Number of records in editorial history: 440972 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:48
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On the top of Cruinneac mountain in the district of Glentogher there is a Spring well and it is a well known fact that if you stir it up a great mist will rise and you will have great trouble in getting down of the mountain.
Out in the Meen in the district of Glenagannon there is a big rock about five ton weight. There is a track of five fingers on it and it is supposed that a giant threw it from the top of Cruinneac and when it fell it split in two. To this day you can see the finger tracks.
In the Glenagannon river near Craigtown there is a rock with a little well in the middle of it which is called the "warty well". Any one who goes there and washes
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:44
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rejected
awaiting decision
was hungry and he got up and ate the loaf.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:44
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awaiting decision
One time there were three men and they had no houses and they were half drunk. They drank all their money and they had only three pence left. They bought a small loaf and they said it was too little for the three of them. One of the men said whatever one would dream the best dream would get the loaf. They went into a barn and slept. When morning came the first man said that he dreamt he saw a turnip so big that it would take two horses to draw it into the house. The second man said he dreamt he saw a turnip and it took an acre of field to hold it. The third man said he dreamt he
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
One time long ago there was a very old man and he was very bent. He lived till he was 100 years of age and when he died he was so bent that the people of the house didn't know how they would get him into a coffin. They thought they would put a big stone on the top of him and tie it down with a bit of rope. They did this and then they put him into the coffin. During the wake there was a crowd of fellows in and when everything was quiet one of the fellows cut the rope off the stone and the stone rolled off the top of the man. The man jumped up and everyone n the house thought the man had come to life and they all ran out.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:39
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awaiting decision
Travelling people still call at my home. They have been calling for years. They are generally very poor, but some are fairly well off. Yes they sell small articles such as shoe-laces, soap, men's studs, combs, hair brushes, handkerchiefs, brooches, safety pins and lace to embroider the edge of a cloth. Some of the people buy these articles but others give them bread and tea or sugar or something to eat for an article. They generally buy these articles in some cheap shop like Woolworths in Limerick or in the Bargain Stores. These travellers are commonly called tramps or
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:07
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:06
approved
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awaiting decision
Then they started on their journey across the mountains to Gúgán. When he reached Gúgán he found he had left his books and spectacles in Drom-a-bhráca. He told the man behind him and the word was passed to the last man who was still in Drom-a-bhráca. He then took the books to Finnbarr. The sign of the books and spectacles remained on the rock.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:03
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awaiting decision
What is in a car that is no good for it ?
Noise.
A head, a foot and four legs ?
A bed.
How is an Aeroplane like a police-man ?
Because both of them take people up.
Patch upon patch without any stitches, riddle me that one and I will buy you a pair of breeches ?
A head of cabbage.
Forty sheep went out a gap, twenty white, and twenty black, A shepherd and his dog, how many feet were that ?
Two feet.
Twenty four white horses hanging in a stall, in comes the red one and licks them all ?
Your tongue licking your teeth.
Why is the sun like a good loaf ?
Because it is light when it rises.
Why is a train like a flea ?
Because it goes over sleepers.
Over the fire, under the fire, and yet not in the fire ?
A cake in an oven.
As round as an apple, as plump as a ball, it would climb the church over, steeple and all ?
The sun.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:02
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many of this generation have dug for but all failed to find the right spot.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 23:01
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The name of my townland is Barnfield. It is in the parish of Killeentierna and in the barony of Trughenacmy. There are eight families in the townland having a population of about fifty. The townland has all slated dwellings. there are four people over seventy living there. They do not know Irish or cannot tell stories in Irish or in English. The houses were more numerous in olden times than they are now. The people emigrated to America and Australia.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:57
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awaiting decision
Who ever has the first smoke up on that morning will have bad luck that year. The people put may flowers, buttercups, primroses and whin blossoms on the door step. If you give away milk on May Eve you will have bad luck that year. It is said that the old women used to turn themselves into witches that day and get a heather brush to sweep the dew and while doing so they would say "come a' to me, come a' to me," meaning to take away their neighbour's milk and butter.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:56
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awaiting decision
It is the custom in this part of the country for the people to make rush crosses on the day before St. Brigid's day and on that day they should be put up. The rushes are to be brought into the house in the following way: Some girl goes out and brings them to the door and kneels on the door step and says, "go down on yours knees and open your eyes and let in Brigid." Those inside who also kneel answer, "She's welcome, she's welcome, she's welcome. This must be said three times. Then the rushes are brought in and the crosses are made.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:55
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Shops were not plentiful long ago in Ireland except a shebeen here and there. There was only one shop in Clarina and it was owned by a woman named Dia Whack. There were two in Mungret about a hundred years ago. One of them was owned by a woman called Maig Moloney. In it was sold two penny packets of tea, penny packets of sugar and two-penny loaves of bread. Poteen was soled secretely. The only sweets
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:52
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awaiting decision
Old John Clancy gave the trade to a lame son of his. Sometime ago the son went away to England as he could not make a living out of rod work. The mother who knew how to weave rods attempted to carry on the trade but for want of a market, she gave it up and went out charing
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:50
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IV
Sweet Lough Gill with Isles so grand
We oft times wandered hand in hand
And rode along that shining strand
Far out from dear old Sligo.
Chorus
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:47
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If I went up a hill on an ass, what would I get down on ?
A goose.
Travels high, lies low, wears boots but has none ?
A football.
What would make more noise under a gate than one pig ?
Two pigs.
As I went out a slippery gap, I met my Uncle Daisy, a stick in his hand, a stone in his middle. Riddle me that and I will give you a fiddle ?
A sloe in a bush.
Why does a dog give two turns before he sits down ?
Because one good turn deserves another.
Brown I am, much admired, many a horse I ever tired; tire a horse, wear a man, tell me this riddle if you can ?
A saddle.
What is it that has teeth and cannot eat ?
A comb.
As round as an apple, as flat as a pan, one side a woman the other a man ?
A penny.
As round as a rainbow, it has teeth like a cat, if you were guessing you would never guess that ?
A briar.
Tink tank, under a bank, ten drawing four ?
A woman milking a cow.
Little red Nancy sitting by the wall, eats all she gets, but drinks none atall ?
A fire.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:46
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awaiting decision
The ruins of old schools are to be seen everywhere. About forty yards from Glostermin school lies the site of an old school. It was built by a man named Mr Murphy in the eighteenth century for the education of his children. It was thatched and had no seats like today. The books were not like those of to day. They wrote on slates or with feather pens.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:46
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awaiting decision
My father told me that he heard it old in his youth about a school at Derradda in the townland of Coragh. It was a mudwall house with a thatched roof. The teachers name was Master O Brien.
There were no pens or pencils used but the children used to write with quills. There were no seats and the children had to sit on turf. There was no Irish taught and the books the had were in the form of what we call a newspaper at present.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:45
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awaiting decision
In the townland of Adoon in the 19 th century there dwell a man named John Reynolds who made barrels. He was called "curley" because he had very dark curley hair. He made the barrels from dale and would bend them with hot water and he made the hoops from holy and briars or hoop iron. His son carries on the trade yet.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:45
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awaiting decision
fathach a mharbhuigh athair an gasúr sin.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:43
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Some years ago when butter-making was in vogue in this district the people put their butter in ferkins which they bought from a cooper. Their is one such tradesman in this district named James Donnelly. He bought the ash trees and got them out into boards in the sawmill. These boards were about four inches wide by a half inch thick and stood about thirty together and shaped the ferkin like a small barell. He then made hoops out of "Sailidhe rods split in the centre to keep the staves these are the boards together
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:42
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awaiting decision
can be made from marl. (blue clay) by being rolled up and set to dry.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:41
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:40
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Once upon a time a fox was full of fleas, and he could not rid himself of them. At last he found a plan by which he did away with them. As he was walking through the fields he found a piece of wool and put it in his mouth. Then he went to a deep river and put his tail in first. The deeper he went the further the fleas went up his back. He went down into the water till there was noting but his nose up. All the fleas left his body and went into the wool. Then he swam out and there was not a flea left on his body.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:38
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:36
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very miserly. One evening when himself and his workman were working in the field the Angelus Bell rang in Fermoy. As soon as old Fouhy heard it he said to the man 'I wonder who's dead to-day'. The next evening again as soon as he heard the first stroke of the bell he said 'What a terrible lot of people is dying, I wonder who's burying to-day'. The third evening the man was too clever for him. The very minute the man heard the bell he said 'Well whoever is dead I'm going to the funeral' and he got his coat and went home to his tea.
'Whoever is dead I'm going to the funeral' as the man said to old Fouhy.
As high as Corrin Tigherana.
'I'm not the legs of this meeting - as Fenton said to Martin Riordan. (He was reminding him that as chairman he {Fenton} should be the 'head'.
They're fainting with grandeur.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 22:21
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awaiting decision
There is a liss in Mr. Patrick Dempsey's land from which the place gets its name - Lissalondoon. The liss is about fifty yards on the right of the public road leading from Craughwell to Dunsandle. About ninety years ago there was light seen in a certain place in the liss, and there the gold is supposed to be hidden. A family by the name of Moloney, from Lecarrow, living a quarter of a mile from the liss dug for the crock of gold but did not succeed in getting it. The light was never seen since.
There is a local tradition that a fairy met a man in the liss, and told him there was a bag of precious pearls hidden in the liss. Next day the man dug for it but he failed to get them. It is said he died a week later.
There is supposed to be a crock of gold hidden beside the old castle of Moyode. The land where the castle is situated is now owned by Mr. Brian Uniacke Glebe, Croghwell, Co. Galway. A family by the name of Hearty living near the castle, dug for the treasure but failed to get it. It was guarded by a black cat.
There is supposed to be a crock of gold hidden in Baile Dorca in Mrs. Kennedy's land. Baile Dorca is about a quarter of a mile on the right of the public road leading from Craughwell to Dunsandle.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 21:59
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awaiting decision
There was a man passing a graveyard late one night and a voice from the grave halted him exclaiming -
"Remember, man, as you pass by". As you are now, so once was I; As I am now so you, too, shall be. Remember death and follow me".
The man answered like a soldier and said "To follow you, I am quite content but I'm damned if I know which way you went" The person that spoke from the Graveyard was dead for a good many years.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 21:53
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flower comes on instead.
There is also another herb; the name of it is Spunk, it grows in tillage fields, its colour is green, it grows in poor land. It spreads rapidly and is very hard to banish it, the colour of it is green and it has long white roots.
There is also a herb known of, the name of it is dockleaf; it cures nettle burn. It makes land poor and it spreads rapidly, and it is harmful to the crops.
There is another herb also, the name of it is "naintéog searg"; it grows in rich land and it makes it poor. Its roots spread rapidly, the colour of it is brown.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 21:43
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awaiting decision
There are a good many herbs found in this district. There is a herb known as "Cáilleach Caorac". It grows somewhat like a small cabbage stalk and it does not flower, but forms little berries which are yellow in colour. It is poison for sheep, and if they ate it they would turn black, and die. It usually grows in dry rocky land.
There is a herb called dandelion. It is given to fowl. It grows in rich and poor land.
There is another herb called glórán. It grows in meadows, its colour is green and there are seeds in the top of it. When the seeds fall off and scatter a white
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 21:13
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is a piece of land in Lurganure called ''Galway'' on account of the wet swampy land that is in it.
There is a farm near our school called
''lamb fields'' from a man named Bernard Brady who used keep a lot of sheep and young lambs on his farm.
There is a field in Tievenaman called ''schoolhouse field'' because there was an old school built there many years ago. The ''well field'' got its name from a large well in the centre of the field.
There was a house in Lurganure called ''Tigh an Gaduidhe''
the house of the rogues which got its name from thieves who lived there.
''Peter's Piece'' got its name from a man called Peter Owens who lived there on a very small piece of land long ago.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 21:08
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(III)
Is binne guth a béilín
Ag seinimh amhraín Gaedhilge
Ná'n londubh ná'n céirseach
'S ná ceól na sluaighte sídhe
Cian maith atá dá dhéanamh
Tá mo chroidh istig dá réabadh
Is géarr is geárr an t-éag uaim
Muna bhfaghaidh mé í mar mnaoi
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 21:05
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awaiting decision
'Sí Brígdín deas Ní Máille
An cailín múinte manla
Níl bean ar bith san áit seo
Níos ailne ná í
Dá bfaghainnse féin mo rogha
De béithibh breághtha an domhain
Sí Bríghid bheith i mbun na n-abhann
Le Páidín Dubh ó Néid

(II)
Is mó cailín speíreamhail
A imtheóchadh liom go h-éasga
Fé shról is fé shíodaibh gléasta
Gur seóide i ngach dlaoi
Ac b'fhearr liom Bríghid mar chéile
Ná inghean Rígh na Gréige
'S ná Hélen tharraing léirsgrios
A's togadh ar an Traoi.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 21:01
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rejected
awaiting decision
is a piece of land in Lurganure called ''Galway'' on account of the wet swampy land that is in it.
There is a farm near our school called
''lamb fields'' from a man named Bernard Brady who used keep a lot of sheep and young lambs on his farm.
There is a field in Tievenaman called ''schoolhouse field'' because there was an old school built there many years ago. The ''well field'' got its name from a large well in the centre of the filed.
There was a house in Lurganure called ''?????????''
the house of the rogues which got its name from thieves who lived there.
''Peter's Piece'' got its name from a man called Peter Owens who lived there on a very small piece of land long ago.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:54
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rejected
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(V)
Tá an Gaoluinn fós ar bhártainn ann
Go láidir tréan
Is beidh go deó fé ghradaim ann
Mar bhárr an léiginn
Tá connradh fhear groidhe calma ann
Gur b'fonn leó troidh le Sasanaig
Nó fós le h-aon treibh ceannairce
Bheadh páirteac le béir

(VI)
Gluaisidh romaibh a ghasra ghil
Na raidte séin
Buailidh síos na galla briuc
Tá lá i ngonta ag téacht
Bhíodh Gaoluinn dúthchais fearainn luirc
Bhúr mbealaibh coidche á sgreagadh agaibh
Tá cáirde an Bhéárla caithte anois
Is ní cás linne é.

Máire Ní Chriodáin, Cúil-lar-Thair a sgríob síos é
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:54
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song was ''Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake.''
Pat Byrd's favourite songs were
''The Fenian man-o-war.''
Robert Emmet and Brennan on the moor
''The song Brennan on the Moor''
refers to a notorious criminal (who lived near the present town of Ballyjamesduff) and who used rob the wealthy people and give the money to the poor. He lived a roving life, and people never knew when he was present in the district.
Phil Reilly, Waterloo, used sing
''The Hackler from Grousehall.''
This song referred to the activities of a sergeant of the RIC stationed at Grousehall Barracks.
This song referred to a ''hackler'' called Pat McDonnell locally known as ''Paddy Jack'' who lived at Grousehall, and used to hackle flax for the farmers in the district.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:52
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to get four other men to help him to lift the barrow and when he got home he saw all the big stones and he was very angry.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:51
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awaiting decision
One time long ago there was a man and he was very fond of playing tricks on everyone. One day he went out to the hill for a barrow of turf. When he was coming home again with the barrow of turf he thought he would go into a house beside the road and rest himself. He left down the barrow of turf at the back of the house and then went into the house. When he was in about half an he began to smoke his pipe. Then one of the boys who was living in the house went outside and when he saw the barrow of turf he thought he would play a trick on the man so he lifted out all the turf and he filled the barrow with big stones and then covered the stones with turf. When the man came out he tried to lift the barrow but found that he couldn't lift it and he had
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:46
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awaiting decision
man and she and all the neighbours set out in search of the sick man. When they were searching a long time somebody got him sitting under a whin bush hatching on four big turnips.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:46
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awaiting decision
Phil Coyle, Drumallaght, was a famous oarsman. He made boasr and won races with them on Lacken Lake, and on the Boyne.
Great mowers in this district were Owen Traynor, Middle Termon Killinkere, Peter Smith, Bogesky, Patrick Kavanagh, Drumfomina and James Stafford, Tievenaman.
Owen Traynor used mow an acre of meadow each day during the Summer months and his pay was 1s per day.
Peter Smyth, Bogeskey, could mow an acre and a rood daily.
He could sharpen his scythe so well that he could cut off the top of a lap of hay without moving the bottom part of it. He used perform this feat several times, and won large sums of money in bets on it.
James Stafford, used mow an acre and a rood of oats daily when harvesting in Co. Meath.
Dancers
The principal dancers in this district were W. Nicholas Comey, Termon, Charles Smyth, Lurganure, Pat O' Brien, Lurgan, John Traynor, Termon, James Reilly, Lurganure, Nicholas Comey, used teach dancing in his district, and the chief dances he used teach were Reels, Hornpipes and Petticoatees.
Singers
Matthew Lynch, Carrickeeshal, Pat Byrd, Drumfomina, Phil Reilly, Waterloo, were good singers. Matthew Lynch's favourite
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:45
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awaiting decision
One time there was a man and he became very ill. The woman of the house had some hens and she wanted them to hatch. She went to the chemist for stuff to make the hens hatch and she got a bottle of medicine for too. When she came home she did not know the difference between the bottle of medicine and the stuff for the hens. So she gave the hens the bottle of medicine and the sick man that was for the hens to make them hatch. When the woman went to bed and was sleeping and everything was quiet the man got up out of the bed and went outside. When morning came the woman got up and she could not see the sick
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:43
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awaiting decision
(III)
Ach b'aoibhinn leat bheith sealad ann
Fé scát coille ar féar
Ag féachaint ar na garbh cnuic
Is sgáil treasna ag téacht
Na h-uain i lár an mhacaire
Go suairc anáirde ag preabadh acu
Is an ghrian anuas ag téacht
Go sámh socair séimh

(IV)
Do chuadhas anáirde ar bhalla
Den caisleán groidhe glé
Is do chonnach mar tolladh daingean é
Ag namhaid le piléar
Is nuair a smaoininn féin ar fhairsingeacht
An cine tógadh is beathuigheadh ann
Is mé bhíonn go dubh croideach atuiseac (?)
Ó táid (?) siad gan réim.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:41
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awaiting decision
When he came as far as the house the pig was on the street and the man hit the pig on the head with the mell. The man who owned the pig said if you hit the pig again I will hit you. So you see he wanted to give the pig a nice death because he was very fond of it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:40
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awaiting decision
One time there was a man and he lived in Trenbane near Carndonagh. He went away to America and some years after he came home and he was very rich. He bought a big farm but he never worked any of it and he was always drinking. He bought a little pig and he called it Johnnie. Everyplace that the man went the pig followed him. So he drank all his money and he had none to pay the rent. All he had to sell was the pig. The bailiffs came up to put him out of the house. He asked them which butcher was the best round here and they said Johnnie McCallion. They sent for him to come to kill the pig. He got ready to come to kill the pig and he took his mell with him.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:37
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awaiting decision
daily when harvesting into Meath.
Dancers.
The principal dancers in this district were Nicholas Comey, Termon, Charles Smith, Lurganure, Patrick O' Brien, Lurgan, John Traynor, Termon, and James Reilly Lurganure.
Nicholas Comey used teach dancing in his district, and the chief dances he used teach were Reels and Hornpipes, and Petticoatees.
Phil Reilly, Waterloo and Pat Byrd were very good singers. Phil Reilly used sing at all weddings, and parties, and his chief songs were
''The orangeman's Confession''
''The boys from Drumlane,''
''Jesse at the railway bar,'' and
''The hackler from Groushall.
This last song eferred to a sergeant of the R.I.C stationed in Grousehall, and who made himself very unpopular in the district.
The songs Pat Byrd used sing
''Brennan on the moor,''
''Robert Emmett,'' and
''The Fenian man o' war.''
The song
''Brennan on the moor'' refers to a notorious criminal (who lived near the present town of Ballyjamesduff, and) who used rob the wealthy people, and give the money to the poor. He lived a roving life, and people never knew when he was in the district.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
'S is thiar ag Béal na Carraige
Táid sáir-fhir glé
Do riarfhadh céadta a sgamall broid
le láimh glic tréan
Luicht labhartha gaedhilge fearainne uirthe
go líomhtha léigheannta blasta iad
Nach staonfadh coidhche i sparainn chnuic
Roimh namhaid dá mhéid

(II)
Do chuadhas ar staír ón gcathair ann
le fáinne an lae
Bhí an drúcht ar bhárr an gheamhair ghlas
Is fás fada an fheír
Bhí an grian go lónnrach taithneamhach
Ag scuabadh an ceó de bharra chnoc
'S cuach ar ghéoíg ag labhairt ann
Is na táinte mion éan
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:36
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awaiting decision
Mohera Road from [?] Cross to Smith's Cross.
Ballyoran Rod from Kenny's Cross to Fermoy.
The Forge Cross on Conna & Coolagown roads.
Killcruaig between Kenny's Cross and Dempsey's Cross.
Boherawarra between Britway & Two-pot House.
The Aghern Road from Fermoy to Ahern & Conna.
The Old Youghal Road from Castlelyons on out by Britway and Clonmult to Youghal.
The Hill Road over Kilcruig from Castlelyons to Fermoy.
A road near Kilworth called the Court Road, It is also called the Old Rocky Road to Dublin.
An old road from Rathcormac to Cork is called the Black Road.
The Old Coach Road leading to Kilworth.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:35
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rejected
awaiting decision
leis na claidheamh acht chuir na Fianna ola ar luta Goll Mór agus chuir síad in a chodhladh e.
Níor dhean síád tada do. Dhearg Mór act feaste eile a dheanamh ar a shon agus leis sin chuinneadar in a shuidhe go maidir é.
Ar breachadh an lae thosuigh an beirt ag troid arís acht bhí Dearg Mór tuirseach taréis an throid a bhi acú an oidhche roimhe sin agus marbh Goll Mór é
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cork - a dancing platform was there long ago.
Barrashugane - the road over the hill from Ardra, Castlelyons to Britway.
The Spaniard's Cross on the road from Pellick, Castlelyons to Leary's Cross.
The Wood Road from Ardra to Spaniard's X.
Ballinterry Road from Leary's Cross (Castlelyons) to Dr. Barry's Bridge, Rathcormac, Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a farm in Glenagannon which at present belongs to Charles Farren. But at the time I am going to tell about it belonged to Gibbons. There was a house on the farm in which they lived. A few yards away from the house they dug a hole to make a cesspool. After they had done this they could not get sleeping at night with all the strange noises, singing and all kinds of music around the house. till at last they were obliged to fill up the hole again.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Watercress grows in shallow rivers. It is used as a salad and is a blood-purifier.
Spurge grows by the hedges. Its stem contains a milky fluid that cures warts.
Fox glove grows by the hedges. Its flower contains a substance that is good for heart disease
Marshmallow is used for making ointment.
Dandelion juice is good for warts.
Dock root and chick-weed grow only in poor land
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
last sight of the cow he saw was her running over Dromore with her tail over her back in smoke.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One time long ago there was a man named Callaghan and he lived in Trenbane. He had an elf shot cow. Every morning it took all the men in Trenbane to lift her. One day they took this cow out of the byre and put her in the barn to give her room. One day the man went out to lift her and they saw manure on the top of the straw. Some days after the man got up early and went out to the barn. When he went out the cow was up on the top of the straw eating away. He got a flail and started beating away at the cow. When he was tired beating with the flail he ran out for the graip. The cow ran out of the barn and the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nettles are the worst weed. They spread quickly and are hard to get rid of. Long ago people used to feed pigs and turkeys with nettles.
Thistles are not found on poor land. They grow only on good land. They are found mostly on pasture where sheep graze.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Molloy, Aughalion jumped Kilnacrott river where it was nne years wide when being pursued by two men who intended to injure him. When he reached the opposite bank he defined them to come any farther.
Walter Byers, Cornagrove jumped a river which was nine yards wide for the bet of a pound.
Phil Coyle, Drumallaught was a famous oarsman. He made boats and won races with them on Lacken Lake and on the Boyne at Drogheda.
Great mowers in this district were Owen Traynor, Middle Termon, Peter Smth, Bogeskey, Patrick Cavanagh, Drumformina, and James Stafford, Tievenaman.
Owen Traynor used mow an acre of meadow each day during the summer months, and his hay was a shilling a day.
Peter Smith, Bogeskey could mow an acre and a rood daily. He could sharpen his scythe so well that he could cut off the top of a lap of hay without moving the bottom part of it. He used perform the feat several times and won several bets of money on it.
James Stafford used mow an acre and a rood of oats,
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The harbour is situated on the eastern side of Skerries and faces North east towards Balbriggan. The islands lying to the south form a breakwater to the harbour proper. The harbour is built on Red Island and nothing only the road connects the harbour with the mainland proper. At the back of the harbour there is a high barrier of rocks on which is situated the Tower or Pavilion. The harbour is the shape of the letter U. There is only one deep channel entering the harbour proper. This channel runs from the pier in an north easterly direction and ships, especially. those heavily laden have to be handled carefully so as to avoid the rocks. The skipper gives the island a wide birth until he brings the north-most house in the town in line with the wind mill on the hill of Skerries. This is done to keep clear of the cross . When the skipper brings those marks to bear he turns his ship and enters the harbour by the "road".
In 1775 the Irish Parliament gave a grant of £2,000 for the construction of a pier in Skerries and also gave £1,500 for the same purpose in 1767. After some time the pier fell into decay, but was repaired by Hans Hamilton. In 1721, the Hamiltons purchased Skerries and the Manor of Hacketstown from the earl of Thomond. There was a tax put on every ship entering the harbour. Those coming from England had to pay 4d and those coming from foreign countries 3/4.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
expression is used 'He did that in spite of his teeth as the tramp said to Mrs Pyne.'
In two shakes of a nanny goat's tail.
As honest as the day.
Small but good for eating like the apple.
As happy as Moll Bell.
As saucy as a weasel.
As drunk as Ballinglanna
As stupid as bog óinseach.
As tough as a 'gad'.
As tough as a wheel-string.
As deaf as a bittle.
A bad case your worship.
As hard as rod-iron.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
very miserly. One evening when himself and his workman were working in the field the Angelus Bell rang in Fermoy. As soon as old Fouhy heard it he said to the man 'I wonder who's dead to-day'. The next evening again as soon as he heard the first stroke of the bell he said 'What a terrible lot of people is dying, I wonder who's burying to-day'. The third evening the man was too clever for him. The very minute the man heard the bell he said 'Well whoever is dead I'm going to the funeral' and he got his coat and went home to his tea.
'Whoever is dead I'm going to the funeral' as the man said to old Fouhy.
As high as Corrin [?]
'I'm not the legs of this meeting - as Fenton said to Martin Riordan. (He was reminding him that as chairman he {Fenton} should be the 'head'.
They're fainting with grandeur.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As wicked as a basket of cats.
As wicked as a basket of weasels.
As wild as a hare
As hardy as a hare
As lively as a bee
As ignorant as the heel of my boot
As thick (ignorant) as a bull's lug.
As obstinate as a mule
"A bit of the way with everyone like 'Lana' Machree's dog
Youth must have its fling - as the farmer said when the banb jumped out of the crib.
Every man to his own taste - as the fellow said when he kissed the cow.
A farmer named Fouhy of Grange, Fermoy, was
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Townland - Grange
Parish - Castlelyons
Barony - Barrymore.
No. of Families - Four.
All family names different.
Population Twenty-one.
One thatched house. Others slated.
There is one person over seventy who speaks Irish and English. His name is
Ned Coleman
Grange.
Castlelyons.
Co. Cork.
He will not tell any stories.
Houses were not more numerous.
There were not any emigrations.
The townland is not mentioned in any song or story.
The land is good. There are no rivers or lakes. There is a small stream flowing into the River Bride.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Patrick Byrd, Drumallaught lifted a stone five cwt which was on a ditch, and carried it about a quarter of a mile to Aasan bridge.
Micheal Rudden, Straugh lifted 6 cwt of flour on his back unaided, and carried it up a stairs in Ballyjamesduff.
John Robert Nixon, Assan carried 7 cwt of artificial manure a distance of three perches for a bet of four ounces of tobacco.
The manure was put on his back by a few men, and the feat was witnessed by Frank Nulty, Assan.
James Kinkade
James Carolan, Carrickaheesil was a great wrestler, and boxer, and used fight with bare fists.
Michale Gillick, Killagrogan would walk forty miles to a fair in Leitrim to buy a cow and he used take her home with him next day.
John King, Billis used walk forty miles a day to fairs without resting or eating any food on the journey.
Patrick Reilly, a poor travelling man walked from Ballyjamesduff, Co Cavan to Wicklow for the bet of two pound.
He started in the morning and reached Wicklow before night.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Townland - Glenarouske.
Parish -, Co. Cork.
Barony - Barrymore.
No. of families - thirteen.
Family name most common - Smith: three families
Most of the houses are thatched. A few new ones are slated.
Canon OLeary once asked at Mac Hugh's Stations if they knew what Glenarouske meant. They said no. He told them that it meant - 'the glen of the rusty water'.
There is a bog near Mac Hugh's house and a reddish-brown scum comes on the top of the pools in the summer time.
There are no very old people there. There are about five people near seventy.
They cannot tell any stories. They cannot speak Irish. Houses were more numerous long ago.
The land is hilly and boggy and there is some very good land. There is no wood or river or lake.
There is one stream flowing down near Mac Hugh's house.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Jim Smith, Gola, Killinkere was a famous county footballer.
He captained the Cavan team fro several years, and led his men to victory in the All Ireland Football Championship at Croke Park in 1993, and again in 1935.
He played with the Cavan team that drew with Kerry in 1937, and was injured in the replay. Followers of the game say he was the greatest footballer of this generation.
The chief strong men in this district were Thomas McEvoy, Patrick Byrne, Patrick Byrd, Thomas Lynch, Peter Boylan, John Robert Nixon, James Kinkad, Patrick McCormack, Peter Smyth, Peter McGivney and James Clarke.
Tom McEvoy, a native of Wexford, spent a number of years in this district as a miller. He was a very strong man, and once won a bet of a pound by carrying 8 cwt of meal up a stairs at Billis mill. He also had to put the meal on his back without any assistance.
Patrick Byrne, Drumallaught was another very strong man.
He was able to throw a fifty-six lbs weight a distance of twenty seven and a half feet.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
d'athruigh sí in a fhuil é. Dubhairt an t-easóg leis go ngabhfadh sé go dtí teach agus nach mbead aonne istigh sa teach acht go mbead pota feola chrochta os cionn na teineadh. Dubhairt sí leis go dtiochfadh bean isteach nuair bhéad sé tamall istigh agus dearfhad sí leis cú a ceangal abair leí nach bhfuil aon rópa a'd agus tiubhraidh sí ribe as a cuid gruaighe duit. Deirfhid sí leat sul a gceanngclóchaidh tú an cú píosa feola a thabhairt as an bpota dí. Nuair a bhéas tú ag togáíl an feoil chaith an ribe sa teine. D'imtigh an buachall agus tháinig sé go dtí an teach agus rinne sé an rud a dubhairt an t-easóg leis agus do marbuigh sé an bhean. Bhí go leór airgead ag an mbean agus fuair sé é cuaid sé abhaile cuig a mháthair agus bhíodar an -saidbhear as sin amach.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Name - Castlelyons
Townland - Mohera
Parish - Castlelyons, Co. Cork
Barony - Barrymore
Number of families - about sixty.
Number of people - about three hundred
Most common name - Barry
Most of the houses are slated now. There are still a good many thatched houses around the village.
The townland got its name from the Ó hÁtháin's[?] who had their castle there before the De Barry's came.
John Daly, Castlelyons, is over seventy years of age. He is a shoemaker. He can tell stories about long ago.
There were far more houses in the village long ago. The majority of them are now in ruins. Not many people emigrated from Castlelyons to America, but when men were caught poaching salmon in the River Bride they used often go away to America before they were tried.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 20:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cork - a dancing platform was there long ago.
Barrashugane - the road over the hill from Ardra, Castlelyons to Britway.
The Spaniard's Cross on the from from Pellick, Castlelyons to Leary's Cross.
The Wood Road from Ardra to Spaniard's X.
Ballinterry Road from Leary's Cross (Castlelyons) to Dr. Barry's Bridge, Rathcormac, Co. Cork.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and cars can cross there now in the summer time. Long ago there was no bridge there and the people used to walk across. After the bridge was built a big deep hole came below it and it is only people who know it well can drive a horse across it.
Ballinterry Ford across the Flesk on the road between Leary's Cross Castlelyons and Rathcormac.
Two-pot House Cross at Barrafohona. A man was hanged there between the shafts of a car during the penal times.
The Cross of Agherne, there is a dance there in the summer time.
The Graveyard Cross, Britway, Castlelyons, a dance used be held there long ago. There is a big stone at the cross that the men used be casting.
Corrin Cross on the road from Fermoy to
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mbuachaill píosa den fheóil a bhí sa bpota a thabhairt dí. Dúbhairt an buachaill nac dtabharfadh go mba strainséara sa teach é féin. Dubhairt sí leis píosa de feóil a thabhairt dí no go marbhocaidh sí e. Thug sé píosa den feoil dí agus chuimil sí treasna ghríosaigh é. Dúbhairt sí leis an cú a cheangal agus dubhairt sé nach raibh aon rópa aige. Thug sí ribhe as a cuid gruaighe dhó agus ceangal an buachaill an gadhar leis an ribe.
Nuair a bhí sin deanta ag an mbuachaill fuair an bhean greim ar agus thosuighe sí dá mharbhughadh coghnadh coghnadh a chú arsa an buachaill. Ní féádfainn arsa an cú tá mé ag fághail bháis. congad congadh a ribe arsa an bean agus marbuig sí an cú agus an buachaill. Cuaidh an buachaill eile agus camán luatre aige bu é an sórt buachall é bhiodh sé sa luathre í gcomnuidhe . Dubhairt a mhathair leis gan dul ag saothrú a beatha. Dubhairt sé leí da cáca a chur síos agus nuair a bhí siad bacháílte d'iarr sí dhe cén ceann a togfadh dubhairt go dtógfhad sé an cácha beag agus mo beannacht. D'imthig sé leis go dtáinig sé chuig tobar. Tainig easog amach chuige agus d'fhiarr sé píosa den arán air agus thug sé píosa den arán dí. Nuair a thug sé an arán dí cuaidh sí isteach sa tobar agus
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Boherclay between Two pot House & Barrafohona.
Bawngour Road from Castlelyons to Terramount.
Boreenahawe between Ballyoran Road and Farran Road.
Boreenaleasa between Gortroe Graveyard near Bartlemy Co. Cork and Kilawilling (Castlelyons)
Hag's Cross - four roads meet there, the road from Ahern, the road from the Metal Bridge, the road from Castlelyons, the road from Coole. An old hag was seen walking there at night.
The Ruane from Britway to Dooley's Cross.
The New Line from Dromey's house (Britway) halfway across the fields to Con Buckley's of Barrafohona. It was built in the famine times and was never finished. It is covered with briars and ferns now.
Belacoon Ford on the River Bride where the Metal Bridge now is at Ballyroberts. Horses
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Whooping Cough:
1st Cure: When a child would have the Whooping Cough the father or mother would go to a house where a boy and girl of the same name were married and ask them for a cure for the Whooping Cough. Anything given by this pair such as milk, sweets, sugar, or water, the parent would take home and give to the child. This was supposed to help to cure.
2nd Cure: If a parent of the child who was suffering from the Whooping Cough, happened to meet a man with a piebald horse on the road and ask him for a cure for the Whooping Cough, whatever the man gave, the parent would give it to the child.
3rd Cure: Another cure was for the girl sponsor of the child to tie a red ribbon round the neck of the child suffering from the Whooping Cough.
Tumours
When everything else failed to cure a tumour a locha leech was applied to it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mohera Road from [?] Cross to Smith;s Cross.
Ballyoran Rod from Kenny's Cross to Fermoy.
The Forge Cross on Conna & Coolagown roads.
Killcruaig between Kenny's Cross and Dempsey's Cross.
Boherawarra between Britway & Two-pot House.
The Aghern Road from Fermoy to Ahern & Conna.
The Old Youghal Road from Castlelyons on out by Britway and Clonmult to Youghal.
The Hill Road over Kilcruig from Castlelyons to Fermoy.
A road near Kilworth called the Court Road, It is also called the Old Rocky Road to Dublin.
An old road from Rathcormac to Cork is called the Black Road.
The Old Coach Road leading to Kilworth.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The games I play are Frog jump, Tig, Hide and Seek, Duck in the Granny.
In the summer we play tops, and spin tops, play hand-ball, pitch and toss, and bowling.
In the autumn we pick blackberries and crack chestnuts.
On Oct 31st we have snap-apple.
Children's games are High Gates, Blind Man's Buff, Hunt the Fox.
Indoor games are Cards, Forfeits, Hide the Button, Burn the Biscuit.
The chief card games are One hundred and ten, Forty five, Twenty five, Rummy.
In the autumn we crack galls. (chestnuts)
In the summer we play Gobs, Queeny.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí bean agus triúr mac ann fadó an mac ba sine aca dúbhairt sé go ngabhfadh sé ag saothrughadh a bheatha. Dúbhairt an mac leis an tsean bhean cáca beag agus cáca mór a dheanadh.
Rinne sí an cáca beag agus an cáca mór dhó agus nuair a bhíodar bácailte d'fiarrfuigh sí de cé aca de na cácai a thógfadh sé. Dubhairt sé go dtógfadh sé an cáca mór agus a mhallacht. Thóg sé an cáca mór agus cuir sé i-na mhála é agus bhí a mháthair ag caitheadh mallachtaí ar nó gur imthigh sé as a amharc. Dimthigh sé leis go dtáinig sé go tobar agus shuidhe sé síos thosuigh sé ag ithe an cáca. Tháinig easogín amach chuige agus d'fiarr sí píosa den cháca ar . Dúbhairt sé leí go raibh sé sáthach gann aige fein. Nuair a chonnaic sí é sin léím sí isteach san uisge agus shaluigh sí an t-uisge. Dimthigh an buachaill leis go dtáinig sé go dtí teach. Ní raibh aon duine istigh san teach acht bhí pota crochta ós cionn na teineadh agus é lán de fheóil. Ní raibh an buachaill í bhfad istigh nó go dtáinig bean isteach agus dubhairt sí leis an
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 19:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The land around here was owned by Perrott who lived in the Manor, Castlelyons where General Bond lives now. It was called the Perrott Estate. The landlords were very harsh and unjust so that in olden days the farmers joined together to fight against the high rents.
The land around Bartlemy, Rathcormac Co. Cork was owned by Bury Barry and
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leis na claidheamh acht chuir na Fianna ola ar luta Goll Mór agus chuir síad ina chodhladh e.
Níor dhean síád tada do. Dhearg Mór act feaste eile a dheanamh ar a shon agus leis sin chuinneadar in a shuidhe go maidir é.
Ar breachadh an lae thosuigh an beirt ag troid arís acht bhí Dearg Mór tuirseach taréis an throid a bhi acú an oidhche roimhe sin agus marbh Goll Mór é
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leis na claidheamh acht chuir na Fianna ola ar luta Goll Mór agus chuir síad ina chodhladh e.
Níor dhean síád tada do. Dhearg Mór act feaste eile a dheanamh ar a shon agus leis sin chuinneadar in a shuidhe go maidir é.
Ar breachadh an lae thosuigh an beirt ag troid arís acht bhí Dearg Mór tuirseach taréis an throid a bhi acú an oidhche roimhe sin agus marbh Goll Mór é
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leis na claidheamh acht chuir na Fianna ola ar luta Goll Mór agus chuir síad ina chodhladh e.
Níor dhean síád tada do. Dhearg Mór act feaste eile a dheanamh ar a shon agus leis sin chuinneadar in a shuidhe go maidir é.
Ar breachadh an lae thosuigh an beirt ag troid arís acht bhí Dearg Mór tuirseach taréis an throid a bhi acú an oidhche roimhe sin agus marbh Goll Mór é
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leis na claidheamh acht chuir na Fianna ola ar luta Goll Mór agus chuir síad ina chodhladh e.
Níor dhean síád tada do. Dhearg Mór act feaste eile a dheanamh ar a shon agus leis sin chuinneadar in a shuidhe go maidir é.
Ar breachadh an lae thosuigh an beirt ag troid arís acht bhí Dearg Mór tuirseach taréis an throid a bhi acú an oidhche roimhe sin agus marbh Goll Mór e
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mór air roimh Goll Mór.
Ba ghearr tháinich na Fianna go dtí an campa.
Nuair a chonnaicheadar é rinne síad feasta mór dhó.
I lár an feasta tháinich Goll Mór amach as an gcliabhán in gan fhios do einne,
Nuair a bhí an fheasta caithte, thosuig Goll Mór agus Dearh Mór ag troid le claidheamh.
Throid síad agus throid síad
act ní raibh Goll Mór in ann Dearg Mór a mharbhuigh ná Dearg Mór in ann Goll Mór a mharbhuigh.
An feadh tamaill stop síad acht bhí an beirt gearrtha
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mór air roimh Goll Mór.
Ba ghearr tháinich na Fianna go dtí an campa.
Nuair a chonnaicheadar é rinne síad feasta mór dhó.
I lár an feasta tháinich Goll Mór amach as an gcliabhán in gan fhios do einne,
Nuair a bhí an fheasta caithte, thosuig Goll Mór agus Dearh Mór ag troid le claidheamh.
Throid síad agus throid síad
act ní raibh Goll Mór in ann Dearg Mór a mharbhuigh ná Dearg Mór in ann Goll Mór a mharbhuigh.
An feadh tamaill stop síad acht bhí an beirt gearrtha
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mór air roimh Goll Mór.
Ba ghearr tháinich na Fianna go dtí an campa.
Nuair a chonnaicheadar é rinne síad feasta mór dhó.
I lár an feasta tháinich Goll Mór amach as an gcliabhán in gan fhios fo einne,
Nuair a bhí an fheasta caithte, thosuig Goll Mór agus Dearh Mór ag troid le claidheamh.
Throid síad agus throid síad
act ní raibh Goll Mór in ann Dearg Mór a mharbhuigh ná Dearg Mór in ann Goll Mór a mharbhuigh.
An feadh tamaill stop síad acht bhí an beirt gearrtha
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
agus thog sé an cloch in a laimh agus chaith sé thar an teach é.
Annsin rith se go dtí an taobh eile acht bhí an cloch ar an thalaimh sul dá raibh sé thart. Rinne sé é sin chupla uair nó go raibh an sraid uilig cartuighthe aige acht níor fhead sé é a dheanaimh
Annsin chuaidh sé isteach go dtí an bhean agus dubhairt sé leithe nach raibh sé in ann an cleas a dheanamh agus go m'fearr leis inteacht go Sasana arís sul da dtiochfadh na Feinne abhaile.
Dubhairt an bhean leis fanacht agus leis sin d'fhan sé é cé go raibh faithchios
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thosuigh sé ag suimhnuigh annsin má ta malrach na fiann chomh laidir leis an ceann sin c'én sort atá na daoine fástha.
Chuir sin faithchios mór air acht mar sin féin d'iarr se d'en bhean cén sort cleasanna a bhíos ag na Feanna chun an t-am a caitheamh.
"Tá cairg mór annsin os chomhair an dhoras agus bíonn síad dhá chaithead tar an teach é agus bíonn cuid acu in ann rith tart agus breith air sul dá dtagaidh sé go dtí an talamh sa taobh eile acht bréag é sin mar níor dhean na Fiann riamh é sin.
Chuaidh Dearg Mór amach
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:35
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before each of them.
In the carpenter's plate she left the few sheavings.
In the hunters plate she left a few ribs of a hare.
In the farmer's plate she left the big cake.
Each of them was ashamed except the farmer and it was him that she married.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:33
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fairly rich.
So one evening she went to the first man's house and he had only a few sheavings to give to her.
She went to the second man's house and he had only a few ribs of a hare to give to him.
The third day she went to the third man's house and her gave her a big whole flour cake.
After that she invited the three of them to her house. She put the three of them to the same table and she left a plate
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:20
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go to his house some evening until she see what would he give her.
Another day another man came. He was also dressed up in beautiful clothes and he had a gun with him.
After him going another tinker woman came in and she told the other woman that the last man was a poor hunter.
The third day a man came. He was only poorly dressed.
After him going the tinker woman came in again and said that he was a farmer and he was
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:18
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There lived in Tourmakeady a woman that wanted to get married.
One day a man came to the house, he was dressed up in his best clothes. He was very smart looking but he was not half as rich as he looked. After him going home an old tinker woman came to the house. She told (him) the woman that he was a carpenter and to
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:16
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an triuch imhtighthe nuair a bheas an naoi lá caithte
3. Má tá tinneas fíachail agat agus má cuirfaidh tú seilmide air cuirfadh sé biseach ort.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 18:14
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1. Buachaillí í teaghlach in a dhiaidh a chéile. Deartar go bhfuil leigheas ag an seachtmhadh buachaill le h-agaidh doghadh.
2. Má tá aan truich ag leanbh agus má gobhfadh sé bainne an asail ar feadh naoí lá un a dhiaidh a chéile. Deirtar go mbeadh
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:37
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I have a churn at home. It is about three feet high and seventeen inches at the top and nineteen inches at bottom. The sides are round. It is seventeen years old. The top of the churn is called the peck. There is no mark on the churn.
Butter is made once a week in Winter and twice a week in Summer. My mother does the churning and is helped by my Father. It takes about an hour. The dash is moved upwards and downwards and sometimes it is given a rolling motion from side to side. When the butter grains appear cold water is poured into the churn and the churning is continued until the butter grains are as large as wheat grains. Then the churning is stopped. The butter is lifted out with a scoop. It is washed and salted and pressed and made into bricks or rolls or prints.
Buttermilk is used for making bread and it is also given to calves and pigs.
If a person comes in during the churning he is expected to say "God bless the work" and take a turn at the churning
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:19
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otherwise he would bring the butter. A stranger coming in during churning is not allowed to take a coal to light his pipe. If he did he would bring the butter.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:19
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In recent years churning is not carried on in the homes in this district as butter is made in creameries instead; however some of the farmers held to the custom until quite recently. It was a very interesting process. The barrel was on a stand about three feet high with a handle on each each end of it which served to turn the beaters on the inside of the barrel. There is about a square foot of an aperture in the centre of the barrel where the cream is poured in the lid of which is covered with a nice clean linen cloth. There is a round hole or vent with a stopper in (then) the end of the barrel which is used to let off the buttermilk when the churn is made.
The men or women twist the handles of the churn and the beaters revolve for an hour or two according to the amount of butter that is being made. A soft crackling sound is heard; the cream is being made butter against the beaters; a few
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:16
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Fairs are always held in the towns. Buyers transact business at farmers' houses in the country. There were fairs held formerly and are not held now. At one time a fair was held at Dangan but it was discontinued because people would rather go to the towns than to these country fairs.
Fairs are usually held in the street of the town but sometimes they are held in a special field called a fair green. Toll is paid on cattle when sold. Fourpence is given on calves, sixpence on two year olds and eightpence or a shilling on cows. The owner of the "fair green" gets this money.
Luck money is given at all fairs. This is called a "luck penny". Sixpence is given on calves, a shilling or two shillings on bigger cattle and from half-a-crown to five shillings on cows.
When a bargain is made the parties show they agree by slapping hands.
Cattle are marked by putting a cut on their hips or by a mark
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:14
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more easier twists of the handles and the golden particles are gathered together. The buttermilk is then extracted and some spring water is poured in. The beaters are again revolved to wash the butter. It is taken out with a wooden dish.
In former days there was a lot of superstition connected with churning. If a stranger came in while the churning was in progress he was supposed to give a hand at it otherwise it was believed he took away their luck or the butter.
On one occasion it was supposed that a woman took away the butter by magic and that a hare jumped out of the barrel when the process was completed instead of butter.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:12
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John O Mahony Gurranreigh was said to be the strongest man in this district about 40 years ago.
He escaped from the asylum and five men followed him and overtook him at the Lee where he waited for them. In a desperate struggle he rendered three of them unconscious and the two others fled. He then swam the Lee and did damage to every house he met on his way home.
Another very strong man lived in Barnadivane up to two years ago whose name was Cornelius mcMurphy. Five days previous to his death he brought the material for a donkey cart and churn barrel from Bandon home a distance of about 36 miles. He was then 77 years of age. While at a fair in Macroon a man challenged him to lift a huge stone of about five cwt. His opponent after much trouble raised the stone about a foot from the ground. Con then told his opponent to sit up in the flag and without taking off his coat he raised his
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:09
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opponent and the flag up to his chest and took off his opponents cap with his teeth.
On another occasion a horse took flight in Macroom and several people tried to stop the startled animal but in vain til Con sprang at him and instantly checked him.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:08
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There is a lot of beliefs regarding weather signs in this locality signs as observed in the sky, moon etc.
The wind at certain points is supposed to bring rain such as the wind from the south or south west. If birds are flying low you may expect rain or if a ring encircles the moon you may expect the same.
If the fire-light is of a blueish hue you can rest assured that a frost will follow. When the sky is red to the south storm is expected by the people of the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 17:06
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locality. You may often hear the cricket singing prior to the rain. Other signs of rain are wet soot in the chimney, dusty roads, and seagulls flying in flocks. The stars shining brilliantly in the sky is an omen for frost.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:58
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At the present day there are but few tailors in this locality as ready made clothes can be procured cheaper than those made by the tailors but in ancient times there were many tailors in this locality. Long ago tailors with their apprentices travelled about from house to house making clothes. They often remained for over a week in houses where there was a large family making clothes for them but this custom has completely died away. They made men's and boy's clothes from frieze which was manufactured from wool which was spun into thread and woven into cloth by the weaver. At the present day very few tailors in the country stock cloth but long ago every tailor had a little shop in which he sold all kinds of materials. There are but few spinning wheels in this manufacturing from flax is a lost art in this part of he country. Tailors in olden times were very poetic and I have often heard some of their effusions which appeared in the public ballads at that time.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:54
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There is a Mass Rock situated in the townland of Rockwood. Mass was celebrated at this rock during the Penal Days. The people of the district heard Mass here unknown to the English soldiers. The place is called "Poll an Aifrinn". Beside the rock is a stone with a hole in it. This hole is always full of water. It served as a Holy Water font long ago.
The priest used to come secretly to this place and say Mass every Sunday. The people used to come and hear Mass there. They had to watch for English soldiers who would kill the priest and all
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:54
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and self-respecting cried whined and lied with the shameless audacity of the professional beggar. Those who faced the local workhouses fared none better than those who remained at home for fed like dogs housed like cattle the inmates were huddled together naked and unashamed screaming cursing howling with pain whining for food having acquired the instincts of the lower animals and lost the higher attributes of man.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:52
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potato was his and their only resource (was) (the) was filled with terror and dismay. The doomed people realized but too well what was before them. The year 1846 thus closed in darkness and gloom but in the new year the gloom deepened and the horrors were greater still. The famine effected my native country very severly : people died in the fields: they died in the workhouses where fever following famine did what famine was unable to do. My father often relates a story which he heard about an afflicted father who took the dead bodies of his seven children to the graveyard alone and there buried them as funerals ceased to be attended. In this locality I have heard of a case where twelve corpses were left in a certain house and not buried atall but were eaten by rats and dogs Coffins became a luxury and in Skilbereen and elsewhere hinged coffins were used one body after another being brought to the grave in the same coffin. The unburied corpses the unattended funerals the pitiful pleadings of the hungry the torture of the fever stricken ceased to arouse pity in this part of the country as overpowering calamity had dried up the fountains of compassion. On the streets and roads women and children once modest
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:48
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In this part of the country the disease on the potato crop called the blight was first seen about the middle of September 1846. The stalks till then green and healthy and loaded with blossom crumbled and withered beneath its touch: the leaves looked as if acid has been sprinkled upon then : the burned spots grew larger until leaves and stalks were decayed and the fields lately vigorous with vegetable life became a putrid mass of vegetable matter. When the potatoes were dug up it was found that the fatal disease had penetrated beneath the soil and that a large part of the crop was rotten. Worse than all when the sound potatoes having been separated from the unsound ones were deposited in the pits and the pits after a time opened it was seen that the blight had entered and laying its awful hand on the sound potatoes rendered them unfit for human food. The peasant with blanched face saw his food thus disappear and as he looked at his children shivering with fear at what they saw and as he thought of the many months before him during which the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:43
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Not far from my home there is a fort. It is circular in shape and two others are in view of it. It is situated in the townland of Toomore.
The fort is surrounded by a stone wall and a bank. It is separated from the other forts by a river and two lakes.
It is said that a great battle was fought on the banks of the river. Bones are still to be seen there.
In the middle of the fort there is a large stone, which is called a wishing stone. People thought that by going around the stone three times and wishing that a request would be granted.
Lights have been seen in the fort and music has been heard there by people still living in the townland.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:43
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Each field in our farm is known by a certain old Irish name. Each field bears a name very applicable to it. One of them which is called "Páirch a'tsagoirt" is a sheltered little field in the corner of which are the ruins of a priest's house. It is ambiguous when this priest lived there. Another which is called "Páirc na Cabhlaighe" derives its name from the ruins of two old houses which are still standing there. "Inse Carraige Doidnine" is a name given to another field. It derives its name from the giant ivy rock which is situated in the centre of it.
Another which is called "Páirch na pilíbíns" derives its name from the continual ditty of the plovers which is heard about the place. "Páirch Séan Gaor" is another field in which are the ruins of an old cabin in which a man named John Gouy lived when Ireland's population was at its peak-point. "Páirch Dun a' baile" is a marshy field at the bottom of the farm. Another is called Páirch na Claisca" which is a field in the form of a valley with with a hill on each side of it. Another where the modulations and intonations
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:38
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of the richest songsters of our groves are effected is called "Páirch na n-Can.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:37
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often threatened him afterwards as he walked that same road late at night and in the end he had to go to America to avoid them as it is said that fairies don't cross the water. Some time after in an international competition in New York Mikie and a few others representing Ireland were beaten when suddenly he thought off the "ceól sídhe" and played it.
It made such an impression on the audience that they were speechless. When they recovered they offered him hundreds of pounds but to play it. He refused and obeyed the "daóine mairhe".
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 16:34
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Long ago there lived in this district a famous fiddler named Michael O'Connell (called Mikie Catnim) who was nicknamed "Mickie Báinín." His name was Michael Connell but he was called this name. he went around to patterns and marriages and there played sweet music. One night as he was coming home from Macroom he heard a tune called the "ceól sidhe" being played by the "Dhaoine mairhe" in the Gearagh, a wooded district near Macroom.
As he always took his fiddle with him he took it out and played without much difficulty the same tune as the wag played by the fairies. Just then a number of voices told him that if he played the "ceól sídhe" more than once he should inlist in their ranks. They
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:59
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h-ainmníatha. Sherlocks. Carthys Molloys. Caseys. Doyles. Powers, and Donavans. The places they came from Sherlocks from Kerry, Carthys from. Clare. Molloys from Waterford, also the Donavans. Powers from the North Malaí.. The most of them carry leather bags with them. Some of them carry thrunks. They sleep in Caravans or under the old carts. When the night gets wet they sleep in camps. Déirch. They always want whatever they see
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:56
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Tom Scally,
Portnahinch,
Lanesboro,
Co. Roscommon,
Got his information from,
Mrs Connor,
Gallaugh,
Lanesboro,
Co. Roscommon.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:54
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beetle. Then they scutched it with a scutching stock and handle. Then they hackled it and spun it on a spinning wheel.
The fine flax, they made fine thread from it. They sent hanks of yarn to the weaver named Thomas Davis to get sheets made from it.
Soap Making.
There was a man named John Nolan making soap. He got ash sticks, whitethorn sticks and blackheads and burnt them till they went into ashes. Then he spread a sheet on the floor and got a fine sieve which let down the fine ashes on the sheet. He got water and damped the ashes with it. He made it into balls and let it dry. He washed the linen with these balls.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:53
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and that you may be ten time's better when I come again Sgéal. One day Mickie Carthy was going through Ennistymoon and he had no light on his cart he took the ass from the carr and tied him to back of it and when the Guard's came they asked him for his light "Oh said Mickie go back and ask the driver the driver wa's the ass because he wa's at the front of the carr by the way he wa's the ass and the ass was at the back by the way he was the driver. But he was let off for his good plan
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:50
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There are alot of tinkers in the locality shuch as Mc Carthy's, Donnive's Siorlough's O Briens and the Coughlin's. The Mc Carthy's are from Ennistymoon. The Donnive's are from Galway The Doyl's are from Kerry. The Coughlins are from Cork. the O Brien's are from Kilrush The Siorlough are from Bogberry. the people of the house dont like tinkers because they beg alot and it is very hard to get them out of the house They dont stay long in any place
They go around in an ass-car or in Caravan's this is the prayer they have "May the Lord spare you your health
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:50
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Once upon a time a fox was full of fleas, and he could not rid himself of them. At last he found a (?) by which he did away with them. As he was walking through the fields he found a piece of wool and put it in his mouth. Then he went to a deep river and put his tail in first. The deeper he went the further the fleas went up his back. He went down into the water till there was noting but his nose up. All the fleas left his body and went into the wool. Then he swam out and there was not a flea left on his body.
M. Ó Gadhra
(Similar story from Tom McCullan with stick instead of wool)
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:47
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bottom of the bed.
The mattress for these beds were made with bags filled with chaff which they gathered when they were threshing.
Whip making.
Peter Farrell in Portnahinch was a whip maker. When a horse died he skinned him. He cut the skin into fine pieces and platted them together and tied a cord to the end of it tied it to a stick.
Linen making.
The people in olden times sowed flax. Then they pulled it. They brought it to a drain.
When the froth would rise on it they took it up to dry. When it was dry they brought it home and made a hurl they put it over the fire until it would dry. When dry they took it down and put it on the floor and broke it with a
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:46
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bottom of the bed.
The mattress for these beds were made with bags filled with chaff which they gathered when they were threshing.
Whip making.
Peter Farrell in Portnalrinch [?] was a whip maker. When a horse died he skinned him. He cut the skin into fine pieces and platted them together and tied a cord to the end of it tied it to a stick.
Linen making.
The people in olden times sowed flax. Then they pulled it. They brought it to a drain.
When the froth would rise on it they took it up to dry. When it was dry they brought it home and made a hurl they put it over the fire until it would dry. When dry they took it down and put it on the floor and broke it with a
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:46
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Christy Hand lived in the Parish of Kilskyre. His home was on the side of a hill and he could not find a place to sink a well. There was a Rath about 150 yards away from the house and a well in it. Christy put pipes from the well to his yard, to let the water into a tub in the yard. From that till he died he was sick every second day
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:45
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These are the name's of tinker's, The O Donnavans, Burkes, Dealaneys, Sweeneys, Dolye's, Hudson's, and the Wards, the O Donnavans came from Tipperary, The Sweeneys came from Galway, The Doyles came from Tippeerary, The Hudsons came from Cork, The wards came from Galway, The Delaneys came from Killkenny, The Burkes came from Kerry, Some of them used to have boxes, made of timber and they used to call it a budget, And they used to make old tinkan's and buckets and sell them in the town, They used to go round from place to place in caravans and ass and cars, Sometimes they'ed ask for anold grain of flour and when you would give them that they'ed want an
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:45
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There is a Holy Well in Bohea about 3/4 of a mile s from this school. 100 yds from the Leenane road. This was discovered about ten years ago by Patrick Kearns, Glynsk, he having heard it from his grandfather. No stations or prayers said there; shrubs all round it.
There is another blessed well in Aughavale about two miles from this school. People still visit it to perform stations by going around it seven times saying any prayers they like. It is said that there was a trout in this well and he used not to come out to anyone only those who performed their station right. Very long ago this trout was caught and brought home, put on the tongs to roast; he jumpedof it & made his way back to the well and the track of the tongs on his side. In 1920 the British soldiers caught him and killed him so he never escaped again. It is thought that this trout lived there for hundreds of years.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:36
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Old Crafts
Rope Making.
There was a man living in Lisanaria named Patrick Hanly making ropes. When they were cutting turf they met with dale blocks in the boghole. They took these up on the bank and tore them into fine pieces. They wound these round two four legged stools. They then platted. These pieces together and they were strong ropes.
They brought in hay to their haggards with these ropes tied in bundles on their backs.
They got four wooden posts and nailed two boards at each side and two at each end. They bored holes through these boards.
They got the ropes and wove them through the hole sat each side and each end for the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:29
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Potatoes are grown on our farm. We sow one acre of potatoes every year.
First of all the ground is ploughed and then all the house-hold people give a hand to get it ready. The ground is not manured before being turned up. In this locality they are mostly sown in ridges. Both plough and spade are used. The spades usually used in this district are bought in the shop. People in this district help each in sowing potatoes. During the summer months the potatoes are moulded and later on they are sprayed with a mixture of blue-stone and washing soda. In Autumn they are dug out by means of a spade or fork. And the children pick them in bucketfulls after school. They are then put in pits (holes),thatched with seran or straw etc & covered in with clayin this shape.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:26
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Written originally by,
John Scally,
Gallaugh,
Lanesboro,
Co Roscommon
Got this information from,
Peter Scally,
Gallaugh,
Lanesboro,
Co Roscommon
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:24
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this school in Weekfield was founded a school was held up in the bog called Cloontymullen.
The master of this school was Patrick Hanley. The school was a little hut and when the weather was hot they stayed under the hedge or beside a clamp of turf. The young children went to school in the daytime and were taught to read and write. The big people went to school in the night. The book they used was the universal book which taught them to read and write. The meaning of the words the economy of human life and the principals of politeness were also in this book. The present that the best pupils got at Chirstmass was a card of pins. The way the masters were paid in this time was two shillings every three months from each scholar. The pupils used to bring him eggs and butter at Xmas.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:21
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is a sign of storm.
When we hear the wind whistling it is a sign of storm.
When we see a blue blaze in the fire it is a sign of rain and storm.
When we see white strokes in the sky an a lot of stars its a sign of storm and thunder
When we see a fog coming in the mountain and down the hollows its a sign of rain.
When we hear a jack snipe roaring it is a sign of rain.
When we see a frog crossing a street it is a sign of bad weather.
When a cat sharpens their nails on a piece of timber it is a sign of snow.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 15:13
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Old Schools
Long ago most of the schools were held outdoors. These schools were called hedge schools.
One of these schools was held in Mount Cashel beside where the present Connor's are living now. There was a little hedge there and every morning the children came to be taught.
Thomas Martin deceased was the master. Geese feathers were used for pens in these days. When the master came in the morning he would have to spend one hour pointing the pens. There was no paper to write on and slates were used instead. There was an old stable beside the place where school was held and when the days were wet this was used for shelter. The lessons that were taught were arithmetic, reading and writing.
For a while before
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 14:47
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them from sally Rods. He sold these sgeehs and baskets at every fair and market. He was paid for every basket and 'sgeehs' according to it's size. He is dead for the past fifty years. Michael Moran was also a great basket maker.
Thatching
Michael Moran of Knockderry was a great thatcher. He used to do about six stacks of straw in the day. He is dead for the past fifteen years.
There are very few thatchers in our district because there are not many thatched houses there. The local thatchers are Jim Clancy of Ballingarry,
Martin Gready of Ballyea and Tim Ahern of Raheen. John Finnerty of the Sparr who is dead 20 or 30 years. They tatch with scallops and sheaves
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 14:23
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Maurice Regan, Kilmihill, Ballingarry made all kinds of baskets. He made sgeehs also. He made
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 14:19
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girls on the upper storey. In former times, slates were used in the school. About 24 years ago Irish was first taught in it. It is now used as a ball - alley. The names of the teachers who taught in it were Mrs Gaffney and her husband John Gaffney, Miss Gayer, David Maddan and John Madigan who were both monators and Hayes. The two Miss Millers and John O'Grady were the last three teachers there. Mr. O'Grady is still teaching in the boys National School but the two others resigned.
Before this school was built there was a hedge school about a mile from Kilmeedy. Mr. Gayer was the name of the teacher. They
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 14:10
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advantage in the most artistic fashion. So much that it must suit the style of hat set or pinned here or there through the clusters of shining curls. Hair dressing is "the rage" at the present period it has developed into an art, and keen competition exists between professional hairdressers as to what model can be the most fascinating and original.
Hairdressing saloons showing model settings in their windows are very much in evidence in all the cities and small towns and villages. It is considered very unsightly to see any lady with her hair not keeping with present day requirements. Few and far between are the heads of flowing long hair, a long plait of hair is never seen rarely in the parish. School going girls keep their hair cropped commonly shaped according to the cut required called a "bob" a "shingle" a "semi shingle". The curls and waves in the hair are kept in place with steel or wine pins. There for getting a head done up varies from 1s for a hair trim up to a guinea or more for waves mechanically set called 'Perms'. The Perm wave is done by "Electric Process, to which the head or hair is subjected to by means of pins and curlers for some hours.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 14:04
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awaiting decision
(1/2 ml. from Clonmellon towards Killskyre)
There was a house in Hartstown. When the people shut the widow at night, when they would get up in the morning, the window would be in the yard. The people in the house saw the ghost. The woman of the house was unconscious for hours one night.

ST PATRICK'S STONE (Cnoc na Ríogh)
There is a field this side of Jack Farrelly's where there is a big stone with the traces of St Patrick's two knees and his staff.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 14:02
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At the north side of Kilmeedy village is situated the remains of an old school which was constructed early in the 19th centuary by the farmers of the locality. It now has an ancient and deserted appearance with only the four walls standing and the roof. It is evacuated since 1928 and is replaced by a new school constructed at the west side of the village. It was divided into two divisions, the boys on the lower divisions and the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:58
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An old man who lived in Ballinlough used to tell this story:-
One night he was returning home at a late hour from a neighbouring house where he had been "Ceilidhidhing". As he was passing one of the fields near his home, he saw a great fair being held in the field. There was a great number of men buying and selling cattle and horses. There were clapping of hands and clinching of bargains. As the old man approached the field-gate, two men called him over and told him to stand at the gate and receive the money. As each purchase passed the gate the owner paid the toll. Before long his pockets were bulging with money. When the fair was over the man
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:54
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Friday is a lucky day for starting to sow crops especially Good Friday.
If a person abstains from meat on St Stephens Day he will have no serious disease during the following year.
To tie a red rag on the cow's tail on May Eve is said to keep the witches from taking the butter of the milk in the following year.
If May flowers are shaken around a spring well on May Eve they are said to keep the water clean.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:51
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awaiting decision
can be made from marl. (blue clay) by being rolled up and set to dry.
(Michael McMahon from his father Sergent MacMahon and Guard McDonagh, Cluain Mioláin)
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:50
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First, the milk was milked and strained through a hair-strainer into timber vessels called kellers. It was left thus for thirty-six hours to produce the cream. The product was then skimmed off with a wooden dish known as a skimmer. It was put into a timber cream-tub and left set for six or seven days. Next came the churning. The cream was poured into a standing churn. This churn was wide near the ground and getting narrow upwards. The cover was fitted down six or seven inches from the top with a hole in the centre. Then there was a stick with a cross at the lower end to beat the cream. This was called a churn staff. This was worked up and down through the hole in the cover by the hand. In this way some of the cream used to come up with the staff and remain in the top of the cover so when the butter was near being made this had to be washed down with milk or water.
The churning was finished then at a slow pace. The butter was then collected by means of giving the staff a few turns around. It was then taken out and washed three or four times in pure spring water. Then it was taken in wooden pails to the "partner" where six or seven other partners would take their butter also. It was measured in wooden gallons or weighed by a stiller and washed in one wooden tub
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:49
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John Croke was a great hedge -school master. He taught a little school in Frankfort at the side of Cairon. He taught English, Aritmetic, Geography and History. He was paid by the parent of the children whom he taught and was kept in the houses. The remains of the school are yet to be seen.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:49
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awaiting decision
The nearest fort to Clonmellon is Cnoc na Ríogh. It is circular and has a hedge around it. It is covered with trees. There is a hole near it. It is said to be the entrance hole. It is all filled with stones. There is a fort in Mr. P. Reillys field. It is circular and has a whitethorn hedge around it.
Lewis' fort Clonmellon is also circular and has a whitethorn hedge. There is no story connected with it. All
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:46
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""Old Moore."
There was a Hedge - school in Ballingaruga. The hedge - school master of this school was "Old Moore." He also taught in the Sparr, Ballingarry. He was a very good teacher. He was paid by the children. He got 6s. " 6d. from every school - child for every three months. He taught Latin, French, Greek and Irish.
The Great O' Baggot.
There was another in Ballingarry known as the "Great O' Baggot." He was paid by the children
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:44
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My father usually prepares our garden for the potato crop. The ground is never manured before being turned up. The potatoes are sown in ridges. The ground is dug with a bought spade. The potatoes are prepared by cutting in two with a few "eyes" in each half. The potatoes are sown a foot from each other.
When the stalks begin to appear they are moulded with clay. The potatoes are dug according as we use them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:41
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labour given in the Famine times. This road is called the "Split Hills".
Another road which has by all appearances been so treated as the road from Clonmellon to Kells via Killua. There is no record of the wages the labourers were paid.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:39
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awaiting decision
Ballyvolane is in the Parish of Castlelyons and in the barony of Barrymore. There are four families in the townland. One is thatched and the other three are slated. Mac Carthy is the family name most common. There are about sixteen people living in my townland. A family of Moylans lived there long ago and that is how it got its name. There were more houses there long ago but no signs of them are to be seen now. The most of the people emigrated to America. Some of the land is good and more of it is boggy. There is a screen and a plantation in my townland. A small stream flows through the screen and it forms two ponds. The stream joins the river Bride at Kilcor north, and it is said that in former years a woman drowned herself in the stream. The people of the district used to hear a "caoin" there after that it was called Gleann Caoin. There are no old people over seventy living in Ballyvollane now, but there was an old man named Ned Finn lived there. He used to tell a great many stories to the young people. He fought at Mrs. Ryan's in Gurtrue in the Tithe War and he escaped uninjured. Three people were killed there.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:39
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Thuit Lá le Stiofáin ar Dé Domhnaig an blian seo caithte. Tháinig buacaillí go dtí ár dtig an lá sin ag bailiú airgid chun an dreóilín do chur. Bhí craobh cuillean in a lamhaibh acu agus bhí ribíní ceangailthe mór thimcheall air chun é a mhaisughadh agus bhí dreoilín istig i lár baill ann. Bhíodar ag canadh "Amhrán an Dreóilín". Tháinig beirt fear comh maith agus bhí agaidhthe fidil ortha agus bhí culaith éadaig stracaithe ortha. Bhí gleás ceóil aca agus bhíodar ag seinnt air. 'Sé an fáth a bhítear ar thóir an dreóilin an lá sin na san. Nuair a bhí na saighdúirí ar thóir Naomh Stiofáin do thóg sé sos fé crann. Nuair do chonnaich sé na saighduirí ag teacht do rith sé suas an crann agus tháinig na saighdúirí agus shuidheadar fé'n gcrann agus ní fhacadar Naomh Stiofáin in ao'cor.
Bhí dreóilín in áirde ar an gcrann agus do dhein sé fothrom le'n a sgiathán agus d'féuch na saighdúirí suas agus do connacadar Naomh Stiofáin agus do rugadar air agus do caitheadear cloca leis agus do marbhuigheadear é agus marbhuigheann na buacaillí an dreóilín ó shoin i leith.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:39
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Some of the short cuts, commonly called Mass paths came through the demense of Killua for the Cloran people.
Another Mass Path was through Rosmead by Rosmead by Rosmead House for Delvin Mass.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:34
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Most girls can make flower chains and girdles from daisies. First they cut a hole in the stem of the daisy. Then they slip another daisy into the hole. They keep doing this till the girdle or daisy chain is made. This custome is still in existence.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:34
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an hour after and it consisted of currant bread and tea. There was no tea drunk in Ireland until about fifty years ago and the first man who got tea put it into an ordinary pot and poured boiling water into it and took it up and strained it. He threw away the tea and ate the tea-leaves.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:32
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In olden days the people used to eat three meals each day. The breakfast was eaten at about eight o'clock and the people were working at six.
The breakfast consisted of potatoes and sour milk. The table was put in the middle of the house and the people sat around it. Instead of cups they had pigins and porringers. The bread was made of potatoes and some of it was made of rye and there was hardly any meat eaten. The most of the meals consisted of potatoes and sour milk and yellow gruel made of Indian meal. When the potatoes were dug they were put into a pit and this was not opened until Christmas night. Servant boys were up by the ditch waiting until dawn, to get their breakfasts and to go working. The supper was eaten at six and the people went to bed early. There was no tea drunk, only at Christmas. There were two suppers eaten on Christmas night. The first one consisted of potatoes and hake fish and the second supper was eaten about
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:31
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There is a simple method of catching rabbits. Get a bit of snare wire about two feet long. Put a small hole in one end of the wire. Then slip the other end of the wire into the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:29
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"The Well Field" is situated a quarter of a mile outside Clonmellon on the Kilskyre road. It is called the "Well Field" because there is a well in the field. When the pumps of Clonmellon used to go dry the people of the town came out to the "Well Field" for water.

"Nailers Bush"
The "Nailers Bush" grows up on the Kells Rd about a half a mile from Clonmellon. It is called the "Nailers Bush" because a nail-maker used to live in a hut built under it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:27
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skirts along with which is worn a blouse. These blouses are made from stuff such as silk, cotton, satin knitted and woollen vests or blouses are very much seen and very fashionable. Jumpers made from wool of different qualities and colours, jumpers knitted from silk thread of every hue and shade are very much in evidence. Irish materials tweeds and linens laces are very up to date and for appearance, texture and durability can vie with any other nation. The Irish Tweeds are greatly used and in demand not only by Irish but by all other nationalities. Hats are now made in Galway felt, straw and other materials are used in the manufacture these hats so manufacturers can take their place beside any foreign model.
Hats now are not as in former days intended to cover or as a covering for the head. The most fashionable hat may be only a part or a fractional part of a hat, no definite shape no standard size, colour, bits of crowns consisting only a band or strap to which is attached a bunch of flowers a bow of ribbon or an ornament are set at any angle on the head, mostly on the side inclining to one side or the other and kept in position by a band of ribbon fixed under the chin. The hair is arranged with
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:26
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There are no heroes nowadays. James Kelleher Aubane was the Jumper in the district. He won several prizes for high and Long Jumps, and also for hop step and jump. He could jump a Height of five feet 10 ins and in a long jump about 22 feet and in the hop step and jump about 46 feet. But once he broke his leg and he didn't Jump since.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:24
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are gone out of fashion.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:23
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The kind of food the people ate long ago was coarse, Indian meal made into porridge, and potatoes.
They were far healthier and stronger than the people that are there now.
They should be up very early in the morning and had to work very hard.
The time they ate their meals was in the morning and at night.
They only ate two meals; one of gruel and the other of potatoes.
They used to drink sour milk at every meal.
The kind of bread they ate was bread made from potatoes which was called "stampy".
They used to sit around the table in the middle of the floor to eat their meals.
Meat was very seldom eaten in those days.
The kind of meat they ate was a goose.
Fish was very often eaten in those times but now it is seldom eaten.
The only time they had different kinds of food was at Christmas, at weddings and at christenings.
It is about seventy years ago, since tea first came in the district.
The clothes the people wore long ago
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:22
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There is a fort down at Balls of Killallon about a mile outside Clonmellon. This fort was supposed to be inhabited by fairies. A long time ago the people used to be sitting on the fort every Sunday evening. One Sunday as they were sitting on the hill one of the men saw a lot of fairies playing football. The other men could see no one playing football. The man that saw the fairies wanted to go down to where they were kicking the football but the others would not let him. At last he went down to the fairies and they kept
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:21
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There are many different kinds of churn in this district, such as the dash churn of which there are two kinds, the barrel churn and the horse churn. One dash churn is round like a wheel at the back and front nd the coming up in a slope to the top which is square. There is a lid on top with a hole in it for one to move the dash up and down. The dash is a long handle with a piece of board shaped like a wheel at the end of it, the long handle protruding out of the hole in the lid. The other kind is the same shape only there is no hole in the lid and there is a handle outside and a dash attached to it inside and when the handle is turned the dash goes round inside.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:18
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The worst year of the famine in Ireland was 1847. Some people say that a lot of people died of diseases caused by the famine. There is a large monument near Kells known as the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:18
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ing, but before fine weather they fly high in the sky. The crows fly towards the mountains when we are going to get fine weather, but they come to sheltered places before bad weather. The cat turns his back to the fire before snow and the dog stays indoors.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:17
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Great Storm
A very strong storm in 1926. About twenty trees were knocked down by it at O'Grady's near Newcastle. It took the roof of Cane's house in the parish of Castlemahon.
Drought Period.
There was a great drought in 1921 from May to the following August. Many cattle in the locality died for want of water.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:17
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"Colours" is usually played in Winter by the children. Sometimes, the old people play the game as well. One person tells another that he will make him say some colour. The other person says that he wont make him say the colour. Then they start off. The person that is trying to make him say the colour tells him to say a lot of other colours. Then he says the colour real quick and the other person says it after him.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:15
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When the fog is on Mount Hillary and moving East towards Mallow, fine weather is coming, but if the fog goes west, then we are sure to get rain. When the wind blows from the South in winter rain comes, but in Summer fine warm weather follows. An Easterly wind is generally cold and unhealthy and in winter it may bring frost and snow.
The North wind is always cold and brings snow and sleet. We get most rain from the South and South-West. When the sun is pale towards sunset, bad weather is approaching, but if the sun sets in a glow of red, we may expect fine weather.
If both ends of a new moon are pointed upwards the weather will be fine during the life of that moon. A shooting star is a sign of bad weather. If the stars are bright and shine steady, fine weather comes but if the stars are glittering frost follows.
When the crickets sing rain is approaching. The curlew is regarded as a great indicator of the weather, this bird has a peculiar whistle before rain or a storm. The seagulls come inland before a spell of severe weather, frost or snow. The swallows fly low, when bad weather is approach-
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:14
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The local shop windows are stocked with all classes of Irish made and imported foot wear. The materials used, shape and style differ very much from the stock seen in a ship window some years ago. Shoes are on the market and in the most remote district made from materials and fabrics of every hue and texture. They are not only made to suit every season but also every suit, and a special variety for occasional times and certain events. A woman in never seen bare footed in this locality and very rarely a child or school going children. The fashion of going without stockings (not for the sake of poverty or economy.) is becoming more and more fashionable, sandals which consist only of a sole and straps which keep it fixed to the foot are the latest creation, for Summer. Men's boots and the lighter Summer classes from canvas or suede of different colours.
Ladies' shoes are made from such materials as patent and kid leather, suede, silk, velvet, canvas, rubber, linen, tinsel, the material colour shape and style must suit the costume the season and the occasion, the style and appearance get first thought, the purse is rarely considered by the buyer, it is fashionable now a days, to leave this consideration to the seller. Ladies costumes or coats and
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:14
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Bhí fear in a cómhnuidhe in iartar Cláir fadó. Bhí sé pósta agus bhí beirt ingin aige. Fuair a bhean bás agus do pós ceann des na cailíní. Bhí an cailín eile ana mór innti agus ní raibh an t-athair in án fear d'fagail eici. Bhí na fir a bhí ana mórdálach ag teacht cuici acht ní tógadh sí ceann aca.
Lá amháin bhí sí in a seasaimh ag an doras agus táinig duine uasal ag marcuigeacht are capall breag aníos an bóthar. D'iarr sé uirthí an raibh sé i bfad ón baile mór. Glaodh sé ar a athair chun cuntas a tabhairt dó agus bhí athas air nuair a connaic sé an capall breag a bhí aige. Dubairt sé go raibh sé míle ón áit sin agus nach mbead sé ann go dtí an maidin. Cad a deanad mé ar san fear nár ceap mé go raibh sé cómh bfad uaim. Níl aon rud le deanamh agat sa, arsan fear ach tar isteach go dtí mo tig sa agus fanacht ann go dtí an maidin agus tabarfad
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:12
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There is a pass leading from Hartstown Boreen to Clonmellon. It comes out beside the Catholic Church. Another path also leads from Rosy Smith's on Hartstown boreen to Killallon. This pass leads through the field for about a quarter of a mile and then joins another boreen which leads out on the Killallon road at McCormacks. There is a path leading from Jim Farrelly's of Hartstown Kilskyre, to Clonmellon. It is only a mile and a Half by the path, and it is nearly three miles by the path. A horse and cart can come from Hartstown to Clonmellon by the path. A few people come to Mass by this path.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:09
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"Tower of Loyd". This was built by the British Government during the famine times to give relief to the starving people.
There used to be a big pot of Indian meal boiled in the Market Square three times a week. The people used to bring cans and fill them with the meal. The pot was called the "Famine Pot".
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:07
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High Gates-
Two of the tallest make a bridge with their hands. All the others trip under the bridge in single file The last to come is held at the bridge, and questioned secretly so that the others who are still going round in a circle may not hear. A gold chain? or a gold ring? whoever selects "gold chain", goes behind that leader. Whoever selects "gold ring", behind the other The game ends with a "tug of war".
"Sally, Sally Water" -
(Usually for girls) All join hands, and form a ring. One stands in the centre. The others go round and round saying -
Sally Sally Water, sprinkle in the pan,
Die Sally, die Sally, your young man,
Choose to the East, and choose to the West.
And choose to the little girl, you love best.
All then stand still, and the girl in the middle selects her partner from the ring. The ring again revolves, repeating
Now they are married and I wish them joy;
First a girl, and then a boy,
Seven years after, a son, and a daughter;
And now my fair lady, walk out of the water.
The girl, who stood in the centre, at first, then walks out, and a new game begins.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:06
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There is a fort in Rosmead. It is surrounded by a fence of trees. It is circular. The Danes built it. There is a story told about the fort in Rosmead. This is the story - Nicholas Clinton a native of Clonmellon was crossing a field near the fort at Rosmead one night, he saw a fair. The people were selling all kinds of fruit, and they were shouting "Who will buy?" but Nicholas Clinton "They packed his pockets with oranges, and apples. When he got home he found that his pockets were full of horse manure.

There is a fort in Galboystown. There is a fence of trees around it. It was the Danes that built it. The Fairies used to live in the fort. Music was heard in it. There is a story told about the fort at Galboystown. This is the story - A man living in the town of Clonmellon was sitting on the back of a ditch one summer's evening near the fort at Galboystown with a crowd of people. The people used to sit on the bank every summer. The man stood upon the bank and he saw people kicking football. The other people could not see them. Then the man said he would go down, the people tried to stop him but they could not so he went down, and they kept him kicking till they nearly killed him. He would have died only for Doctor Davage bled his ears. It happened about ninety years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 13:05
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just in wynds and it was swept on to the bank of the river Maigue. Around Newcastle crops were carried off, some belonged to a man named Sheehy. He was granted £30 for damages. Two cows and a donkey belonging to K. Ambrose of Dromin Deel Newcastle, were drowned and swept off by the flood. No houses were invaded in that district. Outside Newcastle the road was flooded and nobody could pass. The two roadsides were lined up at each side, by motor - cars, horse - carts and bicycles, because it was the holiday season and that was the route to some famous seaside resorts. All these vehicles were held up for over two days.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:59
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the bed thinking that the other boy was in it.
Then they went into their beds. When he caught them gone he took out the calf that was nearly dead with all the blows. Then (th) he went into the bed himself.
When morning came they wondered very much when he was not killed.
He got free every time because of his tricks every time.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:58
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:56
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down his coat letting down the meat which he was after putting in. Then they believed him.
Then one night after him going to bed he heard them making up to kill him in bed that night.
After a while he got up and got a calf and put him into the bed and put the blanket over him.
In the middle of the night the giant and his mother came in and brought a big sledge with them.
They kept on hiting
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:56
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A list of our farm animals : - cows, calves, bulls, bullocks, heifers, horses, pigs, sheep, dogs, cats and rats. All the cows on our farm have got names, Darby, Ket, Polly, Susan, Bessie, Peg, Rags, Moll, Pansy, and Daisy. The cows are more useful then any other animal on the farm. The old saying tells us "the juice of a cow is good dead or alive." There is an old poem in Irish about a cow which when translated means this, "the cow is good, she is milk to drink, she is butter and meat, her tail makes soup and her horns music, and her leather is good for the boots.
When the cow is alive she gives us milk to drink and put in our tea and make butter and cheese with the cream.
We have two horses to do the work
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:54
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This boy was boasting of his strengh to the giant.
Then they killed a bullock and both of them began eating him. The mother said whichever of them would eat the most it was him that was the strongest.
The boy had a wide coat on and he kept on putting down the meat inside the coat until he had nearly all the meat gone.
The giant and his mother would not believe that he had all that of the meat gone and he got a knife and ripped
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:51
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There once lived a poor boy and everyone thought he was very strong but he was very tricky.
One day he went to a house where their lived three giants with their mother.
When the boy went two of the brothers were gone out hunting.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:49
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7. If a person have two spoons in their saucer when taking their tea the people say they are going to a wedding.
8. If two persons sat the (a) same word together it is said that both of them will live another year.
9. If you meet a red-haired woman going anyplace in the morning the people say you would have bad luck for that day.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:43
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people were very glad to have it. It was used as a table vegetable.
The thistle is a harmful weed because on a wild day its seeds fly and destroys all land.
The dockleaf is a harmful because its root is so long it is very hard to get rid of it. It must be taken out of corn fields, because it destroys the corn when its being threshed.
Dandelion is used by consumptive people as a blood purifier.
The leaves of the slánfoch are broken up and given to children as a remedy for worms.
The nettle is very useful weed because it is said if you eat three meals of them during the month of May you will not get any sickness during the year.
Water cress is also used as a table vegetable. It is mostly found on river banks or marshy places.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:40
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4. When the people are making the churning they put a few coals under the churn so that the fairies would not steal the butter.
5. If a stranger comes in when the people are churning and if they do not make some of it the people say they steal the butter.
6. "One magpie for bad luck
Two for good luck
Three for marriage,
Four for death,
Five for silver,
Six for gold.
Seven for the biggest fortune ever told."
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Most of the houses were thatched or made of wood and they thatched with rushes or straw that grew on the land. Every house had a wooden bed in the kitchen in the corner over from the fire and it was called a "pooch" and the fireplace always at the gable wall. The houses was made of daub and clay long ago. The people long ago had no glass in the window only boards and the door was open and the light of the fire and was the light they had in the house. It was mostly timber they used long ago and they had very little turf. There are no candles made in the district as it was rush candles they used long ago for lights. The rush candle is made of rush and grease. The rush
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. If a mare foals on May day he will kill someone before the year is out.
2. If a person is giving milk to a neighbour they put water through it so that they would not bring the butter with them.
3. After a cow calving the people tie a red tape round her tail so that the fairies would not steal the milk.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Local Crafts
Some years ago when butter-making was in vogue in this district the people put their butter in ferkins which they bought from a cooper. Their is one such tradesman in this district named James Donnelly. He bought the ash trees and got them out into boards in the sawmill. These boards were about four inches wide by a half inch thick and stood about thirty together and shaped the ferkin like a small barell. He then made hoops out of "Sailidhe rods split in the centre to keep the staves these are the boards together
E. Doonigan.
Thoman Mc Grail aged 54
Glortermin
Gonvagh
Mohill
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[bol rianna]?
Diomchur sí mála mine buidhe as Baile Féidh go dtí An Cnoc Ard.
[Padruig O’Baoghaill]?
(Be) Bhí sé ábalta cart a thógail ar a dhruim agus siubhal go Oileán Árainn.
[Micheal O’Baoghaill]?
Diomchur sé mála mine o thoighe Sheamhuis Mhac Aoidh go Cró na mBothan.
[lascaidh]?
Diomchur sé mala mine o Leitir go Abhainn na Marbh sin nios mó nó trí mhíle fríd cnoc.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seamus Ua Gallacobair.
Siubhal seisean fosda go Tobar an Dhúin agus arais in ocht uaire.
Padraic Napper.
Siubhal sé go Doire agus arais in na lá.
Eoin Mac Gloinn.
Bhí sé abalta léimint thara rásur agus léimint arais an bealach ceadhna. gan an rásur a leigint amach. Bhí sé in na an-chleasaidh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[Séamus dh Ua naidhe]?
D’fág sé an Clochan Liath roimhe char an phuist agus dfág an car an áit ceadhna agus bhí sé i mBaile na Finne roimhe an char.
[s Ua obhair]?
Siubhal sé go Tobar an Dúin agus arais in ocht uaire.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[ghid oinn]?
Bá íse an bhean a bfearr ag sníomh agus ag cáirdeal. Bhí sí ábalta culaith fhir a dhéanam amach as bainín a ghnídheadh sí fhéin. Chuireadh sí dath air a ghnídheadh sí fhéin as luibheannaibh a bhí ag fás comhgarach. Bhí rabh aon seort aicí le ceannacht le culaith a dhéanamh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seamus Míchail.
An t-oibrigh a bfearr ar an baile. Acra féir an rud a ba lúgha a bhain sé ariamh in na lá. Chaithfeadh dhá fhear agus go minic triúr a beith i bpoll mhonadh dó. Bhí sé ar an cheoltóir Gaedhilge a bfearr dá rabh in áit ar bith sa cheanntar. Bhí morán d na sean amhráinibh aige mar an Gabhar Bán agus Dilín na mBacach. Bhí sé ‘na an-daimhseoir fosda. Bhí sé abalta ocht mbó a cheangal ar an stáca amháin.
Domhnall Ua Braonain.
Ba sin an sealgóir agus an t-iasgóir a bfearr sa’n ceanntar. Lá amháin mharbhuigh sé dhá shean madadh ruadh agus ceithre cinn óga, sin sé madadh ruadh uilig.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mullach, shiar ‘san mhuillin. Thóg sé aníos iad in a “bhins” rud a bhí acu, fa choinne tógail arbhair.
Padruig [O’Domhnaill]?
An fear a ba ghaisde dá rabh ar An tSealgan in a am. Am amháin dimthigh madadh sealga ar oifigeach thios ar an Docharadh agus bhí a rabh thíos in na dhiaidh nó bhí £1 geallta ag an oifigeach dó’n té a bheiread air. Chuaidh Padraic in na dhiaidh agus fuair greim air thios ag Sliabh Sneachta. Bain sé duais an £1.
[ilus inne]?
Bhí seisean ar an choisidh a b’fearr dá rabh ar an bhaile. Bhí sé abalta dhul nGleanntach i leath an ama a théidheadh an chuid eile de bunad an bhaile.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Padruig Mór Ua Braonáin.
An fear a ba laidre ar An t-Sealgán Am amháin, bhí dhá cloigeann déag fear ag iarraidh maide a tharraingt ‘na ndiaidh acht sháruigh ortha, chuir Padruig ar a ghualainn é agus diompar sé é é-fhéin. Nuair a theidheadh bó i bpoll, bhí sé ábalta greim dhá adhairc a fhághail uirthi agus í a chathamh amach ar an bhruaigh. Am amháin chuaidh beathach siar le lód arbhair ‘na mhuilinn agus sgáruigh an beathach roimhe rotha an mhuilinn, agus dimthigh an méid a bhí ‘na chnamhaibh. Chuaidh Padrúig ‘na dhiaidh agus fuair ghreim rubaill air, agus chaith e fhéin agus an ceart suas in eadan claidhe agus chongbhuigh annsin iad, gur tugadh tárrthail air. Am amháin, thóg sé mála arbhair agus deich bhfear in a
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sin comhartha triomlaigh.
15. Má bhíonn fáinne tart comhgarach dón an ghealaigh sin comhartha stoirme.
16. Nuair a thiocfas an gheallach úr agus ‘na luighe ar chúl a cinn, sin comhartha boglaigh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
9. Má bhíonn an toit ag dul suas direach tráthnóna sin comhartha aimsire maithe agus má bhíonn sé ag dul suas cam tiocfaidh droch aimsear.
10. Má bhíonn an gaoth roimhe an ghreín sin comhartha droch aimsire.
11. Má bhíonn tuar-cheatha ar an spéir Dia Satharn cuirfidh sé a bheagán nó a mhorán an seachtmainn sin go dtí Dia Satharn arais.
12. Má bhíonn an spéir dhearg ar an taobh deis ar maidín sin comhartha feartainne.
13. Má thuiteann an súithe in na crapain sin comhartha boglaigh.
14. Má thuitheann an súithe in na
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
4. Má bhíonn tuar cheata ar an spéir ar maidín béidh droch lá ann, agus má bhionn sé ar an spéir san oidhche béidh oidhche maith ann.
5. Nuair atá poill sa loch tá sé ag dul a chur.
6. Nuair a bhíonn an spideóg ar bhárr an chrainn ag ceol tá an aimsir mhaith ann, agus nuair a bhíonn sí ag bun an chrainn ag ceol, tá droch aimsear ag dul a theacht.
7. Nuair a thig an gabhar fhad leis an teach tá droch aimsear ag teacht
8. Nuair adruideann an gat-searbhachan tá doineann ag teacht.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Má bhíonn gruaim ar ná realtógaí tá feartainn comhgarach.
2. Má bhionn cuma uisge na abhna dorca sin comrach feartainne.
3. Má bhíonn solas gorm ar an teinidh sin comharta droch aimsire
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
indiaid.
7. Coileac fraoig ag stairthig béidh doineann ann.
8. Nuair a bhionn greasán le féicheal trathnóna ag steallad lá tar ná barac.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Nuair ata grian baidhtha béidh droc la.
2. Sgala na gcnoc ins an loch duineann.
3. Corrmónadh ag iasghaireacht droch aimsear ag teacht.
4. Grian ag soillsiu fríd feartainne.
5. Fáinne fán gealaigh agus fasgladh ann tiocfaidh an stoirm an bealac sin.
6. Guth gear ag an lon dub feartainn
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
14. Nuair a tig an Dreolan go barr an crann sin droch chomartha.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the beginning of March. It was great practice for children in olden days to go out in the fields and pluck the daisies and make chains and crowns.
Boys used to get a large spool and a spear made by the Smith. Then they used to fill one end of it with timber and the spear on the other end. They also make calapult of timber with a hole in the centre and two rubbers and a piece of leather. They make snares for catching rabbits, and snares are made to the present day.
People used also play cat with two sticks one longer than the other the smaller one which should not be more than three ins in length was pointed at both ends. Another game which was usually played was teetoller pointed and the letters P for put down A for all N for none H for half, each person would have six buttons and who ever would
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
7. Nuair a ísleann na caoraigh ó bhárraibh na gcnoc sin comhartha doininn.
8. Nuair a bhíonn seangáin le feiceal sin comhartha feartainne.
9. Lugain ag sgreadaidh sin comhartha feartainne.
10. Nuair a bhíonn lónair ins na realtaibh sin comhartha siocain.
11. Nuair a triomann na tobair sin comartha feartanna.
12. Comharta fearthanna milteog leatair a fheiceal.
13.
Nuair a bhíonn an - calan ag cuileogaí sin comharta feartanna.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Thig aimsear mhaith le béal Bharra Tráigh Éanna agus droch aimsear le Bárra Ghaoth Bearra.
2. Nuair a bhíonn barraidheacht triomlaigh ann théidheann na lachainn a sgreadaigh fá choinne (trio) fluichlaigh.
3. Nuair a craitheann na lachainn iad fhéin sin comhartha táirnigh.
4. Nuair a tcidhtear morán cuilleog sin comhartha feartainne.
5. Am ar bith a mbíonn ceo ar an Sgreig sin comhartha feartainne.
6. Bíonn an - chalán ag srútán loch na Muirleóighe nuair a bíonn doineann ag teacht.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Thig aimsear mhaith le béal Bharra Tráigh Éanna agus droch aimsear le Bárra Ghaoth Bearra.
2. Nuair a bhíonn barraidheacht triomlaigh ann théidheann na lachainn a sgreadaigh fá choinne (trio) fluichlaigh.
3. Nuair a craitheann na lachainn iad fhéin sin comhartha táirnigh.
4. Nuair a tcidhtear morán cuilleog sin comhartha feartainne.
5. Am ar bith a mbíonn ceo ar an Sgreig sin comhartha feartainne.
6. Bíonn an - chalán ag srútán loch na Muirleóighe nuair a bíonn doineann ag teacht.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
12. Má bhíonn na grainneogaí féir ar a gcois comhartha feartainne é.
13. Nuair a scríobann an cat admad comhartha gaoithe móire é.
14. Ma bhíonn an spideog ag ceol ar bárr crainn comhartha aimsire maithe é.
15. Nuair a bhíonn easogaí le feíceal comhartha droch aimsear é.
16. Nuair á theidheann na caoraigh go bárr na gcnoc comhartha aimsire maithe é.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6. Nuair a bhíos tormán ag an Srúthan Giobach comhartha siochain é.
7. Nuair a tcidh sinn na réaltogai ag achrú ins an spéir comhartha siocháin é.
8. Nuair a bhíonn speirí dearga thart fá an gréin nuair atá sí ag gabhail a’ luighe deir siad go mbéidh sé ag cur lá thar na bárach.
9. Má bíonn cuma dubh ar an fairrge comhartha doininn é.
10. Nuair a bhíos “cailleach dubh” da nighe fhéin ‘san fairrge comhartha doininn é
11. Má fhluichann na cearca iad fhéin ní dheanfaidh sé tireadh an lá sin.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Nuair a thigh cabhar buidhe isteach leis an lán - mhara deir siad gur comhartha feartainne é.
2. Nuair a bhíonn tuam ag Barra Gaoth Bearra sin comhartha feartainne.
3. Nuair a thig na faoileogaí isteach ar an talamh comhartha doininn é.
4. Nuair a thig an ceo anuas ar an sliabh ó thuaidh cuirfidh sé an lá sin.
5. Nuair a tchidh sinn na h-ealaidheacha comhartha doininn é agus cé ar bith an áit a dtig siad as, sin an áit a dtiocfaidh an stoirm as.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Na faoileogaí ag dhul siar comhartha aimsire maithe agus iad ag dul soir droch aimsir.
2. Nuair a thig an teallach na bhaile go luath comhartha droch aimsire
3. Cúl an chait tionntuighthe leis an teinidh comhartha doineainne agus fuaicht
4. Nuair a bhíonn an ghrian ag soilseadh agus scála na néal le feiceal agus gan iad ag bogadh comhartha aimsire mhaith.
5. Amh a bhéas gaoth ar an loch agus tobair ciúin ann tiocfaidh droch aimsear.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About thirty five years ago there lived on the Mogeely road where Lena Collins lives now an old man named George Pomphrett. He was a nailer by trade. He was a thin hardy man, who lived to be a hundred years. He followed his trade at Ladysbridge. He was able to make nails of all sorts and sizes. He had to supply the whole of East Cork with nails. he was also a very good handyman. In his old days, he was good at carpentry and was also able to make baskets, skees, and cages. He was also a keen sportsman. Every Sunday was to be seen out in the country hunting fishing or poaching as the occasion permitted.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Spéira dearga shoir maidín Foghmair béidh sé ag cur roimhe an oidhche
2. Spéirí buidhe - gaoth mhór.
3. Tuar ceatha ar maidín - droch lá
“ “ tráthnóna - oidhche maith
4. Nuair a amharcann na chnuic beag tiocfaidh doineann agus aimsear mhaith má amharcann siad mór.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in na dhiaidh
11. Má tcidhtear an chor-mónadh ag dhul suas an cnoc in eadan an uisge deirtear go silidh sé acht ma tchidhear í ag teacht anuas leis an uisge deirtear go gcurfaidh sé
12. Má thig duilleogai ar na crainnibh go h-an luath deirtear go dtiocfaidh droch bhliadhain acht má bhíonn sé an-mall ag teacht daoibhthe tiocfaidh bliadhan mhaith.
13. Comhartha stoirm an teallach a fheiceal dhá gcrathamh fhéin indhiaidh a gceangal isteach
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
6. Go h-an luath ar maidín má théidheann na spéirthai dearga suas go mullach na spéire sin comhartha lae maith acht ma théidheann siad síos i gcúl na gcnoc, béidh droch lá ann.
7. Ma bhíonn an coileach ag sgairtidh ag dul suas dó ar an fhearra san oidhche béidh droch lá ann lá thar na bhárach acht ma théidheann sé a sgáirtidh nuair atá sé ag cur sin comhartha go dhéanfaidh sé tireadh i gceann mhoill
8. Má tcidhtear an fháinleog ag eiteall go h-an íseal sin comhartha
10 Deirtear má churann sé lá leamóige go gcurfaidh sé ar feadh 40 lá
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The farmers of this district sow about two acres of potatoes every year. Some of the farmers give ground to the labourers to plant potatoes, to return the compliment the labourers will give them a helping hand when they are busy.
Plough men generally prepare the ground. It is sometimes manured first and then ploughed. The drills are then made in the Spring and the seed sown.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 12:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are five forges in the Parish of Mogeely. Three of them are worked by a family called Murname. They are two brothers and a first cousin. In each forge there is an anvil a vice and two bellows. These smiths generally spend the day shoeing horses and repairing ploughs and other farm implements. When they are banding wheels they do it in the open air. Outside the forge door there are two stone troughs for holding water to cool hot irons. There are also two round stone flags for banding wheels.
Forge water is supposed to be very good for to wash your hands. It keeps them from splitting.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Churns are rarely used in Ireland now, as most of the milk is taken to the creamery. Long ago barrel churns were used. Those churns were round like a barrel with a cover on one end. On this cover were four clasps to secure it to the churn. There was a rubber on the inside of the cover to prevent the cream from coming out when the churn was in motion. There was a glass in the cover of the churn so that the cream could be seen while in the churn. There was also a little brass button to press
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mactíre. Do chuaidh an cailín isteach annsan fág an ciseán ar an mbórd ar sise agus tar isteach go dtí an leaba liom. Cuaidh Cochall Dearg isteach san seomra in a raibh sé agus nuair connaich sí a cluasa tháinig iongnadh uirthí ó a mháthair nach mór an cluasa ata agat. Is mar sin is fearr le eisteacht leat a cuisle arsan mactíre agus ná lonnrac atá na súile agat. Is mar sin is fearr iad le eiscint leat a cuisle, nach mór na fiacla atá agat "Is mar sin is fearr iad le ithe a cuisle arsan mactíre de guth garbh, is do phreab sé amach chúici. Do scread an cailín agus do rith sí uaidh. Bhí sé ar tí breith uirthí nuair a d'oscladh an doras is rith fearr isteach. Bhí sé ag baint adhmad sa coill agus cualadh sé Cochall Dearg ag screadadh. Bhí tuagh in a láimh aige agus do mairbh sé an mactíre d'aon buille amháin. Bhí cathú mór ar máthair an cailín nuair d'airig sí go raibh an t-sean bhean marbh acht thug sí buidheachas do Dis gur thainig Cocall Dearg slán ar. Is mór an truagh nár dhein Cochall Dearg mar dubhairt léi. Agus gan mhoill do dheanamh ar an mbóthar. Ach dhein sí gach rud a dubhairt a mhathair léi Cochall Dearg ar san amach.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in order that the air could escape from the churn.
Butter was made once a week both in Winter and Summer. In parts of the country men used do the churning, and in other places it was worked by horse power.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once an old woman, who lived by her self below Dunraymond. The people thought. She was a witch, but they were sure of it, when on May morning She went out with a long tether and tied it to a bush.
Then she began pulling and drawing it in with her hands, chanting all time , "Draw in; draw in," Draw in more.
Then the people found out that she was drawing the milk from their cows. Then the people all tried to get a little piece of her shawl or skirt or dress and burned it with fire and put it smonldering in front
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of the cow nose it brought back the mile. This old woman was called Blunder Cambell".
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Monthly fairs are held in Killeagh Midleton and Youghal. Midleton is held on the second Monday, Youghal on the third, and Killeagh on the fourth Monday of the month.
Years ago there used to be a fair in Castlemartyr but it fell through because it was not convenient enough for buyers.
A fair used be held in Mogeely on St Patricks Day. The field is still to be seen, and is known as the fair field.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once an old woman, who lived by her self below Bunraymond. The people thought. She was a witch, but they were sure of it, when on May morning She went out with a long tether and tied it to a bush.
Then she began pulling and drawing it in with her hands, chanting all time , "Draw in; draw in," Draw in more.
Then the people found out that she was drawing the milk from their cows. Then the people all tried to get a little piece of her shawl or skirt or dress and burned it with fire and put it smonldering in front
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Scéal (amhrán)
Buachaill óg mé atá le pósadh,
Bídí ar thuairisg mná
Mar is deas é mo lámh ar pheann a chasadh
Agus níos deise ag déanamh scáca.
Le gabháil ag céachta in dhiaidh na gcapall
Is cuirean na cruic le fánaidh
Is cailín óg mé indiú siar tríd an pobal
Nach dródamhail í do culaith éadaighe
Cebe tailliúirí a thóg do mhiosúir
Go deimhin bhí sé in ghrádh leat
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
fathach a mharbhuigh athair an gasúr sin.
Seanchairde. Críoch.
Tomás Ó Máille, Bríghid Ní Mháille
Oileán Mór Oileán Mór
Cillmheádon Cillmheádhon
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
olden days they used to get an Arc Luacha in their hand and put him on the place where the burn was. This eased the pain
Long ago when people got a wound they got bhuachallán and beat them with two stones to get the juice. This they rubbed to the wound to heal it.
In olden days when people got a sting of a nettle they got a dock leaf rubbed it to the sting in order to cure it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Other teachers.
The poor scholars who taught in Renvyle before Navin used to go from house to house when teaching. They stayed a while with each family and held school in the house. The fee is said to have been 1/- per week for each child taught.
The teacher who followed Navin was Connolly. Connolly kept school in Ardnagreevagh. He taught in a house belonging to his brother. He taught reading but not much else. His brother put him out of the house and he then went to Derrylough where he taught for some time. He then left the district altogether and is supposed to have gone to teach in Aran. The following verse was written in his praise when he left for Aran.
Dá mbeadh fhíos agam go bhfágfá Árán
Do dhéanfainn bád duit d'iomcharóchai thú
Ar threasna lachanna ague iomairi táidhre
Ag bheadh do bhéan agus do pháisti leat.
Faoi do chomhair
Ach fill abhaile 'nois go hÁrd na
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:43
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A A Coffin.
Q Around the bush around the bush around the bush he went he laid an egg in every bush. What is it?
A Hailstone.
Q Why does a hen peck a pot?
A Because she cannot lick it
Q Why does a cow look over a ditch?
A Becaus she cannot look under it.
Q Londonderry Cork and Kerry spell me that without a K.?
A That
Q Riddle me Riddle me what is that over the head and under the hat?
A Your hair.
Q What is the difference between a greedy boy and a hungry boy?
A One eats too long and the other longs to eat.
Q Hoddy doddy big fat body flat hat what is that?
A A pot
Q What is higher and
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:36
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The robin is believe to have got his red breast from blood which feel on it as he picked the thorns from the Saviour's Crown on Calvary.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:35
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Ants are also believed to be a sign of wet weather, particularly if they fly low.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:35
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When swallows fly low we may expect rain, also when the flags of the kitchen floor are damp, when the moon lies on her back, when seagulls fly low, when soot falls down the chimney, when curlews cry or when the cat sits with its back to the fire.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:30
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Ans. An Umbrella.
Q What is it always walks on it head?
A. A nail in your shoe.
Q When is a piece of wood like a king?
A When it is made into a ruler?
Q What is full of holes and can hold water?
A. A sponge.
Q Why is the letter G like a plum-cake?
A Because it makes a lad glad
Q A flock of white sheep on a red hill here they go there they go now they stand still?
A. Teeth in your gums
Q What is the difference between jumping over a wall and a slice of bacon?
A One is a rash act and the other is a rasher.
Q How would you make a trousers last?
A. By making the waistcoat first
Q The man that made it never wore it and the man that wore it never saw it. What is it?
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:25
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'Seo an dóigh a n-imrigheann na cailíni an cluiche sin na geibheann cailín eighinteacht slat agus annsin suidheann na cailíni eile ar an urláir annsin téigheann sí thart go cós gach duine agus seo an rud a deireann sí "Lurpóg, Lóirpóg, biadh an leomhain leomhan na paban paban súile súile sheac sheac na mile an cós luath luath leac crup isteach an aideog. Abrann sí focal ag cós gach duine agus an duine deireannach a bheas an focal "aideog" aici bíonn sí amuigh as. Leantar ar aghaidh mar sin go dtí an duine deireannach. Annsin smaoitigheann gach cailín ar capall i mbaile eighinteacht, annsin smaoitigheann an cailín a bheas fagtha ar gach capall atá i ngach baile go mbíonn an ceann ceart aici. Nuair atá sin déanta aici stadann siad.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:25
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Long ago there was a woman named Caileach Béalátha living under the Bealaha bridge and the well she used to go to was where Farrihy lake is now. There were two sisters living in the house with her and they used have great balls and dances there every Sunday night. One Sunday night there was a dance there and in the middle of the night they ran short of water and her two sisters went to the well for water.
There was a flag covering the well and if you did not cover the well after you it would overflow. This night the two sisters did not cover the well after them and it overflowed and covered the whole place with water and the two girls were drowned and the Caileac Béalátha was saved and it is from that the Farrihy Lake began.
Then the Caileac Béalátha went into the Bealaha fort and she used to into the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:24
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If he had pulled out the knife she would have killed him before he had time to stick it it into her again. But he left the knife in her and she fell to the ground, dead. In the morning the knife was found on the road but instead of being stuck in the body it was stuck in a lump of slime. The 'cailleach' was never seen or heard of after.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:22
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Q. handsomer when the head is off it?
A A pillow
Q What has a tongue and cannot speak?
A A boot
Q What has a eye and cannot see?
A A needle
Q What has a head and no shoulders?
A A pin
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:22
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There was a witch at Bealaha 4 miles west of Doonbeg. It is said she killed every one who passed by her house with a big knife. One day a man from Galway was going the road on horse-back, and the witch ran out and she jumped up behind him on the horse. Before she could draw her knife the man stuck her with a black-handled pen-knife through the heart. "Draw and stick again" said the witch. "Bíodh an diabhal agat," said the man, and he stuck the knife deeper and killed her. Next day when the people came to bury her they found nothing but a crowd of frogs in a heap where she died.
"Bíodh an diabhal agath"
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:19
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IV)John Hanrahan of Ross,Meelick was drowned in Shannon near Thomand Bridge. He allowed his horse out into river to drink,but standing in cart,at slip near distillery
.The horse got out of his depth and continued into the river.The man remained in his cart although he was told to come out at rear by a man coming to his rescue.When too late he jumped out in front, went down and never came up.it was thought that the horse kicked him under the water.
V. About 100 years ago, a driver had a carriage and [?] having conveyed some people to Ennis from Limk., was returning. At a point close to Meelick
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:16
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accompanied it. The lightening killed a man named Dunlevy a native of Castlemahon. It also killed many cattle around Newcastle and also burned many wynds of hay in the same locality. Many rivers in the locality were over - flooded.
In 1933 a thunder storm broke over Munster and with came a cloud - burst. An old deserted cottage was smashed to the ground in Kilmacow, Kilfinny, Co Limerick. The top of a castle in Kilfinny was also knocked down.
Great Flood.
In the of July 1931 a great flood covered an extensive area of Co. Limerick. The hay was
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:06
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lámh ar a súilibh ; annsin cuartuigheann na cailíni eile é.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:04
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'Sé an dóigh a n-imrigheann siad an cluiche sin na ins an oidhche cuireann cuid mhaith cailíni a gcuid
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:03
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disappeared into safety as they knew a snow storm was approaching.
Great Wind.
In 1839 a big wind blew over Ireland. It did an amount of harm throughout the country. It took two stacks of corn belonging to Richard Wall Clouncagh. It was the cause of setting fire to a hay - barn of hay belonging to Patrick Tierney of Fortwilliam. He had set fire to rubbish in his garden, when the wind came suddenly and conveyed it to the hay - barn.
Mr. Sheehy, Springmount, Ballingarry, Co. Limerick.
Thunder Storm.
There was a great thunder - storm in 1924 and severe floods
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 11:00
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'Sé an doigh a n-imrigheann muid an cluiche sin na téigheann beirt cailín ar suibhal agus glacann cailín amháin aca oraiste cur i gcás agus glacann an cailín eile ubhall cur i gcás. Annsin phileann siad go dtí na cailíni eile agus cuireann siad ceist ar na cailíni eile os iseal cioca ar bhfearr leo ubhall nó oraiste annsin na cailíni ar bhfearr leo ubhall teigheann siad ar chúl an cailín ag a bhfuil an t-ubhall agus na cailíni ar bhfearr leo oraiste déineann siad san an rud ceadhna.
Annsin nuair atá gach cailín ar cúlaibh na beirte eile tosnuigheann muid ag gach cailín de taobh amhain ag tarraingt inaghaidh an taoibh eile agus cé bith taobh a tarrneochas an taobh eile gheibheann an taobh sin an bhuaidh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:59
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disappeared into safety as they knew a snow storm was approaching.
Great Wind.
In 1839 a big wind blew over Ireland. It did an amount of harm throughout the country. It took two stacks of corn belonging to Richard Wall Clouncagh. It was the cause of setting fire to a hay - barn of hay belonging to Patrick Tierney of Fortwilliam. He had set fire to rubbish in his garden, when the wind came suddenly and conveyed it to the hay - barn.
Thunder Storm.
There was a great thunder - storm in 1924 and severe floods
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:58
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About eighty years ago there lived in Dún-Laoghaire a woman about forty-five years of age, she was not married and she worked for rich Protestant people, she was also a Protestant and one morning she went into the Catholic Church in Dun-Laoghaire and received Holy Communion.
She went down to the end of the church and took the Holy Communion out of her mouth and put it into her pocket and went home. When she was at home she took the Holy Communion out of her pocket and put it on the table, and stuck a knife in it. Then a strange thing happened. The Holy Communion began to bleed. The woman was panic stricken and not long
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:58
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Mogeely owned by Mr. Murnane, and one in Castlemartyr owned by Mr Murnane. These forges have been handed down from father to son for centuries past. All these forges are situated in villages. The forge is a stone building with a slate roof and great big wooden doors. It has one window with diamond shaped panes. There is only one fireplace in the forge.
The smith shoes horses and asses, but he does not shoe cattle. The implements the smiths use when shoeing horses are hammers for driving nails to keep the shoes in the horse's hoof, a pincers for pulling the nails left after the previous shoe, and a rasp for smoothering the rough parts of the horse's hoof.
Ploughs, harrows, scuffers, grubbers and other farm implements are not now made at the forge but smiths
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:56
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Old Crafts.
In the townland of Adoon in the 19 th century there dwell a man named John Reynolds who made barrels. He was called "curley" because he had very dark curley hair. He made the barrels from dale and would bend them with hot water and he made the hoops from holy and briars or hoop iron. His son carries on the trade yet.
Michael Reynolds.
Thomas Reynolds aged 60.
Adoon,
Mohill
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:55
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used to make them in the olden days. Farmers nowadays have more up to date implements than smiths could fashion. Spades pikes, shovels, billhooks and axes are all factory made and are much more easily worked than the old fashioned types made by smiths in the olden days, but these implements are repaired at the forge when broken.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:53
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Days of Joy, and hours of sadness,
Faith that never can grow cold;
Prayers in sunshine and in shadow,
Clouds bedecked with Heaven's gold.
Like the wings of angels fluttering
Lingers long the parting toll;
And the peace of Heaven descending
Rests upon the listening soul.
Twilight deepens into darkness,
As the echoes die away;
And we know the sun is setting,
But is light a brighter day.
Yes, for there in all its glory
Stands the New Church rising high
Proving there in regal splendour
That we need not say good-bye.
Noble emblem of continuance
May they consecrated chimes
In the poem of joyous victory
Crown the faith of olden time.
Bless the faith of us thy people
Keep us in Thy holy care,
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:49
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Till we pass beyond the chiming
To the realms surpassing fair.
M G
April 28th 1912
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:49
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There was a heavy fall of snow in the year 1906. When the snow - storm was approaching the sky became cloudy, dim and grey. The people knew it to be the sign of a coming storm.
There was a flock of sheep belonging to my father Mr Sheehy, covered with snow, but they did not die. The storm lasted for one day and a night and when the people got up in the morning the snow was a few feet above the ground. The strong gushes of wind swept the heavy snow to corners of fields and houses. The birds of the air
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:48
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The houses in olden times were not as up to-date as they are now. The majority of them were thatched with wheaten straw. The wheaten straw was called reed. It was thrashed with a flail. If properly put up this roof last for thirty years. The houses along the sea cost used to be thatched with burroch.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:48
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it will not be long until they die themselves.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:47
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ag imirt liathróide láimhe agus cluiche peile.
Uaireannta ar an Dómhnach téigheann fuireann - bhféidir Páróiste in aghaidh Páróiste eile agus bíonn ana spórt acu.
Téigheann na cailiní ag rothaireacht ar an Domhnach.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:46
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eile ar shuibhal agus falluigheann siad uirthi annsin nuair atá gach cailín ináit déineann bean amháin sgairt agus annsin cuartuigheann an cailín iad.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:46
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Local Crafts
Some years ago when butter-making was in vogue in this district the people put their butter in ferkins which they bought from a cooper. Their is one such tradesman in this district named James Donnelly. He bought the ash trees and got them out into boards in the sawmill. These boards were about four inches wide by a half inch thick and stood about thirty together and shaped the ferkin like a small barell. He then made hoops out of "Ssilvoe" (?) rods split in the centre to keep the staves these are the boards together
E. Doonigan.
Thoman Mc Grail aged 54
Glortermin
Gonvagh
Mohill
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:46
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The majority of those houses were one roomed houses. A big dresser used to divide the kitchen from the room. A settle in the kitchen was used as a bed by night. These were very badly ventilated houses. People used to make their own candles long ago.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:45
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Is minic a bhain daoine chun é féin a bhualadh.
Trí buaidh an ólacháin:
Maidean brónach cóta salach, agus pócaí follamh.
Glór árd, gníomh beag.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:44
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There are four forges in the parish of Mogeely, one in Clonmoult owned by Mr Hennessy, one in Dungourney owned by Mr Geany, one in
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:44
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Ar feadh na h-óidhcheannta fada níl aon am chómh maith leis do dhaaoine éigint. Téigheann na buachaillí óga agus na cailíní óga chuig na damhsa, uaireannta eile bíonn na buachaillí óga ag imirt cluiche cártaí agus bíonn na cailíní ag léigheamh leabhra nó ag cniotál.
Bhí an sean-daoine ag innseacht sgéalta agus bíonn na paistí ag éisteacht leo agus ag foghluim na ceachtanna.
Gach Domhnach agus gach tráthnóna bíonn na buachaillí
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:44
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Other teachers.
The poor scholars who taught in Renvyle before Navin used to go from house to house when teaching. They stayed a while with each family and held school in the house. The fee is said to have been 1/- per week for each child taught.
The teacher who followed Navin was Connolly. Connolly kept school in Ardnagreevagh. He taught in a house belonging to his brother. He taught reading but not much else. His brother put him out of the house and he then went to Derrylough where he taught for some time. He then left the district altogether and is supposed to have gone to teach in Aran. The following verse was written in his praise when he left for Aran.
Dá mbeadh fhíos agam go bhfágfá Árán
Do dhéanfainn bád duit d'iomcharóchai thú
Ar threasna lachanna ague iomairi táidhre
Ag bheadh do bhéan agus do pháisti leat.
Faoi do chomhair
Ach fill abhaile nois go hÁri na
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:43
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Oh! how solemn sound the numbers!
And what memories are here
Memories by the past made sacred,
By the mourned dead made dear.
Ruins where our fathers worshipped!
Faint and fainter tolls the bell,
Sounds like sweetest music whispering
Sacred Abbey fare thee well.
O'er the grave yard to the Chapel
Sweetly steal the silvery chimes
Mingling in the hour of parting
Buried past and present times.
Olden Chapel of Mogeely!
Quaint high galleries and nave.
Holy ground where loved ones worshipped
From the cradle to the grave.
How the dear familiar places
Bring the hour of childhood near
Happy days of First Communion,
Childrens' voices singing clear.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:41
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h-eirball tímcheall.
Sin mar a bhí. Fuair si toradh ar a guidhe. Cailleadh gach mac a bhí ag an ministir agus fuair an bhaintreach a talamh thar n-ais.
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:41
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taught. It is impossible to say with certainty what subjects were taught by navin. Martin Malie 86 cashleen did not go to school to Navin though a brother of his who lived in Ardnagreevagh beside navins house 12 years Martins senior did.
Now by deduction we could guess at what Navin taught Martin Malie can read print "quite well. He is still quite keen on a read of the paper which he can still read without glasses
The master often passes him on the paper when he has it read himself. But Martin can make little or no attempt at reading hand writing. From this is clear that Martin was not taught handwriting at school. This is something that Martin is none to willing admit. When questioned on the point he gets fidgety, scrapes the ground with his stick & says- "Well we were taught some writing." Martin also says he was taught "some figures" but this statement must also be taken with reserve.
Martins senior brother who was taught by Navin was in his time the scribe of the village.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:40
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To the old chapel at Mogeely
Lo! the solemn hour is coming
And the quaint, old-fashioned bell,
Tolls above the waving tree tops,
Ringing out the parting knell.
Ringing out old times and customs,
And upon the summer air,
Swift the hills give back the echoes
Each a whispered dying prayer
Ere our eyes have seen the splendour
Of the Consecration Day
Let us pause awhile and listen,
As the old chimes die away.
Every vibrant note sends memories
Thronging through the listening heart:
Slow each lingering not is whispering:
"We must sever - we must part.
Soft it rings through the old Abbey.
Wakens not the silent dead,
As they sleep where once were altars
Where in old times Mass was said.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:39
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Bhí baintreach bhocht i mBaile Mhúraig i n-aimsir an droch saoghail agus nuair ná togfadh sí an anairte agus iompódh ón gcreideamh Caitlicíghe chuir an Tighearna Talmhan as a cuid talmhan í. Fuair ministir a cuid talmhan annsan.
Buaileadh mac an mhinistir breoidhte agus caileadh é. B'é an nós a bhí ag na seana mhná nú ag aon bhean go mbeadh aon ghol chóir aici, dul go dtí tigh an chuirp agus go bhfaigheadh sí págh as caoineadh a dhéanamh. Chuaidh an bhaintreach go dtí tigh an chuirp. Bhí triúr nú ceathrar ban ag caoineadh roimpi. Lúigh sí féin isteach leo agus thosnuigh sí ag caoineadh. Nuair a bhiodh an áirighthe sin guil déanta aici deireadh sí
Mo ghrádh-sa mo mhinistir a thug dom dhá phingin
D'fhonn's a leinbh a chaoineadh
Agus galar an leinbh sin go leanfadh go
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:37
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A number of teachers of different kinds taught in Renvyle before Eagles Nest school was established in the year 1878. The farthest back that is now remembered is Naven but the oldest man in the place Martin Malie (O Malley) now 86 says there were many teachers before Navin whose names he has forgotten.
Navin was what was then called lacally a "poor scholar". This appears to mean that he was a stranger who came into the place to earn a living by teaching. It is not certain where he came from but most people say he was a Mayo man
He acquired a piece of land in Ardnagreevagh where he lived in a little house the ruins of which are still to be seen between Baker's present house and the sea. It was not beside the road. Navin taught school in his own house.
It is not clear what he charged but some say the free was about one shilling per week for each child
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:36
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Long ago as there were no chemists in the country people used to make their own cures and ointments from the herbs growing in the fields.
One of the principal one's that was used was a herb by the name of Cumfrey. It was dug up by the roots and then the hard outside skin scraped off, and the soft white inside which was used for drawing thorns and splinters, it was then applied as a poultice.
A cure for sore eyes was a herb by the name of Saladine, it was pounded until all the juice ran out, and a drop was put into the eyes.
One of the oldest cures was to get soap and sugar for a boil. It is supposed to draw out
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:35
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In October 1934 there was a fierce thunder storm in Renvyle. Before the storm it was a beautiful calm evening. The smoke ascended straight into the air and the most distant islands seemed only a stone throw from the shore. The people were out milking when the change came. The sky darkened the rain came down and there was fierce thunder and lightening.
Everyone ran for the nearest shelter. The lightening struck Nee's house in Curragh broke a bicycle put a hole in the wall and knocked a bucket out of a boys hand in the stable. Yet no one was hurt. On the same evening a cock of hay was burned in Tullycross.
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:30
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Jack Nee a dump fisher man from Letter used to fish a lot with the handline in Letter bay. On the first of October 1887 he was fishing off Curragh. A strong wind had been blowing all day and towards night it increased gradually to gale force.
Jack did not appear to notice it in time he was so absorbed in his work. Frank Fitz Patrick an old Cashleen man saw him and knowing was in danger he waved to him to come ashore in Curragh. But Jack foolishly made for Letter.
When Fitzpatrick went home he told his people that Jack would surely be lost that night. He was right. The fish and oars came ashore on the white strand at Curragh and the boat went to Ballin akill
Jack's body was on the strand fifteen days later. He was terrible swelled & had no clothes except a piece of a sock on one leg
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:30
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the poison. The soap and sugar should be put in a plate. The sugar should be pushed together and the bit of soap down on it. Then it should be pressed with a knife until it is melted and mixed.
Other cures were soda applied to a burn and bandaged to rub a dock-leaf to a nettle burn, to pour cold water in a strain on a hand or foot, and wax is able to cure windscars.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:26
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In Mr. Hills fort at Gortalea a pot of gold is supposed to be hidden, and any person who goes looking for it is hunted by a white horse.
Not many years ago two men whose names I do not know went looking for the gold as they were looking, they saw the horse and they ran away.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:26
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burned at Dan Hickey's Mountbrown Ballingarry, about four years ago. It was caused by fire. Dan Hickey at that time was growing tobacco leaves. He had the tobacco leaves on top of the hay and he was taking up a bucket of fire up to the hay and a bit of it fell out and burned it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:26
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burned at Dan Hickey's Mountbrown Ballingarry, about four years ago. It was caused by fire. Dan Hickey at that time was growing tobacco leaves. He had the tobacco leaves on top of the hay and he was taking up a bucket of fire up to the hay and a bit of it fell out and burned it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:24
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The main road from Tralee to Cork is only about five minutes walk from our home. It runs from west to east. There are several road branching off it after leaving Tralee. The first important road is leading to Castleisland it is known as the main road, near it there is another road leading to the same place it is called the "Old Road". This was the first road leading to Castleisland from Tralee, but about the time of the Famine the other road was made to give employment.
Along the road from Tralee to Cork there are several small roads branching off which are of very little importance, but are very convenient. One can reach another road from the one branching off at the Old Castle. It leads to "Moriartys Cross" It is called the "Red Road" because there are reddish (sandstones) stones on it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:23
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A Local School
My father told me that he heard it old in his youth about a school at Derradda in the townland of Coragh. It was a mudwall house with a thatched roof. The teachers name was Master O Brien.
There were no pens or pencils used but the children used to write with quills. There were no seats and the children had to sit on turf. There was no Irish taught and the books the had were in the form of what we call a newspaper at present.
Michael Scollan.
Patrick Scollan aged 53.
Shrew ave.
Fairfield P.O.,
(?) Shannon
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:20
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A hay - barn of hay was burned at Michael O' Grady's Gorteen, Ballingarry about seven years years ago. It was said to be caused by accident.
A hay of hay was also
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:16
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Our farm is situated in Tureen, Rathanny, Co Kerry. It is divided into several fields and many of those have names as Madan field, Tureen Rawn, Turnip Field, The Black Meadow, Lime Field, Kilnfield, Drom, The New field, Pairc a caol, Cnoc a gcappal, Cnoc an Aifrinn, There is another field called Drombh because long ago there were people buried there.
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:14
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There was a man living in Cashleen once, and his name was John Mullen. This man was working over in Crocan Fátha digging sand for Pat Mullen. He used to go over every morning at about seven o clock.
One morning when he was going over at the school he saw a woman coming towards him. He did not know her. He had a shovel and a pick on his shoulder. As she was coming near him he noticed that she was a well dressed woman.
When she came near him he was just going to speak to her when the pick and shovel fell off his shoulder. He turned round to take them up again, but the woman was gone. He looked
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:13
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Long ago shops in the country were not common. People had to go to the nearest town to buy goods. Sometimes people gave eggs, butter, or other articles in exchange for goods.
Some strange words are used when buying and selling, as, change, means small money, boot equals profit, tick, means credit, luck- signifies good fortune, cante, etc. Often goods or animals are exchanged for things of the same value. Gipsies and tinkers go around selling articles.
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 10:11
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Churching the cow
The cow is churched after calfing. The churching is done as follows. Two people get a red coal in a tongs. They stand one on either side of the cow and pass the coal around the cow three times in the name of the Father Son and Holy Ghost
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:11
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Patrick Dunworth, Ballingarry was drowned in the Mague, Adare, Co. Limerick. When driving the Mail car home, a strong gale blew the car off the road while crossing the bridge. It is about 25 or 30 years ago since this happened. A sister of his is still alive.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:11
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An old Schottol
The ruins of old schools are to be seen everywhere. About forty yards from Glostermin school lies the site of an old school. It was built by a man named Mr Murphy in the eighteenth century for the education of his children. It was thatched and had no seats like today. The books were not like those of to day. They wrote on slates or with feather pens.
Christina Woods.
Patrick Woods Jn. aged 60
Glostermin,
Gorragh
Mohill.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:06
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There is a grave in our locality. It is called Ballymacelligott churchyard. The church and churchyard are surrounded by a great high wall. It is very old. There are more tombs than graves in it, and it cannot boast of any very fine headstones the majority of them are plain. But some of the tombs are very fine. 1846 is about the oldest writings in the tombs.
The graveyard is square, but is very uneven, there are several heights and hollows in it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:02
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After the war of 1914 a most disastrous "flu" raged in Ballingarry and the surrounding districts. Men coming home after the war brought this disease from other countries. As usually happens in time of war, dead bodies are not interred till decay has set in, causing fever and sickness to rage.
This "flu" was dreaded in the village of Ballingarry. There are about one hundred houses in Ballingarry and one or two died in almost every house. The following numbered among the victims; John Dinun who lived in the square, Ballingarry and three of Guard Hayes' children. The whole family of Doherty's,
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:02
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Tá go leor toibreacha beannuighthe i n-Árainn. Tobar Naomh Éinne, Tobar Naomh Colmcille, Tobar Naomh Benín agus Tobar Cheathar Áluinn. Tá Tobar Naomh Éinne i gCill-Éinne ó aimsir Naomh Éinne féin. Deirtear gurab as an tobar sin a bhíodh Naomh Éinne, agus na naomh eile a bhí i gCill-Éinne ag tabhairt uisge. Tá altóir beag déanta i n-aice an tobar agus deirtear gurab' é Naomh Éinne a rinne í. Bhíodh flúírse uisge ins an tobar fadó, acht tá sé ráidhte go ndeachaidh Protastúnach síos ann Domhnach amháin chun a chosa a níghe, agus ó'n lá sin amach ní raibh aon uisge ann. Níl aon lá áirthe ceapaidhthe ag na daoine chun turas a thabhairt ann, acht téigheann siad chuige chómh minic agus is féidir leobh. Tá tobar Naomh Colmcille i gCill-Éinne i nÁirainn ó bhí Naomh Colmcille féin san áit. Níl
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:00
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which numbered five; all got the "flu". They all recovered except their mother who died after about 12 hrs. The two Mahers of Ballingarry died with the "flu". Their relations are still living in the same place. Maurice Quaid of Ballingarry died of the very same disease.
This "flu" held for a few months, whole families died together in one day. It was the worst "flu" that ever was experienced here. It will never be forgotten by those who survived it.
In the year 1921 following the wet harvest, when the hay was saved badly, the cattle and sheep got the "fluke" and died.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 10:00
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Games.
There is a game called colours. Some one would have to pick out an angel and a devil
Someone else would give out colours
All the angels would follow the others.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:58
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an la sin. Leagann cuid de na daoine airgead ann, agus daoine eile páidrín nó bioráin. Téigheann a lán daoine go dtí tobar Naomh Benín chun a bpáidreacha a rádh. Níl aon uisge sa tobar. Deirtear gur tobar an-bheanntughthe ar fad tobar Cheathar Áluinn, acht níl aon éolas i dtaobh naomh ar bith a'baint leis.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:57
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ins an tobar acht iomar beag uisge istigh faoi Aill. Tagann chuile dhuine i n-Árainn a mbíonn a shláinte aige chuig an tobar sin chuile bhliadhain ar an naomhadh lá de Mheitheamh. Tá altóir ann freisin agus tugann na daoine turais thart tímcheall na h-altóire sin. Seo é an chaoi a dtugtar na turais ann. -
Téigheann na daoine ar a nglúnaibh ag an altóir ar dtús agus abruigheann siad roinnt páidreacha. Tógann siad naoi gclocha beaga agus siubhlann siad tímcheall na h-altóire ar feadh naoi n-uaire. Abruigheann siad an Páidir agus an t-Abha Maria ar chuile chloch. Nuair a bhíos an meid sin ráidhte acu téigheann siad ar a nglúnaibh ag an altóir chun tuile páidreacha a rádh. Ólann gach duine trí bhlogam uisge as an dtobar agus tugann sé lán buidéil de abhaile. Daoine nach mbíonn a sláinte go maith acu craitheann siad an t-uisge ortha féin. Fágann na daoine bronntanas éicínt ar altóir Naomh
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:56
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There was a very old house in the locality "Thomas Mac Inenry owned it. It contained one room and a kitchen. The floor of both apartments were of mud. There was only one small window in each. There was a small open fire-place in the kitchen gable, in which turf and wood were burnt.
The roof was thatched and lined with scraws. It was very hard to keep these old houses clean as there was always dust falling off the scraws.
The furniture in this old house was very scanty, a table, dresser, and couple chairs in the kitchen, and a bed or two in the room. Like the majority of other old houses it was built on low ground.
None of this old house is standing today except the flag that served as the doorstep.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:52
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After the war of 1914 a most disastrous 'flu' raged in Ballingarry and the surrounding districts. Men coming home after the war brought this disease from other countries. As usually happens in time of war, dead bodies are not interred til decay has set in, causing fever and sickness to rage.
This 'flu' was dreaded in the village of Ballingarry. There are about one hundred houses in Ballingarry and one or two died in almost every house. The following numbered among the victims; John Dinun who lived in the square, Ballingarry and three of Guard Hayes' children. The whole family of Doherty's,
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:51
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A dark night is a sign of good weather. When the dust is flying off the road that is a sign of good weather. When we have a mackerel sky that is a sign of good weather.
The fair of Clare is always wet.
The fair of Spancilhill is also wet.
The fair of Gort, 7th November is wet.
29th of October St Colman's day wet and Garland Sunday also.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:50
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Monday and Friday are considered unlucky days to get married.
People say if anyone begins ploughing or any work on a Saturday they will never get it finished.
The 13th day of the month is unlucky.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:48
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Several were burned to death and others were trampled to death. Among them were several children.
Amongst those that lost their lives were Rose Irwin of Feenagh. Mary Noonan of Dromcollogher, Mrs O Callaghan Dromcollogher and Nora Hannighan of London. It was a death trap as there was not much means of escape. A large number were also taken to the County Hospital for treatment where they were detained for several months. There was a Solemn High Mass offered for the repose of their souls on the day they were buried. His Lordship Bishop Hanlon consecrated the grave where they were buried.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:46
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and he put away the monks. When the monks were leaving they left a curse on the land and ever since it is called "Pairc na Mallacht."
In the half quarter there is a monument erected to the memory of John Stenson of Tubbercurry. He was shot on October 29th 1908 for driving cattle.
In the townland of Drumcolumb there was an old church long ago. It is thought that St Columbkille passed through this townland and built a church there. This is how the townland got its name. In Behy there are the remains of an old castle. A long time ago the Mc Donaghs lived there and after, the O'Connors.
About a mile from Riverstown there are the remains of an old mill which belonged to the Hunters.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:46
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the same price so I will not charge you for it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:45
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take off your hat.
"No" cried poor Seth "I must go" Let me out" Let me out!
The butter was now pouring down the neck and face of Seth and soaking into his clothes so that he was in a bath of oil and a pitiful sight to look at.
"Well good night Seth" said the shopkeeper as he opened the door.
"The fun I had out of you was worth about ninepence and the butter in your hat
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:40
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two glasses of whiskey Seth felt himself getting warmer.
The butter began to melt on his head until it came runnign down from under his hat and his handkerchief was already soaked with the greasy melting butter.
Talking away as if he knew nothing, the fun loving shopkeeper kept piling wood on the fire.
"Cold night this" he said "Why, Seth you look as if you were very warm." "Why dont you
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:38
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Not until you eat something and the shopkeeper and he made him sit down again.
"But it is too hot" said Seth attenuating to get up again.
"Sit down and do not be in such a hurry" said the shopkeeper as he went to get two glasses of whiskey, the very sight of which in Seth's present situation, would have made the hair stand erect upon his head had it not been well oiled and kept down by the butter.
After drinking the
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:35
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the shopkeeper as he came in and closed the door after him.
The man whose name was Seth did not want to sit down because he had the butter under his hat.
But the shopkeeper drew a chair down and put it as near to the fire as he could and then made Seth sit on it.
He then began to make a bigger fire with sticks but Seth already felt the butter settling down closer to his hair and he jumped up saying he must go.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:30
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One Winter evening a Country shopkeeper was closing up for the night and when he was putting up the window shutters saw through the glass a man grab a pound of fresh butter from the shelf and hide it in his hat.
The shopkeeper seeing the man said he would make fun of him.
"Come in and sit down this cold night" said
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 09:15
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A cenima disaster took place in the town of Dromcollogher in Co. Limerick on the 5th September 1926, in which 48 persons lost their lives. The picture was of the Ten Commandments. The people collected in a lofted barn. The cause of this disaster was not rightly known but their best believe was that a lighted cigarette carelessly thrown away caused the fire.
It was on a Sunday evening went cheerfully to the barn in which they meant to enjoy their evening's outing. Their joy was soon turned into sorrow, for in a few minutes the unhappy crowds were rushing to the doors in terror for the building was in one mass of flames.
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 08:57
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she killed a child without Baptism and the priest said, "that is what damned you."
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 08:56
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used say to them "tis a grand evening for knocking hay." The man used to answer her and say, "it is a grand evening too for making them up, and she used to make up every bit of it herself again when the man would'nt get vexed. It is said that it was a priest that banished her and he sent her draining the sea with a bottomless cup. It was also said that she was a lost soul. A priest once asked her why she was going around the world and she said that she was damned. He asked her what damned her. She said she killed a child. "That did not damn you," said the priest and he asked her again. She said
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 08:36
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Sprid na Barne was a spirit who resorted Barne some 60 or 70 years ago, if not later. She was always met with on the roads and fields in Barna by day and night. People travelling in cars often found her sitting up and travelling a piece of the road with them. Men on horse - back would not see, or hear her until she would be up behind them. She used to harm nobody, but there was a man named M. Mc Aullife who had a meadow beside Barna Station. She used to go into the meadow and tumble the wynds of hay, while he and his men were making them up. She
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 08:23
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There are two kinds of churns, the dash and the barrel. The dash churn is about three feet high and it is a round one. The dash churn is fifty or sixty years old. The various parts are the handle, lid, dash and joggler where the dash comes through and it is like a bowl. The barrel churn is on a stand. There is a a big handle out of the barrel. There is a glass on the lid and when the glass is clear it is churned. It is churned twice a week in Summer and about once a week in Winter.
It is usually the woman of the house who does the churning. If strangers came in while churning is going on they give a hand at the work for fear they would bring the butter with them. If they did not give a hand the people of the house would put down a sod of turf in order to prevent the butter from going. The churning takes about a quarter of an hour in Summer and half an hour in Winter. When the butter is made it gathers to the top of the milk.
Hot water is
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 08:18
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The care of our farm animals
The animals are horses, cows, sheep, pigs, asses, goats, calves, lambs, foals, ponys, geese, turkeys, hens and ducks. The domestic animals are dogs and cats. The cows have names. The usual cows names are Polly, Betsy, Molly and Peggy. When driving the cows we say, "How, how". When calling calves we say "Suck, suck".
The cows are tied with ropes or chains which is put round the neck. They are usually tied to stakes. Sometimes an old horse shoe is hung up in the cowhouse to bring luck.
The horses are put into a stable from October to June. They are fed on hay and oats. They are shoed about three times each year. They clip the horses about once a year.
Sheep are fed on hay and oats.
Animal calls for the horse "Hoe". For the cow "Pro". For the sheep "Cho". For the geese "Baddhy". For the turkey "Yib". For the duck "Whete". For the hen "Chuck". For the chickens "Chis". For the calves "Suck". For the dog "Hir". For the cat "Puss".
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 08:13
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kind of wild flower.
On the feast of Saints Peter and Pauls the people of the parish go to Tubar Maoite to do stations.
On Saint John's night the people of every village in the district gather together in one spot and they make a big bonfire from turf and furze. When the fire is nearly quenched every one jumps over it so that they would not be sick for the next year. When the people are going they bring some of the fire along with them and they throw it in their fields so that they may be lucky.
On the 15th August a number of people go to the holy well in Athenry, County Galway to do stations.
On Saint Martin's day the people kill a cock and they sprinkle the blood in the four corners of the house. While doing so they say "Mhanam do Dhia is do Mháirtín or In honour of God and "In honour of God and Saint Martin".
On November night all the people of the village gather together into one house and they have lots of fun telling stories, fortunes and riddles. The put a ring into a big cake and whoever would get it
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 08:07
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the woman of the house makes a pancake and she puts a ring in it and whoever gets the ring will be married the next year.
On Saint Patrick's day people send gifts to others and they call these gifts "St Patrick's pot".
Chalk Sunday is the first Sunday of Lent. On that day they chalk any old man or woman that are not married.
On Easter Sunday the people of the district has an old custom of eating a number of eggs.
On Whit Sunday the people of the district are afraid to go very near to fire or water for fear they would be burned or drowned. They say if you got a cut on that day the track would never leave it.
The people have a number of superstitions about May Day. They would not give milk or fire to anyone. If anyone came into the house they would have to go out the same door as they came in or they were supposed to bring the luck of the house away. On this day the children make a "May pole". They decorate it with every
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 07:23
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A Story
About 200 years ago there did a family of the Pierces live in Meenogahane.
There were no Postmen there at that time, he sent his postman to Glenbugh for letters.
On his way night came on him and he met a big building that he never met going there before and he went in.
There was a great crowd inside before him and they were all dancing and they all welcomed him.
There were three large pots boiling over a huge fire and an old man sitting in the corner with big long whiskers.
A young girl came on
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 07:22
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There is a field in this district and it was formerly called the Long field now divided into two the quarry field and putter's field called after a man about whom some very scurrilous stories used to be described. There is another field and it is called the fort field because there is a fairy fort in the side of the field.
Garraí clocháne of which there was about half an acre of stones rising into high mounds some of them in a circle. The old people used to be indread about touching it although it has been cleared away there were thousands of stones taken away from
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 07:17
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About 70 years ago poor people used to go around for charity maintaining themselves with the bag, they took anything they got in the line of food. Some of them were good talking generous people. There was welcome for all especially those who were good company.
They were often maintained for weeks and they told stories at night. All could speak well in the native tongue and sing well.
All of them travelled on foot. There was one man in particular went round collecting rags in a bag he gave in
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 07:12
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The road leading along here between Listowel Ballybunion and Ballyheigue is known as the Shannon road. It was not much until the famine years when it was put up by relief work when men taken from hunger got a miserable pittance for putting it up.
Until then the river Feale now called the Ferry bridge was crossed by means of a flat board pulled across by a rope in pulleys. Funerals had to cross in that way. One day a funeral was crossing and one old woman would not come off the board when she reached the other
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 07:08
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the Shannon's mouth enters the broad Atlantic. This school is situated about three miles cliff. These are names of places which are to be seen.
Here are some of the names of the places along the coast.
Bun-na-srotha = Means the bottom of the stream
There is a stream or a rivulet flowing along and it falls down the side of the cliff.
Faill-na-taoide. Cliff of the tide. The sea strikes the side of the cliff with great force.
Las-leathan = Wide water-fall.
Poll a tarbh = Probably a bull fell down here
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 07:04
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and was drowned.
Poll-a-gluggar. Here the waves enter a cave and as the waves retreat they meet against the incoming waves and a report is made. The roar of the waves, it is said was heard in Limerick city.
Poll-a-Mhadra = The young of the dogs used to be drowned here.
Poll buidhe = Yellow hole
Poll-a-Phiobhaire = The piper's hole.
Cúl Traighe = Back of the strand
Céim Cailín = The girl's step
Beann an Tighe The cliff has the appearance of the gable of a house.
Lich cloiche = Flag stone. There
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 06:57
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is a very large stone out on the rocks.
Gleann Airgid = The silver glen - there are stones found there which appear to be like glass or silver embedded on the rocks.
Poll Á Piobhaire means the piper's hole. Long ago the pipes used be heard playing there.
About seventy years ago a young girl was picking seagrass on the rocks and she heard the music and she went towards it.
She began to dance and she was dancing for hours and she
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 06:53
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Rahela is a townland near Ballyduff Healy was a chieftain who lived there.
He was a friend of the Earl of Lixnaw. He was wealthy and gave presents and money to the monks of Rattoo. Rattoo means the northern fort.
There is a Round Tower in Rattoo which is in a good state of preservation.
The monks of St. Augustine lived in Rattoo till 1603 then the monks left on the approach of Sir Charles Wilmot's forces from Listowel. The monastery was burned by the Irish.
About a mile from where
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 06:48
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and cakes for the money.
On St. Patrick's Day the people wear Shamrock, rosettes and harps in honour of St. Patrick.
The little girls wear crosses made of different kinds of ribbon on their shoulders.
Long ago the Masters used to make crosses at school.
These crosses were drawn on paper they were coloured with the yolk of an egg and all the little boys used to bring an egg to the school. Those crosses were worn on their caps and coats.
Shrove is the time
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 06:45
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I hope in heaven your soul will rest.
The people then give them money. When they have the money gathered they have a great night and they invite all the people to their house. They give all the people every kind of refreshments and they stay dancing and singing until morning.
In St. Brigid's Day the children dress up a doll and they call it the Brideóg and they go around from house to house and ask something for the Biddy and everybody gives them a penny or twopence and then they buy sweets
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 06:41
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to each house they show the dead wren to the people of the house. They ask for something to bury the wren and then they sing the following song.
The wren, the wren the king of all birds,
St. Stephen's day he was caught in the furze.
Although he being little his family is great
Rise up land lady and give us a treat.
And if the treat be of the small
It will not treat our boys at all.
And if the treat be of the best,
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 06:38
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In most districts many feasts are observed in a special manner as they occur each day.
In St. Stephen's Day the boys put on masks on their faces and old coats and hats in order that the people would not know them.
They go in a procession from house to house. They look very funny. They take a holly bush with them and tied to the bush is a dead wren. They take fiddles and melodeons with them.
When they go in
anonymous contributor
2020-10-29 05:09
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tig a'diaraidh cúpla pingin agus seo mar a deiridís:-
" Thugas mo dhreóilín cugat sa, a mháistrás, agus ní mar dhúil i leamhan ná i narán, ach nós atá in á ndúthaigh Lá 'le Stíopáin, "
nó díaraidís:-
" Thugas mo dhreóilín anoir ó Pháris, tá sé maluighte agus is deacair é do shásamh, Is a ghasra a' tighe seo cuiridh amach an tairgead, sul a ndeanfhaidh sé sib a cháineadh.
Dá bhfaighidís an tairgead d'iaraidís:-
" Slán beó chúghaibhse a lánmhú a' tíghe seo,
Go maifhidh sibh go deó chun go mbeidh sibh críona
agus chun go bhfásaidh an lua dhearg trí mhullach an tseana thíge agaibh. "

Mura bhfaighedh na buachaillí an tairgead d'iaraidís:
Thugas mo dhreóilín ó cugat sa a chúpat,
A ceann gan innithin is a cloigean gan súile,
Ná sínir do chosa is ná crapair do ghlúine,
Agus go seacht míle measa igcóir an Nodlaig seo chúghainn sibh.

Bhailig: Cáit Ní Drisceóil, Cumolán
Fuaireas ó: Ciarán Ó Drisceóil
senior member (history)
2020-10-29 00:07
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At his father's old headstone
But again there was no rest
For poor Fr John he was oppressed
A blast blew from the east,
And set his church on fire.
In spite of human aid,
And exertions that were made,
'Twas on the ground was laid
A heap of ruins and mire
When he received his shock
He together called his flock
And said ''on Saint Peter's Rock,''
As It stood in days of yore,
If God just gives one time,
It's in Crosserlough sublime,
My church again will shine
Far brighter than before.
So my children do not mourn
All things are but a turn
And the child thats not yet born
To Crosserlough will trod.
We'll find comfort, pleasure and ease
For again I'll cross the seas,
And my church again I'll raise
Or I'm no priest of God
Each hill sent faith a blaze
To welcome his return
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:57
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rejected
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Tá ceithre céardcha í paróiste Cillméadhon
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:55
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There was an old chapel in Crosserlough and it was burned on Saturday 26th February 1881
It was a slated building shaped like a cross with three galleries inside.
The burning was caused by a pan of coals which were left under the organ to heat it.
The burning was going on during Saturday night and it was not found until Sunday morning by the people going to mass. When it was found there was great confusion. There were great exertions made by the people to save the part that was not yet burned but it was unsuccessful. The roof was all burned and there was nothing left but the four gaunt walls.
The Masses were celebrated in the old school during the time that the new church was being erected. The school was north west of the second selected graveyard.
Here is a rhyme composed at that time about the burning of the old chapel and the erecting of the new one.
You Catholics of fame
I pray yo w'ont me blame
Nor on me bring a stain,
For the verses here I write
Ere his only bishop died
He was his only pride,
He found hera true when tried
When he built Saint Patrick's College
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:55
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If a person had a wart on his hand or foot the first stone he would meet with a hole in it and water to be in it he should say - uisce, uisce, cloch gan iarraidh ar do thóir a tháinig mé seon, fanéochaidh cuid Dia orm
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:52
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A Story
Seán na Sagairts proper name was John Maloney. He lived Ballintubber.
He was buried at Ballintubber. A tree grew over his grave. It grew straight first and it turned down again.
He was following a priest one day and they came to a small stream.
The priest jumped the stream but Seán was not able. He flung his knife after the priest but he did
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:51
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a priest again.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:51
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awaiting decision
to it every year, from the fifteenth of August to the eight of September. saint Keeran that founded it. The ruins of Saint Keerans old church are still to be seen. There is no water in the well now.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:49
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Lord Kilmaine was the first descendants of Cromewll to Ireland. His name was John Brown He lived in the Neale. He had a great deal of property. He won the land of Kilmaine from a witch. He was
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:48
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have great power. When the fairies used to come to shoe their horses at night, the smith could make them do what he would like. Long ago it was the smith that used to pull teeth before the dentists were known
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:47
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In Kilkeeran there is a blessed well. There was an old bush growing over the well. Long ago the men used to come on horse back and they would tie a rag to the tree. The tree withered away and a young tree grew up over the well. The people pay a visit
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:45
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It was a small tatched house. The Heneghans that built the forge. There is a small well near the forge and it is called "Tobar Éanacháin." In that well they used to tighten the tyres for the neighbours.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:43
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There is an old forge in Curnicarton. Curnicarton got its name from the forge. There is another forge in Gortjordan. Thomas Shaughnessy owns it. The roof of the forge is thatched. In olden times the smiths were said to
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:41
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1) Furas a fuint in aice na min
2) (?) Brighde Bricín cuir do chuid ar a gcipín

3) Cogluigheann muid an teine seo mar cogluighnns Críost an fágh tá Muire na bon agus Bríghid na bárr Mhicheál ar dTaingeal a chúdach mo theine agus mo theallach go lá
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:37
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About one hundred years ago there was a hedge school in my grand father's dairy. The teacher's name was Master McConnell The pupils sat on rough stones while the teacher used a little wooden stool. The writing was done on slates and the chalk was a brownish-coloured stone found in the local quarry. When writing the pupils held the slates on their knees.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:35
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:30
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is pealed and then steeped in grease and kept rolling back wards and forwards in boiled grease and then the candles is made.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:27
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The floor of the stable is paved with stones and there are two windows and one door in it. We leave the mare out at night and day during the Summer months and we leave her in night and day during the winter. We give he hay during the Winter and a drink morning and evening. We dip the sheep twice every year with Ormsbys dip. We wash the cattle twice every year with dip to kill the warble fly. We have about forty chickens and about twelve hens. There is a special mark put on hatched eggs. We have four cats. We give them milk morning and evening and soup for their dinner. We have a dog. He is a collie. We give him potatoes and bread.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:26
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the workers were going home for the night St Patrick said to one of them in Irish "Nach maith an t-ach an gabhair" which means "Is not the goat a good horse" and in this way "Acaidh Gabhair" got its name
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:24
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rich man who looked on them as fools.
One day St. Patrick sent one of the workers to the rich man to send them something to help them to build the Church.
The man thought he would fool St Patrick by sending him a goat.
But St Patrick instead of sending back the goat ordered him to be put drawing stones with the horses and the goat worked as good as any horse.
As the day drew to an end and as
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:23
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We have six cows, a mare, thirteen big strong cattle, sheep, pigs, ducks, hens, geese, cats and a dog,. we have six cows and they have all got names. Their names are Pansy, Daisy Primrose, Bloosom and Beauty. When we are bringing in the cows out of the field we say " come on," and when driving them back we say "hi on." There is a loft overhead the cow house and the floor is paved with stones. There are three windows in it and one door. It is attached to the stable and it is divided by a board partition. There is a big plank running across from one wall to the other and the cows are tied with chains to the planks. There is a space of about two feet between the planks and the wall and that is called the manger. There are three cows tied on each side
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:21
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When St Patrick was preaching in Ireland he went to a place now called Aughagower which lies withen four miles of Westport.
After converting the people there he wanted to build a church in it.
The christians all gathered to help to build the church except a certain
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:19
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Con Denn, Lackin, Parish of Denn is well known for his cure of ring worm. He got the cure in an old doctor's book which he got from a Protestant. Chemicals and herbs are used in his ointment. Conn never gives away the ointment. You must go to him for treatment. He first puts the ointment on in a circle round the sore. Charge 2/6 or 5/=.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:19
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tháinigh sí isteach. Nuair a chonnaic sí an fear ag nigheadh dubhairt sí "Céard atá tú ag déanamh." "Tá mé ag nigheadh mo bháinín" arsa an fear.
"Ó fan nóimeadh" arsa an bhean go thuibhradh mé na ruda salach seo dhuith agus go nigheadh tú iad.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:15
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D'innis sé an sgéal mháthair.
"Tabhair anuas d bháinín go dtí an cistineach" arsa an máthair leis an fear. agus leig ort féin go bhfuil tú ag dul dá nígheadh. Ní feidir nó bhualfadh náire ortha, agus nighfidg sí féin iad annsin.
Rinne an fear óg mar dubhairt an mháthair leis.
Fuair sé buichéad uisge te agus thosuigh sé ag nigeadh a bháinín.
Bhí an bean óg amuigh an t-am seo.
Taréis tamhaill
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:13
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Cure. The person with the stye brings a friend to any gooseberry bush. Here the friend pulls nine thorns, points eight of them at the stye and throws the nineth away. Next morning, he points seven at the stye and throws the eighth away and so on until the nine are thrown away after nine days. The stye should then be cured.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:11
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Bhí tríur in a comnuidhe san áit seo fadó. Fear óg a bhean agus a mháthair.
Bhí an bhean óg ann - leisgeamhail. Is beag obair a rinne sí ó maidin go h-oidhche.
Ní nigfidh sí bháinín da fear am san blian.
Faoí deireadh
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:09
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one of the boys died suddenly. The death was of course attributed to the fact that the house was an unlucky one. This coupled with many other troubles which befell the occupants, convinced them that it would be folly to remain longer in an ill-fated house and they speedily betook themselves to their native Ballyvourney.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:09
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:08
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9. Chifeann é is é fheichinn tusa é agus is girre duit-sa ná dom-sa é.
"Cul mo Cinn"
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:08
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There was an uncle of mine coming from Cully river very late at night by himself, and he had a bag of fish on his back. On his way he heard a great noise before him on the road and he stood up to hear where the noise was and at the moment all was quiet and still. When he walked on again the great noise was to be heard as plain as ever, but when he drew near them what appeared to him was a great big fair of cattle, sheep and pigs. at which he could plainly hear men and women selling and buying on both sides of the road. He was kept there about two hours and did not know where he was. He was sure that he could describe every word of what they were saying, but still when he got away he could not relate one word of what they were saying. The night that this happened was a very dark night
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:06
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"Moin"
6. Cadh iad na trí ruda a gheobhfadh fear bás gan iad a bheith aige.
"Creafóg, Uisge agus Teine.|"|
7. Shin é sa gcluad é agus dhá chluas air.
"Mala Pluir."
8. Sin é sa gcluad é agus dhá gualann air.
"Tlú."
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:05
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A song was composed about them :-
I
"Come up to the hill, Johnnie Moran, as ne'er such a sight did you see,
The men of Dutch Bill in the lowlands are march o'er valley and lea,
Big cannon they bring for their warfare, and powder and bullets go leor,
To battle the grey walls of Limerick, down by the deep Shannon shore.
II
They girded their corslets and sabres that morning so glorious and still,
They leaped like good men to the saddles and took the lone path to the hill,
And deftly they handled their bridles as on towards the highlands they pressed,
And they swept over woodland and valley
Till they came to the hill's airy crest.
III
Look down to the east, Johnnie Moran, where the wings of the morn are spread,
Each baynet you see in the sunlight, it gleams on an enemy's head,
Look down on their long line of baggage their huge guns of iron and brass
anonymous contributor
2020-10-28 23:04
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affairs he did not like to leave them destitute and so they were very handsome girls he decided to marry one of them. He asked the eldest and she refused. He asked the second eldest and she refused also. Not to be beated he asked the third and she consented.Her name was Maire and there was often a Maire or Maira in the Osborn family ever since.
After a while they left Sledy Castle and went to live in Tickincor Castle. The Osborns bought land in Tipperary and built Newtown Anner House as a new residence and Tickincor Castle fell into ruin. Sir Thomas Osborn built a bridge across the Suir to make it easy to get to his lands in Co. Waterford.
There is a story connected with the building of the bridge. On one occasion when Osborn and others were having a convivial meeting at the house of Bagnell in Powerstown it happened as was not unusual that Osborn was one of those who succumbed to the strong wines and fell under the table. Which in that state
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:03
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3. Teachtaire beag ó tígh go tígh agus bíonn se amuigh san oidhche:
"Casáin".
4. Ta sé faoí an teine agus ta sé ós chionn an teine agus ní fheicheann an teine é?
"Cása istigh í n-óigin.
5. Tagann se isteach í gualann daoaine agus téigheann se amach chomh mín le síoda.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:01
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 23:00
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an Sasana ag iarradh magadh a dheanamh den Éireannach.
Rinne an Éireannach mar dúbhairt an Sasanach.
Nuair a bhí sé ag dul treasna sráid thuit an bocóid síos san sráid.
Tháinigh madadh aghus d'oth se suas an bocóid agus nuair a bhí sé dh ithte aige chuir se suas a chos go dtí a bheal.
"Ó nach orm a bhí an t-adh" arsa an Éireannach nár ithteas an rud sin agus nach a bhfuil innte acht Jew-harp.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:56
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Cuaidh Éireannach go Sasana blianta ó shion.
An maidin la in amaireach bhí breicfásta aife le Sasanach.
Fuair síad bocóid i gcoir a breicfásta. Ní raibh fhios ag an Éirannach céard a bí ann agus d'iarr se de'n Sasanach céard a deanfaidh se leis.
"Tabhair leath é go dtí do obair" arsa
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:53
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"Inseochaidh míse dhuith é " arsa an Sagart. "An Diamhail, AN Domhain , agus an Feoil."
"Ahus an bhfuil fios agat" arsa an sean fear "Trí adhmadha do corp"
"N'l fios" arsa an Sagart.
"Inseochaidh míse dhuith é" arsa an fear. "Teach Deathuig, is e gan fathach agus leabhaidh dreangcuita san oidhche.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:49
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Bhí fear in a chomnuidhe san áit seo fadó agus ní raibh móráin sgoiláireachta aige.
Bhí sé amach ag siubhal lá agus casadh Sagart air.
D'iarr an Sagart air an raibh fhios aige "Trí adhmhadha do Ainm".
"N'l fios" arsa an fear
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:45
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The wild birds found in the district are - the wren, the robin, the blackbird, the thrush, the swallow and the seagull. Some of these birds go away to foreign countries in the winter months.
Each bird builds a nest for itself except the Cuckoo. The corncrake builds its nest in a meadow. The Cuckoo lays ts eggs in some bird's nest. Swallows builds their nests in the rafters of old houses and the robin builds its nest in the bushes. When the Swallows fly low is the sign of bad weather but when she flies high it is the sign of good weather.
It is said that if boys rob birds' nests the bird will forsake it. The Cuckoo is a lazy bird. She builds no nest at all. She lays her egg in some other small birds nest. The birds lay five or six eggs and they sit on them for three weeks.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:44
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36. If you meet a boy who is whistling in the morning you will be lucky for the day.
37. If the cat turns his back to the fire it is a sign of bad weather.
38. If a person finds a horse shoe picks it up spits on it and throws it over his left shoulder he will be lucky for the day.
39. It is not right to hit an animal with a piece of "white thorn" or a piece of alder.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:40
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We have a churn at home. It is 22 inches high. The sides are round. The churn we have is thirty years old or maybe more. The various parts are the dash lid, trencher, and the clappers. There is no mark on our churn.
Butter is made twice a week in our house on Mondays and Fridays. My mother does the churning in our house and we help her. When you are churning and anyone comes in he or she should not go out without taking the dash in her hands for if she does not it is said she will bring the butter away with her.
The churning takes generally an hour. The churn we have is worked by hand. The churn dash is always moved upwards and downwards. There are other churns that are given a rolling motion.
The people know when the butter
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:39
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31. If beetles come in to a house it is a sign of rain.
32. If seagulls fly landward it is a sign of bad weather if seawards a sign of good weather.
33. If swallows fly high it is a sign of good weather if low a sign of bad weather.
34. If the crows build their nests high in the trees it is a sign of good weather. If middle ways a sign of bad weather.
35. If the "piblín miog" whistles it is a sign of rain
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:36
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if they had a toothache would not comb their hair that day.
Beginning work on Friday such as servants being employed in new jobs is considered unlucky. The unlucky days for starting new jobs, such as house building and ploughing is Saturday, and the lucky day is Friday. It is an old saying that a good beginning makes a bad ending. It is lucky to set potatoes on Good Friday. The old people say you should not change from one house to another on Saturday because it is said "Saturdays flitting is a short sitting".
The best day of the year and the most sucessful day of the year for planting seeds vegetables and potatoes is Good Friday and the worst day is 20th May. The Cross Day known in my district is the 1st May each year. People avoid putting out ashes or spilling water on that day.
The cold days of early April are referred to the Ribóg days. There was once an old cow who was ailing all Winter and the people said if she got over March she would come too. March was over and the 1st of
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:36
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Witches often turned themselves into hares to steal the milk of cows. They were chased by dogs without a white hair. When the hare was injured an old woman was usually afterwards found dying in some hut in the locality. This was a common belief.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:33
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except there is some one being buried. It is not right to laugh, sing, or talk going past a graveyard except to say prayers for the dead.
27. It is unlucky to bring "White Thorn" to a house.
28. When a person is about to die the "banside" is heard or a knock (generally three knocks) at the window.
29. If soot fall down a chimney it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:31
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In almost every part of Ireland certain articles are placed in honour of a Saint or Some people have a little altar up in the bedroom in honour of the Sacred Heart. The people wore green in honour of St Patrick. Long ago on St Bridget's Day there were pictures bleesed in honour of her and hung up in each house to bring good luck.
The people long ago used to weave a rush cross of St Bridget and next day the crosses would be blessed and hung up in each outhouse. This custom is not carried out nowadays. On May Eve the children go out and gather May flowers and scatter them at the doors of homes. The children do this to keep away ill luck and bring good fortune.
In olden times when a
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:26
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Once upon a time there was a little princess. Her name was Jane. She had eleven sisters. She was not the nicest of them. She had black hair and gray eyes.
Her sisters had golden hair and blue eyes. Jane's hair could not curl for all the curling pins in the world. Jane was very bright at her lessons and her sisters were as stupid as bats. They could do nothing but look nice and dance wondering if princes would come and carry them to palaces of their own. The princes did come and they found the other princesses no good at learning only at dancing. No one in the palace could speak a different language only Jane. One day a prince came and brought Jane away on a black charger. The princesses sadly watched Jane go to her kingdom. Why
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:22
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22. If you meet a foxy girl or a woman first in the morning you will be unlucky for the day.
23. Often a farmer turned home from the fair on account of this. It is lucky to meet a black haired woman or girl.
24. It is very lucky to meet a sweep first in the morning especially if he has turned eyes.
25. It is a very unlucky sign if a black cat crosses the road in front of you.
26. It is not right to go into a graveyard
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:20
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have thought it was a byre if I had not seen the calf's head looking out of the window.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:20
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and said "Why did you fall off?
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:20
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There was a man one time and he was not very sensible and he thought he could fly. One day he got a pair of wings made and he got up to high step.
There were a lots of people there to watch him start off. When he jumped up he fell down into a very dirty place as a wee boy that was watching said to him "you did not fly far untill you li(?) to pick.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:17
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Paddy the Irish man went to Scotland and he was walking up the street. As he was passing a big building a man looked out of the top window and said "Well Paddy have you any byres like this in Ireland? And Paddy said "I would not
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:15
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17. If a girl pokes the fire often she will never be married.
18.It is unlucky to light anything out of the candles lighting near a corpse.
19. It is unlucky to light three cigarettes with one match.
20. The old people hold that the cock does not crow till there is an evil spirit in the neighbourhood.
21.A whistling woman or a crowing hen is never any good.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:15
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There was a man one time and his wife sent him to the town for a message.
He left his horse outside the door. He went into the shop and just said "I want a 1d worth of" Just then the horse moved and he called "Woo back stand sir" for the wife.
The shop assistant didn't know what he wanted as what he asked for was "A penny worth of "Woo Back Stand Sir for the wife".
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:13
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Old Schools.
only slates and bits of stone.
English books were used. The master remained about twenty years in the school and it was said it was the best school around. Parts of the walls are to be seen standing to this day. It was build of stone seemingly.
The present, and first National school in this parish was built in 1834, that is one hundred and four years ago. Ballinvalley School is its name.
Given to Eileen O Brien by Mrs. Gilmore, Moyleroe, Delvin.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:13
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One time an Irish man went over to Scotland. He was walking alone a street when a Scotch man stopped and asked him Did you see a load of monkeys going passed. The Irish man looked at the Scotch man
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:10
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13. It is not right to pass out a funeral no matter what hurry you are in.
14. It is not lucky to take a pin from another person without sticking it in wood because it would cut love.
15. It is not right to take salt from a person, to give salt is to give trouble.
16. Magpies.
One for sorrow
two for joy
Three to get married
Four to die
Five for silver
Six for gold
Seven for secrets never to be told.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:10
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Old Schools
was for the girls. This is how he showed them to make rush candles. He used get rushes and take the green skin off and then get a big basin of tallow and grease and steep the white part in it. He used leave them there for about a week, and when taken out, they would be fit for burning.
When making soap he used get a dish of ashes and water and potatoes and mix the ashes and water together. He would have more ashes than water to make it hard. He would make it into balls and leave them in the sun to get real hard. When hard he mixed it with red currants and oil.
No Irish was spoken by master or pupils. They had no pens, only slates & slate pencils. The children sat on small stools and blocks of wood. They had no blackboard
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:05
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that there is a spirit in the house.
9. If a boy's ear drops suddenly without reason it is a sign that there is someone from the other world in the house.
10. Meet a pin and pick it up
oh ! what luck.
Meet a pin and pass it by
Many a pin you'll want before you'll die.
11. It is unlucky to leave a wake-house and go home alone.
12. If you meet a funeral it is right to go a few steps with it - these are called "steps of mercy"
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 22:04
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Old Schools
Hedge schools existed in my district at one time. There was one in Moyleroe and it had no name. The school was in Smyth's field in Moyleroe just beside Smyth's house. The school was held indoor and was taught by Master White & his sister Miss White. Master White taught the big boys and girls & MIss White taught the small boys & girls. Master & Miss White were born in Moyleroe. No school was carried on in the farmer's houses at that time. Every child that could afford it had to give a shilling each. The teachers had their own house. They were paid very small sums for their teaching. Every subject was taught in English. At night the grown ups used to come & the master used teach them the office of the dead. On a Saturday he would show them how to make rush candles and soap. That class
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 21:59
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4. If a knife falls it is a sign that a stranger will visit the house.
5. It is said a young person should not count his teeth, if he does it is unlucky, for instance the growth will stop.
6. It is not right to open an umbrella in a house lest a child would go under it and stop growing.
7. If a person spills salt it is said he will be unlucky unless he throws it over his left shoulder.
8. If there is a blue flame in the fire or in the candle it is believed
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 21:57
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Bird Lore
The wild birds are robin, blackbrid, wren, yellow-hammer, thrush, jackdaw, stonechatter, lark, goldfinch, sparrow, linnet, crane, swan, swallow, seagull, bat, chaffinch, bullfinch, cuckoo, corncrake, willie-wag-tail, hawk, stair, magpy, magpydiver, crow. Most of the birds go away to other countries for axample the lark and the swan and the cuckoo and the corncrake and the swallow. The robin builds in a bank and the blackbird in bushes and the crow in the tree top and the wren in moss and the thrush in bushes and the jackdaw in a chimney and the stonechatter in a wall and the swallow in a vacant house and the seagull round water and the bat in a wall. The cuckoo doesn't build at all. He goes round looking for a bird's nest and when he finds one he throws out the eggs and gets into the nest himself and lays his eggs and then gets the bird to hatch them for her. The corncrake builds in long grass and the stair in stones. The robins nest is lined with moss and the blackbird's with clay and the crow's with wool and the thrush's with clay and jackdaw's with wool. The robin's eggs are brown and with and the are green and the stairs are white.
Written by Kitty Mc Cormack, Drumcree, Delvin
Given by Mr. Thomas Mc Cormack, Drumcree, Delvin
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 21:54
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1. April, May keep out of the Sea
June and July swim till you will die.
2. Any person who marries in May will be unlucky, and death will follow. It is unlucky to marry on Monday and Friday.
3. If a glove falls from a person it is not unlucky to pick it up. Leave it there till some one hands it to you and then you will be introduced to a stranger.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 21:49
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There was a huge big tree there also but it is knocked down since and it was on that tree that he hanged himself. The captain was a finished gambler and he went and he went over to England every year on his holidays.
He had much money but he was not lucky and in a short time he lost all but it was very hard on him when he put "The Great House" as a stake in a game of cards. He lost the game and he knew it would be hard on him to give up "The Great House". He was thinking and thinking and at last it went to his head. One day he went out and went up a tree with a rope in his hand.
He tied one end of the rope to a branch and made a running knot at the other and he put it around his neck. He jumped from the branch and he was choked. Hid body was found, taken down and sent to England.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 21:39
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The river which was mentioned in the story of "The Seven Bell Hole" runs through this wood. In the middle of the wood there is a very big house called "The Great House". There are three hundred and sixty six windows in it but there is only glass in three hundred and sixty five of them. The other window was filled in by order of the King of England because there were more windows in "The Great House" than in his own Palace.
In this house long ago there lived a gentleman called the "Captain" and it would be impossible to mention "Ballyseedy" without mentioning the "Captain" and it would be meaningless. He was a real gentleman and everyone esteemed him. There was a deep part of the river in which he used to swim and it is called "The Captains Stream".
anonymous contributor
2020-10-28 21:37
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252
shop was availed of when things ran short towards end of week.
Sunday buying was not general except in case of tobacco.Many men made it a point to buy this locally as a help to owner.
Sunday trading is more general at present in Gavin's shop.
Money was not very plentiful but there was no bartering.
The only occasion on which payment was made by labour was when small farmers paid the middlemen .Ned Frost of Derra was one such middleman .He had as subtenants Thady Mc Inerney ,Mike Meara and John Danaher Patk .Carty was a subtenant of Matt Dropey.
anonymous contributor
2020-10-28 21:27
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251
to pipes and tobacco (and still does).She now has as next-door neighbours ,who keeps a sort of general store.
About 50 years ago there was a second small shop ,in Stonepark about 300yds from the cross.kept by Mary Mc Grath .bread ,tea,and sugar ,candles etc.House now down.
A woman, Mrs Hynes ,had a shop in Derra on the face of Meelick Mt.tea sugar etc.
At Landowne Bridge there was a public house called the Twomile House .They carried a general grocery.
At no time was the district without some small shop.People brought their supplies in general from Limerick.The local
anonymous contributor
2020-10-28 21:17
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Díol agus Ceannach.
There was probably a shop at all times at Punchbowl.This was the first stop out of Limerick on way to Ennis where Bianconi's coach stopped.
In fairly recent times ,a shop has been kept by 3 families.The 1 st was kept by Mrs. Hickey .She sold bread tea,sugar and c pipes of tobacco.She left about 57 yrs ago and was succeeded by Bill Kennor continued the same line.In turn Mrs Shaughnessy occupied (as she still does),but confined herself
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:54
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to put down a pot of water with salt in it and when the water would be boiling they would put in the meal and have a nice clean stick to stir it, and a nice moderate fire the way it would not be burned. It would be left boiling for an hour or an hour and a half, and then when it would be boiled it would be taken off the fire and they would then take a saucer of flour and stir it into it.
So you see it is much easier to boil the kettle than to boil a pot of stirabout as it was done in old times.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:51
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The diet of the people in ancient times was very different to the food we have now a days.
Long ago the principal food was potatoes and milk and when the potatoes were scare then they should have a stirabout and milk, and it was from yellow meal that the stirabout used to be made. The milk they used to drink was very wholesome because there were no separators or no creameries in the country at that time.
This is the way they used to cook the stirabout they used
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:48
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There were many other cures made from herbs which have now been lost, because the people do not know the herbs and they do not know how to prepare them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:48
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Here are some herbs which people long ago made use of as cures Dandelion, Buacallan, Biude, Dock-leaf, Sorrel, Tansy, Spunk leaf. The Cat Herb, Bisarn and Caisreavan.
Dandelion was a good blood tonic. The old people boiled the herb in milk. Buacallan Buds was used for blood-poisoned sores. The skin of the root of a dock leaf was used to cure a sore lip or a cold which broke out on the lip.
Caisreavan would cure the pip in fowl. Marsh Mellow was used to stop bleeding Laurel leaves boiled was good for a sick stomach. Garlic was used to cure spine trouble. the yarrow leaf was used to cure Rheumatism. A little small herb with yellow white flowers was used to cure jaundice and was supposed to be the only for it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:47
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Once there was a woman who had two daughters. She made one of the daughters mind the cattle every day. She gave nothing to eat to the poor girl but a crust of bread.
When the girl would get the crust of bread she would not eat it. The woman was thinking she was getting something to eat.
One day she sent the other girl out to watch her. The other girl saw her touching the horns of one of the calves. She saw a table coming out and plenty of tea and nice bread on it.
The girl ran into her mother and told her all she saw. The woman came out to kill the calf. When the calf saw the woman coming he told the girl to go up on his back and that he would carry her away.
When he was going up a hill he saw three bulls coming to kill him. They killed the calf and when he was dying he gave the girl a strap and he told her while she had that strap nothing could kill her. She came to a castle and there were three giants living in it. She killed the giants and lived in that Castle after that.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:41
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as all the work was done by the horses and you may be sure that the farmer was not sorry to give up the scythe and the hook.
But the biggest surprise of all was when the reaper and binder attached came to take the place of the mowing machine scythe, and the hook and very glad the farmer was to see his oats being cut and bound at the same time. Last of all came the tractor and the farmer had nothing to do but to sit on his engine and drive away.
So that was a big change since the time the farmer had to hold the corn in one hand and cut with the other.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:39
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Seasga bliadhain o shoin bhí féirmeoir in a comhnuidhe i dTóchair agus bhí buacaill aimsire aige a bhí ana deas labhartha. Do tharla go raibh an aimsear ana olc agus bhi an féar in droch chruit ar fad. Bhí moinféir mór cois na h-abhainn ag an bferimeoir seo agus bhí sé i gcocaí beaga. "A Sheain" arsan feirmeóir an mbeidh an lá cun féir" "Bfeidir go mbeidh" arsa Seán. Do cuadar an beirt ag obair agus um meadhon lae bhí na chocaí go léir nach mór leagtha amac acu agus ansan do thosnuigh sé ag baistig go trom. Bhí an feirmeóir igcruadh cás agus diompúigh se feargac ar an bfear
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:39
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In olden times harvesting was very slow work as the corn had to be cut down with hooks. The man working the hook had to catch a bunch of corn with one hand and work the hook with the other so it was very slow work. But then the scythe came into force and the people thought it a great relief to them, so they worked with scythes for number of years.
Then came the mowing machine and the farmer thought no more about the scythe or the hook
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:37
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gate, and upset the car and the man was crushed to death against the wall. HIs father was terrible sorry after him, because he was the only person in the house with him. Every night his father spent his next door neighbours, and many times he said how near he came and after all he was killed.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:35
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Many years ago there lived in this district a small farmer's son.
One day his father sent him to town for goods for the house and on his way home he had a good deal of messages. He had a horse and car, and the horse he had was a young one and very wild. This man did not know much about him, because he was away in a job or a while. On his return home he was watching for fear he would lose his goods.
As he drew near his home he was killed by the horse, going in to his own yard. The man was in the car and the horse dashed against the wall near the
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:32
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them. She told the other boys to go to some place far away and in that spot they would find some weeds pluck some of them and bring to the house.
The boys did as they were told and when they came home the old woman was sitting by the fire. She took the weeds put them into a pot and gave to the sick boy to drink.
The next morning they were cured and the boys thanked the old woman and were very kind to her from that on.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:30
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Once upon a time there lived six boys and one girl.
One winter the girl complained of a pain in her side and the doctor was brought to her. The doctor did all he could to cure her but he failed.
She was in hospital for some years. It so happened that one of the brothers got sick and soon after died. Two more of them also got the disease and could not be cured.
So there lived an old woman in that district who came to see if she could cure
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:30
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On St Stephen's Day in this district parties of boys decorate their clothes with coloured ribbons, and go singing the wren song from house to house. They take with them a long pole on the top of which they tie a big bunch of holly and ivy. The practice of tieing a dead wren on to the bunch of holly has now died out.
In different parts of the country there are different versions of the song, but they all begin with the following words:
The wren, the wren the king of all birds
St Stephen's Day he was caught in the furze
Although he's little his family's great
Rise up old lady, and give us our treat.
In this district wren is pronounced 'wran' and treat, 'trate'.
The money received is divided among the boys, but sometimes a 'wren dance'
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:24
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Long ago, when anyone died suddenly, especially a young person the people believed that he was "whipped away" - that is taken by the fairies. The day of the funeral, when the bearers - there were no hearses then - would reach a cross-road, they would leave down the coffin, and take off the cover. Then a relative would come, and standing over the corpse, call the diseased by name three times. This was done at every cross road that was passed
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:21
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It was thought to be very mislucky to build a house across an old passage, or to trespass on the passage at all.

It was thought to be mislucky to use the wood of the whitethorn for anything except as firewood. But some people used to use it to make a tlú lín. The wood was hard. They used to make tuairghíns of it too.
There was a man living west here at Shinagh Cross about eighty years ago. He was a carpenter. His name was Taidhgín Riabach - Crowley Riabach He built a house for himself there.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:15
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These names would indicate that the Gaelic has been moribund for about two generations. The school children are turning to Gaelic names now.
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Married women were, until recently almost invariably known by the maiden name.
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senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:14
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When it is necessary to distinguish a person from another bearing the asme names, he is known by his font name followed by that of his father, to which the grandfather's name is sometimes added -
John Maurice - i.e. John son of M.
Willy Jerry Bill = W. s. of J. s. of B.
In the case of persons over forty who are so named, the third name is invariably Gaelic, and the genitive form is often preserved -
Dan Jerry Jack Mhóir
Jimmy Seán Pheigh, (40 bl.)
Thade Dan Phaid
Thade Thaidhg
Maidhc Parthaláin
Pat Danny Mhichíl [60]
Corney Mháire ní Shuibhne [90 bl.]
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:08
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"Seamus Cruaite - (80 years ago)
[said to mean pock-marked]
"Plaic" 10 years ago
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 20:04
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Paróiste Dúnmaonmhui, Paróiste Inis Céin (an taobh thuaidh de)
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The custom of giving personal nicknames has died out in the locality.

Names mentioned by
Mr. Patrick Warren (70+)
Ahakeera,
Dunmanway
Do chómhnuig na daoine seo sa chomharsanacht agus é in a gharsún, cuid aca ibhfaid ina dhiaidh san - triocha bl. ó shoin.
Paid Fuinneamh
Diarmuid Anacair.
Bill na Pinse
"Pinch" - a short steep hill.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 19:58
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O Donnchadha Feichín
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 19:57
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Murphy
- Doirbh
- Leadhb
- Stuaic
- Móinigh [Bally"money"]
- Codladh
Mahony
- Céin
- Cnó
- Bán
- Dorcha
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 19:55
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Hurley -
- Carraige
- Beaduí
MacCarthy -
- Glas
- Nórsa
- Rábach
- Cruaidh
- Gadhgach [noted horsemen]
- Roomly [nú Fairsing]
- Sowney
- Ciarruigeach
- Downey
Sullivan -
Buaidh
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 19:51
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Families in Dunmanway parish - and
Donovan -
- Báid
- Tráigh
- Daoil
- Wagstaff
- Caipín
- Maol
- Braidín
Crowley -
- Riabhach
- Buí
- Bacach
- Cóilin
- Céardchan
- Curraig
- Dornach
- Rua
ordinary member (history)
2020-10-28 19:46
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Wet Weather
When swallows fly low we may expect rain, also when the flags of the kitchen floor are damp, when the moon lies on her back, when seagulls fly low, when soot falls down the chimney, when curlews cry or when the cat sits with its back to the fire.
Olive Hudson
Ants are also believed to be a sign of wet weather, particularly if they fly low.
O. Lindsay
The robin is believe to have got his red breast from blood which feel on it as he picked the thorns from the Saviour's Crown on Calvary. J.M
ordinary member (history)
2020-10-28 19:42
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Birds and the Weather
Birds can sometimes let us know what kind of weather to expect.
A crane goes up the river for good weather and down the river for bad weather.
Seagulls fly inland when a storm is near.
Swallows flying low indicated rain, flying high they denote good weather.
If you hear curlews shrieking they say they are calling for rain, When the cuckoo calls after "Bonfire" night it will be a bad harvest.
Jamie Lindsay
ordinary member (history)
2020-10-28 19:35
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Local Roads
There are local roads in this district, they are called the Kilvrine Road, the Irishtown Road and the Ilunmacreena. They all meet at the cross-roads in Logrea.
There are bog roads too- one leading to Kilvine Bog, one leading to Kinmacinella and one leading to Meelick. The Kilvine road is made about one hundred years but I cannot say what length the others are made. Before bridges were made the people had to put planks across the river and walk on it.
Written by -Nancy Noonan, Kilvine,
Irishtown,
Told by - Mrs. Bridget Noonan,
Kilvine, Irishtown
anonymous contributor
2020-10-28 18:52
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People were very badly off in Coonagh during the year of the famine which was in 1847. They had nothing but soup and gruel made of coarse meal distributed in Parteen. The Coonagh men went over to Parteen and smashed the boiler. They then came back to Castlepark and demanded work off Mr Delmege, but he had the gates locked against them He gave them work afterwards reclaiming the mountain and building stone walls The Local Government Board began a road from Cappantymore to Woodcockhill but they never finished it. Lots of people were evicted for non-payment of rent. The potatoes rotted in the gardens In the year after the famine the people set no potatoes. They bought food with their money, and as they had no money to pay the rent they were evicted.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:20
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:19
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Annsin bhí fhios ag Domhall Ó Conaill g raibh rud acint in a chupáin agus dubhairt se.
"Bhíodh ag imreacht is bhearfeadh míse spré dhuit."
Níor thuig aon duine sa teach céard a bhí ar siubhail idir an beirt mar shil siad gur ag canadh amhrán dhó féin a bhí an cailín agus ní raibh fochail Gaedhilge ag duine acu.
Is mar seo a tháinig Domhnall Ó Conaill slán ó láimhe múíntear Sasana.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:17
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It is said that when the sky is very black it is a sign of rain, also when the sun is setting and the sky is very red it is a sign that the next day will be fine. If the clouds are heavy-looking is likely to rain or thunder. If you see a rainbow in the morning it denotes fine weather. It is said that a wet and windy may fills the haggard with corn and hay. The South-west wind brings the most rain to the district.
When the birds are flying low it is a sign of bad weather because the flies are low. When a cat is sitting with her back to the fire it is a sign of good weather. When the midges are in swarms on the road it will for sure rain before long. If you see a blue blaze in the fire it is a sign of bad weather.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:15
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raibh an feasta Bhí sí in a caitilicigh agus bhí fhios aiche go raibh nimh í gcupáin Domhnall Ó Conaill agus níor mhaith leithe aon ceó a bheit air.
Thosuigh sí ag canadh amhrán i nGaedhilge mar seo.
"A Dhomhnall A Chonall an tuigeann tu Gaedhilge."
Chuala Domhall Ó Conall í agus d'fraghair sé arais.
"Tuigeam a chailín chom maith leis an mbéarla."
Annsin dubhairt sí "Ta rud in do chupáin a mharbhuigheóchadh na ceadhta."
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:14
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raibh an feasta, Bhí sí in a caitilicigh agus bhí fhios aiche go raibh nimh í gcupáin Domhnall Ó Conaill agus níor mhaith leithe aon ceó a bheit air.
Thosuigh sí ag canadh amhrán i bGaedhilge mar seo.
"A Dhomhnall A Chonall an tuigeann tu Gaedhilge."
Chuala Domhall Ó Conall í agus d'fraghair sé arais.
"Tuigeam a chailín chom maith leis an mbéarla."
Annsin dubhairt sí "Ta rud in do chupáin a mharbhuigheóchadh na ceadhta."
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:10
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Fadó núair a chuaidh Domhall O Conall go Sasana chun ceist a reidhteach thug muinntear Sasana fheaste dhó.
Bhí gran ag na Sasana roimg Dhomhall ó Conall mar bhí sé í gcomhnuidhe ag tióbhú leis na gcatilicig.
Nuair a bhí sé ag an féaste chuir síád nim in a chupain.
Bhí cailín aimseara ins an teach a
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:09
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In the year eighteen hundred and three a storm swept over Ireland and there was a great
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:08
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flood too.
A dozen or more houses were flooded and the people had to stand upon chairs and tables. It destroyed all crops and the cattle died for want of hay and food such as turnips and other vegetables. It was a terrible month for man and beast. There were some people drowned and the people had to go about in boats.
There was a couple of hundred trees blown down by the storm and a few people were killed.
Any place that was not flooded by rain was flooded by the drains and rivers. Some roofs were blown off by the force of the wind.
There was onother house blown in on its occupants but luckily enough they escaped with a few injuries and got shelter in a neighbour's house for a few days.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:08
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na sean daoine go bhfuil baisteach ag teacht.
4. Má bhrisheann tú shatháin beidh mí-ádh ort ar fead seacht mbliadhain.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:06
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1. Deireann na daoine do mbeadh dhá spunéoga in do chupáin go mbeadh tu ag dul go bainis sar i bhfadh.
2. Nuair a bhíonn laoí ag bó, cuireann na daoine píosa éaduigh dearg thart ar a rubaill san caoí nach ghoidfídh na sidhéoga an baine.
3. Nuair ata dath gorm ar an teine deireann
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:05
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ar turas ann.
Ta crann mór ag fás in aiche leis.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 18:02
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Tá tobair beannuithe suidhe ar bruach lock Meashe ar an taobh ó thuaidh de Parróiste Pártraighe ar a dtugtar "Tobair Colm Cille."
Deirtear gur bhaist Naomh Colm Cille daoine san tobair sin.
Fadó chuaidh na daoine ar turas go dtí an tobair sin agus go dtí an lá indiú téigheann cúpla daoine
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:59
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Taréis tamaill tháinig an beirt shíos as an gcrann agus fuaradar an mala airgid agus ní fhacha síad lá bocht as sin amach.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:58
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agus c'en áit ar shuidheadar acht faoí bhun an crann a bhí an beirt suas ann.
D'osgaladar ar mála agus thosuigheadar ag comhraidh airgid.
Gaduige a bhí ionnta agus bhí síad táréis airgead a goid.
"Leigfidh mé an doran síos ortha" arsa an bhean "agus leis sin leig sí síos an doras agus sgannrúigh go mór iad.
"Tá an speir ag tuitheamh orann" arsa ceann acú agus as go bráth leó agus an mala fágtha in a ndhiaidh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:57
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Hunt the "Hare"
This is played by letting one or two boys out and following him. Who-ever catches him is then the "Hare".
"Hide and -seek"
All the players except two go out to hide. Those two "blind" and after a few minutes follow the rest. The two last caught have to "bling" then and so on.
"Tig"
Some boy is appointed to have the "tig" and if he touches anyone else, the person touched has the tig.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:52
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Do mharbh mo chaolach breágh capall.
Do bhuart sé le plaosca go trom guirid,
Msan eadan le claochlig a Dhorca
ba thruagh lib ar ball é
Nuare a sciob sé an ceann de,
Dho stróg sé are a dhrom é, agus ar easna.
Agus d'fhág sé go fán é gan fiacal'na granndal
Ba garrid go manneach é stranne,
Níor fhág sé sguas tárche, nár stcha, nár store,
Agus dá fág sé don a cnátairt gan anam.
Ba mharthé mar mhárghistir, fo dhéanfadh tour (?) scoláir
ba cliste is ba lérgheannta í theanga.
Go labhradh sé Hébrew, Celticis, is Beurla,
Franncais, touch Gréigis, is laidin.
Go dermhin go mhór socca, nuair a bhí sé ag ebha,
Ar viérs nuair a dhein tréason is peaca,
Do bhí se seal erle ag Abel,
Na 'garranín' (horse) léasca san am
Go dhein Cain é go Threascairt
Ag Mathusalem aosta, do bhí séar fhead tléibgse
Go gcualaidh Noah a mhartheas, Do thóg sé san Árca(term,,
Agus Do shaorthargh sé láir dó.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:51
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to replace them.
The working men of 1847 walked miles to get work their wages being a meal of Indian meal porridge.
The Famine caused the people to leave this country in thousands on free emigration or die of hunger.
The pot which was used in those days was called the "Famine Pot" and can still be seen in Tom Fay's yard. Who was the cook is not known or what were his wages. There is no record.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:49
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Annsin thosaighadar ag siúbhail go raibh an oidhche ag tuitheamh
"Chuaidhadar isteach í gcoill agus shuidearas síos faoí bhun chrann.
Nuair a bhí sé ag eirigh doraca tháinig sgannradh ar an bhean agus dubairt sí.
"Rachamuid suas ar an gcrann seo." Chuaidh an beirt suas an gcrann agus taréis tamaill chualadir torainn.
Ba ghearr gur chonnaicheadar beirt fhir ag teacht. Bhí mála in a dhruim ag ceann acú
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:46
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to replace them.
The [?} working men of 1847 walked miles to get work their wages being a meal of Indian meal porridge.
The Famine caused the people to leave this country in thousands on free emigration or die of hunger.
The pot which was used in those days was called the "Famine Pot" and can still be seen in Tom Fay's yard. Who was the cook is not known or what were his wages. There is no record.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:46
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Bhí lanuinn ann fadó. Bhí síad ann bocht agus ní raibh síad indhon am cíos d'ioch.
Chaith an Tighearna talmhan amach ar an bóthar iad. "Céard a dheana mid abois" arsa an Bhean "Níl dhios agam" arsa an fear "ach go cuideadh Dia linn.
"Ttuibradh mé an sean doras seo liom" arsa an bhean. "Bhféidir go dtaiseochaidh sé uainn san oidhche.
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2020-10-28 17:46
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from Lovely Magheracloone.
VII
But now my friends it is a change not like in years gone by,
When homes like these were built and freed and from them had to fly.
Our clergy they were chased away and had no place or home.
For tide and hellery had full fling round Lovely Magheracloone
VIII
But now thank God it is at an end though we have suffered long,
To support a creed of hellery to which we ne'er belonged.
Our father's fought beneath the flag and smashed the tide in bloom
And norman steel was forced to yield round Lovely Magheracloone
This song was written by Patrick McCahey who lived in the townland of Drumbrone Parish of Magheracloone, Co Monaghan and who died in 1918. It was written (by) about 40 years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:42
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Carraigín An t-Sagart
Tugtar an t-ainm seo air mar deirtear gur mharbh Sean A Sagart sagart san áit sinatá suidhte ar Bhruach Loch Cluan.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:42
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The Famine occurred in 1847 or as the old people called it afterwards "Black '47". In 1846 the potato crop was very plentiful, so plentiful that the people emptied them into the dykes in Spring. They were thought to be worthless.
Then in the following year 1847 a big change came. The entire crop of potatoes failed. They became very scarce. The wheat crop, too, got affected with a disease known as Smut. It was unfit food.
The people had to turn on rye, and black bread. It was the chief food. Few people could buy it and the result was that many people died of hunger.
The Government gave food. This consisted of porridge made from maize meal. The food in this locality was cooked in the Market House in a very large pot (still to be seen).
Then the Government opened up what was known as the Public Works. This work consisted of sinking the little rivers and digging the hills out of the road. This sinking of the hills on the roads can still be seen. In 1848 the Government gave free seed potatoes, a very good variety called the "Scotch Downs" till the blight rotted them and then came the "Champions"
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:41
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Cill Ciaran
Tugtar an t-ainm seo air mar deirtear gur chuir Naomh Ciaran seacht mainisteara ar bun ann san 17ad aois. Tá na fochaire le feicháil ann go dtí lá indiú.
Baile An Tobair
Tugtar an t-ainm seo air mar tá tobair beannuithe ann air a Bhaist Naomh Padraich daoine ann fadó.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:41
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words, the exact junction of these territories was in the centre underneath the 'Table'.
There is a splendid view of the surrounding country from this spot, especially to the north, west, and south, and that while there, these chiefs had the pleasure, or satisfaction, of viewing the greater part of their possessions.
(6) Not far from Dromore Schools - on the eastern side - runs a road from north to south.
This was the chief high-way running in that direction, and towards Bantry, in former times. This is a narrow hilly one, but, we may assume it was a very rough one, little better than a good bridle path, some centuries ago. This has been referred to in previous compositions but the boys, as it runs through the famous 'Murderin' Glen'.
Cromwell is supposed to have travelled over this road on his way to Bantry and Glengeriff, when arriving from the east.
It is not mentioned how he returned.
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2020-10-28 17:40
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IV
St Peter's Church it was the first to attract my wondering gaze,
From eleven till two I stood to view its most enchating rays.
Search Erin's Isle from end to end you will get no finer view,
Than the ancient braes of olden days that remain round Magheracloone
V
As I got to Drumgossatt Cross all on the level ground,
To see the grand new National School built up erect and sound
And changes for to see it with a Master's lovely home
And changes fine since Eighty nine round lovely Magheracloone.
VI
Its up the brae i made my way but soon was forced to stand,
To see the home our Curate owned it looked so awful grand
It appeared so fine my heart that time that I through I possesed a throne
But instead of that I am poor Pat
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:38
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froich ag fás ann.
Doire
Tugtar an t-ainm seo air mar bhí crannta dára ag fás go fluireach ann.
Sean Gort.
Tugtar an t-ainm seo air mar bhí sean gort ann fad ó
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:37
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Crann Mór
Tugtar an t-anam seo air mar tá crann mór ag fás ann ar thaobh an bhothair. Deirtear dá bhairfá píosa as an crann sin go mbeadh mí-adh ortha go dtí deireadh a saoghail.
Carraigh Mór
Tugtar an t0ainm seo air mar bhí (car) a lán cloiche agus crannte agus
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:37
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slope of the hill called 'Cnoc na bhFeach', is a space cut out of the rock sufficienty large for a man to stand into it. It resembles the 'cells' sometimes seen built into the walls of old homes once inherited by chiefs, and used by their military guards when posted on sentry duty. These are to be seen around Kilbrittain Castle, Co. Cork, and also skirting the main road from Skibbcross to Ballydehob, about mid-way between these towns. Nothing further seems to be known about the above 'cell', as to its origin, use, or by whom was it used.
(5) On the top of Cnoc na BhFuch, is what is termed locally "The Lords' Table'.
This consists of a huge flagstone about six feet in length, four feet in width, and eight inches in thickness. It is resting on fairly large stones, and about one and-a-half feet off the ground. In former times the territories owned by three chieftains to the north, the O'Dalys to the west, and the O'Donovans to the east.
It is supposed the chiefs of these clans met here regularly and frequently, and dined there on each occasion, each chieftain sitting on a part of his own territory. Or, in other
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:35
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Local Songs. Lovely Magheracloone.
One summer's day when on my way
through lovely Magheracloone,
That day I bet I'll ne'r forget, it being
on the 9th June.
Each view I got just on the spot to you
I now lay down.
For scenes more gay believe what I say
you may search this country round.
II
As I jogged along quite full of fun
I mean to let you know,
To hear the thrush and blackbird
their music seemed to show.
Their music it appeared to me
like a sweet harmonious tune.
Or like a band of music grand
round lovely Magheracloone.
III
Its up the brae of Tonneneave
as i did kindly go,
The valleys wide on every side
their beauty seemed to show.
The flowers fine all round them twine
and the thrush did sing her tune.
And the hills were green and most serene
round lovely Magheracloone.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:31
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(2) Not far from the Dane's Hole - about a quarter-of-a-mile westward - is an Urn. This is, I believe, on Mr O'Neill's farm. It consists of four large flag-stones standing erect in the middle of a field. The enclosed space is filled with small stones, ones which were apparently picked off the field from time to time, when it used be tilled. Its size would be about dour feet long, by three feet wide, and three to four feet high.
(3) Back of Trabbane - to the north - is a low hill, called Tralibans Hill. On the southern side of this hill, near the foot of it, is a seat apparently chiseled, or cut, out of the solid rock. It is large enough for a person to sit into it comfortably, and is known locally, as the 'King's Chair'. I could not glean any further information about it, as to who carved it out, or what time, or for what purpose. The local belief is that Kings were crowned there in the olden times. If so, these 'kings' I assume were only the heads of clans, who held sway.
(4) About half-a-mile north-west of the 'King's Chair', just behind the dwelling of Patrick Hourihane, and on the southern
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:30
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your business.
They searched the room well but they got no poitin. They went home then and they never found any poitin in that house.
senior member (history)
2020-10-28 17:29
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