Number of records in editorial history: 32359 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-02-25 00:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
me marbh. Tháinig na cumhanna agus chuir siad troid orra. Léim an cat suas an crann agus marbhuigheadh an sionnach tar éis deich chleas a bheith aige. Dubhairt mo athair mhór liom gur a beidh an sionnach an madadh a bhí ag na loclannaigh nuair a bhí siad i nÉireann. San oidhche a mharbhuigheann an sionnach na cearca, Lachain , sicíní géadha. Ní mharbhuigheann sé sa lá iad
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
-oi a déanamh ar dtús é na tuige a bhfuil an chuma sin air. Ta an sionnach iongantach glich. Uair amháin bhí an sionnach agus cat ag caint le na chéile. Dubhair an sionnach leis an gcat go raibh na cumhana ag cur troid orra. Dubhairt an sionnach leis an gcat go raibh dheich chleas aige agus dubhairt an cat leis nach raibh aige acht aon chleas amháin agus mur n-eirigh lion beidh
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
-oi a déanamh ar dtús é na tuige a bhfuil an chuma sin air. Ta an sionnach iongantach glich. Uair amháin bhí an sionnach agus cat ag caint le na chéile. Dubhair an sionnach leis an gcat go raibh na cumhana ag cur troid orra. Dubhair an sionnach leis an gcat go raibh dheich chleas aige agus dubhairt an cat leis nach raibh aige acht aon chleas amháin agus mur n-eirigh lion beidh
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:49
approved
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awaiting decision
down to look for it and when I could not find it I ran home with it.
A. A thorn in your foot.
Q Never was nor never will be look at your hand and you will see.?
A Your fingers are never the same size.
Q. Down in yonder river there is a boat and in yonder boat there is a woman with a red petticoat an if you don't no her name it is not me that is to blame.
A Ann
Q As I was going to St. Ives I met a man with seven wives, seven wives had seven sacks, seven sacks had seven cats, seven cats had seven kits, kits cats, sacks wives how many were going to St. Ives?
A One
Q Forty sheep through a gap the shepherd and his dog how many feet went through the gap?
A Two.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
one clog - maker in this district.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:42
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rejected
awaiting decision
factories are sold to the merchants and the merchants retail them to the people. In former years when a person wanted a pair of boots it was the custom to leave his or her measure with a shoemaker. Then the shoemaker would make the boots and the person who wanted then would pay the shoemaker for making them.
Boots are repaired locally in this district. The man who repairs the boots is called a cobbler. In former years clogs were worn by the people. In olden times children wore clogs to school but at present they wear boots. The (of) uppers of the clogs are made of leather and the soles are made of wood.
The man who makes the clogs is called a clog - maker. At present there is only
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:38
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awaiting decision
Feet are cared by wearing boots and stockings. In former years children did not start to wear boots as young as at present. Children go barefoot in summer, they throw off their boots in May and they put them on in September.
When children are barefoot they wash their feet every night before going to bed. The water that the feet are washed in is thrown out as it is considered unlucky to keep the feet water in the house over night.
There are not many boots made locally at present as the people buy boots that are made in the factory. There is only one shoemaker in this district at present. The boots that are made in the
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:33
approved
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awaiting decision
ago there was a factory near Bailieborough. This factory was situated near the Vale Mills. The farmers brought wool to this factory and got it manufactured into tweed.
When a member of the family dies it is a custom for the relatives to go in mourning for a year. The men wear a black band on their arms and the women wear black dresses.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:31
approved
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awaiting decision
There are three tailors in this district. They work at their trade in their homes. In former years they went from house to house making clothes. Some tailors stock cloth and others do not.
Tailors are said to be very nimble. The instruments a tailor uses are a sewing - machine, an iron, a lap board and a bench. He sews the clothes with the sewing - machine. He irons the clothes on the lap board with an iron called a goose. He sits on the bench sewing the clothes.
The women and girls knits socks for the men and for themselves. The wool is bought in the shops. The merchants get the wool from the factory and the people buy it from the merchants. Some time
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:27
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awaiting decision
palm is blessed there is a branch of palm hung over the door of the byre to bring good luck on the cows for the year.
When a person is milking and another person passing by he or she says good luck on the work. When I am driving the cows out of the field I say howe on When I am calling the cows I say che.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 23:25
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The farm animals we keep are the horses, cows, calves, sheep, goats and pigs. The domestic animals are a cat and two dogs. The name of the cat is Darkey. The name of the dogs are Lady and Sport.
We keep six cows on the farm. The place where we keep the cows is called a byre. It is divided into stalls. The stalls are made of cement. Each cow is tied in her own stall. The cows are tied to stakes with chains. The chains are tied round the cow's neck's. The ends of the chains are fastened together by a runner. The chain slides up and down with the cow's head. The chains are made from iron are the stalks are made from wood.
On Palm Sunday when the
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 14:20
approved
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awaiting decision
About two miles form Omagh, in the county Tyrone, flowing into the river Strule, is a little stream called the Fairy-water. There is a story told as to how this stream got its name.
Once upon a time, on the banks of this stream there lived a woman and her husband. There was also, a baby in this house, who was always crying and giving trouble in the house.
One day, one of the neighbours came and and said. "Why don't you put that baby on a shovel and hold it over the fire, because it must be a fairy.
So, when the woman's husband came home, she told him about what the neighbour had said, and both of them agreed to try it. They got a shovel and put the baby on it and held it over the fire. Suddenly it disappeared.
The next morning, they heard fairy-music outside, and
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 14:16
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went out to see what it was. To their entire surprise the baby was floating down the stream on a cabbage leaf, playing the bag-pipes.
On account of this legend, the local people always call the stream, "The Fairywater."
Scene of Fairy Water.
MAP
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 14:14
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Tom Smyth the Chandler lived in Farrell St., Kells, where Ryan's public house is now, opposite Kiernan's Bakery.
He melted the fat of cattle and sent this melted fat away to Dublin. The fat was melted in big ovens and had to be kept stirred over a large fire.
James Grimes who told me this, is now 73 years of age. He was employed stirring the fat. The fat was sent away in large barrels to Dublin.
There was always a large amount of sidiment left. This was sold to the people in the town for feeding pigs.
Got from - James Grimes aged 73 who now lives beside his old farm on the Balrath estate. His father was evicted from "Grimes; Hollow". Grimes has been reinstated just beside his father's former farm.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 14:05
approved
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awaiting decision
Q. Why is a black hen more clever than a white one.
A, Because a black hen can lay a white egg and a white hen cannot lay a black egg.
Q. I know a little house and it would not hold a mouse and it has as many windows as the Lord Mayors house?
A A Thimble.
Q. Why is a plum cale liek the ocean.
A Because it contains many currents (Currants)
Q. How many wells would make a river?
A One if it was big enough.
Q Why are ripe apples lying on the ground like thieves?
A Because they ought to be taken up.
Q. When does a chair resemble a lady's dress.
A When is is sat-in (satin)
Q. Riddle me riddle me ree what has an eye and cannot see?
A A needle.
Q. When (she is) can a house be
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 14:00
approved
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awaiting decision
Uncle Robbie killed a calf.
Eddie Mullen got the half.
Kate Carragher got the skin to carry ashes out and in.
Jemmy Smith got the tail to make a souple for a flail.
Mysle Reily got the heart to make grease for a f cart.
Phill kettle got the liver to make Mary sit and shiver.
Bob Hoey got the horn to blow the hens out of the corn.
Sydney Hoey got the head to scare his mother out of bed.
Mr Linsday got the belly to make Meta a pot of jelly.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 13:57
approved
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awaiting decision
Q The man who made it never wore nor the man who bought it never wore but the man that wore it never saw it?
A A coffin.
Q How can the train hear?
A By its engineers (ears)
Q Down in yonder getting lane I met my auntie Sarah Jane, iron nose brass toes upon my word she scared the crows?
A A gun.
Q What would go up the chimney down and would not go down it up?
A An umbrella.
Q What walks and its head down?
A A nail in your boot.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 13:54
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awaiting decision
Q. As I went out, as I came in I saw the dead living in. The six sat, the seventh fled. Riddle me that, and hang me dead?
A. A bird's nest inside a dead horse's head.
There is a story in connection with the above riddle which is as follows: A man, who was going to hang aboy for some offence, offered his victim a chance of escape. He said that he would set him free if the boy could give him a riddle he couldn't solve. The boy went out and when he returned he asked this riddle which his executioner could not solve, and so he escaped being hanged.
Q. Headed like a thimble tailed like a rat. You may guess for ever but you'll never guess that.
A. A Pipe.
Q. What is it that goes round the house and drags a harrow after it?
A. A hen with her flock of chickens.
Q Black and white go up the hill, Black came down and white stayed still.
A. A hen laying an egg.
Q What turns without moving?
A Milk
Q What goes from town without moving?
A The road.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 13:47
approved
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awaiting decision
It is a customs to pin sandbags to peoples coats on Ash Wednesday. We light fires and boil eggs to see who can eat the most at Easter. On the 29th June we light bon-fires in the fields. On the 12th July we go to a picnic. Halloween it is a custom to eat nuts and take gates. We tie doors and stuff chimneys and to eat apples and barn bracks. On Christmas day it is a custom to eat as much as we can, and on St stephens day it is a custom to go out as "Wren Boys" and get some money. The twelve days of Christmas are supposed to represent the twelve months of the year. There is usually a hunt on the sixth of January.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 13:41
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awaiting decision
If the sky is red in the evening next day will be good. If there is a ring round the moon it is a sign of rain. If the wind is coming from Droca, which is a townland in the south there will be a storm.
If The wind is coming from the north it is a sign of snow. If the swallows fly high it is a sign of good weather but if they fly low it is a sign of rain. It the cat sits with her back to the fire it is a sign of storms, & if she scrapes at the leg of the table it is a sign of wind. When the smoke goes up straight in the air it is a sign of good weather but if it blows down it is a sign of a severe storm.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 13:27
approved
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awaiting decision
I was once coming home from Peter Mullens and Pearse McGahan was with me. We were coming down between two old houses when we heard a noise which we thought was someone shouting. We did not pass any remarks until finally the shouting got worse. We looked behind us and it was as dark as pitch yet it was quite bright before us. "I will not get back that way" said Pearse. "I will go round the other way". So he went off the other way. I went on home pretty fast fast I tell you. I told them at home about it and they said it must have been a ghost.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 13:19
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awaiting decision
In Georges Browne's house in the townland of Pottlereigh in the barony of Tullyarvey about two and a half miles from the town of Cootehill there is supposed to be a crock of gold hidden under the floor of the kitchen. No one ever tried to unearth it. No lights have been seen at the spot. It was an old story-teller told my fathers mother about it. No gold or silver was ever found in the district. There is another crock of gold hidden about a quarter of a mile from that house, under a big cone shaped stone on the top of Mayo Hill. No one has ever tried to get it because they believe that the fairies will bring bad luck to them.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 13:00
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago in the year of 1839 there was a great wind. I do not remember it but I hear the old people talking about it.
In the old houses of long ago there is a large plank neat the fire about one foot and a half thivk which is called a brace. On the night of the big wind the small children were put up on that plank. The whole houses were blown down that night. When the old age pension came out no one ever knew what age they were so the people asked them did they remember the great wind and that is how they found their age.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:39
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awaiting decision
rags and sew them on a bag. Others can make belts out of sweet-papers.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:38
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finished they are nice. My father used to make little baskets out of sweet papers. He would turn the paper up and round and they would be lovely little ones. Kathleen Keely can make a boat out of a piece of paper.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:37
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awaiting decision
Long ago the people used to make tops "teatom totams" and cradle birds for catching birds.
Joe Jordan from Trimblestown can make catapults. He cuts a fork and gets two stripes of rubber, then he ties the rubber to the fork he then gets a stone and puts it into the rubber pulls it and then lets the stone go.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:35
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awaiting decision
Tom Donnelly from Bohermeen used to make baskets out of sally rods. He used even to make fancy ones. He used to get 3/- or more for turf baskets, and about 10/- for needle-work baskets. Other people used to make rag mats. They used to get long bits of
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:28
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awaiting decision
The custom to give presents to each other is kept all over the world. Santa Claus travels all over the world. Children always leave a nice piece of cake for Santa. Before Christmas the shops are decorated in the town and a stock of toys got in. It is a custom for the shopkeepers to give their customers a present at Christmas. The night before Christmas we begin the feast with the result that we are sometimes sick.
On Saint Stephens Day the Wren boys go out and they get a penny at nearly every house. The boys dress as girls very often. They say, "Up with the pot and down with the pan a penny or twopence to bury the wren."
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:23
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awaiting decision
The grave yard I know best is Dernakesh. It is situated in the townland of Dernakesh in the parish of Drumgoon and the county of Cavan. The graveyard is square. There are a lot of graves in it some of which have tomb stones in the shapes of crosses made of cement and wood. There are a lot of wreaths on the graves. There is a grave made of cement like a table in which is laid Captain Henry Jumath. The grave yard is badly kept the grass is growing over the graves and the briars are going everywhere through it. There are a lot of trees growing in it. There is a big gate leading into it. The gate is painted black.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:15
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and other implements are often removed from one field to another on it. Top dressing is put out on meadows in the "slipe".
The flail is for thrashing oats and hay. It is made of two sticks one longer and thicher than the other. On the top of each stick is a "capping" made of leather or sally. The cappings are tied together with a flax cord. The stick you hold in your hand is called the hand staff and the one that swings is called a "souple". The corn is taken one sheaf at a time and spread out on the floor. Sometimes to men thresh the same sheaf together by standing one each side of it and swinging their flails alternately.
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:09
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awaiting decision
The oldest of all farm implements is the hook. It is used for cutting the corn. It is a curved shape with small handle. The hook is used now for cutting grass of ditches and dressing hedges. Some people still use the hook for cutting corn. Mr. James Carragher cuts lying corn with the hook.
"A Slipe."
A "slipe" is a rectangular box shaped vehicle about four feet long and two feet broad. The sides slope outwards, and this box sits on two curved pieces of wood "shod" with iron and running length wise. There is a hook on each end to one of which chains are attached.
One horse can pull it over the ground. Sometimes clay is carried in it and put on the slopes of hillsides. Ploughs
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 10:03
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awaiting decision
The fires in this district are nearly all open fireplaces. They mostly burn coal and wood. But there are always "shoves" "seeds" and "sawdust".
Fires made of shoves give a great heat. It is the outside part of the flax that the people call "shoves". Seeds of corn are seldom used for bursting in this district.
Sadust is sometimes burned because there are always little pieces of wood through it. There is what is called "Kiln" or "Logy" It is built by putting a beetle standing upright in the centre and a brick in front of the beetle and "shoves" are piled up round the beetle and the brick. The beetle is lifted up out of the "shoves" and there is a hole left in the centre. Then the brick is removed out of the front and then there is a hole left in the front. Then there is a match put to the hole in the
senior member (history)
2020-02-24 09:55
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The first thing is done is to send for a man or woman who shaves a person when they dye.
It is usually a woman who lays out the corpse. They put the dead body in a sheet or a night suit. It is kept in the house in which it dies for two day before it is burried. The night after the person has died there is nearly always a wake at which I believe there is great fun. If there is not drink there is always cigarettes and tobbacco. The four tallest men usually carry out the coffin to the hearse. There are never any woman at the funeral. The usually go to the burial in the middle of the day.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:47
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awaiting decision
There is a well in Nicholson's land called Tubar na Glass and the water is supposed to have the sure of a toothache and a headache.
Mr. Murray of Moymet has a cure of warts in a prayer that he says.
Miss Gannon of Moymet has a prayer to cure a toothache and Mrs. Connolly of Kilbride has a cure of a headache.
Jack Daly of Athboy has the cure of "Wild Fire" Christy Reilly has the cure of eczema. He mixes some ointment and gives it to the person to put on the sore.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:44
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There is an old cure for warts by getting a snail without looking for him and rub it to the wart and then hang him on a thorn till he withers.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:43
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Miss Gannon from Moymet has the cure of the toothache. If you told her you
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:40
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awaiting decision
There are a lot of giants graves in the County Cavan. There are two in this little district. They are both in the townland of Cohaw. On the top of the grave are a lot of big stones about two feet high. The big flat stone on top is about six feet (high) long and four feet broad. It is a rectangular shape. On the one at Cohaw School there is a mark of a crow's foot and the marks of five fingers. Nobody ever tried to find out what weight the stone on top was. There never were any lights seen about it. There is a stone in front of the school which is supposed to have been thrown by a giant.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:33
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Thatching is very easy work. First the straw is pulled until it is even at both ends. The scallops are then got and sand and lime is mixed.
The tools are-: Stopler, Ladder, bucket and thatching rake. Some of the old thatch is pulled off and new thatch is put on. On top is put morter to hold it on in case of a storm. My father is one of the few men who can thatch. He calls each strip a bed. When he has one bed thatched he moves the ladder.
He goes one like this until he has one side thatched and then he goes to the other side. He then gets long sally rods & puts them up on the thatch and then he puts staples of rods to hold them on.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:28
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front and the blaze goes Up through the hole in the centre.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:27
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I never saw a Banshee but she is supposed to be a very small woman dressed in white and she has long fair hair which she is always combing.
She is supposed to follow certain families. It is supposed to sit on the window sill and cry. When the Banshee is heard someone is going to dye in the house at which she is heard.
Some people say they saw a Banshee. I do not know any families which it follows. Those who heard her said it was like a cat crying. She is supposed to walk quickly. She is is only supposed to follow the oldest families in this district.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:22
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Proper Name............Nicknames
Tom McDonald....."Black Tom"
Patrick McCabe....."Hardy"
Ben McDonald..... 'Fiddie'
Patrick McCane...."Boozer"
Michael McCabe...."McGoldrick"
Charlie McCabe...."Cruise"
Mick Kettle............."Sooty"
Jerry Kettle........"Mutton Jeff"
John McDonald...."Black John"
John Markey......."Barney's John"
Jack Clarke........."Willie's Jack"
Tom Kettle..........."Tight Kettle"
John kettle............"Wheeler"
John McDonald...."Fisty"
John Markey........."Barney's Ned"
James McDonald...."Alic James"
Michael McCabe......"Ann's Micheal".
Tom Matthews........"Smaker."
Tom Boyle............."Luggie"
John Boyle............."Buffer"
Jack Clarke.............."Red Jack"
Jim Carragher.........."Big Johnny"
Phil Harold.................."Hop"
Bennt Mac|Donald......."Luggy".
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:15
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There are two roads that run parallel which run to shearcock joined by three lanes namely, Chaldry lane, Carrutther's lane and Torty One lane. It was called Torty One because it was made in eighteen forty one and on during the famine.
Newgrove school is on the Chapel road. These are the names of a few roads around: Barraghy road, Mayo lane, and Cohaw Lane is a lane is a lane not worked by the County Council. These are lanes not worked by the County Council; Linsdays Lane, Kettles Lane and Mac Abes Lane.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 23:09
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Proper Name ........Nickname
Michael Coyle.........."Skin"
Eddie Finegan......"Caizer"
John McCane........"Peck"
Hugh McMahon......"Joker"
Tom Cunningham...."Snuffer"
Tom McLoughlin....."Gaugh".
Tom Brady............"Slappy"
Tom Harold..........."June"
James Drury.........."Whiskers"
John Markey.........."Fluter"
Alic McCabe ........."Shyman"
Pat McCabe .........."Whack"
Peter McCabe ......."Butsy"
Bernard McDonald..."Christy"
Peter McDonald......"Toe"
James McDonald...."Spud"
Dan Markey.............Rake"
Dan Markey ............"Muffy"
Jemmy Mullen.........."Maugy"
Phil Brady.................Tippler
Jemmy Morgan.........Bogman"
Joe Mac Intyre........ "BulL"
Patrick McDonald......"ton"
Thomas MacDonald "Nuck"
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:40
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fort and on the following day a fairy came to his house and took his mother's clothes. Several neighbours pursued the fairy endeavouring to get the old woman's cloths from him but their efforts were in vain.
On the next day the fairy returned to the house and told the old woman that she or her son wouldn't have any peace until they would re-plant the bushes on the fort. The old woman's son planted the bushes on the fort and he or his mother never heard about the fairies again.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:38
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This part of the parish of Crosserlough must have been very famous long ago because in nearly every town-land there is a fort. These forts are sometimes called raths or duns and in Irish they are known as liosanna.
Forts are circular ditches that are supposed to have been built around the castles of great chieftains in the time of the Tuatha de Danann. On the outside of the ditch there used to be a dyke full of water. This dyke prevented any wild animals from getting inside the (dyke) ditch, and it also prevented robbers from entering the castle.
Forts are nearly always built on an elevated piece of land and from them a good view can be got of several square miles of the surrounding countryside.
In the townland of Clarboy there is a fort, the ditches of which is covered with bushes. Long ago an old woman and her son lived near this fort. One day the son cut (cut) the bushes off the
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:25
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high as mountains, and it is called the Alps because these rocks are almost as high as the Alps.
Castle Park. Castle - Park in Dungimmon gets its name from a castle built by the Sheridans to give it the name.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:23
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encircles it, rain will follow.
2) If the moon looks pale or dim rain is expected if red, wind.
3) If not her natural colour fair weather.
1) If the sun's rays appear like Moses' horns, if white at setting or shorn of its rays or goes down into a bank of clouds in the horizon, bad weather is to be expected.
2) If the stars are falling it is the sign of rain.
3) If the plough is numerous in the sky, there is windy weather to follow.
1) If the clouds are grey and black it is the sign of rain.
2) If the clouds are long and white or "tuckered" as it is called it is the sign of big storm.
If the clouds are moving fast it is the sign of storm.
1) The rainbow is a sign that there will not be much rain or storm because after the deluge the rainbow was given to people as a sign that the world will never be drowned again.
If the wind is from the South or South West there will be rain .
If the wind is from the North, there will be
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:16
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hail, sleet or snow.
3. If the wind is from the East there will be cold, hasky, and unhealthy weather.
The South West wind brings most rain to my district.
If the hens are picking themselves under their wings it is the sign of rain.
If the geese have their heads in their feathers, and one foot up from the ground it is the sign of storm.
If sea - gulls are flying high it is the sign of good weather, and if low, bad wet weather.
"When sea - gulls assemble on the land, Stormy and rain weather is always sure at hand."
If the whistling birds are heard whistling it is the sign of plenty of rain.
If the cat sits with her back to the fire it is the sign of storm.
If the dog is seen eating grass or drinking or drinking water out of a stream or river, it is the sign of rain.
If the goat comes home it is the sign of storm.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:09
approved
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awaiting decision
another old woman who was very cross used to come round here. She was called Buckray on account of her wickedness. She used to beg meal, eggs and other things. She would stay one night at every house and lie on straw. If the night was cold she would bring the straw into the kitchen and sleep there contented.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:07
approved
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awaiting decision
There is a fort in this locality and one time a man went to cut rushes for a bed for his pig in it. The fort was convenient to the pig - sty. When he had finished cutting the rushes, he got them on his back and as soon as he did, he started for home. After a while he found himself in the fort again. The music and dancing started and lasted till morning when he hoisted the bundle and came home. He was tired and weary after his night with the fairies.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 13:02
approved
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awaiting decision
If the ass stands along the hedge it is the sign of rain.
If the sky is red it is the sign of storm.
If the sky is blue it is the sign of good weather
If the sky is yellow or golden it is fair weather.
If the hills appear near us, bad weather is expected, and if far away good weather.
If the fog is seen rising in the bog at night, it is the sign of a hot day to follow.
If there is a fog in the mornings it is the sign of good weather.
If the dust on the road is being blown off it is the sign of bad weather and if it rests on the road it is the sign of good weather.
If the water gets away from the lake - shore it is the sign of good weather.
If there are many flies to be seen it is the sign of bad weather.
If the midges are biting wickedly it is the sign of rain.
In summer if the clegs are wicked it is the sign of rain.
If the smoke goes up straight from the chimney it is the sign of good weather
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:56
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awaiting decision
An old man in this neighbourhood was coming home from his ceilidhe one night. On his way home he had to cross a rock. When he was about half way across he heard a noise and on looking round he saw a fairy hammering boots. He caught the fairy by the neck and said "I am looking for you a long time and you will have to tell me where you have the gold." "I have no gold" he said "But the fellow on the stone behind you has it". The man looked around and when he did the fairy went out of sight.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:50
approved
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awaiting decision
on a basin wet with hot water, knead into a lump, then take it to the bread-board flatten out in the shape of a round cake. Then rub some dry meal on the top of the cake to harden it, and leave it for ten minutes or so, on the bread-board to harden. Then place it on a bread-stick in front of the fore for a half an hour. The bread stick is made of steel bars in this shape (Drawing) . The cake is left standing on the last bar lying up against the others. The last bar is a flat one because it protects the cake from the ashes. The use of the leg is - it is put standing on the heart - stone so as to keep the frame from falling. There are homemade ones made also from a piece of an ash tree. This piece has three branches growing from one point and is called a gólág. This gólág forms three legs, the length of each being twelve or fifteen inches. Bread was generally baked every day where there were large families. People going to America in olden times would bring a cake of oatbread with them to eat on board the ship.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
on a basin wet with hot water, knead into a lump, then take it to the bread-board flatten out in the shape of a round cake. Then rub some dry meal on the top of the cake to harden it, and leave it for ten minutes or so, on the bread-board to harden. Then place it on a bread-stick in front of the fore for a half an hour. The bread stick is made of steel bars in this shape (Drawing) . The cake is left standing on the last bar lying up against the others. The last bar is a flat one because it protects the cake from the ashes. The use of the leg is - it is put standing on the heart - stone so as to keep the frame from falling. There are homemade ones made also from a piece of an ash tree. This piece has three branches growing from one point and is called a gólág. This gólág forms three legs, the length of each being twelve or fifteen inches. Bread was generally baked every day where there were large families. People going to America in olden times would bring a cake of oatbread with them to eat on board the ship.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:43
approved
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awaiting decision
Bread was made long ago from oats and rye and a little made from wheat, but not so much wheaten bread made that time as there is now. People remember querns being used in the district as there were about four in it.
The different kinds of bread made were - Potato-Cake, Boxty Bread, Oatmeal Bread. The Potato-Cake was made by mashing the potatoes in a dish with the bottom of a porringer, put some flour in it and a pinch of salt also, then finish it up like an ordinary cake and bake it on the pan. Boxty bread was made by peeling raw potatoes and then grating them into a pulp. Then the pulp was put into a bag made for the purpose and squeezed until it was dry. Then the mashed potatoes were mixed with the pulp and some flour and a pinch of salt. All were mixed together and wet with butter-milk. It was then put into a well greased oven and baked for one hour. In the year of the Great Famine all the people lived on this bread, which was made from black potatoes. To make Oatenmeal Bread, get some Oatmeal
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bread was made long ago from oats and rye and a little made from wheat, but not so much wheaten bread made that time as there is now. People remember querns being used in the district as there were about four in it.
The different kinds of bread made were - Potato-Cake, Boxty Bread, Oatmeal Bread. The Potato-Cake was made by mashing the potatoes in a dish with the bottom of a porringer, put some flour in it and a pinch of salt also, then finish it up like an ordinary cake and bake it on the pan. Boxty bread was made by peeling raw potatoes and then grating them into a pulp. Then the pulp was put into a bag made for the purpose and squeezed until it was dry. Then the mashed potatoes were mixed with the pulp and some flour and a pinch of salt. All were mixed together and wet with butter-milk. It was then put into a well greased oven and baked for one hour. In the year of the Great Famine all the people lived on this bread, which was made from black potatoes. To make Oatenmeal Bread, get some Oatmeal
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:33
approved
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awaiting decision
When the cake would be placed in the oven the mark cut on the top of it was a cross. This was done to keep the cake from cracking and to have a smooth crust. The vessel in which the bread was baked was an oven or pan.
There is a special kind of bread made on feast-days. There is sweet bread made containing different kinds of fruit.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the cake would be placed in the oven the mark cut on the top of it was a cross. This was done to keep the cake from cracking and to have a smooth crust. The vessel in which the bread was baked was an oven or pan.
There is a special kind of bread made on feast-days. There is sweet bread made containing different kinds of fruit.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:31
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awaiting decision
Farewell to the banks of Lough Sheelin
Where oft in my youth I did stray
Along with some jovial companions
Or go for a cruise to Finea.
To view that historical village
That in history's pages doth shine
Where the gallant OReilly of Breffnie
Faced the Williamate troops from the Boyne.
For eleven long years he defended
The sweet county Cavan you know.
Backed up by the brave boys of Breffnie
Who never turned tail to a foe
Reinforcements were coming to help him
When the gallant O'Reilly he fell
Defending the forces of Breffnie
From going to Connaught or hell.
Cut down in the prime of his manhood
Knocked out by an assailants blow
His opponent and he fell together
Their blood in one stream it did flow
And now he is dead and forgotten
His memory it has passed away
But the spirit of OReilly still lingers
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:25
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awaiting decision
1) If the sky is cloudless it is the sign of good weather.
2) If the sky is covered with clouds, it is the sign of rain.
1) If the sun goes down red it is the sign of frost, and if extra red it is the sign of good weather to follow.
2) If the sun is high up immediately after rising it is the sign of a good day, and if low it will be a damp day.
3) If there is a mist before the sun there will be rain.
1) If the moon is dim and a ring
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:22
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there.
It is said that at cock crow each morning the under part of this stone comes round in the ground.
Drawing
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:21
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Around the sweet bridge of Finea.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:21
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In Dungimmon there is an old historic stone. It stands in the field of Mr Nicholas Sheridan. It is of a round shape and is about four feet high. Tradition has it that there are three fourths of this stone under the ground leaving only one fourth to be seen over the ground.
On this stone there is ogham writing such as T.X.Y.T.X. and letters of beautiful shape. They are almost all faded away now as this is said to be the oldest memorial stone in County Cavan.
Tradition has it that there is a chief druid buried under it. Tradition also has it that the chief druid who told king Conor McNessa what happened on the first Good Friday is buried
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:12
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into a protestant church in them days and service was conducted there I believe for a number of years but previous to that time there was an hospital there and the poor and decrepit were fed and cared for there and the priests that watched over the flock were supposed to have lived in Gartranbraher [?] and that townland and several other townlands around there belonged to the clergy. That was the time there were no taxes and no rates to be paid. The clergy looked after the poor and feeble. The sick were tended to and the wherewith and all and food were extracted from the lands which were in possession of the "sagart a rún". I believe that at one time that the parish of Castlerahan and Lurgan were united and the same priest
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 12:05
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and of course it is natural to expect that one would have to pay a visit there in order to find out the dates and I do not believe Dr. Doughlas Hyde, or the folk-lore committee, expects any of the scholars of Lattoon school or the person that is dictating this folk-lore, would walk to Lurgan graveyard to ascertain the dates; the pay for doing this kind of business is so very, very small. There are various kinds of trees and shrubs planted in or around the graveyard such as Yew, Ash, Sycamore, Fir, Boxwood and perhaps other kinds of shrubs. It's partly level with a slight incline towards the south-east. In fact it's lower from south to east. There is an iron gate on the northern side along the road seemingly there from the time of the Reformation. The old catholic chapel was converted
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 11:57
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Waft us, in passing. from each islet holy,
Thoughts pure and calm as round they margins shine.
VI
And when from home and thee our exiles, roaming
By Hudson's banks, or where the Laurence strays,
Bright o'er their pathway in the darksome gloaming
Be thou the Beacon guiding all their ways
VII
Calm as thine own be theirs, the journey onwards
As peaceful theirs as thine, the end to be;
Proudly as thou, with eyes still gazing sunward
Enter as joyous, Eternity's wide sea.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 11:54
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III
Flow, gentle Erne, flow in all thy splendour
Through fair Belturbet's lawns and valleys green;
Thine every infant wave brings memories tender
For all that thou hast heard and thou has seen.
IV
Whisper us softly of the hopes of morning,
Ere yet the Night of Disillusion came;
Oh! for an hour, bring back the heart's glad dawning -
The heart that knew nor grief, nor fear, nor shame.
V
How, softly flow, past lordly hall and lowly,
Past peaceful hearths, and homes, and ruined shrine;
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:45
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I
Flow gently, Erne, queen of Irish rivers,
Long may thy winding banks from care be free;
To me you were the kindest of Life's givers
Would I could give a little song to thee!
II
Beside thy pleasant waters I have squandered
The happiest years life had at her command,
But all my youthful friends have long since wandered
O'er seas of Life and Death to many a Strand
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:40
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had care of both parishes. At some period there lived hermits or lay brothers as the old ruins still remain and is locally called the "cille dubh" (black church) as there were no windows on the building. It was built of stone and roofed like a common bridge. When these holy people took it to their choice to spend the remainder of their days in prayer they went into this building. The door was built up and they lived and died there and when one of them died the others dug the grave inside and buried him. There were two or three holes or openings on the building where parties would hand them in food.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:35
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Sometime in or about the year 1850 there lived in Aughaloughan a man named James Porter. His farm of land was situated beside Lattoon school. He had peculiar and eccentric habits and owing to his manner and behaviour was known for miles around by the name "Mad James". In the same townland there lived another man named James Porter and he was locally named "Tame James".
Now this man called Mad James was one of the greatest high jumpers in this part of the country. He was able to jump six feet high.
His lands adjoined the public road at the bridge beside the school and almost every fair day, in the evening, he had two oak sticks with a "gabhlóg" on the top of each and they placed six feet high and
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:31
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Lurgan graveyard by its present appearance looks to be a very ancient burying ground as it is raised very much over the fences. It is circular in shape. It is surrounded by a small wall along the road and fenced all around. There are some beautiful tomb-stones of the latest type and then there is a number of the old type of flay slabs, of course dating back for a long period
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:26
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penny. It is not calculated in any way but the seller generally gives back two shillings or a half a crown to the buyer. When a bargain is made the parties concerned show their agreement by striking hands. The animals are marked with mud and by cutting the hair. The mud is put on the back of the animal when sold. The hair is cut along the side of the animal. When an animal is sold the halter is not given away. The great fairs of the year are the seventh of May and the twenty-fifth of December. There are no special fairs held for the sail of horses, sheep or banbhs.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:23
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and night in the Winter, and sometimes they get cabbage and potatoes. There are no sticks hung in the byre for luck, but there is a bottle with holy water in it. One of the cows has got a name. "Dolly is the name. She got the name because she is a small cow and a good milker.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:20
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We have ten cows, two horses, two calves and one sow. We have two cats, one dog, seven ducks and about eighty hens. The byre is a long shed. In it are ten stalls. In these stalls, the cows are tied. The cows are tied with chains. There is a long board on the ground and another about seven feet up from that. To these boards there are stakes attached and the chains are caught on to the stakes. The stakes are made of wood. The chains are not home made. The cows are tied by the neck with the chain. The food the cows eat is hay, grass, cabbage, turnips and potatoes. In the Winter time the cows are left in the byre at night and most of the day. In the summer time they are left out all night.
The cows get hay every morning
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:12
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I have a churn at home. It is about four feet tall and three feet wide. The sides are round. It is about ten years old. The handle is the part used to turn the churn. The barrel is where the milk is put. The lid covers the barrel. The stand is the part holding the barrel. There are no marks on the sides. Butter is made once a week Winter and Summer. My mother churns and anyone that comes in helps because it is thought unlucky not to help. It only takes ten minutes with us to churn. It is done by hand. It is not a dash churn we have. People know when the butter is done because there is a hole on the lid covered with glass and when
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:07
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townland of Philpotstown it is called the "spout field" because there is a spout in it. There is a field called "the Pole field" in the townland of Philpotstown. It is called "the Pole field" because the people used to play Pole in it. There is a field called "the moat field" in the townland of Clonardran. It is called the moat field because there is a moat in it. There is a field called the Coblers field in the townland of Clonardran it is called the Coblers fields because a Cobler used to live beside it. There is a field called Paynes meadow in the townland of Lismullen. It is called Paynes meadow because a man named Payne had a meadow there one time. There is a hill called Tankards hill in the townland of Lismullen it is called Tankards hill because Tankards used to live there.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 09:00
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monastery there long ago.
The "deer park" is the name of a farm in the towhland of Clonardran. It is so called because there was a deer park there long ago.
There is a hill in the townland of Lismullen (na) named Saddle hill, It is so called because it was in the shape of a saddle long ago.
The "Cobbs" is the name of a hill in the townland of the decoy. It is so called because there were two small woods in it.
The "decoy" is so called because there is a decoy pond there.
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 08:56
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The "wood field" is the name of a field in the townland of Lismullen. It is so called because there is a wood beside it.
The "hollow field" is in the townland of Lismullen. It is so called because there is a great hollow in the field. "Mulvaney's field" is in the townland of Lismullen. It is so called because people named "Mulvaney" lived there long ago. "Bill's field" is in the townland of Lismullen" It is so called because a man named Bill Tobin owned it long ago.
"Hogan's field" is in the townland of Lismullen. It is so called because a man named Ned Hogan owned it long ago.
"The monastery field" is in the townland of Lismullen. It is so called because there was a
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 08:50
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There is a field called the raheen the property of Mrs Meagher in the townland of Kilcarn and the fairies are supposed to live in it.
There is a bush called Peaders bush in the townland of Kilcarn because a leprechaun named Peader used to cobble at it.
There is a field called the quarry field in the townland of Kilcarn because there is a quarry in it.
There is a field called the brick field in the townland of Dowdstown because there is a well built of bricks in it
senior member (history)
2020-02-23 08:47
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There are fields in Lismullen in the parish of Skryne called the "bull field" so called because bulls were kept in it. The "horse-field" so called because horses were kept in it. "Paynes meadow" so called people of that name lived there. "The kennels" so called because Harriers were kept in that field. "Elymers field" so called because people of the name lived there. The "mill farm" so called because there was a flour mill there and it was owned by people called Burns.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:30
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There was a bitch and she has three pups, trip, tray, and tram, which was the bitches name.
"Which"
What stands on one leg and has his heart in his head.
"A head of cabbage"
Whats the difference between a tree and an aeroplane
"One sheds its leaves and the other leaves its shed."
Why does a dog lick a pot
"Because he can't pick it"
Hizzle, hizzle haw sits in her cage a little above the well all her children died with age but herself is there still.
"A hawthorn tree"
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:27
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As round as a marble as flat as a pan one side a woman and the other side a man.?
A penny.
As round as a marble as deep as a cup and all the king horses could not draw it up?
The moon in a well.
Where was Moses when the light went out?
In the dark.
When was B the first letter in the Alphabet?
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:23
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The treasure is supposed to be hidden in a cave in the townland of Bective. It is a golden coffin and there is a monk buried in it and no one knows who laid it there. It is not known if anyone tried to unearth it. There are gates at the cave and they are locked and no one can enter.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:20
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was laid there by Dealbanna and his clann. Hence the old name for the moat was "Dun Dealbhana". They made the moat from heaps of clay drawn from a field close by and the hollows left there are seen to this day.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:18
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In Mostrim, Co. Longford is "Edgeworthstown House" where the noted Maria Edgeworth lived.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:17
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There is supposed to be an old tunnell running from the moat to the Castle of DeLacy in Delvin. The entrance is supposed to open at the top of the moat. There are some lone bushes there and once when they were cut down the grew in one night to twice their former number. It said a treasure lies hidden in it which
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:16
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There is supposed to be an old tunnell running from the moat to the Castle of DeLacy in Delvin. The entrance is supposed to open at the top of the moat. There are some lone bushes there and once when they were cut down the grew in one night to twice their former number. It said a treasure lies hidden in it which
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:14
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"Bishops Well". It is believed that this is the burial place of the bishop. Some say that his body was removed afterwards and buried at Clonmacnoise. But others hold that this is impossible because at that time the English soldiers were in the country and that he was left in this place. The question is not settled but the place is plain to be seen. There is a row of flat stones between the land and the well which is rarely filled with water.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:10
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Once there was a small boy bringing an ass load of turf home. He was doing his best to get up the hill. A gentleman who was passing by gave the cart a push, and so aided it in its ascent. The boy then said to him "God bless you sir, one ass would never have got that load up the hill.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 22:08
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The villiage of Finea and its vicinity has been the scene of many fierce and bloody battles in days gone by. Who has not heard of "Myles the Slasher" at the bridge of Finea? His deeds are recorded in song, and poem for almost three hundred years and will never be forgotten as long as there is a man worthy of the name on the soil of Ireland. Is there anything in history to equal the bravery of O'Reilly and his comrades at the Bridge of Finea? When General Munroe's advance on the bridge was finished he called on O'Reilly to surrender "No" said OReilly "and before your forces cross the bridge you must walk on the heat of O'Reilly"
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:57
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A terrible (strugle) struggle took place. Munroes forces outnumbered O'Reilly's by twelve to one, but O'Reilly having the advantage of of planting himself and his men like a rock between the battlements of the bridge, he drowned Munroe's men as they advanced company after company in the River Inny. The fight continued for four and three quater hours, when the Slasher fell just as General Castlehaven reinforcements came up. Compelling Munroe and his men to retreat and take the boys for safety. General Castlehaven was commanding a powerful army, he halted for the day in Granard about three miles from the bridge of Finea. there is a beautiful Celtic Cross suitably inscribed erected to the "Slasher" which stands in
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:50
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the villiage street.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:50
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Some Old Customs of our district is on the first day of every month to say "Rabbi" the minute you waken But you must not say another word before you say that.
This is supposed to bring good luck the whole month.
Another old custom is to make a May bush before every May day. It is suppose to keep away faries.When a baby is born
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:46
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nearly all the neighbours go to see it. They always bring it so sort of a gift such as shoes clothes, rings, or money. The first boy or girl of the family is never called after the parents as it is considered unlucky.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:43
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About 4 or 5 miles away from our house there is an old castle. It is often said by old people that "Myles the Slasher" slept in it the night before the battle of Finea. Opposite him Munroe, his enemy slept. Of
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:40
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course Myles did not know Munroe was there, because if he did the battle would have been in Toher.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:40
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In a field at home called Mc Manuses field there is an old milestone. It is now covered with moss, but if the moss was taken away it would covered with Ogham letters in it. About a quater mile from that there is a big stone and the old people say mass was said on it long ago.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:33
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I got the following poem from Mr J. McCormack of Giltown Robinstown parish.
The Poem was written some 100 years ago by one Thomas Connor.
I saw the gransest fox hunt I ever saw before
They came to Ratnally covert
Where reynard bold was found
He darted Dungann
And oe'r Cloncullen then
And headed straight for Dunlough Kill -
In hopes to gain his den
And getting no admittance there.
He cunningly crept down
To that famous fix covert
Of lovely Philpotstown
I heathered to the huntsman bold
Kept clear up all the way
First came Thomas Barnewell
Who rode a splendid grey
Next his brother Richard
With Sam Reynolds of renown
Butler George the whipper in
And Marr of Calvinstown.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:23
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Who did the Danish force subdue.
The mighty Mars his sword he drew.
Those words to me did say:
"The harp melodiousely will sound
When Erin's sons will be unbound
And on Patrick's Day we'll all dance round
The blooming laurel tree."
III
I thought brave Sarsfield drew up nigh,
And to my request made this reply:
"For Erin's cause we'll live and die
As thousands done before.
My sword again on Aughrim's plain
And Erin's rights I will maintain,
I'll leave thousands in their gore."
IV
I thought St. Ruth stood on the ground,
Accompanied by the French all round
Just ready for the field.
Let Erin's sons be not afraid
To die before they would enslave
Their blood for vengeance call.
V
Brave Billy Byrne he came there
From Ballymanus I declare,
Brought Wexford, Carlow and Kildare
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 20:16
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That day at his command.
Westmeath and Cavan all did join,
And the Co. Louth men crossed the Boyne.
|Slane, Trim and Navan all did join,
With Dublin to a man.
VI
O'Reilly on the Hill of Skreen,
He drew his sword both sharp and keen,
And swore by all his eyes had seen
He would avenge the Fall.
Of Erin's sons and daughters brave,
Who nobly filled a martyr's grave,
And died before they would enslave
Their blood for vengeance call.
VII
Along the line they raised the shout:
!Quick march to the right about."
With bayonets they all marched out
To meet the daring foe
The enemy seemed no way shy
With thundering cannon drew up nigh
And through them ran a dreadful rill
As rapid as the "Yeor".
VIII
Brave Fr. Murphy he did say:
"Behold me Lord I'm here this day,
With eighteen thousand pikemen gay
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:59
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From Wexford hills, so brave.
Except what's dead and wounded lay
Not able for to run away."
When I awoke 'twas clear day.
That ends McKenna's Dream.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:58
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This song was given to me by my father. It relates to different happenings in Irish history, but especially '98. The author is it is unknown, but it was probaly composed some time early in the nineteenth century:-
I
One night of late I chanced to stray,
In the pleasant month of May.
And Maques did his flag display,
The moon sank in the deep
On a ruin moor I sat me down
I heard the woodcocks cooing round,
The ocean with its hollow sound
Lulled me fasy asleep.
II
I thought I saw brave Brian Boru',
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:54
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VII
My son Phelim he was born in Trim
And every hand and arm he had a nice little limb.
And now he comes home with no leg at all
Oh why didn't he hide from that bloody cannon ball.
Chorus.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:53
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III
Whilst we were taking a naggin or two.
"Aurra Phelim, dear Phelim sure this can't be you
Aurra Phelim, my jewel were you drunk or mad
Or what became of the two legs you had
Or were you walking upon the salty seas
That you wore your two kickers to the bare stumps away.
Chorus.
IV
Aurra father, dear father I was neither drunk nor mad
But I'll tell you what became of the two legs I had.
I was fighting for the King of Hungry and the snuffy Queen of Spain,
When a large cannon ball shot my two legs away.
Chorus.
V
"Aurra Phelim, dear Phelim what will you do at all.
And why didn't you hide from that bloody cannon ball
Or will you be all your lifetime a poor silly soul
Going round on your ah like Billy in the bowl.
Chorus.
VI
There is bloody open murder and was I will proclaim
Against the King of Hungry and the snuffy Queen of Spain
I'll make them curse and rude the day
That they shot the two legs of my dear child away.
Chorus.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:46
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IIII
She interpeted Lord Thomas Pim with the corn on his back.
To run down those Ultan warriors and change their green to black.
Next time she writes a stanza it will be done with skitle [?]
She intends to eat a grammar her memory to instill.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:44
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P. Leneghan a bit of a poet in the Ardbracken district on coming to a headstone in the Ardbracken Graveyard erected to some Bishop or Divine at the Protestant Church is supposed to have written on the Stone:-
It's with false doctrine
He was crammed
So now he's dead
And double damned
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:43
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The following poem was made by Pat. Brennan in reply to a poem made by a man named Tuite about Ardbraccan.
I
They young men of St. Ultans who wear the green and gold
Stand upright to your colours magstic true and bold
Tis the emblem of young Emmet, Lord Edward and Wolf Tone
Who now lie smouldering in their tombs all silent and alone.
II
Ardbraccan is a shining light all honour to her name.
She sent athlic stalwart men into the field of fame
They stand like noble soldiers when lined upon the field
In hopes to be victorious they die before they yield.
III
In the pages of history the'll be recorded still,
By men of rank and honour who can write a poets quill
Not by a brainless poetess ungramattical missbess.
Who's words of composition was most nautious to express
The most illitrate lay this blockhead would exprese
So stand up in arms against Professor Tuite
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:37
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This was played and the full Rann was known in English. It is the same as the Irish Rann and may be found in any book. Those taking part were put in a aline and the boss said. "Hey This"! & each got his part of (answer) rann to remember & if he failed
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:33
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Up to 40 years ago when a person died the corpse was kept in the house & waked for two nights. This was done in the district around the town of An Uaimh.
The wake was not as serious as now and sports & games were held in the houses & sometimes even dances were held in the outhouses. This is remembered by people about 50 or 60 years of age.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:31
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One of the many games played on such occasions was called Shore the Broge bróg. It was played as "Faich" is played in the Gaedealtact. The "faic" for stricking was a good strong "sugan" made into a solid know.
This was played by young men. (It is now played by boys only in Gaelteacht) and not known by young folk in Meath. The Rhyme used os forgotten.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:28
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This was another game played - it was played just as "ag Ceannac coirce" is played in Gaelteacht.
They had some Rann also beginning with "Bud loss" who was selling oats etc, & the same punishment.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:24
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and he sows about five or six acres of potatoes every year. The amount does not vary. The ploughman prepares the ground. The ground is not manured before being turned up. The ground is ploughed first and then harrowed and when it is harrowed they make the drills. In big places the potatoes are sown in drills. In small places they are sown in ridges. Drills are made with a plough and ridges are made with a spade. I did not hear of any wooden ploughs used now.
There are some of them left but they are not used. The spades are not made locally but are bought in shops. James Mansfield used to make spades long ago. The potatoes are cut into pieces each piece having an eye. The various kinds of potatoes we grow are Main Crop, Kerrs-Pinks, Champions, British Queens, Arran Banners, and Epicures. The local people help one another by lending their horses and plough. When the
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:10
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six feet apart. He placed a beam across each and had them stationary. He and others at the time wore tall hats sometimes called Carolines. He would come down in the evening about 3 o'clock and walk four or five times with his hat and boots on underneath the jump he had erected in his field. Then he would strip off boots, coat, vest and trousers, and with no clothes on only his shirt he would cross this jump every time and continue for hours and never touch the cross stick. When he reached the age of seventy he was able to jump across any iron gate in the country.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 19:04
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In former years children did not wear boots only in Winter time and during inclement weather until they were fifteen years of age. Quite a number of children go barefoot in Summer. There are a few instances where and it is very rare to see a child go barefoot in Winter time. Of course boots soared up in price as also did wooden shoes to such an extent together with other commodities that parents find it impossible to keep foot-wear on the children.
Boots were made locally and are at present time. They are not made in such numbers so as to keep a shoemaker busy. A shoemaker at the present time would barely make five pairs of boots in one year.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:55
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Therefore most of his time is devoted to repairs. In this country they were not very plentiful locally but in our nearest town Ballyjamesduff there were four shoe-makers working at the business forty years ago. The reason why shoemaking is not going on at the present time locally is because machinery has been (into) installed in several boot factories and the most modern equipment in use so that the factories are capable of turning out several dozen pairs in the day with the result that they can sell boots more cheaply than if made by the hand. Apart from all that the managers at those factories buy in several tons of leather at a time and all other materials so that is why out local shoemaker cannot compete with the up to date and modern
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:49
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In this district it is customary on Waster Week for the poor to go about the country gathering "cluedogs". A very old custom on Easter Sunday is, many youngsters gather together and go to some hillside or whinny place and light a fire. Some of them bring "cluedogs" and the, and the, others bring the milk tea, sugar, spoons, knives, bread, butter and a saucepan. They boil the "cluedogs" in the saucepan and they make tea also. After the feast is over the boys kick football and in the evening they return home after an enjoyable day. At Easter the people renew the friendships of the past and go visiting their friends.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:45
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appear over the clay they are moulded that is, the furrows are either dug with a spade or cut with a plough and then the clay is thrown up on the ridges and the young plants are hidden from view. This is done twice during the season. They are sprayed twice to prevent the blight from destroying the crop. They are sprayed twice with blue stone and soda. The blue stone has to be steeped in a barrel of water for a night to melt before it can be used. The potatoes are wed so as to let the stalks grow better and to leave them easier to dig.
In the Autumn the potatoes are dug. The ones that are in ridges are dug with a spade and the ones that are in drills are dug with the plough.
The are generally gathered by the owners of the crop. A person goes along with a bucket and gathers the big ones and then goes back and gathers the small ones. The potatoes are generally
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:37
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stored in pits in the fields. Some place in the field the farmer digs a place a little lower than the ridge and the potatoes are thrown in that and rushes are put on them and then it is all covered over with clay and they are thatched to keep them safe from the frost.
The local names given to the potatoes are kerrpinks, arran-victors, beauty of beauts, arran-banners, champions, Queens and epicures. The foremost potato in this district is the kerr-pink.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:35
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low it is the sign of rain and when they are flying high it indicated good weather. When the sea-gulls are seen inland it is said that there is storm on sea. When you see the crows flying low in the evening it indicates rain and when they are seen flying high it is the sign of good weather. When the cat sits with her back to the fire it indicates storm and when she sharpens her nails it indicates storm also. When you see a dog eating grass it indicates rain.
When the sky is heavy and black it is the sign of rain. If there is a mist on the rocks it is the sign of bad weather. When the hills appear nearer than usual it indicates rain. If there is not dust on the roads in the month of March it indicates a bad Summer. When
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:27
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used lift them. Then they used peel them and then they used make a potatoe cake of them and bake it in a pan.
Long ago they used make ster about of oats meal. First they used get a pot and put water in it. Then when the water would be warm they used put the meal on it and leave it beside the fire boiling. Then when (the) it would be boiled they used lift it and eat it.
Long ago they us
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:25
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They used have tables but they usent bodder eating off them.
Long ago they used make a slitter of potatoes.
First they used peel the potatoes and wash them. Then they used scrape them with a scraper then they used squeeze them and when they used be squeezed they used put them down in the pan to bake.
Long ago they used make a potato cake. First of all they used boil the potatoes and when they would be boield they
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:24
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They sued have tables but they usent bodder eating off them.
Long ago they used make a slitter of potatoes.
First they used peel the potatoes and wash them. Then they used scrape them with a scraper then they used squeeze them and when they used be squeezed they used put them down in the pan to bake.
Long ago they used make a potato cake. First of all they used boil the potatoes and when they would be boield they
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:20
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Long ago they used go out before there breakfast working Then when they used have a great deal worked they used come in and eat there breakfast.
They used to eat potatoes for the breakfast and milk.
They used have tea for the dinner.
They used eat the potatoes out of the basket.
They used leave the basket on a tub or on a pot.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:17
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over a piece of a (Muinn) Muing
Loch Dubh is the name of a lake in our village.
Poll Buidhe is the name of a pool in the rivver under our house.
Corrections
Cloc Aipin is the name of a rock.
Bog na Maide is the name of a Scrát bhogán
Where there is a lot of bogs
on which an old piece of a bridge stands where plants grew long ago.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:13
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piece of a bridge stands.
Straicha is the name of a rock out side our house.
Baile At is the name of a green field in the (no) village.
Brocach is the name of a little hillock.
Rón Dóighte is the name of a little bray in the mountain.
Criogán na Cloiche is the name of a hillock which a big stone stands on.
Rón a Sionnach is the name of a hillock
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:10
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is the name of a soft piece of mountain.
Bán na Muine is the name of a soft sráth bhógan.
Pollachar an Artha is the name of a place where their is a lot of bogs.
Garrdhín na bPlanndae is the name of a place where plants grew long ago.
Bun an Áth is a place where a little hillock is and drain of water close by.
Limear is the name of a stream on which a old
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:06
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Croicín is the name of my village.
Garraidhe Dubh is the name of a field in front of my house.
Cloch an Eidhin is the name of a rock in front of our house.
Cloc Aipín is the name of another rock outside our house.
Spodach is the name of a garden in the mountain out side our house.
Bog na Maide
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 18:03
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 15:10
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What voe would follow Houstin or Loukins Iron will, we will meet them a there own hall door said Rory on the hill.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 15:09
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As black as silk as white as milk and it hops on the road like a hail stone. A mack py A magpie.
It opens like a barn door it closes like a trap you would think of many (think) thing before you would think of that a number ela. [?]
humpty
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 15:06
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if you do not fullfil that promise.
There is a stone in our village on the side of the road that leads to Louisburgh. Most of the people go in on Saint Patricks day to it because it is called Saint Patricks Track. There is a mark of a foot in it and they say it was Saint Patrick that stepped on it and the track of his foot remained,
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 15:03
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There is a blessed well in
They do stations in it always
They say you have the benefit of your station got when the well begins bubling.
It is also said that a person should leave something at the well after him.
They say that it is never right to promise that you would do a station at the blessed well
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:46
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to get the bottle but the womon would not allow him.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:45
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They say that if you leave a sceathach bush across the vessel which the milk is in no one can bring your butter.
There was once a man in our house on May morning and he told the womon of the house that her butter was gone. He also told her that if she wanted to know who had it to get him a bottle and he would bring the person up through the bottle. The man of the house wanted
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:43
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The rule about geting the eggs for the lambs is two for a wether and three for a ewe.
Long ago the children used to gather eggs for Easter. They used to call the number they used to have gathered a Pruchóh. On Easter Sunday they used to eat the eggs with potatoes.
They used to say that if the misarúns would be plenty the new potatoes would be good that year.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:39
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The call the last day of March and the first two days of April the Riabhac days or soemtimes Laetheannta na bo Riabhaigh.
Palm Sunday is called Irish Domhnach an lubhair.
Spy Wednesday long ago was called Ceadaoin a Bhraith.
The son dances on Easter Sunday morning.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:37
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They say that if you wash your hands in the May morning diew you will be able to loosten any knot for the year.
That say that if you give out milk on May day the one that will get the milk will have the whole contents.
They say that if you would put two coals under the churs and a grain of salt no one could bring your butter.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:28
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There are not many places in Ireland but there is less or more of pisreóga to be heard. Here are some of them.
1. Anyone does not like to spend or give away anything on New - Year's day and they do not like a woman to come in on New - year's day unless a man had come in before her because the woman would bring bad luck to the house
2 On the sixth of January they get rushes and dip them in grease and each one will take one of the little candles and stick it in a piece of bread and the first one that will be
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:19
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burned they say that the one that had that candle will die the first.
3. On St. Bridget's night the people make crosses out of straw and rushes and leave them outside the house until twelve o'clock and then bring them in and put them behind the couple and they leave a piece of red cloth also outside on the thatch of the house and they say that if a cow would be sick and if they would put (be sick and if) it on the cow she would be alright.
4 On St. Patricks day every one eats three or four eggs.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 13:15
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5 On May morning every one will try to have smoke before his neighbours the way he would have the luck of the milk and butter for the year.
6 On St. Johns night the people throw a sod out of the bonfire in to the stalks.
7 On Novembers night the people say it is not right to be out at nightfall because they say the poor souls do be out at that time.
8 When a person sells a calf or a cow and if he had a rope on the animal he would cut a bit of the rope and put it in his pocket the way the luck of the cattle would
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:40
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not go from him.
9 When the people are making a churning they put a coal under it afraid the fairies would bring the butter.
10 When a cow is calving put a red string on her tail the way sh would calf alright.
11 When the people go milking a cow the first time after calving they take a coal with the tongs and they put it around under the cows stomach and around over her back they do that three times.
12 If you would be going to a fair or to any place and if you would meet a red haired
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:37
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woman you would have bad luck for the day.
13 The people say its not right to let out a child after sun set afraid the fairies would bring the child.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:35
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When a person gets sick the people from the village come in to see him and they give their judgement on the person. One says he has such a disease and another says he had [?] else and another says his day was up and so on. If he is getting very bad the people send for the doctor and if the doctor says he is in
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:32
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There was a man once in Attavalla. Jackedy was his name. He was a great strong man and he could work very hard. He used to go from Attavalla in to Cross to the races and win every prize within and come out the same day again. And he used also go from Attavalla up to Ballacroy and run in all the races above after walking the journey up and he used to walk it down home again. And he used to walk in all about sixty miles without sleeping a wink at night.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:27
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mass and they used to come home the same day. The people used to go down to Ballycastle to the fair and the women were the most that used to go and they used to carry their pair of bonhams on their backs home. The people used go out to Crossmolina with their rolls of flannel on their backs. The women used to get work along with the men carrying sand and when lunch time would come the women used to go for a race for a quarter of a mile and the person that would win would get a few pennies The men then used to go for a race and the man that would win he would
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:23
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get a few pennies.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:22
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Long ago there were no bicycles nor motor cars. The people had to walk to every place they would be going. My grandfather used to walk from Ballisadare to Edderglen when he used be coming from England. When they used be tired walking with their shoes on them they used to take them off and they used to put green grass into the shoes and put them on again and they used to be taking them off and putting them on until they used to reach home. The people had a long way to go to mass long ago. They had to go up near Croaghpatrick to
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:14
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Through a mill happer,
Through a sheep shank bane,
And right back here again,
If you don't believe in what i say,
I'll enter in devil dout and he'll clear the way.
Here comes I the Devil himself,
If you don't give me money, I'll break all your delph
Money I want, money I crave
If you don't give me money
I'll sweep you all to your grave,
All silver, no brass, bad ha'pence won't pass.
(Then a good song is sung and after that the all say this)
We didn't come to your door.
To beg nor to borrow,
But we came to your door to drive away all sorrow,
With our pockets full o' money
Our barrels full o' beer.
I wish you a merry Xmas and a happy New Year.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 10:09
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1. It is never too late to mend.
2. A little pot is soon hot.
3. A burnt child dreads the fire.
4. A stitch in time saves nine.
5. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
6. Its a long lane that has no turning.
7.A rolling stone gathers no moss.
8. Better late than never.
9. Too many cooks spoil the broth
10. A friend in need is a friend indeed.
11. The fox runs long but is caught at last.
12. Many hands make light work.
13. A good beginning is half the work.
14. Make hay while the sun shines.
15. Procrastination is the thief of time.
16. Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
17. You cannot put an old head on young shoulders.
18. A wise man carries his coat.
19. Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.
20. Use makes masters.
21. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
22. Necessity is the mother of invention.
23. The darkest hour is just before the dawn.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 09:57
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24 Kind hearts are more than coronets.
25 To err is human to forgive devine
26 Brevity is the soul of wit
27 Speech is silver, silence is gold.
28. Make new friends keep the old the first is silver the latter gold.
29. He is happy who knows his good fortune.
30. Idleness leads to vice
31. Patience is a virtue.
32. Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
33. Empty vessels make most sound.
34. All that glitters is not gold.
35. Spare the rod and spoil the child.
36. Method is the true key to business.
37. Work ill begun is ne'er well done.
38. Rise with the lark with him to bed.
39. They think little who talk too much.
40. Do to others as you would wish them do to you.
41. Vice may prosper for a time, but its end is misery.
42. Sloth makes all thinks difficult, but industry all easy.
43. Extravagance in youth, brings want in old age.
44. Charity begins at home, but ot should not end there.
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 09:51
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Weddings take place all the year round except during Lent, but most of them are during the Summer especially in the of June. There are also a lot of weddings after Easter.
The groom and the best man and all the guests arrive at the Church first after them the bride and bride's maids come. The bride and bride's maids are usually dressed in long silk frocks and picture hats and carry flowers. The groom and best man usually wear black-suits.
When the couple are coming out of the Church the people throw confetti on them. A party is held at the bride's home after the wedding and on that evening the couple go off their honeymoon. When they are coming home there is usually a party that night for them. Sometimes straw men come and they usually get money.
There is sometimes a bonfire for the homecoming. When a very important person is getting married their servants go part of the way to meet them, and
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 09:42
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In olden times boxty and sowens were often made but they are rarely made now.
For making sowens the first thing that is done is an equal quantity of seeds and oaten meal are steeped for about three days. Then the seeds and meal are strained and the liquid is boiled until it thickens.
Boxty Bread.
First potatoes are boiled and peeled, then an equal quantity of raw potatoes are peeled and grated. Then the boiled potatoes and grated ones are mixed and a little flour added. It is baked about three or four hours.
Some people make boxty bread for Hallow Ee'n
senior member (history)
2020-02-22 09:33
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of Dignavanty, and Robert Mc.Kaig of Knockmahammer make creels. Alfred Vogan of Drutamon makes baskets but I do not whether he makes creels or not.
A lot of men made nails long ago. There men were called nailers. There was a nailer in Cootehill called Neddy Sherlock. There are no nailers now, because nails are made by machinery. There were a lot of shoemakers in this country long ago, and there are still some shoe-makers yet. The local shoemakers are John Tackett of Drumartin. Tom Coulson of Drum, Mc. Cabe of Bough, Dowd of Cootehill, and Willie Fitzgerald of Knocknashammer. Willie Fitzgerald's father was also a shoemaker. His name was Joe Fitzgerald. There also was a great shoemaker long ago in the townland of Carriknaschoke, in the parish of Laragh. His name was Robert Moore. He lived to be over, one hundred and one years old. The reason that there are not so many shoe-makers now
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 16:49
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rejected
awaiting decision
There were many industries carried on in this district in olden times, but now, they are nearly all discontinued. Leather was tanned in this district. The name of the townland in which it was tanned is Tunnyinn. Leather was tanned in Cootehill, long ago, also.
There was a great "creel-maker" ar Kill long ago. His name was Dermot. He also made baskets. There was also a creel-maker in Cootehill whose name was Mills. There are some creel-makers in this district yet. James McVitty
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 16:44
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along the road-side, and let the cow die.
There were a lot of families during the famine in Coravoggy which were called the "Hills" "Scullies", Bog-men which I have already mentioned and "Tarriers" all of these which are "nick"- names. One time Owen Hill was getting the relief meal and somehow it was reduced so he went to the Master of Tullyvin School named McCollun to write to the Charitable Commission to get the meal restored again. So the master wrote in poetry, which is as follows-:
You- Rev Sirs and gents at large,
That have us paupers in your charge,
With patience bear & wait on still
To hear the case of Owen the hill
Who once had money & goods in store
But now of them he had no more.
Remember that man has cause to pine.
For now on Indian meal must dine.
Four pounds of meal I always got
Which neatly filled my little pot
But some vile person, I know not who
Reduced my store from four to two.
That him or his may never fail.
To want a pound of Indian mail.
Grant Owen's request, then all is well
If not the result -: oh who can tell.
Well those who help the poor in full measure
May hope to live in bliss forever.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 16:36
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awaiting decision
behind the ditch, and he said that there was no use in bringing him home again, then they brought him gruel and he revived and was able to get home. There were thirteen and fourteen funerals nearly every day to some graveyards.
The corpses were drawn on carts to the graveyards as the people were too weak to carry them. The country was full of beggars often ten and eleven came to houses every day for food and money.
There were a family in this country named Clarkes and they all died of starvation but one boy who went to the County Monaghan and hired for 13s for 6 months afterwards he joined the Militia army and then he joined the British Force, and got to be Sergeant - Major in the British Army.
There is a family in this country called Smith of Cornabragher bog and they are called the bog - men. The man that lives there is called Johney the Bog & his wife Mrs the Bog. One time Johney's father was sent for ale for a sick cow so when he was coming with the ale he drank the ale, and lay down
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 16:29
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awaiting decision
Any of the seed potatoes that were left after the first year of famine were sown the following year but they were a failure. The seventh year people were advised by the priests not to sow any potatoes. The people did not obey and in the eight year there were potatoes in great abundance.
The Government sent meal to the parish priest of this district and he distributed it to the people who needed it. Each family got a stone of meal weekly and this was not a big supply.
People died in great numbers by the roadsides and hedges. They were buried without coffins. They were wrapped in hay or straw.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 16:25
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awaiting decision
In Knockadrum in this parish there are four houses now. At the time of the famine there were twenty. Some of the ruins can be seen yet. The names of the people who lived in the houses are, Foxes, Smiths, and Lynches. When the children were going to school in the morning the houses were there, and when they came home in the evening they were knocked down.
The people came from far districts for the porridge. Some of them died on the roadside from hunger coming from the porridge, and others died on their way home from all they had had eaten.

There were fourteen houses in the townland of Allygoola in the parish of Ballinakill which were occupied during the famine times. Only two of them remain standing now. (Any of the seed)
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 13:13
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Before the king. When he came to the graveyard he was able to read what was written on every tombstone except one.
Then he asked the herd to read what was written on it. "This is what is on it", said the herd, "Let no person mock this tombstone." When the kind heard this he gave the man ten pounds and told him to tell anyone that he had done so.
One of the Burkes whose name was Thomas had eleven race - horses at one time. Information by John Fahy, Curra, Kylebrack, Loughrea. John Martin, Lisheeny, Kylebrack, Loughrea.
About six families were evicted during the Land League.
There was an election at that time. Nolan was a Catholic and French was a Protestant and the landlords voted for French. As the Burkes were land-lords they voted for French and any of their tenants who did not vote for him were evicted. Six families did not vote for Nolan and they were evicted.
Eugene Monahan. Information from Finn Monahan, Curra, Kylebrack, Loughrea
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 13:12
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The Burkes of Marblehill were the last landlords of this parish. There is one of them still living in London. The Burkes first came in the year eleven hundred and seventy one.
Once when one of the Burkes was coming home from Loughrea he found a bag of gold on the side of the road near Grallagh which is in the parish of Kilnadeema.
It is well said that after that they bought Marblehill big house.
Once when a priest in Ballinakill Church was giving a sermon one of the Burkes of Marblehill stood up and insulted him. The priest cursed him and said that the people of the parish would see the grass growing outside the halldoor and that the crows would fly in the front door and out overhead.
In the year 1921 the house was burned down by the local volunteers and the people said that the priest's curse had fallen on it.
A king came on holidays to Marblehill. There was a herd in the castle at that time. One day the king was talking about going to see the Burke's burying ground in Partland which is in Tipperary.
When the herd heard this he was in the graveyard
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 13:06
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awaiting decision
About six families were evicted during the Land League.
There was an election at that time. Nolan was a Catholic and French was a Protestant and the landlords voted for French. As the Burkes were land-lords they voted for French and any of their tenants who did not vote for him were evicted. Six families did not vote for Nolan and they were evicted.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 13:04
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awaiting decision
There was one school in the town-land of Cappacon in the parish of Ballinakill.
Martin Burke was the teacher's name. He taught no Irish. he only taught English, mostly by syllables. Boys walked three and four miles to school.
Some of those boys were known as poor scholars. The farmers were very kind to those and as a rule gave them food and shelter.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 13:02
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At that time the pupils paid school fees
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:47
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awaiting decision
Ta thart ar sé tailliúir ins an parróiste anois. Oibrigheann na táilliúir i na dtighthibh féin. Ní gnáthach leis an táilliúr éadacha bheirt sa teach aige le díol. Má bhíonn éadach ar bhith le díol aige éadach a bhéas fighthe san áit é. Ní chaitheann na daoine
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:43
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go léir cultacha éadaigh na h-áite de ghnáth acht caitheann go leór daoine cultacha éadaigh na h-áite dós. Caitheann cuid aca cultacha córda agus caitheann an chuid eile aca cultacha "tweed" tá cathadh maith ins an chórda tá cathadh maith ins an chórda agus insan "tweed". (Deireann na daoine nuair a chaitheann) Dubhairt na sean
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:39
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daoine lionm nach raibh abairtí no sean-fhocal no sgéalta aca i dtaobh an tailliúir san áit. Is iad gléasanna oibhre an tailliúr méarachán, "Mision" puighealann sé na cultracha leis. Bíonn bórd aige dhó fhéin agus níonn sé ag táilliúreacht air. Tá sisiúr mór aige agus gear
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:35
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-ann sé an culaigh leis. Deántar léinteacha ins na tighthibh anois. Deántar do na páistí iad. Deántar na leínteacha as mála plúr. Cniotáiltear a lán stocaí ins an áit. Gheibhtear an snáth o olann- na gcaorach. Beartar an olann de na eaoirigh agus nightear é. Nuair a bhíonn sé
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:32
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awaiting decision
tirim caorthar é agus deántar é do chardáil isteach i roillóigí. Annson snaobhthar na roillóigí agus deántar snáth. Annsin cnoiteáltar stocaí as an snáth. Tá thart ar peoche túirne i Máigh Muilinn anois, Caitheann na daoine éadaigh spiséalta ar ócáidigh éigin. Nuair
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:29
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a bhíonn na páistí af glacadh cuimaoineach an cheád uair bíonn éaduigh agus caipíní, bróga agus stocaí bána ortha, Nuair a bhíonn na daoine ag dul ag pósadh caitheann siad éadaigh gorm. Má chailltear aon nduine as an teach caitheann na daoine éadaigh dubha agus mar bhí éadaigh dubha
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:26
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awaiting decision
Luigh an droch shaoghal go mór ar an gceanntar seo. Mar lobh na fataí agus ní raibh mórán biadh le fágháil. Nuair a d'éirighidís ar amidin ní gheobhaidís bricfeasta ar bith acht théighid
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:24
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awaiting decision
ag na daoine caitheann siad píosa éadach dubh ar ille a muicillí.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:23
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daoine fadó. Dhéiridís go dtí an traígh ag piocadh snúsach. Thugaidís lán bui céad dhé abhaile leo. Nighidís é agus chuididís ag bruith e. Nuair a bhíod sé bruite d'othidís an biadh a bhíodh ins an chnúsach. Ní cuimhin le daoine teacht gan tae go rtí an cheanntar dó'n chéad uair, Bhíod cupáin agus muganaí agus saauspáin ann roimhe sin.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:17
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1 Speír dearg thiar Soineann
2 Soeír dearg thoir ar maidin - deagh aimsear ach má nhíonn se dearh thuas deánfaidh sé fearthainn.
3 Fuaim abhann ó thuaidh Soineann
4 Scamaill ag gluaiseacht go tapaidh treasna na speíre: Stoirm i Toírneach
5 Pianta sna snámha Fearthainn
6 Spear dearg Stoirm.
7Ioghar na speíre dearh le linn luighe greíne
lá breágh ar na mháireach
8 Ceo ar an ngealaigh Feathainn
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:17
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awaiting decision
1 Speír dearh thiar Soineann
2 Soeír dearg thoir ar maidin - deagh aimsear ach má nhíonn se dearh thuas deánfaidh sé fearthainn.
3 Fuaim abhann ó thuaidh Soineann
4 Scamaill ag gluaiseacht go tapaidh treasna na speíre: Stoirm i Toírneach
5 Pianta sna snámha Fearthainn
6 Spear dearg Stoirm.
7Ioghar na speíre dearh le linn luighe greíne
lá breágh ar na mháireach
8 Ceo ar an ngealaigh Feathainn
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:12
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iron with a tail of wool.
A thick needle with a woollen stitch.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:11
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1 There in a bed and they all in the middle.
The spokes of a wheel.
2 What is oftener used by others while it is your own. Your name.
3 One day I was going through a field of corn I picked up some thing that was nice to eat and In kept it until it was able to run about. An egg.
4 A little well on the top of the hill, a window of glass and a door of clay An eye.
5 It has a bed and it does not sleep It has a mouth and does not eat. The river.
6 A thing
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:07
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An enormous pot of gold lies hidden in the townland of Smutterna of Ardcarn, in the County of Roscommon. Deep down in the earth under a spreading chestnut tree, lies that pot of gold. About twenty years ago a man named Luke Mac Loughlinn dreamt that under a certain tree in his garden there was a pot of gold covered over by a large flat flagstone. He dreamt of it three nights in succession.
On the fourth morning he set out early with his loy and
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:06
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to unearth it. From that day to this, no Mac Loughlinn living in Smutterna ever called any of their sons "Luke"|.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:05
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pick-axe to dig for the treasure. It was guarded by a fierce grey hound. While lifting the flag, if by chance the greyhound hit the man with it's tail, the man would die, but if the dog was hit with an boultry stick the dog would die and then he could get the treasure.
But it happened otherwise. The dog hit with its tail while he was lifting the flag, and he died. Every Luke Mac Loughlinn that has been born, has dreamt of the precious treasure but no other attempts have been made
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 12:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An enormous pot of gold lies hidden in the townland of Smutterns of Ardcarn, in the County of Roscommon. Deep down in the earth under a spreading chestnut tree, lies that pot of gold. About twenty years ago a man named Luke Mac Loughlinn dreamt that under a certain tree in his garden there was a pot of gold covered over by a large flat flagstone. He dreamt of it three nights in succession.
On the fourth morning he set out early with his loy and
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:27
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crock of gold. When he left the bush the first time, he never thought he was leaving so much money behind him. The man who lived in the house beside the treasure never knew the man found any money. It was supposed that, that man had a million pounds when he had it secured.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:26
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This treasure was hidden at Cillaraght, parish of Boyle County Roscommon. It was known by a man named Sharkey who lived near bye. That man Sharkey made an attempt. He found a crock of gold under a bush at the back of a mans house. He was told after by a poor scholar that the "Latin" which was written on the crock when translated meant that there was the same at the other side. The man excitedly dug under the bush, there he found another
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:20
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As I was walking I heard a man talking. His mouth of horn and his head of flesh and such a man was never born.
A cock.
An thing that has three feet and never walks.
A yard.
A little polly cow tied up on the wall. She drinks all she gets and eats none at all.
A lamp.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:18
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Johnny Nash the best turf cutter in the parish of Bo [?] Killa. Pat Neill a famous story tellier both in English and Irish Ann Sullivan a good spinner she could spin six pounds of thread in a day.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:10
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5 I know a cow she sits near a wall and she would eat all the hay from this to Donegal
A fire.
6 What would I have left after buying ten rails of turf at ten pence a rail
Ashes.
7 What goes all round the wood and never goes into the wood
The bark of the tree.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:09
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1 As white as milk and as black as silk and it hops on the ground like hailstone.
A magpie
2 As I went up a slippery rock I met my aunty Mary. She had timber toes and iron nose and upon my word she would frighten the crows.
A gun.
3 As I went down into the garden one day. I met my uncle Thady I cut off his head and brought it home and left his body easy.
A head of cabbage.
4 The leaper of the ditch and the cropper of the corn the little brown cow with two leather horns.
A hare
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:06
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1 Níl sé istigh ort n'íl sé amuigh ort ac ní trom leat é.
Mo ainm
2 Fear fada gléigeal is crois da tháobh féin air.
Punnann coirce.
3 Lán ma páirce de ghamhnaibh bána is gámainín dearg eadhortha istig.
Na Fíacla agus an teanga
4 Do bhí sé ag corruighe is níor corruighe sé ríamh as an áit.
Eirbeall na muice.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 10:04
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1 Níl sé istigh ort n'íl sé amuigh ort ac ní trom leat é.
Mo ainm
2 Fear fada gléigeal is crois da tháobh féin air.
Puranna coirce.
3 Lán ma páirce de ghamhnaibh bána is gámainín dearg eadhortha istig.
Na Fíacla agus an teanga
4 Do bhí sé ag corruighe is níor corruighe sé ríamh as an áit.
Eirbeall na muice.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 09:58
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 09:58
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Feuch amach an thó tó, Geuch isteach an tó ró. Tháinigh fear le ceithre cos agus sciob sé leis an tó tó.
luch agus cat.
An duine do dhein é níór cháith sé é agus an té a cháith é ní fheacha sé go deo é.
Comhra.
Do chuaidh beirt de mhuinntir cró. Ag baint slat lá ceóidh. An slat a bhaineadar cháitheadar uatha í. Is an slat nár bhaineadar thugadar leo.
Dha phreacáin ag piochadh cleithí asta féin.
Pinghin, Pinghin, Dhá phinghin, Pinghin go leith, Is leath phingin.
Réal
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 09:51
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Bairrlín bán ar thaobh an tighe agus ní fhéadhfadh aenne dul á nighe.
Geallach.
Cómh h-árd le caisleán is raghadh sé fé bhéal cupáin.
Ceirtilín snáithe.
Bíonn sé thoir agus bíonn sé thiar, bíónn sé i ngáirdín mBaile Átha Cliath, Is mó a ghreim ná greim capaill. Agus ní bhlaiseann sé an bíadh
Speal.
Feuch sa chúinne é agus dhá chéad súíl air
Soup
Théir go dtí an choill igcóir brosna na tabhair craobh cam ná craobh dírreach agus ná tar coidhche gan broasna.
Brosna ainm an Mhadra.
Teachtairre idir dhá thig is bíonn sé amuich san oidhche
Casán.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 09:45
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in the dungeons in the penal days. After this they came to Killimore and lived there till the Battle of Aughrim. There (Father) lived there at this time Dermott Daly with his two sons. On the eve of the battle the two sons set out for Aughrim. One of them was killed the other came home with the news to the Father, and left again and went to Limerick with Sarsfield and his men. When beaten there he had to cross to France, and remained there untill Sarsfield died he then went to Italy.
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 09:42
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was and all celebrations taking place. The harpers at once got their harps and Played and Cohill Daly sang Eibhlín a Rún. He had a most beautiful voice but on hearing it Eileen Kavenagh at once knew him and have him a hearty welcome. He told her about his intentions but to his surprise she told him she would marry him, and got the consent of her parents. She then married Cohill Daly and came to live to Lara. Their successors afterwards were great (p) Pariots one of them Denis Bowes Daly was one of those who perished
senior member (history)
2020-02-21 09:38
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travelling with the other to Eillens home. He then composed the old Irish song (Eillen) Eibhlín a Rún Having all plans and music prepared they set out on horse back bringing a extra horse.
Fortune favoured him in many ways as in those days when an important member of a family such as "those" was getting married the doors of their hall's or "Castle" were (opened) open to the poor and stranger to come and pay their compliments to those about to be married on their arrival they (where) were taken in to the reception room where Eileen
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 22:31
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He knew he had to (thow) (trow) throw the dice and he threw it. It hopped on the other man's dice, and it turned up one. This left Mr. Darcy's Castle safe, and he got the others man's money. It is said that how he was so lucky this time he was praying to the Saint with whom the well was connected.
After this he set up a flax factory and was very successful and started growing and manafacturing flax. But one day when a number of men were hackling flax the Castle was burned by accident, and was never reroofed. One of their successors Col. Darcy now lives in Athenry
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 22:27
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Cap na Ubhall
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 22:26
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of wine. In the same age there was a great school at Tolooban, near (by) Dunsandle where the (D) daughters of Noblemen came to get their education. Amongst those was a young lady named Eillen Kavinagh, whom Cohill or "Charles" Daly knew well when having finished her education she went to the home of her Parents. Cohill lost sight of her for a long time. But this day as Cohill returned to his home from France, a Party of Harpers called O'Dalys of "Tipperary" called on him it was
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 22:21
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customary for them to the visit the Castles of nobetily of Ireland and Play and sing. It was from those men Cohill Daly heard of the engagement of Eileen Kavanagh and that she was to be married next weekend on hearing the news he became very sad as he intended to ask her to marry him. He made known his feelings to the Harpers and asked them to wait over night. It was on this day he thought of disguising himself as a harper and
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 22:12
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Observation tells us that the lark never sings over the lands of Brittas. We account for this by relating a legend of many years ago. In the days of the "Old Cruice" the labourers working in Brittas had to be at work before the lark should sing. This particular morning a priest who had not been long in the parish was returning from a sick call which he had been attending. He met one of work men going to Brittas and inquired what was the
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 22:08
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cause of his being out so early in the morning.
The man replied he should be art work before the lark should sing over there. The priest then driven to anger from a patriotic view said that never again would the lark sing over Brittas. Even to the present day this curse has not been removed.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 22:05
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(into Nobber) and begged of him to put his father back to where-ever he came from. The priest went back with him to where the father was. The priest said to old Cruice. "Will you go back through the way you came and he said "No", that he wanted something to bring (to bring) with him The priest then fired an old cat at him and he went out through a hole in the side-wall of the house, and there is a big opening in the wall since and no one inhabited that room ever afterwards. A few years afterwards, the Cruices were received into the Catholic Church
One of the sons who was Colonel Cruice led a Catholic army into Muff County Cavan where the Orange men had assembled for the murder of Roman Catholics. The Orange-force retreated and refused to face the Catholics force.
Poor Cruice died a Catholic
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:56
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:56
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A stitch in time saves nines.
Old friends are best.
Don't throw out dirty water until you get clean in.
It is an ill wind that blows nobody got
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:55
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The weather can be judged by the curlews. When you hear them whistling it is the sign that it is going to rain.
The crows are a sign of good weather when they are flying against the wind.
When the sea-gulls come and lie on the fields it is the sign of wet weather.
When you see the wild geese coming from the north it is the of frost.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:53
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Lurabog, Larabog, Luimbur leac five miles six o clock she sat she sung she daily sprung Ellis me dear give me the loan of your spear till I go to the wood to kill a fat dear lixter laxler ticklle the banister open the door and let in the fat geeseter.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:52
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Dona go leór a tháilliúr.
A burned child dreads the fire.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
Look before you leap.
Hills look green far away
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:51
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Dona go leór a tháilliúr.
A burned child dreads the fire.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
Look before you leap.
Hills look green far away.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Creid a mhic ní go glan,
Na cabhair ainm Dé gan fáth,
Coinnigh an saoire mar is cóir,
Tabhair d'athair is do mháthair onóir
Ná déan marbh God na drúish,
Ná déan fiadhmhaise bréige ar aon chúis.
Na sanntuigh na slat fhéin
bean clann ar an eile agus na airnéis.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
living in it. There was a hole in the roof and it was called poll-deataigh. There was another one where Pat Cassidy in Magheraboy is now.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is goire cabhair Dé ná an dora [?] Mac Dé go lá ní feadh na go bráth. Ní lá na gaoithe agus lá na scolb. Ta smeacht mór ar an Nodlag agus cille bhrónach. Grádh grás mór agus tiocfadh fúre [?]. Ta mé bástál níl fhios agam cé'n áit, cé'n ús b'féidir gan fhlaitheas le Congnamh Dé.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was an old house in Tom Cafferkeys street in Magheraboy about thirty or forty years ago. His uncle was
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
people in their day. If the people did not obey the landlords they would evict them. There were more bailiffs who resided at Cashlahanny Kilmovee. These were the Dalton's. One of them got to be an agent for the protestant bishop of Ballina to collect his rents. He made it his business to evict nine families on a Christmas night in the townland of Rusheen's. There was another landlord but he was not a full landlord. He had control of Magheraboy. He sent the sheriff and the soldiers one morning to Magheraboy to evict all the people and three women beat them all and sent them away. They saved the evictions.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pat Rock, Culclare has a cure for a sore mouth because he never saw his father.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Over 200 years ago there was a Graveyard in Carrylockey. At that when people would die they were put in no coffin.
Unbaptised children are buried in James Griffins land. The name of the place is the Childrens Burial Ground. Unbaptised children are buried there yet. I heard of some children that were buried there.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1907 there was a big storm. It was on the 4th of August. It did a lot of
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
There were a good deal of spinners in my district. There was a women in Egool her name was "Bríghid mór" a nick-name she had. There was one in Culgariff and her name was Briget Mac Cann. They were very good spinners. They used to spin for blanket's and stockings and many things else.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A beggar came in one day to the same man and he said "Ce fearr an taobh seo na an taobh sin". The man said that he thought that they were the same. There is a pot of gold in this side and there is nothing this side.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 19:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a cave in Cul Cashel and it was opened last year. The Cul Cashel's opened it. It is running to Patrick Duffys and from there to Jim Griffins and so on
The Danes used to hide under there and when Cromel was in Ireland the priest used to hide under there. They used to hide in the Cashels also.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was an old school beside a river in Lecarrow. There was a man called Mr. Egan teaching in it. The school was thrown about sixty years ago. They used to write on slates with leadpencils and with chalks. on the blackboards. There were no seats in the school. They used sit on the floor doing their lessons. There was no Irish taught.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:55
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rejected
awaiting decision
Paddy Cafferky, Leveelock, used to make baskets and creels. He used to sell these baskets and creels at the market.
John McCann Magheraboy, used to make matches out of "kipins". He used not sell any of them but he made them for
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:54
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awaiting decision
his own use.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:52
approved
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awaiting decision
There was another man in the same place. He used to weave. His name was Mr. John Horan. He was
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:51
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awaiting decision
If you went in to a place where there was a man or woman milking a cow, Say "Bail of Dhia ar an obair" For fear you would bring the good luck.
The duck can swim because she was not "amplach".
There was a roll of butter left down to the hen and duck.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:50
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rejected
awaiting decision
My grandfathers name was Martin Rush. His fathers name was Michael Rush. His father was Martin. They were all living in one street in Patsy Rush's Culclare, Kilmovee, is now. The first of the Rush's came from Roscommon or else Sligo.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:46
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awaiting decision
The churns of the olden days were about ft 2 - 6 ins. high. The top part of the churn was called the "cáisin". There was a hole in the centre of the lid for the handle of the dasher. There was another part called the "claibín". The thing they used to clean the churn with was a "sean-sguab" to clean it well.
I got this from pat Rock, Culclare. The Costello's were bailiffs for the landlord. They resided at Ballyglass [?] Kilmovee, Co. Mayop. They were bad
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:42
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rejected
awaiting decision
Doherty from Castlemore.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:41
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rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a théighim siar bíonn an ghrian ar m'éadan,
Filleamhamt arais dom bíonn an ghealach go spéireamhach
Seárd dubhairt gach bean liom agus inghean ó na céad-mná (baintreabhach)
Go b'olc a' tuair ar Carrach do bhean a bheith dhom éalú.
(Cur-fá)
Agus furú mo chrúisgín
Agus dhiunan deor ann.
Agus ma' fhághaim bás caoin
Fágfaidh mé le m'udhacht é,
Mé thiubhairt go teach a táirne (tábhairne)
Is mé a chur ar chúl a chúnntair
An áit a mbeidh na cártai is na cragairi dá rúsgadh,
Is ba bhinne liom an céol sin
Ná céol binn na dtrompaí.
Curfá
Is nach aoibhinn dho'n fhear údaigh
Chuir a bhean sa gcúnra (cónra)
Thug ag an reilig i
Agus a d'fháguigh faoin bhfód í,
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
Peter Shiel Carrownelacky has a cure for the yellow jaundice.
Mrs Towey is Ardcul has a cure for ring worm. She is the seventh daughter. Worms were dug and put on her hand. When she leaves her left hand on a persons hand or foot it is cured
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a tailor in the Co. of Mayo and his name was Michael Brennan. He dreamt three nights in succession that there was a pot of gold at the bridge of Drogheda. He went there to look for the pot of gold. When he arrived there, there was a man with a drove of cattle at the river. Both men spoke to each other. The Drogheda man said to the Mayo man "You are a stranger to me. Are you looking for something. I dreamt three nights that there was
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Reid's grandfather lived on the same street as us. Eddie Regan's house was built in 1911. The old house is used now as a barn. It is 100 years old. The house before that is still standing, or a part of it, It is an old barn now.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The ash tree over our grave in Kilmovee cemetery was planted by Jimmy Breheny, grandfather of Pat Melvin (who died 1937, aged over 80). Jimmy Breheny was a weaver.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a rifle, shotgun and bayonet hidden in the barn in Pairs Bhrighid Ruas, Ballinvoher. Police came to search, and went straight to barn (which showed that information had been given). The walls were sounded, roof and thatch searched, but without result. Arms were hidden in a groove in the wall, behind the door, which was left open during the search.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If a great number of crows gather round the kitchen window it is the sign of a death.
If a great number of seagulls are seen flying inland it is a sign of rain.
If a robin is seen on the door-step in winter it is a sign of snow.
There is a story told about the way he got the red breast.
When Our Lord died a robin came and started to the thorns out and the blood splattered him and left a red mark on his breast.
If philibeens are heard at night it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some people take great notice of the birds and watch, their movements very carefully.
It is said to be unlucky if a person is going on a journey and a mag is seen crossing his path. If a black feather falls from a mag's tail it is said there is going to be a death. If mag's are heard fighting at night it is a sign of death.
There is a rhyme said about mags.
One for a letter
Two for a joy,
Three for a marriage.
Four for a boy.
If a person kills a mag any other mag will not be seen round the house.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 18:13
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rejected
awaiting decision
Tá liosanna i gceantar na scoil lioscháin a tugthar ortha. Ta dhá liosachán i mBáile Dhuibhne agus tá siad a radharc a chéile.
Ta siad tógtha lé clocha agus tá sceacha ag fás mór timpeall ortha cuma cruinn atá ortha go léir. Ta cheann aca anaice "Tobhair a leasa" agus tá uachais mhór ag dul isteach san líos fén dthalamh. Cúpla blíain ó shoin chuaidh daoine isteach san lios ach bhí sé ró dhorcadh istigh.
Ní raibh fhios aca cad é an sort Deir ná sean dhaoine gur thóg na fhir bolg na liosanna.
Ta aith éile i mBhauile Uí Dhuibhne anaice na fairrge agus "Cathair" a glaodhtar air. Cuma cruinn atá air agus poll mór istigh' ni lár.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 17:55
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awaiting decision
Fadó tugtaí bainne géar do na mucha, agus cuirtaí an bainne isteacht sa tobán cúpla seachtmhain. Annsin tugtar do na mucha é, agus i thiocfadh aon crampaí ar na mucha ann.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 17:50
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awaiting decision
they used bake it, and when the cake was baked they used eat it hot with a piece of butter and a grain of salt.
They used eat only three meals in the day. The breakfast, the dinner and the supper. The men were stronger than the men now.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 17:47
approved
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awaiting decision
cured. Many people around there go to that well to wash their eyes in it if they are sore.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 17:46
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awaiting decision
There is a blessed in the north west of Ballyheigue called Glendahillon well. There is an old story told about it.
It says that a ship once came in to the harbour there. Robbers were in it and they were going to rob the convent and kill the nuns.
The nuns prayed for help to God. So help came to them and the robbers were struck blind. Then the nuns took pity on them and they told them to wash their eyes in that well. They did so and they got
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 17:42
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awaiting decision
At the foot of Keel Micada on the cliff of Kerryhead there is a little lake and in the of it there are three rocks which it is said sprong up instead of three priests that were killed there.
It was said that it was an enemy attacked them and drove them into it during some war. Some say that it was in the time of Cromwell that his soldiers drowned them and three rocks sprung up like the heads of three men. They are plainly to be seen when the tide is full even to the present day.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 17:38
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awaiting decision
they would not do anything to her. But they came to do so and this time they were struck blind, at the nuns' prayers. But the Rev. Mother took pity on them and said to them, to wash their eyes in the well near by. This they did and their eyes got better again. From that time forward people go there, who have sore eyes, to try and get cured. It is said there is a fish seen inside in the well, and when seen a cure is always effected.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 17:01
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awaiting decision
To the north of Ballyheigue in a place called Glenahillon there is a well called the "well of the eyes". Many cures have been effected here for people with sore eyes.
Long go there was a big convent here and sea-robbers sailed in to the shore and the nuns and the Rev Mother prayed to God that the sea robbers woild not molest them.
But the sea-robbers tore down the convents and went away. Again the robbers came and again the Rev. Mother prayed that
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 15:47
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awaiting decision
Before Glenderry school was built there was a school in Michael Hare's field.
It is near the side of road, and Glenderry creamery is near it also. There are ruin's of it there at this time. About a half century ago it was knocked and Glenderry school was built then.
There was another old school in New Lane in pat Goynor's cow house: the fire place is there still. It was Mr Harthy who was teahear in the school ion Michael Hare's
Long ago in Ballyheigue there was a farmers
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 15:44
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house. It belonged to Tom James. It was all Irish that they were taught there.
It is half a mile from Glenderry. The boys and girls were in the same room, and learned the same lessons.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 15:42
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awaiting decision
Long ago there was a landlord in this country.
One day as he went out to his garden he looked at his plants and they were not growing so well because he had no good earth to make tham grow. He thought one day where would he get earth; so he said a graveyard could be a good place for getting earth.
He went to the graveyard to get the earth to put his trees growing. So he got the earth and carried it home to his garden.
Then he put the earth
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:44
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to the trees and plants to make them grow.
The landlord used take a walk out every evening about six o'clock and he used come back at ten o'clock. One night at ten o clock as he was coming along the road he heard a noise. It was a dog, and it charged in- to a horse, and it caught him by the hand and it pierced the hand off him. After that he was not better off , because it is wrong to do any thing to the dead.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:41
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senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:39
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after he went out fishing he got drowned. People often go looking for the gold. The gold is in the shape of a shoe. Once there did a man go looking for it, and he saw the Keel houses, and Brendan's cave. He had a bottle of holy water, and he made a ring around the place where he was standing with the holy water. He went digging for the gold and a bull followed him. It is said that a bull and a turkey are in care of the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:37
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It is said that there is a hidden treasure in Glenderry mountain. There did a man steal gold out of a ship that came into Keel bay many years ago. He hid the gold in Glenderry mountain.
He told his wife that she could get the gold if she would see the top of the Keel houses, and Brendan's cave or some other places near from the slope, as the gold would then be under her.
No one got the gold. The day
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:34
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senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:33
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senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:33
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There were many poets in this district long ago, but their poetry was never written down into books. Some verses have been preserved locally.
Once Kerry was playing Wexford and a poem was made about the players. It says Lawlor then was on the ball. A man of might and grit, And with the kick he gave it. He drove it through the net. Sullivan and She who leap the sky, and every kick he gave the ball. Up Kerry was the cry.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:29
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senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:29
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CBES_0417C_01
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:28
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Connor and Elizabeth Hanlon. They can tell English Stories of long ago. There is only one thatched roof there and the six others are of iron Some of the land is good and some very bad and mountainy.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:26
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My home district is New lane. The reason it was called New lane is because it is not long made and because they were many trees growing there long ago.
They cut them down and then they built the houses where they are now along in one line and that is why it is called the new lane.
There are seven families in New lane and there are fifty-four people in this town-land
There are two persons in this town-land over seventy years, namely Catherine
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:22
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awaiting decision
The plant called the houseleak when boiled through milk is supposed to be a fine cure for sore eyes.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:21
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awaiting decision
The Local fair is held in Ballyjamesduff. They are always held in towns. Byers never transacted business in the country. The town fair is held in the streets. There is no local tradition of fairs held on hillsides or in the neighbourhood. When an animal is sold luck money is given. it is called the luck-
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:19
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people sow them in drills. First of all the ground is ploughed. If it is for ridges it is springtoothed and then the ridges are marked. Every ridge is about a yard wide. For the drills the ground is ploughed, harrowed and cross-ploughed. Both a plough and a spade are used. The spades are bought in a shop.
The potatoes are stored in a barn and before they are set they are cut. A potato is taken and it is cut in two or more parts. If there is not an eye left in every part it will not grow. An eye is a growing sprout from which the plant grows.
The people help each other in setting the potatoes. They help each other in dropping, in setting and in cutting furrows.
They are moulded, sprayed and wed during the summer months. When the leaves of the potato begin to
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:09
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awaiting decision
There is a fairy fort in the school district. It is called a fort. The fort is situated in Lismeen. It is within view of another fort in Drumaduff. They are all circular in shape with a deep trench around them on the outside. There is a fence of earth and stone around on the inward side of the trench. In the fort in Drumaduff there is a hole in the centre with stepping stones going down to it but nobody ever ventured to go down. Some people say that it was the fairies who built them but it was the old Kings who built them. They built them for to protect themselves from the invaders.
The fairy people are supposed to live in them even at the present time. The owners
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:04
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of the land where the forts are situated never interfered with them when ploughing or planting crops. In the fort is Lismeen some years ago lights were seen and music was heard also.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:03
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Potatoes are set on our farm every year. Over an acre of land is set aside for potatoes each year. Generally the same amount is set every year.
My brothers prepare the ground for the potatoes. The ground is not manured before it is ploughed. Some people sow them in ridges and other
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 13:01
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awaiting decision
the house they dance and sing around the floor. After that they get some food and lots of beer and after all they go home in the best of humour.
Long ago a wedding procession was held. The people of the wedding used to run races on horse back on the way home. In olden times wives used to sit on the horses with their husbands. At the present time a wedding procession is not held nor wives do not sit on the horses with their husbands either.
Straw boys were more numerous long ago than they are now but in some places they do still go about.
On Shrove Tuesday it is said that the girls have a puss on them for the time that is in.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 12:58
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awaiting decision
having pancakes for the supper. The unlucky month for marriage is July and the unlucky days are Friday and Saturday. Matches are made in this district. Money is generally given as dowry. When money is not to be had goods are given.
The people do not remember marriages taking place in the houses.
On the wedding day the bride puts on her bridal dress and when she is going out of her own house the old people throw an old shoe after her for luck and when they come out of the church some of the friends throw rice on them. A wedding feast is held. It is held either in the wife's house or in the husband's house.
Straw boys visits the houses sometimes dressed in straw and rags and when they enter
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:38
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awaiting decision
21. Chuaidh éan gan cleite isteach faoi bhéal leice tháinic éan gan béal agus thig sé leis é - (Caileóg sneachtadh nua ir a leaghaidh an ghrian é.)
22. Cé a chaitheas an hata is mo sa dhomhan - An duine a bhfuil an chlaigean is mo air.
23. Trí chosa i n-áird dhá chois ar an talamh agus cionn an rud bheo ag goil i mbun
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:36
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:35
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awaiting decision
18. Tá sé san fhéar agus ní ghearrtar é tá sé san uisce agus ní fhliuchtar é tá sé san siopa agus ní dhíoltar é tá sé san loc agus ní bháitear é = (soillsuí na gréine)
19. Fear fada gléigeal agus crios dhá chuid féin air = (punnann choirce)
20. Ní fuil ní feóil agus ní cnamh é as fuil agus as feíól a d;fhás sé bain an ceann dhé is tabhar dhó deoch agus beidh se ag cainnt go lá dhuit - (Cleite ge)
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:31
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15. Bréidín buidhe ar taobh an tigh agus ní féidir a shníomh na réidteach = (an ghrian)
16. Tá sé san fhéar agus ní ghearrtar é tá sé san uisce agus ní fhliuchtar é tá sé san siopa agus ní dhíoltar é tá sé san loch agus ní bhaitear é = (soillsiú na greine)
17. Ceard nach bhfacaidh dia ariamh - (ní fhacaidh sé a macasamail féin ariain)
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:28
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go leith agus leath pighinn - (sé pighne.)
12. Chaith me suas e chomh bán le sneachtadh agus tháinic sé anuas mar ór buidhe ar leachta - (uibh.)
13. Ce'm taobh a bhfuil an chluais ar an cúpán - (taobh amuigh.)
14. Caipillín stadáilte babáilte don shuibhailfeadh sí Éire agus ní fhluichadh sé a bun = (beachóg)
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:23
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8. Is beag agus is mór é agus is cosamhail le biréad m'athaire móire - (similéar.)
9. Cé mhéad taobh ar teach = (dhá taobh amuigh is taobh istigh.)
10. Cé aca an ghé dhubh na an ghe bhán an gandal - (ceann ar bith aca mar géadha uilig iad.)
11. Pighinn pighinn dhá pighinn pinghinn
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:20
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awaiting decision
siad ag baint sméara maidin cheó an méid nar bhaintadar thugadar leo ias agus an méid nar bhain thug siad leo iad = (ITrí bhréachán dhubha ag l piocad a gcuid cleiteacha.)
6. Teachaire beag d theach go teach agus bíonn sé amuigh san oidhche - (casán)
7. Is cruinne é na mo cheann agus is fuide na céad luing - (ceirtlín sná)
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:19
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awaiting decision
siad ag baint sméara maidin cheí an méid nar bhaintadar thugadar leo ias agus an méid nar bhain thug siad leo iad = (ITrí bhréachán dhubha ag l piocad a gcuid cleiteacha.)
6. Teachaire beag d theach go teach agus bíonn sé amuigh san oidhche - (casán)
7. Is cruinne é na mo cheann agus is fuide na céad luing - (ceirtlín sná)
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:15
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awaiting decision
1. Céard is cosamail le asal- (asal (eile.)
2. Moiltín bréagh a thuit le h-ail agus níor breiseadh cnámh na cos ann =(Seilimid)
3. Sid amuigh e sid istigh é sid sa chlúid is dhá chéad súíl air= (creitear)
4. Tá bean amuigh annsin agus dhá shúil déag uirri - (claigean eabáiste)
5. Triúr chlainne chonal chréamha chuaidh
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:07
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awaiting decision
A cure for mumps is to go under a donkey three times.
Another cure is for some one to lead you to north running water with winkers on you.
A cure for warts is, if you see a hole in a rock with water in it, rub the warts with the water.
Dandelion roots are a great nerve builder.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 10:03
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awaiting decision
When the sky is red in the west in the evening it is the sign of good weather. When there is a heavy grey sky it is the sign of a heavy fall of snow. When you see streamers from the sun it is the sign of rain. If you see the moon on its back it is the sign of frost and if there is a ring round the moon it indicates storm. Red clouds is the sign of wind and black clouds on a summer's day is the sign of thunder. A rainbow is the sign of unsettled weather. The north wind is supposed to bring snow and the south wind rain. The east wind indicates hard dry weather and the west wind usually is the sign of rain also. The south westerly winds bring the most rain to this district.
When the swallows are flying
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:57
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awaiting decision
"haul" them home. Long ago the groom used to steal his bride from her home. Matchmaking was done long ago but it is not done very much now. It is said that it is lucky for the bride to wear something borrowed on her wedding day, it is also lucky for an old boot to be thrown after the couple.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:54
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awaiting decision
Most people prefer home made bread rather than bought bread, soda bread and brown bread are used mostly.
How to make Soda Bread.
A quantity of flour is put in a bowl. Then salt and soda is added and butter-milk is stirred in.
It is mixed, then it is put out on a floured board and kneaded and formed into shape. It is them put into a tin and baked in a moderate oven.
Brown bread is made much the same way only an equal quantity of wheaten meal is added with the flour.
Pan Cakes
A quantity of flour is put in a bowl. Then sweet milk, an egg, and baking powder is added and mixed and then it is put on the pan and fried.
Potatoe Cake.
Boiled potatoes are peeled and bruised and mixed with flour and then caraway seed is put in. It is then baked on a pan.
Potatoe is very nice when fried for breakfast.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:48
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awaiting decision
(1) Mr Burgcoyne - lived at the Cross Roads about 1/4 mile N.E. of the school in the townland of Carrowreagh. He left in his will some money for the poor children of the district about 220£.
There is a very funny story told about him. -
He kept a horse of which he was very fond, and the people say that he dressed himself up in his shroud and went up to the horse in its stable & scared it very badly.
He had his coffin made also and in the house.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:44
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awaiting decision
La Hoats a French vessel coming to take Ireland with army & ammunition was taken prisoner & crew put in Derry gaol. It was wrecked near Port Salon, off the Atlantic Ocean.
The power of the cannon was such that the very plates & delph on the dressers were shaken.
This happened about 200 years ago.
Wasp - The wasp was lost off Tory Island. the wreck was caused by a storm of wind, & happened about 70 years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:39
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awaiting decision
There are stories connected with churning in my locality. The people of my locality believe that if a person comes into the house where the butter is making that he would carry it away with him by some magic power. The people of my locality also believe that if they put the leg of a dead calf under the churn or under the cream tub that they will be very lucky with the butter. They also believe that the butter could not be carried away by devilment when the leg of the dead calf is under the churn.
There was a man living in the townland of Dromartin by the name of Dan Connell whose butter used to be carried away by "Pishogues". Every May morning a woman used to cross his yard with a bucket of water and he had suspicion that this woman was
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:34
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doing the harm. When the cream used to be put into the churn for to make the butter it used to turn into a mass of forth.
A Connaught woman came the way by chance and the farmer told her his story. Then the woman told him that she could stop that mischief. She stayed in the house that day and put two old irons into the fire and told him bolt the two doors. Then she told him when a knock would come to the door to say "Squeeze! Squeeze!" and she also told him that when the woman passed by with the bucket of water to put her outside his gate and lock it and that his butter would be all right for ever more.
The people of my locality long ago considered it very unlucky to give away milk
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:30
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on May morning.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:28
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ever they struck with their "shilleagh" gave any more trouble that day.
The two stuck close together aided by a girl named Mac Bride from Murmod. She wore a pair of home spun knitted stockings. She took off one stocking placing a stone in it about one and a half pounds in weight. Brady, Reilly and this girl beat the whole crowd of Protestants back and they fled home and took their guns, landed themselves together and returned, but all had left except their own who were wounded. They fired several shots in the air but that was the last of the road racing at the Billis.
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:24
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awaiting decision
racing was carried on at the New Inns. Of course the race course was on the braad road from the New Inns to Lisgray cross or someplace about there. There was a stronghold of protestants at the Billis from the Reformation on and all of them kept good horses and do at the present day. Most of them protestants competed at the race year after (after) year but on this particular race-day a Catholic man named Smyth also kept a good horse and in fact he was best. At the finishing of the race Smyth's horse was arriving home almost neck by neck and it was well known that Smyth's horse arrived first. A dispute arose and a row started and a hand to hand battle waged between Protestants and Catholic and there were bloody heads and broken bones and among the most noted were two men from the townland of Lattoon namely Mickey Reilly and Mickey Brady. No man
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:17
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the ne'er to do wells were rushed on to a ship and sent to Ireland in a mistake for brogues. All of them corner boys and jail birds were placed on our ancestor's land. Of course they never worked when in England nor when they came to Ireland. It's their children's children we have in Ireland and that is why a Protestant never likes to work hereditary. They are something like the men they took from the sea-board in the west and planted in the "gaeltreadhacht". They are not willing to work either.
2.
In later years some of our country men and women too distinguished themselves in free fights with the orange men. About 100 years ago year after year horse
senior member (history)
2020-02-20 09:11
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The houses in the old days in a great many districts especially in Coragh and Lattoon were built of mud and rushes mixed. It was called "Scroughn" [?] and "Scroighn" [?] is a wall made of mud and rushes. The house was built in a similar manner to the concrete house of the present day. The channel clay would be crowded up and large stones picked out of it. It would be wet and left to toughen for a considerable time. The side of the house would be lined out and about 15 ins. high of this mortar would be placed (would be placed) all around the size of the house.
The heap of clay would be stirred up and the green rushes mixed through it. It would be wrought like lime and sand until it would be tough and sticky. Then the wall
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:50
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was started and about 12 or 15 ins. high of this mixture was placed around but they had no frame as now for the concrete wall. Of course this wall could not be built only in dry weather. When they had 12 or 15 ins. on the wall and when this layer was perfectly dry layer after layer was put on until the wall was high enough. When perfectly dry then the house was roofed with bog oak as it was plentiful in most district then. "Scraws" were cut and dried & placed over the timber with an over lap of 2 ins. A "scraw" was a thin sod cut in a moory place about 2 1/2 ins. thick and about 14 ins. long. The scraws then were dry and light and caused the house to be warm and comfortable. The thatch was usually of straw as it was plentiful in them days and the first coat was generally sewed with
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:41
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It is unlucky to get married on Friday's and on the cross day of the year which is three days after Christmas day. Long ago it was customary to get married in the houses. My mother says that our neighbor Martin Kelly got married in his own house.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:38
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Drawing of a Peat spade
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:37
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A stitch in time saves nine.
Pride always gets a fall.
Look before you leep.
It was time enough, that left the man's peats in the moss.
Put up your umbrella when it comes on wet.
The world will over take you.
Take your hurry ion your hand and run on.
If you would heed all you hear you might eat all you see.
Grey hairs are honourable old maids are abominable.
Dogs follow their master.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:34
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You can get that. She got a tin of tar, and rolled herself in it, & then rolled herself in feathers, and for on the top of the tree
The fairy landed the next day and the old woman was on the top of the tree, so the fairy said "You have won your riches another time".
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:32
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Mr John J. Homes, Lisleen, Donemana, has a young pig aged two weeks, which is being mothered by a hen. They stay in the same box and the pig follows the hen, on all occasions.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:30
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Fortune always favours the brave.
As the old cock crows the young one learns.
Bad weeds grow well.
The harder the frost the nearer the thaw.
The darker the night the nearer the dawn.
The more haste the less speed like the tailor with the long thread.
Yellow to yellow makes yellow look white.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:28
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Paddle your own canoe
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
For ant of a nail the shoe was lost and for want of the shoe the horse was lost.
You never know the want of the water till the well goes dry.
Look before you leap.
.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:27
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Don't cross the river until you come to it.
Don't meet trouble half way
It takes two to make a quarrel one can always end it.
Laughing boys are never bad laughing girls are seldom sad
Small things do cause war.
Don't squeal until your bit.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:24
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V
In the deep solitude
Of the lonely green-wood
How sweetly its petals are peering;
And low in the fen
Of the dark highland glen,
The path of the brown bee its cheering
VI
Like a soul-cheering star,
We may find it afar,
In the gully and gorge of the mountain
And by the clear stream,
Where the fairy elves - dream,
That joy in the song - raising fountain.
VII
And lovely it waves
O'er the unlettered graves
Where the poor of the village are sleeping
And by the wayside
It delighteth to bide
And cheer up the weary and weeping
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:20
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II
Through each lonely vale
It enamours the gale
As the Summer is spreading before us
Nor does it grow sear
When the Autumn is near,
And the gloom of the grey clouds hang o'er us
III
O'er the beauty it has
How I glory to pause
While the light of the morn's falling near us
And when in the shroud
Of the day - closing cloud
Like it there is nothing to cheer us
IV
As, bright with the dew,
It appears in our view,
O where could we look for its marrow
The lark, on her nest
Loves to shelter her breast
With the rich-scented bloom of the yarrow
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:16
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and round the circle of flax.
The men pushed it out and in with rakes to get the heads bruised first and then the roots.
They have no call for these stones now for they have got rollers.

This stone is in my father's yard.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:14
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Drawing
diameter 56 inches
9 inches thick
round circumfer
72 inches thick
through centre
About 200 years old, not used now.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:13
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Long ago when the flax scutchers had no rollers to roll the flax the people that had flax had to keep a large round stone to bruise it themselves.
The stone had a spindle through the centre of it or a big wooden log. Then the flax was laid in a round circle and a horse was yoked to the spindle and he had to draw it round.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:11
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From out yon star methinks 'tis streaming,
Where there is neither sin nor care,
Among the bless'd in bliss she's dreaming.
And Death ne'er took a lovelier thing
What more from me can now be taken
No earthly flower can pleasure bring
My soul is to its centre shaken.
VIII
As from the grave we passed away
Where her dear child was left to rest in.
We saw her grief could ne'er decay.
While there as life her aged breast in,
We heard the main rush o'er the plain.
That tore away her dearest treasure,
And 'neath its sound she sank again
Her every thought in grief to measure.
VIIII
And now she sits at Rachel's grave
In all the agony of sorrow,
Without a hope she'll ever have
A happy night or cheerful morrow.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:07
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Her love of life has passed away,
In vain we labour to restore it;
The star where all her pleasure lay
Has now the green sward growing o'er it.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:06
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In glen, wood, or bower,
We have not a flower,
So dearly beloved as the yarrow;
By it we can see
What the future may be
If o'er it we dream, ere to-morrow.
II
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:04
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There is a lot of games now but the best ones are dying out and these are the names of some of them. Jacks, duck, hide-and-seek, and cap ball. The best of these I think is cap ball.
You get six or seven to play and their caps must have a name according to the days of the week. The one who is Sunday throws the ball into any of the caps and if he does not throw it in, Monday gets his turn and if he gets the ball into any of the caps the rest run their might when he is getting the ball out of the cap to hit them, & whoever he hits with the ball gets his turn next to throw the ball into a cap.
You must be able to stand a good crack for sometimes you would get hit on the head. It goes on till the rest of the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 23:00
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game is played out.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 22:59
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awaiting decision
I know a lot of games such as tig, hide and go seek, shooting marbles, duck, grand old duke of York, Ludo and Draughts
When you are playing Duck you get a big flat stone and set it in a level place. Then you get a round stone and set it on the flat one. Then you get three or four smaller stones and you stand six or seven feet off the stone which you call the duck and you throw the stones at it and try to tumble it and if you miss it you are put out and some one else gets into your place and if you tumble it you win the game.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 22:55
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When children had mumps long ago their father or their mother put horse's winkers on the one that had the mumps, and led them to the well and let them take three drinks of water and after that they got better.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 22:54
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First the people get a donkey and made it eat oat bread. There were two people, one stood at each side of the donkey then they reached through the one that had whooping cough three times over the donkey's back and through its four legs: after that the child got better.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 22:52
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I know a game called Sea Saw. It is not played so often now. First they placed a plank on a barrel or ditch.
Then some one sat at one end of the plank and the other at the other end. They weighed one another up and down. When one is up high the other is down. They go on this way for a long time, then some other two get a ride on the plank when the first two are tired.
It is a nice game. It took two the same size to play the game. Small ones would not be allowed on the Sea Saw because they might fall off and be hurt or killed.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:25
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I can make a lot of home made toys such as a tortoise, a daisy chain, a whistle, a doll's pram, a doll's cot, a swiz, a spinning ginny, a rag doll, a boat, a kite, a water mill, and a cart.
I like to make a tortoise out of half a wall nut shell and six cloves.
I put one clove for its nose, one for its tail and four for its feet.
Then when I have the cloves ready I have to stick them on to the shell with certofix. I like to make it on Hallow Eve night when I have the shell.
Drawing of a tortoise.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:19
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Drawing of a Golliewog
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:18
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You can make a lot of toys at home such as little boats, kites, daisy chains, water wheels, whistles, spinning jinnies, barrows, Jack in the box, and wee gollie wogs out of yarn.
I think making a gollie wog in the nicest. You must have two or three colours of yarn.
You tie the head and then the neck and you get a wee bunch of wool and tie the two ends then put it through the middle of the wee man and when that is in, you tie below that again then the two feet and get a needle and yarn and make the eyes and nose.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:15
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Drawing of a boat
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:14
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Drawing of a Spinning Jenny
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:14
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frowning
As screamed her mother o'er the deep
"My daughter, oh! my daughter's drowning"
"My child" my child!" was still her cry,
Thy love again will never cheer me
Oh! would to God I now could die,
And heaven in pity sure will hear me.
VI
My sorrow here can ne'er be stated
How could I live and not deplore thee?
When in the cold grave thou art laid,
And all thy playmates weeping o'er thee!
Come Death, oh! come, 'tis only the [?]
Can free my soul from all this sadness,
Cast thy dark shroud around my brow,
And lead me to a land of gladness.
VII
My Rachel's love I long to share,
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:09
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Its deep and sullen waves around her,
Which left her sadly to complain
Far from the spot where love first found her.
Unfit was she to hold the net
Against the raging roaring water;
Scarce on the eddy was it set
'Till Death with al its terrors caught her.
IV
Down, down she sank beneath the surge,
Nor e'er in life was she seen after;
Winds sang along her funeral dirge
Where'er the flood was seen to waft her.
As closed her eye, her prayer rose high
To Him whose power hath no controlling;
Yet there was none to aid her nigh,
When o'er her breast the waves were rolling.
V
But many an eye soon turned to weep
Where wild the water-wreath was
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 11:43
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1. What gloomy clouds have gathered near,
A tale of grief to me revealing,
And one so sad ne'er met the ear,
Since first we saw them o'er us sailing
Their weighty tears were falling fast
While leaning o'er yon raging river
Where lovely Rachel breathed her last,
Where human aid was none to give her.
II
She left behind her mother's cot,
Where joy and peace cheered every hour;
Passed many a lone and lovely spot
To gain her favourite fishing bower
And she was sweeter, dearer far,
Than flowery vale or moonlit mountain,
And blither than the morning star,When rising from its glorious fountain
III
But soon the main rolled o'er the plain
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 11:24
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awaiting decision
Is fada é ná long: Is cruinne é na liathróid?
Cad é sin? [Ar ceithrelín snáth]
Cioca ba mheasa leat mháthair chéile bean do driothár nú inghean driothár thathar
Fr: [Máthair céile bean dhriothár - sé sin do mháthair féin]
Níl sé amuigh is níl sé istigh is níl sé gar mór ón dtig? Cad é féin: [Fuinneóg nu doras]
Ní fuil is ní feóil is í cnámh é
As fuil is as feóil dfhás é:
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 11:11
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1. Oh Donegal the pride of all I oft times think of thee.
My cottage home where oft I roamed when I was young and free.
Big houses grand in a foreign land cannot compare at all
With my cottage bright on a winter's night on the hills of Donegal.
2. Right well I mind the harvest time the doleful dreary day.
When leaving all in Donegal to wander far away.
Neas Cressloughtown my friends stood round I bade farewell to all.
And from the van I waved my hand to the hills of Donegal.
3. When gazing back through Barne's Gap on my own dear native hill.
I thought no shame but who could blame 'twas there I cried my fill.
My parents kind ran in my mind my friends and comrades all.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:59
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1. Rev. Chevers lived in Lisfannaon.
2. " Crookshanks lived in Rectory Burnfoot.
3 " Tidd - livid in Rectory Burnfoot.
4 "Carnernie livid in Rectory Burnfoot
5 " Rev. Sides - livid in Rectory Newtowncunningham
6 Rev. Abercrombie livid in Rectory Newtowncunningham.
The Episcopal Church was formerly in a place called "The Glebe" in Milltown, where the ruins are still.
There is also a graveyard in Milltown.
Rough drawing of Carrowreafh New School built 1933.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:45
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Drawing of Turf Spade
Shaft - 34 inches long
spade 18 " "
from thread 12 " "
tread 2 inches across
spade mouth 4 1/4 " from corner to fold and
4 1/4 gain where folder over
hold 4 1/2" long
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:40
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some time before (1088) and he ordered his army to bring from Aileach to Limerick a stone of the demolished building for every sack of provisions which they had with them."
This was the end of Grianan as a "royal" residence, The clans descended from Owen and his tribe, called in Irish genealogy the Kinel-Owen, had in accordance with the custom became universal throughout Europe, assumed a surname and were now called O'Neills. They removed the seat of the "sovereignty" eastwards, and their chieftain, and tenests in long succession were afterwards installed at Tullaghogue Rath, near Lough Neagh. They also built castles at Dungannon, Omagh, Clandeboye, Shane's Castle and elsewhere. The Grianan meanwhile lay deserted and desolate, for long centuries falling more & more into ruin. Yet once more in its chequered history the old cashel was fated to be used as a temple, this time of a different faith. During the dark days of the Penal laws, the R. catholic people of the neighbourhood used to assemble furtively within it to hear mass, and on the relaxation of those laws a small chapel, 16 1/2 X 14 1/2 feet, with walls 2 feet thick, was built in the centre. For the priest to celebrate the rites of his church therein, whilst his flock were arranged on the broken terraces around. Soon after a peoples chapel was built at Burt, below
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:27
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the hill, and the Grianan was once more forsaken for a lime.
In 1837 the Ordnance Survey Commission having examined the ruins and published a full historical account of them, public attention was called to the place, with disastrous results. Visitors came hither from all parts, & the work of destruction which had hitherto been confined to time was accelerated with calamitous rapidity by the hand of man. Wantonly destructive Vandals, treasure hunters, and antiquaries, with more curiosity than discretion, all aided in the evil work, until in the year 1873 the wall of the cashel had been brought down to a height of 5 or 6 feet, and its materials scattered all about, inside & outside. The worst was over, how ever the day of its regeneration was now about to dawn.
A resident of Derry Dr W. Bernard a gentleman of rare archaeological learning, taste & zeal undertook to repair & restore the cashel. He saw that no enclosing or railing in would be of any avail in such a situation; the only mode of preserving the historic structure would be that of restoring it to its original condition. With indefatigable energy & spirit he worked upon the people of the district uintil hje had
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:12
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awaiting decision
infused into them a portion of his own enthusiasm, and induced them to make a beginning of the restoration work in the spring of 1874. With consummate antiquarian knowledge and fidelity he directed and encouraged his volunteer band of helpers, & persevered until the task was completed. The work occupied a considerable portion of each year until 1878 - nearly five years! The neighbouring farmers & their men, from their long practice of building dry stone fences, round their fields were adept at piecing together the walls of the cashel; the materials lay ready to hand thickly scattered about the ruins; Derry merchants & contractors supplied the scaffolding. Dr Bernard fed the workers, and personally superintended the progress of the work until at length the whole was completed, and the spirited promoter & his willing assistants had the gratification of seeing the grey walls & terraces once more in the pristine condition. Dr Bernard was guided in his plan of restoration by the vestiges of the cashel found in their original position, and by the analogy of similar buildings in Ireland, notably that of Staig Fort in Derry, which is nearly entire, The only new materials brought into requisition were 181 flags, split from the adjacent rocks to supply the place of the coping stones carried away by the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:58
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say that any one of the snug farmhouses now beneath the Grianan hill contains more comfort and treasure than ever did the "palace" of an Irish "king". Neither let the reader fall into the mistake of imagining that the dry open stone work of the cashel constituted the wall of the palace; the latter stood inside and the cashel was merely its protection & defence.
So the Grianan continued for over 600 years, during which period it was plundered several times by rival "kings" and by Norse rovers. Thus under date A.D. 674 the Irish annals record, "Aileach -Fririn [?] was destroyed by Finsneachta, the son of Donough, king of Ireland. Again in 937:- "Aileach Fririn was pillaged by the Danes". And the crowning disaster came in 1101, When the Four Masters record:-
Murtagh O'Brien, King of Munster, at the head of the forces of Leinster, Ossary, Meath & Connaught, marched with a great army across Assaroe (on the river Erne), and proceeded into Inishowen, which he plundered and raviched [?]; and he burned many churches and strongholds about Fiahan-Mura and Ardstraw, and demolished the Grianan of Aileach, in revenge of the destruction and demolition of Kincora (village of O'Briens) by Donal MacLaughlin
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:43
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of the Nine Hostages (from whom the O'Neills derive their clan surname) who had brought Patrick when a boy as a slave from France. Owen was converted through Patrick's preaching, and baptized by the Saint, in the well outside the cashel. The Pagan worship was abolished and the druids banished but though the Grianan thus lost its sanctity in one respect, it retained and acquired fresh reverence in others. Owen's successors built their palace inside the cashel, and the old walls which had been a temple now became a fortress.
A word of warning here. Let not the reader be misled by the words, king, palace, royal etc used in this connection; neither let him imagine that any building resembling Windsor Castle, or the Chateau of Versailles ever existed here. An Irish "king" was merely the elected (not hereditary) head of a coterie of half-savage clans, chosen because he was the ablest, strongest, or most cunning amongst them; his "palace" was a rude erection of logs & sods, thatched with straw; and his treasures consisted of the cattle of the clan, and their products, weapons, clothes and personal ornaments. it would be no exaggeration to
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:34
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human freedom and progress - the hut residence of the wild chief of the north country was here also. It was probably within the earthen enclosure outside the cashel; where also were driven the cattle of the tribe, and its women and other "treasures" kept for safety. Here too was the inauguration stone upon which successive chieftains and tanists were installed with rude ceremonies; the same which now lies at Belmont, near Derry.
There are strong reasons for believing that the Grianan as a "royal" seat was known to Ptolemy, the Greek geographer, who wrote in A.D. 120. In his map of Ireland he marks a place Regia "royal" which corresponds fairly well with its situation. Ptolemyy obtained his information from merchants or mariners, mostly Phoenicians, who were the ancient traders to these islands.
At the period of Ireland's conversion to Christianity in the fifty century by St. Patrick that famous and holy man visited the Grianan and preached the gospel there, in A.D. 443 Eoghain (pron. yoan) Anglicised Owen) from whom Inishowen, Tyrone, Benowen, Catmore [?] and many other places in Ulster are named was then "king" He was the son of Niall
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:24
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stone, and is consequently of very ancient date. When Solomon was building his temple in Jerusalem wild Irish "kings" were reigning on Grianan hill, and from its walls the smoke sacrifices to to Baal, the Sun-god, arose morning and evening.
The history of Grianan - Aileach is full of interest from every point of view. Its name is derived from the Irish word grian, "the sun", and means, pertaining to the sun." The name Aileach is a compound of the Irish words, ail, "stone" and leach, "house"; and signifies a stone building. The whole name may thus be translated, the stone house of the sun"; which points to the conclusion that the old cashel was originally a temple of the sun (which indeed its peculiar situation and construction would irresistibly suggest); and also that is was one of the first built of stone. Further, we know that in every case where we can trace the emergence of man from primitive barbarism, and the evolution of his religion, his first and last edifices are invariably dedicated to the service of his gods. The temple for the priest is always his grandest work; the palace for the king is only a secondary affair. But as kings and priests have all through history been, proverbially allies - an alliance which has generally boded ill for
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:05
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People say that you could travel churchyards on Christmas Night, without fear, because the Mother of God was out also.
On Christmas Night the youngest child should light the Christmas candle, then all should kneel to say a little prayer. The Rosary should be said afterwards.
When going to bed that night people would not bolt the doors nor would they take food off the table. It was the wayfarer's night
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:05
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Potatoes were so scarce and the people suffered so much from hunger that the shoots were planted alone. The potatoes were used as food when the shoots were taken off. The shoots grew and gave fairly good return.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:00
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Children were warned by their parents that warts or scabs would come on their hands if they robbed birds' nests.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 08:59
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If a person, whom bad luck followed, put eggs, laid by domestic fowl, under another person's hay it was believed the latter would thenceforth suffer from the misfortune which the former passed on to him.
Usually the eggs are placed under the tops of hay-cocks, in the meadows.
The practice was fairly common long ago but now it is practised and believed in by only very few.
The fact the some person intended to get rid of his ill-luck by passing it on to themselves - if he could- caused people great anxiety.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 08:55
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Old people used say that the robin was at the foot of the Cross when Our Lord was being crucified and that a drop of blood from His wounds fell on its breast.
The robin's breast is said to have been coloured red for the first time on that day. It is regarded as a blessed bird and people are careful not to injure it in any way.
Old people used say that the robins were Our Lady's hens.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:11
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I know names of games such as Tig, Hide And Seek, Ludo, Draughts, Duck, and Marbles. When you are playing Tig some one runs after you to try and Tig you. If you get tug you must run after them, to try to tig them.
There is always a den to run into. If you get into the den before you are tug them the one running after you has to tig some one else and keep out till he tigs some one.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:09
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There are lots of games such as Tig, Hide and Seek, Duck, Farmers in his den, Ludo, Snakes and Ladders, Jack stones, and Drafts.
Hide and Seek is not so popular now,. The people in olden times used to play it.
The first thing you do is to get someone and you make her close her eyes. Then the other ones run away and hide. Then when they are hid they shout "Cuckoo" and the one that has her eyes closed comes and looks for them. Then the girl that is found first has to close her eyes and stay in the den the next time.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:03
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revengeful O'Briens in 1101 to complete their chieftains castle at Limerick. The uppermost stones found in situ, were marked with tar. Dr Bernard removed all traces of the little R. Catholic Chapel, as forming no part of the original structure.
Under the ruins & beneath portions of the wall which it was found necessary to rebuild from the foundation Dr Bernard discovered a number of articles such as a rubbing stone for grain, stone weapons, discs, clubs, etc, which were sent to the Royal Irish Academy Museum; also a quantity of turf, ashes & bones of the Bos longifrond or primeval bull of Ireland. Some of the objects thus found are extremely curious: for instance a flat stone chequered into 36 squares for playing chess, which was a favourite game of the ancient Irish; and a stone phallus.
At the base of the Grianan hill there are several caves penetrating for a considerable distance into its interior. Within the innermost of these caves, tradition says, some troops of Hugh O'Neill's horse lie in an enchanted slumber, awaiting the hour when they shall be called forth to strike a blow against the Saxon "for the freedom of Ireland". The legend also relates how a peasant, who accidentally discovered
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 23:51
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inclination inwards as it ascends. The gateway is wider below than above, and its lintel is formed by a very large flat slab of stone, which supports the wall above it. The stone of which the whole cashel is built is the common grey schist of the district, interspersed with a few blocks of quartz, gneiss and granite.
Outside the cashel, three concentric rings of circumvallation, or earthen enclosures, can be faintly traced, surrounding it at unequal distances. Between the first and second, east of the cashel, are the barely discernable remains of a tumulus; and between the second and third, due south of the cashel, an ancient well. The circular apex of the hill contained within the outermost enclosure, is 5 1/2 acres; within the second, 4; and within the third, about 1; and within the cashel itself about, 1/4 of an acre. The visitor will observe that many of the stones, outside and inside, are marked with tar: these were the uppermost found in their original positions when the cashel was restored.
The architecture ("a work of art without art") is of that rude style of uncemented stone-work, called Cyclopean for want of a better name. It exhibits a specimen of the first attempts of savage man to construct an edifice of
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 23:39
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77 1/2 feet in diameter, surrounded by the wall of the cashel, which is on an average about 13 feet thick at the bottom, and diminishes as it rises, giving room for two (sometimes three) terraces or platforms of varying breadths.
The top parapet of the cashel is 3 1/2 feet high above the upper platform, (which runs all round) about 2 feet thick, and has a coping of broad flat stones. Within the thickness of the wall at bottom, there are two passages or galleries, one on each side of the gateway: the first north-east, running inwards to a length of 41 feet, 5 feet high, and 2 feet wide; the other to the south-east, is 68 1/2 feet long, 5 feet high, 2 feet wide, and has a recess with a seat in it, 55 feet from its entrance. *
The orifices of these galleries are each about 3 feet high, and 2 feet wide. Access to each platform on the wall is obtained by flights of stone steps, of which there are, roughly speaking five groups. At the western side of the floor is a hollow, formerly occupied by the sink or midden, from which there is a flagged drain going underneath the wall to the outside. The rocky ridge of the hill runs north-west, to south-east, forming the floor. The external surface of the wall is not perpendicular, but has a curved slope or
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:19
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street, and right on through Rosemount, passing the city waterworks on the left, until he reaches the hamlet of Creggan. Here a slight turn to the left, ans then to the right brings him into the road which leads straight on for about 3 miles, the Grianan being in full view all the time, like a huge, low truncated tower, on the top of its hill.
At the foot of the hill we come to a meeting of five roads at two cottages; we take the left front (rough) road and make direct for the top. After a sharp pull up the heathy slope we arrive at the site of the "ould fort o' Grianan." (as the peasantry call it) and find that we are on the summit of a bare round hill, 802 feet in height, the centre of which is occupied by a huge mass of dry stone masonry, circular in shape, and about 17 1/2 feet high. This building is the Cashel of the far famed Grianan of Aileach. Approaching it we find that it has but one gateway, facing the east, 7 feet high, and average breadth 3 1/2 feet. On each side of the gateway in the thickness of the wall, is a niche, evidently made to receive folding doors, laid back when the gate was open. Entering we find ourselves in a circular amphitheatre.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:13
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What turns without moving?
The road.
What goes round and round the house and peeps into every wee hole?
The sun
What has legs and cannot walk?
A chair
My hands are black my face is white I am going day and night I cannot speak but strange to say I tell the time?
A clock
Up the chimney down, but cannot go down the chimney up? An umbrella.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:11
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What goes across the water without making a sound?
A shadow
What can you be to-morrow that you cannot be to day?
Older
Why is the cloakroom of a railway station like a forest?
Because it is full of trunks
Hairy out and hairy in all hair no skin?}
A grass rope
As green as grass as red as blood as black as ink what is it?
A blackberry
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:09
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Londonderry Cork and Kerry spell that without a K?
That
What is the differences between a sailor in gaol and a blind man?
The one cannot go to see and the other cannot see to go
When should you lose your temper?
When it is a bad temper
When is a rock not a rock?
When it is a shamrock
Why is a pound note like a bridge?
Because it goes from one bank to another
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:07
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Which trees are always found on the hearth?
Ashes
What is that which is bought by the yard and worn by the foot?
The carpet.
What has teeth and yet never uses them to eat?
A comb.
Which tune does everybody like?
A fortune
What is it that never asks questions and yet requires a lot of answers?
The door bell.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:05
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What is that which is full of holes and yet holds water?
A sponge
Why are policemen lie airships?
Because they both take people up.
What has an eye and cannot see?
A needle
What keeps the sun up in the sky?
Its beams
What goes into the well and is not drowned?
The sun
What has long legs short thighs little head no eyes?
The tongs
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:03
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What is the softest thing that boils and never loses its colour?
A cabbage.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:02
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What has a tongue and cannot speak
A boot
Why does a man look into his pipe?
Because he cannot get in and look out
I have a wee horse with an iron throat and every time he gallops he swallows the rope?
A mill.
What has eyes and cannot see
A potato
A little white and round house and it is full of meat it has no doors or windows to let me in to eat.
An egg.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:59
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Its black and its white and its read all over
The newspaper
What has wings and cannot fly
A cart
What goes up the stairs with its head down
A nail in a boot
How many hairs in the cat's tail
There are none in it that are all outside
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:58
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God bless the grey mountains of dark Donegal.
God bless royal Aileach the pride of them all
For she sits ever more like a queen on her throne,
And smiles on the valleys of green Innishowen.
Sir Charles G. Duffy.
Unquestionably, by far the most interesting place in the vicinity of Derry is the Grianan of Aileach, and the tourist should not miss seeing it on any account.
To reach it, any one of three roads may be adopted. The visitor may hire a car - the distance is 5 1/2 miles from the city; he may go by rail to Bridge-End station on the L & L.S. Railway, and then walk the remaining two miles up the hill; or he may walk direct from Derry. If the latter course be chosen, he will proceed by Waterloo Place, William Street, Creegan
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:56
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it is level and tillable. The track of a house is still plain, just at the foot of the hill as you go up Ros-na-gcaorach next Tráigh. Ghearr.
Here lived Peggy Oates, with her husband. She was evicted by Lord Palmerston, in order to make way for his present domain. The track of the ridges where potatoes were set, are still plainly visible. He got a small piece of land at the back of Mullaghmore.
The place is known locally as Peggy Mhór field.
Between the Lodge at Classybawn and the sea
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:56
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it is level and tillable. The track of a house is still plain, just at the foot of the hill as you go up Ros-na-gcaorach next Tráigh. Ghearr.
Here lived Paggy Oates, with her husband. She was evicted by Lord Palmerstown, in order to make way for his present domain. The track of the ridges where potatoes were set, are still plainly visible. He got a small piece of land at the back of Mullaghmore.
The place is known locally as Peggy Mhór field.
Between the Lodge at Classybawn and the sea
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:52
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Ros-na gcaorach Directly opposite Cliffoney village is a rocky promontry, stretching for 1/2 mile or so in the sea. It is slightly heathery and is now part of land owned by Lord Ashley. This is called Ros-na-gcaorach. Formertly sheep were reared on it; hence its name.
Peggy Mhór. Between this and the Lodge, owned by Lord Ashley, lies "Peggy Mhór's" field. It is a fat piece of ground bounded by the sea on both sides. It is mostly rocky but part of
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:47
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9. If the hens are quarrelling a stranger will come to the house.
10. If the cat is seen washing his face with his back to the fire it is said the coming week will be wet.
11. If you see a dog with a white spot on his back you will have bad luck.
12. A friend in time is worth nine.
13. Man's best friend is his pocket.
14. Many hands make light work.
15. A bird in the hand is worth two the bush.
16. It's a bad wind that doesn't favour somebody.
17. Bíonn a luch ag rinnce nuair a bhíonn an cat amuigh.
18. Ní hé lá na gaoithe la na scolb.
19 Tá fuil níos i tiughe ná uisce.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:42
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Áth Thadhg, Áth Garbh, Áth Buidhe, AÁth na Crois,Áth an n-oileán, Cúilín Sgáire Conn a céir, Teampall agus an Corí.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:41
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The fox is certainly a very cunning animal after killing a hen or a goose he does his best to get to a place of safety
When he has this devoured he seeks another one and if he is then seen unaware of himself he lies down as though he were dead.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:38
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59. One day three brothers were passing by a graveyard, one of them said, I must go in to pray for my brother's son, and the other siad I must go in also to pray for my brother's son, but the third man said I will not go in because I have no brother's son to pray for. What was the man to the boy the others went in to pray for.
He was his father.
60. There was once a man and he ploughed forty days in March. He had done when he had started, he had done when he had half done and he had not done at all when he had finished. How did he do the work?
Done was the horse's name and he had him when he started ploughing. He also had him when he had half done, but he died before the work was finished, and March was the name of the place.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:34
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61. Why does a cow look over the fence.
Because she can not look under it.
62. What smells most when you go into a flower-garden?
Your nose.
63. Ce'n fáth go bhfuil an leitir 's' mar oileán?
Mar ta sé i lár uisce.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:32
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senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:32
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senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:32
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1. When the wind is blowing from the north it is a sign that we will have snow.
2. If it would start to rain the storm will cease.
3. When the sheep are seen lying at the bottom of a hill it is a sign that we will have snow.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:30
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e bhí ag na fir bás, agus d'imthigh an ór uatha gan fhios aca cé'n áith a raibh sé. Do bhí siad níos bochtaighe annsin ná mar a bhí siad riamh roimhe sin agus do bhí siad brónach nuair nár chuir siad suim ins an gcar dubh.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:28
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Tá an ciste seo suidhte sa Mhuaidh. "linn" an tainm atá ar an áit in a bhfuil sí. An áit seo tá sé idir Sean-Chaisleán agus Roinn Bhreac, i bparóiste na hUaighe Móire, i mbarún Gallen agus i gCo. Mhuigheo.
Deirtear gurabh é an ciste seo bairrille óir agus "Rí Eascú" - mar gharda air. Ins an áit is doimhne sa bpoll atá sé.
Aon lá amháin tháinign beirt fhear de'n t-ainm cheadhna chun é a thabhairt amach. D'eirigh leó na sleabhraí a chur timcheall an bhairrle. Nuair a bhí siad ar tí é a thabhairt amach tháíning an "Rí Eascú" go dtí barr an uisce do bhuail sé na sleabhraí le na ruball agus do bhris sé iad.
Chuaidh an bheirt abhaile gan bacadh leis an mbairrile óir ó shoin i leith.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:22
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senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:22
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5. I Turloch ar an teorainn idir Caisleán an Bharraigh agus béal leath bearrtha tá poto óir le fághail faoí chrann ar bhruacha abha. Tá se i mbarún Gallen agus i gCo. Mhuigheo.
Uair amháin do bhí cúpla fear ag iarraidh an pota sin a thógál suas le capaill agus slabhraí. Annsin tháining cat mór subh as poll agus tháinig sé siar go dtí na capaill. Do bhris na slabhraí annsin agus do rith na capaill. Bhí eagle ar na fir annsin níos mó a dhéanamh agus do chuaidheadar abhaile.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:19
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senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:19
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6. Tá póta óir ins an Loch áluinn aoibhinn sin loch Calaidh, I mbaile fearrainn Calaidh, i bparóiste Cille Lasraigh, i mbarún Gallen agus i gCo. Mhuigheó.
Pota óir an ciste seo. Aon la amháin tháínig beirt fhear darbh ainm Pádraig Mac an Ultaigh chun é a fháil.
D'eirigh leo na slabhraí a chur timcheall an photo mar bhí céard an isnáimh go han mhaith aca.
Do bhuail siad na capaill agus do bhuail iasg na slabhraí agus do bhris sé iad agus dubhairt sé go gcaillfeadh ceann aca mar gheall ar an bpota a tabhairn amach.
Ní raibh fhios acha ce'n duine a gheobhadh bás mach an tainm ceadhna a bhí ar an mbeirt
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:14
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Ach an bheirt ag feachainn amach dó lá brónach an bháis.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:13
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senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:13
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Deireann na daoine go bhfuil ciste suidhte i mbaile fearainn Lios Dubh, i mbarún Gallen agus i gCo Mhuigheó. Ós rud e go bhfuil an baile fearainn lan de liosanna deirear go bhfuil se i bhfolach i gceann díobh.
Bhí fear ag dul thar an lion maidin amháin agus chonnaic sé firín beaf bídeach agus pota óir le na thaobh. D'fiafruigh an fear de cuid de'n ór a thabhairn dó, acht do leig an firín seile air agus as go bráth leis chomh thapaidh leis an ngaoith. Ní rud focal eile faoí in a dhiaidh sin.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:09
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senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:09
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8 Deirtear go bhfuil potaóir le fail a loch Sheoin laimh le Coill Uí Neachtain, i bparóiste Cille Lasraigh, i mbarún Gallen agus i gCo Mhuigheó.
Tá athair numhe ag tabhairn aire don ór seo agus deirear go mbíonn sé in a codhladh an fhaid agus atá an t-Aifreann ar siubhal.
Fado bhí fear ag iarraidh an pota sin a thógáil suas le capaill agus slabhraí as an lock go dtí go dtáinig an athair nimhe amach. Nuair a tháining sé dubhairt sé sórt dán agus fuair an fear bás.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:03
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senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:02
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of the fellow".
"Married in white sure to fight."
"Married in black will be glad to come back."
Wedding. On the night of the marriage there is a party held in the man's house, and the neighbours and friends assemble there.
Strawboys. Sometimes the strawboys come and they dance and sing. They are dressed in an old suit of clothes and a straw hat with straw also tied round their waits. A number of them come together and there is one leading them
This is known a cleathaireacht in my district.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:56
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O Mhuise, croidhe mo bró-ín, ó mhuise croidhe mo stóirín,
Croidhe mo bhó-in gleoidhte féin.
Mar gheobhad-sa leat go otír fairsinge,
Mar gheobhadh-sa duit-se fairsinge.
Féar breágh taithneamhnach
Dó uisge bun carraige,
Feachaint ciachu is mó a thaithnfeadh leat,
Mó thabharfadh chun bainne thú,
Le cabhair an eadarthtath',
Croidhe mo charadach
Dochroidhe-sé féinig
Croidhe mo bhó-in croidhe mo stóirín
croidhe mo bhó-ín gleoidhte féin.
Mar is ím í féin ar noein,
Is bainne í le n-ól,
Is solas geal ar bórd
Is leathar í chun bróg
Is seinéann a h-adharca ceol.
Agus croidhe mó bhó-ín, croidhe mo stórín,
Croidhe mo bhó-ín gleoidhte féin.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:49
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There is a stone in Jerome Commins' field which is situated in Lios Beithe. It is said that a man and his dog were in pursuit of a hare from Curragh Hill. The dog was not the length of himself behind the hare when the hare leaped a distance of two miles to that stone. the prints of the man's knee the dog's leap and the hare's leg are plain to be seen.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:47
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There is a field near Shannonvale in which five pillars of stones stand. Each is approximately a tom weight. It is said that five giants were removing them to build a house. They met a woman on their journey and they didn't want her to know them. The woman was going to a well about a mile beyond. They flungs the stones a distance of eight miles. From that day to this they stand there. It is said a person wanted to remove them but he had a dream before hand he would die if he removed them.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:44
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Máire Gheadhealach was a ghost that haunted the people that were out late at night. She travelled from Carhuvouler to Boulteen. She appeared in different forms. One night while a priest was at a sick call he met her and she tried to kill him but he escaped from her. She was banished for eighty years and she was to come back again in 1856. He continued his journey home. When he came near his own gate his boy was out to open the gate for him. He put the horse into the stable. Next morning when he met went to the stable he found the horse dead.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:22
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are about seven shoemakers in the district and some of them can make boots, and shoes but others only mend the old ones. Clogs are worn by some people in parts of the country, and sometimes the clogs are bought. In almost every district people buy their boots and shoes in the towns and cities as the hand-made boots are too dear. There are sayings about the shoemaker such as, "A red haired shoemaker is never busy."
The reason why this is said is because people say red haired people have a bad temper, (as) so that people dont like going to a red haired shoemaker.
There was a tanning factory in Mr Jameson's yard about fifty years ago. Clogs are worn locally and are made in the country. When a person was going to market long ago he did not wear his boots but carried them across his shoulder and when he came near the town he would put them on. He would not wear them because the leather was so hard
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:14
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that it would hurt his foot.
A neighbours of ours told us that when she was going to school she would take off her boots when she would get out of sight of her own house and put them on again when she reached the school. The cobbler brought his tools with him and made the shoes in the house of the people. In olden times the people went to a shoemaker and got the measure of their foot taken and got their shoes made to measure just as your would get a suit of clothes made. Shoes are most common now. The boots and shoes are nearly all factory-made now. There is one factory in Bailieborough but only small boots are made in it. Some boots are made of rubber. There was a man in Killinkere who never wore boots or shoes either in summer or winter and he could walk about in the frost and snow just as well as in warm weather. He would dig potatoes just as well as men with boots. There were two men called Smyth's who lived in William
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:05
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in the morning the bed was folded up and a seat was made of it. These were called "settle-beds". There were other beds called "press-beds, and they were folded up and a press was made of them.
Instead of the fireplace being at the gable end of the house long ago, it was in the corner of the kitchen.
There were no cement floors long ago, but the people made clay floors themselves.
Nearly every house had a half-door on them, and on some houses they are still to be seen.
The people long ago burned turf and sods on the hearth and some people burn them still.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 10:01
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Money was not always given for goods as some of the goods were bartered, and some were given in exchange for labour.
The are a lot of words connected with buying and selling such as, "Boot" is the money given with one animal in exchange for
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 09:59
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demense near Bailieborough, and goes right through the wood, and alongside that lane there is an old snow-house into which long ago they put snow. The roof of this house is made of sods and is about 100 feet deep.
Long ago there were no bridges, so the people made an arch of stones at the bottom and sticks at the top.
The roads were nearly always straight and very narrow, because when horses were bringing a load they had to carry it on their backs, as there were no coaches at that time. There are a number of these roads still to be seen, but grass has covered the rest of them so they cannot be seen.
These roads were usually made of flat stones and laclea clay. The old coach road from Cavan to Dublin ran through Bailieborough, and the changing place (is) for horses is supposed to be above the Masonic hall.
The road from Lear school to Corglass Presbyterian church is very old. Mr Tomas McCleery helped to make it. There used to be a plank across a river in Mr Samuel
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 09:49
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put it on my finger, and pull it up and down and the buttons go up and down also. I can catch birds also, on a frosty day I get a riddle and prop it up with a stick, then I tie a long cord to the stick and out some food under the riddle and stand in a house and when a bird goes at the food I pull the string and the stick will fall, and the riddle will fall, and the bird will be inside the riddle.
I also make a catapult from the fork of a tree and a piece of rubber band, first I get the fork of the tree, and I tie the rubber band on to it then I put a stone in the rubber and pull it and the stone will go away.
Rabbits are caught in this country the men by snare wire and put two loops on the end of it and they bring one end of the wire through the other loop.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 09:41
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There is an old path, which starts on the
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 09:38
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When you see magpies it means - One for sorrow, two for joy,
Three for a wedding, four for employ,
Five for silver, six for gold,
Seven for a secret that will never be told,
Most of the birds go away to Africa as they would die here with hunger and cold.
But the robin stays with us the whole year round.
It is very pleasant to hear robin singing in winter. The robin is brown, and has a red breast. I think the robin is liked best in our district as he is not greedy and sly like other birds.
If the cuckoo sits on a bare thorn bush, you may sell your cow and buy corn.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 09:35
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I can make a top that goes up and down and the way I make it is, I get two buttons and I sew them tight together with thread, and tie it on to the button, I sewed the button with thread then I wind it up and
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 09:30
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We have a Churn at home 3 1/2 feet high and the diameter of the top 27 inches and the bottom 30 inches the sides are round. It is about 20 years old the Dash, and the lid are parts of the churn usually there is a mark of the cooper that made it on the side or the bottom.
In the winter butter is usually made about once a week and in summer about twice occouring to how many cows are on the farm.
The members of the house do the churning especially the mater, when a stranger comes in while churning they help with it. In olden times people thought it unlucky if the stranger would not help, he was supposed to take the luck of the butter with him.
A good churning an hour to do. In most parts of the country the churning is done by hand, with the dash pulled up and down and when near finished it is given a rolling motion from side to side so as to gather the butter.
When the dash comes up clean with no butter attacked to it the churning is finished.
Luke warm water is poured in during the process. When the milk is not of the right temperature luke warm water is poured in.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 09:20
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festivals.
On Hallow E'en the boys and girls put on false faces and old clothes and go from house to house asking for money.
In the county some very bad tricks are played. The boys take of the gate of some fields and bring it away and trows it in a bog-hole. Others leave a gate open and then any animals in the field go out through the gate and are lost, and sometimes they are not found again.
On St. Stephen's Day boy and girls blacken their faces and put on old ragged clothes and go from house to house begging money. They also sing some rhymes.
If they receive a good share of money they divide it equally among themselves, and buy cigarettes and drink with it.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:52
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In former times children did not wear shoes until they were about seven or eight years old. In almost every district children go barefoot in summer. There
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:51
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Mr. Corrie.
Their people have been blacksmiths for many years past, especially Mr. Corrie, his people have been blacksmiths for generations.
The chief work carried on in each forge is the making of gates, and ploughs, and shoeing horses, and also shoeing cartwheels.
The blacksmiths wear a kind of leathern aprons to keep the sparks from burning their clothes.
When the blacksmith is shoeing wheels he usually does the work outside the forge door
The roofs of the forges are galvanized and the doors are big oblong shaped ones.
It is said that the water out of the forge trough will give you warts. Forge water is also said to be good for chilblains.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:47
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Long ago some of the houses were thatched and others were slated.
Long ago there were beds in the kitchen and
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:44
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If you gently touch a nettle
It will sting you for your pain,
Grasp it like a lad of metal.
And as soft as silk remains.
If ivy is boiled in water, the water will take the stains out of clothes.
A leaf of ivy rubbed on a corn will cure it.
Dandelions are sued for making wine.
A dock will cure the sting of a nettle.
If fairy-flax is boiled and sugared it is good for bad kidneys.
Dandelion flowers are good for blood diseases.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:42
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The birds which I know are the crow, the sparrow, the robin, the pigeon, the blackbird, the wren, the curlew, the corncrake the starling, the thrush, and the lark.
The robin builds it's nest in the hedge.
When the curlew whistles it is a sign of rain. If the crows fly very high in the sky when they are going to bed, there is going to be good weather.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:40
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The most harmful weeds are nettles, thistles, docks, and ragweed.
It is a sign of good land to see ragweeds growing on it.
When nettles are boiled in water the juice will cure measles.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:39
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And for want of a horse the rider was lost.
When the cat's away the mice can play.
Good goods are out in small parcels.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:38
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Long ago, people washed their feet in rain water. Boys up to twelve or thirteen years of age wore red petticoats and long stockings and a kind of sandal with wooden sole. Clogs are worn locally and are made in the country.
The names of the shoemakers in the district are Mickey Byrne, Mr McGinnity, and Tommy Traney. These shoemakers make clogs.
Boys and girls go barefooted in the summer, and big boys and girls go barefooted in the Summer making hay and cutting turf.
There was a tanning factory in Jameson's yard about fifty years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:34
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The local names for cows are, Daisy, Polly, Hetty, Star, Primrose, Darkie, Peggy, and Tilly. Darkie is the name given to a black cow. Polly is the name given to a cow without horns. Star is the name given to a cow that has a white spot in her face. Whenever you go calling cows you usually call, "Howie"? Howie"!, whenever you are calling calves you call "Súck", "Súck," "Suck". The house where the cows are kept is called the "byre". Cows are tied with a chain round their necks. The chains are made of iron.
The local names of horses are, Fanny, Silver, Nellie, Daple, Daisy, Jack, Florrie, Alex, Jerry, Lizy, and Baldy. Silver is the name given to a steel grey horse, Baldy is the name given to a white horse, and Daple is the name given to a dappled coloured horse. The house where the horses are kept is called a "Stable". Horses are tied with a piece of rein round their neck.
The houses where pigs are kept is called a "pigsty."
If the ruster crows in the middle of
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 23:23
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horses. Even they did too the army he was commanding was poorly clad, especially in foot - wear for travelling through mountain, glen and hillside. Numbers of them had not a shoe on their feet and he could obtain them nowhere here in Ireland. When he was near the town now called Bailieborough he caused a letter to be sent to General Head-Quarters in England informing them of the soldiers sad plight in foot-wear and in that letter he ordered a ship load of brogues to be sent on immediately. At General Head Quarters where the letter arrived and whether it was through bad writing or misinterpretation an order was given from General Head Quarters for some of the officers to collect all the rogues and rascals and jail birds. Quite a number of the prisons were visited and all
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:43
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methods.
Clogs or wooden shoes were worn in this locality almost eighty years ago. There was a man named McKeon who started making clogs about that time and continued on for years. Others started now and again and a few years ago there was quite a horde of them a round the Billis. Owing to the dearness of boots in the last five or six years quite a number of farmers wear clogs during the Winter months.
Leather never was made in our district but there was a tannery in Navan town somewhere around ninety years ago. There is no record of foot coverings being made of sheep skin or untanned hide etc. ever been worn in this locality
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:38
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:38
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the lake gets rough it is the sign of storm and high waves is the sign of storm also. To see the worms in the top of the clay is the sign of bad weather and when they are away down in the ground it indicates good weather. When the smoke is going up straight in the air it indicates frost. When there is a blue flame in the fire it is said to indicate storm and when the fire is real red it is to indicate frost. if the soot is coming down the chimney it indicates rain.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:35
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Marriages take place most frequently before Lent and Advent. Shrove Tuesday is celebrated by
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:31
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Some of the games I play on wet days are "Hide The Thimble" "The Farmer wants a wife" "The Grand old Duke of York" How I amuse myself on dry warm days is sometimes I pick black-berries and gather nuts from the hazel bushes. In the Summer I gather wild flowers and string them together.
Paddy's black pig is a favourite game with many children. it is played as follows -
All the players stand in a row, with a small article in their hands. One player is chosen as the leader. He asks all the other
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:28
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players funny questions and the answer to each question is always "Paddy's black pig" The players must not laugh when giving their answers. Any player who laughs or smiles stands aside.
When all the children have stood aside, the second part of the game begins. As each player was told to stand aside the leader took the little article from them. Another player is now chosen to be the "Dreamer" The leader holds each article over the "Dreamer" The leader holds each article over the "Dreamer's" head and asks the question "What is the owner of this charming thing to do"? The Dreamer has
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:22
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orange is the winner.
Another game I play is _ Get some money give it to a player and ask the players in turn how much you gave away or how much the other has in his hand.
Whoever answers right gets the money and the game goes on as at first. I also play Treasure Hunting, Tracking, Skipping and Paddy's Black pig an outdoor game.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:16
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I play Chestnut Capture for an indoor game. Get an orange and cut in half and scoop the inside out. One person takes the orange and the other player a collection of oranges or pennies.
The player with the chestnuts throws them up in the air one by one and the one with the orange has to try and catch them in it.
Several players can have a turn one after another and whoever scores 20 that is the person who succeeds in catching all the chestnuts in the
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:13
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There is a man named Thomas Murray. He travells about selling goods such as combs, brushes, knives forks and spoons.
When anyone offers him a shed to sleep in, on a cold wet night he does not take it. He has a tricycle for travelling on and he always travells alone.
There is an other party by the name of Carrols who are commonly seen in this district. They travel in a caravan and at night they put up tents on the side of the road.
The girls in the Summer
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:08
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in the people say "suck" "suck" The place where the cows are kept in is called a byre. The cows are tied to stakes made of iron.
When the cows are being brought in or out of a field the people say "How How".
There is no branch or emblem hung in our byre at home to bring luck on the stock because we are not superstitious
When people are calling hens they say tiocfaid which is an Irish word
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 13:01
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The woody Nightshade is a deadly poisonous plant. There comes a berry on it and if anything or anybody eats these they will die immediately and for this reason it is called Deadly Nightshade.
Also the Foxglove or Fairy-finger is poisonous to animals and the berries that come on the Honeysuckle. Long ago people made medicine for the heart from Foxglove and it was the peoples best cure.
The stems leaves and bulb of the Bluebell served old people for glew long ago. The Colts Foot is a
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 12:54
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and every one heard the funny saying, and it was always called "The Hill of the Eagle" or Knocknaveigh. There is a man who is over seventy years living there. He cannot speak Irish but tells all his funny stories in English. His name is Mick Hetherton, Knocknaveigh Virginia Co Cavan.
There are some old houses which were occupied long ago and now are in ruins. Some of them were burned and some have fallen with age. Many of the people of this district emigrated.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 12:50
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very many are thatched.
There are only two thatched houses in Knocknaveigh all the others are slated or tiled.
Knocknaveigh (the hill of the eagle) got its name as it was looked upon as being a very hilly place, and there were travellers going around. At one of the houses he called and he said to the woman in the house if she would give him a drink. She said to him "there is plenty of water in those hills," then he grew angry and cursed and said "those are hills of the eagle"
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 12:46
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There are many varieties of potatoes such as Golden Wonder, Aran Banner, May Queen, Kerrs Pink, Aran-Victor and Purple Top.
Before the potatoes are set the ploughman ploughs the ground and then puts manure on it. Afterwards he open the drills and when the potatoes are dropped the ploughman closes them again.
Some people use spades and they make ridges. There are potato diggers nowadays, but very few people have them. When dug they are put in pits in the field and
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 12:43
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sometimes brought in to a house.
The farmers put them in a heap in the field and put straw or rushes over them. Then they put clay on top of that.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 12:41
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There is a saying that's old and true yet it is as good as new, never trouble trouble until trouble troubles you. Make hay while the sun shines.
Never put off until to-morrow what you should do to-day. Robbing Peter to pay Paul. My own spun on another persons horse. The day of the wind is not the day of the scollops. It never rains but it pours. There is many a slip twixt the cup and the lip, and Rime and tide wait for no man.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 12:37
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Some of the proverbs I hear locally are "Morning brings councils."
There was a man who went into a shop for medicine for a cure, and he mistook a "y" for an "i" and he got the wrong medicine. When he drank it, it killed him. The people say it was "Snalies mistake.
Some people when they get any medicine for a cure refer to "Snalies Cure". Another saying I hear locally is "A good word never broke a person's mouth" and also "Life is made for pleasure". The windy day is not the day for thatching.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 12:33
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The name given to a cow house is the byre, and to the horse house the stable. Some people believe that you should start milling with the right hand and then with the left. One day a man was milking with his left hand and he got a pain in his arm and he could not lift it after that.
Some people when setting eggs for hatching do not put any more than fifteen because they believe that it is unlucky and they put a dock leaf under the eggs.
When ducks are coming
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 10:17
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out some people dip them in buttermilk or milk and water. Some people hang a cows horn or a horses shoe up in the byre and stable for luck.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 10:16
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Some of the animals at home are cows sheep horses foals, calves, lambs and pigs.
The names of the cows are "Carlow", "Spot", "Mulligan", and the cow with the crumpled horn. When the calves are being brought
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 10:13
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My Grandfather Charles Coote Knocknaveigh, Virginia Co. Cavan was a poet. He was born in the year 1837 and died in 1931 at the age of 94 years. he was buried in Munterconnaught graveyard.
Grandfather composed all his poems in English. He was also a farmer, and could read but could not write very well, and he used to get Mother to write for him. Everyone looked forward for the "Weekly Irish Times" as all his poetry was on it. His name was Charles J. Coote Some of the poems he wrote were "Silence The
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 10:09
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seen again. It is said the fairies changed him into a fairy. Many people have seen lights in this fort and music was also heard. The fairies never do any harm to the cops but those along by it.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 10:08
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There is a field "Fairy Fort" in this townland of Knocknaveigh Virginia Co. Cavan and it is called "Reilly's Fort". It is enclosed by a fence of trees which is circular in shape.
There is a hole in the centre of it by which a man went to explore the interior. This man was never
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 10:06
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Before the great famine of 1845-47 this district was very thickly populated. Many sites of old houses then occupied and now in ruins.
The blight came on the potatoes and they withered, most of them died in the ground and very few remained good. When they were pitted they decayed in the ground.
The people in this district ate oatmeal bread and porridge instead. Many people died with starvation and sickness. The poor people had no food nor money to buy any and so they died.
There were twice as
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 10:01
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gather flowers and sell them in the towns. With the money they buy leather and make school-bags. They also go around the peoples houses mending shoes and boots.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 09:59
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Fold a piece of paper several times and cut the shape of a doll on it. Open it out and there will be several little dolls hand in hand.
A Lantern
Take a turnip and cut a face out on it, and place a candle inside and it will make a handy lamp.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 09:56
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Get a cork and a piece of card-board. Draw a duck's head on the card and cut it out. Make a slit in the cork and put the head in it. Then make a tail from the card board and put it in the opposite end of the cork and when completed it can be put in water and it will swim nicely.
A Whistle
Get two ends of cartridges and hammer them together and it will whistle when you blow through it.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 09:51
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herbs and parts of animals to cure certain ailments.
Mrs McErne has the cure for a whitlow she can only pass this cure unto some person whom she knows will never tell it until she comes to a certain age. The cure is seven different herbs, because there are seven different kinds of whitlow, crushed together and the white of an egg to mix it. Nobody knows what the seven different herbs are only those who have the cure.
Mr Conarty Island Ryefield Virginia has the cure of ring worm and running worm
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 09:44
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hole in it. If there is water in it it is supposed to kill warts.
A person with mumps can be cured by putting an asse's winkers and bridle on him and driving him round the pig-sty seven times.
Also a person suffering with measles can be cured by putting his or her head at the foot of the bed and their feet at the head of it, and to leave them there for half-an-hour.
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 09:41
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Long ago the people used
senior member (history)
2020-02-17 09:41
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There is a man named Mr Connerty who lives in Munterconnaught, Virginia Co. Cavan. He is the seventh son and when he was born there was a worm placed in his hand and this has given him the power to cure running - worm or ring-worm. People from all parts of the country who have this disease come to him and he is supposed to heal it by putting his hand on the spot and saying a few prayers.
Many people believe that if you find without looking for it a stone with a
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:31
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sé ag teacht in-aice le aít uaigneach casadh taibhse air agus thoisigh sé ag troid leis an fhear. Annsin thug an taibhse am dé'n fhear fead a leigeann. Leig an fear fead agus tháinig a mhadadh aige. Annsin chuaidh an fear abhaile agus rhosuigh an madadh ag troid leis an t-aibhse in-ionad an fhear.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:28
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naomhtha agus is é is dóichighe na gur ghlac sí an spideóg na lámh. Tugtar soideóg Mhuire ar an éan sin o soin anuas.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:26
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1. Aon uair amhaín bhí fear an cuair tuairim is míle ó na theach. Bhí sé deireannach nuair a bhí sé ag teacht abhaile ó na chuairt. Nuair a bhí
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:24
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Is fuide a (ra) rachas an fírinn na an bhréig.
Trí ní nac féidir a dheánamh bainne ciath circe dhá in adharc muice, agus cleite cait a shuacadh.
Níl olc i dtír nach fáirde fear eicínt
An lonarca cóchaireacht a mhilleas an t-anbhruith.
Ní cuimhnigheann cú gorta ar a choiléan
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:20
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Déanann amadán amháin dhá amadán déag.
Is done an cú nás fiú fead a dhéanamh air.
Fuigheal an mhagaidh ag déanamh maghaidh.
Adbhar an mhagaidh ag déanamh mhagaidh.
Níor tháining ariamh an mhaidin meadh ar mór nach dtiocfadh in dhiaidh an dubh bhrón. Is Rí gach duine ar a thoill.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:13
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yellow flower and the leaf was used for chest complaints and coughs.
The cowslip was useful for the complexion: and wine was made from it.
The Marsh marigold is a good cure for warts, it was used frequently long ago but seldom now. The Great hairy Willow Herb has been boiled with fruit to cure some rash.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:11
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he is said to be able to cure it by the person coming back to him the seventh time. He puts his hand on the sore and says some prayer each time. He is the seventh son and so he has got the cure.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:09
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The name of my townland is Carrick, and the parish of Munterconnaught and the Barony is Castlerahon. This district is very thickly populated and the majority of the people live in slated houses.
Carrick gets its name from the numerous rocks that are in it. There is a man named Pat McEnro who is eighty two or three, but he knows very little Irish. His address is Lurganboy Virginia Co Cavan.
Another man named Tommy Sherden Knocknaveigh Virginia Co. Cavan who is going on for eighty six
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:05
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The population in and around this district a few years ago was almost 200 but many of them have gone to England and America.
The townlands of Carrick and Carrick Mór are hilly and boggy.
There are also a good many woods. The hazel tree is common in these woods, also the Fir and the Larch.
There are two lakes Lough Ramor and Lough Sheelin, and the river is the Blackwater. You can get a lovely view of Lough Sheelin from a hill name Croc a Welsh
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:02
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which is owned by Michael Lynch Lurganboy, Virginia Co. Cavan.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 23:01
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The name of my home district is Knocknaveigh. There are twelve families in it, the number of people living in Knocknaveigh is about sixty. Reilly is the most popular name in this district.
Most of the houses in this district are slated, not
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:59
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There lived a man named Mr Dunn and he used to compose poetry and songs. He got them printed in a big book. After work every evening he would write a poem or story. The neighbours did not like him because he spent all the evening inside composing poems and he would not come out to talk. He had one half of the book with Irish songs in it and the other with English ones in it.
Before he died he gave the book to a grandaughter of his who lived in England. She studied this book and now she is making poems herself. The names of two
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:56
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she wrote are "The Mountains of Wicklow" and "The Gifts of Nature."
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:55
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The common birds of this district are the robin, blackbird, thrush, wren, and pigeon. The robin and wren build in holes in walls. The pigeon and thrush build in trees, and the blackbird in bushes or small trees. The robin has a red breast. It is said that when our Lord was hanging on the cross, that a robin passed by and stopped to try to pull the nails out of his hands. While he was doing this the blood got in to his breast and is on it ever since.
One day a blackbird was flying away with a piece of
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:49
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many people in this district before the famine. It caused the death of many people, and also many of those that remained went to America.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:48
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Another man named Michael Mulvaney who was very poor and the people remarked that he had not been seen around the house for some time.
Someone went in to see what was the matter. He found him lying under his bed and he was very ill and he had nothing to eat or drink for three days.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:47
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I have heard old people say that in the time of the famine the children coming home from school would be very glad to take home a turnip for their dinner.
One day a man the name of Pat Fitzsimons went to the town to buy some meal to make bread. His wife and children were eagerly watching him home. When at last he came, and when he came in on the door he fell dead. Later his wife and children had no money to keep them living and they had to go to America.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:43
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to think of something amusing to say. I like this game very much and I play it at school nearly every day.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:42
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The road from Oldcastle Co Meath to Virginia Co. Cavan. is said to be the oldest road in this district.
Old people say that one day a man stole the teachers coat out of the school in Oldcastle and the children saw him and ran after him, but could not catch him.
He ran back and forth until he was outrun and had to give back the coat. After that there was a fine path and people travelled on it until it was formed into a road.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:39
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Some of the local roads are known as the "Broad Road". It leads from Virginia Co Cavan to Kells Co Meath. It was made in the 18th century.
There are old roads and they are called "By Roads" as they are not as wide as any of the main roads.
There is an old road near Ballydurrow, Virginia Co. Cavan and it is called "Flanagans Lane". Not many people travel on this road very often.
There is an old pass in from the Virginia Co. Cavan main road to Knocknaveigh, Virginia. Long ago it was thought a
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:36
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a very good road but nowadays the people never think of going this lane unless they are in a very great hurry.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:35
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Our churn is 4 1/2 feet high. It is twenty years old. Butter is made twice in the week during the Winter, and four of five times in the Summer. Sometimes we have two churnings in the day.
When any neighbours come into the house during churning time they always take the churn because they believe that there will be no butter in it if they do not take it. There is a little window on the top of the churn and when this is clear the butter is made. Then it is salted and made into
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:32
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pounds. lastly it is folded up in grease proof paper and sold.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:31
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About a mile from my home in Gallonfree Virginia Co. Cavan stands the old remains of a fort where fairs and markets were held long ago.
My Grandfather told me how his father's father used to bring his animals there to dispose of them. Sometimes instead of selling them they used to exchange them for other goods. For instance a calf was worth a couple of pigs and so forth.
The people cut a piece of hair of nipped the animals ear when bought or sold. If a man was selling an animal and was not getting a satisfactory
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:25
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price for it the buyer had to give a load of hay or some other items as well as the money.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:24
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The Marquis of Headford was the local Landlord of this district - Virginia Co. Cavan. He was a very nice man and when he saw the walls of a house built he slated it for them.
He built houses and set plantations and did everything to make the people happy and to make the country look beautiful.
When a person was unable to pay the rent he paid it himself. Many people liked him because he was a decent man.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:14
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A farmer here usually plants from half an acre to an acre of potatoes. All the farmers plant potatoes and the amount planted varies little from year to year.
They are mostly planted in drill's now, but many still plant them in ridges.
The ridges are about a yard wide. The place where the trenches are to be is ploughed lightly and the top grassy sod laid along the side of the ridge, or else a spade is used to do all the work in a similar way. The manure is spread on the grassy spare between the trenches and the seed potatoes placed on this. Then the trench is ploughed or dug and the loose earth thus obtained is used to cover the seed.
The trenches after a few weeks are again ploughed or dug and more earth placed on the ridges.
Wooden ploughs were used in olden times, but none are left now.
The spades are bought in a shop.
DRAWINGS of a spade
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 22:05
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The main road from Dublin through Cavan and Clones to the North passes through this district near Cloverhill school.
The portion of it between Cloverhill Cross and Gannon's Cross was constructed as a relief work during the last century. The older road which it replaced is now the avenue to Cloverhill House.
The road from Belturbet to Ballyhaise crosses this road at right angles at Cloverhill Cross. About five or six hundred yards of the road from the cross in the Belturbet direction, was made by the railway company when the line from Ballyhaise to Belturbet was constructed. This avoided a level crossing. It is maintained by the railway company. The old road which it replaced, runs past the end of Cloverhill School, and forms the pathway to the school. There is no public right of way through it now.
There are no streams of any size crossed by roads in the district, and so there were no fords of any importance.
No local customs connected with cross roads except to form meeting places on a summer evening.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 21:56
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There are four fairy forts in this district. They are simply called by the name of the man upon whose land they are, as: Lee's Fort. in Knockatura, Bridie's Fort, Rudden's Fort, and Corrarod Fort, which is named after the townland. The people know no other names for them.
The names 'liss'. "rath", "Cathair", "dún" are unknown.
These forts are within sight of one another. They are all circular in shape. There is a fence of earth around each.
In the case of Lee's Fort, there used to be an outer circular stone fence, but this has been removed and the stones were sued to build Mr Hugh Lee's present house.
There is no account of anyone having explored the interior of any of these forts. They are usually spoken of as "Danes' forts."
They were also connected with fairies
The Quilsons who live in a house in the farmyard at Cloverhill House, say their house is built in the fairies path from one fort to another. They say they often heard noises in the house at night, which the ascribe to the fairies.
The forts are not interfered with for crops.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 21:48
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"Travelling people" still call to peoples houses in this district, In some cases the same people have been calling for years. They mostly appear to be very poor.
Most of them smell small articles, as needles, pins, brooches, thimbles, boot laces, or cheap pictures. Generally people buy from them. Some, if not all, get their supplies from ordinary retail shops.
They may not always be welcome, but they are generally if not always treated in a charitable and hospitable way.
They sometimes stop more than one night. They are usually allowed to sleep in outhouses and sheds. They do not have food with them.
They are usually given pence, eggs, potatoes or bread.
The "beggar-men", and "beggar women" travel on foot and singly.
The "Tinkers" travel in families in a cart or caravan.
The "Gipsies" travel in caravans, and in bands. All who travel thus are called "Gipsies" locally, but it is very seldom real "Gipsies" are seen in this district.
senior member (history)
2020-02-16 21:40
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These so called Gipsies encamp by the roadside for a day or two and then move on. They make wicker baskets, chairs and tables which their women folk sell around the district.
They also deal in horses, asses and dogs.
They are very numerous here in the Spring and summer. They disappear in the winter. They are by no means welcome as they spoil fences by pulling them down to get sticks for their fires, and their horses and asses are often turned into the farmers' fields during the night.