Number of records in editorial history: 29706 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 13:31
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If the cuckoo comes early, it is said to be a sign of a wet Summer.
The birds are our big big hosts of friends. It is they that assist us in fighting our foes, the insects and other pests. Were it not for the birds, the insects would devour all the vegetables of the world, and then there would be a scarcity of food. Not only a scarcity of food but we would not have the proper food required for the body, for man not only needs meat, but they also want vegetables.
24/02/1938
Philomena Bergin
Coolnacritta,
Cullohill
Rathdowney
Leix.
Material supplied by
Mr Laurence Kenny (56) Farmer
Raheenleigh
Cullohill
Rathdowney
Leix.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 13:16
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extracted a thorn from his head, and a drop of blood touching his head gave it a red breast.
The Irish boys we know are fond of killing the wren, on St Stephen's Day. There is a story regarding this practice. Once when the Irish were about to seize upon the Danes, while they were asleep, the wren picked an ear of one of the Danes. When he awoke, he at once announced it to the others. Since then the Irish boys are in pursuit of him on St Stephen's day.
The older folk still retain some superstitions about swallows, looking on them, as half sacred and not to be interfered with. If they do not return to the eaves of houses, but desert their nests, it is a sign that some misfortune is coming to the household. If a boy or girl robs a bird's nest, the cows in that family are supposed to yield blood instead of milk.
We learn weather conditions by observing the flight of birds. When the birds fly high, it is a sign of a continuance of fine weather, and when they fly low, it is a sign of rain.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 13:07
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The Devil breaks the Church Window at Swords
Years ago there were very few missions in the country and people used go many miles to attend one. Once it happened that there was one in Swords and my grandmother was there. The church was thronged to the door, so that there was not even standing room in it. It was the closing night and the Missioner told the people that the devil might try to raise a panic among them. He told them not to mind if a pane or two of glass got broken or if the whole window came in. When the Missioner was in the middle of preaching a sermon a pane of glass dropped into the church but nobody stirred. Just an odd person could be heard saying, “There it is.”
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 13:04
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August. The swallows come in April and they go away in September. The sea gulls go away in August and return in February.
The sea gulls which come in thousands to our bog, in Raheenleigh, build in the rushes on a bank in boggy land. They make a little round nest of withered rushes, where the eggs, which each female bird lays are laid. She lays four eggs and hatches them for about three weeks. The sea gulls travel round the ploughed fields through out the country, looking for food. They follow the farmer, as he ploughs the field, and you would see numbers of them alighting on the red field, after he has just ploughed it, when it is easy for them to get the worms.
Imagine the dreariness of the country without song birds! We are so used to their songs, we don't notice them, except rarely, when we are alone on a long journey, or in the Winter time. When the city people visit the country, one of the first things they take notice of, is the sweet music of the birds.
There is a traditional story related to how the robin has got a red breast. When Our Lord was dying on the cross, the robin
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 12:51
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Long long ago there was a house which people said was haunted. The people that lived in it used to see an old man with two sticks walking from one house to the room.
When he reached the room he used to disappear.
In the night people could hear footsteps in the room. After a while the people left the house and it fell soon after the people leaving it and nothing was found in it.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 12:49
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Page 276
"Bird Lore"
One of the most interesting things that the study of nature reveals is the marvelous way in which the young of all living creatures, especially birds, are cared for, until they are able to support themselves. We can notice it most, among the wild birds that inhabit our district.
All birds are produced from eggs and the female bird lays those eggs. The eggs which the female bird lays is laid in a nest. All birds build their nests in the beginning of Spring. The crows, jackdaws and others build on the tree tops. The sea gull builds in the rushes in bogs. The cuckoo builds no nest, but she lays her eggs in another bird's nest. The swallows build in the eaves of houses, usually. Some of the birds come to the old nest they had the previous year, while others desert those nests and build new ones.
The wild birds which mostly inhabit our district are, the crows, the wrens, robins,sea-gulls, swallows, black birds, water wagtails, wild widgeons, partridges and others.
Some of our birds migrate to warm climes before the Winter sets in. The cuckoo comes to this country in May and goes away in
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 12:46
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One night a man by the name of Jack Fox was out looking at his cattle.
When he was coming homehe saw a white calf coming owards him.
He started to drive the calf down to the cows, when it disappeared. He thought it had gone behind a clump of ferns, so he looked behind them. But he could not see the calf.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 12:40
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in. When he was inside he saw a white man going through the wall. He fell in a weakness on the floor and he left the house a month afterwards.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-04 12:37
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Long long ago a man by the name of Tom Ryan was out gathering some sticks for the fire. He was looking for a place to put his sticks for a while. He just had a place got when he saw his mother coming towards him.
He got afraid because his mother was dead for four years. His mother told him not to come there anymore because it was haunted. He ran for his life towards his home and when he got home, he went straight
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 23:44
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Captain Gore who lived in Curraghmore Ballintrillick was murdered by a high way man in the townland of the Drinaghan, Ballintrillick about one hundred years ago. The name of the high way man was Foley Roe McSharry and Gore had offered one hundred pounds for his body dead or alive with the result that he got nobody to earn it, which was the cause of him losing his life in the following way. On the night previous to Gore losing his life the high way man passed through Curraghmore and in doing so passed by Gore's residence and looked through one of the windows of the house and saw Gore eating his supper, this the high way man related to Gore next day in Drinaghan when Gore asked him to surrender. Foley refused to surrender, as he lay in a holly bush
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 21:35
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There was an old school over in Dooey. It was over beside James Gallagher's house. The teachers that were in it were Michael McCauuley and Mrs. McCauley. There was another old school in Meenagowan. Condy Boyle was the teacher in that school.
Mickey Toland
Madavaugh
Lettermacaward
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 21:28
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ropes to thatch the school. Theyused to get salted buns and they woukd have to go to a burn nearby to drink the water with the buns. At one time they got clothes and they had to pull tickets to see who would be the lucky one. The Master was a very pious old man and reared a very good family. There would be three priests in it if the had to live.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 21:17
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the tree.
The giant thought he jumped over the tree.
He became afraid of the tailor and ran away to his home.
Next day the tailor went to where the giant slept.
That night the giant was entertaining another giant.
When the giants were sleeping the tailor climbed up the tree that the giants were sleeping under and dropped down a stone.
The the one giant began complain that the other was hitting him.
At last the two giants began to fight.
They fought till they killed each other.
The he went and told the King that he had killed the giants. Then he gave him a large sum of money and he lived happy ever after.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 21:10
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Once upon a time there lived a little tailor.
One day as he sat by the window sewing he saw seven flies creeping up the window.
He lifted a piece of cloth and hit the flies and killed them. Then he thought he was a great man and so he got a label on his coat with the words printed on it " Seven at a Blow ".
When the people saw it they began to be afraid of him.
By and by the King heard it Then he sent for him and so he came.
The King said "There is a giant living in the wood near by. He was sent to kill him; he met the giant and the giant pulled down a branch of a tree and told him to catch hold of it.
When he caught hold of it the giant let go the branch.
The the tailor sprang over
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 21:08
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Old Schools
There was an old school over ibn Dooey. And it was situated above James Gallagher's house on the top of a bank. It was all one class room and there were very good old teachers in it. Their names were. Mrs McCauley and mr. McCauley. In those days they had no slates or pencils. They had no copies. Their books were, Reading Books, Arithmetics and Geographies. Every Scholar had to bring a sheaf of straw and a clew of
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 19:42
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My father, Thomas Ruane, Main Street, Claremorris, knew a Mr. Cullinane, Claremount, Claremorris, who moved seventeen acres of oats in seventeen days with a scythe in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty.
Mr. Higgins, Main Street, Claremorris, the employer of a certain man who catches hares and rabbits by running after them and hitting them with a stick.
Miss Kelly, who is at present in The Flats, Mount Street, Claremorris, is a wonderful dancer. She won medals in Scotland for dancing.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 16:02
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turned the boat right again.
They found that the men who were under the capsized boat were nearly dead.
They took Mr Willbanks and his son to a house near by, where they got hot-water drinks and dry clothing and received every possible kindness: Sad to say, poor Mr Willbanks died, but his son recovered and is living still.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 16:00
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About twenty years ago, a man and his two sons went out fishing near Crookhaven Harbour.
The man's name was Mr Willbanks, and his son's names were Tom + George. One night Mr Willbanks put out his nets hoping the next day to bring them in.
Next day came, and Mr Willbanks and his two sons went for their nets.
They had a good handful of fish. Suddenly a storm rose, and Mr Willbanks tried to come in to shore as fast as he could, but the storm rose so fast that the boat was upset, and one of Mr Willbanks' sons was drowned.
Mr Willbanks himself and his other son were caught under the boat. A man on shore saw the boat and ran quickly for help.
Soon the strand was covered with people.
Then the men got a hook and
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 15:54
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Those skiffs were used for holding potatoes long ago. They were in boats too, for holding fish. The old people would never give those skiffs to anybody for nothing, because they considered it unlucky. Those twigs, are very scarce now, because people make no use of them and they grew into thick sticks and no use can be made out of them.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 15:53
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In this district long ago skiff making was done very much. The first they used do was to get get a bundle of green twigs, and out of that bundle, they would pick the two thickest rods.
Then they would fasten one rod on to the other, and make them round, they used put it near the fire then, for a week, until it hardened, and they used to call that part of the skiff the bough.
The next thing they do is to put twigs from one end of the bough to the other, and they call them the ribs of the skiff.
Then they get thin little twigs, and they put those, in and and out between the ribs, and they continue that until the skiff is made.
It is very few that can make skiffs now, they arent used atall. Long ago they got alot of money for those skiffs. The man that used to make those skiffs most in this district was John Murphy and he lives in Gunpoint
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 14:40
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Crossakiel Hill
A man from West-meath was going to the horse-fair in Crossakiel to sell his horse. There were very few clocks at that time, and the man started off too early, as he didn't know the time. As he was passing the Moate, he met a gentleman who asked him to sell his horse to him. The man sold the horse to the gentleman and got a good price for him. It seems, the gentleman took the man into a beautiful room in the cave, and showed him a big heap of gold in a corner. "Take the price of the horse out of that heap", said the gentleman. The man took what he thought was the value of the horse. The gentleman then said, "You are a lucky man for if you had taken any more I'd have killed you". The man went on his way then, to the fair, and related all that happened to him. On his way home, he tried to find the place where the cave was, but he couldn't see anything but the Moate.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 11:58
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was dead. The old people say that she buried a pot of gold in the lake. One night raiders attacked the castle for the gold, but before they could get it she buried it in the lake. The gold cannot be found until the lake is dried which will never be done. They also believed that she has a palace under the lake guarding the gold.
Lucy Lambert.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 11:39
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Nora na Ceann
A couple of centuries ago a cruel tyrannical woman ruled over this neighborhood. Her name was Nora Burke, but, because of the killing the people's stock she was locally called Nora nagCeann, "Nora of the Heads." She owned large estates including all Ballymurn. As at that time there was no road beside the lake. Her castle walls were washed by its waters. She had a large retinue of soldiers guarding her. She had her avenue through the wood because the river wasn't in it at all. The poor people lived in constant terror
anonymous contributor
2019-12-03 07:43
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'san drurfair-se arís a shíbín."
bhí sí chomh tugtha amach san taréis na boidhie gur ar éigin a bhí ?re s?ubal abhaile an bhean bhoch.

Caonas a bháidh an báirneach An Mada Ruadh.
Tá mada ruadh scubhtha chum báirnigh. bhí sé sa bhfaill an lá so agus chonnaic sé na báirnig amuigh ar charraigh buile beag amach ú bhun na vaile. bhí an taoide ag líonadh ach dúbhairn sé go mbeadh blaise beag deas aige ar na báirnig sul a mbeadh an charraig vá loch.
B'sea leis amach agus d'aimsig sé ceann breágh mór des na báirnig. bí sé ag dul do aon bhogadh a bainr aisirigo drí go dtáinig an sáile uirthe. Bogann an saíle an báirneach. Nuair a bhrath sé ag bogadh i shleamhnuig sé a theanga vé biorahc a' bháirnig is ,a briathar má dhein gur fhásg an sliogán ar an dteangais gur choinnibh
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 23:06
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Skerries Harbour
The harbour is situated on the eastern side of Skerries and faas North east towards Balbriggan. The islands lying to the south form a breakwater to the harbour proper. The harbour is built on Red Island and nothing only the road connects the harbour with the maintained proper. At the back of the harbour there is a high barrier of rocks on which is situated the Tower or Paulion. The harbour is the shape of the letter U. There is only one deep channel entering the harbour proper. This channel runs from the pier in an north easterly direction and ships, especially. those heavily laden have to be handled carefully so as to avoid the rocks. The skipper gives the island a wide birth until he brings the northmost house in the town in line with the wind mill on the hill of Skerries. This is done to keep dear of the cross . When the skipper brings those marks to beaar he turns his slip and enters the harbour by the "mad".
In 1775 the Irish Parliament gave a grant of euro 2000 for the construction of a pier in Skerries and also gave euro 1,500 for the same purpose in 1767. After sometime the pier fell into decay, but was repaired by Hans Hamilton. In 1721, the Hamiltons purshased Skerries and the Manor of Hacketstown from the earl of Thomond. There was a tax put on every ship entering the harbour. Those coming from England had to pay 4d and those coming from foreign countries 3/4.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 22:45
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Níor dhein sé aon díoghbháil.
2. Deirtear go bhfuil feircín óir curtha go Frenidhe ropaire i gCnocán Fréinidhe i mBarra na Stuac.
3. Díoladh Caisleán Strancally ar cheann m uice agus díoladh dé méid gleann doimhin ar cúig scilling sa tsean-aimsir - adeir Liam Ó Caoimh.
4. "Tá sé caithte thar a saoghal" a deirtear le duine a bhíonn an-aosta, le duine a mbíonn trioblóid air agus go bhfanann a rian air.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 22:04
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little education. That was about 95 years ago.
Marriages
Long ago when there used to be a couple getting married all the people in the neighbourhood used to be invited to the wedding.
They used to stay at the wedding till about eight oclock the following morning. they used to always ask the woman after night when the people would be all in bed
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 22:00
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boots and tell the teacher that it was the Catholic boys that were doing it to get them threshed.
So they had to leave there altogether. A short time later there came an old Catholic teacher round through the neighbouring towns and he stayed a few nights in every town, teaching the children as best he could. That is why the old people were left with very
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 21:56
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Old Schools
The oldest school I have heard of in this district was the old Robinson school at Longfield.
There were no Catholic schools in those days. So a few oof the boys from our town wen to that school and they had no living at all among th Protestant boys.
The Protestant boys used to make a noise with their
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 19:37
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and they put them on themselves.
The smiths make farm implements such as ploughs, harrows, grubbers ases nippers and pikes.
The put hoops on the carts out in the open air near a river or a stream.
When the wheels are being hooped the iron hooping is put into a big fire until it is red.
Then it is taken out and put on the wooden wheel.
When the hoop is on the wheel it is put into the river to cool to keep the red hoop from burning the wood.
In the forge there is a window to let light into the forge.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 19:26
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the bellows so that when you pull the handle the air gets into the bellows and lights the fire.
There is a hearth built of stone to put the fire on.
On the hearth there is a sheet of iron to keep the fire from destroying the stones.
The fire is made of coal.
The tools he uses are such as hammers nippers two or more sledges files and a hammer for shoeing horses, and a hooping stone for putting hoopins on the cart wheels when they are new.
He shoes hores and asses.
The shoes are made of iron.
The iron is put into the fire until it is red hot then it is taken out and the iron is curved into a round shape.
This is done to keep the hoof from getting broken on the hard roads.
Some people in our district get the shoes made with the smiths.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 19:07
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In our district there are three forges.
The name of the smiths are John MacLoughlin. Neil Harkin and James Johnaton.
Their fathers had been smiths in years gone by.
They forges are situated near the main road.
They forges are all built of stone with wooden roofs on them.
In each forge there is only one fire place.
There are streams near the forges for they black smiths to get water to cool the red hot irons.
The bellows are made of wood with a leather covering on them.
There is two wooden sticks standing upright and the bellows are attached to the sticks.
In each side of the bellows there are two holes to let the air in so that the air would make the fire burn.
There is a handle attached to
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 17:11
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found the remains of a dún or fort stated to have been the residence of the O'Cannon. The old people of Letterkenny know plenty of Irish and English and could tell you many old stories of Ireland. Mrs. P Sweeney Ballymacool Letterkenny and Miss Moye Sallaghgrane Letterkenny has many an interesting tale.
In olden times people travelled to America to make their fortune in a foreign land. Although they had no ships like what they have nowaday. They had to travel in sailing boats to foreign lands to try to make their fortune and elsewhere.

Letterkenny is mentioned in a song named Letterkenny town. And these are the words of the song,

My name is Pat Mac Cready,
I have yous all to know,
I came from Donegal where the wind and Swilly flows.
You may travel the wide world over,
No equal you can find,
Than that spot where I was born in Sweet Letterkenny town.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 17:08
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Fairymount Hill
On fairymount Hill, there is a stone which is supposed to be thrown by a giant from the hill of “Keish” to this hill, and it is said that the two giants were fighting.
I think our giant must have lost because there is also a grave in which he is supposed to be buried.
In another part of the hill there is a bed in which he slept, and it is said that whoever sleeps in it will never wake again.
The big fingerprints of the giant are seen around the stone.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 05:41
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Local funny stories
Told by, William Gallagher, Gorlough, Rathmullen Age 59 Co. Donegal.
About forty years ago there lived in Glencross, Rathmullen, Co Donegal, a family called Armour and their son James. There people were very rich. They put all their gold in a stocking. Everyday before going to work Mr. Armour and James warned Mrs. Armour not to give away the gold. It happened one day that a neighbour whose name was John Scott came into their house disguised as a poor man. He said he came down from Heaven on a white horse in search of gold. He asked her for the stocking of gold. He told her if she would give it to him he would bring her three times as much at the end of the year. At first she hesitated a little but finally agreed. She gave him the gold and off he went on his white horse to Heaven. He was just about five minutes away when in came Mr. Armour. Mrs. Armour told him of her experience and he, with a great rage, spurred his horse and followed John Scott. John hard him coming and fortunately there was a wood nearby. He got off his horse and he took it into the wood in great haste. He also left the gold in the wood. He came out and sat along the road. He was just seated when Mr.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 02:43
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Cure for Measles.
"Give the Patient some Strong Saffron Tea", and if you ask (as I did) "whatever is Saffron tea" you would be told a plain unvarnished tale - and assured of the absolute efficacy of the cure" but you would not find the Saffron Tea in any "B.P." or Medical Pharmacology of the day, for how should I write it without offending - Saffron tea is the brew of sheep's manure, and is supposed when taken as a strong potion to "bring out" the measles in the Patient.
And on telling my narrator that a Patient would now want be so patient as to be dead before such an infliction Could be administered He replied, "Well Master, I took it myself"
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 01:09
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There was a hedgeschool-master who lived in knocklmeack his name was Martin Casey. He taught in a little tatched house that can still be seen. He taught every nigh and lots of people to school to him. His left hand was turned back and he was born that way. He was a lovely writer and his writing can still be seen in ther house of a man called Mr.Kelly who lives in Ballinaceogh. My grandfather went to school to him.
Peggy Roche
Lisnagry
Co Limk
This was given to me by my father Mr Roche.
anonymous contributor
2019-12-02 01:02
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Long ago there were such things as hedge school, taught by smart men in their own homes. With a table for a desk and a stool to sit on, no boards, no maps and no jottors only a slate and a pencil. There was a hedge school teacher named James Molony who lived in Killinagariff and the parents had to pay him school fees so much a wuarter according to the classes. Only for the hedge school teachers the people that were far away from the schools would have no education.
Frances Ryan
Ahane
Lisnagry
Co Limk
This story was given to me by my mother.
Mrs Ryan
Ahane
Lisnagry
anonymous contributor
2019-12-01 17:15
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96
A Funny Story
One day Michael Fannagher was digging potatoes, known as "Protestants", in the village of Mucknosaune. Canon Lynn a protestant Canon of Cong happened to be passing by and he asked Michael Fannagher what kind of potatoes was he digging. "Protestants" replied Michael. "Oh!" said the Canon "I thought that you Catholics would not eat Protestant potatoes." "Faith then we do," replied Michael "but we boil the devil out of them first."
Told by Pat Browne
Muckersaune
The Neele
Clare monis [?]
age 72
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 22:42
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The pincipal tribes of tinkers that visit this part of the country are the Joyces, McDonoughs, McManuses, Caseys, Powers, Gavins, Quinns, Hynes, Nevins and Grahams. Powers and Grahams are sweeps while the rest are tinsmiths.
Art McDonough is the present King of the Tinkers.
Davy Joyce who died about five years ago in Athlone was also King of the Tinkers. He was a very tall man being six feet seven inches in height and was famed far and near for his great strength.
He settle all quarrels and disputes among tinkers. "Lone Bird" Joyce is the principal manufacturer of caravans and he spends the Summer months making them on the road of Bellair. These tinkers are supposed to be able to make money. Their principal strong hold is Athlone where new houses have
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 22:27
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q57
The Monument & Chimneys of Tubberaraddy
Ribard na Clognarnac
So called from the ruins which still remain. This place, a short distance from Castlestrange was the residence of a tyrant landlord known as Ribard na Clognarnac or Robert of the Skulls, on account of all the people he got murdered and hanged on trees in penal days.
Robert Ormsby
A poor widow, whose two fine stalwart sons were to be hanged, because they did not turn Protestant, want up to the 'Gallows' which was at Castlestrange cross roads, and exhorted her boys to stand firm and die for their faith.
After witnessing the hanging she knelt down and cursed (Richard) Robet.
1720.
On his way home, some time late from the Hell Fire Club in the Dublin mountains Robert (Richard) was killed. People say by a blacksmith's curse.
It was a fine frosty night, his horse cast a show and he called at a wayside forge to get a show on. After shooting the horse Robert Richard ordered the blacksmith to curse him round the anvil. 'In order to laugh at superstition' he said. The blacksmith at first refused, but Richard pointed a revolver at him and said he would shoot him if he did not.
The blacksmith walked round his anvil x
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 22:19
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154
'Townsell' the Spy
During the Fenian movement there were many men in this Parish having Fenian sympathies.
About 100 years ago a man named Townsend lived in Co. Liachtar. He was known locally as 'Townsell'. This man was a strange and came from the North of Ireland. Very soon he became friendly with the neighbours and made himself their leader found out all their secrets and passed them on to Headquarters Government authorities.
The men began to suspect that there was a 'leakage' some place. They were to have a great meeting down n=ear the lake. Word went round that each sworn man was to bring his gun loaded and shoot 'Townsell' so that it could not be left on any particular man.
About thirty men surrounded 'Townsell' and at a signal from the leader, fired- They were so close together that the shot wounded some of them as well as killing the 'Spy'. They went to hospital in Roscommon and the secret was found out. Some were flogged but on account of all being implicated in the shooting mo one was ever hanged. The men returned home lived quietly on their little farms and kept their secrets.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 22:12
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153
New Road & Co Licahtar
New Road is really part of the downland of Colemully. It is a small village with about ten thatched houses built on each side of the road and a population of forty people.
Over a hundred years ago when people were coming to the flour mills of Castlecoote the New Road was then only a cart track and they usually went a round about way to reach the mills.
In order to make the journey more direct and convenient for travelers the New Road was made which linked up the road to Donamon and Oran and the towns of Creggs, Ballymoe and Castlerea.
Co. Liachtar is a small village at the back of Castlecoote off the main road. An old boreen winding from the bog and rive Suck, serves the few people who eke out a living in the lonely silent valley. Where once could be seen the smoke from twenty cottages, no=w there are only three families, with about twelve people.
Wild fowl are got in abundance and foxes have their dens near the Donamon woods. In summer people go down fishing to the silent rive and are invariably satisfied with their days outing. For their is pleasure in the pathless woods and a rapture on the lonely share.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 22:04
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152
A True Story
Over 60 years ago the men in this locality were very fond of shooting 'Game'- Snipe, duck, wild geese, plover, etc. were in abundance on the river Suck.
One evening in Autumn two friends - James Golden and James Corbet went down th fields for a shot. They separated and on coming home again the former crossed a ditch near his own land. When jumping out into the next field, he found two coins 2/1 on the top of the ditch. He put them in his pocket, came home and put them inside intending to sport the cash.
The two sportsmen went for six or seven evenings shooting - both separated and on returning home James Golden found silver which increased each evening. He put it in a box over the old-fashioned bed canopy and treated this friend to some drink in the local 'pub' but said nothing about his 'find'
At the end of a week when the silver kept on increasing, James Golden came home with a very frightened look. His father asked him what was the matter. He then told the story about the money; how the silver increased each evening and how he spent it. The remainder was given to the priest on the advice of his parents and that was the end of it. he never found any treasure after telling the secret.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 21:57
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151
Castlecoote - continued
Upon a rising mound overlooking the river Suck fitting site of an ancient fortress stood the Castle built by Sir Charles Coote, in the days of Strafford. Round the grim walls manny a bloody battle had been fought with native rebels.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 21:54
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The Gunnings
The Three Graces It is said that the 'Three Graces' or beautiful Miss Gunnings at one time lived in Castle Coote. Their father Major Gunning was a rollicking, duelling fine old Irishman who left his widow and daughter penniless at his death.
Maria Elizabeth Duchess of Hamilton & Argyle The widow went to Dublin and had the good fortune of getting into the favour of a great actress who introduced the beautiful Miss Gunnings into society. Maria and Elizabeth married the Earl of Coventry and the Duke of Hamilton respectively. They became the rage, and reigned supreme as Queens of Beauty.
Sophia died At the height of her fame, Maria died seven years after he marriage. Elizabeth became the close friend of the Queen.
Every age has its beautiful women. They play their parts and pass on down the corridors of time.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 21:51
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The name of my village is "Buaile na nDamh" which means the Báning field of the bullocks. There is a field (fort) there called "Lios a' Riogh". It is an elevated field with a dyke all around it. There is another one in a neighbouring farm and it is said that there is a passage under the ground from one to the other. The Danes used to live there long ago, and it is said that there would be gold got there if it was opened.
The names of the other fields are,
Páirc Úr
Páirc a' Luachra
Cathair
Páirc Caol
Páirc a' Locha
Páirc a Bhóthair
Gáirdín Dearg
Páirc a' Leasa
Páirc an Aitinn
Páirc a' Phóirse
Gairdín Bán
Graifín
Páirc na bPiséan
Clais
Log na n-Iothlainn
Pluais
Páirc Fhada
Páirc na nGamhan
Sliabh Garbh
Páirc an Aonaig
Búna na Pláis

Sliabh Mharbhuighte is so called because there were battles there long ago. There is a rock there called "Gollán", and there is supposed to be Danes buried under it, and there is writing on it. There is also three ruins of houses there which were there before the famine.
There was a Queen there long ago and she said she would marry the strongest giant. In order to find the strongest man they
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 21:47
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149
Castlecoote - continued
On one occasion two brothers came to settle a dispute re ownership of their farm. The landlord ordered his bodyguard of soldiers to shoot them. He then took possession of their farm.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 21:44
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148
Castlecoote - continued
A soldier who had served in France and was a 'crack shot' wished to avenge his brother's death. He waited and watched the methods adopted by the ruthless tyrant. One morning at day-break he planted a 'fear bréaga' with a gun inn his hand just in the line of fire opposite the castle in a soft marshy place, where there was plenty of cover. The soldier had not long to wait - In the stillness of the morning a shot was fired, down fell the 'fear bréaga' and before the tyrant had time to fire his second shot, our friend had him riddled with bullets.
The servants of this tyrant never knew in which room or bed he slept. They peeped five or six beds every day and found all tossed each morning. He rusted no one. He suspected everybody. No wonder he got his deserts.
Another landlord of later times had the habit of taking farms big and small from his poor tenants.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 21:38
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147
Castlecoote
Caisléan An Cuirig - The name comes down from Charles Coote a soldier in Cromwell's army. He built a castle on the right bank of the Suck, the remains-ruins can still be seen.
Convenient to the old castle are the ruins of the old flour mills which were burnt forty years ago and were re-built, but fell into disuse when the river was sunk and power taken from them.
Castlecoote is a pretty little village nestling between hills in the valley of the river Suck. It is about five miles from the county town Roscommon.
The old name for the village is Creemully which is still retained in the next downland.
According to local tradition the castle was once occupied by a great tyrant. he shot the first man he saw crossing the old bridge, after rising every morning. Feeling of great resentment ran high in the locality.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 20:51
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'Twas the last I saw of my colleen breágh my Inchigeela Lass.
VI
I sped through Inniscarra's groves before the dawn of day.
Took refuge in a Yankee ship that in Queenstown Harbour lay.
The captain was a Fenian bold my safety to compass.
I soon set sail from Granuaile and my Inchigeela Lass.
VII
And what became of Máirín Óg Eveleary's fairest flower.
She droops as droops the Mayflower beneath snowy wintry showers.
Ere Autumn's trees had shed their leaves they had laid her neath the grass.
That winsome rogue my Máirín Óg my Inchigeela Lass.
VIII
Eveleary dear Eveleary far across the ocean waves.
You hold what I prize most on the earth my Máirín's moss grown grave.
My present habitation is in Broadway, Boston, Mass.
But the Buacaill Ruadh is true to you My Inchigeela Lass.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 19:31
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main road.
Another road is named Uimney brae.
The Uimney brae leads to Meadon More road.
Uimney brae is a steep road.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 16:27
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Once upon a time there was a man and son who lived together and this son
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 16:15
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number of bye-roads branch off.
Some of these roads lead to the hill.
The Three Trees road branches from the main road at Three Trees National School.
The Three Trees road goes up round and comes out on the main road at Carrow keel.
A road named the Irish Town branches off the Three Trees road.
Another road branches off the Irish Town named the Gorta Gore and the Gorta Muineagh road.
The Gorta Muineagh road leads to the Meadan more road.
Another road named the Glaen More road branches off.
The Glack More road leads to the hill.
Another road named the Aught road branches off the Glack More road.
The Aught road leads to the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 15:07
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The road from Derry passes through Muff barrow keel White Castle, Red Castle, and Castle Kerry to Movill.
A road runs from Quigley's Point through Glen togher to Carndonagh. Then from Carndonagh to Malin head.
There is a road from Derry to Letter Kenny to Buncranna.
There is a road from Derry to Lifford and Straban.
On all these roads buses, Motor-Lorries Cars, and bicycles are to be seen.
Lorries carry goods such as coal, timber, iron, steel, meal, flour, corn butter and eggs.
Buses carry passengers from town to town and from place to place.
Numbers of cars are to be seen on the roads.
Lots of people are to be seen with bicycles on the roads.
From these main roads a
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 14:41
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money gives back five shilling of the purchase price.
Drinks are called for and all who took part in the deal drink to the health and good-luck of the dealers.
This takes the biggest part of an hour.
During the time they are drinking they discuss the price of farm produce and cattle. Items of new are exchanged and sometimes politics and discussed.
The party breaks up with expressions of good will on all sides.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-30 14:36
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By this time a crowd of dealers and friends of the owner will have collected.
They now take part in the conversation trying to complete the deal.
Eventually the dealer mentions a price which he will give for the beast usually a smaller one than the owner is asking.
The onlookers suggest that they should split the difference. This means that supposing there is the difference of one-pound between the price asked and the price offered the seller will agree to take ten shilling less and the buyer to give ten shilling more.
The bargain is clinched by the two parties striking hands.
All go to a public house.
Here the question of a lucks-penny is discussed and settled.
The man who receives the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-29 22:32
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tongue
Name- Bridget Reilly
Storyteller- John Fry,
Cloneymeath, Summerhill,
Co Meath.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-29 22:31
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Herbs
"Groundsil" and "scutch" are the most harmful weeds growing in the garden because they spread rapidly.
The "wart weed" is an herb with a tiny yellow flower. If one breaks the stem a milky fluid comes out which if rubbed to the wart will cure it.
The "mouse ear" is an herb which has a leaf shaped like a mouse's ear. This herb cures the "burst".
If one drinks the water of boiled "cranes bill" it will cure back- ache.
"Foxtongue" gets it's name because it is shaped like a fox's
anonymous contributor
2019-11-29 21:12
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At Kilbree house, in the townland of Kilbree, in the parish of Cappoquin Co. Waterford a large sum of gold issued to have been hidden. One moonlight night
anonymous contributor
2019-11-29 16:40
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Seo caise athá ag Srúthán Maithiu.
Eírigheann an srúthan seo sa "Leich Dubh". Tá puill domhain uirthí seo . Tá ailltreacha ag eirigh ar gach taobh de'n abhainn seo. Thughthar Srutan Paddy ar an Srutan seo mar gluaiseann sé trídh talamh fír(?) darab ainm Paddy Sheáin Labhrais. Sean fear é, agus tá sé chaoch.
Tá fraoch ag fhás le cholbh an t-srúthain seo, agus dearcann sé go h-an deas sa Shamhradh, nuair a bhíos
anonymous contributor
2019-11-29 12:11
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A boy named Dugan or Duggan over was employed as a herd on the farm now owned by Berney McEvoy, Drinnanstown Rathangam. The portion he herded his between me enjoys house and the banal. On his way home with cows each evening a black bat appeared to him. The boy became troubled as the cat often spoke to him so he went to the Parish Priest who lived in Kildare. Priest and people gathered to see the cat. The cat could be heard speak but could not be seen. The Priest requested some one to question the cat. Some one suggested a man named Dugan (Dugan) doing so. But the cat answered there was too much sin there and he (the cat) would not speak with that person. The boy Duggan
anonymous contributor
2019-11-29 10:01
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Bhi fear ag teacht anoir as na Croisbhealaigh lá amháin agus bhí mála mine leis ar dhruim beithidhigh. Chuaidh sé anonn an tráigh agus ar ghabhail thríd an deán dó thuit an mála isteach san uisce. Bhí fear eile ag coimhead air agus sgairt sé amach go magadhamhach "A ghiolla thall, is feárr dhuit tuilleadh mine a chur ar an uisce no béidh an brachan lom".
anonymous contributor
2019-11-29 05:46
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There lived a highwayman in this district called Rattler Meehan. He had a gang, five of whom were named Rooney, one McGuire and one Cullen. They hid in caves on Thur mountain. These caves are pointed out yet. A women in the district got word that her daughter was ill and thinking it was daybreak got up out of bed and went to her. It happened to be but the middle of the night and on her way, she came across Rattler Meehan and his gang dividing their spoil. She was seized and some of the gang were in faour of killing her. But Raltler prosposed to free her on condition that she took an oath to tell no person what she saw. She kept her promise but the secret was troubling her. Some person advised her to tell her story to a stone wall. She did but her two brothers were behind it. The gang had to separate and two of them were shot. Ratter Meehan was kept in hiding by a Gallagher woman and died three months later.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 22:00
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(1) About a hundred years ago there was a man coming up the wood at the priest's house. At the same time there were people on the road and the horse frightened and instead of crossing the shallow place he jumped into the river. He never was heard of again. It is said this place is very deep. It is said that this man had a lot of money when he fell into the water. This hole is called Poll a' Gacaxlla. It is near the curate's house. It has no bottom. Other people say that the druids put hold vessels and ornaments down there. I heard my grandfather tell this story. -Sean Wade
2) About two hundred years ago there was a landlord down in Furlough not far from Balla harsh. This landlord gathered a large amount of money. Then he got an iron bon and he put the money into it. Then he dug a big hole and he threw the bon into it. Then he turned a stream on it because he thought there would be no use made of it. He wanted no one to find it. That land-lord's grandson heard about the hidden treasure. He made up his mind to search for it. He got a dredger and dredged the stream until he came to a big hole. He sent to Sullin then for a diver. When the diver came e dived into the deep hole. He said some queer animal was down in the hole guarding that gold. I do not believe that gold was ever found. The landlord's name was Fizgerald and he lived near the Round Tower at Furlough.
(3) Once upon a time three men found a hidden treasure at-
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 21:03
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What is the easiest way to light a cigarette. Pull out half the tobacco.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 21:02
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Tis red tis blue tis sparkling green the Queen cant come at it no more than the King. A Rainbow.
Four young ladies long and tall one goes in and the other goes out and that is the way they work about. Four knitting needles.
Tis in tis out tis like a trout tis slipping wet and greasy
A Tongue.
The more you take from it the bigger it gets. A grave.
Ink ank under a bank ten drawing four. A woman milking a cow.
Over the fire and under the fire and never touches the fire. A cake in an oven.
London, Derry, Cork and Kerry spell me that without a k. That.
Black and white and red all over. A newspaper.
What goes to Mass on their heads. the nails of our boots.
Two little girls dressed in white one got the fever and died last night. Two candles.
Why is a man who grumbles like an overbaked loaf. Because they are both crusty.
Why should you carry a watch when crossing the desert. Because there is a spring in it.
When is a Queen like a piece of wood. When she is a ruler.
The man that made it never wore it and the man that wore it never saw it. A coffin.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 17:13
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old ruin situated by the side of the road, not a very far distance from Saint Ronan's well. There was a shop here one time. In olden times people were afraid to pass by this old house late at night, as they believed that a ghost used to be seen there. The ghost was said to be a tall, dark man with a high, hard hat and swallow-tailed coat, all dressed in black, with a walking stick. Perhaps this story is only a fable, but some people say it was often seen. It is never seen at present, but the old ruin is still there. People are still nervous for fear they would see the ghost, as everyone has heard the story of olden times.
There was also a larger number of people in the village in years gone by, as two or three or four people out of each house emigrated to foreign countries, principally to America. The land is hilly, covered with large clumps of furze. A bog lies to the north of the village, where turf is annually cut.
There is no wood growing in the townland, but trees grow around almost every house in the village. There is a field in the centre of the townland called "Paurkeen", and a lot of bushes(grow) and trees, the majority being hazel trees, grow, and form a fence or ditch around
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 17:11
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but after the marriage the bride's father often gives stock to his daughter.
On the wedding day the couple are married generally in the morning, and after the marriage celebration the party return to the bride's home usually, where breakfast is eaten. A wedding feast is held in the bride's home during the day, and in the bridegroom's home during the night.
The local boys who are not invited, dress themselves in straw, and go to the place where the wedding is held. They are called "straw boys". Their dress is all of straw, their faces being covered so that they would not be recognized. They sing, dance and shout, and make every type of sport about the house. People are glad when they come, as they are the best amusement of all.
Motors are nowadays used to convey the marriage party to the Church, but horses and sidecars were used in ancient times. The latter was considered far nicer, as a better view of the marriage party was to be had, and the trotting of horses' hoofs was everywhere to be heard.
The night of the wedding a bon fire is often lit in honour of
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 14:20
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On the second day of April 1831
Being on a Good Friday at the rising of the sun
Our neighbours going to the market town.
Came flocking to the shore
And fourteen of that number returned there no more
Between Rossbeg and Corry point
We hoisted up our soil
And if the wind blew from the west
We would have a pleasant gale
Going in a row from Harbour
Johnny to her did say
Be quick and make your market
Early in the day
They all agreed to sail at three
And go along the shore
They all agreed as you may see
And Johnny said no more
At seven oclock that evening they all agreed to go
And Johnny to the helm the other three to row
And Jerry Corrigan and M[?] [?]
were two young lads
And eight young females made the other half a score
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 13:58
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Once upon a time there was a little boy living with his mother and they got very poor. The boy went off to earn for himself and his mother. When he came as far as this house he took lodgings for one night and then set off again. He came as far as another house and the woman that was in the house gave him work for a quarter of a year.
The boy worked hard and when he was coming home at the end of his quarter he got a hen that would lay
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 12:47
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There are many herbs usedas cures, such as march mallow which is good for sprains.the sap is pressed out of the plant and then rubbed on to the sprained limb.
There i a plant called locally Piseach and people often boil it with meat when they have no cabbage.the leaves of nettles are also used in similar way.
The dandelion is supposed to be a good cure for turkeys that have a disease called 'pine'.It is choppedup very finely and mixed with mealand given to them as food . Dandelion is also chopped up and mixed with pigs food.There is a plant called 'cut me and I will come' and people eat it as a vegetable.Some people also eat water cressraw when no lettuce is to be had.
Don Joe Wall got the above from
miss O Brien,
Knocpatrick,
shanagolden
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 11:45
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ach, by boiling its leaves and drinking the juice.The ivy cleans stains out of blue clothes.A flower which grows on the road side called camomile is good for keeping fair hair clean and bright by boiling the flowers and rubing the juice to the hair. The dandelion is a useful plant, it cures fluke in calves and it is good for bad livers in people by boiling it and straining it and drinking the juice.People gather the dandelion in large quantities and chop it for the turkeys.The juice of the dndelion it is said, when applied to warts to banish them
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 11:40
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distance of about two Statute miles, and that the coal from the pithead be conveyed by aerial railway to G.S.R. line in Ballynonty, whence it could be carried to any part of Ireland over the railway system. The work of boring etc. occupied almost two years, and the Government allocated a sum of £14,000 to pay expenses.
Hope was high in Slievardagh that the Government would set the mines going, if it was returned to power at the Election, and that it would give work and bread to the poor miners and labourers of this district. Slieveardagh voted solid for the Government and even ignored the claims of Labour. The Government, which had expended a sum of £14,000 in carrying on an enquiry, surely meant business. The Government won the Election and were returned with an increased majority, but up to the present no relief has come. It is right to say that at no time has the Government made any promise to anybody in connection with this matter.
There has been no official report issued or published for the public, but the full official report of the experts can be read in the Office of Industry and Commerce, Dublin.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 10:26
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VII
‘Se do bheatha na tíre seo a Chití bheag álainn óg
Is gur bean de d’ainm a bhí tamall san ait seo rómhat
Bhí fial flaitheamhail san nidh a ghlacfas do láimh go deo
Bí do cheann mhaith do na leinbh tabhair ionad na mathara dóibh
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 01:06
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situate half a mile south of public road leading to Ballinasloe. It is a small low lying field.

Shraduff
name of townland west of Church Park. In it is situate the holy well of St. Ronan patron saint of the parish of Taughmaconnell.
meaning:- the dark sward or valley

Ard na gClog
Village in west of Taughmaconnell about five miles North East of Ballinasloe.
meaning:- the height of the Bell

* * *

The following place name are in the parish of Taughmaconnell, Barony of Athlone South
Collected by Patrick Keogh Clonohill.

* * *

Coolatogher
Townland in extreme east of Taughmaconnell. The public road here has to cross a neck of bog which divides the parishes of Drum and Taughmaconnell

Dulock
Townland of Coolatogher
situate on right of public road leading from Athlone to Taughmaconnell and about fifty yards from it. It is a small lake about a half an acre (statute) in area.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-28 00:43
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old ruin situated by the side of the road, not a very far distance from Saint Ronan's well. There was a shop here one time. In olden times people were afraid to pass by this old houselate at night, as they believed that a ghost used to be seen there. The ghost was said to be a tall, dark man with a high, hard hat and swallow-tailed coat, all dressed in black, with a walking stick. Perhaps this story is only a fable, but some people say it was often seen. It is never seen at present, but the old ruin is still there. People are still nervous for fear they would see the ghost, as everyone has heard the story of olden times.
There was also a larger number of people in the village in years gone by, as two or three or four people out of each house emigrated to foreign countries, principally to America. The land is hilly, covered with large clumps of furze. A bog lies to the north of the village, where turf is annually cut.
There is no wood growing in the townland, but trees grow around almost every house in the village. There is a field in the centre of the townland called "Paurkeen", and a lot of bushes(grow) and trees, the majority being hazel trees, grow, and form a fence or ditch around
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 17:58
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Seery to be a dangerous man, Ford unharnesses his master's horse and brought them home, to prevent them being taken away by Seery. Mr Barsnett, a Kilbeggan publican swore Seery called to house on the day after the robbery, that he got drunk, fell asleep, and that he had two £10 Bank of Ireland notes at least in his possession.
Mr -- a loca; J. P, gave evidence for the defence. He never knew Seery to be of evil character, tho' the whole county knew of his outrages and robberies committed in the Barony of Rathconrath. THis loyal J.P, said Forde was a sheep stealer. Mr Thos, Bannon, Forde's employer who lived quite near the school, swore that the evidence of the J.P, was a fabrication. He swore Forde had worked with him for years and was an honest man,never charged with any offence, Another loyalist -Jas Nugent of Ballincar where Wm. Finnerty now lives, gave evidence in defence of Gamble, Seery was a notorious character yet landlords and J, P,s of the district identified themselves with him. Seery was found guitly, Gamble was acquitted. When the jury announced the verdict there was applause in court. It was taken up byt those outside , They included many friends of men in jail on the perjured testimony of Seery. He was executed publicly in Mullingar by Tom Galvin, hangman, before an immense throng who came to see the sentence carried out. There was no sympathy for the unfortunate wretch.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 16:39
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There used to be many stories told about Hunter Gowan's ghost, and with the passing of years they are fading out of local tradition. It is said that Father Francis Redmond curate at Camolin in 1798, prevailed on the Insurgents, when they entered Lord Mountmorris's mansion at Camolin Park to restore some of the property they had taken for the purpose of their campaign. A tradition accuses Hunter Gowan of conspiring at the priest's death, and that on a fabricated charge, Father Redmond was arrested, conveyed to Gorey, and there hanged, and buried with an Insurgent named Patrick Carroll. For years a square mound, on the side of Gorey Hill, and facing Kilnahue Lane, was out as the site of the grave. There is a strange story of an apparition, which was said to cause
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 14:46
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I
Oh then tell me Sergt. Dunphy,
Tell me why you hurry so
Och! There is life in danger,
And to Sheridans I must go,
II
A lady was insulted
When coming home from Mass
She is in fear & terror
And Sheridans she won't pass
III
Now go Constable Connor
And meet her at the gate
And Daly lie in ambush
The signal to wait
IV
And when you pass by Sheridans
With your truncheon & your gun
Try to get up their tempers
And its then you'll see some fun
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 12:58
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There are many legends connected with the first day of May. It was customary long ago to place a May-bush outside the door and to decorate it with primroses, cowslips, bluebells, and other flowers to honour the month of May.
Presently some people will not give away milk on the first of May as they think it will bring misfortune to them and their cows. If a person washed her or his feet in the dew of the grass they will not have chill-blains or any other foot disease. If a person washed her of his face in the dew of the grass on a May morning their appearance will be very handsome and they not have freckles. A churning is performed on that day, and if any person comes in to the house who is not an immediate member of the family circle he is bound to help at the churning, as it is supposed he will bring some of the butter if he does not help at it.
If a cow gives birth to a calf on May day it is supposed to be lucky and the owner will have the height of good luck throughout the year. Delia Harrington. 6th May 1938.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 12:54
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May day superstitions did not quite die away yet. Many of the old people carry the old superstitions yet. May day is one of the most important days throughout the whole year.
A turnip is placed at the entrance of the gate and a piece of may bush pierced into it to welcome everyone that visits the house and to bid welcome to the bright golden summer.
The whole family wash their face, hands, and feet in the dew upon the dew on the grass, the face and hands are washed to prevent freckles and the feet is washed to keep away chilblanes.
If a cow calves on May day it denotes good luck. A churning is always done on that day to have plenty of butter for the whole year, and if a person comes in to the house while the churning is going on they turn the handle to help to churn the cream so that they would not take the luck of the butter away with them.
If a child is born in a house on a May day, it is supposed to see ‘the hundred’. Eggs are hatched to have plenty of luck ever after. Vera Smith. 5th May 1938
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 12:50
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May day superstitions are dying away now. Long ago people churned on May morning so that they would have butter all the year. They tied a red string on the cow’s tail as soon as she calved that she would give milk all the year. They also lighted a blessed candle and with it singed the hairs off the cows udder.
People washed their face in the dew that they would net get freckles and they washed their feet in the dew that they would not get chilblains. A branch of a white bush was planted in the dung-hill and decorated with primroses, cowslips and blue-bells. This is the may bush. It is left there till it is well withered.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 12:48
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In olden times the Irish people were very superstitious and on May day especially. They practised many things that appear very foolish nowadays. For instance all who had cows wished to have a churning to make on May day, and if any neighbour chanced to come in during that operation they were expected to take a hand at the churn for fear of taking away the butter. They also disliked lending anything to a neighbour. Another practice was going out early while the dew was on the grass and bathing their faces with it, with the idea of preventing head-aches during the coming year.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 12:18
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An Anglo Saxon Coin from 979 to 106 Found in Milltown in 1914.
In August 1914 Mr James Wafer Milltown who lived about 200 perches from the school was engaged in digging for sand in field adjacent to the right of his house. He accidentally discovered a silver coin. Right under the spot where where the coin was discovered, James found a huge stone slab and its removal reveales a large cave. In one corner of the cave, was a large flat stone. When it wa removed a small chamber was revealed. In the chamber were a few bones and the skull of a small animal. The coin was sent for inspection to the National Museum. On the obverse side was a bust of the Saxon King, Ethelred II, who reigned from 976 to 1016. On the reverse side was was the moneyer - Eadric - and the place of minting -York.
The coin will be found catalogued and described in the British Museum Catalogue of Anglo Saxon Coins Vol II page 215 No 81
He would be leading intelligence to a higher place who could essay a sensible historic - economic "cause" for the presence of the silver coin and bones in the Milltown artifical cave.
22/11/34
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 12:02
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Notes on Leo Casey
Leo was engaged as the Irish correspondent of the Boston Pilot. To that paper he contributed until his death. He delivered lectures in Cork & other places on Clarence Mangan, Davies, Moore etc on "the influence of National Poetry". In London, Bermingham, Liverpool, Manchester and everywhere he went, he was enthusiastically received. But his labours were tellin on a stalwart frame . weakened by prison suffering. He complained much of his chest and lungs. He rested in Dunleary for a while & on his return to Summerhill Dublin in Octr 1869, he himself. In company with his young wife & friends, including, Rev Charles Meehan - a man of brilliant talents. Fr Meehan was a Ballymahon man.
In March 1870, a cab he was driving in came in collision with a dray. Casey, highly nervous, leaped from his seat and was fluncg with force to the ground. The fall ruptured a blood vessel. He died a holy death on 17 March 1870. He got a public funeral. All Dublin wept for him. His last words were "O Holy St Patricj intercede for me and for my country"
His remains rest in Glasnevin.
N.B Above is a reproduction of "Notes on "Leo" Casey, written by me during a Night School Session in the Winter of 1904. S.O.C
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 11:51
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Notes on "Leo Case"
My frame is terribly exhausted, both by confinement & by insutls which a donkey could not, properly speaking, endure" This missive to his cousin was sent out of prison without catching the warder's eye. While in prison he was visited twice by Miss Mary Briscoe, who afterwards became Mrs Leo Casey. Leo was released on Nov 16th 1867. He spent a few days with his relatives in Ballymahon, returned to Dublin & returned to Dublin to take up duty in the National press. He never saw Ballymahon again. (Leo's cousin was John Curran Keegam. Keegan Dale the ? and Room 9 Trinity College Dublin)
III
On his return to Dublin Leo was married to Miss Briscoe in Marlbro St Cathedral, Dublin. He was again to be arrested & on leaving the church had to take refuge in the house of a friend. For a while he and his wife lived near Dublin Castle. He went under the name of Mr J Harrison. Many articles from him appeared in the"Shamrock". He was often visited by the siste and brother of John O Leary ex-editor of the Irish People . On Patrick's Day '68 he decided to hide no longer & from that time on he took a prominent part as a prominent nationalist in Irish public affairs. He, with Rev Fr Anderson O.S.A. signalised themselves in the defeat of the Castle Lawyer Sergt. Barry, in the famour Dungarvan election. (Anderson incurred ecclesiatical censure in defending the character of the Fenians. )
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 11:36
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around his humble home in Mount Dalton. The first poem - "The Lesson on the Polish rebellion" was sent for publication to Mr A. M Sullivan, Editor of The Nation. When it appeared great was the joy of Ballymahon. Afterwards Leo's effusions became a weekly feature of the Nation. Before he was 18, he had fallen in love - with the wild and fervent worship of a simple boy. But "Kathleen" and "Mairé Dubh " proved false and fickle and he vowed never again to love a woman - a vow he kept until he met Mary Briscoe of Castlerea whom he married. The Murtagh Brothers of Ballymahon appointed "Leo" as their clerk in Castlerea Stores. Despite he weary work in figures and accounts in his office in Castlerea Leo never lost the ? for all that was beautiful and pure in nature and continued all the time to sing sweet songs. In 1866 his first collection of poetry was published by subscription. It was entitled "A Wreath of Shamrocks" Towards its publication T.D. O Sullivan, Poet and Patriot rendered invaluable assistance. At once it was felt that a new national poet had arisen.
During his term in Castlerea, Leo was watched by Dublin Castel spies, In March '67 he was arrested & sent to Mountjoy jail. While in prison he wrote to his cousin John C Keegan, then a student in T.C.D. "My mind is much affected here - I am treated as if I am a murderer
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 10:41
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Superstitions of May
People tie a red cloth around the cow’s tail on a May day to keep the fairies from taking the milk.
A horse shoe is placed over the door as people say it will bring good luck.
People do not give milk on a May day as they say it is unlucky.
If certain people in parish meet a white horse on the road on a May day they will turn back as they say it is unlucky.
People say it is unlucky to meet a lone magpie on the road on a May day.
It you go into a house when there is churning in progress you should give a hand as it is said you bring away all the butter.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 07:28
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Pishogues etc.
1. A calf's ear was cut on the first Friday after it's birth, for luck
2. If a hen crows it is a sign of a death. A whistling woman and a crowing hen will never come to good end.
3. If the cock crows at night it is a sign of bad luck
4.If you chance to put on a garment wrong side out, don't change it, or your luck will change.
5. If a hare crosses the path of a pregnant woman, she must tar her skirt or petticoat immediately or the child will have a hare lip.
6. It is lucky to find a bright piece of metal, it is lucky to carry a piece of iron.
7. It is unlucky to meet a red haired woman first thing in the morning.
8. The magpie superstition here is,
One for sorrow, two for mirth
Three for a wedding and four for birth
9. Lucky is the bride that the sun shines on.
Happy is the corpse that the rain rains on.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 07:13
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Old Stones
Beside the house now occupied by Myles Bradley on the farm of My McVeigh of Drewstown, Kells Co. Meath are three very large stones, roughly of rectangular shape.
They are all nearly the same size, about 5' long 1' height and 1.5' wide.
They now lie on top of other, but formerly one slab lay on the other two forming a kind of table. The name of The Druid's Altar was given to them.
Told me by Margaret Bradley age 14yrs Newtown Sirley(?), Fordston Kells. Co, Maeth, who was told of the stones b her uncle, Myles Bradley. Drewstown. Kells. C. Meath who lives beside thestones. He is 30 years old.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 07:02
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Children went around from house to house gathering their "cloodhog" (?) on Easter Saturday.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 07:01
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Ash Wednesday
Ash- bags_ little bags filled with the ashes were pinned to the coat tails of old bachelors on Ash-Wednesday
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 06:59
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and a plate on which there was snuff. Women came to the wake during the day. Each knelt(?) down on coming in and sat for a while talking to other women. The plate of snuff was handed around and everyone took a pinch, saying The Lord have mercy on his (her) soul as they took it. Refreshments were served in another room. At night men attended the wake. They generally came in groups and recited the De Profundis at the door before entering. They sat up all night, and often had songs and games such as "Harry the brogue".
Sometimes the corpse was "waked" in he barn.
Mass used to be celebrated at the wake house on the morning of the funeral.
When the corpse was taken out to be buried the coffin was placed on two stools outside the door while the priest recited prayers for the dead. When the bier was removed from the stools it was very important to knock down both stools at once so as not to leave them ready for another corpse. Care was taken to put out the candles in the wake room immediately the corpse was removed for the same reason.
On arrival at the graveyard the corpse was carried three times round the graveyard after which it was left down on a certain placein the churchyard- usually the site of the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 06:42
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Wakes and Funerals
A sort of awning was made over the bed or table on which the dead body was "laid out" by means of ropesand five sheets. One sheet was pinned on the wal at the back of the bed, one at each end and two were draped at the front of the awning. They were held together by pins and ornamented with bows of ribbon_ black for a marred person_ white for un-married. A broader ribbon was need to form a cross which was pinned to the sheet at the back.
When the time came to "take out" the corpse, the women who ad done the "laying out" got busy.
Men were got to undo the ropes which were usually tied to the "couples" while the women were careful to remove every pin so as to take the sheets asunder as it was onsidered unlucky to have one sheet attached to another_ it was looked upon as a preparation(?) for another wake.
A table was placed beside the corpse on which were three or five lighted candles in brass candlesticks
anonymous contributor
2019-11-27 06:41
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phráta bhíomar ag cuimhneamh ar conus a thabharfaidis isteach sa scioból é. Bhailigheamar na comorsain. Fuaireamar san spíce adhmaid agus ringirí ach do theip ortha an práta do chorruighe. Chuireamar fios ar siúinéirí agus saoir agus nuair a thánadar chromadar ar an bpráta do ghearradh na miotaibh beaga. Do ghléasamair an capad annsan fén gcairt agus do bhíomar ar feadh dhá lá agus formhór dhá oidhche ag tarrach toradh an phráta isteach san scioból. Dubhairt m'athair annsan go raibh dóthain na bliadhna istigh anois aige agus diarr sé ortha annsan an chuid eile den phráta do tharrach aníos an bpoll na raibh sé ach níor fhéadadar é. "Is dóigh liom" arsa Seán "gur mhó go mór an gas san ná a bhfuil de gasaibh id gháirdín go léir. Críochnuigheann san obair an lae indiu. Thánadar fé dhéin na cúirte. Thógadar a ndínnéar (agus rl. fé mar atá thuas). Deirigh Seán maidin an triú lae. Dith sé a bhreicfeast. Do
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 20:22
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"Folklore"
Some people have grates and others have their fires on the hearth. It is a grate we have at home. Before going to bed each night all the coals are gathered and put under the grate and some of the ashes is spread over that. Then some turf is put around them. All this is done so that the fire will be easily kindled the following morning. Some people who have their fires on the hearth rake them also.
When I get up in the morning I first take up the coals with the tongs and put them overhead. Secondly I put some dry sticks over them and I put some dry turf over this. I then put some paraffin oil over this and soon the fire is blazing heartily. Then I would put some coal on it.
We use coal and timbers as fuel.
2.10.38
Tomas O' Scanlain
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 19:41
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are all taken out of the grate. Then all the ashes is raked down with the poker. Then the lighted coals are again replaced in the grate. A row of sods of turf are built around them. A covering of sods are also put on the top. When these are well lighted a covering of coal is put over them. If there is no turf this is how we make the fire at home. We put a bundle of sticks in the grate. On top of them we put a covering of coal. We pour the oil on them and light them with a match. Sometimes we kindle it with boards as it oftimes happens that the sticks are wet.
15.5.38
As known locally.
Maire Ni Scanlain
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 19:33
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tain and in the low lying bogland. Sometimes mud tuf are made that are handmade ones. Before the people of the house go to bed they rake the fire. This is how it is done. A little fire of coals is made and around it a little dry turf is built. Then some of the real dry ashes are put on the top and on them the shovel is left.
In the morning those are lit and this is how the fire is made. All the ashes are raked out of the grate and the lighter coals are built up in the middle. A few dry sticks are placed on the top of those and on its top is placed a covering of any clods of turf. Then a few drops of paraffin oil are poured on the top and a lighted match is set to these. In a short time the smoke is all cleared away. To light the fire sometimes a little tin lid is filled with dry ashes. Some paraffin oil is poured on these and this and it is pushed in under the sticks. A lighter is then set to it and all blases up. The smoke which comes off the turf fills the chimneys with. if it is cleaned often the soot falls down in big lumps. You would need some coal to burn so as to keep the chimney dry and to keep the soot from falling.
This is how we renew the fire. The lighted coals
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 19:20
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The fire
in most houses it is ina grate the fire is burned. Sometimes coal is burned, but it is usually turf and sticks. The turf are cut on the moun-
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 17:12
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When a crow lies on a persons shoulder it is the sign of a death in the house. If crying is heard around a house at night it is the sign of a death in the village. If a funeral is scattered it is the sign of another death in the village. When a frog comes in the door it is a sign of death in the house. When the priest is anointing a person if the wool and cotton goes up in a blaze it is a sure sign that the person is going to live. When a number of rats are seen in the house one of the family is going to ( illegible ). When the farmer leaves a ridge of potatoes the length of a coffin it is the sign of a death in the family. When mags are seen flying together a death will occur in the village. When a crowd of crows are seen flying on a church is the sign of a funeral. When a wisp is caught on to hens tail it is a sign of a death in the family. If there a person such in the house and if the dog crys at night that person is going to die soon.
Gathered by Éamonn ó Ceallaig from my grandmother aged 72 Mary Birmingham, Kalgamff, Charlestown, Co Mary.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 16:39
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Caillen's term of office as Bishop, and according to the Book of Fenagh as Primate peace and plenty reigned among the Conmaicne.
Locally it is yet believed that burial in Fiodhnach means heaven hereafter, for those who were interred there. Fenagh was also a Pagan burial place. It is said that 900 Parchatonions were downed in Loch Salach by the current set up by a reptile and their remains were interred in Fenagh. Formorian Kings slain by Lughaidh Lámh Fada were buried in Fenagh.
Several Irish Pagan kings were buried there.
St. Columcille visited Fenagh and wrote a poem praising Fenagh. Below is an English version of this poem.
I bid farewell to Dun Baile,
A noble angelic place
Where I found respect for a while
With the arch-senior of Erin. This was St. Caillean
Dear to me the holy town,
And dear its men in grade.
Dear to me its stone its trees,
Dear its lake, and dear its river.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 10:35
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Old Roads
I.
In Scardaune there is a little road called "bothar [?] sop" and it leads to Bunanomar. This road was made hundreds of years ago. There is a road leading from Ballyglass to Ballindine. This road should come out a little bit above Ballindine but it was never finished. It was started in the famine times to employ the people but there was not enough of money to finish it. Twopence a day they used work for and later on they worked for tenpence a day. A man names Jimmy Cunningham used to walk from bothar [?] sop to Tuam every morning and back again in the evening and that was thirteen miles in the morning and the same in the evening
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 10:20
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IV.
There was a bakery in Ballindine and also a distilary where McHugh's is now. One of the houses is called the Brewery.
Mrs. French Killeen Ballindine
Age about 60 years
Pupil's Name Kathleen Fahey
V.
a tallow-chandler was the name of the man who made candles.
The candles were made of rushes steeped in tallow. the tallow used be in a little pot called the grisset.
John McHugh Ballindine Age 48 yrs
Pupil's Name Nanette Waldron
VI.
There is a well in Ballindine called Faideog where they used steep the candles
Miss Kelly. Ballindine
Age about 76 years
Pupil's Name Kathleen Hession
anonymous contributor
2019-11-26 01:38
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mounds. These are probably where the soldiers are buried.
Sometime ago before last Christmas my father James Codd and a neighbour James Aherne from Yoletown, Ballycullane, Co. Wexford (whose fields the mounds are in) were returning from a neighbours house. When coming along this road two men crossed the road in front of them. They believed them to be the two men from Kayle who were killed in 1798.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 22:23
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In some parts of the country the people can tell from the sky the kind of weather that is coming. It is said that if the sun goes down red, it is a sign of fine weather. If the moon is on its back, it is a sign of rain, and if there is a halo around it, it is a sign of bad weather. If the starts are very bright it is a sign of frost and if they are dim it is a sign of rain. We also notice that if the wind blows south or south east we shall have
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 21:59
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Notes on Leo Casey
In 1838 Luke was transferred from Milltown to Newbristy school where he taught until his removal to Gurteen N.S (Ballymahon) in 1854.
In 1846 was born in Loughan, Rathconrath, Joh - the future Leo - whose ballads were destined to rouse a generation maddened by famine and landlord rule.
At 18 the poet was appointed principal teacher at Tipper N.S. After 3 months he changed to Keenagh N.S.where he taught to 1865. He lived in Ballymahon & was the chief local organiser of the Fenian organisation. At the time wholesale evictions, the burning of farm-steads were of daily occurence. The new ranching system was born which led on to to prisons, workhouses, emigrants, secret societies, annuities and the rest. Great was the faith of young Leo to preach and sing at such a time the doctrine of national resurgence. To rouse the people he sang:
"Think upon your famished brothers
Think upon your fathers' graves
By their glories and their sorrows
Youth of Ireland be not slaves"
II
Early in life the making of ballads became Leo's dominant passion. While attending the celebrated Newbristy seminary he wrote on slates verses of gentle satire on on many of his fellow pupils & on the scenery
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 21:48
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was well withored it was taken to a pond or a boghole and there it was stepped. To keep it from rising there were a few stones left on it. It was left in the boghole for about nine days to soften the tow or outward skin of the flax.
The flax was then spread on the bare meadow in rows. After a while it was brought to some house in the neighbourhood to be scutched. The house in which it was scutched was called a camn and it was the girls in the district who scutched it. It was then sent to the weaver to be weaved into linen. When it came back from being weaved it was washed. There was a field called the 'bleach green' and on it the linen was spread. While spread there it was sprinkled about three times each day with water.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 21:39
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Linen making long ago
First the field was prepared for the seed. They dug up the field and then harrowed it until it was as fine as ashes. Then the flaxseed was sown and it was just the same as apple seed. Then they got their harrrowing rake and renewed their work again. The seed was usually sown in the middle of April.It was pulled in September. When the braird cam up blue boughs appeared on it. When it was ready for puling the boughs fell off. Then a number of men gathered together and pulled it. Sometimes it was cut like corn.
The flax was then taken to a meadow from which the hay was clared(sic) and it was spread there. If it was wet weather the flax was turned once or twice each day. If it was dry weather it would be turned only four or five times altogether. When it
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 18:59
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Notes written on 20 5 36
On John Keegan (Leo) Poet and Patriot of Milltown & on his father - Luke Casey - One Time Teacher in Milltown School. Luke Casey taught here in Milltown (Chapter XIII) from October 1836 to May 1838.
Luke Casey, father to the poet, belonged to the O'Casey's of Sonnagh and Fingal whose territory (Bregia) extended from Dublin to Clondra in Co Longford. Luke was trained in Marlboro Training College in 1834. Luke Casey had the seeds of poetry in him and showed them when he was in College. While in Milltown, Luke Casey was reported by the Inspector of Schools who complained bitterly on the improper conduct of the teacher and the Board ordered that the manager (Fr. Coghlan) should show cause why Mr Luke Casey should not be dismissed. The teacher was supporting the farmers in their war against "tithes". His salary, about £15 a year was stopped and restored after six months. Luke had married Mary Keegan of "The Cat and Mouse". The marriage took place in Liverpool. Mrs Luke Casey died in poverty in Ballymahon about 40 years ago. She and her daughters were defrauded of the money collected for them by (placename?)) Longford exiles in the Argentine. Thereby, too hangs a sinister tale
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 13:40
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living in little houses about a quarter of a mile east of Ballindine. The cooker's name was Patsy Flahey and the weaver's name was Ned Glynn. The cooker used make dishes and keelers for holding cream and also fl Losseto that the people used make bread in. There are some of the blankets and quilts that were made by Ned Glynn still to be found.
Mrs. O'Connor, Cloonmore Ballindine
Age 55 years
Pupil's Name Brigid McManee
III.
In Creevagh a man named John Cunnigham used make baskets of sally rods. He used skin the rods boil them leave them to season and then weave them. The trade died with him.
John Coyne. [?] Ballindina
Age 40 years
Pupil's Name Attracta Rhatigan
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 13:30
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Trades
I.
Long ago there were a lot of tradesmen in Ballindine.
John Glynn a weaver
Thomas Connory a tailor
John Burke a shoemaker
Michael Bane a blacksmith
Jimmie Sweeney a tin-smith
John Dolan a mail-maker
Paddy O'Rourke a bartender
Pat Lynch a shoemaker
Pat Kelly a booker
Ellen Finegan a wool carder
Thomas McHugh, Logalisleen, Ballindine
Age 43 yes
Pupil's Name Kathleen Hynes
II.
There were three cookers in Cloomore, situated about a mile outside Ballindine. One was named Ioghlan and the other two named Healy. There was also a cooker and a weaver
anonymous contributor
2019-11-25 12:39
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An average of about three roods of potatoes is sown each year on our farm. In preparation for these my father puts a considerable quantity of farmyard manure on the land. He next ploughs the land and digs the furrows. The field is now ready for the seed, which is prepared in the following manner. The potatoes are first taken from the place in which they had been stored for the winter season, which is generally in a pit in the field wherein the potatoes were grown the previous year. These potatoes are then cut, care being taken that each part contains at least one eye. When planting these "splits" holes are made in the ridges with a spade. The "splits" are next placed in the holes, which are in rows, each row consisting of three holes. There is usually a distance of about ten or twelve inches between every two holes, likewise between the rows. The holes are next closed.
The potatoes are then moulded for the first time. When moulding them the clay, which is in the furrows, is put on the ridges. This is done when the stalks begin to peep over the ridges. They are moulded secondly when half grown.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 21:41
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Sgeul an Fhile
Do ghaibh file isteach go tig feirmeóra sa droch-shaoghal agus d'iarr sé ar bhean a'tighe, a bhí ag crúdh na mbó sa macha iostas na hoidhche uirthi: "Tabharfad agus fáilte" ar sise, "ach dein rann." "Seo," ar seisean: "Chím dhá chruach dúbha den mhóin; Dhá chapall córach, dhá choin, d'á phreachán níos duibhe nán gual, Dhá mnaoí, Dhá bhuaraig agus dhá bhoin."
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 21:40
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Ar eagla d'úrlar-sa bheith scuabhtha,
Ná úrlár na mnaoi úd thall."
Bliadhain ó'n lá san do ghaibh sé an bóthar arís, agus ní raibh i dtig na mná saidhbre ach croídhtín gan díon gan cómhla. Chuaidh sé isteach sa tig eile agus bhí leanbh sa chliabhán agus crut an t-sonais ar an dtig. D'iarr sé ar bhean a'tighe cad d'imtig ar muinntir a tige eile.
"Tháinig ár orra", ar sise. "Beul", arsan fear, "is mise bráthair fith-innis, agus is le Dia an leanbh san agus caithfidh sé gabháil le teagasg an chreidimh.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 21:39
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Scéul Bráthair Fith-innis.
Do bhí beirt bhan na gcómhnuidhe treasna'n bhóthar ón a chéile sa t-sean-shaoghal. Bhí duine aca chómh bocht dealbh agus d'fhéudfadh saoí a bheith agus bhí an saoghal ar a toil ag an mnaoi eile. Ní raibh aon uisce ar thalamh na mná saidhbhre agus chaitheadh saoí dul amach nach aon lá ag iarraidh uisge sa tobar a bhí ag ceann tighe na mná boichte.
Bhí lán tighe de chúram ag an mnaoi saidhbhir leis agus ní raibh aon chlann ag an mnaoi bhoicht. Ní bhíodh aon lá na go spídeadh an bhean saidhbhir an bhean bhocht síos go talamh agus go ciúis na mara. Sclábhuidhe a beadh fear na mná boichte seo. Lá dá raibh an bhean saidhbhir mar sin ag spídeadh is ag maoidheamh do gaibh bacach társa agus agus chuaidh sé isteach i dtig na mná saidhbhire. D'iarr sé déirc agus má iarr ní bhfuair sé ach an t-eiteachas tairciusneach. Tháinig sé amach agus d'iarr déirc ar an mnaoí boicht. Má iarr fuair go fáilteach agus go fial. Annsan chuaidh sé isteach ag triall ar bhean an t-saidhbhris arís agus seo mar a dubhairt:
"Eist-se a bhean an mhórtais,
As do mhór chuid ná bí teann (Ar lean)
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 21:21
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1.
They came that day prepared for us
The like was never seen,
They thought to server the writs on us,
But we were all to keen.
They thought to server the writs on us,
But well their officers knew,
Its not in the days of ninty - eight
Or the days of Brian Borou.
2.
When they came to sweet Clonfanlough,
The children now did yell,
To gather the country round them
They rang the chapel bell,
THey were coming fast from
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 21:03
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One time there was a man and he had seven cows and he noticed them failing in their milk. When he would go out to the byre every morning a hare would run out in front of him. One morning he made up his mind that he would gather a pack of hounds and kill it.
So he did, and they hunted it thro' the country and the hounds were very near catching it and one of the hounds took the bun off it. When it came to Gallaigh it escaped. It went into and old house of Pat Corrigan's and the man saw the hare go into the house and he went after it. When he went in there was a wee old woman putting on her clothes and the man went over to her and he lifted her up and the blood was running out of her where the dog took the bun off her and ever after the man had plenty of milk.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 20:41
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are to be seen yet on the stones around.
The story of this well was told by Mr. John Byrne, Carrick Castlefin (26.9.39 age about b60 years family living in Carrick for over 5 generations)
Everybody who lives in this district knows about the cures to be got at the well.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 20:39
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In the townland of Liscooly, Castlefin on the side of the road near to Liscooly Station there is a deep well locally known as The Duke's Well. It is situated in Mr Richard Roulstone's farm.
It has been called The Duke's Well since about 1688 when the Duke of Berwick was passing through Liscooly on his way from Enniskillen to a fight at Clady.
That night he got lodging in Mr. Dill's house which is the big house on the opposite side of the road and his men were billeted on the houses around about. The next morning when he was leaving he took a drink out of the well and gave his horse a drink out of it too. From then until now it had been called The Duke's Well.
There is a stone at the bottom of the well with something written on it but the well is never dry long enough for anybody to see what it is.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 20:39
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Béarla - Gaedhilg - Míniú

Mullinavanog - Mullach na bhFeanóg - hill of the scald crows

Nahill - An Eochaill - the yew wood
Rooskey - Rúsgaidhe - moors
Skeagh - Scéach - a bush or bushy land
Skervan - Sceibháin - white rock
Togan - Tógan - raising or elevating
Tullykenny - Tulach Chionaith - Kenny's Hill
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 20:27
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Additional Notes on the Location of the Battles of Gaireach and Ilgaireach
ground towards Ardbrennan one can easily see a spot corresponding with the headless hills. There are saucer like depressions, which present the appearance of of having had their interior portions removed. Beside the standing stone at Rathcarro, there is another one of remarkable appearance, not far from it at the cross roads at Clonaboy. An account of the battle of "Moytura" tells us that after a battle,"kinsfolk & relations , friends and familiars were buried and that there were raised "mounds" over the brave men, grave stones and tombs over the soldiers, and hills over the heroes. The large earthen mounds ("moats") at Rathconrath & Moranstown were perpahs "hills" built over heroes. The smaller "mounds" and "pillar stones" which abound on the suggested site of the Táin battle were perhaps also erected over the graves of "solders and brave men" who perished in the famous fight.
Seán O Cathasaigh O.S.
Baile an Mhuilinn
Rathconrí
Muileann Cearr
Co na hIar Mhidhe
24/10/34
These notes, with other notes were sent by the writer to the late Thomas J Shaw Mullingar when he was engaged in writing a "brochure" on the site of the battle of Gaireach. They were were sent in June 1902. A copy was also sent to the late Tigmus (?) De Rane MRIA. in August '02
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 20:27
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“Three Cheers” a goirti ar fear ó Iochtarcú a bhíodh a dul tímcheall fado. Chuaidh sé thart fé Ceann Mara tráth. Nuair a tháinig sé abhaile go hIochtarcú cuireadar ceis air i dtaobh an choir a chuireadh air
Ní raibh muc ag sgreadaig ná gadhar ag gearán
Ach suain go dtuitfeadh ort ag ithe ime ar do canntaibh (a)ráin
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 20:09
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Additional Notes on the Location of the Battles of Gaoireach and Ilgaireach
The swelling tableland beyong Corr and Rathcarra slopes down to a river. The name of the place is Washford in the townland of Tubbercormick, Washford, I suggest may be a transposed translation of Ath an Bháis, the ford of death. The local tradition is that a fierce and mighty battle was fought there. North east of Mr Ham's house in the lands of Halston is a large and remarkable mound, locally called "Cruachan na gCeann", the "mound of the heads". The mound is shaped like an irregular triangle & has the appearance of being artificial. It is 36 yards long and with an average breadth of about 8 to 10 yards. The tale tells us that Fergus with mighty sword. at the battle of Gaerach cut off 300 heads of the Ulster warriors with each of 3 blows of his sword. Some writers held that the word "Gaireach" is from "gair" an uproar of the great battle or from the outcry which the youths of Emania sent up around "Cuchullain" as he lay on his bed of gore. Those who put together the tale doubtless utilised the natural and other conditions of the country with which they were familiar as their groundwork. Beyond Washford, is the townland Killare. The word could mean "wood of the slaughter" . In the battle Fergus is also described as cutting off with his magic sword, the tops of the hills (maoláin). Standing near the the stone of Rathcarro, and looking across the boggy
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 15:52
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The Battle of Gaireach and Ilgaireach (con.d) d
wild spiky thorn, Cuchullain lay, held in his sick man's bed by hooks and ties and crooks" "I heard a great shout then said Mac Roth "eastwards to the battle and westwards to the battle " Fergus said "I know that shout, that is Cuchullain coming to advance to to proclaim battle, after having risen from the sod of his lowly sick bed in Fort Sciath" There is a pillar stone on Skeagh Hill around which a number of human bones were found deep down in the soil about 10 years ago. The pillar stone may be the resting place of Sciath, daughter of Deagath. Between the hills of Skeagh and Clare is a large extent of hight table land including the the town-lands of Corr, Ballymoren, New Bristy. Cappajuan, Rathcarra sloping to Halston and Washford. In Ballymorren is a conscpicuous moat- 1 mile from the Rathconrath one. These townlands would be just the place for a great battle. The tale relates that "the four great provinces of Erin established a "Dún" & and encampment in Clothra that night. Mac Roth, (Maeve's courier) saw a great array on Slanemore coming from the north east. While the main army of Queen Maeve was in Clare hill, the advance guard would be in Corr - New Bristy, formerly called Mullach na Sleibhe - whilst the Ulster forces would in the great plain of Balgarret & Kilpatrick leading up to Rathconrath with Skeagh Hill on their right wing.
The passages quoted are of importance in investigating the "Táin" topography. I hope to advance further reasons later
(20 X '34)
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 15:31
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said locally to be the burial place of a King. It is marked by two large stones separated from each otherby 7 feet. The large stone is 5 feet 8 inches wide and 3 feet 4 inches above the ground. The smaller is 42 inches wide and 34 inches above ground. In this townland, at a short distance from the moat of Rathconrath there is a hill sloping towards the road leading to Milltown. Towards the top, on the south west side, is a small circular earthwork and on the west side are 3 large stones known locally as the "leegaun" of the type found in the battlefield of Moytura.
In Ballinlug, in the side of the road near Rathconrath, is a small earthwork called "Mweelsen Moat" also called Croca Maoilin. It is of a "sepulchral character" . All the earthworks in the district seem to be of sepulchral origin. Looking towards Slanemore towards the South west is a commanding eminence beside the lake of Loughan. The ancient name of the eminence is lost. The Dalton family changed its old name to Mount Dalton. The lake of Loughan corresponds with the situation of the lake in the tale as "the lake between the the 2 hosts" as given by Professor O' Looney's translation in the Book of Leinster.
To the north of Farthingstown & right in front of Milltown school is the remarkable hill of Skeagh. It is a hill of white thorn bushes. In Mres Hatton's metrical translation of the "Táin" is the following passage;- "So in a high hill nook on Fedan Collina, amid whitening bushes of
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 15:12
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Notes on the probable site of the Battle of Gaireach & Ilgaireach.
as being the conspicuous hill called Clare hill about 2 miles from Newbristy school. Clare hill commands a view of the entire county for miles around. From Slanemore to Clare hill the distance if about 10 miles. The great battles of the Táin must have taken place in the intervening space. I give my reasons for the view
III Gaireach and Ilgaireach
The actual site of the battlefield is not definitely identified. I have my opinion on a close examination of the disrict between Sleamhain and Clathra and on the toprograpy of the battlefield as narrated in the tale and on the tradition of a great battle which lingered in the district about 40 years back. The late Fr Hogan S.J. believed that Corr, one mile from Milltown school, would represent the ancient name of Gaireach. An armay encamped in Slanemore and moving towards Clathra would stream across the table land of Slanemore, cross the townlands of Coolnahay, Balgarret & Kilpatrick. In leading towards Corr and after passing Kilpatrick, the army would meet with the townlands of Rathtrim (rath of the elder trees), Ballyglassm Ballinlug, Farthingstown (a short distance from Milltown School) and Corr. Quite a number of earthworks are to be found in these townlands, in Kilpatrick 6, in Rathtrim 2, in Ballyglass 6, including the well known Moate of Rathconrath. In Ballyglass is a grave
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 14:57
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Notes on the Probable Site of The Battlefieldof Gaireach and Ilgaireach , Referred to in the Táin Bó Cualainge
I The Sleamghan of Midhe
Our great Irish Saga, the "Táin Bó Cualainge has been termed one of the most precious documents in the world's history. In it, the arrival of the Ultomán forces on the hill of Slemghan Midhe is described in glowing and graphic language. It is agreed tat the hill of Slanemore, on the Mullingar side of Ballynacargy is the Slemain Midhe of the tale The hill is suitable for military purposes, as for the camping ground of an army. A mound on the hilltop corresponds to with the description of the mound erected by the first Ultster company arriving at the hill. That company erected the moung for their lord, Cormac, king of Ulster, and son of the high king of Erin. Embraced in three quarters of an acre, are three mounds on the crest of the hill, The cirfumference of the largerst mound, is 56 yards. From the top of the big moung there is a wonderful view. The whole country is visible for miles on either side. One and a half miles ot north east, Portloman, the traditional site of Loman's Cross mentioned in the Amhrán Colum Cille.
II Clathra
On the night before the battle, the army of the four provinces of Erin encamped in Clathra. So the tales tells us. The universal opinion of historians places the situation of Clathra
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 14:28
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The man went in and prayed for a few nights. He then went to his priest and told him about it. The priest told him to go in every night except the twelth night. On the twelth night as he was passing it, he heard sad crying. If he went in that night, he might have died.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-24 14:25
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There are three graveyards in this parish. There are two in Roundfort and one in Robeen. Two of hem are shaped round and one square. They are sloped to the East. There are a number of old tombs in the old graveyard in Roundfort.
There was a man passing the Robeen grave yard late one night. He met a big man at one of the gates. The man halted him. The other man asked him what did he want. The big man named out a certain grave. He told the other man to go in and pray at that grave for twelve nights.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-23 18:48
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The Great Maloney of Rathconrath
attempt to break through the enemy. He failed. His men were exposed to a raking discharge of grape shot, they were attacked in flank by the enemy's cavalry. The ranks after three hours of fierce fighting were broken and they fled in all directions. Those who escaped from the scene of battle, sought shelter in farm houses in the district. The houses were quickly surrounded by cavalry and infantry. The houses were thatched & tho the insurgents offered to surrender the offer was refused. The houses were set on fire. The unfortunate persons who succeeded in is rushing out through the scorching flames were mericlessly shot. Any wounded one of Maloney's band, found alive during the succeeding daya was butchered in cold blood. Those who had nothing to do with the "rising" were treated likewise. Girls were subjected to a worse fate. Since the days of Cromwell there was never such an atrocity committed in W. Meath as that committed by the "Yeomen" after the battle of Wilson's Hospital, The wail of the females of Rathconrath and Bunbrosna areas after the battle of Wilson's Hospital could well be likened to the "wail" after Knocknanoss - a wail enshrined in the famous piece - "Gol na mban san Ar" The brave Maloney was never heard of after the battle. He was wounded & doubtless roasted to death.
Trócaire Dé ar a anam
anonymous contributor
2019-11-23 18:33
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The Fighting James Maloney of Rathconrath
against the Norman freebooter (this line is struck out in the manuscript)
On 5th September 1798 James Maloney assembled the "Croppies" of the Barony of Rathconrath opposite Milltown school. James was born in the village of Rathconrath. At the time there lived in Skeagh a family named Turnert, boasted loyalists to the throne of King George. The "Turners" had a contempt for the mere Irish who they dubbed "d - d" Papish rebels who should be hanged" The rebels had resolved to "smoke out" the Turners and to put them to death. Maloney dissuaded them from doing so. He said it would be mean and cowardly to attack a defenceless family; in doing so it would be imitating the example of the ruling classes. He marched his men to Ballynacargy and from there to WIlson's Hospital, near Bunbrosna where it was said a large quantity of Yeomanry arms were stored. The Bunbrosna "Yeos" who guarded the Hospital surrendered to Maloney. The old men & children in the Hospital expected to be put to death. Not one of the inmates was interfered with. On the following morning the "insurgents" were attacked by an overwhelming body of royalists. They five pieces of artillery. Maloney and his 500 patriots, had few guns, they were mainly armed with pikes, scythes and forks. Three times, did Maloney
anonymous contributor
2019-11-23 17:59
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The 1798 Period in Milltown District
At 2 oc on Monday 19th June 1798 the bloody deed took place. The four dead bodies were thrown on a cart and conveyed to Moyovre village. There three others were arrested on "W's" information. The three were Henry and (indecipherable) Smyth and Michl C Murray. "W" accused them of being United Irishmen. The three were tied to the cart on which were the mangled remains of their neighbours -the Carrolls- and while the militia drummer played "Croppied Lie Down" and amidst the "caoine" and screams of the female relatives of the "murdererd" & onlookers, the party marched to the "Fair Green" of Ballymore. It was fair day there. The three prisoners were put on their knees and on the command of Hempenstall and in the presence of wives, sisters, relatives and the multitude present they were at once riddled with bullets. The aim was to terrify the onlookers. That night Moyvore village of 40 houses was burnt to the ground under Hempenstall. In 98 the history of this disctrict was one of butcheries and burnings.
III The "Fighting" Maloney of Rathconrath.
One of the finest characters in the '98 period in this disctrict was a man (Jas Maloney) chivalrous as brave, scion of a fighitng house whose warriors rode forth to battle under their native chiefs (the Geoghegans)
anonymous contributor
2019-11-23 16:27
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The '98 period Milltown District
across the wide historic hill. The party reached Killare and when right in front of where the "Uisneagh Inn" now stands the robbers heard the noise of the approaching coach. They shout to the driver "Pul up or you are a dead man" was unexpectedly answered by a sudden discharge of of firearms from the inside of the vehicle - a volley that kileld three of the marauders and wounded three others. These included "W". The defenders of the coach were a party of "Yeomen" stationed in Athlone. The raid had been planned some days before and one of the robbers had reported of the intended outrage ot "officer" of the "Yeos" who happened at the time to be on a visit to his native hamlet of Rathconrath
II
"W" anad his comrades wer captured and conveyed to Mullingar. "W" swore against his comrades in crime. They were hanged. To save his own life he promised to betray the "United Irishmen" of Rathconrah-Moyvore districts. With Hempenstal, and a regiment of the Eicklow Militia "W" went to Moyvore and accussed Edward Carroll - then over 70 yeas - & his sons of making "pikes". "W" led the soldiers to the graveyard of "Temple Patrick" and to the bog of Dalystown in Milltown parish. In both places pikes were discovered. Carroll and his three sons were at once butchered in cold blood. HIs house and everything he possessed were burned.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-23 16:11
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The Walking Gallows
The 1798 period in Milltown Parish
Patriots, Thieves and Spies
(This story is authentic. Commenced on 18th October 1934)
As there are still several who bear the name in this parish I abstain from giving it. I call him "W"
In 1798 the "pikes" for the patriots of the Barony of Rathconrath were made by a blacksmith Edwd Carroll and his sons John, Thomas and Edward. They lived between Moyvore Cross Roads and Templepatrick. At the time there was a notorious band of outlaws headed by "Boyle the Robber" which had its headquarters in the deep glen at the rere of Loughan, near the lake of Loughan about an Irish mile - as the crow flies- from the southward from Milltown school. The situation was romantic and it was a safe place to hide stolen property. In June 1798 the gang decided to plunder the night coach at Milltown on the road from Athlone to Dublin. The robbers were well armed with guns and with bottles of "poteen" distilled in the neighbouring bog of Killahugh sped across "Sugar Hill" and the marsh land of Corr until the reached the slopes of Royal Uisneagh where they rested & partook of deep draughts of Killahugh "dew", whilst a raging storm swept
anonymous contributor
2019-11-23 15:39
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western boundary. The chapel is marked on the Down Survey Map as a ruin in the year 1657 and the graveyard contains the remains of all those who lived between the introduction of Christianity up to present time as burials take place there still.
Near the place is a small hill called the Terist hill on which there are the remains of an old observatory built by the Rev. Mr. Wright, the then rector of the parish, 50 years prior to Donovan visiting the scene and which Rev. Mr. Campbell in the day of '98 used as an auxiliary outlook for watching the movements of the United Irishmen of whom Mr. Hamill was Captain and whose descendants are still happily amongst us to the present day.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-22 23:12
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nine or ten of the (mowers) best mowers in the parish were called to a test. At that time there lived a good mower in bahurnagry named Connor O Gorman. He went to the test and set to cut a four acre field with a scythe. At about half past six in the evening of the same day, he had all the meadow moved down.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-22 19:09
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Notes on Milltown Parish
Milltown was before 1840 merely a townland in the ancient and historic parish of Rathconrat. The Geoghegans, an under sept to the O Neills were Gaelic rulers of the barony of Rathconrath. At the Norman invasion & after some fierce fighting race (?) were beaten (?) and their fertile lands confiscated. The Dalton family became the owners.
Rathconrath parish was changed to Milltown parish when the church was built in Milltown on the place near where Milltown school stands. It was in 1849 the present church - called Milltown Church was built in the town-land of Corkan. In olden days the peopel worshipped in Killahugh called after the famous St Hugh born in Killare. Afterwards the parish church was in Rathconrath first near where the Protestant Church was afterwards erected. When at the Reformation period the Catholic Church was levelled in Rathconrath at Mullach a Pobal (hill of the congregations) a high ridge less than a mile from Rathconrath village. The priests of the parish for a long time lived in Loughan (?)
20/7/34
anonymous contributor
2019-11-22 18:54
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St Patrick's Holy Well
St Patrick's Well is in a field owned by Thos TImbs in Kilpatrick adjacent to the hamlet of Rathconrath (Rath con nyre?)
St Patrick and his retinue were travelling on one of the five main roads from Tara on their way to the western province. They came to Kilpatrick. It was a warm day and there wasnt a drop of water to be had. (Water is a scarce commodity in the disctrict today)
St Patrick placed a stick upright in the ground, said some words and a "spring" started at once. That well has ever since been called "Holy Well" of Kilpatrick. During the centuries since St Patrick thousands have come and paid "rounds" at the well. There is an immense ash tree growing at the well. There are 14 branches to tree called 14 stations of the cross. The branches overhang the well. People continue to visit the well to drink its waters and to take it away in jars and bottles to give it to man and beasts to effect cures. They leave pieces of cloth on the branches after them as an offering . They leave them as tokens of gratitude for favours received or hoped to be obtained 20/9/34
anonymous contributor
2019-11-22 18:42
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in the historic Hill of Skeagh - Conoc na Sgeach- not far from Rathcastle cross roads in a field now held by James Sullivan , Milltown that the "screecher" was settled. The rite was performed by the priest who was surrounded by a multitude, armed with forks, scythes and other weapons, Whilst the priest was reading the roaring of the gander became fierce and shrill and startled the countryside for miles around. During the ceremony, the "gander" remained invisible to all save the priest. As Fr Murraay neared the end of the ceremony, the cry of the gander subsisded and finally died away. Peace reigned once more in the quiet countryside and the "gander" has not since been seen or heard .
13/7/34
anonymous contributor
2019-11-22 14:53
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(a) About 90 years ago there lived a tailor in Dromelihy in a certain house. May eve the woman of the house had a churn made and she went to a neighbour of hers, leaving the tailor sewing away from himself. A man came in, in her absence and took a coal with him to light his pipe. As he did so the tailor got up and put another into an oven and covered it. The man came back a second and a third time repeating what he did at first. The tailor repeated his action likewise. The woman of the house soon returned and on going to the churn-barrel noticed she hadn’t as much as a bite of butter though there had been three big lumps of butter in it before she left. The tailor turned round and told her take the cover off the oven. There she found her three lumps of butter saved by the tailor when he counter-acted the actions of the man who wanted to bring the woman’s butter.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-22 10:54
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We sow an acre and a half of potatoes every year. The men prepare the ground. At first they put manure on the ground. Then they plough the ground into ridges. They put five scrapes together to make a ridge, and there is a trench between each ridge. Next they hack the ground with a "grafán". While the men are doing this my mother cuts the seed. After a few days the men put seed into a pouch and stick the seed. There are about nine inches between each seed. Next they close the holes with a "faraheen". In April we plough the trenches and put earth on the ridges with a shovel. In June and July wee wet blue - stone and washing - soda. and we spray the stalks. When we are ploughing we use an iron plough. We buy the spades in the shop. In Autumn we dig the potatoes. We put the largest
anonymous contributor
2019-11-21 16:24
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is ag díol na mbróg ar an t-Srath Bán,
I mBaile Nua ní fhághaim cead comhnuidhe,
Mar bhím ag rógaireacht leis an mnáibh,
Bhí mé ar aonach i gCondae Aotruim,
'S ní theachaidh sgíth orm acht ag ceannach boc,
Thug mé aníos liom thríd Condae an Ríogh iad,
ar fheacht a ndíola 'gus mé faoi thocht,
D'ól mé a luach uilig i ló go h-oidhche,
le cailín caoidheamhail, mo shuidhe ar sop.
Bhí mé i mbaile Uí bhFiacháin is mé ag díol píopaí.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-21 16:10
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'S is ró-bheag m'áird ar a bheith nó a dtrian,
Bím go h-aerach ar malaidh shléibhe,
ag déanamh bhéarsaí 's ag ceartughadh ceóil,
Seal ag pléadáil le mnáibh ar aontaighibh,
'gus seal ag bréagadh na gcailín óg,
seal in mo úcaire, gus seal 'mo mhéire,
'mo bhuachaill spéiriúil i dtigh an óil,
Seal ' mo thonnadóir ag cartadh léadhbach,
eadar an Éirne 's an Mullach Mór,
Bhí mé i mo phóiticeóir ins an lubhar
'S le feabhas mo chumhraidh 'sé
anonymous contributor
2019-11-21 12:53
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Say about one hundred and fifty years ago, there lived in Clonina Cree a gentleman named Mr Mc Mahone who owned a farm in Rehy Park which was afterwards my grand-father's possession.
This gentleman owned a remarkable race-horse and a great-jumper. Her made a bet with another gentleman in the west, that his horse-trainer or jockey , would take a most dangerous jump over a stone-wall, which was within a few yards of the edge of the cliff at the brink of the River Shannon.
The horse had only just standing room to land across the wall , and should he go a step further would be dashed down the cliff one hundred feet in depth meaning death for both.
Mr Mc Mahon told his jokey the night previous with a threat he should do this, or lose the bet. The jockey suffered such grief at this during the night that his hair turned white, for he knew it meant his death. When they reached the place, he faced his horse in a slanting direction, took the leap, and landed at the other side, and then jumped it back again to the amazement of the on-lookers, and won the bet for his Master. This was considered one of the bravest deeds
anonymous contributor
2019-11-20 14:05
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The Penal Days.
In the time of the Penall days, Catholics were not allowed to hold any job in the service of the state or in the army. They were not allowed to have schools or schoolmasters.
Every Catholic had to pay dues to the Prostestant clergy. A Catholic could not own land. They would not be allowed to hear Mass except on the hillsides. Doctor McMahon Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of all Ireland, lived in a farmer's house in ordinary clothes under the false name of Mr. Ennis.
The soldiers who used to be everywhere trying to capture the priests were called priest hunters. Sometimes the priests said Mass on the rocks or on the hillsides.
Long ago, the priests used to say Mass in houses, sheds or caves because they were persecuted and watched so much. During the years 1846 and 1847 the people of Ireland suffered from a most terrible famine, the result of the potatoe blight. Great Britain also suffered severely. In 1841 the population of Ireland was over eight millions but in 1851 it was reduced to tow millions. Part of this was due to emigration. Several thousands died of hunger and disease.
Long ago, there were laws known as Penal Laws. These laws prevented the Catholics from holding and position in armies in law courts or in town corporations. they were forbidden to carry arms. There is a moate at a place near Naul where
anonymous contributor
2019-11-20 10:42
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We have a fairy field at home.There is a fairy living in it by night.Long ago when we used to put the cows into it the were put out again by the fairy.She frightened the people as well.The name of the field is pair a cuille. One night there was a man passing the field the fairy ran after him and killed him.After that no one would not go to the field by night because they were afraid of the fairy.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-20 10:40
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WALSHE'S FIELD: This field is so called because years ago a man named Walsh lived there. He died and ever since it is called Walsh's Field.
JOHN YOUNG'S FIELD: It is so called because a man named John Young owned it.
MC EVOY'S FIELD: It is so called because a man named Mc Evoy lived there long ago.
PIERCE FIELD:It is called the Pierce Field. because years ago a man named Pierce owned it.
PUMP FIELD: It is so called because there is a pump in the centre of the field.
CONWAY'S FIELD: It is so called because years ago an old man and woman named Conway lived there.They died and ever since it was called Conway's Field.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-20 10:40
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came to the station.The people of the his hid their self in the furze in the bog.The people enjoyed their-self with the potatoes.
Name-Dan Shine Killaha -14 years
Name-Jim Cahalane Killaha-73 years
anonymous contributor
2019-11-20 10:38
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There were people living in it the middle of a bog.They kept a very dirty house.The people told the parish priest that they had a very dirt house.They kept the ducks, hens,geese,turkeys,and pigs inside in the house.The priest said the only thing to do for them was to publish a station.He published the station.They cleaned the house very we'll.The woman of the house send her daughter to the shop for a half pound of tea.Her mother put the half pound into a put.She put it on the fire for two hours.She boiled a pot of potatoes. She took the pot of tea from the fire.She threw out the tea and she kept the tea leaves.She strained the potatoes.She put the potatoes into a pan and she put it on the table.She put a gallon of butter milk and six big spoons on the table for the people.She put two glasses of sweet milk for the priest.The people
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 22:37
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Mín Ruadh. (Meenroe) John Walsh Mínroe, owns the following fields. The Long Meadow. The Front Field. The Well Field. The High Field. The Green Field. The Small Field. The Rushy Field. The Kiln Field. The Coarse Meadow.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 20:34
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Folklore
The potato crop
Potatoes are grown in my
farm every year. One
acre and sometimes two
are grown under potatoes
each year. The amount
sometimes vary. My father
prepares the ground. -
First it is turned up and then it is manur-
ed. The potatoes are mostly sown on ridges.
Wooden ploughs were once used but they are not still used. The potatoes are mostly sownwith a spade. It is not madelocally it is bought in the shop.
The preparations for
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 20:22
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Folklore
The Potato crop.
There are a lot of potatoes growing
in our farm. We sowed about
two acres this year. Some years we
sow more and other years less.
my father manured the ground
and made it into ridges.
We sowed all the potatoes in ridges
this year. There were wooden
ploughs long ago. The people
never use these empliments now.
People help one and other in
tilling the soil. In Autumn the
men dig the potatoes.
Told by. mrs. Bridged Noonan
Kilvine,
Irishtown.
Written by. Nancy Noonan
Kilvine, Irishtown
co. Mayo
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 18:58
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Coiglím an teineadh seo mar a coigleach
Críost Cásg Muire na bun agus
Brígidh i na bárr na trí Angeal
sollasmhar atá i bhflaithis na ngrást
go raibh ag clúdach an tighe sé gus a n-aoinne go lá. Améin.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 18:54
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The Abbey was founded in 1184 by Flaherty OMuldorry king of Tyrconnell. It was a house for Cistercians who numbered not more than thirty. It existed for over 400 years and was occupied once by the English of Connaught who came to lay siege to O'Donnell’s Castle at Ballyshannon. It is now dismantled and in ruins. (A full description of the History of the Abbey is contained in Dr. Maguire’s “History of Ballyshannon”).
Local traditions regarding vicinity of Abbey are to be found in Hugh Allingham’s “History of Ballyshannon”.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 17:34
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Luibh na feacht [=? seacht] ngádh grows in mortar on walls. Fotharam (figwort), lus mór, marsh mallows, Seanduinín liath, boiled in goats milk and given to cattle. Most if not all of the above are poisonous and only used when all else failed. Luibh na feacht [=? seacht] ngádh was also used as a charm to protect from the "Good people". Spúnc boiled and drunk fasting is very good for bad stomach.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 14:02
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Long ago when the Fianna were hunting near a lake they saw a lady coming to them riding on a horse. She told then that She came to bring Oisin to Tir-na-nog. Oisin went riding on the horse behind the lady. When he was one hundred years in Tir-na-nog he came to Ireland and when he was riding through the country his saddle broke and he fell to the ground and he never went back again. Lies
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 14:01
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twelve. There was an old school up where the doctor is living now in Trim. This school was in use the time of the famine it was a protestant school. The people were trying to coax the catholics to come to it. It was called the bharter school.
Got from Mrs. Brennan, Clonfane, Trim (41yrs)
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 13:57
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Old schools
Long ago in the Penal times there were no schools like now. A man the name of Peter Higelton taught the wandering schoolars. He taught them in Mr. Rooneys hay barn of Kilbride and in Trimblestown.
They paid him a penny a night and they brought turf to make a fire. They were fairly bright at learning. He taught them how to read, to write and to spell.
Mary Brennan aged
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 11:24
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One very dark night as Tom Galligan was coming home from Pat Gaffney's he was just on the top of the lough hill, when he heard a horse galloping behind him. He stood in by the road-side to let it pass. The horse was ridden by a very fair young lady, who stopped when she came up to him and asked him to get up on the horse, but he refused. She told him to get up quickly.
He knew nothing more till he found himself galloping off on the horse across fields and hedges. They never stopped until they landed in a beautiful little house where there was a number of people dining. They asked him to have supper but he refused. The next morning he refused to eat again. That evening he refused to eat also.
Later on the same lady came to him and said "get up on the horse quickly, you are not wanted in this haunted house of Lisnaskea." He got up on the horse once more beside the lady and off they went across fields and hedges and landed
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 09:43
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The Local Fairs, 22nd February 1938
The local fairs are held in the Fairgreen. Very seldom the fairs are held outside the towns. The buyers the day before the fair came to a cross-road and went to farmers' houses and bought cattle. This is still done. battle buyers often kransack business in the country, at the cross-roads and at farmers' houses.
The fair is held in a special fair-place. It is situated outside the town. A toll of three-pence is paid on every animal that is put in the cattle-yard. It is paid to the Urban bouncil. A member of the Urban bouncil is placed at the gate of the cattle yard to lift the toll. Luck-money is always given, It is called a "luck-penny". When a bargain is made the people strike hands
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 03:50
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I know two Holy Wells in this Parish. One is situated on the left bank of the river Erne about three miles East of Ballyshannon and the other is near the Abbey Assaroe which is about one mile North West of Ballyshannon. The holy Well on the banks of the river Erne is called St Catherine’s well and the one at the Abbey is called Saint Patrick’s well. The well at the Abbey is visited by many people between the 29th of June and the 15th of August while the other well is visited any day one likes.
Any person who wishes to make a pilgrimage must go round the stations. First of all the person goes to the side of the Ocean, takes off his or her shoes and lift fifteen pebbles from the Ocean side. Then the person must go to the wells and drink three sips of water in honor of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. At St. Patrick’s well there are five beds of stones with a cross at each bed. The person must kneel down beside each bled throw in a pebble and say five Our Fathers, five Hail Marys and
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 20:36
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stoop down and light a tuft of dry rushes and the light went out. From that day to this, the top of every rush is withered or singed even in a field where there is a forest of rushes.
On his way back from Slieve Bawne St Patrick slept a night in Kilbonsilla - the wood of the willows. The townland of Kilbonsilla is situated at the foot of Slieve Bawne just inside the eastern boundary of Kilgefin parish and adjoining Doughil - the black wood where there were 441 acres of wood so late as 1654
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 20:28
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St Patrick came to Slieve Bawne and as he passed along the mountain he blessed the wells for the people. When he came to Slieve Bawne he was surprised to find the people around the mountain when to bed so early. As he approached a dwelling to make inquires a women came out to meet him. He asked her why the people around here went to bed so early.
The woman told him they were afraid of seeing the fairy lights as anyone who saw them would be gone in twelve months. The saint told her the lights were harmless and not to be afraid. While they were talking one of the lights appeared in the valley. The Saint did nothing but
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 20:08
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Fish - Trout - salted herring - eels - crawfish and perch were cooked on a grid - iron over turf coals.
Foods on Special Occasion
Potato-cake on Hallow-Eve - and ''Christmas Eve''
Eggs on Easter Sunday - Geese on ''Christmas Day''
Fowl on St Martins' night 11th November
Loaf bread and Milk on St Johns night at the bonfires and sometimes fowl - Potatoes - Bacon, Cabbage Geese formed the wedding supper.
''Cally'' or Colcannon was used on Garland Sunday and November night.
Tea was used by some in 1840 and cost 8/- per lb. The poorer people did not use tea at that date.
Vessels Noggins made by the ''cooper'' were used as cups. Those were made by scooping out a piece of oak - the noggins was without joints and was all one piece. These were scrubbed with sand. There were no plates but shallow wooden dishes also made of oak.
The table was placed along the wall and the smaller children eat the dinner around the cisean of potatoes in the middle of the kitchen floor. Goats milk and some-times the ewe was milked when the cow was ''dry'' and both were used with potatoes oftentimes three times a day.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 19:36
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Food in olden times was much different to nowadays. When the people would rise in the morning they would do an hour's work before they would eat their breakfast. The breakfast consisted of porridge and buttermilk in a wooden bowl called a naggin. At two o'clock the dinner was eaten. At dinner time the potatoes would be put in a rod basket which was used for the purpose. The people of the house would then sit around the basket having a bowl of buttermilk and a pinch of salt each and eat their dinner. At tea time they would eat oaten bread and milk.
The people did not know what tea was at that time and they were much stronger and healthier than the people nowadays. Tea is in the district about fifty years. Special food was
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 18:58
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The names of local roads are called boreens or bye-roads. Almost all of them lead from the county road to villages. They were made about a hundred years ago. There are not many old roads in this district. Most of them are used as bog roads now. The roads were not used as Relief Work during the famine period.
The pay the people got was four-pence a day and they thought it a good pay. When there would be roads made in the villages the people living in it would work on them.
There are plenty of paths or bye-roads in the district. They lead from Gorrynagowna to the chapel of Drum and they are still used by the people because they are shorter than to go by road. People used to cross the rivers by means of wooden planks before bridges were made.
There is a story told about the ford of Griffins bridge near Taylorstown. Long ago there lived a Blacksmith named
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 16:00
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Sé an cnúdán an breac is aistigh cruth agus déanadh a bhfairrge. Tá a chloigeann ar nós cearnóg. Tá sé reamhar as a chloigeann agus a dheireadh caol.
Tá dhá eite dheiligneach faoí agus os a chíonn. Ní féidir greim fághail ar an gcnúdán beo mar tá sé chomh cnámhach sin go bhfuil sé indon láimh duine a lot le na chuid deilignibh. Ní bheadh an cnúdán indon iascáin bheaga a bhreith leis marach trí spiacáin atá fé na gheolbhach. Tá cnúdún dearg agus cnúdán glas ann. Is idir dhá uisce a fannas cochraigh an cnúdáin go dteagadh an síol óg amach asta. Sgeitheann an cníudán ó mhárta go lár an tSamhraidh. Marbhuightear an cnúdán leis na baoite céadna a fheileanns
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 10:30
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Local cures
As regards those local cures everybody in the district knows who has them and I think it unnecessary to give the author as each child has heard it in his or her home. Some of the cures are mentioned over and over again by the different children.
Mr Pete Heslim Drimmien Bloone Mohill has the cure of the ring worm. He makes a bottle to be taken for it. Written down by Bridie Roohy Augharas Mohill.
P.Quinn of Augharas has the cure of the weak heat. This man lives some miles from the school. The information was handed in by J.H. McNulty who is a relation to this P.Quinn.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 10:14
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In the village of Moate there lives a man named Patrick Kenny. He is not a native of that place but he has lived there nearly twenty years.
When he came to Moate there was no well convenient to him, and therefore he had no water to drink.
One morning he broke a piece of a haw-thorn bush when it was in bloom. Taking the piece of stick in hsi right hand he
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:39
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yourself and and and [sic] also when you are finished. While you are going under him and over his back he must be eating oaten meal. What ever meal falls from the donkey’s mouth is made into a cake which is ate in three mornings before your breakfast. Anyone whoes [sic] father and mother are of the same name before they are married can lead for the mumps. When anyone is led for the mumps a donkey’s halter is put on them and are led three times round the well. Every time you go round you get a spool ful [sic] of water out of the well. There is a little well along the road which runs through Lisnamulligans [?] above James Patton’s house. If you can find it yourself it will cure warts. There is a well in […] Roulston’s farm of the Kiltown which can cure toothaches and headaches. Another cure for a toothaches [sic] is if you are opening a grave where there was a corpse buried before and get the scull of the person
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:36
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It is only since the great war that doctors knew well how to stop diseases. Before this when anyone got sick in a house the people sent for someone who cold could cure it.
Patrick Duggan of Tievebrack can cure for the whittle. Ennen [?] Catterson of the green road Pollyarnan can cure for the jaundice. James Bradly Corradoey can cure for the ringworm. He burns the head of a match and writes with ink a saint’s name round it to keep it from spreading. Mathew Harpur of Carnadore can cure a sprain by rubbing it with his hand. Ellen Mc Menamin of Pollyarnan can cure for jaundice. She cures it with certain herb she boils.
If you go under a donkey and over his back three times it is a cure for the Whooping cough. Before you begin you must bless
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:31
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There was also a man drowned in Charles Mortlands of Ballygonigans mill-dam.
His name was Edward Kennedy of Tievbrack.
This man went to bathe in the mill dam one summer’s evening. There were other men with him. This boy dived to the bottom and was drowned. The other boys could not save him.
There was a man named Dan Doherty of Meenlougher. He was drowned in the river Finn.
He and another man went after their day’s work to bathe. Neither of them were good swimmers. This man swam into a turn pool in the river.
About ten minutes after that there were hundreds of people there.
The man had Scapulars on him but he took them off. The priest said if he had kept on the Scapulars he wouldn’t have been drowned.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:29
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There were (are) a great many drownings and happenings in my district. The greatest of them all was the great bog slide.
It happened in the year 1900. It rained for a night and a day. This mountain was so soft with the rain that the scroof [sic] on the surface burst and the log water and mud came down the basin of the Black Burn. Joe Young’s house was full of this mud. They did not get back to their house for six weeks.
Nobody lost their lives in the bog slide.
Several people at Castlefin and Lifford cut turf on the banks of the Finn river.
Some time after that thousands of people were around the place. None of them would venture to go up to where the top of the mountain was for if they did they would sink.
That place is called the “Duck Holes” now. There are a great many wildducks [sic] in it now.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 19:30
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Local Cures (Contd):
Whooping Cough:
A cure for whooping cough was to pass the patient in and out three times between the four legs of an ass goat
Fever:
A cure for fever was to take from the arm of the patient a certain quantity of blood by means of a lancet thereby reducing the temperature after which the patient was allowed only buttermilk whey for some days with no solid flood only flummery. This was a product taken from ground oats. The husk or covering was steeped in water and the water when fermented was boiled. The boiling formed it into a thick fluid resembling light gruel. When this cooled and sat it was very nice to eat and most appetising.
Cures of other diseases by visiting Holy Wells:
The curse of various diseases are sought by visiting Holy Wells particularly St Brigids Well in Greaghnafarna, Ballinaglera and many cures are attributed to the intercession of the Saint by rising her Holy Well. [For a fuller account of the well see page ]
Sprained Limbs:
The cure for sprained limbs is made by some form of prayer which has to be said on a stone which is partly down in the earth and has never been stirred or removed. The person having the cure kneels on this stone with his knees bare of all cloth and during the time of prayer he holds a thread in his hands which is made of flax. The thread is then worn on the sprained part until a cure is affected. The name given to the thread locally is a "straining thread".
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 19:15
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On the thirty first of October there comes a great feast and there are alot of games played that night. There is a great supper in every house and every one of the family is present that night. The people make cakes and put a ring in each one of them and whoever gets the ring will be married first. all the young people play a lot of games that night. They get a basin of water and put a coin into it and then the people puts their heads down in the water and whoever gets the money can keep it.
Many other games are player also. They put three plates on the table and put a ring on one plate water on another and nothing on the third one. Then they are blindfolded and if you put your hand on the ring you will be married. If you put your hand on the water you will cross the sea and if you put your hand on the other plate you will never leave home. On that night the people gets alot of nuts because they are ripe that time and get bad very quick. The children get an apple and hang it on the roof and try to eat it without catching it in their hands. If they get a bite of it they can eat it all. When Halloween is over young and old be looking forward to its approach again.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 16:02
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the purpose of sheltering him. There and then, he surrendered.
Next, in the townland of Eden, Michael Keegan was the victim. The people tried to defend his home but Buckshot Foster was victorious. After the eviction, a few people were arrested, brought before the Star Chamber and sentenced to imprisonment-male and female suffering alike. Jane Early and Catherine Keegan served a month each in Sligo jail.
In March ?83, on the Crofton Estate, Pat Rynn, Urbal, Stephen Kellegher, Tullivacan, and Pat Rynn, Tullinaha were evicted. After the evictions, Fawcett, the agent, resigned and Cox took up duty and re-instated all the tenants.
In July ?83, onthe Harlech Estate, Pat Rynn, Druminalass was evicted. In this case a settlement was brought about through the interference of the bailiff. But, he deceived the tenant. Accordingly, Rynn was, again, evicted in the following June.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 14:51
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138
15-6-38 The Fairy Ring
About seventy years ago a man by the name of Mr O. Kinsella was ploughing a field in Killiney. When he was in the middle of the field he saw a ring made of mushrooms. The man did not mind and drove on but when the horses put their feet in the ring they fell dead. The man ran to the house and told the people of the house what had happened. Then the people told the man that it was a Fairy Ring.
Henry Young 10 St Patrick's Rd Dalkey.
From Mrs Mullen 10 St Patrick's Rd Dalkey
Age 75 years
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 14:41
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Glann More
On the farm of Mr Dennis Brennan, Lemgare, Castleblaney hence called because it is so low lying.

Red Field
In Tullinmalra, Castleblaney, so called because of reddish soil got there.

Sally's Hill
In Tullinagrove, Castleblaney thus named because in ancient times an old woman named Sally owned it.

Cave Hill
In Carrickaduff, Keady, Co Armagh, so called because a cave on top of it.

Spa Rock
In Tullinagrove, Castlebalaney, named owing to a spa well being in it.

Sounding Brae
In Carrickaduff, Keady, Co. Armagh hence called owing to a musical sound which is heard from it, when walked on.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 10:02
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Spider Lane -: This lane is situated between Power's and Keating's opposite the New Bridge. It is so small that a spider could not pass (throught) through it. Hence it is called Spinder Lane.
Mrs Organ
Sir John's Road
Carrick on Suir.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-16 20:59
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Abhac - said of a small person as "Sammy the Abhac"
Agúisín - an addition
Ailleán as "He is a nice Áilleán"
Alpadh as "The pig alped it up"
Aindeis as "He was very andeis looking"
Aindeiseóir as "You'd pity the poor angisheór"
Airc Said of a person who was always looking for food "Theres an "airc" in his heart"
Airc luachra, airgead, Amadán
Amalach as "They are very AMALAC in that farm".

* * *

Bacac - (beggar miserly person)
Bacac as - He had two "bakky" feet" crooked, swollen or lame
Bacán - The hook on which a hinge is fitted
Báinín - flannel waistcoat
Baitín - chiefly carried by a woman as "Let every old woman be out with her "baitín" to help ou the good cause"
Balbh - Balbh ánuí - dumb. stammerer.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-16 17:06
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This is what my parents told me about the beggars of long ago. In the olden times the beggars begged for potatoes, some of them gathered rags, and bottles, some of them used to buy donkeys, and sell tin-cans, and saucepans, strainers, and candle holders, and tin lamps. The names of these beggars were Dan Kelly, Ned Moughan, Pat Monnion, Harry Gill, Mick Pickett, Pat Larkin, John Stanton, Grogen, and Paddy Glynn, Mommie Flynn, and Biddy Barrett and her husband, and Tom Green, and his step sister, Peggie Patent.
Dan Kelly was a very tall man. He wore a hard hat, and a tag coat, with colour-ed feathers on the hat, and a knickerbockers, and leggings. They called him a foreigner. He was a great dancer. He got lodgings in Ballybough one night, and he was so tired dancing that he fell asleep, and there was a crowd of the youngsters there, and the people were all life long ago, so they had laid him out on the table, and covered him with a white sheet, lit two candles, and he lay there a few hours, and when he awoke, he was in a raging temper to see the state he was in.
Ned Moughan used to wear a hard hat, and a swallow tail coat, and a corduroy pants
anonymous contributor
2019-11-16 11:21
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their sacrifices to the sun on it.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-16 11:17
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Seven for a secret that is never to be told."
Other believe that if a bird flies into one's dwelling house, it is the sign of death.
In have never heard any people interpret the birds language except one.
"Wee bit of bread and no cheese
Pity, pity me."
This is supposed to be what the yellow-hammer,a small speckled bird with a yellow neck says.
I have only heard once how the robin was supposed to have got his red breast. When Our Saviour was been crucified, and had a crown of thorns on his head, the robin was supposed to have come, and picked a thorn out of his brow. A drop of blood fell on the robin's breast, and from that day to this, the robin had still got his red breast.
A remarkable thing about the wren is that in the springtime, when all the birds are building their nests, the cock-wren builds a nest, and when he has it built, he leaves it, and goes and builds another until his temper cools. This is how so many empty wren's nests are found in the bushes in the springtime.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-16 11:03
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the blacksmith presents long ago. But they do not do so now.
It is told that the local blacksmith once made his own horse-shoe nails out of bars of iron.
In the winter evenings the men of the village gather into the forge and tell stories, or talk over the day's happenings. Our forge has never figured in any historical events.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-16 10:56
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April 1938
Old Cures
Several of the old people in our district have old cures which they make out of herbs. Some of the herbs used just as they are pulled.
Sage, a bitter herb with a curly leaf resembling that of a foxglove, is supposed to be a cure for a sick stomach. If one east a small raw potato, it will cure the heartburn. A pinch of baking soda is also a cure for heartburn. When one receives a burn, if one immediately dips it in a little buttermilk, to which some baking soda has been added, it will prevent it from blistering. Many people believe that if those suffering with warts, spit on them for nine mornings in success, that it will cure them. Another cure, is to get a large black snail and to rub it on the warts, and then stick the snail on a bush. By the time the snail will have decayed away, the warts will be done. Soap and sugar mixed together until it
anonymous contributor
2019-11-15 22:46
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About 1 1/2 miles west of the Curreeny school, there is a mountain called Mauher Cle. On the Ordnance Map it is called Mauherslieve its height is given as 1,783 feet. On top of the hill there is a pillar of small loose stones supposed to be made by visitors to the hill on pattern day the 15th August. Beside it is a hole about four feet deep and a diameter of 5 feet. There is a wall built around the hollow & an opening can be seen on the eastern side.
It is said there is an underground passage leading from Moher Cle to Cnoc thaidhg. a hill about 1 mile to the north of Mauher Slieve.
There is very little known locally about this mountain or the underground passage. Some say that a fire used to be lighted on top of this hill, when the Southern chieftains used to be calling up their soldiers to fight against the Normans. Others say there was a spear buried here in early times & that there was a mound of stones built over it to mark the spot. The biggest stone on top of this hill is only about 5 stone weight & there is not Ogham writing on any stone.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-15 20:10
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and Greek.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-15 17:54
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58. (Contd)
(b) Fox - harrow.
A piece of straw rope about fifteen inches long - thick and well woven is obtained. Nine or ten boys, seat themselves on the floor. The boy holding the rope - the fox as it is called - stands in the middle of the ring of boys who are seated. He passes the fox to one of the boys who shouts "Fox harrow & passes it round under their legs. The fox is kept going - all shouting. Fox harrow- narrow ?? and at the time giving an occasional stroke to the boy standing on the floor. The boy on the floor is continuously turning on all sides & grabbing down among the boys - between their legs to try & get the fox. Finally he succeeds & boy on whom the fox is found is the next victim.
This is continued until the boys are all fairly well exhausted. The game has been practised for generations & is still practised at the wakes of old persons.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-15 17:01
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An incident of the Penal Days
Fr Ambrose Cassidy was on his banishment. He was accompanied by Captain Gildea, who was one of the most noted marksmen of his day. They took cover in an 'alt' and rested there for the night. Some time during the night, however, Captain Gildea saw a light. He raised his rifle, and fired in the direction of the light and shot the spy that was on the priest's track. A solitary bush now stands where the spy fell. This incident happened in the downland of Tullinaha. Captain Gildea is buried in a meadow in Drumdristan.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-15 11:32
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The Soggarth was roused at an untimely hour.
By a crashing blow on the door of the tower.
"I am captured at last" he exclaimed with a shiver.
As he kissed the gold Cross with pale lips all a quiver.
"Tis Black Captain Dick" and he mumbled a blessing.
But his aged hands shook as he hastened his dressing.
The door was burst in and old Father O'Farrell'
Saw the Rapparee outlaw bold Phelim O'Carroll
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 18:34
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the island. He was at one time head of the pagan sanctuary but he adopted Christianity.
At the command of an angel it is said he left the island to St. Columba who died in the year 545. After that Inis Cealtra passed on to St. Caimin. Under him the school became of the most famous of our seats of learning. It drew scholars not only from the remotest parts of Ireland but from mountains as far as France and Germany.
Inis Cealtra was plundered many times by the Danes and again by the English. There are the names of seven churches, a round tower, five high crosses, and a holy well to be seen on the island.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 18:25
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Inis Cealtra is an island situated close to the northern short of Scariff Bay and not far from the village of Mountshannon. The name Inis Cealtra means "church island" but it has always been known as Holy Island.
It is about fifty acres in area and its soil is exceedingly fertile. Before the year 1849 it was part of Clare but in that year it was transferred to the Galway. In the year 1849 however it was restored to Clare and so remains since.
Originally Inis Cealtra was a pagan sanctuary but of that phase of its history nothing is known. St. Mac Criche was the first to establish Christianity
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 15:09
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Riddles.
It's deep and it's damp and it's wet on the bank and its fit for the lord of the lady. Turf.
Aunty Naughty built a ship an' on that ship her daughter lay. An' I'd be blamed to tell her name. An' thats three times I've told it _ anne.
I know a man with a long tail. He goes in and out the gap 40 times a day. Each time he leaves a bit of his tail after him. Needle & Thread.
It flies high, hops low, wears shoes and has none _ A football.
Under fire, over fire and never -tough- touches fire. A cake in a pot-oven.
A cake with all the crumbs around it (moon & starts)
Four legs up and four legs down: soft in the middle and hard all round - (a bed)
As I went up the [?] I met my uncle Tony
He had an iron and steel Toes and upon my word he'd frighten the crows _ (a gun)
As I went up the [?] I carried the [?] on my back _ (a ladder)
It's as black as ink and ink it isn't
It's as white as milk and milk it isn't
It hops on the road like a marble stone
And a marble stone it isn't (A magpie)
[?]
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 12:27
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Fairy Forts
Collected from Michael Brady Lisatoo Laragh Cavan
Written by Michael Reilly Castletara Castletara Cavan
There is a fort in the townland of Creeveland. It is on a farm own ed by Robert Rowntree. It is a round shape with a whiney deyke round it. There is an enterance through a gap. There are three forts in view of it. There is no enterance in the centre.
There was nothing remarkable ever seen about the fort. Long ago Robert Rountrees father used to labour the fort and their cows used to die without cause.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 12:05
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when they spoke of the Burning of Churchtown “As dead as Benlap”.
About midnight on the first of February the Whiteboys surrounded the barrack and those on the eastern side threw a volley into the barrack from a nearby wall. The boys on the western side threw sods of lighting turf on the roof which was thatched. Most of the police were killed and three private houses destroyed.
Next morning Colonel Gough came with soldiers intending to burn the whole village but only for “Sherriff Crofts” who lived near the place and a Father O’Brien who was in Churchtown at the time, the whole place would have been burned out. Three Whiteboys were killed and their bodies were taken to Carrigeen Bog and hidden in ricks of turf until later when they were buried. Two other Whiteboys named Brosnahan and Lillis, two important men, escaped to England but were followed by detectives and a friend of their own who gave them away.
They were hanged on Peggy’s Rock about half a mile from the village on the Buttevant Road. Another Whiteboy, names Singleton, was hanged on Knockardbane Hill near Liscarroll and the grass has never since grown on the place.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 00:28
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Another version of the last story gives the name of the hunted priest as Father Mc Gowan but the more common tradition is that his name was Father Ambrose Cassidy. He was, I have heard, a native of Blacklion District of Co. Cavan. He was the last hunted priest in this parish. He was here in 1798.
It is said that when he was pursued by the yeomen that he stood behind a holly bush. The yeomen passed by but they did not see him - except one man who noticed his hiding place. This man was called Cullen.
In some years afterwards when the priests got their freedom, the priest met Cullen who asked the priest if he remembered the day he was behind the holly bush. The priest said he did and then Cullen said that he saw him. The priest replied that he could not have seen him unless he was baptised. Cullen replied that he never heard that he was. He said, however, that he was sickly when he was young and that he was in charge of a Catholic nurse. He said that the nurse was still alive and that he would go to see her. She told him that she got leave from his parents to get him baptised as he was delicate when young.
(Michael Flynn from his father, Michael Flynn of Carntulla.)
Some people say that this nurse baptised him secretly herself in case he would die.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 00:26
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In the olden times people spent Hallowe'en just as they do today. They put some apples into a tub of water. The boys and girls must try and catch the apples in their mouths to see which of them would get the most apples.
Another game they play is to get three saucers and put in each saucer a ring
anonymous contributor
2019-11-14 00:21
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Bhí fear darbh ainm W ot in aice an stáisúin i mBaile Glúinín a bhí ag déanamh leathar
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 23:39
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and then ask the others and if any one of the girls would say the right time one of the girls would follow her and if she did not catch her she would be the timer
Another game we play is Betshel. We would get a flat stone and beds and if the Betshel goes on the line we are out and when we are for our eight we buy a bed and then we start again.
Another game we play is riddles. Some of the girls would go at one
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 23:38
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It is the custom to "wake" a dead person two nights: if a person die after 12 o'clock, say half-twelve or one o'clock they have a long wake. (3 nights and two days).
All who come to the house to pray and remain some time get tea and wine or whiskey if they care to take it. But in Co Sligo where I come from (and left about 1902) it was usual to give a new clay pipe filled with tobacco to each person who came to the wake, which was called the "corpse-house" during the day, and the wake during the night. You would hear two persons "discoursing" and one ask "Were you at so and so's wake?" "No, but I was at the corpse-house."
Re - the distribution of pipes and tobacco, each person should take a "blast" - at least that was sufficient for non-smokers - and say "God rest his or her soul". And each person on entering should kneel down near the corpse to pray for the departed soul, and also on leaving. And people did not think it "right" to go or come alone; nearly always a few come and go together, and some member of the family should remain all the time near the corpse.
In Sligo a plate containing snuff was also handed around; each person should take a pinch and snuff it, and say "Lord have mercy on his or her soul."
"A decent funeral" meant distributing whiskey etc
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 23:36
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The games we play are Betschel[?], Jig, Times, Riddles, Steal the Sheep, Hide and go seek, Steps and Bottles, Lards and Draughts. We play House in the summer. We pick Blackberries too in the Autumn. This is how we play Times. We get two girls, and about eight more girls and put them standing up against the wall. The two girls would say some time
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 23:31
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Our Holy Wells (Answers to questions in circular of April 1934.
St Brigid's Well
1. St. Brigid's Well is situated in the townland of Greaghnafarna, parish of Ballinaglera, in the county of Leitrim.
2. It is situated on the side of a hill about one and a half miles from the eastern shore of Lake Allen. The lake, however, is not visible from the side of the well. The hill on which it is situated slopes in a north-easterly direction looking towards the Sliabh an Iarainn Mountains (Co.Leitrim) on one side and the Teebawn-Monesk mountain range in Co. Cavan on the other.
It consists of a perfectly circular hole in a stone, eight inches in diameter and one and a half feet in depth. Beside the Well is a cairn of stones. The water in the stone has no outlet or inlet as the hollow is all stone which precludes the possibility of water coming up through the ground. The land around the well is dry even in Winter. It is said that the well never runs dry even in times of prolonged drought.
3. St. Brigid is the Patron Saint of the well and tradition states that the hollow in the stone was caused by the presence of St. Brigid's knee.
4. The Well was known as Tobar Brighde to the older generation.
5. No tradition survives of any annual pattern and it is not likely that such was held. Any Saturday of the year may be a day of Pilgrimage but in order to gain requests, the Well must be visited on three consecutive Saturdays.
6. The Well is frequently for the cure of the toothache. In order
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 12:35
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12. Crainneach
13. Diolúisc
14. Sleamhach
15. Duagal, longán (doogle) - flat fish enclosed in two large flat shell
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 11:55
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would go without horses & that after that drays would go without horses up in the sky. They meant cars and aeroplanes.no
One day Danjel Moran was going home by Fraine Rath. He called the Púca Práine to carry him home. The Púca Práine knew he wasn't tired or old but yet he carried him. He brought him through hedges and bushes till his feet were torn off him. When he reached home he thought he was an hour away but he was a week.
These stories of the Púca Práine are well known in the district - I take it that Práine means "haste".
Danjel Moran must have been a famous character he is often quoted as the source of old stories.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 11:14
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1. barrach buidhe - may wrack
" block
2. barrach glas - Harvest "
3. léigheach (?) - black "
long wide strips growing next shore.
4.
Raimhneach - Winter wrack
5. barr-chadaigh - long thin wrack
("whangs")
6. milseáin - grows in brinches on rocks.
7. Cleim-seachán - used with carraigín yRl for eating - broad-leafed wrack.
9. Slait mhara - sea rods
10. faimneach, bulgáin - with air bubbles in it
11. bárlán feimnighe - grows near shores
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 03:55
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pipe and he took it. When he had it smoked he said "the Lord have mercy on the dead" and she was released of her Purgatory.
Kathleen O'Keeffe,
Ruhillmore,
Boherbue,
Co. Cork
Class VI
Name of person who gave information-
Edmond Fitzgerald (Ned Davy Bill)
Ruhillmore
Boherbee
Co. Cork (Age 70 years)
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 03:53
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do him more good than harm. Sean was very fond of tobacco and took much pleasure in smoking his pipe. When he had his pipe full and a piece of tobacco in his pocket he used to say "I am as happy as any King that ever ruled Ireland."
One night in the month of January Sean found himself very much disappointed. There was a hole in the pocket of his vest and through the hole slipped his piece of tobacco and the next shop that sold tobacco was ten miles away. Sean went to his neighbour Mickie Tag and asked him for a piece of tobacco but Mickie had only a piece the size of a marble, and could not afford to share with Sean. Sean left disappointed. He next went to Davie Keeffe another neighbour and again left disappointed. Davie had only as much tobacco as was in his pipe and Sean had to leave without any smoke.
He thought of the woman of the well and he went towards her. She handed him the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 03:52
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would be nearly killed. If they were caught carrying them their legs or hands would be broken.
It is often five or six died on the same week. They were buried without coffins or anything. They weren't even buried in a right grave. There was a big hole in Schull burying ground and it was called a "Dump". The bodies were carted to the burying ground and they were all thrown into that big hole. They were also buried at a place called the "Kill field". The people living near that place carried them to the "Kill" in wheel barrows.
After a spell the "Stores" in Lowertown was made into a work house. All the people who were dying or hungry went into that work house. They didn't get much to eat because sometimes they broke out of it and ate the limpets off the rocks near the place. If they were caught outside they would be beaten.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 03:50
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butter would not be alright unless it got its final wash in this famous water.
There are several stories told about this well. Tradition tells us that in the early eighties an elderly woman was seen sitting close to the well smoking a clay pipe with a very long stem and a bright tin cover. Any person who came to the well for water at midnight between the hours of twelve and two would see her. She would reach out her hand as if anxious to take the pipe from her but no body could be found to take the pipe.
There lived in the neighbourhood a man of giganic stature named Sean Mor. They called him big Johny or Sean Mor. Sean was a very robust man. He stood six feet fix inches in his vamps and measured 45 inches around the chest.
Sean had little fear of fairies and did not believe but if he met them that they would
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 03:47
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A Famous Well 8.11.38
Tobar na Croi is a well that never ran dry. It is situation in Ned Davy Bill's land in Ruhillmore, Co. Cork. The flow of water from the well is about 200 gallons a minute. Since 1848 it has removed about 100 yards. The water that flows from this well is very warm during the winter and very cold during the summer. The water of this well is supposed to be the best in Munster.
In old times when all the farmers in Ruhill made their own butter and put it into firkins and sent it on to a buttermerchant in Cork the water in this well was much used. Three or four farmers used join in the butter-making, and a firkin of butter was filled by some one each week, and so on until each one had the firkin full.
The butter should be well washed, and for the last wash the water from Tobar na Croi should be used. The people thought the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 03:47
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got that was working there was a gallon of meal and that was supposed to rear his wife and himself and his family.
[-]
They died by the sides of the roads. There was a dead man found by the side of the road by some one of the Fisher's parish and they carried him to the Altar church and they buried him in the burying ground there. He was buried the wrong way and Fisher told them to take him up again and bury him the right way. Someone who was standing by the grave said "Would it bring him nearer to heaven" and Fisher didn't say anything, but he was left that way and the grave is to be seen still.
Some people stole out in the night and carried raw potatoes and other things from the protestants and landlords. If they were seen carrying them they
anonymous contributor
2019-11-13 03:41
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and all the people went in there. They got better food, but some of them were too far gone and they died. When the times got better, there was a hospital called "The Work House" built in Schull district between Schull and Ballydehob. The man in charge of it was Michael Brown from Dreenathraw. All the sick and hungry people were put in there and it also gave work to some people, to get food and to take care of those people. It was a great improvement to the poor people, but the Sinn Féinn men of nineteen sixteen burned it fearing the English Soldiers would come to live there. The four walls of it are still to be seen.
[-]
It was at that time that the main road from Schull to Goleen was erected and all the people around that place were working at it. The payment a person
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 19:40
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About thirty years ago, all the young men in Lisdowney district were stepdancers. The most noted of them were Richard Hoyne, Richard Grace and James Cody. They were well able to dance the Hornpipe, Reel and Double. They learned these dances from a man named Ivory.
There was a woman living in Ballyphilip in the parish of Lisdowney Co Kilkenny and her name was Bridget Maher. Every Saturday she walked to Kilkenny with a firkin of butter on her head.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 18:54
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Deir na sean daoine go rabh Cúchulainn ins an chonndae seo ar fastodh ag feir abhí in a chomhnuidhe agus mbaile Dún na nGall. Chaith sé bliadhna ar fastodh ann, agus ag deireadhan ama sin d'imthigh sé leis na bhaile. Nuair a chuaidh sé na bhaile bhí lúghthair mhór ar a mháthair agus ar a athair agus ar na comharsanaigh roimhe.
Rinne siad féasta mór dó, agus nuair a bí an féasta thart d'imthigh sé leis agus chug sé leis [?] beag a bí aige, a fuair sé nuair a bhí sé agus nDun na nGall, agus chusidh sé suas
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 18:39
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More than sixty years ago, a fever broke out in Celbridge called the "Black Pock".
The Hospital was not able to accomodate all the patients, so the board of guardians were looking for an idle building to put the patients in.
They asked the McKennas for Coolfitch House, and it was given to them. Later, they thought it too small so they took Newtown House. The patients died in great numbers and nobody would touch the corpses.
There was an old man named Paddy Lyons who used to wheel the corpses in a hand cart to the grave yard for burial, until he got a pony to carry them away.
The Dunnes of Coolfitch had the making of the coffins. The old man had £2 for each corpse he buried. Later on, this place was purchased by the late Mr. Kennedy of
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:26
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was broken off and used instead as soap whenever it was needed.
Note: A "Scoith" rope was made from beetled rushes which were dried. About twelve of them were then plaited into a thin rope.
(Francie Browne from his grandmother, Mrs. Susan Rynn of Aughrim.)
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:23
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About seventy years ago a substitute for soap was used. Ferns were burned and the ashes were mixed with water and made into a paste. The paste was then mixed into small circular cakes with a hole in each. They were left out to dry and harden in the sun. Then they were put in on a "scoith" rope and hung up to dry over the fire. A piece of cake
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:20
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Resin Candles: Resin was bought in the shop and melted in an non spoon-shaped vessel which was made in a forge. This vessel was called a grisset. Then thin strips of calico or other material were cut. Then the strips were dipped in the resin. Then they were taken out and rolled on a board until they were made into long sticks. The candle sticks were made of iron on the top with wood underneath. The iron was made so as to open in and out like a nippers. The candles generally used were three rush candles plaited together.
{Francie Browne from his grandmother, Mrs Susan Rynn, Aughrim.}
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:11
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Rush Candles: The process by which rush candles were made is very simple. Thick green rushes were chosen and they were peeled leaving a narrow strip to form a support. The rushes were dipped in oil or melted fat. Then they were left aside to get hard.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:09
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Old Crafts (Contd): Candle - Making (Contd):
Before tallow candles came into use there were two other kinds of candles used in this district which the people made in their own homes. These two kind were rush candles and resin candles.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:07
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The rushes used to be cut in October and November. Then they were peeled leaving a little strip of the skin still on to keep them from breaking. They were then dried. Butter was then melted in a grisset. The rushes were then dipped "in the dip". When dry they were ready for use and one was placed in a wooden candlestick and burned as required.
{ Cáit Nic Réill from her father, Francis Mc Greal; also Maighread Mic Dorcaidh from her grandfather, James Mc Gourty - both of Slievenakilla}
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:05
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There was a hedge school in Glangevlin, in the County of Cavan. Brian Mc Govern was the teacher's name. He used to go to the children's houses to sleep and get his meals. My grandmother used to go to school to him. There was no government pay in those days.
{Mary Flynn, from her father, Michael Flynn, Carntulla, farmer aged about 60}
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 17:03
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Old Schools: The First Slievenakilla School (Contd)
his home. He was a man of low stature and was old when he was appointed here by Fr. Frank Mason, the Parish Priest. He was here in Father Smith's "early days" too. He died in the little house he occupied and was buried in Ballinaglera. Reading, writing and Arithmetic were the principal subjects taught. He used a rod occasionally. He carried the pencils in his pocket. Slated were used for writing.
The building which still stands in a good state of preservation, although slated, was not watertight. The floor was clay and was often covered with water in the morning. This had to be put out with spoons and porringers in the morning.
Francis Mc Greal of Slievenakilla succeeded Patrick Clifford who in turn was succeeded by Francis Mc Kenna from Inishmagrath. Master Kelliher, who later taught in Urbal, served in Slievenakilla for about one year. Mr Robert Bannon succeeded Mr Kelliher and served here till 1927.
{ I got the above piece of information from Pat. Gilmartin of Corralubber now (1938) aged 70. He was a pupil with master Clifford for 6 or 7 years}.
Note: The present "Slievenakilla" School was built in the townland of Carntulla in 1895.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 16:53
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The First " Slievenakilla" School
The first "Slievenakilla" School was built on Owen Mc Grail's land on the bank of the river that separates the townlands of Slievenakilla and Carntulla. It was built in the townland of Slievenakilla about 100 years ago. It appears that the first teacher who taught in it was Master Cullen. Later Patrick Clifford of Fermanagh was appointed as teacher. He taught there from 1860 to 1874 approximately. He lived in Francis Rourke's shop. It was previously occupied by a Miss Gilmartin who was an invalid. She was a sister of "Bobbie" Gilmartins' and a daughter of Peter Gilmartin's known locally as Peadar Beag.
Mr Clifford's salary was £26 per year. The children used to promise him money but few gave him any. They used to take two turf to the school every day and sometimes and egg or two for books. He wore a very tall hat in which he used to carry the eggs. He was a rather odd man and wanted no visitors or company in
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 16:46
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Old Schools (Contd)
There was an old school in Stranagarvana at Frank Mc Grails. It was a byre. The scholars used to sit on straw mats. They had no desks and they wrote on their knees on slates. Peter Mc Grail taught in it. The floor was made of clay.
There was another school in Carntulla at Denis Mc Hugh's. It was an old byre. The pupils used to sit on sods in the summer time when they were dry. They used to sit on stones covered with straw in the winter time. They wrote on slates. Johnny Loughlin, Drumristan taught in it. The floor was clay.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 16:43
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Another Old School:
There was an old school on our land in a place called "Poll na Hana". If the weather was fine, the people used to stay outdoors and if it was bad they used to stay indoors. He was a man named Mr Healy who taught in it. School was not carried on in the farmers' houses. The subjects taught in it were reading, wriiting, arithmetic and Latin. Irish was spoken by the teacher and the pupils. It was used in teaching the subjects. Writing was done in those old schools on a slate with a slate pencil. They used to write on their knees sitting on big stones.
(Francie Browne from his grandmother, Mr Susan Rynn, Aughrim, Ballinaglera)
Note: For further old schools see the following pages.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 16:37
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The "Lodge" in Slievenakilla: The Lodge was built about seventy years ago. It was built on Owen Mc Grails' land. The landlord, Arthur Ellis got it built. It belonged to the Landlord. It was called "the Shooting Lodge". The Landlord used to come each year and he used to have men called Arthur Barlow:
*See an account fo the "lodge" on this page, page 41: see also pp. 44-45
anonymous contributor
2019-11-12 16:37
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Local Hereos; Strong Men
James Mc Morrow of Fahy (Faiche), Ballinaglera, Co Leitrim could lift a large stone that was in the townland of Fahy, on the east shore of Lake Allen. This man is alive yet- he is about ninety years of age (1938). No other person could lift the stone but himself.
Frank Early of Eden, Ballinaglera, could lift forty stone of grain.
Francis Mc Grail, Slievenakilla, Ballinaglera was the best stone thrower in the parish. This man was a teacher in the old Slievenakilla School.
One time Frank Flynn of Derrnageer (Doire na gCaor) was going to a wedding in Glangevlin. When he was going across the mountain a hare rose up before him and he ran after it and caught it.
Myles Mc Girl was the swiftest runner in the parish of Ballinaglera. When the "gentlemen" were in the "Lodge" , a man called Johny Wills, who lived in Dublin, used to come to the "lodge" every year to shoot the mountain. He was a very swift runner and he challenged Michael Mc Girl to run. They ran from the lodge to the river which bounds Slievenakilla and Aughrim. Michael Mc Girl won the race.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 22:08
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When I was a young man - about 40 years ago I used to play cards. I lived in Scart then. We had a thatched house.
We were just about to thatch the house and we needed some sally sticks. We had none on our farm. I knew where to get them but I should get them at night of course. One night I was returning from a gambling school. There were two neighbours with us. We were heading for home across the fields.We came out in Fred Addy's field. I spotted the sally sticks as I was about to cross a hedge. Now is my opportunity, I thought, to cut
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 16:42
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Linseed oil given to a dog with fits would cure him.
Stolen forge water is a cure for chilblains.
A half pint of porter and a half pound of salt mixed is a cure for a beast with the murrin.
Washing soda is a cure for warts.
To put a key down your back would stop a bleeding nose.
A stomach-ache is cured by strong soup.
The crow's toe is a cure for Rheumatism.
A fasting spit is a cure for Chilblains.
A slice of raw turnip and salt is a cure for chilblains.
Chick weed is a cure for a cold.
A cure for a sty in your eye (into) is to prick it with a thorn of a gooseberry bush.
Dandelion is a cure for liver disease in fowl.
Chick weed is a cure for a cut in your foot.
A cure for a dog with fits is to cut the top of its ear.
Flour would cure a burn.
Hot milk would cure a pain in your side.
Washing soda is a cure for corns.
Ink would cure a burn.
The juice of the male fern cures fluke in sheep.
The white milk in the Dandelion flower cures warts.
Dandelion salad is a cure for pimples on your face.
Honey is a cure for a sore throat.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 16:41
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To drink Dandelion boiled in milk is a cure for Rheumatism.
To eat garlic is a cure for Rheumatism.
To rub water from a limestone rock to warts would cure them.
To put a cobweb to a bleeding wound would stop it from bleeding.
If you put chewed rib grass to a bleeding wound would stop it from bleeding.
A cure for sore lips is to rub your fasting spit to your lips.
Pour rem on them and they would get better.
A cure for the Whooping Cough is to make a hole in a slice of turnip and drink the juice.
A cure for a sting of a wasp is to rub blue to it.
Rub a dog leave to sting of a nettle and it would cure it.
A sudden pain can be cured by making the worm's knot three times.
A headache is cured by drinking the juice of onions.
Walking on grass when the dew is on it would cure chilblains.
A dog that had fits can be cured by giving him sulphur or copper to eat.
To drink the juice of garlic is a cure for a cough.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 16:33
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lake and said to the man, "will you get down now." said she to the man. The man lifted his hand to hit the swan and who do you think he hit, but his brother in bed. He was only dreaming.
IV
There was a boy one time, so one day he was going to confession. He had to cross fields before he could get to the chapel. He was crossing one field, when he saw a tree of plums, so he filled his pockets with them. Then he went on to confession. When he went in the Priest asked him to know was God in his pocket. "Well if He is," said the boy, He has all my plums eaten."
V
Some time ago there was a man and he was eating bread on the side of the road, A man and his wife were coming and they had a dog. The woman asked the old man to throw the dog a bit. So the man caught the dog by the tail and flung him down the road, and said, "will I throw him another bit now," said he.
VI
There was two boys one time and they were going along the road, when one of them said to the other, "will we go down to the sea." So they went down, and when they were below one of them said, "will we go out for a swim."
"Oh no, said the other, "if I were drowned my father would kill me when I go home."
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 14:49
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Weather Lore (Contd)
of Tullynaha along the Altnagullion River.
The Weather & Certain Days of the Year:
If the flood is low on New Year's Night, provision will be low that year. If the flood is high on New Year's Night, provision will be high.
It is said that if St. Swithin's Day is wet, it will be wet for forty days.
If the twelve days of Christmas are good, the next year will be good and if they are bad, the year will be bad.
The wind will blow all through the winter from whatever direction it blows at twelve o'clock on Halloween Night.
NOTE: The above beliefs concerning the weather are general in the locality- hence i have not, except in a few places, given the names of seancaidhthe from whom they were collected.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 14:44
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Weather Lore (Contd): Fire, Smoke etc:
Whenever the fire burns brightly, it is a sign of frost. Whenever there is a blue blaze in the fire, it is a sign of storm; when it is green, it is a sign of snow.
When a chimney does not draw, it is a sign of bad weather. When the soot gets soft in the chimney and falls down, it is a sign of rain. When there is a noise in the chimney, it is a sign of high wind or some storm approaching. When there is a storm coming the fire burns brigher than in good weather.
INSECTS AND OTHER WINGED CREATURES: When insects come down on the ground, it is a sign of rain; when they fly through the air, it is a sign of good weather.
When the cricket sings loudly, it is a sign of rain.
When the bee hums it is a sign of good weather. When good weather is at hand, the bats fly about in the air in the evening.
When the flies disturb the cattle, there is going to be rain.
When the river is noisy at Screiglan Buidhe and at Brocach, it is a sign of very big floods and rain.
NOTE: This observation should have been included under "Natural Features". "Screiglan Buidhe " is a large rock along the Altnagullion River (Allt na gCuileann) which flows through the townland of Tullynaha. "Brocach" is a rock in the townland
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 14:31
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Weather Lore (Contd): Natural Features:
It is a sign of rain when the stones are glossy. When the sun shines on the top of the rock it is a sign of good weather. When there is going to be rain, the stones at a distance look like glass. If the mountains seem far away it is a sign of good weather; if they seem near it is a sign of bad weather.
When we see cattle or sheep at a long distance, it is a bad sign of the weather. If the rivers are making noise up at the bottom of the mountains, it is a sign of good weather. If the rivers are making noise down in the country, it is a sign of bad weather. When the storm is at hand, the Yellow River roars all through the glen and also there is a great noise in Lake Allen out at Inch Island. When the noise of a waterfall can be heard far away, it is a sign of frost.
When the weather is going to be bad, the waterfall at Carraig an Ash (Carraig an Easa(?) roars very loudly. Carraig an Ash is in the Aughrim Mountain, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim.
The Fire, Smoke etc: When the smoke goes up straight it is the sign of good weather. Whenever it comes down on the street, it is a sign of storm.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 14:21
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Weather Lore (Contd) Cat and Dog: When the dog begins to eat grass, it is a sign of rain.
FARM ANIMALS: The sheep come down to the country when there is going to be snow.
When the horse gallops through the fields, it is a sign of storm.
When an ass turns his back to the wind when it is raining, it is a sign of continuous storm.
If hens become wet early in the day, it is a sign that that day will continue raining.
When the cows go up to the hills, good weather may be expected; when they come down to the hollows for shelter, it is a sign of bad weather.
When the donkey brays , it is a sign of good weather. When goats go up towards the mountain, good weather is at hand; when they come down a storm may be expected.
FOG: When the fog on the mountains goes down to Lake Allen, it is the sign of rain but if it goes up the mountain in the direction of Poll Glas, it is the sign of good weather. Poll Glas is a slough in the townland of Slievenakilla, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim.
If there is a fog seen on a place on the Aughrim mountain which is called Fuaran, it is sure to rain that day. When the fog comes in at Binn, it is the sign of rain. Binn is on the Tullynaha Mountain. Whenever fog is seen over Lake Allen it is the sign of rain.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 14:13
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Tullynaha. It is a soft boggy place and there is a waterfall down below it.
When you see cobwebs (gossamers) flying with the wind, you will have storm before one day.

Weather Lore (Contd}
BIRDS: When the swallows are flying high it is the sign of good weather and when they are flying low it is a sign of rain.
When the crane goes up the river it is a sign of good weather and when she goes down it is a sign of rain.
When the robin goes into the house it a sign of rain. When the seagulls come inland it is a sign of rain. The geese fly for bad weather. It is said that when a robin is sitting on the top branch of a bush singing there is going to be good weather. When he is down under a bush, or on the under branches, it is a sign of rain.
The crows fly low and all through each other when there is high wind or rain at hand. The blackbird flutters about in the trees for storm.
CAT AND DOG: If the cat sits with her back to the fire, it is a sign of snow. If the car puts her paw across her ear when she is washing herself, it is a sign of rain.
If the cat washes her breast, it is a sign of good weather. When the cat scratches anything, high wind may be expected.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 14:00
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Local Hereos; Swift Runners (Contd):
who lives in Glangevlin, Co. Cavan. The "dragging-home" was across the mountain which was covered with snow. It was considered a very unlucky sign on an occasion like this for a hare to cross the path of the bride. In fact the hare was looked on as a witch and if it was not killed some terrible evil was supposed to happed before twelve months.
Frank Flynn was well versed in this belief and when the hare crossed the bride's path he handed his flute to a companion and ran after the hare. The hare gave the usual turns, tried all her tricks but Frank took her in at every turn and finally turned the hare up with a kick and killed, as all the onlookers believed, the witch which came across their way for no good purpose.
Frank was covered over with congratulations and when they reached their destination, the father-in-law of the bride, when he heard about the killing of the witch, almost washed Frank with the ? old mountain dew.
Sylvester Maguire of Urball Barr, Ballinaglera, heard ths story from Frank Flynn and several eye witnesses, some of whom are living yet. Frank had a son Michael who was a very good musician. He played the flute very well also the violin. In fact he could play a tune on any instrument - all of course traditionally. He died some two years ago at an early age.
Mr. Sylvester Maguire wrote down the above story for me. I have transcribed it exactly as he gave it to me.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 13:49
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Local Hereos: Swift Runners (Contd):
In the townland of Doire na gCaor there lived until quite recently Frank Flynn (nickname "Suck"). He was the husband of Caitlin bean Ui Floinn - see page 5) who was a noted fluteplayer. I have heard him often play all the traditional reels, jigs and hornpipes. He played at all the weddings that took place in the three surrounding parishes for nearly half a century and also after the wedding when the bride was going to live in her new home (this occasion was called the "dragging-home"). Frank was one of the first invited to the drag.
It was on one of these occasions he showed his athletic abilities when he ran down and killed a hare on the mountain side between Ballinaglera and Glangevlin. The bride on this occasion was a sister of the late Hugh Mc Greal of Slievenakilla, an aunt to the present Myles Mc Gourty, who was married to a man
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 13:43
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The Ghost of Slievenakilla Lodge (Contd)
lawn from the county road. Once on the Co. road, Owen got his arms into the rope and got his hay home in spite of the ghost whose yells and shouts awakened all the residents of the place. Owen's encounter was the last public appearance of the spirit; perhaps he wanders still around but he has not much to watch now.
This story was told by Francis Mc Gourty in Boston City, U.S.A. to Pat Durkin of Urball Barr, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim from whom Sylvester Maguire of Urball Barr heard the story. Mr. Maguire kindly wrote it down for me. I am indebted to him for many stories in this book.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-11 13:41
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a hill called Ship Hill, on the South East side of it. It is a fairly large rock flat on top about the size and height of a small table. The top of the rock is covered with a Latin inscription. This inscription was copied and translated into English by Mr. Fahy N.J. principal of Tavannagh N. S. some years ago.
A short distance from the Mass Rock on the South side of the hill is a Headstone, which is said to mark the grave of a Priest said to have been shot during the Penal times. There is a Latin inscription also on this stone. This grave was once surrounded by a wall which is now nearly completely knocked down. Over the grave grow blue and yellow flowers. The name of the Priest is not remembered locally.
It is said that the Parish Priest should keep the wall around the grave in repair. This task has
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:47
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There are many bye-roads in the Crookhaven district. The two most commonly known are the old road and the new road. The new road leads from Crookhaven to Goleen and to all the other townlands and districts outside of Goleen. This road was made in the year 1876. No one can remember when the old road was made. There are many bye-roads leading from the main road. There is antoher main road leading from the top of the strand to Lissigriffin school and to Kilmoe Graveyard and there are branches of it leading west to Mizen Head and other townlands east of Goleen and north to any of the country townlands.
Before the bridge was made on the Lissigriffin road the people of the district had great difficulty in crossing to get to the Graveyard. The old people of Crookhaven can remember the time when the bridge was made.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:44
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were able to pay for it. After some time it rotted in the stores and after the famine they sunk it at the bottom of the harbour.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:43
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During the famine many people died of hunger in Crookhaven. Before the famine there were four hundred people in Crookhaven but many of them died of hunger and also they emigrated to foreign countries during the famine times. Today many ruins can be seen of old houses where the people lived before the famine. The famine was caused by the potatoes decaying in the ground. The very poor people of the locality used to go to a place called Leenane, a district about a mile and a half, from Crookhaven where they got food made from yellow meal and it was known as "stirrabout"". The relief work from the Government did not reach Crookhaven. The people died in large numbers by the roadside and even walking the streets. During the famine America sent a cargo of meal and meat to Crookhaven but the landlord that ruled the place too the meal and put it in a store in a place called Rockisland. He would not give any away but to the people that
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:40
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Hallow Eve falls on the the thirty first day of October. The people of this locality on that night spend a very enjoyable night. They have cakes, which they get in the shops. In side these cakes there are rings, pieces of cloth and pieces of sticks and other things. When the cake is cut the family is very anxious to see which of them will get the things. When they have supper eaten they get a tub of water and put apples into it and each person tries to catch the apples with his mouth. When they get tired of this they sit around the fire telling stories.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:38
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Crookhaven by the young boys.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:37
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Long ago the children of Crookhavene and the surrounding districts made all their own toys. The girls made dolls out of different material as paper, rubber, wood and cloth. They also made necklaces from different wild flowers.
The boys made many toys as guns, tops, slings, snares and bird baskets. They made the guns from the branches of the elder tree. Tops were made from old threadspools. Slings were made from a long narrow twig with a cord from one end of the twig to the other this was used for throwing stones. Snares were made for catching rabbits or hares. They were made out of snare wire with a loop at one end. They put theses snares outside the rabbit borrow so when the rabbit stepped on the wire it would choke him. Bird baskets were also made out of twigs to catch birds.
All theses toys are made to the present day in
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:35
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If they suffered from warts on the hands they believed if they dipped the hands with the warts on it in a hollow in a rock containing water that the warts disappeared. But they should do this inadvertently. The charm would not work if they did it consciously. They also believed a snail would cure a wart if it was crushed between two stones. As soon as the snail would decay they believed the wart would wither away.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:33
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In former years the natives of Crookhaven and the surrounding districts never visited a doctor to get cured,they used certain herbs and greens by which they thought would cure them.
If they had headaches they used boil-a plant called pepperment and drink it. As a cure for a toothache they used boil a plant called camamoile and use the steam of it to relieve the pain. For strains and hurts they used wild-sage. For bad stomachs they used boil garlic and drink it. For swollen or sore joints they used march-malice. For sore eyes they used put hot tea-leaves down on them. In this parish there was a herb doctor. It is said he lived in a place called Corran near the Mizen Head.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:30
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support it.
There is also a king's grave in the place and it is believed that a battle was fought there in former times by the Danes and this king was killed and was buried there and all around his grave are long stones standing up as headstones. Out side of these are tombstones under which the people were buried. It is supposed that a treasure is hidden in the king's grave also. This is hundreds of years ago. The place where he is buried is called
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:28
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at the present day.
There is a story told locally about this lake. Long ago a serpent lived some where near the place. He used do a lot of damage. He used kill the people and even the cattle. So in the end the natives were greatly afraid of him. When St Patrick came to Ireland he banished the serpent into the lake. It is said it was on a May evening he did it. So for that reason the tradition here is that a serpent used appear in different shapes every seventh May evening.
There are also two Mass-rocks in the district and long ago during the Penal laws in Ireland Mass was said on these rocks by Catholic Priests. They are long flat stones leaning against a bank and then there is another stone about four feet high under the out side of it to
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:25
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are many old ruins seen there still. In ancient times people did emigrate to America from there. It is not mentioned in any song or saying. The land is hilly and good. There are no trees there now but there are the remains of a wood a little distance below the place. Long ago it was covered with trees, but in the time of the trouble in Ireland they were cut down by the natives and were used for several purposes.
There is a lake which is fairly large in size and from it runs a stream which runs down through the land and wood and out in the sea near the main road. It is known as the mill stream and got its name from a mill which was on it in former years. It was a corn mill and the foundation of it can be seen
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 22:23
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My home district is Arduslough. It is situated about two miles from the village of Crookhaven in the south west of Cork and in the parish of Kilmoe. This is in the barony of Carbery. AT present there are only two families living there. The population only being fifteen. The houses are slated. It got its name from a lake which is in the district as the word Arduslough means high lake. There are no people over seventy years living there. One person can speak Irish and can tell stories in English but not in Irish. His name is Daniel MacCarthy, Arduslough, Crookhaven. Both population and houses were more numerous in former years in the district than at the present day. There
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 17:48
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One day five or six men were stacking turf in a bog when one of the party had five or six stacks made a whirlwind came and knocked the stacks the man cursed the wind and soon after dinner he got a paralytic stroke and he could not move and he had to be carried home on a donkey and cart.Soon after the man was dying and he was brought to Biddy Early and as soon as the witch saw him she knew him and told him what he wanted. The man got afraid and the witch assured him that she and his father were very good friends. Then she went and looked into the bottle and when she came back she told him that the stroke would leave him but that the effects would make him helpless for his life. She said he had a right to say God be with the whirlwind instead of cursing it as the fairies were going from one place to the other in these whirlwinds and it is not right to say anything bad when the whirlwinds are blowing. The man went home and he died a few years after.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 13:18
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Jack Stones
This was essentially a girl's game. The players had each five stones from the sea.
(1) "Tens"
Five are places on the palm, thrown up and caught on back of hand. This counts ten. This is done five times. If one falls player has to throw up a stone, and catch the one that fell before the other comes down to be caught.
2) "Scatter 'em" Throw up one stone adn catch up the other four with the one coming down (5 times)
3) "Half twos" She throws up one and takes up two from the ground, each time catching the one coming with them. If player not able is out of the game.
4) "Threesies" Same as (3) but three stones to pick up
5) Big Bobs (Bob Suas?)
Spread out hans flat on ground and put a stone between every two fingers. Throw up a stone and while up each time, push one stone from betweeen fingers under palm and catch the one coming. Done 5 times.
6) "Half Threesies"
Throw up two, catching the three off the ground, while the others are coming down.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 12:42
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There are a lot of forts in this district and long ago there used to be fairies in them but it is believed that there are none in them now. There are three or four forts in the school district. There are two forts in my town-land, Cormoy, one in Cornaslieve, two in Lisdoonan and one in Cashlan west. They are all called forts. The forts in Cormoy can be seen from the one in Cornaslieve. The forts that I know are all circular in shape and there is a high fence all around them. On this high fence there are trees growing all the way round.
All these forts were built by the Fir Bolgs. They used them as fortresses for themselves and their stock. It is also said that the Danes built some forts. A long time ago the people believed that fairies used to live in them and they also
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 01:26
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Not long ago a man living near Mount Dillon bog hid a saucepan full of gold in the bog.
Every night lights were seen at the place and one day a man went to look for it. The people living near it told him the lights were seen in front of the mountain but the whole bog was in front of the mountain. Although he and other people spent many days looking for it they never found it.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:24
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there are writings and lines on them. It is believed that the people long ago used eat nuts and they used break the nuts in the holes in the flag in Castle Mehigan. In the townland of Arduslough there is a druid's altar. There is one headstone in my town land which was erected in memory of a dead king which was buried there many years ago.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:23
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There are many standing stones to be seen at the present day throughout this parish. The standing stones are to be seen in the townlands of Arduslough Carrigicat, Dough, Lissigriffin. These stones are mostly in fields. There are no ornamented stones in the parish. There are no traditions connected with these stones. There is a king buried near the standing stone in Arduslough. There are many stones in the district with markings and strokes and hollows on them. There are two of these stones in Arduslough and one in Castle-Mehigan and one of Dough. The one in Castle Mehigan is a large stone and on this stone there are hollows and crosses worn in to it. On the stones in Arduslough
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:20
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One day a number of hens lived together in a farmyard. Some were plump and others were lean. The fat hens were fond of making fun of the lean hens. You are more like scarecrows than hens", the fat hens used to say to the lean hens. One day the farmer's wife came into the yard to choose some hens for her dinner. "I will not have those thin birds," she said. Then she caught up some of the fat hens, and brought them into the kitchen. She killed them. The fat hens wished they had not been so foolish as to laugh at the lean hens that were left alive and happy.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:17
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ever afterwards. After his death there was a lot of money found after him.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:17
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and that he was shipwrecked at the Old Head of Kinsale. He saw this light in the distance and came towards it. While they were talking they heard people talking outside. They heard one saying to the other "strike him". The other replied "strike him yourself". The black man said to the pedlar "Don't mind them I'll fix them" They found out it was a bullock they were killing and that the house was their's. The black man found the hide and horns of a cow. He put it around him and he put his head out the door and the two outside ran away. The two inside searched the house and they found a lot of gold. They found out that the two outside were two thiefs. The black man and the pedlar shared the gold. The pedlar came home and lived very comfortably in his home
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:14
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The following is an old story told locally. Once there lived an old man in Dough about two miles to the west of the village of Crookhaven. He was a pedlar. He used go to Cork and buy small articles such as pins, needles, thread, handkerchiefs, etc. and then come back and sell them in the neighbourhood. On one of these occasions as he was returning the night was foggy he saw a light in the distance and he went towards it. It was the light of a house. He went in. There was no one inside but a black man. He was astonished to see him. The black man asked him did he ever see a black man before. He said no. He then asked did he ever see a Darkey he said no. The black man told him he was a sailor
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:11
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over the door of the Protestant church in Crookhaven. The stone has the mitre of a bishop on it. there are old towers in the locality. There is an old tower in the village of Crookhaven. It is known as Coughlan's Tower. It was built by a man named Coughlan. A considerable time ago. He was an Admiral in the Navy and he had a gun on this tower and he saluted every British warship that came into the harbour. There are two towers at the other side of the harbour. They were built for watching smugglers. There was a poem composed about Coughlan's turret in past times. The following is one verse of this poem:
In this harbour you could see the
Spaniard Frenchman and Portugese
Who ploughed the seas courageously to
bring riches to our harbour
And Coughlan's Turret it stands so high
it illuminates the cloudy sky
You'd see bunting flying there in
days gone by
A big gun connonading
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:11
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over the door of the Protestant church in Crookhaven. The stone has the mitre of a bishop on it. there are old towers in the locality. There is an old tower in the village of Crookhaven. It is known as Coughlan's Tower. It was built by a man named Coughlan. A considerable time ago. He was an Admiral in the Navy and he had a gun on this tower and he saluted every British warship that came into the harbour. There are two towers at the other side of the harbour. They were built for watching smugglers. There was a poem composed about Coughlan's turret in past times. The following is one verse of this poem:
In this harbour you could see the
Spaniard Frenchman and Portugese
Who ploughed the seas courageously to
bring riches to our harbour
And Coughlan's Turret it stands so high
it illuminates the cloudy sky
You'd see bunting flying there in
days gone by
A big gun connonading
anonymous contributor
2019-11-10 00:08
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There are no ruined castles in the village at present. Long ago there was a ruined castle on the strand in the village but there is no trace of it to day except on stone. This castle was built by the chieftain O'Driscoll.
There are five ruined castles in the parish. There are the ruins of three castle at Three Castle Head in the townland of Dunlough about 8 miles from Crookhaven. There is also the remains of one in the townland of Ardslough a short distance from Crookhaven. There is another ruined castle in Dunmanus. These castles were built about 1172. They were built by the O'Mahonys. They are situated in the parish of Kimoe in the barony of Carbery and in the County of Cork. Long ago they were attacked by the English. They became ruins about 1600. They had dungeons. There is a ruined church in the graveyard of Kilmoe. Long ago monks resided there. There is a stone out this church
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:57
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Holy Wells
Adjacent to my district, Arduslough, which is about two and a half miles from Crookhaven is a hill called Letter hill which contains a holy well. The hill is about a few fields from my home. It is now
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:56
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-ied them to about a mile outside the village. The exact spot where they parted is where an old boiler now stands, at the junction of the Crookhaven and the Browhead road. O' Mahony as a parting gift brought an immense cask of the best wine. There they rested and began to drink the wine. All went well till one of the chieftain's was not satisfied. He bent his head into the cask to drink. One of O'Mahony's friends caught him by the legs and plunged him into the wine, in which he was drowned. The O Mahony's then boasted that the chieftains had to admit when they returned home that wine in Crookhaven was as plentiful as water.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:53
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not, I will not stay". AT length he arrived at O Mahony's castle in Crookhaven. He inquired there for his son. O Mahony noticed his condition. He bade him enter telling him his son was in the castle. Then O Mahony sent for the local herb doctor. The chieftain was under his care for some time. At length he recovered his senses. O Mahony treated him very hospitably. On departing he offered him the "beoc an dorais". This was a rich wine. O Mahony's cellars were well stocked with wine, as at that time Crookhaven did considerable trade with Spain. When the chieftain reached his own territory he praised the hospitality of the O Mahonys to his friends. And said that wine was flowing there like water. Three neighbouring chieftains set out for O Mahony's castle to see if all that was told was true. When the chieftains arrived in Crookhaven they were treated like royalty. When departing O Mahony and his friends accompan-
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:50
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The following story is told by the older inhabitants of the village of Crookhaven of the days when the O Mahony's held sway there. The site of their castle can be pointed out today. It stood on the strand a little distance from the spot where the village shops are now situated.
In those days a chieftain in the North lost his son in battle. (The North is probably not the North of Ireland, but some area lying to the North of Crookhaven). He grieved night and day for this son. The deep grief at length caused him to be deranged. He imagined his son still lived, and left his home to seek him. He went from castle to castle seeking his son. His query always being- Is my son Diarmuid here. When he received the reply that his son was not there he used to leave sadly saying "where Diarmuid is
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:46
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Another time Coughlan was coming to Crookhaven with a cargo of contraband brandy. On the route an English man-of-war captured him and took the vessel into Queenstown harbour and stopped watching her.
Coughlan became very friendly with the English crew, and one night he took some of his brandy on board her. He gave it to the crew to drink. When he had them all drunk, he left the ship and went unto his own boat and set sail for Crookhaven unknown to the English boat. Thus he escaped prison.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:44
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Smuggling was carried on to a great extent in my district in the past times. One of the most famous smugglers was Daniel Coughlan, brother of the Admiral mentioned in the previous story. He used to go for foreign countries and bring with him, whine, whisky, tobacco, silks, and other things. Once he went to Amsterdam in Holland and got a cargo of tobacco and brandy and sailed back for Crookhaven. On the way a Revenue cutter chased them. He ran under the Old Head of Kinsale and put out his lights. He then went ashore in a small boat and put a light on the rock. The English men stopped watching it as they thought it was the ship that was ashore. In the meantime he sailed for Crookhaven without any lights and unloaded his cargo.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:41
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on the identity of the musician. He recognised the sailor, who was very anxious to leave his exile. Coughlan approached the chief to set the captive free. But the chief would not hear of it. Persuasion or reward had no effect till Coughlan threatened to turn his mighty guns on the Island unless the sailor was released immediately. Finally the chief had to relinquish his valued musician. So the sailor, and Admiral returned eventually to Crookhaven the voyage being brightened by the music of the Crookhaven sailor.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:39
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ship and entered the navy and he rose from rank to rank in it till he became an Admiral.
There are many stories told about this famous man. One of them was how he saved a countryman of his, and a native of his own village from the hands of a cannibal chief in the South Sea Islands. It appears that about the time Coughlan had gained the rank of Admiral a sailor from Crookhaven was on board a vessel which was wrecked on the South Sea Islands. The sailor was saved. He was a great musician. The chief of the island discovered this. The chief derived great entertainment from the music of the Irish sailor, and decided never to part with him. IN the meantime Coughlan's man-of-war landed outside the Island. The Admiral came ashore. He was amazed when he heard the familiar tunes of his native village been played so far from home. He questioned the chief
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 23:36
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To the east of the village of Crookhaven there is a turret overlooking the Atlantic ocean. It is supposed to have been built as a watch tower by a man named Coughlan who was a native of the village. One day he left Crookhaven and set off for London in a sailing vessel. As he was walking along the river Thames, there was a pleasure yacht on the river and in her were an Admiral and his daughter and crew. The boat through some accident or other turned over, all the occupants been thrown to the water. Coughlan seeing what had happened jumped into the water and saved the life of the girl. Her father was so grateful that he offered him anything in return. Coughlan asked him to give him a position. So the Admiral gave him a post in one of his ships, After a time he left the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 20:53
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Photo
The "Monument tree" in Toneylion near Kilnaleck
Rev. Laurence Galligan was brother to my great grandmother Julia A Galligan Lynch.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 19:29
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159
27th May 1938
Dressmaking
In this district long ago there was a dressmaker named Miss award, Screabog, who made dresses. The people used to bring her the material. In those days days there were no ready made. In olden times it took ten yards of silk to make a dress. In those modern days about two and a half yards are enough. The fashion plates of years ago are most interesting. I have seen a fashion plate of hooped skirts. In those days we have a great deal of readymade and shoddy clothing. People had not as much clothes as they have now. They only got a dress every year. The men
anonymous contributor
2019-11-09 03:39
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My mother told me some signs about weather. It is a sign of fine weather to see the smoke going up straight, to see the sun setting red, to see the birds flying high, to see the wind up north, to see a macarel sky.
The signs of bad weather are to see the smoke falling to the ground. Sheep grazing at night is a sign of bad weather. If you see a cat washing her face it is a sign of bad weather. Seagulls inland is a sign of windy weather. Mares tails in the sky is sign of stormy weather.
Crows tossing in the sky is a sign of stormy weather. If ever there is a circle around the moon we are sure to have bad weather. It is a sign of hard weather to see a cat with her back to the fire. If you see any blackstairs any place we are sure to have frosty weather. A sign of bad weather is to see a cat sharpening her nails. It is a sign of wet weather to see a dog eating grass. The soot falls down the chimney and dogs get sleepy when it is going to rain. It is said in the district that a fog covers Slievcoillte when it is going to rain. A rainbow in
anonymous contributor
2019-11-08 23:26
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was furious. He immediately returned to his castle, collected all his gold, put it in a barrel and enchanted himself along with it in the lake.
Sometime afterwards when the people around heard the Mannan's gold was in the lake, they got a diver from Dublin to investigate. When he went down he could see the barrel all right but there was a monstrous serpent chained to it.
Years later this lake was to be drained and men worked for several months at the drainage. They had the work almost completed with just one rock to blast. When night came they had the holes drilled and were just ready to pull it off. They considered they would leave it until the next morning until they have daylight to catch the fish leaving the lake. And also get the gold.
In the morning crowds gathered but were greatly surpriaed when they found that the drain was all closed up and grass growing on it just as if there never was anything done to it. The ruins of the castle are still to be seen to the present day and it is said that anyone going inside the grounds would get weak. The lake is there also.
The above story was told to Nora J. Cooney, Cargaghoge Carrickmacross
anonymous contributor
2019-11-08 21:36
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There were seven or eight families living near Mitchelstown in Kingstons estetate. One day the Land lord was collecting his rents and this small farmer knew that he was coming. He had a fine haggard of cabbage and two old cows. When he saw the Landlord coming he turned one of the cows into the cabbage. When the Landlord came he accused him for not having his rent and the cow eating the cabbage. He took down the gun and shot the cow and he told the e Landlord that he would get the same.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-08 21:31
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There was a widow living in Darragh one time and she had an only son and he was very lighthearted. At the same time there lived in Mitchelstown a Landlord named Kingston. The widow went to him about her son and he told her to bring him the following day and he would make a tame boy him. The following evening they went to Kingston and he gave them a lodging. The following moring he called at her window and told her to look out. She looked out and saw her son hanging off the gallows.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-08 18:29
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In Marley there were people living named Murphys. At the back of their house the fairies had a playground. There was a little girl in the house an she was about seven years old. One night she was about went out to play with them. She was a very good looking little girl and the next morning she was sick in the bed. She stayed in bed for seven years and she would eat nothing for them only if they went out she would get out of the bed and eat all that would be for pigs or hens. When anyone came in and caught her eating she told them she had to feed a great many people.
This little girl went away every night with the fairies. When they would go to the bed where she was in the day, she would not be in it. She stayed going with the fairies for seven years. When the seven years were over she got up
anonymous contributor
2019-11-08 10:23
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Bhí Rí igCúige Uladh fad ó shoin darbh minm Conchubhar Mac Neasa. Bhí na h-Ultaigh agus na Connachtaigh igcogadh le chéile. Cuireadh piléar igclár éadain an rí agus dubhairt na laoigheanna go gcaithfheadh sé saoghual suaimhneadh a chaitheadh ó rin amach nó dá sgaoilfheadh an pilé as rin go raibh sé marbh.
'Na d'laidh sin thug na h-Ultaigh aire mhaith dó. Nuair a d'fanóchadh Conchubhar ra bhaile go h-uaigneach. Chuaidh na bliadhanta thart. Bhí an rí ag eirghe cuirreach lag-brightheach.
Lá amhaín bhí ré 'na shuidhe leis féin i nalach trom as a chroidhe.
Mhas bhuailsheá do dhá bhoir as a cheile d'éirigh an spéir dubh dorcha. Choirigh an coirthneach i an roilreach, agus bhí an domhan uilig ar crith.
I gcionn tamaill d'éirigh an spéir geal arís. Tháinig an draoi isteach agus chuir Conchubhar ceist air caidé ba chiall leir na h-uathbhair séo nó caidé an choir a rinne un
anonymous contributor
2019-11-07 22:36
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It is a common practice in this district to qualify various (Christian) surnames, if common, by addition of Christian name of father or mother of the family e.g. Patrick Deeney (Pat)' Joe Sheridan (Anthony). In common speech the surname is left out and people are referred to as Neil "Peg", Joe "Anthony" etc
anonymous contributor
2019-11-07 16:24
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St. Josephs well in Glanagimla and after a person had performed their station, this little fish came up three times to the surface of the water if the request prayed for was to be granted. Some years ago a beggar passed by this well and washed his shirt in this well and since then this fish never appeared. There was no fence around the well at one time and a man who was passing by allowed his horse to take a drink of the water and it is said that the well dried up
anonymous contributor
2019-11-07 16:24
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Holy Wells.
I only know of two holy wells in our parish one is situated near Leenane in a village called Glanagimla It is Saint Josephs well. The other one is near Louisbourgh in a place called Kilgeever. There are special days for visiting those wells from the 15th of August to the 8th of September. People perform stations by going around the well seven times and saying several “Hail Marrys” Our Father and the Creed. At one time there was a little fish to be seen in
anonymous contributor
2019-11-07 12:51
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About five miles from Naas is a very old hill known as the hill of Allen. It may be seen from one of the school windows. Once upon a time there was a fairy known as Allen. Once every three years the fairy used to come and throw tins of fire at the walls of a castle that was on top of the hill. Anyone that dared to fight the fairy was killed. In the castle on the top
anonymous contributor
2019-11-07 11:04
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Continued.

for four days so he started them. He could not shave as the razor was too blunt and hurt him too much. “Oh “Oh!! he said, I am persuaded with this razor and cannot shave.
“ His mother who over - heard him remarked. “That is very strange, Luke and I could cut tobacco with it a short time ago”.
The name and address of the person me this story.
Mrs Mary McCormack (66 years)
Keash Road,
Ballymote
Co Sligo.
My own name and address.
Kathleen Cassidy
St. Anne’s,
Ballymote,
Co. Sligo
anonymous contributor
2019-11-07 02:25
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Once upon a time there was a man who used to go the wood every day cutting wood for another man. He was getting a little money out of it, and this was the only means he had of living. He had to get up early in the morning and came home late at night.
One night as he was coming home from his work he met a beautiful lady on the road. She asked the man what was he doing and was he getting much money out of it and he told her.
Would you like to get money said the lady. I would said the man and it is not hard to please me.
He had a little can in his hand in which he carried his dinner. Look in that can in your hand said the lady.
He took off the lid of the can and what did he find in it but a pot of gold. At first he got overjoyed with happiness, but then he said to himself, if only I had a bigger pail she could have filled it just as easy. Then
anonymous contributor
2019-11-07 02:25
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Once upon a time there was a man who used to go the wood every day cutting wood for another man. He was getting a little money out of it, and this was the only means he had of living. He had to get up early in the morning and came home late at night.
One night as he was coming home from his work he met a beautiful lady on the road. She asked the man what was he doing and was he getting much money out of it and he told her.
Would you like to get money said the lady. I would said the man and it is not hard to please me.
He had a little can in his hand in which he carried his dinner. Look in that can in your hand said the lady.
He took off the lid of the can and what did he find in it but a pot of gold. At first he got overjoyed with happiness, but then he said to himself, if only I had a bigger pail she could have filled it just as easy. Then
anonymous contributor
2019-11-06 19:23
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Fadó bhí fear ina chomhnuige i mbaile Na Scócsch. Do bhain sé a slíge bhéasa ag geasnaimh naugíní is chuinneóg os rudaí eile mar sin. Do rachfadh sé cuig gach donach is marghas agus do diolfadh sé ansin iad.
Oíche amháin bhí sé ag dul chuig an donadh i dún mór agus ar a bhealach chonnai sé sgaca ag imirt péile taobh istigh í bpáirc a bhí in-aice bhoisir.
Nuair a chonnaic sé iad sheas sé ag feachainnt ar cupla nóiméad agus chonnac sé faoi dhéara go raibh dream dea a fágáíl 'láimh an uachtair ar an dream eile. Ansin duáirt sé leis féin go rachfaidh sé isteach lé cabhair a thabhairt dóibh.
Nuair chuaigh sé isteach dúirt sé leabhra 'tabhair ca mán dom'. Nuair a chuala siad sin do bhailgéadar le chéile agus chuireadar a marcaigheacht ar capall é.
As go brách leóbrá dtáinigeadar chuir dhor eiceann ina raibh pósadh ann.
Nuair shroicheadar an dír chuaidear isteach i bhfuinneog ar cean an tighe aus isteach leo sa tora
anonymous contributor
2019-11-06 14:58
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Mín- Íseal. (Meenishal)
The following fields are owned by Wm McAuliffe, Meenishal. The Súil, The Well Field, The Glaise, The Lawn, The Coarse Meadow, The Big Field, The Little Field, The Leaca, The Pigs' Field, The Stand (The cattle are kept here in winter time) The Inch. Acra n-Each (2) is the name of another field which is about three Acres in area and is always used as a Meadow. It adjoins the public road.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-06 11:52
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There is one forge in this district and one smith. His name is Mr. Tom Clarke.
The forge is situated on the road-side. The forge is a fairly big house. There is one fire-place in it. There is a bellows in one end of it.
The bellows is not made locally but it is repaired locally.
The smith uses a lot of implements, namely: - anvil, sledge, hammer, vice, rasp, pinchers, shoeing-knife, and a trough in which he cools the hot iron.
The smith usually shoes horses and asses.
He also makes ploughs, scufflers and harrows.
He repairs mowing machines, reaper and binders, potato diggers and turnip machines.
He puts bands on wheels out in the open air.
He has a special flag which he uses.
It is said that forge water can cure warts and chilblains.
There is a cure in the cinders for a cough.
The forge is always usually a centre for story-telling.
There are no disused or ruins of forges in this district.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-06 11:52
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There were two old grave~yards in the district. their names are:- new bridge and Tynagh. they were set a part from the village of new bridge and Tynagh. They are still used. the grave-yard in Tynagh is of a round shape and a great number of head-stones there. They grave yard is a plot of ground taken in from a field in which the people took a plot for himself the old crosses were made of wood or stone. Long ago the people used to bury the small children in a field. There grave yards were called hiso. some people like to be buried in different grave yard. The bishop visits the grave yards once every three years.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-06 11:50
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There is one forge in this district and one smith. His name is Mr. Tom Clarke.
The forge is situated on the road-side. The forge is a fairly big house. There is one fire-place in it. There is a bellows in one end of it.
The bellows is not made locally but it is repaired locally.
The smith uses a lot of implements, namely: - anvil, sledge, hammer, vice, rasp, pinchers, shoeing-knife, and a trough in which he cools the hot iron.
The smith usually shoes horses and asses.
He also makes ploughs, scufflers and harrows.
He repairs mowing machines, reaper and binders, potato diggers and turnip machines.
He puts bands on wheels out in the open air.
He has a special flag which he uses.
It is said that forge water can cure warts and chilblains.
There is a cure in the cinders for a cough.
The forge is always usually a centre for story-telling.
There are no disused or ruins of forges in this district.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-05 21:00
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There is a very old grave in Caranelacky. It is about three hundred years old.
At that time the people used to be buried without a coffin. Kilmovee grave is the oldest in Ireland exept one in Cork. The unbaptized people used to be buried in Jim Griffins land in Magheraboy. They are buried there now.
If you went in to a place where there was a man or woman milking a cow, Say "Bail of Dhia ar an obair" for fear you would bring the good luck.
The duck can swim because she was not "amplach".
There was a roll of butter left down to the hen and duck.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-05 20:42
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On the opposite side of Passage West is the village of Carrigaloe and beside this village are Mass-Caves. During the Penal times the people of Passage and Carrigaline used to go there to hear mass.
Oneday when the people were going across the water they heard from a man that soldiers were in the neighbourhood and they were told to by very careful. The people proceeded to mass as usual and they told the priest what they heard. The mass started and was nearly over when a couple of men came running into the cave. They told the priest and the people that the soldiers were coming. The priest went on with the mass and when it was finished he told the people to hide, and that he would stay and guard the sacred vessels. The people tried to make the priest hide but he would not, so the people went away and hid themselves. When the soldiers came to the cave they found nothing there, not even the priest and they went away again.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-05 01:39
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Between the church and the modern Brother's school was at that time a long row of thathed houses, inhabited by Protestant, of whom one, a certain bailiff was very bigoted.
On one occasion this bailiff met Father James Kelly returning from Mass in Mullaghareighta and told him he had a process to serve onhis reverence "Very Well" said the priest "get up behind me on the horse and I'll take you across the flood". They were in the valley of Kildalogue which is very often in high flood especially after a sudden heavy rainfall. Up got the bailiff and off went the horse; but when they reached the middle of the flood, the priest got rid of his unwelcome guest by the simple process of pushing him into the water. The process was never served. The unfortunate bailiff swore vengence but bided his time. At last he pretended to be ill and took to his bed not omitting to send for Fr. Kelly. He had previously fixed a weight over the door of his bedroom which he intended should fall on the priest's head and kill him. Fr. Kelly arrived and went to the bedroom door but there he stopped. He said to the make-believe patient "You are indeed on your deathbed, you are not sick but there you will lie till the maggot eat you". Not many days afterwards
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 22:33
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they strike hands or spit.
Sometimes there are black men in the fair, selling horse and donkey harness.
They also sell silk and pull teeth.
There are also men in the fair curing deafness and other ailments.
When the animals are brought they are marked with red or blue paint or tar. Some put their anitials on the animals horns with a branding iron. Others put a piece of rope on the animals leg.
When the animals are sold a luck-penny is given to the buyer.
The two biggest fair are the May fair and the November fair. They are both hiring fairs and they are held in Milford. There is a fair in Ramelton on the fifteenth of each month. There is also one in Kerrykeel on the eight and Milford on the twentythird. The halter is always given with the animal.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 22:30
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The fairs are all celebrated in the streets of towns. There used to be a fair in Rathmullan long ago, but it was not in a suitable place.
Horse, cattle, sheep, ponies, donkeys and pigs are the chief animals that are sold in the fairs. People go to the fairs to buy and to sell. Men come from Derry and from other counties, with Selling stalls of delph, tools, and used clothing. They sell things cheap you would get a frock or any other thing for sixpence.
There is no toll paid in the fairs around here because there is no station.
The people used to buy and sell at farmers houses and at cross roads because it was the law. Dealers come to the houses to buy cattle when they are rising in price. They buy them cheap and then they make good profit on them in the fairs.
When two men agree over a bargain
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 22:26
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Children get together in a line as if they were marching. They catch hold of one another and some one defends them.
The mother of the chickens asks the fox what is he sharpening his knives and forks for. Then he says, “I want to kill some of your chickens for my dinner as I am very hungry.” Then the fox runs after the chickens and the ones that are caught have to go out.
Frogs
Two children get down on their knees on the grass. They follow the others and catch them by the leg and tumble them. Then they have to be frogs also.
Nut Cracking
Nut cracking is a great game on Hallow Eve night. We put two nuts on the hearth. We put a girls name on one and a boy’s name on the other. If they jump together they will be married and if the jump from one another they will not be married.
Blackberry Picking.
The blackberry picking is in the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 22:12
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Rough Sketch of Well.
Visited 20.10.17
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 16:12
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Farmer's Work
In January, he draws home the potatoes in the cart from the pit in the field and puts them in a pit near the house.
In February, he ploughs and harrow the land for Winter wheat. He also sets the Winter wheat. In this month the cattle are in, and therefore the cleaning of the stables causes a lot of work.
In March, he prepares the land for the crops, oat, rye, Spring wheat and potatoes. When these crops are sown, he sets vegetables, namely, cabbage, onions, carrots, parsnips and lettuces which are the commonest set in the district.
In April, he manures the potatoes. He also weeds the vegetables and gets the turf-spade, shovel, common-spade and the wheel-barrow or hand-barrow ready for the cutting of the turf.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 13:03
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A long time ago a young man named Dolan lived a short distance from Belhavel lake shore. One night he woke up and fell asleep again. He was dreaming and was of heated in sickness after his late sweetheart who was drowned in the lake that he had a nightmare. He got up and went to the lake shore. He walked across the lake to the other shore. Here he heard a voice which he thought familiar. There came to him a young maiden dancing on the waters. She was very beautiful and the man asked her to marry him. As she was willing to marry him she accompanied him to his house. After their marriage the wife always seemed odd with her new friends. There was a 'shuffle' for the newly wedded pair. At the dance the mermaids clock was stolen. Without this cloak she was quite normal. One day as she was working in the house she got her cloak and she vanished. Before she vanished she said that none of the Dolan family would ever be drowned in Belhavel.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 03:13
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him. The boy had a very easy time from that day forward. There was a girl working for the kind, she was Jack the Smoker daughter. She was great friends with the boy. At last they said that they would get married, and that she knew where the king's purse of money and that she would take it. So the pair went the next day to get married when they were going into the church, the dog followed them and he told the boy to come out to him and he did. The dog killed the boy outside the church. He brought the girl home to the king's house again.
My mother that told me this story.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 03:12
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he the stable cleaned, and he said that he had. The king said that he was a great boy. He told the boy that tomorrow, he was to catch wild horses that no one put a winkers ever on them. The boy went to the field and he went to catch the horses. The dog gave him a whistler to call the horses when the boy called the horses they came to him, and he put them into the stable. When he went to the king, he asked him had he the horses put into the stable, and he said that he had. The next days work was to go over near an island, and the [there] was a bird's egg there, and to he [sic] bring it to him. That he would have an easy time for the rest of his life. The next day he went to the island for the egg. Jack followed him, and the boy was not able to swim. Jack more a road over to the island, and the boy was able to get the egg then. The king was very please with
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 03:08
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Once there lived a cross king. He did not agree with any workingman less than a half a year. A lad saw an account in the newspaper, about this king and there was a deal of money. The lad went to the kind. When he went there, the kind told him to clean the stable, or if he did not that he would kill him. The boy went to clean the stable, as he used throw out one pike of manure, seven pikes use go in. When he came for his dinner he was crying, for he knew that the king would kill him. When he went down, a dog came down and said, "that he was a man once and that the king changed him into a dog." The name of the dog was Jack the Smoker. The boy told his troubles to him and he told the boy to give him the pike, and he did. Jack took the pike and he gave it to the boy, and he told him to clean the stable now and he did. When the boy came up to his supper, the king asked the boy had
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:23
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terror to the children living in the vicinity. It was last seen by the writer of these notes some twenty-six years ago. It was a monster eel about four feet in length and lay basking in the sun on the bank.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:23
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the corpse. Next day they carried it across the Carslean Hills and buried it in Kiltrustan.
Urneen Chapel
when Urneen chapel has long fallen into decay an agent of the Mahons'; one Tom Roberts began removing the cut stone to build gate pillars. When removing the hold water font, a mysterious voice called on the workmen to return every stone to its original position/ Promptly the order was obeyed and for years the building remained untouched by the vandals'.
A mysterious eel has occasionally been seen in the well of Kildalogue and has always been a A mysterious eel has occasionally been seen in the well of Kildalogue and has always been a source of
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:22
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remains of Nicholas Mahon who died in 1680 and of his son who died three years later.
The lone graves at Doonard and Corskeagh mark the last resting place of two victims of the famine. They died on the roadside and were buried inside the wall.
In the field on the north side of the Hollow houses lived a mother and her two sons. A mound now marks the site of their cabin home this poor irish mother died of hunder while her two sons became weaker and weaker from starvation. They rolled her corpse in a sheet and carried her, by night, on top a cliab to Kiltrustan graveyard where they laid her to rest.
Lying over a wall near the ill fated well of Kildalogue was found the corpse of yet another victim of the famine. The neighbours lighted a large fire in the field close by and "waked
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:21
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for Indian meal which now was fed to the starving Irish nation, while their wheat crop was send to England to make flour for the tyrants. This Indian meal was with a herb called Brioscan the only food to be obtained by the starving peasantry. It may be remarked that the above named herb grew in exceptionally large quantities throughout those dreaded years.
Major Mahon was then living in the Bawn and did his best to alleviate the suffering of his tenants for whom he was tryly sorry.
One evening when returning from Roscommon, he was waylaid and shot dead; no readon for the dastardly crime was ever discovered. Two men Hasty and Cummins were charged with the murder, convicted and executed outside roscommon Goal. The murdered major was laid to rest in the vault known today as the 'Major's grave" not far from the black bridge. This vault is built with what may be the ruins of an old church. Here too lie the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:20
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It is related that at the time of this outbreak or epidemic of cholera, those lives at the top of Church St. a young man and his two sisters. He fell a victim to this scourge and the "red coats" came to remove his body to bury it, but his two beave sisters resisted strongly and - leat the soldiers with sticks and other unnamed weapons. These two Irish girls knew that their brother was not dead. They nursed him back to health. it is said that this young man who so narrowly escaped burial alive liver for twnety years afterwards.
But not on the poor alone doth the hand of God fall heavily, many notable residents fell before the scourge of cholera. One was a magistrate who fell ill while hearing a case in court. The dreaded whisper went round the court - cholers ! The floor man was left to die alone without a helping hand, to relieve his anguish. His corpse remained untouched for two days. Then the soldiers buried it. When the potato crop failed in 1845 and famine stalked the land, the old hospital in Lisroyan was used as a storehouse
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:19
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to test her abilities as a chaser. Another name familiar to horsey men in that part of Ireland is "Tom Steel" which alone was able to extend "Foxeen" over any course in the land.
Inpassing we may be forgiven for relating that Tulsk outside of our parish is unparalled in the country or province. About a hundred years ago Cargan's house was destroyed by an outbreak of fire which burned fro a week.
members of our local tennis club often gaze in admiration on Lisroyan house as they pass it and from the tennis courts on dewy summer evenings. I wonder if any of them is aware that this building was ever a hospital, that in the grounds about it lie the last mortal remains of many an unfortunate victim of the fatal cholera which swept the land about a hundred years ago. Aye and t'is yet whispered that many of those unfortunate ones had not yet breathed their last o'er the cold damp earth enclosed their poor bodies.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:19
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while they fought furiously; then the soldiers ordered all to leave. late foes united against the common enemy and all refused to obey. The Riot Act was read. The assembly remained unmoved. The soldiers opened fire and one man was killed and some wounded. Fearing a general massacre, the people dispersed never again to assemble in famed Ballinafad.
But for many years afterwards Strokestown itself was the scene of a great annual aonach, which aimed well at dispelling the glory of Ballinafad. But the old order changed gralding place to the new, and now this great event is well nigh forgotten.
Local turf followers yet recall the legends of the great horse racing events which were part of the fun of the fair in later times. Here in Ballinafad died "Forceen" the gallant little mare which which had carried its owner's colours to victory always. She broke her neck while attempting to land after jumping a false fance, build specifically
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:18
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way to Tulsk about a mile from the town stood a flax mill which enjoyed but a brief spell of prosperity. Little now remains to mark the site or its buildings.
As we leave the town on the way to Roscommon we may visit the kiosk built by the "Round Hole" which supplies the town with water. This well is said to be a fathomless spring which never has shown the slighest sign of diminution.
Just as Tailteann, Uisneagh and Loch Gorman as well as umerous less familiar places were of old fame far and wide for their great fairs so too was Ballinafad famed for its great annual festival which usually lasted for a week. This historic place is a vast plain covering many acres of land some of it the best in Ireland. The scene of the latest fairs and the town which once stood there is about three miles from Strokestown.
On the last occasion on which the aonach was here assembled a quarrel arose betrween different factions; for a
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:17
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Not far from the site of the Kildalogue monastery was situated about 140 ago a potter which has given its name to "oitcher boreen". The only pither known to have been made here was long in the possession of the Early family. On the death of the last member of this family the precious relic came into the keeping of Mr Ed. Connor who still retains a portion thereof through it is to be dedeflored that this pitcher was broken some years ago by an accidental fall and some of the portions thrown away. At the read of the southern side of present Bawn St. stookd over a century ago a brewery owned by a man named O'Beirne whose ale was in great local demand. About the same time whiskey was distilled just beyond the bridge on the left hand side of the road to Longford. Hardly was a tan yard which disposed of the hides of animals killed by the inhabitants of the whole town of Strokestown which apparently was as prosperous if not more so than the present town.
At Cloonfree bridge on the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:17
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alas! one man against half a hundred - the dice was loaded against him. But he was no coward; five yeomen bit the dust so he was overcome and conveyed to Roscommon town to stand a trial for robbery on the king;s highway. The inevitable death sentence was passed upon him. As the noose encircled his neck, the doomed man called out in a clear loud voice; "Is there anyone here from Kiltrustan". A grim silence answered "if there be" he continued is subdued tones "let him not hear to come forward; and I will make him rich forever". The mocking laughter of his enemies rang upon the chill cool air of the morning. The execution was carried out beside the old jail of Roscommon on the King's highway.
Among the peasantry still lives the legend of the fabulous wealth which the highwayman whose name is unknown to us amassed during his career. He is said to have placed all in a calf's skin and hidden it somewhere on the hillside. Perhaps it still remains undistributed watched over by his ghost in the famous cave already refered to.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:16
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which was supposed to be in her possession. At any rate this has never been denied tho' nobody was ever charged with alleged murder of an unfortunate lady.
The eastern side of Cregga Hill is now included partically in the parish of Kiltrustan, a sub-division of Strokestown parish somewhere here abouts lived a highwayman who for years was the sworn enemy of the Gown and its minnions. He earned the friendship of the Irish peasants by his deeds of bravery and his liberality with the money he took from the gentry.
Many a time he owned his life to their hatred of spies and informers, but at last was found amongst them one who coveted the reward offered for his capture. She was a woman whose people had come from afar and settled here, some long years before. Whilst the king of the road slept in her house she informed the soldiers who surrounded the house and tried to take him prisoner as he slept . He awoke before the militia entered but
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:15
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Hollow Houses or Harmony Hollow.
In passing we may relate a tale which tho' not delaying with the place, is of interest.
We have written before of the Grand Entrance to the Demense which was just opposite the Revenue men's barracks. In the wood which now grows there. are the stones marking the site of an old house which was once a gate house or lodge. Here lived on old lady said to be a member of the Mahon family who had fallen into disgrace with her people Not been allowed to reside in the Bawn she was given leave to ive in this small lodge. One night she died; in the morning he body was discovered. The funeral was private; none of the public were allowed to be present. Perhaps it was this secrecy gave rise to the rumours which have lived on in tradition, perhaps the tale may be true. Certin it is said however that she is said to have been murdered per the jewellery
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:14
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to them. He was the man with the cloven hoof - the devil himself. In the harsh terms he was told to leave the house, but refused to so so. The minister was hastily summoned but all his efforts to rid the place of Satan were in vain. At last somebody thought of Fr. James Kelly on his arrival Stan became excited and spend some time in abusing the priest of God, but Fr. Kelly took no notice and calmly began to read some prayers from his breviary.Twice the devil arose from his chair, twice he sat down again. But at last he was defeated and said he would go if he were allowed to bring some living thing with him. Somebody hurled the car at him and likea flash of fire he passed through the end wall of the house, leaving behind him a gaping hole and the abnoxious scent of brimstone. Despite many attempts the wall was mever rebuilt and was ultimately removed completely.
From Doon house can be seen the south easterly extremity of Lough Lee where a Revenue man was accidently drowned when bathing. He was one of hose who lived in the Revenue men's barracks about a century and a half ago. This barracks we have aready referred to as the
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:14
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On his way over the Caislean Hills to Kiltrustan Fr. Kelly once took shelter from the rain in a small vabin where an oldist man liver alone. Mistaking him for a cattle dealer the man asked him about the prices at the fair. His reverence soon corrected him and inquired if he ever went to Mass. Excusing himself the man said he had no pumps (boots) and so he could not go to Mass. "No" said Fr. Kelly leaving him "you have no pumps and never will have". T'is said from that day onwards the lazy dweller of the hillside never had the price of a pair of boots.
In Doon House lived a gentleman farmer named Joss Copper who had invited a few of his friends to a card party one evening. While awaiting the arrival of the guests he strolles along the avenue leading to his house. Meeting a smartly dressed man Joss invited him to join the party - which the strange gladly did. In due course the guests arrived and the merrymaking began while the gambling was in full swing a card fell to the floor. A maidservant stopped to pick it up. With a piercing shreek she fled from the house. In alarm the guests all started to their feet - all but the nameless stranger whose identity was only then made known
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:13
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Between the church and the modern Brother's school was at that time a long row of thathed houses, inhabited by Protestant, of whom one, a certain bailiff was very bigoted.
On one occasion this bailiff met Father James Kelly returning from Mass in Mullaghareighta and told him he had a process to serve onhis reverence "Very Well" said the priest "get up behind me on the horse and I'll take you across the flood". They were in the valley of Kildalogue which is very often in high flood especially after a sudden heavy rainfall. Up got the bailiff and off went the horse; but when they reached the middle of the flood, the priest got reid of his unwelcome guest by the simple process of pushing him into the water. The process was never served. The unfortunate bailiff swore vengence but bided his time. At last he pretended to be ill and took to his bed not omitting to send for Fr. Kelly. He had previously fixed a weight over the door of his bedroom which he intended should fall on the priest's head and kill him. Fr. Kelly arrived and went to the bedroom door but there he stopped. He siad to the make-believe patient "You are indeed on your deathbed, you are not sick but there you will lie till the maggot eat you". Not many days afterwards
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:12
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hands. The four ivy clad walls bear mute testimony to the skill of the builders whose names are hidden in oblivian.
From the top of the Caislean Hills a road once descended coming out on the present day road to Kiltrustan round the top of the curry Hill. This entered the Demense, where th new road now leads to the priest's island. Following the course of the old road we come to the Goat Park gate to wich reference has already been made, thence poast the chape of Urneen and on the the river close by. Here there are traces of the old road on both sides of the river, but there is a present no passage or bridge at this point. Formerly however, the clapper stone still seen in the grace at the back of the river. afforded a crossing place until the river changed its course slightly.
Doonard is the birthplace of Father James kelly a name familiar to all who live about here. he used to read Mass fro the faithful in the Church of Strokestown. The said church being once a courthouse possessed no belfry so father Kelly hung his bell in a nearby stable remarking when questiond over the matter that horses slept better when the tinkle of the bell rang in their ears.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:10
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to blow. T'is said that from men would work the mill in the manner in which Spainards and Moors use mules and ponies to perform the same task. When during the Cromwellian settlement the Mahon family were granted the Bawn and 300 acres which originally comprised the estate one lady member of the family was a Catholi. She obtained the site of a chapel from the owner who probably was her father or brother. The chapel she caused to be built stands a short distance eas of the Bawn house. Here Father James kelly of Doonard used to read Mass for the faithful. Today the four ivy clad walls remain, without a roof or entrance save a window in the eastern wall. Visitors to our Gaelic Park should go to see this precious monument which remains to remind us of the tenacity with which out forefalhers clung to their faith.
Urneen Chapel (further note)
when Urneen chapel has long fallen into decay an agent of the Mahons'; one Tom Roberts began removing the cut stone to build gate pillars. When removing the hold water font, a mysterious voice called on the workmen to return every stone to its original position/ Promptly the order was obeyed and for years the building remained untouched by the vandals'.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:10
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is correctly called Beal ata na mBuilli, meaning the mouth of the ford of the strokes. There we see that the present name of the town should be not Strokestown but Strokesford. This ford is said to have been the scene of a fierce encounter between the native clansmen who are reported to have used stocks inference to more deadly weapons.
Opposite the Hollow House (Harmony House) on the right hand side of the road leading northward to Elphin stood until 180 years ago the grand entrance to the Demense. Two pillars of the big fate are seen at present at the entrance to the new cemetery, where also is the gate formally known as the "ladies Gate". The two remaining pillars were removed from the ground entrance to the "Great Park" where now we find them.
Cregga Hill is a rugged eminence farther north than the Cashlean Hills. It is a rocky plateau covered with sand and hazel trees. On the south eastern slopes of the hill are pointed out to the day the ruins of the house of the famous Bishop McDermott Roe. A short distance to the north of these ruins is an old disused windmill of which is unknown when the wind failed
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:08
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feet of him. Then the ghostly form arose with a groan. With a shreek of fear and terror . The victim of th eunfortunate joke hurled the pitcher at the "ghost" and fled to the monastery. In the morning the corpse of the joke was found beside the well, wrapped in a blookstained sheet, killed by the flow of the pitcher which struck him on the head.
This well thought now but a drinking pool is still known as the "well" by the inhabitants of the district who still relate the above ----- and may be seen in the valley about 300 yds northwest of the mound that marks the site of the monastry of Kildalogue concerning which we hear nothing since Cromwell ravaged out already sorrowful land.
Some years after the diary of the monastery, the land on which it stood was tilled. When the potatoes were dug, human teeth were found embedded in the tubers proving that here was the cemetery in which the community buried their dead.
The eel of Kildalogue well
A mysterious eel has occasionally been seen in the well of Kildalogue and has always been a source of terror to the children living in the vicinity. It was last seen by the writer of these notes some
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:08
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half a mile west of modern Strokestown, the ruins of another palace has been uncovered by the ploughman, but no excavations have been made on the site which is not marked on the Ordinance Survey Maps. Tradition still repeat the fales of the O'Connor family which is said to have a large palace here.
About the end of the 15th Century a monastery was built in Kildalogue with a church or chapel attached thereto - we have no knowledge as to what order the community which dwelt there belonged. Tradition merely calls then Brothers of the this community, one was chef or cook, whose duty it was to bring in everything requied for the meals he prepared on one occasion he is related to have forgotten to bring in water for the evening meal. Matins ! being over at midnight he set about rectifying his mission. Taking a pitcher he repaired to the well nearby. The well is now a drinking ford for cattle - proceeding slowly on his way as the night was very dark. Another member of th community had preceeded him, determined to play a practical joke on the erring one. Wrapping a white cloth aroung him, he lay hidden behind a large stone close by until the man with the pitcher came within a couple of
anonymous contributor
2019-11-04 02:07
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Some traditional history of the Parish of Strokestown from the day of St. Patrick to the Famine.
Told by Bernard Cunningham
Kildalogue
Strokestown
age aabout 65 years
On the journey southbound from Cruashan, St. Patrick followrd the ancient road across the Cashlean Hills, on the western slope of this convience is a spring well from which he drank. On the rocks at the mouth of this very shallow well are the clearly defined marks of he handle of the whip which the saint carried and of the hoop of the foal which accinoanied him on his trevels.
Through known locality on the Cashlean Hills there is no reality but on ehill of the name.
This is a wood covered hill sloping gently to the north and south. To the east and north east the slope is more sharp and the land is of a rugged and scraggy nature.
In Clauin Frare (Cloonfree) the remains of a palace said to belong to the far back O'Connor's is yet to be seen in the Northern shore of Lough Lee - about
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 21:35
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on to the close of last century.
Before that time the field was dug deep with a spade by numerous hands and though the work was slow it was a better job than can be done by any plough.
One big difference being that was no waste with headlands. The old saying being "The headlands pay the rent" is no longer true. Headlands are common now with the plough as room must 9be left to turn the horses on a headland, that is the idea of leaving them.
Well, The drills are opened with the plough in the gort or field and manure is spread in this way so many horse to the rank. Then two men usually spread it and then the seed are planted and finally the drills are closed again with the plough.
The crop is now sown and nothing more is done till about six or seven weeks elapse when the weeding has to be done.
In days gone by 'twas the women did the weeding. That is now changed as it is done now by means of a
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 21:23
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Dromdelgy comes from Drom a back or ridge dely = a thorn hence we come to the English word Thornback or the thorny shrubbery that grew along its slopes. There was an old church stone at Thornback and stories are told of the monks who lived there One such story is current among the old ones of the place but it is probably not quite or entirely true According to this ancient tale, Thornback got its name from the monks who lived there having worn on their backs crowns of Thorns.
Thorn Back is situated opposite Dunmore in a straight line but on the opposite bank of the Nore. It is in the ancient Parish of Saint Canices Kilkenny.
Tradition has it that William of Orange came by Dunmore on his journey from Dublin to Limerick. He haloted at Bennett's Bridge little village 4 miles from our City. The making of this route and the Bridge (Bennetts Bridge) did away with the ancient road or pass at Ballyreddin. The ancient road now
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 20:42
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the little childeren who come unto me" are written on it. In this grave-yard also there are two thieves buried who were fighting in the last war. Over their grave are two chains.
The ruins of the Franciscan Monastery are in the Catholic grave-yard. A number of people are buried within the ruins including David de Barry, founder of the Abbey and the O'Donegans who were the ruling family in Buttevant long ago. Some families buy a portion of the graveyard and they put a railing around it and all the family are buried in that place.
This was obtained from
Mrs. Daly, (age 40 years)
Currymount,
Buttevant,
Co. Cork.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 20:36
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Old Graveyards
There are three graveyards in the parish of Buttevant. One is situated in the townland of Templemary, and two in the town of Buttevant- one outside the Catholic Church and the other outside the Protestant Church.
There is a high wall built around a grave in Templemary graveyard. The reason of this is that there was a young man in America who dreamt over and over again that something was interfering with his parents' grave. He was so troubled that he could not rest, so he came home and found it was quite true. Some pigs had strayed in and were rooting up the ground. Then the man got a concrete wall built around the grave.
There are many fine Celtic Crosses and nicely sculptured in the Protestant graveyard. There is a lovely stone placed over the grave of a child in the shape of a scroll. The words "Suffer
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 16:21
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Hallowe'en is always on the 31st of October. The old people of this district used to call it "All" Hallows" which means "holy eve". It was a belief with the old people that spirits used to be seen on that night and that it twould'nt be safe for anyone to be out late. There are many ghost stories told about ghosts that were seen on that night. Hallowe'en night is a great night of fun. There are a lot of games played such as snap "apple" diving etc. This is how snap apple is played-: There is an apple let hang from the ceiling and whoever is going to snap the apple his hands are tied behind his back then he tries to catch the apple with his teeth. This is how diving is played. There is a tub left on the kitchen floor which is full of water. There are 2 or 3 apples put into the water then the players dive down their heads to try to catch one of the apples. There is another game played with 3 plates clean water one one dirty on another and the other one empty. if the player puts his hand into the clean water when blindfolded he will be married to a very nice girl if he puts his hand into the dirty water he will be married to an ugly girl and if he puts his hand into the empty one he will
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 04:57
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Local Ruins.
The ruins of the old mansion in which Thomas Russell was born is still to be seen the downland of Dromahane about a quarter of a mile from our school. The old mansion is now belongs to a local farmer named Mr. O Callaghan. It has not been occupied for over forty years. The last people who lived in it were a family named Horgans who now live the the adjoining farm. The name of this house is "Correy's House" because Correy's lived in it before the Horgans. It was said that this house was haunted but the ghosts that were seen there were only a few man-owls.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 04:50
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An Old Graveyard
There is an old graveyard in Mr. Goods land where unbaptized children were buried. A strange story is told of this graveyard. One morning my father was ploughing this filed and a lot of white mice appeared in the furrow in which he was ploughing and the horses could not stir another step. That field was never tilled afterwards.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-03 04:48
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Hidden Treasure
On the main road from Dromahane to the Beet Factory there is a place called the "gold diggings." When the men used to be bowling on the road it was a mark to finish the "score." An unknown person or persons came one night and dug all the ditch and some of the dyke, but it is not known whether they got the gold or not.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-02 19:30
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One winter's day long long ago
When I was a little fellow
A wandering piper came to our door
Grey headed blind and yellow
Ah how glad was my young heart
Though the earth and sky looked dreary
To see the piper and his dog twas pinch and Cauch O'Leary

(II)
And when he stowed away his bag
Cross bared with green and yellow
I thought and said on Ireland's ground
There was not so fine a fellow.
And Seamus Burke and Sean Ma Gee and Sly Cauch and Mary.
Rushed in with panting breath to see and welcomed Cauch O Leary.

(III)
A God be with those happy days and
God be with my childhood
When I bare headed roamed all day
anonymous contributor
2019-11-02 16:56
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Townland and village of Knock (An Cnoc)
I live in the village of Knock which is situated in the Burrane School District. This village is in the extreme western part of the parish of Kilmurry Mc Mahon. The village of Knock is included in the townland of Knock. Part of the village is built in the townland of Kilmore (Cill Mor). The road leading from Knock to the old ‘mail road’ divides the Knock part of the village from the Kilmore part. I live in the Knock part of the village.it is in the Barony of Clonderlaw. It is beautifully situated on the shore of Clonderlaw Bay and from the village one can see parts of the adjacent counties of Limerick and Kerry. There is an immense expanse of water - probably two square miles in area just in front of Knock village.
There are eleven slated and thirteen thatched houses in both the village and townland. There were at least twice that number there long ago as can be inferred from the number of old ruins of houses in the village and townland.
There is no particular surname common in this village and townland as there are no more than two families of the same name living there.
The village got its name from the Irish word ‘Cnoc’ which means a ‘hill’. The present village is situated
anonymous contributor
2019-11-01 21:56
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Bhí an Gobán Saor agus a mhac ag dul i bhfad ó bhaile lá agus nuair a bhí tamall maith den bóthar curtha díobh "giorraigh an bóthar dúinn" arsa sé.
Ó más mar sin tá an scéal agat" arsa an Gobán "tá sé chún maith casadh" agus chuadar abhaile.
An lá ina dhiaidh sin chuadar chun bóthar arís. D'imigheadar leo ar a mbog sodar go raibh chuid mhaith den bhóthar curtha díobh.
"Giorraigh an bóthar dúinn a mhic" arsa an Gobán.
"Chonus a gheobhainn an bóthar a giorrú" arsa an mac.
Ó más mar sin tá an scéal tá sé chún maith casadh abhaile arís" arsa an Gobán. Agus chuadar.
Bhí mac an Ghobáin pósta le bean cruinn agus nuair a chuadar abhaile an tara huair d'fiafraigh sí de dé cúis a bhíodar ag casadh abhaile mar sin.
D'inis sé di conaic mar a bhí. "Bheul" arsa sí "is mór an t-amadán tú. Dé chúis nár inis scéal éigint dó. Sin a bhfuil uaidh".
Bhí sin go maith agus ní raibh go holc.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-01 15:23
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This is a story I heard about a man who was coming home late one night and he was passing by a stream of water he saw the banshee combing her hair and he snatched the comb from her. The banshee used to come to the window crying every night. He went to the Priest and asked how he would give back the comb to the banshee again. The priest told him to get a tongs and put the comb in the tongs. Next night the banshee came crying to the window and he put the comb in the tongs and handed it out to her and she broke off the top of the tongs.
She was never seen or heard again.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-01 14:54
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The Potatoes
3.6.1938
Nearly everyone in this district plants potatoes. They prepare he land previously by ploughing it in the Winter. Some people plough in the manure also and more people put it on before setting the potatoes. They use both farmyard and artificial manure.
In the Spring the ground is re-ploughed and harrowed and all weeds picked.
Then the field is drilled and the potatoes planted artificial manure spread, and the drills closed. All the farmers in this district plant the potatoes in the drills in the olden
anonymous contributor
2019-11-01 14:37
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in this parish called the Fair Field, but there is in Clonakilty, where a toll is collected: sixpence per head for cattle and ninepence for a car load of bonhams. This money is used for the rent of the field and is collected by the men appointedby the Clonakilty Town Council.
The fairs of this locality are held in Clonakilty and Ross. In Ross the fair is held in the street. There is a big horse fair there on the 06th August.
"Luck" money is given at the fairs, and depends on the price of the animal: sixpence per bonham: calves half-crown: cows five shillings.
When a bargain is finished the buyer gives the seller a slap on the palm of the hand.
Te cattle are marked by rubbing paint to them or by cutting the hair with a scissors. The halter is given with the house when sold.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-01 14:24
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Fairs. 9/9/38
Got from Mr. Denis Driscoll
Knocknagehy, Clonakilty
Farmer aged 50. Born and reared at home address.
Fairs were held at Newmill, about two miles east of Rosscarbery, up to about twenty years ago, but since they are held in Rosscarbery, this town being more convenient. There is no field in
anonymous contributor
2019-11-01 12:37
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Airgead an Éin
In the year 1844 a man named Bartley Durkin lived in the townland of Urbal Barr, Ballinaglera, Co Leitrim. He had a wife named Peggy Creamer, and a family of three sons and two daughters. Bartley and his wife went to the fair in Drumshanbo on the 16th May 1844. The children were engaged saving turf. The youngest boy, Patrick, was only six years and whilst his elder brothers and sisters were working at the turf he went looking for birds' nests. He had seen a bird going into a hole in the ditch and he put his hand in after the bird and found no bird but instead he drew out a handful of what he called the nicest money he ever saw. He ran for the house through the footings of turf and a little man less than two feet high followed him, calling as he ran "Airgead an Éin, airgead an éin". The youngster tripped over a sod of turf and fell, losing all the money with the exception of a few coins which he hid in a hole in the wall of a house. When his parents returned home from the fair, he lay sick in bed and he told them what had happened, and the place where he had hidden the money. They went to the place he told them and all they found was a few withered leaves. Next day at about the same time he followed the bird and on the day following he was dead. This boy was an uncle to the present Michael Durkin of Cornamuckla North, a first cousin of Mr Sylvester Maguire of Urbal Barr from whom I obtained the story. It was told to Mr Maguire by his mother, also by Francis Mc Partlan of Urbal Barr, both of whom clearly remembered the time this remarkable incident occurred.
Mr Maguire has many stories of the olden times. From him I also obtained "The Hidden Treaure Story- Third Story" on page 12.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-01 12:36
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Airgead an Éin
In the year 1844 a man named Bartley Durkin lived in the townland of Urbal Barr, Ballinaglera, Co Leitrim. He had a wife named Peggy Creamer, and a family of three sons and two daughters. Bartley and his wife went to the fair in Drumshanbo on the 16th May 1844. The children were engaged saving turf. The youngest boy, Patrick, was only six years and whilst his elder brothers and sisters were working at the turf he went looking for birds' nests. He had seen a bird going into a hole in the ditch and he put his hand in after the bird and found no bird but instead he drew out a handful of what he called the nicest money he ever saw. He ran for the house through the footings of turf and a little man less than two feet high followed him, calling as he ran "Airgead an Éin, airgead an éin". The youngster tripped over a sod of turf and fell, losing all the money with the exception of a few coins which he hid in a hole in the wall of a house. When his parents returned home from the fair, he lay sick in bed and he told them what had happened, and the place where he had hidden the money. They went to the place he told them and all they found was a few withered leaves. Next day at about the same time he followed the bird and on the day following he was dead. This boy was an uncle to the present Michael Durkin of Cornamuckla North, a first cousin of Mr Sylvester Maguire of Urbal Barr from whom I obtained the story. It was told to Mr Maguire by his mother, also by Francis Mc Partlan of Urbal Barr, both of whom clearly remembered the time this remarkable incident occurred.
Mr Maguire has many stories of the olden times. From him I also obtained "The Hidden Treaure Story- Third Story" on page 12.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 23:38
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Old Ruins 10-1-39
There is an old ruined castle in the school district called Castlesampson. It was built Sampson Keogh. It is not known how long is it built, some say at least 500 years ago others say shortly before the Williamite Wars.
Situate Townland of Castlesampson Parish of Taughmaconnell, Barony of Athlone South, Co. Roscommon.
Said to have been besieged when the Williamites were on their way from Athlone to Ballinasloe 1691. It has been derelict since that time. There is supposed to be hidden treasure buried near it (see note on hidden treasures). There are two caves about a quarter of a mile south from the castle. It is said that those caves were connected with the castle by an underground passage. There is no tradition of any one being dome to death in this castle.
There are two other castles in the Parish Dundonald and Cluanbigney these were built by brothers of Sampson Keogh). These castles
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 16:11
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Bhí lánamhú bocht shoir i nDún Seun fadó (tá san cúpla míle soir ó'n nDaingean) agus bhí mór seisear leanbh acu. Fuaireadar chómh bocht san sa deire gur diréigean a bhí aon nídh lé n-ithe acu.
Aon lá amháin dúbhairt an t-athair lé na mhnaoi go gcaithfeadh sé féin imtheacht ag soláthar oibre i n-áit éigin agus dá mairfheadh sé go bhfóirfeadh sé ortha.
D'imthig sé lar na mháireach agus sé an
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:52
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beautiful place, and you can also see Dunree Fort, another place which the British have occupied.

(Given by Wm McLaughlin, Hillside, Buncrana)

Long ago the fields of Machrabán were all covered with a mantle of white daisies and all sorts of beautiful flowers, and that is why the people called it Machrabán. The Hillside river separates Machrabán from Hillside.
There is a blacksmith in Machrabán named Edward Brennan, and the people of other districts come to him to get all their ploughs mended, and their horses shod. There is also a thrashing mill and it belongs to John O'Donnell and a lot of farmers get their corn thrashed with it. It is driven by two horses, and it is very useful. The most common name in Machrabán is O'Donnell. There are ten houses in Machrabán and there are four houses in which there are no people dwelling. There are two slate houses. There is also a shoemaker in Machrabán named Hugh Doherty. There is a road at which there are fifty employed working now in Machrabán, because when Summer comes a lot of visitors comes
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:48
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The cotton mills were 134' long, 34' wide and 50' in m height.
The mills contained 10,000 spinning spindles with the necessary machinery for turning out 30,000 lbs. weight of manufactured cotton per week.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:47
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The sheet-iron was used on the floor of the mills as a guard against fire. A family of the name of Crowley lived in Knockbrown at the time Allman was about to build these mills. The old man Crowley told the Allmans that where they intended to build was very rocky but the Allmans were determined to build there. They lost much money in trying to cut the rock and when the strike occurred they closed the mills and came to reside where Barrett the tanner lived in the New Road.
When the mills were closed a man named Thade Lannin bought them and used them as a hospital during the famine times.
The Medical Officer then was named Woods and during this dreadful period a man with a white horse took the half-dead corpses to the present St Mary's cemetery commonly or locally known as "Brady's Hole" for the modest charge of 6d per corpse.
"In "Brady's Hole" paupers who died in the Bandon Union without relatives were buried. Catholics and Protestants were buried there.
The Cotton Mills became a cornstore in later years. Immense quantities of corn were stored and a number of men employed in turning the corn. The proprietor was Mr. Maurice Healy, Corn Merchant, Bandon.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:43
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[Closed in 1810].
Outside the town of Bandon on the main road to Timoleague and about a quarter mile from the hamlet of Old Chapel are the ruins of the famous "Cotton Mills". These mills were built by a man named George Allman in the beginning of the nineteenth century. They were working up to 1810 when they had to close down owing to a strike. George Allman died in 1818. There were five large floors and each floor was covered with sheet-iron. Hundreds of spindles were worked by the water from the Bridewell river which rises near Knockbrown and flows close by. The old mill-wheel- a huge one- was to be seen until very recently when it was dismantled. Old Bandonians states that "every turn of the wheel earned a guinea" for the Directors Sweet or Swift-Sullivan Allman. Those Directors lived in three spacious houses overlooking the mill, viz., Milton House, Overton House, and Mount Prospect. The houses are still there and occupied. The mills were the largest cotton mills in Munster and gave employment to thousands.
Bandon Town at this time extended to the Old Chapel and farther on and the population was nearly 20 thousands. In fact the bulk of the population resided round Gallow's Hill, New Road, and Old Chapel.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:35
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was present, good health. Then the priest said to him did those words come from his heart "Yes" he said "they come from my soul. If I can, only understand the meaning of them" Then the priest told him to come to his house and he would give him a book to try would he believe anything and to bring back the book in a certain time. The priest waited for weeks and no reply came. Then he thought the book must have been torn and thrown in the fire. He thought of going to see him. When he reached Drum's house he asked the wife where
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:33
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Drum- a nonCatholic and his wife a Roman Catholic living in the bottom of Kilshinahan in the time of the tyrant Moore. HIs wife went to Mass on Christmas day and as was customary brought home a bottle of holy-water. When the dinner was on the fire he spilled the bottle of holy-water into the pot. He was a boatmaker by trade. He went to a place- Ahernal in Kinsale during the Christmas time. When the dinner was ready, they did not like not to call him in and they thought he might make a leak in the boat. He was called in and there were drinks given round. He drank the priest's, who
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:30
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killed a calf and sent it by the servant to Moore. When the servant left, Barry left soon after and met the servant returning. "Well what news?" said Barry. "Oh," said the servant "Moore has his head cut off".
There was a schoolmaster named Colman who was a publican in Ballinscarty at one time. He built a hedge outside his house and the name thus got it's origin- "baile na scairre" or in English Ballinascartty "the town of the hawthorn". The tree is still outside Forde's house. He is a son-in-law of Colman. There was a man named Shean
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:28
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those days.
Another great tyrant was Moore of Maryborough south of Timoleague. He imprisoned a priest one day. The prisons those days was to bury people under the ground by making a hole in the ground and putting people into it standing. This happened to that poor priest. There was another tyrant Captain Barry from Barry's hall called since after him, who heard about the priest. He came to the priest's rescue and saved him. Then the priest told him that before another day something would happen. Barry was a very great friend of Moore's and next day he
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:26
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the fellow that saw it "whoever wrote it, wrote it well, for the same is written in the gates of hell"
There was a great shooting of Catholics with guns at the same time. One man Pat Carthy shot a woman who was minding young children. He was asked why he did it. He said it was easier for herself not to be minding those young children. He had some friends in Timoleague and he went there next day selling goods. All the people knew him and they came around him and Guard Lannin killed him.
Another story indicates how much priests suffered in
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:24
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your cold marshy land is no margin".
Sometimes during the famine days when Jones would enter Clonakilty town he would always ask "how many dead to-day"? The more that died the more he was pleased. There is a story told how a ship was rounding the south of Sicily. The people of Sicily heard the crew saying that the devils were putting down more coal, Jones was coming to the next world. In those days when entering Bandon about the month of July there was a notice hanging up "Welcome here for Protestants and Pagans but not papists" Well said
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:21
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the wife of the bold tenant farmer and Jone's son-- the son of the land lord. This argument became the foundation of the said song.
Landlord's words
I saw your old husband, in town the other night. He was shouting + bawling for Captain Moonlight
But after the session I'll put him to flight
He'll get the high road for his garden".
Catherine
If my husband is drinking, what's that to you. Isn't it better he'd drink it than give it to you
So make up your mind for your won't get a fluke for
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 13:18
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Jones of Clonakilty was one of the greatest tyrants of the Land League days. There was a poor man named Mickie Kelly dying in his house near Clonakilty. Jones was watching to raise his rent by £5 when he died for his own maintenance. He came one day to see him when he was not dying. "Isnt long you are living" he said to the poor man. When he died a few days after there was his daughter Catharine Kelly in the house. Jones came asking the rent. At that time the song called "The wife of the Bold Tenant Farmer" was being made. Catherine Kelly was the wife of the bold tenant farmer. There was a man coming from Clonakilty one day and he heard the argument between Catherine
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 12:20
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army came and hunted him out of it. It is said that after that he went to the cave at New-grange and he stayed there until he died and it is said that the people put his body into a stone cup and burned it. The cup that the giant body was burned in is in the cave at New-grange yet.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 09:58
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Mrs Rainsford saw the Beanside. The people who were living in the house had gone out. She was going for a walk along the road. She saw a beautiful woman combing her hair and as Mrs Rainsford was approaching her she waved her hand and Mrs Rainsford went back. She was inquiring who the strange woman was but she found out afterwards that it was the "Beanside".
One night a man named Coffey from Annagh, Murroe, Co. Limerick was up minding his turf. He saw a woman combing
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:35
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(The cliff of the echo) It is so called because there is an echo in the rocks. There is a subterranean passage through the rocks, but its opening is now closed up with briars and brambles.
Corrat lear - Is the name of the bot about fifty yards from this school. It was so called because many years ago there was flax growing in the same place.
Lissacaha. (The fort of teh battle) It is a townland about two and a half miles from here. It was the scene of a battle in the olden times between teh Irish and the Danes.
Poll muslai Is a small deep strand very near us, it is always filled with mussels hence its name.
????? is a field belonging to James Johnson. The old people say that children used be buried there long ago.
Cuas gorm is so called becase the water looks blue at all times. It is a little inlet to the sea.
Oileann gabair is so called because the water looks blue at all times. It is a little inlet to the sea.
Oilean gabair is an island opposite the Altar Church. In the olden times poor people used
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:16
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that a man from the kilnockin side was going to mass to Coolavote. He was passing by the gate of the Church yard as he was passing he saw a priest in the ruins of the old Chapel saying Mass. He went in and heard Mass there every Sunday for a long time.
One of his neighbours asked him what was the matter with him as he did not see him at mass lately. The man said I have mass every Sunday nearer home. The neighbour asked where and the man said in Kilmacow grave yard. There is a priest saying Mass every Sunday in the ruins of the Old Chapel. The neighbour said 'I will go with you next Sunday' The two of them went the following Sunday but the priest did not say Mass anymore.
He was really a ghost.
(Told to me by my Auntie)
Cait Ni Amlaoib, Ban Mor
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:12
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A story about Kilmacow Graveyard
I live in the townland of Bawnmore in the Parish of Lismire, Kilmacow graveyard is not far away from my home.
There is a story told about the graveyard in Kilmacow. In olden times there was a Chapel in the graveyard. There was also a Chapel in Coolavote more than two hundred years ago now called the Old Road. The story is told
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:10
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Then they went off to the battle. The three chiefs were killed. Many people have since looked for the treasure, but their search has been in vain.
(Told me by my parents)
Maire Ni Concubair, Ban Mor
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:09
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Hidden Treasure
There was once a castle in Mrs. William O'Connor's lands in Curraghs.
There lived in this castle three chiefs named McCarthy. They were very sick and owned a lot of gold, silver and jewelery.
There was a big battle going on down near Charleville. The three chiefs went there. Before they left they gathered all their gold, silver and jewelery adn put them into a lead box. They took it down to the river Allow and buried it in a fort there.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:06
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This was considered a great cure for jaundice.
Told me by my mother)
Maire Ni Ceallaig, Lios Maoir
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:05
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to rub ferret's milk to a sore. People paid rounds to a holy well so as to cure toothache, sore eyes, sore feet and other diseases.
Another remedy was - children having whooping cough were put underneath a donkey nine times.
Older people depended on meeting a person with a white horse and asking them for a cure for whooping cough. Hemlock was considered a wonderful cure for a swelling on horses' legs.
Certain people were looked upon as having healing powers, such as the seventh son or daughter, or a child born who never saw its father.
Another cure they had long ago was to boil primroses in milk and give the mixture to the persons who were suffering from yellow jaundice. Also they to go out early in the morning to get nine worms, before sunrise.
They would boil them in milk and give the mixture to the patient for three mornings.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-31 00:01
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There is a mountain peak, called mushera that can be seen from our door and the old people in my locality have this Irish saying with regard to it 'blarac' is another mountain some distance to the west of Mushera.
(Told to me by my parents and grandfather)
Miceal O Caoin, Duar Airgle
Local Cures
A great cure for a child suffering from 'thrush' was to put the 'bill of a gander into the mouth of the child. Slanlus was known as a great cure for a sore on a hand or leg.
Dandelion was also considered a great cure for liver complaints. By washing and boiling the roots dandelion tea was made.
Another great cure locally known was
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 23:58
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Weather Lore
When the crows keep around the rookery, it is the sign of heavy rain and storm. When the crows go back West in the morning is the sign of a fine day. The wild geese fly to the east in good weather and they fly to the north in the bad weather. A grey frost always bring rain.
It is easy to know when a bad storm is coming as the sheep will come down from the hills and go where the shade is. If dust rises off the roadway it is the sign of wet weather. When the smoke goes up straight from the chimney it is the sign of fine weather. All insects gather into some old house when bad weather is to come. Never trust a July sky. When the pot rack gets wet it is a sure sign of rain. When the smoke blows down the chimney it is also a sure of rain. 'Ceo ar Miusire agus Clarac lorn; an comarta soinninne is fearr are doman'
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 23:53
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Weather Lore
Soot falling down a chimney is a sign of bad weather. We know, at our hosue each morning, whether the day will be wet or fine. There is an opening between Winter's house and the mountain, and when the opening is closed by the fog we will have a wet day. But when the opening is clear we will have a fine day.
The southern wind brings most rain to this district. When there is a storm approaching the clouds are very red towards the west. If a number of crows gathered together in a field it is a sign of rain. When the cat is by the fire sleeping it is a sign of bad weather. The cricket sings when the rain is approaching. All birds and living animals give signs of the weather.
Aine Ni Murcasa, Gairdin
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 23:50
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Local Heroes
My grandfather, Mr. Timothy Aherne, Knockavilling, could lift a rolling stone as high as his knees. When only eighteen years of age he could carry a plough on his shoulders, over fields and ditches.
The late Maurice Collins of Knockavilling could put a ton weight into a car in four attempts. My grandfather Timothy Mullane, Patrick connell, Dan Kearney Bawnmore, James Callaghan, Killnockin were great mowers. Each of them could mow an acre of hay in a day. All those old people are dead and gone now. Lawrence O'Brien of Burraghs was a great dancer. His steps were jigs, reels and hornpipes.
(told to me by my parents)
Tadg Labigearn Cnoc Cilla
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 23:47
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a little white and round hosue, and it is full of meat, but has no doors or windows to let me in to eat. (an egg)
Under fire, over fire and never touches the fire. (a cake in a bastable)
As I went out a slippery gap, I met a boy with a red cap. He had iron toes and a monkey nose and upon my word he would frighten the crows. (a gun)
(Told me by Denis Kearney, Bawnmore)
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 23:44
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Riddles
I had a little house and a mouse could not live in it, and all the men in town could not count how many windows were in it. (a thimble)
As round as a marble as deep as a cup and all the king's army could not take it up. (a well)
Long legs, crooked thighs, little head, and no eyes (a tongs)
As I was walking through a field of wheat I met a thing that you could eat. It was neither fish, flesh nor raw bone; it stayed there until it walked home (an egg)
Ding, dong, under a bank, ten drawing four. (a woman milking a cow)
As black as ink, as white as milk, it hops on the road like hailstones (a magpie)
What is as crooked as a river (The bark)
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 23:40
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awaiting decision
A Funny Story
Some years ago there resided in the townland of yvelough a man by the name of William McSweeney. This man owed rent to the landlord, O'Keeffe, Newmarket. The landlord died and his widow was forcing him for the rent.
William McSweeney dressed up like the late landlord and got a horse the same colour as the landlord had.
About twelve O'Clock he visited the widow's house riding on his horse. She seeing him thought it was the ghost of her dead husband. She came to the window and asked him if anything was troubling him. He said 'yes, give to William McSweeney a clear receipt for his rent'.
(told me by my mother)
Eiblin Ni Amlaoib
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 22:22
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Name, Townland, Remarks
Binalta, Ardmalin
Portaronan, Ardmalin
Creg-na-picka-mór, Ardmalin
Stuckawea, Ardmalin
Clagan, Ardmalin
Beal an [?], Ardmalin
Muckla, Ardmalin
Roudy Dowds, Ardmalin, A fishing mark
Gortnamullen, Killourt
Lagna creá, Killourt
Cludies, Killourt
Cilluirt, Killourt
Cloughlin, Killourt
Cur na welta, Ardmalin
Carraig dub, Slievebawn
Port Móre, Slievebawn
The Pier, Slievebawn
The Tower Hill, Ballyhelion
Hell's Hole, Ballyhelion
Devil's Bridge, Backlands
Rana, Backlands
Cnoc-a-fola, Ardmalin
The Sentry Box, Ballyhelion
Baker's Brae, Ballyhelion
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 20:10
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To know you are remembering still your Irihs Soldier boy.
Chorus.
Composed by John MacGettigan
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 20:09
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His leaders ordered to fire to siege all Ireland stood amazed
His comrades came to her cottage door with an oath of pride and joy
Conveying the news and sad appeal of her Irish Soldier boy.
Chorus.
Good bye God bless you mother dear
I am dying a death so grand
From wounds received in battle trying to free our native land.
But I hope we will meet in Heaven above in the land beyond the sky
Where you will be in Company with your Irish Soldier Boy.
J.
Along farewell to Donegal, Kilkenny and Mayo, Tipperary Derry and Tyrone where the bushes green do grow
And when at night you kneel to pray it will be a source of joy,
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 18:58
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November Eve is a great night for fun. Children play snap apple and all other sorts of games. They put the apple on a piece of cord and hang it from the ceiling. Then they would try to catch the apple with their mouths. Beans and nuts are also used. Pan cakes are made, and money, rings, and buttons are put in them. A bowl of water and a ring and clay are put on the table. The person who is going to touch one of them is blindfolded, and if he puts his hand in the water he is going to cross the sea, and if he touches the ring he is going to be married, and if he touches the clay he is going to die.
Old people tell stories of the older times and of battles that they fought.
"On that night candles are lit in every house for the poor souls, may they rest in peace."
Jon O'Connel, (Age 10 years, 11 months)
Turagh
Cappamore, Co. Limerick. 5.11.1937
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 18:55
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Folklore- Mermaid
Long, long ago a man went to the sea and he saw a woman dressed in red, sitting on a stone. He went over to her and he took the cloak from her. Then she went home with him and they got married. They had five children and as this man knew that his wife was a mermaid, he hid her cloak in a stack of oats. One of the children saw the father hiding the cloak and he told his mother. She went and got the cloak and she ran away to the sea and she changed her five children into five stones
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 18:54
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On November Eve the lads and lassies sat around the fire together, playing nuts and snap apple. On that night everyone lit a candle for the poor souls. We had great sport playing snap apple. We got a tub of water and put two apples into it, and we were trying to take a bite off the apples. There we got beans and put some into the fire to roast and when we had the beans eaten we began playing cards with some of our friends. Next we got a bowl of water, a piece of clay and a thimble. The person who is going to put his hand in any of these things must be blindfolded. If he puts his hand into the water he is going to cross the sea, if he puts his handed in the clay he is going to die, and if he puts his hand in the thimble he will be a tailor.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 17:55
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Near the village of Newcastle there stands an ancient ruined castle upon a rath. It overlooks the road. There is a store in connection with it, and it has its ghosts - as what old castle has not. This is the story as told to me by an old man who lived in Newcastle forty-five years ago.
"A miser lived in this castle long ago when it was in good condition. He had a wife and one daughter, who was as beautiful and good as her father was ugly and grasping. There was a nobleman living near who had a son who was brave and handsome, and poor. The boy and girl were in love with each other and used to meet secretly, but one day the old miser found this out and locked the girl in her room.
The boy heard this, and came to try and rescue her away and marry her
He planned it all out in his mind beforehand, and one dark night he stole into the castle through a window, intending to lock the doors of the miser's and his wife's sleeping
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 16:16
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A great Croch
A great Bitheamhnach
A little Míste of a child
A Beart of hay
A Gabáil of hay
a Balbhán
a Bodaráinigh
Bóisceátí
an old Cabhail of a house
a Míola Crionne (a worm slater, milipeder)
a Crostóir of a boy
a Luibarachán of a girl
a lazy Laistir
an old Bodóg
an old Cis of a woman
a lazy Scraiste
a big Leibide
a Criotacáin
a Liobaracháin(?)
the Bocán of the door
a Leadhb of a girl
Have you the Fainne Ór (ace)
a Cailleachín
a big Soláthar of food
a Smúsachán
a Plaidhce
a Seopáili
a Túacáilli
a Rógaire
a Plubaire
Feóchadán
Neoinin
Sgiathóirí
a Bodharáim
a Tuath (a field in 3 townlands here)
Mo Ghreidn Croidhe tu
I have Trállach in my hand
the potatoes are only Trállach
we dug a good Stanng but they are only Criocáns

I got the Plucamus
I have a Bonnleac
I got Fuarneamh in my fingers
I have a Ceochán from talking to you
I saw an Airc Luachra in the Portach
There was Luachra Madra(?) there
I cut my Lúidin
I put Slanlus to it
he has a Stroil
he is an old Stroileachán
I saw a Seán a Caipín's next in the Claidhe Gréíne

the Stopaide got lost
the Speicide got lost
the Priompatán was out last evening
he had a Buailltán of a stick in his hand
she had great Cúram in me
my Fong is broken
A
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 09:58
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Old people in this district still talk of the ghost which haunted the pass of
Gleann Scoheen or Scotias Glen
which contains the grave of Queen Scotia, on the Slieve Mish mountain.
There is not a shadow of a doubt that such a spirit haunted this lonely pass.
The spirit would come in various shapes, and not alone struck terror into the hearts of the people for miles around, but actually killed some of them. At one time it would appear as a cow, at another time as a horse, sometimes again as a sow surrounded by a litter of bonhams, but always it changed into a fierce and terrible woman.
Sometimes people escaped her wrath by being very civil and obliging, but others lost their lives on the spot, or got a severe beating from the effects of which they died. Let us take for instance the case of a man named Bryan Connor, a native of Tralee.
Being out late on business and in a hurry home he had no option but to ride his horse through this pass (it being a shortcut through the mountain from Castlemaine to Tralee). Seeing a feeble old woman on the road he offered her a ride on horseback. The old woman instantly sprang on the horses's back to the surprise of the rider.
They had not gone very far when the horse
anonymous contributor
2019-10-30 03:26
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Once upon a time there was a cobbler who dreamed he would get his fortune on London Bridge. So he prepared and set sail for London. He spent three days walking up and down London Bridge and could see no sign of gold. Just as he was thinking about giving up all hope of finding his fortune an old man came up to him and asked him what was his business as he had seen him
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 23:07
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a mother and her son lived together. one night teh son died and then the mother got a woman to sleep with her. After five nights she told the woman that she'd sleep alone for the future. The first night she slept alone she heard a noise in the kitchen and the chairs rattling and the cups noising and was whistling. It was about the time her son used be in every night and she recognised the whistling as being her sons. She jumped out of her bed and ran down in the kitchen and out in the yard and she saw her son running out of the yard. Next morning she went to mass and when she was coming out of the church she got a weakness and she was carried to the priest and she told him what had happened. He told her never to sleep there again.
Timothy O'Neill,
Gooseberry Hill,
Meelin,
Newmarket,
Co. Cork.
This story and the previous one was told to me by my father.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 23:00
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during the rest of her life.
Andrew Ward
Toorard
Freemount
Charleville,
Co.Cork.
This story was got from Denis O'Sullivan, Knockskehy, Meelin, Newmarket, Co.Cork.
A boy once died. Some days after being buried he was seen walking on the road by two me who were coming from a house where they were card playing and he was barefooted. They did not speak to him - that night a man who was drunk waited up all night where the child was seen but he did not see him. Soon after the two men were in the same house and on their way home they met the child and they asked himi what he wanted. He said 'my mother gave away my clothes but she never gave away my shoes' and he dissappeared. They told his mother what he said. She gave away his shoes then and he was never seen again.
Timothy O'Neill.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 22:56
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Thomas O'Connor,
Gooseberry Hill
Meelin
Newmarket,
Co.Cork.
The Story was got from Patrick O'Callaghan, Knockscovan, Meelin, Co. Cork.
A certain girl was one day at a race meeting. There was a fortune-teller there and the girl gave him a shilling to tell her her fortune. The fortune teller gate the girl a photograph of a man whiom he said would be her future husband. She put it into her pocket. When she fell asleep that night she was awakened again by a queer noise. Then she heard a voice saying 'throw away the devil' The girl got up and burned the photograph. Then she heard the voice again saying 'He is better there than where he was' She went to bed then and she heard nothing else.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 22:24
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bad. I f a person pulled a bad head of cabbage every-body laughed at him because they said he would marry an ugly person.
People threw cabbage at the doors, of houses where children resided. When when they were out of sight the eldest child came out and took in the cabbages and hung it over the door. If the person who took in the cabbage was a girl, the first man to hit his head on it was to be her husband.
This is a trick which is played here sometimes, to find out who your husband or wife will be- go to a lime-kiln after dark, on November night, and be sure to not tell anyone you are going. Take no light with you. Walk round it three times and the third time, throw in a ball of black knitting thread that you must have with you. Keep the end of the thread in your hand. Keep pulling out the thread out of the lime-kiln until you have it nearly all up. When you are pulling out the last piece of thread, you will feel a weight on it. Do not look into the kiln, but tug three times at the thread. When you tug, the last time, you will hear the devil telling you the
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 21:54
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One time there was a school in the townland of Tullynaha, Ballinaglera, which burned at night. All the things that were in it were burned.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 21:53
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There were two men named Reed and Anderson out fishing in Lake Allen in 1897. Their boat was upset and they were drowned. They were Englishmen who were having a holiday in the vicinity of the lake. After nine weeks the bodies were recovered.
A man named Myles Comiskey of Aughrim, Ballinaglera fell into the Yellow River and was drowned.
Feely Loughlin of Aughrim, Ballinaglera was bathing in "turn-hole" in the Yellow River and was drowned.
Owen Early and his wife of Aughrim were drowned in the Yellow River. For a full account of this accident see pages 1-4 of this book.
A man named McTague of Cornamuckla, was drowned while bathing in Lake Allen. A boy named Guckian was drowned in Lake Allen a few years ago.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 21:50
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In the Penal Times
Father Ambrose Mc Manus had a hiding place along the "Lodge" river in the "Allt". It was a hole in the side of the allt and the person who made it for him was called Jimmy Clancy of Slievenakilla. The hole was called "Poll Seamuis". The people used to rise in the middle of the night to go to mass up there. They would not go in daylight afraid the Yeomen spies would see them. The people used to bring the priest's food. The mass was celebrated in an old byre. The people used to come home stealing afraid of the Yeomen. There were many clerks in the district for serving mass. The people used to accompany the priest when he was going away. They used to bring him part of the way every night and leave him in hiding for the next night. They used to have a turf fire at mass and they used to shade the fire afraid the Yeomen would see the light. Father Peter Mc Hale and Father James O'Ryan used to say mass in that place also. Father Dan O'Reilly used to be hidden in Carntulla Rock in a hole under a stone. He used to have mass at "Cloch an tSagairt". The people used to go to mass in the middle of the night.
(Seámus Mac Dorcaid from his grandfather James Mc Gourty of Slievenakilla and from Margaret Mc Gourty ("Bernie") of Slievenakila.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 17:41
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One night two men were coming down from Kilkee. Their names were Patrick Sheehan and Paddy McGrath R.I.P. As they wer were near Clohessy's house they saw three hundred of the "Good people" coming over from the direction of Reid's house. The two men ran as fast as the could They went in to the nearest house the could see. They two boys never stoped until the went under the bed The man of the house asked them what was wrong wh with them but (them) they could not tell him at first. Then after a while we when they got back their senses they told him that there was about three hundred fairies after them. The
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 16:31
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Long ago in Courtown House, a servant girl and she was a Catholic, she was a servant there for a long time. She went to confession, and was to go to Holy Communion that next Sunday. The Courtown's were Protestants and they asked her to bring the Blessed Sacrament to the house and show it to them she said she would. She went to Holy Comunion when the priest put the Blessed Sacrament into her mouth she went to her seat and put the Blessed Sacrament into her hankerchief. When she reached the House and opened her hankerchief out it was full of blood and one drop fell to the floor. When she realised what she had done she went out and drowned herself in the well. Ever since it is called Kelly's well. It was said that her spirit remained in the House for long after crying through the house. The Courtown's got a priest to say Mass there, but he was not able to put away the evil spirit by himself and they got another one to help him. They got the spirit into the Red Sea. It is said that the blood is on
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 15:55
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emigrated to America. Some of the townland is very hilly and there is a lot of bog in it. Some of the land is suitable for grazing and some of it is suitable for growing crops. Potatoes grow best in the land and turnips and mangolds. There is one small river in the townland which joins a river which flows into the Feorish. The bed of the river is not very far down from the bank. There are no stories connected with the river. There are no lakes in the townland of Granaghan-Dillon.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 15:50
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My native townland
Granaghan-Dillon
I live in the townland of Granaghan-Dillon. It is in the parish of Kilgefin and Cloontuskert, and in the Barony of Roscommon. There are seven families in this townland abd tere are 25 people living in it. The most common family name in it is 'Kelly'. There is one two storey slated house situated in it and the other houses are one storey thatched houses. The general number of rooms in each house is three, including the kitchen which is situated between the two rooms. The townland got its name Gránachán on account of it being a good place for growing grain. There is only one person over 70 years in the townland. His name is Thomas Kelly and his address is, Granaghan-Dillon, Curraghroe, Longford.
He is not able to tell stories in Irish, but he is able to tell stories in English of days gone by. Houses were more numerous in the townland some years ago than they are today. The ruins of two houses are to be seen yet. Some of the people in the townland
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 14:57
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The greatest Irish chief of this district was McEniry who lived in the castle west of Castletown Conyers - formally Castletown McEniry. He owned all the land around Castletown but was dispossessed by Cromwell. His castle was shelled from a little hill south west of Castletown. This estate
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 14:57
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The greatest Irish chief of this district was McEniry who lived in the castle west of Castletown Conyers - formally Castletown McEniry. He owned all the land around Castletown but was dispossessed by Cromwell. His castle was shelled from a little hill south west of Castletown. This estate
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 14:28
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Sé an sórt biadh a bhíodh ag na sean daoine fadó ná fataí, iasc, min-choirce, agus min-buidhe. Do bhíodh na fataí aca trí huaire sa ló. Do theighidís amach ar maidin ag an gcladach 'na dtroscadh agus nuair bhíodh na ba blighte ag na mná thiubhraidís amach na fataí aca agus bainne freisin. Ní bhíodh mórán plúir ag na daoine an uair sin mar bhídís bocht agus freisin bhíodh an plúr gann. Ghnídís cácaí as na fataí tré na sgríobadh, leí scréiper le na fáisgeadh agus a leathnú ar éadach agus annsin é bhruith agus buc a thiubhraidís ar na cácaí a dheinidís mar sin. Ní bhíodh mórán feola aca chor ar bith fadó agus na daoine a mbíodh béile feola aca is caoir fheoil úir a bhíodh aca. Bhíodh iasc go minic aca mar bhíodh na fir ag iascach langaí, crudain, sgadáin, agus balachan. Ní bhíodh aon bhia áirithe aca ar ócáidí speisialta. Bhíodh trí nó ceithre uibheachaí ag gach duine Domhnach Cásca. Ní bhíodh aon chupáin ag na sean daoine fadó.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-29 13:58
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Seo sláinte gach h-aon a bhfuil mo spéis ann sá’n chlár
A bhfeil intinn gan claon aige, agus méin mhaith ann a lár;
Is fiosach damh fhéin ann, aoinnidh amháin
Nach bhfuil beadaidheacht gan feidhm leis a’ té udaigh ‘tá i láthair
A Mharcuidhe chaoin uasail a ghluais chugainn ó’n Spáinn,
An ársuigh tú damhsa gan gruaim
Cá h-uair a fuair buachaill Uí Choncubhair bás?
Is marcuidhe caoin uasail mé a bhfuil fuasgailt gach cúis ann mo láimh
Nuair a a d’fhuirigh a chroidhe a’s a chrámha
Sin an lá a’s an uair a fuair buachaill Uí Choncubhair bás
I gCarraig na gCoinneal tá sgillidí óir,
Seistrighe capall a’s caoirigh go leór;
Dá mbéidheadh sin agam, a’s maistrighe bó
Bhearfainn a meas do mo ghrádh gheal.
(Carraig na gCoinneal: Candlefort Hill, Inniskeen).
Cearc uisce ar loch uisce a’s í phlubarnaigh phlabarnaigh.
Dearfainn trí huaire gan fuaireadh de m’anal.
An áit a mbíonn an stráic, is doiligh a bhaint faoi.
(It is hard to humble a proud person)
B’fhorus fuineadh cois mine, nó, is forus fuineadh a gcois mine.
(It is easy to bake when one has meal)
Chan fhuil gar a bheith a’freim, ar chreideamh gan céill. Nach nglacann uaim réim mo chomhairle.
(There is no use trying to advise a silly person)
Is fearr suidhe ann a aice nó ann a áit.
(Better to sit beside it than in its place)
Is iomdha rud a tháirluigheann nach mbíonn dúil leis. (thárluigh)
(Many an unexpected thing happens)
Lá níos aosta, lá mór measa.
Sláinte ó bhalla go balla a’s má tá daoine anns a mballa labhraigidh
(A toast, health from wall to wall, and if there are people in the wall let them speak)
Char ghoid tú sin.
(You didn’t steal that. Said when accusing a person of a hereditary fault.)
Focal bréig’ ‘s a bhéal faoi.
(A lie, and its mouth under it)
Dia leat ach mur snaoisín a chaith tú.
(Said to a person after sneezing. God bless you if it is not snuff you have taken.)
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 18:40
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tethered. The hoof is yet to be seen in the coach house at Mac Cavish's. There are a lot of other old relics to be seen lying around the out - houses, and in rooms that are not in use. The place is all covered over with trees and there is supposed to be a ghost at night. People are said to have heard it. In front of the house there is a lough and in the middle of the lough there is an island. On the island is the ruins of an old house in which there lived a man who used to make poteen but whose his name I am unable to tell.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 18:33
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Verse about Kilkenny.
When ever you visit Kilkenny
Inquire for the hole in the wall.
Where you get twenty four eggs for a penny
And butter for nothing at all.

Katty Phelan,
Maudlin Street,
Kilkenny
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 18:31
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Near our school there is a big four - storey house. The people who live there now are named Mac Cavish's. The house is very ancient and has a lot of the old style about, but nowadays there is not so much care being taken of it, so it is not as nice as long ago. The people who lived there long ago were names Goslings. My father remembers them well. They had a great pony one time called "Lady Maiden". She used to leave the halldoor and go into Ballybay in eight minutes - four miles and a half. This valued pony broke her neck one day when out grazing in a field where she was
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 15:11
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My native townland
Granaghan-Dillon
I live in the townland of Granaghan-Dillon. It is in the parish of Kilgefin and Cloontuskert, and in the Barony of Roscommon. There are seven families in this townland abd tere are 25 people living in it. The most common family name in it is 'Kelly'. There is one two storey slated house situated in it and the other houses are one storey thatched houses. The general number of rooms in each house is three, including the kitchen which is situated between the two rooms. The townland got its name Gránachán on account of it being a good place for growing grain. There is only one person over 70 years in the townland. His name is Thomas Kelly and his address is, Granaghan-Dillon, Curraghroe, Longford.
He is not able to tell stories in Irish, but he is able to tell stories in English of days gone by. Houses were more numerous in the townland some years ago than they are today. The ruins of two houses are to be seen yet. Some of the people on the townland
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 14:31
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I
Come all you Ulster heroes. I hope you'll attend,
And listen to the few sea line, I've lately penned.
Concerning young Reilly, a valiant you man,
And the name he goes under, Paidin Seán Bhán.
II
Near South villa's fair castle, this young hero was bred,
His parents they reared him without fear nor dread.
For good education no one could excel,
But of his late desolation, I'm sorry to tell.
III
It was on a May morning, I heard them say,
Straight for fair Leitrim, this man took his way.
He had no armour, no sword nor shield,
Which caused valiant Reilly that day for to yield.
IV
O! where is the hero that could him regain,
I mean Killeshandra or the boys of Drumlane
If valiant "Wood Draper" my cause he but knew,
He's send Hulmes to dark regions and Reilly rescue
V
Oh the groves of Killeshandra no more will turn green,
Nor the warbling thrush no more it will sing.
The plains of Snakiel no more daisies will grow,
Nor the valleys of Eonish no 'verdure' will slow.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 12:44
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17
then decided he would come home to see his poor mother but he did not know where his other two brothers were .He set out the same road as he had taken the first day and as he was coming near the 3 cross-roads ,he saw his other brothers coming the other roads .The 3 of them went home to their mother and when she saw them she gave thanks to God.They lived in abundance ever afterwards.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 12:39
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Travelling Folk.
Travelling folk visit this district very often especially around horse -fairs.Most of them travel in caravans .They are called gipsies and usually travel in bands.The best known of them are the Delaney's. The alms they usually ask for are flour and potatoes. The gipsies that come here are very bad -they even drink and fight.Some of them that travel sleep in the barns of the different houses as they go along.They are always very welcome as they tell a lot of
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 12:33
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62
of them are not very poor ,they are all healthy looking.They sell small articles such as homemade tables embroidery and other articles which they buy when they come into the town and in other places where they have been .Some people buy those things from them.These travellers are not generally welcome .They usually stay about a week or so at the time .They travel in vans led by horses and they sleep in these. When they come into the town they buy food there .They do not accept any alms other than money
Some of these people travel in families and others singly. The people usually come to the district on fair days sports-days and at such other times.These travellers tell peoples fortunes .The local people
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 12:24
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61
They stay two days in every village .They cannot stay over 24 hours in the public roads because they would be summoned.
They put their horses in the fields during the night and take them out early in the morning before any person around would be up .They make a fire of turf in the open air and when all work is done the neighbours gather round to listen to the stories they tell.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 12:19
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Travelling Folk.
Travelling folk visit this district very often especially when horse fair days are approaching.They stay a small piece outside the village and live in vans.At night they make a camp in which they sleep.
The women go from house to house and take everything they get as food and clothes.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 12:15
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Funny Story
One night a neighbour who lived near us was being waked. It was usual for this old man to attend all wakes as he was present at this one and was known to be merry as usual. He was fond of taking a little drop
anonymous contributor
2019-10-28 07:11
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This district is situated in the baronies of Lower Loughtee and Tullyhunco, and in the parishes of Kilmore, Drumlane and Kildallon. The most common names in the district are Farellys in the Kilmore section, Reillys, Bradys and Fitzpatricks. Old names which are gradually fading from use are Coille Gide near Snakiel; Gort na Geara in Gurteen; the Hanging Bray in Feugh; Lodge or the Grove in Ardonan; Tobar Pádraig in Drumbo, Tobar Mogue in Derrintinny; and Port in Glastown.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-27 20:42
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The dreadful Clean disaster happened on an October evening in 1927. The day had been wet with a wind from the South East. Towards evening the wind went S.W and it grew calm. There was a dark misty fog. Though the sharper weather observers said it might blow all were not agreed on the point.
But if indications of a mere earthly order were few those of a spiritual nature were not lacking to the same extent. As a Boffin crew of four left Boffin horbour they saw another boat following them with a crew of three. They were surprised at this as there was no crew at the quay when they left.
The following boat came at great speed but it detoured so that it was at some distance from the first boat as it passed on it's way. The crew of four could not recognise the others as they sped along it passed on it's way. The crew of four cold not recognise the others as they sped along. Cannon the leader of
anonymous contributor
2019-10-27 18:42
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Paidir a deirtear ar maidin.
"Jesus, Mary, and Joseph guide, guard and protect me for the day.

Ag dul a' chodhladh duit.

Here I lay down my head to sleep,
I give my soul to God to keep
And if any evil touches me,
Oh Blessed Jesus waken me,
That I may have my eyes to see,
And my right hand to bless me.
There are four corners on my bed
There are four angels overhead,
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,
God bless this bed that I lay on.

Paidir a' deirtear a' dul a chodhladh duit.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-27 05:23
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down where the waters meet.
VIII
And those lively boys and charming girls,
Of sixty years ago,
Have left this sad and dreary world,
Of wars and toil and woe.
But on each few still lingering on
Old Fenians to the ground.
Who love to join in freening their land.
Like this sporting lad from Glaun.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-27 05:18
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V
On Sunday we, each lively boys,
Would step the Hornpipe.
Those Jigs and Reels we did enjoy,
And danced with wild delight.
"Follow me down to Carlow"
and "windsome Bunny Kate"
The "wind that shakes the barley grain",
"The pigeon on the gate".
VI
Those sports were on the velvet green,
And down the river side.
The football match, the hurling team,
And crowds from far and wide.
Those manly boys came down the hill,
For dancing on the dell,
The co[?]lins fair came oer the glens
Of lovely heather Bell.
VII
The crowd would join the country dance,
When Sunday's sports were oer.
The laden pair was lovely Nance,
And Jack from Poulanore.
The evening breeze was cool and grand.
The violin music sweet,
For dancing on the rivers bank.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-27 00:14
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Seachrán Chairn tSiadhail.

Ar mo tharraint siar go Carn tSiadhail damh,
An t-aonach ciadna ud na Feil Muire mór,
'Sé thárlaidh an ainnir as an taobh aniar damh,
Is í go cianmhar ag siubhal sa ród,
Is é nídh mheas mé gur sgar mó chiall liom,
Mar bhínn ag siabhrán no seal ag ól,
Óir tógbhadh damhsa gur dhorcha an ghrian gheal,
Le taoibh gach déallraidh d'á gruaidh mar rós

Bheannuigheas féin go prab do'n mhaighdin,
anonymous contributor
2019-10-26 23:51
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and ran after him into the house but he got in and closed the door and locked it. The officer stuck the sword in the middle of the door and the mark of it was in it until the door was taken away. They took the horse that day and he never saw him any more. He got an old horse from the Cleaver Ruadh. I saw the step of his door at the cross a few years ago. Since then someone took it away. This cross is situated a half mile north of our school and known as the Cleaver’s Cross.
Got by Eileen Carpenter,
Grangegeith,
From Nicholas Carpenter
Same address.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-26 23:44
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Once a man named the Cleaver Ruadh lived at the Cleaver’s cross. He sold clothes and other things to make a living. In those days the yeomen were going around and he used to lodge them in his house. They rode horses from place to place and when their horses would get worn out they would leave them with the Cleaver Ruadh to give them a rest. They would give him plenty of money if he got horses for them to ride. They would go to any person who had a good horse and give them an old tired one instead and if you refused to give the horse they would take him by force. You would never get your own horse again. Once they came short of a horse and they came down to my grandfather for his horse and he refused to give him to them. They got angry with him because they were in a hurry and the officer pulled a sword from his belt
anonymous contributor
2019-10-26 14:11
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144
wheat and a "quaron"in the kitchen and she ussed twist the handle ,mill the wheat to flour and make the cake.
They used make a cake long ago called "potato cake"they used make it by mixing potatoes (boiled) with flour and bake it in a gridle.There were four or five gridles in every house long ago for baking.
They used put "graoiseach"under and over the oven.They never made sweet cakes because they had no curants. Nowadays people have sweet cake every day and especially on Sundays.
Everybody puts a cross i a cake when they are putting it into the oven .Nobody knows why but it is a very old custom.
anonymous contributor
2019-10-26 14:02
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143
Bread.
Long ago people used eat bread made from raw potatoes and flower .i do not know how it was made .The commonest known bread of all was wheaten bread.
In every house there was a "quaron" two flat stones with a hole through the middle of each stone and into the middle of that stone the wheat was put and it droped down through on to the other stone and is then crushed and then fell into the pan underneath ,that is how they used make flour long ago.
Everyone used grow wheat long ago and when a woman wanted to make a cake she used have a bag of
anonymous contributor