Number of records in editorial history: 14477 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-09-15 09:47
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There are two holy wells in my parish; one at Keadue and one at Ballyfarnon. People still visit both of them. The time for visiting each is from August 15th to September 15th. The well in Keadue is called ''Lasar's Well'' after St. Lazar. The well in Ballyfarnon is called Tubereille after St. Eille. ''Rounds'' are performed and prayers are said there. The people who go to those wells go round them three times and while doing so they say the rosary. The people also take three mouthfuls of water each time they go round the well. There is a flag at St. Lasars well and people go out under that flag three times to get relief from pains in their backs. Sick people generally drink the
senior member (history)
2019-09-15 09:45
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water of the well. The well was in a protestants field and he did not want it there and one day he closed it in with clay and the next day the well appeared five hundred yards from where it had been at first. There is a bush at the well on the branches of which hang little bits of coloured cloth and religious embelems.
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 19:07
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were at the highest pitch. Cashel's King was the first to requisition the aid of his ablest doctor - one Murtha Mac Phonóge, ? who, after attempting to diagnose the cause of such a sudden and appalling happening, said it was beyond the knowledge of human science to presently and definitely state what really befell those brave rivals 'of Dalcassian's best' on the athletic field.
Thunder rolled and lightning flashed, and it seemed as if the flood-gates of the heavens were opened - so fearful was the deluge of rain that fell on that memorable Ss. Peter's & Paul's Day. The mountain-sides became deserted as did the great plain or "gap" where the Tug-of-War contest was enacted. In chariots belonging to
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 19:03
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and the honour was conferred upon the grand-daughter of the Prince of Thomond -- blood relation to the King of Cashel -- who presented it to the captain of the Meath men.
The men lined up -- 21 brave, brawny, fierce-looking fellows from the fair plains of Meath and 21 equally strong, fierce-looking rivals from "Gallant Tipperary" and the Glen of Aherlow. Forty-two men now grasped the rope as the royal bugler sounded the order to "pull." The strain was terrible: muscles burst out like giants' veins from the arms and legs of the contestants.
The green sward was literally ploughed up from the tremendous ? heel-grips of those powerful men, while the mountain jaws of "The Bit" almost shivered beneath the swaying, roaring
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 19:00
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would be held. The "Devil's Bit" -- the great gap in the mountains within a stone's throw of the town of Templemore -- was the famous spot where the Tug of War was to take place.
The 29th of June -- Saint Peter and Paul's Day -- was the day appointed and as an old chronicler tells us: Not less than 50,000 people assembled on the plain and mountain-side to witness the game. Kings, Princes, Chieftains and Gallowglasses came from as far as Fermanagh in the North and The Kingdom of Kerry in the South. Bards, harpers ?, trumpeters and numerous Pipers Bands in saffron kilts, flocked to enjoy the day and cheer the combatants.
After the National Anthem -- which at that time was Brian Boru's March -- was played and in which all assembled joined in singing the chorus, the Rope was brought into the ring,
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 18:58
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In the reign of Ceallacháin, King of Cashel in the 10th century, games and athletics were universally practised by the people and the spirit of rivalry was, therefore, much in evidence.
At this period a challenge came from the men of Meath to the men of Cashel to test their endurance on the "Rope." Cashel accepted the challenge and under the patronage and guidance of their king, the men -- 21 in number -- of the brainiest ? the bravest and most powerful in "Gallant Tipperary," were chosen to compete with the best that Royal Meath could put against them.
At the toss of a royal coin between two chieftains, representing both parties, Cashel won the toss as to where the contest
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 12:45
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"Peidhre fhiolar seadh iomaire cré, peidhre iomaire cré seadh an domhan"

Maireann dá fhiolar fhaid is maireann rian iomaire ar an dtalamh. Fanann rian iomaire ar an dtalamh go deo

* * *

Sean-Fhocal Eile

"Fear a ' chroidhe bhog go bráth ag díol meala is ag ceannach milseaín"
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 12:40
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(Pádraig Ó Muirgheas a thug dom é)

Ba í an teanga í ba bhlasta agus ba néata
Do d'oibrig gach naomh a fuair bás
Bhain siad le Padraig Naomhtha
gus len n-Ár n-Athair, Ríogh geal na nGrást
Teanga gach an-sprid thar thaladh
Thánaig Inár measc is inár muadh
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 12:25
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Is aicme na mná nach fearrde an duine a bhíonn leo

(duine éigin ó Iathrar Corcaigh a thug é sin dom)
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 12:23
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Bhíodar ag caint sa mbaile an oidhche fé dheire cois na teine. Dubhairt ceann de's na fearaibh
"Filleann an feall ar an bhfeallaire"
Sean-fhocal abhí acu san tsean-aimsir. Bhíodar ag trácht ar dhuine a dhein droch-gníomh ar dhuine eile. Ní raibh an gníomh ibfad déanta aige nuair a dheineadh droch-gníomh ar féin. Ní dhéineann duine riamh feall ná go bhfilleann an feall air.

Fuair mé an sean-fhocal seo sa mbaile.
senior member (history)
2019-09-09 12:15
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Is feárr beirt ag eirighe na duine ag tuitim.

Tagann síon go aon seacht mbliadhan;
(Deirtear go dtagann athrú aimsire go h-aon seacht mbliadhan)

Tomás de Búrca
Cnoc Baile an Oidhre
senior member (history)
2019-09-08 23:28
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12) Ní h-é lá na gaoite lá na sgolb

13) Cuairt ghearr agus a dheánamh go thana agus an uair sin féin i dteach do charad (?)

14) Is minic a bhain fear slat a bhuilfeadh é féin
15) Beatha duine a thoil
16) Nach iomdha rud is feicthear don díomas

17) Ní h-ionann fad na gcúig mear agus a bhéasa féin do aon duine

18) Is mairg a bhí go holc agus go boct, na dhiaidh
19) Is mairg a bhí teáim agus go bocht na dhiaidh
senior member (history)
2019-09-08 21:47
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1) Is minic ub bán ag cearc dhubh
2) Is maith an capall a' tarraingta a cárr féin
3) Ní h-iad na fir mhóra bhaineas an Fhógmhar

4) Umpaigh(?) do chúl le múinin na gciseach
gheobha tú bás no gheobha tú biseach

5) Is minic a cheannuigh fear fada fata ó fhear gearr
6) Má suibhail tú teann ghluais tú mall
7) Do mhaide féin agus capall na comharsan

8) A comhairle féin do mhac Anna agus ní bhfuair sé riam nios measa

9) Is giorra deoch na sgéal
10) Céard a dhéanfadh an cat ac luch a mharbhú
11) Is feárr suidhe gearr ná seasamh fada
senior member (history)
2019-09-08 11:29
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Portrane coast consists of many caves, and steep cliffs. Amongst those numerous caves is an important cave called the Priest's Chamber. Old people of the district say that in the penal days priests used to celebrate Mass in this cave and it was also the hiding place of these unfortunate fugitive priests. Some nearby cave were also occupied by the priests but its believed that this particular cave known as the priest's chamber was their headquarters, and it was also where they performed their religious services. There is a very small entrance to this cave, and any explorer would find it hard to enter.
This cave is situated about one quarter of a mile from Portrane Mental Hospital, and five hundred yards from one of Portrane's popular swimming spots commonly known as "Tower Bay". The interior of this cave is 10 feet in height and 6 feet in
senior member (history)
2019-09-08 09:50
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St Columba was born at Gartan in Donegal. When he grew up he went on to Derry and he founded a monastery there, and after that at Durrow near Tullamore, and then he came on to Kells.
The High King of Tara was a cousin to St. Columba and at this time his eldest son Dermot lived at Kells.
The day that Columba arrived at Kells it happened that Dermot was away. St. Columba went and asked Dermot's men for land to build a monastery on but they only jeered him.
When Dermot returned the same evening he was raging when he heard what had happened. So to make up for the insult he gave Columba all Kells for the site of his monastery. The old people say that he built his monastery where the
senior member (history)
2019-09-08 09:44
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of the previous night, there is usually a crowd around the well anxiously waiting for the 3 trouts which are said to appear at 12 o'clock. People say they are hundreds of years old. Once a man happened to catch them, brought them home, and put them on the pan. They hopped off and were next seen in the well.
senior member (history)
2019-09-08 09:41
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About 3 miles from Kells on the Kells-Olcastle road can be clearly seen from the road Kieran Well which is separated by, a river, (tributary of Blackwater) The wells, as there are three of them, are in a valley sheltered on one side by the high embankment of the Kells-Oldcastle branch of the Great Northern Railway, and on the other by two hills.
At the present time there is an oratory of stone (roof and all) standing out prominently between the two hills. A statue of St Kieran is in a niche in the centre.
From the road one crosses the river by an iron bridge. About three perches to the right is the largest of the wells. It is called the holy well. At one side there are three steps leading to the water. A metal cup hangs by a chain on a post. People drink from this.
Around the well are placed 5 black iron crosses about 2' high. By going around these five crosses three times the pilgrim makes what is called a "station". People would not use the water in this well
senior member (history)
2019-09-08 09:41
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for any purpose but drinking. A short distance to the left is a smaller well, from which the people of the district take water for household use.
Further away still is a small well covered overhead by a rock with an opening on either side. The water in this well is supposed to cure headache, when taken through one opening and tooth-ache when taking through another opening. A very narrow stream (widest part about 4") flows between rocks. People believe that warts are removed by bathing in this stream.
Further away is a shallow pool in which pilgrims wash their feet before they make the stations. People have been cured of rheumatism in this pool. For nine days following the 14th of June people come in great numbers to make the stations. They commence by taking off their shoes and washing their feet. They do the rounds of the crosses three times and then they take a drink from the holy well. Then they put on their boots.
The Pattern day of St Kieran is the first Sunday in August. At mid-night
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:37
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and coming to Errill remained here for some time. The Monastery of Errill, which he is traditionally said to have founded during his stay, was situated in a field called the Bawn mid-way between Errill Village and Errill National School. The site is marked by a slightly elevated square of grassy land level at top and about a quarter of an Irish acre in area. Even the foundations of the monastic building have disappeared. The enclosing wall strongly and firmly built of stones and grouting has also disappeared save at the four angles where some pieces still remain. Underneath the mound there is a vault or chamber, admission to which is through an opening now filled up.
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:34
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cave is very large one having a flat top on it. There are passages cut underground from this cave in Lough Crew to a cave in McDonnell's field. It is said that these passages were made for people to hide and escape in long ago.
There is another field not far from my house belonging to Michael Connell in which there is a lone bush growing. Everyone is afraid to cut this bush as they say if anyone cut it the banshee would be crying around their houses at night and misfortune is supposed to befall them.

Rose Briody
Woodpole
Kells
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:32
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There are few places in Ireland that has not some ancient caves connected with them. In my opinion I think my townland is the most historic place in Co. Meath.
In the ancient churchyard in Kieran Kells there are some magnificent stone - crosses. Some of our great saints of long ago St. Kieran, and St Columcille used to debate as to which of them had the largest head-stones. St Columcille who resided in Kells came one night and stole one of St Kieran's beautiful crosses, and making a short cut through the river he dropped a portion of it which still remains in the river at the back of Mick Tighe's house. The other part which is known as the cross of Kells is erected at Cooney's corner Kells for anyone to see with three concrete steps around it. The saints of long ago must have been very strong as this cross is several tons weight. There are, three more of them in Kieran at the present time. There is one of them which is very remarkable having the arm shot off it by an old English soldier whom I suppose has reaped the benefit of it since.
About six miles from my house there is a great big cave in the town land of Lough Crew. Long ago two men were trying to open it with a crow-bar but as they were doing so the bar fell out of their hands and they could hear it going down for quite awhile. This
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:27
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Situated about three miles from Kells in a valley by the roadside is St. Kieran's Well.
Two hills rise up at back.
One large well is in the rock. Two steps leading down to Well. A metal drinking cup is attached to wooden post. The water here it is said cannot be boiled.
2) Smaller well short distance away used for household purposes.
3) Further away still smaller well covered over with rock, with opening on either side.
Water from one side supposed to cure head-ache. Water from the other side cures tooth-ache.
4) A very narrow stream (widest part about four inches) flows through the rocks. Water cures warts.
Stations are made annually to St. Kieran's Well. Before pilgrims leave they wash their feet in place set apart for this purpose.
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:20
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(Photo 1)
Cross at South side of St. Kieran's Churchyard, Castlekieran, Ceanannas Mór

(Photo 2)
Piece of broken cross (east side) seen in river - see next page
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:18
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In this Churchyard there is a pool called the wart-hole about three inches deep. There is always a little water in it even in the driest summer. There is a hole in a big stone which is said to be the base of a cross and that the hole is the space from which the shaft was removed. The water from this hole rubbed on warts will cure them if the person believes in the cure.
The Graveyard is still used for local burials and there have been seven or eight in the past year. There is a big hole in the ground in the centre of the churchyard. When Bones were dug up they used to be thrown into this hole. Now it is full of rubbish, old tins etc.
A large cross is standing at each side of yard one with partly broken head at west end. The one at the east end is said to have been carried away by St. Columcille who was caught in the act by St. Kieran. He (Columcille) dropped the cross in the river and it broke. Part of it is said to be seen above the water still on the further bank from churchyard and a little distance to north. The rest is said to be hidden in the river and swans are supposed to float on the water just over the place where
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:18
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it lies to show its position.
St. Kieran's Well.
Mrs Reilly's daughter had a toothache and she washed her mouth with water and she was cured
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 13:03
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A little beyond St. Kieran's Churchyard is St. Kieran's holy well. The water from this well is said to cure toothache. Mrs Reilly took her daughter who had toothache, to the well and made her wash out her mouth with the water and her toothache was cured.

(Photeo - St. Kieran's Well, Castlekieran)
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 12:59
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In this parish there is a townland called Kilkerrin. It is called after a great saint, St Kerin. There is a story connected with this saint of how he came to live so far from Clonmacnoise.
One day when he was visiting his friend St Sinon in Scattery Island in his small craft he was shipwrecked and cast in upon this lonely place. When he was met by the people of the townland, they gave food and shelter.
He stayed here for some time and built a Church. The ruin of this Church is to be seen to the present day. There is also a beautiful historic blessed well near the Church belonging to St Kerin which afterwards the people discovered.
Many cures and miracles have been wrought from this Blessed Well. Many people go there and say special prayer in order to gain the indulgence which follows the visit to the Blessed Well.
Old tradition informs us that it moved from one place to another when it was interfered with by people who did
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 12:59
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not realize the good faith that followed it.
senior member (history)
2019-09-07 12:51
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At the west of Labasheeda there is a townland named Kilkerin. It is called after St Kieran who lived at Clonmacnoise. There is a story told about him that he sailed down the River Shannon to visit St. Sinon but a storm came upon him and he was driven ashore at Kilkerrin. The people treated him very well and he built a church there. There is an old story told about a blessed well that was near the Church. One day a woman drew water from the well to wash potatoes. The well was dry the next morning and it was found springing up in the townland of Mountshannon.
People make visits to this well very often in honour of St. Kieran.

Written by GERARD KELLY who had it told to him by his mother Mrs Agnes Kelly, Labasheeda, Co Clare
senior member (history)
2019-09-06 23:26
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The following information is given by a Mrs Austin of Farganstown who is a very old woman and a native of Navan.

The church of Timple Kieran is a very old church, but the ruins is there yet and the bell of the church is there also. St Kieran built the church, and after a while he made a graveyard around it. It is situated on the top of a hill and is about a hundred yards from Garlow Cross.
It is not a mixed-graveyard, but many attempts were made to make it one, but it was of no avail. Any time a protestant was buried in it that night the coffin would be taken up by a spirit and put outside the gates. One day a rich man was buried in the graveyard, but, he was a protestant, and that night the coffin was taken up and put outside the gates. The following night the rich man's relatives hired four guards to mind the graveyard, for they thought it was someone that was doing it. At twelve o'clock the coffin was put outside the gates in spite of the guards. That was the last time it was tried to bury protestants in Timple Kieran.
senior member (history)
2019-09-06 12:41
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Ba fear an-naomhtha é Naomh Ciarán. Chuir sé go leor mainistreacha ar bun i n-Éireann. Is é a chuir ar bun Chluann Mhac Nóis ar bun i naice na Sionaine. Is i n-Árainn a fuair Ciaran a chuid sgolaidheachta. Fuair sé bás ar an naomhad lá de Mheadhon Fhóghmhair agus tá lá mór again ar an lá sin ó shoin. Tá tobar déanta ann le h-aghaidh daoine
senior member (history)
2019-09-06 12:41
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a bheith ag tabhairt turais ann agus cill bheag ann fadó a rinne Ciarán agus tá Cill Chiarán mar ainm ar an áit ó shion. Tagann go leór daoine ag tabhairt turais ann de h-Aoine nó Dé Domhnaigh.
Tugann siad leo cuid de'n chaonach a mbíonn ag fás ar na clocha mar tá sé go maith le h-aghaidh leighis dhá mbeadh créacht ar dhuine a bheadh dona gearr go mbeadh sé go maith.
senior member (history)
2019-09-06 09:48
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that a man was lying there fatally wounded.
He asked piteously for a drink, but the girl said she had no vessel to fetch it in; so he told her to take off his shoe and to bring the water in it.
She gave him a drink and he had barely strength to say
"Bíodh an chreach agat."
She collected her cattle, and drove them home.
It is supposed that this incident saved the girl's life, as she never went to Fiachna. The Bulláns are enchanted, and if she attempted to steal one, she would be in the power of the fairies for the rest of her life.

Dán

"Triúr agus cúigear ó'n Scairt,
Fear agus seacht ó Bhórd Eoghainín
Is iad a dhein an córtha cheart,
Ar Ínnse Gaorthadh Rais ar bhruach an tSíon."
senior member (history)
2019-09-06 09:44
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Gobnet O'Connell
Drominasig
Kenmare

Long ago in the troubled times, eight men from Scairt, near Bantry, stole some cattle from Bórd Eoghainín, near Caherdaniel. The cattle were soon missed, and eight strong brave men were sent in pursuit of them.
They overtook them about a mile from this school, but the Bantry men refused to give back the cattle.
It was decided that the sixteen men should have a fair fight; so they selected a flat field - Ínse Gaorthadh Rais -on the banks of the river Sheen.
senior member (history)
2019-09-06 09:43
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The land is owned by Edward Egan, and the field is still pointed out.
A terrible fight took place, in which they were all killed, except one from each side. One of these lay dying and he asked the other for a drink, but when the other was stooping down, he stabbed him to death. He then lay there all alone moaning piteously.
At the same time some men were talking, in a public-house in Kenmare, about the seven remarkable "Bullans", or round stones in Feachna Graveyard. They put up a bet that no one in Kenmare would go to the Bonane graveyard at mid-night, and bring down one of the seven Bulláns
A girl in the house took up the challenge, and set out. As she travelled along the Sheen, she heard the moaning at Ínse Gaorthadh Rais.
Being very courageous, she went into the field, and saw
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 23:31
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Máighréad Ní Thuama
Gort 'le hÁrd
Cill Garbháin

1) Mair, a chapaill, agus geobhair féar.
Ach fuair an capall bás an fhaid is bhí an féar ag fás

2) Is fearr rith maith, ná droch-sheasamh
3) Ní h-é lá na gaoithe, lá na sgolb
4) Éist le fuam na h-abhann, is geobhair breac
5) Ceannaigh ar a trí, is díol ar a seacht is ní bheir riamh gan capall maith

6) A horse with four white legs,
Keep him not a day,
A horse with three white legs,
Send him far away,
A horse with two white legs,
Sell him to a friend,
A horse with one white leg,
Keep him to the end.

7) Rogha gacha datha donn, ach capall buidhe go mbeadh síogh 'na dhrom

8) Ba chuma cad é an dath dá mbeadh sé go maith
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 23:31
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9) Bior igcóir na feola fiadha, is an feoil fiadhna ar an gcnoc

10) Muna mbeidh an lá chun prátaí, beidh an lá chun cártaí

11) Muna mbeidh agat ach pocán gabhair bí i lár an aonaigh leis

12) Eirigh moch is luig deidheanach;
Muna bhfuil rud agat féin bí in a éagmais

13) Tiocfaidh lá fós go mbearrfar na caoirig sa clós
14) Is mairg a bhíonn thíos ar an gcéad biarnan
15) "Tisn't the number of gowns, but the number of pounds

16) Bean bhreágh, nó tig ar árd, nó capall bán na trí neithe a mheallfadh duine

17) Níor dhún Dia bearna riamh, nár oscail sé dhá cheann eile 'na ionad

18) Tagann gach maith le cháirde

19) "Is mór an nídh an neart", arsan dreoilín teasbaigh nuair a chaith sé an chiaróg leis an bhfaill

20) Bean mhic is a máthair céile, mar a bheadh cat is luch ar agaidh a chéile
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 23:01
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The most usual birds seen in this district are : - robin, blackbird, thrush, sparrow, jack daw, crow, tom-tit, wagtail, yellow hammer, wren, linnet, finches, pigeon, swallow, king fisher, crane, hawk, pigeon, pilibin, starling, curlew, partridge, magpie and the snipe. When the pigeon is calling any of his friends he is said to say 'steal two cows Teady'.
If the cuckoo comes to Ireland early it will be a bad summer.
'If the cuckoo sings on a bare thorn
Sell your cow and buy corn'
The wren is not liked around here - she is said to have betrayed Our Lord. Her family is about 16 or 17. Some say that when Our Lord was dying on the cross, the robin tried to relieve him by taking a thorn out of his head with his beak and a drop of blood fell on his breast and ever since robins have a red breast. The crane makes its nest on a high tree and leaves two holes in the nest . The tom-tit makes her nest in mossy banks. The hawk makes its nest high up on a tree. It steal chickens and other small birds. The partridge makes her nest in meadows of hay. The stone-checker builds
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:53
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lay the eggs in a long grass or under hay, They hatch for nineteen or twenty days. The cock lies nearby. He fights enemies such as the magpie. They appear about the same places every spring. When the hen leaves the nest, she covers the eggs with hay or long grass. If the ground gets wet, the eggs are removed to a dry place. A great many people go shooting partridges. Others set traps where they resort.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:51
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The Partridge builds a nest of grass in a hay field or in a field of long grass. It lays fifteen or sixteen small eggs. It is a game bird. It feeds on clover, grass and corn. They rise very quickly and unexpectedly sometimes when one is going through the fields. When they grow older they rise in ones or twoes.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:46
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Another bird which we know well is the wild duck. She builds her nest in the bog or on an island on the lake. She makes it with moss and feathers. She lays about twelve eggs and sits on them for a month. When the wild duck is leaving her nest she pulls all the down from under her wings and covers the nest with them. If anyone was at her nest he would leave it and begin fluttering away from it pretending her wing was broken to bring you away from the nest.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:43
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The partridge is another wild bird. She builds her nest in long grass. She lays eight little grey eggs which are spotted with blackish spots.

Patrick McCabe
Lisnabuntry
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:41
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The woodcock start to come here in the middle of October and on to the middle of November. They come from Norway, Sweden and Scotland. They build their nests on a cliff. When the female lays her eggs she takes them in her bill or legs to another covert or nest. Three eggs she generally lays. They leave this country about the 20th of February though some remain on till the 17th March.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:38
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There are many herbs; the herbs called "Bochlán" and thistle are the most harmful; they poison horses sheep and cattle. The most reason why they are harmful is because they spread. The thistle grows in good land, and the "Bochlán" grows in bad land.
A few potatoes are boiled put into a stocking and tied round the neck and they are supposed to supply an instant cure for a sore throat.
A dandelion is a great cure for a wart.
Nettles are boiled and used for feeding young turkeys.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:34
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The partridge is a lovely, large bird that frequents woody places, Scairts or Gaoires. It has a beautiful cover of feathers which are used sometimes by fishermen. Partridge are very
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 22:34
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scarce here now though they were very plentiful long ago.
She builds her nest in a flat place near a ditch or Scairt. She lines it with withered Fionán! She lays from 9 to 10 white eggs with brown spots like chicken's eggs. After a short time the young ones run on the grass. In about three or four weeks they are able to fly.
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 14:27
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Seán Ó Ceallacháin
Cill na Fuinnseóige
Neidín
* * *

Tuath Ó Síosta, na mban gcliste

* * *

Snaidhm:-
Baile beag lámh le h-uisce,
Agus mná gan tuisgint ann

* * *

An dá Gráig is grádhna in Éirinn:-
Gráig na nGabhar, agus Gráig na Gréine

* * *

Muckrois na n-éan, agus Achad Eó na gréíne

* * *

Má fágais-se mise gan airgead
Do fhagas-sa tusa gan luain
(Sid é a dubhairt an fear, agus é fhágaint Cill Áirne, t'réis seachtmhaine do chaitheamh ann)

* * *

Seacht seachtmhaine ramhar ó Shamhain go Nodlaig

Má's maith in ao'chor sinn,
Is maith in aonfhacht sinn,
Is minic do bhí fear buan gan a phaidreacha
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 09:57
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14) Nuair a geibheann duine bás idtig, ní chóir d'aoinne de'n líon-tighe dul amach ag lorg aon nídh igcóir an torraimh ist oidhche in a aonar.

15) Nuair moltar leanbh, ná aon nídh beó is cóir igcómhnuidhe "Bail ó Dhia air", nó "Bail ó Dhia is Muire air" a rádh, ar eagla go mbeadh aon mí-ádh indán do.

16) Chun leigheas d'fhaghail ar thriuch -
A fhir ar chapall bhán,
Cad a leigheasfaidh an triuch?
Aon leigheas a thabhairfeadh sé duit, dein é, agus leigheasfair do leanbh
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 09:50
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1) Gan mhuc do mharbhadh ar an Luain
2) Gan do chuid gruaige do ghearradh ar an Luain

3) Cutting your nails on Sunday is the same as eating meat on Friday

4) Aistriú an Luain ó Thuaidh, nó aistriú an Aoine ó dheas, muna mbeadh agat ach pocán ghabhair ní dóca go rithfeadh leis

5) Dul amach an dorus céadna is a thángais isteach, i.e. gan dul amach an doras iadhtha, má thángais isteach an doras ar aghaidh an tighe

6) Má théigheann tú isteach idtigh, is go mbíonn cuigeann á dhéanamh ann, ba chóir duit buille de'n loinithe a bualadh; nó má's bairrile é, é a a chasadh, mar bheadh eagla ar muinntear an tighe go mbéarfá an t-im leat, muna dheanfá é sin.

7) Ní ceart bláthanna na sgeice gile a thabhairt isteach idtigh; tá mí-ádh éigin ag baint leo. Ní ceart, leis, an buachallán buidhe a thabhairt isteach idtigh. Luibh iseadh é sin,
senior member (history)
2019-09-05 09:50
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agus ceann mí-ádhmharach leis

8) Má castar socraid ort is cóir iompódh, agus trí choiscéim a chur díot leis ( trí choiscéim na trócaire)

9) Má tá nós ag an gcoileach glaodhach ar uair an mheadhon oidhche, nó teacht ar lic an dorais, agus glaodhach fé thrí ann, cómartha é sin go bhfuil sé ag bagairt an bháis ar dhuine éigin de'n líon-tighe

10) Ní cheart ionad dorais a bhí sa tigh leis na bliadhanta a dhúnadh, ná sean-phasáiste, nó beárna a dhúnadh.

11) Níl sé ceaduighthe bláthanna a phiocadh as lios, é a leagadh, ná tigh a thógaint air, ná aon bhaint a bheith agat leis, ar eagla go bhfágfadh na daoine maithe aon mhácaill ort.

12) Ní cheart éadach dhuine marbh a ghearradh, ach is féidir iad a ghiorrú nó a leigint leo le h-uamanna, nó le h-iad a scaoileadh. Is cóir iad a chatiheamh fé thrí ag an Aifreann Dia Domhnaigh.

13) Mí-ádh iseadh é do'n duine go mbeireann bó aige Lá Coille, nó go mbíonn dhá laogh ag boin
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 21:53
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In the parish of Bonane, on the old road from Kenmare to Bantry, stands St. Fiachna's Graveyard, still in use. All that now remains of the Church, which was eighty feet long and twenty feet wide is the eastern gable, now fifteen feet high at the apese; and traces of the remaining walls nowhere more than three feet in height. A jungle of shrub, weeds, and ivy cover the ruin, but in spite of this the sanctity is still maintained, and in the eastern gable where a stone had become displaced, somebody has placed a china figure of Our Lady and the Holy Child with other emblems of devotion.
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 21:47
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Eibhlín Ní Shúilleabháin
Leaca-ruadh
Neidín

Meacan-dá-thogha
This herb used to be found successful in curing ring-worm. The roots should be boiled, and applied to the ring-worm while hot. Every three hours a fresh plaster should be applied, and after a while the ring-worm would disappear.
This herb is said to cure boils on the back of the neck.

Cos Dubh
This is a species of hardy fern with a black stem. The fern should
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 21:47
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be picked, put into a saucepan with water and left "draw" beside the fire. It is then mashed up and kept for sores or cuts.

Slántas
This is also called rib-leaf, as the veins run parallel to the mid-rib. The leaves are put into a rag, pounded up, mixed with unsalted butter and applied to cuts or sores.

Neantóga
Nettles were used for curing rheumatism. They should be placed on the painful parts, and bandaged tightly for a few hours.
Sometimes the roots are washed, boiled in water, and applied to the parts while hot.

Caisreabhán
The leaves of the dandelion were much used for sores, cuts and bruises. They use to be washed, pounded, mixed with butter and applied to the sore parts. Caisreaván leaves were often picked, ground, mixed with meal and given to pigs and fowl.
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 21:34
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Written by
Patrick Gillick
Doon
Virginia
Collected from Patrick Gillick Snr
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 21:33
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The Fort Field
This field gets its name because there is a fort at the head of it

The Bush Field is so called because there is a big bush in the middle of it

The Kiln Field
This field gets its name because there was an old lime-kiln in it

Molly Rock's meadow
This meadow is so called because an old woman named Rock lived there in a house long ago

The Boot Field
this field is shaped like a boot

The Lough Field
There was a lake in this field long ago

The Fuird
This is known as a little stream

Dún na Collapaí is the name of a little hill
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 21:27
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Written by
Bernard Fitzsimons
Kilmore
Virginia
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 21:26
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that a Giant was buried there.
The Grave Bush grows beside the Big Man's Grave

In connection with the Big Man's Grave which is in Mr. Philip Carroll's farm in the townland of Burnia, Parish of Killinkere, County Cavan there is a very interesting story.
When he was ploughing the field some years ago he and another man dug up the mound as it was in the way. He found two shin-bones of extraordinary length and throwing one of them away, kept the other for driving cattle. Of course in some time both shin-bones were lost.
The late Father Meehan who was then Parish Priest and very much interested in old ruins and forts was very angry when he heard that the grave was dug up.
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 16:59
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In the townlands of Kilmore and Burnia the follwoing fields are:-
The Fasach is the name of a barren field
The Curragh is a marsh

The Brandra is a field which was not ploughed for many years

The Mollie, the Grobby, the Sluagh, the Gathai Mor, Carraig na Sasanach and the Móinín Bhrádaigh

The Gob is the part of Kilmore Lake which come out to a point

Poll na Scéachóg is a deep place in the Killinkere River over which two whtite-thorn trees grow

The Sruthán is the name of a small stream
The Ráigín is the name of the pass leading to Kilmore Bog
The Crocan is the name of a field with a small hill in it
The Alt, the Cuinicer and the Geata Bán, The Bray
The Kiln-Field. There is an old Lime-Kiln in this field
The Big Man's Grave. It is said
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 16:52
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trial for the death of Smith. I also remember when a boy - the kindly genial neighbours assembled around the blazing turf fires of many a homestedd in Kilmore telling of the deeds of the heroes before named and their local athletes. One song I have almost forgotten only a few lines which I give.
"Young Smith did fall at the Stonewall
For Loyalty I'd swear
But orange blood did make a flood
That night in Killinkere"
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 16:49
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and Gallon, Killinkere for the greater part of the History of the murder of Michael Smith. As he told me it was the late James Clarke (Grandfather of A. Clarke N.T. Killinkere) who attended the funeral and saw the gun-shot wound in Smith's dead body, that, he came to know so much about how Smith lost his life. Alex McCabe was grand uncle of Revd. Dr. McCabe. The writer is a direct decendant of James Fitzsimons and he heard Catherine Clerkin (Sister of James Clerkin) when a school-boy tell the story of how her brother James "Flew" to Australia after the trial.
In conclusion the writer now leaves down his pen and sends a fervent prayer speeding Heavenward to the throne of Our Heavenly Father that the Almighty God may grant Eternal rest to the souls of all that gallant crowd of faithful heroes, who stood on Kilmore Cross that 5th night of November A.D. 1835 and inagurated Catholic Action.

Note:-
It is very significant that 15 men all Catholics were arrested and put on trial for the death of Johnston and not one orangemen was arrested or put on
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 16:41
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Consternation filled the Court as the trial Judge now told the witness
"Go down Sir"
O'Connell made the greatest address of his life for the defence, and after a short deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Not Guilty" and the three prisoners now became three heroes as they walked out of Court without a staiin on their Character.

No rejoicing hearleded their return home, personal safety was first consideration. Poor Alex McCabe emigrated to U.S.A. James Clerkin to far away Australia, and James Fitzsimons left Kilmore and remained with relatives in Crossreagh, Mullagh until times improved, as the Lisanymore and Billis orangmen were sworn to shoot any one of the three on sight and for fully fifty years afterwards small children in Kilmore and Gallon were sent to live with relatives from the 1st July until after the "Twelfth" and the Adults of those two townlands were well prepared and kept watch and vigil for any invasion of orangmen.

The writer wishes to express his sincere thanks to Very Revd. Francis J. McCabe D.D. Chancellor of the Diocese of Pittsburg U.S.A.
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 16:32
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men from the townland of Kilmore and Gallon were arrested and put into prison where they were detained for six months, before they were brought before the Courts they were subjected to every torture to force them to betray their comrades but in vain. Informations were refused against twelve of the prisoners at the first sitting of the Court and three men viz. Alex McCabe Gallon, James Clerkin and James Fitzsimons, Kilmore were returned for trial and lodged in Omagh gaol.
Tradition tells us they were subjected to terrible torture, for so far the crown had no eveidence whatsoever against the prisoners, and were trying to break them down mentally and physically so that one or any of them might turn crown evidence against his comrades - but all in vain.
The late Father John Fitzsimons P.P. Killinkere visited them frequently, and secured for the defence the service of the (Liberator) Daniel O'Connell.
Just three years after their arrest they were put forward for trial on the Captial Charge of Murder. James Clerkin was first put forward
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 16:31
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tried and acquited and now only two remained. James Fitzsimons was acquitted and now only one remained; it is told that a special Jury was empannelled to convict Alex McCabe as the Crown was thirsting for the blood of their victim.
A so called Catholic named Smith from Billis district now came forward to give evidence for the crown, or in other words to swear away the life of Alex McCabe. He swore (perjury of course) that he was passing by the cross-roads that night and that he saw Alex McCabe striking Johnston with an iron bar on the head and that Johnston fell dead after the blow.
The Great Councillor O'Connell sprang to his feet and commenced cross-examing him thus
"Do you solemnly swear it was with an iron bar that the prisoner hit Johnston on the head". "Yes".
"You have no doubt whatever that, that blow of the iron bar struck by Alex McCabe killed Johnston" "No"
"Now, on the virtue of your oath wasn't it with a black-thorn stick McCabe struck the blow that killed Johnston". "It was"
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 09:36
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On the 5th Nov. 1835 coming home from Bailieboro fair at a place known as Stonewall a few Catholic people went into a house owned by a man named Irwin (a Loyalist of the darkest type) where intoxicating drink was sold.
In those far back days the licensing laws were not in operation for years to come. Having taken some refreshments with his own friends a man named Michael Smith (Mickey Vickley) as he was locally called, left the drinking room for the purpose of lighting his pipe at the kitchen fire (matches were not in use then) where a large crowd of Orange-Men had assembled to go to the Orange-Lodge close by to celebrate the anniversary of the gunpowder plot.
When this unfortunate man Smith stooped to put a coal on his pipe, an Orangeman put his foot on the back of his head and crushed his face into the fire. The owner of the house Irwin sprang to the drinking room door, closed and locked it so that poor Smith's companions could not come to his aid. He was dragged out on the road still screaming as the skin was burnt off his face, hands
senior member (history)
2019-09-04 09:36
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and chest.
A shot rang out! poor Smith fell dead (R.I.P.) shot at point blank range 3" over the heart. There is a power of endurance in human beings, both in their bodies and in their minds, which seems to be wonderfully adapted and exactly proportioned to the circumstances in which individuals may happen to be placed - a power which in most cases is sufficient to carry men through every obstacle that may be thrown in their path through life.
Immediately after Smith was shot a horseman coming home from Bailieboro' came galloping at full speed until he came to Kilmore Cross-roads where a crowd of young men were gathered from Kilmore and adjoining Townland of Gallon.
He told them of the terrible murder and then and there those faithful heroes (which after events proved them) joined hands together and made a vow - they would avenge the murder of Smith on the first orangeman to pass the cross-roads. Soon after an orangeman named Archibald Johnston was the first to come and he was put to death.
On the following day fifteen young
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 20:58
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Ainm an duine ó'r chuala sé an sgéal - m'uncal as Doire Úbair

* * *

Bhí Naomh Pádraig ag teacht ó thuaidh agus tháinic sé isteach go Cnoc Maol - D'iarr sé lóistín ann. Ní bhfuair sé ach bamhal d'uisce. D'fág sé an áit agus rinne sé a bhealach amach go Doire Uí Bhriain. D'fág sé sonas Chnoc Mhaol ar Ghleann Dhoire Uí Bhriain agus go siúráilte tá freisin. Níl lá ar bith nach mbíonn a sáith bainne ag muinntir na h-áite.

An Chloch san Abhainn
Bheannuigh sé (Pádraic Naomhtha) an chloch an lá a ndeacha sé treasna. Tá lorg a dhá ghlún sa gcloich.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 20:49
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Naomh Damhnait - cailín a déalaigh as teach a h athara, agus dimthigh i bhfolach in áit eicínt i gCo. na Midhe agus diarr coimirce ar Mháire duine dá mhuinntire féin. Rud a fuair, agus chuir sí fuithe i bpáirc bheag ar a dtugtar Páirc an Naoimh go dtí an lá atá indiu ann. Sa bpáirc seo tá ráth agus sgeach bhán in a láir nár fhás ariamh ach go caol tanaidhe agus tugtar crann an Naoimh Bhig air. Giota taobh tiar de agus ar an taobh eile de'n bhóthar tá séipéal Cillíní Díoma agus i lár na Roilge tá sean-bhallóga do'n tsean-chill.
Tuairim céad slat ó'n ráth bí sórt caiseal ag uasal áithrid, ach níl cloch nó comhartha fágtha de ach an t-ainm, agus mar sin féin níor chuala mé ach ó bhéal duine amháin é, agus Baile 'n Chaisil a bhí aige ar an bpáirc.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 20:40
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Bhí sagart ag déanamh stáisiúin i gcomharsanacht an locha agus chonnaic sé bodach Protastúnaigh ag iasgaireacht ann, agus bhí cnap mór d'iasg gabhtha aige agus diarr sé ceann dá dhinnéar. Nidh nach bhfuair agus mhallachtaigh sé an loch agus gach a rabh ann, agus ó soin níl smidín d'iasg le fághail ann.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 20:37
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Ar na cnuic céadna tá sórt suidheacháin ann ar a dtugtar "Cathaoir an Iarla" air agus seo an sgéal atá ag baint leis go rabh cóir suidhe déanta do dhuijne de mhuinntir Cloinne Riocaird ar bhárr Túir ionnus go bhféadfadh sé limistéar mór fairsing a taisbeánt dá cháirde agus go mbeadh a chuid namhaid ag tnúth leis agus gan amras is breagh an radharc atá le feiceáil ó'n áit, siar go cathair na Gaillimhe nó ódheas
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 20:33
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go Luimneach

ó Sheán Breathnach
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 20:32
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Níl an tainm sin le cloisteál anois ach "Dalyston". Tá coillte ann agus deirtear go ndeachaidh Pádhraig Sáirséal tríd an gcoill agus é ag teicheadh ó dheas go Luimneach tar éis cath Eachdhroma.
Nuair a bhí sé ag teacht bhí air dul go Baile na gCnocán agus deirtear gur tháinic na Gaill suas leo agus gur troideadh cath ann mar fritheadh go leór crámha is skulls i gcoiléar gainmhe a foscaldh cúpla bliadhan ó shoin, bhí rian sean-bhóthair níos fuide ó dheas agus de réir comhartha cuireadh na cuirp i bpoll in aice le cill.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 20:24
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Níl sé deirionnach chun fataí a chur comhfhaid is is féidir féachaint trí chrainn fuinnseóige
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 17:16
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The names on stars as known in the district are, The "Plough," the
"Cluster", the "orb", the "Maras", the "Jupiter", the "Polar star", "Moon-star", the "Morning-Star", the "Evening Star", the "Hook", and the "Mercury".
When a star falls, it is said to be a soul going to Heaven. The "Mercury" was the star, which the old people called to for help, when in trouble. The "plough" is made up of seven stars in the shape of a plough.
The "Cluster" is a big clump of stars.
The "hook" containing four stars is shaped like a hook.
The "Polar-Star" is a very bright
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 17:05
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Nearly all the place names of this district are of Irish origin and many places are obviously Irish in meaning. Here are some of the important ones.
Carrigeen (Carraigín) meaning "Little Rock" is a little village on the side of a hill to the left of the Waterford Carrick-on-Suir road, and about five miles from the former city. The rock from which the place gets its name is very near the surface and in the school playground it is protruding through the surface.
Ballinlough (Baile an Locha) is my native townland, and gets its name from a lake which is situated in it.
Cussanna (Casánach) is a townland beside the river, and means a place abounding in paths.
Aglish (Eaglais) is a village on the main road from Waterford to Carrick-on-Suir, and gets its name from an old church which was there once. The church itself was destroyed by Cromwell, and no trace of it now
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 17:02
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(Ar leanamhaint)

'Sé an Maighistir Seoirse, an t-ógán léigheana
Is aige thá mo shaoire nó mé chur fé ghreim.

* * *

Fuaras an t-amhrán so thuas ó Sheán Ó Maoláin (Mullins), Bóthar Ciarraidhe, Cill a' Dísirt, Co. an Chláir. 75 a aois.
Oibrightheoir is eadh é.
Tógadh é i gConnamara, ach chaith sé a shaoghal i gCo. an Chláir. Chuala sé an t-amhrán ó n a athair, timcheall 60 bliadhain ó shoin. Bhí a athair 50 bliadhain d'aois annsan agus bhí sé in a chomhnuidhe i gCuar a' Chláir (Cúirt an Chláir)
Sgríobhadh an t-amhrán so thuas sa leabhar so an ceathramhadh lá déág de mhí na Samhna 1934.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 16:55
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search was begun, but it was of no avail. The search was abandoned. About a fortnight afterwards two men were working near the Shannon. They saw an object passing towards the Altantic. One man said "That might be Carmody's body". They got a boat and brought in the body and found a purse in it which contained the money. They buried the man, and gave the money to its owners.
The oak will never rot as long as it is wet. The boat was made of oak, and the seaweed covered it so it is always wet. Hence the wreck is still to be seen.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 16:52
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people of West Clare. In the Autumn Season a party of Rinn people were bringing a sailing boat, full of corn to the Limerick market which was the only one they had. A Rinn man owned the boat, but as the boatmen were honest he trusted them to sell the corn and bring back the money to the people who sent corn as well as himself.
All went well until they were returning and night overtook them. The man in charge whose name was Carmody decided to anchor at the Low Island Roads. About twelve o'clock in the night a storm arose and the boat pulled the anchor and drifted.
The men made great efforts to save the boat, but she hit against the rocks near Shore Island. All aboard were drowned but thirteen bodies were found immediately. One was still missing and it was Carmody who had the money. This money was also belonging to poor people and a strenous
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 16:47
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A great deal of places of any importance have Irish names.
Bunker Hill is the name of an important hill in this neighbourhood. Our school is built upon it.
The hill is famous for its faction fights. About a hundred years a ago a fierce fight was held here. One man took refuge inside the old school gate, but he was followed and beaten to death.
A man who had a faction was supposed to be very important and if he had a daughter the person who got married to her used to be very proud, because he was supposed to be of noble family.
He was then enlisted in the faction. If the lad had not any son, the man who married his daughter was made leader.

The year 1858 was a sad one from its beginning to end for the
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:57
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And one morning he wanted to show how rich he was by boiling the kettle for the breakfast with pound notes. And that whole day he worked the mill with milk, and then he died in the poorhouse.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:55
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Drumard Jones got its name from high hills, and Jones got its name from a man who owned all Drumard and his name was Jones.
He had a flour mill and a lot of cattle
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:53
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The Monaghan fair which is held in Mohill on the 25th of February for the past generations it is so called because people the name of Monaghans went to fight at the fair on that day.
When people sell cattle they have to pay six pence on every animal they sell.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:50
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awaiting decision
Carraig Pointe; A rock at the north entrance to Blackrock.

Carraig Cúl Trágha; A rock at the south entrance to Blackrock.

Par-na-Stoícín; A field on the late Mr. Whitworth's estate.
Barra Bag; A field on the late Mr. Whitworth's estate
An Drumhille; A field owned by Mr. Cox.
An Pairc mór; A field owned by Mr. Cox.
An Tobar ona: A field owned my Mr. Cox.
Brummers field owned by M. Geough.
The Cockle hill = a district at the south side of the Village.
The Sandy Lane = a narrow twisted road from the Village to Rock Road
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:42
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awaiting decision
Dathrú
a field in Dungrudh covered with brown coloured grass and furze

Páirc na Lachan
a very flat field containing a small pond where ducks swim in J. Noonan's Barna

Páirc na Cloumpa"
a field in Richardson's land at Dungrud where a great battle was fought

Curragh
a hill in Longford, round, small and covered with furze

Cosacán
a height in Ballyena above Coskeran's

Clash or Closh
a Hollow with steep sides having a small round hill in the centre. It is said that a black boar came from the North and when it reached the hollow it was in great pain. It tore up a ring still to be seen around the height in the centre. This hollow is in Monour

The Cuckán and Crickeen
are heights in two fields belonging to D. Ryan Ballyena

The Blucha Breac
is a clump of bushes in A. Ryan's field Ballyena

Carraig Séadhna
a huge rock on the side of "Sliabh na Much" and called after the Patron Saint of "The Glen" St Séadna

Coulara
a huge rock in one of Conway's fields in Longford

The Wart Rock
in O'Brien's field at Monaboula

Carraig na Binne
a huge pile of rocks on peak of the Galtees south of school
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:04
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In Mr M Kiely's land at Longford there still stands the remains of the walls of what was once a hedge school where on Mr Doran taught for many years. This man, I am told, besides his knowledge of English and Irish was a good classical scholar. His pupils, many of whom were afterwards priests, were mostly boys and girls of the farming class round about. The members of the Kiely family were taught free in payment for board and lodgings received in Kiely's home and the other children paid something like two-pence each per week.
The school was of the roughtest type. It consisted of one room, roofed with rough slates the floor being of yellow mud (Márla Buidhe). Rough branches or limbs of trees found in the wood nearby and fastened with nails formed the seats. Those seats ran right around the walls. There were no maps, blackboards, pins, pencils or copy-books of any kind. Instead rough pieces of slate found in and adjacent quarry and cobble stones
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 11:04
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found in the neighbouring glen were used for writing materials. The teacher sat in a comfortable Sugán chair. The children supplied the fuel which consisted of sods of turf - turf being plentiful in the locality. The teacher was looked upon as being very clever and ever so cross.

About three miles from this school stood another where Barna N. School now stands. And here one Mr Fitzgerald taught. Mr Doran and himself were great friends and spent all their leisure time together especially on Saturdays and Sundays.

Told by our teacher wo got this from
Mrs Forde
Gortavoher
Aherlow
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:51
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through Carrigtwohill Co Cork when he saw the castle on fire.
David Barry was said to be the cleverest man in Munster. He asked Queen Elizabeth to let him rebuild his castle and the Queen did so. Then O'Neill came and he burnt the village of Ballintubber which was in David Barry's land. Cromwell came and he fired a cannon ball at ) it. The castle is empty for the last two hundred years.
There is a dungeon in this castle and any person who would come into the castle and start fighting would be thrown into the dungeon and would be murdered. Inside the door of the castle at the right side there is a hole and it would bring you out in one of Lane's fields in Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork.
About thirty years ago the slates were taken off the castle and new slates were put on by Lord Barrymore's men.
In the castle there is a chapel and monks used celebrate mass in it in times of danger. The monks lived in a monastery in Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:47
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Chalk Sunday:-
The old custom of chalking all bachelors going to or coming from Mass on this day is observed still in many places.

Good Friday:-
Eggs laid on this day are marked with a cross then laid aside and eaten before breakfast on Easter Sunday morning.

Easter Saturday:-
All go to Church for the solemn blessing of Easter water. They take it home and sprinkle the cattle with it before leaving them out on grass. Before a cow calves the cow is sprinkled, a blessed candle is lighted and the sign of the cross made along the cow's back.

May Eve and May day:-
This is the time for the making of "Pisogues" I am sorry to say the evil practice of hiding goose eggs or burying the diseased limb of an animal somewhere in the neighbour's land is still carried on in places here. Many people believe it is not lucky to draw water from a neighbour's well on those days.

St John's Day:-
Huge bonfires in honour of the saint are lighted on the hilltops all around the country
senior member (history)
2019-09-03 10:37
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one and a girl on the other. If the nuts remain together it is said the pair will be married soon, if not, the pair will soon part.

Dalla Phúichín:-
Cuirtear trí fó-chupáin ar an mbórdh. Bíonn cré i gceann díobh, uisge i gceann eile agus fáinne sa triomhadh ceann. Annsan cuirtear púichín ar dhuine agus siubhalann sé fé dhein an bhúirdh. Má cuireann sé a méaranna ar an gcré caillfear go luath é, agus má's an t-uisge a aimsigheann sé raghaidh sé thar lear agus má's ar an bhfáinne cuireann sé a mhear pósfar go luath é.

When all fun and sport are at an end the rosary is recited very devoutly for the dead.
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:57
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Sallys grow very well here. They are used for basket making.

CLONCARLINE (Cluain Ceathar Linn - vale of the four lakes) One mile and a half south-east.
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:55
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Monasterevan is derived from the word Mainistir Eimhin. St. Evin built his monastery here in the sixth century. Prior to that the district was knows as "Ros Glas" meaning the "green wood". From many place names around here, this district was once very well wooded with oak trees.
BORADERA (Bóthar an Doire = the road of the oaks) is a townland one mile east of here.

DERRYLEA (Doire Liath = the green oaks) is three miles north-west.
DERRYOUGHTER (Doire Uachtair = upper oaks) is over four miles south-south-east.

THE DERRIES is over four miles south-west.
LARCH HILL is two miles south-south-east. Has a wood of larch trees.
SALLY ISLAND A small island in the river Barrow over two miles south
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:45
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Michaelmas:- What is known as the "Michaelmas Goose" the first goose of the season is killed and eaten this day.

(From Pupils and Teacher)
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:44
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Halloween:-
Snap Apple - A tub nearly full of water is left in the middle of the kitchen. An apple is then thrown in, and a little boy or girl with hands behind the back tries to get the apple out with its mouth. There is great sport as the child dives again and again trying to get the apple, only to find itself getting a good wetting instead.
Sometimes a lath with a lump of soap at one end and an apple at the other, is suspended from the ceiling. The lath is swung round quickly and a player tries to get the apple with his mouth, often he gets a good dose of soap instead.

Hallow'een Cake:-
Cuirtear fáinne, raol agus méaracán istheach sa báirín breach. An té a gheibeann an fáinne deirtear go bposfar go luath é. An té a gheibheann an mearacán ní posfar coidhche é agus an té a gheibheann an raol béidh sé saidbhir.
Nuts - Two nuts are put close to the fire, the name of a boy is put on
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:35
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2s on a calf and 6d on a pig. When a bargain is completed the parties concerned show their agreement by striking hands, each spitting on the hand before doing so.
When sold the buyer puts his own mark on the animals by cutting a V with a scissors on the flank, by putting mud on the side or by rubbing a little red sort of paint on the forehead.

(Pupils and Teacher)
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:33
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Fairs are held at Galbally, Tipperary, Bansha and "Crocárdan" each place being only a few miles from here.
In the first three the fairs are held in the village or town and at "Cnocárdan" the fair is held on a very hilly field off the main road and quite close to the very old cemetery of Mountbruis.
Several times during the year buyers come here from place as far away as Wexford buying cattle, principally calves. They call to the farmers' houses along the road and purchase the animals, taking those bought away with them in lorries.
The fairs are held in the streets of the town and tolls are paid at least in the case of pigs at Tipperary, to the representative of the landlord, Smith Barry. When cattle are sold the owner gives a luck-penny to the buyer. The amount varies according to the animal bought, it being usually 2s 6d on a milch cow or heifer, from 1s to
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:27
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told him that on one occasion he tried to plough up this field, but had to stop owing to the number of human bones etc. he met. He also came across what was evidently the floor of an old Church. The entrance to the boreen leading to the field still goes by the name of "An Geatha Bán".
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 16:24
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There are three churchyards in this parish, one in Galbally, a second in Lisvernane and a third at Clonbeg, Aherlow. They are all still in use and are rectangular in shape. There are the ruins of an old Church in Galbally and Clonbeg graveyard. A modern Church stands in the graveyard at Lisvernane.
In Clonbeg the ground slopes to the east, a beautiful well called after the local saint, St Seadna, being at the South east. The old ruined church stands in the centre and some old people say it was the church of the same Saint, Seadna. There are trees growing round it, hawthorn bushes overhanging the well. There are some very old tombstones found here a few of the crosses being iron. People are buried in the old ruin. Near hand(?) an old Protestant Church where service is still carried on Protestants are buried at one side of the graveyard and catholics at the other side. There is one disused graveyard at Gortavoher. It is now a pasture field. The owner of it, Mr Hennessy, told me his father
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 10:57
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people of that name lived near where the bridge stands
Gleann na h-Eaglaise - flows into "Clydagh Glen
Coill Glen - in Longford, the place was wooded year ago
Cuan Glen - a glen out of the turf banks called "Cuan" on the Galtees

Gleann na Side - near Cuan
Ladhar " Glen - from the Galtees passes through Lyre
Other Glens and Streams near - The Mill Glen (Old Mill standing)

Gleann Dubh
Gleann Dearg
Gleann Beag
(Those three in Glencushabinna)
Darcy's Glen:- Lyon's Glen
Hughes's Glen
Gleann na Gaoithe - near A. Ryan's Ballyena
Fúitean's (?) Glen near Lisvernane
senior member (history)
2019-09-02 10:48
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Fields near the School
Liosin
a field containing a little Lios or fort at the back of Brien's Monaboula

The Gurteen
Close to above, this way a great tillage field some years ago

Tobar na Gamhnaidhe
field belonging to W. Kiely Longford that got its name from a well in the field. Tradition says that at Midnight many years ago a woman was supposed to be seen at the well milking a goat

Ínsenagabhair
near a well-known glen in Monaboula

Páirc Garbh
in Monaboula also is a small field full of bumps or hillocks

Curragheen
near this school, and so called because of the many little heights in it

Páirc na Sáileóga
near O'Donnell's Lyre where there were willow trees growing long ago

Póll Gorm
Baile Briain - at the (-) of Noonan's house Riversdale
Other fields:-
Pidgon Field, Kiln Field - lime burned here long ago, The Barrack Field, Bridge Field, Cooleen, The Pound Field, The Long Field, The Back Meadow, The Mill Field (Ruins of old Saw Mill still standing) The Strip (a long narrow field in Monaboula) The Lacan - a field in Dwyers Monaboula

Local Names Continued
Streams:-
Gleann na Sgeac - near O'Briens Glencushabinnia
Gleann na Carrag - near Dwyer's Dromleigh so called because of the very rocky nature of its bed

Drocídín "Byrne" - near the school so called because
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:50
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said in the district once. There is a Mass rock to be seen in the district yet. It is very large and a lot of people have tryed to lift it and it was impossible. Lights were often seen around that place.

P.S.
I obtained the above from Stephen Furey Cartron, Kilchreest Loughrea Co Galway.
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:48
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Irish. They are not able to tell stories in Irish. Their names are Mrs Power Lis na Naonac Kilchreest Loughrea and Catherine Connors Lis na Naonac Kilchreest Loughrea.
The houses were more numerous locally long ago. The ruins of the houses are not to be seen now. There is no song about the townland. The land is good. There is no wood growing there but not far from the district there was a wood formerly. This wood got burned and the field it was in is called Coill Dóighte. There are no rivers or lakes in the district. It is said that Mass was
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:44
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The name of my home district is Lis na Naonac. It is situated in the Parish of Kilchreest and in the barony of Dunkellin and in the Co of Galway. There are four families living in it. The approximate number of people living in it is twenty four. There is one thatched house in it and three slated. My home district got its name from a Lis which is situated in it. There are two old people over seventy years living in the district. They can speak some
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:41
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years.
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:40
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Gairidhe Úna
In the parish of Ballymana in the townland of Monksfield there is a garden called Gáiridhe Úna. In olden times a woman by the name of Úna lived in it.

Heather Hill
In the parish of Ballymana in the townland of Emlough there is hill called Heather Hill; it got its name because a lot of heather grows on the top of it every year.

I obtained the following Place Names from Mr Thoma Kerse, Monksfield, Craughwell. He got them from his father who is dead thirty
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:37
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repaired by the leprecaun.

Páirc an Leprechaun
In the townland of Monksfield there is a field called Páirc an Leprechaun. In that field the leprechaun was often heard in it every night.

Cnoc an Aifrinn
In the parish of Ballymana in the townland of Monksfield there is a hill called Cnoch an Aifrinn. Long ago in the penal times mass used to be said on that hill.

Gort an tSaghairt
The garden is situated in the village of Ballylinn; it got its name from a priest that lived in it long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:33
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under it.

Sgeach an Lepreacaun
In the townland of Monksfield there is a bush called Sgeach an Leprecaun. Long ago the fairy shoemaker used to be seen and heard at work under it. Some of the old people were so innocent that they used to leave their shoes under it thinking that the leprecaun would mend them.
This old woman left her shoes under it one night and some prime fellow was watching her. When he got her gone home he took the shoes from under the bush. So that put an end to to the people from leaving their shoes to be
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:30
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Sean Balla
In the parish of Ballymana in the townland of Monksfield there is a field called Sean Balla; it got its name because there was queer old walls in it long ago.

Tobar an Caileach
In the townland of Emlough in the parish of Ballymana there is a well called Tobar an Caileach; it got its name from an old fairy woman that used to be coming there for a pail of water late at night.

Cnoch an Phiobhaire
In the parish of Ballymana in the townland of Monksfield there is a hill called Cnoc an Phiobhaire. It is supposed that a fairy piper was heard playing
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:27
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Monksfield
In the parish of Ballymana there is a village called Monksfield. It got its name from monks who lived there long ago.

Páirc na h-Aitinn
In the parish of Ballymana in the townland of Monksfield there is a field called Páirc na h-Aitinn; it got its name from furze blossoms which bloomed there in great profusion.

Cnoc na mBan Bréagh
In the townland of Ballymana there is a hill called Cnoc na mBan Breágh. It got its name from fairy ladies which were seen there several times by the old people.
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 21:23
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This man's name was Jack Nichol. He lived in Augharas and was always a strange character. He could eat as much as five or six men. There was a party at Clineorick Castle. The conversation turned on people with big appetites. The owner of the Castle said he'd find a man able to eat more than any of them. They made a bet of £20 with the owner of the castle that he would not eat a calf. Jack Nichol was sent for. The woman at the gate house had the meat cooked for him. The two men who made the bet hid in the room and as Jack was going by the woman called him in to have a piece of meat. She gave him dish after dish until the calf was consumed. When she had it all given she said she was sorry she had no more meat. He said it is all right mam thank you I am going over to the castle to eat a calf.
The owner of the castle got his £20.
When Jack Nichol died and was being brought in a hearse, the horses were not able to draw the coffin and upset on the road. People then came to the conclusion that since he was not like an ordinary man when alive he remained the same after death.
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 12:52
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other to hurl again on the following Sunday. Another amusement formerly was to kick the ball across the country. Before this was done the day was appointed for to start. When the two parties came together the ball was tossed in the air. Then the game would start. Which ever party would be able to kick the ball to their native parish would have the victory.
The ball had the same make formerly as at present. They were not sold in shops like the present day but they were made by the local cobbler with corks, thread and leather. In some places goal-posts were used
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 12:49
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Hurling was one of the favourite pastimes played in my district in former times. Parishes played in the townland of Knocnamanagh which is in the parish of Ballymana in the barony of Dunkellin.
The teams thay played were Ballindirreen and Roughbeagh Ballymana and Labane. Twenty one men that played in each team. It was a general rule in this district
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 12:49
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to collect money some days before the hurling to buy three or four half-barrels of portar to treat the hurlers when they arrived on the field.
It was usually the pick of the parish that played but on some occasions townlands played.
The most noted player on the field was Patsy Holland of Kilogileen, Craughwell Co Galway. He was noted for playing football as well as hurling. The two different parties were the "Gaelic's" and Bladder Kickers. Some parishes were Gaelics while others were Bladder Kickers. These parties hurled with great determination and challenged each
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 09:48
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I am now writing of forty seven years ago when there was a hurling match at Clonturk Park in Dublin between the Kerry and the Wexford team in which Kerry won the match with their bare feet. That day was a day of great rejoicing for all the Dublin people as there were several people from Kerry working in positions there. The match started about one o'clock on Sunday. The teams were a draw the first hour, but afterwards Kerry beat them three goals and three points.
The Kerry team were comprised of twenty one men, fourteen from Ballyduff and seven from Kilmoiley, while the Wexford team comprised of twenty-one men. The fourteen from Ballyduff were John Mahony from Kilmore, the Captain Richard Kissane from Kilmore, James McDonnell from Ballyduff, Michael Sullivan from Knopogue, Patrick Carr and Patrick Winn do, Frank and James Crowley from Ardoughter, John Sullivan from Rattoo, Tom Dunn from Rahela Maurice Fitzmaurice, Maurice Kelly and John Murphy, Ahabeg, and Jim Pierce Rahela. The seven from Kilmoiley were Patrick Rourke Thade McCarthy, Phil McCarthy another. The three were cousins. Mike Riordan, Pat and Jack Quane do. The match was over about four
senior member (history)
2019-09-01 09:47
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o'clock and the team took refreshments in shops. The train left Dublin about six o'clock in the evening and was back at Lixnaw at three o'clock in the morning, and the team had to walk home from Lixnaw station. About a week after they got gold medals. They got no money but their expenses were freed that day by the Central Board.

This account I got from my grandfather, Michael Sullivan one of the Kerry team, who played that day. He is 71 years now. He sent his medal to a brother in America.
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 22:34
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Notes on Foregoing Entries re. CAFFERY FAMILY

The Caffery family have held land on the Skeagh Estate since 1641. The first of the family to come to Skeagh, escaped from the MASSACRE OF ISLAND MAGEE. He had been married to a Protestant woman who hid him, till he escaped to Cavan. In former times the family were noted story-tellers.
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 22:27
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Gleevers - fowl buyers (?)
The Curragh - a marsh between Cornaveagh Lake and Rooskey Lake
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 22:12
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Do suibhailigheas sa Cléire, Laogh agus Maininis,
Ó Doirín na Trága agus soir chun Árd Beannuighthe.
Acht ní feacha ina aon áit do bféile ná bhfairsinghe,
Ná Cnochan-na-mBáirneach a bhí lámh leis an bhfairrge
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 22:06
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Do bhí fear thuas i mBéal-dá-hAbh tímcheall le dhá céad bhliadhain ó shoin. Bhí taidhreamh aige aon oidhche amháin go raibh prócha-óir thíos i dTiobhradh Árainn. Ar mhaidin amháireach a bí chúgainn do eirigh sé go moch agus comháin sé leis go Tiobhradh Árainn ag lorg an prócha óir chun é thabhairt abhaile leis.
Nuair a bhí sé tímcheall leath-slíge ar an mbóthar do bhuail fear air agus do chuir sé mar cheist ar cá raibh sé ag dul. Dúbhairt an fear eile leis go raibh sé ag dul go Béal-dhá-hAbh ag lorg óir, agus go raibh taidreamh aige cúpla oidhche ó shoin go raibh ór churtha fé scéith i ngarraidhe a bhí ag Pádruig Ó'Briain, agus bé sin Pádruig Ó'Briain a bhí ag cainnt leis. "Ó, más mar sin é," arsa Pádruig filleach na n-aon duine againn abhaile go dtí ár n-áiteanna féin airís." Do chasadar abhaile airís. Nuair a tháinig Pádruig abhaile do chuaid sé ag baint an gharraidhe ag lorg an óir. Bhí sé cúpla lá ag baint, nuair a fuair sé an t-óir. Ó'n lá san go dtí an lá indiu, tá an ainim ar an áit sin:- Scéith-an-Óir.

Bhailig: - Conchubhar Ó'Drisceóil, Cnochán-na-mBáirneach, Inis Cléire
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 21:52
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Do bhí fear i gCléire fadó agus sé an ainm a bhí air ná Conchubharach Éireamhon. Aon lá amháin do mhairibh sé bó agus bhain sé an croichinn do'n mhuin agus d'imthigh sé go Corchaig leis an gcroichinn. Ní raibh aon ghruaistháin ann an uair sin, agus is amhlaidh a suibhal sé go Corchaig. Ar gábhail abhaile do chonnaich sé dosaén fear agus iad ag íarraidh annchaire mór a tabhairt isteach ó cuan éigin leó. Nuair a chonnachadar an fear mór do stadadar go léir ag féuchaint air. Do
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 21:52
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labhair sé leó agus d'íaraidh sé díobh an bhféadfaidís an t-annchaire mór sin a bhogadh. Dubhradhar ná féadhfaidís é do corraidhe i n-aon chor. Annsan do rug ar an t-annchaire agus do chaith sé ar a a ghualainn é agus thug sé aníos ar an dtalamh é. "An bhfuil sibh sásta anois," ar seisean. "Nílimíd", ar siadh, chaith amach airís é." Do rug Conchubharach ar agus do chaith sé amach as radharch é. "Anois, ar seisean, faighidh é anois," agus do thug sé féin a bhóthar ar abhaile.

Bhailigh: Conchubhar Ó'Drisceóil, Cnochan-na-mBáirneach, Inis Cléire
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 10:16
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awaiting decision
Do bhí áthrach ó'n Phortuingéal ag teact ó thaobh theas mBrica(?) ag dul go Corcaig ar órduighthibh. Do bhí an aimsir doiriche agus níor fhead an captaén an grian a thágaint ar feadh tamaill mhóir. Do cuireadh as a gcúrsa iad in sa chás nár mhothuigheadar cá rabhahar, go rabhadar teanntuighthe idir Cléire agus na Laoidhthe. Leis an captaén féin dob eadh an bád agus do bhí sé féin agus a mhach agus dhá fhear deug innti. Nuair a fuaireadar amach iad féin a bheith teanntuighthe do dheineadar a ndícheall chun iad féin a shábhálta.
Do bhí gaoth láidir indheas ann, agus ceó, agus báistheach agus do bhíodar a' trial ar obrú amach an Bholach. Nuair a fuaireadar amach nárbh aon tairbhe dhóibh é do thrialadar ar theacht chun ancaire ach níor choinnibh an t-ancaire in ao' chor. Annsan d'iaraidh an t-athair dá mhach an t-ancaire d'fághailt aníos agus é do lúbadh sa chábhaltha, ach dubhairt an mac leis gur fhág sé an chábhaltha sa bhaile. Ní raibh aon pílóit aca agus ní raibh aon eolas aca féin ar an áit agus do chuadhar ar charraig atá inaice leis an gCarraig Móir. Do chuadar go léir ináirde ar an dtigín a bhí uirthi ach amháin an captaén, do chuaidh sé sín síos sa chábán a' diaraidh a chuid óir. Ach an fhaid a bhí sé shíos do sguabadh an tigín de'n luíng agus do chuaidh an cuid eile de síos go tón fuíll agus do cailleadh an captaén. Do shnáim an tigín tímcheall ar feadh cúpla lá agus fé dheire
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 09:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Michal Connary was the champion of the athletes in Kilfinane. He jumped from one side of the road to the other near the protestant church. John Handly was also a famous hurler. He was best known by the name of Seán Óg. He was also a native of Kilfinane. John Flynn of Kilbreedy in Martinstown parish was a heavy weight thrower. He went to America and won several prizes in other parts of the world. He came back again and won the all-Ireland champion ship. People used to walk to fairs and work. There was a woman who was over 112 years who used to walk over twelve miles to her work every day and the longest she ever walked in her life was to Maynooth.
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 09:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Years ago, Travellers were to be seen in great numbers, and many queer yarns were told about them and their funny nick names. An old travelling man named "Tom Lome(?)" used to travel about the country buying bones and bottles, and in exchange for them he would give pins, needles, brooches etc. My Grandmother remembers him calling at a house to buy rags, and while he was bargaining inside with one girl, her sister slipped out and filled a bag from the pedlar's car, then came in, saying, "This is all I can collect for you today", and the unfortunate pedlar rebought his own rags.
Another old timer she remembers and he is at present just out of the "Home", Jack the Shilling. He is very old and was a great follower of the Wexford All-Ireland hurlers. They never went to play anywhere but Jack was with them dressed up in the Wexford colours. My Mother told me he often asked her to get him a green tie. He would say, "We're going to Croke Park on Sunday" and if you gave him a red tie he did not know the colour.
Other names of old travellers are Stirabout fine, Denny Gundy, and another called Big Pockets. They all had their favourite lodging place and were never refused a night's shelter.
senior member (history)
2019-08-31 09:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Hurlers of long ago were rougher players than the Hurlers of today.They were bigger stronger but not as fast or as clever as the men of today.
Long ago a team was made up of twenty -one men but is fifteen now.
Parishes played against each other for the County Championship, the Counties played against each other for the Provincial Championship, while the Provinces played against each other for the All-Ireland Championship.
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 23:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fadó shoin ní raibh aon phairifín, ná aon choinneal ann, agus sé an sórd soluis a bhí ag na daoine ná solus geataire. Do théigeadh na daoine amach sa phort agus do bhainidís geatairí agus do scuadhidís an croiceann díobh. Do théidís leis an dteine annsan an geataire agus do chuiridís isteach i slige é agus do chuiridís trien éisg isteach ins an slige, agus do chuiridís an geataire anuas ar sin. Annsan do geibhidís match agus do lasadís an geataire agus do deineadh sé solus breágh.

Bhailig: Cáit Ní Drisceóil, Cumolán, Inis Cléire
Fuaireas ó Thomás Ó'Síothcháin, Cumolán (75bl)
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 23:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
do sguabadh ar dtír é in Inis Arcáin. Tugtar Carraig an Phuirtinéalig ar an gcarraig sin ó shoin i leith.

Bhailig: Cáit Ní Drisceóil, Cumolán, Inis Cléire
Fuaireas ó: Thomás Ó Síothcáin, Cumolán (75 bl)
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 23:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Do bhí máighistir scoile igCléire tímhcheall le trí fichidh bliain ó shoin agus sé an ainm a bhí air ná Seán De Young. Do thugadh na páistí "Máigistir Bán na Coise Briste" air toisc go raibh staf ina chois. Do thugadh na buacaillí pingin chuige gach maidin Dé Luain nú mur a mbeadh an phinghin aca do thugaidís buidéal bainne chuige agus sin é an págh a bhí aige. Do bhí sé ró bhocht chun dul ar a lóisdín agus is ins an scoil a bhíodh sé ag maireachthain agus sé féin a bhíodh ag ríarú(?) an bhiadh do féin. Do thugadh cuid des na daoine mála prátaí chuige agus do thugadh cuid eile aca mála plúir muillinn cuige. Do bhí chuid des na páistí na tabharfadh an pingin chuige agus sé deireadh an máighistir leó ná:
A Chon Mhóir a trousair bhrisde, A Chon Tarey gan aon phingin cuir sé abhaile chugam sa mo scilling", A Spalpín Fánach ó Chnocán na mBárneach, cuir sé abhaile chugam sa mó(?) amáireach. Is a Sheán Thamey na gCuiluig. "Seadh mhaise", arsa Seán Thamey, "is máigistir bán na coise brisde".
Sé an pionós a chuiread sé ar na páistí ná bíodh a gceacht aca ná dul síar go dtí an roilig agus cnámh lé Concubhach Éireabháin a
senior member (history)
2019-08-30 23:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
thabhairt aníos leó agus é do chuir síos airís ar maidin amáireach. Múinteóir cuibhseach maith dob eadh an Máigistir Bán.

Bhailig: Cáit Ní Drisceóil , Cumolán, Inis Cléie
Fuaireas ó: Thomás Ó Síothcháin, Cumolán (75 bl)
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 23:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Oh God be with your Kerry
Where in Childhood I made merry
When I heard the fiddler
Tuning up and Rozening his Bow
At the Cross Roads we were Dancing
And our Cailins Shyly Glancing
Just like their dads and mothers did
In Kerry long ago.
II
Oh! my Heart is Sad and weary
In my dreams I see my Mary
And her golden tresses flying
On her cheeks of rosy Glow
In her joy I hear her singing
With Bill Hanlon's fiddle Ringing
As he played the Stack of Barley
In old Kerry long ago
III
We'll Stroll down to Mary's Dairy
With our hearts all light and airy
At the Churn we take our turn
Till the butter over flows
Then to the kitchen we'll retire
And pick out the
Biggest liar To tell us Fairy
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 22:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
emptying its crystal waters into the broad Atlantic between Kerryhead (North Kerry) and Loop head in Clare.

Peggie O'Neill
Boherbawn
Causeway
Tralee

I got this from James O'Connor, Boherbawn.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 22:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The townland of Clashmealcon of the caves is in the parish of Killury and in the Barony of Clanmaurice in North Kerry. There is 32 families living in it at present and it has a population of over 200 people.
Neills is the most common name in the locality.
They were all mud walled thatched houses long ago and in some of the houses there was no chimney but a hole out through the thatch and the smoke was coming out through the hole and the door.
The houses were knocked down and
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 22:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
new houses were built and they are nearly all slated.
There are a few men over 70 living there and they know very little Irish although in their young days they heard a fine old Irish tongue from the old people that lived then.
There were twice that number of houses because hundreds of the people emigrated to America and their lonely Ochone is still thought of in the early mornings.
There are no bogs or woods in this place nor streams but small rivulets running into the sea as this spacious townland overlooks the Lordly Shannon
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 22:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tiocfaidh na liatha luighe
Tiocfaidh na cruacha cháca
Imteóchaidh na druncaera gan rath
Agus beidh na mná gan náire

Labharfaidh an chuach ar chrann gan duilleabhair agus tiocfaidh Domhnach Cásga roimh Lá na Mhuire

Ná téighir sa ghleann mar a mbeidh rud agat ann
Tabhair rogha do bodach agus tógaid sé (?) diaidh

Tosach fuar ar gach maidin Earraig agus earball fada as san síor

Sonuachar do'n Donuachar

Gach blian a dtiocfaidh a' dul i bhfluice a déanaighe, gach dream a dtuicfa(?) a' dul i mionna is a mbréagaidhe

Éist le fuaim na h-abhann agus geobhair breac
Is mairg do gáireann fé chás do chómharsan(?)

(Page 11-16 were collected by Margaret Grady and written into this book by Seán Rís, (?) )
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 22:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Máire Ní Shúilleabháin,
Grianán,
Cill Áirne, Co. Chiarraidhe

An rud a théigheann i bhfad téigheann sé i bhfuaire
Is maith an capall ná faigheann barra thuisle

Muna ndéanfaidh sé lá prátaí bhaint déanfaidh sé lá earthaí d'innsint

Fód as an díg dhá fhód ar an gclaidhe
Ní bhíonn tréan buan
An rud a bhíonn ró-mhaith i dtosach ní leanann sí i bhfad
Má théigheann tú ar phósadh gan cuireadh
Tabhair leat do stóilín chun suidhte
Is mó cor a cuireann lá Earraig de
Ní bhíonn aon ionntaoibh i lá Fóghmhair
Is baidhiúil iad lucht eincine
Bíonn cead cainnte ag an bhfear coillte i na h-imirte
Ding an leamháin a sgaoilteann é féin

An rud a bhailigheann an cnípire caitheann an rápaire é
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 15:02
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rejected
awaiting decision
Tiocfaidh na liatha luighe
Tiocfaidh na cruacha cháca
Imteóchaidh na drumcaera gan rath
Agus beidh na mná gan náire

Labharfaidh an chuach ar chrann gan duilleabhir(?) agus tiocfaidh Domhnach Cásga roimh Lá na Mhuire

Ná téighir sa ghleann mar a mbeidh rud agat ann
Tabhair rogha do bodach agus tógaid sé (?) diaidh

Tosach fuar ar gach maidin Earraig agus earball fada as san síor

Sonuachar do'n Donuachar

Gach blian a dtiocfaidh a' dul i bhfluice a déanaighe, gach dream a dtuicfa(?) a' dul i mionna is a mbréagaidhe

Éist le fuaim na h-abhann agus geobhair breac
Is mairg do gáireann fé chás do chómharsanna(?)

(Page 11-16 were collected by Margaret Grady and written into this book by Seán Rís, (?) )
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 14:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is minic síos droch-bhean tighe

Níl ar saoghal so ach tréibhse mi-ámhar agus Níl aon chúntas 'ge aoinne ó indé go dtí amárach

Téighir go h-anamh go tigh do cháirde agus gheobhair Fáilte

Téighir go minic is ní bhfaighir náide
Sábháil an Fhoghmhair nuair a bheidh an grian árd
Tabhair rud don phaiste is tiocfaidh sé amárach

A bhuachaill beidh buairt ort go bpósann agus an uair sin beidh buathra do dhóthain

Ní h-aon lochán lán ar theacht a máirt leogaint do mháirta bheith á tiormuigh

Ná tabhair ionntaoibh le ceann tairbh, ná cos chapaill ná fiacal madra

Is minic a bhíonn bramach giobalach in a capall cumasach

Ní fiú an chás ná fear bheith díreach réidh
Ní fiú a bheidh againn a bharr ná fágaimis(?) amhlaidh é
Is olc an áit is fearr ná buile
Is fearr an baile ná aon áit
Is buan é fear nó bean do dtuaithidh féin
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 14:43
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Written by Margaret Grady, Greenane, Cill Áirne
Obtained from her grandmother Mrs Grady aged 80(?)

Má phósann tú i n-aon chur pós i ndeirg
Ní mar a síoltar a bítear

Is mairg a bhíonn i dtír gan duine aige féin lá na Brianne Luigheann an bata ar a thaobh

Tar éis a tuigtear gach beart

Mol a machaire is ná taobaigh is ná tabhair do(?) dhuine féin ar aoinne

De mol an coill agus ná fág e
Ní fearr biadh ná ciall
Cuir do chomhairle mar do gheobhaidh sí
Coirce na bhuidheann no gainíbh na tsráigh
Dean mar a déarfad agus ná dein

Ná díol bó mhaol agus ná ceannuig bó mhaol agus ná bí oidhche gan bó mhaol

Dubhairt an t-éinin trioplac bheadh rud agat féin(?) nó bí i n-a éaghmuis

Tagann gach mbaile cáirde
Bí a bagarach is ná bí bualadh
Beadh cion i gan fhios ar do bhean nó ar do leanbh

Ar do mheisge nó ar do chiall, cara do chroidhe do dhuine féin
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 14:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
Football matches were played in Naddbeg about 26 years ago. Fifteen men generally played at each side and it was a mixed team.
First, one man stood in the middle of the field and he called some one of his comrades to call the match. Then a coin was tossed and it was known which of the two had the first call, and it was every second call from that on.
A referee was also present, and when foul was committed a free kick was given to the team which it was against.
The goal posts were about ten feet apart and a long stick was put across these about eight feet from the ground. Three points were equal to one goal and if the ball went under the stick between the goal posts this was called a goal, but if it went over the stick it was a point. The referee also had a whistler which he blew when a foul was committed. When the half hour was out he blew the whistle and they should all stand to attention and change sides. The team wore their ordinary clothes and boots as football boots were not to be got.
The outside of the ball consisted of six quarters of leather; this was called the Slitter and the bladder was made of rubber.

Cristín Ní Drisceóill
Inchemay

Given to me by my father
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 10:09
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During the nineteenth century when Daniel O'Connell was fighting for Catholic Emancipation he was very often in London. He was hated by all English people. Once he was saved from certain death by the cleverness of an Irish girl working in London.
A certain gentleman in London invited O'Connell to a dinner with the intention of poisoning him. The girl was engaged in this gentleman's and she heard of the plot to poison the Liberator. During the meal the girl came into the dining room and spoke in Irish to O'Connell as she knew the other guests would not understand their conversation. This is what she said:-
"Daniel O'Connell ! do you understand Gaelic?" "If you do put out the light and exchange glasses with your host because there
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 10:09
approved
rejected
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is poison in yours. Soon after this O'Connell let his gold ring fall under the table and when the light was taken to look for it, he took the host's glass and put his own glass containing the poison in its place.
When the ring was found and the meal finished the gentleman became ill and died a few hours later.
Daniel O'Connell returned to Ireland and brought the girl with him, as he knew she would be blamed and perhaps imprisoned and executed.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 09:59
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rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a match played int he level mountain between Lyre and Kilcorney.
The Rae was a flat place where coarse grass grew. The mountain was from the Post Office to the broken cross.
The Lyre boys were waiting for the Kildorney boys a long time. When they came they arranged the match and the ball was thrown up. They had great tearing.
Kilcorney took the ball from the Lyre boys, and they carried it up through Charlesfield. When they got to the top of the hill, there was a great struggle and one of the Lyre boys named "Líam Fíadhan" got the ball and brought it home and Lyre won the match.
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 09:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In my father's time one parish used to play another parish as follows:-

The ball was taken to the boundary and then 21 men on each side were chosen. The ball was then throw in by some Stránger. Both sides had special picked runners and to these the ball was thrown. The others did their utmost to protect these from attacks of the opposite side. The game continued all day if necessary without a decision. Darkness sometimes left the matter undecided and the game was begun again the following Sunday.
No rules were observed as to how a man may be thrown. A favourite throw was to close on a man from behind, as he ran, then take him by right shoulder and put him spinning. The game usually ended in a "Faction Fight". Sometimes the game would be between families in neighbouring parishes.

(The storyteller O'Mahony belonged to a fighting family who were constantly at war with another family)
senior member (history)
2019-08-29 09:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In my father's time one parish used to play another parish as follows:-

The ball was taken to the boundary and then 21 men on each side were chosen. The ball was then throw in by some Stránger. Both sides had special picked runners and to these the ball was thrown. The others did their utmost to protect these from attacks of the opposite side. The game continued all day if necessary without a decision. Darkness sometimes left the matter undecided and the game was begun again the following Sunday.
No rules were observed as to how a man may be thrown. A favourite throw was to close on a man from behind, as he ran, then take him by right shoulder and put him spinning. The game usually ended in a "Faction Fight". Sometimes the game would be between families in neighbouring parishes.

(The storyteller O'Mahony belonged to a fighting family who were constantly at war with another family)
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 21:11
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rejected
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About fifty years ago there was a famous football team in this parish. The captain was Michael Healy who is an uncle to the world famous Dr. O'Callaghan. Michael Healy is still alive and he is about seventy years of age. They were a very young team but they are nearly all dead now. They played some famous matches in the parish. One day they played a team called the Laune Rangers who were then champions of Kerry. In that time no number of points would make a goal. The Castlemagner team played in the final of the County Championship once or twice.
A few of the players played in All Ireland Championship matches. One time they played a team from Co. Wexford in Clonturk Park in Dublin and the match only lasted ten minutes because the Wexford men kicked them off the field to avenge what the North Cork Militia did in '98. One time the Castlemagner team played a team from Mitchelstown called the Mitchelstown Blackthorns and there was a famous man called "Jack Stretch" in goal for the Mitchelstown team. He was seven feet tall and his head could touch the cross-bar.
The match was played in Doneraile and the players and supporters had no cars to go in. All the people used bring spring cars to first mass in Castlemagner and the team and supporters did not
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 21:11
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awaiting decision
go to mass but when mass was half over they stole the spring cars and they went off to Doneraile. When they arrived in Doneraile the Blackthorns refused to play them because they said they were only a "parcel of gorsoons". The local priest persuaded them to play and there was no score (in) the first half hour but in the second half hour they could not count the scores made by the Castlemagner team and they won easily. They arrived home safely and they were forgiven for taking the cars.
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 20:54
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rejected
awaiting decision
Trí na Chéile
Malluighthe
Aingceis
Aingceiseóir
A Mhuire
A Thighearna
A Mhuire na bFlaitheas
Go bfóiridh Dia orainn
Meas
Cnáimhseáil
Padhsán(?) (a thin person)
Súmaire
Táthaire
Gamal
Réightheóir (a pipe-cleaner)
Spéacéir(?) (a go-between in match-making)
Niudaí Nadaí
Fuirse Fairse
Cliadhain(?) isteach
Comh-cliadhaon (?)
Cadhrán (of turf)
Sciollán
Criothán (small potato)
Ciseán
Sciathóg (a flat basket)
Flaitheamhail
Sobalach
Súghlach
Stracaire
Beart (a load)
Bachall
Ladhar
Scoruidheacht-ing
Brothallac ...etc.
Cabhlach
Brus
Buaileán
Caiseal(?) (clamp)
Fámaire
Cábóg
Cúrtóg
Cruiceóg
Cuansóg (?)
Dúidín
Dradaire
Bastún
Tufaire
Stríl
Liobair
Gaisce
Sgrios
Bodach
Ciaróg
Críochnúil
Slachtmhar
Sgiúirse
Meas
Breall
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 20:36
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The name of Murphy is common enough in this district. The branches are designated by individual names for each branch:-
Murphy "Deirb"
Murphy "Móiní"
Murphy "Gaorthadh"
Murphy "Reamhar"
Murphy "Black"
Murphy "Ciolla"

Kelleher "Cnoc"

Leahy "Fiadhain"

* * *

Healy "Cabáiste"
(The last Gov. General is of this family. His family originally came from this district, before going to Bantry)
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 20:31
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When commencing a game of football etc, two players stand out. One calls out "Chuirm ort", the other answers Leigim leat, (?) "John Murphy agam", 2nd "Ml Healy agam" and so on - to form two teams.
Preserved periodically(?) to this day.
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 16:01
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awaiting decision
where his pursuers completely lost him. Liam brought the ball to Lyre that night and there was tremendous cheering for him when he came out from Mass the following Sunday.

NOTE:- At that time the footballs were made by local shoemakers and were filled with a cow's bladder.
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 16:00
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Many years ago the land between Lyre P.O. and the Broker's Cross was a flat plain covered with white coarse grass (Fionán). It was about 1/2 mile long by a 1/2 mile wide and football matches were played there frequently. On one occasion the Kilcorney men challenged the men of Lyre to play them there.
When the day arrived a large crowd of Lyre people assembled on the plain and about 3 o'clock the Kilcorney men were heard coming across Carraig Cannon mountain. There were scores of them there and not a man wore a shoe or stocking. They kicked their ball on before them through ditches and hedges and mountains and a great cheer went up from the Lyre men when the first batch of Kilcorney men arrived on the field. There were a few older men on each side who arranged the rival teams for the contest. After a long delay and many arguments the Kilcorney ball was thrown in between the men by a stranger who came from Ballyclough.
The excitement was terrible and the
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 15:59
approved
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play rough and determined. The Kilconey men strove to take their ball home and the aim of the Lyre men was to capture it. Backwards and forwards the ball went for about an hour and at last Thady Horgan, Kilcorney, got it under his arm and ran for home. At Charlesfield river he was overhauled and there on the "inches" the battle was renewed. All men, on both sides, were barefooted and were stripped to their shirts and trousers, many of their shins were cut and bleeding. After a while Horgan got the ball again and covered a lot of ground before he was overtaken, but still Kilcorney seemed to get the better of the game which was now telling on the men on both sides.
Gradually the Kilcorney boys took the ball along up the slope of Kilmacrane but there in a very large expanse of "Rae" (reclaimed mountain) a strenuous battle took place and free fights were numerous as individual players on each side tried to best each other. Night was coming when a man from Lyre name Liam Fian got the ball and outwitting the Kilconey men he made for Cumar-na-Daor
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 15:21
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He'll be fondly remembered in Lios na Caol Bhuidhe

(IX)
I am told he has a comrade going to the West
Ye all know poor Diarmuid he wasn't the worst
May the Lord be with them where ever they be
Its the prayer of the poet that sprang from Caol Bhuidhe

(X)
Pat Hoare the champion of Lios na Caol Buidhe
I hope you wont blame me to give him the lead,
For if he got training and a fair share of skill
He could challenge John for a round in the ring

(XI)
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 15:20
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(XI)
In the midst of the fray that day in the field,
He'd remind you of Sarsfield in Limerick's siege,
Or gallant old Nelson commanding his fleet,
That lion-hearted hector of Lios na Caol Bhuidhe

(XII)
We had a beautiful heroine taking stock of our goal
Of manly descent from Ferriters Cobh
Cheering her Grádh Geal so valiant and true
Like Niamh to Óisin when the tyrant he slew

(XIII)
They had men from all quarters from hills and from dale
They had young Mike O'Donnell and likewise Andy Kane
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 15:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was safer for them stay herding their sheep
Than to face the bold boys of Lios na Caol Bhuidhe

(IXV)
There was a blacksmith from Camp there
they called him Tom Crean,
Like Carroll he wanted to make a cat of two tails
Before half time was over he had to retreat,
And get sticking plaster to screw on his teeth

Maitias Ua Dúbhda
Baile na Leacan
Clochán,
Caisleán Ghréighre

Fuaras ó Shéamus de hÓra,
Baile na Leacan
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 15:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He'll be fondly remembered in Lios na Caol Bhuidhe

(IX)
I am told he has a comrade going to the West
Ye all know poor Diarmuid he wasn't the worst
May the Lord be with them where ever they be
Its the prayer of the poet that sprang from Caol Bhuidhe

(X)
Pat Hoare the champion of Lios na Caol Buidhe
I hope you wont blame me to give him the lead,
For if he got training and a fair share of skill
He could challenge John for a round in the ring

(X1)
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 10:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
day in the field,
John Lynch, Tom Moynihan and Tom Moore(?) from the Quay,
Two men from Cappa and a man from Liseen,
Helping the brave boys from Lios na Caol Buidhe.

(VII)
I'll make special mention of one person more,
As good an athletic as Ireland could boast of,
I mean Jim O'Ruairc the prince of the field,
No doubt he's a credit to Lios na Caol Bhuidhe.

(VIII)
But alas I am told he's us going to leave,
To earn a living far over the sea
Whether in New York or in Boston or in far Tennesee
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 10:03
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rejected
awaiting decision
When it flew like a bullet away to the east.

(IV)
If you were there it was exciting to see,
Such tumbling and thumping with fist and with knee,
Moustaches and whiskers got ruffhandling indeed
From the beardless young kickers of Lios na Caol Bhuidhe

(V)
We had other athletes there to help us that day
Pat Landers, Ned Rohan and tidy John Real
The Ballyguin boys and two men from Teer
To help the bold kickers of Lios na Caol Bhuidhe

(VI)
We had other grand kickers that
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí cluiche peile annso sa blian 1888 idir muíntir Lios na Caol Bhuidhe agus muíntir Abha Caisle ar a glaodhidís na Portaithe. D'imirígheadh an cluiche thoir i mBaile an Oidhre. Bhí fiche fear ar gach taobh. Séamus Ua Ruairc ón Lios abeadh an captaón. Tá sé marbh anois. Antoní Ó Donnchadha abeadh an captaón ar buacaillí Caisleáin. Chaith muíntir na Portaithe rith as an páirc. Ní raibh aon scór ag muíntir na Portaithe. Bhí cúl amháin ag an taobh eile cé go raibh timchealll deichneabhar i mbogha Caisleáin. Bhí culaití flainín ar muintir a'Leasa. Drár flainín agus léine flainín a bhí ortha. Liathróid coise ar nós an liatrod atá anois ann a bhí aca.

Máire Ní Rócháin ó Branndán a dhein an t-amhrán. Máistreás scoile abeadh í.
Sé seo an t-amhrán;-
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:58
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rejected
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(1)
I'll sing to the kickers of Lios na Caol Bhuidhe
I'm sure you would travel their equals to see,
In wrestling or goaling or taking a spree,
There was no match to be found for the boys of Lios Bhuidhe

(II)
On the 4th of March in the year '88,
Those eastern bullies thought us for to "bate",
But the moment these bog trotters entered the field
They shook in their boots before Lios na Caol Bhuidhe

(III)
Those parties shook hands for to commence the game,
The ball was thrown up without any foul play,
It was scarcely a second thrown in among their feet
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:45
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rejected
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Do h-imireadh peil i mBaile an Aighre ar an ceathrú lá de mhí Mhárta sa bhliadhan 1888 idir Lios na Caol Bhuidhe agus Caisleán Ghriaghaire. Ba leis Pádruig Ó Bríc an páirc a bhíodar ag imirt. Do bhí an páirc dubh le daoine ó gach aon áit an lá san. Fadó ní dhíolfhaidís ag dul isteach go dtí páirc na h-imirtha in-aon cor. Do bhí duine is fichid ag imirt ar gach taobh. Ni bhíodh aon culaithe imirthe ná bróga peile aca fadó. Ní raibh aon referee aca leis. Do bhé an fear a b'fhearr a abhí ag imirt ná Séamus Ó Ruairc. Tá amhrán déanta i dtaobh an peile sin. Fear a b-ainm do Rodger Kennedy a dhein é.

Mícheál Ó Dúinn
Clochán
Caisleán Ghréighre

Fuaras ó Seán Ó Dúinn
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:36
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rejected
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Fadó ní bhíodh na daoine ag imirt peile ach in cúpla áiteanna. Ins an blian 1888 bhí cluiche peile idir na Caol Bhuidhe agus Abhacaisle. I bpáirc le Padruig Ó Bhríc ó Bhaile an Aighre a bhíodar ag imirt. Bhíodh timcheall fiche fear ins gach fuireann. Ba iad fuireann Lios na Caol Bhuidhe an fuireann ba dheise. Ní raibh ach aon cúl ag fuireann Abhacaisle agus bhí timcheall naoi nó deich cúl ag fuireann Lios na Caol Bhuidhe. Bhí an páirc dúbh le daoine an lá san ag feucaint ar an cluiche. Séamus Ua Ruairc an captaon a bhí ar fuireann Lios na Caol Bhuidhe agus sé Antoní Donnchadha an captaon a bhí ar fuireann Abhacaisle.

Seán Ua Murchadha,
Doire na Muice,
Clochán,
Caisleán Ghréighre

Fuaras ó Máire Bean Uí Mhurchadha
senior member (history)
2019-08-28 09:30
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rejected
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Do bhí cluiche peile i mBaile Dhubh ar an ceatarmhadh lá de Márta ochtdeug ochtmhó ocht. Fuireann Lios na Caol Bhuidhe agus fuireann Abha Caisle a bhí ag imirt ann. Do bhí sgata mór daoine sa pháirc ag feucaint ar an gcluiche. Siad fuireann Lios na Caol Bhuidhe a bhuaidh an cluiche sa deire agus deineadh amhrán fada gá moladh.
Do bhí an craobh ag fuireann Lios na Caol Bhuidhe as san amach. Siad na bogha a bhíodh aca fadó ná dhá bhataí sáidhte san cré no dhá cloich. Sé an rud a thosnuig peil ar dtúis ná, bhíodh na daoine idiarraidh an liathróid a caitheamh ó baile go baile féucaint cad é an fear a cuirfheadh an slighe ba fhada é. Annsan thosnúigheadair ar peile agus bhíodh cluiche idir gach dhá bhaile gach Domhnach bréagh sa t-Samhradh.

Cáit Ní Mhuirchearthaig
Mullach Bhéal
Clochán
Caisleán Ghriaghaire

Fuaras ó Padruig Ua Mhuirchearthaigh

Fuaras ó
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:49
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rejected
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Years ago Clonturk Park was the headquarters of Gaelic football. Clonturk park used to be at the back of the Drumcondra (park) Picture House. Years ago they used to kick football with nailed boots and long trousers. They used to have point posts as well as goalposts.
They used to have seventeen a side and two men minding the point posts and if the ball went in between them it was counted a point. Cork came up to play Dublin in Clonturk Park ad Cork won by four points. The score was Cork 2 goals 6 points. Dublin 1 goal 5 points.
The match lasted two hours. It started at 3:30 and finished at 5:30. Cork stayed out on the road all night, and were heard playing ball at four o'clock in the morning.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 23:45
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The football fields was on the Lock Road, right beside the "Little(?) White house". Here, there were always great matches held. About thirty years ago there was a match between Lucan Sarsfields and Round Towers. The Sarsfields were victorious and in the evening they held a dance in the football field. A regular party was given: minerals, biscuits, sweets and sandwiches etc. The whole field was crowded with people from everywhere and everyone enjoyed the party and game.

May Rogers
Lock Road
Lucan

In 1914 a great match was played in the football field (Lock Road) between the Leixlip Stars and Lucan Sarsfields. There were 21 men on each side. The captain of each picked a number of the best players at this game. The captain of the Lucan Sarsfields was Tom Kelly (the boiler man in Hills factory) and the captain of the Leixlip Stars was Neddy Clarke. Lucan Sarsfields won - the exact score is not known but it was a tight match. The Sarsfields wore green and gold and the Stars wore purple and white. The ball used was the same as that used today (but before this the balls were stuffed with hay). They also had goal posts.

Hurling was played a great deal long ago. The hurleys were pieces of sticks got over the fields from trees or in the hedge. They had a slight crook at the end. The ball was a piece of stick about 3ins. long and 2ins. thick. Tom McConnell was a famous hurler seventy or eighty years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:40
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The local heroes of whom I hear talk of are Jack Thompson of Killarney who was best for cycling about twenty years ago. He was able to do a mile a minute.

Mick Mack (Michael Mac Gillacuddy) from Ballhar who is gone to America now, was a the best man for high jump. He was able to jump six feet four inches in height.

Jack Flynn our T.D. was a good man for throwing the fifty six lb weight. He used to take first place at nearly all local sports held in the County by throwing it from twenty four to twenty five feet.

Jack Moriarty of Gurrane Mountain was a noted man for lifting about five cwt weight over his head. He joined a circus for weight lifting.

Willie Kelliher, Roxboro, is a good swimmer. He could swim a mile in about half an hour.

A man named James O'Shea lived at Beaufort. A foot-ball match between two parishes was played in Dan Murphy's field at Tullig Beaufort. O'Shea kicked the ball and sent it across the River Laune. The ball struck a tree and split it
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:36
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rejected
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Botharín na gCloch is part of a stream about half a mile long running from the Graigue road to the Ahacross road. It was much used by farmers in the Graigue School area when the mill at Gleann an Ludaigh was working. Funerals from the same area to Molagga came that way, and the people walked through the water. It is about thirty years since the last funeral went that way. The bed of Botharín na gCloc is strewn with stones.
In the time of the famine a man was taken down this passage in a sheet and when the man was buried his wife plucked some nettles into the sheet and brought them home to the children.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:31
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North of Kildorrery Co. Cork lies a hill the western point of which is called Carraigín na mBróinnte, the Hill of the Quern Stones. Some of these stones are still to be seen along the side of the hill. The stones are of two sizes the large ones for mills and the small ones for use in the homes.

SEOMRA NÓRA
On the western slope of Carraigín na mBroóinnte near the top there is a cave known as Seomra Nóra. In this cave an old hag name Nóra a chieftain's daughter lived with her husband. At Leabba Ceallaige near Glanworth Co. Cork her sister, another hag, lived. She used to hand her pipe to this sister a distance of eight miles.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:22
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Mr. Thomas Drake Oldcastletown Kildorrery Co. Cork kicked a football from Oldcastletown to Tankardstown, jumping over ditches and hedges without letting the ball hop once. There used to be no referee in olden times and the players wore only their shirts and pants. The goal spaces were marked with furze
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 17:22
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bushes. Pieces of sticks called Spacks that were used to hit the ball in olden times.

Another match was played in Ballyvisteen, Kildorrery Co. Cork between Co. Cork and Co. Limerick. The two counties were trying to carry home the ball and the people would have killed each other that day but that the ball broke.

Lewis Walsh,
Graigue
Kildorrery
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 11:36
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Magheramore -( Macáire Mór)
The great plain
Legan - (lagán) A hollow
Cloneyegan (Clúan Egán) The meadow of Egan
Ballinalack (baile na leac) The town of the flags
Mount Temple (Griannán) A sunny spot
Dunegan (Dún Egán) The fort of Egan
Ballyboran (baile na boireinn) The town of the little roads.
Dunlum (Dún lom) The bare fort.
Carn (Cárn) A heap
Laban (láb bán) A white soil.

Patrick Doyle,
Maheramore,
Mt Temple,
Moate.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 11:31
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The old people of this district have an old story of history. It deals with the middle of the seventeenth century.

When Cromwell left, England was his destination, and he put Ireton in charge of his soldiers. Ireton came to Galway in 1652 and demanded "surrender". Galway yielded after many months. Then Ireton's soldiers entered the city.
It is believed that the soldiers came near a Poor Clare Convent, and they made the nuns flee from the convent. The nuns entered the river Corrib. The soldiers thought that these people would die, but their cloaks spread out in the water and the nuns were carried to safety on the opposite bank. After the incident this place was known as Nun's Island.
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 10:53
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rejected
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In this locality quite a large number of northern names survive i.e. Doherty, Nolan, Quigley, Carey, Carr, O'Farrell, Hanly and included in the list are O'Toole tho' they probably came from Leinster. One theory is that they were driven from Ulster Plantation of 1609, '10 the other theory held by some of themselves very strongly is that they fought at Kinsale and settled here instead of returning north.
Story (I)
According to this legend they were from Ulster.
"When the O'Doherty clan had to leave Donegal after the plantation they were travelling along and called at an Abbey for a blessing . A Monk told them to travel on and on to the south and that they must keep going until the reached a level field where ten cows would be lying in a ring chewing the cud and the bull standing in the middle. This they did and never saw cows or bull in that way until they reached Clonoulty. There they found them and there the first of the "Oulthacs" made their home.
Story (II)
At Coonmore Bridge about half way between Kilcommon and Rear Cross there is a level
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 10:45
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patch or "Inch" called Inchnagrauv. This is translated as Ins na gCnámh so called I believe because years ago heaps of bones were unearthed there. The bones were human and tradition says that an encounter took place there between the QUIGLEYS, CAREYS, CARRS being a remnant of O'Donnell's army, and some English Soldiers either in the march to or return from Kinsale. This points to a kind of influx of Ulster people after the Battle of Kinsale.
The same James Doherty had odd words of Irish. He said to me one morning Goide mar a thá tú? When I reminded him that that was Donegal Irish he said Why not? Didn't they come from Innishowen fought at Kinsale and remained here instead of returning north. That more or less disagrees with his legend of Clonoulty or it is quite possible that they settled here both after Kinsale and after Plantation of Ulster.
He got a stroke of a plant on the forehead at a faction fight in Cappawhite about 1876. He carried to the grave a deep dent in the forehead. He wasn't fighting but tried to make peace and got the stroke. The whole party fled leaving him for dead on the street. The fight was between the "Domhnall Mháire's" (Burkes) and the Quigly Carey Carr an Awlthac".
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 10:29
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awaiting decision
either. There was no side line marks of any kind in the field nor sticks for goals nor nets to stop the ball. But two big long stones for goals. There were no fouls but take your kick when you will get it. If you saw one man after the ball you would give him the leg and knock him. You would shoulder him and jump on his back and tear the clothes off him.
Then when one side would make a goal, they would change goals, and the goal-minder should follow the ball himself and kick it. When they would start playing and if one fellow got knocked out he could stay there. They had no time to pull his leg or rub his stomach. The play was to kick, and shove and shoulder, leg, and killing each other. You would see two fellows pegging and fighting each other in a corner of the field, and there was no time to separate them. When the evening came at seven o'clock the sport was over and all teme would go the
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 10:27
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Publick-house for drink. The names of a few men from Taulaught that were playing in the matches were, Eugene Parker, William Parker, Simon Flaherty, Michael Stack, and Pat Moriarty. The field in which the matches were in Ballyea in John Murphy's field.

Batt Stack

I got this manner of Foot-Ball from
Michael Stack Age 70 years
Taulaught
Fenitt
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 10:18
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When the time was up each team tried to take the ball away - to kick it out of the field first and then take it away to the house of a player. The team that succeeded in taking the ball was regarded as the winning one. It did not matter what the score was.
The ball used was similar to that used today. It was kicked with the bare feet. Two coats placed in the ground served as goal posts.

Hurling was also played in this district in old times - before the memory of any person alive now. The hurley was similar to that used today. It was somewhat heavier and not planed so smoothly. The ball used was made of woollen thread coiled round and round. It was sewn with twine. The stitches of twine ran through the centre of the ball from surface to surface. Danny Brennan of Coolbane, parish of Kilcummin, Co. Kerry, was a famous hurler. Without leaving his position, except to circle round, he is said to have struck the ball eleven times in succession, on several occasions.

Handball was played as it is now. It was a very popular game in Killarney. There is still a lane in the town called the "Ball Alley Lane".
senior member (history)
2019-08-27 10:18
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Weight-throwing was also in vogue. A heavy stone was cast off the shoulder. A light stone was thrown from the hand after the thrower had wheeled round two or three times. Weight-throwing was practised at Cross roads where young men used assemble in the evening or on Sundays.

COLLECTED BY
Eugene Moriarty
Leamnaguilea
Farranfore
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 23:10
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Inter-parish football matches were played in this district (parish of Ballyhar, Co. Kerry) in old times - up to fifty years ago or so. Ballyhar and Firies - that is the pick of these two parishes - played Kiltuirmin(?) parish and part of Killarney parish called Poll na Muc, in the year 1875. The match was played in a field of Pat Lawlor's farm, townland of Dromadeesert, in the parish of Kilcummin. As was the custom at that time fifteen men were in each team. The players were selected according to merit. Ballyhar and Firies won the match. At that time "goals" were counted in the same. "Points" were not.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 23:02
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Inter-parish football matches were played in this distsrict (parish of Ballyhar, Co. Kerry) in old times - up to fifty years ago or so. Ballyhar and Firies - that is the pick of these two parishes - played Kiltuirmin(?) parish and part of Killarney parish called Poll na Muc, in the year 1875. The match was played in a field of Pat Lawlor's farm, townland of Dromadeesert, in the parish of Kilcummin. As was the custom at that time fifteen men were in each team. The players were selected according to merit. Ballyhar and Firies won the match. At that time "goals" were counted in the same. "Points" were not.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 21:55
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The way the old people used play football was different to the playing at the present day. In the year 1870 and later years, the ball was made of a pigs or cows bladder and a dog's skin seasoned and was sewn around the bladder. When all the men would get into the field they would make the match. The two men that was minding the goals would stand in the middle of the field and call the best men from the parishes, until they had enough. One of the goal minders would throw up a button for the wind and the other goal minder would call for the what side he would want, and if he won the toss he would call what side he would have.
When the match was made they would all sing out "throw up the ball". Every one should have his shoes and stockings off. You would hear every wallop and leather they would give the old skin a few fields away, and they would not hurt their legs or toes
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 21:45
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Football
There was no goal space and no score. It was up to every man to turn out for his parish. The team that took the ball home won. That night the victorious team held a dance.
No particular dress was worn. All the women folk followed the men and if any of the men had a girl and he did not acquit himself she would not go out with him for a week. The girl took a big stone in a long black worn sock, and if the match was going against her team, she had special way of throwing the stone at her opponents. A favourite match was from the Spa to Ballymac Elligott. It would start in Tralee. There was no referee. A bladder of a pig was used.

Hurling
The Hurley's were made of Ash a root of firs shaped as best as possible. A ball was made from Gutta Perchá
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 21:45
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rejected
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mixed with hair of a cows tail.
A Chap name Carroll from Lixnaw had to play in Tralee he did not know the way so he ran on the track as he was going along he picked a big junk of wood up and with that he won the watch for Listowel.

Brendan O'Sullivan
No 1 Strand View Tce
Tralee
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 14:57
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The only cross country football match remembered by the older generation, was one played at Rathpoge near Milltown, between Keel on one side and the united parishes of Killtalagh and Listry on the other.
After a strenuous struggle lasting for hours, the Keel men were defeated and the ball was carried away by the men of Listry.
Several free fights took place and some sustained nasty wounds and broken bones. A song was made by the victors which ran thus:-
"Hurrah for Séamas Óg, likewise the Coopaleens (Twins)
Who jumped the ditches and cleared the fences
And carried the ball from Keel"
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 14:34
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The hurling was played long ago with no science only rough and tumble work. There was twenty one men in each team. The best goalers in Munster were found by the seaside from Barrow to Ballyheigue. They had a plot of ground at Carrahane between sandhills where they used practice. Pat Rourke was the captain of the Kilmoyley team. He was often known to carry the ball all over the field tipping it on the top of his hurley. Every man left his place to take the ball from him but failed to do so. The Kilmoyley team were often the champions of Ireland.
There was a team known before them as the Bluemen. They played TIpperary in Limerick and done the journey on foot. Their children and grandchildren after them were called Bluemen. The last of them was buried ten months ago. The hurleys long ago were made of ash. They were rough and strong. In the time of the Kilmoyley team goalposts were used.
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 14:19
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used was made of thread rolled round a bit of wood, and it was covered with leather by a shoemaker. Two poles marked the goal, and the man who stood at the goal was called the strong back. The employed a referee to see that both sides got fair play. The best player in the game between Sneem and Tahilla was a man named Johnny Clifford from Sneem.
Hurling was always played in a field, but some other games were played along the road. One of those games was "Bowling". A large iron bowl about the size of a hurling ball was thrown along the road, and the man who threw it farthest won the game. This game was illegal and fines were imposed on people who were caught practising it. They also slung the sledge-hammer here, and threw the half-hundred weight.
About sixty-two years ago the great game mentioned was played between Sneem and Tahilla, and a song was made by a Sullivan man about it. The following is the song and the names of some of the players are mentioned
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 14:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
used was made of thread rolled round a bit of wood, and it was covered with leather by a shoemaker. Two poles marked the goal, and the man who stood at the goal was called the strong back. The employed a referee to see that both sides got fair play. The best player in the game between Sneem and Tahilla was a man named Johnny Clifford from Sneem.
Hurling was always played in a field, but some other games were played along the road. One of those games was "Bowlling". A large iron bowl about the size of a hurling ball was thrown along the road, and the man who threw it farthest won the game. This game was illegal and fines were imposed on people who were caught practising it. They also slung the sledge-hammer here, and threw the half-hundred weight.
About sixty-two y ears ago the great game mentioned was played between Sneem and Tahilla, and a song was made by a Sullivan man about it. The following is the song and the names of some of the players are mentioned
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 14:11
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rejected
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There was a game of hurling played between the boys of Kenmare and the Sneem boys long ago. Twenty-four men at each side that always played. The best players were always chosen, and the players always selected the team themselves.
The Sneem team won in the game. They wore grey flannel pants and white flannel shirts. There were several games played between Sneem and Tahilla at that time and players from both places played other teams also. The shoes they wore were leather ones, and they had blocks of rubber underneath them. They were called "Slitters". The ball they
senior member (history)
2019-08-26 14:00
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort about two miles to the east of this school in a field called Pairc Leasa - fairies used to be seen there every night long ago playing football. One night a man was out late playing cards. He wanted to go a near way home and he went across a field in which the fairies were. They all ran into the fort when they saw him. He walked into the fort after them but he could not make his way out. After a while he fell fast asleep and when he awoke in the morning he found his hair had turned grey. He died a few days afterwards.

Tim Crowley
Old Bridge
Headford
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 22:21
approved
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very strong stick with a thickened end and difficult to break. There was no referee in those days - 1860 - '80. When the heavy ball got in to a trench or drain

(Sketch of Bachall)

a crowd of the players gathered round and many sore head followed the blows intended for the "Sliotar". It was a rough game at times. I often heard of John Condon of Fanningstown, Fedamore. He was a stout and very strong man, about five feet 9 inches in height and was known all over the district as the "Butt". He was ever in the thick of the battle and was not too scrupulous in the use of the "Bachall". The old Irish were determined men who played to win at any cost.

In later years (the 90's etc) Crecora had a famous team of hurlers. There were 21 in the team. Dan Shea played in the centre. He was a thin wiry man and it was a hefty player who could foil him in his work. In those old days hurling matches were taken seriously and were supported with wild enthusiasm.
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 22:13
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When John was 30 years of age, a hurling match was played between Fedamore and Cratloe. This match was what is known as an "all home". One team tried to drive the ball within the boundaries of the opposing team's parish. The team which succeeded in doing so were the winners. The ball used was very large and heavy as compared to the ball which is used nowadays. The hurleys were proportionally large and heavy. Still, the "puck" which the players gave the ball was quite as good as that which is given nowadays to the lighter ball. The old hurlers were much stronger and faster to run than the present-day hurlers. The match mentioned above was won by Fedamore, who succeeded in driving the ball as far as Cratloe. The man from the Fedamore team who drove the ball across the Shannon at Limerick was "Driver" McCarthy, who was noted for the "puck" he had.
Another match played in those days was that between Manister and Mungret in the field now owned by Mrs. Sweeney. This was a different match altogether from the one above. There were twenty-one players on each team. This match was unfinished. One of the Manister players struck a member of the opposing team, and a fight ensured. Hurleys and other weapons were freely used, and in the end the spectators and players from Manister had to flee for their lives, many members of the team, leaving coats and boots after them.

In regard to the old game of hurling mentioned above a "Camán" was not used but a "Bachall". This was a
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 13:25
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greatly surprised that he should pine away.
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 13:24
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As told by Thomas Carmody at a wake

The Midnight Hurling Match in Creevagh

A certain boy from this locality was going home on a moonlight night from his "Cuard". His way led along a well beaten path that passed by a fort. It was late in the night and as soon as he entered the fort field, he saw a great crowd gathered together at the end of the field.
It is said that he recognised many of them, whom he knew to be dead for many years. They were partly undressed as if ready for some contest. As soon as he passed through the gap a lady on horseback came up to him and said he was badly wanted at the other end of the field. He went up to the crowd, and was offered a hurley and was told to take off his coat. The match soon began, the ball was almost as big as a football, They hurled over hedges and ditches over rivers and lakes, without feeling the least obstruction. The whole game was carried on in deadly silence although he could hear the "sock" of the hurleys and the rush of the ball
senior member (history)
2019-08-25 13:24
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He joined in the contest with Geat (?) and always noticed, that during the long night's hurling match, he was silently urged by a man of a dark complexion but who seemed as it were, to be trying to caution him but could not. When the hurling ended they were all again at the entrance to the fort. The hurley was taken from him. He got his coat and faced home; the others without speaking a word made their way into the fort. The cock was crowing when he entered his own house that night. He went to bed, got up alright and told his experiences during the night, to the family.
All went well for about a week when one day while working in the hay field he got a violent pain in his side. He went to bed, from which he never got up alive, pining away every day until at last he died to the great grief of his family and the surrounding country, for he was a great favourite, as he was a great hurler. He was looked upon as a tower of strength, and everyone was
senior member (history)
2019-08-24 19:57
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Mr Patrick Ronan
Cahir Road
Mungret
senior member (history)
2019-08-24 19:56
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There was a hurling about forty years ago between Mungret and Kildimo. There was no such thing as goal posts but two stones on either end of the field. The best hurlers were to be found long ago in Crecora. They were twelve men on either side. Mr Frank Jessop and Mr James Bowland were the best hurlers in the field long ago.
It is said that the men long ago were not as good as the men now because the men long had no one to train them. The Mungret team were dressed in red and Kildimo were dressed in black. The ball was never kicked across the field from one townland to another. There was no referee that time.
The hurleys that the men used long ago were only made of elm. They were not such thing as foul long ago. The match was won by Kildimo.

Esther Ronan
Cahir Road
Mungret
senior member (history)
2019-08-24 10:27
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then cut down, but young trees are again taking their place. It is a nice secluded place for praying at the present day. How much more secluded it must have been in the time of St. Aban. There is a very rocky path going to the "Cill". It is said the pilgrim must go and come by this path, when performing a "round". There is now a specified day in honour of the Saint. At one time the sixteenth of March and the sixteenth of October were observed in his honour. Nowadays when people come on the eleventh of February, St Gobnait's day, or Whit Sunday some of them perform "rounds" at both places.
Although over a thousand years have passed away, since St Aban lived in Ballyvourney his memory still lives on among the people, and their faith in his intercession is as strong as ever.
senior member (history)
2019-08-24 10:22
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many scattered stones testify, that at one time a building existed there. All that is left now is a green circular mound, surrounded by three standing stones. Some believe St. Aban to be buried here, but other authorities say he is not buried in Ballyvourney.
In the side of the mound is a little cavity, which contains two bones. The front of the cavity is closed with loose bones. On the top of the mound is a stone shaped like a holy water font. A little way to the north east of the mound is a blessed well.
The people of Ballyvourney have great faith in the intercession of St. Aban, and in proof of the power of his intercession, crutches may be seen on the mound, left there by the people who were cured. The usual form of praying there is the performing of "rounds". The "round" is gone through in the following manner:
Seven "Our Fathers seven "Hail Mary's" and seven "Glorias" are recited four times at each of the three standing stones. After every seven the person walks around the mound saying the "Apostles Creed" so that the mound is encircled twelve times. Then where bones are kept a rosary is recited. People than bless themselves with the bones and go down to the well and say seven prayers. They also take a drink of the water.
Until about the time of the European War this "Cill" was surrounded by a thick wood. All the large trees were
senior member (history)
2019-08-24 10:13
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my young Púca. The man soon released the young Púca.
I have also heard people say that the Púca used to carry people across the ford, when the stepping stones were covered in times of flood.

Baile an Tobair -
This townland is in the northern end of the parish of Darragh, Co Limerick. It derives its name from a holy well which is dedicated to St Brigid, and which is visited as a cure for whooping cough. Two visits are paid to the well for this purpose and the Rosary recited on each occasion. Some water from the well is given to the person suffering from the whooping cough.
senior member (history)
2019-08-24 10:09
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Baile Bhunóige - High Bridge
About three miles from Kilfinane, (and on the road leading from Darragh to Kilfinane) there is a bridge over the road. It is in the shape of a horse-shoe. The bridge is believed to have been constructed about 1847. The passage across the bridge leads to a County Council Quarry.
The bridge is named "Baile Bhunóige". An old man of 80 years told me a story of how people going to a fair in Kilfinane found a baby there - hence its name, which is often pronounced "Baile Bunóca". It is on the border of the Parish of Darragh where it adjoins Kilfinane Parish - Co Limerick.

Átha Phuca:-
This is the name given to a bridge over a river known as the Abha na gCaora, a tributary of the Funcheon. It is situated on the main road between Kilfinane Co Limerick and Mitchelstown in Co Cork. The river at that point forms the boundary between the two counties.
A story is told of how a man, who lived near the bridge, found a small animal like a calf at the water's edge. He took it home and put it in a house and fed it with milk. That night, he lay awake in bed listening to the bellowing of an animal outside, which called out - Give me out
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 21:45
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Not so well known perhaps as Saint Gobnait, the Patron Saint of Ballyvourney, but still revered by the people, is another Ballyvourney Saint, namely, St. Aban.
This Saint lived in the sixth century, and is said by some to have been a brother of St. Gobnait's. About half a mile to the south-west of the village of Ballymakeera lie the ruins of St. Aban's church. There are now no traces of the walls of the church but the
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 21:42
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There is a lios in the farm of Edmond Condon not far from my house in Rapala and it is the biggest lios in Ireland. There is a bowl in the middle of the lios about 6" by 12" and it is covered with moss. Often we cleaned away the moss but it would be on it again in a few days. After a heavy nights rain would be as dry as before the rain. People came from Kilfinane to take it away but they took the wrong one.

Cúinne Dubh Black Corner
There is a lios in the farm of Jack Hennessy named the "cúinne dubh" or the Black Corner. It is said that Biddy Early stopped there for there days on her way to Castle Gale from Clare on the borders of Cork and Limerick. There is a big fence all round the lios with only one gap for entrance.

Páircín Caol The Narrow Field
There is a lios near my house / in the farm of Edmond Condon. There is a narrow field long side it, it is called the "Páircín Caol" or the narrow field. It is said that some years ago that James Connell
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 21:38
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One night, Mr O'Brien - father of late Dr O'Brien Mitchelstown (lately deceased) was called out to Marshalstown to a hurling match, which was to be played at midnight - the opposing teams were chose from the dead at Labbamollagga and the dead at Marshalstown.
Mr O'Brien brought two companions with him, but they were not allowed to enter the field. He defended the gap for one team and there was another living person in the other gap.
Mr O'Brien's side won and after that he was very successful in life. The opposing gap-man was dead within a week. The men, who accompanied Mr O'Brien saw nothing save the two men in the field, but they heard distinctly the clash of the ash and the cheers when a score was made
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 21:31
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There is a monument in Tynagh graveyard to John Smith Rahan who was a great hurler and there is a hurl and ball drawn out on it. He is dead about twenty eight years.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 21:25
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Got from Mr. James Spillane, Kilkerran (as previously)

About twenty-five years ago there was a football team in this parish and another one in Ardfield, which is adjoining ours. They played a football match in Mat. Twohig's field in Gahanive and the Rathbarry team won. There were twenty-one men
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 21:23
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on each side. Test Matches were held and the best players were selected. They were clothed in jerseys and short pants. The ball used was similar to the one used to-day but something bigger and heavier. They had two sticks standing in the field for goals, and on each side were the "point-sticks".
The Rathbarry and Ardfield team played another match in Tom Donovan's field, Ballylibert. The Ardfield team played a match against Rosscarbery in Ardfield about thirty years ago. Later on seventeen men were selected instead of twenty-one, and later still fifteen, as at present.

There was a game played about 75 years ago called the "Taking and Keeping Game". This is how it was played.One of the Ardfield boys would try and take the ball from one of the Rosscarbery boys and if he failed at first he kept on trying until he got it. A Referee was appointed to give fair-play.

Fred Calnan was captain of the Rosscarbery team and
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:51
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Hurling men.
Then here's to her the land we love
Each grand old hill and glen and grove
Her plains below, her skies above
And best of all her Hurling men.

Chorus:-

I got this from
Pat Donovan
Main Street
Ballydehob
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:49
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Hurling men.
Chorus:-

(III)
On Irish fields when heroes died
And foemen thronged on every side
Our leaders' joy, their hope and pride
Were gleaming pikes and Hurling men
And if God wills that wars' red train
Shall sweep again o'er hill and plain
Our land shall call and not in vain
On fighting lines of Hurling men

(IV)
But meanwhile, let each true heart to
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:48
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The foeman's every plan to foil
And raise, like strong plants from the soil.
Men hosts of Irish Hurling men
To guard their name and love their land
With her through gloom and joy to stand
And each one's gift a heart and hand
And will to strive with Irishmen.

(V)
When comes the day as come it must
When Seaníns rule of greed and lust
Shall lie all broken in the dust
We'll still have Irish
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:42
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Who says our Country's soul has fled?
Who says our Country's heart is dead?
Come let them hear the marching tread,
Of twice five thousand Hurling men,
They hold the hopes of bygone years
They love the past - its smiles and tears
But quavering doubts and shrinking fears
Are far from Irelands's Hurling men.

Chorus:-
Hurrah! Hurrah the stout Camán
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:42
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Not Seánin's steel can match its blow
Hurrah! the arms of might and brawn
And hearts with Freedom's fame aglow.

(II)
They sing the songs their fathers sang
When to the breeze the Green they flung
They speak their own sweet Gaelic tongue
That fires the blood of fighting men
When all around was dark as night
With scarce a gleam of cheering light
When traitors fled their Country's fight
She still had hope in
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:34
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Albert Scully captain of the Ardfield team. They never played hurling in this parish.

The only other game they played was bowling, and it is the only game that is still played there. Every Sunday there is a contest or "score" on, between two, or three, or four opponents. The "bowl" weighs 28 ounces and is thrown along the road. The distance of a "score" is about between two and three miles. There are various terms used in bowling.
The "Shot" the total distance the bowl goes when it leaves the "throwers" hand and stops on the road, where it is marked.
The "loft" or "lob" the distance the bowl goes in the air, from the hand to where the bowl strikes the road.
"Fore-bowl" and "hind-bowl" the distance between the shots.
"Bowl of odds", if it takes A 20 shots and B 21, A has a bowl of odds and wins the score.

Money is better freely in this game and scores have been thrown
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:32
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Daniel Gearan and people used play football in it in former times. This field is called the lawn.
About fifty seven years ago a large match was played there between Cullen and the townland of Rathduane. Cullen won this match.
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:30
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the fences were the only boundries.
The goal-posts consisted of two furze bushes generally about four feet high. There were no such things as points in those days. Formerly the number of players on each side was twenty. One from each side stood minding the goal and the others followed the ball around the field. Under the rules now there are only fifteen players on each side and each player is confined to a small space and on this this account they need not run near so much. In the olden times people made their own hurleys.
There is a large field near Bally-Daly church owned by
senior member (history)
2019-08-23 12:27
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In the olden times hurling was the only game played by the young men and boys in the country districts.
They used assemble at practice matches on Sunday evenings.
It was not until the early eighties that the people turned to football. Very often the people used to play what was called conquering matches sometimes between two townland and very often between two parishes.
In former times there were no certain rules laid down for football. There were no side lines or boundries of any kind. They would select a large field and no matter how large it may be
senior member (history)
2019-08-22 21:52
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Last Sunday there was a football match played in this district between Dunmanus and Goleen reviving the old pastime, as football was a very popular game in the time of our grandfathers.
About forty years ago Dunmanus team was the leading team from Bantry to the Mizen. Mike Kelleher brought the first football to this district about seventy or more years ago.
Mr Someville the landlord of the Prairie patronized the game.

The schoolboys were very fond of hurley. The used to play friendly matches between themselves on Sundays. The ball they used were made of perk. The hurley stick was a blackthorn or a furze stick with a suitable turn.
Handball was a favourite pastime, In the local barrack there was a smooth wall in one end of the house and there the policemen used play handball, and had many a friendly game with local people.
There was a man teaching in Kilthomane school once who was deprived of the use of his
senior member (history)
2019-08-22 21:44
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Albert Scully captain of the Ardfield team. They never played hurling in this parish.

The only other game they played was bowling, and it is the only game that is still played there. Every Sunday there is a contest or "score" on, between two, or three, or four opponents. The "bowl" weighs 28 ounces and is thrown along the road. The distance of a "score" is about between two and three miles. There are various terms used in bowling.
The "Shot the total distance the bowl goes when it leaves the "throwers" hand and stops on the road, where it is marked.
The "loft" or "lob" the distance the bowl goes in the air, from the hand to where the bowl strikes the road.
"Fore-bow" and "hind-bowl" the distance between the shots.
"Bowl of odds", if it takes A 20 shots and B 21, A has a bowl of odds and wins the score.

Money is better freely in this game and scores have been thrown
senior member (history)
2019-08-22 21:34
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for bets exceedfing £100.

Another account about Hurling and Football says:-
Rick Donovan, Kilkerran was captain of Rathbarry football team. They had no special place for playing. Every team had their own ball, and any one would not be left play unless he paid something for the ball. The players had no special clothes. The goal was ten feet wide and if the ball went about eight feet outside the goal on either side it would be counted as a point.

The hurling was played west of Kilkerran Lake, which is called "Mearach Cnáimhin". Hurling was called "goaling".
senior member (history)
2019-08-22 21:23
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An important hurling match took place in a large field belonging to Mr MacCarthy about two miles from Ballinadee. It was played between the Ballinadee team and the Ballinspittal team.It was a very rough match and it was won by the Ballinadee team. There were fifteen men on each side. The outstanding figure on the field was a clever newcomer named Jeremiah Hussey. He was the Ballinadee tailor. This was his first match and he subsequently proved famous.
The Ballinadee teams went miles away to play matches, their method of travelling was running across country. The players wore no playing clothes only their ordinary clothes. There was no refereeing in those days. Might was right and the best man always ruled.
The ball was usually home-made. It was simply a large lump of cork tied up with old rags. It was slightly bigger than the balls that are used nowadays. No goal posts were used, anybody who succeeded in striking the ball into a corner of the field scored a goal. Heavy home-made ash-hurleys were used.
None of the present day regulations were observed in old time hurling. A man by the name of Keohane from Kilmacsimon was known
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 20:32
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Long ago hurling was much different to what it is at the present day. One of the most famous hurling teams around this district was "The Dungourney Team" they were beaten thirty two times before they won and they won Archbishop Crok's Cup and the all Ireland Final. Old people say that there was twenty one in a team then where there is only fifteen now. They wore no special colours or uniforms and they often played barefoot. How they were picked was so many men would join the team and they would keep practising until they were going to play a match then the best twenty one would be picked. The name for the kicking of the ball across the country-side was "Bonaleheri" (?).
The ball was thrown up between the two teams within an equal distance of the town or village from which the teams came. They kicked it and took it in their hands across the countryside. There was no law or order and when they came to a wall a man from the opposing side
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 20:32
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might hit the man's head who had the ball, against the wall and would carry off the ball. The Goal was to reach the team's own village first. Hurleys were always made of wood but long ago they were much heavier. People still say to a team that are always beaten, "Remember Dungourney".
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 20:19
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The people had "conquering matches" long ago. There was a "conquering" match between Freemount and Bawnmore. There were twenty one players on each side. The teams were picked out of every parish. The ball was hopped in my grand uncle's field in Killnockin, and Freemount won because they had downhill play. Jeremiah Con O'Connor won fame in the match. The Bawnmore boys dress was flannel waist coat and white trousers and the Freemount team wore (-) in their shirts and trousers.

There was also hurling played in my district in former times. The hurleys were made of bog deal. The ball was called a "Róinche" ball. It was made from, curled hair, sewn with waxed hemp. My grandfather the late Timothy Aherne was famous at hurling, and also Jeremiah Con O'Connor. They played handball also
senior member (history)
2019-08-21 20:18
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There was a ball-alley in the field at the back of Patrick McCarthys house in Lismire about 40 years ago.

(Told to me by my parents)

Tadg Eachthighearn
Cnoch Cilla
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 21:55
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There is a little road leading from Ath an Cadhlaigh Bridge to Rossadrehid Creamery.
About the time of the "White Boys" an old smith kept a forge on this road. This forge was a meeting place for the boys of the district.
A young apprentice, Tom Dea, was their leader and instructor in drilling etc. Arms were collected and hidden at the forge. The boys got those arms by visiting the local farmhouses at midnight disguised by masks over their faces and their shirts worn over their ordinary clothes. (Hence "Whiteboys")
Tom Dea ordered a full muster of the lads for a certain night. All turned up and waited in vain for the leader. Late in the night the forge was surrounded by military and police. One man was killed and several wounded in the scuffle that took place.
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 21:54
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All the boys of the locality believed that Tom Dea had betrayed them. He was never seen or heard of again. The belief was that he had taken a bribe and gone to America.
My mother, Mrs Margaret Grogan, Montanavoe, Bansha, had this account from her father-in-law John Grogan who had served a term of imprisonment on account of the incident.
This old man sat at the fire in the his old age and often he could be heard muttering to himself - "Ah! Tom Dea" with a world of bitterness.

Eibhlín Bean Uí Mheiscill
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 21:41
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She was an old woman when my grandfather was a little lad. Hers was a little house, neatly thatched, where order and peace reigned within and without. I never heard her surname - to the neighbours she was the "Bean Gasta". On her dresser the plates shone as if they knew they belonged to her. If one was taken down there was nothing to reveal - no untidy "odds and ends" pushed behind it.
Yet the neighbouring housekeepers were not envious of her. The houses in her immediate locality reflected the "Bean Gasta's" and her neat homespuns, spotless aprons and beautiful ironed caps set a standard for the other "Bean a' Tighes" of the parish. Her butter, her sweet baked bread, the "ketchup" from the mushrooms, the jam she made from the "hurts" - did anyone ever taste anything like it?
Her little home was in Ballydavid near the old "Wattled Bridge". The farm has long since passed into the hands of strangers but the old people still refer to it as the "Bean Gasta's" place.

Eibhlín Bean Uí Mheiscill O.S.
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 16:47
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The Cooláchs - (Cúl Áth)
back fords near Castle Mary

Reilig na bhFeara nGonta - Clashoquirke, Bansha
The Reilig where the men who were killed in the "Battle of the Hills and Hollows" were buried. It is a the back of T. (?) Ryan's farm-house, near Castle Mary. Perhaps about 100 years ago an attempt was made by the farmer who owned the Reilg, to till it. So many bones were turned up that he decided to put them back and leave it as it was.

Áth na gCíléiri - where the "keelers" (milk tubs) were weighted and left in the river so that the wood became swollen (joinings closed up) and so prevented leaking.
The ford on the river Aherlow at Ashgrove
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 16:38
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James Coppingar claims to be descended directly from the Danes. He possesses a pedigree of the Coppinger family dating back to 1416
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 16:36
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Fulacht Fiann - Cooking place of Fianna
Tá ceann le fágháil i mBunasdó, míle ar an dtaobh thuaidh de Charraig Tuathail.

Áit eile - Loch a' Bheithe
"Browne's Mountain" - Sliabh Mór
Tá cúinne i bpáirc i Sliabh Mhór agus deirtear gur luig an Glas Gaibhneach ann. Tugtar "Leaba Bó Fínne" air. Tá cnuicín i Léim Láirig agus tugtar "Bóthar Bó Fínne" air.
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 16:26
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Cross Country Hurling
About 80 years ago Ballyhooly and Glenville met at the Barony Bounds. The ball was thrown in and the Battle commenced. Ballyhooly drove Glenville back about a mile and a half. The Glenvilles plucking up courage re-gained the ground they had lost and approached within a short distance of the Blackwater. Again Ballyhooly took the lead and kept Glenville retreating until the Bride was reached, Ballyhooly having the victory.

(Between the Bride and Blackwater was the pitch. The Barony Bounds lies midway between these rivers)
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 16:22
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In Mitchelstown, Co. Cork a certain man went to bed one night. About twelve o'clock he was awakened by a strange voice which called. He got up and was let to a field near by. There before him he saw hundreds of fairies all hurling, and before he knew where he was he was also hurling. At three o'clock the hurling stopped and the fairies disappeared and he went home and went to bed and didin't get up for six months.
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 16:07
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About forty six years ago the hurling began in Farrahy. The hurlers had a great opinion of themselves at first but when a team challenged they became very cowardly. The team that rose up against them was Oldcastletown. They had a good sturdy team well fitted out for the day.
They had the best slippers for running purposes made especially for the job. The hurleys were called Spacks. Both sides hurled and Oldcastletown beat them on their own ground. After Farrahy had prepaired the ground and had put up the goal posts and the strangers to come in and beat them by many goals and points was very disappointing "but every beginning is weak".
They were challenged again by Shanballymore. Farahy were fully sure they would win this match and so were the Shanballymore fellows.The latter were a bit too old and were not good enough for the Farahy hurlers. The descendants of the
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 16:07
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awaiting decision
Shanballymore hurlers are good men now.
They almost won the County Championship last year, but Farahy nor Oldcastletown would not beat them now. There are no team in Farahy but the Oldcastletown hurlers are improving.
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 09:28
approved
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awaiting decision
Sean Ó h-Eachthigheirn
Cúirt an Bharraig
Carraig Tuaitail
Aois - timcheall 80 blianta

AN RÉ
Oidhche Spéir Ghealaighe - a bright night
Oidhche Dhuibhré - a night having a "dark moon".

Fáinne - circle round the moon

Réalt na Maidne - Morning Star
Nóinréalt - Evening Star
Cam Cheacht Dé - Plough Stars
Síog na nAingeal - Milky way
Mathgamhain Mór - Great Bear
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 09:21
approved
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awaiting decision
Matches were played in this district in olden times. The players were from different parishes.
Barrycourt and Dungourney played at Mr. Martin's field in Tullagreen.
There were usually twenty one men on each side. The best men from each parish were picked out to play.
Barryscourt won at all times. The score should be five goals. The ball was kicked from one corner of the field to the other. The players were dressed in white flannel waistcoats; the referee was the most noted athletic to be found and his judgments were final.
The ball was filled with champagne corks covered with horse-skin, but the horse-skin should
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 09:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Matches were played in this district in olden times. The players were from different parishes.
Barrycourt and Dungourney played at Mr. Martin's field in Tullagreen.
There were usually twenty one men on each side. The best men from each parish were picked out to play.
Barryscourt won at all times. The score should be five goals. The ball was kicked from one corner of the field to the other. The players were dressed in white flannel waistcoats; the referee was the most noted athletic to be found and his judgments were final.
The ball was filled with champagne corks covered with horse-skin, but the horse-skin should
senior member (history)
2019-08-20 09:19
approved
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awaiting decision
be from a horse that won noted races.
The regulation ball was nine inches in diameter.

There was bowling long ago also and a man named Dan Twomey was famous at that.

Handball was a great game long ago in Barryscourt castle, and there was weight throwing here also; a man named David Fitzgerald from Woodstock was famed at that. The weight throwing used be played down at Rossmore and the bowling was played on the Middleton road.

I got this form Mr. Keegan, Carrigtwohill.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 23:35
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awaiting decision
In the old days before the rules of the G.A.A. were formed hurling was called “scoobeen”. The matches were played between neighbouring parishes and each side called could have as many hurlers as they could gather. There was no goal gap and the victory rested with the team who carried the ball farthest into the opponents parish across fences, dykes and fields. The hurleys were heavier than hurleys now used and not so well made. The ball was heavier and was called a “slitter”. The “free puck” was called a “hi-raddy”. Under the first rules the goal gap was twenty feet wide and had a point gap the same width on each side as well. A goal was more valuable than any number of points. Each side had twenty one players.
A great match between Ballyhea and Churchtown took place over forty years again in a field in Ballinagrath called the Goal Field under the old rules, and some of the men who played there are still alive. After a great tussle Ballyhea won. A hurler was entitled to kick the ball where ever he liked but this seldom happened, except when his hurley fell from his hand or got broken
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:50
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awaiting decision
A round white stone rests on top. This is called St. Olan's Cap. There was a stone removed from the well but where it is, is not known. Perhaps it may be in the Cork University. It was about 9" high and pilgrims made the sign of the Cross on it.
I read in some book or other that in some life of the saint or in the manuscripts there is mentioned a stone which cannot be traced.
Well I know where a stone lies which relates to the saint and I think there is no mention of it anywhere.

When I was a boy about 8 I used be often with an old man who as herding cows. One day on the road-side he was talking to an old woman and I remember their subject was St Olan and St Laictín. They met, he said, at the very spot where he was standing, at a stone, and St Olan lifted up his foot and placed it on the stone as if to rest his elbow on his knee, the print of his foot remained on the stone. (I suppose the old woman asked him about the mark of the foot) There was a small hollow on top of the stone about 1" deep that held rain water and the woman made the sign of the Cross on her forehead and sprinkled herself with water. She said it was holy water.
(See next page for rough sketch and where stone may be found.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:47
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by the owner of the land. The hermit refused, declaring that the place was outside his bounds. The hermit then stuck into the ground (or as I heard it a dung hill) the crop of a whip and said "beyond where that will spread is yours" The crop grew to be a huge tree with long spreading branches; in fact each branch was a tree in itself. (This tree is now decayed)
The patter day was the 6th of September. From all quarters pilgrims travelled. The road and holy ground used be thronged, and the inch where the hurling match was played by the people of the other world was thronged. Tea houses were erected on this inch and ever since it has been known as "The Tea-house Inch. Dancing and singing and praying went on harmoniously; from year to year the crowds grew larger and therefore the amusements became more inebriating. Finally came the faction fighting and murder and by order of the Parish priest there was an end to the "pattern".
The Rounds are still paid there on the saints day.
An Ogham stone* stands near the well. Dr Graves translation of the inscription is "A prayer for the soul of Mac Corb the Sage". Anm corrpamac Suidd [?] The saint is said to be buried in the adjoining graveyard where another Ogham stone marks his resting place.
*Joyce P. 9 Short Hist.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:40
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St Olan (Eólaing) is said to be the confessor of St Finnbarr and he lived in Aghabollogue.
The well is situated near the opposite bank from the Inch where the hurling was played by the "good people". An enormous ash tree spread its branches over and about the well. The origin of the ash tree is as follows.... There lived above the well in the Cúinne a boy or hermit perhaps who was ordered to leave
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:37
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Twomey's Farm.
It was before any railway opened up that quarter of the country, when country farmers left their homes to transport their produce by road to the city a distance of 18 miles, that Michael Cronin, workman, in the farm of Jerry J Murphy went down the fields towards the river for the horse on a night as clear as day, he heard noise like the clashing of hurleys and on getting on top of a fence saw a field full of people enjoying themselves at a hard match.
Tis said that he had not sufficient nerve to go for the horse that was grazing at his side of the river. He turned back and left the hurlers at peace.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:30
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Long ago a hurling match was played entirely different to what it is now. It was called "Scoobeen". There were no laid down rules or regulations. There was no fenced-in pitch, nor goal gaps, like there are to-day. There were few hurleys then. Some used sticks called Spwacks while others used nothing at all except their hands and feet.
As many as liked could play. One parish played against another. The ball was thrown up between the two teams at the bound's ditch. The game was to see who would carry the ball home to his own parish.
You could put the ball in your pocket and run as far as you were able with it, you could kick it and throw it. Big crowds used turn to see the match; altogether it
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:29
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was a very rough but interesting game.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:09
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Have you seen Tipperary champions
Hurl Clare in Cork's own town
When they won the Munster final
The first step to the triple Crown
I have seen some Munster finals
But none could it compare
To that match in Cork's athletic grounds
Between champions Tipp and Clare

At half time we were leading
With just one point to spare
With the sun and wind against us
Sure it looked a win from Clare
But our old experienced trainer
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 22:09
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Tom Semple is his name
He gave our boys a lecture
As to how they'd play the game

The match again re-started
And we could plainly see
That Tipp would win the champion-ship
That day beside the Lee
They drove men and ball before them
With their old Tipperary dash
Tom Daly on the goal-post
Sure he saw the coming rush
He set himself to save his net
But it was all in vain
They made rail-roads through the back
The green flag went up again.
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 16:20
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There was a football match in Farry's Meadow in Gubrawoolly about 60 years ago. Thirty men played on each side. They were picked from the parishes of Kinawley and Corlough. The Corlough men were winning until towards evening Peter Reilly, Drumcullion took the field for Kinawley and their parish won. Peter is about thirty years dead. Pat McGovern Drumbar (still living) also won fame for Kinawley.
The match lasted a couple of hours. It is not certain what the score was.
The players were dressed in home-made shirts and corduroy trousers with knee garters made of "Scoith", a kind of rope made from rushes which were threshed and crushed and wound into a rope or string. Some of the men wore frieze suits. Many of the foot-
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 16:08
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Brigid Coyle,
Coragh,
Ballyjamesduff

Mr P. McGennis
Coragh
senior member (history)
2019-08-19 16:06
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other in the shins with times a riot, several people hurt and some injured for life. In this football match I refer to a man of each side died as a result of the injuries received. There is no account of the score. I believe the Parish of Lurgan had all the game to themselves and won hands down. I do not think there was any refereeing done by outsiders or neither was there any umpire. The players had no dress except their every day dress. The ball was made of a hay rope about three sizes smaller than the ball of the present day. The goal space was usually marked by placing two coats so many yards apart on each side.

There is not much account of hurling matches although it was played in the district. The hurleys were cut our of the hedges. They were generally made of ash. They were about 2 1/2 feet long with a Cam or shepherd's crook at the end. The ball used in country districts was generally of hard wood cut and formed similar in size to the handball of the present day.
There is little or no account of handball, bowling, weight throwing or other outdoor games being played in this district.
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 21:58
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There was a football match played on the PÁISREE BÁN * on the 29th of June 1829 between the Parish of Lurgan and the Parish of Lavey. There were sixteen men on each side. The supposed best men of the Parish were selected. Of course the selection was not on the lines of the present day system and I am sorry to say that the football game then was not so clean or carried on in a human manner. In them days they used "hand and foot" kicked each

* A local piece of land in Coragh (?) Hill known as the Páiste Bán
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 21:48
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football now used. Big stones were used instead of goal posts. When a goal was scored they would say "Bára out".
Weight throwing was another amusement in olden times. The weight was fired from the shoulder.

Bernard Smyth
Corradoagh
Bailieboro
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 21:45
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Caman or Hurling was common around Knockbride in former times. - James McBrien
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 21:42
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The matches started at about three o'clock. They were over in a short time. These were parish matches and they were very rowdy because the men drank poteen after the match and hence a row began. They fought with the blackthorn sticks. The great matches were played in a field near the Méaran of two counties. They were called challenge matches. They caused great excitement and sometimes fierce fights. They often lasted for three days. The team that won was carried home shoulder high. Bonfires were lighted on the top of the hills and poteen was drunk. The poteen was made by a Mrs Crowley. There was also a field near the Dublin, owned by a Mr Keena in which the games
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 21:38
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Hurling and football matches were very common long ago. They were usually held on Sundays. They took place in a field near a cross-roads, or where three or four roads meet. Great crowds came to the matches and each man carried a blackthorn stick because of frequent quarrels between the two teams. The games usually took place at Cullion-beg cross and Dalystown cross. Mike O'Brien was a famous player from Mullingar. He was a great Irishman and was continually quarrelling with the police. He was not out of jail long when he was put in again. Joe Duffy was the captain for years and years.
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 08:46
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Hurling and Football Matches
The games that were played long ago were hurling and football. They had goalposts the same as we have now. The ball was made of corks with a piece of thread twisted round it. The hurls which they made themselves were got from the ash tree. There was some of them crooked and more of them straight. They shaped them themselves.
They used to play the game any place they would get a piece of level ground. Anyone that was best skilled in the game would be called for a referee. Whichever side would have the most goals
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 08:43
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soon after the final was played. The winners would then become county champions, thus earning the right to represent their county against the champions of any other county. We then see that a county team was not composed of the pick of the players of the various teams, but the team that won the county championship.
Cappataggle hurling teams were twice county champions and New Inn once reached the final to be beaten by Cappataggle. The game was played in Kiltulla before a large crowd. There were 18 players on each side and the game lasted for one and a half hours.
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 08:41
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In former times hurling and football matches were the principal games played in this district. At that time there were very few rules governing those matches so they were played in a different manner from that of the present day.
Matches were not played on the knock-out system, as is now done for the all-Ireland Championship but a League was formed so that every team had to play the others and earn two points for a victory and one for a draw.
The county was divided in four parts and the winners of each division played each other for the semi-finals and
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 08:37
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Long ago the hurlers around this district wore no jerseys. They wore hurling caps instead to distinguish one team from another. These caps were made by the hurlers sisters. There were twenty five men on each side. The ball was made from timber and it was covered with thread. The first match was played in Feagh in the year 1847. The hurls were very badly shaped and very rough and they were cut and made from ash trees with a bend in the bottom.
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 08:32
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The game of hurling was undoubtedly played by the men of past generations; the match generally originating in a challeng either between Clans or parishes.
They are dead, however, those who could throw light on the methods and usages, which characterized the titan struggles, by which one of those contests was decided, when played by our rude but stalwart forefathers.
Not until the revival by Michael Cusack in the early 80's of the last century, did hurling become general as a national pastime.
In those days teams consisted of 21 a side, with two captains, who as a rule were elderly men, and not players. Jostling, tripping, and rough play being a good deal permitted. Strength in a player was as a rule often preferred to agility.
Matches were played between parishes and sometimes the border of a neighbouring county; they were by arrangement or challenge. The championship and league systems now in use being then unknown. More often than not, teams travelled on foot sometimes to a venue eight or ten miles distant.
The team was generally accompanied by a fife and drum band, and a large concourse
senior member (history)
2019-08-18 08:21
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Long ago there big hurling matches in this district. The best known place was "Boulia". There is a long stretch of land and in the middle flows a deep river.
Forty players with hurlers and sticks would appear on the field each having different caps. Two hills on a line or drain or even four stones would stand for goal-posts and if the ball went beyond the mark it would be a goal.
They had no fouls and the used throw them into the river. Their motto was "miss ball, hit shin".
Hurling is one of the oldest and most interesting games in history. It was played our fathers and grand-fathers and is played at present. The hurlers were much stronger than now and the ball they used was heavier.
The most important hurlers were:- Denny Byrne, Pat Fahy and Mike Finnerty and Tom. Some are still alive.
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 22:34
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in 1884. The games were played by all the young men of the neighbourhood collecting in a field after Mass and making a match amongst themselves.
Two leaders would call them in and start by saying:- Bolamurt, Tuigim leat,
And they would call every second man until their team was filled. The best players were always called first.
Then a middle aged respectable man would be chosen as referee. The ball was generally composed of a pig's bladder covered over with leather by a local shoemaker.
The Goal -Posts were composed of stones or the players coats left at each end of the fence. There seemed to be
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 22:33
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Hurling and Football Matches.
1. Bríghidh Ní Ghoireachthaigh.
2. Baile Liam, Caisleán Riabhach.
3. 4. Scoláire.
5. Eamon ó Ghoireachthaigh, Baile Liam.
6. Timcheall 50 blían daois.
7. Baile Liam, Caisleán Ríabhach.
8. 11adh lá Samhna 1938.
Fúair Eamon ó Ghoireachthaigh an sgéal seo ó a athair Mairtín ó Ghoireachthaigh go raibh cómhnuide air i m-Baile Liam agus a fúair bás 60 blían ó shoin in aois 78 blíana.

Football and hurling were two very popular games in this district seventy years ago, that is previous to the formation of the present G.A.A
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 22:31
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They did not play hurling or Football much long ago. They had twenty-one men playing on each side long ago. The best players that always played exept when it would be a big match and then it would be the strong men that would be playing. The matches played in this were usually in James Molloy's bog Gortbrack. No on alive now remembers the games played with fifteen men aside.
The ball was often kicked across the country. The ball would be thrown in at half way between one parish and the other and whoever brought the ball to the chapel first would be the winner or his side would be the winners. The teams were dressed in their ordinary clothes. There was no referee. The ball was a big leather ball. There were no goal posts. The churches were the goal deciders. The team that brought the ball to the other mens church won.
Hurling was played in this district long ago. They were big ash hurleys they used long ago. They also played at weight-throwing.
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 22:24
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Long ago all the football and hurling matches used to be held in Attymon. There were people in the district for driving the players to the field. The man who owned the side-car for driving the players in this district was Thomas Mahon, Newcastle. The players used to be bare-footed and used to wear flannel "baneens" embroidered with green thread and small knitted caps on their heads and soft knitted belts. The games used to be played between two villages and if both parties got the same amount of "points" the race home between the two side-cars would decide the matter.
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 22:17
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A hundred years ago, the custom was for a parish to play against another. There were twenty-one players on each side. The ball would be thrown up in a suitable field near the parish mearing and the best side would hurl it home as there were no goal posts then. About that time there was a hurling match played between Kilconnell and Killalaghton in a nine acre field in Coraneena, South of Kilconnell adjoining the latter parish. They hurled for three quarters of an hour without either side being able to take it out of the field until one of Kilconnell's best players Martin Lynskey got his leg broken after which Killalaghton won the day and hurled it home to Cappatagle.
The hurleys were made of crooked ash much the same as now but stronger. Some players used straight sticks as one could give a better hang with it. Caye Kelly is the best Kilconnell player never used anything else.
Hurley balls were made locally with corks and woollen thread. They used to put a few grains of shot in a quill barrell in the centre to make it carry straight and then they got the local shoemaker to cover it with leather. It was a larger size than the ball used now.

Written by,
Martin Kenny
Kilconnell
Told by his father
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 22:03
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Have you seen Tipperary champions?
Hurl Clare in Cork's own town.
When they won the Munster final
The first step to the "Triple Crown"
I have seen some Munster finals,
But none could it compare
To that match in Cork's Athletic grounds.
Between champions Tipp and Clare

At half time we were leading
with just one point to spare
With the sun and wind against us
Sure it looked a win for Clare
But our old experienced trainer-Tom Semple was his name
He gave our boys a lecture
As to how they'd play the game.
The match again re-started
And we could plainly see
That Tipp would win the championship
That day beside the Lee

They drove men and ball before them
With their old Tipperary dash
Tom Daly in the goal-post
Sure he saw their coming rush.
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 22:02
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He set himself to save his net.
But it was all in vain.
They made rail-roads through the backlines.
The green flag went up again.

By Jack Hughes
Kilcommon
Thurles
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 10:45
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A man once was passing a fort about 200 yards from Áth na Gáir. He was often out at a late hour of the night driving people in his jarvey car, there was no other mode of conveyance that time, so he was kept busy. It happened about the year 1872. Well as he neared the fort after conveying a man to Golden. His horse stopped suddenly and refused to pass the fort. He then came down off his car thinking there was something wrong with the harness of the horse but he could not find anything wrong with the animal or with the harness, still he could not get him to go and he only a quarter of a mile from his home.
The horse was sweating and pawing the road, and to beat him with the whip was of no use. At last the man thought of a plan, - he put his coat over the horse's head and by great persuasion he got the animal to pass the place. When he had got a little bit away from the fort, he looked back and to his astonishment he saw a big number of men in their shirt sleeves playing a hurling match in the field, where the fort can still be seen.
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 10:33
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The match took place between Kilmore and Ballinard. The ball was thrown in near the Piggrin of Ballinaclough and it was to be brought either to the Hill of Ballinard or to the Hill of Kilmore. The latter was destined to be its destination. Billy Shunnery (Ó Sionnaig) of Ballywalter struck the ball down the hill and was after it like a hare. The two rivers they had to cross (the two Multeen's(?)) were swollen bank high by floods. He struck the ball across and swam across followed by the others. They never succeeded in preventing him taking the ball until he brought it safely to Kilmore Hill about two miles.
Fights and quarrells were not infrequent among those who carried up the rear

Story by,
Denis McCarthy
Kilmore
Golden
senior member (history)
2019-08-17 10:22
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It is said that a hurling match took place every Sunday about a hundred, and fifty years ago between the north and the south sides of Knockroe-Borheen.
On the first Sunday the south beat the north, then the north went up farther for more men, and on the second Sunday they beat the south, and the south went down farther for more men, and on the third Sunday they beat the north again, and this continued for three months until finaly there were men from Leix and Offaly on the north side against men from Cork, Kerry, and Waterford on the south side.
The match took place in Mr William Davin's field, and thousands came from far an near to see it, and in the end it was won by the South.
There were no goals in those times, but from ditch to ditch, and sometimes the team who used to carry it the farthest across the country got the match.

Told by
John Byrne (60)
Townland - Kilaidamer
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 22:34
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out Tipperary were, James Hannigan, Rathbrett, John Martley Coolmoyne, Patrick O'Shea Do., Patrick Cahill Do., Denis Martley Do., These five men were able to jump a horse sixteen hands high. Handball was played also in this district

Paricia Ahearne
Ardsallagh
Fethard

Material of Composition obtained from:-
Mr M. McCormack,
Derryluskin
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 22:30
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awaiting decision
In former times hurling and football matches were held between Coolmoyne and Tullamaine. There were sixteen men on each team. When the two teams would meet, each team used to form in a ring, and the two captains had every second call.
A cross country match was generally played. The ball would be thrown up between the two teams. The man that threw the ball in would say, "Kick the ball home". These matches were played between townslands. The players wore their ordinary clothes, but they used to take off their hats and coats.
There was no refereeing
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 22:30
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done at all.
The ball used was called a Sliotar that was twice as large as an ordinary football, and was as heavy that it could be driven only about five yards with a kick.
There were no goal posts used the object of each team being to carry the ball home to their own district.

Hurling was also played in the district. They hurleys were called "Cromawns", they were cut in a ditch and the handles pared with a pocket knife. They were made of ash.

There were other outdoor games such as jumping and weight throwing. At every race meeting this was carried out. The five most famous men through
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 22:18
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In olden times hurling was the national pastime. It was called Hurling Home. The parish of Ballina challenged the parish of Birdhill and the hurling ground was the Pollocks. The goal was from Killaloe to O'Brien's Bridge. The Ballina men to win should hurl the ball across the bridge at O'Brien's Bridge and the Birdhill men to win should hurl the ball across the bridge at Killaloe. The game started after Birdhill Mass and continued until six o'clock that evening. When the Ballina men would get a run of the ball they'd never stop until they'd hurl it to Parteen and out through the Lisheen churchyard and on to the Tinkers hill. The full forward that day was a man named
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 22:18
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Cuddahie and he rose the ball and struck it and drove it in through George Ryan's window at the far side of the Shannon. The prize was a half barrell of Guinness's stout which the Birdhill men had to pay for. They purchased the half barrell from the man they broke the window on. They brought it out on the street and put it up on a table. Old George Ryan himself tapped it for them and said:-
"Guinness stout is here no doubt,
In both wood and bottle;
And Basse's ale will never fail,
To quench a thirsty throttle.
Rum, jin, and wine,
Is very fine;
And makes the weary frisky;
But there's not a draught that was over quaffed,
To equal my own make of whiskey;
Which was Poteen.

One of the hurlers was a publican and he brought the ryme home and had it printed the following day and he put it over the door of his public house. It was only lately removed.
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 21:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were matches played locally in olden times. The Kilbride Riobard Emmet's was the name of the team. They wore green jerseys and white sashes. John Murray was the Captain. There were sixteen on each side, as follows:-
Andrew Madden
Mike Madden
Peter Madden
John Madden
Thomas Regan
Jim Manton
Anthony Hicks
Paddy Shally
Tom Barlow
Bill Connaughton
John Farrell
Pat Farrell
Charles Hunt
Christopher McDermott
Frank Devine
They erected two goals posts in the field on which they played. The posts were about ten feet in length. There was a man appointed for refereeing. This man was allowed to show fair play on every side. They played a game of football in Boyle, Loughglen, Tulsk, Strokestown, Castlerea and Knockcroghary. The Kilbride football team was by far the best in Connaught.
Football was only in comparatively recent years limited to teams of sixteen aside. Football was one of the most
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 21:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
scientific games in the world. Goals are the only scores allowed at the start of the games and later on a ball going over the cross-bar was counted a point. At one period five "overs" counted a point. Down through the ages the literature of Eire is replete with accounts of the game of hurling. Kilbride hurling team hurled in a special field called "Sliabh Ruadh" There is no doubt that the game of hurling is the oldest field game in the world. Hurling was known as "iomain." The hurlers were called "iomawnees". The goals were called "baire". The hurl was called "caman".

Brian O Higgins sings:
When comes the day as come it must
That Ireland's rule of greed and lust
Shall lie, all broken, in the dust
We'll still have Irish hurling men:
Then here's to her, the land we love
Each grand old hill and glen and grove,
Her plains below, her skies above,
And best of all her hurling men.
"In later days, when hope seemed dead,
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Formerly there was a match played between Athboy and Rathmore. At that time they used to play for a set of garters. The men at that time used to wear knee breeches, shoes and grey hand knitted stockings. There were twenty-one on each side. Athboy won. A man named Ward was a special played.
The ball was kicked from one townland to another . One townsland would challenge another to try which of them
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 12:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Football is one the games that used to be played about this district long ago. This game used be played in the race-course of Loyd.
Hurling used be played in Loyd also. Michael McEnroe first started these Gaelic games about the year 1869. These games were played until the year 1884 or later when the G.A.A. was started.

Mattie Rourke

Patrick Farrelly, (86)
Fair Green
Kells
senior member (history)
2019-08-16 12:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The way they used to play hurling long ago in this district is far different than the way they play nowadays. "Hurl to home" they used to call it. Two townships used to meet at a certain place and playing towards their own home town. Through ditch and muck the players rushed with one thought in their minds, to win. The ball they used to have was a round wooden one. The number of players on either side was twenty.
The first football park was where the boot factory is now. There were two famous teams in Kells:- the Stars and the Sparrows.
from:-
Terence Timmons
Farrells St.
Kells
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 17:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
13/12/1938 John McLaughlin (58) Keelogs Buncrana Co Donegal.
Long ago there used to be a Caman match in Stragill every Christmas day. There was eleven playing on every side. They played in a field in Stragill Buncrana. It is in the townland of Stragill. They played between two town lands. The people made the caman sticks themselves. They got a bit of a stick
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 17:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
long ago. It was in a field. It was between Leafin and Sharagore Buncrana. Sharagore is in Desertegney. The match started at 9.30 and they did not stop. Leafin got the win by 4 goals to 2 and Sharagore only got one goal.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 17:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was hurley played in our district long ago . It was very common to play hurley that time. They played it on Sundays and on holidays. They played between two districts. It was between Caraliana and Slavery Buncrana. The people made the things that they played with themselves. Caraliana beat Slavery playing Hurley.
There was a great football match in our district long ago. It was between Dunree and Linsfort. The ball that these men played with was a big rubber football. They started at 1.30. and they were not finished until 4.30 in the evening. It was in the middle of the summer that this match was Dunree win the match. The match was held in Linsfort.
There was a big football match in Leafin
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 17:16
approved
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awaiting decision
and, they put it into boiling water and they turned one end of it. These Caman sticks were the shape of the ones that are now.
Long ago there was a football match in a field in Gortyarrigan. There was eleven people playing on either side. The players from Gortyarrigan beat the ones from Linsfort Buncrana. The ones in Gortyarrigan had 5 goals and the other ones had only 1 goal.

John Baldrick( 80) Claggan Buncrana Co Donegal
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 17:13
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man who lived in Carramore and when the fairies wanted to have a hurling match they wanted two live men, one for each goal, and they used to bring the Carramore man across Lough Conn riding on a Bothalán.
On one occasion when the fairies were coming for him he was digging potatoes with another man and he said to him. "Here they are coming for me" but the other man could not see them so the Carramore said to him "Put your right foot on my left one and your right hand on my right shoulder" and when he did so he saw the fairies.
This man's name was Patseen Roddy.

One day when the fairies were coming for him he told his brother and sisters to tie him to the door post and this time when they came for him they failed to bring him and the next morning when he went to see his cattle the best heifer in his had her
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 17:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leg broken and after he had to go with him.
One day they offered him some food and as he was about to take it a little fairy maiden came and shoved it away from him and he looked at her and recognized her as a niece of his that he thought was dead and then he knew that the fairies had taken her away.

This story was told to me by my grandmother, Mrs B. Kilduff, Carramore, Cloghans, Ballina.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 17:02
approved
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two old men Mr. Jim Hally of Balla and Mr. Michael McGreevy (?) both of whom played the game. They are both over 70 years of age.

Handball was played in this district for quite a long time. The ball alley in Balla is over 80 years there. The handball was made of thread covered with the skin of a young kid.

Weight throwing was common in this locality. The practices took place on Sundays with stones. At funerals heavy stone throwing competitions took place outside the house where the corpse lay prior to the funeral. Then a custom obtained of throwing the Iron weight over the crane on a market day. Each village put forward its best weight thrower. Whoever won had got the privilege of having the oats potatoes or other produce if his village weighed first. This was a great concession because it might mean an early sale of the particular commodity instead of a long wait at the market.

In Local football and hurling matches there were often no posts put down if the game were hurriedly arranged. Stones and coats were used to mark the goal areas. Jerseys were not used in this area before 1896. Then only a few
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 16:58
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rejected
awaiting decision
The oldest report of a hurling match in this locality as far as can be learnt in the district was of a match at Brige Castle between the barony of Barra and the Barony of Gallen. This was about the year 1838. There were about 50 men on either side. There were no goal posts or point posts. The wooden ball was brought into each barony in turn a certain distance. The idea was to hurl it back into the opponents territory. The hurleys were made of ash. Barra won this match.

The only reports of football games go no farther back than around the years of the founding of the G.A.A. One game played between Balla and Castlebar at Lagaturin was in P.W Nally's time. As he was one of the original founders of the G.A.A. it was probably at this time the match was played. R.I.C. came from Ballinrobe and Castlebar to see if anything seditious took place. One old R.I.C. man who is 75 a Mr. Conway of Balla told me he was present. Twenty-one men played on each side. There were two posts up at each end as goal posts. In a line with them on either side were two further posts. These were the point posts. The distance between them was ten yards. The length of the field was variable according as it suited and could be from 150 to 200 yards according to
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 16:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is a lis in Andy Keane’s field in Coad, and is made of earth and stones. There is a Cathair in Coad between Collins’ and Keatings’ and the place it is in is called “Tullán.” It is said that all the fairies in Ireland used meet there to hurl and play football, but one team should have a living man. One day the Co. Clare team of fairies and the Galway team met. The Clare team had a living man. He was the best footballer in Ireland. They played for a long time, and Clare won the game. It was the living man that won it for them.
There is a Cathair in Collins’ land and there is a tall stone standing beside it. This stone is called ”the Liagán.” It is said there is a wealthy giant buried under it.

Collected by: Máire Ní Choisgle, Coad
Told by: - John Costello, Coad (her father)
(58 years)
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 10:17
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and they used to keep calling until the last one in the line was called. Sometimes they used to play among themselves and at other times they played against Louisburgh. They used make the balls out of spools and they used to wind thread around the spools. They used make them as big as a hand-ball.
Long ago the people used to play hand-ball very often. The young boys from Askelane used to come to the village of Accony playing hand-ball. They used to play at Mr Dick Prendergast's barn. They used also play in a place called Sceilp. This place is situated to the north-side fo Askelane hill.

Mr James Prendergast Pat,
Accony,
Louisburgh
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 10:12
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rejected
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Football playing began in this district about forty-four years ago. The young boys used to kick on the Emlagh Dough. There use to be eleven kicking on each side. The principle captain was Mr. James Gibbons of Accony-West. All the boys used to play together and there used to be some person looking on at them to see which would be the best and the best ones were then picked for the match. At one time Accony East and Accony-West played against Louisburgh and another time they played against Clare Island. The football they had long ago was much like the football nowadays. They had no special sort of shoes for kicking with long ago but they used to wear their strong shoes.

Long ago they used to play hurling on the Emlagh Dough when they had a match and when they had no match they used to play in local fields. They used to get a nice thin stick with a nice Camóg on it. They used to hurl with those sticks. Hurling is a very old game. The boys of Accony used to play the boys of Doughmacheon. Fourteen or fifteen used to play on each side. Everyone on their turns used to be captain. Two men used to stand out in front and the rest of them used to stand up in a line. One of the men that used to stand in the middle use to say Buaileamh Ort and the other man used to say Roighim Leath and then the first man would say Béidh such a one Agam and the other would say Béidh such another Agamh
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:55
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awaiting decision
event just like Cliffoney. The Cliffoney team turned out again and as before the match was started. It was not long though until rows arose again. Here there was "war" for as a result, several of them got terms in gaol. A few of the players were almost killed. This put an end to the hurling for sometime and as well, ended the Pattern here. The then Parish Priest prevented it been held from then on.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:52
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The ball was bigger than a duck egg and wooden covered over with leather. The posts were put up, 2 pieces of sticks, branches of trees, about 15 feet wide. There was no crossbar, and the refereeing was done by Paddy McNulty, Tawley.
Well, the match began but before long rows arose and it developed into a melee. Both sides whacking each other. The Leitrim side won and the other party had to clear off the ground.
About a month or so later, there was a pattern in Tullaghan. This pattern was a yearly
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:49
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Hudie McGloin and his men or team were playing a friendly match on the Strand when the Leitrim men arrived. Gettins who was the leader wore a sword and a uniform cap. This I believe was to show his authority. McGloin had a similar attire. When Gettins arrived, he walked over to McGloin and said "Take off your cap and salute me".
Naturally he refused to do so. Then the challenge took place; the losing side having to salute the other and then clear off playing ground.
senior member (history)
2019-08-15 09:46
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match between Sligo and Leitrim.
The Captain of Sligo team was Hugh McGloin, or Hudie as he was called. He lived in Bunduff. His son and son's family are living in the same place. He was the leader and as well there was Thos. McGarrigle, Creevykeel, Thomas McGowan, Bunduff.
On Leitrim side were Paddy Gettens - Finner - Pat Mick McGloin - Grellagh.
The peculiar part about the match is that Grellagh which is in Sligo supported Leitrim. Thus it was Leitrim and Grellagh versus the rest of Sligo, touching Leitrim
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 12:47
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rejected
awaiting decision
were either growing bushes with a turn at the end or ones made by a wheelwright. Even those were rough and ready, mostly tree branches fashioned hurley shape. They were called "Camáns", and were like walking sticks only the butt end was wider and stronger.
At a later date the matches were played, half parish versus 1/2 parish or Cliffoney via Grange.
Here is an account of a match played on Bunduff Strand 60 years ago.

Bunduff Strand Match.
This was a challenge
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 12:44
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As to the numbers on each side; it varied as sometimes there were 20, othertimes 25, sometimes less. There was no fixed numbers. It was like this Carns versus Cliffoney. This meant the townlands of Carns, Edenreva, Clyspare versus Cliffoney, Carton Carnduff, Creevykeel etc. It thus depended on the numbers of players who turned out. There was no outfit; they played in their ordinary clothes; no togs or shoes or such like.
The ball was about an egg size or something larger and was made of wood.
The hurleys used
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 12:36
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This was very common 60 to 70 years ago but has completely died out. They were frequently played - on Sundays - on what is now called "the Flat or Strand. This is a rabbit warren, formerly belonged to Lord Ashley, now to Irish Land Commission. It lies 600 yards so so from Cliffoney village, on the way to Mullaghmore. On it matches are played presently.
Before Ashley gave permission to play on this, the matches were played on the seashore.
senior member (history)
2019-08-14 12:29
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Cnocan - little hill
The Rock - field covered with stones
The Caishil - a sheltered spot near the house
An Pairc Dubh - little field - black earth
Gub - land projecting into Lake Allen
The Guistin - little field
The Red Bray - hill - red earth
The Binn - headland
The Brusha - hill
Sandy's Rock - from name Sandy Peyton
Crocan a Laois - hill of fort
The Lamcrows (?) - crows rest on rock
The Corrac - bog
Aulth Tulanuisce - whole in the path over cliff
Tullavin Aulth - great cliff over river
Pulldugh - black hole
Beasie's Leap - a great leap given by girl called Brigid
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 19:29
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The first match that was played under the G.A.A. was played in the Glenhaumore meadows.
The teams were Drumshambo and Ballinaglera.
Drumshambo won by 1 goal 1 pint to 3 pints.
Drumshambo team wore black and white jerseys while Ballinaglera wore green and yellow.
The ball used was size 8 (?) rubber with leather cover.
Goal-posts were used.

Hurling cross country was a favourite game long ago. The hurleys were made of black Sally - they were very heavy. The ball was of hard wood - generally the root of the Blackthorn.

P. Ryan
Drumnafinla
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 19:22
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Hurling was played in olden times in this district. The hurleys were made from blackthorn sticks got in ditches. No ball was used, but a round piece of timber about three inches in diameter.
When a goal was scored it was called a "Beataigh". Eleven a side played this game. A deceased man named M. Gannon of Drumcoora won fame on the hurling field. Two stones were used as goal-posts.
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 19:17
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Over fifty years ago there were football matches held in the townland of Killeen. The field in which the games were played was known as Faughey. The oldest of the people that played was fifty five years. No certain townlands played. Sometimes there use be ten on each side and at other times twenty.
The best kicker that played there was a man named James McVey who lived in the townland of Tullynascreena. This man had a reel foot, and the team he played with always won. The footballers had no special wear.
On each side of the field there were two poles. Whatever side the ball went out the most times that side lost. There were no goals or points at that time, as they were not as exact that time as now. In former times there was no referee.

They had a great big leather ball. The cover was made from a dog's skin. First the skin was taken off the dog. Then it was left aside
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 19:11
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until the hair almost fell off the skin. Whatever hair remained was shaved off with a penknife. There was a pig's bladder inside of the skin.
There was a lace for pulling the dog's skin together. When the two ends of the lace was pulled together it was hard.

Hurling was played in the townland of Beaugh. Only young boys about thirteen or fourteen years used to play. The ball was made of a small piece of wood. It was about the size of a goose egg, but as round as a ball. This ball was called a crag. John James Finley who lived in the townland of Beaugh was the best hurler in former times.

Obtained from
Hugh McMorrow
Mullaghmore
Killargue
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 19:05
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The following is an old rhyme based on the letters of the alphabet written in capitals. Each letter is said and immediately after comes a word or phrase, telling what the outline or shape of the capital resembles.

A - Cúpla Tighe - the couple of a house
B - Speáclóirí - spectacles
C - Crúdh Gearáin - horse shoe
D - Bogh Fearrainn - rainbow
E - Cois Cairr - step of a jaunting car
F - Cos Muice - a pig's foot
G - Crudh Capaill - a horse's shoe
H - Geata - gate
I - Bata - a stick
L - Piocait - pick-shaped
M - an rud a cuireann tú ar an arán
N - rud is fuisde do
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 19:05
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O - an Ghealach - the moon
P - Píopa - a pipe
R - Roileeán - shaped like a spinning wheel
Z (S?) - Speal - scythe
T - Táirne - nail
Y - Gabhlóg - prop for a tree

Obtained by
Fras. O'Duffy N.T.
Boys' N.S.
Castleblaney

from
Michael Lennon
Tusker
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 16:00
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awaiting decision
In the old days hurling was called "Baire". The game was usually played with a piece of ash or whitethorn dressed and cut in the form of a Caman. Teams from neighbouring townlands played against each other and the ball was generally a large spool.
There were 21 players on each team. Coats were placed for goalposts about six yards apart. The game was played in a large field.
Except for the goalkeeper there was no such thing as men being placed in certain positions as nowadays.
The game was played so strongly that sometimes when a goal was scored, the team that scored it not content
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 15:35
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awaiting decision
it tightly and it would draw it.

2) To put a piece of cow-dung to it.
3) To put a piece of wax to it at night and in the morning it will be out gripped to the wax.

To Break a Lump - to grind a piece of the forum leaf; heat it by the fire and put it to the lump and it will break it.

For a sting of a nettle - to rub a docleaf to the sting

For the Cléithín - leave an oaten-meal cake on the chest and leave twelve rushes lighting on it, and leave a wine-glass over the rushes. The wine-glass will stick to the bone and pull it up.

Cures for Cuts
1) The powder of a fairy-mushroom
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 15:30
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26) Ráiméal-Ridhe (?) - it is good for kidney trouble
27) Garlick - a cure for Asthma

28) Luibh na Mailí Seang (shong) - it is a very bitter weed and it rises lumps on a person

29) the Fórum leaf - able to break a lump

30) Nettle, called Neantóg in places - given to young ducks and turkeys. Flavours cabbage. To eat nettles three times in March prevents you from getting a cold all the whole year

31) Féar Trí Ribe - would give the rot to sheep
32) Glórán - in meadows, is bad for the land

33) the Bud Gadhair - kills sheep and lambs, Goats can eat it

34) the Billeóg Saor - grows on the banks of a river - cures cuts

35) the Fearabhán
36) the Buachallán Buidhe
37) Poppies

38) Thistle (Called "Thrishel") - also called Fóthanán - it is cut for pigs

39) Meag na gCaorach
40) Groundsel - given to goldfinches
41) Scutch grasss - bad for land
42) Cow-grass
43) Dandelion
44) the Cruach Phádhraic - good for a burn
45) Cow-slip
46) Blue-bell

47) Cabbage - kinds grown here:-
York
Flat Dutch
Common Cabbage
Brackley (Curly)

48) Cauliflower
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 09:37
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49) Lettuce - not grown by country people
50) Rhubarb Red and Green
51) Parsley

52) Onions (Innions pron.)
Potato innions
James's Keeping

53) Parsnips

54) Mangels
Yellow Top Mangel

55) Turnips
Aberdeen
Swede

56) Potatoes
EARLY:-
Epicures
May Queens
Rose of the Rhine (Early)
Sharp's Express
Garden Fillers
LATE:-
Kerr Pinks
Aran Banners
Aran Victors
Striped Champions
Butes
English Queens
Golden Wonders (a new potato)
senior member (history)
2019-08-13 09:27
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(Pages Nos. 158 to 161 do not exist)

1) Bráiste - yellow weed that grows through corn
2) the Ceathramha Caorach - sheeps quarter
3) the Crow's Foot
4) Briostán
5) Neanntóg Dearg
6) Robin -run - the - hedges
7) Sponnc
8) Plumcadán - the white roots like parsnip in ploughing
9) Raithneach - in good land for grazing
10) Lamb's Ear - grows in good land
11) the Do(g) Leaf
12) the Ceannabhán
13) Flaggers
14) Water Lily
15) the Mailí - Seang also Luibh na Mailí Seang
16) Chicken Weed
17) Sleóchtán - sign of bad land
18) Bliosgán (?) - Brioslán
19) an Luibh Eoin Baiste - a weed cures kidney trouble
20) Ro - ver - gree
21) Shamrock

22) Blátha comh Brast:-
grows in very bleak lands. So small the naked eye cannot see it. It poisons sheep. Goats eat it - its harm less to them

23) Cotton Plant grows in warm places. When its blossom dies a little pod comes containing a number of black seeds. If cattle eat the seeds they would be choking for a few days.

24) the Tóirpín also Tóispín, grows on old thatched houses. It is a cure for sore eyes in cattle (Greene)

25)
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 18:49
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328) Galar Crupach - when the hoofs begin to rot and the knees begin to fail in cattle

329) he is an awful STREACHAILE - a person who from hard work would look older than he really was

330) he is an awful big PRÁITEÁN - a big soft man - not able to bear much hardship

331) Pléib Óinsidhe - a girl that would do something wrong

332) the Caistin Cloch - a small bird that would be flying from one heap of stones to another

333) he is only an auld BAILE BAILODHAIR - a boy that'd do something wrong

334) he is very CRÁIDHTE for it - sore over losing anything

335) Bundún - he made a BANDÚN of it - a bad job
336) I put the cows down the CURRACHAÍ - soft land
337) Sgioból - an old barn

338) a small little bird that would be around the house like a wren - called DREOILÍN na LATHAIGHE

339) when anything would go wrong with a person they'd say - A Mhuire, Mhuire, what'll I do

340) Ochón go deó - if anything bad happened
341) Móin Bhán - the top turf
342) Spallóg - a small short hurl

343) Spáillín - a small stone you'd stick in the wall to keep a big one steady

344) Cosán - a path

345) the CLOCH MHULLAIG - the last stone to be put on a house

346) I knocked DEATACH out of him - I gave him a beating
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 18:36
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305) "Sláinte geal mo mhúirnín bán" - said to a baby in the Cliabhán

306) Ó Dhia na Cruinne, what'll I do

307) "Go ndeacaidh tú slán" - if a person was going into danger

308) if there was a feast in it, and you walked in without being expected they'd say you had "FHIOS"

309) he was a right old SCÉALAIDE
310) Suidh síos!
311) Go losg' an diabhail thú!
312) I'm going to CÉILIDHE to night -to visit- to CUAIRD
313) I'll MARBHFUSTAR you!

314) Stopóg - land that would not be tilled very well, they'd be wet lumps in it - that field is all STOPÓG

315) a little GARDENÍN the child'd make and he'd sow things in it, tis called a BRÁCÁÍ (?)

316) Claibín Mhullach - the head of an egg that you'd take off when you'd be going to eat it

317) Bairbín - put a toe-cap on your shoe, called a BAIRBÍN

318) there is great RÚPÁILLE out there - noise

319) is there anything on you? (Looking pale or anything) There isn't a FUINNÍN

320) if a person done anything wrong they'd say: You'll get TOCHAINNSE FICSEAR (?) - a scolding

321) Cinn

322) Buail isteach! - we had BUAIL ISTEACH'S to-day - strangers

323) Isn't it on you the FARRACH is - a terrible hurry

324) they call the month of March MÁRTA na GÁGS - because youd have GÁGS on your feet

325) Cóiste Bodhar
326) Bean Sidhe
327) a cut between two toes - the GEALA DRIÚITÍN
senior member (history)
2019-08-12 09:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
270) Bodharach - dry cow dung
271) John is the PEATA an TIGHE
272) Cach bó; Cac asal; Cac cearc; Cac capaill; Cac gé

273) there is no harm in his old DEAGH-CHAINT - foolish talk

274) Peadaicín - a small field
275) he got the FÉAR GHORTACH
276) there's great FAOBHAR on that knife

277) (Sketch) indicating the CAOL-FHÓD in lea-land; the small piece of green sod left between two ridges and dug into both to cover potatoes

278) hadn't I great CATHÚ to do that
279) he was going to do it, MÁ B'FHÍOR DÓ HÉIN

280) if a poor person got a motor car the neighbours would say:-
"Anois céárd deir tú ná bac le Gailli(mh)"

(Gap 281-288)

289) Rúille-búille
290) I'll do it LOM LÁITHREACH
291) Sliogán - an old slippers
292) Slimide - a big soft black snail, without any shell
293) Slán libh!
294) Go mairidh tú é 'sgo go gcaithidh tú é do sláinte"
295) Bíonn fáth le ga' nídh
296) Ná bí ag cainnt!

297) he is only an old THUGA TUGADH !
HUGGA THUGGA

298) have you any news? DHEAMHAN SCÉAL
299) a small clamp of turf - A DÚCHÁN
300) Deir sé!
301) Plás - the part of the bog where the turf is footed
302) Súdar - any kind of grease
303) Gura maith agat!
304) I am going there! MUISE, BHFUIL TÚ!
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 22:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mar dhéintear imeasc naomh agus Eangla
Ar n-arán laetheamhail tabhair dúinn é gac lá
Maith duinn ar bhfíache' is ar bpeacadh mar mhaithimíd an Cealla dích cách

* * *

Doillín tú an pháis faoí'n ar bpeachadh agus an cróin fastí ar a cheann
Bhí do cos agus do láimhe da streacadh' is na táirnighe dá sparac a gcrainn
Saitibh an tleáth in do brollach agus táinic an tuille gan spáis

O Íosa:- Sé do croidhe bhí dá thola, ná leig lúach, do cuid folla le fán

* * *

An Abhairingh sé dubhraibh le t-ainm na dulltigh acht freagar mé draw(?)
Ó sé féin a thugadh cutú d' ón leadhthrom, tabhair cúitú dhó a bhláithis da bhárr
Ná lig sinn í mhuithré na gcaithigh act saor sinn ón bpeacaidh go gnáich
Amén lé na ndubhras a bheith seaspach, faoí dó cumachta - sa gcaithir na ngráist

* * *

Mile agus ocht - gcéad an datha, deich fichid gan bhréigh chuir in a cheann
Ó h-abhairlinn an t-Árd-Rí a céasaibh ar son peacadh shíl Éibh ar an gcrainn
Sin agaibh an datha ann, ar éig sé agus a sinaibh a d'éig ins an ghiall
In uaigneas agus ualach an cré air no go dtagadh lá an t-sléibhe in chin

* * *

Is le gradh dúinn a tabhairlainn tú ar talamh, ní lé grádh ar bith ar saidhbhris an t-saoghal
Níor sanntach tú óir buidhe ná arra
Níor fhan tú ar alach mar míon
Níor shuidh tú fré coisear ar thaillidhe ag ól uisce beatha ná fíon
Act ag comhairle na ndaoine dhá dteagas agus dhá dtreoradh ar fláitheas ná Naomh

Mark and Patrick Callanan (1825)
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 21:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
+2
245) (243) The quill (cuil?) - horsefly
246) Ciaróg
247) the CRIOGAR (cricket) Mrs. Linnane, Creggane
248) Siogán - the ant
249) Siogán Sneachta - the jay-thrush

250) the Minnale - a Minneal - a bird that flies around at night; over a callow

251) a Gobán - a piece of a stick they'd have stuck in a kid's mouth in fear he'd suck the milk of the goat

252) he got a PRAIGÍN of money - a little money

253) On November Night the old people make an oaten cake and strikes it three times against the wall saying:-
"Cuirfidh mé mo ghort síos go tón cúglach ó anocht go dtí bliadain ó 'nocht agus anocht féin, Amen."
(Meaning: I will put my hunger down to the bottom of hell for next year to night)

(Gap 254-260)

261) he took a PREAB with the spade - all the spade would take

262) the Cíor - the row of thatch across the top of a house - combed.

263) the Cloch Préachán - the gable stone - three cornered (sketch)

264) the Teanga - the part of the flail that connects the Buailteán with the handle

265) I knocked SMÚDAR out of him - dust
266) Smúdar - turf dust
267) Sliodar - the ducks made a SLIODAR of the floor

268) when a person would be telling a story and to tell more than what happened they'd say -
he put SLACHT on it

269) If a person was telling a story and you broke in - they'd say you wanted to put your own LADAR in it
senior member (history)
2019-08-11 09:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
+2
225) (223) he is an awful BAILLSÉIRE - crux(?)
226) he is an awful BAILODHAR (BAILOUR) - crut(?)
227) you are very TRÁTHAMHAIL - very timely
228) he has a MEITHEAL working to-day

229) Borróg - the iron that holds on the chain to the swingle trees C.F. Bróigín (Rockfield)

230) he is a very SLACHTAR man - tidy
231) Codladh go do headartha - sleep till dinner time
232) put a PÚICÍN on the calf - the little basket

233) that ass is a PÚICÍN - a young ass, with the hair long and growing over his eyes

234) tis on you the DEIFIR is - hurry
235) Ó Dia á réidhteach - if a wall fell

236) isn't it on you the MACRAS is - great humour, also if a lamb was jumping round they'd say - there was great MACRAS on him

237) he bought a lot of BUILÍNS - loaves
238) have you any old CASÓG

239) a person that would not be able to eat you'd say he has only a "GOILE SICÍN"

240) CAILLICHÍN RUADH - a little red fish like a trout that would be under stones - length of forefingers (Carrigeen)

241) Bolgadán - a fat little fish about the length of a finger that would come up out of the mud

242) Pinncín - a small fishín, black, stays in clear water
243) Ní thagann ciall roimh aois

244) Luighe leis an uan, Éirigh leis an éan
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 20:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sa cóir
Níor mhinteas dá n-árduigheadh dí-céille air ó chaill sé an té a bhí go cóir
Ba baramhail an duine as gach áit é agus ba fear maith é láthair an óil
Act faríor ní feicear ar a bháidh é cé gur minic a d'arduigh sé sheól

* * *

Núair théigheadh ag an rílán Día Dómhnáigh, ba mhoide an spórt é a bheith ann
Sé h-í ar a saoghal i gceann na gcomharsainn mar manach a comhraidh le greann
Sé sgibhibh an bealach é i dtúis óige, sáoghal fada ní se a bhí indan
Agus arnó bfui gile an croidhe móir, dá theigheadh litrice óir as a ceann.

* * *

Is ar siúd a chuala mé an teastais le múineadh, le cneastas agus cíall
A bhárr a cuid féin poinntí maithe ro-mór atá cathaidh in a diaidh
Ma bhí indán dó is gur dhéineamh é glacadh ná gur shibse súil peachadh é ariamh
Ó Íosa! déin siléibh a cheannacht ná tréigh mac ná mbeannact sía

* * *

Bá deas agus bhá geanamhail é a éadain, ba sonnanta laetheamhail é a gnúis
Bhí pharsa teact cumidhe le céile gan arbhíth, éilean o thúas
Bhí sé le moladh as a threith - ré le gráithigh thighe sé chuireadh tlúis
Sé dhéineadh gac oibre gád a d'eathach nach ndearna a né góir in aon cúis

* * *
Sé do bheatha a Bhainnrioghan na n'Eagil, tá línte le toile na grást
Tá an Tighearna go grádhach maidir leat, is beannuigh tú idir na mná
Sé toradh do bríon atá beannuigh, Ó Íosa preabh in a lár
Naomh mar a mathair Día, guidh orainn aníos agus ar úair ár mbáis

* * *

Ár n-athair atá thúas ar na flaitheas is naomh tá e a h-ainm le rádh
Go dtigidh do rígheact ar an talamh agus go ndéintear do toil imeasc cách
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 20:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
+2
200) (198) Calling a hen - Tioc: Tioc;
201) Calling a duck - Pús; Pús; Pús.
202) Calling geese - Beadaidhe; Beadaidhe:
203) Calling a turkey - Dhíb; Dhíb; Dhíb.
204) Calling chickens - Stis; Stis; Sdis:
205) Calling a pig - Deoch; Deoch; Deoch.
206) Calling a sow - Hurrais; Hurais.
207) Calling a goat - Dein; Dein (jen)
208) Calling a sheep - Seón; Seón; Seón.
209) Calling a calf - Suc; Suc;
210) Calling a cow - Pwo; Pwo(?)
211) Calling a horse - Pri: Pri;
212) Calling a cat - Pse; Psh -

213) Driving a cow - "How"
214) he went down the road in a Sodarorín - a Ceantar
215) I got a PÁLTÓG from the master - a slap of a stick
216) Dúdóg - a blow of a fist
217) I'll give you TÚIRNE MHÁIRE ! - a good thrashing
218) You'll get TOGH TOBAC if you don't mind yourself
219) he got as white as MÁIRE BÁN
220) a little SRUITHÍN

221) when you'd say to a cow to move over there you'd say:
Deas fós annsin ! - BLACKGARDIN(?)
Deas fód annsin - CARRIGAN(?)

222) if you were milking and she was stirring:
Fan go socair

223) if a person had a cow milked he'd say:
Bail ó Yes a we

224) you have the MILSEARA(SHARA)
that would be said to a person in a district who would have the potatoes or corn reaped first
senior member (history)
2019-08-10 09:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
+2
179) (177) the Fimidhe - the hind part of any bird
180) "Go ndéana Dia grást air" - when a person would die
181) Go lean an Diabhal é

182) Go deó thú - when a person would be singing a song well

183) Bail ó Dhia ort !
184) if you don't do it they'll be "MURTHER DEARGH !"
185) Céad míle Fáilte !
186) Sáithteán - the twisted scollop used in thatching
187) Frathans - kind of red berries that grow on mountains

188) Crúibín cait's (?) - blackberries while they are green (like cats' feet)

189) the FEOIR ón the creel of turf - the MAOL on top of the creel of turf

190) when people would cut briers they'd say "you can have a LAGÁN there on Sunday

191) he has a STORCHÁN on him to-day - he is in no humour

192) SGIORTÁN in a cow's tail

193) Cis - a small bridge across a river where you'd wheel a barrow of turf

194) a goose's PÍOBÁN - windpipe

195) Plumparnán - a big black bee that flies around at night

196) a SINNEÁN of wind - a blast
197) he had a CLUAIS on him inside the wall listening
198) T'amam ón Diabhall thú !

199) If you were hunting they'd say:-
a Cat - Scuit a dhiabhail !
a Duck - Slach amach !
a Goose - Sgé !
a Hen - Scearc !
hunting out a Pig - Smuich amach !
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 19:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
( Marcas agus Peatsaí O'Callanáin )

Tá muinntear an Oileán go búadhrach ó sínibh san uaigh an fir éan
Ní mhaith linn gur caillibh an buachaill ró-múineadh tabhairt suas le léigheann
A h-abhail ní raibh ar na cúanta, bhí an sway torí suas dó le meáin
Bhí princí fir gac uile úair ann agus ní raibh fear fúach ag Paddy Keane

* * *

Núair a shíl sé dul treasna na h-átha agus é filleamhaint le cótrá na h-oidhche
Siud mar bhí an sinúnt indan do gur thuit sé le fanadh ins an t'-slighe
Bhainibh a chapall as a snáimh agus phreab an tuinn bhaidhte in a dhiaidh
Ní bhfuair sé cead' aitrigh ón mbáis act gur sgread sé h-árdar Dhia

* * *

Is mór a bhí ar a thorramh an dhá oidhche agus é leagthí amach sínte sa gcláir
Bhí dolais ar óig agus críon ann, ní bféidir duine chaoinead ní bfearr
Ba fear é, a raibh meas agus gnidhe air cé nár mhair sé i gceann na daoine act seall - géarr
Ní beidh an misneach chéadhna acú caothain, sé d'fhágadh a gcroidhe tinn é a bheith ar láir

* * *

Déinibh a chléamhnais Día Domhnaigh agus bhí geall air é pósadh Diardaoin
Act fairior ní h-é sin bhí indhan dó acht e síneadh sa gconra ins an gcill
Nách trúagh sin an cailín a phóg é agus nach sine go dteó le n-a thaobh
Act céad a bheitag gosníl go brónach deineadh léan dó agus dóláis in a dhiaidh

* * *

Bíonn a athair ag gosníl agus ag gé ghine, núair chíon sé a cuid éadaigh
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 19:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
+2
149) (147) Salach
150) Suarach
151) the "SCRAITHÍN" in the bog
152) the Bainne Buidhe - beastings
153) Sceach
154) a TOR of bushes
155) Beárna
156) Bata
157) Scáilteán - the young bird
158) Scáiltín - meal and buttermilk boiled

159) he is a big BODACH - a young boy that would be always eating

160) milk that would be too sour even for baking, just for pigs is the "BAINNE GÉAR"

161) Smig
162) Pus
163) Féasóg
164) Glinncín - a foolis
165) the Carn Aoileach
166) Caiscín - wheat when 'tis ready to be ground
167) the Luchín ál - the smallest Banbh in a clutch
168) he tore his coat into MÍLE STRIOCHLÁN
169) Smidiríns

170) Gurraigíns - the irons that hold the coltar of the plough firm

171) Taobhán - (sketch)
172) Taoibhín - a patch on the side of a shoe
173) Ruadhóg - made a RUADHÓG - wax end
174) go our for a BREISNIÚ (?) of sticks

175) two lads to carry an injured person sitting on their hands joined together - carrying him BREISNIÚ (?) BRANDÍ

176) the Críoch is the last scrape when you would be ploughing a field - he is just doing the CRÍOCH

177) Cliabhán - rock the CLIABHÁN

178) the Maide Bradach - the stick that would be in a crib for catching birds
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 12:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a holy well in Araglen called St Michaels well. There is a big sycamore tree growing near the well, and it is said that it is lucky to have a bit of the bark of the tree in your pocket. Many years ago the day before the well, many people would come to the well bringing with them porter and whiskey and they would put up their tents near the well and stay there until next day, knowing that there would be a big crowd at the well and that they would make good profit. Many people got drunk and began to fight, and often a lot of blood got spilled at the well. This was carried out for many years, but at last a priest from Ballyduff stopped the people of bringing drink to the well, and he said it should be called Tobar na Folla instead of Tobar na hOlla.
The rounds are made by going round the tree, three times and say a rosary going around. You could not go around the well because the river is flowing too near it. When you
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 12:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
would have the rosary said you would kneel in front of the well and ask St Michael to intercede for you. Then you would drink of the water and wash your face in it.
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 11:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
+2
121) (119) I had my CÁMÓG with me: - a walking stick with a turn in it

122) the RUISÍN(?) - the evening tea in the meadow or bog

123) Deir tú!
124) he is very CANTALACH !
125) he is MAITH GO LEOR !
126) Fág an bealach!

127) " Bolg mór ar ghiorrán agus bolg beag ar lár "
advice if you were going to buy a horse at a fair

128) leave it MAR SIN
129) here he is coming SOCAR AN' AISY
130) leave that story CIÚIN, dont tell it any more
131) there is a SIONÁN in his breath - he is out of breath
132) Leig do séith
133) he (there) is a CRÓCHÁN in his voice
134) Ná bac leis

135) if a person were very generous they'd say he'd give you FUIL a' CHROIDHE

* * *
136) he is as greedy that he'd kill a SPIDEÓG for the feathers

137) Cé chaoi bhfuil tú!
138) Mogall Muire - a double net (?)
139) he knocked the "TÓN" out of it
140) Gáirdín

141) when they'd be hunting a goat they'd say "Gabhar a ghabhar"

142) he is as hard as a PUCAIDE GABHAR
143) knock a DREAS out of the churn

144) "Is fearr bheith ag marcadheacht ar ghabhar ná coisidheacht dá fheabhas"

145) Turloch
146) a row of stones going across a river - a CLOCHÁN

147) when the same story is talked about for a long time (tis said and not true)
"Dubhairt bean liom gur dhubhairt bean léithí gur chuala sí bean dá rádh"

148) a horse with very hairy legs - a CLIBEÓG of a horse
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 11:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Toureen Wood House, in the townland of Toureen, parish of Kilmoyler, and the barony of Clanwilliam, interfered with it, and it never appeared there afterwards. Maguire was murdered by two young men afterwards and his family went to America.
There is another well in Ballydrehid on the Old Road, in the parish of Kilmoyler and the barony of Clanwilliam. It is not known whether it is holy or not. There is also a lump of butter changed into stone there which was changed by St. Pecaun. The well has changed three times. On one occasion a woman washed potatoes in the well and it changed. She is buried a short distance from the well.
senior member (history)
2019-08-09 10:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
she will be married before the end of the year. Prayers are said while doing the rounds, and the people walk seven times in the stream flowing close to the well. St. Pecaun blessed the well, and invalids go there and bathe in the water. They then tie a 'rag' to the hawthorn bush beside the well, and they firmly believe that they leave the disease after them. Every year the bush is covered with 'rags' of every colour and description, medals and Rosary Beads.
People from far and near go to the well for some of the water which is used for domestic purposes only. Beside the well is a small hole into which the water flows, and the people bathe in it, and it cures cuts, and sprains of every sort. There is no fish in the well but long ago a red trout appeared there every seven years. It was only seen by certain people on certain days. A Protestant landlord named Maguire who lived in
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(+2)
88) (86) a DAOIS of corn - an ear

89) Brat - a bag that would be opened out to cover a cock of hay

90) he knocked a big GÉAG off the tree
91) the BRÓIGÍN of a spade
92) the BRÓIGÍN of a swindetree
93) Biseach a' Bháis - a good turn before death
94) a MÁM of flour
95) Aithnigheann ciaróg ciaróg eile
96) he is very DÁNA
97) he cut a SRAITH of hay

98) whey you would buy a bad cow or horse -
"Ceannuigh droch-rud agus beidh tú gan aon rud"

99) Dóib buidhe - white marley
100) Did he do it? "Tis for the GRÁDH DÉ he done it
101) Mía Mór (Mí-adh) - misfortune
102) I won't do it while PUISÍN is a cat
103) Púitín - a hole in the wall for sheep to pass through
104) Fidín - small stones in the bottom of a wall - fidíns
105) Tobairín - the hole in a rock where the water lodges
Bullóg
106) Cuileóg - the snow is falling in CUILEÓGS
107) Lochán
108) tis as black as a PRÉACHÁN
109) Tá sé fuar
110) Cáibín
111) Droichidín - a small bridge
112) Coinín

113) he was as LEITHEADACH doing it as a lad that would be able to do it. He did not know how but he let on how to do it.

114) the horse is very FAITEACH

115) Go mbeimíd beo ar an t-am so arís. agus
Go mbeirimíd...........

116) Teanam uait (?)

117) The TÉAD BHEAG - the head chain of the plough
118) Bachán - hinge of a gate

119) before a cow calves she passes the BOLGÁN UISGE

120) he is after doing a great GAISGE
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
beart-----a bundle of hay.
sop-----a wisp
gabhail-----armful (of turf)
paithín---a swathe (new-mown hay)
gabhlóg
-----a forked piece of a branch used to prop up a common car when greasing it.
meitheal
-----a crowd that keep at threshing etc.
somach-----strong child
púicín-----calf muzzle
sleaghan-----turf spade
púitín
-----a hole in a wall where sheep can run from one field to another.
bogán-----egg without a shell
glugar-----egg not fertile
báinín-----flannel under vest.
camóg-----crooked stick
bádóir
-----Connemara man who helped at potato digging some years ago in the district
gráineóg-----porcupine
bróigín-----treadle of a spade
dúirnín -----scythe handle
ciaróg-----cock-roach
béilín-----part of a plough
scib
-----a boat-shaped strainer made of rods (used for straining potatoes)
scilleáin
-----potatoes cut for planting.
grógán----- (of turf)
caorán--small piece of a sod of turf
bodharán
-----the timber part of a riddle or sieve covered with sheep-skin. It is used for carrying in turf etc.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
beart-----a bundle of hay.
sop-----a wisp
gabhail-----armful (of turf)
paithín---a swathe (new-mown hay)
gabhlóg
-----a forked piece of a branch used to prop up a common car when greasing it.
meitheal
-----a crowd that keep at threshing etc.
somach-----strong child
púicín-----calf muzzle
sleaghan-----turf spade
púitín
-----a hole in a wall where sheep can run from one field to another.
bogán-----egg without a shell
glugar-----egg not fertile
báinín-----flannel under vest.
camóg-----crooked stick
bádóir
-----Connemara man who helped at potato digging some years ago in the district
gráineóg-----porcupine
bróigín-----treadle of a spade
dúirnín -----scythe handle
ciaróg-----cock-roach
béilín-----part of a plough
scib
-----a boat-shaped strainer made of rods (used for straining potatoes)
scilleáin
-----potatoes cut for planting.
grógán----- (of turf)
caorán--small piece of a sod of turf
bodharán (?)
-----the timber part of a riddle or sieve covered with sheep-skin. It is used for carrying in turf etc.
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(+2)
88) (86) a DAOIS of corn - an ear

89) Brat - a bag that would be opened out to cover a cock of hay

90) he knocked a big GÉAG off the tree
91) the BRÓIGÍN of a spade
92) the BRÓIGÍN of a swindetree
93) Biseach a' Bháis - a good turn before death
94) a MÁM of flour
95) Aithnigheann ciaróg ciaróg eile
96) he is very DÁNA
97) he cut a SRAITH of hay

98) whey you would buy a bad cow or horse -
"Ceannuigh droch-rud agus beidh tú gan aon rud"

99) Dóib buidhe - white marley
100) Did he do it? "Tis for the GRÁDH DÉ he done it
101) Mía Mór (Mí-adh) - misfortune
102) I won't do it while PUISÍN is a cat
103) Púitín - a hole in the wall for sheep to pass through
104) Fidín - small stones in the bottom of a wall - fidíns
105) Tobairín - the hole in a rock where the water lodges
Bullóg
106) Cuileóg - the snow is falling in CUILEÓGS
107) Lochán
108) tis as black as a PRÉACHÁN
109) Tá sé fuar
110) Cáibín
111) Droichidín - a small bridge
112) Coinín

113) he was as LEITHEADACH doing it as a lad that would be able to do it. He did not know how but he let on how to do it.

114) the horse is very FAITEACH

115) Go mbeimíd beo ar an t-am so arís. agus
Go mbeirimíd...........

116) Teamam uait (?)

117) The TÉAD BHEAG - the head chain of the plough
118) Bachán - hinge of a gate

119) before a cow calves she passes the BOLGÁN UISGE

120) he is after doing a great GAISGE
senior member (history)
2019-08-08 22:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a woman who lived in Gleann na gCoirce, and her name was Betí Ní Bhrian. She had two sons and they were two robbers. All the money they robbed they hid it in a cave in Gleann na gCoirce. At last the gards came to arrest them. Betí and her sons were in the house when the gards came. Betí half opened the door and left the army come in one by one and she used kill them as soon as they would come in. It is said that she threw a rock about three tons weight into the river to step across. The rock is still to be seen at the Cummer between Gortnaskehy and Liss. Betí Ní Bhrian could bring half a bullock on her back across the river.

This story was told by James Slattery, Gortnaskehy.

Liam Ó Rian
Propóg
Araiglinn
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 21:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(The Four Seasons of the Year - Peatsaí O'Callanáin)

Thagann an t-Earrach mar a maidean, chiúin thebi
Bíonn dillebhir ar crainnnibh agus cillúr ag eanlaibh
Bhíonn finnsgar ag marcuigh agus adarca da séideadh
Bíonn meidir agus misneach ar intinn gac aon fear

* * *

Núair a thagann's an samhrad, bíonn fad ar na laetibh.
Bíonn teas ins an grían agus neart ar na gáothaibh
Acht teidheann síad in deireadh i gceann againn in a dhiaidh sin
Thagann múis agus fúrú ar ghealra na gréine

* * *

Núair a thagann's an Fóghmhair bíonn lón ag na daoine
Agus biadha le stóráil faoí choinnú an gheimhreadh
Bíonn mbeachaibh ag bailiú a gcuid meala faoí thúrim
Lei aimsir, an teacadh agus dona na túra

* * *

Núair a tagann's an gheimhreadh, bíonn fuinn ins an gaoithe
Bíonn na dilleór ag tuitim, ag crapa agus ag críonadh
Act tagann an Nodhlag le solamar féiste
Mar chine agus ar crocadh ar h-abháirlint an Aon-Mhic.
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 20:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
46) Rai(th)each - ferns
47) Bráiste - a certain weeds
48) Fine day! Seadh, go deimhin
49) Ciaróg -
50) Boithrín (ana-caol - s ) - a small road
51) Catch a teapoot (?) - Tá sé te

52) Broighdeach - a rope that goes from the two horses when they are ploughing to keep them from separating

53) Fine day! M'anam gur b'eadh
54) Báinín
55) Carraig
56) Ceart go leor
57) I'll put SMACHT on him
58) He hit him a LEADÓG
59) I hit him with the BUSÓG
60) he is AR MUIN na MUICE
61) Bainbhín
62) A' bhfuil fhios agat!
63) Mar dheadh
64) a TOM of bushes - a small bunch
65) Riasg - soft land by a river
66) Crúibín
67) Dia linn (pron. Jelinn)
68) Bothán - a small house

69) Go scuabadh an diabhail as mo radharc thú
70) D'tachtadh an diabhail thú
71) he had a fine DROIGHNEÁN in his hand
72) Ciseán
73) Close your GOB
74) when two men co-operate they are on "COMH"
75) Mionnán
76) Gabhlóg
77) the MADADH RUADH passed here
78) he is as wake (weak) as a TRÁITHNÍN
79) the GÉ BEG - the giblets of the goose
80) Bogán - a soft egg
81) Glugar - a rotten egg
82) Céiseach (Céirseach) - a big thrush

83) Bonnóg - a hard lump on the sole of a person's foot from the shoe

84) Bardal (short "a") - a drake
85) Gróigíns
86) DOIRNÍNS of a scythe
87) I got a bucket of water in the SRUTHÁN
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 15:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cnocán : Small portion of hilly land in Cruit.
Leach Artúin : Place near Bracknagh - beside Bothar mór.
Stone with inscription there some years ago.
Roinne Finne : field behind Cloonmore.
Crugáin : Bushy part in Rinanny.
Clocán árd : Behind Clooncagh.
Cluan catha : Village
Cluan mór : village
Cluan Dheisceirt : village
Dubhlacháin : marshy wet place between Cloonmore and Clooncagh.
Tobar na Móna : well in Clooncagh Bog.
Mona Gann : disused bog in Tullaghan
Móinín Cruinn : field
Craobhna : field in Clooncagh with an old fort in it.
Puillean na Muic [?].
Bugan : Field near Clooncraf.
Insh : Island near Inchenagh.
Maillach's : Hilly district near Bracknagh.
Gleann na nGabhar : Place in Inchenagh ([?] na gabar)
Muicinis : Point of Inis Cloithrinn
Deirige : at back of Cloonsellan.
Geata Salach : Portion of road Bracknagh - Knock'ry
Currach : in Cloonmore
Tulleghan : village
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 14:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a small hedge school in the village of Balleymana in the county of Galway. It was near Tom Ruenns house. Tom Ruenns house is near the National School of Balleymana. That hedge school was indoors. The scholars had to bring a penny and a sod of turf every Monday morning. The master lodged in a farmers house near by. All Irish was taught in this school. Master and pupils had all Irish. Slates and Doib Buidhe was used for writing. There were stones used for seats. There was a black board in the school also.

bailighthe ó:
Kate McTigue
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 14:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a small hedge school in the village of Balleymana in the county of Galway. It was near Tom Ruenns house. Tom Ruenns house is near the National School of Balleymana. That hedge school was indoors. The scholars had to bring a penny and a sod of turf every Monday morning. The master lodged in a farmers house near by. All Irish was taught in this school. Master and pupils had all Irish. Slates and Doib Buidhe was used for writing. There were stones used for seats. There was a black board in the school also.
senior member (history)
2019-08-07 14:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9) that horse is BRADACH - would never stay in his old field
10) Brabach - profit
11) Flaitheamhail - generous
12) Sanntach - greedy

13) Troighín - an old stocking put over a boot in time of frost

14) Sciollán - seed-potato

15) the red coals after timber are called SPRIUMHAS(?); when they are black they are called SMIOTÓGS

16) Leachtán - a heap of stones
17) Cárnán - a heap of stones
18) Spairteach - wet turf
19) Caoráns - small bits of turf
20) Brosna - faggot
21) Lúbóg - a small little eel
22) Gabhail - an armful
23) Giorrán - a big strong horse
24) Cipin - a small stick
25) Ceannabhán -
26) Lios - a fort

27) the have no MEAS MADADH for him

28) Ciseach - sticks making a bridge over a drain coming out of a bog

29) a MAOL-COW - a polly
30) Spág - a big, broad foot
31) Caonach Liath - mildew
32) Súgán
33) Bodharán - a dish made of sheep-skin to carry turf

34) Práiscín - a bag a person would have tied around the waist while spreading seed

35) he was out until MEADHON OIDHCHE
36) Gráinneóg
37) Dúidín
38) Leac
39) Faoilléans
40) Pilibín - never called "plover"
41) BUAILTEÁN of flail
42) Tréna chéile - everything upside down
43) Fraoch
44) Siobhán Fhada - Judy long-legs
45) Plámás
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 22:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Peatsí O'Callanáin)

Núair a thagann's an maidin lé h-éirigh na gréine
Bíonn méidhir ar na daoine ag éirig as a ngáeltibh
Bíonn an smólach, an gleóiseac, an chuach agus an céirseach ag tabhairt glóire do'n Árd-Rí, Sé crotach gach aon rud

* * *
Núair a tagann's an t-neadaire i meadhon an lae glé-geal
bíonn soilseach gan smallac in néalra na gréine
Act thugann sí lighinn agus í ag imirt le fánadh
Agus éaluigheann sí uaithne mar imthigheann's an lan-múir

* * *

Núair a tagann's an tráthnóna, bíonn bród ar na daoine
An nBráthidhe(?) a bheith i gcóir shul dha thagann's an oidhche
Act té dhínins fhailigh, nac tugann aire da dhuty
Aró sé an cáilamhaint indeire na cúise

* * *

Núair a thagann's an oidhche, bíonn sgíath ag gach duine
Ag cómhraidh agus ag símse i' na suidhe ag chois teine
Act théighimíd a codladh, trom, tuirseach ó'n scláibheact
Sin, féist do cheap Críosta mar sheimhneas d'ár gnámha
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 21:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
grave -
"the sheaf that is bound in the harvest will be loosed in the spring" -
or they will always be badly off and full of cares and anxieties! No doubt, the original idea was that it was thriftless to marry at a season when all attention should be devoted to saving the crops.

It is very unlucky for the bridal party to meet a lame or squinting person; in some places red-haired people, or even a woman with a red petticoat or a red handkerchief on her head, would be considered an ill-omen to the happy pair! In County Cork, however, the girls at Shrovetide almost invariably invest in a new red flannel petticoat, which they wear going to Mass, market or fair, or indeed anywhere that a match is likely to be arranged for them!

May weddings are supposed to be unfortunate -
"Marry in May,
Die of decay!"
or,
"Who weds in May weds poverty!"
The Scotch version runs thus -
"Married in May and kirked in green,
Baith bride and bridegroom winna long to be seen!"
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 21:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Scotland, there is a prejudice against Friday marriages, for is not that day of the week sacred to "the good people" who resent any mortal merrymakings or festivities on this day? The old rhyme is still current in many parts of our isles -
"Monday for health,
And Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all!
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
Saturday no luck at all!"
Sunday is omitted from this rhyme, yet it is a favourite day with working people all over the world. In Scotland, New Year's Eve is highly popular for weddings; in Ireland, Shrove Tuesday is the favoured day among the country folks.
The prejudice against Lenten marriages is even stronger than in other parts of the Kingdom, where of late a good many society weddings have taken place at this period in spite of the old adage -
"Marry in Lent,
You'll come to want"!

In the South of Scotland it is thought very unlucky to marry during the Autumn, particularly at harvest time: those who do so will either fill an early
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the South of Ireland it is considered most unlucky for two sisters to be married on the same day: one or both are supposed to die before the year is out!

To marry a man whose surname begins with the same letter as one's own is also said to be a sign of misfortune for -
"To change the name and not the letter,
Is a change for the worse and not for the better!"

On the other hand, it is deemed most fortunate to marry without changing one's names. Such people are supposed to have a cure for many diseases - bread or cakes baked by a woman whose maiden name was the same as that of her husband being considered a wonderful remedy for the whooping cough, or "the chin-cough," as old folks still call it. Even a visit to such a person is thought to be efficacious - almost equal to a touch from a man riding a pie-bald horse!

It is thought unlucky to be married on one's birthday, or the anniversary of the death of a near relative, and in Ireland, as in
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 21:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
89) Leipreachán - a small man
90) Glinncín - a foolish person

91) Cabóg - a person that would not be much good
your only a CÁBÓG

92) Pleóta(?) - a fool (?)
93) You are only a GIFIDE(?) - a giddy person
94) Feithide - a small person

95) he is a proper BAILLSÉIRE
nothing SLÁCTAR about him

96) he is only an old RUBALL ROIGHIN -
as tough as RUBALL ROIGHIN

97) he is a RIAST of a lad - a bad-tempered fellow
98) he is only a SIOGÁN SNEACHTA - a weak man
99) he is a very SCIAMHACH man
100) they do call a "NEANTÓG" to a cross person
101) you are an ould PREÁB - a dirty person
102) you are only an old TEAMAM(?) ABHAILE -
a fellow who would be carrying stories around the countrys could not mind his own business

103) a Spadóir

* * *

1) Is he any good? Muise beg a mhaith
2) give the cow a SOP

3) Tá sé chómh bréagach leis a bhfear a dubhairt go bhfaca sé an féar ag fás

4) he is in a CEITHEARNACH lately - well dressed swank
5) that cow is very SCÍOBACH - thin, miserable
6) Gioblach - untidy

7) that lad was no good they had the BAITH(?) IS CÁIN on him and see how good he is now

8) Leath-mhaing(?) - sideways e.g. a duck with a broken wing
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 15:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
64) Bacachán
65) Clapaidín - a person who walks with a heavy step
66) Pusachán
67) Clabaire
68) Púchán - a dark looking person
70) Seán-a-dhá-thaobh

71) Bearróigín - a person who would be sent to do a thing and would not do it right

72) Gliogaire
73) Leidhb
74) Gréasaidhe
75) Straoill

76) Sufarnach - a grown up person who could not read or write

77) Scabhtséara - a scoundril
78) he is a LEAS-CHLOIGINN - head to one side

79) Strea(th)ach - a badly dirty dressed person who would do a lot of work

80) Ciotóg
81) Deasóg

82) give a penny to the poor PÁIDEÓIGÍN - a person who would be out in the rain

83) Geanncín

84) a person who would be always drinking is called a CRAINCÍN DEARG

85) he is very CÚRMAIDE - very careful about himself

86) Dúdáinín - a person who would be always saying that it is cold no matter how warm it is

87) Putóg - a big soft man(?)
88) he is a cold SGRÉACHÓG - he does not like the cold
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 11:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When a girl has not much sense people say she is a "CIALLÁN"

When people look down on others we say they are very DROC-MHEASACH

An untidy person is said to be a "SLAUB"

An untidy woman is called a "Straoil"

When a person is neat and tidy we say they put great "SLACHT" on their work

When a person works in a clumsy manner they are said to be very "CHIOTACH"

When there is great respect for a person we say there is great "TÓIR" or "MEAS" on them

When people are independent and do not accept favours from others we say they have great "SPLAINC" (meaning spirit)
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 10:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
38) Fearin
39) Firín
40) he is only a GEALÚN i.e. having no sense
41) Cailleach
42) Mo Dhuine Thiar knows it
43) A Mhic ó
44) Cruiteachán
45) Cailín óg

46) he has a BADÓIR working for him (a Connemara man)

47) Suarachán
48) Balbhán - (b. = v)
49) Scorróg - a lad of about fifteen starting to work

50) Scairteachán - a person who would be always laughing

51) Seoinín - fear gan mhaith
52) Carrachán

53) Spriosán - a person who would stay small though old

54) he is a SPAILPÍN - a person who would be depending on odd jobs

55) Slíomadóir
56) he is an awful RÉITEÓG
57) Scabóg also Scapóg - a tall thin man

58) a Cantalán - a person who would be in bad humour

59) an ACHLAIS also AFLAIS - an awket fellow (awkward)

60) Ráinnidhe - a small delicate child
61) Pílíoc - a small fat man
62) Píobaire - a child that would be always crying

63) a Faisteachán also a Faiteachán - a person who would be afraid to go out at night
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 10:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
347) he is a great GEATACAIDHE - good for making fun

348) he is an old CEANNUIDHE MÁLA - any kind of tinker

349) did you give the eggs to the CEANNUIDHE
350) Boicín - he is a big BOICÍN
351) Brumach - a filly
352) he is very CAOCH
senior member (history)
2019-08-06 10:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1) A Ghrádh
2) A Stór
3) A Mhaicín
4) A Leanbh
5) A Chuisle
6) A Chailin
7) A Bhuacaill
8) Grádh mo chroidhe
9) Leanbh mo chroidhe
10) Cuidín
11) Stócach
12) A Pháistín
13) A Ghasún
14) A Mhúirnín
15) Peata
16) Sumach
17) Maistín
18) Crostóir
19) Ceólán
20) Pleidhche
21) Smearachán - a giddy person

22) Umadán
23) Leibide
24) he is the MAC IS SINE
25) he bought it from SEÁN SAOR
26) Leitiméaraidhe - a person with a lot of stories
27) Gobán
28) Gobán Saor
29) Óinseach
30) Báirnéalach - bailiff
31) Seannuine - ( sean-dhuine )
32) Seannuine deoite - an old fashioned child
33) Fear Bréige - scare crow
34) Seán-a-hóra
35) Dailtín
36) Róigín - e.g. a child that would steal sugar
37) Dreoilín - a small person
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 22:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
these stones and Graine his wife brought the other one in her apron but she let it fall and it broke in two.

Colman Moylan
Sgéalaidhe:-
Thomas Moylan
Drummin
Gort
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 22:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In William Casey's field in Derralifina, Gort there is a place called Leabaidh Diarmuid where three big stones stand erect and another placed in the top. Diarmuid brought two of
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 21:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
place is supposed to be the haunt of many spirits, and people who have passed there during the night are believed to have seen them.

Kathleen Callanan
Sgéaladihe:-
John Callanan,
Knockourane,
Gort.
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 21:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
but we are told that at the time, also old people were buried there. There is a holy well there which was once visited by St. Patrick. Often people come to it who have sore eyes, to perform around it and sleep there during the night. A few years ago a man named Michael Kelly Derrybrien did this and he was cured.
A small stream flows from the well and some years ago the owner of the land around it attempted to widen it, but he soon fell ill and died. Near the well was a tree on which a leaf never grew it is still to be seen there.
This
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 21:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Knockourane is a name given to a small village not far from here. It was formerly known as "the hill of the song". It got this name because in a certain field there, a pattern took place every year, to which crowds gathered from districts miles away. At this pattern the people performed many feats and sang old Irish songs, so after a short time this place was called Knockourane.
Soon this custom faded away and the field which was once a field of merriment was converted into a graveyard. At the present day infants are buried there,
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 14:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Slac - hunting out the ducks
Hurais - calling the pigs

" Deas anall " - If the cows did not stand for the women long ago they used to say " Deas anall " and then the cows would stand

Maróg - sweet foot
Smuc - what you would say to hunt out the pigs
Scut - what you would say to hunt out the cat
Scearc - what you would say to hunt out the hens
Slact - tidy
Coilleac - a cock
Ceann - a head
Srón - a nose

Smig - a chin
Cosa - feet
Carsán - hoarsness
Créatúr - a creature
Dhistín - calling the chickens
Citeóg - your left hand
Deasóg - your right hand
Trálac - a pain in the wrist

Codhladh drúdhlacht - your foot to be asleep

Gleorán - a weed in hay
Lacht - a heap of stones
Glugar - a bad egg
Mí-ádh - misfortune
senior member (history)
2019-08-05 14:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Breisne - a bundle of sticks
Ruisín - the tea you would get in the field
Maol - the turf over the creel
Gróigín - four sod standing up together and one on top
Salac - dirty
Cipín - a thin stick
Gabhail Móna - handful of turf
Dób-buidhe - yellow clay
Cathairín - a field where there is a Liss
Ciaróg - a black maggot
Geala Gabhlóg - a brown maggot
Crúibín - a pig's foot
Cáibín - an old hat

Beansidhe - a fairy woman
Puisín - a name for a cat
Mám - a hand-full of flour
Smearachán - small potatoes
Réatóg - a piece of the twig for cleaning a pipe

Gabhaileóg - a stick put under the shaft of a car to keep it up

Cubóg - a place where hens lay
Breimear - scutch grass
Slóctán - the name of a weed
Tráinín - a wisp of grass
Scallóg - a potato with no eye

ACT - when the people used to be cutting wheat long ago with hooks they used to cut a straight piece down the field and it is called an "Act"
senior member (history)
2019-08-04 15:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Truscán - a load
Clochín - stones going across a river
Cúasán - the hole in the middle of a big potato
Bainne Buidhe - beastings
Scramógs - the last of the porridge in the pot
Cáithín - the shell of the oats
Cómhguisí - goods
Sciollógs - slits with no eyes
Cis - a bridge across a drain in the bog
Spothán - swelling under the neck of a sheep
Tortóg - a small hill in a field
Gabhal - bundle of hay
Coilleóg - a mark
Histre - a haulter

Cnoc maol drios - name of a field where there is a hill and briers growing on it

Cana Crúidhte (cróta) - a milking can
Spartac - soft turf
Ball odhair - in a mess
Maith go leór - good enough
Gráineóg - a hedge hog
Páircín - a small field
Slisóg - a piece of a stick that goes up under the nail
Bricín - a small fish
Scailtín - gruel for a cold
Báinín - a flannon coat
Bairibín - the toe cap of a boot
Casóg - a coat
senior member (history)
2019-08-04 15:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
h-Anam ó'n Diabhal - soul from the devil
Calac crú - a small fish
Galar cleithte - pin-feathers
Spág - a big foot
Mideac - a broken knife
Maide-éamonn - a bolt for a door
Bóthairín - a bad road
Fidíní - small stones under a wall
Banbh - a young pig
Mallaigh Seang - a weed
Riasc - a wet field
Ciseán - a basket
Sidheóg - a fairy
Pelibín - a bird

Gríosac - red coals in the fire
Scudán - a herring
Putóg - a pudding
Leadóg - a blow
Páideóg - a home-made candle
Feilmide (Feith(?)) - a goose's tail
Brabac - profit
Stúthán / Scúthán (?) mhada - the crane
Féar-gorta - a pain of hunger
Súgán - a hay rope
Bréidín - frieze

Gurigín - the wedge that tightens the culture of the plough

Bróigín - the piece of iron on a swingletree
senior member (history)
2019-08-04 14:55
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and flows through Bruree, Croom, Adare and falls into the Shannon at Carrigogunnel Castle.

The Maigue = river of the plain
Maighreach = full of Salmon
or
Mall = sluggish
or
na Mart = of the Beeves

Filí na Máigh
John O'Twoomey and Andrew McGrath
The latter is buried in Kilmallock

Meaning of word Limerick = Luimneach
The situation of Limerick was so well calculated to prevent surprise by the Shannon surrounding it that it was the rendezvous of a gang of Northmen or outlaws. Here they brought their horses and booty form whence it acquired the name "Lom-neac" or "Luimneach" a spot made bare by feeding horses.
(From an old 17th Century History of Co. Limk.)
senior member (history)
2019-08-04 14:47
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BULGADEN is separated from Kilmallock by a stream which in olden days was crossed by stepping stones, when the people walked to town. Hence its name.
The oldest residents always call it Bulog-a-Dín for it is surrounded by hills on the south and on the N.W. (?) by woods and trees - hence its meaning - the place of shelter.
Bulgaden is in the parish of Kilbreedy (old Church). In the barony of Coshlea (beside the Galtees It is part of the "Golden Vein" to which St. Patrick gave his 'seven blessings'.
The townlands forming the parish are:-
1. Fanstown.
2. Gibbinstown.
3. Stephenstown.
4. Gormanstown.
5. Balline.
6. Ballycullane.
7. Bonagh.
8. Ballinseala.
9. Bulgaden.
The river Maigue with its tributaries drain the East of the County. It rises in the Cork-Limerick border
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 23:58
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Long ago all the fields, streams and streams were named. There is a field in our farm named "Caith Mór's[?]field. The way it got its name was, long ago a woman named Katie owned it. The "Raheen Field" is also in our farm so called because there is a Rathin a field near it.
There is a field owned by Joseph Doyle called the long field and there is another in the same farm called the "Gurt Mor". There is a field in our farm called the "Hurling field". The old people say it got its name because long ago that was the field where they used to hurle.
There is a field in our farm and it is called "Sullivans hill". The way it got it's name was, long ago a man named Sullivan owned it. There is a river running through our farm called the "Auct-na Glár" river.
There is a field owned by Larry Culleton called Thullán-na-Fraocán so called because
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 23:52
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Bugán - a soft egg
Bórán - a sieve made from skin of cow or sheep
Caiscín - a small bag of wheat for the mill
Róistín - grid iron
Liaróg - a short drill in a field
Susán - a heap of oats in the barn for flailing
Cill caist - oats drying in the mill
Búailteán - part of the flail which hit the oats
Colpán - part of the flail held in the hand
Gug - an egg
Púirín - a hole in the wall for sheep
Troighthín - a stocking with no sole

Neacar - an old horse

Bráiste - cocle weed
Cámóg - a stick the shape of a hurle
Scib - a vessel made of sally rods for bringing in turf
Plás - a place where turf is spread
Dannac - a place where turf is cut
Cíarán - a small sod of turf
Póirín - a small potato
Meithil - a crowd of men working
Móinfhéir - a meadow
Loc-áil - the last of a clutch
Práiscín - an apron or a slit-bag
Dúidín - an old pipe
Smidirín - delph broken in bits
Diabhail Sgéal - devil a story
Caonac Liath - milldew
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 23:40
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Leibide / Pleicidhe - a senseless person
Carrachán - a mitcher
Bádóir - a Connamara man who works locally
Spagaide - one who has big feet
Stróinse - a big lazy girl
Cánnaidhe súaire - a wise old man
Sliseóg - a thin person
Seandhuine (Seanaín) - an old man
Seanaichdhe - a storyteller
Putachán - a fat and lazy person
Mantach - a person who has a tooth missing
Pléib - a foolish person
Sugán - a lazy old person
Amadán - a fool
Dár Daoil - wicked or evil person

Claibín Muilinn - a person who is always talking

Staidhce - a lazy person
Strachaille - an awkward person
Carrachán - a tricker
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 17:07
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Ac maidin amháin i mí Abráin thánaig Ponsonby abhaile go Cill Daltún agus bhí bean aige. B'as Béal Átha Seanaig í agus Eibhlís Folliet(?) a b'ainm dí. Nuair a chuala Winifred an sgéal sin do bhí diombáidh an domhain uirrí. Le neart diombáidhe agus brón do chaill sí a meatbhair agus níor feidir léi cuimhneamh ar aon rud ach an gúna bán a bhí aici i gcoir an pósaid. Bhíod sí le feiscint agus an gúna bán uirrí ins na gáirdiní ag gearradh geaga na sgeiche báine le siosúir.
Fuair an sean fhear bás taréis tamhaill agus go gearr 'na dhiaidh sin fuaradh Winifred sínte marbh ar uaig a h-athar agus an gúna bán uirrí. Tug muinntir na h-áite "Bhean Bhan Bessborough" i gcomhnuidhe uirrí.
Annsan chuir Ponsonby Bessborough ar an áit in onóir dá mhnaoi - Eiblise.
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 16:57
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county; he tells us in his poem "Condae Mhuigheó".
He died about the year 1838 in the barn attached to a house owned by a man called Diarmuid Cloonan and he was buried in the graveyard at Killeeneen which is about three miles west of Craughwell. About forty years ago a headstone was erected over his grave by the late Edward Martyn of Tullyra, Lady Gregory of Coole Park, and the late Doctor Cawley of Craughwell, as well as others.

Patrick Callanan, the poet, lived in Caherdivane, about two and a half miles west of Craughwell. He composed many poems and he translated some of Raftery's poems into English.
He used to be invited to the house of teachers and others to tell them old Irish stories and to compose poetry. One of his most well-known poems is "Fataí Bána" about the blackening of the potato crop in the Famine year, 1846. He lived during that period and saw all the misery caused by the famine.
He married Brigid Feeney of Killeeneen. He had four sons and two daughters - Michael Patrick, John and Marcus were the names of
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 16:56
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the sons, and Mary and Bridget were the names of the daughters. John and Marcus went to America and died abroad. Mary married a man named Dooley of Caher, Patrick settled down in the old home in Caherdivan and Michael married Brigid Feeney of Laughile, Craughwell and came to live there.
The great grand-children of the poet still live in Laughile (LaChoill) in the parish of of Carrowbane. One of his great grand-children, Brigid Callanan, is presently attending this school (Ganty) and supplied the information about the poet and his family.
Callanan the poet lies buried in the graveyard at Killeeneen, his grave being only a few feet away from that of his rival, Raftery.
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 16:50
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county; he tells us in his poem "Condae Mhuigheó".
He died about the year 1838 in the barn attached to a house owned by a man called Diarmuid Cloonan and he was buried in the graveyard at Killeeneen which is about three miles west of Craughwell. About forty years ago a headstone was erected over his grave by the late Edward Martyn of Tullyra, Lady Gregory of Coole Park, and the late Doctor Cawley of Craughwell, as well as others.

Patrick Callanan, the poet, lived in Caherdeavne,(?) about two and a half miles west of Craughwell. He composed many poems and he translated some of Raftery's poems into English.
He used to be invited to the house of teachers and others to tell them old Irish stories and to compose poetry. One of his most well-known poems is "Fataí Bána" about the blackening of the potato crop in the Famine year, 1846. He lived during that period and saw all the misery caused by the famine.
He married Brigid Feeney of Killeeneen. He had four sons and two daughters - Michael Patrick, John and Marcus were the names of
senior member (history)
2019-08-03 16:37
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Cailleac - an old woman
Sumachán - a fat person
Clamhsán - a person who is always grumbling
Sliamadóir - a tricky person
Maistín - one who is always crying
Bleiteac - a fat person
Smearachán - a miserable person
Stráic - a long lanky person
Striall - an untidy person
Glincín - a senseless person
Gaimbín - one who lends money
Cabac - one who is always talking
Gobán - a handy person

Pusachán - a cross person
Girrseac - a young girl
Gasún - a young boy
Líob - a fool
Stócac - a young boy
Peata - a pet
Dránaidhe - a delicate person
Miothán - a small person
Scréacóg - one who is always crying
Scabóg - a tall person
Múascán - a stupid person
Bruiscidhe - a fat person
Cruiteachán - one who has a hump
Daraigín - a tatcher
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 22:00
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This prayer is said when you sprinkle yourself with holy water

* * *

I lay my body down to sleep
I pray to God my soul to keep
And if I die before I wake
I pray to God my soul to take.

This prayer is said when going to sleep.

* * *

I had a little prayer. I told it to Mary. Mary told it to Jesus. Jesus told it to God. God said it was good. Mary the flower, Jesus the branch, Mary and Jesus be at my death hour(?)

* * *

Infant Jesus meek and mild
Look upon me a little child
Pity mine and pity me
Suffer me to come to Thee
Heart of Jesus I adore thee
Heart of Mary I implore Thee
Heart of Joseph pure and just
In those three hearts I place my trust.
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:47
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There were two well-known poets in this district over a century ago. Their names were Patrick Callanan and Anthony Raftery. They lived at the same period and were acquainted with each other. It is said they were jealous of each other.
Anthony Raftery was born near Kiltimagh in Co. Mayo, but spent most of his life around this district between, Athenry, Loughrea, and Gort. He usually travelled about on foot carrying an old fiddle on which he used to play to make a living. He was not a good player and he had a bad old fiddle. He used not get much money for his music. He told us in one of his poems the following:-
"Féach anois mé
Agus m'aghaid ar bhalla
Ag seinim ceoil
Do phócaí folamh"

He was blind - the result of some disease which brought on blindness - and he used have a dog to guide him.
He composed many poems which are well known. Some of them were in praise of people and others in blame, particularly of those who were not kind to him. Now and then he used to visit his native
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:36
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Neamh agus Párrthas.
Sábháil sin ón galair márbhás"

His prayer protected the house and it was saved from the fever. All through life Raftery was given to argument. He visited a poet named Burke in the Loughrea district. He addressed the poet as follows:

"An tusa an fear agus ainm Seán Dé Búirce ort"
D'feagair Seán Dé Búirce é mar seo:
"Is mise Seán Dé Búirce gan fúact gan faithcíos
Atá romhath annseo ar bóthar na gCaippí"

Annsin leabhar Reacthaire arís,
"Ní Búircac thú ach fear cruinniú(?) fataí
Núair a bhímse ag bórd ag ól mo gloinne,
Bíonn tusa id sháil ag cúil an deathaigh"
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:27
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went purposely to Callanan's house for an argument.
During coarse of talk Callanan was overpowered by Raftery until he was assisted by his sister who convinced Raftery that he was wrong. Raftery left the house in tears and left his corse on Callanan and his sister.
During course of Raftery's travells through Galway he came on a village in the south of Gort called the "Bléantraca Buidhe". A severe fever was raging in the village at the time. He went into a house which was not already fever stricken. On entering the house he prayed a follows.

"A Íosa Críost a Dia na nGrásta,
A thug chun an talamh sin
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:22
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The only poets heard of or mentioned in my district were Raftery "the blind poet of Connaught" and Callanan.
Calanan the poet lived in a village called Shanvalley in the parish of Craughwell in the Co. of Galway. The story of his lifetime is unknown to the old historians in the district. He is buried in Cilínín graveyard, where Raftery is also buried and over whose grave Lady Gregory had got a headstone erected long after Raftery's death. Callanan composed a poem relating to a priest who lived in Craughwell by the name of Father Ryder. Henery the eight
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 21:22
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was ruling at this time and it is supposed that he was the cause of turning the priest from the catholic religion. He gave the poem the title "The Beetle". All through the poem it is thought it relates to a Beetle but instead it relates to the priest who strayed away from the true church. The poem was composed both in Irish and in English. The English version is to be had at the end of the story.
Raftery lived by his earnings as a musician and as a poet. There poems and verse are still spoken fluently in their native district. Once a dispute arose between Raftery and Callanan. Raftery
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2019-08-02 13:31
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In the district where the Ganty school is situated there is a well-known beggar-man called Michael Hynes and his father was a great runner. Michael Hynes, that is alive now, is well known by everybody in this district. He wears a long black coat, which is usually tied with cords. He has a long beard. He is a very venerable man.
Michael Hynes' father was a great runner. He ran what was called a drag hunt from Roxborough to Moyode, which is a distance of about eight miles. He started from Roxbough dragging a red herring fastened to his coat, so that the foxhounds would follow the trail. He got clear ahead of them and arrived safely in Moyode long before the hounds.
On another occasion he raced Lord Dunsandle's carriage, to the Galway races running through the country. he received a kindly reward from the Lord for his race.
John Connelly of Ganty was a great athlete, he won many prizes for jumping and running On one occasion he jumped six feet, ten inches.

This information was supplied by,
Rosaleen Kenny,
Craughwell
Co Galway
senior member (history)
2019-08-02 13:20
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Ait comhnuidhte do Muinntir Daltún do b'eadh Bessborough fado - Cill Daltún a b'ainm do'n áit ag an uair sin. Caitlicig dilse do b'eadh na Daltúin.
Taréis ionnsuidhe na Carraige do bhronn Cromail talamh agus tigh Cille Daltún ar Ponsonby de bharr gur éirig leis Carraig do ghabhail dhó. Nuair a thánaig Cromail agus a saighdiúirí go dtí Cill Daltún do chuir an sean fhear - Daltún - agus a inghean fáilte rompa agus thugadar gac compórd dóib le súil go saibhailfí iad. Níor dhein Cromail ach a chur inúil do Daltún gur feallaire é agus narbh' fada go mbeadh sé ar crochadh o'n dair a bhí in aice an tige. Ac do labhair Ponsonby ar a shon agus ghlaoidh Cromail ar ais é agus thug sé cead do Dhaltún agus a inghean fanacht sa chomharsanacht nó dul thar lear go dtí aon tír ba mhaith leó.
Bhí áthas ar Daltún agus ar Winifred, a inghean nuair nár rabhadar cun bheith curtha cun báis, cé gur chailleadar gac a raibh sa saoghal seo. Ac d'iarr Ponsonby orta fánacht leis sa tigh ar feadh tamaill. Cailín Deas lághach a b'eadh Winifred agus bhí súil aicí agus ag gac aenne go bposfad Ponsonby í.
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2019-08-02 13:06
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After some time others started ovens and did not require the people to bring the flour but sold them the bread at so much per loaf so that finished Oven Lane.

Garry Ruadh:-
This part of Carrick is situated to the north of Town Wall. It is a large uncultivated patch of earth. When the Summertime comes the place is filled up with wild red poppies. Hence the name Red Garden or Garry Ruadh.

The Cock Pit:-
Some years ago a crowd of youngsters took pride in having their faces scratched and blood stained in the morning. One night a strange man was passing by. He saw those youngsters mauling each other. Describing his experience afterwards he said it was a regular Cockpit and hence the name the Cockpit.

Told by
James Lonergan
Church Street
Carrick-on-Suir
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2019-08-01 21:23
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Cock Lane:- This lane is situated between Town Wall and the Main Street. Some fifty years ago this was the only place in Carrick-on-Suir that used to cater for the country people on fair and market days when there was a brisk business done. Hence the lane got its name.

Oven Lane:- Some eighty years ago the name was given to this street because of a man who started an oven and did the beaking for a very small fee for all the women who brought in the flour.
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2019-08-01 21:20
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Púicín Lane on Bookeen's Lane:- This lane is situated between the Main Street and the Quay and Puicín Lane got its name because of its darkness.

Cock-Pit:- This place is situated between Greystone Street and the Well Road and it got its name because of all the Cock fights which were held there long ago.

Boreen na gCapall:- This boreen is situated between the Well Road and the Quay. It got its name because horses used to haul boats from Carrick to Clonmel and when they came back they were fed in this boreen.

Information given by
Mrs Foley
Sir John's Road
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2019-08-01 21:16
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I am living in Croughnagarraha. it is about four miles from Carrick-on-Suir. The place got its name because it is surrounded by marsh and it has very small gardens. Croughnagarraha is south west of Carrick.
There are places near Croughnagarraha with Irish names, Curraghballintlea, (Currach Baile an Clé) means the left bog of the village.

Garravoone (Garbh Mhóin) means the rough bog.

Near my home there is a Lios field (Páirc-an-Leasa) About half an acre of the field is in the form of a circle. At one time the circle was walled in but now the wall has disappeared.

The Carrageen is a rocky field. The Crab field got its name from the Crab hedge by which it is surrounded.

Near by in Costello's hill there is a Mass rock and on top of the rock there is a hole which is called the holy water font.

Carraig Fenuagh means Saint Fenagh's rock. It is situated in Crehana. There is a large rock on the side of it facing Crehana school. It is called the Weaver's rock. It is so called
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 21:15
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because fifty weaver's came out from Carrick to try and knock it down but they failed.
There is also an old church-yard in Croughnagarraha called Tempall Fenuagh which means Saint Fenagh's Church. The old people say that if you were on the road at mid-night you would hear a bell tinkling as if mass were going on. In the church-yard there is a ruin of an old church. It is said that a man was passing the churchyard one night and he saw an old woman who had been buried there long before sitting in the ditch smoking a pipe.

Told by
Mrs Butler
Croughnagarraha
Carrick-Beg
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 21:01
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About forty years ago there lived at "Poll-na-Duibhe", about fifty yards from the dock, a man named James Dunleavy. He was known to be a great swimmer.
In Summer-time young men usually went to the sea at sun-rise for a bathe. One morning, a man named Larry McGee, from Dooneal, went to the sea for a bathe, with nine or ten companions. Some of them were able to swim and some were not, but Larry himself was a good swimmer. They all stripped and went out into the water. After some time they turned towards the shore, but as they were gaining it they looked back and saw Larry in great difficulty about thirty yards out. As they believed they could not save him they ran for James Dunleavy and called him out of his bed. To make
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2019-08-01 21:01
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sure that he would come, they told him a lie. They told him that his cousin from Glen- easky was drowning and to hurry. James did not delay. He took off his shirt and rushed towards the drowning man. When he reached him he struck him a thump between the two eyes. In a few minutes he brought him safe to shore.

Collected from:-
Frank McHugh
Dooneal
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 12:47
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BÓTHAIRÍN an CHAPAILL
the horse's road - there is a road running down to the river immediately to the north of "Collage"

BÓTHAIRÍN BUIDHE - little yellow road
Cora a Creacáin - weir of booty in the river
Scairbhagh na Páirce - the park shallow also in the river
Cora Mhór - great weir likewise in the river

KNOCKNACONNERY
Cnoc na Conaire - hill of the beaten path

TINVANE
Tigh na Mheadhain - house of the middle place
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 12:38
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BALLINDERRY
Bealach an Doire - Pass of the Oak wood

BALLYLYNCH
Baile Ui Loinsig - O'Lynchs Homestead

MÓIN a BHAINNE
milk bog

THE CUNNAWARRAS
a group of fields in which are situated a group of gravel pits. The curious name seems a corruption of Coney-Warrens

BALLYNAGRANA
Baile an gCránach - the homestead of the sows
The Figgery presumably for piggery (?)
a field

Crann na Ratha - the rath tree

BALLYRICHARD
Baile Risteird - Richard's homestead

DEERPARK
Páirc na bhFiadh - the field of the deer
senior member (history)
2019-08-01 12:31
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1) Páirc na hAbhann
2) Páirc Lasa
3) Páirch Eirbill
4) Páirc an Tobair
5) An Pháircín
6) Páirc Pléide
7) Páirc Poll Mhicil
8) Páirc Tairbh
9) Páirc an Teirrig
10) Páirc Siortáin
11) Pairc Poll na Bruice
12) Pairc na nUbhall Fiadhaine
13) Pairc Tomáis Cait
14) Pairc Sgratáin
15) Pairc Poll Móir
16) Pairc an Chnuich
17 Pairc Fada
18) Pairc Lachan
19) Pairc Troda

20) Coumshingaun - The Hollow of the Ants
senior member (history)
2019-07-31 21:56
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Sean-fhocail iad seo leannas a bailigh Mícheál O'Seacnasaigh, Gleann na Sgál, Uarán Mór sa mbaile:-

Ná mol is ná cáin thú fhéin
Sguabann scuab úr go glan
An rud a gheibhtear go bog caitear go bog é
An rud a ceannuightear go daor díoltar go saor é
Is fada an bóthar nach bhfuil casadh ann
Bíonn an fhírinne searbh go minic
Ní bhíonn an rath acht mar a mbíonn an smacht
An rud nach mbaineann duit ná bain dó
Is olc an breitheamh ar dhathaibh dall

An rud nach gcloisfeadh an cluas ní chuirfeadh sé buadhart ar an gcroidhe

'Sé an duine an t'éadach
Marbh le tae is marbh gan é
Aithnigheann ciaróg ciaróg eile
Ní hé lá na gaoithe lá na scoilbh
An tam ná an taoide ní fhanfaidh le h-aoinne
Is minich a bhris béal duine a shrón
Bíonn blas ar an mbeagán

Ní féidir bheith ag ithe agus ag feadgháil san am céadna

Ná thréig do cara ar do cuid
Ní fiú sgéal gan ughdar
senior member (history)
2019-07-31 10:04
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The usual name given here abouts to fairy forts (many of which are in the district) is the "Liss" : they are sometimes referred to as "raths", and now and again they are called "dúns". There is no doubt but the old people attached much superstition to these and the people never liked to take anything out of them.
I remember an amusing incident which happened some years ago, when I was a child. A first cousin of mine who lived in the city, used always spend his summer holidays here, and he and I used spend the long summer days roaming, two care-free children through the fields. Many of our childish escapades were never known but our generosity once nearly landed us in a mess. We had spent the
senior member (history)
2019-07-31 09:43
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