Number of records in editorial history: 45999 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 19:30
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A Cure for Measles
When children have the measles some nettles roots are boiled and the liquid is drank as a cure. It is said that this helps to bring he measles out on the child.
Another way is to tie a tape round the child's waist three times and say some prayers each time it is being tied.
A Cure for a lump behind the ear.
The Cure is to rub an iron to it for nine mornings in succession and at the end of the ninth morning the inflamation is supposed to go.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 19:27
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A Cure for Neuralgia
A cure for Neuralgia is to go to a public road and rub your hand to your head and then rub it to the road for three times.
The first person that walks where you rubbed your hands he cured you of Neuralgia.
A Cure of Wild fire.
A Cure of wild fire is to rub a goat's ear to it for nine times.
Another cure is to rub a sovereign to the affected place.
A Cure for rickets
The child is brought to the black-smith and he puts it across the anvil nine times before he eats his breakfast.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 19:26
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rejected
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A Cure for Neuralgia
A cure fir Neuralgia is to go to a public road and rub your hand to your head and then rub it to the road for three times.
The first person that walks where you rubbed your hands he cured you of Neuralgia.
A Cure of Wild fire.
A Cure of wild fire is to rub a goat's ear to it for nine times.
Another cure is to rub a sovereign to the affected place.
A Cure for rickets
The child is brought to the black-smith and he puts it across the anvil nine times before he eats his breakfast.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 19:11
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A Cure of Chilblanes.
A person who has chilblanes and dips them in the water that the black-smith cools his irons in they will be cured.
A Cure of the sty.
The cure of the sty is made by pulling a branch by pulling a branch off a goose berry bush with ten thorns on it them one of the ten thorns is taken off. The nine are pointed at it for three mornings in succession saying each time in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost Amen.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 19:08
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His father was a shoemaker also. Clogs were made locally and worn. Some people buy them in the draper shops now and wear them in the winter time. About eighty years ago there was a tan yard in the town of Bailieborough.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 19:06
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About one hundred years ago some people were fully grown before they wore boots. Some children go barefoot all during the summer at present and others do not.
Shoes are to be seen on children in the cradle now. Long ago when people washed their feet they did not throw out the water that night. Some years ago people got their boots made with the local shoemaker but owing to the cost of leather at present the shoemaker only repairs them. There is only one shoemaker in this district now where there used to be two or three.
His name is Philip Crosson.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:59
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There is only one tailor in this district. His name is Jackie Harte. This tailor works at home, he does not go out. There are no sayings about tailors.
The implements a tailor uses are scissors, needles, thread, thimble, cloth, buttons, press studs, hooks, and eyes.
Shirts are not made only in the homes
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:52
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of some people in this district. The cloth the people use for making shirts is Flannelette and Calico.
There is no account now-a-days of the shirts and cloth that were made from flax in years ago in this district. Stockings and socks are hand knitted in homes in this district now-a-days. The thread for knitting them is not spun in this district, but, in a district near by it is spun. The name of the district is Blarney.
There are no spining wheels in this district now only the relics of them. The relics of
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:49
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the stools the old women had for keeping the wheel steady. It was all the old women who used to spin long ago. It was nearly all wool the old women used to spin.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:48
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The local fairs around here are held at Rathduff and Donoughmore. The fairs are held held in special fairfields. When an animal
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:46
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is sold there is always luck money given. The way they mark the cattle is they cut them with a scissors, they mark them on the ears. There are cattle, sheep, and pig fairs. There are also great horse fairs at Mallow, Cahirmee, New Tipperary and others. The people do not pay going into the field. There are not any horses sold at our local fairs. There are special days for these fairs.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:41
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Some people make their shirts at home. The kind of cloth that is used is striped Flannelette. There are no shirts made from flax, because flax is not grown in this district.
Socks and stockings are knitted in this district. The thread is woven and spun in Blarney mills. There is no spinning in this district.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:39
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There is one tailor in this district. His (i) name is Jack Harte. He works at home. The implements he uses are a sewing machine, a scissors, an iron for pressing, and a board to press the clothes on.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:37
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are sometimes made at home. The thread is bought. There are no spinning wheels now in this district, but were there many years ago.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:36
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down a hill, crossed the (road) road, jumped to a rock in the middle of a river (The Martin) then, to the bank at the other side. The tailor was unable to jump, and the rock is since known as "The Tailor's Rock", and the tramp got away with the boots.
A tailor's outfit when going to work in a house consists of, - a needle, (short) and thimble (Tailor's thimble) inch - tape, pressing -board, and Iron. He may use a sewing machine if available in the house.
Shorts are seldom made at home now, they are usually bought at shops. They are made by mass production, and they are just as cheap, and more stylish.
They are made of various materials, flannelette, Oxford shirting, silk, and cotton. Stockings
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:31
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There is one Tailor in the Parish, but is away at present, probably working. There are also three tailors in the next Parish,
and they work at home.
There was a tailor working in a house near Blarney. He was sitting on the table at his work (Tailor fashion) his boots were underneath the table, a tramp came in and ran off with his boots. The tailor followed him. The tramp ran
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:27
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:27
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(near) cross roads, and there is a stream running by each of them. These Forges are small houses covered with timber. The Forge at Rathduff is covered with slate.
The fireplaces are about four feet square, and about three feet higher than the floor. The bellows are a newmake, such as are used in farm houses but are much larger. The implements that are used by the Smith are, a hammer, tongs, sledge, (and) a vice, and a screw plate.
These Smiths shoe horses, and donkeys, and they also put iron bands in wheels and fir machines. There is very little of the Smith's work done in the open air, only putting bands on wheels, and repairing machines. The Smith also makes gates and settles gates.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:23
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There are three forges in my parish. The names if the Smiths are OBrien, Harte, and Healy.
There Smiths are Smiths with many years, and their people before them were Smiths.
These forges are situated in different places. Harte's forge is situated in Grenagh, Healy's forge is situated in Rathduff, and Brien's forge is situated in Ballyhillogue.
These three Forges are on the side of the road, near
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:15
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weary bones.
In holy graves adorned much by monummented stones.
Of granite and of marble with a host of choicest flowers.
Oer _ shadowed by the sycamore and lobely beechen bowers
And pilgrims fail thro-out Granuaile to find they will explore
So grand a (rulc) rural cemetery as that of Donoughmore.
V
And from that spot how eagerly I long to see the day.
When the gallant boys of Paddy's land will muster in array.
To claim their nations birthright with no crave in lip or hand.
But freedom's sword the only word her foes will understand.
When fifty thousand exiles will enrol the flag of green.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 18:11
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your valleys which the Shournaght [?] through it freely gushes forth.
The music of your waters would, the sadest heart regale.
Ambitiously competing with the beauties of the vale.
These beauties ever verdant which peculiarly belong.
To that sweet spat so far renowned in history and song.
And of all the scenes that in my dream I've nightly tavelled oer.
I chose to rove by Richhill grove in dear old Donoughmore.
IV
Oh Dear and Sainted Donoughmore! within your very breast.
The mighty dead of centuries have found a peaceful rest.
Both priest and lay beneath your clay have laid their
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 13:25
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neath.
The hills of Donoughmore.
And how enchanting 'tis to trace the Dripsey in its course.
As from the Bogra's westward point it flows and takes its source.
Increasing as it glides below.
That seat of petty tyranny in days not long ago.
And hear it as ir clamours with solemnity and pride.
Where Sts Locten and Olan met - the valleys to divide.
Then, on toward's the silvery Lee it roars with sullen roar.
And leaves regretful like behind its native Donoughmore.
III
Oh Donoughmore in Summer days how charming to resort.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 13:21
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Oh Donoughmore! oh Donoughmore how oft I dream of you.
And Just as oft my boyhood haunts are pictured to my view.
The grandeur of your scenery replenished my mind.
With serious thoughts of sorrow, Joy, and lovliness combined.
How pleasant for to gaze upon your elevated hills
Majestically towering oer your valleys, groves, and rills.
Defying time and power alike to rob them of their store
Of precious peat which lies be-
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 13:15
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rays to find shade was no fun.
So they called it Grenagh _ "the land of the Sun."
III
Then they called a place 'Mourne Abbey' from its cloister and well.
From the man with the bottle they called "Bottle Hill"
Then 'Beeing' from the brown bog where the wild plover soar.
From the big Sunday games there they called "Donoughmore"
On the land of the red stone they then styled "Cloghroe'.
And the small flowery fields gave them 'Blarney' you know.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 12:53
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IV
In the hills and the hol [?] they have tried all game there,
With the hounds and the huntsman, the footman and hare.
At bowl-playing and gaoli [?] they oft tried their hand
While our best crossed the ocean to a far distant land.
When the cannons did rattle fiery youths took the chance.
With the big fighting forces in (Flaunders) Flanders and France.
When they heard of 'Sinn Fein' with rifle and guns]
How they played at that
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 12:50
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game in the "Land of the Sun".
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 12:49
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Is é Baile Bhalúin mo bhaile dúthcais féin. Ta baile Bhalúin suidhthe í paroiste Griuanach, agus tá Griannach í mbaruntach baróidh.
Tá dhá clainn déag í Baile Bhalúin, tá caogad daoine í Baile Bhalúin. Ua
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 12:47
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Donnbhain an clhann is caitciannte ata ann
Tá an deanamh ceudhna ar na tighthe go leir, tighthe cinn slinnte isead mar dion orta, ach cupla ceann ann agus tá dion tuige ortha.
Ta trúir os cion seachtmóga bliadhan na comnuidhe í mbhaile Bhalúin agus tá bean amháin ann agus tá sí naocad a sé blaidhan daois.
Níl aon gaedilg acu. Is feidir leo sgealta d'innint i mbearla. Do bhí cuig oireadh níos mo tighthe agus daoine í mBhaile BHalúin fado, fe mar ata ann anois.
Tá trácht ar an baile seo in amhran. An ainm ata air isead (The land of sunny view)
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 12:43
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Tá séan dháoine go flúirsheac ann agus tá gaelinn go léor acá. Is déas é bheith ag éistheach leó agus iadh ag ínnsint na sghéala.
Ta plúcains i páróiste Domhnach Mór. Is páróiste mór é aghus 'se plúcains an báile Fearann is mó atá ann.
Fadó, bí dá áinm éile ar Plucains Thuaidh agus Theas. Plúcains "French" agus Plucains "Bennet" mar bbí dhá tighearnaí talmhan ann. Ta talamh maith ann agus tá droch thalamh ann leis.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 12:39
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Tá talamh mait í mbhaile Bhalúin, ach ta cupla portaig ann, porthaig gan moan iseadh iad. Tá trí coillthe ann. Coillthe mór iseadh iad. Ta srut amháin ann leis Níl aon sgeal ag baint leis.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 12:38
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Plúcains an áinm ata ar mo bhaile dutchais. Tá sé róinnte na dá roinn Plúcáins Thuaidh agus Plucáins Theas. Tá alán sáoine na gcomhnúidhe ann agus mar sin tá alán tigh ann.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:47
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An ainm ata ar mo bhaile dúthchais iseadh Liardáin.
Te sé í pbaróiste griana í mbarúntacht Baróid. An meid theaglach atá innti iseadh ocht gchinn déag. An méidh daoine ata í mo bhaile duthcais iseadh naochad. An sloinne is coithchianta isead Mach Cárthaig.
Ta díon slinne ag an cuid is mo dhe na tighthe. Tá alán
daoine ann agus go bhfuil siad thar ochtmhógha bliadhan d'aois.
Níl gaoluinn
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:43
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ag aoinne aca bhí míos mo tigh ann fadó na mar ata anois, Ta ainm an baile ainmighthe in amhrán.
Tá talamh maith chun cuireadóireachta í Liardáin ach ta sliabh an leis, agus fadó bhí cóill ann. Ta sruth ag rith tríd an mbaile. Sí an ainm ata uirtht ná "An Martín".
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:40
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:39
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Most of these were connected with the dairying industry.
A milk pail (1)
used by older women, entirely made of wood and no joining, made out of a block of timber very clean - usually scoured.
Made by coopers_ pails of different sizes, bound top and bottom with hoops.
Drawing
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:37
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II
Shallow vessels called 'Keelers' also made of wood were used for setting the milk before separators came into use. For this purpose also earthenware pans of many different sizes (3) were used.
Two drawings
One of the first type of churns used was worked by hand with a stick called a churn dash IV This was also made of timber.
Drawing of a chirn
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:34
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They drank a health to Ireland and what could they do more.
But sing and dance till morning around that schoolhouse floor.
A merry night being ended with spirits light and gay
I saw their final parting just at the break of day
With a song from Daniel Cronin
"May we rise and never fall"
T'was their last and parting chorus at the Farmer's Union Ball.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:31
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And soon to fight they tackled and took them man for man
With sticks, with stones, and wattles the blows came thick and sore.
Twa's like a small pitched battle around that schoolhouse door
The postman's gun being empty and the barrell broken in
To help the merry dancer's the women backed the men
They ran down through playground and soon they scaled the wall.
When they saw the women charging at The Farmer's Union Ball.
VII
That wild hallow being over without a wound worth while
They settled down melodious in the good old Irish style
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:26
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At the Farmer's Union Ball.
V
They battered in the windows; we saw each broken pain .
Although they bore no orders from their leaders in Sinn Fein
They said we're our for Ireland - out for freedoms "Tá-g-Brághh.'
But 'twas only ditch-planned orders and a branch of mob - made law
If the dancer's they could scatter at the beer theyed have fine fun
This for that they worked the wattle the revolver, stone, and gun.
But it rose their fighting anger when the shots came through the Hall
So they buckled up for action at The Farmer's Union Ball.
VI
Through the hallway bursty the dancers to meet that martial clan
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:22
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With masks and blackened faces dressed in a cowhouse stall
They made straight for the schoolhouse for the Farmer's Union Ball.
IV
Their leader then stepped forward and tightly gripped the door,
And sent a young man marching up through the schoolhouse floor
He shook his humpty shoulders and then we heard a shout,
"I bare orders from the captain - just five minutes all clear out"
"What (with) orders" cried young Downey
"We want no bombast here,"
"Do you think your masks and shot guns will fill our hearts with fear.
You know I must keep order, give up your shouting brawl
And clear outside the schoolhouse
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:22
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With masks and blackened faces dressed in a cowhouse stall
They made straight for the schoolhouse for the Farmer's Union Ball.
IV
Their leader then stepped forward and tightly gripped the door,
And sent a young man marching up through the schoolhouse floor
He shook his humpty shoulders and then we heard a shout,
"I bare orders from the captain - just five minutes all clear out"
"What (with) orders" cried young |downey
"We want no bombast here,"
"Do you think your masks and shot guns will fill our hearts with fear.
You know I must keep order, give up your shouting brawl
And clear outside the schoolhouse
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:18
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no necks, nor arms bare.
Some wore fine silken stockings but never bobbed their hair.
They didnt bob nor shingle, though they wore fine dresses all.
And they kept their Irish fashions at the farmers Union Ball.
III
What foolish glowing shadows now pierced the welling brain
Of them that donned false colours in the nightmare of Sinn Fein.
They wanted sport and money but no other should have fun
Now to stop our merry making they robbed the postman's gun,
They didnt face the Saxon; they might get wounded sore,
They'd rather buff their neighbour's who were living quite next door.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:14
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Chorus
They came from Cork and Mallow, from Blarney and Cloheen.
From Donoughmore, Duhallow, and that highland village Beeing.
But they never heard such music since the time of Adam's fall,
As we had around the schoolhouse at the Farmer's Union Ball.
II
They had a jig, a reel and Polka for we had no jazers then.
Buts lots of colleens all skipping round the men
Nor did they wear short dresses
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:11
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I
In the year of 1920 we had some sport and fun.
Although the times were troubled with heroes on the run.
When they organized a racket to please each lad and lass
At that lonely hillside school house - they call it Ballyglass.
Provisions they had plenty with refreshments there galore
I wish you heard the music when the dancers took the floor.
They had a fine piano, to play for big and small
A gadget, and a fiddle, at The
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:07
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Monaister Across the road from Lisnaratha and 2 fields. Is the North is the 'Monaister' It is a field, almost square surrounded by a moat 6' - 8' wide and 3' deep The rampart except on the W. is in good condition. There are two wide entrances, one on the W. the other on the E. It resembles a square earthern fort.
Cooking Place. Two. fields S. of Lisnaratha is a low horse-shoe shaped mound covered with grass. Blackened stones and charcoal are seen if dug.
Small dolmen. Six feet from the cooking place is the dolmen. It is a block of red sandstone 4 1/2' long, 3' W & about 1' in thickness. One end is buried in the ground and the other rests on an irregular piece of quarzite about 18'' long.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 09:00
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height from the top of the rampart to the lowest part of the fosse is 22' There are no traces of any internal structure and no trace of any subterranean chamber. People say that the fort was one time covered with a thick growth of trees but now all that remains is a solitary pine. Nearly under this tree is a well which helps to keep the fosse, moist and boggy.
II Fort
On the road towards Blarney is the II fort - 3 fields to the left. The diameter is 104' the rampart is from 5' - 6' in height and 7' in thickness. There are no traces of a fosse here. Neither are there any traces of a chamber or buildings .
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 08:55
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and is now in Matehy, Innisarra Parish.
Drawing of Lisnaratha Fort
1. Fort That known as Lisnaratha - The court of the forts' is said to be one of the finest in Ireland. The fort measures inside 220' in diameter; the rampart is on an average 14' in width; the
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 08:53
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On the right hand side of the road, almost opposite to this stone monument stands, one single stone. Its dimensions would be.
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 08:52
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In the parish of Grenagh about three miles North of Blarney Co Cork on the high ground to the East of the Shournagh River lies the townland of Loughane East. In this townland there are a few forts, a Nonaister, a pair of Gallauns, and a small dolmen.
The same townland once had a graveyard, which local tradition had it removed across the river
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 08:49
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twelve feet long and six feet wide. At the head stands one huge stone six feet wide, and about four feet high, at the foot there are two stones one at each corner, and lying in the centre is a fourth stone. It is supposed to be a burial place in former years. A rough plan would be something like this.
Drawing
senior member (history)
2021-01-18 08:47
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There is a very fine example of a stone Monument in a field about a mile from the village of Grenagh. It is on the road from Grenagh to Donoughmore, on the left hand side coming from Grenagh. It is in a field bordering on the road, almost at the of that field.
The monument consists of a huge mound
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:47
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One man went over and looked in the gripe and something flashed a lamp in his eyes. The man stepped back and nearly but the lamp still kept flashing. The two men went home, the light following them and when they stood and looked back the light went out. They went on anyway until they came to their own homes where they stood and looked back and they could hear a voice shouting far behind them. The two men went into the house and ate their supper. They were getting ready for bed when they heard a knock at the door. One of the men went out to the door and he could not see anything. He shut the door and in a few moments the heard the knock at the door again. The man went down to the door again and again he could see nothing. The third time the knock came to the door and again the man went out and he saw a "wee" man standing outside the door and he walked into the house "Good night to you all here" he said. The men in the house asked him would he eat his supper and he said he would
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:40
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One upon a time there were two men going home from a game of cards. They had to go home along an old whinny wet lane and it was about one o'clock. They were coming home the old lane and the heard something leaping and growling in the ferns and bushes. One man told the other he heard something in the bushes
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:27
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Hallow E'en falls on the last day of October. A day or two before Hallow Ee'n people buy apples. On that night they get a crock of water and put it in the middle of the floor and they tie their hands behind their backs and they have to take the apple up out of the water with their mouth.
Another trick is played, hanging apples from the roof of the house and they have to jump for the apples with their mouths. They also put nuts in the fire to crack them.
On Hallow Een people go out and hide gates and sometimes hang them on the tops of trees.
A boy and a girl put two nuts near the fire and if they jump towards one another the pair will be married soon, an if they jump apart the pair will never marry one another. Halloween night people get a porringer and make a hole on the bottom of the porringer. Then they get a rush and rub resin on it. Then they draw the
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:22
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Sometime the youths tie bags on the chimneys and they put ginger in key-holes. Another trick is tying doors.
Girls peel and apple in front of a mirror and whoever they are going to marry they are supposed to see his reflection behind them.
Four plates are obtained, clay is put on one, water on another and a ring on a third. The fourth is left bare. The players are blindfolded in turn.
If one touches the empty place one will be happy, the water one will cross water, the earth one will die the ring one will get married. Each of these events is due inside the twelve months.
When people are going to bed they
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:19
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On a hill over Teevurcher there is a circle and it is said that long ago there was a castle called castle Ausburn and it is supposed that the man who owned it was a brother of the man who owned the Castle of Muff.
Another ruin exists at Robinstown in the county Meath about four miles from Teevurcher and it was built for an officer in Cromwells army called "Gudders"
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is the remains of an old school at Killagriffe. It was blown up in the troubled times. It was two storey high. The boys school was up stairs and the girls was down stairs. The trouble started between two parties as both wanted to have their meeting in it the same night so they dissagreed and in a short time it was blown up. It was never repaired since. The children around there had to go to the nearest school.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a castle in Muff some hundred years ago. It was men by the name of O'Reilly that lived in it. It was knocked when Cromwell came to Ireland about 1649. But it was not finally destroyed till 1830 in the battle of Muff between the Papists ans the Orange men. They fought on the top of the rock. The Papists were winning and the Orangemen fled for their lives. They ran into a house beside the castle. The Papists went to set the house on fire but there was a priest among then and he would not let them burn the house. He went to open the door and when he was
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
asked to the Fair of Muff to play music.
There was another man named Brian Steel. He lived in Moyar Kingscourt Co Cavan. During the troubled times in the fenial days he started from the Loughlinlea mountain one summers morning as the sun was rising up out of the earth and travelled fifty miles to Dublin on foot and back again on the same day.
Then he went to bed for some hours rose up again and travelled nineteen miles to the town of Cavan. He brought a few calves and returned home to the mountain again. He was as good the next day as if he had not travelled the long journey.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 22:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
river there and it was nine yards wide. One of the police was only eight perch behind him. When the policeman came up to the river he rolled one pound around a stone and threw it across to him and said he was the bravest man he had ever met.
There was another man named James Gargan. He lived in Rakeevan. He was a famous dancer of reels and horn-pipes.
One Monday he was in the fair of Bailieboro. There was a man selling crocks on the street and he hopped into one of the crocks and danced a horn-pipe and a jig and stepped out of the crock and it was nothing the worse.
There was a man named Pat Hand. He lived in Corlea Kingscourt and he was noted for his good music. He would be invited to dances to supple music. He could make songs. He would spend part of the summer months at Black Rock. When he came home again he would make a song on the (Hontel) Hotel he was lodging in. He would always be
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 21:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man named Mick Clarke Blackhills Teevurcher walked to Dublin in a day. Another man went to Malahide and he bought a couple of calves and when he was near his home he went into the bog where four men were making mud and he baked it all and then he went home and he was up early the next morning making mid again.
Another man named Jack Reilly Doon Tervurcher walked to Cavan and bought a horse and when he came home he went to bed for a few hours. The next morning he went to the Dublin harvest and when he came home he did his work and he was'nt tired at all.
There was a man named Jack Lynch. He lived in the townland of Corravelish. One time the police were after him and he hid in a neighbour's house. The man of the house let him out on the front door. When the other men were a good piece away he let out the police. They followed him to Moynalty and he jumped into a
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 18:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man in Co. Mayo called Mulowney. They had a neck name on him Sean na Sagart.
He used to be going around after the priests to kill them. He used to get £5 for every priests head. There is a place over in Seanbhaile beag hill called Cathaoir an Easbuigh. And every place he used to go he used to leave a course. The course was that their would be no children in that place. When he died he was buired in Ballintobar and a strange three grew over
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the Harvest of Geese. It is so called because the geese are fat after eating all poicríns.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
spinning
spinners
district
their
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:55
approved
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awaiting decision
her and she could not come out and she had to go up on a tramp of hay.
It was not long till the tramp was gone and when she was a mile from the house she got a chance to leap in on the land.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:54
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rejected
awaiting decision
About 32 years ago in the month of September,
There was a great rain storm. It began to rain when the people came home from Mass, and it did not stop till late that night.
It went in to John Heratys house. It brought the wash tub and the hens from the street and they got it down in the big river.
There was a woman down in Durless and she was out saving hay and the fload came in around
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:49
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awaiting decision
Garrdha gréasaidh. It was called that because a shoemaker lived there.
Nead na bhFeannóg. I was called that because the fanneog built her nest there in that rock.
Móinfhéar beag . It was called that because it is a small field.
Creighean a dó
Creigean corrach. It was called that because there is rocks on the Creigean.
The name of places in our village
Leana Luathair. It was called that because there is a lot of rushes.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:43
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awaiting decision
Feadeán dubh
Feadeain dubh. It is a black stream
Cnoc Dóighte
Cnuich dhochaid. I is red hill like if it was burned.
Lug mór It is a big lug.
Cathain. It was called that because there is a cathair in that place
Srat righ. There is a lot of sand like a strand and a king lived there one time.
Garrda ná scailpe. There is a lot of rocks in the garden
Abhainn na rionne. It is the river between Oughty and Derrymore
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:38
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rejected
awaiting decision
Mác Caine garrdha úir. It was called that because it is a new garden.
Names of places in the hill
Poll na Bhfeath . There was a man walking along Loch ain Gheala and a big eell follow him. The man ran and the eell was up to him. The man took of his coat and through it at the eell and the eel cut and toar the coat and when the eell was
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:35
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awaiting decision
cuting the coat the man got home. And the bell went in to loch glas in Poll na BhGeath.
Creigean Phat Duffy
There is a big rock and there is a Creighean over the rock.
Pat Duffy was living near this place and there was a grave beside the rock. It was some friend to Pat Duffy that was buired there.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:33
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rejected
awaiting decision
husbands.
They say that it was not lucky for them to meet a funeral and it was not lucky for the mother to go to the marrage but she could go to the weeding.

wedding
their
marriages
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:31
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rejected
awaiting decision
Some people have a weeding and more have not.
They do have a weeding in the man's home.
Straw-boys do come to the weeding. They used to wear a straw hat and a straw belt. One is dressed like a girl. The do sing songs One will dance with the bride and one with there own girl. The people that used to go to the marrags used to race other home and the first one at home would get a glass of whiskey. The wives used to sit on the horse with there
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
The time of the year when people used to get married long ago is from Christmas to Lent. This was called Seraft. On Shrove Tusday the people used to get married. The day that it is thought to be unlucky to get married is Lá na Leanbh. The month of May is said to be unlucky. Some peoples matches are made for them. Money and stock are given as dowry. They say that I if anything is broken in the morning it is lucky. If they meet a man or two Magpies it is lucky.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:24
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rejected
awaiting decision
Everyone long ago used to have a lime kiln.
The used to get the lime stone from Lecahvey
They used to use it for plastering and whitewashing and they put it out on their Meadows.
Lecanvey
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:20
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rejected
awaiting decision
The people used dye their own woll, other do dye the thread.
They got the colour from roots of the lillies, they colour grey. The bogink colours black. The heather Colours green The whins colour grey
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 17:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
Spinning was carried on in our district and some people spin yet. Every house in our district has a spinning wheel. My mother does spin yet. When the people long ago would want to spin they would ask carders and spiners. Every one would bring there own cards and spining wheel with them.
When the people would want blankets they would send it to the weaver.
There was no weaver in my district
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:59
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awaiting decision
They used to make their rope themselves long ago. They used get rushes and beetle them until the white would come out
Then they would put them in a pot for a hour. some people used to put them in the boghole for two weeks. Then they would take them up and dry them.
Then the used to twest them in to spancles. These rushes were called Tuige Bórach.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:56
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rejected
awaiting decision
The people used to make there own Candles out of butter and Tallow.
And they boil it and pour it out in a saucepan. Then they peel rushes and dry them and draw each rush through the the tallow and butter.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:54
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awaiting decision
scholars
district
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:54
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awaiting decision
a quarter in each school. Reading writing and sums. There was no irish taught. The names of the books the had were "Reading Made (Made) easy" and a spelling book.
The scolars used to write on a slate with stone and they used to use a pencil and for a pen they used to use a quill and they made ink from roots of the slolascrom. They had no blackboard bur a flag.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:47
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rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a hedge school in Derry more in Pats big house.
There was a hedge school behind at Púll na Carraige.
The Masters who taught in these schools were Master Byrne and Master Gibbons. Master Byrne was a stranger and Master Gibbons was from our district.
The Master used to stay a night with each scholar.
They used to bring him a shilling a quarter
The master used to stay
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:47
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rejected
awaiting decision
Long agio there was a hedge school in Derry more in Pats big house.
There was a hedge school behind at Púll na Carraige.
The Masters who taught in these schools were Master Byrne and Master Gibbons. Master Byrne was a stranger and Master Gibbons was from our district.
The Master used to stay a night with each scholar.
They used to bring him a shilling a quarter
The master used to stay
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:29
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awaiting decision
An gcluinn tú libh me lucht na sgabhail na leigheadh fallaí Dia í n-ár gcás.
Is truaigh liom fear na carraig agus e in-a luighead ar leabhaidh a bháis.
A dhuine bhocht gan céille ná théigir le do theinneas
Na ithe feól Ceidhaon agus ná dein breag le Muire
Ultigh sios dó'n Cleirig is n cúig feile Muire. Dhéan faoistean le Mach Dé is beidh tú ar feastain le na linn.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:26
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:26
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awaiting decision
arsa sise is gearr a bhéas ag breith ar an bpilliúr is dá caithea [?] í gcois na leabhaidh anois arsa sise béad sé sgathadh sul a mbead sé anseo.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:24
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awaiting decision
Do bhí bean ann uair amhain is ba deile buaidh a fághail uirrthí.
Biod an fochail deireannach acú cé be rud a dearfaí aon duine. Bhuail teinncas í lá amháin agus cuireadh fios ar an sagart chunb anb ola deireannach do chuir uirrthí.
Tháinig an sagart agus cuir sé an ola uirrthí. Nuair a bhí se ag imteacht d'iarr sí air an raibh cosamlacht an bás uirrthí. Go deimin ar seisean tá an bhás faoí do cheann ar seisean. Má tá
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:22
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awaiting decision
Chuaidh mé amach ins an ngairdín is bhain me preabhin.
Bhí nead ins an preabín, bhí uibhín ins an neadín.
Bhí éinín ins an uibhín.
Bhí rubhaill ar an éinín chómh fada le mo méarín is nach rí - dheas an sgéalín é sin.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:15
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:15
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rejected
awaiting decision
mhait ar do
Sul a ndeacha sé ag baint féir léi d'féach sí air ag féachaint a raibh sé sátach geir is suibirt sí go raibh.
Dubhairt an fear lei a dul amach i dtosach ag baint is cuaidh sí. Is bhí sé ag coinnéail suas léi.
Nuair a bhí siad í lár an pairc dubhairt an Cailleach Féarach leis
"Chuir faobhar a bodaigh" cuir faobar.
Dubhairt an feat léi ní faobhar a bhainneas féar acht fear maith is speal gear.
Is báin se an cosa dí.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:11
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí bean ann uair amháin darbh ainmh "An Cailleach Féarach ia níor fhéad aon fear í a sárádh ag baint féar.
Bhí gabha ins an mbhaile darbh ainmh Úi Mhaille agus bhí mach aige is chuaidh se léi ag baint féar lá. Chuile fear a chuaidh ag bhaint féar léi bain sí na cosa de.
Dubhairt sí leis an fear seo an spéal a bheith sáthach géar aige. Rinneadh a athair speal nuaidh sho is cuir sé faobhar
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:11
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí bean ann uair amháin darbh ainmh "An Cailleach |Féarach ia níor fhéad aon fear í a sárádh ag baint féar.
Bhí gabha ins an mbhaile darbh ainmh Úi Mhaille agus bhí mach aige is chuaidh se léi ag baint féar lá. Chuile fear a chuaidh ag bhaint féar léi bain sí na cosa de.
Dubhairt sí leis an fear seo an spéal a bheith sáthach géar aige. Rinneadh a athair speal nuaidh sho is cuir sé faobhar
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 13:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
In the Penal days when the priest used to get killed for saying mass there was a priest named Father O Malley who lived near Ballintubber and who used to say mass out in the mountains. One day Seán na Sagart came riding on his big horse. The priest saw him coming and he got his own horse and he galloped off. There was a very big river and the priest had to cross it before he would be caught. Seán na Sagart was very close on him by this time. The priest's horse jumped the river and was across the other side Seán na Sagart's
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:54
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awaiting decision
horse would not face the river so Seán pulled out his big dagger and threw it at the priest. It stuck in the saddle and the priest pulled it out and threw it back again at Seán na Sagart and it stuck in his heart. He cried to the priest to pull it out and the priest said that that was the right place for it and he dropped down dead. It was Seán na Sagart's own dagger that killed him. The priest turned back and he buried him in the place he fell. The priest went off again to the next hiding place.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:51
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awaiting decision
The next day there was a big white thorn bush growing at the head of the grave and the next day (there was a big w) again it was turned down to the foot of the grave and then there was a big arch over his grave. No one was ever bured in that grave after that.
There was a rich farmer who lived in the same place and he used to buy a lot of cattle and sheep. One fair morning he got up at five o'clock to go to the fair. The fire was quenched and he went out and he broke a withered branch of the white_thorn bush that was
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:47
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growing over the grave.
He brought it in and put it down on the fire but it would not light. In a few minutes there was an awful smell in the house and he had to leave back the branch again. When he did that the smell went. Every morning after that at the same time as the man broke the branch he went astray in his mind for about an hour an then he used to recover again. It kept like that until he died.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:42
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Pot of gold in Liscarney Hill: Page
Liscarney pot of gold: Page 2
Riddles: Page 3
Cures: Page 5
Water dogs Page 6
Weeds Page 7
Snow of 1917 Page 8
Old Sayings Page 9
Lanmore Townland: sub-divisions Page 10
Famine Page 14
Churning Page 15.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:40
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awaiting decision
The famine started in Ireland about the year eighteen forty six. All the potatoes failed and as the people lived mostly on potatoes in those times a lot of the people were dying with starvation.
A lot of people (were) went away to America and other places and since that time emigration never ceased from Ireland, so that America is now almost an Irish colony.
Some people were employed working in a quarry, and all you would get for the day was one pound of Indian meal.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:38
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a woman churning. When she was about fifteen minutes at the work, another woman came in and sat down by the fireside, and started to talk about the weather and (other) other things. After about ten minutes she kindled her pipe and went off home without ever leaving a hand on the churn.
The other woman kept churning about an hour and a half but no butter came on inside that time.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:35
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awaiting decision
Old tenants of the sub-town lands of Clionatolthora
In olden times there were two tenants in this place whose names were James Walsh and Henry Walsh.
James Walsh was evicted for failing to pay his rent, and his place was taken over by a man of the name of James Gavin.
While this man was in charge of it he had no ease. Shots were fired at his door every night until at last he was obliged to go away. After him a Protestant named Francis Murphy came in and couldn't be put out.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 12:31
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awaiting decision
The Quarry.
There are three houses in this place. Charles OMalley's, Michael Duffy's and Anthony Duffy's.
Kimeen.
This is a fairly large place it holds six tenants. There names are Thomas MacGuire Sen; Patrick Walsh, Michael Flynn, Mrs Walsh, John Walsh, and Patrick (Walsh) Coyne. Two other tenants of this place are Patrick Duffy and Michael Walsh.
In Lanmore proper there are the following houses.
Thomas O'Malley's,
Mrs. James O'Malley's,
Michael King's,
Mrs, King's,
Patrick Malone's,
Michael Morrison's,
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:46
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mentioned Peter Heraty.
Cregg
This place has three tenants Richard Walsh, John Walsh, and James Duffy. There was another tenant here twenty years ago named Michael Brennen, and his land was divided amongst his neighbours.
Baile an t-Sturháin
There are two tenants in this place Thomas King and Austin McGing.
Clionatholteara
A man named Francis Murphy lives here at present.
There is only one house here at present the tenant of which is Mrs. Berry. But there was another tenant there about twenty years ago named Thomas McDonald, and he was changed over to Mountbrown in nineteen twenty.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:42
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awaiting decision
In Lanmore are the following sub-townlands
Bún na Glaise,
Bun Dorcha
Cregg.
Baile na t-Srutháin,
Conarholtara,
Ceapach.
The Quarry
Lanmore Proper.
Bun na Glaise.
There are two houses in this place the tenants of which are Petr Heraty and James O'Malley.
Bun Dorcha
There are two tenants here also Thomas MacGuire and James Hoban. There was another tenant there some years ago whose name was Thomas Tunney but his place is now the property of the above
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:38
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rejected
awaiting decision
"hee high herio the dog wants a bone. Then another one is taken in and they say "hee high herio the bone wants mear."
Then the game is finished.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:37
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awaiting decision
A ring joins up and one girl goes into the middle of it.
Then the rest says
Hee, high, Hereo the farmer wants a wife. This is repeated twice. Then the farmer takes in some other one and they say Hee, high, hereo the wife wants a child, Then the wife takes a small one and they say "hee, high, hereo the child wants a nurse."
Another one is taken in and they say, "he high herio, the nurse wants a dog" and then the next one is taken in and the rest say
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A ring joins up and one girl goes into the middle of it.
Then the rest says
Hee, high, Hereo the farmer wants a wife. This is repeated twice. Then the farmer takes in some other one and they say Hee, high, hereo the wife wants a child, Then the wife takes a small one and they say "hee, high, hereo the child wants a nurse."
Anotne rone is taken in and they say, "he high herio, the nurse wants a dog" and then the next one is taken in and the rest say
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:25
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and then he stopped and finished his Mass there. The rock is there yet and it is in a green hollow with a ring of bushes growing around it. There is a place in the rock where the priests used to leave their Mass book on when reading it.
Many priests used to hide at Conway's of Pull na gCon also. They used to hide behind the rock because the rock is in a very low hollow like a sand-pit. There are bushes growing around it now.
There is a place also on the rock for leaving the Mass book.
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:23
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time in the penal days when the priests used to be hiding behind rocks, a priest one day was saying Mass behind at Conways of Pull na Ghlon. He had all the people around him when Seán na Sagart saw him and followed him. Seán had a big dagger with him and he flung it at the priest but he did not get the priest but he got some of the followers and wounded them. Seán kept following the priest until at last he had to give up because the priest was going out of sight. Then Seán returned. The priest continued on with his followers until he came to a rock on a hill behind Conorys in Lanmore
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:16
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awaiting decision
1. London Bridge
London bridge is all broke down
" " " " " "
" " " " " "
London bridge is half built up
" " " " " "
London bridge is all built up
all built up
all built up
Take the key and lock her up
Take the key and lock her up
Then it is asked which of two things would you prefer.
2, Nuts in May.
Two rings join up and go in and out to each other saying.
Here we come gathering nuts in May on a cold
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:12
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awaiting decision
and frosty morning.
Here we come gathering nuts in May on a cold and frosty morning.
Who will your nuts in May on a cold and frosty morn.
We'll have (them someone is mentioned) for nuts in May on a cold and frosty morning.
And who will ye have to pull her away on a cold and frosty morning.
We'll have - to pull her away.
Then two, one from each line would start pulling each other.
3.
Sally Warner
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:10
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awaiting decision
A ring would join up and one would go in to the middle of it and close her eyes. Then the rest would say.
Sally Sally Warner sitting in the corner
Wake up Sally and choose to the East
And choose to the West and choose
To the very land you love best.
4 Wallflowers
A ring would join up together and go round about saying.
Wallflowers Wallflowers growing up so high
We have the measles,
senior member (history)
2021-01-17 09:08
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and we will have to die
Except (then someone in the ring is mentioned ) she's the only flower.
She can dance and she can sing and she can can play the flower
Fee, foo, fower turn your back to our
Then the person that is mentioned turns her back.
5.The Lady On the Mountain
A ring joins up and one girl goes into the middle of it. Then the rest says
There stands a lady on the mountain
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 19:42
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Who she is I do not know
all she wants is gold and silver and a bright young man you know
Who will you have love
" " " " " farewell
Then the girl that is in the ring takes another one and they say
Open the gates and let us through
Then the rest say
Not until you show your black and blue.
There's my black and there's my blue open the gates and let us through.
Then the rest in the ring say
Go to church love. Go to
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 19:38
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church love farewell.
Kneel down love
" " " farewell
Say your prayers love
" " " " farewell
Put on your gloves love
" " " " farewell
Stand up love
" " " farewell
Go for a walk love
" " " " farewell
Come back love
" " " farewell
They the say again as before
Open the gates and let us through
Not until you show your black and blue
There's my black and theres my blue open the gates and
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 19:35
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let us through.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 19:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A's is minic ar fán fear fághaid déirce
Níor bhfada uaim gur luaidh sé a bhéile
Is gur chuir sé suas a ghluaiseacht leithe
Mac
Ca bhfuil mo lón de ló nó d'oidhche
Cá bhfuil mo stór de bhó no caoire
Ca bhfuil mo cháil ó is máire dom innsint
Acht a' sodair le do shálaibh is mala 'mo thimcheall.
Máthair
Maidir le duais na luaidh í ar aon chor
Ó t'athair ní bhfuaireas guairceas ná féileacht
Dada gan áird ach náire soghalta
Sagairt is bráithre 'om chrádh 's 'om chéasadh
Mac
Agus maidir le cáil ní hí ba chóir dhom
Acht ag agall na deirce ar thaobh an bhóthair
Go dearbhtha deimhin muna bhfáighead-sa fóirithint
Rachadh sa chill gan mhoill i n-éadóchas
Máthair
Seachain an nídh choidhche a chladhaire
Airigh ar do smaconte is cuimhnigh ar an Maighdin
Tá aici stór go leor is roinnfid
Mar mór dhearmhaidh sí raimh croidhe na faighidhne
Mac
Tá mo foighidhne caithte is ní fearr mar atá agam
Is ruadh e mo hata is is stríoctha é o chába
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 19:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá mo bhróga briste a's níl lúid ar mo shála
A's níl sgáil na tairbhe 'n a abair -se a mháthair
Máthair
A mhéirligh mhalluighthe mallacht mo chroidhe dhuit
Nár léighead ar theagasc na n-aspal ná a gníomharth [?]
Ar go bhfuil an Eaglais dá shíor innsint
Gur dos na boicht do cheapadh na Flaitheas mar oidhrea
Mac
Ma's do na boicht do cheapadh na Flaitheas mar oidhre
Is dócha gur áit é go bhfuil an-chuid bidh is dighe ann
Cuma ná preabann tú maidin nó oidhche
Gan bheith i gcúinne caithe a chneadaigh mar bhíonn tú
Máthair
A mhéirligh mhallaighthe mallacht mo chleibh dhuit
An amhlaidh mheadair don preabadh nó léim ann
Na naoim, na h-aspail 's an Eaglais naomhtha
Ní théighid ins na Flaithis 'na mbeathaidh go n-éagaidh
Mac
Má's áit na Flaitheas nach bhfuil geata ná céim leis
A's g bfhághann-se casadh i gceann seacthmhaine nó lae as
Acht ar eagla aon mhasladh nó easbaidh mo bhéile
Fanfad sa bhaile ag agall na deirce
Máthair
Níl gnó ná obair ann codhladh ná cómhráoc
Ná aon osna le leigint go deo ann
Acht ceolta ag ainglibh is an-cuidh glóire ann
Ná ceilta
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 18:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mac
Muna bhfhuil de shlighe bheatha ins na Flaitis ach ceolta
Vén chaoi gheobhadh bolg bocht folamh aon spórt ann.
Bfhearr liom-sa fuaim pota 'mneith feoil ann
Ná bhfuil d'aingil 'sna Flaithis a' greadadh a gcuid ceolta
Codail a cheallaigh is ná h-abair níos mó liom
A's nuair rachair ins na Flaithis nár chasaidh tú beo as.
Máthair
Móide mallaighthe, peacaidh 'gus aimhleas
Ní dheachaidh riamh go Párrthas fear dobh gníomhartha
Agus fágfaidh do chroidhe i nIfreann thíos thú
Mac
Muna rachaidh aon phreacach go Párrthas choidhche
Acht daoine beannuighthe beidh an-chuid slighe aca
Má's daor 's má's damanta an té leanas ml shlighe -
le bliadhain agus fiche tá hIfreann líonta
A's ní glacfaidh suad mise le h-uaireasbha slighe ann
Máthair
Dlighe na n-aspall agus teagasg na nfraoithe
An seachtmhadh caibidil sé Peadar do scríobh í.
Gurab é deir an leabh a cheannuigh na mílte
An té shéanas ar an dtalamh é nach é na Flaitheas is díon dó
Mac
Ní gádh do Pheadair bheith danaidh ar aon neach
Mar ba ghairid an casmhairt do sheasfadh sé féineach
Dá mbeadh sé a pléidh le caille gan earraidhe gan éadach
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 18:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Gan cóir gan cuirm acht a codhladh ins gach aon tigh
Na miola dá phiocadh faoi ghiobail na déirce
Budh stuacach an duine é is do chloisfeadh an saoghal é.
Máthair
Sul ar sheoluigh tu sa chugaim is minic do léigh mé
Ar Naomh Seobh mar dfhulaing sé an iomarca péine
Fuair sé na Flaithis do deasga na faighidhne
An t-árus beannuighthe mar mheasaim ní bhfághair- se
Mac
Cuimin-se cugat-sa an cheist seo láithreach
Cgh bísinn so shiubhal nuair théighir sa bfhásach
Radharc mo shúl ar do rún ró-náireach
A's mise go dubhach ag iomchur mála
Máthair
Maidir le dtúis is cúis ró-dhaor í.
Canncar malluighthe cú dubh craosach
Acht is measa faoi dhó do gnóthaidhe féineach
Ag séanadh Críost agus Slighe na naomh ngeal.
Mac
Éist a chaillighe 's ná h-abhair liom aon rud
Dá gcuairteochaidh t-aighneadh is measa thú féineach
Atáir mar bhéideadh sagart 'na sheasamh i n-aeirde
Go mbeidheadh a inntin 's a theagasc seacht n-acra ó cheile
Máthair
Na bac leis na sagairt déan do ghnó féineach
'Sé Maois do cheap iad agus thug aitheanta Dé dhóibh
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Gan cóir gan cuirm acht a codhladh ins gach aon tigh
N amiola dá phiocadh faoi ghiobail na déirce
Budh stuacach an duine é is dp chloisfeadh an saoghal é.
Máthair
Sul ar sheoluigh tu sa chugaim is minic do léigh mé
Ar Naomh Seobh mar dfhulaing sé an iomarca péine
Fuair sé na Flaithis do deasga na faighidhne
An t-árus beannuighthe mar mheasaim ní bhfághair- se
Mac
Cuimin-se cugat-sa an cheist seo láithreach
Cgh bísinn so shiubhal nuair théighir sa bfhásach
Radharc mo shúl ar do rún ró-náireach
A's mise go dubhach ag iomchur mála
Máthair
Maidir le dtúis is cúis ró-dhaor í.
Canncar malluighthe cú dubh craosach
Acht is measa faoi dhó do gnóthaidhe féineach
Ag séanadh Críost agus Slighe na naomh ngeal.
Mac
Éist a chaillighe 's ná h-abhair liom aon rud
Dá gcuairteochaidh t-aighneadh is measa thú féineach
Atáir mar bhéideadh sagart 'na sheasamh i n-aeirde
Go mbeidheadh a inntin 's a theagasc seacht n-acra ó cheile
Máthair
Na bac leis na sagairt déan do ghnó féineach
'Sé Maois do cheap iad agus thug aitheanta Dé dhóibh
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 18:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Chríost is na h-aspail do cheap iad 'na shiaidh sin
Chum pósadh agus baisteadh agus Aifreann do léigheamh dhúinn
Agus chum bheirth carthanach, amharcach , déireach
Mac
Maidir le pósadh is gnó ró-dhaor é.
Tá ginídhe óir is c'róin don gcléireach
Muna dtiocfaidh 'na láthair ní léighfidh "Nobis"
'Sa cailligh nach daor é an Sacra Nobis
Máthair
Gan gnóthaidhe sagairt ní féidir ar saoradh
Siad gárda an anma agus lucht ionaid De iad
Dá bhígh go maithidh siad peacaidh agus daor-chuir
Is dócha gur ceapadh Slighe Beatha dá réir dóibh
Mac
Éist a chaillighe is leig do d ráifthe
Dá mbeutheá-sa marbh ar maidin i mbárach
Is go mbéarfainm 'dtí an sagart tú ceangailte i mála
Ní léighfeadh dom Aifreann gan airgead lámh sdhághail
A's i fairsidhe carthanach budh shearbh leis trácht air.
Máthair
A dhuine gan chéill, fág,'s nach breagh afubhairt tú
Is dual do'n mhac droch = mheasach sgiúrse
Tá an t-aghair nó an mháthair gan amhras cionntach
Mac
An té d'imthigh ón athair le fearg gan traochadh
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 14:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
coicín feír,
A chuiread treith ar fear a bhealaigh,
Curfá.
|Ní'l sé in a lá ná ina lá, ní'l sé ina lá ná ina mhaidean ní'l sé in a lá roimh mhíle grád cé gur solas árd atá in a gealaigh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 14:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I
Éirigh in do sheasamh a fhir an tige, cuir oct do bhríste, do mhig is do hata cunnig cómhluadar leis an duine chroidhe a bhíos in do luigh leath annsin go maidean.
Curfá.
Ní'l se ina lá, ná ina lá ní'l sé ina lá ná ina mhaidean, ní'l sé in-a lá roimh mhíle grád cE gur solais árd atá in-a gealaigh.
2
Ó A Chailin bhain údaigh thall a bhfuil do spraodh ar cúl do glaice, is agat féin atá an
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 14:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ceannuidhe-beg commenced to sing:-
"I am off to heaven in the morning".
Another man heard him and said he would take his place. Ceannuidhe-beg put him in the bag, carried him to the lake and threw him in. Ceannuidhe-beg then took the drowned man's cattle and placed them on a hill over the lake so that their figures were reflected in the water. He then went off in search of Ceannuidhe-Mor and showed him the cattle saying.
"I got all those down in the lake," he said "and there are as many more below.
Ceannuidhe-mor then jumped into the lake and was drowned.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 14:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there were two men, namely Ceannuidhe-mor and Ceannuidhe-beg. The first man owned a lot of cattle whereas Ceannuidhe-beg had only one cow which used to graze along the road. One day she strayed into a bog and fell into a bog-hole and was drowned.
Ceannuidhe-beg then gathered a lot of men to pull her out and he took off her skin, went to the town and sold it. He got his money in half-pence and put it into a bag. As he was on his way home he met Ceannuidhe-mor and he said:-
"I am after getting this bag-ful of sovereigns for the skin."
Ceannuidhe mor then rushed home and skinned all his cattle. He then went to the town and sold the skins but got only five shillings apiece for them. On arriving home he captured Ceannuidhe-beg, put him in a bag and brought him off to the lake to drown him. He left the bag outside a shop whilst he went in to buy some goods.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 14:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The clothes worn in olden times were much different to what they are nowadays. The womens' clothes were made from pure wool and flax, a material they called Drogged. They generally wore a very warm skirt, which was wide at the bottom, and narrow at the waste. They wore a bonnett on their head, and a kind of a coat they called a Brat.
The mens' clothes did not change a lot. Some of them wore very narrow trousers, and others wore them very narrow in the legs and wide at the bottom covering the shoes. They wore a tall hat on their head, and a long coat with three buttons.
Men as well as women
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 13:59
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rejected
awaiting decision
Tom O'Reilly the famous footballer. There is a grave in a field along the road to Cavan beyond Crossdoney. It is supposed to be a girl that is buried in it. It is said that she would not be buried in consecrated ground because she was a bad sinner.
Here is a story about a graveyard I heard. One time a woman was driving into Gowna village. She was passing an old graveyard when the horse stopped beside a grave. There were children in the cart. The woman knew that there was a spirit at the grave and she was afraid. She gave her overall to one of the children and told them to get down and tie it round the horse's head. The girl did so and when she did it the horse moved on. Here is a story about Vincent White from Gowna.
One morning Vincent was
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 13:54
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There are seven graveyards in the Parish of Killeshandra including old graveyards and new graveyards. There is an old graveyard in Coronea beside the creamery and the tombstones are still plainly to be seen. It is sloping to the North West. It is not long since it was in use. There is also an old graveyard in the townland of Corr beside James Armstrong's fort. This graveyard was used for burying unbaptised children. There are no tombstones in this graveyard but the little graves are still to be seen high over the ground. Eoghan Ruadh O'Néill when he deid in the year 1649 was supposed to be buried in the Abbey graveyard in Cavan town but many of the older people tell us he is buried in Slanore graveyard beside the home of
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:43
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rejected
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There are many people in this district who make cures for different ailments, such as sprains, burns, a bleeding, and dirty mouth. Owen Moore of Coroneray, Kingscourt, Co. Cavan, makes the cure for a sprain. Eddie Fleming of Coronerary, Kingscourt, Co. Cavan, makes the cure for a bleeding. Lizzie Reilly of Laragh, Kingscourt, C0 Cavan makes the cure for a burn.
This is an ointment made from herbs collected in the fields. The secret of how it is made is handed down from one generation to another. John Tierney has the cure of the dirty mouth. Nobody has this cure, except a child that is born after it's Father's death.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:26
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awaiting decision
spell of rain, but when it is red in the south it is the sign of fine weather. When dust rises from the road we shall have wet weather. if If the smoke goes up direct towards the sky it is the sign of fine weather.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:23
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brightly it is the sign of frost.
There are other local sayings about the weather. Old people say that if the wind comes from the north it is the sign of rain and snow and when it comes from the west fine weather is expected.
There are birds and animals also whose habits are noted as weather potents. If swallow flies high it is the sign of good weather, but if they swallows fly low it is the sign of fine weather. If the cat has his back to the fire bad weather is said to be approaching. People say: if the dogs eat grass it is the sign of wet weather also.
When the sky is red in the west it is the sign of a long
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:17
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There are so many signs and beliefs about the weather that it would be hard to ennumerate them all. These are some of the local saying about the weather - If the sky is dark and clouds floating lazily across the sky it is the sign of thunder and lightning. If the clouds float quickly it is the sign of rain. When the sun goes down red it is the sign of fine weather. if there are numberless stars in the sky twinkling
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:13
approved
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:12
approved
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awaiting decision
of cabbage over the door and the (the) person who enters the house first the next morning is said to be the future husband or wife of the person who put the head of cabbage there.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:11
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The one who gets the nut is said to marry a widow, and the one who gets a halfpenny is said to a widow.
They also fill their mouths with water and go to houses in the neighbourhood. They listen at the door and the person's name that is called out in the house is said to be their future husband or wife.
They also get three dishes adding clay to one, water to another, and a ring to a third to find out their future station in life.
They also go to some garden and pull a head of cabbage. They hang the head
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:04
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There are many customs connected with November's night. It is no harm to practise these customs for amusement, but it is harm to practise them if we take interest in them.
The customs generally practised are_ making a cake and putting a ring, a nut, and a halfpenny in it. The person who gets the ring is said to be the first to marry.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:01
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:00
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disappeared
From that day till this they never went out card-playing again.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 10:00
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awaiting decision
to come with him to to play cards, so they did.
The man put a little table on the grass and they sat round it.
They began to play the cards. "The two boys won all the money off the little man, and the man won it off the two boys again.
It happened that one of the cards fell.
One of the boys stooped down to pick it up and what did he see but two cow's legs on the man.
When he got up the little man and table had
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:57
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The old people have many stories connected with fairies such as the following which I have heard from my mother.
One night there (was) were two boys coming home from card playing. They had to pass through lonely bogs. When they were in the middle of the bogs they saw a little red man approaching them. The man bade them
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:52
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There is a little rhyme connected with the cuchoo
The cuckoo comes in April,
And sings her song in May.
In the middle of June she whistles her tune
And in July she flies away.
When people hear the cuckoo for the first time they look at the heel of their boots and if they find three hairs there they take them off very safely then they think they will have luck for the year.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:47
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There are many superstitions connected with the cuckoo.
It is said that the first time you hear the cuckoo you should take out your money and spit on it so that you will have luck for the year.
The people say that in what ever direction you hear the cuckoo that is the direction your future husband or wife will be living.
It is said that if you have not your oats sown before you hear the cuckoo it will be late.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:44
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The cuckoo comes to Ireland at the end of Spring. When the cuckoo is laying an egg she looks to see if there any bird gone out of her nest then the cuckoo goes in and lays her eggs among the other eggs. When the bird comes to her nest again she hatches the eggs and when the birds are out the mother birds throws the cuckoo birds out.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:41
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live in Lancashire in England.
Michael David was not very long there until he got work in a mill. He did not know how to work the machine and he hurted his hand so badly that it was amputated.
He had a great wish to be educated. he was educated in England
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:38
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Long ago the people were not as (loyal) secure to in their lands as their are nowadays
Some people were evicted from their lands and Michael David was amongst those.
When Michael David was still very young his parents were evicted from their land they had no place to live at home so they went to
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:34
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When we are playing hide and go seek_ one child stands at the gable with here (evey) eyes closed. The other children go in hiding and the first one she sees she has to catch.
We amuse ourselves in - doors in Winter around the fire telling stories of olden times. We amuse our selves out doors in Autumn by picking blackberries.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:31
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ever they catch that one has to go on their side so on till the game is finished.
When we are playing blind man's buff one child puts a cloth round her eyes so that she will not be able to see. The other children stand in a ring round her and who ever she catches has to put the cloth on.
When we are playing skipping two children hold the rope and a few children run in, then the other two chidren twist the rope.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:28
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The games we usually play are :- lemonade, blind man's buff, shipping, and hide and go -seek. When we are playing lemonade we get about ten children and five stand on each side. The children on one side give letters to the children on the other side and of they are able to make out what the letters are they run after them and who
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:25
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awaiting decision
by the bridesmaid and the bride-groom.
At Confirmation and at first Comunion day white is always worn.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:24
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Some of the shirts are made in the homes and others are bought in the shops. The cloth used in making shirts is white cloth with a stripe.
Socks and stockings were knitted locally and are still.
There are special kinds of clothes worn. Black is worn when a person dies. On St Patrick;s day green is worn. The children wear green harps and shamrock on their coats and green ribbons on their hair.
Blue is worn at marriages
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:21
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tailor had no house of his own he came to the neighbor's house and made the suit.
There is not any weaver in my district but there is a spinner in town named Mrs Curry. Long ago people wore the clothes that were spun.
The cloth the tailor uses is serge rough and fine, tweed of all kinds, velvet, nap. A thimble whitout any bottom and a scissors a sewing machine and needles, all these are used by the tailor when working.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:18
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A tailor once lived in our district and when the people wanted clothes made he went to the house and stayed (their) there until he had the clothes made.
The tailors never sold cloth. When a person wanted a suit or a coat to be made he brought the tailor the cloth to him who made the garment.
Sometimes when the
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:16
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awaiting decision
Nowadays people give five shillings for harvest money.
Hucksters and dealers were common in olden times.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:15
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given in exchange for goods. A bag of yellow meal was given in exchange too.
Friday is a lucky day for buying goods and Saturday is an unlucky day even unto this day people consider that Friday is the best day of the week for starting work of any kind.
No markets were held in olden times.
At harvest time the priest got one barth of corn instead of money.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:12
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Shops were not common on our district in olden times. People had to go to the nearest town to buy and sell their goods
Buying and selling was carried on after Mass in the streets outside the Church.
Money was always given in exchange for goods. Sometimes a bag of potatoes, or oats was
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:10
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used for any sort of rash and for pimples.
Bliccán grows about four inches in height. It grows on rich land and poor land.
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:09
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land as it spreads (on the land) and keeps the grass from growing.
The nettle is not a bad weed on the land because it grows round ditches. It is used for food for cows.
The chicken weed is not a harmful weed on the land. It is used for keeping down swellings. The thistle is a bad weed on the land and it is of no use.
The dandelion is not a bad weed on the land. It is used as food for pigs. Glasacoille is l
senior member (history)
2021-01-16 09:06
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There re many weeds that are harmful to the land.
The bochollán, dockets, chicken weed, nettles (no verb) thistles. Bliccán, dandelion, glascoille, fuarán (bound in the district)
The bochollán is a harmful weed because it spreads on the land (on the land) and makes the soil poor. The docket is a harmful weed on the
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 22:19
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living across the sea.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 22:19
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first game that was played on that night was ducking. We got a tub of water and placed it in the middle of the floor and put an apple into it each one tries to catch the apple in her mouth.
If she catches it she is allowed to keep it. Next we got three saucers and put water in one clay in another and a beeds in a third. The girl that puts her hand into the saucer where the water is supposes to earn her
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 22:15
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Last Sunday night was November's night. I invited my school companions to a feast in my house. Some of the many games that were played on that night were ducking, putting a ring cake and putting nuts down in the fire. We also got three saucers: clay in one and water in another and a beads in another. The
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 22:13
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 22:13
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soul for you"
When the two robbers were coming into the graveyard they lost two apples and when they had all the apples counted they said. "What about two at the gate" The men thought it was themselves so they took off in fright.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 22:10
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awaiting decision
graveyard. There, they sat to count the apples.
When they were counting them they said "One for me" and one for you". This way they counted until they had all the apples counted.
It happened that two men had to pass by the graveyard on their way to work and they heard the robbers counting the apples. They thought it was Our Lord and the Devil saying. "One soul for me" and one
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 22:08
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There are many fairy stories told by the old people. The following one was told to me by my mother who lives in the village of Carracanada.
There were two robbers out one night and they went into an orchard and stole a bag of apples. Then they went on until they came to Kilconduff
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:58
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awaiting decision
There are many names in our farm. The long field, The bush field, Ellen's field, and Ellen's little field, The oats field. The meadow field.
The reason that the long field was called its name, because it is big and long. The bush field got its name, because there is a big bush in it.
The reason Ellen's field and Ellen's garden got their names because there was an old women living
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:48
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near them long ago, and that was her field and garden, and we bought it from her and ever since that we called them these names.
The oats field got its name because there was oats in it. The reason that the meadow field was called its name because there was a meadow in it long ago. My father's farm is situated in Scardaune in the Parish of Crossboyne, in the Barony of Claremorris
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:46
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awaiting decision
Corrections
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:44
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awaiting decision
Scardaune is my native village. It is also the townland of Scardaune. It is in the parish of Crossboyne. There are eleven houses in my district.
In my district there are two slated houses and nine thatched houses. The commanst name in my district is Conway.
There was a water-fall in the olden times in Scardaune and that is how Sacrdaune got its
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:42
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name. There are two old people in my district. There names are Mr. Patrick Brannick and Mrs. Murphy. There is no ruins of old houses in my district. The land is good in my district. There is no wood in my district. There is a river and a stream in my district.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:39
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:39
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the hare going in the window, When the man came near the old house he knocked at the door. There was a woman within spinning the man asked the woman did she see a hare and she said no. He saw blood on the the floor he new that she was enchanted woman and he got afraid and went home.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:37
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cow when the women who was the owner of the cow would come to milk her the cow would not have any milk. This morning the man waited out with a hound in the where the cow was, he saw the hare coming sucking the cow and he set his hound after the hare when the hare came near a old house he ran in the window and the hound was after him and he took a bit of
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:29
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We call our cowhouse the cows stable. We put straw under our cows and calfs, for bedding. We tie our cows with chains and we tie some of the calfs with himp-rope and some more with straw ropes. The chains are bought in the shops. We dont hang anything up in our cows-stable.
There was once cow that had a lot of milk every morning a hare used to come and suck the milk from the
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:27
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We keep cows, sheep, pigs horses, donkeys and goats One cow is called the Big Cow. Another one is called the Old cow. Another one is called the strawberry cow.
When I am driving the cows I say habha ! habha!
We call our calfs the Big cows calf the old cows calf and the strawberrys cows calf. When I am calling the calfs to there drink I say suck! suck!
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:23
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one came out and licked them all (a person's mouth and teeth)
I have a little house and a mouse would not fit in it and all the men in Londonderry would not count all the windows in it. (a thimble)
What is deeper than the sea? (a tailors thimble
Why is a dog's tail compared to the heart of a tree? (because it is the farthest from the bark)
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:21
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1. Which of the white goose or the grey goose is the gander? (none of them)
2. What is it that goes around the world and its neck twisted? (A begger man's bag)
3. What is it that goes around the house and around the house and lies at the back door. (a broom)
As round as an apple as flat as a pan, one side a woman and the other side a man (a penny)
Twenty - four white horses in a stall the red
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:02
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:02
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 21:01
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car.
A wedding feast is held in the mans house. Strawboys visit the houses for drink. The Strawboys dress in old clothes. Some people bring the guards for fear that the Strawboys would break anything. The strawboy do be received well in some houses but one or two guards drive the away in other houses. Years ago people used race against each other when
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 20:52
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they used to be comming home. The people of the village used lite big fires of straw when the cars would be comming home in the drag. When they are married the woman and the man goes home to the husbands house after they are married. The woman does not come home to her own house until the months visit. The wife and
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 20:50
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the husband cut the wedding cake togther, and they dance togther. The wifes did not sit on the horses with the men comming home from the wedding.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 20:49
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Marriages most frequently take place before lent or on shrove Tuesday. The month of May is unlucky for marriages. Many local custom's are connected with shrove. Many matches are made in the district. Money is given as a dowry. Stock or goods are not given in my district now, but long ago stock used often be given. People do not remember marriages
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 20:46
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 19:37
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The shops that we have now very common in olden times but they were not as big as they are now. The local farmers used to go round to the fairs such as Newtown, Moyne, Enaghbeg and Enaghmor [?]. Fairs are not held now in the mentioned. The farmers used to make purchases among themselves and only now and again buyers used to come. A lot of business was carried on after mass on Sundays bringing home the weekly supplies for a country house such as meal, flour, tea, sugar and other things as well
On Market days this is still practised
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 19:31
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times. Turf, wood and bog deal for the fire. Bog deal lighted in the fire was used for light because they were no lamps. They used to cut up the bog deal and make it into chips when they wanted to go out to see the cows they would bring a few of them, each one would stand about five minutes
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 19:29
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cows for the hens and there were no clocks that time and the clocks they used to have was a cock in the morning. The fire was usually against the gable wall. They used to have a taster for the beds nicely done with curtains. The front was made with mortar and a basket to conduct the smoke. The fire was sometimes in the middle of the floor and a hole in the roof to let out the smoke. The floor was made of clay. Half doors were used in olden
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 19:26
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The collect stones and burn a kiln of lime. They get sand then and mix the lime and sand together to make mortar. The timber was got in forests, and bogs scrag and thatch for the roof and it was tied with suggor. They used to have a bed in the kitchen and the cows at the end of the house and a drain sepratid between the kitchen floor and the cows place. They used to have the pigs under the bed. There was a loft over the
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 17:21
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awaiting decision
agus mhairbh siad é nuair a bhí sé ag obair,
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 17:21
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thabhairt do na Búrcaí agus tháinigh muinntir Bháile an Bhróin ke conghnamh a thabhairt do na Ceallaigh agus bhuail siad cath i gCnoc Tuagh.
Sa mbliadháin 1916 bhí troid ag suibhal i Eireann idir na Black and Tans agus na Gaedheal. Nuair a bhi na Black and Tans ann do chuaidh siad isteach ins an tighthe agus matbhuigh siad na daoine a bhí ann.
Bhí fear shuas sa Túrlach Mhór agus bhí sé ag troid i gcoinnibh na Black and Tans agus chuaidh na Black and Tans go dtí an teach
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 17:16
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Bhí cath mór i Cnuc Tuagh i bparaiste lacaigh agus ní raibh aon phúdar ag na saighdiúirí le troid a dhéanamh ní raibh acú acht tuaighthe agus sin é an chaoi a fuair an áit an t-ainm Cnuic Tuagh.
Bhí go leór troid i mbaile an Bróin. Ié fathach ar fadha bhí ag troid ann agus marbhuigheadh a lán daoine san troid. Sin é an fáth a fuair an áit an t-ainm Baile an Bhróin. Cúpla bhuadain ó shoin bí an talamh annsin roinnte agus fuair fear darbh ainm Dan Collins píosa talamh ann lá da raibh se ag baint amach clocha i gcóir nalla
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 17:12
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fuair sé go leór cnámh agus vhíodar cómh mór le cnámh chapaill.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 17:11
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Timcheall dhá chéad bhliadhain o shoin bhí cogadh mhór idir muinntir Bhaile An Bhróin i bparáiste leachaigh agus muinntir Cill Chathail i bparáiste Anach Chuain.
'Siad na Búarchaí Í Doire Mac Iaclainn a thosuigh é. Nuair a bhí deire leis an gcoghaidh cuireadar na daoine a mharbuigheadar ann ins an bpáirch a thosuigh an cogaidh agus tá reilt ann ó shoin agus go leor paistí curtha ann. Tháinig muinntir Cnoch Tuagh i bParáiste
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 17:04
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Leachaigh agus Baile an Bhróis le congnamh a thabhairt do na Búarcaí agus annsin tháinig na Sasanaigh ann agus thosuigh siad an troidh agus bí an buadh ag na búacaí. Táinigh saighdiúirí Shasana agus cuireadar fútha i gChantíní agus sin é an fáth a bhfuil an t-aionm sin ar an gceanntar.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 17:02
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Timcheall céad blaidhna o shoin táinig coghadh idír muinntir Anach Cuain agus muinntir Baile an Bróin i bparáiste leacach. Siad na Búrcaí aguis OCeallaigh a thosuigh e. Táinig muinntir Cnoc Tuagh le conghnamh a
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:55
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Money was always given for goods. Labour was given very often in Spring and in Autumn for goods. The words in deals were "tick" which means credit. "Boot" which means, if two men were making a swop and if they considered one thing better than the other the owner of the bad thing would give something along with what he was swopping and the thing he gave with what he was swopping would be called the boot. "Lucks-penny" means money given by the seller to the buyer for luck. Every place markets are held now they were held in the same place.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:48
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fifty or sixty years ago.
Hucksters, pedlars and dealers used to come to this district very often. They still come. Almost all the coins that were used are used still except a five shilling, four shilling piece, four penny piece and all gold coins.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:46
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the smoke. House had no glass for the windows. They used to have a hole in the side-wall, and at night they would put a bag in it to keep out the cold. The old floors were all made of dobe, and flags. Half-doors are common in the district and some houses had a bag hung down from the top of the door. Turf and bog-deal was used for the fire. The old method for giving light was bog-deal and rushlights. The rushes were peeled and a few of them put together and graced and they were then used as candles.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:41
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The kind of houses which existed in former times were all thatched. They were roofed with timber, then bog scraws placed over the timber, and thatched with rushes or black sedge. The rushes and black sedge are got in the bog. In old houses there was usually a bed in the kitchen and it was placed in a corner convenient to the fire. It was called the kitchen bed. The fireplace was usually against the gable wall, and the front of the chimney was made of mortar and stones. In olden times people remember having the fire in the centre of the floor. They used to have a hole in the thatch and a creel or a bucket with a hole in it to draw
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:34
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1. Fear beag in-a seasamh le claidhe otheann sé gach a bhfaghainn sé is ní olann sé uisge.
Fr = Teine.
2. Chuaidh mé suas an boithríncasaidh liom mó mha,. Bhí srón iarann uirrthí is cuirfidh sí ruag ar na preacháin. Gr= gunna.
4. Ta sé ós cionn an teine is faoí an teine is n i fheiceann an teine é. Fr = caca í oighin"
4. Bain as is bain as is rachaidh sé í mhéid. Cuir an is cuir an is imtheochadh sé go léir.
Fr = Poll.
5. Chuaidh sé soir is chuaidh sé siar. Chuaidh sé í ngairdin
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:26
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Baile Ata Cliath ba mhó é a greimh ná greimh calaill is ní blaiseann sé aon biadh.
Fr = speal.
6. Tuige a dearceann an bó ós cionn an baile. Fe = Mar ní fheafidh sí dearchadh faoí
7. Cé mé ruball bó a teigheach suas chuig an gealach. Fr = Ceann dá mbeadh sé sathach fada.
8. Chuaidh mé suas an bóitrín. Is thug mé an bóithrín ar mó dhruin liom. Fr = Dreimire.
9. Céard é an rud nach raibh ann ariamh is ní beadh coidhche.
Fr = Nach ndearnadh luck neadh í gcluas cait ariamh.
Fr =
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:19
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10. Droicheas ar luch gan carraig no cloch. Fr = Leacoidhre.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:18
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Bhí beirt gasúir ag dul ar sgoil lá amháin agus fuaireadar cnó ar an bhóthair rompa. "Ó, fheach an cnó," arsa Seán. Do thóg Sheamhais e, "Is liom-sa é" arsa Séain, mar gur mé a chonnaich ar dtús é." Ní h-éad acht is liom-sa é arsa Séamus. Mar gur mé a thóg é.
Bhí sé in-a troid annsin acú gach duine acú ag rád go ma leis an cnó nó go bhacheadar fear ag teacht cúca.
Dubhairt siad annsin go bhfágadh siad ag na fear a bhí ag teacht, an sgéal a réidhteacht dóibh,
Tháinic an fhear cuca agus d'innis siad an sgéal de agus
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:13
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d'eist sé ho h-arach.
Annsion rug sé ar an cnó i n-a aimh agus bris sé é. Chuir sé an eithin í n-a bhéal agus d'ithe sé é, annsin thug sé leath na blaoisge de na gasuirí agus dubhairt sé.
"Seo a Sheain", ar seisean leat dé'n blaoisg mar gur tusa a thóig é agus dubhairt sé leis an leath eile a tabhairt dhomh. Tháimh féin ag coinnéail na h-eithne í gcóir an tríoblóid a fuair mé ag déanamh breitheamh [?] eadraibh.
Is sé sin an ball a chuaidh ar an mbeirt buachaillí agus ar an cnó.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:07
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:07
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Sean - Fhocla
1. Is fearr mach agat féin no ingean ag fear eile.
2. Is fearr marcuidheacht ar gabha no coiseacht da feabhas.
3. Is maith an t-anlann an t-ochras.
4. An te nach bhfuil laidir ní miste do a mbeadh glic.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:05
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sé an buachaill.
Ar dtús do leimh an leoin, chun an buachaill a ithe acht d'aithin sé é, agus in ionadh é a ithe rinne sé cairde leis, agus is annsin do ciumhnig sé ar an maithneas do rinne an buachaill do.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 16:03
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Bhí fear ann uair amháin agus bhí buachaill aimisre aige.
Níor raibh aon mhaith ins an buachaill aimisre agus dubhairt an fear leis a dhul abhaile.
Lá da raibh an buachaill ag siubhal thart ins an casadh leoin leis, bhí dealbh í tois an leoin thóg an buachaill amach an dealbh dó. Rinne an buachaill rud éigin as an bealach dó'n leoin. Chuir na daoine an leoin isteach í sgiobhall ar feadh seachtmaine. Í deireamh na seachtmaine chuir siad an buachaill isteach san sgioboll leis ag sul go n-iosfaidh
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 15:51
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senior member (history)
2021-01-15 15:51
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Fadó fuair an chearc agus an ge agus an lach teistúir agus theannuigheadar punt ime air.
Bhí an chearc sanntach agus d'ith sí é. Chuimill an ge agus an lach dobhtha féin é.
Sin é an fath nach mbíonn an diann ar an chearc an lá fluic agus sgíorrann an baisteach dó'n ge agus dó'n lach.
(a crioc)
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 15:48
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 15:48
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fhios aige cé'n caoí a racfadh sé abhaile chuig a bhean agus aras arís leis an baile Mhór ag lorg an asal acht níor féad sé é a fhághail in áit ar bith.
Bhí an bhean bhocht ag suil go stiocfadh sé chuile moimead acht níor tháinig sé go dtí an oidche. Nuair a tháinig sé go dtí an teach d'innis sé an sgéal da bhean agus thosuig sí ag gaire muna a fheiceann tusa acht ceithre cinn cim mise sé cinn agus tá tú féin ar ceann acú.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 15:44
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Chuaidh dear go dtí an aonach lá sé cúig asal agus theastuig uaifh iad a dhíol acht níor dhíol sé iad.
Nuair a bhí sé ag teacht abhaile chuaidh sé ag marcuideacht ar cheann acú agus thiomáin sé na ceithre asail eile amach roimhe.
Nuair a bhí sé leatbhealaigh abhaile níor raibh sé in-ann acht ceithre asal a chomhradh mar níor comhradh sé an cheann a bhí sé ag marchuidheacht air. Níor raibh fhios
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 11:12
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Bread long ago was made from home grown wheat, and oats.
People remember querns being used. The different kinds of bread used were Potato-cake, Boxty-bread & oatmeal bread. Potato cake was made from boiled potatoes and was made when potatoes were dug.
Oaten-meal bread was made from oat-meal which they bought in the shops. Boxty was amide from boiled potatoes and all the family used to help in grating the potatoes against a perforated tin. In kneading the
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 11:09
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oaten meal water was added. No water or milk were needed in Potatoe cake.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 11:07
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In olden times when doctors were few the people found remedies for their ailments. If a person had a sty on his eye nine thorns of a gooseberry bush would be found and pointed at the eye nine times.
The cure for the whooping cough was the milk left after a ferret and also asses milk.
It is said that the seventh son of the
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 11:01
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family has a cure for the ring worm by rubbing his hand over it.
The cure for warts was the water that would be found on a rock accidentially. It would be rubbed on the warts three times.
If a person had a toothache pepper would be put into brown paper and put into the jaw beside the tooth and this is supposed to take away the pain. Another cure for toothache is to put a frog on the tooth.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:58
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used to get a frog and leave it on the persons tooth and it would cure it forever.
The food left after a ferret is said to cure the chin-cough and also asses milk.
They used to get herbs such as mountain sedge and it is said to cure a cough.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:56
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In olden times when there were no doctors people used to seek remedies for their own ailments. They used to get themselves bled from feet or hands for pleuricy.
They also got charms for ring-worm from the seventh son by saying some prayers over it. For ericiples they used to give three pieces of butter for different days, Monday, Thursday and Monday again.
They used a silk tale for measuring peoples heads and saying some prayers. They used to go to holy-wells and say prayers and perform stations for the good of their health.
For curing tooth-ache people
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:43
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round the house and into every hole and corner?
Answer: The wind.
Question: As round as an apple as plump as a ball and al the kings horses would not pull it up?
Answer: A spring well.
Question: Hink hank under the bank ten drawing four?
Answer: A person milking a cow.
Question: Under the fire and over the fire and never touches the fire?
Answer: A cake in an oven.
Question: It goes round the wood and round the wood and never goes into the wood
Answer: The bark of a tree.
Question: Why does a hen pick a pot?
Answer: Because she cannot lick it.
Question: How many sides on an
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:39
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oven?
Answer: "Two" the inside and the outside
Question: Why does a cow look over the fence
Answer: because she cannot look under it.
Question: What is the difference between A and B
Answer: When pronouncing A the mouth is opened and when pronouncing B the mouth is shut.
Question: What walsk with its head down?
Answer: The nails in a shoe.
Question: Black and white and read all over?
Answer: The newspaper.
Question: As round as an apple as plump as a ball can climb the church wall over steeple and all?
Answer: The sun.
Question: Steel toes, iron nose,
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:34
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and that is the boy that would frighten you?
Answer: A gun.
Question: What is full that holds more
Answer: A pot of potatoes.
Question: What is the lightest town in Ireland?
Answer: Cork.
Question: What turns without moving?
Answer: Milk
Question: What town in Ireland can you spell backwards
Answer: Navan.
Question: What town in Ireland is like a candle
Answer: "Wicklow" because the wick is low.
Question: The man that makes it does not need it and the man that sells it does not want it and the man that needs it does not see it.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:34
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and that is the boy that would frighten you|||?
Answer: A gun.
Question: What is full that holds more
Answer: A pot of potatoes.
Question: What is the lightest town in Ireland?
Answer: Cork.
Question: What turns without moving?
Answer: Milk
Question: What town in Ireland can you spell backwards
Answer: Navan.
Question: What town in Ireland is like a candle
Answer: "Wicklow" because the wick is low.
Question: The man that makes it does not need it and the man that sells it does not want it and the man that needs it does not see it.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:30
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Question: Why is H like a dying man.
Answer: Because it is the end of earth and the beginning of heaven.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:29
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Answer: The other half.
Question: Spell a broken down fence in three letters?
Answer: A gap.
Question: Billie Bulle, he built a ship an in the ship his daughter sat an I would be ashamed to tell her name an now I have told it twice?
Answer: An.
Question: What I never had or what I never wished to have, but If I had I would not sell it for the money of the world?
Answer : A balled (Bald) head.
Question: Which travels the faster heat or cold?
Answer: Heat, because you can catch cold but you cant catch heat.
Question: Round the house and
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:24
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Question: When is a shoemaker dying?
Answer: When he is preparing his sole for the last.
Question: What will go up the chimney turned down but it wont go done the chimney turned up?
Answer: An umberalla.
Question: What goes in dry and comes out wet and the longer its in the stronger it gets?
Answer: Tea in a tea-pot.
Question: What is the most like half of the moon?
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:20
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St Stephens day occurs on the day after Christmas Day. On that day the people go around looking for money. In some districts boys go (around) out hunting for the wren and they make a little box and put him in, and they go around singing "help the wren."
In our own town a crowd of boys dress themselves in torn clothes in a way they would not be known and they go around singing and dancing.
The words sung are, "help the wren" and the wren the wren the king of all birds on St Stephens
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:15
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day was caught in the furze up with the kettle and down with the pan and give me a penny to bury the wren". When the evening comes the boys divide the money equally among them.
St Brigids day occurs on the second of February. Nearly every house puts up a cross in honour of St. Brigid. The Children go around the street looking for help for St Brigid.
St Patricks day comes on the 17th of March. The people wear shamrock in honour of the time St Patrick preached to the pagons when he took up the shamrock.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:12
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On St Johns (day) night the town boys gather turf and make a fire and they also put a bone in the fire. The people go around the fire as often as they like praying. People take sods of turf out of the fire and throw them into the crop of potatoes.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:10
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The most harmful weeds in the farm are the nettle the Colesfoot the Chicken-weed and the Capog.
The Chicken-weed is harmful because it spreads rapidly and the other weeds are harmful because they are long rooted and they impoverish the soil. There are no weeds looked upon as growing only where land is good. All weeds grow on good and bad land. Rose noble, Dandelion and roots of daisies are herbs that have medicinal properties.
The way in which they were used are in the local cures.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:06
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The mountainy cattle, sheep and goats feed on the heather.
Heather and the moss that grows on the rocks were used for the making of dye. This is the way they were used.
They were boiled and strained and the yarn was boiled in the juice. The people in the mountains still use this dye and the dye they make is a very good dye. Because when washed it does'nt fade.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 10:03
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goods. These are the words connected with buying and selling, "tick", "boot", "cant", "banker", "note", "luckes penny". It was considered unlucky to contract business on Monday's and Saturdays. Fairs were held in fair greens and cross roads, and are still held there and hucksters and pedlers and dealers in feathers and rags visit those places when a fair or market is held there. The names of coins referred are, sixpenny piece, tenpenny piece, fourpenny piece, three penny piece, penny piece, penny half penny piece. The most of these coins are gone out of use.
senior member (history)
2021-01-15 09:59
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Shops were common in olden times and people had to go to the nearest town to make purchases. Buying and selling was carried on after Mass by the country people and is still carried on. The country people used to buy tea, sugar, soap, bacon, candles. Money was not always given for goods. Eggs and butter were given in exchange for them. Labour was also given for
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 21:58
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but some of the very old houses had one small window of about 6 ins square. When a pane of glass got broken long ago it was replaced by a wooden pane shaped in the same way. The floors of houses were paved with with stones and and those near the sea had flag floors.
Half doors were fairly common long ago. The only fuel used for fires was turf and sometimes people near woods used a little wood.
The candles used were long ago were made of fir. This wood dug up of the bog and let dry and afterwards it was spliced and these were the candles they used
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 21:54
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Baskets were made long ago by steeping rods in boiling water so as to make them soft for bending. Four strong rods were put in the centre and four more were crossed on the top of those pieces of turnips were put between them so as to separate them.
Longer rods were fastened to the bottom smaller rods were then woven on top and bottom. A verge of about four inches was woven all round on the basket, the big rods tied on top were platted round this verge so as to keep it from loosening.
Long ago candles were made
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 21:50
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from tallow rolled into sticks about eight inches long and one and a half in diameter. Sheeps' wool closely platted was used for the wick.
Dye was got formerly from moss, when this moss was steeped it gave a brown tinge to clothes. Ivy leaves boiled in water was said to dye garments green. Alum was also used for dying.
Many years ago lime was got from limestones which were burned in circular kilns made in the ground Limestones were broken and put into the kiln - turf was used for burning the stones. Three or four air holes were made in
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 21:45
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the bottom to draw air and keep the turf lighting.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 21:44
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Candles were made long ago out of bull rushes. The rushes were got in ponds, lakes and on river banks.
After drying the rushes at the fire each rush was dipped in oil. A bundle of them was then tied together and lighted.
Basket making was a common occupation among the old people years ago. When traders came to a house the people
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 21:41
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might have no money to buy stuff so they exchanged baskets for the things they needed.
The old people long ago could make anything out of iron. In the forge the blacksmith mades far more things than he does nowadays. He shoes horses and mends ploughs. He makes use of the following implements:- the anvil, sledge, vice and tongs. Spinning and weaving were done in the homes of the people. The women were great spinners.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 21:28
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In our farm there are many animals the most common are cows and horses. there are special names on some cows for instance, Spinc, Branac, Riach and Nigger.
The name of a cowhouse in this locality is Bothán na mbó. Dry rushes, straw, hay, and turf dust is used as fodder for cattle. Cows are tied to stalls, and in some places to big flat flags standing up right with chains often off them. They are tied round the neck. Ceangal is the name of a tying in a certain byre.
Many articles are hung up in byres for luck such as St. Brigid's Cross, a wooden cross, a blessed Benedict Medal, and a horse shoe covered with silver paper. When a cow dies of a disease the Benedict medal is buried with it. Three drops of milk are spilled into the fire to ensure a plentifulness of milk the whole year round.
Slits are put on young calves' ears to prevent blackquarter. When a young calf is born his head is put into a house before his tail.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:54
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From time to time tramps call at my house. As a rule the same people come always. Their names are Boland, Cuinningham and Murphy. There is no account of their native places.
Generally they sell brooches tie pins, holy pictures and other little ornaments. They obtain their goods cheaply in Woolworths or from travelling shopkeepers. Some are welcome as they were once respectable. They stay in each house for about five minutes. They generally sleep by a farmers five-place or in an old cabin. They obtain food from people who are eating when they arrive. When asking alms they say "May God give prosperity to all the people in this house and may the Lord have mercy on the souls of the dead." They always walk and go alone so that (that) they may not leave out any house. Seldom they (go alone) give any account of their lives. If ever get
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:48
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a drink of milk they say "Fá thuairim slan do'n tighearna dhil a bheannuig an fhion dá mháthair" Long ago when newspapers were scarce these people used bring the latest news throughout the country
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:40
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his master told him to save the donkey that he would be reach the shore and save himself. The boy went and took the poor struggling donkey into his boat and landed safely ashore. In about four week afterwards the boy was attacked by a bull on his master's farm. He had neither a stick nor a dog to protect him. The groans of the bull and the shouts of the boy attracted the donkey who went to the scene in a furious gallop. He kept snapping and kicking at the bull, until the boy got a long distance away.
County Cavan stores were burned. It damaged groceries and hardware which estimates £25, 000.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:36
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the room where she was and took her in his arms to a window, where a ladder was set to take her down.
There was a farmer living on Trinity island, County Cavan who had a narrow escape of being drowned. He went to the Christmas market of Cavan about the year one thousand nine hundred and eight. When he returned to where he had his cot anchored, he put his donkey and cart into the cot and then set sail homewards. There rose a strong wind, and although he was great at rowing the wind was so strong that it turned the cot over, thus leaving him and the poor donkey to the mercy of the waves. He had a distance of about one hundred and eighty perches to swim ashore. His servant boy seeing the struggle soon went to his assistance and when he reached,
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:27
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Hamilton. It was about four stories high. This week castle was burned about the month of July one thousand nine hundred and twelve. Fortunately the master and mistress were away on a visit on the day of the occurrence. One of the employers first saw the flames burst out of one of the windows on the top storey. He raised the alarm and in about half an hour. Mr. Fletcher and his employers, Mr Gannon, creamery manager and his staff, and also many people from the town, arrived with their water-carts and horses, but it was in vain. Only part of the furniture was saved.
Mr White, saddler, formerly of Killeshandra, County Cavan, risked his life to save one of the maids who was in one of the rooms in the third storey. He plunged through fire and smoke until he reached
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:22
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There was an outbreak of small pox about fifty years ago which caused a great many deaths. It left many people disfigured for life, so there was an act passed that everybody had to be vaccinated.
There was a beautiful building situated about a half - mile on the eastern side of Killeshandra, County Cavan known as the castle of Castle
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:19
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senior member (history)
2021-01-14 20:19
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There was a terrible wind storm that swept over Ireland in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty nine which caused a lot of damage. There were a lot of houses, hay-reeks, and corn-stacks burned down.
There was also a snow storm about February one thousand nine hundred and thirty one, with a very strong gale of wind that drifted the snow to about the depth from eight to ten feet. There was a man lost his life during this storm on the side
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 17:12
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of Bruce Hill near Arva. There were side sheep and young calves lost also.
A Drought Period.
The Summer months of one thousand nine hundred and twenty two were very dry and warm. There was no rain from the month of April until the second week of August. The potatoe crops were a complete failure. Only some farmers that had their potatoes set in low moory soil, had any to seed their ground the following Spring. The government purchased from Great Britain and Scotland various quantities of potatoes to provide seed for the Irish farmers. They also supplied the poor and small farmers with free potatoes and oats. Oats and hay crops were also a failure. The harvest and Winter crops were the only feeding farmers had for their horses and cattle.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 17:07
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severe losses of cattle from bad water. All inland drains and streams went completely dry. Also many spring wells failed to supply the needs of the household. Some people had to draw water from a lake about a distance of three miles. There were many outbreaks of fever in districts during this period, which was supposed to be from the effects of bad water.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 17:03
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In the townland of Crenagh in County Cavan my birth place there was a man our next door neighbour who was very good at throwing weights. He was Michael Reilly. One time they held a competition between Michael Brady and Michael Reilly. Michael Brady was after winning a good game and the people all had a report sent out about the competition. They held it at the cross-roads in Crenagh. There was a great alarm when it was Michael Reilly that won it. The people had every excuse made up first that the game was not fare. So with the dispute they replayed the game and the second time Michael Reilly won it. The people that sided for him the first time sided for him the second time and they said that the game was played fare the first time so he was to have the luck of winning it.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:55
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There was a man in Cornafean about six miles from the village of Killeshandra in County Cavan. He was able to carry a forty stone sack of grain or potatoes He could lift heavy stones too. He was was Thomas Minage.
Irish people long ago were noted for being great walker's. There were no vehicles in olden times so when they wanted to go from one place to another they travelled by foot. James McHugh of Crenagh was a great walker. He could walk eleven and a half miles in one half day. He often arose at five o'clock in the morning and walk to Cavan and carry home a half hundred weights of flour on his back and would be home at three o'clock in the day time. He would go out and do as much work till night in the fields as the people would do now in two days.
Mr's Reilly and Mr's Kiernan were good walkers too. One morning they arose at four o'clock and started to walk to Arva which is about seven or eight miles from Killeshandra. They went with chickens
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:48
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to sell them to have some money to get their little provisions. They would bring home with them a stone of flour and a stone of mail. They would be home to get the dinner at twelve o'clock. They would go then about their business as usual and no one would know that they were ever away.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:45
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senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:45
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Sure his equals cant be found.
VI
There's David Hayes and Jimmy Gray,
And Billy Fenton too.
Why is fact there's not a waster,
In the famous Gold and Blue.
VII
Down from the North there comes a band,
To swell the ranks you see.
Up strapping able fellows,
From a fine big country.
VIII
There's Mulcahy and Whelan,
And Cotter likewise too.
Not forgetting Poor Mick Savage,
Sure he's loyal to the Gold and Blue.
IX
We travelled down to Charleville town,
To play the "Crooms" you see.
In this we did succeed,
And came home victorously.
X
We brought the honours to East Cork,
And brought them manly too.
So give them cheers for the Carrig boys,
They're the pride of the Gold and Blue.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:39
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I
Come all ye lads of Carrig,
I hope you will draw near.
And appreciate this little song,
Which will make the county fear.
II
Here's a health to the Gaels of Carrig,
And their committee also.
Their deeds will live in history.
Wherever they may go.
III
Now I'll give you a brief description,
And the names of those athletes.
There's the Touhy's and Jack Mulcahy.
Who holds three full back seats.
IV
There's Bobna and Bill Barry,
And the Kennedy's too likewise.
And the trio of Ahern's,
Their a terror for their size.
V
Our goalkeeper John Donovan,
Like a stone wall safe and sound,
And "Killarney" in the centre,
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:34
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care a jot.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:34
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The morning it was frosty but it threatened to be fine,
When four old sporting hunters made off for Denny Ryan's.
They called for poor old "Shandon" but heard that he was gone,
They they got downhearted for they had him all along.
They made off for the mountain in jolly good old form,
For they knew that killing rabbits did no one any harm.
Whenever "Shandon" gave out tongue we knew Reynard was around
And then we beat with out big sticks in case he'd go to ground.
We always hunted for three hours harriers or not
And even if they stopped us we wouldn't
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:30
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Nature still profusely spreads.
Her fruitful mantle o'er
Which crowned my joy when I a boy
Are gone forever more.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 16:28
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But all are gone with noble Tom,
And Anngrove is no more.
IV
When passing by the dairy,
Along in the summer time.
When all were blithe and airy,
With the lowing of the kine.
The young maids all arrayed,
Going milking by the score.
Now empty stalls and lime washed walls,
And Anngrove is no more.
V
It is not fate as I relate,
The cause of all our woes.
All are lost in double cost,
Attending cattle shows.
The money bag for basic slag
The dross of iron ore.
Struwn o'er the bogs (of) to poison frogs,
And Anngrove is no more.
VI
Ah! cease my muse why dwell on scenes,
So painful to recall.
Shade all such retrospective thought,
In dark obliven's pall.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 14:11
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"Alas they're gone the happy days,
When I used often rove.
When out at play would wend my way,
To the attractions of Anngrove.
To view the ponds bedecked with swans,
And hear the waters roar.
But now the lakes are briar and brake
And Anngrove is no more
II
The ancient house that fronts the South
Was splendid to behold.
Its crystal front by sols bright rays,
One saffron sheet of Gold.
The massive oaks their shadows throne,
Up to festooned door.
The feller's ace has laid them flat,
And Anngrove is no more.
III
Anngrove was by friendships chain
Encircled all around
Sloth and pride by virtue's foot,
Were trodded to the ground.
Tom Gubbins kept the poor employed,
With his prolific store.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 14:02
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People eat nettles in Spring for purifying the blood. The Nettles are boiled and then eaten. Water crest is eaten for purifying the blood. To boil elder leaves and drink the water is a cure for Yellow Jaundice. Chicken weed is good for poulticing a sweeling.
A weed called "Búcail An Tíg" grows on the gable of a tatched house and it is a cure for rheumatism.
People do no cut the white Thorn because the crown of thorns that Our Lord wore was made from a white thorn bush and the old people say that the fairies dance around it every night.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:57
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Bochail an tige is a cure for corns. It grows on some old houses. They pull it and take the skin off it, and leave it on the corn.
Long ago the people used to drink the juice of an herb for a cure for Rheumatism. The herb grew in drains in the bog. The people used to boil the herb in water, and the water that was left it was used for drinking.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:54
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The people used to do their own dyeing long ago. They got the herbs from the fields. They used to steep the herbs in boiling water and mixed them in a pot. They used also make vegetable dye.
There were a lot of thatchers round here long ago. There are two at present Dick Meehan and Mick McHugh.
The people used to make leather long ago. If a horse died he was skinned and the skin was left in a cool place for a few weeks, and when it was taken down all the hair was gone off. Then it was cut into pieces and many things were made.
The people made churns long ago, those people were called coopers.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:46
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The principal roads in the district are the castlegrove road, the Kilconly road, the Lissaleen road, the Ballyroe road, and the Ratesh road. There are three old roads two of them are used yet but the other is but seldom used. The castlegrove road is steam rolled it starts in Tuam and and finishes in Ballinrobe. The roads were made long ago. Men and women used to work on them. Some of the workers on the roads used to get from one penny to sixpence. Castlegrove road was made in the bad times.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:35
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Longago the people had molds. They put a wick in the mold and then poared melted tallow into it. Another way they made candles was, they pulled rushes dried them and skined them. Then they steeped them in melted fat then they twisted them (file) like a rope.
The people used to cut the sally rods and weave them together made baskets. Longago the black smiths made ploughs and spades.
Longago the people spun their own thread. At first they oiled the wool and carded it them they spun it.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:31
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Long ago they made candles out of rushes they pealed them and then left them to dry for a few days then they dipped them in tallow. They had a wooden candle stick to hold them while lighting. Baskets were made from rods boiled and pealed. Long ago the old people used to make them an sell them in the market. Long ago the people used to do their own spinning. They used to make big balls of the thread.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:27
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Lewin who was landlord of Castlegrove evicted a family by the name of Sweeney in Cloghans. One of these became a priest. On one occasion while home on holidays he got permission from Father O'Dea Kilconly to Celebrate the Principal Mass. For the first few sundays he preached no sermon but on one Sunday he preached on "Death" and on the next Sunday he spoke about Lewin. At the end of the sermon he said "If Lewin is in heaven I do not wish to go there." He also said that Lewin's bailiffs licked the spits off his boots like dogs and would do it again. After this Fr O'Dea would not allow him to say the principal Mass.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:22
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griddle and on a frying pan nowadays. The stand under the griddle is called the pot iron. The maide aráin is used for rolling bread.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:22
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The Leipreachán has got no name but Leipreachán in this district. Some people say he is only four inches high more say he is nine inches high. People say he wears a red cap and a red cap. It is said that he lives in a tree but it is not certain whether he lives under the leaves of a tree or in a hole in a tree. It is said that a woman had a leipreachán in a little box. He kept shouting "imtheóchaidh mé imthcóchaidh mé" until he had her annoyed. Then she let him go
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:17
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and on letting him go she said "imthigh a dhiabhal as seo". Boys that go visiting very often get them.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:16
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I did not hear of any old school, but James Heneghan (dead) went to school to the Kilconly Catholic church. He went there for a few years, then he changed to a Catholic church in Kilgevrin.
After some time he changed to Caras Catholic church. He did not go to school to Caras for very long as the Irish children were been punished for the Irish language though it was not a national school.
He was taught in Kilgevrin by a man named Pádhraigh Longe. Some of the teachers were from the district more teachers were strangers. The teachers stayed some weeks with each child.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:13
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The Kirwans, who were landlords of Blindwell, evicted twenty six householders in one of our fields.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:12
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There are a lot of Lisses in this parish. They are called "raths" or "Lisses". They are not similar to each other. There are three of them in Lissananny
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:10
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There is one in Kilconly, and another in Kilshanry. They are all round. There are holes in the middle of them. There are bushes all round them. There are circular places all round them where there was water. People often went into them. There was never anything seen in them. There is a Lios in our own fields, and it was ploughed up and potatoes sowed in ridges in it. The next morning after they were sowed the footprints of young children were seen on the ridges. The potatoes never grew. The ridges are still to be seen.
Long ago children that were unbaptised when they died were buried in it. The graves are still to be seen. Some old people say that the Irish made them to protect themselves from the Danes. Others say they were made by the Tuatha de Danainn. Others say they were made by the Fir bolg. I often saw hares and weazels coming out of them. People believe it is not right to cut any of the bushes around them. Old people say that fairies live in the Lisses, and that they
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:04
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used to be seen longago.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 13:02
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The herbs that do damage to good land are redknee, scutch grass, blind nettles, dock-leaves, nettles and chicken-weed.
They made the land poor.
They smother and choke crops. All kinds of weeds grow on poor land. No weeds at all grows on good land. There is only one herb that I know of that cures diseases. the name of it is Mac Na Company. It cures many diseases it cures running diseases. The roots are dug and scraped and boiled. It is put into a jar untill it (cures) cools and then applied to the sore.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 12:57
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senior member (history)
2021-01-14 12:57
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awaiting decision
Dandelion is a cure for liver trouble. Put the dandelions into a pot of water and leave them there until they boil. When the water is boiled take up the pot and strain away the water from the dandelion. Then pout the water into a vessel until it cools and then give it to the sick person.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 11:07
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Dandeion is a cure for liver trouble. Put the dandelions into a pot of water and leave them there until they boil. When the water is boiled take up the pot and strain away the water from the dandelion. Then pout the water into a vessel until it cools and then give it to the sick person.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 11:05
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There is a herb called Meacháin an Tathabha that cures running sores. It has to be dug by a relative of the person with the sores. It has to be washed and boield
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:57
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The Name of my village is Ballyroe and it is in the parish of Kilconly. There are twenty one houses in my village now but long ago there were twenty three houses in it. All the houses were thatched except two long ago, and are all thatched now too except four. The most common place names a leguane. It was
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:54
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was as many houses in one part as there is in all Blindwell nowadays. All houses long ago were thatched now mostly all are slated. The most common name in Blindwell is Welshe. Blindwell is called after a well which was blinded. There are four people over seventy years whose names are,
Michael Colleran
Mary Corcoran,
Miles Burke
Hugh Conern
Blindwell
Cloghan's Hill
Tuam,
Co. Galway
They can speak both English and Irish. There is one ruin "The ice house".
Long ago people went to America from Blindwell. There is a turlough in it.
It is said that a landlord wished to dry his own land. He let the
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:49
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water into Rathbane where it still remains. When the Blindwell people asked him why he did it, he said,"Let every man let it go from himself", but the people did not move it. The people made a drain dividing the land into two parts, so that the people living on one side of the water could not let their stock cross to the other side.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:46
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its early stages. The little leaves are sweet and if the crop is sown near a ditch the hares and rabbits eat it all. Rats ruin beet also. I have seen rats leave haggards and make their homes near beet crops. Foxes kill fowl and young lambs. Sometimes farmers and herds have got to remain out all night to protect young lambs from prowling foxes. Hedgehogs are most dangerous in a farm where there are milch cows. I have heard of cows which died of blood poison after being attacked by a hedgehog while they slept. Wild cats live in the woods and are dangerous if they happen to enter a house among tame cats. A woman once tried to remove a wild cat from the kitchen, but he jumped into her face and scratched her face severely. Foxes live in dens and are very acute. Rabbits live in burrows. Hedgehogs live in long grass. The soup of a boiled hedgehog is recommended for the chin cough. Superstitious people say that if a weasel comes into the house, it portends,
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:38
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up stalks to eat the potatoes raw.
The Spring of 1848 came and the Priests told the people not to attempt to sow any potatoes they had, in case they would fail but some sowed even stems and buds for a trial and a better crop never grew since or before that year even from buds, that they cast aside today.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:35
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saw turnip skins strewn about, took them and put them into the fire until they were burned black, then he drew them out and eat them. He was ravenous.
A woman was travelling to a friend's house with her fifteen years old daughter, for protection. The girl failed to complete the journey, so her mother left her in a barn and went for help but when the help returned the daughter was dead.
In Ratesh village there lived a father, mother and child. The mother used to beg and one day on returning she found both dead.
The fairly well off people used to sow a little potatoes, and many a time when they went to look at the crop on an early morning they found boys and girls, remote strangers rooting
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:27
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In 1847 the potatoe crop failed completely. They slightly touched the previous year but no notice was taken till the first pang of hunger came. It is not known definitly whither bligth or decay of the roots caused the failure but it is supposed that the nutrition was gone off the soil due to burning in cultivation when no artificial manure was available.
Connaght suffered most in the famine time, because it was the poorest province. There are innumerable stories told till today even about events of death from starvation.
In a field in a village in Cloghans Hill, called Ultan there are supposed to be many coffinless bodies buried.
A young from an adjoining village came into my grandmother one day in 1847. He
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:16
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Bruinn go deagh-thapa, mar tháinig realtóg ar speir agis bhí sí trí la sadh. Chauidh sí faoi na dídéan dhá-réag do h-asboil.
Bhí údás ar an meid sin agus ba é s ud fear a bhreatha.
Chaith mo Shlánuightheóir an lá údar dhá mhairseál idir fearaibh ó Herod go Piólat Céas agus é dá lasgadh.
A gCluinn sibh mé a dhaoine - ná bígí aon oidhche feasta gan smaoineadh ar Pháis Chríost agus abraigí bhur bpaidreacha le sibh a sábháil ar droch-ghníomharcha agus go speisialta ar an bpeacadh.
Chuaidh táirní mmaola in a lámha agus ní áirmhin ar a cheann, an crann (coróin?) spíonta ar a cheann naomhtha agus é ag iomchur na croiche.
D'Fhullaing Sé go Fírinneach na cuig míle buillí sábhail chona daonna agus gach mall a smaoinimíd ar Mac Mhuire
Ámén
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 10:07
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1/ I ngairdin Phaíris tá na Phaidrín Pairteach ag moladh na Máthar
Bhí raimh gan locht
Aom Mhic Íosa agus a Rí na nGrásta go dtugaidh Tú grásta d'ár n-anam bocht!
Trosgadh agus cairde agus Grásta Ó Dhia againn!
Do chabhair gach lá againn agus táimíd dá h-iarraidh
Sacraimeid na h-aithrighe go near tuighidh Dia linn agus cuimrigh ár n-anam ar Mhuire Bhan Tighearna
Ámén.
II/ An Cúigheadh lá Fichead de Márt tháinig aingeal as an Flaithis le teactaireacht ag Muire Mháthair mar bhí sí gan fheacadh le sgeala ó Togh na nGrás, agus ó Árd Righ na bhFlaiutheas go mbéidh sí 'ma Mháthair ag Iosa dá mur nídh é ba mhaith leithi.
D'umhlaigh sí síos ar a dá ghluim bhreág gheala agus dubairt sí go mbeadh sí sásta le nidh ar bith ó'n Athair
Ní túisge thuirling Mac Dé fhaoi 'na
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 09:56
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I used to hear the people saying that there is hidden treasure in one of our fields but no one ever went near it because there is a black hare minding it and my father said that any one that would go near it, the hare would kill them.
No one ever went near it on that account. There is a big stone like a headstone marking the spot which is in the middle of the field. The field is not near the boreen. It is near a rocky part of the laand land in West Killina. Hynes house is the nearest one to where this hidden treasure is.
My grandfather saw five candles lighting in it one night many year ago. All held by one hand only. He saw no other person only the hand. We never ploughed up that land. We use it for grazing always. One winter when fuel was scarce my Grand father cut the trees that were growing there. there is only one elder tree left.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 09:50
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Collected by pupils of Killina School:-
Asses' milk for "Consumption " (taken fasting)
Goats " " "
Sheep's' " " sore throat (heated)
Carry 3 small potatoes in your pocket for Rheumatism or for Toothache.
"Foam" of new milk for " .
Ferrets "leaving" cure for measles.
Foxe's tongue to take out a thorn.
Dog'slick for a sore.
"Fairy" mushroom to stop bleeding.
A Cobweb to stop bleeding.
"Goose" gall" rubbed on lumps cure them"
Goose grease as an embrocation for still knees or joints.
Snail in shell rubebd to a corn cures it.
Rub snail on corn - hang up on three seven days. Repeat if corn is not cured first.
Cure for boils - plaster made of sugar, soap and soda apply on linen rag to boil.
Leaf of raw cabbage bandaged on sores.
Juice of dock-leaves for stings - nettles, bees.
Rub gold wedding ring on sty in the eye.
Rub penny on a fresh bruise to heal it - or piece of raw mutton.
Boiled garlic juice for rheumatism.
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 09:41
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They sent fresh oats to the mill to get a "melder" of meal ground. You got back the "seeds" too, (Husks?)
They got a big crock and put these "seeds" into it and poured boiling water over them.
They covered the crock with a wooden lid and left it until the mixture turned sour (which takes about 3 weeks)
They then got a bundle of clean long straw & placed it over a pot - spread it over it - and strained the mixture through this into the pot.
(Strainers were unknown then)
They put the pot on the fire to boil and boiled it until it thickened, added salt to taste and when cool they eat the "slippery result".
senior member (history)
2021-01-14 09:41
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Thy sent fresh oats to the mill to get a "melder" of meal ground. You got back the "seeds" too, (Husks?)
They got a big crock and put these "seeds" into it and poured boiling water over them.
They covered the crock with a wooden lid and left it until the mixture turned sour (which takes about 3 weeks)
They then got a bundle of clean long straw & placed it over a pot - spread it over it - and strained the mixture through this into the pot.
(Strainers were unknown then)
They put the pot on the fire to boil and boiled it until it thickened, added salt to taste and when cool they eat the "slippery result".
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 21:24
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In our village of Newtown there lived a family long ago. Their names were the O "Linanes". They were very miserly. One year the father of the family found a pot of gold. The next year he found another pot of gold and so on until he had four pots of gold. He told no one about the pots of gold only the family.
The way he used to hide the gold was to put it up in the top of the loft. One day his wife said to hide the gold under the ground. So he did but they told no one only their youngest son, and he was to dig for it when he would be dying and get it, put it in the coffin with himself? When the boy was going to die he went digging for the gold.
When he was about a week digging he got the gold he got it and a little red man beside it with a sword in his hand and a battle axe in the other. The boy got hold of one of the pots of gold. "Why are you taking my gold"? said the little red man. "That gold is not yours
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 21:16
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my boy" said the other man.
After a long argument the little red man got vexed and he chopped off the other man's head with his sword. And it is said that whoever digs for the gold and gets it the little red man would kill him. No one dug for the gold yet because they are afraid the little red man would kill them.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 21:11
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My father owns a place called Sugánach in which there is an old fairy fort. Gold is supposed to be buried in this old fort. It was once owned by a king and queen who lived in Sugánach long ago.
It is said that the gold is guarded by fairies night and day and that is the reason why no one would dig for it. Great battles used to be fought in Sugánach long ago. Then the king and queen buried their gold in the fort. Theyw ere killed in the next battle. They were killed in the next battle. Their gold is still in that fort.
It is situated in the middle of a field of about one acre. It is also on the right of the boreen that leads to Sugánach from Killina.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 21:04
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1
They made a grater from a sheet of tin about 9 ins. by 6 ins. with holes bored in it - as close to each other as possible - and nailed it to a piece of board smooth side under.
2
They got some large raw potatoes and peeled them and washed them and grated them into a dish.
3
They wrung the grated potatoes through a cloth.
4
They mixed in some flour and a little salt - some people used put a little sweet milk - kneaded it and baked as potatobread: or they sometimes made "dumplings" of the mixture - size of large eggs and boiled them in a pot of boiling water.
5. They sometimes baked the cake in the hot ashes.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 21:00
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There was a man in our village Cloonasee once and he was blind. One day a woman came in and said that she would cure him if he gave her a bundle of straw; he said he would. She took a cup off the dresser and went out and began to pluck the leaves off the daisies and came in and put two spoons of water in it. She told the man to rub it to his eyes and he got cured.
"If you refused me for the straw you would never get back your sight" she said.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:52
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Expect 'tis toow et and then I can't go,
I get up every morning at a quarter to eight.
To get ready for school for fear I'd be late,
For Killalaghton school is three miles away,
And I have to walk that length every day,
The teachers in this school are very good and kind
They are the nicest teachers that anyone could find,When I go home in the evening I get my hurl and ball,
I have a nice little gun hanging up on the wall,
When I get big there will be less time for fun,
And I can't be playing with my hurl and gun,
Then when I am tired working I can look up at the wall
And my gun will remind me of when I was small.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:47
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Tis very dear unto me though you may think it a trifle,
I'll hang it up now by the side of my rifle,
I'll leave them up there as long as they last,
And I often will think of the days that are past.
In memory of Paddy Headd's holidays by his Mother.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:44
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My name is John Headd ye all know me well,
I live in Killoran the truth I will tell,
And now if you listen I'll tell you some more
I was born in June 1924.
In a place they call Newtown I first saw the light,
Above Killoran chapel in that village to the right,
With my brothers and sisters I live happy there,
I never could be as happy elsewhere.
I go to Killoran mass every Sunday you know,
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:41
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Its many a good holiday in Castlenancy I spent,
At Xmas and Easter and sometimes in Lent,
And when I'd be coming be it early or late,
Grandmother would meet me at the old castle gate,
Aunt Mary would give me sweets and biscuits galore,
However she had such a big lot in store,
So very kind was dear uncle and Horey,
I couldn't forget them in song or in story,
And when I was there it was my delight,
To be playing with my cousins from morning till night,
Going to see Josie it filled me with joy,
Also cousin Jackie a dear little boy,
So when I got my holidays from school in 1922,
I went to Castlenancy Aunt Delia with you,
I went to see Josie the very next day,
He was happy to see me and said put down the tea,
When tea was over he got a toffee bucket,
Gave me a piece of toffee and told me to suck it,
We soon finished up all the toffee delight,
And he gave me the bucket going home the same night,
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:35
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She bade her friends on earth a fond farewell and went away to Heaven, In Abbey holy churchyard now poor Bridget dear does sleep.
Beside her little angel sisters down in the ground so deep,
A home that once was bright and gay is now in gloom and woe,
For she who made it happy is lying cold and low,
No more we'll linger near that home at the evening of the day,
Or listen to the tales she'd tell to pass the time away,
Her neighbours are all sorrowful they are praying for her often,
Since they saw her saintly face when laid down in her coffin,
But I hope she is happy now with the Angels and Saints above,
And from this earth I send her my blessing and best love.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:30
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These are marriage customs which take place around my locality. First a married man makes the match and he asks the consent of the woman's parents. Then when the match is made the woman's father comes to look at the place and if they think it good enough the man will buy the ring. The woman and the man will meet in the nearest town and he will fit the ring on her finger and settle the date to get married on. When they are coming home fires are lighted with straw and oil and when they come in the door oaten bread is broken on their heads. On the night the wedding takes place all the people gather in. It is seldom we see strawboys around this locality but sometimes they dress with straw and come and dance around the house. After a month the woman goes home to visit. The father of the woman often gives her a fortune of about a hundred pounds.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:28
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There is a fort in Lawlesse's field of Oatfield, Cappatagle. Lis na Rup is the name of it. There are three ditches round it and there is a hole in the side of it. You can-
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:27
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There is a fairy fort in the townland of Liosavruggy. Lios Quell can be seen from this fort. It is said that an old man went there to cut a lone whitethorn tree. While he was cutting it the hatchet was thrown from his hand and he was thrown on the ground. That tree is still growing but it is half cut.
There is another story told concerning this fort. There was a boy minding (sheep) cattle near this fort when he saw two children playing around the bush inside in the fort. He was going to play with them when they dissappeared. This forth was devided and given to two men. They never ditched it but they wired it.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:24
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There is an old fort in Ballyterrin. It is (an) about a few hundred yards from the road and it is on very high land. Around this fort is a stone wall with a piece of the wall broken for an entrance.
There is also another fort in Keenan's land and every night there is a light seen rising from the fort and falling again to the ground not far away from the fort. There is no entrance going into it
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:21
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There is an old fairy fort in Loughnane's field. It is called Lios, It is situated in Lurgan and the shape of it is very small. There was a hole in that fort one time and anyone could go into it. It is said that people and rooms could be seen inside in it. No one ploughs it or interferes with it. There is a story told concerning it.
There was a man living
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 20:19
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at the Lought named Larkin. His cow died and he had no milk for the calf. Still the calf lived and was thriving well, so when the man saw that he said that he would watch to see how the calf was fed. He watched one night and the cow came back and fed the calf. He caught the cow by the tail and the cow ran to the fort. He said that he would hold the cow if all the fairies in Connaught were in the fort until he would get his cow. When the fairies heard that they told him to let go the cow and to go to the fair in Loughrea and he would get the price of a cow in a stile in Kilmean. When he came to the stile he got the price of the cow.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 17:44
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There is an old fort in Kilreecle. There is an entrance in the side of it. People went into it long ago. There were stones a ton weight inside in it. There are a few steps going into it. When you would go down you could go along under the village of Kilreecle and come up the other side. There was supposed to be a light seen in it long ago.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 17:30
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Do bhí bean ann fadó agus bhí leanbh deas reamhar aici. Ceap sí go dtógfad na sídheógha é agus go gcuirfeadh siad sídheóg feóidhte ann na ionad.
Oidhche amháin níor stad an leanbh de bheith ag gol, agus bhí sé an0cráidhte, agus 'bé sídheóg feóidhte a bhí ann.
Dubhairt a lan daoine leí é rósta grideal nó é caitheamh amach sa sneachtadh nó a shrón do dhóghadh leis an t-slú acht níorbh fhéidir léi e sin a dhéanamh mar bhí sé an-cosmhail le'n a leanbh féin. La amháin bhúail sí le mns oi-feasa agus dubhairt an bean-fheasa. "Tá trioblóid ort an maidin seo".
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 17:19
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"Tá", arsa an mháthair "mar ta mo leanbh tóghtha agus sídheóg feóidhte ann na ionad" "Acht bhfuil tú cinnte gur sidheóg é" arsa an bean-feasa "Cinnte" ar sise "nár chonnaci mé é le mo dhá shúile. "Mara bhfhuil tú cinnte teighie abhaile agis síos corcan lan d'uisce bris dosaon uibhe uire agus cuir na plaoscan iosteach ann agus beigh fhios agat ciaca ata agat" arsa an bean-feasa.
Abhaile leis an bean, síos leis an corcan, agus in am gairid bhí an t-uisce af beiriú. Gac noimeac bhí an sídheóg ag féachaint amach as an gclíabáin agus sa deire dubhairt sé le guth fear an -aosta "Cad ta tú ag dhéanamh a Maimhí"? Do tháinig iongnadh ar an máthair ach mar sin féin dubhairt sí. "Tá mé brewing a mhic". "Cad ta tú brewing",?
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 17:14
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arsa an leanbh. "Plaoscáin, a mhic," ar sise. "O!" ar seisean "táim cúig céad bliadhain déag agus ní fhacha me an brewery de plaoscán fós." Annsan bhí an poker te, agus rith sí go dtí an cliabhán acht do sleamhnuigh a chos agus bhí an poker ar taobh amháin de'n cistin agus an bean ar an taobh eile,. Nuair a chuaidh sí go dtí an cliabháin bhí a leanbh féin ann 'na chodladh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 17:11
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The old people say if there was a worm in a cow's tail the best thing to cure it, is suet and onions. Garlic and salt, mixed together would also cure it. The juice of a pound of Bucilane pounded up and fresh lard mixed cures sores on cows teats.
Slanles and ivy mixed cures scum in a sheep's eyes. To cure a burn in the hand get laurel leaves and fresh lard boiled and put them on the burn. If your lip is sore the best thing to cure it is a skin of the root
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 17:08
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of a dog leaf. To cure corns get up before sun rise in a Summer's morning and walk in the dew.
To cure ring worm or any kind of rash, train oil and sulphur mixed to a paste.
Beef - pickle and fresh lard will cure dry murrin in cattle. Bessom boiled in water kills worms in horses.
A roasted cabbage leaf and fresh butter will cure a sore throat.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 17:01
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Tá me im chomhnaidhe i' Gleann an Cróchaire. 'Sé an cúis go bhfuil Gleann an Cróaire mar ainm ar an áit na do deineadh duine acu bí ann fadó duine eile do chrochadh mar bí troid ag siúbhal eadtortha agus ón am sin tá Gleann an Cróchaire mar ainm ar an áit.
Tá naoí dtigthe ann anois agus bhí ceitre cínn ann fadó bí na tighte déanta de lathach agus ceann tuige a bhí ortha.
Gleann Gabhra isead ainm do'n scoil agus 'sé an cúis go bhfuil an ainm sin ar an áit mar ní fhanann aon duine in a chomhnaidhe ann, mar tá an áit ró fúár agus ní bíonn
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:53
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ann ach gabha.
Sé Moghaoile ainm an pharóiste 'na raibh sé acht sé Connaithe an ainm atá ar an bparóiste anois, mar do bhí séipéal i Moghaoile fadó agus do leagad ó agus ní raibh aon airgead ag na daoine cun é do tógad árís agus tar chis tamaill do dhéin síad seipéal i gConnaithe agus ghlaoidheadar Conna ar an bparóste annsan.
Ní raibh ach aon doras ins na tighthe agus píosaí admhaidh cun an tuighe do choimeád súas. Ní raibh ach aon seómra ins na tighthe. Ní raibh acht cúpla duine in a gchomhaidhe i ngach tigh. Níor chuir na daoine aon dath ar na fallaí mar cuireann síad anois ortha. Ní raibh aon leac amuigh den doras acu leis.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:52
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anna ch gabha.
Sé Moghaoile ainm an pharóiste 'na raibh sé acht sé Connaithe an ainm atá ar an bparóiste anois, mar do bhí séipéal i Moghaoile fadó agus do leagad ó agus ní raivh aon airgead ag na daoine cun é do tógad árís agus tar chis tamaill do dhéin síad seipéal i gConnaithe agus ghlaoidheadar Conna ar an bparóste annsan.
Ní raibh ach oan doras ins na tighthe agus píosaí admhaidh cun an tuighe do choimeád súas. Ní raibh ach aon seómra ins na tighthe. Ní raibh acht cúpla duine in a gchomhaidhe i ngach tigh. Níor chuir na daoine aon dath ar na fallaó mar cuireann síad anois ortha. Ní raibh aon leac amuigh den doras acu leis.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:47
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:46
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Young boys and girls always love to be playing games between themselves.
We play games like these, "The Cat and the Mouse", "Gaps", and Ring a Rosy", "Drop the Handkerchief, and the bull. We also play bread and Wine, this is the way each is played. Cat and Mouse are played by having a big ring of children. One person should be supposed to be the Mouse, and another the Cat, the cat is to hunt the mouse in and out through each in the ring. Another
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:42
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game is Gaps, and the way to play it is, there should be a ring of children, and one person should run around the ring and tig someone. The person that reaches the gap first has the game won. Drop the Handkerchief is a game played with a Handkerchief,. There should be English and Irish Soldiers to play the game of bread, and wine. Mostly in Winter time we play most of these games in School, but in the Summer it is not the same ones we play. During the warm days, "Birds" "Colours", and High gates are played. In Winter by night the children play games beside the fire, some of them are boxes, the Fox and which hand. It is in School we
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:37
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play the most games, because all the children are together. Another thing that children love is picking Black-Berries.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:36
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There are several useful animals on the farm and each animal has its own use. Horses, Cows, Sheep, Donkeys, Dogs, Cats, Pigs, and Calves are kept on the farm. There are special names on each cow. Some are Heskin, Peg, the Grey cow, and other names too. The cows graze on the fields every day and at night. They are driven in by the farmer and his dog, and milked by the maid and the man who is workind for the farmer.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:34
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The calves are kept inside in a house until they are a month or more. They are fed with milk and when they are old enough they are fed with hay and mangolds.
The house is covered with furze and straw. The cattle are stalled into bails made of timber to hold them while they are being milked. A goat is usually kept on the farm for good luck. Some farmers send their milk to a Creamery and others separate it and make butter of it and sell it at the market.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:30
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to other people and they all agreed that there must have been some ghosts in the room that night.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:28
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were in the sick room. Suddenly they had the feeling that the room was full of people. They grew very frightened but they did not like to leave the sick man. After a while one of them felt her leg being struck with some thing but when she looked at her feet she saw nothing.
Then she told the other woman what had happened and both of them decided to leave the old man, and go down to the kitchen. This they did. Immediately they heard a lot of noise in the other room, but they were afraid to go up. The next morning the man was very weak and during the day he died. The women told the story
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:24
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Many years ago people believed a good deal in ghosts, but the people now days do not believe so much in them suppose it is because people know better now and have more education than they had long ago.
Here is a ghost story. One time a man was very sick, and he grew worse and worse. He usually lived alone and a neighbour's wife came in to see to his wants and to give him a drink when he required it. This night as the man lay dying she and another neighbour
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:20
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and they now say that there are no ghosts.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:20
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One night they stayed up very late to see if they could see anyone making the noise and the candle or lamp or whatever was lighting was put out by flinging things at it to make them go away quickly. Then they knew that there was what, they called ghosts to, in the house.
Shortly afterwards they asked the priest to come and say mass in the house. He came and said the mass and blessed the house and there was never another sound heard there after that.
People do not believe in ghosts now like they used to long ago,
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:13
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In days gone by as we are told the ghosts were seen and heard by different families.
Once upon a time in olden days people were living in a house and they could hear people walking around. They could hear them twisting the machine, making noise with the cups and spoons, boiling the kettle, drawing the chairs to the table, and they thought that they could hear silk dresses noising round the house and people going in and out into the rooms.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:10
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to give them. They are not the very best at praying and it is hard to send them away. Sometimes they would ask you to swop a bad donkey for a right good one. "We brought him from Caherme fair and he is a right good one, sir"
They sleep in their wagons with straw for a tick and a bag for a pillow. Covering is usually a sop of hay and they sleep like fat pigs.
Their skin is as yellow as gold from being out in the weather. Good luck to the poor things.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 16:07
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Travellers come to our house sometimes. We call them tinkers or pedlars or gypsies. Their names are unknown to us. They are mostly all of the male tribe with the exception of a few lassies and you may put it down they are the worst of the gang. They generally ask for a couple of spoons of tea and sugar for a poor sick child in the name of our father's or mothers soul.
The men sell old tin cans and they want to know if we have any potatoes
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:59
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an margadh déanta buailtear a lamha le chéile. Is le píosa lathaigh i mbárr mhaide a marcáltar na beithidigh. Nuair a díolann siad capall tugtar an braighdean don fhear leis an gcapall.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:57
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mar bíonn aonach ann dhá uair sa mbhliadhain.
Bíonn ceannuightheoirí ag dul ó theach go theach anois ag ceannacht stiuc, caoraigh is mó a cheannuigheann siad.
Lá aonaigh is ar na bóithre is mó a bhíonn na ceannuightheoirí agus dá mbeadh siad ag dul isteach ins an bpairc Áonaig bhead orra sé pinginn le h-aghaidh gach beitidhigh a íoch.
Tugtar eirnist don fhear a cheannuigheann an stiuch uaidh. Tugtar an t-adh pinghinn ar an airgead sin.
Le teasbáint go bhfuil
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:51
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raibh aon fhuinneóg ar bith ann. Ní raibh mórán seamraí ins na tighthe fadó an istin agus seomra codhalta.
Ní raibh achta poll san mbhalla mar fuinneoga. San oidhche chuireadhar mála nó tuighe ins an bhpoll leis an bháisteac a chonghbhail amach.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:49
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Ins na bailte móra is mó a bhjíodh na h-aontuighthe fadó. Ta páirc in mo cheanntar féin ar a dtugtar Páirc an Aonaigh air.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:47
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Fadó bhí tighthe an-bheag ag na daoine agus bhí said déanta de clocha, agus bí (siad) cuidh aca déanta de créfóig. Sé cínn thúighe a bhí ar an gcuid is mó de na tighte acht bhí cínn slinne ag na daoine a raibh go leor airgid aca.
Bhí an leabhaidh aca ins an gcistin agus siad na páistí a codhluidheadh inntí. Bhí an (teinn) teine aca i gcuinne san gcistin agus sé an simléar a bhí aca ná poll san gceann. Bhí dha dhoras san teach, agus uaireannta ní
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:43
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na daoine ag éisteacht leó
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:42
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amháin san gcuid is mo diobh bhí an seimléar déanta de moirtéal agus tuígíní agus is minic a bhriseadh teine amach. Bhí sagas leabh aidh san gcistín agus bhíodh gach páiste san teach na gcoladh annsin.
Bhí saghas staighre i nga[?] agus nuair nach raibh dreimhre acú bhí orta a dul suas ar an breisiúr le dul istheach san seómra.
Bhí gach úirnís suas annsin mar túirne agus go leor rudaí eile.
Bhíodh na cearca agus na lachain faoí na leabaidh agus bhíodh síad chomh mhaith le suantraighe bhíonn siab ag sgreachaoil agus bhíodh
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:16
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siad similéir annsin cuireadh siad ceithre chrann beag in a seasamh i lár an tíghe. Phleatáileadh siad slataí suileoga thart timcheall na ceithre crann suas go dtí an binn. Cuireadh moirteál taobh amuigh is istigh air annsin.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 15:13
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Ni raibh aon slinn san domhan fadó ní raibh ar aon teach acht túige. Bhí na tighthe an bheag ní raibh níos mó ná dhá sheomra i ngach teach agus ní raibh acht ceann
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 13:46
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tuige déanta acu aon fhaidamháin. Chuireaddh siad cisín shíos ins na ceithre coirnéil agus annsin bhaineadh siad bun an tíghe agus leagadh siad ceithre troighthe ar leitheid é. Leagadh siad amach áit an dorais annsin aoirde fear an tíghe a d'árdhadh siad é. Thosuigheadh siad ag buildeáil annsin go mbeadh sé tuairim ceithre troighthe in aoirde. Leaghah siad amach na fuinneóga ba beag níos mó na do dhorna a leagadh siad é agus dhéanadar é bhuildeáil go dtí an binn. Dhéanadh
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 13:30
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Ni raibh acht cistín agus seomra codaltá ins na tighthe a bhí amuigh fadó. Túighe an ceann a bhí ar an gcuid is mó díobh. I gcoinnibh an phinúra a bhíodh an teine acht uaireannta bhíodh sé i lár an urláir.
An caoí a leagadh siad amach teach nua:- Seasadh ceithre fear i gceithre cóirnéil. Bhíodh dha rhópaí
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 13:25
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 13:25
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Sé an rud a sinne sí ghearr sí suas an fheoil na giotaí beaga agus chuaidh sí amach na gharraidh agus chur giota dé'n fheoil ar gach sroidhe cáil sa gharradh. Nuair a thainig an t-athar agus an mac le coim na h-oidhche. Bhí riab briste brúighte gan bean ar bith leo. Sgannruigh siad nuair a chonnaic siad cuid madaidh an bhaile amuigh sa gharradh. Chuaidh siad isteach 'un toighe aguys chuir siad ceist ar bhean an toighe caidé bhí contráilte leis na madaidh a bhí amuigh sa gharradh. D'innis sise díobhtha caidé mar bhí. Nuair a chuala an t-athair seo d'imthigh sé agus ní fhacas ní ba mó é.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 13:20
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Bhí sean-bhean agus sean-duine na gcomhnuidhe leo fhéin ar an Árdaidh-Bhig. Bhí mac amháin aca agus Mícheal a b'ainm dó. Bhí siad iongantach bocht agus lá a,háin d'iarr an mhathair ar Mhíchéal teach a chur suas agus nuair a bhéadh sin déanta aige imtheacht agus stumpán mná a chuartughadh nó go rabh a faith le déanamh aca san iad fhein a tógailt. Lá amháin d'imthigh Mícheal agus a sthair a chuartughadh na mná. Nuair a fuair an mhathair Mícheal agus an t-athair ar shiubhal mhairbh sí gamhain agus arsa sise léithe fhéin gur dheas cál le sugh. Ní rabh a fhios ag an bhean an dóigh leis an chál dó chur ar an t-súgh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 11:10
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crack in it from the top to the bottom. It was built by the Gobán Saor. It is in the Barony of of Galmoy, in the parish of Galmoy and in the county of Kilkenny.
Between Durrow and Attanagh a wall was one built and knocked down in the night because it was said to be on a fairies track.
The ruins of Aughmacart which is in the Barony of Clarmallagh, in the parish of Durrow and in the county of Laoighis are those of a monastery and convent the remains of which are to be seen still. The remain of a castle are also to be seen near by. The monastery and convent were built in the year 550 A.D.
A tunnel which commences in Aughmacart grave-yard and leads to Belmont House where the convent was, in olden times. There are two iron doors on each end, both each of which is locked. One door is in the hall of the present church, the other just outside the hall door of Belmont House.
It is said Gold Chalices and other valuable articles are hidden there.
Two wells which cannot be located at present are in the vicinity of Aughmacart.
One well has a stone stairs leading to it in the
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 11:04
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Local Ruins are fully described in
"History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossary"
by "Very Rev. W,. Canon Carrigan, D.D., P.P., M.R.I.A,
Parish Priest of this Parish died 1924.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 11:01
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first man in the procession.
When leaving the house an old boot was thrown after them as a sign of good (look) luck.
It was also thought unlucky for the bride to enter her fathers house until a month after their marriage.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:59
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toothache.
Persons used to crawl out under an ass's legs three times in order to cure the measles.
They sued also crawl under sheep's legs in order to cure the chin cough.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:58
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There were a great many old cures in this district long ago some of which still survive.
In my grandfathers garden there grew a herb called "gladum" which was used for curing a disease on the foot called scurvy.
If a person had a toothache on Palm Sunday he used to chew three leaves of palm at the raising of the Host.
The fat of a goose was stored up and was used for curing pains in the wrists and other joints.
Warts are cured by bathing them in water which had lodged in the crevices of a rock which the person met accidently.
A stye in the eye was cured by prodding it with the thorn of a gooseberry bush.
A woman named Mrs. Whelan used to cure peoples eyes by licking them with her tongue.
At Tobar na Súl in the district of Rathlogan Co. Kilkenny sore eyes were cured. Tobar na Súl is a holy well. The cloth with which the eyes were washed was hung on a bush near by.
It used to be said that if a person could put a frog into his mouth that he would never again have a toothache. People used also smoke worms in their pipes in order to cure a
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:49
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1
(To be said night and morning)
Welcome Friday, Good Friday, too
The day our Lord was crucified,
His blessed Mother standing by
With a broken heart and mournful cry
Whosoever says this prayer, three times by night,
And three times by day
And they shall never die in the state of sin
The gates of hell shall never open for them.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:49
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1
(To be said night and morning)
Welcome Friday, Good friday, too
The day our Lord was crucified,
His blessed Mother standing by
With a broken heart and mournful cry
Whosoever says this prayer, three times by night,#
And three times by day
And they shall never die in the state of sin
The gates of hell shall never open for them.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:45
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II To be said every morning.
O most holy and Immaculate Mother of God glorious Saint Joseph guardians and patrons of our house and Union intercede for us our devoted children now and at the hour of our death Amen.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:35
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(Written in Sligo prison 1882)
The ivied ruin of Ballymote
Looks weird and lovely still,
And fair as ever proudly soars,
Keash Corran's stately hill,
The grim old tower of Emlafad,
Seem sgloomy as of yore
And once again I stand beside
The winging Owenmore
II
Tis twenty years since last I trod
This dear beloved spot,
Tis twenty years since last I gazed,
Upon my native cot.
Ah me, how many and many a change.
Since then has taken place
The ruins of once lov'd home
I cannot even trace.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:31
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III
It stood amid the ashes tall,
Right by the river ere,
And round it, stretched on every side,
Green hedgerows far and near
The "double ditch" by briars crown'd,
Ran by yon hawthorn tree
Its track along the sloping hill
In vain I strive to see.
IV
Unhappy Ireland - land of woe,
Ah, what a fate is thine!
The children from their homestead driv'n,
To be replaced by kine!
Gone are the "double ditch" the cot,
The fields, and hedgerows green
And only fatt' ning kine are found
Where happy homes had been.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:25
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V
"Vile ruffians" "Villahe tyrants" too
They call the spirits brave
In face of threatening danger who
Stepped forth the land to save
Who strove together side by side.
To end the spoilers reign
And bring back peace and happiness
To the old land again.
VI
Tis eventide - the sinking sun
Goes down behind the hill
One lingering ray he cast around
On castle, ruin, and rill.
Meet hour for me to seek the spot
Where my loved home did stand
And curse the devastators of
Our fair and fertile land.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:21
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VI
And on each Garland Sunday great pleasure there does be.
All around this lovely hill of ours are the youngsters gay and free.
They wearied and afflicted doth throw aside their grief.
And listen to the pleasure, where they are sure to find relief.
VII
But now alas! I must away, Oh! from that lovely scene.
And hasten to my home-stead fair all in the valleys green.
And though I may be far away Keash Corran I'll adore.
I love that hill that far famed hill now and for ever more.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:17
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III
If I were a poet or an artist of great skill
There is not a place around us here nor a feature on the hill
But I would trace with special care, with a gay and steady hand.
And get them entertained with the beauty of Ireland.
IV
The beauty and the attitude of this e'er famed Keash Hill
With rapture and with pleasure, my weary mind does fill.
The aspects and the scenery such granduer dies display.
To the hills of Derry Moghera of Brisleagh and Knocknarea.
V
And the adjoining town lands thats convenient to this place.
And whose memory I shall adore till my life doth cease.
Thats Culfadda, and Battle field and Templevany too
Where dwells some noble patriots the best, the bravest and the true.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:12
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Oh! hail to the Keash Corran,
And that green majestic hill of ours,
Whose history in the days of yore.
From Cromwell's wars up to this stage of our history is tenfold
Throughout this little Isle of ours, all by our heroes bold.
II
Ah lovely old Keash Corran how glad I am to see that grand magestic hill of ours
Tis grand to see this lovely hill all upon a Summers day.
When all the wild flowers are in bloom and everything looks gay.
The little warblers of the place their sweetest notes to Sing
In praise of their Creator their Supreme Heavenly King.
And on an Autumn eve' tis lovely to behold, that grand majestic hill of ours
Thats clad in heather brown
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:03
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did not comply with that order, he would evict them. He was locally called "Jack the Sand"
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 10:03
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The local landlord in this district was Mr Basel Phibbs of Carrowdooey, Ballinafad, Boyle. He left this district thirty five years ago. He was a bad landlord.
There were five evictions in the Phibbs property. Four families were afterwards reinstated and one family left for England.
The farms were divided by his instructions into small farms. The farms were sub divided by the tenants in some cases.
The people were punished for any violations of his laws. Mr Phibbs made every tenant farmer under him to put large quantities of sand out on any barren land they held or if they
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:58
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that a golden bell is buried there belonging to the Abbey.
At the foot of the Curlews on the Sligo side lies Ballinafad. The Irish for Ballinafad is (means) "Beal an Atha Fada" meaning the "Mouth of the long Ford. The castle was built by Capt. John Sinbarbe in the reign of James the I from whom he got grants of land. He died in the castle in 1628 and was buried in Aghanagh. In 1642 the castle fell in the hands of the Irish and in 1652 into the hands of Colonel Taafe. The Castle been a recent erection continued habitable after the other castles had fallen in to ruins except Ballymote.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:53
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There are many old ruins in my parish but the best known of them all is Toomour Abbey. This Abbey was built by St Patrick and rebuilt by Bishop Lugaid. St Kevin of Glendalough was ordained there.
There is a stone flag there, with two small depressions which people will tell you were made by St. Kevin's knees in his constant prayer before the Altar.
Toomour meaning "Tuaim an pobhair gets its name from the holy well near the Church. Convenient to the Abbey is the remains of an old altar of stone in which it (was) is said Mass was said in olden times.
There is (an old) a stone flag at the Abbey also on which six crosses are cut out on it. It is believed that six kings are buried under each cross who were killed in the battle of Ceis Corrain fought between the Connaught men and the Ulster men in which the Connaught men were defeated. It is also said
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:45
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There are no holy wells in this parish except Kingstone but there are no pilgrimages to it. It is said St Kevin threw a stone and where it fell a well sprung up. The stone is there to be seen yet. This well is near Toomour Abbey.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:34
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There are four Tailors in this district at present.
Long ago tailors travelled from house to house when they were required to make clothes. They lived in the house of the person while they were making the clothes and it took them a long time to do the work because the sewing was all done by hand.
At present tailors work ion their own home. Some of them stock their own cloth and they would not make a suit for anyone unless the cloth was bought off them. Other do not stock cloth. About one hundred years ago all the clothes the men wore were woven at home but no one knows how to spin cloth at present. There was a woollen
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:30
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at Bailieboro: and woollen good, and blankets, and serges, were made at it. It closed about thirty five years ago and all the machinery was bought by a woollen firm in Ballymena and the roof was taken off and sold also. All the remains to be seen now are the ruins. The cloth used for mens clothes at present are blue serge and Irish tweed.
The tailor implements are Tape measure, A large Scissors, for cutting cloth, A small Scissors, A lap Board, on which he pressed the cloth. A large Iron called the tailors 'Goose' for pressing the cloth. Needles, Thimbles, Chalk.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:25
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Long ago travelling folk did not go about the same way as they go now.
They went singly. Sometimes the men went about gathering rags and they gave the people pins and needles in return. The women wanted oat meal, flour, eggs, potatoes, bacon and milk and anything they could get. At the end of the day when they had a great deal of potatoes and oat meal gathered they sold it to a farmer or in some country shop. They wanted lodging in the farmers houses
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:22
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and the farmers kept them. They made a bed for them in the kitchen with some straw and a cover over it and they stayed there for the night or sometimes they stayed for two or three nights. The farmer gave them their supper at night and their breakfast in the morning before they go away. These were generally welcome because they had all the news of the country with them.
Sometimes these travelling folk acted as 'matchmakers'
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:11
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Travelling folk still go round the country as they have been doing for many years. They are very poor. They sell very small articles and people buy some things from them. They get their supplies from the neighbouring towns. They are not welcome because when they go into the house it is very difficult to get them out and they always want a little of everything that they see in the house. The women are the worst in this respect. They sleep in tents or in vans along the roadside and they stay for one or two nights or sometimes a week in the one place. The farmers do not like them to have them
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 09:01
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camped near them because they pot their horses and asses into the fields and they break down the ditches for the fire stuff. They never have any food with them and they are always going about from house to house asking alms they want flour, oat meal, bacon eggs tea, sugar, milk and they always want old clothes and shoes. Sometimes they go about in families or in bands. The best known of them are the McCanns. It is mostly in the summer they come round this country. Sometimes the women want silver for telling fortunes.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 08:55
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back and the man who reached there first got a pint of whiskey.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 08:54
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bargain concerning the dowry. The dowry is given to the bridegroom by the bride's father. It always consists of money and this money is called a 'fortune'. No old people ever remember marriages taking place in the houses. A marriage feast is generally always given in the bride's house and a great many neighbours and friends attend it. When the bridegroom takes his bride to his own house a crowd of young boys gather together and they cover their heads, their faces, and their shoulders with straw. When they reach the house they sing and dance. Then the bridegroom either gives them whiskey or porter or sometimes when he had no drink for them he gives them money. When they get the money they go to the nearest public house and spend it there. Long ago the people went to marriages on horse back. When the marriage was over the men raced to the bride's house on horse
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 08:48
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Marriages do not take place at any particular period at present but formerly a great many marriages took place the week before Shrove Tuesday. It was quite a common thing to see two or three marriages in one Church on the morning of Shrove Tuesday. People in this country think it is very unlucky to get married in the months of May or August and Monday and Saturday are thought unlucky days for marriage. It is a rare thing to hear of anybody getting married on Sunday. Match making was very common long ago. The people who made the match went to some man whom they knew required a wife and asked him would he marry some neighbour girl. If he agreed they got a pint of whiskey and went to the girls house and asked her to marry him. They generally made a very hard
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 08:43
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no light nor no lamps to show them light they put a fir stick in the fire and it blazed and showed the people light. Resin candles were also used for showing light to the people. In most houses there was a bed in the kitchen it was left along the side wall this bed was called a settle bed. This bed was made of wood in the shape of a box. It was made in two parts and it was put together with two hinges so that it could be closed during the day and it often served as a seat.
senior member (history)
2021-01-13 08:36
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In olden times houses were built with mud and when finished the walls were faced with stones and they were roofed with heavy oak rafters and thatched with rushes. The chimney was always in the gable end. An oak plank was put across from oneside wall to the other and then the chimney was built up with wattles and mortar. The windows on every house were very small because each window was taxed in those days and if the windows were big the people would have a big sum of tax to pay. The windows were always kept shut. The floors were made of clay. There was a half door in every house in the district. The houses were not very big. A tall man would have to stoop going in or out on the door. Turf and fir sticks were burned in the fire. At night when there was
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 22:04
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and it is called a cingcise
St. John's Eve
On St. John's eve which falls on the 23rd June a bonfire was lighted nearly in every townland. All the young boys and girls gather together they go to a bog and take turf (and turf) and sticks when night comes. They carry these to the top of some high hill and when it gets dark and when the people gather to where the fire is lighted. Sometimes a person plays a fiddle or a melodeon and the boys and girls dance until well on in the night.
Long ago when the people were going home from the bonfire each person took a lighted branch or coal with them, and they threw it into the field in which they had oats or potatoes.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:58
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This was done to bring good luck on the crop.
Hallow Eve.
On Hallow Eve night people in the country make boxty bread. A great feast was held in every house on this night. The children got apples for the occasion. They put some of them in a tub of water and try to take them out of it with their mouths. A shilling is sometimes put in the bottom of a tub of clean water and the children duck their heads into it and try to take it out without putting their hands into the water. This causes great amusement and it is very funny to see the children especially the girls with their hair all wet and the water dripping down from it. Some young boys gather on this night.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:54
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:54
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Ní fhachas féin arsa sise ceól ba binne ná seiseir gamhna af déanamh ngrigil agus iad a teacht buille ar buille.
Dubhairt bean an feilmeor ní fhachas féin arsa sise ceol ba bhinne na seisear fear í ngleanntáin coille an fear deire ag cainnt leis an fear tosuig agus íad ag iomchur an fod anias ó'n ngrigil.
Leabhar an muillneoir agus dubhairt sé gur ab é bean an feilmroir is fearr a mhuill a ceirde féin agus gur ab í an chéad bhean a geobfadh an chaisgin.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:50
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Chuaidh triúr mna go dtí an muilleann la le caisgin agus dubhairt an mhuillineoir leobta ce be bean acú is fearr a muillfid a ceirde féin gur ab í an chéad bhean a geobfadh an caisgin.
Dubhairt bean an gabha:- ní fhacha mise, ceol na bhinne no torann na poll agus fum na slinne an turnatáin atá an teacht thar buille agus pota na feola ata ag bruit ar an teine.
Dubhairt bean an tailliur
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:45
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They go through the country tying doors and taking wheels of carts. Sometimes when a man was scarce in cabbage they went to his field and took all of it he had. Then they went to some man who had plenty of cabbage and tied and tied all of it to his door.
St. Stephens day.
On St. Stephen's day all the young boys gather together and they dress up in old clothes in a very fanciful way and they generally wear false faces.
They always carry musical instruments with them such as fiddles, melodeons, drums, and fifes. They go from house to house playing music and dancing. The people in the house generally give them some money.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:39
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When night falls they divide the money equally among themselves. They generally spend it in the nearest public house.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:33
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which dances are held in this district.
Easter Sunday
On Easter Sunday a pot of eggs is boiled for breakfast in the morning. Boys and girls often ate three and four eggs on this morning. Long ago a pot of potatoes was boiled in the morning and eating to the eggs. When the eggs are eating tea is given round. On Easter Sunday evening the children lighted fires outside and they boiled eggs and ate them. They called this eating their cludog.
Whit Sunday
On Whit Sunday or Monday it is thought unlucky to go out on water or to fish at a lake or river. An animal born on either of these days is said to be unlucky
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:25
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St Patrick's Day
On St Patrick's day each person wears a bunch of shamrocks. In honour of St Patrick they do this. It is said that he taught the Irish people the Mystery of the Trinity with the shamrock. Some years ago when the people came home from mass and got their dinner both men and women went to town or to the nearest public house. They always drank a great deal of whiskey and very often most of the men got drunk. They called this drowning their shamrock. A great many concerts and plays are held in towns and in hall's throughout the country on St Patricks night. All the people go to these concerts. This is the only night during lent on
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:15
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Football was played long ago in Gortuore [?] meadow. I believe it was Association. It was often spoken of as "kicking the cod". I have heard of a great match that was played there but I cannot get the names of the teams or any other details. There was a man killed at this particular match. The ball was made of leather and about the same size as the ball used to-day.
Hurling was not played in this district but weight throwing was often practised.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:08
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plesent, and so is the frost.
A penny wise and a pound foolish.
Two things you will not fret at if you are a wise man, the thing you can't help and the thing which you can.
Spray your potatoes early before the blight comes on.
Is your potatoes any good or are they worth a digging put in your spade and try them now. Says wide awake Mc.Guigan.
A green Christmas leaves a fat church yard.
Put in your potatoes early, and fill your drills with manure, put ribbons on her bonnet and marry her when she is young.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:04
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Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
Its a long lane hasn't a turn.
The long road is the short road home.
The early bird catches the early worm.
What is home without a mother.
A green Christmas is a full graveyard.
A wise man always carries his coat.
A man is better than his birth.
Two heads is better than one.
A good character is better than good riches.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:02
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Little said is easily mended
As you rear your pup you will have your dog.
For age and want say while you may, no moving sun lasts a while day.
The moonlight is
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 21:01
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All is not gold that glitters
A hungry eye can see far.
All is not lost that is in danger.
A bird in the hand is worth two in a bush.
Never leave off till tomorrow what you can do to day.
Always taking from the meal tub and never putting in soon comes to the bottom.
Silks and satins velvets and cattons often put out the kitchen fire.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.
Bought with is the best wit ever you had.
If life was a thing money would buy the rich would live and the poor would die.
A stitch in time saves nine.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 20:56
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Hurry, hurry rush and worry at sixty - five.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 20:55
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The time of the snow in (1803) there was an old man named John Mulligan who lived in the townland of Cornnaglar, Threemilehouse, Monaghan. Before the snow came in (1803) he went into the town of Monaghan to buy food for his children. It was a very dark night when he was coming home and he had to cross a large bog. He was very heavily (la) loaded and he went astray so that night it began snowing the old man had to lie down. In a day after one of his sons found him dead.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 20:52
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waterworks in Togan. And there is pipes from it to Monaghan.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 20:52
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Togan is the home district. It is in the parish of Three-mile-house, in the Barony of Monaghan. There is two National Schools, and one Catholic Church. There are about eleven families in the townland. There are fifty people in the townland. Togan which means raising or lifting. Togan gets that because it is on a slope. The soil is good for everything, but wheat. McConnon is the local name. The oldest person in the district is Mrs. Kiearn. There is ruins in the district, and it belongs to people who emigrated twenty years ago. There is another house in the district and the owner is Peter Cash. His family is in Ireland and England. The house is not in ruins. There is a
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 20:47
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My townland is Shervin there is only one family living in it. Our parish is Threemilehouse, and our Barony is Monaghan. There is one Catholic Church in it. There is also an ancient graveyard known as Drumsnatt. There is history about this graveyard. At the entrance there is a mass rock where mass was said in the penal days and ever since when a coffin goes into the graveyard it is rested on this stone.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 20:44
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and bog.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 20:43
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The townland which I live in is Coolcorragh, parish of Drumsnatt. There are seven families living in it and in them there are thirty people living. McGuinness'es are the families most common.
There is one house thatched in the townland. Coolcorragh means the rough back of a hill. There is one old woman of seventy living in it. Her name is Mrs Keenan and her address is Coolcorragh, Threemilehouse Co Monaghan.
Long ago there were eight families more living in it and they are now in ruins. Some of these went to Americia. The land in this townland is hilly and good.
There is a stream running through and it runs into the Ulster canall, and there is also a large lake
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:27
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senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:26
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There are six families in the townland of Drumgarrow and also four thatched houses in the townland. It (goo) got the name Drumgarrow because it is called the rough hill.
It is in the barony of Monaghan. It is in the parish of Kilmore and Drumsnatt.
There are twenty-one persons in the townland. There is an old man, who lives in our townland, his name is Peter Donolly who is seventy years of age. He could not tell any stories in Irish, but he could tell some in English
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:22
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hilly and not boggy but good.
There is no wood growing near the townland. There is no stories connected with them.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:21
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The name of my home district is Drumguill. The Parish's name is Drumsnatt. The Barony of Monaghan.
There are six families in the townland. There are (43) forty three people. McEntee is the name most common. Most of the houses are slated than thatched.
There are some old people seventy living in the townland. They do not know any Irish. Some of them can tell stories in English but they can't tell them in Irish.
Houses were more numerous locally in former times. There are some now in ruins. Some people emigrated to Americia
The townland is not mentioned in any song or saying. The townland is
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:12
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In the townland of Kiltubrid there is a large stone and it was used as a mass Rock in the Penal Days. It is called Kill ná haltar and the way it got its name was that there was a priest killed on the Altar in the Penal Days, by the English Landlords. There is a woman (namely) Mrs Connolly convenient to the Mass Rock and one day when she was going for her cows, she went up to the Rock and she found a silver spoon lying on it. It was used for put
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:09
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ing the water into the Chalice.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:08
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Armour Hill got its name because there was a fight long ago, and this hill is where the invaders kept their arms. This hill is situated in John Murphy's farm in the townland of Drumsheeny, parish of Threemilehouse, and the County of Monaghan
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:06
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Carrick-a-Nairer is known as the Mass Rock is in a field of Rosey Mulligan's in the townland of Kiltubrid it leads to the Leck road to the main road and from the main road to Monaghan.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 17:00
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The cure of the weak is Brandey, and to wash it with "Beaken-sody" every day.
To boil balls of oaten meal, in linen cloths and put beside the heart, and say a certain prayers. Take the balls of meal, and you will find some is missing, and it is cured.
The cure of the weak heart is made by the person that makes the cure goes around you three times praying, when finished there is some gone out of the and the bannock is made into oat cake you must eat it without losing any of it.
Dirty mouth
Mrs. McQuaid, Corretard, Three-milehouse, Co. Monaghan. Has the cure of dirty mouth.
The person who has the cure blows their breath into the other person's mouth three days in success-
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 16:54
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Logwid Hill, so called from the colour of the spring that ouses out of it. Logwid was a dye by the people of this country forty years ago. Minerals abound in small quantities in the hill which is situated in James Traver's farm in the townland of Calliagh in Aghabog County Monaghan.
Armagh Hill
Armagh Hill is so called, on account of a slight skirmish which ten men fought. The Armagh men won the fight against the Monaghan men. This hill situated in the townland of Drumsheeny County Monaghan.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 16:51
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At the entrance he had the card up and on this card was written "what is it that men and money can't do". One day a tramp man came along the road and seeing this wrote on it. "All the men and money in Adam's race could not put a pretty on Colonel Dawson's face."
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 16:49
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Once upon a time there lived in the townland of Ballagh (Threemilehouse Co. Monaghan) an old man of the name of Atty Sreenan (God rest his soul) and at this particular time there was a neighbour took ill and Dr. Whitla of Monaghan was called in to attend her. Atty saw the Doctor going to the house and being inquisitive he went out of his way to meet the Doctor as he was leaving. Having met him he inquired of the Doctor what was the matter with this woman and the Doctor not knowing the old man did not think worth his while to answer. Atty said to the Doctor "I suppose you are like myself you don't know."
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 16:44
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Long ago there was a man named Colonel Dawson who lived at Rockcorry (Co. Monaghan). He was rich and had all the comforts of this world. He built a fine castle and had a nice entrance to the castle. Colonel Dawson was a man who had a broken nose.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 14:15
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On the Blackwater's banks
In the hazels so green:
I will sport round Tyholland
While life doth remain
And with my own beagles
I'll follow the game.
IX
As I went a - walking
And for pleasure did rove,
Down by Rossmore's castle
And down by the grove
I espied a wee charmer
So neatly stepped she,
On the banks of yon river
Near the weeping ash tree.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 14:09
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And I'm come here to walk
On this beautiful plain."
IV
Said I, "My wee lassies
Dare I make so free
As for to go with you
Your flocks there to see,
We'll go down to you brushwood
Where we won't be seen
And there pluck the nuts
From the hazel so green."
V
She say, "My wee laddie
You can't make so free,
As to come with me
My flocks for to see;
We won't go by yon brushwood
For you might me disdain,
And we'd both be transported
From Rossmore's demesne."
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 14:06
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I
As I went a-walking
And for pleasure did rove
Dawn by Rossmore's Castle
And down by the grove;
I espied a wee charmer
So neatly stepped she,
On the banks of yon river
Near the weeping ash tree.
II
As I approached her,
All struck by surprise,
I thought her an angel
That fell from the skies;
Saying "Are you queen (of) or princess
Or the Goddess of love
Or are you Diana
Fallen down from above?"
III
"Kind sir," she made answer
"I'm (mo) not queen of love,
Nor am I Diana
Fallen down from above:
I'm the shepherd's one daughter
From Rossmore's demesne.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 13:57
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Bhí fear ann uair amháin agus ní raibh fhios aige cé'n rud ba cheart dó a rádh. Chuaidh sé amach ag pubhal lá. Chonnaic sé fear ag déanamh puill mhór le a lán asal marbh a chur ann. Dubhairt sé leis an bhfear seo, "Béidh nios mó ná sin le dhéanamh agat mar tá se le cioth sean-ban a déanamh.
Dubhairt an fear eile leis "tuige nár dhubhairt tú an rud ceart" abair "nach deagaidís suas go deo".
"Ceart go leor arsan fear". Cguaidh sé turas eile agus chonnaic sé fear ag cur síl. dubhairt sé leis an bhfear seo "tá súil agam nach dtagaidís sias go deo." Bhí fearg ar an bhfear agus dubhairt sé leis abair "an méid atá síos an bliain seo go mbéid dha oiread sin síos an bhliain seo chugainn."
"Ceart go leor" ar seisean. Chuaidh sé agus chás othraid air agus ar seisean leis an bhfear ar leis an chónra an méid atá síos an bliana seo go mbéidh dhá oiread sin síos an bliain seo tigainn hug na daoine bualadh do agus bhí air dul go dtí an óispidéal.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 13:56
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Bhí fear an n uair amháin agus ní raibh fhios aige cé'n rud ba cheart dó a rádh. Chuaidh sé amach ag pubhal lá. Chonnaic sé fear ag déanamh puill mhór le a lán asal marbh a chur ann. Dubhairt sé leis an bhfear seo, "Béidh nios mó ná sin le dhéanamh agat mar tá se le cioth sean-ban a déanamh.
Dubhairt an fear eile leis "tuige nár dhubhairt tú an rud ceart" abair "nach deagaidís suas go deo".
"Ceart go leor arsan fear". Cguaidh sé turas eile agus chonnaic sé fear ag cur síl. dubhairt sé leis an bhfear seo "tá súil agam nach dtagaidís sias go deo." Bhí fearg ar an bhfear agus dubhairt sé leis abair "an méid atá síos an bliain seo go mbéid dha oiread sin síos an bhliain seo chugainn."
"Ceart go leor" ar seisean. Chuaidh sé agus chás othraid air agus ar seisean leis an bhfear ar leis an chónra an méid atá síos an bliana seo go mbéidh dhá oiread sin síos an bliain seo tigainn hug na daoine bualadh do agus bhí air dul go dtí an óispidéal.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 13:09
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Bhí fear an n uair amháin agus ní raibh fhios aige cé'n rud ba cheart dó a rádh. Chuaidh sé amach ag pubhal lá. Chonnaic sé fear ag déanamh puill mhór le a lán asal marbh a chur ann. Dubhairt sé leis an bhfear seo, "Béidh nios mó ná sin le dhéanamh agat mar tá se le cioth sean-ban a déanamh.
Dubhairt an fear eile leis "tuige nár dhubhairt tú an rud ceart" abair "nach deagaidís suas go deo".
"Ceart go leor arsan fear". Cguaidh sé turas eile agus chonnaic sé fear ag cur síl. dubhairt sé leis an bhfear seo "tá súil agam nach dtagaisís sias go deo." Bhí fearg ar an bhfear agus dubhairt sé leis abair "an méid atá síos an bliain seo go mbéid dha oiread sin síos an bhliain seo chugainn."
"Ceart go leor" ar seisean. Chuaidh sé agus chás othraid air agus ar seisean leis an bhfear ar leis an chónra an méid atá síos an bliana seo go mbéidh dhá oiread sin síos an bliain seo tigainn hug na daoine bualadh do agus bhí air dul go dtí an óispidéal.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:43
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I. Chuaidh mé isteach san ngáirdín chas m'oncal Shéamus orm dó bhain me an ceann dhe agus d'fág me a chorp go sóchamhail.
Freagra :- Tor Cabáiste.
II. Fear dearh in-aice leis an gclaidhe itheann sé gach rud acht ní ólann se uisge.
Freagra :- Teine.
III. Chuaidh mé suas an bóithrín chas mó mhama Noirín orm bhí srón iarainn uirthí agus méaracha airgid agus is í a chuirfeadh ruaigh ar na préacháin. Freagra:- Gunna.
IV. Chuaidh céad caorach amach an bhearna chuaidh céad eile in a ndiaidh chuaidh fear agus a mhadadh in a dhiaidh sin ce mhéad chos é sin. Freagra:- Dá chois.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:39
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I. Chuaidh ,mé isteach san ingáirdín chas m'oncal Shéamus orm dó bhain me an ceann dhe agus d'fág me a chorp go sóchamhail.
Freagra :- Tor Cabáiste.
II. Fear dearh in-aice leis an gclaidhe itheann sé gach rud acht ní ólann se uisge.
Freagra :- Teine.
III. Chuaidh mé suas an bóithrín chas mó mhama Noirín orm bhí srón iarainn uirthí agus méaracha airgid agus is í a chuirfeadh ruaigh ar na préacháin. Freagra:- Gunna.
IV. Chuaidh céad caorach amach an bhearna chuaidh céad eile in a ndiaidh chuaidh fear agus a mhadadh in a dhiaidh sin ce mhéad chos é sin. Freagra:- Dá chois.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:32
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III Osgaileann sé cosamhail le doras shiobóil agus dúnann sé cosamhail le 'trap'
Freagra:- sgáth fearthainne
IV. Tagann sé istheach i mála agus téigheann se agus amach i mbuicéad. Freagra:- Móin.
V
Dhá "n" dhá "o" 'l' agus 'd' cuir sin le ceile agus litrigh dome e.
Freagra:- London
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:28
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I. Céard é sin atá lár sa ló agus follamh san oidhce. Freagra:- bróga
II
Cén taobh de'n cúpán ar a bhfuil an chos.
Freagra:- an taob amuigh se
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:26
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I
Bhí fear an fadó agus ní raibh sé í traen ariamh. La amháin fuair sé leath choróin agus chuaidh sé go dtí an stáisiún le ticéad fillte a fhághail go dtí an Baile Ba ghaoire dhó. Chuaidh sé isteach and níorbh; fada gur thosuigh an trean ag gluaiseacht. Bhí Sagart ins an traen leis an bfhear. Bhí an fear ag féacaint amach an fhuinneóg. "Ó féach" ar seisean "na pairceanna na crainn agus na claidhthe iad go léir ag rith." "Bhfuil is agat" arsa an sagart "an áit a bhfuil tú ag dull ann. "Níl fhios agam" ars an bfhear" "Fé talamh na h-éireann." "Tá tú ag dul go h- Ifreann" arsa sagart. 'Ó' ars abn bhfear ta mé ar mhuin na muice mar tá ticéad fillte agam.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
Teach a bhain le máighistir scoile níorb' féidir leis é a fheiceál as sin amach.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:17
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awaiting decision
Uair amháin bhí m'athair (Padraigh Ó Ceallaigh Múirín Co, Mhuigheó) ag treabhad. Tháinig an céacht in agaidh sean meadhchana acht níor sead na capaill agus briseadh ar fad iad, agus n iorbh fhéidir leis iad a chur le cheile. Dubhairt sé gur cheap sé go raibheadar annsin le cúpla céad bliain.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 10:13
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awaiting decision
Oidhche amhain bhí fear darb' ainm (Séamus Ó h-Éilighe) ag dul go Béal Átha na Muice.
Chonnaic sé dhá lampa san spéir agus daoine thart timcheall ortha. Bhí na daoine a bhí thart timcheall na lampa ag caoineadh uair amhain, agus uair eile bhí siad ag cantan agus uair eile bhí siad cosamhail le tearcaibh. Lean an Radharc gur tháinig sé chómh fada le sean
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 09:58
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awaiting decision
I. Bím ag dul ó theach go teach is bím amuich san oidhche. Freagra :- casán.
II. Tá teach beag cruinn agus tá sé lán le feoil acht níl aon doras ná fuinneóga ann.
Freagra :- ubh.
III. Thug m'athair síol dom le chur bhí an síol dubh agus bhí an talamh bán. Freagra :- ag sgríobhadh leitir.
IV. Eiteallann sí go h-árd agus eiteallann sí go h-íseal caitheann sí bróga agus níl aon brógha aicí. Freagra :- Liathróid coise.
V
Ceann cosamhail le méaracán agus ruball cosmhail le liuch. Freagra :- píopa.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 09:57
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rejected
awaiting decision
I. Bím af dul ó theach go teach is bím amuich san oidhche. Freagra :- casán.
II. Tá teach beag cruinn agus tá sé lán le feoil acht níl aon doras ná fuinneóga ann.
Freagra :- ubh.
III. Thug m'athair síol dom le chur bhí an síol dubh agus bhí an talamh bán. Freagra :- ag sgríobhadh leitir.
IV. Eiteallann sí go h-árd agus eiteallann sí go h-íseal caitheann sí bróga agus níl aon brógha aicí. Freagra :- Liathróid coise.
V
Ceann cosamhail le méaracán agus ruball cosmhail le liuch. Freagra :- píopa.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 09:53
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awaiting decision
Bíonn an feilméar ag brath ar an aimsir le h-aghaidh na barraí go léir agus annsin bíonn a lán comharthaí aife i staobh na h-aimsire.
Deireann sé nuair a bíonn an ghrian dearg af dul faoi go mbéidh aisir bréagh ann agus nuair nmab mbíonn sé dearg go mbéidh báisteach ann. Nuair a bíonn an spéar dearg sa taoibh thiar go mbéidh stoirm ann, agus nuair a bíonn se dearg sa taoibh toir go mbéidh báisteach ann. Nuair a bíonn se deacair na ba a chur isteach béidh sioc ann. Nuair a bíonn na réalta an gheal sa Samhradh béidh báisteach ann. Nuair a tagann na faoilleáin isteach án bhfairrge béidh stoirm ann.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 09:47
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awaiting decision
Long ago the stock the farmer reared was a cow and a mule. At that time the people used to sell a lot of butter.
The food of the cow consisted of turnips, hay and straw.
The people had different names on the cows such as Nelly and Daisy.
If a person was churning and if another person came it is said if he did not help in churning he could bring the butter out of the milk.
The mule was an animal like the ass but larger.
He used to live in a stable in Winter and his chief food was hay.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 09:43
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awaiting decision
Long ago the people did not sow as much potatoes as they do now.
First they used to plough the land into ridges then they used to make the ridges fine with a spade. Then they used to make a hole with a spade and cover a slit within in it with soil. After a while they used to put manure on the ridges with an ass and baskets. Then they used to cover it with soil out of the dike. When the stalks came up they used to put soil around the stalks with their hands. In Autumn they used to dig the potatoes put them in a pit and cover them.
senior member (history)
2021-01-12 09:40
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awaiting decision
There is a plant called the dandelion and there is a cure in it for proud flesh growing on a wound.
A person who has warts can be cured by going to the blacksmith's tub in which he cools the iron and dipping the warts in the water nine times in succession.
If a child was sick and if he passed under an asss's stomach he would be cured.
The seventh daughter of a family has a cure for anyone having mumps.
If a person gets a bite from a mad animal and if the wound becomes septic, if the person kills the animal and leaves his teeth against the wound it will get better.
A person who is bitten by a mad animal can be cured by drinking the remains of the milk, which the mad animal leaves without drinking.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 22:32
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Bí Miceál Ó Cearbháill as Múirnín Clár Cloinne Mhuiris in-don rith chómh tapaidh le con agus bhí sé an féar do bfhearr le leimnigh agus ag caitheamh an ord.
Bhí Tomas O h-Allagáin as Cuirín Clár Cloinne Mhuiris in-don leamnig thar dha chaoaill agus iad ag treabhadh.
Bhí Seán Ó Raighne as Múirín Clar Cloinne Muiris in-don acra go leith féar do bhaint sa lo le speal
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 22:29
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awaiting decision
Bhí Risteárd de Priondargrás as Mace, Clár Cloinne Mhuiris, indon léimnigh cúig troigthe gan aon bhróga air.
Bhí Séamus Ó Conroí as Mace, Clár Cloinne Mhuiris, indon Céad Méadhchain a chaithemh sé troigthe.
Bhí Miceál Ó Fallamhain as Mace, Clár Cloinne Mhuiris indon leimnigh thar dhá chapall agus iad in-a seasamh le taobh geata.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 22:26
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The name of my village is Mace, and it is in the parish of Kilcolman.
There are thirty houses in our village and half of them are slated and the other half are thatched with straw.
There is no ruins of any old buildings in our village except the ruins of an old laundry which belonged to the landlords.
In our village there is no large river except a small river which divides two villages and it flows into a lake called bultibo lake.
The most popular sirname in our village is Prendergast.
In our village there are twenty people over seventy years and some of them are great story tellers.
In our village there are five hundred acres of land and one sixth of it is bad and the rest is good land.
Every farmer in our village has thirty acres of land and an acre of bog.
There are no woods in our village except one small one and it is nearly all cut away.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 22:13
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awaiting decision
In Ireland long ago there were no schools bit in every village there was a barn and once a week a school master would come and teach the children.
In that time there were no pens nor pencils to write with but the master taught the children by repeating the subject several times. The children were compelled to learn everything by heart.
The master that taught the children at that time did not get money but every child that was going to school gave him a little money.
Every night he would go to one of the pupil's homes to sleep and in the morning the owner of the house would bring him to the school in which he was to teach that day.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 22:09
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awaiting decision
When the penal laws were in force the people were forbidden to go to mass or to school and the people would have to sell their animals if they were valued more than five pounds.
The penal laws were in force for over a hundred years and in that time the people had to suffer very much for the faith.
Those laws were put in force to leave the Irish in a state of ignorance.
When the laws were in full force the people always went to mass and to school but sometimes they were found out and put to death.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 22:05
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awaiting decision
The name of our patron saint is Saint Colman.
Saint Colman came to this parish along with others saints and built a monastery in it and afterwards it was called the parish of Kilcolman.
When Saint Colman was in this parish he was going about from house to house preaching to the people and working miracles.
In one place of the parish there was a man sick and when Saint Colman heard he was sick he went to his house and cured him.
When Saint Colman was in this parish he had a lot of men employed in tilling the land and building houses for the poor people.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 21:59
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awaiting decision
In our parish there are three graveyards, one in Kilcolman another in Barnacarroll, and another in Ballinasmalla.
In Barnacarroll the graveyard is at the back of the church, and the graves are arranged in lines and every family has his own burrying ground and it is railed with iron.
In KIlcolman the graveyard is situated near the main road and in it are the ruins of an old chaple which Saint Kilcolman built. The graveyard is not as well cleaned as the Barnacarroll graveyard. The people are buried all over the graveyard and there are no paths in it and the graves are not arranged in lines like the Barnacarroll graveyard.
The Ballinasmalla graveyard is situated near Claremorris and it is very clean and there is a large number of tombstones in it.
Long ago the places where children were buried were called "lisheens". In our village there is one place like that and now it is haunted.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 21:48
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In Ireland long ago fairs were held in certain places once a year. Sometimes the fair lasted for a week and all the animals were brought to it.
Long ago the people did not get up early when they were going to the fairs like the people do now. The fair was held from nine o clock until six in the evening.
When the people brought animals to the fair if they sold they would have to pay custom. The custom they payed was fourpence on a cow, a sheep, and a pig, and they payed sixpence on a horse.
Sometimes if a lot of people had cattle to sell, the jobbers would go to the houses and buy them. Then the people of whom they bought the cattle would give them luck's money.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 21:44
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awaiting decision
In our village there was one blacksmith and his name was John Glavey and he was the best blacksmith in the parish.
Near Kiltimagh there was a blacksmith and he was able to make pikes for the men near Tourmakeady.
One day a band of English soldiers came to his house and killed him.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 21:42
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awaiting decision
Long ago the blacksmith did more work in the forge than he does now. All the tools the farmers used were made by the blacksmith. He made ploughs, gates, harrows, spades and scufflers and also he put shoes on horses.
The tools which the blacksmith used were a big sledge and a small sledge an anvil and a bellows.
Some of the blacksmith's had great power and if any person stole anything out of the forge the blacksmith knew who it was.
Long ago the blacksmith''s forge was a place where all the people of the village used to go visiting at night.
There they used to discuss the affairs of the day, and sometimes they used to tell stories.
There is a cure for warts in the water in which the blacksmith cools the iron.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 21:34
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Note. Dooish Old School was built in 1841. The building is still standing, has been renovated and converted into a shop. The building was condemned as being unsuitable for a school owing to the site's being too low - lying.
Principal's name Particulars
Patrick Patton - taught person now aged eighty years and over.
James Dowds -
John Brogan - appointed October, 1899.
Joseph Dowds - son of James Dowds - former principal - appointed October, 1900.
Francis McVeigh - appointed October, 1908.
Edward McGlinchey, B.A., - now principal Clones Boys' National School. appointed February 1st 1909.
John McGlinchey - now Principal Raphoe Boys' School - appointed October 1st 1925.
John McLaughlin - " November 15th 1927
Note Dooish new school was built (and opened October) 1914, during Mr Ed. McGlinchey's principalship
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 18:21
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awaiting decision
There is supposed to be a donkey skin full of gold in a long narrow field in Ardlaghan. This field belongs to Neddy McGinty. If a cow lies on the spot where the gold is she will be all white.This is the only way it will be known. There was one cow which lay on it but no one knew where she did lie.
2. On the stock ditch between the stock and Corraine there is supposed to be a pot of gold.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 18:18
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district even at the present time in that if a person afflicted with warts happens on a little water in a hollow in a stone, when not looking for it, and bathes the warts in this water they are supposed to disappear gradually as a result.
Another cure for warts given by Bernard Doherty's daughter-in-law (she got it from her mother
The person who wished to get rid of warts gathered some clay and kept it till he saw a funeral. He then rubbed his warts with the with the clay and threw it after the funeral, saying: "Corpse of clay, carry my warts away"
The Doherty family also told of another popular cure of other days as follows:-
potato - that is, one having no 'eyes' or buds. Cut this potato in three pieces, and bury deep under a green sod. The potato, being blind, cannot grow and
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 18:11
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awaiting decision
Tá fotracha shean chaisleáin i bParaiste Lachaigh. Doiremaclochnaigh atá air. Chuir De Burgo ar bun é. Nuair chailleadh é tháinig muinntir Closes 'na gcomhnuidhe ann acht cuireadh amach as an gcaisleán iad agus chuadar go Vlá' Cliath
Nuair a fhuair fear de na Closes bás cuireadh a corp in urn agus cuireadh san roilig é atá le h-ais an caisleán. Ta leach cuimhneachain le feiceál ann agus ta an dáta 1605 sgríobhtha ar a bharr.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 18:08
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awaiting decision
agus chlochaí beaga dana agus gainimh gorm
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 18:05
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awaiting decision
curtar alán ubhall isteach ann. Bíonn na duine ag iarraidh ubhaill a thóghaint amach as an dtuban le na béal gan lámh do chur san uisge.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 18:04
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Tás adeir Máirtín cé sin amuigh,
Mise Rí Dhómnaigh a tháinig indiú
Agys mar mharbhuigheann tú an moiltín cam fada dubh
Beidh tú féin do mhadaí faoí seachtmhain ó induí.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 18:02
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awaiting decision
There is a castle in Manard in the parish of Lackagh. It was called Derrymcloughlin and it was built by the Burkes. There is an old graveyard beside it and it is supposed that some of the Burkes are buried there. There is another castle in Clare Galway and it is said that when the people were build it the Goban Saor passed, and came in and asked for a job and they told him that if he was able to make a cat and nine tails, over the door with concrete, while they were eating their dinner, that they would let him build it and when they came, out from the dinner he had it made, and so he built the castle. The cat
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 17:57
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awaiting decision
Tá caileán i Móinard i bpráiste lacaigh agus cuireadh ar bun é in aimsear na Normánach. Caisleán Doiremaclochnaigh a tugtar air. Chomnuigh De Búrgo ann i dtosach agus nuair a cailleadh é tháinig muinntir Closes ann na n-ionadh, act dibhireadh amach as an gcaisleán iad agus chuadar go blá Cliath. Ta muinntir de Búrgo curtha ins an reilig atá in aice leis an gcaisleán. Ta leath cuimhneachain ins an reilig agus ainm Seáin a Búrca agus an dáta 1605 scriobhtha air.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 17:51
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de na fir phíosa feola dí agus thosuigh sí ag ithe ar a ditheall. Nuair a bhí an píosa sin ithe aicí tugh siad píosa eile dí agus dubhairt leití a dhul abhaile. Annsin d'imthig na fir agus an teine agus bí cos na caorach ag an bean. Bhí sí abhaile ar a dó dheag a chlog agus chuir sí an feoil siós ar an teine agus d'ith d' sí a suipéar agus d'imthigh sí in a codladh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 17:48
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Bí an bean seo i dTuaim la amháin agus nuair a bí sí ag teachth abhaile ní raibh séin am leis an traen a fhághail agus bí uirthí siubhal abaile. Bhí sí ag dul go Baile-Átha-An-Ríogh. Bí sí ag siubhal agus bí sí comh cuirseach is go raibh uirthi dul isteach i gcoill leis an oidhche a caitheann ann agus shuidh sí siós in aiche le geata. Ní raibh sí ro-fhada ann gur thuith sí in a codladh. Thar éis tamaill do dhuisigh sí agus chonnaic sí teine mhór ar a sghaidh amach agus bhí triúir fear tar timceall na teine agus caoirigh mór shiós i bpota aca. Bhí an bean ag feachaint orra ar fead tamaill agus dubhairt ceann de na fir leí a theach go dtí an teine agus nuair a bhí an caora bruichte thug ceann
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 17:43
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awaiting decision
abhaile agus chuaidh sé in a chodhladh agus tháinnigh pían mhór ar a leiceann. Níor fhág sé a leabaidh ó'n la sin amach go dtí an lá fuair sé bás.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 17:42
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Bhí an beansídhe ag nígh éadaigh i dtubán uisge oidhche amháin agus bhí fear ag dul abhaile. Chonnaic é an bean agus shíl sé gur bean ó'n mbaile a bhí ann.
Chuaidh sé siar go dtí an áit 'na raibh sí i ngan fhíos dí agus chuir sé a dhá lámh timcheall uirthí agus d'umpaigh an beansídhe thart agus bhuail sí buille ar a leiceann le'n a lámh agus d'fhág sí márc a cuig méarachaí ar a leiceann Chuaidh sé
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:54
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awaiting decision
That part of the river Abha na Criche which flows past Bun an Cumair and Droumcarbin often flows out over the land.
There is a spot in the river called Michil's because a man lived there once called Michil O'Donoghue but he had to leave his little holding in Ros a Chru because of the floods and he went to live in Srón Darac where he died.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:51
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It was on a stone at the top of Srón Darach height Eoghan Ruadh was sitting when he made that Song "Seo leó a thoil agus ná goil go fóíl"
He was taking a rest sitting on the stone when a girl appeared bearing a baby in her arms. She placed the baby in his arms and disappeared. The child was his own.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:48
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had them all milked they ran into the fort and ever since that the farmer never left his cows in to it.
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:45
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awaiting decision
These are the names of the roads in this parish, The New Line, The Boggy Road and others which have no especial names.
There is another road which is called the Bockhill Road. This Road leads to Castleisland. There is another called Carraig a'Trap road which leads to the Kilcummin Graveyard.
There is only one very old road in this parish but it is not much used by the public nowadays. It was built during the Famine years. Men and women worked together on the hard-edged cut stones, in their bare feet. As payment for this gruelling labour the received the meagre fee of one shilling and their meals. It was for the latter that they really worked.
Long ago people had to cross rivers over which there were no bridges. Near Killarney at a place called the Countesse's bridge there is a
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:40
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pence. The luck penny the owner gets is called "earnest". Cattle are marked with a knot on the tail. There was a man who had long ears. A friend told him to get "earnest" and kis the money wishing that his ears would get small at the same time. He went to the fair and tried to get "earnest". The people thought he was mad and kicked him out. The man went home and killed his friend. He never tried to get "earnest" again. The people never broke the bargain when they made it. An old saying was.
What goes up the chimney?
Smoke
The bargain is made and it
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:31
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Nuair a bhí Glór - taoiseach don na fir bolga ar Inis Glóra fuair sé leide go raibh Rí Múnaigh ag teacht le arm le beithidhigh na tíre seo a sguabadh leis. Chruinniu sé a chuid fear agus rinne sé trí buidhean díobh. Chuir se an chéad buidhean fá a stúiriu fhéin a muic ag Dairi Coirib, an dara buidhean ins na ddumachaibh ingár go Sáilín agus an triommhadh buidhean istigh ar Cheann Cannaigh áit in a raibh na beithidhigh ar fad cruinnighthe acu.
Thosuigh an troid ag Doire Coiribh. Chuir na Múnaigh fir iorruis síar agus síar agus iad ag troid gan staon gan stad gur
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:25
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sroic siad páirc ingar don áit in a bhfuil an teampall Gall Da marbhuigheadh Glór annsoin. Tá uaigh kle feiceál go fóil agus leac mór dá throigh déag ar aoirde os a cionn. D'leig fir iorrius ortha annsoin go raibh siad ar a dteiceadh agus ní raibh siad ach ag iarraidh le na Munaigh a Mhealladh insteach go dtí an áit in a mbeadh congnamh acu. D'éirigh leo mar thainigh siad. Casadh an dara buidheann de fearraibh iorruis ortha ag an áit in a bhfuil teach an t-sagart fá lathair. D'fág an tríomhadh buidheann na beithidhigh agus thainic siad taobh thiar de na Múnaigh
senior member (history)
2021-01-11 13:21
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awaiting decision