Number of records in editorial history: 5816 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 03:23
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From time to time travelling folk call to my home. For many years they been doing so. The majority of them are not very poor. When they come to the houses they have nothing but they are very well off when they reach the public houses.
They sell small articles for a large price.
The general things they sell are :-
scissors, combs, necklaces and picture frames. Sometimes people buy from them. They get their supplies in Woolworths or some cheap place like that. They are never welcome to any house because they
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 02:40
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awaiting decision
sometimes they are made with a single-plough. The potato ridges are made with a spade or shovel.
Wooden ploughs were the first ploughs that were used but none of them exist now.
They were followed by the common iron plough is the one the one that is used now.
The spades are bought in the hardware shops now but long ago they were made by the blacksmiths. When the potato drills are made the manure and the potatoes which must have an eye in them are plaed along in them. The potatoes muct be placed ten inches apart.
Some cover the drills with a plough but others slide them with a shovel. When the potatoes are about two inches over the ground the clay is put up
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 02:31
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Potatoes are sown on my father's farm. About two acres were grown this year and the amount seldom varies. My father or some of the workmen prepares the ground for the crop. In some cases the farmyard manure is shaken on the field and ploughed into the soil and sometimes it is shaken into the furrows.
Arificial manure is shaken in the drills. Early potatoes are generally sown in ridges but the general crop is sown in drills. The drills are made with a double-plough usually, but
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 02:24
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awaiting decision
Sinnotts and Flahertys.
Cooneys lived in my father's haggard and there is a barn now where their house was and the kitchen and dairy that they had are still standing.
There is a small garden at the back of this house and it is known as "Lizes orchard" for Liz Cooney was the woman's name who lived there.
All the people who lived in those places are dead now. There is a well in the field where Flaherty's house was and it is called "Flaherty's Well".
The land is flat and part of it is dry but some of it is very boggy. There is a small river running at the end of the farm which divides Maxboley from Quitchery also from Gibletstown and Ambrosetown.
senior member (history)
2019-07-23 02:15
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awaiting decision
The name of the district I live in is Tullicanna and the townland in which I live is Maxboley. It is situated in the parish of Bannow which is in the Barony of Bargy.
There are only two houses in the townland of Maxboley and the number of people living here is eleven. One of the houses is a labourers cottage and the other is a farmhouse. Both of them are slated. Houses were more plentiful formerely than they are now.
The ruins of some of those houses are still to be seen. The families that lived here were Cooneys, Daltons,
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:27
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awaiting decision
of Rosegarland. The Back Road is another road. It is known as the Back Road because it is not the Public Road, but a back way for people to go if they were not wanting to go around the bridges. It begins at Howlin's cross and ends about half ways up the Belton Hill.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:21
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The green road got its name because it is covered over with trees and there is a wood at each side of it.
It begins at Waterloo Bridge and ends at Mr Boyce's Gate Lodge.
Another Road is the mine road it begins at Mr Dunne's turn and ends at Mr Chapman's cross.
It is known as the mine road because there are mines up along that road.
The Och Road is a road going from Ballylannon to Rosegarland. It is a sort of a by road. It is about a mile in length. It begins at the Cross of Rochestown and ends at Mr Leigh's
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:11
approved
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awaiting decision
Nearly every cross in this district is known by some name or another. There is a cross at Mrs Howlin's shop known as Howlin's Cross. The men gather there every night and have all sorts of games there.
The level crossing is another cross around but that is known as the level crossing because two Railway gates are there. Mc Cutcheon's turn is another cross and it is known by that because Mc Cutcheons live on it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:05
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awaiting decision
people by the name of Hanlons live half way up the hill.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:04
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the 16th Deceber 1819. Sixteen of his fellow sufferers are also interred near this spot.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 03:14
approved
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awaiting decision
The most prominent fairs in this locality are held in Taghmon and Wellingtonbridge. The fairs are not always always held in towns but generally in villages or at crossroads. Buyers come to the houses to buy pigs, horses, and lambs generally.
Some years ago a fair used to be held in the village of Scar but it is not held now as it went down and buyers did not attend it. The fair used to be held in a fair green but when it was changed to another field trade got slack and when it changed to the Bridge of Scar no one ever
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 03:05
approved
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awaiting decision
door has the shape of a horse shoe
It is situated on a cross-roads and there is a green patch outside the forge for the ploughs, harrows or whatever would be getting mended. Outside also is a pump for getting the water for the forge.
There is only one fire place in it and a bellows to blow the fire. In a box are many tools which the blacksmith uses namely a knife for pairing the horses hoofs and a file to make the nails smooth on the top of the hoof and nails and a pincers to draw the nails of the hoofs when a horse is getting new shoes. On the middle of the floor is an anvil to lay the iron on and a sledge to beat it into whatever shape he likes.
There are two other forges in the vicinity namely, Chapman's and Keanes. Jack Keane works in his forge by himself and Peter Chapman has a journeyman.
All the forges are the same but Jack Keane does not mend ploughs
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 04:31
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John Molloy, St. Leonards, tells me there is a Druid's altar over in the parish of Newbawn - 8 miles from this school. It is on Quigley's land of Faree
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 04:20
approved
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awaiting decision
The white-border Cap & the hair Net.
Old women 50 or sixty years ago wore nice white caps with 'crimpy' borders. These caps were washed, starched, and ironed most carefully. There was a special iron shaped like a narrow finger for doing the 'crimpy' borders. This iron was called the "tally iron."
A thick black or brown hair net was worn round the large bun of hair. This net had elastic at the edges so that it gripped well. It kept the hair very neat and tidy. Some nets were made of 'chenille' others were knitted with woollen thread.

Neck Handkerchiefs
The women all wore small shawls made of cashmere, some black, some green, some grey, shepherd's plaid three corner ways across the shoulders, with loose ends in front. These were edged with heavy fringe.
For Sunday and best wear the better class had black lace little shawls.
Drawing of small fringed shawl.

Check Aprons
Capacious check aprons (yards and yards of check) belted round the waist were worn during working hours. The two loose ends of the neck handkerchiefs were gripped in the belt of the apron during work.
When work was over in the night, or when a visitor called, the apron was slipped off.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:52
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awaiting decision
The Sun Bonnet
Most, if not all, the women who lived near the seaside wore what was called a sun bonnet. They made them themselves out of patterned cotton - all colours.
It took about 3/4 yd of cotton and some light laths or sometimes 'sally' sticks.
They 'pooked' out 4 or 5 inches beyond the face, this gave the name of 'pooka' bonnets.
The writer saw women go to Mass in St Leonards on Sundays, with a 'pooka' bonnet (nicely starched and ironed) on the head, & shawl on shoulders.

Woollen skirts & jackets
Woollen jackets and skirts, fine heavy cloth made by Hickey's, New Ross, from wool fleeces brought in straight from the sheeps' backs by these very women who when made, wore their own home-grown wool.
The skirts contained yards and yards !

'Hooded' Cloaks
The writer remembers most of the elderly women of New Ross wearing hooded cloaks.
These were beautiful, with the costliest of satin lining and special makers to make them.
The cost of a hooded' cloak would not be less than £10, by the time cloth (yds of it), satin for lining, and flowered velvet for trimming, were bought. Add on then the cloak-maker's bill.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:32
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(1) Flummery.
Cutlings steeped in spring water
Not stirred for a day - strain off 1st water
Renew with spring water again - not stirred again for a day.
Now strain off the cutlings and boil the súlaigh. This thickens in boil. Boil for 10 minutes or 1/4 hour.
Very digestible and strengthening for invalids.
Kate Molloy often made it at Mr. Leacy's Yoletown Mills when he would be ill.

(2) Oaten Bread -
From fine oatmeal made - wet with milk or water.
Colour brown. Made thin. Very hard when baked.
Used for dinner when the potatoes would be getting bad & scarce in May & June

Scrubbing wooden vessels
Vessels for milk were made of wood. They were :
(1) Keelers
(2) Pails
(3) Churns
These were scrubbed with sandstone and a wisp of straw till a 'fur' rose on the wood. They were then exposed to the air for hours, to purify them.
Drawing of a Keeler
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:17
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awaiting decision
Now we're coming round Sandy Hook
where stormy winds do blow
Our gallant crew are all on board
A-shovelling of the snow.
We'll wash her down and scrub her clean
With scrubbing stne and sand
We'll bid adieu to Jane Walsh, my boys
On the banks of Newfoundland.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:13
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"The Banks of Newfoundland"
as sung by Mrs Ellen Doyle
(See page 14)
Will anyone join this merchant ship
That lies in Liverpool docks
Beware of your monkey jacket
With your oil skins on your hands
Beware of the cold north-westerly winds
On the banks of Newfoundland.
Last night as I lay in my bunk
I had a pleasant dream
I dreamt that I was in Liverpool
And I waking down Park lane
A nice young girl by my side
A bottle of rum in her hand
But when I awoke my heart nigh broke
On the banks of Newfoundland.
We had one Irish girl board
Jane Walsh it was her name
Her passage was paid out to New York
From Dublin town she came
She tore her flannel petticoat up
To make mittens for our hands
She could not see her true love free
On the banks of Newfoundland.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:57
approved
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awaiting decision
Joe Daly }
Taught at Katty's Rock, Boley.

---- O'Hanlon }
Taught in Boley also.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:53
approved
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awaiting decision
Chambers of Taylorstown Castle
M.P. for Clonmines
About 30 years ago a Mr. Chambers
visited Taylorstown Castle and told the present occupiers that he was a direct descendant of the Chambers who held uninterrupted possession of the castle and lands for 300 years down to 1798. They left after '98. He had all the documents he said. He was accompanied by his uncle Mr. Meadows of Thornville, near Wexford.
They were looking for a special stone with some special marks on it, which tradition, down the family, said, gave some clue to the possession of the Chambers.
Members of the Chambers family represented Clonmines in Parliament, when Clonmines was a borough.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:32
approved
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awaiting decision
I have just come from Doyle's house, Boley (4 1/2 miles from this school) where I have been shown a harp made over 40 years ago by Mr. Thomas Doyle. It is a marvellous piece of work for an amateur
Only some of its strings are on.
This boy also made violins and other musical instruments before emigrating (as seen on opposite page). What a pity such brains should be lost to dear Eíre !
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:22
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At Doyles of Boley.
There is a beautiful 'silver lustre' teapot 200 years old with Miss Mary Doyle of Boley who gave me the under bits of folklore.
Boley or Lacystown.
Lacystown is the old name of Boley. The Lacys owned the castle there and were 'the' people in the days gone by.
Doyles of Boley (See page 18). Imprisoned during the French Revolution.
Mr. Doyle was valet to Mr. Colclough of Tintern Abbey. They were both imprisoned in France during the French Revolution. Mr. Doyle had his pipes with him. Both he and Mr Colclough studied wood work in prison and each tried to excel the other in their new profession. Doyle escaped out of prison but he had no money to pay his passage home. So he sold the beautiful gold lace which trimmed his pipes and thus provided money.
Tom Doyle in Ohio and the King of the Belgians
Mr. Thos Doyle, brother of Mr. Aidan Doyle (see page 18) emigrated to America about 35 or 40 years ago. He studied aeronautics, and being an expert on air-brakes on trains. He was stationed at Ohio.
When the King of the Belgians went to America to study air-brakes he was brought to Thos. Doyle who explained everything to him.
His Majesty of the Belgians, anxious to know all that was to be known stayed over night at Doyles house in Ohio and early next morning drove a train with Mr. Doyle's aid, so as to have first hand knowledge of air brakes.
He afterwards introduced them into Belgium.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:15
approved
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awaiting decision
At present this Beads is in the possession of
Mrs. Larry Murphy St. Leonards or Taylorstown
This remarkably old beads has been handed down in branches of the Crane family for 300 years. Mrs. Murphy, who is a Busher of Ballylannen, is a descendant of the Crane family.
It has a silver tubular Cross and silver 'Paters'.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 03:47
approved
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awaiting decision
St Leonards' National School - built 1898
List of Managers
1. Very Rev. T. Canon O'Connor P.P.
(Died 1918)
2. Rev. Isaac J. Scallan C.C.
(From 1918 ---- )

St. Leonard's N.S.
Principal Teachers
1. Mrs. Mary Costello (1898 - 1901)
2. Mary B. Dunphy (1901 - 1938 )
- Retired under 'New Rule' regulating the retiral age of women teachers with a view of relieving unemployment in the teaching profession -
Clonmines School.
The old school, predecessor of St. Leonards NS. is now the dwelling house occupied by Mr. Pat Colfer a member of the Wexford Co. Council. Pat Colfer's father purchased it from V. Rev. T. O Connor P.P. Ballycullane for a nominal sum.
The Teachers who taught there as far as can be ascertained were :
Jimmy Doyle
Miss Long
Miss Furlong
Miss Budd, who afterwards became Mrs. Aspel Ramsgrange, and used to walk all the way from Ramsgrange to Clonmines - 5 1/2 miles
Mrs Costello - who was the last teacher of Clonmines.
She was the 1st teacher of St. Leonards N.S. built in 1898.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 03:39
approved
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St Leonards' National School - built 1898
List of Managers
1. Very Rev. T. Canon O'Connor P.P.
(Died 1918)
2. Rev. Isaac J. Scallan C.C.
(From 1918 ---- )

St. Leonard's N.S.
Principal Teachers
1. Mrs. Mary Costello (1898 - 1901)
2. Mary B. Dunphy (1901 - 1938 )
- Retired under 'New Rule' regulating the retiral age of women teachers with a view of relieving unemplyment in the teaching profession -
Clonmines School.
The old school, predecessor of St. Leonards NS. is now the dwelling house occupied by Mr. Pat Colfer a member of the Wexford Co. Counci. Pat Colfer's father purchased it from V. Rev. T. O Connor P.P. Ballycullane for a nominal sum.
The Teachers who taught there as far as can be ascertained were :
Jimmy Doyle
Miss Long
Miss Furlong
Miss Budd, who afterwards became Mrs. Aspel Ramsgrange, and used to walk all the way from Ramsgrange to Clonmines - 5 1/2 miles
Mrs Costello - who was the last teacher of Clonmines.
She was the 1st teacher of St. Leonards N.S. built in 1898.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 03:23
approved
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awaiting decision
The Fair of Nash was renouned for faction fights.
Nash is a townsland six miles N. from St Leonards.
The 'Fair' has been discontinued. Why?
After the opening of the Railroad between Wexford and Waterford (Southern line) Ballycullane having a station on the line was considered a more suitable place for a fair. Meetings were held to forward the project and after much "Red-Tape" about 'Charters' etc, the powers-that-be allowed Ballycullane the 'Fair' on the surrender of the Charters for Nash and Tintern fairs that is to say two old fairs in the Parish viz. Nash fair and Tintern fair were superseded by the monthly fair of Ballycullane now.
Great opposition to the project was put up by the village of Saltmills and the Hook parish in general, as Tintern fair was much more convenient for them.
Roches and Mc Gunnips were the greatest faction fighters of Nash fair.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 03:10
approved
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Colclough's school on the Garrycullen - St. Kearns Cross
A very funny story is told here about Matty Larkin, the last 'master' in the school : When the Lord of the Soil would be seen coming on his usual visit to the school, the master would shout out above the din of a usually refractory crowd, pounding the desk with a huge stick "Rehearse, ye divils, rehearse!"
The young hopefuls knew at
once what was up and at once set to read aloud from their "Reading made easy" (the name of the textbook used in these times) with the object of impressing Mr. Colclough with their diligence.

Agents on the Colclough Estate :
1. Mr. McCord --- 1807
2. Mr. Gough --- 1832
3. Mr. Powell --- 1854
4. Mr J. Boyd - Bannow, Co. Wexford
5. Mr. Kelsal
6. Mr Doolan --- During which time he esate was sold to the tenantry.
V. Rev. T. Canon O'Connor P.P. Ballycullane,
Mr Laurence Leacy Yoletown Mills
and
Mr. Robert Cardiff, Postmaster, Ballycullane negotiated on the side of the tenantry.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 02:45
approved
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{Archaeologists' hunting grounds.
{Tintern Abbey.
{Clonmines
Sutton -
The last Sutton to live in Clonmines had half the house and half the garden from the incoming tenant,
Richard Codd. *
Sutton, the last of the long line -
from the 1st Sutton of the Norman invasion - who occupied this castle in uninterrupted succession down to 1849 - died I am informed in Enniscorthy about 70 years ago.
Miss Colclough
Tintern Abbey
Saltmills,
Co Wexford
No. 18.
The Colclough Estate.
Colcloughs of Tintern Abbey (since 1572) always lived on the best terms with their tenantry - unlike the 'absentee' landlords, the Colcloughs always made the Abbey their home, and lived among their tenantry.
Miss Colclough has shown me the immense 'seal' attached to the legal papers handing over possession of the Abbey to her forefathers

The present lady's grandfather Mr. J. T. Colclough had a school built on the Cross roads of Garrycullen - St. Kearns for the education of the children. It was not a National school. It is now 'tenanted'.
Mr. Matty Larkin was the last teacher there. He (Mr Colclough) paid the teacher.
* Richard Codd came into possession of Clonmines in or about 1849 -
his grandson Richard Codd is in possession at the moment July 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 02:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
take Rich and Poor
big and little.
What is it.
Answer death

riddles
1) What is the difference between a soilder and a lady
Answer one faces the powder
the other puts powder on the face.

Long legs crooket thies a little head and no eyes.
a Tongue
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 02:12
approved
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awaiting decision
2) There is a house in
paradise and in that
house there is a room
and in that room there
is a table and in that
table there is a
drawer and in that
drawer there is a
cup and in that cup
there is a sup that
everyone must
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 02:08
approved
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awaiting decision
1) Middy Maddy A roundy body three feet and a wooden hat
Answer a pot
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 02:05
approved
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awaiting decision
1) Ducks quacking loud is a sign of rain
2) Gulls screaming over a certain place in the sea is said to be a sing that there is fish there.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 02:00
approved
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awaiting decision
3) What is the most forgiven animal in the world
|Answer) (the Giraffe because it overlooks many things)

4) I have an old heaffer she lies by the hob she eats all I give her
she drinks none at all
|Answer) the fire

5) Daddy Daddy at the warm shelf whispering whispering to himself
(Ans) A pot boiling by the side of the fire.
senior member (history)
2019-07-17 02:21
approved
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awaiting decision
In years gone by, the road which stretches down from the school instead of branching off to the right and left at the pump as it does now, used to continue on down
senior member (history)
2019-07-17 02:14
approved
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awaiting decision
but according as he tries, the apple goes away from him, and very seldom any person catches it in his mouth.
There are four saucers put on a table.
Clay is put in one, water in another, a ring in another, and a beads in the other.
A blindfold is put on one of the company.
He walks to the table. If he puts his hand in the water, he will cross the water first. If he puts his hand on the ring he will be married first, and if he puts his hand on the beads he will be a priest, and if a girl does so, she will be a nun.
"Blind-man's Buff" is another game.
A blindfold is put on one of the company.
All the others gather around her, and commence puling her, and pushing her.
If she catches one of them, that person then must put the blindfold on herself, and the game continue on in the same way.
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 03:46
approved
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awaiting decision
is some conversation going on, when suddenly some of the company shouts out "I have the ring". There is great laughing at this person, because it is the belief that he will be married first.
Some do not make colcannon for the feast, but they have a barm-brack with tea, and in the barm-brack is the ring, and the same sport goes on as with the colcannon
After the supper they have games.
A tub of water is got and placed on the middle of the floor. Apples are thrown into it. Each one dives to the bottom of the tub to catch the apple in his mouth
It is very difficult to get it, and the person's head and face get wet trying to do so.
An apple is tied to the ceiling with a cord. The hands of the people are tied behind thir backs. Each one tries to catch the apple in his mouth.
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 03:17
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awaiting decision
were not allowed, milk, butter, eggs, cheese, and meat, with their meals.
These were called "Black Fast Days."
Those who were bound to fast could only take one full meal and a collation, in the day.
St. John's Eve, 24th June, it was the custom in former times to light bon-fires on that night. The young people used to gather together and then dance around them. But this custom has died out in this district.
All Hallow Eve, that is the night before the 1st November, is one of the most joyous of the festive customs.
People write their friends to their houses on that evening, and have great sport and amusements during the night.
First of all they have a feast of Colcannon. In this a ring is put. No one know about it. While eating
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 03:05
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awaiting decision
Crosses, Badges, shaped like harps are worn too, and made of the same material as the Crosses. These crosses and badges can be cought in the towns ready made, too. In the churches, a sermon is given on St. Patrick, and his good work for Ireland, Concerts and plays are held in the halls in villages and towns, and processions in the towns and cities on the day.
On Palm Sunday, branches of palm are blessed and given to the people. They bring them home, some keep the blessed palm in the houses, until that day twelve months, or for the whole year others put it in the cow house or stable.
During Lent, that is from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, people pray and fast. In former times the fast was severe. On Ash Wednesday, Spy Wednesday, and Good Friday, people
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 02:54
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awaiting decision
day for people to wear the shamrock.
At the great feast at Tara, when St. Patrick was teaching the true faith to the Pagans, some of them could not believe in the Blessed Trinity.
He looked down at his feet and saw the shamrock. He stooped down and plucked it. He held it up in his hand, and said, "See, there are three leaves on this stem, so there are Three Persons in One God. Since then people honour the shamrock on that account. They gather shamrocks and send them to their friends in foreign countries, for no matter where Irishmen and Irishwomen are, they love to get the Shamrock to wear it on that day.
St. Patrick's Crosses are also worn, especially by children. These are made by the mothers of the children out of pieces of green and white ribbons, stiffened by thin cardboard in the shape of
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 02:43
approved
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awaiting decision
On May Eve a common custom is making a May Bush. Opposite all houses this Bush is seen tastefully decorated on May morning. The children decorated it with flowers which they arrange on it in bunches, tied with different coloured ribbons. Egg-shells are put in between the bunches of flowers, and it is set before the door of each house, to welcome in the Summer.
On St. Martin's Day it was a custom long ago to kill a cock, and sprinkle the door-posts with the bleed, but this custom has now died out in this district. On this day also, millers do not work in the mills, as it is said St. Martin was ground up in one. In this district this custom is still carried on, as none of the local mills work on this day.
On St Patrick's Day it is the custom from ancient ties down to the present
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 02:30
approved
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awaiting decision
On Ash Wednesday, the people of the parish go to Mass on that morning, and get blessed ashes on their foreheads.
On Good Friday, it is a custom for the people to visit the Church and make "The Way of the Cross".
On Easter Sunday morning there is a belief that when the sun rises it dances for about three minutes. Several people of the district, who got up early, or at sunrise, saw it dancing, and it was a beautiful sight. For the breakfast people take an egg or two extra. They send Easter cards, Easter eggs, and gifts to their friends.
On the 1st April, it is a custom in this district for people to make "April Fools" of one another. There is great sport in this, but the "Fool" often gets vexed, when a great trick is played on him : "Sending the "fool" a long distance" is commonly played.
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 02:20
approved
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awaiting decision
They used to go from house to house singing a rhyme, to get money.
"The wren, the wren, the King of all birds
"St. Stephen's Day she was caught in the furze
"Although she is little, her family is great
Arise young lady and give us a treat"
The young lady of the house would give them a penny each, and then they went away to the next house, and so on.
On New Year's Day there is no custom in this district but the people wish "A Happy New Year" to one another and send New Year Cards and gifts to one another.
During Shrove, that is from Christmas to Lent, marriages are celebrated, but more especially on Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday. On this night it is the custom to make pancakes in all houses in this district.
On Candlemas Day, 2nd February, wax candles are blessed in the Church.
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 02:09
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with a long grey whisker, dressed in a red long coat, trimmed with white fur, and a red cap, with a sprig of holly on his head. He carries a bag laden with toys on his back. He steals down the chimney, fills the stockings, and then goes out through the window.
Christmas morning they look into their stockings and find a the presents.
People go to early Mass, and greet one another with, "A Happy Xmas", and "The same to you", etc. The Church is beautifully decorated with holly, ivy, and flowers, and there is a nice crib erected in it.
On St. Stephen's Day The custom of "Hunting the Wren" has died out in this district lately, but Thomas Blanche, Gurrawn who is 68 years of age, remembers when he was a boy that three youths in each townland used to dress up in girls' clothes, and put masks on their faces
senior member (history)
2019-07-16 01:59
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There are certain Festive Customs carried on in this district for generations.
The customs for Christmas are considered the greatest. In preparation for the great feast of Christmas all people clean their houses, and decorate them with holly and ivy. They make a plum pudding, and prepare a turkey or a goose for the Christmas dinner.
A supply of sweet cakes are also provided.
Friends and relations send Christmas greetings to one another, and also Xmas presents to their families in foreign countries.
On Christmas Eve when the children are going to bed they hang up their stockings at the foot of the bed, believing that Santa Claus will come when they are asleep and fill the stockings with toys, sweets, and other novelties.
They believe he is an old grey man.
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 03:58
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to put your tail in that split." He did, so Jack pulls out the axe and the split closes on his tail. Jack jumped on his back. He flew over ditches and hedges until he came to Connelly who came out roaring and bawling. Jack asked him was he sorry and Connelly said no. The next day he sent him to a forest where there was a giant.
Jack got some dry curds from Connelly's daughter. He had just started to cut a tree when he saw the giant coming so he climbed up a tree. The giant came and looked up at Jack. He hit him in the eyes with the curds and blinded him. He went home to his wife to get them out of his eyes. She told him to go back and invite Jack to dinner, he came and invited Jack and he returned with the giant. The giant's wife gave them a good dinner.
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 03:40
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a bridge across the river so as we can come a short way home and have thirty cattles' eyes on plates. This was Jack's job for the next day. When he got Connelly off next morning he yoked a horse and cart and brought a load of planks down to the river.
A lane came to each side of the river so he got Connelly's cattle and drove them down to the bank. He killed them one by one with an axe and took an eye out of each. He rolled them into the river and then put the planks across and made a fine bridge. He watched until he saw Connelly and his wife coming. He set the hay and straw on fire. Connelly came so quicwas sorry and Connelly said he was. So Jack got a knife and Mrs Connelly came
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 03:25
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went to the giant. We shall have pap for supper to morrow when we will eat it. I will get a knife and let it out again. Jack had a bag inside of his clothes and he slipped the pap into it. The giant ate a tubfull. Jack got the knife and gave himself a scar and the pap came out. O said the giant anyone could do that giving himself a scar and ripped open his body and that was the end of the giant.
Connelly nearly fainted when he saw Jack for he thought the giant had killed him. "You need not be frightened I have finished that job."
"What end of the giant" said Connelly. "I killed him" said Jack. Connelly lamented about all the harm he had done. "Are you sorry" said Jack. "No" said Connelly. That night Connelly and his wife were talking how they would get rid of Jack. We will go to town to-morrow let him put
senior member (history)
2019-07-15 03:13
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now said the giant if I am stronger than you I will kill you and if you are stronger than me you will kill me
so the giant went down a hill to a well with a big barrell and filled it full of water. He gave it a kick and drove it up the hill to the house. "O, that is nothing" said Jack, "bring me a spade and I will bring it up to your door." The giant got afraid and ran home and Jack came after him. The giant's wife said "give him another chance" "Alright" said Jack.
The giant brought out a big weight and threw it half a mile. Jack got up a tree. The giant said "you are afraid" "No" said Jack "give me that weight"
"What are you going to do? I am going to throw it over to my brother in England. The giant got afraid and ran in. Jack came down and
senior member (history)
2019-07-14 03:08
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qualities.
Chilblains were cured by penny leaves that grow on old walls. They were fried on a pan with hogs lard making an ointment which when applied stopped irritation.
Marsh Mallow or holly hock was another popular herb. The leaves which when pounded into a paste was an excellent embrocation for sprains and bruises.
Dandelion eaten raw was a great lung tonic and many suffering from lung affections have been cured by its use.
Dandelion root dried and cleaned and when stewed on water was used with success and in case of Rheumatism a wine glass full to be taken each morning
senior member (history)
2019-07-14 02:55
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In olden times the people of Ireland were badly served with medical values.
Taghmon Co. Wexford was no exception to the rule and many lived in the district who were classed as "knowing people and to those people the sick and injured were conveyed to be cured by medicine made from herbs. There are certain people to-day who can through the medium of certain herbs cure diseases such as internal Cancer Scurvey and other forms of skin diseases that doctors still do not understand.
Simple cures were effected by almost every person in those days. For instance for the stopping of bleeding it was customary to place a large cob-web over the wound. The web was considered to contain healing and blood stopping
senior member (history)
2019-07-14 02:44
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for such a mill. The hides when from six to twelve months in steep were carted to the bleach to dry before undergoing the final process.
It took over twelve months in those days to tan a hide. Today it can with the aid of machinery be done in as many days.
The Bleach is a narrow strip of land skirting the eastern boundary of Taghmon is about one hundred yards from the site of the Tannery.
senior member (history)
2019-07-14 02:39
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Over one hundred years ago a very large Tannery was in a full working order in Taghmon in the Co. Wexford. There is no person living in this district competent to give full particulars with the result that I am unable to record the name of the person who owned it.
The process of tanning in those days was very slow, and it entailed much labour.
The site of the tannery is at the rere of the houses now occupied by Messers O Malley and Martin Main Street Taghmon and extended to Stream St. Taghmon in the Co Wexford.
The big pits in which the hides were steeped could be seen up to thirty years ago. A road way from the Tannery was at that time traceable to the Bleach.
Many thought a cloth mill once flourished here but that is not the case as there was never sufficient water power
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 04:06
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broken in two.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 04:05
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 04:04
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the house and the devil was never seen there since.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 04:03
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of the man who was buried standing before him. The spirit of the mn took the money to some other place where it had not been found from that day to this.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:54
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senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:53
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One day the hunt was in the towsland of Tottenhamgreen about there miles from the village of Taghmon in the Co. Wexford. When the hunt had gathered one of the men noticed a stranger in the crowd.
He wore a red jacket and was riding a back horse.
When the hunt started off one of the men noticed the stranger.
He was going to tell the head man about the stranger, but to his surprise he found himself not able to talk. Then the stranger said he was going home It was a year before the man obtained his speech.
He then told the people and they knew it was the devil.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:45
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senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:44
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Long ago there lived an old woman named Mary Harte.
She lived in Taghmon and in the County Wexford. This woman died and in the middle of the night a strange noise was heard.
One man looked out through the window and saw the "bow" combing her hair. He snatched the comb. He hurried in to tell what he had done. One man said to hand it back but he was afraid.
He then handed it out on a tongs and when he pulled the tongs in only half of it was there.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:35
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to the present day the spirit of that man has haunted the place where he lived
Written by Fintan Martin Taghmon who heard it told by his Father (Mr MJ Martin) who heard it told from Mr P. Pender Taghmon age 86 years and still alive and living in Taghmon.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:29
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by his Father (Mr MJ Martin) who heard it told by Miss Mary Mc Evoy Taghmon who died 28 years ago age 89 yrs.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:20
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This is a true ghost story, which I am about to tell. It happened years ago, when the train was not running from New Ross to Waterford.
There was a certain driver, and he was engaged to drive some cattle dealers to Waterford, late one evening. It was midnight, when he was returning. All went well until he came half-way between Waterford and Ross. What was his surprise to find the horse stopped dead, on the road and not one step would he go, no matter what he would do. He got down off the car,
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:12
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to see if there was anything the matter.
When he felt the horse, he got an awful fright, as the horse was in a panic also. He looked up suddenly, and saw a man, clothed in black, sitting on the other side of the car, and not a word did he utter.
He got up on the car again, and drove home with the man still there.
When he reached the stable, he sprinkled holy water as the old people always did to banish evil spirits.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 03:00
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Cracking nuts is another game on this night. A fine bright fire is made. All sit around it. Beech or chestnuts are used. Two nuts are put in the fire, one representing a boy and the other a girl, the names are given. If the nuts fly off together, both will be married. If they do not fly together, they will not be married.
These customs and games are still practiced in this district since olden times.
All Saints' Day, 1st November.
On that night in former times in this district, the people lit candles in the windows of the houses, to show light to the poor suffering souls, as they believed, they passed from Purgatory to Heaven on that night.
All people remained in their homes, also on that night, as they were afraid to be out during the night. It was the belief
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 02:48
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that ghosts and fairies were to be seen.
This custom is now dying out in the district. In very few houses now the lights are to be seen in the windows, and several dances and other amusements, such as card-playing are now held during
that night.
All Soul's Day, 2nd November. On that morning there are three Masses said in the Chapel, and the people of the district assist at those Masses, for their deceased relatives. They also make nine visits to the Church between noon on the 1st November, All Saints' Day to noon on the 2nd November "All Souls' Day" and offer prayers for the suffering souls in Purgatory.
New Year's Eve, the last day of the year,
the people of the district make preparations for New Year's Day. The send cards and gifts to their friends.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 02:33
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now can't you see the riders?" But John answered that he could do neither. "Why", she exclaimed, "I can see your wife Molly as plainly as can be, and she is riding on the outside of the fairy company, just on purpose for you to catch hold of her conveniently. Let us walk along the road; and, as you are as blind as a bat, and can't see her, I'll give you a push when we get alongside of her horse, and then it is up to you, John, to do the rest."
So they walked along the mountain road, and presently, through John still could see nothing, he could hear the jingling of harness, the rustling of the feathers which the fairy people wore. All of a sudden, the woman gave him a strong
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 02:23
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He set me down at my door, and gave me five guineas for attendance upon his lady and child, and then bade me a civil good-night. He then went back at a fast speed again.
The good woman, having finished her story, went home, leaving John in the field in a state of anxiety and, fear. All that week, he went about his work as one in a dream, thinking about the fairies
On Friday night, the farmer and the woman who told him the story about his wife, met together at the cross near Templeshambo. It was a lovely night and the moon was shining brightly. At midnight the woman began to tremble all over, and her eyes opened wide, as if with wonder of what she could see in the moonlight. "Can't you hear a jingling of bridles?" she said. "And
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 02:14
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brought me here to be nurse to the baby of their king and queen, But I'll tell you how John can get me back again. As I have chanced to hear, all of the fairies will be going to Old Ross next Friday night, and , if John will wait somewhere by the cross near Templeshambo, where the road from the White Mountain, (which is a continuation of the Blackstairs Mountains) leads into the one to Ross, and if he will take fast hold of me, as I then go riding by with the fairies, he will set me free from them.
The dark man, who, as I now knew was the King of the fairies, came following after me, and he put me on horseback, sitting behind him, in the same manner as when we had come. We rode off at such a pace that I feared every minute I should fall off, until we reached my home.
senior member (history)
2019-07-13 02:04
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by the side of the sea. The walls were dripping with water, and instead of a fine carpet on the floor, there was seaweed scattered about. The waves could be heard breaking loudly on a pebbly beach. And what was stranger still, the dark man, the beautiful lady and the baby were changed into the most miserable-looking creatures, as thin as could be, and with rags and tatters hanging about them. The dark man said to me "Now ma'am, if you'll be so good as to go out to the hall door, I'll see you safely home, and I'm much obliged to you for your attendance."
I went out of that cave, and when I was passing through the cave that was next to it, whom should I see, huddled up in a corner, but your wife Molly, looking very sad and down in the mouth.
Molly said to me "The fairies have
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 04:22
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push, and immediately his eyes were opened. He found that he had got his wife Molly in his arms, and was lifting her off horseback.
A great noise arose, and all sorts of wild unearthly creatures seemed to leap up around, tugging away at John, and trying to make him let go of his wife. But these vanished, as soon as John made the sign of the cross, and called upon the powers of Heaven to help him. There was then deep silence all about, and he found that his wife had fainted away in his arms.
With the help of the neighbourly woman, John got Molly safely home.
She was soon quite her usual self again, and none the worse for her trip to fairyland.
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 04:07
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through different rooms, all very finely furnished : I saw a number of fine ladies and gentlemen moving tp and fro in them, and they all bowed to him as he passed, and he returned their salutation.
We then came to a room where a beautiful lady was lying on a couch, and I now knew that I had been brought to attend upon her and her little baby. I set myself to work and began to feel quite at home.
After a time, the dark man gave me a bottle of green ointment, and told me to rub the child all over with it, but for what reason I could not guess. However, I did as I was told.
The ointment was so strong that it made my eyes water.
I rubbed my right eye, and the strangest thing happened. The room where we were, changed to a cave
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 03:56
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mounted on a black horse. "Make haste," he said, I want you to attend my good lady." So I put on my cloak as fast as I could, and when I just got outside the door, he picked me up, and set me on the saddle behind him: The horse galloped off a great pace, and I was afraid of falling off and breaking my neck."
"Where are we going to, Sir?" I asked: The only answer he gave was to draw his fingers over my eyes, and for the rest of the journey I could see nothing.
At last we stopped, and he dismounted.
Then he gave me a hand to help me down, and very glad I was to feel te ground under my feet again. He drew his fingers over my eyes again but the other way this time. My eyes opened, and I could see a beautiful castle towering in front of us. He brought me into the castle, and led me
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 03:42
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the house, and looked all around, but nowhere was any trace of either his wife or of the fairies that had cast their spell upon her. He went back very sorrowful, and could not sleep that night, nor for many a long and weary night afterwards.
About six weeks after this unhappy event, the farmer was going out to work in the fields, early one morning, when there came up to him a neighbour of his, a woman who earned her living by going out nursing, and she asked to have a talk with him.
"As I was just about going to sleep last night," She said. I heard a knock at the door, and I thought one of my patients wanted me. I put on my clothes, and went to the door, and when I opened it, I saw a very handsome man, of dark complexion
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 03:32
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thing happened.
One night the man as awakened from his sleep by the cries of "Mother ! mother !". He sprang out of the bed, with surprise and fright, and when he had rubbed his eyes, he found out that his wife had disappeared, and his two elder children were standing by the bedside. They were quaking with fear, and, when he asked them where their mother was, they said, that, all of a sudden, they had been awakened, and they had seen their mother in the midst of a ring of little people in white and red and green apparel, and walking away with them out of the door, but with her eyes closed, as if she were fast asleep.
The farmer was terrified at the thought that the fairies might rob him of his wife. He rushed out of
senior member (history)
2019-07-12 03:23
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This is a very old tale which has been told in this district for generations.
Walter Clare, Moneynamough, Rathnure who died about ten years ago, I first heard relating it. He was 76 years of age when he died, and he heard all the old people of the district relating it.
The story is told as follows :-
Once upon a time in the Co. Wexford, there dwelt a worthy farmer, whose name was John, though what his surname was, the story-tellers could not remember. He had a very happy life, for he had a good farm, and worked hard on it. He was married to a good, industrious wife, whose name was Molly. They had three children, the youngest of whom was but a tiny baby when this strange
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 03:01
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Long ago when children had whooping cough , the old people in this district used to pass the patient out under asse's legs, and over his back, 3 times.
They also brought the sufferer to the sea shore as they believed that sea-air was very beneficial

Another "Cure" for Whooping Cough was to give an ass a feed of bread then pick up the crumbs and give them to the "Whooper," after which the whooping would cease
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 02:50
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toothache again.
Sore Eyes :- Bathe the eyes with cold tea about three times a day and it will remove bloodshot and soreness.
Heartburn :- A small quantity of common bread-soda (about what would fit on a sixpence). if taken in water will cure heartburn and aid digestion.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 02:48
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thin stocking and apply to head or back of neck until the pain disappears. Common salt if placed on the tongue and followed by a drink of water is said to be a cure for a sick headache.
A gargle of salt + water will cleanse a coated tongue, taken like snuff, salt will relieve a cold.
It also whitens the teeth, hardens the gums, and stops the bleeding after teeth have been extracted.
A salt + water solution used in washing a deep cut is said to prevent infection.
Toothache :
An old treatment for toothache was to slightly cut the gum around the tooth with an iron nail until it bleeds so that some of the blood remains on the nail, then drive the nail into a wooden beam up to the head, and it is said you will never get
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 02:38
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Stings :-
The juice of the common Dock-leaf will cure a nettle sting. Common Blue, used for whitening clothes will cure the sting of a wasp or a bee.
Mumps :-
Goose-grease if rubbed on the neck will cure 'mumps' or sore throat.
Measles :-
A child with measles may be cured by passing it in and out three times under an ass.
A Gargle :-
A solution of Common salt and hot water as a gargle will cure sore throat.
It also serves as a disinfectant in cases of infection when used as hot as can be borne about three times a day.
Headache :-
A bandage steeped in vinegar and tied across the forehead will relieve a bad headache.
Another cure is to roast common salt in a frying pan, place in a
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 02:30
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Consumption :-
The stem of the Dandelion plant contains a white juice like milk which when extracted and taken as a drink is said to cure Consumption if taken in the beginning of the diseases. Its taste is very bitter and is much like that of Cod Liver Oil.
Another cure for this disease is the juice of the "Mullen" plant which may be got in the Carlow Nurseries. The leaves of this are sometimes dried, boiling water poured over them and allowed to draw like tea.
There is another plant called Canivawn Beg which has a small blue flower and grow wild in the fields and ditches
This plant when boiled in milk, strained and taken as a drink is said to cure consumption, or ordinary delicacy in children.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 02:19
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Whooping Cough :-
Get a live frog, hold it near the mouth of the child who has the cough, allow it to breathe at least three times, and the frog will take the cough from the child.
Piles :-
Pile herb when boiled in milk, strained and taken as a drink will cure piles.
The leaves may also be fried in fresh lard and when cool forms an ointment which can be applied to the piles.
Sprains :
Marshmallows ointment which is made from the Marshmallows plant is a good cure for sprains. The leaves of the plant are first washed, then put into a pan and fried with fresh lard. It is next strained, and on cooling it becomes like an ointment. This cures sprains or swollen joints.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 02:08
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and as the potato rots away, so will the warts disappear.
Burns :-
The juice of a weed called Houseleek found growing on old walls is a good cure for burns.
Blackleg in Cattle :-
A short time ago the bone of a cow's leg was found hanging in the Chimney of an old house. It seems this bone had been hanging there for years and was kept by the old people of the house as a preventive for Blackleg in Cattle.
Fluke :-
The common bracken or fern which grows by the road-side contain's a juice, which when extracted cures 'fluke' in sheep or cattle.
A cure for a Sty :-
A sty on the eye may be cured by pricking it three times with a gooseberry thorn, and then burying the thorn.
senior member (history)
2019-07-11 01:56
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Whooping Cough :-
When two people having the same surname get married a piece of bread given by the newly-married couple will cure a child of whooping-cough.
To heal a deep cut :-
Get the leaves of a plant known as "Old Man in the Garden" which has a red flower, press the leaves until the juice comes from them, then place in a cloth and apply to the cut like a poultice. This plant only grows in gardens and has thick fleshy leaves.
Cure for Warts :-
If you had a number of warts, get the same number of tiny stones and touch each wart with a different stone, then place the stones in a bag, leave it on the road-way or footpath and the first person who picks it up, takes the warts and you get rid of them.
Another cure is to rub the warts with a raw potato, then bury it,
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 04:24
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is said that the banshee also wails when any of the Browne family of Ballelle dies.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 04:21
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in luck to find the gold and silver. His master was very poor and he gave him the gold and silver.
This man and his servant, became very rich.
In later years as the men were walking across the field, they were knocked dead.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 04:18
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This is a true story, which happened at the Three Hundred Club at the Bullawn which is now a ruin.
One night a group of men were playing cards in a club. After a while a girl came in to sweep the room, and one of the men dropped a card.
She stooped to pick it up and all of a sudden she screamed for she had seen the cloven foot of the Devil. He disappeared through a hole in the wall and he was not seen since.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 04:05
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Answer :- To pass you through.
When are tents like black ?
When they are pitched
What tune is almost popular ?
Answer :- For - tune
What is the difference between a spendthrift and a pillow.?
Answer :- One is hard up and the other is soft down.
Why are plum stones like milestones ?
Answer :- Because they are never found in pears (pairs)
Why is a king like a hat ?
Answer :- Because they both have crowns.
When is a cricketer like a hungry tramp ?
Answer :- When he is out for a duck.
What is it that has more windows than a king's Palace ?
Answer :- A thimble.
What is the strongest thing in the world ?
Answer :- A shilliki pookie (snail) because he carries his house around.
When are birds like shoes ?
Answer :- When they are in trees.
Did you ever see bananas hanging up ?
Answer :- "Yes" Well you did not; you saw them hanging down ?
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 03:36
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And comes between two waters ?
Answer :- A man fetchig water in pails
"Patch upon patch without any stitches
Riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of breeches"
Answer . A cabbage
What is full and holds more ?
A pot full of potatoes when you put the water in
"Headed like a thimble
Tailed like a rat.
But you may guess forever
And you will never guess that."
A pipe
What goes round the wood and never gets in to the wood ?
Answer :- The bark of a tree.
"One half dead the other half living and a tail wagging"
Answer :- A dog with his head in a pot
When is a man like a steamer ?
When he's a tramp.
When are two apples alike ?
Answer :- When they are pared"
Why does a porter on the train punch a hole in your ticket "?
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 03:25
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"As round as an apple
as plump as a ball.
Can climb the church and steeple and all."
Answer :- The Sun
What is it that always walks with its head down?
Answer :- A nail.
"Middy - noddy round body
Three feet and a wooden hat.
Answer :- A pot.
What goes away above the ground and returns under it ?
Answer :- A man with sods on his head.
What goees away between two woods
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 03:17
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time she would be in town she would pay it and he then disappeared. A few nights after that, she was on the same road and he appeared to her again.
She then thought of the bill because she had not paid it. He said to her "I see you didn't do the favour I asked you." She said she had not been in town since but she would be going the next day. The next day she went to town and enquired in the shops about the bill and in one shop found that he owed a little bill which she paid.
As she was coming home, it was dark and for the third time he appeared to her and said "Now that you have done the favour I can rest and I will not trouble you anymore." He then said to her "On your way home, you will meet a person clothed in black, but do nothing only pass it by and it won't take any notice of you, but, if you speak to it, it will do you harm." She went on her way and had not gone far, when the black figure appeared to her.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 03:05
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awaiting decision
One time a man died out in Adamstown and he owed a bill in some shop in the town but no one knew about it. One night after his death a woman was walking along the road and he appeared to her. She got terribly frightened and was about to run away when he told her not to fear.
She then asked him did he want anything and he said that he owed a bill in the town and that he could not rest until he had it paid. He asked her would she pay it for him as soon as she could. She told him that the next
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 02:57
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the Maypole and they also crown a little girl, "Queen of May."
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 02:56
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This is a special day for the children to enjoy themselves.
They cut a blackthorn bush and decorate it with ribbons, papers and flowers. All the little children dance around it and sing songs. Then they burn it and while it is burning they carry it about and all the children follow them.
They also have a Maypole.
A large pole on which coloured ribbons are tied is placed in the centre of the field. Each child catches a ribbon and dances around
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 02:49
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the furze,
Although she is little her family was
great,
Rise up land-lady and give us a
treat,
And if your treat be of the best
Above in heaven your soul may
rest,
But, if your treat be of the small
Sure that won't suit the wren boys
at all,
Up with the kettle and down with
the pan,
A penny or two to bury the wren,
All silver, no brass,
We are the boys that carry the
cash,
With your pockets full of money
and your barrels full of beer,
I wish you all a happy and a
Bright New Year."
Then they count their money and if they have a sufficient amount to have a dance they are sure to hold one in some farm-house.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 02:39
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awaiting decision
This is a great day for customs. On Christmas day the boys go out and kill the wren.
They bring her home and tie her on a holly bush. Then they decorate the bush with ribbons and put it away for the following day.
They arise early next morning and dress themselves up in girls' clothes and they wear masks on their faces. They go from house to house and collect money while they sing a little song.
"The wren, the wren, the king of all birds,
Saint Stephen's day she was caught in
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 02:30
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the place. To him she also appeared. He asked her her business and she said "I am here to kill anyone who passes by" He said to her "by whom are you sent" "by the devil" she replied.
"What did you do" he asked "I killed my mother and father" was her reply. "You could get pardon for that" said the priest. She then told him she killed the children, one without Baptism. The priest then told her that it was the unbaptised child that cursed her and he banished her for ever.
senior member (history)
2019-07-10 02:24
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A girl, who was known by the name of Petticoat Loose, killed her mother and father, and two children, one without Baptism. She herself died soon afterwards, and on a certain spot, where she killed the people, she used to appear.
One night a man was passing by on a horse and she appeared to him and he took her up on the horse, and the minute she mounted, the horse staggered. The man remarked that he never noticed the horse stagger like that before. She replied, "the horse never carried such a weight before, for I carry many tons of sin." The man then let her dismount and journeyed home. In the morning he found the horse dead.
He mentioned the matter to a priest, who later visited
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 03:38
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In my previous note I have mentioned the large number of officials employed in
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 03:36
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The remains of its ancient fortifications can still be traced in Passage. A large portion of the main Tower or Castle at the base of the hill
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 03:23
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Ballyfinogue is the name of my townland. It is in the Parish of Piercestown and in the Barony of Forth. Twelve families are in it, and approximately fifty-seven people.
The family name most common is Murphy. Out of the twelve houses only two are thatched. These are farmers places. The rest are labourers cottages and they are slated. Only two persons are over seventy in the locality. They are Hannah Reid of Ballyfinogue and Michael Kinsella of Ballyfinogue.
Houses were more numerous in former times. There was a saying "that every acre of Ballyfinogue provided for a family." The houses were thatched and two-roomed. One field of Mr. Devereux's of Ballyfinogue held eight of these houses and was known as the "Old Town."
The land is flat and fertile and suitable for tilling. Crops of corn and beet are raised on it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 03:04
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them while they were in Wexford. special Mass was said at ten o'clock in Piercestown on Sundays for them. The Militia used march to this Mass led by two bands.
About one hundred yards from Rathjarney there is a field known as the Cock Field. It was used for sport known as cock fighting. At that time the people bred cocks for fighting. It was forbidden by law at that time to hold cock fights in public. Thus they brought them to isolated places at dawn.
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 02:53
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In Kerlogue stands a high rock known as the "Maiden Tower Rock." It is derived its name from an incident which occurred there.
It happened that a pack of hounds was brought to Kerlogue to hunt. After a few minutes a fox arose from a covert near the Rock, and ran in its direction.
There was a deep fissure through the side of the rock. Down this the fox ran, closely followed by the hounds. The huntsmen stood baffled at the top of the rock unable to descend it.
One lady however determined to jump from the rock's summit. In vain her companions told her not to go but she would not listen to them.
She jumped the horse from the top of the rock. Both of them were killed. The place where the tragedy occurred was called the "Maiden Tower Rock" and that name is on it still.
A field in Killugers is known as the Chapel Field. The chapel of Kilmacree where Mass was said in the Penal Times was built with its west end touchng one of its ditches.
The Camp Field is the name of a field in Drinagh. The English Militia camped
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 02:33
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"A stitch in time saves nine,"
"A watch pot never boils,"
"All is well that ends well,"
"It is a bad wind that does nobody good,"
"A rolling stone gathers no moss,"
"All is fair in love and war,"
"The more hurry the less speed,"
"Many hands make light work,"
"Too many cooks spoil the broth,"
"Spare the rod and spoil the child,"
"A wilful waste makes a woeful want,"
"Waste not want not,"
"A half loaf is better than no bread,"
"Better late than never,"
"Last but not least,"
"Its never too late to mend,"
"A good beginning is half the work,"
"A good contriver is better than an early riser,"
"One good turn deserves another,"
senior member (history)
2019-07-09 02:22
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Seven graveyards are in the Parish of Piercestown, two in Piercestown and one each of the following places, Rathmacree, Kilmackree, Drinagh, Killiane and Rathaspeck.
Three of these are closed namely one in Piercestown, Drinagh, and Killiane. Drinagh is the oldest one of these graveyards. It is roughly oblong in shape. It is on a height and it slopes towards the south. Many trees grow in this graveyard as, ash, sycamore, and chest-nut.
The four walls of a church remain standing in this graveyard.
There are many stone crosses in the graveyard. The oldest one seems to be 1717.
One large cross is in the middle of the churchyard. It is about eight feet high. It is about three feet thick at the bottom. A small cross is at the top of it. The arms of the big cross are about ten inches in length.
In Rathaspeck and Rathmackee graveyards are prodestant churches attended by a small congregation. In each of the others are the remaind of catholic churches. People have been buried within the ruins of the churchyard in Drinagh.
Although many families are
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 04:35
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was Mr. Fox going away without waiting to be thanked.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 04:34
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And my gentle mother there with the silver in her hair,
Was praying for the earning ones return.
This song was composed by
John Hore of Kilmore
about twenty six years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 04:29
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At waking in the morning I say -
"O my God my only good the author of my being and my last end.
I give thee my heart, praise, honour and glory be to thee over and ever Amen."
On rising up I say -
"In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost
I will raise myself up from this bed of sleep to adore my God, and to labour for salvation of my soul
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 04:20
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O God of mercy and goodness put an end
to the suffering of the souls of the faithful departed,
and grant to all those for whom I am particulary bound to pray for,
eternal light, rest, happiness, Amen."
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 04:17
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Oh may I rise on the last day to life everlasting."
While clothing myself I say -
"Oh my God my clothe my soul with the nuptual robe of charity grant that I may wear it pure and undefiled before thy judgement seat"

On going to bed I say -
"Into thy hands O Lord I commend my spirit
Lord Jesus crucified I lie down to rest.
Bless me O Lord and defend me,
Preserve me, from a sudden death
and from all dangers
and bring me to life everlasting with thee."
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 04:09
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After the rosary at night we say.
"Oh Most Blessed Virgin more than martyred, yet the suffering, such as afflicted, by the unspeakable joy where the soul was lost in finding the beloved son in the temple, amidst the doctors, disputing with them, obtain for us to seek him and find him that we may never be separated from him again."
On rising in the morning I say.
"I kiss the wounds of thy sacred
hand with sorrow deep and true,
May every move of my hand to
be a million acts of love for you
Dear Lord."
"I kiss the wounds of thy sacred feet
with sorrow deep and true,
May every step I take to day
be a million acts of love for you
Dear Lord."
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 03:57
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"Charity begins at home,"
"A new broom sweeps clean,"
"God helps those who help themselves,"
"Far away cows wear long horns,"
"A friend in need is a friend indeed,"
"First asked first served,"
"A chip off the old block,"
"A wet night brings a dry morning,"
"The more rain the more rest."
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 03:38
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not living near these graveyards they still continue to be buried in them.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 03:36
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At the residence of the late Very Rev. Father O'Byrne P.P. Piercestown is a stone about eight stone weight. It is about three feet high, and eight or ten inches wide, and three or four inches thick. The edges are very much worn.
A number of straight cuts paralell to each other are on the side of the stone. They are supposed to be Ogham characters.
It was found by Father O'Byrne about four years ago on the Saltee Islands south of Wexford.
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 03:30
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"My God I offer thee this day,
All I may do, or think, or say.
Uniting it with what was done, on
earth by Jesus Christ thy son"
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 03:28
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"Oh Holy Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, dying on the Cross for our lives,
Oh Holy Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ ward off from us all evils,
Oh Holy Cross of Christ protect me from my enemies,
Oh Holy Cross of Christ direct me in the way of happiness,
Oh Holy Cross of Christ protect me from a sudden and unprovided death."
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 03:22
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There are four corners on my bed,
There are four angels overhead,
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John,
God bless the bed that I lie on.
This prayer is said at night
senior member (history)
2019-07-08 03:20
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"I kiss the wounds of thy sacred heart
with sorrow deep and true,
May every move of my heart to day
be a milion acts of love for you
Dear Lord."
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 03:36
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awaiting decision
One night as we were sitting around the fire old Miss Browne of Neville St told us a story about hidden treasure. She said that, she was telling it one night to men before and they went out to get it. She starts by saying that there is treasure hidden in Annas Castle, that was left there by the English.
One night the men she told the story to went out for the treasure. When they went down under the trap door they went over to the big iron door they looked around to see if there was any way of opening the door. One of them saw an iron ring
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 03:25
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A man was carrying twelve lamps, he lost one of them what did he become? A Lamp-lighter.

Twice in a moment, once in a month, and never in a thousand years? The letter “m”.
Spell black water with three letters? Ink.
What goes up when the rain comes down? An umbrella.
If a man got sixpence for walking a mile, what would he get for walking a hundred miles?
Sore feet.
What is the strongest animal in the world?
The snail because it carries its house on its back.
What has a tongue and cannot talk? A Boot.

Where did the first tree grow?
In the ground.

Why does a hen pick a pot? Because she cannot lick it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 03:17
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Did you ever see half a pig's head with two eyes?
Yes, with your own two eyes.
If your peacock laid an egg in your neighbour's garden which would the egg belong to you or your neighbour?
A peacock never lays an egg.
The beginning of eternity
The end of time and space.
The beginning of every end,
And the end of every place.?
What is it? The letter "e".
Two "a's", two "m's" two "r's" and a "g" put them together and spell them for me?
Grammar.
If a poker an tongs cost half a crown, what will a ton of coal come to at the same rate?
Ashes.
What is it that goes from the School to your home without moving?
A Road.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 03:07
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Spell "pig" without an "i" (eye)?
"Pg"
A word that is made of three vowels alone
It is spelled backwards and forwards the same.
It speaks but one word,
Makes its sentiments known
And to beauty lays principal claim?
"Eye".
What part of a cow goes over a gap first?
Her breath.
Thirty (sick) six sheep went over a gap, one died, how many were left behind?
Twenty-nine.
Londonderry, Cork and Kerry,
spell me that without a "k".
"That".
Why is Eire like a bottle?
Because it has a "Cork".
I went up the boreen, down the boreen,
and carried the boreen on my back: What is that?
A Ladder.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 02:55
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When can you carry water in a sieve?
When it is ice.
What tree satisfies hunger?
The pantry.
What part of a fish weighs most?
The Scales.
What has an eye but cannot see?
A Needle.
What stick does not grow in a wood?
A Candlestick.
Black and white and red (read) all over?
A Newspaper.
The man that made it sold it.
The man that bought it never wore it
The man that wore it never saw it.
A Coffin.
Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat,
you may guess for ever, but you won't guess that?
A Pipe.
What ring is always square?
A boxing ring
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 02:46
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Under the fire, over the fire, and never touches the fire?
A cake of bread baking in a pan with the lid on.
Why do ladies like looking at the moon?
Because there is a man in it.
What does a lady look for but never wishes to find?
A hole in the heel of her stocking.
What sign is it to hear the cuckoo in March?
A sign you are not deaf.
What is the lightest county in Éire.?
Cork.
When she went into the wood she hadn't it,
and when she came out she had it?
A thorn in her foot.
What is the first thing you do when you fall into the sea?
Get wet.
Why does a hen cross the road?
To get to the other side.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 02:37
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What is it that never was, nor never will be?
A mouse's nest in a cat's ear.
What is the difference between an ass and a postage stamp?
One you lick with a stick, and the other you stick with a lick.
If you get up on an ass what would you get down on?
A goose.
What is the shyest thing in the house?
The clock, because it covers its face with its hands.
When is a clock dangerous?
When it strikes one.
What goes up the stairs with their heads down?
Nails in the boots.
Two Yankees standing on a bridge.
One said to the other I'm a father to your son.
What were they to each other?
Husband and wife.
Why does a cow lie down?
Because she cannot sit.
How many straws go to make a goose's nest?
None, because they are all carried.
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 02:26
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Why is a florin like an English-man?
Because it is under a crown.
There were two men talking one day. One said to the other.
"Sisters and brothers I have none
But your father is my father's only son".
What relationship was between them?
Father and son.
Where was Moses when the light went out?
In the dark.
As round as an apple
As flat as a pan.
The half of a woman
The whole of a man?
A Penny.
What is the best thing to put in an apple tart?
Your teeth.
When is a cow not a cow?
When she is turned into a field.
What were the last words Eve said to Adam when leaving the Garden of Paradise?
I don't care A-dam.
As round as an apple,
senior member (history)
2019-07-07 02:15
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As deep as a pail.
And never gives tongue,
'Till it's caught by the tail?
A Bell
What coloured letters do we eat ?
Green peas.
Why is O the noisiest of vowels?
Because all the others are inaudible.
Why is the letter D. like a wedding ring?
Because you cannot have wed without it
What insect lives on nothing?
A moth because it eats holes.
Name the most fragile race of men?
China - men
Why is a cow's tail like a swan's breast?
Because it grows down.
Twenty sheep went out in a gap.
Twenty more followed that,
Six, seven, twice eleven,
Three, and two, How many is that?
Five. 3+2=5.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 03:46
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What is it that the more you take from the larger it grows?
Answer. A Hole or Grave.
What is it that the longer it lives the smaller it grows ?
A Candle.
What is it that creeps on four legs in the morning, two at noon" and three in the evening.?
A man, because when an infant he creeps on hands and feet, when a boy he walks on the two feet, and when old age comes on, he must carry a stick. He walked both with the stick and two feet.

What member of the Dáil wears the biggest hat ?
The man with the biggest head.
Why is the letter "i" in civility like your nose?
Because it is between two "i's" (eyes).
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 03:32
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coming near the local forge, and as it was long past midnight, the people were in bed. They knocked at the door.
Mrs. Hennessey, asked "Who is there.?"
They said "Open the door quickly" ma'am. We saw ghosts". "The Cross of Christ about us" she said. "Hurry up ma'am." said they "and give us some holy water".
"Get up Lizzie, she said to her daughter, "and shake the holy water". They all got up, and let in Peter and John. When John was in he fell down in a swoon, but Peter was braver. They told what they had seen, and Mrs Hennessey said, it should have been Thomas Martin, and some other man were making for the graveyard. They kept both for the night.
The two ghosts turned out to be two brothers named Binions. One used to get apoplectic fits, and run away, so the brother followed him fearing any harm.
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 03:13
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his ghost. They all gave offerings for Masses for his soul, and his ghost was never seen afterwards.
This is another incident but a rather funny one.
One night as Peter Fenlon, Grange, and John Connors, Rathnure, were going to their homes, they met coming on in the direction of Rathnure two men in their night-shirts, and barefooted. They were running very fast one in front of the other.
As it happened to be Thomas Martin of Ballinookerish was buried in Rathnure Cemetery that day. He was old, and had gray hair. One of the boys who was running was fair haired, and he passing by he grazed by Peter Fenlon's sleeve. Peter and John thought he was Thomas Martin, that he was running to the graveyard, followed by another spirit. They were
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 02:56
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not survive long.
His spirit was seen also by Walter Clare, Moneynamough, who was his great friend. Walter was the Relieving Officer, in this district.
One night as he was coming home from New Ross, with a donkey and car, he saw the spirit of James Furlong. He was dressed as before, but wore no hat. He walked along by the side of the car, until Walter reached his own home. He threw the reins over the donkey's head.
Said nothing, up went upstairs, and gave unearthly screams. He jumped into the bed behind his brother and said "James Furlong is at the door. He also gave an offering for a Mass for his soul, and bought a hat and gave it to a poor man, to pray foor him.
There were others also who saw
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 02:37
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James Furlong is outside," and at the same time he went off in a swoon on the kitchen floor.
His daughter who was in bed heard her father saying those words. She happened to look out the window, and saw the spirit going back from the door towards the yard gate.
When John recovered consciousness, he told the story to his family.
John commenced to pine away, especially his nerves were weakened. He could not sleep or eat. One morning he came to the priest, Fr. Doyle, the parish priest of this place. He went to confession and told him the story. He gave him offerings for Masses. The priest did all in his power to encourage him, but it weighed so deeply on his mind that he did
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 02:29
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There is no protection on this part of the River, and many people have been drowned in this way.
After the burial some time, John Redmond was going home from Rathnure. Going up the hill to Ballybawn, and coming near his own home, suddenly, he saw a dark cloud over his head. It burst, and James Furlong, stood by his side, just as he had seen him that day in New Ross. He wore a dark suit of clothes, and a white Sailor hat with a black ribbon around it. He walked along with him until he reached his own door. He was trembling with fear.
The members of his family were in bed except John's wife who remained by the fire until John returned. He opened the door, and, said, "Betty, put out the light,
senior member (history)
2019-07-06 02:20
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it was so badly decomposed that you would scarcely recognise him. He was dressed just as he was when he walked into the River. His people got word instantly. They went to New Ross to see the sad sight of their brother. An inquest was held, and the remains brought by hearse to Rathnure old Cemetery, where he was buried about ten o'clock that night. His death cast a gloom over the whole district, and everyone had sympathy with his parents, brothers and sisters.
What really happened was.
After parting with John Redmond, he went to buy some stationery, in the shop on the Quay. It was a beautiful moonlit night, and taking the River Barrow for the road by mistake, he walked straight into it, and was instantly drowned
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 04:15
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The woman seemed to walk through the door, without opening it.
The man and the child were found dead at the door. While the woman was in town, she was killed by a car.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 04:12
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Now let me see how long ago
By jingo, its a year.
Still can'st thou brave a stormy gale
A fall of snow, of rain, or hail,
That ought to be enough.
It grieves my heart into the core
To think I cannot wear thee more
That Fate on thee is rough
To part with thee, to bid adieu
For one, whose shape is neat and new,
Would, faith, my feelings hurt,
I knew thee without blame or spot,
I see thee now, but know thee not
Thou are not what thou wert."
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 04:00
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To my old Hat.
O hat, protector of the head,
Although thy life hath nearly fled,
Thou art beyond the block,
Thy brim alas! is limp and slack,
Thy walls are anything but black.
The crown's received a shock
No man, no hatter in the West,
Not even though he did his best
Could make you fit to wear
I purchased thee, ah me! I know,
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 03:39
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any reward. At any rate Gaffney was hanged on the Ross bridge as a traitor. Even to this day the name "spy and traitor" are still hurled at his relatives.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 03:35
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else should marry soon in the same house.
Everyone should wish happiness, health and prosperity, on the wedding ring. The wedding cake should be cut, and sent to the bride's best friends. The bride should not see the bridegroom entering the Chapel the wedding morning, but she should wait until they reach the altar railings.
Then if a pig or a funeral cross their way when they are going home from the Chapel it is the sign of bad luck.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 03:29
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awaiting decision
When people get married it is usual for the mother-in-law to tie a boot and an old horse-shoe to the back of the wedding car. When the pair are coming out of the Chapel their friends throw confetti over their heads.
When the pair enter the house the ride should be carried over the door - step, and the woman of the house should break an oaten - cake over her.
Then the step should be sprinkled over with water so that somebody
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 03:22
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An old beggar woman used to go from house to house looking for lodgings. She often spent a night in his father's house in Templesheelin, where she slept on a couch beside the fire. She was a very pious old woman, and prayed fervently for those who gave her alms.
Every morning, on getting up, she used to say this prayer.
"Good morning, day,
Jesus guide me the right way,
That God may keep me from
sin and shame,
I'll arise to-day God's name."
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 03:12
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could not put a foot under him. Now, he told his people of his encounter with the ghost. The next day he went to the priest of the place and told his story. The priest told him never to take an adventure or to stay out late at night again.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 03:06
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Now he went over to a stile on the side of the road which led a short-way home through the fields. But when he went to the stile he was unable to mount it with the effect of the fright so he had to go home by the road. When he reached his room another man (his brother) was sleeping in a bed next to his. He sat down on his brother's bed, but the bed trembled he was that frightened. His brother asked him what as the matter, but he told him it was nothing.
The next night he made up his mind to go card-playing which he had done for many years. But when he went outside the door of the house he became quite blind and unable to walk. He stayed at home the next night and attempted to go again but the blindness was worse and he
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:51
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no rain seemed to fall, he came out again and walked down the road. He saw a huge heap. Thinking it was a drunken man he said, "Good Night" but got no answer, he passed on and again heard the same noise but did not mind. Then he heard a great noise and saw coming down the road, a huge horse with powerful big feet. The man went on, and on came the horse, he stopped and the horse stopped. This went on until he came to a cottage on the road-side. He went in there because he was getting afraid.
He stood inside the gate. Up came the horse and right outside the gate about a half-yard from the man, the ground opened and down the big horse went.
The man came out, struck a match to see the opening in the road; but the ground was the same as ever
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:39
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There is an old road in Old Ross which is said to be haunted, it is called the Mill Road. A certain man was coming home late one night from card-playing. He had to come by the Mill-Road but there was no need for fear because the moon was shining and he did not think of ghosts.
He was walking along the Mill Road when he heard a noise as of a heavy shower he stepped in under the shelter of the trees but
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:33
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Mt. Garret Castle is situated near New Ross. It is now a ruin but it is still strong and in good repair. Bishop Barret owned it and lived in it. He had a special gate to go into Ross. The field in which the castle is situated is not to be ploughed because it is said that gold is hidden there. There is a well near the castle since the time of Bishop Barret and it is called the "Castle Well". The people still get water from it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:28
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gCailín.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:28
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There is a well near the Ferry bridge New Ross and some years ago many people heard a scream and saw a white lady flying over the well. That is how the place got it's name. The banshee is often heard crying there, and is seen combing her hair sitting near the well.
The Cosgrave family who live in the vicinity frequently heard her wailing and saw her form moving round Tobar na
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:23
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died about twenty or thirty years ago was often heard to relate that at twelve o'clock at night she often heard a bull roaring along the path over this ruin.
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:21
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Oaklands, is situated about one mile from New Ross town. On this estate there is a wood and in it is the ruins of an old bath-house.
After the English settlement, a Protestant man became the owner of this estate and he drowned himself in this bath-house. An old woman in the district who
senior member (history)
2019-07-05 02:16
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There is a street in New Ross, named Neville Street, and in it is a pump. This pump is disused, and is not similar to the one we may observe throughout the town. It is high, and has a long handle with which the people used to pump.
The story goes, that as a priest was going to anoint a person one morning, a Protestant man was pumping water from this pump. As the priest was passing, the man held out the bucket which he had in his hand, and said in
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 03:42
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unlucky day for many makers. Friday is an unlucky day for any sick person to leave the bed, as she would take the sickness again. If you begin work on a Saturday you will never finish it. If you met a red-haired woman on Monday you would have bad luck for the week.
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 03:36
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You cut them for wealth,
Cut them on Wednesday
You cut them for news,
Cut them on Thursday
You cut for a new pair of shoes,
Cut them on Friday
You cut them for sorrow,
Cut them on Saturday
You will meet your lover to morrow."

"Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday for the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
Saturday no day at all,
Sunday most unlucky."

Tuesday is the best day for purchasing, the old people would say that of you sold anything on that day, you are supposed to get paid for it or your luck would be past. On a Wednesday if you saw a curlew or a seagull you would be expecting money. Thursday is an
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 03:26
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"Monday's child is fair of face."
"Tuesday's child is full of grace"
"Wednesday's child has far to go"
"Thursday's child is full of woe"
"Friday's child is loving and giving"
"Saturday's child works hard for a living"
"But the child that is born on the Sabboth day is bonnie and bright and good and gay."

"Wash on Monday and you have the week to dry,
Wash on Tuesday much the same,
Wash on Wednesday and you are very keen,
Wash on Thursday and you are very nigh,
Wash on Saturday late indeed."

"Cut your nails on Monday
You cut them for health,
Cut them on Tuesday
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 03:13
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"Salt, mustard,
Vinegar, pepper, pepper."

"I wrote a letter to my friend,
And on my way I dropped it,
Someone must have picked it up,
And put it in her pocket,
The next time you go to the Post Office,
Be careful of your letters,
Drop them in most carefully,
The way you won't forget them."

Young children are very fond of playing in the mud, making castles they say :-
"Black - man, black - man,
Dry up a piece of calico,
And I'll give you a penny,
For a nice sweet loaf"

When they are toasting bread they say :-
"Brown - man, brown - man
Come on my bread "

At bedtime they sing :-
"I don't want to go bed
I'm having too much fun."
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 03:03
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"Ickle, ackle black bottle,
"Ickle, ackle out,
Two and two are a twopenny loaf
And two and two are out."

Rhymes connected with skipping :-
"I am a Girl Guide dressed in blue,
These are the actions I can do,
Stand like this,
Bend my knees,
Salute to the King,
And bow to the Queen."
"Old Mr. Kane is a jolly old man,
He teaches his children all he can,
Reading, writing, arithmetic
He never gets a minute to use his stick."
"January, February, March,
April, May, June,
July, August, September,
October, November, December."
"All in together, girls,
This fine weather, girls.
Nineteen and twenty
Leave the rope empty."
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 02:46
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Would you like the very best ?"
"Little Minnie,
Wore her pinny
Inside out."
"Two little Gypsies,
Lived in a tent,
Could not afford to pay the rent,
The rent man came to put them out
Gypsy, Gypsy,
You are out."
"P, i, g, pig you have the tig,
And if you do not want to play,
Just take your hoop, and run away."
"O, u, t, spells out."
"I met a cockle - woman,
She met me,
I invited her to tea,
"Have a cup of tea mam,"
"No mam," "why mam?"
"Because I have a cough mam"
"Let me hear you coughing mam."
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 02:31
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"Tig" is one of my favourite games. It is played by a group of children. One child reckons and whoever has the "tig" runs off and follows the other children. There are many rhymes used for reckoning :-
"Each, peach, pear, plum,
Who is your best chum ?
And what is her right age?"
"Little men driving cattle,
How does your money rattle ?
One, two, Sky - blue,
All out, but, you "
"Cups and saucers,
Ready for tea,
How many are we ?
One, two, three."
"As I went up a slippery stairs,
I met a box of colours
hich colour in this box,
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 02:22
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"Here comes one Span, one Spanish maid,
I've come to seek your daughter Jane,"
The mother answers :-
My daughter Jane, she is too young,
To be consoled by anyone.
The other girl answers :-
"Let her be young, let her be old,
'Tis for her beauty she must be sold."
The mother answers :-
"Here is my daughter safe and sound,
And in her pocket three hundred pounds,
And on her finger a plain gold ring,
She's fit to marry any king."
Then the other girl takes Jane by the hand and dances saying :-
"You shall have a duck, my dear,
You shall have a servant, to serve you all the year,
And when your husband dies, leave that girl alone,
She shall sing and shall dance,
and clap her hands together."
senior member (history)
2019-07-04 02:05
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"Hide - a - button
is played outdoors. Some child gets a button and the others hide. The child with the button looks for a hole or some place in which to hide it. When it is hidden the child calls out :- "Hide the button" and all the others come in search of the button.
They ask :- "Is it on the ground or on the wall"? and whoever hid it says whether it is on the wall or on the ground and they all begin to search.
They ask :- "Who is the nearest,"?
and when she replies they all crowd round that place. When someone finds it, the button is hidden again.
"Here comes one Span"
This is a lovely game. A group of children stand up and one girl is appointed the mother and one other child begins to sing :-
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 04:10
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a mocking manner.
"Anoint this."
The priest went on, and by the power of God the Protestant was left standing two days with the handle of the pump in his hand and he could not move.
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 04:06
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Also in this ruin are large figures in stone, of a lady and a dog at her feet. People say it is the figure of Isabella, the founder of the town.
There are other stone figures also one being the Bambino stone which is the figure of the Child Jesus in swaddling clothes. There is also a small square opening at the back of the Abbey which is called the lepers' hole. It is said that the lepers received Holy Communion through this opening. There are also underground vaults in this abbey, but olden families have made their burial place here. There is an underground tunnel which is supposed to go under the river and over to the other side.
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 03:52
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tried to remove it he happened to glance in the direction of the river which was facing the Abbey and he saw his wife with a gold Chalice in her hand. She was in a ship which was sinking and in the excitment to tell his companions to save her, he fell from the top and was killed and they say that his body was turned into stone. On Good Friday it bleeds, three drops of blood appear on this stone which is still to be seen.
____
The daughter of an English man came to New Ross and she wished to have Old Ross and New Ross joined together.
She sent to England for two ships, laden with gold, with which to complete her project. She got up in the bell tower of Saint Mary's Abbey to watch them coming safely to New Ross. As they sailed up the Barrow to her dismay she saw them sinking. This sight caused her to fall from the bell-tower to the ground where she was dashed to pieces.
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 03:40
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There is a tradition about Saint Mary's that there is an underground passage from the Abbey to Mountgarret castle through which a piper went and he never came back. If you went to the place in the night at twelve o'clock you would hear him playing the piper's tune still.
--

Once upon a time, a man was climbing the steeple to take down the cross which surrmounted the Abbey. As he
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 03:28
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The following drink is a very good cure for a cold. Take two ounces of Colts foot, and one ounce of ground ivy.
Put them down to boil in about one pint and a half of water. Boil slowly for about twenty minutes. Strain and keep the liquid for use. Add a little sugar to sweeten, or if possible to obtain, honey may be used.
The drink may be taken like tea, about three or four glasses each day while the cold is heavy.
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 03:20
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Take the marshmallow leaf, which is smooth and of a pale purphy pinkish colour.
Some try to get it to grow but cannot, it comes to other's gardens without any trouble and it is supposed to bring good luck to the owners.
Chop the leaf finely and put it in a pan of boiling fat (fresh lard).
Put in a small piece of pure bee's wax.
Strain the mixture and allow to cool.
This makes
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 03:12
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Between fifteen and twenty year's ago a lady by the name of Miss Dunphy N.T. Irish-town heard the Banshee.
One night Miss Dunphy went to bed and after a long sleep she was awakened by a noise.
Her bedroom window faced down the Irish-town.
When she woke up she was dazed by sleep. She heard screams. At first she thought it was the howling of dogs ut as the screaming came nearer it filled the whole vault of the heavens. Then all of a sudden it struck her that it was the Banshee.
The lady got out of bed and went to the maid's room. She woke the maid and told her she had heard the Banshee. Then the maid said "Come on over to the window until we see what she is like."
But Miss Dunphy did not go over. The maid looked out the window and she said : "That's she alright."
"What is she like?" Miss Dunphy asked.
The description she gave her was :-
At first she looked like a huge tangled ball
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 02:58
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of wool but as soon as she came nearer she assumed a woman's form. After a time she sat on the corner of the Bosheen and started keening and combing her hair. After a while she disappeared
That same night the Banshee was heard in Ryleen and in the Maudlins and on that very night a man named Mc. Carthy died in the Maudlins.
It is said that the Banshee follows families whose names begin with "O" or "Mac."
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 02:52
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On St John's Eve there used to be a bonfire on the Fair Green. All the young girls and boys used to have a dance.
On one St John's Eve a girl - who was one of the dancers afterwards on Green - went into the neighbouring church yard, stole the wooden crosses off the graves and with them started the bonfire. While the girl was dancing a sheegee came and swept the girl away and it said that screams of her going through the air were awful and it is said that she was never seen afterwards. And that finished up the dances and fairs at The Fair Green of Nashe.

Faction Leaders :
New Ross : Gunnips, Bearneys.
Nash : Roches, Connicks
Terrarath : Kents
Loughnageer : Whelans
senior member (history)
2019-07-03 02:42
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In years gone by there used to be a fair at Nashe. Where the fair was held called the Fair Green.
When the fair was over the faction fight used to begin. A man would take off his coat and drag it along the ground and say "Any man there to walk on my coat"? Then another man would step on the coat, and then the fight would start.
As there used only be two fairs at Nashe the people in Nashe and in the surrounding districts used to prepare for the faction fights months before the fair by having black thorn sticks and ash plants greased annd soaking in the chimney for months to have them sound.
The young girls of the districts and places near used to fill their stockings with stones to help their men folk in the fight.
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 04:02
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There are gold and silver hidden in Coolback marshes by the bank of the river Barrow. There is a bull minding it. There is treasure consisting of gold and diamonds
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 04:00
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moan which came from under the stone slab. When they heard this they all dropped their implements and ran in great terror.
Some of them jumped in on top of their fathers and mothers in bed they were so frightened.
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 03:57
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 03:56
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There is a story told about an attempt to find treasure which was supposed to be buried in or about old castle on the Town wall here in New Ross. An old cobbler named May said he dreamt three times
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 03:50
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present. It was owned by Mr. Browne. About thirty men were employed there.
There was a leather factory at the bottom of Jones's Hill. The men made a good deal of leather and sold most of it. Mr. Jones owned it. He is dead now but the factory is there still.
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 03:46
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Howletts Browery in Priory Street and Marsh Lane. They made beer and minerals. There were thirty men employed there. They made it out of barley. It is closed seventy years.
Long ago there was a snuff and tobacco factory in Mary St. New Ross. A man named Jeffars owned it. There were abut five hundred men working in it. At that time all the farmers used to grow tobacco, and they used to sell it, to Mr Jeffars. He used to manufacture it, into blocks of tobacco.
About the year 1905 a large bacon factory in Marsh Lane was
closed. It was worked for many years before it's closing and a very big business was done. Mr. Kehoe was the owner at the time of it's closing.
About fifty years ago there was a factory in Mary St, owned by a man named Jeffars. The snuff was made from tobacco leaf. The men used to grind the leaf and when it would be ground fine it would be stuff.
There was a rope factory in New Ross long ago. It is called the Rope Walks at
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 03:20
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But such was not the case. The thought then came into his head that he might have joined the Army, as recruits were badly wanted.
The Boer War was in full swing at that time. He went to the "Listing Sergeant" as he was called, but he did not enlist any man by that name.
The River Barrow was constantly dragged, and all hopes of finding him over.
As some fishermen were out fishing one evening, about three weeks' afterwards, they saw some dark object, in the River. They came to it, and found the body of poor James Furlong, caught in one of the chains, which tied the boats on the Quay. They immediately gave word to the police, who came along, brought the body out, and
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 03:11
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in which he was seen was a stationer's shop on the quay. The people then began to surmise, that the night being so bright, when he came out of the shop he mistook the river Barrow for the road, walked into it, and was drowned.
Men were employed to drag the river, but of no avail. The body was not found.
His people got courage, and began on the search, around the Country. His brother got word from some people that they had seen him in certain places. He used to travel to those places, but on inquiries it was not his brother.
He was almost frantic, travelling night and day. He got word of a man being seen in Enniscorthy very like him, near the police barracks
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 03:02
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Boland's public house in Ballywilliam. John said it was all right, so John and the other men yoked their horses, and returned home. It was about 9 o'clock when they reached Ballywilliam, but James Furlong was not waiting for them there.
They thought he might have been too tired and went home.
They then after taking a drink returned home.
James did not turn up that night, so his sister wondered what had happened. She sent home word to Ballybawn to the home place. Her brother, Walter, immediately went to Ross, and made inquiries, but could not trace him. He raised the alarm then, and told the police. They went on a search. The last place
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 02:53
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belonged to John Redmond, and the others, being neighbours, were helping him to draw it for him.
After selling and unloading the corn, they went to an eating house, and had their dinner.
They did some business then, bought provisions, and other things. They had a few drinks also, but were not intoxicated
Just before coming home in the evening, they happened to go into a public house on the quay. There they met with James Furlong.
They started treating one another and had a good many drinks.
It was getting late, and James had to return on the train, John Redmond wanted him to come home with them, but he would not. He told John he would go by train, and meet them at
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 02:44
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six miles from New Ross. It takes only about a quarter of an hour to go from Rathgarogue Station to New Ross by train. There is a Teacher's residence attached to the Rathgarogue School, and James lived in this with his sister, who acted as housekeeper for him.
Every Saturday James went by train to New Ross on his business.
The people of Ballybawn, where James was reared always go to New Ross, for their marketing, as it is their nearest market town, and no Saturday passed by without James seeing some of his neighbours from Ballybawn.
It so happened on this Saturday John Redmond, Bartle Furlong, James Whelan, and Thomas Ryan went to Ross, with loads of corn, a distance of 9 miles. The corn
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 02:34
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The following story I heard John Redmond, Ballybawn, relating to my father. He was about years of age at that time.
John Redmond was a prominent leader of the farmers during the Land League in this parish.
James Furlong, was the Principal Teacher of Rathgarogue Boys' School in 1903. He was born and reared in Ballybawn, and was a neighbour of John Redmond as both farms were joining each other. James was Monitor in the Rathnure Boys' School, of which my father Patrick Bolger was Principal Teacher. After his fifth year he passed for Drumcondra Training College, and after his two years' course, got Principal teacher of Rathgarogue Boys' School.
This place is situated about
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 02:24
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to pay the steward for the grazing.
They went riding on horseback, as they wanted to exercise their horses.
As they approached the avenue gate leading from the road, James was in the act of dismounting, but had not to do so, as the gate opened, let both pass through, and closed again.
When they came to the second gate, the same thing happened, and when they came to the last gate, the same thing occurred.
They saw nothing, or heard nothing, but the gates opened and closed of their own accord. Coming home, the same thing happened.
He said this happened early in the night. It was a winter's night, but dark, and only between 7 and 8 o'clock.
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 02:13
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This ghost was never seen there afterwards, and from that day to this, that special place is known as
"The Devil's Skeough."
The mark of the Cross which the priest cut on the bark is still to be seen. The man who was killed there was supposed to be drunk, and fell out of the care there, and was killed.
About thirty years ago I heard James Hughes, Gurrawn telling a story that happened to himself and his brother Richard one night as they went to transact some business with Mr. Orpen's land steward in Monksgrange.
From the avenue gate at the entrance to this man's house there are three other gates. They had cattle grazing on Mr. Orpen's pasture land, and they went this night
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 02:02
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They kept him that night, and in the morning he was not the better of the fright. His nerves were shaken, so they advised him to go and tell what had happened to the Priest.
The Parish Priest, at this time in Rathnure, was Fr. Myles Doran.
This happened about 68 years ago.
Pat Conroy went that evening to him and told the tale. The priest knew by Pat, that he was very nervous, and did not seem himself. He told Pat, that other people saw this same spirit, and he would go with him now to this spot and banish it.
Fr. Doran and Pat went to the place. Fr. Doran said some prayers, and cut the "Sign of the Cross" on the bark of the haw-thorn tree with his penknife.
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 01:50
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Coming near this place, Pat saw a large black dog, and as he was approaching nearer, he thought the dog was growing bigger. He had two fiery eyes, like large balls of fire. The use was leaving Pat's limbs, and he put his hand on his head to keep his cap from rising.
He scrambled on as best he could until he reached the first house by the roadside. These people were in bed. Pat knocked at the door, and shouted, "For God's sake leave me in. I cannot walk further". The man of the house whose name was Pat O'Leary opened the door and when Pat Conroy entered, he fell down in a swoon
Pat's wife got up, and both Pat and his wife had great difficulty restoring him to consciousness.
senior member (history)
2019-07-02 01:41
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whip in his hand. Just as they passed through the gateway, all vanished. He closed the gate, and with the fright, the use left his legs, and he had to sit down for a while until he recovered. Ever afterwards he made sure to come home early in the evenings, and was never caught out after nightfall.
Another night Pat Conroy was going home to Monksgrange from Killanne, he had to pass by a place where a man was killed years before. Pat was working at Mr Orpen's, Monksgrange, and he was playing cards in a house, with other men and boys in Killanne. It was after midnight when he was passing by this place. There was a white-thorn tree growing just at this spot.
senior member (history)
2019-07-01 04:01
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To cure a bad cut or a bruise
get the inner rind of an elder tree, chop it up and put it into a saucepan with some fresh lard and a small lump of bees'-wax.
Place on the fire and allow to draw for some time. When cool this forms an ointment, which if applied a few times to cuts or bruises will heal them
Sprains :-
There is a herb called "Comfrey" which has a root like a potato, and when this is chopped up very finely and mixed with the white
of egg it forms a liniment which is a good cure for sprains
Another cure for a sprain is to hold it under a spout of running water until the affected part becomes numbed, repeat this about three times and the sprain will be cured.
senior member (history)
2019-07-01 03:44
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or "baneens ad armed with their reaping forks. Then the farmer passed through them and having eyed them all picked out those that he considered most suitable for his work.
The Mummers -
Mumming is still a favourite winter past-time among the working classes in County Wexford.
A Set of Mummers is composed of sixteen men or boys who dress in quaint coloured costumes representing historical Irish characters, etc. They then go through a sort of figure-dancing saying comic rhymes, and beating time to the music with their wooden batons. During the Mumming season each farmer in turn gives a free night to the Mummers. He supplies a supper and allows them the use of his barn where the "Mummers Ball" is carried
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2019-07-01 03:32
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The Hiring Fair :-
Up to about twenty years ago it was a custom in Wexford for all servant boys and girls to leave their employment on the 2nd May - the biggest fair of the year, and parade the streets with their bundles under their arms for the purpose of hiring with a new master or mistress, or re-hiring with their former one. Farmers in need of a servant attended this fair for the purpose of securing one.
It was known as the "fair of the boys and girls," or the Hiring Fair." Then again at the beginning of the harvest we had another "hiring fair" when all men and boys wishing to be employed at harvest work or women who wished to be employed as "binders" attended the fair. At a certain time all the men lined up in a double row wearing their "weskits"
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2019-07-01 03:11
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was an unmerciful scream and the man with the cloven foot was seen to vanish through the roof.
The room where this occurred is know as the 'Haunted room' and the present occupants of the house always keep it locked, and we are told that there is an impression on the wall of something like a hand where the mysterious person is supposed to have touched when passing through the roof, and though this has been plastered over many times it can never be effaced.
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2019-07-01 03:05
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There is a house known as Tottenham Green House about two miles from Taghmon in the County Wexford and one night the family invited a few friends to a card party.
At a table at which four men played they noticed that one man seemed to get all the winnings - no matter what game they played, he could not be beaten. During the course of a game a card happened to fall on the floor and on stooping to pick it up the owner of the card got a most awful fright, as what did he see under the table but a 'cloven foot' - it was that of the man who was winning all night. He refused to play any longer, and without saying anything he got some holy water and sprinkled it all over the room. Immediately there
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2019-07-01 02:31
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A woman by the name of Anne Byrne was working Tom Cowmans' of Yoletown.
One morning she went out to bring in the cows and she saw a hare milking one of the cows. She walked over to the cow and caught the hare, she drove home the cows and brought the hare with her. The Cowmans would not touch the hare, as they let her off again. This woman lived somewhere near Bohanna's once upon a time.
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2019-07-01 02:25
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A hare still is seen at times entering the Graveyard in Ballylannon at midnight where it sets up a loud keening like the bawl of a child. It goes along the railway line for a half a mile and then crosses out to the ruins of the Seven Castles of Clonmines which are just across the river.
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2019-07-01 02:16
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5. "If a poker and tongs cost 3 and 2. (pence)
What will a cwt of coal come to."
Ans. "Ashes."
6. "If a body met a body
In a narrow lane,
Could a body tell a body,
What a body means."
7. " 'Tis black + white and re(a)d all over"
Ans "Newspaper.
8. "Black within and black without
Many a nice thing goes in and out."
Ans. "An oven"
9. "What is it women are always looking for but don't like to find it."
Ans. "A hole in the heel of a stocking"
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2019-07-01 02:04
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"I have a piece of linen
That was never wove or spun,
It covers the whole wide world,
But the little shining sun."
Answer: "Snow".
"As I went into my father's hall
I met a man who let a call
His beard was flesh, his mouth was horn
There never was such a man born".
Ans. "The Cock."
"I have a wild boar at home
The more I give him, the more he roars,
The less I give him, the less he roars."
Ans "A Mill"
"It goes around the wood
And round the wood,
But never goes into it".
Answer "The Bark"
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2019-06-30 03:58
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There is a rath in Rathfarden in County Wexford and it is said that it is not lucky to go inside or to cut a bush or tree on it or to plough its land.
A man that owned the rath dug it and sowed cabbage in it and he was a cripple for the rest of his life.
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2019-06-30 03:54
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It is said that some priest was saying Mass on top of Sliabh Coillte, about four or five miles outside New Ross. Whilst the Holy Sacrifice was being offered the English soldiers happened to be passing through that particular part and saw the priest.
It was the custom of the priests to keep their horses tied to a tree or pole nearby in case they would be caught by
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2019-06-30 03:47
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About two miles from New Ross town on Mrs Browne's farm is a field in which is an old rath.
This field is situated on a high hill off the Nash Road in the towns land of Ballylane. It is about 200 yards round and is also surrounded by a trench and is raised off the level ground. It is entered by climbing across the trench and up the steep bank which is in some places covered by furze bushes.
It appears to have been surrounded by a high wall in olden times, because at a close observation of the ground a trace of a wall may be seen. In the centre of the rath is a large stone about two feet in height and three and a half feet in length and two feet in breadth. On the right side of the rath is a ditch and on it is a mulberry tree which in the Autumn
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2019-06-30 03:36
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Some miles outside New Ross in the townsland of Knockmullen is a house owned by a man named Murray. The old people say that where this house is situated, there was about ninety years ago a starch mill.
A wide stream of water flows beside this place and this water-way divides the Parish of New-Ross from the Parish of Terrarath.
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2019-06-30 03:32
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About three miles outside this town is the townsland of Camblin there are fields owned by Mr. Brennan and one of these fields was discoered about thirty or forty years ago to be a graveyard. Its owner began to till it and on ploughing it, upturned some old tombstones.
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2019-06-30 03:28
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is covered with mulberries.
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2019-06-30 03:21
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Tristan, King Mark, in his anger, buried them apart; but an ivy growing from the breast of Tristan, met another growing from the grave of Isolde, and the two plants, entwining, convinced the King that the union of the lovers was pure and undying, and caused him to repent of his anger and bury them together.
Palm is an emblem of victory. Branches of palm are blessed on Palm Sunday, to remind us of Our Lord's triumphal entry into Jerusalem, when the people strewed the way before him with branches of palm. The faithful get palm and bring it home from Mass with them. They put it safely to keep until the following year, when they get fresh branches of palm. They burn the old branches. They consider it lucky and will be victorious in all their undertakings by keeping the palm.
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2019-06-30 03:11
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ore fruit. God allowed the holly to blossom to honour the birth of His Divine Son. The crimson berries remind us of His Precious Blood which He shed for our Salvation.
The Ivy is another Christmas decoration. It is a climbing plant.
It climbs by means of sucker-like discs which attach themselves to walls and trees, or by means of close twining tendrils. It has waxy-green leaves. The small greenish flowers are succeeded by lack berries.
Ivy is a symbol of clinging love.
The altar of Hymen, the Greek god of marriage, whose blessing was invoked at every wedding, was kept green with ivy. When Isolde, in the old Irish legend of Tristan and Isolde, immortalized in Wagner's opera, died, lamenting the death of
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2019-06-30 03:01
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in German and Norse mythology, and it was with an arrow from its wood that the beautiful god Balder was slain.
The mistletoe was said to bring happiness, safety, and good fortune so long as it did not touch the ground.
Perhaps this is the reason why to-day we always hang up the mistletoe. The Celts had the plant in veneration, especially when found on the oak.
Holly is another decoration for Christmas. The holly was known to the Romans as the "Sharp Leaf"
It was called by the Christians in the olden days "The Holy Tree" and afterwards "The Holly Tree."
In Irish it is called "Cuileann."
There are numerous legends concerning holly in connection with the birth of Christ. When Christ was born, the trees burst forth into blossom and
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2019-06-30 02:48
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The Mistletoe is a familiar Christmas decoration with its waxen white berries and glossy evergreen leaves.
It never takes root in the ground, but is a parasite that grows from a sucker root on the trunks of other trees.
It appears as a bushy growth with many forking branches, often four feet long. It has oval leaves and tiny yellow blossoms, followed by the little white berries that ripen after snow falls. It grows in greatest abundance on the apple tree in an orchard. It is rarely found on the oak
The birds eat the pulpy berries. Flying from tree to tree, they carry the seeds, which lodge in the bark and grow.
Because of its peculiar character the mistletoe played a prominent part
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2019-06-30 02:38
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Throughout Ireland the people honour St. Patrick by wearing St Patrick's Crosses on his Feast Day.
These Crosses are made of a piece of strong paper or thin cardboard, covered with silk green ribbon and tinsel, entwined with shamrock, and worn in the coats of men, women, and children on that day.
The Shamrock, is also worn by Irish people no matter where they are, to honour St Patrick, because it was with the shamrock, he taught the mystery of the Blessed Trinity to the Pagans.
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2019-06-30 02:26
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The bedroom in which she was sleeping was haunted. The first night she went to sleep there, she put a small table by the bed-side. On this she had a candle in a candlestick, and a book which she was reading. She had a chair also by her bedside, on which she put her clothes.
When in bed and after extinguishing the candle, the noise began. She thought she heard footsteps coming up the stairs, and into the room. She then heard the lower drawer of the wardrobe pulling out and then put back again. She covered her head with the bed-clothes, and was not able to sleep during the night.
In the morning when she awoke she found that the candle and candlestick, & the book which
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2019-06-30 02:17
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were placed on the small table near her bed, and her clothes which were on the chair beside the bed, were all taken and laid in the corner of the room.
When she got up that morning she thought of what she could do, not to sleep in that room again; so she told the Steward, as Mrs. Bruen was in London at that time. The steward told her to prepare another room which was vacant. The rooms in which the other maids slept were not haunted, and this room which he told her about was all right too, as some visitors had slept in it, and there were no complanits.
She did as he told her, but was very nervous, all the same.
After a week Mrs Bruen
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2019-06-30 02:07
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returned home. The housekeeper told her the story, so Mrs Bruen said it was a mistake on her part not to tell her about this room, as a housekeeper she had at one time slept in it, and had the same story to tell.
Up to the time the Building was burned, that room was always vacant, and no one was put to sleep in it afterwards.
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2019-06-30 02:03
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There was a carpenter named Michael Furlong coming home to Coolbawn from his work in a farmer's house in Ballybawn, about sixty years ago. Just as he opened Coolbawn gate which leads to the avenue, he stepped to one side to leave a carriage drawn by a pair of horses pass by. The Coachman was sitting in the Coachman's seat, and a
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2019-06-30 01:57
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I often heard the old people relating stories of ghosts which were seen in this district, when I was a child of seven or eight years.
I am now 56 1/2 years and I remember many of them.
James Murphy, Rathnure, who is dead ten years ago told the following:-
He was in a place called Askinfarney, playing cards in a friend's house. It was midnight, and he made a short-cut through Coolbawn demense. As he was coming along the avenue, he heard noise like a carriage coming along. The night was dark and he stepped to one side to let it pass. He could see nothing, but the noise still continued, and at last he felt something pass like a gust of wind.
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2019-06-30 01:47
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He thought his hat began to rise up off his head, so he put up his hand to keep it down, and at the same time he could feel the perspiration oozing out of him. He took to his heels as fast as he could until he reached the gate leading to the avenue. Once outside of it, the noise stopped, and he could hear nothing. He never went that way afterwards. This place is supposed to be haunted, since the death of an agent, named Mr. Bolton, who worked for Mr Bruen. He was a very severe cruel man, and it is supposed he still goes around in his carriage. Very few people go through this demense after nightfall.
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2019-06-30 01:40
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Another story was told by a house-keeper who was in charge of the Building while Mr Bruen was away.
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2019-06-29 03:47
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Mrs Quigley told her story to the Parish Priest. Rev. Peter Doyle, and all was right afterwards. Some person smeared the door posts with butter in order to take the butter from Quigleys and bring it to themselves.
There were several other cases like this in the district in former times.
Other people used to put a florin in a hen's nest in order to take away the profit of the eggs from the fowl.
If there was any delay in churning oftentimes people got the coulter of a plough, reddened it in the fire, and put it under the churn to run the fairies.
There were other people who skimmed the spring wells on the 1st of May, in order to take the butter from the people.
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2019-06-29 03:39
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There were several other people in this district who could not get any butter from the churning.
Mrs Quigley, Monamolin, told me this story. One morning when the household arose, and some members of the family going out in the yard to feed the animals, were surprised to see the door-posts of the dwelling house and cow house smeared with butter. It was the churning day, and no matter how long they kept on churning they could get no butter.
They had to give the milk to the pigs.
During that week they churned three times, with the same result. Of course it was a big loss to them, as they had a big stock of cows, and a plentiful supply of milk, but could get no butter, and they tried every plan, by heating it, and bringing it to the proper temperature.
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2019-06-29 03:24
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the centre of a field. The door of the cabin was closed, but the window was open. Just as the hare was jumping through the cabin window one of the hounds pulled a piece of fur out of her hip, but she got through, and into the cabin. When James O'Leary came to the cabin, he found the hounds standing at the window panting, and a piece of fur in one of their mouths.
He was surprised. He opened the door and went inside, thinking he would find the hare, and in the bed in a corner near the fire was an old woman, with a wound in her hip.
James O'Leary found out the cause then that his cows gave no milk in the mornings. This old woman was a witch, and was able to take the form of a hare when she wanted to do destruction. It is supposed the Caulfield families of Grange are her descendents.
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2019-06-29 03:13
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and resides there since her birth.
She is 67 years of age, and her Aunt gave her the following information
She died about 40 years ago, and the story she received from her mother.
A man by the name of James O'Leary, Grange, had a large farm.
He had twelve milking cows. During the summer time, the cows were out in the fields by night and day. His men used to milk the cows night and morning. The got the milk every evening from the cows all right, but in the mornings they could not get a drop. Some one had already milked them.
One morning he got up very early to watch. He saw a hare sucking the cows. He ran home, got his two greyhounds and set them after the hare. They followed her about 1 1/2 miles until she came to a small cabin in
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2019-06-29 03:00
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churn. On the lid there is a rubber band, an air valve, and a piece of circular glass by which means one can see how the churning is progressing without taking off the lid. The churning is done by means of a rolling motion. Turn the handle and the churn goes end over end. The butter is made when the glass is clear. The milk is taken out of the churn, and the butter left inside. It is washed, and the butter taken out on a butter-sieve by means of a scoop, and put on the butter-worker. Salt is shaken on it, and mixed well through it, and then made into rolls ready for use.
There are several old tales told in this district about churning and the making of butter.
The following story was told to me by Mrs Kiely, Grange, Rathnure, who live's in Grange at the present time.
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2019-06-29 02:48
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was taken out of it. It was then salted, washed again, and made into nice rolls, fit for use.
The buttermilk was taken out of the churn, and kept for use in pans or cans. Buttermilk was used and is used at the present time for making home-made bread, and some people use it with porridge.
Buttermilk is also a wholesome drink.
In the Summer time when the milk is plentiful the people churn three or four times in the week, but in Winter, once a week, and it takes longer in Winter to make the butter than in the Summer time.
At the present time the churning is done in a different way, and the churns are also different.
The churn used now is shaped like a barrel, and called an end-over-end
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2019-06-29 02:40
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was skimmed off the top of the pans and put into the churn. The dash was then put in, and the lid put on. The churning then started. The members of the household did the churning, by raising the dash up and down.
If a neighbour, or any person happened to come in while the churning was going on he gave help, because it was considered unlucky if he did not.
The churning progressed until the milk "cracked" that is, the milk looked like little curds. Boiling water was then added, to give additional heat to the milk. The work then went on slowly until the butter formed in the churn.
The work ceased. The lid was then taken off, and the dash taken out.
The butter was taken out of the churn with butter spades and put into a keeler. It was washed well with clean cold water until all the buttermilk
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2019-06-29 02:30
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In former times churning was done in a different way than at the present time. Up to twenty years ago the churning was done with a dash lifted up and down with the hands.
The churn was of a round shape, wide at the bottom, getting narrow, coming towards the neck, and getting wider at the top. There was a lid on it, with a round hole in the centre for the dash to go through. The dash was like a long pole, with a part of a round shape at the end, through which there were parts cut off.
The cows were milked, as at present, twice a day. The milk was strained through a strainer, into shallow earthenware pans, to set. The cream then came to the top. The churn was well scalded and cleaned. The cream
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2019-06-28 04:12
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toothache again.
Sore Eyes :- Bathe the eyes with cold tea about three times a day and it will remove bloodshot and soreness.
Heartburn :- A small quantity of common bread-soda (about what would fit on a sixpence). if taken in water will cure heatyburn and aid digestion.
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2019-06-28 04:07
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herb of seven cures on account of its great healing power,
A "charm for safety" was made by plucking ten blades of yarrow, one of these was cast aside and the remaining nine were put in the stocking under the heel of the right foot, then the traveller could go forth on his journey in safety as the 'Evil One' had no power over him.
Speedwell was used as a remedy for gout; eyebright as a lotion for weak eyes and it was even said to have the power to restore lost sight. A bundle of mint tied around the wrist was said to preserve the wearer from infection, while a decoction of nettles gathered in a graveyard was a cure for dropsey.
The distilled juice of Nightshade given in a drink will make a person believe whatever is wished, while ten leaves of
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2019-06-28 03:50
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hemlock dried and mixed with food or drink were considered to be a powerful "love potion".
The rind of the elder tree boiled with mutton suet cures a burn without leaving a scar, and the Mullein plant is highly valued for chest trouble, while marigolds steeped in vinegar and rubbed on the teeth were a remedy for toothache.
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2019-06-28 03:39
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According to the old herb-doctors and wise women there were seven herbs of great power -
Vervain, St. John's Wort, Speedwell,
Mallow, Yarrow, Eyebright and Self-help, and along with these were ground-ivy, fox-glove, groundsel, hazel, the bark of elder, and the shoots of young hawthorn, but in order to be endowed with their powers it was necessary to gather them on a sunny day at noon when the moon was at its full and allow them to rest for a while in the hand of a dead man.
Verbain was regarded as a holy herb and was used to cure Scrofula & the bite of rabid animals, to restore friendships and to be the pledge of good faith.
Yarrow was known as the
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2019-06-28 03:27
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of salt over which two rushes were placed crosswise. If the child this treated did not speak before nightfall more dramatic treatment was necessary. Instantaneous changes were supposed to take place when the child spoke or screamed - the fairy child vanishing and the stolen child being restored.
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2019-06-28 03:23
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Whooping Cough - If anyone should pass by riding a piebald horse the father or mother of the whooper runs after him crying out : - "You that rides the piebald horse; what's good for the chin cough ?
Whatever the rider prescribes, no matter how absurd, is got and given to the patient.
Another cure was to pass the child three times over and under a donkey, certain prayers being said during the operation.
Parents in these times often believed that the fairies had taken their children, substituting a fairy for it, and in order to get the child back they had different remedies.
One was to put the supposed fairy child on a bed outside the clothes, his feet on the bolster and his head at the foot, on his chest was placed a plate
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2019-06-28 03:11
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in the water of a spring well, not a drop of the mixture should spill, and the vessel containing it should not be put on the ground till the patient drank all the mixture.
They believed that carrying a hare's foot about you was a cure for the Colic; or standing on one's head for a quarter of an hour.
Three drops of sow's milk was recommended for epilepsy.
Bathing on Good Friday cured the itch, and a cure for headache was to wear the tooth of a corpse.
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2019-06-28 03:03
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The Old Irish had a great knowledge of medicinal herbs and salves, but medicinal knowledge was usually engrafted on superstition.
Many of their diseases they attributed to fairy strokes, thus charms and spells entered largely into medicinal treatment.
An old Irish recipe for Dysentery was to take three + half pounds of iron, heat it till red-hot then plunge it into three quarts of milk until it cools; this operation to be performed three times till the milk is boiled down to three pints.
A recipe for a Sprain was to mix the broken roots of marshmallows with hog's lard and apples as a plaster.
Certain prayers were to be said while herbs were being pulled, the herbs were to be boiled only
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2019-06-28 02:45
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There is a road near my house in Coolcull leading from Coolraheen to Horetown and the "dead carriage" is supposed to be seen on it every night after twelve o'clock.
The people in the locality tell us they often hear the prance of the horses and it shakes the house when passing.
One man tells how he was on this road at midnight and this mysterious carriage passed him. He could hear the prance of horses but could not see them and on looking at the carriage he recognised the faces of people who had died some years before. On passing, a terrible fear and trembling seized him and he fell in a weakness on the road and was found by the neighbours
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2019-06-28 02:34
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There is a large mound in a field in Coolraheen from which our townsland derives its name, (Cúl-Raithín), and it is known as the "fairy rath."
One night a man dreamt that there was a Pot of Gold hidden in the middle of this rath. He told some of his friends about it and one night three of them set out to dig for the gold.
They dug for a whole night with no success, but they thought they heard some strange sounds inside the rath.
Next night they returned at the same time and proceeded to dig but they were suddenly frightened by terrible roars and they ran away in terror.
They plucked up courage to return the third night
senior member (history)
2019-06-28 02:16
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At a place called Forest about half a mile from the village of Taghmon there is a meeting house and a quakers' graveyard which is said to be haunted and people never like to pass there at a late hour at night.
A local farmer needed some earth to manure his land and as there was what he considered good stuff in the quakers graveyard he thought he would draw some of it. All his workmen refused to do the job for him so he yoked his horse, drew the earth himself, and spread it on the land.
During the late hours of the following night as some neighbours were returning home they thought it strange to hear men and horses working in this particular field, and next day they
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2019-06-28 02:00
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Slevoy Castle, only a few hundred yards from my house, was always known to be haunted, and the following story is quite common around the locality.
It was then occupied by the late Colonel Piggot and his family, and they were all keen followers of the hunt.
One night they were entertaining some friends, and as they were giving a toast to the old Colonel, someone cracked a whip and as he did, the sounds of horses, hounds and horns could be heard outside. It was then about midnight and as they looked out they beheld the whole lawn crowded with horses, hounds and huntsmen.
Some of them recognised to be neighbours and members of the Piggot family who had
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2019-06-27 03:54
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he saw a great town. He saw sand come up on it and saw it disappear
It was the Buried City.
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2019-06-27 03:51
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One night some years ago a man named Mr Barry locked himself up in a room. There was a bridge near his window and he saw the banshee sitting on it every night.
This night he had a loaded gun in the room and he intended shooting her when she would appear. When she appeared he opened the window and fired at her. The next morning he went out to the bridge where he banshee was sitting the night before and instead of seeing the banshee dead he saw those words in blood on the bridge
"Woe to the man who fired the shot."
After a few days the man went out of his mind and died shoortly after.
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2019-06-27 03:44
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and at the Station Hill, and at the
The School House at Grange a big white light is seen at Grange School house; many people have seen it lately.
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2019-06-27 03:41
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and it is called Banvils Rock, and the wood around it is called Banvils Rock wood. How the Rock and wood got this name was because two people lived there named Nellie and Peggie Banvil. The rock can be seen there still and some little marks of the house.

(3) There is a very high hill near a rath in the locality.
A black dog is seen there every night and a red and blue light are seen there also and no-one likes passing there after dark. As they think they would see the black dog or the lights.

(4) An old house near the Paul is said to be haunted and a man is supposed to be seen there certain times of the year. A ball of fire is supposed to come through it any hour after twelve o'clock.
Other white lights are seen there every night also.
(5) Other lights are seen at the old church of Bannow
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 03:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1) Long ago in the wood opposite to Mr Philip Ryan's cottage there was a road. Leading to Cullenstown.
In that wood there were big holes.
It is said that a man and woman that were poor and had a lot of children lived at the end of the road.
They were both very cruel to the children and one night they threw one of the children down in the hole. For a very long time after the child could be heard crying at night and a light is sometimes seen there at night.
Others say that there was a plague and that the people said that if some - one was buried alive it would go away and they buried a child.
There is a rock in the woods of Grange near the Green Road
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 03:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
concert in Carrig - on - Bannow.
It was eleven o'clock and they were in a donkey and car.
When they were passing the rath they saw a yellowish beam of light flash across the road in front of the car.
At first they thought it was wild-fire, but they knew wild-fire would not be so near the ground.
They then knew they had been the witnesses of some feat of extraordinary supernatural power.
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 03:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1) The last field to the right as you go down to the Old Quay is called the Rope Walk field. Ropemaking must have been carried on there in years gone by. There were limekilns and brickworks at the Old Quay too. Every farmer used lime at the lime on his land. It was great for the land though I often heard the rhyme,
Lime on land without manure,
Makes a father and son poor.
There are two other Quays farther up "Boyd's Quay" which is under Scarview and "King's Quay" which is opposite King's Gate on the Mine Road. Ships used to come in years gone by and go up to those
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 02:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two fairy forts in the district of Bannow. On is Crosby's rath on the top of the Hill of Graigue.
It is round in shape and just inside the gate. The people, who own the field, in which the rath is, never plough that part of the field.
A story is told of a man who ploughed that part of the field
The next morning the horses were all pairs.
There is another rath in Newtown right beside the sea. One night a man was going by this rath when he found a bag of coal
He brought home the bag of coal and burned it. It burned the same as ordinary coal.
Lights are said to be seen in Crosby's rath.
Even as late as the 31st May (1938) three girls named Eveline Maddock, Philomena and Eileen Colfer, John Colfer and Mrs. Colfer were returning from a ninety - eight commemoration
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 02:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two fairy forts in the district of Bannow. On is Crosby's rath on the top of the Hill of Graigue.
It is round in shape and just inside the gate. The people, who own the field, in which the rath is, never plough that part of the field.
A story is told of a man who ploughed that part of the field
The next morning the horses were all pairs.
There is another rath in Newtown right beside the sea. One night a man was going by this rath when he found a bag of coal
He brought home the bag of coal and burned it. It burned the same as ordinary coal.
Lights are said to be seen in Crosby's rath.
Even as late as the 3st May (1938) three girls named Eveline Maddock, Philomena and Eileen Colfer, John Colfer and Mrs. Colfer were returning from a ninety - eight commemoration
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 02:40
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rejected
awaiting decision
I was going to bed one night and I saw all of a sudden a tall woman standing in the middle of the floor.
In the house beside us there was a woman sick so I dressed up and went into the house. The woman was dead.
I went home again and I got into bed and I thought I could feel the bedclothes lifting up and coming down again. One time I really thought they fell out on the floor and came in again.
(4) There was a rath one time in Furlong's field on the hill of Carrig and there was a font in the rath. One time they were building a new pig house and they brought this font and put it in it. They put it tight in the wall and when the house was ready they let in the lot of young pigs in it. When they went out in the morning to let out the pigs they found them all dead and the font back again in its place.
(5) One might late a man went to cut a sally tree on the green road. When he had it cut and was bringing it away he heard a man shouting "Put back that sallie tree". He saw a man looking out over the ditch and he ran away and he felt the big man following him down the road
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 02:25
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rejected
awaiting decision
(1) There was a ship wrecked years ago at the Bar of Bannow.
The ship had come from Greece.
It is said that the sailors can be heard crying for help. At a special time every year they can be heard shouting and crying for help.
(2) One night a man was going into the Churchyard to take a skull out from a tomb.
When he put his hand in something caught him by the hand and drew him in and he was never heard of afterwards.
(3) The old people said that two dogs used to run up and down the road near the School every night. A man waited one night to catch them but they caught hold of him and brought him away.
senior member (history)
2019-06-27 02:16
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awaiting decision
(1) Stephen Roche (great grandfather of James Roche above) lived where Kinsella's are now living on the Hill of Graigue, Bannow.
He joined the Insurgents in '98 and fought in the battle of Tubberneering. He was wounded in the knee and was lame for the rest of his life. They used to call him Lame Stephen. One of that family married in The Moor and lived there till they were evicted. They were wrongly evicted because they went with the rent and it would not be taken.
The house was closed up and the land was divided between James Kane of the Pound and William Brown of the Moor. Brown lived where Cullens of the forge are living. The heap of stones near where Mrs. Sarah Monaghan lives is the ruins of the house.
(2) John Kane of Brandane has a field over the strand at Blackhall. It is called the "Pepper Field".
The rent of this field was 3 grains of pepper and it used to be paid to Boyses the landlords.
(3) There are three families who have rights on the green of Bannow.
Andy Cullen of the Bay has the right to keep a heap of manure there. You'll always see the heap of manure in the field. He can
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 04:40
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awaiting decision
I always heard there was a brrewery in the Island. It was up near the Noordeen in Mr Careys land. They used to make whiskey and porter in it and bring it up to Waterford in one night and be back again in the morning. It was only a timber house at the end of the lane. Patt Staunton was ploughing the field for Mr Carey and he ploughed up some of the ashes and cinders near it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 04:33
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awaiting decision
This story tells that when old Major Boyse of Bannow House died he was being buried. The four horses that were under the hearse were not able to pull the corpse.
There was a Catholic man near by and he took off his coat which had his rosary beads in its pocket and he laid it on the horses' backs and they immediately went ahead with the funeral.
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 04:25
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awaiting decision
in townland of Haggard. No family of that name lived there in recent years but name has come down from ancestors.
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 04:23
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Body Road
This name is given to section of road through hollow by Cross of the Green Road between Hill of the Toker and Hill of Carrig.

Moor Road (2)
The road from Cross at foot of Hill of Graigue to Cross on Newtown Road is also called the Moor Road as the moor lies beside it. Close to this road are the ruins of Newtown Castle.

A straight section on road from Blackhall to Ballygow is called "The Long Walk". It gets this name as a walk from Bannow House - residence of the Boyce family - runs from Grange and is continued after crossing the road on a sort of raised fence to the beach at Blackhall. This was a private walk for the Boyce family and the beach at the end of the walk was private also.

Moor Lane
This laneway connects off the High road from close to Berry Bridge and serves some small homes on the Moor and passes out on the second Moor Road near bounds of Newtown.

Shea's Lane
This lane leads to farm lands
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 04:06
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awaiting decision
Rath Road
This narrow rugged road drops to the sea from the Newtown Road near Mr Morris's.
A rath on the edge of the sea near its termination gives it its name.

Haggard Road
This is a road leading from cross Road known as "Sweep of Haggard" to the sea, and turning East by the edge of the sea it passes over high cliff to the entrance to Blackhall Strand.

BlackHall Road
This road runs from Blackhall Cross to the sea at a pretty strand (which is becoming increasingly popular) known as Blackhall Strand. Several farmhouses and cottages are by this road.

Moor Road
This road runs from Rectory Cross (at gate of Rectory) to Moor Cross. It is narrow and rather spongy and gets its name from Moorish land through which it passes.

High Road
This is the chief road of District coming directly from village of Carrig through Hill of Carrig, Grange, Graigue, Blackhall, The Moor, Haggard, Vernegyle, Bannow, Brandane and ending at Church lane which leads to old Church of Bannow
Its length is roughly about 4 English Miles.
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 03:32
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rejected
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Vernegyle Road.
This road runs from the School Cross at Bannow in a North Westerly direction to the Moor Cross. It serves 4 farm houses and two small thatched cottages. A narrow road.

New Road
Taking a turn to the left at the Moor Cross we come to another cross about 50 yds away. This Cross is known as Molly's Cross and the road westward therefrom is a wide one as far as Newtown Cross.
The road is called the New Road.

Quay Road
A narrow little-used road runs down to the shore of Bannow Bay at the Old Quay which contains remnants of a pier and huge ruins of a former store. This road is called the Quay Road. It is not presently in repair beyond the entrance to "the Cottage."

Newtown Road
This road leads through townlands of Kiltra, Newtown and Brandane and drops sharply to the shore of the bay at the "Cockle Strand". it serves a number of imposing farmhouses and also several cottages. The Quay Road and Rath Road are branches to the West both terminating at the sea.
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 03:13
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a few green mounds. The Church Lane at the end near Church is feared as it is believed to be haunted.

Bay Road.
This road which leads to what is now called "The Bay" serves four farmhouses and led to former Coast Guard Station and Boat house. It is now used also for drawing of seaweed and in summer as way to boats which berth in bay during fishing season - May to October.

Bannow Road
This road leads from Cross at Bannow southwards towards sea. It divides at Cross Road into three narrower roads one being private way to Long Gap, one to west leading back to Pruketh Cross and one to East leading to Crosslake.
Brandane Lane
This leads westwards from hollow below public House westward to the Brandane Road which leads to the Cockle strand. It is narrow and is used only for reaching farm lands.
Green Road
This is the name given to a wide road which leads from present School house of Bannow straight to Cross Lake there were many small houses on it in years gone by - only 2 presently. Much seaweed is carried on this road.
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 02:46
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The Island Road.
This road leads across the passage between the mainland at Church Lane Cross and the Island proper. (This passage was once an arm of the sea being the Eastern entrance to Bannow Bay and having a small island - Clare Island in the centre). It is believed that this channel was the one always used by boats and ships till it became filled with shifting sands. The road is more or less a causeway and has no fences and at high tide is submerged -
the tide that passes over "the bar" and round "the nordeen" flowing till it meets the regular tide under the green at the old church of Bannow. This road is the only means of approach to Bannow Island and is also much used as cartroad for drawing sand and gravel from "the Doncaire" which lies between it and the sea.

Church Lane
This narrow roadway leads from "Station Cross" to "the green" as the field round the old church is called. A gateway into this field ends the lane. Inside was Bannow Castle now only known by
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 02:29
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The game Iplay in school every day is "Catch Hands". This is how the game is played. Fifteen or sixteen girls go together. Two of these girls catch hands. The rest of the girls have to run a certain distance and no farther.
The other two girls follow the rest of the girls. When they would take up to the rest of the girls they would try to catch some of them.
The girls run from one side of the two girls to the other. Each of the two girls try to catch some of the other girls. This is how they catch them. They tip the girl on the shoulder and say one two three and then the girl gets in between the two girls and they follow the rest of the girls.
The game continues the same until they are all caught. When they are all caught the game is started again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-26 02:20
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Hoar Rock - the Rock near Cross Lake.
Table Rock - off old Church of Bannow.
Shark's Mouth - near the bay.
senior member (history)
2019-06-25 04:46
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awaiting decision
Drawings of :-
A FIELD SPADE
and
A GARDEN SPADE
senior member (history)
2019-06-25 04:44
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it to cool it. The butter is taken out of the churn with a wooden-scoop
It is then put into the keeer in which it is made. Buttermilk is used for wetting bread and what of it is left over is given to pigs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-25 04:40
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before the horse and cattle fair.
Horse fairs are held in New Ross and Enniscorthy. Years ago a fair used to be held in Carrig but on account of it being some distance from the railway station it was transferred to Wellingtonbridge.
senior member (history)
2019-06-25 04:36
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The nearest forge to my house is Molloys. There are two brothers and a jorneyman working in it.
They are very good tradesmen
and they get much work to do.
They shoe horses and asses and bind wheels and mend all sorts of machinery. When a carpenter makes a car it is sent to the blacksmith to put the crooks for hanging the chains on the car.
This forge was built by the present men's grand-father and the blacksmiths work has been carried on since. There is a slate roof on the forge and the
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 04:30
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"Big Paddy". Contd
of that wonderful combination of huge men. Who forgets their great victory in Wexford Park, 28 yrs ago ~ over the all-famous A.M.P. team?
But it is in the field of usefulness Paddy has left his lasting mark and there are many monuments to his wonderful skill and ability"
Big Paddy was a self made man never went beond "third Book" in School ~ Could scarcely read or write when he left school ~ but afterwards made good so good that he was a sort of John Sornier local "Book in Breeches".
Many local stories are told of Paddy. Here are a few, showing his resoucefulness and unselfishness.
Once when he was in a wood sawing timber + felling trees he, and two others were fitting
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 04:07
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our engineer + sea man he built + sailed his own boats, he sought + saved wrecks in the storms.
He mended our clocks + watches + yet had hands that befitted a fair sized giant. He was in short an all round man and t'were far easier tell what he was not than what he was.
His hands were handy + his brain the brighest
On the field of sport too he always "played the game" his game of games being "in the rope" ~ where he always "pulled his weight" and helped to bring fame + glory to the then famous Kilmuckridge "Tun team".
Here Paddy was at his best ~ alongside the three Mangan giants. To him in no small measure is due the wonderful achievement
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 03:53
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the nobler + the better sort that never sought reward.
His death is deeply lamented and deeply felt ~ a local, widespread sorrow, an almost personal and general loss, and not only to the immediate district of his home where his brain + muscle, his overflowing kindness and unselfish generosity have served us long + well but far away in many parts of the country, where his outstanding ability and kindly good nature were well known
Our " all round man" was Paddy.
He was our "first aid Doctor", and yet again our Dentist. (many a professional had a poorer practise ~ if a richer reward)
He was a carpenter builder
He dug the foundation - he gave you the key to the home he built for you. He was also
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 03:38
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His big manly voice was ever mellowed by an inate kindness of soul that ever shone through his soft kindly eyes. Kilmuckridge + district is today the poorer for his demise for a real a true, a lasting friend, a friend in need was dear big hearted "big Paddy"
To help others and be kind to speak well of all + sundry seemed his mission, and now that he has been called to his eternal reward he brings with him, our blessing and our prayers. It is our very least ~ and yet our very most ~ our best prayers.
We mourn for him + think well of him in death. Who is there for miles + miles again that has not shared largely + often of Paddy's kindliness + whole hearted generosity ~ his
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 03:25
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soon after his death, written by the local teacher Mr MacDonald, and it will serve the purpose of these notes to write it here.
"A great + good man passed away to his eternal reward on Dec 26th 1930 at the age of 74.
Mr Patrick Dempsey, a very prominent figure in his own native district was also well known in many parts of Co Wexford + even beyond it's confines where several important structures monuments to his keen intelligence and outstanding ability will long attest his worth.
His surely was a unique personality : "Big Paddy" we called him, yes he was, big + big hearted too - brainy to brilliance and brave too amost to folly, aye and brawny too as a modern giant and yet gentle as a child
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 03:11
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Thus we reach the end of an only two short review on John Mangan whose name will certainly be remembered in his native county.
His feats will long adorn our athletic chronicles for we must now look, with awe upon the deeds of the Kilmuckridge giant whose kindly, genial unobtrusive nature was the passport which secured him the affection + esteem of his contemporaries + neighbours of his own time + the admiration + memory of those that came after him.
Above from Notes + Cuttings supplied by Mr Murtagh Mangan, aged 59 yrs.
Kilmuckridge
at present living at K'ridge
Decr. 1938.
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 02:59
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in 1900. However, his only rival, Con Walsh, threw it 16' 2" at Cove in 1908.
Authentic achievements :~
Throwing for height :-
14' 6 3/4" Carrick-on-Suir 1898.
14' 8 1/2" Enniscorthy 1898.
15' 0 3/4" Enniscorthy 1900.
This became for the time the Irish + World's record in the native style.
Throwing with follow :-
30' 1 1/2" Carrick-on Suir 1898.
32 5" Ballsbridge 1899
This latter is still a record.
Throwing without follow :-
27' 0" Ballsbridge 1898.
27 4 1/2" Ballsbridge 1900
In 1895 he won three Leinster
Gaelic titles, 56 lbs for height
unlimited run + follow + for
throwing the 71 lbs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 02:59
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in 1900. However, his only rival, Con Walsh, threw it 16' 2" at Cove in 1908.
Authentic achievements :~
Throwing for height :-
14' 6 3/4" Carrick-on-Suir 1898.
14' 8 1/2" Enniscorthy 1898.
15' 0 3/4" Enniscorthy 1900.
This became for the time the Irish + World's record in the native style.
Throwing with follow :-
30' 1 1/2" Carrick-on Suir 1898.
32 5" Ballsbridge 1899
This latter is still a record.
Throwing without follow :-
27' 0" Ballsbridge 1898.
27 4 1/2" Ballabridge 1900
In 1895 he won three Leinster
Gaelic titles, 56 lbs for height
unlimited run + follow + for
throwing the 71 lbs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 02:40
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of this event when he created the Irish record of 27' 4 1/2" at Ballsbridge July 14th. 1900.
On that same day he contested another big weight event with its world expert, Tom Kiely, in slinging the half hundred unlimited run and follow. Kiely failed to reach his best but although on this occasion was beaten by Mangan (37' 3 1/2") still holds the record of 38' 11" for this the Irish style of throwing.
A contest in slinging the weight over the bar, Irish style, was proposed + he again excelled all his opponents. In his final throw he beat the existing record by throwing it 14' 6 3/4 at which height his record remained until he himself raised it to 15' 0 3/4".
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 02:28
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replied with 29' 10 1/2". Mangan then fell short + Delany fouled his throw. Called for final throw the power of the Leinster man was aroused + he threw it over the unprecedented distance of 30' 1 1/2".
Prodigious as this feat was, Mangans prowess was destined to surpass it almost exactly twelve months later, when he got in the astounding cast of 32' 5" at Ballsbridge Aug 7 1899.
Delany beat him in throwing without follow. The Riverstown man was an expert in this style + his immense height 6' 6", gave him an advantage which he knew how to utilise to the utmost.
As we shall see, however, Mangan also made himself master
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 02:16
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Delany of Riverstown, Hayes of Galbally, Horgan of Banteer
Phelan of Mullinahone + he were in competition - the greatest combination of giants that ever trod a modern art.
In the 12 t. round their respective throws were Phelan (who held the record at 28' 9" ) 27' 6"; Ryan 25' ;
Delany 28' 1 1/2" ; Horgan 26' 8 1/2" ; Mangan 28' 5 1/2"

Ryan + Phelan fell back in the next round + Mangan heaved the massive load 28' 8 1/2" - half an inch short of the record.
Delany threw it 29' 6 1/2" + then Mangan dropped it exactly on the same mark 29' 6 1/2" both beating the worlds previous best.
Mangan + Delany had to throw off for 1st place. The former began with 29' 8 1/2", Delany
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 02:02
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athletic ability has always abounded.
He lived at a period when we possessed an amazing array of strong men. Never again perhaps can such a group be seen as that in which he figured in the Autumn of 1898 in Maurice Davin's famous arena Deer Park, Carrick-On-Suir.
At that select meeting Mangan made one of his best throws + records were shattered at almost every effort in half-a-dozen weight casting + jumping events.
Never were his abilities better demonstrated than on this memorable evening + his performances proved what rivalry could impel him to accomplish. In Slinging the 56 lbs. between the legs without follow, Ryan of Pallas,
senior member (history)
2019-06-24 01:52
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awaiting decision
beyond the confines of his native county for competition. Nature had endowed him with tremendous physical powers; but he had no inclination to exploit them.
The fun of a parish contest was sufficient gratification for him at most times - he rarely sought distinction abroad. Had he done so + have been spurred to greater efforts by intensive rivalry it is certain that his feats which were unsurpassed evidence of his prowess, would have vastly improved.
It is safe to say that John Mangan knew not + even distained training + was satisfied to acquit himself with credit without ostentation + this philosophy seems to be characteristic of the manhood of his county where
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 04:21
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Only three holy wells are in the locality.
They are: Saint Briget's; Saint Senan's and Saint Martin's.
Saint Senan's well is situated in Killiane about three miles from the school. It is owned by Mr. Cullen of Killiane, Drinagh.
The field it is in is known as the Common's field. The well is about two feet square and is fenced around with bushes. It has a healing property which is a cure for sore eyes. About two years ago a woman who was blind washed her eyes with its waters and was cured the next morning.
About one hundred yards from the well the ruins of a church is standing. This also is dedicated to Saint Senan. Four walls remain. Inside the church is a tomb. A plaque on this tomb is dated 1807. The only writing which is decipherable on it is: Elizabeth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 04:12
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Johnson, aged forty five years. 1807".
Saint Martins well is just below Piercestown Chapel. It is dedicated to Saint Martin who was Bishop of Tours and Patron of Piercestown. This well too is said to be cure for sore eyes.
No particular cure has taken place there however during the past few years. A pump is now erected over it, and the water is used for household purposes.
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 04:06
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awaiting decision
continued like that until the players are tired.
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 04:04
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piece of string. The tail is attached to the bottom strings.
A large ball of twine is procured and tied to the nail which joins the the the laths together. The kite is then complete.
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 03:59
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The Dandelion is a small plant which is found extensively in Piercestown. It grows about five or six inches in height. It had a golden coloured blossom and soft toothed leaves.
The leaves are plucked off the plant and boiled in water for about half an hour. The juice in the leaves is extracted by other means, and mixed with water. The water when drank by a persom suffering from consumpton is able to care for it.
Canavonbeg is a small plant found in fields and on ditches. It does not exceed three or four inches in height, and has a thin wiry stem, and purple blossom. The leaves are plucked off the plant and boiled in milk .
When the milk is drunk for nine successive mornings it cures worms.
The Common Plantain known as "cocks and hens" is a cure for cuts, The leaves are plucked and chewed in the mouth. They are then taken and placed on the wound which is cured in about twenty minutes.
When stung by a nettle the affected part becomes covered with a white rash
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 03:42
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which is extremely painful. A dockleaf is then procured and placed on the rash. The pain gradually disappears as well as the rash.
A well, known as Saint Bridget's well is situated in Rathaspeck in Piercestown. When its water is applied to warts it cures the.
Another well in Killiane has curing properties.
It is called Saint Senan's. The waters when rubbed on sore eyes cures them.
Fresh milk taken from a cow and while still hot, if it is placed in an ear which is paining cures it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 03:34
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Travelling folk are not as numerous now as they were a few years ago and in consequence it is hard to acquire any exact account of these peopl. To gain a living they go from house to house selling thimbles, needles, thread, laces, tiepins and various other articles.
About sixty years ago a travelling man known as Johnny Kavanagh used to come to Alywards of Ballyfinoge. The night before Saint Patricks day was his time for coming.
A comfortable bed used be erected in the barn for him to sleep on.
When he arrived word was sent around to the neighbours who gathered in the barn to hear him telling stories of his travels. He used to mend all kinds of crockery. This was his way of repaying the farmers for his food and lodging.
Another man going around at the same time was known as "Stonyeen Radh." No one in the locality knew his name. One peculiarity about him was that he could eat almost anything. He seemed to bare no sense of taste. He used stop three nights in every
senior member (history)
2019-06-23 03:19
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farmer's place.
Every man in Wexford knows Paddy Berry. He earns his living by selling badges, laces, tiepins in Wexford, and by playing a melodian. About four years ago he broadcasted from Athlone.
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 04:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A tinker met with a priest one day.
The priest knew him because he
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 04:17
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awaiting decision
A city man, owning a country place, engaged as a stable boy, a country lad. During his last stay at the place the owner did not see the boy for several days. Finally, however having special need of the lad, he searched and found him. "Where the deuce do you keep yourself "? demanded the master of the place, I do not believe I have seen you since you were engaged; have you been asleep all this while "?
"Yes, sir," was the unexpected response. "I thought that was
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 04:07
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awaiting decision
what you wanted sir. What I wanted ! exclaimed the employer amazed. What are you driving at ?
Well, sir, exclaimed the lad, your advertisement said you wanted a boy of sixteen to sleep on the premises.
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 04:04
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awaiting decision
with the stones so he brought them back to the place from where he had taken the.
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 03:56
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to the property. She married Mr. Orpen, and after their death, their son, Mr. Richards-Orpen became the Owner.
Lord Carew, left Castleboro, and went to reside in England.
He died shortly afterwards in London.
Castleboro and Coolbawn mansions were destroyed by fire in 1923. The Irish Republican Army burned both buildings, and now they stand in ruins. The estates were divided into small farm, and given to the farmers of the locality.
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 03:46
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the landlords, and bringing them to their senses.
There was a great unrest between the landlords and tenants, until the Land Purchase Act came in 1903. This provided money to purchase the land. The landlords had been so severely tried by the long Land War that they were very glad to sell their lands to the tenants at a good price, and the farmers had unquestioned ownership of their own lands, and felt encouraged to work upon and improve these lands.
Mr. Bruen, after the sale, left Coolbawn, and took up his residence in Oakpark, Co. Carlow. His agent died shortly afterwards. Canon Blacker, was rector of Killanne until his death, and Mr Richards, died shortly afterwards. His daughter, was
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 03:37
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he was boycotted. James Burke is dead but his family are still living in Grange.
Richard Binions died about four years ago, and a son of his owns the place now.
Another very effective scheme was the Plan of Campaign. The tenants joined together in a body to demand a reduction from the landlords in the rents, and if they refused to pay into a Campaign Fund, the total amount of their rents, less the reduction they expected. If the landlords still refused to accept this, they were to use it to fight the landlords in the courts, should they bring proceedings against them, and to support any tenants whom they might evict by way of punishment. This was one of the most effective schemes of worrying
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 03:16
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If a person attempted to speak to him, or a shop in the locality buy from him, or sell provisions to him they were instantly boycotted.
The Land League by means of a collection which they made, were able to erect a Land League Hut, in Ballybawn, for John O'Leary and his aged Mother, so they lived in it, until John purchased a small farm in Kiltealy. John is still living but his mother is dead.
During the Land League there was another farmer named James Burke, Grange, who paid his rent, to the landlord, although ordered not to do so. He was instantly boycotted. He met with the same fate as Richard Binions, and being a Catholic, no one would sit in the pew with him at Mass, and if anyone went into the same pew with him
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 03:03
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as at Peter Whelan's.
About a fortnight later when matters cooled, the bailiff and police came secretly to John O'Leary's house, and seized on all his stock, his farm implements, and entered the house, stamped out the fire, threw out the bed and bed clothes, and the furniture. They put out John and his mother then. They took refuge in a neighbour's house.
John's farm was taken by the landlord and given to a Protestant, named Richard Binions. This land-grabber, was boycotted by all the people of the district. No one would speak to him, work for him, buy from him, sell to him, serve or help him. Still he stuck on to the farm as he had his own family to work and help him.
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 02:52
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on their horns hung the bold sign
"Pay no Rent".
The bailiff supported by police from Killanne and Enniscorthy arrived. They were faced by a strong body of men, with their weapons. The goats were let loose amongst them, and they were chased back again, some of them being severely wounded. The police were armed with guns, but did not fire a single shot. They took flight as hard as they could.
Another farmer, named John O'Leary, had a nice snug farm in Rathnure.
He lived happily with his poor aged mother. John was unable to pay the high rent, and was threatened with eviction. The people gathered together the eviction day, and opposed the bailiff who was supported by armed police, so they withdrew fearing the same thing might happen
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 02:39
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Peter Whelan, a prominent farmer who lived in Grange was one of the first who refused to pay the rent.
He had a large farm of land, and spent a great deal of money improving his land, manuring it and building new houses on it, and according as he was making all these improvements, the landlord kept on increasing the rent.
In the end he refused to pay it when the time came. He was then threatened with eviction. A certain day was named for this.
The people of the parish knew about it, and they all congregated together at the house of Mr Peter Whelan to stop it. They were armed with pikes, sprongs, spades, shovels, fire irons, stones, and any weapons they could seize. They brought two male goats with them, led by a long rope, and
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 02:28
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Johnson, and James Hughes. They taught the people of the district to resist the unjust landlords and refuse to pay unjust rents, and resolve no longer to be ground into the earth by the heel of landlordism. They had one powerful weapon which was "boycotting".
"Boycotting" took its name from Captain Boycott, a harsh land-agent in Mayo, whom the people ostracised.
They refused to work for him, to speak to him, to buy anything from him, to sell anything to him, to let anyone serve or help him, and by this means they drove him out of the country.
These speeches from the platforms on Sundays, stirred up the people of the parish, and were successful in frightening both the landlords and the landgrabbers.
senior member (history)
2019-06-22 02:19
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The landlords were rack-renting the tenants, and when the farmer was unable to pay the exorbitant rent that the landlord tried to extract from him he was evicted.
About sixty years ago Michael Davitt who began the Land War founded the great Land League for the redress of the many wrongs of the Irish tenant farmers. The Land League spread like wildfire through every district in Ireland.
Charles Stewart Parnell joined Michael Davitt in the agitation, as well as other Irish members of Parliament.
There were several meetings held here, in Rathnure, at the Chapel Gate, on Sundays after Mass. There were speeches made by the leading farmers in the district Peter Whelan, James Forrestal, Richard Forrestal, John and Daniel Quigley, James
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 04:37
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went to hunt on the mountain and as this man was walking along the mountain away from the others, he walked uo to the cave.
It was a small opening in the rock and down from it were narrow steps. He marked the place and some time afterwards brought an old man who had often spent hours looking for the cave. But strange to relate when they reached the spot no trace of the cave could be found nor ever afterwards
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 04:29
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Sliabh Coillte is a mountain situated four miles from New Ross. This mountain is supposed to have seven wells.
It is also said to have a cave which leads out to the river Barrow.
Many people went to seek to find this cave but none of them succeeded, they went on many occasions but did not find. Then one day a man by the name of Simon Hickey and some others
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 04:22
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the English. The priest therefore immediately jumped upon his horse and ran over the mountain top pursued by the English.
In the haste the horse fell over a rock and some of the hair from his side stuck in a chip the shoe of his hoof stuck there also, and no person that ever tried could get the hoof from the place where it was stuck. The mark of the horseshoe may be seen to this day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 04:12
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The following information I received from Thomas Blanche, Gurrawn, aged 68, concerning Castleboro building.
Castleboro Building is situated about four miles east of Rathnure. It was a beautiful mansion, with turrets, terraces, lawns, fountains, and gardens.
It belonged to Lord Carew, who was one of the local landlords. Castleboro was a vast property. The connection of the Carew family with Co. Wexford began over 250 years ago, when Robert Carew was granted land in Chapel, Clonroche, Ballymaccessy, Lower Gurrawn, and other townlands.
A notable incident in the history of the family occurred in 1799 when the Right Hon. Robert Carew openly insulted Lord Castlereagh for offering him a bribe to vote for the Act of Union.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 04:00
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The castle was destroyed by fire three times. The first fire occurred in 1815, and was again re-built. Again it was destroyed by fire in 1840, and again re-built, and finally in 1923 it was destroyed by the Irish Republican Army, since when it has not been re-built.
It was a fine mansion built of Irish granite with a magnificent porch supported by Corinthian pillars. The main building was 90 feet wide with two wings of 55 feet each. The landscape garden consisted of seven beautiful terraces connected by granite steps with lakes and miniature bridges, marble fountains and stately yew trees.
The walls inside were hung with the most artistic needlework, all worked by Lady Carew's own hands.
Castleboro was visited by many distinguished personages. The Duke of Clarence and the Duke of York visited
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 03:51
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it in 1982, the King of Italy, at that time Prince of Naples visited it in 1896, the Lord Chancellor of England and Lady Halsbury in 1898, and it was also visited bu Cardinal Persico.
The owner in 1790 was succeeded by his son and namesake, Robert Carew in 1829. He married in 1816 Jane, daughter of Major Cliffe of Bellevue, and in 1834 he was raised to the peerage. The second Lord Carew was born in 1818, and married the daughter of Sir George Phillips-Bart, in 1844, and was M.P. of Co. Waterford from 1840 to 1847. His eldest son and heir, Robert George Carew was born in 1860, and succeeded his father as third Lord Carew in 1882. His mother the Dowager Lady Carew lived to the age of 105 years and died 1902.
For many years while the Carew were at Castleboro, visitors
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 03:35
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were allowed to inspect the place, and the annual "big day", the 29th June always found hundreds of people from Enniscorthy and the surrounding countryside availing themselves of the privilege.
Tradition states that on this estate in the Penal days there was a Chapel, with a graveyard attached. It was situated in a wood, and the entrance to the Chapel-yard was a style over a ditch. The little Chapel was knocked down, and no trace of the Chapel or graveyard can be seen at present, but a tale is told by several people who passed by this place at midnight, that the ghosts of the dead were seen crossing this style as they passed by and up to the present time very few pass that way after nightfall.
Castleboro mansion was put up for auction and bought by Mr Cullen, and the estate was divided up amongst small farmers
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 03:22
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Eloping was another custom in this district. If the girl's or boy's parents would not consent the wedding, the pair made it up to elope. They had their clothes and other luggage stowed away beforehand, in the house of some friend, and at an appointed time, usually at night when the household were asleep, they secretly stole away to some town, or far away country place to get married.
Often the parents got a search made for them, but of no avail. They were married before they got any news of them.
Another custom in this district is to tie an old shoe or slipper to the wedding vehicle, to wish the pair "good luck". If the wedding vehicle is a motor car it is decorated with white ribbons, and flowers.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 03:14
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usually Dublin or Cork. The dance was held in the bride's house until morning, and the young men and boys dressed up as before, went that night.
These are called, in this district, "Fools", or "Blackmen". When the bridegroom is "hauling home" his bride to his own house after a week, or fortnight, the friends of both parties meet at his house to welcome them home, and enjoy themselves feasting and dancing
The same customs still hold, except motor cars are now used instead of carriages, and a great many go on the "honeymoon" to London, Paris, and the Continent.
Another custom in this district is to throw a shower of rice or confetti on the bride and bridegroom when leaving the Church. The friends wait outside the Church door and give them a surprise when they throw this shower on them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 03:02
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and boys dressed up in all sorts of attire went that night to the house, and got a good reception. They got plenty to eat and drink, and were allowed to pass away the night merrily until morning, when all the dancing, feasting, and merry-making ended.
The bridegroom brought home his bride to his own house, and settled down for the remainder of their lives.
At that time there was no going away on the "honeymoon"
As times advanced instead of walking to the Church, or pillion-riding, the bride and bridegroom drove to and from the Church in a carriage, drawn by a pair of horses.
The other customs still continued, except that after the wedding breakfast the bride and bridegroom went on their "honeymoon" to some place,
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 02:53
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Shrove, and on the lucky days, i.e. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and any month in the year, except May.
"Marry in May and you will rue the day." If the parties lived near the Church they generally walked.
They had some of their relatives for the bridesmaid and best man. If the parties were well off, the bridegroom rode on horseback, and after the wedding brought home his bride pillion riding.
A wedding breakfast was held at the bride's house, and all the party spent an enjoyable day dancng, singing, and feasting. A beautiful Cake, called "the bride cake", made by the bride's mother beforehand was cut for the wedding breakfast.
At night a great dance was held, and the local fiddler, Tom Breen, was hired for the night. Young men
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 02:44
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The following information as regards the local marriage customs, I received from Mr. Michael Cowman, Grange, from Mr. Michael Cowman, Grange, Rathnure, aged 78 years, who is resident in this district since his birth. In his youth, he saw the customs carried on.
If a man wanted a suitable wife he went to a local matchmaker to find one for him. The matchmaker went to the girl's parents with the news.
The parents then correspond with the man, who went then to the girl's house.
A bargain was made. The girl got a dowry, usually money, and sometimes stock or goods. The parents were quite Satisfied with this bargain, as it was the same when they were getting married themselves.
A day was settled on for the wedding which was generally some time during
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 02:33
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Owner :-
Mr Nicholas Doyle
Ballyshannon,
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford.
a. The hurling green.
b. Doyles Fields.
c. Scullabogue field
d. The still field.
e. The long knock
f. The hill field.
g. The far haggard
h. The lawn-gate.
i. The old orchard
j. The long garden.
k. The fairy field l. The bog field.
m. The kiln field n. The hill field.
o. Cleary's fields p. The lodge
q. The avenue gate field.

Owner
Mr Michael Galway,
Misterin,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a. Mary field.
b. The black gate fields
c. The quarry-hole field
d. The holly-tree field
e. The hill field
f. Jack Murphy's field
g. The three cornered field
h. The beet field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 02:29
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Owner :
Mr J L Doyle.
Scullabogue,
Newbawn
Co Wexford.
a. The moor field
b. The under - bawn field
c. The money - hole field
d. The upper gurt - áun
e. The lower gurt - áun
f. The cornick.
g. The potatoe - field
h. The mangold field
i. The orchard field
j. The field above the haggard

Owner :
Mr Bill Furlong.
Raheen,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The Spout field
b. The fields down in Scullabogue.
c. The fields up at Coleman's
d. The far field.

Owner :-
Mr P Lalor
Newtown,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The kiln field b. The green field
c. The little field
d. The black - gate field
e. The bog field f. The big meadow
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 02:14
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g. The knock field. h. The small moor
i. The long moor

Owner
Mr J Colfer
Newtown,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a. The hollow field. b. The bog field
c. The two acre field

Owner
Mr M Power,
Newtown,
Adamstown
Co Wexford
a. The cross roads field.
b. The lough field. c. The Leap field
d. The red bog. e. Mogue's moor
f. The scraps.

Owner
Mr F. Kavanagh.
Newtown,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a. Bán Mór field b. Foley's field.
c. The gravel whole field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 02:05
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awaiting decision
Owner
Mr S. Rothwell.
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The sand pit field.
b. The mass path field.
c. The old orchard.
d. The back avenue field
e. The long moor.

Owner
Mr M. Byrne.
Doonooney,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The Orchard. b. The Knock
c. The sheep field. d The little meadow
e. Paddy's Park. f. The well field
g. The Castle field h.The spout Field

Owner :-
Mr. John Martin,
Rathkyle,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The Quarry - hole field
b. The well field
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 01:56
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awaiting decision
Owner
Mr P Whelan.
Rathkyle,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a. The sand - pit field.

Owner
Mr P. Martin.
Coolnagree,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. Mat's field. b. Mackie's field.
c. Paddy's hill - field

Owner :-
Mr Anthony Whelan.
Rathguile,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.

a. The screwd. b. The kiln-garden
c. The Sgeach Mhór.
d. The upper rock
e. The hill field. f. Paircín na spiál.
g. The big nock h. The little nock.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 01:56
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awaiting decision
Owner
Mr P Whelan.
Rathkyle,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a. The sand - pit field.

Owner
Mr P. Martin.
Coolnagree,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. Mat's field. b. Mackie's field.
c. Paddy's hill - field

Owner :-
Mr Anthony Whelan.
Rathguile,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.

a. The screwd. b. The kiln-garden
c. The Sgeach Mór. d. The upper rock
e. The hill field. f. Paircín na spiál.
g. The big nock h. The little nock.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 01:47
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awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr Patrick Murphy.
Coolnagree.
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford
a. Páirc na h-áith. b. Sgeach field.
c. The big moor.

Owner :-
Mr Danial Doyle
Glenour,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The gravel hole field.
b. Neville's field
c. The three corner field
e. The kiln field f Egan's moclee
g. The porteen well field
h. The old town field i. The knock field
j. Margen's field k. The pond field
l. The high field m. Mythen's field
n. The sally hole field
o. The moor field

Owner
Mr Bill Kelly
Glenour,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a The rath field
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 01:35
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awaiting decision
Owner
Mr OGorman.
Poulpeasty,
a. The pen field. b. The glibe.
c. The church meadow field
d. The knockatour. e. The Chapel field

Owner :-
Mr McCabe
Ballyvergen,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. Myler's park. b. The sheep field

Owner
Mr Walter Kent
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The mill bog. b. The moor.

Owner
Mr John Redmond,
The Barracks,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The green field. b. The middle field.
c. The hill field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-21 01:26
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awaiting decision
(Mrs) Katie Delaney,
The Barracks,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The hill field, b. The hollow field
c. The kiln field. d. Byrne's lane field
e. Tom's lane field, f. The high field
g. Near Moor. h. Far moor.
i. The field in front of Bill's
j. The field at the back of the house
k. The far field. l. The lane field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:40
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Col. T. Ryan had a most interesting career in the British Army. He joined as a Private and made good right along the line.
He was in Command of a Batallion in Palestine in the World War.
He came of humbleworking parents and the old lime place in Newtown where he was born is still standing
He retired from the Brit Army just about the time of the Truce in this Country. He was given an important post in the National Army to clear up the "Irregulars." When he had his task complete - he took up Farming at a place called Mertin near Macmine Station.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:13
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hero, in doublet + hose. He was not only big in stature, but big in soul + mind.
His memory will I'm sure survive for many a long day and it is fitting to think that he get a mention in these pages - that his name be placed on our local Roll of Honour. He has left his mark on many a farm and homestead and to seek a monument to him is but "to look around you" - for standing here there and everywhere in the Parish are the houses, he has planned + built - the creamery he has established etc. etc.
He was a man of many parts and every part a good one.
A very suitable and well deserved tribute and appreciation appeared in a local paper - the Echo
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:03
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Some Noted people of the Past, that not too distant past that the present can just barely stretch to, and touch, and who once strutted the stage and left their mark in the memories of us that still are.
"Big Paddy"
Such a one is, or was a great man that died only eight years ago. His name was Paddy Dempsey or better and universally known as "Big Paddy" - a native of Ballygarron, Kilmuckridge. He lived in a small thatched house at the Crosses on Mr Cousin's land.
Big Paddy was big no doubt he stalked about just like a giant and always dressed in Knee breeches - moving about like a figure from a past age that reminded one of an Elizabethan
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 04:24
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"Oh, John," she said, "where is the pot of money" "Well," said John. "Andy Whelan and myself dug and dug until we reached the pot. With great delight we lifted it up, but instead of money, what do you think was in it, a pot full of rubbish. I was never as much disheartened in all my life." "Oh, you poor old "amadán". said his wife. "I told you never to believe in dreams. So you now see the result."
From that day until the day of his death about 56 years ago, John never went by any other name, but "Whang the Miller", and he never found out the trick the boys of the townland played on him.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 04:14
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will lift the pot," John was highly delighted. They lifted up the pot, but when John looked in, he saw that it was only rubbish was on the top. "Throw that off the top," said John. But when Andy threw the rubbish off the to it was the same underneath. John caught the pot and turned it upside down, and to his surprise, it was not money was in the pot but rubbish.
"Well," said John, I'll never believe in dreams again. "But," said Andy, "the pot was there all the same". "Well," said John," it must be some of the "good people" forgot bringing it with them when they were changing from one rath to the other," Poor John went home very down-hearted. His wife, who was aware of his dreams met him at the door, with a pleasant smile on her face
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 04:03
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awaiting decision
They set off with the pot and buried it about four feet from the surface, during the night when all the people were in bed. They put sods over the spot and it looked as if it never had been meddled with. When this was done they told the secret to Andy Whelan. Andy and John Howlett set off at night, armed with a spade and pick. They commenced digging, Down they dug until they reached the spot. "Here it is," shouted John. "I'll be made up for life". "Well." said Andy, "I expect some of it, if not, I won't dig any more or help you".
"To be sure," said John, "you must have your share". "What will you give me?" said Andy. Of course Andy knew it was only rubbish was in the pot. "A quarter of the money in the pot," said John. "Well done," said Andy, come on now and we
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:49
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reels, hornpipes, four-hand reel, doubles, jigs, etc. In this way many a Sunday and Holiday passed by. The boys also had hurling, football, handball. skittles, and bowling.
There were some "raths" adjacent to Gurrawn. One man named John Howlett dreamt of a crock of gold being hidden in one of the raths, three nights in succession. He consulted with some of the other men in the townland as to what he should do. Andy Whelan, the local smith prepared to go with John on a certain night. He got 100 yds of woollen thread to put around the spot where the money was supposed to be hidden.
Some of the boys became aware of John's dream, and they consulted together that they would go to this rath and bury a pot full of rubbish just where John dreamt that the money was.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:32
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or trappers, etc. needed there now, so the houses they occupied are let to others, who need them for a yearly rent.
Very few of the English blood remain at the present time in Gurrawn on that account.
Even though times were hard in the latter part of the eighteenth century in Gurawn, the people had many amusements amongst themselves.
They held dances on the crossroads, and the young boys and girls of the townland congregated together there.
The old blind piper, Dolbins, with his bagpipes played up the music.
The partners got out at the dance, and when that was finished, another party got out, and so on, so that no one was tired. After each dance old Dolbins got money in his hat which he placed near by where he sat. Then came the step-dancing ,
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:23
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These were compelled to sail away with their families to America.
At the present time in the townland there are only six farmers' houses, and tow labourers' cottages. All the inhabitants are Catholics, with the exception of one family, named Deacon. The members of this family are Protestants.
Lord Carew's descendents resided in Castleboro until it was burned by the Irish Republican Army in 1922, not to let the Free State Soldiers occupy it.
After that Lord Carew resided in England until his death. The property, Castle in ruins, and demense were sold, and bought by Mr. Cullen who resides in one of the houses in the farmyard as the Castle is unfit for habitation.
He has most of the pasture and tillage land let yearly to farmers from different places.
There are no Stewards, gamekeepers
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Somers tried to take away the trees out of the rath, and bring them home.
He could not stir the trees, try as well as he was able, so he left them as they were. They are to be still seen in the rath as they fell.
Lights are to be seen in this rath, and noise heard like the chopping of sticks.
There is an ancient rath in the townland of Gurrawn, with three rings around it. It belonged to Mr. Dier who lived there at that time, about 100 years ago. Mr. Dier went to level the rath. When he had a part of the outside ring knocked down his eldest child died, and he lost some of the farm animals, so he stopped work.
It is still to be seen where he levelled part of it. This rath is supposed to have been built long before the advent of the Danes, and lights are often seen
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 02:48
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awaiting decision
the time after midnight, they found him on the outside ring of the "rath" and he dazed. They brought him home. He could scarcely speak with fright. He was put to bed, and in the morning when he arose he could not straighten himself, so up to the time of his death he had a hump on his back.
Several people in Grange tell this story, as he told it himself to people.
There is another story told about this rath. Some people heard of gold being hidden there. The went one night with a spade and pick.
There were two hawthorn trees growing near the spot, and while they were digging, the two trees fell and got entwined in each other. The men dug away for a time but could find no gold, so they returned home without it.
Sometime afterwards Mr. Thomas
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 02:38
approved
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awaiting decision
district about the raths.
There is a rath in Grange on the land belonging to Mr. Patrick Somers. His father, who died about twenty years ago at the age of 75, was coming home from Enniscorthy one night. It was rather dark. Going down a "boreen" which leads to his home, and passes by the rath, the horse suddenly stopped.
He was bringing home a load of goods from the town. Thomas, was his name.
He was lifted out of the car, and brought into the rath. He saw a most beautiful sight. All the fairies were singing and dancing, and the brightness of the whole rath was wonderful.
They did not speak to him. The horse went home, and his children were greatly frightened when they did not see their father coming. Getting light they made a search every place, and after a couple of hours, which brought
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 02:26
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awaiting decision
around each constructed of earth, and the spaces between them, whenever possible, were filled with water, as a means of protection against attack.
These frail houses are long since gone and sounds of revelry within them are hushed, but the mounds which surrounded them may still be seen in this district, and in many parts of the country, and here, it is said, when the shades of night fall, the fairies hold high revel and the ghosts of the departed are seen. It is supposed the De Dananns, who were said to be magicians, took the form of fairies, and are still living in the mounds which surround the raths." Even still it is considered dangerous to destroy or injure in any way any of those mounds.
The fairies punish the culprit in some way.
There are several stories told in this
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 04:42
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awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr Nicholas Doyle
Ballyshannon,
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford.
a. The hurling green. b. Doyles
Fields.
c. Scullabogue field d. The still field.
e. The long knock f. The hill field.
g. The far haggard h.The lawn-gate.
i. The old orchard j.The long garden.
k. The fairy field l. The bog field.
m. The kiln field n. The hill field.
o. Cleary's fields p. The lodge
q. The avenue gate field.

Owner
Mr Michael Galway,
Misterin,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a. Mary field.
b. The black gate fields
c. The quarry-hole field
d. The holly-tree field
e. The hill field
f. Jack Murphy's field
g. The three cornered field
h. The beet field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 04:26
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awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr P Murphy.
Coolnagree,
Adamstown
Co. Wexford.
a. bean fields. b. Scough field
c. big meadow. d. Phill's fields
e. Floyd's field. f. hollow field.

Owner :-
Mr A. Whelan
Rathkyle,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. sand hole field. b. white park
c. old orchard. d. bára flóra
e. Parken's pile. f. well field
g. lower rock. h. big rock.
i. the scrúde.

Owner
Mr J. Lacey,
Coolnagree,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. the little field. b. far field.
c. Gary eileen. d. park.
e. moor.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 04:15
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i. The bull field.
j. The pond field
k. The lower McCabe's field
l. The long beaten
m. The knock field
n. The field under Joe's
o. The field over the lough.
Owner :-
Mr P. Fortune.
Doonooney,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.

a. Castle meadow. b. Seven Acres.
c. Lacey's field. d. Granary.
e. half mowed. f. The scort
g. bean moor. h. high fields
i. The kiln field. j. walls field
k. Davey's field. l. The lawn.
m. spout bogs. n. mill bogs.
Owner :-
Mr R Fortune
Doonooney,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. long field. b. hurling field.
c. rath field. d. hill field
e. long garden. f. iorn gate field
g. dairy field. h. cross field
i. cow lane field. j. Tirr's field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 03:54
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rejected
awaiting decision
drinks none at all?
A. A fire.
Q. Although I wear but one horn,
I am no unicorn.
Although I give milk, I am no Kerry cow,
My grandmother she loves me,
Around the fire she shoves me,
Its often I bring a smile from her brow.?
A. A tea-pot.
Q. As round as an apple, as plump as a ball,
can climb the church o'er steeple and all?
A. The sun.
Q. As round as an apple,
As flat as a pan,
The head of a woman,
Whe whole of a man?
A. A penny.
Q. Why is an old man so much like a window?
A. Because he is all pains (panes).
Q. Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat,
if you guess for ever, you'll never guess that?
A. A pipe.
Q. What goes around the house and drags a harrow after it?
A. A hen and her clutch of chickens.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 03:41
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awaiting decision
Under the butt of an ivy tree?
A. A fox burying his mother
Q. What is it that's neither within nor without, but it's under the roof of a house?
A. A window.
Q. How many kinds of trees grow in the wood?
A. Two kinds, crooked and straight.
Q. How many sticks go to make a crow's nest?
A. None, she carries them all.
Q. When is a cow the roundest?
A. When she is licking her tail.
Q. Why does a chicken cross the road?
A. To get to the other side
Q. What stands in a field all day, on one leg and a big belly?
A. A head of cabbage.
Q. What walks with his head down?
A. A nail in your boot.
Q. I have a little sister,
I call her red nose
The longer she lives,
The shorter she grows?
A. A candle.
Q. What has four legs and cannot walk?
A. A bed.
Q. What sits by the wall, eats all it gets and
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 03:28
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A. A ring.
Q. There is a gray goose, and she bears a great prize.
The man that will buy her will need to be wise,
She has feet on her back, and her belly has none,
She goes far for he living and seldom comes home?
A. A ship.
Q. Ten drawing Willie's bags up fork hill?
A. A man putting on his breeches.
Q. What goes to the water and says "jink", "jink", "jink"
And never takes a drink.?
A. A chain fetter on a cow.
Q. What is the loudest thing in the world?
A. Wake candles (because they wake the dead)
Q. Hink, hank under the bank, ten drawing four?
A. A woman milking a cow.
Q. Riddle -me, riddle-me-ri,
Where did you stay last Saturday night,
When the hens flew,
The cocks crew,
The bells of Heaven, struck eleven,
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 03:09
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rejected
awaiting decision
its not in the people ?
A. The letter R.
What is the difference between a station-master and a schoolmaster?
One minds the trains, and the other trains the mind.
Q. What is deeper than the sea ?
A. A tailor's thimble.
Q. Hitty-hatty on the wall, hitty-hatty got a fall, all the kings' horses and all the kings' men wouldn't put hitty-hatty together again?
A. An egg.
Q. What is smaller than a midge's mouth?
A. The bit that goes into it.
Q. As round as an apple,
As deep as a pail,
It will never bawl out, 'till you pull it by the tail?
A. A bell.
Q. Why is the middle of a tree like a dog's tail?
A. Because they are both farthest away from the bark.
Q. The king of Manchester sent to his sister a bottomless vessel to hold raw meat?
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 02:58
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awaiting decision
now," sez he "I must go home without the habit." Away he went and he drenched to the skin. When he got home there was no wan in the kitchen. He stood at the fire to dry himself. After sometime the mistress came down, "Begor , Brian" sez she, "where did you go when you brought in the habit? I got it on the table two hours ago. We just had her arm in it before she died."
He never let on she took it from under his arm going across the river.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 02:52
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harder an' he found himself goin' headlong in the direction of the river, an stop he cud not. He had the habit under his arm the whole time.
"Begob" sez he, "I'll surely be drowned," but at that moment he found himself at the other side of the river safe and sound. Imagine his surprise when he found the habit was gone from under his arm. He thought he lost it in the river. The moon was shinin' very brightly. He thought by its rays he seen something in the river, and he thought it might be it.
He waded into his knees to see if he could get it, "Begog" sez he "it will make no difference if it is wet because she won't be cauld." After a lot of difficulty he got it out, but he was greatly disappointed when he found it was some kind of garment that a tinker had thrown in farther up at the bridge, and it came down in the flood. Sarche as he could, he could not find the habit. "Aint it the divil"
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 02:38
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awaiting decision
Sir Richard Devereux (formerly of Carrigmannon, Glynn, Co Wexford) is buried in the old mound in the centre of Adamstown Graveyard
This family came to Adamstown some time in the sixteenth century and were succeeded by the Downes' family who lived there until about twenty years ago.
The old mound hadn't been used for some hundreds of years.
The skulls of the remains could be seen there less than half a century ago.
The children of Adamstown School used to play Hide-and-go-seek there not so many years ago; then some one was buried near the old vault and that closed it up.
One of the Downes family was owner of the present public house about seventy years ago.
It appears he was a jolly man, full of humour, and he made a wager of half a gallon of beer, with a customer that
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 02:26
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awaiting decision
When the rebels were going away after the Battle of Horetown, three of them went to hide behind a ditch.
One of them was from Kilmore, and he was a great sportsman, and whenever he tried to shoot anything, it was sure to fall.
When they were hiding for some time, they heard some yeomen coming.
They were talking, and these men who were hiding heard the yeos saying "We'll follow those dirty Irish brutes and kill them all."
This young Kilmore man who was hiding said he would kill the captain of the yeos.
He killed him with the first shot
The other yeos started to try to shoot their rivals, but the young men fired on them until their guns were empty.
He killed thirty of them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 03:42
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great-deeds will be remembered. The Kellys of Gurrawn are descendants of the brave hero John Kelly of Killanne.
There are two families of them, and they are farmers.
As years rolled by hard times came again. The famine which swept over the country in '47 and '48 also visited this townland. The potato crop, on which the people chiefly depended, blackened and failed. The corn and other commodities had to be sold to raise money to pay the rent, for if not paid at a certain date, the householder and his family were threatened with eviction. With the famine came the fever, which carried away most of the old people to the tomb.
It is said that crowds of the young boys and girls left the country for America never to return again. There
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 03:32
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intoxicated they went to the doors of the poor panic-stricken Catholics shouting out that"their Papish heads would soon be on the spike". They also commenced burning their property. Enranged by all these outrages, when the standard of revolt was raised at Boolavogue, the men of Gurrawn prepared to take the field. They joined with the other fine youths of the Parish and with John Kelly of Killanne as their leader, they fought at "The Three Rocks," Enniscorthy, Gorey, New Ross, and in all the battles in which their leader fought until he was mortally wounded and executed, his head struck off, and placed on a spike over the Courthouse in Wexford.
Very few of the young returned back to Gurrawn, all the rest fell in battle in different places - But their
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 03:22
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awaiting decision
The field in which the graveyard was is called "The Graveyard Field."
Gurrawn was a flourishing and very industrious townland before the Rebellion of 1798. The population was supposed to be about 290. It was nearly all one village from the Cross of Grange to Mr. Whitney's House; and occasional house on to Castleboro. There were weavers, a cooper, a forge, a public house, a basket-maker, and a great many comfortable small farms in it :
Most of the inhabitants were Catholics and a few Protestants.
During the "Reign of Terror" that preceded the '98 Rebellion, this townland was the stronghold of the Orange Yeomen. Harry Whitney was their Commander. Every night he drilled and trained them. They resorted the public house, and when
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 03:12
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This townland was very important in the seventeenth, and eighteenth, and nineteenth Centuries, most of the land belonged to people named Jefferys and Whitneys. These were Protestants and planted there by Cromwell.
There were two breweries in the townland in the seventeenth century, the owners's name was Mr. T. Whitney. He resided in the house now occupied by Mr. W. Mooney. The ruins of the breweries are still to be seen.
There was a thatched chapel in the townland also in the Penal days. It was burned by Cromwell's followers.
There was a graveyard attached to the chapel. The holy water font, which was in the chapel may still be seen in one of the fields, where the Chapel stood in former times, and there is a legend attached to it, that it is never without water even in dry weather.
senior member (history)
2019-06-17 03:00
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Gurrawn.
The following account I have received from Mr. Thomas Blanche, aged 68, and who lives in the Townland of Gurrawn since his birth. He got the information from his father, John Blanche, who died about 50 years ago at the age of 89.
Gurrawn is derived from an Irish word "Giarrán", which means a shrubbery, In the year 1200, the monks of Graiue-na-managh had a granary there, as well as in Grange, when they had possession of all Killanne, Graigue and Graigue-na-managh.
The townland of Gurrawn is situated about one and a half miles from Rathnure and two miles from Killanne. It is in a valley at the foot of the Blackstairs Mountains, and the glens and valleys around it add to the beautiful scenery.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 03:35
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A man named Dan Tobban told some of his friends that a pot of gold was hidden under a wall of a monastery at St Mary's grave yard. Four of the men said that they would go and get it. It was a big
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 03:27
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Hidden treasure. She is eighty two years of age and she lives in Bewley St New Ross.
The story begins by twlling where the treasure is hidden. There are treasures hidden somewhere in Annas Castle. People used to go and look for the treasure, when they would get near the treasure some kind of creature would appear and guard the treasure against anybody.
On another occasion the Danes plundered many churches took the sacred vessels and hid them in many places. One day my grandmothers father and other men went out to dig treasure in Ballymacar where they were born. They were digging when the came to a slab of stone. They tried to lift up the stone, they put a man in guard of the treasure while they went to get crowbars, the man that guarded the treasure fell in and a ton of clay fell in on him and he got smothered with the clay.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 03:16
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One Saturday night a woman named Maggie Hogan told me a story about hidden treasure.
There is supposed to be treasure hidden in a field near Annas Castle, it was put there by two men who were seeing carrying a
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 03:12
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My grandmother was telling me a story about
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 03:11
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the people that crocks, or pots of gold are hidden away in the earth.
Not far from my home at a place called Cappagh in the County Kilkenny there is supposed to be a crock of gold. At various times local residents have tried digging for this gold, always at night, but were generally forced to abandon the search through fright from weird noises and lamentations.
On one occasion a local youth named "Bob the Miller" with some of his friends thought they had been digging for some time they heard strange noises and on looking around they saw an army of silent horsemen. One of the leaders drew a whip and struck "Bob the Miller" in the face. He and all his friends dropped their tools and ran in terror to their homes and since the treasure has been undisturbed. The treasure is believed to have been put there by the Irish Nobles in the time of the Danish invasion. This story was told to me by some of the people of Glenmore.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 03:00
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This story was told by an old woman named Mrs Reid Garranbehy about hidden gold. It was buried at the back of an old house in Tinckilley. It was hidden there by men who robbed in the time of Republic. One night when the old woman was telling a crowd of boys about it two of them said that they would go. They got their spades and shovels and set off across the fields to the back of the old house. When they had the sods dug up a dead man appeared to them he was all in white. When they saw him they ran for their lives leaving their spades and shovels after them.
When they went home they told the old woman the story of what the saw. She told them it was apparition the saw. It was a man who was burying the gold when he got shot. No one ever tried to get it afterwards.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:50
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be hidden in the castle.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:49
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awaiting decision
In many parts of Ireland there is a belief among
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:48
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a hard job lifting it. When they just had it lifted up they were just going to take out the money. One of them looked behind himself. When he looked around he saw a cow with red eyes approaching them he told the rest of the men and when they all looked around they got such a fright that they ran away leaving the money behind them. They said that they would never go near the place again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:43
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One day a man named Mr Freaney told me a story about hidden treasure.
Out in Annas castle in one of the dungeons There is a big chest full of treasures hidden there. Three men tried to the treasure but when they were near the chest a bull came and chased them away. They dug a large in the ground by the side of the castles. The men were very excited at the thought of getting the chest of gold. They took off their coats, and they began to dig furiously for the treasure
They had about half a yard to dig, when the black bull followed them away. Nobody has tried to get the treasure since that night.
It is never known who put the treasure . There were gold cups and gold coins in the chest. It is supposed to
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:31
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hills the people say three men went to dig for it when they were down about half way a red bull appeared and they left it so.
On the bank of the river at the northern side of the Ferry Bridge there is gold hidden and silver. My father told me that four men went to dig for it when they were down about three quarter way a fierce looking wolf hound appeared to them. They were frightened they went home and got a ball of woollen thread and they wet it with holy water and placed it round the hole and nothing appeared after but they did not get the treasure. In the Island pill near Mac Murrough there is gold and money hidden under the water ground.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:23
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I was told a story about hidden treasure on Sunday by an old man named William Hollern. He told me that there was money hidden in a place near Dunphy's old Mills Bawnmore. One day the people in the street said that they would go and get it. The money was hidden under a large stone it is said that it is there since the time of the Danes.
When they arrived at the place they decided that they would lift up the stone. When they got their spades and crowbars They had
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:18
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long time they thought that they were after hitting something.
They stopped digging for a while and they thought they heard something walking. The men were getting frightened then they saw a horse coming to them and they ran away.
These men went home very frightened they left their picks and spades after them they got such a fright when they saw the horse. The next night they went out with some more men. They started to dig up the place because it was covered in.
The first thing they found was the picks and spades that the five men left after them the night before. The men that were there the night before were afraid of the horse. But the other were not until they saw the horse and then the ran as quickly as the men the night before. They did not get the treasure nor never tried any more.
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:09
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In Mount Garret castle there is alot of treasure such as ammunition money and gold. If the stones and clay was taken away so that you could get down under ground you would find the treasure
My father told me this. On the hill of Ballymacare there is hidden treasure such as silver gold and chalices it was once called the "Convent of the Black Nuns" my cousin told me, There is gold hidden in Ballyanne
senior member (history)
2019-06-16 02:03
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There is hidden treasure in Nevill's wood. It is supposed to be there for the past two hundred and twenty years. It is silver it was put by some robber who hid it there in case someone would get it and keep it. When the robber left the place some men tried to get it but were not able.
A horse used to appear to them. One night five men went out with spades and picks and started to dig for the treasure. They were digging for a long time before they could reach it. After digging for a
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 04:03
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awaiting decision
Uncle Bob stopped with his aunt in Ballymurren
He got up this morning anyhow an' he went out for butter to the dairy for his breakfast.
When he went to the door it was all covered with mouldy butter,
an' when he went inside, it was the same.
He went to his aunt an' asked her
what was wrong with the butter.
He tould her all about it. She tould
him that the butter was gone
They were churning a couple of
days after, "An be whip to it, if I
was to stay churning all day I'd
never have a bit of butter only a
churn of froth," says Bob.
There was a fairy man living near by. an Bob went to him an' tauld him his story. The fairy man went down in a room and started to go around it.
After a certain length of time he stopped at one spot in the room.
An' "Be whip to it" says Bob, "you could hear milk flowin' in all quarters an'
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:48
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not a single cow in all the house."
He went home that night an' he
hardly had cans enough to hould
the milk an' when he churned he
had a churn of butter.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:43
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awaiting decision
Do you know where the
cottage is at the butt of
the hill of Kellystown, well
there is an ould Corrigeen
to the right there, and a
man named Nolan was
coming home wan night and
he heard horses coming up
the hill gallopin' like
the divel.
He kep in and only for
his mother - she was dead -
the head would be cut
off him.
His mother stood behind him
and held her arm over
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:35
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awaiting decision
There was an old woman living in Newbawn and she had a son in Kilbarney and he come home to her one day and sez he, "Mother I'm tired dreaming about sixty soverns that's under the leg of the bed."
"Tut you fool", sez she. "They weren't sixty soverns in the house this hundred years."
He said he'd dig it up, but she would not agree with him, she said, "You tare up the flure!"
He waited until she went some where. Then he pulled out the bed, and dug up the floor, and found the money under a slate in the very place he dreamt about.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:24
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awaiting decision
There was a poor man with a wife and family.
He was in need of food and clothes.
An old man told him there was money near the Castle of Treacystown.
One night he went to dig for the money.
He was no length digging when he heard fairies singing, "Monday, Tuesday".
He went nearer the castle and said, "Wednesday."
The fairies were delighted with him for making their song longer
This man had two humps and the fairies took them off.
He ran home and told another man who had three humps.
This man was delighted, and he went to the castle, and stayed there until he heard the fairies, singing "Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. He said "Thursday,
The fairies brought him in and they were vexed with him for making their song too long. They put another hump on him and he never had anything to do with fairies again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 03:04
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Ould Jim Cullen and his wife were goin' to town one day and when they were goin' down the hill of Brownstown the band came off one of the wheels, and passed them, "And "be dammy but", Jim, what kind of a bicycle is that,?" sez she.
"Begob", sez he "Sure its he bicycle of our wheel.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:54
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awaiting decision
and remained till mid night keeping the child. On coming back the first house was in great commotion, the child there having become suddenly ill. It was explained that little Paddy had been put to bed early + in good form + woke up suddenly very ill.
Peggy Kirwan said "Thats not Paddy here he is" + she produced the real Paddy. The iarlais was immediately "put out on the shovel" + thee was great rejoicing but we were not told what happened the iarlais but Miss O Connor thinks the fairies took it off
Aidan Dempsey (afore mentioned) when coming home one night between 9 + 10 p.m. saw a dresser of delph in John Darby's gravel hole.
Margaret Murray while milking at Aidan Dempseys was knocked down by a strange woman who quickly disappeared.
Pat Dempsey (brother of Aidans) saw a child in white climb the ladder to the barn loft + disappear into air.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Miss O'Connors next door neighbours - Dempseys had a child - eldest son named Con
The child's baptism was delayed so that the mother could take part in the doings that were planned. He was a lovely bonny baby but he suddenly changed and they thought that the fairies had taken him off + put some child in his place. They brought him and dipped him in Coolane well and finally put him out on the shovel for the fairies to take him but they did not. The child lived till he was four years.
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Here is another "Fairy" story
An old lady named Peggy Kirwan who lived where Crane's cottage is situated now Kilmaest told the foll story to Miss O'Connor's mother, Another woman + Peggy went to a wake at night. It happened that the "wake" house was in the same bán as another house - two houses in one bán.
In going to the wake house they saw a hardy little child about 10 months half way out through the window in the gable end of the house. They took the child with them to the "wake" house
senior member (history)
2019-06-15 02:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Miss O'Connor already mentioned told the foll :-
The buachaill aimsiri in the old days used to herd horses when the days work was done. A certain John Wafer grandfather to Kehoes Mill Pond in this neighbourhood sent his "boy" to herd horses
The boy slept and it was night when he woke, and he got a great fright when he saw a woman standing in night attire near him. He spoke to her but she did not answer. He brought her to his employer's house but still she did not speak. She remained on for about a year in the same silence.
One night the boy heard voices which said :- "If only the bit of rush under her tongue were taken away she'd soon speak.
This was done and the woman soon got back her speech and told them she was taken away on her wedding night from the County Tipperary.
She was brought back to her friends and the boy was rewarded with his passage money to America.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man wan time who was reared as a pet.
He was the youngest son of a widow, and he married a neighbouring girl who had a house of her own.
This man's name was Jack Coleman.
After goin' to live with his wife in her farm, he became very morose and silent an' lost all his jolly ways
His wife consulted a neighbouring woman an' told her of his silent an' serious disposition.
"Wait", said the woman, "I bet yeh, I'll make him laugh to-morrow."
The following day, when they were eatin' their dinner, this woman flung a cock with the feathers all plucked off, in over the half-door, on to the kitchen floor, with the result the Misses and the servants went into fits of laughter, but Jack only said, "How funny yez are"
The wife next went to his mother and told her about Jack.
The mother asked her did she ever give him the serapin' of the pot, she said "No"
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following day when the Misses was serving the sweet after the dinner, she asked Jack would he like to scrape the scillit
Jack got up and gripped the scillit, an' after takin' a few spoonfuls, he burst into laughter exclaiming aloud,
"Will yez ever forget the ould cock that came in yesterday an' we atein' our dinner"?
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The dog was nearly as big as an ass.
He went ahead in front of them; his two red eyes were blazing in his head. Dan got a fright. He never saw the dog before.
Pat said, "God, don't mind him young fellow."
Dan never went that way in the night, but the dog passed him.
The were very near home by the time the dog passed them.
When they came to the field at their own house, they saw a lot of little men, with red caps, kicking football.
They sat down on a big stone and watched them for about a quarter of an hour, then all of a sudden the little men disappeared so the two got up and went home to bed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The dog was nearly as big as an ass.
He went ahead in front of them; his two red eyes were blazing iin his head. Dan got a fright. He never saw the dog before.
Pat said, "God, don't mind him young fellow."
Dan never went that way in the night, but the dog passed him.
The were very near home by the time the dog passed them.
When they came to the field at their own house, they saw a lot of little men, with red caps, kicking football.
They sat down on a big stone and watched them for about a quarter of an hour, then all of a sudden the little men disappeared so the two got up and went home to bed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some time ago there used to be a black dog seen on the Killystown road, between Ger Gorman's and the Leap.
There is a path through a field by the side of the road, and no one has ever crossed it, after dark.
There were two families named Morrissey living in Doonooney, and a boy out of each house used to ramble together at night. Pat Morrissey was one of the boys and Dan Morrissey was the other.
Pat used to call Dan the young fellow.
They were out very late this night, and they were coming home through Kellystown. It was about two oclock in the mornin'. They came to this path.
Pat wouldn't go around the lane, so the two got over the stile, and they talked away 'till they reached the middle of the field. It was a fine moonshiny night an' all of a sudden Pat said, "Good God young fellow," keep in an' let the beggar pass."
They could hear him trottin' like a pony long before he came up to them
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Two ould people lived in Coolnagree, be the name of Phil and Mary Jackman.
They were after gettin' so ould that they didn't know Sunday from Monday.
This day they went to sow pyates and it happened to be Saint Patrick's Day.
When Stasia Wickham was goin' down the lane for a can of water Phil asked her what time was it.
"What time is it Stasia", says Phil
"The people'll soon be comin' home from second Mass". says Stasia.
"What "! says Phil.
"They'll soon be comin' home from second Mass," says she.
Wud that he took off his hat and blessed himself and sez he, "Pick 'em up Mary, pick 'em up."
"What are you sayin'," sez she.
"Pick 'em up", sez he "This is Saint Patrick's Day."
They began pickin' up the pyates, and they picked up all the pyates that they had sown since morning.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 03:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
early in the evening in the centre of a field, it is a sign of fine weather
22 There is an old saying "Wet Sunday wet week."
23 When the sea-gulls fly inland it is said that they bring us the rain.
24 When the ducks quack loudly all day rain is sure to answer their request on the following day.
25 "The evening (sky) red, and the morning, grey.
The traveller may go on his way.
The evening grey and the morning red,
The rain falls on the traveller's head."
26 When the goats gather looking for shelter it is the sign of a thunderstorm.
27 A cock crowing going to bed is sure to rise with a watery head
28 A circle around the moon is a sign of a change, and the farther the circle from the moon the nearer the rain.
29 Twinkling stars and falling stars are signs that it is freezing.
30 No morning sun lasts a whole day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the sign of wet weather.
11 When far away hills look near it is the sign of rain.
12 When snipe are heard whistling it is a sign of rain.
13 When the crickets are heard singing in the hob it is a sign of rain.
14 When a frog or a beetle it is a sign that the coming weather will be wet.
15 When the seagulls light on the land, it is the sign of rain.
There is an old saying, which runs as follows :
16 "Seagulls, seagulls sitting on the strand,
We'll have no fine weather, when you'll come to the land."
17 When frogs change their colour, it is a sign of rain.
18 When you see the sheep grazing anxiously in the middle of the field it is the sign of rain.
19 When a cement floor weeps, and when salt weeps, it is a sign of rain.
20 When there is a circle around the moon, it is a sign of rain.
21 When the sheep are lying down
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the sign of wet weather.
11 When far away hills look near it is the sign of rain.
12 When snipe are heard whistling it is a sign of rain.
13 When the crickets are heard singing in the hob it is a sign of rain.
14 When a frog or a beetle it is a sign that the coming weather will be wet.
15 When the seagulls light on the land, it is the sign of rain.
There is an old saying, which runs as follows :
16 "Seagulls, seagulls sitting on the strand,
We'll have no fine weather, when you'll come to the land."
17 When frogs change their colour, it is a sign of rain.
18 When you see the sheep grazing anxiously in the middle of the field it is the sign of rain.
19 When a cement floor weeps, and when salt weeps, it is a sign of rain.
20 When there is a circle around the moon, it is a sign of rain.
21 When the sheep are lying down
16
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. When a cat sits with her back to the fire it is a sign of hard weather.
2. A rainbow in the morning is the shephard's warning, a rainbow at night is the shephard's delight.
3. When an ass is seen going to the sheltry side of a field it is the sign of rain.
4. When the swallows fly high it is the sign of fine weather, and when they fly low it is the sign of bad weather.
5. When the wind is in the East it is not fit for man or beast.
6. When Carrigbyrne puts on her hood the Coonogue river is at a flood,
7. Miss Byrne has on her hood (Miss Byrne refers to Carigbyrne Hill.)
8. If you see a dog eating grass it is a sign of rain.
9. When we hear the crows calling it is the sign of a storm.
10. When smoke goes straight to the sky it is the sign of fine weather, and when it goes to the ground it is
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr M. Fortune
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The church meadow.
b. The glibe

Owner :-
Mr T. Furlong.
Knockreigh,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a The white mountain.

Owner :-
Rev Father Wallace.
Adamstown,
Co Wexford
a The castle field
b. The sand pit field.

Owner :-
Daniel Crean.
Glenour,
Adamstown
Co Wexford.
a The white field b. the old town
c The rath field d. The big field
e The gooseberry garden
f The back o' the house.
g. The Curcheen
h. The field over the mill
senior member (history)
2019-06-14 02:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner
Mr J O Gorman.
Poulpeasty.
a. The race course
b. Miss Annie's field
c. The orchard.
d The blessed well field

Owner :-
Mr A Whelan.
Rathquile
Adamstown
a. The spade step field

Owner:-
Mr P Jackman.
Ratheenduff
Adamstown
a. the bawn fother
b. The blind field.

Owner :-
Mr P. Murphy.
Knockreigh,
Adamstown,
Co Wexford.
a. The pullavones.
b. The spade step
c. The fox burrow.
d. Carney's knock.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 03:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Patrick Whitty of Loughnageer is a great vet. People come from all over the district and twelve miles further when an animal is sick or complaining either a horse or a cow. He is over thirty years at the business and how he learned it first was. Great vets from all over the country used to be lecturing in Clongeen school, and he always went to listen to them. He remembered what they said, he was always getting some one to read books for him, for he could not read himself. And that is how he learned to cure the animals.
He has been known to cure all kinds of diseases and complaints in cattle (mostly) almost daily and very often four or fives times to some farmer's place to attend to or prescribe for some sick beast.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 03:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are four forges in the district
Toomey's. Rowe's, Walshe's, and Cullens.
Toomey's is situated in Foulksmills
Rowe's in Ballylannon, Walshe's in Newcastle, and Cullen's in Mullenderry.
Cullen's is more of a foundry than a forge. They mend machines and motor cars. They also shoe horses and asses. Toomeys shoe horses and asses also. Rowes mend machines and shoe horses and asses. Walshes shoe horses and asses.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are three local forges around Foulksmills, one is roofed with slates and the other is thatched and the other is part covered with timber and felt and corrugated iron. The smith makes the shoes, and shoes horses and asses and makes and repairs farm implements and machinery
Some smiths are not as good as others, nor have the tools to work with. Some people
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Here are some old sayings and proverbs "Like Moll Lams lamentation " sorry too late. This is said about people who lament when the thing is done and it is too late.
"Like Mary of the stream always cleaning but never clean," is another old saying.
When a person likes to be friends with all sides it is said. He is like "leana mo croidhe's dog", he goes a bit of the road with everyone.
Here are other proverbs.
"A rolling stone gathers no moss."
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the cross of Clongeen at a place known as Foley's pond, unbaptised children were buried and it is still regarded as a sacred spot, at local funerals the corpse is carried round this spot before it is brought to the churchyard to be interred.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fr Thomas Broaders - who banished the devil from Loftus - hall - is buried in Horetown churchyard in this parish.
The story is well known in this district.
The inscription on the "cenotaph" - is written in Latin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Everyone in this district will remember for a long time the night of the 24th June 1935. There was a terrible thunder-storm that night and vivid flashes of forked lightning could be seen every five minutes or oftener.
It all came very suddenly and it got so heavy all in a few minutes that very many local people were caught out away from home and had to spend the night wherever they happened to be at 8 o'clock when the Tempest began.
The storm was accompanied by deluges of rain and as a local resident has an instrument for collecting rainfall returns it can be definately stated that on that night 1.99" of rain fell in Foulksmills district. In the all Ireland returns for month of June '35, the above figure was given as being the highest daily rainfall.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a heavy storm about twentyfour years ago. There was a ship wrecked in Bannow Bay on the Keeragh Rocks just out from the strand in Cullenstown. Nine members of the Fethard life-boat crew lost their lives going to the rescue.
The storm lasted for three days and the survivors of the "Mexico" the wrecked ship had to remain on the rocks for three days as no other lifeboat could reach them. During that time one of the crew of the ill-fated vessel died. Some of the bodies were washed ashore at Cullenstown and taken by road to Fethard where a memorial has been erected.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of a bleak hill, the side-car in which they were travelling rose up on one wheel several times until finally it turned over and the occupants were thrown out but escaped serious injury.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 02:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a house blown down up the back road (leading from Foulksmills to Horetown) where the ruins are still to be seen.
It was owned by a man named Cullen who lived in it at that time, there was nobody in the house only himself. The end wall and a piece of the roof fell, he was slightly injured and he slept in another house for that night.
There was straw to be seen the next morning in the tops of all the trees around.
Three men were travelling home from town one night named James Fitzpatrick and the other two were brothers named Hanlon, they were all from the Horetown district
When they were on the top
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:51
approved
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awaiting decision
It is said that "The Big Wind" blew down one tree and that softened the earth around it and the rest of them fell. Several other trees in different parts also.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1915 the greatest fall of snow that ever fell fell in that year. It was in the month of January and about eight feet of snow fell.
On the 24th of June 1935 the greatest thunder storm that was ever heard in Ireland was heard in that month. It was the heaviest that was heard for fifty years. It did a lot of damage through the country it knocked down trees and killed two people in the north of Ireland. It started at eight o'clock in the evening and it lasted until four o'clock in the morning. Also with it heavy rain fell.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:41
approved
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awaiting decision
There was much damage caused by a great storm which occurred in February 1839 it lasted from 21st to 25th the wind blew down trees and a few houses and caused lots of other destruction. On the day after the storm it was discovered that in the big wood about 3/4 of an acre of trees was blown down.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Lucky Cobbler"
There was a cobbler once upon a time, he got run out of wax. He went to a neighbour for a loan of a bit across the fields. He got the wax and had it in his hand What arose from a bunch of ferns but a hare,
He had nothing but the wax to throw at it but the wax to throw at it. He struck the hare with it, and it stuck to the animals forehead.
The cobbler went home saying to himself, how unfortunate I was to throw it at all, As he drew near home, he was startled to see two hares stuck together with the wax between them.
He caught them, and had two hares, and wax going home.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Two men were walking together through a field one day. One of the men owned the men owned the the field his name was Richard Purcell.
The other was a friend was a friend of his. As they walked through the field it appeared to one of them that there were pieces of gold thrown around the field. He said to Mr. Purcell, "look at all the gold", "where" said the other and when they looked again, they were all changed to bits of stone. It was called the money moor' ever after.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:18
approved
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awaiting decision
a parcel rolled up in the vestry. Next Wednesday is the feast of Mary Roche and Tom Magee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:16
approved
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awaiting decision
Once a priest named Fr O'Connor was sick in Ballymitty. He told "the boy" to go out and tell the people -
"that the priest was sick; and it was no sin because they were not attending at mass; - that there were confessions on next Thursday; - and next Friday was the first Friday; on next Tuesday we will be celebrating the feast of St Peter and St Paul. On next Wednesday the marriage will take place between Mary Roche and Tom Magee and if anyone knows of any impediment they are bound to make it known as soon as possible. There was a parcel found, it's in the vestry for the owner."
= The boy went out and said - " ladies and gentlemen. the priest is sick and that's no sin. Next Thursday is the first Friday, and next Tuesday is the marriage between St Peter and Paul, if any of you know why they shouldn't be married, you will get it in
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 01:01
approved
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awaiting decision
about twelve o'clock, and goes from that to Clonmines castles.
Some people say that the policeman who shot himself at the cottage in Coolbrook comes along by Doyles and crosses the river at Grebbells and goes up to the churchyard and goes through Wade's field and up to his grave.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 00:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are four graveyards in the parish of Clongeen, one in Farree, one in Cullenstown one in Horetown and the parish graveyard.
The graveyard in Faree was closed in 1920 for there was a dispute over it for the Protestants said that it was a Protestant yard and the Catholics said it was not. It was opened again in 1924, and it is open ever since.
Also in it the ruins of a church may be seen, there are people named Farrells buried in it. There is a stone coffin in it. It is surrounded by palm and yew trees.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 00:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Newbawn people say that a lot of unbaptised children are buried in a little nook, just where James Brown lives at present. Some people say that they saw a light arising from this place and going down to the churchyard. No children are buried there now.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 00:46
approved
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awaiting decision
In Ballylannon there is a very old churchyard and the old Church is there for over a hundred years. The oldest grave in it is 1804. The ruins of the old church are still to be seen.
Mr. Leigh of Rosegarland has made it into a vault. It is not level but slopes towards the east, some of the tombs are made of iron and more of stone. It is said that one time long ago a man caught a hare upon one of the graves, and that man's spirit used to come back.
The hare was seen by some people since, and it was heard bawling
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 00:39
approved
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awaiting decision
A blessed well is near it, and it is called "hady's well."
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 00:38
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awaiting decision
The churchyard of Owenduff is square in shape and sloping towards the rising sun. It is still used as a burial ground. In the middle of the graveyard there stands the ruins of an old church, and it is not so many years since mass was said in it.
There is a story also about it. A man one day brought home the old stone holy water font, to feed a horse out of. He left it in the stable, and when he got up in the morning to feed the horse the font was gone. He went to the graveyard and there he saw it, but he did not bring it home this time. There are a lot of trees around it now.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 00:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The churchyard of Owenduff is suuare in shape and sloping towards the rising sun. It is still used as a burial ground. In the middle of the graveyard there stands the ruins of an old church, and it is not so many years since mass was said in it.
There is a story also about it. A man one day brought home the old stone holy water font, to feed a horse out of. He left it in the stable, and when he got up in the morning to feed the horse the font was gone. He went to the graveyard and there he saw it, but he did not bring it home this time. There are a lot of trees around it now.
senior member (history)
2019-06-13 00:30
approved
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awaiting decision
The church - of Inch is on the bank of the Owenduff river.
It is round in shape and is now closed up by hawthorns and bushes.
It is over a hundred years ago since anyone was buried in it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 04:21
approved
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awaiting decision
The National School in Clongeen was built in 1843, and it was used as N.S. until 1936 although it was condemned as unsuitable in 1900. The following is a table of some of the masters who taught there.
John Fowler
Appointed 1st January 1867
Left 31st December 1872
Thomas Furlong
apptd 1st January 1873
left 31st May 1873.
Catherine Groves a local resident kept the school open from 1st June to 17th June 1873
Patrick Galvin
appointed 30th June 1873
left 9th August 1875.
John B. O Lonergan
appointed 12th August 1875
left 1st Jan 1876
James Fitzgerald
appointed 31st January 1876
left 30th August 1876
William Bennett
appointed 1st September 1876
now resides in Taghmon
James Howlin
succeeded him for 7 or 8 years.
now resides on his farm in Wellingtonbridge.
Martin Byrne Prin Teacher from 1893 to 1931 when he resigned
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 04:00
approved
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awaiting decision
his term as Bishop of Ferns in 1801.
"Average income of the Bishop 300£
There are thirtysix parishes in the
Diocese with thirtysix Parish Priests and twenty curates all seculars.
The Diocese is fiftyfour miles long and twentyfour wide having an area of 82 square miles.
There are 15 Regular Clergy
8 Franciscans in Wexford.
4 Augustinians in NewRoss.
2 Augustinians in Grantstown Convent which was changed over from Clonmines.
1 Carmelite friar in Horetown
The Easter Dues were paid in corn - one bushel per score - acres."
Taken from Local Paper Clippings.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 03:45
approved
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awaiting decision
In years gone by a Latin teacher lived in Horetown about one mile and a half from he village of Foulksmills.
He was a very learned man and I think it was in the Carmelite Convent of Horetown that he thought the Latin but perhaps he had a school of his own as well, there are accounts of Hedge schools being held in that area. The Convent was situated in Horetown or Goff'sbridge up a small laneway from the road at the back of the place where "Goffsbridge Inn" now stands. There was one priest there - we find reference to him in a letter from Bishop Caulfield to the Pope during
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 03:35
approved
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awaiting decision
The pupils sat on stones when the master taught them sums, writing and arithmetic, and they wrote on slates.
They were not taught any Irish, both girls and boys were taught together.
There was another such school at Smyth's cross in Bryanstown
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 03:31
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a hedge school in a barn near Collop's Well near the Blessed Well of Tubber-Da-Annraoi and the scholars never wrote with a pencil but on some kind of slates with a long-shaped stone pencil a black-board was never used but a larger slate. They mostly learned rural science. They sat on stools and were poorly clad. The teacher's name is not known. Some English was taught there. The teacher was caught by the English soldiers as he teaching his pupils and arrested and they brought him away he was never heard of again. His little school was thrown down and his pupils were scattered.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 03:20
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awaiting decision
by a teacher named John Mullins. The pupil's paid the teacher at 3d per week. Arithmetic and Irish that was all that was taught in it. He had a very little knowledge of English at all. There was an old hedge school in a moor a rather lonely spot about 800 yds from the village of Foulksmills. The moor is now owned by Mr. Hickey, there are large stones to be still seen on the spot.
It was said that the teacher was caught by an English spy as he was teaching, and the pupils were sold as slaves.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 03:10
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a hedge school in Goffsbridge in a little house now owned by Mr. Crosbie near the bridge. The pupils sat on stools made of wood and they wrote on slates with slate pencils.
There was a hedge school in Loughnageer also in Bohannas' barn, about eighty years ago. A teacher named Bennett taught the boys in it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-12 03:03
approved
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awaiting decision
There was an old hedge school in Horetown during the penal days, it was a small construction
it was owned by a man named Cunningham, and given by him as a school. It consisted of nine or ten pupils. They were taught
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 03:52
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The fairy forts in this district are commonly known as "raths". In each townland there is at least one "rath", and in some townlands two or three. They are so numerous that "Rathnure" derives its name from them "Ráth - an- iubhair," which means the "rath" of the yew tree". The yew trees were plentiful also near those "raths". They are all of a circular shape, and most of them have three rings around them. In some of the townlands they are supposed to have been built by the De Dananns and in others by the Danes,
The residence was built in the inner ring. These residences are supposed to have been built either with mud or wood, or wattles daubed with clay. There were two or three ramparts
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 03:38
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was coming from work in a farmer's house in Ballybawn, he had to cross a style wich was in a field, belonging to Mr. John Quigley, Ballybawn leading to another field in which a rath was situated. Crossing one of the steps his foot slipped, and he heard great laughing in the rath. He tried again, his foot slipped, and he fell. There were then roars of laughter in the rath.
When he got up, he did not try to cross the style again, but returned to the road, and went home that way. He never went by the rath since that night.
Some of the farmers till the raths inside. They sow potatoes, and other vegetables in them, but they never interfere with the mounds or rings which surround them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 03:27
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rejected
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There is a rath in the townland of Monamolin, on the land of Mr. James Kehoe. Mr. Kehoe and his servant boy went out one day to level the rath, and worked until noon.
When he came home to his dinner he found a fine sow had perished, and a week afterwards he lost a young calf.
He never after interfered with the rath.
It is believed that there is a pan of gold under an ivy hawthorn. which grows on the inner ring of Mr. James Kehoe's rath, but no one ever tried to look for it, as people believe it is unlucky to meddle with the rings.
There was a rath situated on the land of Mr. Michael Kelly, Rathnure. His brother John levelled this rath with the result that he died after a month.
One night as John Martin, a carpenter
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 03:12
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Grange. He is 56 years of age, and can tell this story about his brother.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 03:10
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awaiting decision
home, but did not put any seem in James. They thought he was only loitering behind. When Patrick O'Brien was a time at home sitting by the fireside with his mother, both got anxious about James, so Patrick said he would go meet him. Just in the act of going out by the doorway he saw James opening the yard gate and making his way home as best he could. When he reached the door, and just at the entrance he fell down in a swoon. Patrick lifted him up, brought him into the fire, and saw he was all black and blue and bruised and cut. When he came to himself he told the whole story to his mother and Patrick.
He went to bed that night, but never rose out of it. He died after three weeks from the shock and the beating he got.
Patrick O'Brien is still living in
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 03:00
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is a rath in Grange on the land of Mr. George Grothier. One night as some boys were going home from playing a game of cards in Rathnure in a friend's house, they had to pass by this rath. Their names were Patrick and James O'Brien, brothers, James Burke, and Jack Caulfield. It was a moonlit night. Just passing the rath James O'Brien stopped behind to tie his boot-lace which was opened. He rested his foot on a stone, and just as he was in the act of stooping down to tie the lace, he was lifted into the rath. The "fairies" gave him a great beating. The others of the company continued their journey
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 02:51
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rejected
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there. Mr. Thomas Blanche, who resides in Gurrawn told me about this rath. He is 68 years of age, and he often heard the old people in Gurrawn relating this story.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 02:48
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Tea was unknown in the district at that time. The chief food was oatmeal bread, porridge, potatoes, and buttermilk.
On Easter morning they feasted on eggs for breakfast. They used two or three eggs each.
Wheaten meal bread was also used.
The wheat was grown on the land, and ground between two flat stones, the wheaten meal then was formed into a dough with buttermilk or thick Skim milk to which a little salt and breadsoda were added. It was then shaped into cakes and baked in a pot-oven.
Potato-cake was also used. The potatoes were boiled and mashed up finely, mixed with a little flour, a little salt and wet with sweet milk. It was made into a dough, rolled out very thinly, cut into quarters, and baked on a griddle. The griddle was well greased or buttered.
senior member (history)
2019-06-11 02:38
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rejected
awaiting decision