Number of records in editorial history: 2859 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2017-03-30 23:00
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The O’Kellys were the Local Land-lords of our district a long time ago. The big house in Barrettstown the home of the O’Kellys was built in 1858. There were well liked and considered good Landlords. They were so well liked by the Tenants that they went to draw in the hay and corn every year. Then the O’Kellys gave a dinner and a dance in return. The O’Kellys then went in debt and in 1882 Master George died suddenly. This man used to give the Tenants 15 per cent off the rent and when he died his brother Master John took on. Then the Tenants refused to pay the rent, as this man only gave them 10 per cent.
Then a man named Ruttledge was employed as agent. He was a very bad man, and would not do any good for the Tenants. The people then joined the “Plan of Campaign”. Ruttledge then seized the Tenants cattle, hay, and corn. Then the evictions started in 1888, and by 1889
senior member (history)
2017-03-30 22:59
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over thirty families were evicted. Dan Kelly’s stables were then turned into houses for some of the Tenants and others took refuge in little wooden huts put up in Morrisey’s fields. They were again evicted out of these in twelve months time. Father Kinsella and about thirty three other men were arrested for the building of these huts. They were kept in jail for a week in Newbridge, and were then let out. After the evictions Clongorey was like a deserted village for nearly all the young people went to America. When the settlement was made, there were very few to come back.
John O’Rourke,
Blacktrench,
Naas, Co. Kildare
Told to him by Mr. O’Rourke,
Same address.
senior member (history)
2017-03-30 22:18
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There is an old man named Thomas Kelly aged 80 living in our district of Blacktrench who used to go to the bog and get rushes at the edge of a bog hole. He would bring them home to two very old women named Gunnings. One was a cripple and used to peel the rushes and the other woman would dip them in a “Greasadh”, filled with grease.
The women would make them into large and small bundles. They would go twice every year to Kildare with a load of them and make about ten or twelve pounds. This would do them until the next season and this is how they lived. This old Mr. Kelly still has the “Greasadh” and knows how to make them.
John O’Rourke,
Blacktrench,
Naas,
Co. Kildare.
[The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......]
Front view and side view of Greasadh made of cast-iron
senior member (history)
2017-03-30 21:57
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“Sheelannach”. Used in expression “Walking sheelannach over yon” – said of someone riding roughshod over one.
“Bocky moan”. A cow’s trouble in the legs – “boglame”.
Borenagluck: A road on the way to Allen.
“Religeen field”: On my cousin’s farm at Milltown, Co. Kildare is a small field, containing a ruin of some building which was particuially under the ground. This field is never tilled.
Muhóg: anything such as a sock with the front cut away, used as a mitten.
Bugawn: a soft egg.
Cloodhog: An Easter present.
Roo-ie: The fan of the bog. The top before the top sods are removed.
Mug-leen myrock: A weed in the garden.
Boochalawn: Prashach Chivee. A weed.
Mym
Thawlack: A wrist pain (generally applied to the pain coming after cutting turf.) The man Cutting, used an eel’s skin around his wrist to prevent a thawl-ach.
Given me by my mother, Annie Partridge, Aged 84, Curragh, Co. Kildare (late of Milltown, Co. Kildare.) Born and reared in Milltown Co. Kildare.
Collected by Joseph Partridge (teacher), Clongorey N. S. Newbridge, Co. Kildare.
senior member (history)
2017-03-30 20:13
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what he thought three hours flight he landed at the end of his house. This story was told to Brigid Dempsey, Blacktrench, Naas, Co. Kildare by Mr. O'Rourke, Blacktrench, Naas.
senior member (history)
2017-03-30 20:09
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There is a place in Allen called the Rath. There was supposed to be a crock of gold hidden there, and there was an enchanted goat minding it. Once there was a farmer who had two men working. One of them was an exsoldier. They made up their minds to go and dig for the gold. Before they started off the farmer got a bottle of Holy Water and put the sign of the Cross on his forehead. Then he gave it to the other man and he did the same. They gave it to the soldier and he said he did not want any Holy Water. There was a knife there to kill the goat. The three men went up to dig for it. The ex soldier stood in the gap with the knife while the other two went to dig. When the men started to dig the
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 21:48
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different times. There were two sub-divisions, Kinelea Citra and Kinelal Ultra, the Latin additions being of later ecclesiastical origin. The name was derived from Aodh, grandson of Eochy (from whom Ui Eachach) grandson of Eochy, King of Munster who according to some gave Cork its name. I mention this with apologies to the strong element who favour Corcach, a swamp as the proper derivation of our famed city’s name.
The full name Kinelea then means the territory colonised by the tribe of which Aodh was chief.
Cineal Laoghaire:- Aodh above, mentioned had a brother called Laoghaire who gave his name to another territory, hence called Cineal Laoghaire. This name had not survived. Its named inhabitants having migrated to Kerry, where they became later
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 21:38
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Corca Duibhne in Kerry. etc., and lee means Lughaidh, son of Ithe, uncle of Milesius, who led the co-called Celtic colony to Ireland about 350 B.C. so that the name implies where the Lughaidh clan settled.
Kinealmehy, a kindred name to Cineala and Cineal Loaghaire and was named after a chieftain named Beic, either one of the line of Cinealea, or cineál Laoghaire, as both tribes had chieftains of this name. This name is now applied to a barony west of Bandon and extending almost to Castletown, Kinneigh, Cineal means race or tribe, and the whole name means the territory of the tribe of Beic or Beice.
Cinealea or Cineal Aogha, generally spelled Kinelea, is now applied to a restricted district near Innishannon, but formerly included a large area and varying dimensions at
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 21:23
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Floinn is derived, as I have just said from Floinn second King of the Cineal Laoghaire the tribal name Muskerry being older. There are several places throughout Ireland called Muscraidhe all being derived from a famous man Musc, called Cairbre Musc son of Conaire More, King of Ireland, in the 3rd century. There are in all six Muscraidhe in Ireland. The latter part midhe (ree) means territory of. This Co. Cork division was originally called Muscaighe Mitine.
Corcalee was the country along the south coast from Skibbereen to beyond Kinsale. Later the name came to be applied to a smaller district, roughly corresponding in size to the diocese of Ross. The prefix Corca as distinct from Corcach a swamp mens race offspring and is pretty common in Irish place names, i.e.,
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 21:10
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agus Ro inret Muscraighe agus UaCairbre” – that is: King Reginald’s, etc., came and ravaged Muskerry and Carbery”
The was derived from a chieftain named Carbery, but who that Carbery was can only be a matter of conjecture. He is generally supposed to be Cairbe Riada, who was a Munster King in the 21nd century. Personally I incline to the belief that he was Cairbre, the third King of the Cineal Laoghaire, who reigned in the beginning of the 7th century and whose territory extended in the Carbery direction. He was nephew of Floinn from whom Muscraidhe Ui Fhloinn is derived. At any rate it may be definitely stated that Carbery did not get its name from a Limerick tribe, as has been so persistently asserted by uncritical writers and guide book compilers.
Muskerry- Called Muscraidhe Ui
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 21:05
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In West Cork we have still names of old territories surviving through the application of the place word is no longer a correct indication of the original area. We have, for instance Carbery, Muskerry, Corcalee, Kinelmeaky, Cinealea, Cineal Laoghaire, Muinntirvara, Beara, etc. these are survivals of old tribal designations.
Carbery:- The origin of this name has erroneously been attributed to one of the O’Donovan family who migrated to West Cork from Co. Limerick in the 12 century. The truth is that the name was known on Cork three hundred years before the O Donovans came south. I read in a fragment of the Book of Leinster and entry 916 A.D. which says: “Thainig Righ Raghnall
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 20:49
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near the “Teampuillín”. This is also visited on the 15th of August. People drink the water and take some home with them. They also pray at the well. The well was blessed by Saint Factna. You should rub the water to the part of the body which you want to get cured. Blind people have great confidence in St. Factna because God restored his signt to him when he got blind.

(Master Pat Galwey, Carhue, Clonakilty)
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 20:35
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to have discovered America before Columbas.
The “Teampuillín” is a little Church now ruined supposed to be built by St. Factna. It is visited by a great amount of people on the 15th of August because the 14th is the saints feast but the 15th is more convenient as it is a Church holiday.
They are supposed to say the Rosary and keep walking around the ruin when saying it. They are also supposed to leave something, such as, and old prayer book, or beads, a badge, or a medal or something in the ruin.
The rag is supposed to be tied to a tree which grows near the wall of the ruin.
Some people leave flowers, a statue or holy pictures with the caretaker of the place for the ruin. There is a big stone near the wall and everytime you walk around the ruin you should make a cross on it with another stone.
There is also a holy well
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 20:26
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The “Teampuillín Factna” is situated in Buragatia about seven miles west of Clonakilty and about one mile from [Clonakilty] Rosscarbery. The English meaning of “Teampuillín Factna” is “Factna’s little Church”. St. Factna was the patron saint of the Diocese of Ross.
The Gaelic name for Rosscarbery is “Ros Alither” which means “Ross of the Pilgrims”. St, Factna had a famous school in Ross about a hundred years after St. Patrick. The great St. Brendan the Navigator once taught in that school. This St. Brendan is said
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 20:16
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There is an old ruin of a castle in Dundeady which is about eight miles s.w. of Clonakilty. It is about 20 ft. high. During the last storm a part of the top was blown off. There are holes in the walls where the guns were kept to shoot from.
It was built by an anglo Norman named John Barry. One night they went east to Barryroe and stole cattle from another Norman named “Barry Bán”.
John Barry had a white horse which would not drink water of any well only the well in “Cráig Gaimhne”. Next day he went to the well with his horse and left him grazing in a field near by called “Pairchín Caol” whilst himself fell asleep near the fence.
It was not long until “Barry Bán” and a great army came attacking his castle. The horse ran to the fence where John was sleeping and started to screech into his ear and woke him.
When he saw the Barryroe army attacking his castle he jumped on his horse and off with him over the fields and fences as fast as he could. When he was crossing the “Góilín” he struck the horse with a “magic wand”. The horse jumped the “Góilín” which is about 15 yds. He struck the horse a second time and the horse fell dead.
senior member (history)
2017-03-26 20:15
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The signs of the horses feet are plainly viable on the rock. That day there was a terrible battle fought between the Barryroe army and John Barry’s army” and this battle is called the “Battle of the Red Strand”. They fought all the way across the “Red Strand”. They fought and fought across the “Red Strand” and up “Ballira Hill” as far as “Ballira House”. John Barry and his army slew and killed all of Barry Bán’s army nearby. John Barry and his army won the battle that day.
For months after there were bones and pieces of bones throughout the place where the battle was fought.
(Master Pat Hayes, Donour, Castlefreke, Clonakilty)
senior member (history)
2017-03-12 23:23
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There is an old ruin of a castle in Dundeady which is about eight miles s.w. of Clonakilty. It is about 20 ft. high. During the last storm a part of the top was blown off. There are holes in the walls where the guns were kept to shoot from.
It was built by an anglo Norman named John Barry. One night they went east to Barryroe and stole cattle from another Norman named “Barry Bán”.
John Barry had a white horse which would not drink water of any well only the well in “Cráig Gaimhne”. Next day he went to the well with his horse and left him grazing in a field near by called “Pairchín Caol” whilst himself fell asleep near the fence.
It was not long until “Barry Bán” and a great army came attacking his castle. The horse ran to the fence where John was sleeping and started to screech into his ear and woke him.
When he saw the Barryroe army attacking his castle he jumped on his horse and off with him over the fields and fences as fast as he could. When he was crossing the “Góilín” he struck the horse with a “magic wand”. The horse jumped the “Góilín” which is about 15 yds. He struck the horse a second time and the horse fell dead.
the signs of the horses feet are plainly viable on the rock. That day there was a terrible battle fought between the Barryroe army and John Barry’s army” and this battle is called the “Battle of the Red Strand”. They fought all the way across the “Red Strand”.
They fought and fought across the “Red Strand” and up “Ballira Hill” as far as “Ballira House”. John Barry and his army slew and killed all of Barry Bán’s army nearby. John Barry and his army won the battle that day.
For months after there were bones and pieces of bones throughout the place where the battle was fought.
(Master Pat Hayes, Donour, Castlefreke, Clonakilty)
senior member (history)
2017-03-12 23:09
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the place where the well is now he fell asleep and while he was asleep a dove dropped a letter on his forehead. When he awoke he put his hand to his forehead and he felt the letter which bore a message telling him that a well would spring up where he slept. Ever since that day the townland has been called “Litir Colm”.
The above account of Lady’s Well was given by Mrs. Madge Harte / wife of Mr. Dan Harte, Builder and Contractors, Mill (Ashe) St. Clonakilty, Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-03-12 23:04
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There is an old ruin of a castle in Dundeady which is about eight miles s.w. of Clonakilty. It is about 20 ft. high. During the last storm a part of the top was blown off. There are holes in the walls where the guns were kept to shoot from.
It was built by an anglo Norman named John Barry. One night they went east to Barryroe and stole cattle from another Norman named “Barry Bán”.
John Barry had a white horse which would not drink water of any well only the well in “Cráig Gaimhne”. Next day he went to the well with his horse and left him grazing in a field near by called “Pairchín Caol” whilst himself fell asleep near the fence.
It was not long until “Barry Bán” and a great army came attacking his castle. The horse ran to the fence where John was sleeping and started to screech into his ear and woke him.
When he saw the Barryroe army attacking his castle he jumped on his horse and off with him over the fields and fences as fast as he could. When he was crossing the “Góilín” he struck the horse with a “magic wand”. The horse jumped the “Góilín” which is about 15 yds. He struck the horse a second time and the horse fell dead.
senior member (history)
2017-03-12 22:33
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foremost. Perhaps it may be that because Charlie was my great comrade and that I loved him greatly, that the scene was seared into my memory. It is still fresh and clear the dirge of the war pipes played by Flor Begley, the slow march of the Brigade Flying Column, the small group of only six others mourners: the rain-soaked sky and eath and the wintry moon that shone, vanished, and shone again as we lowered him into his grave. The grief stricken faced of the rifleman as I gave the order for their last salute to a gallant patriot leader – “Present Arms” and the three volleys and the “Last Post” ringing clearly in the night air are still vivid. The final tribute in an oration by the Column leader was given and we turned from his grave and marched away to the West to cross the main Bandon-Clonakilty road before the dawn broke.
Some day-soon it is hoped, when the Irish people again make paramount the virtues of patriotism, courage, truth and
senior member (history)
2017-03-12 22:17
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to have the fighting men of West Cork at a public funeral. We had to choose between giving him a public funeral or one where only armed Volunteers would be present. We chose the latter as we knew he would wish it to be. So we marched and marched all Saturday and Sunday nights, although already weary and tired after the long fight at Crossbarry on Saturday morning until 2 a.m. on Monday.
when we arrived at Clogagh village. Armed sentries were thrown out, the priest was called and one hundred riflemen filed into the Church to pray that their comrade would have eternal peace. After a short time the column again formed up outside the Church and slow marched to the graveyard with Charlie’s body in their midst.
I have seen many poignant scenes in an not uneventful life, but the memory of that nights burial remains
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 23:28
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rifles and he fell dead into the farmyard with several bullets in him, chiefly through the head. About four miles away at Crossbarry where we were about to be engaged, we heard the volleys and I remember remarking that Charlie was gone. Somehow one knew that his fate was to die in such a way and that it had come at.
Later that evening the British nosed their way back to Crossbarry with reinforcements to collect their dead. There, too, were three of our dead, Jer O’Leary, Leap, Con Daly, Ballinscarthy, and Peter Monahan of Bandon. Charlie’s remains were collected also and these four Volunteers were brought into Bandon Military Barracks. Later Charlie’s body was thrown into the workhouse morgue where he lay until the following day (Sunday) when it was as taken out by subterfuge to the Church at his burial place at Clogagh.
Owing to the war, it was not possible
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 23:18
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Kinsale. The Volunteers assembled at the pre-arranged assembly point at Crossbarry and immediately two scouts were sent to bring Charlie and Sean Buckley straight on to the Column, as they were of course in the line of the British advance. The scouts were captured by the British and the message was never delivered.
And so about a half an hour before dawn, Charlie was awakened not by his comrades, but by the noise of British soldiers battering in the front door of the house with their rifle butts.
As ever thoughtful of others he told the people of the house to remain upstairs in safety and down the stairs he walked in his shirt and trousers only, with his gun in his hand, to meet his death like the great Irishman he was.
The English were in the kitchen when Charlie walked into view, firing as he rushed them. They fired and broke, leaving one dead and two wounded so Charlie made for the back door. Out into the back he rushed to be met immediately by a volley from a dozen
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 23:08
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sacrifice, then will the memory of Brigadier Charlie Hurley patriot and leader; he suitably enshrined and handed on to future generations as an example of all that was best in the Volunteers movement of our times. This tribute cannot be close in any more fitting manner than by a verse of a ballad written by his friend and comrade, Sean Buckley –
“In the lonely graveyard of Clogagh he sleeps his last long sleep,
But in our homes throughout West Cork, his memory we will keep,
And teach our youth his love of truth, his scorn of wrong and fear,
And teach them, too, to love our land as did our Brigadier.”
From “The Kerryman” Xmas 1937.
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 23:01
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none of us were near. And he died just in that way.
Charlie was wounded in the nose during an attack on British military at Upton Railway Station on February 15th, 1921. By a group of eight I. R. A. men. He recovered and sprained his ankle which was not completely cured on the 18th March, when with Sean Buckley (a Brigade Staff Officer) he returned from O’Mahoney’s, Belrose, to his headquarters at Forde’s Ballinphellic, four miles away at midnight Sean Buckley went on to O’Connell’s, about a mile across country from Forde’s where Charlie slept that night.
Meanwhile, the Brigade Flying Column had come on to Ballyhandle, near Crossbarry, where they were to fight on the following morning. The Column was roused at 2 o’clock on the morning of the 19th, as the Brigade Column Commander received reports of British troops advancing on them from all directions – Cork City, Ballincollig, Macroom, Bandon and
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 22:48
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rare occasions. That mysticism of the Celt made Charlie’s love of a religion – a faith – which only allowed him to visualise two ends, either his country’s freedom or his own death in attempting to achieve that freedom.
Usually gay and of good spirits, sometimes he would brood if matters were not going too well. Then one would get a glimpse of the real man. His jaw would set, his eyes shine and this whole face light up as he drove home the doctrine of “Hit Back and Hit Harder”. He had the highest and most noble combination of courage-moral courage and courage in defeat and courage in attach. He was generous to a fault, wholly unambitious and in his unassuming way continually urged that he should be allowed tom relinquish the command of the brigade and left free for wholetime fighting with the brigade Column.
He has a premonition of his death, for several times he told me that he would die alone fighting against the English when
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 22:48
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organise the Volunteers and in early 1918 he was arrested, charged and found guilty of possession of arms and of the plans of the British fortification in Bere Island. Sentenced to five years years’ penal servitude, he served part of it in Cork and Maryborough Jails, but was released with other hunger-strikers under the “Cat and Mouse Act” towards the end of 1918. Back again to west Cork where he was appointed Brigade Commandant early in 1920, on the arrest and torture of Tom Hales. This post he held until his death nearly twelve months later.
Charlie was the idol of the Brigade. He was loved for his patriotism, his courage, his sincerity, his generosity, good humour and his unassuming ways. He was a natural leader with that uncommon power of inspiring men in dark and difficult days. There was a stubbornness in him on the issue of Ireland’s freedom which was not based on any material factor but on a mysticism which one only got a glimpse of on
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 22:47
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unanimous selection. Owning to lack of space this article can only be a brief sketch of a man whose work and sacrifices for Ireland would, if chronicled, fill many pages.
Charlie was born in Baurlagh, Kilbrittain on March 19th, 1892. At an early age he went to work in a stores in Bandon and whilst there he studied and sat for an examination as a Boy Clerk.
He passed and was appointed to Haulbowline. There he served from 1911 to 1915, when he was promoted to Liverpool. This promotion he refused, as its acceptance entailed conscription in the British Army and Charlie was even then a Volunteer of the Irish Army. Since his boyhood in Bandon he had also been an active member of Sinn Fein, the G. A. A., and the Gaelic League, thus being grounded to the faith of Irish Separation, for which he was to work so hard and eventually to die. He returned to West Cork and started to
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 22:46
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recall his name and his deeds, and shame on us even his lonely grave in Clogagh graveyard remains as yet, seventeen years afterwards, unmarked by a tombstone. Yet this Volunteer Commandant of the Irish Republican army was not less great than any of our well known great, for in patriotism, in courage, in effort for his people’s freedom and in his ultimate sacrifice, he stands for all time with Clarke, Connolly, Pearse, MacCurtain, McSweiney, and all the others who strove and died for Ireland.
Fifty-eight West Cork men died of enemy bullets in the fight for the republic, and it is no easy task to select one of their number as a subject for a tribute which may well apply to all of them. They were all great Irishmen, but I have no doubt that, could they select one of their number as a model of all that was best in the Volunteer Movement, Charlie Hurley would be their
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 22:45
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Death of a Patriot
Idol of the West Cork
Brigade. Charlie Hurley’s Work
and Death For Ireland.
On March, 19th, 1921 an Irish Patriot was shot to death by British soldiers at Ballinphellic, Upton, Co. Cork. His name was Charles Hurley, of Baurleigh, Kilbrittain, and he died alone, pressing the trigger of his half empty gun, attempting to fight his way through forty English soldiers. His name is not mentioned in any of the many books written about the Anglo-Irish War, no words of his are handed down to us, no ballad (except one West Cork one)
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2017-03-05 21:51
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When passing by Toureen one day,
We dearly made the Essex pay
And well avenged our brothers.
IV.
When Barry saw the Tans efface,
The spirit of his fighting race
Right through his soul did madly chase.
His blood went boiling over.
He marched his men to Ross’s town
And burned that famous fortress down,
And never again will Briton’s crown
Her foothold there recover.
Chorus:
So piper play a martial air
For the gallant boys who conquered there
No merry tune to banish care.
Or mournful or solemn tune of all is played
By the grander fighting squad of the 3rd Brigade
Whole glorious deeds will never fade.
The men of Barry’s Column.”
From “The Kerryman” Xmas 1937
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2017-03-05 21:50
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They thought they’d teach us manners,
But instead of teaching they were taught
A lesson which they dearly bought,
For when Kilmichael’s day was fought
Low was their bloody banner.
II.
They sought to wipe the column out,
From East to West, from North to South,
Till at Crossbarry’s bloody rout,
They woke from their day dreaming
Though ten to one they were that day,
Our boys were victors in the fray,
And over the hills we marched away
With bagpipes merrily screaming
III.
The Essex brutes who tortured Hales
They scoured the Land to fill the jails,
They though his soul did madly chase
The cheeks of Irish mothers.
Paid dearly for their deeds were they
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 21:48
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moved on to the town where they were told we were gone west. Ponderously with artillery they swept west while we prepared to move to temporary safety across the Bandon river.
Other fights were carried out by the I. R. A. in Rosscarbery and its vicinity, but it is not my task to detail those. It is sufficient to say that for two months before the Truce no English police or soldiers was in occupation of this historic old town.
The Men of Barry’s Column.
I can hardly close this article more fittingly than with the ballad which commemorates the deeds of the West Cork fighting men who hammered the British so often.
1.
“When British Terror failed to win
Allegiance from our people then,
The Black and Tans they were brought in,
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 21:47
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the next and fell short. Barry then said “Keep me covered; open on the bombers who are at the far side of the windows.” Jim opened up on them and Barry rushed in and heaved the charge through the window. He did the same with the remaining one and they brought down the ceilings. The floors caught fire and then it was only a matter of time until the whole building was on fire. It was heartbreaking to hear the ammunition we badly needed exploding in the flames. It was daylight by this time and we left the town.
The garrison by this time evacuated the burning building without their arms, and in the most cases without clothes. They were not fired on, and they secured refuge in, amongst other places, the local convent. Openly singing the songs of our country, we marched through the town on for the West. We halted to put our boots on, then off to the North and then we wheeled back East, passing north of Rosscarbery and on to Rossmore. We reached here about 8 a.m. Meanwhile British columns
senior member (history)
2017-03-05 21:45
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paraffin, lighted it and pitched it in by the point if the bayonet. This set the whole building alight. Then we saw the effect of the explosion. The door and windows had been blown in and all the steel shutters were off but otherwise the building was intact, and it was necessary for the blaze to be kept up. There was plenty of light, of course and while this was an advantage to Barry to see the bombers he was plainly in view every time he went round the corner to throw in a bucket of paraffin. Each time this action brought a hail of bullets. At one time I remarked to Jim Hurley that we would be soon minus a Column leader.
Jim said, “Not at all; he has a charmed life”.
The Column O/C certainly had had a busy time for hours dodging bombs, throwing in bombs, paraffin, and no rest.

Charge Fired Through the Window
The ceilings were plaster and were not catching fire, so Barry shouted for four charges. The fuse was lighted. Jim Hurley pitched one and failed to get it in the window. I tried
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2017-03-05 21:45
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paraffin, lighted it and pitched it in by the point if the bayonet. This set the whole building alight. Then we saw the effect of the explosion. The door and windows had been blown in and all the steel shutters were off but otherwise the building was intact, and it was necessary for the blaze to be kept up. There was plenty of light, of course and while this was an advantage to Barry to see the bombers he was plainly in view every time he went round the corner to throw in a bucket of paraffin. Each time this action brought a hail of bullets. At one time I remarked to Jim Hurley that we would be soon minus a Column leader.
Jim said, “Not at all; he has a charmed life”.
The Column O/C certainly had had a busy time for hours dodging bombs, throwing in bombs, paraffin, and no rest.
Charge Fired Through the Window
The ceilings were plaster and were not catching fire, so Barry shouted for four charges. The fuse was lighted. Jim Hurley pitched one and failed to get it in the window. I tried
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2017-03-05 21:44
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of the petrol they immediately guessed whet was to happen and they concentrated all their fire on the corner where Barry stood. The bombs were the most dangerous. I often wondered how he sensed their coming. He could not see them, and I do not know how he could have heard them coming with the continuous rifle fire, four rifles in the house across the street and at least twenty cracking from the barracks and only fifty feet apart, but as each bomb came he always shouted just in time, “Bomb, get down”, and each of them came to either three or four feet from him. There was a stout pole close by and I stood behind it from several of the bombs. Barry’s back was to me and he did not see me. Had he seen me I would have heard something I would not forget. It worked fine until bomb rolled out further than the others and exploded at the same side as I was. That taught me a lesson and I got down as quickly and as flatly as the others from that one. When he had the petrol tins pitched in he got a bag, folded it, stuck a bayonet through it and dipped it in
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2017-03-05 21:42
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barrack was standing back clear of all houses, a huge stone building, no building touching or overlooking it. It was well stocked with machine guns and bombs, and it was the boast of the garrison that it was the only barracks that could not be taken. Indeed, that night it looked a hopeless task to take it, and I think any other man but Barry would have thrown in the sponge.
Petrol, Paraffin Oil and Bombs
Instead he ordered Neilus Connolly Skibbereen to take three men across the street to the house opposite and open rapid fire with rifles and ordered another party to procure petrol and paraffin oil. From the corner of the house on the left as one would go from the barracks he opened fire to keep the party covered who rushed across the street. Shortly after they had taken up position the petrol and paraffin oil arrived and he unscrewed the caps of four or five tins and pitched them towards the building. When the garrison got the smell
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2017-03-05 21:41
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barrack was standing back clear of all houses, a huge stone building, no building touching or overlooking it. It was well stocked with machine guns and bombs, and it was the boast of the garrison that it was the only barracks that could not be taken. Indeed, that night it looked a hopeless task to take it, and I think any other man but Barry would have thrown in the sponge.
Petrol, Paraffin Oil and Bombs
instead he ordered Neilus Connolly Skibbereen to take three men across the street to the house opposite and open rapid fire with rifles and ordered another party to procure petrol and paraffin oil. From the corner of the house on the left as one would go from the barracks he opened fire to keep the party covered who rushed across the street. Shortly after they had taken up position the petrol and paraffin oil arrived and he unscrewed the caps of four or five tins and pitched them towards the building. When the garrison got the smell
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2017-03-05 21:38
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formation the column O/C led off to Ross. About a mile from the town the order “All Boots off” was given. We moved slowly up and then number one Section handed over the mine. Barry crept up to the gate to slip the latch, but it was too dark and the torches had to be lighted.; then Mick Crowley (Kilbrittain) and myself were ordered to jump with him over the wall if the gate were not open.
The front wall was about twenty feet back from a line of houses and barbed wire was everywhere. The fuses were lighted and we moved up quickly as they began to splutter like fireworks. Barry snapped the latch and to our joy it gave with him.
We placed the mine against the door and then ran back thirty yards and lay flat with our palms to our ears. The mine went off with a deafening roar and sent up a cloud of blinding dust. By the time the dust had cleared the garrison opened fire. To rush in blindly we could not, as we could not see whether there was a breach or not, and inside the building it was dark. Now I have already stated the
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2017-03-04 23:25
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short time. We finished our job by Tuesday. The column O/C was by this time growing impatient. He had to move each night and was getting closer to Rosscarbery than he liked. On his orders to proceed to Benduff we got there through the snow at 7 p.m. Wednesday night (Benduff is about three miles from Rosscarbery). On arrival I reported to the O/C and was questioned as to the condition of the mine, etc., and was told at the same time that Jim Hurley (now Secretary, Cork Board of Health) and myself we to be on the storming party.
Barry then addressed the column telling them their objective was the capture of Rosscarbery Barracks. He said at the same time that the garrison in occupation were expecting the attack.
He named the storming party of ten men each to be armed with two guns; a torch party of ten more to be in charge of Sean Hales (R. I. P.). he, himself took charge of the storming party and it formed the advanced guard; the explosives were to bring up the rest. In this
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2017-03-04 23:11
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The following morning the column O/C, Tom Barry, sent for me and gave me orders as to the preparation of the material required for his next operation – a mine, crude bombs; all to be manufactured for the following Monday evening. He told me the 1st Batt. Q. M. Dan Holland, would detail from where the explosives would be got and then he moved off in a zig-zag direction towards his next objective, Rosscarbery R. I. C. Barracks.
Preparing War Material for the Attack.
The material for the mine and bombs was scattered over a large area. It had to be, so that it would always be at hand for the column. This time, however, it had to be collected from Crosspound and Berehaven. Men had to travel for it with care so as to avoid capture and it was well into Monday night when all were back and we were in full swing preparing the mine and bombs. We worked at the house of John O’Mahony, Ballinvard, and anyone listening to the banter and joking as we worked would never have realised we were going into action in such a
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2017-03-04 22:57
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National goal as fast as the people want them, libel those of our race who proved in 1920-1921 and later, that they will always move as fast as honest leadership will take them.
On March 19th, 1921 (one year to the day after the brutal murder of Brigade Commandant Thomas Mac Curtain, Lord Mayor of Cork) the West Cork Brigade Flying Column had attacked and inflicted a terrible defeat on the British column rounding up at Crossbarry. It had then moved West, and in the following month, April, has billeted in the 2nd Battalion area near Ballinscarthy; the intention being to attack a convoy of enemy troops which usually travelled to Clonakilty Junction on Wednesday mornings. The attack was called off as the military did not travel, and the column moved further in to my area the 2nd Batt. I was then Vice O/C. Immediately the column arrived I was responsible for their billeting etc. I took them to the Kilmeen company area fifteen miles north of Rosscarbery.
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2017-03-04 22:43
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other places. The enemy numbered thousands and held important posts right over the whole area.
Unselfish support for the Column.
The civilian population were of the type found in almost every area in Ireland at the time; the Irish backing the column and the fighting men to the last man; the mixed breeds and the Imperialists openly hostile. Those of the civilian population who were good could not have been much better. They were of the best this country or any other country ever produced; old and young of them gave their all to the Army of the Republic. Night and day saw them standing to behind the men of the column. Enough credit can never be given to the old folk who sat up at night to give their beds and accommodation to “the lads” who scouted and acted as sentries often all night as the column rested.
The true history of their unselfish and marvellous support could never be told in a short article.
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2017-03-04 22:27
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The Fall of Rosscarbery Barrack.
Many better and braver men of the Cork 3 Brigade of the I. R. A. could write the account of the capture of the R. I. C. stronghold of Rosscarbery in April 1921.
Before setting down the details of that fight it would be well for readers to have some ides of the situation existing at that time in the west cork area.
The Brigade area extended from Kinsale on the eastern side to the
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2017-03-04 22:26
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coastline at Berehaven and from a line running across via Crookstown on the north to the sea in the south.
The Cork 3 Brigade of the I. R. A. operated in this area. It consisted of seven battalions and its Active Service Flying column on parade numbered approximately 100 rifle men. The full Column were not taken into service on each operation. In the column were men from all grades – farmers, students, tradesmen, labourers; West Cork men all, loyal and staunch comrades, equipped with the arms and ammunition fought for and captured in attacks on British Crown forces and all armed with that deadly hatred of England and Imperialist oppression. The column leader or O/C was Tom Barry. Under his leadership the column had attacked, disarmed and defeated the British forces and Auxiliaries at Kilmichael, Toureen and Crossbarry and
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2017-03-04 22:00
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to open fire on the enemy posts. We kept it up for a bit and then moved off to join the remainder in billets.
The White Horse Story.
Those who remember reading the newspapers of the time will recollect the British headlines on the following day:
“Michael Collins Shot Off a White Horse at Burgatia”
The horse was a bay mare belonging to Kingston which was being taken for I. R. A. work. Billy Sullivan, who was told bring her along was on her back. She stumbled and came down, but was not hit.
Collins was not in the area at all.
“An tOglach” – the I. R. A. organ of some weeks following waxed very sarcastic at the expense of the British claim for compensation arising out of the fight. One Sergeant was at that period awarded one thousand pounds compensation for the loss of his moustache, which was shot away.
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2017-03-04 21:42
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admittance, he replied that under no circumstances would he admit us. Needless to say, we were soon in the house, had sentries posted and we sat down to a good meal which was badly wanted, after our tiring march.
We rested around on the floors until morning and then when Kingston’s workmen came along they were all arrested, and not allowed to leave the house. Kingston himself was of course under close arrest, all the time.
Problem Presented
About 11 a.m. a pretty problem presented itself in the arrival of a British official whose detention for and length of time would arouse suspicion as to our presence in the neighbourhood. He was released with instructions to continue his usual duties after he had given a solemn undertaking not to divulge to a living soul that the I. R. A. were in occupation of Burgatia House. The day wore on, and double sentries were mounted. About 1.00 o’clock a local
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2017-03-04 21:41
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Volunteer (Sonny Maloney) arrived and reported that the official who had been permitted to go two hours previously had gone straight to the R. I. C. barracks at Rosscarbery and had remained there.
Maloney further reported the British military were arriving from skibboreen and Clonakilty.
The Column stood to and Maloney was sent off on another intelligence mission, but we had scarcely been placed in positions when the enemy were reported coming.
Very Difficult Position.
Now, the reader should know that geographically we were situated in a very difficult position if the intelligence report of troops from Clonakilty and Skibbereen was correct. He we were, one mile from Rosscarbery, at our back the sea was only a few hundred yards, at our front we could see with our own eyes the Black and Tans. To our left was Rosscarbery -
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2017-03-04 21:40
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probably held by troops as well as ploice – and surely, our only remaining way out on the East would be held with troops coming from Clonakilty. To make matters more difficult, the fields around Kingston’s house were very large, and it was at least four hours before darkness would set in.
The British Advance.
The order was given that no shot was to be fired until the O/C blew his whistle, no matter whether the enemy were closing in or not.
In a few minutes a volley was fired at us from the road, but we did not reply. Up the avenue, a short distance came some Tans. Another volley was fired at the house – still we did not fire – no whistle sounded. We remained crouched in our positions. The British then started to advance up the field on our left, firing as they came, but they did no damage to us. By this time they appeared puzzled at no reply to their fire, and must
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2017-03-04 21:39
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have wondered if somebody dreamed about an I. R. A. Column at Kingston’s. Meanwhile the O/C had sent out scouts to ascertain if the British had closed the remaining line of retreat, and he remarked to me that even if they had us completely surrounded we would hold them 'till nightfall, and then break through them. He warned me to see that the house, which we would eventually retreat to (but only when forced to) did not catch fire. The scouts returned from the East and reported that the way out was clear.
The British continued to advance slowly, and were still peppering the house behind us, when all of a sudden the whistle went and we opened rapid fire at the enemy. They broke and ran. Out we went on to the avenue, and fired down it after them.
After a few minutes rapid fire, to hasten their retreat, the order was given for one section to double away to the East and
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2017-03-04 21:37
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hold the road until the remainder passed out. And so, whilst the enemy were running, we moved off without delay across that road to the East which, if the British officer in command had held it before he attacked our front, would have made impossible our retreat till nightfall.
“Another Battle Up”
On we marched until we had put about three miles between us and the scene of the fight. We halted. The main portion of the Column were sent on to billet North-East, whilst the O/C took a section back to the town of Ross which they entered after nightfall.
The idea of a section returning was for two reasons, namely, to be on hand if the British were attempting any reprisals, and secondly, because of the fact that it would have a good morale affect on the I. R. A. and the people generally, to give the English another rattle up a few hours after they thought they had us surrounded. All was quiet in the town, and, after waiting some time, we were ordered
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2017-03-03 23:09
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Story of the Fight at Burgatia House
I. R. A. Column in a Trap
With Their Backs To The Sea
Their Front and Flanks Open
To The Enemy.
In February, 1921 most of the small barracks occupied by the R. I. C. throughout West Cork had been evacuated owing to the attacks on them by the West Cork Brigade of the I. R. A.
In very few towns, except those garrisoned by English Military or Auxiliaries, did the British attempt to retain a police barracks. The only one I can call to mind was the barracks in Rosscarbery.
This seaside village is situated about eight miles from Clonakilty, 12 miles from Dunmanway, and 13 miles from Skibbereen. Clonakilty and Skibbereen were then British military posts, whilst about a hundred Auxiliaries occupied the
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2017-03-03 23:08
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workhouse at Dunmanway. There was only one barracks occupied within this fairly large area approximately 240 square miles – Rosscarbery – and if this was gone it was obvious that a fairly large area would be available as bases, or retinnge country, for the West Cork Brigade active service men.
In Hostile Country
The barracks was occupied by a strong force of R. I. C. and Black and Tans, and as several barracks had been attacked in West Cork, the police were very wary. Another difficulty was that the surrounding district at that time held a number of families generally non-Catholics, who were hostile to Republicanism and friendly with the British. So our leader Tom Barry moved off a Flying Column of about 35 rifleman one night, and we guessed before long that we were moving for Rosscarbery. The plan was that the Column would move about 14 miles through the night, occupy a large house near
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2017-03-03 23:07
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Ross, rest all the following day come fresh for the attach the following night, and be fit to protect ourselves after smashing the barracks, in the event of our meeting reinforcements of British military and Auxiliaries.

Burgatia House.
We arrived about 3.30 a.m. at the house of one Thomas Kingston J. P., a large farmer and good British supporter. Kingston was openly hostile to the I. R. A. and was very much in touch with the British. Actually at that time, when motor were scares, he used volunteers to drive the police mails to Clonakilty, to prevent the possibility of their capture by the I. R. A. who had many times raided the mails on that route, his house was situated about one mile from Rosscarbery, on the Clonakilty road, and about 200 yards up an avenue from the road.
The house was surrounded and Kingston was called. On being informed that it was the I. R. A. who were seeking
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2017-03-03 22:29
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whilst other equally fabulous amounts were granted to those killed and wounded at this fight at Burgatia, Rosscarbery.
And so ended our first attempt to get close enough to attack Ross Barracks, but its destruction was only postponed.
N.B. This article (above) is taken from the Kerryman March 1938 and written by Mr. Jack Corkerry, Bandon.
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2017-03-03 22:16
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Family of the O'Heas - Burial Place To Be in Timoleague Abbey
“Omnibus” writing in the “Cork Examiner”, says: It was really to the scholarship of a friend that I am indebted for my first knowledge of the O’Heas not a very common Co. Cork name now.

He told me that the Franciscan Abbey of Timoleague was the burial place of the famous South-west Cork clan.
They came originally from the barony of Corklea in Limerick and possessed themselves of Pobble O’Hea in Carbery. One of them a Cistercian monk, John O’Hea, became Bishop of Waterford in 1179.
My pet hobby is tracing the history of modern scions of our ancient clans and here are a few
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2017-03-03 22:16
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facts about some of the O’Heas. One of them became a very prominent figure in the Regency period. He was John MacNamara Hayes – the name Hayes is derived from the original clan name, O’Hea.
He was a native of Limerick and took his M. D. at Rheims. As personal medical adviser to the Prince Regent, one of his chief functions, no doubt, was giving advice as to just how tightly the which has Royal master wore to correct excessive corpulency would be laced. Another Edward Hayes of Tipperary, was a painter of note in Dublin in the 1850’s.
John Fergus O’Hea, born in Cork about this date also achieved fame as a painter and exhibited in the Royal Hibernian Academy. As a cartoonist and artist he was well know in contemporary Journalism.
(Master Fintan Higgins, South Square, Clonakilty)
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2017-03-03 21:54
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A Fairy Ship That Landed at the Red Strand.
About eighty year ago a boat was fishing near the “Black Rock” which is about seven miles south west of Clonakilty when they saw a sailing ship coming in the bay and a large crew standing on her deck about twenty men dressed in white and each man having a flag red and white a spear in his hand a hatchet on one side and a hook on the other side. This hook is to catch a person around the neck and pull him close to him and draw the hatchet on his neck and kill him.
So, as the crew saw the ship coming nearer they said this is not a fishing ship and and I think that this is a fairy ship. The moment he said that word they
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2017-03-03 21:53
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all got frightened and they pulled up the anchor and began to row the boat towards the “Red Strand”. When the ship’s crew saw them go into the strand they began to shout “come back here”, “come back here”, and the moment they said those words a woman sat on the prow of the fishermens boat in white. All the people ran to the stern and were afraid. She said “ye would not want to be afraid if ye did right. What should we do?” She said do ye know the night ye have? We do said one man it is “Lady Well Day Night”, well said the lady dont ye be out late any other “Lady Well Day Night”. We will not replied all the crew. The lady and the ship disappeared and was not seen since.
Any fishermen would not stay fishing late on the 14th of August since after
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2017-03-03 21:51
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ten o’clock. It was said that it was the Blessed Virgin who appeared to them.
(Master Pat Hayes, Donour, Castlefreke, Clonakilty.)
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2017-03-03 20:02
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churchyard among the hills of his beloved West Cork, Dick sleeps his last sleep. A temporary wooden cross marks his grave until such time as Republican Ireland erects a fitting monument to his memory.
Let seceders not dare to presume to such an honour; that is a task for those who are true to the Republic for which Dick gave his life. May the sod rest lightly on him.
(From Xmas. Number “Southern Star”, Skibbereen)
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2017-03-03 19:55
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respect. A guard of honour composed of old comrades; surrounded the coffin. On the train journey from Cork to Enniskean I. R. A. units presented arms at each station on the route.
The remains were borne on the shoulders of his comrades from Enniskean to Ahiohill churchyard, a distance of six miles, in torrential rain.
The funeral cortege was so large that it would almost seem that all Republican Ireland had assembled to honour the dead patriot.
Armed soldiers were sent to prevent his comrades firing a volley over his grave. Notwithstanding the presence of Free State troops the military honours were carried out.
In the quiet of Ahiohill
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2017-03-03 19:35
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turned his thoughts from the things of the earth to the eternal life.
And so Dick Barrett died as he had lived. Alas! that English bullets fired by Irish hands should have stilled the heart of one of West Cork’s most gallant sons.
They buried Dick’s body and those of his comrades in the prison yard, but their freed souls soared to join Ireland’s martyred dead.
Forced by public opinion and, who knows. Perhaps, by remorse Dick Barrett’s executioners in November. 1924 gave his remains and those of his comrades, to their relatives for re-interment.
On the arrival of Dick’s remains in Cork large contingents of the I. R. A. and the public came to pay a last tribute of
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2017-03-03 19:26
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or bitterness towards those who are to put him to death. His writing is fraught with sorrow that Irishmen should have become the tools of England.
His last letter to his parents and family – a copy of which his brother Mr. W. Barrett Clonakilty has kindly le’nt me – is written in a truly Catholic and patriotic spirit. He makes affectionate mention of his little niece and nephew and says “When they grow up they will glory in the triumphant cause of Irish Freedom and will love to learn that I did not die for any other freedom but that for which Tone, Emmet and Pearse died. I want you now not to cry or mourn over my loss. Be proud that I have not died in disgrace”.

The End
Then the priest came and Dick
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2017-03-03 19:19
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to meet his Maker and to write to his parents and friends.
How did Dick receive the fatal new?
He took it like the brave soldier and true patriot that he was.
First his thoughts go his comrades who have gone before him. Next he pours forth words of comfort to his parents, brothers and sisters.
With characteristic modesty he refers to the greatness of Rory O’Connor, Liam Mellows and Joe McKelvey who are to die with him and their loss to the cause. Of himself and his own worth he reckons not at all.
His thoughts next go to his fellow prisoners and he writes them a message of farewell and cheer. He leaves his cigarettes etc. for them.
There is no expression of rancour
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2017-03-03 19:11
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Dick at once espoused the cause of complete independence. On the occupation of the Four Courts by the I. R. A. he was appointed Quarter Master General of the I. R. A. he took part in the defence of the Four Courts and when the I. R. A. capitulated he was made prisoner and lodged in Mountjoy Jail with Rory O’Connor, Liam Mellows and other Republican Leaders. Here again Dicks active and astute mind played no small part in planning a daring escape which almost succeeded. In prison, he never ceased to plan and hope and pray for the cause for which he was soon to make the supreme sacrifice.
On December 8, 1922, they called him at half-past three in the morning to tell him he was to be shot in four hours time four hours in which to prepare himself
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2017-03-03 19:02
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Here he organised the prisoners and was prominently in identified with the agitation for proper treatment of political prisoners. Shortly after the Truce was declared Dick with Tom Crofts and others made a daring escape from the Island.
I remember meeting Dick on the night after he had regained his liberty. Once he had made inquiries after his friends who were free his whole conversation and attention was concentrated on planning how to effect the escape of his comrades who were still in prison. Dick only allowed himself a day or two to visit his parents when he set off to encompass the liberation of the prisoners.
In Four Courts
When the unfortunate division occurred in the ranks of the I. R. A.
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2017-03-03 18:55
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impelled him to take up a soldier’s life.
No wonder his comrades loved him. On one occasion Dick met a political prisoner who had escaped from the custody of the Crown Forces in a Cork hospital disguised as a nurse. Owing to an oversight the fugitive had not been provided with boots when he changed his disguise. Dick immediately took off his boots and gave them to his comrade and had himself to walk some miles in his socks before he could procure another pair of boots. It was only one of the several unselfish acts that ennobled that very noble character.
Under regrettable circumstances the British authorities came into possession of certain information regarding the West Cork Brigade. Dick was arrested in the spring of 1921 and interned in Spike Island
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2017-03-03 18:46
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were the heroes whom Dick exhorted his pupils to emulate. Thanks to his teaching, the Government of the Irish Republic had no more loyal citizens than Dicks pupils to the majority of whom he was not only their teacher but their hero and idol.
Dick endeared himself to his comrades in arms no less than to his pupils. Gay unassuming and generous to a fault there was nothing of the braggart gunmen about Dick. He did not love fighting for fighting sake. The spirit of christianity humanity and gentlemanliness filled his soul too much to permit of that.
It was the galling reality that his country was in chains and his belief that only physical force could break those chains, that
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2017-03-03 18:35
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reached the authorities until a few months before the Truce in 1921.
From 1917 to 1922 Dick taught during and planned organised and carried out the arduous duties of an I. R. A. officer during the evening and night. It was typical of the big-heartedness and generosity of the man that not only did he devote his time and energy to the cause of his country, but he spend practically the whole of his salary in the furtherance of that ideal for which he was later to give his life. Even during school hours he worked for Ireland.
The approved text books for the Commissioners of Education were discarded and books impregnated with national aspirations and sentiments used in their stead.
Moulding His Pupils
Tone, Emmet, Pearse, Rossa,
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2017-03-03 18:25
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Brigade to a degree that established it as one of the most potent menaces to the Crown Forces in the immortal fight for freedom.
West Cork was one of the most active scenes of operation during the Anglo-Irish struggle.
Dick Barrett was one of the most active men in the area. So great was his enthusiasm and co-operation that he spared neither his physical and mental faculties nor his means.
It was thought that he could give better service to the cause if he remained at his post as teacher and so avoid the suspicion of the British forces. The loyalty and solidarity of the people were such that though Dick was an active member of the Brigade from 1917 onwards a fact which was also know to the majority of his pupils not a word
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2017-03-02 23:25
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and hurling fields.
After a period of service at St Patricks School he was appointed Principal at Gurranes National School, Upton. It was then his work for Ireland began in earnest.
Organising Work
He took a very active part in the organisation and promotion of the famous West Cork Battalion and Brigade. He was attached to the Battalion and Brigade staff, and was a close friend and confidant of the Brigade Commandant Charlie Hurley whom died fighting against overwhelming odds on the morning of the Crossbarry ambush. Charlie as Brigade Commandant and Dick as Brigade Quarter Master, with other loyal officers and comrades built up the West Cork
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 23:17
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later to the devote to the cause of Irish freedom. He chose the teaching profession as a career and was trained at the De La Salle College, Waterford.
Having finished his training he received a first-class diploma in teaching. He was appointed to a post in St. Patricks School Upton.
At that time the spirit of nationalism in West Cork, as in other parts of Ireland was if not actually dead at least dormant.
Dick did more than one mans part to fan the dying embers into flame.
He devoted all his spare time to the promotion of Gaelic League classes, Irish-Ireland concerts and Gaelic games. Like many others of that patriot band of soldiers he was no mean athlete: he had made his name on the football
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 23:16
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From Ballineen To Mountjoy
Life Story of Quarter-Master General Dick Barrett.
His Last Letters.

Rory O’Connor from the East; Liam Mellowes from the West; Joe McKelvey from the North and Dick Barret, the teacher, athlete and soldier from Ballineen, was chosen as the Southern victim to face the firing squad on that December morning sixteen years ago.
They were shot on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, 1922.
Richard Barrett was born at Hollyhill, Ballineen. He attended the national schools at Knox and Knockeagh. At school he brought the same intelligence and zeal to bear on his studies that he was
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2017-03-02 22:57
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a fine head, and a heart of courage, the soul of truth and honour. With a ready tongue and a hearty laugh, with an energetic intellect, but never an evil thought. To God and Ireland true, Faithful, merry-hearted friend, beloved by little children. Gentle in peace, brave and fearless in war, he will never be forgotten. He is with the dead he loved, and his name is another bulwark to the Republic. Not in sorrow but in triumph his friend may cry out: “The blood of men fighting for freedom is never shed in vain”.
The foregoing is by Brian O’Higgins, 38 Upper O’Connell St. Dublin and taken from The Wolfe Tone Annual 1937.
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2017-03-02 22:36
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imprisonment and at the end of it a few hours notice of death, a firing squad and release for ever. He died as he had lived, bravely and splendidly, thanking God that he had been chosen to lay down his life for Ireland. To his parents and his brothers and sisters he wrote from Mountjoy a couple of hours before the end; -
“I want you now not to cry or mourn over my loss. Be proud that I have not died in disgrace. Pray for me…Remember all the brave lads that have been killed in this fight, and try and take it as your lot that you are called upon to give one member of your family to this holy cause.”
One who knew Dick Barrett well wrote of him after his martyrdom “Richard Barrett, teacher, patriot and martyr; with tall, stately form, rapid stride, merry eyes, dark hair,
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2017-03-02 22:28
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and inspiration during the strenuous years when England by savage methods of warfare strove to break the spirit and morale of the Irish people.
He was a man of great physical strength and like his country-man, O’Donovan Rossa, no torture or ill-usage inflicted by his jailors could subdue him. He escaped from Spike Island on a stormy night in November, 1921, and in company with six others captured a boat belonging to a British launch and battling with the elements for hours eventually landed near Cobh before it became known that they had left the prison.
When the treaty of surrender split the I. R. A. he remained true to the old ideal and was one of the gallant band of soldiers who garrisoned the Republican Headquarters at the four Courts when it was attached in 1922.
Then after the surrender, five months of
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 22:19
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“Richard (Dick) Barrett”
He was a school teacher, one Irish Irelander, an athlete and a student, a soldier who did the work of twenty during the Five Great Years, a Gael to the core of his heart, a splendid man whose clean young life made death easy and acceptable when it came. To his I. R. A. comrades in County Cork – he was a native of Hollyhill, Ballineen – he was a tower of strength
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 22:11
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freedom; there shall be no peace until the Republic is restored; there shall be no peace until the manacled are undone”.
That would be the “Flyers” message from the grave. Those who knew him and who had the honour of working with him here and now would avow that until that freedom for which he worked and for which he worked and for which his comrades gave their lives, was a reality, there would be armed men within this country who would take the opportunity, when it would come, to again go out in arms for the freedom of this nation, if it were necessary. When the “Flyer” would meet across the Great Divide the men of 1922-’23, like Dick Barrett and Lar. Cunningham, or the men of 1920-’21, like Charlie Hurley, Paddy Crowley, Dick McKee, or further back, the men of 1916, like Pearse, Connolly or Clarke; or further back
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 22:01
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Weakened however by the sufferings and wounds and the hardships forced upon him by the Imperialist element in this country, he had not enough resistance to meet the attack of pneumonia to which he succumbed, and he died fully fortified by the rites of Holy Church, and the Nuns who were attending him said they had never seen a more peaceful or calmer end. The “Flyer” could sleep peacefully feeling that throughout his life he gave of his best to his country and its people, his one dominating passion being the freedom of his native land. And though he sleeps peacefully and quietly the “Flyer” was one of the men who, in life would never have a peaceful mind while the task to which he had set himself was still unachieved. The “Flyer” would be the first to say –
There shall be no peace without
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 21:53
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thank God, and he continued faithful to the Republican cause. After the great depression of 1924, when the Republican army were beaten on the field by overwhelming numbers the “Flyer”, like many more Irishmen, had to leave the country to seek a livelihood in foreign lands. From that time, until 1933 he was exiled from his country.
He who, for ten years had fought for his country, who had given his blood and every moment of his time towards the betterment of his people, was denied the right to live in his own country. But from the moment of his emigration he was still in touch with the I. R. A. movement, his first act in the places in which he was domiciled being to get in touch with local Republicans.
And when he reported back to Cork, a couple of weeks previous to that day the “Flyers” first duty was to become again attached to the Brigade of the I. R. A.
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2017-03-02 21:44
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which they were fighting and in which they were hard pressed at the time.
And when the damnable Treaty of surrender came, which had cost so many of their greatest lives the “Flyer” remained true to the Republican faith and the Republican movement.
When in 1922, the minions of England in this country, with their British guns, British money, British propaganda and British gombeen men again waged war on the Irish people and on the Republican Army, the “Flyer” was one of the first men to go to duty outside Cork, serving in Limerick, Waterford and Tipperary, in the capacity of officer in charge of a Flying Column; and there was no Column at that time that gave greater service towards stemming the hordes of the British minions than the Flying Column.
When in 1923 he lay wounded by British bullets, fired by Irish renegades not very far from that spot, many had despaired of his life. But he pulled through
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 21:34
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of West Cork in organising the Volunteers, and in himself becoming a trained and fit soldier to serve his country in time of need. When the fight for the independence of the nation was resumed it found the “Flyer” not alone ready, but trained and efficient and willing to take his part in it.
When the activities against the foreigner started in West Cork one of the first officers selected to take his place in the active service unit of Cork No. 3 brigade was John Nyhan of Clonakilty. It was hardly necessary for him (Mr. Barry) to recall to his comrades who were there the services John Nyhan had given to the Flying Column. There was no post of danger, no post of honour to be allocated which had not John Nyhan in the van.
When in 1921 he was arrested and interned in Ballyhinlar, his ar first and only hope was to get back again to the fray, to help his comrades in the cause for
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 21:19
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remains lay beneath them at Ballymoney, the name and the memory of the “Flyer” would never die while his comrades who had worked with him for the cause of Irish independence would survive. The memory of the “Flyer” the patriot and Irishman, the memory of the “Flyer”, the daring soldier of the Republican Army, the memory of the “Flyer”, the efficient and consistent, and above all the memory of the “Flyer” who had remained faithful to the end would survive for all time.
Tracing the history of the late John Nyhan, Mr. Barry said he joined the Irish Volunteers in 1915, and took part in the first organisation of that body especially in West Cork, during which he was associated with some of their patriot soldiers who had gone before him – Charlie Hurley, Dick Barrett, Dick McKee.
He devoted his time and his efforts towards educating nationally the people
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 21:14
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again, the men of ’67, or 1903 or of 1798 – when he would meet those men he could face the calmly knowing that his life had been dedicated to his country, knowing there had been none in any generation who had been ever given greater service to his land than – the “Flyer”.
From “The Southern Star” Skibbereen.
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2017-03-02 20:56
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T. O’ Donohue, Ballineen; Jim Lane, Clonakilty; W. Daly, Shannonvale; W. Buckley, Bandon; Sean Murphy, do.; P. McGrath, J. J. O’Connell, T. Crofts, J, Keegan, E. Fitzgibbon representing Lachora Gaedheal, Cork ex-I. R. A. Men’s Association; D. Manning, Kilbrittain, etc.
Mr. Jim Hurley. B. Comm, accountant to Westmeath Co. Council, and Mr. O’Donovan, V. S. Dublin, had a big hustle to arrive in time for the funeral, and they arrived in Clonakilty just after it started. They had an equally brisk hustle to catch the mail train to the metropolis in the evening.
The Fianna Boy Scouts, Cork, were in charge of Mr. Ml. O’Lehane.
Graveside Oration
Mr. Thomas Barry, Cork who was in charge of all the arrangements, delivered the graveside oration. He said they were there to bury Staff-Capt. John Nyhan, No. 1 Cork Brigade. But though his mortal
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2017-03-02 20:40
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brigades.
Amongst those attended (in addition to those already mentioned) at the removal of the remains or at the graveside were: -
Messrs. J. C. Dowdall, T. D.; T. Hales T.D., D. Corkery, T. D.; Sean French Lord Mayor of Cork; Jim Hurley, B. Comm, J. O’Donovan, M.R.C.V.S. Dublin, Capt. Sean Lehane and Mrs. Lehane, P.W. O’Donovan, solr.; T. H. O’Donovan solr.; Dr. P. O’Sullivan, Cloyne; Dr. O’Donovan, O. McCarthy. M.R.C.V.S, Skibbereen; P. J. Cullinane, do.; Mrs. Tom Barry, F. Begley, Bandon; Ml. O’Reilly. do.; F. Kneeshaw, Dunmanway; J. McCarthy – O’Hea, solr., Bandon, Dr. E. Callanan, Innishannon; D. Canty, Newcestown; D. T. Lordan, Ballineen; F. Hurley, do.; T. Warren, do.; M. Crowley Kilbrittain; C. Crowley do.; J. Fitzpatrick, do., D. Holland, Timoleague; J. Hughes, Shannonvale; M. Hughes, do.; S. Holland. Skibbereen. S. Kingston, Drinagh; J. O’Hara Kilmeen; M. O’Donovan Club House;
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 01:46
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Misses O’Sullivan, Shannonvale, Mr. and Mrs. J. Barrett, Reenroe; Mr. and Mrs. C. Barrett, Hollyhill; Willie Barrett, Tom Barrett (cousins).
Amongst the wreaths laid on the grave were:-
“In proud and loving memory of John (Flyer) Nyhan, from Kilpatrick Club”;
“In loving memory of John (Flyer) Nyhan Staff Captain, Irish Republican Army, Cork No 1 Brigade. from officers and men of Cork No 1 Brigade;”
In loving memory of John (Flyer) Nyhan. from officers and men 3rd Brigade Cork Brigade, I.R.A.
“From old comrades in Bandon, Cork No 8 Brigade;”
In loving memory, from the employers of Deasy and Co., Ltd.,
They were also wreaths with Irish inscriptions from the first and third Cork
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 01:32
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Mr. T. Barry, standing on the newly-made mound, delivered an oration.
Then there was a dramatic interlude. Half a dozen young men suddenly marched to the graveside, where they took up positions, three on each side, and at a word of command three volleys were fired from half a dozen rifles over the grave. Fianna Boy Scouts sounded the “Last Post” and “Reveille”, and all was over.
The chief mourners were – Daniel Nyhan (father): Mrs. J. Flyoin and Mrs. F. Crowley (sisters): Gerald and James Nyhan (uncles): Mrs O’Connell, Ballygurteen, Mrs. J. Nyhan, Hollyhill (aunts), Mary and Pat Flynn, Florence and Mary Crowley (nieces), Mr and Galvin, Gurtaleen, Mr. and Mrs. Barrett, Kinsale Junction: Mr. Mrs. And Mary O’Donovan Shinnock, Mr and Mrs. Ml. O Neill Shanaway: Mr. and Mrs. Ml. Collins, Carravouler:
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 01:15
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their mournful dirges to the tattoo of muffled drums as the departure was made from the Church, were again heard playing the funeral march in appropriate tempo as the graveyard was reached.
Like many-armed spectres silhouetted (again) against the sombre background of leaden skies, the giant trees of the old churchyard hummed a dirgeful rhapsody, swayed by the wintry winds, a sympathetic overture, as it were, to the solemn theme.
The remains were reverently removed to the waiting grave into which they were gently lowered by the bodyguard. Right Rev. Monsignor Hill P.P., V. G., Clonakilty, recited the last prayers, assisted by Rev. J. Ambrose, C.C., Trev. D. Crowley. C.C., Rev. J. McCarthy, C.C., while uncovered heads remained bowed in prayer. The grave was then filled in, after which a final prayer was offered up, and
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 01:03
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mBan under Nora Bean ni Mairtin, Cork. Behind walked the general public and followed a long line of motor cars and other vehicles. Blinds were drawn and shops shuttered as the cortege passed out of the town, while crowds on the footpaths showed reverential respect. The route lay vis Fernhill, Kilgariff and Lyre, on to the family burial ground at Ballymoney, one of the oldest cemeteries in the country where stand the gaunt and ivied ruins of an old Church whose origin is almost lost in the mists of Irish ecclesiastical history. A strong wind and piercing rains were no deterrents to those who formed the huge concourse of mourners, and the adverse elements and rough, uneven, muddy roadway that cuts across country from south to north were unnoticed in the solemn and impressive ritual of final heartfelt homage. The pipes which had sounded
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 00:53
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united in spiritual unison their prayers for the repose of the soul of the deceased, while a guard of honour of his old comrades in-arms stood rigidly to attention by the wreath-laden coffin which was draped in the tri-colour. At noon the remains were transferred to the hearse, being borne thither by six onetime comrades, while a bodyguard took up position on either side. Amongst those were noticed Messrs. Sean Buckley, P. Kearney, Tadhg O’Sullivan, C. Crowley, M. Crowley, Stephen O’Neill, Jack Hennessy, D. Holland, D. Galvin, T. Kelleher, T. O’Donohue, Liam Deasy, Sean Corkery, Dr. E. Callanan.
Two bands - Bandon Volunteers’ and Cork Volunteers’ Pipers bands - took up a position at the melancholy procession. Behind the hearse walked the bereaved father and relatives, and then came companies of the Irish Republican Army from Cork Bandon, Clonakilty, Ballineen, Dunmanway, etc., as well as a goodly number of Cumann na
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 00:41
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on the grim errand of War, a War of National Independence, with a price on his head. He would go through those streets and over that rugged, but he would not see them. His mortal remains it was that would traverse them to the slow, methodic re-echoing rhythm of the footsteps of old comrades, old admirers, of new disciples in the cause to which he dedicated his life.
The “Flyer” was going Home, amid the tearful melancholy homage of a vast countryside, whose name is writ in bold type across the pages of the history of a thousand years.
From far and near men and women had come on this bleak morning to offer this final homage. Long before the cortege started from the Church, vehicles were bringing crowds of mourners into Clonakilty. At the Requiem Mass, which was celebrated at 11 o’clock by Rev. J. Ambrose C.C., a crowded congregation
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 00:15
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It was a typically raw, wet morning the morning of Tuesday. A strong southerly wind drove blinding sheets of rain before it through the streets of the town of Clonakilty, over the surrounding hillocks across the plains and undulations into the distant north-lands. Everywhere there was a dreary bleakness, a whining, moaning shrieking elemental cataclysm. A fitting setting, perhaps, for the final act in the drama of “Flyer” Nyhan, a realistic background for the closure that signalised the ringing down of the curtain on the Romance-Tragedy of one whose name will be enshrined in glamorous memory long after the present generation had been gathered to its fathers.
The” Flyer” was going on his last journey. In a few moments he would travel through the streets of the town he knew and loved so well, over the rugged road he had often trudged before, in the darkness of the night, mayhap,
senior member (history)
2017-03-02 00:00
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Hill, P.P., V.G., Clonakilty, officiated. Mr Tom Barry, Cork, a well-known I.R.A. leader had charge. The coffin was draped with the tricolour, and there were numerous wreaths. The guard of honour of eight was composed of fellow officers of the deceased in the West Cork Brigade I.R.A. including peter Kearney, T. Kelleher, T. Donoghue, Ml. Crowley, C. Crowley, S. O’Neill, T. Lynch, and J. Hennessy. Passing from the City through West Cork, funeral cortege made an impressive spectacle, and included 800 Volunteers, a contingent of Fianna Éireann, Cumann na gCailini, Cumann na mBan, and Irish Republican units. Some 4,000 mourners are estimated to have passed through and 110 motor cars and 10 lorries left Cork, where it was joined by the Lord Mayor of Cork and Mr. T. Hales, T.D. Solemn Requiem High Mass was celebrated on Tuesday, and the funeral took place to Ballymoney Ballineen at noon.
senior member (history)
2017-03-01 23:43
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Wormwood Scrubs Prison. He served as an officer in the 3rd West Cork Brigade, I.R.A. and when the Treaty was signed fought against the Free State troops. He took a leading part in numerous encounters during both periods of hostility.
When order was restored, Mr. Nyhan crossed to Glasgow, where he took up a position with an engineering firm under the management of Mr. J. Crowley (son of the late Mr. John Crowley, N.T. Clonakilty). Some little while ago he distinguished himself by a heroic attempt to save a fellow workman, when something went wrong with the machine at which they were both employed and it is believed an injury then sustained hastened his premature demise.
The remains were removed to Clonakilty on Monday, the funeral procession being headed by the Cork Volunteers Pipers Band. Right Rev. Mgr. P
senior member (history)
2017-03-01 23:33
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“Flyer” Nyhan Laid To Rest
Last Sad Journey To Ballymoney
Graveside Scenes And Incidents
Final Salute of Rifle Volleys
Oration By Mr. T. Barry
The death took place at the Bon Secours Home, Cork, on Sunday of John “Flyer” Nyhan, late of Clonakilty. Deceased was a well-known figure in the I.R.A. movement, and was prominently identified with the famous 3rd West Cork Brigade, I.R.A.
In his early years, the late Mr. Nyhan was employed in the local electric light station, Clonakilty and also in Deasy and Co.’s Brewary.
Joining the I.R.A. movement he fought in the pre-truce struggle against the British Forces in Ireland, and was on several occasions interned, being at one time for 20 days on hunger strike in
senior member (history)
2017-03-01 23:10
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At Grace Dieu there is a curve in the ditch about 200 yds the West side of Tom Hand's house. In the space by the roadside there is the mark of two graves which have been recently covered over by clay which has been thrown out of the ditch when the road was being repaired. The people of Roscall say that two of the rebels that were killed in the insurrection of niney-eight were buried there.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 17:14
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Paud’s Cross is only a short distance from Blarney Village towards the west. Long ago there lived in the house where Mr. O’Sullivan is living now, a man called Dan Paud Kelleher. He worked in Blarney Mill. In a short time Dan Paud got sick and he died. The Cross is called Paud’s Cross to this very day.
Teresa Wallace. Got
Information from
Henry Wallace,
Killowen,
Blarney,
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 17:10
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Fox’s Bridge is situated about three miles from my house in Killowen. The bridge got its name because a certain fox used to appear on a certain part of the bridge and anyone that came on and stood on that part of the bridge, would fall in and be drowned.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 17:06
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There is a small wood on the Western side of the Castle called thye Devonshire Wood mto commemorarte the visit of the Duke of Devonshire to Blarney.
Eilis Mc Kernan got
Information from
Thomas Mc Kernan
5 Shamrock Terrace
Blarney
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 17:05
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On a side of hill facing the southern side of Blarney Castle is a wood in the shape of a heart. This wood is said to be planted on the spot where Cromwell placed his gun when attacking the castle.
Eilis Mc Kernan got
Information from
Thomas Mc Kernan
5 Shamrock Terrace
Blarney
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:58
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“The Dry Bridge” is situated a little outside Blarney village. It is a fine limestone building. At one time it bridged the river Martin but the course of the river was changed with the extensions to the mill. The Bridge still remains bit no river runs under it and that is why it is called “The Dry Bridge”
Mary Carroll got this information from
Cissy Harrington
13 Shamrock Terrace,
Blarney,
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:54
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As you brew you must bake.
A slow fire makes sweet malt.
A straw best shows how the wind blows.
An idle man tempts the devil.
A wrinkled purse a wrinkled face.
As the fool thinketh so the bell clinketh.
A knave is one knave but a fool is many.
Smooth waters run deep.
A stitch in time saves (name) nine,
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Empty vessels make most sound.
Make hay while the sun shines.
Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
A penny saved is a penny gained.
Take care of the pence and the pounds will take of themselves.
A Glutton lives to eat, a wise man eats to live.
A good thing when lost is valued most.
Peggy O’Brien got information from Thos. Ingerton,
22 Mangerton Terrace. Blarney. Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:45
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where it still lies.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:44
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The Doctors Steps are situated on the Waterloo Road. They are leading to the house which used to be the residence of the late Doctor, named Dr. Noonan.
The new house was built for Dr. Ryan. The Steps are the rendegrous [?] for both old and young. No matter whether people are going hunting or fishing, it is always the case of “Ill meet you at the Doctor’s Steps.”
Mary Carroll got information from Betty Horgan
7 Shamrock Terrace Blarney Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:37
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The Chapel Field is neat Killard in the North Parish & it so got its name because in the Penal Days when the people had no other place to hear mass. It was in a field which is now known as the "Chapel Field".
The holy water font is to be seen in Clogheen Chapel.
Esther O'Callaghan got information from
Mrs Lizzie Kelleher,
Killard,
Blarney,
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:33
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About a mile from Blarney is situated “St. Ann’s Hill Hydro. Near the Hydro is a castle of which we know very little.
In the eighteenth century a community of nuns lived in the castle. The Revd. Mother’s name was Ann, and the place is called St. Ann’s in her honour. Seemingly she must have been canonized.
In a wood close by there was a well called “St Ann’s well” which is now covered.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:27
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On the year after the famine 1848 the first train was run on the G.S.R line from Cork to Dublin and was called “Lady Mac Neill”. On that day people from miles and miles around came to see the unusual sight. One old man amongst them could not believe that it was steam and water made the train run and he is supposed to have said that it was the Devil himself was driving it.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:23
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Everyone who knows the history of Blarney Castle should know about Mac Carthy’s Treasure. When Cromwell attacked the Mac Carthys they (the Mac Carthys) went through a tunnel which led to a lake about 30 acres in area into which they threw all their jewels so that Cromwell would not get them as well as the Castle.
Here is a Legend connected with the lake – Every May a woman riding w white horse appears on the lake. And if the seventh son of the seventh son of the Mac Carthys is there when she appears she will give him the treasure.
The Castle is now owned by Sir George Colthurst. Many tourists come to visit the Castle and maybe some day one of them will be the seventh son of the seventh son of the Mac Carthys. If it is we hope that he will come on a May morning and that he will visit the lake and by such means receive the treasure of his ancestors.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:09
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fom the "lady on the white horse".
Helen Clancy got information from
Mrs. Ellen Linehan
19 Mangerton Tce.,
Blarney,
Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-25 16:06
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If the moon is turned on its back its a sign of wet stormy weather.

Peggy O'Brien got information from Julia Ingerton.
6 Mikle Stream Row, Blarney. Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 22:33
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altar, and inserted a niche in the wall behind the altar and put in it a beautiful statue of our Lord being taken down from the cross and resting on his Blessed mother's lap.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 22:31
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Brigit Flynn in 1910 who holds the position still.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 22:27
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awaiting decision
The Castlecomer fair is held in the Square once a month. Cattle and bonhams are sold together. Luck money is given when an animal is sold. Animals are marked either with mud on the flank or by clipping the hair of the sides. The halter is retained when the animal is sold. The dealers spit on the hands and sometimes strike their hands. May fair is the greatest fair of all. Special fairs are held for horses and sheep.
Dora Booth VI Cass. Colliery N.S.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 22:22
approved
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is ready the potato seed must be cut. My brother generally does it and he has to be very careful that there is an eye in each slit. The neighbours generally come and help them sowing the seeds. When these are sown the work is not finished yet as during the summer months they have to be wed. they have also to be sprayed to keep away the blight. In Autumn they are raised from the earth by means of a plough and a horse. A couple of men are employed to pick them from the soil. If a potato is too far down to get them up by hand a piece of slate is used. When they are all drawn home a pit is dug in the garden in which the potatoes are put and covered with straw and clay. There are a lot of names on the different kind of potatoes as; shamrocks, skerry blue, Kerr’s pink, champions, arranbanners, but the seeds most suitable for our soil is Skerry Blues and arranbanners.
Harriet Langrell. VI class. Colliery N.S.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 22:10
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In our parish Mayo there are three forges. There are two men working in the forge in Cretty as there is a lot of work to do in it. Byrne & his son are the smiths. This forge is situated in our field by the cross of Geneva. It is on the main road going from Kilkenny to Dublin. It is a fairly large square house with boarded and iron roof on it. The door is
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 22:06
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We sow potatoes on our farm every year. About an acre or so is used under potatoes but some years we sow more. In spring my father ploughs the ground in order to have it soft enough for the crop. This crop is sowed in drills and manure is spread in the furrows. As a spade is too tedious and laborious to dig that amount of earth we use a plough. Wooden plough are now gone out of date and we never used them. The plough was bought in Carlow but was made by Pierce in Wexford. When the ground
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 21:59
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A few years ago a cyclone occurred in the vicinity known as the Colliery which lies in the county Kilkenny. It went in a narrow belt across the county. In its wake it swept many roofs off houses and buildings. A vast number of trees were uprooted and fell across the road so that people were not able to travel that way. The crops in the field did not escape the effects of it either as they were damaged.
Even the turnips were blown out of the drills in exposed areas. The length of the storm damage was ten miles. It was of short duration. The Government came to the assistance of people who suffered from damage and gave them grant with which to repair their houses.
Harriet Langrell. VI class. Colliery. N. S.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 21:51
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The most harmful weeds growing on our farm are buacaláns and fioráins. They spread very rapidly and this is why they are harmful.
If they are pulled and allowed to wither they are poison if cattle eat them.
Thistles are found in good land. Blue buttons are got in poor land. Saffron is for dyeing purposes.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 21:44
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In the townland of Monteen there is a holy well called Killgorey. People visit it on the 15th August. People who go there are supposed to bring home a bottle of water and take it to the priest to get it blesses.
Then they would rub it to the part which was effected and it is supposed to cure them. Pieces of rags are seen at the well hanging on a bush.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 21:35
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The duff that is left over from the anthracite coal is very useful. It makes a lovely fire in the night time when we are finished cooking. It is used in making bombs.
In making bombs two buckets of yellow clay is used to one bucket of duff and they are thoroughly mixed together. Some water is then procured and all are well tramped by a person with good strong boots. There are various other methods in making bombs. The bombs are then made and shaped well by hand until they are about the size of a hand ball. When they are made they are stored away on the hob to dry and harden till the following day.
Lily Langrell, VI class. Colliery. N.S.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 21:35
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We still make a certain amount of soda bread in our home as it is considered more wholesome that loaf bread. When we are about to make a cake we must put the bake pot hanging over the fire by means of a crook to have it hot enough for the cake to go into it. The lid must also be put on the fire.
To make a cake we use two
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 21:33
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pounds of flower, one tea spoonful of soda, a half spoonful of cream of tartar and a half spoonful of salt. These ingredients are mixed together. To this we add a pint of buttermilk. When it is mixed into a nice, smooth dough we sprinkle a little flower into the bake pot so as to prevent the cake from sticking to it. Before we put the cake down we must be assured that the bake-pot has a good fire under it and over it. We then put down the cake and it usually takes three quarters of an hour to bake. When it is well baked on each side we leave it aside to cool until the following day.
Lily Langrell, VI class. Colliery. N.S.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 21:31
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My home district is called Ardra. It is situated three miles from Castlecomer which is in the Co. Kilkenny. The number of families in the townland are about seven. The approximate number of people is about forty. The family most common is Brennan.
Most of the houses are slated but there are some thatched also. The townland got its name from Ardra Castle. There are two old people over seventy years whom I know and whose names are Michael Dogue Deerpark, Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny and William Buckley Loon, Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny.
They both know Irish. The houses were more numerous long ago than now as there are a lot of ruins namely, Draper’s House and the Castle and others.
The land is good and most suitable for grazing but there is some tillage also. Draper’s plantation is growing near us. It is called by this name because Draper’s owned this estate. There is one river us also. In Mr. Hogan’s fields there is a lake called the “Horse Shoe” because it is like a horse shoe. Many streams flow into the river but I do not
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 20:47
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Why is a christmas pudding like a swiftly running river?
Ans: A christmas pudding is full of currants, while the river is also full of currents.
When is Father Xmas most successful?
Ans: When he is at the top of the tree.
Where is the cat's half acre.
Ans: On the hob.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 20:43
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know their names.
Dora Booth VI class Colliery N.S.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 20:40
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27. An easy conscience fears no accusation.
28. Eggs badly boiled are good things spoiled.
29. A dirty grate makes dinner late.
30. Muddle at home makes a husband roam.
31. A blunt knife makes for a dull wife.
32. A bad broom makes a dirty room.
33. Never venture, never win.
34. It is better be born lucky than rich.
35. Disease is the punishment of neglect.
36. Despise school and remain a fool.
37. Faint heart never won fair maid.
38. The race is not always to the swift.
39. Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
40. Be just and fear not.
41. The loveliest birds have no song.
42. Deep rivers flow with silent majesty.
43. Shallow brooks are noisy.
44. Tea seldom spoils when water boils.
45. Pure water is better than wine.
46. A letter box saves many knocks.
47. Keep your keys and lie at ease.
48. A chair unsound soon finds the ground.
49. A good beginning often makes a bad ending.
50. Well begun is half the battle.
51. The best hurler is always on the ditch.
52. Second thoughts are always best.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 20:28
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1. A stitch in time saves nine.
2. It is never too late to mend.
3. A rolling stone gathers no moss.
4. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
5. Don’t beat about the bush.
6. Look twice before you leap once.
7. Practice what you preach.
8. A windy day is not the day for thatching.
9. An uprooted tree will not grow the same way again.
10. All that glitters is not gold.
11. Be slow to promise but quick to perform.
12. Lost time is never found.
13. Make hay while the sun shines.
14. Be just before you are generous.
15. It’s a small lake will sink a ship.
16. Faraway cows wear long horns.
17. Many hands make light work.
18. Too many cooks spoil the broth.
19. Too much bed makes a dull head.
20. Al work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
21. Hunger is the best sauce.
22. As bust as a hen ay a bag of oats.
23. Better wait on the dinner than on the doctor.
24. We never miss the water till the well runs dry.
25. Always make the best of a bad job.
26. Positive men are most in error.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 20:18
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37. If you walk under a ladder, you will stop growing.
38. If you strike a person with a clean stick he will grow no more.
39. If a herring pea swells when you put it on the fire, you will cross the sea.
40. If you whitewash the house in May, You will be sick on Christmas Day.
41. If your eye itches you will cry soon.
42. Whoever looks first at the cat after she has washed her face will soon die.
43. A whistling woman and a crowing hen.
44. If you pay out on Monday, you will pay out all through the week.
45. Exchanging money with your friends on New Years’ Day is considered lucky.
46. If you are unlucky at cards turn your money on the table, or in your pocket.
47. Happy is the corpse that the rain falls on.
48. Letting your gloves fall is a sign of disappointment.
49. If you hear the death watch beetle somebody in the house is going to die.
50. To find a nail or a pin is lucky.
51. If you give a pin to anybody stick it in wood or else it will break friendship.
52. If your hair falls out, you will lose a friend.
senior member (history)
2017-02-23 20:07
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20. If a straw hangs on a cock’s tail a stranger is coming to the house.
21. To meet a black cat is lucky.
22. If your nose itches you will fight before long.
23. If your left ear is hot, somebody is speaking badly of you.
24. If your right ear is itchy, somebody is speaking well of you.
25. Sweep out the dirt and you sweep out your luck.
26. If a picture falls from the wall a death is imminent in the household.
27. A rat running across the floor means a death.
28. A cock crowing in the doorway means a death.
29. Breaking a mirror means seven years’ bad luck.
30. The number 13 is an unlucky number.
31. To hear a beansidhe means a sudden death.
32. If a tealeaf rises to the surface of the tea money is coming to you.
33. If you drop a coin when paying for anything spit on it for good luck.
33. If you put your clothes on inside out, it is a sign of good luck for the day.
34. If you set eggs in another persons crops, you destroy their chance of a good yield.
35. If a knife falls, a gentleman is coming.
36. If a fork falls, a lady is coming.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 22:46
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53. To sneeze is the sign of success during the day.
54. Never give a scissors to anybody. It cuts friendship.
55. A hole in your pocket is the sign of a christening.
56. To hear an ass crying is the sign of a christening.
57. Never sweep the floor after seven in the evening, or before sunrise. It is unlucky.
58. If you walk under a ladder bad luck will follow.
59. When a person dies, open the door to let out the soul.
60. Leave a chair before the fire on all Souls Night, for the poor souls.
61. Fruit out of season means talk without reason.
Eamonn R. De Paor.
10 Eanair, 1937.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 22:35
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Superstitions common to Locality.
1. Meeting one magpie on a journey means bad luck.
2. Meeting two magpies means good luck.
3. To meet a funeral and not to walk back three steps with it is unlucky.
4. To cross a churchyard at midnight is unlucky.
5. If a dog crys it portends a death.
6. A cock crowing before midnight heralds bad luck.
7. Sometimes the clock is stopped when a member of a household dies.
8. When a spoon falls visitors are coming.
9. To spill salt is considered unlucky.
10. Walking under a ladder is unlucky.
11. People put an egg over the henhouse door to bring good luck to the hens.
12. If a spark from the fire flies towards you, you will get money.
13. If your right hand is itchy you will get to shake hands.
14. If your left hand is itchy you will get money.
15. To find a horseshoe is lucky.
16. To find a pin or a piece of steel is also lucky.
17. A bright spark on the wick of a candle means that a letter is coming to the house.
18. Wells are skimmed on May morning in order to take butter from those who use the water.
19. To meet a redheaded woman in the morning is unlucky.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 22:23
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97. When oak trees bend with snow in January, expect good crops.
98. When Candlemas Day is come and gone, the snow won’t lie on a hot stone.
99. If snails come out in February, they will stay at home in March.
100. If February brings no rain, there’ll be neither snow nor grain.
101. A dry March never begs its bread.
102. March often comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lamb.
102. If apples bloom in March you may search for apples.
103. March many weathers rained and blowed, But March grass never did good.
1
Eamonn R. De Paor.
7 Nollag, 1937.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 22:08
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75. When the sunbeam comes on Brigid’s Day, the snow comes in before May Day.
76. Fog rising from the valley signifies fine weather.
77. An eclipse of the moon brings thunder and lightning.
78. When frost remains long on the window, dry hard weather follows.
79. A cold winter follows if birds and badgers are fat in October.
80. If a cat lies in the sun in February, she will creep to the hearthstone in March.
81. Blackbirds chirping round a house is a sign of hard weather.
82. When frogs turn brown in the skin, expect rain.
83. When frogs croak overmuch, rain will follow.
84. If the hare wears a thick coat in October – a hard winter.
85. Swithin's day wet means 40 wet days to follow.
86. Swithin’s day fine means 40 dry days to follow.
87. Evening red and morning grey, a sure sign of a warm day.
88. When a cat scratches the table, hard weather follows.
89. A fog in the evening is the sign of rain.
90. If a cock crows late in the evening, rain will follow.
91. If a cock crows loudly in the morning – a fine day.
92. Never trust a July sky.
93. A thick fog on an August morning betokens rain.
94. If the milky way in December shows clear, you may safely count on a fruitful year.
95. A January Spring is worth nothing.
96. All the months in the year curse a fair February.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 21:49
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51. If the cuckoo sits on a bare thorn, the farmer may sell his cow, and buy his corn.
52. When goats come down from the hills, a storm is near.
53. A fog in the morning means a fine day.
54. Shooting lights in the sky mean thunder.
55. Wind changing to the south means rain.
56. Wind changing to the north means cold weather.
57. Many hips and haws, many frosts and snow.
58. Ice in November that a duck can bear, muck and sludge throughout the year.
59. Cool August after hot July brings a hard winter.
60. A warm, fry august means a snowy winter.
61. A wet March makes a bad harvest.
62. June if sunny brings harvest early.
63. Wind whistling in the bushes is a sign of snow.
64. When crickets sing sharply, we will have rain.
65. When a clock crosses the road, it is a sign of rain.
66. If rats run across the road, it is a sign of rain.
67. When woodlice creep, it is a sign of rain.
68. Cloudy sky with wind from S.W. means rain.
69. Red sky in winter is a sign of frost.
70. When jacksnipe bawl we will have fine weather.
71. A tambourine gets soft at the approach of rain.
72. Lightning on a winter’s night betokens frost.
73. Wind from East means cold foggy weather.
74. Wind from the west means showers.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 21:36
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25. A robin singing on the lower branches means rain.
26. A cat sitting with her back to the fire means cold weather.
27. A cat washing her face near the fire means rain.
28. A dog lying with his paws to the fire means rain.
29. If cows begin to pair, then rain will fall again.
30. A sudden attack of rheumatism means rain.
31. Spiders webs across the road mean great heat.
32. If seaweed weeps, rain is to follow.
33. If the floors and walls are damp, it will rain.
34. When cows lie down in the early morning, we will have rain.
35. If foxes bark in October, they are calling for snow.
36. Flocks of crows in the morning is a sign of rain.
37. Flocks of crows in the evening is a sign of fine weather.
38. When a curlew whistles, rain is at hand.
39. Many hips and haws betoken a hard winter.
40. Early arrival of wild geese means a hard winter.
41. If leaves remain on the trees, a hard winter will follow.
42. Smoke blowing down the chimney betokens rain.
43. If ducks run against the wind, rain will follow.
44. Capped hills in the evening means rain before morning.
45. Dogs sleeping in the daytime is a sign of rain.
46. When dogs eat grass, we are near rain.
47. When smoke rises straight, fine weather is at hand.
48. When robins are tame, we will have a hard winter.
49. Shooting stars is a sign of rain.
50. Glistening stars in winter is a sign of frost.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 21:08
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Signs of the Weather
(The following were given by pupils. Some of them are local and original.)
1. If swallows fly low it is a sign of rain.
2. If swallows fly high, it is the sign of fine weather.
3. If the river roars, it is a sign of rain.
4. Too bright a sunrise betokens a bad day.
5. A red sunset means a good day to follow.
6. When the moon is on her back rain will follow.
7. A halo round the moon is a sign of rain.
8. If a crane flies up the river, it means fine weather.
9. If a crane flies down river, it means rain.
10. When seagulls come inland, a storm is to follow.
11. When starlings fly with crow’s hard weather will follow.
12. Soot falling down the chimney betokens rain.
13. Swarms of midges in the evening often bring rain.
14. When ducks quack loudly, rain is to follow.
15. When the mountains seem near, rain is to follow.
16. Haze on the hills in summer is a sign of fine weather.
17. If swine are restless, rain will follow.
18. If cows gad, we are near rain.
19. A rainbow in the morning is a sign of fine weather.
20. A rainbow in the evening means bad weather.
21. A white frost brings rain.
22. A black frost means continued bad weather.
23. A ragged sky brings thunder.
24. A robin singing high in a tree means fine weather.
senior member (history)
2017-02-22 20:55
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occasion the gallery fell on a man named Buckley O’Flynn – a Protestant who had entered the Church.
He was not killed.
When this old Catholic Church fell the parishioners had to go to their duties in Smithstown Church until the present church was built in Coone.
There was a cemetery surrounding the old Church and the bodies and other remains were taken up and re-interred in the graveyard in which the present Church Stands.
Many whitethorn bushes still grow over the site of this old churchyard, and it is said that they were planted to mark the positions of graves.
Small stones, still to be seen are also declared to be tombstones.
Some years ago a severe flood cut away part of the corner of the old graveyard, laying bare coffins, skeletons, etc. These were removed, and re-interred in another part. Unbaptised children have sometimes been buried there.
EP
senior member (history)
2017-02-20 00:52
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stands at Pike road junction to this school.
A place locally known as “Line-ups” (I cannot trace the origin of this name and it is spelled phonetically) stood in the yard where the Creamery stands.
A woman named Mary Sandy lived in a field now owned by Mr. Paul Kinsella – the field is still known as Mary Sandy’s field.
People named Honours (phonetic spelling) lived in a house on land now owned by Mr. Charlie Tracey. The stones which remained of this house were taken away lately in order to sow a wheat crop in the field.
An old woman named Pegg Corry lived in a clay and stone house in a field known as the Well field, owned by Mr. Patrick Hely [?], Cruttenclough. The name of the well is An Cuala Tobair.
At Barry’s Cross, there lived the following: - Jude Barry, Brennan Arnotts, Willoughby’s. John Brian, Martin Hely [?], & Brennan Anthony.
N.B. Brennan is such a common name in this district still that the families are distinguished by nick-names.
Where James Coady now lives in Cruttenclough Willoughby’s lived.
John Brian lived in Martin Healy’s and Brennan Anthony’s lived in Tindall’s field known as “Charlies Hill”.
The Church at that time was in Bradley’s “Kiln Field”. It had a thatched roof, and on
senior member (history)
2017-02-20 00:49
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The Famine (1846-’47)
Name of person from whom the following account was got: Peter Roche.
Address: - Cruttenclough. Age: - 70 Trade: - Shoemaker.
Born: - Kilkenny City. Reared: - Kilkenny city and Wexford.
Got story from his grandfather, Peter Roche and also his father Peter Roche.
Heard the account 50 or 60 years ago. Peter Roche, grandfather of present man was 80 when he died.
Account written in this book on 2nd November 1937 Verbatim.
The famine time was known as Black ’47. It effected the district very much and caused a great decrease on the population. The potato crop was the main source of food and its complete failure led to the famine.
At that time the people used eat them with salt and buttermilk.
In some places the potatoes were plentiful enough but rotted in the pits later on. In other parts of the district they rotted in the ground, and good potatoes were so few that one would have to dig for a day to get a bucketful.
Ruins of houses which were inhabited during famine times are to be found in numbers, and people still point out places where there were sites of which no trace now remains.
The following are the sites of some of those houses: -
There was a row of houses down where Bradley’s now
senior member (history)
2017-02-20 00:13
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Paul Kinsella’s great great grandmother lived in the house at present occupied by the Widow Geoff Brennan. Her husband fought with the rebels at Vinegar Hill in 1798, and was shot there, she worried a great deal after his death, and as a result she completely lost her sight. Her son was a carpenter, and was married. He and his wife, and mother came to live to “Mary Bradley’s”, a house which formerly stood on Kinsella’s land, near the river. He was a journeyman carpenter, and was often away from home. One night he was
senior member (history)
2017-02-20 00:12
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away as usual, and his wife and mother-in-law were sleeping together. At the dead of night, the blind woman heard the door opening, and the sound of many voices. She recognised her husband’s voice, and the voices of others who were killed with him at Vinegar Hill. They talked for a time, and suddenly there was a commotion as if they had been alarmed, and they all took their departure through the back window. The younger woman also heard the noise, and was very frightened. When her husband arrived shortly afterwards, she was afraid to open the door for him, and the blind mother had to grope her way and let her son in. she said that there was no need to be alarmed, as they all came and went in good humour.
senior member (history)
2017-02-20 00:01
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Ghost In Coone Chapel.
The late Rev. Fr. Delaney was C.C. in Coone about the year 1900. One night he was obliged to go on a sick call. He went in to the Chapel to procure the Blessed Sacrament, and was in the act if opening the tabernacle door when he heard a footstep on the stairs leading to the gallery. Much surprised, he turned round, and saw a woman, dressed in black silk, coming up towards the Parish Priest’s confessional. Although rather frightened, Fr. Delaney went towards the box, and as he neared it, he distinctly heard the rustle of the silk, but did not hear the woman move away. Thinking that something was worrying the poor soul, the good priest cane a number of nights afterwards, but he never saw or heard anything further.
senior member (history)
2017-02-19 23:53
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During the time of the Whiteboys, three brothers named Somers from the Lotts, were arrested for alleged complicity in the burning of a house belonging to a man named Lockett, who was grandfather to Mrs. Cavanagh, Coone. The two houses were close to each other, and the night of the burning the brothers were a short time absent from their home. This they admitted when questioned, and suspicion immediately fell on them. They we arrested and brought to Kilkenny, when they were tried. A girl, who was at Somers’ house on the night in question, was inadvertently the cause of their deaths.
senior member (history)
2017-02-19 23:52
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The whole case for the prosecution rested on their ability to prove that the three men were absent long enough to have been to Lockett’s , she, not realising the import of the question, immediately answered that they would have had ample time to be there. Thus satisfied, the State was not long in bringing in a verdict of guilty. And the three accused were sentenced to death. They were hanged in Kilkenny Gaol, and it was widely asserted at the time that they were innocent. Many there were who hinted darkly that the trial was framed, and that the real culprit was well known, but was of the right colour, so escaped.
Paul Kinsella’s grandfather was arrested shortly afterwards on suspicion of being a Whiteboy. He and some others were confined in the room occupied by the Somers before the trial. Each night the Rosary was said, and they distinctly saw the three executed men packing the room. All their bodies were visible, except their heads, which were in shadow. Immediately the prayers were finished, the three men disappeared. This went on for three months, until the men were released. None of them ever spoke to the ghostly visitors, or molested them in any way.
senior member (history)
2017-02-19 23:33
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The following roads were constructed under the Relief Schemes introduced after the famine of '47.
(1) Dowling's Cross to Bradley's.
(2) From Cadogan's to Bryan's Corner.
(3) Wood Cross to Coone.
Under this scheme a man and horse were employed at the rate of 2/6 per day.
senior member (history)
2017-02-19 23:29
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Story obtained from: Paul Kinsella
Date of insertion in this book: 16th March. 1938
Fr. Dan Carroll was C.C. in Coone when Coone Girls' National School was erected. Where it now stands there was a shebeen owned by people named Carroll, who were related to the present Carroll’s of Coone. The landlord at that time was Humphries, and he was not in favour of the school being built on his land. Part of the school was built in the graveyard, and part of it in the Castle field. Humphries would not give the priest land enough, so Fr. Carroll had to ass in some of the cemetery. The corpses were exhumed, and re-interred in another slot.
McLanaghan, Humphries’ agent, arrived one day shortly after work was commenced on school. Fr. Carroll was speaking to James Byrne, father of the present man, when he arrived. McLanaghan was a truculent, ill-mannered individual, and he brusquely ordered Fr. O’Carroll to have the school knocked. Fr. Carroll was a strong willed man, and he told McLanaghan that neither he nor Humpheries would make him abandon the project. Humpheries returned to his residence after an absence, and, upon receipt of the news from McLanaghan, he ordered him to write to Fr. Carroll and to instruct him to have
senior member (history)
2017-02-19 23:29
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the school removed at once. McLanaghan did so in no measures terms. When Fr. Carroll received the letter he immediately replied, telling the agent that for his trouble he would never write another letter. His prophecy proved correct, for within the week McLanaghan had died – suddenly.
Shortage of money prevented the school from being finished properly. And from 1868 to 1908 there are frequent references in Observation book to lack of out-offices. The school was wainscoted, and ceiled, and a new floor laid down in August, 1908. Previous to that the floor was flagged, and the walls were roughly plastered. New presses and tables were supplied about the same date. One of the first teachers there was Mrs. Butler, who taught there from 1-2-1868 to 18-10-1907. She lived in Coolcullen, and walked to school every morning. Prior to being appointed, she served as a monitress in the same school.
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2017-02-19 23:00
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Story obtained from: Paul Kinsella.
Address: Coone, Bagenalstown.
Where reared: Above address. Age:
When inserted in this book: 16th March, 1938

Coone Chapel was built about 120 years ago, but was not as big then as it is now. The end of it came level with Kinsella’s burying ground. And the gallery was entered by a flight of stone steps. Just inside the entrance was a holy water font which has an interesting history, it was taken out of St. Lazarian’s Church, Old Leighlin, shortly after that church was taken over by the Protestants. The man who took it came to live in this district, and his family gave it to the priest in Coone when the chapel was being erected.
Fr. Dan Carroll was C.C. in Coone 89 years ago. He had the chapel lengthened, erected a belfry, and a porch, and closed the former entrance. The holy water font is still to be seen at the left hand side of the gallery. Prior to this, a large iron cross surmounted the chapel. This was replaced by the belfry, and was given by Fr. Carroll to the Shirley’s, who placed it over their burial ground. It is to be seen to the present day in front of the chapel door. It is bedded in granite, and stands about four feet high. There is no inscription of any kind on the Cross.
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2017-02-18 01:04
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V
May the far Eastern beauties be ever so fair
And the gems of the ocean be most precious and rare
I’d renounce them for ever and prove constant and true
Did I own that sweet treasure in a bonnet of blue.
VI
Then where ever I may ramble, my fond thoughts shall be,
On the mountains and valleys around sweet Clonaslee.
And the green woods of Brittas where I last bid adieu
To the flower of Kilmanmon and her bonnet of blue.
Theresa Kelly,
GlenKeen, Clonaslee Laoighis.
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2017-02-18 00:51
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Clonaslee
I
This memory on Pharnasis the Gods and Goddesses did meet.
Occasioned by a summons that Jupiter did circulate.
He said “with speed you must proceed to Mount Slieve Bloom
There just pass the day”
It specified that Conway’s boys should merit a victorious sway.
II
Beautiful aura dispersed the gloomy shades of night
And uttered forth most charming
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2017-02-18 00:50
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Our beauteous boys for to excite.
To meet the famed Doraignes precise on the appointed green.
And never to surrender.
Until from twenty one will loose nineteen.
III
Next morning did appear mild as in the charming month of May.
Where the villages were cheered by the warbling of the songster on its spray.
Mars met the goddess sweetly and told her she had just prepared.
One hundred gods enamoured their grans enamoured train to bear.
IV
That they from Cappanarrow to Roundwood Court should go in state.
And from that into the Harrow to see our boys accumulate.
But first they tell young Conway
That zealous for his countryhood
That all the fiery honour of the day should come to Upperwoods.
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2017-02-18 00:49
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V
Brave boys be now courageous and let the famed Doregno.
See that the theme of future ages should be out invincibility.
Incline to aid each other
Stand hard as marble to the sun,
Be active and unanimous.
And no impending danger shun.
VI
Then o’er those lovely the gods and goddesses did go.
With heather all the fountains their fertile banks did overflow,
Convenient to Doragno they waited like undaunted friends
Till at noon exultation from east to west did our extend
VII
When they perceived young Conway himself so boldly.
Signalised unanimously said you ought to be immortalised.
Had he that day neglected appearing on the plain.
Until time would take its period.
He ne’er would obliterate the stain.
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2017-02-18 00:48
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VIII
Then what violation can we exert to let them see.
That he should be neglected by us or our posterity.
Our candid inclinations shall be to wish him happy days.
Then bet surrounding poets give Conway meritorious praise.
IX
As stout as Alexander this youthful boy did animate
Saying the best Commanders sometimes will meet
With a debate we value not
What happened to us that day on Rushin green
But on a second trial our proof of valour will be seen.
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2017-02-18 00:10
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The Fame Delour
1st
My inclination for mediation requires
the aid of the muses nine
For in my travels to mount Pernasses
I became acquainted with a prince sublime
His kind assistance without resistance
He freely preffered at any hour
If id entreat him he’d elevate me
go sing the praises of the fame Delour.
2nd
From a lofty mountain a purling fountain
Extends its course through a winding vale
Through Lacca’s arbour where nature formed
Commodious woods and aspiring dales
Cold winters breeze ne’re disrobes the trees
That does embellish this lovely bower
But give contentment to the resedentur
That lives adjacent to the fame Delour.
3rd
Through those sweet vales it does gently glide
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2017-02-18 00:03
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The Famed Delour
I
My inclination for mediation
Requires the aid of the muses nine
For in my travells to Mount Pernasses
I became acquainted with a prince sublime
His kind assistance without resistance
He freely promised at any hour
If I’d entreat him he’ed elevate me
To sing the praises of the fame Delour.
II
From a lofty mountain a purling Fountain
Extends its course through a winding vale
Through Lacca’s arbour when nature formed
Commodious woods and aspiring dales
Cold winters breeze ne’er disolves the trees
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2017-02-18 00:02
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That does embellish this lovely bower
But gives contentment to the residenter
That lives adjacent to the Fame Delour.
III
Through those sweet vales it does gently flow
And passes Mt Salem where there is wealth in store
Nigh through Coolrain like the surging man
It tears its banks with eagerness to meet the Nore,
It joins in Cranna where beauteous Flora
Bedecks its banks with varrigated flowers
The muddy waters becomes transparent
When purified by the Fame Delour.
IV
The trout and salmon do float in union
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2017-02-18 00:01
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With numbers of the Agnes train
There not contented when circumvented
Till they approach this delicious stream
The smaller species of the feathered creatures
By Hawk or Eagle was ne’er devoured
But strains its throat with harminous notes
In chanting praises of the Fame Delour
V
For healthful bathing in any season
It far surpasses the sea or spa
If royal fairmaids would try experience
From foreign waters they’ed soon withdraw,
In those recesses they’ll find caresses
Where true fertility displays its power
For generation and population
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2017-02-18 00:00
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On the shady banks of the Fame Delour.
VI
When Bacus travelled this Irish Nation
Seleborous waters for God’s to find
Twas in Northgrove he met the Queen of love
And stopped a while to recreate his mind
At his departure he said hereafter
If any liquor should turn sour
If right applied should be delveified
By the wholesome waters of the Fame Delour.
VII
Its not my intention for to accuse
The accurate baid to whom verse does flow
The youth that poured on the River Nore
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2017-02-17 23:59
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Or the candid daughter of the sweet Barrow
I do them laud and there verse applaud
While orator does me impower
My present toast and perpetual boast
Will be in Praise of the Fame Delour.
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2017-02-17 23:20
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Camross Roads
I
One night as I lay in slumber
Strange phanthoms abstracted my rest
I thought I had been an old Empress
When Bacus those words he expressed
No longer I stay here to tarry,
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2017-02-17 23:18
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erected.
In which children pure shall not be neglected,
It is a fine building and strongly protected
And on a rock founded that never will fail
Here children are taught by divine inspiration.
To attend to their duty there with resignation
May they spend their days without depredation
And live to conclude them in Castletown Dale.
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2017-02-17 23:13
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many underglidings.
Nemervo [?] erected a machine for grinding
With the art of industry upon it sit smiling.
With chance to the beauties of Castletown Dale
V
The rural swain in the field cultivating
The cottage spinner at home regulating
Thoughts with their muses in the shades moderating
The harmonious notes of the cuckoo and owl,
‘Tis here cunning Reynard his cubs are defending
Poor puss from the hunt has escaped their attention
While Dan with his pipes he is superintending,
The groves that are charming near Castletown Dale.
VI
Kind providence here has a temple
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2017-02-17 23:02
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III
At the foot of this Edon runs a torrent serpentine,
Its banks decorated with roses and with eglantine
With assortments of seal both larch spruce and Indian pine
For to ornament this Courteous plane
The fish of this torrent is always surpassing
In winter and summer and springtime are dashing
The hook of the anglet all seasons are smashing
In the spontaneous river of Castletown Dale.
IV
There are assortments of fruit both the apple and the berry,
The goddess phenomenon approved of the cherry
Whilst Ratches gives orders drink wine and be merry
And a full flowing bumper of October ale
There are pearl rimmed fountains and
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2017-02-17 22:54
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The blackbird and thrush their shrill notes were relating
When slowly I wander sometimes meditating
On the transeding beauties of Castletown Dale.
II
‘Tis here Beauteous Flora resides at her leisure.
And here fame nature bestows a rich treasure
And the wounded lover spends time out of measure
In those silent bowers all flies to repair,
Diana not chaste them her grace she infuses
The goodness of wisdom her aid not refuses
The lyric of Apolla in co with the muses
Resounding the beauties of Castletown Dale.
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2017-02-17 22:41
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Castletown Dale.
I
One morning alone ‘twas for pleasure I sported
And down by the groves where the wild fowl resorted,
So charmed was I with their tunes so melodious
Of the warbling thrush and the sweet nightingale,
The turtle dove mates their sweet times were repeating
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2017-02-17 22:37
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When I think of the Lily I leave in Glendine.
V
Young man she says you'r uneasy
And 'tis all for the loving of me.
So I'll fulfill your conditions and set you at ease.
And I'll ramble the world with you where you please.
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2017-02-17 22:32
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On the top of this mountain a fair castle does stand
‘Tis embroidered all over from the top to the land
With the torches in porches, and the lamp shining bright
‘Tis a signal for sailors on a dark rainy night.
III
At the foot of this mountain the main ocean does flow
And the ships from the West Indies to Derry do go.
With the red flags aflying, and the firing of guns,
With the sweetest of music, and the beating of drums.
IV
On Monday morning we got the route my boys,
And on Tuesday we marched away,
Many hearts they were light and gay,
But it was not so with mine.
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2017-02-17 22:20
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These poems were Gathered by.
John Breen, Aughdubh, Camross Aged 67:
The following is a collection of Ryan’s Poems.
His house can still be traced beside the “Foot Stick”, over the River Tonnet, between Marymount and Rosnaclonan – in the Barony of Upperwoods.
Authority: Michael Phelan Rosnaclonan.
Dear Ryan is no more.
The muses are gone with their favourite Bard
To fields of illusion their toil to reward
To lofty old the trumpet of fame
To a far distant nation their voices proclaim
While echoes remurmur round Erin’s green shore
And whispers in silence, “Dear Ryan is no more”.
II
The fair winding Tonnet of whose beauty he told
Alas our fond poet shall we never behold
The “famous Delour” his favourite song
In heedess murmurs may wander along
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2017-02-17 22:17
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And tell when it meets with the slow moving – Nore,
The Bard of our bowers, “Dear Ryan is no more,”.
III
Adieu, thou fond poet, forever adieu,
No longer I’m able my time to pursue
So he laid down his pen, with a heart troubled sore
May the Heavens be with you,
“Dear Ryan is no more”.
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2017-02-17 22:16
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The Slieve Bloom Mountains
I
The Slieve Bloom Mountains are most rare to be seen.
Above all other mountains it bears a great name.
For a fishing and a fowling and a hunting also.
And the finest of fruit on those mountains do grow.
II
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2017-02-17 21:56
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Gathered from John Breen, Aughdubh, Camross. Aged 67.
Linguistic.
1. Epitaph on Ryan's Grave in Camross Graveyard
Barony of Upperwoods, Co. Laois
Here lies Entombed a Bard Sublime,
Whose verse in Solust [?] numbers bowed
Now gone to the Seraphic Clime
To sing the praises of his god.
Where Ryan rests that man of fame.
Whom upper shades did once adorn
This speaking stone shall loud proclaim
to generations yet unborn.
In rain shall years attempt to blot
his Deathlefs name from Memories Page
Ah. No, he ne’er shall be forgot
Till time herself shall die of Age.
The steady friend the social gay
Whose country to his heart was dear
Pause, Reader, pause and o’er his clay
Let fawl [?] the tribute of a tear
Nature’s favourite child of Jenius sublime
and beloved by all who knew him
Departed August 4th 1825
Aged 75.
May he rest in Peace. Amen.
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2017-02-17 21:22
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Archaeological
55.
Found:- Flint Javelin Head.
Discoverer: Eaton Thompson.
Time: May 1933.
Place: Glenall Bog. Camross.
Dimensions of Javelin:- 3¾" L.
Width of the blade above the tang 1⅛".
Note:-
The little weapon consists of a beautifully flanked pointed blade with a short tang for hafting in a wooden shaft, the whole measuring about 3¾" in length with a maximum width of the blade above the tang of about 1⅛".
This has been forwarded to the Museum through Miss Roc Librarian Portlaoighise.
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2017-02-17 21:05
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Far dearer the grave and the prison
Illumined by one Patrist name
Than the trophies of those that have risen
From Liberty's ruins to fame.
John Breen, Rosnadough. Camross.
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2017-02-17 21:01
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There is an underground Tunnel from Castletown Castle to Aghaboe.
Tom Delaney, Camross.
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2017-02-17 21:00
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used for holding water.
Tom Tynan, Camross, Mountrath.
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2017-02-17 20:58
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III
Yet idle as those visions seem
They were a strange yet faithful guide
When heaven itself had scarce a gleam
To light my darkened life beside.
And if from grosser guilt escaped
I feel no dying dread the thanks
Adieu to the power that shaped
My visions on the Brosna’s Banks
IV
And love I feel will come too late
Abe too late to comfort me
And fetters from the land be cast
Though I may not survive to see
If then the gifted good and brave
Admit me to their glorious ranks
My memory may though not my grave
Be green upon the Brosna’s Banks
John Breen, Rosnadough, Camross.
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2017-02-17 20:50
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The Brosna’s Banks.
By Frazer.
Oh, yes I’ve idled many an hour,
Whether I thus could idle now,
In wooing back the withered flower,
Of health into my wasted brow
But from my life sore shadowing close
My unimpassioned spirit ranks
Among the happiest moments those
I’ve idled on the Brosna’s Banks.
II
For thereupon my boyhood broke
The dreamy voice of nature first
And every word that vision spoke
How deeply has my spirit nursed.
A woman’s love, a harp a pen
A rescued land a nation’s thanks
A friendship with the world and then
A grave upon the Brosna’s Banks.
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2017-02-17 20:40
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IV
I now declare it truly my heart is sore oppressed
A sorry man am I today and nowhere can I find rest
Sweet sleep has from my eyelids fled my hair as white as snow
For my inhuman conduct on the Plains of Aghaboe.
V
A King once reigned in England who cursed these very laws
It deprived him of his subjects and that without just cause
Now I curse the self same weapons and their forgers too also
For they caused my whole destruction on the plains of Aghaboe.
VI
And their week of torture I feel I can’t endure
So I’ll settle with the lady and make her tenure sure
I’ll make her restitution and give a lease also
In hopes that I might live in peace near beauteous Aghaboe.
VII
To all rack renting landlords I now say hold your hand
Do not eject your tenants but plant them on the land
It was such cruel conduct that proved mine overthrow
And swept an English Army from the plains of Aghaboe.
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2017-02-17 20:38
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Composed by Dannie Doolin (Poet) of Castletown, Mountrath.
The Plains of Aghaboe – (Achadh Dá Bhó)
In aice le baile Máighe Móise.
[?] Shasana - Rushall)
Come all ye Irish landlords and fox hunters likewise
I hope you’ll pay attention and take a good advice
I hope you’ll pay attention while I in grief & woe
Relates how I was conquered on the plains of Aghaboe.
II
It happened on a Saturday the 28th of May
The sheriff with his bailiffs came forward on that day.
Likewise came soldiers and police
With magistrates also
For to drive Miss Dolin’s cattle from the plains of Aghaboe.
III
The people came in thousands the women led the van
Just as before in days of yore thy swept the Dutchman’s clan
From Limericks walls into the forest they swept the foreign foe
And now again had conquered on the plains of Aghaboe.
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2017-02-17 19:54
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When the cock crows three times at unusual times - it means trouble far away.
Michael Dalton
Cloughleigh
Golden
Co. Tipp.
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2017-02-17 19:51
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Stock on a Leix Farm:
John Breen, Rosnadough
Camross.
Goats: two
Cats: One
Dog: One sheep dog.
Pigs: 3 sows. 3 slips
Cows: 3 cows
Bullocks: 2.
Heifers 2 little heifers.
Horses 3 Horses (2 workers and a young one).
Sheep - None
Hens - twenty hens and a cock
Ducks - Three ducks
Geese - Four (2 old. 2 young) a gander.
List of Implements.
Plough (Rawsome wheel).
Harrow (common - & spring - toothed)
Spade,
Shovel,
2 Sprongs four-grained),
2 Slane's
Wheelbarrow
A horse cart
Pulper
Churn (household)
John Breen, Rossnadough
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2017-02-17 19:41
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said for her and then she could go to rest.
Egan got the Mass said and he never saw his mother again.
Thomas Seymour, Cloncullt, Camross.
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2017-02-17 19:38
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One night a man was coming home from a fair. He was drunk and he met two men. He started cursing. The men thought to beat him with a stick.
When he came to his own gate he turned round to strike the men and they were gone.
He went to bed and died at 12 o'clock that night.
Ita Col, Derrylahan.
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2017-02-17 00:00
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I
By the setting of the sun.
As my daily work was done.
I wended my way by the shore
Then I seem all alone
I sat down on a stone
To muse the works of the Lord.
By the light skate of my boat.
While my barque she moved on the bay.
To memory I awoke
And so sadly I taught
Of my own native land far away.
II
It was England’s cruel Laws
That were the very cause
And her off springs I
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2017-02-16 23:59
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long to betray
And if ever I go home
No more from them I’ll roam
Till my body goes imprisoned in the clay
Then my body you will
will leave in Old Ireland
in my own native land far away.
Irene Seymour age 11 years
From her mother Mrs. Seymour.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 23:50
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the moment he did so a Black cat walked out and the people never saw or heard of it after.
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2017-02-16 23:48
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The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 23:47
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It is unlucky to cut your nails of a Friday or Sunday.
To go anywhere it is unlucky to turn back.
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2017-02-16 23:46
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Obair an Fheirmeora i gCamros
Jan. He does his first ploughing.
Feb. He sows his crops.
March. He finishes sowing his crops.
April. He cuts his turf
May. He saves his turf.
June. He sows his turnips.
July. He draws his turf.
August. He mows his hay.
September. He cuts his corn.
Oct. He digs his potatoes.
Nov. He pulls his turnips.
Dec. He fences.
Staff Scully Garranbaun Camross.
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2017-02-16 23:40
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one. There is also a short handle on it.
Taken From
John Dooley (12 years)
Through his father
Michael Dooley (54)
The Grissit.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
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2017-02-16 23:38
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If you're born you're not buried.
Sean-Fhocal.
Mary Hanlon, Rickett's Town
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2017-02-16 23:36
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Good Christians all,
Both great and small,
Kind Christians for me pray,
As true I’m an Irishman,
This is my dying day.
My grave will soon be opened,
And I’m ready now
To die so Pray for the soul of
O’Donnell when in his grave he’ll lie.

Máire Ní Ealuidhe
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2017-02-16 23:32
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We fired until the second round,
When I shot him through the head.
And I gave him the third revolver shot
Before he did depart
The captain had me handcuffed
And guarded iron bound
And I was kept a prisoner
Till we landed in Capetown
I was then brought back to England
When my trial it came on
And the prosecutors for the Crown
Was Carey’s wife and son
The jury found me guilty
And the judge made this reply
For the murder of James Carey
O’Donnell, you must die
And on the 23rd of December
And on the gallows high
So the Lord have mercy on your soul
Your hour is drawing nigh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 23:30
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Pat O’Donnell
My name is Pat O’Donnell,
And I come from Donegal,
I am you know a dangerous foe,
To traitors one and all.
For the shooting of James Carey,
I been tried in London town,
And now upon the gallows high,
My life I must lay down.
I sailed aboard the Montrose
In August ‘83
And on my voyage to Capetown
He was made known to me
When I heard he was James Carey
We had angry words and blows
And the villain he strove to take my life
On board of the Montrose
I stood up to defend myself
And fight before I die
My pocket pistol I drew forth
And at him I let fly
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 23:17
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Mrs Coady's House - Rosnaclonan
380 Camross.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
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2017-02-16 23:10
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July:
Drawing home turf.
Cutting old meadows.
August:
Cutting corn.
September:
Drawing home corn and hay.
Picking it.
October:
Digging potatoes
November:
Threshing Day. (Red Letter day).
December:
Raffle here and there.
An old calf or goose or ass or duck.
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2017-02-16 23:06
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April:
Main crop of Potatoes. Varley and Oats sown by machinery.
Kerr’s Pink, Skerries, Champions (varieties of Potatoes)
May:
The bog: On my own land
(1) Skin one spit of surface, cut with sleán, Spread it out of the barrow heaps, and rear it good sized heaps. Draws it home out of the heaps. Stacks it outside at home.
Mangoes sown. Turnips sown.
June:
Thinning beet, mangels, turnips.
Cutting new hay.
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2017-02-16 23:05
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Work according to the month on a Leix Farm
John Breen: Times in a thatched Rosnadough, house Camross.
January:
Beet-Pulling. Cleaning out cow house. Feeding a few pigs. Trapping and snaring rabbits. Trimming hedges and laying ditches. Rambling at night. Having an odd card school.
A few dances here and there – music Melodeon or Fiddle.
February:
Lambing season. Out at night minding lambs (lantern).
Cross-ploughing to sow early potatoes.
Garden-tilling for a few early cabbage plants. Spring wheat sown.
March:
Sowing potatoes in drills.
Cows calve in March. Milk sent to the creamery.
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2017-02-16 22:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Curds of milk and lime mixed together will stop a leak.
John Breen,
Rossnadough
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 22:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He was a great "bárrseach" of a lad.
meaning a great talker.
John Breen, Rossnadough, Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 22:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The man went home and never came there any more.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 22:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time when Rody Phelan of Cahir was cutting a tree he found money in a hole on the side of the tree.
Given by Joseph Phelan
Through Jimmy Kilmartin.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 22:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
remence I rode off their horse.
When the saddle bags were opened, and then they were fold
Five hundred bright guineas in silver and gold
A bright pair of pistols the farmer did find
John O John you have well sold my cow.
Taken from Mrs. Lyons, Shrahane
Through her daughter Maggie Lyons.
11 Years.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 22:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a rich farmer in Yorkshire did dwell.
He had a youthfull boy his name it was John
John take this cow to the fair
She is in good order, and I have her to spare.
John turned the cow out of the Lawn
And instantly to the fair they ran
He did not go far till
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 22:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Say three Haily Marys, three Our Fathers, three Glorias to the Sacred Heart before the Elevation.
This is in honour of St. Patrick's Mother, who died from a toothache.
Mrs. Con Delaney, Rossnaclonagh, Coolrain, Mountrath, Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 21:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
From foreign waters they would withdraw
In those recesses they’ll find caresses
Where true fertility displays its power
For generation and population
On the shady banks of the fame Delour.
6th
When Bacus traversed this Irish nation
Geletorious waters for gods to find
Twas in Northgrove he met the queen of love
Where he stopped a while to recreate his mind
At his departure he said here after
If any liquor should turn sour
If right applied might be dulcified
By the wholesome waters of the fame Delour.
7th
Its not my intention for to accuse
The accurate bard to whom verse does flow
Or the youth that poured on the river Nore
Or the candid daughter of the fame Barrow
I do when laud and there verse applaud
While orato does me inpower
My present toast and perpetuall boast
Is the shady banks of the fame Delour.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 21:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and passes Mount Salem where there’s wealth in store
nigh to Coltrain like the surgin main
it tares its banks with eagerness to meet the Nore
it joins in Cranna where beauteous Glora
Bedecks its banks with variegated flowers
The muddy waters becomes transparent
When purified by the fame Delour.
4th
The trout and salmon do float in union
With numbers of the aguis trane
There not contented when circumvented till
they approach this delicious stream
the smaller species of the feathered trane
by hawk or eagle was ne’re devoured
but strains its throat with harmounis notes
in chanting praises of the fame Delour
5th
For healthful bathing in summer season
It far surpasses the sea or spa
If royal fair maidens would try experience
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 21:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Fame Delour
1st
My inclination for mediation requires
the aid of the muses nine
For in my travels to mount Pernasses
I became acquainted with a prince sublime
His kind assistance without resistance
He freely preffered at any hour
If id entreat him he’d elevate me
go sing the praises of the fame Delour.
2nd
From a lofty mountain a purling fountain
Extends its course through a winding vale
Through Lacca’s arbour where nature formed
Commodious woods and aspiring dales
Cold winters breeze ne’re disrobes the trees
That does embellish this lovely bower
But give contentment to the reaedentur
That lives adjacent to the fame Delour.
3rd
Through those sweet vales it does gently glide
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 21:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saying Here:
Paying back the cabhair (coor) in work.
John Breen, Rossnadough
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 21:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is great for a calf that would be bad with a pain.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 20:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I often heard the Mrs talk about a little old man called "Mickey the Fairyman". Once upon a time he always kept going from place to place.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 20:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Breen found a key in his field the square field and it is supposed to have locked the chest of Gold that was brought in the troubled times to be buried in Rossnacreena.
He still keeps the key.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 20:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An old remark about Saturday's Moon. It comes seven years too soon.
John Breen, Rossnadough,
Camross Aged 70.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 20:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived an old man with two more of his brothers. This was around the time of the famine. After a few days the old man was nearly dead with hunger. The other brothers went and got him a coffin. They put the old fellow into the coffin and they said he would be dead when they would get to the graveyard. They were carrying him along the road when they would they met another man. The man asked them who was dead. They told him that he had died from hunger. This man said I will give you a cart of potatoes and let ye take him home again. The old fellow sat up in the coffin and asked the man were the potatoes ‘snagged’. The man said they were not snagged but it was not very hard to do that. Ah here said the old fellow take me on and out me in the grave for I am in a hurry.
Taken from
(67) Thomas Seymour
through his daughter Eilish.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived an old man in a small house long ago. His name was John McCabe. He was one of queerest men ever known
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old road leading from Con Cullinanes to Michael O'Hallorans which is called "the bog road". The road leading from Tom Kenny's cross to John Howard's cross is called the crag road. These roads were made in the time of the Board of Works.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old road leading from Ashfield to Coolarty which is called the Board of Work. It was made in the time of the Board of Works and is going through a crag.
Collected by:- Máire Ní Fhógartaigh, Poundtown.
Told by: Thomas Fogarty, Poundtown (her father) (58 years)
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The road leading from Kilnaboy to Corofin is called Bothar na Mac Rí. There is another ole road leading from Lememeigh to Roinn na Móna called Sir Donats Road. This Sir Donat was Máire Ruadh's son and lived in Lemeneigh Castle. Turf from Roinn na Móna bog was burned in the Castle.
Collected by:- Máire Ní Níalláin, Roughan.
Told by:- Edward Neylon, Roughan, (her father) (52 years)
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Collected by:- Máire Ní h-Allmhúráin, Knockaunroe.
Told by:- Martin O'Halloran, Knockaunrowe. (her father) (55 years)
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old road leading from Kiltonaght to Boulthadine called the Board of Work. Grass has grown on it now as it has not been repaired for a good while. There is another old road leading from Clifden to Corofin called "the Wood Road"
Collected by:- Bríghid Ní Fhlathaigh, Whitemount.
Told by:- John Lahiff, Whitemount, (her father) (55 years)
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old road in this district called Paul Corry which was made in the time of the Board of
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The jury found me guilty
And the judge made this reply
For the murder of James Carey
O’Donnell you must
And on the 23 December
And on the gallows high
So the Lord have mercy on the soul of O’Donnell
When in his grave he’ll lie,
Taken From:-
C. Delaney,
Rossnaclonagh,
Coolrain
Aged 50 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I fired again the second round,
‘Till I shot him through the heart,
And I fired the third revolver shot
Before I did depart.
IV
The captain had me hand-cuffed,
And guarded iron bounds
And I was held a prisoner
Until I landed in Cape Town
I was then brought back to England
And my trial it did come on,
And the procuters for the crown,
Was Carey’s wife and son,
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
II
I sailed on board on Monthly Rose
In August eighty three
And on my voyage to Cape Town,
It was made knowing to me,
When I heard it was James Carey
We had angry words and blows
And the millions strove to take my life,
Upon the Monthly Rose,
III
I stood up to defend myself,
And fight before I’d die,
My pocket pistol o drew fort,
And at him I let fly,
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My name is Pat Ó Donnell from the county Donegal
I am you know a dangerous foe,
Ta traitor one and all, for the shooting of James Carey I have been tried in London Town,
And now upon the gallows high,
My life I must lay down
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
never told what happened.
Taken From-:
Matthew Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the Islands of Glenkit,
Taken from:-
Patrick Conlon,
Glenall,
Camross,
Mountrath,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-16 00:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
milk-pans.
Sadie Dunphy,
Capanara,
Camross,
Mountrath.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Taken from-:
Thomas Dunne,
Closh,
Camross,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cab=nice Sheeran,
Coolrain,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Handle
Blade
Nut
Bolt
Turnips
Board
It was for chopping turnips long ago. People used it before the pulper came.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a story told of
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is the shape of a pan. Is used for frying. There is a grid ro go under the pan.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
This is the grid and it very useful for making anything firm. When the thing is cooked it is left on the grid.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is the shape of a pan. Is used for frying. There is a grid ro go under the pan.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
years.
Taken From,
Matthew Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
on the Sunday afternoons.
When the road from Roscrea to Camross was getting made it was on the North side of the Rath. All the stoned that were built into the Rath were drawn to the road. This road was never finished but it was made a small distance South of the rath. They said that the stones from the rath were not lucky.
Taken from Mrs. Coady.
Ross-na-Clough,
Aged, 75 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
seen from this rath. If any foes were coming they could only come from three points: - East, South and West. The could not come from the North on account of the Slieve Bloom Mountains. They could be seen coming from any other direction at a good distance and could be attacked at a good distance. The land around the rath is very fertile and is believed to be cultivated hundreds of years ago.
At the south side, there is a level field and (taken) in it part of the hurlers of Upperwoods used to practise
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ross-na-Clonagh,
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Proinséis Ághas
About one hundred yards North West of Clonohill cross there is a rath in the Fields. There is nothing there now except the remains. There is still to be seen the ring where it was. The ring is about one foot in height all around. A couple of Whitethorn bushes still grow on the mark of the ring. You could see to the Devil’s bit from this place. A view of four miles south and four miles East can be
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sadie Dunphy
Cappanara
Camross
Leix.
Proverbs.
A stitch in time saves nine.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Many hands make light work.
For the want of a nail the shoe was lost,
For the want of the shoe the horse was lost,
For the want of the horse the rider was lost.
All for the want of a horse-shoe nail.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Here are some of the things that are on our farm.
8 Cows
3 Horses
1 Sow
14 hens
9 ducks
10 calves
10 pigs
2 dogs
26 chickens
10 geese
2 lambs
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs. Bergin,
Glencondra,
Camross,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs. Costigan, Ballinrally.
Kevin Conroy, Glenall.
Timothy Conroy, Glenall.
Patrick Conlon, Glenall.
Mrs. Ryan, Glenamona.
Bridget Foyle, Neilstown.
Mr. Maher, Neilstown.
Martin Fitzpatrick, Clonin.
Joseph Carroll, Ballaghmore.
Peter Cuddy, Garronbawn.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs. Dooley, Neilstown.
John Hegarty, Clonin.
James Bastic, Garriffin.
Thomas Seymour, Cloncully.
Dan Moloney, Cloncully.
James Dooley, Ballaghmore.
Timothy Hogan, Johnsborough.
Patrick Moore, Glendine.
Pierce Dooley, Neilstown.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Conn Delaney, Rosnaclonagh.
John Breen, Camross.
Mrs. Breen, Ballina.
Charles Delaney, Ballinrally.
John Delaney, Ballinrally.
Jack Delaney, Windsor.
Jack Fitzpatrick, Windsor.
James Doyle, Coolrain.
Robert Dann, Coolrain.
Conn Scully, Garronbawn.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One Storey thatched houses.
William Guilfoyle, Carrowreigh.
Thomas Dunne, Closh
Mrs. Ryan, Carrowreigh.
John Delaney, Cardtown.
Patrick Brown, Neilstown.
Patrick Clooney, Neilstown.
Thomas Neill, Neilstown.
Edward Scully, Garronbawn.
Mick Culleton, Cardtown.
Mrs. Coady, Rosnaclonagh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Trees
Mountain Ash
Pine Apple
Currant tree
Crab tree
Poplar
Blackpine
Forest-spruce
Shrubs
Stinking Roger
Sore eyes
White Roses
Laurel
Vegetable-Marrows
Snow-drop
French Lily
Weeds
Ferns
Moss
Dog-briar
Bluebell
Cuckoo-spittle
Sea-weed
Couch-grass
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 23:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Trees
Cherrytree
Peartree
Chestnut
Ivytree
Ashtree
Birchtree
Oaktree
Elm
Sally
Quicken
Plum
Gooseberry
Strawberry
Blackberry
Hawthorn
Apple
Pine
Lime
Dale
Larch
Spruce

Shrubs
American Fuchsia
Crimson Rambler
Hollybush
Boxhedge
Wallflower
Pansy
Lily
Sweet-William
Astors
Roses
Daffodils
Peas
Violets
Beans
Sago
Mint
Rhubarb
Cabbage
Lettes
Onions
Parsley
Weeds
Nettle
Violets
Seaweed
Wild daisies
Docks
Redknee
Conboluus
Mitre
Coltsfoot
Feocadan
Foxglove
Wild Woodbine
Water-lily
Water-crest
Red, White and Yellow clovers
Cowslip
Dandelion
Thistle
Blackbuttons
Rattlebozez
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Trees
Whitethorn
Sycamore
Birch
Oak
Beech
Hazel
Ash
Blackthorn
Furze
Alder

Shrubs
Rose-bush
Current-bush
Laurel
Gooseberry
Plumbush
Cherrybush
Appletree
Lupin
Fearns

Weeds
Chicken-weed
Thistle
Dock
Primrose
Buttercup
Silver weed
Groundsel
Ragwort
Prishaug
Buacaillin Buide
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have a hay-rake at home. It is a very useful thing. The summer is the only time it does be
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Pulper
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Turnips
Teeth
Handle
Pulped Turnips
Legs
We have a
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Closh
Camross
Mountrath
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bread would be cut and inch thick to fill the lads. Everybody would drink two mugs of tea at dinner. They do stay lying on the ground for and hour. The barrow men are in their bare feet to run in and out.
About six o’clock more tea is got. The men is always complaining of pains in their back at tea time. They cut again for about two hours. The two men in the bog hole dose be down about 20 yards. Sometimes the bank might fall in.
Patrick Scully. Longford.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In June the people starts to cut the turf. First he would clane the green sod of the bank and throw it into a hole. Next morning he would gather nine of ten men and take them to the Bog. He would have two men cutting the turf. Two more filling it and four taking it out from the bog hole with barrows. There is always a dog on the bog looking for food.
About twelve o’clock they get the dinner. The oldest man would get it because he would be getting tired. The
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
At six o’clock they get ready for tea this is like the breakfast. The they eat porridge for their supper at nine.
Time: Seven o’clock
Meal: The Breakfast
What the meal is: Tea and bread and sometimes eggs or sometimes rashers.
Time: Twelve o’clock
Meal: The Dinner
What the meal is: Potatoes and bacon and cabbage and often tea.
Time: Four o’clock
Meal: The Tea
What the meal is: There might be apple cakes with it or some jam.
Time: Nine o’clock
Meal: The Supper
What the meal is: Sometimes we would have porrage and other times bread and milk.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
farmers get up at six o’clock and work in the yard milking cows and cleaning the yard. They eat their breakfast at eight o’clock. For breakfast the farmers have bread and tea and eggs or meat.
They work on the farm then until twelve o’clock or dinner time. This meal is usually eaten at twelve o’clock. They eat potatoes with bacon and cabbage. After this they get tea and then return to their work.
During the long days of summer they get tea in the field at three o’clock.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Baker
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Hooks
Lugs
Legs

We have a baker at home like this. It is mostly used for baking, but sometimes bakers can be used for frying instead of a pan. The bakers are only used in the country. A baker can stand great heat.
Kathleen Tynan
Camross
Mountrath.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Everybody when they get up they eat their breakfast. Some of the
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
on the bog for about a month. In the hot weather the binding often comes off the wheel. After the handle might break when there would be turf on it.
C. Delaney,
Rossnaclonagh,
Coolrain,
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Beet Spray
Handle.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Wheelbarrow
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Head
Wheel
Body
Leg
Handles.
We have a Wheel Barrow at home. It is a very useful thing, especially for the bog. It is worked every year
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 22:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Shears
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Handles
Blades
Piece of rubber for keeping it closed.
The people only use it once a year. The sheep are shorn with it. The people have a piece of ruber for keeping it closed. The handles are partly like a scissors.
C. Delaney,
Rossnaclonagh,
Coolrain,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
William Dooley,
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Co. Leix.
A Hedge Clipper
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Handles
Bolt
Knives
We have a hedge-clipper at home. It is a very useful thing for clipping hedges.
A clipper had two handles and two knives and a bolt in the middle of it to keep it together.

Liam Ó Dúlaighe
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Bill-Hook
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Handle
Ring
Hook
We have a bill-hook at home. We use it sometimes for clipping or clearing trees when we cut them.
The principal job we use it for is for cleaning ditches in the winter and spring.
Seán Ó Coiléin
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seán Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Mountrath,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Scythe
Blade
Ring
Edging Stone
Handle Grips.
We have a scythe at home. We use it for cutting litter and old docks and nettles.
The principal use we have for the scythe is for opening the headlands of corn and meadow. We also use it for cutting grass for the horses in the summer.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Kettle
A Teapot
We have a kettle at home. It is able to hold a gallon of water. The teapot is able to hold half a gallon of water. We put water into the teapot and leave it by the side of the fire after a while we would take it up and the tea would be made.
Martin Delaney
Rossnaclonagh,
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Pot
It is made of steel. It has three feet. It is made to hold potatoes. It has a big handle. It is round on the top.
Martin Delaney
Rossnaclonagh
Coolrain
Mountrath
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Crane
A Crane is a thing that hangs over the fire. There are a lot of crooks hanging on the crane. The crooks are for hanging the kettle and pots upon.
Frank Tynan
Camross
Mountrath
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Skillet
A skillet is a thing much like a pan.it is made of steel. The top of it is not round but shaped like an egg. It has a long handle and three short feet.
Denis Dooley.
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Handles.
For Keeping in the seed.
roller for drill.
for covering the turnip.
Box.
Taken from C. Delaney,
Aged 50 yrs,
Rossnaclonagh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is another roller behind that and on it there is a knife for keeping it clean. There is a kind of an iron box between the two rollers for to put the seed in.
The is a row ring of iron in the box and there are a lot of little light wire for cutting out the seed. There is a strong piece of wire from the handles to the box and there is a flat piece of tin on top of the wire to keep in the seed at the headlands.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
December:
In December he sows his winter wheat and takes a rest until Christmas. Then he drinks for a couple of days around Christmas. Then he rests after his hard year’s work.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Turnip Machine
It is not every Farmer has a turnip machine. They are a very useful thing for sowing turnips. Most of the shopkeepers keep them for to make money.
It has handles like a grub. It has no wheels, but in front there is a roller for rolling the drill.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
from heating and then rotting. He then draws it home and threshes it. If he has a horse to sell he sell it at the September Horse fair.
October:
In October he pulls his mangols and prepares the land for to sow the winter wheat. He digs his potatoes and pits them. He first covers them with straw and then he puts eight inches of soil on them.
November:
In November he pulls his turnips and removes the leaves off them. He draws out manure on the stubble ground and spreads it and ploughs it into the soil.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 21:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and puts it in a long reek. He draws the turf.
August:
In August he sprays his potatoes for the third and last time of possible. He draws home the hay from the meadows and places it in the hay barn. During the end of the month he opens the potatoes headlands or digs so many yards off each drill end.
September:
He begins to open the headlands of his corn, Barley, or Wheat. He cuts the corn and ties it into sheaves. He then put it in stacks with six or seven sheaves in each stack. This is to keep them
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
May:
In May he cuts his turf and puts it in heaps. When it is dry he draws it out so it will be handy for drawing home.
June:
In June he cleans the potatoes and thin the turnips and mangos. He thinns some of the beet. He does have the most of it thinned.
July:
It July he cuts his meadows and works hard until it is dry. Then he puts it in trams. He draws it into the haggard.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Farmers Working Year 1938.39
Month / General Work
January:
In January the Farmer are ploughing and sorting potatoes for seed. He also removes pits of potatoes from the field and places them in the haggard or barn. If he has any lay to plough he turns it up for the frost and snow to till it for him.
February:
During February he is tilling any piece of land that turnips were growing in. If there are any hedges to be cut he cuts the.
March:
In March the Farmer sows his potatoes and cleans any drains that want to be cleaned. He cuts the bank of the drain with a spade and then shovels out the mud on to the bank.
April:
In April he sows his corn and some potatoes. If he has not his potatoes sown before the 22nd of April they are cuckoo potatoes. He is tilling the soil for the turnips. He rolls it to make it fine and then he harrows it.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Farmers Working Year 1938.39
Month / General Work
January:
In January the Farmer are ploughing and sorting potatoes for seed. He also removes pits of potatoes from the field and places them in the haggard or barn. If he has any lay to plough he turns it up for the frost and snow to till it for him.
February:
During February he is tilling any piece of land that turnips were growing in. If there are any hedges to be cut he cuts the.
March:
In March the Farmer sows his potatoes and cleans any drains that want to be cleaned. He cuts the bank of the drain with a spade and then shovels out the mud on to the bank.
April:
In April he sows his corn and some potatoes. If he has not his potatoes sown before the 22nd of April they are cuckoo potatoes. He is tilling the soil for the turnips. He rolls it to make it fine and then he harrows it.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4 ducks
30 chickens
12 sheep.
Martin Delaney
Rossnaclonagh,
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
These are the things on our farm:
1 plough
2 harrows
1 horses car
1 asses car
1 bog barrow
1 spade
2 sprangs
2 digger
1 axe
1 hay rake
2 rollers
1 turnip machine
1 horse
1 ass
5 pigs
10 calves
2 cows
1 grub
40 hens
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and take his money and that would end the paying back.
O’Toole had to come in across the bog to the house, so this night those two men met him and killed him and buried him in the bog. He was in two years after by a man cutting turf.
Taken From-:
Matthew Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Age 57 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and buy together.
O’Toole was far better off than either of those dealers. From time to time O’Toole lent those dealers a lot of money for to buy cattle or horses.
After some time he had a lot of money lent to them, so this day he said he wanted back his money that he was going to give up dealing and live on his money.
The men had no money to pay O’Toole so they did not know what to do. In the made up their minds to kill O’Toole.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there lived a man in a small house in the mountains. His name was Lawrerence O’ Toole. This man was a great cattle and horse dealer.
After some time he joined in with another party of dealers. They used to go to the fairs and sell
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Measuring-wheel
Hatched
Water trough
wheels
Nuts
Vice
Machines
Saws
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 20:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
May Seymour,
Cloncully,
Coolrain.
These are the things that are in a forge.
There are ploughs, harrows, horse-shoes and an anvil.
Bellows.
Sledge
Punch
Bolts
Hammer
Shoeing-hammer
Penchers
Shoeing knife
Pieces of iron
Coal
Fire thongs
Fire shovel
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1 Truck.
1 Mangol-boiler.
1 Horse.
4 Cows.
3 (Cows) Calfes.
3 Cats.
1 Sow.
4 Ducks. (4 eggs a day)
20 Hens. (17 eggs a day)
21 Sheep.
18 Chickens.
Denis Dooley
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Leix.
19adh-6=1939.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The following are the things on our farm
1 Single Ploug.
2 Harrows.
3 Carts.
2 Bog Barrows.
1 Turnip Machine.
2 Grubs.
1 Hay Cart.
2 Spades.
1 Sprang.
2 Potato Digers.
1 Scythe.
1 Horse Clippers.
1 Trap.
2 Ladders.
2 Troughs.
1 Stone Trough.
3 Water Barrels.
2 Tar Barrels.
2 Creamery-cans.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Dash Churn
Joan Dooley
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10 ducks 10 eggs a day.
20 hens and 1 cock.
3 sheep and 6 lambs.
3 calves age 5 months.
2 cats black and white.
400 rabbits grey.
2 dogs brown and white terrier and a sheepdog.
Spot and Rover.
Paddy Scully,
26 = Bealtaine 1939
Longford,
Camross,
Mountrath,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I wish to tell you all the animals that we have on our farm. In the field we have three horses
4 Cows aged 10 years each.
3 Horses aged 3 years each.
4 pigs aged 2½ years each.
1 Ass 5 years old.
3 geese aged 6 years each.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The guards got to know about him and came to look for him. When they found him they hanged her.
Taken from:-
M. Phelan
Aged 84 yrs.
Rossnaclonagh
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man after coming home from a fair and after coming home he eat his dinner. He was after selling a lot of cattle and he had a drop of drink, in.
He fell asleep beside the fire. There was a very small woman working with him. When she got him sleeping she got the hatchet and killed him, then she robbed him. She put him in a bag and she put an American knot on the bag and took him out the field and hid him under a hay stack.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Molua
We don’t know where he belongs. Some say he belongs to Killaloe. He had his monastery in Kyle. Near the monastery he had a big stone where he used to pray. There are two big holes where he laid his elbows, and two more where the tears fell.
In Ballaghmore there is a trough laid up on a stone. It is always half-full of St. Molua’s water. The hottest day in the summer the well is always half-full of water. When he died the people of Killaloe wanted to bury him in Killaloe and the people of Kyle wanted to bury him in Kyle. They made two coffins, one went to Kyle and the other to Killaloe. He had another monastery in Offaly.
Tom Seymour
Cloncully.
Age 60.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the people used to go to the fairs and markets across the mountains. When they would be coming home they stop here.
One night as a man was coming to this house he was attacked by two men and killed. These were two robbers who watched him leaving the town. Those two men were afterwards killed by his spirit. There names were Jim and Jack Casey. That man’s spirit was seen up to lately.
Taken from-:
Matthew Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Age 57 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was an old hut or house in a valley on the top of Glenall Mountain this was called the “Money House” or the fair house. It was owned by a man named Tom Ryan.
The reason it was called “Money House” was this. Long ago all
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
was never captured after. He died in a place called Glenkit.
Taken From-:
Mr. M. Collier
Carrowreigh
Age 56 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About three months later Hogan shot another English Landlord so they said they would catch him this time or know for what.
This time they came upon his hiding place so they captured him and took him to Mountjoy prison and tried him and sentenced him to death.
That night Hogan escaped through a window and got free. The next day he came home and stayed in his own house. He
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 19:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in it very often his name was James Hogan.
Once upon a time James shot an old Landlord who was ruling up there. When the English found out he was shot they became furious so they found out who was after killing him by their spys.
After some time they became to know Hogan so they got a lot of other soldiers to search for him. After some time they gave up searching for him so Hogan came out of his den and went around as usual.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a little house or shop near a place called Mon na Sup. Long ago this was a great hiding place for the Irish. There was one fellow who used to hide
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
room and shoots the two boys, so from that on John stayed at home and worked with his sister. It was never known what happened the boys.
Taken From-:
Mrs. M. Collier
Carrowreigh
Age 40 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
before I die with the cold and wet", so when she went up and opened the door who stepped in but her brother John.
After a few minutes he went into the parlour and said “stay quiet I’m followed" so in a few minutes two men came in so when they saw he wasn’t there they said they would go into the room and sleep for the night.
When they were asleep John comes out and gets his revolver and slips into the
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Before I die with the cold and wet, so when age went up and opened the door who stepped in but her brother John.
After a few minutes he went into the parlour and said “stay quiet I’m followed" so in a few minutes two men came in so when they saw he wasn’t there they said they would go into the room and sleep for the night.
When they were asleep John comes out and gets his revolver and slips into the
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was an old woman living in a little house at the foot of a mountain. Her name was Miss. Casey. She has a brother named John Casey so when the war broke out in Ireland he had to fly from his home or else he would be shot.
One night as Miss Casey was going to bed she heard a knock at the door so she went down to the window and asked “who’es there” let me in quick
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The snows or flowers are strown,
Well trodden on the path that leads,
to thy grave Young Wolfe Tone.
IV
For he who all to Ireland gives,
Dies not while songs are sung,
He inherited enshrined lives,
Forever brave and young,
Time blurs renown, but his abides,
Through crowned years have flown,
As fresh as the atlantic tides,
The fame of Young Wolfe Tone
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As from the hollow cliffs the notes,
Rang proudly back again,
What King or Caesar drunk with power,
Has such sweet tribute known,
As this boy pays at twilight hour,
For honour Young Wolfe Tone.
III
Where sotted Georges grave is made,
What man could stop to pray?
Where Norbury’s vile dust is laid,
Who knows or cares today?
But whether on Kildare’s green meads.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Young Wolfe Tone
Where on the skyline Muckish lies
Like a great boar asleep,
I wandered under sunset skies,
Past flocks of browsing shop
And heard a boys voice,
loud and bold,
breaking the silence lone,
singing a country ballad old,
in honour Young Wolfe Tone.
II
It seemed as if a hundred years,
Choroused the rousing strain.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a big house.
After some time they would bring in this engine and start sorting the potatoes. This was a sort of a thing with two holes in one big one and another small one.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Pully.
Handle.
Potato Separator.
Taken From-:
M. Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Age 56 years.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago they had a thing for sorting potatoes. This was worked by a tractor or old motor car. When they would dig the potatoes they would draw them into
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
up and going out. It was the spirit who made them go out. From that night till the night they died they could not play cards in that house
Taken from-:
Mrs. M. Collier
Carrowreigh,
Camross.
Age 40 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
three weeks so this night when they drew out their penknifes they heard noise behind them so the lamp went out and they were afraid to light it after some time all was quiet again so they light the lamp again and sat by the fire for the rest of the night.
The next night they started to fight as usual so the lamp went out again and after a few minutes they saw the two men getting
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night as they sat down to play those two men started to argue as usual so they stayed at this for about half an hour so in the end the drew out their penknif’s and laid them down on the table.
The names of those two men were-: Cardial and Keenan. Every now and again one would say to the other-:
If you don’t hold your tongue I’ll give you a tip of this.
This went on alright for about
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old house not very from Glenkitt. This house was a very noted house for gambling. All the people from around the place used to come to gamble there.
The house was supposed to be haunted by some evil spirit. There were two men who used to gamble in this house every single night. When they would sit down to play those two men would usually begin to argue over the way the cards were played or something.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
After this one person would be able to turn the wheel and keep in the joints of wool to the wheel. There was a piece of stick working on the axil for to twist the wool on. Now the wool was spun and ready for use.
The wheel was built on a long seat. On the rim of the wheel is the handle. The wheel is mad from cherry-wood.
Taken from Mrs. Coady
Ross na Clonagh
Coolrain, Aged 75 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Spinning-Wheel
Long ago there were no factories for spinning-wool and spinning-wheels were used instead. The farmers used to sheer the wool off the sheep and give the fleece to somebody that had a spinning-wheel.
When the fleece was cleaned, flax-oil was poured over it and left in it over night.
The wool was then carded or combed with an iron comb. Then the wool was rolled into pieces of about ten inches, with the back of the carder.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
him so he said “again” so the old man walked out through the door and out on the mountain.
After a few minutes the man went out too so when he turned to come in he saw the whole place on fire. It is said that it was the old man’s spirit who set the house on fire. It is said that the old man’s spirit always remained in this house and that it was him who set the house on fire.
Taken From-:
Matthew Collier
Carrowreigh,
Age 56 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
fire”.
A long time after this a man came to live in this place so he built the house again. This night the man was asleep so he woke up some part of the night with a fright. He thought he heard some noise in the inside room.
The next night he heard the same thing so he hot up and dressed himself. Then he went into the room and just as he did an old man walked out of the corner. The man went to strike
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
day they came to this house and asked this man for his money so the man said he would not give it so they said we will kill you if you don’t give it.
After a few minutes they got out the man and set fire to the house so when the house was in blazes they caught the man and shoved him into the house and locked the door.
Then they went away so the house burnt for about three days. The house was afterwards called the “house of
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
said we will kill you if you don’t give it.
After a few minutes they got out the man and set fire to the house so when the house was in blazes they caught the man and shoved him into the house and locked the door.
Then they went away so the house burnt for about three days. The house was afterwards called the “house of
senior member (history)
2017-02-15 18:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was an old man living in a little hut near Glencondra. This old man had plenty of money so he used to never go anywhere only to the shop. They people around the place had him nicknamed greedygut.
This old man would not give a penny to St. Peter. The Black and Tans were in this country at that time so this
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Taken from,
Mrs. Lyons,
Shrahane,
Age 42 years.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Churn is a very useful piece of Furniture. Without it we could have no butter. All Churns are made of Timber. There are many kinds of Churns such as:- End over end, dash and the
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
well-off, we will have to raise his rent. So a farmers life is the hardest life of any one.
Taken from.
Mrs Bergin
Glencondra
Aged 38 years.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
beater. When we want to churn all we have got to do is to put in the milk and turn the handle for a few seconds and when we look we have butter.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Mrs Bergin
Glencondra
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Dresser
Dish.
Cups.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
shelves for keeping bread and Butter amd all other things. A dresser cannot be done without in a kitchen. A dresser is made from timber.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I see the Moon, the Moon sees me
God Bless the Moon
God Bless me.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago, a farmer sent his son John to the fair with a cow. When he was going in to the fair, he sold the
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
shop is still to be seen.
Taken from,
Matthew Collier,
Carrowreigh.
age 56 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
about a month later.
Taken From:
Matthew Collier
Carrowreigh
Camross
Age 56 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Swing
Taken from:-
C. Delaney
Rossnaclonagh,
Coolrain
Mountrath
Leix.
Aged 50 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ruined walls still there to be seen.
Taken From:-
Matthew Collier
Carrowreigh
Camross
Age 56 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Taken from
William Lyons
Aged 56 years
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Slane it would cost a half a crown. You would have to buy a handle for one shilling and a step for three pence and two rings from the Blacksmith.
Then you can settle it up yourself. Before it is worked you put in water to steep.
Then you get a man and pay him half a crown a day to cut the turf. There was none of that turf got this year 1938. The handle is about four feet long.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Slane.
Handle.
Swing.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Slane is made of steel, and it is very easy to cut turf with it. It is like a spade only it has a point on it called a wing. If you went into a shop to buy a
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Horse Shoe.
Taken From
Tim Bergin
Aged 60 years.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Zigzag Harrow.
Cross bars.
Bulls.
Pens.
How to Make a Horseshoe (continued)
forge. He blows a fire with a bellows and heats the iron. He hammers it on the anvil and forms it into a shoe. he puts it on the horses hoof by five horse nails.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 22:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A horse shoe is made feom iron. It is made by a smith in a
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Taken From
Paddy Scully
Age 50 Longford
A sprong is used mostly around the farmyard for giving hay to horses cows and cattle. Some people would rather have a sprong. It is used most for digging a stoney garden. It is used for cleaning out houses and for bedding animals.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Four Grained Fork
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the mold board is bolted are mettal also. There is a part of the plough called the colter and it cuts the sod and that is made of iron and the point of it is made of steel.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Plough
Taken from
Thomas Seymour,
Cloncully,
Aged 58.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Plough
There are many kinds of ploughs in Ireland at present. A wooden plough is called an olliver plough. The handles of it and the beam are wooden. The mold board and the point are mettal. The wheels and the body of the plough where
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dressing timber.
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
An Axe.
Iron
Wood
Steel.
Taken from
Thomas Seymore,
Aged 58 Cloncully
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An Axe
An axe is made of iron and steel. The edge of it is made of steel and the top of it is made of iron. It has a wooden handle. There is a hole in the iron part of the axe and the handle of it is put in the hole. It is a very useful thing for cutting sticks and trees and for
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Blacksmith easily a mile distant from the forge. A good Anvil would be very costly.

Taken from
Pat Cordial
Cappanara
Age 40
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
19 Jul 1939
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Anvil
Back Horn.
Wedges.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Dibbler
Slays.
Handle.
Plugs.
This is an instrument that was used for sowing turnips long ago.
The man that would sow the turnips was to go along beside the drill and stick the dibbler in the drill which would make six holes in the drill. Then the man would put the seeds into the little holes and cover them in.
James Maher, Clouse
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hay Rake
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Hay Rake.
Teeth.
Hook.
Slides.
Handle.

used. It is worked for drawing in hay to
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
make trams. It is pulled by one horse.
Seán Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.

The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
Potatoe Planter:
Seed Box.
Axle.
Wheels.
Chain
Long ago the people dis not know how to
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Fishing Bag
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Cage
It is for holding birds. The birds rest on the sticks. The hang it up with a ring on a nail mostly outside the door or inside a window.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long time ago there lived a very holy man in a little hut on a hill near St. Ciaran's church in Clareen in Co. Offaly. This man lived by
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
The bees live in a little house of there own out in the sun. Some are very cross and more are not. If you went to lift up the hive they would
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......

A Roller is very useful around a farm. It is used for breaking the lumps on corn. There are two different sorts of rollers. A wooden roller and a stone roller. The stone rollers are the heaviest.
Frank Tynan,
Camross,
Mountrath,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 21:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......

There is a big Boiler in Pratts yard. It is very big. It is used for holding water. There is a pipe coming out at the side of the boiler. There is a plug in the pipe. When the plug is pulled out the water comes out. Long ago it was
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The page includes a drawing, not reproduced here......
A Hand Rake is used for Raking yards. It is useful around a farm. The farmers use it for raking hay.
Frank Tynan,
Camross,
Mountrath, Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
used for boiling.
Frank Tynan,
Camross,
Mountrath,
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the Devil but he was not able! The man died shortly afterwards.
Denia Dooley
Coolrain
Mountrath
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man coming home from rambling. On his way home he met a small man. He sat up on the car with him and neither of them spoke. They little man nearly went home with the other
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8 cows
4 horses
24 sheep
26 hens
14 pigs
10 ducks
18 geese
Willie lyons
Shrahane,
Camross
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man coming from rambling in the night. As he was coming by a momument he saw a little dog. He brought the dog with him.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Micky Matty had a hen
She laid eggs for gentlemen
Sometimes one and sometimes two
In Micky Matty's like shoe.
I
High Ho Harry
If I were a maid I'd never marry.
II
You should spit out when you see a rat cross your path.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The grand old Duke of York
He had so many men
He marched them up to the top of the hill
And he marched them down again
And when they were up they were up
And when they were down they were down
And when they were half-ways up
They were neither up nor down.
Frank Tynan
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
You may fall from a house top
You may fall from above
But whatever way you fall
Don't fall in love.
Frank Tynan
Camross
Mountrath
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mountrath
Co. Leix
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night a priest and a man was walking through Derrynaseerna when they (a when) saw a white
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
woman. The man shook his fist at her. But she spat at him. She then disapeared. At the Preaching House appeared again. The man went to hit her again but the ghost flew at him and he fainted.
Frank Tynan
Camross
Mountrath
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When Cock crows in at the open door: sign of bad luck.
Sean Heffernan.
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sign of Good Luck to meet an ass early in the morning.
Ann Heffernan
Camross.
Herrings alive and their eyes open
Pipes in their mouths and they all smoking.
Ann Heffernan
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Anything born on a Whit Sunday is unlucky.
Meet a sow coming towards you it is good luck.
Meet a sow not coming towards you it is bad luck.
No grass grows on Gold mines said by bald people.
Ann Heffernan
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An Ulster city for foremost find.
Then an Irish river place behind.
Some band curtailed will bring to view.
A place that is well known to you.
Christina Seymour,
Cloncully.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Read forward or backward
I am spelled just the same.
A neat town in Ireland
Now find out my name.
Christina Seymour,
Cloncully
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dear James a well known animal
For primal part you'll take.
The next will be a number
Just give the same a shake
A Charming bird upon my word
These simple parts will show
In flowery Mayo.
Christina Seymour.
Cloncully,
Camross,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The primal is the final
No man can deny.
Or the final join to priimal
A total then descry.
Christina Seymour
Cloncully.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My pen is now trite
and I scarcely can write
No matter again I will try
A piece for old Moore
which I love and revere
And will till the day I die
Two fifths of a bird
You are second for third
Please mix what I do
while I write
Now the answer uncreen
No ads for a solver
so bright
Hannie Birgin
Camross
Mountrath
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A measure or a number neat
My next is a number two
and when we meet upon the street
I'll be sure to total you.
Hannie Bergin
Camross
Mountrath
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wee Willy Winkle
never says his prayers
catch him by the lame leg
and throw him down the down stairs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If you are mimicking when the clock strikes you will be mimicking all the days off your life.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bury one, bury two and the third will bury you.
Ann Heffernan
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
If a hen crows in the night it means very bad luck.
Mrs. Heffernan
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bob in a bob in babo
Where can the thrushes go
through the east through the west
And through the old birds nest.
Seán Heffernan
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A priest asked a boy what kind of potatoes he was picking so the boy told him they were raw ones. The priest said:- "You are very smart if I asked you what was Baptism you would not know". "I do so" said the boy. "It was half a crown before you came and you
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A priest asked a boy what he was beating the ass for because our Lord rode and ass to Jerusalum. The boy said:- If he had this ass the sight of Jerusalum, he would never see.
Taken from:-
Mary Hanlon
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Taken from:-
Mary Hanlon.
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 20:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My father and mother were Irish
and I was Irish too
I brought a pig for nine pence
And it was Irish too
I cut it up in slices and fried it in the pan
And no body would eat it
Only me and Mary Ann.
Taken from:-
Mary Hanlon,
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
made it five shillings.
Taken from:-
Mary Hanlon,
Camross.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a little girl in the famine time going
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
home with a basket of meal. She went into a lime cill to warm herself and she got burned up in the time cill.
Taken from:-
Mrs. Heffernan,
Camross
Mountrath
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wise men think alike,
But fools seldom differ.
Taken From-:
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A little nonsense now and then,
Is relished by the wisest men.
Taken From-:
Matthew Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
he would be the end of him.
Taken from:-
Mr. Dooley,
Coolrain,
Mountrath,
Co. Leix.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs. M. Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.
Age 41 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Goosie, Goosie gander,
Where do you wander,
Up stairs and down
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Don't kill the thrush boys,
Don't rob her nest,
For of all the pretty songbird's,
She is one of Ireland's best.
Taken From-:
Mrs. M. Collier,
Carrowreigh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stairs, and in the ladies chamber.
Taken from-:
Mrs. M. Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.
Age 41 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Drawing of a Hayseed Barrow.
Geer Wheel
Wheel
Axle
Box
Cross Lat
Latches
Handle
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A knapsack is a very handy way for spraying potatoes. It is nearly used for spraying all the potatoes in Camross.
There is of course another sprayer called the horse sprayer, but it is only the people who sow three and four acres of potatoes that use it.
It is a very quick way of spraying towards the knapsack.
Taken from-:
M. Collier,
Carrowreigh,
Camross,
Leix.
Age 57 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Strings
Pipe
Handle
String
KA Napsack
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
But the sadness of her gladness
And the gladness of her sadness,
Is nothing to a woman when she's mad.
Taken from-:
E. Dunne
Closh,
Camross,
Leix.
Age 73 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Guinesse's stout is good no doubt,
In either wood or bottle,
But Perry's would poison a Whale,
No matter where you get it.
Taken from-:
T. Dunne,
Closh,
Camross,
Leix.
Age 69 yrs
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Oh! the sadness of a woman when she's sad,
And the gladness of a woman when she's glad
senior member (history)
2017-02-14 19:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Queen Elizabeth (of England) was a man! ( - - )
Queen Elizabeth would throw her eye on a fine man in one of her regiments. He was invited to spend the night with her. She always cut his hair in such a way that she would know him again. The following day he would be put away and dead men tell no tales. This night she singled out a fine big Irishman. She cut his hair when he was going but if she did, he was one too many for her, for when he got back all the other soldiers were asleep and he cut the hair of all of them in the room, as his own was done. When she came to pick out her man in the morning she couldn’t as they were all alike. She saw she was done so says she to the soldiers:
“‘Twas well done, and wisely done,
And wise was he who did it
But let no man know,
Who knoweth it not,
Nor do it again who did it”.
“Ballinamona” W. O’Connell.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 22:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Finn sat on Seefin hill and washed his feet Loc Currac. Finn was fighting with a jiant and the jiant was beeting him and his mother gathered an apron of stones and threw them at the jiant. Every stone was as big as a house.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 22:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This song was made about a football game between Killinkere and Larey about fifty years ago.
Young Tully bold, its for the goal,
This noble hero ran.
And, as he met them on the field, He jumped them every man.
Until they all surrounded him,
And formed into a ring,
To their great surprise, he could then fly.
This gallent bold Mac Finn.
It was on the wing this bold MacFinn,
Was placed that very day
Says one unto another.
As the word went all around
That very blade, must be McCabe
The runner from Mullagh town
The Feminines, along the lines
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 22:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A tree from which a Sinn Féin flag was floating was cut down in Derryham in 1918. The following song is about the incident.
In the month of June when trees did bloom not very long ago
The Sinn Féin flag was hanging high in Tully's grove you know
The Derryham boys stepped up to Phil and to him they did say
"Take down that flag that is hanging there or you will rue the day"
"Bedads" said Phil "that is a thing I shall not do. My clogs they are so slippery and the tree it is so high. If I should chance fall I would be sure to die.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 22:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In 1849 the school was built by lord Bath and the first master was a Mr. Gartlan who died in 1854. Then came a Mr. Byrne in 1854 to 1877. He is still remembered by the old generation. He had a workmistress named Mrs. Donnelly. She retired in 1877. Mr Philip Connolly came from 1877 to 1922. His wife a Miss Clarke came 1878 and retired in 1920 and was succeeded by her daughter Chris Connolly 1920 to 1926. When she married and left off teaching The present teachers came. The Principal P. Connolly 1923. Mrs Callan 1923. Mrs Connolly 1926. There was an assistant named Thomas
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 22:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Irish hero who died for the land where the shamrock grows.
Oh where's the men like wolfe tone and gratten and robert emett fought against his foe's there were tiern victoms' for well they know them and they died for the land where the shamrock grow's.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 22:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
went to the girl and he asked her what did she give away. I never I never gave anything away only a drop of milk to the Widows children and a bit of my dinner. So he told her to go back and the old woman, and the place would be hers when the old woman would die.
So she went back and it was not long until the old woman died. The girl had all for her charity. When the old woman was dead she used to come back every night. The girl told the priest, he told her to sell the place, she sold the place. She gave money to the priest for the good of the first owner, she gave money to the widow to rear her orphans and only kept her own due for herself.
Name: Anne Shine 11½ yrs Killaha
Name: Stephen Shine 50 yrs Killaha.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a servant girl one time and she worked for a rich hard-hearted woman who never gave charity to anyone. The girl used to give milk to a poor widow with six children, and she used to keep a bit of her own dinner for them also.
The woman found this out and she sacked the girl. So the next morning there was a rat in every milk crock and they gave the milk to the calves and all the calves went mad. The next morning there was a rat in every milk crock they gave the milk to the pig and all the pigs went mad. The next day the same thing happened and she put the milk in the tea and they all went mad at the table.
She went to the priest she told him all. He asked her did she ever give any charity. No she said. Haven’t ye a servant girl said the priest she’s gone said the woman, why snaps the priest. Oh she used to give away things behind my back say’s she. The priest
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a devil and a man long ago. They were in great friends I bet you said the man to the devil you could not go into that bottle. I will said the devil stay there now says the man. The man died and the devil broke out of the bottle. The devil would not leave him into hell or God would not leave him into (hell) heaven and God gave him a lamp to go about the hills every night. He was called Jackie the Lantern and he frightened every one.
Name: John Leary, Killaha, 13½ yrs.
Name: Dan Leary, Killaha, 54 yrs.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was in September I well remember three noble heroes to Manchester came.
It was their intension I here make a mention to free old Ireland from her tyrant chain.
II
The police they viewed them as if they knew them and to pursued them they did fail.
They did surround them with handcufs bound them and marched them prisoner to Journal jail.
Young Allin seen that his men were taken to O’Brien and Larkin he quickly flew saying for Kelly and Dasey I am uneasy. My men are taken what will I do. Like Loyal heroes we will go together and loving brothers we will agree and every man to go to the van and smash it open and set them free.
III
Remarked kind friends what after those men were taken as you might see both judge and Jury they found them guilty and they died three martyrs for their country free.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Dawning of the Day
At early dawn I once had been
Where Leens blue of waters flow
And summer bid the groves be green
And lamps of light to glow.
And on by bour and town and tour
And widespread fields I strayed
I met a maid in the greenwood shade
At the dawning of the day.
II
Her feet and boches head and bear
and mantle none she wore
But her waist her golden hair
Which swept the tall grass oer.
With milking pail she sought the wail
And bright her charms display
Out shining for the mourning star
at the dawning of the day.
III
Beside me sat this maid divine
Where grassy banks outspread
I pray be mine for ever more
Fairmaid I likely said
False man for shame
Why bring me blame
She cried and rushed away
and the sun’s first light
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pursued her flight
at the dawning of the day.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
January 1894
I
On ’93 July 6th a gallant barque set sail,
And with a cargo laden “Port Yarrock” was her name,
With a crew of nineteen hands like-wise a captain brave,
For Queenstown bound for orders across the Atlantic waves.
II
This vessel was an iron-clad, with copper she was laden,
Her sails they were all shattered because she got no haven,
Three hundred days she braved the seas though sad it was her lot,
That night she lay in Brandon Bay when no anchorage could be got.
III
It was scarcely a week after when the winds began to blow,
The Port Yarrock drew her anchors and to the sea did go,
The seas were raging furiously, it was plain she could not stand,
And as night approached she ran a wreck close
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 21:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
by Kilcummin Strand.
IV
Early next morning at the hour of nine o’clock
The seas rolled high like mountains the ship she struck a bank.
The captain cried “prepare my boys I fear we are all lost,
The only chance to save our lives is to tie on to the masts.”
V
O! how mournful was the scene when the ship began to break,
And twenty human bodies into the deep were laid,
And as we gazed upon them the many on the shore,
No help or aid to save their lives alas they are no more.
VI
God help their poor relations that they have left behind,
Far far away from Brandon Bay in sorrow there you’ll find,
Thinking on their sailor boys who were lost in Kilcummin shore,
It’s all in rain for to regain their sailing days are oer.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 20:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
VII
Before I lay down my pen I have one word to say,
Let other men who may pass by remember Brandon Bay,
Where captain Forbes and all his men close by the shore are lying,
May the Lord have mercy on their souls for suddenly they did die.

Siobhán Ní Leighin (Rg. VIII)
Sc. Baile Uí Dhuibhne
Fuaireas an t-amhrain so ó’m mháthair atá 57 Bl.
Fuair sí feín é ó na Mháthair feín atá marbh anois.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 00:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stay until to-morrow. It was then the agent and the bailiff understood Daniel O'Connell's truck, and the woman's possession become a freehold.
This story is told be Mr. James Cotter aged eighty-one.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 00:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Denis Flynn 20-9-1938
Elder Ointment
The bark of the elder tree and the soft green tops were put into a saucepan with fresh butter and boiled. Then strained and left cool. This ointment was used for curing sores in cows papo [?]
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 00:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
So in order to be doing something they planted trees in each side of the road.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 00:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the night and if the man had come straight from Bantry he would have reached it at mid-night and have been drowned off the bridge.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 00:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The story about Lord Bantry's rookery was told by Seamus Mac Coitir.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 00:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Denis O Sullivan 18-5-1938
A Story about Carriganass Castle
Once upon a time Carriganass Castle was occupied by an English army and their captain was by the name of St. Ledger. he was not afraid of anyone but Donal Cam from whom he had taken the Castle. One day he and his army were hunting in the mountains around Keimaneigh they met a lovely lady. St. Ledger kindly saluted her and asked her to marry.
senior member (history)
2017-02-13 00:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A local horse named Loch Lomond owned by Miss Cowhey of Churchtown House won in the Derby in the year 1919. There was great rejoicing in the parish when the news was heard. The following lines were written by a local scribe on the occasion.
“Long life to Quirke the jockey
He’s the champion of the year
To Parkeson his trainer we’ll give a resounding cheer.
The same to you Miss Cowhey
You won it once before
May God direct and God protect
You’ll win a thousand more”.
Margaret O’Sullivan Windmill Churchtown.
Information received from Denis O’Sullivan Windmill Churchtown.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 23:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It left a deal as well as he unable for to buy
The coat he had for every day and Sunday here to fore,
Was not only scuffed, but ragged, tired and tore,
One evening as he quit his work as daylight did expire,
He went home into his cot’ and sat beside the fire,
He pulled out his pipe, fingered it, and shook out the dust,
Immediately put on a coal and took a beggar's thrust,
And as he smoked to bother grief and strove to wear it by,
He used to spit out and give a heavy sigh,
He smoked away in silence, both pensive, sad and dull.
Until at last he rose a whil-a-loo like Eager's Wicklow bull,
His wife she started in surprise and asked what caused his pain,
And regarding his old coat, the tale he did explain
She told him rest content and not let his courage down.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 23:48
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You men of talent, wit and lore I hope ye’ll pay attention, and grace my rude expressions in a tale I’m going to mention and if you’ve time to stand with me I’ll count it well and good, while I tell a little story of our neighbour Peter Flood. It’s of a linen jacket this man got of late. It has been my instigation of commencing here to treat, for since the foreign war began clothing got so high it left a date as well as him unable for to buy. The coat he had for everyday and Sundays here to fore, it was’nt only scuffed, but thin ragged, holed and tore. When Peter thought of Winter and saw his little shade he knew he’d have a chilly time of it. The poor man got afraid. One evening as he quit his work as daylight did expire, he went home into his cot and sat beside the fire. He pulled out his pipe and fingered it, and then shook out the dust
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 23:47
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He immediately put on a coat and took a beggar's thrust,
And as he smoked to bother grief and strove to wear it by,
And every time he would spit out
He gave a heavy sigh,
He smoked all the time in silence, both pensive, sad and dull.
Until at last he ris a whil-a-loo like Eager's Wicklow bull.
His wife she started in surprise and asked what caused his pain,
And regarding his old coat, the tale he did explain
She told him rest contented and not let his courage down.
For a coat you'll have “me darling” if the cat went to the pound,
It’s no matter for the dearness of the pilate or the frieze
I'll make you a linen walley coat so now dry up your eyes.
And I’ll line it with the blanket to make it snug and warm
That you need’nt care for frost or snow or any other storm.
She had a bunch of yarn that she was
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 23:46
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after spinning.
And she brought it to a weaver to make a piece of linen,
She left on all those restrictions -
To make it close and good,
The weaver for to please her told her he would
He says I’ll give it double knockin
And I’ll shuttle it with skill,
Besides I’ll decorate it with the sack and double twill,
She half ways bid Good Even before that-she
be thought, of asking the waver
When would he have it wrought
The weaver thought some time in silence with
his hand up to his cheek
And says he out of a study about
d’other morrow week
She paused awhile in silence and
she studied in a maze
And she cocked up all her fingers
to count how many days
She then went home without any more delay
She came back for the linen on the appointed day.
The weaver had it ready and she liked the work the best,
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 23:46
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She drew the waving money from a traze bag from her breast,
She paid what he demanded and said he earned more,
And like the ould cow with the hay stack
They’d compliments go leór
She then went home to Peter and to Mary her own daughter.
And they all agreed the waver took a shocking dale of bother.
This woman being determined to recommence her toil,
She made a preparation for the buidhchan boil
With chamberly and cow dung she boiled it neat and clean
And she whacked it with the betle to close it in the grain
She did all this as I have told you without a word of lie
And she brought it home and spread it out to dry
A man called Barney Reilly was sent for on the spot,
Now styled the porridge tailor or more mate upon the pot
To make this new Sur Single of which we’re bound to brag
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 23:45
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It stands for either frock or coat
The more for body coat or tag
His patterns being bias he made it like a saddle
T’was high above & high below
And hollowed in the middle,
‘Now’ he says this new construction
shall be the wearer's friend
T’will cast the winter storm off Peter's double end
Besides he further added, were you to go abroad
They’d think you were some squire, some earl, duke or lord
His wife upon that moment, wished him well to wear
Saying Peter a stór, a grádh, mhílis.
For since you put it on you me self would hardly know you
For your quite another man
Now to conclude and finish and on it say no more
We wish him health and comfort till the last of it is wore.
Note:
Peter Flood lived some 100 years ago in vicinity.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 23:06
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was a labouring man, who worked with The Magistrate Donohoe, who lives in the townland of Coranure in Co. Longford.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:37
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Once upon a time there lived a King and he had a son named Jack. One snowy morning Jack went up to the top of the hill. He saw a raven flying over his head and he fired at it and he fell to the ground. Then he went to
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:35
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with sore.
There was a letter in her breast and it wrote with blood saying,
cruel was the father that thought to shoot my love.
Let this be a warning you know to all fair maids so gay.
Never let the lad you love sail to America.
Nellie Duggan
Information by:- Kitty Glynn, Annagh, Inagh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:32
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constant as a dove.
O‘ Daughter dear, I’m not severe, hear is a thousand pounds.
Send O’Reilly to America and purchase there some ground.
When she got the money to Reilly she did run. Here is a thousand pounds in gold my mama sent to you.
So sail away to America and I will follow you.
When O’Reilly got the money you know next day he sailed away. And when he put his foot on board
Those words to her did say, Here is a token of my love and break it into two.
And have this heart and have this ring until I find out you.
O’Reilly, he came back again for to take his love away.
The ship got wrecked, her hands got lost, and the father grieved
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:24
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My love lies on the raging sea bound for a America.
My love he is a fisherman and his age is scarce eighteen.
He is as nice a fellow you know as ever your eye could see.
My father has riches you know,
Great O’Reilly he is poor, because I loved the fisherman, they could not me endure.
John O’Reilly is my true loves name and lives near the town of Bray.
My mama took me by the hand,
Those words to me dis say. If you be fond of O’Reilly, let him quit this country.
Your father says he will have his life or shun his company.
O ‘mother dear, don’t be severe, where shall I send my love.
My heart lies on his breast as
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:16
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Willie O’Reilly
As I roamed out one evening oh,
Down by a river side, I heard a maid complaining you know.
The tears rolled from her eye, saying this is a cold and stormy night, those words to me did say.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:14
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For the Earl or Duke or who chooses to wear them.
No hand is so neat or acute to prepare them.
IIII
A prince he can furnish with street at a ball.
With fronts a fine fashion to dazzle them all.
There is not a mate who had taken her measure from this excellent tradesman.
But hence would be courted with more admiration.
Nellie Duggan.
Information by:- Mary R. Ryan, Skagh, Inagh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:07
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kind population.
A tradesman enjoys a sublime reputation.
His name far and wide is in bright circulation.
From the fair Shannon’s side to the Ennistymon plantation.
II
If down from Kilkenny to Galway you’d fare.
His name is from hence to the castle of Clare.
For Garrihy is the youth with his useful vocation.
That treated and suited the true blood of emulation.
III
This lad is reputed for shoemaking neatly
The best fashion boots he can smooth them completely.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 22:02
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The mountains of Tipperary I rambled through and fro.
The Galtee Mares you know right well and the glens of Augharlow.
A bad agent or a landlord, I cannot bear them still,
I’ll give them whet the baker got says Rory of the hill.
III
O’, Erin are your daughters gone the foremost of the day.
When your gallant sons, the best of men were forced to cross the sea.
They were form landlords who are in Erin still.
But boys keep your powder dry says Rory of the hill.
Nellie Duggan
This song was composed by Mr. Mc. Curtin the poet.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 21:57
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On the green hills of Moy, amongst a
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 21:55
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“Rory of the Hills”.
In Sliabh na mBan, I met a man,
Who asked was Scully dead.
I cannot give you that account, but
I hear he is bad in bed.
He put my mother out the door,
But I might meet him still,
I am the bold Tipperary Mountaineer
say’s Rory of the hill.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 21:51
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But I haven’t time to listen, I must hurry to the fair.
VIII
Then says she, I am Nora Daly
from the parish of Kilmaly,
My father is a farmer, and the
crossest man in Clare,
If he saw you here beside me.
I am in dread he would chide me,
So you’ll please get down and walk
a bit before we reach the fair.
Information by: Mrs. M. Glynn, Annagh, Inagh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 21:50
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But I haven’t time to listen, I must hurry to the fair.
VIII
Then says she, I am Nora Daly
from the parish of Kilmaly,
My father is a farmer, and the
crossest man in Clare,
If he saw you here beside me.
I am in dread he would chide me,
So you’ll please get down and walk
a bit before we reach the fair.
Information by: Mrs. M. Glynn, Annagh, Inagh.
senior member (history)
2017-02-12 21:45
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was a mass of nut brown hair.
Her smile both sweet and tender
made me vow that I defend her against
that rascal of a donkey.
Till she safely reached the fair.
VI
Though to her I was a stranger,
now that she was out of danger,
She gratefully invited me the
pleasure board to share, and with
Cupid for outrider, up I gladly sat beside her.
And we drove along right merrily to
Miltown Malbay.
VII
Well I really felt enchanted as along we
gaily jaunted.
And smitten with her beauty bright
my love I did declare,
Bu