cat had a kitten, kittens and ties, men and their wives how many were going to St. Ives.
Answer - I myself
51. Where was Magna Charta signed.
Answer - at the bottom
52. What part of the cow goes over the ditch first.
Answer - Her breath
53. If a man falls off a house what does he fall against.
Answer - His will.
54. A little brown cow, with two little horns, leaper of ditches and jumper of thorns.
Answer - A hare.
55. Goes up high, wears shoes, but never walks.
A football
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:45
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rejected
awaiting decision
41. A flock of white sheep on a red hill, here they go, there they go and now a stand still
Answer - your teeth
42. Why is marriage a failure.
Answer - Because the bride does not marry the best man.
43. When is a Queen like a piece of wood.
Answer - When she is a ruler
44. What month do babies talk least.
Answer - February the shortest.
45. How did Alice get into Wonderland
Answer - Down a rabbit hole
46. What word is finished by adding one letter
Answer - one add "d" and it is "done".
47. When is an artist a dangerous man.
Answer - When his designs are bad.
48. Fire under, fire over, and never touches the fire.
Answer - A cake baking in an oven.
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:41
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awaiting decision
32. Long, lanky, deaf and dumb has no feet but yet can run
Answer - A river.
33. Little white Nancy with a red nose, the longer she stands the quicker she goes.
Answer - A candle.
34. If you went up on an ass where would you get "down"
Answer - On a goose
35. Father, Mother, sister, brother running all day, and cannot get up to one another
Answer - The wheels of a motor car
36. What walks with its head down.
Answer - A nail in your shoe.
37. What has three feet and cannot walk.
Answer - A yard.
38. Why do you carry an umbrella.
Answer - because it cannot walk.
39. When is the clock hungry
Answer - when it is going to ate (8)
40. What bird has wings and cannot fly.
Answer - A dead one
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:19
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awaiting decision
25. Middy noddy, round body three feet and a wooden hat.
Answer - A pot.
26. Headed like a thimble tailed like a rat you may guess for ever but you couldn't guess that.
Answer - A pipe.
27. Ding dang into the pan ten drawing four.
Answer - A woman milking a cow.
28. Two black men and one white man went up in a car the two black men ate the white man what was the number of the car.
Answer - 281 (two ate one)
29. What has an eye but cannot see
Answer - A needle.
30. What turns without moving
Answer - Milk.
31. Spell black water in three letters
Answer - ink.
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:10
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awaiting decision
15. Why is a river like an elbow
Answer - because it is always twisting
16. What can fly without wings
Answer - Dust : Time
17. Why is a rat like grass
Answer - Because cattle (cat'll) eat it.
18. What is it that has 16 legs and cannot walk
Answer - 8 pairs of trousers.
19. What nuts cannot be cracked
Answer - Dough nuts.
20. What is the difference between a steep hill and a pig pill
Answer - One is hard to get up & the other is hard to get down.
21. What is the difference between a bottle of medicine and a hearth-rug.
Answer - One is taken up & shaken & the other is shaken up and taken.
22. Four legs up, four legs down
Soft in the middle and hard all round
Answer - A bed.
23. Why is hot bread like a caterpillar.
Answer - Because it's the grub to make the butter fly
24. There was a house,
On the side of a hill,
White outside,
And yellow within
Answer - an egg
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:06
approved
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awaiting decision
8. When does a caterpillar grow good
Answer - when he turns over a new leaf
9. There was a little house,
And a mouse couldn't live in it,
And all the men in town,
Couldn't count all the windows in it
Answer - a thimble
10. What trade would you recommend to a small boy
Answer - a grocer (Grow Sir)
11. Whitie, Whitie, told Whitie,
To turn Whitie out of Whitie
Answer - The white man told the white dog to turn the white cow out of the white cabbage
12. Under water, over water
And never touches water
Answer - A woman crossing a bridge with a pail of water on her head
13. A lazy old woman,
A hard working old man,
Twelve little children,
Inside in a pan.
Answer - a clock
14. Patch upon patch
Without any stitches,
Riddle me that,
And I'll buy you a breeches
Answer - a head of cabbage
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following is a collection of riddles received from pupils of the Brennan N. S.
1. It is black, it is white, and red (read) all over
Answer - a newspaper
2. As round as an apple as plump as a ball, can climb the church over steeple and all
Answer - The sun
3. Long legs, crooked thighs,
small head, no eyes
Answer - tongs
4. Put out your hand,
and you'll plainly see,
What never was.
Answer - any of your fingers as long as your middle finger
5. A cow near the wall, that eats whatever you give her.
Answer - a fire
6. In Amsterdam, it is common,
In Germay, it is still
It is always in a mountain
But never in a hill
Answer - The Letter "m"
7. What is it that is full, and can hold more.
Answer - A pot of potatoes before pouring in water
senior member (history)
2021-11-18 13:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. It is black, it is white, and red (read) all over
Answer - a newspaper
2. As round as an apple as plump as a ball, can climb the church over steeple and all
Answer - The sun
3. Long legs, crooked thighs,
small head, no eyes
Answer - tongs
4. Put out your hand,
and you'll plainly see,
What never was.
Answer - any of your fingers as long as your middle finger
5. A cow near the wall, that eats whatever you give her.
Answer - a fire
6. In Amsterdam, it is common,
In Germay, it is still
It is always in a mountain
But never in a hill
Answer - The Letter "m"
7. What is it that is full, and can hold more.
Answer - A pot of potatoes before pouring in water
senior member (history)
2021-11-17 15:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and when morning dawned in that village of Cappa, the people arose to find stacks of oats, and cocks of hay scattered and a few trees knocked down.
The stacks of one farmer were thrown and scattered about nearly two hundred yards from the haggard where they had been - while down the bay (Brandon Bay) nothing could be seen except white-capped waves in a disturbed trough of sea and "fairrge cháit" disappearing in the distance.
Not much damage otherwise was done - except the scattering of stacks and cocks and nearly every farmer suffered in that manner. No lives were lost in the locality"
senior member (history)
2021-11-17 15:53
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awaiting decision
much afraid of gales, as indeed are all people of W. Kerry, and "there was no bed for him that night" - only when he heard the gale coming he often ejaculated "go saoraidh Dia sinn."
Between every gale was a lull - when according to my father "you could go around the village with a lighted candle in your hand." Then at a distance you could hear a faint moaning sound gradually coming near and nearer, and the noise increasing in intensity and violence until the gale struck the house and its surroundings - its noise resembling hissing thunder.
Each gale between two lulls lasted from five to ten minutes. My grandfather used to say that the lull which occurred after each gale was the greatest sign of danger.
On that night my uncle John, my father, grandfather, and others of the family were on the hearth all night listening to the tremendous gales - which in that district are real whirl-winds or tornados - and awaiting to hear the cracking of roof or chimney. My grandfather (R. I. P.) had put a strong rope-weighted down with two large stones - over the felt roof of the upper bed room, fearing its being swept off, and he and my uncle Séan were as he used to say, "tied to the little 'bunaire', or cock of hay all night" fearing its being swept off.
The storm died down gradually during the night
senior member (history)
2021-11-17 15:41
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awaiting decision
The children have supplied accounts of severe storms which occurred here as elsewhere at different times, but generally are not very exact as regards dates of occurrence. They may be approximately correct as to the year but details of intensity and duration of storms are sadly lacking so that one cannot form much of an idea as to their magnitude and the damage done by each.
Here is an account given by Áine Lynch - a pupil of this school - of a storm of wind as described by her father - (a native of W. Kerry) which occurred during his youth:-
(1) "My father told me about a great wind-storm which occurred when he was almost a child. He said that it occurred during the month of February 1903. He does not remember the exact date of the month but says that the noise of the rushing gale rings still in his ears.
He says that this storm commenced early in the night after a drizzle of rain. The rain cleared off and a stiff breeze at first was felt - which later developed into a tremendous gale which used shake almost to its foundations the low-thatched farm house where he lived in W. Kerry.
His father, that is my grandfather, was very
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 14:06
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awaiting decision
On St Bridgets Day:- People make crosses out of rushes or straw. They also get a few ears of corn and make a cross out of them a potato is then stuck through the cross and those are put for seed in the Spring. Young boys or girls go out dressed in white and go to each house singing Here comes Bridget dressed in white give her something in honour of the night.
St Patrick:- In olden times people used to think that it would not be right if they had not
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 14:03
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awaiting decision
people wash the churn dash and clappers in a running stream. It is said that if egg shells were put in a tillage field on May-morning the crops would fail, because they were taken by the person who put the shells there. On St Johns night every family light a bonfire, and with the last coal of it, the man of the house blesses the crops. On St Martins day every family kill a cock and the blood is spilled on the doorstep. If it rains on St Swedens day it will rain for forty days. On Halloween people who are anxious to find out who they would marry fill their mouths with water go to three houses and listen at the keyhole and
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 14:00
approved
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awaiting decision
On shrove Tuesday pancakes are taken for supper. On easter Sunday morning some people get up at sun rise to see the sun dance, and two or three eggs are taken at each meal. There is a lot of superstition connected with May day some people dont light a fire in the kitchen until after twelve o'clock, others would not sweep the floor, and others would not give away milk. It is said if a person milks another pearsons cow secretly on May morning they would take the butter, to prevent this happening supersticious
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:54
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awaiting decision
Indian stirabout. They used to eat the breakfast at seven o clock and the dinner at twelve o clock and the supper at six o clock. The people used to work two hours before their breakfast. The table used to be placed against the wall. Oaten meal bread made with water they used to have. They used to eat meat only at Christmas. They used to have white bread at Christmas only
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:52
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a shoe maker who was very lazy. One night some of his neighbours came to visit him and the began talking of where a pot of gold was hidden. So the next day he set off to look for the gold and he met the grasey on his way and asked him was it time that there was a pot of gold hidden under a big tree and he said "Yes". Then he started digging and after a long time he came to a box so he lifted it up and opened it and found a hammer and awl and a last. And he got a piece of paper in the corner of the box and on it were the words written "Use
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:48
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awaiting decision
If you lick a lizard it will cure a burn.
The juice of raw onions with flax-seed is a cure for a cough.
Goose grease is good for swollen joints and sprains.
Asses milk is a cure for the whooping cough,
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:46
approved
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awaiting decision
Household-blue is a cure for a wasp sting
A cure for a burn is bead soda
A child who's father was dead before its was born curs thrush by blowing his breath three times on the childs mouth.
Garlic is a herb which cures yellow jaundice.
A seventh son has a cure for ring-worm
A cure for a cut is pariffin oil.
A cure for a toothache is pepper.
Gladmon is a cure for mumps.
A cure for taking out a thorn is a foxes tongue steeped in vinegar.
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:43
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awaiting decision
During the penal times there lived in Ballyfinton a priest who used to hide in a castle. So one day he ventured to say Mass beside the castle. Before he had Mass finished a protestant man came along on horseback, and got his servants to siege the priest, and shut him up in a upper room of the castle. The people were weeping, and he drove them of his land. A neighbour named James Kelly went in disguise to the Protestant for work. After a few days he found the priests room and he brought food and drink to him. James Kelly brought the priest safely out of the castle and afterwards he said "Go to Mass for the good his soul, and to church for the grass of his cow."
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:40
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awaiting decision
Kilcooley castle is an old ruin with high walls surrounding it. It is said it was build by a Norman woman, Norah Creena by name. It is not known at what time it became derelect. It is said it was attacked by the Williamite army believing that Sarsfield took refuge o nthe way to Limerick. The Canricard's were said to be the occupiers of the castle at that time.
There are the ruins of an old castle in this district called Kilcooley, which is said that the Clanricard family lived there long ago.
Tradition states that any peasant passing by the way had to bare his head, otherwise his life wasent safe. It is also said that a man named Lynch a retainer there at the time shot a man who failed to comply with the rules and it is also said that the Lynches never had any luck from that day to this.
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:27
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awaiting decision
There are four corners on my bed.
Four heavenly angels on them spread
St Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
God Bless the bed that I lay on
This Prayer is said when in bed
When arising say:
I arise from this bed for the love of Thee
Who didst die on the cross for the love of me
May Jesus of Nazerath, King of the Jews
Preserve me from a sudden and unprepared death.
Amen
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:24
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awaiting decision
may be accomplished for their glory and our salvation. O good Jesus, O Jesus our Redeemer do not abandon us nor punish us as our sins deserve but hear our humble prayer and grant what we ask for by the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary for the glory of the Holy name
Heart of Jesus I adore Heart of May I implore Heart of Joseph true and just in those three hearts I place my trust so grant me grace to love thee daily more and more
May Jesus of Nazerath king of the Jews preserve me from a sudden and unprepared death Amen.
St Martha I resont to your protection and faith. I offer you
senior member (history)
2021-11-11 13:18
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Blessed be the hour in which our Lord Jesus Christ God and man was born. Blessed be the Holy Ghost by whom he was conceived. Blessed be the Glorious Virgin Mary whom this God man was born. May the Lord hear our prayers by the intercession of the glorious Virgin Mary and by the rememberance of the sacred hour in which God man was born that all our desires
senior member (history)
2021-11-10 12:49
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awaiting decision
of his Sacred Passion, and in honour of his Glorious resurrection and God like assension to which he liked to bring me to heaven. True as Jesus Christ was born on Christmas day. True as Jesus Christ died to save us sinners. True as the three wise Kings brought their offering to Jesus on the thirteenth day. True as he asended into Heaven to the honour of Jesus Christ will keep me from my enemies visible an invisible now and forever more Amen
Lord Jesus Christ have mercy on me. Mary and Joseph pray for me. True the Necodemus who took our Lord down from the Cross. Lord Jesus Christ through the sufferings on the cross. This soul was fliting out of this world. Give me grace that I may carry the Cross and keep me from all dangerous deaths now and forever more Amen.
senior member (history)
2021-11-10 12:44
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O adorable Lord and Savour of Jesus Christ dying on the Gallows tree save me. O holy Cross of Christ see me save through. O holy Cross of Christ ward off from me all Napons of danger. O holy cross of Christ ward off from me my enemies. O holy cross of Christ guide me in the right way to happiness. O holy Cross of Christ ward off from me all dangerous deaths and give me help always. O Crucified Jesus of Nazareth have mercy on me now and forever more Amen. O blessed Mother of God interciede for us poor sinners Amen in honour of our Lord Jesus Christ and in honour
senior member (history)
2021-11-10 12:22
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mild ask Jesus to pardon the sins of thy child. And if at the dawn I should draw my last breath and the dear sleep I take be the long sleep of death. Be near me dear Mother for dear Jesus sake when my soul in Eternitys shore shall awake.
To be said before going to bed at night.
Devine hands of Our Blessed Lord Help us pardon my God pardon.
This is another way for saying the Hail Mary
senior member (history)
2021-11-10 12:19
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Night has fallen dear Mother the long day is 'oer and before they loved image I am kneeling once more. To thank thee for keeping me safe through the day, to ask thee this night to keep evil away. Many times have I fallen this day mother dear many graces neglected since last I knelt here. O Mary, my mother my own Mother
senior member (history)
2021-11-10 12:13
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When I'm standing at heavens door and ask him to give me shelter
for ever and ever more
Amen.
When people see the first sheep sheared they say "That we may live to see it again"
When strangers go into a house they say "God save all here"
When people take a drink of milk they say "God bless the cow"
When people get money they say "May God increase your store"
When people do a turn for somebody else they say "God spare you your health"
When the lights go on at night some people say "The lights of heaven to our souls"
senior member (history)
2021-11-10 12:09
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people before going to bed kneel before an image of Jesus Crucified. Make the sign of the cross, and then put the letters I. N. R. I. on their forehead with their thumb and say -
Jesus of Nazereth
King of the Jews
Preserve me from a sudden or unprepaired death.
On St Patricks night the following prayer is usually said after the family rosary
I am only a poor old sinner and my soul has many a stain,
But you'll say a word for me Padráig when I am going through the wind and rain
wont you speak to the God of Mercy
senior member (history)
2021-11-10 11:54
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 13:33
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the back on chalk Sunday. The woman has to have a fortune for the man, but sometimes the man has to buy a wife. On Wednesday the people around here usally get married because they believe it is the luckiest day. They tie a pair of old shoes on the back of the car when they are going on their honeymoon for good luck. Some used to go on horse back, and when they were coming home they used to run a race to see who would be home first. Sometimes them all would come in side cars and they called it the hauling home.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 13:32
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In olden times weddings were very interesting. It was customary to make matches and often men went miles away to get a suitor one that had a good dowry or a good fortune as they would call it. Horse-back was customary in our four-fathers time
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 13:28
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prints with wooden instruments called butter hands. In connection with churning there is a lost of superstition. When strangers go into a house when the people are churning, they should twist the churn without being told in case they would bring the butter. Certain people have a charm to bring back butter. This is done by obtaining from that person three special pieces of paper. One of those is placed under the churn, another under the crock of cream, and the third piece is burned, and while it burns a prayer is said. Then the cream is churned and the butter comes back, other people in case the butter would be taken put a coal under the churn.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 13:11
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farm as your father did of yore,
Go in to Tenner pay your rent at a fair reduction and nothing more.
III
I put a hand down in my pocket and a revolver I pulled out.
Tenner fell down in a slumber and for the Police loud he did shout,
Now Mr. Tenner stop your shouting,
Here is your money I will count it down,
Or lay my word I will have your life or get 7/6 in the pound.
"Chorus"
Hold the ground and stock the farm as your father did of yore,
Go in to Tenner pay your rent at a fair reduction and nothing more.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 13:07
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I
As I rode out from Woodford town,
And I making for Loughrea,
When I went in near Tenner's office, Learings loud I heard him say,
Here is one of the Woodford Tennant's and his rent he is going to pay.
"Chorus"
Hold the ground and stock the farm as your father did of yore,
Go in to Tenner, pay your rent at a fair reduction and nothing more.
II
When I went in to Tenners office
I this to him did say,
I will pay my rent at a fair reduction.
As William O Brien is round Loughrea,
What care I for William O Brien or any other who e're he be.
Since my Body is well guarded from my head down to my knee.
"Chorus"
Hold the ground and stock the
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:58
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awaiting decision
Garlic is used for bronchities, asthma, yellow jaundice, and also for the blood
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:58
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rejected
awaiting decision
The most harmful herbs that grow on our farm are praisaec and gloran. Praiseac spreads and destroys crops especially oats and wheat. Gloran grows in meadows and poisons turkeys. Black-heads grow in poor land rushes and flaggers grow in wet land, and clover grows in good land. Garlic is a herb used to cure yellow jaundice and is supposed to be bad for cows. An ointment is made by mixing together grouncil soap and sugar and is supposed to cure boils. House-leek is also a cure for boils.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:57
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The blind nettle is about the most harmful weed on the land. Switch grass makes the land dirty and is very harmful to the crops and soil. Crowfoot takes away the substance of the soil. Spunk and brislaun is very harmful to the land. Gladium is a cure for mumps.
Bogbean is a cure to the heart. Ribgrass is a cure for burns. Featherfue is a cure for the heart and liver.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:41
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Garlic is used for bronchities, asthma, yellow jaundice, and also for the blood
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:41
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rejected
awaiting decision
The blind nettle is about the most harmful weed on the land. Switch grass makes the land dirty and is very harmful to the crops and soil. Crowfoot takes away the substance of the soil. Spunk and brislaun is very harmful to the land. Gladium is a cure for mumps.
Bogbean is a cure to the heart. Ribgrass is a cure for burns. Featherfue is a cure for the heart and liver.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:37
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harmful weed and it only grows on poor land. It is very harmful to stock, but as a rule they never eat it.
Comfry root is a very bad weed, it is a cure for a sprain.
Garlic is a cure for the yellow jaundice.
Nettles are good food for turkeys.
Preasach is a weed found in oats
The dock-leaf, lambs quarter, and robin run the hedge are very harmful weeds.
Nettles, chick weed, gladom, dock-leafs robin run the hedge, spearment, prasach and poppy seed grow in our land.
Nettles are good for rash.
Chick weed for swollen legs
Gladom for sore throats.
Forum leaf is good for cuts.
The dandelion is good for nerves.
Garlic is a cure for yellow jaundice
Brass leaf is good for a burn.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:29
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There is a great big hill between Shangarry and Ballyfinton. It is called Arna-na-Muga. One evening as Dick Fitzgerald was crossing this big hill. He heard a great noise, and looked around, but could see nothing. When he was near the bottom of the hill, a little round barrel with a pig's head caught him by the leg, so that he could not walk a step further. He shouted for help, but got no assistance. Then he said "the devil send you away" and let my leg go." The little pig only caught a harder grip of his leg. Then he shouted again "O God come to my aid, and save me from all danger," and at last he let Dick's leg go. He never crossed the hill after that, but he was always lame.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:20
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If a weasel crosses the road it is considered very lucky.
People consider it hard to churn if the churn was left under a rafter.
If a man came into the house while churning and he not to bring a coal it is said that he would bring the butter.
Long ago people believed that if a person came into the house while in the act of churning that that person would surely take the butter from the milk.
A wet and windy May
Fills the haggard with corn and hay.
If the fear á tighe dies sell the horse
The clock is stopped immediately when a person dies in a house.
When setting a hen an egg is broken for luck
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:16
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If you dream of a death you'll hear of a wedding.
People believe that if a person started work on a Saturday that he would not have it finished for Saturdays.
People say that it is unlucky to bring a dead person or a person who would be killed into the house
You should not stir the crane at night unnecessary lest you would dirty the fairies shirts.
It is considered unlucky if a strange cat came into the house.
It is considered unlucky to give away money on an Monday.
If you were going on a journey and a hare to cross the road it is a sign of bad luck.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:13
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A man should not go out at night with a coal in his pipe.
It is considered unlucky to cut finger nails on a Sunday.
It is considered unlucky to bring peacocks feathers into the house.
Do not spill salt and fail to throw a pinch over your shoulder.
If a wild goose flys over the house it is a sign of death.
It is unlucky to get out of bed the wrong side.
If a person sneezes three times and no one to say God Bless Us the fairies would bring him.
What a bride should wear.
Something old, something new,
Something borrowed, something blue.
A lucky wedding day
Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses, Friday for crosses
Saturday has no luck at all.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:07
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Some people do not like to see anyone taking anything out of the house when churning but they would bring the butter
People place a coal from fire or red iron or horseshoe under churn if they thought the fairies took the butter.
People would not let a man take a coal from fire to light his pipe but he would bring the butter
Salt is put in cream as people thing the butter could not be taken when the salt is put on milk.
The fairies will sleep on the table if you churn on the table
If a person who came to the house while churning refused to "take the churn" the key of the door was thrown after him
Some people would not give the loan of a needle while churning but they would loose the butter
If a man came into the house & lit his pipe while you would be churning you should put ashes under the churn
Some people say that if you left the cat or dog in the house when churning you could not gather the butter.
If you came into the house with the churn on your shoulder you would grow no taller than you are.
If people find it difficult to churn they put the tongs or a horseshoe or a coal under the churn to help them.
If the cow calfed on May Day you should not give away any of the milk until you churn
If you were talking to a very handsome person an old saying was - If you hav'nt the colour of the butter you have the colour of the crock.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 12:00
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Most churns used in district are called barrel churns the body of the churn is shaped like a barrel & it is placed on a stand. On one end of the barrel is a hole through which the handle goes. The handle connects with the dash. By twisting the handle the dash inside is made revolve. On the lid is a hole covered with glass. There are a few upright churns (dash churns) in district. At the bottom of each churn is a hole with a plug in it. The butter milk is let out through this hole.
In summer time most people churn twice a week - Tuesdays & Fridays. In winter when milk is scarce churning takes place only once a week.
The churn is scalded with hot water before the cream is put in. The churn is lift on floor on the chair when churning. When the glass on the lid is clean the butter is made - Then it is gathered
Pisreóga
Every person in the house has to "take the churn". If not it would be hard to finish the churning & the butter would be scarce.
If a person (stranger) enters the house during the churning he has to "take the churn" for a few moments.
If a person come to the house for the loan of anything during the churning he would not get it lest he would take away the butter.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 11:59
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rejected
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Most churns used in district are called barrel churns the body of the churn is shaped like a barrel & it is placed on a stand. On one end of the barrel is a hole through which the handle goes. The handle connects with the dash. By twisting the handle the dash inside is made revolve. On the lid is a hole covered with glass. There are a few upright churns (dash churns) in district. At the bottom of each churn is a hole with a plug in it. The butter milk is let out through this hole.
In summer time most people churn twice a week - Tuesdays & Fridays. In winter when milk is scarce churning takes place only once a week.
The churn is scalded with hot water before the cream is put in. The churn is lift on floor on the chair when churning. When the glass on the lid is clean the butter is made - Then it is gathered
Pisreága
Every person in the house has to "take the churn". If not it would be hard to finish the churning & the butter would be scarce.
If a person (stranger) enters the house during the churning he has to "take the churn" for a few moments.
If a person come to the house for the loan of anything during the churning he would not get it lest he would take away the butter.
senior member (history)
2021-11-09 11:37
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Three or four cows are kept by each farmer in the district.
Cows are called - "Cailín", "Hag", "Bradac" or "Bradác", "Maoilán", "Bracket" or "Speckled"
When driving cows people say "How" - "How on" or [?] When calling cows they say "Pro Pro" - When calling [?] they say "Suck" Suck"
Cows are kept in at night from November to May. The shed in which they are kept is called, "Cow [?]", "Cow Cabin" or "Cow houses". Such sheds have walls of stone & have thatched or galvanized roofs.
Some people tie their cows with cow-chains which are attached to the manger. The chain is put round the cow's neck. Others tie the cows with straw rope (sugán). The rope is either put round the neck or round the horns. Cows are also tied by "Bales". Near the manger are two upright sticks fitted to two horizontal sticks. The upright sticks are from ten to twelve inches apart. One of the upright sticks is loose on top & can be mooved to one side or other. The cows neck is put between the sticks the loose one is tied. The cow can not pull her head through the sticks.
A branch of a spruce tree is often placed in the roof of the cow-cabin to bring luck on the stick - cattle &c.
senior member (history)
2021-11-08 12:39
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Two horses are kept by most farmers in locality. All the work on farm is done by the horses.
Horses have names; Fanny, Jess, Rose, Bob, Charly, Mannen &c.
An old horse is called a "[?]" A lazy horse is called a "knacker". Other horses are referred to as a "Prod", "Plug" & Cob.
Colour, Bay, Chestnut, Steel Grey & Pibald.
They are kept in a stable. Most horses are tied in stable with a "sugán" which is attatched to the manger & tied round the neck. Others have "halters" or "Head-collars" on the head.
When in the stable the horses are given hay. If working they are given oats a few times a day. Feeding bags containing the oats are hung on the horses' heads. Such bags are called, "nose bag" - "muchán", "púgán"
senior member (history)
2021-11-08 12:21
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humane landlord. He never evicted his tenants out of their houses or land. He used to give time to pay the rents and these were not very exorbitant at the time. A certain time was fixed for the paying of the rent in money. There was great peace in the district during his time as landlord.
There is now no member of the Redington family in Kilcornan Castle. The house is derelict and was purchased a few years ago by the Galway County Council for the purpose of converting it into a sanatorium.
senior member (history)
2021-11-08 12:17
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The local landlord in this district was Mr Christopher Redington. The Redingtons came to Ireland in the eighteenth century and lived at Kilcorman Castle near Clasenbridge. A brother of the Earl of Clanricarde, Edmund, resided at this castle, but in the maternal line Kilcorman passed by marriage into the possession of Right Hon C. Y. Redington J. P. He was a Senator of the Royal University and a Commissioner of National Education. The Redingtons were Catholics.
The Redingtons gave a site to the Very Revd. Michael O'Flay D. D. Parish Priest, for the building of Ballymana Church, parish of Craughwell. This priest died in 1867
Mr Redington was a kind and
senior member (history)
2021-11-08 12:10
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O'Daly, chielf professor of poetry in Munster and in the opening of the 15th. century there was Carroll O'Daly, the ollain of Corcomroe. A poem of his which has come down to us through the centuries is "Gileen Aroon."
The chief branches of this ancient family acquired landed property in Galway, Roscommon, and Westmeath. Of the Galway Branch in the time of James II, Denis Daly was Lord Justice of Common Pleas and another Denis Daly was M. P. for Galway. He was described by Henry Grattan as "one of the best and ableast characters Ireland ever produced." A member of this family was created Lord Dunsandle but the title became extinct in 1911. The present owner, Mr. Bowes Daly, is M. F. H. at Craughwell.
senior member (history)
2021-11-08 12:05
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Dunsandle is about a mile and a half from the Ganty School and is approached by an entrance gate from the road which leads from Athenry to Loughrea. There is in the grounds the ruins of an old Castle. It is the property of the Daly family for several generations.
The Daly's or O'Daly's were from an early date the hereditary bards of the chieftains of Burren, (or East Corcomroe in County Clare) - the O'Loughlins. IN 1598, the O'Loughlins had as many as 20 castles within the fastnesses of Burren and at that period we find the name of Owen O'Daly, an honoured name. They resided at Finievara (near Kinvara) where they kept a famous Bardic School
In the 14th. century we had Geoffrey
senior member (history)
2021-11-08 11:58
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The ruins of this ancient castle are to be seen from the Ganty School on the south-west about two miles, "as the crow flies." It is convenient to the road which runs from Craughwell to Kilchreest. Information about it is to be found elsewhere in this book under the head of Local Happenings. Very little now remains of this ruin. The Castle was connected by an underground passage with the old Castle of Cahercinmonwee which is about a quarter of mile from the Ganty School in a south-easterly direction. This castle has been a ruin for many years. It is said that General Ginkle and his army after the battle of Aughrim in 1691 passed by this latter Castle on their way to Galway where they followed up the Irish, under Sarsfield.
senior member (history)
2021-11-07 13:26
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well. For all that she would not give her consent. "Tell this stranger" said she to a messenger, "that I have never seen a man worst dressed". Fionn at this time had only skins of animals for clothing. "Tell your mistress," said Fionn to the messenger, "that it is not my clothes, but myself I ask her to wed." Then Fionn did not wait for an answer but he tied his clothes around him. Then he jumped then and knelt down at the lady's feet. Then the prince went away very angrily.
One time there lived a giant in the Clare mountains. He did not like the people of the town of Galway. One day he came to a big rock up on the mountains. He thought he was able to throw the rock as far as Galway. He caught up the rock and tried to throw the rock. The rock did not go as far as he wished. It fell about two miles short of the town of Galway. This rock is called Cloch Asgair or Mark Rock to-day. There was another man some people say and more say that it was the same man that wanted to throw another stone. This man thought to do better than the last man. He got a stone. He tried to throw this one as far as Galway. It is not known was it by chance or by good luck that the town was saved this time. He was very angry this time. He was going to give the stone a great heave; better than the last one when his foot slipped. This time the rock fell about three miles from the town. Then he was terribly angry and he got his sword. He jumped after the rock and he cut the rock in two halves as soon as it reached the ground. The two parts of the rock are to be seen to-day.
There was a very strong woman in County [?]. He father was very poor. One day she came to this place. She saw a man ploughing in a field. She went in the field. Then she caught the man and plough and horses and put them into her prison. She brought the home to her father .
I got these three stories from Michael Monhan.
There are many old stories about an [?] with who lived in this place. He name was An Cailleach Féarach
senior member (history)
2021-11-07 13:03
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the dog gave a yell of pain and at the sound of it the King and his chiefs thought of Setanta. "He is dead, out little hero is dead" they said. When they rushed forth they saw that it was the hound that was dead at Setanta's feet. The smith was angry at the loss of his great hound and Setanta was sorry for the smith and he said "I will guard your cattle and your home until another such hound as this is grown." Then his name was changed and he was called Cuchullan which means the Hound of Cullan. He was known for some time as Cuchullan. When he grew up he won another name. He guarded Conor's kingdom, and men called him "Cú Uladh", the hound of Ulster.
There is another story about how Fionn won his wife. One day while hunting Finn came to a deep river between two rocks. It was so deep that the river running below could not be heard from the bank above. On one side of this river stood a beautiful lady. She was richly dressed. On the other side of the river were several men, all were very richly dressed also. In the middle stood a prince wearing a tunic of green with a silver brooch. As Fionn looked he saw he prince go back from the river. Then the prince turned quickly, and ran fast towards the river. Many a time he did this. When he came near the bank he stopped Fionn asked what was the meaning of this. He was told that the prince wished to marry this lady, but he could not unless he was able to leap the river. "I will take this leap myself," said Fionn. Now the lady had caught sight of Fionn and she like him very
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 12:22
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but his mother thought he was too young. The boy asked his mother every day to let him go. At last she let him go. At length he came to the place where the boys were playing hurley. Setanta rushed in. Then he caught up the ball and he kit it. He put the ball out the goal. Nearly all the boys turned against him. At this moment the king came to the spot. He asked the boy what was his name and who was he. The boy told the king who he was. The king did not believe him at first because he had not his mother or anyone belonging to him with him. Setanta lived for a long time. After a while be became the leader of the boys in that place. At that time there lived in Ulster a smith named Culan. One day Culan invited King Conor and his nobles to a feast. On the evening of the feast King Conor got ready to set out. The King asked Setanta to go with him. Setanta asked to be left finish the game he was playing. He said that he could find the hoof-marks of the horses. They went away leaving him to this game. When they sat down to table, the smith asked had they all come. They said that they had as they forgot Setanta. After some time Setanta came running to the feast. He always carried with him his hurley and his hurling ball. As soon as he came near Cullan's fort the fierce hound sprang towards him. He went on till he was near enough to take a sure aim. Then he hurled his ball into the dog's open mouth
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 12:13
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hunting and they were very hungry. In the evening they came to a fairy palace and when they went in they saw more food than they could eat left on tables. They then sat down to eat and when they had enough eaten they all went out again except Goll Mac Mórna. He kept on eating until he had all the food eaten. When the rest of the Fenians came in looking for him he was not able to rise from the chair. Then all the Fenians dragged him from the chair and some of his skin gripped to the chair. They then put wool on him and it grew on him ever afterwards.
There are many stories of olden times in this place. One story I heard was how Cuchulian got his name. There was a boy named Setanta living with his mother near the place where the town of Dundalk now stands. His mother was the sister of Conor Mac Nessa. Conor Mac Nessa was the King of Ulster. At this time King Conor lived at Eamhain in the North. At this place Conor had gathered together a lot of players and gave them a playingfield. They were trained to play all the Irish games. Almost every day the king paused a while to watch their sports, for, he said "These boys, when they grow up, will be the leaders and defenders of my kingdom."
Now Setanta wished to be one of Conor's band,
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 11:59
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castle where Cuchulian was. Emer went to the room where Cuchulian was, and she begged of him to open his eyes and look at her and to hear what she had to tell him about his children. Cuchulian lay there still and at last Emer began to cry bitterly. An old woman came into the room and told Emer that she must let Cuchulian go with her for some time and that she would bring him back cured. At first she would not agree to let Cuchulian go but at last she consented for fear that he would die without awakening. Emer went away leaving her husband with the old woman. This old woman was a fairy and she brought him away into the country and told him many secrets of the earth and of the sky. The old woman cured Cuchulian and one day the god of the air told her that she must give Cuchulian back to Emer. One day they met on the seashore and Emer was very angry when she saw how young and beautiful the old fairy was. She said that she had taken Cuchulian away from her. The god of the air sent a great storm and darkness and Cuchulian and Emer had forgotten all about his sleep. They then went home and lived happily together ever afterwards.
Another story the people of this place know is abut Goll Mac Mórna. One day Finn and the Fenians were out
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 11:50
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Bhí féin. Sé an chaoi a adéanaidís na leabtha na go léor píosa adhmaid a ceaghal le chéile agus féar a chur ós cionn na n maidoi. Tá sgéal ag na daoine atá san áic seo faoi Oscar. Deirtear gur chaith sé choth mór aniar as conainara agus tugtar chloch Osgair air tá an chloch sur ur aice le [?] tá an chloch sin le feiceal go atí an lá induí tá sé tuairim agus dá tón meadhchan.
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 11:29
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awaiting decision
The people know many stories about Fionn Mac Cumhal and Cuchulain. Once upon a time Cuchulian was at war and his wife Emer was to home watching him to return but he did not come. Every morning Emer stood on the walls of her castle and looked across the land for the sight of spears glittering in the distance. She would sit all night on the castle also watching for him to come. When he was not coming Emer thought that she would never see her husband again. One evening as she sat on the same place on the top of the castle a man came to her. She asked him was Cuchulian dead. "Not dead indeed" he said, but he lies under a heavy sleep from which no one can wake him. He is lying in a castle far away where he slept night and day. "If you come the sound of your voice may waken him." Emer got ready to go and two or three men went with her. After travelling night and day they came to the
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 11:26
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was a great tryant. A person could not sell a cart of straw without his permission. If he saw that a person was tilling his land well he would raise the rent on that land. If he saw a person having a new coat he would raise their rents. A person could not sell a beast without his permission. If he saw a new pane of glass in a person's window he would raise the rents. If a person tilled the head-lands of his tillage field and he to see them he would raise the rents on that land. If he saw a person improving his property he would raise the rent. Some of the people got disgusted on that account. Then boycotting started. It first started in the County of Mayo. Michael Davitt first started boycotting the land lords. Michael Davitt and his father and another were thrown out, off their house on the roadside. The landlord threw them out. Michael Davitt and his father and mother were then forced to go to England to earn their living. Michael worked in a factory, where he lost his arm. After some time he returned home; and held the first Land League meeting in the ruins of his father's native home, thus began the downfall of
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 11:20
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and when the people were not able to pay the rent he threw them out on the roadside and took all their furniture. He is living still in Australia. There was a landlord in this place. He was one of Lord Wallscourts of Ardfry. He very seldom came to this place. He lived most of his life in the city of London. First he was called Mr. Blake. As first the blakes of Ardfry were Catholic. After some time they became Protestants. When they became Protestants they got the title of Lord Wallscourts. Only two of them got this title. When Owen Roe O'Donnell was in Spain looking for help one of the Blakes got some money for poisoning him. When O'Donnell was going to a dance in Spain one of the Blakes put poison in his dancing shoes. The last landlord was well liked by most of his working men. Our landlord was Lord Wallcourt. He lived in a big house in Ardfry. About thirty years ago he sold the lands - over which he ruled, to the land commissioners, to whom we now pay the rents. His estate was not a very big one, He had Ardfry, Mweeloon, Prospect and part of Tawin. As all other landlords he
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 11:11
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a bad landlord. John Heaven of Prospect was his agent. He was a very bad agent and he evicted many people out of their houses and gave their lands to other people. Once upon a time a beggarman came to the door of the landlord's house and asked him for some apples. The landlord refused him for them and told him to go away. When the beggarman was going away he said to the landlord that the crows would be flying in and out through the roof of his house some day. What the beggarman said came to pass because the crows are flying in and out through the roof of it now. No one is living in Lord Wallscourt's house now. When he died his wife left it and all the furniture was stolen out of the house the time of the Black and Tans. There was another landlord in this district also. His name was O'Flaherty. He was the landlord of Ballinacourty and of Blackweir. He was a very bad landlord
senior member (history)
2021-11-05 11:01
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He had another house in London and he used to live there in winter. He came to Ardfry in summer and he spent about four months there. When he came to Ardfry to visit the place twelve of his tenants went out to meet him dressed in sailors' clothes When he came as far as the first gate going into Ardfry the twelve men took the horse from the carriage and drew the carriage to the door of his house. While he was in Ardfry he held great feasts and he invited most of his tenants to the feasts. He made some of the people sing songs. Every Sunday while he was in Ardfry he had great amusements for the young boys of this district. They ran races, went boating, and jumping and playing many other games. He gave prizes to those who were best. He had many people from this place working for tenpence a day. He had a nice garden at the back of the house in which many fruit trees grew. The name of his gardener was John Donellan. Lord Walscourt was not
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 12:10
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spirits of the people he had slain came around him. He called his chief druid Barrach to tell him what was happening. Then the king asked if anyone in Erin had done wrong and were the gods angry. The druid said that there was only one god and that he came on earth to save the people but that he was put to death that day. Then the king rushed for his sword and he went out into a wood saying that if he were near that man he would defend him. As he was saying this he started cutting the bushes. He said that if he were near that man that he would kill his foes as quickly as he was cutting the bushes. At this same time Connal Cearnach was a prisoner in Rome. The people there tried to make him happy. He never liked that place. He often thought of the people her in Ireland. The people there gave him a horse to ride. One day as he was taking his ride through a field he saw a man being crucified. He saw a soldier drawing a sword and going to kill a defenceless man. He leaped off his horse and tired to stop the blow but he was too late. The soldier killed the man and one drop of the man's blood blood fell on Connal. He threw up his hands and his sword fell from his hands. The soldier began to threaten him. Connal got his sword and leaped on his horse. The man he had tired to save was Our Lord. He came home to Ireland and his companions were lamenting his death but in the middle of their sorrows Connal came to them and told them his story and they held a big feast.
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 12:02
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went their way. That evening the soldiers came searching for them. The soldiers asked the farmer did he see the people that they were looking for. The corn that he had sown that morning was not fully grown up. The farmer said that he saw the people that they were looking for when he was sowing the corn. There was a deargadaol near them and it began to say yesterday, yesterday. Then the soldiers continued their search. There is another old story about Conner Mac Nessa. Some time before the birth of Our Lord Connor Mac Nessa and his men were at war with the Connaught men. He was hit with a brain-ball. He was not entirely killed. His chief doctor said that he could not go to battle, that he should not have any excitement and that if he did the blood would rush to his head and the brainball would fall from his head and that he would die. He led a quiet and peaceful like for some time. At the death of Our Lord the sun darkened, the earth trembled the walls of the castle shook and the
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:57
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in the village of Ballinacourty used to hear a holy soul walking outside their house every night. When the people of the house went out to see who was walking outside the footstep stopped. When they went into their house again they heard the footstep outside again. The people of the house were not able to sleep all night they were so frightened. The next Sunday they went to the priest and told him about it, and they got a Mass said for holy souls. They did not hear the footstep after that. There are many religious stories in this place. One that I heard was about St. Joseph and the Infant Jesus. When they were running from Herod they came to a farm-house. the man of the house was sowing corn that day. The farmer gave them food. When they had eaten it they
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:52
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ago a woman in this place went to "Tobar Sabhairne" for water for her tea. When she brought the water home it would not boil. The next day she went to the priest and asked him if it was any harm to boil the water. The priest told her not to desecrate the holy water by boiling it. The next day she went again to the well and brought home more water to boil it. When she had the water just hung over the fire she got suddenly ill and after some time she died. Long ago a certain person in this district used to see the Blessed Virgin and she carrying a child in her arms, coming into her house every Christmas night at twelve o'clock. The people of that house used to stay up all night watching her to come. When the woman of the house was dying a light was seen near her bed. The people of the place leave the doors of their houses opened all during Christmas night in case that the Blessed Virgin and her child
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:26
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Seventh Son
The seventh son or daughter of a family is supposed to be able to cure a person with wild fire. The blood of a person by the name of Welsh is a cure for ringworm.
A Cure for warts
Bathe them three times in a stone with water in the hollow of it. Another cure Get five stones and hide them and whoever would get them would take the warts.
A Cure for a Sty.
Get a ring and put the sign of the cross three times over it and look through the ring. Another cure is to prod the sty with a thorn of a gooseberry bush and it will cure it.
Got from Mrs Cannon Cloonamorris Woodlawn.
Asked by Michael Cannon Cloonamorris Woodlawn.
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A Cure for Warts
To get a dandelion stem and squeeze the milk out of it and put it to a wart, it will go. or if you wash your hands in water that is got out of a blacksmiths forge.
For a Sting of a wasp put a blue rag to it and it will go.
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:24
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Seventh Son
The seventh son or daughter of a family is supposed to be able to cure a person with wild fire. The blood of a person by the name of Welsh is a cure for ringworm.
A Cure for warts
Bathe them three times in a stone with water in the hollow of it. Another cure Get five stones and hide them and whoever would get them would take the warts.
A Cure for a Sty.
Get a ring and put the sign of the cross three times over it and look through the ring. Another cure is to prod the sty with a thorn of a gooseberry bush and it will cure it.
Got from Mrs Cannon Cloonamorris Woodlawn.
Asked by Michael Cannon Cloonamorris Woodlawn.
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senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:21
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for a few days and the ringworm will go.
17. Another cure, Get a marriage ring and put it around the ring-worm three times in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy-Ghost, on Monday and Thursday and it will go.
18. Toothache
Put a small grain of mustard into the hole of the tooth and that will cure it.
19. Earache
Get blacks sheeps wool and dip it in sweet oil and put it in the ear and it will cure it. Another cure. Get an onion and roast it and cut it in two and leave it to your ear and put a bandage around it. Another cure. Put boiling water in a jug and put a piece of flannel over it and put your ear to it and steam the ear
Cure for burn
Equal part of lime-water and linseed oil and it is then called barron oil.
Got from, Mrs. Kenny Hillswood.
Asked by, Mary Joe Kenny Hillswood.
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To Cure a Wart
Get a black snail and put him on the wart and then put him on a white thorn bush and he will grow into a wart in
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:20
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the bush. Another cure is to fill a paper with stones and hide them and the person who finds them will get warts.
To Cure a Sty
Get a goosberry thorn and make the sign of the cross over the sty and it will go, or get a marriage ring and rub it to the sty three times in the name of the Father and Son and Holy Ghost and then get the person to look through it.
To Cure Corns
Wash them in the dew in the morning or else in a boghole.
To Cure Ear Ache
Get a jug of boiling water. Hold the ear over the jug and the pain will go
Got from Mrs. Mac Donagh, Hillswood
Asked by Tommy Mac Donagh Hillswood
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To Cure Warts
To bathe them three times in a stone with water in a hollow of it.
To Cure Thrush
A posthumous child is supposed to be able to cure it.
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:17
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for a few days and the ringworm will go.
17. Another cure, Get a marriage ring and put it around the ring-worm three times in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy-Ghost, on Monday and Thursday and it will go.
18. Toothache
Put a small grain of mustard into the hole of the tooth and that will cure it.
19. Earache
Get blacks sheeps wool and dip it in sweet oil and put it in the ear and it will cure it. Another cure. Get an onion and roast it and cut it in two and leave it to your ear and put a bandage around it. Another cure. Put boiling water in a jug and put a piece of flannel over it and put your ear to it and steam the ear
Cure for burn
Equal part of lime-water and linseed oil and it is then called barron oil.
Got from, Mrs. Kenny Hillswood.
Asked by, Mary Joe Kenny Hillswood.
To Cure a Wart
Get a black snail and put him on the wart and then put him on a white thorn bush and he will grow into a wart in
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:10
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with a hollow and holding water in it dip the wart's into it three times.
12. If a child has the whooping-cough and it is swong under a donkey three times it is a cure for the whooping.
13. A white asse's milk is good for the whooping cough.
14. A cure for heart disase, get a cup of oaten meal and level it off with a knife and cover it with a clean cloth, and leave it up against the persons heart three times and take off the cloth and if the cup is half filled the persons heart is bad. The remainder of the meal is put on the pan and is made into griddle cakes and the person that has the bad heart eats them and he gets cured.
15. To cure cancer outside on your body you have to go to the person that has the cure. He makes up a plaster of herbs and clay and puts it on the sore. It wont stick to any sore except cancer. The person suffers great pain but he cannot take it off until it falls off. Then the sore comes out. Nobody knows the cure except the person that has the cure.
16. Ringworm
Dissolve a lump of washing soda in paraffin oil and rub on the effected parts, persist
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:10
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with a hollow and holding water in it dip the wart's into it three times.
12. IF a child has the whooping-cough and it is swong under a donkey three times it is a cure for the whooping.
13. A white asse's milk is good for the whooping cough.
14. A cure for heart disase, get a cup of oaten meal and level it off with a knife and cover it with a clean cloth, and leave it up against the persons heart three times and take off the cloth and if the cup is half filled the persons heart is bad. The remainder of the meal is put on the pan and is made into griddle cakes and the person that has the bad heart eats them and he gets cured.
15. To cure cancer outside on your body you have to go to the person that has the cure. He makes up a plaster of herbs and clay and puts it on the sore. It wont stick to any sore except cancer. The person suffers great pain but he cannot take it off until it falls off. Then the sore comes out. Nobody knows the cure except the person that has the cure.
16. Ringworm
Dissolve a lump of washing soda in paraffin oil and rub on the effected parts, persist
senior member (history)
2021-11-04 11:03
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5. If the palate of the mouth dropped, the seventh son of a family was able to raise it by leaving his hands on the person's head as it was believed the cure was in his hands.
6. If a person got a bad pain in the back of the head they gave it a good rubbing with goose grease. They also kept a jar in the house for the purpose. It was also good for sprains and stiff joints.
7. The cure they had for a sore throat. They heated course salt on the griddle and put it into a wollen sack and tied it around the neck.
8. If seven sons are born one after another and no daughter between, the seventh is supposed to be able to cure ringworm. There is a certain kind of a ring and if you put it to the ringworm it will take it away.
9. If you get a dandelion stem and squeeze the milk out of it and put it to a wart the wart would go.
10. If you steal a piece of fat bacon from your mother and rub it on the wart and then bury it, it will disappear.
11. A cure for warts. If you find a rock
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:52
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should not be married. There were certain days that were considered lucky. Wednesday was the luckiest. There are no marriages celebrated during Lent or advent. Shrove Tuesday is the last day before lent and a great many people marry on that day. The man and woman go to town a week before the wedding-day and the man buys the ring. The morning of the wedding each of the couple start from his or her own home. The bridegroom should be first in the Church. The 'groom puts the ring on the brides finger. When the ceremony is nearly over in the church the best man tries to get the first kiss of the bride. It is unlucky if he gets this chance. When the couple go outside the church there is rice or some thing like that thrown at them by some friend to indicate the good wishes that the will always have plenty of every thing. Well wishers, neighbours and friends dress up in straw and they are called strawmen and meet the bridal party a short distance from the man's home with torches
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:47
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This is a rhyme about marriage,
Monday for Health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for crosses,
Friday for losses,
Saturday no day at all.
Something old something new
Something borrowed and something blue
Married in blue and you love will be true
Married in green not fit to be seen
Married in yellow ashamed of the fellow
Married in grey and you will sail far away
Married in brown and you will live near a town
Married in black and you will wish yourself back
Marriage was a very important function in olden times and there was great work to be done in preparation for it. First of all the Priest published the banns on three successive Sundays so that the people would be able to talk over the match and tell the Priest if they knew any reason why the couple
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:43
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sign of fine weather. When the clouds go in the air and come down on top of their heads and when sea-gulls fly inland it is a sign of fine weather.
When the distant hills look near we are going to have rain. When the swallows fly high it is the sign of fine weather and when they fly low it is a sign of wet weather. If you see the dust of the road rising it is the sign of wet weather. Moss horns from the sun means that we will have rain A bright clear sky is the sign of good weather. IF there is a white cloud around the moon there will be rain. If there is a yellow cloud around the moon there will be snow, and when the clouds and shaped like a wool pack we will have rain. If the clouds are of a black colour. We are going to have thunder.
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:40
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storms. The wind from the east brings calm weather. The wind from the north brings frost and snow. If the crows are cawing it is a sign of rain. Sheep always go to a hill and cattle go for shelter when there is a sign of rain. When you see the seagulls decending on the land it is the sign of rain and frost. If the moon is lying on its back it is the sign of bad weather. If the sun's rays appear like Moses horns, if white at setting or shorn of its rays or goes down into a bank of clouds in the horizon we will get bad weather. When the wind blows the dust of the road we will have rain. When the road is covered with ants it is the sign of rain and when you hear the water fall clearly it is a sign of rain. When you see a rainbow it is the sign of rain and if you saw a black cloud in the sky it is the sign of rain. To see hens picking themselves or to see soot falling down the chimney is also a sign of rain. To see smoke going up straight out of the chimney or to see cows running from flies is a
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:32
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father would have a cure for ring-worm.
Got from Mrs. Golding Killaan Woodlawn.
Asked by Crissie Golding Killaan Woodlawn.
If you have a toothache and if it is a decayed tooth, a small piece of powdered alum placed in the tooth will give relief. To fast from meat on Wednesday and you will never get a toothache or to get water and hold it in your mouth and sit by the fire until the water boils and the toothache will go.
A child that never saw its father has a cure for ringworm.
A cure fore sore throat to get roast potatoes and put them in a sock and put it around your throat.
Cure for a stye
Use an eye bath and bathe the eye night and morning in salt and water one small teaspoonful of salt and put on a poultice of tea leaves
Whooping Cough
Put one tablespoonful of glycerine in a glass of hot milk and this will give relief
Ringworm
Disolve a lump of washing soda in
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:16
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A Cure for a Sore Throat
To warm coarse salt and put it in flannel. Tie it around the throat and it will cure it
A cure for a toothache
Get a bit of tobacco and put it down in the hole in the tooth
A Cure for Convulsions
To put the child in a bath of hot water and sponge the forehead with cold water.
Asked by Maureen Mullen Killaan Woodlawn.
Got from Mrs. Mullen Killaan Woodlawn.
A Cure for a wart
Get a snail and rub it of the wart and put it on a thorn bush and while the snail would be dying the wart would get better.
A Cure for a sty is a prod of a gooseberry thorn.
A Cure for ear ache is black sheeps wool and dip it in sweet oil
A Cure for the chin Cough
If you met a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure and whatever he would say would cure it. It is said that a child who never saw its
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:08
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63. I have a little house and a mouse would not fit it and all the men in Derry would not count all the windows in it?
A thimble.
64. I shake with fear when cats are near. Yet like a cat in every house I am to be found?
A mouse.
65. If a farmer can raise a hundred bushels of wheat a fine day. What can he raise on a wet day?
Umbrella.
66. Twenty sheep went out the gap twenty more followed that after came the Shepherd and his dog how many feet went out the gap?
Two feet.
67. As round as an apple as flat as a pan the half of a woman the whole of a man?
A penny.
68. A man without eyes he saw apples on a tree he took no apples off it or no apples left on it did he?
He had only one eye and there was only one apple on the tree.
69. Two ducks before a duck two ducks behind
senior member (history)
2021-11-02 13:03
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Ashes
55 A man sat upon a stool with a leg of mutton on his lap a dog came and ran away with the leg of mutton and the man threw the stool after the dog?
56. What always walks with its head down?
A nail in your boot.
57 Whats full and holds more?
A pot full of potatoes when you pour the water in.
58 Middy maddy round body three feet and a wooden hat?
A pot.
59 Why does a dog wag his tail?
Because the tail cant wag the dog.
60. What happens once in a minute twice in a moment and it never occur all the year round?
The letter 'M'.
61. Up the road and down the road and carry the road on my back?
A ladder.
62. I'm always at school and I never learn anything I teach boys and girls to read and I cannot read myself?
A book.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 14:04
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45. What is it that you have it and I haven't it and I make more use of it than you that has it?
Your name.
46. My father gave me seed to sow, the seed was black and the ground was white?
Ink and paper.
47. Why is the letter 'b' like a fire?
Because it makes oil boil.
48. What was the first thing Adam planted in the garden?
His feet in the mud.
49. Why is life like the greatest of all things?
Because we must all give it up.
50. What is the shyest thing in the world?
A clock because it always has its hands up to its face.
51. What walks on the sea without feet?
The ship.
52. As round as an apple as plump as a ball can climb the Church over steeple and all?
The Sun.
53. How may cows' tails would reach the moon.
One if it was long enough
54. If a blacksmiths anvil, sledge, and hammer, costs £5 " 5S " 0D what will a bushel of coal come to?
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 13:57
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4. What is the most dangerous weather to be out in?
When it's raining pitch forks.
5. Enough for one two much for two, and nothing for three, takes one to make and two to keep?
A secret.
6. when is a window like a star?
When it is a skylight.
7. What is that which you cannot hold ten minuts although it is as light as a feather?
Your breath.
8. When is a baby like a cup and saucer?
When it's teething.
9. How many cuts does a well pointed scallop want?
No one.
10. What is the shyest thing in the world?
The clock.
11. What walks on the water without feet?
A ship.
12. A little white man the longer he lives the shorter he grows?
A candle.
13. Headed like a timbel tailed like a rat?
A pipe.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 13:49
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ring again and shouted "Where are you my pritty ring?" The ring answered I am here in his big toe. He threw the hatchet again and it went down by my head. I then took the hatchet and cut of my big toe. I threw the big toe and ring into the lake. He made a jump into the lake He was drowned. The Knight of Glen then said take off your boot and show me the toe cut off and he did. Now show me your rib and he did. Now let down your trousers and show were the slice is taken of your hip and he did. He then jumped and put his hands around the neck of the Black Thief of Slone and kissed him several times O God I have found you at last you are the man that saved my life. I will now make the princes a present of my bells but I will keep you with myself while you live. You need steal no more. He then loaded the bells on his horse for the three princes and his servants went a great part of his way home. When the queen heard the bells ringing coming she pitched herself down from the pinnacle of the castle and was killed dead. They put down the kittle and made tea and drank it and If the dont live happy that we may.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 13:44
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then a prod of a bayonet of being stuck in the left side and I am here to day. I asked him would I tell him the story. He said yes if the story was worth it I told him I was very very hungry this-day. It went into a giants house this day and his housekeeper gave me food. She heard the giant coming and she took me upstairs to a large room There were dead bodies of five men lying mouth under and the naked and She told me to strip my-self off and to lie down between them and she hid my clothes. The giant came in with a big dagger knife in his hand and smelt every one of us around but I was the freshest. He cut off a slice of my hip. He went down and ate it and fell asleep. The woman then came up and bandaged my hip. I came down the stairs and I took the poker and stuck it in the fire and then I stuck it into his two eyes and blinded him. He followed me with a hatchet and a ring that he took out of his pocket and threw it after me crying out "Where are you my pretty ring?" The ring would answer, "I am here near him" He then threw the hatchet at me. On one occasion cut the hair of the side of my head I was then near a lake I took of my boots. He threw the
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 13:34
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at the end of a large forest and the saw a small glimmer of light far in the forest and the came to a small cabin and the saw a dark complexioned old man with a woolen old cap on is head and a gun left by his side and one of them vintured to the door. and asked the old man would he let them in that the were foot-sorley after the day. He said "Yes come in" They went in. He asked them who the were and the told him and what brought ye here. They told him the command their stepmother gave them about stealing the steeds of bells from the Knight of Glen. He told them he was the greatest robber in Ireland and that nothing ever failed him to steal but the bells and went by the name of Black Thief of Slone and the Knight of the Glen lived the other side of the forest and the next night he would show them the way and venture himself with them. He did and when they touched the bells the began to ring. The four of them was taken by the guards that were watching the bells of the Glen and taken before the Knight himself. He ordered the youngest princes to go on his knees that he had only five minutes to live and pray. The black thief of Slone said "Five minutes is a long time I was within the shelp of a knife of being killed" He then turned to the second eldest told him to go on his knees that he had only five minutes to pray. Five is a long time. I was
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 13:11
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awaiting decision
eighteen. There was also an old hen woman in the yard in his time who was very fond of that queen. The king married again an other queen who was a very proud woman. The king did not tell her that he had three young princes sons. At that time he had sent them away travailling. When the present queen would go out through the yard she would speak to the old hen woman. The hen woman cursed her and if she knew all she might not be so proud and the queen asked her what did she mean and the hen woman told her if she gave her the produce of the eggs she would tell her and she agreed and the hen woman asked her did the king tell her that the had three young princes sons and she said no and she asked the hen woman what she would do. She told her when the would be after dinner to say to the kind that I am informed you have three young princes sons. He said yes. " She then said you must get them home at once I would be glad to see them and be very kind to them" He then got them home. She went again to the old hen woman and asked her how she would get away without the law catching her. Then hen woman then handed her a pack of cards and told her after dinner to produce the cards and to say to the eldest prince. I will play you for one game. He will say what "Will the game be for Mother"? She then replied "If you win the game anything you ask me to do I must do it
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 12:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
To cure a "Bonnlacht"
Apply fat bacon
To cure a Sting
Applhy the dampened blue-bag.
To cure a Whitlow
(i) Make a poultice of soap and sugar.
(ii) Get the white of an egg. Mix some starch with it & put "a squeeze" of the blue-bag into it & apply the past to the affected part. (This is an unfailing cure for calling nails & other types of sore fingers such as splinters under the nail etc.)
Cures for Whooping Cough
(i) the milk ferrets would leave after drinking (commonly called "ferret's leavings".)
(ii) A man riding by on horse-back on a white horse is supposed to have a cure for whooping cought. "A fhir an chapaill bháin céard a leigheasradh an triuc?" Whatever he names will be the cure.
(iii) People skin a gráincóg & make soup of him & this soup is a great cure for whooping cough.
(iv) A child is slung under a donkey to cure whooping cough. One person catches his hands & another his feet & he is swung three times under the donkey.
(v) Donkey's milk also cures whooping cough.
Another Cure for Warts
Get ten straws with rifts or knots in them. Bury them & when they rot the warts will go.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Preventative for Tooth-ache.
(i) When a tooth falls out carry it around with you in your pocket & you'll never have a tooth-ache.
(ii) Fast from meat every Wednesday & you'll never have a toothache.
To Cure Chillblains.
(i)1 Get the woman of the house to save potato water. Heat it & bathe the chillblains in it.
(ii) A tobacco spit will also cure chillblains.
(iii) Heat the tongs & leave it on the chillblains while it is as hot as you can bear it.
To Cure pain in Stomach.
(i) Take three mouthfuls of salt & water in the name of the Father, of the Son and of the Holy Ghost.
(ii) Hot milk with ginger in it.
To Cure Coughs & Pulmonary Ailments.

Boil the big blankety leaves of the mullein plant; strain & sweeten. Add whiskey for bottling & preserving.
To Cure Burns.
A person who has rubbed his tongue to a lizard has a cure for burns. Any burn he licks after that will cure immediately.
How Thorns were Removed Long Ago.
Long ago when people had no needles to remove thorns they hunted a fox & killed him & his tongue was used to take out thorns.
To Remove Thorns.
A poultice of fat meat and sugar.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 12:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
To Cure a Cold
(i) Make "scailtín" as follows. Put some buttermilk to boil and a handful of oaten meal & let both boil together until the grains of meal are cooked. Then take up & put butter & sugar in it & take it hot.
(ii) Put some milk to boil & put a peeled onion into it & let both boil for a time. Remove the onion & drink the milk.
(iii) Make hot carrageen drink as follows. Put a pint of milk to boil. Wash as much dry carrageen as would fit in an egg-stand & put it into the milk with tow teaspoons of sugar. Let all simmer for ten minutes. Strain away carrageen & use the hot drink for coughs & colds.
(If wished this can be let set into a blancmange & used as a sweet. This is the only way the old people made up carrageen in this district)
To Cure Nettle sting
Get a dock leaf & beat with a stick or stone to bring out the juice & lay it on the sting. The juice immediately cools the burning sting.
Another Cure for Warts
Collect some dandelion flowers press the milky fluid out of the stem & put it on the wart. This should be done frequently until the warts disappear.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 12:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Likewise a posthumous child can by its breath cure the craos-galair (thrush) by breathing into the mouth.
Another cure for warts
is to wash the hand in the water that rests in the hollow in rocks. To wash the hands in water in which eggs were boiled is supposed to give one warts.
The froth of the river is also supposed to cause warts.
The hands of boys who rob birds' nests are said to fill with warts.
To Cure "the Pip" in Chickens
Get a horse-hair & put it down the chicken's throat & the worm in the chicken's throat will twist around the horse-hair & can be lifted up
Belief about a Horse-hair
If a horse-hair is thrown into a well an eel will grow out of it, provided there is not exit or out-flow of water from the well.
Another local Cure for "Pip"
Ge the man of the house to redden his pipe & puff some smoke into the chicken's mouth & that will kill the worm & he will be coughed up dead.
To Cure a Boil
Remove portion of the bark of a pine tree & with a knife scrape some of the sap & put it on a clean cloth & apply it to a boil.
This also cures cuts.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 12:20
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awaiting decision
To some he would suggest a drink of goat's milk or something equally simple, but whatever he recommeded was sure to cure.
To Cure a Wart
Get a black snail & put him on the wart & then put him on a white-thorn tree & he will grown into a wart on the tree
To Cure a Sty
Get a gooseberry thorn & make the Sign of the cross over the eye three times with it & the sty will go.
or
Get a marriage ring & rub it to the sty 3 times in the name of the Father, Son & Holy Ghost & then get the person to look through it with the affected eye & the sty will go.
To Cure Ringworm
Get a marriage ring & make three circles around the ringworm with it & it will spread no further
or
Three drops of the blood of a Walsh can cure ringworm also
or
the breath of a seventh son can cure it also.
or
The breath of a child who never saw its father.
senior member (history)
2021-10-30 12:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a short distance & then before he had time to think the little man shouted, "Mind the dog behind you or he'll bite you." The old man looked back to see the dog but of course the leprechaun had disappeared when he looked round. The following evg. the old man went carefully by a round about way to the wood & came again on the little man. This time he was determined not to take his eyes off him so he carried him away & didn't listen to what he said. Sone a ghost appeared & chased them but the old man held the leprechaun in his arms till he got right to his own door. Then a sharp knife came quickly thro' the air & struck in the jamb of the door beside the old man narrowly missing him. He looked for a second at the knife but the leprechaun disappeared. The old man was so frightened at the way the ghost flung the knife to help the leprechaun, that he decided to have nothing more to do with ghosts or fairies.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Barney got the better of it. He got into bed.
64. I went to the fair and I had browney
I came home and I had browney.
I had a dog called browney
65. My first is in number my second is in measure my third is to mar or to injure ones pleasure. My fourth is a town that is very well known for its fairs and markets in the county Tyrone.
Sixmilecross
66. As bright as an angel. As light as a feather both heavy and dark. When you squeeze me together.
A snow ball
67. Spell a red running rogue in three letters.
fox.
68. Thumby, gitentree, longman, brisby, and wee jack andy.
69. B and O and X in the middle T and and Y come tell me the riddle.
Boxty
70. When is a clock on the stairs unsafe
When it runs down
71. Why are tall people the laziest.
Because they lie the longest
72. What is it that is often put on the table cut, and passed, but not eaten.
A deck of cards
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A pot of potatoes
54. Why does a rabbit go up the hill.
Because it can't go an under it
55. As round as an apple as plump as a ball and covers the market house steeple and all.
The sun.
56. If a man falls off a house what will he fall against.
His will
57. Down in yon meadow I have a table how many men sits around it
A man mowing
58 Pink : pank : down yon bank ten about four.
A woman milking.
59. What begins at one end of the wood and licks it all over.
A sow licking a trough
60. There was a man of Adams race. He had a certain dwelling place It was neither earth, heaven, hell or any other place for man to dwell in.
Jonas
61. Four and twenty white cows standing in a stall up comes the red bull and licks over them all.
Your tongue licking your teeth.
62. Why is hell like a cobblers shop.
Because it is full of condemed soles.
63. Biddy boxted it and battered it and
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:37
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awaiting decision
and a half-penny more.
A shilling'
44. Why is a school master compared to a clock.
Because he warns before he strikes.
45. I brought twenty-four heads to water and not one of them drunk put one
Twenty-four nails in a horseshoe and none of them but the horse.
46. What goes round the house and round the house and its fathers big coat about it.
A sheep.
47. What goes from house to house and lies out at night.
A pad.
48. What goes round the house and leaves a rag on bush.
The snow
49. Why is a cowardly soldier compared to butter.
Because it runs before the fire
50. I built a bridge from her to Dublin what height is it.
The height of nonsences
51. What grows in the wood and sounds in the town and earns its master many a pound.
A Fiddle
52. What goes away between two woods and comes home between two waters
A man with two wooden buckets of water
53. What is full and holds more
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a car. There was two black men and a white man in the car. the two black men ate the white man. What was the number of the car.
128 (one, two, ate)
36. What goes round the world and round the world and leaves a bit of its tail on every bush.
The mist
37. How many wells would make a river.
One if it was big enough.
38. Forty sheep went through forty mor followed that six, seven, eleven, three and two how many is that.
five.
39. The latest of fruit the greatest of gain the largest of measure and that spells my name.
Hamleton. "Haw" "mill" "ton"
40. As round as an apple as flat as the pan. The half of a woman the whole of a man.
Penny, (Queen Victoria)
41. Half-ways in and half-ways out its just half-ways between it's neither in or out
A door-case.
42. Whats too short and take a piece off it to make it longer.
A grave.
43. A half penny wet and penny half dry four pence half-penny and a half-penny and a half-penny behind four pence half-penny
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:26
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rejected
awaiting decision
26. Chip, chip cherry all the men in Derry couldnt climb chip chip cherry.
The smoke.
27. Wooly without and wooly within I lifted my leg and put in.
A stocking
28. Black and white and read all over.
A newspaper.
29. A houseful a roomful and you couldnt catch a spoonful.
The smoke.
30. What is it that is as green as grass and not grass and as white as milk and not milk. It has a beard on it like a goat and its tail stands up
An onion.
31 What goes through the water and the two ends of it down.
Bag on a horses back.
32. As I went over yonder hill I saw three pots boiling and no fire under.
Three spring wells.
33. As I sat on my hunkers I looked through my winkers and I saw the dead burying the live.
Raking the fire.
34. What part goes up the hill first.
Her rout.
35. As I was going out the road I met
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:15
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awaiting decision
Lambe, being in need of money & being well warmed up with whiskey jumped at the offer, and sold his wife to Hanna for a sum of money & Hanna's housekeeper.
Mrs. Lambe was very indignant when she heard what had taken place & refused to go home with Hanna. Hanna, to show that he possessed her according to law took her by the arm & lifted her into his cart & drove away with her.
It is stated that the new arrangement worked out admirably & that the women became acclimatized & lived in greater harmony with their new masters than with the old ones.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:11
approved
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awaiting decision
Up to the middle of the 19th century the belief was prevalent that wives could be sold if the bargain was made in a fair town on a fair day.
A transaction of this kind took place in Monaghan about 90 years ago. The parties concerned were Teacy Hanna of Killadonnelly & Pat Lambe of Tattindonagh both townlands about 2 mls from Smithboro. Teacy Hanna was not married but Employed the services of a housekeeper whom he was tired of. He fixed on Pat Lambe's wife (who was a thrifty good-looking woman) as her successor & happening to meet Pat Lambe who was a drunk and in Monaghan fair made a suggestion to Pat that he would buy his wife and assured him that it would be legal
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:04
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rejected
awaiting decision
Number [?] of swallows - I got a young swallow out of barrel used for spraying potatoes - just clinging side - week - I could n't hold in my hands - could not close in box - darent let loose for fear of cat - so I thought of a quiet hen - put swallow under it - 2 hrs after heard cry - swallow getting away from hen
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 10:54
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awaiting decision
on leading road from Monaghan to Smithboro
Aughnamalla Fort Pat Lamb wished to build house there - crock of water, "Good people if you allow me to build dont spill water to-night. Crock not spilled build - hadnt good luck - drank.
Tom Hamill lives beside asked to put animal into Lamb's - went one night - black object leaped out frightened life out of him - my sister was coming from Carraberro one Evening - a man in grey clothes & grey cat formed before her and disappeared - no gap, no place to go into - she was annoyed.
Robert Thomas St anna was coming along one night and at the forth he fell his cap stand up with the hair of his head and took week I could nt tell what reason.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:01
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awaiting decision
Oaten Bread baked on a griddle in front of turf fire.
Yes, a Quern Stone was found in Carnowen Bog - was given to Rev. Arthur Rose who took it (it is thought) to the Museum in Belfast. Dr. Rose is dead.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:00
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awaiting decision
"Boot" = something given "into the bargain"
"Tick" = bought without money
Change - money returned when too much was tendered in payment.
"Carl" = auctioned -
Yes, dealers in feathers & rags & scrap iron, horse hair, are still going round now and again - less common than a few years ago. I've heard of a 'tenpenny' bit: "To bite a tenpenny" was a phrase applied to a cross woman whether a ten-penny bit (money) or a tenpenny loaf - I dont know
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:18
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awaiting decision
Ans = Her breath.
What is taken of you before you get it?
Ans = Your Photograph.
Where was Moses when the light went out
Ans = In the dark.
One side a woman the other a man?
Ans = A penny.
What is the smallest bridge in the world?
Ans = The bridge of your nose.
Riddle me riddle right where did I sleep last night through a rock, through a reel, through an old spinning wheel through a bag of pepper through a millers hopper through an old sheep's shank bone and such a riddle never was known?
Ans = A moth.
what is full and will hold more?
Ans = A pot of potatoes.
What gets bigger the more you take from it?
Ans = A hole.
As round as an apple as deep as a cup and all the king's horses could not pull it up?
Ans = A well.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:14
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rejected
awaiting decision
What goes round and round the wood and never goes into the wood?
Ans = The bark of a tree.
What is cut but never eaten?
Ans = A pack of cards?
Why does a hen pick a pot?
Ans = Because she cant lick it.
four legs up and four legs down soft in the middle and hard all round?
Ans = A bed.
Black and white and read all over?
Ans = An newspaper.
What always follows a mouse?
Ans = Its tail.
What goes from house to house and sleeps out all night?
Ans = A path.
What goes round and round the house and sleeps in the corner at night?
Ans - A brush.
What has an eye but cannot see?
Ans = An needle.
What goes up the ladder with its head down?
Ans = A nail in a man's boot.
What part of a cow goes into the byre first.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
62. A lazy old woman, a hard-working man & twelve little children sitting round a pan. What is it?
(the face of the clock)
63. How many sides on a round plum-pudding?
(Two - inside & outside)
64. What's the use of a cat's skin?
(To keep her warm).
65. What makes a loaf in every window?
(Snow.)
66. What is the difference between a shilling and a penny?
(Eleven-pence)
67. When is a man hospitable and a treat at the same time?
(when he takes you in)
68. Why is the sun like a good loaf.
(Because it is light when it rises).
69. How long did Cain hate his brother?
(As long as he was Abel).
70. Why is an egg too lightly boiled like one boiled too much?
(Because it is hardly done)
71. What kind of ear (eers) have engines?
(Engineers)
72. What is the dead centre of Dublin
(Glasnevin)
73. What is everything on the earth doing?
(Going round).
74. How many hairs (hares) in a horse
(Ten) (There are 10 3-penny bits in a half-a-crown)
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:57
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awaiting decision
but has four fingers and a thumb?
(A glove.)
50. What flies with four wings?
(Two birds.)
51. To N's, two O's an L and a D put that together and spell it for me?
(London)
52. What kind of paper is like a sneeze?
(tissue paper).
53. Head without hair, teeth without lips & a leg?
(A rake)
54. Why is Ireland compared to a bottle?
(Because there is a Cork in it).
55. My back's bare, my stomach's empty. I have two heads & I think it's plenty?
(A nippers).
56. Patch upon patch without any stitches. Riddle me that and I'll buy you a pair of breeches?
(A head of cabbage.)
57. Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat, you can guess for ever but you'll not guess that?
(A pipe).
58. A man had a pair of pants with twenty patches on them. What time was it?
(Time he had a new pair)
59. I have a wee house. It wouldn't hold a mouse. It has as many windows as the King's house?
(A thimble).
60. What has its ears a yard from its head?
(A spade).
61. What is full in the daytime & empty at night?
(A shoe).
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:49
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awaiting decision
41. What is the strongest thing in the world?
(A snail. He carries his house on his back.)
42. Why is a train like a flea?
(Both run over sleepers)
43. What flies high, flies low, has no feet, but wears out shoes?
(Dust.)
44. Black I am, and fair of face. They tore my hair and scratched my face, and took me from my dwelling place?
(A sod of turf).
45. I sat on my honkers, and looked through my winkers, and saw the dead burying the live?
(A person covering up a fire with ashes - raking it - for the night.)
46. A word of five letters I am. Come riddle me out if you can. My first and last are alike, I declare, My second and my fourth alike are a pair. Cut heads & cut tails, I am also a name. Spelt backwards and forwards I am always the same. The test I will leave to my carpenter friend, who oftimes takes hold of me to accomplish his end
(Level).
47. What French word contains all the vowels but only one consonant?
(Oiseau.)
48. What stand on one leg and has its heart in the middle?
(A cabbage-head).
49. What is it that is neither flesh nor bone,
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:42
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awaiting decision
29. Why is the crow a sensible bird?
(Because he never complains without cause {caws}).
30. What bears but never blossoms?
The crook.
31. When did Noah strike the first nail in his ark?
(On the head).
32. If it takes half a yard to make a cap, what will it take to make a suit?
(A tailor).
33. As I went through a wheat-field, I saw something nice that I could eat. It was neither fish, flesh nor bone, what was it?
(An egg.)
34. If three men ate 6 potatoes, what would the number of their motar-car be?
(386)
35. A kitchen full, a room full and you couldn't catch a spoon ful?
(Smoke)
36. Through the wood, and through the wood, and through the wood it ran, although it was little thing, it killed a big man?
(A bullet.)
37. Clink, clank down yon bank ten about two?
(A person milking a cow)
38. How man hairs are there in a cat's tail?
(None. They are on the outside).
39. How many feet have forty sheep, the shepherd, and his dog?
(Two)
40. Look at me and you are somebody. Turn my back & you are nobody?
(A person using a looking-glass.)
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:33
approved
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awaiting decision
19. Which two notes of the musical scale would you prefer if you were tired?
(Soh - fah - Sofa).
20. Chips-chips-cherry all the men in Derry couldn't climb up Chip-chip-cherry?
(Smoke).
21. A leaper of ditches, a cropper of thorns, an wee brown cow with a pair of leather horns?
(A hare).
22. As round as an apple, as sharp as a lance. If you sat on it, it would carry you to France?
(The moon).
23. I have a little sister, she has but one eye, she'd climb the sky were it ever so high, and wade the sea were it ever so deep?
(The moon)
24. If a chicken could swear, what language would it be?
(Fowl language)
25. What is it that every living person has seen & never will see again?
(Yesterday).
26. Where was Nelson going in his 39th year?
(Into his fortieth).
27. Why does a hen pick a pot?
(Because she can't like it).
28. What goes up and down but never moves?
(The road).
29. Opens like a barn door, shuts like a trap. You can guess for 40 years but you'll never guess that?
(An umbrella).
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:25
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awaiting decision
9. Why is hell like a cobbler's shop?
(Because it is full of condemned soles (souls)).
10. B and O and X in the middle, T and Y come tell me the riddle?
(Boxty.)
11. When is a clock on the stairs unsafe?
(When it runs down.)
12. Why are tall people the laziest?
(Because they lie longest in bed).
13. What is it that is often placed on the table, cut and passed but not eaten?
(A pack of cards.)
14. Why is a cowardly soldier compared to butter?
(Because he runs before the fire).
15. If Ireland were flooded what would be the safest town to live in?
(Cork, because it floats).
16. As I went over Derry's wall, I heard a man give a call. His head was flesh, his mouth was horn, and such a man was never born?
(A rooster.)
17. If a man got sixpence for walking a mile what would he get for walking thirty miles?
(Tired feet.)
18. I am an old unicorn. I have but one horn, and I can give milk like a wee Kerry cow. My grandmother loves me and round the board shoves me, and smiles, a sweet countenance placed on her brow?
(The teapot.)
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:18
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awaiting decision
1. Rickety-Rockety clothed in green. The King could not ride it or neither could the Queen. They sent for the wise man who lived in the East. He swore it had horns but it was not a beast.
(A holly-tree).
2. Why are the clouds like a coachman?
(The clouds hold rain - the coachman holds reins.)
3. Why does a beggarman wear a short coat?
(Because it may be long enough before he gets another.)
4. Granny in the corner drinking. Johnny in her cap winking?
(A lamp.)
5. A half-penny wet and a half-penny dry;
four pence half-penny and a half-penny dry,
A half-penny behind and a half-penny before;
four pence half-penny and a half-penny more?
(A shilling).
7. Why is a school-teacher compared to a clock?
(Because he warns before he strikes.)
8. If a man falls off a house what will he fall against?
(His will)
9. There was a man of Adam's race. He had a certain dwelling-place. It was neither earth, heaven, hell, or any other place for a man to dwell in?
(Jonas - in the whale).
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:09
approved
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awaiting decision
or before, till the last of them was out of sight and out of hearing behind the hills. And Sheela sorted the money-bags, and loaded her man to the ground with the weight o' riches. But what remained over and above she slung on her own shoulders and away with them over hedges and ditches, by short cut and long cut, by near way and far way, up hill and down dale, till they came to their home on the lonely corner of the mountain. And they bought another wee cow at the fair at the five crossroads, where the cattle of the whole world were gathered together, and they bought a fat pig in the town. But that all happened long ago when there were kings in Ireland and princes in every barony, when the birds sang in the night-time and slept by day-light, when the maidens spoke truth like a lesson and knew only of their own affairs. And if they two didn't live happy together - then that you and I may.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:04
approved
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long in the branches when a band of robbers came along. And they built a big fire under the tree, and feasted and drank till you'd think they'd never finish, and sang songs that would put fear in your heart, and shouted, and sharpened their knives, and told bad tales. Till at long last the robber-chief called for his money-bags, and twenty of them were brought to him for his pleasure. And he emptied them at his feet, and he counted his money till you'd think the gold o' the whole world was in his hands. And Sheela the 'Gam' had her neck stretched out and her eyes on the riches, when what would you have happen, but the unfortunate door slipped from the branches, and fell with a clatter among the thieves. And Sheela was so frightened with the happening, that she lost her hold and her seat and down she plops, like a bag o' hay on the top o' that. And the poor mountainy man seeing her fall, put out his hand to hold her, and overbalanced and fell on top o' that.
Now, the robbers thought that the Devil was amongst them, and they up, to a man, and such screeching and racing you never saw, since
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:56
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through forests and fires, up hill and down dale, across rivers and lakes and heavy swamps, with Sheela behind him, and the stars and the moon out before him.
"And what's keeping you," says he, when he missed the old wife from his heels?
"It's the weight of the door", says she.
"The weight o' what door", says he.
"Didn't you tell me to pull the door after me," says she, "and here it is to the good, as large as life and as sound as a bell. But by the Four Waves of the sea, it's a load and a half on a long journey."
Now there's ways the man would have turned his tongue on the 'Trollop', but he was a good-for-nothing sort of a 'Lingle', and "Sheela," says he, "we'll rest till the morning." So they climbed a tall tree, for they were afraid to sleep on the ground, and nothing would satisfy the poor 'Oinseach' of a woman but to pull the door up into the branches, and stretch it out snug and warm like a Christian. "For who knows," says she, "what might happen to it if we left it below, and wilful waste," says she, leaves a woeful want."
Well it so happened that they weren't long
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:46
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:44
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It is the custom for people to decorate their houses at Christmas time with holly and mistletoe. Some say that the reason that holly is used is because that the cross on which Jesus was crucified was made of the wood of the holly tree. Others say that it is because that there are few flowers in bloom at Xmas and the holly branches are a very pretty sight with their bright red berries, and are suitable for decoration on. May day the mayflowers and Marsh mallows are gathered and scattered around the byres, and at wells to keep witches away. On Palm Sunday branches of the palm bush are taken to the priest and blessed by him. The palm is taken home and hung up in the houses or sometimes in the outhouses too until Ash Wednesday of the next year comes. Then it is burned and the ashes and rubbed on the foreheads of the people. It reminds them that they are made of dust and that to dust they shall one day return. People of this district used to go to Lough Patrick and get some water. They sprinkled this water on their cows on the first day of May. Noggins and piggins which were the old wooden vessels the people used, are still preserved in some houses as emblems of sentimental value.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:39
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My Grandmother, Mrs Greer of Drumleek North told me a strange story of a leprechan. One day she and my grandfather were in the kitchen. It was almost dinner time and my grandmother put on the pan to fry. A little woman about three feet high and wearing a little red shawl came to the door and asked for a piece of bacon. When she saw the pan on the fire she asked to have it fried. They put the slice of bacon on the pan for her. After a time Mr. Greer said to his wife "turn the bacon for that thing." The fairy woman much offended went over and lifted the bacon in her fingers and ran out of the house.
The old people of this district believe that fairies live in lone bushes and any bush which grows out in the middle of a field or near a fort is sacred and must not be cut down lest some bad luck should fall on the person who touches it. A man in Drumakill cut a lone bush to fence a gap. On the following night a crowd of fairies came to his house and tried to take him and drown him in the river.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:34
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My Grandmother Mrs. Armstrong often told us a story about this fort. One time she worked with Mr. Watters who owned the land round the Fort. This man had a cow which was expected to calve any day and she was grazing on the hill near the fort. My grandmother went out often to see the cow lest she should calve and the calf be lost. She saw the cow grazing as usual one evening, but next day she could not be found anywhere. They searched every place for her. On the third day when by Grandmother went out to look for her again she found the cow grazing beside the fort with the little calf running beside her and an old shawl tied round the cows body to keep her warm. Everyone believed that the fairies in the fort had the cow that day taking care of her.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:23
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Long ago the houses were called mud cabins. They had mud walls in their houses. The roofs of houses were thatched with rushes, and some were thatched with wattles and reeds. The wheat straw is the best for thatching the houses. In later years they began to use stoney slates which were found in a quarry in Creeve near Ballybay. The fires were all in the centre of the floors and there were no chimneys in the houses. The smoke went out through the door. Long ago there were no beds and there was nothing but settle beds and these settle beds folded up like a long seat. There are four or five settle beds in the townland of Drumakill still. The settle beds were placed in the chimney corner. There were no windows in the houses. Our teacher knew a house with a small pane of glass for the only window. The people made a hole in the wall and boarded it up and the light came in through the splits. Long ago the floors were earthen floors and these floors were not level. It wore into holes and people fed the cats in these holes. It was very common to have a half
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:18
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There were no country shops long ago. People went to the towns. Long ago people bought and sold after mass on a Sunday. They do not sell as much as they used to, but they sell the "Democrat" at some chapels after mass yet. They did not pay for all their goods in money but they gave something in exchange. Labour is often given in exchange for goods still. When people go to a shop and get goods without paying for them we say that they get them on "tick". Boot means profit. If any person sells a thing and gets more money for it than he paid we say he made a "boot". When a person pays for an article and gets some money back it is called changes. It is supposed to be unlucky to meet a red haired person on the road when going to buy or sell anything. The person should turn back and let the red haired person past and then the person can turn and go to the fair. It is unlucky to
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:13
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it. Then when it is thick it is kneaded with flour and then it is rolled out. It is put on the fire to cook. Some times is was not put on the fire at all but it was put on the grid iron and it was set before the fire until it cooked. This oat bread was about and inch thick and some people had to break it with the hammer. This oat bread was very hard and that is why the people had good teeth long ago. This bread was either baked on the griddle or in the oven. The people who have the hearth rise an oven and they call it the pot oven or the dutch oven. Long ago people did not use soda. They used a substance called barm. They did not wet it with milk but they wet it with water. The people baked bread once a week. Some people put the sign of the cross on a cake of bread and long ago the bakers put their elbows in the dough.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:08
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There were several different kinds of bread made in this district long ago namely oaten bread and several other kinds of bread made with potatoes. They eat a lot of oaten bread. They did not buy the meal they grew the corn and got it ground at home. They ground the corn between two big stones. The people made potato cake, stampy, boxty, and oat meal bread long ago. Potato cake was made with boiled potatoes mixed with flour and it was put on a griddle and cooked. Stampy is much like potato cake only it has oat meal mixed with the potatoes and flour. Boxty is made by equal parts of grated raw potatoes and grated cooked potatoes. Flour was kneaded into it. Oat cake is made with some oat meal and salt in a bowl and boiling water is put on
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:09
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No restless wave in fury beat
Upon their rock bound lone retreat
With anxious look they scanned the bay
Whose tranquil waters round them lay.
And soon behold! a huge wild boar,
Swam swiftly to the island shore.
In haste it climbed the steep hill side.
And straightway sought the rampart wide.
Where now the moonlight faintly shone.
O'er trench and mound and walls of stone.
The stones by some strange power controlled
Were down the hillside headlong rolled.
With hastening steps, by crag and fen,
The wild boar sought the shore again
And vision strange! twas seen to take.
His burden o'er the misty lake.
The watchers in their corracks rude
With pliant oars their freight pursued.
And lo! the spoil was found upon.
Green Churchill's broad and grassy bawn.
The wondrous visions of that night,
Proclaimed to all what Heaven deemed right.
For on that Isle, traditions tell.
God willed no monk should ever dwell.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:03
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An island rose all bleak and bare,
The wild boar's favourite haunt was there.
No wild flowers decked its rugged sides.
No copsewood grew its slopes to hide,
No stately trees of giant form,
To wrestle with the Winter's storm.
Twas here St. Maeldoid wished to rear,
A sacred shrine surpassing fair.
Where lonely monk and Anchorite.
In hallowed prayer could oft unite,
Skilled hands the chosen site prepare,
Foundations deep are laid with care.
Night comes, the toilers home have gone
To wait to-morrows welcome drawn.
Not dreaming that the morning's sun
Shall gleam upon their work undone
A grey light steals athwart the bay
The herald of the coming day.
The Holy Abbot seeks the shore.
And gazing the calm water o'er,
A strange sight meets his wondering eyes.
That holds him mute in sad surprise
Some evil worker dared to spoil
The earth works raised by patient toil.
The stones which formed the basement wall.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:03
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And strangely vanished one and all,
In heath, and gorse, and dingle shade,
A long and anxious search was made
But all in vain for none could trace,
The plunderer to his hiding place.
And though the untowards event
And filled them with astonishment
The Saint undaunted bad his men,
Resume their willing toil again.
Until the shades of eventide
Fell o'er the calm lake's bosom wide.
III
When evening into night had grown.
And darkness wrapped the island home,
Saint Maeldoid sent a chosen few
To guard the Isle the long night through.
Deep stillness reigned o'er wood and wave,
And all was silent as the grave,
No sound disturbed the slumbering dells
Nor scared the wakeful sentinels;
The dewy night crept slowly on.
The mystic midnight hour had gone.
When lo! quite near a sound was heard.
And yet no wind the thicket stirred.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:58
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An island rose all bleak and bare,
The wild boar's favourite haunt was there.
No wild flowers decked its rugged sides.
No copsewood grew its slopes to hide,
No stately trees of giant form,
To wrestle with the Winter's storm.
Twas here St. Macldoid wished to rear,
A sacred shrine surpassing fair.
Where lonely monk and Anchorite.
In hallowed prayer could oft unite,
Skilled hands the chosen site prepare,
Foundations deep are laid with care.
Night comes, the toilers home have gone
To wait to-morrows welcome drawn.
Not dreaming that the morning's sun
Shall gleam upon their work undone
A grey light steals athwart the bay
The herald of the coming day.
The Holy Abbot seeks the shore.
And gazing the calm water o'er,
A strange sight meets his wondering eyes.
That holds him mute in sad surprise
Some evil worker dared to spoil
The earth works raised by patient toil.
The stones which formed the basement wall.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:53
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Dark waving woods and vales of green,
With tranquil dales and hills between,
Steep hills whose wooded summits hide
Fair Muckno's dark blue waters wide,
Here proud Mac Mahon's castle stood
In lonely Concra's sheltering wood.
Or Temple crowned the upland fair
The huntsman sought his quarry there.
Full often in the early morn,
The fearless hunter's echoing horn,
Through silent glens and woodlands rang
While from its lair the fleet hind sprang,
Tossed its proud antlers in the air.
Nor ventured long to tarry there.
By Muckno's calm and glittering bay.
The timid hind sped on its way
Through Concra wood across the vale.
To seek the heights of Annahale.
Where lingering yet the dews of night
Flashed in the early morning light.
Nor paused on wood crowned hill to view
If hounds and hunter still pursue.
II
Close by the shore where Muckno's wave,
To hill and grove reflection gave.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:47
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The most popular of all the local songs was "Sweet Mary of Lord Blayney's Demesne. It was composed by a man of this district and it describes a beautiful girl called Mary who was a housekeeper in Lord Blayney's castle. The poet was in love with her. None of the people living now can repeat it, but an uncle of mine recited three verses of it at a luncheon five years ago. Unfortunately he has passed away since then, and before we began to collect folklore so we can not get any other account of the song.
The following poem or song was written by Rev. Father Rapmund in 1892 when he was curate in Castleblayney. It explains the local legend of Muckno and the visits of the black pig.
In ancient Muckno's wide domain
The varied scenes of hill and plain,
Present a landscape bold and grand
Unrivalled in our northern land,
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:25
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oatmeal which came from the mill after grinding was steeped in water in a crock overnight. Then it was strained and the liquid was put on in a pot over the fire and stirred until it thickened.
There was another dish called "brose". A cupful of oatmeal was placed in a bowl and boiling milk was poured over it and it was then eaten.
Long ago people eat a lot of salt herring. They put a stick through the tails of the fish and hung them up beside the fire. They eat dumplings at Hallow'een and at Christmas they eat beef. At Easter they eat a good many eggs. When the people had no milk they made a thing like milk with oaten meal and water and they called it bull-milk. The people had noggins and piggins before they had cups and they made their spoons out of cow's horns.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:19
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The local fairs are held in towns. The nearest fair to us is Castleblayney. The fair is held every month on the first Wednesday at eleven o clock. Some times buyers go to farmers houses to buy cattle. In Castleblayney the place where the cattle are sold is called a "cow commons" and it is called the cow hill in Ballybay. There is a special street for the fowl, and the horses and pigs are sold on the main street. There is no toll to be paid on cattle in the fairs round about here, but at Christmas we pay a penny a head on the turkeys. It is paid to the town clerk. When people sell cattle they get luck money and the person who buys the calf gets the luck money. This luck money is called a "luck penny." When people sell cattle they give a luck penny about a shilling or half crown people do not give much for a pig. When the bargain made they strike the palms of their hands together to show they are agreeable. Some people spit on the luck
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:14
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measuring tape, scissors, thimble, needle and thread and a gooses. The goose is a very long smoothing iron for pressing seams too. he has a long narrow board for pressing on. The shirts are made in the homes. The shirts are made out of wool and cotton and long ago the shirts were made of linen. Long ago people scutched their own flax and spun it into thread and then they wove it into cloth. Socks and stocking are kitted in the hoes still and some people have a knitting machine. The wool is not made in the homes now but it is bought in the shops. Long ago people clipped their own sheep, they dyed it and spun it into yarn and they knitted it into stockings. There are no spinning wheels in this district now. White is the usual colour to wear on wedding days. When any body is dead people usually wear black on confirmation day children wear white for purity.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:10
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There are no tailors in this district. Now the tailors make the clothes in their own houses but long ago the the tailor went to the houses and he stayed over night if he was not finished over night if he was not finished making the clothes. When the tailor came to a house he made clothes for all the family. Tailors nowadays stock clothes and people can pick the cloth and the tailor makes the clothes. People made their own cloth long ago. Cloth is not spun or woven locally now. People do not wear clothes now made out of such cloth. There are many different kinds of wool tweeds made into mens suits. Cotton is used for children's frocks and women's too. The tailor sat with his legs crossed on a table in a little niche or poke that was in the houses long ago. He did not take up extra space in the kitchen. The tailors thimble is different from any other thimble for it has no bottom and he sews with the side of his finger. The tailor has a
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:00
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they would have to send out and get one more, or send the thirteenth one home. When two are washing in the one basin they both spit in it in order that they may not quarrel. Magpies are supposed to be very unlucky. There is a rhyme which says: one for sorrow, two for joy, three for a girl, and four for a boy, five for silver, six for gold, seven for a secret, that will never be told. When a banshee is heard crying near a house it is a sign of a death. If the two horns of a rainbow are in the one townland it is the sign of a death in that townland. If you put new shoes on the table it is unlucky. "See a pin pick it up all that day you'll have good luck." Froth on a cup of tea is a sign of money. When people wash the sugar bowl it is a sign of a visitor that day. A tea leaf on a cup of tea is for a sweet heart. You are supposed to take it out and put it on the back of your hand and hit it with your other hand and say the days of the week. Whatever day it comes up you will
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 14:48
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an out house for good luck. Long ago witches came to the houses and if the people were churning they could take the butter off the churn so people kept a piece of iron under the churn to prevent them from doing so. On the last day of April and the first of May people tie red strings on the cows tails to keep away the witches. When people are calling horses they say 'show! show! When they are calling the hens they say chuck! chuck! and when they are calling the geese they say leg! leg. We say pee! pee to call the turkeys and wheet! wheet! to call the ducks. We say much! much or gurry! gurry! to call the pigs. It takes a month to hatch geese eggs, a month to hatch turkey eggs, a month to hatch duck eggs, and three weeks to hatch hen eggs. Some people put black dots on hatching eggs, and others put an x on them.
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 15:28
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We have a churn at home and it is about four feet wide. It is about to feet wide at the top and the same width at the bottom. The sides off our churn are round and it is about ten year old. There are many parts in the churn, the dash, the staff, the hoops, the body, the lid, the handles, the crib, and the cap. Butter is made four times a week in summer and two times a week in winter. At first the cows are milked, then the milk is strained into crocks and left there until it is thick. When the milk is thick the churn is scrubbed with cold water and a scrubbing brush. Afterwards is scalded with boiling water and left out in the fresh air for about ten minutes.
Then the milk is put in the churn and hot water is added to rise the temperature of the milk. The temperature of the milk is risen by the agitation of the dash up and down.
If strangers enter the house and the people are churning it is the customs for them to say "God bless the work" or "Good luck to the work" and take a brash in case they
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 15:15
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level of the floor of the byre is a manger from which the cows eat straw, ect. If the cows are fond of jumping across ditches the owner ties a spancel on their two front legs. This spancel is usually made of leather. Although these customes are now disappearing, some of them still exist:- such as leaving palm in the byre, leaving May flowers at door, or hanging a horse show above the door. The Foremilk is usually the weakest of the milk and the stiplings is the best part of it. These two milkings should be kept seperate and put in seperate vessels.
The stable is also a neatly white-washed place with a paved floor, a door, and some air-holes. the manger is raised well above the level of the floor and is made of wood. Men when driving horses in the cart say to the horse "go on" or "hop"; when driving horses in the plough they say "hop off" or "come up" or "get down 'er that. The horses are tied by halters, made of soft thick rope. The fodder which the horses get is hay and oats. In late Winter the horses are clipped by machine clippers and are shod by the blacksmith.
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 15:05
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A man in this district called Mc'Kenna dreamed three nights after one another about a crock of gold in the Worm Ditch. Mc'Kenna told this to a neighbour called Smith and both men started off to the place. They dug and dug for a long time until they came to a large flat stone. The stone was fixed firmly in the ground and Smith sent Mc'Kenna off to get a crowbar to lift the stone. Mc'Kenna went off to fetch the crowbar but when he came back the stone was lifted and Smith was gone. He is still believed around
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 15:02
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guided him home every night disappeared and only for a neighbour's house he would have been travelling all night. He went on till he met a person in the fields and said to him "show me the way home." and the other man says "where are you going to? The fellow says "to my own house". 'You are off your pad entirely" says the other fellow, "and if you go on like this you will get drowned in some lough." Then he turned to him and said "do you see the way home now"? and strange to say whatever was on his eyes before this disappeared and he saw the pad as straight as the main road. He got safely home.
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 14:58
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I mind the fellow this happened to myself. One night when he was coming home from his céididhe on a pad (path across fields) he knew well the night got dark and rain began to fall heavily and the night grew darker. The man was "bate" off his pad and the light which
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 14:53
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with the dogs. The dogs viewed the hare for a long time and strange to say the hare just kept a little in front of the dogs the whole time. The hare came to a bridge and went under it. The dogs came up as far as the bridge and began to bark and cry but would not gain. The men went in and there they saw the dead woman that they had been waking sitting on her hunkers.
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 14:51
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There lived a man around this district called Oiny Mac Caul. He was nicknamed Oiny Cawfel (Caulfield?) because his sister was married to a man called Cawfel and he used to spend most of his time in Caulfel's. Cawfel lived in Bnuakena. One night Mc'Caul went to a wake. It was a moonlight night and he proposed to go to hunt a nd so with a few others he went out with dogs. They were not far away from the house when they rose a hare. The dogs followed the hare. The huntsmen were smart and kept up
senior member (history)
2021-10-21 14:33
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The above stories and traditions (Page 135 to 137) were collected by Michael Moore from John Mac Donald of Tullyghlost*, Scotshouse, parish of Currin Co. Monaghan, on the night 6th January 1938. Mac Donald is about seventy four years of age and learned his stories from the old people who used to tell them round the fire in his father's house. He used to know many more stories but has now forgotten them. He is a small farmer and has lived in his native townland all his life. He was a great athlete in his early days and according to his own story he was able to jump 2 ft. 9 ins. with a six and fifty weight in each hand. He was also captain of Coppenagh football club in the early days of the G.A.A. in this district.
* Tullaghaloyst
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2021-10-21 14:19
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One first Sunday of August there was a big row at Maghera. After this the stone disappeared and never was seen since.
Maghera in olden days was a great place for faction fights. They used to take place between a crowd from Cavan and another one from Monaghan. It was after one of these that the stone disappeared.
senior member (history)
2021-10-19 15:07
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"sir" said Big Tom "Will you take this" pretending it was some tax or other and O'Hanlon shouted "Come in and put your hand to the pen" as if pretending to sign something and while he was in O'Hanlon said " 'Cap' and tie that sentry" and O'Hanlon shouted "Will you release Miss Smith". The sentry said "Yes I will and away went O'Hanlon and Big Tom to the wedding house.
By this time Graves was in Armagh and he went into an hotel along with the rest of the 'rigiment' to get provisions but the owner of the hotel said that he had nothing good enough for them. "Tip it here anyway" said Graves and when they had hung up their carbines in another room they began to eat and drink and make merry. When dinner was over they rested for awhile and in the meantime there passed a lame-minister up by and several remarks were passed on him. A while after this four men came in carrying a dying woman on on 'auld dure'. Shouts were made for a Protestant minister. By the way the woman was put into the room where the carbines were and soon the minister who had gone up before, come in and told the soldiers to keep quiet while he was attending her. He now ordered a kettle of boiling water and when he got it he put some of it down on the powder of the carbaines. When this done Graves marched off with his men and the minister said to them "I'll go with ye for I'd be catched by Redmond's men". They did not go far when they were attacked by Redmond's men and Capt. Graves was pulled down. The carabines did'nt go off. The shouted to Big Tom "Have you the cat o' nine tails with you". "Yes I have" said Big Tom. "Well" said the minister "strip this man and give him forty lashes - no more nor no less" This Big Tom did. Then the 13 soldiers of Redmond stripped the other soldiers of their uniforms and tied them to trees and lashed them. Redmond and his men them marched away having the uniforms and all with them. After this a reward was to be given to
senior member (history)
2021-10-19 14:56
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The English were at this time round Dundalk and near it there lived a very fine looking girl called Smith. The English officer found this out and went over to her house to try and get her to fall in love with her, but after a short conversation she took a sword from the wall and put him out with it. A short while after this Mc Mahon came matchmaking with the girl. Poro Bacus was telling about the 'chiverness' of Capt. Graves but Mc Mahon settled him. Mc Mahon's brother lay outside in the barn that night. Capt. Graves came that night with 12 horsemen and brought away the girl, a prisoner through the country and into the barracks. He just arrived in time as Redmond's men were after him. She was put in a lighted room but still and all she would not submit. When Mc Mahon was going home he met Redmond and Redmond demanded his money and Mc Mahon said "Get us here a test of strength first" and so they had but O'Hanlon tossed Mc Mahon several times. Mc Mahon then handed him a purse and told Redmond that his bride had been stolen by Capt. Graves but O'Hanlon said "I will get you her again" and he told him to be at a certain place on a certain night. Redmond wrote a letter to Capt. Graves in the handwriting of Capt. Lucas. The letter stated that O'Hanlon was lying injured in the mountains round Armagh and to come and capture him. This was to get all the soldiers away from the barracks.
All the soldiers went away and O'Hanlon and his men went to the barracks.
When he came to the man on guard he was asked "Who are you"
O'Hanlon = "I am Capt. Lucas."
Sentinel = "You are not."
O'Hanlon = "Yes I am. Do you not see the handwriting" presenting him with a letter. Big Tom was behind O'Hanlon and said "Will you take this" O'Hanlon said to the sentry "Is'nt Miss Smith here. I have great influence over women and so let me up" and he was let up.
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 14:28
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Redmond O'Hanlon lived in a cave in the Newry mountains and had 14 or 15 soldiers under him. He would not submit to the English. He used to go around and lift tithes or taxes from the people and anybody who did'nt give him something suffered the consequences. There was an 'auld' man called Poro Bacac and he was always giving away on Redmond to the English
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 14:18
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save me 'ill get me in marriage. 'Leve' your head upon 'me' knee until I see how many seconds I have to live" She then took out a silver pair of scissors, clipped a hair out of his head and rolled it up in a small piece of paper and put it in he breast. When that was done the 'say' dragon came. The young man mounted his steed of swiftness. The waves come rolling like mountains; he leaped from his steed to the dragons back. The dragon put up his head to toss him but he his his neck until the sword and killed it. The 'say' come flowing out to where the princess was, and it red with blood. That all the sons of the kings were saying 'It was 'me' that saved her" The fair princess prepared a very large dinner and asked all the gentry from miles and miles around to attend it and so they did. When they had all off their hats and taking their dinner she was walking around examining everybody hair until she recognised the man's hair as being the very colour of the grain which she had. She then placed it in among the rest of his hair and it immediately took root and grew. The young man seeing this greeped her had and they went off and got married.
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 14:11
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awaiting decision
lead hit the other head and the 2 heads rolled off, and then the giant cried out "Spare my life, spare my life and I will give you all about my castle." The giant gave him a cloak of darkness whereby he could go from one place to another without being seen. He drove the sheep home and when one of them was killed it weighed 3 lbs. heavier than the one which was killed the night 'afore'. At this time there used to come a big dragon and he ate a fair princess every year and the man that would slay the dragon 'id' get the fair princess in marriage. When he came home the gentleman said to him "I'm afeard there is 'could' blood in you or else 'yid' be away trying to save the fair princess." So away he went the next morning and drove the sheep to a giant's castle and put his shoulder to the wall and levelled it, as before. They were not long here until down come a giant with six heads and said "A dirty Briar Cruck you have killed my brother and 'tuk' all he had. I will grind you between my finger and thumb and I will snuff you up for snuff." "Be easy" said the young man "until you shall have a step of a dance" He then blew his whistle and all the birds fell down dead. Then they started to dance and while they were dancing one head knocked the other off until only one head stayed on and it was bent. "Spare my life! Spare my life! and I will give you all about my castle." so the giant gave him a steed of swiftness and a sword that was never defeated. The young man then came home and when one of the sheep was killed it weighed 7 lbs. more than the one killed the night 'afore'. The gentleman said to him "I'm afeared there is could blood in you or else 'yid' be away trying to save the fair princess." The next morning he got on his steed, put on his cloak of darkness and tired the sword to the saddle and started off. He soon arrived to where she was strapped to a chair beside the 'say'. She was crying and he asked her what was the matter with her. "Of 'coarse' " she said "you k
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 13:57
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awaiting decision
Once there lived together and 'auld' pair and an adopted son. They were very good to him and he got plenty to 'ate' and drink and he was growing very big and sturdy. 'Wan' day 'auld' Molly Mac Givern the beggar-woman came round and she says to the woman "I Think you should get rid of him because when he gets up he will put you and the 'auld' fellow out to the road." "how would I do that" says the woman. "Bedad!" says Molly "if Tom Mac Cavon was going round and you gave him a good feed he would 'lave' him in the wood for you" Just at that minute Tom happened to be passing by. They took him in and gave him a good feed and he left the adopted son in the wood. Gentleman were out hunting the same day and the hounds came up to him but they did not touch him and 'wan' of the gentlemen lifted him up and said there must be royal blood in him or else the hounds would have 'ate' him. The gentleman took him up to his castle and reared him until he was a big man. The herds-man who was herding the sheep was a bad 'wan' and the sheep 'was' poor. The young man said "I will heard the sheep." Of course he was well prepared. The saddl-maker gave him a whistle that when he would blow it all the birds of the air would drop down dead. He also got a belt that when he would wear it he would be as strong as forty. This he went out to herd the sheep. He brought them as far as a giants 'domain' which was all surrounded by a big wall. He put his shoulder to the wall and levelled it and he drove the sheep into a field. Then came a big giant with 3 heads and every time he would breath in the man 'id' be pulled in towards him and every time he'd breathe out he'd blow the young man way from him. The young man said to him 'be quiet, until we have a step of a dance" so the giant began to dance but one
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 13:56
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Once upon a time there was a man coming home from his céilidh and he had to pass by Drumcor Lough which lies a couple of miles from Redhills between Cavan and Monaghan. As he was passing by he saw two water-horses drinking out of the Lough. He went over to them but they went back into the Lough and began to swim. Then they looked like two big eels.
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 13:16
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offered him £50 but Manus said he would not take £100 for it. He then bought several lumps of brass like the lump of 'gould' and bedad the next shop he went into he handed the boss the lump of 'gould' and asked what would he buy it for. The boss said so much, but Manus refused and took back the 'gould'. By and by they came to a bargin' but Manus gave the boss the brass and then slipped out. In this way he made his fortune. He was now very rich and once when he was in Wexford a man named Toner said that he would buy the 'gould'. He came to Manus and while they were making a bargain Manus said "It'll not be a dry bargin' " Manus got a bottle of rectified spirits and Toner took five glasses and Manus one. Toner got drunk and did not sober for 3 days. When he came 'to' he found that Manus had robbed him of all his money. Manus had now his fortune made and all his children married persons of royalty.
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 13:10
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remembered that they had forgotten a very particular book. They told the next men and so on until the last man heard it and they were able to to get the book and take it away with them.
(III)
Coming on to Christmas the town (Clones) was in poverty. There was one man named Manus Mac Neill who lived beside the rath in a small thatched mud-wall cabin. He had a lovely little wife three daughters and six sons. On Christmas Eve he had not a morsel in the house. He went to the rath and threw himself down on his mouth and nose and he lay there in a bad state. When he was a wee while there, a wee man with a hand-mill came up to him and said to him "Go home, spread sheets on the floor, turn the hand-mill and it will give you lots of 'mail'; but you are to tell no one how you got this mill." Home Manus goes, spreads the sheets on the floor and sets the wee mill in the centre and turns away at the handle until he had all the bags in the house filled. His wife, however, was not content because she did not know where the mill came from. "You do not love me as much as you did" she said. One fine day the next Summer she dressed up in a 'shoot' of her best, put on her blue cloak and said that she was leaving. He let her out so far as the door but when he saw her auburn hair waving and her blue eyes it melted his heart and he told her where he had got it but after that the mill would work no more.
By this time, nearly all the 'mail' had run out and so he got a spade and started digging up the rath. He was not long digging until he came at a bump of 'gould'. He fetched it away to a blacksmith to see what it was and he was stold that it was pure 'gould'. The blacksmith
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 12:58
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(1)
Once upon a time there was a musical choir a teaching at Newbliss. A young man called Doherty was a band-boy a teaching in it and during the singing of a tune called the 'Orange Feather' the band-master was always at him saying "Doherty sound your 'A' 's. When the practise was over and Doherty was coming home he as attacked by a large number of fairies and they all shouting at him "Doherty sound your "l's", Doherty sound your "A's" and they dragged him over hedges and ditches, A man, the name of William Hall heard the noise and went out with his gun on his shoulder to see what was the matter. Immediately a charge of calvalry came down the field and defeated Hall. By this time Doherty had got a 'hault' of a lone bush. The shouts were now so loud that Hall came out again and fired a shot. When the fairies saw the light they went away. There never came any buds on the tree that Doherty got a "hault" of. Doherty was taken to Drum and he had to be strapped to a table while the doct pulled the thorns out of him.
This is a true story as John Patterson saw the the doctor picking the thorns out of him.
(1)
Long ago Clones was a noted place for 'larning'. There was an abbey and round-tower at it and they stretches from where the round-tower is to the calf-market (Analore Str.). At that time there was water all-around Clones. When it fell into the hands of the invaders the students had to leave and they marched 2 days until they came to Cummer (Cumber). Then the first two
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 12:41
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Jack O'Hara was coming home from the battle of Ballinamuck with his pike across his shoulder and at a sudden turn in the road he was accosted by five yeomen and the fetched him away to their headman's house. The headman was not at home but his wife was and on seeing O'Hara she took pity on him. She gave him a mug of sweet milk and a piece of oaten bread. The five yeomen held consultation and they decided that they that they would shoot him themselves. One of them said to him "you man eat that quick for its the last bit you'll ever eat." Says O'Hara "If it is I'll pitch it on the flure." The yeomen then took him away to the yard to shoot him. They place him on a chair and one of the yeomen held his hand where he was sitting. Before he was to be shot a hankie was to be waved three times. Hardly was the third wave given when Jack leaped up shoved the yeoman into the chair. He jumped the wall and away with him and he lived about Ballinamuck for remainder of his life.
"So Jack O'Hara brish and bold,
You often heard this story told,
How he did so gallantly display,
At Ballinamuck the battle-day"
(Vid. P. 100 for continuation of these)
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 12:28
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with him?" says Mickey. "He had" says the priest. "Well" says Micky "Ill give you nothing for the mass for if he had the blackthorn stick with him he could bate the divil himself".
senior member (history)
2021-10-18 12:27
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In the parish of Raragh in the county of Cavan there lived a father and two sons together. The father died and about the same time there came a young curate to the parish. When the father was dead about a month the two sons invited the young priest to come and say the month's mind mass in the house. The priest promised and came. When the priest came there was a son and a litter of pigs on flure. Of course the priest asked them if there w as anybody there able to serve mass and says Micky. "There is. I think I can serve." When mass was over says Micky to the priest. "Did you see him (my father) in the Mass?" "I did says the priest "and had he the blackthorn
senior member (history)
2021-10-15 15:11
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long look at the man saying "that is a very beautiful lady you have with you." He went up and told his wife that their daughter was down in the shop if ever they had one and told her to go down and see her. She came down to them with a drink and said to the man that the girl was her daughter if ever she had one. The man told them how he got her the day and date. And says the hotel man "that is the very day our daughter died. They all then consulted together and as a result the young man and woman got married and got the hotel.
senior member (history)
2021-10-15 15:07
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Billy would come there on his white ass and he would always begin the dance by a bar of "[?] Halls". The women would have their hats "tallied" to be there, and the boys and girls, brothers and sisters would come there dressed in their plain home made Irish clothes and Irish-made light boots. When they would reach the dance house the old Irish word was not forgotten "God save all here." There were no foreign dances then all Irish ones reels, hornpipes and petticotees. Billy at certain times would get drink at the dance and when a row would start Billy and the fiddle would be tossed "[?]. When they would have tired themselves they would lift Billy up and put him in the armchair. Billy would then try the case and settle it never more to be spoke of. Billy of course lived very poor and for a long time he couldnt get a fourfooted beast to live with him. One morning in June Billy rose and looked out through the window, and what did he see but a fine roaring springing heifer on the sheet. Billy thought it was some stray one so he published the news all around but he could never get an owner for it. Billy kept it and she had a heifer calf. That calf became a cow and from that day till he died Billy never wanted. Of course the cow was given to him by the fairies.
senior member (history)
2021-10-15 14:45
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Billy Williamson was born in 1802 near Crossreagh fort in the parish of Killeevan. The fashion at that time was to leave the tongs across the cradle on going out. When Billy was three months old his mother went out of the kitchen and she forgot to put the tongs across the cradle. When she came back the child was rolled up like a little ball in the cradle crying and from that day on Billy's legs never got any bigger that a baby's but the rest of his body did and he had as fine a looking body as you could see. When Billy was ten years old he took on to play the violin and he soon became a gifted musicianer. There never was a dance but Billy was there to play the fiddle.
senior member (history)
2021-10-15 14:40
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the robber "I have no more bullets left." and immediately then the man drew out his own pistol and says he to the robber "The money or your life". The robber handed up the money and the man got safely away.
senior member (history)
2021-10-15 14:39
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On early times there used to be highway robbers. One time a man was carrying home money for the landlord, the rent. When he was coming along this dark road all of a sudden didnt a robber step out and demanded the money off him. the Robber said "Your money or your life." and the man says "Oh! sir how could I give away the gentleman's money?" says he to the robber "would you put a bullet through my shirt so that I will be able to tell the gentleman that I made a stand of the money." "Yes I will" says the robber. Pulling up one end of his coat the man says "put a bullet through this " and lifting up the other end said the same. And also says he lifting up his coat again "put a bullet through that". "Begorra" says
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 17:58
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down goes the door on top of them and away the robbers fled in all directions for they thought it was vengeance from heaven was coming on them for the wicked deed. So Jack and Tom came down, got the gold, paid the gentleman for the lamed cattle and lived happily with him ever after.
Phrase "Pull door after you" means simply in this district "Shut the door".
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 17:55
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lave it". "Faith" says Tom, "an' Ill lave it too". and away they went. They walked until night came on and when it was dark they went into an ould house, which seemed very like a gentleman's place, but there was nobody in it. They spent a while here and were talking to one another until they came to the conclusion that the house might be filled with ghosts. So they made up their minds to "lave" it. When they were leaving it says Jack to Tom "pull the door after you". On they went but when Jack looked back he saw Tom dragging the door after him. Jack says "What did you bring the door with you for?" "Oh!" says Tom "didnt you tell me to pull it after me". So on they went anyhow until they came to a thick forest and in it there were great thick trees. They were afraid that the forest might be filled with wild animals. Both of them climbed up a tree and pulled the dure after them and fixed it to lie on and soon were asleep. In the middle of the night there came a batch of robbers who were after making a seizure and they just sat down in under the tree. They soon lit a fire and were counting the money in heap-fuls. This awakened Tom and Jack and says Tom "Ill throw down the door on them". "Do not; do you want me to be killed?" says Jack. "Here goes" says Tom and
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 17:48
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There were two fellas herding for a gentleman, Jack and Tom their names. They were out fencing this morning before the cattle - a lovely bright sunny morning. Says Jack to Tom "Go and get my breakfast." Tom started for home and when he was coming back with Jack's breakfast he looked behind and saw a man following him all the time. Tom took pity on him and threw a bit of Jack's breakfast to him. He kept doing this and in a short time he had it all thrown away to him. When he arrived at the place where Jack was says Jack to him "When is my breakfast" but Tom said "there was a man following me all the way and he seemed to be very hungry as I took pity on him and threw a little bit now and again to him until I found it was all gone. "Ye fool ye" says Jack "that was your shadow. Anyhow mind these cattle until I come back for I am going home to get my hatchet to cut a bush and stop them from coming out. Jack comes back after a while and says to Tom "did the cattle go anywhere?" "Faith Ill warrant you they didnt" says Tom. "And what did you do with them?" says Jack. "I boughed them" says Tom. "Oh!" says Jack, "I may lave the country, I may lave the country, and I will
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 17:39
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cursing and complaining of Adam and Eve. "Well" says the gentleman for whom he was working "come up to my castle and I'll give you a good time." The gentleman fetched him into a big room and there were all sorts of things in it and he was tould he could make used of everything except a dish which was in the middle of the table. He was going about with a silk umbrella whenever he wanted one and was better dressed than the gentleman himself. When he was about three months with the gentleman this day he had a fine dinner but he was not contented. He wanted to see what was in the dish on the centre of the table. He said to himself "It will be no harm if I lift the lid and see what is in it. He lifted the lid and immediately there jumped out a white mouse and it began to run all through the room. The man ran after it and nearly pulled down everything in the room to try and get it but he could not lay his hand on it. The gentleman heard the noise and he came into the room and said to the man "You are as bad as Adam and Eve. I'll strip you of your grand clothes and send you out to earn your bread by the sweat of your brow"
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 17:33
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Once upon a time there was a poor man and he was working very hard but was still
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 14:34
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Jack"? "The same as yourself" says Jack. That was of course nine quarts of boxty pudding ". Jack ate away and ate away. He was low of the chin and every other mouthful he took, he had a leather bag under his chin, and dropped it into it. When the dishes were cleaned says Jack to the giant "Ill show you a trick now." so he lifted a butchers knife, ripped the bag and let all the boxty pudding out. "Ha!" says the giant "anyone could do that" and with that he lifted the butcher's knife letting out his whole insides. So Jack made his home there in the giant's castle and lived there till he died.
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 14:31
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'Wan' time there was another giant so Jack went to see him. Jack came to the 'divie', raps and the giant shouts "whose there." Jack shouts - "Jack! Jack. "Your welcome Jack" says the giant "and come in. The giant asked him what supper he would have and Jack said "Whatever you are taking yourself" "Ill take nine quarts of boxty pudding" and of course Jack tak' the same. After the maid showed Jack a bed to lie down on in the room. Jack wasnt long in bed until he became suspicious and so he listened at the "dure" and heard the giant saying
"Although he sleeps there the night
He ne'er shall see the morning light
But with my club I'll knock out his brains quite."
Jack was in a bad way and did not know what to do so he searched and searched the room and at last he got a block of a stick and he placed this block on the bed and lay under the bed himself. In the middle of the night the giant came down with his club and gave as he thought several blows so that he thought he had every bone in Jack's body broken. When morning came Jack rapped at the door. "Hah!" says the giant "did you find anything last night?" "Yes" says Jack, says he, "A rat came up and gave me several tips of with her tail." "Well" says the giant, "what kind of a breakfast will you have
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 14:02
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"strappel" his butcher knife and and went down to the room to where the dead men were lying and started to look for a fat piece and [?] didn't he cut the hip off poor Jack and Jack could hear him frying it on the spit. The good 'oul' maid came and dressed up Jack's wound. Whe the giant had the feed taken it was no time till he fell asleep in his armchair. Jack 'ris' and went up to the kitchen and put the poker in the fire and when it was hot he stick it into the eye of the 'oul' giant. and away went Jack and the giant up and out after him. The giant had a ring and whenever he would throw it and it 'is' light it'rd say "Here I am" "Here I am". He threw it now and it stuck on Jack's big toe and it shouted "Here I am" "Here I am". Jack was in a bad way and after thinking over for awhile he cut off the big toe and threw it into the 'say'. The ring kept shouting "Here I am" "Here I am, I have him by the big toe." The giant rushed into the 'say' and was drowned and Jack got off safe.
Jack was now being heard tell of, so a giant invited him to his mansion one day. Jack went in this day and says the giant to Jack "Now are you Jack." ___ The giant then took Jack by the shoulder and lifted him and locked him in a room upstairs. He then went away for three of his brothers in order that they would have the satisfaction of killing Jack. Jack did not know what to do; he searched through the room and at last came at a led tether. Jack made a "dull" of it and when he saw the giants coming through the gate (the gate was under Jack's room) he let down the rope and caught them by their necks and began to pull with all his might and main. He then slid down the tether and when he came down they were pale in the face (dead).
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 13:48
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"Wan" there was a fierce giant and he had an eye in the middle of his forehead, and he carried away man and beast and for hogs and sheep, he strung them to his belt like a bunch of bandoleers. Jack thought that he would go and see him this day but when Jack arrived the giant was not at home. Jack went in and in a short time the house-maid heard him coming and shouted to Jack "There he comes". "What will I do" says Jack. "Go up and take off yourself and lie in the room with the dead men," says the maid. Jack went up and lay down. When the giant had got his mead he complained to the maid that she didn't make him enough. He
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 13:44
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"Wan" time there lived a weaver at Dunleek in a dilapidated house. His mother called him in one morning to his breakfast and the skillet of stirabout was covered over with flies. He lifted his hand and hit them down, killing four score and ten with one blow. He says to himself "I'll never weave anymore." He went and took the lid of the skillet for a breastplate and then wrote on it "I am the best of all men. I can kill four score and ten with one blow." He put the skillet on his head for a hat and the pothooks under his chin, and out he starts for the road. He travelled on until he came to a gentleman's place and in the vicinity there lived a dragon which was taking all about the gentleman's place, and he profited a peck of "gould" to the weaver if he would kill the dragon. The dragon and him fought until the dragon threw him up on the tree and the branches were that thick that the dragon couldi'nt get up after him, and the dragon would say "You may as well come down for I'll stay here till morning until I eat you," I'll not go down I'll not go down" shouted the weaver. The dragon
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 13:30
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(b) I mind well the ould school down where Boyle's place now is (i.e. house now belonging to Madden on right hand side of road to Clones in Annies) In my time Katty Mac Mahon taught there and before her a man called Monahan was teachin in it but he was dead before my time. Miss Mac'Mahon taught and lived in one room an' the other room belonged to Monahans. It was a wee thatched house and the scholars used to pay a penny or tuppence every week. There used to be about 30 scholars some of them from as far as Connons the Greggs and Mc'Cabes. The book we read were Mansfield's Universals. We learned spelling and each day the bed-boy and girl were made king and queen. We used to be working at crooks and potsticks (?). The mistress had a big rod and she used to welt us along the leg if we didnt' know our things. One mornin' when we came down ould Monahan had her furniture thrown out and after that all the name he got was "Bailiff" Monahan. That put an end to Miss Mc'Mahon's teaching in Annies. Our people didnt' like to send us to Killyfargy National School at the time because it was a mixed school and the clergy didnt
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 13:22
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(a) The last hedge school-master I mind was Peter Ursen of Cavony. He taught in a thatched mudwall cabin just inside Mc'Kernan's lane (1935). The site was immediately below the road and in wet weather was often flooded. From ten to twelve scholars used to attend an' I was one of them. We read out of the "Universal" books and many a time I was sent out to the hedge to cut a pointer. Most of us brought a creepy stool to sit on but others just sat on a stone with a bag on it. Jordans, Martins and Molloys were the chief onewsw who attended it.
Peter himself was a small little man inclined to drink too much and very often went to Cootehill fair.
senior member (history)
2021-10-14 13:12
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The night before my son Paddy went to America we had all the neighbours in our house and among them was Ned Gregg from across the river. When Gregg was going home I went with him and rowed him across the river in a boat. When I was returning I saw a girl just before me on the bank. She began to run on but I passed no remarks but went on. When I came as far as the foot of Maguires Brae I saw the girl again still running and she was crying and keening. She ran away down the lane. I didnt pass much remarks about it because I thought it was one of the ceíhdlers in my own house trying to scare me. When I went home I mention this but none of them had been out. It must have been a ghost or a banshee.
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 15:07
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you couldnt see him going past the house but when he had gone passed you could see the shadow of him over the road. The sound of his step was as if you were hitting the heel of your boot against the Road. One night the Mac Keirnans of Corconnolly shouted when the thing was going past "come in for a céilidh". The thing came in, smashed everything in the kitchen, (they couldnt see him) and then they could find it getting into one of the beds. The priest was sent for and he banished it into Corconnolly Lake.
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:57
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not long after than I got word telling me to go to another Fenian meeting. A person delivered this to me They were afraid to write a note in case it might be opened on the way by officials. During this meeting I was applauded for what I had done at the Scotshouse meeting because the gentleman was no other than one of the Mddens of Springrove. He had been appointed by the government to come there and find out all about the society and its members and Mac Cabe and Young Murphy (master Murphy's son) were the principal headmen around here (Drum side). The Fenians were afterwards suppressed.
The landlord of this townland was Westenia of Monaghan. William Brownlow was a bailiff of his. Dunwoody was an official of his. Dunwoody was a cruel brute.
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:43
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One day a meeting of the Fenians was called for Scotshouse. Everyone of the Fenians that were in the district attended and the parlour of the meeting house was full to the door. The gentleman who came to address the meeting was of very fine appearance and very well built. He spoke and when he was a while speaking he said that he wanted the name of every man that was in the society and intending members. I immediately stood up and objected and my motion was seconded in quick time. The crowd was that big that we couldnt get sitting down again. Some did not agree with me and then began a buffing match and the gentleman was thankful to get away with his life.
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:38
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pikemen advance. Madden grew afraid. He then presented terms to Mac Mahon if he would dismiss the crowd. Mac Mahon did this. When Madden thought the men were a good distance away he captured some of the Catholics. Mac Mahon then immediately sound his horn again and in less than an hour all his men were back again. He told Madden to release the captives or he would be arrested himself. Madden did release them.
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:35
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The country around here used to be a great place for Protestants and yeomen. At this time they were giving a lot of trouble. One of the Mac Mahons raised a kind of army on Horny Hill outside Scotshouse and as he was in need of men as his enemies were attacking him he sounded his horn on this hill in order to bring in other detachments. He sounded it three times. Immediately another was sounded in return showing that men were being sent on. In about three hours there came a detachment from Granaid and they formed up in line of battle. Madden heard this and determined to put a stop to it and came to Horny Hill and told Mac Mahon to dismiss them. But the Mac Mahon replied "bring up the carbines and let the
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:27
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In old times there was a school in Laurelhill not where Laurelhill N.S. now stands but where [?] Murphy has his byre. The teacher of it was a Master Murphy of Drumhilla. He lived in a house now in ruins
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:24
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house. He took a glass himself and gave the other man a couple and Mr. Codd soon became drunk. When he was drunk Minister Philip threw him out of this house and left him lying on the road. He also put on notice on him and wrote on it "this is Mr Codd who became drunk." I cant recall just what was written on it. Anyhow the bishop found Mr. Codd lying in this way. So he immediately dismissed him and appointed minister Philip in his place
II
Minister Philip didnt like the excise men. He hated them. One day Philip was out fishing and he was not long fishing until he saw an excise-man coming and immediately he began pulling in his rod and splashing it out again. He did this to attract the attention of the excise-man. Says the excise man to Philip "What are you doing Philip?"
"Sm fishin' for the divil" says Philip.
"And what bait have you on"? says the excise-man.
"I have on an excise-man" says Philip.
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:17
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hours before he'd come and maybe some Sundays he wouldnt come near the church at all. The bishop heard about this so one Sunday morning he came to Philip's house and there to his surprise he saw Philip playing the fiddle like egood one. The bishop became astonished and asked Philip for an explanation. Philip said he was scarce of money and that the children had'nt a bit to eat and they were crying with hunger. So to pacify them and keep them quiet before he'd go to church he played the fiddle and this put them in good form and kept them from crying. The bishop thought it a pity of Philip so he raised his salary.
The bishop then went away but reports came to him again about Philip. The bishop came along and caught Philip at the same thing again but let him off but gave his a going over. The bishop went away thinking Philip would be a better man in future. The following Sunday came but Philip didnt turn up and this went on for a few Sundays until the Bishop himself came along and dismissed Philip and appointed in his place a Mr. Codd. When Philip heard this he invited over Mr. Codd and pretended to be awfully well pleased that Mr. Codd had got the job and so he said he would drink good health to Mr. Codd. Philip happened to have some strong rectified spirit in the
senior member (history)
2021-10-07 14:08
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Minister Philip was at first a priest but he turned to be a Protestant minister because he thought it was a more profitable job. He then got married and had a large family. He got a job as a minister but Philip was lazy and didnt want to work and every Sunday he would keep the people waiting for
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 14:16
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When {Eoghan} Owen Roe O'Neill came to Ireland he trained 7,000 men for nine months. When he had these trained he set out for the south and was met by Stewart, the English leader at Malnavonagh mill. Stewart had placed his his cavalry on the hill before the mill. Owen sent out ten of his men and they were all cut down; ten more were also cut down. Owen then placed soldiers behind the hedges and on both sides of the road. He then sent out ten more pikemen and they were all cut down to three but the men in ambush slew a good many English. The real battle now began and a hand to hand now took place. It was fought Mrs. Jackson's field (1938) to Gr ___ of Newtownbutler Rd (1938). Owen now heard that his baggage but he said that he would not give a man to recapture. He marched back again to Belturbet {my mother's fore father was there - Conner Maguire}. X In Clones there is a holy well at the back of the fort. It was named St. Tierney's well and in those days it was the custom for any young person who were going abroad to join a foreign army to wash their head in it. If they did this they were always sure of returning safe. One time five or six young men were leaving to join a foreign legion. They were all Catholics except one Protestant. The Catholics as was customary washed their heads in the well. The Protestant refused to wash his because he said it was only foolish and then he laughed at them. Then the Catholics lifted him by the heels and managed to did one-half of his face in the well. The men went off and the Catholics returned safe but the Protestant fellow had half his face shot off. The safe half was that one which had been dipped in the well. {This, the narrator declared to be a 'fact'}. The well
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 14:12
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note and shortly before his death he taught music. Also before his death he started business as a shoemaker. He lived somewhere about Newbliss.
There is supposed to be the remains of an old graveyard in Hilton near the ashwood i.e. beside the Lake.
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 14:08
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as fighting men but as shovel shaft menders, and boot-makers to Cummen where they settled down. One of the disbanded men of Coole's brigade or any was given Corkimmons. He was from Amagh. When he got the property he came here to see it. He called at Knights place but owing to a flood being on the river he was unable to cross it. There was no bridge over the Finn at the time. The Knights told him the land in Corkimmons was no good - it was nothing but bog and shrubs and briars. The man believed this story and was anxious to get rid of the land. The Knights had a great white horse and as every officer at that time was anxious to have a white steed he took it for the land. So that is how the Knights came to get Corkimmons. When they came first they lived in huts.
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 14:02
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Billy was a fiddler and was a fine build of a fella and was in every way a fine specimen of nature but for his legs. His legs never became any bigger that those of a baby. It was nature left him this way. He was a very good fiddler and was at all the dances around. He used to ride about on an ass and used to ride into every shop and house he entered. He played the fiddle by air but shortly later he learned it by
(vid. P. 100)
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 13:57
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woman called Freeman also owned another one. She used to wear a long cloak that used to touch her heels. The fair generally lasted a week and it always ended up with a fight - the victors pushing back the defeated as far as Lisabuck Lake. There the victors would wash the defeated. It is not so long ago since the fair was held there.
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 13:28
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The Cullough is said to have had eight daughters and three sons. Two of the sons became priests and later bishops. One of them went to Connacht and the other to the south of Ireland. Many of his daughters married Protestants.
One of them married a man called Crowe and as a dowry Cullough gave to Crowe the townland of Dunsrim. The Crowes later on lost it and a Presbyterian family got it who though they were Presbyterians were great rebels. There were good soldiers.
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 13:09
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The school teacher used to go about from house to house teaching in one place for about 3 weeks. Pat [?] had a little shop and also a school. There were piles of stones and round timber resting on these for desks. He himself could write very well.
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 13:01
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Pat Maguire (grandfather of the narrator on his mother's side - he was probably from Clonmackin {near Clontivern} - the narrator {1938} has their farm now) was the captain of the United Irishmen around here. He marched to Lisburn and the journey took him 3 weeks. {the narrator here mentioned that Maguire was courtmartialled eleven times and escaped each time but that is rather doubtful} He with his soldiers marched to Lisburn and slept there. He was then told to watch a certain pass. He drew up his men and had just fixed the pikemen when the English cavalry came and a battle took place. The English were not able to pass but they got by another pass. Before the battle commenced my grandfather spoke to his men in Irish and English. He told the Catholics to invoke the Blessed Virgin and six men only, knelt down to pray
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 12:43
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There were never many Fenians around here because there was another society here called "The Ribbonmen" and these never let the Fenians go ahead. The principal Ribbonman here was James Mc.Cabe - probably from Manorwaterhouse (writer's note)
senior member (history)
2021-10-05 12:40
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When {Eoghan} Owen Roe O'Neill came to Ireland he trained 7,000 men for nine months. When he had these trained he set out for the south and was met by Stewart, the English leader at Malnavonagh mill. Stewart had placed his his cavalry on the hill before the mill. Owen sent out ten of his men and they were all cut down; ten more were also cut down. Owen then placed soldiers behind the hedges and on both sides of the road. He then sent out ten more pikemen and they were all cut down to three but the men in ambush slew a good many English. The real battle now began and a hand to hand now took place. It was fought Mrs. Jackson's field (1938) to Gr ___ of Newtownbutler Rd (1938). Owen now heard that his baggage but he said that he would not give a man to recapture. He marched back again to [?] {my mother's fore father was there - Conner Maguire}. X In Clones there is a holy well at the back of the fort. It was named St. Tierney's well and in those days it was the custom for any young person who were going abroad to join a foreign army to wash their head in it. If they did this they were always sure of returning safe. One time five or six young men were leaving to join a foreign legion. They were all Catholics except one Protestant. The Catholics as was customary washed their heads in the well. The Protestant refused to wash his because he said it was only foolish and then he laughed at them. Then the Catholics lifted him by the heels and managed to did one-half of his face in the well. The men went off and the Catholics returned safe but the Protestant fellow had half his face shot off. The safe half was that one which had been dipped in the well. {This, the narrator declared to be a 'fact'}. The well
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:54
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James Smyth of Corrachan and Micky Mac Donald of Dungonnon (where Boylans now have land, 1938) were the first men that started the Fenians round here. There came a detective around here and he was sent to capture the leaders. I was in the Fenians at the time and one day he called me over and said to me "your are a fine big boy and has plenty of sense and tell those two boys to get out of the country as quick as anything. I am only doing what I have been ordered to do and if I dont catch them, well somebody else will, and when they are leaving tell them to go by Newbliss and not to go by Clones." I missed auld Rice coming here to organise the Fenians. He came to Clerkins'. I was put as a watchboy. He held a meeting in a room in Clerkins (in Scotshouse; they were millers and are still there but the mill is in ruins). This polis (police) come and Rice had only time to get out on the back door and
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:44
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Master Brady was a teacher in Laurelhill national school. He had a row with the P.P. (Fr. Mc'Kenna) and he got the run. He set up a hedge school where Mich Cann's (Sheáin) lane now is (1938) and taught there for a long time. He was a well educated man and knew Latin and Greek and taught Latin to his scholars. Mich Cann (O'Reilly) is a friend of his.
N.B. The O'Reillys of See were known as Canns. Mich Cann, Johnny Cann etc. The nickname probably comes form Seán. i.e. Mich Sheáin (John's Mich etc.)
Peter Ursen taught a hedge school in Cavany. (vid. P. 113)
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:38
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The principal teachers in Killyfargy N.S. as far back as I mind were
(I) Master Ed. Murphy (ob. 1870 aged 76 years - From headstone).
(II) Master Braedon.
(III) Master Gimmely
(4) Master Heuston
(5) Master Mac Adam (1881 - 1904)
(6) Master Farmer (1904 - 1915)
(7) Master Moore (1915 - 1)
(N.B. these dates were not given by narrator - Seámus P. Ó Mórdha)
Master Gimmely did not like the assistant he had and he used to put the scholars up to call her
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:37
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names. The assistant at the time was one Mrs. O'Harte.
The parish priests of Carrin as far back as I know were
(1) Fr. Mac Kenna
(2) Fr. Donnelly
(3) Fr. Meehan
(4) Fr. Mc Elroy (1889 - 1908)
(5) Fr. Brennan (1908 - 12)
(6) Fr. Breen (1912 - 30)
(7) Fr. Mc'[?] (1930 - )
(N.B.) (Dates not given by narrator).
Where the priests' house now is situated (1938) there used to be a thatched house. Master Mac Adam bought it off Fr. Donnelly for £100.
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:27
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The principal teachers in Killyfargy N.S. as far back as I mind were
(I) Master Ed. Murphy (ob. 1870 aged 76 years - From headstone).
(II) Master Braedon.
(III) Master Gimmely
(4) Master Heuston
(5) Master Mac Adam (1881 - 1904)
(6) Master Farmer (1904 - 1915)
(7) Master Moore (1915 - 1)
(N.B. these dates were not given by narrator - Seámus P. Ó [?] )
Master Gimmely did not like the assistant he had and he used to put the scholars up to call her
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:14
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goodnight. "We see you are going to Monaghan with your pig" says they. "You are going far too early. You should go back and lie another hour in bed. Ask plenty for the pig for if you dont you will get a bad price for it for those Monaghan people are tricky." He went on a bit farther and met the ones who were at the end of the crowd and they bid (bade) him goodnight and told Harry that he would get a great price for his pig in Monaghan. Then when he left them they all began to cheer and laugh. When he when to the market he got a great price for his pig, better than he ever got before.
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:11
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flourish after that. I myself mind seeing the sithewood in Maguire's. after leaving Maguires the wee woman went to Mc'Keirnan's and she told the Mc'Keirnans "you have a boy here that will rob the church" and this did happen as one of the Mac Keirnans did stole money from the chapel. After leaving Mac Kernan's she went on to a house where the Sharkeys were living and she told them that they would become paupers and at the present day there is no trace of the Sharkeys. They got out of their land. After tellin' the Sharkey's their fate she went on to Fitzgeralds of Ferney Hill and she told they "You are Catholics but not very good ones and you will not be true ones". Her saying again came true as the Fitzgeralds lost their religion and went over to the Protestant church.
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 12:01
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One time Harry the Rocks (Smyth) killed a pig and brought it to Monaghan market. He could not read the clock, and anyway they hadnt many of them them times, and so he started off about 11 or 13 o clock at night. When he was going over Knock Brae or Victory Brae now (1938) he met the wee people and a funeral of corpses. They stretched about half a mile. When he met them they all shouted "How are you Harry" and bade him
senior member (history)
2021-10-03 11:58
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One time the Maguires of Chincorn were building a byre. When they were building the byre a wee woman with a red cape came to Maguire's home and asked a drink off Maura (the woman of the house). Maura gave her sweet milk to drink after a while she (the wee woman) said "I see you are building a byre, but it is being built on our pod (rath)". Then she showed her where they should build it. She gave Maura a bit of sithewood and she said to Maura "As long as you will keep this sithewood you will flourish." And right enough the Maguires did
senior member (history)
2021-09-30 15:32
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started to batter and beat Terry; but Terry was strong and held his own and again he escaped and he was never seen after. As far as I know he went to Scotland and was murdered there.
The men that did raise Bourke were two in number; (I) a granduncle of Peter Reilly that used to have the shop in Clones-Diamond - I think his name was Charlie; (II) Shiels - a brother in law of Reilly; he is not that long dead. When he was dying he sent for me and he told me to tell my father that it was himself and Reilly that raised Bourke and that Jemmie Shiels had no part in the act at all.
senior member (history)
2021-09-30 15:27
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neighbours house and get some help. The boy was afraid to go out after night alone so Francie himself went with him. The neighbour came and gave the help. Other witnesses were found to prove that the other young fellows were also innocent. Mc Entee had committed perjury and sufficient evidence were given to prove this. Mc Entee was tried for this and the judge pronounced that he was guilty of wilful corrupt perjury so he was sentenced to a period of 14 yrs. on Van Diemen's land. The yeomen then marched him from station to station because he was to be transported from Cork. When they were nearing Cork Mc Entee made a plunge and jumped into a wood and got away. Some time after, about 5 or 6 years Mc Entee was seen by the sergeant, named Dorothy, dressed as a a soldier in a British uniform. Dorothy was talking to my father about the same time and he told him that that man must be a deserter because England was then at war and no soldier were allowed to get off. Dorothy fount out some time after who he was and wanted my father to inform on him, but my father would not so Dorothy himself informed on him and the 'polis' followed Mc Entee tot he Mountain hill but he escaped. Mc Entee was a great man, very big and terrible strong and he was also a great runner. He was called around here Terry the stag. My father and another man called Dalton used to deal in strippercows and they used to travel to all the fairs around. Sometimes they would be two or three days, at a time, walking to fairs. One time my father and Dalton were going to a fair in Connaught. They were walking this night and they came to a small hut and to all appearances there was some merriment going on. They knocked at the door and were told to go in. My father entered first and glanced around and immediately he became annoyed and he nearly fainted when he saw Terry the Stag sitting in a corner. One of the men shouted up "What is wrong with you?", and my father says "Do you not see Terry the Stag in the corne
senior member (history)
2021-09-30 15:03
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Some man - I cannot recall his name - changed his residence from Drumanan and came to Clones. He also changed his religion from being a Protestant to a Catholic. He died in Clones and then there began a row as to where he should be buried. The Catholics wanted to bury him in consecrated ground and the Protestants wanted to bury him in a Protestant graveyard. The result was that a big fight was fought on Corkimmons hill between Drumanan fellows and the yeomen of Scotshouse and the surrounding districts. It was a terrible battle and one yeoman distinguished himself-, namely Bourke - and he fought great and he was a daring and fearless man. some of the opposing side took mark of Bourke and determined to revenge themselves on him. Bourke died and this report went out. He was buried in Drumswords graveyard. He had been 2 weeks buried when on the night of the 18th of February 1828 he was raised out of his grave and tied to a tree with a big straw rope. This night was one of the wildest that ever came and such rain never fell before. The whole county was stirred by the news and a reward of £1441 was offered as a reward for the person who could get the men who raised him. Terry Mc Entee and a score of other young fellows were arrested and brought to gaol. Mc Entee heard about the reward and said that three young were at the raising of him. He got the money in mostly shares. Himself and the young fellows were in gaol for 2 yrs. and 2 mths. before the trial came on (it that time there was no law against the raising of a dead person holding that there was no value in a dead body. The trail commenced and and sufficient witnesses were got to prove that these young fellows had no hand in the raising of the body. Mc Entee was first taken in and examined and he swore that he saw these young fellows doing the deed. Jemmie Francie was one of the witnesses for Mc Entee. His servant-boy was arrested and he swore that Francie had a young heifer sick on the 18th of February and he tol
senior member (history)
2021-09-30 14:12
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all labour in vain because that is how they succeeded. Ever afterwards the place where the treasure lies is known as Dollar Bay.
senior member (history)
2021-09-30 14:08
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Many years ago a privateer was wrecked off the coast of that strand. The privateer was driven during a terrific storm up to Faill an Airgid. The pirates had just plundered two ships and had burned the ships and escaped with a great cargo of gold and silver. It drifted round the coast for several hours. The people who saw her would not go out to her because they were afraid that the pirates would kill them. At length mountainous waves filled her with water and she began to sink. Some of the pirates jumped into the sea intending to swim to the strand but they were drowned. The pirates on the ship began to fling the chests of gold and silver into the sea but they had not one flung into it when the ship sank with all her gold, silver and pirates. The people named the strand "Faill an Airgid" because the ship with millions of pounds worth of gold and silver had sank off its coast
senior member (history)
2021-09-30 12:41
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Pirate Byrne, who lived in a castle where the house of Cuchulainn once stood, is supposed to have hidden some of his money in a cave under the castle. This cave is connected with another cave in the Deer Park, but the passage is now blocked up. It is possible that in that cave there are chests which contain Pirate Byrnes money.
senior member (history)
2021-09-30 12:30
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In years gone by a Schooner was passing by Money point having for a cargo gold bars. Her captain was a native of Jugo Slavia and was a member of a secret society called the black hand. Just as she was out straight money point a pirate vessel came swooping on her and as she had no means of escape her captain immediately sank her but in doing, so he used some black art. The cargo was never salvaged and every diver that ever went down came up immediately and by no means would venture down a second time although she isn't far out from the shore.
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 14:31
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place. When the boy wokened the next morning he went home and told his mother that he got a magic loaf. When she cut the loaf it got smaller like every other loaf. She began to scold him and sent him back to the shop and to say that the loaf was no good and to get something else. He went back to the shopkeeper and said that the loaf was no good and the shopkeeper said that he would give him a table cloth. When he was going home he lodged with the same man. He told the old man about the table cloth. When the boy went to bed the old man stole down to the room and took the table cloth and left another one in its place. When the boy went home he told his mother about the table cloth. She would not believe him so she told the table cloth to make dishes but it did not do so. The boy said that it must be the old man he lodged with that was taking the dishes things. He made up his mind to watch him this night. He went back to the shopkeeper and told him about the tablecloth and the man gave him a magic stick and told him that whenever he would be in any danger to say "stick beat" and the stick would beat. When the boy was coming home he stayed with the same man as before and when he went to bed he lay awake till he found the man coming down to the room and he made out he was sleeping.
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 14:25
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Once upon a time there lived a woman who had only one son. One day she sent him to the shop for a can of flour. When he was coming home the north wind blew very hard and blew away the most of the flour. When he reached home his mother was very angry with him and she told him to go back and to get her the flour. The boy did as he was told. When he reached the shop the man told him that he could give him no more flour but that he would give him a loaf of bread that would last forever. On his way home it was near nightfall so he took lodgings with a man. He told the man about the loaf. When the man got hi in bed he stole down to the room and took the loaf and left another one it its
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 14:21
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told him what to do with the bottle. The landlord said "magic bottle do your work". Out came two men and began to beat the landlord. He started to call for John. John said "give me back my other bottle and I will let you up." John got the first bottle and then he let the landlord free. He went home. John and Mary got very rich and lived happy ever after.
senior member (history)
2021-09-29 14:19
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cloth on the table and sweep the floor, and to say "Magic bottle do your work." John bid the little man goodbye and went home. When he returned home his wife asked him how much he got for the cow. Then he told her the story of what happened between him and the little man. Then he told her to put a table cloth on the table. She did as he told her. She said "magic bottle do your work" and as she spoke these words two little men came out of the bottle with golden dishes and meat of all kinds. When they had ate their fill Mary left away the gold dishes and the bottle also.
The landlord came to them the next day and they told him about the magic bottle. The landlord gave them some gold for the bottle. The next day Mary told John to go and sell the other cow to the little man. On his journey he met the little man again and he sold the cow to him. The little man gave him another bottle and told him to do the same as he did before. He went home and they did the same as before. Mary said "Magic bottle do your work." Out came two men with big sticks and bate both John and Mary. Then John shouted "let me up" and the two men jumped into the bottle again. John took the bottle and ran to the landlord and
senior member (history)
2021-09-28 16:02
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There was a faction fight on Knocks Brae a long tine ago and Muddy's Pat was killed there. His correct name was Reilly.
senior member (history)
2021-09-28 16:00
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There were far more people in Scotshouse long ago than now. There were about forty house from Knight's Lane (1938) until you come to Scotshouse.
Where the Black House now stands in Dunarim (1938) there used to be a baker called Brennan. He used to make bread and deliver it to Clones and Redhills and even as far as Ballyconnell.
Around where the Protestant church now is there used to be a number of houses. The names of the occupants were Flacks, Boyle (he was a carpenter), [?], and Grimes.
Below the village on the Annies side of it there used to be two houses between the creamery and Pat Smiths (1938). The names of the occupants were Pat Art and John Art. I mind well making my céilidh in these houses. Ned Smug's right name was Ned Cashlogh (Costello. He was
senior member (history)
2021-09-28 15:48
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a blacksmith. He lived in Killyfargy where Pat Mc'Phillips is now living (1938). He later went into the poorhouse. He was the last to be buried in Bally's acre. (i.e. the burying ground of Clones workhouse. - S.P. O'Mórdha).
senior member (history)
2021-09-28 15:45
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There is a mass rock in Smith's field in Laurelhill. There were stations in Drumen rocks for doing penance. Ould Ned Gregg's grandfather saved a priest from the yeomen.
There are water horses in Drumcor Lough. They used to come out on the bank and sun themselves.
senior member (history)
2021-09-28 15:39
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Bawn Brides of Knocks, the Ribbonman, and Johnny Maguire of Coolnacarte were to fight at Aghareagh big meadow. They only fought two rounds when they were scattered by the Police. There were faction fights between the Connolly's of Drumhillagh and the Caseys. They used to fight at the fairs with "loaded buts".
Commons (Comán) was a great game in my young days. We used to cut a hooked stick out of the hedge to play with. We used to have sports down near the lake and had running and jumping. I was a good jumper. John Maguire was a great runner. He was afterwards on the police (pron. polis). We used to call collect in Corkimonons meadow to play football on a Sunday. The Cassidys used to come from as far as Annagheane. We used to kick with a big straw ball and after we used to play commons and football on bright moonlit nights. Hunting was also another great amusement. Auld Pat Hand was a great hunter ( This P. Hand died 1875. S. Moore) They used to have horse races at Corconnolly and Cumber (Mon cummer),
The Anny (from Annies) bridge over the Finn was built in my father's time. Before that there used to be stepping stones across the river. There was a woman drowned when crossing these stepping stones one night. Another woman also slipped when crossing them and
senior member (history)
2021-09-28 15:25
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awaiting decision
My mother was a spinner and also the Maguire's down the Annies Road (They lived in Coolnacarte). The whole business was here until a few years ago.
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 13:48
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awaiting decision
Dohertys, Finnegans, and Lappins were some of families who lived in the townland of the Annies in my early day. The Lappins were the biggest men that ever left the country for america. There were also Mc'Entees and Donagheys.
Fenians
I was a Fenian myself. There used to be a captain over twelve men. I was under Tom Gavan. I was sent for to come up and join them in Scotshouse when I was only about sixteen. I was never sworn in since Tom knew me well and said I was good enough without swearing. They were very widespread over the country. They went one time to a great meeting in Cortehill. The leaders were Andy Mc Cabe and Tom Mc'Caul of Knocks. Bawn Brides was the leader of the Ribbonmen until the Fenians did away with them. Bawn went to America and the crowd that marched after him a piece of the way would stretch from here to the Downs. He was a fine strong clean fellow.
Madden owned this townland (Annies) as long as I mind. Madden's grandfather would have put out all Annies only they had their leases safe. He told them to give the leases to his man, Bullock, but Master Monahan said to him "We'll give them to whosoever we wish" and they gave them to Jimmy
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 13:18
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awaiting decision
There is a Mass Rock in Skerrick on the lands, I think, of Mechaul Connolly.
The people of this part of the parish used to bury in Maghera. My grandfather Teddy Mc Golem was buried there. I remember him. He used to say his prayers in Irish.
It used to be said that the Catholics had a chapel where the Protestant church of Scotshouse now stands.
When the coffins were being taken to be buried in the abbey and Round Tower graveyards in Clones they used to "keen" the corpses on Tee Hill.
There used to be a lot of trades in the country in them times, coopers, hacklers, thatchers and many others. Coopers, named, I think, Clarkes used to live where Jack Donaghey is now living in Scotshouse.
Part of the Rats Brae was either made or mended a good deal in '47.
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 13:02
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old prayer of this kind.
"Thanks be to God for the light and the darkness,
Thanks be to God for the hail and the snow,
Thanks be to God for the shower and the sunshine,
Thanks be to God for all things that grow,
Thanks be to God when the barn is empty,
Thanks be to God again when its full;
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 13:00
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awaiting decision
The chief societies around her were the Fenians and the Ribbonmen. One time there was a big hunt around her and Cavan men came down to it. When the hunt was over the Cavan men went down to Scotshouse to get a drink. The Brides of knocks made up their minds to stop the Cavan men on their way home but when they saw the Cavan men approaching they got afraid and went away home. The Cavan men went through knock beat the Brides, kicked the doors and wet the thatch on the houses.
In olden days the people used to thank God for everything whether it was good or bad and here is an
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:52
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griddle. The griddle would be placed before the fire, and the head was baked in this way. The oaten meal was mixed with flour and then placed on this iron bread iron which was about the breadth of an ordinary pan. Boxty was often made; round boxty made like a loaf was called "boxty dumplings".
Boxty : Peel raw potatoes. Grate them on a grater into a tub or crock. Put grated potatoes into fine linen bag and squeeze juice out of them. From this juice people got starch. When juice is removed from pulp, the pulp left in linen bag is put into basin. Flour is sometimes added to make it firmer. A little salt is added and water to moisten. Then same process is followed as in baking a cake.
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:48
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Get resin, melt resin on a pan. When it is fairly well melted get a wick and draw it through resin. Roll it then into a round roll and leave it away to dry and harden.
Vid. P. 99. for process used in making rush candles.
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:46
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awaiting decision
Boxty dumplings are made in same way but are of round shape like a loaf. They are then put into a pot of boiling water where they remain until baked. Late Mrs Kennedy of Annies (died 1936) was an expert at making these. She always made them for Hallow'een. They were much favoured about sixty years ago.
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:41
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awaiting decision
Long ago there used to be only three meals each day, the breakfast, dinner and supper. The breakfast consisted of porridge; the dinner consisted of potatoes and vegetables, raised at home, and again the supper consisted of porridge. The breakfast was generally taken about 7 or 8-30 but the worker had about two hours work done before that time. They would nearly have a days work done before breakfast. The dinner was generally at one o clock, and the supper of porridge would always be taken when the men had stopped working. In summer, during hay-season, this would be about 9 o clock. The bread used then was oaten bread and this bread was made on bread-irons or a
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:35
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Ragweed (Buacallán Buidhe - as it is generally known here) = Pull that weed, make a poultice of it with the other usual ingredients and put them on a sore bump and it will cure it.
Black Current bush = Pull the leaves of this; boil them and mix the juice well with sugar-candy and liquorice and this will cure a cold.
Ivy = This used to be given to cattle especially to milch-cows and it is supposed to help the yield of milk.
Dandelion = Pull it; pound it and drink the juice of it and this is good fort a weak heart.
Fourhound(?) = Boil it and stew it and mix it with brown sugar and vinegar and this is a good cure for a cough.
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:29
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awaiting decision
the same formula is gone through by "straddle the turf-stack" and the P.P. (pseudo.). The fun of game is as follows - if person called on fails to respond immediately to call of his name by shouting "is it me sire" he is emutted with soot. Each player gets his turn as priest of parish. The names put on players were as outlandish as possible in order to increase difficulty of quickly recalling them. Needless to remark the game was a "scream" from start to finish.
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:24
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(cont'd from P. 134)
answering immediately. Priest says "Yes you sir". Jack says "that's a lie sir". Priest says "Who then sire?" Jack would immediately have to shout out the difficult name of one of other players, though pointing away from player whose name he shouts. Suppose Jack accuses "Straddle-the-turf stack"
senior member (history)
2021-09-27 12:12
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N.B.
When a dance was held in a house the guests were served with refreshments of all kinds, including some drink. Then the guests collected among themselves and got more drink. This was called a "join" as described above. A dance of this kind was called a spree. This custom,
senior member (history)
2021-09-26 15:32
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(2) A priest was going by a house one time and he saw a woman inside sitten' inside a ring of crocks of water an' she sayin "come all to me, come all to me". She was stealin' her neighbours' butter by power of the divil. The priest never thinkin' says for fun "come half to me, come half to me". They were churrin' in priests house a while after this and one of girls (servant) says to priest "We cant move the staff in the churn" (there was so much butter in it.) The poor old gawn of a witch only got half the butter an' the priest got the other half.
(3) Wan time before me mother was married she was milkin' the cows. A friend (relations) of her own with red hair was goin' past an' she took the milk off the cows. Me mother went to a priest who lived where Currans now are (in Drumbuie) and he said he would bring back milk for a bottle ow whiskey an' also bring the woman that took milk screeching before them. They didnt' want to see the woman at all an' the priest only brought back the milk.
senior member (history)
2021-09-26 15:24
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and going round the dwelling house and outhouses hang a twig over door of each saying "In the name of the Father, etc"
20. On May Eve put whin bush i.e. furze or gorse, on dunghill to prevent ill-luck.
21. A "clock" i.e. the insect known as a beetle is killed whenever seen. It is supposed to have betrayed our Lord. For each one you kill you get eight sins off your soul.
22. A cure for warts: Wash the warts in the water which lies in a hollow on the top of the wall of a bridge. You must however, come on this water unexpectedly.
23 Another cure for warts: Rub a snail to them and stick the snail on a thorn bush. When the snail withers the warts die.
24 To get rid of warts: Rub a handkerchief to the warts and throw it away. The first person who lifts it or touches it will get the warts and they will leave you.
25. To lend a pin will cut love between a boy and a girl. First prod the boot with the pin and no ill effects will result.
26 When a cow is bought place a stone where she takes the first bite after you take her home.
27. A very small egg (yolkless) sometimes laid by a hen is placed on the "march" or mearing ditch.
N.B. 26 and 27 were got in Drum district.
28 A cure for mumps (from West Tyrone): The sufferer is
senior member (history)
2021-09-26 15:17
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11. The rinsings of a vessel from which milk had been emptied would not be thrown outside.
N.B. The above 1 to 11 were practised by a person in the Connons area of the parish who died in 1882 aged over 70 years. Some are still practised.
12. IF you come on a person milking or coming from milking you are supposed to say "God bless the cows and the milk" or "Good luck to the work." Otherwise you might be suspected of trying to "overlook" the cows.
13. A person entering a house where churning is going on is expected to take the churndash and help for a short while. Otherwise "overlooking" might be suspected.
14. If you meet a red-haired woman and you going to the fair or such business you may turn back as you will have no luck.
15. If you start on a journey it is unlucky to turn back for something forgotten, etc.
16. You should not move from one house of place to another or begin new work on a Saturday. "A Saturday flit, a short sit"
17. Mayflowers are scattered at the doors and windows on May Eve.
18. On May Eve a red ribbon was tied one a cow's tail to prevent her being "overlooked" and it was kept on until that time twelve month, when it was customary to renew it.
19. On May Day before sunset get a piece of rowan-tree
senior member (history)
2021-09-26 15:08
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- | On rolls
Surname | July 1935 | July 1928 | July 1921 | July 1914 | July 1907
Kells | - | - | 1 | - | -
Mulligan | - | - | - | 1 | -
Glancy | - | - | - | 1 | -
Clarke | - | - | - | 2 | -
Turley | - | - | - | 1 | -
Martin | - | - | - | - | 2
Mc Eniff | - | - | - | - | 2
Mc Gowan | - | - | - | - | 1
Mc Cluskey | - | - | - | - | 3
Victory | - | - | - | - | 4
Rehill | - | - | - | - | 4
Mc Geough | - | - | - | - | 2
Hughes | - | - | - | - | 1
senior member (history)
2021-09-26 15:04
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- | On rolls
Surname | July 1935 | July 1928 | July 1921 | July 1914 | July 1907
Reilly | 1 | 3 | 3 | - | 4
Mc Dermott | - | 3 | 2 | 6 | 3
Harney | - | 1 | - | - | -
Murphy | - | 5 | 7 | 4 | 2
Rooney | 1 | 2 | - | - | -
Fitzpatrick | - | 3 | 8 | 8 | -
Finegan | - | 3 | 3 | 3 -
Moore | 3 | 4 | - | - | -
Burke | 7 | 2 | - | - | -
Murray | 1 | 1 | 1 | 4 | 3
Sheridan | - | 1 | - | - | -
Mc Phillips | - | 2 | 2 | - | -
Tierney | - | 2 | 1 | - | 2
Bowers | - | 2 | 1 | 1 | 1
Morrow | - | 1 | - | - | -
Mc Guiness | - | 1 | - | - | -
Kearns | - | 1 | - | - | 1
Burns | - | 1 | - | - | -
Rudden | - | 1 | 4 | 5 | 6
Beggan | - | - | 4 | 1 | -
Mc Caul | - | - | 3 | - | 1
Lamb | - | - | 3 | 3 | 3
Fay | - | - | 3 | 3 | 3
Mc Kiernan | - | - | - | 2 | 2
Heffernan | - | - | - | 1 | 3
senior member (history)
2021-09-26 14:53
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- | On rolls
Surname | July 1935 | July 1928 | July 1921 | July 1914 | July 1907
Donaghy | 4 | 7 | 4 |- | -
Boylan | 9 | 3 | 1 | - | 1
Brides | 5 | 6 | 2 | - | -
Duffy | 3 | 0 | - | - | 3
Monahan | 1 | 3 | 3 | 1 | -
Beattie | 3 | 5 | 2 | - | -
Toal | 4 |2 | 2 | - | -
Hand | 1 | 3 | 3 | - | -
O' Neill | 4 | 1 | - | - | -
Slowey | 4 | 2 | - | - | -
Gribbons | 4 | 1 | - | - | -
Maguire | 2 | 6 | 5 | - | 6
Cassidy | 6 | 1 | - | - | -
Connolly | 2 | 2 | 3 | 7 | 12
Mc Cabe | 2 | 5 | 4 | 5 | 7
Greenan | 3 | 1 | - | 2 | 2
Herbert | 4 | - | - | - | 2
Molloy | 6 | 3 | - | 2 | -
Mc Donald | 3 | 5 | 3 | 1 | -
Clerkin | 1 | 3 | 3 | - | -
Brady | 2 | - | - | 2 | 3
Morgan | 1 | - | - | - | -
Cooke | 1 | 1 | - | - | -
Stynes | 1 | - | - | - | -
Smyth | - | 5 | 10 | 10 | 10
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 14:32
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dropped dead in the plough and the other man met with no loss because he pleased the little fairy.
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 14:31
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This man is a farmer and has lived in this district from his infancy. It appears that this story has been handed down. Here it is.
Long ago thre lived a man on the farm where Tommie Mc Conkey now lives. His name was Sergeant Francey. One day he and a neighbour were ploughing in a field below the "Black Fort" or "Forth" as it is called round this district. When the were there a strange little woman came to them and asked Mr Francey for the lone of his churn staff. He told her to go down to the house and she would get it in the kitchen. When she had her milk churned she came back with the staff and two cuts of bread well buttered for the men. Mr Francey who lent her the churn staff took the brand and eat it. The other man would not eat it as he did not like to take it from the strange little woman. In a few hours his horse
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 14:24
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The bread of long ago was made from flour, oat meal, and indian meal. They lived mostly on oat bread and potato bread. The oaten bread was made on a baking board and flattened out, then it was stood against a thing in front of the fire. It was like the shape of a horse shoe, with wires across the middle of it. There was a little iron bar at the back to make it stand up. The cake was laid against this, till it dried. Then it was ready for eating. The meal was put between two flat stones, and ground into flour. Oat meal bread was made of water and oat meal. The bread was made daily. There was potato bread made on a griddle. Potato bread was made in squares. The potatoes were skinned and smashed,
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 14:21
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The fairs long ago were held in streets, and fair greens. Some of them were held in the country fields. The people came out to country houses, and bought cattle, and that was called poaching. There was not toll on horses, cattle or sheep. It was only on pigs. There was always luck money long ago. It was called a luck penny. Some people gave a good luck penny, and others did not. It was just according to the price. A bargain was made between two people. The buyer would bid so much for the animal and may be he would bid two or three pounds less than (what) the animal was worth. The sell would not take the price for the animal. Then a man out of a crowd would come to the dealers, and would start dividing pounds, until
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 14:17
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The people round this district are very sociable. In the winter, they arrange to have a concert on a certain night. The organisers get all the singers they can, and on that night they have a very long interesting programme. There is a collection of one shilling a head. They have tea before the programme and tea after it. After the last tea is over they play a few games, such as. The farmer wants a wife, and in and out the windows. They stay in the hall till two o'clock in the morning. Other nights they arrange to have only games. They have tea before they start playing games. The admission is one shilling. They play till two o'clock in the morning. About Christmas time, the men and boys go in for shooting. Other nights they have dances. They dance the Polka, one step, stack of barley sets, and a few others. In Summer they have
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 14:08
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toothache : People say if you are digging a grave, and if you see a skull, and teeth in it. If you pull one of the teeth out, with your teeth, you will have the cure for the toothache.
Thrush : A child who never saw his father has the cure for thrush. he breathes on it and prays
Sprains : people rub and pray for their sprains.
goose seam : people rub their sprains with it
nettles : boiled in water are good for a cold.
nettle tea : is good for the blood.
cold tea : is good for sore eyes.
smoke : is good for sore eyes.
[?] : boiled with water are good for burns.
Goose greese : is good for thrush.
paraffin and soda : are good for burns.
dandelion : is good for warts.
[?] : boiled with water is good for a cold.
[?] : oil of it is good for sore eyes.
whins | pounded whins are good for making a horse strong.
chickenweed : is good for putting down swelling.
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 13:56
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About a mile and a half from this school, in Drumaconnor in the parish of Tydavnet lived a gentleman called Reid. He gave a ball one night. There were two girls from Dublin at it as quests. Their names were Emily and Mary Wilde. They were related to Sir Oscar Wilde, a very famous man of Dublin. These two girls were very fond of each other, and always went together. One was twenty four years, and the other was twenty two years of age. This night they were dancing, and one of their frocks caught fire, and the other one ran to rescue her, and she caught fire too. The two of them were burned. There was not one there to help them, because it was at Christmas time, and the men had drink on them. These two girls died of their burns. Instead of being taken back to Dublin to be buried, they were buried in Drumsnatt. They were buried together in the one grave. There was a tomb stone put up, and on this stone was written, "They were
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 13:50
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About a quarter of a mile from our school, Ternamona, N.S. an old woman and two sons named Henry and Johnnie Neill, lived in the townland of Tirnaskea, in the Parish of Tydavnet County Monaghan. An old woman and a man named Meighan came to live with them. This man was eighty years of age. All his life he had saved three hundred pounds. He gave the Neills his money, to keep Mrs and Mr Meighan to the end of their days. The Neills treated Mrs and Mr Meighan very badly. Old Mr Meighan began to be dissatisfied and he wanted his money back, to go and live some place else. The Neills would not give him his money back again. In the year 1879 the 13th of July a very warm Sunday, Mr Meighan lost his tempter and mind. The Neills were all at mass. Mrs and Johnnie Neill came home. Henry went to some neighbour house. Johnnie came in first and he went down to the room to change his clothes. Then Mrs Neill came in and Mr Meighan was hidden behind the jamb wall with a hatchet. He struck Mrs Neill when she came in. When Johnnie heard
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 13:41
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Birds | Nest | Eggs | Hatching
Partridge | a large nest in briars with hay | from then to seventeen eggs | a month
Crane | in a high tree. It has two holes in the nest for its legs to hang through |two narrow long blue eggs | a month
Owl | a large nest in a barn or in an ivy tree with leaves | two eggs | three weeks
Baldy | a small nest on the side of a lake | seven black and white eggs. | a month
Sea gull | on a rock | three white eggs with marks on them | three weeks
Linnet | small nest in a hedge | four green and white eggs | a fortnight
Tom-tit | small nest in a hedge | four eggs | a fortnight
Bluebonnet | small nest in an old wall | four eggs | a fortnight
Wagtail | small nest in a bank or wall | four white and black eggs | a fortnight
Crow | big nest of sticks and leaves in a tall tree | four white eggs | a fortnight
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 13:35
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Bird | Nest | Eggs | Hatching
Swallow | a small nest in a house. | six white spotted eggs. | fortnight.
Cuckoo | lays in another bird's nest. | one white egg. | a fortnight.
starling | a small nest in a wall. | five green eggs. | a fortnight.
corncrake | a big nest in a hay field. | eight brown eggs. | fortnight.
May thrush | a big nest in a high tree. | four green eggs. | fortnight.
robin | a small nest in a bank. | five brown eggs. | fortnight.
magpie | a big nest in a high bush. | seven white eggs. | fortnight.
wren | a small round nest in a bush. | from eighteen to twenty four brown eggs. | fortnight.
sparrow | a small nest in a bush. | five green eggs. | fortnight.
blackbird | a big nest n a hedge. | four blue eggs. | fortnight.
hawk | a large nest in a tree. | two to five blue eggs. | fortnight.
jack daw | a large nest in a tree. | four black and white eggs. | fortnight.
thrush | a big nest in a hedge. | five green eggs. | fortnight.
pigeon | a big nest in a tree. | two white eggs. | fortnight.
goldfinch | a small nest in an apple tree. | four brown eggs. | fortnight.
wildduck | a big nest on a bank. | twelve green eggs. | a month.
swan | a large nest on an island. | six to eight white eggs. | a month.
waterhen | a small nest in a bog. | six brown and white eggs. | a month.
lark | a small nest on the ground. | four brown eggs. | fortnight.
pheasant | a large nest on the ground. | ten to fifteen brown spotted eggs. | a month.
senior member (history)
2021-09-24 13:23
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If you meet one magpie that is for sorrow, two are for joy, three are for a wedding, and four are for a boy.
It is said that the cuckoo sucks other birds eggs to make its voice clear, and only shouts cuckoo three months of the year.
If they come early in Spring, it is a sign of an early Summer, and of good weather.
If they fly high it is a sign of good weather. If the gulls come inland it is a sign of rough weather at sea. The cuckoo is followed by other birds because they want to punish it for throwing out their eggs and laying others instead. It is said than when the Saviour was hanging on the cross, that a robin flew against him and got blood on its breast. the birds foretell the signs of rain, crows come near the house, robins gets very tame, gulls come ashore, swallows fly low, crows fly towards the mountains, curlew shouts loudly, waterhen comes near the house, wagtail comes into the yard, starlings flock, robin sings at the root of a bush, cranes fly high, and scream loudly, blackbird sings clearly in the morning. for good weather, crows stay quiet, lark sings high in the sky, robin signs on the top of a bush.
The wild pigeon says "Come now old cow."
The peewit says, "You'll rue it yet."
The corncrake says, "Eat, eat, meal is cheap."
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 15:35
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apple cake, and they might a cup of tea. They never got teat at any other time, and sometimes did not get it atall. At Easter they ate eggs, and the children made Easter houses, and cooked eggs out-side, and ate them in their Easter houses. There was not much tea long ago. They only got it at Christmas. It is over fifty four years ago, since they started using tea. They drank from noggins. They were made of oak, and bound with a copper band, and had handles which just came up straight, and had holes in them for hanging them up. After they used them, they scrubbed them, and shined the copper, and hung them up on the dresser. Antique dealers would give a large sum of money for them, as they are very rare now a days. Long ago, the cups were made without handles, just
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 15:32
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They had oaten bread, boxty, potato bread, indian bread long ago. They had very little meat. It was fresh meat they ate. They often killed goats, and salted them, and ate them. It is said, that when cattle were cheap, that they killed a calf, and ate it. They had fresh water fish, such as, pike, eels, perch, and roach. They had not as many vegetables as we have now. they had boxty and also flumery. Flumery was made from offals off the corn. The offals were steeped twenty four hours in buttermilk, and then strained through muslin. Then it was boiled about three hours, and put out on a dish to cool, and taken with new milk. It was a very choice dish, and induced sleep. If any visitors came to the house, it was reckoned a very nice dish. They did not eat very late. At Christmas, they got rice and cornflour, and
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 15:26
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China. The upset of Greece?
The butler bringing a turkey on a dish to the dining room and he let it fall.
156. My first and third are just the same. Pray how can that be two letters more would spell the name. A man of wits was he?
Adam
157. How many sides are there on a football
Two sides.
158. Which would you say "the yoke of a egg is white or ae white."
No, a yoke of a egg is yellow.
159. Why is a horse chestnut called a horse chestnut.
Because there is a horse shoe on it.
160. Little Nannie Eddie coat sits in her Petticoats.
A candle.
161. What eats all it gets.?
A fire.
162. What is the longest word in English language.
Smiles. Because there is a mile between the two letters.
163. There is a man of Adam's race. He had a certain dwelling place. neither did dwell in heaven on hell. Where did this man dwell?
Jonah in the fishe's body.
164. What has eyes and cannot see.
A potato.
165. Why should you not tell secrets in a cornfield
Because there are too many ears.
166. What fruit is on a penny.?
The date.
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 15:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
that thing was five weeks old. Adam was years five score?
The moon.
147. What is the shiest thing in the world?
A clock.
148. What goes round the house and peeps into every window?
The sun.
149. Where did Noah hit the first nail in the ark?
On the head.
150. We left our little ones at home. We marched in a perfect row. The wicked still in view. We lived to man, and died to God. Yet nothing of religion knew.?
The cows that brought the ark.
151. I had only one match in my pocket. I had a cigarette and a stove to light, which would I light first?
The match.
152. What is sweeter than a bowl of sugar.?
Sugar in your mouth.
153. I have a little dog and he is terrible after ducks. I tip him in the middle, and he blows out his guts.?
A gun.
154. We spoke as man spoke, and n'eer did sin commit, and yet in heaven he shall never sit?
Baalen's donkey.
155. A golden bomb, a silken curtain, and a marble.?
An egg.
156. The downfall of Turkey, the break up of
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 15:14
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rejected
awaiting decision
shroud is in every house until this day?
Lot's wife.
139. What is full of holes and none of them through?
A thimble.
140. Write a short term for father, then turn the word round. Write a short term for mother and to it do the same. These parts put together and, lo, our old father who ne'r had a mother, now tell me his name?
Adam.
141. What goes through the wood, and leaves a white rag on every bush?
The snow.
142. A duck behind two ducks, a duck before two ducks, a duck in the middle between two ducks, how many duck is that?
Three ducks.
143. Why is a fleas like a train?
Because it runs over sleepers.
144. A cow and a calf cost a dollar and a half what would a ton of coal come to?
ashes.
145. There was a donkey on one side of a river, and a hay stack on the other. The river was broad and deep, and how did the ass get over.?
Do you give it up. That is what the other ass did.
146. There was a thing, full a month old, when Adam was no more. When ere
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 15:04
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rejected
awaiting decision
127. What beats a good wife?
A bad husband.
128. For and twenty white bulls tied in a stall in comes red bulls and over licks them all?
Teeth and tongue.
129. When is a wash woman happy?
When she has the clothes up and the pegs in.
130. What will go up a chimney down and will not come down a chimney up?
An umberalla.
131. What part of a horse touches the water first?
His breath.
132. What's all eyes and cannot see.?
A crook.
133. I have a little house and it would'nt hold a mouse, and there are as many windows in it as in the King's big house?
A thimble.
134. What is seen in the shop and never is sold.?
The sun.
135. What goes up the water, and never gets to the head of the water?
A mill wheel.
136. How many feet have forty sheep, the shepherd and his dog?
Two.
137. As round as an apple, as deep as a cup, all the men in Derry could not lift it up.?
A well.
138. Bible character, name unknown whose body never went to corruption, part of whose
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 14:58
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rejected
awaiting decision
place. L.
117. If a herring an a half cost three halfpennies, what would a dozen cost?
A shilling.
118. As round as an apple has plump as a ball, covers the market house steeple and all.?
The sun
119. What never was, and never will be, look on your hand and that you'll see.?
Your wee finger as long as the rest
120. As I went to the fair of St Ives, I met seven men with seven wives, the seven men wives had seven sacks, the seven sacks had seven cats, the seven cats had seven kits. between cats and kits and sacks and wives, how many went to the fair of St Ives.?
One
121. What is all holes, and it holds water?
A thimble.
122. What touches one and unites two?
Wedding ring.
123. Once day a white man and two black men went a journey and two black men ate the white man, what was the number of their car?
281.
124. What sits with its heart up?
A Cabbage.
125. A clipper of ditches, a skipper of thorns?
A hare.
126. Why am I a better man than God?
Because I can find a better man than myself and God can't.
senior member (history)
2021-09-22 14:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
hanging on a crook.
108. A, b and an o and an x in the middle, a t and a y, come tell me this riddle?
Boxty.
109. What member of Parliament wears the largest hat?
The one who has the biggest head.
110 As I looked over the garden wall, I saw a wee man, and he let a loud call, his head was flesh, and his mouth was horn and such a wee man never was born?
A rooster
11. Down in the meadow, there is a table, and it is neither ash, oak or yew, nor any wood never grew it?
A table of ice.
112. I have a nest of wee things, rough and racked, yellow backed, pretty little wee things?
A bee's nest.
113. What is a herring worth when half eaten
It is worth turning over.
114. Forty sheep went through a gap, forty more followed that, six seven, ten eleven, three and two how much is that?
Five
115. Two o o, two n n, and L and a d put that together and tell it to me?
London.
116. Luke has it before, and Paul has it behind and John Kelly has it twice in the one
senior member (history)
2021-09-21 13:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
there names when married
Barney Dowd, Dromod = sprain
Rose Mc Kenna, Corraveckan = sprain
Paddy Mc Grath, Lisnaclea = sprain
Barney Key, Lisnaclae = sprain
Mrs. Thos. Clarke, Mullahara, sprain
Mick Finnegan, Corgreagh, sprain
Paddy Boylan, Lisnaclae, rickets
Mary Mc Enaney, Mullahara, sprain
senior member (history)
2021-09-21 13:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local People that has cures
Mrs Duffy, Drum cunnion = cure of strain
Mrs. M Martin, Mullahara = cure of whooping cough
Mrs Kernaghan, Drum cunnion = cure of dirty mouth because she never seen her father