Number of records in editorial history: 30408 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2022-05-24 09:08
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school, and it is said that there is a coal pit or column pit near it. There must be some cave or hollow; for on every change of weather from dry to wet, or from wet to dry, a low deep hollow sound that can be distinctly noted, comes from the river.
senior member (history)
2022-05-24 09:07
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Weather Lore received from P. J. Keane of Direen, Scartaglin.
He heard it, as a young man, from a labourer named Thomas Devane, also of Direen, who died about 35 years ago, aged 92 YEARS.

It is a good sign of the weather to see the wild geese flying to the north, and a bad sign to seem them flying to the south.

In summer it is a very bad sign of the weather to see the crows flying low down on the meadow or perching on the sides of "wines" of hay. It is a bad sign to see swallows flying low, and a good sign to see swallows flying high.
When the "crane" (heron) flies against the water of a river, it is the sign of a flood. When the cat sits near the fire, cold weather is coming.
When the white birds fly inland from the sea it is a sign of rain.
Soot falling in great quantities is a sure sign of a change of weather, from very dry to very wet; or from very wet to very dry.
There is a small stream flowing by the
senior member (history)
2022-05-24 08:58
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Among the curate (Revd. J. Brick (1905-1913) is well remembered for his untiring labours in the cause of Temperance. He former Societies in each of the parishes and had his followers taken on annual excursions. I remember two of these - one to Crosshaven and the other to Valentia - hundreds travelled on both occasions. He formed football clubs and had inter-parish matches and it was through these matches that Matthew Daly (55) of Nohoval Lower was selected as a Substitute in the never-to-be-forgotten Kerry and Louth drawn game on 4th May 1913 and the replay on 29th June in that year.
(Mattie lived in Co. Cork just across the Blackwater from Kerry) Fr John Brick turned his attentions to Drama and founded a Dramatic Society from among his Temperate members. They produced, as far as I remember, The Patriot Priest and "Rober Emmet" as well as many lesser and comic sketches. He (Fr. Bric) whose hobby was carpentry made a boat and on Sundays and Holydays in Summer and Autumn he took parties to Shrone Lake (in the Two Paps) where they enjoyed very pleasant afternoons. His transfer to Ballydesmond then known as Kingwilliamstown was a sever blow and gradually the grand organisation he had built faded away.
senior member (history)
2022-05-24 08:47
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their years of study and school they were never happy except when 'on the roam'.
Mike Matt told me of one of these, who on his travels came to a public-house which displayed a Sign - a Beehive - and under the beehive was printed
"If you are dry come in and try
The flavour of my honey."
The "Poor Scholar" wrote underneath:-
I am dry, but I can't try,
The flavour of your honey,
If I went in, your bees would sting,
Because I have no money.

In Co. Kildare an ex-British Colonel lived who had his nose blown away in some war. He was rich and owned a large farm and a fine house. On his gate was printed. "What couldn't men and money do"
A poor scholar chanced the way and after some meditation wrote:
senior member (history)
2022-05-24 08:46
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to Gneeveguilla is a much older road than the Knocknagree - Ballydesmond one (See page 138)

In a discussion on Hedge Schools I learned for the first time what a "Poor Scholar" really was. In cases where the parents died or one person died and the other remarried the orphans were left without means or property. Many of these were looked after the Parish Priest or some generous-hearted person. They were sent to school, Denis Dennehy remembered one in Knocknagree School. The poor scholar came to school and the Master took charge of him. In the evening some FARMER'S son was chosen to take the pupil home with him and to see all his wants that night with strict injunctions to bring him to school the following evening and another the next and so on. In this way the "Poor Scholar" was educated and fed and kept until he found something suitable to do in life. I, myself, often heard the expression "going in a Poor Scholar" applied by the old people to individuals. These boys were often of a vagrant type and even after
senior member (history)
2022-05-24 08:39
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When Denis Matt (Dennehy) was a young boy he wore no boots and later when he did wear them he had to throw them off when he went playing football. Often he saw the Tureen and Lacka women bringing their boots on their shoulders when coming to Mass. They would sit down near "the Kiln" (in Scrahan) and put them on and when returning they would take them off again at the same place. They were not used to them and didn't want to be "carrying the load of them."

One interesting item which I heard from Denis and his brother Mickie that their mother (father died when they were young) often spoke of the passage used by the Miong an Oidhin and Ballydesmond people when going and coming to Knocknagree. The present road was not in existence then but the people who travelled on foot and on horse-back principally travelled the bed of the river Blackwater as far as the present Farrankeal Bridge. Wherever there was a deep hole they came out on the "Inch." The road running from Knocknagree...

(Tim Guiney the evicted tenant who would be 120 years now also told them this tale about the road. Tim, when he was very young saw people travelling there)
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 22:59
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(III)
You will see the Benbulbin mountain
Where a prince and his lady might dwell
You will see the glen and the fountain
All around by Sweet Lisadell
You will see all around Knocknaree
An back to sweet Lurganboy
Your will see all around Sligo Bay
If you take a trip with Jack Hoey.

CHORUS

(IV)
Make haste and get married this season
Fro time is fast fleeing away
There is nought to be gained by being lazy
But a great deal's lost by delay
Be quick and get married this season
In the sweet time of summer and joy,
It will cheer up yourself and your missus
To be driven by noble Jack Hoey.

(CHORUS)

Told and sung by James Devins who remembers seeing Jack Hoey and his car.
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 22:51
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There is but one churchyard in this parish. Its name is Ardcrone and is situated in the townland of Ardcrone. There are three others but they are not in use for years and years. One is situated in the townland of Killeen, one in Kilfalney and another in Glounbairn. This latter is round in shape, all the others being rectangular. There is a ruined church in Ardcrone graveyard and the O'Sullivan (Ulicks) are buried there. Kilfalney graveyard is level and there are five or six whitethorn bushes growing in it.
Ardcrone contains some very old tombs and monuments. There are several crosses in it some made of wood, others made of Iron while a great many are made of stone. Some of the crosses are ornamented. The Celtic cross is predominant there.
In the three disused graveyards there are no crosses to be seen but old mounds or cairns.
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 22:40
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being informed that the sons of Milesius had divided the country between them when they first came into it from Spain, Goul Mac Drabh told his majesty that it was Mac Broghan's right to land first if so said the king of Spain who was so named I claim the right to land first.
The king of Spain with four hundred choice troops landed and put the country to fire and sword.
It was long before this predicted to the Irish people that their country would be invaded by numberless forces from all parts of the world to subdue them which caused Fionn to keep watch on every harbour round the kingdom and the man who was in charge of Ventry Harbour was Cabhan Creithir from Luachar Gearr. At the very time that the king of Spain and his troops landed Cabhan was in a sound sleep on the very top of Creac a' Goirtín a mountain above the harbour and what awoke him was the cries and lamentations around him for the king of Spain and all his troops put every human being they met with to the sword sparing neither young nor old blind or lame, man woman nor child. The whole being all in a blaze. When Cabhan saw the country all in a blaze and the harbour full of ships, he regretted
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 22:31
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No 1 The Billie Blue
No 2 The Robin
No 3 The Wren
No 4 The Thrush
No 5 The Starling
No 6 The Sally-picker
No 7 The Crow
No 8 The Swallow
No 9 The Blackbird
No 10 The Linnet
No 11 The Wagtail
No 12 The Cuckoo
No 13 The Woodcock
No 14 The Sparrow
No 15 The Magpie
No 16 The Pheasant
No 17 The Sea Gull
No 18 The Jack Daw
No 19 The Yellow Hammer
No 20 The Gold Finch
No 21 The Bullfinch
No 22 The Chaffinch
No 23 The Woodquest
No 24 The Scawl Crow
No 25 The Owl
No 26 The Corncrake
No 27 The Bat
No 28 The Hawk
No 29 The Hedge Sparrow
No 30 The Curlews
No 31 The Tomtit
No 32 The Water Hen
No 33 The Wild Duck
No 34 The Wild Goose
No 35 The Kingfisher
No 36 The Lark
No 37 The Snipe
No 38 The Swan
No 39 The Plover
No 40 The Green Linnet
No 41 The House Sparrow
No 42 The Green Linnet
No 43 The Missel Thrush
No 44 The Song Thrush
No 45 The Wood Thrush
No 46 The House Martin
No 47 The Sand Martin
No 48 The Common Linnet
No 49 The Great Linnet
No 50 The Pied Wagtail
No 51 The Wood picker
No 52 The Swift
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 18:49
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About the fourth century counting from the birth of Christ, there reigned a renowned magnanimous and heroic king in Hisperia named Dara Donn mac Luscín Lom Lumarne who by the success of his arms had obliged all the potentates of the earth to pay him tribute. Ireland only excepted and being informed that such an island in the western ocean remained unconquered, he said that he could not rightly be called monarch of the world while such an island remained unconquered. He made up his mind to act and calling all the kings and princes he summoned them to a counsel of war, and explained to them his intentions and that he wanted their support in men and arms from each of them for the invasion. They all agreed to be ready on a certain date, and on that date the expedition sailed for Ireland.
As they were nearing the Irish coast they met a lone man in a boat. The monarch of the world gave orders that he be captured and brought before him to be interrogated.
He asked him his name and his business alone on the ocean.
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 18:44
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My name said he is Gleas Mac Drabhin and I am leaving Ireland because I was driven out of it. I am fleeing with my life from the anger of Finn Mac Cool.
"How did you provoke his anger," asked Dara Donn?
Because said Gleas on a certain not very long ago Finn and the Fianna and their dogs went for a big hunt and the deer outstripped both men and hounds but Gleas Mac Drabhin outstripped even Bran and Scolan and left hounds and hunters far behind. Fionn was enraged at this and had evil in his mind towards Gleas. It was besides conveyed to Fionn that Glas Mac Drabhin was conspiring with Cormac Mac Airt mac mic do Conn Cead Cathaig (surnamed from the hundred battles he had won) monarch of Ireland for some time. Dara Donn asked Gleas could he pilot the fleet into any safe harbour.
Gleas answered and said there is a large and safe harbour not far from hence in the western part of Cnochán an Aonaigh where the fleet can anchor with safety and the forces land with ease.
The fleet immediately steered their course for Ventry, and it was Dara Donn's great barge that first came in. When the rest of the fleet came up, Dara Donn asked whose division they had come into and
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 18:08
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Our Lord's head - A drop of blood fell on her breast and since it is red.

The Thrush.
The Thrust is a bird about the same size as a black-bird. Her colour is brown and her breast is grey. She lays about four eggs. The thrush lives on snails. When she finds a snail, she catches it in her beak and flies away with it to a stone. Then she hits the shell against the stone to break it. The stone on which she breaks it is called the thrush's anvil. There are three kinds of thrushes, the mistle thrush, the song thrush and and the wood thrush. The mistle thrush is seen only in winter, and the song thrush and the wood thrush are seen all through the year.

The Crow.
The crow is a fairly large bird. Her colour is black, and there is also a crow with a grew breast called a scawl crow. The crow begins to build their nests always on the first of March and it is said that if Sunday was the first of March, they would wait
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 18:02
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29) THE WILD DUCK
The wild-duck is like any duck only taht she has a light brown breast and wings. She is smaller than the tame duck. She is nearly always seen on the river or pond. They scarcely ever fly through the air like wild geese. If you approach the pond while the wild ducks are on it they will swim in under a bunch of briars or rushes from your. It is the sign of bad weathr when the wild ducks are seen flying through the air and bawling.

30) THE CANARY
The canary is a lovely yellow bird. She is about as big as a thrush. She is a very tame bird, and is often kept in a cage. She eats birdseed. She is a very good songster.

31) THE BAT
The bat is a strange kind of bird. It is like a mouse on wings. Its wings differ from the wings of a bird, by having no feathers. Some people say that the bat is blind, but it is not, its eyes are very small and keen. Its eyes are so small
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 17:56
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till Monday to begin. During March they are seen gathering bits of sticks and flying off with them to their nests. They are often seen, fighting and trying to take them each other.

6) THE SWALLOW
The swallow is seen in Ireland only in Summer. It goes to a warmer country. The swallow lives on insects, and they are not to be got in cold weather, and that is why they go away in Winter. They arrive here in May and begin to build their nests. In an old shed or under the eaves of houses. It is made with mortar. A wet day is useful to the swallow. It gathers the sand and mixes it well, and then carries it carefully to the nest.

7) The Starling
The starling is seen mostly in February, and when you wake in the morning, you may hear its soft notes floating down your bedroom chimney. The starling song is beautifully sweet, and it cannot be mistaken for that of the thrush. At a
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 01:30
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hazel rods. There are two kinds of "sallies" which grow locally. The "sally" which grows along streams and in wet places is unsuitable for basket making because the branches are too short and crooked. They are however very suitable for spars which the thatcher uses and also as ribs for the Saiteán (or bottom) of the basket and for the ribs or "stays" (meaning staves I believe) of the Sciathóg. The other kind of "sally" and the one from which baskets are made is cultivated in the following manner:- a twigie is cut into lengths of about a foot - just slips. About three fourths of it is stuck in the earth leaving one or two "eyes" for buds over the surface. The eyes under the earth shoot out to form roots and those over the earth shoot out to become the twigies from which baskets are made. The slips are put down about October or November and the shoots appear the following Spring. These are sown around the cabbage haggard (pronounced haggart) so as to be protected from animals.
The following October the twigies are cut to within a foot (?) of the ground and what is left becomes a "Stock" from which
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 01:17
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or in a thick heap of briers. She lays three or four eggs.

24) THE YELLOW-HAMMER
The Yellow hammer is of a brownish colour, with a yellow breast. She builds her nest in a white thorn bush or on briars and lays three or four blue eggs. When the young birds come out they are very like young robins.

25) THE PLOVER
The plover is a well known bird in this district. There is a green plover and a grey plover. They usually are seen in flocks. They are mostly seen in winter. When they are heard bawling in the evening it is the sign of bad weather. They are often shot for food. They are usually roasted.

26) THE JACK SNIPE
The jack snipe is a small bird about the size of a willie wagtail. His colour is black with white spots on his
senior member (history)
2022-05-23 01:10
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that the sunlight dazzles it, and it never comes out until the dusk. There are two kinds of bats, one kinds live on fruit, and the other kind on insects.

32) THE OWL
The owl is a large white bird, and her head is like a cats head. She kills rats and mice, and they are useful about a farmers place for that reason. The owl is never seen out in the daylight. It is said that long ago, when the wren became the king of all birds, the other birds were very displeased, because the wren had won by trickery, and they decided to drown him. It had been a very dry year and they could find no water to drown him. At last they hit on a plan. They found a large basin a farmyard and each one cried over it till at last it was filled with tears. When the owls turn came, just as she was perching nearby, she hit the basin with her claw, and spilled all the tears. All the birds were very angry with her
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 12:50
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Spancels and ropes were made from hair with a contrivance in the form of a cross. It is (Sketch) called a cross but I think in the olden times it was called Casadh-Crúcán. The hair was twisted first into a light cord and this cord was usually twisted in four strands on each other to make a spancel or a rope. An unevenness of the twist caused what they called a Casadh-Crickeen in the cord. A few people in the district can still make these spancels and ropes. Baskets to be carried on the back and hand-baskets are also still being made in the district.
Candles were made in moulds from the fat of the cow in this district about fifty years ago or later.
Cards for carding wool were quite common until recently also, and some houses have their spinning wheels for spinning wool still and in a few houses we have wheels for spinning flax. Most of the out-fit for treating the flax could be collected in he district. We have in the school a Tlú which was used in drawing the flax.
There are to be found too in this district several quern stones wich shows that they ground their own grain.

In Kealkil there lived a smith named Sullivan Sean a' Gabha famous for making farming implements, spades, pikes, or forks and fir-hatchets. That was more than eighty years ago and there is still in the district one fine fir-hatchet made by him.
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 12:38
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Mo dhiachar 's a loch
Mo dhiachar 's a loch
Mo chroch is mo bhrón srl.
This was chanted over and over again until sufficient edge was on the blade. While mowing they wore a Súgán round their waists. At night they retired to the nearest public-house and caroused until a late hour. This shows the stamina possessed by those men. Their food consisted of cans of milk, bread and butter. Milk was drank out of piggins. Tea was made only on Xmas Day, and this was done in the calve's pot.
The the hay was saved with Gabhlógs, which were wooden forks cut from the bough a nearby tree. It was raked into huge rows with handrakes. Then it was rolled by hand into large cocks. A horse with a looped rope collected those cocks, one at a time. Then the pikes were made. Ten pence a day was good hire for a day's hay-saving. The day of the rick-making, all the neighbours were invited, and when the rick was made, they danced and made merry to the accompaniment of a barrel of porter.
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 12:30
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About sixty years ago before harvesting-implements came into favour, harvesters had a very hard life. Gangs of harvesters walked about 12 Irish miles to a distant farm carrying scythes on their shoulders and wearing Báinín. They began work at 4 o'clock in the morning and they worked until 9 o'clock at night. They were paid at the rate of 4/- per acre, and it is on record that a single harvester would mow two acres in a day. This would not be counted as a wonderful feat, as it would take a good man nowadays to mow a half-acre in a day. They depended everything on the "edge," as they called the sharpness on the scythe. While sharpening the blade with the scythe-board they chanted a rhyme which was a sort of charm to "put up edge." The following is how the rhyme runs:-
Mo chroch is mo bhrón
Mo bhrón, mo bhrón, mo bhrón
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 12:23
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trade.

5) Gates are made at all the local forges. Blacksmiths rivalled each other in turning out smart gates. This keen competition still goes on. The iron is bought in long bars from iron foundry.

6) Wooden ploughs were made locally but not generally, as they were never believed in by the farmers.

7) Fire-cranes were made by a local blacksmith. It was shaped as in 'A' sketch.
(Sketch of Fire-Crane)
The contraption A was movable to enable utensils to be hung high or low. The end of the iron B is placed in a well on the floor so that the whole crane may swing.

8) No material is available about spinning and weaving in this district. The nearest "waver" (weaver) lived on the Hill of Knocklong three miles away.

9) Thatching was a very skilled trade in
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 12:16
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this district and it still is. The straw is put in suitable sheaves before hand, and a short bunch of straw about a foot long is tightly bound round with a Súgán.
(See sketch) This is called a "garsún." The pointed scollops, or strips of sally rods are stuck in this. The thatcher takes his full of scollops with him up on the roof of the house.

10) Coopers generally made the churns, barrels, and firkins. The local coopers were Dick Gorman of Emly, Jom O'Dwyer of Ballinagrana and Din Noonan of Bohercarron.

11) Wheel-making still flourishes. The local carpenters make wheels and the blacksmiths band them.

12) Johnny Hayes was the local nail-maker. He is dead for the past forty years, and the trade died with him. He used work in a little cabin on the side of the street of Emly, where he was a centre of attraction for the children of the parish. The following is a description of the trade
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 12:06
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and Knocklong. The graveyard contains some very old tombs and crosses. Some of them date back to 1700. Locally, it is believed that there are several bishops buried in it. The oldest crosses are made from old red sandstone, while the more modern are hewn from from the local limestone. No tradition is available as to the burial-place of unbaptised children. Other traditions connected with this graveyard are told elsewhere in this book. Local families use the graveyards of their ancestors, though they may be much more distant than the parish graveyard. For instance, funerals often come here from West Limerick, and places even further distant. St. Ailbhe's Well, described elsewhere in the book, is in the centre of the graveyard.
Here is a true incident that happened about fifty years ago, in connection with family burial-places:-
"A local employee of the G.S.R. married a woman of the parish named Margaret McGrath, whose descendants still live here. His name was Patsy Russell. His wife's family burial-ground was in the local graveyard, and some her children had been buried there. Russell was transferred to Killarney, and there his wife died. Before she died, she requested to be buried in Emly, but Russell had her buried in the cemetery in Killarney. For many subsequent nights while on duty in the
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 00:09
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There are two ruins of houses in my farm. The inhabitants of these houses left Ireland and went to America after the great famine in liners called "the free emigration ships." These ships sailed from Valentia Harbour to America.
There are two Lioses around her one in Gurganbawn and an other in Renard. In those places they buried unbaptised children in former days.
Ballycarbery castle is situated on the left side of the river Fertha about three miles from Caherciveen, it is now an old ruin; it is said there is an underground passage from Ballycarbery castle to Renard it was made by the McCarthy Mórs. The reason why it is so strong is that the mortar was mixed with blood, of the cattle that were killed for the workers who were helping to make it. It was once shelled by Cromwell from Valentia Harbour
senior member (history)
2022-05-22 00:02
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35) THE SEAGULL
The seagull lives mostly by the sea they come inland for shelter when bad weather is coming. They build their nests in caves and rocks by the seashore. They are of a grey colour. When the people of this district see the seagull they say there must be bad weather on the sea. They are often seen in the gardens picking worms. They are often called the "White crows."

36) THE SPARROW
The place where the sparrow chooses for its nest is under the caves of houses in the tatch, where it is sheltered from wind and rain. The nest is made with hay and feathers. The sparrow are often seen in the fowl house gathering the soft fluffy feathers, which the fowl lose as they fly up on the roost. The sparrow carries one feather each time till the nest is completed and it is amusing to see them when they arrive at the nest. They open their (beaks) to chirp to their mates, and away goes feather but they catch it again before it reaches the ground. Sometimes they use a swallows nest, built of mortor under the
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 23:22
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The wounded men when dressed by him, rushed out to fight again
And charge those cruel tyrant foes, like gallant Breffni men.

(V)
The fight went on still fiercely, and ever did O'Neill (O'Nale)
Head on the fearless Breffni boys, whose stout hearts ne'er did quail,
The bigots cursed and rushed again, but soon their blood runs chill
For now a cheer that rends the skies is heard on Bredagh Hill.

(VI)
Then Croppies in their hundreds rush, to save our grand old town
The bigots fly for home at once, or fall in dozens down
The blacksmiths's carried shoulder high - all cheer for brave O'Neill
The Conqueror of tyrants and defender of the Gael.

(VII)
O'Neills in Carrigallen now are telling with delight
Of him their great grand parent brave - defender of the right,
Who built again for battle the men who wounded lay
And conquering drove the Orange hordes from Breffni far away.
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 23:07
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The following are the injurious herbs:-
Thistle, Cupóg, Praishacwee agus 'Táhél'
The thistle, Cupóg, and Praishacwee impoverish the land whilst the Táhél (Runningweed) stifles crops such as potatoes, turnips and sometimes cabbage

The following grow in good land:-
Nettles, Thistle, Cupóg
Rushes grow abundantly in Bad land.

Herbs that cure:- See back under heading "Leigiseanna"

FOOD HERBS
Carsherván (Caisearbán) is cut and is still given to fowl, hen and duck, supposed to be very good
but Nettles ar also given to Fowl yet and are supposed to be very good for "laying purposes"

COLOURING CLOTH:-
A kind of grey rough plant which clings to rock is used in certain districts for dyeing cloth. It is called "Drus na gCloc"
It is however used now more or less for dyeing "Jerseys." It is prepared as
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 12:50
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timpall trí troighthe déag ar leithead agus d'éaluigh sé. Glaodtar "Léim an Fhiaidh" air leis.
Baineann beagán staruidheachta leis an áit seo. Troideadh cath fuilteach ann timapall an bhliadhain 1847. Glaodhtar "Cat Céim an Fiaidh" air. Is tagarit do'n chat seo i n-amhrán go bhfuil ainm na h-áite áite air. Dhein bean-fhile an t-amhrán so agus mórán eiel mar aon leis. Máire Ní Laoghaire b'ainm di ní tugtar "Máire Bhuidhe" mar leas-ainm uirri. Ní ró-fhada ó'n áit a bhí a tig comhnuighthe. Bhí na Sasanaigh ar thaobh agus na h-Éireannaigh ar an dtaobh eile. Marbhuigheadh fear gurb' ainm dó Smith (?) agus Sasanach a b'eadh é. Cuireadh is seana phort é an chéad oidhche. Bhí eagla ortha go sgéithfeadh duine éigin agus tógadh an corp agus rugadh ó thuaidh é go Muinn Fliuch agus cuireadh ann é. Tugtar "Muinn na Biorraidhe" mar ainm air. Fuair na saighdúirí amach mar gheall air agus dheineadar d'fiacaibh ar fear éigin é thóghaint. An poll as ar tóghadh é bíonn rud iongantach ag baint leis, mar dathuigheann an t-uisge éadaigh buidhe. Áit ana fliuch iseadh é agus tá clúmairt maith ann. Cheap file éigin an dán so
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 12:38
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St. Peter warming himself before the denial of his Master.
Next is a spear, also a foot with nail, two scourges, one at each side of a pincers, and a hand extended and pierced through the palm. On the right of the window on the first panel is the date 1585; underneath the initials "R.M.C.C." (Randal Murthuile, Catherine Coilean) The ornamentation on the other panels has nearly disappeared, the result of time and vandalism. On the whole, the carved ornamentation of these windows seems more suitable for those of a medieval abbey than of a fortified castle. From the "glas-lar" another staircase led upwards, and out into the turrets and battlements of the castle, some of which still remain. Two machicouli project at the north-western and south-eastern angles of the walls about half way up. These constructions aided in the defence of the castle, as those posted in them, while themselves were secure from attack, could aim offensive weapons at enemies attempting a breach in any part.
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 12:29
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many meanings, such as "the great harp", the "large hump" "the great cross or gallows". The natural formation of the locality as a roundish elevation is very likely the key to its true meaning. The well known legend of the Lough of Cork is beautifully rendered by Crofton Croker and needs no reference here. Some 50 years ago an event occurred in the Lough that afforded food for much gossip for many a day. On a winters night a large shoe of the northern end of the island in the Lough, composed chiefly of sedge, seeds and rushes, became detached from the more solid portion through the action of a violent storm and floated to the northern shore, where it was found next morning. The news of this movement of the island spread like wild fire through the city and large crowds of people hastened to view the scene. Among them were some old folk who "had heard if from their fathers".
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 12:26
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the burning of the Courthouse in 1891, after which it was transferred to the Museum in Fitzgerald's Park, where it now rests among litter and debris. It bears the following inscription: - "Presented by Christopher Rye, Esq., Mayor of Cork, A.D. 1668."

The Lough of Cork
"Oh! fair is the Lake of Cork City,
Where the wild fowl all safely can rest,
And in Winter, though frozen, 'tis pretty,
When my boy glides over its breast."
So sang Denis Delaney in the "Irish People" newspaper of March 25th. 1865. This well-known part of Cork lies at an elevation of about 100 feet above sea level. Its shape resembles that of a right human foot having the heel directed towards the city. Its earliest Irish name is Loch na Farnoge or the Lough of the Ferns or Alders, from the abundance of these shrubs that grew on its banks. The townland whose toes dip into its waters is Crotamore, a name of
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 12:20
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"who had heard it from their grandfathers who had read it in St. Columbcille's prophecy," that when the little island in Loch na Farnoge would change its position, there would be an end to the Saxon rule in Ireland.
The late Mr. McMullen, City Engineer, gave the following particulars of the Lough in a report made in 1893:-

"The greatest depths is about 9 feet. The depth varies in different parts from 9 feet to 6 inches. It is feed by springs and rain. The volume discharged is scarcely perceptible except after rain. There is no marked difference between summer and winter levels except what is caused by rain. The overflow is conveyed in a south-westerly direction towards Summerstown by an 18-inch gully sewer."
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 12:11
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A BRÍDEÓG or doll to be carried round by children on St Brigid's Eve is made out of old clothes.
Daisy chains are made into necklets bracelets... rings, head wreaths', girdles. Buttercups are used in the same way.
Girls make rag dolls too. A pillow of rags or wool forms the body. The limbs are stuffed with wool or rags - beads are used for the eyes.
Boys made bird traps with twigs (elder) Snares are made for catching rabbits out of snare-wire and sticks.
Whistles out of the sycamore tree catapults out of the stick and rubber, and models from turnips.
Children made "Yó Yó's" out of buttons and twine
Boats are and were made out of paper and wood also corks and matches and paper.
Hurleys were made from wood
Balls were made of leather stuffed with corks and wool
The game of "Gobs" was played with five small stones.
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 12:03
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Potatoes are grown on every farm in this district.
The ground is manured before the potatoes are sown.(?) Potatoes are generally grown here in drills. A Drill plough is sued to open and close the drills.
Wooden ploughs were used - a man named Coughlan of Ballyoran uses one still. Potatoes with good "eyes" are used for seed purposes - the potatoe is cut in sections called "Scalláns."
The local people do not "Comhair" when potato planting is in progress.
Scallans are "dropped" by hand still.
Potatoes are "earthed" twice during growth.
The plough is used for this work.
The growing plants (stalks) are sprayed with "blue stone" at least twice and generally 3 times. A fortnight usually elapses between each spraying.
The potatoes are "picked" in Autumn and pitted
The pit is lined with straw and earth to keep away the frost - the pit is finally covered with straw and earth.
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 11:54
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WARTS
The well in Coole - 1 visit - "say a Hail Mary - rub the well water in the sign of a cross to your hand.
Any ache is cured by the Brat Brigde. It is a piece of cloth that is hung outside on St. Brigids Eve. (U. Daly Std VI)

Cure for Whooping Cough - "Put the patient under a donkey."

Mrs Stewart of Glenarousk and Mrs Ginn of Castlelyons are both very skilful in the used of herbs.

Ringworm can be cured by a lady in the village
Tar and (?) are two of the ingredients used in the ointment used to cure ringworm.

To cure "wild fire" write your name all round it with ink to keep it from spreading

To cure a sore throat - put the vamp of your stocking around it

Boiled marshmallows are good for rheumatism.
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 11:46
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BOGS
Hayes' Bog in Glenarousk
Buckleys in Glenarousk
Barry's in Kill St Anne
Collins' in Ballyoran
Ahernes in Ballyoran
Maooneys in Ballyoran
Mayes in Corrin
Fouhys in Poole
Smiths in Glenarousk
Higgins in Corrin
Coghlans in Carrin (Farran)
Kielys in Ballyoran
Barley up near McHugh's Glenarousk

BRAKES
Aherne's Brake in Ballyoran
Coghlans Brake in Corrin
Hayes in Glenarousk
Buckleys in Glenarousk
Higgins in Corrin
McHughs in Glenarousk

Verlings "Big Field" was once known as the The Games Field. The Fenians are said to have played games there.
The field is near this school.
Information supplied by Mrs Lenihan, Kill St. Anne
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 11:38
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employment to many curriers, and others in the manufacture of leather; it used to be carted to Cork for transport abroad. There used to live here a number of architects who found work in the building of mansions for the gentry. In the middle of the principal street a large-sized Market house, with a high and lofty arch at both ends to admit the highest loads to pass through; and at the northern end was a Maypole 80 feet high above the level of the ground and as straight as the mast of a ship. The manufacture of tobacco and snuff went on here, and on the windows in the other towns used to be displayed the announcement "Castletown tobacco and snuff sold here."
About a mile to the west of the town races used to be held once a year and some of the best racehorses in Ireland used to meet here. Horses belonging to the Devonshires of Kilshanig; the Smyths of Ballistray; the Courtneys of Ballinamona; the Beresfords of Waterford; the Hydes of Castlehyde etc. And it was generally known that Colonel Hydes horses were the best in the country yet they scarcely ever won for it is believed that the Jockeys used to be bribed. Colonel Hyde never went to see his horses racing but on one occasion he came and when the horses were about to be off he cried from the top of the grandstand "a bushel of gold on his horse" as a challenge to all the sporting men present and none could take him up.
In the memorable year of 1798 an army of 10,00 men under the command of General Myers was encamped midway between the parishes of Fermoy and Castlelyons. It was from Castlelyons town and parish that army was supplied with provisions and other
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 11:28
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bottled, and then used. Marshmallows are used for horses too, as medicine.
Nettles boiled down like cabbage are good for the blood.

AS FOOD
Dandelion is used as food for chickens
Nettles are used for turkeys and pigs
Water-Cress is used like lettuce as food
Herbs were used extensively in this area in former times as cures for various diseases.

VEGETABLES
1) Mint is used for dyeing purposes - eg for colouring sweets
2) Celery is used for rheumatism
3) Spinach is used as a blood tonic
senior member (history)
2022-05-21 11:25
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"Docks," Cornkale, Charlock, Nettle's, the Buachailín Buidhe, Scutch grass, ferns, thistles, Silver weed, Spúinc are some of the most harmful weeds growing on land about here.
They are harmful because they spread very rapidly and because they impoverish the soil. Cornkale is a rapid spreader and it impoverishes the soil very much too.
Thistles and Buacalláns grow where land is good, while ferns seem to do well on poor land.
Here, certain herbs are said to possess medicinal properties.
Yarrow - is good for rheumatism
St. Johns wort growing in Buckleys Bog Glenarousk is a cure for warts. The flower is yellow and small.
Dandelion is used for liver trouble.
Marshmallows cure "pains" (Rheumatism)
Marshmallows are boiled, the juice is strained off.
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 11:55
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75) An té a bhíonn tinn ní binn leis aon rud
76) Tá an bóthar fada agus tá an oidhche breágh, acht mar sin féin fan go lá
77) Mar a bhfuil agat acht gabhar bí i lár an aonaigh leis
78) Fágaim le h-úcht níl aon rud comh maith chun píopa dheargadh le maist
79) Ní impigheann an fear saidhbhir trioblóid an fhir bhoicht
80) Is fearr bean ná spré
81) Níor bhris focal maith fiacail riamh
82) Briseann an dúthchas tré shúilibh an chait
83) Bhainis an focal as mo bhéil.
Deirtear sin le duine a deireann rud éigin a bhí an té a labhair 'na dhiaidh ar tí a rádh
84) Níl aon gar a bheith leat.
Deirtear sin le duine ná glacfadh comhairle a leasa uait
85) Nuair is mó an deitheanas is mó an mhoill
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 11:36
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named Lyndon who was most unpopular and deservedly so. Lyndon was illegitimate and owed his name - so say the farmers - to the fact that he was found under a linden
There were several families evicted on these estates but the farms were left derelict and the owners were provided with houses by the Land League until the landlords climbed down and made a reasonable settlement. The three outstanding cases in the district were those of:
1) Thomas O'Flaherty Teenbroin
2) Timothy O'Connor do.
4) Michael Sheehy Drom
3) Hussey Estate
1) Landlord: Edward Hussey nephew of Miss Clarissa Hussey who built the Catholic Church in Dingle.
2) Agent: Sam Hussey brother of Edward Hussey.
The Husseys were regarded in this district as just and even generous
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 11:27
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go dtí an Seipéal i gcoir an tarna h-oidhce. Cúig no seacht gcoinnlí abhíonn ar lasad idtig an torraimh agus bíonn siad san de gnath ag cosa na leapthan ar bórd beag.

When the corpse is being coffined the coffin is placed beside the bed on two chairs. The corpse is then lifted and put in and the lid put on. Immediately the corpse is taken the Sheets are pulled down and left where the corpse was until after the funeral. Then they are washed. The coffin is then rested on two chairs outside the door. When the funeral moves off those two chairs, as also the two chairs on which the coffin rested inside, are turned up side down. On one occasion I saw an old lady trying to turn the table in the wake house up side down when the corpse was taken out.
When taking the corpse
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 10:55
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My School district is divided into the following townlands namely:- Knocknacurra, Meengathaunlish, Reamore North, Maugha, Grafeen, Esk and Beeng. It is situated in the parish of Ballymacelligott in the barony of "Trucanaicme." Twenty-one families inhabit this district, forming one hundred and three people in all. The family names most common are O'Connor, Lynch, Collins and Leen.
Thatched houses are the most common type in this district. There are about eight people over the age of seventy living in the district namely:- Mr. and Mrs Denis Harris, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Leen, Mr. Edmund Scanlon, Mrs. McCarthy, Mrs Moloney and Mr. Tim O'Connor. Few of these old people know Irish except a word here and there such as "Beart," "Gabhail" and "Meisscre" (?).
Houses were not more numerous locally in former times. There are about three in ruins. People did emigrate from the district in former years. The townlands of the district are not mentioned in any song or saying.
The land is hilly and boggy. The district contains no wood. The names of the rivers are the Glashoreag, and the Maugha River and the Glasha. The streams in the district are the "Ciseán Bán," "Túirín Teinteán," and "Poll an Raithín," "Three Stream Boundary and the Green Vein. There is no story connected with them.
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 10:40
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When the person died he was laid out in the kitchen on a table. There was a canopy of sheets over the corpse. Some people kept these sheets specially for the dead and lent them when required. Every person who came to the wake got a clay pipe filled with tobacco and they said the prayer "The Lord have mercy on his soul and on the soul of the Faithful departed." Snuff was handed round frequently.
An uneven number of candles were placed on a table and one was always left unlighted. All people - women - who came to the wake were to both sides of the table and cried or keened.
It was right to light your wake pipe whether you were a smoker or not. No pins should be left in the habit when putting the corpse into the coffin. All nails or screws have to be removed from the lid.
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 10:30
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The Mac Gillicuddy Eager - the grandfather of the present Mac Gillicuddy of the Reeks was a very tyrannical Landlord. His tenants were very poor and their rents were excessive.
He arranged to meet them in Killorglin on a certain day and a number of them were grouped together near Morris' Corner in the town, looking very sad and dejected.
Fr Bat O'Connor of Milltown happened to be passing and he asked them what brought them together. They told him
In a short time the Mac Gillicuddy Eager came driving along in a carriage drawn by a pair of dashing horses.
Fr Batt told the people to take a good look at him, and when the carriage reached the present Mangan's gate, both
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 00:15
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Cows, horses, calves, pigs, goats, donkeys, hens, geese, turkeys, chickens, dogs and cats are some of our farm animals. The cows have names such as "The red cow," "The White cow," "The grey cow" and the Red heifer.
We say How! How! when driving the cows. When we are calling the calves we say "Suck! Suck."
In the cow-house is a log stick called a beam, and there are stakes tied to this beam. In front of the cows there is a manger where the hay is kept. The cows are tied to the stakes. The cows were often tied by the neck, horns and legs.
The Tyings are made out of iron, they are off a foreign make.
On May Eve some people hand a round berry branch in the cow house to bring luck on the stock.
On a May morning some people used to get up early and milk a cow that did not belong to them and then they said that this brought all the butter and milk to them.
The floor in the stable is paved
senior member (history)
2022-05-20 00:04
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The domestic animals kept on a farm are horses, cows, heifers, calves, pigs, hens, ducks and geese. Pure bred cows most have names. We say "Bail up" when driving cows in or out of the fields. There is a milk-stand for leaving milk on, and a stall made of concrete for cows to stand on and a manger for the cattle to eat out off. Cows are tied to stakes, they are with chains by the neck. If the cows are not milked properly the udder goes wrong.
Horses are fed in the winter with hay, oats and meal, and they get water to drink and in the summer they eat grass. The shoeing and clipping is done in the blacksmith's forge. Long ago there were famous horses called post horses. They used to go from Ballinamore to Carrick and from Carrick to Drumod in a certain length of time.
The ducks are called by saying "Wheety! Wheety!" when calling turkeys you say "Bee! Bee." For geese you say "Gé! Gé" Some people mark the eggs before setting them. When they are four days hatched the eggs can be tested by looking at them with the aid of a candle. I got this information from my brother
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 23:50
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and if she ever came out duirng the day, they would peck at her.

23) THE GREAT TIT
The great tits are to be found in every garden. Though called great they are no bigger than a sparrow, they are great when compared with the other members of their family, the blue-tit and the long tailed tits. The great tits are the most useful in a garden particularly when they are rearing their young so they gather thousands of caterpillars which would cause great destruction to the vegetables.

24) THE (MISSEL) MISTLE THRUSH
The Missel thrush sings occasionally during the Autumn months. You will see it on a tree top, swaying in a gale, while he sings facing the wind, and for that reason it is often called that storm-cock. It is interesting to know that the Missel thrush which is now so common in every garden was unknown in Ireland until the year 1808 and the first Irish example was shot in County Antrim. After that they quickly spread through the whole country.
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 23:36
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an locha ach ní bhfuair sé é. Micheál Ó h-Éanacháin, Doir Easa, An t-Sraith, Clár Cloinne Mhuiris, a b'eadh a ainm agus a seoladh. Tá a mhac ar an mbaile go fóill. Deirtear nár rugadh an fear a gheobhas an leabar go fóill. Ní baistthear aoinne de ainm naomh Colm Cille san áit ach baistthear iad d'ainm Naomh Pádhraic. Níl aon paidir ag na daoine a bhaineas leis na naomh sin. Níor thug aoinne easonóir do na naomh sin ach bhí siad an-chineálta leo.
Fuair mé an t-eolas seo ó m'athair Micheál Mach Ging agus ó mo mháthair Eibhlín Ní Ging.
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 23:29
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'Sé ainm Naomh Pádhraig atá i mbéalaibh na ndaoine san cheanntar seo. Do bhaist sé a lán daoine i dtobar i mBaile an Tobar https://www.duchas.ie/en/cbes/5215614/5206869ar a bhealach go Chruach Phádhraig. Tá mainistir ann freisin a thóg Cathail Cróbh Dhearg. Dóigheadh cuid de sa mblian 1922 ach cuireadh cuid de'n díon air arís ach níor críochnuigheadh é. Tá sé ina sheasamh fós.
Tá béaloideas ann gur chaill Naomh Colm Cille leabhar i Loch Measga agus go bhfuil sé ann go fóill. Deirtear nach féidir le aoinne é a fhághail ach fear le láimh aimháin. Rugadh fear san áit timcheall céad blian ó shoin agus shíl gach duine gurbh é an fear sin a gheobhfadh an leabhar. Chaith sé a shaoghal ag cuar-
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 23:19
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Kiltartan (Cont.) No in Family / Married or Not
Thomas Keely 3 Married
John McLoughlin 4 Married
Patrick Connors 2 Widower
Laurence Fahy 2 Not

Rinn Rush - 4 families - 18 people
James Donohue 3 Not
John Gillane 4 Not
Colman O'Shaughnessy 7 Married
Bernard O'Shaughnessy 4 (4) Married

Rineen
John Nolan 1 Not

Barnagaoithe - 3 Families - 10 people
Patrick Cahill 4 Married
Lawrence Cahill 2 Not
John Ward 4 Not

There are only three Irish speakers now living in the district:-
John Diviney, Ballinamanton, Gort
Patrick Mulcair, Castletown Do.
Pat Quinn, Ballyaneen Do.
John Diviney and Patrick Mulcair are Storytellers
Patrick Hayes, Castletown, Gort has some stories in English
Stories from Mulcair and Hayes are already recorded by the Folklore Commission
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 11:52
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were brought in some nearby Hardware Shop, brought to the Corpse House or barn thereat, A couple of Local carpenters or handy men as they were called were got to make the coffin from these boards.
Now a grand uncle to me named Bernard Quinn Rossan who was also a cousin to this Mrs O'Rourke was brought to help another man to make and this unfortunate woman's coffin. It was customary to plane and paint the boards. In this instance when these men tried to plane the board of this coffin, though they had excellent tools and in good condition not a chip could they take off. They sharpened their places again and again but all in vain - They not not plane the boards. Of course at last they gave it up and proceeded to make it as best they could of the rough boards all went well till they started to nail the boards together. But it with the greatest difficulty they could get the nails to enter the wood - four out of every five nails breaking bending or turning crooked.
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 11:21
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ache or toothache

Cure of Sprain
As Jesus rode over the moors and mountains Jesus' foals foot was sprained. He put sinew to sinew and bone to bone and Jesus rode home on his foal again.

Kindling the fire
I light this fire in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost.

Against Disease
Glorious St. Roche present our favour in they efficacious prayer to the throne of thy divine Mercy that we may not be affected by thy powerful intercession from the pestilence of the body and above all deliver us from the most grevious maladies of the soul

Against Damages
May Mary and the Saints be between us and harm. Mary and her son Patrick with his Staff. Martin with his mantle. Brigid with her hood, Michael with his shield And God before them all with His strong right arm. God bless and save us all May Patrick Brigid and Columcille guard each wall. May the Queen of Heaven and the angels bright keep us and our house from harm this night

Author - My Aunt M. Canning Corriscoffey, Dromod
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 10:59
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Our teacher told us that in his young days he heard prayers that were never written in a book.
cannot be taught in school. This one he remembers well. It is said on Sunday mornings when waking:
"De bheath-sa chughainn a Dhomnach Beannuighthe
A tháinig chúghainn tar éis na seachhtmhaine
Bog ár gcos amach go dtí an t-Aifreann
'S bog ár mbéil chun na breithre beannuighthe"

* * *

Here is another said in bed before going to sleep. He picked it up but does not know where
"Now I lay down my head to sleep
To God I give my soul to keep.
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 10:50
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Our noble clergy led the ranks they're foremost in the van
Of honest acts and generous deeds 'tis they alone who can
Through summer's sun or winter's snow they're still our only friends
Where sickness or oppression's heel or palid death attends.

I'll conclude these hurried lines - I hope you'll bear in mild
Two of the Fanad prisoners are yet in gaol confined;
We hope they'll gain their liberty at no far distant day
A consumation to be wished for which all men should pray..

I'd also ask you each and all to join your prayers with mine,
That the sinless soul of Heraghty in bliss may ever shine
'Mong kindred spirits in heaven above before God's holy throne
Where worldly sufferings terminate and sorrows are unknown.
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 10:44
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Since by your achievements I have been decoyed.
Your graceful comportment and lovely discourse
The Godess Diana to love would seduce
You are endowed with science and qualities rare.
No pedigogue teacher with you I'd compare.
Your qualifications are truly sublime
With learning and talent your greatly refined
You are gifted also with an eloquent genius.
That brilliant and fluent, both noble and famous
Those royal perfections that I have depict.
Your carriage with rectitude, reason and wit.
But if on such principle I should proceed
My intended object would have disappeared
My topic expounds from an unceasing flame
That Cupid has deeply excited with pain
But if you still be a true lover of mine
My woes will abate, my pain decline.
He is not on this earth of the masculine
Another whom I would so freely embrace
Dont think my expressions are stained with deceit
For my heart has divulged every word I relate.
I am your affectionate lover till death
That ne'er will dissemble, disown or forget
So now to conclude and my love to disclose
Your letter direct it to Michael McEeon.
(Poet Higgins, Clooncoose, Ballinamuck)
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 10:34
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Mr Furlong of Ballyvaldon gave me the following bealoideas:
At Buffers Alley six miles N.W. of this locality lived two characters 'Mickey the Goat' and 'Tom the Poet.'
Tom had a sick horse and so had a sack thrown over it while in the stable. The horse by some means left the stable and went astray, and of course Tom the Poet had to go look for it.
While doing so he met Micky and:
"Did you see 'eer a quadruped"
"I gazed on his rusty old coat
It took me sometime to consider
That he belonged to a poet"
And Tom:
And from the height of your 'baver' (hat)
To the bit of hair that's under your chin
It takes me no time to consider
That you belong to goat

Then there was Owen Leary an uncle of John Belvin's mother. He'd rhyme on anything I have heard it said. He with two more brothers
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2022-05-19 10:17
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Birds commonly found in district:
Skylark, blackbird, thrush, crow, robin,
wren, magpie, snipe, plover, curlew,
crane (heron), swan, finch, linnet,
pheasant, corncrake, swallow, martin,
jackdaw, wild duck, water-hen,
kingfisher, water wagtail, pigeon,
woodcock, cuckoo, seagull, sparrow,
hawk, owl, wild geese, sallypecker
Migratory:
Plover, curlew, crane (heron), swan,
corncrake, swallow, martin, woodcock
cuckoo, seagull, wild geese.
When crows fly high it is a sign of fine weather. When they lodge on ground in big numbers it is a sign of bad weather.
The wren is supposed to have spied on the Saviour.
The red breast or robin is said to be a drop of blood from the Saviour
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2022-05-19 10:11
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Potatoes are grown in every farm.
A big farmer sows about an acre
A small farmer sows about 1/2 an acre
A poor man sows about 1/4 an acre
Potatoes are sown in ridges and drills
Two sods in ridges. Plough does the work. Spades are not made locally but bought in shop.
Potatoes are cut in Sgiolláns with an eye in each.

(Sketch of Spade)
' Tilly for leg at right hand side'
Local people do not help one another in sowing potatoes.
Potatoes are stored in pits
Two kinds of potatoe, the big ones and crahawn (?)
senior member (history)
2022-05-19 10:01
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Seán Ó'Donabháin, Gorta-na-hEornan, Cill Biortáin a chum an píosa filidheachta seo leanas le h-agaidh cailín aimsire a bhí ag obair le Scotts, Gort an Ghleanna, Cill Biortáin.
Mac feirmeóra ab'eadh é. Chaith sé seal gairid ar sgoil i gCill Biortáin. Pósadh é ar cailín go raibh tig tábhairne aice ag "an Loch" i gCorcaig. Bhí post aige sa phríosún annsan. Nuair a tugadh culaith éadaigh nua isteach fé cheilt chuig William O Biren cuireadh an cor i leith Sheáin Uí Dhonnabháin agus chaill sé a phost. Chuaidh sé go dtí Meiriocá.

(1)
One evening fair for peregrinations
As I strayed by the banks of Sweet Lisheen's side
I espied a damsel both fair and handsome
And that charming goddess had my heart beguiled.

(II)
That blooming lassie, she far surpasses
The most charming goddess of ancient Rome
Its loose and nimble she can work her thimble
And describe the ship in the seas white foam.

(III)
Had I the sceptre of loyal princes
Or the most glorious crown of the King of Spain
The wand of liberty in her hand I'd place it
If true to me she would still remain.
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2022-05-19 00:03
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Now its drawing late
And I must retire to rest
And on this composition
I have done my best
And if it doesn't suit her
For whom it was made
I must turn my hand
To the shovel and spade!
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2022-05-18 23:48
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seven large Bulláns or rock-basins, undoubtedly artificially arranged, as shown in the accompanying scale-plan. Each Bullán is about one foot in diameter, and five inches deep, having nearly vertical sides and a slightly rounded base.
In each of the seven Bulláns there lies a smooth, rounded and oval-shaped stone, of a size suitable to that of the inside of the basin. Rain-water fills each hollow round the contained stone.
This big boulder is known as the "Petrified Dairy," indicated as such by its seven "keeler," and seven "pats of butter," one in each keeler.
These pebbles should never be removed from the keelers, or some misfortune may befall the person who does so. It is said that a man took one pebble home to cure a sick cow, and that before morning all his cows were dead in the cabin and that the pebble taken, came back of itself and rested again in its own "keeler."

Plan of Rock on next page.
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2022-05-18 23:41
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But the thought will bring delight let my path be dark or bright
That McCarthy won the flower of Cahermore.

(V)
Then here's to that noble Boy may his wife be full of joy
May he never lose the Laurels that he bore.
And each day that rolls along make his arm proud and strong
To defend the flower he won in Cahermore.
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2022-05-18 23:34
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I live in Bárr a Coille. This place got its name from a big wood that was there long ago. The parish I live was called Cill Caitairn long, but it is now called the parish of Eyeries. In the burying ground in Cill Caitiarn there is the foundation of a church.
Bárr a' Choille contains fourteen (14) houses. It is a very nice place to live.
I live in the Barony of Bearra. There are many old stories of how Bearra got its name. There were two King in Ireland long ago, "namely" Con Cead Chatha and Eogain Mór. Both of them wanted to be high King of Ireland. A fight rose between them and Eogain went to Spain for help. On his visit to Spain he married the King of Spain's daughter. They came to Ireland to live and they landed in Baile Caislean. Eogains wife's name was Bearra so they called this place Baile Caislean Beara
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2022-05-18 23:27
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The town land I live in is called Bunskellig. This townland got its name as it is at the bottom of Skeilg hill. There are seven houses in it now, but long ago it contained of fifteen houses. There is a beautiful lake in Glenbeg. The parish I live in called the Parish of Eyeries, but long ago it was called the parish of Cill Ciatiarn. In the cemetry in the point of Cill Ciathiarn stands the ruins of an old church. The old people said that this church was built in the year one thousand about the time of Brian Boru.
This peninsula is called the Barony of Bearra. We have an old story which tells us how Bearra got its name. There were two Kings in Ireland about the time of St Patrick ? Eogán mór and Con ceadh cata. A battle was fought between as they both wanted to become high King. Eogán went to Spain looking for help. While he was away he married the daughter of the King of Spain, whose name was Bearra.
He landed
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2022-05-18 23:14
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masonry are almost toppling from its top. Some people say that the leper hospital was near this mill, and others say that the mill itself was the hospital, some people say that the lepers were always shouting "unclean, unclean." There is an old ruin in Innishannon about 3 miles outside the town of Bandon. It is called Downdaniel castle.
"Its ruined towers and ivy grand.
Are but remnants of the beauty
Of our once proud native land."
A man named Barry óg lived in this castle with his daughter Eileen - the fairest maid in Munster.
"His little daughter Eileen, his darling and his pride,
And no fairer maid than she, dwelt in that wide country-side
And many a high-bred chieftain, with castle and broad land,
Would have gladly knelt at Eileen's feet, if honoured with her hand."
But this Eileen was in love with Roche the chieftain of Pól-na-Long (Shippool). And every night the lovers would meet near Downdaniel
"And the light from out his true love's Eileen
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2022-05-18 23:06
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There is across in Barryshall , between Leary's and Deasy's houses, it is erected to the memory of a Hegarty man. He was a servant boy in Goods (were Learys live now). The Sunday before he got shot the Black-and-Tans followed him over to our house, but he ran up the "boithrín cam" (a boreen near our house), and escaped them. From that time he was sleeping in an outside loft and nobody but God knew where he was sleeping. Some time after, the Black-and-Tans came into the loft where he was sleeping, took him out, and shot him at Barryshall cross. It was said that Billy Good (son of his employer) was one of the gang who shot Hegarty. The "I. R. A" knew that Good had given information as to where Hegarty was sleeping and when John Good's son (who was also called John), was coming from Bandon, he was hunted as far as Scardowen, where he was killed, he escaped from the gunmen, but the others pursued him, and someone hit him with a dorn of a door, and killed him.
There is a cross in Pairc a Cumin, it is erected to the memory of a Donovan man, who was shot on the spot, my uncle was "on the run" with him on the day that he was shot, but he escaped. He
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2022-05-18 23:02
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Donovan man in Ardfield a townland about four miles west of Clonakilty. The tumber which was of a very good quality was sold very cheap. Mr Mc Carthy Timoleague bought some of the timber for £1 and it was worth £50.
My father went to Ardfield for the timber, he also got a bundle of silk stockings which were very good.
"Another ship the Ciampa" was wrecked on "Bird Island" an island near Dunworley in the parish of Barryroe. Some time after the wreck, legs, hands, and heads were seen floating on the water.
It was wrecked upon "Bird Island"
A place not far from here
And many a widow and a child
Have shed a bitter tear
But to their dearest relatives
Across the deep blue sea
There is one consolation, that
they are buried in Lislee.
Doctor O 'Driscoll's uncle and two Fitzgeralds uncles of Mrs Hallihane who lives at Barryshall a townland about two miles from Timoleague village, were drowned
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2022-05-18 22:56
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Timoleague Castle was built by a Norman family named Barry. It was well preserved until the time of the Trouble. It was occupied by the I.R.A. The castle was strongly built and strong fortification surrounded it as the word Crú Bhán, (white fortress) indicates. The Crú Bhán is a wood which is situated about 100 yds. north of the castle.
A ruin of an old castle can still be seen in Horse Island commonly known as Birds Island. The castle is situated on a little narrow strip of land connecting the island with the mainland. Tradition says that it was the stronghold of a pirate named "Red Barry." He was so called, because he had red foxy hair. He is supposed to have given Barriroe its name. Over 30 years ago this island was the scene of a shipwreck. An Italian barque called the Ciampa was lost there, in a terrific storm with all hands.

Kilbrittain Castle was the stronghold of the McCarthy's. It was occupied by a rich Englishman named Alcockstawell. In olden days it was the scene of bloody fights, and was held by various chieftains
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2022-05-18 22:45
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About forty years ago several old people went begging and sometimes selling things from house to house.
"Mad" Ellis who was from Bandon, went to Courtmacsherry every fortnight. The schoolboys used to go inside the Abbey walls and throw sods at him when he passed.
Jack "Straw" who was also a native of Bandon, died suddenly in the barrack.
Johnny Meagher was from Ballyheda, a townland a few miles from Bandon. He was a fine singer, but was subject to fits. He used run around in circles when he got these fits. He used spend most of his time between Timoleague and Courtmacsherry. Sam Keating or "Sam the Dummy" lived where Hurleys' now live (in Mill Street). He used hunt the boys with a razor.
"Boxer" who was Tadhg Murphy of Carhue (about two miles west from Timoleague) was a matchmaker. He used travel around from place to place. He was an uncle of the Murphys and O'Leary of Carhue. Maggie, "ring the bells" was Maggie Keohane from Clonakilty. Her niece was working for my great-grandparents about fifty years ago.
Jude Hayes was caretaker of Lady's Well, and she
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2022-05-18 11:22
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142
Famine Years.
In the years 1846 - 1847. When the canal was being made poor men and women used work there drawing stones on their backs at fourpence per day. In the evening they used be so weak that they used sit down by the roadside and die. There used be so many deaths that a kind of an ambulance came around and pick up the remains take them away and bury them in some pit.
Not far from where I am living - Ballyvelly, a very sad incident occurred. A poor man went to dig a well off farmer's potato plot, after the farmer had it dug, to try to find a stray potato. The farmer whose field had been dug brought out a gun and shot the poor man. There lived also in Ballyvelly at the time of the famine three brothers whose names were Denis, James and Jack Cahill. Jack was supposed to be an amadán. One day he went to the Union to procure a shave and a charity meal. When he came home he asked his brothers to make the Leitean. They refused and said he "I'll settle it for ye."
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2022-05-18 11:02
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the seminary any more and in a few months she sickened and died. The bishop's house keeper her former superior determined to go the "wake" and it was towards the end of the day when she had an opportunity of leaving her work. So that it was nearing dusk when she approached the lane leading to the girl's parents' home. This lane was unusually dark as tall whin bushes grew on each side of the fence shutting out even the last of the evening twilight. When she was almost at the end of the lane she must have encountered an enemy for it was her fearful shrieking that attracted the attention of the people in the house who rushed out and found the woman lying at the end of the lane unconscious. She was carried into the house where she soon regained her powers to tell what had happened. Her bedraggled and torn appearance bore out to some extent a portion of her statement and when she persisted in declaring that it was the dead girl who had attacked her there was no little consternation among the mourners and other listeners. Just then some curious person uncovered the corpse on the bed and there they saw her not as she had been laid out as if in a peaceful sleep but twisted up and partly on her face and when she was straightened back again on the bed the beholders were horrified to find or see a look of demonic fury on her face and her two hands were grasping two locks or coils of the housekeeper's hair.
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2022-05-18 10:44
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One particular story which I could not banish from my mind for months was told by poor Barney Diver. (R.I.P.)
Many years ago when a seminary did not exist in Derry as St Columb's College does now a bishop resided in the neighbourhood of Ballybogan. He had a great many students and a staff of clerical workers. The students had to contribute a certain amount of work as their up keep. Now the harvest was got safely in and stored and there was to be a thanksgiving and entertainment and a joy making corresponding to the now almost defunct Harvest Home or "Churn". A house keeper and her assistant maid looked after the dairy and the laundry and the cooking, and they were both very busy preparing for a feast. The usual strict discipline of the college would it appears be relaxed somewhat and the maid would like to be sampling the good things but the more mature housekeeper was becoming hot tempered. She chanced to see the young girl dip a wooden cup into one of the tubs of cream which was set for churning and BROKE the cream. She reproved the girl in no gentle way and the poor maid felt mortified as some of the students and teachers were within hearing distance. The maid snatched her shawl and ran from the dairy and from the place screaming "Dead or alive I shall have revenge" and she hurried to her parents' home which was not very far from the college. She dd not return to
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2022-05-18 10:21
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In the wild woods of America
Their weary feet they set
He haunted them to their dying day,
And he haunts their children yet.

I tell ye never the voice o' blood
Called from the earth in vain,
And neve has crime won earthly good
But it brought its after pain.

"Now that's the story o' Stumpy's Brae
And the murderers' fearful fate
Young man your face is turned that way
Ye'll be ganging the night that gait."

"Ye'll' ken it weel through the few fir trees -
The house where they used to dwell
Gin ye meet ane (?) there as daylight flies
Stumping about on his twa bare knees
It'll just be Stumpy himself' "

Young man 'tis hard to strive wi' sin
But the greatest strife of a'
Is where the greed of fear creeps in
An' drives God's grace awa' "
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2022-05-18 10:13
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It had stricken nine, just nine o' the clock,
The hour when the man lay dead
There came to the outer door a knock
And a very heavy tread

The old man's head swam round and round
The woman's blood 'gan freeze,
For it was not like a natural sound
Like some one stumping over the ground
On the banes o' his twa bare knees.

An through the door like a sough of air
He stumped around the twa,
Wi' his bloody heid and his knee banes bare
They'd maist a' died wi' awe.

The wife's black locks (?) ere morn grew white
They say, as the mountain snows,#
The man was as straight as a staff that night
But he crooked when the morning rose.

An' every night as the clock struck nine -
The hour they did the sin,
The wee bit (?) dog began to whine
An' the ghost cam' clatterin' in.

Dancin' to his plays again
Over the tops o' stools and chairs
Ye'd a' thought it was ten women an' men
Dancin' all in pairs
senior member (history)
2022-05-18 09:59
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"The pack's too short by twa guid span, (?)
And what'll we do" cried he
Says she "Yere a dotin' unthinkin' man;
We'll cut him off at the knees"

They shortened the corp and they packed him tight
Wi' his legs in a pickle o' hay,
And over the burn in the bright moonlight
They carried him to you brae

They shovelled a hole right speedily,
And laid him on his back,
"A right guid pair ye are quo' he
Sittin' bolt upright in the pack"

"Ye think ye've laid me snugly here
Where none will know my station,
But I'll haunt ye far, and I'll haunt ye near
Father and son wi' terror and fear,
To the nineteenth generation."

They sat all alone the very next night
When the dog began to cowl,
And they knew by the pale blue fire light
That the evil one had powe.
senior member (history)
2022-05-18 09:53
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Guid bless us a' cried the wife wi' a smile
But yours is a thrivin' trade.
Oh aye I've travelled many a mile,
And plenty have I made.

The man sat on by the dull fire-flame
When the pedlar went to rest,
Close to his ear the devil came,
And slipped into his breast.

He looked at his wife by the dull fire-light
And she was as bad as he,
"Could we no' murder you man the night?"
"Aye cold we ready" quo' she.

He took the pick without a word
Where it stood ahint the door,
As he passed in the sleepe stirred
But neve wakened more.

"He's dead" said the auld man comin' back
"But what o' the corpse my dear?"
"We'll bury him safe in his ain wee pack
Never you mind the loss of the sack,
For I've ta'en out the gear"
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2022-05-18 00:17
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151) Rath Ban
152) Pull a Pucha
153) Boithrean Doraca
154) Fáil Mór
155) Bothair Buidhe
156) Fáileagh Móg
157) Baile Deala
158) Páirc Glás
159) Muc a Ruadh
160) Deer Park
161) Bush Meadow
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 23:35
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brúach an locha, agus thit an rud chéadhna amach, diompuig sé ar nos (?) núair a thóg sé sup don uisge, agus núair abhí sé ag dul a bhaile bhí an tuisge cómh bán le bainne. Do caith sé na (crutches) isteach i lár an locha mar bhí an súbhal aige
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2022-05-17 23:31
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In aice an locha i mBúnacha do bhí scoil protastúnaig déanta ann fadó. Fínngín Chaoch a dhein an scoil sin ar Chontract. Núair a bhí sé déanta do líoneadar le min, í, chun na daoíne do mhealladh go dtí na scoil, ach níor chúaidh aoinne leis (?)
Chúadar amach as an áit, agus sé an aith a chúadar ná go Árdgroom. Gach de hAoíne, do bhíod dinéar is gach rud acha, chun na daoíne a bhreith leó, níor chúaid aoinne síar ach beirt fhear amháin, d'ar a bainneamh Plibh O hÚrdail, agus fear eile, ach níor d'impúidear 'na bprotústnaig inachor.
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2022-05-17 22:49
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An Inid an t-am is gnáthaidhe a phósann daoine timcheall na h-áiteanna seo. Nuair a thagann Máirt na h-Inide bíonn a lán pósanna in-iarthar an Chláir. Bíonn laetheannta speisialta sa t-seachtmhain 'na pósann daoine. Tá rann mar gheall ar na laetheannta sin. Seo é é:-
Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
And Saturday no luck at all.

The old people have other superstitions about when the bride should get married. The following old saying does not apply to marriages but applies to the corn:-
"An rud a cheangaltar sa bhFoghmhair, scaoiltear san Earrach."
The old people have a rhyme about the dress of the bride:-
Get married in red, I wish you were dead
Get married in green, you're ashamed to be seen,
Get married in blue, you're sure to pull through.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 22:24
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walked home again the same day.
Another famous walker was Michael Herlihy, he was at Tralee fair and he met with a cattle dealer. The cattle-dealer asked him to drive cattle to Cork, so he started from Tralee city and drove them through Cork City, and loaded them at the boat alone, and walked home again the same day.

This is one authentic local feat of walking. I knew an old woman (Mary Greaney) who lived a few hundred yards from this school, and my father remembered the incident. She set out for Mallow over Winter's day in the year '48, a distance of 42 miles. On the return journey on the same day she was back as far as Ballydesmond as the lamps were being lit. She brought a stone of meal on her head
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2022-05-17 22:10
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said "I am called." He left promptly and did not return until next evening. Nobody ever questioned him as to his whereabouts, but sometimes he would be communicative enough and speak on some of his adventures with the "good people."
He was known for miles around the country and was often met and passed by on the road several miles from where he was known to be lodging at that particular moment. This was common knowledge at the time I knew Hurley.
I remember him one day writing a "charm" for my father who had a bad toothache. He wrote on a long sheet of blue paper, stopping now and then waving his arm as if warding off something, saying "the devils are around me now. My father kept this "chain" for years and during this time never got a bad toothache, but whether for luck or otherwise he lost or misled it he was attacked once again by the awful pain. This time he extracted the tooth.
Mr. Hurley died in West Kerry. To me he was a remarkable man. I wonder there is not more known about him in
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2022-05-17 22:02
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the hedge school master.
He was well known to the natives and could call every one by his christian name, and each answered in response "How are you Mr. Hurley"
The master was a regular visitor to my father's house. He and my mother discussed many matters and we sometimes remained at the kitchen fire listening to them discuss the past principally in Irish though the master was a fluent English speaker too.
I welcomed his visits and I longed to listen to his stories about different parts of this country and they often took in adjoining counties.
So far "Hurley" was a normal man - nothing very different from other men but it was rumoured that the could see and speak with the "Good People." It was well known that he would leave a house where he went to lodge and say before leaving "I am called" but no other word. Later in the night he would return debating as with some unseen persons some important subject.
Hurley go the "call" in our house one night before I went to bed. He was on the thick of some subject when suddenly
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 21:55
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The above are townlands in the parish of Glenflesk, Killarney and separated by a third called Cnoc an Imiris. Harry Murphy his wife four sons and five daughters lived in a fairly large farm at Cnoc an Earbhaill 100 years ago.
He owned a black mare - a valuable one but the owner was not aware she was quite as valuable as she was. Mr Herbert was landlord and on a visit from his agent to collect rent the mare was noticed and subsequently requisitioned by him for his offer.
Harry defintitely refused and as a result was evicted from his home in Cnoc an Earbhaill. He soon after settled in Cnoicín a' Ghabhann and brought the mare to her new home. He did not enjoy his home here very long. He got sick and lingered for a few weeks. During his illness he often spoke of the mare and ordered she was not to be sold for money. He died but for some nights previous galloping of horses and falling stone fences were plainly heard by members of his family
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2022-05-17 21:44
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17) Cooking utensils and delph are left quite clean before retiring for the night
18) Fresh clean spring water is brought in before nightfall and a supply in clean vessel.
19) The hearth in particular is left very tidy
20) A pinch of salt was always put in milk before sending it out of the dairy - whether to poor people, to people working in the farm or even for lunch to school children.
21) Bride and groom do not travel in same car to the church.
22) Whichever came out of the church first after marriage lived the longer
23) Medicine should not be tasted by nurse or other person before being given to the patient
24) Slándus was plucked and chewed on May Morning (fasting) to keep illness off during the year.
25) At a particular place in the Gaedhealcht local people would make no attempt to rescue people in difficulties while swimming or bathing.
26) When a mare foaled the covering on the young beast was wrapped round a pole, dried and preserved.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 21:35
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Over you stretch o' meadow-land
And ove the burnie bright,
Dinna' ye mark the fir tree stand
Around you gable white?

I mind it weel in my young days;
The story yel (?) was rife -
There dwelt within that lonel place
A farmer and his wife.

They sat together all alone
That blessed Autumn night,
When the trees with out and hedge and stone
Were white in the pale moon light.

The boys and girls had a' gone down
A wee to the blacksmith's wake
There passed one by the window (?)
And gied the door a shake.

The man rose up, and op'ed the door
And when he'd spoke a bit
A pedlar man stepped into the floor,
And tumbled down the pack he bore,
A right heavy pack was it
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 15:37
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eyes. There seems to have been no special days set apart for paying these rounds but the feast of St Nicholas was apparently a very popular day for making the pilgrimage.
The rounds were made in the usual way. The pilgrim walked slowly round the field from right to left while he recited the Rosary. This he did three times. It was usual to apply the water of the well to the affected part. It was sometimes drunk but not taken away. When leaving the pilgrim left some small object near the well.
Tradition says that on one occasion the well was profaned by a woman from the neighbourhood who took some of the water away to be used for household purposes. When she poured it into a kettle she noticed a little trout swimming in it. The water would not boil so she was obliged to take it back to the well and procure a fresh supply from another source.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 15:31
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Christmas comes but once a year
And when it comes it brings good cheer,
Up with the kittle and down with the pan
Give us our answer and let us be gone."
Money is given and the boys spent it afterwards.

On May Eve holy water is blessed in the Church. There is such a rush for it in buckets and cans that it is kept in the sacristy and the Sacristan gives only a certain amount to each person.
Cattle and crops and houses are all sprinkled with the May water May Eve so that the devil or evil people who practice "Black Magic" would have no effect on them for the year.
In several farms around here, farmers have lost cattle by disease, or a crop of potatoes or turnips might fail through no cause whatsoever and if they search their rick of hay or dig their garden they will find eggs put there to do them harm. These must be burned where they are found.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 15:15
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We sow about two acres of potatoes every year. First of all ridges are turned and farm-yard manure is drawn and spread on the back of the ridge; then the cut seed or Sgoiltheáin are then put down in the shape of the leg of the pot; then the furrows are piked up on the Sgoiltheáin and then it is shovelled. When the young stalks come up the furrows are again shovelled up on the stalks. This is called trenching.
When the young weeds come up they weed the furrows and when the month of October comes the potatoes are dug. Then the neighbours come to help one another. This work is called "coring."
The day of the digging of the potatoes the old women come together with baskets. There are three ways of setting potatoes, by Taobh-fhóid, Barr-fhóid and drills. Every farmer has his own way for setting potatoes. Some sprout them, some stick them and some spread them. There are many kinds of potatoes such as Kerr pinks, Beauty of Bute, Arran Banners, Arann Victor, Arran Chief, Duchess of Cornwall, Champions, Irish Queen, English Queen, Epicures and Beauties.
In olden times the people used to manure
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 15:07
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the ground before turning it: One method was burning the long withered grass: this was called fallowing; this made the ground rich to grow a good crop. In those days very few had ploughs and the ploughs that they had were wooden ones. The people who had spades had a special smith for making them. The name of the smith who made the spades for the Castleisland district was Begley, the smith from Knocknagoshel.
When the potatoes are dug they are stored away in a pit; other people make a hole in the ground and put them down and cover them with earth; the people who make pits have thatch them with briars and grass.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 14:57
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At night these came, a fearful flood,
Three days the skies had poured.
The top wi' foam and the bottom wi' mud
The burn in fury roared.
She says Guid man Ye need us' turn
Sae pale in the dim firelight,
Stumpy canna' cross the burn
We'll na' be here the night
For it's owe the bank and its owe the binn,
It's owe the meadows rig.
"Aye" says the Ghist couin' [?] clatterin' in,
An' he gi'ed the auld wife a slap on the chin
"But I came round by the brig"
They sold their gear, and owe the sea
To a foreign land they went -
To a foreign land, but who can flee
From appointed punishment
The ship swam o'er the water clear
Wi' the help of the western breeze
But the very first sound in guilty fear[?]
Was the tapping o' those two knees
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 14:49
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It would appear that a young man once asked an old man in St Johnston town in County Donegal a station on the G.N. Railway to point him out the way to Strabane. He was told to go by Stumpy's Brae, but he remarked that he had never heard of Stumpy's Brae, and did not know the situation of it whereupon the old man told him the yarn as under. Perhaps it would be well to remark that there is a strong indication of the Scotch Accent in the district like (?) what we call "broken Scotch." -

Heard ye us' tell o' Stumpy's Brae?
Sit down sit down young friend!
I'll mak' your flesh to creep today,
And your hair to stand on end.
Young man it's hard to strive wi' sin
And the hardest strife o' a'
In when the greed o' gain creeps in,
And drives God's grace awa'.
Oh it's quick to do, but it's lang to rue
When the punishment comes at last,
And we would gi' the world to undo
The deed that's done and past
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 14:36
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The man immediately collapsed and they had to take him into the house and it was 3 days before he fully recovered. He never told who he was and all the information they got was that he came from Co. Longford. When Old Barney saw the state the man was in he didn't like the job of delivering 3 straws, so he gathered the whole family together, took his beads off a peg on the hob and offered up the rosary to save them from the "CHOLERA MORBIS." The poor man had travelled the whole way from Co Longford before he got a house there was no straw in.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 14:30
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If a person had a wart on his hand or foot the first stone he would meet with a hole in it and water to be in it he should say:-
Uisce, uisce cloch gan iarraidh ar do thóir a tháinic mé seo faneóchaidh cuid Dia orm, agus ag iarraidh a leigheas atá mé.

If a person had the whooping cough and to meet a man riding on a white horse the cure he would give him would make him well again.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 14:26
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Tá go leór cómhartha ag na sean daoine faoi an aimsear.
1) Má bhíonn lasadh gorm sa teine bíonn aimsear fliuch againn
2) Is cosamhail le stoirm é nuair a bhíonns na caoirigh bailighthe in aon
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 10:55
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nettles in May he will not suffer from any rash during the remainder of that year.

WATERCRESS:-
To get in streams and is used for salads. It is said to be very good for delicate people.

SCOTCH GRASS
Scutch grass grows in most potatoe gardens; it is harmful because it spreads.

BUTTER CUPS
Grow in most fields in this district but they are said to impoverish the soil.

GARLIC
Forms part of the undergrowth of woods, and is very strongly scented. It is said that if cows eat it their milk and the butter got from it taste very strongly also.

SPLOUNK
This is very harmful because if not cut down it spreads rapidly and impoverishes the soil.

GROUNDSEL
A small little plant which grow near or on top of walls. Birds love to peck at it and eat it.

LAUREL AND IVY LEAVES
Are used for cleaning black or navy clothes
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 10:46
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At one time there was a Protestant living in Rehill. One day as he was very sick and as he thought there was danger of death he sent for the Minister. When the Minister was sent for there were two smart boys in the neighbourhood and they dressed themselves up as like a Minister as possible and went to see the sick man.
They took with them two large sacks and on reaching the house one of them said he was the Minister and the other said he was his Clerk. The "minister" went into the room to see the sick man and the clerk stayed in the kitchen where a lot of bacon was hanging. The "minister" prayed over the sick man and said "Per omnia saecula saeculorum" and when the clerk would have the bacon in the sack he would answer "Amen." The minister remained praying until the Clerk had all the bacon in the sacks. He then wished (?) good day to the sick man and said he would be back again in a day or two to see him
(Contd)
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 10:36
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coining. One night as himself and his brothers were drinking in the pubic house at Goatenbridge one of them handed in a shilling for some drink. When the woman got the shilling she looked at it and said it looked queer and handed it around to the other men and they said it looked queer also. She took the shilling to the police and when they came Maurice was gone. They looked for him again and got an account that he was in a house in Knockballinira, near Crough. The police surrounded the house and two of them went to the door. The man of the house got up and said "Who is there." "Police on duty" they answered. The man went back and told Maurice and he immediately got up and took a spade from behind the door and when he was opened he felled two policemen to the ground. Then Maurice rushed through the yard of police and jumped over a wall 6 feet high but in doing so hit his toe and broke it. He fled to the hills again with a broken toe. He was on the run for 7 months and got so tired that he gave himself up again and was imprisoned for life.
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 10:24
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About 100 yrs ago, there lived a family of 7 brothers very far our in Knockmealdown Mts in a place called " Uisce(?) Soluis." They had a little arm of their own. It so happened that the Duke of Devonshire's sheep were grazing on the mountain and the robbers came and stole them and had them in their dens. The Duke was informed that his sheep were missing and he immediately sent out messengers in search of them and also notified the local police. After some time they got news that they were hidden in dens in the mountain, and when they came there, nothing was seen but the skins. The seven brothers were on the run. Eventually they were all captured except Maurice - the youngest. The others were imprisoned for a number of years. Maurice was still on the run and he became so tired that one morning he came to the Barrack and gave himself up to the police and he told them that he was hiding for the past fourteen months in the nearest house to the Barracks. He was sentenced to 5 yrs. imprisonment. Some of the brothers died in prison and some were released. When Maurice had his term done he too was released and when he came home himself and his brothers started
senior member (history)
2022-05-17 10:11
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Long ago in South Tipperary, the Protestant Ministers should get a tenth of the harvest from the farmers - both rich and poor. The men who collected the tithes were called PROCTORS. Now it happened one day when one of these Proctors was collecting this Tax he saw two men approaching him and he became suspicious and ran into a nearby house. They followed and shot him on heap of potatoes. The British Military came out from Cahir in search of the two men but failed to find them. As the soldiers and police were passing by a place called "Poul a Tar" near Ballybacon there was a man fencing a gap on his own farm on the roadside, and he was taken away by them to the Ball Alley at Goatenbridge. They held a Court Martial and sentenced him to be hanged. The gallows were erected and the priest sent for, and when he had the prisoner prepared for death he declared that the gallows would not hang him and it didnt. The rope broke and the police and soldiers agreed to let him free. But a local Protestant gentleman on horseback
(Contd)
senior member (history)
2022-05-16 11:42
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Dromore is the townland in which I live and the townlands surrounding it are Aughaville, Colomane, Gortnascreena and Maonvour. It is in the parish of Caheragh, and in the Barony of West Carberry.
There are about twenty families there and about ninety people. The family name most common in this district is O'Brien. There are five families of this name in the same district and three families of the Mac Carthys.
All the houses in this district are good slated houses with the reception of one small thatched house which belongs to Thomas Finn. Dromore got its name from a big hill which is north of it and the meaning of "Drom-mór" is the big ridge.
There are about seven old people over seventy years living in this townland and two of them are noted for being able to speak the Irish language fluently. They can tell many stories and sing songs in Irish. There is an Irish teacher living in this townland also namely Séan O'Brien. There are no old ruins in this district, but, there is one big stone in a field in the form of Mr. Tim O'Brien. This stone is said to have been thrown by a giant down from Dromore Hill.
It is about eight feet in height and fifteen feet in circumference. It is standing up straight and is called a "Gollán." Many people have emigrated to England during the past few years. The land is fairly good and there is no bog in it. There is one big wood owned by Mr. J. Keohane to the east and a big river runs along the south side of the townland. The name of it is "Aba na Siogán." There is one small stream running along the eastern side namely "Aba na Clár Side. (Sidhe)
senior member (history)
2022-05-16 11:28
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country people firmly believe that the ensuing period of that particular moon will be accompanied by bad weather. It seems to be an open question, however, as to what other day of the week is the most suitable for a "good-weather" moon to appear in the firmament. Apparently "any day except Saturday" is the generally accepted dictum in this connection; at any rate I have never heard any other day of the week mentioned as being a suitable day for the advent of a new moon.
The stars do not seem to receive much attention from the rural population with regard to their ability as weather prophets. In fact the meteorological phenomena which they are deemed capable of foretelling is the advent of frost; they are believed to do so when they "shoot" into space continuously on a bright starry night.
A local waterfall in the townland of Drumkillean and parish of Mohill is thought by the old people to be a very efficient weather guide. If it is clearly audible in the neighbourhood at night then good weather is at hand but if its barely audible or altogether inaudible then rain will follow.
A few further omens of the weather as indicated by the behaviour of certain birds are the following:
A robin sitting on top of a branch instead of lower
senior member (history)
2022-05-16 11:17
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The sun moon and to a lesser extent the stars are also looked upon as weather indicators. If the sun rises with a red glow in the eastern sky rain is supposed to follow, but if it sets with a similar glow good weather is indicated. If "streams" or rays are seen shining from the sun through the clouds at the approach of sunset, rain may be expected next day. If, in the midst of a period of bad weather, a very close, hot day is experienced, country folk fail to be impressed by the apparent change for the better in the weather. They will shake their heads wisely and express the opinion that it is "only a pet day."
When the moon is surrounded by a small hazy "ring" this is regarded as a sign of approaching rain. If, as is sometimes the case, a very large circle surrounds it then a storm is said to be close at hand. If the first quarter of a new moon coincides with a period of wet weather then the remaining three quarters will also be accompanied by rain. Conversely if the first quarter of a moon is accompanied by good weather than the remainder of that moon will also be good. Saturday is generally supposed to be a bad day upon which to have a new moon make its appearance so
senior member (history)
2022-05-16 11:11
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is beginning to wither, a small circle of verdant grass remains growing around it, as the animals have hitherto kept away from its immediate vicinity. When the rest of the pasture has been cropped close throughout the summer months, these small circles of grass are very tempting to the horse, who had avoided them previously. Now, however the offensive weed is almost withered and has lost its nauseating scent so the horse eats the disease-infected grass.
Some herbs are commonly believed to have healing properties and are extensively used as cures in this district. Cuckoo sorrel is commonly utilised for the purpose of healing cuts or wounds of any kind. To get the best results from it the leaves of the plant are boiled together with leaves of cabbage. When they are well boiled they form a kind of sticky paste which is applied as hot as possible to the affected part and good results are said to result from the treatment.
The herb known as comfrey, which is not, by the way as plentiful locally as in other districts is used to alleviate swellings. It grows chiefly in boggy soil and its roots which bear a close resemblance to radish are used to make the cure; its leaves have no efficacy at all. The roots are cut or pounded up well and mixed with unsalted butter and the mixture is
senior member (history)
2022-05-16 11:03
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(Contd)
The common belief is that this weed is only found in good land and this opinion is probably correct, as it is rarely growing in rugged or mountainous districts. Its roots are very strong and having a firm anchorage in the soil it is extremely difficult to uproot. Some farmers take the trouble of pulling every weed of this kind up by the roots as they believe that cutting them is useless as a preventive to their growth. The seed is feathery like that of the thistle, and if a field adjacent to one infested with the weed is tilled a fresh crop of Buachalláns will make its appearance in due course. A peculiar belief with regard to this weed is that it infects horses with that slow but fatal disease locally known as "the staggers" because of the dizziness and tendency to stagger which it produces in its subjects.
The horse dislikes the taste of the Buachallán and cattle also fight shy of it; sheep however will eat it and suffer no serious injury thereby although some farmers think it causes stiffness and pains in the joints. The infection of horses with "the staggers" is caused, in a sense through their own aversion to eating it, because it is believed to be harmless when in its younger stage of growth. When the pollen falls, however, on the surrounding grass it infects the grass with the germ of the disease. Later, when the weed
senior member (history)
2022-05-16 00:06
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True Irish hospitality
For every grade and quality
With cheerful liberality
Were from him to be seen
He seemed a grand selection
Made by Divine Perfection
When man was in dejection
And famine stalked the land
Each seemed a ghostly skeleton
As he walked an empty wallet on
His shoulder not a pallet on
To rest his head or hand
When the miser, cool capricious
Became cold and avaricious
And when the most ambitious
From virtue fell away
The poor man got his merit
Comfort, cash and credit
Whenever he came for it
To John O'Connor Day
With still his days unnumbered
His deeds will be remembered
Long after he'll have slumbered
And mingled with the clay
And the stranger yet with pleasure
To his tomb his steps will measure
senior member (history)
2022-05-16 00:00
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Patrick Robinson was a National Teacher, who lived in Loughfouder, Knocknagoshel, Co. Kerry. He was born in Co. Clare. He was regarded as a poet of outstanding merit by the people of the parish and his verses were very popular. He was endowed with a keen sense of humour and a very ready wit.
Many patriot songs came from his pen and he also composed verses on others (current events) subjects of interest to the local people.
Most of his songs were written down but many are not lost. All the songs that I have written here, of which he was the author, were obtained from Mr. Denis Collins, Loughfouder the poet's son-in-law, who has a copy of about a dozen of them. I wrote them from the copy
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 23:55
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Shawn O'Connor Day was a shopkeeper in Knocknagoshel village, during the Famine and the lean years that followed it. He became famed for his charity and consideration towards his customers who were in great want. He gave credit freely and never pressed for payment. He even gave food to the starving, free of charge.
His descendants are shopkeeping at the present time in Knocknagoshel - a village which is known locally as the "Mall." This song, in his praise was composed by Patrick Robinson, Loughfouder.

To honour true nobility a bard of poor ability,
With courteous affability, this non-poetic lay
Bequeaths a grateful populace, as all demand unanimous
To make the name magnanimous of "John O'Connor Day."
His deeds of pure humanity were doled with such urbanity
As freed from pride or vanity his venerated name
And made it's lustr'd brilliancy so bright in Christian heraldry
That we inscribe his memory on the pinnacle of fame

Justice, worth and charity, Suavity for poverty,
Integrity and probity characterised his mien
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 23:45
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By the margin of the ocean one morning in the month of June
As I heard the warbling songsters, their charming notes did sweetly sing;
'Twas there I spied a female who seemed to be in grief and woe
Discoursing with young Bonnie Part concerning the bonny bunch of Roses O
Upsteps the young Napoleon and he takes his mother by the hand,
Saying "Mother dear, have patience until I'm able
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 21:55
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was when in this locality. Owen Ruadh was a ploughman or labourer with the Nagles. One of the boys of the family was home from school in England and was reading a Greek book in the kitchen in Annakissa, Owen was listening and went over to the boy and corrected his mistakes in Greek.
It was only then that the Nagles realised that they had a learned man, and a great poet in their employment.
Rev. Philip Canon Burton succeeded Rev. James Fitzpatrick, died in Feb. 1881, and was buried in the church in Ballyhooly which had been erected through his exertions.
Rev. John Carver succeeded him
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 21:52
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Manntach Magner, of Kilquane Castletownroch, and Patrick O'Regan of Castletownroche, were in the men's aisle, left their place and took the seat in question outside the church door. I think they smashed it there.

This story was told to me by James O'Regan of Castletownroch who was born in 1829, and died about 25 years ago. Patrick O'Regan was father of James. James told me he buried 14 people in one day in Castletownroche Graveyard in 1847. They all died of famine fever, and most of the inhabitants being in bed sick of the fever, James did the Good Samaritan and buried them himself. He brought them in a donkey car to the graveyard in instalments, made
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 21:48
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Rev. Donough Callaghan was ordained priest in 1671 and was parish priest in 1704.
Rev. John Walsh parish priest in 1766
Rev. John Donovan, died in 1781
Rev. John Leonard, ordained priest in 1761, died in March 1803, and was buried in Killathy.
People used to take away some of the earth from his grave in Killathy, Ballyhooly, as he was considered to be a saint.
Rev. Michael Collins P.P. in 1811, and in that year the present parochial registers of baptisms and marriages were begun by him. He became P.P. of Skibbereen in 1814, and Rev. John Kirby came from Skibbereen to Castletownroche. I myself
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 21:40
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The most harmful weeds which grow locally are the preshash (probably Praiseac), crow-foot, Buachallán, and thistle. The first of these is especially harmful to crops of oats wheat or other grain crops. It is of a yellow colour and usually infests fields which are composed of peaty soil. They spread rapidly owing to their free manner of dispersing seed and are practically impossible to eradicate. In fact crops of oats and wheat are often rendered useless by the prevalence of this weed.
The crowfoot weed is also a cause of annoyance and loss to farmers. Though not so damaging in its effect as the Praiseach weed it, nevertheless, tends to smother or retard the growth of germinating seeds and plants, particularly in boggy soil. It, too, is very hard to get rid of, as it is of a deep-rooting, tenacious nature, and unless the soil is deeply dug and carefully cleared of weeds, the crowfoot weed will probably render the plot useless for the production of a successful crop. In soils of a clayey nature, however, this particular weed does not make so much headway as in peaty soil.
The well-known Buachallán Buidhe is to be found abundantly in pasture which is being "let out" for meadow grass, after producing a crop of oats or wheat.
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 21:28
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Flax was grown, from which linen was made. This gave considerable employment, not only in the growing, but also in the scutching, spinning, and weaving. Camps of scutches were a common event and work was generally followed by a short dance.
The wool was only worked up locally and made into frieze. A frieze coat generally did a man for a number of years, and was used as an overcoat as well as a dress coat.
Tom Morris, Cloonee, and Pat Breaden, Springfield were the last weavers. The latter lived down to about twenty years ago, and possessed an unlimited store of folk-lore, which unfortunately no one ever thought of writing down.
A nailer named Clarke lived in Cloonee and another named Mulhern of Clooncoose, died quite recently. The cross roads there is still called Nailer's Cross.
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 21:09
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The Parish of Mora, was the first point of Lismore Diocese, touched by St. Patrick on his way south from Cashel. This parish and Donoughmore - another place visited by the Apostle - are the premier Patrician parishes in Lismore Diocese, absurdly called "Waterford" Diocese. But as Christian locations they are junior to Ardmore, St Declan's location. This seems to be the reason that Mora and Donoughmore are prebends in the Diocese of Lismore. On this journey, southward, St. Patrick seems to have been fulfilling the terms of his commission as Evangelist to "the Irish believing in Christ," and as there was a Christian Community at Ardmore, similar associations must have existed at Mora and Donoughmore.
The Breviary Legend shows that St. Declan was converted by a pre-Patrician missionary and there is no reason to doubt that such missionaries were operating north of the Suir. Traditions of these early Christian societies have been lost because to escape persecution they were secretive.
There are indications that Lisronagh was, in Patrician times, a stronghold of Paganism. The road from the north by Donoughmore was the old Clonmel-Cashel road, and the Patrician itinerary from Cashel to Mora, from Mora to Donoughmore and thence to Patrickswell shows
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 20:54
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18) COLEMAN (Upper and South) 25 families. Pop. 120
Family names mixed. 12 thatched, 15 slated. 4 over 70yrs
Dont know Irish. Tell stories in English
1) Mrs Egan 2) Mrs. Woodlock

19) CARPET LANE 10 families Pop 35
Families most common, Sullivan 5 thatched, 5 slated
4 over 70. Dont know Irish
a) Mrs Howley b) Philip White c) John Hickey d) Johanna Slattery

20) SPRINGMOUNT 10 families Pop = 36
Family names mixed. All houses slated.
2 over 70. Dont know Irish.
a) Mrs Purcell b) Thomas Ryall

Over 100 yrs ago the family names most common in the district were O'Donnell's, Slatterys, and Bates's. Houses were then far more numerous, mostly thatched. Ruins can still be seen in the village of Clerihan. The population of the village alone at that time was over 200, now only about 50. After Famine most of the people emigrated to America. The houses were mostly built by the people themselves of mud and straw after The Big Wind. The people had to put these up or perish. The people at that time used to say The Rosary in Irish and spoke the language also.
The land is very fertile and suitable either for dairy farming or grazing. Undulating and not very boggy. Knockeeran Wood grows at the south of the village, being cut away now after place being divided. No river of any size except River Moyle at north side.
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 13:14
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to cut it away. The following morning when he woke up, a hand and a foot were paralysed, and they remained so until he died.
Another local hero was Willie Kelly of Drumcamogue. He was a powerful long-jumper and could do over 22'.
A very noted athlete who was well-known locally was Jim Wall of Bansha. A Blacksmith by trade, he was a well-known walker and high-jumper. He could jump 6' 1" high. At present, his son is following in his footsteps, and is a budding champion.
John Flanagan of Kilbreedy, Kilmallock, was another athlete who won fame on athletic fields. He was a comtemporary of Jim Mitchell's. On his return from America after the "Irish Invasion," he brought a negro with him. He was the centre of attraction for this locality for months. He was called "Longboat," and was a great long-distance runner. He made a record road-run one day from Limerick to Mitchelstown. As a matter of fact, followers on fast horses were left far behind. Longboat always held his tongue between his teeth at the side of his mouth. One night in Kilmallock, he was introduced to Guinness's stout, and from his first taste of it, he deteriorated in speed and staying-power. Shortly afterwards he returned to America.

The best local dancer was Peter Scanlon of Ballylanders. He learned his step-dancing from
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 12:21
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3 Forges in the parish. Smyths - Michael Perkins, Patrick Lafford, and James Smyth. These people's forefathers have been smyths for over 100 yrs. Situated beside the road. Roofs slated, timber windows. One fireplace in each, raised up from the floor. Bellows made of leather and iron. Not made locally. Implements - hammers, rasps, anvils, tongs, sledges, punches, shovels, knives, vices. Houses, mules, ponies, jennets and asses shod. Only farm implements made are socks of ploughs, pins for harrows and rakes, mostly repairs to farm implements. Wheels are bound in the open. Fire lit in the forge yard.
Forge water is a cure for warts. If the sparks fly towards a person, it is said that money is coming to him. The 3rd generation of blacksmiths can cure rickets in children. The child is put on the anvil "Innnin Ceartán" and after that it gets cured. William Reidy, blacksmith, aged 75 years living in Moorestown, Cahir has this privilege still and his father before him had the same named Michael Reidy.
Ruins of forges at Ballinlough, Coleman and Giantsgrave, Clonmel. Smiths named Smyth occupied the former and Keating's the latter. These latter used to have 3 fires working and 3 smiths engaged in shoeing, making ploughs and binding wheels. "Logs" (?) are used in the binding of wheels. Long ago these forges were the centre of story telling. The people used to be there all day, waiting for repairs to be done to their ploughs, during the Russian War, when tillage was in vogue, and whiled away the time by story-telling.
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 12:13
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rejected
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3 Forges in the parish. Smyths - Michael Perkins, Patrick Lafford, and James Smyth. These people's forefathers have been smyths for over 100 yrs. Situated beside the road. Roofs slated, timber windows. One fireplace in each, raised up from the floor. Bellows made of leather and iron. Not made locally. Implements - hammers, rasps, anvils, tongs, sledges, punches, shovels, knives, vices. Houses, mules, ponies, jennets and asses shod. Only farm implements made are socks of ploughs, pins for harrows and rakes, mostly repairs to farm implements. Wheels are bound in the open. Fire lit in the forge yard.
Forge water is a cure for warts. If the sparks fly towards a person, it is said that money is coming to him. The 3rd generation of blacksmiths can cure rickets in children. The child is put on the anvil "Innnin Ceartán" and after that it gets cured. William Reidy, blacksmith, aged 75 years living in Moorestown, Cahir has this privilege still and his father before him had the same named Michael Reidy.
Ruins of forges at Ballinlough, Coleman and Siatsgrove, (?) Clonmel. Smiths named Smyth occupied the former and Keating's the latter. These latter used to have 3 fires working and 3 smiths engaged in shoeing, making ploughs and binding wheels. "Logs" (?) are used in the binding of wheels. Long ago these forges were the centre of story telling. The people used to be there all day, waiting for repairs to be done to their ploughs, during the Russian War, when tillage was in vogue, and whiled away the time by story-telling.
senior member (history)
2022-05-15 11:46
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1) A Prayer said when getting up in the morning
"Oh my God, I arise from this bed of sleep,
To adore my God, and to labour in the salvation of my soul,
Oh, may I rise on the last day,
To Life Everlasting, Amen.

2) A Prayer said when going to bed.
"Lord Jesus Christ lay me down to sleep,
I pray to God my soul to keep
And if I die before I wake
I pray to God my soul to take
There are four corners on my bed
There are four angels on them spread,
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
God bless this bed that I lie one
If any evil comes to me
Oh, blessed Lord deliver me
When Christ saw the cross he was to be crucified on
He trembled and he shook.
Said the Jews to Him, have you plague, fever, or ague,
Or do you shake with fear,
And anyone that keeps these words in writing or in memory
Shall never have a plague, fever or ague,
The cross of Christ be my guide
The Holy Ghost may save me.
My powerful Queen, my soul serene,
I ask that prayer of Mary.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph I give you my heart and soul
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 23:19
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Jesus, Mary and Joseph assist me in my last agony,
Jesus, Mary and Joseph may I breathe forth my soul in peace with you
Into Thy hands, oh God I recommend my spirit
Lord Jesus receive my soul
Holy, holy, Lord God of Hosts
Heaven and Earth are full of Thy Glory,
Glory be to the Father, Son and Holy Ghost
As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be
World without end. Amen."

3) Another prayer said when in bed at night.
"As I lie on my right hand side
I pray to God to be my guide
There are four corners on my bed
Four angels daily round me spread
St. Matthew, Mark, St. Luke and John
God bless the bed that I lie on
To night and for ever more, Amen."

4) Prayer said when entering a church.
"I will draw near to the alter of God
To God who rejoiceth in my youth."
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 23:06
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The fools money does not last long
Spare the rod and spoil the child
Silence is golden
Rome was not built in a day
Things do not always turn out as we expect
Birds of a feather flock together
Good words cost nothing and are worth much
Even the truth is not believed from the liar
The longest way round is the shortest way home
A burned child dreads the fire
Don't count the chickens before they are hatched
Look before you leap
Many a change youth undergoes
A good beginning is half the work
A bird on a hand is better than two on a bush
A little pot is soon hot
The ill wind blows good for someone
The greedy do not know when they have had enough
He who grasps much looses all
He who steals a pin shall live to steal a greater thing
Earn gold and wear silk
Better late than never
Earl to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 22:59
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Faint heart never won fair lady
A rolling stone gathers no moss
It's no use crying over spilt milk
A stitch in time saves nine
A man's house is his castle
Out of the frying pan into the fire
New brooms sweep clean
Kill two birds with one stone
No rose without a thorn
Many hands make light work
Its the early bird that catches the worm
When the cat is away the mice can play
What's seldom is wonderful
Beware of him who does not talk much
Strike while the iron is hot
Little good is the good that is boasted of
A man without a dinner is two for supper
Honesty is the best policy
It's like asking the cat for his skin
Nature bears out through the eyes of a cat
Nature goes further than training
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 22:51
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(II) There lived in Newbridge a courages priest named Father Lynch. One night he was out walking and he met a man who had been dead a year before that. The man said he came on earth to do penance for his sins and that he was looking for shelter. The priest said to him that he would give him shelter if he never appeared to another person. the priest took the man and put him behind the alter in the old chapel.
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 22:50
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(III) The is a pot of hidden in Creeveroe between two gardens. It is hidden under a gooseberry bush and to black cats minding it. It is said that children
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 20:42
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As grey as a badger
As brown as a berry
As red as blood (rose)
As lovely as the lasair léana (lovely green weed grows on tops of bogholes)
As fresh as a daisy
As blind as a bat
As deaf as a bítil
As clean as a whistle
As healthy as a trout
As thin as a herring (whip) [tongs]
As gay as a lark
As snug as a thrush
As proud as a peacock
As proud as punch
As rich as a Jew
As poor as a churchmouse
As mild as a cat eating sprouts
As sore (peevish) as a weasel (briar)
As conthrairey as an armful of cats
As dead as a door nail
As thick as a ditch
As lively as a cricket
As straight as a ramrod
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 20:41
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Each new poem was severely criticised and if eventually considered worthy was inserted in Bolg-an-tSoláthair. Periodically locals examined this book an so a constant stimilus was kept up.
Native music was fostered with native song and an Irish piper was always kept at "Faithche." Cnoc-an-Cheoil (now tenanted by Con P.C. Warren) was owned by Domhnall Ó Laoghaire (Geoffrey O'Donoghue's (?) piper. The fairy music is believed to have been heard periodically long years after his death. The pipes were of enormous size and Domhnall was a powerfully strong man.
When Eoghan left this district poetry did not leave with him - other poets were Tadhg Críonna O'Scannell and Matthew Hegarty ancestor of James Hegarty Rathfarnham Dublin. James was once a parishioner and was actually a "Monitor" in Raheen Boys' School.
Eoghan could never be worsted in his game. When he got tired of soldiering and was anxious to leave the army he blistered his shins with spear-wort or
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 20:19
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te, agus le glóire duit-se a Dia aoibhinn álúinn.
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 20:15
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God's peace be to you Bere
and many God's peace Finaha crown
God's peace be always there
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 20:07
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As grey as a badger
As brown as a berry
As red as blood (rose)
As lovely as the lasair léana (lovely green weed grows on tops of bogholes)
As fresh as a daisy
As blind as a bat
As deaf as bítil [?]
As clean as a whistle
As healthy as a trout
As thin as a herring (whip) [tongs]
As gay as a lark
As snug as a thrush
As proud as a peacock
As proud as punch
As rich as a Jew
As poor as a churchmouse
As mild as a cat eating sprouts
As sore (peevish) as a weasel (briar)
As conthrairey as an armful of cats
As dead as a door nail
As thick as a ditch
As lively as a cricket
As straight as a ramrod
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 20:03
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rejected
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Each new poem was severely criticised and if eventually considered worthy was inserted in Bold-an-tSoláthair. Periodically locals examined this book an so a constant stimilus was kept up.
Native music was fostered with native song and an Irish piper was always kept at "Faithche." Cnoc-an-Cheoil (now tenanted by Con P.C. Warren) was owned by Domhnall Ó Laoghaire (Goeffrey O'Donoghue's (?) piper. The fairy music is believed to have been heard periodically long years after his death. The pipes were of enormous size and Domhnall was a powerfully strong man.
When Eoghan left this district poetry did not leave with him - other poets were Tadhg Críonna O'Scannell and Matthew Hegarty ancestor of James Hegarty Rathfarnham Dublin. James was once a parishioner and was actually a "Monitor" in Raheen Boys' School.
Eoghan could never be worsted in his game. When he got tired of soldiering and was anxious to leave the army he blistered his shins with spear-wort or
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 19:51
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and the bailiff was never seen at their doors.
The school at "Faithche" prepared boys fro the Seminary at Killarney. Eoghan attended here. It was not purely "grinding" like some of our present schools but fostered poetry and music as well as Irish English Latin and Greek. Here Eoghan first showed his poetic ability.
Less than a mile on the other side of the river at Schrahanaveal "Aodhgán" as born. When very young his father died and his widowed mother found it hard to carry one so hard that she was obliged to give up her holding and went to live in the next townland - Cnoc na Chorrfiadh (Stagmount) Later the children lived in Liosbáibe, Schrahanaveal and Kilquane and many of them showed wonderful poetical talent.
"Poor Scholars" attended the Faithche and like all of their kind were hospitable, entertained in the farm houses. The whole district was permeated with the spirit of learning and song and rivalry was very noticeable between families on both sides of the river as regards music poetry and manly games.
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 19:42
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1) Mothers tied a burnt bit of coal somewhere in the clothing of young children on their being taken out for the first time.
2) The Sign of the Cross is made very reverently when A new moon appears
3) The mower always "edged" his scythe when putting it up after his day's work.
4) Relating to Marriage! - Change the name but not the letter - you change for worse and not for better.
Sunday Marry over (a second time)
Monday for wealth
Tuesday for health
Wednesday for best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for Crosses
Saturday for No day at all

5) When a member of a family by whom bees were kept died, the lives were creped and a tap was given at every hive announcing the death - otherwise the stocks would die.
6) When calves died a kid was provided and allowed feed with the cattle until it yielded milk and then accompanied calves the following year.
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 19:31
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In the centre of the Moate there are supposed to be chambers built, where treasure of some kind might be hidden. Some say there was an underground passage from the graveyard which is situated a short distance on another hill south of the Moate of Castletown. The graveyard is also in the townland of Castletown. The monks of the church might have used these passages to store away the treasures.
Some people suppose that the Moate was the burial place of a chieftain of that of a giant. Only very little can be found out as to the occupants of Moate or the use made of it. (Another version says that the Chieftains of this territory used to hold Feiseanna on the Moate and arrange their subjects according to caste)

Hidden Treasure in Mrs Murray's field in Gurteen
"I know for certain where there is a crock of gold in a fort about a hundred yards above Ned Hing (?)
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 19:21
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"Above all the places on the earth its here I'd like to roam
I love you dear old Erin's Isle my fond dear native home.
Where'er I roam by night or day still memory throngs my brain

I will still think on the hours I spent in Carden's Wild Domain

(II)
Above all the places on this earth its here I'd like to roam
Where the pheasant grouse and partridge do find a happy home

The wild brave hare that rises there and scampers o'er the plain
To try the swiftness of our dogs in Carden's wild domain.

(III)
It grieves my heart to see this land crushed down by tyrants' laws
To strike a blow for this fair land would be a righteous cause,
To see her sons and daughters all crossing oe'r the main
And leaving such a land behind as Carden's wild domain.
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 19:12
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Martin McCann's mother (deceased) used to spin about fifty years ago. The spinning wheel was there till it was useless and was either thrown out or burned.
Michael Kennedy found a firkin of butter hidden away down in his turf-bank near Foxboro when cutting turf a few years ago.
There was a lathe in Honeymount. Old Mr Thomas Corcoran (deceased about twenty years ago) used to make tops for the boys of the locality. He could make tackling for sale, and he used to sell boots (home made also)
He used to make footballs (as a pastime) and he could paint beautifully and had a wonderful idea of mixing colours.
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 11:33
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fasting
(2) Boiled Garlic for cough.
(3) Corrigeen Moss boiled in milk and ale cures colds.
Wheezing in Chest
(1) Melt some unsalted butter on sheep's wool and while very hot apply to lungs and chest.
Yellow Jaundice
(1) Boil some of the "barbary tree" in porter.
Blood-poisoning
(1) Boiled Indian Meal and Butter-milk.
Boils.
(1) To rub a weed called "Meachan t-athamhail" to them.
Rash To wash in water in which there is rimilay
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 11:16
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When Parson Eagar came he stocked this big farm with cattle principally bullocks. The Poor people who had been driven from their homes were naturally sore and one night a few of them came and "houghed" all Eagar's Bullocks. That is they cut sinews or muscles of the hind legs of each bullock down near the hoofs so that the poor animals could never lift that or those legs more. It was a cruel act. But it was crueller to turn poor men women and children to the roadside to starve. Some forty or fifty bullocks were dealt with in one night in this way. All the Parson could do then was have them slaughtered. This he did; and then advertised "For sale Beef one penny per lb. The neighbours came and bought.
One Wag came to find it was all sold: and was told so by Mr Eagar and his Butcher. Then said the wag, "I must wait TILL THE NEXT FALL." When the wag was some distance gone, "What did that fellow mean by the Next fall," said Eagar to the butcher. "O: of course he meant," said the butcher He must wait till another batch is "houghed" on you. Eagar, who prided himself on being a pugilist, shut his fists, and jumped, and said, If I knew what direction he is gone I would follow him and smack his face, till he would not be able to walk - no more than the poor animals.
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 11:07
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former minions. His servants even left one by one. In the end he had no one to work for him but a few of the "Lowest types of Humanity."
With these, in his downfall, he tried to bear up and drive off REMORSE by drinking and carousing. In one of these Drunken Orgies (It is said, three or four of his concubines attacked him and beat him to death with wet linen Sheets. I forgot to mention earlier that this tyrant was locally known by the nickname of "SKELPER LAUDER."

Another Landllord not in the vicinity of Cloonsarn N.S. but in the vicinity of Carrigallen in a place called Druminchin Glebe, Carrigallen, Co Letirim. He was known as Parson Eagar and on whose estate, I now live. Of course he is dead seventy or eighty years. I cannot give the date of his coming. But I understand that before his coming, about twenty or thirty families were evicted from their little homes not for nonpayment of rent. But their farms were wanted to make a Demesne for his Revernce. In addition to this big farm in Druminchin he had an income as Landlord from the townlands of Milton Corrawalleen and several other townlands
senior member (history)
2022-05-14 10:58
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fifteen families in the townlands of Killyfea Aughalough and Clevy on a Christmas Eve, with about ten inches of snow on the ground.
In most of the houses evicted that day there were big families of small young children. Besides having the Police for protection Lauder had that day The Military with him "The Red Coats" as they were called. And though Lauder was noticed to smile every time he hear the poor little children crying, and that was a constant wail the whole day from house to house; yet it was remarked that even the "Red Coats" had pity on those poor little children - It was noticed again and again that the tears welled up in the eyes of the soldiers - and as they went from house to house they gave coppers to these crying children trying to pacify them.
Now this James Lauder was not content with persecuting his tenants. He plotted, planned and conspired with a few scoundrels whom he intended, as tools offering them Bribes to murder a Mr. Marsh a Landlord for whom he Lauder was agent. The Plot was discovered and failed, Lauder though not handed over to the Law was exposed. He lost all his AGENCIES and very soon found himself Bankrupt.
Having become poor he was deserted by his
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 21:24
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1) When the salmon are leaping in the river it is a sign of rain.
2) When the midges are out in the evenings it is a sign of bad weather also

* * *

1) It is a sign of good weather when there are bright clouds over Tros mór mountain.
2) When there is a mist down on Beal Mór it is a sign of rain.
3) When the wind is from Ballintogher for a few days it is a sign of rain.

* * *
SIGNS OF STORM
1) To see white foam in a line along the shore of the lake
2) When the wind blows from the sea
3) To see black spots in the Lake (Glencar)
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 21:13
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(11)
Mike Billeen, from near the wood,
His proposals, too, are good;
He has an orchard of good fruit,
A rarity for Yule.

(12)
Besides, he has another good bar,
He has a penny-horse and car,
The rest of these, he don't regard,
For they have only mules.

(13)
Tomeen Daniel can sweetly sing,
Likewise Thadhg Cuddy and Don'leen Den,
They can play the music and dance like "men"
To please their hearts delight.

(14)
There are some more, our numbers fill,
From Árd a' Bhóthair's furry hill,
Far better, if their brown knob, they till,
And sleep and rest the night.

(15)
There are some more who are exempt,
A verse for them I wont attempt,
But the next time, I'm fully bent,
Their names to put in rhyme.

(16)
These are the "tenders" as I may call,
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 21:06
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To baffle the scent of other hounds
That might come on his trail.

(6)
He has a cottier-farm of land
Well drained and tilled by human hand
His house on an elevation stands
Four miles from Abbeyfeale.

(7)
Next comes Jim Doody, from "New Street",
With yankee tone and accent sweet,
He'd die with pride, but for his feet,
He has the peacock's frown.

(8)
He has a larger farm still
But eighty pounds is an awful bill
When this he'll get he'll have, at will,
Old Bills' Imperial crown.

(9)
"Tady Florie," the stunted man,
He's almost broader than he's long,
But yet he says, he's just as strong
As if he was six feet high

(10)
Now he's a boy, who has all trades,
Can work the shovel, scythe and spade;
He can mason and thatch and pitch and pave,
And be a good earning boy.
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 21:01
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the audience but two - the author and singer.
Needless to say, many of the men folk were not too pleased with the manner in which their names were mentioned for the first time in song.

Ballinahoun
(1)
Ballinahoun, this lovely place,
With a garb of beauty on its face,
Its latest history I will trace,
To amuse you for a while.

(2)
The girls of this lovely town
Are the fairest dames that can be found
And many a weary heart have bound
And bring them many a mile. (sic)

(3)
No matter how the rain do blow,
Or hurricanes of drifting snow,
Though water from their clothes do flow,
They say they are alright.

(4)
Those roving 'sports' we now will mock
Moreover the athletes of the flock
From East New Street to West Knockbrack
We have them here each night.

(5)
"Charlie" from Kilmainham's bounds,
Each night he takes quite different rounds,
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 20:54
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The song entitled "Ballinahoun" that appears below was written by the authors in the early years of this century.
At that time house-dancing was very popular among the youth of the town-land. A short dance was held every winter's night at the home of a neighbour, John Griffin. This house, then, as now, was also serving the purpose of a dispensary. Among the many attractions of the dance was a Miss Hanna Sweeney, a relative of Mrs. John Griffin. Her beauty and lovable ways attracted the attention not only of the youths of the townland but also of young men from neighbouring townlands. Rivalry between the locals and outsiders resulted. The local boys considered that they were most entitled to her affections.
Her wooers were of the cottier and small farmer sort and she was one of their own social standing, but she had no fortune.
This song is something in the nature of a general summing up of the chances of those who frequented the dance from neighbouring townlands. Of course the rivalry - if it could be called by that name - is very much exaggerated. The singing of the song, for the first time took place during one of the usual dances, and came as a bombshell to all
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:50
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Of cottier-farmers, tradesmen and all,
But in maiden's fortune there is a fall
When beauty on them smile

(17)
This is a fact, though I am sorry,
The maids are few but the wooers many,
The townland boys, with them they tarry
And pass each night in cheer

(18)
An advice now, to those roving 'sports'
Far better for them, at home resort
For the townland boys, these maidens court
And their hearts have won quite clear.
Finis
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:41
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or large loop of sallows was affixed to one side of the creel near the top. By means of this "Gad" the creel was hung on to the horn of the straddle. First a large mat made of straw woven neatly was placed over the back of the ass. The straddle was placed on top of this. The straddle consisted of two flat boards attached one to each portion of a crooked piece of wood called the "Crutch" and shaped like the letter V turned upside down. The horns or pegs were stuck into the "crutch." This was clamped down on top of the mat and all were held in position by means of a hay-rope passing from horn under the donkey's body and firmly fastened to the peg on the other side. There was also what was called a crupper. This was made of soft hay rope and was generally covered with cloth. It passed from one side of the straddle underneath the donkey's tail and then to the other end. This large loop was always kept fastened to both ends of the straddle and when the was being removed the crupper came with it. By means of the rope passing under the donkey's body and with the help of the crupper the "straddle and mats," as they were called, were very firmly fixed on the donkey's back. The creels were then hung, one on each peg or horn of the straddle, and the donkey was ready for work.
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:25
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Paidir 4
Árd Rí na n-Aingeal
Do cheannaig go daor sinn
D'Fhuilig é céasadh ar a gcrann go h-árd
Tarraingeacha na scillinge a trachta[?] a ghéaga
Agus an cleith lúdaigh daill
Ag dul thrí na thaobh deas
Thar cheann na cine daona
Á saoradh ar an namhaid.
Paidir 5
A Míchil naomhtha glaodhaim ar t-ainm
A Eoin Bhaiste grádhaim thú
Táim a d'iarraidh cabhair oraibh do' mhanam
I gcóir an catha ná táinig
Nuair a bheidh an t-súil a dhunadh
Is a bhéal a leachadh [?]
Agus a meabhair ag imteacht go fánach
Mo cúis a glaodhach agus mo léas a caithte
A Dhia Mhóir saor-se mh-anam an lá san.
Paidir 6
Luighim leis an Trínóid ró glórmhar
Leis an Mhaighdean Muire agus le Naomh Ióseph
An t-Aingeal cóinleachta agus déanamh treó dhom
Agus bhrat beannaithe na Maidne Glórmhar
An t-Uan trócaireach ag luighe ar leabaidh liom,
Agus Íosa ag eirú asta liom
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:18
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Paidir 1
San uair úd aréir
Is im' uaigneas liom féin
Is mé a smaoineamh ar an uair úd
Bhead go fuar lag sa chré
Iarraim grásta Dé
Agus grásta an Spioraid Naomh
Cun a croise d'iomcur
Ins sa túr so liom féin.
Carry the cross
Don't drag it
Paidir 2
A bhanríoghan bheannaithe is a bhanaltra Rí na nGrás
Caithim suas m'anam ort anois agus gach am sa lá
Nuair imtheoidh an tanam as an gcolan go fuair gan fáil
Bíse 'maice agus seasaimh
Go cruaidh mo chás
Paidir 3
A banríoghan beannuigthe is a banaltra Rí Glórmhar
Tá an saoal-sa m'dhalladh agus
Ná léig mé chun mhí-dhócháis
Agus a Críost bheir m'anam go Cathair na Glóire
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Patrick Lowney
1) Gort an Tagal
2) Buaile
3) Leath-éidan
4) Inses
5) Muíng
6) Páirc amháin
7) Buaile glas
8) Páirc Casey
9) Maoílean

John 'Lowney
1) Leat-badan (?)
2) Páirc amháin
3) Gort a earach
4) Meadow
5) Plaus
6) Cuimín
7) Leaca
8) Biddie's Meadow
9) Muíng a galair
10) Maúntán
11) New Field
12) Jibbeen
13) Long meadow
14) Garden
15) Muíng
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs Patrick Shea
1) Gort a leasa
2) Gort
3) Páirc bheag
4) Seana gardín
5) Seana buile
6) Páirc na h-Abhann
7) Móinéir Mór
8) Páirc láir
9) Páirc an Cumair
10) Gort garbh
11) Inse
12) Oileán Mór
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Timothy Lynch
1) Mountán
2) Páirc a Coínlig
3) Insi
4) Connachán Olar
5) Labh in a gcóir
6) The Bule's
7) Páirc amháin
8) Páirc a Cnuich
9) A partner ship hill

John Lynch
1) Páirc chonnaic
2) Páirc Fhada
3) Gort a leasa
4) Wester labh in a góir
5) Easter labh in a góir
6) Wester gort a leasa
7) Easter gort a leasa
8) The Poundín
9) Mountán
10) Eisg a gcapall
11) Túr
12) The hill
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 18:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs Hanora Sullivan
1) Mountán
2) Sarrie Mháire
3) The garden of the trees
4) The big meadow
5) Lán beag
6) Cán é
7) Leaca
8) The small garden
9) Laghánibh
10) The field of the house
11) Culín
12) Libín
13) Gardín
14) Slúng
15) The wester slúng
16) Coon line hóirne
17) Cnáith
18) The upper cnáith
19) Gort a láin
20) Gort fruaig
21) The middle fruaig
22) Gura high
23) Scout Lán
24) The mountáinín
25) The slupe

Mrs Elizabeth Sullivan
1) Ciallán
2) Seana mhaca
3) Goirt a Cathairín
4) The long field
5) The field of the house
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 12:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tory Hill is situated in the centre of County Limerick about two miles East of Croom, and one mile from Manister Abbey. It has an area of about 106 acres and is 476 feet in height. It is composed of limestone and its pasture produces the finest cattle in the world. A gold gorget was found on the hill in 1852, and it is now in the National Museum of Dublin.
This is a historic hill and is said to have got its name Knockdrum Assail (Hill of the Ridge of Assail) from Assail a Firbolg chieftain, who when the Firbolgs were defeated by the Dananns at the battle of Moytura at Lough Mask, escaped, and got the protection of the King of Leinster, who gave him the hill and the surrounding territory which included Croom.
Other authorities state that it derived its name from the number of Tories who frequented its sheltered
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 12:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sides when dispossessed of their properties by the orders of Cromwell in 1652.
Others also state that it derives its name from "Tara" meaning a hill with a beautiful view. There is scarcely a doubt but this was one of its ancient names by reason of the fact, that a good-sized stream - having its source in a lake - (Lough Nagirra) - situated a little to the North-east of the hill, and flowing along its eastern base until it reaches a little beyond the South side where it turns westward to join the Maigue - is known locally as Sruthán-a-Tara (Tara's Stream). Also on the northern slope of the hill is a graveyard with the ruins of a Church dating back to the 8th century. This Church is called Cill Tar or Tara's Church, though it may also mean a graveyard, primarily a church.
There is another church about 200 yards south-west of the hill known as Drumassail Church. It was under the Deanery of Croom, whilst Dr. O'Dea was Bishop of Limerick 1405 - 1424, and probably founded by one of the O'Briens of Thomond. After the disestablishment of the Church, it was used as a Protestant Church under the deanery of Croom, during which time it fell into disuse and only the walls are now left.
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 12:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
while THE FAME OF ITS SANCTITY AND LEARNING SPREAD BEYOND THE SHORES OF ERIN TO DISTANT LANDS!
Within these sacred walls, now in ruin and decay, dwelt for the long span of 500 years a succession of monks renowned for piety and learning.
To the neighbours they acted as doctors for the sick and the infirm, they fed the poor and the needy, as well as disseminating the blessings of religion and knowledge to bands of students who thronged their College halls, some from foreign climes, as well as the local Gaelic youth of Thomond.
The ruins are situated on a bed of limestone rock on the south bank of the River Camogue, a tributary of the Maigue. The front faces the river and measures 66 yards, calculated by pacing. Only the walls and gables remain. The entrance is formed by two beautiful arches, built of stone with a reddish tinge, and separated by a handsome square pillar constructed of the same material. The chancel is about 80 feet in length and at its eastern part is one of the finest arches in Ireland formed of polished grit. A triple lancet window of lofty dimensions and elegant design occupied the Eastern gable.
The prevailing character of architecture is that of the early English, but the present remains are inadequate to convey any just idea of the former grandeur of this once extensive monastery.
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 12:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Suddenly it is related - the church was filled with a bright light, and the dead brethren appeared in their accustomed places enwreathed with crows of glory, and sang the Vespers in the strains of heavenly music.
When the last chant had died away, darkness fell upon the scene, and the poor bereaved monks saw nothing but corpses and blood-spattered walls.
The devastating hand of Time, as well as the ruthless ravages of vandalistic warfare, have dealt hardly with this storied ruin.
We may easily visualise what a superb structure it was in the days of its uninjured greatness, when it is so impressive now in its ruin and decay.
This abbey was in no way influenced in its architectural details by Anglo-Norman ideals, as were the Abbeys of Adare, but was founded by an Irish King and erected by Irish artisans many years before Strongbow and his mail-clad legions trod upon the soil of Ireland.
In conception and execution the Abbey of Manister was the creation of native genius and a native art, and it stands as an enduring memorial, not only of architectural achievement unassisted by foreign aid, but also as a lasting memorial to the ancient Irish civilisation.
All the soil within a radius of 50 perches from Manister Abbey is consecrated and was all a burial-ground. Near the Burnt Cross, close to the abbey is a portion of
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 11:55
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rejected
awaiting decision
defeated. They retreated to the fastnesses of Aherlow.
Among the slain o the plain of Manister was found the body of Dr. Allen, the sacred banner clasped in his cold and lifeless hands. Many refugees sought safety within the precincts of the abbey, thinking its sacred shelter might afford them some protection. But vain was the hope. The cannon of the English thundered against the massive buildings, the surrounding walls were razed to the ground, and the soldiery poured through the breaches into the sacred building. ALL FOUND WITHIN WERE PUT TO THE SWORD, the Abbot was slain on the steps of the altar, and forty monks were cut down without mercy.
Only one aged brother escaped this ruthless slaughter as he had been sent on an errand, and returned later to see nothing but blood and destruction, and the hewn corpses of the Holy Brotherhood, who had taken no part in the battle. The refectory and cloisters were destroyed, and the destruction wrought was so great, that never again did the monastery recover its former greatness.
In the Annals of the Cistercians is contained a beautiful legend in connection with this event.
On the Eve of the Assumption, the aged who had escaped the slaughter entered the chancel, and throwing himself before the broken statue of the Virgin, wept bitterly that there were none to keep the festival of her to whom the Church was dedicated.
senior member (history)
2022-05-13 11:46
approved
rejected
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where his posterity have since continued as the branch known as the Waterford O'Briens.
The tide of battle again surged around the hallowed walls of Manister Abbey in the reign of Queen Elizabeth on OCT 3RD 1579. The Spanish forces which had been sent by the King of Spain to the aid of the Geraldine forces, and had landed at Smerwick Harbour in Kerry marched eastward into the heart of the country under the command of Sir John Fitzgerald younger brother of the Earl of Desmond. The latter hesitated whether he should join with his brother or remain attached to the English. The confederated Irish and Spanish force 2,000, strong fixed their camp at Manister.
Sir Nicholas Malby with a force of well-armed troops numbering 600 foot and 450 horse, besides a superior artillery contingent, were marching to secure possession of the powerful Castle of Askeaton when he was informed that the Geraldine army was within a short distance. Malby's army turned aside to attack them, and the battle was fought on the plain contiguous to the Abbey of Manister.
The Irish and Spaniards led by a consecrated banner in the hands of the Papal Legate Dr Allen D.J. pierced the English lines by two successive charges, but were driven back again. For some time victory hung in the balance, but in a third onslaught, a deadly volley from the English lines at close quarters decided the issue, and the Irish retired
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. During the Shrove marriages take place. Fridays are unlucky days for marriages and also during the months of Lent and the month of May. There is money given in same cases. Stock and goods are sometimes given. Some people remember marriages in the houses, but it is a long time ago, more than a hundred years.
There is feast held in the house. A lot of straw-boys visit the house. There were processions and haulings-home in many cases.
The people used to race their horses home from the wedding and their wives sat behind them.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. During the Shrove marriages take place. Fridays are unlucky days for marriages and also during the months of Lent and the month of May. There is money given in same cases. Stock and goods are sometimes given. Some people remember marriages in the houses, but it is a long time ago, more than a hundred years.
There is feast held in the house. A lot of straw-boys visit the house. There were processions and haulings-home in many cases.
The people used to race their horses home from the wedding and their wives sat behind them.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. During the Shrove marriages take place. Fridays are unlucky days for marriages and also during the months of Lent and the month of May. There is money given in same cases. Stock and goods are sometimes given. Some people remember marriages in the houses, but it is a long time ago, more than a hundred years.
There is feast held in the house. A lot of straw-boys visit the house. There were processions and haulings-home in many cases.
The people used to race their horses home from the wedding and their wives sat behind them.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2. Most marriages took place before Lent and before Advent than at any other time of the year. The month of May was counted unlucky for a wedding. Matches were made at night by the fire by the old people. A fortune was given to the girl by her father. On the marriage-day there was usually a feast given in the Bride’s house. There was usually
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:17
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rejected
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porter given at the feast. When the couple would be coming home after the wedding great fires would be lit and the people would cheer at the top of their voices.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:17
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rejected
awaiting decision
porter given at the feast. When the couple would be coming home after the wedding great fires would be lit and the people would cheer at the top of their voices.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3. In olden times people would only get married in Easter and Shrove. No people ever got married on a Friday. Old people will tell you it is unlucky to get married during the month of May. Long ago two old men would meet at a fair and one of them one would say, “my boy wants a wife”. Then one of them would suggest a drink. They would stay there for a couple of hours discussing how much money the girl and boy had. On wedding days people dance and sing and make merry. Long ago marriages used to be held in houses. Straw boys used to visit the houses where the marriages are held. They dress in every kind of clothes with straw tied around them. They go and dance and get a bucket of porter.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:08
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rejected
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30. Under the fire and over the fire
and never touches the fire
(a cake of bread in an oven).
31. tis as white as milk, and milk it isn’t
Tis as green as grass, and grass it isn’t
Tis as red as blood, and blood it isn’t
Tis as black as ink, and ink it isn’t
(a blackberry)
32. Tis as white as milk, and milk it isn’t
Tis as black as ink, and ink it isn’t
And it hops on the road like hailstones
(a magpie)
33. Tis as round as a penny, tis as deep as a cup.
and all the king's horses couldn't pull it up
(the moon shining in the water)
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 23:06
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rejected
awaiting decision
4 Things hard to find
4 shoemakers not liars
4 frenchman not yellow (Ceathair franncach gan buidhe)
4 priests not covetous
4 (forgotten, not known)
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 22:55
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rejected
awaiting decision
supplies he shouts "reed" or "spars."
When a spar is not inclined to respond to twisting it is used as a stretcher.
When spars are cut too long before being used they are toughened by having boiling water thrown on them. Potatoe water is particularly good for this purpose. Along the eaves, at the ridging by the gable ends and around the chimney the thatcher works designs with the spars. He makes diamonds or triangles or semi-circles. The thatcher uses a thatcher's knife for trimming the reed at the eaves and he keeps his knive as sharp as a razor.
In the school district there is one professional thatcher named Paddy Looney of Calfmount, Headfort, Killarney. He is nearly eighty years of age and still works at his trade. He is a handyman and can work as stone-mason and plasterer but prefers thatching. His son Tim is also a tradesman and lives in Calfmount.
( Illustrations of bittle and knife )
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 22:49
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rejected
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pieces being split through the pith. If only one spar is being made from a piece, portion of the bark is peeled off so that it would not take root on the house. The thatcher starts at one wall (gable end) and works to the left, in strips. He starts at the lower right-hand corner and put on a strip about two feet wide to the ridging of the roof. After putting down each hand-full he stretches a spar across it. He then pins that spar down with others which he has twisted into shape of a staple with one leg a few inches longer than the other. He pushes them in with the palm of his hand and then drives them home with taps of a bittle. A bittle is a piece of wood about twelve inches long and six inches wide and two inches thick with a handle at one end which is fitted at an angle. He always has a helper and the assistant prepares small Bearts of reed and twists the spars. The thatcher has a pike stuck near him on the roof and above that he puts the reed and takes it as he requires it. The spars when twisted are stuck in the "butt" of a sheaf of oats. When the thatcher wants further
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 22:48
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pieces being split through the pith. If only one spar is being made from a piece, portion of the bark is peeled off so that it would not take root on the house. The thatcher starts at one wall (gable end) and works to the left, in strips. He starts at the lower right-hand corner and put on a strip about two feet wide to the ridging of the roof. After putting down each hand-full he stretches a spar across it. He then pins that spar down with others which he has twisted into shape of a staple with one leg a few inches longer than the other. He pushes them in with the palm of his hand and then drives them home with taps of a bittle. A bittle is a piece of wood about twelve inches long and six inches wide and two inches thick with a handle at one end which is fitted at an angle. He always has a helper and the assistant prepares small Bearts of reed and twists the spars. The thatcher has a pike stuck near him on the roof and above that he puts the reed and takes it as he requires it. The spars when twisted are stuck in the "butt" of a sheaf of oats. When the thatcher wants further
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 21:41
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rejected
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There was a great famine in Ireland in the beginning of the Autumn of 1845 and it lasted till 1847 although on all sides were to be seen signs of full and plenty. There were great corn crops and one of the most promising potatoe crops for many years. Public houses were shut up for want of customers and breweries and distilleries were closed. The drink traffic declined by one half and crime in a corresponding proportion. It would be hard to say what Ireland's destiny might have been but for the famine. Again it was the old story of blighted hopes.
A great disease came to Ireland in '45 which was never heard of before the famine. It destroyed one half of the potatoe crop of '45 and practically the whole of the '46 crop. It is commonly known now as the "Blight." It was first noticed on the coast of Wexford but it soon spread inland. The roads leading to the "workhouses" were often strewn with dead bodies. Sometimes when townspeople used open their doors they used find people who had come there for shelter lying dead outside them. A road inspector found 140 bodies along a public road in
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 21:31
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At mother's home, that is at Crowley's in Cummeen Donoughmore Co Cork spinning was always carried on. First the wool is taken from the sheep and is next loosened out with the fingers. Then it is carded with two pieces of timber with wire on the front of them. It is then made into rolls and lastly is spun.
The spinning wheel is like a stool with two pieces of timber standing on the ends. At one side the big wheel is attached and on the other the "Lúbáns" which are made of platted rushes. These hold the spindle in which the thread is kept. The spindle is attached to the wheel by the wheel strings. The wheel strings are made of seven or eight strands of cotton thread. If the wheel strings are not put round the wheel right it is impossible to make the thread.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 21:17
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Composed about a remarkable Bowler who lived in the townland of Maolisheen Leap and was educated in this school from about 1800. His name was Felix McCarthy (Farsing). He lived with his two brothers and sisters in the farm now occupied by their sister-in-law Mrs Jerome McCarthy. He went to Australia to seek his fortune about thirty years ago and met his death there when a gravel pit fell on him and smothered him. While he was at home he was a famous Bowler, and no man could win a score from him. He had a brother named Jim who composed the following lines, out in Australia
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 21:07
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The names inscribed on the sides are-
Simon Dwan (?) James Kearney Ryan
Daniel Ryan ([Gabha]) Timothy Hihill(?)
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 21:00
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On May 31st 1913, a monument was unveiled in the Churchyard Cullen, to the memory of the local Fenians. The attendance was the largest ever seen in the district. Several bands played suitable music and mamny speeches were made by prominent M.P.'s etc.
The inscription on th the monument reads:-
"To the memory of James Dillon of Cullen whose remains lie beneath this stone, and also of his fellow patriots whose names are inscribed on the sides.
This monument has been erected by the Nationalists of this district to mark their admiration for those Fenian men, and the principles for which they suffered and risked their lives. Arrested in 1866, Dillon underwent a long term of torture in an English dungeon and died in 1883 soon after his liberation, the others went into exile where -
On the shores of foreign lands
Their weary bones they rest.

* * *

All are gone, but the inspiration of their heroic self sacrifice has ensured Irish Liberty.
For Freedom's battle once began
Bequeathed from bleeding sire to son
Though baffled (?) oft, is ever won.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 17:40
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brown.
There is another plant called logwood and it dyes a lovely black.
The ELDER TREE also dyes a lovely biscuit colour.

Beer is made from heather also.
A story is told about the beer-making:-
It was the Danes that discovered it. An old man and his son, the last of the Danish race, lived on the mountain. The people around know that beer could be made out of the heather, but nobody except the two knew the plan, so the people decided to attack them to get the plan. Late in the evening, some of the neighbours went up to the house, and threatened to kill them if they did not tell them the plan.
The old man was afraid the son would tell, so he said
"Kill my son, and then I will tell you."
They killed the son and then the old man said
"You can kill me now, for I will never tell, "how." So they killed the old man, and the secret remained untold.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 17:07
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Long ago it is said that some people had power to take the butter from their neighbours by magic.
One day a woman was milking the cows in the field when a woman came looking for milk. She said she would when she had the cows milked. The woman looking for the milk said she could not wait, and she went into the house and took a bottle of milk out of the churn.
The next day the woman of the house started churning, but had no butter. She said the woman who took the bottle of milk had stolen the butter.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 16:58
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At present there are only a few thatched houses in the school district. They are thatched with the straw of wheat and is called Reed. Wheat for thatching is cut with a reaping hook and when stacked for some time is scutched to remove the grain. The scutching (or scotching as it is called) is done by striking it on a table which is got to incline towards a wall by putting stones under two side legs. In this way the reed is not broken. The reed is then cleaned by pulling it through the prongs of a four pronged pike (or dung-fork).
The fork is put through a hole in the wall with the points of the prongs turned up or its handle is put between the top and second laths of the back of a chair and securely tied.
The thatcher uses spars for fastening the reed to the house. The spars are made from Sallow (sally) or hazel. The spars are about two feet long and pointed at both ends. When a spar is being made if it too thick it is split into two or more
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 10:04
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CREEL-MAKING AND BASKET MAKING
Almost every townland had a man who was skilled in creel and basket making. A sort of creel called BÁRDÓG (in other districts Párdóg is the word) was also made. The bottom of this creel could open on a sort of hinge made from willows or sallows. The Bárdóg had one flat side which lay next the side of the donkey. The other side was circular in shape. The Bárdóg was used for carrying manure. There was one on each side of the donkey and when he reached the field the ass was brought to the desired spot where the ridges of potatoes were to be made and when placed in proper position the bottom of the Bárdógs were opened simultaneously. A strong piece of wood was fastened across the bottom of each Bárdóg. One end of this board was fastened by a hinge of sallow just as the bottom was fastened. The other end of the board was pushed into a loop of sallow at the opposite side of the bottom. When the board was pulled back a bit, the bottom fell down and the manure fell in a small heap in the desired position. It was very slow work to bring a big heap of manure to the field by means of Bárdógs but very often several asses were employed on the work
(next page)
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 10:03
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CREEL-MAKING AND BASKET MAKING
Almost every townland had a man who was skilled in creel and basket making. A sort of creel called BÁRDÓG (in other districts Párdóg is the word) was also made. The bottom of this creel could open on a sort of hinge made from willows or sallows. The Bárdóg had one flat side which lay next the side of the donkey. The other side was circular in shape. The Bárdóg was used for carrying manure. There was one on each side of the donkey and when he reached the field the ass was brought to the desired spot where the ridges of potatoes were to be made and when placed in proper position the bottom of the Bárdógs were opened simultaneously. A strong piece of wood was fastened across the bottom of each Bárdóg. One end of this board was fastened by a hinge of sallow just as the bottom was fastened. The other end of the board was pushed into a loop of sallow at the opposite side of the bottom. When the board was pulled back a bit, the bottom fell down and the manure fell in a small heap in the desired position. It was very slow work to bring a big heap of manure to the field by means of Bárdógs but very often several asses were employed on the work
(next page)
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 09:53
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Manister Abbey suffered spoliation from time to time, even at Irish hands, in the sanguinary battles which were fought beneath the shadow of its walls.
In 1365 Maton, King of Thomond died, and by the law Tanistry was succeeded by his brother Turlough Maol (bald). The latter did not enjoy his elevation to regal honours. In less than three years he was dethroned and banished from the kingdom by his nephew Brian.
The dispossessed fugitive fled for protection to Garret Fitzgerald Earl of Desmond, who espoused the cause of the refugee, and led an army to reinstate him in his authority.
Brian hastily summoned his ever-ready Dalgais, who crossed the Shannon and on July 10th 1369 encountered the forces of Desmond on the level plain adjacent to the monastery of Manister. The result was an overwhelming victory for Brian, who thereafter became known in the family pedigrees of the Royal house of O'Brien as Brian. Catha an Aonaigh.
Many English nobles and the Earl of Desmond who escaped from the engagement sought refuge within the monastery but they were carried away captive and only released on payment of a heavy ransom. Some accounts say that a portion of the conventional buildings were destroyed on this occasion.
The victory placed Brian in undisturbed possession of the kingdom of Thomond. Brian made generous provision for the dispossessed Turlough and assigned him a home and lands near the Comeragh Mountains in Co. Waterford
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 09:32
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across the path before them. Owen said to his wife Ellen
"Is girrfiadh maith é sin ba mhaith liom é bheith agam le h-aghaidh mo dhinneír amáireach."
"Bhéadh sé an deas" said Ellen.
Owen changed himself into a hound and off he went after the hare. Away they went until the hare came to the lake. She looked back and seen the hound after her and she jumped into it, and when the hound came out with him also.
When he went out he went down to the bottom of the lake and there was the woman before him but no trace of the hare. Owen's wife heard what happened and she went to another old woman and asked what would she do so that she would get her husband up. She told here to bring down her spinning wheel or go spinning. She brought it down and started spinning and the woman put up her head and asked the wheel of Ellen. Ellen said she would if she would give one sight of her husband. The woman put his head over the water.
"Ó muise cuir suas i gceart é" said Ellen, and the woman did and Owen turned himself into a hawk and flew away, and that was all the woman ever saw of Owen again as himself and his wife lived happily together.
senior member (history)
2022-05-12 09:29
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across the path before them. Owen said to his wife Ellen
"Is girrfiadh maith é sin ba mhaith liom é bheith agam le h-aghaidh mo dhinneír amáireach."
"Bhéadh sé an deas" said Ellen.
Owen changed himself into a hound and off he went after the hare. Away they went until the hare came to the lake. She looked back and seen the hound after her and she jumped into it, and when the hound came out with him also.
When he went out he went down to the bottom of the lake and there was the woman before him but no trace of the hare. Owen's wife heard what happened and she went to another old woman and asked what would she do so that she would get her husband up. She told here to bring down her spinning wheel or go spinning. She brought it down and started spinning and the woman put up her head and asked the wheel of Ellen. Ellen said she would if she would give one sight of her husband. The woman put his head over the water.
"Ó muise cuir suas i gceart é" said Ellen, and the woman did and Owen turned himself into a hawk and flew away, and that was all the woman ever saw of Owen again as himself and his wife lived happily together.
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 23:16
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Bailigeas an t-eolas seo 1928. Tá an fear boct imtighthe ar shlighe na firinne anois le cupla bliain.

AN SEAN-FHOTHARAC SAN REILG
(PHOTO)
Taisbeánann an grian-graf seo an meid den teampall atá fághta anois.

I lár na reilge tá le feisgint go dtí an lá indiu sean fhotharach. Teampall Protustúnaig abeadh agus seo an sgeul atá mar gheall air
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 23:11
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him and to remember his blessing. Ever after that a great Pattern used be held on the Rock on the 25th of September. After awhile the people began to exchange horses and cattle there and in the long run a fair was started then. But the pattern used be held all the time as twas no bother to see a Faction Fight in one place and the Boys and Girls dancing in another place. The Fair grew and grew and every year it was becoming more famous, and after awhile the people of the Parish regarded it as a Parish Holiday and looked forward to it like you'd look forward to Christmas. People used come to it from all parts of West Cork young and old alike. There used be stands on the side of the Rock where the people could buy Ginger Bread. Pigs' Crubeens, Sugar Sticks and Lemonade. It was a great Fair for selling apples, onions and the Tlúgh for drawing Flax.
Those who were anxious for drink were well looked after too. There was a Public house owned by one McCarthy where Sam Rosse's house is now. (The House referred to can be see in photo) and he used to do
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 23:02
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catch they named a day and a place to meet her friends.
It was usually in a public house they met and then theyd be plenty of drink and talk. THE SPÉICÉAR (?) would introduce the match and the first question would be the Fortune. The boys's parents would ask so much and then the Spéicéar would make an offer. They kept bargaining that way just like you'd be selling a cow dividing the difference until they clenched the bargain. Of course if there wasnt enough money there the match fell through.
Twas often a good match was made though without any Spré. The girl might not have any fortune, only a few sheep or a few cattle or may be a couple dozen hens.
When the money was settled the next thing was TO GO TO SEE THE LAND. The girl's friends would visit the intended place and look at everything in it to see if it was worth the money. If they were satisfied the match was completed and a day was named TO DRAW THE BINDINGS. That meant the parents had to sign over the peace to the Boy getting married. But they always demanded certain rights for themselves. The ould pair should have a room in the house and maybe an annuity long with that. Twas often the ould pair caused trouble afterwards.
The next thing then was to appoint the day for the wedding, go to see the Priest and that put the finishing stroke on the match.
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 22:49
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having a good few "DEOCHS" (drinks) the man of the house tould Con that the girl he came to meet was coming down stairs. Con made for the stairs and she seeing him coming shoved into the wall thinking that Con would pass up. But instead Con put his hands around her and composed the following rhyme
Upstairs down-stairs
Anywhere at all
To kiss a pretty girl
With her back against the wall
When the girl found out that Con was a poet she wouldn't marry him at all because she said all poets DIE YOUNG.
Another day we were coming from Mass and it was in the time of the Big War. See here says Con, There is every kind of a person implicated in that Grásgar now.
THE NOBILITY, THE MIDDLE CLASS OF GENTRY AND THE SCUM
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 22:47
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having a good few "DEOCHS" (drinks) the man of the house tould Con that the girl he came to meet was coming down stairs. Con made for the stairs and she seeing him coming shoved into the wall thinking that Con would pass up. But instead Con put his hands around her and composed the following rhyme
Upstairs down-stairs
Anywhere at all
To kiss a pretty girl
With her back against the wall
When the girl found out that Con was a poet she wouldn't marry him at all because she said all poets DIE YOUNG.
Another day we were coming from Mass and it was in the time of the Big War. See here says Con, There is every kind of a person implicated in that Grásgar now.
THE NOBILITY, THE MIDDLE CLASS OF GENTRY AND THE SCUM
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 22:46
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having a good few "DEOCHS" (drinks) the man of the house tould Con that the girl he came to meet was coming down stairs. Con made for the stairs and she seeing him coming shoved into the wall thinking that Con would pass up. But instead Con put his hands around her and composed the following rhyme
Upstairs down-stairs
Anywhere at all
To kiss a pretty girl
With her back against the wall
When the girl found out that Con was a poet she wouldn't marry him at all because she said all poets DIE YOUNG.
Another day we were coming from Mass and it was in the time of the Big War. See here says Con, There is every kind of a person implicated in that Grásgar now.
THE NOBILITY, THE MIDDLE CLASS OF GENTRY AND THE SCUM
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 22:39
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In oulden times there used be a fair at "Ínse na Ciotac" half ways between Drimoleague and Skibbereen. It used be a great fair and in the evening the poets would come together and start rhyming. But the best of them all was Con Mahony.
Con lived in the townland of Clais Dub. The townland was also called "Tón - Fóghmhaire because the corn would be reaped everywhere before twould be ripe in Clais Dubh. Thats why they called it Tón Fóghmhaire.
It was many the good ould day we spent together, but the best day I ever had with him was the day he carried me into Dunmanway match-making. We went into a public-house and after
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 16:42
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It is said that Cuchulainn followed a pig from Sligo to BALLYCRANA and killed it there. The place ever afterwards bore the name of Baile Crana. The townland of BALLINAMONA is situated about two miles west of Galbally. Turf used to be cut there in large quantities long ago.
LISARD is about a mile and a half west of the village. There is a high LIos in the townland and from this the place got its name.
DÚN TRÍ LIAGH is about three miles west of Galbally. There was a Dún there long ago and Cormac Ceas, son of Olliol Olum made a bed there between three large flagstones after the batle os Samhain
The Height of the Mill is near Mr Morrissey's on the Gleneffy road. There was a mill there long ago.
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 16:36
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The old man, James Quinn, mentioned earlier, told me that people said St Patrick was on his way to destroy Crom Cruach but halted at BREDAGH, preached and baptised people in the well.
The practice of doing Stations at the Well (Tubberpatrick) Aughawillan formerly Bredagh) has completely died out. When a small boy I saw the usual pieces of rags tied on the bush over the well. Some time ago the bush was cut down and at present the well is wholly unprotected. The water is still clear and is used for cooking purposes but there is nothing to prevent cattle etc from drinking in it.
Tom Shannon (pron. Shane-on locally) who died (?) years ago, aged 75, told me that when St. Patrick was leaving Tubberpatrick (Aughawillan) he passed through "Currach an Phooka." I asked him where that was and he pointed out a boggy marsh now occupied by 2 small lakes named "Gangin" (a sub-division of Drumbranlis) and "Mosey." No one can give any explanation of how the latter name came about. There is no townland of the name. Now this marshy place referred to by Tom Shannon lies in the direct line from Bredagh in the direction of Darragh Fort.
Mr. J.P. Dalton (R.I.P.) when Divisonal Inspector of Schools visited Carrigallen and, in course of conversation, told me there was no doubt
(next page)
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 16:23
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A cure for the prevent BLACK-QUARTER, is, when a cow is young, the farmer holes her PROCHALL, that is the long loose dewlap flesh under her throat, he then puts a light very short tarred rope through this hole in the Prochall. He then makes a knot on each end of this short tarred rope so that it will not completely pass through or fall from the Prochall and this was supposed to keep the cow from getting the black-quarter (called in some places) the blue-quarter (also called sprochar (?) dewlap)
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 16:11
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A grand and stately pile.
Where lovers meet and poets think and travellers rest a while
Where the honey tips the wood (?)
As the sun is sinking low.
It's twilight shadow gleams the (?)
Where the Leitrim waters flow.

(IV)
Upon a Sunday evening in the merry month of June.
When all the feathered warblers do warble forth their tune
Along by the towering battle ment,
The boys stand in a row.
Benath their feet, like ambour (?)
= ads,
Old Leitrim waters flow.

(V)
These youthful days are gone and vanished.
And youthful pleasures too.
Since that cursed, emigration has drained them one by one,
My comrades all both great and small to a distant land have roamed.
From Aughue bridge, Riverdale,
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 12:43
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The following Old Crafts and Industries were carried on in Glanworth, Co. Cork, in former times.
Basket Making:-
A man named Mr. Burns, who lived in the village of Glanworth, Co. Cork about a hundred years ago. He was noted for basket-making. He specialized in Fancy Baskets, which he sold locally.
The following make baskets for their own farm use at present:-
Mr. D. Twomey, Johnstown, Glanworth, Co. Cork.
Mr. Maurice Pigott, Dunmahon, Glanworth, Co. Cork.
Mr. Barrett, Dunmahon, Glanworth, Co. Cork.
Mr. E. Burke, Curraghoe, Glanworth, Co. Cork.
These men make hampers and Sgiatha.
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 11:41
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Dá mbeinnse in Uíbh Ráthach
Do bheadh rás chun mo thórramh
Do bheadh sagairt agus bráithre
A' léigheamh pháis ar mo Comaraimh
Is mó ógánach lúthmhar láidir
Ó gleann Cárn go Bólus
'Gur truagh leó i lár sinn
Agus gan aon fágháil a bheith beó 'gainn
A Ciarrdhaig bídídh (?) ag guidhe linn
Mar is binn iad bhur nGloire
Is mó bheannacht-sa libh coidhche mar ná cífear ann beó sinn

Bean dubh dhorcha dhuairch
Is olc an fhuadac í ag aoinne
Is cuma duitse cia bheidh sí duairc
Má bhíonn sí suairc lé féinig
Sin adubhairt an cailín óg nuair a bhíodar ag déanamh cleamhnais agus nuair a dubhairt athair a bhuachalla an céad líne
Séamus O Séaghdha.
Is é an baile gan adbar
Níl gainnimh i dráig na i gcuas
Níl foithim i gCruach i stalla ann
Agus anaithe agus gála adtuaidh
Céad altú le Dia mo shláínte
Sí barra ar gach áirí luan (?)
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 11:24
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Mo creach aidhn cráidhte
Ná fuil sgéal agam mhuintir
Mé a bheith daoradh ar a gCóbh
Agus gan beó mé ach go hAoine
A dhritháir na páirte
Ná fág mé go hAoine
Go ndeinidh tú mo thóramh
Mo gleó agus mo caoine
Cuir go comharainn cinn cláir mé
Is go breágh deas mé'm luighnte
Is gheobhaidh tú bhfuil dár buidhe agus pláta
Agus a bhfuil éadach breágh im thímcheall
Tá mo sriansa agus iallait ar iarraidh le sealg
Tá mo chamán á liaithe ar iarthar na leaptha'
Tá mo liathróid a bhualadh
Ag buachaillí an bhaile
Agus mé féín go dubhach uaigneach i bpriosún fé glasaibh
Mhuise Morty na nárann
Mo cás tinn go deó tú
Do cheann geal ináirde
Is do corp áluinn mar seo 'cu
Mar beidh ar gcinne ar spícibh mar sheó 'cú
Fé sneachta na h-oidhche
Is gach síon uile a ngeobhaidh léí
senior member (history)
2022-05-11 11:12
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Is mó árduig sé raol iad
Is nár bheir aon céim cruaidh air
Ná cruadhtan ná beidh réidh dó
Ar seacht sleasa Bhéara mo léan duit ní rugadh am riamh
Marcac cómh tréan leis nuair a théigheadh le mustar na cliabh
Is bhíodh "taddi" agus daor-puins aige a fhéin go fairreach a
riar.

Sar a chuireadh "an Giománach" cun báis do chúm sé na bhéarsaí so i bpriosún i gCorcaig.
Sé Seán Puxley fhág go dubhach sinn
Fé lúbaig na daoirse,
A gCorcaig na long
Gan aon súil le sinn a scaoileadh
Mo creach aidhn cráidhthe mar a thánag go Béarra
Ná mar conach riamh an lá úd
Do thána ar a ' saoghal so
Mar agamsa a bhí an máighistir
Do bhfearr a bhí in Eirinn.
Mar do conach sa féin lá é
Agus a claidheamh áluinn aige chun comhraich
Agus do dhéanfadh sé dhúinn beárna
Trí gárdaibh Rí Seoirse
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 23:47
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Dileann (?) m anam
M anam ón dhiabhal
God Bless the work and the workmen too
May the Lord be praised and glorified
Thanks be to the great God
O God help us
A Jesus Mary and Joseph help us
God Bless us and save us
O Holy saint Joseph help us

O Holy St. Anthony seraph of (?)
To whom Little Jesus came down from above,
O Holy St Anthony help us.

Lord save us and guard us
God between us and all harm
O Holy Moses help us
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 23:28
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"Dick seo Thuas" and Seán seo Thíos" -
Two Barrys - cousins, living in Woodstock, one in the Glen and the other on the Hill.

"Dick, the Fluke," and his son "Pat, Gusty"
"Major Kennedy" (Michl Kennedy who was never in the army (?)

"Topper" Quinn
"Na c-Eoghánaig" (A family named Aherne)
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 23:22
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Meara 1
Buckley 1
Fenton 1
Egan 1
Dorgan 1
Sheehan 1
Fowhy (?) 1
Mackey 1
Manning 1
Horgan 1
Harty 1
Murray 1
Cronin 1
Houlihan 1
Doherty 1
Cahill 1
Arnold 1
Collick 1
Blake 1
Shanahan 1
Lynch 1
Coffey 1
Grandon 1 (?)
Creedon 1
Coughlan 1
Collins 1
Lettuce 1
O'Connell 1
Crowley 1
O'Leary 1
Hyde 1
Mullins 1
O'Driscoll 1
Foley 1
Leonard 1
Mahony 1
Lawton 1
Touhy 1

1903
Fitzgerald 14
Buckley 7
Aherne 7
Barry 7
Cotter 7
Kennedy 7
Sheehan 6
Murphy 6
O'Connell 6
Deasy 5
Twomey 5
Connelly 4
O'Brien 4
Strachan 3
Ryan 3
O'Reilly 3
Flynn 3
Keegan 3
Mackey 3
Foley 3
Grey 2
O'Callaghan 2
Harty 2
Collins 2
Hyde 2
Murnane 2
Power 2
Harte 2
Sweeney 2
O'Donovan 2
Nolan 2
Ambrose 2
Meade 2
Leahy 1
Daly 1
O'Keefe 1
Mulcahy 1
Fielding 1
O'Neill 1
Higgins 1
Jeffers 1
Hegarty 1
Leavy 1
McCarthy 1
Foley 1
Lynch 1
Mahony 1
Hayes 1
Roche 1
Ide 1
Curtin 1
Dorgan 1
Wallace 1
Lawtwon 1
Savage 1
O'Meara 1
O'Regan 1
Riordan 1
Fouhy 1
Hartshorn 1
O'Shea 1
Bolger 1

1910
Cotter 7
McCarthy 7
Fitzgerald 6
Leahy 5
Lawton 4
O'Brien 3
Mulcahy 3
Harte 3
Buckley 3
Kirby 3
Nagle 3
Gillman 3
O'Connell 3
Lynch 3
Hernus 3
Lane 3
Morey 3
Cashman 2
Murnane 2
Mackey 2
Crowley 2
Collins 2
Day 2
Grey 2
Roynane 2
Wallace 2
Morrissey 2
Kennedy 2
Mullane 2
Power 2
Lee 2
Fitzgibbon 2
Curtin 2
Deasy 2
O'Keeffe 1
Murphy 1
Foley 1
Roce 1
Geary 1
Sullivan 1
Casey 1
Bray 1
Meade 1
Ahern 1
O'Reilly 1
O'Shea 1
Doyle 1
Mahony 1
Barry 1
Sweeney 1
Harrington 1
O'Callaghan 1
Jeffess (?) 1
Cronin 1
Columb 1
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 22:58
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The night was dark and dismal,
No moon or stars were seen,
The wind sighed out in gushes
Men moved towards the green.
As the muffled figures hastened,
Their nerves were boldly set
To clutch a rifle, pike, or sword,
To aid the work of death.

Assembled in a common cause
Their country dear to free
How feeble were their efforts
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 22:54
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On ST BRIGID'S EVE, children visit houses with a large rag (?) baby representing the Saint, gathering coppers.
This custom has almost died out here.
Formerly, rushes were placed on the doorstep, to allow the Saint to stand outside and bless the house.
Also, Ribbons were hung out, and left outside till 12 o'c p.m. when they were brought in. These ribbons should not be moved (?) for twelve months, and should be SILK.
This custom, also, is dying out.

ON CHRISTMAS EVE
The Rosary was said before supper, (which consisted of Currant bread etc) and after making the sign of the Cross the youngest member of the family lighted the Christmas Candle which was decorated with colour papers, and then placed in the window, to give light to the Holy Family. This custom still prevails.

ON NEW YEAR'S EVE
A special cake was made, and great care had to be taken when lifting it out of the oven, as no pieces should be broken off. The Bean a' Tighe took the loaf and struck it three times against the door saying,
"Fógraimíd an gorta amac
Indiu, bliain ó indiu, agus anocht féin."
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 19:32
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had a Laghach tone of voice, never had a bad story to tell of anyone, had a soothing and consoling word for the bereaved or afflicted and by his gentle manner was a general favourite with all his clients, thoug he was only a Ragman. He seemed to have got an Education in his youth. He once said to me
"Was Carolan the last of the bards?"
"Well, I'll be the last of The Ragmen"
He died about thirty years ago R.I.P.
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 19:00
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Bhéarsa ar Cluain nó Allihies
Is deas an ball na hAllaithe
Agus is deise an cluain taobh leis
Lucht na dtreabhsairí ruadh anairte
Agus na gcasógaí bréide
Fuaradar éadach uasal fairseach
Nuair a thosnuig na mianaig

Nuair a phós mo sheana-athair do cúm fear a bhí san baile na' gáin an bhearsa so dó
Sláínte chun na mná úd dó dtháínig aniar
Agus sláinte chun na sár-fhear do tháínig na diadih
Molaim go h-árd iad agus ní cáínim iad thiar
Agus gur bé Donncadh Óg a ndóithin de cliamhaimh.

Do chúm Conchobhar Ó Seaghda an béarsa so i gcóir mo shean-athar Donnchadha Ó Murcadha. Níor glaodhidh riamh air acht "Dendy Mór"
Sé Donncadh Óg a ' buacaill
Go bhfuil fuaimine agus géim ann
Do tharraig sé dhúinn boithre go leór ar fuaid Béara
Níor leagh sé síos feoirling iad
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 19:00
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Bhéarsa ar Cluain nó Allihies
Is deas an ball na hAllaithe
Agus is deise an cluain taobh leis
Lucht na dtreabhsairí ruadh anairte
Agus na gcasógaí bréide
Fuaradar éadach uasal fairseach
Nuair a thosnuig na mianaig

Nuair a phós mo sheana-athair do cúm fear a bhí san baile na' gáin an bh earsa so dó
Sláínte chun na mná úd dó dtháínig aniar
Agus sláinte chun na sár-fhear do tháínig na diadih
Molaim go h-árd iad agus ní cáínim iad thiar
Agus gur bé Donncadh Óg a ndóithin de cliamhaimh.

Do chúm Conchobhar Ó Seaghda an béarsa so i gcóir mo shean-athar Donnchadha Ó Murcadha. Níor glaodhidh riamh air acht "Dendy Mór"
Sé Donncadh Óg a ' buacaill
Go bhfuil fuaimine agus géim ann
Do tharraig sé dhúinn boithre go leór ar fuaid Béara
Níor leagh sé síos feoirling iad
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 16:05
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The patron saint of Dromtariffe holy-well is Inghean Bhuidhe. Saint Ineen, Dromtariffe Old Church, Co. Cork.
This female saint is venerated on the 5th May every year. According to popular tradition she was the sister of St. Lateerin who is likewise popularly known at Cullen in that part of the county and to an older sister who lived at Kilmeen. The remains of the ancient paves way may be traced between the places. It is stated according to local tradition that the Angels of Heaven made a road one night from Kilmeen through Dromtariffe and on to Cullen, so that the three sisters might then more conveniently visit each other once every week. A further account is given in Edward Walshes "popular legend of the South".
Number three St Lateerin. Much obscurity hangs over their history as their celebrity appears to be merely local although the people in their part of the country have a great veneration for these sisters.
Inghean Bhuide is the patroness of Dromtariffe.
The well is in the middle of a field under a few trees, a hole in the ground about three feet deep and badly kept.
This information was got from a Curate in this parish - An tAthair Uí Chonnaill
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 09:18
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I am living in the town-land of Tulligubbeen in the district of Castleisland and in the barony of Triuch-an-Aicme. There are eight families in this townland. The name most common is Fitzgerald. There are also Brodericks, O'Connors, Leanes and Murphys. The approximate number of people is thirty-six. Most of the houses are thatched or ironed; few of them are slated. There are a few old people over seventy and a few more over eighty years of age in my district; each of them can speak a little Irish. Houses were more numerous in the country in former times than they are at present. There are a few ruins of old houses in every farm in the district. Those had small little holdings and were not able to pay for them, as the landlord turned these out and they had to emigrate to America.
senior member (history)
2022-05-10 08:59
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Parson Eager of Druminchin
The memory of Parson Aegar (or Eagar) is kept alive in the name "Aegar's Broad Road" which is now the main road from Carrigallen to Mohill. He was a member of the Leitrim Grand Jury and had control of the making of the road. The road in use previous to this was the road through Church Street through Killahurk, Mullinadara, Drumerkane, Corduff etc and passing out at Keegan's near Cloone Bridge.
A story is told of the reason why Aegar's Broad Road did not pass through Cloone village. At that time there lived in Cloone a man named West. This was either the West in whose place the French encamped on the night before Ballinamuck battle or his son. The Rev. Peter Conefrey P.P. Cloone at present lives in the house. Mr West sent word to Parson Aegar to be sure and have the road to pass through Cloone village. Now, if this happened it would mean that West's land would be cut up as the road would pass through it. But West knew that the best way NOT to have the road passing through Cloone was to ask Mr Aegar TO HAVE IT PASS that way. West and Aegar were very bad friends. Aegar constructed the road but it passes within more than a quarter of a mile of the village of Cloone.
Aegar seems to have been a big well-built man and was a noted boxer as well as being noted for
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senior member (history)
2022-05-10 08:48
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their eyes out.
Good weather is judged by appearance of swallows in April, and bad weather is judged if they go away early.
If a bird flies up high, weather will be good; if it flies down low, weather will be bad. Birds chirp loudly when weather is going to be good.
When our Lord was being crucified the robin stood under the cross and a drop of blood fell on its breast, and after that every robin had a red breast.
There was a rebellion in progress in Ireland one time, and one day all the troops were asleep. The enemy were approaching and the wren came and hit the end of a drum, which was near a man's ear. This woke the man up and when he saw the enemy coming he woke his comrades and they all go away safely.
At the North Pole long ago there was only one fire; a boy was put to watch it every night in case it would go out for there was no way of lighting it again. There was a bear who did
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2022-05-10 08:43
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The local wild birds that can be seen around Athlone are the Starling, Crow, Jackdaw, Rook, Wren, Lark, Magpie, Sparrow, Wagtail, Swallow, Thrush and Blackbird. Around bogs the wild goose, the wild duck, and the plover.
The swallows, the green plover, and the wild geese migrate.
The robin's nest is made from hay and lined with feathers, and hair, and wool. The colour of the eggs is light brown.
The blackbird's nest is made from manure, lined with straw. The colour of the egg is light blue with white spots on them.
The starling's nest is made from twigs and lined with straw.
A crow builds her nest on the top of trees. The thrushes build their nests in trees and bushes. The wild-pigeon build their nests in ivy trees. The yellow-hammer builds her nest in a bush. A robin builds her nest in holes in the ditch.
Boys are told they would have bad-luck if they robbed a bird's nest, and also the birds would come in the window in the night and peck
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 23:52
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published this story in the "Irish Press." He gave it as happening in some other county. I was to contradict it ast the time, but I let it slip by. But you can take it from me that it happened in Aughavas not three mile from where I live. I have heard the story of Tom Gillheany and Shuffling Sean since I was a kid. I have also the song about it written by the "Poet Higgins" another native of this area and I will send it to you if you wish. Besides the Fergusons still live in Drumgoinne Aughavas are though good and loyal Protestants still, are yet good neighbours and often boast of how their people stood by a poor wandering croppy when he was betrayed by one of his own Shuffling Sean.
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 23:45
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croppies leaped on Brock and one of them took the horses fetters (?) off his shoulder and they beat him on the skull till his head was a mass of pulp. And that is how the notorious John Brock was killed the night of the Battle of Ballinamuc.
There was a poem about it but my father could only remember the 1st two lines. It was my father that told me this story.
George * wrote to red Lucifer
Hell's gates to unlock;
And the fire to kindle
As a bed for John Brock.
* George III King of England.

I heard the old people say that the French soldiers when they had made camp in Cloone on the day of their arrival, went down to Annaughmacoolin lough and spent a lot of time looking for wild ducks nests and that they were searching round through the old rushes and marches below Cloone for hours, and that they had a lot of eggs back with them.

Parson Eager
Parson Eager lived in Drumsillagh near Carrigallen and his hobby besides roadmaking, was spotting suspicious characters. He kept a special eye on journey men and was gravely
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 23:36
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and some people still pay visits to it. His feast day is on December 20th. His sister Fionmaith was the mother of the famous St Berech a Bary who was born in Gorth-na-Luachra, Cloone.
(3) Old John Clancy told me that he heard that before the time of St Patrick there came into this area a very wild and warlike people who hunted St Patrick when he came to preach among them, and that St Patrick said that they would yet be converted by one of their own, who would be famous throughout the land. This old tradition would fit in fairly well with the authentic historical account of the coming of Con. Maicne into Maigh Réin.
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 23:34
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(2) Cloone forms the centre of a surrounding range of hills bearing the same name Sunach eg Sunnaghmore, Sunnaghconnor, Sunnaghhennity, Sunnacbeg, and also a smaller range bearing the name Annaugh, Annaughmacoolin, Annaughmaconway, Annaughbrennan, etc. On each of the Sunnaghs there are the remains of forths and these I believe were strongly fortified by the Con-Maicne. In Annaughmaconway there is the remains of an old burial ground. It is on a hill called Caldaragh (See Survey Map). This is not a pagan burial ground as many suppose, because leading from Cloone across the bog to Caldragh, there is the remains of an old pass which the very old people tell me was called Bóthar na Naomh. Along this pass was carried the corpses of the dead from Cloone Monastry to be buried in Caldaragh. Now according to history the Con Maicne occupied this part from the 4th to the 8th century A.D. Cloone monastry flourished under St Creigharee (Cruimhthir Freach) about 475 to 545) and there is no doubt but that St Creigharee was of the Con Maicne. His holy well is still to be seen in Drumharkin Glebe
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 23:20
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Loughteague = Loughteeog School Stradbally - Table
Ethnographic - Surnames -- Popularity in historical years
Brennan
Dunne
Dempsey
Doody
Drennan
Murphy
McCormack
Reilly
Morrin
Bergin
Moore
Carrey
Fitzpatrick
Colligan
Hagan
Ryan
Coss
Robbin
Condron
Neill
Byrne
Lowry
Sides
Kearney
Keegan
Fennelly
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 23:16
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Abban ( Stapleton )
Rory, Roddy, Rody ( Delaney ) Byrne family name)
Murl (?) ( Delaney ) Lalor )
Lewy, Lewis (Lalor)
Con (McEvoy)
"Gownee" ( same vowel-sound as tOWn and clOWn )
Gobhnaith ? Fitzpatrick entered as Esther on Rolls.

Mogue (Delaney Downey)
Loch = Lochlann - PRON. LOCK - Lock Fegan
Fint = Fintan numerous families
This old Irish name is now changed to "Vinny."
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 23:00
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The wild birds of this townland are the Magpie, Blackbird, Thrush, Corncrake, Starling, Pigeon, Jackdaw, Crow, Lark, Bullfinch, Goldfinch, Curlew, Cuckoo, Swallow, Hawk, Woodcock, Wild geese, Owl and Crane. Those that emigrate are the Cuckoo, Corncrake, Swallow, Woodcock, Wildgeese, and Crane. The Magpie builds on a dael (?) tree. The Blackbird and Thrush build in bushes, and sometimes their nests are found on a ditch. The corncrake builds in the meadow. The Starling builds in the eaves of houses. The pigeon and crow builds on lofty trees. The Jackdaw builds in chimneys. The Lark's nest is usually found on the ground. The white thorn bush is the bush in which the bullfinch's nest is found. The Goldfinch builds in an elder tree. The Curlews nest is found on the ground in a bog. The Swallow builds under the eaves of houses. The Owl builds in old ruins. The Hawk builds on the top of a tree. The Wild Geese build on high cliffs in Scotland. The Woodcock never builds in this country, but she builds in France. If Swallows fly low it is a sign of rain. The Conrcrake and Wild Duck cries for rain. When the Plover is seen on the uplands it is the sign of frost. When Seagulls fly down on the ground the weather will be bad.
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2022-05-09 11:50
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(II)
There is a forge in this parish belonging to Joseph Bannon. This man's father was also a smith. He did not work in this forge. This forge is in the townsland of Lissanode and parish of Drumraney. It is built beside a crossroads and there is a well convenient to it. The walls are built with cement and the roof is covered with felting tarred and gravelled. The tools he uses in the forge are hammer, sledge, rasp, pincers, punch and knife. There is a bench at one side of the forge and a vice attached to it. There is a cement tank in the forge to hold water to cool red iron. It is said that the water in a forge is able to cure warts and chillblains. There are two half doors leading into the forge and a long bolt to keep them closed together. The work the smith does in the open air is shoeing wheels. Sometimes he mends ploughs and gates outside.
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 11:45
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There are three forges in this parish. The names of the owners are Joseph Bannon, Michael Ward and James Keegan. Joseph Bannon is situated in the townland of Lissanode, Michael Wards is situated in the townsland of Walderstown and James Keegan's is in the townsland of Ardnagragh. Joseph Bannon's is beside a cross-roads and there is a stream near the forge. The roof is covered with a roofing called felt. There are only one fire place in the forge and that is at the end of the forge and the bellows is in a small house at the back of the forge. The instruments the smith uses when shoeing horses are, a pincers, hammer, rasp, nails and a knife for paring the horses hoof. He shoes asses and horses but he does not shoe cattle or he does not make ploughs, harrows, spades, shovels, pikes or axes, but he mends all the instruments. There is one job the smith does in the open air - he shoes wheels. Forge water cures boths in horses.
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2022-05-09 11:37
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day's fun It is said that this well was situated on the side of the road about 2 miles from here on the road to Kilmallock but a beggar woman came along and washed the child into the well, and the following morning it had removed. The place of a well is thee of some prints on the stones of the old people say that it was the print of the mother and child.
On the night that it removed a family called Mahoney noticed a very strange light in the middle of a field of theirs and heard some lovely music coming seemingly out of a "Ceo" which was round the light. They did not go near it and when morning came, the well had arrived in the very spot where they had seen the light the night before. People from far off places even from Dublin come to this well and give rounds, and it is said that many are the cures effected there. The well is round and situated in the centre of a field and a stream flows out of it. Inside is a little ledge of rock, upon which at statues and objects of devotion and also glasses out of
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2022-05-09 11:33
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A story is yet told by some old people that an R.I.C. Sergeant who was stationed in Ballylanders, heard of the trout which was in it and that he came and caught the trout and since no cures have bee effected there. It was also necessary "to see this trout" to get the full benefit of the rounds and prayers. No rounds are given there now, but it is peculiar that the cattle graze on the field in which it is and have easy access to it, none of them ever go near it to drink nor eat of the bush near it. In the hottest weather, the water is beautifully cool and palatable.

About four miles distant is the "Well of Maloe" as the people call it, but it is really St. Maloe's Well. The old people say that St. Malo St Ailbe, Patron saint of Emly in Co. Tipp. and St. Fannahan, ( to whose memory a Pattern is held in Mitchelstown yet and to whom great cures are attributed Pattern Day - 25th November) were brothers.
Pattern day of St. Malo is held on the 3rd. August every year but people give rounds there - within the octave i.e. 8 days before and till the Sunday week after. The local people attend on the Sunday in their very best - not to give rounds but for a
senior member (history)
2022-05-09 11:22
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John O'Donnell Glenbrohane can tell stories in English of bye-gone days and of what he heard from his parents and grand-parents but he mixes them all up.
Houses were much more plentiful in former days. The traces of the sites and the little haggards are still to be seen. And in some places, the old houses are now made into fences. Wherever you see a high stone fence there stood an old house long ago. The people lived in mud cabins but houses their cattle in stone walls and slated roofs.
Emigration from here went on in a large scale, several families having cleared out altogether. Some went to America and some to Australia and New Zealand.
The townland is mentioned in several songs composed locally but no one seems to remember any in full.
There's one:-

"Farewell lovely village beneath the tall mountain,
Where often in rapture my footsteps are drawn,
Farewell to the hill tops and sweet verdant valleys
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2022-05-09 11:14
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Four or five griddle cakes were kneaded at the same time and milk was used to mix them. These were let by as long as possible before being put on the griddle and when the lower side was cooked, the cake was turned. They were rolled out as "thin as a 6d (?) so that when cooked they were only the substance (?) of a sandwich. Enough for the day was baked at the time unless on Saturday or before a holy day or when any work was on hands and a "Meitheal" expected. Then seven or eight cakes would be baked and put by. But generally the day's work for the woman of the house included "baking."
The Cake was always marked by a cross on top, and is still. I do not know the reason of this but I'll inquire. It was because the old women were so much accustomed to making the sign of the cross that they made a cross on every occasion even when sewing they finished off in a cross.
The cakes were baked in bastables and griddles and some were cooked on grid irons over a turf fire. Often a cake - very light and flaky would be baked beside the fire. When a visitor called a cake called a "batter" was made. It was made of eggs well beaten up and milk and flour and sugar and poured into the hot
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2022-05-09 10:56
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In very olden times bread was made of yellow meal, later on home crushed wheat was mixed with it and still later oats and flour were blended with new milk to make a cake.
The wheat and oats were crushed with querns and there are some of these to be found yet in the neighbourhood. The very old people, over 80 - remember their being used. In Cush, Kilfinane, where the excavations have taken place - and which is only 1 1/2 miles from here, several querns are yet in houses of the people there. The wheat and oats were grown in the neighbouring farms.
Oaten Meal Bread, Bran Bread and Plain white cake were made, and a great feature of the locality was the making of "griddle cakes." The griddle was a round flat piece of iron like the bottom of a pot oven and to this was attached a pot hangers. These cakes were baked beside the big turf fire and were very tasty and were, when cooked, split in two and eaten hot with butter. These were generally the food for the bog for turf-cutting
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2022-05-08 23:55
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The power of verse-making was in the ancestors of Jeremiah Mahony. He composed about ten songs, namely: The Land League, the Mealough Winding Stream, the Whiteboys of Kéím-an-neigh, the potatoe meithall, the Wren song of eighteen sixty four, Nell Flaherty's beautiful Drake, the blackguarding boat that carried me over. He was a farmer, and he owned about twenty acres of land. He was a well educated man, able to read and write.
The local people looked upon him as being gifted. Dan Shea, lived in "Galáns," and he composed a song about the "Old oak tree." He was also a farmer. He was also born about two hundred years ago, and he died about a hundred years ago. He was buried in the Abbey. The following are a few verses of Jerry Mahonys songs:

THE LAND LEAGUE
Three cheers for Parnell grádh mo chroidhe
And three cheers for Gilhooly of Sweet Bantry
Three cheers for old Ireland soon will be free
And down with the Grabber and tyranny.
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 23:46
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in song making, and very often attacked one another. They were mostly farmers, some of them were tradesmen. They composed songs during their work. They could read and write and they received good education. They were supposed to have great powers, such as charms to banish rats. They had certain songs, or charms, or music, which enticed the rats to follow them. They also had power to send rats to the houses.
Their songs are still sung locally. Another poet named Mr. T. O'Sullivan who lived in Bantry in former times. He died about the year seventeen ninety five. Songs were composed about local happenings, such as the "Wren" on St. Stephen's Day, or on Shrove. They usually composed them in English. Mr. J. D. O'Sullivan was another poet. He was born in Bantry in the beginning of the eighteenth century. He was buried in Glasnevin, Dublin. He was the author of the "Felons of our Land."
Tade Sullivan was another famous poet. He lived in Cúm-an-tSagairt. He was buried in Kilmocomogue. Mostly all Irish he spoke, and he used to compose in Irish. There was another poet, who lived in Coomleigh. His name was Richard Scully. He was a
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2022-05-08 23:25
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(IV)
When Lying down at NIght
In the name of Jesus Christ crucified
I lie down to rest
Bless us O Lord and thro' this short and miserable pilgrimage defend and govern me, and bring me to life Everlasting - Amen

(V)
Here I throw myself in the Arms of Jesus
Asking the three highest Angels in Heaven to guard and guide me from the temptations of the devil, the World and the flesh.
God the Father Bless me,
Jesus Christ defend and keep me
The Virtue of the Holy Ghost enlighten and sanctify me,
The purity and humility of the B.V.M.
The Protection of the Angels, The intercession of the Saints, And the elect of God, enlighten, protect, direct and govern us now and for ever more,
Amen.
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 23:19
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(III)
God Save you 'White Prayer'
God save you kindly
Where did you lie last night?
In the bed of Heaven.
Where will you lie to night?
In the bed of poor
What's that before you?
Four score of Angels
What's that behind you?
Four score or more
What's that in your right hand?
Three drops of water the B.V.M. carried from door to door.

Said for the key of Palestine and let in St Brigid and her cloak

Those who say this prayer 3 times by night 3 times by day shall never fall into mortal sin or the Gates of Hell shall never enter in.
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 10:22
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Many poets lived in this district in former times. There still lives in the townland of Glencreagh a man named Mr O'Sullivan, nicknamed "Tadgh Andheos." (?) He is about eighty years of age. He used to compose poetry in former times. His ancestors were not poets, but he got the power suddenly. He composed songs in English about local people.
Poets did compete against one another
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 10:19
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and one in Inchiclough. Unbaptised children use to be buried there and are still, as they would not be allowed to be buried in consecrated ground.
The bodies used to be taken away and buried there, in these "Killeanachs," generally in the dead of night, unknown to the people. Stones mark their graves, one at the head and one at the foot, in these graveyards. Also mounds of earth mark them. They were also in general use during the Famine years.
The bodies used to be put into timber boxes and used to be taken there on horses and carts, and sometimes on peoples backs or in bags. There is another "Killeanach" in the townland of Droumleigh. It is a pauper's graveyard. Long ago people who died in the poor house in Bantry, were buried there, also unbaptised children. This graveyard is wired in and there is a timber cross on top of it. There is another Killeanach in Droumlicacrue. This was the principal graveyard of the parish. Later on a house was built in it and anyone couldn't sleep in it, as it was haunted. Long ago when the Douce Road was made from
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2022-05-08 10:12
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Crosses are made of wood. There are also people buried between the ruins and the Churchyard. This is situated in the townland of "Lisheens." Some of the graves are very ancient, and they trace back as far as seventeen ninety seven or sixteen ninety one. Certain families still use certain graveyards where their ancestors were buried.
The Abbey burial ground is situated about a mile west of Bantry. IT slopes north east and commands a great view over the sea. Long ago a monastery was situated there, but it was destroyed and burned down by Cromwell's soldiers in the year fifteen forty. In the Abbey a large Cross stands over the grave in which all the people were buried during the Famine in eighteen forty five and eighteen forty seven. The Bantry Churchyard is sloping east. There are trees and shrubs growing in it. There are some very old tombs in these Churchyards.
There are many disused graveyards in the district. There are three situated on the bank of the River Mealough, one in Ards, one in Cloonagorman
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 10:06
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side. Mealagh team were from townlands adjoining the Mealagh and Kealkil team were men from Kealkil and the surrounding townlands. It was a game simply between townlands. Mealagh team won having four goals to their credit, while Kealkil team had but one goal, two points.
John Hourihan and John Sullivan won game on the field on that day. Mealagh team wore blue jerseys and Kealkil team wore red jerseys but on some occasions the men played wearing their ordinary clothes. The ball was made of leather and it was the same size as the ball, which costs fifteen shillings at present. Branches of trees were used as goal posts. Hurling was played in former times and ash hurleys were used. The ball was round and it was the size of the ball used at hurling at present. Bowling was also an ancient game. The score was always played from one famous cross to another. A twenty eight ounce bowl was used for men and a sixteen ounce bowl was used by boys. About forty years ago, a score was thrown from Skahanagh
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2022-05-08 09:51
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a large stone weighing three hundred weights to the town. He walked the entire distance and carried the stone on his back. He was also a powerful worker on the farm.
Another of the same type was a man named McCarthy. It is said that this man carried two sacks of potatoes, one on each shoulder and walked with that weight from his home in Beech to Kilcrohane. He was marvellous for throwing heavy weights long distances and he won many trophies at local sports meetings.
John Murphy, who lived in Bawn Gorm was one of the swiftest walkers that ever lived in the district. He is supposed to have walked from Cork to Bantry in nine hours and a half. While out with his hounds hunting rabbits one Sunday he, himself chased one of them and caught it, and in the run, he jumped over a deep wide tank in which the neighbouring farmers dipped their sheep.
A powerful swimmer, who lived in this district was Captain Hutchins, who lived in Árd na gCaishil. On a Summer's day, he swam from his home
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2022-05-08 00:52
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The Sea was calm, the Stars shone bright
The wind was scarce a breath
When Britain's pride, her youngest ship
Ran madly to her death
Put two and twenty hundred souls
Bound for America unconscious of the iceberg large
That firmly barred her way
That from the arctic frozen fields
By angry currents rent
A fearful monster of the north
On deadly errand sent
Came down that night where all was still
And blocked the steamer's way
And like a tiger crouching law
Awaiting for its prey
Upon her maiden voyage bound
With speed unequalled yet
The gallant ship Titanic came
Her throttles open set
Propelled by engines powerful
The mightiest man could make
I was her determination
All fast records to break
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 00:52
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The Sea was calm, the Stars shone bright
The wind was scarce a breath
When Britain's pride, her youngest ship
Ran madly to her death
Put two and twenty hundred souls
Bound for America unconscious of the iceberg large
That firmly barred her way
That from the arctic frozen fields
By angry currents rent
A fearful monster of the north
On deadly errand sent
Came down that night where all was still
And blocked the steamer's way
And like a tiger crouching law
Awaiting for it prey
Upon her maiden voyage bound
With speed unequalled yet
The gallant ship Titanic came
Her throttles open set
Propelled by engines powerful
The mightiest man could make
I was her determination
All fast records to break
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2022-05-08 00:43
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Unheeding friendly warnings
As if impelled by fate
Her flying speed was never checked
Until it was too late
At three and twenty knots an hour
The mistress of the Sea
Was rammed against the frozen foe
Which proved her destiny
For she received a fatal blow
That made her timbers reel
The ragged ice tore off her plates
And pierced her hull of steel
And left a deadly gaping wound
Along the giant side
And soon the surging waters flowed
First through the opening wide
Upon the bridge in deep dismay
The captain stood aghast
For well he knew her maiden trip
Would also be her last
And o'er his pallid features stole
A look of agony
To think that all so very soon
Must slumber in the sea

His painful task he realised
As from his pale lips burst
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 00:37
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That well remembered warning
Women and children first
For since we cannot save you all
Brave men now stand aside
And trust the women to the boats
And mercy to the tide
That scene of desolation before your mind may dwell
The horrors of that awful night
No tongue can ever tell
Where loving wives their husbands left
Their hearts I'm sure were sore
And Sweethearts parted on that deck
To meet on earth no more

And many an exiles soaring hope
With that great ship went down
Of prospects bright in distant lands
Of fortune and renown
The heart of all America
With honest pride may swell
The roll of the Titanic's dead
Is quite enough to tell
Of how her sons so bravely died
That others might be saved
Their cherished memory in our hearts
Will ever be engraved
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 00:31
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For while the rolling ocean
Their ashes consecrate
In silent admiration
Their deeds we venerate

The pages of our history
Their names may well adorn
Their deeds of bravery be told
To ages yet unborn
For since the goal of Valour first
The pride of man became
It never was more proudly won
Than on that deck of fame
When Millionaire and peasant shared
The fate of that great Ship
With faces that betrayed no fear
Though prayer moved every lip
Marshalled on the deck above
The officer's and crew
With willing hands stood ready now
Their duty for to do.

No thoughts had they themselves to save
The feeble and the weak
Must first be placed in safety
Their posts they wont forsake
The old tradition of his race
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 00:25
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More cherished than his life
The brittsh tar will still uphold
Till death will end the strife
And many an act of bravery
And courage was displayed
As there between the sea and sky
The crowded life boats swayed
And far and wide across the wave
The call for help was sent
And high into the air above
The fiery rockets went
To summon aid that never came
Tis sad to tell the tale
Another ship at anchor lay
Within an hour's sail

And though her Captain plainly saw
The signals of distress
He prized the safety of his own
Too dear he must confess
Full fifteen hundred helpless beings
Twas in his power to save
Were left unaided there to die
And share the ocean's grave
But quickly the boats were filled
And launched upon the main
Though scarce a third of the passengers
Was all they could contain.
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 00:19
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As for the rest all hopes being gone
To die they must prepare
And sad and solemn was the sight
As each one knelt in prayer
The flag was flying at the mast
The light shone brilliantly
As if they neared a friendly port
In calm security
And their last hour on earth to cheer
The band played solemnly
That sad sweet strain befitting well
Nearer my God to Thee

And as the silver trumpets tried
Their dismal thoughts to drown
They waved Adieu, then sank from view
So many fathoms down
And on each boat, there quickly spread
A gloom of dark despair
Their long felt hopes were sinking low
That aid would reach them there
But the "Carpathia" heard the Call
Though many leagues away
Ignored all danger to herself
And went without delay
Through icy fields and mountains
She had to navigate
senior member (history)
2022-05-08 00:12
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Her Captain was a Sailor brave
And would not hesitate
And as the day began to dawn
The rescuing Ship espied
The sad survivors of the wreck
Full many of whom had died
All that was left of what had been
A few short hours before
The mightiest proudest floating home
That ever ocean bore
And oe'r the side each little boat
Was taken tenderly
And fainting forms were soon revived
With hospitality
And as their doleful task was done
And they could do no more
With silent prayers for all gone
down
They headed for the shore.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 21:29
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Our saintly Priest Father Pat Gilchrist
Pure patriotism does his bosom swell,
May he long prosper the Faith to foster
And preach the Gospel near Drumreilly Bell.

These lines of poem were composed by Patrick Flood, Cloverhill, Ballinamore, now deceased, after the installation of new bell at Aughawillian Church by Rev. Patrick Gilchrist, P.P. Lower Drumreilly, between thirty and forty years ago.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 21:26
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(I)
Rapt in meditation one evening lately
A sweet vibration, on my senses fell,
Deep notes enchanting soft and entrancing,
Reverberating from Drumreilly Bell.

(II)
Every morning you'll hear it warning
Sounding most charming o'er hill and dell,
An in the evening like peals from Heaven
Pours forth the knelling of Drumreilly Bell.

(III)
You can hear it pealing at Augnasheelin
And from thence across unto Newtowngore,
From Ben Brack's heights down to Garadice
And around the borders of Ballinamore.

(IV)
Its sweet vibration throughout this nation,
It has no equal or parallel,
Its exquisite splendour and majestic grandeur
And the thrilling clangour of Drumreilly Bell.

(V)
It would take a Homer or a man of love, or
The great Tom Moore its praise to tell,
Of the sounds melodious, soft and harmonious,
Wafted so glorious from Drumreilly Bell.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 21:18
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out his head, and when he took it out there was twelve portions long side it.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 21:12
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Béarfaidh a dtiochfaidh mar bheir a dtáínig riamh leis
Beireann sé an lag 'sa láidir
Beireann sé an seanóir bearrtha liath leis
Ach ní bheireann an Rac ná an ghrian leis
Agus ní bheireann na grásta o Dhia leis.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 21:11
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Béarfadih a dtiochfaidh mar bhain a dtáínig riamh leis
Beireann sé an lag 'sa láidir
Beireann sé an seanóir bearrtha liath leis
Ach ní bheireann an Rac ná an ghrian leis
Agus ní bheireann na grásta o Dhia leis.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 20:43
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of dog-brier (called Scíathóin na Madra) which is fairly old and strong and about an inch in diameter. The dog-brier is cut from the roots and is cut at other end beyond a side branch so that the Geaid which holds it in Bogha shape will not slip off either end, the root at one end and about an inch of a branch at the other keeping it in position.
The Geaid is made of twigies or hazel rods twisted in the same way as the Buinne of the basket. The ribs are of "sally" or hazel and number about five - one in the middle and two at either side. The centre rib is first put in position. It is pointed at one end and the point is inserted in the Gead and projects about two inches beyond it. The rib is bent and the other end is brought in line with the narrow end of the Bogha where it is fastened with a twigie. At this point the weaving starts. The craftsman works up along until it is time to insert the first pair of side ribs. The first is pointed at one end and stuck through the Geaid like the centre rib. The weaving holds it
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 20:33
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ann go dtugtar Caisreabhán na Coise Deirge air. Dá n-íosadh aon ainmhidhe é seo ní mhairfeadh sé thar cúpla uair a chluig.

BILLEOGA SRÁIDE
Fásann siad so i dtalamh neamh-thorthamhail agus deineann siad dioghbháil mór. Deintear úsáíd dóibh mar biadh do's na cearca mar aon le neanntógaibh.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 15:33
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in Killarney. It was a Fair Day and Donnie Hayes Kilquane had a calf for sale. The calf tried to break away and Hayes caught a grip of his tail and gave it such a pull that he whipped it off. He swung it about his head and shouted "Up Murphy."

There was a fierce bull in Lord Kenmare's Demesne. He would kill anyone who would go into the Park. Word was sent to SEÁN MÓR O SÚILLEABHÁIN of Sheans in the parish of Rathmore that if caught the bull he could take him home and kill him for himself. Sean agreed and when he came what men were in Killarney were upon the wall looking at him. He came to the gate with a big stick and told them all to keep out of his way. He went into the field waving a red cloth. The bull ran at him. Sean stepped side-ways and caught the bull by the tail and started flaking him with the stick. He jumped on his back and shouted at him to go on and ordered the gate to be opened. Out charge the bull and on towards the town of Killarney. He never drew breath till he reached the bottom of New Street and before he was up again he was as quiet as a lamb. Seán took him home that night and killed him.
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 15:24
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JOHN MICKY RIORDAN still lives at Knockanes in the parish of Glenflesk. He was very fond of horses and still is and would talk about them from morning till night. Once when he was a young man he "made up" a horse for Kanturk Horse Fair. As soon as he left his own home the horse being "mad for the road" started to trot and John Micky ran along "beside him" and they never stopped till they reached Kanturk nearly thirty miles away.

DAN KELLY of Carrigavana in the parish of Glenflesk used to take a half a sack of flour on his back from Headfort to his own home across the mountain from Draumcarbin. The mountain is about a thousand feet high.

TIM COOPER of Draum used take a plough on his shoulder from Liosnagrave to Draum.

JERH CONNELL (JERRY GEOFFRY) READMINAGH brought a sack of meal in his arms from Maggie Free's (Daly) yard to the road. He took it by Na Cluasanna and pitched it against the hill over a horse rail into his own car.

The Murphy and Sullivan Elections were on,
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 15:01
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had such an effect that it was with difficulty any of the old people could be got to speak of him and then only with a mixture of reverence and pity.

LARY MÓR OF ANNAUGH was a great weight thrower and one day he threw a stone from the Hills to Carrigeen and he caught such a grip of the Stone that the print of his fingers remained on it and may be seen to the present day as the stone is still near Sylvester Dwyer's house at Carrigeen.

TADHG PHEADAIR OF MOUNTMUSIC was a great runner - Killarney is eight miles from Barraduv and he ran from Barraduv to Killarney and back in an hour.

PADDY THE MANNIC (O'Donoghue) from Glenflesk was a great mower. Leary Mud had four coxes of hay and Paddy mowed the lot in one day.

GILES COOPER OF DROUM was a noted man at the Tug a' War. When in training he used to tie a rope to a fairly good sized tree and pull the tree out of the roots.

JAMES COOPER DROUM used to lift a horse cart clamped with turf
senior member (history)
2022-05-07 14:53
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to beat SEAN CONNOR of Sheans mowing. He was one of a team mowing in Limerick one day before their breakfast. The Captain who was paid extra used to lead the field. Sean was now a fairly old man but he asked the boys to leave him second. So the Captain started off and here is Sean after him. Twas short till the Captain started to sweat but Sean didn't want to notice him.
They were called to breakfast and the Captain fell on the floor and could not leave it for the rest of the day.
Twas after this he was challenged to mow a swarth around Ballydaly Big Field. Doing that was considered terrible Gaisge. Sean did it but he dropped dead. The field is 60 acres.

JOHN NAGLE of Gortdarrig in the parish of Rathmore who died about 1908 walked to Cork and back again in one day. He walked over 80 miles that day.

JOHN KELLIHER of Corran in the parish of Rathmore used to chase wild goats without a dog until he caught the one he wanted.

DAN KELLIHER ARTIGALLIVAN who died an old
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:53
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man in 1915 used to put a half tierce of stout into a horse rail.
Pat and Denis Rourke of Minish used to take a half-ton weight between them on a hand-barrow. They are brothers and still alive. They were the strongest men who ever worked with the Great Southern and Western Railway.
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:50
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Denis Beag O'Leary of Mileenbawn walked to Cork and home again the same day and Cork must be almost 43 or 44 miles away from his place. After reaching home he said he had an occasion to go to Killarney. He only took off his shoes and ran it about nine miles each way.
When he was returning home there was a flood in the river and Dennis Beag only ran across it and he did it so fast that he said he could see the print of his heels in the water.
There was a man by the name of Thady Daly and he was called the Kerry Racer. The blood of a fox was put on his clothes at Headfort and he started to run with the beagles after him. He ran to the Quarry Cross and down by Meeveguilla and made Headfont before the hounds.
Daniel O Murphy was a blacksmith at Kilquane and he could swim with a bar of soap on his back
Terrance Dennehy of Rathmore John Favier the school teacher at Glenflesk about fifty years ago swam to the island in the middle of Loughquitane and out again.
There was no man in Kerry, Cork, or Limerick
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:43
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The Pruiseach Buide is the most harmful weed in my district. The Geosadán is a harmful as the Pruiseach Buide. The Pruiseac Buide grows in all gardens and it spreads very quickly. It takes all the good from the plants that are growing in the gardens. The Geosadáns grow very quickly; and are very plentiful.
Where ever you see rushes and nettles growing it is a sign that there is bad land there. Geosadáns generally grow on good land. Ellistrums grow on bad wet land.
Dandelion is often used for rheumatism. The leaves are plucked and boiled until all the juice is extracted from them. It is then in a mug for a time and then drank. Dandelion is used to cure warts and is said to take them away in a few days.
People use nettles as a vegetable when cabbage is scarce. They pluck the nettles and boil the same as cabbage.
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:37
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Aileach of the Kings
Chieftains of Tir Eoghain
(By Thomas Maguire (?) Tattysallagh)
(NEWSPAPER CUTTING - ARTICLE)
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:37
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Aileach of the Kings
Chieftains of Tir Eoghain
(By Thomas Maguire (?) Tattysallagh)

(NEWSPAPER CUTTING - ARTICLE)
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:34
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Dan T. Long:
Dan T's Cross (also called Dantee's Cross) is in the townland of Kilquane in the parish of Rathmore about a mile to the east of the village of Barradubh. It gets its name from a man named Dan T. Long who lived beside it a century ago and the remains of whose house were to be seen there until recent years.
Dan T stood seven feet, four inches high in his stocking ramps and was stout according. He was as quiet as a child and was never in a row in his life. When he was a young man Faction Fighting was very common and fights used to be arranged as was one between Rathmore the West of Killarney. The fight was arranged for College St in Killarney. The men from the West had a great name as fighters and the Rathmore men were in dread enough of them. But they thought of a plan. The prepared a huge club and induced Dan T. to hold the club over his head and march in front of their band. Although he never struck a man in his life, his appearance frightened the men from the West and they ran away.
He died during the famine and was buried without a coffin and used be mentioned as
Dómhnall Ó Longaigh a chuireadh 'na léine.
His death and the circumstances of his burial
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:21
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drawn when resisting tithes. Hackett married when old. He lived where Devilly lives now. His house had bags in windows. When he died his wife lived in Ballinakill, did up Devillys house married Lynch of Toberoe. Mrs McDonagh Myne HIll daughter of Hackett. Hackett left much money and much to priests.
It is said people were buried alive time of famine in Gortnamóna. Whole families died in New Village of starvation. Soupers those who took soup from Protestants were also called jumpers.

LANDLORDS
Between J. Hoades and Gannons there were three more houses. Squatters were installed on tenant farmers by the landlords on condition of getting employment on the lands of tenants. There were two more houses opposite Queallys. NESBITT was a Protestant landlord owned land from Cave to Ballinvoher including (?) land, Bawnmore and Kilvolan. Thomasheen McDermott lived between Cottingham's and (?). There was a road from Thomasheen's at back to a village 6 or 7 houses near the Lisheens in Roche's fields. People were evicted there. Finnegan lived where Rhattigan now Stone was one tenant; also Cottingham
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 22:11
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The reaping book and flail were much used, also scythe ploughs and harrows were wooden. Harrows used have iron parts inserted at forge. The Buailteán and the Colpán were the parts of flail, held together by thong made of sheepskin. They still make a Bórán like a sieve (but of course no holes) from skin of sheep for giving oats to horse. Threshing was done in a barn. Long ago corn was ground by quern upper stone had wooden handle and hole wherin corn was dropped and fell bet. two stones. Drinking vessels were noggins and smaller type held two tumblerfuls handles straight up from side. Timber twisted - with few tacks or short nails. Blue type and copper coloured delph.
(There is a wooden jug in Hyland's house in Kilvolan) top note
Women old and young wore white caps with frills made by gouffering iron.

TITHES
There lived 3 Hacketts in Headford. Martin, Pat & -- Pat was the tithe collector. Used to have men helping him. The tithes went to Protestant Minister of Headford. One Minister was Plunkett. Sometimes his salary was £500 per an. One Minister had £1,200. People had to give so much oats. People resisted. Mike Taidhg O'Rielly headed the Killamonagh contingent. His grandson lives in Killamonagh now. Patie Rielly. Sometimes blood was
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 21:58
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lived in Mossfort. One of them was married to O'Flaherty's sister. They were very rich one time. The daughter married a Mr Clark who lived where Newells now live near Belclare. Clark got so poor that later he was conveyed around in an ass cart. The Redington Roches lived where Mr Palmer now lives. There was an avenue leading from Rhattigans gate to the house and another behind Miss Kellys house. They were Catholic and during the Famine charged no rent to tenants but gave them seed.
Before the church was built in Headfort people used hear Mass at the top of the town near forge in the open air. Cloch an Iubhair people used to go to Mass there.
Before introd of Roman Collar about 60 or 65 years ago priests wore Knickerbockers, cut away coats high collars and black ties like people around.
New Village in this period was densely populated one time; many died of starvation. Night School was carried on here for a number of years. Adults used attend them. Rding Writing Arith taught. Headlines were written on every copy book. On Sundays the priest used appoint grown up boys and girls to teach Catechism. Mr Heaney attended a Hedge School. Catechism used be taught after Mass
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 10:57
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Marriages are celebrated from Shrove until Shrove Tuesday but no marriages are held during the holy period of Lent with the exception of St Patricks day.
Easter is also a great period for marriages and Easter Sunday and the following forthnight is a famous time for marriages.
When the people get married the straw-boys usually gather in, and they make the married couple dance and sometimes drink is stolen.
There are old customs. The following are done in my district.
When the two who are getting married are leaving to get married the tongs is flung
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 10:47
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but it was brought a few yards forward because the people in the sides could not see the priest. A man named Stanner from Ballinrobe had the contract.
There is a small church in a 'Clais' in Belclare. It is called Clais an Aifrinn. There is another like in Sylane near the school. Mass used be said there in the Penal Days.
Three curates lived in a house in Eamone. The P.P. used to lived near Corner Chapel. Dr McHale administered Confirmation in Feeragh but no trace of a Church there. Feeragh is a townland in this parish. There was a church in Kilvolan. There is a peculiar old stone in Kilvolan.
The Abbeytown Monks moved over or had a branch in Myre Hill, where the Kellys now live. A bishop used to lived in Sylane or near it and one in Cunninghams (Belclare)
The inside work of roof (ceiling) floor cement and walls was done by Fr. Michael Keaney PP. Mrs Morrissey Principal Teacher of Caherlistrane G N S for many years was the
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 10:27
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were owned by the Kilkellys of Mossfort and the O Flahertys of Lisdonagh. There were gates in the church leading in to the seats.
The school was where the teacher's residence is now - a long thatched building with mud floor. Mr Cunnane whose son now teaches in Kilcoona N S use to teach there and he lived in a house opposite John Casey's. This he rented from a farmernamed Judge whose descendants live in the house opposite the school. One of Mr Cunnane's sons (Frank) was executed in 1923 and is buried in the Republican Plot in D. Patrick graveyard. A family named Craven lived in Cunnane's house. One of them became a Christian Brother and later editor of Our Boys. Judge's house was a public house. The Post Office was one time in Thomas Hoades house and another time in John McHugh's. The old ruin near the teacher's residence was a coach house used by the Kilkellys of Mossfort on Sundays for carriage and horse.
The old alter was burned and the marble alter was found was first at the wall (east)
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 10:16
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Fr McManus. Fr Burke.
Corner Chapel - the Chapel of ease was built in 1829. It was called Corner Chapel because it was built near the corner of the Cross Road. The owner of the demesne objected to building the church opp dem. (?) gate at the x roads - so it was built further up on the Kilcoona Rd. The clan (?) is now (?) and nothing remains of the castle but one wall. There was a church near Knockroon one near McDonaghs, Several Protestants lived in Headford one time.. Headford & Shruile were big centres for them. The Prot. Church is in this parish (D patrick). Any person found picking even a twig in demesne was brought to the Square in Headford and put in stocks which were opposite the present National Bank.
The markets long ago used be held near Knockroon before the town of Headford grew up. The Protestant Church near Headford is in this parish. The demesne near Headford was owned by the St. George who lived in a castle in the demesne. Only one wall of the castle remains. There were several Protestants in Headford one time. Any person found even
senior member (history)
2022-05-06 10:04
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small jockey called to the house and offered to ride the horse. He is known locally as Shawn Boy and was presumed to be a fairy frim Knockma.
On the day of the race he told the owner that if he had the whip in his left hand going first round that would be a sign the horse had a poor chance of winning; but if he had whip in his right hand that would be a sign the horse would have a good chance of winning. He had the whip in his right hand - the horse won. From that on the horse was never allowed to run races but grazed at will voer the fertile field in front of the big house. When the horse died his head stuffed a and put up in the main hall of the big house so when the house was burned in 1922 the head was burned.
A fair used be held in the big 65 acre field s. west of the hill. It was called Castlehackett Fair. The fair was transferred to Caherlistrane, now held in a field belonging to Thomas Hoade - as a concession to said farmer who now enjoys tolls of said fair.
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 23:49
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When a person dies no one stirs for a while. Then the person is prepared for waking. In country places around here there are in some places special long tables which are utilised for all the wakes in the neighbourhood. Sheets are got, very often borrowed and dressed in a brown habit with hands reverently folded and beads sometimes between them, the corpse is laid out, and surrounded on three sides by the white sheets. On the table near the corpse are five candles, which are kept lighting during the entire wake
A plate of tabacco broken up with a supply of clay pipes, used until very recently be placed at or near the corpse table. Cigarettes have taken their place now. Snuff is handed round the whole wakehouse very often, the recipient saying "may the lord have mercy on the dead. or beannacht De le anmann na marbh (?) if in or near the Irish speaking district, or if the recipient is an old man or woman. When strong liquid refreshment is handed round , as is still common, the recipient says some words.
The rosary is invariably recited at midnight. All clocks are stopped.
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 23:18
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The Clarkes came from Athenry. Clark bought that place near Belclare for his son from Capt. Kirwan. Clark became aristocratic and hunted; married one of the Kilkellys of Mossfort. Became poor afterwards and went to Mass in ass cart. Count Blake lived in Cloc Ballynore near Clarenbridge.
There was an old church in Ross Lodge.
When Kirwans had race horses and land in the Curragh the finest hay came from Cloonbar, Cloonasgrah.
Father Heaney helped to buy (i) Cullinan Est, (ii) Count Blake Est, (iii) Poll na hAille Est.
The people gave the money or got loans from the Bank.
Count Blake was made a Count by the Pope. His sister, Mrs Murphy, had Abbeytown and Tonacooleen. He was born in Ballinfad near Balla. Other estate of his was in Clocballymora. Gave much property to Church.
Kilkelly's father came from Dublin and bought Carheenard, Mossfort from Sir George of Tir Eoghain. Gummins gave site for Kilcoona School and had a tannery in Galway.
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 23:07
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result. There was a champion team best in Connaught here about 50 years ago. Burke Mick McHugh John and Coyne John were outstanding. Coursing of recent introd. not held now, used to be held on Mangan's Hill. Hunting fox was and is carried on. Coloured Jackets, packs of beagles crowds used follow them. Bird catching on dark nights was practised - had lanterns and sticks. Stick called Maide Bradach. Card playing was and is carried on - played for sheep.
Weaving was carried on. 3 weavers - two named Lawless, one Hughes Killamonagh - looms made flannel and blankets. At night the woman spun thread, colured cloth red and made skirts and bawneens. Rich d Canavans father (Headford) napped (?) the cloth to make fleecy.
Before 1847 there were 1800 families in parish 17 families in Mossfort once. Kilkelly used kill a bullock and 12 pigs for them every Xmas. 4D a day was wages. Famine and emigration depleted popul.
About 60 yrs ago 75% of people spoke Irish very well. English has a good deal of Irish idiom i.e Eng now spoken here. e g There is rain on it .
Gaisc, Bail odhais, Slacht, léana, eanach, fasloch, cuthach, (?) garrdha, turloch, báinín, cúlán are common through. Engl. word like ladeen, dogeen etc etc are very common
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 22:54
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up to about 1923 or 24. Poor scholars were clever lads who were educ at Limerick or elsewhere free and set up or were allowed to teach in a barn kitchen or in the chapel. The Blessed Sacrament used be kept in Priests house. A fire used be put down in middle of the chapel and when smoke cleared away work began. There were a few seat. Teacher was fed in houses of the people when school was held in kitchen - woman of the house went back in the room working. Fee was a shilling a quarter per pupil. They used have a feast Xmas and Easter. Pupils wore a block of timber round the neck; block was notched whenever Irish was spoken and pupil slapped according to number of notches on block. Pupils of poor people were induced to attend Souper Schools on the lure of soup. There was one such near Knockma; one at Castlehackett School. Mrs Kirwan a north of Ireland woman was manager(ess) of it.
Dancing often held at Cross Rds. Pipers often blind Irish dancing. There was a very good piper in Derrymore. A HURLING often assoc. with X Rd dancing. A boy and girl were selected, boy would provide meals for the men, the girl for the women. Donkey and horse races were often held too. Matches often
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 20:42
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was very drunk so he fell asleep. A man named Mike O'Brien got a sheet, and put it over him, and lit candles, and he got pipes and tobacco, and he called all the neighbours, and told them Dan was dead. So when Dan woke up, he did not know what was the cause of the candles and all the people, so he was terribly angry. There was another beggar man called George Sweep, he used to be sweeping chimneys. There was another beggar called Dochtúir Seóigheach. She used to be vaccinating children. There was a man going around gathering rags called John Campbell.
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 20:41
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The beggars were very numerous in this locality long ago. My father told me all about the beggars of long ago. There were beggars in Myre Hill long ago. They had a row of little hovels along the roadside. There was a beggar in Myre Hill named Biddy Gill. She was a very cross old woman and the children were very much afraid of her. She used to go around to the houses begging, and if she did not get what she asked for she used to get vexed and go away. She had two sons
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 20:34
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The R.I.C. lived in barracks, Castlehackett in house now occupied by Vincent Corcoran. Turloch na bPiléar is about a 1/2 mile north of school. It is said two police were drowned there. One visiting the other, drowned going to Castlegrove.
Rents used be raised. Inability to pay meant a notice to quit. The Relieving Officer from Tuam came and notified evicted tenant of a place in Tuam Workhouse. The Castlhackett barracks superseded the Yeoman Barracks.
Beaghmore Landlords. St George of Tyrone and Mrs Brown. Land sold to Land Commission 1928 and divided among tenants. The estate org (?) consisted of Mossfort and Carheenard. These townlands were sold to Capt Kilkelly who came from Cloc Ballymore near Kinvara. Blakes lived in Clogballymore. The Frenches lived in Castle at Fahy's (?). Two brothers went away to Australia. Then St George of Tyrone got possession.
The Frenches were landlords in Poll na h-Aille. The Blakes got possession. The last of them - a famous solicitor in Tuam French Henderson went away to America. Francis Blake Oranmore was going to build a new house there but gave the cut stones for the church
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 19:56
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Although the place for the fair has been changed it is still called Castlehackett fair - held twice a year - 2 June and 2 Oct. The October fair was once the one of the last fairs in Connaught for rams. Great crowds came to it. And besides business transactions it was a venue for much sport and amusement. Now owing to transport facilities the fair green is practically deserted at 12 noon.
There are two Killamonaghs in the parish. The old Killamonagh is now called Ballinvoher. In the townland there was a Premonstratensian Monastery. Date founded uncertain. It was called St Mary's Premon. Monastery. See History of Archdiocese of Tuam (Dalton) There was a church in Kilkilvery.
The new Killamonagh is about a mile north of the old village of that name. It is a cluster of old thatched buildings population about 200 with a thriving shop in the middle of it. A good deal of Irish is still spoken there. There are ruins of an old church in the middle of a graveyard near the old Killamonagh and the next townland west of it is called Abbeytown
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 19:31
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at own expense. So there was a poem of praise made about it Amhrán na Mine.
His portrait was in Castlehackett House. He owned Friar the famous racehorse. Shawn Boy was his jockey. When the horse died the skull was preserved. The Major was poor at the time and a race was to be run at the Curragh. Shawn Boy was ill and another jockey had to be got. Horse was tricky and difficult to ride so there were small hopes of success.
See note in Mrs Costello's Book Amhrán Muighe Seola.

Friar Park is the name of a field on the hill.
When the horse used to hear bell ringing in Castlehackett house he used round the field.
The Tyrone branch of the French family now known as St George. See Mrs Costello's book Amhrán Muighe Seola.
NB Many of above notes re customs and families
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 19:21
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The R.I.C. lived in barracks, Castlehackett in house now occupied by Vincent Corcoran. Turloch na bPiléar is about a 1/2 mile north of school. It is said two police were drowned there. One visiting the other, drowned going to Castlegrove.
Rents used be raised. Inability to pay meant a notice to quit. The Relieving Officer from Tuam came and notified evicted tenant of a place in Tuam Workhouse. The Castlhackett barracks superseded the Yeoman Barracks.
Beaghmore Landlords. St George of Tyrone and Mrs Brown. Land sold to Land Commission 1928 and divided among tenants. The estate (?) consisted of (?) and Carheenard. These townlands were sold to Capt Kilkelly who came from Cloc Ballymore near Kinvara. Blakes lived in Clogballymore. The Frenches lived in Castle at Fahy's (?). Two brothers went away to Australia. Then Al (?) George of Tyrone got possession.
The Frenches were landlords in Poll na h-Aille. The Blakes got possession. The last of them - a famous solicitor in Tuam French Henderson went away to America. Francis Blake Oranmore was going to build a new house there but gave the cut stones for the church
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 19:00
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In Drumclough there is a field called Pairc-na-Gearóidí none of the old people can explain this name but I got the following story from one of them about it. The incident would refer to a period of more than one hundred years ago. The land then belonged to the grand-father of the present occupier. He was named Liam O'Mathghamhna. Three of his children died in a very short period less than a month it is believed. As they all died rather suddenly he was advised by his friends and neighbors to go to see a bean-feasa who lived in Glengarriff and seek her advice on the matter, because they all expected that he must have offended the good people in some way. He went on their advice and after they had exchanged salutations, he was just about to introduce the matter when she said, You need not tell me I know your trouble, but why do you let your children play in Páirc-na Gearóidí every evening after sunset, unless they give up this practice more will happen. He prevented their playing in the field late in the evenings and he had no further deaths in his family.
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 18:58
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(-)
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 18:51
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At present there are three forges in the parish namely Barretts, Murphys, Aherns. Their people have been smiths for many years. Mr. Barrett's forge is in the townland of Annsgrove and about one mile from the village of Carrigtwohill. It is near Ballinoe cross-roads. Ahern's forge is in Ballyadam a mile north east of Carrigtwohill. Murphy's forge is in Waterock three miles east of Carrigtwohill and it has an abundant supply of water there.
About fourteen years ago my grandfather ran a forge in the village of Carrigtwohill. He had another forge at Midleton Kennels. Two men would go to work there two days a week. He also had two other forges one in Ashgrove near Cove and another in Ahenish. Those forges would be worked a couple of days or so in the week. The one great forge was in Ballymaclinton, Shepherd's Bush, London. In 1908 at the Franc British Exhibition. In 1909 at the Imperial International Exhibition and in 1910 at the Anglo Japanese Exhibition.
Our forge is fifty feet long and thirty feet wide. At one time there were three fireplaces but now there is only one. There are two doors a large one and a small one and several large windows. The roof is covered with timber
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 11:54
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Cnoc na Saoid : Knocknaseed
Cnoc na Sionnac : Knocknashinnagh
Anach ? : Anagh
Ath na Bláth : Awnabla.
Leaca : Lacagh
Ré na sop : Raynasup
Más Reamhar : Masrour
Magh an tSamhraidh : Mahanthourig
Gort a Cárthainn : Gortacorring
--- : Mount Horgan
An Baile Thiar : ---
Gabhlán : Goulane
Míng an Oidhean : Meenganine
Meall an Eich : Meallanegh
Cnoc Dúr Áth : Knockduragh
Mointe Fluich : Meenteflugh
Túr na Loch : Tournalough
Cnoc Meadonach : Knockmanagh
Fearran Caol : Farrancaol
Two Gníomhs : Two Gneeves
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 11:43
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In olden times the parish of Nohival Daly extended from Rathduane to the source of the Blackwater at Meenganine.
In a field adjoining the Nohival churchyard there was a round tower a village and a monastery
It is said that Cromwell shattered these from either Drishane or Rathduane, with cannon.
Underground cellars were recently discovered where these buildings stood. It is also said that the chapel of the monastery was inside in the graveyard and that the altar of this chapel stood where the tombs of the Moriartys of Cloonts now stands.
The passage into the graveyard was only a little bóthairín known as "bothairín na gcorp" until the year 1680. But in that year there was a new road made into it, and there was also an addition put to the graveyard, in the same
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 11:41
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My opinion is that its name has something to do with Cladach owing to the flaggy nature of its bed.
On the banks of the Breanagh beside Clough, in Mrs McAuliffe's land there lived a turner whose trade was that of fancy wave designs. The relics of his little hut are known as "Insín Tórnóra".
About 500 yards froim Cumairín a' Phúca, mentioned before a headstone stands which was a landmark of P'lib Céad Bó's. According to the late John Connell, Scrathan to whom the writer is indebted for all this information, this man was a great robber who lived at Knockane. In Meenganine Glen (Muing an Eidhin or Muing an Oidhin - most likely as I have another story to relate.) he had a hut concealed in the side of a cliff. He possessed 100 cows, all ill-got and was a menace to the general public and feared by all for his misdeeds. The people finally collected and captured him and had him imprisoned for the thefts. Since I have been informed by Denis Cullinane (74 years) nicknamed "Scotty" - the only genuine Irish speaker in the district that the real Pilib lived at the place known as "Faill Philib" at the top of Cool on the side of the "Black Road" leading from Mt Eagle, Brosna to Cordal, Castleisland. Phil Houran (Horan) was his real name. He had his hut in a cul-de-sac of a glen where he kept his concealed his stolen stock. It appears he was the sworn enemy of
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 11:32
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In the year eighteen thirty-nine there was a terrible windstorm and it is known from that time as “the big wind”. It started in the evening and continued through the entire night. The people stood up the whole night to keep on the thatch and the galvanize. There was scarcely a house in the country that came safe from this storm and the roofs were blown off the houses that weren’t entirely blown down. The house now owned by the entire country but then owned by John Mac Cann and the house now owned by my father were all the houses in the country that were left untouched. The roofs of the houses built on uplands were blown down to the valleys and the roofs of seven were blown into John Mac Canns garden. The whole country’s flax was blown into a meadow belonging to Jimmy “the mad” called the Mad's bog. When every man went in the morning to look at his crop and to see was it much damaged it was blown away and it so much mixed up that is was no use. The day after the wind the people went in bands from house to house putting up temporary roofs on their houses as it was starting to snow and if there would be a fall these would be worse consequences than those following the big wind. The night of the big wind
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 11:25
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my father's grandfather, Patrick Collins, also a great poet, was coming home his "Céilidhe" past a house now owned by Francis Carnew when he found the stones slipping just about to fall and heard the frantic shouts and despairing screams of a man inside. He went in and rescued the poor man from the house which had almost become his grave. When Patrick reached safety and left down his burden he heard a terrific thud and beheld the downfall of the house. Needless to say Jacob Carnew, for that was the man's name faithfully helped his rescuer through every difficulty. Afterward Patrick Collins made one song about the big wind and another on the man he rescued which consisted of forty eight verses.
There was a family living on Mullagh Mór and their home was knocked down altogether. They were called Greenans. The man who was living in the house when his home was knocked down got married because he had no house to live in. There was a song made about the night of the big wind by Patrick Collins one verse illustrating the fact that Greenan was forced to leave his home and go into another house:
It was a terrible night the night of the big wind sir,
It blew so sore round Mullagh Mór, it blew poor Greenan in sir,
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 11:01
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Locally the Leaprachaun is known by the name of "taibshe," "poucha," "gaunchanna" and "fairy." Locally a lot of people say they saw a leaprachan but they took their eyes off him too soon.
One or two people say that they saw a leaprachaun but they are now dead. He is discribed to be about two feet in height; to be dressed in a red coat and cap, and to be living under a mushroom.
One man in this district has seen a leaprachan working on shoes. One day Francis Brady or "Francis the Bush" of Drumnatrade was going to Cootehill in an ass and cart. When he was going down to Kill Cross all on a sudden he heard a "tap, tap, tap." He looked over through the fields now owned by Billy McKeever and there under a mushroom busy working at shoes. He got down from the cart and went into the fields but foolishly he lifted his eyes from the leaprachaun had disappeared with his ass and cart.
There are several stories of people in this district catching the fairy and demanding a pot of gold. One night as Owen the Loughman's hired servant was coming home off his "ceidhle" he met a fairy. He caught him and ordered him to give up his gold. They took him away several hundred miles from his home. Then they gave
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 10:52
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evening playing as they were coming from the well with water. It was just about dusk.
About 400 yds to the north in Mike Mickey Nancy's land is a Folach Fé where Aen claims meat was roasted in olden times. He says that some meat was found there some years ago and it was in a perfect state of preservation. The meat, he says was taken to Dublin where it was tested.

Gleann Leathan: In Meenganine glen we have Léim a' t-Sagairt, a huge glen where in Penal days mass was celebrated. After some time the pass was sold and an attempt was made to capture the priest. One morning the priest hunters arrived to find the priest celebrating mass. The mass was almost finished when they drew near the rock on which the Host was. The priest turned out and jumped from the rock off the steep cliff and landed on a rock at the opposite side leaving the sign of his thumb and knees in a solid rock also the sign of his whip. (Before this I heard it was the sign of his fingers and feet). These marks are visible to the present day. - hence Leím a' t-Sagairt.

Donal a' Cásga - This outlaw lived in ancient times and had his hut or cave in the side of a cliff overlooking the river Ariglen enar Kiscéam Co Cork. He got to this cave by the help of a twig which overhung the cave. Some say that there was a hole within the mouth of the cave to prevent people from entering and that a few soldiers were drowned in
senior member (history)
2022-05-05 10:35
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(VI)
The women shouted "Do not touch the vestments of the Lord,
Spread out and fly" cried Dermot Dhunn and dashed along the sward,
The Saxon's fire and down there fall full many of the Gael,
The priest escapes and Dermot drags the hunters on his trail

(VII)
"Thank God! the Sagart's safe" he said, and now I soon must find,
A place to fight those butchers grim who press so hard behind."
A mountain athlete strong and tough he led them far that day,
When near the Friar's Stepping Stones he thought he'd stand at bay.

(VIII)
The hunters find no Sagart now but fighting Dermot Dhunn,
The man beneath the Chasuble has sabre dirk and gun;
He crossed the framing torrent and beneath a rock he stood,
Then Redcoats first he riddles till the waters red with blood.

(IX)
A score of England's hirelings did Dermot then lay low,
While fiery flashes round him made the rocks and gorge aglow,
"Come on ye Saxon dogs" he cried, "I'll face ye here alone,
My cry is 'Eire glas go brath' and 'down with George's Throne.'

(X)
Then Captain Elliott rushed at him when all the rest were down,
But Dermot meets his sable bright, and fights without a frown;
The Captain in the struggle pierced his shoulder with a sword,
But Dermot has the "kithogue" left to fight at Friar's Ford.
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 23:52
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Once upon a time there lived in west country a little girl who had no father or mother. They died when she was very young leaving her to the care of
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 23:50
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(I)
Adown the mountain strode the last of the Breffni's Rapparees,
His dark long hair defying care was flying in the breeze.;
He says " The priest will be today below on yon Mass Rock -
I'll join them and if need there be I'll guard him and flock".

(II)

Then down he went, and armed was brave Dermot to the teeth,
"If England's sleuth hounds come" he said "I'll meet them on the heath, [?]
They'll never touch our Sagart dear while I a gun can draw,
I bid defiance here today to England and her law".

(III)
He knelt while mass was going on; the women shrugged and said
"We never thought we'd see him here for wild's the life he's led."
But Dermot prayed most fervently, and told his Maker there,
That if the foemen came in search they'd find a lion's lair.

(IV)
When near the ending of the Mass, the ban - dogs did appear,
The women and the children screamed and old men shook with fear;
Then Dermott rushed up to the priest and said "now Father dear,
Give me the outer vestment and for your life now clear".

(V)
Then, on he put the Chasuble the priest he forced away,
"God bless you, Father, we shall meet upon the Judgement Day;"
Make for the mountains quickly now, I'll take your place and well,
I'll fight them when they meet me in yon spot beyond the fell."
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 23:42
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He drew the hilllman's dagger then and Elliott he laid low,
"I'd like" he said "to meet some more I'm fond of Erin's foe."
While fell the Red-Priest-hunters there the women on the brae

Saw Dermot Dhunn the Rapparee spring up and clear away.

(XII)
He made for Aughrim district then where he had loyal friends,
Who often helped him in the past the Sagarts to defend;
Next night above near Patrick's Well he told the awful tale,
And old men blessed brave Dermot Dhunn "defender of the Gael."

(XIII)
God rest your soul! famed Dermott Dhunn but few are like you now
Alas! to-day we've Irishmen who to our foes "kow-tow."
But thank the Lord who gave us you and all your gallant band,
'Twas men like you "Astore mo Chroidhe" who saved our native land.

(XIV)
You saved the Gaels; you saved our priest; you chose the heatherbed,
You made the cruel Bodagh quake and England's hounds in Red;
You kept on high our nations flag, and handed that flag on,
Till Rebel men raised it again on the slopes of Slievenamon.

(XV)
Young Gaels of Erin "gra macree" stand up and vow today,
That Erin's Faith and Erin's rights you'll never give away,
That true you'll be to Innisfail like Erin's brave now gone,
O'Dwyer famed O'Hanlon and fearless Dermot Dhunn.
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 23:25
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1) Basket Making
Old people had great knowledge about baskets and how to make them. It was an old custom with the Irish to collect the "Bent" which grows on the sandhills. Those who lived near the sandhills gathered loads of the bent. The bent is very like long grass, but stronger and tougher. When saved it looks like the twig which they now make sweeping brushes of. They first made the bottom of the basket by plaiting the bent round and round until they had it oval shaped. From this they plaitted the sides and when it was seven or eight inches high they sewed the rim with a twine. Next they plaitted a few strong twigs of bent together. Those they fastened on the sides of the baskets, as handles. As many as ten baskets a day were made by some families. They took those to the market on their heads. It was a common sight to see a woman bearing a bundle of forty or fifty baskets on her head, moving along gracefully to Kilrush.
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 23:14
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In the townland of Raheenagh, Knocknagoshel and situated on the right bank of the little river, Abha Bheag there is a labourer's cottage, quite close to the water.
The river divides Raheenagh from Ballinahown and Meen. The cottage is the "Yacht" mentioned in the song. A man named John Callaghan was tenant of the cottage during the days of the World War and Sinn Féin. This John Callaghan was born in Meen,, where his father Con Callaghan had a house and a little plot of ground in the farm of Denis P. Murphy.
John Callaghan became known as John Con.
In his younger days he led a wandering precarious life. Never contentented at home, he worked and "tramped" in every county of Ireland. He worked as miner in Wales, England and Scotland and made many trips to America - once as a stowaway - and back. He had a sailor's longing for sea-faring.
During the intervals of his voyages, the "yacht" became the resort of the boys of the neighbourhood each night. They were the "crew" of the yacht "Mary Jane."
The yacht became a centre for card-playing, dancing etc. and of course captain and crew had a little drop of drink in stock to celebrate special occasions.
Most of the "crew" took an active part in the War of Independence.
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 22:58
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Andrew Mac Dermott alias "Jingler"
A Hedge School Master (later a N.T.)
(Page obscured by Survey Docket re potato ground )

John Parr of Cornaveagh for whose father the potato ground was measured. "R" indicates the number of ridges. Surveyor was paid a penny a ridge. (J. McBrien)
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 14:33
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1) Why does a cow look over a ditch?
(Because she could not look through it)
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 14:28
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The beggars of long ago were very poor, and they had to suffer great hardships, besides the beggars of the present day. They had no vans to shelter them from the rain and cold. They had no carts to carry them from house to house, and they never wore any shoes. There was a beggar woman long ago called Sally Laighléis, she used to go around begging flour, or tea, or sugar. She used to come around once in every three months.
There was another beggar woman going around the locality called Sally Mc Lally, she had seven or eight dogs. Every dog she saw, she used to say he was one of her own dogs and she used to start scolding. There was a beggar man named Dan Kelly, all the children used to be afraid of him, and he used to have feathers in his hat. When he used to go through the town the children used to follow him around. One night he stayed in a house in Ballybogough, and he
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 10:23
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A football match was played at Ballinattin between the Moyle Rangers (from Clerihan and Rosegreen) and Kilcash. It played at the side. The best men and the strongest were picked from each place, parish against parish. 4 posts were used at each side I pt.I goal I pt.I , centre ones for goal and outer ones for points, no cross bar used as now-a-days. The match was rough and tumble. The referee did not trouble much about rules. The Moyle Rangers won.
Some time before that the match used to be played from one parish to another. Begin at a certain place and try to carry the ball home. Generally played along the banks of the river Moyle. The ball was kicked across the country and several of the players used to be permanently injured, as no rules were observedd. The ball was somewhat similar to the one now in use but a bit elongated in shape. The Moyle Rangers were a famous team at that time being never defeated.
The players were dressed in their ordinary clothes, no coat except shirt. The most noted players of the Moyle Rangers were John (?) Moorestown, Coleman (dead); Pat Woodlock, Coleman (dead) Pat Hanly (?), Ballinattin (dead); Pat and William Anglim, Rosegreen and Rathbrit, (alive). These were extraordinary tall strong men.

Hurling was also played in the district, but not as much as football. The ball used was the same as now. The hurleys were straight sticks, completely different from
senior member (history)
2022-05-04 10:05
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Fohurum
herb grows on the side of the road. Put as much in a saucepan as a quart of new milk will cover, bring to a boil, leave simmer 3 minutes and give to a cow affected with a stal (?) in her dug.

Funysceacbragh (?)
grows on old castles and walls, little bigger than moss. Should be put in the pocket wherever seen, as it is supposed to be a disinfectant or preventative for disease. Means "Gift of the seven cures."

Pig-root
Poisonous Plant used for convulsions or fits in pigs. A small string of the root is put into the pigs ear after making an incision in the ear PARALLEL to the body of the animal or head. Generally put in both ears (?), one is sufficient. If put into the slit in the ear facing the body of pig, it will kill the animal. A good many people put it in whether the pig is ill or not as a preventative. Only grows in certain places. People who come for it to the farmer who has it, will not get it on Sunday, will have to wait until Monday to pull it.

Crooredearg (?)
used for dysentry in calves, boiled in milk
Grows on old walls. Now called Tansy."

The seventh son is credited with having healing powers in the district. A great many of other cures and gifts are passed from parent to child. Outside Fethard is a woman named Mrs. Walsh who is a noted "bone-setter." She got the gift from her father named Heffernan. People go to her for miles around this locality.
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 23:53
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Comfrey
An herb which is chopped up and fed to pigs with other substances.
Nightshade is a deadly poison
Scutchgrass and Prausagh Bwee impoverishes the soil and do great harm
Saddlegrass is to be found on good land while Louseworth is only found on very poor land.
All other cures and herbs were used extensively in former times and up to the present day by the people. They always gave relief or effected a cure.
Dock-Leaf used for stings of nettles
Plantain is put to a cut to stop bleeding
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 23:46
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These are the games I play:-
Hide and Seek
Someone hides their eyes and the others go and hide. And the one that had their eyes closed goes and trys to find them to tig them.
There came thirteen men to work one day
Thirteen get on every side and one side gets something to do in front of the others, and when the other side guesses what it is they run after them and if they catch any of them at a certain point they go to their side.

Colours
There is a whole lot of children lined up and then there is someone picked out and she gives the rest of them colours. Then some two are the devil and angel, and when the devil is called on, he asks for a colour and if there is a girl with the same colour as the devil asks for she then goes away with him. Then the angel is called.

Blind man's buff
Someone ties a handkerchief round his eyes and trys to catch some of the rest and when someone is caught she is then "blind man's buff."

Chain-tig
Someone has the tig and when she tigs someone the two catch hands and that goes on until the whole lot is tug, and the last one that is tug she then has the tig.

The fox and the chickens
Someone is the fox and someone the mother. Then all the children get behind her let on they are chickens. Then the fox trys to get the
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 23:35
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Continued
with potkeen for them. Sometimes when the girls parents has got no money she gets a cow or some animal as a dowary. On the wedding morning crowds of people gather to the church and some men have guns with them to fire shots after the wedding. Whenever the wedding party comes out of the church the people go and shake hands with them and wish them many happy days. Long ago the people used to go to the weddings on horseback and the women used to ride behind the men on an iron hoop and a seat in it and it attached to the saddle and it is called a pilon.
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 23:30
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Philip Doherty of Hillside, Desertegney, Buncrana was a very strong man in this district long ago. The people thought him a great hero and always called him Big Philip. Sometimes if his horse would not be fitting for work he would take the cart as there was not many wheelbarrows in that place during that time and go to Buncrana town. He would take a ten stone bag of flour and other goods home in the cart, that is about a distance of seven miles. When he would be busy digging potatoes all day he would come in and not go to bed until four o'clock because he would be threshing. He could thresh the stack in two nights. He made a very big kreel that could carry a load of turf. He would take home two or three kreelfulls every day and in a short time he would have as big a stack of turf as any man in the parish. One time when he was working
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 23:19
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The herbs that are found in our district are, Benweeds, Hemlock, sorrel, pyril, coltsfoot, red shank, yar, thristle, ribbon grass, milk thristle, fairy thimbles, ferns, crow foot, dockens, mug wood, Prasha, nettle, dandylion, biller, bogbine, chicken weed, rushes, butter cup, daisie, clover, celindine, stitchwort, primrose, blue bell, violets.
The most harmful of the herbs that grow in the fields are, yar, sorrel, thristles, dockens, crow foot, red shank, milk thristles, Prasha, pyril. These herbs smother up the crops, and take the good out of the land by using up the manure.
When you see a field with a lot of benweeds that field is good land. Benweeds do not harm the crops. You do not see these others in good rich land. When ever any of these bad weeds are growing in one side it will not be long until they have spread over the whole field. The working of the land makes them spread if they are not gathered.
Hemlock is a large plant with a white blossom on it. It is found growing along ditches. It is a a very poisonous plant.
Sorrel is found along ditches as well as in fields. They are an oval shaped green leaf
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 16:57
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And the stream that spread the Lee,
May heaven be with you golden lane and the tower of "Sweet Rathlee."

(IV)
Oft times wer viewed the corn-fields all springing in their pride
From Cloonenmore to Fortland grove and along the mountain side,
As swiftly glides the River Moy from Ballina to the sea,
Sure we can't forget poor Enniscrone and the tower of Sweet Rathlee.

(V)
Farewell to evening dances, where many a comrade meet
When the fiddler would say to the boys and girls get up and shake your feet.
Its there you would see the pretty colliens chat would fill your heart with glee
I'll risk my life or make my wife a girl from "Sweet Rathlee."

(VI)
Farewell to you my comrades all, its for you I must (?)
My hand and heart Ill leave to you, though my back I am forced to turn
And a hundred chances are to one if ever again I see
The kind old friends and neighbours round the tower of Sweet Rathlee.
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 16:50
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is about two hundred people.
There was a song composed by a blind man the name of Thomas Madden a native of Rathlee. The song he composed was the town of Sweet Rathlee.
A Song The Town of Sweet Rathlee
(I)
Kind friends we'll meet in love to night on Columbus tranquil shore,
Three thousand miles from Ireland we never shall see more
But dearer still is Croc-an-hill than any place to me
Sure it is my own and my native home and they call it Sweet Rathlee

(II)
How dear to me is memory sweet recollection brings,
How often did wer listen to the thrush and black-bird sing,
And softly does the cuckoo call from our the hallow-tree- (?)
Far sweeter notes would echo round the tower of "Sweet Rathlee."

(III)
It deeply planted in my mind, those places I have seen
From Carrowmacbrine to Easkey town, and along the road to Skreen,
The lake and grove round Temple view
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 16:27
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to pay the smiths they sent them farm produce instead. The smiths are always looked upon as being strong as they exercise their muscles a lot during their work. On wet days the neighbours all gather to Carty's forge to get their animals shod and if they wish they can have a drink in the lcoal pub across the way. Cashelgarron forge was used as a hiding-place in the time of trouble for the Irregulars from 1914 to 1923.

Children enjoy watching the smith at his work and they delight in seeing the sparks flying, which reminds of the poem which says:-
"Children coming home from school
Look in at the open door;
They love to see the flaming forge,
And hear the bellows roar,
And catch the burning sparks, that fly
Like chaff from a threshing-floor."
Ada Shaw, Nunstown
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 16:21
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some calves and walk them home again.
Pat Feeney of Cartronmore was the best high jumper in this district. He was known to jump stone walls five feet high.
Bernard Drury of Cloonaghbawn often competed at old fair of Carney and he was also known to jump great heights.
Tom Magee of Drumcliffe was said to be another good jumper. He was known to jump Drumcliffe river which is about 16 feet wide.
John Christal of Cloonacrin was said to be the best swimmer in the district. He swam from Lissadell to Rosses Point carrying a man on his back
Danny Kerrigan who lived in Drumcliffe was an excellent swimmer and was known to swim from the lower Rosses to Drumcliffe Bay, a distance of 1 1/4 miles with his clothes and boots on him.
Thomas Magee, Drumcliffe; John Hennigan, Finid; Pat Hennigan, Finid; and Michael Feeney, Ballygilgan were the best oarsmen around this district.
Paddy Friel, Cashelgarron, Jimmy Hennigan, Barnaribbon; Darby McMorrow, Urlar and Thady Scanlon, Gorterowey, any of these men were known to mow an Irish acre.
John Mannion, Sen. Carney, Pat Gorevan, Cashelgarron John Mannion won a cake at Drumcliffe Races.
Pat Herity, Urlar, was a noted singer. He used to sing at wakes and weddings, and his
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 16:06
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found poor Kelly still alive.
The brave old man though numbe with cold walked home. He used to tell often of his adventures in the snow, and how, to keep himself alive, he took the whang out of his shoe and chewed it.

5) Roger Feighney of Augharrow, Grange, carried a sack of meal - 20st - on his back from Muininane home - three miles
6) Michael Gilmartin of Carnamadow moved an acre of good meadow with a scythe in one day.

7) Patrick McGowan of Augharrow now in Ameirca could lift 1cwt of meal in one hand and 1cwt of flour in the other at the same time.
8) Two members of the Currid family in New Grange dug a half-acre of clay land for oats with their two Láidhes in one
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 12:04
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Colomane
This townland is situated in the Parish of Caheragh and in West Cork. It got its name from a Saint that lived there long ago. There are some ruins of an old church that was built by St. Colman in the farm of Mr Florence Crowley, Colomane Bantry.
A "boreen" leads up to this ruin and it is on a hill at the south west corner of a field about a quarter of a mile from his residence.
It is now covered with moss and furze and anyone never heard of any pilgrimage being made there. About a half a mile from the ruins is a graveyard where people used to be buried. There is a boreen leading from one to another. The extent of the field is about three acres.
The graveyard is in the farm of Mr James Crowley Colomane and the name of the field it is in is "Sliabh na gColadh. There is a fort in this field also.
An old man once lived in the farm of Mr. James Crowley and he ploughed the field in which the graveyard is in. On the following morning his two horses were dead; the field was not tilled since.
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 11:35
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would take some writing. The big men would take themselves to the nearest public house and enjoy their evening's fun. While the smaller lads had some special necessity of their own a pair of shoes, a cap, some books for school and so on and St Stephen thus often acted the friend in need. On St Brigiids night it was a custom to make up large dolls and take them with false faces and it often proved a merry night. Shrove and all belonging to it is for the grown ups.
St Johns to the people of these parts was a day of importance because of the rounds at Tuberin Factnas and Fr John Power's tomb in Ross at which places there were several cures effected. On one occasion a poor old man on two crutches on telling he was going to Fr John Power who was then living with another person. A strong man who mocked him saying you may as well come to me to cure you. Well the old man went his way and saw Fr Power and told what this other man said now said Fr John leave your crutches with that person he needs them and he did.
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 11:24
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present day "The Wife of a Bold Tenant Farmer."
I believe the man lived to be about the age of ninety years and was buried in Drinagh churchyard.

There was also another poet in Kippagh whose name was James Calnan who made the song of the "Capparies" which runs thus

"The Capparies"
You sons of Erins lovely Isle pay attention to my song,
I'll sing for you a verse or two I won't detain you long,
About a band of gallant lads the Capparies by name
From that townland you understand they do derive that song(?)

(II)
On every Sunday evening after coming home from Mass
Those boys would meet for converse sweet
Down by O Conolly cross
They are out for every kind of sport
But in them you'll always find
Allow for one-another, and a friendship true and kind.

(III)
Then they'll join in one harmonious band with laughter and good glee
Some for a dance are eager bet while more are for a spree
At a "pitch and toss" or bowling match some more of them you'll find
But among them all I've found a brawl of any kind.

(IV)
Though a little friction may arise about the fairer sex
senior member (history)
2022-05-03 11:13
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Poets were very scarce in this district long ago. There lived in the townland of Ballyboy, a poet named Timothy Crowley. He was born in the townland of Ballyboy about one hundred and twenty years ago. He was about eighty years old when he died.
He is buried in Fanlobbush graveyard about three miles east of Dunmanway.
It is said that this poet received the power of verse-making very suddenly and that there were no poets among his ancestors. He used to make poetry about all his neighbours. He used to make poetry in Dunmanway on fair days, and any person who would want to make poetry about themselves used to come and tell him about themselves and then he would make poetry about them. He composed all his poetry in Irish. He was a shoemaker by trade and he used to sing while he worked.
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 23:17
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Twas the goose first assaulted thug fáscadh fé'n madra,
With her long bill and bake do phleusc sí annsa mhalainn é,
Agus fan na gcliathán leis na scíathaín do ghreadadh é,
My dog being ashamed bheith traited ar an aiste seo,
Rug sé ar chéus chinn uirthi as ba bhreágh bain sé staich (?) aisti

Do caitheadh amach an chuis gan dochar
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 23:11
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Lá n-aon dá raibh Eoghan Ruadh a' siubhal trí Cathair Bearnach do glaodh sé isteach idtigh feirmeóra. Bhí madra deas géur an-aonfheacht leis. Do ráinig go raibh gé ar gor de tigh. Do dhein sí ar an madra láitreach agus thosnuig sí ag gabhail do le gob is le scíathán. D'iompuigh an madrín ar an ngé, rug ar muineál uirrí agus níor leag sé uaidh í gur thacht sé í. Thug muintir an tighe ós comhair na ngiuistísí Eoghan. Do dhearbuigeadar gur mhairbh an madra an gé agus nár chuir Eoghan aon cosc leis. D'fhiafruigh na giuistísí d'Eoghan cad do bhí le radh aige. D'freagair sé mar leanas.
One day as I was walking trí bánta na Cathrach
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 22:49
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cat." The latter is rarely said now but was commonly said about 30 or 40 years ago. About that time people used to salute in Irish as often as in English.
"Dia dhíbh" or "Dia's Muire dhíbh."
When "God bless" or "God bless all here" was said the woman of the house always answered, "God bless you kindly." or "The Same to you" or "And you likewise" always adding "Dé bheatha sa" or "Fáilte romhat."
"Céad míle fáilte romhat" I knew one old woman who always said "Céad míle milliun fáilte romhat." Sometimes I heard people answering "Dia's Muire dhuit" with "An Dia céadna dhuit" or "An bail céadna ort."
When people or a person left a house the remaining people said "go n-eirighe an t-ádh leat." or "Go
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 22:41
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said even today.
Passing along the road people working in a cornfield inside, saving hay or digging potatoes, building an out-house or a dwelling house the salute is "God bless the work." Old people who have Irish say "Bail ó Dhia ar an obair." The answer is "And you likewise" "and you too." or "Gurb amhlaidh dhuit." This custom is gradually dying out. Only an odd person now says it.
Passing a church - a Catholic one all men raise caps or hats, women face the church and bow. A lot of old women genuflect. A good many too make the Sign of the Cross. A good many men too make the sign of the Cross when their caps are raised - that sign of the Cross would be very small tho' only across their faces
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 22:36
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n-eirighe do bhóthar leat" or " go n-eirighe Dia is do bhóthar leat." or "God speed you" or "God speed the journey"
Sometimes if there were a "prime boy" in the road he'd say "That the road may rise with you and strike you in the heels" or "That the road may rise with you as high as the ditch."
When a person woned (?) sneeze, the would say "Dia linn" or "Dia linn is Muire Mháthair." or "God bless us." sometimes someone present would say the "Dia linn" or "God bless us." if the person who sneezed didn't say it. Someone, too sometimes would answer "Amen."
When talking about someone who was dead people always say "God rest his or her soul." or "May the "heavens be his bed," or "the Lord have mercy on her soul."
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 22:24
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1) Behind near Paddy Moses (Craig Abbeyfeale)
2) Neighbour's place, Cnoc Cul Caor Mt Collins
Sloes are growing over the grave.
I think these 1 & 2 were used as burying places for unbaptised persons.
3) In Garbhán. In Mrs Curtain's (Dubby's) place. They couldn't plough it. Bones and skulls used turn up every minute. In one corner of the field no one was buried there. They set spuds there. They were only like crabs.
4) One in Phil Flanagan's place (Baile Beag) Lights are seen there. Spoons dishes plates forks and knives were found there.
5) Jack Dick's ( ) Mountain
They found six bodies. Money was found around the place.
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 22:04
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1) If an expectant mother happens to meet a hare she should at once stoop down and tear her petticoat; otherwise the baby will have hare-lip. If such a woman cut herself while preparing a hare for cooking the baby will have hare-lip.

2) Catch hare and "scut" it before bringing it into the house.

A child was born in Kilteale about 1916 or so with six fingers on one hand. The doctor advised the mother to have one of the fingers off. This was done the other finger being removed and scarcely a mark left to create disfigurement. The old women of the district said this shouldn't have been done as it is not lucky to interfere with what God sent.
The girl is now a married woman having met no bad luck in her life so far (1942)

A baby born 1939 with hare-lip still bears the disfigurement as his Granny says "It is not right to change God's handiwork." and "It would be flying in God's face" to have lip changed.
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 21:52
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After the first mass in the chapel after the child's birth the baby is baptised.
Whoever you choose for "gossips" are asked after the child's birth - no set arrangement you can have relatives or otherwise. People don't name or lay the gossips until after the child's birth. They may have them in mind but they don't mention them.

Churching of mother takes place as soon as she is able to go to the chapel. She is not to prepare food or bake bread or serve refreshments until she is churched. There is no rule about going to mass.

Water for Baptism is brought out from Maryboro by the priest. People don't bring salt or towel here.
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 21:45
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1) Catholic Chapel in graveyard adjoining Powellstown and Coolnacarrick
2) Old two-roomed house occupied by teacher till 1889
3) New Residence for teacher erected 1889 with 2 acres of land, statute(?)

FARMS

A) Drennan's
80 I. acres: all good land level ground
Slated two-storey dwelling house built 1900 or so.
Big yard, very fine out-houses, pump in yard.
Small lawn before hall-door, ornamental shrubs, gravelled avenue from front gate.

ALBERT EMPEY'S
Old low two-storey slated residence;
Farm-yard at back, good out-buildings;
Front door opening on small flower-garden through which gravelled walk leads from front-gate.
100 acres here, much more away from house

MRS RAMSBOTTOM'S
Newish two-storey slated residence (B. of Works) Kitchen and parlour or floor bedrooms above.
About 70 I. acres under tillage chiefly - all level
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 01:17
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Around Skibbereen there are several blessed wells but I know only a couple of them and now I am going to tell you a few stories about these wells.
Sceabhar well is situated near Lough - Ine. On the 30th of April every year crowds of people are to be seen praying and making the rounds: every time a person goes around the well they drop a white stone into the well, and along side the well there is a white thorn bush; on this bush people tie old rags, but the last couple of years very few
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 01:16
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In the Penal Days when the priests were hunted one of them was saying mass on Cnoc Camtha at Lough Ine about five miles from Skibbereen. When the priest saw the soldiers coming he ran away and one of them followed him. Both horse and solider fell down over a big cliff and were killed. It is known as "Soldier's Hill".
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 01:07
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Threshing machines - steam thresher drawn along the road by horses - was in use here 70 years ago.
Mowing machines in use then.
The "combined" machines i.e. a mowing machine with a reaper attachment in use too.
The Reaper - and - Binder - self-tying - was in 50 or 60 yrs ago but only a few farmers owned a Reaper - & - Binder, the "Combined" being more generally used. After this machine a man went along "sheafing" the corn which was then tied by hand.
A workman named Tindall brought out the first Reaper - and - Binder ever seen in this part of the country. He was taking it to his employer Mr. Tarleton, near Stradbally. When he appeared on the streets he was mobbed and had to get the police to save him. At that time cartloads of harvesters used to come out from the town to help at the corn, getting 3/- per day when an ordinary workman in constant employment only got 10/- a week. Those workers became angry because the new machine was likely to deprive them of work. This happened in Maryboro' between 50 & 60 years ago.
Reaping - hooks have not been in use for corn - reaping for generations though an odd one may be got here and there in the parish.
The scythe is only used in opening the field or on small bits of grass.
Poor people in Bauteogue and Big - Bog often yoked cow and horse together for ploughing etc. within living memory.
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 00:59
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Loughteague = Loughteeog School Stradbally
Edhnographic - Surnames -- Popularity in historical years
Delaney
Smyth
Comerford
Keeffe
McEvoy
Holohan
Mahon
Kelly
Conran
McKenna
Greene
Fingleton
Rankins
Wall
Doyle
Doran
Bradshaw
Cooke
Lalor
Flynn
Holland
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 00:52
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learn his trade without ever getting a penny in payment. After that he went all over the country working at the harness-making - he even worked for the Duke of Leinster often. After some years he settled at home in Banteogue with the brother where he set up his workshop. He was a tip-top tradesman who always earned the best of money.
Mary Hogan went from house to house sewing before the sewing-machines came into use. She was able to do plain sewing, but only a 'botch' at making clothes. There were girls who made men's shirts by hand too, and did no other form of sewing.
Every farm-house had a spinning wheel for woollen yarn up to 70 years ago or so, but there is not a single person in the parish to-day who can spin. Women spun yarn for socks and stockings. All knitting was done by hand until recently. The woollen factory at Pass (4 miles south of this) wove rugs blankets, shawls, etc. It fell into decay many years ago.
"Old Mills" a townland adjoining Timogue had corn-mills, one of which was working in last generation. The corn-mill nearest to us now is at Lalor's Mills near Port Laoighise where oats and wheat are ground.
Old Miss Mahon says her father and men of his time wore white home-spun linen shirts tucked and gathered - they were called "Blackthorn Shirts," - she doesn't know why, but thinks there were little knobs or roughness in the linen. Her brother didn't wear them. The latter was born in 1856. An old lady named Smith fell out with her daughter-in-law over the making of the men's linen shirt
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 00:32
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The only tradesmen in this country district at present are three blacksmiths ( cf. Answer to Questionaire on Smiths) who the odd jobs of smith-work, working as farm-labourers the remainder of the time , one "handy-man" who with his son, does some mason work , puts up sheds of concrete, repairs slated roofs and little jobs like that; two carpenters living in the locality work in Stradbally with carpenter there - their chief work being coffin-making, building of carts and wheelbarrows, kitchen furniture and plain carpentry:
Son (?) Tom Connor now 88 or 89 years old, was a harness-maker by trade, but for some years he hasn't worked at the trade. He lived with his farmer-brother in Bauteogue where he had his workshop. The last local tailor died about 40 years ago. Old Mary Hagan, who died about 20 years ago, used to go from house to house making children's and women's clothes. When she was a young girl before sewing machines came into use. There is no dress-maker in the district now.
Dick Comerford a small farmer living in Loughteague does odd jobs of mason-work and a little thatching. There is no local thatcher in the immediate neighbourhood, though there is one or two in every parish around.
"The Little Mill" in Timogue was a flax-mill. An uncle of old Mrs Carry's (?) worked there. When the mill fell into disuse he went to U.S.A. with his wife and family in one of the old sailing vessels. That might be 90 years ago. Mrs Carry was born in 1848. When Tom Connor was a lad he was apprenticed to Prendergast a harness-maker in Athy. He served 7 years to
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 00:17
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In a run across Laoighis I noted the following thatched hosues within view of road Maryboro to Clara
Chimney - C = central
E = end
Gable - P = painted
H = hipped

Survey - See table .
First two columns are for Laoighis.
Last ,, ,, ,, ,, Offaly.
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 00:13
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Dysart Hill is dotted with lime-kilns. Lime was freely used on the land up to 68 or 70 years ago. Only two are now working - these burn lime for white-washing chiefly, or for making mortar of lime and sand.

All the comfortable farm-houses in this locality have a good iron gate at entrance. This is set between stone pillars or stone-work piers flanked by a wall of good mason-work. At one side there is always a stile over the little wall. The approach is bordered by a clipped hedge.

Many old houses are now falling apart, the owners having tone into modern slated dwelling-boxes.
Those old houses had been thatched, the walls were raised from earth level with no sunk foundations. The lower part of wall is usually of rough stone work bound with lime and sand mortar; this rises for 2 1/2 or 3 feet above which a wall of undiluted clay rises to the thatch. Around the windows and doorway some stone or brick is set to hold the frames. Hipped gable or all mud walls.
senior member (history)
2022-05-02 00:04
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The mother complained that the wife's sewing was too coarse saying "I could make gathers and tucks as fine as a pin." This row took place 110 years ago (1832) and is still told of the family.
The last coach-builders in Maryboro went out of business in 1909 or 1910. Jack Lyons, the Nailer, was the last to follow the trade of nail-making. His once flourishing business had declined to vanishing point, though he kept his work-shop open in Lower Main St. Maryboro till his death which occurred in 1939or '40. He was 72 or 73.
Jimmy Duane, an elderly man, and his son follow the trade of tinsmiths. They live in Stradbally. In addition to making tinware they repair tin and zinc vessels; build and repair walls, roofing, water-chutes, set grates, stoves and ranges. They do not travel about.
The Wards of Maryboro are travelling tinkers whose chief occupation is begging. To this family belongs the famous ? singer Patrick Ward, born in Port Laoighise.
An elderly man living in P. Laoighise makes crude baskets of umpeeled sally and hazel rods. Every farmer has a few of those for carrying potatoes, turnips, etc. They are shallow, oval, baskets with curving sides and bottom big enough to hold two stones of potatoes or so. He makes small shopping baskets too but they are even rougher and more unfinished than the other.
Larry Connell, a bone-setter, died in Stradbally 9 or 10 years ago at an advanced age. 50 yrs ago or so he used to draw teeth.
A man named Mannion near The Heath is an excellent bone-setter who now sets all the broken bones and sprains for the injured people in this parish. They say he is "better than a doctor."
senior member (history)
2022-05-01 11:30
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There are 5 Graveyards in the Parish
1) The Abbey
2) Cill Mac Comóg situated 1 mile west of Kealkil (Catholic)
3) Bantry Church Yard (Catholic)
4) Bantry Protestant Graveyard in the back of Bantry town.
5) There is a graveyard in Whiddy Island.

Scarcely any people are buried in the Whiddy Island graveyard of late years. The Graveyards are Rectangular Shapes. There is a Cabhlach in Cill Mac Comóg Graveyard and people are sometimes buried in this Cabhlach - The slope faces east in all cases, where such exists.
There is an old tomb (the only one I'v seen ever) in Cill Mac Comógue Graveyard. It was errected by a man (Portugeese) - native of Portugal - Named Captain Biaia. (?) This Captain was shipwrecked in Bantry Bay over 70 years ago. He landed safely himself and after a number of years; he 'settled down' at Kealkil Village where he married a rich farmers daughter. He died about 30 years ago approx.
His daughter's line still and keep a shop.
senior member (history)
2022-05-01 11:29
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There are 5 Graveyards in the Parish
1) The Abbey
2) Cill Mac Comóg situated 1 mile west of Kealkil (Catholic)
3) Bantry Church Yard (Catholic)
4) Bantry Protestant Graveyard in the back of Bantry town.
5) There is a graveyard in Whiddy Island.

Scarcely any people are buried in the Whiddy Island graveyard of late years. The Graveyards are Rectangualr Shapes. There is a Cabhlach in Cill Mac Comóg Graveyard and people are sometimes buried in this Cabhlach - The slope faces east in all cases, where such exists.
There is an old tomb (the only one I'v seen ever) in Cill Mac Comógue Graveyard. It was errected by a man (Portugeese) - native of Portugal - Named Captain Biaia. (?) This Captain was shipwrecked in Bantry Bay over 70 years ago. He landed safely himself and after a number of years; he 'settled down' at Kealkil Village where he married a rich farmers daughter. He died about 30 years ago approx.
His daughter's line still and keep a shop.
senior member (history)
2022-05-01 11:16
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Thatchers were in great demand, and tried to rival each other, both in speed and pattern.
They (the farmers) cut, dried and pointed their own scallops, and except in rare cases, they thatched their own outhouses.
The women spun the thread for the socks and stockings at night, and often "Árnáning" was carried on 'till the early hours of the morning.
They told the time by certain stars or bodies of stars at night, and went milking in the evening, when the sun was at a certain mark on the kitchen floor. They had no clocks or watches.
A sort of a thick liquid found in certain mountains was used for dying flannels. They called it "Black". It was just like jam, but black and more greasy. It was lifted in buckets into barrels on the mountains and brought home in carts. In Knockadulán mountains, about 5 miles from Glin one of these "Black holes" was much sought for in ancient times.
senior member (history)
2022-05-01 11:11
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One Tailor at Kealkil (70 yrs old) used to work in country house up to about 15 years ago. Not customary at present.
They wage a 'war of Propaganda' against 'Hawkers' who sometimes visit the district with cheap ready made clothing. These Hawkers do sell inferior cloth and injure their trade somewhat - Nevertheless they are continually engaged at work.(?)

The local Tailors (Kealkil) work during the Winter nights (by lamp oil). This work is called "Árnáning." The Árnáning commences always after Lady day (15 Aug) and terminates at St Patrick's Day. They usually work up to 12 o'clock by night.

Shirts are made in several house in the country districts here. Material used Flannelette. Women make them.
Stockings (Woollen) are also knitted. Women "Farmer's wives" are continually engaged at this work during their spare time - especially during the "Long Winter nights."
A few people in the townlans of Coosane still spin their own thread and make stockings and jerseys from it.
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 20:51
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For unrelenting in her ire,
She mounted a steed that wouldn't fire,
That from his nostrils belched forth fire
This demon of the night.
And though on a message of mercy (?),
That a dying (?) might repent;
Her weight on his saddle-bow (?) she leant,
And he fainted at the sight.

But when a pater and ave he said,
This friend of darkness quickly fled;
Down towards the Tar valley she sped,
And his horse at once revived
He reached the priest without delay,
And brought his reverence all the way
Back to the house where the sick man lay
Then was the (?) shrived.
Edmond Murphy
Chicago
late of Killeely (?)
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 20:26
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And cut them stripes by the way they were tripes
And boiled them his ould leather breeches

(6)
When the tripes were stewed on a dish they were strewed
The boys all cried out, the Lord be thanked
But Hegarty's wife was afraid of her life
So she thought it high time for to shank it
To see how they smiled for they thought Pat had boiled
Some mutton and beef of the richest
But little they knew that it was leather burgoo
That was made out of Paddy's ould breeches

(7)
They walloped the stuff, says Andy its tough
Says Paddy you're no judge of mutton
When Brian McGurk on the point of his fork
Held up a big ivory button
Says Darby what's that, sure I thought it was fat
Brian leaps to his feet and he screeches
By the powers above I was trying to shove
My teeth through the flap of his breeches
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 20:17
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to Drumlish Co Longford where he is at present.
Fr. John Curran P.P. native of Aughavas Co Leitrim was next P.P. He came from Mostrim (Edgeworthstown) where he was C.C. from his ordination until his appointment as P.P. except for a couple of years when he was i Killoe or Clonbroney Co. Longford. He was transferred from Edgeworthstown to Killoe but was sent back again as C.C. after about 2 years. He spent about three and a half years here in Rathowen as P.P. and is now Parish Priest of Mostrim where he will likely spend his remaining years.
Rev. Francis Skelly P.P. succeeded, coming from Mount Temple, Moate, Westmeath where he had spent seventeen or eighteen years as C.C. He was a native of Clondra Co. Longford near Tarmonbarry. He died on the 30th March 1936 aged 51 years. He is buried in Clondra R.I.P. During his short period on the mission here he completely renovated the parochial house and added a new portion to same.
He secured sites for two new schools in the parish and completed the legal formalities in taking over same. He was not spared to see the grant secured or the building done.
Rev Patrick Egan P.P. Fr. Skelly's successor
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 20:07
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Fr Ledwith P.P. native of Legan succeeded Fr. Redahan, coming from Edgeworthstown (Mostrim) where he was C.C.
He took an active part in the Land League. During his time as P.P. a Protestant Landlord H. (?) Bond of the district was boycotted in connection with a farm he held in Carawm and Kilmacahill. Some local farmers and others were sent to jail because of their efforts to get this farm. Fr Ledwith also proposed erecting new schools in Rathowen and was negotiating a site for same when he was transferred to Ballymachugh in Co. Cavan, dying there about 1924.
Rev. Patk O'Hara P.P. succeeded, he was also C.C. in Mostrim before his appointment here. He was a native of Granard Parish. He was transferred to Streete and thence to Mostrim. He was made a Canon there. He died about 7 years ago aged about 75.
Rev. E. Briody P.P. was Adm. in Streete before succeeding Fr O'Hara as P.P. Rathowen. When Fr. Hara was transferred to Edgeworthstown (Mostrim) Fr Briody became P.P. of Streete. At present he is P.P. of Dromard parish Co. Longford.
Rev Bernard Manning P.P. was next appointed here: coming from Colmcille where he was C.C. He is a native of Glen Parish of Ardagh Co. Longford. Between eight or nine years ago he was transferred
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 19:52
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The Landlord (Whitney of Newpass) refused a site on or near the village. Then Bond gave the present one. Whitney changed his mind later but the priest would not accept his offer then and further said that their landlord would never see the new Church. He was blind before it was built.
Another version is that Lady Fetherston of Ardagh, Co Longford was landlord of Rathowen and that it was she who refused the site.
Fr. Owen O'Reilly brother of Fr. James was C.C. and his elder brother from 1866-71. On his brother's death he became P.P.
He died Jan 1884 aged 71
Fr. Lynch was Adm. for Fr. O'Reilly, before becoming a priest, he was in the Police Force. (D.M.P.) it is stated.
Fr. Michael Kelly P.P. succeeded Fr Lynch who was transferred to some other part of the diocese. Fr. Kelly died 12th March 1892, aged 49.
Fr. Redahan P.P. succeeded, transferred later to Legan and still later to Colmcille where he died nearly 20 years ago.
A brother of his was a famous doctor in Mohill Co Leitrim. This man also spent some time in Maynooth preparing for the priesthood. On changing his mind he took up medicine. He died comparatively young, appearing to be in his early sixties.
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 19:41
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at McAdden's Winetown where Christopher Hughes lives at present.
Miss E. Langan, Russagh (see opposite)
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 19:38
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Miss Elizabeth Leonard 50 farmer, Rathowen says Fr. O'Donnell was P.P. here in 1839 and was living in Cox's Rathowen on the night of the Big Wind. He went outside to pray for protection from the storm for the people. Someone held a lighted candle for him as he walked up and down the street of the village praying from his book. The storm did not quench the candle. The light never went out. He was praying that the people would not be injured or suffer loss during the storm.
Rev. Jas O'Reilly P.P. died 1871 (aged 85). He built the present church in 1846 on site given gratis by (-) Bond Protestant landlord who lived at Ardglass or Fairy Hall, Rathowen. He gave a lease of 99 years. He couldn't give it for longer, and afterwards while grass grows or water runs. Some say he gave the site on condition that the church would be built in the style of Protestant Churches of the time, and that it was for a long time without any cross
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 19:31
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Fr McNally was temporary in house at Corry Bridge. Fr. Jas. O'Reilly was going back to Ck-on-Shannon (he was curate there at one time) He fell and got hurt; there weren't much hospitals then. He was nursed in a house Lavins. He brought one of the girls back. She remained with him until she was on crutches. He left her a lot of money. She was with her (his) brother.
Fr. McNally died after settling "Leg Woods"
Miss Ellen Langan Russagh (see previous page)
Fr. McNally, if acting as P.P. during Fr O'Reilly's illness was likely later than Fr. Gray's time. Fr O'Reilly was P.P. and there is a record of each succeeding parish priest. His immediate successor was his brother Rev Owen O'Reilly who was curate here for some years with his elder brother and becoming P.P. after the latter's death.
T. F. McG N.T.

Fr. O'Donnell lived in Muleadys Loughanstown. Muleady married into this place, his wife was Farrelly. It was by the Geraghtys Farrelly got it. Geraghty was owner in Fr. O'Donnell's time. The priest had a door out for himself. He lived for a time also
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 14:38
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Mr. Timothy O'Dea born near Macroom Co. Cork, was the next teacher. He was Principal of Boys School until 1925 and later of the amalgamated schools until his death in early 1928 R.I.P. He was then aged 60 and had been teaching here for 30 years.
Mrs. Muleady returned on pension from the Girls' School in1921. Their daughter Mary now Mrs. Weir worked with her a J. A. M. from 1908. She still teaches in the amalgamated school.
Miss Kathleen Kane native of Abbeylara (father a teacher) succeeded Mrs. Muleady as Principal of the Girls' School in 1921. She resigned her position in 1923 on the occasion of her marriage to Mr. Conway Colonel in the National Army. A few years later she took up teaching again and is at present working in Corry N.S. in their parish.
Miss HACKETT succeeded Miss Kane as principal (?) This lady is now teaching in Co Meath where she is married.
Miss O'Byrne was next Principal in a temporary capacity .... though not fully aware of this when coming to take up the position. The school was then amalgamated.
Miss Margaret Muleady second daughter of Mrs Muleady was appointed J.A.M. in the
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 14:23
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from the County of Co Meath also taught here. The school then was a mixed school - one-roomed. The teachers Mr. Lenaghan and his wife lived in a portion of the present school building on the North-East end.
Mr. Patk Muleady succeeded Mr. Lenaghan. He married Margaret Lenaghan daughter of the former teachers. She too taught in this school. There was trouble between the Manager and Teacher in the years 1880-1890. Mr. Muleady ceased teaching and Mrs Muleady was for a short time in Corry School.
Fr. Kelly P.P. manager made separate schools (Boys and Girls) Mrs. Muleady was made Principal of the Girls School. The teachers no longer resided there and the building was divided by a stone-wall into two somewhat equal divisions.
Mr. Muleady was succeed by a Mr. Joe Kelly from near Kilmessan Co Meath - a sister of his late married a man named Weir in the village. Mr. Kelly because of local trouble remained only about two months. He is still living in Co Meath.
Mr O'Sullivan from the South next came. He left after about three months, when he became aware of local feeling.
Mr. Norris succeeded Mr. O'Sullivan. He remained for about three years.
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 14:14
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The present school building was formerly the Catholic Church, for the Russagh portion of this parish just as Corry N.S. building in the other part was the Catholic Church for the Rathaspic parish. The parish usually called "Rathowen" "United parishes of Rathaspic and Russagh."
The present Catholic Church renovated during portion of 1937 and this present year was built in 1846, by the Rev. Jas. O'Reilly P.P.
The old school buildings now about to be replaced were when used as Churches very likely thatched buildings with clay floors. Tradition states that the building in Rathowen - which to be exact is situated in the townland of Russagh bordering Rathowen was put up in a week. It is about 55' long by 16' broad internal measurement.
Likely this building was used as a school since the Church was built 1846, though it appears from records it was not recognised as a State or National School until 1863.
Teachers - Mr. Shields - hedge school
Mr Lenaghan a native of Cavan was the first National Teacher recognised. He may have taught here prior to the school being recognised as a National School. His wife Maria Donohoe
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 13:28
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them behind the fire. They did so ?
After tea they asked Fr O'Brien about the Gospels and he says "Let every man go look for his own" He then went to the fire and drew out with t he poker his own Gospel the same as he threw it in.
The bishop was there and he said "Fr O'Brien, if you give up those works I'll give you a parish worth £300 a year
"Oh my Lord. You may do what you like with me but the power God gave me I'm free to use and when I'm dead I expect to be buried in that green churchyard called Russagh, and they that believe in the dust of my bones will get relief and be cured.
Several people come and take away a little of the clay - they leave other clay instead. There were several cured.
Fr. Redahan (Parish Priest of Rathowen died nearly 20 years ago. P.P. of Colmcille Co Longford)
stood in the flat tomb-stone over his grave, it broke and left him standing on the ground. Somebody said to Fr. Redahan he'd have to put up a new one. He did not do so, but Mrs Joe Monaghan (from Russagh beside
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 13:21
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B. Connor 83 Wintetown North told by his son Bernard 35 approx.

At the time of this election a party of men came down the road one day from the Rathowen side. I dont know from how far up they came. And Im not sure to which side they belonged. They came into every house on their way and any able man or middling sized boy had to go with them. If he didn't of course they'd pay him off for it then or afterwards.
In our house my father had a elder brother named Tom, and didn't they make him go with them although he was only a gosoon. They walked down as far as Edgeworthstown and they went into the station and weren't they waiting for the train to Longford. Some friend saw my uncle and asked him what brought him there. He told him. The friend advised him what to do. He made an excuse to leave the platform and get down behind the fence. He stole along the fence back to the
senior member (history)
2022-04-30 13:05
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Boherquill was a great gentleman until he fell out with Fr. Smith of Boherquill. Fr. Smith said he would leave him dying in a foreign land with the hunger. He would let his servants go to Mass Sunday or Holidays. Then to make up with the priest he bought the gates going to Boherquill chapel and then these are the gates that are there still and the priest never came out or got great with him. He built a police barracks at the grand gate Kildevin, had police there, travelled at night with them himself to keep the country right. Next he got into debt and got bankrupt. He had a trust worthy man from Rathowen William Madden. The officer of the law bribed this man and let the men in and seized his goods and sold all and he had to go poor to South Africa, so he died very poor.
The next of kin came in and got the place. A gentleman Moses Sprowls whose lady owned all the land from Kildevin to Russagh River kept one hundred men and women working in the land of Culvin and ploughed it with a brace of bullocks.
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 16:41
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house and the people of the house were fast asleep when the priest went in, so he prepared her for death and the last word she spoke was "What will I do for a mass," and the priest said "I will say a mass for you" and when he went back to the chapel he was surprised to see the light in it: when he opened the door and went in the candles were lit on the altar it being long after midnight so he said the mass for her and he said she was happy

The estate next to Derrymona in olden times belonged to the (Leglen) ? family Kavanagh. Malahide married Lady lately of Killmore the parson's daughter.
Next to that comes Collamber Castle owned by the O'Haras. In olden times the family of gentle blood always kept priests in the house in Penal days until they were betrayed by their valet (James O'Sullivan)
Next to that a part of that land a gentleman lived Sir Thomas Nugent and his wife was Rose Tyrell.
"Sprowls" that lived in Kildevin in the famine times he put up a hospital in
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 16:38
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house and the people of the house were fast asleep when the priest went in, so he prepared her for death and the last word she spoke was "What will I do for a mass," and the priest said "I will say a mass for you" and when he went back to the chapel he was surprised to see the light in it: when he opened the door and went in the candles were lit on the altar it being long after midnight so he said the mass for her and he said she was happy

The estate next to Derrymona in olden times belonged to the (Leglen) ? family Kavanagh. Malahide married Lady lately of Killmore the parson's daughter.
Next to that comes Collamber Castle owned by the O'Haras. In olden times the family of gentle blood always kept priests in the house in Penal days until they were betrayed by their valet (James O'Sullivan)
Next to that a part of that land a gentleman lived Sir Thomas Nugent and his wife was Rose Tyrell.
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 16:32
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Mr. Butler has the land now and is living in the old house of the Swifts.

The next farm to that Moateland belonged to old Mc---- Mr Burns has that place now and Mr Wilson being the landlord of all he got the side of this moat opened one time. In a few days after his lady was painting in the drawing room and she fell dead with the brush in her hand and then he closed it up. When he was dead and gone his son Willie opened it and found a lovely hall in it and some rooms and a grand well inside it and a bunch of keys and his lady then got sick and then he got it closed up and it was never opened since.
The next farm to that is Derrymona. A workman of Mr Wilson's living in Derrymona and a poor travelling woman when she would come that way used to stop with them and one night took sick sudden and Fr. Duffy of Boherquill was called by a voice saying "Follow this light to save a soul where it will stop" He followed it on and it stopped at this
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 16:14
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D'fulangeochadh fuil, fuil i ngorta acht ní fulangeochadh fuil, fuil do gorta
Is mó tadhsach iad, adharca na mbó thar lear
Is mairg a bhíonn gan driothar
Tosach an uilc is é is usa de chosg
An rud is annamh is iongantach
Tir gan teanga, tir gan anam
Bean gan riaghail, bean gan ciall
Sagart balbh, sagart dealbh
Ní féidir ceann críona a cur ar colain oig
Dá fhaid é an lá tagann an oidhche
Tuigsint agus mítuigsint
Ní oireann siad le chéile
Mar is dóigh le fear na buile
Gur bé féin fear na ceille

Níl aon tairbhe dorus an stábla do dhruid tar éis goid an éich
Go mairidh sé abhfad daingean is gan crothadh
Ní cothuigheann na briathra na bráthra
Deachaireacht gach ndeachaireacht, aon ní a cleachtar a cur i ndearmhadh
Is baile bocht, baile gan toit gan teine
Marbhuigheann mian an duine fallsa, é féín
Ná bain tuighe de do thig féín, le sleanna a chur ar thig an leanna
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 16:04
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Starch was made from potatoes in every household. The potatoes were first peeled, and then finely grated. The grated potatoes were then put into water and left stand for about six hours. The mixture was then stirred well and strained through a piece of linen to separate the solid particles of potatoes. The strained liquid was again left stand until the starch all settled at the bottom of the vessel. The was then drained off.
Colouring or dyeing of home-made socks, jerseys and jumpers is still sometimes done in the homes. The garments are boiled with a special kind of moss got off rocks. This gives them a light brown colour.

When thatched houses were in used the wheaten straw was used for thatching. The grain was not removed from straw to be used for thatching by means of flails. It had to be what they called "Slashed." This was done by standing a door on its side on the floor and strike out the grain by striking the straw in small handful on the uppermost edge of door. This left the straw much sounder and better for use as thatch than when threshed in the usual way with flails. The parts of a flail used for threshing were the Colpán Buailtean and iall. The Colpán was the stick held in the hand. The Buailtean the stick with which
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 15:55
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the straw was beaten and the iall was the thong which bound those two sticks together.
Corn was cut with a reaping-hook (Corrán) The reaper made four draws of his hook to cut each fistful. A draw of the hook was called a "Teadhall" and the fistful was called a Dornán. Four of these fistfuls again made a sheaf (Punan) The wisp with which the sheaf was bound was called a (Cuibhreach)
Wheat was usually "slashed" at night time and for night work it was necessary to treat the workers decently. The Bean a' - Tighe used boil some of the wheat in a pot until the grain was softened completely. The workers then drank the water and the old men say of it, "That was the drink for a frosty night and 'twas not your porter of to-day."
The grain that was left in the pot was then mixed with a little honey and eaten for supper.
Apparently only a well to do farmer could treat his helpers so generously.
The smaller farmers whose supply of wheat was more limited usually gave the workers a potato cake for supper. This was made by finely gratin potatoes, then mixing in a little flour. When baked it was eaten hot and if a little butter was given with it the workers were well pleased with their fare.
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 15:42
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You Irish people one and all attention pay to me
Till I'll relate the praises of my native country
Although being far across the seas, my memory do run
And I bless the day I chanced to stray from Castledonovan.

No pen or talent can describe, the praises of this place
'Tis blest for generations by men of a stylish race
Since Breenan now, he is laid low, its praises he has won
But he is far from Deelis now, as likewise Tom his son.

It's a quarter of a century, since I've seen this place before
And now to view the spectacles, which grieves my heart full sore
The population has decreased, they're now in a foreign land
For they were forced to cross the sea, far from their native land

'Twas through the Gaortha I did stray, each Sunday afternoon
To view those pretty charming maids, all in their youth and bloom
You'd see them there assembling on a Sunday after mass
You'd think you were in Paradise down by the Castle cross.

When I'll recall my youthful days I'll plainly let you see
How some of my ancestors, died on the gallows tree
But for God's sake I ask of you, I hope you'll for them pray
Which leaves me here in exile now, all in America
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 10:48
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Ned Fraher, a blind piper from Knockcarron. Ned used make his own pipes, using elder sticks to make the chanter. Ned Fraher emigrated to London, where his prowess on the bagpipes earned for him a recital before Cardinal Wiseman. Ned Fraher opened an Irish dance-hall in London. During his wanderings, Peter Scanlan also arrived in London and one night he visited Fraher's dance hall. He recognised his old friend and decided he would give him a surprise. He arranged for a corn-Phíopa to be played, and as Fraher played, Scanlon danced as he never danced before. Poor blind Fraher's face brightened, and when the dance was over, he said:- "Well if you walked the whole world, you are Peter Scanlon from Ballylanders." In those days, step-dancers usually danced on a table. The test of a good tidy dancer was to dance on the timber skimmer used for skimming milk in a dairy.
A good weight-lifter was Tom Jackie (Thomas McGrath) of Monemore, who used walk around with a 20-stone sack of meal. On a Pattern Day, a stone-throwing contest used take place in the churchyard near St. Ailbhe' Well. This was generally won by Tom Jackie. The stone they used throw was called a "Carraig."
"Three standing jumps" was a very popular patime in this district, and Will Hennessy of Coolboy was supposed to be one of its best exponents.
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 10:35
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of weight-throwing by throwing weights at sports in the neighbouring village of Hospital for five shillings per sports meeting. The rest of his career is known to the general public through the medium of newspapers etc. The 16lb shot with which he broke the world's record, I had until about 5 or 6 years ago. It has been taken to New York by a returning visitor, and it was presented to some club there.
One of the best mowers that ever handled a scythe lived about one hundred yards from my house in Log-a-Bhóthair. His name was Billy Buckley. He was reputed to be able to mow an acre of heavy hay in one day. It is believed localy on good authority that his fame extended over the whole County Tipperary. As a matter of fact, Kickham got his inspiration from Buckley for his likeable character Billy Heffernan in immortal "Knocknagow." Another hero-worker was Jim Hogan who used team with Billy Buckley. He used to dig a quarter (acre) of bawn in a day. In those days workmen were never paid by the day, just each job of work to be done was called a "task." This Hogan was working in a meadow in Bartoose one day mowing hay. A Sidhe Gaoithe suddently came into the field. Now even to the present day, people are afraid of the Sidhe Gaoithe, but Hogan stood his ground. The Sidhe Gaoithe threw the day in swathes around him, and he rose the scythe
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 10:26
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The meat was left in the barrel for four weeks, and then hung up in the chimney to be smoked -
It was not used until turned yellow.

Hurrish! Hurrish" and "Bach! Bach!" are the sounds made when calling a pig.
"Jin! Jin! calls a goat
"Preith!" "Preith!" calls a horse
"Tiuch!" "Tiuch!" calls hens
"Feedy! Feed!" calls ducks
"Baddy! Baddy!" calls geese
"Biadh! Biadh!" calls turkeys

Guinea-hens are always kept in a farm-yard with other fowl - they are supposed to have the power of keeping rats away.
When a hen has been "clucking" for a few days, a clutch of eggs is put under her. A clutch consists of 13 eggs ( odd numbers are lucky)
Eggs from a strange breed are marked with a spot of soot from the bottom of a bastable
"Red" clay is put under the eggs in preference to hay, as the housewife believes the clay will produce better results.
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 10:14
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(Contd)
A year they left the country, Daly went to America and Grady went to England; he was spied in England and arrested there. He was to be put to death in the following manner. His clothes were to be taken off and put into a barrel with iron spikes driven through it, then the barrel was to be rolled through the streets of Castleisland where the murder took place. A warder of the jail told Grady, and one morning he broke his head in the cell before he would give the English soldiers the chance of giving him that horrible death.
Nolan nick-named "Tadhg Leathan," did not suffer for all this afterwards. He lived to be an old man a few miles outside Castleisland. His relatives live in the School locality and are numerous and influential.
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 00:37
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They also used to tie a cord from the ceiling and a lump of round soap was tied to one side and an apple on the other. When a boy or girl's turn came he or she would be blindfolded and his or her hands tied behind his or her back and they would try to catch the apple in their mouth. Often they caught the soap.

ST BRIGIDS DAY
The old people used to put a silk piece of rag, called a "Brat Brighde," out on a window on St. Brigid's Night and they said it would be Blessed in the morning. It cured headaches.

MAY DAY
The old people would not borrow anything from their neighbour on May Day because it was thought to be very unlucky. They would not walk through another man's land because they would carry away the substance of the land.

ST JOHN'S NIGHT
The old customs of St. John's Night are kept up still in some districts. Great bonfires blaze at every cross-roads in honour of St. John. Some of the people used to tie a bundle of reed on to a top of a stick and set fire t it and walked all around the garden. The
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 00:27
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There are four graveyards in the parish of Drimoleague - all in use at present. Besides those there are older graveyards and burial places of still-born children called "Cillíns."
The graveyard in Drimoleague is situated in the town-land of Drom dá Leig (from which the place gets its name). There is a tradition of the removal of a flag-stone from this graveyard to the parish of Rosscarbery. The story goes that the underground position of the flag then split in two becoming Dá Líag. Although not ranking with the oldest graveyards in Munster (traditionally) "FÍACHNA, LÁTHNA, (?)) COMÓG" this is a very old graveyard - some of the tombstones bear dates 80 to 100 years back, and many are older. Both Catholics and Protestants are buried here - and there is part of a wall of an old church in the centre of the plot (which is known as "Páircín Roger") upwards of 100 years old. Beside the church there is an old tree, and around the boundary wall there are a few others. The graveyard slopes towards the south and east - and contains five or six tombs - one dates to 1856 and there are several crosses and grave flags (of slate) with inscriptions. A monastery is supposed to have existed in the field adjoining this graveyard, but no trace of it exists now. The church is supposed to have been confiscated by the Protestants about 100 years ago.
senior member (history)
2022-04-29 00:12
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You might remember that I told you a few nights ago that General Hugh Massy got a forfeit estate in Duntryleague (Dún Trí Liag) (Galbally Co. Limk. Coshlea) in the year 1659 from the British Government in part payment for heavy arrears of pay due to him for helping to suppress the rebellion of 1641 with the Earl of Mountrath Light Infantry. Well in the famous old hill of Duntryleague there lived an old hag who used change herself into a hare. She used go out at night and milk the neighbours cows and roam about the countryside.
One night she went out as usual and didn't a hound spot her. Away with the hound after her and off through the fields over hedges and ditches they went tally-ho. Such hulla-bulloo and Kip-i-de-reel and Ceol and Ruaille-Buaille was never heard since or before with the hound yelling and the old hag shouting and dust flying from her heels. The hound was gaining ground on her as they faced her own house. She made one spurt in through the yard and jumped for the window. Just as she was jumping through the window the hound tore the "Scot" off her. (i.e. white patch on a hare's tail)
senior member (history)
2022-04-28 14:52
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same name.
Small children play little games of their own, such as ring a ring a rosy, Oranges the lemons the bells are clements, horse and car, train, and baby-house and they also speak different to big people because they are unable to sound every syllable, so I will give a list of them, wat (rat), Bidie (Bridie) hoss, (horse), sicken (chidken), dop, (drop) beckfast (breakfast) seets (sweets) bed (bread), guass (grass), Ganda (Granda) wook (work) and many others which I cannot describe, but I love to be listening to the little ones who are just beginning to talk, because it is amusing to hear the way they pronounce the words.
Only for playing games like I have mentioned we would all be as stiff as old men and women of eighty years of age.
senior member (history)
2022-04-28 14:43
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pincers, the spokeshave, the chisel, the plane,
the brace, the level, the countersunk, the compass, the callipers, the auger, the pliers, the tongs, the punch flattener, the spanners, the rasp, the gimblet, the ratchet, the square, the sledge, the axe, the saw, the mallet, the spirit level, and the nippers. The smith shoes horses, and donkeys, but he never shoes cattle. Some people get the farm implements made in the forge. Sometimes young horses would not go in, and then the smith shoe them outside. He binds the cart wheels outside also.
There is a tub in the forge in which there is water. In this the smith cools the shoes, and it is said that the water would cure warts. If the sparks from the hot iron fly towards you, you are supposed to get money.
Nearly every smith is very strong and healthy. The smith has seven uncles who are smiths at the present time. Some people gather into the forge to tell stories.
senior member (history)
2022-04-28 14:35
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rejected
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