Number of records in editorial history: 331979 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 20:12
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was taken over by the Land Commission. The gentlemen to whom it belonged bad it closed up again. This formerly belonged to Mr. P.D. Culle [?] There is a bit of a Celtic Cross still to be seen at the foot of this hill.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 20:09
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There are many festivals during the year through out Ireland.
St. Stephen's Day: It falls on the 26th of December. It is a custom to go around with
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 20:07
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and tied at the end with thread.
When we scoop out the pulp of a woodbine stick we put in pieces of paper in balls and shoot these out with a piece of thinner stick driven through it. We call this a bullet gun. We also can make a sling from a piece of stick shaped like a fork with a piece of rubber. When we make a pull at the rubber a stone that is placed in it shoots out of the sling into the air.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 20:05
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We grow potatoes athome every year. We grow about an acre every year. My father and
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 20:00
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shoes to exhibet at the annual Navan Horse Show.
Inside the forge there is a large square hearth and in the centre the blacksmith builds his fire. He uses coal called "blacksmith's coal." Near the hearth is a large block of wood on which his anvil is fixed securely. To the wall is secured a chain for holding the horses while being shod.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:59
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How the Escaping United Irishmen were Captured in '98
After the defeat at Tara the escaping volunteers from Kildare and Wexford were trying to make their way home safely. They were scattered in all directions and some when retreating went north instead of south.
As the weary volunteers went across the fields, not nearing any road, they came on a field of wheat belonging to an O'Reilly of Oristown. They stopped to eat some what and O'Reilly seeing them brought them in and offered them food. The hungry United Irishmen well enjoyed the hearty meal until they were all surrounded by the Meath militia.
They were all brought out, none of them escaping, and shot one by one. None of the volunteers knew how the soldiers came upon them or how they were traced so quickly, but it was later discovered that it was O'Reilly who informed the soldiers. O'Reilly received a great sum of money for betraying the volunteers. The betrayer had a shop in Oristown and was there
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:58
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There are three forges in Navan. The largest is situated in Watergate Street. One blacksmith's name is Mr. Wallace. His people have been at the same trade for many, many, years now.
The forge is like a large shed with a galvanize roof. Within the forge at the right hand side, is a large fire-place. There is always a bellows at the side of the fire. A bench is sometimes placed at the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:54
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until it closed a few years ago, but he never had any luck since.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:53
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Ninty Eight.
(1) There was one very fierce battle fought at (Cnoc an Air, about two and a half miles outside Navan on the Proudstown road. There were hundreds killed and wounded at that battle. There is a memorial slab on Cnoc an Uin marking the place were many Soldiers fell.
(2) There was another fierce battle fought at Wilkinstown, during the same period. There were over three hundred killed and as many wounded. There was a charitable farmer in the district and he had a barn. He ordered all the wounded men to be put into the barn. This farmer had a workman, and the workman went out in the evening and told one of the English soldiers about this barn. That evening one of the English Soldiers came and burned the barn, and all the wounded
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:49
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An incident at Bective Abbey.
I go the following from Mrs. McGoona of St Finnians Terrace. Her grandfather told her the story and how he heard it, was that he worked in Bellinter, and the Prestons who lived in Bellinter went to church at Bective Abbey, and the Prestons told him.
An incident happened in Bective Abbey the time the Protestants took it. Every time a Protestant minister got up on the pulpit to preach a thick fog would descend; and immediately the minister would come down off the pulpit the fog would rise, and so that a word of the Protestant religion was never preached there, even though it was a Protestant church at one time.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:46
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Desecration of Font
I got the following information from a Mrs. Austin of Targanstown:- The time Staffordtown church was knocked, the soldiers forgot about the woly fater font which stood at the side-door. The Butlers'
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:44
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all over the hole an number of gold coins and silver ones. He ran down the town telling everyone about his find. He happened to bump into a number of "Black and Tans" who arrested him and told him that the coins belong to the Government The "Tans" took the coins and sold them to a number of people. Some of those coins were dated back to 1500 and 1600 hundred. Mr. Patrick O Brien Watergate St. Navan has a couple of those coins in his possession. The vase is no longer to be had some people say that Mr. Patrick Finnegan has the vase.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:41
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Coins found in Finnegan's Land
This happened During the Black + Tans.
In the year 1922 when Mr. P. Finnegan was building a house in Abbeylands Navan there was a jar of coins found.
When the plumber was digging a hole to put the pipes down, he struck an old ancient vase with his pic-axe and broke it he looked to see what he struck and when he saw
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:37
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present English half-crown.
There was also a Spanish coin found that dated back to the year 1555. A.D. It is as big as a penny and on one side are the heads of King Philip of Spain and Queen Mary of England. On the other side is a shield divided into four parts.
The coins sound like tin when dropped on the ground and are supposed to represent silver coins. The coins were probably lost during the making of the Navan walls. One one of the English coins the date 1581. A.D. is given.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:35
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An old Sword
A local woman named Mrs. Mc Carty of Athlumney was digging in her garden about two years ago, when she was digging she found a very old sword in the garden. She brought in the sword and covered it with silver paper. The (sword) length of this sword is two and a half feet, and the handle of the sword is six inches wide, and the blade of the sword is very sharp. This sword is to be seen hanging on the wall in Mrs. Mc Carties house.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:32
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Old Coins
Some years ago a number of old coins were found in Trimgate Street, Navan. They were found near where the old walls of Navan were. Among them were two old English coins. One of them is about the size of a half crown and the other about the size of a shilling, both bearing the head of Elizabeth and her name is shown clearly on it. On the other side is an English shield, much like the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:25
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Once upon a time a number of men were playing cards. One of them when giving a hint to his partner said:-

"Coingibh an cárta a bhaineann le práta (the Spade)
Agus imir an cárta a cuirtear sa chlaidhe (the club)
Coingibh an cárta a ghearrann an fáinne (the diamond)
Agus imir an cárta is giorra do'n chroidhe" (the heart)
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 19:03
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failed, so the two Islands are in the same place as they are to-day with the highest and widest part towards the north-west.

No IV

An Cailleach Bhéara

When the Summer came the Cailleach Bhéara drove the bull out to the grassy parts of Béara. One day when the bull was being driven out, he heard a cow lowing in Kerry, so he started off towards her. The Cailleach went ahead of him, but he jumped into the tide and started to swim for Kerry. The Cailleach struck him with her wand and as she was doing it, the bull called the cow, and her calf with him, and they form the bull, cow, and calf rocks now.

(Told by)
Danial Houlihan (55yrs)
Croumphane,
Eyeries
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:59
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A man named Jack Connell living in Kells used to sell buttermilk. The Connell family were accused in the selling of the milk "of stretching it for the creatures."
One day, one of the Connell's customers was seen going to the pump for water and shortly after was heard to call out, "Come out quick, there's a pratie in the throat of Jack Connell's cow" (The potato was in the spout of the pump).
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:57
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Long ago at the time of Saint Patrick three witches, An Cailleach Bhéara, Cailleach an Dhaingean, agus Cailleach Bhóilis lived. At that time Saint Patrick was teaching the true faith in Munster, but the Cailleach Bhéara would (not) believe that God was there, or that He was the maker of the world.
About a few weeks after Saint Patrick was preaching to her, she went to his house and stole a few holy books he had. St. Patrick following her, struck her with his wand, but not before she had jumped from Sgíac, to Coolagh and from there to Kilcatherine. It was while she was taking the last span that St. Patrick's rod struck her, and she is now in the form of a rock in Kilcatherine with the basket of books on her back. The print of her foot is in the middle of a flat stone, about five feet long by six feet wide in Coolagh, and it is full of water both Summer and winter.
The Cailleach Béara was said to have the best sight, and the best voice, in Bere Haven, because once when she was standing on Sgíac, she saw a
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:57
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white cow, in her sister's garden in Bolish and she shouted to her, that she was eating the potato stalks. Her sister was making butter near the fire, when she heard the shouting; she told her husband to go out, that something was wrong outside.
He went out and found the strange cow in the garden, as the Cailleach Bhéara had seen. Anyone that has sharp sight since then, it is said in Irish:-
"Tá radharc Caillighe Bhéara aige" (?)

(III)

Cailleach an Dhaingean
The Scarbh islands were said to have been outside Dingle once, but the Cailleach an Daingean said that she would like to be nearer to the Bull Rock and to her sister in Beara, so she and her daughter made a ring of something around the Island, and started to pull it towards the Bull Rock, but it cracked as it was not strong enough, the Island broke in halves too. They mended the ring again and started off, but the daughter had to go in front as the Cailleach's sight was getting bad. It was not long until they were astray, and the daughter shouted at her mother, and at the same time the ring broke again. They tried to mend it, but
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:56
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This castle is situated one mile outside the town of Clonmellon. Built in 1311 Sir John Rielly lived there in the time of Cromwell. Cromwell, having journeyed
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:55
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on the cart himself and coming up the field the wheel gave way. He took it out and threw it there on the field. He held the axle with one hand and drove the horse with the other.
He was not like any other man the doctors said after he died that he had a double sheet of ribs. He is about 30 years dead.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:53
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that he would not lift the anvil and he took him up on the bet and to show how strong he was he took his gold watch out of his pocket and he let it on his chest and he lifted the anvil three times without breaking or touching his watch The weight of the anvil was two cwt one quarter and eleven pounds
He went to a man for a harrow and he tied the two harrows together and and put them round his neck and rode the bycycle home.
There was a big man stationed in the Dublin D.M.P the name of Fitzimons and he was home on holidays and he used always be boasting about what he could do with a man But Kit Mc Dermot was coming from Finnegans public house and Fitzsimons stepped out to arrest him. in a joke Mc Dermot caught hold of him by the arms and he was in Navan Hospital after him Another time he had a sick horse and cart and he put the sick horse and he could and he put the horse up
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:51
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One night a man was going home from Mullagh, when he saw a crowd of little men playing
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:51
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coming towards him, some were riding bullocks. The foremost said to Matty "Will you come for a ride Matty." He accepted and was given a bullock as a mount. The galloped over the country side and came back to the place from whence they started.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:50
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In the annals of Westmeath it is told that Bishop Mac Geoghan was buried within a stone throw of our Brosna. In a field near our home there is a place which we call the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:49
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Long ago at the time of Saint Patrick three witches, An Cailleach Bhéara, Cailleach an Dhaingean,(?) agus Cailleach Bhóilis lived. At that time Saint Patrick was teaching the true faith in Munster, but the Cailleach Bhéara would (not) believe that God was there, or that He was the maker of the world.
About a few weeks after Saint Patrick was preaching to her, she went to his house and stole a few holy books he had. St. Patrick following her, struck her with his wand, but not before she had jumped from Sgíac, to Coolagh and from there to Kilcatherine. It was while she was taking the last span that St. Patrick's rod struck her, and she is now in the form of a rock in Kilcatherine with the basket of books on her back. The print of her foot is in the middle of a flat stone, about five feet long by six feet wide in Coolagh, and it is full of water both Summer and winter.
The Cailleach Béara was said to have the best sight, and the best voice, in Bere Haven, because once when she was standing on Sgíac, she saw a
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:48
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Kit Mc Dermot was a very very strong man He Lived in Bohermeen. He was often known to carry a harrow on his shoulder. He went to the fair of Kells to buy a pig. on the same day he bought a churn He put the pig into the churn and carried him home. Once upon a time he asked to give him a hand to pull a bullock out of a drain. They could not get ropes around the bullock so Mc Dermot asked the man to catch his hands. Mc Dermot only could catch the top of the mans fingers. The man had to roart to let him go or that he would pull the arms out of his body he pulled up the horse himself.
Ue used to bring about a half ton of hay on his shoulder to fodder his cattle on a bicycle.
A very long time ago he came for the loan of cart. He brought no horse for the cart it was a very heavy tumbling cart and so he pulled the cart home.
Another time he came to Callahans forge in Charlesfort and they were talking about how strong he was. The blacksmith made a bet of five pound with him
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:37
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and it is about one foot wide. If you stood on the top of it you could see the bay out as far as the horizon. It is said that Mac Eoghain used stand on it, so that any ship could not come into the harbour without his seeing them. When the soldiers came to shoot Mac Eóghain and Beara, he was watching from the "Cillíneach", and she was watching from the stone. The soldiers came from the north, and shot Beara near the stone. Then they dug up the stone and buried her under it.

Told by the late Eileen Harrington
Kilmacowen
Eyeries
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:34
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There is a field, about an acre in size, at the foot of the Bawrard hill. It is in Patrick Harrington's farm, and it is about a mile from this school. There is a stone standing in the centre of the field. It is about five feet high,
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:30
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Long ago there lived in Beara a very old and wicked woman. She was feared by all the people because she was a witch. It was said that she could walk twenty miles in five minutes.
One day she was returning from a neighbouring village when she came upon a Saint sleeping by the road-side. There was a bag of holy books by his side. Being a pagan and hating Christians she destroyed the books.
When the Saint awoke he knew, by the power of God, that it was the witch who had destroyed the books. He put a curse on her and changed her into a rock, which is to be seen to this day at Cill Caitiarann. This rock is called the "Hag of Beara".

Thos. Fitzgerald
Barrack Road,
Bantry
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:23
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For the gallant parish priest, you could not him surpass;
For he makes reference to this good cause on Sunday after Mass.
II
Ye have a gallant burite, he will do all he can to keep the flag-a-flying.
And to drive the Temperance van.
His name is Father Mac Philips from the New Bridge he was sent.
The people of that parish, his departure did lament.
III
He was in Leargaidhe parish; he studied every man
I will describe one instance in my ballid now to hand.
There was one Barney Kitty, who fell into arears.
This holy priest he came along and settled the affairs.
IV
He paid the money for the man, who was then let back to his old home.
In Gubaveeny; with this good priest at his back.
V
But strange to say this Temperance is so prominent in our land.
Yet every day upon the way, you can see the porter man.
Coming with his barrels and carts, trying to tempt us out & out.
VI
Out the men of Glan this curse wont stand; They're bright and free for to think.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:22
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mend to leave this place. It was on a day in June. He was leaving.
On that day, he went out to look about his yard. As he walked along, he was a big rat coming out of the house with gold and silver in his mouth. After him, there came six more with silk handkerchiefs, socks, and a large number of other valuable goods in their mouths. They came on to a large wide flag that was in the center of the yard. On this flag they spread out the gold, silver and goods. A part from this time was passing by at the time. He wrote a few lines in poetry, ordering the rats to go to another house. The leading rat took the order in his mouth, and passed on with his comrades at his heels to their new home. Now, the merchant took up his own belongings and settled at his work again.
Many years ago, educated men used to go around here gettin information and admiring the scenery of the mountains and then writing poetry about this. One of these men resided here long ago. His name was Boyle, and he travelled as a pedlar. He was very true to the priests, and while he was here, he wrote the following song:-
I
The boys of Glan and every man are true into their cause. They struggled hard and willingly to uphold the Temperance.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:22
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mend to leave this place. It was on a day in June. He was leaving.
On that day, he went out to look about his yard. As he walked along, he was a big rat coming out of the house with gold and silver in his mouth. After him, there came six more with silk handkerchiefs, socks, and a large number of other valuable goods in their mouths. They came on to a large wide flag that was in the center of the yard. On this flag they spread out the gold, silver and goods. A part from this time was passing by at the time. He wrote a few lines in poetry, ordering the rats to go to another house. The leading rat took the order in his mouth, and passed on with his comrades at his heels to their new home. Now, the merchant took up his own belongings and settled at his work again.
Many years ago, educated men used to go around here gettin information and admiring the scenery of the mountains and then writing poetry about this. One of these men resided here long ago. His name was Boyle, and he travelled as a pedlar. He was very true to the priests, and while he was here, he wrote the following song:-
I
The boys of Glan and every man are true into their cause. They struggled hard and willingly to uphold the Temperance.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:21
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How dare you come here to tempt me so
You may think that the lake is between or I would make you suffer before I would go..
There is also another poet who lived in the neighbouring parish. He made several songs such as "Glangevlins valley fair." He made also another song about Pat Maguire. Here is a few lines of the song which I heard.
I
The swans and fishes of you green lake in grief they do retire.
They all seem to say he is dead to day God be with you Pat Maguire.
O death you have dealt that fatal blow in the prime of bloom and beauty.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 18:18
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The blessing comes from temperance; and the curse that follows drunk.
A curse that is now raging in our country '02
If you look up my records, you'll find my statements true.
VII
So come on ye men & women from this open hearted Glan.
And pay attention to what I say, and it will lead you in the light.
If you uphold its furtherness, it will keep you in God's sight.
There lived a man in Glangevlin and his name was James McGourty. He was a poet and a very clever man. He could make a song and sing it while walking the road. One of the songs he confessed was about two asses that were scolding each other. Here is one which is still remembered.
One pleasant evening as I was musing I ceased from labour at the close of noon.
For recreation and contemplation
I made my way towards the bar of Dun.
I was much astounded to say two asses could scold and speak.
I was much more confounded as their words resounded across the lake.
You nasty stranger cried Reillys ranger
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:58
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among the crops for good luck.
The 24th of June is Pattern of St. Johns who is our local Saint. In Lecarrow there is a holy well which people visit on this day and where they say prayers.
On Sr Martin's Eve a cock is killed and the blood is sprinkled on the four corners of the house and this is supposed to bring a blessing on the house.
On November Eve a great currant cake is made and a ring is put in it. At tea time the cake is eaten and whoever gets the ring is supposed to be the first to marry.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:55
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This farm is owned at present by Mr Foley but at the time the men were hanged this farm belonged to a man named Power.
These men were supposed to have beaten an old man, and woman who were living near the present Mr Foley's house on Hayes farm.
These men were hanged after the '98 rebellion, about the year 1811.
They were supposed to have grabbed the old man and woman's land, they were called moonlighters, and they went around grabbing lands.
These men were working at Mr Walsh's, Tigroe. The farmer heard what they had done, and he also saw the soldiers coming up the farm.
He went out to where the men were working, and he said that if any of them were guilty to flee from the work, as they yet had time to go away, as the soldiers were far off. One of the men, when he heard
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:53
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For the gallant parish priest, you could not him surpass;
For he makes reference to this good cause on Sunday after Mass.
II
Ye have a gallant Curite, he will do all he can to keep the flag-a-flying.
And to drive the Temperance van.
His name is Father Mac Philips from the New Bridge he was sent.
The people of that parish, his departure did lament.
III
He was in Leargaidhe parish; he studied every man
I will describe one instance in my ballid now to hand.
There was one Barney Kitty, who fell into arears.
This holy priest he came along and settled the affairs.
IV
He paid the money for the man, who was then let back to his old home.
In Gubaveeny; with this good priest at his back.
V
But strange to say this Temperance is so prominent in our land.
Yet every day upon the way, you can see the porter man.
Coming with his barrels and carts, trying to tempt us out & out.
VI
Out the men of Glan this curse wont stand; They're bright and free for to think.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:49
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On Easter Sunday morning it is said the sun dances. It is customory to eat a number of eggs that day.
On May Eve the children get a maypole and decorate it with cowslips primroses and daisies. Then the pole is placed at the gate and left there during the 1st of May. It is supposed to be unlucky to give away milk, throw out ashes or work in clay May day.
On the 23rd of June is bonfire night. A great fire of sticks, turf and sometimes tar is lighted and the fire often lasts till the following day. Each family brings home a burning sod or stick which is thrown
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:45
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There is a forge situated near Carraigeán road leading from Dundullerick Bridge to Knockeen a gCruach. It is nicely surrounded by the waters. About a one hundred years ago A man worked there by the of Mc Carthy. He did not get much work there. He was a poor man and when he died the forge was closed up. It is built of stone and mortar. It has a slate roof. The door is rectangular. There is no bellows there now. There are two fire places in it. He had a lot of tools a hammer, a chisel, a vice, an anvil, a pinchers, a sledge, a file, a punch. He was good to shoe horses and asses.
William Ward next door neighbour was a shoe maker and a brother in Law of Mc Carthy.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:43
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Another poet was Tadhg Gaedhalach O'Sullivan, and he was called the wandering poet because he used to wander from place to place.
He made poems about Ireland and about the people of Ireland.
He died on the 3rd May 1715, and was buried in Ballylaneen near Kilmacthomas in Co Waterford.

Taken down from:-
Mrs Whelan
Knockaderry
Kilmeaden
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:40
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these are the Flour Mill at Pouldrew and the Woollen factory at Fairbrook.
These employed a great number of people, and when the Mill, and the Factory were closed, owing to bad times, the people were unemployed, and they had to go to America to seek work there.
The only big industry in this parish now is the Kilmeaden Co-Operative Creamery which is a very flourishing industry at the present time.
The main road from Cork to Waterford runs through the centre of the parish and running parellel with this is the Great Southern, and Western Railway.
Irish was spoken by all the people in this parish long ago, but now there are very few old people in this parish who know it.
The family name most common is Power, and this is a Norman name.
One of the most important ruins in this parish is Kilmeaden Castle which is situated on the Banks of the Suir and which was built by one of the De la Poers in the twelfth century.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:39
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My native parish is Ballyduff or in Irish "Baile Uí Dhuibh". It is situated about eight or nine miles west from Waterford City.
At first thought a stranger would think that it meant the Black townland this is not so; it got its name from a tribe or family called the O'Duff's who lived there long ago.
Slated, and tiled houses are very numerous in this Parish with the exception of few very old houses which are thatched.
Houses were more numerous long ago, and the ruins of some are still to be seen.
The ruins of some very notable houses such as the house in which Doncadh Ruadh Mac Namara taught, the famous teacher and poet of Co Waterford taught was to be seen up to a few years ago.
This was situated at the west end of the parish near the railway gates in Ardeenlone, or Carroll's Cross.
Mills, and factories flourished in the parish long ago; the most important of
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:38
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Twelfth night.
On the eve of the 6th of January it is customary in some homes to make a cake of cow dung and on it is placed twelve candles or rushes dipped in wax. The candles are lighted and each member of the family has a light for himself. The Rosary is recited and each person is watching the burning candles. The person whose candle quenches first is supposed to be the first to die in the family.
On Shrove Tuesday the people are treated to pancakes as they will have few luxuries during lent.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:36
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readen a piece of iorn and to put it into the sore tooth.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:35
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In this district a farmer cut the tongue out of a fox to get a needle out of a man's body and gave it to the doctor.
To cure a toothache-: is to find a cuckoo's spit and rub it to the tooth,
Another cure for a toothache -: is to put a frog into your mouth and make him screach and then it would go away.
To cure a corn on your toe -: is to kill a fox and cut off his tongue and rub it to the corn.
To cure a pain in your head rub Cas Dubh to it.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:34
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In the townland of Carn there lived an old poet, named James Mallie. He was a poor man. He lived in a small house, with his wife and one child. He wrote a poetry called "The Fair Hills of Ireland". Sometimes this poet used to teach school. He used to get sixpence for every week. His wife was a blind woman known as "Blind Mary". This poet wrote a poetry called, "Home Sweet Éire Ó" This man was born in Carton. He died at the age of 70 years. He is buried in Aghamore.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:31
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A cure for a cut is to rub the Bucalán wee to it.
To cure a pain in your ear get the Currigfracan.[?]
Inán talamh ;- for a sore heel.
Another cure for a toothache is to
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:30
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Donnacadh Ruadh Mac Conmara was born in Clare in the year 1715 and he stayed with his parents until he was about 15 years of age.
He was then sent to Rome to college to study for the priesthood.He stayed here for some years but he was expelled from college for his bad conduct.
After that he came to Waterford, he went to the West of Waterford and came to Ardeenlone in Co Waterford where he taught. He taught in an old house there which some of the farmers gave him. Here he taught every evening after the work.
He died in the year 1810 at the age of 95, and is buried in Newtown graveyard.
One of his poems was the "Fair Hills of Eire". He wrote this poem while he was in Newfoundland.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:30
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is a circular wall surrounding the graveyard.
There are two graveyards in St. Johns one for the Protestants and the other ?? for the Catholics. Those two graveyards are near each other. The remains of walls and buildings can still be seen around the graveyards and the ruins of a monastery can also be seen. The graveyard in Killinvoy is divided into two parts, one part for the Catholics and the other part for the Protestants. In the Protestant part there is a vault for a family named the Kellys.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:29
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Long, long ago there lived in Corbally-Ban in the parish of Lisgoold a man who lived in a thached house. A boreen leads to that place, It is believed that he used take a red hankerchief out of his pocket and a hare used run away.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:28
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Donnacadh Ruadh Mac Conmara was born in Clare in the year 1715 and he stayed with his parents until he was about 15 years of age.
He was then sent to Rome to college to study for the priesthood.He stayed here for some years but he was expelled from
college for his bad conduct.
After that he came to Waterford, he went to the West of Waterford and came to Ardeenlone in Co Waterford where he taught. He taught in an old house there which some of the farmers gave him. Here he taught every evening after the work.
He died in the year 1810 at the age of 95, and is buried in Newtown graveyard.
One of his poems was the "Fair Hills of Eire". He wrote this poem while he was in Newfoundland.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:27
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pariffin oil. It would keep you alive for twenty four hours.
The old cure for yellow "jandise" is boil ivy leaves and rub the juice to them. Another old cure for measels is to drink hot porter.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:26
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In my locality there are many old cures. To cure a tooth-ache there are many ways. Tobacco, bread-soda, salt and other things are the old cures to be put into the sore tooth.
The old cure for wart is count the number of warts you have. Then, collect the same number of stones and put them into a small bag and lay them at a cross roads. Whoever would catch the bag they would get them and the warts would go from yourself. Another old cure for rheumatism is to boil heather and drink the water in which it is boiled. The old local cure fo pneumonia is to drink milk and
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:23
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There is a haunted field on the bye road between Kilmeaden and the "Five cross roads" which is about three miles from Portlaw, on Mr Dempseys farm, and it is called "Leag na Gearleact".
The reason why it is called by that name is because it was the burial place of the unbaptised children.
On the road from Cork to Waterford there is a noted field situated near Kilmeaden Creamery which is seven miles from Waterford City.
It is called the "Coffin Field" because during the Famine period many bodies were buried all in one great big pit here.

"Páirc na Crocadh" is the higest field in Ballyduff, and seven men were hanged there. This field is about nine miles from the city of Waterford and is about 12 fields from the main road from Waterford to Cork.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:22
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four feet long. There are two anvils large and small sledges, hammers a vice and a punch, a chisel and one large fire.
He shoes horses and asses. He makes gates harrows and repairs all farm implements.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:20
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Present owner: 30 yr. - Father, a smith; His father [?] smith; Forge still working:
In the parish of Lisgoold at the top cross there is a forge on the road leading to Midleton
John Aherne is the owner of it.
His father worked in it and his grand-father also did for many a year. A little north of it there is a cross roads.
The shape of the door is an ordinary rect angular one. The roof of the forge is tared felt and they walls are made with stone. The bellows is a useful affair and it is made with leather and wood with a handle
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:16
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houses have slated roofs and a part of one house has galvanize and the other part boarded. There are twenty people living in Clash
Houses were more numerous long ago in my townland.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:15
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There are three graveyards in this district Cill Coman, St. John's and Killinvoy. Cill Coman is situated on a small hill below the school. There is a small road leading into it from the main road. This graveyard got its name as St. Coman built a little church there. The remains of the church is still to be seen. It was built of huge stones and the windows were small and the church had pointed arches. In the ruins there is a vault fir a family named the Mac Donnells. There
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:14
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I live in the townland of Clash, in the parish of Lisgoold and in the barony of Barrymore. Clash is situate between the Pound road and Lemlara Road. It begins at Ballyleigh on the road leading to LIsgoold and finishes below at a forge near Knockaheen. It is called Clash because there is a valley in a portion of it.
There is also a "borheen" running down through Clash which was one time the main road to Midleton. The top of it is called Ceann an bhothair. The boreen is about a mile and a quarter long. A stream runs through Clash and it rises in Ballyleagh at a place called Poll Buidhe and that stream divides Clash and the Pound Quarter. It runs down Midleton direction and flows into Ballinacurra. At the other side of Clash there are three or four woods. There are five families in the townland Buckley's Barrys Callahans Mc Carthys and Aherns and the church is also in Clash. Four
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:03
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them was true - the old lime Kiln is still there - filled to the top but it has never been burned.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 17:01
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In the village of Ballyure, Kiltoom, Athlone there is an old lime Kiln. In years gone by a good deal of lime was burned in it.
On a certain day when some men were filling it and had it ready for burning a strange red haired woman passed by. She did not speak until she was some yards past the kiln. Then she said "it is filled now but it will never be burned". She also foretold misfortune to the one who would burn it. When she finished speaking she disappeared. The men were amazed as they had never seen that woman before or since. What she told
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:53
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For the gallant parish priest, you could not him surpass; For he makes reference to this good cause on Sunday after Mass.
II
Ye have a gallant burite, he will do all he can to keep the flag a flying. And to drive the Temperance van. His name is Father Mac Philips from the New Bridge he was sent. The people of that parish, his departure did lament.
III
He was in Leargaidhe parish; he studied every man. I will describe one instance in my ballid now to hand. There was one Barney Kitty, who fell into arears. This holy priest he came along and settled the affairs.
IV
He paid the money for the man, who was then let back to his old home. In Gabaveeny; with this good priest at his back.
V
But strange to say this Temperance is so prominent in our land. Yet every day upon the way, you can see the porter man. Boming with his barrels and carts, trying to tempt us out & out.
VI
Out the men of Glan this curse wont stand; They've knight and face for to think.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:48
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Mar deireadh Naomh Padraig
"Tá mé in grádh le Fuará
& tá Fuarán in grádh liom"
Tá suidheamh ar Cnoc Fuaráin i gConndae Rosacomáin ar an mbóthar mór idir baile mór Rosacomáin & Caisleán Riabhach acht tá sé níos giorra do Rosacomáin ná baile eile.
Cnoc árd maordha iseadh é & is féidir radharc breágh a fhágail ar an limistéar on a bharr. Nuair a bhíos lá breágh gan sgamall ann cifídhe Cnoc Pádraig i gConndae Muigheo uaidh.
Cnoc stáireamhail i seadh é freisin. Fuair sé a ainm on am Naomh Pádraig.
Nuair a bhí sé ag munadh an Fíor Creidimh don muinntir na tíre seo tháinig sé
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:47
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mend to leave this place. It was ona day in June. He was leaving.
On that day, he went out to look about his yard. As he walked along, he was a big rat coming out of the house with gold and silver in his mouth. Aftre him, there came six more with silk hankerchiefs, socks, and a large number of other valuable goods in their mouths. They came on to a large wide flag that was in the center of the yard. On this flag they spread out the gold, silver and goods. A part from this time was passing by at the time. He wrote a few lines in poetry, ordering the rats to go to another house. The leading rat took the order in his mouth, and passed on with his comrades at his heels to their new home. Now, the merchant took up his own belongings and settled at his work again.
Many years ago, educated men used to go around here gettin information and admiring the scenery of the mountains and then writing poetry about this. One of these men resided here long ago. His name was Boyle, and he travelled as a pedlar. He was very true to the priests, and while he was here, he wrote the following song:-
The boys of Glan and every man are true into their cause. They struggled hard and willingly to uphold the Temperance.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:41
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move it in the churn. They they would get the butter of the very churn in the neighborhood. People would not bench a coal or salt when churning. I heard it told of one person who lent salt to a neighbour woman and the next time they churned they had no butter. The milk took a taste and smell and no person could taste it. Next time they churned the milk was getting worse. At last they brought a drop of milk to the Priest to get it blessed. When the priest blessed it the cows got sick in the byre and the priest asked did they find anything and if so to bring it back. It was salt which was lent and they brought it back and put it on the milk. They mill left the milk and every time they churned they had double the amount of butter until they got back their own.
Nearly all the Poets who lived in Glangevlin long ago lived in Derrylahan. The poets belonged to a family of the Maguire's. They were able to write history in Poetry and could make a song and put music on it in a few hours. It is said that they often wrote a few lines in poetry ordering rats to leave a house and go to another one and live there instead. About seventy years ago, a very rich merchant lived in Blacklion. He had four servant boys. After a few years, he noticed himself getting poor, even though he was selling and getting in plenty of money every day. He couldn't find any fauld to his servants, so at last he made up his
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:41
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Mae deireadh Naomh Padraig
"Tá mé in grádh le Fuará
& tá Fuarán in gradh liom"
Tá suidheamh ar Cnoc Fuaráin i gConndae Rosacomáin ar an mbóthar mór idir baile mór Rosacomáin & Caisleán Riabhach acht tá sé níos giorra do Rosacomáin ná baile eile.
Cnoc árd maordha iseadh é & is féidir radharc breágh a fhágáil ar an limistéar on a barr. Nuair a bhíos lá breagh gan sgamall ann agus Craich Pádraig i gConndae Muigheo uaidh.
Cnoc stáireamhail i seadh é freisin. Fuair sé a ainm on am Naomh Pádraig.
Nuair a bhí sé ag munadh an fíor Creidimh don muinntir na tíre seo tháinig sé
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:25
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Also the sign of rain.
When the birds fly high and the swans go towards the. North it is sign of fine weather while the swans go towards Limerick it is the sign of rain, When the River Shannon is very dirty and muddy it is the sign of rain and very bad weather.
When the animals such as the cattle run from the flies it is a sign of heat. When it is hard to light the fire or when the distant hill look (nigh) it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:20
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Tankardstown Cave
Tankardstown lies between Kells + Navan where Hickeys Publichouse now stands.
There is a cave in this district in which a man was lost. The cave had never been explored + a travelling fiddler undertook to do so. He arranged to go in and play his fiddle as he followed the tunnel + the local boys by remaining overhead would hear the music + would thus be able to follow the course of the cave + see to where it lead. For a considerable distance they were guided by the music. They said that the cave took a very zigzag course but still seemed to head for the Blackwater. Suddenly the music stopped + the watchers waited for a while waiting for it to recommence, but it never did. The fiddler was lost and those outside ran away with fear. They say that travellers passing by the spot at night were often startled by the music of the fiddle coming from the cave.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:16
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Candle making or Bean na mBrobh
The bean na mBrobh used be seen at every fair + market in olden times. She used have the peeled treated rushes tied in little bundles of a dozen each a farthing's worth.
Melted tallow was kept in an a vessel called the "Grisset" into which the rush was places previous to pouring in the tallow
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:13
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Sacking Weavers
The Stapletons of Windtown Rathaldran Rd Antlaim used carry on the trade of "Sack-weaving" + also linen weaving. A field now in Kearneys land Windtown is called the Flax Hole Field. Bags were made later in Factory Village Athlumney.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:10
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Ploughs
Ploughs were made by Pats where Highlands Garage Railway St now stands + before that at Gilberts Mason Academy St. This must have been only 50 years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:08
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Basket Making
This was carried on up to two years ago out at the Ladys walk Ardbracken by the O'Connelly + Lynskeys. They grew about two acres of oziers. They also made Gabans for calves.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 16:06
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Coopering
Proctor still carries on coopering in Athlumny Navan
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:59
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Slammers Barn:-
It appears that Slammers Barn Broalep farm Randlestown was the next school started after Authers Cross. We do not know who taught there. After some years it was deserted + almost immediately afterwards we find a school started at Stapletons Barn in Wandtown. The master died when a young man + is widowed mother was stricken with grief + every day at 3 oc she was to be found at his grave in Donaghmore to pray for the repose of his soul till at last she was found dead on her sons grave and buried with her loved one.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:56
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Liscarton
Liscarton is now owned by the Cullens. The Cullens probably came there during the Cardinals time. They were well off and kept many cattle. The old people remember seeing the men go out in the morning at 6 o c + shovel stirabout to the cattle. This place one belonged to people called Gerrard pronounced Jarret by all the old people. Well this Jarrett sold a field to Randlestown on the otherside of the river "for the space of 3 lives + m 1912? when the third person died the lios field was given back to the Liscarton Estate -- This is the story if not very clear as told by Eoghan Matthews Aged 60.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:53
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Na Deocana.
Tá 27 deocanna ó Cromán Iochtar go dtí Túr atá i Dúca. Seo íad ainmh gach ceann aca. Deoc Tom. Glaotar an ainm sin air mar tá fear agus sé an ainm atá air ná Tom Murphy. ‘na comnuide in aice na h-aite. Tá sé na chomnuide ann fós. An Sgoth. Tagann trí taoide le céile ar an áit sin, fuair an deoc an ainmh mar geall air sin. Deoch an Úil. Deoch Nua. Dheineadh an deoc sin le deinighe. Poinnte Reamhar. Fuair an deoc sin an ainmh ón talamh leathan atá ag dul amach sa fairrge, i n-aice na h-áite. The Garden. Ghlaoidh na daoine an ainmh sin air mar tá gairdín breagh i n-aice na h-áite. Guala Leaint. Fuair an deoc sin a ainmh mar bhí fear darbh leas ainmh do leant, bhí tig aige sa tráigh, leas ainm a bhí ag na daoine air. Tá a mhac na chómhnuide i nGlaise. Deoc a Chaca. Glaoidh na daoine an ainmh sin air mar tá slac ar an uisce, san áit sin. Foill an Fhíona. Fuar an deoc sin a ainmh mar thánaig bairrle fíona isteach ann i n-allóid. An Lúib. Fuair an deoc a ainmh mar tá an tráigh casta san áit sin. An Lodge. Fuair an deoc sin a ainmh ó tigh ar a glaodhar an Lodge, atá I n-aice na h-áite. Do bhíodh lodgers ann fadó. Is le Sandy Néill an tigh sin. Seana deoc. Tá an deoc sin ann le fada. Cloch Buidhe. Fuair an deoc sin a ainmh ón cloch bhuidhe atá i naice na h-áite. An Carraig. Fuair an deoc sin a ainmh ón na cloca atá sa tráigh i naice na h-áite. Deoc na mBan.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:28
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Moulin or Mullan of Ratoath
Some time ago a number of skulls were found in a cottage plot at Ratoath + according to the old people this plot belonged to the Mullans notorious highwayman.
The story goes that there were 3 brothers Seamus, Nial, + Micil Ruadh one sister Cait Grandma who went to America when over 90 years of age.
Seamus the youngest was killed or died from a horse bite and was known as Seamus Tocadaip (tacadoir?)
Niall Ruadh or Niall Ciocog was employed as a Servant in Slane Castle but on his identity being discovered Nial tried to swim the Boyne but was drowned.
Michail Ruadh on robbing a carriage was recognized by the occupant a local landlord. Some time later the landlord spotted Michael at Skyrne Fair as he stepped between two rows of horses + shot him in the back.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:20
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James Fox a Boy Hero in 1916.
James Fox a son of P.J. Fox Spencer Arms Hotel Drumree died for his country 1916. He was told by his parents not to go to fight, but he did not listen to what his parents told him. He was only sixteen years old. He told the officer of the army that he was nineteen years old and he was let fight. He was shot at Stephen's Green.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:17
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men were writing a threatning letter to the Landlord Mr. Preston of Belinter which house is no occupied by Brisco. This night the men were writing a letter and one of the little girls were listening to all that (all) was said and written. She informed the authorities Mc Cormack was arrested and tried in Trim court. He was condemned on the girls evidence and transported to Tasmania. He never was heard of after. His poor wife Cattie walked to Trim to see the Trail with the little baby in her arms. She sat on the jail steps crying never to see him again. She had to sell her bit of land to help rear her children as best she could. The girl that swore on was taken from her mother Mrs. Martain. The Landlord did very well for her and made a lady of her. She never came to this part of the country anymore becaus if she did the neighbours would kill her for telling on Mc Cormack. His wife was forbidden to write to him.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:13
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About 1850 there lived (an) a man the name of James Mc Cormack of Upper Bothar Allen who was a letter writer. This man lived with his wife and four little girls, the youngest being two months old. They owned a small division of land. They kept a woman and her two daughters in a small room off the kitchen as lodgers. Mr. Mc Cormack used write the letters in the kitchen. Mc Cormack and a few more
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:11
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Joe Byrne
Joe Byrne who lived in Kilcarne was an other letter writer (+ lived in) He died in 1903.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:10
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to the minister conserned"
We do not know what were his fee for letter writing but there is a story told of his refusal of a half-of-whiskey and a sixpence from one old lady and indignantly threw the letter in the fire.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:09
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Pat Reedmond
Brew's Hill an Uaimk Famous Letter Writer Ambrella Mender + Maker, a Mouse traps maker and bird cage maker.
This Pat Redmond was an all round man and could do almost anything with his hands. The trap was made just the same as the present hole traps.
Pat did all the letter writing in those days and by his efforts many of the ex-Indian soldiers obtained Pensions "One of his favourite sayings was "I must write
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:04
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and spent most of his time cleaning and brushing up a few statues he had in his possession and would not sell. A banquet was given bu his townsmen and admirers as a mark of their appreciation of the extraordinary talent displayed by him in producing the statue of the Blessed Virgin. The Very Rev Dr. Power President Navan Seminary Presided.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 15:02
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Tomas Curry of Navan
My Great Granduncle Tomas Curry was born in the year 1821 and died 1911. In his young days he had a taste for sculpture, but never attended an art school. He was self educated. Some of his works included, the cross in the chapel of Navan and St. Patrick erected over the Croppys grave at Tara. The latter work was done and erected at his own expense. When at the age of about eighty he still had a taste for sculpture.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:59
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Mickey Mulvany of Navan.
My father knew an old man from Navan named Mickey Mulvany. He was a very old man when he died and in his young days papers were not to be had like nowadays. It was the usual habit to pay a penny or twopence for the load of a paper. Mickey had a paper stall and one day a man got the loan of a paper and forgot to give it back. Micky walked to Drogheda after his man + got back his paper.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:56
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John Rice of Atlumney.
My Great Grandfather William Curry walked to Dublin with a man named John Rice of Atlumney to take the pledge from Father Matthew and walked home.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:54
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A Hireing Fair
Bective fair was one of the old fair in Ireland. It was held on the 1st of November and on the 16th of May. It was the best fair in the country and all the people that would have cattle would bring them there. it was all so a great hireing day for boys and girls. There used to be a lot of tents and shoes and circus the boys and girls would be dancing it used to be a most enjoying day for there would be all sorts of musicions there. It was held in a field and on the Square. On anything sold in the (fair) Field you had to pay toll and anything sold on the square was free.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:49
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hit him with the quirt across the face. He asked him again but it was no use Mc Grath still refused. This time he ran across the field and Gerrard got a horse and followed him. It was not long until he caught up with him and the boy shouted out, "You wont kill me the way you killed my father." Then Gerrard got angry and crossed the chap with the horse. The horse;s shoe hit Mc Grath on the head and killed him. Gerrard would not let anyone go near the body. That night a few Irishmen stole the body and buried it in graveyard. Not long after that the mother died with hunger under a few bushes. She was buried in the same place.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:46
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his master's displeasure and was killed. In those days it was no harm for a rich man to kill a poor man and the murder had passed away the very same as if nothing had happened at all. Mc Grath had seven in family and they all went to America except the oldest son who stayed at home to help his widowed mother. He worked with ploughmen and sometimes when he would not be working with them he worked as a stable boy for Gerrard. The stable man that Gerrard had were either Scotch or English and when they had hard or dirty work to do they got an Irish boy to do it. On this occasion Gerrard has a wild black horse who was very difficult to catch. he told the stable men to catch him and saddle hi,. They were afraid and they sent for Mc Grath but he refused and would not go near the horse. When Gerrard came to see was the horse saddled the stable men told him that Mc Grath refused. He was very angry and sent for Mc Grath. When Mc Grath came he still refused and Gerrard
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:40
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Another Storey connected with the Gerrards.
Fathers disappearance + Sun killed.
There lived a family called Mc Graths on a small farm near a huge field which is now called the "Bansha." One day Tom Gerrards father went out to hunt and he took with him Mc Grath who knew the land for miles around. That evening Gerrard came back but Mc Grath never returned. It was rumoured that Mc Grath incurred his
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:39
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up the defisit, gave him food and a pair of fresh stocking for the road.
John Gerrard - a kinf man
One day John Gerrard was on his way to Carlanstown Fair (May-day) he found a sum of money on an old handkerchief. Farther on he met a peasant who was evidently looking for something + seemed to be very much distressed. Gerrard stopped and asked what was the matter. The peasant replied that he had lost the price of his cow + was looking for it.
"I have found it" said Gerrard" "Oh! Give it to me + may God bless you" said the poor man. "I wouldn't part with it for all I have" said Gerrard but go up to Gibstown House + Give this not to the Steward + you can get the best cow on the estate. And so he did.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:35
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There lived a family called Mc Graths on a small farm near a huge field which is now called the "Bansha." One day Tom Gerrards father went out to hunt and he took with him Mc Grath who knew the land for miles around. That evening Gerrard came back but Mc Grath never returned. It was rumoured that Mc Grath incurred his
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:32
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Chilblains:- 1. Paraffin oil. C. Delaney
2 Tops of crab trees + boil sleep finger in water T. Regan
3 Steep in water in which parsnips were boiled
4 Rub with cream of goat's milk
5 Dip fingers affected in water collected on cows droppings in field - T Regan
6 Rub with mutton suet
7 Melt Pigs lard + mix with mustard
8 Steep in water in which potatoes were boiled
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:29
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Ring Worm. Blue stone and lard.
Sting. Blue
Sting of Nettle:- Get a capog and rub it in saying "Dalkin Dalkin in and out take the sting of the nettle out."
Measles. "Red nettle boiled in milk."
Wart: Clay off heel of boot when moon is full.
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2020-02-19 14:28
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Rickets:- Split a young ash + put child through opening
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:27
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James Tallon of Martry has the cure for warts. The person must bring cotton thread James kneels down on one knee. He makes the Sign of the Cross on himself Then makes the Sign of the cross with the thread on the hand where the are. He asks how many warts you have. He ties a knot on the thread He puts the thread in his purce. He says to the person, "Your as well off without them." and the person not to be looking at the warts begin to wither away and there are gone in about three days. He cured my warts
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2020-02-19 14:26
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It is fairly widely believed that there used be a school at Donaghmore before the Famine Neall or Neil Gibney was the last master to teach there. Tradition says he used go around the country when the school was broken up sleeping here + there + teaching at night when the days work was over. He was a very clever man + spoke Greek Latin + French as well as English. He knew every townland in the county + their history every rath + mound but there is no trace of anything that was written by him. He it was who told the story of the Rider of Ardnaganaimle.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:25
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I can make a lot of home made toys such as a tortoise, a daisy chain, a whistle, a doll's pram, a doll's cot, a swiz, a spinning ginny, a rag doll, a boat, a kite, a water mill, and a cart.
I like to make a tortoise out of half a wall nut shell and six cloves.
I put one clove for its nose, one for its tail and four for its feet.
Then when I have the cloves ready I have to stick them on to the shell with certofix. I like to make it on Hallow Eve night when I have the shell.
Drawing of a tortoise.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:24
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Maher's field Charlesfort, Kells, Co. Meath, gets its name from a man who was killed in it when riding a horse about a hundred years ago. There is a well in the field called Maher's well and there is a cure for whooping cough and headache in it. The person must take a drink out of the well. The well is also called Tobar na Gloise or the or the Glorious well (Tobar na Glóire)
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:21
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At the cross Rds Randlestown where a number of houses once existed stood a school taught by a Mr Farrelly. This was over one hundred years ago acording to Mr Mangan.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:19
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Drawing of a Golliewog
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2020-02-19 14:18
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the school and there was a jute factory in it also. Fr. Casey who died in Beupore attended the school, and Pat Sheridan's mother attended it also.
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2020-02-19 14:18
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the school and there was a jute factory in it also. Fr. Casey who died in Beupore attended the school, and Pat Sheridan's mother attended it also.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:18
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You can make a lot of toys at home such as little boats, kites, daisy chains, water wheels, whistles, spinning jinnies, barrows, Jack in the box, and wee gollie wogs out of yarn.
I think making a gollie wog in the nicest. You must have two or three colours of yarn.
You tie the head and then the neck and you get a wee bunch of wool and tie the two ends then put it through the middle of the wee man and when that is in, you tie below that again then the two feet and get a needle and yarn and make the eyes and nose.
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2020-02-19 14:18
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Once upon a time a man was going home from playing cards. He had to get out at a stile at a crooked tree a long the side of the road. He was living in Joe Coyle's fields in Balrathboyne. This night he was getting out at the tree and he saw a man standing at it. The stranger asked him would he have a game of cards and he said he would. Then they played a game and a card fell. The man stooped down to lift it up and he saw the devil's feet. He left the cards there and went home as quick as he could.
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2020-02-19 14:16
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and from that day to this every one of the Corbally have a birth mark resembling drops of blood.
The horses refused to draw Jacksons hearse. And every one of the Smiths of Raffan has a mane of hair down their backs. Tis said if anyone of them cut it that they would go mad.
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2020-02-19 14:16
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During the early days of the reign of Queen Anne a little Chapel was erected at Leisgbrook Navan. This Chapel was open for seven years and was closed during the Penal Laws. When Leisgbrook Chapel was closed Mass was said on the lonely rocks, which line the Boyne, below Blackcastle.
In the year 1772 the mudwall Chapel fell in on Christmas Night. The next Chapel to be erected was where our present Church now stands.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:15
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Drawing of a boat
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:14
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broke the lep cap of my livery on a pawn brokers wig. "Good boy Jack," and I to myself and I put my head in under by oxter and my two shin bones in my pocket and I ran away through bogs of stirabout and bogs holes of buttermilk till I came out at the Curragh of Kildare. I struck my nose on the battlement of the bridge and the old had fell out. She was instantly burned in a blaze of cold water and she is now making beaver hats out off deal boards and the above story is all true because I saw it with my shin and my elbow.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:14
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Drawing of a Spinning Jenny
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2020-02-19 14:14
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The Smiths of Raffan.
A band of insurgents under a Fr Murphy encountered the yoes at Drakestown Bridge not far from Wilkenstowne. The Yoes were commanded by a Jackson from Kilmainlane Wood, William Smith of Raffan, + Corbally of Wilkenstown. A man called Nulty or Naulty of Naultys cross was supposed to have warned the yoes that the "rebels" were in the district. The attack started + Fr Murphy caught the bullets + threw them back in the yoes daces but Corbally rushed forward + inflicted a mortal wound on the priest + Fr Murphy exclaimed only one of my own Religion could have given me my death blow. Fr Murphys blood can still be seen on the wall of the Bridge where he died.
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2020-02-19 14:14
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frowning
As screamed her mother o'er the deep
"My daughter, oh! my daughter's drowning"
"My child" my child!" was still her cry,
Thy love again will never cheer me
Oh! would to God I now could die,
And heaven in pity sure will hear me.
VI
My sorrow here can ne'er be stated
How could I live and not deplore thee?
When in the cold grave thou art laid,
And all thy playmates weeping o'er thee!
Come Death, oh! come, 'tis only the [?]
Can free my soul from all this sadness,
Cast thy dark shroud around my brow,
And lead me to a land of gladness.
VII
My Rachel's love I long to share,
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:13
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Many years ago in Navan there was no moat. But a queen was living in Navan at that time, when the queen died her sons buried her and built the Moat over her grave, the fairies are supposed to live under the moat and they are supposed to come out every night at twelve o clock.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:12
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hospital. Where the dose well operated. He was safely delivered off a blacksmiths anvil, and thirty two tons and a half weight. He then took sick of the stomach and he threw up cur dogs, bull dogs, hare houses, greyhounds, lap dogs and spanels. He then threw up seventy five flying grenadiers round cartriges on their way to St. Helana to bring back Napolean and they were to be back on the fifty second day of the hungerist month in July. Then a great fight took place three weeks and half outside Dublin, between an old hackney steam coach man-o'-war and a tobacconist. The fire roasted oyster shells, burned wigs, stewed lap stones and consume seventeen burned leagues of the sea. Then Jack said he would show me of his wonders, he brought me in to where himself and his sons were threshing tobacco in peas and one of the peas hopped through wall that was forty-four feet thick and killed a dead dog that was barking at a pockmarked cat that was knitting a pair of stockings and dying with the chincough. Then he brought me up an old castle eleventy seventy seven flights of stairs and I fell down and
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:10
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Mrs Coogan's shop is now. AFter a while Mr. O Neill went to live in another house. This house is situated on the corner between Brews Hill and Railway St. The fragment of the cross is supposed to be in the bottle house.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:09
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Rats in The Rye
This story is to be found in another place. some say the event happened in Rathmore + others in Randlestown. It happened in '98
Murphys Brewery + The 98 Men
See under Buildings
Soldiers Hill at Top of Old Rd Athlumnay connected with '98.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:09
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Its deep and sullen waves around her,
Which left her sadly to complain
Far from the spot where love first found her.
Unfit was she to hold the net
Against the raging roaring water;
Scarce on the eddy was it set
'Till Death with al its terrors caught her.
IV
Down, down she sank beneath the surge,
Nor e'er in life was she seen after;
Winds sang along her funeral dirge
Where'er the flood was seen to waft her.
As closed her eye, her prayer rose high
To Him whose power hath no controlling;
Yet there was none to aid her nigh,
When o'er her breast the waves were rolling.
V
But many an eye soon turned to weep
Where wild the water-wreath was
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2020-02-19 14:07
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and not much being in it saved the dog's life.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:07
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soldiers were burned to death.
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2020-02-19 14:07
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shed where the woman was milking and lay down at her feet until she took the note and then he trotted back home again.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:06
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when he died by a local bard.
If heven be pleased when sinners cease to sin
If hell be pleased when sinners enter in
If man be pleased when parting with a knave
Then all are pleased when G is in his grave.
There is a tradition in the parish that a priest named Fr. O'Rielly was put to death by the puritans in the time of Cromwell. In the year 1704 Rev. John Barnwell was registered at Trim as popish Priest of Ardbraccan. This priest was a very famous man and was related to Lord Trimblestown. He was frequently on the run from the Priest hunters and had to disguise himself. Mr. Walter of Allenstown was very kind to him and frequently gave him information when the Priest hunters were about. He could always find shelter in Wallers house and was welcome. Few Priests suffered more than Dr. Barnwall.
When he refused to take the oat of abjuration he had to leave his home and take shelter in the ditches, the barns and cabins of the poor. In those days there were two mudwall thatched chapels in my district one at Peiltown and the other in Cortown. When things were quite Fr. Barnwall said Mass in these chapels, but when Priest hunters were about he would be obliged to say Mass behind a rock or at the back of a ditch. Some
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2020-02-19 14:06
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The object which was the ban-sidhe then disappeared. When Cyril reached home his skin became as black as soot and he remained that way for a few days feeling very much out of sorts.
This story is a true one and it happened about fifty years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:05
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of the young men (of) were put on guard and God help the Priest hunter that appeared.
A notorious scoundrell and Priest hunter named Sir Richard Barker who lived near headford Kells plotted to capture Fr. Barnwall A messenger was sent for the Priest to attend a sick call. The family of the house were Protestants and the were in great glee in anticipation of the arrival of their victim. But a catholic servant overheard what was intended and managed to meet Fr. Barnwall and give him warning.
Another time word was sent for Fr. Barnwall that Mr. Waller wanted to see him. When he arrived he was captured by Priest hunters and marched to Trim Jail. The charges against him were that he was a popish Priest, refused the oath of abjuration and practised the idolatrous superstitions of the church of Rome. But through the influence of Mr. Waller he was released. A Priest hunter named Pilot tried to capture him another time, but Fr. Barnwall was a very powerful man and on this occasion Pilot got a good thrashing.
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2020-02-19 14:04
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2020-02-19 14:04
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saying, "Shut mouths catch no flies.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:03
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This story concerns the same man in Westmeath.
It was a very wet day and the priest was passing the old man's house. The priest wore white shoes and stockings. The man was standing at the door when the priest was passing. "Its a great day for young ducks and dockens" said the priest "Yes your reverence," said the man and for white shoes and stockens."
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:01
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About fifty years ago an old man lived with himself in Westmeath. The parish priest knew him well and he usually spoke to him when he met him. Once he had a pig of his own and he left it in the house along with him. One day the priest was passing by and he said to the old man "why do you keep that pig in the house. "O father, he said, it is not me that is keeping the pig in the house. It's the pig that is keeping me,"
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 14:01
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Deirtear go raibh fear d’ár bainmh do Seán Mac Enerí agus bhí triúr ban ag iascract san deoc sin fadó. Fuair an deoc a ainm mar sin. An Gob. Fuair an deoc a ainm ón gob, mar tá gob inaice na h-áite. Tón na mbád. Fuair an deoc a ainm mar tá tón ann agus thaghadh báid isteach ann chun fuithin d’faghail san oidhche. Cnapáns. Clais na tragha. Cúil a’bháid. Deoch Rahilly. Fuair an deoc sin a ainm ó duine d’ár bainmh Rahilly a bhí na chómnuide sa thráigh. Eamonn Óg’s. Fuair an deoc sin a ainm ó fear d’ár bainm dó Eamonn agus fuair sé bás nuair a bhí sé óg. Fuair an deoc a ainm mar sin. Scrallam. Deoc Robert. Fuair deoc Robert a ainm ó fear d’ár bainm dó Robert Burke ‘na chómnuide sa trágh. Claisín. Buna-Bhótair. Tá an deoc sin ós cómhair boitrín Seán de Búirce. Sé an fát go dtugdar bun-a-bhótair air ná go bhfuil bun an bóthar ós a chómar amach. An Caisleán. Sé an fáth go dtugdar an Caisleán ar ná go raibh caisleán ann fadó ag na Sasanaig. Fuair an deoc a ainm ón gcaisleán. Faill an Fhíona mar fuaradh bairrle fíona ann fadó. Do dhéin na deocana. An cead rud a dheineadar ná na cloca do thairraint. Ansin cuireadar ainm ar gach ceann aca. Sé an fát go dtugtar An Seana-deoc ar ná go bhfuil sé an deoc is aosta sa tráigh. Sé an fát go glaodtar Guala Na Corann ar ná go raibh cora ann fadó.
Pádruig.F. Mac Cárthaigh. Cromán. VII Rang. ó Seán Ó Carúna. Loch i nGainimh bháin. 56bl.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:59
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when he died by a local bard.
If heven be pleased when sinners cease to sin
If hell be pleased when sinners enter in
If man be pleased when parting with a knave
Then all are pleased when G is in his grave.
There is a tradition in the parish that a priest named Fr. O'Rielly was put to death by the puritans in the time of Cromwell. In the year 1704 Rev. John Barnwell was registered at Trim as popish Priest of Ardbraccan. This priest was a very famous man and was related to Lord Trimblestown. He was frequently on the run from the Priest hunters and had to disguise himself. Mr. Walter of Allenstown was very kind to him and frequently gave him information when the Priest hunters were about. He could always find shelter in Wallers house and was welcome. Few Priests suffered more than Dr. Barnwell.
When he refused to take the oat of abjuration he had to leave his home and take shelter in the ditches, the barns and cabins of the poor. In those days there were two mudwall thatched chapels in my district one at Peiltown and the other in Cortown. When things were quite Fr. Barnwell said Mass in these chapels, but when Priest hunters were about he would be obliged to say Mass behind a rock or at the back of a ditch. Some
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:59
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Once upon a time there lived in a little village a girl and her mother. The girls name was Shelia. One stormy night a knock came to the door and Shelila asked her mother may she open it
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:57
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noticed the loaf of now stale bread and butter he fully realised that he had spent a week with the witches.
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2020-02-19 13:57
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2020-02-19 13:56
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and told man what the serpent had said and he also became very angry. While the swallow was away the serpent found out, that the swallow was man's friend.
When the swallow was returning home he passed the serpent on the way, and just as he was passing, the serpent took a piece out of his tail, and ever after all swallows have forked tails.
The magpie is thought an unlucky bird by some people. When we see one, we say it is for good luck, and when we see two we say it is for bad luck. When the thrush sings during a storm, it is a sign that it will not last long.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:56
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senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:55
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"When our Lord sits on our Lady's lap England will meet with some mishap."
When Good Friday falls on twenty fifth of March there is supposed to be some trouble in store for England.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:55
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"When our Lord sits on our Lady's lap England will meet with some mishap."
When Good Friday falls on twenty fifth of March there is supposet to be some trouble in store for England.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:54
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"You'll do it when the hens go to Denmark."
The old people said that when the hens were settling down at night they cluck to each other. There were supposed to be planning to go to Denmark.
It must have been believed that the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:53
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boys take a delight in robbing birds nests and sometimes kill the birds.
The birds give us signs when we are going to have good weather or bad weather. When we see the swallows flying high it is a sign of good weather or bad weather, and when we see them flying low it is a sign of bad weather. When the crows return home late in the evening it is a sign that there is a storm approaching. When we see the sparrow coming towards the door it is the sign of a bad winter. When we see a flock of birds eating grass in a field it is a sign of rain.
There is a story told that at the time when our Lord was hanging on the cross, a robin came and seeing the crown of thorns on his head, he tried to pull them and while doing so, his feathers touched the blood on "His head" and ever after all robins have red breasts.
There is also a story told why the swallow has a forked tail. One day there was a dispute among the birds as whose blood would be fit for the serpent. At last they decided that the blood of man was the best. The swallow hearing this became very angry because he was a friend of man. He went
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:52
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(These coins owned by Mr Patrick McNamee, Knockbrack, Oldcastle).
Drawings of George III coins
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:47
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The wild birds which are found in this district are the robin, the thrush, the blackbird, the wren, the gold-finch, the sparrow and the magpie. The birds that migrate, are the cuckoo, the corncrake, and the swallow. These birds come to us in the end of April and stay with us till the end of August.
The robin builds its nest in a nice mossy bank. It makes it of moss and feathers and lines it neatly with small feathers. The thrush and blackbird build their nests in close bushes. They make them of moss, and wool, and feathers. and clay. The swallow makes its nest in a hole in an old wall or stable. The cuckoo makes no nest at all. It lays its eggs in another birds nest. The crow builds a large rude nest of sticks and clay.
The robin lays four small eggs of a brownish colour. The blackbird lays four or five eggs of a green colour with dark spots. The thrush lays five eggs similiar to the blackbird. The cuckoo lays three eggs in another birds nest and the bird that owns the nest has to hatch them. The wild birds hatch the eggs for about a fortnight. Some bad
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:42
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crying very loudly that is the sign of rain. When we see the seagull flyings inland that is a sign that a storm is approaching
Young boys are told, if they rob a birds nest that the bird will come to their room that night, and it will pick the eyes out of them.
A story is told about a magpie.
Once when the soldiers were looking for Our Lord, a magpie saw a piece of paper in a soldier's hand. He darted down and snapped it from him and took to Our Lord It was a plot concerning Him, and he had time to get away.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:39
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The birds that are most common this this district are - the robin the blackbird, thrush, sparrow, wren, crow, pigeon, and the magpie. None of these birds go away from us in winter.
Most of the birds in this district build their nests in bushes or in holes in old walls or in tree tops.
The nest of a robin is usually found in an old wall. It is made of hay and old dry leaves on the outside, and on the inside it is made of hair and wool and moss. The nest of the thrush is usually found in a hedge. The outside is made of hay and moss and dry leaves and the inside is lined with dry mud. The thrush lays five blue eggs. The two birds mentioned sit on their eggs for about three weeks.
The kind of weather that is approaching can be foretold, by carefully watching the actions of certain birds.
When we see the crows and the starlings mixing in the same field that is a sign of bad weather. When we hear the curlews
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:32
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There is supposed to be a Leipreachán in a quarry which is situated in a field which is called the quarry field. He stays under a bush during the day-time and comes out at night. Many people have seen him and they say his clothes are red and black shoes and a red cap.
He is supposed to have stolen a small child from Kilbarry and hid him in the furze on the hill of Balsaw.
There are mushrooms growing in this field which are called fairy mushrooms, and anyone who will pull them the Leipreachán will keep them awake that night.
There was once a boy who went astray in a snow-storm and he could not find his own house and he started to cry. He suddenly heard a noise near him. It seem to go further and further and further and in the end he followed it. It went a good distance and soon he saw a light and when he went nearer, he found it was his own house, but the cry was heard no more. When he told the story they knew it was the Leipreachán
On some nights there was heard a strange
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:21
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noise like music, but when anybody went near to see what it was, it suddenly stopped.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:19
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thing. When everyone is on the sides that they say they begin and whichever one does not fall wins the game. The "key of silence" is another game we play in summer when the day is very warm. We all sit along in a row except one and that one says an old rhyme which is, "The key of silence is now open anyone that laughs, talks, grins, or smiles, will be put down on their knees for five minutes" Anyone that does any of thes things will be put out of the game and whoever keeps silent longest will be the person to say the rhyme next.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:16
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We generally play colours when the day is warm. All the children go in row except two One is called the "namer" and the other the "fox". The namer gives a colour to each one and then the "fox" is called. The fox guesses the colours and each one runs when their own name is called. If you are not tipped you get another colour but if you are tipped you have to go out and wait till the game is over.
We also play towns and countries when the day is warm. It is a queer sort of a game. The The half of the children go on one side and the other half go on the other side. The children on one side think of a sentence that has the name of a place in it and the other children guess the name and they try to tip someone but if they do not tip anyone it is the otherones turn again. The game goes on like that.
"Trains" is a game we generally play inside when the day is wet. Two children go together and are called the gates. The rest of the children go together and they run one after the other and they run through the gates. The gates think of something and they tell it to each one when it is their turn to stop and they ask the person which of the things they like best and whichever one you say you go on the side that has that
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 13:08
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It Games I play at school are, tig, hide and seek, colours, towns and countries, trains, the key of silence.
Tig is a very good game when the day is cold. The tig is given out and whoever it falls on has the tig and she has to run after the rest of us until she tips someone and then she had the tig and so the game goes on. Some of the rhymes we use when giving out the tig are, "F. I. G you have the tig." We also say "Ickel, ackle, black bottle, Ickle, ackle, out, whoever wants a pot of jelly, please walk out." We keep saying this until everyone except one has left "den" and the lasst one in den has the tig. "Tig, tog Molly's bog, you will be lying with the black dog. Another way of giving out the tig is, "Inty, binty, banty, bay, I'll dile daman ay, Olca, bolca, stony rock, And dand, dust."
Hide and seek is another good game. One person is called the seeker and she must not watch the rest until they are hidden. Then someone shouts "cook" and the seeker comes and looks for everyone and whoever is seen first is the seeker then, and so the game continues on.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:55
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The most harmful weeds growing on the farm at home, - are the thistles, nettles, chicken-weed, prusha, running ivy, scutch weed and dock-leaves.
The land on which thistles and nettles grow is supposed to be rich and fertile. The weed which causes the most damage is the chicken weed because it creeps along the ground and clings to each plant, thus preventing the sun from shining on the plant.
Prusha is a big strong plant with a yellow blossom and it grows in poor land, and it usually grows in ground where turnips or mangolds grew the previous year.
Scutch is a very harmful weed, because it holds a lot of little worms that eat their way into the root of the plant and destroy it. Dock-leaves are usually seen growing on well-manured ground and it is very difficult to get rid of them.
Running ivy, grows on hard stony ground and it holds birds and insects which cause a great lot of harm to crops.
Dock-leaves and nettles are usually seen
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:49
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There was a boy playing handball at his house one day. His name was Jack. There came a man passing by and he asked the boy what was he doing? Jack said "I am amusing myself with this ball" so the little man said, "will you play me a game" and he also said that they would play the best out of three for one hundred pounds. "Ah" said the boy, "I have no money" "Well you must get it" said the little man. "Allright" said the boy. So they played the game and Jack won. "I will meet you here tomorrow evening" said the little man, for the second game." They played the game and the little man won and Jack was down-hearted. "That is one each said the little man. To-morrow evening we will play the final." The boy won the last game. "You must come to my house for your hundred pounds," "Where do you live," said Jack. I am the little man of the "Green Hills" far far away." "I do not know where that is" said Jack. "You must find me out or if not I'll come back and kill you" So next day Jack went off to look for the little man's house of the green hills far far away. He travelled night and day and at last he found him. He went up and sat on the big hill and after a little while the little man
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:37
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vessels used were mostly "noggens" small wooden vessels shaped like a barrel with one handle and three brass hoops. Wooden plates called "platters" or "trenchers" were also much used. The porridge was boiled in a little pot called a "skillet". There was a wooden box or bin divided into parts for holding wheaten, oaten and other meal, and was called a "lusset". Many of these old vessels are still kept in farm-houses throughout the country, and, though not used, are greatly treasured.
Bread was usually baked on a "griddle" before the oven pot came in use. The "griddle" was a flat round iron about 40 inches in circumference, with a handle on one side of it. It was put over the "greesha" in the fire and thus the bread was baked.
All bread was marked with the cross before being put to bake and this is still done in most houses.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:33
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he rose up and said, "Barret you'll pay for that when I'll come out." Then Barret got the judge to change the sentence to that of penal servitude for life. He died about four years ago in an American jail. It is supposed that as he was leaving he buried his gun in a field near the house.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:32
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The potatoes were boiled "in their jackets" and when teemed, were left over the fire for a while to dry out. Often then they were spread out on a clean, scrubbed table, everyone sat round it and had the dinner. Potatoes were peeled with the fingers.
Though breakfast, the first meal of the day was early, much of the morning work was done before-hand. The men milked the cows, fed calves, pigs and other animals and often did other farm work, too, while the "Bean-a-tighe" was preparing the breakfast. This was usually oaten porridge with milk and for those who kept bees, some honey to make it tasty. When Indian meal became known in Ireland, it was often used for making the porridge
When going to work in the fields, the men used to take a vessel of butter-milk with them for a drink, and were very fond of it, as a great many still are.
Potatoes were often used used for the evening meal before tea was introduced. Sometimes, however, potatoe cake was made and fried on the pan with "rashers" and this made a good meal. Boxty bread, rye bread and oaten bread, all of which are seldom used now, were then fairly common.
Vessels used in those old times were not like the delph and china-ware now in use. Drinking
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:32
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him was that he never robbed from the middle class in fact he was charitable to them.
Distance was no object to him and once he went to Carriganass Castle near Bantry to rob the landlord there named Barret. As he was entering the Castle with a lighted candle in his hand Barret aimed at the candle and shot his hand.
As it bled profusely it was easy to track him to his hiding place.
He was then captured and tried in court. As the judge gave him a sentence of fifteen years imprisonment
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:28
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Gee was not a native of this place but came from Tipperary with some men who went down there during the Harvest and he settled down in this house now an old ruin.
He carried out some famous robberies and was always successful. A few of the men who introduced him to this district always helped him and in fact they formed a robber gang with him as head.
He robbed all the wealthy Protestants for miles around as they were the only people that had money that time. The remarkable thing about
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:25
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There are rumours of gold being hidden in various places, but however people are very seldom able to locate them. Near my house in the townland of Mountmusic is the ivied ruins of the house in which lived the highway robber Paddy Mc Gee.
People from time to time have lifted the big flags on the floor of this house expecting to find some money there but it was all in vain. No attempt however was made to knock the walls as they are still quite firm but covered with ivy. Paddy Mc
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:25
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In olden times meals were not so varied or dainty as they are now, as people had not as much foreign food at their disposal.
Their chief food consisted of oaten porridge or "stirabout, wheaten, oaten and potato bread and, when they were introduced into the country, potatoes became a very important part of the people's diet. Tea, cocoa or coffee were not even heard of in Ireland in olden times and a lot of milk, both fresh and butter milk, was used. Goats' milk was thought a great deal of.
For meat, bacon has always been popular with the Irish and it is said that there was scarcely a farmhouse in Ireland in which there was not "a pig hanging in the chimney." This phrase was was used because, when the bacon had been salted, the "flitches" were taken and hung from the ceiling by iron crooks over the open fireplace, so that the smoke, going up the chimney also "smoked" the bacon, thus completing the curing.
Dinner very often consisted of bacon and cabbage and potatoes. Poor people, however, could not always afford even this, and had to be content with "praties and salt", with a noggen of butter milk for a drink.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:22
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October and November. Digging the crop is done in three ways viz: digging by fork, by plough, and by machine. When dug the greater part of the potato crop is stored where grown. This is usually done in this part of the country in what is designated a pit. Pits vary somewhat particulary in width according to the custom of the district.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:21
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men made preparations. After nightfall they gathered together near the home of the newly-weds and started their performance. They marched up and down outside the house, singing, shouting, playing music and beating all kinds of tins. Some of those who were "kettled" did not mind in the least as they knew that it was not with any malicious intention that the men were doing it. There were others, however, who greatly resented it, especially when the thing was kept up for many nights in succession; so, with the passing of the years, the custom has been, more or less, dropped.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:20
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planting consists in placing the seed along the bottom of the drills the distance between the sets varying from about 9 inches up to 18 ins. This work in the past was always done by hand usually in many districts by women but now is frequently accomplished by the horse-driven potato-planting machine which is expeditious, saves labour, and does satisfactory work. By hand-planting a woman about an acre a day. After manuring, sowing, and planting, have been done the ridges are spit over the sets.
In two or three weeks after planting the drills are harrowed to uproot weeds. This is done many times through the year until potato digging commences in
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:19
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The bride's people were very "flahula," as a rule, treating the guests to the best of food and drink. When all had assembled, music was played so that all the young people, and indeed many of the old ones too, could dance. Fiddles were the instruments mostly used and such tunes as "Haste to the Wedding", "the Geese in the Bog," "the Stack of Barley" and other lively airs kept the active young dancers on their feet. Songs and recitations added to the programme, helped to make it all very pleasant. The merry-making continued until morning and then the newly married couple started for their new home, the bride's mother throwing an old boot or slipper after them for luck.
If they entered the new home together, hand in hand, so they would continue through life in happiness and unity - "hand in hand" with each other. If one entered before the other, that one would be master over the house and its occupants, so the bride-groom used to see to it that it was not the bridge who was first to cross the threshold. When a girl married a man whose surname began with the same letter as her own it was said that she "changed the name and not the letter, changed for worse and not for better."
When a widow or widower got married secondly, they used to be "kettled" by the neighbours. When the wedded couple came home, the boys and
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:15
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In our farm the potato crop is mostly disposed of for human consumption. When however the price falls so low that they can be economically utilized in the feeding of stock potatoes form a valuable addition to the other food supplies of the farm.
Planting the potatoes in this district usually commences in February and continues till the middle of May. The first step in the preparation of the land in this district is to plough it and when prepared it is made into ridges or drills usually with a double board plough but in former days these latter were made with a spade.
The
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:09
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The old people had an instrument which gave a remarkably correct weather forecast. They got an empty jamjar, a bottle, and a piece of cork. The jar was half filled with water; the cork was pushed into the bottle which was also half filled with water. The bottle was inserted upside down in the jar. Position of each told of the weather.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:08
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pair rode together on horse-back.
Three or four men ran on in front of them on foot, to the house. The first to arrive there got the bottle of whisky which was ready for them and raced back again to meet the wedding party. He treated the bride first, then the bride-groom with the whisky and this was supposed to bring them good luck.
A different version of the story is that, on arriving and getting the bottle of whisky, the man broke it on the corner of the house to bring good luck and prosperity to the newly married couple.
A wedding breakfast was usually held at the bride's old home, before going away for the day. The bride's cake was cut by the Parish Priest before the breakfast and every one liked to get a piece. Some people put a little bit of it under their pillows going to bed that night, "to dream on it," with hopes that they would get an insight to their own future life in their dreams.
Nearly every one, no matter how poor, went away on their wedding-day to spend an enjoyable honey-moon. They would usually return to the bride's home in the evening.
At night all the friends and neighbours came to the house (on invitation, generally).
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 12:02
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stitious belief of the time. The old rhyme says:
"Married in white, you have chosen all right.
Married in black, you'll wish yourself back.
Married in blue, your love will be true.
Married in red, you'll wish yourself dead.
Married in green, ashamed to be seen.
Married in yellow, ashamed of your fellow.
Married in brown, you'll live in the town.
Married in grey, you'll go far away."
After looking in the mirror when ready to go to the church to get married, the bride should add something, even a brooch or a hairpin. Otherwise she will not have good luck.
Dowry, usually consisting of money, used to be given to the bride as a wedding present by her father. In the the old days when matches were often arranged between the parents of marriageable children, especially daughters, if a girl married a man of whom her parents did not approve, she would get no dowry, and her parents would "give her the cold shoulder," which meant almost disowning her.
In the ordinary way, however, there were great celebrations and feasting on the wedding day. After being married, the couple left the chapel together to go to the bride's home. Sometimes they had to walk, others travelled by means of horse and "side car" or "back to back" trap; while often the bridal
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 11:56
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The usual times for marriages in this district are during Shrove - from Little Christmas to Shrove Tuesday - soon after Easter, (if this is not during the month of May) and in June, the month of the roses. These are the most popular times, while May is a month when few people like to get married; another is an old saying; "Married in May, You'll rue the day."
Wednesday is the day on which most marriages take place and perhaps people are influenced in their choice of a day by the old rhyme concerning wedding-days. This is what it says:
Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
Saturday no luck at all.
Preparation of the bride's trousseau was a very important matter. She used to make most of her required clothes under her mother's direction, the material often being the linen and woolen cloth made in her own home. Choice of the colour for a girl to wear on the important occasion of her marriage was a matter which was rather hard to settle. The colour which one would like, might be unlucky according to the super-
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 11:43
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1. What gloomy clouds have gathered near,
A tale of grief to me revealing,
And one so sad ne'er met the ear,
Since first we saw them o'er us sailing
Their weighty tears were falling fast
While leaning o'er yon raging river
Where lovely Rachel breathed her last,
Where human aid was none to give her.
II
She left behind her mother's cot,
Where joy and peace cheered every hour;
Passed many a lone and lovely spot
To gain her favourite fishing bower
And she was sweeter, dearer far,
Than flowery vale or moonlit mountain,
And blither than the morning star,When rising from its glorious fountain
III
But soon the main rolled o'er the plain
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 11:24
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Is fada é ná long: Is cruinne é na liathróid?
Cad é sin? [Ar ceithrelín snáth]
Cioca ba mheasa leat mháthair chéile bean do driothár nú inghean driothár thathar
Fr: [Máthair céile bean dhriothár - sé sin do mháthair féin]
Níl sé amuigh is níl sé istigh is níl sé gar mór ón dtig? Cad é féin: [Fuinneóg nu doras]
Ní fuil is ní feóil is í cnámh é
As fuil is as feóil dfhás é:
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 11:11
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1. Oh Donegal the pride of all I oft times think of thee.
My cottage home where oft I roamed when I was young and free.
Big houses grand in a foreign land cannot compare at all
With my cottage bright on a winter's night on the hills of Donegal.
2. Right well I mind the harvest time the doleful dreary day.
When leaving all in Donegal to wander far away.
Neas Cressloughtown my friends stood round I bade farewell to all.
And from the van I waved my hand to the hills of Donegal.
3. When gazing back through Barne's Gap on my own dear native hill.
I thought no shame but who could blame 'twas there I cried my fill.
My parents kind ran in my mind my friends and comrades all.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:59
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1. Rev. Chevers lived in Lisfannaon.
2. " Crookshanks lived in Rectory Burnfoot.
3 " Tidd - livid in Rectory Burnfoot.
4 "Carnernie livid in Rectory Burnfoot
5 " Rev. Sides - livid in Rectory Newtowncunningham
6 Rev. Abercrombie livid in Rectory Newtowncunningham.
The Episcopal Church was formerly in a place called "The Glebe" in Milltown, where the ruins are still.
There is also a graveyard in Milltown.
Rough drawing of Carrowreafh New School built 1933.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:45
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Drawing of Turf Spade
Shaft - 34 inches long
spade 18 " "
from thread 12 " "
tread 2 inches across
spade mouth 4 1/4 " from corner to fold and
4 1/4 gain where folder over
hold 4 1/2" long
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:40
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some time before (1088) and he ordered his army to bring from Aileach to Limerick a stone of the demolished building for every sack of provisions which they had with them."
This was the end of Grianan as a "royal" residence, The clans descended from Owen and his tribe, called in Irish genealogy the Kinel-Owen, had in accordance with the custom became universal throughout Europe, assumed a surname and were now called O'Neills. They removed the seat of the "sovereignty" eastwards, and their chieftain, and tenests in long succession were afterwards installed at Tullaghogue Rath, near Lough Neagh. They also built castles at Dungannon, Omagh, Clandeboye, Shane's Castle and elsewhere. The Grianan meanwhile lay deserted and desolate, for long centuries falling more & more into ruin. Yet once more in its chequered history the old cashel was fated to be used as a temple, this time of a different faith. During the dark days of the Penal laws, the R. catholic people of the neighbourhood used to assemble furtively within it to hear mass, and on the relaxation of those laws a small chapel, 16 1/2 X 14 1/2 feet, with walls 2 feet thick, was built in the centre. For the priest to celebrate the rites of his church therein, whilst his flock were arranged on the broken terraces around. Soon after a peoples chapel was built at Burt, below
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:27
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the hill, and the Grianan was once more forsaken for a lime.
In 1837 the Ordnance Survey Commission having examined the ruins and published a full historical account of them, public attention was called to the place, with disastrous results. Visitors came hither from all parts, & the work of destruction which had hitherto been confined to time was accelerated with calamitous rapidity by the hand of man. Wantonly destructive Vandals, treasure hunters, and antiquaries, with more curiosity than discretion, all aided in the evil work, until in the year 1873 the wall of the cashel had been brought down to a height of 5 or 6 feet, and its materials scattered all about, inside & outside. The worst was over, how ever the day of its regeneration was now about to dawn.
A resident of Derry Dr W. Bernard a gentleman of rare archaeological learning, taste & zeal undertook to repair & restore the cashel. He saw that no enclosing or railing in would be of any avail in such a situation; the only mode of preserving the historic structure would be that of restoring it to its original condition. With indefatigable energy & spirit he worked upon the people of the district uintil hje had
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:15
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blue. These old rhymes are not often heard now but long ago they were believed in as well as being heard.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:15
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cake which is called a "bride's cake" for this occasion. After the breakfast the married couple and some friends go for a drive in cars or go to the city. When they come home that night they have a dance and the next day they leave for their own new home. It is supposed to be unlucky for the bride to come back to her old home before a months time. There is generally another dance after a month.
There is an old rhyme about colours for getting married in, it is-
Married in blur,
You'll always be true,
Married in white,
You've chosen aright,
Married in black,
You'll wish yourself back,
Married in brown,
You'll live out of the tow,
Married in grey,
You'll go far away,
Married in red,
You'll wish yourself dead,
Married in green,
Your not fit to be seen,
Married in yellow,
You're ashamed of the fellow.
It is supposed to be lucky to get married in - Something old, and something new, Something borrowed and something
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:12
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infused into them a portion of his own enthusiasm, and induced them to make a beginning of the restoration work in the spring of 1874. With consummate antiquarian knowledge and fidelity he directed and encouraged his volunteer band of helpers, & persevered until the task was completed. The work occupied a considerable portion of each year until 1878 - nearly five years! The neighbouring farmers & their men, from their long practice of building dry stone fences, round their fields were adept at piecing together the walls of the cashel; the materials lay ready to hand thickly scattered about the ruins; Derry merchants & contractors supplied the scaffolding. Dr Bernard fed the workers, and personally superintended the progress of the work until at length the whole was completed, and the spirited promoter & his willing assistants had the gratification of seeing the grey walls & terraces once more in the pristine condition. Dr Bernard was guided in his plan of restoration by the vestiges of the cashel found in their original position, and by the analogy of similar buildings in Ireland, notably that of Staig Fort in Derry, which is nearly entire, The only new materials brought into requisition were 181 flags, split from the adjacent rocks to supply the place of the coping stones carried away by the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 10:11
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Marriages most frequently take place during Shrove locally. May is supposed to be an unlucky month to get married in. The old people have an old rhyme about this "Marry in May you'll rue the day." Friday is supposed to be an unlucky day to get married on. There is a rhyme about days for getting married on, it is -
Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
Saturday no day at all.
It is a custom when marriages take place to have a wedding breakfast at the bride's home. The bride has a
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:58
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say that any one of the snug farmhouses now beneath the Grianan hill contains more comfort and treasure than ever did the "palace" of an Irish "king". Neither let the reader fall into the mistake of imagining that the dry open stone work of the cashel constituted the wall of the palace; the latter stood inside and the cashel was merely its protection & defence.
So the Grianan continued for over 600 years, during which period it was plundered several times by rival "kings" and by Norse rovers. Thus under date A.D. 674 the Irish annals record, "Aileach -Fririn [?] was destroyed by Finsneachta, the son of Donough, king of Ireland. Again in 937:- "Aileach Fririn was pillaged by the Danes". And the crowning disaster came in 1101, When the Four Masters record:-
Murtagh O'Brien, King of Munster, at the head of the forces of Leinster, Ossary, Meath & Connaught, marched with a great army across Assaroe (on the river Erne), and proceeded into Inishowen, which he plundered and raviched [?]; and he burned many churches and strongholds about Fiahan-Mura and Ardstraw, and demolished the Grianan of Aileach, in revenge of the destruction and demolition of Kincora (village of O'Briens) by Donal MacLaughlin
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:46
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put the lid on the coffin again. Ever since then the gates of that part of the tomb were always locked.
There are two parts in this tomb. One part was for the rich Howleys and the other part for their poor relatives.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:45
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a stray sod. The next morning the men came out on a road near the town of Cavan. They came home and when they looked at the oats, it was not cut or interfered with at all.
There is the remains of a large house on ''Trumero'' road. It is said very poor people lived there long ago. One of the men who owned the house used to go to some other house a short distance away. This night he was crossing the fields on his way to the house and as he was crossing the stile he met a fairy. He said to the man you will have a very strange dream to night, the fairy walked with the man for a long distance and never stopped laughing.
That night he dreamt that as sure as there would be four blackbirds on his ridge of potatoes the next morning there would be a treasure of gold or a lot of money in the centre of a fort in some field near the Crookedwood. They went the next morning and the four blackbirds was [were] on the ridge of potatoes. He then suggested for himself and a few neighbours from
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:43
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of the Nine Hostages (from whom the O'Neills derive their clan surname) who had brought Patrick when a boy as a slave from France. Owen was converted through Patrick's preaching, and baptized by the Saint, in the well outside the cashel. The Pagan worship was abolished and the druids banished but though the Grianan thus lost its sanctity in one respect, it retained and acquired fresh reverence in others. Owen's successors built their palace inside the cashel, and the old walls which had been a temple now became a fortress.
A word of warning here. Let not the reader be misled by the words, king, palace, royal etc used in this connection; neither let him imagine that any building resembling Windsor Castle, or the Chateau of Versailles ever existed here. An Irish "king" was merely the elected (not hereditary) head of a coterie of half-savage clans, chosen because he was the ablest, strongest, or most cunning amongst them; his "palace" was a rude erection of logs & sods, thatched with straw; and his treasures consisted of the cattle of the clan, and their products, weapons, clothes and personal ornaments. it would be no exaggeration to
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:42
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:40
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marriage custom
An old marriage custom in this district was for the bridegroom to sleep one night in the bride's house before they were married. The bride and her people would then discover if he had the habit of snoring and if he had, he suffered for it by getting a smaller fortune.
A two shilling piece was, and is even yet, put in each of the bride's shoes to bring her luck and plenty.
The bride should wear.
"Something old and something new
something borrowed and something
blue."
An old shoe in flung after the couple when they are going out the door to get married.It is supposed to bring them luck.
Some years ago, when the married couple returned to the house both would kneel on the floor, while the wedding cake was being cut over their heads. This was done to make sure that the couple should always have full and plenty.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:37
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heads and it took two blows to cut off each head and it was evening before he got the fourth blow home. Next day, he set off to fight the last and most terrible-looking giant, who had three heads and it tool three blows to cut off each head. He fough in a most determined manner but in spite of all his efforts it was dark night before he succeeded. Then he set off for home to tell his father of his good luck. After a while he came to a tree where he saw a man named Concubar-a-thorn chained to it. He induced the boy to
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:34
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human freedom and progress - the hut residence of the wild chief of the north country was here also. It was probably within the earthen enclosure outside the cashel; where also were driven the cattle of the tribe, and its women and other "treasures" kept for safety. Here too was the inauguration stone upon which successive chieftains and tanists were installed with rude ceremonies; the same which now lies at Belmont, near Derry.
There are strong reasons for believing that the Grianan as a "royal" seat was known to Ptolemy, the Greek geographer, who wrote in A.D. 120. In his map of Ireland he marks a place Regia "royal" which corresponds fairly well with its situation. Ptolemyy obtained his information from merchants or mariners, mostly Phoenicians, who were the ancient traders to these islands.
At the period of Ireland's conversion to Christianity in the fifty century by St. Patrick that famous and holy man visited the Grianan and preached the gospel there, in A.D. 443 Eoghain (pron. yoan) Anglicised Owen) from whom Inishowen, Tyrone, Benowen, Catmore [?] and many other places in Ulster are named was then "king" He was the son of Niall
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:24
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stone, and is consequently of very ancient date. When Solomon was building his temple in Jerusalem wild Irish "kings" were reigning on Grianan hill, and from its walls the smoke sacrifices to to Baal, the Sun-god, arose morning and evening.
The history of Grianan - Aileach is full of interest from every point of view. Its name is derived from the Irish word grian, "the sun", and means, pertaining to the sun." The name Aileach is a compound of the Irish words, ail, "stone" and leach, "house"; and signifies a stone building. The whole name may thus be translated, the stone house of the sun"; which points to the conclusion that the old cashel was originally a temple of the sun (which indeed its peculiar situation and construction would irresistibly suggest); and also that is was one of the first built of stone. Further, we know that in every case where we can trace the emergence of man from primitive barbarism, and the evolution of his religion, his first and last edifices are invariably dedicated to the service of his gods. The temple for the priest is always his grandest work; the palace for the king is only a secondary affair. But as kings and priests have all through history been, proverbially allies - an alliance which has generally boded ill for
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:05
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People say that you could travel churchyards on Christmas Night, without fear, because the Mother of God was out also.
On Christmas Night the youngest child should light the Christmas candle, then all should kneel to say a little prayer. The Rosary should be said afterwards.
When going to bed that night people would not bolt the doors nor would they take food off the table. It was the wayfarer's night
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:05
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Potatoes were so scarce and the people suffered so much from hunger that the shoots were planted alone. The potatoes were used as food when the shoots were taken off. The shoots grew and gave fairly good return.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 09:00
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Children were warned by their parents that warts or scabs would come on their hands if they robbed birds' nests.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 08:59
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If a person, whom bad luck followed, put eggs, laid by domestic fowl, under another person's hay it was believed the latter would thenceforth suffer from the misfortune which the former passed on to him.
Usually the eggs are placed under the tops of hay-cocks, in the meadows.
The practice was fairly common long ago but now it is practised and believed in by only very few.
The fact the some person intended to get rid of his ill-luck by passing it on to themselves - if he could- caused people great anxiety.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 08:55
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Old people used say that the robin was at the foot of the Cross when Our Lord was being crucified and that a drop of blood from His wounds fell on its breast.
The robin's breast is said to have been coloured red for the first time on that day. It is regarded as a blessed bird and people are careful not to injure it in any way.
Old people used say that the robins were Our Lady's hens.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 06:50
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There are five forts in my school district. One is situated near the village of Lixnaw in the townland of Lixnaw. Another is in Lisoughtra in William Conway's land. Another is in Ballinagar in George Gilbert's land. Another is in John Pierse's land and another in Thomas McElligott's land at Ballinagar. The fort I know best is the one which is situated in Lisoughtra in Will Conway's land. If you stood in this fort you could see the four other ones in different directions around. People say that a path is leading from each one of these forts to another.
The forts I know of are circular in shape. William Conway's fort has a fence made of trees around it and there is an orchard inside in it. John Mahony and William Conway cut all the trees inside in the fort and dug up the ground and planted apple trees in it. They grew very well and are now producing excellent fruit. The entrance to this fort is a hole in the north side of it. Inside in the middle of the fort is a large
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 06:42
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flag which is believed to cover an underground passage. John Mahony tried to dig up this flag and he failed. Every time he stooped to rise the flag he got a pain in his back and he had to stop. William Conway was once cutting the trees in this fort and he got a lump under his arm and he also had to cease work. Many people tried to explore this fort and they were driven away by a fierce bull. People in my locality say that anyone who ever tried to explore a fort did not live long after.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 06:23
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The names of the fields in my father's farm are the West Field, the Railway Field, the Big Marsh, the Orchard Field and the Quarry Field.
The West Field got its name as it is the most westerly field in the farm.
The Railway Field got its name as it is the nearest field in the farm to the railway.
The Big Marsh is so called as it is the biggest marsh in the farm.
In former years one of our fields was an orchard and at the present day we call it the Orchard Field.
The Quarry Field got its name as there is a quarry in it.
We also have another field named Ferry's Marsh and this
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 06:17
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the golden ring are symbols of his giving his wife all the wealth he has.
When the two are married the people throw rice down on them as a sign of showers of blessings. When the girl is leaving her house and is going to the Church to be married she looks into a looking glass to get one last glimpse of her young life because it is said that she will be old when she is married. Before they leave the house that morning the man comes for the girl and they leave then for the Church. The man always goes in the first car and the girl goes in the last car. The time the people get married at in this district is at seven or eight o'clock in the morning. There is no wedding feast held at the present day but they go to the nearest town for their breakfast and then go on their honeymoon.
Up to a few years ago a wedding feast used be held in the man's house on the night of the marriage. A huge feast would be given and all would make merry.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 06:09
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Large quantities of food and drink would be consumed and music and song would last till morning. "Sappers" visit the house of the newly-married couple and play, sing and dance for money and drink. They do be dressed in a queer manner and some of them have their coats turned inside out and others have their faces polished and sometimes they wear masks.
"Roping" is an old custom in this locality. By "roping" I mean that when the people are coming home from the wedding a crowd of boys stop them with ropes on the road and make the newly-married couple give them money.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 06:03
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and agree to accept each other.
In this locality money is given as a dowry and cattle are also sometimes given but goods are never as a dowry in this locality. When a person is going to get married and go to live to a new home the friends of that person walk the land and examine it to see if it is good or bad land or whether it is suitable for growing crops or not.
The people of this district do not remember marriages taking place in the houses but they say that it was done very long ago in this locality. There are many customs connected with the morning of the wedding day. It is an old custom to tie a shoe on to the car which is going to take them to the Church on the wedding morning. While the pair are getting married it is a custom for the man who is getting married to take a silver coin and a marriage ring from his pocket and give them to the girl. The silver coin and
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 05:56
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Spring".
There are many customs and beliefs connected with Shrove. Making pancakes on Shrove Tuesday night is an old custom in this locality. There is also another custom about Shrove Tuesday. It is said that the pair who are after marrying get two coins with the same image on each side of each coin and toss them up in the air. If these coins reach the ground with the same side facing up the spectators say that those who are after marrying will live happily after.
The people of this locality make matches before marrying. Matches are made in this manner. The people belonging to the girl who is getting married go to the man's house and agree to give him a certain amount of money according to the amount of land and money he possesses. On other nights the man's people go to the girl's house and make the same agreement. Then the boy and girl meet together
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 05:49
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The people of this district have certain periods of time during the year for contracting marriage. Shrove is the principal period for getting married in this district. Shrove is a period of time before Lent, starting the day after the sixth of January and ending on Shrove Tuesday which is the day before Ash Wednesday. The most of the people of this district marry on Shrove Tuesday because it is the last day of the Shrove period.
It is said that May and September and October are the unlucky months for marrying. If any person marries during these months it is said that he will have some misfortune soon after marrying. The local people say that a person should never get married on Monday, Wednesday or on Friday. The people of this district never like to get married during the harvest as they say that, "Whatever is joined in the harvest is sure to be ripped in the
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 01:17
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Thiar imBéára a bhí cómhnuidhe uirthi idtosach. As sin thaínig sí ileith go Drom Uachtaigh agus bhí tig aici ar mullach Sliabh Carn. Do sheasadh sí go minic ag féachaint siar ar a h-aít dúthchais agus is amhlaidh mar a bhíodh sí ina seasamh na' cos amhaín aici ar gach taobh d'Inbear Scéibhne. Do mhairbh muinntir Drom Uachtaig í agus do dheineadar ceithre ceathramhana dí. Tá ceathramha amhaín curtha inaice Lic(?) h-Áth Mín (in Drom Uachtaigh) agus is feídir leis na daoine an aít agus an uaig a theasbaínt go foilín. Ní fios dóibh cá bhfuil na trí ceathramhana eile curtha. Seo rann a theasbaíneann chómh tapaidh agus a bhí sí:-

"Cnoc Daod do léimeas maidin gaoithe,
Agus as san go Clanna Caoilte,
i gCorcaig aerach do dheineas pas maith rinnce,
Agus i Mainistir na Féile do chuadhas i chodladh san oidhche".

Seo an breicfeasta a bhiodh aici:-

Bhíodh an meidhbhán fíreananch fíor gheal aici,
Agus an duilleasc ó Chuanta Chláir,
An bradán geal ón Leamhain adtuaidh,
Agus breac eile ó Mhullach Bheím.

(M. O'h)
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:58
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lá na Cúirte. In Innis, do glaodhadh ar Micheál chun beurla a chur an Dán Gaedhealach abhí igceist. Do chuir Micheál an leagan beurla ab'fearr arb'féidir leis a chur air. Do saoradh é.
Do chum sé agus do scriobh sé dánta grádh, dánta óil agus dánta politiochta. Do thosuig sé ar an ólachán agus chaith sé cuid dá shaoghal ag ól agus a' baint pleisiúr as. Chuaidh sé leis an olachan toisg go raibh na dligthe no luighe go trom ar Catoilicig mar é féin. Indeire(?) thóg sé an Spáinn air feín, go dtí a dhriotháir. Tásg ná tuairisg de indiaidh sin níor fuaradh. Fuair sé bás annsin.
Is é an bearla ceart atá ar ainm ná Green. Tugann an Dean Mach Faoite, ughdair de stair Chonndae a' Chláir, "Cooney" mar an leagan beurla ar a ainm ach níl sé sin ceart. Do chómhnuig sliocht Seáin ins an gceanntair go dtí le goirid. Bhí Tomás Ó h-Uaithnin, "Estáte Agent" in a chómhnuidhe in Innis. Do chómnuig an Tomás seo uair amháin i Teach Doire. Do shíolraig clann Mach Sionann as teach Riovlí (?) agus muinntir darb' ainm Strech(?) ós Cillseannaigh ó Sheaín.
Cathain a mhair sé? Bhuel is féidir linn é sin a fhreagairt ach smaoineadh ar Micheál Ó Cuimín
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:44
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1) How-ye or Hower-ye (in Kerry How are oo)

2) "Horrid" meaning "magnificent" or "great". It was a horrid field for coursing (?)

3) "Formint" meaning "opposite"
4) "Sorra" bother on him" nothing wrong with him.
5) Gossoon
6) "Butty man" - as a salutation
7) "Good men" salutation
8) Stout fellow - as a salutation
9) Janey Mac, exclamation
10) "Geases" for stalks
11) Geahaile - girls
12) "Tip it there" meaning shake hands

13) Sweet (?) man, or good sweet man, or tight hardy fellow, or (?) youth enconiums

14) "Bad scran to ye"
15) Ye Dickens
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:36
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The Cloicteach of Tullaghard, near Trim (?) was burned by Tiernan O'Rourke. Dermod Mac Morrogh, King of Leinster, who had spread terror throughout Ireland, after putting the English in posession of the country, committing excesive evils against the Irish people, and plundering and burning many churches among which were Kells, (founded by St Colm Cille) and Clonard the original seat of the diocese of Meath (founded by St Finnen).
Fear Ceall, or Fearcall - The Lordship of O'Maolmuaidh or O'Mulloy, which O'Dugan places in the ancient kingdom of Meath, and which comprised the present baronies of Ballycowen, Ballyboy, and Fercall, or English, in the Kings county.
Another predatory excursion was made by Tiearnan O'Rourke, into Deisceart Breagh, on which occasion he slew Giollu Enain Mac Lughadha, chief of Cuithcne and Mac Gilleseachnaill
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:36
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The Cloicteach of Tullaghard, near Trim (?) was burned by Tiernan O'Rourke. Dermod Mac Morrogh, King of Leinster, who had spread terror throughout Ireland, after putting the English in posession of the country, committing excesive evils against the Irish people, and plundering and burning many churches among which were Kells, (founded by St Colm Cille) and Clonard the original seat of the diocese of Meath (founded by St Finnen).
Fear Ceall, or Fearcall - The Lordship of O'Maolmuaidh or O'Mulloy, which O'Dugan places in the ancient kingdom of Meath, and which comprised the present baronies of Ballycowen, Ballyboy, and Fercall, or English, in the Kings county.
Another predatory excursion was made by Tiearnan O'Rourke, into Deisceart Breagh, on which occasion he slew Giollu Enain Mac Lughadha, chief of Cuithcne and Mac Gilleseachnaill
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:11
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I know names of games such as Tig, Hide And Seek, Ludo, Draughts, Duck, and Marbles. When you are playing Tig some one runs after you to try and Tig you. If you get tug you must run after them, to try to tig them.
There is always a den to run into. If you get into the den before you are tug them the one running after you has to tig some one else and keep out till he tigs some one.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:11
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Áit Ainmneacha.
Seo iad cuid de na h-ainmneachaibh atá ar cuid de na garrbhaibh, cnocaibh, agus aill agus carraigeachaibh i Sruth-Sháile.
Aill: Aill Mhicil Uí Éamoinn, All an Eidhinn, Aill Riabhach, All Tiobóid Áll na nGabar, Aill Phádraig de Bhúrca, An Túr.
Cnoca: Máimín an Uathbáis, Doire Uí Bhuilt, Cnoc na Seithe, Caorthann Mór Broc Árd Breac Leacaí, Garrdhaí Garrdha Pheigin, Garrdha Nuadh, Gáirdin Máire na Mhilleadh Garrdha na Thaca, Gardha Thomais Garrdha Pháirteach, An Feileóg, An Bainnseóg, Cnocán an Lín.
Carraigeacha Mara: Carraig a Mara, Carraig an Róin, Carraig an Ime, Capaillí Cor an t-Snamh Cor na mBráthar Cor na Ceapaidhe.
Gleann Glas: Deirtear go bhfuil fathach curtha i nGleann Glas agus shil na sean-daoine go raibh ór in a uaigh agus chuadar a' toruidheacht. Bhí buidéal sa gcónra agus bhí rud éigin istigh ann. Dhoirteadar braon de ar an gcorp. Craith sé é féin. Braon eile agus dhirigh sé é féin. Ní dheaca siad níos fuide ach ritheadar leó abhaile.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:09
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There are lots of games such as Tig, Hide and Seek, Duck, Farmers in his den, Ludo, Snakes and Ladders, Jack stones, and Drafts.
Hide and Seek is not so popular now,. The people in olden times used to play it.
The first thing you do is to get someone and you make her close her eyes. Then the other ones run away and hide. Then when they are hid they shout "Cuckoo" and the one that has her eyes closed comes and looks for them. Then the girl that is found first has to close her eyes and stay in the den the next time.
senior member (history)
2020-02-19 00:03
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revengeful O'Briens in 1101 to complete their chieftains castle at Limerick. The uppermost stones found in situ, were marked with tar. Dr Bernard removed all traces of the little R. Catholic Chapel, as forming no part of the original structure.
Under the ruins & beneath portions of the wall which it was found necessary to rebuild from the foundation Dr Bernard discovered a number of articles such as a rubbing stone for grain, stone weapons, discs, clubs, etc, which were sent to the Royal Irish Academy Museum; also a quantity of turf, ashes & bones of the Bos longifrond or primeval bull of Ireland. Some of the objects thus found are extremely curious: for instance a flat stone chequered into 36 squares for playing chess, which was a favourite game of the ancient Irish; and a stone phallus.
At the base of the Grianan hill there are several caves penetrating for a considerable distance into its interior. Within the innermost of these caves, tradition says, some troops of Hugh O'Neill's horse lie in an enchanted slumber, awaiting the hour when they shall be called forth to strike a blow against the Saxon "for the freedom of Ireland". The legend also relates how a peasant, who accidentally discovered
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 23:51
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inclination inwards as it ascends. The gateway is wider below than above, and its lintel is formed by a very large flat slab of stone, which supports the wall above it. The stone of which the whole cashel is built is the common grey schist of the district, interspersed with a few blocks of quartz, gneiss and granite.
Outside the cashel, three concentric rings of circumvallation, or earthen enclosures, can be faintly traced, surrounding it at unequal distances. Between the first and second, east of the cashel, are the barely discernable remains of a tumulus; and between the second and third, due south of the cashel, an ancient well. The circular apex of the hill contained within the outermost enclosure, is 5 1/2 acres; within the second, 4; and within the third, about 1; and within the cashel itself about, 1/4 of an acre. The visitor will observe that many of the stones, outside and inside, are marked with tar: these were the uppermost found in their original positions when the cashel was restored.
The architecture ("a work of art without art") is of that rude style of uncemented stone-work, called Cyclopean for want of a better name. It exhibits a specimen of the first attempts of savage man to construct an edifice of
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 23:39
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77 1/2 feet in diameter, surrounded by the wall of the cashel, which is on an average about 13 feet thick at the bottom, and diminishes as it rises, giving room for two (sometimes three) terraces or platforms of varying breadths.
The top parapet of the cashel is 3 1/2 feet high above the upper platform, (which runs all round) about 2 feet thick, and has a coping of broad flat stones. Within the thickness of the wall at bottom, there are two passages or galleries, one on each side of the gateway: the first north-east, running inwards to a length of 41 feet, 5 feet high, and 2 feet wide; the other to the south-east, is 68 1/2 feet long, 5 feet high, 2 feet wide, and has a recess with a seat in it, 55 feet from its entrance. *
The orifices of these galleries are each about 3 feet high, and 2 feet wide. Access to each platform on the wall is obtained by flights of stone steps, of which there are, roughly speaking five groups. At the western side of the floor is a hollow, formerly occupied by the sink or midden, from which there is a flagged drain going underneath the wall to the outside. The rocky ridge of the hill runs north-west, to south-east, forming the floor. The external surface of the wall is not perpendicular, but has a curved slope or
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 23:19
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Cistí Óir i bhFolach.
Bhí fear in a chomhnuidhe thart annseo fadó agus bhí císte óir aige i bhfolach i tuighe a theach. Ar eagla go ngeobhadh na saighdiúirí é chuir sé annsin é. Nuair a chuaidh sé á thóiridheacht níor fhead sé é fhaghail ag[?] chaith sé an tuigh uilig bhaint de'n teach sul a bhfuair sé é.
Tá a lán sgeálta faoi óir a bhí agus atá sna cnocaibh taobh suas de Sruth-Shaile. Bhí fathach curtha in aice Cnuic Caisil. Cheap na sean-daoine go raibh ór in a bhfolach in a uaigh. Tughadar pící agus sluaisde leo agus cuadar chuig an áit. D'fhoscail said an uaigh. Bhí cónra ann. D'foscail siad é. Bhí buidéal ann. D'foscail siad an buidéal. Bhí rud éigin istigh ann. Chraith siad braon de ar an gcorp agus do corruighe sé é féin. Craitheadar braon eile air agus dhirigh sé é féin. Ní dhearnadar níos mó ach ritheadar leo abaile.
Deirtear freisin go bhfuil ór ag [Altó ?] taobh suas de Sruth-Shaile. Tá cupán oir, buidéal ór agu claideamh óir ann.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:49
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About fifty years ago pischogues were very common in Ireland.
It was a custom to light no fire before seven o'clock in a May morning as it was supposed that certain people had the power to take the milk butter of that farmer's cows for the year if the smoke was seen out of the chimney before that hour. Farmers used to mind their cows on a May morning.
It is told of a certain farmer that he was minding his cows on a May morning when he noticed a hare running between the cows. He had with him two fine greyhounds and sent them after the hare.
They closed with her as she was getting in the window of a thatched house on the road side.
The hare became a woman when she entered the house.
Written by John Dineen, Maulmane (Kilbrittain), Bandon.
Told by Mrs Dineen ( native of Farnivane, Bandon), Maulmane, Bandon.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:42
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of good weather. When the road is dry and dusty it is the sign of good weather. When rain is coming rivers run faster and louder. Flies fly low when rain is coming. If smoke goes up straight and thick it is the sign of rain. Soot falls before rain. A blue blaze in the fire is the sign of storm. A redness is the sight of frost.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:40
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If the sun goes down dim and pale there will be rain. If it goes down red there will be good weather. A pale moon is the sign of rain and a red moon is the sign of wind. Stars shooting in the north is the sign of a frost. If the clouds are black and heavy it is the sign of rain. If rainbows are in the north it is the sign of good weather. The wind blowing from the south in any season is the sign of rain. The wind blowing from the north in the winter season is a sign of frost and snow. It is supposed that whatever way the wind blows on Hallow-eve night it will blow that way for three months. The south wind brings most rain. A dog eating grass is the sign of rain. A cat scraping a tree is the sign of wind. Birds flying low is the sign of rain. Ducks go off the water before a storm. If hills and rocks and mountains appear near it is the sign of rain and when they are far away it is the sign
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:37
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Once upon a time two foolish men lived at Greeman's cross and they were very poor. One day they said to each other that they would have to leave the house and look for a living. When they were going out through the door one man said to the other, Pull the door after you - meaning close it - but he thought that he meant trail it after him and he trailed it after him until they came to a tree. They got up and were sleeping when robbers came along. One of the men turned round and down they fell and they got the money and went home in great joy.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:37
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In Ballinvalley there is a field called the Caldra. In this field there are many old graves. In this field also there is a stray sod. They say that there is a child buried under this stray sod. The child it is said was never baptized and that it is not at rest because it never saw the face of God. If people walk on this piece of land it is said that they are sure to go astray. The grass always stays green on this sod and that is the only way people
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:36
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Once there lived in Ballyjamesduff a woman named Mary Reilly. This woman was famous for making brooms or as they are sometimes called beesoms. She made them out of heather which she got from the bog. She would carry the heather home on her back. She would also cut a bundle of briars and pare the skin off them. With this peel she would tie the brooms on besoms, which she sold at a penny each. This great woman is dead now
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:36
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Once upon a time there was a butler named Handy Andy. His master held a party. Handy Andy was bringing up a goose on a tray, but before he brought it up he ate the leg off it. When he went up the master said "Has the goose only one leg?" "Yes it seems so" said Handy Andy. The master was very angry.
One day Handy Andy was driving his master in a coach. There was a flock of geese in a field they were passing. They all had their legs up with the cold. Handy Andy said, "Look those geese have only one leg and you were angry with me because the goose on the table had only one leg." "Hiss" said the master to the geese and they all stood on their two legs "O but you did not say "hiss" to the one on the table," said Handy Andy.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kate Growney Bolies hs a spinning wheel, which she got from her grandmother. She spins wool on it after her brother has short it of the sheep. She first washes it and then cardes it, and then she puts in in long strings and puts it through a hole at the wheel. she then works it out with her hand and foot. They usually have black and white sheep. When winter would come she would knit this wool into jumpers. The wheel that this girl has is about a hundred years old.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:33
approved
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awaiting decision
and he was going to be put out of his land for not paying the rent. One day a little man came in to him and he told him he would make him rich if he would keep it a secret. The man said he would surely. He told him to go to Faultaugh Forth on such a night and there he would find a pot of gold. The man did as he was told and he found the pot of gold. He payed his rent and he bought horses and cattle and land and he became very rich. He kept it a secret for three or four years. One day his friend came to pay him a visit and he told him of his good luck and how he became so rich. In the morning when he went out to fodder his cattle and horses he found they had vanished into a heap of dust.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was one a man named William Givney who was a famous man for weaving baskets. He lived in Moylough and was my grandfather. He was so good at this that he was called the Sally Man. In order to prepare the rods he would boil the rods, but if he was making baskets for children to bring to school he would paint them first, and then weave them. If it was for for potatos basket and creels he would not paint them. We have at home a small shopping basket made by him.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some of these treasures principally gold were hidden in forts and also in caves. Some people say the Danes buried these treasures others say the fairies.
It is said there is a pot of [gold] in a cave in Latnamard. It is in a field in Latnamard owned by Willie Dixon. A man named Barney Mac Philips came by night and tried to unearth it. He dug far down and at last something in the form of a black cat came out of it. The wind of it going past put out the candle which was giving him light. He became frightened and did not continue. The black cat was supposed to have been the devil.
Lights have been seen on forts. They are supposed to be a token of a hidden treasure.
Any red haired person is supposed to be descendants from the Danes. Once upon a time a poor man lived whose cattle and horses died
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
do bhó
Is tusa rinne an píopa ba fairrsinge sa dtír seo
Is ní caithfear ráithe an Gheimhridh go ndéanfaidh mé do spórt.
III
Siúd í an bhean a líon é, is ní le tuighe é gan strób
Chuir sí naoi bpunt síos ann is píopa de'n duilleóg
Cailleacha na tíre chruinnidís a timcheall
Is d'fag siad ar fad fuigheallach as Píopa Aindí Mhóir
IV
Ag dul go h-Inis Niadh dhom le lucht caoirigh agus bó
Maidin garbh Gheimhridh is é gaothmhar go leor
Ag dul trí Tiuin Uí Fhloinn dhom thosuigh an bád á' líonadh
Is nach maith an galún taosghadh rinne Píopa Aindí Mhóir.
V
Bhí mé amuigh i gCill Bhrighde 's mé ag ól
Bhí chomhluadar maith mo timcheall 's riar maith ceól
Bhí beirt isteach as Luimneach is an stil mhór aca líonta
'Séard d'fiafruighe an t-sean-bhean aosta: an é sin Píopa Aindí Mhóir
Bhí Raftaire an file timcheall annseo freisin. Tá túm i gCluan Áill ainmnidhthe i na dhiaidh. Deirtear gur codail sé oidche faoi agus rinne sé amhráin 'ghá mallachtú mar dubhairt sé gur "leig sé an báisteach anuas air.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Piseóga
Dá mbeadh fear ag dul ag obair ar maidin agus gur b'é an céud rud a chasfaí air ná bean ruadh ní bheadh aon rath leis i gcaitheamh an lae sin.
Dá mbeadh feirmeóir ann agus go mbeadh a chuid ba agus capaill agus cearca agus rudaí mar sin ag fághail bháis air. Dá bhfaghadh sé smut de rud marbh agus é do chaitheamh isteach i dtalamh a chómharsainn d'imtheóchadh an mí rath go léir uaidh.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Bolies there is a man named James Growney. This man is a basket maker. Long ago he used to make baskets for anyone who would ask him, but as he is getting old he does not make them at present. He used to get sallie rods and weave them together. This man also used to make cleeves for measuring a hundred of potatoes, or for carrying small sticks. He would make small cleeves for draining potatoes on. He made small baskets for carring eggs. When people heard of this man being so good they used to pay him large sums of money to make baskets and cleeves for them.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time a woman lived, who did not attend her duty. One day the minister came to see her. He asked her why she did not attend her duty as she should, "Don't you know Our Lord died for you." "Our John does not be out at all and we never heard he died," she replied.
My good woman said the minister "you are in the dark altogether." "Aye but if you had seen us before we got in the back window."
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
do bhó
Is tusa rinne an píopa ba fairrsinge sa dtír seo
Is ní caithfear ráithe an Gheimhridh go ndéanfaidh mé do spórt.
III
Siúd í an bhean a líon é, is ní le tuighe é gan strób
Chuir sí naoi bpunt síos ann i píopa de'n duilleóg
Cailleacha na tíre chruinnidís a timcheall
Is d'fag siad ar fad fuigheallach as Píopa Aindí Mhóir
IV
Ag dul go h-Inis Niadh dhom le lucht caoirigh agus bó
Maidin garbh Gheimhridh is é gaothmhar go leor
Ag dul trí Tiuin Uí Fhloinn dhom thosuigh an bád á' líonadh
Is nach maith an galún taosghadh rinne Píopa Aindí Mhóir.
V
Bhí mé amuigh i gCill Bhrighde 's mé ag ól
Bhí chomhluadar maith mo timcheall 's riar maith ceól
Bhí beirt isteach as Luimneach is an stil mhór aca líonta
'Séard d'fiafruighe an t-sean-bhean aosta: an é sin Píopa Aindí Mhóir
Bhí Raftaire an file timcheall annseo freisin. Tá túm i gCluan Áill ainmnidhthe i na dhiaidh. Deirtear gur codail sé oidche faoi agus rinne sé amhráin 'ghá mallachtú mar dubhairt sé gur "leig sé an báisteach anuas air.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time [??] and his son were going to the fair. They went a long distance without talking. At last the father said to the son "you will have to shorten the road." The son replied that he could not shorten the road. How could he? The father then said, if he would not they would have to go back.
The second morning they were going, it turned out the same way. That evening the woman asked the son what happened between him and the father that they returned home these last two evenings. She told him the next time the father would ask him that question to talk about the beautiful scenery he saw. The third morning they started off again. When the same question and the son began to talk about a beautiful field he saw. The father said, "Ha! you got a whisper last night." They continued on their journey that day.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:25
approved
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awaiting decision
The quickness of the eye deceives the hand.
A closed mouth says nothing.
Tinkers' quarrels only renew friendship.
An empty sack cannot stand.
God never closes one door but he opens another.
A day lost can never be gained.
It is often a persons mouth breaks his nose.
Strife is better than loneliness.
A wise man changes his mind - a fool never.
Don't look at all you see and dont listen to all you hear.
Three removes are as bad as a fire.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ceann an stáca
Ceann an stáca, leag ar lár é,
Go bhfaghaidh sé práta agus bolmac bláithigh.
Cá mo chuid-se? D'ith an luch é.
Cá bhfuil an luch? Siúd fé'n sop é.
Cá bhfuil an sop? Dóigh an teine é.
Cá bhfuil an teine? Mhúch an abha é.
Cá bhfuil an abha? D'ól an damh é.
Cá bhfuil an damh? Dhein tuagh mór de.
Cá bhfuil an tuagh mór? Dhein tuagh bheag de.
Cá bhfuil an tuagh bheag? Dhein snáthad reamhar de.
Cá bhfuil an snáthad reamhar? Dhein snáthad caol de.
Cá bhfuil an snáthad caol? Chuaigh sé síos annso agus suas annso,
i d' iarraidh beirtín luachra, chúgham-sa agus chúghat-sa,
An té a bhromfadh ná gáireadh, ná taisbeánadh a fhiacla,
fiche buile beag, fiche buile mór, fiche greim siongáin, fiche speach gearáin, agus fiche smúlóg.
Slaghdán Shéumais Uí Mhurchadha ó Shamhain go Bealtaine.
Síol iothlann nú clann ministir, ní bhíonn siad buan.
Ól anbhruith caorach,
A's gach a bhfeicfidh do shúil,
Diúr anbhruith mairt,
Ná fág braon de.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One time a man went to the shop with a horse and cart for his groceries. When he had all his groceries got and was going to start for home he said to himself "when I have the horse and cart here I'll get a half an ounce of tobacca."
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Treasures are supposed to be hidden in forts. They were placed there [by] the fairies. People have made attempts to unearth it, and dug to they saw the gold, but then the devil appeared and water covered the gold. The treasure is supposed to be gold. Gold was discovered in Lisarley Fort.
Once there lived a man named Leary in Lisarley who dreamt three nights after each other that there was a pot of gold on London Bridge in England. At last he went there and it was crowded with people and he said to himself that he a poor fool for coming here. As he said these words he met a man who said "you seem to be troubled." The other man told him about his dreams. The man that he met said, "Sure I dreamt three nights after each other there was a pot of gold in Ireland at a bush on Lisarley fort." The man came home and got the gold, at the bush, under the stone, on the side of Lisarley fort. Learys descendants are living in Lisarley yet.
All red-headed people are descendants of the Danes. The devil is supposed to guard the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This hard to get a good hook for a bad reaper.
Rubbish is good riddance.
If you dare a dog he will bite.
Hard pleased and easy fitted.
Do not put your wife in your pocket.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:19
approved
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived an old man whose name was Jack and he had a hump on his back. At midnight one night, when he was coming from his work he heard music behind the ditch. He stopped and listened and began to sing. The fairies were so pleased with him that they came out and invited him into the ring. About daylight the next morning a fairy came up to him and told him to look down at the ground and there saw his hump at his feet. He thanked them and went home in great joy.
Now there lived in the district another man who had also a hump on his back and he went to the place. The fairies came and he was invited into the ring.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:17
approved
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awaiting decision
or if he didn't he would loose his head and then he disappeared. The man then thought that his end was come but just then a fairy appeared to him asked him what was wrong, gave him oil to put on him before going in so as not to get burned and told him words to say so as to get in. He did so and soon found himself at the gates of hell and he got the iron bar. He gave it to the little man but he vowed that he would never again play a game of card.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived a man who was very fond of playing cards. One night when he was coming home after playing a game he met a little man who had a red coat and a beard down to his knees. The little man asked him to play a game and he did so and won. Then the little man said that whatever he would require he would get it and if he didn't he would have power to cut off his head. The man said he would like to see his father's field covered with cattle in the morning and it was so.
The next night he met the little man again. They played another game and he won and this time the fields were covered with sheep the next morning. The third night they played another game but this time the little man won and then it was his turn to ask for his request. The little man said he would have to get the iron bar from hell
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:12
approved
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awaiting decision
There was a man living in Latnamard who called himself Colonel O'Neill. One night he was coming home from a wake when he suddenly saw fairies all around him.
Another time he was in Raffoney and he saw gold built up in heaps, but he would not touch what belonged to the good people. It is said that the fairies respected him by going to his wake when he died.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:11
approved
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awaiting decision
In the townland of Lissarley stands a fort, which is covered with small bushes. A Mr Higgins took a notion he would dig these for firewood. He was warned by the neighbours that the good people would make him suffer but nothing could daunt him. That night about midnight, he was awakened by some unusual noises and the room was full of light. All about his bed, fairies were going round in rings. They were making such faces at him that he nearly lost his senses. The next morning he could hardly walk. He made his sons repair the damage.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:09
approved
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awaiting decision
jamb corner, wringing her hands and weeping, but his mother.
When John entered, she jumped from her seat and says she, "Arrah John, avic, where in the world have you been? Sure I thought you were lost entirely and that I'd never set eyes on you again." John was dumbfounded, and it was with difficulty he got his mother to understand that he thought she was lost. He enquired how she had got home and she told him that when he crossed the stile at the Giants' Grave, she was lifted by unseen hands, and carried away over bog and ditch and even over Raffoney Lough itself and deposited safe and sound on her own street.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:06
approved
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awaiting decision
It was Hallow Eve night just 70 years ago. John O'Neill his mother had gone to Monaghan early in the day for the few luxuries common to the folk at this festival. Towards dark they were returning home and as they had to pass near the home of John's sister Mary McPhillips in the townland of Cornasoo they decided to call and see her. They struck across the path by the Giants' Grave on the farm of Philip Coyle and reached Mrs McPhillips' house. Mary wouldn't let them away without a drop o' the crathur and whether they lost count of the time boxing the clatter I don't know but when they came out it was quite dark.
Mary at once produced the oatmeal and salt and put a goodly supply on the head of each, and they set off, taking the pathway by the Giants' Grave again. As it was quite dark John crossed the stile at the head of the Giants' Grave and then turned to take his mother's hand, but to his surprise she had disappeared. He was alarmed, but thinking she had returned to McPhillips', back he went, but found she wasn't there. He got a lamp and with the help of some of the neighbours, searched the adjoining fields, but no trace of his mother could he find.
Sick at heart, he turned home, not knowing how to tell his father. He lifted the latch and went into the kitchen and who should he see sitting in the
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Páirc na Cille
Páirc í seo atá i seilbh Bean Ui Ghadhra i gCnoc an Aifrinn. De réir na sean daoine bhí cill nó eaglais anseo timpeall sé chéad bliain ó shoin. De réir gach cúntas do tógadh an chéad eaglais sa paróiste seo i lár an oirthear, áit an-iargcúlda. Ansin do tógadh ceann eile i gCnoc an Aifrinn. Le h-imeacht aimsire do thit an seipéal agus do deineadh an t-Aifrinn a léigheamh sa pháirc. Tugtar Páirc na Cille air ó shoin agus "Cloch an Altóra" ar an gcloic a bhíodh mar altóir ann.
Currach na mBráithre:
Ar thaobh an bhóthair as so go Baile Mhic Chairbre mar a ghabhann an t-aith-ghiorra ó Droichead Cnoc an Lisín go Gráig na nGabhar tá currach atá beagnach tirm anois ach dréir na sean daoine bhí paiste tirm is lár istig mar a bhí clúdach maith de sgeachaibh agus ón dtaobh amuich bhí casán beag ag dul isteach tríd an bportach. Le linn na dlighthe peannadach bhíodh na sagairt istig na lár ar a dteitheadh. Ar deire thiar thall sgéitheadh duine éigin ortha agus tháinig na saighdiúirí ar a dtóir.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Páirc na Cille
Páirc í seo atá i seilbh Bean Ui Ghadhra i gCnoc an Aifrinn. De réir na sean daoine bhí cill nó eaglais anseo timpeall sé chéad bliain ó shoin. De réir gach cúntas do tógadh an chéad eaglais sa paróiste seo i lár an oirthear, áit an-iargcúlda. Ansin do tógadh ceann eile i gCnoc an Aifrinn. Le h-imeacht aimsire do thit an seipéal agus do deineadh an t-Aifrinn a léigheamh sa pháirc. Tugtar Páirc na Cille air ó shoin agus "Cloch an Altóra" ar an gcloic a bhíodh mar altóir ann.
Currach na mBráithre:
Ar thaobh an bhóthair as so go Baile Mhic Chairbre mar a ghabhann an t-aith-ghiorra ó Droichead Cnoc an Lisín go Gráig na nGabhar tá currach atá beagnach tirm anois ach dréir na sean daoine bhí paiste tirm is lár istig mar a bhí clúdach maith de sgeachaibh agus ón dtaobh amuich bhí casán beag ag dul isteach tríd an bportach. Le linn na dlighthe peannadach bhíodh na sagairt istig na lár ar a dteitheadh. Ar deire thiar thall sgéitheadh duine éigin ortha agus tháinig na saighdiúirí ar a dtóir.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fuaradh é seo leanas ó (Mhiceal) Thadhg
Ó Muláin ó Múirneach beag. Aois 59. Sclábaidhe. Chuala seisean é ón a athair féin Mícheál a mair go 78.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 22:01
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awaiting decision
According to another old tradition the black pig is supposed to have gone from Anabrack Hill to Lisevney Fort.
Meal and Salt mixed was put on young people's heads if they were going out after dark on Hallow Eve. Mrs Fitzpatrick Carn Newbliss who is about 71 remembers having this done to her.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:59
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awaiting decision
Willie Whelan Glassdrummond, Newbliss was coming on his ceildh to Fitzpatrick's of Carn one Winter evening about six o'clock. He saw a little girl in front of him and he hurried up to overtake her because he thought she was a little neighbour's girl. He overtook her on Carn Lane at James' Pats and as he drew level with her he looked to see was it the girl he took her for but there was nobody there. She had disappeared.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:58
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awaiting decision
consented and the two were married. The old man and woman never found out where the girl got the money until the day they died.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:57
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awaiting decision
the fire. The old man said to the girl "it is a pity that you have not got a fortune, and if you had I would give you my son in marriage". "How much do you want" said the girl. The man told her, and she went into the room an brought out two fists of gold and placed them on the table before their eyes. They were nearly astonished when they saw the gold or where did she get it they could not know. They all waited at the fire that night until the boy came in. The father asked his son would he marry the girl. The boy
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:57
approved
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awaiting decision
Páirc na Cille
Páirc í seo atá i seilbh Bean Ui Ghadhra i gCnoc an Aifrinn. De réir na sean daoine bhí cill nó eaglais anseo timpeall sé chéad bliain ó shoin. De réir gach cúntas do tógadh an chéad eaglais sa paróiste seo i lár an oirthear, áit an-iargcúlda. Ansin do tógadh ceann eile i gCnoc an Aifrinn. Le h-imeacht aimsire do thit an seipéal agus do deineadh an t-Aifrinn a léigheamh sa pháirc. Tugtar Páirc na Cille air ó shoin agus "Cloch an Altóra" ar an gcloic a bhíodh mar altóir ann.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:56
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awaiting decision
An old man called Oins (Owens) who lives in Cornasoo has a field with a lone bush in it. He had two men ploughing for him. One branch of the lone bush was sticking out in the way of the ploughing and one of the men got a saw and said he would cut it off. Owens told him not be he showed he'd do it anyway. He did do it but they weren't three times round the field when one of the horses took sick and they had to loose.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:54
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awaiting decision
Mary Murphy who lives in Aughaclea was getting a barn built on to her dwelling house. One evening a strange wee woman came in. She sat down and stayed a while and told her not to go on with the building, and gave her a good share of money. The barn was on the fairies' 'pad'.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:53
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awaiting decision
her when returning to her work, and his parents would allow her to marry him.
The girl paid the money that the woman owed and was soon back to her work again. After working for three or four weeks the farmer was grumbling that the girl had no money to get married to his son.
Of this she told the boy "well" said the boy, the next time he will say it to you ask him how much he wants, and then go into the room and bring out the gold and place it on the table before his eyes. The next night as the three were sitting at
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:53
approved
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awaiting decision
Phil O'Neill Latnamard heard his father telling about one night he was coming off his ceilidhe and Finlay's field near his own house in Latnamard was filled with wee people - as thick as rag-weeds.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:52
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awaiting decision
but try as he would he couldn't get out of the field. He came back to Fitzpatrick's and told them and then went home the lane and his remark was - "That was always a very gentle field."
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:51
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awaiting decision
There was an old man named O'Neill, an uncle of Phil O'Neill Latnamard, Newbliss and one night he went a ceilidh to Johnny Fitzpatrick's of Latnamard. When he was going home he went over what is now called the "well-field,"
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:49
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awaiting decision
Pat Fitzpatrick of Carn, Newbliss, Co Monoghan who died about five years ago and would be about 70 years old now had a brother Joe who lived down at Killecoan. One Sunday he came to see his brother in Carn and when going home took a short cut through Garron Rocks. As he was going through the rocks he heard a voice calling "Hi Joe." He stopped and called "What?" but received no answer. On he went and every foot or so he was called "Hi Joe." He called into the nearest house - Cusack's and told the old woman about it. He was afraid something was wrong in his brother's in Carn, but the old woman said "Go on home, you're not the first that was called in them rocks."
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:48
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a few shillings to, for I could not go to Heaven until this money be paid". The woman said she knew where he was going to. So she said she would convey him to the house. They both sat upon the horse and went on to the house where the girl lived. The boy went into the girl's house, and it was in the window he went. When he was inside the woman gave him in the two pots of gold and then disappeared.
The boy gave the girl two pots of gold and told her to pay the few shillings. The boy told her to bring the two pots of gold with
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:45
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awaiting decision
came to a place called Fairy Street Bridge he saw a woman sitting upon the bridge.
As soon as the horse came to the bridge he stopped up and would not go any further and the woman stood beside the horse. The boy dismounted and asked the man what was troubling her. "Well" said she "you are the best man and most courageous that ever before passed this road". She said to him "will you do me one turn", "I will why not" said the boy. "Go inside that bridge there and you will find two pots of gold there, and with this gold you will have to pay a man that I owe
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:41
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awaiting decision
time, there was nothing going right in the farmer's house. This night the boy decided to go to see the girl. The boy did not wish to have the parents hear he was going.
They went into bed about nine oclock and the boy went into his own room but did not go to bed. When he thought the parents were asleep, he went out the window, shook straw on the yard and took the horse from the stable and put on the saddle and started on his journey.
The night was dark, and the boy was travelling at a very fast rate. When he
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:34
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived in the vicinity of Lurga a girl named Mary Enright. She was in service in Castlemahon with a farmer, as her parents were very poor. This girl was very obedient and could do all sorts of work. The farmer and his wife had only one son. They were always grumbling that the girl had not got any fortune. After a long time in service the girl fell sick and had to go home. When she was at home for some
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:31
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returned home, and from that out Williamín slept sound and the ghost was never seen.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:30
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knelt in the shade of an oak tree, praying and asking God to pardon him for the murder he had committed. At home, when Williamín was not returning, the man of the house and his son went in search of him. They travelled for a long part of the night, until at last they came to the oak tree. Here they found Williamín praying, and there and then, he confessed to the man of the house, what he had done to his brother, many years previous.
As they were speaking a ghost appeared and ordered the man of the house to follow him to the castle, which he did. When they entered the old castle, the ghost told him to lift a special stone, and there he found the purse, which his brother hid the night Williamín attacked him for it. The pan pardoned Williamín. They all
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:25
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awaiting decision
He struck him on the head, with the wattle which he had prepared and the man fell to the ground never again to rise. Williamín immediately went on his knees to search for the purse, but he could not find it, and very soon he took the man to a nearby river and dumped him into one of its deepest holes.
Williamín returned home, weary and broken-hearted, without either the man or the money. He made a fine excuse for the man of the house, saying that his brother did not turn up. Williamín used sleep alone in the loft, but from that night forward his sleep was finished. Each night the ghost of the man he had foully murdered came to haunt him.
One stormy night, Williamín put out from home and made for the old castle. There he
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:21
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awaiting decision
bringing a fortune. Williamín, the innocent man by the way read it as usual, found out about the fortune and the date on which he was coming home, and made up his mind to meet him at an old wood which was convenient to the house.
They all waited eagerly for the night to come, when he would arrive, but alas, that night never came. When the night of his arrival came, Williamín put out with his lantern to meet him. He hid in the bushes, and very soon the man cam on and passed by. Williamín started after him, and when the man heard him he began to run, and ran into an old castle, placed the purse under a stone and ran out again. Williamín was standing outside in bewilderment, when the man came out.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 21:14
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time, there lived in the vicinity of Templeglantine, an old withered man who was called Williamín by all the people. This old man had no home of his own, but lived with people named Murphys. The man of the house had a brother who went to Canada and promised to return after a while with a fortune. The man went away, and as they got each letter from him, Williamín read them.
Finally, one day a letter came, and to the surpsie of every one in the house, it stated in it, that he was about to come home, and was
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:24
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awaiting decision
Droumatinaheen, my home district is in the parish of Durrus and it is six miles from Bantry town. There are two families in the townland and in the two families there are fifteen people. Dukelow is the most common family name. The houses are slated there. Houses were more numerous locally in former times. There are not many now in ruins.
Some of the inhabitants emigrated to America in former times. My townland is not mentioned in any song or saying.
The land is good but a little boggy but there is no wood growing there. There is a river there named "The Four Mile Water" running between Droumatinaheen and Ballycomane. There is no story connected with the river.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:19
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What town in Ireland when reversed is the same?
Ans., Navan.
Where was Moses when the light went out?
Ans., In the darkness.
Where did Noah strike the first nail?
Ans., On the head.
What is it that you wouldn't like to have, and if you had it you would not give it away for all the world?
Ans., A bald head.
Cork and Londonderry, spell me that without a "k"?
Ans., "that."
A kitchen full a room full and you couldn't get a spoon full?
Ans., Smoke.
Half a circle, all a circle, the same again repeat, and A the body stands on two feet?
Ans, GOGOA. [?]
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:13
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The man that made it never wore it,
and the man that wore it never saw it?
Ans., A coffin.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:12
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middle and hard all round?
Ans., A bed.
Why does the cow look over the ditch?
Ans., Because she couldn't look under it.
As round as an apple, as plump as a ball, can climb the hill oe'r steeple and all?
Ans., The sun.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:10
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took the road on my back?
Ans., A ladder.
A flock of white sheep on the red hill, here they go, there they go, now they stand still?
Ans., The teeth in your gum.
It opens like a barn door, it shuts like a trap, you may guess forever but you couldn't guess that?
Ans., a scissors.
What goes round teh house and round the house ans stops at the back-door?
Ans., A brush.
What's black and white and red all over?
Ans., A news-paper.
What's bought by yard and worn by foot?
Ans., Carpet.
Patch upon patch without any stitches?
Ans., A cabbage.
Four legs up, four legs down, soft in the
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:05
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What is is that always walks with its head down?
A nail in your boot.
What's full and holds more?
Ans, A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in.
I went down the road. I went up the road. I
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:03
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Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat, you'ld stay guessing for ever but you'ld never guess that?
Ans., a pipe.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 20:01
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Have you ever seen a deer with horns?
Ans., You have never seen a deer with horns, you have seen him with your eyes.
Why is a drawn tooth like something you have forgotten?
Ans., Because it is out of your head.
If I lose a shilling, and suddenly found it, what would I do?
Ans., Give up looking for it.
What has a head but cannot get a hat for it
Ans., Bray - Bray Head.
If a man got 6d for walking a mile, what would he get for walking eighty miles?
Ans., Sore feet.
Why is a dog with a broken leg much like a boy doing sums?
Ans., Because he puts down three and carries one
If a fellow met a fellow in a field greens, said a fellow to a fellow what a fellow means how many "fs" are in that?
Ans., no-one (no "f" in that)
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:54
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My Home District
Droumatinaheen, my home district is in the parish of Durrus and it is six miles from Bantry town. There are two families in the downland and in the two families there are fifteen people. Dukelow is the most common family name. The houses are slated there. Houses were more numerous locally in former times. There are no many now in ruins.
Some of the inhabitant emigrated to America in former times. My downland is not mentioned in any song or saying.
The land is good but a little boggy but there is no wood growing there. There is a river there named "The Four Mile Water" running between Droumatinaheen and Ballycomane. There is no story connected with the river.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:53
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Ans., Because there is not a single person in it.
Which tradesman is never generous?
Ans., A fisherman, because his trade makes him sell fish (selfish)
How many feet has forty sheep, a shepherd and his dog?
Ans., Two feet.
Which house is never dark?
Ans., The lighthouse.
What has teeth but cannot eat?
Ans., A comb.
What has legs but cannot walk?
Ans., A pot.
Under the water and over the water and never touches the water?
Ans., Sun in water
Why is a toffee like a race-horse?
Ans., Because the more you lick it the faster it goes.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:50
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... as the year of the crahawns (criochans). Father Carney, a clergyman and Doctor Donovan were very charitable during this famine. Sergeant Ingham distributed food from the barracks. Food which was kept in stores was given to the people according to the number in the family, so for this cause the people borrowed children, and by so doing received a good supply of food.
In Skibbereen there was a man named And Collins who was very poor and the following poem was composed by his:-
I'd rather go to Jail,
Than breaking stones upon the road,
For a pound Indian Male.
Conn Neill who was a tenant, and he got stir about for every meal and he became so sated of it that once he threw it at the housekeeper and the following poem was composed afterwards about him:-
The gruel he got to the
It would run from plate to plate
And out to Shannon's gate
Says the Sean Bean Boct
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:49
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When she is whipping cream and beating eggs.
If a man had ten sons and each son has a sister how many children has that man?
Ans., Eleven.
What is it that the longer it lives the smaller it grows?
Ans., a candle.
What is it that's put in dry and comes out wet and the longer you leave it the stronger it gets.
Ans., Tea.
Why are cheap stockings like mice?
Ans., Because they run quickly into holes.
What burns to keep a secret?
Ans., Sealing-wax.
Why is the letter "m" like good taste in playing on the piano?
Ans., Because without it music would make u-sic (you sick)
Why is a room full of married people like an empty room?
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:45
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The Famine Times
The following are stories got from elderly people about the famine of 1846-47. There was a soup-house in this district in Beamish's farm at Ardrogeena, Durrus. The soup was made in large pots and given out gratis to the needy. There was a regular staff in the soup house who distributed the soup throughout the whole day.
Monetary help came from America and Spain and food came in boats from England. Their chief food consisted of potatoes and fish and they also ate boiled Indian meal with new turnips cut into it. Some people at those times were very charitable. There is an account of one very charitable person - Mrs O'Donovan who nursed, cared who fed the people who were in want. She attended to the need of others to such an extent that her own people faced poverty. Later she became so poor that she was unable to pay the rent and eviction was her only earthy reward for her kindness.
Food came in boats from England and was stored up in a store-house, the ruins of which are still in the district in the downland of Friendly Cove. None except the wealthy were able to purchase it, and it is said that it was thrown out to sea afterwards.
In the year 1878 there was another famine, known ...
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:44
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What do we often catch but never see??
Ans., A passing remark.
What is taken from you before you get it??
Ans., Your photograph.
Why are clouds like coachmen??
Ans., Because they hold the rains (reins).
When is a cook angry?
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:38
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Old Schools
In this district it is not known of where any hedge schools were carried on. In former times the people paid about five shillings per quarter for their education. They used no copy books but they wrote on slates with slate pencils. There was a blackboard in the school chiefly for the infants use. There were very few desks in the school. So few that all the scholars were unable to sit in them at the same time.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:35
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Old Graveyards
There are two churchyards in the parish which are sill in use. One is situated in Ahagowna and the place the other is situated is known as Chapel Rock. Neither of the churchyards is round in shape. one is facing southwards and the other is sloping north and south. There is a church in each which is presently used. There are trees in both graveyards.
There are no crosses or monuments in either churchyard. There is on newly built tomb of concrete in on churchyard and two other disused ones. Local families use graveyards which are much farther away than the local graveyards in which their relatives are buried.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:25
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An Old Story
20th September 1938
Years and years ago there was a man named Hill living in Donnybrook near Doneraile, Co. cork. When ever he was going any place he rode a white horse. He was never seen on any other horse. There was a man from Doneraile working for him. He left him after a year and joined the soldiers. He and his company were sent out near the burning mountain. One evening as he was out on his duty facing the burning mountain his hair stood on his head with fright "Well beggar if that is not old Hill of Donnybrook. I must dreaming". In his next letter from home they told him that old Hill of Donneybrook died on the same evening that he saw hi riding into the burning mountain.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:21
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She had to go over to the field to show it to him. When they went into the field and when she showed him the four walls, he said to her "go no farther. kneel down there, you are in consecrated ground".
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:20
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An old Church and Graveyard
7th June 1938
In the lands of Mrs O'Regan, Kilconner, Shanballymore, Co. Cork, there is a field called the Church Field. About two hundred years ago there was supposed to be an old Church in this field. Every morning there used to be mass said in this church and people from miles around used to come there to hear ass said in this Church. In the Churchyard there was a graveyard and many people were buried there. Now in this graveyard there was erected beautiful headstones and there was also lovely flowers in it. It is supposed that the last mass that was said in this Church was in the first century. About fifty years ago Cornelius Horgan, the owner of this land was ploughing the land one day and he ploughed up the sculls and bones of a human being. That night when he was going home he took home the bones to his mother and when she saw them she made him take them back and bury them where he got them and he did so. About six years ago a priest came from England to Mrs O'Regan looking for information about this church ...
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:15
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A famous Man 6th May 1938
There was a man named Johnny Roche living in Wallstown, Killavullen, Co. Cork about sixty years ago. This man made himself very independent of all his neighbours. He was a very handy man and he was called Jack-of-all-trades. Johnny got married and his wife went to America. After three years his wife left him. Then he travelled all America with nothing to trouble him. After the third year he came back to Ireland and spent the rest of his days amusing the people by his funny doings. The first good work he done was to build a mill by the banks of the Awbeg. This mill was first used for making cotton. The next use was to cut up stones to make headstones for the local graveyards.. These works made the people very suspicious of Johnny and so he gave up his works and used his mill for grinding oats. The building of the mill was done by himself.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:09
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... river is called Bluepool to this day. The ? is still in good condition and it is a place of special interest to sightseers and many are the stories that are told about it.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 19:08
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Kanturk Castle
About a quarter of a mile from Kanturk stands the ruins of an old cast.e. It is called the old Court. It was built during the reign of Queen Elizabeth by the McCarthys but it was never finished by them. The Queen got to hear of it and she feared it would be to great a stronghold for the Irish so she ordered soldiers to seize it and finish it for herself. The castle and the workmen that were building it were seized. Some refused and they were beheaded and the mortar was mixed with their blood. Amongst those that were killed was a widows only son. The widow cursed the castle and it was never finished.
The story goes that anyone who attempted to finish it, something happened to them. The glass for the windows was sent from England for it. It was beautiful blue stained glass. It was stolen from the castle and thrown into a deep part of the river near the town. That part of the ...
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 18:07
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The Old Graveyards
Unbaptised children were buried near cross roads, these graveyards were called "crisis na leanbh".
There was one at the forge cross quite close to our school. Con Burke, Milane, told me that he remembers quite well throwing a stone on a little cairn there as he was going by. These graveyards are never used now-a-days.
Mr Draper, Rockgrove, Dunmanway said that twelve Germans (who were shipwrecked) were buried within the ruins of the old church in Carrowrane Graveyard near Old Head of Kinsale.
There is a disused graveyard near Ballinacarriga Castle about four miles south-east of Dunmanway.
Mrs Hurley, Inch, Dunmanway said unbaptised children were buried at cross road in West Kilbarry and the place was called "Crios na Marbh".
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 18:04
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Ballyduff is a village not far away from the bog and that is why it got that is why it got that name.
Ballynure in this village there were a lot of yew trees growing but most of them are cut down now.
Lisphelim. There was a man by the name of Phelim living in that place and there was a rath in one of his fields.
Kilmore so called on account of the big wood in this place.
Carnagh - There is a little round hill in this village.
Carrowphadeen. There is a crossroads here and years ago a man named Páidín lived here. There is a field near the crossroads and it is called Paddy's field.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 18:03
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They lived there happily for about ten years and had many children. The rent they payed to the cruel landlords was so high that they could endure it no longer. One night with all their goods they left for Rosscarbery and bade goodbye to Sunnyrock for ever.
In this town their children grew up. The youngest, Jeremiah, was a very noble, high spirited boy who loved Ireland. When he was twelve years old Daniel O'Connell visited Rosscarbery. Jeremiah was the first person who shook hands with him and welcomed him.
When he grew up he became a clerk in a shop in Skibbereen. He always wanted to do something for his country so he joined the Fenians in the year of 1864 and became the great patriot Jeremiah ODonovan Rossa.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 18:01
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On this beautiful September evening, the sun is setting far away in the west, just as it did one hundred and twenty years ago. From a grand old well young girls still draw clear, cool water as my grandaunt did so long ago.
Eileen O'Driscoll of Reenascreena, the eldest of a family of eight girls and three boys, went to this old well with her sisters, to draw water. As they stood by the well they saw a young man riding a horse, come towards them. He saluted them; they also saluted him. He told them that he was coming from Rosscarbery fair.
At that time it was the custom of all young people to ask the men coming from the fair for a "feirín," so Eileen asked him for a "feirín". He had no sweets or fruit, but he gave her a golden sovereign.
From that day forth friendship grew between them. Shortly afterwards they were married. He took his young bride of seventeen to his home in Sunny-Rock.
(Note) (Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa, was a first cousin of my father. When he was in America and when he was in jail he used to send papers and letters every week to his uncle, my grandfather. In these he told them how he was treated, which indeed was very cruelly.
There are three O'Driscoll families attending Reenascrena School, all of whom are cousins of O'Donovan Rossa.)
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:56
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St Peter and our Saviour were travelling through the Holy Land one day, when they met a poor man who asked them for alms. Our Lord gave him something, so they went their way. After a time they met another beggar who asked them for help also but they gave nothing to him. St. Peter turned to Our Lord saying: "Why did you not give that poor man anything". "Search his pockets" said Our Saviour. St Peter did so and found in them gold and silver. Our Lord told him to go to the lake and throw it in. When he came back, he asked him if he did as he was bid. St Peter answered: " I threw in the silver but Kept the gold. Our Lord said: Why didn't you throw it the gold? St Peter replied:
" When I came to the lake I thought it is a sin
To throw the beautiful money in
We are often hungry, we are often cold
Money is money, I'll keep the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:52
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and sometimes fifty. When a girl is getting married the boy buys a ring for her. The day before Lent is called Shrove Tuesday. Often people wait until that day to get married. The people of the house get tea for the straw boys so that they enjoy themselves.

Annie Gravin
Gortnaclassagh
Clogher
Westport
Father: Patrick Gravin
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:50
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One Summers day in the middle of June, Patrick Collins was in a funeral near Timoleague. As he was walking along by the corpse he heard a lot of crying, he asked couple of the men that were walking along with him, did they hear that, and they said they did. It was not any one in the funeral that was crying it must be the dead people.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:48
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One night Dave Grady left our house about one O clock, and he going east the road he saw a lot of men in the dike. He walked on for he thaught they were "SinnFéiners" and he just into them they were a crowd of small little men and they carrying a coffin.
The same person was going to a wake to Sanoo; there was a little Girl dead. In the field near the house was a lot of little Girls playing, about the size of the little one that was dead. There was another man with him, and they stopped for a few minutes watching them and then passed on.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:48
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their colour to a dull brown
11) Flies are near the earth because their wings are heavy with moisture and they are not able to fly high.
12) Cats sitting with their backs to the fire

Signs of fine weather :-
1) A clear blue sky.
2) Swallows flying high.
3) Dew on the grass.
4) When the floods are high
Signs of frost:-
1) Bright twinkling stars in the sky at night.
2) Crisp air.
3) Very distinct sound of train.
4) Clear bright moon.
Signs of snow:-
1) Greyish clouds in the sky.
2) Northenly winds.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:43
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In Reenascreena there is a Shrine called the "Druids Altar". There are thirteen big flags standing around in a circle. It is said that the clergyman used be inside in the middle of these and the people kneeling around outside. If the grass and litter was all cut the signs could still be seen. It was a place of worship in the olden days. It is through that that Reenascreena got its name.
These flags are in my Uncles land in the town-land of Reenascreena about a mile South West of the school.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:38
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437
32.
Tuar a' toileáin in Knockatona, Kilmaley Co. Clare land owned by Griffey family, used to used the land in common - meadowing in strips, every second year,a name for every strip. place enclosed by rivers at each side (oileán).Tuar = mac.They used to let out the land in macs.
Steang a'leacht -one of the strips in Tuar a' Toileáin.
Gleann blonoige west of Letteragh, Kilmaley.
Gleann na Gamhnaí west of Buaile na gCléireach in parish of Lissycasey.
Ráth Cróna - townland in Kilmaley.
Ré Claidhe -a division of Kyleatunna, Kilmaley place occupied by Griffey's - last portion of Kilmaley next to Lissycasey.
Ráth Gabhar, another portion of Kyleatunna
Cabhail Mholly .Cabhail Shúilleabháin.
Casaoireach-a field in Kyleatunna -a stream runs down by the wall.
Buaile na gCleireach -a townland in Kilmaley ,when the Church was burned down the Friars lived there and used to say Mass there- a mountainy place .
Crag na n-asal.All the people used to have asses going to Ennis selling turf.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:38
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There is a big wide flag in a field West of my house and up on it there was Mass said and all the people and the priest were killed. The signs of the priest's knees are on it, and the peoples also. It is there always but it is covered with rushes and briars. It is called "Cloc an Aifreann".
One day a man was looking for stones to build a gap and he saw this flag. He went home for the horse and car and carried it home with him and built the gap. Next day he found all the stones scattered about and the flag was taken back to where he got it. It is said that it was the "good people" were sent by God to take it back.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:36
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Signs of Rain:-
1) Corns and bunions are more troublesome and people with rheumatism can foretell rain by the sharpness of their pain.
2) A rainbow in the morning.
3) Dark clouds in the sky.
4) When floods go down quickly.
5) Seagulls fly inland.
6) When the rooks and curlews are calling.
7) When smuts come down.
8) When hens pick their feathers and stay near the farmyard.
9) When ducks are quacking continually.
10) Frogs croak and change
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:22
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& ón lá sin amach cuireadh na daoine marbta i rolic Furain & ni cuireadh aoinne i Rath - na n-Éag.
Is féidir leat cuma na h-uaigh a fheiceal & na lic freisin ins an spás fearach glas sin.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:21
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& ón lá sin amach cuireadh na daoine marbth i rolic Furain & ni cuireadh aoinne i Rath na n-Éag.
Is féidir leat cuma na h-uaigh a fheiceal & na lic freisin ins an spás fearach glas sin.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:18
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Paírch Garm
This field is all rocks and it is very rough.

Moher Buíde
It is the brownest Moher in the land.

Pump Field
There is a pump in this field.

Poll na Sgéach
That place is all bushes.

Dairy Field
Long ago there was a dairy built in that field.

The Small Field
This the smallest field in the land. All
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:16
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ag munadh an Fíor Creidimh dos na duainibh bhí roilic? ann insan áit sin & cuirtí na daoine annsúdh. In aice na h-áite sin bhí sean bhean in a comhnuidhe. Tharla lá gur tháinig an Naomh Pádraig don áit sin & nuair a chonnaic sé an roilic do thug sé a beannacht dó.
Bhí a sean bhean ag féachaint air ag déanamh an ghnímh sin. Casadh an Naomh. Chonnaic sé a sean bhean & do labhair sé léithi & dubhairt sé "Nuair a gheobhaih tú bás ní bheidh turas fada le déanamh agat. Is dócha go gcuirfear ins an roilic seo"?.
"Ní bheidh ar sise ag magadh faoi.
Do shín sí amac maide a bhí fén a asgal aice a baineadh sí usáid as an maide sin nuair a bhíodh sí ag déanamh lín éadach & dubhairt sé ag teasbaint an maide dó. "Faid an maide seo fé dhó".
Tháinig cutach feirge ar an Naomh & dubairt sé "Nuair a chuireas tú acht an meid suime i mo chuid oibre beidh turas níos fuide le déanamh agat. As go brach leis an Naomh annsin go dtí gur shrois sé Cnc Furáin & nuair do leag sé súl air do líonadh a croidhe le grádh leis an áit sin. Do chuir sé Teampul & roilic ar bun annsúd.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:15
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ann ach níl sé codtrom.

"An Motairín"
Sin paírch beag cearnóghach.

"Seana Mhéitheál"
Sin sean ainm igcóir páirch.

"An Padock"
Sin paírch mor le fhallaí ard.

"Cois na h-Abainn"
Sin paírch atá in aiche le abha

"Sean t-Sráid"
Sin páirch agus bhí cró ann fadó igcóir ba. Do bhí sráid ós a gcómhar agus sin é an fáth gur thugadar an t-ainm sin air.

"Garraidhe Fhloinn"
Sin gáirdín a bhí ag fear darb ainm "Floinn".
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:08
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"Garraidhe h-Abhainn"
Sin gaírdín atá in aice abha.

"An Motarachaín" - Sin paírc beag

"Garraidhe na h-Ealla"
Sin gáirdín atá i gleann.

"Cloch na Spridhe"
Sin paírc agus cloc mór bán ann.

"Poll na gCaorach"
Sin Poll cun caoirig a nígheadh

"Na Caóith"
Sin páirch atá
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:07
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ag munadh an Fíor Creidimh dos na duainibh bhí roilic? ann insan áit sin & cuirtí na daoine annsúdh. In aice na h-áite sin bhí sean bhean in a comhnuidhe. Tharla lá gur tháinig an Naomh Pádraig don áit sin & nuair a chonnaic sé an roilic do thug sé a beannacht dó.
Bhí a sean bhean ag féachaint air ag déanamh an ghnímh sin. Casadh an Naomh. Chonnaic sé a sean bhean & do labhairsé léithi & dubhairt sé "Nuair a gheobhaih tú bás turas fada le déanamh agat. Is dócha go gcuirfear ins an roilic seo".
"Ní bheidh ar sise ag magadh faoi.
Do shín sí amach maide a bhí fén a asgal aice a baineadh sí usáid as an maide sin nuair a bhíodh sí ag déanamh lín éadach & dubhairt sé ag teasbaint an maide dó. "Faid an maide seo fé dhó".
Tháinig cuthach feirge ar an Naomh & dubairt sé "Nuair a chuireas tú acht an meid suime i mo chuid oibrre beidh turas níos fuide le déanamh agat. As go brách leis an Naomh annsin go dtí gur shrois sé Cnac Fuaráin & nuair do leag sé súil air do líonadh a croidhe le grádh leis an áit sin do chuir sé Teampul & roilic ar bun annsúd.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:06
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There was a hedge school on the old Ture road. There were three dozen scholars, and they paid him two pence a week each. It was taught by a Master Morris. They wrote on slates with slate pencils.
The scholars brought the master home every day in their turn, and gave him his dinner. That was before they started to pay him the twopence. He turned out the best of scholars.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:03
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Thatching is carried out yet, but not as much as long ago.
There was a man named Tom Brown who lived in Newbliss who used to make nails out of nail rod. He had a hammer for the purpose to put the heads on them.
About forty hears ago the people used to burn their own bricks in kilns. There were two burned one in a farm in Drumlaney, and the other in Tullyard.
The way they made the bricks was first, they raised the clay, and turned it over and picked every stone out of it, and then they put them in moulds and left them out to dry. When they were dry, they put them into the kiln and burned them and then they built houses with them.
There were bricks made for a house of Mr John Herbert about ten years ago in Drumlaney. Mr David Lyons and Mr John Herbert made them. They burned a kiln just that same as before.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 17:01
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Rugadh M. O'Cuimín igCillcornán i 1688. Cailleadh é i 1760. Mar sin bhí S. O' h-Uaithin beó timcheall an ama úd 1688 - 1760. Ó thárla go bhfuil muid a cur síos ar M. Ó'Cuimín is feidir linn é seo a rád.....do rinne sé dán a' cáineadh na sagairt a thóg mionna idtaobh riaghlú na ríghthe.
Bhí suinéir na chómhnuide in - Innisdiomáin timcheall 1840. File agus scríobhnóir Gaedhealach cáiliúl ab'eadh é agus na h-amhraín a chum Micheál Ó'Cuimín tá siad le fáil i láimh sgríbhínn (Micheál Ó) an file sin. Micheál Ó Ríodha ab'eadh an suinéir sin agus tá a láimh-sgríbhínn le fáil fós i Colaisde Magnuadhat.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:57
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About seventy years ago the people made candles out of resin, which they got from fir trees. They had frames made out of iron, which they put in the resin, and then they put in the wick in the centre. They made candles out of rushes too, first they peeled the rushes and put them into grease for a day or two and left them to harden. These were called rush candles.
About forty years ago, the people used to make their own baskets. First they got a round hoop and split the ribs, and then intertwined the fine rods in and out through the ribs. Before they could make the baskets, they had to gather the sally rods and let them dry properly, or they would break. This is carried on in parts of Ireland yet.
The way they used to thatch is, first they drew the straw, and butt it, and then they had to put it on the house nice and even in beds, and put sally scallops on it, to keep the wind from blowing it off, and then they had to sew it on. The weapons that are used are a stapler and a needle for sewing it on.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:53
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File an Cheanntair:- Seán Ó h-Uaithnín (Green)

Do chómhnuig a chlann i Doirín, Cillseannaigh ibParáiste Liosceannúir. Ba leis a chlann Teach Tullach Mhoír agus an dúthaigh mór timcheall an tighe. Ní foláir nó go raibh comhacht tabhachtac aca mar thóg an Riaghaltas a bhannaí nuair a chuaidh sé (athair an file) imbannaí igcóir sagairt paróiste Innisdiomáin go mbeadh siad dílis do'n Ríogh. Rinne an athair an rud céadna igcóir sagairt Paróiste Liosceannúir agus na paraísdí eile. (1704)
Bhí beirt mhac ins an clann - bhféidir níos mó ná beirt - ach bhí beirt ann ar cuma ar leith, Domhnall agus Seán. Chuaidh Domhnall i loingeas na Spáin agus rinneadh Árd Admiral de. Tháinig sé abhaile uair amháin agus do bhronn sé cáilís ar teach phobhail Liosceannúir.
Duine leigheanta ab'eadh Seán agus is léir ó na chuid filiochta gur thuig sé go maith staid na gCatoiliceach le na linn .....go mór mór Catoilicig mar é féin abhí leigheanta. Igceann amhaín den'a chuid amhrán do cháin sé an Riaghaltas dá bhárr na droch dlíghte a chuir siad ibhfeidhm. Thóg an Riagaltas é ós cóir na Cúirte agus is cinnte go bhfuigeadh sé pionós trom marach an deagh-gníomh a rinneadh Micheál Ó Cuimín (Úghdar "Laoí Oisín")
Produstunaig dob'eadh Micheál Ó Cuimín, agus ar
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:50
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About forty years ago there was a school held in Closdaw. Mrs Daly Druminan taught in it. She resided there and each child gave a half a crown a quarter and in the winter time each child brought a turf or gave sixpence and the landlord gave her ten pounds. There was a blackboard and they wrote on a slate with a slate pencil. There were books and each child had a seat of its own. The subjects that were taught were Grammar, Geography, Dictation, and Irish was not used in any subject. There was a school in a house in Druminan about seventy years ago, and the people wrote on paper with burned sticks. Mr James Shannon Newbliss taught them and the children gave him some money. There was no blackboard. They put the paper on pot lids, and they just learned to write and read, and they sat on the floor in rows.
They burned resin candles for light. Mr Shannon lodged in his own house, and the people supported him.
Collected from Mr J. Lyons, Drumlaney
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:47
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"There's always a fine hour on Saturday - to dry the priest's shirt."
"What Friday begins with, it ends with."
"A Salmon sky:
Not long wet and not long dry."
-See the various pupil's exercise books.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:39
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About thirty years ago in the townland of Lisnagore there lived and still lives a man called Thomas James Finnegan. One night he was returning from a wake. As he was nearing his own home he went into a field with a lone bush in it. As he came to the bush a strange feeling came over him but he walked on. He could see the hedge about sixty yards from him but he could not get near it. On and on he walked but he could not reach the hedge. He did not know what to do. At last he lay down worn out by exhaustion. All night long he lay there listening to the lonely cry of owls and the other animals and birds of the night. Several times he thought he heard something pass him but he saw nothing. When day dawned he saw a pad round the field where he had walked all night. He arose and went to the hedge and got out of the field. He then went home and went to bed. He said after that it was the fairies that did it but he knows now that if ever he crosses a stray pad again to turn his coat inside out and he will come off safe. A stray pad is a trap set by the fairies to keep people from touching their haunts.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:30
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let you out of the field until morning. This path is generally leading up to a lone bush.
In the town-land of Killacoona on the road from Clones to Newbliss in the field of Mr. Agnew there also stands a lone-bush.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:29
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Around the County of Monaghan lone-bushes are not very scarce. There are at least two or three in every parish. There is one in the middle of Joe Larmer's field in the town-land of Drumacoon on the road from Clones to Newbliss. There is also one in Father Quigley's field in the town-land of Lisalea on the same road.
When people are ploughing these fields they plough round the lone-bush, and when they are cutting the crop they cut round the bush. They are called lone-bushes because they stand alone in the field. The fairies or "the good people", as they old people called them are supposed to liver under the lone-bushes, that is why the farmers won't cut them down, they say they would have bad luck. The old people say that the spot that the lone-bush grows on is a "gentle place". Sometimes people build houses on fairy paths that is a path leading to a lone-bush. The fairies will not change their path, so they will do their best to disturb the house. They will toss the furniture in the house and do all the harm they can until they take down the house. Sometimes people go on "a stray pad", that is a fairy path. If you go on their path at night they wont
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:28
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chains.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:28
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used to go and frighten people. One would get up on the other's shoulders and put a white sheet over them, and as this man thought it was a trick by two playboys of the kind he was not frightened and he went on. Just as he was passing the thing jumped out of the ditch and ran after him. He was frightened then and did not know what to do. He went on home pursued by the thing. He went in to the house and the pursuer went into one of his sheds. The man went to bed and got up in the morning to see if it was in the shed still, and it was.
The man looked for a while and what did he see only a lovely, white woman. This woman is supposed to be at that same place every night and when anyone passes who has something belonging to another person she follows him and if he has any sheds she sleeps in them till morning.
She is a fairy woman. Sometimes she turns into a horse and once a man got up on the horse and at once it turned into the white woman and he ran away as quickly as he could. Sometimes when anyone is passing she is believed to rattle
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:27
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used to go and frighten people. One would get up on the other's shoulders and put a white sheet over them, and as this man thought it was a trick by two playboys of the kind he was not frightened and he went on. Just as he was passing the thing jumped out of the ditch and ran after him. He was frightened then and did not know what to do. He went on home pursued by the thing. He went in to the house and the pursuer went into one of his sheds. The man went to bed and got up in the morning to see if it was in the shed still, and it was.
The man looked for a while and what did he see only a lovely, whte woman. This woman is supposed to be at that same place every night and when anyone passes who has something belonging to another person she follows him and if he has any sheds she sleeps in them till morning.
She is a fairy woman. Sometimes she turns into a horse and once a man got up on the horse and at once it turned into the white woman and he ran away as quickly as he could. Sometimes when anyone is passing she is believed to rattle
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:22
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leg bleeding. The men could not kill her because she appeared to be an old woman. Within a short time she died and a hundred black hounds were seen to go round the house three times and then disappear. After that the cow always gave milk and the man lived in peace ever after.
My grandfather James Murray Lislea, Newbliss, Co. Monaghan told me this story. [He died 1937 aged 93].
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:20
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He is a story my grandfather told me a long time ago. Whether it is true or not I don't know, but I will tell it to you now as it was told to me.
There was a man living at Monaghan who had but one cow. Every morning when he went to the field to milk the cow he saw a hare beside the cow. Soon the cow stopped giving milk and the man got suspicious of the hare. At last he took it into his head to kill the hare. He gathered a crowd of men with guns and hounds and surrounded the hare but she miraclously escaped. She was surrounded again and fired at but it seemed that lead would not kill her. That night the hare was seen in the field again. Next day the men surrounded the hare again but without success. When evening came the hare got tired, the men got round her in a bog. Every man but one fired at her but she escaped. This man had quicksilver in his gun so he fired at the hare and broke her leg. There was a ring of whins near and inside the ring of whins there was a ring of whitethorns, and inside this covered from view was a little house. The wounded hare crawled into this. The men followed and found and old woman with her
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:19
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Once upon a time a man was coming by the Ballybuile road from town. He was very late. When he was half-way home he saw that it was not his own bicycle he had with him, and he did not know whether to go back or to go home. Finally he decided to go home.
On his way he heard a noise as of chains and saw something very white in the ditch. When he was near it he got off his bicycle and walked along the side of the road. It was the custom that time that two men used
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:16
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She said, "Patrick Bán, only for the iron that is in your horse's hooves I would let you know whether you would pass me again."
He was very much frightened, and when he went home he was teeming sweat. It was not long after until he died. The horse was marked with the Lady's five fingers as long as it lived.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:14
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Reamh - Rádh
Fuaireas an sgéal seo on bhfear darbh ainm Brian Brún atá in a chomhnuide i sráid - bhaile beag. An t'ainm atá ar an sráid - bhaile Cireal ?tóg agus tá sé suidhte i bparóiste Fuaráin i gceartlár an Chonndae seo. Tá suas le Seamhadh seasca bliadhain caithe aige anois, & rugadh & tógadh é & chaiteadh sé a shaoghal ins an tsráid-bhaile sin. Bhí sé in a mhaor i dtosach a shaoghail go dtí an t'am cupla bliadain ó shoin nuair a bhí an fheilm a bhí fé chúram aige roinnte amach i measg na ndaoine. Fuair sé gabhaltas annsin & tá sé in a fheirmeoir on lá sin go dtí an lá indiu.
Chuala sé an sgéal seo on a athair (go ndéanaidh Dia trócaire ar a ainm) & fuair a athair é ó na sean - daoine san sráid - bhaile sin.
Sgéal i dtaobh na h-Áite
I bhfeilm Tomáis Ó h Eadhra i sráid bhaile CilChulóg tá spás fearach glas. Tá sé i bhfad níos glaise ná an talamh in a timcheall & sin an t'ainm a tugtar ar an spás sin Rath na n-Éag. San am fadó nuair a bhí an Naomh Pádraig
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:08
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One night a man named Patrick Macken of Lisrenny was coming home on horseback. As he was passing by a bank along the roadside, he saw a beautiful woman sitting on the bank combing her golden locks. This was the queen of the fairies, but the man did not know at the time who she was, and he began to look admiringly at her. She asked him what he was looking at. He said he was looking at her beautiful golden locks.
She ran after him. He drew a blow of his whip on the horse's back and the horse galloped up the road with the woman after him.
Macken was racing towards a stream. He knew that if he got across the stream he was safe, because evil spirits cannot cross running water. Just as he was crossing the stream, the woman drew a blow of her hand on the horse's back and left the trace of her five fingers on the horse.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 16:02
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Once upon a time a man who lived near a hill had cattle grazing in an adjoining field. A man told him one day to take his cattle out of the field because that night there was going to be a big war on the hill. "What is it?" asked the owner of the cows.
"There's going to be a big war between the Meath fairies and the Louth fairies".
"And which of them will win?" said the man.
"Well, you'll know tomorrow", said the other man. "If the bultherns aare hanging their heads Meath won and Louth were beaten".
"Bulthern" is the local pronunciation of "buacallán", the ragwort.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:56
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Once upon a time a man who lived near a hill had cattle grazing in an adjoining field. A man told him one day to take his cattle out of the field because that night there was going to be a big war on the hill. "What is it?" asked the owner of the cows.
"There's going to be a big war between the Meath fairies and the Louth fairies".
"And which of them will win?" said the man.
"Well, you'll know tomorrow", said the other man. "If the bultherns aare hanging their heads Meath won and Louth were beaten".
"Bulthern" is the local pronunciation of "buscallán", the ragwort.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:51
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so frightened that he ran home without the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:44
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Na deocanna
Tá feiceadh cuig deocanna i gCromán agus iad seo na h-ainmneaca atá ortha. An Screig. Deoc Tom. Deoc an Úil. Guala na Corann, Poinnte Ramhar, The Garden, Guala Leaint, Deoc a’chaca, Foill an Fhíona, An Lúib, The Lodge, An Seana-dheoc, Cloch Buidhe, An Carraig, Deoc na mBan, Tón na mbád, An Gob, Na Cnapán, Clais na Trágha, Cúil a’bháid. Deoc Nua. Eamon Óg’s. Sgrealm. Deoc Robert. An Claisín. Is e an fáth gur cuireadh An Screig air mar ainm, bhí talamh ana garm agus cairigeadh. Do tugadh Deoc Tom air mar bhí fear in-a chómnaide in-aice leis darb ainm do Tomas Ó Murchada. Do cuireadh an ainm ar an deoc mar bhíonn dhá uisge a gcasadh isteach ann agus bíonn sé fliuich i gcómhnaidhe agus tugadh deoc an íul air. Tá poinnte ramhar ag dul amach ins an uisge. Is i an fát gur cuireadh deoc a’chaca mar ainm air, bhí an salachar go léir ó gairdíní Cromán ag dul amach ann. Deirtear gur thainig báirle Fíona isteach leis an taoide I bhFaill na Fhíona. An Lúib mar tá sé ag iompócadh isteach ar gach taobh. Do b’é an céad deoca dheinead agus deoc is aosta atá ann anois agus glaodhtar An Seana-deoc air. Tugadh Cloch bhuidhe ar deoc eile mar tá cloch mór agus dath buidhe air. Tugadh Éamon Óg’s ar deoc eile, mar bhí tig ag Éamon Óg ann.
Muiris ÓGríbhín, Glaise, VII adh Rang, 30adh Lá Mí na Samhna 1938.
Fuaireas é seo ó m’Uncail Seán Ó Morónaig 35 bliadhna d’aois.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:43
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held the round wick. There was no screw for adjusting the wick which had consequently to be moved by means of a pin or hairpin. There was a handle on the side of the lamp. This lamp held about a half - pint of paraffin oil.
Next came a lamp with a glass bowl to which also there was a handle. This lamp had a small burner and a globe.
Then came a tin lamp with a bigger and better oil container, a flat wick, and a tin (later, glass) reflector. This lamp could be hung on the wall or stood on the table. It is still in common use.
Note:- The candlestick referred to on opposite page was a more primitive form of that illustrated on Page 164 (Fig. 220), Joyce's "Social History of Ireland," Part (II). So says Mrs Callan to whom I have shown the illustration.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:41
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held the round wick. There was no screw for adjusting the wick which had consequently to be moved by means of a pin or hairpin. There was a handle on the side of the lamp. This lamp held about a half - pint of paraffin oil.
Next came a lamp with a glass bowl to which also there was a handle. This lamp had a small burner and a globe.
Then came a tin lamp with a bigger and better oil container, a flat wick, and a tin (later, glass) reflector. This lamp could be hung on the wall or stood on the table. It is still in common use.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:40
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and said to the woman look, look behind you they all looked towards the door and they saw their own little child standing there and when they turned to the fire the fairy child of sheerragh as they are called was gone.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:39
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could he kiep a secret and Connelly said he could. The Child jumped up and got the bagpipes and began to play and he was playing until they heard a car coming into the yard. He jumped into the cradle and was crying again when they came in. They asked him how he got on with the child he told them make down a big fire and he would show them something they were surprised but the woman did as he said Connelly put the shovel over the fire and told the man and woman hold the child on it they did and the child began roaring and bawling
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:37
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and he sent for the doctor but it was no good he could find nothing wrong. At that time tailors used to go around from house to house. One day a tailor named Connelly came to this house as they were going to town. They told him him to mind the child and they game him work to do and they drove off to town.
Connelly was cross - leged up on the stable sewing when he heard someone calling him, he looked around and saw the child sitting up. The child said to him
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:35
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Once there lived in the district of Old Mill a married couple and they had one child. One day when the father was gone to work the mother was washing and she went out to a stream for a bucket of water while the child was asleep in the cradle.
When she came in she noticed that queer change had come over her child, he was crying and was very old looking. When the father came home she told him what happened.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:34
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amongst the members of the household, lighted, and held in their hands while the Rosary was being said. When the family consisted of a father and mother and young children the twelve candles were sometimes inserted in a piece of cowdung placed on a plate which stood on a table.
The candelstick had a round wooden base in which was inserted a wooden pillar about a yard high and as thick as a hay-fork handle. In the top of the pillar was inserted an iron nippers made in the local forge. This nippers gripped the resin or rush or bog-deal candles and contained a socket for holding the "white" candles. [See Note next page]
The first lamps were of tin and were made by the local tin-smiths in Ardee and Carrickmacross. They were also made by travelling tinkers. They were shaped somewhat like a jar. A lid went over the neck of the lamp and through this lid went a hollow tin cylinder which
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:28
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what was wrong with him and he said that he went hurling the day of the match with the fairies because when one of their men got knocked out he was called in to play in his place and ever since he felt sick.
About 12 o'clock the next night he died.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:27
approved
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awaiting decision
knocked out. the man heard a call and he ran in and took his place. They played away for a long while and they were all fine players and he was as good as any of them.
Wen the match was over there was no one in the field but himself. When he got home it was about 4 o'clock in the morning. He went to bed and his wife called to go to work but he was very tired and he stopped in bed that day and the same the next day.
The third day he got very sick and his wife asked him
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:27
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awaiting decision
being used.
All the foregoing varieties were made in the home. "White" candles, as they were called, were bought in the shops. My grandmother never saw them being made, but when young she often saw them in use.
They were of various sizes: 4, 6, 8, etc., to the pound. At the top of each candle there was a loop in the wick. A cord was run through the loops of as many candles as weighed a pound. The cord was then knotted and was hung on a crook in the roof. There were several of these crooks in every shop. The size generally used was 10, i.e., ten candles weighed a pound. Poor people bought them singly or in pennyworths. There was a "tailors candle", size 4, which was used by these tradesmen while they worked in the house.
The rush candles gave a bright, clean light, but did not last long. The resin candles were smokey.
On the eve of Twelfth Night (i.e. on 5th Jan.), twelve rush candles were divided equally (or as equally as possible)
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:25
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a famous hurler [?} one day they were hurling in a certain place and, they had a great match, that day when the match was over he went into a public house near the place and he was there until it got very late in the night.
When he was about half way home he saw a fort in a field and out of it came two teams of fairies toged out. The game began and he watched it for about a quarter of an hour until suddenly one man was
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:22
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awaiting decision
Once upon there lived a man in Barnagh named Shaughnessy he married a wicked woman.
One night she attacked a boy in the road in the form of a hound she begane spitting fire at him the boy had a bottle of holy water he sprinkled it around himself and she could not catch him. the boy sprinkled some of the holy water on top of her and she disappeared.
The priest of that parish made her do penance and she had to drain the sea with a bottomless timble.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:19
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street, and right on through Rosemount, passing the city waterworks on the left, until he reaches the hamlet of Creggan. Here a slight turn to the left, ans then to the right brings him into the road which leads straight on for about 3 miles, the Grianan being in full view all the time, like a huge, low truncated tower, on the top of its hill.
At the foot of the hill we come to a meeting of five roads at two cottages; we take the left front (rough) road and make direct for the top. After a sharp pull up the heathy slope we arrive at the site of the "ould fort o' Grianan." (as the peasantry call it) and find that we are on the summit of a bare round hill, 802 feet in height, the centre of which is occupied by a huge mass of dry stone masonry, circular in shape, and about 17 1/2 feet high. This building is the Cashel of the far famed Grianan of Aileach. Approaching it we find that it has but one gateway, facing the east, 7 feet high, and average breadth 3 1/2 feet. On each side of the gateway in the thickness of the wall, is a niche, evidently made to receive folding doors, laid back when the gate was open. Entering we find ourselves in a circular amphitheatre.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:18
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it was round in shape. The process was repeated until all the resin in the grisset was used up. The candles were then placed on the candle-board which was laid by on the mantel shelf, the candles being used as required.
RUSH-CANDLES:- A number of thick rushes was selected. The tops were cut off and the rind, with the exception of a narrow, longitudinal strip to keep the pith together, was peeled off. The piths were placed on a board before the fire until they were perfectly dry, care being taken to remove them before they became too brittle from over-drying. They were then drawn through unsalted melted butter, grease of animal fat or dripping. They were laid on the candle-board and when dry were fit for use.
Sometimes, when neither rush nor resin candles were available, a piece of bog-deal was cut in thin strips about half-an-inch in width. These strips were well dried before
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:12
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night. At all fairs and markets there were "standings" where resin was sold by the pound or half - pound. When taken home it was put over a fire and melted in a grisset, a receptacle resembling an oval, three-legged frying pan. Before it was put on the fire, water was put with the resin so that the latter might not burn. As the resin melted it was continually stirred with a piece of stick and any unevaporated water was drained away.
Strips of clean, well-dried, part-worn calico were made, about a quarter-inch wide and of any desired length. When the resin was somewhat of the consistency of thick cream one of these strips was drawn slowly through the liquid and twisted continually as it was being drawn. If it was not thought to be sufficiently thick it was immersed a second time. It was then laid on a candle-board and, when cool enough to be handled, it was rolled by hand on the board until
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 15:04
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awaiting decision
whitewashed inside and outside and in many cases the outsides of the chimneys were whitewashed.
There was a settle bed in most kitchens. It lay along the back-wall and as near the fireside as was found convenient or desirable. It was generally the children who slept in it. Where families were large they often had a shake-down on the opposite side of the floor. In the houses of well-to-do farmers press-beds were sometimes, though rarely, seen, and they were usually in the parlour, if there was a parlour.
The floors were made of "striven". Sometimes the kitchen floor was flagged.
Almost every house had a half-door. At present there are few half-doors.
Turf was the fuel in common use. It was supplemented in winter by the clippings of hedges..
Seventy or eighty years ago resin-candles and rush candles were the principal sources of light at
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:58
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townland.
The Hare Field gets its name because there used to be a lot of hares in it. There is a story told about a hare that could never be caught. Several men with great dogs tried to catch it but they never succeeded.
There is another field called the Sand Pit. There used to be sand lifted in the pit but there is none lifted at present.
There is a story told about another field called the "Raheen." There is a Lios in one of the corners of the field.
My Grand-father was going past the field which was a meadow in that year. It was after twelve o'clock. He looked out in the field when he was going past and was surprised to see a horse and cart at each cock. There were two little men about a foot high pitching the hay on to the carts. My Grand-father thought that all the hay would be gone before morning but he was surprised to see that it had not been touched.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:58
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hole and drew out as many potatoes as she needed. In due time her neighbour discovered his loss and the manner of it. He taxed Katty with theft which she indignantly denied, saying, "May the devil blind me if I took one of them!" Later in life she lost her sight completely, perhaps as a result of her prayer, and had to depend on the charity of her neighbours. The children of the locality led her from door to door. My grandmother often conveyed her from my great-grandfather's house to another house, the children of which in their turn escorted her to the next house.
James McQuaid, who lived with his wife and family in a small and very low house in Edmondstown (adjoining Aclint - see above), had for a chimney an inverted pot, portion of the bottom of which was missing. Whenever the chimney failed to draw James went outside and from the ground altered the position of the pot so as to create a draught.
Most of the houses were
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:57
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If you are calling a hen you say chuck! chuck! chuck!
When I am calling ducks I say weet! weet! weet! weet!
When calling a turkey I say yib! yib! yib!
If I were calling a chicken I would say chick! chick! chick!
When I am calling a pig I say hurrish! hurrish! hurrish!
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:57
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kicker" because she kicks when she is being milked. Another one is called "cockhorn" because she has a pair of pointed horns like a two-grain fork. Another cow is called "the white one" because she is white. Another one is called "the scut tail" because she has a short tail.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:55
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gets its name because a black cloud is said to come over it at nightfall. A person cannot see this cloud from the road but when they enter the field it becomes very dark.
It gets the name of "Glann" because it is lower than any of the other fields around it.
The "Baker's Field" gets its names because bricks used to be baked in it long ago. No person from our district remembers to see them baked in the field.
The field called "The Scregan" It gets its name from the well which is in it. It is said that an old man who lived in the yard where my parents and I now live buried a crock of gold in the "Scregan" directly in front of the the end of his house. The ruins of the house were to the right of the house we now live in. This ruin was taken down about two years ago. No one ever dug for the gold because it is not known whether it was in the middle or at the ends of it, it was buried.
"The Big Field" gets its name because it is the biggest field in the
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:54
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There is a stile leading into a field belonging to Mr Kilroy behind the church yard in Killeagh which is supposed to be haunted. One night a man named Jack Mac Cormack was coming home from work. He had to count sheep in this field. As he came near the stile he was surrounded by big walls he tried every way to get out but failed. He had to stay there untill morning. When he went home he was unable to tell them what happened to him as he got such a terrible fright he never went that way again.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:50
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The dock-leaf.
When you get a sting this is a very good cure, to rub the leaf on to the sting.
The Sow-thistle.
This is a great cure for warts to cut the thistle and get the milk out of it and but it on the wart.
The Dandelion.
This a great cure for the jaundice to boil it along with butter-milk and when it its boiled take out the weed, and drink the mixture.
Garlic.
This is a good cure for worms in horses or in cattle, is to put a cut in the skin and put a piece of Garlic inside the skin.
Oak-bark.
This is a sure cure for restoring hair to horses knees when they are cut by falling.
Laurel Leaves.
When these laurel leaves are boiled in new-milk it is a sure cure for scour in calves.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:47
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The townland I live in is called Demailstown. It is in the Parish of Kilbarry. There are seven hundred acres of land in the townland. It is situated about one mile to the south-east side of the school. There are eighteen houses in the townland and about eighty people in it. There are more houses in it at present than there used to be long ago as new houses have been built.
There is a Lios in a field called "The Raheen" which is owned by my father James Doggett. There is an old cave in one of the fields called the "Cave Field" owned by Mr John McHugh.
There are other fields called Glann Dubh, Scregan, White Meadow, Bakers field, Hare Field, Hare Field Bottoms, The Big Field, The Sand Pit.
There are two people over seventy years of age in our district. Their names are Mr Thomas Kealy and Miss Margret McGuire. No person in our district can speak the Irish language.
The "Glann Dubh" or "Black Glen"
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:45
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There once lived a man who name was Tom Daly. He lived in Dungimmon. He was a very good runner and walker. Tom won gold medals for his running in Dublin and in other parts of Eire as well. One day he started to walk to Dublin. He left on a Monday morning and he was back form Dublin on Wednesday evening.
His father was a very good dune, runner as well. Tom was a noted runner. He often went miles and to races and ran after his journy. There are two boys of his alive to the present. One of them is about sixty five and the other is about sixty one. When he was a young he ran to Mullingar in two hours . He is dead about twenty one year. He was beried in the old graveyard called Killbrid. His father was a Blacksmith and his mother was a dress maker.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:40
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The two men were to kill the cat and then of course the jug was to be theirs, Heany was ambitious of course and decided not to tell Clarke and to go alone so off he went gun in hand and spade over his shoulder determined to dig the hidden treasure. He arived at the spot and waited for the given time, then started operations.
He dug for some time then reahed the flag, the next he saw was the black cat he lit a match, though the were very few at the time All at once he recognised the cat to be his one ashiepet he said with alarm you poor little devil I wont kill you, Yould do me no harm took the cat left him aside and turned up the flag and got the jug.
He took it home very carefull. On reachin the house lit a candle and to his dismay found nothing in the jug only turnip seed. He put it unber his bed for 9 night and 9 day thinking he night dream again but he never dreant form that day to this day.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:32
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Some while about the 18th Ceentery there lived a man in Clonty duffy named Henry Sherwood. He was in fairly low Circumstances. One night in the month of January he had a very pleasant dream.
He dreamt of a jug of bold which was concealed in a fort in Rechlaghy. Two nights leater he dreamt the same story over again, but at this time there was a draw back that was that he would bring an old man with him named Hugh Clarke, and this he couldn't think of doing.
A week past and he dreamt the same story again and this great jug was to be guarded by a cat. The jug was covered with a flag where the great cat was to sit.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:26
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These are some old prayers I have heard at home. This is one that is said when you go to bed at night.-
There are four corners on my bed,
There are four angels round my head,
Mathew, Mark, Luke and John,
Protect me 'till this night is done.
Another prayer that is said when in bed is to make the letters I.N.R.I on your forehead and say Jesus of Nazareth King of the Jews protect me from a sudden and unprepared death.
A prayer said when getting up out of bed -
O angel of God my guardian dear,
To whom God love commits me here,
Ever this day be at my side,
To light and guard to rule and guide.
A prayer said when going on a journey -
There are four corners on my bed,
There are four angels round its head,
Mathew, Mark, Luke and John,
Protect me 'till this journey is done.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:21
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met by a Fairy and the fairy said me hardy fellow and John said I am hardy enough for you by that he was brought away by they fairy and never seen any mor. It is said that he was brought to Butts Fort. He was often seen by his bother around Christmas riding on a white horse along with other fairys.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:18
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At about 1930 there was a man named John Lynch who was allways playing cards. This night he was coming from card playing on a lonely road and he had the voise saying will you have a game John and he said he would and a table was set before him and a man siting at it and deck of cards John sat down and the man put out a sixpence and John put out another and the man won it and he put out another and he won it.
John said he would play any more. The man that was playing with was the devil and he was taking the money out John pocket. John got up to go home and when he looking under the table he saw the feet of him he started off. He was about a mile from home and he was
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:12
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he went in and told his Mother of what happened.
The Mother was alarmed for the moment but afterwards made up her mind to take in the coffin which the did, the coffin was no sooner in the house when the found a little noise they opened the lid and to there great surprise a nice young landy sat up said dont be afraid of me
Im not a corpse I was taken away by the fairies So she called for food and a drink which she got warmly she got a comfortable bed and in the morning early when she recovered from her fatigue she told her whole story There was a messenger sent to her father for whcih he recived cooly saying that his daughter was dead and bured the messenger related the Story as he herd it and insisted coming to see her, which he did, There was unspeakable joy and tears at the meeting and when she told her story and how, her rescue came to pass with tears of joy and sorrow in his eys her father embraced James which was accepted accordingally so next morning the whole party left for the Co Longford.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:12
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There was once an old man and they thought he was very poor. He had a walking-cane and every place he went he brought the cane with him. When he was dying, he told them to bury the cane with him. When they were putting the cane into the coffin it was too big, so they cut a bit off it and a big heap of gold and silver fell out
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:12
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In or about 1833 there live a boy named James Mooney in the town land of Molley boy in the County of Cavan now James was afine handsome young fellow living in a little farm with his Mother he was a lighthearted young boy.
fond, of Music dances and especially a game of cards his Mother grew tired sitting alone by herself at night and often said to James Avic now you will have to be in at 10 oclock of course James paid little attention to his Mother request
but time and again this appeal was made to James and a length his Mother grew angry and told him that if he woulden't take her bidding he would be sorry In the mean time James had it arranged with some friends of his owne for a game of cards in Colligan's of Barconey.
All assembled on the appionted night the played the cards
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:10
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find out. He went into the castle, where he got a great welcome from the owner, who asked him if he would stay. The man said he would. So the other showed him his room. He did not go into the bed himself, but his dog did. The man had decided to wait and see what the owner would do but he did not need to wait long, because the bed gave away under the dog and it sank down into the Maine. The man then knew the secret and made it known to the public and the owner was executed.
(The same story is related abot Kilorglin Castle.)
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:07
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A Story
Once upon a time a very rich man was living in a castle which was situated over the Maine, a river which is flowing beside the town of Castlemaine. He used to invite a number of people to his castle, but what made the people wonder was that those who entered used never be seen again. The people made up their minds to see what was happening inside So one man said he would
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:05
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till about 12 oclock each went home in there own direction while James Mooney had a very lonly road to traval along.
James hadent gone far when he heard the trampling of feet behind him and he went some what faster the sounds that he heard in the distance came nearer and finally over took him.
He recognised the marching people to be a funeral with one man in front giving an occasionall call fall out and fall in"
James got frightened at the very taught of a funeral at that time of night in the midst of his fright the leader of the band gave his usual call "fall out James thaught tht the call appealed to him
before he had time to use any more judgment he was shouldring the beir while he was carrying it there was no further call "fall out" from the leader till he came near his owne gate
When all the marching crowd disappeared then the coffin was lift to him.
Tis then he felt terrifed
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:03
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On St Patrick's Day it was considered that the proper thing to do was to offer treats to each other in honour of St. Patrick.
A certain woman would offer a lot of drinks. On one St. Patrick's Day a woman who had offered the drinks was going home and she sat down on the side of the road and fell asleep. When she woke and was getting up to go home she found that she could not stand and she said "O Holy St. Patrick look what I am suffering for you."
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 14:00
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out. He went into the castle where he got a great welcome from the owner who asked him is he would stay. The man said he would so the other showed him to his room. He did not go into the bed himself but his dog did. The man had decided to wait and see what the owner would do but he did not need to wait because the bed gave away under the dog and he sank down into the Maine. The man then knew the secret and made it known to the public and the owner was executed.
(The same story is related about Killorgan castle)
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:57
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A Story
Once upon a very rich man was living in a castle which was situated over the Maine, a river which is flowing beside the town of Castlemain. He used to invite a number of people to his castle but what made the people wonder was that those who entered used never be seen again The people made up their minds to see what was happening inside so one man said he would find
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In or about 1833 there live a boy named James Mooney in the town land of Molley boy in the County of Cavan now James was afine handsome young fellow living in a little farm with his Mother he was a lighthearted young boy.
fond, of Music dances and especially a game of cards his Mother grew tired sitting alone by herself at night and often said to James [?] now you will have to be in at 10 oclock of course James paid little attention to his Mother request
but time and again this apeal was made to James and a length his Mother grew angry and told him that if he woulden't take her bidding he would be sorry In the mean time James had it arranged with some friends of his owne for a game of cards in Colligan's of Barconey.
All assembled on the appionted night the played the cards
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:56
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awaiting decision
Long ago there was a woman living with her daughter. The daughter knew that her mother had money, and she was always anxious to find out where she had it hidden. Her mother got sick one day. She called her daughter to her bedside and she told her when she would die not to comb her hair at all. After she had died they prepared her so when they combed her hair they found a purse of money and gold rolled up in her hair.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:53
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Long ago while a man was cutting a field of oats with a hook a hare arose. He threw the hook at the hare and stuck it in the hare's back. The hare ran around the field cutting the oats with the hook as he did so. The man followed the hare until it had all the field of oats cut down - that was how people thought of a mowing machine.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:51
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will hide it the next time
This game is also called "Hide the Spoon.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:51
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"Donkey"
"Donkey is played with a ball. This is how it is played.
Four children stand in the form of a square and throw the ball from one to another. Anyone who lets the ball fall is called "D". If "D" misses
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:49
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awaiting decision
will hide it the next time
This game is also called "Hide the Spoon.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:47
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awaiting decision
[Drawing] - Candle Mould
[Drawing] - Lead Mould
[Drawing] - Top View
SHOWING WOOD THROUGH INTO WHICH THE TALLOW WAS POURED - AND TWELVE MOULDS IN POSITION.
THIS FRAME OF MOULDS IS NOW THE PROPERTY OF HENRY MORRIS Esq. DEPUTY CHIEF. (10 - 1937).
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:46
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The people said that the son would not have been saved only they had answered the Rosary
Each time one of the family that heard the footsteps would die.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:45
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the Rosary said, they went out of the house.
The next morning the man and woman got a wire that one of their sons was dead
It happened again in 1920 - the footsteps came into the house again and the old pair heard their deceased son say the prayers this time. The got out of bed, answered the prayers Then the footsteps went out of the house again
The next morning another of their sons came home, and told them he ran into an ambush. He said that he would have been shot only that one of the sergeants said that he was not in the fight at all, so he was saved
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:44
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A SWORD STICK, THE PROPERTY OF JOHN SMITH BALLINACREE 88. LIKE A WALKING-STICK. WORN A BIT AT BOTTOM. SWORD IS CONCEALED IN HAND END OF STICK.
[Drawing] - Sword-Stick
- 3 feet in length
- Notch
THE STICK HAS A NOTHC MADE BY A KNIFE. THE NOTCH IS CERTAINLY VERY OLD.
[Drawing] - BRASS CAP (Closed)
[Drawing] - Sword-Stick, sword extended
- SWORD - 9 inches
- CAP (open)
- Notch
THIS SWORD CAN BE RELEASED WITH A SHAKE. IT REMAINS FIRM ONCE RELEASE. THE SWORD IS STILL VERY SHARP.
HE SAYS IT BELONGED TO ONE OF THE YEOMEN. IT WAS TAKEN FROM THE YEOMAN IN A SKERMISH NEAR MULLAGH MIN (A LOCAL HILL). THE SWORD WAS USED TO KILL ANOTHER OF HIS PALS - HENCE THE NOTCH.
TEACHER
CAN BE OBTAINED BY TEACHER IF DESIRED.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:42
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Many years ago a family of Cahillanes lived in Laharn, but they are all dead now
One night when the man and woman were going to bed, they heard footsteps coming up the gravelpath and into the house, although all the doors were locked. The footsteps came into a little room, and recited prayers. The woman could hear one of her deceased relatives recite the Rosary. When they had
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:36
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R. Why is an author like a strange animal?
A. Because his tale (tail) comes out of his head
R. Why is a blow like a soft hat?
A. Because it is often felt.
R. Why is pastry like the sun?
A Because it rises when it is light.
R. Why has the letter A a bad effect on men?
A. Because it makes men mean.
R When is a girl's hair like the sea?
A When it is in waves.
R. What is the difference between a fisherman and an idle scholar?
A One baits his books and the other hates his books.
R. Why is music valuable?
A Because it is full of notes.
R. What is it we all say we will do, but which nobody has yet done?
A. Stop a minute.
R. Why is a pig like a strange creature?
A. Because it has to be killed before it can be cured.
R When is a sheep like ink?
A When it is put into a pen.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:30
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Riddles (Continued.)
R. Why is a wood like a luggage van?
A. Because it is full of trunks.
R. What Irish county never goes hungry?
A. Meath because there is always meat in it.
Riddle When is a ship in love?
Answer When she is attached to a buoy (boy)
R. Why should you never starve at the seaside?
A Because each waves comes in with a roll.
R. Why is the rudder of a steamboat like a judge?
A Because it has a stern duty to perform.
R. Give the three degrees of getting on in the world?
A Get on, get honour, get honest.
R. How would you make money go as as far as possible?
A By giving it to Foreign Missions.
R. Where was the first potato found?
A In the ground.
R. Which is the oldest tree?
A The Elder-Tree.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:30
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mirror it will bring you very bad luck.
A Rat.
When a rat runs around the house there is a person going to die in that house
To break delph.
It is said that when you break delph it is unlucky.
A fairie's ring on your path.
It is said that if you meet a fairies ring on a path it is very unlucky.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:28
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the road you would not get buying it or if you got buying it, it would not be lucky with you.
Magpie
Another unlucky thing is if you saw one magpie you would have good luck and two for bad luck.
If the magpie builds her nest in bushes which grow over the house somebody in the house is supposed to have bad luck.
A Red haired Woman
It is said that if you meet a red haired woman and you going to the fair it would bring bad luck on you. There are some people and if they meet one they would turn on the road and go home.
To break a mirror
It is said that if you break a
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:25
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The Rat
If the rat crossed the road and you going to a fair to sell anything you would not sell it or if you did sell, you would not get a good prise for it.
Another unlucky thing about the rat is if you were going to the fair to buy anything and he to run across
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:22
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her living by spinning. She lived in the townland of Roebuck and she used go from place to place spinning for the people.
First she would get sheeps wool and tease it. Then she would rub oil into it with her hands and get wool cards and card wool into small rolls fit for spinning. When it would be spun it was a lot stronger than the wool we buy now in shops and much coarser when knitted and more warmer also.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:20
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There was once a woman named Kate Mac Ginn who used earn
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:19
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walk a lot.
She went to Castle Pollard in Co West Meath fasting with eight miles to go from Greeve and she also walked to Multy Fernham, which is fifteen miles from Greeve
Once she wanted to go to Cloherhead wich is a bathing place. But as the journey was too far she hired a man to drive there in a jennet and cart. She stayed a few days at Cloherhead the bathing place.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:17
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About twenty years ago there lived in the town land of Greeve an old lady named Mary 'O Rielly who was a noted walker. She used to walk miles and miles to missions, funerals, and wakes.
At that time there was no bicycle or motor cars and people had to
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:15
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little gallon of whitewater in the field for a drink.
When the old weasel found her young in the hedge she then went over to the gallon of whitewater an spat in it in return for the kind turn that the man had done her.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:13
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What turns without moving?
The road.
What goes round and round the house and peeps into every wee hole?
The sun
What has legs and cannot walk?
A chair
My hands are black my face is white I am going day and night I cannot speak but strange to say I tell the time?
A clock
Up the chimney down, but cannot go down the chimney up? An umbrella.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:13
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Many years ago an old man named Tom Fagan went down to the bottoms in Crossdrum to make hay. The weather was very bad at that time and he had the hay in little cock's for many days.
At one little cock when he turned it up he found under it three youngf weasel's and an old one. As he was sticking the fork in the hay to turn it he stuck it through one of the young weasel and killed him.
The old weasel ran off to the hedge and then Tom took up the two young ones and brought them over to the hedge and made a little nest of moss and put them into it.
People say that a weasel's spit is poison and if you go near him he will spit at you. Tom had a
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:11
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What goes across the water without making a sound?
A shadow
What can you be to-morrow that you cannot be to day?
Older
Why is the cloakroom of a railway station like a forest?
Because it is full of trunks
Hairy out and hairy in all hair no skin?}
A grass rope
As green as grass as red as blood as black as ink what is it?
A blackberry
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:09
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Londonderry Cork and Kerry spell that without a K?
That
What is the differences between a sailor in gaol and a blind man?
The one cannot go to see and the other cannot see to go
When should you lose your temper?
When it is a bad temper
When is a rock not a rock?
When it is a shamrock
Why is a pound note like a bridge?
Because it goes from one bank to another
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:07
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Which trees are always found on the hearth?
Ashes
What is that which is bought by the yard and worn by the foot?
The carpet.
What has teeth and yet never uses them to eat?
A comb.
Which tune does everybody like?
A fortune
What is it that never asks questions and yet requires a lot of answers?
The door bell.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:05
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What is that which is full of holes and yet holds water?
A sponge
Why are policemen lie airships?
Because they both take people up.
What has an eye and cannot see?
A needle
What keeps the sun up in the sky?
Its beams
What goes into the well and is not drowned?
The sun
What has long legs short thighs little head no eyes?
The tongs
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:03
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What is the softest thing that boils and never loses its colour?
A cabbage.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 13:02
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What has a tongue and cannot speak
A boot
Why does a man look into his pipe?
Because he cannot get in and look out
I have a wee horse with an iron throat and every time he gallops he swallows the rope?
A mill.
What has eyes and cannot see
A potato
A little white and round house and it is full of meat it has no doors or windows to let me in to eat.
An egg.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:59
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Its black and its white and its read all over
The newspaper
What has wings and cannot fly
A cart
What goes up the stairs with its head down
A nail in a boot
How many hairs in the cat's tail
There are none in it that are all outside
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:58
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God bless the grey mountains of dark Donegal.
God bless royal Aileach the pride of them all
For she sits ever more like a queen on her throne,
And smiles on the valleys of green Innishowen.
Sir Charles G. Duffy.
Unquestionably, by far the most interesting place in the vicinity of Derry is the Grianan of Aileach, and the tourist should not miss seeing it on any account.
To reach it, any one of three roads may be adopted. The visitor may hire a car - the distance is 5 1/2 miles from the city; he may go by rail to Bridge-End station on the L & L.S. Railway, and then walk the remaining two miles up the hill; or he may walk direct from Derry. If the latter course be chosen, he will proceed by Waterloo Place, William Street, Creegan
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:56
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Larrie usually rose and went out in his sleep so that night also he got up and went down to the lake.
There was ice on the lake and also some snow. He walked in on the lake, the ice broke and he fell down. The next morning his brother missed him so he and some of the neighbours went in search of the missing one. They traced his footsteps in the snow as far as the lake. The they saw the ice broaen.
The broke it all and got a boat. They found him The sad occurance spread through part of the coutry and he was deeply regret by the neighbourhood.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:44
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There is a small lake situated near Castlepollard in the Co Westmeath named Lough Fore. It is about a mile in length and half a mile in width. About the year 1860 a man named Larrie Halpin lived near the lake. He was living with his brother Benney. In the of that year there was a very hard frost. One night there happened to be a light fall of snow
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:40
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There was a big candlestick about two feet in height in which the candle was stuck. There was a piece of board on which she put he feet when spinning. Her sons and and daughters would be sitting around her and when a piece of the candle would be worn she would say to them "help the candle" and so on till the candle would be wasted.
On the sixth or the twelth night they would light twelve candles, and say the Rosary round. All the old people had this custom.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:36
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The people of long ago had many old industries which are now all forgotten. When the old people went their ways the customs went also.
One industry of theirs was candle-making.
Long ago there was an old woman named Mary Casey. She lived near Castlepollard. She had two sons and two daughters. She would send them for bundles of rushes to a nearby bottoms. They peeled one side off the rushes and left the other side on so as to stand up.
Then they tied time together and hung them near the fire-place to dry.
There was a little metal pot in the shape of a boat which they called a grisset in which they would put some grease and melt it. The rushes would be soaked in this which where now ready for use.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:31
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this stone make sure you kill the cat you must be there to the minute of eleven o'clock saying this he disappeared. Tim went home and went to bed but didnt sleep much thinking of what the little man told him. Tim thought if he brought his neighbour with him that he would have to give him half of the gold and decided to go himself and have it all and that his neighbours would not no anything about it so next night he started and took with him a spade and growbar and went to the forth and waited until eleven o'clock takes the grow bar and rolled away the stone when he rolled away the stone his own cat was sitting on the crock and he did not like to kill him and took him by the tail and through out of his way and lifted the flag and picked up the crock and brought it home and when he took the lead of to his great surprise he found it was crock of turnip seed instead of gold.
He was terrible disappointed over what had happened and told the oldest man in the neighbourhood about it who advised him to put it under the bed in a dark corner for a year and a day and that it would grow into gold if you dont watch it. Tim delighted with the news went home and put it in a dark corner under his bed when the time was up Tim was anxious to look at the Crock to his great surprize instead of growing in to gold it grew into a crop of turnips, which was of very little use to poor Tim who thought of the old saying have it your self or be without it
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:22
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Good night kindly said Tim, you are a commade looking little fellow or where did you come from. I came from a place that nobody knows I call it Coney Hatch. Might I ask you are going or what have you in the bag. "A" said Tim I am going for a bag of turf might I company you Tim. I would be delighted to have your company. So they travelled together and chatted very friendly until the came to a place called the Ladder Cesh on the green ridge which leads to Roebuck bog but all of a sudden the little man stopped and said I cannot cross this Cesh I will stay here until you come back "but dont be long" as I must be at Coney Hatch by twelve o'clock. Tim hurried of filled his bag of turf quickly, and hurried back afraid the little man would be gone.
When Tim returned to the Cesh the little man was seated on what Tim thought to be a mush-room. I will carry that bag for you Tim said the little man very well and Tim as he was tireed of his load. As the were walking along together the little man asked him if he would like to hear about gold. I would be delilghted said Tim. It was heaven sent you out. Well said the little man I will tell you where their is a crock of Gold. Now to find this gold you must do as I tell you.
Under the big stone in the centre of Lords forth you fill find this crock but you must bring your neighbour with you as their is a cat minding it. When you lift this stone make sure you lift
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:10
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In olden days their lived in Dungimmon in a mud walled cabin a man named Tim O'Hoe. This cabin was situated on the road-side convenient to Lords forth near Floods hollow the valley of the black pig. Tim was brave and covetous man and was very anxious to get rich but did not want to work, as he was rather lazy. His mother often told him about a crock of gold being in Lords forth but no body knew the exact spot.
Tim sat all day long by the fireside thinking how he could get it. While his neigbours worked hard to save their crops. He never gave them any help but like the owl he would seek his prey at night. When those farmers went to rest Tim would take his bag go to their fields and fetch what ever he wanted. This went on for long and long but he never heard anythink more about the gold. One November night poor Tim had no fire he took with him the bay as usual and started to Roebuck bog for turf. When going through Clara rocks. He was very much surprised at the approaching of a little man dressed with a tall green-hat and a red swallowy tail coat.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:07
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another animal in much the same condition if they receive a trifling sum.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:07
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Tinkers and tramps are fairly frequent visitors to this district, but one scarcely ever sees a caravan of genuine Gypsies now-a-days.
Those dark-skinned wanderers, when they have their palms crossed with silver speak mysterious words concerning dark strangers and journeys across the sea, were usually addicted to stealing, so people are not sorry that they do not see them now.
Tinkers are generally regarded as a nuisance as they beg a great deal and pester the house-holders to buy their tin-cans and other wares.
The tinkers art is kept a secret from outsiders and they always work when hidden from the gaze of curious country-folk. They also deal in horses and donkeys and generally know where there is an old horse or pony for sale, and then offer to exchange
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:01
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 12:01
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About the year 1839, there occurred a great storm in this locality, and it did a great deal of damage
One man who owned a small house was left homeless in the morning. The storm began about midnight, and had not abated towards morning.
Mr. Patrick Flynn, whose house was damaged, lived on the outskirts of Ballynoe Village. The storm was so fierce that the roof was completely blown from the house, and the man who lay in bed was exposed to the wintry storm. He immediately dressed, and went to seek shelter.
When his neighbours heard of his plight, they were very hospitable, and had great compassion for their less fortunate fellow creature.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:56
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it is level and tillable. The track of a house is still plain, just at the foot of the hill as you go up Ros-na-gcaorach next Tráigh. Ghearr.
Here lived Peggy Oates, with her husband. She was evicted by Lord Palmerston, in order to make way for his present domain. The track of the ridges where potatoes were set, are still plainly visible. He got a small piece of land at the back of Mullaghmore.
The place is known locally as Peggy Mhór field.
Between the Lodge at Classybawn and the sea
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:56
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it is level and tillable. The track of a house is still plain, just at the foot of the hill as you go up Ros-na-gcaorach next Tráigh. Ghearr.
Here lived Paggy Oates, with her husband. She was evicted by Lord Palmerstown, in order to make way for his present domain. The track of the ridges where potatoes were set, are still plainly visible. He got a small piece of land at the back of Mullaghmore.
The place is known locally as Peggy Mhór field.
Between the Lodge at Classybawn and the sea
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:52
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Ros-na gcaorach Directly opposite Cliffoney village is a rocky promontry, stretching for 1/2 mile or so in the sea. It is slightly heathery and is now part of land owned by Lord Ashley. This is called Ros-na-gcaorach. Formertly sheep were reared on it; hence its name.
Peggy Mhór. Between this and the Lodge, owned by Lord Ashley, lies "Peggy Mhór's" field. It is a fat piece of ground bounded by the sea on both sides. It is mostly rocky but part of
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:47
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9. If the hens are quarrelling a stranger will come to the house.
10. If the cat is seen washing his face with his back to the fire it is said the coming week will be wet.
11. If you see a dog with a white spot on his back you will have bad luck.
12. A friend in time is worth nine.
13. Man's best friend is his pocket.
14. Many hands make light work.
15. A bird in the hand is worth two the bush.
16. It's a bad wind that doesn't favour somebody.
17. Bíonn a luch ag rinnce nuair a bhíonn an cat amuigh.
18. Ní hé lá na gaoithe la na scolb.
19 Tá fuil níos i tiughe ná uisce.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:42
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Áth Thadhg, Áth Garbh, Áth Buidhe, AÁth na Crois,Áth an n-oileán, Cúilín Sgáire Conn a céir, Teampall agus an Corí.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:41
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The fox is certainly a very cunning animal after killing a hen or a goose he does his best to get to a place of safety
When he has this devoured he seeks another one and if he is then seen unaware of himself he lies down as though he were dead.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:38
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59. One day three brothers were passing by a graveyard, one of them said, I must go in to pray for my brother's son, and the other siad I must go in also to pray for my brother's son, but the third man said I will not go in because I have no brother's son to pray for. What was the man to the boy the others went in to pray for.
He was his father.
60. There was once a man and he ploughed forty days in March. He had done when he had started, he had done when he had half done and he had not done at all when he had finished. How did he do the work?
Done was the horse's name and he had him when he started ploughing. He also had him when he had half done, but he died before the work was finished, and March was the name of the place.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:35
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bush!" So the Poor Scholar was the means of bringing an increase of fortune to the already very fortunate family and they were very grateful to him.
The man of the house was convinced that it was his dreams and his visit to the "Bridge of London" that had been the real means of getting his fortune.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:34
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61. Why does a cow look over the fence.
Because she can not look under it.
62. What smells most when you go into a flower-garden?
Your nose.
63. Ce'n fáth go bhfuil an leitir 's' mar oileán?
Mar ta sé i lár uisce.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:33
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anything, but his heart had nearly stopped beating in his surprise. The place which the other had described agreed in every detail with his own residence - the house, the garden and even the bush, at the side of which a pot of gold was to be found, if the Englishman's dream came true.
As hastily as possible he returned to Ireland, came back to his poor, little house in Wilkinstown. His first act was to dig in the spot indicated in the Englishman's dream. Sure enough, there was the pot of gold and he was a rich man from that on.
Across the top of the pot, there was a slate with writing on it. The poor man could not read, and neither could his neighbour, so the message on the slate remained a mystery for some time, but this did not trouble him, as he was "well off" and no longer had need to worry about the support of his wife and children.
Then it happened that one of those "Poor Scholars" of the time came to the district and stayed in the house of this man. He saw the slate and the writing and read it for the household. This is what was on it:- "There is another pot of gold at the other side of the
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:32
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:32
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:32
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1. When the wind is blowing from the north it is a sign that we will have snow.
2. If it would start to rain the storm will cease.
3. When the sheep are seen lying at the bottom of a hill it is a sign that we will have snow.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:30
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e bhí ag na fir bás, agus d'imthigh an ór uatha gan fhios aca cé'n áith a raibh sé. Do bhí siad níos bochtaighe annsin ná mar a bhí siad riamh roimhe sin agus do bhí siad brónach nuair nár chuir siad suim ins an gcar dubh.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:28
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Tá an ciste seo suidhte sa Mhuaidh. "linn" an tainm atá ar an áit in a bhfuil sí. An áit seo tá sé idir Sean-Chaisleán agus Roinn Bhreac, i bparóiste na hUaighe Móire, i mbarún Gallen agus i gCo. Mhuigheo.
Deirtear gurabh é an ciste seo bairrille óir agus "Rí Eascú" - mar gharda air. Ins an áit is doimhne sa bpoll atá sé.
Aon lá amháin tháinign beirt fhear de'n t-ainm cheadhna chun é a thabhairt amach. D'eirigh leó na sleabhraí a chur timcheall an bhairrle. Nuair a bhí siad ar tí é a thabhairt amach tháíning an "Rí Eascú" go dtí barr an uisce do bhuail sé na sleabhraí le na ruball agus do bhris sé iad.
Chuaidh an bheirt abhaile gan bacadh leis an mbairrile óir ó shoin i leith.
senior member (history)
2020-02-18 11:22
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