Number of records in editorial history: 7691 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 10:17
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ran to Cork after a side car, a distance of about fifteen miles. Jeremiah O'Sullivan another of the Aghabullogue hurlers was also a famous runner. He won a race of twenty miles among thirty competitors.
There were several great walkers who used walk to Cork with a load of hay in about four hours.
There was a great jumper named David Buckley (son of David Buckley the weight thrower) who used jump six feet one and a half ins.
James Buckley of Kilcolman was another long distance runner. He won races locally, also in Wales & in America.
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 10:09
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This parish of Aghabullogue is noted for athletic men in every sphere. Tradition has it that Aghabullogue was never without a hurler, a bowl player or a weight thrower. There was a man named Daniel Cronin of Dromatimore who won the weight throwing competition of Boston. He was the strongest man in Boston at that time.
Other famous weight throwers were David and John Buckley, Rylane. Jeremiah Murphy, Knockrow, known locally as 'big Jer'. Michael Healy of Clonmoyle known as "bun [cra?].
Patrick Reardon of Aghavrin one of the old Aghabullogue hurlers often
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 09:56
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is put down on his back, he is not allowed to get up, and the longer it takes him to guess, the longer the load gets.
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 09:55
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The games I play in school are Blind Man's Buff which is played as follows. One person gets a hankerchief and puts it over his eyes and then he hunts the rest of the people blind, and whoever he catches puts the hankerchief on himself and so on. Giant Fox which is played as follows, two people hunt until there are two left and then those two start again.
At night I play cards and draughts and ludo and other games. The old people long ago used play the following game. One person used have a lighting piece of wood in his hand and he or she used pass it on to the next person using the following words bírin beó, birín marb is má geibeann mo birín beó uoir do dhá láimh ort beidh an trom trom ort. Whoever gets the piece of wood in his hand and when it dies out there he is put into a corner and certain things are put down on his back and until he guesses the last thing that
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 09:34
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Local beliefs in regard to the weather are as follows. If St. Swithin's day is wet the forty days after it will be wet and if St. Swithin's day is fine the forty days after it will be fine. For the sign of rain soot falls down the chimneys, black clouds are seen in the sky, the crows flying low, and the curlews scheeching, birds fly very low, and if the sun goes down yellow the next day will be wet.
Spiders from their cobwebs creep
Last night the sun went pale to bed
The moon in halo hid her head
The boding shepherd hears a sigh
To see a rainbow span the sky
The walls are damp, the ditches smell
Close to the pinkeyed pimpernell
Loud quack the ducks, the peacocks cry
The distant hills are looking nigh
How restless are the snorting swine
The busy flies flies disturb the kine
Puss on the hearth with velvet paws
Sits wiping oer his whisker jaws
Lo' on the grass the swallow wings
The cricket too how sharp he sings.
The south west wind brings most rain to my district.
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 00:11
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priest examined the children. On that day there were four old men confirmed. The priest asked them a few questions and the man with the long whiskers answered him sulkily. I went to the Bishop and he asked me: "What is grace"? I went very near to say, what John Phaitín said when he was asked "How many persons in God" - "Well this is the way it was Father when I was going to school the master was very cross" - said John. "Never mind that now" said the priest. It is gone out of me head Father".
During the Holy Mass the choir sang the "Kyrie Eleison", the "Gloria" the "Sanctus" and the "Agnes"
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 00:06
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The Catholic school of Toormore was built in the top of the townland of Toormore and at the time Toormore was made church property the catholic school was done away with for no catholic school would be allowed in Toormore by Mr Fisher the Minister of that time.
The was an old house occupied by a woman named Mary Barry convenient to the site occupied by the present school (Dunmanus) and the parish priest of that time [?] took the house over from her and built an extension to it to make a school for the catholic children of Toormore & Dunmanus In the meantime he got another house built for Mary Barry which is at present occupied by Ida Hayes. The river running to the back of the school is the boundary between Toormore & Dunmanus. The old school was built in a field called Gort na Neacaire. There is a subterranean passage where the sea beats against the fence and extends for about half a mile in a westerly direction. An old tradition says that it was used by the Danes when they came to Ireland. The late Mr Baylie's grandfather was landlord of Toormore & the Altar. He sold his property to Mr Fisher & that is how it became church property.
senior member (history)
2019-09-13 00:02
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senior member (history)
2019-09-13 00:02
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is a shepherds warning and a rainbow at night is a shepherds delight". The south-west wind brings most rain to this district. When bad weather is approaching large flights of crows are seen flying low. When cats and dogs are seen with their tails to the fire it is a sign of snow. The bird known as the plover come inland when bad weather is approaching.
If the mountains are covered with fog it is a sign of bad weather and if dust is seen rising from the roadway it is a sign of stormy weather. If the waterfall is heard to make a loud noise it is a sign of rain. If the smoke is seen to go down to the ground it is a sign of moist foggy weather. If soot falls down the chimney it is a sign of bad weather. Blue light in the fire is a sign of frosty weather.
senior member (history)
2019-09-12 23:50
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These are some of the local beliefs with regard to the weather. When black clouds are seen in the sky it is said we will have rain and if the sun rises red it is a sign that we will have rain before night and if it rises yellow it is a sign of a fine day and if it goes down red it is a sign that the next day will be fine and if it go down yellow it is a sign that the next day will be wet.
The first night a new moon appears in the sky if the whole circle is seen it is a sure sign of bad weather. If there are countless stars seen in the sky it is a sign of frosty weather. A rainbow in the morning is a sure sign of a wet day the old saying is "A rainbow in the morning
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:04
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May think of Erin's happy hours as I may think to-day.
Ah! some day I will see them when free from duty's call,
And may God shower down his blessing upon them one and all.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:00
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The ills that irritate us, the fever and the fret.
Rusheen and Ballyvongane and thriving Ballinagree,
Dripsey and Coachford, all renowned for hospitality.
IV
Oh! to meet in some sweet village at the balmy close of day,
When the whispering wind is bearing the scent of new mown hay.
When the little bat is busy, and the fleecy vapours rise,
And the stars like sapphires are just peeping in the skies.
V
Then I would chat with some good man about three score and more,
We'd discuss the local topics and the days that are o'er.
When all were quite contented and found joy in every thing.
And Aghabullogue and Clondrohid made the Gaelic echoes ring.
VI
The villages of Muskerry, the exiles far away.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:40
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The villages of Muskerry by hill and winding stream,
The lovely little villages that make the wanderers dream.
Famed Aghabullogue and Rylane and Carraig by the Lee,
And Peake beside the gentle stream where I would like to be.
2.
The villages of Muskerry that nestle in the shade,
The pretty little villages where history was made.
Lisarda and Dooniskey and Kilumny near the Bride.
Delightful Farran and Farnanes beside the green hillside.
3.
The villages of Muskerry, ah! tis there we would forget.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:30
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for dinner and potatoes for supper.
Tables were placed in the middle of the floor and every one sat around and enjoyed his meals even tho' the food was plain.
Bread was never plentiful in past years but brown home made bread was seen oftener on tables than bakers bread.
Brown bread was made out of whole meal flour and sour milk and bread soda mixed and put into a 'bastible' for half an hour to bake.
Meat was very scarce. People rarely had meat except at Xmas, and then fresh meat as a rule. It was the cheapest.
Eggs were eaten on Easter Sunday. Some ate as many as ten.
Tea was first used about seventy years ago but not so plentiful as now. Bowls and tin mugs were used before cups came into use.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:12
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People in olden times used eat three meals a day, breakfast, dinner and supper. Meals were taken at various times of the day according to the work the men were doing but breakfast was usually taken between the hours of six and seven o'clock. Dinner was served at mid-day and supper at seven in the evening.
People worked hard before breakfast especially in the summer as work had to be done in the cool of the morning to avoid the intense heat of those days. They were up as early as half past three and worked for hours before having breakfast so that they remained indoors at mid-day.
Meals consisted of porridge for breakfast, potatoes and 'skim milk'
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:02
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agus í o barr na sróine go barr a rubaill com geal ban le sneachta na h-aon oidhche. Nuair a tháinig Máire amach leis na piginí líom sé gach ceann acu go dtí an chriobhan. Ó an lá sin amach bhí ath mhaith ar Sheán bhán agus bhí dóigh maith ar na paistí. Acán bhliadhain go cionn trí no ceathar bliadhain thug an bó dhá gamhain dó comh geal leithe fhéin. Ach bhí Séan ag éirighe brodamhail agus socruighe sé an t-sean bó a dhíol, ar an chead aonach a bhí i nDun na nGall. D’éirigh Sean go luath agus theann air. Nuair a bhí a breicfeasta deanta aige, leig sé amach an bhó agus thoisigh a tiomaint ach caith sí a ceithre cosa ins an aer agus ar shiubhal leithe treasna na genoc. Rinne na gamhna ar rud ceadhna agus fagadh an boitheach folamh arais.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:00
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Bhí fear ann aon uair amháin darbh ainm Seaghan Bán. Bhí ganntanas món fríd an tir an t-am seo agus díol Seaghan an bó dheireannach le biad a fhagháil do a bhean gus agus a clann. Bhí maidín amháin uair a bhí an phighinn dheireannach caithce agus bhí Seaghan bocht trom-croidtheach ag smaointié ar an ocras a bhí ag teacht agus ar Mháire agus ar na páisdí. Ní thiochfadh lus fanacht san teach agus chuaidh sé suas go dtí an tulach agus thoisigh sé ag caoineadh. “Caidé a tá cearr leath a Séain Bháin” arsan glór coimhtigheach ag a thaobh”. Bhí Séan náirighe ar fad ach b’éigin do a a trioblóid a innsint amach. Nuair a d’amarc Séan suas chonnaic sé fear greannmhar ag a taobh. “Tá mé bean a’s mo chlann” arsa Séan ar an anás agus níl oiread as bó in mo bhoitheach le deor bainne a tabhairbh dobhtha”. “Car mhaith liom an leitheadh de buadhartha a theacht treasna ar mhac do athara no eisean a bhí in a cheann mhaith damhsa an lá a mhair sé. Gabh arais go dtí do bhoitheach a Shéain agus geobaidh tú bó ann. Tabhair aire maith dithe agus ní bheidh tú fhéin no do churam gan bainne fad as a tá sé ar igín agat”. Arsa fear beag agus shiubhal leis. D’éirigh Séan agus iongantas an domhain agus síos leis go dtí an toighe agus isteach san boitheach agus caide a tcí sé ar an bhó a ba deise dar chaith sé a dha shúil ariamh air
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 10:39
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I have no farm, but there are lots of farms around where I live. There are lots of harmful weeds growing on these farms. One of the weeds is "Preasach bhuidhe" (of]) or common corn kale.
Helmock and garlic are two other very poisoness weeds. If cattle eat them they may die.
"Preasach bhuidhe" is harmful because it spreads rapidly and it does not give room to the corn to grow. Thistles and dock roots grow in good land, and daisies grow in bad land. Sea weed is supposed to contain iodine, and it is very good for glands also.
To cure corns you should boil ivy leaves, penny leaves, and bay leaves together, they will cure the corns if you throw away the water and rub the leaves to them, and you should boil the leaves for ten minutes.
If you had a stained suit of clothes, you should boil ivy leaves and rub the juice to the stains. There is a fern called the "cos dubh". It has a very black foot. It is said if you pull this you will die within twelve months. Dandelion is good for sick cows. Tansy is given to all poultry that have the pip. Nettles are used for killing flies. You should wet the nettles and hang them over the window
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 10:34
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13. A blue flame is seen in the sky before a frosty spell.
14. The soot gets wet and falls down before a frosty spell.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 10:32
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"A rainbow in the morning is the shepherds warning.
A rainbow at night is the shepherds delight".
7. The crows looping the loop is a sign of the coming storm.
8. The soot falls down, the Spaniard sleeps.
The spider from his cobweb creeps.
Old Betty's joints are on the rack.
The frog has changed his yellow coat.
8. The grey plover comes during frosty or snowy weather.
9. Birds fly high for good weather low for bad weather.
10. The mountains appear very bright and far away if we are to have a spell of good weather, and they appear near and cloudy when bad weather is approaching.
11. The river "rattles" to the north if good weather is approaching and to the south if bad weather is near.
12. The smoke has a downward tendency for rain and goes straight up for fine weather.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 10:21
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Some of the beliefs with regard to the weather are as follows:-
1. If St. Swithin's day happens to be wet it is believed that the following forty days will be wet and if it is fine the weather will last for fort days.
2. If fog is seen on the hills and if it rises up it is a sign of very good weather, and if it keeps down the hill the weather will be wet.
3. If a pale red colour is seen in the south easterly sky in the morning it is a bad sign of the day.
If the sun goes down with a red colour it is a good sign for the following day.
4. If a halo is seen around the moon it means bad weather to follow.
5. If the stars shine brightly it is a sign of frosty weather.
6. Heavy white clouds are a sign of broken weather.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 10:03
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There is an old church in our parish. It is in the local graveyard. There is only one side and gable standing now. It was bought by a farmer to build a house with the stones but he could not knock it all.
There is also an old house in the middle of a wood it was once a protestant school but it is roofless now and over grown with ivy.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 09:58
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would soon leave them victorious and then the joy of their dear curate knew no bounds.
Then as time went on many of those hurlers left for foreign lands to seek their fortunes elsewhere until finally the grand old Irish team died away only to live for ever in the hearts of the people.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 09:54
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famous Hurlers such as the "Barrs & the Rockies" as they were known to meet in the hurling field in Coachford.
The teams then consisted of twenty one aside. Some of their names were. Lane, Horgan, Hinchion, Connors, the Reardeons, Sullivans, Linehans, Drew and Twomey, most of the players are now dead. Onely five remain. The teams were very lucky to have staunch supporters at their head the late Father O'Reardion took a keen interest in his team and nothing was too much trouble to do in order to help them. Mass often celebrated at the dawn by him in order that his beloved flock would be able to have their duty done to God first before the would travel many miles to bring as usual with them the honour of the little village. As often as possible their beloved little priest would be at their head when setting out on their journey and often when the team felt their strength and aim failing he would call on them and ask them "Boys for the honour of the little village" then as if a new spirit was after entering them they would rush their rivals and goal after goal
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 09:23
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It was in the year 1890 that the little village of Aghabullogue became known to many owing to its hurlers glorious honour in bringing am all Ireland Championship to Cork County.
Hitherto a place almost unknown its hurlers rose to fame almost unnoticed until suddenly they wrestled the honours from Wexford and Aghabullogue for the first time in history shone forth on the Map never again to sink into oblivion while successors of those great athletic men lived. In those days transport service was not as convenient as the people nowadays have. The Cars then known as long cars helped to carry supporters of the Gaelic pastimes to the matches but a great boon to the Aghabullogue Hurlers was the Muskerry Railway now closed. Thousands of people travelled to see those famous Hurlers meet equally
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 10:20
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There was a great bowl player named John Cotter from Rylane, Coachford, Co. Cork. He lofted bowl over Inchageela Castle which is about fifty feet high.
There was also another great bowl player named Mick Lynch from Kilcolman, Coachford, Co. Cork. He lofted a bowl 40 over at Peake, Coachford, Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 10:01
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One man known locally as "Buckalock" ran from Clogheen near Cork to Mallow. The police ran after him but when he reached the river Blackwater he jumped it and left the (guards) police behind.
There was a woman at the other side washing clothes. When she saw what he had done she said "That was a big jump". He replied
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:56
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"Leaders Buildings" are situated between Clonmoyle and Henmount in the valley of the Dripsey river.The buildings were built by the workmen of Henry Leader about the year 1860.
The central buildings on the banks of the river are about one hundred feet in height. At each side of the river the ground is sloping upwards higher than the river and so the buildings as they ascend the higher ground and the tops of them are all one level. There was a timber trough going across from Clonmoyle to Henmount for the purpose of taking water from one
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:46
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There is the ruins of a castle in Aghavrin. It was built by the McCarthy More of Muskerry. It is derelict about a hundred years. It was never attacked.
There is a ruined church in Aghabullogue Graveyard. One night the slates were taken off it by the White Boys. There was a man living near it who took stones out of it to build his house.
There is a stone near Olans Well with Ogham writing on it. It was used once for a bridge across the river that is flowing near it. There is also a few stones with Ogham writing on them in an old graveyard in Knockrour.
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:39
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Dromatimore who won the weight-throwing competition of Boston. He was the strongest man in Boston at that time. There were several others there also. Their names were David and John Buckley of Rylane. Jeremiah Murphy of Knockrour who was locally known as "big Jer". Michael Healy of Clonmoyle known as "bun crainn".
Patrick Riordan of Aghavrin one of the old Aghabullogue hurlers often ran to Cork after a sidecar which is a distance of about sixteen miles. There was another great runner named Jeremiah O'Sullivan of Clonmoyle a member of the old Aghabullogue hurlers. He won a race of twenty miles among thirty competitors. There were several Great Walkers who used walk from Aghabullogue to Cork with a load of hay. They used go in, in about four hours. The women would do it also.
There was a great jumper named David Buckley (son of David Buckley the weight thrower) who used jump six feet one and a half inches. Another long distance runner was James Buckley of Kilcolman. He won races locally in Wales and in America. Thomas Healy
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 00:12
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South Westerly wind brings the most rain.
When the sinking sun is red it is a sign of fine weather. When there is a fog on Muisire it is a sure sign of good weather. When the seagull flies inland it is a sign of stormy weather. When the swallow flies low it is a sign of rain and when she flies high it is a sign of fine weather. When the cat lies near the fire it is a sign of rain. Dogs eat grass when it is near rain. Cows run towards the water from the fly in very fine weather. When the rocks are shining it is a sign of good weather. When the distant hills are looking nigh it is a sign of rain. When the insects are walking on the ground it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 00:03
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There are many signs which can be observed which may indicate good or bad weather. Some of these can be seen in the sky. For instance when it is going to rain we notice the clouds getting black. An early morning fog is a sign of great heat during the day. When there is a halo around around the moon it is a sign of rain. The stars are almost invisible when it is going to rain. When a rainbow appears in the sky it is a sign that it is going to rain. The
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:57
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a pot and boiled them for an hour. Then she got a basket or a "schoig" as it was then called and put it on the doorstep and strained her tea through it. She kept the leaves as she thought those were the right thing to use. She tried to eat it then but she said it was not a bit nice and that she would go back to the potatoes and salt.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:51
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There once lived an old woman and her family was in America and they sent her some money for Christmas. As she never had tasted tea before she purchased some. She asked the assistant in the store how she would make tea. He told her to put it into a teapot and draw it. When she went home she did as she was told but it was cold water she put in and when she had done this she tied a cord to the handle of the teapot and drew it around the house but the tea was not a bit to her liking.
She told her neighbour about it and she advised her to boil the tea, so she put tea and water into
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:51
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There once lived an old woman and her family was in America and they sent her some money for Christmas. As she never had tasted tea before she purchased some. She asked the assistant in the store how she would make tea. He told her to put it into a teapot and draw it. When she went home she did as she was told but it was cold water she put in and when she had done this she tied a cord to the handle of the teapot and drew it around the house but the tea was not a bit to her liking.
She tolod her neighbour about it and she advised her to boil the tea, so she put tea and water into
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:38
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sé ag bualadh an fear a bhí ag ithe an cháil. Cáide a thug tú isteach ag goid cáil a fhear dhóigheamhail a thug lóistín damh aréir. “Mé fhéin a tá ann”, “Mé fhéin a tá ann” arsa seisean. “O tá fhios agam gur tú”. Rith sé isteach annsin agus d’imhtigh sé abhaile. Ó an lá sin go dtí an lá indiú thugh sé a sháith do gach duine le h-ithe agus le h-ól a tháinigh trasna an toighe agus chuir sin muineadh maith ar Eoghan Doicheall. Chuaidh Seaghan Gan Níos abhaile agus saothrughadh na bróga.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:35
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“Eoghan Doicheall”. Chuaidh sé fhéin agus a chuid bratóg agus sheas sé ag an doras. D’fiafruigh Eoghan Doicheall c’ainm agus a sloinneadh do. Sé n’ainm agus mo shloinneadh Seoghan Gan Níos agus ag an am ceadhna bhí tabla i lár an toighe agus iad ag ithe. Tháinig sé anuas agus shuidh ag an tabla agus dubhairt Eoghan Doilheall leis caidhe an t-adhbhan gur suidh mé ag an tabla. Nar dhubhairt tú liom “Seoghan Gan Níos”. Ní rabh mise i bhfad ag an tabla gur iarr sé ar bhean an toighe an tabla a thóghail. Dubhairt mise na gcornuigeacainn go n-íosfainn mo shaith. Thánigh an oidhche agus chóirigh siad sradóg do cois na teineadh. Ni rabh sí i bfad in a luige gur orduigh Eoghan Doicheall do tuirtín a deanamh do agus a cun ar na h-aibhleógaí. D’éirigh sé agus tharrainge sí amach na h-aibhleógaí. Thóg fear na sraideóige a cheann agus dubhairt sé “Ta do buadhartha fhein agat agus fuair mise mo bhuadhartha fhéin comh maith leatsa. Bhí ceithre mac agamsa agus bhí talamh agam agus ní rabh duine d’én ceathar nach rabh ag garagáil ag éirighe an feirm agus ní rabh slighe agam agus fuair sé greim ar an mhaide briste agus rinne sé ceithre ceathramha d’én tuirín agus sin mar rann mise an talamh eatorra. Sgairt Eoghan Doicheall an rabh an tuirtín rósta. D’éirigh Seaghan Gan Níos agus rinne ceithre ceathramha de’n tuirtín fríd an luath. Ó ní bhéidh mise beo leis an ocras ar maidín. D’éirigh sé in a sheasamh amach as an leabhaidh agus cuaidh sé amach fhad leis an gháraidhe cáil agus thoisigh
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:33
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awaiting decision
Bhí buacaill ann agus pósadh é ar nighean Gréusaidhe bróg agus nuair a théigheadh sé go teach na brídheóige bhí abhainn aige le dul trasna ag tarraingt ar an toigh agus bheirfeadh sé léim i dtolam trasna na h-abanna nuair a bheadh sé ag teacht abháile caitfidh sé siubhal fríd an abhainn. Oidhche amháin bhí na comharsanaigh uilig ag cuartaidheocht in a theach agus bhí baicle fir ag suidhe thart f’an teinidh. Arsa fear acu leis an fhear “Caidhé an sgéal duitse go dtugann tú léim tiar an abhainn nuair a théigheas tú a d’amharc ar do bhean agus go siubhalann tú fríd an abhainn nuair a bhíos tú ag teacht abháile?”. “Bal innseochaid sin duith. Ní fhaghainn leat mé sháith le h-ithe ann. Nuair a bhíos an table réidh le suidhe aige ní bhíonn dá greim ithte again go n-abrann fear a’ toighe
“Tá mé féin suas a”
“Tá do bunadh suas a”
“Éirigh cailín an toighe agus réidhtigh an tabla”. “Bal tá mise comh lag agus nach bfuilim abálta léim thar an abhainn”. Caidé a bheirfeá damhsa arsa fear de na fir léigheasfainn sin duith”. Dheanfaidh mé péire maith bróg agus pronnfaidh mé ort iad”. “Tá mé sasta sin a ghlachadh uaith agus cuirfidh mé gléas ort go bhfuighidh tú dó shaith le h-ithe. Gléas sé agus cuir sé air culaith bratógach ar agus sé an t-ainm a bhí ar athair na
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 11:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí meitheal ag abhailt féir aon lá amhain. Lá breagh gréine a bhí ann. Bhí bean pósta amuigh fosta agus thug sí an leanbh óg amach go dtí an phairc leithe. Bhí an leanbh sochruighthe go deas i ngranóg fhéir faoi sgath na gcrann. I geaiteamh an lá amach tháinig fiolar agus sgiob sé leis an leanbh. D’éirigh an fiolar in airde ins an spéir gur tuirling sé an carraig i mbarr na n-aille. Bhí sgannradh an domhain ar na daoine. Bhí na mná ag caoineadh agus bhí na fir ag iarraid do chur cun suaimhris. Connaic siad an fhiolar ar bharr na h-aille ac ní tiocfadh leo dul suas. Bhí an aille comh díreach deacrach sin. D’éirigh máthair an leinbh agus thoisigh sí ag scnapadaighe suas in eadán na h-aille. Gearradh a cosa agus a lamha ach níor mhothuigh sí aon phian lean leithe agus na daoine go dtuithfidh sí aon bomaite. Bhain sí barr na h-aille amach agus fuair an nead a bhí in fiolar ann. Fuair sí an leanbh go bréagh beo agus é ag gáire leis fhéin go sásta. Cheangal é an leanbh in a n-aprún agus níor stad sí gur fag sí in an talamh é.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 00:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In my fathers farm a treasure is supposed to be hidden. It was placed there by the Danes in the year 1777. It is a pot of gold within an inch of being full.
An old woman was put in charge of it with teeth as long as harrow pins. For the past twenty years this old woman has no longer charge of it.
About fifty years ago three men made an attempt to unearth it but did not succeed in securing it. These were Mr Ned Holland of Ballinvoher, Mr James Moran N. J. Mr John Shaughnessy Countbrown all deceased. They first went to a fortune teller at the Jerry Bridge by the name of "Biddy Earley". She told them that they were not to talk while they were looking for it.
They spent three days and three nights searching for it and then one man struck a flat stone and said "I have it". On removing the stone, a crock was found but it contained only stones. They they went "Biddy Earley" again. She sad they would never get it if they
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 00:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Mac Namaras were a very powerful family in Clare in the early centuries of the Norman invasion. They owned extensive tracks of land in East Clare, and most of the castles in that parts of the country are Mac Namara castles. Gradually however they lost their lands, lost them mainly in war against the invader and no rich members of that clan survive to day.
In the latter half of the eighteenth century there lived in Moyreisk, about four miles from Ennis one of the name who was nick-named "Fireball". He got this name because he was a marvelous shot. He always carried two pistols which he calls "Bás gan Sagart" because anyone receiving a charge from them never lived long enough to get the priest.
At one time "Fireball" suffered from a tumor and was removed to a Dublin hospital. Doctors were
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 00:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As I went out the garden gap I got what I didn't want.?
Answer (A thorn in your foot)
It's black and its what its read all over.?
Answer (A newspaper)
Its in the pot and a hundred eyes on it.?
Answer (soup)
Jimmie Huddle in the puddle with his green green coat.?
Answer (A rush)
Its under the fire and over the fire and it never touches the fire.?
Answer (A cake in the oven)
As I went out the bóthairin I met my Auntie Noreen. She had iron toes steel nose
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 00:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two forges in this parish, The smiths are, John Glavey and James Carney. Their parents were not smiths only they decided to learn this work. The forges are situated two miles from the National School, and two miles from the chapel in Mayo. They are both near the cross-roads and beside the public-road. They are not near a stream.
The forges are one story high and are roofed with iron. the roofs are very wide and are four cornered. There is only one fire in each forge. A bellows is situated near the fire.
The tools used by a blacksmith are; a sledge, hammer, rasp, knife, hacksaw, bellows, and a pinchers. He uses the sledge to hammer out the iron and can shape it into any article he likes. A hammer is for making small
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 00:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some of the land is hilly, and some of it is boggy, but the majority of it is upland.
There is a wood in Mullen and the majority of trees that grow in it are beach.
There is a river in our village which is locally called a big river. Its name is "Abhann na Geerach". It rises in Fairymout and flows through Mullen, and finally flows into Lough Gara.
There are several little streams flowing into the river.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 00:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times farmers had a custom of pulling heather for thatching houses and other purposes.
The story is this a local farmer sent his men to pull heather in Knocknagown bog. One man was working away a bit from the rest and when he was pulling the heather the whole sod came with him and underneath lay a big pot of gold. He was so coveteous, he turned the sod down on it again so that the other men would not see it and he worked away until he would have a chance of taking it unseen by the other but when he came back he could not find it, and it was never found since. Only for the finder being so greedy, he and his comrades would be rich for the rest of their lives. This is a true story as I
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 23:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
killed in Milstreet. It caused great anxiety and alarm in the house, his wife was in an awful state and his mother got a weakness, two horsemen rode in haste for the priest to Clondrohid about seven miles away, and the three horses came like lightning to the house. The old lady got better and the priest remained in the house all night consoling them, two horsemen set out for Milstreet to see was it the man was killed, and to their grief it was, the priest thought they were too slow in coming so he set out to meet them on foot. The horses were within three or four miles of the house when he met them, he returned again to the house and stopped until eight o'clock in the morning in common cars and side cars also the priest went on horseback and that evening all the footballers of Clondrohid sholdered him from Milstreet hospital to his home in Moulnihorna in the parish of Clondrohid a distance of over 17 miles along the mountain road and the priest walked it the whole way. He was waked that night in his own house and the funeral took place the following day for Clondrohid, he was again shouldered to Clondrohid Burial Ground and the priest walked it again a distance of over 12 miles. The priests name was Father Philip Murphy born in this parish of Aghabullogue.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 23:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the 1st of March there is always a horse fair held in Milstreet which is a great gathering of the people of the surrounding parishes. Football was a great game in the northern parishes about 47 years ago. Milstreet and Clondrohid had a great hatred for each other over this game, After Clondrohid won the championship of Ireland one of the football kickers named Quill was killed about ¼ of a mile outside the town of Milstreet by some people unknown, he was then taken to the Dead House in Milstreet hospital.
About 1 am there was a loud knock at the door of Quills house. And who was there but two members of the R.I.C. after coming from the town of Milstreet to enquire if the man of the house was at the fair on that day, they replied he was, and the police said that there was a man of his description
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 23:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a shuidheas an cat agus a cúl leis an teineadh. Ta an doineann comhgarach. Airdeann na caoraig ar an cnoc, nuair a bhios an aimsear ag teacht. Nuair a bhios loinnir na gréine ins carraigeacha, sin comhtharach boglaig. Tigh an séidean sidhe le h-athrughadh na h-aimsire. Tuiteann an suithe le h-athrughadh na h-aimsire. Nuair a bhios an ghréin ag soillsiú ar na cnuic ins an Gheimhreadh, sin comhtharach gaot mór. Nuair a bhios an gaoth ag feadalaigh ins na doirse, sin comhtharach doineann. Nuair a bhios an gréin dear gag dul a luighe oithe tráthnóna, sin comhtharach gaoth mhór. Nuair a bhios fainne if had uaith ar an gealaig doineann i ndeas duinn. Fainne i ndeas do’n gealach doineann i bhfadh uainn. Nuair a bhios na h-éanacha ag fanacht amuigh san fheartain sin comhtharac go bhfuil an fheartain le mairsteadh go cionn tamaill. Nuair a bhíos an madadh ag ithe fear agus ag ól uisge sin comhtharach boglaig. Nuair a bhíos madad gréine ar an spear sin comhtharach fearthainne. Nuair a bhíos na míltóga gear bíonn an fhearthain ag teannad orainn. Nuair a chluinfeá tuaim an chluigin go soilleur agus é i bhfadh uaith sin comhtharach sioc. Nuair a bhíos séidhead anuas ann sin comhtharach athrú ar an aimsear. Nuair a bhíos bladhair gorm ins an teanead sin comhtharach doineann. Nuair a bhíos na cearca fraoic ag teacht comhgharach do na toighthe sin comhtharach go bhfuil an aimsear gabhail a bhrisead. Nuair a bhíos tuair-ceatha ann bíonn an fheartainn comhgharach.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 23:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Teidthear dúinn go bhfuil na cnuic i bfad ar shiubhal. Nuair a bhios na tobair lán. Na caoirigh ag ól uisge. Nuair a éireochas na caoirigh go barr na gcnoc. Nuair a bhios an ghealach geal ag éirighe dithe. Nuair a bhios an spéal geal ag dul a luighe dó’n ghréin.
Droch Comhtharaí eile.
Nuair a fhanas na cearca amuigh san feartain. Nuair a chraitheas an bhó í fhéin ‘san bhoitheach. Nuair a bhios siubhal faoi ‘n easóg agus an frog. Nuair a bhios ceol na spidóge gear ‘san tráthnóna. An gaoth ag feadalaighe. Ceo ar na cnoc. Nuair a thigeas an naosgan comhgarach de na toighthe.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 23:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Na cnuic a bheith indeas dúinn. An madadh ag ithe féir, an madadh ag ól uisge. An cat in a shuidhe agus a chúl leis an teinidh. Na cearca ag piocad iad fhéin. Seidead anuas. An toit ag dul go direach suas ins an spear. Torman age as ar bith. Na caoirigh ag pilleadh ón cnoc go dtí an pháirc. Dath donn a bheith ar (bheith) an uisge. Nuair a thigeas na cearca fraoié ón cnoc. Fionnadh gabhair ar an spear. An suithce ag tuitim. An ghealach a bheith báidhthe. Na criogar ag léimnigh sin go bhfuil átrú ins an aimsir. Nuair a bhíos fainne ar an ghealach. Dath gorm ar an teinidh agus an teas raibh. An t-uisge a bheith iseal ‘san tobar.
Nuair a bhios sioc ag teacht:-
Nuair a bios dath dear gar an ghréin ag dul a luighe dithe. Na realtógaí ag léimnigh. Torman mór a ghluaisteán. Ceo bán ar na h-aibhne. Solas i dtuaisceart na spéire. Na geacha fiadhna ag dul go dtí na cnuic.
Nuair a bhios gaoch ag teacht:-
Na lachain ag deanamh an- torman agus ag éirighe ar eiteóg. An cath ag sgríbhadh. Nuair a bhios cuil ar na spéartaí.
Aimsir mhaith:-
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 11:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and never take land any more.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 11:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and walked to Cork prison. One man called John O'Sullivan was convicted for twenty four years but his term was reduced to eighteen and he came out of prison as strong as ever. Also there was a local man convenient to Mount Massy, who used to pay the land annuties and grabb the lands so the people called him a grabber. One man and seven children were evicted out of their house and thrown in a bed of straw in the roadside the grabber then said
At once I was called a land grabber.
That's a name I wont be any more.
I'll now give it up altogether.
And never take land any more.
When one of those men was evicted.
No doubt but 'twould grieve your heart sore.
With his seven all weak little children.
No doubt but 'twould grieve your heart more.
I'd be frightened to go out night or morning.
To go to the market or fair
Or even to mass on a Sunday
I'd find no one to speak to me there.
At once he was called a land grabber.
That's a name he wont be any more.
He'll now give it up altogether
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 11:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Another story is told about this local landlord that lived at Mount Massy near Macroom as he evicted several people from their holdings for unpayment of land annuties. In one townland on a cold December's morning he evicted eight families from their holdings at Clondrohid. In those days there was no motors or lorries. The police were brought in horses and sidecars and when the police and bailifs came the occupants had local men got to try to scald them with boiling water and meal in porridge. All the doors and windows were barred only one, and the men stood inside that door to try to scald them as soon as they came inside for there were no guns or firearms at that time. In one house one man held possession by going between the ceiling and the slates and when the bailifs were gone he put down a fire and broke the lock. The rest were arrested and every two were handcuffed together
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 11:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
property. There was a priest in the parish of Banteer at that time whose name was Fr O'Riordan and who was a sportsman. He started a hunt one day with all the men in Banteer and the surrounding parishes. They began at Banteer and hunted until they came to Mount Massy, passed the gamekeeper's house i Mushira and there was over three thousand people all between ten and eighty years of age there when they reached Mount Massy. They lined up at the lodge before they reached the great house, what hares they had killed were thrown over the horses necks, and what hares they had alive they lined at both sides so that they should run straight to the hall door and the hounds after them. John Massy stood at the hall door, thought that the people were mad, and the hares were killed at his feet. About two hundred horsemen surrounded the house, demanded the reward, as the reward was as much as the fine could be. That day broke John Massy's heart and he died shortly after and the gamekeeper died in Mountjoy prison.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 10:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Deirtear lion gur tú an oibhrighe i fearr sa tír agus mar ndeanfaidh tú mar tá mé ag iarraidh orth. Chuirfidh mise 'un báis thú O bhail bheifidh tú neart ama la na dheanadh deir Ruaidhrí ghcobhaidh tu do sháith ama deir an rí. Shubhal Ruaidhrí leis.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 10:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí lánamháin ann aon uair amháin. Ruaidrí a bhí mar ainm airsan ag Síghle a bhí mar ainm uirtise. Ní rabh meas ag Síghle ar Ruaidrí mar bhí choir dí agus rinn sé gach aon scort a dtiochfadh leithe a dheanfad ag iarraidh faghail réidhtigh leis.
Bhí Rí in a comnuidhe ins an áit agus. Cuaidh Síghle fhadh leis lá amháin. Seo an cineal cómraidh a bhí eadorta. Arsa Síghle leis, “Níl Rí ar bith eile i n-Éirinn nach bhfuil caisleán úr deanta aige ach tusa”. Maisc deir an rí “Din rud atá doilig a fhaghail fear a dheanadh caisleán. “Aru bí do thost” deir Síghle. Cáide fa Ruaidhrí ar ndoigh ní bhéidh sé i bfad ag ceann duit”. “Sil mise” deir an Rí “Nach dtiochfadh le Ruaidhrí bocht chloc ar bith a leagaint” “Is é an oibrighe is fear sa tír da leighfead an fallsacht do a dheanadh” deis Síghle “D’iarr thusa air theacht annseo amarach” Deir an Rí. Nuair a chuaidh Síghle abhaile an oidhche sin dubhairt sí le Ruaidhrí go rabh an rí a gheall ar é a fheiceal ar maidín. Níl fhíos agam caidhe an gnaithe atá aige liom deir Ruaidhrí leoga níor inns sé sin damh deir Síghle.
Maidín lá thar na barach d’imtigh Ruaidhrí fhadh leis an rí “Caithfidh tú caisleán ur a dheanamh damh” deir an Rí “Mise nar leag ‘n cloch ariamh caidhe an dóig a dtiochfadh liom caisleán úr a dheanadh.
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 23:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
crainn le na loirgneacha. “C’ainm a tá ort” arsa Seán. “Loirgneacha géara” arsan fear. Annsin d’imtigh siad fád le palús an Ríogh. Chuaidh siad isteach agus cuir siad suas daobhtha fhein an oidhche sin. Annsin chuaidh Seán ag éirighe nighean an Ríogh.
Bhí coire uisge te aici.
Agus bhí nighean an ríogh bainte aige annsin. Pósadh é ar nigean. Bhí baireis-aca a mhair lá agus bliadhain agus ní rabh dhá greim da aon biadh acu agus blas mealach ar gach ghreim.
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 23:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí rí ann uair amháin a rabh triúr mac aige, agus bhí da fheirm talamh aige. Lá amháin chuaidh na mic amach ag obair. Dubhairt an mac a ba óige gur seo feirm s’ aigesean agus dubhairt an dara mac gur leisean an feirm eile, agus an mac a ba sine Seán a bhí air agus ní rabh feirm arbith aige. Phill sé chun na bhaile agus fuair a chuid saidhbreas o’n Rígh. D’imtigh sé arias ach ní theachaidh sé i bhfad gur casadh fear air agus é in a luighe ar an talamh. “C’ainm a tá ort” arsa Seán “Cluas Ghéar”. An deanfa fastód arsan fear. Dheanfhainn arsan “Cluas Ghéar”. Caidé an méid a beitha ag iarriadh cun lá agus bliadhain. “Cuig Phunta” “Cluas Ghear”. D’imtigh siad leobhta agus ní teacaidh siad i bhfad gur casadh fear ortha a’s é ag sgaoileadh leis na realtógaí. “C’ainm a tá ortsa” arsa Seán. “Súil díreach an gunna”. “An dearfá fastód” “Deanfaidh” arsa seisean. “Caidé an mead a béitha ag iarraidh”. “Cuig phunta” arsa seisean. D’imtigh siad leobhta go dtainig siad fad le fear agus ceann da cuid cosa ar a gualann agus an ceann eile ar an talamh agus é ag coinnealt gearrfiadh istoigh i bpairc. “C’ainm a tá ortsa” arsa Seán “Cos Luath” arsan fear. “An ndeanfá fastod” arsa Seán “Deanfaidh” arsan cos luath. “Caidé an méid a beitha ag iarriadh chun lá agus bliadhain”. “Cuig phunta” arsa seisean. D’imtigh siad leobhta ach ní theacaidh siad i bhfad go dtáinig siad fhad le fear a bhí ag gearradh
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 23:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
án n- intinn. Ba maith linn an cust socraighthe agus a beith rúdh leithe. Fa coinne sin, cruinnig muid as gach ceann de’n domhan leis an cust do chur ort a shagart”.
“A daoine mhachánta” arsan sagart “caide mar gceist”.
“A shagart an é dó bharamhail indiaidh pionnús fada do chur suas annseo an dtiocfadh linn a fhághail isteach ins na plaitheas”.
Ní thug sé freagra arbith ortha gur dhubhairt sé paidir in a intinn fhéin. Thóg sé a cheann annsin agus dubhairt- “Na h-iarr orm freagra a tabhairt dóibh ar an cheist sin. Ghach go dtí an aith a dtáinig sibh aiste”. “Ni racaidh” ansan ceann urraidh. Tháinig muid fa coinne in freagra agus freahra a caithfidh muid a fhághail no ní rachaidh tusa as seo”. Nuair a chualadh an sagart seo bhí sé buadhartha.
Thoisigh sé ar a praidhreacha arais. Nuair a tóg sé a cheann dubhairt sé leobhta “Seo an freagra, ma tá ins na cuisle de na mílte dóibh a bhfuil annseo an méid fola a thoghfaoi ar barr bioráin tá dochas agaibh” Nuair a chualaidh siad seo chuaidh an uaillfeartach a ba bhrónach agus a ba uathbasaighe a chualthas ariamh. Tháinig séideán gaoithe annsin agus nuair a dhamharc an sagart ní rabh rud arbith le feicéail ach bother Bhuinne Boghaine os a chomhair.
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 23:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá sé ceithre sgor bliadhain nó níos mó ó bhí Seaghan Mac Goldrick in a shagart paróiste ins an Pharóiste a bhfuil muid in ár gcomnuidhe ann. Oidhce amháin Foghmháir tháinig teachtaire fa na coinne ag iarraidh air dul cuig duine tinn a bhí in a chomhnuidhe in abainn Ruaidh ar chúl Cnuic na Beinne Boghaine.
Mar ba ghnathach leis chuaidh sé ag marcaidheacht an chapall donn a bhí aige ar feadh níos mó na sgór bhliadhain. Bhí sé fhéin agus an capall ag iarraid gear shean. Nuair a fuair sé fadh leis an abhainn Ruaidh agus nuair a thug sé a beannacht do’n duine tinn phill sé arais le dhul abhaile. Bhí sé annsin indiaidh an meadhon-oidhche Oidhche reabh ghealaighe a bhí ann. Thiocfadh leis bother Bheinn Boghaine fheiceáil ag síneadh roimhe. Bhí sé ag radh a paidhre nuair a stad an capall agus í sgannruighthe.
D’amharc sé roimhe go bhfeiceadh sé caidé a bhí cearr agus chonnaic sé o cheann an chapaill fhad as a thiocfadh leis a fheiceail mílte de daoine beaga agus achan daoine ag marcuidheacht ar capall. Coisrioc an sagart é fhéin agus tug seo uchtac do agus arsa seisean leis na daoine beaga “In ainm Dé caidé a tá cur buadhartha oraibh”. Labair duine amhain acu agus dubhairt sé, “A shagart dílis tá muid mílte bliadhaintaibh ag spaisteóracht an t-saoghal seo anois agus béidh muid milte eile ann agus an t-am sin uilig tá cust amhain ag cur buadhartha ar
senior member (history)
2019-08-24 19:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sibh-s go léir a bhíonn ag trácht ar chruithneacht, an rabhabhair riamh á baint le corrán? Mar go deimhin, da mbeadh sibh, chruimhneochadh sibh tamall air. A dhuine, ní haon adhbhar magaidh lá ag buain le corrán agus meitheal in aonfheacht leat agus gach aoinne fear ‘má luaithe ag breith brághaidh ar a chéile. Níor mhór don tosaidhe bheith in-a fhear mhaith aibidh nó bainfí “na fála dhé,” mar adeir-téar, agus dá mbaintí chaithfeadh sé dul abhaile, agus ba shin náire go deo aige
* * * *
CAOGA BLIADHAIN Ó SHOIN.
Is mar atá ráidhte agam a bhaintí an chruithneacht annso (I Rinn ó gCuanach I nDéisibh Mumhan dom), caoga bliadhain ó shoin agus I bhfad roimhe dar ndóigh. Baile iasgaireachta é seo agus nuair a bhí an iasgaireacht I réimh ann, ní chuimhneochadh aon iasgaire ar bhreith ar úirlis oibre-ní chodlóchadh sé san áit a mbeadh ceann acu.
Bíonn an iomarca saoirse ag baint le fairrge chum duine á chartadh féin isteach in áit chumang dála páirce dá mhéid agus é bheith ar úrla ó mhaidin go hoidhche. Ní dheunfadh iasgaire é an uair sin ná aon rud dá leithéid. Daoine móra ba eadh iasgairí tamall maith de bhliantaibh ó shoin; daoine a raibh acfuinn agus maoin acu agus ní ar gach aon obair ná gnó a bheadh meas acu.
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LOSGAIDHE AN CHORRÁIN.
Is dian an obair lá a thabhairt ar do chromada ag buain le corrán. Tá losgaide ag baint leis, agus tinneas cinn , agus tinneas droma. Is mo fear óg láidir groidhe ná raibh i n-iúil ar é féin do dhiriú tar éis do an cheud lá riamh a thabhairt a buain ar a leithéid de chuma; is mó [End of column]
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go ceann sgaithimh mhaith. Bhí tinneas droma an chorráin chomh dian san gur dhein fear éigin aor air. Seo mar a thosnuigh sé air :-
Mo leun ar an gcorrán agus loiscearan cruaidh air
‘Sé chur greim im shlinneán agus critheán in mo ghualainn.
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I NDIAIDH NA MBUANAITHE.
Agus na mna a bhíodh ag ceangal i ndiaidh na mbuanaite ní díomhaoin a bhiodh an lá acu.
Is minic a chuala mé trácht ar mnaoi áirighthe a cheangl
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 21:00
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There is a fort near Oughty it is called Lis A Phúcha
There is a bank of earth around it.
There are forts back in Glenkeen. There are lumps of stone around them.
One dark night there was a man passing by them
He prayed to God to send him a light and there was a candle lighted on his hat and it remained on it till he came to his own street.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:58
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There was a man living in Tamnach Slinnain. His name was Pat Hastings. He used to compose songs. He is dead about thirty years. He is buried in Drummin graveyard.
There was a man living in Derrykillew. He used to compose songs. He is living now in Dublin: He composed a song called the Breezie Mountain Blue. He is about fifty years of age. His name is Patrick Tunney
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:56
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The old people have stories about the famine of 1846-47
The people still point out sites of houses. There was an old house near John Hastings where people lived long ago
It is in ruins now. There was an old house in Tamhnín tSeagail and the ruins of it is to be seen yet. The potatoes did not grow that time
Great numbers of people died.
For food the people used to use yellowmeal. Where the people used to die they used to be buried there. There is a person
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:54
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buried in Tamhnín tSeagail
It affected this district very much. The district was thickly populated before the famine.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:52
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These are the games we play "Frog in the middle", "Killock", "Here's the robbers coming", through, "Jennyjoe", "Dalóg", "Four Corners "Good Angel and Bad Angel"
In Autumn we pick blackberries and slows. We do not pick nuts. We pick flowers and make daisy chains.
In winter when we are sitting beside the fire we play chip chop cherry and we play tip
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:42
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An Teampall
Togadh an teampall í gCaíséal Fhinnigh bliadhnta roimhe sin, is docha , mar na produstanaigh saidhbhir agus bi a lán acab ann le an obair do chur ar aghaidh. Bhí sgoil ag na produstanaigh chomh mhaith i Leitircreann agus b'eigin do na cataoilicigh dul chuiche sul a togadh an sgoil cataoileach in 1880.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:39
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An Séipéal
Tógadh an séipéal timcheall le 100 bhlidhain o shoin. £50 a cáithead le é a thógail. Adhmud dara atá sa gceann de agus tugadh an adhmd sin o sliabh - ard na gcapall - ar an bportach agus thairraing na fir na piosaí móra tríd na cnocaibh agus na gleanntaibh le míle na mar seo le ropaí mar ní raibh bóithre láimh leo agus níor bhféidir leo capaill a thabhairt isteach go dti an portoch bog agus ni raibh cairt ag na daoine annsin - an tAthair O Riain a chuir ar bun é.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:30
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Sean Sgoil
Bhí sean sgoil i Leitcrann timtheall le 100 bliadhain in-aice an t-seipéal áit go bhfuil an stábla ann anois. Leígheamh agus scriobhnóireacht abhí ar suibhal ann agus bhí cloch agus mata ag gach bhuachaill le suidhe urre. Ní bhfuair an máighistur - O Donnghaileach - aon pháighe bhí sé ar lóisdén o teach go teach.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 20:25
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An sgoil atá ann anois tá sí suidhte is Roilig i Leitircrann mar ní bhfuigheadh an sagart paróiste a bhí ann t-amser - an t-Áthair Mac Eanna s.p. – áit i a thógail in aon áit eile ón dtighearna talmhan – Seán de Leaslaoi – prduntanach bheadh é . Shan mbliadhain 1880 tháinig na daoine le chéile agus thug siad saothar saor leis an obair a dheánamh. Tá an-bheag le sa fuinneóga beaga , neamh sláinteamhail gan clos máith .
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 11:33
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made besoms. He is dead this thirty years. After Parnell got the “Hanging Gale” wiped out, some landlords still contented it was there. The Hanging Gale was an installment of rent that was due even though the tenant had paid to the day. Arthur Monaghan of Beechill and William Monaghan of Carn wanted a clear receipt and the case was brought to court in Pettigo. Attorney Gallagher, Donegal, still alive, defended on behalf of the Monaghans. The case was dismissed but Attorney Gallagher got it appealed to Dublin and the Monaghans went too. In the High Courts in Dublin Attorney Gallagher won the case for the Monaghans. Although they were ordinary country farmers they were well skilled in tenant laws. It was a test case for all Ireland and I am told that tenants after that case got a clear receipt to the day. The Fr. Gallagher mentioned was the curate priest in Pettigo and a great friend of the farmers. This case was fought about 1881. It is recorded of Arthur Monaghan that when asked was he not rich because he had so many cows, Managhan replied, “Your Honour, you could rear a cow on a ship.”
The landlord in his case was Sir John Leslie and the landlord’s agent in Pettigo at the time Mr. McCallough. Mc Callough said at Pettigo Court he would use the Hanging Gale as a whip, but Attorney Gallagher said he would take
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 11:05
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n-éireochadh sé arís, níor cuireadh é go dtí rabh siad cínnte nach raibh an t-anam in a chorp.
Ánna Ní Laochraidhe,
An Charraig Bhuidhe,
Béal-Áthá-eanaigh.
Fuair mé an sgéal seo ó cheann de na mnaoibh Riaghalta, Béal-Átha-Seanaigh. Bhí an aithne mhaith aice ar Sheaghan agus tá an sgéal fíor.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 11:03
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ocras an domhain air, bhain sé amach an chisteanach, agus tharraing chuige sgála bréagh brachain. Nuair a tháinig an cócaire isteach agus chonnaic an spioraid thuit sé i luige i lár an urláir.
Tugadh aire mhaith do Sheán agus níor b’fada go bhfuair sé biseach. Bhí gach uile duine go maith sin dó gur fhan sé istigh i dteach na mbocht ar fadh. I gcionn tamaill fuair sé posta a roinnt na móna agus freasdail ar na mucaibh.
Lá amháin bhí sé ag roinnt na mónadh mar ba ghnáthach i seomra na sean bhan. Bhí siad na suidhe thart fan teinidh go fallsach agus nuair a connaich siad Seán nach raibh siad ag brath corrughadh as a bhealach thóg sé bata le iad a sgabadh. Phreab cailleach luaitridh amháin in a sheasamh go dána agus sgairt amach go feargach – “Suidhigidh thart, suidhigidh thart, seo chugainn buitleír “na muc”!
Mhair Seán fiche bhliadhain in a dhiaidh seo, agus nuair a fuair sé bás an dara h-uair, ar eagla go
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 11:02
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millteanach ar dhoras seomra na marbh. Tóg sé leis an eohcar, chuaidh amach go tapaidh, acht nuair a thainig sé go dtí an doras bhí a chroidhe amuigh ar a bhéul le h-eagla, agus ní raibh sé ábalta é a fhosgladh. Rith sé fá choinne na gconstablaí go tuith is bhí an a cho saibh agus d’innis an sgéal, acht dubhairt siadsan nár bhain leiteadh sin le na gcuid oibre – sean gur in a dhiaidh daoine beo a bhí siadsan, acht sin is uilig cruinnigh fear amháin suas misneach go leor. Thóg a bhata in a láimh agus thug aghaidh ar an chontabhairt. Amach leis i gcuidiachda an mhaighistir, agus nuair a thanaig siad fhad le seomra na marbh bhí an callán go millteanach sin go raibh siad fhéin ag fághail bháis leis an eagla. Mar sin féin ní raibh ann aca acht buaileadh ar aghaidh. D’fhosgail siad an doras go mall fadalach agus caidé tcé siad? Seán Ua Ruathan gléasta suas in a éadach báis ina sheasamh ar an urlár! As go bráth leobtha agus an taidhbhshe ar d’tóir. Bhain an maghistir amach a sheomra, agus thug an constable do na bhónnaibh agus caidé rinne Seaghan? Bhí
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 11:01
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Bliadanta ó shoin nuair a bhris an galar dubh amach in Éirinn rinne an aícid sgrios mhór.
Aícid iongantach a bhí innti agus thiocafadh tamhsuan ar dhuine a bhí cosamhail leis an bhás agus measaim gur minic a cuiriadh duine nach raibh marbh darírib.
Tart fa Bheál – Átha – Seanaigh bhí an phlaígh seo go h-án olc, agus cuireadh isteach go teach na mbocht mór chuid de na daoinibh a buaileadh síos. Bhí fear d’ar b’ainm Seaghan Ua Ruathan in a measg . Bhí sé go fíor-dhonna agus fa dheireadh fuair sé bás. Anois bhí an oiriad sin a fágail bháis, nach raibh cómhraí go lear fa na gcoinne , agus cuireadh corp Sheáin agus beirt eile isteach imbraithlín . Fágadh amuigh i seomra na marbh iad agus cuiread an doras faoi ghlas.
Anois nuair a bhí am luighe ann, agus maighistar thíghe na mbocht ag tarraint ar a leabai , chuala sé toraman iongantach , sgreadach agus buaileadh
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 20:57
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A landlord named John Massy lived once in a place called Mount Massy in the town of Macroom. In one part of his property in a place called Musira he had a grand house built for a gamekeeper, and under the kitchen of that house there was a stall to hold twenty cows. This house was situated half way between Macroom and Millstreet in a by part of the country. The gamekeeper's name was Lucey and as the gamekeeper was travelling one day to Mount Massy he was fired at and got a few grains on the head but escaped. He was fired at a short distance from his own house, the gamekeeper had a gun but it was of no use to him at the time. The man that fired at him made his escape to a foreign land, although police and soldiers were in search of him. After that the gamekeeper got police protection and John Massy advertised on the paper that a reward be given to any man found hunting in his
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 20:44
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became very angry and said she would send them a little punishment for their refusal. Two days passed by and the people of the house thought she would not return but they were mistaken.
One night when they were in bed they heard a great noise and came to see what it was. When they reached the kitchen they saw the flour swarming with rats. On opening the door another crowd of them swarmed in out of the yard, and the yard itself was full of rats.
The people of the house were in great trouble and when the old lady returned they promised her lodgings for the rest of her life if she would take away the rats but she said she get two pounds as well before she would so. They agreed to it and she lived with them for the rest of her life.
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 20:34
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About sixty years ago an old woman visited a house about three miles from this school. It was a very cold winters night when the snow was on the ground. On entering the house she asked for something to eat. The woman of the house was a hospitable person and she took the old lady in and gave her a good supper. When supper was over the old woman asked for lodgings for the night but was told she could not be kept as there was a big family. She then asked for whiskey but was refused. She asked for flour, meal, milk and potatoes but got nothing. When these things were refused her, she
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 12:10
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and St. Lachteen, the patron saint of Donoughmore were to walk on their knees until they met and the meeting place would be the boundary between the two parishes. They met at Ard na n-Aingeal and they had a fight and St Olan said that every mad dog would go to Donoughmore and St Lachteen said that Aghabullogue would never be without the bed of a robber.
St Olan was buried in Aghabullogue graveyard and a tombstone erected over him with his name written in Ogham on it.
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 12:03
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fifth of September. People go there on that day to pay 'rounds'. They pray first at the well and then at a stone two fields away on which are the footprints of the saint. Prayers are finally said at the grave in Aghabullogue graveyard where he is buried. Long ago when the 'rounds' were paid, the pilgrims went to a field near by and made merry.
There was a tree growing over the well until recent years. This tree was supposed to have been planted by St. Olan himself. One day when he was minding cows he stuck the twig he had been using in the ground and it grew to be a big tree. It was said that no one could burn it; but the late Fr. Aherne burnt it in Aghabullogue school and church.
One day some tinkers were passing by the well and being short of water for tea they took a gallon of water from the well and put it to boil but if they waited until today it would not boil.
St. Olan, the patron saint of Aghabullogue
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 11:23
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There is a holy well dedicated to St Olan situated about three quarters of a mile from Aghabullogue church. On leaving the church you travel northwards on the road leading to Rylane. There is a steep hill just before you reach the well and a cross roads near by. The well is in the corner of a field near the road and is covered with a hood and a white thorn tree.
The 'Pattern day' falls on the
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 10:54
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In former times tents were set up in a field near the well and tea was served in these tents, and today this field is known as the 'tea house inch'.
A story is told of a quarrel between St Olan and another saint called St. Lachtaoin who is now the patron saint of Donoughmore parish. Each cursed the other's parish as a result. St Lachtaoin said that Aghabullogue would never be without a robber and St Olan said that Donoughmore would never be without a mad dog.
They fought because of a dispute which arose between them as to where the boundary between the two parishes should lie. Each was to walk on his knees from a certain point at an appointed time and keep on walking until they met and that spot would mark the boundary between Aghabullogue and Donoughmore parishes.
St. Lachtaoin was too clever for St. Olan and he set off earlier and
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 10:37
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There is a holy well situated about half a mile from Aghabullogue church on the road leading northwards to Rylane. The district in which it is situated is called Mount Rivers.
This well is called St. Olan's well. St. Olan is the patron saint of Aghabullogue. He was buried in Aghabullogue graveyard. A big stone bearing the footprints of the saint stands near the grave. On the big stone lies a smaller stone called 'Caipín Olainn'.
Every year on the 5th of Sept. crowds of people go to the well to pray and drink some of the water. They pray in thanksgiving for favours received and ask for more favours.
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 10:21
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to rain and he told the devil to go back for his bag. The devil did so and fell into the bag and could not come out of it. Seán carried him to the mill and told the miller that he would give him a firkin of gold if he would throw the bag into the mill. The miller agreed and all the devil's bones were broken up.
Seán gave the miller the firkin of gold and lived happily ever after.
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 10:16
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into it.
When the three years were up, the devil came and said the time was up for Seán to go with him.
Seán said that he should finish a set of shoes before he could go. He told the devil to catch the sledge and hit the iron. The devil did so and could not let the sledge go again and Seán began poking him with a hot iron. He was screaming for mercy and promised Seán his freedom for another three years.
When those three years had expired the devil came again for Seán. "Reach up for my walking stick" said Seán. The devil did so and clung to it and could not let it go. Again Seán began poking him with a red hot poker and was released by Seán on condition that he would give him his freedom for another three years.
The third time he came Seán was going along with him. When he went out on the road it began
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 10:02
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a fire is made in the open air.
They had special privileges at times such as being able to banish rats. They have been always looked upon as being very strong.
There was a forge in this parish long ago at "Croisin a Ghabha". It was kept by a smith named Seán Gabha. The old people tell a story of how he got the better of the devil. One day the devil came in, in the shape of a man and he gave him three firkins of gold on the understanding that he would come with him after three years. In the meantime another man came in and Seán told him sit by the fire and warm himself. When he was warm he gave Seán three wishes. The three things Seán wished for were 1. That any one who took the sledge but himself would cling to it. 2. That anyone who would catch his walking stick would cling to it. 3. That anyone who would go near the bag which he had in the corner would fall
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 09:47
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There are three forges in this parish. Two different families of Twomey's own two of them and the third is owned by Mr Allen, Rylane. All of them are situated near cross roads.
The roofs are made of felt. A big door leads into them. There is one fireplace in each with a bellows near it made of leather with timber handle.
The implements the smith uses are: hammers, sledges, pincers, punches to make holes in iron, a knife to pare the hooves and an anvil to hammer the iron on it.
He shoes horses, donkeys and cattle were shod when going long journeys to fairs. He mends ploughs, harrows, spades, shovels, pikes, axes and other farm implements. Some of the work is done in the open air, such as putting bands on wheels for which
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 09:27
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ag shocruigh siad dul isteach faoin droichead le cúpla cluiche a bheith aca. Bhí sé dorcha san áith gidh go rabh an gealach ag soill siughadh, ach go raibh sé tirim agus bhí fasgadh ann.
Smaoithigh fear aca ann sin go raibh giota coinnle aige in a phóca fa thuairim ordlach ar fad. Fuair sé losán agus les sé an choinneal. Thosuigh siad ag imirt ann sin. Tamall bhéidh fear amháin ag baint agus tamall indiaidh sin bhéidh an bhuaidh ag an fhear eile. Do lean siad mar sin agus níor mhothuigh siad an tam ag dul thart. Ní raibh fear ar bith aca ag imirt mor ba chóir.
San deireadh mhotuigh siad fuaim daoine ag cainnt agus chualaidh siad glór daoine ag teacht. Chuir siad cluas orra féin agus stad siod. Nuair a chuaidh na daoine thart chuaidh siad amach ar faoin droichead agus thug siad fa dear go raibh an ghrian ag soill suighadh agus na comarsain ag dul chun an aifrinn.
Chuaidh siad isteach faoín droichead arais leis na cándas a thíghbhail
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 09:25
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Bhí beirt fear san cheanntar seo tamall maith ó shoin agus bhí an dúil aca anns na cárdai. Bheadh siad amuigh go luach agus go mall gach oidhche san geimhreadh ag imirt. Tá an bheirt aca marbh anois acht fuair mise an scéal ó dearbhrathair fhir amháin aca acú in a chomhnuidhe go foil i seas can no gréine – on baile is neise do mhín a bhealaigh.
Deirtear go raibh an beirt aca an mhaith ag imirt, agus ba ghnáthach leobhtha mórán airgid a dheánamh ar an imirt. Deirtear fosta nach raibh siad direach san imirt agus gur le sin an fach a déirigh leo go maith.
Bhí an bheirt aca ag teach abhaile oidhche Sathairn amháin fa thuairam an mheadhan oidhche. Oidhche bhréagh gheal a bhí ann. Bhí an gealach ag soill siughadh agus bhí rud beag seaca ann. Bhí siad ag cainnt eattora fhéin fan chluiche a bhí aca san oidhche sin. Bhí fear amháin aca agus bhí leach – choróin [?]aillte aige, agus bhí an néid ceadna bhuaidhsé ag an fear eile.
Bhí sean droichead an an bhothar
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 10:48
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one in Coachford. Mr Allen owns the forge in Rylane and Patrick Twomey and Daniel Twomey the forges in Clonmoyle and coachford respectively. Their fathers were also smiths. All three forges are situated near cross roads.
The forges are roofed with timber and felt. Horse shoes are nailed on the doors to show that they are forges. There is only one fireplace.
Bellows have gone out of fashion and are replaced by a fire machine. The implements used are, hammers, chisels, anvils, sledges, rasps and files. He doesn't make farm implements but he mends them. He shoes horses outside the forge door.
Forges are great centres for card parties and story telling.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 10:38
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There are three forges in use in this parish and two others in ruins. The ancestors of the present smiths worked in these same forges. All of them are situated near a cross and near a stream.
The roofs are made of wood and the walls of stone and mortar. The smiths shoe horses, ponies, donkeys and wheels.
They work in the open air. The forge is like a newspaper, because all the news is heard there, and all the young men gather there in the evening to hear the latest news.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 10:22
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My home district is Dromatimore which means 'the back of the house'. In former days the landlord lived in this house. It was the principal house in the parish.
Twenty four families live in this district. There are also a Catholic church, school, curates house and a Co-Operative creamery.
Murphy is the family name most common. Healy comes next. Most of the houses are built of stone and mortar and roofed with slate. A few new houses have red tiles. Houses were more plentiful in former times, but at that time they were nearly all thatched, and are now completely wiped out.
A little Irish is spoken but there is no historian left.
The land is fairly good. A river flows by the borders. There is a wood on the river bank but it is in
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 10:12
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Woodfield is the townland in which I live. It is in the parish of Aghabullogue and the barony of East Muskerry.
There are five families in the townland and about twenty or thirty people. Of the five families two are Twomey's.
All the houses are slated. There were many more houses in former times but not even the ruins of these now remain. At one time there were twenty families in this townland.
There are a few old people who know a little Irish and can tell stories both in Irish and English, vig, Mrs Twomey and Daniel O'Sullivan.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 09:48
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The name of my home district is Dromatimore. It is in the parish of Aghabullogue, and in the barony of East Muskerry. There are about thirty five families in the townland and about one hundred and twenty people. Murphy is the family name most common. All the houses are slated. There are two old people in the parish who can tell stories in English but not in Irish vig. John Lynch and Mrs Cronin. Houses were about three times more numerous in olden times. The ruins of two or three remained until recently, but those are also thrown down now. To America most of the emigrants went.
The land is mostly good, fertile and level except for a few bogs. It has one river flowing through it - the Delahena, which is about eight miles in length.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 09:37
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all over Ireland. It was caused by the failure of the potato crop which was the principal food of the people. It effected the district very much.
The country was very thickly populated at that time. There are some ruins of houses still to be seen. The blight came on the potatoes because the people grew the same seed in the same places too often and the potatoes decayed in the ground.
They had not much seed for the following year as they had hardly enough to eat. The potatoes were sown in ridges. The people ate Indian meal and turnips then. The Government employed the people to make roads so that they would make money. The people died in great numbers with hunger and weakness, some of them emigrated to other countries. A great sickness followed the famine, it was called the fever. There were other famines previous to that one which the old people talk about.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 09:26
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rejected
awaiting decision
Information supplied by Denis Healy, Aghabullogue, Coachford, Co. Cork Age about 55 years.
Famine Stories
In the year 1846 there was a great famine
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 09:25
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rejected
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The name of the townland in which I am living is Dromatimore. It is in the parish of Aghabullogue and in the barony of East Muskerry. There are about twenty families in it and about a hundred people. Murphy is the family name most common in the townland. The majority of the peoples houses are slate. There was a man by the name of Captain Carey living in Dromatimore house and the townland was called after his place. "Drom an Tighe Mhoir" which means the back of the big house. There are no people over seventy years living there.
Houses were more numerous locally in former times. There is hardly any one of them there now. People emigrated from this townland to America in the Cromwellian period. The townland is not mentioned in any song or story. The land is good with the exceptions of a few marshs. There is not any wood in it. There is a river flowing through it called the Delehina.
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 00:27
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labhair sé.
I gcionn tamaill chualaidh sé coisceim eile agus chonnaic sé fear eile ag teacht. Leím seisean isteach fosta ag thoisigh ag baint.
Lean siad mor sin go raib fa thuoirim duisín aca san pháirc agus gan duine ar bith aca ag coinnc. Do labhair an fear cupla uaire ach ní raibh gar ann.
Nuair a bhí an phairc beagnach bainnte aca tháinig sconnrodh air agus d’fág sé an pháirc agus ar shiubhal leis abhaile. Nuair a chuaidh sé amach ar an ród, tháinig seidean gaoithe moiré agus cualaidh sé sgread uathbasach. Dámharc sé thorc ach ní raibh fear ar bith le feiceal.
San mhaidín nuair a d’amharc sé amach bhí an coirce uilig ag fás arís.
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 00:23
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Bhí fear eile thoin fan áit ceadna agus ba ghnáthach leis bhí ag obair go mini car an Domhnach fosta. Is cosamhail go raibh sé cosceannta aca san am. Ar scór ar bith chuaidh sé amach oidhche Dhómnaigh amháin le coirce a bhaint agus corann leis. BhI sin i bhfad nús measa mar nach raibh gnáithe leis ar chor ar bith.
Thoisigh sé ag baint, agus i gcionn tamaill chualaidh sé cossceim ag teacht. D’amharc sé thart agus chonnaic sé fear beag dabh ag teacht annuas an ród. Léim sé thar an claidhe isteach sa pháirc, tharraing sé corrann ar faoi a chóta agus thoisigh sé ag cuidiughadh leis an feor eile. Do labhair fear na páirce air, ach ní bhfuair sé freagra ar bith. Saoil sé ar dtús gur be ceann de na comhursannaibh a bhí ann ach bhí iongantas air nuair nór
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 00:15
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rejected
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 00:11
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not lined. The robins eggs are a creamy colour. The thrush eggs are blue. The crows are white. The swallows eggs are green with yellow specks. The wagtails eggs are like the robins. Boys are told that it is a sin to rob birds nests. The birds sit on the eggs for about three weeks then the young ones come out.
When the swallows fly high it is a sign of fine weather and when they fly low it is a sign of bad weather. The curloo is known to whistle before rain. The seagulls fly inland before a storm. The crows are also very noisy before rain. The birds always fly back before rain.
St Francis was very fond of birds they used perch on his shoulders and on his hands. When Our Lord was on the cross it is said that the robin came under him and that a drop of blood fell on his breast. The cuckoo entices the smaller birds with her call and then when they come near she frightens them away by screaming.
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 23:59
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Information supplied by Mrs Healy, Aghabullogue, Coachford, Co. Cork. Age about 50 years.
The wild birds which frequent this parish are. The cuckoo, robin, lark, wren, thrush, crow, sparrow, blackbird, jackdaw, wagtail,swallow. They go away in the Autumn to warm countries until the Winter is over.
They build their nests in bushes by the roadside and under the eaves of houses. The crows build on the top of trees. The jackdaws build in chimneys. The larks build in tufts of grass.
The nests are made with sticks lined with moss and hair. The crows nests are
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 23:45
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travel in families. The most well known are Mick Driscoll, Paddy Driscoll, Bill Driscoll, Mary Tinsley, Daniel O'Connell, Mrs Hourigan, Mrs Mahony, Mrs Lynch, Kate Creedon, Dene The halfpenny and several others. As a rule they come at Christmas and Easter or when there is a wedding in the district. They often bring news from distant parts. The old people used gather around them as there was hardly any newspaper at the time.
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 23:38
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Information supplied by John Flynn, Oldcastle, Coachford, Co. Cork. Age 70 years.
There are people of no fixed residence who travel around the country from place to place. Some of them travel in caravans and others travel on foot. There are not so many now as formerly They make a living by selling small articles, such as lace, studs, buttons, laces, and sometimes cheap ornaments.
They often do a good trade amongst the people, and they get their meals from them. They buy their supplies in city shops such as Woolworths and such firms.
They are welcome in some remote places where there are no shops. Some of them remain for a long time and go around the country and put up at one house. Some sleep in the open, others in caravans, and others get shelter in the farmers houses. They get their food in the houses they are in a habbit of frequenting. They often receive donations of food such as eggs and potatoes and milk and other eatables and cast off clothes.
Some of them travel singly and others
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 23:28
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I
At all Ireland final last year at Killarney,
There were thousands of people from all over the land.
The arrangements were excellent in the beautiful stadium,
There was fine room for all to sit down or to stand.
II
The scenes that I witnessed I'll never forget them,
The myriads of voices all joined in one song.
And when the bands played the National Anthem,
The touching attention of the whole immense throng.
III
The games that were played were certainly gruelling,
A minor and senior for the coveted cup.
From start to finish they were most thrilling,
There was not a dull moment until time was up.
IV
One thing I regretted to see to see the mountains in mourning,
All capped with a mist that excluded from view.
The most perfect scenery this world can bost of,
Each time you will visit you will find something new.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 22:36
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Away with the hounds and the wild tallyho.
VII
Ti's awfully kind of you Patsy says she,
Resign your position and go along with me.
You can hunt in my woods and have nothing to do,
But permit me to play on your wild Barraboo.
VIII
The Southern Star has reported we hear,
That the fishermen heard it in Castletownbere.
They were stricken with terror saying what can it be,
Its the booming of thunder we can't go to sea.
IX
Stop said another, its an instrument unseen,
It belongs to a giant of the old named Oisin.
It was hid underneath some old druic dolhaun,
And ti's playing at a foxhunt today in Rylane.
X
But more of the men took a different view,
They said t'was the sound of some distant review.
They guessed what was right and they said what was true,
T'was Patsy was sounding his wild Barraboo.
XI
So now to conclude and to finish mu song,
Long life and success to that hero Pat Long.
And now that he is married and have nothing to do,
Only teaching the ladies his wild Barraboo.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 22:19
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of a most interesting and funny fox chase.
II
The seventeen lancers assembled one day,
By the borders of Rylane so sprite and gay.
The hounds they were growling aloud for fresh game,
As soon as they entered in Patsy's demesne.
III
How slyly poor Reynard stole out of the glen,
Although being surrounded by hundreds of men.
The hounds and the huntsmen they did him pursue,
And Pat Long kept sounding his Wild Barraboo.
IV
Then round the cover he played for an hour,
And next took his course towards Carrigagour.
The hounds and the huntsmen they did him pursue,
And Patsy kept sounding his Wild Barraboo.
V
A neat looking lady rode first in the chase,
Her hunter was bounding at a terrific pace.
How sullen and sudden she stopped and withdrew,
When she heard the first note of Pat Longs Barraboo.
VI
Young man said the lady have you seen the fox,
He's here Miss says Patsy like Jack in the Box.
He's comely and handsome he's foxy and brown,
And I'll let him fly into your fist for a crown.
The money he got and the fox he let go
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 21:28
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rejected
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1
You jovial young fellows of every degree,
I claim your attention and listen to me.
I mean for to sing and moreover to trace,
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 21:16
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Ba é an chead rud a rinne siad coilear airgid a chuir ar a mhuineal. Thanig an rása fríd páirceanna agus uile ach indeireadh na dala d’imthigh an madadh ruadh ar an t-iomlan aca agus ní fhacaidh siad ní ba mhó é.
Seachtmhain nó mar sin indiaidh sin bhí an fear seo ag obair mar ba ghnáthach leis nuair thug sé fa dear go raibh rud éigin ag an fhuinneog. Nuair damharc sé amach caidé bhí an acht an madadh ruadh ceadna arís agus an coilear ar a mhuindal. Thainig sé ó Conndae na Midhe arís taobh istigh de’n seachtmhain. Marbhadh é tamall beag indiaidh sin agus an coilear ar a mhuindal agus an data air – data am lae ar sgaoileadh amach é i gConndae na Midhe.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 21:13
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Tamall maith ó shoin san pharáiste seo bhí fear darb ainm Pádraig Ua Breislin. Bhí sé na táilliúir agus ba ghnáthach leis bhí ag obair go mall san oidhche go minic.
Oidhche amháin bhí sé ag obair agus é na shuidhe ar an table ag an fhuinneog, nuair chualaidh seo gleo áit eigin amuigh. Amach leis agus caidé fuair sé ach madadh ruadh istig i gcró na gcearc. Thunn tuigh sé isteach arís agus fuair sé pluidh chuaidh sé amach agus caic sé an plúid ar an madadh ruadh. Fuair sé greim air agus chuir sé isteach i mbarraille é. Chuir sé clár ar an bharaille agus an maidin lá thar na bhárach thug sé an madadh ruadh do tighearna talaimh a bhí na chomhnuidhe in Árd a’Rátha san am.
D’imthigh seisean leis go Conndae na Midhe an lá indhiaidh sin. Bhí móran daoine cruinnighte annsin le seilg a béith aca agus leig siad amach an madadh ruadh.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 10:59
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Your shoes they are in tatters, and your coat is all tore.
Tis hard for you be happy when your clothes they are so shabby,
And money that would buy them, you have left it down your throat.
VII
My mind it is much easier than the great old German Kaiser,
Who is guarded by a cordon as he goes along the road.
Both night and day he's guarded from the shell of the anarchist,
His crown it is a burden and his millions are a load.
VIII
Your kids at home are bawling, and for bread they're loudly calling,
And the money you've spent to-day, would buy a peck of coal.
And perhaps your wife is crying in her humble bed she's lying,
While you a drunken vagabond are singing round the road.
IX
Kind sir you are mistaken in the view that you have taken,
My kids feel no hunger nor the pinch of cold.
For my wife I never married nor to bed I never carried,
I am as single and as airy as a kid of ten years old.
X
I'll take you down to Fornaught, beside the river Shournach,
Where all of your ovation will be of no avail.
For if you cant pay the fine, I will take you down the line,
For a fortnight picking okum inside the county gaol.
The foregoing song was composed by John Crowley.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 10:14
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I
One Sunday evening lately as I strolled from New Tipperary,
My spirits being elated I sung a jovial note.
No wife I have to tease me, no children for to please them,
With a step so light and airy, I faced towards my home.
II
But my song was stopped so suddenly,
When the Sergeant he stepped up to me.
From the shadow of the graveyard, and I passing Donoughmore.
His features were so yellow, so cunning and so sallow,
And in front of his physiognomy there was a pointed nose.
III
"Young man" he says to me "You've been drinking much too free,
Besides you are disorderly by shouting on the road.
Your name and destination, for I'll take you to the station,
Where you can sing till morning inside in the Black Hole".
IV
"My first name as you see it commences with a P,
My namesake was a noble saint who preached to great and small.
And banished all the vipers from out this holy island,
And he never meant that Ireland should be ruled by Saxon laws".
V
My second name is Sexton, my forefathers lived in Leitrim,
Where they fought the Saxon foeman beneath the flag of green.
But when Cromwell crossed our shore, they faced for Donoughmore,
And now your humble servant is living in Killeen.
VI
You have been drinking Beamish porter, till your legs they cant support you,
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 09:46
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In olden times the general rule was three meals a day, breakfast, dinner, and supper,
Usually two or three hours work was done before breakfast. For the breakfast indian meal porridge and skim milk and some times potatoes and milk were used. For dinner potatoes and milk for the supper sometimes they had the porridge left over after the breakfast reheated. Where there large large families the table was placed in the middle of the floor and they all sat round it. Bread was made from Indian meal dried with flour. Meat was seldom eaten but when used, salt beef was used. Sometimes fish was used. Sprats were a general favourite.
On special festivals such as Christmas and Easter Sunday there was special food used. For Christmas they had tea and bakers bread.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 09:30
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Tháinig biseach ar an chois arais ach bhí sí cam. Ón lá sin amach bhí sé bacach.
Mar dubhairt mé cheana féin, bhí sé na ghreáfaidhe, agus ba ghnáthach le mórán daoine a beith ag airneal san tigh aige. Bhí baicle istigh oidhche amháin san gheimhreadh, agus bhí siad uilig ag cainnt ar bhaines a bhí ag teacht. Dubhairt duine eiginteach nach bfuigheadh Tadg bean choidhche siocair é a bheith bacach. Lean siad den chainnt sin ag gaíre agus ag deánamh grin ar Thaidg. Tháinig fear ar Thaidg sa deireadh ag eisteacht leo. Sín sé amach an chos cham. Thóg sé smutan a bhí a chois no teineadh. Tháinig sé anuas ar an chois, agus bhris sé arais í san áit ceadna. Sin an treas uair a raibh sí briste san áit ceadna. Chóirigh an doctuir i san am seo, ach bhí sé bacach go dtín lá a d’fág sé an tír seo. Nach iongantach na daoine a bhí ann san am.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 09:25
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thuic sé go dtín talamh agus bhris sé a chos ag an ghlúin.
Cuireadh fá choinne an doctúra, agus cheangal seisean suas an chos arais agus i gcionn tamaill bhí sé abalta suibhal comh maith ár bith sé ariamh roimhe.
Lá eile tamall indiaidh sin bhí toga i leic chonaill agus dfág lán cáirte fear an áit seo ag dul fod leis an tógha. Bhí achan rud maith go leor go raibh siad ag teacht abhaile. Is cosamhail go raibh bio tailte le fagháil ag an scoil, agus nuair a bhí siad ag teacht abhaile thuit siad amach.
Do scannruigh an capall agus ar siabhal leis. Chuaidh rath na cairte suas ar an cloidhe agus thionntugh sé. Do thuic an capall agus uile ar an ród agus bhí Tadg bocht faoín cháirt. Bhí an chos briste arais go direach san aít cheadna. Níor cuireadh fior ar an doctuir an uair seo ar chois ar bith. Dubhairt Tadg nach raibh maith ar bith ann. Dubhairt sé nach rabh an chos cóirighthe mar ba chearc an chead uair nuair a bhris sé arais san áit ceadna.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 09:13
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Ní raibh Tadg é féin bacach nuair a bhí sé óg. Nuair a chonnaic mise é an chead uair bhí sé na shean duine beagnach. Thug sé a chuid talaimh do fear eile agus chuaidh sé go dtín Oilean Úr. Fuair sé bas annsin seal tamail ó shoin do réir mo bharamhala.
Bhí cruinn mhór ag fás thart fa teach a athara nuair a bhí sé óg, agus bhí nead ag Snag-breac ar ceann aca. Dhréapuigh sé suas an crann lá amháin go raibh sé ag an nead. Mhill sé an nead acht nuair a bhí sé ag teach anuas
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 09:09
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leis an baile a fhágaile. Rinne Dómhnall a dhícheall gan a leigine leis ach ní raibh gar ann. Tháinig Seán beag suas leis, agus cuirr sé lann na speile fríd a choir, isteach ar taoibh amháin agus amach ar an taoibh eile. Chuir sin stad leis an chomórtas an lá sin, agus bhí Dómhnall bacach go dtí lá a bháis. Níl ceachtar aca beo anois. Fuair siad bas fa thuairim fiche bliadhain ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 09:06
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Bhí scaifte fear ag bainc féir lá amháin san (tass) tsean am do fear darb ainm Tadhg Tharlaigh – Tadhg Ua Gallchobhair i Mín na Coilleadh. Gréafaidhe bhead Tadg agus gréafaidhe an mhaith fosta do reír cunntais na ndaoineadh.
Ba gnáthach le tadg bróga a deánamh do na fir seo. Bhí se bacach agus de thairbhe sin ní thiocfadh leis mórán oibre a dheánamh taobh amuigh don teach.
Chruinnigh scaifte aca lá amháin le cuideidh a thabhairt de. Spealadóirí maith a bhí ionnta uilig. Bhí clúi ag gach fear aca ar obair spéile ar fud na tire.
Chuaidh siad isteach ceann aca indhiaidh an chinn eile. Bhí sraich le baine ag gach fear aca, agus ba truagh an duine nach raibh abalta a áit féin a chonghbailt.
Bhí fear ar an Ruadh Chró darb ainm Dómhnall Ua Maol Dómhnaigh, agus ba eirean an cheid fear a chuaidh isteach. Bhí an chliú aige ‘san ceanntar seo leis an speil. Indiadh bhí fear ar Mín a Teicheadh darb ainm Seán Ua Gallchobhair. Bhí Seán ag tarraingt suas leis agus scairt sé amach
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 00:22
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The sign of the cross must be made first starting at the forehead then towards the feet as far as the hand can reach, then as far as the hand can reach each side.
The prayer as follows.
Áine máthair Muire. Muire máthair Críost Eiblis gabrail máthair Eóin baiste cuirim an trúir fan idir mé is gabas na leaba cuirain an crann gur crochodh Íosa Críosd idir mé agus an trom laighe.
In Ainm An Athar agus an Mhic, agus an Sperod Naomh
Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 00:09
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A Turk, Jew, or Atheist
may enter here
But not a Papist. (another name for Catholics in olden days)
At that time there were learned men going around known as "Poor Scholars" who used to teach the children. One of these was passing the gate and he saw the writing, he did not like that because they were good Catholics. So he rubbed out the writing and wrote under-neath it.
Who ever wrote it
Wrote it well
But the same is written
On the gates of Hell.
When the owner of the house saw it he was very angry and he put on the paper that he would give a hundred pounds reward to whoever would tell who put down the writing but the story was never given away to him.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 00:07
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Hedge schools existed in my district. One at Hilmoyley, now Sayer's work shop, another at Bally Hemican on Pat Carroll's land, and another at Ballinvoher near Johny Carroll's. I can't say except a teacher named Dan Flynn who taught at Ballinvoher. I don't think they were strangers. You had such names as Dan Flynn and Garret Stack. The well to do farmers on some occasions had a teacher in the house for their own children. The teacher was boarded and lodged in the farmers houses as also were poor scholars who seemed to be gifted at the time and in many cases became the future teacher. The subject of Reading, Writing, Spelling, Arithmetic especially Mental Arithmetic were taught. I believe all through the medium of Irish also Catechism. They used two books long ago, namely, "An Gabha", "An Maistir". Writing was done with quill pens, and a sort of home made pencils called true stone. They had something in the shape of a black board. Often a large board painted any colour. Of course you
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 00:05
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by St Brendan, and "caused to abound in fish", in the course of time those who fished there churlishely refused a salmon to the monks of Ardfert which they wanted for a special occasion the blessing was withdrawn and ever since the Thyse is a fishless stream as it had been before Brendan's blessing. When the people go there to pay rounds they go in first and kneel down beside the well and pray and ask their petition. Then they start at the end of a little mound and say three rosaries and come to the well to finish up by taking a drink of the water and it is said while bathing in it or taking a drink if they see trout coming to the brink of the water they are sure that their petition is to be granted.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 11:46
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For the great part he took in this fine hunt to-day.
VI
Now before I conclude I must say a word,
And 'tis to express how my feelings were stirred.
When I saw how the ladies and gentlemen all,
Cleared every bank, rock, and stonewall.
You may talk of your cinema or big picture place,
But for genuine enjoyment give me the fox-hunters chase.
Long life to the ladies, and also their teams,
I hope through this night they have nice pleasant dreams.
To yourselves and the huntsmen 'tis all I will say,
You will always be welcome to sweet Coolineagh.
[Composed by T.T. Murphy, Coolineagh, Aghabullogue.]
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 11:36
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Where he kept us going for nearly an hour.
V
Then all around in a circle he went,
"Cripes" says Con Ring "for Mountrivers he's bent".
Just at that moment the fox changed his mind,
And got it into his head to leave Mountrivers behind.
Says Mick to his comrades "We have fine sport to-day",
As the fox headed back to his own Coolineagh.
Then on through the bogs and up the steep glen,
And now all the hunt came together again.
VI
Some of our party said "Tis not fair play,
To have so many of us out on our own for the day".
Three of the lot retired at the rocks,
And the fourth one held on and I say "he's some fox".
Then on for Woodhill, Dromatimore, and Aghavrin,
And sure it was now the real fun did begin.
He took us all over this very nice place,
"Well indeed" says Dan Twomey "It is a grand chase".
VII
Then on for Coolacullig, Rockgrove and Carhue,
To keep him in sight was all we could do.
Now darkness came on you could not hear a sound,
With the baying of the dogs when the fox went to ground.
The Master now said "Before we depart,
I must say a word or two from my heart.
I desire to sincerely thank Michael O'Shea,
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 11:15
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And similarly mounted were the O'Regan's & Shea's.
II
The Murphy's and Mahoney's were well to the fore,
And another fine sportsman from Mushere More.
And last but by no means the least in the sting,
Came that bold fearless horseman whose name is Con Ring.
When the Master arrived he looked round with delight,
And he said "Now to-day we'll give the foxes a fright.
If the hounds do not catch them we have boys here that will",
Then we moved off in line for Rylane's only hill.
III
Rylane was drawn black and we turned away,
And headed right over for sweet Coolineagh.
When we arrived at the covert we found game galore,
Then O'Mahoney shouted "Tis not one fox but four".
The Master turned round and spoke to himself,
As each party of hounds took a fox to itself.
Suddenly he shouts "Is Mick Shea in the crowd"?
"I'm here Sir all right" Mick answered aloud.
IV
"Very well Mick, let you take the fox on the right,
And I'll follow the others so the job will be light".
Away on with Mick and his gallant band,
Sure he's the best huntsman we have in the land.
Straight down the hill went the dogs and the fox,
But Mick didn't care about glen bog or rocks.
Over the flat and on for Knockrour,
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 10:44
approved
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1
At Aghabullogue Cross on the 8th of December,
We had a foxhunter's meeting you all will remember.
And which was attended by each gallant member,
From famed Blarney Castle to Mushera More.
All the sporting young farmers that live around here,
Came out in large numbers the huntsmen to cheer.
Dan Lyons and Dan Twomey on a fine pair of bays,
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 10:26
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When will you laugh at my airy comics,
Not till I come back to old Erin's shore.
So farewell dear father and likewise mother,
Farewell dear comrades all here around me.
When o'er the ocean I'll think of you,
Farewell mavourneen for thee I am sailing.
But woe to nature, it I will drown,
And a fond good bye to those colleens,
With light hearts airy in Knocknagown.
The above song was composed by Patrick Twomey for John Heirlihy about twenty years ago when he was leaving for America.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 10:15
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To bid farewell, it almost fails me,
My heart it falls from my bosom down.
But while I'll live I will remember,
The times so aisy in Knocknagown.
111
No more roving or evening scoring,
When will I ride on my fathers steed.
As I used to do when young and airy,
And jump the fences from field to field.
Oh by the laws that are in force in Erin,
And with taxation she is trodden down.
Leaves many a one like me bewailing,
Leaving Erin and Knocknagown.
1V
I am not a poet of high experience,
But hearts own nature causes me to rhyme.
And I being at leisure one evening lately,
I sat bewailing to write those lines.
Were it my lot to remain among you,
I'de sing your praises without a frown.
And with bards of a foreign nation,
I'll sing the praises of Knocknagown.
11V
When will I meet with with my fond companions,
When will I dance on my neighbours floor.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:59
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1
Kind friends and neighbours, please pay attention.
To a bit of poetry which breaks my heart.
Iv'e dwelt among you those twenty-two years.
I am feeling lonely, we now must part.
To a foreign shore I am bound to travel,
To seek a fortune while in my bloom.
But if God will spare me, I'll soon return to the friends and neighbours of Knocknagown.
11
It is hard to part with the dear old homestead,
But whats alotted we must go through.
And harder still to leave behind me, my friends relations and parents too.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:50
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it soon started,
And I promised to meet her one evening quite soon.
The above song was composed by John Cronin about twenty five years ago when the above match was played in Coachford for the repairs of the Aghabullogue school.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:46
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Jack Manning a genius,
Likewise Mickie Lynch the Cork men he fooled.
And young Mossie Maurice the pride of the parish,
He often laid low a young saint from Blackpool.
Frank Murphy was plucky and likewise Dan Buckley,
Next came young Heagarty showing them homerule.
Next was young Foley and also Jack Crowley,
Playing hide and go seek with the lads from Blackpool.
Jack Regan was there he could run like a hare,
Halloran and Kelleher ne'er broke the rule.
Likewise Paddy Buckley who played nice and plucky,
So ended the match with the lads from Blackpool.
1V
I winded my way right up to the station,
The lad with the gadget played a nice tune.
My doll I then parted the train
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:27
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I gaily paid eight-pence in aid of the school.
11
The first in the cards were the Reds and the Barrs,
This match was onesided and played rather cool.
For the Reds they ran through those lads wearing blue,
And are on for the final in aid of the school.
Then our own seventeen dressed white and green,
Next crossed their commands with the lads from Blackpool.
They all kept their places and hurled like blazes,
And made themselves winners in aid of the school.
111
At the goal stood Den Healy who hurled so gaily,
At midfield Dan Maurice who whipped it so cool.
Patcha and Billy were racing like devils,
And showed them some science which they ne'er saw at school.
Mick Moynihan was famous
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:15
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awaiting decision
The hurling match in aid of Aghabullogue School.
It is well I remember the 24th of September,
The morning was wet but it cleared off at noon.
When Mass it was over I being a young rover,
I went to pay fourpence in aid of the school.
I was late for the train when I met Captain Lane,
He said it was Joe Devlin would bring us home-rule.
For twenty-seven pounds to him they sent down,
Begor then said I it would build a nice school.
He walloped his horse right into a gallop,
And I followed after and whistled a tune.
I had two pints of porter and a doll by my shoulder,
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 11:37
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The names of the fields most common in the district where I live are, The Long Field, The High Field, The Well Field and the Fort Field. The Long Field got its name on account of its length. The High Field got its name because there was a house built there once and it was higher than any house in the parish at the time. The Well Field got its name because there is a spring well there and nobody remembers when it was made. The Fort Field got its name because there is a fairy Fort situated there. There is another field also called "Field of the Hurling". It got its name because fairies are supposed to be seen there hurling.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 11:37
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rejected
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The names of the fields most common in the district where I live are, The Long Field, The High Field, The Well Field and the Fort Field. The Long Field got its name on account of its length. The High Field got its name because there was a house built there once and it was higher than any house in the parish at the time. The Well Field got its name because there is a spring well there and nobody remembers when it was made. The Fort Field got its name because there is a fairy Fort situated there. There is another field also called "Field of the Hurling". It got its name because fairies are supposed to be seen there hurling.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 11:28
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there was a priest being hunted and and he jumped across a chasm which any other person could not jump.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 11:26
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awaiting decision
There are several old rocks and fields and bushes with names on them in this parish. There are three rocks in this parish called Carraig an Fhoindhne, Carraig na Goat, and Carraig a Chleisur.
The Mass Rock. So called because there were masses said there long ago.
The Paddock Field. So called because cattle were kept there.
The Chapel Field. So called because in that field there are three steps leading up to an altar.
The racecourse Field. So called because there were races held there long ago.
Pairc a Mullaig. So called because it is on top of a hill.
Mount Beag. So called because it is a small little hill.
Tobar na Buacalla. So called because boys used have a pattern there.
The Deers Leap. So called because a deer jumped across the river at this place.
The Priests Leap. So called because
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 11:14
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Forts or fortresses are underground caves supposed to be the homes of Danes in olden times. Where there is one fort you could see another fort from it.
There are passages underground from one fort to another. Not far from here in the Rylane district there are no less than three fields under one fort, while in one of the fields there are two stones standing perpendicular supposed to have Ogham inscriptions on them.
Now there was a house supposed to be the most unlucky house in the parish, and three families living in that house and the three families were all ways fighting between themselves, one day when they were fighting one woman let her child fall, and they walked on the child and killed it. And it was buried by the roadside the grave can be seen to the present day.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 10:54
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horse was drowned there long ago and that an eel comes out on the bank once every seven years wearing a horses colar.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 10:51
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The names of some of the fields in our farm are
The Chapel Field. So called because it is the field behind the chapel.
The School House Field. So called because it is the field in front of the school.
Crusheen Field. So called because it is situated near a cross called Crusheen na Gaba. A smith lived there long ago.
The Long Field. So called because it is a long field.
The Small Field. So called because it is a small field.
The Slate House Field. Because it is near a wood with a big slate House.
The Race Course Field. So called because there used to be races held there long ago.
The Tea House Inse. So called because they used to drink tea and make camps there when they used go paying rounds to the well.
Pairc na Moná. So called because there was turf found there long ago.
There is also a river running through our land it is called Delehina.
There is a place called Mullineasog it is said there is a hole there to which there is no bottom. It is also that a
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 10:22
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Páirc na Plover. So called because the Plover is always seen there.
Na Páirc Bhan Fada. So called as they are long white field in the middle of the hill.
The Oak Field. So called as there is an oak wood at the back of it.
The Rightaway Field. So called as the farmer in the next farm had a passage through it.
The Sandpit Field. So called as there is a sandpit in it.
The Parks. So called as they are large square fields.
Sparrows Field. So called as there was a man living at the corner of the field who was nicknamed Sparrow.
The Path Field. So called as there is a path through it.
The Carraigin Field. So called as there is a large amount of rocks in it.
The Watery Field. So called because there is a drain of water running through it.
The Fort Field. So called as there is a fairy fort in it.
The Field of the Kill. So called as there is an old lime kill in it.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 09:57
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awaiting decision
In the farm of Mr E Twomey of Woodfield each field is known by a different name. Páirc na Sprid. So called as fairies were supposed to be seen there.
Páirc na Croisse. So called as it was the field at the cross.
Páirc na Stand. So called as there were stone stands there for hay in olden times.
Higgins Field. So called as it belonged to a family named Higgins one time.
The Gold Field. So called as it is said there is gold hidden there.
The High Field. So called as it is a very high field.
The Flat Fields. So called as they are very level fields.
The Lake Fields. So called as they are near the Lackaneen Lakes.
The Seven corner Field. So called as it is all corners.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 09:42
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Nuair chualaidh siad na páisdi ag caoineadh, d’aithin siad ga maith go rabh na daoine ann sin fosta. Chuairtigh siad na tighthe roimhe sin ach ní raibh duine ar bith le fághail.
Chruinnigh siad thart fan lig agus mharbh siad na daoine uilig acht beagan fear a déaluigh orra. Ní raibh ainm ar bith ar an áit ó shoin ach “Poll a Mhurdaí”.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 09:39
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Anns an am araibh na dlighthe peannaideach ar bun san tír seo. Ba ghnáthach le na siaghduiri dearga a bheith ag dul thart, le creach agus ar a dheanamh ar na Caitliocoigh.
Bhí daoine na gcomnuidhe i gcaiseal san am agus fuair siad eolar go mbeádh na saighdiúirí amuigh an oidhche sin. D’fag siad uilig na tighthe idir óg agus aosta, agus cruinnigh siad uilig le chéile i lig ar thaoibh an chnuic. Bhí an oidhche an doineannta ag cur fearthanna agus ag seideidh gaoithe moiré. Bhí beagan fargaidh aca faoí aill a bhí ar thaoibh an luig. Fa thuairim an mheadhan oidhche thoisigh cuid de na páisdibh óga ag caoineadh:
Caidé tharluigh ach go raibh dream de na saighdiúirí ag dul thart san am.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 09:30
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Bhí fear i Mhín na Coilleadh fad ó shoin darbh ainm Searlas Ua Gallchobhair. Lá amháin i ndeireadh an Fhógmhair bhí sé amuigh ag bainc féir agus bhí a bhean istigh san tigh ag sníomh. Bhí an tráthnóna ann, agus bhí sí na suidhe ag an fhuinneoig agus í ag abair ar a dícheall nuair bhuail duine éigin ar an doras. Tar isteach; arsa sise. Fos gladh an dorus agus cé tháinig isteach ach bean bheag aorta. Chuir bean a’ tighe fáilte roimpi, agus diarr uirre suidhe tamall.
Dubhairt an bhean bheag nach raibh faill aici suidhe. Go raibh deifre uirre. An féidir leim rud ar bith a deánamh duit arsa bean a toighe. Tá mearcan ime de dúghbhail orm ars an bhean bheag ina tú a leithead le spárail agat. Tá cuideachta le bheith agam anocht agus níl mo shaích ime agam. Níl airgead ar bith agam le tabhairt duith fa – na – coinne, ach ní bhéidh tú dadadh níor meara da dtabairfeidh tú damh í.
Ní raibh ag an bhean ach giota amháin ime, acht glac sí truagh do’n mnaoi bhoithe, agus thug sí díthe an t-im.
Thug an bhean bheag buaidheachas díthe, agus
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 00:17
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awaiting decision
bell ringing. In the outskirts of that parish there are also two galán's and a man was killed there it therefore was called Galán Caum.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 00:14
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awaiting decision
In the land of Mr Michael Twomey, Woodfield, there are several fields bearing certain names. The Chapel Field: is so called as there was a chapel there in the Penal times. The Fort Field: is so called as the is a fort in it. The Small Field: is so called as it is the smallest field in the farm. The Galán Field is so called as there is a "galán" in it. Páirc an Apples: is so called as a lot of apples used grow there long ago. The Cill Field: is so called as there was a cill there long ago. Páirc a Draine: is so called as the field is all drained. The Straw Field: is so called as the straw is always being threshed in the same field. The Long Field: is so called as the field is very long. The Field of St Olan's stone: is so called as there is a stone in the field with the print of St Olan's foot in it. In the parish of Clondrohid and in the townland of "Knockraheen" there was also a church in a hollow in the middle of a mountain, this church is still to be seen. Some people from an outside parish stole the flags from under the altar by night. Sleep was impossible for the people until they returned them again, all night long they used hear the little altar
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 12:19
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There are three grave yards in this parish. One in Aghabullogue, one in Kilcolman, one in Magourney.
They are all in use. The shape of one is round and the other two are oblong. St Olan is buried in Aghabullogue and the remains of an old protestant church is still to be seen there. There are a lot of trees growing round the grave yard there. There are a few tombs there. There are several old dates on monuments and crosses. Some of the dates are 1700. 1762. 1800 - 1806. There are also a lot of other dates.
There are also a lot of headstones, several kinds. Some of the old headstones are high stones stuck in the ground. The new stones are made of marble or limestone.
The fore going information was supplied by Mrs Murphy. Ahghabullogue, Coachford, Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 12:08
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Information supplied by Mr P. Murphy, Dromatimore.
There are three churchyards in this parish. They are situated in Aghabullogue, Kilcolman, Magourney.
They are all in use. There is one of them round. The other two are oblong. Their is a ruin in each of them. Magourney churchyard is sloping towards the south. Kilcolman churchyard is sloping towards the west and Aghabullogue churchyard is level. There are a lot of trees growing in each of them.
There are old tombs and monuments in them. There are several dates on them dating from 1700 A.D. to 1900 A.D. The new monuments are ornamented with wreaths of flowers. There are several kinds of monuments in them. Some of them are five and six feet high and the dates that the persons died are written on them.
More of them are high stones stuck in the ground at the heads of the graves.
There are others about four feet high with round tops. They are made of marble and stone and iron and limestone and sandstone.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 11:34
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There are three graveyards in this parish. Aghabullogue, Kilcolman and Magourney. Aghabullogue graveyard is situated in the glebe lands about ¼ of a mile from Aghabullogue church. Funerals come there very often. There is a ruin in Aghabullogue and Magourney. There is a wing and gable end still standing. There are also graves at the mouth of the gable end. And also a very old fashioned monument in which there is no date marked. There are also two graves with ten iron bars and ten strong chains going from one bar to the other. Here all protestants were buried. There are very old dates marked on the tomb stones, back to the year 1700, 1705 and the newest is 1933. Un baptised children were buried in unconsecrated ground behind the old church. Every family still uses certain graveyards. There are trees all around the graveyard, which are very high and will be cut down. The protestant church was a catholick church in the penal days. There was also a hut there where the police used stay.
The foregoing information was supplied by- Mr D Creedon, Dromatimore.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 11:13
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you may guess for ever but you cant guess that.
A. A pipe.
Q. What is that is taken to the table, cut, and never eaten.
A. A deck of cards.
Q. There is a little house, and a mouse couldn't live in it, and all the men in town couldn't count how many windows in it.
A. A Thimble.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 11:09
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Q. What is half the moon like?
A. The other half.
Q. What month do babies speak least?
A. In February.
Q. There lives a black man in the middle of my field, when I pull his tail his nose will bleed. What is it?
A. A pump.
Q. Four long standards, four lily anders, two lookers, two cruckers, and a whisk about. What is it?
A. A cow.
Q. It has a head like a thimble, a tail like a rat
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 11:03
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Continued From Page 33.
It returns every year to the old nest and repairs it. The crow builds its nest on the top of a tree and lays about three eggs. The Jackdaw builds its nest in the chimneys of houses. It also lays about three eggs. It is a very troublesome bird.
The Curlew and Seagul are birds which foretells a change in the weather by their movements. The swallow also foretells a change. When the swallow flys low it is a sign of rain. When the Curlew flys north and whistles it is a sign of rain. When the Seagul flys inland it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:54
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The sparrow builds its nest in the hay barns. It lays about four eggs. The wren builds its nest in a hole of the fence or on a low tree. It lays about from sixteen to twenty eggs. The robin builds its nest in the hole of a fence and it lays about five eggs. The Cuckoo is a migratory bird. It comes in the end of April and leaves in July and it is heard of no more until the following summer. The is a bird that nither builds its own nest or hatches its own eggs or rears its own young. It lays its eggs in another birds nest. When the young cuckoo comes out of the egg it is very greedy and after a few days it eats all the food which the foster mother brings in. It also throws the other little birds out of the nest.
The lark builds its nest down on the ground in a place where there is very high grass. It lays about five eggs. The black bird makes its nest on a low tree. It lays about four eggs. The thrush makes its nest in a bush or a low tree. It lays about four eggs also. The wagtail builds its nest in a hole of the fence. It lays about five eggs. The swallow builds its nest in the inside of houses. It rears two and sometimes three batches of young.
Continued on Page 38
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:52
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A. Death.
Q. If you and a goose were up in a castle how would you get down.
A. Pluck her.
Q. It is in the bolster but not in the bed. It is in the brain but not in the head. It is in the minister but not in the people. It is in the Church but not in the steeple.
A. The letter r.
Q. Twenty six (sick) sheep in a field one died how many were left.
A. Nineteen.
Q. The more you take from it the bigger it get.
A. A hole.
Q. Constantinople is a very big word if you cant spell it you are a very big dunce.
A. It.
Q. Spell tumble down ditch in three letters.
A. Gap.
Q. Ink, ank under the bank ten drawing four.
A. A woman milking a cow.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 10:32
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Question. There was a man rode through the town Great Britian was his name the horse he rode was shod with gold three times I have his name.
Answer. Was.
Q. As I went up to Saint Luke's I met three Christian people they were neither men, women, or children, what were they.
A. Man, Woman, and child.
Q. As I went up to saint Ive's I met nine men and their wives each wife had a cat and each cat had a kitten and how many went up to St Ives.
A. No one but myself. I only met them.
Q. If Jacks father was Paddy's brother what was Jacks father to Paddy's mother.
A. Her son.
Q. There is a well behind the house and in the well there is a cup and in the cup there is a sup and every one must taste it
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 00:26
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Local fairs are always held in the town and certain country places. Cattle buyers buy at the country houses. In small places they hold the fair in the street and in big towns they hold them in fairgreens.
In fairgreens toll is given if you sell 3d or 6d is usually paid as toll money. If you don't sell you put your finger on a red mark this is almost the same as swearing on oath.
When an animal is sold luck money is given and
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 00:20
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auntie joaney, she had timber toes and an iron nose, and upon my word she would frighten the crows.
A. A Gun.
Q. Ten men's length, ten men's strength and after a little boy could take it up and run away with it.
A. A rope.
Q. I have a little cow and she never runs dry and I milk her by twisting her horns.
A. A pump.
Q. As I was going over Parliament Bridge I met a Parliament scholar, he drew off his hat, and drew of his gloves tell me the name of the scholar.
A. Andrew.
Q. I have a little house and a mouse could not live in it and all the men in town could not count how many windows in it.
A. A thimble.
Q. Which would you rather pick a bone bare or a bare bone.
A. A bone bare.
Q. I have a little horse, he eats ash, elm, and oak and when I give him a drink he chokes.
A. The fire.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 00:07
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Question. Long legs, crooked thighs, short head and no eyes.
Answer. A Tongs.
Q. What is half the moon like.
A. The other half.
Q. How many wells would make a river.
A. One if twas long enough.
Q. Forty sheep went out a gap forty more went after that, six and seven twice eleven; three and two how much is that.
A. Five.
Q. As I was going over a bridge, I had a little pig, I should pay a penny custom I had no penny I got no penny and I paid the penny custom, how did I pay the penny custom.
A. I had a halfpenny and I had a halfpenny.
Q. Tis black, tis white, tis red all over.
A. Newspaper.
Q. Why does a cow look over a ditch.
A. Because she cant look under it.
Q. As I was going up a slippery gap I met my
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 23:55
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The sparrow builds its nest in the hay barns. It lays about four eggs. The wren builds its nest in a hole of the fence or on a low tree. It lays about from sixteen to twenty eggs. The robin builds its nest in the hole of a fence and it lays about five eggs. The Cuckoo is a migratory bird. It comes in the end of April and leaves in July and it is heard of no more until the following summer. The is a bird that nither builds its own nest or hatches its own eggs or rears its own young. It lays its eggs in another birds nest. When the young cuckoo comes out of the egg it is very greedy and after a few days it eats all the food which the foster mother brings in. It also throws the other little birds out of the nest.
The lark builds its nest down on the ground in a place where there is very high grass. It lays about five eggs. The black bird makes its nest on a low tree. It lays about four eggs. The thrush makes its nest in a bush or a low tree. It lays about four eggs also. The wagtail builds its nest in a hole of the fence. It lays about five eggs. The swallow builds its nest in the inside of houses. It rears two and sometimes three batches of young.
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 23:37
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awaiting decision
About a quarter of a mile from the scool there is a fort. It is circular in shape. It is surrounded by a trench about eight feet deep. There are trees growing around it. I have heard from those who explored it that there is a passage leading to an under ground chamber and that there are several small rooms in it. There are passages leading to three other forts in the district, one in Clonmoyle another in Coolinea and another in Woodfield. The fort in Clonmoyle is within view of it. They were made by the Danes in Ancient times, and in times of war they were able to hold communications with each other.
Birdlore.
The birds most common in our district are the sparrow the Wren the Robin the Cuckoo the lark The black bird, the thrush the wagtail, and the Swallow and the Jackdaw and Crow.
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 23:33
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awaiting decision
About a quarter of a mile from the scool there is a fort. It is circular in shape. It is surrounded by a trench about eight feet deep. There are trees growing around it. I have heard from those who explored it that there is a passage leading to an under ground chamber and that there are several small rooms in it. There are passages leading to three other forts in the district, one in Clonmoyle another in Coolinea and another in Woodfield. The fort in Clonmoyle is within view of it. They were made by the Danes in Ancient times, and in times of war they were able to hold communications with each other.
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 21:05
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exploring further something quenched the candle. They then lit a match but it quenched. They failed to light the candle so that they had to come out again. The entrance or the hole which is in the middle of the fort is now closed up with stones as pigs were going down there. There were many stories connected with this fort in olden times. Music was supposed to be heard playing and cocks were supposed to be heard crowing and the people believed that fairies were there. It is said that these forts were built by the danes or by another race called the Tuatha Dé Dánnans. The Lepracaun used be also seen there. It used also be said in the olden times that if a person died of a sudden death, he was carried by the fairies and taken to the nearest fort. The underground passages lead from one fort to another. The fort at Woodfield connects with one in Clonmoyle.
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 20:51
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There are in this district several forts the majority of which are still intact. They used to be a Liss in the olden times. Each one of them is in view of the other, these forts used to be levelled to the ground in the olden times but the shape of them are yet to be seen. They are circular in shape with double mounds of earth and deep mud between some of them.
There is a very large one in the vicinity of Aghabullogue and in the townland of Woodfield. It is at least one acre of ground in area. There is a hole or entrance in the middle of the floor with several steps leading down to the apartments below. When you enter down the steps, there is a hall or gangway. The floor, walls, and roof are covered with flags. The person who told me this went down there about fifty years ago when he was a young boy. He was also accompanied by another young boy. They explored a good many of these rounds but found nothing above the ordinary but pieces of broken earthenware. The place was very dark so that they had a candle and when they were
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 20:28
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awaiting decision
sidheóg ag gluais thart ar bharr aille a bhí ar cionn an luig. Bhí siad uilig gleasta suas cosamhail leis na gárdai a bhí ann san am. Bhí cualaich gorm, caipín píce, crios agus bata crochta uaidh ar gach fear aca. Stad siad agus d’amharc siad ar na fir. Ach núr labhair siad fical ar bith. Tháinig eagla ar na fir nuair a chuaidh siad ar amharc, agus chruinnigh siad suas gach rud a bhí aca mar gleas-oibre san áith.
Chuir siad gach rud i bhfolach gan móran muille. Ní rabh ann ach go raibh siad ar shiubhail ón áit nuair a tháinig scaifte de na (pileors) thart. Rinne duine éigin spidóireach orra, agus bhéadh ach an fear gaibhte ach is be na sidheóga.
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 20:27
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awaiting decision
Ag deánamh poitín.
Anns an ceanntar seo san am fad ó ba nós ag na daoinibh poitín a dheánamh go minic. Siomaidh scéal greann mar atá innste fa’n obair. Tá áit ins an ceanntar seo idir Caiseal agus Mín a’Bhealaigh, agus seo sceal fa baicle fear a bhí ag deánamh poitín annsin oidhche amháin.
Bhí scaifte fear amuigh oidhche amháin annsin an log seo agus iad ag deánamh poitín. Bhí sé ag torraingt suas leis an mheadhon oidhche agus iad beagnach criochnus gheo leis an obair, nuair chualaidh siad fuaim cómhgarach doibh. D’amarc siad thart gach aon aít ach ní raibh a dhach le feiceal. Tamall beag indiaidh sin chonnaic siad scaifte
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 20:26
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awaiting decision
huamhacha acht sin a raibh aca mar thoradh. Bhí an bheirt aca slán beo san uaimh i rith an ama. Deirtear gur bhí Gráine a ba chionntaigh leis an chleas seo ar dtús.
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 20:50
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fán teach nach raibh liónta. Cúpla lá indhiaidh sin bhuail siad an bainne ramhór a bhí cruinnighte aca agus ní fhaca aon dhuine ariamh an oiread sin ime a’r bhí san chuinneóig. Dhúl obéin an tim agus cheannuigh sé biodh do na fir oibre. Beigean díthe an bainne a bhualadh gach lá bhí an a rud sin aici, agus mhóir sí mar sin go raibh an teach úr tígtu. Dfán an bhó leobtha irich an ama agus chuir sé sán a gcraicinn de un gantas ar achan duine nac raibh duine ar bith ar a lorg.
Lá amháin i ndeireadh an Fhighmhair bhí sí amuigh san bhuaile ag inigilt mar ba ghnáthach leithe, nuair a thóg sí a ceann go tobann agus thusigh sé ag géimnigh. I gcionn tamaill thíg sé a ruball san aer agus ar shiubhal leithe ag rith ar a dícheall. Chuaidh sí ar amharc ar bharr chnuic neas do Carraig a’ tSagairt, agus taisg no tuairisg ní raibh le fagháil uirre ní ba [mhd?]. D’imthigh an gamhain leithe. Deirtear gur ba le na si deigaibh an bhó.
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 20:42
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leis an obair a déanamh ni mbheadh mó abalta iad a chothughadh. Is cuma fa sin ars an fear beag, caithfid tú glanad amach ar an áit seo. Achan brain uirghe acú tusfa ag cathadh amach ar an dorus tá sé ag teacht isteach dúinne. Tá feorg mhór ar an ri agus an bainríoghan agus de thairbe sin. Caithfid tú im theacht.
Do leag sé an teach nua arair agus d’iompar sé cuid de na cloche go dún bun úr. Nuair o’ déirigh sé san maidin bhí an cuid is mo aca san áit. Chruinnigh cuid de na comfurannaibh nuair chualaidh siad on scéal, agus chuidigh siad leis ar antigh úr.
An chead lá a bhí siad ag obair thainig bó choimhthigeach anuas an pháirc agus í ag géimnidh ar a dícheall. Do stad sí san bhuaile taobh amuigh den boith agus thoisigh sé inigilt. Chuir sé scéal amach fein bhuin ach [nún?] tháinig duine ar bith fá-na-choinne. Cheangal sé san boith í an oidhche sin agus rug sí gamhain ar maidin lá h ar na bhásach. Bhí an oiread sin bainne aici ar ní raibh suitheach
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 20:36
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Bhí fear san baile seo am amháin agus thóg sé teach úr. Bhí sé na chómhnuidhe tamall beag ins an tigh seo nuair a thug sé fa dear go raibh rud éigin cearr.
Achan oidhche indhiaidh a dúl a luighe de, cluinfead seo an ghleo ar fad thart fan teach. D’éirigh sé go minic ach ní raibh aon rud le feiceáil.
Tráthnona amháin ag tuitim na h-oidhche bhí sé ag teacht abhaile agus obair an lae criochnuighthe aige. Casadh fear beag air ar an tsráid agus labhair sé leis mar seo.
“Caithifidh tú an teach seo a athrú” arsan fear beag, tá sé tóghta ar mo chuid talaimh. Caidén doigh adtig liom sin a déanamh ars an fear, nil sé criochnuighte agam ach seachtínoin amháin. Caich mó iomlan mo chuil airgid ar an obair agus anois níl pinginn raudh agam. Le na chois sin, níl bó agam no bainne ac oiread, agus da bfuighinn fir
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 20:30
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Bhí fear in a chómhnuidhe i Mhín na Coilleidh i bPáraiste Árd a Rátha fa thuairim céad bliadhain ó shoin. Darb ainm Séarlas Ua Gallchobhair. Bhí sé amuigh ga luath maidín amháin ag buachailleacha na mbó ar thaobh an bhealaigh mhóir. Maidín deas the a bhí ann i mí na Bealtaine.
Bhí sgairte caorach ar thaobh an chnuic agus bhí sé ag amharc orra. I bpreabadh na suil thóg na caoirigh uilig a gceann, agus d’imthigh siad le rása. Shaoil seisean ar dtús gur sionnach a bhí ann ach igcionn tamaill chonnaic sé an taírt ag teach ann uas an cnoc. Bhí si cosamhail le fainne mór dubh agus comh mór le roth cairce. Chuaidh se thart le na thaobh agus coidé bhí ann ach eascon mhór agus greinn rubaill aici na beal féin. Chuaidh sí isteach san lich beag atá suidte san bhaile seo fos.
Dfág sí lorg tsanna ar an talamh, lean seisean an lorg seo go barr an chnuic, agus fhad le lich beag eile atá annsin. B'furus a
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 20:19
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siad cléar air.
Rinne siad rópa de ghruaig an fhir agus cheangal siad an rópa do posta an doruis. Annsin sgairc siad amach go raibh an námhaid ag teacht. Mhurgail an fear, thug sé léim agus d’fág sé croiceann a chin agus a chuid ghruaige ceangailte den posta. Níor b’iongantas ar bith go raibh sé ca mhór ar a chéill le feirg. Chruinnigh sé na mná uilig isteach san cháislean agus chuir sé teine leis an t-iomlan
Fán am seo bhí na Fiana ar bharr chnuic giota maich o’n áic agus chinnaic siad an lasair.
Thionntuig siad agus thug siad aghaidh ar an cháislean chom tuich agus thiocfadh leo. Ach ní rabh gar ann. Nuair ranig siad an áit bhí an caislean doíghte go talamh, agus ní rabh dadadh le fagháil ach cnámha na mban, bhí an fear ar shiubhal.
Chruinnigh siad na cnámha agus chuir siad iad uilig i gcuideachta a chéile san áic a dtugtar cill na mban uirre ó shoin.
‘Siomaidh uair ó shoin a
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 20:09
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“Cill na mBan”.
Seo an tainm atá ar sean roilig atá san taobh uchtar de’n baile a dthugtar “brácaigh” air. Tá an baile seo suidte i bParáiste ÁrdaRátha i gconndae Thír Chonaill, agus tá an tsean roilig fa thuairim leach-mhíle ón mbaile mór.
Seo an scéal atá innite fan chill seo.
San am fad ó nuair a bhí na Fiana in Éirinn bhí cáislean adhmuid aca cómhgarach do’n áic seo. Bhí siad amuigh a seilg lá amháin, mar ba ghnáthach leo, agus d’fág siad feor amháin san cháislean mar gárda. Bhí scaifte ban san caislean fosta.
Lá an te a bhí ann agus bhí an fear seo na shearamh taobh amuigh den doras agus píce in a láimh aige. I gcuinn tamaill thuic sé na chodhladh. Tháinig cuid de na mnaibh amach ar an dún. Thug siad fa dear caidé mar bhí an scéal agus rinne siad suas go ni mreochaidh
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 00:42
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rope round the barn at Milltown for a wager.
Further South along the Coast near Termonfeckin Thomas Maguire of Sheatland and the Drews were also fine athletes, who had heard of the prowess of our local men and were anxious to try conclusions with them.
Accordingly a meeting was arranged between them at Grange Bellew about the tie of the Fenian rising, the events including running jumping weights throwing and handball.
Owing to an accidents to Termonfeckin's best miler the mile was not decided though Sarsfield turned up alright.
Grange Bellew had victories in there long jump.
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 00:39
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Sty in the Eye:- A thorn of a gooseberry bush is pointed at the stye. The person is to do this three times a day and at the end of three days the sty is gone.
Gumboil:- The gumboil is a very sore thing which causes swelling in the jaw. This torture can be easily stopped by putting a stocking full of roasted salt on the swollen jaw which causes the gumboil to burst and after a few hours the pain goes away.
A Lump on the head:- a cold stone is put on the lump and by degrees the swelling lowers.
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 00:31
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when he was gone his wife thought she heard him come back again so she got up and went out to see if he wanted any thing. She was out for some time and when she came back she said he was not there. She was dead for that day week. It was said she was taken by the fairies.
Her husband went to some wise old person and he was told to go fort at midnight and to make a ring with holy water there, and that he would see some horses coming and that his wife would be up on a white horse behind a man. He was told to take her off the horse and to take her into the ring made with holy water and that he would have his wife. He went and did all as he was told. He saw his wife but he had not the courage to take her of the horse.
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 00:21
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taken up by the forts so he set to work to level them out. He worked until he was nearly finished. He felt very tired one night going to bed. He thought it was from working too hard but when morning came he could move no hand. He never did a days work after and he had to be fed while he lived as his hands were lifeless.
Another man had a fort in his land. He never liked to interfere with it. His son always wished to plough it out. One day when the father was out the son got his horses and plough and ploughed out the fort. When the father came home he was very angry with him but that night the son complained of a headache and he was buried for that day week.
There is another story told about a house being built in the passage between two forts. The house is in the parish of Aghinagh. The people who live in that house never lock their doors and if they did they would be open in the morning. The story is told that the man of the house was going to the fair early in the morning and
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 00:06
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In my district there are many forts. It's supposed that they were fortresses of Danes. They are circular in shape and are made up of earth, now over grown with moss and grass. Inside of those circles there is a hole leading under ground from one fort to another. All those passages are between two and three feet high and are lined all round with flags.
No one likes to interfere with these forts as any one who interfered with them in the olden times was suddenly stricken down and if they died it was said they were swept away by the faries for interfering with the forts. These are some stories I have been told in connection with forts. A man one time had three forts in his land. This man did not like so much of his ground
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 23:54
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was put steeping in water and it pounded with big mallets. Then when it was steeped enough they made linen out of it with a special wheel for that purpose.
Thomas Healy
Aghaballogue.
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 23:53
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They gathered a lot of willow twigs and they put the strong ones at the bottom. Then they put five or six strong twigs standing around the baskets and they weaved the others in and out around these to make the sides. One would be made in a couple of hours and they were sold for about a half a crown. They were called "panniers".
"Sugan" chairs were also made in the district. These were made much the same as the baskets. The backs and legs were made of twigs and the seats were made of twisted hay ("Sugans").
Women used make tallow candles out of the fat of cows. When a cow was killed the fat was taken out of her and made into candles. This is the manner in which the candles were made. First of all the fat was boiled in a big pot until it was a liquid. Then a mould was got and a bit of twine was put into it. A nail was put at each end of the twine to keep it in position. Then the mould was filled with the liquid and it was put in some cool place to become solid. They were used to light the homesteads.
The old women used to spin wool by night around the fire and make woolen thread. This they weaved into cloth.
Flax used be grown in the fields and the fibre used be gathered when it was ripe. Afterwards it
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:29
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There were many old industries amongst the Irish long ago. Such as basket making and candle making and spinning and weaving. Many people made baskets
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:26
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Long ago flax was grown in Ireland very much, it was the only means the people had of making calico or coarse linnen and which they used for making shirts and sheets, it was very hard wearing material.
Frieze or a coarse kind of tweed was made also. In Mullinhassig near Ballinamorrive there was a mill for making frieze. In latter this mill was changed into a creamery.
Baskets were made of twigs, There was a big kind of basket called pannier carried on the back.
Candles were made from the fat of animals especially the cow. They were called tallow candles. One kind were dip candles they were made by dipping a cotton thread, a wick, into boiling fat and taking it out to cool and dipped again and again till it was the required thickness. There were other kinds of candles called mould candles. These moulds or shapes were filled with the boiling fat each having a thread or wick through the middle, when the fat was cold it was removed from the mould and was ready to be used.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:12
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In the Penal Times (continued from page 16)
or that they may be shot down, but as it has been said before although the house was occupied by soldiers and police they failed to find the priest. One night at the same time a crowd came and threw the slates off the protestant church a few days previous to that there was a man named Denis O'Leary from Clonmoyle arrested and they left a notice on the door with the following inscriptions
"They tumbled down our churches"
"And branded on our doors"
"No more of your false preaching"
"Till O'Leary will come home".
On the eve of his coming home a large procession gathered at Peake and he was sholderered home and there was tar barrels blazing in praise of O'Leary. The person who gave me this information did not see these events happening but his father did.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 00:40
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"O Mary conceived without sin pray for us who fly to thee. Refuge of Sinners, Mother of those who are in sorrow, leave us not in the hour of Death, but obtain for us perfect sorow, sincere contrition, remission of sins, a worthy reception of the most "Holy Viaticum" and the strength of the Sacrament of Extreme Unction so that we may be able to stand with safety before the throne of the just and merciful Judge "God". Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 00:33
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with thorns. They will cruafy thee to a cross they will pierce thy side with a lance. My dear Mother your words are true Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 00:30
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When the gentle virgin Mary was sleeping in her bed there appeared to her a vison of her son passing and re-passing before her observing this he speaks to her Mother what is it thou dreamest. My son I see men coming. to arrest thee carrying a bright lantern. They spit in Thy sacred face. They will spurn thee under foot. They will scourge thee with whips. They will crown thy sacred head
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 00:23
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Most merciful God have mercy on me my soul and my body I give up to thee. To thy five bleeding wounds that were nailed to a tree most merciful God have mercy on me forgive me my sins and bring me to life everlasting Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 00:18
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St Joseph took Our Lord down from the cross and buried him. O Lord Jesus Christ through Thy sufferings and death on the cross thy soul was fighting out of this world. Give us grace that we may carry our cross patiently save us from all dangerous death now and forever. Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 00:14
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O Adorable Lord, and Saviour Jesus Christ, dying on the gallows tree. O Holy Cross of Christ see me safe true. O Holy Cross of Christ ward off from us all dangers deaths. Give us life always. O Crucified Jesus of Nazereth dying on the gallows tree save us. O holy Cross of Christ protect us from our enemies. O holy Cross of Christ guide us the right way to happiness. In honour of Our Lord Jesus Christ in honour of his Glorious resurection in Gods like ascension to which he ascended into heaven through as Jesus was born on Christmas Day in a Stable at Bethlehem. Through as Jesus died to save sinners. Through as Nicodemus and
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 00:01
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At the sight of a priest you ought to say.
This is he who made me a Child of God, and opened Heaven to me, who purified me from sin and gives my soul nourishment, Amen.
At the sight of a church say
The body of Our Lord is there. How come it there. A priest has been there and has said Holy Mass. Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 23:54
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Sprinkle "Holy Water" on your room and bed saying - by the sprinkling of Thy most precious blood, Lord Jesus, and by the merits of Thy bitter passion, wash me from every stain, and cleanse me from every sin. In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, Amen
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 14:25
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Nuair a bhí sé ag dul cómhgarach ag an ghleann chonnaic sé an gal saluis ag dul suas san spear. Síos leis giota eile agus tcí sé an caislean ba fhíor bhréaghta da’r leag sé súil ariamh air. Bhí sé uilig na fhuinneógai agus é lasta ó thalamh go dian.
Ceann sé cómhgarach chuig an doras agus d’amharc isteach. Caidé tcí sé istigh ach sgaifte de fheara beaga tárnocta, an sgian aca, iad d’á síneadh ó dhuine go duine, gach fear ag amharc go gear uirthi agus an ‘iontas ortha de réir a gcuma. Chaith Conán de a chuid éadaigh féin, isteach leis agus sheasuigh ina measg. Thainic an sgian fhad leis, agus choinnigh Conán í.
“Leig uaid an sgian”, ars an fear ba deise dó.
“Is leór duit a luathas a bhfuigh tú í”, ars Conán, agus sháith sé an sgian ann. Leag sé ortha agus char stad sé go rabh an t-iomlán aca marbh aige ach fear amháin a d’imthigh air.
Cuartaigh sé thart agus thuas san tseomra fuair sé moll mór óir i gcroidhe braith line a bhí spréidhte ar
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 11:00
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Lord Jesus Christ, I accept this sleep in the spirit of love with which Thou didst sanctify it when Thou didst deign to sleep in Thy most sacred humanity to the Glory of God the Father. Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 10:57
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A prayer said when going to bed.
If I die before I wake I pray to God my soul to take. There are four corners in my bed there are four angels around my head one of them to guard me one of them to guide me two of them to carry my soul to heaven. Saint Mick, Saint Matt, Saint Luke, and Saint John, God bless the bed I die on.
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 10:37
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Deireadh na bhFiadh.
Réamh – Radh – Mar-an-gceadna.
An Sgéal.
ús: Ní rabh mé fhéin ariamh gan sgéal-úr nó seansgéal. Da mbheidhinn gan aon sgéal, chumfainn fhéin sgéal, nó rachainn na Frainnce fa dhéin sgéal. Da mbéidhinn bódhar ní chluinnfinn é, ‘sda mbheidhinn balbh ní thiocfadh liom é innse ach nuair atá sé agam innseochaidh mé é.
Bhí sin ann i bhfad o shoin agus i bhfad o shoin fhéin é. Nuair a thainig Niamh Chinn Óir go h-Eirinn ar lorg Oisín thug sí sgian do na Fianna darbh ainm dí “An Sgian-Ranna” agus “muna leagtai an sgian sin ach ar cheathramhadh d’fhiadh gheobhadh seacht geátha na bhFian a s’aith”.
Chuaidh na Fianna amach a sheilg lá amháin agus an sgian-ranna leóbhtha. Ní dheachaidh siad abhfad gur mharbh siad fiadh. Rinn siad teine, rós an fiadh, rinn codtracha de leis an sgin agus fuair iomlán aca a sáith.
D’imthigh siad léobhtha. Thainig siad fhad le
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 10:32
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Lag an Fiadh.
Réamh – Rádh.
1. Proinnsias Oh-Éaghrain;
2. Mín-a-Dúbhan, Baile-na-Finne, Co. Dhún-na-nGall;
3. 88 bliadhanta; 4. Táillúir;
5 I nGleann-na-mBuachall, Baile-na-Finne, Co. Dhún-na-nGall
Chaith sé a shaoghal ‘san áit cheadna.
6. Tadhgán O h-Éaghrain as an Baile cheadna.
7. Tuairm ar cheithre sgór.
8. Tuairm ar cheithre sgór bliadhanrach
9. I nGleann-na-mBuachall.
10. An 3adh lá de Iúl, 1934.
An Laoi.
Oisín ag innse an sgéil do Naomh Pádraig:
Innseochaidh mé sgéal iongantach agus caithrim mhór, Ar an fhiadh fhearrgach na dtréan slog, A thainic ann ár ndáil le ár gceannas uilig do dhubh fhághail.
Is crích na n-Indiacha ‘ghluais sé,
Mac Árd Rí na sleamhan-lann cruaidh,
Nó go bhfacaidh an Fhiainn é teacht ann ár ndáil
Ar stead é, mac amh
Ar a chréathra ní rabh spíd,
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 00:02
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awaiting decision
From the time when, as a mere stripling, he had fought with his uncle, Hugh of Tirowen, at the battle of Kinsale, Owen Roe had been absent from his native land. But he had seen service on many a battlefield in the Continent and had risen to high rank and distinction in the army of Spain.
Now that he was back in Ulster, a beacon of hope burned brightly once more, and from all sides the clansmen came flocking to his standard. "Owen Roe is come!" was the cry everywhere and hastening couriers brought the glad news to every part of the four provinces.
From Carrickfergus the English general, Monroe, moved cautiously southwards, until, near the village of Benburb, only the Blackwater separated his army from that of Owen Roe. During the whole of that long, sunny June day, until late evening, the two armies watched each other, with nothing happening save occasional skirmishes. Then, when the westering sun shone full on the faces of the enemy, Owen Roe, giving the watchword "Sancta Maria!" launched a whirlwind attack.
The issue was never in doubt. Nothing could withstand the momentum of that onslaught. The legions of Monroe were hurled into the river, cannon, baggage and provisions were captured; thirty-two standards were taken. Monroe and the remnant of the Scottish mercenaries went flying [?] to the shelter of their [?] fortresses. Ulster - for all too [?] time - was once again in the hands an O'Neill.
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 23:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Co.: Dún na nGall
Bar.: Boylagh
Par.: Innis Caoil
Scoil: Édan Anfaidh :
Oidhe: Gráinne Ní Éagrain
1934-1935
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 23:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sgeúl : An gasúr agus an Sagart.
Bhí gasúr agus beag ag buachailleacht ar thaobh an bhealaigh mhóir lá amháin. Táinig an Sagart tart. Cuir sé ceist air an raibh sé abalta é féin a choisneachadh. Dubhairt an gasúr rach raibh.
“Máigh ó tá sin corr” arsa’n Sagart. D’foghluim sé annsin do an dóigh le é féin a choisreachadh agus chun go mbeadh sé abalta cuimhneamh air. Dubhairt sé leis a cur igás gurab í an bho bhán an t-Athair, agus gurab í an bho dubh an mac agus gurab í an bho dhonn an Spiorad Naomh. “Imthigh leat anois” a dubhairt sé “agus muna mbeid Fhios agat sin amáireac muibhfidh me thú”. Bhí go maith agus ní raibh go h-olc. Nuair a bhí an gasur ag cur abhaile an eallaig sa tráthnóna thoisigh siad ag troid ag an geafta. Thoisigh an bho dubh agus an bho donn ag troid. Cuidigh an bho bhán leis an bho dubh agus chaith siad na h-adharc de’n bho dhonn. Lái tar na bhárach thainig an sagart thart arís.
D’Fiafruigh sé de’n gasúr an rabh sé abalta é fhéin a coisreachadh indiú. “Ó a atair” arsa seisean, “bhí an – greann annseo inde Thoisig an mac agus an Spiorad Naomh ag troid glac an t-Athair páirt ann. Chuidig an tAtair leis an Mhach agus eocortha chaith siad na h-aodarca den Spiorad ,M, Naoimh.
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 23:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An t-ám a chuidh mé go Tír Eogainn bhí gasúr beag ar an bhaile seo am amháin. Rinne sé suas in a intinn go n-imteochadh sé go Tír Eoghain, mar ndúil go bfhuigheadh sé fasta a deanamh le feirmeoira ar feadh an t-séisúir.
D’imtigh sé tráthnóna amháin inghanfhios do na mhathair agus do na athair. Nuair a bhí sé ag tarraingt comhgarach do an Bhrocaigh bhí sé ag eirighe mall go maith san trathnóna. Casadh cailín ruadh air agus bascáid mhór géal léithe. D’ fiosruigh sí do ca rabh sé ag gabhail, agus dubhairt sé go rabh sé ag tarraingt ar an tSrath-Bhán. Agus dubhairt sise go rabh lúthghair uirthi an cuideachta a bheith léithe. Siubhal siad leo giota fada agus sa dheireadh d’iarr sí ar an ghasúir an bhaschaid a iomchur giota díte go rabh sí ag éirighe tursach leis. Nuair a thainig siad go Bealach Féidhe d’iarr sí ar an ghasur dul isteach léithe go teach biocailte go bhfuigheadh siad rud eiginteacht le h-ol. Fuair sise dhá leath sheann uisge bheatha. Ní rabh ag an ghasuir acht sgilling amháin agus thoisigh sé ag smaointeadh dá sgairtfeadh seisean ar dhá leath cheann eile nach nbeadh fágta aige acht dhá phínginn. Acht ua bith, smaointigh sé nach mbeadh sé na bhachach agus fuair sé dhá dheoch eile. Nuair a bhí sin ólta aca dubhairt an cailín ruadh go rabh sí ag gabhail amach go dtí teach eile, agus nach mbeadh sí bomaite go mbeadh sí arias. Acht dá bhfannochadh an ghasuir i dteach na biodailte o shoin ní thiocfadh an cailín arias. Sa
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 00:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the custom in this country at that time when there was danger of a seizure or arrest or eviction to have scouts appointed in every parish under the control of the "National movement of the day. One of the activities of these scouts was to run from one parish to another to give an account of danger ahead. When the account came to the parish where the seizure, arrest, or eviction was to be held the bells of each parish was tolled so that the people knew that danger was near. Every able bodied man and woman went with all haste towards the chapel and were there told what was wrong. All this happened the evening Fr O'Regan was to be arrested the people went with all haste to Coachford because it is where Mr T Sheehan lives he lived at that time. The police and soldiers came and searched the house from top to bottom but could not find the priest. While the search was going on although the house was surrounded by police and soldiers the priest suddenly appeared at the hall door and adressed a few words of warning to the people assembled in the village asking them to keep quiet and not to arouse the anger of the soldiers,
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 00:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Irish Constabulary lived at that time. The RIC at that time were kept very busy night and day for the soldiers were in pursuit of priests and people. There is a funny story told about the hut. "One night about one o'clock a.m. there was a loud knock at the door. At first they thought it was a ghost so they got there arms ready and what was there but a goat whom the caretaker of the church whose name was Harry Keys had at that time.
Somewhat also at that time [about fifty years ago] we had a priest in this parish whose name was Fr O'Regan who took an active part in the political regime of that time. The Farmers were also fighting for their very existence against the landlords and any one who dare stand up and say a word in favour of the farmers was immediately arrested and thrown into prison. Tis said Father O'Regan got into favour with the authorities and he tried to make a settlement between tenant and landlord and the upshot of it was that they came to the conclusion of arresting himself and to affect a regiment of soldiers was brought from Cork city and a large number of police from all over the county. It was also
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 21:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in the penal days. This rock is in the vicinity of Ballinamoirive where we are told people used to hear mass in the penal days kneeling on one knee for they used to have to watch behind them as well as before them lest the soldiers would attack them unawares. We have here in this parish of Aghabullogue two places where we are told chapels used to be in the penal days the remains are still to be seen in stones etc. One is at a place called Knockrour and the other at Woodfield both in this parish. The old roads leading to the chapels although not used as throughfares are still intact. The farmers through whose lands these old roads run do not interfere with them although they are more or less useless at the present day. We had a protestant church in Aghabullogue which we were told was a catholick one in the penal days. This church forty years ago was attended by a large number of protestants but they have all practically dissapeared from the place and the church or building was sold out by auction. It is now levelled to the ground. This church was in the burial ground. There was in the burial ground also a hut where the Royal
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 20:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We in this parish have not any account of where mass was said in the penal times. But in the neighbouring parish of Aghina there is a rock called "Carraig an Aifreann" where we are told priest used to say mass
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 20:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
surrounded by rocks. It is said that while Mass was being celebrated there was somebody watching from the top of the rocks lest an enemy should approach. The vestments were not kept near that place but in another field a little bit away. The cave in which they were kept was called the Vestry. Another story about a big flag that was at the foot of the alter mentioned in the last story is this. A local farmer who was building a new house thought that the flag would be very nice for the fire place because it was big and smooth so he concluded in taking it with him. When himself and his family went to live in the new house sleep was impossible because all night long there were bells ringing and after a while he was advised to take out the flag. He did so and took it back to the place where he got it, and it is still there.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 20:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In my district there is a rock known as the "Mass Rock" where it is said a priest offered up Mass in the penal times. The rock to which I refer is situated about four miles from the church of Aghabullogue in the parish of Aghina. It is also said that a Bishop was beheaded at the castle of Carrigadrohid because he would not give up his faith. It is also said that three priests were beheaded at Macroom.
There is also an other Mass Rock about a half mile from the church of Aghabullogue. It is surrounded by bogs, woods, and high rocks. This Mass rock is a small one. There is a large cave with strokes and lines inside in it and that hole is supposed to represent the Tabernacle.
There is another Mass rock something like a Church but having only three right walls and a little fence for the other one. It is
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 20:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marriages generally take place during Shrove. May and August are considered unlucky months for marriages and Mondays and Fridays unlucky days.
Marriages are arranged beforehand. Each party must have a certain amount of means, either money or stock.
The parties meet at the church and sometimes there is a Nuptial mass.
It is a custom to have a collection made for the Sacristan. The wedding parties then set off for the brides home. Rice and confetti are thrown on them as they enter the carriage.
The large wedding cake is cut over the brides head and each one takes a piece to dream on it and some is sent to friends who did not attend the wedding.
Beggars flock to the wedding and they generally have a dance and receive silver.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 11:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Matches are made in this district. Every girl who is getting married gets money as a dowry. Stock and goods are also given.
Marriages took place in the brides home about 50 years ago
The bride goes in the last car to the church.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 10:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
May is said to be a very unlucky month for marriage. "They that get married in May will rue the day. Mondays and Fridays are also said to be unlucky and very few get married on Wednesdays. Money is given as a fortune. Stock and goods were given in former times but not nowadays. Marriages took place in the houses long ago but not now. When the bride and bridegroom are going to the church old shoes are thrown after them and on leaving the church rice is thrown on them.
Wedding feasts were held immediately after the wedding at the brides home and lasted for a few days.
When there were no motors or carriages the bridegroom took his bride home on horseback.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 10:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
Murchadha Beag agus Murchadha Mór
Roise bean Mhic a Luain 75-Aos
Na Cruacha, An Coimín, Leithbhearr.
Bhí beirt dearbhrathair ann am amháin darbh ainm Murchadha Mór agus Murchadha Beag. Bhí scór ba ag Murchadha Mór agus ní rabh ag Murchadha Beag ach ceann amháin. Bhi páirc ina mbeadh ba na beirte istoigh ann agus bhí sruthán aca le theacht air nuair a bheadh siad ag teacht amach agus ní rabh ceis ar bith air. Bhíodh Murchadha Mór ag rádh le Murchadha Beag achan lá go ndéanfadh siad ceis do na buaibh.. Deireadh Murchadha Beag i gcomhnuidhe níl agam ach
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 10:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
go dtí an lá indiú.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 10:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
té a bheadh amuigh indiaidh na h-oidhche.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 10:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An Reilig
Pádraig mac Giobúin
Tá suas le cúig roilig sa pharróiste seo-Parróiste Inis Caoil. Níl iomrádh sa tseanchas ar cheann ar bith aca ach roilig Chill Riaghain.Istoigh i lár na roilige seo tá sean bhallógaí teampaill agus seo teampall a thóg naomh darbh ainm Riaghain tá fada riamh ó shoin. Níl sé cinnte cé aca fear no bean a bhi sa naomh seo ach cerbh í bhí beirt naomh eile den teaghlach a thóg teampaill- ceann san áit a bhfuil Cill Cathardha anois, agus ceann san áit a bhfuil Cill Taobhóg. Shocraigh siad na
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 10:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
Le sinne posadh go h-óg béimid gan dóigh san tsaoghal lean thusa mise sa ród is ní bhéidh ort pinghinn a dhíol
Da leanainnse tusa sa ród ba goirid go dtógfa díom
Cúrsa ag imirt ‘s ag ol ní dheanfaidís lón den phínginn
Acht lean thusa mise sa ród is dheanfamuid lón araon
Sé d’fhiafruigh mé féin den mnaoí óig an rabh fhio sarí áitar sa tír a bhfuighin gloinne le h-ól.
Tógfaidh an bhrón seo díom
Tá teach beag ar imeall an róid agus coinnigheann sí i gcomhnuidhe braon
Téid tusa gus rap ar an bórd agus díolfaidh do sgór mé fhéin.
Nuair a caith mé seal don ól sé mheas mé gur choir damh díol
Le h-eagla go dtiocfadh an coir go mbainfeadh an t-óg bhean díom
Sé dubhairt sise béidh tusa ag dul cheoil as ní thiocfaidh ort phínginn a díol
Níor bhfada bhí mise ag dul cheol gur chruinnigh an taos óg un toighe
Achan duine agus gloinne na dhorn bórd le comradh thabhairt don dís
Bhí biotailte fairsing go leór ann agus beagan daól santír
Da nólfainnse gálun Uí Dhomhnaill ní thiocfadh orm pínginn a díol
Ní fhaca a leithead den óig bhean i mbaile na i dtír ariamh
Is dá bhfeicfinn Malann na moiré gheobhainn cailíní óga ar phínginn.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 09:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a bios agaibh le thabairt as toigh a ohil libh.
V11
Is féarr díbh buachaill fearamhail a deanfadh cur as treabadh diobh da bfhaghainn amach i gcionn in chuid oibre mar ba choir damh acht ta puirín bhan ag gol agamh agus an giobhog ar an chomharsainn.
Ámhean
1 Chúalaidh misé bean da rádh
Ag bruach na coilleadh duine dúil leis an thráigh
Crann udaí amuigh críon is an bhun
Ubhlaí ní thig ar caorthaí na blát.
2
Sí bhean dhubh udaí chráidh mó chroidhe
Sí bhain lúth na gcos agus na lámh díom
D’fág sí mé mó chréatúir bhocht mó shuide ar shop
Biad na deoch is ní fhághaim ó na mná.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 09:43
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awaiting decision
1) Rith mé sa choill go bhfuair mé é. Shuidhe mó agus chuatraigh mé é acht ní bhfuair mé é, agus thug mé liom abhaile é? Dealg.
2) Síad sa chlúdaigh ó agus dhá chéad súil air? Rideal ginimh.
3) Muilte i arainn agus ruihle olna? Snathaidí.
4) Cá com bán air agus ní girrfiadh é cá bárr geár eir agus ní meanaith é? Feag.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 09:40
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awaiting decision
Ámhran.
1
A d’agar-sé tháinig mé Néill.
Go gcúirfea dámh gléas ar spáid.
Leasadh a chur ar a béal.
Bheadh milis glan gear ins an lán.
Go ngéaradh sé cloch agus cre.
A’s na crainn atá ar thaobh a Mháis.
Go ndéarfadh gach duine gur saghadh
A’s nach bhfeicfidhe a leithead go bráth.
11
Saoghal bréagh fada le shéim.
Go bfág tusa Niall a ghrádh.
Aoibneas le chois a bhéith saoghalach.
Flaitheas na Naomh go b’fáigh.
Gheobhaidh tusa bean a mbéid spréidh leithe.
Dá chlannaid na n’Gaedheal is feárr.
Agus í mar bhéadh, Sinead le sgéimh.
Thug Padraig Sheáin Ghréig a bárr.
111
Is tú dheanfadh muilleann leat fhéin.
A’ Cáislean a chéid ‘s an bád.
Na luingis ba ghaiste na an ghaoith.
A bhearfadh go h-Eireann tráigh.
Na bhaitseanna is deise faoí an ghréin.
Ar chumadh na réalta bán.
Is na clóigne dean bomaite bhréig.
Agus mo Sheacht N-anam deag do lámh.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marriages generally take place during Shrovetide. It is said to be unlucky to get married in August and in December and on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. There are matches made around this district sometimes but nit very often. It is the usual thing for the bride to bring money bridegroom. The money she brings is called a fortune. On the day of the marriage it is a usual thing to go touring until dark and then have a party at the brides home. It is not usual for "Strawboys" to visit the houses nowadays but long ago it was a frequent custom of theirs to visit the house where the wedding feast was held. They used to dress in their own clothes and they used to have bits of straw sewn on here and there. They used to go to the doors singing songs and asking for money. Those who attend the wedding are usually guests at the wedding party.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Basket Making: Baskets were made in the following manner: Light twigs were got and were were woven in and out to make the sides of the basket. Some stout twigs were then got so as to make the bottom of the basket, they used then make them into whatever shape the wanted to. Then they were put away for some time in a dry place for to harden.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:59
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rejected
awaiting decision
Thread was made from the wool of the sheep. It was first carded or torn asunder with cards- timber plates fitted with steel teeth which opened up the wool and freed it from knots and dirt and converted it into long rolls. It was then spun with a spinning wheel.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:55
approved
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awaiting decision
cloths were made from it.
In Mullinhassig there was a mill for making frieze- a coarse cloth which gave very good wear. Later on the mill was converted into a creamery.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
Candles were made in the following manner. The tallow of the cow was put into a pot to melt. A mould was then prepared into which a strong thread was put and kept in position. The tallow was poured in, a little at a time and let set. Little by little it was poured in until the mould was full.The moulds were then set aside to cool and harden and when set the candles were drawn out of the moulds. The candles now-a-days were much cleaner.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hidden Treasure
Long ago an old man lived near our house in the town of Derrindaffe. For three nights in succession he dreamt that a crock of gold, was buried under a great oak tree that grows on the bank of the river Smerla. It was commonly supposed that evil spirits guarded this treasure. So he told about the dream
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:41
approved
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awaiting decision
Remedies are applied for ailments on Monday and Thursday.
People think it unlucky to leave one house to go to another on Saturday, they say, "Saturdays flitting means a short sitting".
People consider it late not to have all the crops planted before 18th April.
The three last days of March and the three first days of April are called Revog Days and their is generally bad rough weather.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 20:39
approved
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awaiting decision
midnight. It did a great deal of damage to the houses and cow shades and especially to slated houses in Listowel. It also blew off the weather cock off the Parish Church in Listowel. The road to Listowel at that time was bordered with many woods.and for many days it was blocked by falling trees. The railway also was blocked, a great many shipwrecks occurred around the coast.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:42
approved
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awaiting decision
Fear de chloinn mac gaoithin a bhí chomnuidhe i nGleann Finne agus bhí stair-fhiacail aige, mar sin de bheireadh siad ‘Padaí an cáir’ air. Bhíodh sé ag tabhairt amach min-cháirde ar gaimbín agus bhíodh na daoine an-mhúinte dó fhad is bhí cáirde aige ortha. Sé deireadh siad nuair a castaoc daobhtha é.
“Goidé mar tá tú, a Mhr Mac Geehen”. Ach nuair na chaithfidhe é a dhíol i gcionn na gceithre mí na mar sin, bíodh siad ar a neamh thuilleamaighe agus sé deireadh siad. Seo dhuit do chuid anois a Padaí an Cháir”.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:39
approved
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awaiting decision
rinne mé moil beag ag teach Eóin Sheain. D’iarr sé orm cupla súgan a chasadh dó fha is bhéadh an dinnear a dheánamh réidh. Rug me féin ar an chor-shúgán agus thoisigh a chasadh agus bhí seisean ag innse scéil.
Le sin connaic mé “coisí” an madadh, na rud amach agus ise ag scairtigh an méid a bhí in a corp na dhiaidh. An scadán a bhí sí gha ros bhí sé leis in a bheal agus isé ag éirigh in áirde na dhiaidh. Labhair Eoin léithe.
“Téigh isteach ‘un toighe agus na bhí ag éirigh in áirde, agus do thubaiste leis an scadán shíos i mbolg an mhadaidh”.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:33
approved
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awaiting decision
-ach ar maidin"
Dubhairt O Domhnaill
Na tabhair áird ar fiach dubh no feannóg nó briathra mná
Cibé mar shoillseas an ghrian sé mar is toil le Dia bhéas an lá".
(Nóra Bí Sleibín a scríobh síos ó Micheal Ó Tomais, Eadar Ghabhail)
Toralach O Siadhail
Bhí sé na chomhnuidhe i (Nún) Mín an Fhéidh agus tugadh ós comhair na cúirte é cionnus nach rabh díolta aige ar a mhadadh. Ar a bhealach go Dún na nGall. D’fhan sé an oidhche toigh s’ againne. Fear Dúr Doicheallach a bhí ann agus ar a bhealach na bhaile sa tráthnóna arias, bhí sé ag gabhail thart leis an teach agus gan rún aige teacht isteach. Sgairt mo mhathair leis.
“Tar isteach a thoralaigh agus innis dúinn goidé mar rinne siad leat”.
“Ta” arsa seisean, “mar rinne siad leis an chuid eile”.
“Maise plóid ortha”, arsa sise, “ná ní rabh aon dhuine cosmhail leat féin ann”.
Tubaiste an Scadáin
Nuair a bhí mé ag teacht isteach bealach na gCreach indiaid a beith ag cuartú caorach
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lá a rabh O'Domhnaill ag brath a chuid féir a fheistiú, thainic an meitheal ar maidin. Shíl an cáilín aimsire nach rabh cuma mhaith ar an lá fá choinne na hócaide agus d'iarr ortha fannacht tamall. Nuair a thainic Ó Domnaill 'un tosaigh chuir sé ceist ortha cad cuige nach rabh siad ag obair. Dubhairt siadsan "Bhí an fiach dubh ag eitilligh go h-íseal ar an talamh.
Bhí an fheannóg ag scairtigh níos mó na ba chóir dí.
Agus go rabh an ghrian ró bhladar-
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:22
approved
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awaiting decision
(leite) a beith mar bí sí a roimhe.
Bí an fear cineal bodhar agus mar síl sé gur fá’n caoraigh a bhí an sagart ag cainnt. D’éirigh sé (a) i lár an pobail.
“A shaghairth” arsa seiseamh - An t-am deireannach a chonnaic mise í bí sí gan lomadh ach dhá lomfaídhe í aníos tá mé ag deanadh go mbéadh sí go maith is bí aríamh”
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I bfadh ó shoin nuair a bhiódh caoirigh fánacha ag dul thart ins an earrach is miníc a bheirfidhe go dtí an teach phobail iad agus gheobhaidh an sealbhthóir ceart annsin íad.
Fear as Gleann Finne a chaill caorac agus ní rabh dul aige í a fhaghail. Fá Dheireadh chuaidh sé ionnsair an tsagairt agus d’innis sé do goidhe an seort caorach a (bí ann) chaill sé.
An domhnach seo bhí an sagart ag tabaírth seanmóra. Bhí sé ag cainnt ar bhuachaillí ag imtheact le Cailíní geall ar a bpósadh ach nuair nach bhfuigeadh siad crud =spré in a sásamh leobhtha ís minic a rachadh siad ar gcúl ins an chleamhnas. Ní rabh seoceart agus an cáilín a mbeirfidhe an íde sin (leite) (duocioadh) duithe ní thiocfadh léithe arais
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:13
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a dhá ngualainn.
Cailleacha buidhe Machaire Galthan bhí siad na gcomnuidhe ins an Duthaigh ar imeall na mara. Bhíod siad beo ar biadh cladaigh. Is doice gur an biadh sin a rinne buidhe iad. “Comh buidhe le Cailleacha buidhe Machaire Ghatthan”.
(Nóra Nic Giolla Brigde (84) Machaire Clochair, Gaoth Dobhar a D’aithris)
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:11
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awaiting decision
i riocht tachrán leinbh. Ní rabh aon dhuine sa teach ach an mháthair. Dubhairt sí go rabh an leanbh sa chliabhán ag fágail na gcead bhfiacal. Cuir duine aca a lámh in a bhéal le na mochtail ach druid an leanbh a char agus bhí an mhéar leis ón alt.
Dubhairt an bhean go rabh an doras ar aghaidh na gaoithe agus go rabh Fionn é féin amuigh ag fiadach. Dá mbhiod sé fá bhaile go Dtionntocadh sé an teach thart fá choinne scal fás gaidh o’n ghaoith ach go mbféidir go ndeánfadh siadsan an gar sin duithe anois.
Thainig sgannradh ar na Mic Uí Gorra annsin le na bhfaca siad agus a gcualaigh siad. Thug siad cúl do tír agus agaidh ar muir agus ca dtug siad níos má buaidh reamh do na Fianna.
Dob nó gallan “jackstones” na clocha bhiod ag na fianna. Goll a caith bunas na gcloch ata ar bhárr na nárdhán “Bealach mor na bhfianna” an clochan Fear agán atá thart ar chnoc Fola.
Deartharacha Goill bhí siad naoi dtroighthe naoi huaire ar leithne idir
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 12:04
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rejected
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Biodh na fianna na gcomhnuidhe i gConnachta agus ba gholl an fear a ba láidre ortha. Thainig said aniar annseo am amhain agus chuir said futha ann.
Thainig na Mic Uí Ghorra i dtír agus chuala said iomradh ar na Fianna. Ba mhaith leo fios a bheith aca ar rabh a ngaisge i on churtha le na gcliú.
Is cosmhail go rabh eagla ar na Fianna rompa agus d’imthigh Fionn fán chladach (agus) i riocht fear tire ag cur i gcéill go rabh sé ag deánamh cruad acht trágha. Nuair (rabh sé ag deánamh) a thainig na Mic Uí Gorra un chlad-aigh chonnaic said é ag tionntadh na bhfaragán móra ag deánamh gho rabh sé ag sleibhtíu bidh chlad-aigh futha. Chuir a urradh agus a neart iontas (antac) ar na Mic Uí Giorra.
Cuireadh goll i luighe sa chliabhán
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 17:30
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Basket making: Baskets were made in the following manner. Ten stout twigs were got and a frame made for the basket. Light twigs were got and they were woven round the ten others until the basket was finished. Then they were put away in some dry place to dry and harden.
Jeremiah O'Keefe, Clonmoyle
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 17:28
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on the fire still it would not boil.
A passer-by once broke off a branch of the tree growing near the well to drive his cows and when he had put them into a field he threw the stick inside the gap but next morning the stick was back in the very same place from which he had taken it.
It is also said that there is a frog in the well and any person who goes to the well suffering from any disease it is said that he would be cured.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 17:22
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'Rounds' in honour of St Olan are paid every year on the 5th Sept. When the 'rounds' are finished people drink some of the water out of the well and leave a medal or beads or some token near the well.
A number of 'travelling folk' were one day passing by the well and as they had no where to get water they took some water from St Olan's well but if it were
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 17:17
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field near the well which still been the name 'tea house inch'.
About two fields from the well in Timothy Murphy's land there is a stone on which are the footprints of St. Olan. The saint is buried in Aghabullogue graveyard and on the large stone which marks his grave there is a small round stone called 'Caipín Olan. It was once taken for some cure but was brought back again.
St. Olan had a brother St Lachtaoin and there is a well dedicated to him in Donoughmore parish.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 17:08
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rejected
awaiting decision
St. Olan's feast falls on the 5th Sept. It was formerly called 'Pattern Day'. Rounds were paid and are still paid on that day but feasts are no longer held. In years gone by teas were given in a
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 17:05
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This tree is supposed to have been planted by St. Olan himself. It is said that he was minding cows near the well and had in his hand a twig for driving the cows. He stuck it beside the well and it is from that twig the famous tree that was growing beside the well until a few years ago grew. When it fell another tree sprang up in its place and it is to be seen on top of the well now.
Some neighbours took some of it to burn but they had no luck with their cattle they took no more and it can still be seen at the back of the well. Some people took water from the well to boil it but it would not boil.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 16:55
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Method of paying rounds at St Olan's well. "Say five times, Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory be to The Father. Then go to the graveyard in Aghabullogue graveyard and say prayers at St. Olan's grave. It is usual to take home some water from the well. When the summers are very hot and the well dries up people take away a piece of the bark of the tree near the well.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 00:19
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great friends until a certain thing happened.
Both agreed that what each would 'walk on the morrow' would be his parish. However Lachtaoin, by setting out while it was still dark covered more ground than St Olan and people say that is the reason why Donoughmore parish is bigger than Aghabullogue. Both saints cursed each others parishes. St Olan said that all the mad dogs would run towards Donoughmore and St Lachtaoin said that Aghabullogue would never be without a robber.
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 00:11
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St. Olan's well is situated about a mile to the north of Aghabullogue church on the left hand side of the road leading from Aghabullogue to Rylane.
There is a large stone standing near the well with Ogham inscriptions on it. It is said that the stone once formed a footbridge across a river running near the well.
Long ago many people visited the well on the 5th Sept. and paid 'rounds'. The rounds were finished in Aghabullogue graveyard about three quarters of a mile north west of Aghabullogue church. In this graveyard there is a stone bearing the footprints of St Olan and on top is a round stone called St Olan's cap.
Patterns were held when the 'rounds' were finished but owing to faction fights the police forbade the holding of any more patterns so at present the people just pay 'rounds' and go home.
St Olan and St. Lachtaoin were very
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:36
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awaiting decision
The Leipreachán is also know by the name of the Luairagán.
Once upon a time a Leipreachán lived under a mushroom in Kildangan. One night there was a man coming home from work. As he was passing the fort, he heard a tapping, like a bird breaking a snail off a stone. He listened. Then he made up his mind to see what it was. He entered the fort, and there he saw a small man about a foot high sitting under a mushroom. The man's name was Pat. Pat stole up to the Leipreachan, and caught him by the neck. Pat asked him for some gold. The Leipreachán
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:30
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Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
The longest day has an end.
The nearest friend must part.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.
Think twice before you talk once.
The least said, the soonest mended.
Listen on and pretend nothing.
Dirty water washes clean.
Smooth water runs deep.
Cuckoo oats and wood-cock hay make the farmer fly away.
The dearest is the cheapest in the end.
Bend the twig, bend the tree.
There is no smoke without fire.
Never put off until to-morrow what you can do today.
Smooth is the water where the brook is deep.
Penny wise pound foolish.
Dúthcas breaks out through the cat's eyes.
A windy day is not the day for putting up scallops.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:21
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awaiting decision
An Cómhairle D’iarr an ilar :-
A aíndeise an t-suoghail ná déinig dióm – sa spreas.
Ná fhéad ar – sá flínig ciaca daoibh mo leas.
Ainnir ciúin shéim na gcraob fholt gcíorla – gcas.
Nó an caille bhog bhaoth agus géimneach laoig as bas.
An freagra !-
A faraire séim nár taobhaig puinn de’n t-snas.
Ná mealladh an spré tú fílin na laoithe bán.
Rughaid na clan – fhionn sa bfhlít
An mhaol an bhuidhe san b’peach
Sin imtighte an spré agus an leíbis snaidhinthe leat.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:19
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Do bhíos – sa aréir ag glandhach ar gharbhiú fhían
Cuir “D” in – a dhéidh agus bearfair “Parabail” cruinn
Ar tigheacht na faolchon géire a chleasuig le ‘m’ chlí
Gur sin a tréine mé lag marbh gan bhrigh.
Más duine tú atá túirseach caithce cráidhte
Ag iomarca de sughlach ubhall gcumhra agus leanna láidir
Cuir – cé cughat más fonnleat [tenet?] id sláinte
Ri le die clúmh – na cú – san lár na mháireac
“Is uaigneach an nigeachán gan leine [?ir]”
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:17
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geibid a súil isteach comh maith is bhí sé reamh I gceann Uthaigh
Camhruigh sé cúig loingeas déag le Banrioghan Anna isteach go dtí an Spáinn.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:15
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awaiting decision
Muintir Domnaill Caoimh
Do buaidh Muintir Suileabhaín [blar?] trí bhuadh ná bfhuil ag aon duine eile.
1 Tú bárr féile
2. Bárr gaisge
3. Bárr mar cuigheachta.
An cead Uluig na haon shul is uaidh a tháinig muintir Suileabhaín go leír bhí bárr agus é leith aige sin. Ní eilig sé aoinne riamh ar aon nidh ach dubhairt aoinne amháin go gcailfílid sé é féin d’eileach d’iarr sé an taon tsúilamháin air agus deir na sean daoine go cuir mhéar diaobh istig dá súil agus go sín sé chuighe é.
Deiridís gur thuil in dá súilamach as an bfear d’iarr an tsúil agus gur
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:08
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Níl aon mhait le lei nag gabait dóibh
1 ag adúghad teine ar loch.
2. nú ag cuitheamh cloch le chuan,
3. Comhairle do tabhairt do [mn???] bhuirb
4. nú bheith ag gabhail do ribh ar larann fhuar.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:07
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Paidrín.
Reir de go ndeinimhid ulatha na naomh go dtuillimíd.
Righeacht na bflatas go srouimíd agus ceol na naingeal go gclo[?]imíd.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:06
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Is fear míneacht ná an buirb mór
Is fear lag choir na dul cún lighe
Is fear tig beag agus teann lóim
ná tig mór ar beagan bid.
Dig gach teine an fearnóg glas
Dig gach sión an gaoch indeas.
Dig gach dighe an meadhg
Is dígh gach dígh an droch bhean.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:05
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Bhí Domhnall Ua Conaill thall I bParis ag chómh cruinniú
Ceistig duine acu é feacain a raibh a téanga dúthchais aige.
“Níl” arsa Domhnall ach ta bearla agam.
Tar fairrge má racann tu I gcúirsár an tSnogail
‘S go gcascar ort fear eaganta I gcursái leiginn
Nách tarcuisneach is nách aimlte an gnó duit é.
Gan bheith blasta cliste I dteanga milis do dútaighe féin.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:03
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A priest came to a house and expected to get venison. He failed however and then said.
Is mair a bhíonn gan [chrall?] agus ná cur an srian le na ghuth
Anois nuair na tháini gan fiadh
Is maith an biadh caoire dubh.
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:01
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do cuireadh ualach trom air agus bhí air iomhan a labair ar cad a bhí ar a druim.
Fanfadh sé ann go dtí gur eirig leis a innsin cad a bhí air agus annsan bheadh ualach mór air.
Beadh fiche ag imuigh agus cuireadh an birín ó duine go duine.
Fuair an innsin sin ó
Martín Aghas
senior member (history)
2019-07-29 00:00
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Bhiodh na páistí n-a suidhe timceall na teine agus bíodh birín (Piosa admaid ar lasadh) ag duine aca.
Deireadh sé, Seo mo bhirín duit. Cad is birín do? birín beo, birín marbh. Má geibéann mo birín bás ar do dhá láimh trom, trom do ben ort.
An té a fuair an birín marbh bhí air liughe ar an urlár. Nuair a bhiodh an meid sin raidhthe af an gcead duine do tugad an birín don gcead duine eile.
Biodh ar an duine sin an meid cead na a deanamh.
An té fuair an birín marbh bhí air luighe ar an úrlár agus
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 23:06
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would not sell that atall.
And the buyer came up to the basket and opened it. And he said to the man this just what I want. And he put five pounds note into his hand for the three legged chicken. And the man never opened his hand until he went home.
And then he found what he had, And he got a fright when he saw the five pound note.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 23:05
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would not sell tat atall.
And the buyer came up to the basket and opened it. And he said to the man this just what I want. And he put five pounds note into his hand for the three legged chicken. And the man never opened his hand until he went home.
And then he found what he had, And he got a fright when he saw the five pound note.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 23:00
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Once upon a time there live a man who used to put a hen hatching ever year. One day he said to himself, If my chickens will go right with me.
I will sell them when they get old.
And one day he took them to the market.
And he had a three legged chicken.
And he put him into the basket by himself and carried him of to the market.
And when he arrived at the market a man came up to him.
And asked him what he had in the basket.
And he told him that he
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 22:53
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as I take the air at the dawning of the day.
111
Years came and roll but I never sigh for my love is now is now my bride,
though we often take of the morning walk by the pleasant Bandon tide.
Each passing year bring help and cheer and we'er as bright and gay,
as that first glad hour of the Bandon bower at the dawning of the day.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 22:46
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As the sun rose high in the morning sky and the fields grew wet with dew.
I strayed beside the Bandon tide where the woodbines sweetly grew.
I heard a song in the woods among like the thrushes morning lay,
twas a comely maid who quietly strayed at the dawning of the day.
11
God bless you maid I gently said as shyly I drew near,
Why do you come so far rome home and have you got no fear.
She said kind friend my way I went thus for my heart is gay,
I know no care
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 22:30
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If churning is going on and a stranger enters he helps without asking and if he didn't he was suppose to steal the butter.
A certain man (Maurice Prendergast) Ardcanaught, Castlemaine, missed a spancel and whil it was missing no butter could be made. The spancel was found with a certain woman and brought back and the butter could then be made.
Information supplied by Martin Ashe.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 22:22
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had to live on potatoes and salt. They arose at six and worked till eight without breakfast. They had to plant 56 spades of a furrow before breakfast and more than twice that amount for dinner.
Information supplied by Martin Ashe.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 22:18
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When potatoes failed the people had to eat nettles and turnips.
Near a bay they provided themselves with fresh fish.
Information from Martin Ashe.
P.S.
Herrings were available from July to January.
Herrings were in season till the first of October when they spawned.
Not of much use till the middle of November when they commenced to improve.
Green herrings were available from Christmas to January.
Sometimes milk was not available so that the people
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 00:13
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awaiting decision
Chuaid said san a t-ath agus chuaidh mise an clochán, baithead iad san agus thainig mise slán.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 00:11
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thart arais. D’imthigh Diarmuid gur shríoc sé cnoch a Dúin an áir a rabh áit bruidhean shíogaidhe. Bhí doras na bruidre fosgalact agus anáit folamh. Chuaidh sé isteach agus sheasuigh sé i gcúl na cómhlach. Níor bhfada go d’tainig an sluagh isteach agus go deacaidh siad a dh’aithris a gcuid tréithe.
“Bliadhain agus anocht” arsa duine aca, “a ghoid Diarmuid nighean Rí Cúige Laighin”.
“Is beag a bhí ar a shon sin aige” arsa bean eile aca. “O ta sí bodhar balbh gan láthair o lá sin go dtí an lá indiú”.
“Ca mbhiodh sí mar sin” arsa duine eile aca. “Dá dtarrneóchadh biorán (bairn) suain atá sáite in a folt i gcúl a cinn agus a chaitheadh sa teinidh. Bhéadh sí comh maith is bhí ariamh”. Níor éist Diarmuid leis an dara fhocal, bhí léim un doras aige agus an sluaigh síos sa tóir na dhiaidh. Bhí abhainn gul fríd an ghleann ag bun Cnuic-An-Dúin agus nuair a thainig sé go dtí an abhainn léim sé (se) amach san uisce agus shiubhal se trasna agus ní rabh cead ag na sluaigh sidhe ghabhail ní b’fuide.
Bhain Diarmuid a baile amach. Tharraing sé an biorán suain as gruaig an cháilín agus chaith sa teinid é. Dhéirigh an cáilín slán follámh mar bhí sí araimh. Scríobh sí leitir abhaile chuige a h-athair agus d’innis do caidé mar bhí.
Chuir ahathair coisde ceithre eachraidh amach fa choinne [diamid?] agus thug fad le na gchúirt féin iad. Pósad an lám amaic agus bhí bhainas mór aca mhair seacht lá agus seacht n-oidhce agus b’fearr an lá deireannach na an cuid eile uilig. Bhí mise ag an bhainis mar duine agus nuair a bhí an deireadh thart thug muid uilig an n-aghaid ara baile.
senior member (history)
2019-07-27 00:01
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Bhí baintreabhach na comhnuidhe san áith seo fad ó shoin agus ní rabh aicí acht an mac amháin. Diarmad a b’ainm do. Tógad in uailinn é agus bhí shliocht sin air. Nuair a thainig sé i méaduigheacht bhí sé na sheadaidhe. Níor luaithe shoir na siar é agus b’ionnan oidhche agus lá dó. Is minic a dubhairt a mhathair go mbéad droch deireadh air, acht ní rabh gar ann.
Oidhche shamhna amháin bhí sé ar a chois go mall. Oidhche smúid ghealaigh a bhí ann agus e go cuán is nach bhogfad sé ribe ar do cheann. Chuala sé callán ag tarraingt ar agus nuair a thainig an sluaigh i ndeas dó d’aithin sé go rabh siad ag iomchar toirt cosamhail le comhnar síos i lár a bhealaig mhóir agus le bhfaiteadh na súl d’imthigh siad.
Chuaidh Diarmuid go dtí an chomhair agus d’amharc isteach inntí. Bhí cáilín óg dhoigheamhail na laighe inntí. Leag sé a lámh ar a h-éadar agus rinne sé amach nach rabh sí marbh acht gur na codladh a bhí sí. Smaoieigh sé go dteachaidh an sluagh sidhe a bobaireacht agus go mbuailfeadh seiseann bob ortha. Chait sé ar a ghualainn í agus thug a bhaile chuig a mháthair í. Bhí sí annsin gan cainnt gan coisaidheacht. Gan ucht. Gan mhairg ar feadh lá agus bliadhain. I rith an ama sin thúg an baintreabhac bhocht modh agus uarraim dí acht má thug féin ní rabh sul ar bith aice a beith ina cuidheachta nuair nach rabh cainnt aice.
Bhí go maith is ní rabh go h-olc go d’tainig oidhche Shamna
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 09:51
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awaiting decision
Thiar cois tragha dom lá is me im aonar
I gCuan na mbád lámh la Béara
‘Seadh docrith mo lamha is mo chnama le céile
Nuair a cualadh trácht ar do bhás, a Phaoraig.
11
Súid cun reatha me go h-aitearsac leán mhar
Is go deimin nior stadas gur glanas de’n léim soir
Mar a bfaca - sa an t-am thú an Gall is an Gaodhal
Ó Bealac go Ros ag gol le ceile
111
A Phaoraig bheannuigthe do fuair gradam on Righ Naomhtha
Is nar leag bean leamb in-aistir na nídh deírce
Ba mhór sgaipe ar ar gcúma dá dtaigheadh cugainn an Paorac
Ce go bfuil sagart deagh – chlumhail as cionn a threadta
1V
Ta pobal an Mheallainn go h-aitearsac leánmhar
is go deimhin an Canainn fi bhreachadh na taoide
bealuig a’loc fe mhórninn cíor-dubh
In diaidh an tsagairt a chneasuigheadh na mílte
V
Is do dhóirse dúnta mar a mbiodh fluirse na féile
Fi sgeimallaibh dubha gan lonnradh gréine
Tigearna Cairbre thug taithneamh a chleibhe duit
Do chuir cluig na Sacsan ag mairighniughadh an Paoraig.
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 09:44
approved
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awaiting decision
Do chomhnuig feirmeoir beag ar thaobh Mhuisire agus bhí a ceathair no chúig cinn de bhuaibh aige. Do choiméadadh sé beirt fhear ag obair do agus mar seo lá bhí se deallramhac ar bháistig. Bhí na fir ag ite a mbricfeast. Pratai is bainne a bhiodh mar biadh ag gac einne san aimsir sin. Bhí an la ag bagairt ar bheith fluic. Bhí eagla ar bean an tighe go n-iompocadh sé amac go h-olc agus nár b’fhéidir dos na feartaibh aon nidh a dhéanamh agus an bricfeast ithte aca. Bhí si ag an ndorus ag feacaint ar mullac Mhuisire agus d’iompuig si ortha go h-átha sac agus dubairt :-
“Ta ceo ar Mhuisire agus Clárac lom
an Comarthai s[?]inne is fearr ar Domhan”
Bhí na pratai ana – ganncúiseach i bfiadhnaise na bfear agus dubairt duine aca :-
Má tá ceo ar Mhuisire ta an clár-sa lom
Agus d’iosfaimís tuille aca dá mbeidis ann.
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 09:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Do tog Concubar suas a ceann agus d’éist sé leis an rann agus nior thaitn an cailin riamh leis agus nior thaitn seisean leis an gcailin ar comh beag agus dubhairt Concubar
Is file gan slacht do mol an bhean
Ba bhuidhe is ba grainne sgéimh
Gur cuma duit chugat a gnuis ag teacht
Na capall dub a’ féith
Na h-eol di gnó a chur ar slacth
Is grám í súil 'sa béal
Is ní cailin deas í ac Sile bhat
Le Fainne Geal an Lae
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 09:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Do chomhnuig fear i gCill-Mhichíl (in-aice Magcromta) gur bh’ainm do Stiophna na Bréide. Bhí buachaill aimsire aige go nglaodtaoi Concubar Bán air. Bhí filideacht ag Stiophna agus bhí beagan di ag Stiophna leis. Bhí cailin aimsire ag Stiophna gur b’ainm di Sile bhat. Do bhuail tinneas cinn bean Stiophna agus ni raibh sí ábalta eirige ar maidin cun na mbo a chrudadh. Bhí bo aige gur bh’ainm di “Smólac Mhór” agus ní leog fad sí d’aoinne i do chrudadh act an maigistreás fein. Is gnathac gur amuigh a crudhtai beitidhigh an uair sin. D’eirig an cailin cun na mbeithideac do chrudadh agus ‘sí an “Smolac Mhór” an cead bhó a thug sí faoi. D’iompuig an bhó uirthi agus do rit an cailin agus an bhó na diaidh. Do rainig go raibh Stiophna tar eis eirighthe agus do connaic se ag rith on doras í agus an bhó na diaidh. Do dhein se deithneas i chosaint ón mbuin do bhí Concubar ag romhar ar agáidh an doruis sa clós.
Tráthnóna an lae Ceadna do sín Stiophna le h-ais na teine faid is do bhí na prataí á mbeiriughadh agus do chan se mar leanas :-
Ar mhaibin indiu ar mh’eirighe dom
is me ag amharc ar an spéir
Ce chidhfinn cugham an stuaic an deas
Ac an bhean dob’ culne sgéimh
Agus mhile luth ‘ci isglaodh
Agus Smolac mhór na diaidh ar drag
Le Fainne Geal an Lae.
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 09:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
111
Do dearc me í is ba dheas í o gnaoi
Sa maladh ba caoile breagtha
Sa leaca bhí ar dhat an aoil
Sa gean do bhí na gáire
Mam a cice, do cealg me’m chroidhe
Le taitneamh dhá cicáib bana
Crobh a géig, a pip sa déid
Sa cúm ba chaoile breaghtha
1V
Mo creac is mo chás gan mise smo ghrád
Ar leabaidh gola nár n-aonar
Go ciuin is go tlát gus an tAifreann dá radh
Is gan neart ag ar namhaid sinn sgaoileadh
‘Oig- bhean breágh na leabhair cromán
Och d’fhúigis m’inntinn buartha
Sis mór go mb’fearr leim chroidhe tu d’fagháil
Na righeacht agus stát mar dhualgas.
V
Oc agus mo chead anois agus me ag triall
Fí sna duithchíbh siar go bronac
No measg na gcliar ata le sealadh fí chiach
Anois agus me a d’iarraidh snuacair
Oigbhean, sa chiallaig, a cumannaig ‘sa ghrianaig
Is cliste mar a rianfa an brón diom
Is go bfuilim it diaidh le tuilleadh is da bliadhain
Is na’ fuilaing i bpian nios mo me.
senior member (history)
2019-07-22 09:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I nDún na Séad ar eirige an lae
Is me ag dul fé dein mo shláinte
Mar a mbíodh caora is cno buidhe ar géagaibh
Agus mil na slaodaibh ar bántaibh
Do labradar na h-éin is do las na spéartaibh
Is ta an fairge na caoraibh lan suas
Is do mhúsgail an ghrian a bhí le sealadh fe chiac
Is d’eirig an t-iasg na lan rith
11
Annsud ar dtuis dom in – imeall ciúise
I gcoillte cumhra thárlag
Mar a raibh an Fhinne Bhean Fhionn
Gur bhinne ar a tiúin
Na fidil, fluitas clairseach
Ba ghlas i a súil is a maladh os a cionn
Sa leaca mar ciúis na tragha ‘muigh
Is ba gile ar a pip na’ an sneacta
Ar an gcraoibh
Is do lion mo croide le grádh dhi.
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 00:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. On the "Molly-wee" there lives a deer,
With silver horns bright & clear.
It is neither fish flesh nor stone
But on the "Molly wee" it lives alone. A snail
N.R. The "Mollywee" is a local lane.
2. I am six foot three as you may see,
No house is right without me;
Take me back the other way,
And I'm forty perch exactly! A door
3. I have but one horn, yet no unicorn,
I milk no Kerry cow.
Grandmama loves me and round the table shoves me,
With a smile of good luck in her brow! A Teapot.
4. As round as an apple, as plump as a ball
It climbs over churches, steeples and all. The sun.
5. Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat;
You may guess for ever, and you'll never guess that: A pipe.
6. My first's a crime in every clime, an article for second.
Part of your pane, transpose the same, for third & last are reckoned.
These parts will name a beautious place, In some, well known to you
And from Cloc Uectairs fortress bold, my total you can view.
Killakeen ( a part of Lough Oughter)
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 00:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live in Drinadaly. It is in the parish of Boardsmill. It is in the Barony of Lune. It got its name from the wood of Daly. There are eight families in my townland. There are forty people in the townland of Drinadaly. There are six slated houses and two thatched ones. There is one old man over seventy years. His name is Thomas Douglas Drinadaly Trim. The old people do not know Irish. They tell stories in English. There were more houses in Drinadaly long ago than now. The ruins of those can still be seen. I do not know of any emigrants who left my townland. I never heard any
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 00:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Woodtown, in the parish of Ballivor, and in the Barony of Lune. There are only two families living in Woodtown. There are nineteen people living in Woodtown. It got its name because there is a lot of woods around it. There is one thatched house and one slated house in Woodtown. There is no old people in Woodtown. There are the remains of an old house in Woodtown. I heard no
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 00:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
story or song about my townland. Some of land is good and some of it is bad. It is good for grazing and tilling. There is no wood near Drinadaly. The river Boyne runs through Dinadaly and there is a big bridge over it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 00:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear criona ag dul cun báis agus bhí aon mhac amháin aige gan pósadh. Bhí an mac san ag suirighe le beirt bán. Baintreac a b’ead bean aca agus bhí stoc is stor is oll mhaitheas aici agus a clann tógtha aici. Cailin óg da thamhail a b’eadh an bhean eile na’ raibh spre na faghal thas aici.
Ba mhaith leis an mac comhairle a atar do bheith aige sar a bfaghfadh an t-atair bás agus do chuir se an ceist cuige mar seo :-
Ta dís bhan ag sior- cur buartha im ceann
Ta ba caoirig ag mnaoi aca cruacha is clann
Ta dhá ros mhin ag mnaoi aca na gcuaca leabhair
‘Sa a dhaoine, an fhios díbh ciaca is snuachar ann.
Do labhair fear na leaptha mar leanas
A mhic a chroidhe istig, má bhionn do snuachar ann
Leig-se díot an crion- bean do tóg a clann
Cuir do chroide ins mnaoi na gcuaca leabhair
Go bfuil a dá ros mín mar fhír- uisge fhuar i ngleann.
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 00:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
‘Sior ól bhrannda ‘seadh bhim gan aimhras
Nuair a bhionn an brúid bocht ag romhar go deimhin
1V
Do labhair an Slabuidé:-
Nuair a ghabain mo ceactda treabaim na reidh cnuic
Agus beathuighim fein gac a ndubraís fós
Sin cuid dem shaothar san cruithneact chraorac
‘San eorna leasac in aon braith is beoir
Nuair a theighim ar aonac bionn feirc im bhéabhar
Sis mear a taosgaim se punc ar bhórd
Nuair a bionn tú i gcein ag siubal na hEireann
Agus do cleití gheana ‘gat á gcur i dtreo
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 00:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
La Feile Padraig im shuidhe idtigh tabhairne
Mar a raibh cuideachta sár – fhear lein taoib ag ól
Bhí meidre mna ann na gcuaca in breaghthe
Bhí a cneas mar bláth agus a gruadh mar ór
Biodar sár- fhir na suidhe os cionn clár ann
Thug searc is grádh ar fad do’n maighdin éig
Fear súiste is rainne ‘gus maighistir sgoláirí
Do shiubhlaig a lán is do léig go leor
11
Do labhair gac aon aca a bpáirt le céile
A’ moladh ‘mbréithre le beál na n-óg
No feacaint a mbféidir aon chuínse in ao’ cor
Adh fághail gan faoiseamh cun dul ‘na dtreo
Do labhair an speir – bhean mall, tais, maordá
Ní gradhfainn fein an t-é is ailne snódh
Ac an t-e is gunta is geíre cun an cios a dheánamh
‘Se ba inian liom a cás im threo
111
Do labhair an maigistir sgoile:-
Mise mhuineann an sagart clumhail
Agus gac saghas prionnsa da bfuil le fagháil
Sás laidne fhogluim ‘gus Gréig a sgrúdu’
Is na Doctuiri seo a dheineann leigheas
Sin cun suibal me bim mear luthmhar
Is deas í mo triubhas is mo Caroline
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 10:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
X1V Do tharraig se leis sin na h-aird ó thuaidh
Cun ab’a- an- tige nua aige is cun Caladh an Droma Móire
Soir Ceap a’ Cuin’ is trí sraid Leasa – Móire
Cun go cuireamar i dtalamh é imbarra Sliabh Luachrach
Curfa – is a ram de dam ---
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 10:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
V1
Is gearr uainn Sean do creachadh na béir ann
Mo craoibin, aoibhinn, aluinn óg
In imeall na Sraide á lamac le pileiribh
Mo craoibin, aoibinn, aluinn óg
Is breágh í a áitreabh i lar an Ghaorthaidh
In-imeall an atha is gan fagháil ag aoinne air
Is go dtagaidh an bás go Bráth ní baoghal dó
Mo craoibín, aoibínn, áluinn óg.
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 09:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
111
Bionn an fiadh cuthaig ag conairt ghó thraoc’ ann
Mo craoibin, aoibinn, aluinn óg
Mna tighe is leinbh ar a gcuis leannaibh ag feacaint
Mo craoibin aoibinn aluinn óg
Bid na ceadta duine aca ag druidim le na céile
Cun é shaoradh ó imeall na coille da mbfeidir
Sa bpabhar na gcumas ni cuirfeadh o’nGaortadh é
Mo craoibin, aoibinn aluinn óg
1V
Is tá sagart breágh naomh da do leigeann na Sgríbhinn
Mo craoibín, aoibinn, áluinn óg
De Mhaithibh na bPaorac ó táobh na bríghde
Mo craoibin aoibinn aluinn óg
Togann sé an ceo des na sloíghthib daoine
Bheadh sa coire go deo dhá ndoghadh dir theintibh
Agus sagart dá shórd nil i gcóta Iosa
Mo craoibin, aoibinn, aluinn, óg
V
Is bionn moran bád gac lá ar Tuinn ann Mo craoibín, aoibinn, aluinn, óg
Cun fir agus mna gac tráth do thionnlacht Mo craoibin, aoibinn, aluinn, óg
Ce go mbionn mo stór ag gleo sa bruighin liom
i dtaobh teact no gcóir ó pharóiste Draighnigh
Is de Thir - na - n-Óg an treo go mbim – se
Mo craoibin, aoibinn, aluinn óg
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 09:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mo shlán beo cuirim cun imeall an Gaorthaidh
Mo chraoibhín aoibhinn áluinn óg
Se an ball é is deise dá bfeicim in ao’ball
Mo chraoibhín aoibhinn áluinn óg
Lar na cille mar a gcuir fear mo chreachta
Beidh mo bhólacht cun socair cois Tuinne
Dá n-aodhracht
Cois an crainn iubhair cluthmhar mar a bhfuil
Tuille dem Gaoltaibh
Mo chraoibhín aoibhinn áluinn óg
11
Is mó macaidh breagh bó sa treo im thimcheall
Mo craoibin, aoibhinn, aluinn óg
Cloc – aoil, móin agus mor cuid mínligh
Mo croaibhin, aoibhinn, aluinn óg
Bionn ann ceol sport agus aoibhneas
Is ba minic na gcomhair me ag sport san ínse
Caismirt na gleo ni bhionn go deo dir daoinibh ann
Mo chraoibhín aoibhinn aluinn óg
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 00:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
accuracy how much money or stock was likely to be given to the girl by her Father. Armed with this knowledge the prospective bridegroom and match-maker report for the ladies' home. Before going there however they made sure to take with them a substantial quantity of the "crathur" with the sole purpose of "softening" the man of the house (It must be remembered it was the Father not the girl who had to be satisfied). When all was finally arranged they usually imbibed freely. A night was arranged when the groom came and collected the Dowry. This night usually preceded the wedding day.
Wedding Day:- This was a great day. The bride and her friends were astir early and busied themselves preparing for the arrival of the groom. Certainly "Sean gach bídh agus nua gach dígh" was to be found in abundance. The bridegroom and his friends came to the house of the bride. There they feasted and made merry, while fiddlers played their sweetest, and songsters sang their best songs. The merriment lasted well into the afternoon. Then the procession to the Church for the marriage ceremony took place. Before the Bride left her parents' house however, pathetic scenes were
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 00:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There a few old trades still being pursued in this district
(1) that of a cooper;
(2) that of a thatcher;
(3) basket-making;
(4) making sugán chairs;
(5) burning lime in lime kill
(6) salmon and trout fishing
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 00:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When Mr Ashe was a boy people wore no boots except on Sundays going to Mass. Boots were not worn to any extent until 1870.
A man by the name of Diarmuid Gabha never wore a boot. He could drive a spade through the hardest ground with the naked foot.
When feet were washed the water was kept and not thrown out til the last representative of the family came home.
This was supposed to keep away evil spirits.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 00:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Blue bells when pulled and boiled in new milk for some time are a certain cure for jaundice.
A tea spoon full take every morning will cure gall stones. Mr Ashe gave this cure to a neighbour - John O'Mahony who was suffering from jaundice for several weeks and in the course of a few weeks the man was perfectly cured.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 00:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mr Ashe distinctly remembers to see the wife sitting behind the husband coming home from the wedding in 1873.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 00:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a famous smith living in Fibrock who was an expert at making spades. Fibrock is near Castlemaine. A man by the name of Matthew Sullivan lived also at Fibrock. This man was remarkable for the manufacture of cranes, ploughs and ironwork. A man by the name of Harty lived at a place called the White Gate near Castlemaine.
This man was noted weaving. A man called Seán Tomás was an outstanding thatcher, and another in the same district was an expert nailer.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 23:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí bean ar an bhaile seo i bhfad ó shoin a dtuga siad Bidí Phroinnisis uirthi. Bhí meitheal alcí ag cur isteach an fhéir agus bhí Híudaí Ruadh ann. Ní rabh morán tae ag gul san am ach bhí dúl ionntach ag Hudaí ann.
Bhal ní rabh morán gléas ar Bidí tae a cheannacht agus preataí a bhí ann fá choinne an bhricfeasta, agus preataí fa choinne an dinneara. Bhí Hudaí ag súil go mbéadh an tae ann nuair a bhí siad réidh sa tráthnóna ach preataí a fágadh síos arais.
“Níl dadaidh cosmhail leis na preataí”, deireadh Bidí.
“Go hifreann leis na preataí” arsa Hudaí na bhí fearg air nuair chonnaic sé goidé mar bhí.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 21:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
X1V Do tharraig se leis sin na h-aird ó thuaidh
Cun ab’a- an- tige nua aige as ceen Caladh an Droma Móire
Soir Ceap a’ Cuin’ is trí sraid Leasa – Móire
Cun go cuireamar i dtalamh é imbarra Sliabh Luachrach
Curfa – is a ram de dam ---
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 21:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
X Siud amac an madra is do leanadar go leir é
Na h-áird ó thuaidh is cun Áth an Téide
Trí Ruadh Glaise an tSionnaig curraithibh in aonaig
is tri Sliabh Baile an Aitinn ce gur fada iad ón a ceile
Curfa – is ram de dam ----
X1 Tharraig se leis sinn tri Innse-an-Rinnce
Sa coill an Gleanna mhóir seadh gréad se an croide ionnainn.
Tri Cnucaire – an - Corraig cnocainibh Mhic Duibhne
Sios air an Funnaisg is tri Innsibh Caoin’ Soir
Curfá - is a ram de dam ----
X11 Tharraig sé leis sinn cun an Droma Duighthe
Cun leaca na dTarraing agus bun an Cumair Doimhin soir
Ag deanamh ar an gCarraig do bhí imbarra Gleanna Meidhre
Sa baile Geal na Tragha ‘sead fearamar na radarc cur
Curfa - is a ram de dam ---
X111 Ó deas Sliabh an Daingin biod an gearraidh againn le ceile
Soir Ceappa – Coinne agus sios cun Magh-Géille
Ac ar a ndul sa talamh garbh biodh na capaill ortha á dtraoc ‘ ann
Agus cidhfeá marcaig treasgeartha tar braghaidibh a céile ann
Curfa – is a ram de dam ----
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 21:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
V1 – Bhí gadair fhiaig Wallas ann is gadair Mhistir O’Neill ann
Gadáir Morgan Rattléir is gadhair na Mhullearac.
Gadair an Tigéarna Massie agus gadair na bPaorac
agus gadhair lórd Kingston o’baile Mistéal’ ann
Curfá – is a ram de dam --
V11 Lá Nodlag beag do bhi deire leis na Saoire
Seadh sgaoileamar ar nGadair go meanmac, meidhreac
Amac fe’s na garbh cnuic ag tarrac ar Raghnárd
Agus sios cun luimhnig thug sé agaidh ann
Curfa - is a ram de dam ---
V111 Gadhair Cill a Ghurra do thóg buadh an lae sin
D’fhiadhacadar an madra o’n gconairt go leir seo
Ac nuair a thanadar go dti an caladh tainig eagla ar gac einne
Ac Cnáid, a gadhair sa capaill agus é ag snámh trid an mhór mhuir
Curfa – Is a ram de dam - - -
1X Cuireadar i dtalamh é i mbarra Clais’ Mhóiré
ac dhompuig sé ar an gcaladh mar a stadadar na h-uaisle
Ac ar a casadh do ins an bfarraige Brodar na gadair sugs leis
Tallie hó! Arsa Cráid agus é ag snamh trid an Mór mhuir
Curfa – is a ram de dam ----
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 21:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11 Is do bhí Mister Wolf ó bhó-Neill ann
Agus Morgan Rattler na dhiaidh ar saothar
Ó Maghcromtha bhí Hedges Sayers agus Captain Bólar
Gan snáth de’n leine air
Curfa – Is a ram de dam - - -
111 Is do bhí Standis Riobárd ann ó liam láithreac
Agus Sean Geal Pine ó Baile Mhistéala
Croide na Feile do. Rye beag bárnete
Agus barr na h-Eireann do Square Geal Cární
Curfa is a ran de dam
1V Is do bhí Piarus Paor ó Baile Maoir ann
Agus Artur Rossers o Cluain-Tir ann
Biodar na Faoitigh ó Banntraige ann
Radhri Ártúr sa “Lango – Laoi” ann
Curfa – is a ram de dam - - -
V Do bhí Curnél Hyde ó Carraig-an-Eid ann
Curnél Tomson is Curnél Bailí
Curnél Rixon is Curnél Agent
Is Curnél Mass, i migCeann go leir ann
Curfá – is a ram de dam --
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mould and the whole was allowed to stand perpendicularly in a green sod until the tallow became solid.
The nail then helped to pull out the candle.
Rough sketch of candle in mould partly drawn out.
Information and equipment supplied by Mrs Julie Elizabeth Ashe,
Aughills, Castlemaine. Age 70 years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Candle Making.
In olden times house wives made candles of the suet of the cow or the sheep or the goat. Moulds were made by the tinsmith.
Special thread was sold for wicks. If that were not available thread for sewing flour bags was used.
This thread was put through the mould and kept in position by means of the opening of the mould.
The thread was kept in position at one end of the mould and at the other (the closed end) by means of a nail.
The tallow was then poured into the
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At that time there were no blackboards.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In 1875 hedge-schools closed in Aughills, Castlemaine.
The teacher would teach four lessons every day.
Each pupil was taken separately.
They continued teaching in the hedge schools for six years after the National Schools were established.
The children then went to Annascaul to the National School.
The teacher was William O'Brien. The ["Varter"?] Atithmetic was used.
Every pupil got a headline to write. When this was written each pupil went out to "play".
The pupils had to sit on stones
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a severe storm in 1886. It started on the 8th December. It blew from the west and tumbled everything before it. Snow came in the key holes in 1888 and 1889.
It was over twenty feet high in a flat field.
The snow was small and dry. The narrator saw small dry snow cover a large area.
He also saw fork lightning knock a house in Boulteens Castlemaine.
This was Corcoran's house.
Martin Ashe supplied this information.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:10
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The following game though not now played so frequently was very much practised some years ago:-
Several children have fists on top of each other then each child repeats one of the following sentences
Clann is stáca, leag ar Lár é.
Go dtí maidin amaireach.
Go bfaigead sé cúpla práta agus bainne Cuappta[?]
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 11:03
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In olden times the roofs of the houses were made of timber. This was the first coating, over this were placed green sods. Then a covering of heath was applied, then heather, and lastly thatch.
On the first year after the new roof was put on it was tied down with ropes. On the second year spars were applied. At that time the fire was in the gable and there was no chimney.
A hole in the roof took the place of the chimney.
There was a bed in the kitchen known as a settle bed as it could be used as a settle by day.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:42
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of a ridge.
Information supplied by Martin Ashe. Aged 76
Writer. Denis O'Mahony
P.S. Further information supplied by M. Ashe.
Landlords wanted their rent and no farmer could pay as they had no hay. no potatoes and consequently no money.
The landlords then gave 20% reduction to any tenant that would pay. this gave an inspiration to Davitt to start the Land League.
"Leather Coats" were the potatoes then planted.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:40
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In 1878 it froze from November till the 8th December.
It was snowing till the 15th so from walking in the roads ice became about 4" thick.
Thaw then set in and the narrator was sent to the mountain to inspect the sheep and often passed glens covered with about 20' of snow. (Several sheep were lost)
It rained in January 1879 and in February 1879. Remained raining till the middle of March. Potatoes were put in in the beginning of April.
It rained again in the summer and the stalks which were fine brought forth no potatoes When the potatoes were dug in October a man would dig to 8 stones for every 10 spades
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:35
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This information was supplied by Martin Ashe, Aughills, Castlemaine, who has a quern on his farm. Two others were taken by Major McGillicuddy probably to the Museum in Dublin.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:31
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In later times a little flour was mixed with the potatoes. This was the bread used throughout the year without butter, except on very rare occasions such as Easter and Michaelmas.
At Christmas flour bread was used and butter added as we do now.
Querns for grinding corn was the only form of grinding machine in existence.
The querns were round stones one of those was hollow and the other was so made as to fit into this. To the uppermost one was attached an iron handle which set the stone revolving and during this process the grain was crushed.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:21
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In the year 1875 tea was drunk in Kerry for the first time. There was no kettle used when tea first came in.
The tea was put into an oven or pot after the water had been boiled in either of them. The people then drank it out of bowls.
Bread.
About 1878 Stampy was used extensively.
It was made from grated raw potatoes squeezed and pressed dry and then baked on a griddle.
The object of squeezing the potatoes was to remove the starch which was used for stiffening clothes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:14
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Martin Ashe father of the man referred to in previous page walked to to Cork one day from Aughills Castlemain, distance about 70 miles. He returned the next day wearing a new hat. This happened in 1838. His son related this story or incident.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:13
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Martin Ashe father of the man referred to in previous page walked to to Cork one day from Aughills Castlemain, distance about 70 miles. He returned the next day wearing a new hat. This happened in 1838. His son related this story or incident.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:12
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Martin Ashe father of the man referred to in previous page walked to to Cork one day from Aughills Castlemain, distance about 70 miles. He returned the next day wearing a new hat. This happened in 1838. His son related this story or incident.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:07
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and held it thus until he saw that the child was safe. The rail was supposed to be about 14 cwt.
This incident was related to me by Martin Ashe, Aughills, Castlemaine. aged 76.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:05
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A man by the name of John Langford of Keel. Castlemaine went for a crib or rail of turf to the bog accompanied by a child. When the rail was full the child stood near the wheel of the cart.
Langford noticed the horse moving and knocking the child under the wheel.
He immediately lifted the cart completely off the ground
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 10:00
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Keane succeeded in jumping in but failed to jump out while his opponent - James Murphy a carpenter, succeeded in jumping in and out again and thus won the bet.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 09:56
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Mr Burke also related an incident of which he was the principal witness. Keane's father boasted that his son was the strongest man in the locality.
Mr Burke said he'd bet a half "teerce" of porter that he'd provide stronger. Keane (Senr) took up the challenge on behalf of his son. The feat was to be as follows:-
Keane and Mr Burke's contestants were to jump into a barrel about four feet high, bearing a half cwt in each hand, and jump out again while still burdened with the weights.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 09:36
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by the late Thomas R. Burke.
Hotel. Coachford. Co. Cork.
(Writer) Denis O'Mahony.
Coachford.
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 09:34
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Supposing the day is calm the cormorant is quiet. Cormorant turns to the North if the weather changes. He leaves the sea in frosty weather and goes to the lakes and seas looking for trout. Crows are supposed to caw when a storm approaches.
Soot falls down in an open fire place.
Local Heroes.
A man by the name of Keane lifted a butt of sand and consequently helped the horse which was attached to the "butt" to pull same out of a deep rut. Weight of the load would be about fifteen cwt.
This incident was related to me
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 09:25
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V
Eve Leary O; Eve Leary O; though fair across the main.
You holds what I pride most on earth, my Maureen's grass grown grave.
My present habition is Broadway Boston Mass.
For a Buachaill Ruadh is always true to his Inchigeela Lass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 09:19
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Lass.
111
We passed through Inniscarra groves at the dawning of the days.
Took passage in a yanke ship that in Queenstown harbour lay.
The Captain being a fenian bold in safety to compass.
I sailed away from Gráinnawails with my Inchigeela lass.
1V
Eve Leary o how sweet the name rings in an exile year.
Though I have not seen her heath clad hills for five and twenty years.
'Twas there I met my hearts delight on a Sunday morn at mass.
I knelt and prayed in the chapel there with my Inchigeela Lass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 09:09
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My Inchigeela Lass.
1
To greet you proud Eve Leary's sons and daughters fair and true.
Assembled at the southern club all friendships to renew.
The annual opportunity allowed to let it pass.
'Ere I will reate a tale to night to my Inchigeela Lass.
11
She is modest as the cooing dove as gentle as the fawn.
That roamed o'er Desmond's storied heights.
Or the high lands of Gugane.
No God is fair or grecian lair in beauty can surpass.
She is my winsome rogue my Maúreen óg my Inchigeela
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 00:12
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He is crossing the ferry
And he walking his dogs around the Myshall domain.
1V
Wherever I will wander I will think of Kilmurry
Though the waves of the ocean between us may swell
For I will soon bid adeui to my old home in Derry
And charming Kilmurry for ever farewell.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 00:06
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11
Mid a cluster of trees on the hill o'er Kilmurry
Stand the old abbey ruins with ivy-clad walls
There the elm the lime tree the evergreen cherry
Around the old abbey grow shady and tall
All nature wild flowers in perfusion are growing there
O'er graves that are marked with a cross at each head
And the evergreen palms that for ages has stood there
Like a sentinel guarding the homes of the dead.
111
How delightful to stand on the hills of Kilmurry
When the sun from the west sheds its light
The huntsman at evening
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 23:59
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1
On the hills of Kilmurry where often my childhood
I spent my young days with a heart free from care.
And gathered the fruits from the vines in the wild wood
And plucked the wild roses perfuming the air
And often at evenings when homeward returning
I watched the sun shedding it light o'er the plains
O' what delight in my young heart was burning
For I wished in Kilmurry I had always remained.
11
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 23:52
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and rain
I would long to be back in Kilmurry again.
This was obtained from Mr Edmond Sexton, Knockane, Berrings, about 35. Inniscarra, Co Cork.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 23:49
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So plain to be seen
You can hear the train whistling going down to Gurteen.
V1
So rally with me boys and its there you will find
That there is one spot in Ireland that I have left behind
There is the home of O'Connell our patriot so bold
With the martyrs of Ireland his name is enrolled.
V11
When you next go to Berrings Your attention is drawn
To the beauty surrounding that I am going to call
There is a pictureque chapel Both portly and tall
A school and a "pub" and the georgeus town hall
With deep desolation in sunshine
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 23:40
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I will trace
And down by Magoola with the fox in full chase
If you go there on Sunday it is a fine hunting ground
It is the emblem of sages the best can be found.
1V
I give my best wishes to sweet shandy Hall
My heart is with Fergus Cronody and all
I reflect for one moment in sweet Lisladeen
And the home of the wanderer is Ballyshoneen.
V
Go on to Inniscarra, and up by Cloghroe
And down by Magoola where the wild plover soar
Till you come to that hamlet
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 23:33
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Song.
1
The lakes of Killarney are dear to my heart
From the green groves of Blarney o why should I part.
For I sooner live lonely in landscape serene
From the low lands of Dripsey to the lands of Scarteen.
11
There is Macroom Castle the pride of the west
And the fair hills of Carrig with their heath-woven crest
Where in childhood I wandered With a heart full of glee
Go out through the moorlands of Sweet Canovee.
111
Coachford and Peake are the next
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 20:58
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the Abbey.
A double row of elm trees leads to its shady hall
The ivy crowns its shaded towers and dilapidated walls
It was a seat of learning and Religion profound
Till enemies determined to raze it to the ground.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 20:54
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About eight miles from my house is situated Kilcrea Abbey. The abbey is now in ruins and is used as a cemetery.
Long ago before Cromwell came to Ireland the abbey was occupied by monks, but when Cromwell came it was destroyed. After that the people buried the dead there.
About a hundred years ago a woman was seen every day from morning until dark collecting the bones around the ground. She was of low stature, and had a hump on her back.
She spoke to nobody and nobody spoke to her. The people never knew where she lived but they said it was in the abbey, she never ate anything. Then one day she disappeared and was never seen again.
The following is part of a song about
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 20:46
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work, whoever went on his back and had to be sold.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 20:45
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Long ago there lived a man who had a horse that would never work unless there was a man on his back, and another one driving him.
The owner however could not afford to have two men following one horse so he decided to do something to trick the horse.
One day he got a coat a hat and a trousers. He filled the trousers with stones and stuffed rest of the "man" with hay.
At first he strapped the "man" very carefully and the horse went on quietly.
However he strapped the "man" rather careless one day while ploughing in a field the man fell off and the stones fell out of the trousers.
When the horse saw this he refused to
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 12:21
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senior member (history)
2019-07-11 12:20
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gun pressed against the priest all the time. But the Priest said to wait and see.
The priest took out his prayer book and began to pray and after a while whistled. Nothing happened so he began praying again. He whistled again, and as nothing happened, he prayed again. Then he whistled a third time, and the protestant came with a lot of chains tied around him.
Then the priest asked him where he was when he first whistled and the answer was "In the pits of Hell"
"Where were you when I whistled secondly". "Waiting to get the gates opened". "Where were you when I whistled the third time". "Coming as fats as I could". Then the priest sent him away.
This story was told to me by---
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 12:11
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Long ago there lived a Protestant and when he died, the servants and people around where he lived saw him ride in his carriage up to the door of his house every evening. All the people thought he had a fine time in the other world and were always talking about it.
However a priest heard it, and one evening while walking near the house of the Protestant he met a neighbour. "What a fine time the Protestant has" said the neighbour, "I saw him driving around on his carriage a few evenings ago". "You may think so" says the priest, "but he drives around he has his Hell with him.
The next moment the protestant's son jumped out over the fence asking the priest what he meant by speaking like that of his father. He had a
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 12:01
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even threw holy water around but to no avail, until at last he had to throw his stole at the devil.
When he did this the devil went up through the roof of the rooms in a ball of fire taking with him the roof of the room.
When the rest of the household heard the explosion they came to inquire what had happened, and on being told the Protestant went down on his two knees to beg the priest's pardon for what he had done. He was converted immediately and received Holy Communion before he died.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 11:55
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she declined to answer at first.
After some persuasion she told him that nobody that ever slept in that room was alive in the morning. The priest although a little frightened at first was very grateful to the girl, for what she told him and asked her for salt and water. Having blessed the water he put on his stole and began to pray.
At midnight the door opened and a fashionably dressed man walked in and said "I am your brother". The priest answered "If you are my brother show me a mark under your arm". He showed him the mark but the priest said "Put out your right foot". The devil wouldn't do this for his right foot is a horse's hoof.
Instead he began attacking the priest in various ways.
However he continued praying and
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 11:45
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In the penal days there lived a protestant.
He wished to capture or kill the Parish Priest and the curate. So he prepared a feast to which he invited both.
Suspecting no evil they both went. In the course of the evening the parish priest got something to drink that him very ill.
When the night came the Parish Priest was unable to go home. So they were invited to spend the night in the Protestant's house. The room was prepared and the priests were taken to it. The parish priest being put to bed went to sleep but the Curate didn't go yet awhile.
When the maid was leaving the room he noticed that she was crying. He asked her what was wrong but
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 00:32
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Germany on the other hand turned the beautiful idyll in to a hideous horror of unmasked militarism making the feast day of summer a day of sorrowful expectation of war to the peace loving people of the world.
Soon it may be that May Day will cease entirely to be remembered and celebrated as the opening day of Summer and became a day devoted to mere modern and other things.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 00:25
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are still to be observed in the garlanding of horses and cows bait these few remnants are pitiful to behold, when one considers how elsewhere mighty and magnificent celebrations take place with all man's might and pomp. Ireland in many ways is a sentimental and warm land is most undemonstrative when it is a question of giving public expression to her joy at the approach of summer.
May day celebrations for centuries past have been of healthy happy amusements. Who has not heard or seen the songs and dances round the May-pole which opens the days fun, and failed to appreciate somewhat the loveliness of springing life. In our own day Red Russia on the one hand and the Imperialist
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 00:13
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Processions march through public streets in gay attire, and parade in public squares exhibiting every symton of uncontrolled mirth and pleasure. Care and misery usually the close companions of man are abandoned. The King or president on high the very beggar on the street are one in all imbued with new life and hope. It is a strange thought that mankind ever seeks the future, even when most intoxicated with the present.
Thus May Day the herald of summer when life and growth will triumph most assuredly, a precious and pleasant date.
In our own native land it has been neglected, and the great festivals and processions are only now recalled by the oldest among us. Some relics of the public expression of joy
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 00:00
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The most glorious season of the year is summer, and it is the period of the year most welcome to all mankind. To the young it brings joy and happiness and long spells of joy and sunshine and open air amusements, to the old relief from pain and sickness, strength to combat the decay of life. The day which ushers in so welcome a season is surely a day marked for rejoicing, and this the first day of summer is made the subject of joyous expressions of hopeful expectation.
In many countries on the Continent of Europe public meetings and festivals are held on this day, to bring in the new boon summer of season of season of growth and ripening crops.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 21:52
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and presently saw that the King had only three men, and one King left on the board.
Diarmuid knew that the King had only one move to win the game, and yet, failed to see that move.
Diarmuid at once picked a small nut from a tree close by and gently dropped it on this particular move. The King moved his man won the game, and then started up with a loud cry, that there was no one in Ireland could play that move only Diarmuid. He looked up, and there Grainia and Diarmuid were discovered.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 21:44
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pursuit. She could distinctly hear them entering the forest, and a loud angry voice above the rest was surely her father's. She called Diarmuid from his sleep, and both remained immoveable, until presently they entered the forest, unfortunately the whole cavalcade rested and dined beneath the trees were Diarmuid and Grania were resting. Now the sun had ascended the heavens and the morning had become exceedingly sultry, and the calm and beautiful breeze had died away. And even the birds had ceased to sing their lovely songs. Some of the soldiers slept but the King called for his draught board, and challenged Donnead Mór to play.
Diarmuid had full view of the game
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 21:32
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It was a beautiful spring morning at the latter end of October. The sun was shining beautifully as it often does at this time of the year. And the faint murmer of the rippling leaves could be heard so peacefully at sunrise. Grania awoke, with a full sense of well being from her repose, her bed was arranged by Diarmuid of some well constructed branches in a substantial old oak tree in the midst of a huge forest where both of them had escaped her father's pursuit. Diarmuid still lay slumbering on a similar bed in the tree next to her. When she heard the unmistakeable sound of the heavy tramp of horses and the voices of many men, instinctively she knew that it was her fathers men in a hot
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 00:07
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obtained its loan for healing a sick cow. He kept it despite the nuns protest. His cow again falling ill, he went to the cupboard where he had hidden securely the precious bowl. He found it gone. In terror he confessed its loss. The nuns were guided to the cleft and there found it secured from thieves and greed. There it has ever since remained. To this day cures of aches pains and sores have taken place, and are taking place and it remains a testimony to the piety and fervent faith of Saint Gobnait and her flock.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 23:59
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erection of the Protestant chapel. By Divine providence she held the bowl towards the partially erected Protestant chapel, and making the sign of Cross implored divine protection for her flock. Immediately the masonery of the Protestant building collapsed. This was repeated from time to time to and finally the erection was abonded.
The years went by and St Gobnait went to Heaven. The bowl long celebrated as the instrument of divine grace in the hands of the Saint was kept in the Convent. Miraculous cures were performed and people used to come to the convent regularly and take it away for the purpose of touching the diseased persons or animal.
At last a covetous farmer
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 23:48
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The patron Saint of Ballavourney district is St Gobnait. The ruins of her convent built on a spot chosen under supernatural guidance can be seen to this day. Near by the ruins is a cleft formed from the convergence of two rocks.
In this cleft fixed immovably is a bowl. This bowl is endowed with miraculous power, and tradition locally attributes a marvellous origin to it. Saint Gobnait built her convent and adjoining chapel on a hill. Some time after the Protestant religion found some supporters in the district. They decided to build a church and by this means to win over member of Catholic Faith.
To frustrate this impious design, the Holy founder of the convent was inspired to prevent the
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 20:25
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Cuiread cruit Domhnall ar Thaidg i gcuideachta a chinn féin agus thainig sé abhaile na fear bhrónach. Agus bí an dá chruit air ó’n oidhce sin go dtí an la a bhfuair se bás.
“Eirig a Roíse cuir ort do bhróga
Téigh ag faire an fhir fuair bás”.
“Ca Dtéidhim a mhathair tá poll ar mo bróig
B’fhearr liom san bhaile ag an fhear atá beo”.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 20:24
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Bhí beirt fhear na gcomhnuidhe ins an bhaile talamh amhain darbh ainm Domhnall agus Tadhg. Bhí cruit ar gach duine aca.
Uair amhain bhí Domhnall amuigh go mall agus bhí aige le dul thart le lios. Chuala sé an cainnt mar seo istigh an lios. “Dia Luain, Dia Máirt, Dia Luain dia Máirt” agus mar seo de. Dubhairt Domhnall, “Dia Luain Dia Máirt agus Dia Ceadoin”. Le sin chruinnigh sgaifte de fir bheaga thart fá dtaoibh de agus tharraing siad isteach san lios é. “Goidé deanfadh muid leis” arsa fear aca. “Bainfid muid an cruit de”, arsan chuid eile.
Bhain siad an chruit de Domhnall agus leig siad abhaile na fear díreach é. Lá ar na mbharac chuaidh an sgéal amach go raibh an chruit ar shiubhal de (tadg) Dhomhnall. Cuaid an scéal fad le cluasa Thaidhg. Thug sé cuairt ar Domhnall agus d’fhiafruigh do caidémar fuairse réidhtigh de’n chruit.
Dhinnis (tadg) Domhnall do caidé mar thárla dó. Chuaidh Domhnall amach an oidhche sin agus chuaidh sé an bealach céadna. Dul thart ar an lios do chuala sé an chainnt céadna “Dia luain Dia Mairt agus Dia Ceadaoin”.
Sgairt Tadhg amach “Dia Luain, Dia Máirt, Dia Ceadoin, agus Diar-Daoin”, Thainig Sgaifte de fir bheaga amach Agus tharraing siad isteach son lios é.
“Goidé deanfas muid leis” arsa fear aca, “cuirfidh muid cruit Dhomhnaill air” arsa an chuid eile.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 12:41
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One day a man caught a fairy in a field. He asked the fairy to tell him where the crock of gold was hidden. The fairy told the man that the gold was hidden under the rush bush. When the fairy showed the rush bush that the crock of gold was supposed to be buried under, the man tied a knot on it because the field was full of rush bushes. Then he went home for a spade to dig out the gold. When he came back there was a knot on every bush in the field so he did not get the gold after all.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 12:33
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senior member (history)
2019-07-08 12:32
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heard a voice crying out pitious appeal. The only response she made was that she would not share her supper with anyone. Repeatedly the voice called and entreated her attention.
At last she responded and listening she heard "Dig up the hoarded gold buried underneath the kitchen hearth stone and let it be utilized for some purpose, for as long as it remains idle my soul will suffer in the fires of Purgatory". Michael returning shortly afterwards discovered the poor imbecile wildly repeating these words. Michael wasted no time in digging up the gold. He purchased a fine farm with it, and no further disturbances took place from that night onwards.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 12:23
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far when looking back she saw the sovereigns changing in to spancels and gathering in clusters around the trees nearby.
The treasure was buried by the old couple under the hearthstone in the cottage kitchen.
The family prospered exceedingly in the following years. The old couple transferred the farm to their only son Michael and soon after died. It was a queer happenings startled the occupants of the cottage. Terrible cries and moans of agony were heard nightly and the house was shunned by the neighbours as a place of uncomfortable sensations. Michael took to spending his nights elsewhere and Molly the poor imbecile aunt was left alone.
One such night as she was cooking her small meal on the fire she
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 12:00
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They stretched away before her covering the ground with a golden mantle and so thickly were they crowded that she imagined the blades of grass had by some magic wand turned to golden sovereigns overnight.
Seeing so much wealth lying before her she attempted to gather it up in her arms but this proved futile and she shovelled it with her cupped hands into her porringer which was soon filled to the brim. "Alas" she cried "Is this all I am to take of so much wealth going a begging". In vain she racked her brain to devise a scheme for collecting more and finding none, decided to mark the spot by tying her spancel to a tree. Then she went off rapidly to call her husband and her imbecile sister Molly to help to carry more home. She had not gone
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 11:48
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It was my grandfather's delight to recall a ghostly experience of an old serving woman Kate O'Flynn employed as a non-residing dairy maid by his mother. Old Kate used to live about a mile from her employer's house. And daily at daybreak would wend her way there. One morning duly equipped with a porringer and spancel, she proceeded from her home to work. Passing through a way edged with trees the ground before her commenced to sparkle brightly. The sun's rays were still weak and quite insufficient to cause so extrordinary a radiance from leaves or sod. The old woman went on eagerly and gave vent to an exclamation of deep joy when she beheld golden sovereigns scattered profusely over the path.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 11:18
approved
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awaiting decision
a short distance when he suddenly thought of the strange cow.
So he came back again to see if she were still there, yes she was still there but as he was within a hundred yards of her- she disappeared.
He forllournly searched every part field but failed to find her. Then when he returned home he asked his people if they could explain the matter. But they assured him that she appeared after every seven years in that same lis or fort for seven hundred years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 11:04
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awaiting decision
Ireland is exceedingly rich in fairylore.
I will tell you a strange story that occurred years and years ago.
In a part of our land in Tulligmore, Coachford, there is a lis or fort. This lis is fenced in, in a ring by abrupt ledges of rock. There was once a man who was very fond of spending an hour or two on sunny mornings reading a book at this solitary spot. But one morning he was surprised to see a lovely black Kerry cow feeding contentedly quite near him. He knew at once that she was not any of his own stock and he never noticed anyone like her by the surrounding neighbours. He finished the chapter he was reading and retraced his steps homewards. He had only gone
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 10:34
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 10:34
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awaiting decision
In the phenal times there was a very holy well and the name of this well was "the lady's well". This well was in Timoleague. It was a very deep well and in this well there was a fish.
And the water out of this well would cure any kind of a desease. So the poor people went to the well to be cured.
And when they went to the well some of them were cured and some of them were not.
And those who would not be cured would not see the fish. This story was told to me by
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 10:26
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awaiting decision
great battle in 1798 between the O'Donovan's and McCarthy's.
This story was told to me by Mrs Donovan.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 10:24
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Ballincarriga Castle.
This castle was on a rock. It was built about three hundred years ago by the O'Leary's. This castle was build with stones and the morther was mixeed with blood so it will not ever fall.
You could go from the ground to the top of the castle from the outside and all round it.
There are about a hundred windows in this castle and seven doors. There is water all round it and a bridge over the lake going into the castle.
It was a great place for war long ago. Many a famous battle was fought there. There was a
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 10:15
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the rose and the priest tried to take away the rose but failed to do so. So he brought the red-haired woman to the bed and made her take away the rose from the boy.
This story was told to me by Denis Donovan.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 10:11
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One day a little boy was going to school. On his way he met a red-haired woman and she gave him a lovely rose.
She told him not to give it away to any one. Not even when he would go to bed. When he went home his mother asked him wher he got the rose. And no one in the house could take it away from him. Every day he went to the cross and carried the rose with him.
So he was pining away and no good could be done for him. So his parents sent for the priest and the priest asked him where he got the rose. The boy told him wher he got
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 00:13
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Dripsey Castle is a very fine senery. scenery.
It was built by the McCarthy. It is built about fore hundred years ago. There are three stories in it and there are many rocks around this Castle.
There is water all round it and there are many pecular stones in frunt of the Castle and there five small towrs round this Castle.
This Castle was so high that the giants of old use to set on the top of it and wash their feat in the Dripsey river and are many silver pine trees and many [pame?]
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 00:11
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trees.
This Castle is very dark inside in it , all the windows are covered with ivy. This story was told to me by Mrs Donovan.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 00:09
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rejected
awaiting decision
Dripsey Castle is a very fine senery. scenery.
It was built by the McCarthy. It is built about fore hundred years ago. There are three stories in it and there are many rocks around this Castle.
There is water all round it and there are many pecular stones in frunt of the Castle and there five small towrs round this Castle.
This Castle was so high that the giants of old use to set on the top of it and wash their feat in the Dripsey river and are many silver pine trees and many tame
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 00:00
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rejected
awaiting decision
He went away and met the huntman and he said to him, Tom what have you in the bag and he took the bag from Tom and let out the cat to the hounds and the hounds ran after her.
The cat ran across a bog to a small house in the other side and the hounds after her. To the door of the house the huntman went. The men broke in the door and killed the cat. This story was told to me by Denis Donovan.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 23:54
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So Tom said to her that he would go to town and would take her with him and she said to him that if he would not go she would tare the eyes out of the children. Next morning she was ready before Tom got up, Tom told her wate he should go on a journey. So he walked away to the huntman.
The huntman told him to put the cat into a bag and bring her to the cross rodes at ten o'clock.
He told her to go into the bag oh no she said I will walk it with you and she went into the bag.
She told him not to tell anyone not to leve the cat out of the bag.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 23:44
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rejected
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A farmer by the name of Tom Connor lived on the borders of Kerry. A cat came to him one day. They had no cat at the time and they kept the cat, the cat stayed with them in side at home for a long time. One day Tom said that he would go to town for shoes for his children. He brought the shoes home, the cat got very cross, she ran out in the yard and started to tare at the sow that was in the yard.
What the divil is rong with that cat to night look here now that cat is a witch.
Tom went out and the cat started talking and scolding him as he did not bring her shoes from town.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 20:27
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awaiting decision
Fuaras na dánta ar leanas ó fhear d’ar b’ainm do Taig O’Murcadha timceall le fiche mbliadan o soin. Do rugadh é i bparoiste Cill Michil in aice Maghcromtha sa bliadan 1842 agus fuar sé bas in aice Ath Coisde (igCluain Taidhg) i mbealtaine 1932.
Gaedilg ar fad a bhí aige nuair a bhí sé ana-óg go dti go raibh se deic mbliadan d’aois no mar sin agus ‘na dhiaidh sin béarla a bhí dá labhairt aige go coitcheanta.
Bhios ag bailiughadh na nDán uaidh ar feadh i bfad agus do chuireas an cuid ba mhó aca go Cumann an Bhealoidis i mBlath Cliath.
Seo cuid aca a bhailigheas uaidh
Beannacht Dé le an anam :-
An Fiadhac
1 Biomar lá breágh ar iar an tsleibhe 'muigh.
Is bhí mór uaisle na gCuig gConntae ann.
Cuireamar a'r nGadhair go cruinn le na céile.
Agus siud amac an madra is do leana mar go leir é
Curfa
Is a ram de dam de dou del um
Ram de dam de dou del um
'Sa ram de dam de dou del um
Ram de dam de dam
An curfa an tarna h,uair-
Is ram . . . .
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 00:16
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awaiting decision
First prize Mallow (Cork Co Championship) 1937
(Championship Cup won here)
3rd prize Banteer (Co Championship) 1938
1st " Timoleague 1938
3rd " Skibbereen 1938
3rd " Ballyfeard 1938
3rd " Carrigtwohill 1938
1st " Timoleague 11th January 1939
Note - At the Co Championship Contest held in Banteer in 1938 the first three places were obtained by three representatives from this Parish of Coachford namely:-
Pat Murphy, Coolacullig, Coachford 1st Prize.
Tim Roche, Kilabbey, Coachford 2nd Prize.
Joe Murphy, Tullig, Coachford 3rd Prize.
one of which this parish may well be proud.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 00:05
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1st prize Carrigtwohill - 1938
1st " Coachford - 1938 (winner of Silver Cup)
2nd " Timoleague 11th Jan 1939
Pat Murphy represented the County Cork at Athenry, Co Galway in 1934 with two others already mentioned.
Pat Murphy has obtained to date 17 Prizes in all made up of 6 first prizes, 5 seconds, 4 thirds, 2 fourths.
Joe Murphy, Tullig, Coachford is another ploughman of this Parish (Coachford) who has a fine record and one also of which the Parish may be proud :-
(Collected by T. Forde N.T. from Joe Murphy, Tullig)
1st Prize - Cloghroe (confined to Agricultural Classes 1926
1st Prize Coachford (Novice Class) 1927
3rd " Coachford (open) 1928
2nd " Banteer 1929
3rd " Whitescross 1929
3rd " Banteer 1930
1st " Drumtarriffe 1934
1st " Carrigtwohill 1934
3rd " Drumcommer 1935
2nd " Drumcommer 1936
3rd " Rosscarberry (Championships) 1936
Selected to represent the county at Tullamore All-Ireland Championship Ploughing Contest 1936.
2nd " Donoughmore 1937
3rd " Crookstown 1937
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 23:37
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Patrick Murphy commenced his career as a ploughman on Ballinamorrive 1919 having previously obtained some instruction from Jim Roche Kilabbey as to proper method of "opening a land" and the setting of the tail-piece.
The following is a list of prizes obtained with dates.
3rd prize Ballinamorrive (Aghinagh) 1919.
3rd prize Garihesta 1920
1st prize Cloghroe 1922
4th " Coachford 1925
3rd " Banteer 1927
1st " Banteer 1934
2nd " Whitescross (County Championship) 1937
4th " Belgooly 1935
2nd " Drumtarriffe 1936
2nd " Carrigtwohill 1937
2nd " Ryecourt 1937
3rd " Donoughmore 1937
1st " Minane Bridge 1937
2nd " Timoleague 1937
1st " Banteer (Co Championship) 1938 where a Silver Cup was won.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 23:36
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rejected
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Patrick Murphy commenced his career as a ploughman on Ballinamorrive 1919 having previously obtained some instruction from Jim Roche Kilabbey as to proper method of "opening a land" and the setting of the tail-piece.
The following is a list of prizes obtained with dates.
3rd prize Ballinamorrive (Aghinagh) 1919.
3rd prize Garihesta 1920
1st prize Cloghroe 1922
4th " Coachford 1925
3rd " Banteer 1927
1st " Banteer 1934
2nd " Whitescross (County Championship) 1937
4th " Belgooly 1935
2nd " Drumtarriffe 1936
2nd " Carrigtwohill 1937
2nd " Ryecourt 1937
3rd " Donoughmore 1937
1st " Minane Bridge 1937
2nd " Timoleague 1937
1st " Banteer (Co Championship) 1938 where a Silver Cup was won.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 23:21
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But you ran him off his feet
Oh! what a sporting crowd came thro' My Sweet Old Home in Peake.
1V
There was no time to me so gay as those happy days of yore
Oh many the sporting dance we had At the Doctors cross before
Where the men were of the truest And the Colleens oh so sweet
Sure they still still write me more and more From My Dear Old Home in Peake
V
Oh! many a change has come and gone Since those events took place
And we are few and far between Like all the Irish Race
Perhaps some day I'll come again A quieter life to seek
To live in peace and happiness In My Sweet Home in Peake.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 23:08
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1
I'll sing one song to-night, my boys! About my native home
Tho' far from it I've wandered Across the raging foam
There was no living here for me And my fortune I should seek
And that's the reason why I left My Sweet Old Home in Peake.
11
I sometimes sit and meditate When by the fireside glow
My memory of'times brings me back To the scenes of long ago
To the days our boys played Evergreen And knocked them out complete
When they won the Hurling Tournament In my Sweet Old Home in Peake.
111
May God be with you Mickey Lynch You were the dashing man
For laying a bowl upon the road to meet you no man can
Jack Forrest thought he could you play
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 21:07
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X
Were I beside the Lee to-night I'd quickly find the spot,
Where Maureen's smile brought joy unto Her widowed mother's cot.
Where the love that sparkled in my eyes Of the sweet coleen deas,
Still lights my way and I always pray For my Inchigeela lass.
X1
Eveleary! Oh! Eveleary! Though far across the waves,
You hold what I pride most on earth My Maureen's moss-grown grave.
My present habitation is Broadway, Boston, Mass.,
But the Buachail Ruadh Is always true To his Inchigeela lass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 20:51
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V11
O'er Muskerry's heights and Shehes slopes The waning moon shone pale,
As I clasped her to my heart that night In Keimaneighs emerald vale.
And when inside the cottage door Her nimble form did pass,
The last I saw of my coleen breagh My Inchigeela lass.
V111
As I sped through Inniscarra's groves Before the dawn of day,
Took passage in a Yankee ship That in Queenstown Harbour lay.
The Captain being a Fenian boy My safety did compass,
And I sailed away from Granuaile And my Inchigeela lass.
1X
What became of Maureen ogue Iveleary's famous flower,
She drooped as droops the mayflower 'Neath belated wintry showers.
Ere the autumn trees had shed their leaves They lay her 'neath the grass,
My promised bride the village pride My Inchigeela lass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 20:38
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1V
She tripped along the leaf green banks Each Sunday afternoon,
Her nimble feet were keeping time With the piper's merry tune.
The classic "Job of Journey Work" She danced it on the grass,
The pattern queen of Keimaneigh Was my Inchigeela lass.
V
Like all the boys along the line I joined the Rebel Band,
I pledged myself to Freedom's Cause To home and motherland.
An outlaw I've been chased from Cork To Keimaneigh's fair Pass,
Then forced to flee from Keimaneigh And my Inchigeela lass.
V1
Before I from my native land For ever would depart,
I slipped behind the soldier's line To the darling of my heart.
Our shadows o'er the moonlit lake Were mirrored as in glass,
As I bade farewell in the hazel dell To my Inchigeela lass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 20:25
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1
I greet you proud Iveleary's Sons and daughters fair and true,
We'll assemble in the South-End Club Old friendships to renew.
This annual opportunity I loath to let it pass,
Till I recite a tale to-night Of my Inchigeela lass.
11
Eveleary! oh how sweet thy name Rings on the exiles ears,
Tho' I've not seen your heath clad hills For five and twenty years.
Where I first met my hearts delight On Sunday morn at Mass,
As I knelt in prayer at the Chapel With my Inchigeela lass.
111
She was modest as the cooing dove And gentle as the fawn,
That leaps o'er Desmonds storied heights Or the highlands of Goughane.
No godess fair or Grecian heir In beauty could surpass,
That winsome rogue my Maureen ogue My Inchigeela lass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 20:04
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Rogha na Mrá {Nuala Ní Dhochartaigh. (87) Oilean na Cruite, Ceann Caslach a d’innis.
Bean ar tugadh breitheamhnas báis ar a fear, ar a mac agus ar a dearthair. Fágadh faoi an bhean cibé de’n triúr ar mhaith léithe saoradh go mbéadh an Rogha sin aicí. Smaoitigh sí tamall agus labhair sí :-
“Gheobhaidh mé fear agus gcruinniú agus mac fá bhroinn agus béidh mac m’athara féin liom”.
Saoradh an triúr aca annsin.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 14:47
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to reside with his brother Richard in Coachford from 1872 to 1874. Here he built up his health and spent much of his time here fishing and shooting. He returned to America in 1874 where he took an active part in American politics. He built a Railway between Monterey and Mexico City. He was closely associated with O'Donovan Rossa both here and in America. Burke died in May 11th 1922 aged 84 and he lies buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Chicago. (R.I.P.)
( "Heber", "Cork Examiner" Nov 6th '37)
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 14:37
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Notes on Song, "Down Erin's Lovely Lee".
Local Associations & references.
Peake - a village situated about a mile on north side of Coachford Village and was one time an important Station on the Muskerry Rly.
Burke - Was a brother to Richard Burke - Burke's Hotel, Coachford, now occupied by Mrs George Walsh being granddaughter of Richard Burke and daughter of Thomas R. Burke.
The Burke mentioned in the song was Richard O'Sullivan Burke born at Kinneigh near Dunmanway in 1838. His father Denis had been agent and manager for the estates of Arthur O'Connor the famous leader of the United Irishmen. Richard received his early education in Dunmanway Model Schools. He emigrated to America where he joined to 15th Regiment New York Light Infantry. In America he joined the Fenian Movement and became an important "Centre". His activities included the purchase and despatch of arms to Ireland from England. He led a small force across the Tipperary Border from Waterford in '67. He was closely identified with the Manchester Rescue in November 1867. He was imprisoned in Clarkenwell Prison when an attempt was make to rescue him by trying to blow up the prison walls. He was sentenced to 15 years imprisonment for his participation in the Fenian movement. Released in 1872 he returned
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 12:42
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He had only a few tunes and these he kept continually repeating. Jigs, reels, and hornpipe were mostly danced.
Dances
After mass every Sunday in Genamaddy there would be a dance held near the lake at the workhouse. The boys wore cordroy trousers and heavy nailed shoes. Girls very plain hooped skirts. Run a rod in the hem at the end and this makes it very wide and round.
Old Women wore mantles. They were caught up in the front and hung down behind. And they wore white caps.
Domnick Daly from Leahive was a great dancer and he used to attend all the dances around.
Michael Collins from Ballyhard walked to Dublin, and from Hollyhead to Skegnes in Lancashire.
A man fell into a pit and Martin Madden jumped in after him and swan about a mile after the man. After some time he succeeded in saving the man. Since that time the pit is called Maddens pit.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 12:40
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kneel + the cake is broken in two over their heads. Butter Roll or lump was also left on top of oaten cake. This cake is afterwards divided among the guests. Pig's head - boiled was principal dish for young couple. The two - man and wife shd enter together - not one a step by the other. A man was appointed to hold a stick horrizontal to keep the couple step together while they went into house. Holder of stick to keep backing in. Most particular about this.
Feast - Cabbage, bacon + pops: the fatter the bacon the better (as it wld go farther and less eaten) If there's anybody at feast that there's a particular wish for, the Cook pokes at dish for a choice bit. (In coming from church - she's front on horse, he at back) Feast over the youngsters go to a barn + dance, old folk remain in kitchen.
Matchmaking. matches usually made at a fair or market. Young girl is first asked from parents, then couple meet.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 12:38
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thrush build on an apple tree, the corn-crake and the skylark build on the meadow, the sea-gull builds on the lake-shore or on the sea-shore, the water-hen, and the water-duck build on the shore or in an island, and the caithlín cloch builds in the wall.
The weather can be judged by the sea-gull with his loud cries, by the crow when he flies eastward, by the curlew with his loud cries, by the mionán aereach when he is out at night.
Boys are told that if they rob a bird's nest they will have bad luck.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 12:31
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Too forward young man hast thou spoken,
Much trust to impose it on me.
My parents would blame me you know well,
If with you alone I had strayed.
From the lovely sweet village of Coachford,
And the sweet shady groves of Clontead.
1V
My case I appealed and once more said,
My pretty and courtly young dame.
Believe me to be no imposter,
I never was known by that name.
But if you will make me your own love,
You need not hence forth be afraid.
My bride I will make you in Coachford,
By the sweet shady groves of Clontead.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 12:23
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1
It being in the month of October,
To Cork I was going my way.
All nature seemed dreary and lonely,
No creature I noticed that day.
I spied a fair maiden most lonely,
As she sat down sewing in the shade.
By the lovely sweet village of Coachford,
And the sweet shady groves of Clontead.
11
To approach her at once I stepped forward,
In a customary motion of grace.
I bowed to her Lady-ship lovely,
Most frankly I told her my case.
I said of she'd make me her own love,
She need not hence forth be afraid.
My bride I will make you in Coachford,
By the sweet shady groves of Clontead.
111
This maiden replied in a moment,
In as gentle a tone as can be.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 12:09
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Go dtug se an tamharc don dall. Is beannuighthe-
An cúÍgeadh subhailce fuair an Mhaigdean Bheannuighthe
Sí sin féin an tsubhailce bhí mór.
Go bhfuair sí subhailce ó na h-Aon Mhac Uasal
Gur léigh sé leabhar ann aifrinn
Is beannuighthe –
An séamhadh subhailce fuair an Maighdean Bheannuighthe
Sí sin féin antsubhailce bhí mór.
Go bhfuair sí subhailce ó na hAon Mhac Uasal
Gur iomchar se an chroic ar a (gulann) Ghualainn féin.
Is beannuighthe –
An seachtmhadh subhailce fuair an Mhaigdean Bheannuighthe
Sí sin féin an tsubhailce bhí mór.
Go bhfuair sí subhailce na hAon Mhac Uasal
Gur fosgal sé geaptaí na bhflaitheas
Is beannuighthe -
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 12:07
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An chead subhailce fuair an Mhaigdean bhéannuighthe sí sin féin an tsubhailce bhí mór
Go bhfuair sí subhailce ó na hAon Mac Uasal gur rugadh mac óg duithe.
Is beannuighthe D’Aon Mac Óg
Is beannuighthe Naomh Muire Áig
Na seacht subhailce dhá nideirthea
Ag iomchar A héididh = an scaball donn
Go mbéithen go síorruide í-nglóir
An dara subhailce fuair Mhaigdean Bheannuighthe
Sí sin féin an tsubhailche bhí mór.
Go bhfuair sí subhailce o na hAon Mhac Uasal
Go deacaidh an mac óg dé shuibhal Is Bheannuighthe [agus ri?.]
An tríomadh subhailce fuair an Mhaighdean Bheannuighthe
Sí sin féin an tsubhailce bhí mór.
Go bhfuair sí an tsubhailce ó na hAon Mhac Uasal
Go dtug sé an céisteact do’n bhodhar Is beannuighthe-
An ceathrmhad subhailce fuair an Mhaigdean Bheannuighthe
Sí sin fein an tsubhailce bhí mór
go bhfuair sí an tsubhailce ó na hAon Mhac Uasal
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 21:34
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Shops were common in the district in olden times. Sometimes the people went to the nearest town to make purchases and sometimes they went to the faraway towns because they could not make purchases in the nearest towns.
There were some shops kept open on Sunday but not as many as now. Tobacco snuff bread Sugar tea were the things sold in the shops. Two ounces of Tea and a pound of sugar and a loaf were common purchases. an ounce of tobacco and a pennyworth of snuff were great purchases. Selling and buying is still practiced but on a larger scale. Money was not always paid for goods. Eggs and flax and oaten meal were paid for goods.
Goods were bartered in the district. Labour was given in exchange for goods and that was called the truck act and it was stopped thirty years ago. It is considered unlucky
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 20:48
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About fifty years ago there was a Fife and Drum Band here in Coachford. It started about 60 years ago in the year 1878, it disbanded about 40 years ago in the year 1898. In the time of the land League Father Jeremiah O'Dwyer C.C. Rocklodge, was put to prison for nine months by the English laws, when he was let out the band went to his house to welcome him home. It was in the year 1888. They played patriotric tunes as "God Save Ireland" and the "Wearing of the Green". It was "God Save Ireland" they played in front of O'Dwyer's. Father O'Dwyer is alive yet he is now in Castletownroche. He has a brother named Johnny O'Dwyer he is living yet. These are some of the men who participated in the band - Den Crowley he was playing a fife, also his brothers - Cornelius and Johnny Crowley each played a fife. Tim Sheehan, Carpentar, was also playing a fife. Michael Foley was the drummer in the band and not being as good as William McSweeney, Blacksmith, was replaced by him. Foley was also a nailer in Coachford together with his brother in-law-Nugent.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 19:53
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another occasion the Rev. J. O'Dwyer a native of Rocklodge, Coachford, who had undergone a term of eight months imprisonment in Tullamore Gaol in connection with the land war was met by the band on his return to Coachford. He was then curate at Castlelyons. The band was accompanied by tar barrels and torchlights not without opposition as a constable of the R.I.C smashed the big drum with his baton. The tar-barrel was borne by Tom Gillman, John Moloney, and Michael Buckley in defiance of the police. Parnell held a demonstration in Cork attended by 80,000 people. The band attended headed by Rev. Fr. O'Regan, Coachford, and marched before Parnell's carriage from the Western Rd. to the Park. Another man who took great interest in the band, and furnished press reports was Cornelius Buckley then a clerk at Burke's Hotel and afterwards an American Millionaire.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 19:39
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About fifty years ago there was in Coachford a fife-and-drum band which did its part in the old land war. The members of the band were fine stalwart men some of whom were Bill McSweeney (drummer). Tom Buckley, John Moloney, T. Sheehan, D. Herlihy etc. About this time several stirring national events occurred. During the land war the local peasantry staged an alleged fox hunt to kill foxes to spite the landlords who used to ride to the hounds. As the congregation emerged from Mass they were amazed to see a company of cavalry known as the "Scotch Greys" who had been sent to stop the hunt". On
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 19:27
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Coachford was famous for crochet making in the past. They used to sit on the road side and knit away for hours. They used to earn their living by it. They sold it to the local ladies and sent the remainder to England, where they got a big price for it. It is about thirty years ago since they gave it up. The most of those who worked at it are dead now. (1938)
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 19:23
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awaiting decision
There is a well in Roovesbeg which is called "Tobar Domhnaigh". People come paying rounds there. There are broken cups and eggstands and safety pens left there by the pilgrims. It is about two miles from Coachford and near Rooves bridge.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 19:19
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There were many women in Coachford experts at making crochet, one of them was Ellie Long as was also her daughter Mrs Sullivan, Clontead. This was carried on extensively about 35 years ago. Mary Ryan was also a great crochet maker. She is now dead. Miss Katie Murphy, Chapel Rd, was a crochet maker also.
There was a nailer in Coachford named Foley, he was also drummer in the Coachford fife-and-drum band some 40 yrs ago.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 19:13
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Do chomhnuig feirmeoir beag ar thaobh Muisire. Bhí a ceathrar no a cúig cinn de bhuaibh aige agus spota deas tailimh aige. Do choimeádadh sé beirt fhear ag obair do agus la mar seo bí sé deallramhac ar bháistigh. Do bhí na fir ag ithe a mbricfhaist. Prataí is bainne a bhiodh mar biadh ags gac aoinnibh an uair sin. Bhí an lá ag bagairt ar bheith fluic agus bhí eagla ar bhean an tighe go n-iompócadh se go h-olc agus nár bfheidir dos na fearaibh aon nidh a dheanamh agus an bricfhaist ithe aca. Bhí sí ag an doras ag feacaint amach ar mhullac Muisire agus d’iompuigh sí orta go h-athasac agus dubhairt :-
“Tá ceo ar Mhuisire agus clárach lom
An comhartha soininne is fearr ar domhan”.
Bhí na pratai ana-ganacuiseach i bfiadhanaisc na bfear agus dubhairt duine aca :-
“Má tá ceo ar “Muisire thá an clár so lom agus d’iosfaimís tuille aca da mbeidís ann”
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 11:10
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awaiting decision
The usual food at every meal was Porridge for the three meals- Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper. At others stirabout for a change, also bread with porridge. They used to steep oat-meal in a basin the night before and pour milk on it, then in the morning they would get up at 5- o'clock and prepare the breakfast then they would pour the porridge into basins and eat it with spoons and a big bowl of soup for dinner also soup for Christmas day with mutton after awhile. They got about two kettles in one village, each person would get it in their turn for to make their tea, the kettle would only hold about a quart of spring water. The people would be delighted when they would get the kettle. It would go around three times a day to celebrate the meals. The people were very strong. Before they got the kettles they had pots. The pay was 4d a day.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 10:53
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awaiting decision
Up to forty years ago the chief food was potatoes and oat-meal mixed with sour milk. The oat-meal and sour milk were eaten for either the dinner or supper and the potatoes and milk for breakfast. The bread that was used that time was brown and white cake and white loaf bread was very seldom used. Butter was made by the farmers, but it was sold at the weigh-house by them and scarcely any of it was kept at home. Tea was seldom used. Meat was often used by some farmers. Cocoa was seldom used. Coffee was often used, Jam seldom. On Christmas Night a pot of potatoes and plenty of fish was given for supper and after that tea and some sweet-cake and bread was given for the second supper and the children used to be delighted on account of having the two suppers. It was called the "night of the two suppers".
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 10:42
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awaiting decision
Stations are a very Catholic custom. Some people say the custom is peculiar to the Irish people by decree of the Holy Father through the constancy of our Fore-Fathers to their Faith through the ages. To try and describe the stations it is nothing else than Our Lord's Body and Blood Soul and Divinity being offered up in our humble Homes for our Redemption as the same Lord was Crucified on Mount Calvary for the Salvation of mankind so the Mass is offered in our homes is just the same but the Sacrifice being offered in a different manner.
The Rev. Fr. Roche P.P. told us the stations are just Our Lord going from one district to another to visit all his people; surely we could never be properly prepared to receive such a visitor.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 10:26
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awaiting decision
1. It is not lucky to take salt from one house to another when removing and it is not lucky to take a cat from one house to another when removing.
2. It is not lucky to take eggs from one house to another when removing.
3. It is not lucky to clip a baby's hair until he is over twelve months.
4. It is not lucky to spill salt in a house.
5. In olden times people would not sweep the floor until after twelve o'clock in the day lest they may sweep out the luck.
6. Some people would not go to bed at night without sweeping the hearth.
7. If you broke a mirror there would be no luck in the house for seven years.
8. In olden times people would not give away any milk on May day lest they may take away the luck for the year.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 10:14
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My box would speak if it had but a tongue
And a penny or two would do it no wrong
Sing holly, sing ivy, sing ivy, sing holly,
A drop just to drink would drown melancholy
And if you draw it of the best
I hope to heaven your soul may rest
But if you draw it of the small
it wont agree with our boy's at all
Coachford boy's are gone to rack Since Mary O'Leary went to Cork
But we're the boy's to bring her back in spite of Sergeant Major
Up with the kettle and down with the pot
So give us our answer and let us be off
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 10:05
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awaiting decision
On St. Stephen's Day the wren boys go around from house to with a holly bush and the wren suspended from it and sing the wren boy's song. Then the wren boy's used to go around dressed up with blackened faces and They used have a melodian and mouth organs playing and they had a box for gathering the money and they get about a pound which was shared equally amongst themselves.
The Wren boys Song.
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds
St. Stephen's Day he was caught in the furze
Although he is little his family's great
I pray you good lady give us a treat
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 09:57
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awaiting decision
it was usually recognised as a holiday in the locality. Our present P.P. is Rev. H.J. Roche and Curate Rev. G. O'Dwyer Coachford.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 09:55
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awaiting decision
The stations are held in the various country houses twice a year,-generally about Lent and also in October. They are held in each Townland the various suitable houses being selected in turns. Great preparations are made before the station. They white-wash the walls inside and outside and clean and prepare the house in every way. The places where they are to be held are announced from the Altar about two or three weeks previously. The priests arrive at eight o'clock in the morning he says mass and hears confession. This occupies about an hour. He collects the station due and makes inquiries about the various houses as to whether any are sick or unable to come . Breakfast is given to the priest as well as to those who attend the station. In former years almost everyone in the Townland attended the station and
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 09:52
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awaiting decision
Burying the dead is treated very solemnly being the last mark of respect that can be shown to our diseased friends.
Some time ago it was the custom that if a person died before 12 o'c. it was usual to hold a wake that night and the night after and when they died after 12 o'c. the wake was held for the rest of that night and two nights after. But for some years past the clergy have prevailed on the people to carry the remains to the chapel the last night and from there the funeral procession proceeds next day at some given convenient time. Then the funeral procession starts off on its last journey headed by the clergy of the parish then comes the hearse with the coffin followed by the friends and relatives and sympathisers. In some cases the procession reaches very large dimensions according to the number of relatives and the esteem in which the diseased or their friends are held
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 00:12
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awaiting decision
2nd -- Cloghroe 1922
3rd prize -- Kinsale 1922
3rd prize -- Donoughmore 1922
1st prize -- Whites Cross (open to Munster) 1925
2nd prize -- Coachford 1925
1st prize -- Coachford 1926
4th prize -- Banteer 1927
2nd prize -- Upton 1927
2nd prize -- Ballyfeard, Kinsale 1927
3rd prize -- Whites Cross (Cork) 1928
1st prize -- Banteer and small holders Championship
2nd prize -- Belgooley medal 1935
1st prize -- Riverstick Co Cork 1936
1st prize -- Timoleague 1937
2nd prize -- Mallow (Co Championship) 1937
3rd prize -- Drumtarriffe 1936
2nd prize -- Banteer (Co Championship) 1938
4th prize -- Coachford 1938
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 00:00
approved
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awaiting decision
Tim Roche has been ploughing since he left school and has won in all 24 prizes. He got 9 firsts, 8,2nd prizes, 5,3rd prizes, 2,4th prizes including two silver cups and one gold medal and a silver medal. He represented Cork in the All Ireland Ploughing Competition at Athenry, Co Galway February 1934 together with Pat Murphy, Coachford and Con Kelleher, Whitechurch and gained 5th place being beaten by only points for 3rd place, an achievement which no other Cork man gained since the start of the All-Ireland Competition. The prizes won are as follows:-
1st prize -- Coachford 1909
1st prize -- Cloghroe, Inniscarra 1912
1st prize -- Rylane 1917
2nd prize -- Canovee 1918
3rd prize -- Canovee 1919
1st prize -- Ballyglass, Grenagh 1920
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 23:44
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awaiting decision
you first see the new moon through the window it is said you will have no luck for a month.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 23:42
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Magpies - Should we meet one
It is for luck
Two for joy
Three to get married
Four to die.
People that see a moth flying around believe they are going to get a letter. If you get two spoons in your saucer by mistake it is said you will marry twice. If
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 23:38
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awaiting decision
a story told about a labouring man who was going to a bog cutting turf with some other men. Matches were very scarce at that time. As he was passing by a farmers house he went in to light his pipe. The woman was making a churn. She refused a light for the pipe. She told him to put his hand on the churn he thought by doing this he would get it but it was all in vain as the woman believed if she gave him a light he would take away her butter and fire for the year.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 23:31
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awaiting decision
Very often an insect is heard ticking in old woodwork somewhat like a watch, this is supposed to be a sure sign of death in the family circle. In the case of fowl dying in a certain housekeeper these fowl are often thrown into the adjoining land. The owner of this land firmly believes that this brings sickness and ill luck to his own fowl. On May day farmers would not give milk, butter, eggs or a horse to anybody lest misfortunate would befall them for that year. I heard
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 21:04
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mirror you would have no luck for seven years. When going on a journey if you forget anything it is unlucky to return for it. Tis unlucky to build a house at cross roads. Thirteen is an unlucky number. It isn't right to throw water out the door at night. It isn't right to have three lights in the one room. It isn't right to carry a pack of playing cards in your pocket at night. If a knife falls it is a sign of a gentleman visitor.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 20:58
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awaiting decision
If you rub silver to a baby's gum when it is cutting its first tooth it will cut the rest easily. When the cock crows it is said that someone is dead. It isn't right to rock an empty cradle. Never remove on a Monday or Friday. Tis unlucky to leave dirty water in a house over night. Tis unlucky to brush the dirt out the door. It isn't right to go to see a baby without giving it something. It isn't right to draw water late at night. If you spill salt it is a sign of poverty. If you spill sugar it is a sign of plenty. Tis unlucky to return meat. Tis unlucky to bring white thorn blossom into a house in May. If you break a
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 10:18
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awaiting decision
tooth fell out it is not lucky to throw it away without making the sign of the Cross and throwing it over your shoulder. It is not considered right to cut a baby's hair or nails of hands or the toe-nails until he is one year old.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 10:14
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awaiting decision
If you broke a mirror you would have no luck in the house for seven years. It is not lucky to remove a cat or salt from one house to another when removing. If you met a funeral on the road it is usual to go the same way in which the funeral was travelling. It is not to go into a new house that somebody is living in without taking something in your hand. It is not lucky to look at a young baby without putting some kind of silver in its hand. It is not considered lucky to look at a new moon without making the sign of the Cross. If you got beestings from a person it would not be right to return the vessel without putting salt in it. If you got a loan of a hen from a person it would not be lucky if you would not give some money "for luck" even a penny. If you dreamt that a bull was hunting you someone would be slandering you. It is said it is not lucky to make a grave for the dead on a Monday. It is not right to have a baby look at a mirror until he is twelve months old. If a
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 09:37
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A dancing man is made by getting a sheet of cardboard cut to the shape of a man's body then his legs and hands are tied to his body with strings, this is also passed through the body and when it is pulled the figure dances.
A pop gun is made of elder stick its pith being removed and another stick stuck in the hole and damp paper for bullets.
A bow and arrow is made from a tough stick and a string which is tied at each end. The arrow is made from another stick. Then the string is pulled and the arrow is placed in the centre of it and when the string is pulled the arrow goes forward.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 00:27
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awaiting decision
The name of my town-land is Tamnach-Slinneáin. It is in the parish of Westport and in the barony of Murrisk. There are seven families in my village, and there are twenty-seven people in it now, but there are a lot gone to America and England. The name Hastings is the name most common in my village. All the houses are thatched except one house that is slated.
There are two old men in my village namely Tadhg Ó h-Oirín and
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 00:23
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John Hastings. He is called John (Hastings) Fadney to distinguish him from other men of the same name. Tadhg Ó h-Oiraín is eighty six years and John Hastings is over seventy. Both of the can tell Irish stories. There were three or four houses in this village that are not in it now. The people that were in them are dead. Some of the houses are in ruins.
Long ago the men used to go to England in June and come home in November. The girls used to go to America until four or five years ago. Now they all go England.
There are no songs in which my
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 00:19
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parts of Mayo and Galway. They used come through the mountains and across this village to the well. The women with their red petticoats and white handkerchiefs and the men with their báinín's.
These are the prayers and rounds they do. They go around the well first. Then they pick seven stones and they go around the well seven times, dropping a stone at each round. Then they go to a rock where the track of Saint Patrick's knee is to be seen. They say prayers there too. Then they go to the chapel
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 00:16
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awaiting decision
In the winter time when frost and snow are on the ground it is a great pastime to make cribs to catch blackbirds and thrushes in the crib. The crib is usually made from sally twigs it is only a frame work kept together by twines securely tied. First there is a square of twigs made and in each corner they are nailed by means of a short nail or bot tack. Each square is graduated until it becomes narrow or dome-shaped on top. When you have them securely tied your crib is made. You get a small stick called a gabhalóg and from this is another little stick connected with the upright or gabhalóg, on this stick or near it the bait is fixed and as the bird jumps on the twig she stirs the gabhalóg and she is enclosed within.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 00:03
app