Number of records in editorial history: 379250 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 11:20
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lay a crown so Mick was delighted + ran to hold the stirrup for the gent to put his foot in to hold the horse. When he put his foot in the stirrup Mick saw that it was a cloven foot + his two eyes were like two sparks of fire looking down at Mick.
The smith watched him until he turned down an old lane that ran through Clerches plot but is now closed. Mick recovered after a bit + walked in to his wife + the first question she asked him was did he give you any money. 'Yes' says he, there's half a crown pitching it into the window beyond the wife. Who was he she asked him. 'I don't know' says he unless he was the devil he went down the old lane at the Crabbush. In the morning the wife went to get the half crown for to go for the breakfast. There was nothing there only an old fairy cap.
The lane I refer to went through Clerche;s plot: there is about 70 yards of it still below the plot. There was an old crab tree at the entrance at the road + the old people said it was an old road that went out straight to the castle for there was logs of timber raised out of the soft ground + across the streams time after time by the old people + they say most of the stores used in the building of Clonmore castle work that way from Ballyhane + Killalongford.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 11:10
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at that says he. What did God ever do for you + you are always praying to Him.' I would have more confidence in the devil and he would do more for us. The poor wife was shocked + after a time they went to bed. Mick fell asleep but the wife remained awake thinking how she could manage for a breakfast in the morning when a knock sounded on the door. So she wakened Mick saying there was some one knocking. Then there came two more heavy knocks + Mick asked who was there and a deep hollow voice said he worked a shoe put on his horse. Mick answered that he hadn't a shoe nor nails nor a light to fasten it on and the voice replied he had all the fittings _ he would pay him well. "O says the wife "Get up Mick we will be able to get our breakfast in the morning so Mick dressed + went out + there was a tall gentleman with a beaver hat holding a beautiful black horse that was chaffing the bit. Mick was both dumbfounded + amazed + led the way into the forge. The forge lit up with a light that Mick could not tell where it came from. Then the gent handed him the shoe + nails and Mick put on the shoe. The gent handed him
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 11:04
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The Blacksmith + the devil.
As told by James Byrne Gould See Page 25 (9-6-36)
"On the road of Ballyshane below Clerches cottage where the Iron gate is on Roche's land before you go to the Piers gate there was a blacksmith's forge over 100 years ago. The Blacksmith's name was Mick Lane, he had a wife + child + was in very poor circumstances. The times was bad + he had little for his time + had to work hard.
Blacksmiths hadn't the ready iron then as they have now, they had to take old Jacks and old iron of every shape, into the shape of of a shoe to get a horse + they had also to make the nails to fit them on, and was poorly paid for all.
The house Mick Lane lived in was only 50 yards from the forge and the remains of both can be seen to this day. He had dropped off work this evening after a bad breakfast + dinner + had no supper nor no prospect of breakfast the next morning so you may be sure he was in a bad humour. The poor wife was trying to console + pacify him saying God was good + He won't forget us. You are always
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:53
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Comhnuigh an tríur acha an sean-fhear agus an Ríogh agus a bhean go lagadhach le céile.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:53
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completed. The guilty conspirators remembered the maid was near + they decided to shoot her his she were not asleep. They almost singed her eyelashes to try if she were awake but she did not budge under the test. Some of the conspirators' names were Malones, Stones + Moorhouse, none of whose names are in the country side now. The Parish Priest is supposed to have said that not one of their names would last who had a hand in this dastardly act.
At this time the jails over country side were filled by almost innocent victims of Landlord greed. An infamous judge Sir Jonah Barrington often presided at Court trials in Carlow. His constant verdict was "Guilty or guilty not, you may trip it - my lad"
Above accounts were given by my father James Kearns Rathvilly about 14 years ago he was then 82 years of age - he was six years of age in the Famine
Brigid O'Grady 22 August 1938.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:51
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"Óra! ars' an Ríogh le Padhraich an tusa mac an fir seo". Ní mé arsa Padhraich acht is mach don Ríogh mé athá in-a comhaidhe ins an teach mór sin thiar. Bhí fuath ag mo leas-máthair dhom agus ba mhaith léití dochar a dhéanamh dhom. D'éaluigh mé féin agus mo leas-dríothair agus shabhail an fear seo muid.
Annsin lán and Ríogh trí mhála óir agus thug sé dóibh é. Pós an ingean agus Padhraich. Túgh an Ríogh go leór bronntanaisí dóibh agus chuir sé abhaile ag a n-athair iadh.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:47
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The Philip Germain referred to in previous letter was the owner of the property + house occupied now by Lord Rathdonnell, a brother of his Michael owned the property now known as Salter's Knocknagann. Phil another brother owned the Kappel farm. After the Evictions Michaelwent to Australia also several others among them Peter Kelly of Rathmore who married Judith Kearns sister to John Kearns Rathvilly. The years of Evictions Meetings were held secretly in a house in Duffrey where plan of campaign was started to lower Rack Rents. Numbers of these who joined it never got back their houses or lands - Portion of chorus to song then composed was : - "Down with confiscation Pay no rent at all, Only Griffiths Caluation" the remainder of it is in oblivion.
Fr. Maher - A priest in Rathvilly took a prominent part in aiding the poor evicted Tenants at this time. He was a nephew to the saintly Fr. Maher of Graigue Cullen whose remains were recently exhumed + found intact . As a reward for his kindness _ a plot was formed by a number of planters in the house
Plotters - in which I am living now to waylay him on his way home from a meeting near Carlow. Only his horse arrived home whinning + prancing + in great distress. Its master was killed on the roadside. The names of the plotters were afterwards made known by a servant girl who pretended to be asleep in kitchen but overheard what went on. When arrangements were
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:44
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A closed mouth and a wise head.
Be afraid and there is no danger of you.
The grip of a drowning man.
People met but the hills or mountains do not meet.
Tell me your company and I will tell you who you are.
It is only a wisp instead of a brush.
The deed will praise itself.
Hang your griddle your bread is baked.
The rale wheat from the middle of a stack.
Your goose is cooked.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:42
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A Funny Story
Once upon a time there was a man who had a great hump, on his back.
One night while coming home from town. he had to pass a fort. While passing he heard "Dia Luain".
he answered "Dia Máirt". That moment he was taken into the fort and never enjoyed such a night with the fairies. When he came out in the morning his hump was gone. He was telling this to another man who had a hump. Some other night this man was passing the same fort he heard "Dia Luain" "Dia Márt" and he added "Dia Céadaoin" He was also taken up but for adding a new day to this rhyme he came out with two humps. and that was his reward.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:42
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Nuair a cuaidh ingean an Ríogh abhaile d'innis sí an shgéal don Ríogh agus bhí gach duine i dtíghe an Ríogh lán le bródh agus iognadh.
Arnó ars' an Ríogh níor éirigh an léon. Gan aimhreas d'éirigh ars' an ingean. Sabhail a maitheas í. "Buidheacas do Dia ars' an Ríogh imhtigidí ar seisean le na chuid searbonthaí agus túgadh annseo é."
Nuair a sroich na searbonthaí an teach. D'éirigh an t-athair agus an beirt dríothair agus cuadhar go palás an Ríogh.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:39
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House wives long ago used to make starch from potatoes by paring and grating them and washing the product several times in water. They would put it out on the window sill to set in a way that the water would fall away and the substance remain. This would be fine white starch just like the starch you would buy in a shop and would save money a great deal.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:38
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Housewives used also set their own flax seed. They used sow it just like oats. When it would be fully grown they would pull it from the roots. Then they would bind it in sheaves. They would would then stop a hole of water what they used call "logging". Then steep it there for three weeks. They would then take it out and dry it and would give it a second drying over the fire in the kitchen. They would then pound and bittle and hackle it and make it fine enough for spinning
then the house wives all through the long winter nights would be spinning until 11 or 12 oclock The course part would be sent to the weaver and the fine part would be made to suit fine shirts.
Every man in Ireland used to wear Bandle shirts
They used make sheets of the course part.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:37
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Copy of "Urgent Appeal" issued by Rev John Phelan P.P. St Patrick's Rathvilly
Owing to the action of the Landlords of Rathvilly Parish, in enforcing their iniquitos Rack-rents at the bayonets' point the people are so reduced in circumstances as not to be able to complete without external aid their magnificent new Church, now in course of erection.Nowhere else has felonious landlordism exercised more cruel or despotic sway than in the historuc barony of Rathvilly. In the well kept records of Rathvilly Parish Church the population fifty years ago numbers 7,707 Catholics; to-day the population is little over 3,000. In passing through the clearances effected by "Lord Rack-Rent," Rathdonnell and Hume Dick, the notorious "Fenian Evictor," on cannot help falling that hundreds of victims, besides Philip Germaine, have been sacrificed to the Moloch of avaricious landlordism, and the lines of Thomas Davies rise unbidden to the mind -
"And thro' many a field you passed and will pass.
In this lordling's cleared demesne.
Where households as happy were once, but alas,
They too are scattered or slain",
May I respectfully hope that you will kindly help us in the good work in which we are engaged, and assest local rescources by sending an offering, and by collecting among Rathvilly friends and lovers of St. Patrick generally, in your locality, subscriptions to complete the great work commenced by the late Father Nolan and which the depression of the times renders it impossible to successfully carry through without assistance from the outside public. "The work is great, for a house is being prepared, not for man but for God" Donations and subscriptions for this charitable object and made payable at Baktunglass, Co. Wicklow or Tullys Co. Carlow will be thankfully acknowledged bu St. Patrick;s Day 1887.
John Phelan, P.P.,
St Patrick's
Rathvilly. Co. Carlow, Ireland.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:37
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a horse race to see who would be at the brides house first and the man that was there first got a pint of whiskey. When the bride and groom would be coming home the bride would sit on a horse before the groom. When the bride would be going into the house somebody would break a farle of oaten bread over her head. At night all the young boy and men would gather about the time that the groom was taking home his bride and light bonfires. In the groom's house there would be dancind which would last till the early hours of the morning. The bride on no account would visit her old home for one month after her marriage or if she did it was counted very unlucky.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:33
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to your cows.
Horses live in a place called a "stable" They get hay, straw as fodder. Horses are shod nearly every two months their shoes are made of iron. Horses are clipped in the Winter time, part of their hair is taken off to make them cooler when they are standing int he stable day after day and night after night.
When eggs are to be hatched there is a mark put on them usually, in case any other hen would happen to lay in the nest and so they are known.
8th November 1938.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:31
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The domestic animals are cows, horses, dogs, cats, hens, ducks, and geese and sheep. Some of the cows have names such as Bawny, Blanch, Panzy, Bluebell, and Daisy, etc, etc. When driving cows from the field you say "How How". When calling calves you say "Suckie Suckie". When calling hens to their food you say "Chuckie Chuckie" or "Birdie Birdie". When calling ducks "Wheet Wheet" and turkeys "Pee Pee" and sheep "Huchie Huchie" and when calling cast "Phuss wiss ssss".
The cowhouse is dividing into "stands" tow cows in each stand. A wooden stake with a chair is nailed to a partition with a large iron ring that pulls up and down the take. The cowhouse is called a byre. Sometimes cows are tied by the neck and horns. The chain that ties the cows is made of iron. These are sometimes made at home. They are made of little (red) round "links"
when cows are a putting in you say "tie the cows" or Halter the cows". When any one comes in if you are milking they say. "Good luck to your work. "Good luck-
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:31
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A short distance from where I live there is a hill called the Coran Hill. On the south side of the hill there is a large bush. Under the bush there is a chest or box of gold. About the first of November a horseman rides round the field three times. Long ago there lived a man named Peter Sweeney who was a weaver by trade. He had a son who was a soldier and who was home on leave. It so happened that Peter Sweeney dreamed three nights in succession that under the bush he could see a large chest of gold, and he also dreamed that a soldier would dig it up, but that the horseman would ride round the field at full speed three times. If it was not dug up before he would be round the third time, the soldier would lose his life. The chest was to be dug up sometime before twelve o'clock midnight. Peter Sweeney and his son got ready to dig up the gold, but failed as they were afraid they would lose their lives.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:29
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slatracha, agus bhaineadh sé an craiceann dhíobh.
Bhí aon fhear amháin darbh ainm Colm Ó Conraoi as Fearann an Choirce a dhéanadh crochanna agus geataí, agus ba mhaith uaidh iad a dhéanamh freisin.
Bíodh Pádraig de Bhailis as Cillmhuirbigh ag sníomh lín agus do rugha le túirne lín. Bhí sé ag fághail glaodhaigh mhaith ortha mar ba mhaith uaidh iad a dhéanamh.
Bhíodh go leór daoine ag iascach san am fadó, acht ní raibh aon daoine chomh maith le Liam agus Maolruadh Mach Donnchadha as Gort-na-gCapall. Tháinig siad oidhe stoirmeach isteach i bPort bhéil an dúin le lán an churraigh de langaibh agus chuir siad iongantas ar mhuintir a bhaile. Bhíodh sé ráidhce nach raibh aon bhean chomh maith le Ánna Ní Chonghaile as Fearann an choirce ag dathughadh. Sé an chaoi a dhathuigheadh sí: bhaineadh sí fraoich agus caonach a bhí ag fás ar chlochaibh eibhir. Bhruitheadh sí san bpota iad agus dhathuigfheadh sí leis an súgh.
Bhíodh sean-daoine as Gort na gCapall fadó ag dóghadh aoil taobh ó dheas den bhaile thuas ag róidín na tornóige aoil. Sé an chaoi a dhóghaidís é: Dhéanaidís balla cloch, agus bhuailidís le muirtéal é; D'fhaduigheadh siad teine agus chuiridís clocha beaga os cionn na teineadh ag dóghaidís an t-aol.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:23
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Cualaidh na h-eascóiní an cainnt seo agus glacadhar trúaigh dhóibh agus d'iompair siadh an bhuachaill agus an chaile go h-imeall na h-abhann.
Tar liom-sa ars'an bhean óg le Padhraich. Tíocfadh arsa Padhraich nuair a feicfas mé m'athair agus mo dhríothair. Nuair a sróich sé teach a athair bhí an t-athair ag caoineadh.
Ná caoin a athair arsa Padhraich ór táim-se tagtha cugath arís. Bhí an sean-fear atruighthe comh mór ó connaich and mach ceana é agus nar aithnigh sé é.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:23
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in his pocket for some time after and it was as black as your boot.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:23
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Bíodh tuighe luachar agus cíb mar cheann ar na tighthe fadó. Gheibhtí an Liachair agus an chíb ag fás ins an chnoc. Chuiridís an tuighe ag fás gach bliadhain. Nuair a bhíodh sé fástaí ghearraidís aguis cheangluighidís agus dhéanaidís cruacha de. Annsin bhainnidís an coirte ass agus chuididís ar cheann an tigh
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:22
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The following are a list of riddles which I know:-
1. What is the difference in a man riding a bicycle and a dog running behind him?
1 Answer. (One wears trousers and the other pants.)
2. Treat me well and I am everybody, scratch my back and I am nobody?
2. Answer. (A mirror)
3. As round as an apple as flat as a chip
it has four eyes and can't see a bit?
3. Answer. (A button.)
4. Why is six and seven added together like a lame dog hopping on three legs?
4. Answer. (Because six and seven are thirteen, put down three and carry the one, and a lame dog puts down three legs and carries one.)
5. What has hundreds of eyes but cannot see?
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:22
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Hemlock A deadly poison but is used for making very strong poultices. It has been used for drawing out inflammation. It has been known to draw out piece of diseased bone from a man's hand
Boil stem + chop up finely + fry or soak in lard + apply as poultice
Elder Flower Ointment for skin diseases. Fill jam-pot with blossoms + pack down. Pour a couple of tablespoons of boiling hot fat or (lard) or fresh unsalted butter on it. Tie down tightly with a lid of greased paper Put it into pot oven or hot pan + allow to simmer for 1 hr. This makes when cool a splendid ointment for skin pimples or rashes. Put a small nut of alium in if ointment is to be kept for a year.
Lesser Celandine is used in curing piles. The roots are dug up washed + stewed in milk one pint of milk is used to every cup of little lump like roots. When tender strain + use 1 tablespoon to 1 wineglass in milk or water [glinies?} daily
Dandelion is used for liver + kidney disorders - Use 1 oz of root to to 1 1/2 pts cold water. Boil quickly for 1 hour with tight fitting lid strain off liquid + bottle ready for use Use 1 tablespoon 3 or 4 times daily in water.
The Mullain Plant is greatly esteemed as a remedy for lung diseases. The flowers are gathers as they blossom + the corollas removed + stewed in milk to which is added plenty of cream. Above, collected from Mary Toole Rathmore no 77 years of age during August Vacation 1938. B. O'Grady
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:16
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The spinning top is one top which can be made at home. It is made out of a thread spool. One end of the spool is made into a sharp point, and a nail is driven in the point of it, in order to make it spin.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:14
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and I licked her up and she got sick, and she heard it, that it was me that licked the cup. Go around now and see is there anyone listening and they did and they got the poor scholar in the bushes and they ate him.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:14
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saw what made his heart leap, for seated under a large furze bush was a Leprechaun mending shoes for the "Good people".
Stealing over very gently he seized the little fellow, and told him to take him to where he could find a crock of gold. The Leprechaun tried all his means to get the shoemaker to look back but in vain.
The Leprechaun led him to a fairy rath in the oghill rocks, and told him to come in the morning and at the foot of the lone-bush that grewt in the middle of the rath he would find a crock of gold.
When he went to dig next morning at the lone-bush he was surprised when after digging for a long time, he came upon a large box. He would not wait to go home to open it but opened it at the place.
When he opened it he was
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:13
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"Ná caitidhidh an bhuachaill sin san sruthán nó sin caithidhí míse i n'aon feacht leis ar (seisean) síse. Bhí an bhrón air an Ríogh mar geall ar seo acht caith sé an ingean i chur leis.
Bhí an beirth acha caiththe amach san sruthán. Labhair Padhraich agus dubhairth "Ó tharla gur míse an leon sílfeá go ndheanfadh sé cúis mé cur san uisghe agus gan í seo a chur ann".
Annsin dubhairth an bhean ógh nuair nach bhfuil aon trúaigh ag aon duine eile dom nach bhfuil sé chomh maith dhom bás d'fághail.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:11
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There was a battle fought at the Bloody pass in the year 1842 it was between Munster and Connacht. There was a history written on this battle. At the time of the battle there were treasures hidden at the Bloody Pass. At that time there was a Famine and they people had to go twelve miles for sugar and they only got one lb for each month and they had too go six miles for what tea would do them for twelve months.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:10
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Our goat one time went into a house, the goat went away up the stairs and got in under the bed. (When) The lady of the house came up to put the children to bed.
The goat horned the woman and she looked in under the bed and she saw the goat's shining eyes. She ran down the stairs an said she saw the devil. The man came up and took the goat out.
One night a man was sitting at the fire. The cat was sitting on a chair beside the fire. The man looked at the cat and put out his tongue at the cat.
The cat leaped to the top of the stairs. I was a lad and so was my Dad I jumped into a bean hull. The bean hull being to full. I jumped into a roaring bull. The roaring bull being too fat I jumped into a gentleman's hat. The gentleman's hat being too fine I jumped into a bottle of wine. The bottle of wine being too thick I jumped into an oak stick. The oak stick being too narrow I jumped into a box barrow. The box barrow wouldn't wheel I jumped into a horse's heel. The horse's heel began to crack I jumped into an asses back. The
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:10
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Some Remedies used Locally
King's Evil. Put an 18 carat gold ring on evil Inside of ring place a small earthworm. Keep it there for a few minutes It it is the Evil worm dies + Relic is then applied daily for a week or two. This relic is supposed to be the Blood of a King who gave his life for the cure of this disease
Burns + scalds. An ointment is made by melting a portion of a 60% wax candle in olive oil + applying to affected part; not removing it until healing has commenced (i.E) a couple of days. Then renew.
Ringworms Aqua fortes quicksilver+ lard made into an ointment + applied.
Eczema. Mutton suet melted down + mixed with a little anchanged Tar
Earache. The Bark of ash heated juice extracted + put warm into ear.
Tuberculosis The milk of donkey sheep or goat frequently drunk
Rickets. Drink lime-water + eat red carrots grated raw + boiled. The other cures are still kept as secrets among families Above collected by B. O'Grady in the course of conversation with people concerned.
Miss Hopkins of Ballybitt now 81 years of age told me she had in her early life an old Herb Doctor's Book with Herbal Remedies for almost every disease but one of her brothers sent it to the museum in London. He mother made up + gave freely ointments + salves from that precious book which cured the countryside - until local Doctors became annoyed. Then she gave up her practice. B O'Grady
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:08
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One time there was a shoemaker who lived in the townland of Doohamlet. He was extraordinarily lazy so lazy was he, that he would not work to earn his living. He was always saying to himself if only i could meet a Leprechaun and get a crock of gold from him I would be rich for the rest of my life without working.
One night as he was on his ceilidhe[?] he heard the people saying, if you were out on a bright moonlight night you might manage to meet a Leprechain at some fairy fort and get a crock of gold from him.
The night happening to be very bright the man decided to come home past a fort that is in "Benny McMahon's" field. As he passed by a light rapping like the sound of a clock took his attention, looking sideways he
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:03
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making baskets long ago.
Wood-work
The carpenters long ago were handy in making boats, barrels, and churns they also make cart wheels. It is a very old trade.
Lime Kilns
John McCabe lives between Castlblayney and Carrickmacross and he owns a lime kiln.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:01
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IX
Now to conclude and finish and may the Lord on high
Who was witness to this sad tragedy with His all seeing eye.
Receive into the mansion of everlasting life
The children's' souls the mistress, the monitor, the master and his wife.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:01
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The old people have a lot of superstitious cures. If a child had the whooping cough, they used to get a cure from a man riding on a white horse, and also to get a cure from two people married having the same name. Another one is, to give a jug of mild to a ferret and all he leaves after him give it to the child. Another one is to give the child an egg stand full of asses milk every two hours. If you had the ring worm get the charm made for it. If there is a family having seven sons, then the seventh son has the charm. If you got a bite from a dog or cat, and it began to get blood-poisoned then get a bunch of hairs off the dog's or cat's back and rub it on the cut. Comfrey is a herb, and if any person had a bleeding hand, or foot, and that the blood could not be stopped then put a leaf of this herb to the sore and it will stop the blood.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 10:00
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could be heard for miles around.
Before that helps could reach them to the bottom they went down.
VII
It would draw a tear from the strongest heart that every beat in man.
To see their parents that that evening all around Lough Sillan strand
Their fathers they were frantic and their mothers screaming wild
Saying God above where is my love my dear darling child.
VII
May the Lord receive their souls they met with an awful doom.
To be taken away so suddenly all in their youth and bloom
May the Lord comfort their parents and their friends we do implore
That were left behind to mourn their loss who on earth shall meet no more.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:57
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terminate in death and misery
IV
They were dressed in their best attire their cheeks a rosy red
The small selected party with master at their head,
They weren't long arrived where the water reached the side,
And the fatal boat was waiting for them upon the (the|) tide
V
When they were seated out it would make your heart rejoice,
To see their innocent pastime and to hear their laughing voice,
They gave three cheers with joy as they went out from the shore,
And little was their notion they would never return more.
VI
They scarcely were a mile from land when their cries were heard quite clear
The boat began to spring and leak which shook them all with fear.
With terror shook their cries for help
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2020-05-29 09:55
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Song on Lough Sillan Drowning 1878
I
You feeling hearted Christians of every degree
I claim your kind attention to sympathize with me
Until I relate the unhappy fate that lately has befell
Seventeen souls upon Lough Sillan most heart rendering to tell
II
It being on the twenty fifth day of July upon the present year
In the parish school of Cullies it plainly does appear
The master and the mistress the monitor and the wife
Went to boat upon Lough Sillan where they lost their precious life
III
That morning the children's hearts were joyful at the news
When they heard on Lough Sillan's water they were going to have a cruise
They parted friends and parents not knowing for to be
That their pleasant day would
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2020-05-29 09:55
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Long ago when people would be getting married their fathers would make "matches" for them. Sometimes they would meet in town and say to one an other My son would suit your daughter," but perhaps before they would leave it they would have the match made. Maybe one never saw the other until the day of the wedding Often money was given to the bride as a "fortune". Sometimes she got cattle and sometimes land. There are some days which people count unlucky to get married and some lucky. Thursday, Friday and Saturday are the unlucky days and Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday are the lucky days. There was an old rhyme which said "Monday for health Tuesday for wealth Wednesday the best day of all Thursday for losses Friday for crosses and Saturday the worse day of all.
After the wedding there was
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2020-05-29 09:55
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"wild pepper".
Killoran - also in this parish. The Church of St. Odrian [or Odhran].
Owenshan - in the parish of Thurles - known as the river of the fairy woman - "aba an bean side". When certain families such as Doyles Russells etc were about to die the banshee was supposed to be heard in this locality.
Templeree means the temple or church of the king. One of the main roads in ancient Ireland ran through this place and there was a church here dedicated to Christ the king.
Templetuohy - "Teampall na tuaite - the country church or Teampall na Tuata the church of the district [or division of land from tuat] It has another name Killragh [Cill brea] or fine church.
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2020-05-29 09:55
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Collected by :- Bridget Gallagher, Scullibeen, Crossmolina
Entered on ;- 11 adh lá Mí Eanair 1938
There are alot of different kinds of birds, some which leave the country and more which do not. All those birds leave the country, the cuckoo, the swallow, the corncrake, the wild geese. The swallows go to other countries in Autumn. They come back to Ireland in Spring. They build their nests in old walls. They lay four eggs. The cuckoos build no nest of their own. They lay their eggs in other birds' nests. The corncrakes build their nests in the meadow fields. They lay six eggs. The wild geese do not build their nests in this country. They make them in other countries. There are other birds which do not leave the country such as the blackbird, the linnet, the robin, the goldfinch, the thrush, the magpie, the seagull, the crow, the wren. The blackbird lays four blue eggs. The thrush lays five eggs. She builds her nest in hedges. The robin builds her nest in the ditches. The robin is a small bird with a red breast. The reason why the robing got the red breast because once upon a time he was beside a fire and this began to die out. The robin began to blow the fire and a spark flew out and burned his
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2020-05-29 09:55
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You feeling hearted Christians of every degree
I claim your kind attention to sympathise with me
Until I relate the unhappy fate that lately has befell,
Seventeen souls upon Lough Sillan most hearts rendering to tell
II
It being on the twenty-fifth day of July upon the present year
In the parish school of Cullies it plainly does appear
The master and the mistress the monitor and the wife
Went to boat upon Lough Sillan where they lost their precious life
III
That morning the children's hearts were joyful at the news
When they heard on Lough Sillan's water they were going to have a cruise
They parted friends and parents not knowing for to be
That their pleasant day would
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:54
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soda through it then they would let it set then cut it into small pieces, and use it as soap.
Nailers
About forty six years ago a famous nailer named Tomas McElearney lived in Main Street Castleblayney.
He had his shop in the house where James Lougheran dwells. That time every person was trying to get McElearney's nails.
Basket-Making
Patrick McElroy Modice used to make his living by making baskets and creels and he sold them in fairs and markets. Francis Duffy of Killycrum also made his living by
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2020-05-29 09:53
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29
Local Place Names
Asdee - Caislean a castle Eas a waterfall, Dubh black
Craughdarrig - Red marsh
Athima - ath-ime-the ford of the dam
Ahafona - The ford of the ground
Ballingowan - The town or place of the Smith's
Ballincrossig - The place of the cross.
Ballyduff - black town
Bally brennan O Grenna's townland
Ballylongford - The ford mouth of the fortress
Ballyloughran - O'Loughran's town.
Coolatoosane - back of the long hairy looking grass (soosawn)
Coolaclarig - back of the level land (or corner)
Derryco - oak wood of Cuckoos - doire (cuack)
Doonaha - fort of the ford
Gootmaskehy - The fields of the white thorns
Knockanuve - The hill of the yew trees
Leaca - a hillside
Lahardane - Leath-Ard half a height, gently sloping ground or eminence
Lakesrough - half Ploughland Leath - half, seisreach ploughland
Lick - flag or stone- flat surfaced rock.
Listowel - O'Thoohal's fort
Pollagh - land full of pits or holes
Shroneowen - the nose of the river.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:51
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The people long ago used to use thick oil and a wick for a light at night.
Soap-Manufacture
Our fathers long ago used to kill a pig and take the fat of it. Then they would get caustic soda in a chemist shop and mix it with the fat.
Then they would leave it in a dry place for a month and they would have good soap.
The old people long ago used to make soap every time they would kill pigs. They would melt fat and mix costic[?]
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2020-05-29 09:51
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a funeral which took place here in ancient times a large amount of white mice followed the bier.
Kilanehar - "Coill an atar" or "wood of the father". In the penal days a priest by the name of Father Dempsey hid in this wood from the soldiers who were always watching for him. He was, however, caught at a place called Boulerea, not far from the wood Kilanehar is a portion of the townsland of Tullow.
Derrgfadda Carrig - Doire Fada - Long Oak-wood from "carraig" a "rock". There is a big rock here - about a mile from the village of Templetuohy.
Blawnrue - Spelt 'blátán ruad" which means the red blossom easily known on account of the large amount of red flowers which grow here. There plants are known locally as
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:50
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1. Ma tcídhtear na faoilghleógaí shuas ar an talamh, sin comhartha droch aimsire.
2. Ma tchídhtear an corr mónadh ag dul na cnuic sin comharta droch aimsire.
3. Ma tchídhtear tuar fearthainne ar maidin, sin comhartha fearthainne.
4. Ma tcidhtear san trathnóna í sin comartha aimsire maithe,
5. Ma tá na cnuic i bhfad uainnsin comhartha aimsire maithe.
6. Ma tá siad in aice linn sin comhartha droch aimsire.
7. Ma tcidhtear an madadh ag ithe féir sin tuar droch aimsire.
8. Ma tcídhtear an cat na suidhe agis a chruin leis an teineach sin
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2020-05-29 09:50
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a funeral which took place here in ancient times a large amount of white mice followed the bier.
Kilanehar - "Coill an atar" or "wood of the father". In the penal days a priest by the name of Father Dempsey hid in this wood from the soldiers who were always watching for him. He was, however, caught at a place called Boulerea, not far from the wood Kilanehar is a portion of the townsland of Tullow.
Derrgfadda Carrig - Doire Fada - Long Oak-wood from "carraig" a "rock". There is a big rock here - about a mile from the village of Templetuohy.
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2020-05-29 09:50
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A man was coming home from town one day and he was very drunk.
He started to beat his wife after he left the town. His wife got out of the cart and walked home. When she came to a certain place she went across the fields to her home. The man had to go round the road with the horse and cart.
The man came to a bridge, he pulled the reins the wrong way and the horse and cart went over the bridge and the man was drowned. There was a man hanged himself on a tree not far from this.
12th April 1938.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:48
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were near it a good many scholars attended it daily. Each pupil had a slate and a piece of chalk with which to write. No copies were used in those days or books also were not used.
The teacher's name was James Duffy and he lodged in Hanratty's house. His pay was a penny a week and three-half pennies a day if he would teach singing.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:46
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made potato bread they made it with cold potatoes flour and milk. It was cut into shapes and put on the griddle before been put on the griddle it was rolled in a round ball and left awhile, Then the lady came along and stuck her thumb in it. It was then put on the griddle and when blisters came on it, it was said to be very good potato bread.
When bread was made it was made to do for a whole week. Bread was made on a griddle or pot oven.
11th March 1938
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2020-05-29 09:46
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Candle-Making
The candles which our father had long ago were made of tallow wax and melted resin which the people used to make themselves
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:45
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when Roderick O'Connor, Árd Rí of Ireland was marching with his army to intercept Strongbow at Thurles he was attacked at Castlefleming by an enemy force in which a number of the Irish were killed.
Lisanure :- Pronounced "Lios - an - uaig" or the "fort of the grave". The Irish that were killed were buried at Lisanure and mounds in the place are supposed to be the graves which are still plainly to be seen.
Toher - alos in this parish comes from tócair - a causeway or a cutaway place.
Tullow - Tulao - an elevation or raising of the ground. It takes its name from the high hill which is in the locality.
Lisheen - small fort or rath situated in the parish
Clonmore - Cluain Mór - big meadow
Derryloughta - means the "oak-wood of the mice". It is supposed that
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2020-05-29 09:45
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28
Local Place Names
Bromore - The great mansion
Ballybunion - The townland of the Bunyans
Lisselton - The fort of St Eithne
Sliss - Borderland
Beale - The Mouth
Tullamore - The big hill
Carrigane - The Rocky ground
Faha - The sports green
Kilconly - From Connla who destroyed a monster
Sliss - Borderland
Littor - The wet side of the hill.
Killeton - The church of St Eithna
Barraduff - The Black top
Ballyegan - The townland of the Egans
Ballyeigh - The place of the O'Heas.
Kilcolman - Colman's Church
Tullane - The pillar stone
Tullabeg - The small hill
Doon - A fort
Barna - A gap
Dirra - The wood of the oaks
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:45
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other rare occasions the people would get a loaf of white bread.
A scholar was often seen going to school with a large bunnock[?] of oaten-cake tied around his neck. The person who would make it would put a large hole in the centre of it so that you could put a chord in through it and tie it to your neck any you could take a chunk of it anytime you were hungry.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:43
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information on informant.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:43
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whom he used go to Mass was a sinful man. One Sunday as this man was on the road. When all the people had gone to Mass he met a stranger. He and the stranger walked for some distance. After a while the stranger asked the other man to show him a spring well, he did so and they both drank an amount of water. when they had finished drinking they followed up the stream and they found that it was running through the carcase of a dog. Then the stranger said to the other man that it made no difference to him if the priest who celebrated Mass was a sinful man because he said that "water running through the carcase of a dog may taste sweet".
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2020-05-29 09:43
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Collected by : - Eibhlín Ó Hóra, Cloonkee, Ballina
Entered on :- 12 ádh lá mí Aibreán, 1938
There are a lot of unlucky days in the year. Anything born on Whit Sunday is cross all its life. If you gave out money on New Year's day you'd be giving out money all the year. But if you got money or any goods in on that day you'd get them in all the year. If you put out dirt or ashes on that day you'd give out all your luck for the year. People always begin work on a Friday because they say it is the lucky day. Any people that get married on Saturday never have good luck. If a clutch of eggs were put down at night when the chickens would come out they'd be all cocks. Any chickens that came out in June or after it will be always squealing and chirping. All potatoes should be planted before the thirteenth of May. Turnip seed and cabbage seed should not be set at the filling of the moon, because they will all grow wild. Monday and Thursday are the days for the charm of the ring worm. If chickens were due to come out when the cuckoo comes, it would be four or five days later before they'd come out.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:42
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Long, long ago, there were different sorts of bread made They made potato cake, Boxty bread, Stampy. Oaten-meal bread etc, etc. Boxty bread was made with potatoes, flour, and milk. When they had it all gathered together, they would put it out unto the (together) table and knead it then they would fling it up in the air, this is supposed to make it light and then they (put) roll it out into a flat piece of dough.
Oaten-meal bread is made from oaten meal flour and (milk) water and a little dripping or fat or butter. It was kneaded together and then put on a grid iron. This is made of iron and sometimes ornamented with flowers. When one side was quite hard and brown it was turned and when that side was the same as the other it was taken off. When they went to the bog they took a "whack" of oaten bread with them. This was thought to be good for fasting on.
When the women of the houses
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2020-05-29 09:42
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comharta droch aimsire.
9. Ma tchídhtear an corr mhónadh ag dul chun na fairrge sin comhartha aimsire maithe.
10. Má tcídhtear fáinne thart ar an gealaighe sin tuar droch aimsire.
11. Má tá an fáinne in aice leithe tá an stóirm ibhfad uainn.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:40
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be boiled they would be emptied into a creel[?] and put in the middle of the floor. The whole family would then sit round the creel with mugs of buttermilk in their hands and eat the potatoes. They would peel the potatoes with their thumbs.
In the evening when the work would be over they would partake their evening meal. It consisted of oat-meal porridge or as the old folk calls it stirrabout. A large oven of porridge would be put on a box and a noggin of buttermilk thrown on the porridge. The whole family would sit around the oven and eat out of it. They would little wooden ladles in their hands.
Some Sundays they would have beef for dinner. They ate plenty of fish and home-grown vegetables. On Christmas day and on
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:39
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There is a story told in my local district about a man by the name of Jeremiah Twohig of Horsemount Ballinagree. This man was in the habit of answering Mass in Ballinagree church about once a week. One night as he was in bed he awoke finding the room in which he was sleeping illuminated by lighted candles. He was dazed at first but when he looked to the opposite side of the room he saw an altar and at the foot of the altar he saw a priest. Just as he was looking at the altar the priest turned and looked towards him as if he wanted him to come and answer Mass. He did not go and after some time the light disappeared.
Another story is told about a man who gave up going to Mass, because he said that the priest to
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:38
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1. Má tchídtear tuar fearthainne shuas ins an aer sin comgartha go bhfuil cíoth ag teacht. Má tchídhtear í ins an mhaidin sin comhartha go mbéidh droch lá ann agus má tchídhtear í ins an tráthnóna, sin comhartha go mbéidh an lá na ndiaidh sin go maith.
II. Má tchídhtear an corr mhonadh ag dul suas chuig ma cnuic sin comhartha go mbéidh droch aimsire ann.
III. Má tchídhtear í ag dul síos chuig an fhairrge sin fáisnéis go mbéidh aimsear mhaith ann.
IV. Ma tchídhtear na faoileogaí amuigh ar an talamh sin comhartha droc aimsire.
V.Má tchídhtear an fhairrge garbh sin tuar droch aimsire.
VI. Má tchídhtear na lacháin af éiteall corr
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:36
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Sin doras amháin ar an saoghal so ná féadfaimíd-ne an glas a chur air ná an glas a bhaint de, nó chun é a rádh i n-a mhalairt de shlighe, rud isead é, má's chóir a rádh, atá fé stiúiriú "Riaghaltas" na bhFlathas. N'fhéadfaimís brath a leathad ar solas na gréine ná "eochair aibhleíse na gealaighe" do chasadh, agus dá mbeimís ag tabhairt ordú do'n ngaoith a chuid cosgán do tharrac, go dtí go mbeadh ár nguthanna ar aon leibhéal le guth an phréacháin, sé an sgéal céadhna a bheadh againn.
Do réir cainnt na "gceann mbán" ba mheasa fé dhó an aimsear a bhí ann fadó ná aimsear na h-uaire seo. Dar leó is féidir tuilte atá ann anois do dhuígadh i gcupán. Bhíodar san mar
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:34
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cake when it is baking, to make it bake quickly. The oatenmeal bread and the ryebread were baked standing up against a "leach" or a "bácús"
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:32
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Long ago people used bake ryebread and oatenmeal bread. In former times there was a mill at Carrigagulla. This mill was owned by the Horgans who lived at Carrigagulla House. Flour used to be made at that mill. That mill was i existence about seventy or eighty years ago. Long ago people used grind corn by mend of a grinder. A grinder consisted of a stone and another stone with a hole in its centre. That was called a "grindstone" or a "quern". Potato cakes were very common in former times. Some of them are made up to the present day.
People used also bake bread in former times. It consisted of frosted potatoes mixed with salt. The oatenmeal bread used to be baked in a griddle. A griddle was a bastable without any sides. In former times bread used be baked every day and it is up to the present day. A cross is put on top of the
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:28
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"Fuaireasa mo shean duine báidhte i bpoll móna,
Cos leis briste, agus cos leis leóinte,
Thugas abhaile é chun é do thórramh,
Agus d'imthigheas go Corcaigh ag iarraidh gleás tórraimh.
Píop, tobach, cailc agus cómharann
Nuair a thánga abhaile leis an ngléas tórraimh
Cá raibh mo shean-duine acht amuigh ar an mbóthar"
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:26
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A cairn is to be seen in Keeffe's field. Once when men were digging round this cairn they found bones. There is another cairn at Tóchar. It is supposed to mark the crave of Mathgamina a brother to the famous Brian Boru who defeated the Danes. it has evert since been known as "Leach Mathghamina.
N.b. This information is very improbable.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:26
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uair sin comhartha gaoithe.
7. Má tchídhtear an cat agus a chúl leis an teine sin tuar droch aimsire.
8. Má tchídhtear an cheo ag teacht isteach an cnoc sin tuar droch aimsire.
9. Má tchídhteatr an cheo af dul amach an cnoc sin comhartha aimsire mhaithe.
10. Má tchídhtear na chearca amuigh agus é ag chur fearthainne sin comhartha go bhfuil sí a' dul a chur an lá uilig.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:23
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Stone circles:-
There is a stone circle in Mrs Connors filed Carrigagulla. Lights and people are supposed to be seen round this fort at night. Sometimes crying was heard there formerly. These is another stone convenient to it in Dennis Kelliher's Réidh. There are two stone circles in Sextons farm near Sheedy's house. There is another stonecircle in Peter Ring's farm Dunneen's. One day when Bill ring was digging stones out of this circle a hound came out of it and attacked him. When he went home his skin was black and he died the day after. it has been left untouched since. There is a ring in the field at Padeenens Cross and every time a sow went into this stone circle she became lame and unable to walk.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:20
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sin tuar droch aimsire.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:19
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1. Ma tchídhtear na faoileogaí ar an talamh sin tuar droc aimsire.
2. Ma tchidhtear an corr mónadh ag dhul síos cois na fairrge sin tuar aimsire mhaithe.
3. Nuair a bhíos na chnuic an aice linn sin taur droch aimsíre.
4. Nuair a bhíós na chnuic ibfád uainn sin tuar aimsíre maithe.
5. Nuair a tchídhtear an corr mhónadh ag dhul suas go dtí an cnoc sin tuar droc aimsire.
6. Na tchídhteat ar cat agus a dhruim leis an teine sin tuar droch aimsire
7. Nuair a tchídhtear na cnuic dubh dorcha sin tuar droch aimsíre.
8. Ma tchídhtear an fairrge garbh sin tuar droc aaimsire.
9. Ma tchídhtear an spéir dearg ar an taoibh
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:19
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Gollauns:-
There are ten gollauns in this district. There is a gollaun ni Carrig Uí Ulla Rúdh. It is about six feet high and there is writing on it called ogam writing which is a very ancient form of writing, There is another gollaun in Duggan's Réidh in Mushera. A capped pillar stands in Mr Twomey's Rúdh. A capped pillar is a large stone standing on the ground and another stone on top of it. There are three gollauns in Mushera. One in Garran's farm, one in Twohig's farm and one in Sullivans. There are two gollauns in William Rourke's farm Annagarrihy. Each gollaun measures about five feet high. Another gollaun stands o top of Carraig a Gabhar. People say where one gollaun stands another gollaun can be seen from it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:15
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áit seo fad ó roimh teacht na Loclanach agus nuair a ruaigeadh na manaigh ó Mágh Cluain Eich. Do fhanadar tamall beag i gCill na Rómhanach san mainistir ar a slighe dhóibh i gCÍLL GLAS ar an dtaobh theas den pharóiste. Bhí roilig bheag in aice na mainistreach in ar cuireadh na manaigh. Níl rian na roilige le feiscint anois ach roinnt blian ó shoin nuair bhí Míchéal O Muirtuille (i.e. sealbhadóir na feirme na raibh suidheamh na mainistreach) ag treabhadh. Do nochtuig sé roinnt cnámh daona. Tugadh Cill na Rómhánach ar an áit toisg gur Caitilicig Rómhánacha a bhí sa mainistir. Tá tobar naomhtha san áit céudna leis. Beidh tuille le rádh mar geall ar seo.

CILL GLAS
In aice le Cill na Romhánach ar an dtaobh theas tá "Cill Glas". Ní h-airightear Cill Glas ar an áit seo in ao' cor anois ac "Greenville". Bhí cill agus mainistir san áit seo fadó agus de réir tuairisge (-) mainistir tabactach leis. Nuair a ruaigeadh na manaig ó "Mágh Chluain Eich" is go Cill Glas a chuadar tar éis tamall bhig a caitheamh i "gCill na Romhánach". Tá cuid des na fothracha le feiscint fós. Ní h-aithneóchadh na daoine óga anois cad í an áit a bheadh i gceist agat dá ndéarthá "Cill Glas" act suas go seachtmhódh de bhliantaibh o shoin airighim ná tugtaí riamh ar an áit acht "Cill Glas". Sin sampla eile conus mar tá an Galldachas ag cur isteach orainn.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 09:01
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Long ago when there were no lamps people made candles out of resin and calico.
First of all they boiled the resin in a "griset". A grisit was like a little three legged pot. They boiled the resin so as to melt it. When they had the resin melted they got a thin stripe of calico for a wick and dipped it into the resin. As the melted resin is very "sticky" it stuck to the calico. Then they rolled it out on a board so as to make the candle round. Sometimes they peeled the skin from the rushes and made the wicks out of the inside of them.

ong ago when there were no lamps people made candles
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:59
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one lying but I heard that the one lying was on top of the other three at one time.
I heard that there are two giants burried in Neil Loughrey's field. There are (two) stones standing up and two lying. I heard that Dermot and Grainne were lying there but I do not know whether that is true or(e) not.
There are stones standing on Leathard [?] hill, two standing and one lying but I never heard why they are there.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:58
approved
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awaiting decision
with them, with wings of horse shot and with our horse broke upon them twice, in the end they joined battle with our within a mile and a half of Wicklow, where the most part of our men were lost, many of our horsemen sore hurt and through the cowardice of our armed men that never would once couche their pikes or offer to strike one stroke for their lives, do what their leaders told, who did long abide it until their men quit them and these brought off by the horsemen. No captain lost but Captain Wardman, Captain Loftus hurt in the leg, no men could better than his, whilst one man was able to stand.
He lies in Castle of Wicklow, wanting a good surgeon of which I wish your Lordship to have care. My nephew Montague with his horseman served well.
He broke through the head of them, was struck with a pike in the side and received two blows of a sword, yet our men would not stand but dispersed. He with his horseman brought off the colors ready to be possessed by the enemy and brought all away with their drums save only Captain Loftus who was brought away by his Lieutenant.
Henry Harrington
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:56
approved
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awaiting decision
In Olden Times giants roamed about the country. Giants were great big men that went from place to place, some looking for fight and others were civil and some of them had two or three heads.
Giants went about here because in fields and places we have giants beds and people come from Dublin and places to view these beds. There are stones standing in the places where there are beds and it is said that it was the giants that put up these stones.
There are stones standing in Patrick Doherty's field and there is a giant buried under the stones. There are three stones standing and
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:55
approved
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awaiting decision
Defeat of Sir Harrington by Phelim Mac Feagh Byrne 1599. (State papers Kilkenny Archeologica C. Sept 1859.) June 2nd 1599 (42nd of Elizabeth)
The council of Ireland to the Lords.
Sir H. Harrington appointed by the Lord Lieut. (Earl of Tasca) to be in garrsion at Wicklow with 500 foot and 60 horse marched with his said companies the 28th of the last month, Monday and encamped near the Ranelagh. On 29th Phelim Mc Feagh set on Sir Henry and his whole regiment with all his forces and broke them with a lamentable slaughter of the most part of the companies foot we have advertized the same to Lord Lieut. who is at present in Munster.
We shall examine against his Lordship's return, the chief offenders touching this disaster that being discovered his Lordship may inflict punishment accordingly.
May 29th 1599 Newcastle.

Sir H. Harrington to the Lord Chancellor.
Coming from our camp within a mile and a half of the great water (Avon Mor) returning to our garrison place we were hotly pursued by the traitors whose forces were far stronger than ours, marching on our way all along we entertained skirmish
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Defeat of Sir Harrington by Phelim Mac Feagh Byrne 1599. (State papers Kilkenny Archeologica C. Sept 1859.) June 2nd 1599 (42nd of Elizabeth)
The council of Ireland to the Lords.
Sir H. Harrington appointed by the Lord Lieut. (Earl of Tasca) to be in garrsion at Wicklow with 500 foot and 60 horse marched with his said companies the 28th of the last month, Monday and encamped near the Ranelagh. On 29th Phelim Mc Feagh set on Sir Henry and his whole regiment with all his forces and broke them with a lamentable slaughter of the most part of the companies foot we have advertized the same to Lord Lieut. who is at present in Munster.
We shall examine against his Lordship's return, the chief offenders touching this disaster that being discovered his Lordship may inflict punishment accordingly.
May 29th 1599 Newcastle.

Sir H. Harrington to the Lord Chancellor.
Coming from our camp within a mile and a half of the great water (Avon Mor) returning to our garrison place we were hotly pursued by the traitors whose forces were far stronger than ours, marching on our way all along we entertained skirmish.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:38
approved
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awaiting decision
Sometimes he would come down. One time there was a giant in Upper Drumhallagh. He and another giant are buried in Neil Loughrey's field. The grave is still to be seen.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:37
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awaiting decision
There are giants in this place long ago. There was a giant in Inch Island one time. He was very big and everyone was afraid of him. There was another giant living in this place. The one did not like the other. One day the Inch giant threw a big rock over to this side and it is still to be seen in a (fier) field of ours called "Creag Mór."
There was another giant in this place who had a bed up on Patrick Doherty's hill, up above Inniskill. He was a terrible big man and the people were all afraid of him. He lived away up in the hill
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:35
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:32
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awaiting decision
There are many Holy Wells around this district. Saints blessed the wells long ago.
There is a holy well in Ann [?] It is supposed to have been blessed long ago. It is down among the rocks and when the tide comes in and flows into it the water is always fresh when the tide goes out again.
If anyone is given to headache and goes down to the well with the intention of being cured and lifts some water and rubs it on his or her head it will be cured.
I don't know the prayers that are said at the well. There is no turas to the well at any time
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:28
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awaiting decision
In the townland of Oram in a place named Tullaghnabasta is a burial ground where the McGrath clan were buried who died in the Penal Days. In Oram, as in many other places were clusters of houses. These are some of the old place-names Pullafeka, Bunduh, Nough, Monafarawaka, Mullac Oram, Ballinnwara, Conoc Ceann, Uid Tarac, and Carrig Sagart or Priests rock where Mass was said in Penal Days when England's laws hunted priests, and people to the bleak hillsides or to caves under ground to hear Mass. The clan assembled at Carrig Sagart to hear Mass, when Cromwell's soldiers rushed upon them and the most of the men gave their lives to save the priest. The clan went to a cave on the hillside close to Tullaghnabasta where they remained in hiding for six years. A number of small children, close on one hundred, were housed in this tunnel; for at that time close on fifty families lived in Oram, where to day there are about fourteen. These children poorly clad and illnourished, were a prey to infections diseases one of which as far as tradition goes wiped out the entire clan. They are all interred in this burial ground which overlooks the Drumleek road where to this, can be traced
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:26
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Ins an t-ean am nínrábh scoil ar bit ins an áit seo. Chuaidh maighistir thart dárbh Uí Duibhne ó áit go h-áit ag fogluim na bpáistí. D'fán sé oidhche annseo agus oidhche ann suid.
Ní rábh leabhraí ar bíth ag na páistí ach fuair siad sclataí agus pinn luaidhe deánta dé sclataí agus d'foghluim siad achán rúd ó na sclataí. Bheadh anceacht sgtíobhtha ar na sclataí. Cuaidh an maigistir facoinne a dinneara godtí na toighte a bhí thart fá an áit. Annsin tógadh scoil ig
Ceathramhaidh Domhain ceithre sgór bliaidhain o shóin agus bí maighistir dárbh ainm ÓDuibhne ag teagasc ann. D'fhoghluim na páistí litriacht agus scríobh ar an scoil. Cuaidh na páistí na scoile nuair a bhí siad seacht mbliadhain agus d'fhán siad ar scoil
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:18
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awaiting decision
siad an tóir a bfolach agus níor cuaidh aoinne ann riamh cun a cuarthiogadh acht amáin an fear seo Padraigh Nolán. D'inis mo uncail an sgheakl sin dom d'arb ainm Séan Mc Carthaigh.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:16
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Tá cátair eile ann darb ainm Cátair Cumáin agus tagann daoine o Ameríca go dtú an Cáthair seo ag iarraidh óir d'fághail bá é Dr Neill O Hankin an taoisach a bhí ann do bhí thoice fhir ag obtai ann act ní fhuair siad aon rud acht cnama. Do bhí siad ag oleach [?] ann ar fead sé seachtmhaine.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:12
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awaiting decision
Tá cáthair eile ann darb ainm Caislean Geár acht nior táinig aoine ann ag iarraidh óir. Tá an cathach seo ah taob an bóthar agus tá sé suidthe in áit darb ainm Gleann
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:10
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Cúpla bliadain ó shoin fuair fear darbh ainm Padhraigh Nólan bonnóit in áit darb ainm gleann Sladhe agus do cuir sé é go baile Áth Cliath agus do fuair sé ceadh púrt as Timcheall bliadhain 1200 deirtear go raib arm mór le taoiseach na gaedhil ag teach ó Cill dá túga no áit éigin (no áit) annsan go dtí Corcom Ruadh. Tháinig siad tre Gleann Cuilm Cille agus the coiscéim agus timhceall leat slíghe doir sin agus Corcom Ruadgh i gcort a - Cláir act do tháinig arm eile de muinntir Ue Briain agus do choidheadh cáth mó ann. Bhí an buadh ag Ui Briain agus nuair a bhí an arm eile ag rith dho, chur
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:04
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:03
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 08:03
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Ís é Cronin naomh an paróiste so. Tá Tobar beannuighthe í Tarmon, "Tobar Cromin" a tugtar ar. Tá séipéal í Tarmon agus tá sé margheall ar Cromin. San oifhche cuaidh sé go dtí an fhaill atá inaca an aith agus luighe [?] sé ann ar feadh í bhfad ann annsan tainig sé aras aris go dtí tobar beannuighthe. Tá an tobar atá ann go maith lé na súilibh. Tá alán rud ann mar atá:- cupán, anathaid agus alán rud eile. Is maith an rud dul timhcheall an tobar cupla uair.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 05:05
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King John's Castle:
Built 1207 by King John. It is situated on a small hill overlooking the Harbour. The castle is very big. its walls are very sound and a person can climb to the very top. It is said that its labour cost a penny a day. There is a window on the east wall which was used as a look-out for ships coming into the Lough.
Taaffes Castle:
Built in 16th Century. This castle was owned by Nicholas Taffe, Earl of Carlingford who was killed at the Battle of the Boyne.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 05:05
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December this church is supposed to light up but only old people can see the light.
The Tholsel was the public place of execution and many young men were killed in it. There is still a Portcullis Gate in the centre. An English General was hanged there.
The Mint
One the dwelling place of the Kings of Carlingford. A man's and a horse's head are carved out on each window. Money used to be made there and given to the people of Carlingford.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 05:02
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There are many ancient ruins in Carlingford. Some are on the borders ofthe town and some in the town itself.
King John's Castle is one of them, situated in the north part of the town. This Castle was established in the year 1207. It is built on Castle Hill. There are many underground tunnels and secret passages leading out of it. One of these tunnels leads to another Castle in centre of the town.
Taaffe's Castle
The places where the fires were lit are still to be seen. The Castle itself overlooks Carlingford Harbour and the Lough of which a beautiful view can be obtained from
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:58
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King John's Castle, Rooskey Church, The Tholsel, The Mint, The Abbey.
Rooskey church was knocked down by Cromwell.
The Thosel leading to the Greenore Rd. Gets its name because the people had to pay toll when passing through.
Monks used to live in the Abbey, but it was plundered by invaders and the Monks had to leave.
There is a Round Tower in a field by the Greenore Rd. It is said an old chieftain was buried there.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:49
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King John's Castle
Built 1210. King John was once a prisoner there, & there is a tunnel across Carlingford Lough to Red House in Co. Down. There are also other small tunnels to dungeons in the Harbour. Once attacked by Cromwell and roof was blown off. King John was captured and shot.
St. Malachy's Abbey
Was blown up by Cromwell and all the monks killed. There is a tunnel leading from the Abbey to ruined church on Rooskey. On a certain night in
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:46
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There are ruins of some old castles where Kings lived, in this town.
John's Castle: On Castle Hill, etc.
Taaffe's Castle
On Station Rd. In years gone by Nicholas Taaffe, Earl of Carlingford lived in this Castle. There is also a place in the Castle which was used for hanging criminals, in years gone by to be seen yet.
The Mint
In Tholsel St. Money was made there long ago.
There is also an old church in Rooskey which belonged to the Dominican Fathers, and there are said to be some holy vessels hidden under this church. There is a graveyard near-by and there are places in this graveyard which people are afraid to go near.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:42
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Castle under the sea, over to Greencastle.
The Mint
The Mint is situated on Tholsel St. It was a place for making money in olden times.
Taaffe's Castle
Situated on Station Rd. Their "hanging place" remains there yet.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:34
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King John's Castle
Built in 1210. It is a very old building and Cromwell and his Ironsides blew the roof off it. Kill William once had this castle and it was taken from him. There is a tunnel leading from John's Castle to the Tholsel - where they hanged people. This tunnel was filled up by Cromwell in case any enemy would escape into the castle. (?)
Old Church Ruins
Ruins of an old church of Rooskey Road. Also an old graveyard beside it. The property belongs to Mrs Smyth. There is a tunnel leading from St. Malachy's Abbey to this old church. The monks used it in coming from the church. They used to say Mass there. A chalice & a sword were found in this tunnel and they were taken over to the Museum in London.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:30
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King John's Castle
Build in 1210. The builders' wages amounted to 6d week. It is situated on Castle Hill. It was built with line, bullock's blood and stones. There is a tunnel leading from it to the Carlingford graveyard. There is another tunnel leading from this
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:27
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King John's Castle
This was built by King John in 1210. It was modernised by Edward II in 1320. It is typical of the Castle built by Edward Loundlees. It was captured by __ Gernon 1400 and Sir Nicholas Bagnall in the last century. It was surrendered to Lord Inchiquin in 1649 and Charles Cate in 1680.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:15
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The Mint
This is a very old building, believed to have belonged to the old City of Carlingford & there is still to be seen a horse and the head of a man carved out over one of the old stone windows. It is also believed that an old man named John Mc Kevitt found an old coin made of gold, in it, and a few days later he lost it. Shortly afterwards he died.
The Tholsel
Also a very old building believed to have belonged to the old city of Carlingsford. Anyone who wanted to get into the city had to pay a toll and if he tried to get in by force, he would be caught and hanged there & then.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 04:11
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St Malachy's Abbey
Founded about 1304 by Richard De Burgh for the Dominican Order. It was suppressed & closed by Henry VIII. The Chapter House, Dormitories and Water mills are none no more. It was handed over in 1550 to Sir Henry Bagnall who was killed at the Battle of the Yellow Ford. It was used as a stable by the Cromwellian soldiers.
The Tholsel
This was formerly a 3 story Gate Tower in the town wall. The Parliament once met here. The upper part has recently been added. It was used as a prison & borough in the 18th century.
The Mint
This was a house fortified by the Tudor family. Was supposed to have contained the Royal mint which was established in Carlingford in 1467. It was later the residence of the Soverigns of Carlingford.
Taaffe's Castle
This was a square Norman Keep with dwelling house. There is either a King's or Princesses seal on the roof. The castle was built by Nicholas Taaffe, Earl of Carlingford who was Killed at Battle of the Boyne in 1690.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:57
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Magpie, Waterhen, Blackbird, etc.
Waterhen: This bird is of the same build as a chicken of about 3 months old. She is dark brown and she builds her nest of sods and sticks, and she lays up to ten eggs of white and black spots. She sits on the eggs for about three weeks to hatch the eggs, and the young are called "scaldings". If you throw a stone at her she will dive into the water, she is a very strong swimmer. It is said that if you touch her or her nest you will have an accident, or some sickness inside twenty-four hours.
The Wren: Don't kill the wren boys, don't rob her nest. For of all the Irish warblers, the wren is the best.
It is believed that if the crow flies low it is a sign of bad weather. If is also believed that if you frighten the crow, she will turn grey for an hour afterwards.
Magpie: If you see three magpies together it is the sign of a death.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:51
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Swallow: Black Paddy; Tom-tit, etc.
Swallow: This is a small bird which comes in the middle of April. It flies low towards the ground. It is a black bird with white under its wing and red under its breast. It builds its nest under the
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:50
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5 or 6 eggs and it takes her three weeks to hatch them. It is said that if you touch her nest, she will curse you and if you handle her eggs she won't hatch them.
Don't touch the thrush, boys, don't rob her nest.
Of all the Irish warblers, the thrush, she is the best.
To see the Swallow flying low is said to be a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:50
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The Swan is a very large bird and she has a black beak. You can't frighten the Swan from a distance. Old people say that if you kill or injure the Swan in any way, you will never have any luck. The Swan comes to this district in the winter and she builds her nest in the rushes and lays her egg every other day and has her "scaldys" out in a month. Then when her little ones are able to fly, they kill the old mother.
When you see three magpies flying together it is a sign of a death.
When you see the Pigeon flying high it is the sign of war.
When you see the Sea-gulls flying inland it is the sign of a storm.
When the Curlew is shouting it is the sign of a storm.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:47
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5 or 6 eggs and it takes her three weeks to hatch them. It is said that if you touch her nest, she will curse you and if you handle her eggs she won't hatch them.
Don't thouch the thrush, boys, don't rob her nest.
Of all the Irish warblers, the thrush, she is the best.
To see the Swallow flying low is said to be a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:44
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Blue-bonnet; Tom-Kit; Wren
The Wren is a very small bird. It's colour is brown and it builds its nest in a bucket or in a hole in the wall. Its eggs are small and blue and it takes her three weeks to hatch.
When the Curlew starts whistling, it is said that it will soon rain.
When the Swallow flies low it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:42
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The Thrush is a brown and grey spotted bitrd and it is a fairly long bird with a black beak. The nest is composed of small bits of sticks & sheep's wool & plastered outside with mud. Her eggs are a pale blue colour and brown spotted and she lays
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:39
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Pigeon: Felt; Snipe; Hawk; Crow; Grouse; Raven.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:39
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Raven; Croww; Jackdaw; Wren; Plover; Black Paddy.
The Plover is a large bird. It's colour is black and white and it builds its nest on rocks or mud or straw or in the sand. It does this by scooping a hollow in the sand. It lays about six eggs and takes about three weeks to hatch them out. The Plover comes in on the land when hard weather is coming.
The Blackbird is supposed to curse you if you touch her nest.
It is said that when three Magpies are seen together or in line it is the sign of a death.
If you hear the Curlew crying at night, it is a sign of rain.
If the Plover is seen picking in the field it is a sign of snow.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:37
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she will curse the person who robs it.
If people see a Magpie alone it is said those people will be weeping with sorrow soon. If two Magpies are seen it is a sign of joy. If three Magpies are seen it is a sign of death. If four Magpies are seen it is the sign of a marriage. If five magpies are seen it is a sign of a birth.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:36
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Goldfinch; Singing linnet; Green Linnet; Ciskin; Skylark; Sandlark; Singing Thrush; Missel Thrush; Nigthingale.
The Goldfinch is one of the nicest of our feathered friends. It is a very popular bird with everyone. it is beautifully decorated with feathers of the nicest colour. The goldfinch has red, grey and yellow feathers on it's head and an odd white feather in it's wings. The rest of it's body is a mixture of grey and brown. It builds it's nest in an ivy wall, & lays about four eggs. It hatches for about three weeks.
When the Blackbird's nest is robbed, it is said
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:34
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The following is a list of a dozen of the most common birds in our district. Raven; Robin; Corn-Crake; Linnet; Blackbird; Sandpie; Cuckoo; Chaffinch; Thrush; Bullfinch; Cormorant; Yellow Hammer.
The Cuckoo: The cuckoo is a large species of bird. This bird never builds her own nest, but waits till another bird builds one and then she steals it, and throws the young birds out and lays an egg in it. One egg is the usual number the cuckoo lays and she very rarely lays two. The cuckoo sits on her egg for about two weeks.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:31
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out you must go, because the King and Queen say so and if you do not want to play, take your hoop and run away. Hide and go Seek a penny a week, 1. 2. 3 out.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:28
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Several games can be played with cards, for instance: Stripe Jack; Rummie; Snap; Whist; Donkey; Spoof; Solo; Pontoon; Fish; Bridge; Nap.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:28
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Pontoon; Darts: Oxo; Boxes; Fox & Goose; Ducking: Hickerty, Dickerty, Dock; Musical Chairs; Snap Apple; Water Snap; Hop Scotch; Skittles.
Pontoon is a card game and is constantly played in this district and from which hours of amusement and pastime can be obtained.
Draughts is a game full of sport and amusement, and is numbered amongst some of the best games. It is played indoors.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:24
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Rounders: This is a game in which any number can play.
Tigger: A game usually played by girls.
Chasing: This is a game in which two boys are picked out to chase the others.
Football: There is a great interest taken in football here in Carlingford. There is a team called the Coley Kickhams.
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:22
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Tigger; Strick the Light; Squares; Cockshot.
Tigger; P. I. G pig you have the tig. O.U.T spells out and
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:18
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all is ready for actual dropping. One boy - James Thornton, of Rocklands, Greenone Rd, Carlingford, said his father dips the cut seed in lime before dropping them; and another boy - Kevin Murphy, of Dundalk Rd., Carlingford said his father rubs a piece of clay to the cut part before dropping. The seed one placed anything from 12 to 15 inches apart. In nearly every case the boys stated the cutting was done by their fathers, helped sometimes by the mother. One boy - Henry Adamson, of Bar View, Carlingford, stated his father always gets an old woman who lives near by to cut them.
When the seed have been dropped they are lightly covered with a little clay from the drills on each side, and then left in condition for about three or four weeks, until the young shoots begin to peep up. The remainder of the clay in the drills is then turned over on to the potatoes, and drills formed. This operation is known as "rising" the potatoes. The first covering is usually done with the shovel, but the "rising" is done with the plough. When the stalks are strong they are "moulded", that is fresh earth is thrown up against them by running the plough along each furrow. Nothing further is done then until it is time for
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 03:11
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The manure used is principally farmyard manure, but those living convenient to the shore ofther use sea weed as well. When stubble ground is to be opened for potatoes, the manure is spread on the stubble before ploughing and later ploughed into the ground.
Then comes the preparation of the seed. If the potatoes one to be planted in fresh ground, seed from the previous year's crop are used; but if the same ground is being used for potatoes a sevond year then a change of seed is obtained from a neighbouring farmer. Sometimes two farmers exchange seed when it suits both to do so. On no account is the same class of potato grown in the same plot two successive years. Small seed are placed in the ground whole, but seed that are large and have two or three or more eyes are cut into two or three parts as convenient, care being taken that there is at least one eye in each part. The seed are not cut until the drills are opened and the manure spread in the furrows. The seed are then placed immediately in the furrow, with the cut part turned down on the manure. In almost every case the boys stated their fathers plant the potatoes while the cut is still wet, and the seed are not cut until
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 00:14
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awaiting decision
St Brigids night.
St Patricks Day:
It falls on the 17th of march. It is a customs to wear a shamrock in honour of St Patrick who brought the true faith to Ireland.
Shrove Tuesday:
It is the day before lent. People make pancakes put a ring in them. Who ever gets the ring will be married the fallon year.
Holy Thursday:
It is the last day in lent. There is supposed to be a cure in the water that falls on holy Thursday. The holy oils are blessed on Holy Thursday.
Good Friday:
Our Lord died on the cross on Good Friday. It is a moveable feast.
Easter Satureday:
paschal fire is lit in the porch on Easter Saturday morning. People go around looking for their Easter cludog.
Easter Sunday
Our Lord rose from the dead on Easter Sunday
Whit Sunday
People say the drowning is supposed to be on the water on Whit Sunday.
Whit Monday
People born on Whit Sunday are called kinkisheens and a clout from a kinkisheen sometimes turns out serious; they are also unlucky.
Cingcís is the Irish for Pentecost and that is how the name Cingcísín originated.
May Day
May day is called Lady day in honour of our blessed Lady Lady. Children go around with
senior member (history)
2020-05-29 00:05
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Nách cheart dul isteach i dtig nuadh 'gan fód móna nó rud éigin do thabhairt isteach ann

Nách cheart do dhuine aon nídh d'iomchar ar a guailnibh ag cur táirsigh an dorais isteach de, nó má bheireann ní bheidh breis fás fé

Nách cheart seasamh idir éadach bán a bheadh 'á thiormú, agus an teine

Nách cheart sméaroíd teine do leigint amach le linn na coiginne bheith' á dhéanamh

Nách ceart do dhuine a cheann do bhearradh Dé luain
"Bearradh an luan, cur san uaig"

Nách cheart bheith i dtosach ná i ndeire socraide

Nách cheart uisge na gcos do chaitheamh amach ist' oidhche

Nách cheart dul amach fé éadach bhán san oidhche
Nach cheart solus do chur in éág Oidhche Nodhlag
Nách cheart bheith ag feadhghail san oidhche

Nách mbeadh aon rath ar dhuine ar feadh an lae, dá mba bean an chéad duine a bhuailfeadh leis ar an mbóthar maidin lae aonaigh

Go mbíonn droch-rath ar dhuine ar feadh seacht mbliadhna má bhriseann sé cupán nó aon driotháir dó

Gur cheart uisge glan do bheith istigh i gcóir na h-oidhche

Go ndeineadh gach bean tíghe coigeann Lá Bealtaine, nó muna mbeadh adhbhar an coiginn aici, deineadh sí ím i mbuideal, agus coimeádadh sí trí píosaí de'n ím sin ar feadh na bliadhna, agus caitheadh sí ruaine beag di isteach i ngach tubán ime a bheadh aici i gcaitheamh na bliadhna

Go mbíodh leisge ar na daoine an teine d'adú maidin Lae
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2020-05-28 23:54
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Sun. When the sun is cloudy it is a great sign of rain.
Moon. When there is a ring around the moon it is also a great sign of rain.
Stars. When a lot of stars appear in the sky it is a great sign of frost.
Clouds. When there are big clouds in the sky it shows signs of rain.
Rainbow. Rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's warning. Rainbow in the night is the shepherd's delight.
Cat. When the cat scrapes sticks and the crow begins to fly it is a sign of storm.
Wind. The wind that comes from the south is the wind that brings
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:47
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do chuaidh. An maidin nuair eirig na daoine bhí iongnadh mór ortha mar bhí abha ag dul tré Ghorta Fóire agus níor eirigh le h-aon saghas céardaí í d'iompáil riamh ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:45
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When we see darkness round the sun it is a sign of rain.
When we see a ring round the moon it is a sign of rain, or when the moon sits back on its poll.
A starry night is a sign of rain and a starless night is a sign of frost. When there is a wool pack in the sky it is a sign of rain. Bright clouds fortel fine weather.
The wind whistling in the key holes is a sign of rain.
When the gulls come inland it is the sign of coming storm.
When an ass turns his back to the wall it is the sign of rain.
When the birds go to roost early it is a sign of rain.
When the south west wind comes it usually brings rain.
A rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's delight, a rainbow in the evening is the shepherd's warning.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:40
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A number of James II coins were found in various places in this locality. I referred to them in Cuid I. I have one of which I am attempting to give a sketch. It was found when a new fence was being built on the divided ranch at Fanningstown near Croom about six years ago. It is BRASS Mr. Charles McCarthy at the moment resident at Tullovin Castle has an identically similar coin OF COPPER; at least I think it is Cu every detail of it corresponds with the similar detail on the one I have. He found it near the castle ruin. He also found there other coins to the number, I think, of five. There are two Charles - Carlo? coins, and one very much battered which I think has the letters CIC - on it. I have only had a glimpse at them and without a glass.
[ three drawings on page, showing edge detail and each side of a coin, with the note - "This is only 1/12" greater in diameter than the coin itself"]
All the coins which Mr. McCarthy has, with the exception of the one sketched here, are about the size of a half-penny and perhaps smaller. I shall see them again and get an opportunity of examining them more closely.
(later) The coins are 1 James II as sketched above 2 Charles II in very good condition dated 1680, one Mary very much worn but bearing the letters MARI clearly.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:40
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Abfhad sara deineadh bóthar Chealla bhí abha ag rith annsúd. Bhíodh sprid bán gléigeal ag damhas ag béal na h-abhann. Oidhche amháin tháinig tuille mór san abhainn agus do chur san isteach ar an mbanrioghain. Do labhair an bhannrioghan leis agus dubhairt sí leis an abha dul síos i ngleann eile, agus
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:37
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Do thagadh na daoine ó'n meadhon tír go dtí na Cealla tímcheall am an Gorta, mar do chothuigheadh na h-uaisle iad. Bhí seisear ann agus ó bhuail an Fiabhras iad bhíodar sínte i bpoll. Do fuair ceann aca darbh' ainm dó Séumas Leathan ó Rínn bás agus glaodhtar Poll an Duine Mharbh ar an áit ó shoin. Bhí sé ann ar feadh choigchíse. Bhí bean ag teacht abhaile ó'n gcathair agus fuair sí lagacar ar an mbóthar. Tháinig Séumas cúiche agus d'iarr sí air é do chur agus do chuireadh é annsan.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:34
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There was a man living near Bantry long ago, and, when he was dying, he told his wife to bury him in a certain graveyard. His wife did not grant his request, but she buried him in another graveyard.
A couple of nights afterwards two men were going home, along the road near the graveyard, and they heard a great loud noise. They stopped as they were, and after a while, they saw a funeral coming along. They stood in off the road, and the funeral passed by. There were
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:33
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Sun. Red sun at night signifies fine day following.
Moon. Halo around the moon signifies wet weather.
Stars. falling star, a soul is going to heaven.
Clouds. A mackerel sky sign of storm.
Rainbow. Rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's warning. Rainbow in the night is the shepherd's delight.
Wind. Wind from the north and east snow in Winter, dry weather in Summer.
Sign of Storm.
Sea gulls come inland.
The swallows fly low.
The wind that brings most rain with it.
South West.
Signs of rain from birds.
Fowl take shelter.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:28
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There is a lake situated about two miles to the east of Bantry. It is about 21 acres in area and it is called Loch Bó Fionna. Long ago there lived near this lake a widow woman. She had a cottage and a few goats kept the milk to her. One night a white cow came into the yard. When the woman got up in the morning she saw the cow and thought it was a neighbour's, so she tried to drive it away. The cow would not go so she kept her and got milk from her. After a while the cow had a calf. That went on for seven years and in the end of the seventh year she had seven cows. Then she decided to sell the old cow. The night before the fair, when the woman had just gone to bed, she heard a bellow from one of the cows. She went to the window to see what was the matter and she saw all the cows leaving the house and going towards the lake. When she got up in the morning she went out and saw six of the cows coming out of the lake but the old one stayed there. It is said that the fairies kept the cow and from that on the lake has been called Loch Bó Fionna.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:27
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SINGEÁIN go flúirseach ins na h-ínnseachaibh chois na Laoi annso agus ní h-aon iongnadh go dtugadh "Innse na Síngheán" ar an áit. Tá an ainm seo aistrighthe anois ag CUID des na daoinibh a maireann ins an mbaile fearann seo go "Antville".

TOBAR na FEÁRNANN
Ar imeall "Inse na Singeán" tá "Tobar na Feárnann". Tá tóbar fíor uisge annso, agus deirtear nach bhfuil fíor uisge sa Paróiste cómh maith leis agus deirtear go bhfuil leigheasanna ag gabháil leis an uisge seo. Mór tímcheall an tobair seo, tá mórán féarnóg ag fás agus deirtear go mbíodh níos mó aca ann fadó. Níor airigheas aon ainm eile ar an áit seo ach "Tobar na Feárann".

MÁGH CLANN EICH
Comhgarach do Innse na Singheán leis, tá Mágh Clann Eich ar a dtugtar "Macloneigh" anois. Ins an tsean aimsir tugtaí Mágh Clann an Eich ar an áit seo. Is fuirist a thuiscint gur cailleadh an "An" le h-imteacth aimsire. Do réir bealoideasa na h-áite bhí clann na gcomhnuidhe annso fadó fadó, go raibh capall ráis ionghantach aca agus deirtear gur leo an Mágh nó an baile fearann go léir agus toisg 'na rudaí seo, tugadh Mágh Clann an Eich ar an áit. Áit ana staireamhail is eadh Mágh Clann Eich. Bhí mainistir tábhachtach ag na CISTERICANS ann fadó, ach do ruaig na Danair na Manaig. Tá fothrach na mainistreach ann fós agus tá roilg ann leis. Beidh tuile rádh i dtaobh na h-áite seo in áit eile.

CÍLL na RÓMHÁNACH
Sgriobhtar an ainm seo "Kielnarovanagh" i mbéurla anios. Bhí Cíll agus mainistir bheag san
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:26
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21. all day.
22. There comes a drop on the leaf of the Arum Lily.
23. The Fir cones close up.
24. The cement floors
become damp.
25. Mist comes on the
windows.
26. The crane sits in the bog.
27. "Red in the morning
Is the shepherd's
warning.
28. A marley sky is a sign of
Rain.
29. Clouds sailing quickly
through the sky.
30. A ring round the moon.
31. Streamers from the Sun.
32. The dust on the road
blows up in the air.
33. When the wind comes
from the West rain falls.
34. The Blackbirds sit on the
bushes near the houses
and shout when frost
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:25
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Long ago there lived two rival chieftains, one in Castledonovan, the other in Castletown Bere. The former chieftain had a son, who was to become chieftain of the two estates when he was old enough. The other chieftain did not like that so he planned to kidnap the child.
He succeeded in his cruel plan until he and his followers came as far as Mulach Meise. The country at this time was thickly wooded and there they were held up. The father of the child got ready and with his men he pursued the kidnappers.
Before long they were drawing near to the kidnappers, so that the latter were forced to hide the child in the wood. They then escaped.
The father of the child and his men searched the woods for two days, and on the third day they the child sitting under an elm tree. The father saw that he was sucking something in his mouth and what was it but the bark of the elm. He
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:24
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The Sun = When the sun sets palely we are sure to get rain.
The Rainbow = A rainbow in the night is the shepherds delight, and a rainbow in the morning is the shepherds warning.
The Wind = The north wind doth blow, and we shall have snow. Wind from the east is not good for man or beast.
The Coming of a Storm = The sky is purple towards the west. The moon has a copper ring around it.
Wind with most rain = South-West.
The signs of rain = The wind whistles through the keyhole, and the sky is cloudy and heavy.
Knowledge of rain from birds and animals = The birds fly low, and the
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:22
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had kept himself alive by sucking the juice of the elm. The father then decided to call him Súgh-leamhain which means juice of the elm. That was how the name Sullivan came and from this child descended Donal Cam O'Sullivan the great Prince of Beara.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:20
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On a Hallowe'en night many years ago, a little boy, living in a house near Glengarriff woke up one night very thirsty. He got up and stole down to the kitchen for a drink, - taking care not to wake any other member of the family.
On returning to bed he got an awful pain in his leg, and could not sleep again. Next day it was very bad, and the day after it was worse, and the pain was terrible. So the parents decided to send for the Seandree. He came and had a chat with the boy and found out how he got the pain after coming down for the drink late at night.
Now this Seandree was supposed to know a lot about the fairies. So he told the parents to lay the table that night for six persons, and be short one fork and not to leave another fork in the house any where. So that night, when the six fairies were sitting at the table one said. "Where is my fork?" and the others said "Where did you throw it on Hallowe'en night?" "go and get it." Then just at the time the fork was pulled out of his leg, and he gave an awful roar. Next day his leg was a little better and in a day or so it was alright.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:15
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On the road from Glengarriff to Bantry there is a townland called Cahir. This got its name from a very remarkable fort which was made of stone. Nobody touched these stones because if they did it is said they'd have bad luck. Once the County Council wanted some stones and they took them out of the fort. They used them and they had no bad luck after.
When a neighbouring farmer saw that the stones did no harm to the other men he drew some to build a cowhouse. When the cowhouse was finished he drove his cows into it. About ten o'clock in the night he went out to see the cows. He noticed that some of the stones had a reddish colour like blood. He did not like this but he went home and forgot about it.
The next morning he went out and to his surprise his best cow was dead. He was very frightened and he asked a neighbour what he should do. He told him to shake holy water on the cowhouse. He did and he was lucky with the cowhouse ever after.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:13
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Sun. If the sun is covered with clouds, and shows little light it is a sign of rain.
Moon. If there is a circle around the moon it is a sign of bad weather, the wider the circle the nearer the storm.
Stars. If there is a great number of stars, twinkling brightly it is a sign of frost.
Clouds. If the clouds are dark and heavy it is a sign of rain.
Rainbow. A rainbow in the night is a shepherd's delight, and a rainbow in the morning is a shepherd's morning, is a saying about the weather.
Wild Geese and Crows. If the wild geese are seen going south, it is a sign of rain, and also if the crows flock together.
Soot. If the soot falls down the chimney it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:12
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green glass is scattered around the strand. The furnaces were heated with charcoal made from the local oak trees.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:10
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In Tim Regan's farm in Ardnatrush there is a Cromlech This consists of one large stone resting on two other stones standing on end on the ground. There is no local name for this monument.
In the townland of Ardnatrush there is a blessed well known as Lady's Well. Local tradition says that the Blessed Virgin was seen at that well years ago. People used to pay rounds there on the fifteenth of August every year. But that practice has died out during the last twenty years. That townland got its name from the rounds that used to be made at the well.
In Ardnatrush there is also a circular dún or fort. This is situated on the brink of a cliff overhanging the sea. The old name for the fort has been lost.
About a hundred yards from the fort are the ruins of a large, oblong, stone building. It is about thirty feet long and fifteen broad and the walls that remain are about twelve feet in height. Tradition says that it was being built by fairies when a man going out for a cow to drive her to the fair interrupted them. The man was struck sick went home and died shortly afterwards, and the house was never finished.
At the water's edge in Reemeen there was a glass bottle factory. Only very little of the walls remain but many lumps of dark
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:06
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The townland in which our school is situated is called Derry Creha. This is how it got its name. There lived a chieftain in Castletown Bere. There lived a chieftain near Drimoleague named O'Donovan. One night O'Donovan went west to Beara on a cattle raid. He gathered all the cattle he could find and was driving them homewards. He had them brought as far as below the school. O'Sullivans men told O'Sullivan that his cattle were taken. So O'Sullivan gathered his army and followed O'Donovan. He got up to him near the doctor's house. They fought a bloody battle and at last O'Sullivan won. O'Donovan fled with his life. The stones over the graves of O'Donovan's men are still to be seen in the wood above the Doctor's house.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 23:04
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Sun.
If the sun rises red it is a sign of showery weather. If it sets red it is a sign of fine weather.
Moon.
If there is a ring around the moon it is a sign of foggy misty damp weather.
Rainbow.
A rainbow in the morning is the haymaker's warning, a rainbow in the night is the haymaker's delight.
Animals.
Cat. When we see a cat with her back to the fire it is the surest sign of bad weather.
Dog. When a dog is heard crying at night it is a sign that someone is dying, or if he eats grass it is a sign of rain.
Ass. When an ass has his back turned to a wall it is a sign of rain, or when he brays it is a sign that a tinker is dying.
Birds. When a whole flock of birds is seen flying together it is a sign of a
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:59
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Over fifty years ago fish was very plentiful in Bantry Bay. The most of the families round the coast had boats for fishing. Many people near the coast made their living by fishing. Lobsters, herrings, mackerel, and hake were very plentiful. The districts near the coast were more thickly populated at that time than what they are now.
The lobster fishing was a very important industry at that time. There is a big pond at the bottom of Ardnatrush with a big wall all round it and a narrow entrance to the sea. This is known as the Losters Lobster Pond. It was built by an English gentleman named Captain Chambers. He also built a big house near it. In the summer time when lobsters were plentiful and cheap he bought thousands of them from the local fishermen and placed them in the pond and fed them with coarse fish. At the mouth of the pond near the sea there was a sluice which used to be opened when the tide was coming in to let in fresh water and closed when the tide was going out. When winter came and when lobsters got scarce and dear he used o sell them in England for a big price. In this way he prospered year by year. One night a terrible thunder shower fell. The drain near the pond over flowed its banks and the fresh water went into the pond and killed all the lobsters. Then Captain Chambers became bankrupt and went back to England and the pond and the house are now in ruins.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:54
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Over a hundred years ago there lived in the mountains a long way back of Glengarriff a man who did so many bad deeds that he was considered an outlaw. The poor people who lived near him loved him because he robbed the rich and helped the poor.
The Earl of Bantry offered to give a substantial reward to any one who captured or who gave any information about the outlaw. There were no police in those days and the Earl of Bantry tried to keep the law in force over this district. There lived in a little cottage away up in the back of the glen a poor old woman, and the outlaw often paid her a visit.
One day he was on a visit to her and three strong men came in. One of them had a grubber in his hand and he pretended to be firing the handle of it. All the time he was advancing closer to the seat where the outlaw was sitting. Suddenly he swung the grubber and brought it down with great force on the outlaw's head and he became unconscious. The old woman began to scream and the men rushed out thinking the outlaw was dead. After a while he returned to consciousness and he asked the old woman to help him to the door and he'd show her where she'd get money enough to do her for the rest of her life. It is said he had a lot of money hidden somewhere. Just as they were going to the door a neighbour came in and the outlaw told the old woman to put him back where he was. After a short while he died.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:53
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One fine day two little frogs fell into a cream-tub. One frog was very brave but the other was not. Both swan hard trying to get out.
One frog lost courage saying "We are both going to die and he died. He sank to the bottom of the tub.
The plucky frog kept on swimming round working his legs until at last he turned the cream into butter.
When the butter gathered he rested himself on he top of it. When the dairy-woman came in the evening she let the frog go loose and in this way it saved its life.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 22:53
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Templemichael Castle is situated on the River Blackwater about three miles above Youghal. In olden days the Fitzgeralds lived there and it is said that thirteen families of them lived there in succession.
When Cromwell was in Ireland and when the Fitzgeralds heard of his plunderings and robbings, they were afraid that he would take the castle by surprise. As his plundering increased throughout the country, they thought it was better to be sure than sorry. Without any delay they dug a hole about a hundred yards from the Castle and hid their treasure. They then left the castle.
As Cromwell was on his way from Tallow to Youghal, he fired on the Castle and blew
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:50
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seen in the Glen again.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:49
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Long ago there lived a widow who had one son whose name was John. John was half a fool and he was very strong and he would not do any work but he used eat enough for four. Everything his mother used gather he used eat it. At last she said she would put him out of her way. One evening she sent him to the Glen to tie the donkey. That time there was a spirit in the Glen and the woman believed if the boy met it, it would kill him. John took the chain and went to the Glen to tie the donkey. When he reached the Glen the night had fallen and the first thing he met was the spirit in the form of a woman and she attacked him. John was very brave and he was not afraid. After a while he threw the chain around her neck because it is said that a chain is one of the things that has a great effect against the fairies. John pulled her after him until he came to the door of his house. He knocked at the door and told his mother to open it which she did very unwillingly When she saw John's companion she fell in a weakness. John went in and tied the spirit to the leg of the table and he kindled a big fire. When it was alight he threw the spirit and the chain into it. When the fire had died out there was nothing left but ashes and the chain. From that time on his mother had a different opinion of him and the spirit was never
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:40
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Once upon a time there lived a man, and his wife. They had twelve sons, and they all lived happily together. But it happened that the mother died. The father got married again. But his second wife was very cruel to her stepsons.
They were having a big party one night, and she put the twelve boys in an out house. One of the boys was dull and stupid. The foolish boy said to the rest "Let us try to come out of here, she will surely burn us tonight.
They all escaped and shortly after the barn was on fire. The boys travelled on until the came to a twelve cross road. They each took a different
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:40
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Long ago there lived in Ros na Gréine a very poor and industrious woman. She had only three cows. Although she was poor she helped any neighbours that were poorer than herself.
One day she was herding her cows on the slope of Barley Lake. She was not long there when she saw three cows coming running out of Barley Lake. She was scared at first but they began to feed with her own cows. When she drove home her cows she noticed that the three black cows followed hers. She milked them with her own. The three strangers had more milk than her own cows. The cows had calves like hers. She sold alot of them to her neighbours and the district was full of their calves. She kept them for several years.
One evening when she had the spancel put on the cow and when she was milking her, the knot loosened and she kicked the pail and spilled all the milk.
The woman began to beat the cow and immediately the three cows ran out of the stall bellowing towards Barley Lake and it is said that over a hundred cows were seen going into Barley Lake and they were never seen again.
The lesson we learn from this is that we should always take a gift when we get it and we should never find any fault with it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:32
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Long ago there lived a man near Glengarriff named Cian. He had a lot of money and there were raparees hunting him to get the money. He buried the money in the hill before the raparees went hunting him. In the hunt he broke his leg and he went into an old ruin. The raparees saw him and they asked him where he buried the money. He did not tell them but he pointed west. Then he went back into the ruin and another man followed him and killed him.
They went away west trying for the money and while they were there a voice said "díolfar as", to the man who killed Cian. He said, "Cé díolfar" and the voice said mac mhic do mhach id'diaidh".
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:31
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The belief that ghosts frequent graveyards makes people afraid to pass them at night. Jokes have often been played on those who are very nervous.
After the death of a man in Quin a neighbour dressed himself in the clothes of the dead man. He walked from the Abbey towards the road at a time when a certain man was due to leave the village.
On seeing the "ghost" the man returned to the house he had left and told his story. The same thing happened for a week but some men found out who the man was.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:27
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There are peculiar cures for certain diseases in rural districts in Ireland. Long ago when anyone got sick the relations would never send for a doctor but they would try to cure them themselves. There are various "cures" for diseases and the most of them are successful.
Not many years ago a very common disease among children was "thrush or craos-galar" If a child got "craos galar" the father would catch him in the morning and blow his breath into the child's mouth. This is done three mornings in succession and at the end of that time the child is supposed to be cured.
Other people say a gander would cure "craos-galar" The gander is taken from the flock of geese and left fasting under a basket or a tub for a night
In the morning he is taken out and a person holds him before the child's mouth and squeezes him so that the gander's breath would enter the child's mouth.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:25
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Long ago there was a man who was in the habit of killing a pig for St. Martins Day. He was a very poor man and one year he was not able to buy a pig. He was very sorrowful when he had no pig to kill, because it was an old custom of his to kill one for St. Martin's feast every year. One night when he was in bed he heard a pig grunting at the door. He got up to put the pig away, but she would not stir, so he had to kill the pig. From that day to this the locality is called poll na much.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:24
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There is a moat about 300 yards from the village of Ballylanders in the townland of Clogán. It is called Cleary's moat. Years ago the story goes that men were digging around a stone at the entrance to the moat, they were trying to remove the stone when fire broke out followed by thunder lightning and heavy rain which hunted the men. while digging the men found bones crocks and funeral urns. A white hare was often seen there and on Sundays music used to be heard.
The foregoing is an account taken down from the present owner of the moat - John Cleary - who heard the stories from old people.
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There was a moat in the hands of Wallace (Killeen Ballylanders) and old Wallaces father to the present owner got it dug out bu th afterwards fell lame and was lame to the end of his life (taken down from Pat Hannian Ballylanders)
Near the place where the moat was there was a little church cillín - mud wall 60' long by about 40' wide. The remains were knocked down only recently.
Pat Hannian says it is believed that a treasure probably gold is hidden in the ruins of the old monastery in Ballylanders Churchyard. Several times people dug for it and dug very deep. The dividing
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:17
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Once upon a time a man and his wife came from Kilrush to live in Quin. The two of them were very foolish and also very cross. They had one daughter who was out earning her living in County Limerick. The man had a nick-name "Gandy". They never told anybody their names but it was found out afterwards that they were O'Mahonys.
Now these people never went out except on Sunday to go to Mass. One night a man named Reynolds "Quigley" as a nick-name went up on the chimney, he started throwing bottles of water down the chimney, "Gandy"came out but as soon as he did "Quigley" disappeared into a nearby yard. This went on for a few nights until he had to report it to the Guards.
The Guards arrested "Quigley" but "Gandy" died before the court was to be
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 22:15
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Kilbrogan Church
St. Michael's as it was called This capel ceased to function in Canon Cahalon's time. The graveyard surrounding it is very old and both Catholics and Protestants were interred there at one time, the latter before ( and for a time after ) the erection of the Church in North Main St. It is on record from information supplied to the Provost of Bandon by one Solomon Foley that in 1731 there was in the parish of Kilbrogan '' no reputed Mass - House or '' Parish Chapell.'' The reputed
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 22:05
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"Paddy McGrath of Tyredagh"
There lived in a place called Tyredagh a noted distiller of poteen named Padddy McGrath. The police pursued him every where he went, but always returned without making seizure. After some time the sergeant was reprimanded for neglecting his duty.
He was transferred and a man Gunter replaced him. Gunter was a born detective and most anxious for promotion, and was delighted to be picked out to succeed where many of his predecessors had failed.
He picked on a certain day to trap Paddy and posted spies at various crossroads. About eleven o'clock he got word that Paddy was to pass by the barracks with two "clíabhs" of turf on the back of an ass and so he did. Standing on the road in front of the barracks, expanding his chest and looking masterful stood the sergeant as Paddy came along.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:50
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1. Comfrey is a herb that grows in any land, and is a good cure for sprains.
2. Dandelion tea is a good cure for diseased stomachs
3. Glourans. There is electricity in glouráns and if the juice fell on a person it would give a very severe burn.
4. Meachan-a-Tathú is a herb that grows like a carrot. It is a good cure for boils but it is deadly poison.
5. Prashakweed.
6. Crested dog's tail.
7. Chickenweed prevents grass from growing and smothers plants.
8. Marsh Mallows.
9. Turkey-grass is a cure for rheumatism.
10.Garlic is a cure for coughs and colds.
11. Our Lady's Mantle is a cure for warts.
12. Agrimony tea is good for nervous people.
12. Squitch-grass.
13. Grounset.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:34
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Shops were not very common in olden times. There was an odd shop in every town-land who kept just a few small articles like matches tobacco blue and fish.
Buying and selling was carried on after Mass. Mrs. Bradford, in our district used to go to town the day before and buy small articles such as tobacco, matches, tea and sugar. She brought in a basket on her back to Mass.
Markets are still held in the town of Castleisland every Thursday.
Hucksters and pedlars visited the district in former times. They used get bottles rags feathers horse's hair. The gave the people in exchange small goods such as laces needles and pins.
The threepenny piece is known as a "kids eye"
The sixpenny piece is known as tanner
The shilling is called a bob
The fourpenny bit, crown half-sovereign and sovereign are gone out of use
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:27
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A number of James II coins were found in various places in this locality. I referred to them in Cuid I. I have one of which I am attempting to give a sketch. It was found when a new fence was being built on the divided ranch at Fanningstown near Croom about six years ago. It is BRASS Mr. Charles McCarthy at the moment resident at Tullovin Castle has an identically similar coin OF COPPER; at least I think it is Cu every detail of it corresponds with the similar detail on the one I have. He found it near the castle ruin. He also found there other coins to the number, I think, of five. There are two Charles - Carlo? coins, and one very much battered which I think has the letters CIC - on it. I have only had a glimpse at them and without a glass.
[ three drawings on page, showing edge detail and each side of a coin, with the note - "This is only 1/12" in diameter than the coin itself"]
All the coins which Mr. McCarthy has, with the exception of the one sketched here, are about the size of a half-penny and perhaps smaller. I shall see them again and get an opportunity of examining them more closely.
(later) The coins are 1 James II as sketched above 2 Charles II in very good condition dated 1680, one Mary very much worn but bearing the letters MARI clearly.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:11
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The people sow the potatoes in the beginning of April First they make ridges or drills. Then they put the potatoes in them and then they put manure on them
A ridge is about three and a half feet wide and the potatoes are planted in three rows the distance between about twelve inches apart.
A drill is about twenty four inches wide at the bottom and narrows to about 6 inches at the top
The potatoes are
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:10
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There is a churchyard in the townland of Knockataggle in the parish of Kilcummin. Is is Kilcummin churchyard. This churchyard is a long while in use. It is situated on a sloping hill. There is a monastery in ruins in the centre of the graveyard. There are no trees around it. There are marble and limestone crosses in this grave-yard. Some people are buried within the ruins.
There is a certain place to bury unbaptised children. There are other graveyards in the surrounding district also. These are Rathmore, Kilsorcan and Knocknagree. Every family has a certain plot in which they are buried.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:09
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sin nuair a bhíodh sé tirm chioraidís é. Cháirdealaidís agus sníomhaidís é. Bhéadh snáth aca annsin. Bhíodh rud mór aca agus cuiridís isteach an snáth ann. Cuiridís an t-inneall ag oibriú. Nuair a bhíodh an snáth fighthe thógaidís amach é agus thugadh an duine ar leis é abhaile é. Nuair a bhíodh na daoine ag dathugadh san am
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:07
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There were a few old crafts going on in the district long ago the soap and candle making got broken up but the spinning is going on all the time by the women.
First they get the wool then they oil it and card it and make it into rolls then they spin it and make it into thread theny they knit it and make it into stockings and ganzies for both men and women.
The way they used make the candles is peal rushes and put them in tallow.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:07
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Once upon a time a man put a penny into a box for every mass he had heard. One day he said that he was rich enough and that he need not go o mass any more. About a year after he looked for his money and he found a very small number of pennies there.
Once upon a time a man went to confession. He was a queer man. He stole a saddle from another man and he was afraid to tell it to the priest for fear he would tell the other man about it. At last he told his sin to the priest, and he told him not to tell the other man about it. Next morning when the priest was celebrating mass he said "Domini [?[ sarculorum". The man stood up in the chapel and said "With your saddlearioum and your saddleorium I knew you would tell it".
A man did not really believe in the Divine Presence in the Blessed Eucharist until one morning he saw the form of a child when the priest was giving out Holy Communion. An awkward priest once spilled wine out of the chalice and it fell on the cloth. This turned the cloth red and it could not be washed out.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:07
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Hillycrum, Killaboley, Tonnyglasson, Tattyreagh and Grigg. He was looked upon as a very bad landlord, because he was always evicting people out of their lands and him having no cause to do so. His son is at present a solicitor in County Monaghan.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:05
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In olden times the people only take three meals per day, breakfast, dinner and supper. The people used to rise at four or five o'clock in the morning. When they would have an hour or two work done they would go in to the house and take their breakfast. This meal consisted of porridge and good sour buttermilk.
A little later in the day they would take their dinner. When the potatoes would
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:02
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When the big wind came it took the tops of some houses and carried away hay and oats from some.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 21:00
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The Leipreacån is a very small man. He is only about sixteen inches in height, and he has a very long nose, nearly as long as himself. He had a small [?] suit on him. He lives near a fort, and he is always hiding. By chance you may see him before sun-rise in the morning. He is always making shows for the others. Once upon a time a man was out early in the morning and he saw him taking the wool off the sheep's back. He stole up to hum and he caught him and he asked him for the bag of gold. The leipreacån told him to look behind and when the man turned to where the leipreacån was, there was no sight of him. They are not friendly, but if you caught them and held them they would answer a great many questions. If you did let him go he is always sure to have revenge.
The mermaid is half a woman and half a fish. She is always in the sea, and you could never catch her. Once upon a time a fisherman caught her. It came in with the tide and he left it go again. They are said to have families.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:57
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English soldiers who came here long ago, and for their payment the Government of England have them numbers of townlands in each locality.
The Landlords did exercise special power over his tenants. They had head-clerks for lifting the rent. They would go around their tenants to see where they doing anything wrong to the lands. If they were going to do anything this their lands and did not ask permission of the Landlord they would be severely punished.
There would be battles fought often when an evicted person would be put out of their lands.
There was another landlord who lived in Monaghan also. His name was Daniel X Keenan. He owned the town lands of -:
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:55
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the giant told him he would kill him. The giant took him to his house and the little tailor said he should have his supper before the fight. Then the giant prepared the supper, and the tailor had a couple of pants on him, and he filled the pants with porridge. When he had finished packing in the porridge into the pants he said to t he giant "When you will kill me I will be alive again. You must do what I will do before we fight". The little tailor got a knife and cut the pants, and out came the porridge. The giant did the same and killed himself.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:54
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fadó. Ar dtús gheobhaidís sguaib ín dathughadh agus dath. Tósaidís an clár dé' n dhath agus chuiridís an sguaibín isteach sa dath. Tósaidís an sguaibhín aníos as an dath agus chuiridís an dath ar rud ar bith, ba mian leo. Bhéidís ag cur an dath ar go mbéidh sé dathaighthe uile. Díonaróireacht. Chuiridís díon ar na tighthibh gach blian. Chuiridís
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:52
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Every one has their own mark. Some marks the hair with scissors and other put marks of keel[?] on the back of the beast. When a horse is sold the seller gives the halter into the bargain. The best fairs are around the Month of May and November.
Ballybay at one time was supposed to be the best horse-fiar in all Ireland.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:50
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The name of the Local Landlow was Sir Hamilton. He owned the town land of Colmannon, Clenanore, Tonnyscallon, Dernaglug and Doohamlet. He had his abode in the town of Monaghan, where his family had been settled two hundred years before that.
He was looked upon as a good landlord. The majority of the evicted people went to Yankee Land. His ancestors were
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:49
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Bionn na creacai ins an talamh tar eis an fheir a bhaint. Agus nuair a bhionn daoine oga ag siubhal ar an talamh ina gcosai is olc an rud a seasamh duine ar bith orra. Bheadh poll mor in a chos agus bhead ar dul go dti an oispideal leis b'fheidir. Fagann na cradan thart air na claidheacha agus bionn rudai morai ag teacht amach orra. Ni fhasann an uair shleibe ach i dtalamh iongantach maith. Fasann na neantoga i dtalamh bocht. Ta leigheas ins an luibh seo. An neantog. Nuair a bhionn an bhruithineach ar phaiste deirtear go bhfuil neantoga
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:46
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cíb, no luathair, cochann ar na tighthibh. Chluidaigís gach taobh de mullach an tigh le cochann, no cíb, nó luathair. Chuiridís róbaí treasna ar mhullachan tighe. Annsin chuiridís clocha ar bhárr na róbaí. Bíodh na róbaí ag teacht anuas chomh fada leis an díon. Ní dhéanaidís téada de chnáphe na do rua inneach ghiumhais. Leasadh leathair.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:45
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cíb, no luathair, cochann ar na tighthibh. Chluidaigís gach taobh de mullach an tigh le cochann, no cíb, nó luathair. Chuiridís róbaí treasna ar mhullachan tighe. Annsin chuiridís clocha ar bhrr na róbaí. Bíodh na róbaí ag teacht anuas chomh fada leis an díon. Ní dhéanaidís téada de chnáphe na do rua inneach ghiumhais. Leasadh leathair.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:43
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The Local fairs are held at Ballybeg and Castleblayney and also Clones. On a fair morning buyers for cattle go out two or three miles the road to Doohamlet cross to see what cattle they could get. It is still done when there is a good market on.
In olden times the fairs were held in different places. There was one held in Clannore and in different places throughout the county. There was no railways nor county roads only by-roads and old lanes. There is a special place for selling the cattle and it is called the cow-green. There is no toll paid on cattle, only on loaded carts. It was a customary thing to give a luck penny back to the buyer when you would get paid for your beasts.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:41
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Bionn na creacai ins an talamh tar eis an fheir a bhaint. Agus nuair a bhionn daoine oga ag siubhal ar an talamh ina gcosai is olc an rud a seasamh duine ar bith orra. Bheadh poll mor in a chos agus bhead ar dul go dti an oispideal leis b'fheidir. Fagann na cradan thart air na claidheacha agus bionn rudai morai ag teacht amach orra. Ni fhasann an uair shleibe ach i dtalamh iongantach maith. Fasann na neantoga i dtalamh bocht. Ta leigheas ins an luibh seo. An neantog. Nuair a bhionn an bhruithineach ar phaiste deirtear go bhfuil neantog
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:40
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Bionn na creacai ins an talamh tar eis an fheir a bhaint. Agus nuair a bhionn daoine oga ag siubhal ar an talamh ina gcosai is olc an rud a seasamh duine ar bith orra. Bheadh poll mor in a chos agus bhead ar dul go dti an oispideal leis b'fheidir. Fagann na cradan thart air na claidheacha agus bionn rudai morai ag teacht amach orra. Ni fhasann an uair shleibe ach i dtalamh iongantach maith. Fasann na neantoga i dtalamh bocht. Ta leigheas ins an liibh seo. An neantog. Nuair a bhionn an bhruithineach ar phaiste deirtear go bhfuil neantog
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:39
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with a sewing machine. The are a very few tailors in the district now and only a few in the towns.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:38
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In olden days they would make their own cloth by weaving and spinning. The socks and stockings are knitted locally, and them that had sheep could get the sheep shorn, and could get their own wool made for knitting, and they also can get their own blankets made.
At other times the tailors used to go around the house and make the clothes for the people of the house. They would buy the stuff, generally Corduroy and send for the tailor. He would come and sew them in the houses.
There were no sewing machines in those days. There was a tailor named Patrick Martin who lived in Corderrybane. He used to go from house to house in his young days, then he got a job in the Workhouse making clothes for the inmates, but he had to sew
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:38
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Níl fhios ag na sean-daoine cé'n chaoi a leasaidís leathair. Ní dhéanaidís rotha san áit seo fadó no anois.
Ní dhéanaidís táirní sa gceanntar seo. Cheannuighidís iad ins na siopaí. Déanamh fuipeanna. Gheobhaidís maide sleamhain fada agus rópa teanaidh. Cheangluighidís an rópa de bharr an mhaide. Dóghadhao
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:33
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to cure the Whooping Cough.
A sty on the eye is cured by pointing a gooseberry thorn nine times to it.
A child born after its father's death, has the cure of thrush, or sore mouth in Infants.
A dock leaf cures the sting of a nettle.
To cure rheumatism cut one half of a raw potato in two parts, wear one half down the back and the other on the front, and the rheumatism vanishes.
There is a "Wart Well" near here to cure warts.
Another wart cure is to pull three straws out of a stack, bury them, and when they are rotted, the warts will have gone.
Chillblains are cured by rubbing with paraffin oil.
A cut in the hand, if licked by the dog is supposed to be cured.
If the hand bleeds from a cut, a cobweb will stop the flow.
A frog put to the cheek a while cures toothache.
A Thaw Lock or Tá luc, is cured by wearing a tight, firm, leather strap on the wrist for some time.
To cure neuralgia brown paper is burnt and the sufferer tries to swallow the smoke as it burns.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:32
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There are two tailors in this district. In olden times the tailors used to travel from house to house to make a suit for you if required.
But nowadays the tailors always lives in the town. The tailors stocks the cloth and the cloth is spun and woven in the big cities. The people wears the cloth if it is made by Irish Manufacturers.
The kind of cloth used are the blue-serge and different other colours. The implements that the tailor uses are as follows -: scissors for cutting the cloth and a needle and thread to sew, and a tape for measuring. The shirts are made locally at the homes and you can get them made in the shops also.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:31
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Is iad na cupogai, na creactai agus na cradan. Ta na cupogai go h-olc le h-agaidh an choirce agus nuair a bhionn na feil imeiri ag gearradh an choirce piocann siad na cupogai amach as. Deirtear muna ndeanfadh se sin go mbeadh droch sil aca an bhliadain dar gcionn
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:31
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-il. Dhéanaidís turnóg agus bhrisidís clocha aoil. Chuiridís na clocha isteach sa turnóg agus lasaidís iad le teine. Nuair a bhíodh an t-aol déanta thugaidís abhaile i málaí é. Iasgaireacht. Dhéanaidís a lán iasgaireacht sa n-am fadó. Bhíodh siad ag iasgaracht go moch ar maidín agus teighidís abhaile ag breac
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:28
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There are about three forges in this district. The first one is situated as Doohamlet cross-roads and the other is situation at Dunfilmy at the other is situated at Cremartin. The roof of it is slated. The implements that the smith uses are the anvil, hammer, nippers, and a knife, to pear the horses hoof and pichers and a rasp. The bellows the smith uses are large wooden bellows with leather sides.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:26
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cuireann se an dallog air agus bionn se ag iarraidh na paisti eile a cheapadh agus nuair a cheapann siad duine caitfidh se an dallog a chur air. Bionn siad ag imirt mar sin ar feadh sgatamh agus nuair a bionn siad go leir ceapai ag a cheile stopann siad.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:24
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-adh lae. Ag lasgareacht bulógaí scadán, mangaí, agus sgiataí. Ní dhiolaidís mórán iasg san ampadó mar ní raibh mórán biadh aca ach iasg. Foglaeracht. Ag foghlaeracht coiníní, girrfiadacha, agus sionnaí. D'ithidís na girrfhiadacha agus dhíolaidís an croiceann agus dhéanaidís an rud céadna leis an sionn
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:08
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Long ago a giant lived near Rathmore at a place called [?] arrigaline. He was a very huge giant. People say that it was this giant threw the stones from the top of the two paps. These stones are very big stones and signs of the five fingers are to be seen on them. Those giants used to fight against one another. Once upon a time a Scottish giant challenged the world to get a man to fight him. An Irish giant said he would fight him, and the Scottish giant came over to Ireland to fight the Irish giant. The Scottish giant was defeated and in his hurry to get away the Irish giant tore up a big portion of earth and hurled it after him, and it fell into the sea, and it formed Ireland. A large lake was formed where he tore up the earth.
One upon a time a giant met a little tailor and
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:02
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candles themselves with the tallow of the cow's fat. They also had dips for giving light. These were made by dipping a splinter in a crock of melted tallow and letting it cool.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 20:00
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In olden times houses were very plain. These houses were thatched and the walls were made of mud. The walls were made with heather and mud mixed together. There were no rooms in those houses. A bed was at the bottom of the kitchen. This bed was called a "shake down". There were no windows of glass but timber shutters. Then there were other beds which were called settle beds. Those beds were near the fire. Cows and horses were kept in the houses also. The gables were not straight at all. They were called hip gables. There was only one straight gable the fire-place gable. The breast was made of rods woven together, and mud plastered outside them.
The old floors were made of mud. They had half-doors. These doors were used to keep out fowl and let in air. They had turf and bogdeal for the fire. They used splinters and candles. They made the
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:55
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not pay for goods when you got them it was called getting them on tick. Markets were held at cross roads long ago. They are still held at cross-roads in some places. Long ago a penny was called a wing, and a halfpenny a make, A sixpenny-bit was called tanner and a shilling was called a bob. The four-bit and the farthing have gone out of use.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:52
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Shops were very scarce in olden times. People had to go to towns for all their messages. Money was not always given for goods. Labour was given instead. When one man was swapping animals with another man the owner of the better animal gave the other man his animal and he got back the other man's animal and money. This money was called "boot". If the two animals were of equal value they swapped "tail to tail". If you did
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:48
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The bread they had in olden times was oat-meal bread. They baked it in a steak-pan. When they were baking it they put a cross on it because if you did not put a cross on it it broke when you were turning it. They made the oat-meal bread with oat-meal and water and a grain of salt.
The bread they made from potatoes was called stampy. This was baked in front of the fire against a supporter. They also made bread from Indian meal. This was cut into squares and baked in a griddle. When the squared were baked they took them up and they ate the with sour milk.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:30
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They were surprised to see him well and they told the king that their brother was a wicked man. Then the king told the boy to bring all the wolves of his kingdom to a certain hill, and if he failed he was to be hung. The boy went out into the fields and he met the wolf whom he cured. the wolf told him that he would bring the wolves to the hill. The king came to the hill and the boy's brothers were with him, and the wolves ate them up. Then the boy went to the palace and married the princess and became the king.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:20
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Once upon a time a man and women had three sons. They were so poor that they could not feed them. The three sons went out into the world to earn their fortune. The youngest was the nicest of them all, and his two brothers got jealous of him. Then the youngest brother fell asleep, and while he was asleep his brothers cut off one of his feet and tour out his eyes. His two brothers went away leaving their brother alone. There was a well near by, and anyone who went into it got cured. The young boy was scrawling around and he fell into the well. and he got well again. He took a bottle of water with him. He had not gone far when he met a wolf whose leg was broken. The boy rubbed the water to the wolf's leg and he got cured.
He went away to the king's palace to get work, and the first people he met were his brothers.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:15
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used for casting. One of them was a big stone which was called a pushing stone and the other one was a light stone which was called a wheeling stone. The big stone was pushed form the shoulder. You were not allowed to follow this stone at all. The light stone was wheeled over the head. You were allowed to follow this stone.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:14
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There were matched played in olden times. The teams were Scartaglen and Kilcummin. There were fifteen man on each side.
The game was played in Kilcummin. It was a parish game. Kilcummin beat Scartaglen by one point. Long ago people played hand-ball against the facing of kilms. Casting was practiced in older times. First of all they put down a mark, and when they were casting they put the tops of their shoes at the mark. Then they threw the stone over their shoulders. The person who threw it the furthest won. There were two kinds of stones
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:10
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the gruel they ate it in the middle of the floor. when they were eating potatoes they pulled out the table in the middle of the floor and they put a coarse bag on it. They put the potatoes on the bowl and they began to eat.
The bread they had was in squares. Meat was only eaten every Sunday, and it was salt meat they had. They only drank tea at Christmas and they ate eggs on Easter Sunday. Tea became plentiful about thirty years ago. It was out of timber mugs they drank their tea. Timber mugs were made from solid blocks of the sycamore tree.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:07
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Long ago people ate only three meals every day. These were, the breakfast, dinner and supper. They went out in the morning to reap the corn and they scotched it, and they ground it in a quere before they ate their breakfast. They had squares and thick milk for the breakfast, and potatoes, milk and salt again for the supper. Some people ate potatoes at all the meals. They made a cake from potatoes which was called stampy. First of all they got six potatoes and they grated them. They squeezed the water out of them and they put a fist of flour in the grated potatoes. They they put it on a griddle in front of the fire to bake. When a crust came on one side of it they turned the other side of it to the fire, until it was baked. They ate yellow meal gruel and sour milk.
It was eaten in the summer time when the potatoes were scarce. When they were eating
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:07
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Nicholas Kelly and his mother, a widow, lived in Treenfoughnane. The boy was about to get married to a girl in the village but as he was very poor and could not pay the rent the Landlord evicted him six days before his intended wedding day.
Nicholas and his mother went travelling until they came to a wood outside Swinford. In the middle of the wood there grew a large oak tree and at the bottom of the tree was a large flat stone. Nicholas thought this was the door into a fairies castle. He lifted the stone and under it he found a belt of peculiar shape. He put on the belt and said to his mother "I am now the strongest in the world". His mother would not believe him but he caught hold of the large oak tree and pulled it from the roots with such a crash
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:02
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fright by putting a blank-cartidge in and firing at him. One of the men put a bullet in the gun and he gave it to the other man. When they came to the house they met the man and they fired a shot at him and they killed him.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:02
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nose, that was enough. They all ran home a lot faster than they came.
Another man that wanted stones was directed to Mícheál. They made the bargain for £5. That day he and a few other men came for the stones, but the same thing happened. They heard a voice saying "leave us our house for shelter, leave us our house for shelter, leave us our house for shelter", The man said "If you let me take the stones I will build a better house for you in Tooromeen and when I have it built I will give you the key of it". The fairies agreed. The man took the stones. He built the house for the fairies as promised and one day gave them the key and that house is Tooromeen N.S.. That is the reason it it haunted.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 19:01
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Lord Kenmare was the Landlord of our district. His name was Browne. He was a good Landlord. This family was there for centuries. There were people evicted around here and some of them went to live with their friends while others lived in cow-houses. There were care-takers put on the land. The undertakers got large tracks of land from the Englsih. This land was divided into farms for tenants.
The farms were subdivided in marraige. When a farmer had two sons he got the two of them married and he gave half the land to each of them. When people were put out of lands other people paid the rent and they got the farms themselves. Those people were called "Landgrabbers". Any person was not allowed to talk to them or do anything for them. If a person was caught talking to a "Landgrabber" moonlighters went to his house that night and they frightened him. There is a story told about a person who was caught talking to a "landgrabber". A neighbour who did not like him lived near the man. The neighbour and another man decided to give him a
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:56
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to leave the house altogether to the fairies and build a new one for themselves. But Mícheál would say "is it to leave my fathers house for the sake of the fairies. No indeed If I built a new one I would be inclined to invite them into that one also".
But constant dropping wears away a stone. Tired of his wife's pleading, he consented. He built a new house. After a while a man came looking for stones. He went to Mícheál and mad a bargain for the stones at £5. Next day he and four cartmen came for the stones of the old house, but every hand that was left on a stone to pull it down was nearly cut off by another stone that was fired at it by an evil and invisible hand. It was alright until the man who bought the stones got one on the
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:55
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bhí stuirm more eile tímcheall ortdeag bliadhain ó sin agus do lag sé alan tigthe agus crainn i gCara.
Do badhadh fear dár a bainn Seamus ÓGlinn a Moruc. Do badhadh fear éile dár a bainm do linán ans an loc ata inaice le scamuinán tímcheall trí míle ón áit seo agus do bádhadh trí fir eile ar an áit céadhna.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:53
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mo thíghe. Tá an falla sin tímcheall sé troughthe ar aoirde.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:52
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Bhí fear ina comhnuidhe í leimaneac agus "Long" a bainn do. Aon lá amháin diompar sé a mháthair go Cilmacduac agus (agus) abhaile arís. Aon la amháin dubhairt a maghaistir do muna mbheadh sé abháilte roinnt prátaí do iompar bhead siad aige.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:50
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rejected
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Bhí stuirm mor í gCarn í mí Feabhra tímcheall triochadh bliadhain ó shin agus do lag sé alán tighthe agus crainnte
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:49
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Tímceall ceatharca bliadhain ó shin bhí fear ina cómhnuidhe i Poll a Phuca atá inaice na háite seo agus is é an ainm a bhí air ná Micheál do Ciosóg. Do cuir an fear seo an "GAA" ar bun agus bhí sé go maith ag imirt peile agus iománuidheachta.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:49
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Tímceall ceatharca bliadhain ó shin bhí fear ina cómhnuidhe o Poll a Phuca atá inaice na háite seo agus is é an ainm a bhí air ná Micheál do Ciosóg. Do cuir an fear seo an "GAA" ar bun agus bhí sé go maith ag imirt peile agus iománuidheachta.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:48
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A man Mícheál Phadraig Ruaidh by name lived in Altine in his forefathers house. His father and mother were dead and he was alone except for the of fairies.
Mícheál was so used to the fairies that he was loth to leave them or his house. He used to leave spring water and a few potatoes at the fire at night for them. He used also leave some fowl for then when he would kill it to keep the fairies in good humour.
After some years Mícheál brought a bride into his house. This woman was not used to the fairies and their ways so she was annoyed when she had to leave potatoes, water and fowl when she had it, for them at night. So she asked Mícheál
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:47
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Bhí fear ina cómhnuide í Meige agus ise an ainm a bhí air na Pádraig Ó Scanlan agus caith sé mála plúire ina bheal.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:46
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Do méim Tadg Mac Giolla Mártín a bhí ina cómhnuidhe í Meige falla mor atá inaice
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:45
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tells the man they he bought the animal from to put her into a place. The man is paid for his animal in the evening.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:44
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awaiting decision
There are fairs held in a great many places in my district. There is a fair held Killarney, Castleisland, Knocknagree and there is a pig-fair held at Rathmore. There is a certain field in Killarney where the fair is held. This field is called the "Fair Hill". There is not any fair-field in Castleisland and the fair is held on the street in Knocknagree also. there were fairs held in great many places long ago. There was a pig-fair held at Scartaglin but there is no fair there now. When pigs were bought at Scartaglin they were driven to the nearest railway station. When they were taking pigs from Scartaglin to Headford they used to give them a rest at Anabla. When people sell an animal to another person he must give him money which is called Luck Penny". This money is paid according to the price which is given for the animal. When there is a bargain made, the two parties show that they are satisfied by shaking hands. The animal is bought the buyer puts a mark mark on the animal. Some buyers mark the animals with a scissors.
The buyer
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:44
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She threw out the blood, washed the pail at the same time making a vow that she would never again refuse a drink to weary travellers. She did much penance, and became a good religious woman. Owing to the immediate and sincere repentance of the woman. God did not punish her further.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:42
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go rábh siad seacht déag no ocht deág agus annsin d'fán siad sa bhaile. Nuair a béadh sé am dinnear a rachadh sé amach godtí teach fá coinne a dinnear agus níor mhaith leis iasg facoinne a dhinneára agus ní rachadh sé godtí teach ar bith a rabh iasg acha fa coinne an dinnear agus corr uair bheireadh siad cuireadh do teacht nuair a bhéadh iasg aca.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:42
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Story of the Holy Family
There is a local story which has come down from far off times that the Holy Family on their journey from Bethlehem to Egypt called at a house, and asked for a drink. The woman of the house refused, saying she had none though she had plenty in a pail. At that moment the child groaned in his mothers arms. They proceeded on their journey. Soon after the woman of the house went to the pail for some milk, and to her horror the milk was turned to blood. She at once came to the conclusion that the change in the appearance of the milk was due to the refusal of the drink to the weary travellers.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:38
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[details of contributors]
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:38
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Hurling and Football Matches
There were no regular football matches in former times in this locality. Occasionally the youths of two townlands met on Sunday evenings, and kicked football on some level field. This was done for the purpose of mere amusement. The only arrangement was that about twenty young men from; say Derrynananta met twenty young men from Moneensauran. Then two poles were put at one end of the field a certain distance apart and two poles similarly placed on the opposite side of the field. Then if Derrynananta succeeded in driving the ball between the poles in the Moneensauran side that was a goal for Derrynananta and vice-versa. They seldom played more than two games on one evening.
Another game very prevalent about fifty years ago was leaping. A number of (men) young men met, and they tried who could make the longest jump. In connection with this a very favourite exercise was the hop, jump and leap. By this three separate spaces were gone over, the hop brought the youth through one space, the step to another space, and the leap through a third space all in a direct line.
Another game was throwing a stone about half a stone in weight to see who could throw it the longest distance. There was no fixed place for playing any of these games. They were played in one field on a certain day and in a different field on another day and so on.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:37
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bealach na bhaile thoisig an stóirm agus an fearthainn.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:37
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Bean is eadh í agus ruball éisg uirtí. Tá gruaig an fhád uirtí. Bíonn sí ag caoineadh nuair a bhíos droch aimsear ag teacht.
Lá ámhain bhí mo shean athair agus mo uncle amuigh ag iasgaireacht. Bhí maidin deas ciún ann buair a d'fág siad an cuan. Bhí siad amuigh giota maith agus (cus) chonnaic siad an Maig dean Mara na shuidhe ar carraig a' baidhthe ag caoine.
Táinig siad arais aris go drí an cuan, nó bhí fhio [?] acha gur sin droch comartha.Nuair a bhí siadh leath
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:36
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The Patron Saint of my district is Saint Cuimín. There is an old church in Kilcummin which was built by this Saint. The parish of Kilcummin is called after Saint Cuimín.
Though Saint Cuimín died in Kilcummin his remains were taken to Clonferth to be buried. There is no local day kept in honour of Saint Cuimín. No person in Kilcummin is called after.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:32
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took it to the weaver to be woven into cloth. They coloured the cloth by boving it in water mixed with bog-stuff.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:32
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Bíonn an maighdean mara na chomhuiode amuigh ins an fharrge. Sóirt cáilín atá inntí agus ruball éisg uirthí. Ta gruag fhada uirthí agus bíonn sí ag cíoradh a chuid ghruaige nuair a bíos sí le feiceáil. Droch comhartha 'seadh í chun í a fheiceáil.
Lá amháin bhí daoine amuigh ag iasghaire acht agus chonnaic siad an maighdean mara ag chíoradh a chuid gruaige agus í af chaoineadh Dubhairt duine aca gur cheart iad dhul na bhaile agus dubhairt an chuid éile nach rachadh siad sa bhaile. Leath-uair na ndiaidh sin chonnaic siad an mhaighdean mara ag dhul síos ins an uisge agus ar an bhomaite sin tháinig tonna móre agus baitheadh iad.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:28
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the woman of the house went up to look if the bread in the oven was baked but when she went to take off the lid the braid was out of the bread and up through the lid of the oven so the woman at once thought that the woman who left must have been the Blessed Virgin when she saw what happened she followed her and wanted her to come back but she would not. So the Blessed Virgin then went to a very poor looking house and asked the woman of the house would she give her shelter for the night. The woman answered and said that the place was very miserable but such as it was hundred welcomes. So the Blessed Virgin told her Divine Son about those two women and asked him what reward he would give the woman that was so good to her. He answered the woman who was so good to you all her family will die before her and the other woman will have all her family at her death bed. The Blessed Virgin asked him how it was that all the poor woman's family would die and leave her. He answered that she would have them all to come to meet her with lights and accompanying her into eternity and that the other woman would have none of hers to meet her that they would be all here after her.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:27
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the (hed) head of a man?
A penny.
What goes round the house and a harrow after it?
A hen with little birds.
Patch upon patch without any stitches?
Cabbage.
What goes round the wood and never goes into it?
The bark of the tree.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:26
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I flung. If you were there to see the fun.
A jag.
6/ As I went up yon slippery slap I met my uncle Davy I cut his throat and sicked his blood and left him lying easy.
A bottle of whiskey.
7/ Three ladies all dressed in white they took the fever and died on [?] night?
Three candles.
8/ I have a wee mare they call her Dunlop the harder she gallops the faster she swallows the rope.
A spinning wheel.
9/ As round as a ring, as flat as pan the whole of a woman and
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:23
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Round and round a rock a ragged rascal man ram. If you would tell me how many r's in that you would be a clever man?
There are no r's in that.
What would you have to cut a bit off to make it long enough?
A drain.
Four stiff standers, four jolly hingers, a licker and a crucker and a swinger?
A cow.
The jumper of the dyke, the clipper of the thorns, a wee brown cow with a pair of leather horns?
A hair.
As I went up yon slippery slap I met a mad bull. He stuck and
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:22
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There a great many tailors in my district. The instruments a tailor has are a thimble, needle, sewing-machine, scissors, tape and chalk. Some tailors keep cloth for making the clothes. Tailors nearly always work at home but some tailors go around from house to house. Some people knit stockings at home.
Flax was grown by everyone long ago and people made their own linen cloth. Whenever a person died, the relatives wore black clothes.
Long ago they used to make cloth called Friege. People used to get wool from the sheep and they used to card it and warp it and make it into balls of thread. They they
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 18:06
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cairrigeacha, srutháin agus oileáin. Tá cuid maith oileán, cairrgeacha agus srúthán san áit seo, agus seo cuid do na h-ainmeacha:-

Oileán Bán
Tá ceannabhán bán ag fás ann, sin é an fáth a bhfuil an t-ainm sin air.

Oileán na nÉan
Tá go leor éanacha le feiceal ann anois agus arís.

Carraig Tanaide Bán
'Sé an fáth a bhfuil an t-aim sin air mar tá gaineamh bán ar an tráigh.

Carraig Leac Dubh
Ar an taobh teas don loch tá sé suidhte. Tá a lán leac dubh air. Sin é an fáth a bhfuil an t-ainm sin air.

Sruthán na Teorann
'Sé an fáth a bhfuil an t-ainm sin air mar tá sé idir dhá theorainn.

Sruthán na Samalachán
In Dubhros. 'Sé an fáth a bhfuil an t-ainm sin air mar tagann samalachán isteach ann uaireannta.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 17:56
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283
unlucky for the house if a woman entered a house on New Year's Day.The man of the house used stay up until after twelve o'clock that night and then he used come in and wish all in the house a Happy New Year.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:52
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Religious Story.
When the Blessed Virgin lived on this earth one day as she was going along she felt in need of something to eat. So she went into a house and asked the woman of the house for some bread and the woman told her she had none only what was in the oven on the fire. The Blessed Virgin said a piece of that would do. Then the woman said it would be scarce enough for the men who were out working and that the needed it more than she did. The Blessed Virgin asked what were the men doing and the woman her her they were drawing water and putting it on the wheat that would never grow with the horrid drying that every thing was all burned of the earth. The Blessed Virgin answered and said it would grow and walked away. After she left
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 17:52
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267
A closed mouth and a wise head.
Be afraid and there s no danger of you.
The grip of a drowning man.
People met but the hills or mountains do not meet.
Tell me your company and I will tell you who you are.
It is only a wisp instead of a brush.
The deed will praise itself.
Hang your griddle your bread is baked.
The rale wheat from the middle of a stack.
Your goose is cooked.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:49
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tháinig an cónra aníos as an uaigh trí huaire. Tugtar as é, agus cuireadh i reilg Protustúnach é.
Ní cuirtear daoine na parróiste i reiligí iasachta.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:46
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Tá ceithre reiligí san áit seo. Tá ceann ar an bhFáirche ar a dtugtar "Teampull na Fáirche". Tá ceann eile ar Inis-an-Ghoill ar a dtugtar "Teampull na Naomh". Tá ceann ar Inis-dá-Bhuidhe agus ní tugtar aon ainm air. Tá ceann i nDubhros agus ceann i mBaile an Tobair agus ní tugtar ortha acht "Teampull na Leanbh". Cuirtear daoine i ngach ceann acu acht amháin ar Inis-dá-Bhuidhe. Tá gach ceann acu cearnógach acht amháin Teampull na Leanbh i nDubhros. Tá cuma trí coirnéal air.
Tá fothrach teampuill ar Inis-an-Ghoill. Ní cuirtear daoine sa bhfothrach. Tá na reiligí leibhéalta acht tá fánaidh i reilg na Fáirche. Tá an fánadih i dtreó an iarthar. Tá crann rósanna ag fás ar cuid de na h-uiagheannta. Tá fothrach teampull freisin i reilg na Fáirche. Tá daoine curtha sa bhfothrach, acht ní cuirtear aoinne ann anois. Tá dhá reilig diomáine san áit, ceann ar Inis-dá-Bhuidhe agus ar Oileán na gCorp i nDubhros tá ceann eile. Níor cuireadh aoinne ar Oileán na gCrop le tríocha bliadhan, agus níor cuireadh aoinne ar Oileán Inis-dá-Bhuidhe ón mbliadhain 1846. Níl aon clocha ornáideacha in aon reilig acu.
Cuirtear páiste gan baiste i gcoirnéal garrdha ar bith. "Cillínigh" tugtar ortha. Fuair mé an sgéal seo ó mo mháthair. Cuireadh fear Protustunach i reilig Baile-an-Tobair fadó, agus maidin lár na bhárach fuair na daoine an cónra ar bárr an uaighe. B'eigin dóibh é a thabhairt as annsin agus a chur in áit eile. Chuala mé an sgéal seo ó m'athair. Cuireadh fear Protustúnach ar Inis-an-Goill fadó agus
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:43
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Eucharist as here to fore. If you do this God will reward you.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:42
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Religious Stories
A story has come down about an event that happened over a century ago. It is about a man who attended Mass regularly and then ceased to go. The reason why he stopped going to Mass was due to a quarrel he had with his parish priest. His absence from Mass continued for a long period. Some of his friends spoke to him on the matter and requested him to go to Mass. This he refused to do saying he would never go to Mass as long as the priest remained in the parish. Some of his cattle and sheep died and they did not appear to be suffering from any disease. One of the children who was his favourite got sick, and though many remedies were tried to help his recovery there was no improvement in his health. One day a strange man visited his house, he was old and venerable. He appeared to be tired and hungry and the woman of the house gave him food to eat. After the rest and the food he commenced to talk. Among other things the man of the house told him about the sick boy, about his losses in cattle and sheep and finally about his quarrel with the priest and his absence from Mass in consequence of the quarrel. The stranger paused for some time and then told (him) the man of his folly and sin. He said to him if you are a true Christian who believes a quarrel of the kind you state keep you from your religious duties. Go to Mass become reconciled with your priest and receive the Sacraments of penance and
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:24
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Religious Stories
There was a woman one time who went to confession to tell her sins. She did not know how many Sundays she was at (from) home from Mass or how many Sundays she was late. The priest made a box for her and told her to put a stone into the box for every Sunday she would go to Mass and that he would count them at the end of the twelve months. The woman used to spend a long time dressing and she used to be late. One Sunday was wet and she did not take time to dress herself for fear she would be late. She put her shawl about her and got her stone and ran away so she was in time. She put her stone into the box and knelt behind the door and when Mass was over she went home. At the end of twelve months the priest counted the stones and there was only one stone in the box so the priest said that she was only one Sunday at Mass.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:20
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Do rinne sé aitrighe sa mainistir sin sul a bfuair sé bás.

Sorcha Ní Shúilleabáin,
Sgoil = Cluain-an-Bhrúnaigh
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:19
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stuck them in the house, byres, stables and any other building.
It was customary on May Eve to get some soft yellow clay and pour water on it and make it into a soft mass sprinkling it with salt and holy water. Early on May day this soft mass of clay was rubbed over the cows udder this was done to prevent fairies or witches interfering with the milk or butter of the cow.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:18
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Tá lorg dhá chaisleán sa gceanntar seo. Tá ceann i nDún agus ceann i gCunga. Sé Rí Domhnall a thóg an ceann i gCunga. Sé Ódó O'Concubhair a thóg an ceann i nDún. Bhí dún ann ag muinntir Flatharach. Do mhill Feilim O'Concubhair é sa mbliadhain 1233. Thóg Uaitéar de Búrca é arís agus bhí sé in a chomhnuidhe ann. Nuair táinig muinntir Chromaill go h-Éirinn mhilleadar arís é. Choinnigh Earl of Iveagh ceannphort caisleán Cunga Caisleán na Circe gan tuitim isteach in a bhfothrach. Thug Gráinne Ní Máille cuairt air go minic.
Rinneadh ionnsuidhe ar caisleán Cunga, an uair a bhí na Firbholg agus na Tuatha De Danann ag troid. Bhí an caisleán láidir an uair sin. Deirtear gur cuireadh muinntir an chaisleáin fá draoidheacht, agus go ndearnadh iasg de mhnaoi uasal chaisleáin. Sin í an t-iasg atá le feiceál fós sa tobar in aice an chaisleáin.
Tá fothrach dá theampull ar Inis-an-Ghoill. Sé Lughnadh Naomtha mac inghine Naomh Pádhraig a thóg ceann acu. Tógadh an ceann eile blianta in a dhiaidh sin. Thart os cionn dorais an tséipéil tá dhá chloigeann déag de na h-Apstail le feiceál ceaptha amach ins na clochaí. Tá lorg na ndoras agus na bhfuinneóg le feiceál fós air.
Rinneadh mainistir i gCunga sa 12adh aois. Turlach O'Concubhair a rinne é. Sé Feichín Naomhtha an t-abb deire a mhair i gCunga. Is ann a fuair Ruaidhrí O'Concubhair an t-Árd Rí deire a bhí ar Éirinn bás sa mbliadhain 1198.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:17
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Emblems and Objects of Value
Herbs are very commonly used in this locality for curing. Rib-grass was used for cuts and wounds. The rib grass was boiled then mixed with oil and reduced to a pulp. It was then laid over the cut or wound. It was most effective in healing up the wound; two or three dressings were quite sufficient for the purpose.
The use of holly at Christmas is a very old custom which still exists in this part of this country. On Christmas Eve the holly sprays were collected and the windows dressers and chimney-pieces were adorned with them. If some of the family died since the previous Christmas a spray cypress was mingled with the holly. In former times the people carried branches of larch or spruce, as substitutes for palm on palm Sunday to the Church to be blessed. They brought these back and
ordinary member (history)
2020-05-28 17:14
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A Funny Story
Once upon a time there was a man who had a great hump, on his back.
One night while coming home from town. he had to pass a fort. While passing he heard [?].
he answered [?]. That moment her was taken into the fort and never enjoyed such a night with the fairies. When he came out in the morning his hump was gone. He was telling this to another man who had a hump. Some other night this man was passing the same fort he heard [?] and he added [?] He was also taken up but for adding a new day to this rhyme he came out with two humps. and that was his reward.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 17:13
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Historical Tradition
The Land War started here in eighteen seventy nine. Eighteen seventy nine was a very bad year. The potatoes were a total failure and the weather was so bad that no turf could be saved. The price for cattle was at the lowest ebb. As a result the farmers were unable to pay any rent. Under these circumstances the farmers had to combine to to resist the exactions of the landlord. At this time there was landgrabbing; when a tenant was evicted another tenant took the farm and got it by merely paying the rent. The landleague put an end to all this grabbing. The local bailiff was so frightened that he had to seek police protection. The regular battle then began between the landlord and the tenants. On one side were the combined tenants the emergency men police gamekeepers and sometimes soldiers on the side of the landlord. The evictions began and if the rents and costs were not paid the houses were tossed by means of a battering ram, which was manipulated by the emergency men. This continued for over twelve months and was ended by the landlord of eighteen eighty one. The tenants succeeded and the landlord went down.
ordinary member (history)
2020-05-28 17:04
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An old prayer and song
The very first joy our Lady had it was the joy of one, it was the joy of her own dear Son when He was born man.
The very next joy our Lady had,
it was the joy of two
It was the joy of her own dear Son
when He taught us what to do.
The very next joy our Lady had
it was the joy of three
It was the joy of her own dear Son
when He made the blind to see.
The very next joy our Lady had
it was the joy of four,
It was the joy of her own dear Son,
when he begged from door to door.
The very next joy our Lady had it was the joy of five, It was the joy of her own dear Son when He raised the dead to life.
The very next joy our Lady had
it was the joy of six, It was the
joy of her own dear Son when he
cured the sore and sick.
ordinary member (history)
2020-05-28 16:52
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Marriage Customs
The custom of the "The Gander" is handed down to us from long ago. On the night before the wedding, the friends from both sides get an invitation to the "Gander"
Sometimes they have a Gander but it is usually meat they have. They also having dancing and singing. It takes place at the girls house, and break up about twelve oclock. On the following day they have what is called
"The drag". The bride and Bridegroom would be in the first sidecar, for there were no traps long ago. After the wedding the Bride and Bridegroom wold leave the Chapel. They they would choose some favourite place such as the lakes of killarney and all the cars would drive around them.
ordinary member (history)
2020-05-28 16:41
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This story was told to me by my grandmother Mrs [?]
House wives long ago used to make starch from potatoes by paring and grating them and washing the product several times in water. They would put it out on the window sill to [?] in a way that the water would fall away and the substance remain. This would be fine white starch just like the starch you would buy in a shop and would save money a great deal.
Flax
Housewives used also [?] their own flax seed. They used sow it just like oats. When it would be fully grown they would pull it from the roots. Then they would bind it in sheaves. They would would then [?] a hole of water what they used call "logging". Then steep it there for three weeks. They would then take it out and dry it and would give it a second drying over the fire in the kitchen. They would then pound and [?] and hackle it and make it fine enough for spinning
then the house wives all through the long winter nights would be spinning until 11 or 12 oclock The course part would be sent to the weaver and the fine part would be made to suit fine shirts.
Every man in Ireland used to wear Bandle shirts
They used make sheets of the course part.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:38
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There was a regiment of Soldiers, and Black and Tans at Bellewstown Races July 7th 1920. The Tans took up positions on the roads leading from the Bellewstown when the Races were over and searched people as they passed.
There were three men hanged at Cocklesbridge on 20th April 1812 fro stealing a few clothes. value 5/9. There names were Duff Carroll & Lambe
Collected by [?] Smyth Per Richard Dunne, Rath
A cock of hay and Pat Malone's House were burned on Sept 2nd 1931. The Church doors of Ardcath Church and entrance piers were also tarred
The Sacking of Ballriggan by the Tans at which Lawless and Barten were murdered was on Monday night 20th September 1920.
James Kelly and Thomas Murphy were arrested by the Black and Tans on February 15th 1921.
(The Tans called to Walls house Hawkinstown earlier that day and arrested Thomas Wall. They then visited Ardcath cemetery at about 9.30 a.m. They searched the graveyard and emerged carrying a breastplate. A noted Tan named Brockertin called to me in the school and asked for chalk with which he wrote "Up the I. R. A." on the breastplate. They had Tommy Wall in the lorry and tried to make him hold the breastplate. J. J. D.)
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:27
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Local Remedies for Diseases in Cattle + Horses
Ringworms _ Black Sulphur mixed in Lard for Constant applications
Cracked Hoofs _ Archangel Tar + Paring
Eczema Heels of horses " + lard mixed
Sore breasts " " wash in saltwater cold
Swellings in cattle _ Saltpetre + lard rubbed in daily
Hoose in calves Linseed oil + salt 1 glass each + 1 teasp salt,
Pits in Dogs _ Red Drench - 1 teasp daily,
Blood Murrain in Cattle Red Drench three doses
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:23
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Families with Homely Remedies or Cures.
Cancer. Cured externally by Harris, near Coolmanagh, Hacketstown.
King's Evil or Scrofula by Corcoran's Ballyhackett - Tullow CO Carlow
Burns + Scalds Mrs Nolan's Rathmore ---- " "
Ringworms. Miss Mary Toole Rathmore --- " "
Toothache. John Coates " " "
Felons + Whitlows Miss Finnegans Ballybitt __ " "
Eczema + skin diseases Miss Hopkins Ballybitt " "
Bone Setter Mr Conway Straboe __ " "
Measles Mrs Corcoran Ballyhackett __ " "
Yellow Jaundice " " " __ " "
Quinsey Mr John Nolan " __ " "
Earaches Miss Ryan Tobinstown __ " "
Shingles or Anthonys_Fire_Kehoes' Blood_Mrs Nolan Rathmore " "
Warts Peter Byrne - Ballyhackett __ " "
Bleeding or Haemorrahage John Coates . Rathmore " "
Tuberculosis, Mrs Confrey Tobinstown __ " "
Rickets " Mr Kelly " __ " "
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:19
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which was a remarkable feat.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:18
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was Fr. John Donnelly who was ordained in 1675 at Dundalk by the saintly Martyr, Blessed Oliver Plunkett, another priest of the parish was Father John Whelan who died in 1775 aged 91 years. It is said that Fr.Whelan in his young days knew a very old man named Cullen who had often spoken to two men actually living in Mullagh-mast at the time of the dreadful massacre in 1577, when several members of the seven septs of Leix were treacherously done to death.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:17
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surrender, Burke became the owner of Tinakill. Later, however, the estate was sold to a man named Warburton who had been a drummer in Cromwell's army,and founder of the Warburton family. He was known by the nick name of "Silly Dick". The Warburtons were never popular and were very hard on their tenants in Garryhinch. The landlord of the Warburtons was fired at one day by some of his unfortunate tenantry and lost an eye. The castle is in ruins now but some of the walls are standing, and there is a winding stairway leading to the top from which a splendid view of Leix can be had. Half-way up the stairs there is an alcove called
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 16:17
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John Byrne, Winetown, Summerhill.
Age 68
The Coran Hill (near Trim)
A short distance from where I live there is a hill called the Coran Hill. On the south side of the hill there is a large bush. Under the bush there is a chest or box of gold. About the first of November a horseman rides round the field three times. Long ago there lived a man named Peter Sweeney who was a weaver by trade. He had a son who was a soldier and who was home on leave. It so happened that Peter Sweeney dreamed three nights in succession that under the bush he could see a large chest of gold, and he also dreamed that a soldier would dig it up, but that the horseman would ride round the field at full speed three times. If it was not dug up before he would be round the third time, the soldier would lose his life. The chest was to be dug up sometime before twelve o'clock midnight. Peter Sweeney and his son got ready to dig up the gold, but failed as they were afraid they would lose their lives.
The Pipers Bush
At one end of our field there is a bush known as the Pipers Bush. People say that a piper was under the bush, and that he played all night. Crowds of people went
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:17
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My father often told me that when the present Building in Lisnavagh was in the course of erection, the poor labouring men had to walk from Rathwilly about 3 miles distant to begin work when the Bell rang at 6 a.m for the noble sum of sixpence per day working a twelve hour day. On this they had to live + raise families. If they were a minute late they had to go home + suffer the loss for the day. B. O'Grady.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:16
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The ruined castle of Tinakill once belonged to a scotch family of planters named Mac Donald who settled in the district, and owned most of Garryhinch. It is said that one of the Mac Donalds,who was very extravagant, owed money to a man named Burke, but refused to pay it. Burke laid siege to the castle, but was unsuccessful at first. He then engaged a piece of artillery from the English, and placing it on a hill (known as "Cromwell's Hill") about a thousand yards away he caused a breach in the walls and Mac Donald was forced to
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:15
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the well are the same as the stones in the ruined church, so it is assumed that St,Brigid was the founder of the church. This well supplies the water to the lake in the grounds of the Jesuit Novitiate at Emo, and has never been known to go dry.
During the Penal days a holy priest,called"The Silent Priest" lived in a little hut not far from the well. He was persecuted and hunted, his chapel and hut been burned, but he told his persecutors that in spite of their tyranny the catholic religion would flourish in Morette, a prophecy that has come to pass. After his chapel was burned the priest used to say mass on a little rock some distance away and that rock is still to be seen and is often
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:15
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the well are the same as the stones in the ruined church, so it is assumed that St,Brigid was the founder of the church. This well supplies the water to the lake in the grounds of the Jesuit Novitiate at Emo, and has never been known to go dry.
During the Penal days a holy priest,called"The silent priest" lived in a little hut not far from the well. He was persecuted and hunted, his chapel and hut been burned, but he told his persecutors that in spite of their tyranny the catholic religion would flourish in Morette, a prophecy that has come to pass. After his chapel was burned the priest used to say mass on a little rock some distance away and that rock is still to be seen and is often
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:14
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then, that any further attempt to recover the treasure would be useless and determined never to interfere with it again.
A couple of years ago when dredging operations were in progression the Barrow, Mr,McGuire was anxious to see what would take place at the pool, so he managed to be there when the engineers were examining that part of the river. To his disappointment, when they came to that spot, the engineers said it was deep enough and passed on.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 16:13
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4 "Proverbs"
As dry as a gurnet.
As long as a wet week.
As deaf as a leather -ear.
As high as Mount Callan.
As green as grass.
As crooked as a ram's horn.
As long as a late- breakfast.
As poor as a church mouse.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:13
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The Local Fair 28 - 4 - '38
The Fair of Leighlin is held but once a year on the 14th May. Everybody looks forward to its coming. There are lots of fun for every class, men making bargains others dividing what is between them. When the seller would not agree the buyer would say "hold your hand divide again, it is a bargain." There are usually a good many cattle dealers. When the people are setting out for the fair with their cattle they put a couple of sods of turf in the cradle. When the buyer comes along to buy a beast the owner praises it. If the buyer doesn't believe them they say "May the twins I left in the cradle be burned when I go home if what I am telling you is not true."
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:13
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When Cromwell came the castle was taken by his forces, commanded by Colonel Hewson, and it was dismantled and partially demolished by them. The last person to take up his abode in Lea castle was the famous rapparee Charles O Dempsey called locally"Cathal na gCapall" owing to his reputation as a horse stealer. It is said that in order to baffle his presuers "Cathal na gCapall" used to reverse the shoes on the horses feet, but in spite of his cleverness he was captured in the end and hanged.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:11
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or the castle of the Island. In the 14th century the O'Dempsey clan succeeded in capturing Lea castle but it was retaken by the Fitzgeralds after the lapse of over a century,for we are told that it was reckoned to be one of the six best castles belonging to the great Earl of Kildare who furnished it with guns and ammunition. During the war of the Forties Lea castle was garrisoned by the confederate Catholics and it is said that Owen Roe O' Neill lodged there on his way to Kilkenny.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:11
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The Lios of Gloun
There is a large lios in the townland of Gloun. It is situated one field in from the road between Mr. Desmonds and Mr. O'Connell's lands. About two hundred yards away from this lios there is a smaller one in Mr. O'Connell's land and it is supposed that there is an underground passage connecting the two of them.
The entrance in the larger lios is in the centre of the top and the entrance in the smaller one is in the western side, but both entrance are nearly closed up.
According to tradition some chief lived in the bigger one and his men lived in the smaller one. In a field of Mr. Desmonds about then yards away from the big one there are some mounds and it is said that the people who lived in the lios are buried there.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:10
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There are standings in it some with sugar-stick and sweets and some amount of other things. There are some standings in it that sell and clothes. The children love to go to the fair of Leighlin. The fair will fall on Saturday this time.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:10
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Several children in the school have been cured of the "Menareac" by taking the bottle made up by Miss Dunne.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:10
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for Miss Dunne who is able to tell whether the child has "Menaerac" or not. She gathers a certain herb, known only to herself and rubs it between her hands. If froth appears the child has the disease, so she makes up a bottle from the herbs mixed with water and orders it to be taken three times a day. The mixture which is a dark green colour is very unpleasant to taste but if given in time, has never been known to fail in effecting a cure. Miss Dunne tells the mother to say certain prayers while the bottle is being taken, and she never asks for money in payment.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:09
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The Local Fairs. 07 - 4 '38
The local fairs are held at Castlecomer, Bagnalstown, Carlos and Kilkenny. There is a fair held every year in Leighlin. The Kilkenny fair is the biggest of them. The fair is generally held on Friday in Castlecomer, in Bagnalstown on Monday, in Kilkenny and Carlow on Wednesday, for cattle, sheep, horses and pigs. One the cattle fair two shilling are given for luck except when dealings are out out for so much luck money. The luck-money on a sheep is sixpence, on pigs one shilling. When there is a good demand the buyers go around the country buying animals.
There used to be a fair in Kilkenny the 28th of March but it is not held now and another in Carlow the eight of November and it is not held either Large crowds go to the fair of Leighlin some with cattle and others with sheep.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:08
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where he saw a man ploughing, and he asked him to save him. The farmer-a Mr Copeland-was a protestant, but he assured the priest that no harm would befall him. He told him to change clothes with the ploughboy and to take his place at the horses' head. Scarcely had the ploughboy disappeared when the priest hunters entered the field and asked the farmer if had seen a priest pass by. The farmer answered that a man had come the way shortly before, and that they could easily overtake him. The priest- hunters continued their way and when the coast was clear, Mr Copeland took the priest to his home and sheltered him for three weeks. The field in which he was ploughing is enclosed
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:08
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During the penal times the Catholics of the of the parish of Portarlington were fairly free from persecution, and generally managed to have mass every Sunday although it had to be celebrated in the open air. This happy state of affairs was due to the kindness of their Protestant neighbours, who often helped to conceal the priests. One Spring's day some priest hunters from a neighbouring parish got word that one of the Portarlington priests was out on his rounds among the parishoners, and immediately set out on his trail. Hard pressed by his pursuers the priest turned into a field
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:06
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At a place called Baldurgan, there is a field called “Dead man’s bones”. This field got its name from the battle of Clontarf. When the battle was ended the Dalcassians journeyed to Baldurgan, where they buried their dead. Hence the name “Dead mans bones”.
About half a mile outside Swords, there is a hill called Gallows Hill, which gets its name from the time of the English invasion. They used to hang their Irish prisoners on this hill and then bury them there.
About a mile from
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 16:05
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slatracha, agus bhaineadh sé an craiceann dhíobh.
Bhí aon fhear amháin darbh ainm Colm Ó Conraoi as Fearann an Choirce a dhéanadh crochanna agus geataí, agus ba mhaith uaidh iad a dhéanamh freisin.
Bíodh Pádraig de Bhailis as Cillmhuirbigh ag sníomh lín agus do rugha le túirne lín. Bhí sé ag fághail glaodhaigh mhaith ortha mar ba mhaith uaidh iad a dhéanamh.
Bhíodh go leór daoine ag iascach san am fadó, acht ní raibh aon daoine chomh maith le Liam agus Maolruadh Mach Donnchadha as Gort-na-gCapall. Tháinig siad oidhe stoirmeach isteach i bPort bhéil an dúin le lán an churraigh de langaibh agus chuir siad iongantas ar mhuintir a bhaile. Bhíodh sé ráidhce nach raibh aon bhean chomh maith le Ánna Ní Chonghaile as Fearann an choirce ag dathughadh. Sé an chaoi a dhathuigheadh sí: bhaineadh sí fraoich agus caonach a bhí ag fás ar chlochaibh eibhir. Bhruitheadh sí san bpota iad agus dhathuigfheadh sí leis an súgh.
Bhíodh sean-daoine as Gort na gCapall fadó ag dóghadh aoil taobh ó dheas den bhaile thuas ag róidín na tornóige aoil. Sé an chaoi a dhóghaidís é: Dhéanaidís balla cloch, agus bhuailidís le muirtéal é; D'fhaduigheadh siad teine agus chuiridís clocha beaga os cionn na teineadh ag dóghaidís an t-aol.
Bhíodh go leór daoine ag
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 16:03
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Miss McNamee
Miss Dolan
Miss Mullens
Miss Markey
Miss Casey
Miss De Lacey
Miss Blaney
Miss Shaw
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 16:03
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the gold was when he came back. He went home in great humour and the next morning he came to where the gold was with some of the neighbour’s but when he came to the field it was covered with sticks and then he did not know where to look for the gold
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 16:02
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the field. One night he was passing by the field he saw a light and he got frightened and ran home. He was wondering what light was and he thought it might have been someone who was put to care the money because Mr Lalor was dead
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 16:00
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Extravagance in youth makes want in old age.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:59
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There is a Poney's Skin in John Herron's; hill and it is supposed to be full of Gold.
Denis Crossan of Derora when he was a little boy used to go up everyday with the cows, and while he was herding he would dig
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:56
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is called Tobar Mhuire. In the Penal times a bishop came to it dressed as a piper and administered the sacrament of Confirmation to many children.
About thirty two years ago there was a mission in Killargue. One eveining the missioners with hundreds of people marched from the chapel to the Holy Well. the missioners carried the Blessed Sacrament and blessed the Holy Well.
Some invalids drink the water, others bathe their feet in the stream, while many rub the water to an affected spot. Relics are left behind at the well. There were offerings made at the well also. Some people believe in leaving money and more in leaving cloths at the well.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:54
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There were two men talking one day,
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:54
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There was an old man called Neil McDaid going along the Tullyhullion road one day, and he met a whole crowd of fairies, and each one of them called, "How are you, Neil?"
There is a certain weed in lonely dark places. If you cut your finger, and pull a piece of this weed and chew it and put it on the cut, it will stop bleeding. If you put a cobweb on a cut it will stop bleeding immediately.
If a horse is bleeding a good remedy is to give him some garlic through corn. He will stop bleeding as soon as he has it taken.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:50
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Australia.
In general the land is hilly and boggy but some of the reclaimed land is fertile.
On one hill in the townland there is "a stray" where it is believed an unbaptized baby buried.
There is only one river flowing through the townland.
Lough Belhavel or Lein (which is the older name) is only a quarter of a mile from my house.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:49
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There are many games children play such as Blind Man's Buff. Fox and Goose, Snakes and Ladders, Ludo, Draughts and Card Playing.
The following is a description of how to play Blind Man's Buff:- Five boys stand in a row, and the tallest of them gets four straws of equal length and then a long one, and whoever pulls the long one has to be masked. He tries to catch one of the four and whoever is caught, must put on the mask next.
Before you can play Blind Man's Buff in the real way, you will have to take off your shoes, so that you will make no noise when running.
On a winter's night it is the only game of any sport.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 15:48
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until the hair almost fell off the skin. Whatever hair remained was shaved off with a penknife. There was a pig's bladder inside of the skin.
There was a lace for pulling the dog's skin together. When the two ends of the lace was pulled together it was hard.
Hurling was played in the townland of Beaugh. Only young boys about thirteen or fourteen years used to play. The ball was made of a small piece of wood. It was about the size of a goose egg, but as round as a ball. This ball was called a crag. John James Finley who lived in the townland of Beaugh was the best hurler in former times.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 15:47
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Three feet up as cold as stone two feet down of flesh and bone the mouth of the dead and the mouth of the living come riddle me that and I will give you a shilling.
Going to the forge with a pot.
What is nearest shape yo a horse's shoe?
A mare's shoe.
What makes a pair of shoes?
Two shoes make a pair.
I put my foot between her legs and on her I did jig and with my long and hairy thing I made her whirl a jig.
A spinning wheel.
I have a wee horsey and the
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 15:47
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In the neighbourhood of Killargue there lived a chieftain called Farrel (Fearghail) whose son was bethrothed to the daughter of a chieftain who lived near Mullies.
Before the marriage the bride to be decided to go to through Lough Deng on a pilgrimage which journey brought her by Rosinver where was situated a monastery staffed by very learned men. As she passed the monastery she was seen by a monk who instantly became enamored of her. The monk lay in wait for her return.
She returned by same route and was seduced by the monk at a place still called Cornavannoge where he overtook her. {Cornavannoge is stated to mean "the cairn of the young woman" but probably it's meaning may be "the crime of the young woman" who may have been the seducer.} The story tells us that, her visitor gone, the woman committed suicide. {The reason may have been remorse}.
Becoming uneasy at her long absence her lover set out to enquire of her. He met a monk at Manor Hamilton who said "Desist from thy search for no good will come of it and if you persist you shall meet a man and both of you will die. Ferrell's son however kept his pursuit till he met his prey at Kilmacurril. He killed the monk and then relieved himself of his life. He was buried at Kilmacurril, which means "Grave of Fornell's son", or
"church," which he may have caused to be erected as a reparation.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:44
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faster he goes he swallows the rope.
A spinning wheel.
6/ What goes round and round the house with a harrow after it?
A hen with young chickens
7/ What is full and still holds more.
A pot full of potatoes will hold water
8/ A wee man sits behind the wall. He eats all he gets but never drinks water?
A fire.
9/ It grows in the wood and it sounds in the town and it earns its master many a pound
A fiddle.
10/ He has timber heels and iron
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:43
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There are five or six forts near my house. There is no particular name on any fort. There are two forts in Shureeney one near Castle brinn one in Mr . Fitzgerald's land and one in Ballysheen in James Keogh's land. He cuts hay within the ring of earth each year with a mowing machine.
A ghost was seen near Kilkishen by some of the neighbours of the place. It appeared near a fort called ''The Lissahan.'' It appeared first like a statue then it got bigger and went up into the clouds.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:41
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toes and upon my word he would scar the crows.
A gun.
Hills are full of it and glens are full of it but you could not gather a cupful of it?
Mist.
It is long and it is narrow and it is not very wide and it wears a green selvege at every side?
The road
A round as an apple, as deep as a cup and all the king's army could not pull it up?
A well.
I have a web of cotton, it was never wrought nor spun and it covers all the world but the water and the sun?
The dew on a summer morning.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:38
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and woman too.
The letter m.
Lena had a big one Mabel had a small one boys never have it girls have it once. Laura had it she married Mr. Mason he never had it, neither had she any more, but poor Mrs. Allen had it twice over.
The letter L.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:38
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15 A bunnock of bread and a sheetful of crumbs?
The moon and the stars.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:38
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Once a priest who was reading Mass at Polathreeseen was hinted by the English soldiers. Polathreesheen was a mass rock in Altavra in Killargue parish. In a short time after three infants we buried at this place.
The children's grandfather had a dream some time after the children had been buried. In his dream someone told him that there was fold where his grandchildren were buried. In his dream he also saw his father who was buried at Polathreesheen. His dead father told him that there was a cistín of gold under a big stone at the Mass Rock. He told the living man that there was a big eel guarding the cistín and when the gold rattled a life would be lost as the eel would spring up at the person who would look for the gold. The person also told him that the person who would look for the fold would have to dream of the gold being in the place and he would have to bring a black cock and a pick and nothing else. The Ghost told
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:37
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You teeth.
Where did William Tell stand when he shot the apple off his son's head?
On his feet.
Where was Moses when the light went out.
In the dark.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:36
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Why is a school-boy like a fisherman?
Because one bates his hook and the other hates his book.
Who are the smallest men in the world.?
The Inchmen.
If there are 15 patches on your trousers what time is it?
It is time to get a new pair.
What man must the king take off his hat to?
The barber.
What is it that is all holes and still holds water? A sponge
What is the best thing to put in a cake?
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:35
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There were old schools al in this district about one hundred years ago. there was a hedge school in Tullintowel. It was in an old out-house. The scholars used to write on slates.
The teacher taught the children how to do farm work and house work. The pupils had seats to sit on. The teachers remained a month in every hedge school. They had no blackboard. Children had to write with burned sticks.
There was a hedge school in Tullynacross. It was situated in a field. There was a man named Kelly from Tullinwanna teaching in it. No Irish was taught in this school. They carried three turf to school each day.
The scholars used to write with slate pencils. The pupils used to go to school until they were twenty years. a great number of children attended this school. There was no mistress in it.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 15:28
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in his pocket for some time after and it was as black as your boot.
Written by Sarah Hall, Daumartin till(?)
Information derived from parents, teacher and from fireside competitions.
Riddles and Answers
The following are a list of riddles which I know:-
1. What is the difference in a man riding a bicycle and a dog running behind him?
1 Answer. (One wears trousers and the other pants.)
2. Treat me well and I am everybody, scratch my back and I am nobody?
2. Answer. (A mirror)
3. As round as an apple as flat as a chip
it has four eyes and can't see a bit?
3. Answer. (A button.)
4. Why is six and seven added together like a lame dog hopping on three legs?
4. Answer. (Because six and seven are thirteen, put down three and carry the one, and a lame dog puts down three legs and carries one.)
5. What has hundreds of eyes but cannot see?
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:25
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:21
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Beside the Holy Well there is a birch tree and a white thorn bush growing. It was a priest named Father Joe Meehan that planted them, when the well was consecrated. He was born in Manor, Hamilton, and was a curate for a time in the parish of Killargue. He is dead now.
People drink the water in the well, and when a person has sore feet he washes the affected part in the stream. Once upon a time there was a man named Patrick McGoldrick of Cloonaquin who was blind, and one day he went to the Holy Well. He said prayers at it, and after a few months the man had his eyesight as good as ever. Toothache, Rheumatism, and many other diseases may be cured there.
There were several people cured at this Holy Well a few years ago, but some of them are dead now. There were people cured of deafness, of blindness, and of diseases on the arms and feet.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:16
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used to bring turf in Winter. The school was a mud-wall thatched cabin with stones for seats. Many gave him potatoes, butter and bacon for payment. Some folk paid him for writing letters and making wills.
He had a small piece of land and a house of his own. He was the last teacher in that school and his ancestors were teachers also. Then the National School was built and his was closed.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:13
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form the rock to the Johnstown road, which is always known as the Mournful road, because there is always a mournful song heard along it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:12
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Just at the turn on the Derryvella road there is a small cave. This cave is connected with other caves which run under James Bourke's land, and ends at the rock of Derryvella. These caves are known as "Ger Grant's Caves". Ger Grant lived in Carrig years ago and he was a native of Moyne. He was a real high way man as he used to plunder and rob all he could get from the rich people and hide it in these caves. Afterwards he would give it to the poor. He always left two men to guard the goods. One night they heard a voice telling them to go away. When they went to see who was speaking something ran along before them in the caves, and they chased it until it went out of the cave under the rock of Derryvella. Next day they saw the mark of a big cloven foot on the rock and it is said that it was the devil they chased, and in passing over the rock left the mark of his foot on it. There is a road leading
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:11
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in the fort but lights have been seen in the fields around it. There is a man living beside it and he used to leave tobacco in the fort for the fairies and he thought it was they that took it but it was his workman.
Once a man took a branch of one of the trees in it and put it in the fire but it would not burn.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:08
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There is one fort in my District that I know of. It is in the Townland of Crowenstown. It is not in the view of any other fort or near any other fort. It has a round shape and there is one circle around it. The circle is of big trees and there are more smaller ones in the middle of it. I never heard tell of a entrance hold in the centre of it. There are supposed to be fairies and ghosts and gold hidden in it. There were very very funny noises heard in it like the sound of cats mewing. And the people are half afraid to pass it at night. More times there were supposed to be banshees heard in it. There are the ruins of an old house it. The owners of the land never interfered with any part of it.
Lights have never been seen
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 15:06
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107
Mrs.P.Neylon
Skagh,
Imagh.
Her age is seventy eight years and the people call her Nanse Tierney. She can tell Irish stories and sing both in English and in Irish. There were fourteen houses in Skagh long ago. The commonest name in the townland is Callinan. There are four Callinans in it Pat Callinan, John Callinan, Jackie Callinan and Bat Callinan. The population of the townland is forty eight people.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 15:01
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time at night. This fort is also surrounded by a whitethorn circle and it is believed to be built by the Danes in the early ages. There is a large tunnel leading from this fort to Ballinlough Castle and parts of this tunnel was found recently by men carring out blasting opporations in Ballinlough grounds. This tunnel keeps going on till it reaches the fort in Tiernans field it is said to be unlucky to cut a bush in the fairy fort. No one likes to because it is noticed that stock die or some noticable bad luck turn up. Reilly's fort is not an ancient fort. There are circles on Quinn's Hill where the fairies are dancing and playing all the night long.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:56
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There is a fairy fort in Tiernans field in Croenstown. It is built on top of a hill the round ring is surrounded by a circle of whitethorn bushes growing on large mounds of earth. There are two entrances to this fort for fear of invasion probably it was build by the Danes who one time lived in this country. There is also a fairy fort in Paristown it is partly on the side of the road and the fairy are supposed to be there at the present day it is said if you are in this particular spot at night music and singing can be heard. There is also a gate and a large gap as entrance to this fort it is remarked in this present age if the gap is closed the gate, although locked by the owner will be open at a certain
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:54
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Henry the eight as I relate
Was called the Faith;s Defender
Till from the Pope he did elope.
Then he was called Pretender.
In brutish ways John Walker says.
Poor Harry pleased his fancy.
He took a wife to suit his life
His own dear daughter Nancy.
I know right well he is now in hell
In Pluto's chains patrolling.
He may regret when first he met
The wife of Thomas Boleyn.
Those lustful plans were very bad
As I dictate most truly
But in all such fun they were outdone
By Parson Peter Mooney.
When Mooney reaches the river Stykes
May Mercury forsake him
May Pluto on his lonely throne.
Eternally embrace him
May Cerberus the dog of hell.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:50
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23. When the crows light on the hills.
24. When the rainbow is seen in the evening.
25. When the sun is crossing the wind at two o clock.
26. When the goats and cattle are going in shelter.
27. When goats are eating early in the morning
28. When goats are eating late at night.
29. When donkeys have their backs to the wind.
30. When curlews are crying.
31. When soot is falling.
32. When furniture is creeking.
33. When the hall is damp.
34. When frogs are croaking.
35. When the frogs and clocks are coming into the house.
36. When there is no dew on the grass in the morning.
37. When the sun sets in a bank of clouds.
38. When drying comes too quickly after rain.
39. When a pig carries his bed in his mouth.
40. When there are not many stars in the sky.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:50
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The laws of our Creator.
These deadly bones he dug in scores.
These skulls he frustrated.
In watching o'er it grieved me sore.
The graves he penetrated.
I must confess, I spoke as thus.
Unto this fornicator.
Saying "don't deny but tell me why.
Thou has been such a traitor.
The bones that rot are not forgot
By our sweet heavenly Saviour.
To take them from their silent dust.
Thou are the instigator.
He thus replied "I don't deny.
I am the instigator
Of taking those who lonely lie.
From their soft silent station.
I'll bereave each and every grave.
Without much hesitation.
I will rout each Papist sprout.
From the glebe of sweet Old Leighlin."
" I say you are worse than Luther was.
Who caused the Reformation.
Whose heart indeed did not believe
In Transubstantiation.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:49
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23. When the crow light on the hills.
24. When the rainbow is seen in the evening.
25. When the sun is crossing the wind at two o clock.
26. When the goats and cattle are going in shelter.
27. When goats are eating early in the morning
28. When goats are eating late at night.
29. When donkeys have their backs to the wind.
30. When curlews are crying.
31. When soot is falling.
32. When furniture is creeking.
33. When the hall is damp.
34. When frogs are croaking.
35. When the frogs and clocks are coming into the house.
36. When there is no dew on the grass in the morning.
37. When the sun sets in a bank of clouds.
38. When drying comes too quickly after rain.
39. When a pig carries his bed in his mouth.
40. When there are not many stars in the sky.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:45
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A Local Song 5 -5 - '38
There was a workman named Daly living in this district about fifty years ago, who was always making songs about local happenings. His compositions were always spontaneous. The following is a song he made about a minister who lived in Old Leighlin by the name of Peter Mooney. Mooney dug up the graves of bishops and monks in Old Leighlin cemetery, and put out the clay for manure on his land.
"On the fourth of May as I can say
As I was ambulating
I had resource to start my couse
To the plains of sweet Old Leighlin.
When I beheld this infidel
Of Satan delegated.
To rob the womb of every tomb
Of bishops consecrated
This old reptile I watch a while
To view his bad behaviour,
Who did oppose as I suppose
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:39
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I'll ask you for once and for-ever
To credit me one stone of meal'
'When will you pay me' says Doran
'Next week' says poor Jim 'on my word,
If Thursday be any way favourable,
Peg will go down with the fowl'
Hosey started off with his lumber
The parcel been small and genteel
Who did he meet coming running
The parcel he thought to conceal
"Oh good morning brave Hosey" said Scarff
Your colour is somewhat decayed
Oh! shake hands my dearly-beloved
At last I have met a comrade!
Hosey was getting leg weary
The man he was so very small
"A when be the hokey" said Hosey
"Will I ever reach the lane in grouse Hall!
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:39
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A stitch in time saves nine.
Cows in Kerry wear long horns.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
Time and tide wait for no man.
An excuse is nearer to a woman than her apron.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
You cannot knock an old dog off his trot.
Better late than never.
It is easier to fall than to rise.
Going to a goat's house for wool.
Half a loaf is better than no bread.
Many hands make light work.
The early bird catches the worm.
It is a long road that has not a turn.
The deeper the well the better the water.
However long the day is the night will come.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:38
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3. When you see a rainbow in the morning it is a sign of bad weather.
4. When the wind is comming from the north it is a sign of snow.
5. When the wind is coming from the East it is a sign of cold weather.
6. When the wind is from the south it is the sign of bad weather.
7. When the birds are flying low.
8. When the wild geese are calling.
9. When the birds are not singing very much it is the sign of rain.
10. When the cat has her back to the fire.
11. When the dogs are eating grass.
12. When the cattle are eating leaves.
13. When the animals are far up on the hill.
14. When the goats are up on the hills.
15. When the cats are scraping wood
16. When it is dark over Devlin.
17. When the hills are blue.
18. When the is a blue blaze in the fire.
19. When the smoke goes up the chimney straight it is a sign of rain.
20. When the sun is watery.
21. When the moon is not shining brightly.
22. When the stars are running in the sky.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:36
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3. When you see a rainbow in the it is a sign of bad weather.
4. When the wind is comming from the north it is a sign of snow.
5. When the wind is coming from the East it is a sign of cold weather.
6. When the wind is from the south it is the sign of bad weather.
7. When the birds are flying low.
8. When the wild geese are calling.
9. When the birds are not singing very much it is the sign of rain.
10. When the cat has her back to the fire.
11. When the dogs are eating grass.
12. When the cattle are eating leaves.
13. When the animals are far up on the hill.
14. When the goats are up on the hills.
15. When the cats are scraping wood
16. When it is dark over Devlin.
17. When the hills are blue.
18. When the is a blue blaze in the fire.
19. When the smoke goes up the chimney straight it is a sign of rain.
20. When the sun is watery.
21. When the moon is not shining brightly.
22. When the stars are running in the sky.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:35
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A Local Song 4 - 5 - '38
This song was composed by William Bambrick. He lives in Bawntree. It is about Jim Hosey and it was made up during the big snow when Hosey's provisions ran short and he had no money to but any more. So he went down to Johnny Doran, a shopkeeper in Old Leighton to give him a stone of meal on credit. The following is the song.
Hosey went down to Old Leighton
In the height of his grief and his woe.
You'd think it was death upon wislen
And he to the hips in the snow.
When he attired at the villafe
The signboard he chanced for to spy.
He went over and met Johnny Doran.
Poor Hosey he began for to cry.
"What is your trouble" says Doran.
"Come tell it to me now in haste
You look like a man that is dying.
I'll send Jimmy Walshe for the priest"
"O! no then," replied my brave Hosey
"And as your a substantial man
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:28
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when he is being confirmed takes the name of Lazerian. His feat is celebrated on the eighteenth of April. There is a holy well dedicated to him and there is a tradition that anyone who had sworn falsely and drinks out of this well will have his mouth turned crooked.
The eighteenth of April is the Saint's patron day. So huge crowds assemble at the well on that day. The local clergy are there and recite the rosary. Saint Lazerian died in the year 639.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:26
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The Patron Saint of the Diocese
13 - 4 0 '38
Saint Lazerian is the patron saint of this diocese. he lived in Old Leighlin and founded a monastery there. He spent the early years of his life in Scotland. It is said that he was born towards the end of the sixth century. he is said to have been of royal decent, his father, Cairral, belonging to a princely family of Ulidia, in Ulster and his mother, Gemma, being a daughter of Aidon King of British Scots. he built a school in which there were 1,300 monks at one time. When St. Lazerian came first to Old Leighlin he could get no - place to build his church only where there was a pond. So he blessed three stones and threw them into it and the water vanished and he built his church there. It was made of wood. It was burnt down in the thirteenth century. Saint Lazerian was the first bishop of this diocese. Every boy in this parish
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:18
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Old Schools 6 -5 - '38
The schools in olden times were much different from those nowadays. During the penal laws there were no schools for catholics in Ireland but teachers used to go around teaching anyone who wished to learn. At that time some people wer'nt able to write their names. There was a hedge school in Bawnree. The teacher's name was Mr Hanlan. The young scholars used to go to school in the day and the bigger scholars used to go in the night and bring a sod of turf or candle with them. There were only a few books in the school that belonged to the master. The masters used to get their keep for their teaching. When my father was going to school the master's name was Master McCabe. He taught three subjects - writing, reading and arithmetic. He only got £18 a year. He used to teach night-school at a farmer's house. Those who went to night-school never had been at any other school. They used to make a
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:14
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small subscription every night.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:14
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Old Schools 8 - 5 - '38
Poor scholars, as they were called used to teach in olden times in a vacant house in many districts. There was one named Henry who taught in a house in Mile Bush lane. He used to get some of the scholars to bring turf an others to bring potatoes. When class was over they used to roast the potatoes and eat them. He would say we will be learning roasting and eating. These poor scholars were very good teachers at reading, writing, spelling and Arithmetic. They used to go home with different pupils every night and got their support in this way. It was very hard for them to knock out an existence. The pupils were very anxious to learn. Most of them were up to eighteen years of age.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:11
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:10
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eight or the Virgin Queen to pray for him. It is said that his ghost drives in at the black gates in Shankill in a coach every night.
The next heir was a man by the name of Tolar who took the name of Tolar Alyward. He was a real gentleman. He never had an eviction. His son lives in Shankill at the present time. During the war when tillage was compulsary he gave amount of his land to his tenants for nothing but he put a big rent on it. Still the people were glad to get it as it was good.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:07
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The Local Landlord 28 - 3 - '38
Mr Alyward was the landlord of our farm. The family had been settled for about one hundred and ninety years in the district. He was a cruel landlord. There were several small farms on his estate. He evicted the tenants and planted all the land with trees. He used to take land from people in the country because they did not pay their dues and gave it to others who paid him more for it. He used to make his tenants go help with his work in the Spring and harvest. They were afraid of eviction if they did not. Tithes were collected by the police and military both in kind and money. They is a story told that Alyward lived a bad life and when he was dying that he left some of his estate to the Protestant church estate as he wanted Henry the
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 14:00
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Is giorra cabhair Dé na an doras

Nuair a bhíonn's duine i gcruaidh-chás, agus nach bhfuil fhios aige cad is fearr a dhéanamh, deirtear
"Is giorra cabhair Dé ná an doras"

"Ceathrar cailleach gan a bheith manntach,
Ceathrar franncach gan a bheith buidhe,
Ceathrar Gréasaidhe gan a bheith bréaghach,
Sin dáréág nach bhfuil sa tír."

Fuair mé an eolas seo ó mo mháthair
Sorcha Ní Shuilleabháin
Sgoil Cluain-an-Bhrúnaigh
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:59
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stored house covered with felt. There is a pond at the back driving the turbine which drives the machinery and the dynamo for the lights.
They are manufactures of turbines, gates, ventilators, they are also motor mechanics. There is a lathe, nine tons weight and a spring hammer all driven by the turbine in this forge.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:55
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Signs of Bad Weather.
I. From the sun.
1. When the sun rises red in the morning
2. When there are streaks from the sun.
3. When the sun is weak and watery looking.
4. When the sun goes down pale in the evening.
5. When the sun is covered with clouds.
6. When the sun is up too early in the morning.
II From the moon.
1. When there is a circle round the moon.
2. When the moon doesnt come out at all.
III Stars
1. When you see the stars are falling.
2. When you see them twinkling.
3. When they are dull.
IIII. Clouds
1. When you see the clouds black.
2. When the clouds are grey
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:52
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Sgoileanna Protastunacha.
Fuair mé an eolas seo ó mháthair.
Sorcha Ní Shúilleabháin,
Sgoil Cluain-an-Bhrúnaigh
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:51
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Fadó bhí sgoileanna scairte ag na daoine sul ar cuireadh na Sgoileanna Náisiúnta ar bun sa mbliadhain 1831. Bhí dhá ceann sa gceanntar seo agus ceann eile i gCorr-na-Móna. Do bhí máighistirí san áit seo ag múineadh ceann amháin darb ainm Búrca agus ceann eile Coirbín. Taobh istigh a bhíodh na páiste ag foghluim. Ó chondae na Gaillimhe a bhí na muinteóirí. Bhíodh na muinteóirí ag cur fútha i dteach feilméara in aice na sgoile. Annsin thuibhradh gach sgoláire trí pighne don maighistir chun iad a mhúineadh.
Do múintí Áirmh, léighteoireachta, sgríobhneóireacht agus beagán Tír-Eolas ins na sgoileanna úd. Bhí Gaedhilg ag na muinteóirí agus is ionnta amháin a múintí Gaedhilg. Bhíodh filí ag múineadh ionnta anois agus arís. Bhí grádh ag na múinteóirí don Gaedhilg agus cultuír na h-Éireann. Bhíodh leabhair ag na páistibh, leabhar Gaedhilge, leabhar Tír-Eolais agus leabhar Áirimh.
Bhíodh na páistibh ag sgríobhadh ar slinnte agus píosa cailce acu. Bhíodh cúpla binnse acu agus shuidhidís ortha. Suidheadh an maighistir ar stól dó féin. Thugadh na máighistírí trí seachtmhaine de na sgoláirí sa Samhradh, seachtmhain fa Nodhlag, agus seachtmhain fá Cháisg mar laethannta saoire.
Bhí cuid de na sgoláirí sin go han mhaith, agus bhí meas ar óg agus aosta ortha. San am sin ní raibh cead aon sgoile a chur ar bun do Caitilicigh. Bhí an cion ag na Gaedhil ar léighinn, acht mar sin féin níor mhaith leo na sgoláirí a bheith ag dul chuig na
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:51
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When potatoes are being sown the land is first top-dressed. If the farmyard manure is very plentiful it is spread over the land as top-dressing. But very often the farmyard manure is not plentiful enough for that purpose and then it is top dressed with clay. When this is done the fences around the field are cleaned and
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:45
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daughter is your daughter for ever.
It is lonely to be empty.
Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
New brooms sweep clean.
A closed mouth makes a wise head.
The truth never choked a man.
Hunger is good sauce.
A borrowed horse has hard hoofs.
When wine is in wit is out.
You can't take feathers of a frog.
Every cat after its kind.
The truth is often bitter.
You can't whistle and chew meal at the same time.
Praise youth and it will come,
Well begun is half done.
A friend's eye is a good mirror
The mills of God grind slowly but they grind exceeding small.
Better late than never.
Nearest the heart nearest the mouth.
Health is better than wealth
Still waters run deep.
18th July 1938.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:41
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Far away fields are green.
Fine feathers make fine birds.
It never rains but it pours.
Birds of a feather flock together.
Least said is soonest mended.
Empty vessels make most sound.
An empty sack cannot stand.
Work is better than talk.
When it is raining porridge the beggars have no spoons.
It is a long lane that has no turn.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
Live horse and you'll get grass.
It is not the hen that cackles most that lays the biggest eggs.
Do as you would be done by.
If the cap gits you wear it.
They who have much get more.
Many are called but few are chosen
Time and tide wait for no man.
Time is a good story teller.
It is a poor priest that has no curate.
Many a man's mouth broke his nose.
Your son is your son till he marries, your
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:40
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awaiting decision
County of Meath Parish of Ardcath Barony of Duleek
Proprieters 1641 Ardcath Area A.R.P. To whom distributed
Rog E ffinglas Ardath 40-- Thos Greydon.
Thos. Dillion 15 - Thos Dillion
Church land.
Thos. Conge. Irishtown 64:3:12 John Greydon
{Conran}
Thos. Conem. Breinsparke 62:2:0 John Whaley
............................... Robert Langfield
...................Porterstown John Graydon
................Corstown. 40- John Whaley Robert Langfield
Lord Gormanstown
Xpher Golding Cloghan 205-- Thos West. Lord G.
Thos. Dillion " "" 56.2.6 and Sir Sudley Merven
Mrs Edgeworth. (P) " 11 Mrs Edgeworth
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:36
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Sul ar cuireadh na scoileanna náisiúnta ar bun sa mbliadhan 1832 ní raibh aon scoil ann, acht scoileanna scairte, gearr scoileanna, agus na scoileanna chois chlaidhe. Do théigheadh múinteóir thart ó theach go teach dhá oidhche san t-seachtmhain. Théigheadh na daoine isteach i dteach agus do bhíodh siad ag foghluim Béarla, gramadach, agus uimhriocht. Do bhíodh siad ag scríobhadh le píosa adhmaid dóighte ar clár adhmaid bán. Ní raibh pioin-luaidhe ann ar chor ar bith san am sin. Scolairí bochta a bhíodh ann.
Annsin do tháinig na scoileanna protasúnachta. Do bhíodh múinteóir ionnta. Do thaghadh daoine isteach agus do bhíodh siad ag foghluim ó'n Bhiobla protasúnachta, agus do bhíodh siad ag foghluim Béarla, Gramadach, tír-
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:31
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Seo cuid de na h-ainmneacha do bhí ar na scoileanna do bhí fadó sul ar cuireadh scoileanna Náisiúnta ar bun. Scoileanna Eigse, Scoileanna Scairte, agus Gearr Scoileanna. Do bhí múinteóir ag muineadh i sóiléir síos fán altóir sa séipéil. Bhí doras ar an dtaobh amuigh chun dul isteach. Tá sé le feiceál fós ar áit a raibh sé. Inghean Carbat a bhí ag múineadh annsin.
Seo cuid des na h-áite mar a raibh scoil fadó. Bhí scoil i Tráigh Árd i bhFarabhán agus bhí scoil eile mar a bhfuil an séipéil anois. Séan na Scoile ab ainm do'n múinteóir a bhí i dTráigh Árd agus Pádraigh Seóighe a bhí ag múineadh sa séipéil. Lá amháín tháinig an cigire agus bhí sé amuigh ar Oilean Bhobaí (?) ag fiadhach. D'iarr an chigire ar na páisdí cá raibh sé agus dubhradar leis go raibh duine ag bádhadh agus go ndeacha sé amach chun é a shabháil. Leige saor é.
So bhíodh múineadh ar siubhal i dtighthibh na bhFeirmeóirí fadó. Is amuigh fan aer a bhíodh siad ag múineadhan lá bréagh. Ní
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:25
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Ins an tsean-am bhí chaoirigh ag na daoine agus fuair siad an olann nuair a ghearr siad í ó na coairigh. Annsin thug siad an olann chuig an fhigeadóir agus rinne seisean éadaigh dí. Rinne na daoine a gcuid stocaí de'n olainn agus rinne siad go maith iad. Rinne na cailiní agus na mná na stocaí agus na rudaí a bhí a dith ortha ar feadg an Geimhridh agus nuair a bhí na stocaí deantar [?] acu bhí siad bréagh teith.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:22
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Bhí túirní in ghach an teach san sean am. Níl mórán ann anois. Sníomh na mna an olann leis an túirní. Rinne siad snath dí. Baintear an olann de na chaoirigh san tSamhraidh agus nightear í. Cuireadh an snath chuig an figheadóir i bGleann. Bhárr annsin. Rinne sé éadach dí. Bhí an téadach an teith agus tugtar báinín air. Rinne na daoine cótaí agus bríste leis annsin agus bhí siad bréag teith.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:17
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they think it is under a big rock which is too big to move.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:17
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the town and earns his master many a pound. A Fiddle.
If your mother's sister isn't your aunt, what relation is she to you. Your mother.
What has twenty legs and can't stand.
Ten pains of trousers.
Spell a broken down hedge in three letters. Gap.
What has a tongue and can't talk.
Your boot.
20th June 1938
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:16
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out again nothing remains in the well but a little drop of fresh water and there is no spring in the well. He also told me that if any one had a sore head and went to the well and drank a little drop of the water the sore head would go away.
I also heard that there is a well somewhere below Smiths of Killy Garvan. I also heard that if anyone was leaving his home and went to that well and washed his hands in it he would not be sorry when leaving his own home.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:15
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As round as an apple as plump as a ball, can climb the church over steeple and all.
The sun.
What is it that always walks with it's head down.
A nail in a boot.
What goes away between two woods and comes back between two waters.
A man carrying pails of water.
If you fell from Milltown chimney what would you fall against. Your will.
What goes away above the ground and returns under it. A man with sods on his head.
Middy Noddy round body, three feet and a wooden hat. A pot.
What is full and holds more.
A pot full of potatoes.
One half dead, the other half living and a tail wagging.
A dog with his head in a pot.
What has hands and no fingers.
A clock.
Why is the letter T like an island.
Because it is in the middle of water.
Why is the letter k like a tail.
Because it is at the end of pork.
What is made of wood, sounds in
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:10
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black came down and white stayed still.
An egg laid by a black hen on the top of a hill.
What is the most useful thing in the house and the least thought of.
The dish cloth.
What does from my house to your house and leaves a white rag on every bush.
Snow.
What would you put in a barrel to make it lighter. Holes.
As round as a O and as flat as a pan one side a woman an the other a man.
A penny.
What has twelve wings and cannot fly.
A shilling.
Why does the millar wear a white cap.
To keep his head warm.
What man in the world wears the biggest hat.
The man with the biggest head.
If you got up on a donkey's back where would you get down from. A goose
If all Ireland was flooded which county would float: Cork.
What goes round the house and a harrow after it: a hen with a flock of chickens
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:07
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I heard the people talking about holy wells and people that were cured at the wells from various diseases. I heard the people saying that there is a holy well on Deeney's lane in Inniscille. It is a very small well with a little drop of water in it. And James MacGarvey of Killycolman was cured of warts at it.
My brother told me about a small well that is down in the rocks below Anney. There is some thing wonderful about that well. The tide comes in over it every day and when it goes
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 13:04
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2. "Proverbs"
A tired as a dog.
As smart as a hare.
As thin as a herring.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:04
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A strip of red, a strip of green, the king couldn't guess, neither could the queen, they sent for wise men out of the east, he said it had horns, but it was not a best, what was it. A twig of holly.
What is always behind time?
The back of a clock.
Patch upon patch without any stiches?
A cabbage head.
What goes round the wood and round the wood and never goes into it.
The bark of a tree.
Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat, you can guess for ever but you can't guess that. A pipe.
Spell black bird in four letters. Crow
Spell back water in three letters. Ink.
Spell the red rogue of the world in three letters. Fox
What goes from house to house and sleeps outside at night. The road.
What has one eye and cannot see.
A needle.
What has teeth and cannot eat.
A comb.
Black and white when up the hill
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:04
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I have a mare with an iron throat the faster she goes she swallows the rope.
A spinning wheel.
What cap never comes off to a lady?
A night cap
What foot has no legs?
The foot of a mountain.
What face never laughs? Clock
As I was going to St Ives I met a man with seven wives every wife had seven sacks every sack has seven cats and every cat had seven kittens. How many were going to St Ives?
One.
I am a little paper house with paper folk inside me and on my little paper wall the Kings head hangs out side me.
An envelope.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 13:03
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254
It is difficult to cut wool off a goat.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.
Don't be hard and don't be soft.
The world would not make a race -horse of an ass.
Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to -day.
One to-day is worth two to-morrow.
the longer you live the more you know.
Dont be making "Seánín ó Shea" of yourself.
A good beginning is half the work.
Milk is better than tea.
Cows over the sea have long horns.
Don't look at all you see.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 13:00
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7. A long thin body, a tiny little head
I never am hungry so I never am fed.
A pin.
8. A long thin body a sharp little nose the longer it lives the shorter it grows.
A pencil.
9. What is it that grows in the wood and sounds in the town and earns its master many a pound?
A fiddle.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:56
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Bhí maighdean mara shíos ins an fharrage uair amháin. Chonnaic a lán daoine í. Bhí gruag fhada uirtí. Bhí sí go deas. Lá amháin bhí fear shios ag an faifrrge agus bhí sé af cur amach i (bád) bháud. Ní rabh sé ibfad amuith nuair a cualaid sé an maighdean mara ag caoine [?] d'amarc sé thart ach ni rabh a dhath lé fheiceail aige. Bhí fear leis agus d'iar se air (gan) an bhád a chur isteach. Níor chuir sé isteach í.
D'eirigh an stóirm agus da mbeadh an bhádh bomaite eile ag teacht isteach bhéad iad uilig báidh.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 12:56
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251.
As deep as the sea.
As old as Mathusalem's cat.
As many colours as the rainbow.
As dark as pitch.
As big as "Bumbo" Green.
As heavy as lead.
As funny as "Sweet Vale ".
As long as Jim Scanlan.
As good to be out of the world as out of fashion.
As slippery as an eel's waistcoat.
As obstinate as a mule.
As nice as pie.
As red as a fox.
As tight as twopence.
As much cheek as old nick.
As cross as a tinker.
As white as milk.
As much gab as the gab-sheep.
As bright as day.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
A stitch in time saves nine.
A green Christmas makes a fat church-yard.
The early bird catches the early worm.
Lie with the lamb and rise with the bird.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 12:44
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250
As blind as a bat.
As dead as a maggot.
As tender as a chicken .
As long as a wet week.
As grey as a badger.
As straight as a whip.
As crooked as a ram's horn.
As long as a late breakfast.
As poor as a church- mouse.
As heavy as a log.
As cross as a cat.
As round as a hoop.
As long as a ha'p'orth of twine.
As sour as a crab.
As old as a bush.
As cracked as a goat.
As holy as a strainer .
As lively as a bee.
As clean as a new pin.
As yellow as a soverign.
As round as a ball.
As cold as ice.
As high as Mount Callan.
As soft as putty.
As green as grass.
As blue as indigo.
As brown as a berry.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:42
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Stephen Furlong’s father was also a blacksmith and spent his life at Ballyvaldon Cross Roads.
I was able to procure some béaloideas from him under the following
Wooden Ploughs: He says these were quite common in his youth. But he said the mould-board sole-plate sock and coulter were iron.
The sock had to be fitted to each particular plough. It was bought in the rough so to speak then forged and fitted on an iron model and finally on the wooden plough.
Spades: He showed me an old model of a home made potato-spade. This had a wide bos with a shank containing a hole for a nail to be driven through on the handle or “tree”.
[Drawing]
Further an iron ring took in this shank and the spade handle and was often wedged like a mounted scythe blade.
Then there was the “planting spade”,
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:40
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he calls this also a bos spade. The blade or bos was much longer and narrower than the potato digging spade above mentioned and was deeply flanged at the top to 'let in' the spade tree and a heavy wooden wedge or 'step'.
Nails: Mr Furlong made nails occasionally when a young man. He remembers quite well he says being in "Larry the Nailer's" work shop in Blackwater once when Larry was engaged turning out 'brads'. He had a fire of colum with two iron rods of required section being reddened.
When one rod was at required heat he took it out hammered the point then cut the required length by judgment leaving a scanán not to break connection completely with the bar. He then thrust the nail material into a tapered hole in a flat bar of steel snapped off at the mark and drew four hammer blows to form the head - these blows were of course at even distance round the section. Then he inverted the steel bar and tapped it smartly to release the nail from the hole and let it fall into a tin mug beside the anvil.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:37
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was raised to the Dignity of Dean and in 1893 was promoted to St Patricks Cork. In 1896 he was Domestic Prelate to the Pope. He always had public processions in the grounds on the Feast of Corpus Cristi: Provision of Stations of Cross : Vespers etc. When he died at the age of 83 he had spent 60 years in the priesthood.
Very Rev' JCanon Shinkwin Ovens succeed him in 1893 and was P.P. in Bandon until 1918. He got the schools in Gallows Hill built the carriage way from New Road to the Church constructed. On the occasion of his silver jubilee the parishioners desired to make him ( Some) some gift he gratefuly declined it. but suggested that they would do something for the Church. They did so by providing the white marble altar. He had the cemetery enlarged in 1914.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:35
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A Trotting Match from Clogherstown to Ashbourne was held on Sunday 19th 1919.
Mr Patrick v Mc Grane.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:30
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stands as the same was the estate of the late Sir Wm. Dillon to whom he is heir at law and has served a notice on Mr Leonard stating that if he will not give him quiet possession of said ground he will in six months from the date therein take such steps as the law allows for the recovery thereof.
Cousel says George Dillon cannot recover possession nor can he build a gallery.
Ardcath present Parish Church was opened 7th June 1863.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:27
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assistants out of it and locked the door thereof and put the Key in his pocket and went to breakfast at a neighbour's hose in the village.
The said John Leonard on his returning home after breakfast passed by the said chapel and saw one of the doors thereof open and saw therein the said Gerald Dillon and the carpenter at work under his direction and the said John Leonard having inquired by what means they entered the chapel was told by the carpenter that the bottom light of one of ths sashes had been broached and that he was put in through the window and had opened one of the doors which was only closed by a bolt in the inside
Rev Leonard then desired the said Gerald Dillon to quite the chapel which he refused to do and Rev Leonard told Mr Dillon that he would pull down as fast as they would build notwithstanding which did by desire of Gerald Dillon proceed in erecting the Gallery.
On the evening of the said day the said John Leonard brought four or five men to the chapel and pulled down some rafters that were nailed up and had them and the other timber and boards which had been brought there by the desire of Mr Dillon removed out of the chapel and laid in the street of Ardcath where they remained til lthe following evening, when Mr Dillon had them brought to Manningstown
The said G. Dillon now threatens that he will take possession fo the ground on which the old chapel
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 12:25
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A Distinguished Pastor
Towards the latter end of the 19th century a very distinguished man occupied the pastorate of Bandon.He was Very Rev' Canon Denis Mc Sweeney who had been P.P. of Carrigaline
( nephew of Very Rev' Dan mSweeney previous P.P. of Bandon)
During his time in Carrigaline he was instrumental in getting the Church of St. Brigid built there and he was interred in it when he passed away Feb 1906. It was he who in 1883 - 18184 laid out the beautiful approach to St. Patrick's R.C. including the embrand gates, the opening and blessing of which took place in honour of the Immaculate Conception
Dec 14 1884. The ceremony was performed by Dr Delaney assisted by his coadjutor , Bishop Dr O Callaghan. The magnificent statue of the B. Virgin was also was also blessed on this occasion.
Canon mSweeney ( afterwarst Dean ) did not not rest there. He provided the new cemetery attached to the Church in which , it is worthy of note, the first interment was that of Mr Andrew Hickey of South Main St. He also got walls and gates for Kilbrogan and Ballymodan cemetries and was responsible for the building of Crossmahon School. In april, 1890,
Canon mSwiney
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:24
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"Tá mé ag dul go Corcaig" ars' an fear ó Gleann Beithe agus táim tuirseach ó bheith ag siubal." Bheadh i n-éinfeacht leat" arsan stróinséar mar tá mé ag dul go Corcaig." Coimeád síad i n-éinfheacht. Ní rabhadar ró fhada i n-éinfheacht nuair dubhairt an stróinséar leis an bhfear eile amhrán a rádh chun an bhóthar do dhéanmah gairid. "Níl aon amhrán agam" arsan fear ó Gleann Beithe. "Cuirfhidh mé geall leat" arsan stróinséar "go mbeidh amhrán déanta agam sar a mbeimís i gCorcaig." Coimeád síad i n-éinfheacht arís. Chonnacadar a lán caorach istig i bpáirc agus lomra bliana ortha. Dubhairt an fear ó Ghleann Beithe leis an stróinséar "Nách bréagh an lomra atá ar na caoirigh." "Is bréagh" arsan stróinséar. Tar-éis tamall eile chonnacdar bean 'na seasamh ag a doras féin. Dubhairt an fear ó Ghleann Beithe leis "Nách breágh an ceann gruaige atá ar an bhean sin." Is breágh" arsan an stróinséar. Níor bhfada go
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:23
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Tá mé ag dul go Corcaig" ars' an fear ó Gleann Beithe agus táim tuirseach ó bheith ag siubal." Bheadh i n-éinfeacht leat" arsan stróinséar mar tá mé ag dul go Corcaig." Coimeád síad i n-éinfheacht. Ní rabhadar ró fhada i n-éinfheacht nuair dubhairt an stróinséar leis an bhfear eile amhrán a rádh chun an bhóthar do dhéanmah gairid. "Níl aon amhrán agam" arsan fear ó Gleann Beithe. "Cuirfhidh mé geall leat" arsan stróinséar "go mbeidh amhrán déanta agam sar a mbeimís i gCorcaig." Coimeád síad i n-éinfheacht arís. Chonnacadar a lán caorach istig i bpáirc agus lomra bliana ortha. Dubhairt an fear ó Ghleann Beithe leis an stróinséar "Nách bréagh an lomra atá ar na caoirigh." "Is bréagh" arsan stróinséar. Tar-éis tamall eile chonnacdar bean 'na seasamh ag a doras féin. Dubhairt an fear ó Ghleann Beithe leis "Nách breágh an ceann gruaige atá ar an bhean sin." Is breágh" arsan an stróinséar. Níor bhfada go
ordinary member (history)
2020-05-28 12:19
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The care of our farm animals 20.12.1932
There are many farms in this vicinity. The majority of the land is divided into large farms. Cows are kept in those farms and as they grow old, they receive names from the owner so as to know one from the other. These names are Snowball, Black Polly, Holestine and Headford.
When driving in the cows, we say "how", "how" and when calling the calves we say "suc", "suc". The cow shed is divided into several portions which are called stawls. A short rope is fastened to the post and the cows are tied by the horns. These tyings are not home made. The various names of tyings are stawls, and ropes, and chains. The horse is an animal that needs care. He has to get some oats twice a day when he is working and has to be taken to water.
His stable is clean and comfortable. The horse must be taken to the forge to be shod and in the winter time he is clipped when he is put in. In olden times everyone were making butter and they had famous horses to cart it to Limerick and Cork.
When calling the
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:14
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to render the chapel more roomy and convenient for the other parishoners and as it was supposed and intended said intended gallery could with their families accommodate; did propose to pay one guinea each or more if necessary for the purpose of erecting said gallery.
On Sunday 5th April 1807 the said Mr Arnold requested that such of the persons who had proposed to subscribe for the erecting of the gallery and had not paid their subscriptions would no longer defer doing so as it was time to begin to erect it and the said Gerald Dillon who happened to be in the Church on that day and who [?] contributed 6d towards building said Chapel in said addition thereto said he would erect a gallery in the new addition.
Whereupon the said Mr Arnold said he should not be permitted to do so as Gerald Dillon thereupon replied that he would build a wall to separate the additon which was not built upion his estate from the Old chapel which he alleges stands upon estate - and would convert the old part into an ale house.
Nowithstanding that said Gerald Dillon was so informed that he would not be permitted to erect a gallery in said addition, he did about 8 oclock of the 11th April [?] send a carpenter and two men to attend him to the said chapel in order to proceed to erect a gallery therein and the Rev John Leonard having been informed thereof went to the said Chapel and turned the carpenter and his
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:13
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signs of a storm are when the cattle lie under the trees for shelter, when the dog will not go out, and when the goat's are inclined to come down from the hills. Other signs of fine weather are - a frog going up the hills,: a frog over the river at night, - a starry night - when the spiders creep around the floor.
Bad weather is indicated by the following signs - When the birds come near the door - when the road looks yellow - If a frog passes you on the road - when the rivers look brown. - If your corns pain you. When the cat scrapes wood. When the seagulls fly inland. When the sheep gather together. When the fowl pick themselves. To hear the curlew crying - A halo around the moon.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:06
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cricket's singing and wild geese flying in the sky are indicators of bad weather. When a goat comes into the farmyard or when sheep come down to the valleys it is a sign of rain.
When sheep go up to the top of the hill, when swallows fly high it is a sign of fine weather. The wind at certain points is a useful weather omen. The north wind is a sign of rain. Wind from Summerhill direction also indicates rain.
When the distant hills apparently look near rain usually follows. Smoke going up straight indicates fine weather, and when it comes down the chimney it is a sign of fine weather.
When the crows build their nests up very high it is the sign of a dry summer. Cattle grazing in the morning denotes fine weather. When the birds stay low in the trees it is a sign of a storm. Other
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:00
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There are many beliefs in this country with regard to the weather. The following are the commonest local beliefs. Different appearances of the sky are noted as fateful indicators of the coming weather. There is a rhyme regarding the rainbow which says:-
"A rainbow in the morning is a shepherd's warning,
A rainbow in the night is a shepherd's delight."
A circle around the moon indicates bad weather. When the stars are very numerous it is a sign of frost.
Birds, animals and insects are also useful weather prophets. Swallows, flying low, a cat sitting with his back to the fire, a dog eating grass are also signs of bad weather. Swarms of midges in the evening,
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 12:00
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Long ago the old floors were made of clay. In some houses there are half doors but they are not very common in the district.
Turf was usually used the fire but sometimes people burned sods and shows.
At night rush candles, resin candles, and tallow candles were burned.
Candles were sometimes made in peoples one home they would melt down fat and cut the rushes into lengths and lay them in the fat. When they would be well coated with the fat, then they were lift over to cool and harden. Then there was a little square bit of wood and the rush was set in the middle of the wood.
14:12:1937
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:57
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Long ago houses were not anything like what they are now. They were about one storey high and thatched they were thatched with flax, straw or rushes.
People got some of the things to thatch with in a bog, but when they were thatching with straw or flax they got that thatch in the field.
Some of the houses long ago had a bed in the kitchen and it was called a settle-bed.
In the (bed) day time it was folded up to make a seat and at night opened out to make a bed. It was put in a corner against the back wall of the kitchen.
Usually the fire was placed against the gable wall, it was hardly ever against a wall or in a corner.
Some people had no chimney in their houses and all they had was a bucket without a bottom sat on it.
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 11:54
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5 " Weeds and Plants".
The following plants are harmful to crops such as nettles, thistles,the crowfoot,the scutch grass,and a few others.They make the land poor and dirty and they smother the crops.The crowfoot is the only weed that grows in good land.I do not know any story about weeds that cure diseases,neither do I know any story explaining the shape of the leaves or their colour,or the shape of roots.There are certain weeds which are used as food such as the leaves of turnips and water cress.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:53
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he calls this also a bos spade. The blade or bos was much longer and narrower than the potato digging spade above mentioned and was deeply flanged at the top to 'let in' the spade tree and a heavy wooden wedge or 'step'.
Nails: Mr Furlong made nails occasionally when a young man. He remembers quite well he says being in "Larry the Nailer's" work shop in Blackwater once when Larry was engaged turning out 'brads'. He had a fire of colum[?] with two son[?] rods of required section being reddened.
When one rod was at required heat he took it out hammered the point then cut the required length by judgment leaving a scanán [?] not to break connection completely with the bar. He then thrust the nail material into a tapered hole in a flat bar o snapped steel off at the mark and drew four hammer blows to form the head - these blows were of course at even distance round the section. Then he mounted[?] the steel bar and tapped it smartly to release the nail from the hole and let it fall into a tin mug beside the anvil.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:52
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The droppings of geese cure liver trouble
A poultice of buttermilk porridge will cure inflamation
It is unlucky to turn back on a journey for something you have forgotten.
When an apple tree blooms twice in the one year it is the sign of a death or trouble in the family
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:49
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as rent or anything whatever in lieu of rent was ever paid for said ground not was any ever claimed for same by the said Wm. Dillon whose estate said ground had been.
The said Sir Wm. died in 1802 unmarried and without issue leaving Gerald Dillon and Richard Dillon who are brothers his cousins germaine and said Gerald clained to be entitled to the estates whereof said Wm. Dillon died deceased and possessed as heirs at law of said William and said Richard Dillon claimed to be entitled thereto under a will by him alleged by him to have been duly made and published by the said Sir Wm. Dillon, and said claims were afterwards as is supposed [?] by compromise and said Gerald Dillon is now in possession of lands of Manningstown and of the other estates thereof said Sir Wm. Dillon died.
On front of the said Chapel is the street of the Village of Ardcath and the rear ?? walk joins or is built in the Church grounds of said Church and the R. C. parishoners have lately with the consent of the Minister and Protestant parishoners in said Parish built an addition to the said chapel in the Churchyard.
Nowithstanding the said addition the Chapel is still too small for the congregation who restort [?] and in the month of February last (1807) the said Nicholas Arnold did at the request of the said John Leonard recommend it to 15 or 16 of the parishoners who had contributed most money towards building the said addition to erect a gallery therein at their own expense and for the use of their families in order
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:46
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In olden times the poeple would be full grown when they would start to wear boots. It was the costum that when May-day would come all the children would go barefoot in the Summer.
The shoes are only repaired in this locality. There are two shoemakers in this district. This was a tradition in the families, perhaps from their grandfather. There are people in this district who always fix their own boots.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:44
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1. Why does a dog lick a pot.
2. Because he can't pick it.
1. Headed like a thimble tailed like a rat you can guess for ever but can never guess that.
2. A pipe.
1. Why does the water flow down the hill?
2. Because it can't flow up it.
1. What goes through the water and through the water and never toughes it.
2. An egg in a duck.
1. Why does a cow roar over a hill.
2. Because she can't roar through it.
1. Chip, Chip, Cherry, all the men in derry could not clime Chip, Chip, Cherry.
2. The smoke.
1. What goes from house to house and stays outside at night.
2. The road.
1. Why is a nice young lady like a carriage wheel.
2. Because there is a ring of fellows all around her.
1. What turns without moving.
2. Milk that turns sour.
December 1937
anonymous contributor
2020-05-28 11:44
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248
wed and then grubbed and softened and sprayed to keep the blight of them.When ripe the drills are opened in two and the potatoes are picked and put into pits and covered.They made a wide trench, not deep,on the ground and put all the potatoes into it.The potatoes are left in the pit all the year round ,and they are turned so as to prevent them from growing.There are many kinds of potatoes .Some of their names are Flounders, Champions,Leagures,Ker Pinks,Queens,Striped Champions ,Aran Banners,Aran Victors,and Fat- Man.The Champion is the best but it is out of date.I know of no other name but Sciolán for the cut potatoes.Potatoes were used to make starch long ago.This is the way it was made.The potatoes were grated and drained through a cloth,this is done about fifty ago.To make bread the potatoes were first boiled and half flour and potatoes mixed and the cake was made.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:44
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butter is done. In the winter hot water is added to it to heat it up and when it is almost finished cold water is poured in to make butter hard. And in the summer-time it requires nothing by cold water. The butter is lifted out with a strainer and leave it on a dish for to salt it. Then you get your butter boards and make it into rolls.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:42
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The height of our churn at home is about four feet and about three feet in diameter and the diameter at the bottom is about two feet. The age of it is six years. In the summer-time butter is made twice a week and in the winter once a week. My mother always does the churning. In olden times strangers entering the door would say "God bless the work" and then take a brash. The churning is always moved upwards and downwards and it is also given a rolling motion from side to side to help to gather the butter. When the staff is clean then you know when the
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:41
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Sgéul
Bailighthe ag Pádraig Ó Coinnigh ó Drom
Bhí fear ó Gleann-Beithe ag siubhal go Corcaig fadó. Ní bhíodh aon traen ag rith an uair sin. Nuair do bhí sé seacht míle ó'n a bhaile do bhuail sé le stróinséir. "Bail ó Dhia ort" arsan stróinséar. "Bail ó Dhia ort" arsa fear ó Gleann Beithe. "Cá bhfuil tú ag dul" ars' an stróinséar.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:39
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Stephen Furlong’s father was also a blacksmith and spent his life at Ballyvaldon Cross Roads.
I was able to procure some béaloideas from him under the following
Wooden Ploughs: He says these were quite common in his youth. But he said the mould-board sole-plate sock and coulter were iron.
The sock had to be fitted to each particular plough. It was bought in the rough so to speak then forged and fitted on an iron model and finally on the wooden plough.
Spades: He showed me an old model of a home made potato-spade. This had a wide bos [?] with a shank containing a hole for a nail to be driven through on the handle or “tree”.
Further an iron ring took in this shank and the spade handle and was often wedged like a mounted scythe blade.
Then there was the “planting spade”,
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:39
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Long Long ago there were no doctors, but people believed in local cures. Here and there in the country, there lived skillful men, and no matter what would be wrong with the people there was no doctor called in. But one of these men were called and he bled the patient and he was called the bledder.
When anybody sprained their arm or their legs, there were people who had the cure of the sprain. I myself have the cure of the sprain, which I got from my father. You make the cure three times.
Say a few words and make the sign of the cross. Some people have the cure of the mumps. You put the horses winkers on the patient, and lead him into the pig house and say a few words in Irish.
Jaundices was also cured. There is a well outside of Clones that people go to get cured. There is a family out side the town who have the cure of the Jaundices. There are other different cures for whooping cough. Some people get the milk that is left after the ferret is finished drinking and make the patient drink some of it.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:37
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senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:37
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Old Houses 18 5 - '38
The houses nowadays are much different from those in olden times. The houses around this district were mostly mud-wall cabins with flag roofs and clay floors. They got the flags in Lacken quarry. They had yellow clay for floors. There used to be generally two rooms and a kitchen in every cabin. In some of them there was a window in every room but there were some houses which had only one room and a kitchen and there was only a window in the kitchen They were very comfortable in these cabins. There is a half-door in every house. It is to keep the chickens out and to let light in. The fuel burned is turf. There is a bog near this district. The people used to cut enough of turf to do them the whole year round. Some people used to cut it to sell during the winter months.
There is always a bed in the kitchen called a settle-bed which can be turned up in the day to form a couch.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:36
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The animals we have at home are, Cows, Sheeo, horses Pigs goats and calves. The names of our cows are Blacko, Brownie and Polly. When driving the cows out to the field you say ""Chea!Chea!" Our cowhouse is called a "byer". The cows are tied to a post with a chain, they are always tied by the neck.
We feed our cows with Straw, turnips and meal. We have two horses at home. We tie them with ropes. We feed them with oats and they eat it out of a manger. Some people say when the world was flooded, Noah got two of every animal and they is how these animals are now.
When my mother is calling the hens she says Chuck! Chuck! Chuck! she says Pea! Pea! Pea! to the turkeys and she says Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! to the ducks and to the goats she say Kiddy! Kiddy!
The most famous horse in the district in the olden times was Keenan's Leggie. He swan Tonyscallon lake to Tommy Brennan's carn and when he had his fill eaten he came home again.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:31
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was sure that it was to kill his cousin Marin and he said to himself I suppose I will be the next to be killed. So he started blessing himself and was praying all night and was sure that his cousin Martin had been killed until he saw him in the line next day.
Patrick O'Connor told me this story.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:30
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In our farm every year there are about two acres put under potatoes. My father prepares the ground.
First of all he ploughs the ground, and then he manures it.
The potatoes are dug with digger sometimes, but if the weather is bad its with the spades they be dug. The sort of potatoes that are growing in the district are Kerr's Pinks, Arron Banners, Uptodates, Pilots, the Quenns, Champions.
The Kerr's Pinks and the Banners are the best growing in the district.
The Cutting of the Seed.
Whenever people beging cutting the seed the most important part is minding the "eyes" of the potatoes. Unless the eye remains in each potatoe it will never appear above the ground any more.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:27
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senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:26
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Food in Olden Times 23 - 5 - '38
The people in olden used to three meals daily - breakfast dinner and supper. Breakfast consisted of oaten meal stirabout. It was put out on a dish and milk put on it and the people of the house sat around and ate of it. They used to have a cup of tea and some brown bread. The dinner consisted of potatoes and dripping. They used to drink milk, some of them butter-milk and some of them new milk. They had whole meal bread for eating. Some of them had tables that could be turned up against the wall when the meal was over. They used to eat plenty of potatoes. They used to eat fish on Friday and Sunday. The most of them used to eat at about seven o'clock at night. They had wooden vessels called noggins which held a pint and a half. They were generally made of beach. They used to eat a lot of vegetables such as parsnips and cabbage. The dish on Easter Sunday was potatoes and eggs.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:25
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is to do is to make broth out of the seed of a dalken and drink it.
The nettle is a very bad weed it is a tall weed with three or four leaves growing on it. No-one like this weed because it would sting you if you touched it, it is a very sore sting. The nettle grows in sick or poor ground.
The whin is a harmful weed it grows in rich warm ground and spreads rapidly. It is good for horses in the spring-time. It will not grow in poor ground.
It flowers in April and stays in flowers the whole year round,
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:24
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In answer to that noble call the people all obey.
The funeral returns back again, Clonalvey gains the day.
On the road beside the bloddy hearse one recreant traitor stood
Who aid the funeral obsequies and dye his hands in blood.
Iscariot - light headed with discipline grime was seen
Like Hackett of Dungarin who steered the Algerine.
(Nicholas Aspell was returned unburied from Clonalvey Cemetery on January 21st 1885 J.J.D.)
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Fulham's Lament (Refers to Contest Meath-Louth in Parrell times)
Farewell Farewell to Westminster a long and sad farewell
About his pleasant luxuries some others mow may tell
Poor Paddy Fulham from Demore is no longer and E.M.P.
For he is religated back unto obscurity.
Louth-Meath, your former member bids you now a long adieu
And to your patriotic priests my warmest thanks are due
For when they fight a battle they are very hard to beat
They stepped into the break so well that now I've lost my seat
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:23
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1
Mo léin gan mé in Acaill ná ar bhóithirín ur an Ár.
Ag Róipe ar a Mullranng na thóir ag maread ban. Domhnail Og Ó Ceallamaigh go geraraid sé liom láimh. Seamus bhrían in Acaill dar liom gur maith an áit.
2
Mo leán gan mé in Acaill beag bheinn call(?) ag Antoine Uan.
Ag Seán O Thadgh an tafaire tá thall ar Cloc Mhór.
Nac é mo chroidé briste agus[?] cé féarr líom é ná bron.
Na báid ag teacht on fairrge agus[?] na luing ag fuigleach seol.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:22
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The Festival Customs 14 - 6 - '38
Each season of the year has its own festival customs. On the 29th June there is a bonfire lit in honour of St. Peter and Paul. On the 29th of September or Michaelmas day a goose is killed in honour of St. Michael. On St Martin's day, the 11th of November a fowl is killed and the blood is sprinkled on the doors to prevent sickness. On St. Stephen's day the people go to hunt the wren and they sing songs such as.
"The wren, the wren
The king of all birds.
On Stephen's day she was caught in the furs.
Up with the kettle and down with the pan
A penny or twopence to bury the wren"
They go about from house to house and collect money. On Easter Sunday the people boil a lot of eggs to see who would be
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:18
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When there is a marriage in this district there is an old boot tied to the back of the car in which the bride is to wish her good luck.
Another custom is to get the bride's maid to to cut the wedding cake over the bride and bridegroom.
There is also white stuff called confetti thrown over the married couple.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:18
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to be able to eat the most. On the 31st of October, November eve, the people make a colcannon in which they put a ring a half-crown and a button and all get some. Whoever gets the half-crown will never be without money, whoever gets the ring will be married during the year but whoever gets the button will never be married. A tub of water is got on that night also into which some apples are put. Then the people's hands are tied behind their backs and they dive for them with their mouths. On May day a bush is cut and egg shells that are collected from Easter Sunday are put on it with ribbons and paper.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:15
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The hearse is moving slowly that bears Aspel to the grave
The snow white plumes of innocence above his head doth ware,
For him a gorgeous funeral his friends they did prepare,
To take him to Clonalvey - but he wont - but he wont be buried there.
No he wont be buried there, the solemn vow was heard,
Where the victim of his vengeance was the day before interred
We will out with due unformity to the just commands of Sod
For his remains will never desecrate our consecrated Sod.
Before the funeral started Brave Sherwin and bold Rock,
With plying steeds the country roused like an el-ect-ric shock,
The people roused all ran with speed unto the churchyard gate,
With defiant air and steadfast looks the funeral now await.
The funeral now arrives, inside the walls are men avoid of fear
Say, take him away to whence he came he wont be buried here,
Above the glamour and the noise a voice was heard to call
All who are in the people's course all stand inside the wall.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:15
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Clothes made Locally 22 - 6 - '38
Our tailor's name is Michael O Shaughnessy. He lives in Castlecreen Country Kilkenny. This tailor does not go from house to house but his grandfather used to go and bring his maching with him. The tailor stocks all Irish material. The tailor's implements are a sewing machine, a scissors and a special thimble called a tailor's thimble.
The shirts are made at home by the women from flannelette which they buy in the town In olden times the people used to grow their flax and used to make the threads with a spinning wheel. The weavers made the threads into line. Then the women brought it home and made the linen into shirts. The tailors in olden times used to go from house to house with some material and his machine and scissors. The weaver's name was Philip Murphy who lived at a place now called Fleming's cross but all trace of his house has disappeared.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:10
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senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:09
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light bonfires. Another custom is on Shrove Tuesday to make pancakes for the tea.
There is a custom at Christmas for people to send christmas boxes to their friends. Candles are left lighting on Christmas Eve night as a guide to all who may be wandering about and unable to find a house to stay in. At Christmas the children all get presents. There are several customs practised on Hallow'een night. One is to have a tub of water and some apples into it and each person tries to catch one with his mouth. Another custom is to put nuts in a pan for a pair, to see will they be married. If the two nuts will jump together the pair will be married, if they jump apart they will be separated for life.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:05
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Festival Customs 13 - 6 - 38
Most of the festivals have customs of their own. It is a custom for boys to go around hunting the wren on St Stephen's Day. They dress up specially for that day and cover their faces so that no one will know who they are. They go from house to house singing this verse.
"The wren, the wren
Th king of all birds.
St Stephen's day
He was caught in the furze.
Although he is small
His family is great
So get up young laddie
And give up a treat."
They get money from some people.
There is a custom on Easter Sunday morning to eat eggs and to try who would eat the rest.
The custom on St Patrick's day is to wear a shamrock and a badge and some people wear a green suit.
The custom on the 29th of June is to
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:03
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the smother the crop in which they are and they also make the soil poor. Certain herbs grow only in fertile soil such as the "bohilawn" herb will not grow in marshy poor land. In by gone days great value was set on herbs for medicinal purposes. The old people got all the medicine they used from herbs. The dandelion was boiled in water and it was used for a cough. the nettle to arrest bleeding from the head the thistle was used in the making of a cure for a thorn.
The heather of heath was used for dyeing purposes.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:02
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When the distant hills seem dark it is a the sign of rain.
When the sun goes to bed pale it is the sign of rain.
If the curlews are crying it is the sign of rain.
If the dog eats grass it is the sign of rain.
If the cat sits with her back to the fire and washes her far, it is the sign of rain.
If the salt is damp it is the sign of rain.
If the ice is not able to bear a duck it is the sign of rain.
If the swallows fly low it is the sign of rain.
When the smoke straight from the chimney it is the sign of a nice calm day.
When the robin comes into the house it is the sign of stom.
There are always twenty one fine days in October
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:01
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The Turkeycock. A True Story.
My teacher gave me this story. In Drumbad lane near, Gortlettragh Church, a turkeycock appeared some time ago and is said to have appeared since.
One night a man was coming home from his ceilidh. When he reached his own lane a lorry passed him, just then the turkeycock came out before him and crew.
He was very much afraid as he had to pass the place where the turkeycock came out.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 11:01
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in the stable to keep the horse from kicking each other. The stall is made from timber. The fodder we give our homes is hay and oats. Some people give their horses the prickly leafage of the furze ground with a machine. The horses are shod by a smith. He makes the shoes first he measures the horses hoofs and then he makes the shoes and beats them unto the same shape as the horses hoofs. The horses are clipped in November.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:58
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The Care of Farm Animals
8 -6 -'38
The animals on our farm are cows, sheep, horses, pigs, goats, calves, lambs and cats. Some of our cows have names Looby and Panay and the rest of them go by their colours. When we are driving the cattle out of the field we say "hie home" hie home" Our cowhouse is covered with zinc. There is a channel in our cowhouse. It is called a cowhouse or a cowshed. The cows are tied with baled which are made of timber. The cows head is put in between two sticks which are fastened in the top with a clasp. There is a holy picture in the cowhouse to bring luck on the stock. It is a custom to sing when milking as people say the cow gives her milk quicker. There is a saying that if a swallows nest is knocked down in the cowhouse the cows will milk blood. There are stalls
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:57
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a crowd of men sitting round it. There is also supposed to be a black dog seen sitting there at nights guarding the treasure.
Strangers who saw it often dream of it. We sometimes wonder what caused it to be there, but cannot find out. The fear that it has something to do with the good people prevents both young and old from touching it and there it remains to the present day as it has been for generations past. It belonged to another family at that time, but since it came into our possession we have not seen or found out anything about the gold and we have no doubt but that the old people told and believed these stories.
The above story was told to Frances Mc Inerney by her Grandfather, Thomas Mc Inerney a farmer in Ballyea, who died in the year 1922 aged 84.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:57
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is put in the manger for the horse to eat. Horses are shod according to the work they have to do. The horses are clipped usually in October.
This is the way we call our fowl:-
The hen:- "Tuic! Tuic!"
The turkey: "Biadh! Biadh!"
The goose:- "Beadai! Beadai!"
The chicken:- "Dís! Dís!"
The duck:- "Faoit! Faoit!"
This is the way we call our farm animals:-
The horse:- "Prtcheo! Prtcheo!"
The cow:-"Prig! Prig!"
The pig:-"Furish! Furish!"
The sheep:- "Teabh! Teabh!"
Before we set eggs we put a cross on them. We also set an uneven number.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:53
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There was a beggar and the beggar had a brother, and the brother died, and the man that died never had a brother. How could that be?
The Beggar was a sister to the man that died.
What has two tails, two sleeves, a neck and no head?
A Shirt.
Why is Westminster Abbey like a fender?
Because it contains the ashes of the grate (great)
Riddle me, riddle me, candy bo, my father gave me seed to sew. The seed was black and the gound was white, Riddle me that and I'll give you a pipe?
A Newspaper.
As I sat on my hunkers, and looked through my winkers[?], I saw the dead burying the alive?
A person raking a turf fire.
What is white and black and red (read) all over?
A Newspaper.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:52
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burned years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:52
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Hidden Treasure
There is a pot of gold in Páirc na h-Altóra.
The old people always said it was there.
There was a man from Drumhalla going down to Oileán na Uan and he met another wee man. He took him into a cave where there was a lot of sovereigns and thinking this not enough he filled his hat. When it was time to go home he could not rise and he thought of the weight of the hat and he emptied it and he could not rise and he had to empty out the last half sovereign. There is another pot of gold up at the standing stones. My Aunt told me it was under the lying stone. Neil Ferry and some other men dug for three days looking for the pot of gold in Pairc na h-Altóra but found none and now
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:49
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Two brothers went into a grave-yard and they knelt on two different graves and prayed for two different mothers. How could this be?
They were two Christian Bro's.
If it took four men to dig a hold in one day, how long would it take them to dig a half hole?
They couldn't dig a half a hole, it would always be a hole.
If you were standing on sea-level and you were looking out upon the sea, how far could you see out upon the sea?
As far as possible.
There was a square room and in every corner of the room sat a cat, and there was a cat sitting on every cat's tail, how many cats were in the room?
Four cats.
One day a man pointed to a photo of a man and he said to a man beside him -: Brothers + sisters I have none, but that man was my father's son.
He was pointing to a photo of himself.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:48
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Mr Patrick Kilcullen, Mrs Costello
Mrs Barrett Mr Thomas Barrett
and Mrs Mc Donagh. live in,
Carrowbricken,
Dromard,
Ballisodare,
Co Sligo.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:44
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As I was going up Tara hill, Tara hill was shaing, four and twenty black things tearing up an acre?
A Man Harrowing
Down in yon meadow there is a house and in that house, there is a girl and I told her name three times and I will not tell it again?
Ann
What belongs to yourself and is used by your friend more than by yourself?
Your name.
What is taken from you before it is given to you
Your photograph
What has eyes and cannot see.
A potatoe.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:40
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A Hole in her stocking.
I went up the road and down the road and took the road on my back?
A ladder.
What has a mouth yet cannot eat?
A River
What did the person buy the two halfpenny candles for?
A Penny
If I built a wall from here to Dublin what height would it be?
The height of nonsense.
What is hairy all over, and rough in the skin, lift your leg and put it in?
A Stocking
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:38
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three ran, while the earth and stones rolled back to their place.
The above accounts were given to Eileen Casey by Michael Corry Killerk, Darragh, Ennis, Farmer, aged 73.
In Morgan McInerney's farm in Ballyea there is a fort in the centre of which is a large square stone. It is believed unlucky to touch it for underneath are supposed to be two crocks of gold.
One time a man went to uproot it to find the gold but doing so he felt sick. This man was know as the "Captain" a relative of my own and a neighbour of his named Owen Garrihy advised him to settle back the sod or he would never get rid of the sickness but doing so he got better.
On another occasion as two men were coming home from a circus they saw a light there and
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:37
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What has two wings, eleven heads, twenty-two legs, yet cannot fly or walk.
A Football Team.
What is the difference between a white hen and a black hen?
The white hen lay an egg the colour of herself and the black hen can't/
When is it that an artist always likes to draw?
His tea.
When is a man not a man?
When he turns into a lane.
What is it that a woman is always looking for and when she gets it she hates to see it?
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:34
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What grows in the wood and rounds in the town, and eases his master many a pound?
A Fiddle.
Cut a bit of it and still it will get longer.
A Grave.
Why should a horse never be hungry on a journey.
Because it always has a bit in it's mouth.
Did you ever hear the story of the two wells?
Well, well.
Flowers from England, fruit from Spain, met together in a shower of rain. Put in a bag and tied with a string. If you answer this silly riddle I'll give you my ring?
A Plum Pudding.
If you take this dog and cut his head.
Don't you expect that now it's dead.
But there, high above us in the sky.
A bird, quite easily I can spy.
Beagle-Eagle.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:33
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In Darragh there lived a man named Terry Commane and two men dreamt that they would get gold hidden under a flag outside his house, while Mass would be going on in Kilmaley Church. They went and it is said they found it under the above flag.
In the townland of Lisheen there is a fort in which four men went digging for a tub of gold. While doing so a black hound (which is a very bad omen) came up and stared up at them. Some thought to kill him but the others said to leave him alone. They kept on digging when all at once three men came up bearing a coffin. The men got nervous, but never spoke only dug away in silence. They were very near the lid when to their horror a man came up from the lake in a white water steed flashing a sword to and fro. The
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:30
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What is the difference between a school mistress and a person who is late for the train?
One trains the misses and the other misses the train.
What is the difference between a brave soldier and a young lady?
One faces the powder and the other powders the face.
What time was beef the highest?
When the cow jumped over the moon.
A head without hair, teeth without lips, a long tail and no hips?
A rake.
Why does a donkey eat thistles?
Because he is an ass.
A King of Marokey, sent me a crokey, and it could hold part of my blood, flesh and bone.
A Ring.
senior member (history)
2020-05-28 10:28
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Hidden Treasure
In the townland of Binn about five miles from Ennis there lived an old woman named Mrs. Noonan, who dreamt three times in succession of a tub of gold. She related her story to a certain man in the vicinity who gathered eleven courageous men to dig for it. They got blessed water from the priest and went to the rock where the gold was hidden. They sprinkled the rock thinking that would keep away any ghosts or spirits that would appear. They spent three nights quarrying this rock and on the third night two of them were standing down on the cover of the tub and digging around it when a man came towards them on a white horse. They fled and left the rock and gold which is there to the present. It is said that this gold was hidden by the Dances.
senior member (history)