Number of records in editorial history: 13729 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tigeann Oidhch 'l tSin Seáin ar an tríomhadh lá fichead de Mheitheamh. Timcheall trí seachtmhainí roimhe sin tagann na páistí an bhaile uilig le chéile
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
visit this well and pay rounds there as it is believed that anyone washing their eyes in the waters of this well will benefit by it. A man having very sore tender eyes went to this well and washed them three times in its waters and in a short time they were perfect. A large stone is still visible to mark the place where the well is believed to have been.
Close to this graveyard is to be seen the ruins of a house blown up during the "Black and Tan terror". There was an ambush close to this house, some of the military were wounded and early next morning the "Black and Tans" arrived ordered out the two brother Boddies and blew up their home as a reprisal. It is also remarkable that at this very spot two men lost their lives afterwards. John Buckley of Mallow in a motor bicycle.
Our Lady's Blessed Well is situated in the townland of Castleharrison beside a little grove. It is a beautiful well
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
named Wrixon who lived there in a Castle and that is how it has its name of Castlewrixon. The castle still stands in perfect order and is now owned by a Mr. McDermott who has bred valuable horses "Castlewrixon Wire" and "Castlewrixon Bell".
There was a poet who lived in Castlewrixon one time Jack Connell by name who composed fine old songs. There was a beautiful spring well in Castlewrixon but owing to some trouble with neighbours the owner closed it up and there now remains a small drain to mark the spot where it was. This well was known as Port-a-Heen.

Imphrick is another townland of Ballyhea that has its history also. There is a beautiful blessed well near Imphrick graveyard. It is known as St. Declan's well. This well is supposed to have been at the other side of the road but through somebody disrespecting the place the well removed. People
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ard-Skeigh is situated north east of the Parish. There is a very ancient burying ground in this townland. There has been nobody buried in this graveyard for years. All its walls are broken down and the only thing to mark its existence is a little Abbey which has been repaired a few years ago. Close to this place is a cross named the cross of Ard-na-Crúad. Legends say the last battle to be fought in Ireland will be finished at this cross.

Sorrel is also historic. Overlooking this townland is famous "Gallows Hill" where the remains of four fir trees still stand to mark the place where people were hanged in olden times.

Debbie Quinn got all that is written up to this from her father Patrick Quinn Ballinadrideen Ballyhea Charleville

Copied by Kitty O'Connor Newtown Ballyhea Charleville.
Patrick Quinn is over 60 years.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Ballinadrideen is the graveyard of Aglish. This is the burying place of the Harrisons of Castleharrison. Even at present but formerly use by several families as there are many tombstones to be seen there.
There is a beautiful building in Miltown. It is known as Miltown Castle. It was built by a Major Bruce. It is entered by an avenue and a beautiful lodge. The man who erected the lodge and entrance gate was ordered to carve the bust of Cromwell broker(?) outside the lodge door. When he had finished he thought of Cromwell's tyranny to the Irish. He turned round and smashed the faces with a hammer. To this day the figures can be seen with the nose broken off. Although Bruce offered him a large sum of money to replace the figure but his Irish blood would not let him. There are also to be seen two large eagles on the entrance gate.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Tobar Laictín)
visited by many people who spend a long time praying there. Not far from Ballyhea Cemetery is a spring well Tubber-Lock-Deen. This well has been never known to run dry although during the Summer months a lot of people draw water from this well. Ballyhea Cemetery is beautiful. It has many fine head-stones erected there. There is an old abbey in the centre of the Church. There is a beautiful Monument in this Church erected by O'Shaughnessy. This man lived in Ballyhea years ago and he owned a mill at the eastern side of the railway crossing. That place now is still called the Mill Road.

In the townland of Cooline there is an ancient churchyard where there is also an Abbey. In the townland of Ballynoran Baile-an-Fhuaráin there is a spring well. "Tubber-na-Griolla. It is situated in a corner of four farms and a large drain or Strután is known as the Pola-Buídhe.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
time do you intend to be back".
The agent had his plans well laid and rode away. He collected all his rent, then he filled a bag with coppers and stitched the notes in the pocket of his saddle. He started for home and as he came along Richard awaited him held him up and demanded his money or his life. The agent picked up the bag of coppers and flung it as far as he could into the cave saying "You can follow it now. Richard was so avaricious that in his hurry to get the money he slipped on the flag of the cave and was dashed to pieces beneath and that was the end of Richard the Robber but Richard's Bed still remains to be seen.
Not far from this lies a place called The Weaver's Haggart. Right across from the mountain stands the ruins of four houses which were supposed to have been built but never roofed as it was believed the place was haunted. Castlewrixon at one time belonged to a very rich gentleman
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Caislean Eóin)
The parish of Ballyhea has many townlands and each has its own history. In the townland of Castlewrixon and in Cuis-lán-Óin mountain is a famous spot known as "Richard's Bed". Richard was a highway robber who lived in a cave beside this place. He used to meet people travelling from Cork to Dublin, hold them up and take their money from them. Richard's Cave is situated beside the road which at that time was the main road from Cork to Dublin.
A gentleman used to travel this road from Dublin to Cork to collect his rents. Each time he passed he was held up by Richard and robbed of his money. At last his agent thought of a plan. One day he said to his master. "You stay at home and I will go and meet the robber. As he passed the mountain he was held up by Richard who spoke very kindly and said, You will be very late returning" and, what
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ballinadrideen the meaning of this word is supposed to be Baile na Druidin(?) the town land of the starlings.

Ballinoran Baile an Fhuaráin the town land of the spring

Ballinagrath Baile na Greatha the meaning of this is supposed to be "Greagh" - a course mountain flat

Shinana - Sean Eanac the old marsh

Fiddane - Feadán means a streamlet

(It is Mrs Herbert, Ballyhea that told her this)
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cahirmee fair comes but once a year. Cahirmee is a great annual horse fair which lasts for three or four days. Buyers come from England and pay good prices for horses. Gipsies and tinkers come from every part of the world there. A good many people go there to buy horses. Long ago it lasted for a week but now it only lasts for three or four days. Cahirmee fair is held in Buttevant. About twenty years ago the fair was held in Cahirmee. When Cahirmee fair is over the tinkers all depart to different places. They often fight with one another to the great delight of some of
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the young people who go there in the evenings to see the performance. The tinkers usually turn up for this fair and travel in caravans to it in order to be there in time. The horses are bought at different prices such as £50, £80 to £150. The shop keepers in Buttevant especially the public houses do a great trade during the days of Cahirmee.
Cahirmee fair began this year on Saturday and was finished on Tuesday. After Cahirmee there are tinkers and gipsies all around the country. The people are annoyed from them for five or six days after the fair.
Bridie Rea, got this information from her father Edmond Rea of Ardnageehy, Charleville. A farmer about 60 years of age.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a horse fair held every year in Buttevant about the twelfth or thirteenth of July. It is known as Cahirmee fair and it was called Cahirmee because in former years it was held a mile outside the town at a place called Cahirmee. It holds three days but long ago it held for a week. People come from all parts of the world to buy or sell horses not alone do people come from England but also from France, Germany, Russia, and alot of other places. The week before the fair the roads are crowded with caravans and gipsies. Before the fair tinkers and gipsies are seen moving towards Buttevant. They do not go in to the middle of the town but stay about a half a mile outside it. Every evening after the
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
work of the country is finished great crowds go to see the fair.

Julia O'Keefe go this from her father Daniel O'Keefe of Castlewrixon Ballyhea who is a farmer aged about 60
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The townland of Cahirmee is situated halfway between Buttevant and Doneraile. Here are two fields where a very famous fair was held long ago which was called "Cahirmee Fair". The names of the fields where the fair was held were known as the galloping field, and the market field. The market field was occupied by horses, buyers and travellers. The galloping field was the one in which the horses galloped before they were bought. In the market field also there was a double row of tents running through the middle of it in the form of a street. There was also a tent for Vetinary Surgeons to examine the horses. A house stood on the side of the the road in which men used to put their coats, saddles, and bridles.
Nowadays this fair is not held here. The owner let the fields to the Military in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty to exercise their horses and the people
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
boycotted the fair and it was transferred to the town of Buttevant where it is still carried on. This fair is traced back to the fifteenth century and perhaps before it. At that time the fair continued for a month and became famous all over Europe. Buyers from the four Continents came to buy "The Irish Hunter for the armies of the world". However, from one century to another the fair shortened from four or five weeks to three, two and one week until finally in nineteen hundred it lasted only for four days. This continued to the beginning of the Great War when the days of the fair were reduced to two days and since the above incident occurred in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty the fair is held in Buttevant on the thirteenth and fourteenth of July.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 09:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
isteach, thar an gclaidhe a bhíos i n-aice an tighe agus deirtear go mbeadh bárr fada ar an ngarraidhe sin, nuair a bheadh sé fasta, agus go mbíonn an t-ádh ar an ngarraidhe céadna.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 09:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tuiteann Oidhche 'Teine Cnáma ar an 23adh de mhí Mheitheamh. Nach ar na páistibh sgoile a bhíos an bród an oidhche sin, nuair a thagann siad abhaile ó'n sgoil! Ní dhéanann siad tada acht a ndinnéar a ithe, agus tagann siad isteach i dteach atá i n-aice an chnocáin, a bhíonn siad ag fadú na teine ann, agus tugann siad cúpla splannc leóbh as an teach sin, agus gabháil mhaith món. Faduigheann siad an teine sin ar an gcnocán is aoirde ar an mbaile, agus fágann siad annsin í, nó go mbíonn sé na thráthnóna. Annsin cruinnuigheann na daoine fásta thart timcheall na teine, agus piocann siad amach beirt bhuachaillí beaga a cheapfhas siad a bheith cneasta, agus cuireann siad iad sin ag cruinniú airgid i ngach teach ar an mbaile. Tugann gach duine ar an mbaile, ubh nó pinghin dhóibh. Bíonn builcín maith uibheacha aca, agus iad go sócamhlach aca i gciseán beag deas. Téigheann siad ag an siopa leób sin, agus fághann siad ola ortha. Tugann fear nó bean an t-siopa braon beag eile ola lé cois dhóibh.
Téigheann siad go dtí an teine annsin, agus bíonn na liathróidí déanta aca rómpa as ceirteachaí. Caitheann siad braon den ola sin ar chuid de na liathróidí, agus annsin a bheadh an spraoi ag caith 'suas na liathróidí agus iad lasta, agus gach duine aca ag iarraidh an liathróid a chur níos aoirde ná an duine eile. Nuair a bhíos na liathróidí caithte aca, agus é in am dhul a chodladh, tugann gach duine splannc abhaile leis. Sgaoileann siad an splannc
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 09:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tagann lá Fhéil Sin Seáin ar an 24adh de mhí Meitheamh. Bíonn na barranta fásta agus bíonn fataí nua ar fághail.
Tá nós ag na daoine ag cur teine cnámh suas in-onóir do Naomh Seán. Téigheann cupla duine thart an tráthnóna sin agus bailigheann siad pingneacha le h-aghaidh ola mhór. Bíonn cupla duine eile ag déanamh liathróidí le málaí. Nuair a thagas an oidhche faduigheann síad teine ar chnocán agus cuireannsiad cupla cnámh isteach ann. Líonann síad soitheach le ola mhór agus tiomaun síad na liathróidí síos ann. Annsin lasann siad iad agus caitheann siad san aer iad. Bíonn siad ag cur liathróidí san aer mar sin ar feadh na h-oidhche. Nuair a bhíonns siad ag imtheacht tugann chuile dhuine splannc leis.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 09:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The people about here always make a large bon-fire on the twenty third of June.
They go then and take some of the old
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 09:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
burned sticks that are not burned out and they carry them into every field of potatoes on their lands.
They throw a bit into every feild to see will the top of the potatoes hold them up.
If the potato tops hold them up they say that there is a good crop in it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 08:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have a lot of feast days in the year which we celebrate in some way. On St Stephen's day the day after Christmas day we go out mumming. We dress our selves in old clothes so that we will not be known and we go from house to house for money. As we are going into the house we say the wren boys' rhyme.
Up with the kettle and down with the pan
Give us some money to bury the wren
The wren, the wren the king of all birds
On St Stephen's day she was caught in the furze
Herself is small her family is great
Get up landlady and give a treat
I hope in heaven your soul may rest
We dance also and when we have finished we get money. On the second night of February "Brideogs" night we go from house to house for money. We dress up in old clothes also and one person brings a doll. We dance and when we have finished we ask money for "Brideog".

On the twenty third of June St John's night or bonefire night. We light a fire in honour of St John. We go round the fire three times and say our prayers. Every person brings a coal from the fire for luck from St John. They throw a coal in their fields also for St John to bless the crops.

On Easter Sunday the
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 22:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
at St. John's -day sports. The pattern was held on the public street where stalls were erected.

St Stephen's Day:-
St. Stephen's Day the 26th of December is a great day of sport in this vicinity.
The boys of the parish get together in groups of three and four and dress themselves in gay clothes. They then go round to each house singing and dancing and for the singing and dancing they get money. When they have the money collected they usually buy a football
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 22:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is only healthy and athletic people can enjoy sport. There is no nation that loves open air amusements more than the Irish and all their amusements are pure and clean.

St John's Feastday:-
There is no town in Connaught that celebrates the feast of the glorious St John but Kiltimagh. Long ago St John's day was looked forward to as a great day for open-air amusements. The young boys saved every penny to spend
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 22:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
pot in the fire and they give it round to all the people at the bonfire. Everyone brings home a sod of turf and it burning from the bonfire.

November
On November Night all the young boys go to the shop for ducking. When they come they put an apple into a tub of water and they go ducking for the apple. They also tie an apple on to a string and tie the string on to the rafter of the house. Then they swinging the string round and try to get a bite of the apple in their mouths. They have great fun in catching the apple to get a bit of it in their mouths.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 22:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is also said by the people that if they go out early on the morning before Sunrise they would not get Sunburned for the year. It is also said that if anyone be out in the fairies path on May morning that they would be brought with the fairies until November's night. It is also said that the butter is stolen away from them on May Morning.

St. John's day and night
On St. John's day the young children about nine and ten years old get very happy on account of that night because on that night they make the "bonfire". They also boil loaf and milk in a
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 22:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They used get the loand of a pot from a neighbour. They would break the loaves into the milk and boil it in the pot. They used called it sops. The old people used to say that Saint John would be present while the fire is burning. They used be dancing on the road.
They used say the rosary at the fire in honour of Saint John. If the children would jump across the fire they would live for the year but if they woudn't jump across they would not live for the year. The old people used to say that they would pray for every boy that would bring an arm of turf.
They used gather round the fire and tell stories about Saint John. They use not leave till about three or four a clock in the morning. They used to walk round the fire praying to Saint John that he would pray for them. They used to sit on stones and sods of heather. When they would be going home
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people used to light bone fires at every cross road. They called them bone fires because they used to throw bones into the fires. They used to go from house to house for arms of turf. When they would have enough of turf they would gather to gather and and buy a gallon of oil.
They used to get cans and milk people’s cows. They used milk goats also. When they would come home they would buy two loaves between them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The feast of Saint John is kept on the twenty fourth of June. On the Eve of Saint John's day there are bonfires lit. They are lit on the side of the road usually, but sometimes they are lit on the top of a hill.
The fires are made of sticks. The children gather the sticks the previous day. The fires are lit when it gets dark about eleven o'clock. It is only children that light the fires now. Long ago young men used to light them. They danced and they sung around the fire till it quenched.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and put a name on each of them and watch which of them will burn longest. The one that burns longest the person will longest and the one that burns shortest that person will die first.

Collected from
James McMorrow
Corrigeencor
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the twenty third of June it is a custom to light bon-fires in order to give light to the Cuckoos to return to the warm countries.

It is also said the bon-fires are lighed to bid farewell to the Cuckoos.

It is said that if you get up early on May morning and skim the well you will have good Luck. If you use the water in butter you will also have good butter during the year.

It is said that if you get up at six o'clock on Easter Sunday morning you will see the sun dancing with joy of the risen Savour.

On the twelfth night or the sixth of January it is a custom twelve candles
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
light a furze bush, and bring it around their gardens to protect their crops for the year.

On May Eve they would sprinkle Holy-Water on all their fields and gardens, to keep away all failure of their crops and hay. This is done in some places yet.

Mary Maher
Ballinaglera,
Ballinure
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St. Brigid's Day long ago the old people would make crosses of rushes and put them up in the roofs. They would leave these crosses on the roof until the next St. Brigid's Day, when they would take them down and put up new ones. They would also put a black ribbon hanging out on St. Brigid's night and they would keep this ribbon for the year as it was a cure for a pain in your head.

On St. Martin's Day they would kill a chicken and spill the blood at the door, to keep away all sickness for the year, and in honour of St. Martin.

On St. John's night it was the custom of the people to light big bonfires. They would make a very big fire, and when it was made they would jump over it, and they would put animals jumping over it too.
They would also
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In this district bonfires are lighted on St. Johns Night the eve of 24th of June. This is to remind us of the miraculous preservation of St. John by Almighty God from being burned when he was cast into a cauldren of boiling oil, not even the hair of his head was injured.

John Conway
Ballinamorsough
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
November's Eve is a great night of fun in every home throughout the County Limerick. Various games are played and the games are as follows
(1) Picking an apple out of a of water. Your hands would be tied behind your back and your eyes blindfolded and you must take the apple out with your mouth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
my district. Bonfires are lit in every nook and corner of the town. Boys go around and gather sticks, coal, oil turf and matches from the people. People subscribe very generously to the custom. The fires are never quenched, they are left burn out to the last.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
words and phrases such as:- sidhe, gaoithe, ná bac leis, coileán (as a term of contempt), mo leanbh cumhra bán, aingciseoir, bóithrín, (called in Kilkenny Bósheen) taoscán, sop, crág, cipín, goirtín, steall, óinseach, amadán. Almost all of these words are used in the everyday conversation of the people of that district yet.

In my childhood days it was customary to light a bonfire on the evening of SS. Peter and Paul's Day (June 29th) and a big crossroads dance was held at some well known rendezvous of the young people of the district. Bonfire night as it was then called was eagerly looked forward to. This custom prevailed up to about ten years ago but is now discontinued.

During Holy Week the poor people go to the farmers houses gathering eggs or as it is called "gathering the cúbóg". The response is usually generous.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the night of the feast of St. Martin (November 11th) a custom known as "the spilling of the blood" is still carried out in my native parish of Gowran Co. Kilkenny.
A fowl, usually a young cockerel, is killed and the blood is sprinkled on the hearth and also on the doorstep.
Mills are not worked on this day and it is also considered unlucky to go fishing on St. Martin's Day.

On the night of Shrove Tuesday or "Pancake Night" pancakes in abundance are baked by the housewife and partaken of by the family at supper. In earlier times it was the custom to take one of the pancakes and striking it against the wall at each side of the door say the words
"May God keep hunger from this house
From this night until this night twelve months"
I heard my grandmother (died 1924 R.I.P.) tell of above custom many years ago. The words quoted were said in Irish by her but as I knew no Irish at that time they were unintelligible to me and I can remember only the translation which she also gave. The quotation was the only sentence in Irish that she knew although she had many other
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
have a goose for dinner on Michaelmas.
On November Night nuts are cracked by the fire. Three saucers one of earth one of water and one with a ring. The person who touched the ring while he is blindfolded will be married. The one who touches the earth will be dead and the one who touches the water will go to a foreign country.
On Christmas Night people stay up late and go to early Mass.

Margaret Doyle
Keelcoulaght
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are different customs for different feast-days. On St Stephens Night all the men of the place went hunting the wren with big sticks. Then the young little boys of the place went from house to house gathering money.
On St. Patrick's Day people usually went to town and took an extra drink of stout - they called it Patricks Pot.
On Shrove Tuesday night pancakes were made - it was called Pancake Night.
On May Day people would not give away milk.

The first few days of April is called Seana-Máirt. Long ago there was an old cow and she said she was alright as March was gone but April borrowed a few days from April and killed the old cow.

People eat a big number of eggs on Easter Sunday.
On St John's night bon-fires were lighted. People used
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 20:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The people of Ireland are very holy and they have a special ceremony for each Saint's day.
On St. John's night many people build big bon-fires. St. John's night is on the 24th June. On that night the people light huge bon-fires and dance and make merry around the fire.
People sometimes have feasts around the bon-fires. They also offered sacrifices that night long ago.

Once, a bunch of young boys lit a big bon-fire in Ballymullen and they began to dance and race around the fire. Suddenly one boy tripped and fell into the fire.
His clothes began to take fire and with the fright the boy ran for a nearby stream and he jumped into the stream. Although the boy was not burned to death he was badly scorched in many places.
People still light bon-fires especially in the country where they burn logs of wood and turf.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The first, of Kerry's many All-Irelands was won by the famed Killorglin "Laune Rangers". These men won it in the year 1892. The captain of the team was John O'Sullivan, who was claimed to be the best all round athlete in Europe. This man was the father Dr. E. O'Sullivan, of Killarney, who trained our rising Kerry team last year for All-Ireland honours, which as you know they won.

When Kerry won the All-Ireland in 1903 the captain was the late Dick Fitzgerald in whose memory the Fitzgerald Stadium was made. In that game Paddy Dillon, of whom, it is said, that he could leap his own height above the crossbar, guarded the Kerry net with one hand only. His other was dis-membered. He is still alive and has three All-Ireland medals to this credit.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The first and only team to win a Hurling All-Ireland was the Ballyduff side. These men played in their bare feet and they used "groths", or hurleys of their own make, during the game.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the water of the well and sometimes take it home with them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a holy well in the parish of Ballyvourney. It is situated in "Gort na Tubrid". It is called after Saint Abbey and it is known as St. Abbey's Well.
People visit this well on Whit Sunday and also on the eleventh of February. The latter is known as St. Abbey's Day. People pay a certain number of rounds in the place where the well is situated and then finish up at the well. Any person who sees a fish at the bottom of it is cured from certain diseases.
Once a Protestant took some water from the well. He took it home and tried to boil, but if he had it on the fire for ever it would not either heat or boil.
Several people were known to leave their crutches at the well and go home completely cured. People drink
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The patron saint of the Killarney area(?) is called Saint Finian Cam. He founded the monastery on Innisfallen in the sixth century. However, it is said that it was St. Finian Lobhar who founded but there is no authentic evidence. He went to Offaly and founded the monastery of Kinnity near Birr in the year 650. He then returned to Innisfallen.
Saint Finian was a scholar of the great navigator Saint Brendan who is Patron Saint of Kerry. No children were ever given the name Finian in Baptism here. There are no places called after the Saint. He used to got into the woods to pray for he could not bear to be distracted when praying.
He would sometimes stay out in the woods for days fasting and praying. His "Lá Fhéile" is held on March the sixteenth at Iveragh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a holy Well in Ballyheige. It is called St. Marys Well. A long time ago there was a family, named Stanley. They were black Protestants and lived near the Hold Well. There was a green-spotted trout in the well and anyone who saw the trout were cured from their sickness. The eldest son in the Stanley Family was very wicked. He brough a dog with to the Well. When the dog saw the trout he jumped into the
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
changed into a stone, and remained a stone for ever. It can still be seen at the edge of the well.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
through under the sticks with the leaves attached to the ends. Then the married couple march to their camps and take bread and milk and potatoes and set them down on the grass. They then call their friends and parents and tell them to have a good time dancing and singing. At night they set burning tar sticks around in a ring and the wife sings inside and dances also. When it comes 1 o clock in the morning they retire to bed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tramps do not call very often at my house, because we live close to the town and they are afraid of the Guards
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cnucán na Saighdiúirí is a little hill near my home and when the Civil War was raging, this little hill was the haunt of the Republicans. When the Free State Soldiers used to pass the road they used be mown down by the Republicans.

Páirc na gCruach is a small field and it is near a bog. When the people used to cut the turf they used to put the reek in this field and the name has lived on since the earliest days.

Sliabh a' Naoimh is a place I know and it is said that when St. Brendan came to this district he used to preach from this hill.

Mrs J. O. Mahoney
New Street
Killarney
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Carrig a bhFuama is a place near my birth place and it is on top of a hill. It is said, that in olden days there was a volcano which made a huge hole on the rock which is on the hill-top. Now if you threw a stone into the hole it would make an awful noise,, and from that, the locality got its name.

Páirc Éile Ní Rathallaigh is a place near Rathmore and also near Egan O'Rahilly's home. Eily was one of his sisters and she got this field in which she built a mud-cabin and to day the old stones can be seen. Then for a living she divided the field and on one side she had potatoes and on the other she had a cow.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Carrig a bhFuama is a place near my birth place and it is on top of a hill. It is said, that in olden days there was a volcano which made a hug hole on the rock which is on the hill-top. Now if you threw a stone into the hole it would make an awful noise,, and from that, the locality got its name.
Páirc Éile Ní R
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 16:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a certain place in a river which flows under a bridge about a mile from Killarney. The place is situated amidst the fields about a mile in from the bridge and it is called "Poll na gCapall". It is called that name because people say that a horse and cart were drowned there in a dark corner of it. Boys swim there but they never go near that corner.
There is a well called "Tobar na Mudrán" in Annaghmore, Headford. Long ago it was a holy well and people did rounds at it. The people say that the water cured headaches. There is a hill or rock called "Carraig Liath" and it is situated on J. Donoghue's property in the Townland of Inch Glenflesk.
About a mile from Loo Bridge station, on the river Flesk is a deep hole called "Poll Gorm, and

Mrs. J. O'Sullivan
Inchicullane
Kilcummin
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 09:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were four poets in my district namely Joe Dineen, Hugh Rahilly, Owen Ruadh O'Sullivan and Geoffrey O'Donoghue. Joe Dineen and Owen Ruadh lived in Rathmore. Rahilly and O'Donoghue lived in Meentogues or "Na Mínte Óga".
O'Sullivan and Rahilly were buried in Muckross Abbey. Dineen was buried in Rathmore, and O'Donoghue found his grave in Killaha, some miles from Killarney.
Joe Dineen wrote all his poetry in English but the three others, being native Irish speakers, wrote their poems in the Gaelic. The poems were of a complaining note, because at that time the English landlords took the land from the Irish people, leaving them destitute and poor. Thus the poets, heretofore well-fed and cared for, were rendered poor also, and had to beg and scrape for their living.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 09:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nevertheless though they lived an humble life were never refused food by the Irish peasantry, herabouts. O'Sullivan who died when he was about six and thirty years of age, was called the "Spailpin Fanac" because he was always tramping from farm to farm, looking for work.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 09:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My home town is called Killarney. It is composed of several parishes chief of which are, the parishes of Fossa and Glenflesk. Most of the land around Killarney is owned by Lord Kenmare.
"Cill Áirne", as it is called is the Irish for the "Church of Sloes". The church was built in the midst of a wood of sloes, and the name of the town is called Cill Áirne.
Killarney has many old people. Mr Moriarty who owns a drapers shop is past 80(?) but he is as healthy as a young man. An old story-teller whose name is Tom O'Connor lives in St. Mary's Terrace. He can relate stories both in Irish and English.
Killarney abounds in famous ruins. They are, Ross Castle which the Irish surrendered to Cromwell, Muckross Abbey where the Franciscan monks lived, and Agahdoe where the Bishops of Kerry resided.
There are three lakes in Killarney the biggest of which is Loch Lein.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 09:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This lake probably got its name from the monastery on Innisfallen as Loch Lein means "The Lake of Knowledge".

A. J. Moynihan
3 York Rd.,
Killarney
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 09:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the parish of Glenflesk there is a farm called Coracow (Cómhrach Abha). There is one field in this farm called the "Front Field". Old people say that this field should not be ploughed as there was a fort in it. Mr Scott - the owner of this farm - decided to plough the field as there were no visible traces of a fort. No sooner did he begin than he became seriously ill of a fever. The priest of the parish asked the people to pray for his happy death or speedy recovery. He recovered but was convinced that his illness was the result of his ploughing the field.

Ainm an sgéalaide:-
Edward Forde
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 23:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
AINM an SGEALAIDHE:-
Bean Uí Laighin
Lios-a-Trí

AINM an CAILÍN A FUAIR AN t-EOLAS:-
Éana Ní Laighin
Lios-a-Trí
Lios-a-Phúcha
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 23:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
wall. These fields are never tilled but the cattle usually graze on them.
In our farm also there is a place called Áth-na-gCorp. Long ago funerals from the parish went through Áth-na-gCorp to Muckross Abbey. Sometimes the river used be flooded and the people had to wait for a couple of days until the flood had subsided. When the remains of Eoin Roe were passing through Áth-na-gCorp the river flooded and the remains had to stay back for two days and two nights.

Ainm an duine a thug an scéal dom:-
Bean Uí Cúrnáin
Maigh-Inis

Ainm an cailin a fuair an t-eólas
Síghle Ní Cúrnáin
Maigh-Inis
Cíll-Áirne
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ainm an cailín a fuair an t-eolas
Cáit Ní Cúrnáin
Cúlbáin
Faithche
Lios-a-Púca
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was at her grandfather's house that night. The bodies of the father, mother, and three children were found and were buried in the Old Chapel graveyard, Rathmore, but the three others were never found. There is a lime kiln near the place where the house stood which remained uninjured by the bog slip. It is situated in the townland of Tureenamult about three miles from Rathmore.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
place gets it name - Ath Fionn Abha now corrupted to "Avenue".

POUND ROW
Bothar na Gabhann so called because there was a pound there. It was owned by the British government. If animals were straying they would have to pay a shilling for every animal the owner wanted to get back.

BOTHARCAOL
The narrow bohereen. It was the most important street in Killarney once as it connected every other street.

AINM AN DUINE A THUG AN T-EOLAS DOM:-
An t-Ath. Seán Ua Coinnleán
Gilmoss
Liverpool

ainm an duine a fuair an t-eolas
Brighid Ní Fhlainn
An tSráid Árd
Cill-Áirne
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
seventy cottages. It was in the "goats commonage" facing this that the martyrs were hanged. The site is still identifiable.

COLLEGE STREET
From the Imperial Hotel to Market there were twenty-one houses (1859) including National School and residence. The Superior was Brother John Counihan. Here also was a "Hedge" school under a Mr Norris. James Stephens the I.R.B. Head Centre taught here in 1856.

EAST AVENUE
In the premises used by the Electric Supply Co. formerly known as the "Brewery" there is a stone archway of outstanding proportion. It replaces the old ford across the Park River - the Fionn Abha from which the
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
very dilapidated cottages demolished in 1857.

KILLARNEY - CILL-ÁIRNE
"The church of the sloes" or the church of St. Airne but an older spelling is Coill-Airne, "the wood of the sloes". This explains such references to Killarney as:-
"An dair go ró bhreagh sí is fearr ar magaibh na Mumhan
Crainn loingis is bád gan trácht ar pluma ná ubhall"

FAIR HILL
Above the Fair Hill there is the railway goods section. from the milestones across to the present Railway Hotel - thence along the Eastern wall of the market back again was a very distinct village: property deeds of 1751 identify the Cork Road section at Harnetts Row. There were
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Áit - Ainmneacha
RATHANANE:- In Kilcummin there is an old fort called Rathanane. Years ago a chieftain by the name of Finain lived there hence its name Rath Fhionáin. The remains of the walls can still be seen under a cover of grass. In the centre of the fort is a large cross of marble and limestone. This was erected about twenty years ago to mark the place where mass was said in the Penal Days. Canon Lynch a priest in Manchester and a native of Kilcummin, erected it.

THE MOVING BOG
The moving Bog. About two miles from my home there is a bog called BogacH na Mine. On the 28th December 1896 this bog moved along the valley till it entered the Killarney Lakes. On its course it flowed over the house of a man named Donnelly, drowning himself and his family save one - a little girl aged twelve years who
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a river not far from my home called Áth Shionnaig. It flows through a valley and joins the Flesk about a mile and a half from Killarney. The general belief is that the name means the "Ford of the Foxes" but a few old people cling to belief that it is not Áth Shionnaig but Dath Shionnaig.
It is believed that when the Danes came to Ireland some of them took possession of the land on one side of the river. They had a battle with the Druids who had a dwelling on the other side. The battle was fought in the valley along which the river flows and it is said that the river ran red with blood of those who were slain in the battle and because of this it got the name Dath Shionnaig.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago it was customary to bury unbaptised children in forts. There is a place about four miles from Killarney called Cathairín na Leanbh and it is supposed that there are people buried there some of whom are people who died as a result of the famine. When the railway was being built the ditch was built through Cathairín na Leanbh but next day it was knocked. It was re-built but was again knocked during the night. Two guards were then put on sentry there and during the night a man came to them and told them to build the ditch six feet farther out and it would not be knocked. This was done and the ditch remained standing. It is still visible with a curve of about six feet in the part where the graves are supposed to be.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 22:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About seven miles from Killarney in the townland of Annaghmore there is a field in the land of Daniel Murphy called the "Faithche". When Eoin Ruadh lived at Mintogues there was a hedge school in that field and he went to school there. He was an awful dunce and could not learn anything. One foggy morning he went astray and went into a fort. Being worn out he fell asleep and when he went back to school after he was the cleverest boy there.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 10:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and Cave called after St. Moling.
The Sunday within the octave of 20th August (supposed to be saint's feast day) witnesses a patron even to present time.
Perhaps it was during his journeyings to urge ment of Leinster to resist(?) borumean tribute he paused at this spot.
Local tradition tells a sad story connected with the Saint. He once asked for food at a certain house in Mullinakill District, the people in derision produced a young hound cooked, on a platter to Him. He prayed over dish and immediately animal took shape and walked off the plate. St Mullins is then said to have laid his curse on that district and to this day tradition says there is always a fool or onnseach to be found in the homes about Mullinakill.
Another story told is about a man named Conway who once tried to cut down a tree near Holy Well. First attempt he made on looking back towards his home he thought he observed a rick of hay on fire. He went back home there was no fire. 2nd attempt he made he thought he saw his outhouses on fire - he returned to put out fire but when he reached the spot there was no fire
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 10:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Parish of St. Mullins lies in the barony of Lr St Mullins in the County of Carlow. The Parish derives its name from the celebrated Irish saint named Moling, who according to some writers died in the year 696 of the Christian Era. The original Irish name of this place was Teac Moiling - this place was previously called Achadgh Cainidh - Teach Moling i.e. House of Moling and athough this name has been modified to the Anglican form still it is not totally lost for several of the oldest inhabitants of that place call it Teach Moling to the present day.
The holy Moling took a very active and successful part in the politics of his day and succeeded in inducing Fionnachta - Rí na h-Éireann to omit the old borumean tribute, which had been levied off people of Leinster from the time of Turtal the Acceptable. Moling lived however to see the tribute levied once more by the Monarch Hugh Mac Aimeriach against whom he raised his voice and and his Paschal (Crozier) and at head of men of Leinster compelled him to leave the country in complete discomfiture. St Moling afterwards became Bishop of Ferns and died 17th June 697.
Now about 3 miles from this School Coolroebeg there is a townland called Mullinakill also a Holy Well
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 10:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a bone fire in Nash since that.

Josie Kehoe
Carrigbyrne
Newbawn

Told by James Kehoe (63 years)

Told to him by
Patrick Kehoe (80 years)
Kilscanlon,
Ballinaboola
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 10:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there used to be a bone fire in Nash on the 29th of June. It was a custom for every wan to bring a piece of a stick or something to throw in the fire.
This night there was a girl goin to the bone fire. There was a path goin' from the girl's houses through the graveyard. The girl went through the graveyard for a short cut, she forgot to bring a piece of stick with her, an she saw a wooden cross in the graveyard an she took it up and brought it with her. When she reached the fire the people told her not to throw the cross in the fire, but she threw it in. When she was dancin' after, she was taken away an' she was seen goin' through a big sceac on the ditch. She appeared to her brother the next night and she tould him that she would be coming out in a gap the next night riding on a grey horse and if he was able to take her she would be safe. The brother went to the gap but he wasn't able to take her an' she was never seen again. There was never
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 09:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people used invite the weasels to come about their houses if they were annoyed with rats. It is a well-known fact that they used come.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 09:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the teaching or learning of Irish Language.
If the children were heard speaking Irish they would be punished by him.

Books:- The first book (primer) used in school about 1865 was called a "Redimadaisy". A lazy pupil, at that time, was also called "Redimadaisy".

Writing:- Slate-pencil and slate were used. Sometimes pupils wrote on their slates with the stem of a clay-pipe.

Seats:- Children sat on logs of wood -
Those logs rested on stones. Children also sat on stones which had for cushions bundles of withered grass called "buntanions".
Teachers used not remain long in a district. They depended on what money the people would give them - Some parents were able to pay tuition fees - others were not.

Gearóid Ó Céileachair (oide) (do bhailigh)
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 09:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In 1846 there was no school in Eden, Ballinaglera Parish, Dowra Co Leitrim.
Giblin from South Leitrim was the first teacher.
Then Paddy Flynn, Cornagee, Dowra taught in Eden.
The next teacher was Healy - a native of Ballinaglera.

His successor was Durkin a native of Ballinaglera. He was succeeded by Phil McHugh, a native of Doobally, Co Cavan.
Then next teacher in Eden School was McMorrow (Gog). This teacher spent 20 years in Cavan College and was a brilliant classical scholar. He taught Latin and Greek. His successor was Philip Comyn, a native of Doobally, Co. Cavan.

Attitude towards Irish Language:-
Paddy Flynn used teach Irish. Frank Earley, Eden could read the Irish Catechism. He died in 1871. Master Durkin was opposed to
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 21:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá daoine ann agus Oidhche Lae Sheain nuair a bhíonn an Teine Chnámh ag meathlú gheibheann siad sméaróid ó'n teine agus fágann siad imeasc na ngas bprátaí í chun go mbeidh prátaí maithe acu.
Cuireann siad sméaróid eile as an teine-chnámh in a dteinte féin.

From
Mary Gaughan
Emlybeg,
Belmullet,
Co Mayo
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All got away before dark as the "pooka" was supposed "to be out' that night.
On one occasion, a party who had visited their friends after the bonfire, were frightened almost to death, on the way home . Their path led past the remains of the bonfire . A mighty wind tore across the place throughout the neighbouring rushes, and left a road in its trail. The bonfire ceased to be held there afterwards. It was held about a quarter of a mile nearer to the houses.
Now , the bonfire is held near a cross roads as the young people are fewer in number and it requires more than one townsland to make up a number sufficient for the dance.
The fire from the remains of the bonfire is no longer taken away for the gardens and 'pookas' are regarded as things of a foolish age
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Another custom in the West of Ireland is to light a large bon-fire on Saint John's eve. The boys who live in the towns collect money and buy a load of turf and the boys who live in the country bring turf with them from home. They build a large stack of turf at every cross-roads and spill a can of oil down on it. Then they put a big bone on the top of the turf and light it. When the fire is blazing up somebody starts to play music and all the boys and girls dance round about it until midnight. Sometimes the fires remain lit until the next morning.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two bonfire nights celebrated one on 23rd June and the other on 28th June.
It is a common belief that if the weather breaks between these nights, it will be a wet Summer and I have known this to happen sometimes.
The bonfire is made on the hill top or often at a roadside convenient to a bog from which supplies of fuel could be easily provided.
When the fire blazes up as the result of a sprinkling of dry turf and sticks with paraffin oil supplied gratis by the local shopkeeper.
It is a pretty sight when on a dark night one after another of the bonfires of surrounding highlands all twinkle in the night while faint cheering may be carried from far off on calm nights.
I met an old woman on bonfire night carrying half-burnt turf sods from the bonfire. She told me that her husband had always taken turf home with him to throw into his cottage garden and that she was so to speak continuing the old custom.
Cattle are never driven through the smouldering ashes though I have heard of that custom in other counties.
While the fire burns brightly, the people - young and old gather round talking, singing or listening to the music of a violin or melodian.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 20:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bonfires are still kept up and in one family the farmer or his wife jump over the red embers for luck. The wife Mrs Murphy takes a kindled stick and ashes to each field where a crop is growing i.e. corn, wheat, potatoes and roots. This red ash is supposed to banish the fairies and keep the crop from being blighted.
In other parts the people dance around the fire and in Mayo a boy who has a wish to marry a neighbouring girl is particular to catch her hands and dance around the fire hoping to be lucky in this way of getting the colleen.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bonfires are lighted on St John's Eve and on the Eve. of the 29th June.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
held on the first of May they had various games and athletic feats, mirth and carousing and the pagan youth watched and watied eagerly for May Eve. So as St. Patrick went through Ireland converting young and old he found it difficult to keep the young men converted to his faith from patronising the great Pagan Bonfire. The saint being a very wise man thought the best way and only way to prevent his converts from intercourse with the pagans and their fires was to have a bonfire in memory of St. Peter an St. Paul on the Eve of the 23rd of June and on St. John's Eve. So that is how the first bonfires started and continued to be held but alas they are gone almost never to return.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bonfires were common about thirty years ago and they are not completely a thing of the past yet. The chief cause of the decay of bonfires is due in part to the lack of firewood and another cause is the decrease in the population of youngsters.
In olden times there was a bonfire on every hill but in parts of the locality there was a special bonfire and young men and some old people too walked a considerable distance to one of these given out (?) bonfires. There used to be fiddlers and all kinds of musicians present at the bonfires, tambouring and fives. Young girls were there by the score and if the night was good and dry they sang and danced unti the small hours of the morning and this custom was continued from the time of St. Patrick. When he came to convert the Irish people they had their great bonfires especially the great fire they had to memory of Baal, then chief God. Young men frequented these bonfires which were
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the twenty eight of June every year there is a bonfire lit on nearly every crossroads and especially near a bog or a wood where they can get lots of fire. On that day people come from all parts of the village and spend the whole evening getting sticks and make a big heap of them in one place.
Then they get a cart and pull it themselves, and draw them to some place
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
where everyone can see it. Then they build up the sods of turf like a churn and pack the sticks into the heart of it. They put lamp oil on it then and put a match to it and soon the whole thing is ablaze.
Then some of the boys play a mouth-organ or a fiddes and more of them sing so that it is more of a dance than anything else. The singing and dancing keeps on until about twelve or one o'clock when everyone starts for home.
When they are going home everyone brings a piece of a lit stick and throws it out in the tillage field so that all the crops in that field will be a success.

Tomás Mac Siómóin
Baile Ard
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"St John's night bonfires were lit always long ago and the cows were followed around the field with burning bushes in order to bring them in calf"

Nora Lyons
Cratloe West
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 15:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Saints in this place were St. Muireadach, St. Farnan, St. Baithen, St. Charles and St. Patrick visited this place.
St. Muireadach was a native of Inishmurray part of the parish of Templeboy. He left Inishmurray when he was young and came to live in Aughris for a while where there is a blessed well for him. Some people call it St. Patrick's well. It has a cure for sore eyes and some people go there the second Sunday in August. People say that St. Patrick made him the first bishop of Killala. Innismurray is called after him and some people has the name Muireadach in this district.

St. Farnan lived on the western side of the Parish of Templeboy on the top of Ballygilcash at a place called The Keeve. He lived in a valley on the bank of the river and his bed was a small cave on the side of a cliff. There is no well but there is a large heap of stones and people say that he used to say a Hail Mary for every one of them every day.

St. Baithen was a native of Aughris also and was in Innishmurray. St. Some people call him St. Molaise. Some say that Templeboy got its name from St. Baithen - Teampall Bhaoithín. St. Baithen went to Iona with Columcille and became head of the monastery there when Columcille died.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 09:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
trouble.

St Stephen's Day is celebrated in much the same manner as St Brighid's Night. Boys and girls travel from house to house gathering money and when they are pleased with the collection the captain of the contingent divides it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 09:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In this district the feasts which are celebrated in any special manner are limited to a few. If taken as they occur in the calendar they may be placed in the following order:- St Brigid's Night, St. John' Night, Halloween and St. Stephen's Day.

On St. Brigid's Night a party of "Clathardhas" consisting of men and boys equipped with old torn clothes and whatever musical instruments they can lay hands on, travel around to every house in the district. They sing and dance as best they can and they generally get a few pence in every house. At the end of the journey they divide the takings.

It is customary to light a bonfire on St. John's Night. It is usually lighted at a cross-roads. Turf and oil are gathered by the young men and boys of the district. When the fire is lighted the old men gather around it and spend the night conversing. The young people amuse themselves by throwing up lighted rockets saturated with oil. When they are going home a member of each family brings a lighted coal and throws it into the potato field to bring luck on the crops.

Hallowe'en is celebrated in a way that is not commendable. The old customs of breaking cabbage on the roads is still practised by the young men and boys of this district. They also throw stumps and "heads" at the doors and very often gives rise to
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mulhuddart is the name of this village or in Gaedilg Mullaigh Eadairne. It is still called by the old inhabitants '' Mulla Heather''. Some people say that the right name of the village is Mullac Eadairne.

Cruice Rath and Hollywoodrath denote the presence of two Irish raths.
Huntstown, Tyrrellstown, Buzzardstown, Powerstown, Whitestown and Blakestown show the places around the village were once in the hands of Normans.

Godamendy
Godamendy is a townland north east of the village. There was an old church there and the priest came on horseback every Sunday to say mass there. One night the mare had a foal and the next morning being Sunday morning the priest had to bring the mare and her foal with him. He tied them to to the gate and went into the church
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Timcheall míle ó Chluain Ioraird tá áit fé leith a chuireann Laochra na h-Éireann i gcuimhne dhúinn, sí sin. Uagha na gCroppaí. Tá cros mhór 'n-a seasamh os cionn na n-uaigh, agus ainmneacha na bhfear geatma(?) do throid agus fuair bás ar son na h-Éireann sa bhliadhain 1798. scríobhtha uirri, in- Gaedilg agus i mBéarla.

I mbliadhain 1934, coimeádadh lá fé leith i gcuimhneachán na bhfear so, le h-ónóir is omós do thabhairt dóibh agus coimeadtar é gach bliadhain ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(V)
And now to conclude with as sure as I began it
As much in its praises I could say
Its down to Inamore where the sportsmen cross the ferry
And along to sweet Ballinatray
Tis there you would hear the hounds and the sounding of the horn
The fox close pursued on a fine dewy morn
The race-horses coursing most beautiful and charming
By the lovely sweet banks of the Bride

(VI)
Farwell charming Glenville I never can forget thee
Where my forefathers lived at their ease
And the Hon Sir Edward Kinahan he lived in great splendour
May his offspring be always the same.
There is a spring well in yonder green isle
It cures both the lame the dumb and the blind
They have forgotten their crutches and left them behind
By the lovely sweet banks of the Bride.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Glavin 14 Inchinanaugh got this poem from his father Wm Glavin

(1)
All you that are prone to sport and to pleasure
Come roam by the sweed Bride's side
Tis there you will be amused by the youths when collected
No grief there to trouble their minds
Where the fifers and fiddlers with pleasure do play
And the song birds do tune their sweet notes on each tree
Joining in each chorus in praises all the day
of the lovely sweet banks of the Bride.

(II)
Tis down by charming Glenville and Peet Driscoll's inn
The water do gently glide
Where numbers in coaches cross over Keame Bridge
With a sporting laugh and a smile
Where the trout and the salmon do jump with joy
And the long snouted otter do gently dive
The flat fish and eel no closer can lie
By the lovely sweet banks of the Bride
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 23:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(III)
And along to Castlelyons where oft time youve have heard
It mentioned, it always carries the swan(?)
Where lords, dukes, and knights combine together
To take the evening fresh air
Where the hare is on his seat, and the rabbit in his burrow
The fox well secured with his den and well cover(?)
The ducks wild and tame in the streams they do flutter
By the lovely Sweet banks of the Bride.

(IV)
Where the water glides is a fine situation
Its equals are scarce to be found
They have a wholesome air, and the plains they are bounded
All spangled with sweet scented flowers
Gentlemen have made it their place of abode
O'Brien brave Thompson likewise Mr Boles
A church they have for service and a bridge to cross over
On the lovely sweet banks of the Bride.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ní fiú pingin
Arbh fiú dul ann? B'fiú go maith
Niorbh fiú. Narbh fiú
Dá mba bfiú liom ort é
Dubhairt sé narbh fiú

Ní fiú sean-dheich(?) truigh é
Ní fiú cáirt salainn é
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Coláiste le Gaedhilg i n-Eochaill
(File gan ainm do chum)

Tá an Gaedilg arís go ceannasach fé mheas ag buidhin na Fodla
Ní fhuil easonóir na tarcuisne dá thagairt leí níos mó (a)'gainn;
Acht óg is aosda ag formad go toilteanach le dásach,
Ag feucaint cé na ciaca 's mó molas is go grádhas í

Más áil libh togha 's siogha oideacais seo cuireadh dhíbh go h-Eochaill
Tá oide múinte clisde ann sár-oilte feidhmeamhail foghanta
An té do chaitheas sealadh ann is maise dho go deo é
Mar tugann blas na teangan leis go ceasda milis modhmharach

I n-eaghmuis léighinn buan-tairbheach is aiteasach an áit sin
Tá feoithne fíor na farrge faoi bhratacha na mbarc ann
Tá sláinte féile is fairsinge 's gan dearmhad céud fáilte
'S na radharca is breághtha i mBanba chum taisdeal libh a cáirde.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 22:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Coláiste le Gaedhilg i n-Eochaill
(File gan ainm do chum)

Tá an Gaedilg arís go ceannasach fé mheas ag buidhin na Fodla
Ní fhuil easonóir na tarcuisne dá thagairt leí níos mó (a)'gainn;

Acht óg is aosda ag formad go toilteanach le dásach,
Ag feucaint cé na ciaca 's mó molas is go grádhas í

Más áil libh togha 's siogha oideacais seo cuireadh dhíbh go h-Eochaill
Tá oide múinte clisde ann sár-oilte feidhmeamhail foghanta

An té do chaitheas sealadh ann is maise dho go deo é
Mar tugann blas na teangan leis go ceasda milis modhmharach

I n-eaghmuis léighinn buan-tairbheach is aiteasach an áit sin

Tá feoithne fíor na farrge faoi bhratacha na mbarc ann
Tá sláinte féile is fairsinge 's gan dearmhad céud fáilte
'S na radharca is breághtha i mBanba chum taisdeal libh a cáirde.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
eggs another pigeon comes and takes her place while she is away for food. She sits on the eggs for a fortnight or three weeks. Another pigeon comes and sits beside her to keep her company. When the young ones come out they are like young ducks. One of the parent birds has a busy time carrying food because the other one must stay and mind the young birds lest the hawk would come for them to feed his young. When the young ones are learning how to fly they fly from branch to branch and from tree to tree. They are very tame when they are learning how to fly. You could catch them. They would not be afraid. If their nest is near a house they eat with the hens in a garden. The pigeons always rear two broods in one year. Some people catch pigeons and tame them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is go ndéaraimíd a réir
Mor uraim duit a Sheósaimh naomhtha
Mar is tusa fúair an grás Íosa is
Muire beith ag soláthair
‘S in a grádh seadh fúair tú bás
Seosaimh Naomhtha guidh orainne
Ó go bhfaghaimíd sólás
Bheith mar tú ar feadh ár mbeatha
Is mar tú go bhfaghaimíd bás
A Dhia síorruidhe na trócaire
Ar ár naomh féac anuas
Led’ ró naomhtha coimeád í
Síotcain aondacht is i bhfeabhas
Dár bpápa tabhair do beannacht Díadhac
Dár n-easbog is dár sagairt grás
Do peactaig tabhair ar grás aithrighe
Dár namhaid is cara tabhair sólás.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 15:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a.24 An Croidhe Naomhtha

Is peacach gránna salach mé Neamh tairbheac deireoil
Atá lán le beartha gangaideach
Is malluightheacht an tsaoghail
Acht cum Croidhe ró Naomhtha Íosa
Iompuighim in uair mo gádh
Mar sé croidhe ró Naomhtha Íosa
mo dhócas ‘s mo grád
A shaoghail aicídeach malluighthe
Ó scaraim leat go deó
Le do bród fallsa scannalac
Le dfhormad is do gleó
Is do Croidhe ró-Naomhtha Íosa
Sead geillfid mé go bráth
Mar is é do croidhe ró Naomhtha Íosa
Mo dhócas is mo grád
Duinn ó a Maighdean ró onóireac
Grad dhuit ta nár gcroidhe go doimhin
Mar sé aon Mhac Riog na Glóire
Do chaith trí raithe ‘n do bhroinn
Guid orainn a Máthair dhílis
Is ó peacad tabhair sinn saor
Go molaimíd d’aon Mhac milis
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 12:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
MACOIDHE - (macoy) - a fine boy
breall glic

Punóg - little knob formed on under clothing through wear as in flannelitte

Reiméad - a Rubber(?) or torn piece of garment hanging loosely

Umhnán - froth of milk
Snamhaire - a "snot", or cringing boy

Dearbhaoil - the cleaning of dykes consisting of briars and waste stuff. Dirty stuff

Dríodar - sediment
Scúirse - a whipser, applied to a girl, a fine active girl
Gamalóigín - an innocent youngster
Criocáilidhe - a bladder or one who speaks like a child

Dúlamán - the green stuff which floats in a spring well in summer

Rúmáile - water crowfoot
Gaibhsleach - an earwig
Tufóg - a smell

Tuifera - a stinking person
a cábog

Scrín - what passes from the male to the female at time of conception

Síafra - a fairy, a small person
Straoil - an untidy girl, Giobalach
Giobal - a rag
Gobal ime - a lump of butter (small say 1/4 or 1/2 lb.

Gabhlóg - (Illustration) a fork, wooden, used when cutting briars etc.

Stillers / Stileirs an ounsel or spring
balance (Omit S to suit the language) (??)

Buitseacán - a short thick man boy or person

Suidhistín - a small seat filled with curled hair, used for a child

Sáilslear - what is used to hold salt at table
Racait - a child's frock
Cába - collar of a coat
Cuarán, - slippers, sandal,
maothal, beistings 1st and 2nd milking
Nús - beistings
Ísbín - a sausage
Grísgín - a rasher or gizard of a bird roasted on coals
Glas - watery looking (milk)
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
adh ag an gceannuightheóir san áit san freisin.
Bhí Fireball in a gcomhnaidhe i gcaisleán i Aill i bparóiste Fiacail ar tamaill géarr agus do chaith sé tamaillín eile de a shaoghal i gCill Eanacha i dteach Donnachadha Ó Diolláin.
Fuair sé bás agus cuireadh é le a mhuinntear féin san mainistear Cuinnne.

Donachadha Ó Muineóg
Eanair 3, '38
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
an Spáinn agus nuair bhí sé ann do mharbh sé Spáineach i gcomhrach beirte.
Do lean mac na Spáineach go h-Éirinn é agus casadh ar a chéile iad ag Geata Bán taobh thoir dé Co. an Chláir agus bagairt mac na Spáineach é agus bhí comhrach beirte eile eathorra agus do mhairbh Fireball an Spáineach.
Deirtí go raibh morán áithmhéala ag Fireball an rud sin a dhéanamh acht ní raibh aon leigheas aige air.
Tar éis an troda do chas sé fear darbh ainm Drew idir Geata Bán agus Scairbh. Dúbhairt sé leis go raibh fear marbh i bpáirc i n-aice Geata Bán. D'órduigh sé é an t-airgead a bhí ag an Spáinneach do thógaint agus é do choiméad agus an Spáineach féin do chuir i n-áit éigin.
Do dhein Drew an obair sin agus ni raibh aon comhrach beirte eile aige. Do cheannuigh Drew píosa talmhan lámh dheis den mbóthar i n-aice Tighe na mBocht idir Scairbh agus Toma Gréine leis an airgead.
Deirtear nach raibh t-adh aige san áit san agus do dhíol sé é agus ní raibh
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Do rugadh agus tógadh Fireball Mac Conmara i Mo Riasc in aice Tulach i gCo. an Chláir timcheall céad bliadhain ó shoin. Duine de sliocht muinntir Mac Conmara do b'eadh é agus fear calma laochrach do b'eadh é freisin.
An t-am sin bhí na Sasanaigh tíoránaigh san tír seo agus bhí gráin mór air iad a bheith ag déanamh sin.
Bhí dhá phiostal ag Fireball agus sgríobhadh 'bás gan sagart' ar ceann amháin aca agus 'casúr an bháis' ar an gceann eile. Thug sé casúr an bháis' do Ó Connall nuair a bhí sé ag troid i n-aghaidh D'Esterre.
Do chaith sé cuid is mó de a shaoghal isteach ag bagairt agus ag troid i n-aghaidh na Sasana agus bhí eagla an domhain ar na lucht Plandála i gCo. an Chláir air.
Nuair a bhí Ó Connall ag troid an comhrach beirte le D'Esterre do chabhruigh Fireball lámh uachtar d'fhágail air.
Is mó comhrach beirte do throid sé in a shaoghal. Chuaidh sé go dtí
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(I)
O Heart of Jesus out from Thee,
A mighty stream is flowing,
Of God's sweet grace and blessings,
And his mercies over flowing.
Oh Sacred Heart then keep my soul,
From every thing defiled,
The little while I am to stay,
Make me Thy grateful child.

(II)
Oh Heart of Jesus kindly grant,
That I at length may see,
With radiant orbs made heavenly bright
The way that leads to Thee,
That I may fill some vacant place,
Before Thy heavenly throne,
And that my heart unsullied,
May find rest within Thy known.

(III)
Oh when I think as oft I do,
How good God is to me,
My Heart with rapture clings to Thee,
Thy glory there to see,
That I may love Thee in my soul,
For thou hast been so kind,
And thank Thee for they blessings all,
Which I can bring to mind.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(IV)
Now I am old and nearing fast,
The ending days of life,
Oh Sacred Heart and be my strength,
And lead me in the strife,
Oh help me keep Thy fire of love,
A flame within my breast,
And give me grace to light my soul,
To its long eternal rest.

Treasa Ní Mhuineog
Rang (III)
25ad Mí Nodlag '37

Mo Shean-athair do cum. Tá sé nocha agus cuig bliadhain anois.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Remember Our Lady of the Sacred Heart the ineffable power which thy divine Son has imparted thee over His adorable Heart. Entirely trusting in thy merits we come begging thy protection O' Heavenly Treasurer of the Sacred Heart of that Heart inexhaustible fountain of all graces which thou mayest open when thou pleasest in order to distribute amoungst men.
All the treasures of love and mercy of light and salvation which it contains grant us we beseech thee the favours we solicit no we cannot be refused and since thou art Our Mother Our Lady of the Sacred Heart.
Propitiously hear and grant our prayers. Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, pray for us.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
thy holy will grant me health and strength never the less not my will but thine be done. O sweet heart of Jesus make me love thee ever more and more.
Eternal father, I offer thee the adorable face of thy beloved son for the honour and glory of thy name for the conversion of sinners and the salvation of the dying.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
not to offend you any more.

Prayer to the Virgin Mary
Oh we love thee Mary trusting all to thee what is past and present and what is yet to be our Lady our queen and our mother in the name of Jesus and for the love of Jesus help us in our troubles.

A Pray for a happy death
Oh my Lord and saviour support me in my last hour by the strong arms of thy sacraments and the fragrance of thy consolations. Let thy absolving words be said over me and thy holy oil sign and seal me. Let thy mother Mary come to me and my angel whisper peace to me that I may die as I desire to live in thy faith and in thy love.

A Prayer to the Sacred Heart.
Though I have asked for a long time still I ask thee O Sacred heart of Jesus once more to plead for me to thy Eternal Father for a great favour. I place it in the centre of thy broken bleeding heart when covered with the crimson clock of thy most precious blood of thy Eternal Father cannot refuse to her not my prayer but thine. O my God through the love of the Sacred Heart and the Precious blood which flows from it. If it be
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 11:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Oh Jesus I cast myself and all my concerns into your Sacred heart overflowing with all sweetness. I commit to you with perfect confidence all my spiritual and temporal interest. I beg of you in the hours of my weakness and excitement when I forget to call upon you for help to be still my protector and guide. Give me light to see your will, strength to do it and grace
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
" The hollow winds begin to blow
The clouds look bleak the glass is low
The soot falls down the spaniel sleeps,
And spiders from their cobwebs creep,
Last night the sun went pale to bed
The moon in halo hid her head
The boden shepherd heaves a sigh
To see a rainbow span the sky,
Low o'er the grass the swallow wings,
The cricket too how sharp he sings,
Puss on the hearth with velvet paws,
Sits swiping[?] o'er her whiskery jaws,
Loud quack the ducks, the peacock cries
The distant hills are looking nigh,
Hark! how the chairs, and tables crack
Old Billy's joints are on the rack,
T'will surely rain, I see with sorrow
Our jaunt must be put off to morrow. "
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bíonn cailín ag poc léimrigh i lár an urlár, agus 'na cailíní uilig a' rith 'na tímcheall; agus raon mar seo aca.

A bhearaidh tú orm a laoigh
A bhearaidh tú orm a laoigh
Ó bearad is fáilte a cuidiní
Dílse mo croidhe

Fuairas é seo ó'm mhatair

Úna Ní Shúilleabháin
Baile Gibb
An Uaimh
Co. na Midhe

An té a scriobh:-
Máirín Ní Shúilleabháin
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
monastery to be found except a few stones near the pump and a little holy water font now to be found in the Brothers' House.
About the close of the twelfth century Joceline de Angulo founded or rebuilt an Abbey at Navan for Canons Regulars of Saint Augustine. There is a tradition that a monastery of St Colmcille existed here before the Canons were brought over by De Angulo or Nangle and that is why the school is called St Columba's Abbey School.

Cannon or Canon:- Just one field away from the school is the street called Cannon Row. This is said to have belonged to the monks and derived its name from a row of Canons cells so the Irish name should be Sráid na Manac or Sráid na g-Canonac and not Sráid na nGunnaí Mór as it is locally called.
A famous statue was kept in this monastery of the Assumption of the B.V. and was called Our Lady of Navan. Miracles were worked here some of which will be found in another place. The statue was destroyed 19 July 1539.
Indulgences were granted to persons by Pope Nicholas V (to persons) who came on pilgrimages to this monastery.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 23:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What is now known as the Abbey Schools is used as a school since 1917. Before it was unoccupied for a short period. But up to the time of the Great War it was occupied by the a section of the Meath Militia.
Many alterations have been made to give it the appearance of a school. The upper stories were used as sleeping quarters for the horse soldiers and the lower storey was the stable. These rooms are very dark and low and very depressing. We are all very glad to get out of the down stairs classrooms as it is very difficult to see the blackboard and on dull day it is difficult to write. The are four poles supporting the ceiling. These were used to hang the harness. They are made of iron and are hollow and might contain military relics.

A few days ago whilst making a new path to the W.C. human remains were found. These were re-buried underneath the path. This was the monastic graveyard up to the time of Henry VIII. And it is also said that during the cholera cart-loads of corpses were buried here.
There are very few remains of the
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 22:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Breacla
Gearrygorm
Bainnre
Pallyguney ( Poll a' Gaineamh ) A = U go minic
Lug Gorm
Saileog or Silouge

Sgeac Ranna - Bush of Division - Kells Navan and Mulgainmh

Páirc na h-Easmaighe
Duog = Dubhóg - a little black river

Cor an Eisg - a place frequented by the Cor an Eisg - the name for the Heron in Meath

Barrla - small pond
Clann Magadan - (Cluan Mac Paidín?)
Bun na gCros - at Joe Feely
Croc Béil
Grabhaidhe
Páirc a Clábhair
Croc Breac
Rath Dubh
Curragh Mór
The Bán
The Báinse
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 12:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bíonn cailín ag poc léimrigh i lár an urlár, agus 'na cailíní uilig a' rith 'na tímcheall; agus raon mar seo aca.

A bhearaidh tú orm a laoigh
A bhearaidh tú orm a laoigh
Ó bearad is fáilte a cuidiní
Dílse mo croidhe

Fuairas é seo ó'm mhatair

Úna Ní Shúilleabháin
Baile Gibb
An Uaiimh
Co. na Midhe

An té a scriobh:-
Máirín Ní Shúilleabháin
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 12:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mr George Nichol
Ballinahone,
Fahan

There is a Holy well in Lisfannon Upper. It is situated on a height overlooking the sea in Barnes Gap. There are no trees growing round. A cairn of stones is on the top of it.
St Anthony is the patron saint. People go there to get cured. They go on the sixteenth of June. The well cures eye diseases. People have to go round five times in prayer. Each time they through a stone in the well. They can say any prayer. They also drink the water. Beside the well there are beads, hairclips, medals, shells, stones, pencils. Near the well is a grave called Friar's Grave. When a person is cured they leave a piece of cloth. The Friar lived at the times when the Danes first
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 12:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(20) He's very fond of PLAMÁS (soft talk)

(21) The men wear BÁINÍN(S) in the West
(white flannel coats of home spun)

(22) She's a lazy old STRAOLL (an untidy person)
(23) Dont make a PRACAS of your dinner (a mess)
(24) Turf is cut with a SLÉAGHAN (a slane)

(25) GRÉASADIDHE - a shoemaker - now mostly used as a nick name

(26) Gabha - a blacksmith - also used as a nickname at present

(27) A Mhic - used when addressing a little boy - "Come here, A Mhic."

(28) He's a big, lazy LIUDHAIDE of a fellow

(29) Cailleach
1) an old woman
2) the word is also used to describe the shrivelled old seed potato which is found attached to the stalk when digging new ones.

(30) These are only PÓIRÍN(S) - very small potatoes used for pig feeding

(31) She has not GRÁDH for learning (love)

(32) Make a SCIORD of tea or a SCEALLÓG of tea.
(a small drop of tea)

(33) He has the CRÁDH CROIDHE badly (love-sickness)

(34) I had a great SEANCHUS with them ( a chat )
(35) He lived in an old SHANTY (Sean-Tigh)
(36) Look at that little CROCKAN - Cnocán (little hill)

(37) It is broken into SMITHEREENS - Smidiiríní

Collected by
Mrs Kelly,
Henry St.,
Baileboro
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 12:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1) It isn't worth a TRÁINÍN (blade of grass)
(2) She's a good GIRSHA (Girrseach) (little girl)
(3) She's a fine GEARRCHAILE (little girl)
(4) Such a poor TACHRÁN (poor delicate child)
(5) He cut down the SCEACH-bush (the whitethorn)
(6) He's only an AMADÁN (a fool)
(7) There's some MÍ-ADH on that family (bad luck)

(8) He's very DONNY
(go dona) - said of a sick person

(9) She's crying like a BEAN-SIDHE all day

(10) She baked the cake with the hot GRÍOSACH (hot cinders)

(11) He cut the GRÍSGÍN(s) out of the pig while boning it (fresh pork)

(12) That's a fine CLIB of a horse ( a year-and-a-half old horse)

(13) Its only a PROCH of a house (a small stuffy house with small windows)

(14) Dont talk RAMÉIS (nonsense)

(15) He's finished planting his potatoes except a few GEARROG(S) - (short ridges)

(16) They all believe in PISTHEROGS (pisreóga)
(17) That Galway hat is a real CÁIBÍN
(18) He brought a new pair of BROGS (boots)
(19) That child puts no SUIM (heed) in his lessons
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 12:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(14) Six head of cows
(sé cinn de buaibh)

(15) He an out and out bad fellow - very bad
(amach is amach)

(16) He is on the pig's back - very fortunate
(ar dhruim na muice)

(17) He has the story up-side-down - all wrong
(bun os cionn)

(18) I am just after doing it - I have just done it
(tar éis a dhéanamh)

(19) I am after my dinner - I have just eaten it
(tar éis mo dhinnéir)

(20) They are on his track - searching for him
(ar a thóir)

(21) I was looking on at the time - watching
(a féachaint air)

(22) He came to quickly - recovered (after fainting)
(tháinig se chuige féin)

(23) He is going ahead with his work - improving
(a' dul ar aghaidh)

(24) You're a' calling - somebody's calling you
(a' glaodhach ort)

(25) I got a toss - I fell
(fuair mé tuisle)

(26) He has a power of money - a lot
(neart airgid)

(27) He got his death of cold
(fuair sé bás)

(28) The man reddened his pipe - lit it
(dhearg sé a phiopa)

Collected by
Mrs Kelly
Henry St.,
Bailieboro
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 10:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1) What's on you? What's the matter with you?
(Cad tá ort)

(2) What's wrong with you?
(Goidé tá cear leat)

(3) He is only letting on - pretending
(a' leigint air)

(4) He is out of his mind - insane
(as a mheabhair)

(5) I came up with them - overtook them
(tháinig mé suas leo)

(6) He fell out of his standing - fainted
(in a sheasamh)

(7) What hurry is on you - why are you in such a hurry
(ce'n deifir atá ort)

(8) It took a start out of me - frightened me
(bhain sé geit asam)

(9) I didn't find you coming - hear or see
(níor mhothuigh mé thú)

(10) I'll do it out here - sometime in the future
(amach annseo)

(11) I'll do it from this out - from now on
(as seo amach)

(12) He hit the road - started on a journey
(bhuail sé an bothar)

(13) I struck up with them - met them
(bhuail mé suas leo)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 10:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(73) Enagh - (An) Aonach - a fair

(74) Coppenagh - Copánach - abounding in dock-leaves

(75) Lisagoan - Lios a' Ghabhann - the smith's fort
(76) Bogeskey - Bog Uisge - soft water

(77) Carricknamaddoo - Carraig na Madadh - the rock of the dogs

(78) Tullynaskeagh - Tullach na Sgéith - the height of the whitethorn

(79) Currawoggy - Cor a' Bhogaigh - the hillock of the swamps (or marsh)

(80) Greagharue - Gréach Ruadh - the red bog

(81) Greaghacrotach - Gréach a Crotach - the bogey plain of the curlews

(82) Lisnasassana - Lios na Sasanna - the fort of the English

* * *

Townlands collected by the children of St. Anne's G.N.S. Bailieboro.
Probable derivations arrived at by the assistance of the teacher
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 10:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
To the memory of these patriots, a monument was erected in Wolfe Tone St, Mountmellick in 1898 and the minutes of meetings, then held for the purpose of raising funds to erect the monument, are still extant.
The bodies of the young heroes are interred in the old Graveyards at Graigue, Ivy Chapel (Mountmellick and Rosenallis)
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 10:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Eleven young men from Mountmellick and Rosenallis parishes were brutally done to death on June 11th and 12th and 13th 1798.It is said that an engagement took place between the Yeos and the United Irishmen at or near Summergrove which lies half way between Mountmellick and Rosenallis.
Five local men by name Francis Dunne, William Holohan, James Deegan, Daniel Dunne and Patrick Guilfoyle were taken prisoner. tortured and dragged along the street now known as O'Moore St, to where Dr,O'Brien's house is now situated. There a horse's cart stood with shafts in the air. A number of heavy stones was put in the end of the cart so that the shafts would keep erect. A noose was tied between the shafts, and the young men were hoisted each in a half-fainting condition to the noose and then hanged or slowly suffocated to death.
A young boy named Willie Brooke, a youth of eighteen was playing marbles on the street nearby, and some of the Yeos went in to question him as he knew of the movements of some of the United Irishmen. He refused to give information and was brutally flogged and maltreated on June 11th 1798. On the next morning June the 12th he was dragged half-dead a distance of 50 yards to the scaffold and like his townsmen of the previous day, was brutally done to death.
On June 13th Thomas Dunne, Daniel Conroy, Patrick Murray, George Gilligan and Patrick Dunne were barbarously maltreated and executed in the same spot.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 19:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(59) Mullabrack - Mullach Breach - the speckled hilltops

(60) Tullybrick - Tulach Bruich - the badger's height
(61) Crossmakeelan - Cros Mhic Chaoláin

(62) Cor Leacht Uí Chearbhaill - Corlattycarroll - the hill of the burial mound of O'Carroll

(63) Corlattylennon - Cor leacht Uí Leannáin

(64) Drumkeery - Drum Caroach - the ridge of the sheep

(65) Corneary - Cor an Aodhaire - the round hill of the shepherd

(66) Moylett - Magh Leacht - the plain of the tombstones or burial mounds

(67) Beagh - Beitheach - a place where birches grow

(68) Dunaree - Dún a' Roigh - the king's fort

(69) Pottlebrack - Pottle Breach - "pottle" a land measure ( speckled land )

(70) Nolagh - 'n Ulaigh - the altar-tomb or prayer-station

(71) Corraghy - Cor Achadh - the round hill of the field

(72) Raffony - Rath Fanaidh - the fort of the slope
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 19:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(59) Mullabrack - Mullach Breach - the speckled hilltops

(60) Tullybrick - Tulach Bruich - the badger's height
(61) Crossmakeelan - Cros Mhic Chaoláin

(62) Cor Leacht Uí Chearbhaill - Corlattycarroll - the hill of the burial mound of O'Carroll

(63) Corlattylennon - Cor leacht Uí Leannáin

(64) Drumkeery - Drum Caroach - the ridge of the sheep

(65) Corneary - Cor an Aodhaire - the round hill of the shepherd

(66) Moylett - Magh Leacht - the plain of the tombstones or burial mounds

(67) Beagh - Beitheach - a place where birches grow

(68) Dunaree - Dún a' Roigh - the king's fort

(69) Pottlebrack - Pottle Breach - "pottle" a land measure ( speckled land )

(70) Nolagh - 'n Ulaigh - the altar-tomb or prayer-station

(71) Corraghy - Cor Achadh - the round hill of the field

(72) Raffony - Rath Fanadidh the fort of the slope
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 19:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
river meadow

(46) Tierworker - Taobh Urchair - the hillside of the cast or shot

(47) Ballynamoney - Bealach na Mónadh nó Baile na Mónadh - the path of the turf or the town of the turf

(48) Moybolg - Magh Bolg - the plain of the Firbolg

(49) Rathkeevan - Rath Caoimhin - Kevin's fort (perhaps)

(50) Carriga - Carraigeach - a rocky place

(51) Tullyatten - Tullach Aitinne - the hilltop of the furze

(52) Lisdromskeagh - Lios Druim Sgéith - the fort of the ridge of the whitethorn

(53) Lecks - Leacha - Flagstones

(54) Dromamuck - Droma Much - the ridges of the pigs

(55) Threecarvaghs - Trí Ceathramhadh - three - quarters ( a land measure)

(56) Knockateggart - Cnoc a tSagairt - the priest's hill

(57) Suidhe Ódhrain - Seeorum - the site or situation of St Odhran

(58) Seefin - Suidhe Fionn - the whitish site or situation
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 19:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(31) Relaghan - Réidh Leathan - a wide, level place

(32) Glanadarragh - Gleann na Darach - the glen of the oak tree

(33) Lisgar - Lios Gearr - short fort

(34) Cavanskeldra - Cabhán Cealdrach
(1) the rocky hollow
(2) or the hollow of the burial place (of unbaptised infants)

(35) Coravilla - Cor a' Bhile - the round hill of the tree

(36) Greaghlough - Gréach Cloch - the boggy stoney place

(37) Farthadreen - Feart a' Droighin - the burial ground of the blackthorn

(38) Clifferna - Cliath Fearna - the slope of the alder
(39) Clliffin - Cliath Fionn - the whitish hillside
(40) Srahan - Srathan - a river meadow
(41) Carnagarve - Carn Garbh - the rough cairn
(42) Lurganbawn - Lorga Bán - the long whitish hill

(43) Coraweelis - Cor a Mhaol Leas' - the round hill of the low (flat) fort

(44) Carnaveagh - Carn na bhFiach - the cairn of the ravens

(45) Stravicnabs - Srath Mhic na Buaidh - MacNabo's
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is a bird which goes away to other countries. It is said that the corncrakes do not all migrate because very often corncrakes were found old holes in a sleepy
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
condition. It lives in the corn fields and makes its nest of a few leaves in an old hole and there it lays three or four eggs.
It is late in the year when the young ones come out. The corncrake is of a brown colour with small wings and very long legs. It cannot fly far but can run fast.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The "Seven sleepers" are: the bee, the bat, the butterfly, the beetle, the porcupine, (sic) the cuckoo and the corn crake. (Tiob. 'Ar) Only five of the seven have survived into the Croom list, no's 4 and 5 being missing)
"Maith an sgéal a dtaga 'n sgéal eile" .
One story is alright until we hear another one. (Jas. Kennedy, Ballymacamore)
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bone-fiddler, while his companions, waiting about, took advantage of the bird's unwariness, to kill them with sticks or stones.
(From Rev. ---- ---- P.P.)
Note- Parteen is a suburb of Limerick city on the Clare side.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Corncrake is a land bird and she is also a Migrant. She builds her nest in a meadow. She never flies much except when she has to go to other countries in the Winter. We can hardly see her in the tall grass but we can hear her singing. She is a brown bird and has very strong legs. She comes to Ireland in the month of April and sings every night and day. She is bigger than the blackbird.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is supposed that the corncrake whilst singing, is lying flat on her back with her two legs stretched upwards. She imagines that
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it is she that is keeping the sky up.
She feels proud of her difficult accomplishment and the words of her tune are said to be -
"strong, strong", meaning - am I not strong!
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Corncrake comes to Ireland at the end of April. She lives in the thick grass. She is to be heard in the evening and at night.
She keeps calling until late June. She is too weak to fly when she comes to Ireland. Then after a bit she gets stronger and is able to fly farther.
They make their nests in the (-) or in thick grass. They lay up to about a dozen eggs.
Then they nearly all go away in August. Sometimes later than that you would see one.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The corn crake comes every year. She builds her nest in a meadow feild. It is built with straw and dung. She lays spotted egg's. The spots are brown. She lays six egg's. Her colour is brown. She hatche's on them three week's.

Written by
Mary A Gallagher
Gleneaskey
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The corncrake is found in a meadow of hay. She very seldom flies unless she is in a tight corner. Some say she doesn't leave this country but sleeps in a
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 16:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
hole in a ditch. When she is heard whistling it is a sure sign of rain.

Eamonn McCabe
Lisnabuntry
Patrick McCabe
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 15:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
blackbirds
(18) Dundragon - Dún Dragáin - the dragon's fort

(19) Loughomlea - Loch an Léighis - the lake of the cure

(20) Skeagh - Sgéith - the whitethorn

(21) Drumacarrow - Druim a' Ceathramhadh - the ridge of the quarter (of) land

(22) Drumonespic - Druim an Easbuig -
the ridge of the bishop
or Druim an Easa Bhig - the ridge of the waterfall

(23) Lear - Ladhar - the river-fork (meeting of two rivers)

(24) Tattyreagh - Taite Riabhach - "Taite" a land measure containing 60 Irish acres
"Riabhach" - grey or speckled

(25) Muff - Magh - the plain

(26) Derrydamph - Doire Dáimh - the oak-wood of the oxen

(27) Dromore - Druim Mór - the big ridge

(28) Greaghadossan - Gréach a' Dosáin - the boggy plain of the little bush

(29) Greaghnamale - Gréach na Maol - the boggy plain of the round flat hills

(30) Dromesker - Druim Eiscir - the ridge of the sand hills
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 15:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1) Tandergee - Tóin Ré Gaoith - back to the wind

(2) Tullycushlan - Tullach Caisleáin - the castle height (site of ancient castle of the O'Reilly's

(3) Lios na Laoigh - Lisnalee - the fort of the calves

(4) Lisnalsky - Lios an Fháil Sgeith - the fort of the whitethorn hedge

(5) Gartnanane - Gort na nÉan - the field of the birds

(6) Urcher - Urchor - the shot, throw or cast

(7) Crocknahattina - Cnoch na h-Aitinne - the hill of the furze

(8) Curkish - Cor Ceise - the round hill of the kesh (across a stream)

(9) Curlurgan - Cor Lugan - the round hill of the ridge

(10) Leitrim - Liath Druim - the grey ridge
(11) Leiter - Leitir - wet, soft land

(12) Carnalynch - Carn Uí Loingsigh - Lynches' cairn

(13) Cill Aine - Killann - the church of St. Anne
(14) Corglass - Cor Glas - the round green hill
(15) Glassleck - Glas Leach - the green flagstone
(16) Pottle - a land measure
(17) Drumlon - Druim Lon - the ridge of the
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 12:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old scholar who had Meath Irish and spoke it was a native of Staholmog called by the ancients Histiholmac
(Sta or Stack = house Danish)
The word Tigh seem hidden in Histigholmack.
One day when there was a Feis at Tara and all the Meath Ladies were dancing McCabe was asked
"Cad é so mheas ar damhsa(?) mrá na Midhe
To which he replied:-
"Damhsa Mrá na Midhe
Corruig do thón
Is na bris do croidhe" (?)

"Tá tón tacra mhór ag an bhean sin" say McCabe refering to one of the women
Diompuig an bean agus ar (?) cad é sin agad á rád
Nilím ach aráidh arsa Seán go bhfuil Éadan daira(?) deas agat
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 11:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Táid ag imirt crapai thuas 'a ród
Sin ingin agus ná bí ag cainnt
Chá ró sí ar cor ar bith

Old Kitty Curtis when in good humour used say
Goirm Gáirim, Guirim Guirim
Pacaí bhuidhe so Mháire (?)
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 11:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Puncanán -
a sprid that used to come out of a cave at night an wash up delph in Sir Nugent Everards House

Craig of meal - ladhar of meal
Cleag - a horse fly
Meigiollín - gad for the suiste

Slamóg - there are "SLAMOG" in that hay: not fit to put up

Reisg(?) -
Muile - (múnlach?) mud from the duck pond etc.
Súiliní - bubbles
Seáin - an banbh is lugha ar an ál (?)
Tá "CIC" sa phota - there is heat in the pot
Seisg of hay - a bank of hay

Eisir (Easar) - the first sheaves or as much as would make a barrel

Fearabán - crow-foot

Saile Samhna(?) - a long feathery weed with roots supposed to reach "the other end of the world"

He was TACARN corn or oats etc - gleaning
Méirín - a finger of a glove for sore finger
Bacan Bearrac - a poisonous mushroom
Clib - a young horse
Glanóg - a Ceangal for tying sheaves of corn
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 11:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dauk - a thorn
Goban - a little basket put on calves mouth
Bradach - a thieving cow
Capock - a dock
Bainin -
Brogue -
Kipeen -
Traithneen -
Dearcan - thistle - as cross as a DEARCÁN
Scaldy - a young bird
Sallan - a kind of bodhrán made of skin
Cludog - a gift - Easter Cludog - eggs given at Easter
Cocail - Stick backs
Sheinicins - primroses
Blubiscins - yellow flowers growing in wet place
Callí Caoirthin - mountain ash
Sris -
Sugan - Sugán
Sugan - Coiléar gan leathar
Slang - a long narrow field
Lancis - a spansel for a goat
Coicil - stick backs (plant)
Bacan - the bacan (Bachán) of a spade
Cushogs and Traineens - that's all that is in the field
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sgéul fa Naomh Coluimcille

Nuair a bhí Naomh Pádraigh ag taisteal na tíre seo bhí an tSean Gleann, (Gleanncoluimcille anois) lán deamhan. Bhí an naomh ar a bhealach leis an tóir a chuir orthú as nuair a bhris a chárbad anuas taóbh thall dé'n abhainn ag Mín an Aodhaire. Thainig na deamhan orthú agus mhárbhaig siad fear dé na mánaighibh a bhí leis darbh ainm Art agus cuireadh annsin é agus ó,n lá sin go-dtí'n lá indiú bheirtear Sráth na Circe ar an bhaile sin. Dúbhairt sé go bhfágfagh sé an Gleann ag fear níos feárr na é agus phill sé an bealaich a dtainig sé.
'Nois ba é Naomh Colmcille an fear níos fearr na é fein a labhair Naomh Pádruig air. Thainig sé as Toraigh go Gleánn. Bhí clog leis agus thoisigh sé ag bualadh an cloig agus thoisigh na deamhain ag rachaidh roimhis agus níor stad siad go dteachaidh siad síos ált, amách san fhairraige i gcúl an Mhullach Leathan na Ceann Glinne.
D'fán sé ann annsin támaill fada agus chuir turas ar bun ann atá trí míle ar fad. Déir siad go dtig sé arais go Gleánn an uile bhliadhan ar an 9adh lá dé Méithimh agus go bhfanann sé go dtí lá Muire an Fhoghmhair, an 15adh Lúghnasa. Tá na cárnain agus na crosannaí na seasadh ar fud an Gleanna indiú go díreach mar bhí siad an chead lá ar cuireadh annsin iad.
Déir siad go raibh sé ag siúbhal amuigh lá agus gur casadh air daoine agus bhí paisde leobhtha lé báisteadh. Ní rabh uisge ar bíth i neas do acht bhí carraic
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 20:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leáthan comhthrom ag na thaobh. Chrom sé síos agus cuimil a lámh do'n chloich. Aníos leis an t-uisge agus bhaist sé an leánbh. Ó'n lá sin go dtí'n lá indiú tá uisge sa charraic ca bíth teas a tiocfas. 'Sé an t-ainm atá ar an charraic Ámar Glinne. Tá sé sa targaireacht nach mbéidh aon duine beo indiaidh an cogaidh acht an mhéid a bhéidheas taobh ó thuaidh dé'n Ámar.
Tá cros amhain sa turas agus tá poll ann Caithfidh an uile duine a siubhlas an turas amharc fríd. Bhí bean na cómhnaidhe ar an Fhochair i lár an Ghleánna dárbh ainm Nora Ní Bhárrain agus nuair a d'amharc sí sa poll connaic sí geáfta Flaithis. Níl sin acht tuairim 80 bliadhain ó shoin.
Tá a theach le feicealt i mBífán agus a leabaidh san teach. Shuas ós a chionn tá an tobar agus moll mór cloch thart fa dtaobh dé. Caithfidh an uile duine trí cloch a iomchar suas lé caitheamh ag an tobar mar pionús ar son a gcuid peacaigh.
Tá a cathaoir fosda lé feicealt go fóill agus nuair a shuidhfeas tú ann tá'n Gléann uilig faoi do shúil.

Seo an biadh agus an deoch a bhíodh aige i nGleann,

"Dúlaman Carraic Cormoda,
Uisge Dheocha Dheochadan
Agus eorna an Iomaire Cam"

Caitlín Nic a tSaoir
7adh Béaltaine 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 20:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sgéul fa Naomh Coluimcille

Nuair a bhí Naomh Pádraigh ag taisteal na tíre seo bhí an tSean Gleann, (Gleanncoluimcille anois) lán deamhan. Bhí an naomh ar a bhealach leis an tóir a chuir orthú as nuair a bhris a chárbad anuas taóbh thall dé'n abhainn ag Mín an Aodhaire. Thainig na deamhan orthú agus mhárbhaig siad fear dé na mánaighibh a bhí leis darbh ainm Art agus cuireadh annsin é agus ó,n lá sin go-dtí'n lá indiú bheirtear Sráth na Circe ar an bhaile sin. Dúbhairt sé go bhfágfagh sé an Gleann ag fear níos feárr na é agus phill sé an bealaich a dtainig sé.
'Nois ba é Naomh Colmcille an fear níos fearr na é fein a labhair Naomh Pádruig air. Thainig sé as Toraigh go Gleánn. Bhí clog leis agus thoisigh sé ag bualadh an cloig agus thoisigh na deamhain ag rachaidh roimhis agus níor stad siad go dteachaidh siad síos ált, amách san fhairraige i gcúl an Mhullach Leathan na Ceann Glinne.
D'fán sé ann annsin támaill fada agus chuir turas ar bun ann atá trí míle ar fad. Déir siad go dtig sé arais go Gleánn an uile bhliadhan ar an 9adh lá dé Méithimh agus go bhfanann sé go dtí lá Muire an Fhoghmhair, an i15adh Lúghnasa. Tá na cárnain agus na crosannaí na seasadh ar fud an Gleanna indiú go díreach mar bhí siad an chead lá ar cuireadh annsin iad.
Déir siad go raibh sé ag siúbhal amuigh lá agus gur casadh air daoine agus bhí paisde leobhtha lé báisteadh. Ní rabh uisge ar bíth i neas do acht bhí carraic
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 10:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
anall thar an druim í gearr an chroch chéasta leis an aibhleóg idir dhá shlinneán na bó, an tríomadh h-uair rachaidh an aibhleóg anonn faoi'n sgeadamhán agus anall thar an mhuinéal, agus an iarracht seo, gearrfaidh tú fíoghar na croise idir dhá adhairc na bó. Béidh seo uilig le deánamh trí maidne i ndiaidh a chéile. Nuair a bhíonn ainmhidhe caithte síneann sé, agus béidh a fhios agat as an tomhais go gcrúpann sé gach lá go mbéidh an fhad ceart ann an tríomhadh maidín.

Fuarthas na léigheasanna seo ó
Siúre na Trocaire
Clochar na Trocaire,
Carn Domhnaigh

Mise,

Monica Ní Chaomhnaigh,
Glac,
Carn Domhnaigh
a scríobh isteach iad
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 10:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(4) LÉIGHEAS TEINE AIGHTHE:
Cuimil píosa óir nó síbhin cocháin thart ar gach ball nimhneach d'a bhfuil ar an aghaidh, ag deánamh fíoghar na croise "I n-ainm an Athar agus an Mhic, agus an Spioraid Naoimh; teine aighthe; teine a chuir. Is lag an teine, is beo an duine; Mac Dé a chuir." Tá sin le rádh trí h-uaire; uair gach ám a chuimiltear.

(5) LÉIGHEAS FIABHRAS CROIDHE:
Glac cupa min-choirce agus tarraing sgian thar bhéal an chupa go rabh an mhin cothrom le n-a bhéal. leag an cupa i gceithre h-áiteacha ar chroiceann an duine tinn, fa'n bhásta, faoi'n chroidhe agus siar fa'n druim. Deán sin trí cúrsaí. Deán fhéin agus an duine breóidhte bhur gcoisreacadh i dtoiseach agus abairigidh, "Dia i n-aghaidh na h-urchóide." Bí féin ag rádh an "Phaidear" agus an "t-Abhe Maria" fhad agus atá tú ag deánamh an léighis, agus cuir trí "Paidreacha" agus trí "h-Abhe Maria" ar an duine tinn mar bhreitheamhnas aithrighe le Dia a bheith i n-aghaidh na h-urchóide.

(6) LÉIGHEAS AINMHIDHE CAITHTE:
Is minic, do réir mar a dubhairt na sean-daoiní, a chaitheann na sidheógaí ainmhidhe, cuir i gcás, bó, agus seo an dóigh a ndeántar léigheas. Tomhais an bhó ó ruball go srón le do láimh ó uilinn go barr an mhéir, agus i gcionn gach aon fhaid láimhe gearr fíoghar na croise. Annsin glac maide briste agus aibhleóg, agus cuir an aibhleóg anonn faoi bholg na bó. Bíodh duine thall agat ar an taoibh eile de'n bhoin leis an aibhleóg do chur anall chughat thar a druim. Gearr an chroch-chéasta ar an fhionnadh ar chúl-druim na bó. Cuir anonn an aibhleóg arís faoi'n bholg mar a' gcéadna, agus nuair a thugas tú
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 21:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A thrush is a grey bird with black dots. She is usually heard singing at the end of Spring. She builds her nest at the beginning of the Spring and she hatches four eggs. Her eggs are coloured blue and white and are fairly large in size. The thrush does not migrate so she remains in this country during the winter. She spends her time in ditches and flying from hedge to hedge.
She is a very jolly bird. It is pleasant to rise early on a long Spring's morning and listen to the sweet notes of the thrush on the hedge while she says
"Summer is coming, is coming, is coming, I know it, I know it, I know it".
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 21:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sé Naomh Colm Chille, Naomh Beglaigh agus Naomh Finnéin na trí Naomhanna Pátrúin na h-áite seo. Bhí mainistir ag Colm Chille i nDoire. Chuir sé cheann eile ar bun i nDurmhaigh agus cheann i gCeanannus na Midhe.
Is i gCluain Ioráird i gCo na Midhe do chuir Naomh Finnéin a mhainistir ar bun.
Tá Tampall eile ag Beglaigh i mBaile an Tampall. Tá tobar i Ioraruaidh agus tobar AisFionán a tugtar ar. Amh amháin nuair a bhí an Naomh Finnéin iongantach tinn bhí sé gabhail a fhaghail bháis. Ní rabh uisge le faghail acu acht uisge na fairrghe. Bhuail Colm Chille Chreag
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 21:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá guth bródamhail Thír Chonaill go háluinn indiú,
a' musgladh 'na mac alla go hárd as go tuigh;
is cléirigh na gcoiste go Gartan a' triall
Ó bháiltibh an chonndae go fras as go fial.
Tá'n pobail go cráibhtheach ar uignuigh 'sa' ghleann,
s gan fasgadh an sgathlainn féin cumhdach a gceann
Tá na sagairt mhaith cóirighthe's an tAifreann dá rádh
Ur(?) altóir an sciamhal le ró bheaghan sgaith.
Tá clann Chonnaill go céimheamhail 's go tréanmhar annseo
le prionnsa ar dteampaill 's Tighearna Easboc ratbhoth:(?)

Tabhairt buaidheachas 'gus altughadh do Dia mhór gan mhoill

ar son na ngrása a phroinn sé ar naomh Colm Cill.
Naomh Colm gan amhrus ar gColaman féin
Rugadh ar an leic seo tá ceithre chéad déag bliadhain;
Mac Feidhlimidh 'gus Eithne(?) ó'n fuil uasal ud thall
Sliocht Cathair Móir agus Niall na Naoí nGeall.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 21:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Aon lá amháin thainig Colmcille go dtí baile éiginteacht i dTír Chonnaill. Chruinneigh muinntir an bhaile thart agus thoisigh Colm ag innsigh dóibh gach aon rud
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 21:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Sgéal ar Naomh Colmcille)
fa dtaobh do Dhia agus do'n chreideamh. D'éist siad go madhamhail leis ar dtús ach i gcionn tamaill thoisigh siad ag gáiridhe air agus ag deanamh magadh faoi agus i ndeireadh dubhairt cuid aca nach rabh ann ach amadán.
Stad sé a chuid cainnte agus dubhairt sé, Bímsa in mo amadán nó na bím, ní bhíonn ar an mbaile seo go bráth ach amadán agus d'imtigh sé leis. B'íor é. Ó'n lá sin go dtí an lá indiu bhí amadán nó dhó ar an mbaile sin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 13:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Aon lá amháin tháinig ColmCille go dtí baile éiginteacht i dTír Chonail. Chruinnigh muinntir an bhaile thart, agus thoisigh Colm ag innsigh dóibh gach aon rud fa dtaobh do Dhia agus do'n chreideamh. D'éist siad go madhamhail leis tamaill, acht annsin dubhairt siad nach rabh ann acht amadán.
Stad ColmCille annsin mar go rabh siad uilig ag gáiridhe air, agus ag radh nach rabh ann acht amadán
"Bímsa mo amadán nó cá bhím." Cá bhíonn an bhaile seo go bráth gan amadán. Bh'fhíor do. Chan fhacthas an bhaile sin ó'n lá sin go
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 13:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Sgéal ar Naomh ColmCille)
dtí an lá indiu gan amadán do bheith ann.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cá rabh mé fhéin ariamh gan sgéal uair nó sean sgéál, da mbéinn gan aon sgéal cumfhainn fhéin sgeal nó rachfhainn na Frainnce fá dhein sgéal. Da mbéinn bodhar ní cluinfhinn é, dá mbéinn balbh ní thiocfhadh liom innse ach nuair a cas Dia cugam é innseocaidh mé é.

Bhí sé ann i bhfad ó shóin agus is fad a bhí.
Nuair a bhí Naomh Colm Cille ar an t-saoghal seo thuit cnaipe dá chasoig lá amhain. Chuaidh sé isteach i dteach. Bhí taillúir agus greasaidhe ag obair san teach seo. Ar ndóige diarr sé ar an taillúir an cnaipe d'fhuigheal ach dhuiltuigh an taillúir é.
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Annsin d'iarr sé air an greadaidhe an cnaipe a fhuagail do, thug an greasidhe leis a meannadh agus a corda róisín agus dfuaig sé an cnaipe. Ar imteacht do Colm Cille dubhairt sé,
"Nimh an pholladóir ar a' tsnáthaid agus fuacht an tonnadór ar a' taillúir"
Ón lá sin go dtí an lá indiu bíonn an taillúir i gcomhnuidhe dhá fhleachadh, agus má shaitheann sé an tsnáthad in a mhé(?) tá sé cinnte líonadh le síleadh agus a bheith frithir agus is cuma(?) caide'n poll a dheanas an greasaidhe air féin ní mó nach go mothuigeann(?) sé é. Chuaidh siad san t-adh mise an clochan. Bathadh iad san agus tháinig mise.

Dómhnall Ó'Bróin
Ranna Dubh
senior member (history)
2019-06-10 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
'The more rain, the more rest'.
'It is a pity that a fine day should ever do harm': said when the crops want rain.
'A blanket is all the warmer for a fold in it' said when relatives are getting married.
'When his hat is on, his house is thatched': said of a person who takes things easy and is fond of rambling.
'Burn the candle burn the inch'
'Both ends of the house on fire'
'Easy got, easy gone'
'If you put him out in the front door, he would come in the back door' said of a person that would be hard to get rid of.

There is one of Columcille's prophecies being quoted at present by the old people with regard to the Liffey Scheme water works. The prophecy says that there would be a work started in Wicklow which would never be finished and which would be the cause of the loss of life. Already a couple of men have been killed by explosions at Poul-a-Phouca.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 22:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
All the old people of this district count it a lucky thing to put up a May bush on May-Eve in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

There is a huge bonfire lighted on every cross-road and in every townland, every Saint Peter's and Paul's night.

It is an old custom to make cálcannon on Hallowe'en. There are a lot of tricks played in every house on Hallowe'en night.

"As long as the eleventh of June" is an expression often used in the Parish of the Rower. It was on the 11th June, 1921 that the Black-and-Tans were in The Rower. All the people had to stay in hiding on that day and it seemed a very long day to them. It was on that night that Mr. Butler's house was burned. It was also on the 11th of June that the Yeomen passed through the Rower Village after the battle of Ross. The people had to stay in hiding on that day also. The yeomen murdered two men as they passed through The Rower.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 22:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lá amháin bhí Naomh Colmcille ag suibhal thart agus chuaidh sé go teach a bhí comhgarach aige. Nuair a chonnaic fear an toighe é ag teacht d'imthig sé i luighe agus leig air féin go rabh sé in na chodladh. Tháinig Colmcille isteach, d'fhiafruigh sé cá h-aith a rab fear an toighe. Dubhairt bunadh an toighe go rabh sé in na codladh agus dubhairt Colmcille,
"Má tá sé in na codladh go neíreochaidh sé slán agus mar bhfuil sé in na codladh nach n-eírigheochaid go deo"

ó Bean Ua Baoghail
An Clasaigh
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 22:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lá amháin bhí Naomh Colmcille ag suibhal thart agus chuaidh sé go teach a bhí comhgarach aige. Nuair a chonnaic fear an toighe é ag teacht d'imthig sé i luighe agus leig air féin go rabh sé in na chodladh. Tháinig Colmcille isteach, d'fhiafruigh sé cá h-aith a rab fear an toighe. Dubhairt bunadh an toighe go rabh sé in na codladh agus dubhairt Colmcille,
"Má tá sé in na codladh go neíreochaidh sé slán agus mar bhfuil sé in na codladh nach n-eírigheochaid go deo"
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 22:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a bhí Colmchille ar a taobh seo dé'n tír codlaigh sé oidhche i gcúl cloiche mhóire a bhí os coinne Baile an Ghleanna. Ar maidhin muschail mna an gleanna é roimhe an lá. Dubhairt seisean go mbeadh siad ag troid i gcomhnuidhe. D'fhág sé annsin agus chuaidh sé go Gleann Árd agus bhí cuidh de na fir oga na seasamh áit eiginteach agus toisigh siad ag tabhairt onoir do agus dubhairt sé nach mbeadh an bhaile sin gan fir laidre a bheith inn.
Cuaidh sé go bo cuinne agus bhí bo croiste inn agus lean sé Naomh Colmcille agus dubhairt sé na nach mbéadh an baile sin gan bó croiste a bheith inn agus tá mar sin.

Máire Níc Fhionghaile
Gleann Ard
Cill-Míc-nEanam
Fuair mé an sgeal seo ó mó Mhathair Mór
Maire Bean Mhic Fhionghaile
Gleann Ard
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 22:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sgéal eile a d'innis an bhean chéadna

Ins an t-sean-aímsear fad ó shoin bhí Naomh Colmcille ag teacht agus é tuirseach agus ocrach ar fad. Shuidh sé síos ar thaobh an locha - sin é Loch Colmcille.
Bhí bean annsin ag déanamh réidh bidh fá choinne na bhfear a bhí ag baint mónadh comhgarach do'n loch. D'iarr sé cuid de'n bhiadh a thabhairt dó. Bhí cuid dé'n íasg amach as an loch aici. B'féidir nach rabh fhios aici gurb é Naomh Colmcille a bhí ag cainnt leithe, acht ar sgor ar bith, diultaigh sí é.
Thainig fearg mhór air annsin, agus deirtear gur chuir sé mallacht ar an loch. Ó'n lá sin go dtí an lá indiu, níl íasg ar bith le feicáil nó le fágail ins an loch.
Tá tobar beannuighthe ar bhruach an locha, a léigheas aicideacha. Ar bharr an chnuic bhig in aice leis an tobar tá moll cloch, agus caitheann achán dhuine a théidheas thart cloch eile ar an mholl. Tá sé ráidhte ag na sean-daoine go mbéidh teampall mór déanta ins an áit seo fós.
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 09:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is é Colmcille pátrún an cheanntair seo agus rugadh é i nGartan deas do'n áit seo. Mar sin do chuaidh sé thart go minic fríd na bailte seo.
Lá amháin bhí sé ag teacht anuas frí Tullach agus cia bith cineal eudaigh a bhí air bhí muinntir an bhaile amuigh ag gáiridhe faoi. Níor shásuigh seo an Naomh agus dubhairt sé go mbéadh ádhbhar gáire acu fhéin o sin suas. Deir siad go rabh amadán no fear nach mbéadh i gceart san bhaile sin o shoin.
Char stad sé do'n t-suibhal sin go rabh sé shíos i tTírleathan. Tháinig sé fhad le fir a bhí ag iasgaireacht bradan. Nuair a chonnaic siad an
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 09:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Naomh ag teacht chuir siad na bradáin i bhfolach. Dubhairt fear acu
"sin Colmcille ag teacht agus béidh sé ag iarraidh ceann acu".
Nuair a tháinig sé fhad leobhtha d'fhiafruigh sé daobhtha an bhfuair siad bradáin ar bith agud dubhairt siadsan nach bhfuair. Dubhairt an Naomh annsin leo.
"Mar bhfuair go bhfághaidh sibh go leor, acht ma fuair nar fhághaidh sibh a cheann go bráthach arís."
Ní tháinig bradán ar bith aníos Baidhe an Mhaoil Ruadh on lá sin amach.

Máire Ní Chómhghaill
Tír-Leathan
Carraigairt
Fuaras an sgeul seo ó
Séan Ó Cómhghaill
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 09:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a bhí Colmchille ar a taobh seo dé'n tír codlaigh sé oidhche i gcúl cloiche mhóire a bhí os coinne Baile an Ghleanna. Ar maidhin muschail mna an gleanna é roimhe an lá. Dubhairt seisean go mbeadh siad ag troid i gcomhnuidhe. D'fhág sé annsin agus chuaidh sé go Gleann Árd agus bhí cuidh de na fir oga na seasmah áit eiginteach agus toisigh siad ag tabhair onoir do agus dubhairt sé nach mbeadh an bhaile sin gan fir laidre a bheith inn.
Cuaidh sé go bo cuinne agus bhí bo croiste inn agus lean sé Naomh Colmcille agus dubhairt sé na nach mbéadh an baile sin gan bó croiste a bheith inn agus tá mar sin.

Máire Níc Fhionghaile
Gleann Ard
Cill-Míc-nEanam
Fuair mé an sgeal seo ó mó Mhathair Mór
Maire Bean Mhic Fhionghaile
Gleann Ard
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 09:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
san tobar seo fa chionne paistí a bheas ag caoineadh i gcomhnuidhe. Cuireadh Colmcille i nDun Padraig agus tá bealaigh i mBaile-an-Teampoll. Tá roilic san ait ina bhfuil Beglaigh agus sé'n t-ainm atá air na "Tullach-a-Beglaigh".

Tá tobhar beannuighe thios ag an fhairrge ar a dtugtar Eas-Finian. Ní mbaistthear moran leinbh san pharoiste d'ainm an Naomh.
Ar an cuigmhadh lá deag de Lughnasa theid daoine sios go Eas-Finian le turus a dheanamh.

Séamus Ua Caisleán
Dúnmór
Falcarrach
Seán Ua Caisleán a thug an t-eolas damh
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 08:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Siad Naoimh Pátrúin an cheanntar seo na Colmcille, Finian agus Begláigh. Bhí manistir ag Colmcille thios annsin in Rágh. Bhí teampoll eile ag Begláigh in Bhaile-an-Teampail. Is on teampol sin a fuair an bhaile a ainm. Tá'n manistir a bhí thíos in Ragh na sheasamh go foill. Acht an ceann a bhí i mBaile-an-Teamnpaill níl moran ann anois a balla amháin.
Deirtear go raibh Colmcille ag cur air a chuid broga lá amhain ag Loch Doire-Paol nuair a thainig saighdiuirí air. Bhí na saighdiuirí dhul a dheanamh
senior member (history)
2019-06-09 08:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
priosunach dó. Nuair a chonnaic Colmcille iad rith sé agus léim sé an loch. Tá lairg a dha chos le feiceal go fóill. Tá uisge ionnta i gcomhnuidhe agus tá leigheas fa chionne fairthiní.
Rinne Colmcille mhíorbhailtaí san ceanntar seo am amháin.
Am amháin bhí Finian iongantach tinn agus bhí sé le bas a fhaghail. Ní raibh uisge ar le faghail ach uisge na fairrge mar bhí siad comhgarach don fhairrge. Bhuail Colmcille an chreag trí h-uaire agus tháinig uisge as. Annsin fuair Finian biseach agus on lá sin go dtí an la indiu sé Eas-Finian an tugadh ar an ait sin. Tá leigheas
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In one of St Columbkille's prophecies he foretold that the first man to climb the hill outside Carndonagh would be riding on a white horse. He would be a great patriot, and crowds of people would gather to hear this speech.
This prophecy is supposed to have been fulfilled when a crowd of tenant farmers gathered to hear a speech about the land league and the man who delivered the speech was riding on a white horse and spoke from the top of this hill, so that all the people would hear him plainly.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One day a woman was putting on a pot of potatoes. The water spilled from the bucket and when she looked around it had disappeared in a hole in the hearth. When her husband came, he lifted the flag and found a cave, it is believed, in which a priest hid long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A house near Temple Douglas was owned by Protestants. One night they planned to shoot the Catholics. When they went to the pantry where
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St. Colm Cille was reading one day. He went away and forgot his book, leaving it on a rock. He sent a cleric for it. There was a shower, but an eagle was perched on the rock, its wings outspread to keep the open pages of the book dry.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Out on the rocks of Turmone Shore to the east of Port Ban is a hollow in the rock called St Colmcilles well. There is no tradition as to the circumstances of its establishment. It is out on the rocks and mostly filled with salt water. People to go pray there and it is credited with cures for headaches indigestion and minor diseases or troubles of that kind.
The fact of so many wells with St Colmcile's name on them in Inishowen proves that at least there was belief in his being very often here. It strengthens the evidence that Cooley was the Moville mentioned.(?)
The local belief as to the origin of the Moville well and the Shrove well is that St Columba - exiled - left Derry by boat and came ashore at Moville. He then, the tradition says, came ashore at Shrove for a look up the Foyle. It just might be possible that he also came ashore at Turmone to visit Killybredagh Church the people - monks - of which he would know.
It might also be possible that coming back in 563 he landed at Turmone and crossing the north eastern end of the peninsula he then crossed the Foyle and there by visited his former retreats. This is purely personal surmise. Tradition, so outspoken, for once is silent.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When St Columba was leaving Derry to go to Scotland he sailed down the Foyle and then saw Cooley monastery on the hill. He came ashore and went up to Cooley on a visit. The place he landed shows his miraculous powers. A spring came out of the rocks.
It runs clear spring water summer and winter and is one of the sources of spring water in Moville apart from the ordinary pipe water.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Although this is the native parish of St Columb there is a strange dearth of stories about the saint. True there are quite a number of stones known as "St. Columbs Stones" in various places - one near the local Rl. station and one on the roadside near the present chapel.
Moreover the stories heard represent him as engaged in futile pursuits - not, at all like the verile and practical missionary. Possibly the reason is that the Saint lived here only in very early childhood. Another reason perhaps is that the district seems to have been greatly "planted". There was also the Adair Eviction (See Story Ireland(?) Sullivan). The Old Stock remaining are, to a great extent at least, people who were employed in one capacity or another in the houses of the two local landlords.
Half the parish to this day is a wilderness of waste land.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a bhí Naomh Colmcille 'na fhear óg i nGartan ba gnathach leis a urnaighe a radh gach lá shíos i gcois na haibhne. Ba gnathach le fear a theacht ag iasgaireacht ag an abhainn agus cha raibh an naomh sasta leis mar chuirfeadh sé frid a chuid phaidreacha.
Aon lá amhain d'iarr Colm ar an iasgaire gan é a theacht an casan sin níos mó. Dubhairt an fear eile go dtiocfadh.
"Ma sheasann tú ar an bhruach sin arais," arsan naomh, "fód do bhais a bheis ann."
Bhí go maith agus ní raibh go h-olc go dtainig oidhche mhóir feartainne. D'eirigh an t-uile. Bhris an bhruach ar gnathach leis an iasgaire seasamh air. D'iomchar an t-uile an bhruach seo síos an abhainn agus ghreamuigh sé i n-ait eile.
Cupla bliadhain in a diaidh sin thainig an fear arais a iasgaireacht. Caidé rinne sé a seasamh ar an bhruach chéadna bhris an bhruach faoi 'na chois. Thuit an
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 18:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
t-iasgaire isteach ins an abhainn agus baithiughadh é.
B'fhearr do éisteacht le Colm ar tús.

Sgríbhneoir
Brian O'Duibhne
An Cnoc

Sgéalai dhe
Cathal Ua Gallchobhair,
Loch-as-Carraig,
Tearmonn
Leithbhearr
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 13:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
These are the names of some of the fields on the lands of Mr Thomas Farrelly, Cormaddysduff, Virginia, Co Cavan.

Cnoc na Garrdha - the hill of the garden
Corr Mada Dubh - hill of the black dog
Cros a Féin - the cross of St Fenian
Carraigh - a rock
Poll Dubh - the field of the black hole
Cnoc Bán - the field of the white hill
Lorgan - parish of Lurgan / ridge of hill
Máchaire - a plain / the parish of Maghera
Sgeath Óg - the field of the young bush
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 13:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a well in a field owned by Mr Mortimor, Parish of Mullagh, townland of Longfield.
The well is now covered with grass, no people go to visit it now. The well is called Saint Kilian's Well. St Kilian is the patron saint of Mullagh church. His feast is celebrated on the eight of June.
Thirty years ago the priest and teachers of Mullagh Parish tried to revive the memory of St Kilian. They got a collection of poems composed by a local poet about St Kilian.
The teachers of the five schools of the Parish instructed the children to recite the poems.
senior member (history)
2019-06-08 13:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St. Columba who was born in the townland of Lackoo, in the parish of Gartan, in the year five hundred and twenty one, was one day on a mountain named Cruckcraw in Glendowan, and he was being pursued by enemies.
He stepped from this hill close to where Churchill Barrack now stands a distance of about two miles. The print of his foot is still to be seen on a large stone on the side of the road, and as the people are passing it, they kneel down and say prayers.
This story was told to me by my father, Matthew Buchanan. (Age 64 years)
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 18:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Senan is the patron Saint of this district. This is a miracle he worked.
One Sunday Saint Senan's father and mother told him that he should stop at home from mass and mind the birds from the corm. When they were gone to Mass he gathered all the birds and put them into the barn and went to Mass. When his father and mother saw him they thought that the corn would be destroyed. When they came home they found all the birds inside in the cabin and a harrow keeping them in. There is a lake called after him. There are a great many people called after him.

Siobhán Ní Chléirigh,
Sliabh na hAbhann
An té d'innis é:
Cáit Bean Uí Chléirigh,
Sliabh na hAbhann.

The form of the name in use is "Sinon".

Tomás Ó Gormáin
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 18:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He was an ordinary saint for he was amongst the greatest of them, one whose life and labours entitle him to rank with a Peter or Paul. He was born in the wild, rugged beauty of Gártan in Tir-Conaill and after spending some time which he spent under the care of a venerable old priest he went to the famous school of Finnian's at Moville.
He then went to Clonard and ere long was ordained a priest. Then he began his great work of founding churches and monasteries. He founded a church near here in Emlaghfad and which he left under the care of one of his disciples Enna.
Then a grander vision rose before his view. Looking towards Alba he saw a nation seated in infidelity so he decided to bid adieu to the land he loved so well and convert the Scotch. He landed on the bleak, uninhabited island of Iona and founded a monastery there which was to be the bright lamp pf Christianity for Northern Europe. Before his death
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 18:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
all Scotland was converted by him.
In this town the local grave-yard is known as St Columba's cemetery in honour of the saint. We are very proud of our patron saint and he is an example for us all.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Protestant Church in Tullow was previous to the Reformation, Catholic. In the burial-ground round the Church lie the remains of two Catholic priests, Frs. Byrne and Galvin.
There is a subterranean passage leading fro the Church underneath the river to the Abbey burial Ground (Abbeydowne see P. (-) ) where the Augustinian Friars lived. It was used by them as a hiding-place during the Penal Days, both for themselves and for the Sacred Vessels and Vestments.
There is nobody living who knows where this underground passage really is.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Columba prophesied that there is going to a war between the north and south of Ireland and that the blood will be so thick that it wont be able to flow under the eye of the bridge in Gleann na Muice Duibhe
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We are living near Columba's Church. It has five windows in it, two of them has Coloured Glass with pictures on them. There's a big Churchyard round the Church with lots of graves in it along with ancient crosses. There are about seven trees in the Churchyard. There are Church services in the Church every Sunday . There is a round tower in the yard and it has five windows in it and it was built for safety and from the Danes.
Our tower has only five windows to look out every road in Kells and if they saw anyone coming they'd bring all their valuables in the tower.
It is very old. There is three crosses in the churchyard. Their is an underground passage from the belfry, too or three miles into the country to a building named Loyd Spire.

Written by
Robert Lougheed
Church Street,
Ceanannus Mór.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At the head of our old historic town, Kells stands St Columba's Well. It is approached by a long and I am sorry to say badly kept lane.
On the ever of St Columba's feast townspeople gather at the well recite, the Rosary and sing hymns.
We know that cures are obtainable at this holy place for last year Mrs Reilly Carrick St. was suffering from toothache. Her face was very swollen. She went to the Well blessed her self with the water there and immediately the swelling went down and the pain ceased.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Columba was very charitable to the poor and he made a rule that they were to come at a certain hour. One day an old beggarman came for alms but St. Columba said he came too late. Then they talked together.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
for a long time and they went into the Church together. When they were kneeling down the old man said to the saint
"You should never give charity by rule".
When he said this he disappeared into the Tabernacle, and it was said that the old beggarman was Our Blessed Lord

Moncia Kavanagh
Glack,
Carndonagh

Information obtained from Nellie Williams,
Taken down from her grandfather, Mill Brae, Carndonagh
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When St. Columba was in this part of the country, the soldiers were after him and he was running. The rushes tripped him and from that day to this day there never grew a straight rush. They all grow along the ground.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times priests used to stay in the houses with the people as there were people going about called priest-hunters. There was a priest one time who stopped in Owenirk in the house of Michael McDaid. The people of the house used to cook his food. He used to say Mass, and the people around used to gather in, and hear Mass unknown to the spies who were going about. The ruins of this house is to be seen yet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 17:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that Columcille founded many wells in Buncrana Parish and there is one in Slavery a few yards from the main road. This well is supposed to be founded by St Columcille and the tracks of his knees can be seen on a stone where he did penance. No pilgrims go this well in these days. The people that live near this well take water out of it, because it is spring water.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Cholumcille Naomhtha, do lean Brighid, Pádraig agus do leanais-se an bheirt, táthí thuas anois i láthair na Tríonóide Móire Naomhtha, bidhse, bídhigh i dtrúir, Coitchianta ghá iaraidh ar an dTríonóid ró- Naomhtha an creideamh a cimheád beó i nÉirinn go deo agus mise, agus mo chualacht a bhreith suas ag triall oraibh, tré Iosa Críost ár dTighearna.
Amen
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
48
in which Colmcille's army was defeated. The high King then banished him from Ireland. He went to Iona in Scotland which was a pagan village. He converted the pagans there. While he was in Iona he was always thinking of Ireland. But when he went to a meeting in Armagh he was led here blindfolded. Saint Colmcille means the "dove of the church",

James Connor,
Market Square,
Tullamore
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
47
The Local Patron Saint
the local patron Saint of our district is Saint Colmcille. He was born in Donegal in the year 521. Later he founded a church in Durrow the ruins of which are to be seen to this day. The people celebrate Saint Colmcille's Day on the 9th of June. The day is called "Pattern Day of Durrow". Saint Colmcille got the loan of a book called the "Book of Kells." He took a copy of it and gave it back to the owner but he did not give back the copy. The owner went to the King and told him about the copy and the King said "As every cow owns its calf so does every book own its copy." Saint Colmcille would not give back the copy. A war followed
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
from Gartan Lake and connects with another river called the Glassagh. The River Lennon was supposed to be made by St. Columcille. St. Columcille is said to have drawn a sally rod down the valley and used the words, Leanainn, Leanainn which means follow me. The river has ever since been known as the River Lennon.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Gartan less than a mile from the birthplace of Columcille, the clay known as Gartan clay is to be found. A peculiar thing about this clay is that no person can lift it only one family named O'Friel.
This family has been lifting Gartan clay for hundreds of years. The gift of lifting being handed down from father to son. No person is allowed to even look on while the O'Friels are lifting this clay.
We are told a story of a man who wanted to find out where and how this clay was obtained and he went spying upon O'Friel when he went to lift some clay, and it seems this man died immediately afterwards.
This clay is as white as chalk and makes up into nice balls
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Anyone who kept this clay on his person has never been known to be drowned no matter what danger he was in.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to protect them from drowning fire or sudden death.
Gartan is also well known for its beautiful scenery and large numbers of foreign and Irish visitors come to spend their holidays in St Columba's Hotel which is beautifully situated at the edge of Gartan Lough. Some visitors spend a very pleasant time fishing on the lakes, while others spend their time shooting in the woods and on the mountains in the neighbour.
Close by is Derryveigh where forty-four poor families were evicted by their cruel landlord John Adair and left to starve by the roadside. Some years ago large quantities of soap- stone were quarried and exported from Gartan. Most of the people living in Gartan are farmers. There is also two public-houses and a grocer's shop in Gartan.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Gartan is situated about a mile from Churchill. It is one of the most noted places for scenery in Donegal. It has three beautiful lakes Lough-Nacally, Lough - Accibon, and Gartan Lough. There is an abbey in Gartan and a holy well.
Many people go to this holy place to get cured. Gartan is famous throughout the country throughout the country as it was the birth place of St Columcile. There are several old relics in the district of Gartan associated with St Columcille. There is also a graveyard in which is situated a stone at which Mass was celebrated during the Penal days.
It is in the graveyard that the widely known Gartan clay is lifted by one family called Freil who reside at Teragus. Many people travel long distances to get it from them in order
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
renovated, a beautiful path constructed down the face of the cliff and a beautiful life-size statue of St. Patrick presented by some unknown Donor. The statue is placed on a pedestal in a beautiful Alcove in the face of the cliff beside the well and this is surrounded by a beautiful iron paling fastened in cement. All round the alcove has been planted with roses and (?) shrubs and flowers. A care taker has been appointed to look after it. A few years ago Mass was celebrated at the spot and each year on the 15th of August a procession from St. Patrick’s Church sends wends its way to the spot. The Rosary and Prayers are said and the band plays sacred music.
History records that St. Patrick spent some time at this place and blessed the well. Here also the natives were baptised by him.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 13:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that he would bestow upon him all the land that he could travel round in one day. Now St. Barron was a very old man and the chieftain believed that all the land, round which he could travel, would be very small indeed. St. Barron, however chose one long June day, starting off at sunrise travelled for almost three miles due west and then making a circuit took in a wide sweep southward then eastward and finally turned towards the sea, on reaching which, and being unable to proceed farther he threw with great force unto the sea, the staff he carried in his hand. Next day his staff was found on a small uninhabited island off the coast of Killybegs named the island of Rathlin O’Beirne and from that day to this the Island of Rathlin O’Beirne belongs to the Parish of Kilbarron.
There is no holy well dedicated to St. Barron and there is no Feast Day in his honour. The Parish Church at the present time is dedicated to St. Patrick and is called St. Patrick’s Church. It is built in the town. A holy well called St. Patrick’s Well stands on the shore at the edge of the town. People make a Turas there every year. Cures have taken place. Rags and bits of garments are left behind. The place has recently been
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Samhain 1adh 38"
Adhbhar - The Local Patron Saint

It is said by the old people that the time when Colmcille visited Trillick and the Marahs it is said that he put a spell on the rushes and from that day to the day that the rushes never grew straight. When he was fishing in the Mill river and had caught nothing he cursed it and said that there would never be a salmon caught in it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I heard the people talk of saints connected with this district. These are the saints, Saint Colmcille, St. Patrick, and St Muna.

St Colmcille is the patron saint of Iskaheen, but we consider him our patron also. He belongs to a Royal Family, and was born in Gartan about ten miles outside Letterkenny.
He was a cousin of a man who owned Grianan whose name was Aodh Mac Ainmine. He got the place from him in Derry to build his monastery where the Long Tower Church is now.

ST PATRICK
While St. Patrick was walking round Ireland he came to Grianan and a well is there in his name. People go to it if they are subject to Rheumatism and they get cured. I have known women and men who suffered from sore legs and arms go to the well and they got cured.

ST MURA
Is the patron saint of Fahan and he
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
built an Abbey in Fahan called St. Mura's Abbey. There is a well belonging to him in Fahan also. He wrote the life of Colmcille. There are two stones left from the Abbey, and a cross in the Graveyard marking his grave.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I heard the people talk of saints connected with this district. These are the saints, Saint Colmcille, St. Patrick, and St Muna.

St Colmcille is the patron saint of Iskaheen, but we consider him our patron also. He belongs to a Royal Family, and was born in Gartan about ten miles outside Letterkenny.
He was a cousin of a man who owned Grianan whose name was Aodh Mac Ainmine. He got the place from him in Derry to build his monastery where the Long Tower Church is now.

ST PATRICK
While St. Patrick was walking round Ireland he came to Grianan and a well is there in his name. People go to it if they are subject to Rheumatism and they get cured. I have known women and men who suffered from sore legs and arms go to the well and they got cured.

ST Muna
Is the patron saint of Fahan and he
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a rock beside St. Columcilles lake and there is a trout carved on it, and it is said that this is where he roasted the trouts.
He said that nobody would ever get a curlew's nest and it was so.
There is nobody in the parish called after the saint. His day is not kept as a holiday.
He also cursed any school teacher that would abuse one child more than the other because he said they would be going about begging before they would die. One day he went into a school and the teacher asked a question, two of the children missed it and the teacher gave two slaps to one child and none to the other, the St. cursed him and said that he would never have a day’s luck and it happened.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Columcille is the saint that is traditionally connected with the district. Glenalla Church is called after him.
Sain Coumcille’s lake is situated mid-way between Millford and Glenalla on the Garrigort road. There are plenty of trout in the lake, but there can only be three trout caught in it in the day and at three different times.
It happened that one day that the saint was walking on the road and he saw a man fishing. He asked him how many trout he caught and he cursed and said, “I have only caught three and at three different times. Then the saint said, that there would only be three caught in the day ever after.
He was born in Gartan about fifteen miles from here in the year 521.
He was caught in a turf bank once and he said that his curse would be on any body that wouldn’t leave a step to get out of a turf bank.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
From
Frank Crerand,
Breen,
Ramelton

Saint Columcille was the Patron Saint of this district. He was born at Gartan in Co Donegal, and educated in a monastry near Kilmacrennan. The ruins of this monastry are still to be seen.
There is a lough near Milford, and it is called after Columcille.
Columcille was heard to say, that if anyone interfered with this lough, that the guilty person would either go blind or die in the work-house or in the asylum and these words came true.
Three men later interfered with it. Before long two of them were sent to the asylum and the other man went blind. There is a small island in the centre
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of this lough, where Columcille stayed. The track of his foot is to be found on the island.
St Columcille was buried at Downpatrick in Co. Down.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Columba was born in Gartan in the year 521 A.D.
He was educated at Kilmacrenan.
He founded schools and churches all over the country.
He was a great scholar and write.
He died in Iona in 597.
senior member (history)
2019-06-07 09:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St. Barron is the Patron St. of this parish of Kilbarron. The parish took it’s name from the first Church built by St. Barron and incidentally the name Barron is the most common to be found in the Parish..
The church of Kilbarron founded by St. Barron still remains to be seen but only the walls now stand. It is situated in the townland of Creevy a few miles north east of Ballyshannon and about half a mile from the ruins of the castle of the O’Clerys in the town land of Cloughbally overlooking the Atlantic. This church was very small. It was in disuse for many centuries. The Abbey Church founded by the Cistercian Monks who lived in the Abbey Monastery outside Ballyshannon was later. It, too is in ruins only a few stones standing n the middle of the present Abbey graveyard.
The legend told by the local people re the Parish of Kilbarron is as follows:
St. Barron went one day to the native Chieftain and requested some land on which to found a monastery. The Chieftain replied
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 19:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the had caught any they would never catch another and ever since it never had a salmon in it again.

Rose B. Doherty
Tullydish
Buncrana
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 19:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
rushes will never be green and it is noticeable that the tops are always brown.

(II) The carriages would run from Derry to Carndonagh without horses by this he meant the train which in time did run to Carn.

(III) A third prophecy was that Gory quarry would go past Fahan Hill in smoke. The train is to be seen taking the stones past Fahan hill to Derry at the present.

One day Colmcille was going past the Tullydish river and saw men fishing whom he asked for a salmon as he was hungry. The men had hid their salmon when they saw him coming and said they had caught none.
He remarked that if
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 19:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Colmcille is the patron saint of this district. He was born at Gartan near Letterkenny and it was he who established what is now the city of Derry.
While in Derry he sent a man named Mura now known as St. Mura to take charge of Fahan District. While in this district Colmcille prophised the following things:-
(I) The tops of the
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 19:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and the never grew up straight as others in that field since.
This is a general tradition and the field is owned by Peter Doherty of Ballinahone Fahan and is about 500 yds from our school.

Ellen Hegarty
Maraghs
Burnfoot
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 18:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the man to look and see Derry which he did and then asked him what he saw and he said he saw crows flying over Derry. A second time he told him to look back and the man said he saw some pigeons among the crows.
A third time he told him to look back and he saw all white pigeons the Colm Cille explained the story to him by saying that there would come a time when an Orange man in Derry would not be seen.
This St cured many people. One day while in Tullydish and going through a field he tripped on the rushes and he cursed the rushes and the lay down before him
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 18:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
come togeth on the one day.
By this it is thought he means what-ever year St Patricks Day and Palm Sunday falls together that year will see Ireland free this will happen in 1940.

He also predicted that a big quarry about a mile north of Buncrana called gory quarry would go round Fahan hill in smoke and the train takes the stones from the quarry to Derry which though fulfills the prophecies.
One day while and another companion were coming from Derry to Colmore in a boat and when they reached Broom hall which lies betweemn Derry and Culmore Colm Cille was reading a book and told the
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 18:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The patron Saints of my parish; Saint Muras.
St Colm Cille and St Mura

Colm Cille was born at Garten near Letterkenny and while on earth he prophied certain things.
One of these is that the will never grow a green top on a rush a second prophecy was that Ireland will be free in when the palm and the shamrock
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to build and when they went back they saw it was tumbled and they started to build it again. They built on again to night and they went home. Next day they went back again and it was tumbled again. Then Columcill said that some ten men should stay up. They decided to stay up all night and watch who was tossing it. They ten men stayed up all night and they saw nobody till it was dawn in the morning. Then Columcill told all the people to gather and have a meeting on some Sunday. One Sunday all the people gathered and they had a meeting.
When all the people was gathered a dove lit and lifted a stone and went away with it. Columcill told all the people to watch where it would go. They watched where it went and it lit over at Collen and they built the Chapel there. Then Columcill said that they would call it Carndonagh because it was on a Sunday we had the meeting where to build the Chapel. It is now a old ruin.

Written by
George Clafferty
Cleagh
I got this from my mother
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 13:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
curse to that river and he said that there would never be a fish in that river again nor neither there were.

A long time ago Columcill was passing through Clonmany and he said that the day would come when that old Chapel out at Straid would be roofless and that there wouldn't be anyone to go into it and that time came. The track of Columcilles knees are still to be seen at the old Chapel.

A long time ago Columcill said that there would be a woman and she was to have to daughters and they were to have red hair. One of the daughters was to go out and she was to come running in saying I saw a man. The men was to be that scarse that it would be strange to see a man.

One time Columcill was building a Chapel. He was building it over at Carndonagh and there was a lot helping him. They all started to build it and they built a lot the first day and at night they all went home. Next day they went back again
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 13:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago when Columcill was Bishop of Derry there was a old begger woman passing by and she went in. The servant of the house had a scone of bread on the fire. The old begger asked the servant for a bit of bread but the servant told her that she had no bread in but I have a scone on the fire. Then the old beggar walked out and the servant looked at the scone of bread and when she looked at it it was all growing over with barley. Then Columcill said that any one would refuse a beggar would have his curse.
One time Columcill was passing through Urrismanah and there was a lot of boys fishing in the river and they had a lot of fish and Columcill asked them for a fish and they wouldn't give him any. Columcill was hungry and he wanted one to roast when he would go home. Then Columcill give his
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At Columcille's time there was a druid to whom every one looked up because it was thought that he could perform miracles even bring the dead to life. One day he was demonstrating to a huge crowd what he could do. He had a woman told to lie down on the ground and pretend she was dead and when he'd have a half hours praying done she was supposed to rise up and thank him for working the miracle. The crowd of course knew nothing about this trick. Columcille happened to be passing the way, and he asked what was going on. When somebody told him he said
" Más marbh í go raibh beó agus más beo í go raibh marbh".
That was if she is living may she be struck dead and if she is dead may she be alive. The druid
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
She took the coal anyway and brought it back to her master in an old can but she didn't forget to tell him about the things the Augheys had said about him and although there was little or no harm in any of them or no insult meant, nevertheless the good man was angry.
"Take them back their coal", he ordered and the girl had to lift the coal from the fire-place again. "Just put it in your apron; it won't burn it, so don't be afraid", he said in amazement she obeyed him.
The Augheys were astonished, too, of course when she came in and left the fiery coal in the fireplace again but when they beheld her apron uninjured - not even scorched - they knew that Columkille was a saint, and treated him with reverence and respect ever afterwards.
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Columcille's house may be seen to this day in the town of Kells, or Ceanannus Mór. The following is a little story told me by a man named Aughey and I blieve it is true for the Augheys or O'Heas are supposed to have lived in Kells long years before Columkille's time.

One day the fire in Columkille's house went out and the holy man told his servant-girl to go across to Augheys' for a coal. She did as he told her and when she told these good people her business they began joking and making laughing remarks about her master whose ways were considered very unusual and strange by the townspeople who had no idea that he was a saint.
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an island on Lough Gowna called Inis Mór on which St Columcille erected a monastery.
Dunbeggan Chappel is not far from here and there is an interesting story told about the bell which is still in Dunbeggan Chapel. This bell originally belonged to Teampaull Cholmcille on Inis Mór.
After the dissolution of this monastery about 1540 this bell was taken away by the protestants but it was brought back or as the people say "it came back". Again it was taken away and the tongue taken out of it but again it came back. Fearing it would disappear again Peter Mulligan and Julia Sullivan his wife who lived on the island rolled it up in a piece of frieze and buried it deep down in the ground where it lay concealed until the days of persecution has passed.
About 60 years ago Tom Mulligan in his death bed had told the then P.P. Father Monaghan where it was. He got it immediately and put it on Dunbeggan Chapel where it still is.
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Doogans (a local) mill wheel was to go round three times (or three days and nights) in human blood. The miller was to have two thumbs. (a malformation of hand found in Doogan family)

The war was to begin between the scythe and hook i.e. between hay time and oat cutting time.
(about August)

All the cream of the country was to be churned in the same churn.
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Columcille, one of Ireland's greatest saints was born at Gartan, Co Donegal in 521.
The house in which he was born is long since in ruins but the late Mrs Adair who owned Glenveigh castle erected a beautiful black marble cross where the house stood.
Near this cross there is a great big, flat stone and it is all that remains of Columcille's home.
If a man is going to America or any country across the seas and lies down on this flat stone the night before he sails he will never be homesick.
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Crotal is a sort of a scum that grows on rocks and lovely dye is made from it. First of all the crotal is gathered and put into a little cloth bag and then it is put into a pot of boiling water and put on the fire. After this wool or woollen thread is put into it and boiled for one hour and the wool is of a brown colour when taken from the pot.
senior member (history)
2019-06-06 12:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One time when St. Columcille was living there was a thorn bush up in "Brochar", it was called the "Crann". St. Columcille slept in under this bush, all night and in the morning somebody came and woke him up. He said that always after that there would be somebody whistling or calling in that place every day would come.
The bush that he slept under fell sometime after that, another one grew up and it is to be seen yet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 22:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Columcille was born in Gartan near Kilmacreanan in the year 521. He was the son of a King and he himself could have been King of Ireland if he had wished but he wanted to be a priest.
He went to school in Kilmacreanan and afterwards went to live with a man name Fionan in Moville. This old man had a book of the four Gospels. Columcille made a copy of the book. When the old man came to know this he was very angry and demanded the copy. Columcille would not agree and the case was brought before the High King. The judgement was to every cow belongs its calf and to every book belongs its copy. Columcille gathered an army and fought the High King and many people were killed in the fight. Columcille was very sorry for having killed so many Christians. He loved Ireland so well that he promised to leave it and go away to a foreign land and convert as many people as he had killed in the fight and never to return to Ireland again.

Margaret Durnion
New Mill
Ramelton
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 21:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St. Columcille’s lake is situated midway between Glenalla and Millford on the Garrigort road. It is full of trout but the story goes that only three trout can be caught in the day and at three different times. St. Columcille’ is said to have prophesied this. As St. Columcille was walking by this lake one day, he saw a man fishing and enquired of him, how he was doing.
The man said that he had only caught three trout and he had come there three times that day to catch them, and then he cursed. When the Saint heard this he said there would never be any more than three caught in the day ever after.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 21:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lough Columcille is situated between four hills - Mr Starrit's hill on the north, Mr Patterson's hill on the west, Mr. Reynold's hill on the east, and Mr. Burns' hill on the south.
The lough got its name "Columcille" because Columcille is said to have stopped there.
There is a large rock in the shape of a chair and this is called the "Wishing Chair". People come from all parts of the country and tourists from England come to sit on this chair to make their wish.
Columcille is said to have put a spell on that lough.
It is said that no man can catch more than three fishes at one time.
There is a rock on which he is said to have cooked a fish on and the shape of the fish is to be seen until this day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Columcill said when he was in Umricam he said that a man from Fanad would never be hung.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time St Colmcille was crossing the river Finn at a place called Corraguill Fintown. He happened to slip on a salmon and fell. He was very angry and he foretold that no salmon would cross the river until the railway would be made and until the black pig meaning the train would cross it. This came true for no salmon ever crossed the river until the railway was made.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Another
St. Colmcille was the patron Saint of this Diocese and he travelled a lot through this part of the country. He prayed at a well in this gap Ma Moir. Some people get cured at it, some of them seen a little while they were drinking at it and if anybody see's the little trout they are sure to be cured.
Another day the Saint was travelling through this part of the country and he came to Sharagore river. From behind a little height he saw a smoak rising. He wondered what the smoak could be doing so close to the river. He went over the height to see what was wrong and then he saw a man beside a fire. He went over to it and the man was frying trouts. He asked him for one but he refused and Colmcille said may you never get another trout in the river you got them in.

Told by
Neall Jackson
Owenirk
Linsfort
Buncrana

Written by
Edward Jackson
Owenirk
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 16:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Colmcille was supposed to go to Sorne and he asked a man for lodgings for the night and he got it. The following day the man of the house went to the soldiers, and he told his wife not to tell Colmcille where he had gone. The woman roasted a herring for the breakfast and when it was roasted she took it off the fire, and kissed it on the head, and she said "you were never kissed before", when Colmcille heard this he knew there was something wrong, and he had one shoe on and the other off. Then he ran out and he met the soldliers, and he ran on until he reached Sorne river where there was a man fishing for salmon and Colmcille asked for "one of them" and the man said he had none and then Colmcille prayed that there never would come a salmon up that river again, and no salmon ever came up it since. Then he went on another bit and he fell on rushes and he prayed that there would never grow a straight rush in that place again, and one never grew straight since.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night a man was going up above Pat McDaid's of Drimacnoo. He went on a little piece till suddenly, he saw a woman dressed all in white standing in the middle of a whin-bush. He wasn't the least scared. This happened about 12 years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a well in Cloc a Toíge it was blessed by Colmcille. There was a cure for drunkard's in it, but the well is still there but there is no water in it now, but the spot still remains.
Colmcille jumped from Croc a Taige down to Drimcavna, there with the track of his two knees on it.
Colmcille was born in Gartan
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Seadh", arsa'n duine bocht. Fhad a's bhéas grian ins an aer ní rachaidh fial go h-ifreann.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pádraig Mac gCeannfhaele
Cill-Fhánaid

Bhí baile talaimh ag Colmcille uair éigín. Bliadhain amháin tháinig an-triomán san earrach agus bhí morán fear aige lá amháin ag cur uisge ar an arbhar ar eagla go dtriomóchadh sé barraidheacht.
Bhí an cailín aimseardha an ghnoitheach ag deánamh aráin le na mbricfeasta a thabhairt do na feara'. Tháinig fear bocht isteach agus d'iarr sé déirce.Chaith sí cnap de'n taos chuige agus d'iarr ar fhéin arán a deánamh de.
Cá dteárn seisean a dhatch ach a chaitheamh isteach i lár na teineadh agus d'imthigh sé leis amach ar an doras. Nuair a thionntuigh an cailín thart chonnaic sí tom geamhair ag fás i lár na teineadh ar an taos.
Tháinig Colmcille isteach agus d'fiafruigh sé díthe cá dteachaidh an duine bocht? Dubhairt sise gur tionntuigh sé coirneál a' toighe. Lean Colmcille é agus tionntuigh an fear bocht thart agus dubhairt :
"Nach dtug mé do sháith dhuit"
"Thug", arsa Colmcille, acht ní thug tú croidhe damh le na chaitheamh".
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One day Colmcille was passing through Umricam. When he was walking along some men saw him and they gathered more men and started to chase him. They followed him for a long time and when they started to draw closer to him, Colmcille reached a river. The only way he could escape from these men was to jump across the river.
He walked back a few steps and took a running jump and jumped across the river. On the other side of the river he landed on a rock with one of his feet and the mark of his foot was left on the rock. The mark of his foot is still to be seen on the rock out beside the river in Umricam.

Com McLaughlin
West End
Buncrana
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seán Mac Giolla Easbuig
Cill Fhánaid,
Gleanncholuimcille

Nuair a bhí Naomh Colmcille sa Gleann seo bhí sé an-mhór le fear ar an "Bhaile Árd". Shuidhfeadh an fear istoigh gach lá ag seannchaisg leis an naomh agus cá ndeánfadh sé aon dath oibre.
"Anois", arsa'n bhean leis lá amháin, "Tá Colmcille ag teacht agus gabh thusa suas 'um t-seomra i bhfolach agus déarfaidh mise leis go bhfuil tú tinn".
Nuair a tháinig Colmcille isteach d'fhiafruigh sé "cia rabh fear a' toighe?".
Dubhairt an bhean, "go rab h sé tinn".
"Bhal", arsa'n Naomh, "má tá sé tinn go bhfághaidh sé bás".
Ar thoradh moille nuair a chuaidh an bhean suas 'na t-seomra bhí an fear marbh ar a leabaidh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sean Mac Niallghuis
Dúnalt
Gleanncholuimcille

Seanfhocal:

Séideann an ghaoth mar is áil léithe fhéin,
Níl fhios cia h-as a dtig sí no cia h-áit a dtéid sí

An áit a bhfuil amadán tá glagaire fosda
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sé amach go bhfuair sé na cnámha agus na h-easnacha, na ceithre cosa agus na h-adharcha agus an croiceann agus chuir le chéile arais iad. Ní bhfuair sé ach súil amháin agus thug sé "Lios a t-Súil Cháich" ar an bhoin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seán Mac Giolla Easbuig
Cill Fhánaid,
Gleanncholuimcille

Nuair a bhí Colmcille sa t-sean Ghleann seo bhíodh coimhthiolán ag na naoimh go minic ag áit ar a dtugtaoi "Currantaigh Searc" air go dtí'n lá indiu.
Is cosamhail go rabh Colmcille rud beag lasta 'san agaidh agus i lár an t-seanchais dubhairt duine de na naoimh go rabh braon fola in a phluc. Ghoill seo go mór ar Colmcille agus nuair a tháinig sé 'na bhaile d'fhiafruigh sé do'n chailín aimsire an gcuireadh sí bainne fríd an arán. Dubhairt sise nach gcuiread sí a'n dath ach an sgaith a mheasgadh sí ar an t-soitheach, agus tháingi oiread feirge air a's go dteachaidh sé amach agus gur mharbh sé an bhó.
Seal gearr in a dhiaidh sin bhí an cailín aimsire ag mairgnigh fá'n dóigh bhocht a bhí ortha gan a'n deor bainne a bheeith aca agus tháinig aithreachas air chionnas gur marbh sé an bhó. D'imthigh
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seán Mac Niallghuis
Dúnált
Gleanncholuimcille

Nuair a ruaig Colmcille na deamhain as Gleanncholuimcille, chuir sé amach 'san fhairrge iad ó thráigh Ghlinne agus is é is ainm do'n tráigh sin, "Tráigh an Agairrigh"
D'iarr sé annsin na deamhain seo a bheith curtha sa chruth nach ndeánfadh siad dochar do dhuine no do bheathadhach a choidhche. Agus sin an t-iasg a bhfuil "an Dallóg" mar ainm air, sin an chumadh in ar chuireadh na deamhain.
Agus rud an-aistidheacht i dtaoibh an éisg seo, sé sin, nár scéith sé ariamh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a lake in this district surrounded by high hills, and the name of it is Lough Colmcille. It is a good trout lake, and angelers frequent it every year. It is said that Colmcille spent three days at it. This legend goes on to relate that the table he dined on is there. Many searches have been made but it could not be found.
In the year 1846. One morning about 8’ o’ clock there was a man named Barron driving his cows to the mountain. When he came in sight of the lake it was dry, and he saw an animal about the size of an ass foal playing on the green. Barron ran off frightened. When he went home he told his neighbours but few believed him
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One Christmas day the Protestants were playing Caman on the ice in Gartan lough, where St. Colmcille put in three steps to cross the lough. One of them said we
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 11:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
can walk on the lough and St; Colm-Cille had to put in steps. At that moment the ice broke and closed in and cut the head of him, the head went around and around calling "Hail hail".
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
catch another in the same place. No man ever caught another Salmon in Gartan lake since.

* * *

On another occasion a man asked Colmcille could he turn the water against the hill. Colmcille said nothing but he turned it against the hill and it is running against the hill since.

* * *

On another time he couldn't cross Gartan lake so he put three stones in it. These stones are there yet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that St. Colmcille was coming along the road one day. He met a man with salmon which he caught in Gartan lake. He asked the man for a Salmon. The man refused and Colmcille said "you never will
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
every woman who moves the bread round before she turns it" It is said that when a woman makes Bannóch of bread in Attiduff her fingers get burned.
He went on till he came to Killmacannon he went into a house there and asked for a Nógín of water. The woman of the house said, the water I have is dirty. "My curse on Killmacannon and that there never be anymore than one well there. Ever since there is only one well in Kilmacannon. He then went on to Raughly and went into a man named Hooks and asked for an apple. "Well", said the man the apples I have are no good and I will not give you any of them to eat. "Well", said Colmcille, the day will come when there shall not be anymore than one man named Hooks in this part of Raughly but one".
That day has come there is only one man named Hooks in the whole part of Raughly. Colmcille went across to Tireragh heartbroken saying

"Sin iad bailte na Mallacht"
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
But the well is no longer there, as Mr Rooney got it closed up, but it burst out again a short distance from where it was first.
In the old days on the eve of the 9th of June, two bands, one from Dublin and one from Kells visited the well. There were good players in the Kells band in those days. These bands played all night till morning. The Rosary was recited and hymns sung.
Cans of water from the well were brought home to those who could not visit the well.
Sore legs and toothache were cured there.
There is a tradition that the well will never run dry. The old people say that there is an underground stream from Kieran Well to Saint Colmcille's Well.
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This well is situated on the west side of the town of Kells a few hundred yards off Climber Hall. A narrow lane which is very badly kept leads down to this well. The well too is very badly kept and is no credit to Kells.
At one time St Colmcille's Well was in a field owned by a man named Rooney. This field is now owned by Skelly
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and he threw it into the river where it now stands. In the old stone house there is a chair of stone and a bed made of stone, also an iron stairs up to the upper floor. St Colmcille lived with his mother and one day they had no fire and he told his mother to go Augheys house and bring a lit sod home, but they would not give it to her, St Comcille said that the name of an Aughey would not be a priest.
Collector:-
John Maguire,
Maudlin St.
Kells
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Colmcille was born in Donegal in the year five-hundred and twenty-one. He went to the Collages where St Fingin taught. He was a scholar and a poet as well. He founded a (-) in Derry, Swords, Kells, Offaly. He copied a book that St Fingin wrote. After that he had to go to Iona and leave Ireland. He had a monastery in Iona. He taught the true faith to the picts who lived in Scotland at that time. When St Colmcille died he was buried in Downpatrick with St Patrick and St Bridget.
No remains of the Monastery are to be found, only the four crosses and the well. St Colmcille loved to copy books. The house which he and his monks lived in is an old stone house on the top of Church Lane. St Colmcille took four crosses and when he was taken the last one he was caught by St Kieran
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
he was caught and he threw it into the river and ran off.

Author: Mr Edward Farrelly
Collector:- Edward Farrelly, Kilmainham, Kells
senior member (history)
2019-06-05 09:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Colmkille was born in Donegal in the year five-hundred and twenty-one. Colmkille studied at many famous schools. He was a great scholar and also a poet. He founded many monasteries at Offaly, Kells, Derry and many other places. Colmcille had a great battle with Saint Finian at Sligo, over a book and it is said that he had to leave this country and that he should not see this country any more.
It is said that he came back but that he was blind. There are many things in rememberance of him. There is a well at the end of the town, and a band visits it every year and a Rosary is said. It is said that there is a cure in the well. There is a little stone house belonging to Saint Colmcille in Church Lane with a small door going into the room and it is that small that you would have to go in side-ways. It was a stone pillow that St Colmkille had for his pillow and the track of his head is on it yet. It is said that St Colmkille stole three of crosses of St Kieran and when he was taking the fourth one
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 21:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Drawing - "The Salmon of Knowledge"

Photo - The Lake, Newberry-Hall, Carbury, Co Kildare
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 21:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a story locally told about St. Colm cille and his wanderings in the neighbourhood of Edenderry.
One hot summer day the Saint and a friend were passing through Ballykillen, and, feeling thirsty, they went into a house and asked for a drink, the woman of the house told them to "be gone". "You will get no drink here beggars like you."
St. Colmcille and his friend had just left the house when the woman's husband came in. He asked her did she know to whom she had refused a drink, and when he told her it was St. Columcille, she got sorry and asked him to run after them and bring them back. The saint refused to come back, and at that moment struck the ground with his heel and a spring of pure water gushed up.
The Saint said. "There is enough water here for me to drink and for everyone that passes this way for ever.

Told by Edward Watson aged about 65 yrs, St. Francis St. Edenderry - told to him by Mrs Rehan aged about 100yrs now bedridden. Now of Francis St. Edenderry - Born at Ballykillen
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 21:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When St. Colmcille and his monks were coming from Durrow to Lynally to visit his nephew St. Colman they were very thirsty. He saw a girl with a pail of milk. She had milked the cows in the field as was the custom at that time. He asked her for a drink. She was afraid they would drink all the milk and she refused to give it to them.
St. Colmcille cursed Ballykilmurry and said there would be always a scarcity of water in it and there was and is. Several people spent hundreds of pounds in trying to sink pumps but they were not a success.

Helen Connolly

told to me by my father
James Connolly
Ballykeenahan
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 21:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
every woman who moves the bread round before she turns it" It is said that when a woman makes Bannóch of bread in Attiduff her fingers get burned.
He went on till he came to Killmacannon he went into a house there and asked for a Nógín of water. The woman of the house said, the water I have is dirty. "My curse on Killmacannon and that there never be anymore than one well there. Ever since there is only one well in Kilmacannon. He then went on to Raughly and went into a man named Hooks and asked for an apple. "Well", said the man the apples I have are no good and I will not give you any of them to eat. "Well", said Colmcille, the day will come when there shall not be anymore than one man named Hooks in this part of Raughly but one".
That day has come there is only one man named Hooks in the whole part of Raughly. Colmcille went across to Tireragh heartborken saying
"Sin iad bailte na Mallacht"
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 21:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
there be no more than one pair married here for one hundred years". It is said no pair ever got married here for one hundred years. He went on then till he reached Ballyscannell where he saw a man standing on the road.
"Will this road bring me to Lislary," asked Colmcille "I don't know whither it will or not", said the man "My curse on you and on Ballyscannell and it never be without a fool" said Colmcille. Ever since Ballyscannell is not without a fool. He went on then till he came to Breaghwy. He went into a house there and asked the woman of the house for a bit of bread. She told him he could not eat it as it had fallen into the red ashes. "My curse on Breaghwy and may it never be without Red Ashes". Ever since Breaghwy is not without red ashes.
He went on then till he came to Attiduff, he went into a house there and saw a Bánnoch of bread at the fire on a fire iron. "Give me a piece of bread" said Comcille "Oh you cant eat it", said the woman for only one side of it is baked." My curse on
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 21:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told by Mrs Curran, Breaghwy P.O.
from John McGovern, Moneygold 60 years ago
This is how the following was told to me:-

Colm Cille one time had to pass Aughorrow. Some children who were playing at some street saw him coming and they said to each other that they would throw stones at him. Colmcille asked a man who was standing near why they were throwing stones at him.
"Oh", said the man there is a wedding here to day and the bride and groom belong to this place and the children are enjoying themselves". "My curse on Aughorrow", said Colmcille and may
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a family in the Lower Rosses of the name Killerlane. After the battle of Cuil Dreimhne St Columcill was very tired so he came across the Back Strand to the Lower Rosses he went into Killerlanes house. they gave him food to eat and cleaned the blood off his hands. When he was going he said that he had no money to give them, but he gave them his shoe and told them it would cure man and beast every morning. 18 1/2 was found in the shoe. One man came and asked the lend of the shoe and they gave it to him, but he never brought it back. The shoe will not cure anyone unless it is in the hands of the Killerlanes.
Written by,
E. Gillan
Erin Cottage
Rosses Point.

Told by
T. Killerlane
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 20:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This well is situated in Ballyconnell. From the 15th August to the 8th Sept people visit it to perform a station. They do three "rounds" and say five Pater Ave and Gloria and each time they pick up three pebbles and throw them into the well. A trout has been seen in it. An altar and stations have now been erected beside the well. When people have done the stations they leave flowers, or beads or medals or pieces of rags at the well. In doing so they feel "they are leaving their ailment after them".
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 20:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As a boy Colmcille was attending a public School. The master of the School had some fields not far away from the School. In one of those fields he had some wheat, oats, and barley growing. Each day he sent one of the Scholars to keep the different birds, which were doing a lot of damage to the crops, from lodging in the corn, and when it came to the Saint's turn he went also.
When he reached the cornfield he saw an old shell of a house by the side of the fence so he said to himself that if he could get all the birds into this old house they would not be able to do any damage to the crops, and that he would
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 17:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
be plenty of women.
It is told that there is a stone near Williamstown and that any person that hides there during the war with a noggin of mead will have enough to eat while war lasts and they will be saved. The place is called "Lios Riomhas".
It is said that when the Green in Dunmore is surrounded by houses then the end of the world is at hand.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 17:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
would turn its whole force with determination against England and gain their Independence from England Ireland would become a nation as they were of old. That is the miracle wrought by Colmcille with white and red handkerchiefs.

M. B. Tobin got this story from her father 59yrs
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 17:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
be conquered or if conquered would she ever become a nation again.
Colmcille to explain more clearly the questions which they put to him asked them for two handkerchiefs to turn into two lions. Two ferocious lions jumped up at once, one of them white and the other one red and they attacked each other. The white lion which represented Ireland held his own for along time, but after a great struggle the red lion overpowered him and knocked him down. The red lion represented England. The saint asked the workman which of the two lions they considered would win the red lion having the other almost killed. The saint then said to them to wait and see and after a very long time the white lion seemed to gain strength renewed him attacked on the red lion whom they thought was going to be the victor.
The saint exclaimed to the men that Ireland would be attacked by a very strong army from England which they saw when the red lion dived into the white lion, but after centuries of persecution and hardship Ireland one day
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One day Colmcille was walking through a field where some workmen were busy at work. The workmen hearing of the miracle wrought by the Saint confered with themselves and said they would ask him some questions about the future of Ireland which they were very anxious to know,.
When the saint approached one of the men asked him would Ireland ever
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cross is still to be seen in front of the House on the edge of the river, Colmcill caught Kieran stealing the Cross, Colmcill prophesied about Kieran".

Matthew Reilly
11, Old Hill,
Drogheda
told by
Mary Meehan
Sampson's Lane
Drogheda
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cross is still to be seen in front of the House on the edge of the river, Colmcill caught Kieran stealing the Cross, Colmcill prophesied about Kieran".

Matthew Reilly
11, Old Hill,
Drogheda
told by
Mary Meehan
Samspson's Lane
Drogheda
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Colmcill was born in Navan. His house is still to be seen. He became a priest. There was a price on his head if he could be found.
"He used to go into his Mother to see her unont(?). When he would go in to his mother he would say, "How are you Mother". she would always say, "I had a very bad night, I am not too well," That was always the story. He would say, "Worser and worser may you be". One morning he went in and asked as usual and his Mother answered, " I had a fair good night", he said, "Better and better may you be".
"He had a cross which he valued very much, St. Kieran had his eye on this Cross, One night he stole the Cross. There was a river in front of the house, While he was crossing the river the Cross fell, and the
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people put great faith in Colm Cille's prophecy which foretold the end of the world, as they believed.
It said that the cars would run without horses, that the milk of the country would be all churned in the same churn, and that the people would fly through the air like birds.
These things were believed to have happened when trains first run, and when creameries were established. If the old people could see the aeroplane, they would be certain that the end of the world was coming.

Told by
Miss B. Farrelly
Anne St.,
B Boro
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people put great faith in Colm Cille's prophecy which foretold the end of the world, as they believed.
It said that the cars would run without horses, that the milk of the country would be all churned in the same churn, and that the people would fly through the air like birds.
These things were believed to have happened when trains first run, and when creameries were established. If the old people could see the aeroplane, they would be certain that the end of the world was coming.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that he would bring out the other and sell her. There shall be three Sundays in Clonnescer without Mass and the three were in it. There is a stream beyond near Clonescer chaple and once it was running milk and some one washed their hands in it and it turned in to water. It is said it is to run blood.

Anta Christ is to be born of a very red haired woman there shall be five widows of the same name. Shall be in ... and the five were. Before he will come out.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a fist of sand and throw it at them the will have to go back. They shall be stopped below Gort. He stood beyond where Clonnescer chapel is and said a chapel shall be built on that very spot, and some Sunday they people shall go in to Mass in peace and when they will come out they will go knee deep in Orange blood.

Before the end of the world there shall come three years of great scarcity and then three years of great plentiness. If a man had only two cows and go to the fair with one. He would get so much money for her
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that before St Colm Cill died he prophecized about the Orange men. The people of Ireland shall go on wheels. The cars shall go without horses and horses without heads. There shall be crying at one side of the lake and laughing at the other side Stories shall go on the top of stick.
When all this will come to pass the Orange men will break out. The dogs shall go mad so that when they will come there will not be a dog to bark at them. When they will break out first if the first priest shall bless
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Colmcille built a church on the second largest island on Lough Allen. Around the church was a graveyard. The people on the mainland used to bury on the island.
The corpse was placed on a great flag stone and four people stood on the stone. Then the flag moved across the lough to the grave yard, and remained on the strand until the burial was over.
The flag then moved back to the main land with the burial men.
Colmcille blessed the flag.
One day a boy and girl went in on the flag, and the flag moved off.
Whether they used bad language or whether they committed a bad deed, it is not known, but when they were out in the water the stone split and one part went to the island and the other back to the main land.
Others say the stone sank with the boy .
The old people say the stone moved from Rynn's shore in Ballinaglera to Inch Island, and that it was St Buoy or St Bouy that blessed the stone.
Drumkeeran parish today is called the Parish of Innismagrath.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 15:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was seen floating on the sea of Kilfian an old wooden box. The people did not heed it for a while. At that time there lived a man in Kilfian who kept a lot of cows. Every morning when the would let out the cows one of them always went down to the box and sucked it. After a while the man went down to the shore and opened it. When he had it opened he saw a little boy within in it. He brought him home and named him Colmcille.
One day when they were reaping corn the man said to Colmcille. "I am going into the house to get my (?) and you will wait here and watch the corn" So saying he went into the house. When he had gone Colmcille gathered all the birds in the air and put them into a barn without a roof. Then he went into the house to get his dinner. When the man saw him he said "Why did you come in The birds will have all the corn destroyed". The corn will be all right" said Colmcille. When they went out not one grain of the corn was missing.

Kathleen McGuinness

Author - Thomas McGuinness
Rathball
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 14:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some of Colmcille's prophesies are that before the end of the world the Summer will not be known from Winter only by the leaves on the trees.

That there would be cars without horses
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
servant boy who came from Bealcragga. One wet evening the boy was coming home from work along the Clounlaheen road when he saw a little dog covered with mud and apparently worn out from travelling. It was a very small terrier and the chap had pity on it and took it up in his arms meaning to carry it up to the priest's kitchen, but while he was walking along with it, it bit him on the chin. He was so annoyoed that he pelted it out of his arms and thought no more about it. But a few days later he heard that it was a mad dog and had been destroyed.
He went to Miss Hodge (Unknown to Fathar Lynch) but as soon as she looked in the crystal and saw the dog hanging from his chin she told him she could do nothing for him. She added that it was quite possible he would not get hydrophobia at all, but in a very short time he got mad and had to be put in the Asylum in Limerick - there was no Asylum in Ennis then. He died shortly afterwards.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Another man who visited Miss Hodge was a servant boy employed by Father Lynch the parish priest of Kilmaley during the '40s and 50s. When Father Lynch came to Kilmaley there was no priest's residence in the parish and only a tiny thatched chapel. Father Lynch got the present chapel built, and the old chapel is now used as a shed for cattle by its owner John Davoren. As well Father Lynch bought a thatched house and a few fields from a man named Kelly and this was the first parochial house. Kelly went to live in another smaller house on the farm but bit by bit he sold all his farm to Father Lynch and then left the parish. At his death Father Lynch willed this farmer to his nephew who pulled down the thatched house and built "Fairy Hill House", where his grandchildren still live.
After Father Lynch's death his successor Father Burke bought the present parochial house "Snugvill". This house and farm at one time belonged to a relative of my mothers - a Protestant named Greene - and I believe it was he called it "Snugville". Kilclogher is the real name of the place. Greene got "smashed" and sold the place to a man named Frost who came from Newmarket-on-Fergus. Frost found it hard to manage the whole farm and when Father Buke came to the parish he sold him "the big house" and part of the farm. He kept the rest of the farm and a small house for himself and his descendants are still there.
When Father Lynch was farming in the 40's he had a
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About the time that Biddy Early lived in Feakle, a Miss Hodge lived in Kilrush. At that time an extraordinary number of dogs suffered from rabies. and people lived in hourly dread of getting hydrophobia. Miss Hodge claimed to be able to prevent hydrophobia. She had a crystal and when she looked into it she could see (so she said) the mad dog hanging off the person he had bitten, and hanging from the part he bit. If he was hanging from below the heart she claimed to be able to set a charm which would prevent hydrophobia, but she could do nothing, if he bit above the heart. Miss Hodge was a Protestant - some said she was a minister's daughter - and like Biddy Early she knew no Irish. Apparently it is easier to indulge in "hocus pocus" through the medium of English than through Gaedhealg. No bonus for Irish in the nether world!
Some years before my grandfather got married - say 85 years ago - he and two other farmers who had horses went to help a poor man named Keatinge (the father of Baitiléar a Phluic) to get home his turf. Keatinge had a fair share of turf saved in Moinagowel bog less than a mile away and on the day of the Miotaill Beag(?) he helped the men to load the turf into the creels, then he used come along with them to his own house and help to empty the creels and unload the turf. After that he used "to throw up" some of the turf, that
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 11:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
is make into a rick and then trot along partly by road and partly through fields and get back to the bog as soon as the men with the horses and then help to load up again.
That afternoon when the men were returning to the bog with empty creels, my father leading, they saw a little dog coming down the road towards them. They did not like the look of it as it appeared to be mad and they were afraid it might bite the horses. My grandfather beckoned his whip at it and it ran into the ditch and did not interfere with them in any way, so they thought no more about it. But further down the road it ran into poor Keatinge and bit him on the hip. It then ran towards Coru (?) where a number of people got round it and killed it with spades. (No humane killing then)
Old Keating was afraid of hydrophobia and he asked my grandfather to go twith him to Kilrush and act as interpreter in dealing with Miss Hodges.
They got there in due course, paid the lady's fee a half a crown - and then she looked through the crystal and saw the little dog hanging from Keating's hip. She set a charm then and it must have been effective because Keatinge did not get hydrophobia.
It was some years later that he had to visit Biddy Early on his son's behalf, and many many years later that he had to beat Baitiléar a Phluic out of his young lady's home. None of his family or descendants are left in Kilmaley now though there are many other people named Keatinge in the parish.
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 10:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About the time that Biddy Early lived in Feakle, a Miss Hodge lived in Kilrush. At that time an extraordinary number of dogs suffered from rabies. and people lived in hourly dread of getting hydrophobia. Miss Hodge claimed to be able to prevent hydrophobia. She had a crystal and when she looked into it she could see (so she said) the mad dog hanging off the person he had bitten, and hanging from the part he bit. If he was hanging from below the heart she claimed to be able to set a charm which would prevent hydrophobia, but she could do nothing, if he bit above the heart. Miss Hodge was a Protestant - some said she was a minister's daughter - and like Biddy Early she knew no Irish. Apparently it is easier to indulge in "hocus pocus" through the medium of English than through Gaedhealg. No bonus for Irish in the nether world!
Some years before my grandfather got married - say 85 years ago - he and two other farmers who had horses went to help a poor man named Keatinge (the father of Baitléar(?) a Phluic) to get home his turf. Keatinge had a fair share of turf saved in Moinagowel bog less than a mile away and on the day of the Miotaill Beag(?) he helped the men to load the turf into the creels, then he used come along with them to his own house and help to empty the creels and unload the turf. After that he used "to throw up" some of the turf, that
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 10:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(copied from the end cover of the old notebook)

and Sundays. As the National Schools were all built in the chapel yards, the pupils there attended schools as usual until two or three o'clock when they went to the chapel for instructions. The pupils in the hedge-schools, however, seldom went to school on Tuesdays or Thursdays; they merely went to the chapel in the evenings. This course continued for about six weeks. At the end of that time the children made their first Confession, and received their first Communion and a few days later they were confirmed.
When my father was 11, he had to go to Kilmaley Chapel for Religion Instructions. These instructions were sometimes given by one of the priests and sometimes by the Principal of Kilmaley N. School, Mr Crowe. My father liked Mr. Crowe so much that when Confirmation was over he refused to go back to Maggie's school and so had to be sent to the National School. He was practically the only pupil that ever deserted Maggie. All the time she taught her relations with both parents and pupils were excellent. (?) A mother never came to abuse her, and a pupil never turned "Bolshie" though she often beat them well.
Some years later she married "Willie the Weaver". He set up his loom in the house so, of course, the school had to be discontinued. Her pupils scattered to Kilmaley, Kilnamona, or Inagh N. Schools, with the exception of a few who went nowhere on the plea that the schools were too far away. Soon the weaving business declined and Maggie, the husband, and children found themselves in very poor circumstances. Maggie died quite young and Willle took the children home to his mother in Coroffin. The house fell in and only part of the walls is standing now.

Sin deire mo scéil anois, agus má tá an oiread tagairt dom' athair ann ó thús deire is atá i "Peg of My Heart", ná tógtar orm é.

Bríd, Bean Mhic Niocaill
senior member (history)
2019-06-04 10:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in it was a lesson on the "Salt-mines of Cracow". Children who were using the "Third Reading Book" had to learn "Carpenter Spelling Book" as well. They were given a certain number of words and they had to learn "their meanings" and how to spell them. Maggie examined these "tasks" individually every morning. Those who did not know them were put back to learn them, sometimes one of the better pupils had to assist the duffers. Later she examined the tasks again and this time she produced the big flat ruler and when any one missed on his second trial she "welted" him well. The "Fifth Reading Book" was the highest reader in use in National Schools in those days but few of Maggies' Puppils ever reached the Fourth.
All the pupils were supposed to pay her 1d a week. Sometimes they paid in kind instead of cash. They brought her milk, butter or eggs. He ex pupils always came in Spring on a Meiotall Dómhnaigh and planted her garden for her, they came again later on in the year and cut plenty of turf. Her mother used look after the garden on fine days, on wet days she sat on "the hob" beside the fire knitting. Maggie used "foot" the turf and gather it up on Saturdays. Sometimes she got her bigger pupils to help with it during school-hours. "Footing" turf was probably pleasanter than wrestling with Carpenters Spelling Book.
Altogether Maggie and her mother were quite comfortable. Their means were small but their wants were small too. Neither ever wore a hat. A shawl lasted a lifetime and a flannel petticoat or skirt lasted for years. Meat was an unknown luxury but then they had never tasted it and so did not want it just as a modern N.T. does not want caviare.
The priests from Kilnamona and from Kilmaley sometimes visited the school and examined Catechism. When Confirmation was due all the children in the Confirmation class whether attending National Schools or Hedge Schools had to attend a Catechism class in the Chapel on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 22:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
happened Maggie promptly undressed him and put him into her bed while she dried his clothes at the fire.
The school was situated in what may be described as an ideal positions for a "pay school". It was about three miles from the National Schools of Kilmaley. Kilnamona and Inagh and the district was densely populated at the time. Maggie's father was a hedge school master and taught in the same school for years. All the family with the exception of Maggie went to America, when they grew up, but Maggie stayed on with her mother and ran the school after her father's death.
While my father was going to school there, Maggie used have about thirty pupils in the summer time and fifty or sixty in the Winter. She taught them reading writing spelling arithmetic and the R.C. Catechism. They wrote on slates mainly though some of the bigger pupils used copies and ink. When writing they put the copies or slates on the "form" and knelt on the floor - a clay one. They worked sums on their slates standing but if they got tired of standing they were at liberty to bring in a Carraig from outside and sit on it. When the school got overcrowded some of the bigger pupils used go out in the "street" and work their sums and learn their spellings out there. Each pupil was called up to the teacher's "desk" to say his or her lesson. Class teaching was unknown in hedge schools apparently.
Little children used a "1st Primer" which consisted of little more than the large and small alphabets. Later on they were given a 2nd primer which contained two and three letter words. The next book was called "Reading Made Easy" and after that came the "First Reading Book". The "Second Reading Book" seems to have been fairly difficult. One of the last lessons
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 21:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
school in a thatched cabin. It consisted of one fairly big room which was at once school room kitchen and bedroom. There was a bed at one end of the room where Maggie and her mother used sleep and at the opposite side was a big open hearth where a good turf fire blazed summer and winter.
There was no dresser but hanging on one of the walls was a Cleibhí a few shelves fastened together and used, to hold a few cups plates and mugs. There was one small table which served as a desk during school hours and on which Maggie and her mother took their meals. There were two or three Sugán chairs and two "forms" that is benches without desks. There was one entrance door and it was nearer the end where the bed was than the side where the fireplace was. The bed stretched parallel to the western gable and between the end of the bed and the door was a small space fitted with a few pegs where the girls hung their shawls. On a wet morning when there was an extra amount of shawls to be accomodated some were hung on the "posts" of the bed.
The boys always wore caps going to and coming from School. They kept these in their pockets during school hours, when they had pockets. The chaps in "petticoats" kept their caps under their arms all day.
Between the house and the road was a well flagged yard or "street". At the back was a fair sized garden and quite close was Moinagowel bog. At playhour the girls played around the road and the boys went in to the bog and went jumping bog-holes. Now and again a youngster fell into a bog hole and got drenched to the skin. When that
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 21:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When my father was a child in the '60s there was a National School in Kilmaley. He did not go to it however until he about 11 years old. He accompanied his cousin to a hedge school in Raheen about a mile and a half away from his 6th to 11th year.
This school was kept by a young girl named Maggie Kennedy. When my father began to go school she was in her early twenties, and was a very good looking girl. She conducted her
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 10:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fionn Mac Cumail was strolling through Leinster. He came to Glendalough. There he saw a lot of people gathered around a stream.
The King and Queen and Princess of Leinster were there. Fionn heard the people saying that whoever could jump across the stream could marry the Princess.
A few of the young men tried but none succeeded. Fionn tried and succeeded. The king did not know who Fionn was
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 10:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Rock of Cashel is situated about seven miles east wards from the school. This is how the rock of Cashel came to Cashel.
One day St Patrick met the devil and the St said that the piece of ground that they were standing on would be some time covered with buildings. Then an angel appeared to them and the devil followed it. When he was passing the Sliabh Bloom Mts. the devil took a bit out of the Mts and dropped it in Cashel where the Rock is now situated. Afterwards there were houses built on it, the round tower, Saint Patrick's cross, Cormac's Chapel, the Cathedral and the Royal residence. The rock of Cashel is about 300 feet high.
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 10:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
were called back to work on Tuesday.
When they arrived in Cashel they had a bowl of tea and a loaf of bread at Carrolls of the "Lower Gate" and had nothing else for the day. No food of any kind was left in Cashel that evening.

Storyteller:
Dennis McCarthy
Kilmore
Golden

Collector
M. MacCárthaigh
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 10:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One of O'Connel's greatest meeting was that of Cashel. It was held on the "Dean's hill".
O'Connell drove in from Carrick seated in a boat carried on some form of carriage.
Colonel Vandeleur who was in charge of the Cashel garrison had cannon placed at the top of the street with the intention of dispersing the meeting.
Word was sent to Captain Long of Longfield who was General Route Master of Ireland. He came immediately and indignantly ordered Colonel Vandeleur in to his barracks, after throwing the papers of his authority in the face of the dismayed Colonel.
The order was complied with and the meeting went ahead peaceably. Colonel Vandeleur was "routed" from Cashel shortly afterwards.

Denis McCarthy (father of storyteller) with his older cousin "Big Dinny" were present at the meeting against the orders of their Landlord and employer Welland of Ballywalter, who warned his men on Saturday night that anybody attending O'Connell's meeting need not come back on Monday morning.
The two above mentioned disobeyed but
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 09:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
After the battle of Wexford word was sent around to all the parishes to join up and have all their men ready for the battle of Ross which was fought on the 5th of June 1798.
A large number of men were ready in every parish only in Sutton parish and word was sent to the priest but it was of no use only two men were ready.
On the night of the fourth of June they started off on the journey. When they came to Cáronreigh they stopped to sharpen their pikes the mark is to be seen on the stone up to the present day.
One of their names was Neville and the other was my Great, Great, Grand Uncle his name was Nick Croke. They walked along until they came to the cross of Dunmain they met the Tintern men there and all of them started off for Corbet Hill.
When they reached there they joined the rest of the soldiers and marched on to the town. During the battle two of them were killed in the Main Street.
After the battle the yeomen heard that these two men were fighting so they went to burn their houses they went to Nevilles first and when
senior member (history)
2019-06-03 09:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Account given by Mr. Joseph Keefe Slievemweel, Moyne - who has two daughters attending this school - Stasia and Bridgid.

The Holy Well that I know of is situated in Slieveroe by the roadside. There is a white thorn bush growing near it. There are three stone steps leading down to it. St. Colm Cille is the patron saint of this well. He was travelling through this country and he rested at this well and blessed it.
Many have been cured by the water. Long ago people came from far off, and left bandages and crutches at the well. A Protestant man who was living near by complained of his cattle eating those rags so he filled up the well and got the tree cut down that the rags were on. After that he had many losses. His cattle died.
Some years ago the well was re-opened. Nearby is a pattern green where the pattern used be held once a year. The day was the 5th of June. It is about 90 years since the last pattern was held.
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 09:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of a bard playing a harp, a soldier with a sword or shield, a fish, and scroll work. On the other pillar is a human figure with a bell and human faces.
According to local accounts the cross was taken by two Protestant men and thrown into Trawbega Bay, but on the following morning it was back in its former place and it has not been tampered with since. Others have it that it was taken as far as Buncrana and was found back again in its accustomed place the next morning.
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 09:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A short distance from Carndonagh in a place called Churchtown stands the Donagh Cross, or St. Patrick's Cross. It measures about 11 feet 6 inches in height and is carved on either side. It is said to be one of the oldest stone crosses in Ireland and is attributed to the seventh century. The two pillars standing one on each side belong to the same period. On the east side are several full-length robed figures, believed to represent a bishop in an attitude of blessing. On the west side, there is interlaced work, and one oval face which tradition holds to have been a representation of the Blessed Virgin.
One pillar has a representation
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 09:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
elevated.

Cna Talmhan
gets its name because there are many nut trees growing there.

Gleann Tirim = because the land is very dry.

Gort Teinead
is another name for "The field of the red plain". In olden times it was called "Gortkinney" which is its right name. It is called "The field of the red plain", because in all the fields around this place there are mineral products in the soil which colour it red or make it look fiery.

Máigh-Réidh Cruaidh
pronounced as Mara Cruaidh. The hard plain dug from the stony nature of the ground.

Druim Dubh = Black back
Leana Liat = Hilly ground

Máigh Réidh Bán
pronounced by locals "The level field", or Marabhán.

Gort na Monadh
the peat field where turf was dug in former days.

Mara Tochaill - the dug up field
Léine Buidhe - a field, pronounced as Lenaboy.
Mín a Clog Bán - a hill
Druim Léith = the hill which separates two rocks.
Druim a Sáid - a hill
Falla Túir - the hedge of the tower
Árd Ró - the hill of wood
Mín na h-Airneise - the plain of the goods or stock
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 09:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ard-na-gCon gets its name from hounds which are often seen pursing rabbits there.

Tullach Bog = because it is a very wet field, though
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 09:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
May Day.
On the 1st of May. The fields, crops and all the animals of the farm are sprinkled with holy water.
Cows were driven out on the morning with a quicken plant as it was believed to be lucky and keeps their profit from been taken.

In Glendalough there was a very old custom of holding a pattern on 3rd June St Kevin's day. A crowd of people used to drive to a place called the pattern bank and dance and sing and storytelling. They used spend some time in prayer in honour of St Kevin.

People used spread rushes in front of the door to welcome a visitor.
When a cow would calve, and the first milk taken from her, it was given back to her.

People used to hide their money in an old stocking in the thatch of the houses.
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 09:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There to enjoy a pleasant time, while other hearts feel sore.
And that will be for years to come, down by the Shannon shore.

(VI)
And now to end this mournful rhyme, I have no more to say.
The cave will be their monument, and that for many a day.
May God reward those guileless souls, and blessings on them pour.
Console their friends who miss them gone, down by the Shannon shore.
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 08:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They knew they could not hold the fight, being then reduced to four.
And they yielded to their enemies, down by the Shannon shore.

(IV)
Their captain was a noble man, with a heart both loyal and bold
He knew that death would be his lot, when the rope went down we're told.
Brave Timothy Lyons it was his name, from a place called Garrignagore
He met his doom in early bloom, down by the Shannon shore.

(V)
Ned Greaney, Mac(?) , and Hataway, in irons soon were bound.
And taken off to Tralee jail, where guilty they were found.
They were placed before the firing squad, which quickly on them poured.
And now they sleep in martyrs' graves down by the Shannon shore.

(VI)
Their comrades sorely miss them gone, though their loss they now deplore.
When strangers come to view the cave, and roam along the shore.
senior member (history)
2019-06-02 08:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following song was written in memory of "Aeroplane Lyons" and his five comrades who stood siege for three days and nights in Clashmealcon Caves during the Civil War.

(I)
It being on a Sunday morning early in the month of Spring,
The rife shots rang in our ears, the chapel bell did ring,
But louder still their shots rang out, you could hear the tender roar
As the ambush it was taking place, down by the Shannon shore.

(II)
In Dunfort's cave they took their stand, the last in Ireland's rights,
Three days and nights with rapid fire they nobly held the fight,
Till worn out without relief, they did at length give o'er
And they gave their lives for Ireland down by the Shannon shore.

(III)
McGrath and Shea were washed away, as the foaming tide did rise,
Their comrades knew that they were doomed, when they heard their drowning cries
senior member (history)
2019-06-01 13:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the coffins in Gortnamara for a night and next day they would bury them down in Malin.
There are two old people in Gortnamara, Michael Collins is aged seventy one and his wife Grace is seventy years. They do not know any Irish and they don't know any stories. There is only one house in ruins in Gortnamara . Most of the people emigrated to America and Scotland. The townland is not mentioned in any songs or sayings.
senior member (history)
2019-06-01 13:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of my townland is Gortnamara. It is situated in south west of the parish of Donagh, Barony of Inishowen, Co Donegal. The number of families in Gortnamara are six and the number of people are twenty.
McCool is the most common name in Gortnamara and the next common name is Doherty. There are six houses in Gortnamara and they are all thatched. There are two rooms in two of the houses and the other four houses have a room and a large kitchen. The reason it was called Gortnamara is, because two hundred years ago they used to rest
senior member (history)
2019-06-01 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of my townland is Carndoagh. It is situated in the north-west of the parish of Donagh Barony of Inishowen, Co Donegal. There are four families in it. The number of people is thirty. The houses are all slated. Two of them are two storey and the others are one storey. It was in Carndoagh. Bishop McColgan hid in the Penal Days. The cave can be seen under
senior member (history)
2019-06-01 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the floor in Willie Campbell's barn Joseph Campbell great grand-father to Willie loosed the horses out of the plough and took him away in time. When the soldiers came and looked in the cave and saw he was gone they said "The nest is warn but the bird is gone". He left him over at Leenan and he got a boat there that left him at Fanad. The bishop said that as long as there would be a Campbell in Carndoagh he would have good luck.
There is a place in Cregamullan called "Bun na hAltora". Mass was said there in penal days. The rock can be still seen. There is a rock in Willie McCandless' field called "Creg na Spainne" because three Spaniards were hung on that rock in Penal Days. The track of the rope can be yet seen.
Susan McDonald is the oldest woman in Carndoagh. She is about eighty years of age. She doesn't know any Irish but she can tell some stories. There were more houses in it in the former times. The name of the people who lived in the houses were McLucas and Doherty. Ned McDonald was the first to emigrate to America. George McLucas hanged himself in Paddy O'Donnell's barn.
senior member (history)
2019-06-01 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
She was thinking the shore to gain,
She took one tear like an old march hare
And went to Dabhag against the wind.

4th verse
The owners names I now mean to mention
They are the Devlins at the Bridgend
Another class of the same sort of men;
They are the Doherty's as they pretend
They may prosper if they ever lost her,
The gallant boat called the Fanag Bréagh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-01 12:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1st Verse

You may aid me with consolation,
Assist my Jean you, till I explain
To sing the praise of a sort of seamen;
That went a ' fishing in the harvest-time;

2nd Verse
One morning early as day was breaking,
This crew and Dennis they did prepare
To main the Fanag in Port a Teanmhala
Those gallant seamen they had gone their
To breast the breeze fresh across the sea;
A silly deed unto unsnare
The breeze came on a little fresher
From the Northway it chanced to blow;
When Peter John from his seat he started,
On the weather bow he began to row;
Johnny lanced out another oar,
And the two were pulling on the weather side,
When Johnny cried out, sine mile murder -
Our bodies soon, will lie in the tide.

3rd Verse
The Fanag flew like an old canoe
senior member (history)
2019-06-01 12:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
37. If you have your clothes off to go swimming and you think it too cold and don't go you are said to "baulk the water" and will get drowned next time you go.
38. When children are bowling marbles to a hole, one fellow gets down on the his knees and makes the sign of the cross before the hole and they say to bring bad luck: "Criss Cross Tom Bawn's ass! " They also "griosc in the last bowl" i.e. swap marbles at the last throw.
39.There's a charm in dead ducks.
40. Rob a bird's nest and you'll get scabs in your hands.
41. Never rear a pigeon 'tis unlucky.
42. Don't pick whitethorn blossom and bring it into the house.
43. Never go into a churchyard except at funeral time.
44. If a sow was going to have bonhams in the morning and you went out the night before and your shoes ripped she'd have no bonham.
45. If you bite the yellow flower of a furze bush the Joe-ees will haunt you that night.
46. If the weather was very good you cut grass in grazie field you'ld have bad luck.
47. Say "Rabbits and Hares" when you get up on first of June and you'll get a present that day.
48. Don't throw away beestings.
50. Never hit a person with an elder stick.
51. They say tisn't right to hit a hedge in the nighttime.
52. You'd never grow if you put a spade or shovel on your shoulder inside in a house.
53. My mother told me that the corncrake is the waterhen in the winter.
54. Sparks flying out of a fire you'll get money.
55. A frog in a house means childbirth.
56. Bless yourself 3 times with a frog and throw him over your head for luck.
57. Two girls stayed up November Night to see the water changing into wine and they died.
58. Fish are more easily seen by night then by day.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
concave on one side and convex on the other, are regarded as being elf-stones.

(Although my own opinions recorded here can hardly be termed folklore, I give them, as they may form a basis of investigation later on for others better fitted to make definite statements on the subject than I.)

Of course it must be understood that some of the elf-stones are flint arrow heads or other flint implements, but as far as I can learn these are usually picked up in the soil. Those bearing the "track of a thumb" are the ones PEOPLE ARE GENERALLY struck with.
When a person sneezes somebody says "God Bless Us" or "Dia linn": if he sneezes a second time "Dia a's Muire Linn," a third time "Dia a's Muire a's Padraig linn" and a fourth time "Dia a's Muire linn a's Padraig a's a Da Aspoil Déag."
If a person sneezes while eating somebody else throws a piece of bread on the floor. The fairies are supposed to be connected with sneezing.
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the borrower until needed by somebody else. It is "not right" to return them without being asked for them.
Even though they are thus always moving about from house to house they still remain the property of the original owner. When a person needs them he goes to the owner who tells him to whom he lent them: this person directs the inquirer further and so on until they are eventually tracked down.
It is worthy of note that they invariably cure the swollen cow who may be swollen for days until she gets the drink of the Saigeadhs
Bualadh Saigead is the name of the disease that attacks the cows. They are supposed to kill the cow by sickness and so carry her away to fairyland.
When a person is struck he or she picks up the stones and preserves them and they are used for cures later on.
That the stones fall or are thrown there is scarcely any doubt and it is possible they are meteorites for any stones having the imprint of a "thumb," that is, roughly
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
fairies.
In olden times people used to see the fairies riding on white horses but they have not been seen here now for over fifty years.
The fairies strike people or cattle with stones - elf-stones. A cow so struck swells and can only be cured by giving her a drink of water in which the stones have been washed. The stones or Saigheads are carefully preserved. Twelve, and a piece of iron generally make up the healing group.
In one bunch I examined I found the majority to be flint arrow heads, some leaf-shaped and others with chipped bases.
The leaf-shaped one was very thin and transparent, the others were stronger and rougher.

(A more detailed account of these Saigeads has already been sent to the Folklore Commission)

When the saigeadhs are borrowed for a sick cow they must be retained by
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
being destroyed.) An iron tongs is put across the cradle if a person is leaving a child alone in it at the twilight. This is to prevent changelings or the substitution of a fairy for the child.

Iron is used with the Elf-stones or "Saigheadhs" when giving a cow afflicted with "Bualadh Saigead" a drink.
Ironstone is never put into a building as it is supposed to be unlucky in a house.
Buildings are never erected on passages, that is fairy passages from one fort or Ráth to another.
A neighbour of mine, Pat McCann, began to build a stable when he was a young lad of about eighteen. He had the work nearly completed when he fell sick with pleurisy. He was removed to hospital and his father threw the new stable to the ground. It was supposed to have been build on a "passage.| The lad recovered after a very lengthy illness.
When people find it necessary to fence across an old road they always leave a gap in the fence for fear of incurring the anger of the
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The belief in fairies is still strong here even amongst the young people who still practice the customs for mollifying the "Good People." There are a number of things which it is "not right to do" and others which it is "right to do."
If a person happens to be eating bread outside at night it is right to throw a piece to the fairies. The first drop that comes from a still (illicit distillation) has to be thrown away otherwise something is bound to happen those engaged at the poteen making or happen the poteen itself.
Scores of instances are cited as proof that this custom must be performed in cases where a person forgot to throw away the first-drop. The fairies must also get the first drop out of a bottle that is being drunk outside at night.
Iron is a great safeguard against the pranks of the wee folk. A piece of iron is put in the barrel of "wash" the preparation for poteen making. (In lightning I believe it saves the wort from
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 14:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the borrower until needed by somebody else. It is "not right" to return them without being asked for them.
Even though they are thus always moving about from house to house they still remain the property of the original owner.When a person needs them he goes to the owner who tells him to whom he lent them: this person directs the inquirer further and so on until they are eventually tracked down.
It is worthy of note that they invariably cure the swollen cow who may be swollen for days until she gets the drink of the Saigeadhs
Bualadh Saigead is the name of the disease that attacks the cows. They are supposed to kill the cow by sickness and so carry her away to fairyland.
When a person is struck he or she picks up the stones and preserves them and they are used for cures later on.
That the stones fall or are thrown there is scarcely any doubt and it is possible they are meteorites for any stones having the imprint of a "thumb," that is, roughly
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 11:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wherever there is a waterfall or cascade the salmon jump from below up and many of them used be killed by men using gaffs. There is a cascade near Barradubh School but rarely are salmon taken there now. There are cascades in the Flesk where White salmon used be netted.
When the water rushes over a cascade it drops to the pool below in the form of a curve leaving a space between itself and the rock as shown in the diagram.

(Diagram)
Rock / Pool
senior member (history)
2019-05-31 11:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When it is known that there are salmon in a pool the fish are sometimes blown up. They are either thrown out on the bank or the concussion burst the gut and they float on the surface. Formerly a jar or bottle was filled with hot lime. Water was poured in and the cork driven home. The bottle was then flung into the pool where it sank. When sufficient gas was formed, if the cork held in position the bottle burst driving the salmon to the surface in a dazed condition where they were gaffed.
In latter years more high explosives are used such as detonated gelegnite. The gelegnite is detonated and a fuse attached. If it is not known that salmon are in the pool a little sand and oil as in the previous article are thrown in. If the salmon are seen the fuse is lighted and the packet thrown into the water. The fisherman then takes cover as tons of water and even stones are thrown up. Sometimes the fish are thrown to the bank or they float in the water where they are gaffed or secured with a "Strokeawl".
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 23:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Starragán is still used in the school district and has been for generations. As it is an illegal way for catching fish the craftsman who makes them does not advertise. They are "set" at nightfall generally and the trout removed early next morning. They are "set" under a "sally" bush or overgrown bank and are not easily detected. They are used principally during the winter when trout leave the rivers and go up small streams to spawn.
An ordinary peck basket is also used for catching trout, but in the day-time. Two generally are employed. One holds the basket at a narrow part of the stream. The other has a stick and he goes along prodding under the bank with the stick. When a trout is touched he rushes off and into the basket. Immediately he goes in the man who is minding it lifts up its mouth and so the fish is trapped. If a man is fishing alone he puts a bundle of grass or hay into the basket and the trout remain under it.
"Prodding" a stream with a stick with
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 23:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a view to getting trout on the move is called Cliobair-ing.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 23:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At various points in nearly every stream the water can be diverted into a field. When the original stream runs dry the trout start to jump in the sand and are picked up. Before the stream is turned the part beyond it higher up the stream is Cliobaired so as to drive the
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 23:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When it is known that a trout is under the bank of a stream in a certain place the fisherman goes on one knee on the bank, puts one hand under the bank and searches along until he touches the fish. The trout is facing the current therefore the tail is the first part touched. Every young fellow who is accustomed to this, can move his hand along the trout barely touching it until his hand is opposite the stout part behind the head. Then he grabs and if the fish "backs" a finger gets into the gills.
When a trout is very big the fisherman takes a fist of grass in his hands and with this it is easier to hold the fish.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 12:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mouth of the burrow for the fourth night. If set at the burrow mouth the first night and a rabbit caught which is almost certain the other rabbits would desert that opening for a long time.
When shooting rabbits if a man is stalking the animal and that the rabbit becomes suspicious and raises his head, if the hunter starts plucking grass with his fingers the rabbit in nine cases out of ten starts to graze again. The belief is that the rabbit thinks a cow is grazing near-by.
Sulphur and red-pepper are used for making rabbits bolt from their burrows. The sulphur and red pepper are put on a piece of wadding which is lighted - The wadding (or packing of a coat) smoulders giving out an awful odour which travels along the burrow and no rabbit can stand it. The rabbits are shot or caught in nets.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Rabbits are snared but the snares are set over the rabbit paths the snare loop being between two and three inches over the ground ans supported on Cipíní . This has been done during the memory of man.
Rabbits are trapped. To trap a rabbit scrape a hole in the earth an put the trap in it covering it with earth but taking care that no earth is between the jaws(?) where they move in they move in the holes. When the rabbit sees the red earth he starts to "root" and is caught. When several rabbits are in one place the trap should be set about a hundred yards from the burrows the first night. If a rabbit is caught the others will not venture out so far the next night so the trap should be brought in a third of the distance and set there. If another rabbit is caught it should be set half ways between that and the burrow for the third time. If again successful it should be set at the
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 12:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to take up the soup but found that it was still in water just as when she had put it down. It was left boil for four hours but never cooked.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 12:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and not more than two hounds are left after a hare. The old hunting rule was that hares were not to be coursed any month that did not contain the letter "R".
When a hare runs into a gullet where he remains or tries to escape into a rabbit burrow or Clochar it is a sign that he is worn out.
Formerly hares were reared as pets and if a remarkably big hare was killed the skin was stuffed and kept as an ornament but neither pets not stuffed hares were allowed in a house where there was a young married woman fearing future children would be born with hare-lips.
Some people do not like hares. The are considered uncanny. A man in Glenflesk came across a hare dragging a snare and the piece of wood to which it has been fastened. He raised a stick to strike the animal when it shouted and he thought the animal said "Mike don't strike me". When a hare is wounded he cries like a person. A man in Glenflesk brought home a hare and it was put boiling. When the woman of the house thought it was boiled she went
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 12:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
going up the mountain one day when a badger jumped out in the path before him. Without thinking Flor drew a kick and struck the badger which turned around smartly and made a snap at the boot. He gripped the loose trouser's leg and top of the boot and tongue with his teeth taking them with him. Fortunately he did not touch the skin. Ever after Flor never interfered with a badger.
senior member (history)
2019-05-30 12:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
* Fíníon Thomáis he was called

is a strong well defined odour from the skin of the badger. This has nearly disappeared about the time of the Badger-Moon.

In Sroneaboy in the parish of Glenflesk lived a man named * Fíníon O'Donoghue. His farm included a mountain. He kept cattle in the mountain and it was the duty of his son Patsy Fíníon to go the hill each day and count the animals. Patsy was this time about eight or nine years old. One day he found two young badgers which he thought were pups and he brought them home. They were under a flat flag when he found them. When his father saw them he became alarmed and accompanied by other men and dogs and armed with pikes the young badgers were returned to the exact place where Patsy had found them.
Seemlingly if they were not returned the young fellow could not go to count the animals for ages as the old badgers would find the smell of the young ones from him and attack him. Nearing seventy years of age Patsy died about ten years ago. He had a younger brother named Flor Fíníon who when a young man was .....

(There was a cure in the flesh of the badger. If after her confinement a mother did not regain her usual strength she was restored to health and vigour by eating Badger flesh boiled with cabbage. But if she found the flesh too strong the cabbage alone restored her.
This information is supplied by Donnchadh Ua Conaill O.S. Scoil an Bharra Dhuibh, Cíll Áirne. His mother who lives at Beárna(?) Glenflesk remembers when the cure was resorted to)
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 18:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(There was a cure in the flesh of the badger. If after her confinement a mother did not regain her usual strength she was restored to health and vigour by eating Badger flesh boiled with cabbage. But if she found the flesh too strong the cabbage alone restored her.
This information is supplied by Donnchadh Ua Conaill O.S. Scoil an Bharra Dhuibh, Cíll Áirne. His mother who lives at Beárna(?) Glenflesk remembers when the cure was resorted to)
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 17:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
rapidly down hill the tail protecting his face. His front legs are shorter than the others and when going down hill adopts this method of travelling.
When skinned and cleaned the flesh was put into pickle for six weeks before being used. The skin was nailed to a door until dried when it was a very nice foot mat, but it took ages to dry because of all the fat in it. The hairs or bristles grow far into the skin.
Just like the famous hares there were famous badgers too and great contests between good badgering dogs. There are places named from the badger thus you have in Glenflesk "Coimín a' Bhruic" and "The Badger's Den".
Badgers seem to have been more numerous in the last century when they were killed regularly because fields near the mountains were often rendered unfit for grazing the badgers having done so much rooting and badger hunts used be organised just as pigeon drives are organised on the Kenmare Estate woods at the present day.
The badger is supposed to have no back-bone. When out of season there...

(There were two breeds of badgers - the Pig Badger and Dog Badger. Only the Pig Badger was eaten. When killed during the Badger Moon in November - he was four stone weight and mud fat)
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 17:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Foxes have a den and have lived for years at Corhill Headfort Killarney about a mile and a half from Barradubh School. Though young ones are seen year after year near the den the number of grown foxes has not increased. It is said when the young ones are reared the old ones take them away and "settle" them in some other district. The neighbours do not interfere with them and they never do any harm locally.
When the fox kills a bird which is heavy like a geese he grabs the bird by the head and twists under her neck getting the body to rest on his shoulder and he doesn't eat the food till he reaches his den, then sharing it with "all at home". Indeed it would appear as if the old fox feeds the young ones while the parent goes hungry.
There was a fox den in a place called Rossalia overlooking Lough Guitane in the parish of Glenflesk, Co. Kerry. Beside it (and not more than half a mile away) lived a man named Jim Spillane. One Sunday a fox which must have been mad from hunger came into Spillane's yard and took away a hen. He was coursed by a
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 17:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dog and only dropped the hen dead, near the den. Spillane poisoned the hen immediately leaving her where she had been dropped.
A few days later the litter of four woolly cubs were dead outside the den and the old foxes were still to be seen.
I should have mentioned that a few hours after having been poisoned, the hen had disappeared. It would appear that the old fox had returned and taken in the hen never tasting it. This was only about twenty three years ago and I saw the four dead cubs.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 17:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Foxes have a den and have lived for years at Corhill Headfort Killarney about a mile and a half from Barradubh School. Though young ones are seen year after year near the den the number of grown foxes has not increased. It is said when the young ones are reared the old ones take them away and "settle" them in some other district. The neighbours do not interfere with them and they never do any harm locally.
When the fox kills a bird which is heavy like a geese he grabs the bird by the head and twists under her neck getting the body to rest on his shoulder and he doesn't eat the food till he reaches his den, then sharing it with "all at home". Indeed it would appear as if the old fox feeds the young ones while the parent goes hungry.
There was a fox den in a place called Rossalia overlooking Loughguitane in the parish of Glenflesk, Co. Kerry. Beside it (and not more than half a mile away) lived a man named Jim Spillane. One Sunday a fox which must have been mad from hunger came into Spillane's yard and took away a hen. He was coursed by a
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 17:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
rat traps were set in the bog and straw scattered about. For days at a time the geese avoided the straw but eventually were tempted.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 17:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the Landlords shot the game in the parish they sometimes, during hard weather when wild geese were in the bogs, brought an artificial cow, hollow on the inside and having windows on the side through which the birds were fired at. A man or two with guns took the "cows" on their backs and keeping "on the point of the wind" so that the birds would not scent them they moved along imitating the movements of a cow until they came within a shot of the wild geese. It was rarely they succeeded. Local "poachers" would get into a drain and walk almost covered with water to get a shot of a wild goose or they made a hole in the side of a rick of turf and await their chance.
Geese were often trapped. Traps like
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 11:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He has nails about three inches long in his paws and he fights with these using his teeth only when overpowered. When cornered he fought his way to a rock putting his back to it. His bones are very very narrow and he is all joints. He can used his paws with great dexterity hitting sideways as well as in front and as the tops of the claws are hooked a little if he struck a dog about the forehead he stripped the skin off to the nose and that dog went home crying.
When badgers were hunted for the sake of their flesh the huntsmen assisted the dogs in killing. Some dogs were so accustomed to them that while one was facing the badger another got over him up and jumped at him gripping him by the neck.
The badger has a tail of about four or five inches long and under it is a little pocket about two inches deep. The butt of the tail is stout and strong. When hunted he tries to get above his den. He rolls himself into a ball with his nose in the pocket under his tail and rolls
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 11:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
known where the "Clocharachán praties" were and during the daytime there was a look out for the badger's rooting. He nosed down into the ground or scraped it up with his claws to a depth of about three inches and he did no unnecessary rooting. Next night a party of men and dogs set off well after nightfall according to the time the moon came out. The men wore leggings and carried strong sticks because when cornered the badger is a terribly fierce animal and unlike the otter he sticks to what he catches until he is killed. The otter let go his hold when he hears a bone breaking.
The huntsmen scatter in all directions because the badger does not hide like other animals but runs off. When the men and dogs are scattered someone is sure to find the game.
When the badger was found a shout was raised and generally the dog which found him barked because it was rare to find a dog prepared to attack a badger alone. All the dogs were left attack him and he often fought his way for a mile or longer often escaping.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 11:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This was a favourite sport a hundred years ago and continued up to the beginning of the present century. In some localities it continued even later but is rarely heard
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 11:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of now-a-days. The badger lives in a burrow and is commoner in the mountains then in the lowlands. When in the lowlands he makes his own of a rabbit burrow which he enlarges. When meat was scarce in the last century badgers were eaten and when properly cured was boiled with cabbage to which it gave the same flavour as bacon. Even after it was no longer eaten it used to be boiled for the sake of flavouring the cabbage.
The sport was called "badgering" and started about November when what was known as the Badger Moon appeared. The badger comes out after nightfall and travels to the fields where he roots down into the earth for what are called "Clocharachán praties". These are like potatoes but are only about the size of a large marble. In the Summer they throw up a stalk of six or seven inches which flowers and are then more or less tasteless. But in winter they are very sweet and school boys dig them up and eat them.

When the badger-moon appeared in the sky a hunting party was organised. It was
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 11:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
skin until his hunger is satisfied.
Formerly when meat and fish were scarce people used to be on the look out for "salmon after the otter". If not much eaten the part untouched was cut off and taken home for food. But often what looked like a fine fresh salmon was only skin and bones.
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 11:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are some otter trappers in the parish but the greatest was Patsy Donoghue (Patsy Jack) of Curreal, Glenflesk Co Kerry. At the age of about seventy five he died about ten or twelve years ago.
The otter trap is at least three feet long and has powerful jaws which have cloth twisted about them so that they would not cut off an otters leg. Otters come out of the water and run along the sand wherever there is a bend in the river and a tráigh. He
senior member (history)
2019-05-29 11:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
takes a short cut across to the stream again. His tracks are plainly visible and it is here the trap is set and must be well nigh invisible. The otter must walk blindly into it. Otters are terribly savage when wounded. On one occasion Patsy Jack trapped one. A younger brother put a basket over the animal but the creature gripped the first Buinne of the basket and tore it asunder.
When an otter catches a grip with his teeth he holds to it until he hears a bone breaking. The old hunters used to wear leggings inside which were packed cinders. If the otter bit the person he would hear the cinders crush and let go the hold thinking a bone was broken.
In the present century from about 1905 to 1910 the local river were hunted by packs of otter-hounds brought by visitors to Killarney in huge horse drawn vans.
Otters kill many salmon during the winter. They catch the fish by the tail. The salmon turns and runs down stream dragging the otter until at last the fish becomes exhausted when he is dragged ashore and eaten. The otter starts to eat the neck and continues back along inside the
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 20:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tagann lá Féile Stiofáin indiaidh lá Nodhlag. Sin é lá an Dreolín. Déanann na daoine bosga bheaga don dreóilín agus fágann siad puill bheaga ar an mbosga sa gcaoi go mbeidh aer isteach aige. Tugann na páiste beaga leó an bosga annsin agus imthigheann siad leó agus tosuigheannn siad ag cuartú ins na claidheacha agus i mbun-tsop an tighe agus má fhághann siad an dreóilín cuireann siad isteach ins an mbosga é agus cuireannn siad a mbéal isteach leis an mbosga agus tosuigheann siad ag casadh amhráin:-

Dreoilín, Dreoilín Rí na n-éan,
Lá Fhéil' Stiofán do gabhadh an t-éan
Is mór é a mhuinntir agus is beag é fhéin
Agus dhá mbeadh gunna agam chaithfinn é

Téigheann siad ó theach go teach annsin agus an port sin ar siubhal aca agus tugann muinntir an bhaile airgead dóibh.
Nuair a bhíonn sé na tráthnóna scaoileann siad amach an dreoilín agus téigheann siad ag an siopa agus ceannuigheann siad milseáin agus bíonn siad sásta tar éis an lae.

Ní bhíonn aon "láir bhán" acu san áit seo. Ní théigheann tart leis an dreóilín acht na buachaillí beaga agus corr-dhuine acu sin féin.
T. O'S
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 20:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was laid on the broad shoulders of Tom Kelliher a tailor who lived at Tullig and who for many years presided over the destiny of the Wren.
Tom's head enveloped in an Agaidh Fidil protruded from the centre of the horse's back. With him was an array of dancers - boys dressed in straw with false faces, a wren bush carrier, a drummer and a flute player. They danced from village to village and collected money while the Láir Bhán opened and shut its mouth often lifting a shawl or a man's had. At the end of the day the whole company retired to a public house, and at night all adjourned to Kelliher's house where they danced and feasted until the following morning.
As time went on the "wren" performers gradually dropped the straw costume and dressed in ladies' clothes giving a highly comical effect.
I heard recently that the wren's boys in Castlegregory do a play of Shakespeare's while making the tour.

In the eighties servants male and female were always barefoot except on Sundays. Farmers' boys in the Báiníní.

Cowhouses and stables were strewn with sea-sand. A common sight was that of a farmer's son or servant sitting driving a sand cart and singing a song from a ballad purchased at the latest fair. When spring tide brought in a quantity of sea-weed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 20:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Beside Cloongrehawn is a hill called KNOCK.
Donal or Donal's Hill. It is so called because a man named Donal lived there.

CILL CILLÍN (?) is the name of graveyard about a mile below Cootehall. There was a church there long ago. Nothing now remains save the stones which are thrown in little heaps. It is from those little heaps that it gets its name "Cill Cillín" or "the church of the clusters of stones".
Cloon-Cooscar which borders Moigh is a small townland. The proper name for it is "Cluain Coscartha". This means the meadow of the slushy ground. The land of this townland is of a wet nature and it was from this it got its name. This name is now gone out of existance.
Cryanstown got its name from the people who lived there. They were Cryans and they were so numerous that the place where they lived took its name from them. None of the Cryans now remain but they are remembered in the name Cryan'stown.
Druim an Iolar which means Mount Eagle is a very high hill overlooking Shanballybawn Lake.
"Lochíll" or "Longfuil" now called Loughill, is situated on a hill overlooking the lake.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 20:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a convent. The river is called by this name because there was convent near the river.
Annagh meaning a pass was so called because there is a pass across the bogs in this place by which the people went to town.

DRUMSILLAGH is so called because the clay in the district is of a very dirty and dauby nature. Some maintain that the name is "Drum Sáileach, as "sally" rods or bushes grew in abundance here.

POWELLS HILL was so called because a man named Powell was killed there.

FOXHILL was so called because the foxes made their home there in the rocks. They lived there many years ago. They were so numerous that the townland was given the name "Foxhill".

LOUGH EIDEN was so called because a saint named Eiden lived near it. She is now buried in Tumna. The name for LAPHOIL IS "Leamh Coill" which means the wood of the elm trees. "Loughill" was the old name of the school named from the townland "Loughill".

About a mile below Cootehall is a place called CLOONGREHAWN. The old Irish name for it is "Cluain Grianan" or "the meadow of the sun". It is an old hill and it is so called because the sun shines on all of it from it rises in the morning till it sets in the evening.

The word "Laphoil" of recent origin was considered to sound better than "Loughill". Hence Canon Kelly named the present school building Laphoil in 1884.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 19:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Phonetic form of local place-names

"CLEHEEN" or "Cliathan" in Irish means hurdles. Those hurdles were marking a ford which was made across the lake from Cleheen to Toomna. The people used to go across this ford on their way to Carrick on Shannon.

CILLEEN is the name of a place in the townland of Churchill. It means a little church. There was a church there at one time .

MOIGH or "Mag" meaning a plain. This townland is all one plain and that is how it got its name.

CLOIGNE meaning skulls. There were a lot of skulls found in the vicinity and thereby it got its name.

There was a man named Coote living in a castle in COOTEHALL. The townland was called after him. COTTAGIN(?) or Carragin meaning little rocks is the name of a place below Cootehall. There are a lot of little rocks in the place. Shanballybawn or the old old white wall. There was an old white wall in this place.

CLOONFAD or long meadow is the name of a townland in which there is a very long field.

CLOGHER or CLOTAR meaning
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 12:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the river for final rinsing. They were placed on stones in the river bed and the water was allowed to flow over them till they were quite clean.
All the wooden utensils belonging to the dairy were brought another day and scoured with river sand till the wood was white, and the iron hoops shone like silver.
This was a social gathering where births, deaths, and marriages and all that was worth talking about were discussed. The workers were generally surrounded by children who went to hear the news.
The advent of zinc milk pans put an end to this social function. The washing (public) process ceased about the same time.

There was a wonderful spring well just outside the village. In dry seasons people had to bring their carts to this well for water - some living over a mile away. The well was arched over; two steep steps led down to it. It was quite possible for four people to stand on the lower step and be under Cover. This was also a great gossiping centre.

Bridget McLoughlin age 57
National Teacher (7.1.1938)(?)

The information in the preceeding pages was obtained from Mrs. Johanna Crowley (Dougherty) Nat. Teacher at Castlegregory till about 1890. The information was received between 1885 and 1900. Happenings and customs between those 15 years took place in the memory of the present writer.
B.M.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 12:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
farmers and their boys had to go out knee deep in the water often in the night time, and by the light of the moon capture with pikes and bring ashore sea-weed to manure the land. They were obliged to walk back sometimes a few miles by the side of the cart of seaweed in dripping flannels, only to return for another load without changing clothes.
This was what a farmer considered his hardest work, and the ambitions of every poor farmer was to have a son old enough to "keep him from the sea".

Up to 1887, there were few farms which did not contain a Lios. Up to that time no one would disturb the Lios. By 1900, all the Lioses had disappeared, and the plough had gone over their Sites.

Up to 1887 a fair quantity of wheat was grown, each year after that the wheat crop was reduced, until in 1900 only two farmers (in Killiney) grew wheat and had it milled for their own use. In former times when wheat was being threshed people of the house boiled the grain in water with a little sugar - Gráinseachán they called it. It was a little luxury for threshers. Some of the wheat was roasted with sugar. Children brought tins full of this to school to share among their friends.
On Summer afternoons the village girls brought washed clothes in "cools" - half tubs with upright wooden handles
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 12:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was laid on the broad shoulders of Tom Kelliher a tailor who lived at Tullig and who for many years presided over the destiny of the Wren.
Tom's head enveloped in an Agaidh Fidil protruded from the centre of the horse's back. With him was an array of dancers - boys dressed in straw with false faces, a wren bush carrier, a drummer and a flute player. They danced from village to village and collected money while the Láir Bhán opened and shut its mouth often lifting a shawl or a man's had. At the end of the day the whole company retired to a public house, and at night all adjourned to Kelliher's house where they danced and feasted until the following morning.
As time went on the "wren" performers gradually dropped the straw costume and dressed in ladies' clothes giving a highly comical effect.
I heard recently that the wren's boys in Castlegregory do a play of Shakespeare's while making the tour.

In the eighties servants male and femal were always barefoot except on Sundays. Farmers' boys in the Báiníní.

Cowhouses and stables were strewn with sea-sand. A common sight was that of a farmer's son or servant sitting driving a sand cart and singing a song from a ballad purchased at the latest fair. When spring tide brought in a quantity of sea-weed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 12:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the castle were finally removed about the eighties of the last century (19th), by the farmer who owned the field and who lived in the Banndrach. Archdeacon Rowan - (Protestant) one day visited the scene and noticed in Murphy's cow-house, forming part of the doorway a very remarkable stone which the Archdeacon recognised as one belonging to an entrance in the Castle. The minister bought the stone from Murphy andcit lay for years in the grounds of the parochial house (Protestant) in Tralee.

In the Banndrach also lived an old man Moriarty - Donncadh the Nailer - the last man to practise this trade. I think he died about 1887. He had a daughter a dressmaker who made St. Patrick's Day Crosses of the scraps of dress material and trimmings. The crosses about 4 inches each way were sold for a penny, and two pence, and were worn by little girls on the left shoulder on St. Patsrick's day. The boys wore green rosettes. Maggie Moriarty went to America, and fashion of wearing these crosses died out with her departure.

On St Stephen's Day the wren celebrations were known as the Lair Bhán. A wooden frame representing the back of a horse, with a neck and head (resembling those of a girraffe) attached was covered with a white sheet. This arrangement
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 09:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When I was born in 1881, all the grandmother generation could speak Irish. But the big bulk of my mother's generation did not know Irish. Some who lived among old Irish speakers could understand Irish and translate it.
Dingle was referred to as Duibhneach, and was spoken of as a very backward place - nothing to be heard there but Irish. To the Dingle people those at Castlegregory side of the mountain were referred to as Litireach. I have recently spoken to a number of Dingle people who never heard the words Duibhneach and Litireach.
At the foot of Conor Hill Castlegregory side where hill road rises towards Dingle sometime in the Seventies (19th cent.) were two cabins - homes of herders - one family was O'Donnell Branch. I forget the name of the other family. The two families were always quarrelling. One morning O'Donnell was found murdered. The hand of the dead man had clasped tightly in it a little corner of a shawl. The people of the neighbouring house were at once suspected. The sergeant of the police Sheridan, I think was his name entered the cabin of the suspected party. The woman of the house was sitting in the kitchen. When the policeman entered she shot a frightened glance towards the cupboard in the wall near the fire.
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 09:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the early eighties two brothers - "Whelan" one a fiddler and the other a dancing master visited the village and trained the young men for a brass band.
There was at that time a "dancing" school every winter which was attended by all youths and maidens of the village.

Many poor people in the eighties also grew a few "sally" bushes to make baskets. Paddy McKenna who lived in the village made potato baskets. He first put a kind of frame in the ground in the garden. Then he placed just outside this a number of upright sally twigs then he pleated in the cross twigs. After this he removed the frame, finished off the circular part (bottom of the basket) and completed the outer edge with stronger twigs. These baskets were sold at one shilling each.

Bridget McLoughlin
Age. 57
Born at Castlegregory and lived there till 1901
Barony - Corkaguiney
8.1.1939
Present address Kenmare Convent Kerry
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 09:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When I was born in 1881, all the grandmother generation could speak Irish. But the big bulk of my mother's generation did not know Irish. Some who lived among old Irish speakers could understand Irish and translate it.
Dingle was referred to as Duibhneach, and was spoken of as a very backward place - nothing to be heard there but Irish. To the Dingle people those at Castlegregory side of the mountain were referred to as Litireach. I have recently spoken to a number of Dingle people who never heard the words Duibhneach and Litireach.
At the foot of Conor Hill Castlegregory side where hill road rises towards Dingle sometime in the Seventies (19th cent.) were two cabins - homes of herders - one family was O'Donnell Branch. I forget the name of the other family. The two families were always quarrelling. One morning O'Donnell was found murdered. The hand of the dead man had clasped tightly in it a little corner of a shawl. The people of the neighbouring house were at once suspected. The sergeant of the police Sheridan, I think was his name entered the cabin of the suspected party. The woman of the house was sitting in the kitchen. When the policeman entered she shot a frightened glance towards the cupboard in the w
senior member (history)
2019-05-28 09:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The glance did not escape the policeman who went at once to the cupboard and found in it a shawl with a little corner missing. He inserted the piece found in the hand of the dead man into the missing corner. It fitted perfectly and completed the pattern.
The woman Caitín something was condemned to death. But as she was about to become a mother the sentence was commuted to Penal Servitude. I think to Tasmania. No more was heard of her after that in the village. The two cabins were deserted. The remaining O'Donnells went to America. The sight of the cabins is still pointed out.

Very poor people such as Lord Ventry's pensioners were always careful to grow in their little gardens a patch of onions. These were eaten raw with potatoes and salt. These poor people as well as tradesmen were the first to have tea and "flour" bread for morning and evening meals.
The poor farmers were the last to give up potatoes and milk for the three meals. About 1890 tea and "flour" bread had become universal. The land and Home Rule agitation together with the advent of a railway to the villages killed the last remnant of the "Middle Ages".
Marriages were performed on Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and rarely on Sunday. All other days were unlucky.
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 21:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Outside Castlegregory there was a bothairín leading from the upper end of the New Road to the Station Road. It was called Bothar na gCrainn, but there were no trees there in my time. At a corner of the old road was a heap of loose stones, and children never passed that spot without adding to the pile lest the Fairies or good people might take revenge for the neglect. It appears that an old man was one day walking along the road and dropped dead in this spot.
About the year 1890, a girl named Maunsell, living at Coolroe, went outside the door one winter night, and was struck with a paralytic seizure. The child was about ten years old, and lay helpless in bed for four or five years. The illness was always referred to as "Fairy stroke". After some years she recovered sufficiently to walk with a stick.
The village of Castlegregory is shaped somewhat. At one spot in the curved street a small lane leads off towards the east. This lane was known to the old people as the "Banndrach". At the end of the lane was a gate leading to a field. It was in this field that the Castle stood, which gave its name to the village. It was built by Gregory Hussey and is mentioned in Histories of Kerry. Sydney and Spenser passed a few nights within its walls on their way from Tralee to Smerwick in the time of James Fitzmorris Fitzgerald. The remains of
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 21:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Between the years '95 and 1900 great shoals of mackerel arrived in Brandon bay, ad were often sold to local curers (in Dingle) at 2 shillings per 120.
Curing of the fish was carried out in Dingle both by Armericans and by local people, and a considerable number of barrels was need. A barrel full of cured fish which cost 4/5 was sold in America for 10 shillings.
The coopers of Castlegregory, Casey and Fitzgerald who had a little capital started barrel making and did very well. Sometimes they made and stored barrels for two years, and the whole stock was got rid of in a month or two. Now fish seems to have deserted that coast.
At the entrance to Stradbally, from the east on the left hand side of the 'upper' road was a gallan. In the distance it resembled a woman with a child in her arms, but on near approach the resemblance ceased. It was clearly the headstone of a grave at the foot of which were a few small stones inserted in the ground.
At the entrance to Aughacasla village from the west at the left hand side of the road was another gallan. It was said this was a stone thrown by Finn Mac Cumhail from the top of Cathair Cum Rí (about four miles or more away) at a flying bird.
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 21:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On Holy Thursday, people were busy picking sleadhacháin(?) or sladdy a kind of sea grass. This was boiled and bittled for several hours and made a very pleasant drink for the Good Friday dinner, when no milk eggs or butter could be used.
By 1890 neither cockles nor sladdy could be got. Up to this year also wheat or barley or oats or rye was winnowed in a (bodhrán) or dildarn a sort of circular wooden vessel with a sheepskin bottom. It was held over the head on a windy day and shaken until the chaff had gone with the wind and the grain remained.
About this year three farmers were able to procure winnowing machines, which were lent gratis to the whole neighbourhood.
Soon after this the threshing machine arrived.

Up to 1905 there was one weaver in the village, Robert Downse. His customers came chiefly from the mountain villages in the neighbourhood of Aughacasla.
Home-made flannel was sold on fair days by the bandle. This measure looked something like a yard measure.
There were four coopers in the village. The advent of butter buyers and zinc pans ruined this trade. The last of these Robert Casey died about three years ago (1936) aged 104.
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 21:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was soon abandoned.
A great quantity of 'wreck' timber was often cast ashore on the Maharees and the Islands.
Between 1887 and 1893 the writer remembers three wrecks on Brandon Bay. The Charger laden with timber was wrecked at Cill Seanaigh. The bodies of the crew were washed ashore. All perished. Mr McCowen of Tralee bought the greater part of the timber which took months to remove. This was a three-masted ship.
The Catherine Richards which was seen in difficulties in Brandon Bay was driven into Ballyheigue and wrecked while the bodies of the crew were found in Castlegregory Strand.
On Jan 1st 1894 The Port Yarrock had dragged two anchors into the terrible breakers of Brandon Bay. The pilot went to the rescue, but the Captain would not desert the ship. The former regained the strand with difficulty. Immediately after the crew sent out signals of distress. It was then too late. The sailors lashed themselves to the masts, which at one moment rose perpendicular, next touched the waves on the right, then rose upright, only to touch the waves on the left.
The sight was terrible. Nothing could be done. A message was sent to the Dingle coastguard. But all was over when they arrived. The masts broke, and the unfortunate men were first
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 21:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
severely injured, and finally drowned. As far as I can remember fourteen men were washed ashore, not all at the same time. Relatives of some arrived from England and Wales. All coffins were shouldered to Killiney a mile distant, and the village people made and put on the coffins artificial wreaths. The strangers could not express their surprise and gratitude to the local people whose kindness had overwhelmed them.
A nice monument erected by the relatives of the sailors now marks their last resting place.
The ship (3 masted) was laden with copper. Messrs. McCowen Ltd again bought the cargo, which was being extracted bit by bit at low tide. The operations were still in progress in 1911.
Soon after this ship had been wrecked a coastguard station was established at Brandon, and remained till the Great War when all hands were needed for Britain's navy.
There lived at Coolroe a family of O Neills whose main occupation was to gather cockles at Clahane, boil them and then sell the shelled product in the village at 1d per pint. Outside O Neills house was a precipice over a little stream. The cockle shells were thrown here. In the course of years there was made a fine bank of shells. Future geologists may think of some sudden inundation of the sea here.
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was soon abandoned.
A great quantity of 'wreck' timber was often cast ashore on the Maharees and the Islands.
Between 1887 and 1893 the writer remembers three wrecks on Brandon Bay. The Charger laden with timber was wrecked at Cill Seanaigh. The bodies of the crew were washed ashore. All perished. Mr McCowen(?) of Tralee bought the greater part of the timber which took months to remove. This was a three-masted ship.
The Catherine Richards which was seen in difficulties in Brandon Bay was driven into Ballyheigue and wrecked while the bodies of the crew were found in Castlegregory Strand.
On Jan 1st 1894 The Port Yarrock had dragged two anchors into the terrible breakers of Brandon Bay. The pilot went to the rescue, but the Captain would not desert the ship. The former regained the strand with difficulty. Immediately after the crew sent out signals of distress. It was then too late. The sailors lashed themselves to the masts, which at one moment rose perpendicular, next touched the waves on the right, then rose upright, only to touch the waves on the left.
The sight was terrible. Nothing could be done. A message was sent to the Dingle coastguard. But all was over when they arrived. The masts broke, and the unfortunate men were first
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 20:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
near the island is the ruin of an old church (Cill- Seanaigh).
People had a belief in mermaids and many old people thought they had seen them. It was probably the presence of seals gave rise to this belief.
Schools of porpoise could be seen occasionally sporting in Tralee Bay. The writer of this account was once presented with a slice of what seemed to be cooked bacon with a fishy taste. It was porpoise. Dilisk was collected on the Strand (Strapallach) and sold when dried in Tralee and in Cork.
On the islands (off the Maharees) a superior kind which fetched a higher price was found - shell dilisk. The mussel shells were left attached the dilisk to show the genuineness of the article. Many people took the dilisk as an aperient.
Carragin Moss was also collected and dried; then taken to Cork to be sold.
At spring tide a great many poor people gathered from the wrack a species of sea weed - light thin ribbon bands about 1/4 in. width. This was then washed in the river which flowed into the sea (Sean Abhainn) and when dried was used for ticks, pillows and bolsters. It was renewed each year. [Sivy / Swy (?] was the name given to this particular weed.
Mr James O Donnell of Castlegregory, a shopkeeper started a small factory for the manufacture of kelp from sea-weed. The business did not pay. So the work
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 20:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
at the head of the bed. It was not until about 1895 that people adopted the custom of bringing the remains to the Church on the second night.
When the remains were removed from the house, chairs, tables and stools were turned upside down till after the funeral to prevent a death within the next twelve months.
The clothes of the deceased had to be worn three Sundays at Mass by somebody.
It was considered lucky that where possible the bearers of the coffin should be of the same name as the deceased.
I once saw a stone brought with great secrecy to a priest (Rev. James Crowley, a native of the village). The stone was round with edges water worn and centre slightly hollow; carved on it was a chalice with a host above it and rays proceeding from it on all sides. The work was nicely executed, and I believe it had been found on Leary's Island (Oileán an tSeanaigh) near the Maharees. Fr Crowley died in 1906 in Ardfert. I never heard what became of the Stone. The deceased priest had cherished it very much. (On the island there are the remains of beehive cells, and a church; the rude altar of which was in position in 1900. A graveyard was attached. Many mounds were to be seen in it. For many years (previous to 1900 only infants were buried there. On the mainland
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 17:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
townland gets its name from a hillock which is situated in the middle of the townland. At the foot of the height lived a man named Da.
Ardoughter means upper height. Boherbawn means white road.
Kilmore means the townland of the big Church. It is said that there were seven Churches there long ago.
Lioseen (?) was a name of a field in Clashmealcon. There was a man by the name of (?) killed there he was a whiteboy and he was pursued by the yeomen and he was
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 17:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mountain of the peak of the rabbits because now as in former days there are a lot of rabbits found there.
Benduff means the black mountain. The land here has a black appearance.
Ballyduff means the black village. About the year 1812 when the Pressgang were coming into the village. The inhabitants ran away and the soldiers burned it down and when the inhabitants returned and saw the smoke rising from the cabins they called it Baile Dubh (black village)
Ardagh means Das or Daithi's height. The
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 17:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Slievadara means the mountain of the dogs. It was not known why the townland got its name. It was a favourite resort of the fox about fifty or sixty years ago, and the landlords of the different estates around came here with hounds hunting the fox.

Addergown means between two rivers Idir dhá Abhainn and so it is. There is a river in the east and a river in the west of the townland.
Beencuneen means the
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 17:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pinkeen - a little fish
Maol cow - a polly(?)
Búdog - a slap on the ear
Keebín - heather turf
Cappóg / Scutch - dock, grass
Suggán - a horse's collar
Bonamh - a pig
Cailar(?) - a tub
Spág - big feet

Theigatar(?) - men who visit the houses on Hallow Eve

Praiseach / Prashah - weed (charlock)
Bodhar - bothered / deaf
Col Ceannan / Cally - new potatoes bruised up
Dudeen - an old clay pipe
Clannish - very devoted to one another
Clout - a rag
Bout - a turn of sickness
Cuit - to the cat
Crandy - a basket
Scolb - sticks used in thatching
Móinín / Caish - a marshy place
Camallayah - a party
Scailtin - a yellow bird
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 17:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Beanshide - a woman fairy
Ceilide - visit a person
Shoneen - person with a tendency towards England
Praoisir bog - soft butter
Leprechaun - small little man
Amadan - fool
Crúisgín - jug
Cuiteóg - left handed
Fallóg - land ploughed
Ciaróg - she eats no ciarogs (she's no fool)
Tioc tioc - calling hens
Boirin - a little road
Alannah / Mavourneen - a little child
Scib - a basket
Spud - a potato
Drumán - a back strap
Fraocáin (frauhans) - berries growing in a bog
Lasset - chest for meal
Lasset - bread, board
Scudán - herring
Gonc - a disappointment
Gob - shut your gob
Smig - beard
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 16:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Poirin - a small potato
Scillan - rubbish of seed
Scillet - a pot
Griseach - hot ashes
A Vic - boy
Dreoillin - weak delicate
Muirnin - a boy who is small and cute
Acushla / Asthore mo Chroidhe - term of endearment
Duirnín - a handle of a scythe
Trithín - a slane
Buail-in - walk in
Caibin - a cap
Cliabh - a basket
Cish - a turf basket
Brag - a boat
Puch turf - soft turf
Granóg - a hedgehog
Seanbruitte - old boiled
Pisherog - superstition
Girsha - girl
Caire Pucka - mushrooms
Galore - lots
Flathoola - kind and generous
Maryah - I don't think
Púcka - a fairy
senior member (history)
2019-05-27 16:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Koshier - ploughed land, meadowed after
Praskeen - an apron
Ciotal - a kettle
Puncan - knoll - hillock
Buacaill - boy
Gosoon - boy
Garahallayah - girl
Buacaillán - weed (yellow flower)
Tranin - drong grass
Méirín - finger for a sore finger
Cipin - a stick
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 20:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Go mbeannuightear dhíbh a lucht na Scafula
Na tugaidh Faillighe inbhúr gcás

Is mairg a bhíonn gan caraid luighe go lag ar leaba a a bháis

A Pheacaigh bhoicht gan ciall ná dein bréagh le Muire

Na h-ith Feóil Dé Chéadaoin agus ná h-éagchaoin bheith tuirseach

Dein do shiothcháin le Mac Dé agus beidh tu ag Féasta ag is na Leinbh

Chuaidh Muire is a Mac amach sa Lá

Chonnacadar cúcha St Simon ag teacht agus é beannuighthe ón Róimh

Shín sé cuige Scapular na mBrainnse Óir
Crios Muire mo Chriost. Crios na gCeithre gCros
Crios na gCeithre mBeann. Crios ar rugadh Críost ann
O A Mhuire feac ar airtigeal a bháis
Ó Feach Féin air a Mhich ó ós agat atá

Níl aoinne a dhearfaidh mo phaidir gach aon Maidin Luain

Ná beidh Flaitheas Dé mar dhualgas agus a iarraidh le fághail

A Mhaighdin Ghlórmhar Bháin le Feiscint trí lá roimh a bhás

A Mhaighdin Ghlórmhar bháin dein fuasgailt ar mo chás

Anois agus ar uair mo bháis.

Seamas E. MacMathghamhna
Cabhar,
Sráid na Cathrach
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 20:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Go mbeannuightear dhíbh a lucht na Scafula
Na tugaidh Faillighe inbhúr gcás

Is mairg a bhíonn gan caraid luighe go lag ar leaba a a bháis

A Pheacaigh bhoicht gan ciall ná dein bréagh le Muire

Na h-ith Feóil Dé Chéadaoin agus ná h-éagchaoin bheith tuirseach

Dein do shiothcháin le Mac Dé agus beidh tu ag Féasta ag is na Leinbh

Chuaidh Muire is a Mac amach sa Lá

Chonnacadar cúcha St Simon ag teacht agus é beannuighthe ón Róimh

Shín sé cuige Scapular na mBrainnse Óir
Crios Muire mo Chriost. Crios na gCeithre gCros
Crios na gCeithre mBeann. Crios ar rugadh Críost ann
O A Mhuire feac ar airtigeal a bháis
Ó Feach Féin air a Mhich ó ós agat atá

Níl aoinne a dhearfaidh mo phaidir gach aon Maidin Luain

Ná beidh Flaitheas Dé mar dhualgas agus a iarraidh le fághail

A Mhaighdin Ghlórmhar Bháin le Feiscint tgrí lá roimh a bhás

A Mhaighdin Ghlórmhar bháin dein fuasgailt ar mo chás

Anois agus ar uair mo bháis.

Seamas E. MacMathghamhna
Cabhar,
Sráid na Cathrach
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 20:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ÁIT-AINMNEACHA
List of the names of fields in my townland -
An Currach
Baile-Mhaich
An Cuilín
Gar na Dóibe
Flúir
Páirc na Móna
Páirc a Chapaill - (bíonn an capall sa pháirc seo igcomhnuidhe)
Gairidhe Chaol
Páirc Mhór
Moineirín
Gort Dubh
Bogac Beag
Búird
The Pound
Baile Mhicil

* * *
Gort Ui Bhrianaigh
Moinéirín
An Riasg
Gairdin na Dóibe
Gairdín a Thriallaigh
Páirc na Pochán
Páirc a Tobair
Gairdín na nGabhar
An Ínnse
Currach na h-Abhann
An Cuilín
Pairc a Bhóthair
Páirc a Tairbh
The Moher of the Rock
The Isle
The Ray

Michael Neylon
Poulaknew
Connolly
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 20:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ÁIT-AINMNEACHA
List of the names of fields in my townland -
An Currach
Baile-Mhaich
An Cuilín
Gar na Dóibe
Flúir
Páirc na Móna
Páirc a Chapaill - ( bíonn an capall sa pháirc seo igcomhnuidhe )
Gairidhe Chaol
Páirc Mhór
Moineirín
Gort Dubh
Bogac Beag
Búird
The Pound
Baile Mhicil

* * *
Gort Ui Bhrianaigh
Moinéirín
An Riasg
Gairdin na Dóibe
Gairdín a Thriallaigh
Páirc na Pochán
Páirc a Tobair
Gairdín na nGabhar
An Ínnse
Currach na h-Abhann
An Cuilín
Pairc a Bhóthair
Páirc a Tairbh
The Moher of the Rock
The Isle
The Ray

Michael Neylon
Poulaknew
Connolly
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 19:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ÁIT-AINMNEACHA
List of the names of fields in my townland -
An Currach
Baile-Mhaich
An Cuilín
Gar na Dóibe
Flúir
Páirc na Móna
Páirc a Chapaill - ( bíonn an capall sa pháirc seo igcomhnuidhe )
Gairidhe Chaol
Páirc Mhór
Moineirín
Gort Dubh
Bogac Beag
Búird
The Pound
Baile Mhicil
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 19:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An Páirc Mór - The Pound
An Poll Mór - The Sand Field
An Cnoc - The Quarry
An Poll Dúbhán - The Garraí Dub
Baile Mhicil - The Island
The Ray - The Bull Field
The Hard Field - The Gort
The Inch - Poll Dubh
The Black Garden - An Cnoc Mór
The Acre - Páirc a Bhríste ( sold for a trousers)
Gar na Dóibe - Páirc a Chapaill
The Green Field - The Fern Field
The Frúir - The Crow's Meadow

Bridie Hehir
Fieghroe
Connolly
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 19:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Gleann na Guirte
An Currac
Gleann Bog
Páirc Fada
Páirc an Tobair
Páirc an Bhóthair
Páirc na gCapall
Poll Loty
Gáire Boland
An Inse
An Inse Glas
Croc Daraighe
Páirc na Pocán
An Riasg
Páirc na Coille
An Reidh Beag
Páirc Ruadh
An Cuilín
Páirc an Tairb
An Páircín Glas
Currach na h-Abann
An Reidh Mór
John Burke
Drimathey
Connolly
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 10:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An apple a day keeps the doctor away
The young may die but the old must
Spare the rod and spoil the child

Early to bed an early to rise makes a man healthy wealthy and wise

It is easier for a camel pass through the eye of a needle than a rich man go to heaven

A rough and windy May fills the haggard with corn and hay

Every heart has its own sorrow
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 10:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mair a chapaill agus gheobhair féar
Is fearr focail sa chúirt ná púnt sa sparán
Ní hé lá na gaoithe lá na sgoilb
Níl aon teinteán mar theinteán féin

An rud a cuirtear san Earrach baintear san bhFoghmhar é

Is mairig a labharann go teann

A closed mouth catches no fly
A rolling stone gathers no moss
A stitch in time saves nine
The longer you live the more you see

A wise old owl sat on an oak, the "more he saw the less he spoke the more he heard why cant' we all be like that bird

Where the sun does not enter the doctor does
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 10:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Misfortune seldom comes alone
Look before you leap
Necessity is the mother of invention
False friends are worse than open enemies
Half loaf is better than no bread
He who goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing
It is a sad heart that never rejoices
Waste not, want not
Do as you would be done by
All that glitters is not gold

Eily Neylon
Poulaknew
Connolly
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 10:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ní hé lá na gaoithe lá na sgolb
Níl aon teintéan mar do theinteán féin
Mair a chapaill agus geobhair féar
Is goirre cabhair Dé ná an donas

An rud a chuirtear san Earrac baintear san bhFóghmhar

Is mairg alabarann go teann
Is maith an t-iomainidhe an té abhíonn ar an gclaidhe
Mo bhród féin agus capall duine eile

A stitch in time saves nine
As you sow, so shall you reap
A rolling stone gathers no moss
A rotten apple injures its companions
A friend in need is a friend indeed

A fool can make money, it requires a wise man to spend it

A penny saved is a a penny earned
Better late than never
Be slow to promise and quick to perform
Death keeps no calendar
Fortune knocks once at every man's gate
An hour in the morning is worth two in the afternoon
Better go to bed supperless than rise in debt
He that steals an egg will steal an ox
It is never too late to learn
One never loses by doing a good turn
Many hands make light work
Many a true word spoken in jest
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 09:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
six a penny, any lacer five a penny, any lacer four a penny, any lacer three a penny, any lacer two a penny, or any lacer one a penny".
Michael McMahon
Roxton
Corofin
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 09:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Two men used come this way long ago one called Paddy Nester, and the other man, Paddy Blake. They used be welcomed long ago but they are not welcomed now. Some of them sell apples and other things and others go around begging. All of them carry bags, one for potatoes, and the other for flour. They stay a week on the road side and sleep in a camp. They go around every day begging. When they used come to the houses long ago the prayer they used have was,
"Mo cheadh fearr nuair a thiocfad arís mar is fearr mar is measa, go gcuireadh Día grásta d'athair is do mháthair is do dearbhraithreacha is do driofuirecha agus go h-aon fan leat mo aipín faoisdíne darm an aifreann lae saoire nó Domhnach goine Día agus Maighdean glórmhar é do fhuaiscailt go dtí glóire na flathais."
"Mo sheacht mhíle beannacht duit"
"The Lord God keep ye from all danger, temptations, hurts, and harms,"

Another old tramp used go around on a horse and car long ago and as soon as he would come to the door he would say "eight lacers a penny so he was called "Eight penny lacer". They composed a rhyme about him, "Any lacer eight a penny, any lacer seven a penny, any lacer
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 09:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The next night as soon as the woman got on the horse, he turned and stabbed or stuck the knife in her and immediately a voice spoke and said, "Tarraing agus sáith arís í", but he did not. After a little while the lady fell off and he rode on about his business. On returning he looked to see if there was any-trace of her where he lost her, but he saw nothing but a lump of frog-toad on the exact place where she fell. He afterwards found out that he was lucky not to pull the knife, if he did he would have been killed himself.
The hill at the eastern side of Clouna Church is known as Cnochán na Caoineadh. It is supposed that there was a gallows about midway between this and Átha Drúgha and that the relatives or friends of those about to be hanged were only allowed to come to this hill where they used "to cry enough", hence the name Cnocán na Caoineadh.
The field at the western side of the "metal bridge" at Cullenagh which is now divided into two by the railway is called Gort na Sgeal. It is said that anybody who went into this field after dark was "put astray" and was kept there all night. This happened more frequently before the railway was made although neighbours know of people having been "put astray" there within the last twenty years.

This story re- Átha Drugha was told by P. O'Donohue deceased who would be about 100 years now.
M. Mee
senior member (history)
2019-05-26 09:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The townland of Monreel is divided into, Grianán (Monreel North) Cnoc Glas, Cluan na gCaislín, Sgearamh. Gríanán is the division of land between the northern road and the railway. Sgearamh extends between the main road from Ennis to Ennistymn and Inagh or Cullenagh river. Cnoc Glas and Cluan na gCaislín is the division between the two roads above mentioned. The following are also place names in the district, Aill Míchíl, Bearna an t-Séilbh, Poll an Eas.
Cullenagh has Átha Drúgha where the river crosses the road about half way between Clouna Church and Ennistymon. This old road which joins the main road at the "pound cross" Ennistymon continues through Maurice' Mills, Kilnamona until it again connects the main road near the present Fountain Post Office. In olden times when this was the only road between Ennis and Ennistymon the mails were carried by a man on horseback. On coming to Átha Drúgha at night or in the early hours of the morning a young woman got up and sat behind him on the horse's back. This happened on several occasions and the man became very nervous. He was told to stab her with a black handle knife and that she'd disappear.
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 22:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá sean teampall suidhthe i gCill Croise timcheall trí mhíle nó mar sin ón áit seo i bparóiste Cill na Móna.
Tá roilig ann agus cuirtear daoine ann fós ach níl cead ag aoinne "cloch cinn" a chur suas ann. Creidtear go dtiocfadh mí-ádh éigin ar na daoine mór thimcheall na h-áite dá chuirfeadh cloch-chinn suas ann.
Deirtear go mbiodh clog le cloisint dá bhualadh gach seachtmhadh bliadhain sa t-seana cill atá sá roilig sin go dtí gur cuireadh Protastúnach dár b'ainm Mac Gearailt ann agus deirtear nár cloiseadh an clog á bhualadh ó shoin i leith.
Tréis an fear san a chur
senior member (history)
2019-05-25 22:58
approved