Number of records in editorial history: 7197 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-01-20 03:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that if you lick a lizard's stomach you can cure a scald. The lizard must be a live one. Manure is put on the scald if you lick it off the scald is cured.
There is another cure for the chincough. Throw the child who has it in under an asse's stomach, run around as quickly as possible to the other side and catch the child before it falls to the ground. This is said to be true.
There is one about warts. Rub a snails spit on the warts then put the snail on a hawthorn but do not stick it on a thorn. If it dies the warts are said to go away. Also cut a potatoe in halves rub it on the warts bury it in the ground and if it dies the warts will die away. If you do it with a snail you must not do it with a potatoe.
Put a frog in your mouth when you have a toothache and you will never have a toothache again.
Boil sheep's manure in water or milk and give it to people who have the measles and it will cure them.
Old people believe that it is good
senior member (history)
2020-01-20 03:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is time enough to bid the devil good-morrow when you will meet him.
You might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb.
The old dog for the hard road and the pup for the path.
A new broom sweeps clean.
A gold ring in a pig's nose.
A weet Friday a weet Sunday.
Marry in haste and repent at leisure.
You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.
You cannot take a glove off the hand that it is not on.
Have it yourself or be without it. Half a loaf is better than no bread. It's as long as' long as the eleventh of June.
It's as tight as twopence.
It's as old as the field behind the house.
Everyone for himself and God for us all.
It's a bad wind that doesn't blow fair for someone.
What seen is believed.
One penny in the money box makes more noise than when full.
senior member (history)
2020-01-20 03:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the morning is a sign of a storm and a rainbow in the night is a sign of fine weather. There is an old proverb which says, - "A rainbow in the morning is a sailor's warning, a rainbow in the night is a sailor's delight."
The old man's weather glass is a flower which only opens when the sun is going to shine.
It is a sign of wet weather to see a new moon on a Saturday for the proverb says "Saturday's moon is a month too soon".
There is an old proverb which says, - "A shower of hail in May is worth a load of hay." Another proverb is - "Wet and windy May fills the haggard with corn and hay."
Slugs in the road is a sign of rain. When the river is clear it is a sign of good weather and when the river is dirty it is a sign of bad weather. If the stars shine bright you will have bad weather. If the salt is wet you will have bad weather. If the dog sleeps in the morning you will have bad weather. If you saw a fog in a valley you will have bad weather. When there is to rain the fowl will all, into the house
senior member (history)
2020-01-20 02:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have horses, cows, sheep, pigs, and calves. We have six cows and they are all named, Annaghs, Nellie, Daisy, Polly, Topsy and Susie. Chew on" is said when driving the cowes and "Chew home is said" home is said when bringing them home. When you are bringing in the calves you say Suck! Suck! and they come to you.
The cowhouse is a long range with bales by one wall dividing the cows, each bale for a cow and are tied with chain tying round the neck. They are tied to part of bale. The horses have the same type of a house each horse in a closed-in stall. Each horse has a large manger which holds the fodder and oats and mangolds. They are shod at a blacksmith's forge.
They are clipped once a year in the winter-time. You say "Come! Come! when you are calling.
You say Ma! Ma! when you are calling sheep.
You say Hurrishe! Hurrishe! we when you are calling pigs. You say Chuck! Chuck! when you are call-
senior member (history)
2020-01-20 02:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
each of players in turn and she gives the button to one of the other players. She asks one of the other players to guess who has the button. They keep guessing until the player who has the button is guessed and which ever player guesses the right person she gets the button to go round.
Frog in the middle" is played by girls. One girl is the frog and the rest catch hands and stand in a ring. They run round the frog. They say frog in the middle jump up," and the frog catches one of the girls and if she says the girls name that girl is the frog.
Fox-and-goose is an indoor game. Only two can play it. A number of squares are made on a copy-book page and one of the players draws any letter in the square. The players must have different letters and if the player suceeds in getting his letter at each side of the other players
senior member (history)
2020-01-20 02:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of the team which is out suceeds in catching the ball before it hits the ground the team is in but if he does not he will throw the ball after the boy and if he hits the boy who is running the team will be in. Only one chance is given to the boy to throw the ball.
The team which makes the most rounds wins the game.
Witch-in-the-well is played by girls. One of the girls is the mother. The rest of the girls are her children. She sends them to the well for water. Each time they go the witch keeps one of her children until the mother has no children.
Then she goes to the house of the witch and she has to go and fight for her children. The children help her. The witch is driven away and the children are brought home.
"Hide the button" is an indoor game. Boys and girls play that game. The player's sit in a row and join their hands. One of the players has a button and she goes to
senior member (history)
2020-01-20 02:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
letter he owns that letter and so on until all the squares are filled.
The player with the most letters wins.
"Billy four corners is played by five people. The four stand about eight feet appart. The other player stands in the middle as a fool. The other players exchange corners and if the fool gets in before the player that player is the foal. Stoop tig is played like ordany tig.
senior member (history)
2020-01-18 04:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Shops were scarce in the country districts in olden times. People used to go to town at the end of the week to purchase goods. Buying and selling were carried on after. Mass in former times. Articles such as tea, sugar, stockings, laces, tobacco, and matches were sold. These articles are not usually sold after Mass nowadays.
An old woman used to live where Miss Sane of Piercestown lives now.
Her name was Kate Mac Donald. She used to make toffee, and anyone who bought sixpence worth of goods, used to get a lump of it. After the Masses on Sundays she did a good trade, mostly in clay pipes and tobacco.
If a person were buying goods and had not the money to pay for them, at the moment, he would get them on "tick," which meant he would pay later. If two persons were exchanging goods, and one person's goods were of greater value than the other's, the person with the less valuable goods would give the other man some soney, called "boot."
Men called pedlars used to
senior member (history)
2020-01-18 03:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kilmachree is the name of an old parish about two miles from the school.
The name seems to mean the Church or Bell of St. Mochree. The natives pronounce the name as if it were meant Cill Mo Croide, the church of my heart. The old church of Kilmachree is situated in a townland of the same name, and to the left of the road as you go from Wexford to Killinick village, and about three Irish miles to the south of the farmer. This church was opened for service in 1797.
Before this time Mass was celebrated in a little mud building (which was roofed with thatch.) at "Amens" cross,
One day when Mass was being celebrated a quaker named Mr Jacob Poole was passing by. He saw the congregation kneeling on straw in the mud. Taking pity on them he bestowed a portion of land on which the present church was built, known as Kilmachree church. A man named Ned Crowley travelled far and near collecting for the church funds. A slab to his memory is erected in the church wall. The words, "Pray for Ned Crowley" are printed on the slab. The Rev. Denis
senior member (history)
2020-01-18 03:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Leipreachan is known by , various names in this locality as "lutharagan," the "merrily Gog" "Jack 'o the Lantern" "Will 'o the Wisp" and the "little green man." He is about two feet in height. He wears a green coat with a red cap which tapers to a top. Out from the top of this cap comes a tassel. He spends most of his time making and repairing shoes under the buachalan. He also minds gold.
Tom Waters of Rathjarney caught the Leipreachan. The Leipreachan told him to look behind him to see who was coming.
He did so and when he looked back the Leipreachan was gone. Tom caught him thinking that he would deliver up his crock of gold which he had but he was too clever for him.
It is a common belief around here that he lives under ferns and under bushes at the banks of rivers, in holes in rocks and under the blackthorn bush.
senior member (history)
2020-01-18 03:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The fox is a very clever animal. Stories connected with his doings are always amusing. One winters night many neigbours were gathered together around a log in a farmers house. The talk came about fox hunting. "Well" said one old farmer, the fox has certain virtues of his own. I knew a poor widow, who had the finest flocks of geese, ducks, turkeys and hens in the country. The covert was close by, and although she was a widow and the fox knew it, he never touched a feather on the fowl. There they were, crowing and cackling and sailing over the pond under his nose and he never at them.
But one winter came in very cold, and the country was snowed up all around, and the fox got hungry. One night he went to the widow's yard and took away one of her finest hens.
When she discovered her loss she was angry.
The weather cleared up again and one morning when the widow came out to count her chickens, she found she had to more than the right number. "Well she said to herself "those are'nt mine". Just then she looked up and there
senior member (history)
2020-01-15 03:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
----------
Wan time there was a fella up in Rathgarogue lavin home an goin' out in the world, an' his father started to give him a little advice before he went.
He said to him :- now sez he "Always sit in the middle of the table and keep yer eye on the platter keep plenty in yer noggin, and keep yer shpoon thravellin' still"
senior member (history)
2020-01-15 03:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
28. When rheumatism gets worst with people it is the sign of rain.
29. When soot falls from the chimney it is the sign of rain.
30. When crickets chirp loudly at night it is the sign of rain.
31. When the moon is on its back it is the sign of rain.
32. When there are sun-suckers in the sun it is a sign of rain.
33. When a blue blaze is seen in the fire it is the sign of frost.
34. If a cock crowing going to bed,
Is sure to rise with a watery head
35. The evening red and the morning grey,
the traveller may go on his way.
The evening grey and the morning red,
The rain falls on the travelling head.
senior member (history)
2020-01-15 03:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
delight."
17. When there is a circle around the moon it is the sign of rain.
18. A wet Sunday a wet week.
19. Black clouds the sign of rain
20. If there is a lot of threads to be seen on the ground it is the sign of rain.
21. If sheep are seen lying near a ditch it is a sign of rain.
22. When floors weeps or when salt weep it is a sign of rain.
23. If the frost rises early in the morning it is the sign of rain, and if it does not rise until late it is the sign of fine weather.
24. A wet and a windy May fills the haggard with corn and hay.
25. When the roads and fields dry up quickly after a shower of rain it is the sign of more rain.
26. When chairs or tables creak it is the sign of rain.
27. When crows build their nests very high in the tops of trees it is the sign of a fine Summer.
senior member (history)
2020-01-15 03:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9. When an ass is seen on the sheltry side of a field it is a sign of rain.
10. When the wind is from the east it is neither good for man or beast.
11. When snipe are heard whistling it is a sign of rain.
12. When a frog or a beetle comes into the kitchen it is a sign of rain.
13. Seagulls, seagulls sitting on the strand,
We'll have no fine weather when you'll come to the land.
14. When the smoke coming from the chimney goes up high it is the sign of fine weathers, when it goes slanting it is the sign of rain.
15. If the wind was in the north and it changed to the south it is the sign rain.
16. When a rainbow comes in the sky it is a sign of rain, there is an old saying
"A rainbow in the morning is the shepherds warning,
A rainbow at night is the shepherds
senior member (history)
2020-01-15 02:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was wan night and Ned Hayden was going to the public house. Moll o' the Wads that is where mc. Cabes are now. He went in to Nowlans o' Ballagh an' he said to wan of the girls, "Give me a shilling and I'll bring you in a hen and xhickens". She was delighted, and she said she would to be sure.
She gave Ned the shilling, an' he went out an' brought her in a hen an' twelve lovely little chickens
She put them into a box, an' when Ned was gone she went to go feed them, an' what was in the box only twelve skilawns of spuds an' wan big one
Ned was up in Ballinaboola wan night at Brennans Pub. It was after closin' time but Ned thought hed get a sup. The seargent was on the cross, an' Ned expected he saw him goin to go in. So he took off his boots an' told the
senior member (history)
2020-01-15 02:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Two men from Cushinstown went to Kilkenny wan time to look for a job. It was if a Sunday.
When they reached Kilkenny they went into a farmer's house. They asked the man for a job.
He said that he had plenty o' work for 'em. He told the woman to make a dinner for the men. The woman got two big quarts o' milk for 'em and two big dishes o' mate, an' she gav' 'em two big wooden spoons to ate it. Shure the two bockos began to laugh when they saw the two big spoons.
The man o' the house said to 'em "I know what ye are laughin' at" ye Wexford lados "ate yer nough now" I know what ye are laughin' at " ye Wexford lados well.
When they had their dinner atin' He said to 'em "Come on ye lados now and I'll show ye where ye are goin' to live " Ye go across
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
said "Thats mine". The other man said "you can't own 'em all" I'm taking this one". Then he brought it into the public house an' when he got his money he went into the graveyard an' laid back the scull an' said "There 'its for you" and he filled the grave again
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sai "Thats mine". The other man said "you can't own 'em all" I'm taking this one". Then he brought it into the public house an' when he got his money he went into the graveyard an' laid back the scull an' said "There 'its for you" and he filled the grave again
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
or confetti on the bride and groom when they are leaving the church.
An old slipper is tied to the car in which the couple are to leave, and ribbons are also tied to it.
When entering her future home the bride is generally carried over the threshold by her husband.
On the night that the bride comes home a party of boys dress up in strange costumes in an effort to disguise themselves and they go to the brides house to do what is called fooling. They demand a meal and a bit of a dance and if they are not taken in the right spirit they can do a lot of mischief.
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many old customs concerning marriages still practised in this country. The days on which it is lucky or unlucky to get married are joined together in a little rhyme which is as follows:-
"Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all.
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses
Saturday is no day at all"
There is another old rhyme about the person's wedding clothes which says :-
"Married in white is chosen all right
Married in blue love ever true
Married in grey go far away
Married in brown live in the town
Married in black wish yourself back."
It is the custom to throw rice
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. When dogs are seen eating grass it is a sign of rain.
2. When swallows are flying high it is a sign of fine weather and when they are flying low it is a sign of rain.
3. When the sun goes down red in the evening it is a sign of fine weather.
4. When we hear the telegraphs poles roaring it is a sign of rain.
5. If from a distance we hear the train coming in to the station it is a sign of rain.
6. When the fog comes on the rock it is a sign of rain, there is an old saying,
"When Miss Byrne (Carrigbyrne hill) has on her hood"
The local rivers are near a flood."
7. When the fog comes in on the land it is a sign of warm weather.
8. When far away hill appear near it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. When dogs are seen eating grass it is a sign of rain.
2. When swallows are flying high it is a sign of fine weather and when they are flying low it is a sign of rain.
3. When the sun goes down red in the evening it is a sign of fine weather.
4. When we hear the telegraphs poles roaring it is a sign of rain.
5. If from a distance we hear the train coming in to the station it is a sign of rain.
6. When the fog comes on the rock it is a sign of rain, there is an old saying,
"When Miss Byrne (Carrigbyrne hill) has on her hood"
The local rivers are near a flood."
7. When the fog comes in on the land it is a sign of warm weather.
8. When far away hill appears near it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fellas used to be goin' 'round years ago in me grandfather's time staling horses, wan time there wor a horse stole on me grandfather 'imself, an' on Horton. He lived over in the Boola where Rossiter is livin'. They tracked 'em to some place in Kilkenny an' they went to a house where they suspected the horses were. There were two men in the house an' they got the woman to get a supper for me grandfather an' Horton an' asked 'em to stay all night.
After a while the two buckos started to talk in Irish, and sure didn't Horton know Irish, an what were the two plannin' only to murder their visitors. Bejob Horton made some sign to me grandfather an' went out sayin' they'd be back in a few minutes, they left their hats after them and came home only for the Irish they'd have been murdered.
(over)
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 03:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I suppose you often heard of the woman in Garranstacle that killed the Hussian, its in Fr. Kavanagh's history.
Anne Flood was her name.
This fellow was passin' by an' he went into Flood's for a drink. Anne was proddin' potatoes in a big basket with a crusheen - that was a kind of a mallet they used to have for washin' spuds - the head of it was nearly as big as a turnip an' a long handle.
Well, the Hussian had plenty o' drink in him, an he began to talk to Anne, a way she didn't like, an' she up with the crusheen an' gave him such a blow that she killed him dead. Garranstacle you know Bill Curtis my
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 02:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was named Thomas A Cobden, it was built in 1839. Its height is 94'..3."
There are steps going up inside of it and that is the way people go up on it.
There are no people over seventy living in my district. Two people went away from my district out of the same place. One went to England as a Christian Brother and the other went to America. Their names were Pat and Martin Murphy.
There is no song about my district.
There is a river near my district called the Ballinaboola river.
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 02:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of my district is Carrigadaggan
It is situated between Wexford and New Ross, in the Parish of Adamstown and in the Barony of Bantry.
There are four families living in it and about twenty eight people.
It is a very small district. There is no shop in it, but there used to be long ago.
There is a pillar in it. It is built on Mrs. Doyle's farm. It is about two fields from my house. A great deal of people go up on it, especially in the Summer.
It was built on the rock of Carrigadaggan by General R. Browne Clayton, K.C. D.C. L.F. S.A., who got the estate of 3,000 Statute acres from his father in 1801. General B. Clayton had the pinnacle erected in memory of Sir Ralph Abercromby, who fought at the conquest of Egypt, and fell wounded at Alexandra in 1801.
The architect who buit the pinnacle
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 02:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My townland is Carrigbyrne.
It is in the Co. Wexford, Barony of Bantry and in the Parish of Adamstown. There are about one hundred people living in Carrigbyrne and there are about twenty houses in it. There are more houses in it than in former years.
Most of the houses are slated . There are two thatched houses, and there is one roofed with tiles.
The commonest name in Carrigbyrne is Curtis.
The oldest person in Carrigbyrne is Mr. James L. Doyle, Carrigbyrne, Newbawn Co. Wexford, Barony of Bantry. He is about eighty seven years of age.
There are two rocks in Carrigbyrne.
The height of one of them is seven hundred feet. There are a lot of trees and laurels growing in one of them. The other is nearly bare, there is only an odd tree growing on it. There
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 02:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a blessed well in Ballyshannon and its water is always icy cold.
The land around is marshy and boggy. There is a small field in Ballyshannon, overgrown with bushes and brambles with a small stream of flowing through it, called the "Kennels," so it must have been a beagle kennels long ago.
There is a ruin of a house in another field which is called "Evoy's field because an old woman named Kate Evoy was the last inhabitant of the house before it fell to ruins. Doyle is the family name most common in Ballyshannon. There are not many old people in Ballyshannon.
A lane which passes through Ballyshannon is the subject of a song called the "Ballyshannon Lane."
This song is given in first of book.
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 02:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
thickly wooded. These woods are beautiful in Summer, because rhododendrons and other plants fill the place with brilliant colours. Looking to the north west of the district we can see famous Carrigbyrne rock silhouetted against the sky, and to the north the Blackstairs mountains, and to the east Ballyvergin hill.
A broad river flows by Ballyshannon and separates it from the next townsland. It is called the Ballyshannon river by the people of Ballyshannon, and I suppose it takes the name of every townsland it passes through.
Trout and eels are caught in this river. Snipe and water hens are numerous around the river. Wood pigeons and cocks abound in the woods, and partridges are to be found in the district. There is
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 02:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The townslands in this parish of Adamstown are rather small, not consisting of more than a dozen houses. The name of my native townsland is Ballyshannon.
The population consists of sixty people. There are eleven houses in it, one of which is a gentleman's residence, where he lives when he is not abroad. Then the place is in care of a steward, and work continues on the land.
A great number of cows and some horses are reared there, and the people around the place can get supplies of fresh fruit and vegetables from the extensive gardens attached to the house. Fourteen servants, between men and women, are employed there. Ballyshannon is a sheltered district, and it is
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 01:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
oldest people there. A few people emigrated to England and America.
Miss Kane went to America, and she often pays a visit to her old home.
There are two big stones one in Mr. Foley's field and the other in Mr Kane's field in Raheenvarren. The legend says that, a giant and his wife once lived on Carrigbyrne hill.
They threw those huge stones down from the top of the hill. The woman was supposed to throw the small one which is nearer the rock than the other.
Raheenvarren is a very beautiful district. There is no river there. There are many big deep bog holes in the bogs. Snipe are very plentiful in the bogs. Water hens sometimes build their nests in rushes on the banks of the bog holes. People earn their living in Raheenvarren
senior member (history)
2020-01-13 01:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Raheenvarren is the name of my home district. It is situated in the County of Wexford and in the Barony of Bantry. It is situated in the parish of Adamstown.
It is about fourteen miles from the town of Wexford and seven miles from the town of New Ross. It is situated at the foot of the famous hill of Carrigbyrne.
There are about ten houses there. All the houses in my district are inhabited.
The houses are all slated except a few out houses.
Some ruins of a house are there. There are about fifty people living there.
Mrs. Lacey, Raheenvarren, Newbawn, Co. Wexford, and Mr. Deverux of the same address are the
senior member (history)
2020-01-12 04:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4.
The sun in summer's splendour now
Shines on the Insurgents ranks
Keen are the pikes their handles grew
Along the Slaney's banks;
An ashen forest shod with steel
Oh, well may Johnson pine
For his serried ranks in death shall reel
Before that fighting line.

5.
The bugle sounds to arms
The trumpets note is shrill
But disension and confusion reign
In the camp at Corbett Hill;
The chieftains are divided
Some counsel to fall back
But gallant Kelly of Killanne
Prepares for the attack.

6.
A volley from the redcoats
Stretched Furlong on the field
And the English general, Johnson
Refused the town to yield
Still Genervey stirr'd not,
And idly lay the pike
While the Shelmalers awaited
The order soon to strike

7.
At length with boyish ardour
The brave young hero, Lett
Pointed to the enemy
And waved a bannerette;
At headlong speed he rushed on
The foremost British square
And as he went he shouted
"Follow me who dare."

8.
Ten thousand pikes are gleaming
With Kelly in the van
Shot and shell came screaming
Still young Lett led them on
Dwyer, Cloney and Byrne
Charge Skerrit's Grenadiers
And the scarlet line went down in death
Before the Shelmaliers

9.
Oh! cried the youthful hero
"Follow me who dare"!
And the waving bannerette was seen
'Mid the cannons deadly glare;
Through leaping flame and hissing lead
Though bitter was their loss,
The pikemen swept o'er piles of dead
And swarmed into New Ross.
senior member (history)
2020-01-12 04:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
under the command of his grand-uncle (Begenal Harvey) to the outskirts of New Ross on the memorable day of the 5th June.
The insurgents were on the point of being finally replused when, a young gentleman of 13 years saw the disorder of the men and the incapacity of their leaders and with boyish impulse he snatched up a banner and calling out "Follow me who dare" rushed down the hill 10,000 pikemen followed uttering the same cry. In a moment he was at the three bullet gate and rushing upon the yoemen he destroyed a great lot of them. There is also a song composed about the battle of Ross and here it is :-
"Follow me who dare"
1.
When Eire gives due honour
To those who fought and fell
Beneath her flashing banner
Mid round shot grape and shell
Upon the scroll of glory
Historian, don't forget
To write the name and story
Of brave young Master Lett.
2.
When Erin rose undaunted
The tyrants blood to spill
When Tone and Russell planted
The standard on Cove Hill
When Wexford stung to fury
Arose in wrathful might
Than Lett no braver ever
Shouldered musket for the fight.
3.
The hero of my humble theme
Of years was but thirteen
When mid the cannon's scorching flame
He, pike in hand was seen;
And when Harvey marched to battle
Young Lett with flashing pike
Follow'd him to red New Ross
For freedom's cause to strike
senior member (history)
2020-01-12 03:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On Sunday the 5th June was the anniversary of the battle of Ross, and of the many brave heroes who took part in that eventful fight in 1798, one young lad on account of his youth (for he was only 13 years of age,) deserves a place on the scroll of fame. His name was James Moore Lett the second son of Stephen Lett of Newcastle, Wexford. His mother was a niece of Bagenal Harvey and it is interesting to recall that the tract of land called "The Commons of Wexford" was sold by public auction and bought by Stephen Lett for the sum of £650

The first notice we have of James Lett, the boy insurgent, is when a body of Insurgents visited the residence of Mrs Ann Sealy of Bloomhill not far from Killinick. They were very hungry (provisions being scarce at the time) and they eagerly eat up a quantity of bread that Mrs Sealy had baked. They asked for more and while preparing it she discovered that the party were accompanied by young James Lett. Mrs Sealy who was sister of Charles Lett of Tinacurry claimed to be a blood relation to young Lett and for the service she had rendered he asked what return or favour he could make to her. She asked for tea and sugar (great luxuries in those days) to be sent to her from Wexford which was faithfully done. This Ann died in 1844 aged 86.
After this young Lett accompanied the Southern army,
senior member (history)
2020-01-12 03:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14.
Q. What runs fast, but has no legs.?
A. The tap.
15.
Q. Why is a policeman like a rainbow?
A. Because he appears when the storm is over.
16.
Q. What do liars do when they die?
A. They lie still.
17.
Q. What small animal is turned into a large one by being beheaded?
A. Fox (Ox)
senior member (history)
2020-01-12 03:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A A woman milking a cow.
4
Q. A lepper of ditches, a clipper of thorns a little brown cow with two leather horns
A. A rabbit.
5.
Q. Little thing, little thing, sits by the wall it eats all it gets but drinks none at all.
A. A fire.
6.
Q. As black as ink as white as milk and hops on the ground like hail-stones.
A. A magpie.
7.
Q. As I was going out in a slippery gap I met my Uncle Davy
I cut off his head and left his body lying easy
A. A head of cabbage
8.
Q. As round as an an apple as deep as a pail it never cries out till its caught by the tail
A. A bell.
9.
Q. What is the difference between an aeroplane and a tree?
A. One leaves its shed and the other sheds its leaves.
10.
Q. Eight arms, but no hand; a wooden leg, but cannot stand; is often wet, but cannot feel; has no boots, but is shod of with steel; a dress of silk, with a belt around the middle; now can you guess this silly riddle
A. An umbrella.
11.
Q. What is it that is full of holes and yet holds water?
A. A sponge.
12.
Q. What pain do we make light of?
A. A window-pane.
13.
Q. Who always makes you cross?
A. The man at the ferry, of course
senior member (history)
2020-01-12 02:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a rath in Brickestown and one night there was a man passing by near the rath and he found a bunch of keys and he picked them up and brought them home with him and when he went to bed he could not sleep with noise. He got up and went back to the rath with the keys.
There is also an old house in Bricketstown known as the Fairy's path. It is said that when they were building this an old woman past by and she said "Turn the door the other way". The men did not mind her and kept on with their work. This house was built on a Fairy's path and no one could ever live in it. The slates cannot be kept on it and every night lights are seen in the windows.
There is also a corner there called Dennie's Corner and in this corner fairies are seen dancing nearly every bright night.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 04:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the people used to thresh with a flail. The flail was a piece of long stick with leather on the end of it and another piece of stick joined to it. The people used to tresh in a barn and the barn was a thatched house with a level stone floor. The people used to leave the sheaves in the barn and then thresh it with the flail. When the people used to have a lot of corn they were often months threshing it. After the flail came the horse machine.
The horse machine was brought from house to house to thresh and at night they would be a great dance in the house.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 04:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night two men were coming home from a fair and they were passing by a rath owned by Mr Whitty and they saw a lot of fairies dancing in it. After that they were seen very often in the same tath.
Another night there were two other men coming passed it. When they were coming past the rath one of them stopped to hear some noise in the rath the other man kept goining on. When the first man stopped he heard fairies singing in the rath and he started to sing with them. The fairies brought him in and gave him a bag of money. He went home with delight and told the other man he came back and heard them singing again but he had no voice and he started anyway. When the fairies heard him they brought him in and they put a hump on his back. He had the hump till he died.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 04:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One dark night about twelve o'clock a man named Sonny Creane was leaving Mrs Cooper's house and he had a path going through a rath. So he went through it anyhow and when he was in the middle of the rath something started lepping on his back and he did'nt know what was on his back at all.
Then he started to look around and he saw a little fairy on his back so he done everything to get it off but he could'nt. Then his feet and legs and half of his body went down in the ground in muck and he was just able to creep home.
He then was in bed for two or three years and that stopped him from going through that rath and he got such a fright that he never went across it any more.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 03:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the people used have no blankets only old bags and old things like that. Only about fifty years ago there came a Spinning Machine and all the people had a good lot of sheep so they brought all the wool to the Spinning Machine in New Ross.
Some people used to bring it to the factory to be washed and cleaned and then they would have it spun into blankets and tweed.
Before the Spinning Machines were made there was an old Woollen Mill in Brownscastle and all the farmers got their Blankets and tweed made there.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 03:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and see the horse. When he went to the field he found the horse hanging from a sgeach and he dead, and he had a little saddle on his back. The fairies had ridden him to death and then they hung him from a sgeach in the rath.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 03:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are a lot of fairy forts around this part of the county. There is one in one on my father's land and the name of it is the Clunearan Rath.
One day a man named William Cooper was digging in this rath and when he was digging a little fairy came out of the rath and told him not to be digging. So the man went home.
About a week after that the same man had a very fine horse and he was very careful with him. He was putting this horse in the field where the rath was, when he saw there were a lot of stumps around the ditches. He started to cut the stumps away because he was afraid the horse would get caught in them, and when he had that finished he put the horse in the field.
The next morning the man said he would go
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 03:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the barn.
They used to lay down two shaves on the ground and thresh it with a flail and all the corn would come out of it. Then they would turn it over on the other side and beat it.
They would shake the corn out of the straw. When they had a compliment of corn threshed they would bring it out in the field and put it on a sheet. Then they would hold it up against the wind with a seve and the chaff would blow away. Then it would be fit for the market.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 03:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was no schools at all and if the parents sent their children away to be taught anything, other people would come along and take them away. The parents would not see the children for six or seven years.
In this district there was a man going around from house to house looking for lodging. If anyone game him lodging, he would stay for three or months and teach all the children around. The way he was paid was the children around used to go to this man to be taught their lessons and they brought
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 03:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fairy forts are common in this district. There is a rath near Barry's Cross in a field owned by John Ennis. There is nothing ever left in this field at night because once there was a horse left in this field and ever morning the mark of a saddle was left on the horse's back.
One day a man named Mat Ennis found a key in this rath. When he went home he left it on the dresser. That night the dresser shook and everything on it fell on the floor and broke. When they got up in the morning they were all right. He left the key back in the rath and never interfered with it again. This rath is surrounded by a ditch and a dyke. There are two paths going into the rath.
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 03:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Renowned where Wexford gales abound at last he sees his dream.
Come true with Jim his brother and with John and Larry too
Who stemmed the tide against us when the game was looking blue
Here's to the brothers Frank and Bill and Aidan Cullen too
To Donnellys Dick, Jack Codd and Goff and Kinsella ever true
With Garda Glynn amongst the back one word of praise I'll say
For one and all were worthy of the parish on that day.
4
Now ere I close this rambling rhyme a tribute I must pay
To all old gales who travelled to the final on that day
To Sinnot, Rack and Parle too to Tom Cox and Tarent Tom.
And to the tones that battled when hope was nearly gone
So one shout for Carrigmannon where two hundred years ago
Our fathers on there hurleys swung the leather to and fro
We've got the ash we've got the men we've got the will to win
Hurrah! we are County Champions say the gallant boys of Glynn
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 02:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Hurling boys of Glynn
(Composed by M. Kehoe, Glynn.)
1
Come lads around me, till I sing you a song of days gone by
A song of home and hurling men who's glory ne'r shall die
In olden days tradition tells in Carrigmannon's vale
Where Slaney ever seaward flows was heard the shout of gale
The clash of ash the headlong dash that marked our father then.
Are ours today in manly fray when we comfort our men.
From north to south to Slaney's mouth to Gorey and with in
The four walls of our County boys Hurrah! for gallant Glynn.
2
To link the present with the past Fitzgerald leads the van,
And when our team lines out at last he's every inch a man
Between the sticks is gallant Hicks prepared to stop and dare
And woe betide the man who tried to take him unaware
The Clancy's Pat and Frank and Bill are like wise to the four
With Keegan Nick and Johney Walsh no hurlers could do more
We've got the ash we've got the men we've got the will to win
We will bring the medals homeward say the gallant boys of Glynn
3
Of Wadding Dick I fair would sing the vertain of the team
senior member (history)
2020-01-11 02:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago people used to cure diseases. Here are some of them. They used to cure headache by putting vinegar on brown paper and tying it tight around the head.
They used to cure warts by getting a snail and rub it on the warts and making the sign of the cross at the same time. Then they would tie the snail on a hawthorn and if the snail go away the warts will go away.
There was an old man who lived in Barmony and he used to cure farresey by getting three stones and putting them in three different places. Then he would get the horse and walk around the stones saying prayers for a long time.
There is a well in Brownscastle which is blessed and it is said that any person who got there with a toothace shall be cured. There is also a big
senior member (history)
2020-01-07 04:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
grass. She had a wand in her hand and she tipped the horse and man with it and the man and the horse dropped dead. I never heard of any more stories about the raths.
senior member (history)
2020-01-07 04:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many fairy forts in the school district. The name of the one that I am familiar with is "Cathair's" Den, "Cathair's Den" is situated in Nash, New Ross, Co Wexford and is circular in shape. There is a fence of earth all round it, and some time ago there used to be a light seen all over the rath. In this rath there were many things seen such as black cats and black dogs.
One night about nine o'clock there was a man
senior member (history)
2020-01-07 04:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a mass path in Kilscantlon, Co. Wexford. Fr. Brian Madden said first mass in Kilscantlon and second mass in Carnagh in the penal times. The soldiers followed the priest and when he heard them coming he hid underground. One day the soldiers came when he was saying mass, the priest threw a look at them they had guns ready to shoot him. The priest made some kind of a sign and the soldiers dropped dead on the ground. It was the will of God that killed the soldiers. They were protestant people there called Bowers, and beside where they were living the priest said mass. These protestant people told the soldiers to kill
senior member (history)
2020-01-07 04:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
By the hand of labour and industry every acre can be made fertile, while every farmstead is well watered. There is none of those flooding or inundation so determined to agriculture in low-lying or more inland districts, where the waters have to run a long sluggish course before they find an outlet in the sea.
There is no trace of any religious edifice in Coleman to-day, yet there is evidence that it was a centre of christian piety in the days long gone by, when the Irish church was in the full strengthof its youthful vigour and pristine glory ere the rude barbarians from the north came to plunder her shrines and extinguish the torch of christian philosophy, that burned so brightly round the shores of green Erin and was dispelled
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 05:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was feasting and merry making till morning.
But immediately after the wedding there was a race for the bride's garters of 'bucks' among the guests - this was a race on horse back 'cross country from the church to the bridegroom's house.
I myself was told details of such a race:
how Tom Cullen of Ballyvaldon beat Paddy Dempsey Ballyvoodock although not so well mounted.
My informant John Belvin saw the race and showed me where Cullen went the Comhgar to win well.
The marriage of widows or widowers was not popular. When darkness fell the 'boys' 'blew' them. The 'blowing' was done through bottles without bottom.
The oldest inhabitant here does not remember to have seen or heard of a wife sit on a horse with her husband.
As far as I can find out Shrove is meaningless to the
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 05:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs Margaret O Byrne N.T.
Killincooley, Kilmuckridge
I give the home address of the above mentioned lady who is 1st Asst. of Sgoil Naomh Brígdhe Blackwater. She is 51 years of age and her parents lived to be very old, her mother dying in 1932 age 81. Her father who died a few years earlier.
May was considered an unlucky month for marriage and is still. Saturday was the unlucky day.
the bride always got from her mother a white counterpane (crochet or knitted)
Mrs. OByrne's mother remembers but one marriage taking place in a house but that christenings were quite common in houses - the 'case of necessity' not being the cause. This was an occasion for a 'celebration'.
On the wedding day morning the bridegroom in a carriage (when he could afford one) repaired to house of the bride elect when there was a feast.
Then to church, thence to the bridegroom's house where there
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 04:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
always carried over the threshold if this was not done he would have much ill luck. On the feasting days the people who were not asked to the wedding dressed themselves up such as turn their clothes inside out and cover their faces and danced with the Bride.
The month of May was kept by the old people as the unluckiest month in the year for marriages to occur. The unlucky days are Fridays and Saturdays and the lucky days are Tuesdays and Wednesdays and most marriages were held on those days.
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 04:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
soiled their clothes, and hurt them. Another custom was that the pair rode home on horseback with the bride riding behind the bridegroom.
Then when they were going in through the doorway of the home the bride was carried in over the threshold as it was considered unlucky for the bride to walk in over the threshold of her new home. When night came the youths met again and dressed up and got old bottles and broke out the bottoms, if it was not already done, and set out for the house. When they reached the house they began to blow through the bottles which made a great noise. Then they were brought in and given food and the price of a half or a quarter each of whiskey. Then they danced and sang and played music for a couple of hours and at last all went home quite satisfied. If the were refused the cask of whiskey or the food they would blow and annoy the people until they surrendered. Sometimes this blowing and annoying went on for a week. But in the end the people of the house had to give in. These youths were called "straw" boys.
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 04:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What Master Joe Lacy heard in the Local Forge
Long ago when people were getting married they had very funny customs and beliefs. I am going to write about a few that I heard in the local forge recently.
When a marriage was thought of between two people the youths of the neighbourhood would go around gathering turnip stumps or cabbage stumps for about a week before the day of the marriage.
When the newly married couple were coming home from the church and close to their home a hail of turnip and cabbage stumps met them and very often
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 04:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the olden times when people got married they rejoiced for a very long time. They went to the Bride's home first and feasted there for two days and two nights. They then went to the Bridegroom's home and feasted there for two days and two nights also. If the feasting happened to fall on Shrove Tuesday they feasted until twelve o'clock and at that hour they all were silent and said they feast no more because shrove was in.
The Bride's mother always made a special kind of a cake for the marriage day. She made the top of the very hard and she made a lovely cover for the cake. She got a very stiff piece of cardboard and she covered it with a very ornamental cloth. When the marriage group came in the Bride and Bridegroom stood on the cake while the people around congratulated them.
The old people say that the Bridegroom was
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 04:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
divided her piece between herself and the bridegroom. Then the bridesmaid cut the cake and gave a piece to each guest.
Whoever got the last piece if not married was said to be married before the next year was out. This hardly ever came to be true. Friday and Saturday were considered unlucky days to get married on. Some people were married in the afternoon.
If people got married on Thursday afternoon they never had a feast that day but they feasted all the next day and feasted all night also.
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 04:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following is the way the wedding cake was cut.
The bride and bridegroom were put sitting back to back and the bride held the stand on which the cake was on and the bridegroom put his hand over hers.
The cake was raised over their heads. Then the bridesmaid cut the cake and gave the bride the first piece. Then the cake was left on the table and the bride
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 04:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year following the Famine the seed potatoes were not to be had in this locality. The local fishermen went in their small fishing cots to some County North of County Dublin and procured a supply for themselves and the people of the locality. They landed them along the sea-shore from Blackwater to Cahore.
The potatoes were of huge size and in some cases allowed of the "sets" being cut off and the surplus part or centre of the potatoes was used for food. The potatoes were then sown in ridges only.
In wet or heavy land ridges about five feet wide were ploughed. A piece about one foot wide being left between each ridge. This piece was sometimes used ploughed also. Farmyard manure was spread on the ridges. The seed "sets" were placed on this about nine or ten inches apart. The bone or piece between each ridge was then turned on to the ridges to cover the potatoes - a spade being used
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 03:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5. A kitchen full, a room full, and couldnt catch a spoon full
- - - Smoke
6. When is a hat not a hat at ---
When it becomes a nice young --
7. What goes up the chimney down
and down the chimney up
An umbrella
8. What part of a cow goes over ditch first.
Her breath.
9. What is it a lady always looks for but dreads to find.
A hole in her hose
10. Why does a hen cross the road,
To get to the other side.
11. What goes from town to town without moving
a Road.
senior member (history)
2020-01-04 03:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. What is black + white and hops on the ground like hail stones.
A magpie.
2. At Gorey town 30 people got in the train, and at Ferns again did 40 more go in, and yet at Wexford when the run was done there wasn't a single person on it, and none got off between Ferns + Wexford.
"They were all married"
3. The more you take out of it the bigger it gets?
A grave.
4. Why is a man generally like a bad chimney
Because he smokes.
senior member (history)
2020-01-03 04:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What is black + white and Read all over
A Newspaper.
Hairy in and hairy out and hairy into hairy's mouth.
A man putting on his stocking.
What has a head like a thimble and a tail like a Rat.
A Pipe.
There is a little hole, and it stands by the wall and would swallow all the coal from here to Donegal.
A Fire.
Hink, Hank, under a Bank
and 10 drawing 4.
A Woman milking a Cow.
As round as an apple, as flat as a pan
half a woman and a whole man
A Penny.
senior member (history)
2020-01-03 04:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago people people used to say that if a woman had the same name before and after marriage, that she would be gifted with the Whooping Cough cure : She had merely to give the sick child some bread and it immediately got well.
It was also believed that if a child was passed out under an asses legs and over its back three times that it would be cured of Whooping Cough.
Another reputed "cure" was that if a mother had a deaf + dumb child and put it in a bag and carried it round on her back while she went begging bread from door to door among her neighbours + friends, without letting them see or hear the child - that
senior member (history)
2020-01-03 03:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What part of a cow goes over the ditch first.
Her breath.
How many hairs in a Cat's tail
None - they are all on it.
What is the diff between ten + 100
(Nought) nothing
senior member (history)
2020-01-03 03:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it would be relieved of the affliction and speak + hear perfectly.
For Burns + Scalds, Mrs Kinsella states that the old people used "Penny leaf" - an herb that grows abundantly in this district.
senior member (history)
2020-01-03 03:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
seen in broad daylight the Mermaid sitting on the rocks in a very steep portion of the coast
He had told us the story as we went along to the house, of how this old lady was one of seven who had seen this strange lady of the waters. He told me that of the seven who saw "it" - three were in America - three had died and the old lady was the only one left here to tell the tale.
They saw the mermaid quite clearly they tried to approach nearer but the very dangerous rocky character of the coast, prevented them from getting much nearer.
They then procured some ropes and were just about to throw the rope in her direction when she or it dived with a mighty dive right into the ocean. Now he says
senior member (history)
2020-01-03 03:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Told by Rev Fr Gleeson, aged about 60
Knockadoon, Co Cork.
This is not a local story, but being the only one of its kind that I have ever heard, it is I think worthy of record, especially coming as it does from the worthy Priest whose name is givven above.
Rev. Fr Gleeson ran a boys' camp down in Knockadoon some miles below Youghal
I had three of my boys down there learning Irish - and spending a holiday. During one of my visits to the Camp, Fr Gleeson took a party of us including my wife + myself to the house of an old woman, who he said had
senior member (history)
2020-01-03 03:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is the story of one Wat Bolger of Ballyvaldon or Kilnew district
Who had an uncle buried in Killincooley graveyard, Wat had just put up a headstone to his uncle a John Ferguson and he went out one evening about dusk to visit this graveyard to see if the newly erected stone had shifted. Just when he got near the Cemetery, he was "whipped off his feet" and knew no more till he found himself inside the old castle at Castleannesly in the townland of that name, or near Morriscastle.
The narrator and another man who knew Mr Bolger, state that he does not and never did take drink.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10.
The Union Jack in blood and dust
Before the pike went down
And the Rebel Green is floating high
And bright o'er New Ross town
Johnson now in swift retreat
And sunk in deep despair
While the warcry of the Shilmaliers
Is "Follow Me Who Dare."
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the money with them.
If this man could not get lodging he used to set up a little hut in the field and the children used to go to him there.
The children at that time had no jottors or pencils like the present time.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the old people used to make candles for their own use. They used to get rushes in boggy land, and when they would bring them, they would peel them and dry them. The next day they would go to town and buy sheep's lard and when they would go home, they would put the lard into a pot and let it boil for about three or four hours. After that they would dip the peff of the rush in the tallow and hang it up to dry. After a couple of days they would light them.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times the people used to thresh the corn with a flail. First of all the people used to bring in about one hundred shaves of corn and put it in
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
longer you would leave it without using it the better it would get.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The people got cotton threads to make candles then they would boil greece and keep dipping the cotton threads in the greece until they had it made;
then the people would hang them to dry.

Soap was made by boiling greece a half a pound of pot-ash, and boil it for half an hour then put it into dishes and let it set then cut it into large bars and let it get really hard and
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Holy wells are very common in the locality. There is one well in Brownscastle which is called St Munn's. This well is supposed to cure sore eyes. There was a man who came from the county Kilkenny with sore eyes and he got cured.
Another man in the district had a lump on his jaw and every Sunday he went to the holy well, and rubbed his jaw with the water and prayed there. One Sunday he went asleep beside the well, and when he wakened the lump was gone.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was supposed to have hurted his leg jumping and afterwards he was called "Lame Fiarish". Fiarish often challenged people to jump against him, but he beat them badly. He often jumped a great distance but it is said that his greatest jump was from the hill of Ballenclay to Barmoney a distance of about a mile. "Lame Fiarish said before he jumped to bury him wherever he jumped to. Two large stones still mark the spot where this huge man is buried.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Years ago there was a giant who lived in this County. All his lifetime he kept wandering around the country challenging every on to jump against him. He
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 04:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stone bed there with a cross on it, and it is called St. Munn's Bed. Any one who lie on that bed with a pain in their back will be cured.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 03:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time a man in County Wexford had a rath and one day he thought it was only a waste of land to have the rath there. One day he plouged some of it and that night he was sitting at the fire when a great shower of stones came in through the window. The came coming in until the kitchen was almost full of stones and the windows and delph and everything in it were broken, and he had to go to bed and when he got up in the morning it was alright. Nothing was broken or damaged and he never plouged anymore of it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 03:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were two brothers one time called William and Thomas and they were very clever. Their father was in town one day and he bought a new trousers. The next day when their father was out at work, the sons saw the new trousers and they said to themselves that they would get two suits made out of it. So they cut it up into square pieces, and they divided the pieces into parcels one each to go to the tailor who lived about a mile away. When they were coming near the tailor's house the two boys fell out and threw the two parcels over the ditch. They turned to go home, but they were afraid to go home.
They lived on turnips for three or four days in an out farm close to their home. One evening they went near home and they vied with one another to see which of them would go in.
As there was a pot of stirabout cooling at entrance, Thomas went in and swept the pot and ran for a big pond that was in front of the door and his father after him. When he reached the edge of the pond he turned short and in goes his father on top of his
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 03:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some fields have strange names such as North's walls. This field got its name because people named North's lived in it long ago.
Barron's Garden, Flood's Garden and George's Garden, Flood's Garden and George's Garden got their names, because people of that names lived in them long ago. The hollow got its name because it is really a hollow. It is in this place that Saint Garvan's well is. The cross-field got its name because it is at a cross.
The church park got its name because it is beside the graveyard. The bridge field got its name because it is near a bridge.
Some fields that it is not known how they got their names are the scarbuct, moon beg, bawn beg, big gort na scort, little gort na scort, gort na counach, rushy park, the big meadow and the old town.
The long field got its name because it is a long field. The rath field and the inside rath field got their
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 03:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About fifty yards from our house there is a very large rath, and about half a mile from it is another rath.
This one is very small; in the centre there is a mound and some people say it is the burial place of a king
The other rath is surrounded by deep dykes on the inside and outside of a ditch. In one corner is a small stone wall by the side of which is a narrow passage, which goes to a field. They do'nt think there is any treasure in it, but one morning the owner of the rath saw that someone was after digging in it during the night.
One Autumn my father was making stacks in a corn field, the day was very calm but suddenly a whirlwind came from the direction of the rath. It came across in a straight line knocking down a row of stacks from one end of the field to the other, it then went across other fields in which were stacks and knocked down one all in the same direction. It went on and diseppered in a rath in Whitechurch.
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 03:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived in Ireland a giant whose name was Oscar. He heard that there was another giant living and he made up his mind to visit him. When he reached the place there he found the giant himself and his mother sitting at the fire. As the Irish giant was pretty tired he said he would go to bed for a little while. "Alright" said the woman "I will prepare a place of rest for you." When the giant was gone to bed he listened to what the English giant and his mother would be talking about. He heard the woman telling the giant to get a sledge and to go to the room where the Irish giant was and give him three strokes of the sledge. When the giant heard this and he in bed he looked about to see would there be anything in the bed but himself. He got an old block of wood and he put it into the bed and covered it. Then the English giant came into the room and gave the block three strokes and then went to the kitchen again. In the morning when the Irish giant got up the English giant said to him "Did you find anything last night?" "Yes I got three tiny strokes on the back" replied the Irish giant
senior member (history)
2019-12-31 02:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stable and two men armed in the door and a fire lit in the centre of it. Off Bill went and bought three bottles of whiskey. He then lay down in a manure heap and pretended to be dead. As he lay down he saw a large sow also lying beside him. Bill commenced to pinch the animal and the men heard the noise and ran out. They found the boy and carried him into the stable. As he lay on the floor the men saw the three bottles and drank them thus becoming drunk. When Bill knew they were all asleep he took the horse and away. He went back to the gentleman and told him how he succeeded. This man told him to take the sheet from underneath himself and his wife and they in bed. The gentleman said that he himself would be armed. Bill went off that night, got a corpse, put a rope around it and let it down the chimney. When the gentleman saw the feet coming he fired a shot and down the corpse fell. "Now" said the gentleman Billy is done for as long as he ran. He took out the dead body to a hole to bury it - thinking it was Bill. While out Bill came down the chimney, ran up to the room, told the woman in the bed to lie over to the wall that he was cold and when he'd be warm he'd finish the burial. The woman's husband came in after a short time and his wife said to him "Mhaise you were not long finishing the
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 04:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was. The priest could say nothin' only he turned round to the altar, an he was a big fat man an' you could see him shakin' up an' down wud the laugh.
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 04:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and ran back to the house leaving the cripple there.
When the man was goin' in through the door the cripple passed him running an' he was never a cripple again.
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 04:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hugh Farrel Faree, Newbawn, Co Wexford, Barony of Bantry said he was going by the graveyard in Faree wan night and begor the grave yard gates opened and a skileton came out running, and after him every skileton in the graveyard came, so the race held in and out in the gates for about half an hour and then the gates closed.
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 04:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ye lado and bring home them ould Luaks. The man gav 'em a shillin' then an' he said to 'em "Ye get a drink on yer way home now, lados". The men went to work with the man afther.
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 04:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
29. Which is the easiest to spell "goose" or "geese".?
Ans" Geese because you spell it with more (ease).
=====
30. Why are policemen + postmen like the days (of man).
Ans. "Because they are numbered."
=====
31. What part of a fish is like the end of a book?
Ans - "The fin-is."
=====
32. Born at the same time as the world,
Destined to live as long as the world,
And yet never five weeks old.
Ans - "The moon."
=====
33. As black as ink, as white as milk,
Ink nor milk it isn't.
Hops the road like a marble stone,
But a marble stone it isn't.
Ans :- "Magpie."
=====
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 04:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
25. It has a head, a foot, and four legs but cant stir.
Ans. "A bed".
=====
26. "Big mouth, can't eat
Two ears can't hear
Three legs cant walk."
Ans. "A pot"
=====
27. "The King of Morocco built a ship
An' in that ship his daughter sat
An' I'll be blamed for telling her name,
An' there's three times I have told it"
Ans "Anne"
=====
28. "England, Ireland, France and Spain
All gathered up in a shower of rain
Put in a bag + tied with string
Riddle me that + I'll give you a ring."
Ans. "A pudding".
=====
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 04:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
20. As I walked in, as I walked out
I saw the life the dead was in
Seven there sat, one got free,
Riddle me that or hanged you'll be."
Ans " Bird's nest in horse's ear".
=====
21. "As I went out in a sloppery gap
I met my uncle Davy,
I cut off his head, sucked his blood,
And left his body lying easy."
Ans. "A head of Cabbage."
=====
23. "What is the quickest way to get from Dover to France".
Ans. " Cross out the "D" + you will get "over" at once.
=====
24. "It's in the rock, and it ai'nt in the stone,
It's in the marrow and it ai'nt in the bone,
It's in all kinds of timber, but not in the wood,
It's in all kinds of water, but not in the blood"
Ans Letter "R"
=====
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 03:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15. "As round as an apple,
As flat as a pan,
One side a woman,
And the other side a man."
Ans. "A Penny".
=====
16. "Patch upon patch without any stitches.
Riddle me that + I will buy you a breeches".
Ans. "Head of cabbage."
=====
17. "What is the best way to save your soul"
Ans. "Walk on your heel."
=====
18. "What part of a cow goes over the ditch first".
Ans "Her mind."
=====
19. "Four legs up + four legs down
Soft in the middle + hard all round."
Ans. "A bed".
=====
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 03:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10. "As round as an apple,
As plump as a ball,
Can climb the church,
O'er steeple and all."
Ans - "The Sun."
=====
11. "Why is a dog's tail like the fork of a tree".
Ans " :. It is farthest from the bark."
=====
12. "A house full, a room full,
You couldn't catch a spoon full."
Ans "Smoke"
=====
13. "What is often brought to the table,
Cut, but never eaten".
Ans. - "Cards".
=====
14. "Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat,
You may guess for ever, but yo'ull never guess that".
Ans "A Pipe".
------
senior member (history)
2019-12-28 03:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10. "As round as an apple,
As plump as a ball,
Can climb the church,
O'er steeple and all."
Ans - "The Sun."
=====
11. "Why is a dog's tail like the fork of a tree".
Ans " :. It is farthest from the bark."
=====
12. "A house full, a room full,
You couldn't catch a spoon full."
Ans "Smoke"
=====
13. "What is often brought to the table,
but, but never eaten".
Ans. - "Cards".
=====
14. "Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat,
You may guess for ever, but yo'ull never guess that".
Ans "A Pipe".
------
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 04:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
breast.
I think the country would be very dull without the bird.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 04:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
breast.
I think the country would be very dullwithout the bird.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 04:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
plucked a thorn out of His Head and that the blood ran down its breast giving it its name.
The world would be very queer without birds.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 04:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
34. When was beef highest?
Ans. "When the cow jumped over the moon"
===
35. Black I am but much admired,
Men seek for me till they are tired,
I tire horses and comfort you.
Ans - "Coal".
===
36. Why are tall people lazier than short ones?
Ans. Because they are longer in Bed.
===
37. What is difference between a riddle + a lot of children sitting on a bun?
Ans. - One is a conundrum and the other is a "bun under 'em ."
===
38. Why does ticket-collector put a hole in your ticket?
Ans. To let you pass through.
===
39. How many "peas" in a pint?
Ans. - One
===
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 04:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
40. What smells most in a chemist's shop.?
Ans. The Nose.
===
41. Why is "D" like a wedding-ring?
Ans. Because "WE" couldn't "WED" without it.
===
42. What was it that Adam first planted in the garden of Eden?
Ans. His foot.
===
43. When do your teeth do what your tongue should do?
Ans. When they chatter.
===
44. What key is best for unfolding the tongue?
Ans. - "Whiskey"
===
45. Why should Ireland soon be rich?
Ans. Because its capital is "Dublin".
===
46. Why is a caterpillar like a greedy boy?
Ans. Because they both make the butter fly.
===
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 03:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Potatoes are grown in this district.
The amount varies according to the size of the land. If a person had a hundred acres of land he would sow about two acres of potatoes if he was not going to sell any, and if he had any left over he would use them for feeding pigs and fowl.
Labourers with cottages generally sow whatever land they have with potatoes and many of them sell potatoes.
Potatoes are generally sown in 24" to 26" drills. Sometimes the land is manured before they are sown and sometimes it is manured after they are slided. When blossoms come on the potatoes they are sprayed two or three times with a mixture of bluestone and washing soda and they are wed shortly after coming over the ground. When the stalks are withered about October they are dug with a digger but people
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 03:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
who have small plots dig them with a spade. They are then picked into baskets called "kishes" generally made locally and put into pits. The pits are made of clay, lined with straw and covered with straw again. Sand is sometimes put in the pits to prevent the potatoes from growing.
The varities which grow best in this district are, Kerr Pinks, Aran Banners, Aran Victory, Presidents and Butes.
Wooden ploughs were used long ago but not now. Potatoes were used largely in the making of starch and bakers used also put them in bread.
Potatoes are also used for cleaning knives.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 03:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
who have small plots dig them with a spade. They are then picked into baskets called " kishes" generally made locally and put into pits. The pits are made of clay, lined with straw and covered with straw again. Sand is sometimes put in the pits to prevent the potatoes from growing.
The varities which grow best in this district are, Kerr Pinks, Aran Banners, Aran Victory, Presidents and Butes.
Wooden ploughs were used long ago but not now. Potatoes were used largely in the making of starch and bakers used also put them in bread.
Potatoes are also used for cleaning knives.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 03:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
used in this district are made in Pierce's factory in Wexford.
Potatoes should be sown as early in Spring as possible, the earlier they are sowed the better, as the "blight" comes on them in July or August, and to prevent it, people have to spray them as early as possible. There is a special machine for spraying called a "spraying machine".
The spraying material consists of
"Bluestone" and Washing-soda, -
8 lbs Bluestone and 10 lbs Washing soda to 40 gallons of water, it must be the right strength and the man that is over the sprayer should be able to test whether it would be too weak or too strong.
When they are about two months sowed they weed them and earth them up with a plough.
About 1st July they dig the early potatoes but some people do not pick them until after 15th August.
When the potatoes are done growing and after the harvest they are ploughed up
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 03:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have a half an acre of potatoes sown at home.
How to prepare the land.-
First the land is spring- harrowed, then it is ploughed and harrowed again and rolled. When the clay is made fine and all the lumps are broken the drills are made with a plough.
Some people sow them before they put out the manure and others put out the manure first evenly in the drills, in the former case the potatoes are "slided" with a shovel.
The potatoes are sown about 12" apart.
Some people cut the potatoes, and make two seed out of one, but they should be very careful to leave "an eye" in each seed, but most people sow whole ones as by cutting them they make the crop weak.
Long ago wooden ploughs were used for ploughing but they are gone out of use now, the plough now used is called a wheel-plough, most of the ploughs
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 03:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and put in pits to secure them from the frost. First they turn them up with a plough and then they are picked up out of the clay and collected in baskets made to carry them to the pits.
First they line the pit with straw, and then they cover it with clay and the thatch it with straw to keep out the rain.
This is how the potato basket is made -
"First they make a rim with "laurel" then they have to get strong "salleys" to make the ribs of the basket and put the shape on it. They have to weave the "red salleys in between the ribs, it takes a good long time to make it.
They make handles out of laurel to carry them
Michael Sullivan Foulksmills and Michael Busher Longraigue make them.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 03:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Potatoes are grown by every farmer in this country. Some of the farmers sow an acre or two.
The ground must be manured because the potatoes would not grow without it. The farmer goes to alot of trouble tilling the ground. If he sows them out in the field he will have to make drills but if he sows them in the garden he will have to sow them in ridges.
They used to dig them out with a spuddle and pick them in potato baskets. Nearly all the farmers used to bring them into the barn. The champions were the best potatoes at that time and they used to get barm from the potatoes for the bakers to make bread, they also used to make starch out of them.
Golden Wonders. Kerr pinks. Champions. British queens.
The farmers must spray them three times.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 02:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
time is judged for churning it.
Sometimes it takes about ten minutes to churn and more times it takes anything from twenty minutes to a half an hour to churn. There is a flat piece of glass placed in the centre of the cover to indicate when the butter has come.
Water is poured into the churn during the interval of churning. Sometimes cold water is used and more times warm water is used that is to suit the temperature of the cream.
The butter is taken out by means of butter spades. Then it is salted and sold in pound rolls and so on up to ten pound rolls.
Buttermilk is drank and is very wholesome.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 02:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I have no churn at home. Churns are usually seen in every farmers house. The churns of long ago were nothing like the modern ones. The ones used long ago were mostly tall ones about four feet high and about four feet in circumference at the bottom and tapering up to about two feet in circumference at the top. They were worked by a long handle with a piece of wood at one end, club shaped and this was called a "dash".
The churn of the present day is of a different shape and a different size. The barrell is oval shaped about three feet high and about two feet in circumference at each end and about two and a half feet in the centre. This barrell is placed on a frame made of four legs and works by means of a handle running on iron rollers. About four gallons of cream is put in at the time, and according to the temperature of the cream, the
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 02:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is unlucky to meet a red haired woman the first thing in the morning.
To meet one magpie is unlucky, but to meet two magpies is a sign of good luck.
If a black cat comes in to the house it is a sign of good luck.
If a hen brings in a straw a visitor is coming.
When a knife falls it is a sign that a lady visitor is coming, if a fork falls a gentleman is coming and if a spoon falls it is a sign of a misfortune.
You should never hit a person with an elder stick, if you do he will never grow any bigger because it is said that it was out of an elder tree Judas hanged himself.
When you see a new moon for the first time you should bow three times and if you have a coin in your pocket you should turn it, and any
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 02:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When the sky is the colour of mackerel it is a sign of fine or windy weather.
A lot of "woolpacks" or white clouds in the sky foretell fine weather.
A circle round the moon is a sign of rain.
A rainbow at morn is the sailor's good warn'
A rainbow at noon is the sailor's doom,
A rainbow at night is the sailor's delight."
When rooks or crows gather together and make a lot of noise, it is a sign of bad weather.
If seagulls come inland there is a storm at sea. When spiders get busy weaving their webs it is a sign of rain.
"Loud quack the ducks, the seagulls cry,
The distant hills are looking nigh.."
When frogs and beetles come in, it is a sign of rain.
The curlew does not cry the same when rain is to come, there is a twist or change in her voice.
If a dog eats grass it is a sign of rain or if the cat sits with her back to the fire.
senior member (history)
2019-12-27 01:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a tree in the lawn of Miss Deane's Longraigue or Suttons lawn as it was called called Sir John Moore's tree.
It was here that Sir John halted + bivouached before he went forward to meet the insurgents at Horetown. There are three other trees close beside it forming a kind of small square. It was here that an iron gate used to be hung between the four trees, a fire was lighted underneath and a beast or bullock roasted on it, the meat of course being then distributed to the soldiers.
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 04:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My home is situated in Boolabawn half a mile from Glynn and six and a half miles from the town of Wexford.
With regard to the number of families in it there are about six. In the Parish, the population is about three hundred.
The family name most common is "Roche".
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 04:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of my home district is Glynn. Its townsland is Bulgen.
It is in the Barony of Shelmalier West. There are at least thirty families in this district and about one hundred people. The habitations are mostly thatched
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 04:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and one is called Heaven, the other "Purgatory" and the other "Hell". Then Heaven comes and knocks, and one of the girls says who calls there and Heaven says, an angel from heaven, then she guess the colours that one girl has given to the others, and Purgatory and Hell does the same.
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 04:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of my Home District is Killurin. My townsland is Cornwall, and my Parish is Glynn. It is in the Barony of Shelmalier West.
There are about forty families and about two hundred people. The most common name is Carley because there are four or five families in the District. The houses are nearly all built the same, The farmers'
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 04:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mr Molloney another travelling man visits this district twice every year. When he came first he was very very poor but now he has got an ass and cart which brings him around from place to place.
None of these "travelling folk" remain for longer than one night at a time in any place. Some are very welcome but others are not, as they are rude and impudent.
They usually bring news and stories from other parts. Some are very talkative but others seldom speak.
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 03:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
you will see caravans and tents placed by the sides of the roads or in some byways which are occupied by the travelling folk.
These folk are well known in locality. Once every month they visit each house They have been doing this for many years. They sell many things such as beads, prayer-books, mirrors and laces.
They obtain their supplies mostly in Dublin and from other towns through which they pass.
They also get their food in these places but some of them get it from the women of the house into which they go. These folk generally travel in families I shall here give you some of the best known of them, Moll Dundon, Mag Good, Mrs Hughes and the Connors.
Mrs Hughes, Mag Good and Moll Dundon generally come for the local patterns but the Connors visit us most frequently
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 03:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
also Pat Molloney, a native of Kerry. This man visits this district twice every year. On his first visit here he was poor but now he has an ass and cart which brings him around from place to place.
He is a very decent sort and on that account he gets a deal of work to do when he comes.
Mag Good and Mrs Hughes visit us for the patterns, whilst the Connors are daily visitants.
Most of these folk bring strange stories and news from distant parts some are very talkative and interesting but others seldom speak.
I would not like to have a life like theirs, and I thank God I have not one.
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 03:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the men can make cans from tin.
They make big ones and small ones, called tommy-cans, teadrawers and others.
They generally buy their foodstuffs in the towns or cities through which they pass. Some of them are welcome but others are not as very often some of them are impudent and cheeky.
These "travelling people" never remain longer than a night in any one place. When entering the houses they say the old Irish salutation, "God save all here", then they unpack their baskets and ask's the "women of the house" to buy something, but ask for alms, but it is not everything they except.
These folk generally travel in families.
Here I shall give the names of the best known of them May Good, Mrs. Hughes Jim Delaney Jerry Connors and his family and
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 03:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
but most of them have donkeys and carts and the more wealthier ones have caravans.
Some of them travel singly but the most of them travel in bands, and families. The most popular ones in the locality, are the "Connors" family,
"Moll Dundon" "Mrs Hughes" and Mag Good.
The "Connors" family lodge in the district very frequently, but "Mag Good" only comes for the local pattern.
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 03:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some old "travelling folk" still visit this district and have done so for many years. I would not say that the majority are too poor. Some sell small articles such as, toothbrushes, clasps, mirrors, brooches, which the people buy from them more or less to get rid of them. Most of
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 03:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some of these people are poor, but not as poor as they say, or as you would imagine. Some of them sell small articles such as, pins, needles, beads, prayer-books, hair-clips, picture-frames, and small mirrors which they obtain in the nearest town.
Such travellers are generally welcome to nearly every house, and before going in they always use the old salutation "God save all in here."
They do not remain very long at any house, some stay only one night, but there are others who stay so long as they are kept.
They generally sleep in the barns, where some straw is made into a bed.
Sometimes they bring food with them but they nearly always get food wherever they stay.
They never visit any house where a dog is kept, because the dogs know them and bark wickedly when they see them coming.
Some of them travel on foot, but
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 03:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
upside-down and sleep under it at night and when the day comes they start on their journey again. They travel about in an old donkey and cart or in a pony and cart, but you generally see a little donkey under a big cart loaded with children of all sizes, a big basket of all sorts of articles, and a big horse walking behind but they all go round very happily together singing and shouting.
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 02:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
you that they always got something from your grandmothers and grandfathers, so to get rid of them, you give them something for God's sake.
These travellers are welcome in some parts but I think they do not get the same welcome as in olden times, and why it is I do not know. Of course in olden times newspapers were not as plentiful as nowadays and many of the old people were unable to read so the travellers brought all the news and told it to them. The most welcome of them are of course the ones that are always to be seen at the local pattern in the month of August which are the Connors, Mag and Kate Good, Blind Mary and Jim Delaney. Some of these are very poor and others are not. They have no house of their own but an old car which they turn
senior member (history)
2019-12-23 02:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The travelling folk are "as old as the hills" in most parts of Ireland,
sometimes in the country and sometimes in the town, going from one house to another asking for alms such as - tea, sugar, bread, butter, milk, potatoes, an old pair of boots, an old coat or hat, and sometimes they try to sell little articles such as - pins, clips, combs, brushes, laces, needles, holy pictures and tin cans. They purchase their articles in the towns and sell them in the country and they make the tin cans themselves from sheets of tin which they purchase in the hardware shops. When they come round to the houses if you do not buy something from them or give them something they will tell
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 05:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
they drank out of little tins which they called "noggins" or "goblets".
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 05:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
some people drink it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sown in this locality are -
"The Kerrs Pinks," "Presidents," "British Queens," "Shamrocks," "Arron chief," "Epicures" and "Arron Victors."
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The principal crop in this district is the potato. The farmers with plenty of land usually sow three acres under this most useful crop, while the people in the labourers' cottages sow their half-acres.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a man in this district by the name of Mr. Donnolly who has the old cure for worms or worm fever. He lives at the cross of Muchwood which is n this parish of Glynn.
The cure he gives, is in the form of medicine which must be taken in the morning fasting. If it is a very small child the medicine must be rubbed into its back, its chest, its hands, the soles of its feet and its nose and it is also given a few drops to drink in the name of the father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost.
It is made from herbs which he alone can gather. The moment he begins to mix the medicine the person gets better. Many families around the district have been cured by it. I myself had a cousin
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
out now. There are no monuments erected near my home.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In this locality there are two holy wells, one in Carrigmannon wood know as Saint Lawrence and the other in Ardcandrisk.
On local patterns people
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I only know of three holy wells in the parish of Glynn
The names of them are 'Saint
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We play many games in this locality especially in the summer.
The ones we enjoy best are
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In this locality games are played at every time of the year especially in summer.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We play so many different kinds of games that it would be difficult
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If you travel from place to place
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a custom to gather faggots and make bonfires from them.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
what use is wealth without health.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
what use is wealth witthout health.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In our district the old people are very superstitous. They look on certain days as luckier than others, as regards marriages, cutting your nails, commencing work, sowing, or ploughing and moving from one house to another.
With regard to marriages they say -
Monday is for health,
Tuesday is for wealth,
Wednesday is the best day of all.
Thursday is for losses,
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marry in June your life is all a honeymoon.
Marry while the snow falls your true love is sure to last.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
den, while whistling at night is the devils delight.
Friday is supposed to be a very unlucky day on which to begin ploughing, sowing, or reaping.
There is a great deal of superstition connected with marriages, for example it is looked on as being unlucky to get married in green, on a Friday, or in the month of May. The bride seldom fails to observe the old wedding superstition.
She wears
"something old", something new,
something borrowed and something blue."
Another old belief regarding marriages is, - To marry on
Monday is for health,
Tuesday is for wealth,
Wednesday is the best day of all,
Thursday is for losses,
Friday is for crosses, while
Saturday is no day at all.
Another is, -
Marry in May you'll rue the day.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
pain in your back.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people of the present day are full of superstition especially regarding certain days and certain months. For example moving into a new house on Friday is supposed to be unlucky.
Kittens born in the month of May bring evil to the inhabitants of the house, while chickens hatched out in July are supposed to be very weak and squeaky.
A whistling woman and a crowing hen calls the devil from his
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 04:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times the people had many cures for their ailments.
Scalded buttermilk and linseed oil is a good cure for a cold.
The juice of rotten apples or house leeks is a cure for sore eyes.
To cure a pain in your back is to go through a hole in a rock or through a hole in a wall.
A cure for any sore is to catch an evit and to lick it before it looses its tail, and cut it in nine pieces behind your back.
There is a big cross in Adamstown, and if you could span it you never have a
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
her, and she said "the highest penny in the fair". So off he went with his cow. He reached the fair all right. After a while a man came over to him and said, "what are you looking for the animal" and the boy said "the highest penny in the fair."
Well I am the man that will give it to you and he took a penny out of his pocket, climbed a tree , put the penny on the top and said "there now is the highest coin in the fair," so he gave it to him and the boy went home quite satisfied.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I am now about to relate to you a story of two boys who went to gather nuts.
It happened one day that two boy
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
hot rum. "But" said the man
"I could not, the whole neighbourhood would know I was drinking." "Well then," said the doctor "send the servant for it and when you want to take it tell the servant you want hot water to shave yourself."
Next day the doctor came in and asked the servant how the patient was. "Oh" said the servant "he has gone mad, he is shaving himself every five minutes in the day."
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a boy who was not too sensible. One day his mother sent him to the fair of Taghmon to sell a cow. He asked her what he should ask for
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
passenger seemed to think nothing of any great house no matter how large the building. He said to the jarvey, "Why man, over on the other side, meaning America, they put up any of those houses in a day, so poor "Paddy" was furious.
As they returned home in the evening past the "General Post Office", he asked the jarvey "what fine building is that Pat?
"Begor : I do not know that for it was not there in the morning when we were passing" said Paddy.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
began to curse and swear because he was on the wrong train.
When he got out at Wicklow he got into another one which was going to Waterford. He began to curse and swear just the same as before. He got into another train when the other one stopped. He happened to be in the same carriage with a priest.
He asked the priest where he was going, but when the priest heard him cursing he told him that he was going to hell.
Oh am I said the man, "begor" I am in the wrong train again.
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At Killurin on the left bank of the river Slaney, is situated an old castle, which was built by the Danes years upon years ago.
Age, and the strain of years are beginning to tell on it.
The walls are crumbling away and the ivy has taken root in the little crevices. But, inside those walls there is supposed to be a hidden treasure.
Tradition tells us that a crock of gold is buried in a certain room of the castle and that if a person were there at midnight he would see a soldier who would offer him a sword to fight him with, and who-ever gets the upper hand, takes the gold. My opinion is, that if
senior member (history)
2019-12-22 03:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the left bank of the river Slaney there stands an old Castle which was built by the Danes in the time of the persecution by Cromwell.
It stands in a field owned by people named Laffans.
In one of the rooms it is told that there is a crock of gold buried and that a soldier appears there with two swords every night at twelve oclock. If you were there he would give you one of them, ask you to fight with him and if you were lucky enough to kill him the gold was yours.
One night a strange incident
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 05:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a man who got an attack of the "flu." The doctor said "he was to drink plenty of
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 05:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a man who was wanting to go from Dublin to Wexford. He got into the train at Dublin, and after a while he found out that the train was going to Wicklow.
The man became furious, and
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 05:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
often passed that road. The tinker saluted the priest and the priest saluted him in return. Now "Jerry" said the priest are you able to say the "Our Father" get. "Well" said the tinker respectfully "everyone as he is brought up "are you able to mend a hole in a tin can yet."
The priest began to laugh and resumed his journey. The tinker was too smart for the priest.
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 05:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Irish Jarvey was noted foor his wit.
An American was one day being driven through Dublin by one of the local carmen. The "Yank" appeared greatly interested in all the fine buildings and streets as they drove along and "Pat" tried his best to impress him with the magnitude of the place but the
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 05:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a little boy who had a lady teacher for himself and he was taught in a room in his home.
There was an old clock in the room the door of which could be opened. One day his mother went to the door, the teacher went out and the little boy followed her. She told them that his uncle was coming to take him for a drive in his motor-car, at twelve oclock. The boy
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The extensive district of Polehore is famous throughout the pages of Irish history. In its vicinity there is an old castle now in complete ruins. It was built there by Bruce De Burgh in the year twelve hundred and forty-three. Adjacent to it is what they call Cool-na-horna where there is gold supposed to be hidden. Near this bog there is a drawwell and in it the most rare species of gold are hidden. For over a hundred years this well has not been used. The old folk say that near this well there
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in Bulgan, not far from my home, this treasure is supposed to be hidden.
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
occured opposite this place. As some men were fishing, they pushed a pole into the water but when it reached the mud they were unable to push it any farther, for a large flag was underneath it, they pulled it up and pushed it down again in the very same place, but it went down without any trouble, this was a strange thing to happen.
One day afterwards they went to this place in search of the flag but they failed to find it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a tradition that a crock of gold and sacred vestments are hidden in an old rath in this parish. Many attempts were made to discover them but without success. One old man living in the vicinity heard the story and decided to go and dig for them.
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the left bank of the rier Slaney there stands an old Castle which was built by the Danes in the time of the persecution by Cromwell.
It stands in a field owned by people named Laffans.
In one of the rooms it is told that there is a crock of gold buried and that a soldier appears there with two swords every night at twelve oclock. If you were there he would give you one of them, ask you to fight with him and if you were lucky enough to kill him the gold was yours.
One night a strange incident
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Shops were not common in olden times, buying was carried on after Mass such as it is now but only a little.
Goods were often bartered but not now.
People sometimes get Goods out of the Shop on "tick". It is unlucky to transact certain business on certain days, such as to start building a house on a Saturday
It is unlucky to whitewash in May.
The fowl-markets held formerly were in Carrig, Ballyhack + Wellingtonbridge, and there is one held in Clongeen now.
Dealers and pedlars used to call around to buy feathers and horse hair.
One man that comes from New Ross is called Peggy's Leg. A woman used to come, she was known as "Mary from Waterford" and she knew Irish.
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local fairs are held in Foulksmills, Wellington Bridge, Ballycullane and in Taghmon. Business was seldom trasacted in farmer's houses long ago but it was sometimes done. There was a great fair held in Nash about fifty years ago. There were faction fights after the fair. The greatest fighters were the Gunnips of Nash.
A big bonefire was lit after the fair and the people danced around it. In Wexford and New Ross fairs were held in streets but in most villages there is a fair green. Luck money is given and is known as "boot" and it is given according to the deal about a shilling is given with a pig and it increases when a horse or a cow is sold. When marking a bargain the parties strike their hands.
Raddle is put on the animals when sold. The rope is given with a horse when sold. There is a special fair for horses
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Not only is every townland and village known by its name but even every field, glen and valley also have each their special names. Here are some of the fields that have a name.
"Bán Ráis" - it is so called by that name because races were held in it years ago, it is in Newcastle alongside the road from Garryrichard to Clongeen.
Mr. Stronge Raheenduff has a field called the kiln-field, it is called by that name because there is an old lime-stone kiln in it where limestone was ground into lime up to forty years ago.
He has another field called the Money Moor by the banks of the river it is so called for it is said that money is to be found in it.
Mr. Hickey of Garryrichard has a field called the Chapel field for it is said that there was a chapel there in years gone by. More say that there was a mass-path across the field out to the graveyard in Faree where there was a church in years gone by.
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 04:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Not only is every townland village known by its name but even every field, glen and valley also have each their special names. Here are some of the fields that have a name.
"Bán Ráis" - it is so called by that name because races were held in it years ago, it is in Newcastle alongside the road from Garryrichard to Clongeen.
Mr. Stronge Raheenduff has a field called the kiln-field, it is called by that name because there is an old lime-stone kiln in it where limestone was ground into lime up to forty years ago.
He has another field called the Money Moor by the banks of the river it is so called for it is said that money is to be found in it.
Mr. Hickey of Garryrichard has a field called the Chapel field for it is said that there was a chapel there in years gone by. More say that there was a mass-path across the field out to the graveyard in Faree where there was a church in years gone by.
senior member (history)
2019-12-21 03:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fields belonging to Mr. Robinson Bryanstown are called "Bán na-gháirdín", poll namuc, Dunne's field, car-park, horse-park, "bán-tulla" and "clósanna."
In Garryrichard we have "Bán ráis," Shamrock-Hall, The debs garden,
The "cuckrums" is a covert of moors and marshy land between Hickeys and Farrells.
The "Corack" river is the river formed by the meeting of Foulksmills river and Goffsbridge river and the "Quay of Rospile, where boats of coal used come up years ago, is on that river.
It is still to be seen although not now in use as river is closed up with trees.
The "Moate of Rathgorey" is a "moate" a round mound about forty feet high covered with bushes where some soldiers were buried in 1798. It is also said that there was a house on the Moate, there was a mill-grounding stone alongside it where limestone was ground.
senior member (history)
2019-12-18 04:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nell Cullen of Boley
Nell Cullen of Boley was a young girl in '98. Her brother fought and fell at the battle of New Ross.
When the women went to look for their dead after the battle Nell Cullen walked all the way from Boley to New Ross to look for her brother. She found him among the dead. Carrying the loved one Reverently on her back, she walked all the way home with her precious load, and had him buried in the family burial ground.
Nell Cullen would be great-grandmother to the Dave Egan's of Boley - also great-grandaunt of the Cullens at the forge at Mullinderry.
senior member (history)
2019-12-18 04:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Millers paid themselves long ago by taking a percentage of the grain they ground. This was called
Miller's Toll
But they had the name of taking more than their "toll."
A story is told of a miller who accosted a school boy one day on his way from school.
"You are a long time going to school now John" said the miller "you ought to know everything that is to be known"
"Well," said John "there are things I know and things I do not know"
"Tell me some of the things you know" said the miller.
"Well, one of the things I know" said John, "is, that millers always have very fat pigs."
"Tell me some of the things you do not know" said the miller.
One of the things I do not know" said John, "is Where do they get all the meal that fattens them?"
senior member (history)
2019-12-18 04:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Continued from opposite page)
Three escapes from being shot
I was praying fervently all the time for I expected to be riddled with bullets any minute. Myself and the lorry were now keeping pace, I behind
Evidently the Officer came to the conclusion that they would spare my life. The dreadful lorry gathered speed and was now tearing out of my sight. Oh, the relief of it! And the thanks I gave to God! Though the whole episode took but five minutes it seemed an eternity to me!
3. In 1922 at Prout's taking of Waterford I was doing my Irish Course at the Presentation Convent, when a bullet passed within 6 inches of me.
senior member (history)
2019-12-18 03:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cheevers the Schoolmaster
Taught after Matty Larkin in the old shool in Garrycullen.
Cheevers was a very darkskinned man. His mother was darker-skinned in fact a real 'mulatto,' being the daughter of a foreign sailor - a black- sailing on the sailing vessels to and from New Ross
Her name was Belinda Davis - she was a teacher of the old type who taught in their homes.
-----
Matt Barron
Belonged to a Fenian Brotherhood - lost all he had by the movement. Appears to have been a native of New Ross. Travelled these parts more as a guest than a beggarman. Last heard of round here 40 years ago, was then about 80 years of age.
-----
"Fontenoy"
A very small man, slight build, and extremely dark, used to come periodically to New Ross. He recited stirring ballads on the Streets. Crowds used gather round him and enjoy his declamation.
Now that, I know the difference, he was an excellent reciter.
His favourite piece was "Fontenoy" which he did with the precision of a military officer. Last seen about 45 years ago was then about 60 yrs
We never knew him by any name only "Fontenoy."
-----
Biddy Coady
In the Land League days Biddy used to dress herself up in green and parade the town of New Ross. She attended all meetings "dressed up" nationally and fantastically. It was her great ambition to be considered like Miss Fanny Parnell.
She called herself "Erin."
She was a native of New Ross.
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 03:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
blowing his leg off by the Rocket.
After some hours it was possible to put out a boat, when they succeeded in taking off the injured man only to find that he was so badly hurt that he died a few hours later in a house owned by a man named Mick Charles who lived at Tinnaberna.
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 03:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Note from J Carberry Litterbeg.
Kilmuckridge
About 40 years ago, a fine Yacht came in at Tinnaberna, at a spot about two miles from here.
A local Tinnaberna crew manned her and brought her to Wexford town - where each man got a Bonus of ten Pounds.
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 03:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Farmers used often make their own candles as follows -
They procured shapes or moulds into which they poured melted Tallow - having first affixed a thread or cotton for a wick. These filled moulds they allowed to cool, and then by placing the mould to a fire for a short time, were able to draw out the made Candle.
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 03:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the description of whom exactly allied with the inmates or visitors of the machine in the Barn.
Yet a third visitation !
This same woman another day bringing chickens to market to Kilmuckridge and had them covered with a piece of bag, or sacking
She was stopped on the way down by a woman who asked her if she had any chickens to sell. She stopped - got down from the car - went to the back of it to turn back the sacking cloth that covered the chickens - when out stepped from under the Cloth and in to the "side lace' of the cart -
"3 wee men" exactly similar to those she had met in the lane.
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 03:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He saw them come out - move about - go in again, come out again, and when he pointed them out to his nearest companion they vanished again into the machine. He told his strange story to those present as he did to me - and one of his hearers said he too on another occasion had seen the "wee men" but hadnt mentioned it ever as he knew or feared he would be laughed at.
Again Mr Walsh further tells me that later on about three months after that occurence in the Barn, that his sister was walking up the lane from the house towards the Road, leading two children by the hands, when she saw coming down the hill towards her 3 little men
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 03:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
their mid-day meal + tea.
One dark November day they were so gathered in his barn about half past one clock
the door was closed and the light inside was poor - there being but one small window.
There was standing in the Barn opposite the door, a Winnowing machine the business end of which was facing the little light that came from beneath the door.
Mr Walsh states that he was nearest the winnowing machine + on the opposite side of the barn when during a strange lull in the conversation - three small men came out of the bottom of the winnowing machine - or from the part where the cleaned corn comes out.
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 03:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
their mid-day meal + tea.
One dark November day they were so gathered in his barn about half past one clock
the door was closed and the light inside was poor - there being but one small window.
There was standing in the Barn opposite the door, a Winnowing machine the business end of which was facing the little light that came from beneath the door.
Mr Walsh states that he was nearest the winnowing machine + on the opposite side of the barn when during a strange lull in the conversation - three small men came out of the bottom of the winnowing machine - or from the part where the cleaned corns comes out.
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 02:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I have this story personally from a very old resident of Kilmuckridge, who died about 10 yrs ago - at the ripe age of 90 yrs.
His name was Patrick Walsh of Kilmuckridge, and an uncle to the famous Mangan brothers. He resided in the house at Kilmuckridge where Mr Murtagh Mangan now lives.
Mr Walsh was a very sensible sober and rather well-read man.
He never drank, and was most religious + God - fearing
This is his tale of the Leprechaun or Luiricín (Pron loora-keen) as he called it.
He and the other three or four men who worked at his place used generally retire to a barn for a yarn or a smoke after
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 02:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Miss o Connor of Blackwater who is over 80 yrs of age, tells many a story of the Fairies or wee folk.
She fully believes in them herself and gives numerous instances to convince her listeners
She states that it was quite usual for people to be simply snapped up + carried away also quite common for children to be taken off and other weaklings left instead, and that then the weakling would in turn be put "out to the fairies" -
that is left out to be again changed for the sound or healthy child
This weakling was usually placed "on the shovel", and
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 02:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs o Connor of Blackwater who is over 80 yrs of age, tells many a story of the Fairies or wee folk.
She fully believes in them herself and gives numerous instances to convince her listeners
She states that it was quite usual for people to be simply snapped up + carried away also quite common for children to be taken off and other weaklings left instead, and that then the weakling would in turn be put "out to the fairies" -
that is left out to be again changed for the sound or healthy child
This weakling was usually placed "on the shovel", and
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 02:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
years before, blossomed out to full-sized real, live ghost stories, culminating in my own startling experience of the lights in the night.
But you will say "what of the lights"
ah, but there are lights and lights and as a matter of fact I had scores of times seen a light in that same room before - could do so any night for, from the same reason known only to the inmates of that house - those lights were never let die out -
not one in that house would sleep in a room that wasn't fully lighted! So much for the lights - what of those poor people that had of necessity to live in that ghostly hole of a house?
where are they now ?
Well, they lived on there as only they them -
senior member (history)
2019-12-17 02:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and commenced to tell me a strange story of a nights happenings in yonder house across the way.
A lady - a Mrs T---- had just been over to my mother to tell "that of all the nights and of all the noises last night capped them all"
This Mrs T-- lived next door to the haunted house, and had the further additional remarkable news that
"3 fine pigs were found dead in the sty outside"
(These nocturnal noises and weird happenings were invariably accompanied by loss of stock)
My mother's story was told her by Mrs T. seemed but to throw light as it were, on the lights I had seen - they confirmed my fears; and now the yarns I had listened to unmovedly for so many
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 04:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
-selves can tell - they kept on losing stock - their horses and their cows - their pigs and their sheep till nothing was left to them but empty fields
empty cattle sheds, and a whited sepulchre of a house
That had perforce to leave it - when the means whereby the lived had dwindled away and now they are scattered in various parts of the country.
Ten years ago The house itself was not exactly demolished, but very much structurally altered, and strange as it may seem is now a flourishing
"Hotel" with "R I A C" signs etc
and all the other "draws" to fill to
capacity - but not for all the gold
in the King's mint would I be
be "drawn" to that 'Rest for the tired,' even to risk seeing from afar, those Lights in the Night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 04:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
-selves can tell - they kept on losing stock - their horses and their cows - their pigs and their sheep till nothing was left to them but empty fields
empty cattle sheds, and a whited sepulchre of a house
That had perforce to leave it - when the means whereby the lived had dwindled away and now they are scattered in various parts of the country.
Ten years ago The house itself was not exactly demolished, but very much structurally altered, and strange as it may seem is now a flourishing "Hotel" with "R I A C" signs etc and all the other "draws" to fill to capacity - but not for all the gold in the King's mint would I be
be "drawn" to that 'Rest for the tired,' even to risk seeing from afar, those Lights in the Night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 04:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
years before, blossomed out to full-sized real, live ghost stories, culminating in my own startling experience of the lights in the night.
But you will say "what of the lights"
ah, but there are lights and ights and as a matter of fact I had scores of times seen a light in that same room before - could do so any night for, from the same reason known only to the inmates of that house - those lights were never let die out -
not one in that house would sleep in a room that wasn't fully lighted! So much for the lights - what of those poor prople that had of necessity to live in that ghostly
hole of a house?
where are they now ?
Well, they lived on there as only they them -
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and commenced to tell me a strange story of a nights happenings in yonder house across the way.
A lady - a Mrs T---- had just been over to my mother to tell "that of all the nights and of all the noises last night capped them all"
This Mrs T-- lived next door to the haunted house, and had the further additional remarkable news that
"3 fine pigs were found dead in the sty outside"
(These nocturnal noises and weird happenings were invariably accompanied by loss of stock)
My mother's story was told her by Mrs T. seemed but to throw light as it were, on the lights I had seen - the confirmed my fears; and now the yarns I had listened to unmovedly for so many
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I didnt wait or want to see it - I had done all the investigating + Confirming I needed - and I at once "took to cover" again this time to dig myself in as it were, and to squeeze my eyes tight to prevent those blinding lights from piercing through closed lids.
I could not sleep - I was too frightened - just tossed + turned about and longed for the lights of dawn - thaat would dispel all such lights + shadows
It came, and found me still wide awake - still seeing vividly that room of lights + fire, but thankful that I hadn't to squeeze my eyes to shut them out.
At nine o clock my mother (God rest her) brought my breakfast to my bed
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of that same house opposite -
of how their neighbours were being constantly disturbed by the unearthly mighty noises heard within those walls - sounds of heaps of delph being broken - rattling of chains + irons -
all these came back to me as I lay with my head under cover and frightened me still more - and changed then from mere "yarns to full frightfulness of a real ghost story.
I decided to confirm for myself that these lights + colours were but of my imagination, and to have just a quick look once more - a mere flash, a glance would do - I did so - and now I saw right into that room - I saw it blazing in much coloured lights, but if there was more to see
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
before settling down to that best position wherein one best brings on that gentle sleep I looked out the window, which was just at the rear of my bed - out, as expected at the dark - dead dark night, for such it was in the room when I put out my light - what I saw I shall not soon, - ever forget -
where should be dark except for a light in the bedroom opposite it was ALL light - and from right across that haunted house there glowed beams of VARIED COLOURED lights -
lights that settled and centred to a focus in the window of the haunted house. Recovering from the shock + surprise I took "to Cover" - and then I bethought me of all the "Yarns" I had heard
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"The lights in the Night"
This is the story of a haunted house and a haunted, troubled family that lived in my native town but for obvious reason I am leaving out the real name of the family there being several of the family still living.
My home was exactly opposite this haunted house and I slept in the top storey of a 3 storey house from the window of which I could look down to the street and over direct, to the haunted spot at the other side of the street.
I used often read in bed and on this night, having read till 1.30.am I decided to turn in or rather, turn over, being more or less tired from reading rather than feeling sleepy, but
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 02:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mend it for you". He then went away towards his home, and when he returned to the Raheen later on he found the dash lying on the ground.
He mended it and went away home again, but on returning later to the mound to his great surprise he found that the mended Dash had been taken away, but in its place a jug of beer had been left in its place.
His companion advised him not to drink the beer, but he would not be advised and drank as much of it as he cared for.
When they both went home one of them went to unyoke the horses, but when he looked for his companion who had taken the beer, there was no tale or tiding of him for the Fairies had carried him away and left him in the North of Ireland.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When old people complain of rheumatism it is a sign of soft weather.
We hear the train very plainly when rain is near us.
When sheep flock together and go to the sheltry side of the ditch it is the sign of a coming storm.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Evening red and morning grey
Will speed a traveller on his way,
But morning red and evening grey,
He must wait another day.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sky to make a sailor's jacket, it is a sign of fine weather.
To see sparks on the bottom of a pot is also a sign of good weather.
To hear wild geese is a sign of a storm.
If fine weather comes with the new moon we will have fine weather for the month.
More signs of fine weather are
if the floor is dry,
if a lump of salt is hard to be broken,
if the fire is easy to be lit.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
To see smoke out od a chimney going down to the ground or to see chickens picking their feathers are signs of rain.

Here is a poem for signs of rain
i
"Loud quack the ducks, the peacocks cry,
The distant hills are looking nigh,
How restless is the snorting swine,
The busy flies disturb the swine.
ii
Puss on the hearth with velvet paws,
Sits wiping o'er her whiskered jaws,
Last night the Sun went pale to bed,
The moon in haloes hid her head."
To hear crickets singing or chirping is a sign of rain.
"A rainbow at night is a sailor's delight
A rainbow at morning is a sailors warning"
To see swallows fly low is a sign of rain, or to see the soot fall down the chimney.
If there is enough blue in the
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A shilling is called a "bob" and sixpene is called a "tanner", five shillings was called "crown or a dollar and one pound is commonly called a "quid."
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
on a griddle and they had no butter to put on it. In nearly all the houses there were tables and when the people were finished using them they were hung against the wall.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Shops were not as plentiful in olden times as they are now.
People had to go to the town to make purchases.
Buying and selling was carried on after mass and it is still just a little after mass. Labour was given for the exchange of goods for at that time money was very scarce.
Sometimes "tick" was allowed and some times "boot". The old people would not like to transact business on Friday.
The hucksters and pedlars and dealers use to visit the district to collect feathers and rags.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times people only got three meals a day, breakfast, dinner and supper. They got potatoes for their dinner and supper. They used to get up at five o'clock in the morning and go out into the field to work and they were brought out a keeler of porridge for their breakfast.
They did not get any vegetables except potatoes . When the potatoes were strained they were put into a basket and laid on the floor, then the people of the house sat around the basket and peeled potatoes with their fingers. They always drank buttermilk with the potatoes.
They ate oaten bread made
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the following Christmas Pewter mugs were used before cups became common also pint tins were used.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 03:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
including the man and woman. Some houses where there were only a small family a table hanging by the wall would be lowered down and three or four could sit round it. When not in use it would be hung up against the wall. Meat was only eaten at the principal meal. Salt meat was generally eaten. The vegetables were not very plenty cabbage and turnips were the most common.
On fast days they used to eat herrings. Six o' clock was latest they ever ate.
They used to make Colecannon on the night before all Saints day and that habit is carried out still in most places.
At Easter time everyone would get a couple dozen eggs extra and see how many eggs they would be able to eat on Easter Sunday. The children used to go to the houses for their Easter egg.
Pan cakes were made on Shrove Tuesday a flour-pudding used to be made in every house with the exception of a couple of rich people would have rice.
A brack used to be bought at Christmas and everyone would get a bit of it and would not get any more until
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 02:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Only three meals a day used to be eaten breakfast dinner and supper
the breakfast used to be eaten about nine o clock. The men would go out to their work at five o clock and at nine the farmer would bring out a pot of yellow porridge and oaten bread the men would sit down in the field and eat it.
At twelve o'clock they would come into their dinner of potatoes cabbage and bacon. They would eat their supper at six o'clock; for their supper they would have potatoes and buttermilk.
They used to go to bed between half past seven and eight o clock.
Potatoes were eaten at two meals and sometimes at the three meals. They used to pull out the kitchen table and everyone in the house would sit round it
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 02:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the money you receive. There are many names on the coins for example the sixpence is called a tanner, the shilling is called a bob, a pound is called a quid.
"Boxty" bread was sold at Brennans of Coolboy.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 02:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times people used to eat only two meals a day breakfast and supper. They ate their breakfast at about eight o clock in the morning and their supper at about seven in the evening. They ate potatoes and meat for every meal.
In some places people sat around the table in the centre of the floor and generally in every house table was against the wall so as when the meals were over they would hang up the table. The people used a lot of butter-milk with the Potatoes.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 02:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Shops were not very common long ago. The shopkeepers used to sell groceries after Mass. The people used to work for certain things.
Markets were usually held in this district but it is not done in many places now.
A fowl market is held in Newbawn and Clongeen.
Martin Hayden of New Ross, and William O Neill of the Hook used to go around buying rags. They do not come around now as they are dead.
It is unlucky to buy or sell anything on the 21st of March, if you do the devil spits on
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 02:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times people worked for an our or two before they ate their breakfast. For this meal they got cutlen stirabout boiled the night before and made so thickly that they used to cut it in slices with a knife.
They usually drank buttermilk or skimmed milk with the stirabout out of noggins and ate the stirabout off platters which were made by coopers or local craftsmen.
Long ago when tables were not in use they were made so that they could be used for a seat also.
For dinner people usually had potatoes and fish.
Fish was eaten more, long ago than now as also were vegetables.
Tea is not so very long in use in this district. When it came into use at first people did not know how to use it.
Sometimes they would put a bag of tea on the teapot.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 02:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a fair always held at Nash and it is noted always for its faction fights. The Gunnips of Rathnageerah were great faction fighters
The fair of Nash was near a cemetery and after the fair a bonefire would be lighted, it was given up when the girl was taken up in the sky and never heard of again. There were always luck given at these fairs and was called "luckpenny". They dipped the stick in mud and put it on the animal. The buyer will slap the seller's hand when an animal is sold. The halter is always given.
There was also a fair held in Foulksmills which extended from the moate of Rathgorey to the fair green of Foulksmils. A fair used to be held in Tintern, which held from twelve o' clock to seven o' clock in the morning a bonefire was lighted after the fair and a quarter cask,
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 02:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The fairs of the county are held in Taghmon, Foulks Mills, Wellington Bridge, Campile, New Ross, Enniscorthy and Newtownbarry.
The fair of Ballycullane is held near a cemetery and the fair of Wellington Bridge is held across from the castle of Clonmines.
Fairs were held formerly at Nash, Carrig, Bannow, Ballyhack and there was always a great fair held in Tintern on the 12th of May but these were discontinued owing to they not being convenient to a railway station. The town fairs are generally held in the streets but there is always a paddock for testing horses. When a bargain is made they strike hands.
When an animal like a cow or sheep is sold there is a mark like a cross put on its flank. The rope must be given with a horse when sold.
There are special fairs held in New Ross, Enniscorthy and Taghmon for horses and there is a special pig market held in Wellington Bridge every Tuesday.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 04:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They also drained the water off and ate the tea-leaves. The women used to hide it at first from the men and drink it for themselves.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 04:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Food in olden times.
The people in olden times used to only eat two meals a day, potatoes were eaten at every meal and butter-milk was drank.
The table was hung up on the wall, some of these tables are to be found still.
The people used not eat any meal after six o'clock. They ate "colcannon"
pancakes on Shrove Tuesday, nuts on All Hallow's eve and eggs on Easter Sunday. They used to eat oaten bread and it was very hard but they had very good teeth because they did not many sweets or hot tea.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 04:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and pigs. When an animal is sold the buyer and seller go into the public house to "drown" the bargain.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 04:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wellingtonsbridge, Taghmon, Ballymitty and nearly every May there is a fair held in fair held in Foulksmills.
In New Ross there is a fair
held for horses every year.
When the horses are sold the halter is always given with it. When the animals are sold they are marked with raddle. When two men are making a bargain they strike hands. There is alwayd a pig market held in Wellingtonsbridge every Tuesday.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 04:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
held on the streets in Taghmon. The Ballycullane fair is held in a field adjoining the cemetery. The fairs of the towns are held on the streets. When an buyer buys an animal from the farmer a cow or a horse etc, he gives him luck money back or not they say it would be unlucky.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 04:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were fairs held in Nash which are not held now. At that time the fairs were held in fields and when the fair was finished people fought and many a person was killed with a black thorn stick.
About two years ago after that a man ploughed the field and there was nothing but bones in the field it was never ploughed since and it is called the fair Green of Nash. There are fairs held in
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 04:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fairs are usually held in the following places, first Carrig-on Bannow in Ballycullane, Ballyhack, Nash, Rath Gorey.
All those fairs were held usually in country places called villages. Buyers generally used to go and buy at the farmers places and more times used to meet them at the cross roads when going to the fair.
There are no fairs held in - these local places now. They are held now in Wellington Bridge instead of Carrig, Ballycullane instead of Ballyhack and also in Taghmon in place of Nash. The Wellington Bridge fair is held in a field adjoining the cemetery and station. The fair is
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The local fairs are held in Taghmon Foulksmills and Wellingtons Bridge
About fifty years ago a fair was held at Nash. When the fair was over at Nash the people would start fighting and continue for two or three days and stay drinking what they had made on the fair. The town fairs are held on the streets.
When an animal is sold on a fair luck money is given according to the value of each beast sold.
If two men made a bargain two sell an animal they would strike hands.
When animals are sold they are clipped but sheep are raddled. When a horse is sold the halter is always given in.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mend either boots or clogs.
Some of them wore elastic boots. In those times the shoemakers were very numerous to the number of shoemakers nowadays. Some say they made their own leather and some say that they made sheep-skin boots and lined them with wool.
The people of the present day are not so attentive to their feet but they still have those ailments. Shoe-making long ago was a great trade but it is not so good now
Very few people wear home-made shoes at the present day. There are but a few shoemakers around this locality now. The shoes worn nowadays are usually leather ones.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In certain places long ago, there were people living in the country who made boots or shoes.
There was a man named James Doran who stopped in the hotel in Foulksmills about forty years ago. He spent his time in repairing boots.
He also made light shoes or sandals for women with skins of animals which were killed on the farm. The soles were made with three pieces of skin stitched together, which made them strong. There were two men in the little Cullenstown, one of the used to make clogs out of wood with skin inside with hair inside. The other used to
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In certain places long ago, there were people living in the country who made boots or shoes.
There was a man named James Doran who stopped in the hotel in Foulksmills about forty years ago. He spent his time in repairing boots.
He also made light shoes or sandals for women with skins of animals which were killed on the farm. The soles were made with three pieces of skin stitched together, which made them strong. There were two men in the little Cullenstown, one of the used to make clogs out of wood with skin inside with hair inside. The othe used to
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
but it was water nor he did not care.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A fair used to be held at the Moatregorey on Ascension Thursday. When the fair was over the men had faction fights, stallion fights. A fair was held at Ballygarvan they were faction fights there also with people by the name of Gunnips.
The fair of Nash was a good one, it was held from the 15th of August to the 20th of November. All sorts of fights were held there with sticks and boxing. A lot of stands used to be on the fair green, selling beer, lemonade and gingerbread.
The children were let out early from school on the 20th of November. One man was boxing he got very thirsty, he ran into a house to get a drink, he dipped the mug down in a can of blood, and drank it. He ran out again and fought twice as hard. He did not know
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Ireland long ago the people made a different sort of bread than what they make nowadays.
There is a sort called "boxty bread", it was supposed to be the healthiest of them all.
It was made from oats, barley and wheat which was softened in water first. Sometimes only one of those kinds was used.
It was mixed with goat's milk and salt but no soda. It was round in shape, in certain houses a lot of this bread was made and sold to other people. One of those was at William Brennan's of Coolboy.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A game that is played by young and old is cards. Cards drives are got up in some houses for many different purposes. Many games are played on the cards: forty five, thirty, "old maid", nap and rummy.
Nap and thirty are the commonest.
When the game starts it usually continues until the early hours of the morning.
Most of the boys going to school are able to play cards now. It is often now we hear of a "turkey" at Xmas, or a "pair of chickens" or "an ass" being played for at the cards, and often the person who wins puts him up again to make more money for himself.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 03:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Here are some of the different games which we play in this district, "skittles", "katty", "hide and -go-seek" "tig" Prisoners base, fisherman's net, soldiers, frog jump,
spinning tops, pillow the cap,
blind man's buff, rings and marbles. Balls in the cap, rounders,
Jack of all trades, high gates, ass race, "garter," bull in the ring,
"beds", "dices, jackstones, razer back, see saw, hoops and "teetum totum".
"Blind man's buff" is played by getting a cloth and putting it on the eyes of one of the players. Then he gropes around trying to catch one, and whoever is caught the cloth
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 02:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Many words are used when playing marbles, such as brace, bar brace, far, brink, knuckle down risings and brace at you. Also hide and-go-seek is played when you are caught, who-ever catches you says "caught". Another game that is played by the boys of this school is "Golden chain. First two boys are selected Pat takes a golden chain and Tom takes a golden watch. The rest line up behind them the last boy is stopped and asked which would he prefer.
If he prefers a golden chain he goes behind Pat and if he takes a golden watch he goes behind Tom. When all are gone the two leaders pull and whatever side breaks the other side wins. Bull in the ring
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 02:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Young people around this district play many different sorts of games. Here are some of them, which are played in the long Winter nights.
Blind man's buff. Rings. Ludo. Cards. Draughts. Putting nuts in the fire all Hallows Eve.
Seeing who would be able to eat an apple the quickest. Getting a saucer of water, a saucer of clay and a ring in an other saucer.
Here are some of the games that are played in Summer.
Skittles. Hunt the fox. Plucking the petals from daisies to see who would get married to a tinker or a tailor.
Playing marbles. Tig. Fisherman's net.
Bull in the ring. Prisoners base.
senior member (history)
2019-12-12 02:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following are some prayers never printed in paper.
When getting up in the morning say,
Blessed by the hour that Jesus was born,
Peace to the living and rest to the dead
Merciful Jesus have mercy on me,
My soul and my body I give unto thee.
Though the five Sacred Wounds that hung on a tree,
O merciful Jesus have mercy on me.
The old people usually when the clock strikes, Bless themselves and say,
Another hour of my life has passed Sweet Jesus be with me at the last.
When starting to churn they say,
Here we go in the name of God.
Another prayer is
There are four corners on my bed,
There are four angels over head.
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
God bless the bed that I lie on.
If any evil come to me, Holy Mother waken me.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
brew them over again.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
For the shuttin' of the gate it is so late
Against the Lord's anointed
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a young man livin around here wan time. He didn't mind grabbin' a few things when he'd be hungry an odd time. Wan day he stole some heads o' cabbage on the priest.
After some time he went to Confession begor. He went into the Confession box an' he said to the priest "Begor Father I stole a few heads."
"What kind o' heads" said the priest. "Is it a pig's head or a cow's head or what is it my boy."
The boy was mad because he was asked this question an' says he
"You're damn inquisivite Father."
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a young man livin around here wan time. He didn't mind grabbin' a few things when he'd be hungry an odd time. Wan day he stole some heads o' cabbage on the priest.
After some time he went to Confession begor. He went into the Confession box an' he said to the priest "Begor Father I stole a few heads."
"What kind o' heads" said the priest. "Is it a pig's head or ac ow's head or what is it my boy."
The boy was mad because he was asked this question an' says he
"You're damn inquisivite Father."
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
boots to go in, away marched the boots, an' when the Seargent heard the steps he made at wance for the dure, but all he could see was a pair o' boots.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
nephew lives down there now. I dont know if its where Floods lived, he's livin' or not, if not its next dure to it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
are two groves in Carrigbyrne. There are about one hundred trees growing in them. They belong to Mr. Jefferies, Ballyshannon, Adamstown, Co. Wexford, Barony of Bantry.
Carrigbyrne is a beautiful district.
There are songs concerning Carrigbyrne which are given in front of book.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
by tilling the land. The land is fairly good, but some of it is very boggy also.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was no such thing as flour bread when I was a chap, we had barley bread an' oaten bread, an' plenty o' cutlen stirabout for our breakfast.
Of coorse that time people would be out in the fields in the Summer time at 3 and 4 o clock in the mornin'.
There weren't many very strong men to my remembrance. I saw men, times an they'd carry a bag of barley under each arm from the barn to the cart
There were many big men, but there were many small ones too.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There used to be travellers going round the country an' they'd have Butts of ash on their shoulders an, they'd stop in the farmers houses makin' riddles, sieves you now, an' baskets there was no machinery then an' the corn was all threshed with a flail.
I often saw them here makin' the riddles, they'd take a sliver off the ash as thin as a whip then they'd put wan end in their mouths between their teeth an' hold the other end in their hands an' cut it down the middle, then they'd weave the pieces of ash beginnin' at the centre an' workin' out before 'em.
There was three kinds of riddles, the barn riddle, a great big riddle, the wheaten riddle an the oaten riddle.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 04:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tould him to keep away an' says he "Go an' kill a Hussian for yourself."
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 03:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Did you ever hear about the hussian that was killed down here in the Meehan Lane.
Well, Mogue Furlon' o' Scorth, an a fella called Murphy were goin to the battle o' Horetown.
Murphy was a well edicated fella an' he went be the name o' "The Councillor".
They had their pikes on their shoulders an' begor when they had gone a bit didn't they see two Hussians comin' on horseback. They ran into this lane an' begor' the two Hussians came pell mell into the lane after 'em, an they had to stand for fight.
After a long tussle Furlon' stuck one of the Hussians, an' pulled him down out o' the saddle, an the other galloped off for his life. Furlon' began to sarch the Hussian an' see if he had any money on him, an Murphy went over to help him expectin' to get a share o' the booty but Furlon'
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 03:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr. David French,
Raheenvarren,
Newbawn,
Co. Wexford.
The Park, The Pump field,
The bush garden, The road field,
Eustace's corner field.
This field gets its name on account of being near the cross-roads at Eustaces'.
Sam Greens' field.
The field is called this name because a man named Sam Green lived there years ago.
The three corner moor.
The moor is called this because there are three corners in it.
Wher's field,
Back o' Tom Mc Gee's field.
The long field.
-----
Owner :-
Mr. David Curtis
Carrigbyrne,
Newbawn,
The kennel field,
There was a dog kennel there, years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 03:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr. Jeffries,
Ballyshannon,
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford.
The brick field,
The Palin field.
It s called this name because there is a paling on one side of it.
-----
Owner :-
Mr. R. Furlong,
Ballyshannon,
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford.
The brow field. It is called this name because it is very hilly.
-----
Owner :-
Mr. M. Mc. Grath,
Scullabogue,
Newbawn,
Co. Wexford.
Garryhumertoon, The little moor.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 03:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Street field.
The rath field.
It is called that name because there was a rath there one time.
The Gleanntan field.
-----
Owner :-
Mr. John Roche,
Ballyshannon,
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford.
The Well field.
It is called this name because there is a blessed well in the field.
The kiln field.
It is called this name because there is a big kiln in it. Lime used to be burned in this kiln years ago.
The Dock yard field,
It is called this name because dock weeds always grow in the field.
The shore field, The river moor,
The Sean gorta,
The three cornered field
It is called this name because there are three corners in the field.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 03:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr. Frank Doyle,
Grallagh,
Raheen,
Co. Wexford.
The kiln field. This gets its name from an old kiln which is in the field.
The palin' field. This gets its name from a big paling which is all around it.
The crab meadow. This gets its name from a lot of crab trees growing there.
-----
Owner :-
Mrs. Murphy,
Courtdale,
Raheen,
Co. Wexford.
The long string.
It is called this name because it is a long narrow field.
The Riascs,
The gollimore,
The knock field.
This field gets its name from a knock which was there years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 03:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Shiolthan, The long field,
The green field, The rath field,
It is called this name because here is an old rath in the field.
-----
Owner :-
Mrs. Watchorn,
Scullabogue,
Newbawn,
Co. Wexford.
The round field,
The rath field,
It is called this name because there is an old rath in it.
The Orange meadow.
This field is the place near Scullabogue Barn where these poor prisoners who were put to death in '98 in the Barn are buried, that is how it got the name. The mound where they are buried can be still seen. This field has never been tilled since '98.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 02:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr. Nicholas Doyle,
Ballyshannon,
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford.
Hurling Green, Fairy Field,
The still field.
It is called this name because it is said there was a still there years ago.
The Bán Gate Field.
It is called this name because it is near the house.
-----
Owner :-
Mr. James L. Doyle,
Scullabogue,
Newbawn,
Co. Wexford.
The money hole, The Curragh,
The big park (A very large field)
The Mooncaun Particushta.
-----
Owner :-
Miss Cleary,
Raheen,
Adamstown,
Co. Wexford.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 02:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a big pond of black dirty water in it.
-----
Owner :-
Mr T. Foley,
Carrigdaggan,
Newbawn,
Co. Wexford.
The middle field, The long haggard,
The big stone field.
This field gets its name because there is a great big stone in it, and it is said that a giant threw it off the Rock of Carrigbyrne.
The old house field.
It is called this name because years ago there was an old house there.
The kiln field.
This gets its name from an old kiln which is in the field.
The quarry field.
It is called this name because there is a great big deep quarry in it.
The well field
It is called this because there is a well in it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 02:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owner :-
Mr. M. Stephenson,
Ballinaboola,
Co. Wexford.
Barony of Bantry.
Flanniers garden, The Bán Moor,
The Wher's field.
-----
Owner :-
Mr. Murphy,
Courtdale,
Raheen,
Co. Wexford.
The Pound, The Wray Field,
The Bawn bog. The rock field
-----
Owner :-
Mr. M. Murphy,
Carrigdaggan,
Newbawn,
Co. Wexford.
Martins' Garden,
It is called that name because many years ago people called Martins lived there.
The black-hole field.
It is called that name because there is always
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 02:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
not know the name of the teacher.
Wan o' the Cautheen's was a hat maker, she used to plait wheaten straws an' make hats out of it, another used to go around as a midwife to sows, that was her trade, she often stayed a couple o' nights in a place, she used to get a plate or male or something like that when she'd be finished.
There used to be another public house on the Cross o' Crush Philip near Newbawn. I remember it well, an' all the people used to go there on a Sunday straight from Mass, an stay there all day, drinkin', an singin' an dancin' (may be you oughtnt to write that down tho') but it's the truth they went straight from Mass to Crushphilip.
senior member (history)
2019-12-09 02:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I remember a little shop over near the Alley just where Paddy mc.Gee is livin' now, it's eighty years ago since it was there, people called Kellys had it.
Cautheen Kelly was the owner, an' the place went be the name of "The Cautheens". I remember goin' over to the shop, I can remember things since I was six years old. I'm just eighty seven now I don't remember what they sold, not very much, I think, there was no such thing as a loaf o' bread then.
They used to have a meeting place over there, an' the boys an' girls used to be dancin', the stone they used to dance on is there still.
"The Piper's Stone" they used to call it, if you were ever over there near the Alley, you'd see it, a big, flat stone. My father often tauld me there was a public house in it wan time, an' he remembered a hedge school there too. I do
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 03:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is also another cure for the
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 03:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is unlucky to throw out water in the night.
When the hen drags in a straw you will be visited by a stranger.
When you sre sweeping away the dirt in the morning you are sweeping away the luck.
If you hit anyone with an elder stick you will never grow any bigger.
People would go to all the wells on May day and skim them into a bucket then they would churn it.
When you are churning and cannot get the butter you should redden a sock of a plough whoever would have the butter would come to the door.
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 03:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cough the frog takes it.
There is another cure for it also, give an ass bread, and whatever crumbs are left.
To cure Chilblains they used to scoop out a potato and put salt into it, then put a small drop of water into it leave it for a while, until the salt melts and rub it on them
There is another cure for them also. Put lamp oil on the stocking and hold the stocking to the fire.
Rib leaf crushed up and chewed will take away the heartburn.
There is a woman in Raheen whose name is Mrs Walsh, she is able to cure ring-worm by rubbing a medal three times on the sore.
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 03:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If you had warts on your hand, get as much stones as there is warts
Rub each stone on each wart make the sign of the cross, put them in a little bag and leave it on the road. Whoever will get the bag of stones will get the warts also.
If you held your head over a mug of hot water it would take the pain away.
If you got a cut of bread from two married persons the one name it would cure the chin-cough.
They would give a child with the thrush borax and honey.
If a person had the whooping cough, they used to hold a frog over the person that would have it, when the person would
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 02:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The people in this district were often cured by herbs -
To cure a toothache they used to put a frog in their mouths.
When a child had a whooping cough, it was passed under a calf.
If they had a cut or scratch they chewed a small leaf called the rib-leaf.
There is also supposed to be something mysterious about the seventh son or daughter. Mat Wall is the seventh son and is able to find springs with a piece of stick.
If they had warts on their hands they would bury a straw,
with as many knots as there is warts. They made the sign of the cross over the warts. They hung a snail up on a "sgeac" as the snail withers so will the warts go off.
There is a wart-well in Clongeen graveyard, it is said to be
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 02:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the mother bird would throw them out of the nest when she comes back.
If you took the heart out of a jackdaw, the heart would creep around on the ground. (B. Whelan).
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 02:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Martins, sparrows build under eaves of houses.
The snipe and water hen build on the rushes in a bog or marsh.
The yellow hammer builds under a head of cabbage.
(T. White) Foulksmills.)
A blackstair builds in a pigeon-hole in the end of our dwelling house each year.
(J Cullen).
Bull-finch, green linnet + chaffinch build in ivy.
Pigeons build in holes made specially for them in ends of dwelling-houses, these are fairly plentiful in this district.
Written by . Jas Cullen Longraigue.
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 02:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The lapwing makes no nest at all but lays her eggs (4) in a bunch of rushes.
(P. Treacy.)
If a snipe saw you at her nest, she would take away her eggs to some other place in her bill.
(R. Doyle).
When young waterhens come out they don't stay on the nest but go down to the water.
(T. White) Foulksmills.
The woodquest's eggs are hatched in a fortnight.
The wren lays up to eighteen eggs but she throws out some of them;
(P. Ryan)
if you gave worms to young robins
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 02:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The lapwing makes no nest at all but lays her eggs (4) in a bunch of rushes.
(P. Treacy.)
If a snipe saw you at her nest, she would take away he eggs to some other place in her bill.
(R. Doyle).
When young waterhens come out they don't stay on the nest but go down to the water.
(T. White) Foulksmills.
The woodquest's eggs are hatched in a fortnight.
The wren lays up to eighteen eggs but she throws out some of them;
(P. Ryan)
if you gave worms to young robins
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 02:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The birds that migrate are -
cuckoo, swallows, bame-crake, plover, wildgeese
partridges, grouse, blackstairs, woodquests (migrate in Summer
French-magpie, "pilibín", French jay (comes in Summer).
-----
The larger birds magpie, crow, woodpigeon and the jay build their nests in tree tops.
The blackbird + thrush in "sgeacs" and bushes
The wren in a bush well covered up.
The robin in a hole in a ditch.
The lark and sandpiper in the grass on the ground generally in a meadow.
The finches + green linnet high up in a "sgeac"
The jackdaw in a chimney and she brings anything bright she sees in it, sometimes silver-paper, (even silver) wool and timbles have been found in them.
The swallow builds with mud under the eaves ofhouses, generally over a window and they come to the same nest year after year. The sparrows often run them out of their nests and take possession of them. The sparrows have nests in splits in walls also wagtail and tit mouse.
The leather-wing-bat in ivy on the "eye" of a brige
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 02:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The wild birds commonly found in this district are : (Clongeen B.N.S),
robin, wren, gold finch, chaffinch,
bullfinch, greenlinnet, crow, jackdaw, pigeon, woodpigeon
(or more commonly called woodquest)
sparrow, leather-wing-bat, long-tailed-tit, tit mouse, tomtit, mudlark, blackbird, thrush, jay, magpie
heron, (called a crane and just as commonly called by its Irish name "Corriasc") grouse
partridge, woodcock, plover, snipe, pheasants (were very plentiful but are rather scarce now.) lark, hawk, tomtit, willie-water-wagtail, woodpecker
sallypecker, jennyspinner, minnie-goat, stonechatter, kingfisher, greylinnet, lapwing, catowl, ringdove, browneen, "pilibín", martin-swallow, swallow, golden-plover, curlew, sandpiper, shoveller waterhen, roselinnet, black-diver, barncrake, blackstairs, black-cap, golden wren, cuckoo, scaldcrow, chiff-chaff.
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 01:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once a woodquest went to a crow to learn how to build its nest.
Now says the crow you put the sticks all crossed in the nest at first. "I know" said the pigeon", well if you do said the crow go and make it"
The woodpigeon flew away and that is why the woodpigeon never learned how to build their nests. They make the worst nest of all birds, just a few sticks or twigs laid flat and they lay only two eggs and sometimes they fall out of the nest altogether.
When the crows fly around the trees cawing loudly its the sign of a storm coming.
When you kill a wren you break a rib in the devils body.
The owl builds its nest inside in a barn, - the "ninny owl" is often heard in this district screeching at night. The magpie is said to have the devils blood in it and the wagtail has three drops of it. When the swallows fly low it is the sign of rain. When the crows are praising you they will put their heads together when they are
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 01:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and white. One day as it was singing in the woods it saw the magpie counting gold pieces on the ground beneath him. It flew down and asked him for some, the magpie told it if he would go to a certain place that evening it would get some gold there,
when evening came the blackbird flew to the spot and there it saw the gold, it began to pick them with its bill and as it picked it became yellow and at the same time a demon appeared blowing great clouds of smoke from its nostrils ands the blackbird's colour became black
so from that onwards the blackbird's colour is black. If the jackdaw's tongue is cut with a rusty sixpence it will talk.
Long ago as the Jews were planting a crown of sharp thorns in Our Lord's Head the robin seeing the way He was suffering flew on to the thorns and tried to pull
senior member (history)
2019-12-08 01:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was an old fashioned doctor some years ago called "sequaw". In a village not far from here there was a man who was very fond of drink.
One day he had no money to buy it he happened on the sequaw. The sequaw knew well that he was very fond of drink. He said to him "Well what is wrong with you the man made answer and said he was not well. The sequaw said put out your tongue and the man did so; the sequaw laid a a half a crown on it. Well I said the sequaw. "Instant relief" said the man.

------
Once upon a time there was a man selling bicycles. He happened on an old man and asked him to buy a bicycle and he said would'n't it be better buy a cow and the man, "Would'nt you look well riding a cow, But the other mman said wouldn't you look well milking a bicycle.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some grown-up people wear wooden clogs but they are very few, wooden shoes are not worn at all, children especially girls wear sandals in Summer time
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
but it was water not he did not care.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They say that if you sell any-thing on the 1st of March the devil spits on the money which you receive and you will never have any luck.
If you set turkey eggs on a Sunday tey will never come out.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to put on his eye.
Razor back is played by lying on your on your back and putting out your hands. Another person stands on them and lies on your legs and they are thrown into the air.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
is also played a boy gets in and all the rest join up and form a ring
When the boy gets out they all follow him and whoever catches him is the bull.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
toothache, got a pinch of blessed salt and put it into your tooth. There is an old cure for sore throat, get a pinch of salt and a cup of water and gargle your throat with it.
Whittles are cured in this way, when a potatoes are boiling, dip your finger into the water. You can cure warts, peal a potato and cut it in halves and rub it on the warts and then bury the potato in the ground and as the potato decays, the warts will decay.
If you have a cut on your finger get a ribleaf and cut it up small and put it on the cut and it wil lcure it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the river. He has a field called "nine-acre", and another the "mushroom" field as mushrooms used grow plentifully in it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
caught the latter and told him that if he told them where he had his treasures hid they would let him off, but if he did not tell they would bury him alive. He did not tell them, they made a hole, and put him down in it. This field where he was buried is still seen in a field beyond Quigleys of Faree. The field is called the "giant's field".
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The "Rosy Meadow" owned by Mr. Fletcher is so called because it was there "the pikeman" said the Rosary before advancing to the battle of Horetown - one of the principal battles of the Wexford Insurrection of '98.
The "Lios-field" so called for it was said the Fairies resided there; when the field was ploughed up, around the Lios was not touched for fear of the fairies.
The "báinlea" so called because all the year round the grass in the field was whitish. The "Brow" because there is a steep hill running down to
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a kiln in a field at the back of Daniel Egan's shop which I heard called "the kill o' Shanmore." It got that name because it was owned by a man who was called "Shaun Mór."
His right name was John Doyle, he was probably a big man, and that name was put on him.
Miss Deane has a field called the "Sports Field", so called because sports were held there each year up to a few years ago.
James White of Ballyclemock have nine or ten fields called the "old town". There was a lot of houses there, and the ruins are still there.
Most of the people in those houses were called Barrys and there is a farm near this place, it is owned by a man named Barry.
One day two giants were travelling together, they met another giant. The two of them
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 03:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mr. Leigh of Rosegarland a very extensive landlord owner, who has almost one thousand acres of land has names on most of his fields.
Currey's Hill, The rabbit-hill, Power's Hill,
The Pound, because it was used to put cattle in the night before he brought them to the fair.
Forty-acre field so called because of its size.
A large field he owned was known as "Poldoon" and that is also the real name of the land in and around the village of Foulksmills.
This field was divided up by the Land Commission in 1927 and local farmers now own it.
A local rhyme composed that time began :-
"Twas in nineteen and twentyseven,
That the farmers were in heaven,
(For) the Commissioners came around
And they got a bit of ground.
(Refrain)
"Says the poor "ould" man,
There were ten or eleven verses in all and they referred to each of the local farmers, almost twenty in number, who got land for themselves. Flax was grown in this place for about four years + a "scutch"-mill was erected about 1927.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 02:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many fields in this district known by a special name.
The cowfield is good for grazing,
the Keeper's field, the Horsefield because it is good for horses.
The Westnett's field; the Mangold-pit field;
Cotter's Gardens; the fir field, the yard field nearest to the yard, Power's hill annd the rabbit hill.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 02:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Many fields and nooks in this district are known by their names.
Poundings field, People by the name of Poundings lived there one time but they went to America.
The Butter-meadow; because a lot of buttercups grow there in the Summer; fields that those grow in are said to be good grazing fields.
The "factory-field" on my father's land in Mullinderry so called because it is alongside the old woollen factory where wool was spun about fifty years ago.
The kiln field, The "Bláge-field because it is near the river where the bleaching was done
The "Paur Fán means the white park.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 02:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sunday nearest the 18th May as it is believed that is was on that date the graveyard was consecrated.
Among the dead lie the remains of Fr. Redmond; and Bishop Nicholas Sweetman. He was elected Bishop in 1742 and ruled the See of Ferns for forty years. He was arrested and brought to Dublin Castle in 1743 on the unfounded charge of favouring the Young Pretender. He was again arrested in 1752 on a charge of high treason the evidence however was unsustainable and he was released. Bishop Sweetman died on Oct 9th 1786. The tombstone, which lies flat on the ground, over his grave bears the inscription
"Nicholas Sweetman - departed this life 19th October 1786
aged 86 years.
Bishop of Ferns 42 years
Another interesting tombstone is that bearing an inscription in Latin over the grave of Nicholas Walsh.
Latin teacher who taught Latin in the Horetown Convent about two miles from Clongeen.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 02:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The present surface of the church-yard is almost ten feet over the surface of the road which runs alongside it, this leads one to believe that the number of burials must have been very great. There are two large "Deal" trees growing inside the walls.
There was an old chapel in the centre of the graveyard but no trace of it can now be seen but a small round font in a flatstone, which is believed to have been the holy-water font. It is now called a "wart-well" and people who have warts on their hands still go there to get cured, three visits are generally made.
When funerals take place there, the coffin is carried around the graveyard first, two men preceeding it saying the De Profudis. The feet are laid nearest the chapel-wall so leaving the corpse facing the chapel. When it has been lowered into the grave, many of those present throw in a fist-full of clay on the coffin.
The Pattern-Day is the
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 02:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
told about people being seen in grave-yards. Once upon a time four boys were coming home from a dance and they danced on the road "again" the graveyard and suddenly four men clothed in white came out and danced against them.
There was a bone-fire lighted near a churchyard and a certain girl gathered up all the wooden crosses off the tombs to keep the fire lighting.
Suddenly a great gust of wind came and she was carried quickly away in the rush of wind. She was never seen or heard of again but her clothes were got afterwards in a quarry-hole in Ballygarvan.
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 02:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
from the present churchyard. When any local resident is being buried the coffin is carried around the "green" at the Pond before being brought round the village to be interred.
(Mrs Sinnott, Longraigue.).
There are many old church-yards in this district, there is a graveyard in Inch but it is not now used.
The first man to be buried in it was John Bowe who died in the year 1811.
There are many trees growing around it.
There are many wooden crosses in it.
There are ruins of the old Church in it and a very large tree (ash) is growing inside the walls which gives us an idea of the length it has been since church was there.
There is an old churchyard in Loughnageer at the Five Roads and it is named after St. Catherine.
Many of the residents of Loughnageer did not go there as it was not a custom to bury in the nearest churchyard. Many stories are
senior member (history)
2019-12-04 01:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a churchyard at the five-cross-roads in Loughnageer about one hundred years ago, and its site is still there, a small three cornered field covered with briars and bushes.
It has never been ploughed or disturbed as local tradition is against interference with such sacred spot.
There are no crosses or tombs to be seen there now. There was a chapel near it at that time known as St. Catherine's Church and the site is also there, the holy-water font is still to be seen there.
When the church was being used there was a mass-path down through the fields to a well called St. Catherine's Well about five hundred yards away.
St. Catherine's Church was in the Parish of Tintern and it was changed from Loughnageer to Clongeen when Clongeen Parish was first named in 1846.
There are people buried at Clongeen also in Foley's Pond which is on the cross-roads in the village about fifty or sixty yards
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 04:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When a shoe maker throws away his 'ends', what is he doing.
Preparing his sole for the last.
What the Dift between a Boxer and a lap dog.
One licks faces - other faces licks.
When a Cricketer like a dentist
When he pulls out the Stumps.
Why a Postage Stamp like a sulky donkey
The more you lick it - more it sticks.
Why a hen like a bricklayer.
they both lay - one eggs, other bricks
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 03:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is in the River, but Not in the Flood -
in all kinds of Timber but Not in the wood -
its in the marrow, but Not in the Bone
- in all sorts of timber, but Not in a stone.
The letter R

The man that made it didnt want it -
+ wanted to sell it -
The man that bought it didnt want it - and couldn't even see it
What is it ?
A Coffin.

Whats smaller than a Fly. ?
The bit that goes into its mouth.
Which does a Short Candle or a long Candle burn the Longer. ?
Neither, they both burn shorter.
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 03:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Black + white + Red (Read) all over.
What is it.
A Newspaper.

Why is a Shoemaker's Shop so much like Hell
There are so many Bad (Soles) in it.

Why is a Priest like a Cobbler.
They both save soles (Souls)

How to divide 18 pence evenly between 2 fathers and 2 sons.
The 'Catch' is that one of the Sons was also a father, or the father had a son, and then that Son had a son - so thats only 3 people and gives 6d each
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 03:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cortege suddenly stop -
I looked out through the window of the car - I saw exactly as I had seen in my dream of three nights previously. The Cross being taken down - being placed amongst numerous other wooden crosses and then we drove on, this time, not to the land of dreams, but towards that small piece of earth in a lonely wayside graveyard where was laid the remains of that dear lady; at the same thinking that perhaps after all, Dreams are not made of the stuff they are supposed to be made of.
Do they not sometimes hold the mirror to the Future?
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 03:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
there too - but we had paid our tribute to some old custom that I knew not the meaning of - and we drove on - an on, through the land of dreams till it ended as all dreams do - just as a dream.
Next morning my wife, had a wire from her home that her sister, who lived about 40 miles away, had died rather suddenly.! Nothing in that you will say - No, of Course not but what of the coincidence that followed.?
As a matter of course, being of the family I followed the Cortege of this fine young + beautiful woman
I was in a Motor Car - a few yds behind the hearse which carried her remains to the grave - I saw the
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 03:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Personal experience of W J MacDonald, Kilmuckridge aged 55.
I dreamed one night that I was in a motor car following a funeral and that en-route to the cemetery, the hearse behind which I was only a few yards, pulled up.
I looked out to discover the cause of the stop - so unusual - I thought at a funeral on a straight Country road. I saw (in my dream) a man get down from the hearse, bearing a wooden cross, which he placed near a 'skeac' tree
There were numerous other similar crosses
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 03:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Narrator. Mr. J Carberry age70 Litterbeg, Kilmuckridge
A Holy Well
This is the account of a holy well that is situated on Mr Ned Sinnotts' land of Upton.
Mr. Sinnott is not long in possession of this holding. He is a native of Blackwater and was left this place by an old Uncle a Mr. Mogue Brien. I asked Mr. Sinnott about this holy well / which is marked on the map / but strange to relate he knows nothing of it beyond stating that "it was changed and then became No good"
From another source the narrator above, I have learned that there were several burial urns found in the vicinity and that a gentleman named Mr. Knox - an antiquarian brought them away to the museum.
These urns were found near Mr. Middletons yard
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 03:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mr Boggan told me this story as told to him by a priest of this diocese. He was a curate at the time he had this unusual experience - but later became Parish Priest. He died about four years - but had told this same story to several people during his years as Curate + Parish Priest.
In the Parish where he laboured as a Curate, it came to his knowledge that there was a House in which the inmates were seriously troubled + annoyed by nocturnal noises and disturbances of a most unusual kind.
The owner of the house called in Fr -
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 02:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
told him of the unnatural happenings. He explained to the priest that the whole place seemed to be "pulling to pieces" - that beds, chairs, tables etc were moved about by unseen agency.
The Priest decided that he would Probe into the matter he even decided on staying anight in the house.
He did so and Could then confirm what his parishioners had told him of the haunted house. He was actually lifted bodily out of the bed.
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 02:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in the Bog - or in the harvest field they often brought some of these sustaining "Biscuits" with them and in this way - they were often able to work from dawn to sunset. They didn't mind a long "fast" as long as they had these revivers at hand.

Weaving.
An old man named Thomas OBrien aged 80 yrs. of CastleAnnesley Kilmuckridge has told me that there were in his fathers day, three very famous weavers in Blackwater. They used at first work together for the common good but later set up each in his own and in the words of the old narrater they "upset one another," so much so that they give up the business
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 02:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The dough so made was quite springy just like a wheaten sponge.
For oaten Bread the oats had to be ground fine just as for Barley bread. The flour was then mixed with a little salt and "wet" with sweet milk
The dough was then spread thinly in a hot pan or griddle and baked slowly. The resulting Cake was flatish - unlike our Wheaten Cakes - It produced a hard flat Cake, something like a crude biscuit.
But if it didn't look the thing - it was certainly the whole thing as regards nourishing sustaining food. These Cakes were like Tabloids of energy + health, and in the olden days when workers were "hard at it"
senior member (history)
2019-12-02 02:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bread-making / old methods.
While bread as we now know it was not in use in this district 80 yrs ago. The bread was either oaten, barley rye or wheaten.
For Barley bread the grain had to be first ground fine, and all the shells or hulls blown or sifted off with a sieve.
This fine flour was then "Wet" with Sour milk, to which was added - a small pinch of soda. It was then kneaded into dough, and baked on a pan or griddle by being hung on the fire
Where turf was used, the cake had to be put in a pan or griddle + baked before the fire
senior member (history)
2019-12-01 03:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
said that his life blood dyed the stones at the bottom of the river and it is to been seen at the present day.
Near the Big Cross about a mile from the school we had an example of the wooden hut. It was a small building just able to hold the priest and the servers. The congregation knelt outside in the mud on cushions or o bundles of straw.
Dr Poole a Quaker who lived in Killiane happened to be passing one day while Mass was being celebrated. On beholding the poorness of the place he was deeply moved. He gave a grant of money and a site to build a church. One was erected in Kilmacree. Father Kelly was the priest there. The church is standing still. Part of the roof on the west end has fallen in. Inside the chapel, door a large cross is standing, firmly embedded in the ground.
People who visit the chapel bring away a piece of this cross. It is said to be a cure for sore eyes and toothache.
senior member (history)
2019-12-01 03:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the Penal times Mass was said on altars hollowed out of rocks, in sheltry valleys, or in a small wooden huts. The priests under fear of arrest and execution at any moment had to take precautionary measures, and hence Mass was said in the above said places.
The Mass Rock in the Deerpark in Murrintown points out the place where Mass was celebrated in the Penal Times. The Rock is about forty feet high, and fifty feet wide. It is sheltered by trees on the west side. It overlooks a small valley and a river runs at its base.
The altar can still be seen and two steps where the priest stood whie saying Mass.
One day the place was discovered by the English. They pursued the priest along the river bank. The fugitive took refuge beneath a bridge which was about four hundred yards from the Rock.
In vain his pursuers sought for him. The priest however after the sharp run, succumbed to a violent fit of coughing.
His hiding place was immediately discovered.
He was shot down in cold blood. It is
senior member (history)
2019-12-01 03:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
this wall and glass was put in it. Outside the big kitchen door a half door was situated. This half door was put there to keep the soft children inside, and as well they got plenty of air, as the windows were very small and very little air could pass through them.
A ledge one foot from the ground was left around the kitchen. On some occasions a bed was placed in the corner of the kitchen. The mattress of this bed was made from clean chaff, and sometimes straw. These beds were called cots.
Turf was burned long ago. Turf is not used in this district.
The floors of the houses were also made of clay.
The marlholes in which the clay was got can still be seen. but now the animals drink out of them as they are always full of water.
Rushlights were used in the district long ago. They were made from rushes and sheeps tallow. A pot of tallow was melted in water.
The pith of a rush was dipped into the tallow, and let dry. This dipping was done nine or ten times before the candle was complete. This candle was used around the kitchen.
senior member (history)
2019-12-01 02:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Houses long ago were made from yellow clay, wattles, and straw. These houses were about ten feet high.
First of all yellow clay was procured, then wattles were got from timber.
Straw was placed between the cllay to keep it together. The clay was wet, and made into paste.
When a quantity of clay was wet children and sometimes men used to walk in it in their bare feet. This was done to make it tough.
Thatched houses were nearly always built on a hill. If they were built in a valley the water would stand aound the foundation of the houses, and soften the clay. Then the houses might fall.
About three feet of foundation was laid. This foundation was made of clay.
As it rose up, wattles and straw were put between the clay to keep it from parting. The roof was made with thatch. Straw and rushes were used for thatching. These rushes were got from the marshes and wet land around the district.
A small jam wall jutted out from the big wall parting the parlour from the kitchen. People used to sit on the ledges of the windows. A small square hole was made in
senior member (history)
2019-12-01 02:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
People putting out the light when going to bed say :
"May God grant us the light of Heaven."
This seems to be a very old prayer and is still said in many houses.
"May God bless the man and his work" is the usual salutation given to a person who is working by a passerby.
When the people are lying down to rest they say :
"Under the protection of the Holy Family I lay down to rest this blessed and holy night."
A very old prayer said also at night is "Bless O Lord the repose I am going to take that by renewing my bodily strength I may better and able to serve thee.
All ye Saints and Angels but especially thou O Mother of God intercede for me. Not only now during this night, but especially at the hour of my death.
Pour down thy blessings on my parents, benefactors, friends : on my enemies if I have any.
Protect my superiors both spiritual and temporal.
Help the poor and sick, and those in their last agony. Convert all heretics and unbelievers
senior member (history)
2019-12-01 02:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it.
About three or four hundred yards from the north side of the church, There is a well, known as Saint Brigid's well. Saint Brigid was the patron saint of the catholic church. The water of the well is able to cure warts.
Near the church too, there is another well which is regarded as a holy well. It is called the "Dutch man's Well", because a Dutch man lived near it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-01 02:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Rathaspeck was a parish long ago.
It consisted of twenty one townlands.
Rathasbuig in original language was the name of the parish which means,
"Rath of the bishop".
No account shows who the bishop was.
This catholic church has disappeared, and a protestant church is built in the same place.
The church is built on a high piece of land, which was evidently a fort, from which the first part of the name is derived.
The only remains of the catholic church is an old baptismal font, which was on the south west of the graveyard. It is in the present protestant church now. Tradition tells us that the font was carried out, and it went back again into the church.
The font is about two feet high and nine inches deep. It is formed of granite.
The protestant children are baptized in
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 03:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old stone in a field belonging to Mr. O'Shea Knockea, Campile, there is a cross on this stone. A priest named Father Kehoe said mass there in the penal times. One morning as he was in the middle of Mass he saw the soldiers appearing over the hill to.
He kept on saying mass until the soldiers came up and they dragged him away from his little altar and put away the people.
The priest put up his hands to be shot and the soldiers took up their guns and fired but it was all of no use for every time the bullets were fired they did not go within a yard of the priest and they could not
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 03:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
they would'nt allow him in,
they stood on guard at the door with guns, but the priest passed them in and they never saw him.
He annointed the girl and prepared her for death and passed out again.
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 03:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Dunmain, Cassagh New Ross Co Wexford a priest met a man on the road, he was a soldier. The soldier raised his gun to shoot him, but the gun fell to the ground. When the soldier stooped to pick it up he stuck to the ground. It was the power of God done this.
On the Hill of Slieve Coillte Co Wexford the soldiers were following a priest, Father Murphy was his name. The horse fell and the shoe hit the rock and the mark of it is to be seen there still.
At Clarkes Bealistown, Ballycullane, Co. Wexford there was a sick girl. The soldiers were staying there. The girl wished for the priest. The soldiers said that
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 03:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a mass path in the district of Boley, Ballycullane, in the parish of Tintern, Co. Wexford where mass was said in the penal time. One Sunday a priest named Father O'Connor was saying mass here out in the open air. This priest was not allowed to say mass as he was not ordained for this diocese.
This morning when he was in the middle of mass a crowd of soldiers was seen coming, when the priest heard them he ran off and the soldiers went after him and could not catch him. The soldiers went back to the mass stone and took the priests property they brought them a piece down the road and put four big stones on
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
hut and word came to him by an old tramp that the Red coats were hunting strong for him.
So he dressed up in old ragged clothes and went off and hid himself. The soldiers were hunting strong for him and after five years escaping them, they caught him and cut off his head. This was in the year of the famine.
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old bog on Matthew Larkin's land Aclamon Co. Wexford.
It is called the "Red Bog" and the people around here dont know why it is called that.
There is an old place here called the "Priests Hut." This place traditionally got its name because a priest hid there in the time of the penal days and often he said mass there. Fr. O'Brien was his name.
There is a path going from this to a mass stone that is in Garryduff, Campile, Co Wexford.
It is said that Fr. O'Brien said mass there also.
The soldiers were often in pursuit of this priest.
One night he was in the
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
turned it up when he was ploughing he was working on Croke's farm as a labourer he went to Dublin and he never returned. Tradition says there is plenty of gold in it still.
There was a path leading through the "Red Bog" Aclamon, Campile Co Wexford to this Mass stone. It is called the "Priest's path."
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a mass stone in Croke's land between Ballykerogue and Campile where a priest said mass in Penal times. There was a cave there too where the priest stayed. The mass stone is in the form of a cross. The name of the priest who said mass in it was Father Croke.
He was killed down there in ninety eight.
There was a big battle fought here. Many redcoats were killed there including many officers. There were gold ornaments found there years afar. The last was found about forty years ago by a man named Barron it looked like the top of a helmet. He got seventy pound for it in Dublin as it was pure gold.
A man found a stirrup belonging to a saddle he
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the penal times a priest lived in Rathimney Co. Wexford named Father Tierney. He was hunted from his curacy in Carne, Co. Wexford by the English soldiers and was obliged to take refuge in his home.
At that time there was no coal burned. The turf was taken into the kitchen to be burned. There was a little room in which the turf was piled up to the door in such a manner as to make it invisible.
In this room the priest had his altar and said mass for the members of the household.
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
fire the house was surrounded by soldiers. The mother had a shawl on her and when she could not get anything else to protect him she threw the shawl over him.
They searched every bit of the house but could not find him he afterwards got free.
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In "The Poll" in Drealistown Co.Wexford there is to be seen the ruins of an old church.
Although the church and furniture was burned the holy water font remained intact. Although every effort to remove it was was made by the Protestants it was fruitless, it was afterwards taken out by Catholics. when times settled, it was taken to Duncannon church where it remains to the present day.
A Fr. Robert Whitty said mass in this church every time he came home on holidays. He was an ancestor of the present family. When he came home this time, it was in the troubled times. One night he and his mother were talking at the turf
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the Penal times an order of the Augustinian Friars dwelt in Clonmines castle the ruins of the chapel is still to be seen. They were driven out of it by the soldiers in the Penal days they were all shot except one Friar who escaped across the river. He made his way to Grantstown and took refuge under a barrel in a small cabin and the soldiers pursuing him searched the cabin but were unable to find him
When they had gone he made his way to France. When the Penal times were over he came back again with some of his order and built a monastery in the same spot where the cabin stood where he hid from the English
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 02:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
completely surrounded on the mountain top which was covered all over with trees at that time. The priest hid himself and his horse under the rock and whatever the soldiers would do they could not find him so they gave up the chase and reported that he was not on the hill.
The priest sent them word to seek again the rock and would find the proof. So they did and in the rock they found the track of his horse's hoof and it can be seen there to this day.
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 01:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A mass stone can be seen in the townsland of Killesk at a place known as the Conibar on the land of Mrs Colfer. It stands by the river bank that divides the townsland of Ballykerogue and Killesk. The field in which the stone stands is known as "The Mass Field." There are three shelves cut on the stone also a cross. In the Penal days of 1680 mass was celebrated in the conibar and many other lonely places on the Ballykelly side of Slieve Coillte mountain.
Mass was also said and there is still a land mark on the Rock on the top of Slieve Coillte mountain.
One day the priest was hunted by the English soldiers they had him
senior member (history)
2019-11-27 01:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a battle fought at Inch which is in the district between Ballygarven and Boley Co. Wexford. This battle was fought between two hills. There were two Rebels fighting there from Kayle. One of them was Thomas Doyle and the other was Philip Kehoe. Their descendants live in Kayle still.
They were fighting away and they killed 17 English soldiers. They buried the men at the "gulley". There was a church yard and the road now crosses it. These two men were killed at the cricíns and were buried at the gulley also. There are three mounds in a field near by, and the grass never grows on the
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 03:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year of 1798 the soldiers called into a farmer's house O'Connor's Aclamon were their names.
Mr O'Connor and his wife were there. They had a baby in a cradle. One of the soldiers was going to drive his sword through the baby, but the little baby put up his hand to the sword. When the officers saw the baby, it stired his feelings and he ordered his soldier not to touch it, if he would he'd drive the sword through his own heart. The woman was very glad and she gave the soldiers a feed of potatoes and meat.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 03:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1798 people named Murphy's lived in Drealistown where Keatings live now. One night as they were going to bed they heard the tramping of horses outside. The woman went out to the door to see what it was and there she saw a soldier coming to the door.
He went in and asked her for some money or he would kill her on the spot. She said she had no money atal, then he asked her for a cup of tea she made the tea for him and he drank it. The second time he asked her for some money she said again she had none. He went upstairs and in a box he found some money. He came down and hit the woman with a
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a battle fought in Foulksmills Co. Wexford between the Insurgents and Sir John Moore.
This was called the battle of Longraigue.
After the battle was over all the Irish soldiers scattered to save themselves as their ammunition was getting scarce.
There was one rebel who went into the Pound in Horetown.
There were several men and women hiding there. He had one shot left in his gun. An English officer came riding past. This rebel came out and he said "I have one shot left in my gun." The people tried to stop him but before they could do anything he shot the officer off his horse. No one know's what
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
this rebel's name was. There is an officer's wife and child buried on one of the ditches in Longraigue along with a crock of copper.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year of 98 there was a farming man living in the Currach Gusserane New Ross Co Wexford.
One night he heard of the yeomen being on their way from New Ross to Gusserane and he set off to meet them. He expected to meet them in Aclamon New Ross Co Wexford.
but to his surprise he met them at a place which is called "Miúnicheóg."
They engaged in a deadly conflict but the result was, he killed five of the yeomen and when he did, an officer drew his bayonet and cut the head off the man and then threw him into the ditch. It is said when the man was rolling into the ditch, he was heard to mutter a curse and this curse
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
fell at Municeóg and from that day to this no an can meddle with the ditch.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
towards his heart "Drive it into him" cried one of the crowd "No" he said his life is no good to me but mine is.
He laid the point of his pike on the ground and with, one spring landed in the horses saddle and off he went guiding the horse with the shaft of his pike. They did not at all mean to give him his freedom. It is recorded that well-trained horses would not leave their master even at the point of the bayonet.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
were they with their capture. One sent forth a challenge. It was if anyone in the crowd would fight a rebel with a pike only. He was answered by one who said he would take up the challenge.
Young Fortune was appealed to, to see if he would fall in line if he won he got his liberty.
He nobly answered "Yes." They returned to the hall and drank freely except the man that was going to fight.
Morning dawned and all were merry.
The horseman mounted, sword in hand.
The young rebel faced his foe with his formidable weapon - the pike. The charger came along on his hind legs.
It did not take young Fortune long to cut the reins put the hook of his pike around the Hessians neck and bring him to the ground. He then laid his foot on his throat and pointed the top of the pike
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Young Fortune (that I told about in my last story) after his adventure in the forge with the intention of joining the main body, left his home and went to see his sweetheart Máirín Donoghue of Grange Campile, Co. Wexford. When returning home he was captured by a small party of Hessians and brought to Aulderstown, Co Wexford again. When passing the fatal tree of our other story he was asked by one of the officers did he see the tree from which he would be hung ere the day broke. He boldly answered "Yes". He was chained in a small room and the Hessians enjoyed themselves by drinking plenty of liquor so delighted
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 02:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
boy was fighting in Ross and during the fight he was taken down a back lane and killed and covered with leaves. His sister went in to Ross two days in successions and the soldiers woudnt give him to her. The third day she got him and when she brought his body home the pin was stuck in his sore leg as she had dreamt.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 01:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In ninety eight there was a lime kiln where William Kiely Ballygarvan, Gusserane New Ross, Co. Wexford is living now. There was a great battle fought there and there was a rebel burned in the lime kiln.
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 01:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were people named Rochfords who had a forge in Ballygarvan
New Ross Co. Wexford. The descendants of these Rochfords still live in the vicinity at Ballygarvan. They still work as smiths.
A few years ago they sent old guns that were used in 1798 to the Dublin Museum.
The Rochfords in ninety eight made the pikes that were used at the battle of Ross. All the Rochfords went except one chap and girl
There was one of the Rochfords who had a sore leg and his sister dreamt that the pin that was stuck in the bandage had stuck in his sore leg. She dreamt it three nights in succession. This
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 01:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man named Mogue Cullen in the townsland of Boley Ballycullane Co. Wexford living where Mick Molloy is now who was the great grand-father of Thomas Cullen who is now living in Yoletown.
Mogue Cullen fought at the battle of Ross and left his wife and children at home out in a field, at this time it was dangerous to go into your home for fear the soldiers would come in and kill them. There were only two guns at the battle of Ross and Mogue Cullen had one of them he came home walking from the battle with his gun on his shouder and went out for his wife and children in the
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 01:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a battle fought at Inch which is in the district between Ballygarven and Boley Co. Wexford. This battle was fought between two hills. There were two Rebels fighting there from Kayle. One of them was Thomas Doyle and the other was Philip Kehoe. Their descendants live in Kayle still.
They were fighting away and they kiled 17 English soldiers. They buried the men at the "gulley". There was a church yard and the road now crosses it. These two men were killed at the cricíns and were buried at the gulley also. There are three mounds in a field near by, and the grass never grows on the
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 01:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
riding towards the Connigberg, Dunmain Co. Wexford but they did not fiind him. That night, a few neighbours collected took him out of the oats and buried him in a disused corner at the cross of Ballinagcearc, Drealistown, Co. Wexford.
For years after the "cant" word went "Kill a Hessian for yourself" and this is how it originated.
In the Connigberg glen north of Campile there is a large stone on which four men from the district whetted their newly-made pikeheads on the morning that they travelled to join the Insurgents at Corbett on the 4th June 1798. They took part in the battle of Ross on the following day and three of the four were killed. The survivor settled in Campile district after the Insurrection
senior member (history)
2019-11-26 01:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
their officer passed by the road outside. The officer thinking he might happen on something inside reined up his horse and went in.
As soon as the woman saw him stopping she started pounding the furze with the mallet. He asked her "How she was" she replied "Well". He got a piece of paper rolled it up and stooped down to the turf fire to light his pipe. She came home on his head with the full force of the mallet and split it open. "Thank God" says she "I killed a Hessian for myself," She dragged him over to the heap of oats and covered him in it. The soldiers not finding the officer coming turned back and asked the woman,
"Did you see the officer," She told them she saw a horseman
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 04:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St. Stephen's Day a number of boys gather together and catch a wren. They put her in a box and go around from house to singing the wren-song and saying the rhyme.
"The wren the wren the King of all birds on St. Stephen's Day she was caught in the furze." Then they get money from the people of the house.
When they are finished up in the evening they divide the money between them and spend it as they wish.
On Easter Sunday night a crowd of boys gather and go round from house to house gathering eggs. When they have a good many gathered they go to a certain house and boil the eggs and eat them.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 04:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St. Stephen's Day a number of boys gather together and catch a wren. They put her in a box and go around from house to singing the wren-song and saying the rhyme.
"The wren the wrwn the King of all birds on St. Stephen's Day she was caught in the furze." Then they get money from the people of the house.
When they are finished up in the evening they divide the money between them and spend it as they wish.
On Easter Sunday night a crowd of boys gather and go round from house to house gathering eggs. When they have a good many gathered they go to a certain house and boil the eggs and eat them.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 04:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
weeded after coming up. They must be sprayed twice or three times to keep away the blight. Generally they are sprayed in June and July. They are dug in September or October with a potato-digger drawn by a pair of horses. There are kind of sprongs on the back of the digger and when it is put in gear they spin around. They root up the drills and they throw out the potatoes and then they are picked and brought home in cars to the haggard. They are pitted. They are piled in a long narrow pit and are covered with straw and clay.
The names of the potatoes are, "British Queens, Golden Wonders, Kerrs Pink, Presidents, Aran Consuls, Aran Bannors, Butes, and Main Crop.
Kerrs Pink and Presidents grow best in my district.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 04:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One acre of potatoes is grown on our farm every year. The amount seldom varies it might be a little more or a little less. The workman prepares the ground with an iron plough and harrow. Then he makes the drills with a duble plough and the farmyard manure is spread in the drills and then th potatoes are planted. Bag manure is spread on them and then they are covered with the same plough. The seed is generally whole but if they are extry large they need to be cut or if they are scarce they are cut also. At the present time there are no wooden ploughs in our district. The neigbours do not help one another in sowing the potatoes.
During the summer months a lot of work has to be done with with the potato crop.
First the tops have to be knocked off the drills with a small light harrow and then a drill-stone is run in the furrows to brake the lumps. If the field is dirty they must be
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 04:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old rath in Killowen.
It is circular in shape. Outside the rath there is a big pond of water and in the rath there are hawthorns growing.
It is built of clay and stone.
In the rath under where the hawthorns are, there is grass growing and it is always green.
About ten years ago a man was passing the rath and he saw a little man sitting near the rath. He had a green coat and a red hat on him. Some years ago a red haired woman went into Bill Walsh's house in Killowen and asked for a dish of meal. She was given the meal and she went away and never came back to the house again. One of the men followed her and when she came to the rath she disappeared into it.
There is a rath in Piltown and it is square. The headless coach was seen there some
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 03:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a rath in Killowen which is surrounded by earth and trees on top.
There was a man from Gusserane who had a half acre of grass. In the middle of the half acre there was a clump of bushes. One day he cut down the bushes. That night he was walking along the road with some other men. The man stopped to light his pipe while the other men went on. The men waited for him and wondered what was keeping him so long.
Then they someone shouting. They followed, and it went into a churchyard. When they entered the churchyard they found the man crushed to death between two tomb-stones.
senior member (history)
2019-11-14 03:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Travelling people travel around the country in caravans. Each faimly has a caravan of its own or a tent of its own. There were travellers at the foot of Charity Hill last summer. They were from Galway
They used steal things from the people.
Two travellers used come to our house a few years ago. Their names were Mary and John. Mary used sing and John used dance. They used sell cans and cups and mugs to the people. They used to travel round the country in a car. Another family named Donevans used stay at our house once every year when he would be on his was home to the Co/ Waterford. He used to tell stories and sing songs. Now his children are all grown up and they are all away working. Their father and mother are living in a cottage
senior member (history)
2019-11-09 04:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
loosening the skin and cutting a piece out of the skin so that you could blow in under it and then the whistle is made.
A catapult can be made by getting a stick in the shape of a fork and getting two pieces of rubber about a foot long. Tie each piece of rubber onto the top of each fork. Then get a piece of a tongue of a boot and out a hole in each end of it. Put each end of the rubber through each hole and tie it. Put a stone into the leather and stretch the rubber and when you let go, the stone goes off.
senior member (history)
2019-11-09 03:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
water till the twist is gone out of the rubber.
Get a bough off a tree and cut five pieces of the same thickness four inches long and three quarters of an inch thick. Cut three more pieces about two inches thick and six inches long. Make a ring in the ground and make it into quarters put one of the little sticks in middle of the ring and put the other four sticks at each corner of the ring. Draw a line about five yards away from the ring and take the three long sticks and throw them at the little ones and knock them out of the ring and play with them.
Make an aeroplane with ply-wood make three wooden wheels for the aeroplane.
Put an iron bar in such a way that it came out in the front of the aeroplane and bend
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 02:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A little pram can be made from timber and tin. Get four pieces of timber for the sides and nail them together. Then get a piece for the bottom. When the hood is made nail it on. Then get four polish -boxes for the wheels and put a hole in each of them with a nail. When this is done get two pieces of strong stick. Get them to fit the holes and then get two staples to hold the axles. Get a sally stick for a handle to shove it with.
A picture-frame can be made from corks.
The way to make it is to slice the corks and get four pieces of plywood for the frame and glue the corks on the ply-wood and the corks can be painted.
A model can be made from a turnip.
When the model is made a lighted candle is placed inside
senior member (history)
2019-11-07 01:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Preshough,
Spunk,
Comford,
Thistles,
Preshaugh is harmful because it spread quickly. It grows mostly in corn. This herb kills the crop. It is sprayed with bluestone to prevent it from spreading. It is very hard to clean out of the ground.
Comfort is a herb which grows on poor land. It has a root like a carrot. It is used to cure sprains and my uncle told me that it is also used to cure scour in calves. It is cut and boiled. The root only is used. When it is soft it is put as a poultice to the sprain.
I do not know how it is used to cure calves.
Spunk is a herb which grows in mangolds and turnips. It grows in patches and has a long root. When the crops are being thinned the spunk has to be pulled and it pulles up a lot of the plants and it causes a big damage to the land. Thistles
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 03:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a fella wan time livin' in the Boola, Raheen, an' he used to go round workin' from place to place.
Paddy O Connor was his name.
Well this time anyhow Paddy was workin' up in Raheen, with a man be the name o' Katin'
Katin was a schoolteacher. Wan day Paddy was atin' his dinner an' he had potatoes - roasters they used to call 'em because they used to put 'em down in the grioshach to roast after boilin' 'em. Well Mr. Katin' was in the kitchen an' he was pressin' Paddy to have more roasters.
Paddy was a great hand at makin' rhymes an' this is the way he answered Katin
"Of Potatoes hot and potatoes cold,
Of Potatoes new and potatoes old,
Of Potatoes tender and potatoes tough,
I thank you Mr Katin' I've quite enough."
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 03:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I was atin' me dinner wan day in Ross at Larkin's atin' house that's where Mac Donald's have set up now in Conduit Lane. There were two ould women from Kilkenny at the table gettin' their dinner too. They has frightful talk all the time an' wan of 'em sez "Do ye know our Seamus is afther gettin' a vatch."? "A vatch !!" sez th' other woman, is it s vatchim dogim or a vatchim clockim." "Vatchin, dogim, divil" sez she, "aint it a vatchim clockim to tell the time o' day for prácás."
Told to her by James Maddock
(Died 1929 aged 80 yrs)
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 03:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wan day a very long time ago, a man was goen' to the races in Rathceale in the county Limerick. As he went on his journey it began to rain. He had such a long journey to go, an as like all men in the ould times he was walkin', he said to 'imself "Begob if I could only could get somethin' to carry me." As he said this a large bird came floatin' along in th' air an' said to im. Get up on me back if you are commin' to the race." The man did that, an' soon he found they war over he race field, an' he said to the bird, "Let me down," an the bird tould 'im to jump off his back as he had'nt time to alight on the field. The man got angry an' he hit the bird on the head.
It all turned out to be a drame an' the bird that he hit on the head turned out to be his own brother who was sleeping with him an' he got the worst of it for hittin'
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 02:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There's a man be the name o' Dunne livin' in Kilbraney at present. There's a style goin' in to some o' his field an', begings, there's supposed to be goold under the steps. Three men went to dig for the goold wan night
Wan o' them brought a spade the other a shovel an' the other a pick.
Wan o' them dug off the top sod an' the other took off a little bit o'clay. Then wan o' them druv down a pick an it hopped off a thing, an' the thing sounded like a pot. "Begor a man," said one o' them "we have the goold now."
He had'nt long said it than a cock crew, they got sooch a fright that they ran for their lives, an' left their tools after them.
Then the next morning they came for their tools an' they were after turnin' into oak trees an' they were never caught near that place anymore
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 02:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a giant wan time be the name of Robinson an' he lived in a cave on Tinnecarrig rock situated in Newborn an' the remains o' the cave is there still. There's a dure an' it is the shape of an "A" an' it is full up o' goold. Begob a man, the giant was able to fasten the dure from the inside so that when he would go away the people would'nt get in to take the goold. Begor a man wan day the people went to stale the goold an' when they were nt able to get in they left blood hounds outside the cave. The giant came and shut them in the cave, an' it is said that they are there still.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 02:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
home. Wan day they met an ould man. They asked 'im, did he know any people be the name o' Lord Castle Bangers.
He said that they lived down a bet that road. They went down a bit the road an' they saw the house. There was an ould man sittin' in the forge, an' he was eatin' potatoes off his apron.
When he was finished, he washed his hands in the trough o' water, an' wiped them in his apron. They went into the house then, and there was an ould woman sittin at the fire an' her face was as black as the hob. She was smokin' an ould dirty pipe. The men went back to England delighted with their adventure.
The gentleman was waitin' to hear their story. They said that there was a man sittin' in the parlour eatin' a grand dinner, when he was finished eatin he washed his hands in a dish and wiped them in a lovely towel. They also said that there was a grand girl sittin' at the fire and that her face was as white as snow. The gentleman was
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 02:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man and his wife livin' together wan time near this place. They had only wan son. These always went to the name of Lord Castle Bangers. They had a fat pig wan time and they sent the son to sell the pig. He got a good price for the pig.
When he came half ways home he tied the ass to a gate. He walked back to town and he went to England. When he reached England he went to a gentleman's house to look for work. The gentleman asked 'im his name. He said Lord Castle Banger. The gentleman thought he was rich he had such a grand name. He gave 'im a job as a gardener. The gentleman's daughter and Lord Castle Banger decided to get married. The gentleman would'nt allow them. He sent four men to Ireland to look an' see what kind of a house had he. The daughter bribed the men to say that he had a grand house supposin' it was only an ould hut. The four men set off. They sarched all Ireland but could'nt find his
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 02:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
'im where he was. He said "Come over here, and you'll see me." The father went over. The child said "Begor I'm in here in the horse's ear." The father took 'im out.
There was a man lookin' on all this time, an' he asked the father would he give 'im the child. The father said he would'nt. The man said that he would give' im a hundred pounds for 'im. "All right" said the father. Thumbeen went off with the man. That man was a robber.
He knew where there was money in a house. He told Thumbeen to stale the money for' im. He did so, but when he came out, the robber could'nt see 'im. He stole a thousand pounds. He went home to his parents, with it. They put down the kittle, and made the tay an' if they don't live happy that we may.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 01:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were a man and a woman livin' together wan time. The man was a wood cutter and he used to go to the wood every day to cut firin'
He had two ould horses. The woman used to go with his dinner every day, she used to bring the hrses with her for a load of firin'
There was a path goin' from the house to the wood. These people were always lamented because they had no child. The woman was very sorry because they had no child, she said that she'd love to have a child if he was only as big as her thumb.
After awhile there was a child born he was very small an' they called 'im Thumbeen.
Wan day when he was middlen' old, the mother said that it was a pity he could'nt bring home firin' "Begor I will" said he. "How will you" said she.
"You put me in the first horse's ear an' put my father's dinner in the other ear.
The mother did this an' off he went to the wood. He used to say "Hop off" to the horse often. When he reached the wood he said "hop off." The father asked
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 01:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tied bags on the axle an spilled tar an' lamp oil on them.
The men that were workin' thought they were down on the goold begob, an' they were delighted. Begor, the next thing they saw was the wheels comin' down the field in a blaze. The men didn't know what to do would the fright an' they went home through fields an' bogs, an' they never went to dig for goold again.
senior member (history)
2019-11-06 01:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There's a story tould about goold hid in Mr. Cadogan's avenue outside the churchyard gate. Wan man dreamt about this goold three nights wan after thother. This man tauld some o' his fellowmen about his dream an them men live about the place. Their names were - John Doran, James Butler, and Ned Brown, o Carrigdaggan Newbawn. On a certain night these men went to dig for the goold. They were diggin' for a while, an' an ass near where they were diggin' began to bawl, an' they got such a fright that they left their tools afther them an' ran for their lives.
A few nights afther, they went again to dig for it, an begor a crowd o' fellas heard o' what happened before. They brought two wheels of a car, an' an axle, an' they hid near by. They
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 03:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dead in the houses and amongst them were two of his best milking cows. The farm was a thriving one up to this but ever since it has been a struggle to live there.

N.B.
There is a local tradition that a monk was put to death in Boley Castle by the soldiers, at some time during the Penal Laws and that his body was cooked and eaten by the soldiers
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 03:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
years ago the castle was taken over by the Board of works and six trees which were growing in it were cut down and the walls repaired and put in good orders. It is now in the hands of Antiquarians.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 03:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it up straight higher than the aeroplane and then again I bent it back over the aeroplane. Then I made a propeller and I put it on the end of the iron bar.
One windy day I put the aeroplane down on the ground, with its tail turned towards the wind and the wind forced the propeller to go around and the aeroplane went along.
Get a spool and fill the hole in it with timber.
Make a point on one end of the spool. Put a nail with a round head in the point of the spool and then you have a spinning top.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 03:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I can make a toy boat that is driven by a rubber ring and a square piece of timber. First cut a piece of timber about a foot long and five inches and half an inch thick and bring one end of it to a point.
Then cut out a square piece of timber out of the other end so that there will be two pieces of timber left at each corner. Then put a rubber ring in over the two pieces at the end. Make the square piece of timber smaller than the piece you cut out and put it in between the rubber band and twist it until it is tight.
Then hold it tight till you put it into the water and let it go. It will go around in the
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 03:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the shape of a boat. Then they put a hole in the inside of it and put it sailing on the pond.
At other times they make propellers of tin and timber. They get a motor propeller sometimes. At other times they get a long piece of timber. Then they get tin and cut it into the shape of a motor propeller and put a nail in the middle of the propeller and out through the middle of the timber.
They bend the tin a little. Then they put it up high in a tree against the wind.
My mother told me that when she was young going to school they used make houses from mud. Then they used put a roof of felt on it. They made it high enough so that when they were going into it the did not stoop. In it they had a fire of sticks. They got two bricks and put long iorns on them. Then
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 02:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
two fingers of an old glove and I filled them with chaff then I sewed them together. The small bag was a head, the big one a body, and the fingers a pair of legs.
At other times we used make belts from the glassy paper on Player's cigaretts. Then we used make necklaces and braclets from jonnajmagories. (hips) They are red and grow on rose bushes. Put them one after another on a thread like a necklace.
Sometimes we put on necklace stones and mix the hips with them often.
I was without a ball to play games with. Then I used get a lump of paper and shape it into a ball. Then I used put twine around it and it and iit would be as good as any ball.
My brothers make boats from timber by cutting a piece of timber into
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 02:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When I was a young girl about seven or eight years of age I was very fond of making toys especially chains from daisies and making wreaths from them.
Sometimes I made braces and necklaces.
The way to make them is to make a long hole at the end of the stem with your nail, then draw another daisy through the hole and continue the chain until you have it as long as you want it.
One day my youngest sister was annoying me to make a doll for her, so I got a piece of timber and cut it into shape. Another day I made a doll by getting a piece of cotton and sewing it the shape of a bay.
Then I got another smaller piece and did the same. Then I filled them with chaff and sewed the two pieces together. Next I got
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 02:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a well in a field called "St Brigids Well. One night it went dry and all the people wondered what had happened when they saw it next morning. Late after-wards someone saw that a spring had burst in ground in a new place. This well was in Whitechurch.
In the village of Whitechurch about five miles from New Ross, there is "a Green" as it is called. It is the ruins of an old farm of long ago. Mr Holden was the owner of it. But now it is like an old stoney field with grass growing on it. No matter what kind of weather we have it is always green. About half a mile east of Whitechurch on the main-road there is a cross called "Griffin's Cross." Some years ago a Protestant farmer lived there. They still own the farm but they do not live there. About half a mile below Piltown by the side of the river Barrow there is a place called "the Stage." Some years ago ships used unload coal and other cargo's there. "The Ice
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 02:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cattle were lying in the shade and the man frightened them. The dashed through the wood making a great noise. The soldiers thinking it was an army of rebels retreated. The man went to the house of a man named Doyle and stayed the night. In the morning the man of the house saw the soldiers coming. He told the man he was done. A thatcher was thatching the house at the time and the escaped priosnar told him to come down. He changed clothes with the thatcher and went to thatch the house. The soldiers searched for him in vain for the following three days. He escaped that night to Ballyhack and afterwards came to live in Mountain.
This man was great-grandfather Sylvester Dempsey. When the soldiers did not find him they hanged his first cousin out of revenge.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 01:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
happened in Newtownbarry. All guns were taken up in '97 and were in the barrack and in the rising of '98 the men went to the barracks to demand their guns. They would would not give them their guns. But they threw out a gun in the window of the barrack and the man who went to pick it up was shot. Another man picked it up and loaded it and when the Sergeant put out his head to throw out a second gun he was shot from outside. They then set fire to the barrack. Two little children remained in the burning building and two men resued them. They brought them to a house and gave them to the woman. She knew the men and swore on them they were arested and setenced to be hanged. The morning of the excution one of the men jumped the jail gate and escaped through a wood. The soldiers followed him. When they came to the edge of the wood a herd of
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 01:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What always walks with his head down on the ground?
A nail in your boot.
Tink Tank o under the bank, ten drawing four. What is that?
Milking a cow.
As I went out in a slippery gap; I met a little chap with a red cap a stick in his back and and a stone in his belly riddle me that and I'll give you a penny.
A pip.
As round as an apple as plump as a ball can climb the church over steeple and all. What is that?
The sun.
A clipper of ditches, a cutter of thorns,
a little red cow with two leather horn, What is that?
A hare.
If a man had twenty patches on his trousers what time would it be?
Time to get a new one.
Why is a plum-cake like an ocean?
Because it contains many currants.
senior member (history)
2019-11-05 01:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
buried it there. He buried it there, because he had no relations living convenient to him and it was his wish to bury the money.
He buried it himself before he died.
It is said that the was buried about a hundred years ago. This man was also a widower. Tom Delaney and Philip Roche heard of this money and they set out one night to dig for it. When they reached the place they started digging for it, and when they were a while digging they saw a white woman coming out in a gap near where they where and they had no holy-water. The woman came over to them and they stared at her and she stared at them but they had to run after a while.
They came the next night again but the same thing happened. The third night they brought Pat Walsh with them and he brought holy with him. He stood in the gap with the holy water to stop the woman while the others were digging. The
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mend boots. His name was Thomas Ryan. He was a cobbler and he used to repair boots. That was how he earned his living. He is now married and has bought two new lorrys since. How is now living in the house which he used mend boots in Whitechurch.
My parents never new anyone who wore clogs leather was never made in my district at any time.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Stephens Day. They say that its unlucky to go live in another house on Friday.
Its unlucky to plough on St Martins Day.
It's unlucky to buy a new brush on the first of May because they say, "A new brush in May sweeps all the luck away.
It unlucky to throw out ashes on a Monday because you throw out the luck.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to skin her and it had to borrow three or four days from April to finish her. That is why the cold days of April are called the days of the old cow.
It is not good to swim in April and May. There is an old saying
"April and May keep out of the sea".
June and July you could swim till you die.
May is an unlucky month in which to whitewash.
Some people light bonfires on the first of May and drive the cows through the ash so that nothing would happen them.
It is unlucky to give away milk on the first of May.
It is unlucky to bake bread on Sunday
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to skin her and it had to borrow three or four days from April to finish her. That is why the cold days of april are called the days of the old cow.
It is not good to swim in April and May. There is an old saying
"April and May keep out of the sea".
June and July you could swim till you die.
May is an unlucky month in which to whitewash.
Some people light bonfires on the first of May and drive the cows through the ash so that nothing would happen them.
It is unlucky to give away milk on the first of May.
It is unlucky to bake bread on Sunday
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said to be unlucky to work a mill on St.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said to be unlucky to throw out ashes on Monday because the luck would be thrown out for the week. The ashes are left in the kitchen until Saturday.
It is also unlucky to sweep out through the door on Monday because the luck would be swept out for the week.
It is unlucky to change houses on Friday.
Long ago a cock was killed on St. Martins Day to bring luck for the year.
It is also unlucky to yoke horses on St Stephens Day.
It is unlucky to see a black hare on Monday.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
March is so cold that it is said that they are skinning the old cow in March. March failed
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I made a toy out of a reel without and thread on it and a bit of a candle and a bit of rubber and a match.
I put the rubber out through the hole in the reel and tied the rubber at one end. Then I got a bit of a candle and put a small hole in the centre of the candle and put the candle on one end of the reel and put the hole in the candle opposite the hole in the reel and put the rubber out through the candle. Then I put the match through the rubber and then I wound up the rubber and the reel ran along. James Creane, Fethard, showed me how to make this.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 03:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A pop-gun can be made from an elder stick. It could be made any time of the year. To make the gun get a thin piece of ash for a ram-rod. Then clean out the elder stick and put a cork in the top of the stick and put the ram-rod up in stick and give the ram-rod a dart. The cork flies out and lets a shot.
A doll can be made by gettiing a piece of timber and making it round. Then get a pencil a pencil her eyes and nose. Then get another block for her body and two wooden legs and glue them together.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
weed on it. The chicken weed should be rolled in cream before its put on.
Put a spunk leaf on a sore and it will draw anything bad that is in the sore out of it.
A cure for a sty is to get a gooseberry-thorn and point it at the sty and say "it is a sty" three times and the sty will go away.
A cure for warts is to gather as many pebbles as there are warts and put them in a paperbag and leave it on the road where someone would pick it up. The person that would pick it up would get the warts and the other would be cured.
March mallows are a cure for a white swelling (blister).
It should be first boiled and then the swelling should be washed with the water that the "March mallows" are boiled in.
The juice of a house leek is a cure for sore eyes.
A poultice of boiled snails is a cure for sore feet.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A cure for a toothache is to put a small quantity of whiskey in your mouth for some time. Another cure for a tooth-ache is to bathe the tooth with cold tea and tea leaves.
A cure for a cut is to let a dog lick it.
A cure for a scald is to put it in cold water as soon as you get it.
A old cure for a corn is to clean it well and drop a little iodine on it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that when you get a sting of a nettle you should rub it with a dock-leaf and that will take away the sting. To take away swelling put a poultice of roasted chicken
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
there long ago. There is a field in Piltown called "Barron's Garden". It is called that because a man named Barron lived there. There is a field in Oldcourt called "Bán na Scort." There is a field in Camblin called the Sgoc-a-loc. There is a field in Camblin called the "Hollow Field". It is so called because there is a hollow in it. There is a field called "the well field."
It gets its name because there is a well in it. It is in Camblin. There is a field in Strokestown called "the Terraced Field." "The Mass path Field" is in Killowen. It gets its name from the Penal Days when the people used go to Killowen to Mass. There is a place in Ballykelly called "Carraig Ben". It gets its from a big rock which is there. There is a field in Piltown called the "Rac Narvay."
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs D, Mrs i, Mrs ffi, Mrs c, Mrs u, Mrs lty,
Difficulty.
Why do you go to bed?
Because it will not go to you.
One fine day in the middle of the night two dead men got up to fight, two cripples went for police, and two blind men went to make peace. What is that?
A lie.
What's full and holds more?
A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in.
What's brought to the table cut and never eaten?
A pack of cards.
What is the longest word?
Smiles.
When is a horse not a horse?
When he is turned into a field.
When is a man up to his ears in debt?
When he hat on his head not paid for.
What's a herring worth When half-eaten?
Turning.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Four legs up and four legs down soft in the middle and hard all round. What is that?
A bed.
Four lillie-landers two sticks standers
two lookaders two crookeders and a wack-about. What is that?
A cow.
Why does a hen pick a pot?
Because she can't lick it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Why are tall people always lazy.?
Because they are longer in bed.
Patch upon patch without any stitches riddle me that and I'll buy you a pair of breeches. What is that?
A cabbage.
As I was running, a thing I found, when I couldn't find it, I had to keep it, all day. If I could find it I'd throw it away.
A thorn in my toe.
What has one eye and cannot see?
A needle.
What is deeper than sea?
A tailor's thimble.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 02:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A clock.
What is the lightest thing in the world?
Light.
When was beef the highest?
When the cow jumped over the moon.
What goes round the wood and never goes into the wood?
The bark of the tree,
Riddle me riddle ranttito my father gave me seed to sow, the seed was black and the ground whtte riddle me that again tomorrow night?
A newspaper.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 01:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kitty inside the ditch and kitty outside the ditch if you touch kitty she'll bite you.
A nettle.
What part of a cow goes out in the gap first?
Her breath.
Less than a mouse, and there are more windows in it than a king's house. What is it.
A thimble.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 01:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a man. What is it?
A penny.
It went to Africa, it stopped there it came back because it would't go there. What is it?
A watch.
What goes up when the rain comes down?
An umberella.
As round as an apple as deep as a cup, it never cuckoo's till you pull it by the tail. What is it?
A bell.
As I went up the hill of wonder, I saw twenty-four bulldogs tearing the hill asunder. What is that?
A harrow.
What is the shyest thing in the house.?
The clock, because it always has its hands on its face.
How would you make a slow horse fast.?
Keep its food from it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 01:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A wee little mother, a big lazy father, twelve little children all the one colour.
What is that?
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 01:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I have but one eye and that without sight yet it helps me what-ever I do
I'm sharp without wits, without senses, I'm bright. The fortune of some and of some the delight and I doubt not I'm useful to you.
What am I?
A needle.
Why is a favourite singer's voice like a queen's crown?
Because it is replete with precious tones
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 01:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Why does a cow look over he ditch?
Because she can't look under it.
Why does a hen cross the road?
To get to the other side.
What has a mouth and no face?
The river.
Why dose'nt the clock strike thirteen?
Because it has'nt the face to do so.
What goes round the house and sleeps in the corner at night?
A brush.
senior member (history)
2019-11-04 01:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As round as an apple as flat as a pan the whole of a woman the half of
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 04:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Coleman forms part of the high table-land that rises from the east side of the valley that runs from Dunbrody to Arthurstown
It is worthy of note that the physical features of the Barony of Dunbrody constitute a succession of gentle sloping vallies and rising eminences;
with numerous small streams or rivulets that find a quick exit to their outlets in Waterford Harbour; so that on the main portion of the estate there is nothing in the nature of bog or quagmire.
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 03:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the darkness that hung over the western world.
In a field belonging to Mr. A. Wallace that overlooks the Dunbrody valley is one of these blessed wells such as we have described in Kilhile at the opposite side.
In the corner of the same field is an ancient mound that the old people held in great veneration. It was held to be a christian burial ground that belonged to the distant past. There was some tombstone or cross where the people used to pray for the departed souls.
It is probable that this well and mound marks the shrine of St Coleman who gave his name to this district.
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 03:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
from this bay to Passage on his way to Lismore Castle from thence he took shipping to France. From this event it took the name of King's Bay. The bay forms the terminus of several valleys that carry down the water from the high table-lands of this part of the Dunbrody estates.
One of these, a deep valley that skirts the Dunbrody demense on this side, is called Gledine. On the Mersheen side of this glen stands the Templemore mansion. A second mansion belonging to the Templemore family on the Coleman side of the glen is called Glendine House. At the foot of Glendine on the Mersheen side stood the ancient watermill and above the mill close by the Dunbrody mansion was an old distillery. The mill and
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 03:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The name of Arthurstown is in no way connected with the history of St. James's Parish, any further than it got its name from the second Baron of Templemore a couple of generations ago.
Arthurstown is built on a part of the two townslands of Coleman and Mersheen
The mill-stream running through the village divides the two districts. When James 11 left the fort of Duncannon as a fugitive he took his departure
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 03:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Eibhlin a Ruin,
Translated from Hardimans Irish minstrelsy.
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 03:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
her name to this district.
We may well assume that the castle was built by christian hands in the vicinity if not on the actual site of Helens shrine or church.
Paurkhale on the other side of the valley derives its name from the same source.
Paurk means a field or a farm (Paurkeen a little field or garden.)
Paurkhale would mean Helen's field or farm.
Hale and hile are synonymous names, Aileen sometimes takes the form Eileen (little Ellen or Helen) in both forms they are wedded to the sweetest strains of ancient Gaelic melody.
"More beauteous than Venus,
far more fair than the midnight star,
My, Helen without stain you are
Eibhlin a Ruin
My red rose my lily white,
My treasure unfading bright
Darling my Souls delight
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 03:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
although they never used the water from it they kept the approaches to it clear of all briars and shrubs.
The plough would never go too near its situation
This well is one of those small shallow fountains, with a flag or smooth stone at the brink. It is arched over on top and leaves only a very small opening, so that water could only be taken from it by a pitcher or a small vessel. It could be meant to serve only a very small number of people perhaps one or two.
As the name of Kilhile suggests the shrine or church of Helen - a name most common amongst the women of ancient Ireland; it is most probable that this blessed well is linked up with the name of the holy woman of the ancient Irish church that gave
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 03:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dimension the walls are not near so massive, but laid out in proportion to the height and size of the building.
The basement or foundation stones are laid on the soft clayey surface. Had they been laid on a rock like Ballyhack it would have withstood the ravishes of time and be in a much better state of preservation. As it is, there is only the north side of the square tower with vaulted arch, standing; the foundations of the other portions having given away in the early part of the 18th century. The stones were removed to build the new Dunbrody Park and mansion when the Chicesters deserted the old residents at Dunbrody Abbey.
It is only about half a mile from Ballyhack and about two short miles from
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 02:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The townsland of Kilhile is divided into two divisions or districts; Kilhale (as it is pronounced by the natives) and Paurkhale. The Kilhile district adjoins Ballyhack and Nuke on the west side of the valley that runs from the confines of Dunbrody to Kings Bay or Arthurstown in this district stands the ruined castle.
Mr. Hores account of this castle throws very little light on its history and we have no specific account as to what race or period it belongs. In style of architecture and internal and external structure, it is a perfect duplicate of Ballyhack, but on a very reduced scale. It falls far short of Ballyhack in height, it is not near so spacious in general
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 02:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
surrounded the town on all sides down to the river's edge.
They stood about fifteen feet high with raised turrets at intervals. These formed the quarter of the soldiers or garrison whose duty it was to defend the town from attack.
The inhabitants still call these ruins "the old garrison". In 1798 it was used as a horse-barracks by the troops stationed at Geneva. As this place is notorious in the animals of the Wexford rising in 1798 and gave rise to evil influences, the effects of which come down toour own day; I will pause in my antiquarian peregrinations to give this matter a short space.
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 02:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
is still standing. Its top portions were battered down by Cromwell's cannons that were placed in position on top of the precipitous rock that hanged over the little town-ship, for this reason the rock is stilled called Carrig-Connew or the "Rock of the Cannon".
A portion of these ancient buildings are roofed in and used as coalstores, stables, etc. An Angelus bell is placed in one of the windows of the tower, to remind the people of the great mystery of the Incarnation, morning, noon and evening. About three hundred yards from this part of the town running down to the water's edge, stands another part of the ancient walls; some of these walls have been swept away by the wash of the sea; some of them from this cause are in the position of toppling over. These walls seem to have
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 02:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to-day is the only branch of the industry that the fishermen can turn to with any hope of remuneration.
It will thus be seen that these fishery grants mentioned in the ancient Charters were, not amongst the least considerable of the gifts bestowed upon Dunbrody Abbey by its founders and confirmed afterwards by the Plantagenet kings.
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 02:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
twelve inches above the hard surface of the beach, they were covered over by about five feet of mud. The oldest inhabitants of Ballyhack had no idea that there was a weir in being here; it was probably for the special use of the occupants of the Castle in ancient times.)
In the famine years of forty-six and forty-seven the people from the most distressed places inland flocked to this district and subsisted on the abundance of fish that a merciful Providence, provided the people here with. I have heard old men say that it was no uncommon thing, to see heaps of the best qualities of fish, deposited on the beaches along the river side after every flow of the tide.
The salmon fishing
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 01:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
they were all taken down, with the exception of two; one at Woodstown, that was so far removed from the course of shipping it was allowed to stand; the other, one of Lord Templemores at Buttermilk Castle the title of this weir was so strong that it could not be abrogated even by an act of Parliament. Lord Templemore held other salmon weirs at Arthurstown and Duncannon, but they had to go by the board.
There was some special clause in the grant of Buttermilk Castle weir to the Abbey of Dunbrody, that it could not be taken down.
(I may here mention that when the Department of Agriculture were improving the Harbour at Ballyhack lately in clearing away the mud was found the remains of an ancient salmon weir; the stakes or poles were all sawed about
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 01:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to earn a living for himself and his family.
This grievence was so intolerable, about seventy or eighty years ago the fishermen of the upper waters (or as they are called down here "The Cot Men") took the law into their own hands. They came down in large numbers with saws and axes and cut down the salmon weirs. Some of Lord Templemore's tenants went in boats against these fierce assailants and one of them, got their head split open with the blade of a paddle.
After this agitation a gentleman in Parliament named Patrick Mc;Mahon (the fishermen still call him Paddy Mc,Mahon M.P.) took up the fishermens interest. He attacked the weirs under the navigation laws and as an obstruction to navigation
senior member (history)
2019-11-03 01:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
trawlers, that have murdered the Irish coast fisheries, these and the other fisheries of this district of the Suir were able to give a plentiful supply of cheap fresh fish to the people for miles and miles inland, as far as they could be carted with the fish joulters or vendors.
The ancient salmon weirs, were erected at every vantage point of the river from the Great Island to Duncannon and from Cheek Point to Credan Head. While these weirs were in being their owners had a monopoly of the salmon fisheries of the Suir. Besides the favourable situation of the weirs in the tide-ways, those possessions of feudal rights, had the fishery laws hedged round with every Penal clause that could hamper the poor fisher-man, who was plying his net
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 04:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and lowered him gently to the anxious onlookers below.
Paddy stated afterwards in refer. to this incident that it was the toughest job he ever took on hands" and that all he was sorry for that no one could ever tell whether the hawk had actually left the chicken in the nest. It was never solved + it was ever "an open question" beteween Paddy + Connors.
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 04:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
any how he'd show them all that it could be done. He made his start and believe it or not, got to his objective by simple digging himself into the sides of the bare tree and stretching out his elastic limbs in the Caterpillar fashion, till almost within reach of the nest he completely lost the use of himself and lay a limp heap among the top branches of this desert-like tree, 35 ft up from where he should be lying (under such conditions)
He gave no sound nor sign even of life to those below, he simply ceased to function + looked for dead. Paddy soon braced himself for the occasion; he went up that tree carrying up with him rope, got to the top, secured his patient (but incidentally of course forgot the chicken)
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 04:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
when a great commotion arose over a hawk that had carried off a fine fat chicken and brought it to the top of a tree where it seems it had a nest.
- a tree too, without any limbs or branches + measuring or branches + measuring from ground to nest 34 ft. high
A man named Connors of this district also had succeeded in frightening off the hawk, but insisted that she had left the chicken behind' so he decided to satisify himself on the point and incidentally to retrieve the Bird, much against the advice + wishes of the onlookers, and especially of Paddy, who saw nothing but trouble in such an enterprise
It was all no use, he should go up, it was so easy, he was such an expert climber, and
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 03:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Easter Saturday and Easter Sunday :
On Easter Saturday the people go to the church and get Easter Water. On Easter Sunday the people get blessed salt in the churches.
Palm Sunday : On Palm Sunday all the people receive Blessed Palm from the Priest afte Mass. Every one eats three leaves and this is supposed to protect them from serious sickness for the rest of the year.
May Day : People erect a May-bush on May Day. It is decorated with ribbons and flowers. On May Day altars are erected in the Catholics' schools, in honour of Our Lady.
At the end of May the altars are taken down.
Ash Wednesday : Ash Wednesday is the beginning of Lent. On that day people go to the churches and have Blessed Ashes put on their foreheads by the priest,
All Hallow E'en : On Hallow E'en it is the custom to have "snap -apple," It is played by hanging apples from the ceiling. The children take turns to try and catch the apples with their mouths. Who ever catches an apple with his mouth may keep it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 03:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St. Stephens Day : On St Stephens the boys of New Ross and other places go around carrying a match-box with a feather in it, singing at the same time. The rhyme is :-
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds,
St. Stephen's Day she was caught in the furze,
Although she was little her honour was great.
Put your hand in your pocket and give us a treat.
St Brigid's Day : On St. Brigids Day some people make a cross from rushes. When the cross is made it is put in the roof over the door. This is supposed to protect the house from fire and other evils.
St. Patrick's Day : On St. Patrick's Day, which falls on the seventeenth of March, People wear shamrock. It is only the Catholics who do this. Some people wear badges with harps on them. There is a procession to the church where prayers are said in Irish.
Good Friday : On Good Friday people go to the church to kiss the cross. Some people do the Stations of the Cross.
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 03:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in succession about the treasure which was supposed to be buried in or near the old castle. He told his brother and an old friend by the name of Doyle about his dreams but they laughed and made fun of him. He persisted in talking about it day after day until they thought something might come out of it so they decided to investigate with him and help find the treasure. They made inquiries quietly and in that in times gone by thieving soldiery of various invaders buried their loot after having sworn one of their number to guard it dead or alive. This soldier was then shot and his ghost was supposed to mind the treasure. They decided to start the following Saturday night and after getting the necessary tools and a large bottle of holey water they made way to the spot. Their courage was kept up by a good supply of the hard stuff and they did not care if they encountered the old boy himself. 12 o'clock came and May shook the holy water in a ring around the castle. They began to dig and went on until they had a pretty good hole dug and no sign of the gold. Their supply of grog had given out and some scoting remarks were been made about dreams when all of a sudden a black dog came up out of the hole "Bad luck to that dog" says May "where did it come from"? That must be what you were dreaming about" said Doyle who had been thinking he was let down. While they were arguing about the dog up comes his pups. They gasped and let out a yell and ran for their homes in double quick time.
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 02:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is a story of Hidden Treasure. This story was told to me by my Grandfather who is aged 89. It happened when he was about 20 years of age. There was a woman who employed my Grandfather after his work to draw in corn. The weather was very good at the time and the moon used be shining bright.
This night my Grandfather and four other men went to draw in the corn. They started at about 8 o'clock in the evening.
At about 12 o'clock they were about going home, when the woman called them in. They did not feel the time passing. The woman was telling them that she used see an armed soldier on the night of the 6th of June in the corner of her garden. The men then said the would dig the place where the soldier used be seen. My Grandfather said that he would stay with the woman while the others dug. Shortly there was a terrible scream from the men. They ran as hard as the could into the kitchen
One of them fainted with the fright. The other men told the story to my Grandfather then. He said that he a soldier come up the hole they were digging. The flag under which the gold was hidden is still to be seen if you dig half a foot down. There is a large iron ring in it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 02:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
swing the child under the ass three times and after that the cough is gone.
Warts :- One of the cures for warts is to put castor oil on them and after a while the warts wither away.
Warts :- If you had a wart, the way to cure it is, get a piece of straw out of the Crib and rub the straw on the wart once every day for several days.
Warts :- If you had a wart put your fasting spit on it for nine mornings.
If you had two warts get two stones and put the two stones on the warts and put the two stones in a bag and put them on the street and whoever picks them up will get the warts.
Corns :- The way to cure a corn is in the summer, to get up in the morning at six o'clock and to run in the grass for three mornings one after the other.
Warts :- Some cures for warts are to bury a piece of oaten straw and when the straw would rot the wart would go away.
Boils :- In order to get rid of boils put a poultice of pure linseed meal to them so that the boils will burst. Fill a bottle with boiling water and put the neck of the hot bottle to your boil.
Boils :- One cure is turpentine another is with daisies soap and sugar. Cut up the daisies put them is a tin; put a piece of soap and some sugar in. Put the tin on the fire. When it is boiled it turns black; put it on a cloth and put it on the boil and it will cure it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 02:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Warts :- An old cure for warts is to get a snail and put the wart into the shell. A white fluid will then come out of the snail. When the wart is covered with this fluid throw the snail away. After a couple of days or maybe weeks the wart will disappear. Some people put the snail on a thorn or on a road so that the snail will die. They say that when the is dead the wart will die also.
Gumboil :- This is an old method used by people to cure a gumboil.
Fill your mouth with hot water and keep the water in your mouth until the gumboil bursts.
Toothache :- An old method used by people to cure toothache is to fill the mouth with cold water hold your face over the fire until the water heats. After a while the toothache disappears.
Toothache :- Another cure for toothache is to burn a piece of blotting paper and then blow it out. Then put it to your nose and draw the smoke through your nose and let it out in your mouth and then the toothache would be gone.
Nettle-sting :- When you get a sting of a nettle get a dog leaf and put it on the sting and after a short time it would go away.
Boils :- To cure boils get a cut of bread and boil it in water. Then put it on the boils. When the bread would get cold put on another piece and after a while it would go away.
Thorn :- If the thorn is down very deep get bread and water, boil them and then put the bread and water to the thorn as hot as you can bear it. If the thorn is not very deep get a neddle and take it out.
Whooping Cough :- If a child has the whooping cough get an ass and
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 02:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
must have three pelters.
"Hide and seek."
"Hide and seek" is played outdoors. There are two verses to it.
One of the verses is "little men driving cattle how does your money rattle one two, sky blue all out but you."
The other verse is "Ickle ackle black bottle ickle ackle out, two and two is a twopenny loaf and two and two is out"
"Forfeits."
Forfeits is played indoors. One person kneels on a chair and another person picks something from the things that the crowd has left down and he or she says "heres a fine thing, a very fine thing and whats to be done with this fine thing".
The person says, "The person who owns it must do something such as stand on his head for half an hour.
"French tig."
Another game is French tig. This is how it is played. When one player hits another then that player has to put his hand on where he has been hit. The verse used is .
"Two little sausages frying on a pan
All of a sudden one gave a bang."
"Ghost in the garden."
In "Ghost in the garden" one child is the "mother" and one is the "ghost" and the rest are her children. The mother says, "Go into the garden and see is your father's shirt dry". The children go out but in a few minutes they rush back screaming.
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 01:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
you. When they get hold of you they will put you in the rope and follow the rest and the two last caught will follow again.
"Peggy".
The way you play peggy is you get a stick and then you will get another stick and cut two points on it and you draw a big ring and one of the boys will throw the peggy and if it goes in to the ring you have only one stroke of it. If it goes on the line you have two strokes of it and if it does not go on the line or into the ring you will have three strokes of it.
"Queeney".
Queeney is played by facing the wall and throwing the ball back over your head and then turning round and saying who has the ball.
"Marbles".
A lot of boys play marbles. It is played on the road. The way to play is to make three holes and the distance between the holes is about two feet. If you are playing you can either run the holes or guard the holes. There is another game in marbles. It is called taw shot. You put your marble on a stone and let the other boys throw at it. The boys should be about six feet away and if a boy hits you off the stone you must give him another marble. Then when all the boys have thrown you throw at them once if you hit their marble they must give you a marble.
"Skittles".
The way to play skittles is to put on the ground the five skittles and to stand away about four feet and throw the pelters at the skittles. You
senior member (history)
2019-11-02 01:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Hunt the fox."
The way to play "hunt the fox" is to count ten and the boy that ten falls on is to represent the fox. Where ever that boy goes all the boys follow him. What ever boy catches him is to run and represent the fox and so on like that until the game is finished.
"Tig."
This is how we play "tig". A lot of children stand in a circle, one of the children use a little rhyme saying :-
"Pig you have the tig and if you do not want to play just take your hoop and run away."
"Four corner fool".
Five children play this game "four corner fool". You must make four rings and a ring in the middle. The four children would stand in the four rings and the fool in the middle. The children would start running from one corner to another. If the fool got into one of the corners the other child would be the fool.
"Hide the button".
A group of boys would sit around together and a boy would have a button in his hand and he would give it to one of these and then he would ask a fellow, who would have the button. If he did not know he would get a slap.
"Press."
The way you play "press" is two boys or girls will hold each side of a rope and spread out and run after