Number of records in editorial history: 26859 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 23:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2
lonely, he was afraid and he started to run towards home the the nearer the noise seemed he ran the nearer the noise seemed to come .
When he got near home he began calling for company,
some people rushed out and approached the object and they found it was only a pet goat that wanted play.
They man was never lonely after or never believed in fables connected with November.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 22:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
51
21st.June 1938.
Folklore
In the fairs long ago there used to be terrible fighting .
Any little difference would beat two parties and they would rise a row a person had a blind cow for instance ,and he sold her to another man and the man to whom he sold the cow discovered that she was blind he would gather a crowd from his own district and fight against the other mans party so that was the way he got back his money .
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 22:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
50.
14 June 1938.
Folklore.
In some farms there are certains names on fields and cows .
We have a field or rather a mountain at home and it is called that because it is a soft marshy place and mountainy. We have another field and it is called the loishem it is called that because it is called that, because there are two forts in it.
We also have a cow at home and we call her Kerry,because she is a Kerry polly .
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 22:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
49
minding it ,this hare was often hunted and could never be captured ,so the hundsemen found out about the hare and the money and since then nobody ever touched the money or the hare.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 22:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
48.
31st May 1938.
Folklore.
Since the olden times there are still some remains of gold in the district .
It is said and is believed that there is a shoe of gold sovering's hid in the Glen ,in Martin Moloney farm ,it is said it was put there by an old jew who came to this district some years ago ,and had no friends or relations to will it to.in our farm there is said to over a thousand pounds worth of money under three corned rock,it is said there is a black hare
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 21:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are no stories about any-body being haunted from the graveyard.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 21:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Graveyards
There is a graveyard in Templedouglas. There is one in Gartan. There is one in Church-Hill and there is one in Trenta. There are people buried in these graveyards still. Church Hill graveyard slopes east and Templedouglas graveyard is level. There is an old abbey in Templedouglas graveyard. Trenta graveyard slopes eastward. There is a Presbyterian church in Trenta graveyard. There is a church in Church-Hill graveyard. There is an old abbey near Gartan graveyard. There are people buried in Gartan and in Templedouglas ruins. There are bushes in all these graveyards. There are tombstones and headstones in Trenta graveyard and in Church-Hill graveyard. There are tombstones and crosses in Templedouglas and in Gartan graveyards. There are no special graveyards in which to bury children who were never baptised.
There are lots of people who are afraid passing a graveyard after night. Some people think they see ghosts about the graveyard gate.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 21:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thatch roof is the type of house most common.
There were seven more houses in Graigue in olden times. Five people went to America from Graigue.
Johnson's mill for crushing corn is now in ruins. The land is hilly, and boggy, mostly good, part of it is a wood. It is now cut down.
The river that flows through Graigue village is called the Glen.
Where the river flows through the wood and falls over a big ledge it is called Poll-an-Easa. Further up the hill where there is a crossing place the stream is called the Wash. Near this spot, or perhaps at it, the people living in Graigue wash their sheep.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 21:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Teresa Fitzpatrick told me this story which she heard from her father.
About forty years ago an old woman named Ann Palmer - a Protestant - whose ancestors came over from England during the Laoghis plantations lived in Ringstown. It is said that these people were very rich but they hid a lot of their money during and before the Rebellion of '98. and were unable to locate it afterwards.
The woman who lived there forty years ago dreamt frequently and on successive nights that gold was hidden under a black thorn bush in one of her fields and she wrote to her two sons who were in America and told them about her dream.
They both came home and they dug and dug under the bush for three days, but it is (uncertain) if they got any gold. But the sons spent a long holiday touring Ireland with their mother very well dressed, sharing
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 21:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Many of the old people speak of the famine as the "Black forty seven''. James Kinerney told me that his father often told him many stories about the famine and that he remembered many things which happened then.
He told me that the people were very careful in bolting their doors dwellings and out houses at night fearing any stranger or traveller who had the plague might come in and communicate it to them. He also told me that it was during the famine that the wall surrounding the Deerpark and also the wall surrounding the Demesne now owned by the Patrician Brothers but then in the possession of Cootes was constructed, and the labourers worked at the rate of four pence per day.
People called Bantons who lived at the end of Mountrath gave Indian porridge free and they also gave soup to the poor starving people who consented to turn Protestants.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 20:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
With the decline of the industry these moved with their patent to England, and now form part of the famous Sheffield Cutlery Manufacturers.
In the town-land of Clonard, the river-side there is brick-clay still, though not used. Several farmers did make bricks there, and sold them to builders in the town, thus making money to live on, and to pay their rent. These bricks are to be seen in the present chimneys of the town.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 20:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the sacred light of religion by putting Saint Patrick to death. Fortunately however, the pious solicitude of a lady, by name Briga for the safety of the old man, discovered and defeated the plot which had been concerted against him." Saint Patrick immediately left the county, and passed into the district now known as Carlow.
The above is one of a series of Articles published in the "Leinster Express" (a paper printed in Portlaoighise) about 1932 or 1933. I tried to procure the others from the office, but did not succeed. Sr. M.A.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 19:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Composition.
An old Abbey.
There is an old abbey out in Gartan. It was Colmcille's chapel. There is a stone in this abbey which is full of water, and any person who has an ailment can be cured when they rub the water on their sores.
When a person makes a touris they always leave a pin or a handkerchief or something else behind them. There are graves in this abbey too. There are three small windows and a very small door in the abbey. The abbey is very small too.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 19:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
41
5th may 1938.
Folklore .
There are a lot of horses with different colours such as black, brown, red ,specled and grey,
They say that there is suspicion about grey horses especially a grey mare.When some people are selling grey horses the man who sells the horse would not part with the bridle for any money it is said if he gave the bridle he would never have luck in horses again.It is still believed that if a person in any house got the chin -coff and if one of the people of that house
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 19:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
42
met a man riding on a grey mare any cure he would give them it is said it would cure the chin coff.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 19:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
28
3rd .March 1938.
Folklore .There lived an old woman in the parish of Feakle about sixteen years ago and her name was Moll Egan she belonged to the travelling class.
She was a very strong woman and the people had a nickname on her 'Moll the horse' .She never wore boots Winter or Summer or never got sick or got cold.
She was always in the habit of carrying on her back an old bag full of rags and every house she would go into she would throw the bag on
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 19:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
29
the floor and then throw herself on top of it .
If you didnt make the tea for her she would curse you but they sat her curses were harmless. She died in the old work-house in Tulla and the people of Feakle buried her in Feakle.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
27
were very dark indoor ,the firing they usually used bog-deal sticks.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
25
that and do the same next day. When people had too much of any commodity they exchanged it with another person for something they required.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
24
24th February 1938.
Folklore.
Long ago there were no shops or shopkeepers .
There were at that time men called Peddlars travelling around selling clothes such as blankets quilts curtains and all household drapery.
The travelled around in horse and carts and performed journeys of about seven or eight miles each day.
They used to keep travelling on before them and whatever many miles they would travel each day they would stop at
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22
Folklore 22 nd .February 1938.
there are a lot of stories told of people coming to life after dying.
This is a story which was told by a neighbour .He said he was in an hospital over in America and a man died and the nurses went into another room and when they returned to the room where the man was dead, they got a great surprise to see the man dressing himself.
I dont know whether those stories are true or not but are believed
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
23
to be true.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
20
17th February 1938.
Folklore.
Long ago when people used to be churning they had very peculiar way of doing it.
It is said if any person came into your house while you were churning you would have to draw a few strokes on the churn.It was a very common belief among the people that butter was taken in them if they could not make it for a time.Some people put a coal from the fire under the churn to prevent it from being taken by
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
neighbours who were supposed to be able to take the butter by witchcraft.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
19
covering. Bawneens were made for men and Petticoats and dresses for old women were made from it.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
18.
15 th February 1938
Folklore .
Long ago people wore clothes made from homespun material which was made from wool.
This would spare a lot of money nowadays if he young people knew how to spin. When the sheep were shorn the wool was steeped in blue stone for a day and night, then it was brought to the mill and carded and made into rolls. It was then brought home and spun into thread.
This thread was used for making many a warm
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
17
endowed with special virtues for the cure of sore eyes.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16
10 th February 1938.
Folklore.
There are some Holly Wells in the parish of Feakle.
In Faha there is the remains of an old church and near it ias a Well called St Ann's Well.Some say it was monks built it but no other account has been handed down to us.
There is another Well in Feakle which is perfect and which is probably unique in having within it a dolmen it is called Tobar Ghrainne.
rounds are performed to this well and it is believed to be
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8
out of the churn by the butter-cup, and then put into a butter dish. it is next rinsed to take the milk out of it. Then it is salted and rinsed a few more times to take some of the salt out of it . Next the water is taken off it, and the butter is made into pats and rolls.
There is a proverb about the churning, that when people come into a house and the churning going on they take a "brash" of the churn and wish that "the weight of themselves of butter may be in it. The people drink some of the butter-milk , and it is used for making bread. It is also given to the pigs.
Mary Callan
Port,
Dunleer.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
13
called beggars or tramps go from house to house begging.
I know a few travellers who come around very often ,the Sweeneys, the Caseys,the Doyles and the Mc Carthys.
Dan Murphy was a great traveller in his time, but he died since and he was always singing this song .The stone outside Dan Murphy's door.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7 16-11-37 Our Churn
We have a churn at home. It is forty-seven inches in height and twenty-one inches in width at the top and bottom. The sides are round. We bought it new twelve years ago, and it is in sound condition still. The various parts of the churn are, the legs, the handles, the lid, the whells, and the vent for letting out the steam. Butter is made twice a week in Winter and four times in Summer.
My Mother does the churning always. If strangers come in during the churning they help at the work, for, if they left without doing so, the woman of the house would think ill-luck would come upon the churning. The churning takes about an hour. When the butter is gathered on the milk, then the churning is finished. Water is sometimes poured into the milk during the work to break the milk and thus to hurry on the churning. The butter is taken
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
12
1 st.February 1938.
There are several kinds of travellers ,tinsmiths ,chimney swepers and gypsies who visit the district.
When tinsmiths come around the men makes buckets and saucepans and the women goes from house to house selling them .The chimney sweepers sweep chimneys for the people around Christmas and Easter .
When gypsies come they make money in reading cups and telling people's fortunes and making tables and chairs and other articles .Another party comonly
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 17:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9
18 th January 1938
My grandfather says it is a very common belief among the people if a woman was first visitor to your house New Years day people of the house would have bad luck for the year especially a red haired woman.
It is also an old saying if any person broke a looking glass new years day that person would have seven years of misfortune.
If any person was going to a fair new years Day and if they met a red haired
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 15:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11
in olden times and the cure for them was to poultice them with hot bran.
in the year of the famine a great amount of people died of different diseases from eating bad food it is said they used to eat rotten eggs and black potatoes and other bad food.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 15:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10
man it is said you would not sell the cattle at the fair.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 15:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8
other prizes.One evening when he and his servant was coming home from some races they disappeared and the man and his foal were never seen again.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 15:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6
is said to be a good weather guide .in the morning if the fog comes down the sides of hills we can expect a wet day, and if the fog moved towards the top of the hill we are sure of a dry day.
If the houses in Flagmount are reflected in the lake in the evening fine weather can be expected.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 15:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times in Ireland the people were pagans. Long before St Patrick came to Ireland, on the last night of April, the people used to have a great feast. After the feast was over, they used to light a fire outside the house, and from that fire they used to take coals and put one coal on every field. Then they used to pray to them as their gods.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 15:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I was often in Gartan graveyard. There is the ruin of an old church in it. The four walls are still standing but the roof is gone. The door-way is very small and the windows are just slits with stones cut to form arches at the tops. The church is very small and most of the people must have knelt outside.
There is a large flat stone in it on which Mass used to be said and the shape of a cross is cut on the stone. There is another almost round stone also and there is a hole in it in which holy water was kept.
There is a holy well beside the church in which some people have been cured of sickness.
A gentleman named Mr. Michael Gallagher told me a story about the well.
Years ago there was no well there, only a shallow pond from which the water had no outlet. There was a cross there, whether it was
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 15:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
47.
ago used a tape and a tape and a tape and a tape and also used for meauring timber.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My grandfather told me this.
A man was passing along the road on a May morning. There was an old woman behind a ditch who was supposed to be a witch. She said "All come to me" and he said "The half come to me". When he came home all the vessels in the house were full of milk. The girl said there was something wrong about the house for she could not keep the milk from flowing over all the vessels.
The man went to the priest and told him what had happened. The priest went to the old woman and made her promise that she would never do the like again. There was no witchcraft acted in that townland ever since.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
45
pass along and the one that would say cakes would go with the girl that would be cakes and the one that would say sweets would go with the girl that would be sweets,and then they pull.
Tread the needle two girls would catch hand and the rest would go out under their hands and thread the needle.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My father told me this story.
Not far from my house there is a field on which a small hawthorn tree is growing. A long time ago a story is told that a man was living near to where the tree was growing. One day he had no fire and he was poor. He took his axe to cut it. He saw a small man coming towards him. The small man came over to him and he said that if he would let the tree grow he would leave a present at the foot of the tree. "If you come to the tree tomorrow you will get the present" said he. The man came to the tree the next day and he found a great lot of gold waiting for him.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My granny told me this story.
Not far from my house there is a field and in the middle of it htere is a tree which people say that every morning long ago there was mass said at. The tree is there still but no blossoms grow on it. It is rotton [sic] but it has never fallen. Many beads were found at it. There is a very large stone in the same field which it is said that fairies used to dance and play about.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
44
5th April 1938.
Folklore.
School children have a lot of nice games ,which they play every day.
Ring-a- ring- a rosy ,sweets and cakes, tread the needle.
Ring-a- ring- a rosy , all the girls catch hands and say ring-a- ring- a rosy a bottle full of posey ,one for me and one for you and one for little Josey.
Sweets and cakes, two girls would catch hands, one would be cakes and the other sweets ,and all the rest would
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
43
wouldent be lucky.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
42
March 30th 1938
Folklore.
There were certain days during the year which are considered lucky and unlucky .On New Years day it is considered unlucky for a red haired person of either sex to enter a house first. there is also an objection to any woman .
On May Eve people stick quick beam in the garden to preserve their crops lest other people would interfere with them .On May Day there is an objection to people ploughing or digging in their gardens that it
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When Godfrey O'Donnell was lying wounded on his island, one of the O'Neills of Tyrone came to fight him. He gathered his army and went to meet O'Neill, as he was wounded his men carried him on a bier or strecher.
The two armies met at a small hill near the town of Letterkenny beside where the golf course is at present. The two armies fought here and the place is now called Cnoc-An-Áir which means the Hill of the Slaughter.
The Tir Connaill men won the battle at Cnoc-An-Áir, but when they were marching home again they discovered that their Chief was dead.
They did not take the body home but they buried it behind the wall of a monastry which is situated a few miles from Letterkenny.
The place is now a graveyard, and only one wall of the monastery is still standing and it is covered with ivy. This is the wall behind which O'Donnell is buried and his grave is covered by a large flat stone.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
41
siting out in fields ,on fine summer days.Other games that used be played were hand ball and bowley.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
40
29th March 1938.
Folklore
The favourite pastimes of long ago were hurling ,tug- of -war, jumping and stone throwing, pitching money.
The big boys used to play these games the same as they are played now- adays.
Boys going to school used to indulge in spinning tops and pitching buttons.Girls in olden times used to play jackstones.
Three or four girls used to play and the game used be played with five small round stones ,generally
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
is built with the stones from the castle. The name of the house is Belvin and it is the property of Mrs J. Lindstone.
There is supposed to be a cave under the island on which the castle was.
On a smaller island on the same lake there is a stone shape[d] like a chain. It is called the wishing chain and the people used to believe that if they got on the chain and wished their wish would be granted. This lake is sometimes called Lough Veagh which is wrong. Lough Veagh is the lake in Glen Veagh, almost seven miles from the place.
The right name for Lough Veagh is Lough Bheathach which means the lake of the Silver Birch. On this lake there is an island and there is supposed to be a cave under it, the entrance to which is covered by a large round stone.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
machine, and other songs. When Mr. Cullen got drunk he composes like lightening. The following is a little song he composed.
Of all the farmers I ever heard, I think I heard a few,
One of them is Lord Grandey who lives in poverty view,
If you go work you must be a turk,
And do that this as your told,
Your shilling is stew make sure it is true,
Or else you will get little all,
As he did it with me as he went on the spree,
Although I done him a dutch was not once before just half a more,
When I killed the old chicken called crouch.
John Fleming, Corballis, Rathdrum.
Information supplied by:-
Thomas Griffin, Corballis, Rathdrum
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Poets
There are four sheets in this district. The following are the names of the poets The Roving Bard, Jack Fortune, Mr. Duffy and Mr. Cullen. All those poets are alive. The Roving Bard has no home. Jack Fortune lives in Larag. Mr. Duffy lives in Glendalough. Mr. Cullen lives in Bahan, Whaley, Clash, Rathdrum.
The Roving Bard plays a tin whiistle and he composed a song about the missing hiker. Mr. Cullen composed a great number of songs altogether. The following are the names of some of the songs, The Slasher's Mare, The Ploughman, Have a banana do, The Old Man and his Ass, The Farmer's Thrashing
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in their own clothes with their coat turned inside out and a pair of hob nail boots. The day before the match all the plaers sent their boots into the cobbler to get them nailed and a piece of tin on the toe of the boots. There was no refering done. The type of ball were used was a hay ball stick together with tar or pitch.
Gerald Doyle,
Kilcommon,
Rathdrum.
Some of this information was suplied by, Mr. P. Doyle, Kilcommon, Rathdrum, Co. Wicklow.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 14:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hurling and Football
There was a match played locally in olden times between Newbawn and Barndarrig. There were twenty one men on each side. The teams were picked in this way, all the men of that place met at a crossroads the night before the match and picked the men, but they never did any practice before the match. The reason why they did not practice was, because they were all farmers sons and they had no time to practise. The team that won the match was Newbaun. The score was 3, 2 to 4, 5.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hillhead, Bonemaine Bridge-End, Co. Donegal, whose grandmother rode on horseback to church to get married. The lady's name is Mrs Thomson, and this information came from herself. She is about 70 years of age, & still in Hillhead House, Bonemaine Bridge-End, Co. Donegal.
Straw boys don't visit the houses here in this district, but they do in Co. Cavan where Rev. Boyd lives. This information came from Miss Boyd Herself. They dress up from head to foot in straw, and blacken their faces so as not to be known. They go to the house of the married couple where there is a feast on the wedding night and entertain the people, dancing & singing in expectation of getting food, money, or a drink in return.
The bride is supposed to wear
Something Old & Something New
Something Borrowed, Something Blue
on her wedding day. People say it is not lucky to meet a funeral, either in going or returning to a wedding.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Occasionally marriages take place in the houses.
Mr & Mrs Edwards (Miss Fanny Crockett, and Mr William Edwards) were married in Miss Crockett's home. (about 1921)
Mrs Peoples Tully Aaron, about 30 years ago (in their own home)
Mrs Glenn Drumbannet " 22 " "
It is now usual for the married couple to have lunch with invited guests, either in a hotel, or at the home of the bride's parents, after this the couple go off on their honey-moon. They usually stay away a week or 10 days, and when they return, their friends have the house warmed up, & there is usually a festival.
If it is known what time they are returning, a bon-fire is usually lit, as a [?] burned, & shots are let off. Sometimes the carriage containing the couple is met and the horses loosed out, and the carriage drawn home by some friends and neighbours. It used to be the custom for the bride to ride to the churce on the horse back and there is a lade here living in
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marriages usually take place in this district in the Summer months, or about Easter time.
Monday for wealth,
Tuesday for health,
Wednesday the best day of All.
Thursday for crosses,
Friday for losses,
Saturday no luck at all.
Matches used to be made, for example Miss McColgan, Burnfoot, Co. Donegal, now Mrs Griffin (about 80 years) old.
Her parents were making the match for the girl in the parlour, when she slipped out the door with the man of her choice. Some time ago, it was the custom to give money as dowry, and there was a saying in connection with this. something like the following - "The boot always goes with the lame hourse" meaning that if the bridegroom/man has any deficiency (or is older), he is supposed to have riches to make up for this. Cattle or money was frequently given as dowry, and where people possess these, they are given yet.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Robert Robb has a black-smith's forge in Churchtown. It is made of wood and painted black. This man's father and grandfather were blacksmiths too. Robert's brother Sam helps him to work in it. Everyone round the country side bring horses to it for to get shod.
There are a great many tools in a forge such as an anvil, bellows, hammers, sledges, spanners, tongs, nippers, etc. People get cart wheels shod in it too and all sorts of iron work such as ploughs, harrows and farming implements made. It contains two windows and one fireplace and a wooden bench.
He uses water to cool his iron. This water is a cure for (water) warts. The forge is beside Churchtown burn. The winter is a busy time for a black-smith for horses need to be well shod going out in the frost.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
39.
can be very destructive.
Wild Animals.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
38.
24th March !938.
Folklore.
The most common wild animals in this district are the fox,the hare,the rabbit and the badger.
The fox is the cleverest of all the animals ,and often steals a lot of fowl from the farmyard.
The hare and the rabbit can do a lot of harm by burrowing holes in the ground and eating vegetables.
The badger lives in rocky places, and he eats turnips and roots and
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
side cars. Sometimes when they would get drunk they would be trying races to see whose horse was the best and very often the side-cars would be tumbled.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
37.
22 nd March 1938.
Folklore.
In the year 1889 there was a great storm ,which was known as the big wind.
It occurred in the night and lasted for about four hours it swept houses and trees before it, so that the people had to leave their beds and take shelter in cabins and sheds .
It was the greatest storm remembered by the old people.
The Big Wind,
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9.
to sell.
Story.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 13:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7
9 th December 1937.
Folklore.
Long ago it is said that Lough Graney was only a well.
One night a girl went for water to the well and her name was Graney and she fell into it and she was drowned and the well sprung up and that is how it got its name .She was afterwards found at Derry-Graney and burried at Tuam -Graney.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5.
7th December 1937.
Folklore .
A few nights ago my Uncle told about different signs of bad weather.
He said that when the swallows fly low they indicate bad weather.
He also said that when sea-gulls appear and also wild geese that it is a sign of bad weather and when the fog comes down the mountains in the morning and when the cat sits near the fire we are sure of bad weather
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6.
Story
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4
it in and he was alright.
Story.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 12:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3.
2nd December 1937.
Folk-Lore
There lived a man in Corbeha and he had the habit when returning home at night of pulling a bit of a tree and chewing it.One night after returning home he became ill .The Priest was sent for and when the priest came he could do no good for the man and they sent for Biddy-Early to work a charm. She came and she told him to put the branch where he got it and he went back and put
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
52.
May 24 1938.
Folklore.
The houses long ago were built with dobe buidhe.
They were hipped houses and had a small little hole in the end of them for a chimney.
They had no windows but a small hole in the wall and they used to stick out their hat in it at night to keep out the cat from the milk.
They doors were only half ones and knitted wire on top.
Olden Houses.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 12:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
51
Swimmers.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 12:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
50
May 17. 1938
Folklore.
There was a man in this Townland long ago and it is said he was the best swimmer in the Country.
His name was
Thomas Cooley and his address is .Lanaught ,
Feakle,
Co.Clare.
The feat he performed was he went down to the bottom of a lake 100 feet deep and brought up a fist of sand from the bottom.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 11:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Marriages take place mostly in Spring and Summer. Marriages don’t often take place at Shrove. The month of May is said to be an unlucky month for a marriage. Tuesday is also an unlucky day for a wedding. There are no matches made in the district now but long ago the [sic] used to be made. Money is not given as dowry nor is cattle or goods ever given. Long ago marriages took place in the house of the boy or girl who is getting married this was done for a good many years. When two people come out of church the people throw rice on them. A wedding feast is always held in the house of the bride. Straw boys do not visit the house now. The people do not go home on horseback.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 11:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
black.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 11:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
48.
10th May 1938.
Folklore.
The only boots the people long ago were clogs.
The clogs had timber soles and stiff leather uppers.
The people long ago use't ware any boots until they would be 21 years of age.
There is a beggarman going around the place and he never wore boots and if you saw his a distance away you would'nt know whither he had boots or not his feet are so
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 11:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
45. Place names.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 11:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
44
May 3 1938
Folklore.
The name of a certain field in our farm is Garrie Glas which means the green Field.
The name of a certain bush on our farm is Seatha Fíobra which means the piper's bush for it was said that a piper was heard playing under it long ago.
The name of another field in our farm is Garrie Moore for it belonged to a man named More long ago.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-13 08:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Old Roads
Written by Patrck Nolan of Abbeydown Clonegal age 50, Farmer.
I daresay that when starting to wrie on local roads it is not necessary to menton our modern highways but to go into the old by-was used by our fore-fathers before the age of etrol, trodden by the feet of Saints and Pilgrims perhaps by Kern and Gallowglass warriors and nobles.
Two such roads ran trough
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 23:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
can of water. When she had the can of water filled, she crossed the step, and as she crossed it, she saw a man standing beside her dressed in white. She frightened, but did not faint at first.
“The man asked her who was she, and what was she doing there” The girl fainted and when she came to herself again he had disappeared. She came on another bit, and she had to go through a wood. As she entered the wood she heard some lovely music and she listened and looked around every side of her, and she saw a great crowd standing at a blazing fire. She never felt till she was placed in the middle of the crowd. They did not speak a word, but kept looking at her. The poor girl was very frightened but she found she could not move. At last a big man came up to her, and asked her to
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 23:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mother of St. Kieran. This was sometimes called the Friary of Donore, and the Dominican Monks from Trim sometimes retired to this place. The walls are still intact but it is roofless. There is a churchyard surrounding it and there are some graves inside.
Queen Mary's Castle - on the Clonard-Edenderry road and one mile from Clonard - on the left bank of the Boyne. Only the foundation of the walls are now left. Lord Ormond held this castle when Cromwell was laying siege to Drogheda.
Tircroghan Church - Beside this castle in the Tircroghan Church - walls still there and belfry, but roofless. It is on high ground and surrounded by ancient churchyard. There is a substantial stone wall enclosing it. No burials have taken place here now for some time.
Brigidine Convent - The ruins of this convent are at Johnstownbridge - one mile from the village of Enfield. This ruin is now in the possession of the Ruttledge family.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 23:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
47
a fair one day selling a grey horse. A buyer came to him and looked all over the horse and after a while he shook his head .
The owner said don't be afraid of my decent man for ha has his work done already.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 22:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
46.
May 5 .1938
Folklore.
When a person goes to a fair he would not part with the halter it is said it would not be lucky.
A Grey horse without a black spot is said to be enjoying the life of a man.
If a person is suffering from chin cough and if he meets a man riding on a Grey horse the rider is able to give him a sure cure.
There was a man at
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 22:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It really consists of the front or main entrance and the back entrance to Kilkerley House. there are lanes from Kilkerley bye road to Campbells House (running west) and to Hardy's house (running east)
There are two small bridges in the townland where the Fisher Stream passes underneath the Kilkerley bye road and the main road at Duffys. There are no names on these two bridges and I was unable to ascertain when they were erected.
Railway: The Great Northern Railway line from Dundalk to Derry passes through the townland. It passes over the main road at Rice's Bridge. I have been unable to find out why the bridge is known as Rice's Bridge. It probably refers to people called Rice who lived in the locality at one time. The line was built at the time of the famine 1845 - 47.
Landlord: The Landlord of Kilkerley was the Earl of Dartry, who lived in Dartry Castle in Co. Monaghan?. His agents name was Mr Henry Rathnestin, Co. Louth. (I got this from Anna May Duffy, schoolpupil aged 13, who adds that there were no evictions or tithe collections.) Thomas Rogers, workman, aged 40, says that the landlord was Fitzgerald and his agents name was Donaldson. He says that there was one eviction of the tenant in the old days.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 22:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
43
Story Teller.John Loughrey.
Lanaught.
Cromlecks
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 22:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
42
28 th April 1938.
Folklore. There is a cromleck in this parish about a half mile from this school in the Townland of Corbeha .It is situated a short distance from a bye road.
Some people call it the mass rock and others call it the cromleck but it is believed that the cromleck is the right name.
it is the land of Thomas Spelman and a lot of people visit it every year
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 21:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
40
26 April 1938.
Folklore.
One of the pastimes which people of this place had in olden times was a person would go down a barrell and every time he would put up his head a crowd of people would pelt at him and who ever would hit him would have to take his place.
Another past time was a person to put a cap over his face and follow the crowd of people and who ever he would catch
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 21:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two comparatively old people living in Kilkerley namely Mrs English (75) and Anne McHugh (80?) neither of whom speak or know any Irish.
Fields: The following are the names of the fields on Mr Michael McEvitts farm (given by Anna May Duffy a pupil of the school aged 13 years) : The Pailing field, the Grove field, Conlon's Hollow in which there is a well known as Peggy's Well, the Hunt field, the Big field, the Railway View, the Calf field, the Meadow field, the Pump field, the Commons, the Rock field and the Sand Hold field.
There is a bog in the Pigeon field called the Paddie Claddie.
Referring to Cortial Lake she says her father told her that potatoes were grown on the island on the lake.
The fields on Patrick Hardy's farm are named as follows (given by Thomas Rogers, (school pupil aged 13):- the flat field, The Honey comb, the Well field, the Wee Common and the Tailors Garden. There is a quarry in Mr McGough's field. There is a height in one of McKevitts fields. There are four rocks on Hardy's farm, while there four lone bushes on McKevitts farm. The house in which Mr McKevitt resides is known locally as the big house, partly on account of its size and partly on account of the importance of the people who lived in it. There was an old mill where McKevitts farm now stands. It was worked by the Fisher Stream, but has long since fallen into disuse.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
39
mass on it in the penal days.There are finger prints and crosses to be seen on it still .
The penal days.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
38
Aipril 12 1937
Folklore.
In the penal days the protestants were percuting the Catholics.
They had soup houses and they would give soup and bread to the Catholics if they gave up their Catholic religion and changed to protestants.
The priests had to go to lonesome places to say Mass.
There is a rock in this place and it is called the Mass rock.it is said that a priest said
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
37.
April 7 .1938
Folklore
Bowling was largely carried on in this district long ago:Crowds of men would gather near.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cunningham was so common in my townland that they had to be distinguished by nicknames thus - James the Lady, Micky the goat, Cappy, Micky Bawn, and Biddy Frank. Micky Bawn derived his name from his white head of hair. Beside my home there is a rock known as "Carraig na gCapaill" meaning the rock of the horses.
On our farm there are the ruins of an old house which was made of "daub" but it is not known who lived in it but it is to the present day known as the "malt" house. In my townland there is a house belonging to a man named Dolan and heretofore it was a private church. The man who is living in that house at present is called Michael Dolan and he is locally known as "Michael of the church." This church was used by the landlord and his family, his name being Whyte.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
36
and the other boys try to put them out of the den and race them and try to catch them before they reach the den again.
The way racing is played is a number of boys run a certain distance and the first to finish is the winner .
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Cartron. My townland got its name because it is a large division of land. There are eight houses in my townland one of which is vacant at present. The people who were living in it changed to another house in another townland. There are four of the houses in my townland slated and the other four are thatched. The name most common in my townland is Dolan. In my townland there is a hill named "Congrams hill". It is so called because a man named Congram owned that hill and when he died my grandfather got the hill. It is now owned by my father.
There are thirty people in my townland. There is one fort on our farm. Houses are more numerous in my townland at present than they were long ago. Long ago the name
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
35
April 5th 1938
Folklore.Some of the games which the young boys of this place have at present are hide,fox and racing. The way they play hide is one person remains in a den. He goes in search of others who have hidden themselves and they try to reach the den before he touches them.The last one touched before reaching the den has to take the next turn and so on.
The way they play fox is a couple of boys go into a den and pretend to be foxes
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
34
for they year.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
33.
March 31 .1938.
Folklore .Lucky and Unlucky Days.
Friday. The people of this place begin the Spring work on Friday for they say it is lucky.
May day. The people of this place stick quick beam on the crops May day for they say it keeps all evil away from them.
New years day.The people of this place do every thing right on the day for they say whatever a person would do on that day he would be doing it
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
23
piper went to a house for lodgings and the man told him to go.
Ninety eight.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22
March 8. 1938.
Folklore .
In the year'98 the Protestants were killing the Catholics.When they killed them they hung them on trees.A piper was passing a tree on which a dead man was hanging.He had bad shoes and he said he would exchange them for those of the dead man.When trying to get off the dead man's shoes the legs came with them .It was nightfall and the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 18:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
1 st March 1937.
Folklore .
In olden times there were no shops and it was by exchange they got what they wanted.They had no mills and it was by quarens they used to grind the corn. It would be a great thing Long ago to get half a cup of tea on Sunday .Potatoes and porridge were the chief foods long ago.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 17:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
20
with the hurdleys.
Hurling,
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 17:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
19
February 22.1938
Folklore.
The people of this district used to walk to the hurling field long ago.
Which ever team the captain would like best he would he would give them the most fair-play.
When the match would be over the teams would go to the public house and get drunk .Then they would rise a row and beat one another.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16
15 th February 1938.
Folklore.
long ago tailors went around to the houses making clothes.
Thare was a tailor in this district once who went around to the houses making clothes.It was very easy vex him and the people of the place used to argue wrong points with him .A man came in to him one day as he was cutting a suit of clothes .The man knew the tailor had
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15
F.Writer, Pat Loughrey lan.
S. Teller John Loughrey
Lanaught.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
February 10.10 1937.
Folklore.
Beggars are very numerous.Sometimes three or four families gather together and make camps on the roadside.
The women go from house to house begging tea,sugar, bread, milk, butter and potatoes.
They also beg turf for to make fires to cook their meals.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14.
Writer Pat Loughrey Lan S. Teller JOhn Loughrey
Lanaught .
Story.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
13
February 8:1937
Folklore.
there are twelve houses in the Townland i live in.
There were seventeen houses in it long ago but the owners have died and there is nothing to be seen now but the ruins.
There are five schools in this parish.
Two of them are new Flagmount and Gorthaveha.There is a beuyful lake in this parish ,Lough Graney.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
12
house at night used to hear churning going on in it
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11.
February 3.1937.
Folklore.
There is a rath in this Parish in the Townland of Derryfadda.
There is a crock of gold in it and a man named John Walsh searched for it but he was hunted by the fairies.
there is a rath in the parish of Beha in the Townland of Fox Dale Hill. It is situated at the end of a house and the people who used to visit the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10
January 20 1938.
Folklore
I heard my father telling the names of a particular fields in our farm one night.
The name of a certain field in our farm is Garrie Glas because it is a very level green field and the house is built on it.
There is a big crab bush in our farm and it is called Sceatha phiobra because a piper was heard playing under it long ago.Story
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9
January 18 .1937.
One of the Customs of New
Years Day is if a man comes in on that day the old people say it is the sign of good luck.
The old people say that if you break a looking glass on that day it brings misfortune into the house for seven years.
Long ago the people used to go around on New years day wishing every one a happy New year.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8
December 16 .1937.
I heard the neighbours telling the following story one night.After Queen Elizabeth's death her ghost was seen by a soldier who was reading in a separate room in the castle.Looking up he saw her before him
he settled his gun to fire at her but she disappeared.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 16:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7
December 14. 1937.
Folklore.
There lived in Lanaught a man named James and one of his Christmas costums is the following one.
Every Christmas night he used to remain up until four o clock and he used to leave the door open.
That costum is carried out to the present day by many people.
Christmas customs.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St John's Eve
In this district fires are lit in the potato fields on St John's Eve. Withered bushes are gathered together, and they are so placed that when lit, the wind blows the smoke over the crop.The people say that the lighting of these fires brings a blessing on the crops.
This custom has been carried out in this district as long as the people can remember.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 14:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
burst up through the soil, more clay has to be put on them then to keep the sun from burning the potatoes.
During the Autumn the potatoes are taken out with a plough, we call it a "spuddler". The potatoes are picked by the men and women and sometimes the children. They are picked into baskets and put into pits. These pits are about six feet long, 3 feet wide and six inches deep. The potatoes are put into these pits and piled up in a great heap, and covered with straw, and then covered with clay.
The following are the types of potatoes that grow in this locality:
Duke of York
Epicure
British Queen
Arran Chief
Kerr's Pinks
Champions
Arran Victory
Golden Wonder
Sharpe's Express
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 14:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We sow potatoes at home. We usually till about a quarter of an acre. My brother John prepares the land. No manure is put on the land before it is dug up. We sow them in ridges.
Drills are made by a straight stoke along the ground. Then dig the earth six inches deep. The manure is then spread and the potatoes sown and covered with clay and left to grow.
Ridges are made by digging the earch and making the ground into big squares. The manure is then spread and the potatoes are sown, and covered with clay and left to grow.
We never heard of wodden ploughs.
The spades are always bought in a shop. For sowing big potatoes they are cut in the middle, leaving an eye on each part, small potatoes are not cut, but each must have an eye.
Neighbours do not help each other in this part of the country like they do in other parts of Ireland. They do the work themselves, or else hire men.
During the summer months the men dig between the drills, because when the potatoes are growing they
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 13:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
17
a few days they leave for another district.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 13:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16
1st February 1938.
Folklore.
Beggars are very numerous. Sometimes three or four families gather together and make camps on the roadside.
The women go from house to house begging tea,sugar bread,milk ,butter and potatoes.
They also beg turf and make fires to cook their meals .
The men make all kind of tinware such as buckets,cans and saucepans and the women sell them to the farmers wifes .After
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15.
most honour.Long ago it was a common custom for strawboys to come to the wedding and they should be treated better than any other person in the house or they would kick up a great row.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 13:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
27th January.
Folklore Marriages.
Long ago the people used to go to the chapel on horse back and the man use to bring his wife behind him on the horse.Two men use to go on horse back one man from the woman's side and another from the man's side whoever reached the chapel first got the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
13
Folklore.
The names of Diseases and their cures are yellow -Jaundice if a person blew into your mouth in the morning when fasting you would get cured.
The Whooping -cough .If you met a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure and whatever cure he would give you it would be a sure cure. Another disease is Rheumatism and the cure for
anonymous contributor
2019-06-12 11:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
12
until the storm was over. The recited the rosary many times and when they were returning home they had to wade knee nearly lost in great floods .
The afternoon attributed their safety to the rosary
Thunder storm.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 23:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Doonmakiever in the parish of Glangevlin, Co. Cavan on the first road (now old and disused) there are two upright stones close to each other. These mark the place where two men fell when they were shot down by what was then called revenue officers. This shooting took place on Christmas day over a century ago. There was a Sheeven close to Cartys bridge in which a man named Carty illegally sold drink. A local man in the pay of the Government reported Carty, and on Christmas day in that year the aforesaid officer came. They people were coming from Mass, and a crowd followed the revenue officers, and were pressing close on them; they suddenly turned round and fired on the mob and two men fell mortally wounded on the spot where the stones now stand.
On the top of Cuilcagh mountain there is a cairn of stones which is visible in all directions for a considerable distance. There is a difference of opinion as to the origin of this cairn. Some assert that it marks the grave of a
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 21:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
38.
15 th March 1938
Folklore.
On the 17 th .inst St.Patrick.s day will be celebrated with its usual costoms and blessings.
On the day everybody will wear shamrocks and the young boys and girls will wear harps.
Some time ago everybody used to have green handkerchiefs for that-dayand the day was spent feasting and visiting.
It is customary also to exchange greetings cards for this day and as St.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 21:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
39
Patrick's day generally falls during lent "Holy mother The Church"grants for children the privilege of no fast or abstainence on St,Patrick's day.
Patrick's day Customs.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2
When he went back he saw Finn mac Cuhall standing on a rock ," Why do you hunt my stag asked Finn"Because it is the best in the land " said O Sullivan .The answer pleased Finn for he said, "You are thirsty and desire a drink .He struck the rock with his heel ,and there burst forth the waters now known as the lakes of Killarney
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 20:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1.
30th .November 1937.
Folk-Lore.
I often heard Jack Halloran describing how the lakes of Killarney were formed.
One day a man named O'Sullivan was hunting in Kerry when they ran across his patch the most beautiful stag he had ever seen. All day long he chased him,and when it was growing dark the stag disappeared ,and O' Sullivan faced homewards .he was not gone far when he heard a voice calling "O"Sullivan,"O'Sullivan come back
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 20:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seán Mac Giolla Easbuig
Cill Fhánaid,
Gleanncholuimcille

Nuair a bhí Colmcille sa t-sean Ghleann seo bhíodh coimhthiolán ag na naoimh go minic ag áit ar a dtugtaoi "Currantaigh Searc" air go dtí'n lá indiu.
Is cosamhail go rabh Colmcille rud beag lasta 'san agaidh agus i lár an t-seanchais dubhairt duine de na naoimh go rabh braon fola in a phluc. Ghoill seo go mór ar Colmcille agus nuair a tháinig sé 'na bhaile d'fhiafruigh sé do'n chailín aimsire an gcuireadh sí bainne fríd an arán. Dubhairt sise nach gcuiread sí a'n dath ach an sgaith a mheasgadh sí ar an t-soitheach, agus tháinig oiread feirge air a's go dteachaidh sé amach agus gur mharbh sé an bhó.
Seal gearr in a dhiaidh sin bhí an cailín aimsire ag mairgnigh fá'n dóigh bhocht a bhí ortha gan a'n deor bainne a bheith aca agus tháinig aithreachas air chionnas gur marbh sé an bhó. D'imthigh
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
heart to give me more".
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tramps come to our house very often. There is one tramp and he comes to my house every Wednesday. His name is Mickey Delaney. He lodges about forty yards from my house. He makes small cans and calf-muzzles and sells them. He comes to our house about one o'clock because he knows he will be in for his dinner. When he would have his dinner eaten he would say "May God increase your store, and put it in your
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
so that he would be in time for his dinner. When he would have his eaten he would say "May God increase your store, and put it in your heart to give you more".
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tramps come to my house now and again. There is one tramp and he comes every Saturday. His name is Johnny Pins and Needles. He lodges in Cashel which is about three miles from my house. He used to sell pins and needles and that is how he got his name. He used to buy them cheap in the town. Inside his coat he used to keep his bag for the pennies he used to get from the people. Every day that he comes he came at about twelve o'clock
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. If you have three lights lit in a house together, it is a sign of bad luck.
2. If a person cut his hair on a Monday he would get baldy.
3. If a person was going fishing and if he met another man and if the other man asked him where he was going and if he said that he was going fishing he should turn back because he would catch nothing.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22. If you moved from one house into another on a Friday you would have good luck.
23. If you were moving from one house into another and if you took your cat with you you would have bad luck.
24. If you saw a star falling it would mean that a soul was going to Heaven.
25. If you spun a knife around the table whoever the handle or the knife would be point to when it stopped would be the first in the house to die.
26. If you got a chill in your back that would mean that somebody was walking over the place where you grave would be.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
going on a journey, you would have good.
14. If you dropped a knife you would have a visitor.
15. If you dropped a fork you would be in company.
16. If a tealeaf floated on top of your tea when you got it you would have a lucky wife.
17. If a hard tealeaf floated on your tea when you got it you would have a man visiting you and if a soft tealeaf floated on your tea when you got it you would have a lady visiting you.
18. If you saw the full moon through glass for the first time in the month you would have bad luck.
19. If you walked under a ladder, you would have bad luck.
20. If you opened an umbrella in your house you would have bad luck.
21. If you had two spoons in your cup you would be married twice.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
on your way to the fair you should turn back or you would have bad luck.
6. If you got married in May you would have bad luck.
7. If you got married on a Wednesday you would have good luck.
8. If you found a horse-shoe and if you threw it over your shoulder and if you did not look at it any more you would have good luck.
9. If a picture fell off the wall someone in the house would die soon.
10. If you broke a mirror you would have seven year's bad luck.
11. If you spilled salt you would have a row; but if you threw the salt over your shoulder you would have no row.
12. If you met a red-haired woman and if you were going fishing you would catch no fish that day.
13. If you saw a white horse early in the morning and if you were
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The games I play are, hunting, hide and seek, skipping, spinning tops, ludo, draughts, rings, darts, snakes, and ladders, bricks, table-tennis, musical chairs and blind man's buff.
Hide and seek is played by a number of children. One would seek and the rest would hide. Then the one who is seeking would look for the others and the one he would catch first would then seek.
Hunting can be played by any number of children. One child hunts and the others run off. The child who is hunting would try to catch the others. Then those who are caught would catch hands and hunt the others.
Ludo is a very nice game and it is played with a board, a dice and men. The person shakes the dice and whatever number he gets he moves the men. The
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. If you put a piece of wedding cake under your pillow for three nights in succession whatever you would dream about during those nights would come true.
2. If you saw a black cat you would have good luck.
3. If you found a piece of coal and if you put it in your pocket you would have good luck.
4. If you dreamed of your future wife you would have good luck.
5. If you met a red-haired woman
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
love.
5. If you spill salt it is the sign of bad luck.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. If you put any of your clothes on inside out it is the sign of good luck.
2. If you look in a mirror at midnight on Halloween you would see your
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. If you saw a white horse you should spit out.
2. If you walked under a ladder you would never grow.
3. To see a read-headed woman and a magpie is bad luck.
4. To see a black and white cat is bad luck.
5. If you found a farthing you would be rich.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 18:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bring the milk back to a well. She would go around the well three times and say some prayers. Then it is supposed she would have take all her neighbour's butter.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 17:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
graveyard which is as follows: Long ago when the railway was being made the railway company wanted to make it through the graveyard, but the people heard of this and headed by their priest who was called Father Campbell, they went down to the ? and would not let the men proceed. So the men had to put a curve in the railway there.
When the wall was being put round the graveyard a skeleton was found just where the men were digging. That was about sixty years ago.
A piece of new ground was put on to the graveyard, but long ago there was two houses in it owned by Barney Boyle and Paddy Small. There is not a trace of them now.
Long ago the people of Omeath wanted to make a graveyard in Knocknagoran, behind Nucella, but the priest who was called father McVerry said that the one that they would do then for fifty years and then when fifty years was past it might do for another fifty years. It is called Cill Cám
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 16:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5
December 9. 1937.
Folklore.
I heard my father telling a story one night.Once a great giant lived in Ireland while another lived in Scotland.
The Scottish giant made out he was a great bully and he wanted to do away with the Irish giant.So he was preparing every day to come.
At length he started his journey but when he came over he found himself no match for the Irish Giant who put him to
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6 flight quickly .
then the Irish Giant followed him and on his way he tore a great mass of rock and scraw and threw it art the Scottish Giant but it fell in the middle of the ocean and formed the Isle of man.
Story.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 16:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3
December 2 1937.
Folklore.
I heard my Uncle telling the following story last night.
Once a very cross old man lived in Dromamdoora. Nothing would content him .One day he met a witch and she asked him if he wanted money.he said he did and she told him to hold his hat.The hat was a worn one but it would hold a little money. When sh had some money in it ,it began to break and the witch
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 16:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4.
asked him if he had enough but he said put in a little more. She told him then that if one coin fell they would all change into sops.She put in a little more but the hat burst and all the money fell and turned into sops .
he who wants too much will lose all.
Story
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 14:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two comparatively old people living in Kilkerley namely Mrs English (75) and Anne McHugh (80?) neither of whom speak or know any Irish.
Fields: The following are the names of the fields on Mr Michael McEvitts farm (given by Anna May Duffy a pupil of the school aged 13 years) : The Pailing field, the Grove field, Conlon's Hollow in which there is a well known as Peggy's Well, the Hunt field, the Big field, the Railway View, the Calf field, the Meadow field, the Pump field, the Commons, the Rock field and the Sand Hold field.
There is a bog in the Pigeon field called the Paddie Claddie.
Referring to Cortial Lake she says her father told her that potatoes were grown on the island on the lake.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 13:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
33
21st June 1938.
Folklore.
We have a churn at home named the dash churn which is worked by a hand up and down.
Its height is about three feet and the width of the top is a foot, and bottom 1.6".
There are many kinds of churns the Dash ,churn, the Barrel churn, the end overe end churn ,and many others.In Summer time people churn twice a week and in winter once a week.
if a man came in whilst the churn was been made he should get a dreas.
Churning.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
31
31st May 1938
Folklore. The Famine.
Among all the evils in Ireland long ago the Famine was the worst of all ,it killed and starved most of the people.The fever wiped out the most of them.The poor people were to be seen dying by the ditches with starvation and it is said that they were like walking skeletons and even ate rats with severe hunger.the cause of the feavor was that the people died in very large numbers that the could not be properly burried and many lay by the roadsid and field where they died .it lasted about ten years but the last five years left Ireland in a dreadful state.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 12:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
20
15 th March 1938
Folklore.
In olden times the people of this district used to be preparing with black thorn sticks for to go to the town on Patrick's day and rise a row.Shamrocks or green harps mad of green-ribon are worn on St.Parrick's day.Long ago there were a lot of old-customs associated with Patricks day.
When pulling the shamrocks you should pull a basket full of them for if you dident you would have no luck for the rest of the year.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 12:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9.
18th January 1938.
Folklore.
If a woman went into a house New years day first the people of the house would say that they would have misfortune for the year,and that is the reason that wemon dont go into houses on New years day.it is said that if a man with crucked eyes and a high instep went into a house and wished them a happy new year they would have luck for the year .False believes.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8
13 January 1938
Folklore.
In my farm we have a field and it is called Hynse's field and the reason is it got that name it a man of that name lived in it.
In our mountain there is a rock and it is called "Carraig an Aifrinn"because it is said that in the time of the "Penal days"priests used to say Mass on it.We have another field called "Tobar an Tsúir"because there is a spring well in it.
Place names.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 12:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7 saw the grand flat field out before him and when he had it crossed he met a man and he asked him who owns the large field ,and he told him that it was Lough Graney.
Story.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6
16 th December. 1938
Folklore .
One night last week i heard the the people who visit our house at night time talking about a heavy frost that occured a long time ago.There was a severe frost for three weeks and Lough Graney was frozen .Immediately after the frost there was a heavy fall of snow so that anyone who did not know Lough Graney would never imagine it was a lake.
There was a man travelling on horseback from Galway to Feakle and he
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 12:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5
obtained from the surface of a bog and kept the framerods in position while the lighter rods were been interwoven to produce a strong basket which would last for many a day.
Osiers.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 12:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4
14th.December 1937
Folklore.
The dark November nights is the time for cutting the osier rods for making baskets.Long ago everyone made their own baskets, turf baskets,manure baskets,and calf baskets.
The weak are used for making calf baskets and the strong rods for making turf and manure baskets.Long ago tough sods about 2. 1/2 ft square were used as a means of standing the vertical rods which were to form the framework of the basket.
The scraw or sod was
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 11:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Gallouse Hill
There is a hill stretching for about two hundred yards over the Black Quarry and Sandpit in Kilkenny called Gallouse Hill. This was the place where the English soldiers hung the Kilkenny people.
At that time this hill was covered by a wood. It is now fenced in and cows and cattle graze their. The people were hung by means of an iron bar tied from one tree to an other. The rope hung from this bar to a deep drop below.
Most of the people were hung for the wearen of the green. This hill can be reached by means of quarry or sandpit. It is about six hundred yards from the Castel.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 11:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2
Peter Cunningham .
Story Teller John Brody Killanena.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-11 11:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
2nd December 1937.
Folk-Lore.
There lived a man in Dromandoora ,he had the habit when returning home at night of taking a piece of a bush and chewing it.
One night after reaching home he became ill.The priest was sent for,when he came he could do no good and they sent for Biddy Early to work a charm.She came and she told him to put the branch back into the bush,he went back and put it in and he was all right.
Story
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 22:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
32.
16 th June 1938.
Folklore.
Long ago in this district the roads were very bad.
The principal means of transport and bachloads which meant baskets and straddle on a horses back.
There were no motors or bicycles at that time .
the most important of the old roads were Ard de- bhóthair ,Gleann -tuaithill Noch Ó phónta ,Sliabh -feathaibh
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 22:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
30.
3rd may 1938.
Folklore.
When Our Lord was twelve years old Mary and Joseph brought him to the Temple and he was lost in the temple and they journeyed for one day without noticing His absence .When evening came they could not find Him and they were overwhelmed with grief.In the latter end of three days they found Him in the temple in the midst of the doctors hearing them and asking them questions.Story.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 22:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
25
5th March 1938.
Folklore.
Some of the games which the young of this place have at present are hide ,fox and racing.The way they play hide is one person remains in the den untill the others have hidden themselves .he then goes in search of them and they try to reach the den before he touches them. The first one touched before reaching the den has to take the next turn in the den and so on.They way they play fox is a couple of boys go into a den and pretend to be foxes and the other boys put them out of the den ,chase them and
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 22:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
27.
7th April 1938.
Folklore.
Brian Merryman lived in the year1800.
he was born in Ennistymon but he spent most of his life time in Upper Feakle.
He was a great poet and scholar. The name of one of his poems is Cúaird an Méadhan Oidhce.
He was the schoolmaster in Kulclarin he died in the Workhouse in Limerick and was buried there. A poet.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
huge form being clearly visible against the sky-line.
As the Americans say "the men froze". They remained terror-stricken for how long they never knew. The only thing they could remember was the "Horse" moving towards them with heavy plodding steps that seemed to shake the ground, his eys shining like two huge red lamps.
"Old Patsy" not too easily frightened went to seize an iron bar which lat a few yards away but in doing so he walked on the cat which gave two terrific shrieks. So that together with the advancing horse was too much for the gallant leader.
So he and his men filled with confusion ran through hedges and ditches and no body ever since sought the "hidden treasure".
Told by Mr John Priest Baskina, Athboy. From Mr Patsy Herman John Priest as 50, Pat Hernan age 70
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 21:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kenny's Hill (Told by John Priest Baskinagh)
Some time ago an old man used to come at night to have the neighbourly chat with my father. I was very interested in the tales he used to tell. He knew by my anxious face I would like to hear of the "Hidden Treasure" on an old hill not far from my home.
"Old Patsy" was the man's name who told the story. He told me that on "Kenny's Hill" the Hidden Treasure was to be found. It was guarded every night by a "White Horse".
This night five or six men with shades and shovels set out to dig up the "Hidden Treasure". "Old Patsy" being the leader told his men that a life had to be lost in the finding of this "Treasure".
So they promptly seized a cat and took it along together with a bottle of holy -water which they spilled on the ground forming a circle to prevent evil spirits from interfering with them. The work of digging went steadily on for some time when all of a sudden the "white horse" appeared on a rise, his
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 21:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old Schools...Told by Mrs Priest Baskinagh, Athboy.
There were no hedge schools in my district. An old lady beside my home went to a teacher in Kildalkey named Miss Margaret Smyth. This teacher came from Carlow. She was a very hard teacher and also very strict. This Miss Smyth was married to a Sergent in Kildalkey. This Sergent's name was Mr. Gill. They lived in a house which is now Revd. Fr. Ryan's lodge.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The time Jesus was been crucified the Jews went to the blacksmith and asked him to put in Our Lord's hands but the blacksmith said he would not. So they went to the tinker and asked him to make the nails so the tinker made them and that is why the tinkers are poor.
Bernard Reilly.
Told by William Fulham, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 21:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the Blessed Virgin.
Yes! that indeed is why when a black-smith washes his hands he feels himself refreshed and stronger.
Lily Priest
Told by John Priest, Baskinagh, Kildalkey.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 18:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14
it is Crucheen Salts.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 18:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
26.
try to catch them before the den.
The way racing is played is -a number of boys run a certain distance and the first to finish is the winner of the race .
Ancient pastimes.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 18:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
23.
March 31 st. 1938
Folklore.
There are special days of the year ,when customs are carried out.On May Day quick-beams stuck in the garden and holy water is sprinkled on crops and stock.November night a cake is made and a ring put in it.
The cake is cut and whoever gets the ring is the first to get married .
The saucers are placed on the table one is filled with clay ,the second with water ,and a ring is put in the third one. A person is placed
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 18:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
24
at a distance before the the table blindfolded .he then proceedes with his hand out- stretched towards the table.
The saucer which he touches is supposed to be an omen of death,a journey across water or marriage .Special days.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 18:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22.
29th March 1938.
Folklore.
The cures that the people had for diseases in this district were .The hooping cough if you met a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure and what ever he would tell you it would cure you.Cure for Rheumatism is Crucheen Salts. The cure for a toothache is to put a frog into your mouth and leave it for a little while and the it would disappear.The seventh son born in a house is said to have a special cure. Diseases and their cures.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 18:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
March 22. 1938.
22 nd March 1938.
Folklore.
There were not many schoolhouses long ago and teachers had to find a sheltery bush or hedge to instruct their pupils.They got very poor pay or no pay in those days,and they got their meals and lodging free from the people of the district.The teachers were forbidden to teach Irish by the English law,but they used to teach it without they knowing it That was the reason they had no schools .Hedge Schools.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 16:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
12
3rd February 1937
Folklore .Famine.
When the famine was in Ireland the people had nothing to eat and they died with the hunger and they were buried in big piles and covered up.When the potatoes failed the people had to live on turnips and other root crops.
When people would have nothing to eat they went to another farmyard and took food out of it and the man of the farm was not able to prevent them .Famine.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 16:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11
25 th January 1938.
Folklore.
The names of Diseases and their cures are Yellow Jaundice if a person blow their breath into your mouth in the morning when fasting you would get cured.
The whooping- cough if you meet a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure and whatever cure he would give you it would be a sure cure .Another Disease is Rheumatism and the cure for it is Crucheen salts. Diseases and their cures.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 16:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10
20 th January 1938
Folklore.
The names of wild animals in this district are ,the Fox, the badger, the Hare and the Rabbit,the Weasel and the Squirrel.
The Fox steals fowl from the farmyard and eats them.The badger eats nuts and robs bees'n eats .The Hare and the Rabbit eat grass,
The Weasil drinks the blood of small animals and birds ans Squirrel eats nuts.
Wild Animals
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 15:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There were numbers of superstitions connected with magpies.
If a person saw one magpies it was a sign that they would have bad luck.
Two magpies were the sign of good luck.
Three magpies seen together was the sign that there was to be a wake
Four magpies seen together was the sign that a wedding was to be.
Five magpies was for silver
Six " " " gold.
Seven for a secret that cannot be told.
If one magpie comes about a house it is said that the people of the house will get a letter.
If a person's right hand was itchy it is the sign that he will get a strange shake-hands.
If his left hand was itchy it is the sign that he will get money.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 14:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is the ruins of an old castle in Kilkeeran. The Eldwards lived there long ago. Before the canal was made it was all a
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 13:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
19
7th March 1938.
Folklore.
I heard a good deal of old stories which my Grandfather told me.He said a white woman very often appeared in Lough Neagh lake and she was always crying and one night and lad's coming home from cuairt she was still crying and one boy cursed her.So every night afterwards the white woman came screaming to his bedside and the boy hung himself.Story.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 13:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The boy said he came to bring the sow and with that rushed out the door terrorstricken. "Be gob" says Charley "Only I was here my darlin' pig was gone" He tied the door and lay down to rest, being very tired after his long walk. It was not long till he fell fast asleep and slept until 10 oclock Sunday morning. When he went to the dwelling house door he found it was locked, and said "She must be gone to Mass so I'd better go too as I never missed Mass and I am not going to miss it now." As Charley went out on the road there were people before him and behind him. When those before him saw who was coming they started to run on. "Begob" says Charley I must be late so I'd better run too." the faster he ran the faster the people in front went until
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 13:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
18.
3rd March 1938.
Folklore.
Long ago money was not in circulation as it is today.People exchanged goods .The farmer exchanged their farm produce for the goods he required.
The goods consisted of tea, sugar and flour and the farm produce consisted of ,butter, eggs ,potatoes and corn.
Circulation of Money.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 13:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
17
1st.March 1938.
Folklore.
The houses long ago were very small small and were built of mud.They were roofed with bog sticks and covered with tough scraws which were got in boggy land.
There were hardly chimnies in the houses.Instead there was a hole in the centre of the roof and the fire was made in the middle of the floor.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 12:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16.
24 th February.1938
Folklore.
The hurlers of long ago were rougher players than the hurlers of to day.They were bigger stronger but not as fast or as clever as the men of today.
Long ago a team was made up of twenty -one men but it is fifteen now.Parishes played against each other for the County -Championship, while the Provinces played against each other for the All Ireland .Championship Hurlers.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 12:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15.
22nd February 1938.
Folklore.
People long ago had not much food to eat and they used to eat only three times a day.
The principal food they had long ago was potatoes.
The tables they had was a block in the middle of the and a big board over it.They used to spread a cloth on the board and eat off it.When the meals were over they used to put the board by the wall. Scarcety of food.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 12:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14.
17th February 1938.
Folklore.
The names of the landlord of this district was Major Hall and the people purchased their land from him about thirty years ago.
Before they purchased the land the rent was very high and it was then reduced and the people found it easier to live.
Landlords.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 12:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
29
about the size of the mouth of a bowl.One hole was in the centre of the dyke and it was surrounded by eight others for 8.7.6 etc.
Each bowler got three bowls and he who made the highest score was winner.Bowling.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 12:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
28
12 April 1938.
Folklore
Bowling was a favourite pastime with the people of this district about thirty years ago.it was played generally and especially on Sundays when boys came a distance of six miles.The cross-roads at Knockanena was the centre for the bowling.
Other games such as card-playing and pitch and toss were carried on in the same locality.
In bowling a round stone about the size of two closed fists was used and this stone was kept in a house near the Cross roads.There were nine holes
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 12:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
47
April .26 .1938
Folklore.
Bowling was one of the best past time which the people had long ago.There were moine holes in the side of the road and the men used to stand at the other side if the road and they used to get three boles.it was about thirty years since it was played.on Sunday it was generally played and the people stayed up all night playing them with a candle lighting. Bowling.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 12:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
46
April 7.1938.
Folklore.
In olden times the people of this district used to be preparing with black thorn for to go to the towns on St.Patrick's day and rise a row.
The girls of this place long ago used to wear green dresses on St Patrick's day .in olden times the people used to put small crosses of timber under the rafters on the day after .Old fairs.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-10 00:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3th October 1938
There is a small well in the hollow of an old tree in Clonard. It is called St. Bridgets Well. It cures warts. Anyone that wants warts cured has to go for three Fridays and say the Hail Mary five times, then they get cured.
4th October 1938
In Moyvalley at the present day there is a man named Mr. Cusack. He has the cure of warts. About this time two years we had a cow that had warts. One day he came down to Broadford and brought him up the field. He hunted her into a corner
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 22:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
before! The hare simply flew, with the dogs in hot pursuit until they came to a large house. The board on the bottom of the door was on hinges, and the hare quickly pushed it in before her. Just as she was disappearing one of the dogs bit off her tail.
The men forced the door in. They saw an old woman sitting on a board across the top of a tub in the corner. They asked her did she see a hare. She said she didn't. They searched the house, high up and low down, but could find no trace of the hare. At last one of the men happened to look into the tub. He saw that it was half full of blood!
The old woman was a witch who turned herself into a hare at times. The widow's cows were never sucked dry again.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 22:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a woman who had four very good cows. One day a woman with a child in her arms came in. She asked for a cup of milk for the child. "Well," said the woman, "I have four of the best cows in the parish, but the won't give me a drop of milk." The woman at the door informed her that a hare comes at daybreak and sucks the cows. "I fyou send but a couple of dogs and hunt the hare, she will never trouble you again."
So next morning before daybreak the widow's two sons with two good dogs lay in hiding near the cows. Just at daybreak the hare came and proceeded to suck one of the cows. Then she went around on the other three. When she had nearly finished a the last cow, the men jumped up and let go the dogs.
Such a hunt was never seen
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
45
your mouth and leave it in it for a while and then the toothache would be gone.The seventh son born in a house is said to have special cures.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
April .7 .1938
Folklore.
The cures that the people of this district for diseases were.The Hooping cough if you met a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure whatever he would tell you it would be a sure cure.Cure for Rheumatism is Cruscheen Salts.
The cure for a toothache is if you put a frog into
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
44
another one is November night Oidche Shamhna the night of the Puka. customs
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
March. 29. 1908
Folklore.
Jack stones was am old Irish pastime. Five small stones were used and the children usually sat on the ground in a circle.After casting lots the biggener took the five stones in one hand and them let them fall so that they would not scatter too far appart.He then picked up one of the stones.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
42
in a burrow under the ground.The badger is a very wicked animal and lives under the rocks.
Wile animals.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
March. 24. 1938.
Folklore.
There are a great many wild animals in this district but the most common ones are the fox the hare and the rabbit.The fox is the cleverest of all the wild animals.The food the rabbit and the hare lives on is cabbage turnips and mangolds and the food the fox lives on is fowl .the fox and the rabbit live
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
41
of the out houses were knocked.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
40.
March .22 .1938
Folklore.
There was a great storm about fifty four or fifty five years ago the people could hardly leave their houses and they had to put sticks to the houses and to the hay to prevent them from falling.The storm was followed by a great fall of rain which remained on the earth for for a few days.A lot of straw and hay were swept and a lot of roofs
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
13
January .18.1938.
Folklore.
On New years day people stay up on the night before new years day to welcome in the New Year.
Long ago on New Years day people went around wishing a happy new Year and taking bread.
People object to let a woman om th it day for they say it would bring bad luck for the year.
New years day.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
38
March .15 . 1938.
Folklore.
Once there lived about a mile from Feakle a famous woman whose name was Bidie Early.She had magic power and could cure all kinds of diseases.There lives a woman at that time whose son was dying and she went to Biddie Early and she told her to go home and throw out all the broken delph that was in the house she did so and her
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
12
.Michael Hurley.Lanaught.
S.T. Thomas Hurley. L
A faithful friend.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11
December.16 1937.
Folklore.I heard my uncle telling a story one night .it was about a faithful friend.
A rich farmer kept a lot of sheep and he had a dog named Bran.
Every evening and morning the man went to look at them and the dog collected them.One evening as he was crossing a ditch a large stone fell on his leg and broke it.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 20:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
10
14th .Dec.1937.
Folklore.i heard the neighbours on night on cuairt conversing about the dark November night and the cutting of ozier rods for turf baskets manure baskets and calf baskets.
There us a frame for the baskets when they are making them.There are but a few men for making them and they put down a year.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 17:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tombs and crosses in them. Some of the crosses are ornamented with the images of hearts and birds. There are some little crosses made of wood and others made of iron.
There was a family named Barrett buried in 1842 and another family named Fallon died in 1886. James McDermot died in the year 1830. John Jordan died in 1832. A family named Curley died in 1835 and another family died in 1879 named Madden.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 17:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Old Graveyards
There are two graveyards in the parish. Their names are, The Old Abbey and Clontuskert churchyard. The Clontuskert churchyard is situated in Chapel Park and the Old Abbey is situated in Abbey Park. The two graveyards are still in use. The Clontuskert Churchyard is almost round in shape but the Old Abbey is not.
There is still a church in Clontuskert Churchyard but there are only the ruins of one in the Old Abbey. The Clontuskert Churchyard is not level but it slopes towards the east. There are no trees growing in any of the Churchyards.
There are some fairly old
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 17:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bird Lore 27-5-1938
Song Birds
Blackbirdm Thrush, Sky Lark,Gold Finch.
Game Birds
Pheasants, Pigeons, Partridge, Snipe, Wild ducks, Wild geese, Wood Cock, Grey Plubber, Curlew.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 17:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Cures 25-5-1938
The people sought remedies for their ailments in former times by herbs in the fields and food left behind certain animals. In former times people used to keep the milk or food left behind a ferret because it was a cure for the whooping cough.
The people used to visit holy wells long ago and they used to be cured. One well was called Tobar na Súl and people who had sore eyes used to go there.
The seventh son of a family used to have a cure for ring-worm. People who had thorns in their feet used to get a bit of a foxes tongue and put it to it. A child who never saw his father has a cure for a sore mouth.
Corrections
Sought, sought, sought, sought.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-09 15:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ar mhuin na muice
útamáil
siocán
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 15:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A long time ago some men used to gather at a certain house every night to play cards. One night a row rose between them over money and they all started fighting and cursing one another. After some time however the row stopped began to play again, the same as ever. They then kept playing until midnight when one of the men who was getting tired stretched himself and said it was time to go home. At the same moment he felt something rubbing against his legs and he asked the other men what was under the table. Scarcely were the words out of his mouth when what came up through the middle of the table but two big long horns. The men got terribly frightened and fled for their lives from the house never waiting to see what it was. Next day when they came to look at it the two horns were gone and there was not any trace of where they had come up. After that the men never quarreled between themselves again and they were always best of friends.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 14:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that it was never tilled. This field probably gave the townland its name.
Furnaceland - a townland in which the iron was smelted. It dervies its name very probably from Furnis.
Uragh - a name given to a townland which was noted at an earlier date for its plantations and probably yew trees.
The Strait - A name given to a hollow in Commas townland up near Cuilcagh mountain.
The Knocken - A field in the farm of Mr Patrick McGovern. Borim Swanlinbar. It is a high bank over a river with a lone bush growing in it.
Mallai Buidhe - a field owned by Mr Peter McGovern. Teeboy, Corlough Co. Cavan covered with yellow buachlanns.
Borim - A townland ridge shaped like a cow's back.
Coragh - A townland in the parish of Kinawley near the village
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 11:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
New year's day is not kept in Ireland but it is kept in Scotland and none of the people work.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 11:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The people do not work on good Friday. They keep it as a holiday.
Easter Sunday is the day that Jesus rose from the dead and Easter Sunday keeps us in remembrance of that. The people eat eggs on Easter Sunday.
Whit Monday is another holiday and the people do not work. The schools are all closed.
May Day is on the first day of May.
Lady Day is on the 15 th of August and the catholics keep it as a holiday.
Old May day is on the nineth of May.
Halloween day is on the last day of October and the people eat nuts, and apples, and at night the young people leave cabbages at the door-step, and they throw ones into the kitchen. That is the custom about here.
Christmas Eve night is the night that the children hang up their stockings for Santa Claus. It is on the 24 th of December.
Christmas day is on the 25 th of December and the people do not work. They go hunting for rabbits and hares and game.
New year's eve is on the last day of December and it is the day before New year's day.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 11:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and he continues saying "Oh, see what I have done I have killed my only daughter's son. Now twenty pounds for a doctor and not a doctor to be found." The next man comes in is the doctor and he says, "Oh, yes, yes, here comes I old doctor Green all the way from Shibbereen." Johny Funny comes after that and says "Here comes I Johny Funny I am the man collects the money, and he has a tin box with him and the people put money into this box. Johny Funny is the man who collects the money.
St Patrick's day is on the 17th of March and all the people keep it as a holiday. They do not work but they walk about and gather shamrocks and put some in their coats.
Shrove Tuesday is Lent eve. Lent begins in the middle of March and it lasts forty days. The people keep off eating something such as sweets, or butter, or taking sugar in their tea or cream on their tea for those forty days.
Ascension Thursday is another holiday with the catholics.
Good Friday is the day that Jesus was crucified and it is the Friday before Easter.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 04:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Catholic Curate of Swanlinbar
(Rev Bernard O'Reilly CC)
Had I they pen or the skill of Homer,
Or the poet Virgil of ancient time
I would feel unable to set forth the praises
Of our holy pastor her Saint divine.
(Rev Peter Whelan PP)
I lay down my pen as the case is settled,
So fill your glasses with rum and gin
And drink a health to our friend Montgomery and Benisen,
We leave our case in these men of honour
That never were guilty of crime or wrong
And the Swanlinbar boys will not be forgotten,
Its no lie to call them old Grania's sons.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 04:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to day?"
When Millions were all assembled
And ranged in order, in septs and clans,
heard one Chieftain say to another
"Here comes our brethren from faithful Glan."
On Montiagh brave! -have you been divided?
You once wore laurels, though now a slave;
Your sons of old around the hills of Macken,
Would lose their lives or the Chapel save.
The Swanlinbar men were all determined,
To fave the tyrant and make him yield,
Their cheers re echoed the heavenly regions
As they manoeuvred in Gallagher's field:
My stupid brain can't reveal their number,
A hundred thousand they exceeded far
All paying homage to the Star of Europe
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 04:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
power of demons
Shall not retard or lead her astray,
So we are obliged to stand up and
guard her,
Let earthly landlords say what they may.
Had you been there on that Friday morning
On the tenth of August the night before,
When Grania's sons they were all alarmed
From Lisnaskea into Ballinamore.
Saying "Prepare, my boys, with a moment's warning,
You shall be guided by the morning star;
Now is the time to replace the stranger
And save the Chapel at Swanlinbar.
From Leitrim's mountains they came in thousands,
From Cavan hills and Fermanagh gay
Saying, "Where is the offspring of the stranger
That dare oppose us or our Church
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 04:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mountain,
And the briny ocean for the straying sheep,
He consecrated three hundred Bishops,
Drove snakes and serpents from our Saintly Isle,
And told the people that the Church would suffer
Much persecution till the end of time.
So it came to pass as the Saint predicted
For Satan's power, we are told,
Is yet as strong as when tempting
Judas
To sell our Saviour for the sake
of gold;
The fallen angels are still impatient
Though driven from Heaven for raining war;
Of late they have tempted their earth
by bailiffs
To seize the Temple of Swanlinbar.
Christ tells His Church that the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 04:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The landlord had rent against Swanlinbar Chapel. The people would not pay it to the landlord, so the landlord was going to burn down the Chapel. The Cavan people would not let him. This was in 1870. Thomas McGoldrick of Cloughhogue Swanlinbar composed a song about it. Here is the song.
Ye gentle Muses. I pray excuse me for my intrusion on learning wings,
Inspire my genius, ye lords and sages,
My country's praises I mean to sing.
Tradition mentions, without contradiction,
How blessed Saint Patrick he was sent
o'er,
By Pope Belestine to improve a wineyard
called Lire Og or the Virgin Shore;
And like St. Peter, when his Master told
him,
To feed his lambs and his flock to keep ,
He ranged the desert, the vales, the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 03:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
for a couple of coppers per day. It was well known afterwards that the greater part of the money never reached the pockets of the poor and the needy. 1847 was even a blacker year as a disease broke out among the people and they died in thousands from cholera black fever. Skin disease the result of starvation and exposure were common. The population of Ireland reduced to near the half before the country recovered.
My grandmother (who was then Catherine Best Clincollow) and my great grandfather (Mr. G. Best Clincollow) were digging potatoes the time of the famine. They dug for a day and they hadn't enough sound ones for the next day's dinner. They used to cut the sound bits off and grind them in a quern and ring them and make boxty out of them. My great grandfather (Mr. W. McMullen) had no bad ones at all and he made £40 the next year on what he sold. The people made the Woodford Canal to get some relief. They worked all the day and at night they got Indian meal porridge at the Market House in Ballyconnell. Some of them got 4 a day and thought it great pay.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-08 03:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He owns a motor car and has it for hire, + he says he often heard his mother talk about her nights adventures. At any rate the Skeogh is a haunted place. I know a boy who saw a soldier + two children
It is said that they killed + buried them there. The banshee is often heard wailing over that green patch of grass at the Skeogh. The ghost takes different forms. Some people see a light others hear a noise. My father saw one eye glaring out of the ditch. Other men saw a ball of fire + my father had to turn back home one night with a poney as he would not go any further.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 23:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
36
A Song
"I have travelled afar from my own native home
Away for the ocean across the white foam
But give me a home where the grass grows so green
On the old mossy slopes by the cliffs of Dooneen.
How nice tis to walk on a fine summer day
And to view the sherees* that will never decay
When the seagrass and seaweed and old corrigeen
Grow rich on the rocks by the cliffs of Dooneen
The sandhills of Beale are lovely and grand
The old castles ruins look out towards the strand
The rabbits in plenty to day can be seen
Making holes for their homes by the cliffs of Dooneen.
My footsteps retreat to the boathouse of old
The dance at the Clash where love stories were told
Today you can see each young lad and colleen
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 23:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
29
Local Place Names
Asdee - Caislean a castle Eas a waterfall, Dubh black
Craughdarrig - Red marsh
Athima - ath-ime-the ford of the dam
Ahafona - The ford of the ground
Ballingowan - The town or place of the Smith's
Ballincrossig - The place of the cross.
Ballyduff - black town
Bally brennan O Grenna's townland
Ballylongford - The ford mouth of the fortress
Ballyloughran - O'Loughran's town.
Coolastoosane - back of the long hairy looking grass (soosawn)
Coolaclarig - back of the level land (or corner)
Derryco - oak wood of bucks does (cuack)
Doonaha - fort of the ford
Gootmaskehy - The fields of the white thorns
Knockanuve - The hill of the yew trees
Leaca - a hillside
Lahardane - teat-ard half a height, gently sloping ground or eminence
Lakesrough - half Ploughland beat half, seisreach ploughland
Lick - flag or stone- flat surfaced rock.
Listowel - O'Thookal's fort
Pollagh - land full of pits or holes
Shroneowen - the nose of the river.
Michael Griffin
Bromore, Ballybunion
14-7 '38
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 23:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
all the other animals and children should be trained to do so. Dogs also should be fed and cared as they are very useful and also very affectionate. They should not be beaten or ill treated. Cats also should be fed, but when they are old they should be shot. In Ireland people have the custom of having names on their cows such as "Red Twin", "Grey Twin", "Two Paps". "Small heifer", "Polly", "Kerry", "Magpie", "Maol", "Tough cow", "Blue cow", "Jumper". When we go out to catch the horse we say "fill, fill, fill", and he walks up knowing that he is to be caught. When we go into the poultry yard we say "tuck, tuck, tuck",, to the hens, and "chick, chick, chick, when we want to call the pigs we say "wat, wat, wat"
July 13th 1938
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 23:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I am living in the townland of Beale, in the parish of Kilconly, and the barony of Irraghticonnor. Beale got its name from the mouth of the river Shannon. There are about seventy-two houses in Beale. There are sixty-two farmers' houses and ten laborers' houses. Each farmer keeps about twenty cows. Beale is so big that it is divided into four parts. Beale Hill, Middle Beale, Lower Beale, and Beale Acres.
I am living in Beale Hill. There is good land in Beale. There is an old castle ruin in my townland. There is a public house and there are two shops in my townland. The most common name in Beale is Carmody.
There is an old man living in Beale, hale and hearty, and he is eighty four years of age. His name is Pat Carmody. There are six or seven living in the district who are over seventy years. Their names are (Michael) Michael Hennessy, John Mulvihill, Mrs King, Tom Walsh, John Creed, Mrs Collins, Martin Carmody.
Beale is situated on the bank of the Shannon. You could see the ships sail on the Shannon and some of these ships carry coal to Sullivans in Ballylongford. You could see the Tralee Hills and loophead from this district.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 21:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a young, red-haired fellow in it, and he used be putting a rod out under the horses belly all the time, while they were with Micheál Mór. The other fairies used catch him, and throw him back.
Recorded from Thady Hastings, Thawnaslinnaun, Drummin, Westport, Co. Mayo.
Written by Áine Ní Oistín, Doiremhór, Dromainn, Westport
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 21:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of them rose up behind on the horse and he carried them across. When he had these four across the rest started asking him, “Will you bring me, Miceál Mór? Micheál Mór will you bring me?” “Ah the devil a one of ye that I won’t bring” said Micheál Mór. They told him not to be cursing and they plunged out in the river every one of them and they crossed. They were with him until he came to a crossroads, where he should turn from them. Then they said to him, “God speed you now, Micheál Mór and send you safe home, you have a bad way to go home” (he had four more miles to go).
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 21:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fairies
One night my great, great grandfather Micheál Mór Ó hOistín was coming from town. When he was coming at a fairy fort spot, called Cloch Mór, in the village of Leitir Bruc, he met about fifty fairies. They asked him was he afraid at Cloc Mór. Cloc Mór used to be giving blood. He said he was not. They came with him for a mile and a half, until they came to a river without a bridge. When they came to the river, they asked him would he carry them across the river on his horse. He said he would. Then four of them
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 21:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I saw three men hanging, I sucked their blood and eat their flesh and left their bones there hanging.
A. Blackberries.
Q. Head like a thimble, tail like a rat, you may guess for ever but you'll never guess that.
A. A pipe.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 21:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A list of local riddles are-
Q. As I was going over Parliament bridge I met a parliament scholar he took off his hat and drew off his gloves, and if you're very smart you'll tell me his name as I've told you before in the riddle.
A. Andrew.
Q. Long and lanky, full of fun, it has no legs but it can run.
A. Water.
Q. Eliza, Elizabeth, Betty or Bess went over the hills to see a birds nest. There were five eggs in it, they each one, how many eggs were left.
A. Four.
Q. How many cows tails would reach to the moon.
A. One if it was long enough.
Q. Black and white and red (read) all over.
A. A newspaper.
Q. Four bottles full of milk, no corks on them turned upside down and yet wont spill.
A. Milk in a cows pap.
Q. As I was going up a little red road
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 20:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
68. Ag seachna an chinn agus ag bualadh an mhuiníl.
69. Is feárr ádh ná éirghe go moch.
70. Is feárr an t-ádh ná éirghe go moch.
71. Is feárr marcaigheacht ar each ná coisidheacht leat féin.
72. Is feárr sean-fhiacha ná sean-fhala.
73. Is feárr an troid ná an t-uaigneas
74. Is feárr mall ná ró-mhall
75. Ní hé lá na gaoithe lá na scolb.
76. Is feárr marcaigheacht ar ghabhar ná coisidheacht dá fheabhas.
77. Is feárr marcaigheacht ar asal ná coisidheacht dá fheabhas.
78. Innis dom do chomhluadar agus innseóchaidh mé dhuit cé thú féin.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 20:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
56. Is feárr dreoilín ‘sa dorn ná corr ar cáirde.
57. Ní’l tuile dhá mhéid nach dtráigheann.
58. Níl stoirm dhá mhéid nach sídheán a deireadh.
59. Níl lá dhá fhaid nach dtagann a thráthnóna (also an tráthnóna)
60. An rud a scríobhas a púca léigheann sé féin é.
61. Is feárr an madadh leat ná in do aghaidh.
62. As na tighthe beaga téigheann siad ins na tighthe móra.
63. As na tighthe beaga a théigheanns na daoine ins na tighthe móra.
64. Tighthe móra a’s córthaí folamha (Donegal: corthaí = cómhranna)
65. Níor dhóigh an sean-chat é féin ariamh.
66. Dhó féin a ghníos an cat crónán
67. Ar mhaithe leis féin a ghníos an cat crónán.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 20:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
46. Is ró-dheas an chaoi
bheith i ngan fhios do’n dlighe,
agus ní costas dhuit choidhche an t-éadach.
47. I ngan fhios do’n dlighe is feárr bheith ann.
48. Is binn béal nach n-déarfaidh (n-abróchaidh) tada.
49. Is binn béal ‘na thost.
50. Is binn an béal nach n-abruigheann tada.
51. Bíonn dhá innseacht ar scéal.
52. Ná creid an chéad scéal go m-beiridh an dara scéal ort.
53. Ní scéal rúin é agus fios ag triúr air. (Ní rún é)
54. Ní chuimhnigheann an chú ghortach ar a coileáin.
55. Ní chuimhnigheann an chú ghortach ar a coileán.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 20:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
37. A dhuine gan chéill,
Tabhair aire dhuit féin
Níl tuile dhá mhéid nach dtráigheann
38. Níl grádh dhá mhéid
Nach dtigeann gráin dá réir
A’s níl, tuile dhá mhéid nach dtráigheann
39. Ní námhaid an chéird acht í a fhoghluim.
40. Is námhaid an chéird gan a foghluim.
41. Is feárr éan in do láimh ná dhá cheann ar chraoibh.
42. Is feárr éan in do láimh ná péire ar an tom.
43. Is feárr éan ‘sa ghlaic ná dhá cheann sa tom.
44. Is feárr éan in do láimh ná dhá cheann ar an chraobh.
45. Is feárr éan ‘sa láimh ná dhá cheann ‘sa tom.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 20:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
27. Is feárr leath-bhuilín ná bheith gan arán.
28. Is fearr leath-bhuilín ná aon rud.
29. Ná h-innis do ghraithe d’aoinne.
30. Bíodh scéal gach uile dhuine agad agus ná bíodh do scéal féin ag duine ar bith.
31. Stoirm Shamhraidh, agus téigleadh Geimhridh níor sheas siad riamh i bhfad.
32. Dhá rud nár mhair i bhfad ariamh, stoirm Shamhraidh agus téigleadh Geimhridh.
33. Níl fearg dhá mhéid nach síothcháin a deireadh, a’s níl tuile dhá mhéad nach dtráigheann.
34. Ní fearg dhá mhéid nach síothcháin a deireadh.
35. Níl dólás dá mhéad nach sólás a deireadh.
36. A dhuine gan chéill,
Tabhair aire dhuit féin,
Níl tuile dhá mhéad nach dtráighfidh
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 20:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14. Is deas an chaoi bheith i n-gan fhios do’n dlighe, a’s ní costas do dhuine choidhche an t-éadach.
15. Is rí-dheas an chaoi bheith i ngan fhios do’n dlighe, a’s ní costas ar bith an t-éadach.
16. Is glas iad na cnuic i bhfad uait.
17. Is glas iad na cnuic i bhfad uainn a’s ní féarach. (also féaramhail)
18. Is glas iad na cnuic i bhfad uait, acht ní féaramhail, agus fill ar Acaill arís.
19. Is glas iad na cnuic i bhfad uainn.
20. Cuairt gheárr agus imtheacht bhuidheach.
21. Cluin mórán agus abair beagán.
22. Cluin mórán agus can beagán.
23. Bíonn ádh ar an amadán.
24. Bíonn a chiall féin ag an amadán.
25. Tá ádh ag amadán.
26. Bíonn a chiall ag an amadán.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 20:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Is trom cearc i bhfad.
2. Is trom an rud cearc i bhfad.
3. Cuairt gheárr a’s í dhéanamh go h-annamh.
4. Cuairt gheárr an chuairt is feárr ar bith.
5. Cuairt gheárr agus a déanamh go h-annamh.
6. Is feárr caraid ‘sa gcúirt ná bonn ‘sa sparán.
7. Is feárr caraid ‘sa cúirt ná lámh ‘sa sparán.
8. Is maith an capall a aithnigheas a cárr féin.
9. Is capall maith a tharraingeas a carr féin.
10. Is maith an capall a tharraingeas a cárr féin.
11. Is maith an capall a tharraingeóchas a h-ualach féin.
12. Is maith an capall a tharraingeanns a cairt féin.
13. Béal eidhin a’s croidhe cuilinn.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 18:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
her why she had not done another, she would always answer that she was "just going to do it".
So at last the priest, tired of the excuse decided to play a kind of trick on her. He had a great collection of books and one day he brought the girl into the library. "Why don't you take down all those books and wash them", he said very suddenly. The girl was taken unawares and her ever-ready reply rose to her lips, so she said "oh, I was just going to do it, Father" . Ever since that time the phrase "just going to do it, like the priest's girl" has been used.
Dolours Sheridan
Wilkinstown.
Story from John Sheridan
Wilkinstown.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old saying I have very often heard used in this district and this is the reason people have for saying it. Long ago all the birds did not know how to build nests but the magpie did. One day the crow came to him to know how to make a nest. After every little bit of instruction which the magpie would give, the crow would look very wise and say "I know". Before the magpie had half-finished, however, he lost his patience with the crow so he said "When you know so much you can finish the nest yourself."
Dolours Sheridan
Wilkinstown.
"Just going to do it, like the priest's girl"
Often I have heard people remark sarcastically "I suppose you are just going to do it, like the priests girl" When a person makes an idle excuse for not having something done.
There is a story told to explain the origin of this saying. A priest once had a careless housekeeper & no matter when the priest told her do one thing or asked
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sign that you will be dead before the year is out. If you put it on the water you will cross the sea & if you put it on the ring you will be married.
Christmas Eve -
It is customary to light a candle and put it in the window to give light to any stranger who might be passing by.
It is said that if you get seven different pieces of pudding on Xmas Day that you will be married before Xmas comes again.
Nancy Sheridan Wilkinstown.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Stephen's Day -
St Stephen's Day is the day after Xmas Day & the boys look forward to it. They dress themselves in queer clothes and wear false faces. They go from house to house singing, dancing and playing music. The people give them money & sometimes the wren boys have a holly bush and they have a dead wren it it and they say that they want money to bury the wren.
The drink and make merry when night comes. The wren-boys song -
"The wren, the wren, the king of all birds.
St Stephen's Day he was caught in the furze,
Although he is little his family is great
Rise up landlady, and give us a "trate"
And if you are going to give it to use give it to us soon
And let us be away by the light of the moon"
Hallow Eve -
This is an old Hallow Eve custom. Place three saucers on a table. Put clay in one, water in another and a ring in the third. Then there is a cloth put over your eyes and you have to walk round the table three times. You put your hand on one of the saucers. If you put it on the one with the clay on it it is supposed to be a
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
work especially farm work on a Friday.
A grave is never opened on a Tuesday because the people have some superstitious belief that is it unlucky. So, if a person dies on Sunday the funeral is to take place on Tuesday the "green sod" is removed on Monday so that the work may not be started on Tuesday.
Holy Saturday -
Holy Saturday is the day before Easter Sunday and the day on which Lent ends at mid-day. In preparation for the feast of eggs of the following day poor children used to go from house to house looking for eggs and the ones collected in this way were called the "clusog". Few children go round like this now but some people still give presents of eggs for the "clusog".
Dolours Sheridan
Wilkinstown.
Most of these customs given by
Thomas Duffy
Wilkinstown.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the days of the week that are lucky and un-lucky. Concerning days on which to get married they say:-
"Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
and Saturday no luck at all"
Day of the week on which children were born were also believed to affect their after life. Thus people say that
"Monday's child is full of grace
Tuesday's child is fair of face
Wednesday's child is full of woe
Thursday's child has far to go
Friday's child is open and giving
Saturday's child must work hard for its living"
There are also other sayings about the days of the week one being that "Saturday's flitting is a short sitting". Therefore, Saturday is considered a very unlucky day for taking up abode in a new house or starting on a long journey. Friday on the other hand is said to be a lucky day and people often begin some new
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Brigid will pray for the household.
May Eve and May Day -
Being on of the famous feast days of the Pagan Irish many customs have down to us which used to be practised on May Eve and May Day. The one that is practised in this district at present is the decoration of the May Bush. On May eve the youngest member of the family goes out and cuts a nice green bush and carries it home. It is then set up in front of the house and bunches of lovely flowers are tied on it with many coloured ribbons. Sometimes painted egg-shells are also put on it. When it is finished the children dance and sing around it and when night falls they light candles on it. Some years ago when the May Bush was decorated the children used to carry it round from house to house looking for money and singing "A long life a happy life"
And a penny for May-Bush.
The old people say that the young girl who goes out and washes her face in the dew at sunrise on May morning will always be beautiful.
Lucky and Unlucky Days -
The old people had strange beliefs about
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that the following was the way the custom started. Good Friday, the day on which Our Lord was put to death was on the 1st April in that year. The Jews were mocking him and treating Him as a fool & this was supposed to have been the origin of "All Fools Day".
5. St. John's Day -
St John is the patron saint of this parish of Kilbarry and his feast day is on the 21st June. This is also midsummer day. On St John's eve the people of this district used to light great bonfires on the hills but the custom is not practised now.
6. St Brigid's Day -
The feast of St. Brigid the Mary of the Gael occurs on the 1st February & is held in great reverence by the Irish people. An old custom which used to be practised on this day but which is now nearly dying out was the making of St. Brigid's crosses. I only know one person in this district who still does so and he makes them very simply of wood. He hangs them up inside in the thatch, so that
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
on that day will never be in want of it during the year, while anyone who gives away money on Hansel Monday will have to give away much during the year.
3. Good Friday -
Good Friday is the one day of the year when it is said it is not right to shed a single drop of blood. This is in honour of Our Blessed Lord's Passion and Death. It is said that anything planted or sown on that day is sure to grow and flourish. It is usual to spend a short time in prayer at 3 o'clock on Good Friday, the hour of Our Lord's death.
4. All Fools Day-
The 1st of April is called 'All Fools Day'. There was an old custom which used to be practised on this day & which has not quite died out. One person would by some trick make "a fool" of another and call the person whom he deceived "April Fool". To anyone who carried on this custom after April 1st it is said "All fools day is past and gone, And you are the fool for carrying it on"
Some people say that it is not right to make an April fool of anyone as they say
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. The Three Borrowed Days-
The three borrowed or 'borrowing' days as they are called in this district are the first three days of April. They are also called the "days for skinning the old cow".
Long ago it is said that there was an old cow who thought that if she could live during the wild month of March that she could live through the whole year. March tried its best to "skin the old cow" but failed. The cow jumped for joy when March was over and said "I'll live another year". Not to be defeated however, March borrowed three days from April and in these three days succeeded in its work. That is the reason why the three first days of April are called the "borrowed days" and are always cold and wild.

2. Handsel Monday -
Handsel Monday is the first Monday in the New Year. The money a person receives on that day is called "Handsel". It is said that anyone who gets money
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cattle are marked by cutting hair off the flank of the animal, or by raddling with paint over the hips.
The most important fair in our district is held on the 23rd of October, which is known as "the bullock fair day". When this fair was first held, no animals were allowed into it, except bullocks. In a recent daily paper it was stated that over four thousand bullocks were sold at this fair, in 1937.
The next fair is held on the 27th of December, and is called the "Christmas fair".
The fair that is held on March 25th is of no outstanding importance.
The April fair is always a big one. Buyers come to it from far and near, as cattle are always plentiful and in good condition at that time of the year. It is also a bonham fair.
Then comes the "holiday fair" which is held on the great feast of Corpus Christi. This is generally a good fair, and is well patronised by buyers and sellers.
After this - on July 22nd - comes the "gooseberry fair". This got its name from the hawkers who used to come to Newport for this occasion to sell gooseberries.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 17:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Fairs
June 23rd 1938
The local fairs are held on the streets in the village of Newport. Sometimes buyers transact business in the local farmers' houses, that is if they happen to take a fancy to any animal or animals the farmer has on his land.
It was usual, in olden times, for the farmers to meet buyers at the cross roads, outside the village, the fair morning, and to dispose of their cattle there and then. The majority of the people preferred to go to the fairs, and carry on their buying and selling there.
At the Newport fair, toll is paid to Mrs. Delaney, Cork Road. She appoints a man to stand at every road leading to the village, and the buyers are obliged to pay him fourpence a head on every beast. Many people look on this custom of paying tolls, as a penal measure imposed by our oppressors, and would like to abolish it.
Luck money is always given by the seller to the buyer, and is calculated as follows:- Two shillings for a two year old animal or upwards, one shilling for a calf or sheep, and sixpence usually for bonhams.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 16:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kilmichael burial ground is situated on the ancient road leading from the northern towns of County Cork to the southern towns. It’s site is supposed to be on a lions or fort which was called “Lismongeen”. A Catholic Church stood there before the Reformation and there is a tradition about it that a priest who intended to build a church found it difficult to select the exact spot where it should be erected.
It is said that he had either a premonition or an inspiration that he should travel along this fore-mentioned old road and in the spot where he should see two goats browsing there he
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 13:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lady Well
At Arklow there is a well called the Lady Well. Even up to the present day the residents of Arklow make a visit to this well on the 25th March.
They bring home some water and tie pieces of ribbon on a thorn bush which grows over the well.
I was told this by my Grand
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 13:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and when he came to himself at daylight he found right under him what he thought at first was the devil but was really a floating buoy off some line in the bay.
The Beach Combers and Kidnappers were out to kill people and sell them to doctors who would experiment on them.
This story was told to me by Mr. Clancy, Main Street.
Maura Breen
21 Togher
Arklow
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 13:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Story
In years gone by at Arklow there was a gang called Kidnappers and another called Beach Combers.
One night at a very late hour a Beach Comber was going to the beach and was chased by the Kidnappers, escaping the Kidnappers by running into the sea for a for while that he was out of the frying pan into the fire.
On looking around him to watch for the Kidnappers he saw something in the water he did not like. The wind was blowing right from the sea and it kept on coming closer to him until he thought it was close enough and he ran up the beach and over the hills expecting every moment to sdee the Kidnappers yet hoping not to meet them.
After he got tired out he sat down to get a rest and to his big surprise he saw the sea serpent which he had noticed in the sea coming over the hill behind him. Like wild-fire he took to his heels and fell over the next hillock exhausted.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 12:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
47
31st March 1938.
Folklore.
There are certain days in the year that are considered lucky and unlucky.
On New Years day it is considered unlucky for a red haired person of either sex to enter a house first.There is a greater objection to a woman.On May eve the people stick quickbeam in the gardens to preserve their crops lest other people interfere with them.On May day there is an objection to people ploughing or digging their gardens,
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 12:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
48
that it wouldent be lucky Monday is considered the lucky day to look after your health that is to consult a Doctor if you are ailing in any way.Tuesday is the lucky day to go in search of wealth say a to a fair or market.Wednesday is the lucky day to get married. Thursday is a bad day to embark in any buisness the old people say you would meet with a lot of crosses and Friday is the best day to go live in a new house or return home after the honey moon.
Lucky and unlucky days
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 12:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1
7th .April 1938.
Folklore.
The favourite pastime of long ago were hurling and tug-of- war for the grownup boys and also stone throwing and pitching money and buttons.
The boys and girls going to school used to pay jackstones spinning tops and tug-of- war were played in olden times the same as they are played today,but hurleys were called camans.
Jackstones was the favourite game for girls in summer time.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 12:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2
The jackstones were played with five small round stones and the game could be played with three or four girls.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 12:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3
26th April 1938
Folklore.
Bowling was a great pastime with grown up boys about thirty years ago.
The boys would asemble in the long summer evenings and Sundays.Every two or three would play against every two and three.The bowling square consisted of nine holes and the bowly was made of mettle.it was usually played about 40 or 50 yds from a public house .The game would be started to know
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 11:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4
which crowd would pay for a drink for all the rest.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 11:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7
4th May 1938.
Folklore.
There are 7 fields in my fathers farm and each has a name.
One is called the church field because there is an old church yard in it another is called the well field because there is a blessed well in it.
There are two fields called Lisheen upper and lower there are two forths in them names.Another field is furie field because it grew a great crop of furze some
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 11:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8
years ago.
others are called the castle field and bull field from which they get get their names respectively the remains of an old castle are still to be seen in it and the bull field is kept always in the other.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 11:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
18
ing or digging in their gardens ,that it wouldent be lucky
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 11:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
17
7th June 1938
Folklore.
There are certain days in the year that are considered lucky and un-lucky.
On New Years day it is considered unlucky of either sex to enter a house first. There is greater objection to a woman .On May Eve the people stick quickbeam in the gardens to preserve their crops but other people with interfere them.
On May day there is an objection to people plough
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 04:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A is the army that covers the ground.
B is the buckshot we are getting all round
C is the cro-bar of cruelest fame.
D the Davitt of our right glorious name.
E is the English that robbed us of bread.
F is the famine that left us instead.
G is for Gladstone our life is a lie.
H is the harvest we'll hold it we'll die.
I is the Inspector when drunk is bold.
J is the Jarvey that will drive him for gold.
K is Kilmainham where our true man abide.
L is the Land League our hope and our pride
M is the magistrate who makes black white
N No rent which makes our wrongs right.
O is old Ireland that yet shall be freed.
P is the peeler who sold it for grief
Q is the queen whose life is not known.
R is the rifle that keeps up her train
S is the sheriff with woe in his train.
T is the told that others may gain.
U is the Union that works bitter harm
anonymous contributor
2019-06-07 02:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5
A good many years ago a man lived where the O'Mearas are living now. He had a sister married in Ramore and he went to visit her almost every evening.
Before leaving he used to say the Rosary, but though he had two Rosary beads -- one in his own house and one in his sister's -- he never carried one with him. One night coming home from Ramore he met a stranger on the road. The stranger asked him to say the Rosary so they began to say it. When they had finished the stranger asked the other had he no Rosary. The other many explained he had two. "Well" said the stranger "never go anywhere without your Rosary beads." She then disappeared and after that the man always carried a Rosary beads about with him.
6.
Over forty years ago a woman named Nellie Conway lived in Heathlawn. The remains of her house are still to be seen. She used to go in the fairies. My father often went up to her house with milk. When she was in the fairies there was always another woman left in her place. The fairies used to beat her -- and then she used run away.
She used to have to name the days of the week before she could tell anything about the fairies. If she did not do this they would hear what she was saying about them.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 22:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Previous to the Reformation the church of Whitechurch appears to have been a chapel-of-ease to the parish of Kilkuran (Cill Ciarán). It is mentioned in a list of churches of about the year 1500. The ancient Catholic Church has been destroyed and its site is occupied by a modern Protestant church. None of the tombs in the graveyard are of interest. The holy well is 100 perches to the west, at Cregg Bridge; it was formerly much frequented by pilgrims, its name is Tobar-Mhuire, the Blessed Virgin's well.
From Luke Murphy
Cregg,
Since deceased
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
March. 31. 1938. Pastimes.
Folklore.
There are days during the year which have special customs and 'beliefs connected with them.On May day quick-beam is stuck in the gardens where crops are sown and holy water is shook on them .On St John's the 24th June a fire is lighted and the remains of the cinders are put in over the ditch.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 19:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
43
threw her into the air ,grabbed at the other four and caught the first stone before it reached the ground all in the one hand.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 19:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
35
March .8 .1938.
Once there was a woman who travelled around this district she did not know A from her name was Moll Egan.
They used to call her Moll horse and she used to scold them for she was wicket .When she used to around she used to stop in one house one night and so on.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 19:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
34
abused the people in every house in which she billited herself she was a great favourite.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 19:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
33
March 3 .1938
Folklore.
Once there lived a woman who traveled around this district she did not know A from B.her name was Moll Egan.
The used to call her Moll horse and she used to scold them for she was wicket.
When she used to come around she used to stop in one house one night and another house another house another night and so on.Although she
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 17:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Feasts of the Year.
The mummers go round from house to house about three weeks before Christmas. About seven boys dress up in women's clothes, and in white shirts and in old rags and go out after dark, and one of them carries a tin box and he collects money in it. They all go to somebody's door and knock and say. "Are there any admittens for the Christmas mummers." They say, "come in", and they come in and go over the rhyme. One man comes in at a time, and the first one comes in and says "room room a gallen boys, and give me room to rhyme, and I'll show you some activity about the christmas time." The second man comes in and says. Here comes I Gillispie, Gillispie is my name, and with my sword and pistol, I meant to win the game." "A gamesir a game sir was never in my power I'll cut you up in inches in less than half an hour." Then he kills the other man and
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 16:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3
7th December.1937.
Folklore.
A few nights ago my Uncle told about the diffirent signs of bad weather.He said that when the swallows fly low they indicate bad weather.
He also said that sea-gulls appear and also the wild geese that it is the sign of bad weather and when the fog comes down the mountain in the morning and when they cat sits near the fire we are sure to get bad weather .Weather guids.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 16:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
52
May .24.1938.
Folklore.
Long ago the houses were built with do-buidhe.They were hipped houses and a small little hole in the end of them for a chimney.
They had no windows but a little hole in the wall and they used to stick out their hat in it at night to keep out the cat from the milk. The doors were only half doors and knitted wire on top.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
51
May 18 .1938
Folklore .
When a person sells a horse at a fair he will not part with the halter for it is said he would be parting with his luck. A grey horse without a black spot is said to carry the life of a man.
If a person suffering from chin cough and meet a man riding on a white horse and what ever cure he will give you it will be a sure cure.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 16:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
50
man named Luke lived in it and that is the reason it is called Luke's meadow.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
49.
May. 3 . 1938.
Folklore.
The names of some of the fields in our farm are the big meadow,the clover, the garder and Lukes meadow.
The reason that the first is called the big meadow is it is a very big meadow very level and very easy to be mowed.it is situated near the road.
the reason the second is called the clover is that a lot of clover grows in it.There was a house in the third and a
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
39.
son was cured.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
36.
March. 10. 1938.
Folklore.
Once there lived about a mile from Feakle a famous woman whose name was Biddie Early.She had magic power and could cure all kinds of diseasses.there lived a woman at that time whose son was dying and she went to Biddie Early and she told her to go home and throw out all the broken delph that was in the house she did so and her son was.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
37.
cured.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
32
March1. 1938.
There are two grave-yards in this parish .They are built in the shelter of a little grove .One of them are situated in Faha and it is called the Faha grave-yard and there is another one in Killenana near the church.There is the ruin of an old church in Faha grave-yard.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
31.
February .24. 1938.
Folklore.
The houses of the oldin times were built of mud and some of the roofs were flat.
The roofs were of scraws and it tatched with rushes.The fireplace was in the middle of the floor and there was a hole in the roof to let out the smoke.
They had no windows but a hole in the wall.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
30
February 22 .1938.
Folklore.
Long ago people did not use money to purchase what they required .They exchanged goods.The farmer exchanged his surplus farm produce for goods required. The goods consisted of tea ,sugar and flour and the farm produce consisted of tea,sugar and flour and the farm produce consisted of potatoes, eggs,butter and corn.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Those who received lands in Teallach Eochaidh during the plantation of Ulster were Captain Cuilme, Walter Talbot, Sir Richard Grimes, George Grimes and William Parsons.
The following McGoverns received lands :-
Felim McGovern (chief) 1000 acres at a rent of £ 10 : s 13 : d. 4
Cormac McGovern 175 acres at a rent of £ 1 : s 17 : d. 6
Donagh McGovern 75 acres at a rent of £ 0 : s 16 : d. 0
Hugh Óge MacManus McGovern 150 acres at a rent of £ 1 : s 12 : d. 0
Brian Óge McGovern 200 acres at a rent of £ 2 : s 2 : d. 8
In 1641 many of the clan regained these lands by joining in the rebellion. These who led the clan in the rebellion were :- Coll McGovern, Gildernan McGovern, Turlough McGovern, Domhnall McGovern, Philip Óge McGovern and Richard Graham.
A number of the McGoverns fought on the side of Owen Roe at Benburb in 1646.
Books relating to the clan McGovern :-
(1) An Irish Sept - J.H. McGovern.
(2) History of their clan - J.H. McGovern
(3) '' Plearáca na Ruanach ''
O' Rourke's feast, by Hugh Óge McGovern and translated into English by Dean Swift.
'' Our honour and our stainless swords,
Our old ancestors names,
Alone are ours, all else is lost.''
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
29.
February .17. 1938.
Folklore.
The most common weeds are chicken weed ,thistle and the dogleaf.
The chicken weed grows principally in the potato crop.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
28
Once there lived a man who was distracted by a toothache and a clever boy told him to go to the blacksmith that he had a great cure.
He went to him and the blacksmith tied a strong cord around the tooth and tied the other end to the anvel and redened a hot iron in the fire and told him that after a few minutes the toothache would not trouble him
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
27
15 February 1938.
Folklore.
The forge is a house in which a lot of agricultural implements are made and repaired and horses are shod.The blacksmith has a big hammer ,and sledgea pritchel, a pincers and the blacksmiths tongs and a small hammer for putting on horse shoes.
Coal is used in the forge for the fire .There is but one blacksmith in the parish.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
26
February .10 .1938.
Folklore. On Weeds.
Our most common weeds are chicken weed,thistle nettle and the dogleaf.
The chicken weed grows principally in the potatoe crop it also grows in the turnip and mangold crop.
The thistle grows in soft dry place near a ditch and and sometimes in the oat crop .
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
47.
to eat wild -animals foxes,deers and other poison ,unnatural foods.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
25
lovely lake at the other side of the parish known as Lough Graney.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 13:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
24
February 8. 1938
Folklore .
On the Townland and District. The townland I live in is Lanaught in the Parish of Killenana and in the barony of Upper Tulla.
There are twelve houses in the townland and there were more houses in the townland long ago the family of Luke Flynn and the clan of Minogue.
There is awood at the western side of the townland and there is a
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22
February 3.1938.
Folklore. There is a rath in the parish and in the townland of Derryfada .There is a big dike all round it and it is level in the middle.There are white thorn bushes all round it and they are covered with ivy.
There is a rath in Beha in the townland of White Dale Hill.it is situated at the end of a house and the people used to go in and out
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
23
used to hear churning inside in it.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
21
wifes.After a few days they leave for another district.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
20
February 1 .1938
Folklore.
Beggars are very numerous .Sometimes there or four families gather to geather make camps on the roadside.The women go from house to house begging tea,sugar,bread milk,butter and potatoes/They also beg turf and make fires to cook meals.The men make all kinds of tinware such as buckets,cans and saucepans and they sell them to farmers
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
19
great supper and they would get married next day.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
18
26th January 1937
Folklore.
On Marriages.
Shrove is the time for contracting marriages.Shrove begins after Christmas and ends on Ash Wednesday.When a few aged men would be sitting around the fire in the Shrove nights.They would draw down a match about some young boy and girl .When they would have all finished up they would brig the boy to the girls house and settle on the fortune.They would kill a few geese and have a
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and chairs and other articles.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16
Folklore.
There are several kinds of travellers ,tinsmiths,gipseys who pass through this district.When the tinsmiths come around they make buckets and sauspans and the women go from house to house selling them.When the chimney-sweepers come around they sweep chimneys for the people at christmas and Easter.When gipseys come around they make money in reading cups and telling people fortunes and making tables.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 12:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15
the lake became black and was black for months.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 11:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14
20 th January 1938
Folklore.
A couple of years ago we had a very heavy fall of rain in winter time and the summer before it was very dry and caused the bog to split and when the rain go in under it bursted up and ran down along the side of the mountain.It would have done a lot of harm but for it met a height and divided it.
It ran along the river and the water of
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 09:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
38.
The rosary was recited many times in the house and when they were returning home they were nearly crowned in great floods ,which covered the whole place.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 09:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local-Cures
25.5.1938
The people found remedies for their ailments in former times by herbs and animals.
Food left behind a ferret is good for a child with the whooping cough.
The grease of a goose is very good for a sore leg.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 07:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the people would build some sort of a hut for them. The sheriff would not evict unless there would be 3 or 4 years rent due.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 02:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Near Roisín (magCromcha) is a Holy Well and each year people went to pay rounds there. One night as some soldiers were passing this place they desecrated the well. They broke the holy pictures and destroyed all the place around the Well.
On the next day when some people visited it they found that the well had taken up its position in the other side of the road.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 02:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A long time ago a farmer was ploughing a field where there was a "lios" (This lios can still be seen. It is situated near where I live) when he suddenly felt very weary, and sat down near the "lios". Before long he was in a deep sleep.
When morning came, as he had not returned home during the night his family went searching for him. The found him nearly dead at the mouth of the "lios". They took him home and put him to bed. He remained in bed for a few days and some time was was quite alright again, but he could never remember what happened to him the night he slept near the "lios".
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 02:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year 1921 a man named Michael Murphy was living in the field where St. Gobnait's Holy well is. One day a great feast was held in the house and being short of water, someone was sent to get water. This person went to the Holy well and drew a bucket of water. When he came to the house he filled the kettle with some of the water. The water was in the kettle a full hour and it did not boil, and all the people in the house were very much surprised. The kettle was left on the fire two hours more but the water did not boil. Then some of the people began to be afraid as they believed there was some devil in the house. The reason that the water did not boil was because it was taken from the Holy Well of St. Gobnait.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 02:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Hycaul". They were washed bleached, then starched, and tallied every week. The cap was made to cover the whole head together with the ears. Attached to the cap were two strips of linen about three inches wide, and eighteen inches long; they were called the chin stays and were used for keeping on the cap by means of tying them under the chin in a bow knot leaving the ends to hang down in the front. There was a special iron used for making up the caps called the "Tallie iron". It was about two and a half inches long (g) and finger shaped. The quilling on border round the cap was pressed out by means of this little iron. When it was properly heated it was put into each quill in turn and pressed to ito place. The cap was made thus: -
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 02:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The women of the last century were dressed altogether differently to the women of the present day. The head dress only consisted of a white linen cap with borders. This cap went by the name of the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 02:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The birds in this district are
The blackbird, Thrush, Wren, Crow, Sparrow, Jack-daw, Robin, Starling, Swallow, Pigeon, Waterhen, Yellow-hammer, Wagtail, Hawk, Gold Finch, Magpie
Nest
The blackbird builds in bush. Eggs greyish blue Nest made of hay and wool.
The Thrush builds in bushes blue eggs nest of hay and mud.
Wren builds in ivy white eggs with brown spots nest made of moss and feathers
Crow builds on top high trees grey eggs nest made of sticks.
Sparrow builds in thatch blackish grey eggs nest made of hay and feathers.
Starling builds his nest in holes of trees and houses, rough nest made hay or straw.
Pigeons on a tree white eggs nest made of sticks.
Waterhen builds his nest at the edge of the river nest made of reeds, big rough eggs.
Wagtail builds in a wall grey eggs,
nest made of hay and moss
Gold Finch builds her nests in elders pale blue eggs nest made of moss and feathers
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 01:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is one man in this parish able to make baskets. His name is Mr Patrick Mac Namara. He gets sallies and weaves them in the shape of a baskets. He makes sgíacs for gathering Potatoes.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-06 01:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Whooping Cough
If you met with a man on a white horse you should do the first thing he tells you and will be cured.
Warts
If you saw a hole in a rock. Make the sign of cross three times over it and the warts will vanish.
Sore Eyes
If you had sore eyes look through a gold ring or wash them in Blessed Water.
Stye
If you had a stye in your eye put a gooseberry thorn to it saying at the same Away, Away, Away.
Sprain
If you have a sprain in your wrist you should tie a bit of woolen thread around it. Also to pump water down on it.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 23:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8
9th Dec.1937.
Folklore.
Long ago there was a rich man named Luke he was so fond of the money that he went about in rags and left himself short of good food and one fear was that a thief would come and steal his gold.I will melt it all up into one big lump ".he said and hide it".He put the gold into a box and left it at the hole of the wall ol
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 23:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9
his garden.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 23:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6
7th.Dec.1937.
Folk-Lore.
I heard my Uncle telling a story the different ways by which we can fotell the weather.He said that our summer visitors the swallows are good to indicate the kids of weather when the swallows skim along the ground suspect rain and when they fly high we are sure of fine weather.in winter before series frost sea-gulls come inland. When the cat sits by the fire
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 22:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7.
with his back turned to it we are sure of bad weather.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 22:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5.
W.Michael Hurley,Lanaught.
S.T Hurley .Lanaught.
A man and a postman.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 22:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4
man who wore a fine suit of clothes he took them off and put them on himself giving him him a kick and he fell into a hole.He went on his way to the funeral he had such good times there that he did not come home for three months.His wife went to look for him and finding the man in the hole thought it was her husband.She brought him home and the funeral was carried out and she.
When the three months were up her own man came home.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 22:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2nd December .1937
Folk-Lore.
I heard my uncle telling a story the other night about a man and a postman.
Once upon a time a man was on his way to the bog and he met a postman.He received a letter telling him that his friend pat Burke was dead. If he returned home for his good clothes he would not be in time for the funeral so he went on with the clothes he had on him.On his way he met a dead
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 22:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2
and cover the whole district.
It happened one evening that a girl came to the well and forgot to recover it with the flag and the next morning Lough Graney the largest lake in Clare appeared.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 22:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
30th .November .1937.
Story.
I heard my father one about how Lough Graney lake was formed.The place now occupied by Lough Graney contained grand green fields and in the middle field was a well covered with a flag stone.
When the neighbouring people had come to take water from the well they recovered it for they had a tradition that if it were left uncovered it would over - flow
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 21:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4
When they would be coming home they used to make a bet to know who would be at home first and who ever would be at home first the other man would have to give him the bet.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 21:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3
30 th June 1938.
Folklore..
In olden times the people used to drink a lot of porter when they went to the fairs.
They were very wicked and they used to rise a row.
They would be preparing for a week before the fair and they used to have black thorn for the row.
They used go to the fair on horse back and they used to have the stick to the reins.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 21:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
56
30th .June 1938.
There are different kinds of churns such as wheel churns,barrel churns and dash churns .The churns were generally use are dash churns.The dash churn is worked by lifting the dash up and down.
if you went into a house when a person would be churning you should say God bless the work.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 20:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Tuohy has a field called Gleann na t-Uadán and the reason it is called Gleann na t-Uadán is there was a priest hiding in it and his name was Father t-Uadán. This priest said mass in a little house every day. One day as he was saying mass a soldier ran in and shot him and he also shot the people that were at mass. He was buried in Killuane graveyard.
This story was told by Edward Nevin aged 78 years of Ballygreaney, Balltmacward, Woodlawn, County Galway.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 20:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During the famine of 1847 all the crops got the dry-rot in the pits. All that were not rotten were eaten and they had no seed for the next year. When the famine was over they had nothing to sow. The years before the famine they had to much of everything.
This story was told by Ellen Raftery aged 50 years of Killuane, Gurteen, Woodlawn, County Galway
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 20:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the night of the big wind in 1839 there was a dance in Ballymacward. When the dance was over the people were drinking tea when the roof was blown off the hall. All the people ran out of the hall with terror. They could not go home because trees were falling across the road. On that particular night houses were knocked and cocks of hay and straw were blown away. The people had to leave the houses for fear of being killed. When they were outside they could taste the salt water blowing against their faces. The storm lasted for a week.
In this particular week a ball of lightning fell in Patrick Flannery's bog ad it shook the houses for a half mile around. It burnt into the bog and the wind blew asked and mud around everywhere. There was no harm done to animals.
This story was told by Martin Barry ages 79 years of Cloonkeen Kerrill, Colemanstown, Ballinasloe, County Galway.
2. On the 21st of August 1891 a cock of hay was burned by lightning on Patrick Greaney of Ballygreaney Ballymacward, Woodlawn, County Galway. On that particular day as he was coming home from the fair he noticed smoke rising out of a cock of hay. He
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 20:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A copper coin was found by Michael Mullins as he was digging potatoes one cold October day 1936. At first he thought he had found a crock of gold but it was only a penny. On one side was engraved the picture of George the third and on the other side was written "In God we trust."
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 18:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Here is a big house in BallymacElligot where a farmer once lived there. This farmer before he died sold the house to a well off catholic. This house was one of the old big houses and there were bells in the kitchen. Every night when the catholic returned and to bed he used leave the bells ringing and and so he thought the house was haunted. He told his tale to his neighbor and they both decided to stay up all night ,during the next night to discover what caused the bells to ring . They stayed up and to their great surprise they discovered that it was a mouse that walked in the bell string and then causing them to ring.
John O’Brien , Listellick (Lios-Tullaig)
Tralee aged 50 years
(19)
Mr. O’Sullivan of Ballinlourth( Baile -n’-habail -Jorz) was coming home one night very late. As he was passing Rath (Ráz) graveyard he saw a light inside among the graves. He turned back from the rush of Botharbue (boo hat-buisie)as he was afraid to pass the light : He plucked up courage and he went past it but to his surprise he found it was a poor man picking brosna (faggoc ) for his fire that lot have after night .
Mrs Roche
Ballinlourth( Baile-‘ habail jorrz)
Tralee aged 58 years.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 17:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people had a remedy for this. If they could secure a piece of this person's clothing and burn it under the cow's nose in the byre this evil person could not take away the good of the milk any more.
Collected by Peter McGorman
Drumary
Newbliss
Got from Mrs McGorman, Drumary, Newbliss
Mrs O'Rourke, " "
Mrs McGorman aged about 50 years
Mrs O'Rourke " " 60 years
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 17:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
contrivance fixed to the wall and attached to the churn-staff. By turning a handle this contrivance moved up and down and caused the dash to move up and down also and so the churning was done.
When churning mother lifts a spoonful and if there are yellow pieces here and there through the mlik she says "it is broken" or in other words the butter is beginning to come.
Many stories are told about churning. Long ago it was supposed that there were people who could take the good away from the milk and people would be churning for hours and could get no butter.
One of these stories is told about a woman who used always to go to a certain house when they were churning and ask for something. So sure as she came they never could get any butter. A friend told them to studd every hole in the house and start the churn. They did so but forgot about the key hoe and she came in through it.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 16:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Churning
We have a churn at home and it is 3 feet tall. We have it for about 15 years. The different parts are - the dash, the mercher [?], the clappers and the cappin and the lid and moulder. We churn twice a week in summer and once a week in winter because milk is scarce then. It takes us an hour to churn it and it is done by hand.
When strangers come in and while we are churning they help or "take a bash" as they say. This is supposed to bring "good luck." If they didn't we would think that they didn't wish us well and it is supposed that the butter would not come on the milk. When they come in they say "good luck to the work."
My aunt, Mrs. O'Rourke of Durmary, Newbliss, told me that long ago churning was done in her county by "glakes". This was a
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 15:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
from the sea when a storm arose. In the ship there was a captain, Mr. Slattery, Mrs. Moloney's son and four more. The captain and Mrs. Moloney's son clung to a raft. They were in this position for six days. The captain would be dead but for a chew of tobacco which he had in his mouth. On the sixth day Mrs. Moloney's son saw a boat coming. He said "A boat" and that moment he died. The captain was saved.
About sixty years ago a ship belonging to Mr. Pim, Main St., Youghal called 'The Countess' was drawing deal to Youghal. A storm arose which drove her up to the bar. There was a crew of eight men on board. They were all drowned except the captain who stood on a plank and waited for a boat to come and save him.
House burnings
The house of Conn Stableton, Bridane, Lismore was burned about forty-two years ago. Mr. Stableton was dead and coffined when the house caught fire. The coffin had to be pulled out the side of the road. The house was burned to the ground.
About twenty years ago the house of Mr. Power, Glenasaggart, Lismore was burned. On a Summer's day he was tackling the horse and cart. He was lighting his pipe and he threw the match
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
41
would have to take his place .
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
51
31 st ,May 1938.
Long ago in the parish of Kilbeacenty in the Co Galway there lived a gentle man's family of O Learys.
They were sinking the foundation of a pier for agate they got a crock of gold under the pier and a pan covering it.
they brought home the crock and the pan there was writing on the pan which no scholar could read it and they hung the pan up on the wall pf the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
52
kitchen.In them old times there was poor scholars going around from school to school.
One morning a poor scholar came in for his lodgings he was looking at it and the woman of the house asked him if he could read it and he said yes and she asked him what was written on it and he said there is as much more on the other side.
The O Leary's went and sunk the other pear and found another crock of gold and they were rich
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a fiddle". So he gave the cow and took the bee and went home. "You were not long" said the mother. "I sold her but I got no money - only a bee that will play a fiddle. So the bee got up on the table and began to play the fiddle but the mother was very angry. So he started with a heifer and when he came to the hill he saw the same little man. "How much will you take for the cow?" "Ten pounds no less". So he asked him would he take a mouse that could dance. So he took the mouse home to his mother, and the mouse danced and the bee played the fiddle. "You will go no more to the fair" said the mother and she began to cry because he did not bring home any money. So Jack rose in the morning and his mother did not know
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
53.
while they lived.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
50
Europe and was never beaten before by anybody"."Well it took a Tipperary man to beat you"said Donivan.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
03_049
49.
17th May 1938.
Folklore.
Long ago there was a great runner named Pat Naughton .he was known by the name of racer Naughton.he won in every neighbouring race and he lived in Feakle.There was a great weight thrower named Mat Donivan he lived in Knocknagoughin Tipperary.They had sports in Tipperary and himself and a caption of an army threw a half hundred weight and Donivan won.The captain said "you ought to be proud of yourself Donivan.I travelled
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
47.
5th May 1938.
Folklore
Long ago when people used be selling horses they would put a winkers and a rope on the horse and when the horse would be sold they would have the rope on her and bring her home the winkers and when they would be working they would put it on the horse.
One time a man brought a grey horse to a fair when the buyer was buying the horse he would go around her and looking at her for they say that there is the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 09:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
03-048
life of a man in a white horse. The buyer shook his head and the man said dont fear the horse has his work done.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 01:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
all round. They are in places that people have not much to do with on account of the fairies living in them. Some forths are level, others hilly.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 01:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is no fort in our farm but there is one in our neighbour's. It is situated in the townland of Loughboro about half a mile from O' Callaghan's Mills. At one time there lived a pilgrim in it and he used to come down to the houses for his meals. After some time he left the place and no one knew what became of him. There is a round mound of earth around it and bushes growing
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 00:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
IIII.
Oh she says my dear
Its the truth you speak
Sure I am in love with you
There's not a man throughout the land
Will enjoy my heirs but you
Let us join our hands in wedlock bands
In the Shade of the Sweet Bell View
IIIII.
Oh its now to conclude and to finish up and to see what love can do,
I was but a poor widow's son,
And I gained this rich lady
Chorus
Miss Mary Jane
Is my love's name
She's a girl
That did prove true
And she lives in a mansion
In a lonely place
In the Shade of the Sweet Bell View
Miss Mary Jane
Is my love's name
She's a girl that did prove true
And she lives in a mansion
In a lonely place
In the Shade of the Sweet Bell View
This song was made in Lord de Vescie's demense in Abbeyleix.
I got this from Miss Margaret Ryan, Knockmay, Maryborough.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 00:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Chorus
She's the pride and joy
Of the Shandon side
She's the Maid
Of the Sweet Bell View
II.
Oh she says young man don't you understand,
That my parents they won't agree,
For to marry you a poor widow's son,
And I a rich lady.
Ten thousand is my fortune,
I have other portions too,
There's a Lord you see
In love with me
In the shade of the Sweet Bell View.
III.
Oh [s]he says my dear,
Its the truth you speak,
I was but a poor widow's son
And she reared no child but me
But now I am caught in the snares
of love and I don't know what to do,
Like a real mad man I will tarry along
Through the shade of the Sweet Bell View.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 00:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I.
The praising of a lovely girl,
I am now going to unfold,
Her lovely hair hung down her back in ruddy links of gold.
Her cheeks they are of rosy red
And her eyes of a dazzling blue
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 00:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My father was a brick-layers daughter,
He worked in a tailor's shop,
He was going up a bucket,
With a ladder full of bricks,
And he fell from the bottom to the top.
It [there] was midnight on the ocean,
And a tram-car came in sight,
And a bare footed boy with his boots on,
And it rained all day that night
As I went to a bazaar,
One day in the middle of the night,
I took a front seat in the back,
I fell from the floor to the roof,
And I broke the front bone of my back.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-05 00:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Great Worm of the Shannon
A druid foretold that Patrick was to come to Ireland and that he would banish all dragons or serpents. At this time the great Ollpheist of the Shannon was in a hole in a lake near Arigna. When it heard about this man who was to come it made up its mind that it would leave Ireland and make its way for the sea. It cut a channel out of the hole to try make its escape to the sea. On its way it -
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 22:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2
unfinished from that day to this. Old roads.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 22:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
001
June 21 . 1938.
Folklore.
There is an old road in my townland called Páirke garbh.
It is leading to Ming a dubh.
It was made about 2 hundred years ago.
It is used still but is not in good repair
It is not finished rightly for when they were making it they were shuving the wall in on a person's field and the man would not allow them to do it ,so they left it
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 20:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tímcheall cead blíadhan ó shoin do chómhnuidh san áit seo fear dár bainim Seán Láidir Ó Craulaoi. Fear láidir neamh eaglach abeadh é agus do bhuaidh sé an ainim sin do féin le na neart. Thagadh gaiscidheach ó gach áit in Éirinn ag íarraidh na gniomhartha ionghantaca do dhein sé do dheanamh, chun bheith cómh maith leis ach ní raibh aoinne acu ábaltha ar an órd do chaitheamh cómh fada leis, ná aon rud eile a dheanamh a fheudfaí a chuir i gcompráid leis na gniomhartha a dhein Seán Láidir.
Lá do tháinig Seán go dtí áit go raibh alán daoine ag caitheamh úird.
Ní raibh aon airgead ag Seán an uair ceadhna agus cheap sé ar sheift chun airgead a dheanamh. Bhí mac tighearna talmhan ann agus bhí sé ró mhaith do aon duine eile chun an órd do chaitheamh.
Chuaidh Seán agus rug sé ar an órd ach má dhein níor chaith sé ar a dhícheall é agus so bhuaidh mac an tíghearna air. Chuaidh mac an tíghearna abhaille go mórálach mar bhí ana áthas ar an onóir san do bheith aige.
Cúpla la na dhiadh san chuaidh Seán go tig an tíghearna talmhan agus bhí sé
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 20:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
be able to go back to his lessons again. So he prayed to Almighty God to help him. After praying for a while he commanded the birds to fly into the old house and they obeyed. When they were inside in the house the Saint returned to the School.
When the master saw him back from the field, he was very angry so he said to the Saint "I thought I sent you to mind the birds in the cornfield. Is it that you are too important to do the humble work of your comrades. Colmcille said there were no birds in the cornfield but that they were all in the old house. "Oh! said the master I suppose you worked a miracle and put all the birds into the shell of a house without roof, door's, or window's." The Saint begged of the master to go and see for himself so the master and all the scholars went as he could no believe that such a thing could happen. To their surprise all the birds of the district were packed inside in the old house.
When the master saw this great miracle he apologised to Saint for being so cross with him. They all went back to School again, rejoicing, and thanking Almighty God for his goodness.
This was the first miracle St. Colmcille wrought.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 17:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22.
Chriss Brody.Killanena.
Story teller ;Mr Pat Moloney.
Killanena.
Spinning Wheels.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 17:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22.
with ash plants and black thorn sticks.It was said the women used take of there stocking and put stones in them and woe be the man that would get a stroke of one of them .
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 17:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
24.
house would not let him take a coal out of the fire until the butter would be made and in those times when the butter would be slow in churning they would surely say that the cream was interfered with it.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
31
Story Teller Peter Mac Mahon Acres .
Funny Stories.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
46.
To see our flag unrolled and my truelove to infold in the Valley below Sliab na Mban.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
45
Nor the soft black eyes nor the flowing hair was in her lilly white brow
Twas melting Ruth and the smile like the summer's dawn.that stole my heart away one mild summer's day in the valley below Sliab na Mban.In the festive hall by the star watched shore.
My restless spirit cries.
My love and My love will i ever see you more.
My land will you ever uprise .By night and by day I ever ever pray.
Whilst lonely my life rolls on
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
18.
Story Teller peter Mac Mahon.
Acres.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6
open on Christmas night,for old people believed that the Blessed Virgin travelled abroad on Christmas night.
The house is decorated on Christmas Eve with Holly and Ivy.And on that night children hang up their stockings for Santa to fill them with presents.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
20
the fire under the churn to prevent the butter being taken by neighbours who were supposed to be able to take the butter by witchcraft.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it was followed by a heavy fall of snow,which covered Lough Graney and made it like a white field.
There was a man travelling on horseback and my Grandfather was talking to him. and he was telling him about the lovely white field he had crossed and there was no fences in it.
Then my grandfather told him that it was not a field atall but Lough Graney.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
30th November 1937
Folk -Lore.
Long ago a great giant lived in ulster and at the same time another giant lived in Scotland.
When the Scotch giant heard of the Irish hero he said he would measure his strength with his rival.
So he swam over to Ireland and challenged the Irish giant to fight.
The Scotch giant was no match for the other who put him to flight and as he was running away the Irish giant tore up a great
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8
made separated from the uppers and are fastened by means of a slip.
Ozar pods
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4.
the giant child eating he said when the child was able to eat so well he said he would be very strong.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2
there was no trace of it .A man who stood by said "why do you fret so much about it ,it is no grate loss at all.Put a big stone in the hole and imagine it is your lump of gold.it will do your as much.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 16:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
30th November 1937.
Fireside Story.
Long ago there was a rich man named luke but no means was he that he went about in rags and left himself short of god food and his one fear was that a thief would come and steal his Gold.
"i will melt it all into one big lump "he said and hide it where no one can find it ."He put the gold into a box and left it at the foot of the wall in his garden .he went to see it every day but one day it was gone
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 14:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
During the summer months clay is thrown up out of the shoughs [?] the drills or ridges before the stalks come up. This is called setting the potatoes. Then a wooden roller is run over them. More clay is thrown up on them when they [?] are just over the ground. This is called moulding the potatoes. When they are about six inches long the stalks are sprayed. This is done by spraying a mixture of bluestone, washing soda and water over them.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 14:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Potatoe Crop
We grow potatoes on our farm. We grow about two acres every year. We do not grow the same amount of potatoes every year. Some years we grow more potatoes than we grow other years. The ground is not manured in any way before turned up. Sometimes the potatoes are grown in ridges other times they are sown in drills. In [Ireland?] where it would be hard to make drills ridges are made always. The men of the house plough and harrow the ground first. If they make drills they make them with a plough. If they make ridges they make ridges they make [sic]. The people help each other by ploughing and by leaving and pitching the potatoes in drills or ridges.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Wild duck's nest
On[e] evening I got a Wild duck's nest. There were ten eggs in it. It was with moss and feathers. The eggs were about the size of a duckegg, and light blue in colour.
The Nest was in a mossy bank at the side of a little stream running through a valley. You could not see the nest nest [sic] unless you saw the Wild duck going out, because she had it covered in with heather, that grew about it.
Picked from Copies of Schoolchildren
Cuilagurrane
Castlehill
Ballina
anonymous contributor
2019-06-04 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Swallow's nest
There is a swallows nest in our card house on the top of a rafter. It is made of soft clay and hay. when the swallow has it built, she gathered a lot of straw and lined it with it. Then she gathered feathers and lined it with them. In a few days time she laid four eggs in it. She lay on them for three weeks. When the sgaltans came out she fed them for a few days and then they flew away.
Waterhens nest.
The waterhen makes her nest along the river. I got q her nest the other day. She nuilds her nest of bull rushes and grass. She lays seven speckled eggs. She sits on them about three weeks
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 23:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The local fairs are held in Clones, Cootehill, Monaghan, and Ballybay. They are always held in towns. Sometimes buyers transact business in the country while the animals are being brought to the fairs, or at the house before or after the fairs. There used to be a fair in Newbliss long ago, but there are more now because the village is too small. The town fairs are held in a special place. When the animals are sold, lucky money is given., this is called a luck penny.
When a bargain is made, the parties shake hands with each other. There are no special fairs for sheep or horses. The great fairs of the year locally are the May and November fairs.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 23:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Lisdaragh in the parish of Killeavan, and in the barony of Dartrey.
There are sixty families in Newbliss and two hundred and sixteen people.
The townland get its name from a fort that is behind the village.
Most of the houses are slated in Newbliss.
There are only a couple of old people in our district.
The houses were more numerous in former times, but they are gradually getting built up again.
Some people went from our district to American and other places in former years.
There are lakes, rivers, hills, streams, bogs, and woods around Newbliss.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many kinds of birds in our district. the birds that are commonly found in our district are the robin, blackbird, thrush, wren, swallow, lark, corncrake, cuckoo, crow, and magpie.
The swallow, corncrake, and the cuckoo come to Ireland for the Summer, and they go away to warmer countries when it begins (to get) cold here.
The robin mostly builds its next in a hole of a ditch, with twigs, and moss, and lines it inside with hair. She lays six eggs and hatches them until young birds come out. The colour of the eggs is white with red spots.
The blackbird builds her next between roots of bushes, and lays four eggs. She hatches them for three weeks
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
from the monastery by cruel laws, for a drink of water. No sooner did she refuse than her tongue shot outwards and remained in this manner until her death which was hastened by thirst as she was unable to drink. She refused to give the water she was so soon unable to use herself.
There is a well called "Tobar Bainis in the townland of Doonmorgan and it is believed that the reason why it is called that name is because Saint Parick married a pair at this well.
In my townland namely the townland of Corraghan there is a well called "Browney" and it is believed that whoever is first at that well on May morning will have the most butter the whole year round. At this well many a row took place between the Corraghan women because if one woman when going to the well met another one coming she would spill the water and then they would rise a dispute. This happened about forty years ago but
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 19:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My essay is connected with traditions connected with Local wells. There is a holy well about nine miles from this school and it is called "Tobar an alt" and it is said that there is a fish in it and that one of its sides is burned because it is said that some person caught the fish and when it was being cooked it leaped off the frying pan and it went back into the well again.
In the townland of Doonkelly there is a well called "Tobar Padraig" and it is said that Saint Patrick visited that well when he was in this country and that he read mass there.
Close by the wall of Creevalea Abbey in Dromahair is another well. Any visitor to the old ruin may yet notice a carved stone on the south wall of the old monastery. This carving represents a woman's face with the tongue hanging out. Tradition tells us that a bad woman returning from the well refused a poor starving monk who was driven
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 19:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
religion.
About two years ago a motor-boat used go from Sligo to Dromahair every Wednesday and Sunday with passengers but it has stopped since becase they were not getting enough passengers and the boat was becoming rotten also. There are a few castles on the shores of Lough Gill. There was an old castle on the shore of the lake in the townland of Kilmore but about six years ago it fell into the lake. It was called Dooray castle and was used as a watch tower for O'Rorke. There is another old castle on the north side of the lake which is covered over with ivy and a man named Parkes lived there long ago.
There is an island on Lough Gill called Church island and long ago there was an old graveyard in this island and the people of Calry used bury their dead on this island but Calry was much bigger then that at present.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 19:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
old houses are still to be seen on the shore. When the races were being held around the lake people used to go to the top of Banagher hill or Doon hill and they had a fine view of the races. Also on this lake a man carted turf across it one time when there was ice on it. It is said that this lake is very much like another lake called "Lough na Suil" in County Sligo because "Lough na Suil" disappeared one time and it is said that Lough Doon has an underground channel to Lough Gill and there is a tar barrel in it and if it burst the water would flow down to Lough Gill. This occurred to Lough na Suil and some people thought that it was the good weather that dried it up. There is no fence on the road side of this lake but if there was it would be much safer for everybody.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 19:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Not far from this school is a lake called Lough Doon and at this lake many accidents occurred. A woman who was coming from Mass one Sunday named Mrs. Reynolds of Carrickfad was passing by Lough Doon when she fell and she had to be carried home and afterwards she died. Also at this lake a man committed suicide and when he was found he was three weeks in the water and he was almost beyond recognition. This man's name was Jack Byrne a workingman of Mr. Whyte. One morning this man went into a boat on the lake and took with him one oar and when he was in the middle of the lake he threw himself into it and was drowned. Lough Doon is situated between two hills namely Doon hill and Banagher hill. It got its name from this hill. This lake was made for sport by Colonel Whyte. Long ago races were held around this lake and tenants were evicted to make this race course and the track of two old
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 19:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man in the Parish of Nicker named O'Brien.
He kept a ferret.
My grand aunt Miss Kate Harty supplied him with milk to feed the Ferret. But one night she was unable to take the milk. She was very ill in bed. She sent a girl with the milk. The ferret did not drink all the milk as usual he left half of it. The man sent back the remainder of it and told the girl to tell my grand aunt to drink the milk. She drank the milk and was as well as ever the following day. This story was told me by my Aunt.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 16:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the night of the 29th Jan 1839, a ship left Sligo for America with a party of Emigrants.
The evening was terribly stormy and as the night approached it developed into a regular hurricane.
Several of the Emigrants and their friends requested Captain Crangle, the master of the ship to postpone the ship's departure until the storm abated.
All their entreaties were of no avail. Crangle said "If the ship is blown to H- and in spite of God and the Devil I will sail."
He did so and only got as far as Raughley coast - not far from Ronan Point when the ship foundered with almost all hands including the Captain himself. The sight
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 16:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Saint Catherine's Well;- There are many Holy Wells throughout our country one of which is in Killybegs. It is about half a mile to the south of Killybegs. This is how it originated. One night long ago a terrible storm (and) arose and a ship was in danger. The sailors prayed to St. Catherine to save them and their prayer was granted. They landed in this town and when they came ashore they went up to this field where the well now is, and gave thanks to the saint and as they prayed the well sprang up. From that day to this the well is held in honour of St. Catherine and there is a turas to this well on the 25th November of every year. Many people come to this well on the day of this turas as the people have great faith in St. Catherine. It is said there were people cured at this well. One day a minister hired men to close up the well and no sooner had they closed it than it sprang up again. The minister was in his Parlour watching the men working and it is said that when the well sprang up after the men closed it that it burst out in the minister's Parlour and he was nearly drowned. It closed up again in his Parlour and he called on his servants and
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 13:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5; Buscuailleán= Yellow flower growing in a pasture,supposed to be pairinly under them.
6;" Poreens"= Little potatoes.
7; Scillet= Three legged pot.
8; Running amock= Going mad.
9; Juggen = A heavy rope tied round a man's trousers,under the knee to keep them up.
10; Keenawn Chkhrawn = A small bit of turf
11; Spadhaugh =Soft turf on top of bog.
12; A mic =Used when addressing a boy.
13; Manna; Used when addressing a young person.
14; Thrawneen (traíninín) = Tall grasses,like hay in a pasture.
15; Amadán = A fool.
16; Spronn =Used for a fork.
17; Brogue =Used for a boot.
18; Cipín = A stick.
19; Sop; = A wisp of hair;
20 Gosoon = A boy.
21; Bonham = A young pig.
22; Shanty (sean wiz)=Used for an old horse.
23; Banshee = The fairy woman.
24;Park used for a field.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 11:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15. The O Garas were the ruling Irish clan in the district before the English came. They are not remembered locally.
18. Lord Dillon was the local landlord, he was an "absentee" his agents were Charles Strickland, then Mr Hussey and Mr Jackson. When Charles Strickland about seventy years ago there were "clearances" to the west of the town of Ballaghaderreen. The people removed got homes on the bad lands around Ballyhaunis. The lands cleared were turned into a ranch and given to a brother of the agents. This man started dairy farming and a flax mill which gave employment in the district but he became bankrupt and had to leave. This agent, Charles Strickland is spoken of with respect the people say he was anxious to help the tenants. The land was divided into farms by him.
There was a custom of subdividing farms among members of families on marriage. The person who gave this information was one of two brothers, his father wished to divide the little farm of eight acres between them but he refused to marry and live on four acres so the little farm was left to him and his brother was satisfied with money as his portion.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 11:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
priests were vexed, but since they had a soft corner for him.
The first bicycle
The first bicycle seen in this side of the country was owned by a daughter or a niece of Walter Lee - an army officer living near tralee about 600 years ago. This Lady came often to visit Mrs. Hassep at Edenburn. They bicycle had a big rear wheel and a small one infront. All the children ran when they say the "flying girl" as she was called then. They would not go out when she would be around.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 02:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[ ar leanamhaint ó leathanach 70 ]
"N'fhéadfainn é", a dúbhairt s. "Eirig!" a dúbhairt se arís. D'eirig sí 's bhailibh sí gach a raibh ann.
"An bhfuil aon t-slighe agat a bhféadfá mo bhuachaill a leigheas?" arsa Ubhall. "Ta", arsa an Seanduine "ach n'féadfá-sa é dhéanamh go deó. Tá seacht gcéad acra de tairnge (?) cruaidh agam. Seacht gcéad acra do bheithigheachaibh fiaine agam, agus seacht gcéad acra d'fhéar ar lasadh, agus n'fhéadfá-sa siubhal na h-áite seo do dhéanamh in a'chor".
"Beir chúghat na cnámha", ar seisean, "agus buail amach rómham". D'eirigheadar, is chuadar go dtí na tarnaí (?). "Tair ar mo dhrom anois", adúbhairt Ubhall leis an Seanduine. Do chuaidh an Seanduine ar a dhrom agus níor ceangail aon tairne (?) air. Chuadar ansan go dtí na beithidhíg fiaine, ach níor thóg ceann aca a cheann den dtalamh. Chuadar annsan go dtí an áit 'na raibh an teine mhór , ach chuadar tríthe gan pian na marc ortha. "Anois", arsa an Seanduine, "feach rómhat suas ar an gcnoc. Tá seacht gcéad saighdiúirí ag tabhairt aire de thobar atá annsan. Tá fear eile ann leis, leath dhe [?] chruaidh, is leath de d'iarann, agus marbhochaidh na saighdiúirí thu má bhíonn sé sin na dhúiseacht. Ach má bhíonn s''na choladh, ní mharbhóchaidh siad thú in a' chor".
Chuadar go dtí an cnoc. Dúbhairt Ubhall leis an Seanduine fanamhaint mar a raibh aige, go raghadh sé féin anáirde. "Má chídheann tú", ar seisean, "an
anonymous contributor
2019-06-03 02:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
viii
But he soon found out, beyond all doubt,
That he should with his comrades fall
His courage then began to fail
And loud for help he then did call
ix
The donkey then did his foes defeat
He proudly turned and walked away
And homeward to his master went
To feed on Irish oats and hay
x
Let all our donkeys have such pluck
In every country that they be
And in their own defense to fight
Like men to die or else be free

The Sergeant in question was a man named Flanagan, father of Mr. Patrick Flanagan, an ex-sergeant, who is living in Blackwater Village now.
Hackett was summoned by the Sergeant and was tried before Mr. Bolton of the Island. He won the case however and showed his licence for poetry which allowed him to sing for the public.
Hackett and Guilfoyle died about 75 years ago.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 22:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The graveyard of Clough.
In addition to the monuments erected in the graveyard of Clough to the memory of the priests who were buried within the Old Chapel there are many momuments to the Phelans, Hylands, Kavanaghs, Bergins, Ryans, Kavanaghs, Finlays, Dunphys. The oldest inscription in this graveyard is 1818.
Written by Mary Phelan Chapelhill, Ballacolla. Material given by her father Patrick Phelan, Chapelhill, Ballacolla age 57 years. The place-name Clough. (An Cloc).
The old chapel here has always been called "The Chapel of Clough" because it was built on the townland of Cluchathunna ie Cloc a tSionnaig or the Fox's Rock, entered on the Ordnance map as Chapel Hill.
On the highland south of the village of Clough many limestone rocks appear above the surface which have given the name Clough ie Cloc to the district.
A short distance east of the village is a hill locally know as Carraigín.
Written by Mary Phelan, Clough, Ballacolla.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 22:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to prevent the starving people of the locality from taking the turnips for their food.
Another story told by her seems to show that the potato crop did not fail completely in this district as strangers often visited the district by night to take some from the small store of potatoes which the residents had at the time.
One night raiders came to take potatoes which were stored near the dwelling house. She was in the house with her young children. The children were asleep and she, hearing noise outside, suspected the cause. In order to pretend that there were men in the house who would attach the raiders she shouted so that the raiders could hear her. "Get up, Pat, Joe and Tom, the potatoes are being taken from us. The raiders quickly left and their small store of potatoes were left for their own use.
The above was written by Mary Connor, Court, Clough, Ballacolla. material was given by William Connor, Court, Clough, Ballacolla. Age 49
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 22:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Famine Times
The tenants on the Grantstown and Grattan Bellew estates did not complain of unduly harsh treatment by their landlords. The population of the district was very much larger than at present, the holdings generally were very small and the general distress caused by the failure of the potato crop caused numbers of people to emigrate to England and to Australia.
My grandmother who lived in this district in the famine times told the following story:-
A woman and her three sons lived on a small farm in this locality. The woman had yellow meal stir-a-bout prepared for the dinner. She went to the door and called out "Come in boys". One of the sons went in quickly, and he was so hungry that he had all the food eaten when the others came in. The boy who had eaten all the food died shortly afterwards.
The following was also told by her:-
A farmer living near Grantstown had a large field of turnips. He employed a man to guard this field by day and another man to guard it by night so as
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 20:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ramsgrange
The present parish of Ramsgrange is modern and only dates from 1863 when it was formed out of the large parish of the Hook.
Up to the year 1863 Ramsgrange was one of the four curacies of the Hook : - Diuncannon, Ramsgrange, Templetown and Poulfur, but on the death of Rev. G. Murphy, March 17th 1863 Bishop Furlong divided the parish of the Hook into the parishes of Ramsgrange and Templetown - Rev. T. Doyle becoming the first pastor of Ramsgrange and Rev. W. Codd first pastor of Templetown.
The thatched chapel of Ramsgrange was burned on June 19th 1798. The present Church was built in 1838-1843 (87 yrs) towards which a sum of £500 was collected on June 5th 1842 on the occasion of a sermon by the famous Rev. T. Maguire. Very Rev, Canon Doyle who had been C.C. of the Hook from 1853 - 1858 was appointed P.P. in Ramsgrange March 17th 1863. During 41 years his voice and pen were untiring in the cause of Faith and Fatherland. He gave up his house to the Sisters of St. Louis. Not alone did he introduce the Sisters of St. Louis but also the De la Salle
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
13-6-1938
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
Early to bed early to rise.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Rivers 20-7-1938
Let us briefly recall what, no doubt many of you already know, in this way in which a river is formed. The rain falling on the uplands runs, in part, down the slopes to join an existing brook, or sinks, in part, into the ground until it is stopped, by some layer, such as hard rock or clay, which it cannot penetrate. Here it gathers in a pol until pressure forces it to seek an outlet, and it issues from the hillside in a trickling stream which is often the source of a river.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
28-6-1938
It was only when the ardour of battle was departed that the dire mischief wrought upon Corney's little cabin and the consequences likely to ensue, dawned forcefully upon all. The door was not any more; the portable articles which had been within were smashed the windows were gone; the gable was broken in; the roof was laid open. Everyone was in distress and sorrow.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It was a usual habit with the old people which is still carried out to put a sign of a cross on the top of a cake with a knife before being baked. There were two reasons for this; first to keep the top of the cake from rising of and to honour the sign of the cross.
The bread was baked on a grid-iron in an oven in front of the fire. It was common to make grid-cakes out of flour or oaten meal.
There were special kinds of bread eaten on eve's of feasts and other occasions and these were: Pancakes, sweetcakes, potato-cakes, and other sorts of cakes.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bread 23-6-1938
The bread that the people made in olden times consisted of wheat or corn or oaten-meal and water and sometimes butter-milk. Boxty bread was used too and this was made from potatoes and salt and water. The potatoes we scraped on a tin with holes in it, and they mixed with the sale and water and some flour and then baked. Potato cake was eaten in olden times. It was made from potatoes and salt and flour. The potatoes were boiled and the skin was taken off them and they were crushed and mixed with the other things. This mixture was in a cake then. It was cut into three corner bits and then it was baked on a griddle.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Half-doors are common in the district as they were in olden times. These can be shut and the big door left open.
The people had no lamp-light in former times but there were two bog-deal sticks coming out of the chimney and they were set on fire and gave light.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
used to pen and shut and this was very handy because it could be opened in the night and shut in the day. The fireplace was at the gable-end wall and it was called the hearth. There were some houses which had no chimney and the fireplace was not at a wall but, the fire could be in the middle of the floor or any place about it. and there was a hole in the roof of the house which the smoke went out through.
The floors in these houses consisted of clay and mortar. The clay was put down int he bottom and the mortar was put down in patches and they were very rough and unlevel because of the patches.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 14:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old Houses 14-6-1938
The houses which the people had in olden times were built with stone and mortar. They were built up to the roof with these and then the roof was built with scraws and sedge or rushes. The scraws were laid down on the rafters and it was thatched. They were not half as good as the houses that are now in existence. The chimney was made from hazel and paper and bags. The hazels were laid on boards and the bags were spread over and this was the chimney.
The houses had a bed at the back wall and this was known as the settle bed. These
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 02:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Fairs
June 23rd 1938
The local fairs are held on the streets in the village of Newport. Sometimes buyers transact business in the local farmers' houses, that is if they happen to take a fancy to ant animal or animals the farmer has on his land.
It was usual, in olden times, for the farmers to meet buyers at the cross roads, outside the village, the fair morning, and to dispose of their cattle there and then. The majority of the people preferred to go to the fairs, and carry on their buying and selling there.
At the Newport fair, toll is paid to Mrs. Delaney, Cork Road. She appoints a man to stand at every road leading to the village, and the buyers are obliged to pay him fourpence a head on every beast. Many people look on this custom of paying tolls, as a penal measure imposed by our oppressors, and would like to abolish it.
Luck money is always given by the seller to the buyer, and is calculated as follows:- Two shillings for a two year old animal or upwards, one shilling for a calf or sheep, and sixpence usually for bonhams.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 01:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Very few animals, except bulls, have halters or ropes on them at the local fairs. These halters are retained by the owners after the sale of the animals. There is no local tradition regarding fairs being held near hills, castles, forts or cemeteries in the locality, but there is a plot of ground near the village, and it is said that it was a fair green in years gone by. On this plot a cottage is now built which is occupied by a Gleeson family.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-02 01:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cattle are marked by cutting hair off the flank of the animal, or by raddling with paint over the hips.
The most important fair in our district is held on the 23rd of October, which is known as "the bullock fair day". When this fair was first held, no animals were allowed into it, except bullocks. In a recent daily paper it was stated that over four thousand bullocks were sold at this fair, in 1937.
The next fair is held on the 27th of December, and is called the " Christmas fair".
The fair that is held on March 25th is of no outstanding importance.
The April fair is always a big one. Buyers come to it from far and near, as cattle are always plentiful and in good condition at that time of the year. It is also a bonham fair.
Then comes the "holiday fair" which is held on the great feast of Corpus Christi. This is generally a good fair, and is well patronised by buyers and sellers.
After this - on July 22nd - comes the"gooseberry fair". This got its name from the hawkers who used to come to Newport for this occasion to sell gooseberries.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Transcription 20-1-1938
When the shades of late, late evening came slowly sifting down on midsummer night, the boys began gathering from the glens and the dales, wending their way in twos and threes and half dozens to the top of Knockdiara hill, everyone bringing with him as much as he could drag of whins, brasna, limbs of trees, bogfire, turf or broken boxes. And after these toiling groups came bands of merry girls, some shawled, some unshawled, who made the evening ring with laughter. And, finally, the old men and wiseheads of the country
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Grammar 26-1-38
The old man walked.
The young boy walked.
The old man walked feebly.
The old man walked to the field.
The old man walked last week.
The old man walked for his pension.
The young boy walked proudly.
The young boy walked to town.
The young boy walked everyday.
The young boy walked for the cows.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Analysis 31-3-1938
The night was falling weary in merry Bandon town.
Subj Night
Enl of Subj The
Pred Falling
Ext of Pred weary of manner in merry
Obj no obj Bandon town of place
Enl of obj. no enl
When in his cottage weary an Orangeman lay down.
Subj Orangeman
Enl of subj no Enl
Pred lay
Ext of Pred "in his cottage"
Obj no obj
Enl of obj no enl
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Grammar 21-2-1938
The boy picked blackberries. The farmer ploughed the field. The boy who liked blackberries picked them on his way home. The farmer who was good at ploughing ploughed the field.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the cure of a burn. Garden-broom not the ordinary wild species boiled and the juice drunk was said to be a cure for kidney disease especially Brights disease. Roasted salt is an old fashioned cure for a sore throat. Slamish is a very good cure to stop bleeding. First you chew it and then apply it in a lump to the cut. Allenberries bruised and mixed with buttermilk and put on thickly on the top of a wart is a very good poultice for drawing a wart out.
Violet Armstrong
Nootka Lodge
Carlingford
Co. Louth
17.6.38
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
People in former times had no qualified doctors as we have now and so in former times they had to seek remedies for their ailments by other means. It was said that if a person had toothache to lick a man-creeper would bring instant relief. There are herbs called marsh-mallow and comfrey root and the old people often boiled the roots of these herbs and applied it as a poultice to a sprain. Another cure was to hold the sprained part under running water. This cure is still found to be very effective. Two people married of the same name were supposed to have the cure of the whooping cough. Crawling between the legs of an ass was said to be another cure for this distressing complaint. A cure for mumps was to roll in a pigs bed. Bog-beam boiled and taken every morning fasting was said to be a sure cure for boils. A cure for a cough was to take stewed dock seed. Roasted potatoes and buttermilk were applied to a burn. A cap made of ivy leaves was good for a scabby head. The seventh son or daughter were looked upon as having
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Emmet 14-3-1938
"Let no man write my epitaph, for as no man who knows my motives dares now vindicate them, let not prejudice or ignorance asperse them. Let them rest in obscurity and peace: my memory be left in oblivion, and my tomb remain uninscribed, until other times and other men can do justice to my character. When my country takes her place among the nations of the earth, then, and not till then, let my epitaph be written".
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
456
and if she says the right colour ,the girl that had that colour runs off and she tries to catch her.
They continue is another game.We make four corners on the ground and one girl goes in the middle.Then they try to change corners without letting the girl the girl in the middle get into them.If the girl in the middle gets into any of their corners then the girl (in the middle)that was in the corner becomes fool.Skipping ,jack stones,and home star are the games
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Altar Linen 31-3-'38
Altar Cloths.
There must be three cloths on the altar for Holy Mass. The Altar linen represents the linen in which Our Lord's Body was wrapped for burial.
Corporal: A piece of linen, about twelve inches square, which the Priest places on the Altar, and upon which the Sacred Vessels rest.
Purificator: A square piece of linen with which the Priest purifies the Chalice and Paten.
Pall: A small square linen envelope, stiffened with cardboard, with which the Priest covers the Chalice during Mass.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Communion Cloth:- A linen cloth laid on the Altar.
Early to bed, early to rise. Early X 14.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
455
"Willie wag tail"is a nice game. When we are playing "Willie wag tail" oone girl stands at a wall and a lot of other girls stand at another wall opposite her.Then she says "Willie willie wag tail" one, two, three,.".She turns around then and if she catches any of them walking they have to go back to the wall.They continue this until one girl reaches the wall without being caught.
Colours is another game we play.When we are playing colours a crowd of girls stand by the wall together and one girl gives each of them a colour.Two girls try to guess their colours.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 21:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Children play a lot of games at different times of the year .Here are some of them marble home star ,willie wag tail,jack stones, and hide and go seek. When we are playing hide and go seek one girl seeks the other girls go in hide.Then the girl that is seeking goes to look for the other girls,and the one that is last tigged will have yo seek
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
night.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-01 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Feasts of the Year.
There is a feast on Christmas Day. Mummers come round a few nights before Christmas. Each one says a different rhyme. They put on old clothes and false faces. They knock at the door first. When the first mummer comes in he moves about and says, "Room sir, room sir, give us room to rhyme and we'll show you some activity about the Christmas time." When one has finished another comes in. Another is Saint Patrick. He says, "Here comes I, Saint Patrick, all clothed in armour bright I come to give you my blessing upon this Christmas night, and with this good staff which I hold in my hand I have banished the serpents from your land." Another says, "Here comes I, Belgibum, Belgibum is my name, and with the sword and pistol I meant to take the game. Another says, "The game, sir, the game, sir, it never was in your power, I would cut you up in slices in less than half an hour." Then the two begin to fight, and one pretends that he is killed. Then the doctor says a rhyme and cures the man. Johnny Funny comes in last. He collects the money. His rhyme is, "Here comes I, Johnny Funny, I'm the man collects the money, all silver, no brass, bad half pence will not pass." Before they go out they sing a piece of a song. On Saint Patrick's Day it is a custom for the people to wear shamrocks. Halloween is a feast day. People eat nuts and apples on Halloween
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 23:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some Old Customs
People used "to drown the shamrock" on St Patrick's Day. This meant going to the public house for a "half-one."
"Match making". A man wanted to marry a certain girl, himself and a neighbour would go to the girl's house and bring a bottle of whisky. They'd tell the object of their visit and ask the girl's father for his daughter. The fortune would then be settled and the whisky would be drunk. The "bean-a-tighe" would make tea and the bargain would be sealed.
Run-away marriages were frequent. A boy and girl would run away to a neighbour's house and stay there for a day or so. In the meantime they'd send word to their friends who'd prepare for the wedding.
Got from Mrs Morton (about 40 years).
Crappagh, Newbliss.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 17:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
453
Hide and go seek is a game we play often .A crowd of girls go off in hide while one of the girls seeks at the wall.Then they shout and she runs after them.The one who is last tigged is to seek.
Skipping is played with a skipping rope .In summer that game is played .
Jack- stones are also played with five small stones called jacks.
There are certain times of the year for some games.
In Summer we play picky,spinning top nuts in may
In Autumn we go picking blackberries and nuts.
In winter we play indoor games such as ludo ,happy hikers, draughts,and cards.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 17:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Else is treated with tea and cake.
Another custom is to give a band of crepe to all the relations and friends of the dead. These are tied loosely round their hats.
All their clergymen who attend the funeral as well as the drivers of the hearse wear a very large band of pure white line across the right shoulder and tied under the left arm at the waist.
These pieces of linen are new and bought specially for each funeral and are never used at a funeral again, but are afterwards given away, usually in charity.
Sammy Sweetman
Morahin,
Aughadown
Skibbereen,
Co. Cork.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 17:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Games
We play a great deal of games at home and at school .The games are :- the cat and the mouse,hide and go seek,nuts in may,skipping and jack stones.
The cat and the mouse is played with a crowd of girls who forms a ring.They hold up their hands .Then the girl who is the cat follows the girl who is the mouse .Then after a while if the cat does not catch the mouse a second cat comes and helps the first one to catch the mouse.This game is very amusing.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
452
Informant :- Patrick Mc Namara ,
Carnnakella,
Newmarket -on Fergus
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 17:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Custom
There is another custom in West Cork. It is usual when anyone is dead, for his people to get a quantity of pipes, tobacco, and whiskey to be used at the wake.
The owner of the house usually gets one or tow of those who are present at the wake to cut up the tobacco into small pieces, and with it to fill the pipes.
Then everyone present is asked and expected to take a pipe, no matter whether he smokes or not.
It is considered an insult to refuse to accept one. The pipes are usually white “clay” pipes made in Ireland especially in Knockerockery.
After some time, all those who can take intoxicating liquid are presented with a glass of whiskey while everyone
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 17:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
451
There are a lot of forts to be seen in the country.There is one very big one in Carnakella.It is the the Mc Namaras own it.there is around bank of earth in the middle of it.There is a wall all round and there are a lot of trees growing inside the wall.there is a place between the bank of earth and the wall in which you could walk all round it.
Three forts can be seen from it ,- Liddy's fort, Tobin's fort and Connery's fort.it was the Danes who built the forts long ago.They also prayed there
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 17:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
466
sticks and put them across eachother and tied them with cord . Then they stuck them on the roof .They had another custom on St.Martin's day .On that day no one would knit or put a horse under a car or do any work which was going round.The reason they did not do these things was because St.martin was killed in a mill.
When the old people were sowing onions they sowed them on the shortest days and pulled them on the longest days.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 16:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The landlord of this district was Mr Tatlow. He owned a large amount of land and if the tenants would not vote for him he would evict them.
There was a man named Hughes who was a candidate for Parliament; but it is not known was he in favour of Mr Tatlow or against him. There was an election about seventy years ago known as "Hughes Election" and most of the tenants voted against Mr Tatlow. That night he burned the houses of all the the tenants who did not vote for him and hunted them out along the roadside to die of starvation. A house belonging to a family of Molloys was burned and the land was given to a protestant named Lord after this election. Most of these Molloys emigrated to America.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 14:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
445
Certain days.
There are a good many days in the year on which it is lucky to do some things and unlucky to do other things.
Friday is supposed to be the luckiest dog in the week. If people were going into a new house or if a farmer was going to plough they would do it all on Friday.Thursday is an unlucky day to do anything .You should not pay your debts on a Monday because you would be giving away your luck .
A common custom among the old people on the 31 st January was hanging up St. Brigid's cross.They first got two
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 12:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The inhabitants of the castle afterwards said he was seen going out the same gate on the preceding evening, with a spade in his hand, so he must have made a hole for it on that evening. That crock of gold was never found.
While Mr Barrett had care of the castle and for a long time after his death, the place was supposed to be haunted by fairies. Every night horses were heard prancing in the stable, and often times when no horses were in the stable terrible noise terrible noise could be even heard.
One night horses and carriages were heard coming to the front door. The household was in great confusion, and someone going to their door discovered that there was no one to be seen. On the night Mr Barrett died, knocking was heard at his bedroom door. It continued for ten minutes, and then stopped, just as the man died, still no one could be seen at the door.
From that night on an unnatural light could be seen around the castle. Finally the inhabitants of the castle got a priest to say Mass there and the fairies never haunted it again.
The place is now owned by a neighbouring farmer.
Nora Murphy. Std. VII 14 years of age
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 12:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
447
The old people have certain days on which they do not like to do some things,Here are a few of them .
To pay back your debts or to give away money it is said to be giving away your luck if it is done on Monday.
Some people say it is lucky to start ploughing on Friday.it is said to be unlucky to start ploughing on Thursday.
On St.Brigid's Day people make crosses of light rods and hang them in the out-houses or up on the roofs of their dwelling houses.
On St.Martin's day people would not knit or sew because St.Martin was killed in a mill
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 12:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
434
The old people have cures for many diseases.
Toothache is one of the diseases .Whiskey,soda and a smoke of a pipe cures a toothache. Warts are cured by rubbing them with the shell of a snail or with water found in the hole of a stone without looking for it or with a cut piece of bacon hidden away until rotten .A headache is cured by putting vinegar in a handkerchief and putting it to your head.Chilblains are washed in the water the potatoes are boiled in .The rub of a raw onion is another cure for chilblains in your feet.Corns are cured by rubbing wet washing soda to
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 12:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
2/5/38
Carrigboy Castle
Carrigboy Castle which is situated near a beautiful wood, about mid-way between Macroom and Dunmanway. Was destroyed by fire about the year 1935.
It was one of ancient buildings in County Cork, and was considered to be built about two hundred years ago. It contained fourteen rooms, each of which was very large.
This castle was owned by many people. The most important man who had care of it for some time was called Barrett. He was supposed to be very rich and possessed much gold.
A story is told of a crock of gold which Mr Barrett hid. One Sunday while the household was at Mass, one woman remained to take care of the castle which was the usual custom, he came into the kitchen with a crock and a gun in his hand.
He threatened the woman if she would watch him that he would shoot her. She was frightened. When he was gone, she got her Rosary Beads and went into a room upstairs.
She chanced to look the window and saw him go out the gate of the yard. She looked no more, but ran to the kitchen and finished her house work. Mr Barrett returned soon after
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 11:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
433
child's mouth for three mornings.There is supposed to be a cure in the seventh boy of a family.The cure they had for whooping cough was to meet a man riding on a white horse and ask him for a cure .Whatever he said the person took it and got better.There is a well in Fenlough and a person who was blind came there and made seven rounds around the well.he also rubbed the water to his eyes and got better.he was thankful.His name was Tom o' Leary.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 11:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
460
there are a lot of roads in this district on which there special names.
There is the Ballycar road which leads to Ballycar.there is the Ennis road which leads to Ennis.There is the Limerick road which leads to Limerick.There is the weaver's road which leads to Ballycar .Bog line is so called because there is a bog in it,and there is a road going through the bog.
father Murphy's memorial is out in the limerick road.father Murphy helped the catholic cause in the time of Daniel O'Connell.He was a
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 11:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
461
very good man ,and when he died the people erected a memorial to him.
There is a road in Ballycar and it is called Bóthar na gcrann and there is a stone on the side of the road to mark where a man was shot.The stone can be seen yet.Almost all roads here are made by the County . Council
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 10:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
458
Roads.
There are certain roads which have certain names such as; the Limerick road leading to Limerick;the Ballycar road leading to Ballycar station;the fort road leading to Dromoland ;the Killnasoolagh leading to Killnasoolagh church yard.
Some men take these roads in contract.Patrick Conroy is the Contractor of the road from the Doctor's cross to Ardsollas station.he breaks the stones himself and he has his own horse and car.He puts
anonymous contributor
2019-05-31 09:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
moving on the other side of the hedge & he fired. The son got some of the shot in his eyes & lost his sight. Ever afterwards he had to be led in to the chapel.
Story:
Once a Protestant woman lived near a chapel There was a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the chapel grounds and the Protestant woman used to give pennies to the children to spit into the face of the statue. She ddid this for many years until she died. When her coffin was put into the hearse the wheels sank down and the horses lay down. All that the people [coved] do they couldn't move the horses or the hearse. After a while they sent for the priest. The priest said it was an agent of the devil was in the coffin. He read some prayers
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 23:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
agus tháinig fear isteach.
Shuidh sé arís ar an gcathaoir cois na teine agus ar deire thuit a choladh air.
D'imig an fear go dtí an seomra mar a raibh an bainríoghan óg. "A bhainrioghan óg" ar seisean, "tá an méirleach-san ó'n nGréig 'na choladh". "Slán beo an scéalaide!" adúbhairt sí. D'eirig sí 'na suidhe agus rug sí ar dhá chois air, agus dhein sé a cheann a smiotadh ar an bhfalla agus mhairbh sí é.
Annsan do chuaidh sí a'triall ar Ubhall agus dhúirig sí é. "Téir a choladh anois", ar seise, "agus ní baoghal duit éinne anocht arís". Do thresbháin sí an fear marbh do. "Tháinig sé sin", ar sise, "chan mise do bhreith leis, agus dá n-eireóchadh leis, ní fheicfá-sa arís go deo mé".
D'eirigheadar ar maidin agus do thógadar leo an capall agus an Slaicín Draoidheachta agus chuir sé trí fiacla a athar 'na phóca. Do thangadar go dtí Gleann Dubh na Méighleach. Do bhí a bheirt driothár annsan ar an dtaobh thiar de'n Ghleann ag fanacht leis. Do scaoil sé anonn sa bhád an bainríoghan. Chómh luath is fuair na
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 23:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A blacksmith named Pat Clery who lived about one mile from Rathcabbin, has a hen, and this hen used lay an egg in a corner of the forge every day. One day Pat happened to be in very bad humour. Everything seemed to upset him. The hen sat on her nest quite calmly, but when she had laid the egg she cackled at an awful rate.
This irritated Pat, and he proceeded to hunt the hen away, but her cackling never ceased. Finally, he lost his patience and on seeing the egg she had laid threw it after her, and shouting at the top of his voice said "Hen! you are making such a compliment of your old egg - take it with you".
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 23:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Holy Wells
about a quarter of a mile away, but an irreverent, imprudent woman washed clothes in it, whereupon it immediatly dried up and its waters appeared in their present position.
Anna Killian, Phaos Villa, Fahy, Offaly.
This information was given to me by Mr. Killian, Phaos Villa, Fahy, Offaly.
The Blessed Virgin's Well
In Ballyheshill a holy well is found it is called the Blessed Virgin's Well. There are many superstitions regarding this well which was at one time supposed to be situated on the top of a hill called "Wakleys" There lived a woman beside it who used it for house hold purposes. When she went out next morning the well had vanished and it sprung up a few fields away from the hill. There it remains to be seen to the present-day.
Some years ago people made processions
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 23:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Blessed Virgin's Well
to this well every May Eve. It is covered over on the top by the trunk of a tree, this they used for a altar, which they decorated with flowers and then recited the Holy Rosary. Any one requiring a cure who drank some of the water and left some token on the top - such as a pin, medal, delph, glass or a penny recieved the cure. At other time during the year they had to go nine successive days to the well.
It is supposed to cure head-aches teeth-aches pains and many other complaints. This general belief is now dying out as the old people are all dead. yet still the present generation go there on May Eve.
This information was given to me by Mr J. O'Mara, Ballybrian, Fahy, Offaly.
Christina O' Mara, Ballybrian, Fahy, Offaly.
St Patrick's Well
St Patrick's well which lies at the foot of Croghan hill is specially dedicated to St. Patrick
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 21:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
call. He had not gone far when the horse started to sweat profusely and stood up stock still on the road.
A glare of light rolled along before men one night as they were going for the priest.
At a certain spot in the road which winds round the fort of Crocán mountain peculiar accidents have happened from time to time. This night a priest was on a sick call and at this very spot (which he knew nothing of) the car went in over the fence, though the steering was perfect, and he was in full possession of his faculties. One of the peculiarities of accidents that happened in this spot is that there were no fatalities, only marvellous escapes. It is a dangerous spot, inside a fence which is 12' high there is a drop of some 60' into the glen which is not too deep however.
A couple of years ago three or four girls and a driver were coming along in a pony and trap within 200 yards of the danger zone the pony took flight. Fortunately they had then [been] thrown from the car, before the pony jumped in over the fence where the motor car went in. The pony and car dropped
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 21:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bréagh Thig. (Bréthig) The name suggests its origin. At one time the finest house in Cordal was situated in this townland. The Griffins now own the farm in which this house was built.
Cnoc a Tighe. Another townland stretching along at the foot of Faill Cliff, the name of which suggests its own origin. The O'Donoghue family possessed this district. Their residence was called Cnoc A Tighe, hence the name of the townland.
Crag a Noinin so called because of its rocky soil, which in Spring and Summer is covered with daisies. It lies to the west of the old creamery on the Cordal road to Castleisland and extends northwards till it meets the Brosna road.
Tobar Maing about a mile east of Castleisland extends to the south till it meets the townland of Tullig. The river Maine is supposed to rise from a well
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 21:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
because of the giant Latairn who once owned it. On one occasion the giants quarrelled, and had hot words across the glen. Doodey no longer able to restrain himself took a tremendous leap across the glen in pursuit of his opponent - hence the name Léim an Duada. Any further consequence of the quarrel however is still a subject for research.
Cumang. So called because of its shape. It is a long narrow townland stretching between Faill Filip on one side and Crocán mountain on the other.
Faill is a cliff about a half a mile long lying to the north east of Kilmurry school.
Crocán mountain and the only mountain in the district north east of Kilmurry lies to the east of Kilmurry school and directly opposite Faill. Saint Crocan is supposed to have dwelt there in olden times.
Cluain river which is really the source of the river Maine on which Castleisland is built rises in Crocán. Other tributaries of the Maine rising in Cordal parish are Cordal river rising in Barness a hill lying due south of Kilmurry school. The Léim an Duada river rising in Cnoc a Cur due north of the school. All those rivers are tributaries of the Cluain, which changes its name
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 21:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A native of Cumang was coming from Brosna one night, when he came to the spot already mentioned, a gentle whirlwind lifted the hat off of his head. He saw where it dropped and searched to find it but failed. Rather ashamed to go home hatless, moreover when it was a new one, he got off the horse, and searched the road minutely for it, but did not succeed in finding it.
A friend of his lived near by and he thought he would borrow a hat from him until morning. To reach the house he had to pass in through a little gap in the mountain. The horse absolutely [refused] to be either led or driven through the gap, but galloped home furiously at the first available opportunity.
Next morning the man came in search of his hat, and found it in the exact spot where he dropped it.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 20:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
holiday or at least the "brakes" were put on as far qas school work was concerned and one of the ceremonies of the "day of rest" was the distribution of the finished headline copybooks to the owners.
Some had 7 or 8, others had only 4 or 5 but all had some, and no sooner did the play half hour arrive than pell mell down the village shop went all the scholars to exchange his valuable? manuscripts for sweets or the best peppermint sagarstick (a great favourite in those days)
The good vattendees who had a pile of copies"came out on top" of course with a big bag of sweets while the others paid for bad attendence by having to accept very few of the sweets going.
From that day on for many months everything was sold in a bag made from the leaf of a scholars copy - tea, sugar, soda, snuff, sweets, salt and the rest, and no one seemed to remember that perhaps that leaf around their purchases might not have been very clean or very free from germs either.
V Quinn
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
454
Informant :- mrs Flannery ,56 yrs
Crussa,
Newmarket - on Fergus.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 19:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
457
we play in Spring .We play hide and go seek ,Willie wag tail and four corners in Winter.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 19:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
459
sand over the stones then.
There are many paths,crosscuts ,and boreens which the old people had long ago.here is one of them ,Clancys boreen leading into Quin.there is a path at the other side of the road at Clancys gate leading across two fields till you come to Dromoland back yard.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 19:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
465
called St Malorie's Well.There was a man cured there one time.He was almost blind. He went there very early in the morning.He did four rounds and said the Our father,Hail Mary,the Creed,and the Confiteor. His name is martin Fox Newmarket .
People leave money after them at Fenloe Well .They leave it in a box near it.There are trees and bushes growing around it.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 19:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
464
There are five holy wells in this parish of Newmarket..The names are as follows:-
St Luchtighern's well in Fenloe.
St Catherine's well in Carrigoran.
St Malorie's well in Kilmaleery.
St Senan's well in Kilconry.
St Brendans well in Clonmony.
People visit Fenloe on the 28th of April. They say the Rosary there.They also drink some of the water and rub it to the diseased part.They bring some of it home but they do not use it for ordinary household purposes.Fenloe well is called St Luchtighern's Holy Well.
Kilconry well is
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 19:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
449
Old travellers.
Long ago poor people had a very hard way of living.
One time a priest was walking a road and he got so tired that he went into a woman named Mrs.Barry and he asked her for lodgings and she said she would.But when her husband came in he would not let anybody stay inside his door and the priest said he would sleep on the chair by the fire and would feed himself .The husband said he would not allow him and the priest went away and he said "long life to you mam "but a very short life to him .So after a few weeks the husband
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 19:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
450
died.
Another man lived in Newmarket named Davy Gilligan.He used keep a great deal of lodgers .One of them was Peter Griffen .He used to sell tobacco ,sugar tea and needles .He got bottles for those .He sold these bottles to a man named Mr Mc Mahon.That was the way poor people made their living long ago.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 16:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
435
them.
There is a blessed well in Newmarket called Fenloe blessed well.Long ago there were three men cured at that well.One man had colhera and he went and did the rounds and he was cured .His name was Patrick Murphy.Another man called John Hayes had lumbago and he went to the well and was cured on his third visit.James Conroy long suffering from palsy was also cured at this blessed wells.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 16:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Garry Reyall. Candle Making. Bridgequarter.
Long ago when there were no lamps the people made their own candles. Every woman would have a few swarms of bees. They used to smother the old bees and take the wax out of the hive. They would get some lard and boil the lard and the bees' wax together. Then they would have a round mould the shape of a candle. Though the centre of this mould they would put a kind of turine which was the wick. When the land and the wax were boiled they were put into the mould and allowed to cool. Then they would be taken out in the form of a candle. In this way they made a great deal of candles in a few hours as they always had more than one mould.
Got from: My Father: 47 years
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 16:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
432
Old cures.
The people long ago had different cures from what we have not.The cure they had for corns was to rub paraffin -oil to them.If they found water in a rock without looking for it they rubbed it to warts and the warts went away. Another cure for warts was to steal a piece of bacon and to hide it in a pit.If the bacon rotted away the warts would go away.The cure they had for a cold was to put mustard in hot milk and drink it.If a baby had Craos-Galar a man who had never seen his father had to come fasting in the morning and blow into the
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 16:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
470
carry with them also musical instruments .They sometimes travel on horseback but usually they walk.They get money in almost every house.Sometimes they divide this money between themselves .usually they spend the money on a dance to which they invite all their friends .
Girls as a rule do not go out as wrenboys.Sometimes children do.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 15:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
469
Feasts of the Year.
St Stephen's Day.
St Stephen's Day is a very enjoyable feast day.There is always a hunt held in Newmarket on that day.A great many of the people follow the hounds through the country.
Another custom on this day is the dressing up of boys called the wren boys. these boys dress themselves in all sots of clothes .They paint themselves and put all sorts of covering on their heads.They do not wish to be known by anyone .They carry with them a bush decorated with papers and ribbons .In the centre they have a little bird.
They visit each house and sing and dance. They
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
driving a pie-bald pony or horse and give to the person who is ill to eat. It will cure them. To get something eatable from two married people of the same name and give it to one who has "chin cough" will cure them also.
Donkey's milk is also a cure for whooping-cough and ferret's milk - some milk left over after a ferret has taken some of it - will cure it. There are some people who are supposed to have the cure of the chin cough and if you got three eatable things from them and give them to the person who has it, they'll get better.
There are also cures for the mumps. Put a halter round the person who has mumpus and lead him three times around the pig-house. Also to put a donkey's collar round them and bring them to South running water and let them drink of it. Collect some broom, boil it and give the water to a person suffering from Dropsy. It is good for this disease.
Nettle soup is good to drink by one who has measles.
There are many persons who have a cure for a sprain. They can't tell anyone
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 15:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Cures
Long ago people used to have cures for various diseases. They did not call in the doctor as we do now-a-days. They used to make use of many herbs. Some of these herbs used were chicken-weed, nettles, water-cress, dandelions and seven sisters and crow-foot.
These were boiled and the water in which they were boiled was rubbed on the affected part. Sometimes it was drunk. The water was supposed to be good for rheumatic pains.
Celery plant is good for persons suffering from pains of any kind.
"Goose-aim" - fat of the goose adhering to the intestines - is kept in many houses and believed to be good for rubbing on swollen joints or parts of the body affected with pains.
There are many cures for "whooping cough". One is to get a piece of bread from a person who is
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 15:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The " Gullion Dubh " is a field in Anna-ma-kerrig. It is so called because it is wet and marshy and on account of the black ivy which grows in it. There is a field on Mrs. McGorman's land in Drumary called the "kiln field" because there used to be brick kilns burned in it.
There is a little meadow in Mr. Burke's land in Drumary called the Black Hollow and the path leading to it is called the "Worm Path" because it is very crooked.
A field near the school is called Lanes' Field because a man named Lane used to live in it. It now belongs to Mrs. Guthrie of Annah-ma-Kerrig and Lanes' house has disappeared.

Collected by
Brigid Mc Goldrick
Knockcorr
Newbliss
Peter McGORMAN
Drumary
Newbliss
Got from
Pat Smyth
Drumskelt
Newbliss
around 40 yrs. of age
Mrs B McGorman
Drumary
Newbliss
around 50 years of age
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 14:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seo scéal d'inis m'athair dom timpeall caoga bliain ó shoin. Thit an scéal amach ós cionn 70 bliain ó shoin.
Chónuig sean-fhear bocht, dealbh dar b'ainm dó Tomás Tóibín agus a bhean-chéile i dtigh beag buailte suas le tigh m'athair. Bhí naonúr cloinne acu. Seán an té ba shine. Nuair do tháinigh an t-am cuireadh é mar phrintíseach chun táiliúra. Tar éis bliana gearradh amach pádh dó. Tháinigh sé abhaile um Nodlaig agus cuireadh roimh na Fearradh Fáilte mar bhí fhios ná raibh Seán ag teacht le pócaibh folmha.
Cuireadh i gcóir dinnéar mór mar onóir ar theacht Sheáin. Shuí an t-athair ag ceann an bhúird agus bheúghaig gach duine eile isteach d'réir mar d'éid sé. Dáileadh an biadh blasta mór-thimpeall. Sar ar thosnuigh aoinne ar na sgeanaibh do chur i bhfeidhm labhair an t-athair mar seo :- "A' bhfuil feoil agat a Chaitlín?". "I have, dad, sir". "A' bhfuil feoil agat, a Mhary?" "I have, dad, sir". "A' bhfuil feoil agat a Thomáis?". "I have, dad, sir". Mar sin a d'imigh an cheist ceadna agus tháinigh an freagra ceadna ar feadh deich babhta. Chuir sé an cheist fós arís chun sean-Chaitlín - an mháthair - agus fuair mar freagra "Tá Thomáis". D'iompaigh an t-athair chun Sheáin agus le gliondar agus faobhar ina ghuth dúirt "Stick to your trade, Jack-a-Boy"
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
448
Some people would not put a horse or an ass under anything with wheels.Some people kill a cock or hen or goose and let the blood drop at the door in honour of St. Martin.
Friday is an unlucky day to get married is said to be unlucky to sow potatoes on Monday or Friday.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
443.
The people long ago made a lot of useful things out of paper,cloth,flowers and shells.
They made daisy necklaces of daisies.They made snares out of light wire.They made a circle of the wire into which a rabbits head fitted.Then they put a loop in the end.They then went to a rabbits burrow,and put the circle of wire outside the hole. When the rabbit came out his head went into the circle and he tried to draw himself out he drew the wire and the circle became smaller and smaller until it choked him.
They stuck shells on to boxes and made ornaments of them .They also
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
444
stuck them to flower pots and to picture frames.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
442
Paper is used for making belts.Gauze paper is used for making belts.Paper is used for making fans and fire screens also.
Snares are used for catching rabbits .A snare is a piece of wire with a loop in the end of it.The loop is put before the burrow and the other end of the snare is tied to the ground.When the rabbit comes out he sticks his head into the loop and the loop draws out and chokes him.
They used to make dolls out of rags. They gathered shells and stuck them to a box.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
441
My favourite pastime is making dolls out of hay.First i make a ball for the head and body.Then I get clothes and cover it.Then I make the legs and hands.
I make purses of paper.First I double the paper.Then I fold the two corners.Then I pull the top piece of the paper which is the cover.
I make fans of paper also .I cut a round piece of paper.Then I crease it and I cut it at the bottom.
I make baskets of grass.I make it round and I put a hole in the middle.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
440
them in snowy weather.When they are setting the bird basket to catch birds they put a stick under it and tie a cord off the stick.They put dry crumbs in under the basket and when the birds go in under the basket for the bread they draw the basket over them by means of the cord.
They make a sort of a gun with a stick by putting a hole through it.Then they put a piece of rubber at the end and put a stick through the hole .When they draw the rubber back the stick goes out of it.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people used to make garlands with daisies ,butter cups, and other small flowers.These were made much the same way as daisy chains ,but a good deal longer so that you could roll them around your head many times.
Boys have different pastimes .They make bird baskets with elm rods .They weave them in and out together. They catch birds with
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
439
ancient times people never got palm like what we get now only a plain cross made of stiff paper.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 13:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
438
Old Pastimes.
Children make necklets from large daisies which grow in meadows .They get a strong wisp of hay called a black -top and stick it through each daisy until a long string is produced.These necklets when worn look very pretty and there is a very fresh smell to be got from them.
The making of paper frocks for dolls is another very interesting pastime.Belts are also made from paper.In olden times the people made harps from paper.very nice fire-screens were made from white paper and nice designs were worked on them.
In very
anonymous contributor
2019-05-30 11:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision