Number of records in editorial history: 261882 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:37
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This hill was cut out at the time of the famine to give work to the poor, and to make the road level. The day's hire was one pound of Indian meal.
During the famine years the people round Kells were not as badly off as the people in other districts. They had plenty of yellow meal. But Cholera broke out after the famine and many died in Dulane.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:35
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Long ago the houses of the poor were merely (mood) mud hovels. The walls were built of yellow clay, and the roof was thatched with rushes.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:35
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to do this, but one in particular, urged on by the evil spirit, defied and blasphemed him.
One day whilst she was in the Church the priest blessed her with holy water, and commanded the evil spirit to leave her.
It did so and escaped by way of the belfry. As it was going it took a stone out of the belfry. This stone is still missing.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:31
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Before the Famine time in Ireland there was a hill on the road running between Dulane Church-yard and Kiernan's cross-roads.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:30
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genuflecting is quite visible.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:30
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There is an altar stone cut out in the rock of Muff, another in Killencare, and a third in a rock near the site of the present Church in Laragh not far from Cootehill.
There is a stone missing out of the belfry of this Church, and there is a very strange story told about this stone. It happened that at one time some ladies in the parish formed a league, and the heads of this league used to preach outside the Church on Sundays. The priest forbade them
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:26
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Some years ago, a woman in Kells found a large white medal about the size of a crown piece or larger, in the ruins of an old house up at the Railway Station Kells. She brought this medal to one of the nuns and we were shown it in class a week ago.
This medal is round, and seems to be largely made up of tin and lead. On the obverse is stamped a shield surmounted by a cross. On the lower part of the shield can be read the letters I.H.S. The upper half shows the lamb bearing the flag, the emblem of victory. Standing erect on each side of the shield is a man to the left and a woman to the right, each bearing a standard. Round the edge are the words IN HOC SI G NO VINCES.
On the reverse side are stamped the words:- I promise to abstain from all intoxicating drinks and except used medicinally and by order of a medical man and
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:20
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Long ago a shilling was called a bob, and a florin was called a cross, a three-penny bit was called a kid's eye, a penny was called a wing, a half penny was called a make, and two-pence was called a duce a £1 was called a quid.
The word "tick" means on credit, or on tally. The word "cant" means to sell or to hackle.
Meet me Miss Miss 2s at the 5s hotel between 4 and 6 1/2 no delay
Yours truly
1/6
Meet me Miss Florin at the Crown Hotel between 4 and 6 1/2 no delay.
Yours truly
Bob Tanner
The above sent by Bob Tanner to Miss Florin to meet him at the Crown
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:16
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Shops were not common long ago. But there were houses in which tobacco and drink were sold without a license. These were called "shebeens", and were out far in the country in lonely backwards places.
On a Sunday the people would sell wool, linen, yarn and cattle on the road-side and bargain there all day.
There were many words that were used in buying and selling such as "boot" that is :- if anyone was buying a cow for £15 and he had only £13 he would give a calf to "boot" to make up the sum.
A "meitheal" was a number of men or boys gathered together to work for a widow who had no one to work for her.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:08
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An old woman who lived in Tinnehinch many years ago earned her living by nursing. She nursed sick people in the town and also in the surrounding country districts. The pursuit of her onerous duties often necessitated her being out late at night, and in those days there were no motors or buses. Frequently she had to make the journey to the sick person's house on foot. As a consequence of the long trudge and the monotonous nature of her work, it is a small wonder that the poor creature was often very fatigued,
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:05
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and though benighted compelled to rest by the wayside.
One night she was making her way homewards exhausted after a long and weary day's work; she sat on a fence to rest a while. It was the dead hour of the night. Having rested a while she arose to "make the rest of the road home", and had not gone far when she noticed a beautiful house in a field. All the rooms were brightly lighted up. She was amazed and to satisfy her curiosity went over and looked through in the windows, but could see no one.
She then entered the house, and searched every room, but could not see nor hear anybody. Finally she lay down on a bed in one of the rooms and fell asleep. When she awoke in the morning she found herself lying in a path with a stone under her head as a pillow.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:04
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prepared when the call came.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:04
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Meet me Miss 2s at the 5s hotel between 4/6. 1/2 no delay
Yours truly
1/6.
Meet me Miss Florin at the Crown Hotel between 4 and six. Make no delay
Yours Truly
Bob Tanner.
The above is a copy of a wire sent by Bob Tanner to Miss Florin
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 09:03
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could support his children. The stranger said, "Go back home Pat, and at the back of your house under a bush a crock of gold is buried."
Pat returned home, and dug under the bush. After some time he unearthed a crock of gold. On the top of the crock was a flat stone. On the stone were written the following words, "On the other side there is twice as much." Pat dug at the other side, and he unearthed two crocks of gold.
Pat was then the richest man in Freynestown, and he built a new house. Shortly afterwards seven sons were born to him. He educated them, and sent them away to college. The seven of them were ordained priests, and were afterwards consecrated bishops.
Some of them went to foreign lands, but they came back to die in Freynestown. They are buried in Freynestown churchyard, and their graves can be seen there to the present day.
P.S. Pat was an illiterated man. It was a poor scholoar who read the inscription on the stone. The poor scholar happened to be staying in Pat's house at the time.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:59
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and his sore toe began to bleed. "Now", said Jimmy "If I had my new boot on me they would be destroyed."
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:58
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About ten miles to the north west of Graignamanagh there is a townland called Freynestown. It is a barren district, and the people find it very hard to earn a living there.
Once upon a time there lived a pooir labouring man in this barren district. He was married, and had a large family. He wasn't able to support them, and they weren't any bigger than your fist, Good bless the mark.
He left the country, and went to England to seek work, One day when he was on London Bridge he met a stranger. The stranger asked him what he was doing. Pat told him that he was looking for a position so that he
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:57
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There was a man living in the neighbourhood of Kells. He was engaged to be married to a girl but she jilted him.
When he heard it he lay hidden in a corn field for a day and a night. After that he did not go to Mass for years. A woman who pitied him used to send him holy water, blessed palm and a blessed candle at Candlemas.
One day he got a slight stroke and asked for a priest himself. He lived four years after that and was
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:54
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is represented as having knocked over a salt-cellar when stretching out his arm to Our Divine Lord and saying "Is it I, Rabbi?"
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:52
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There was a man named Mr. J. Philips, who never wore boots till he was 80 years.
His sister was coming form America one Summer and she brought Jimmy a new pair of boots.
Now, three days before this Jimmy cut his toe with a scythe. He went down to meet his sister, and she gave him the boots. He put them under his arm and ran home.
Now Jimmy was fond of kicking stones, so he kicked a big rock
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:52
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St Patrick's day.
The custom on St Patrick's day was to eat fish.
On Easter Sunday eggs were eaten.
Pancakes were eaten on Shrove Tuesday, Shraft Tuesday was another name for it.
May was considered an unlucky month to get married.
Rice was eaten on St Stephen's Day instead of meat.
On May morning it was the custom to take beastings to the neighbours' houses. Salt was put by them in the bucket when returning it.
Matches were made in this district. Money or (fields) land was given as dowry.
It was the custom for collicks to come to wedding feast they danced and sang but did not take any money.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:45
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certain spot. Then on returning one morning the masons found that the part they had built the evening before had fallen down. They rebuilt it, but, was down again the following morning. To their consternation they discovered that with that part of the wall "what they built in the day was down in the night"
They then decided to arch it and in this way got by the unholy spot.
Carr.
Very little seems to be know of this gentleman except what I have mentioned on P 54 - re the famine.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:42
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Close to the house and castle at Annaghs is of course, a garden. This garden was made about the same time as the house.
The masons and workmen on having completed the building of the house turned their attention to the garden wall to enclose the garden.
The was was of "lime and sand, lime and sand" and all went well till they came to a
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:37
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sprung up in Glamourstown. Beside the well there was an old ash tree and some person who lived in the district tried to cut down the branches off the tree and when he had cut them off he left them till the following day to bring them away. When he arrived the next morning he was surprised to see the branches had grown on the tree again and that there were none on the ground. There is the stump of an old ash tree to be seen there still.

About a quarter of a mile from the village of Streamstown in a field owned by a man named Rafferty, Tobar Harbeen is situated. People who suffer from vomiting are cured by the water from this well. An old woman named Mrs Scott who died some years ago was once cured by water from this well when she had been vomiting for four days. People who obtain water from this well leave behind some relic such as a penny or a pin.

Tobar-na-gCloch is also beyond the village and is situated in Rickard's ground. There is an old legend about this well
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:37
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that when the Normans were in this country the Norman chief who owned the land in which the well was situated built a wall all round the well to prevent the people from coming there on pilgrimages. On the night that the wall was completed the well sprung up in another field which did not belong to the Norman.

These old wells all date back to the age of Saints and Scholars and perhaps they are hallowed by the footsteps of some Saint and we should respect and venerate them.

Mona Montgomery
Streamstown
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:35
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A variation of the above story is.
The first or the oldest girl was the heroine & not the youngest. Also - The mother asked when the cake was baked & she had divided it into two portions which they'd prefer the big portion & her curse or the little portion & her blessing (or the big half & her curse & the little half and her blessing. these are the actual words)
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:32
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People around always grew from an acre to an acre quarter for their own use. The varieties grown were "Scotch Downs", "Flounders" and the always popular "Champions"
Drills were made first with the plough. There were nine drills to the ray & in some case eleven drills to the ray. Some then put in the sgiolláns which were mostly cut by the women who knew how & lime put on them & then the dung was put in & the drills closed. Others put in the dung first & then the sgiolláns or sgiollógs. The drills were then closed When the stalks were well over ground the weeds were scuffled from them & then ther clay put to them. Much the same methods are employed today.
There were wooden ploughs used her long ago with iron tips. None left now in any farmers' place. The people don't help each other at the potatoes.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:22
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Ireland is hallowed and sanctified by her holy wells as well as by the footsteps of her Saints, and there is scarcely a district which has not a holy well to boast of. In the Streamstown district there is at least five holy wells. These are:- St. Brigid's well in Killare, St David's well in
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:22
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Donore, Tobar Bohine, Tobar Harbeen, and Tobar na gCloch.
St David's well is situated in Donore about a mile and a half from the school and it is still visited by the people on the feast of St Peter and Paul. People go there on that day and recite certain prayers. They then take away water from the well and drink it. It is believed that it it will cure certain diseases. Beside the well there is an old ash tree and there is a chair cut out of the tree. People who suffered from pains in the back are advised to sit in this chair and drink some of the water from the well.
Tobar Bohine is situated near Glamourstown in the parish of Castletown. This well was not always situated here but at one time it was situated in a place called Tibohine about three miles distant at Loughnavalley. One night a woman living near the well took water from it to wash clothes. The next morning when the people got up the well had disappeared and in the night a well had
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:20
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wind as a fairy blast. Soon after they met the father of the man who had sold them the cow. The buyer of the cow reproaced him for the son selling him a "thief". The father said that he was sorry & that he had told his son not to sell that cow to any of the neighbours for he said "The fairy woman told me that it would be the last time she would cure the cow for me."
The woman who was supposed to have given him the cures was living in Waterford and the man who bought the cow knew where she lived
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:17
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Tory Hill & which were seen on a hill in Glenmore about the same distance away from Tory Hill as Tory Hill is from Doyle's Moat. These fires were supposed to be signal fires or beacon fires.
A story is told in connection with this moat. A farmer bought a cow from another in the neighbourhood The cow was a "thief" that is a rover who would not be satisfied to remain where she was put but would break away into other fields at every opportunity. The man after buying her put the cow in to the moat field She didn't remain long but went thieving. The next day the farmer missed her & went in search of her. After a while he found & brought her back to the field. He was accompanied by his son. When they just had the cow in the field, a rushing wind a Sidé gaoithe came suddenly and almost swept them off their feet The saw the cow shivering but thought nothing of it. The next day the cow was dead. They looked upon the
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:10
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In Ballinerla there's a fort situated. This is a short distance from the Lower village of Kilmacow (about a mile or so) The fort is called Doyle's moat. The sides are kind of terraced as if steps were made all round. It is supposed to have been inhabited by Druids at one time. Lights or a fire were supposed to have been lighted on this fort, which were seen on Tory Hill about seven miles or so away as the crow flies. These fires were lit
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:06
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out of tune. No sooner had he started than the music inside stopped and the fairies rushed out & surrounded the hunchback & dragged him in to the king *(They were very angry & dissatisfied and the king pronounced sentence of death on him. The poor man begged for mercy so hard, the king took compassion on him & gave him his life) but they put an extra hump on his back. He came home with two humps instead of one.
*Part in brackets not certain
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:03
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out of the fort and stood around until the song was finished. They then invited him in & he being very curious was only too willing. They entertained him right royally & he sang several songs for them. They were highly delighted with his singing & as a reward the king of the fairies removed the hump from his back & he came out of the fort was straight as a whip. Rejoicing he went home & soon spread the news of his wonderful adventure with the fairies The news soon spread to the surrounding villages. In one of these villages there lived another hunchback who heard the news He resolved to visit this fort and thought that perhaps the fairies might be good enough to remove his hump also. Late at night he made his way unknown to anyone & stationed himself outside the fort & sure enough the music soon started. He listened for a while. Then he broke into song himself. The poor fellow was a very bad singer & always sang
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 08:02
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so many districts.
Lady Loclann was the first landlord, and she was not too bad to the people. Lady Thompson was next and she was hated by all the people, and when she died the Hurleys fell in, because he was an agent for her and she left him her property. When he died he left it to his son John. John Hurley was the last landlord. He went to England in 1903 and he died about four or five years ago. The Land Commission bought over his estate and the farmers purchased from them then. Some fathers divided their land between two children and it had to be revalued. Anyone that would "grease their fists" with money in disguise, got a good farm for a bad one and the people in the good farm had to go into the bad one. If you had not paid your rent up to the mark your cattle would be taken away from you.
There was often a fight in the district between the people that were evicted, and the bailifs who were trying to carry off their cattle for the money, and they were often hunted.
James sullivan had a fight with the bailifs, trying to save his cattle. Only one was saved - a white heifer. It was Mrs Reidy
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:58
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In the village there lived a hunchback. This was a very cheerful fellow and he was always whistling and singing while running errands or working for the neighbour's. One night he happened to be passing a fort and he heard beautiful singing inside. He listened for a while entranced by the music. At last he could contain himself no longer and he burst into a song himself. On the moment the music inside the fort stopped, and the hunchback nothing daunted kept on singing. The faries all trooped
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:57
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A swarm in May is worth a ton of hay
A swarm in June is worth a silver spoon
A swarm in July is not worth a fly
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:57
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Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
& Saturday no luck at all,
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:56
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Riddle me, riddle me ranty row
My father gave me some seed to sow
The seed began to grow
Like a garden full of snow
Ths snow began to melt
Like a man without his health
And the man began to fall
As a bird against the wall
The bird began to fly
Like an eagle in the sky
The sky began to rattle
Like a thundring field of battle
And blood began to spill
Like the lashing of the mill
And the mill began to stop
Like the spinning of a top
And the top began to fall
And the Lord save us all
Answer - A person writing a letter
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:53
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A woman was tormented by her husband at one time. He was always out late at night playing cards in the neighbour's houses & never came home until after midnight or thereabouts. The wife was so desperate that at last she determined to cure him. She knew that he always made a short cut home through the graveyard. One day she happened to be coming the same short cut herself & saw the grave-digger digging a grave. She planned with the grave-digger to frighten her husband so that he would not be staying out late. The grave digger agreed to do so. That night he went to the graveyard & got into the grave shortly before midnight. The husband soon came along. When the grave-digger heard him coming he started saying in a groaning kind of way. "I can't rest I cant rest" The man heard him & came to where the grave-digger was & listened to what he was saying. Then he said "It would be hard for you to rest, poor fellow when you have nothing to cover you so he started filling in the
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:51
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That he will never die in his bed
But be killed by an old mud wall".
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:51
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John Joe Hurley was the last landlord of this district. He was in this district for about 32 years. He was a good man to some people and a bad man to some others. Daniel, Jack, and Robert Brown, Michael Quill, Din Scanlan, Mrs. Fitzgerald, and Mrs. Murphy were evicted. Daniel and Jack Browne built little sod houses near their own fences and minded their farms. Robert Browne, Michael Quill, Din Scanlan, Mrs Fitzgerald and Mrs Murphy went dairying to some neighbour's house and took their cattle with them. After a time they were reinstated and came back to their own land but some of their houses were torn down.
They were a branch belonging to the English and they made them landlords over
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:46
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a small tributary of the Suir to Strang's Mill some half mile from Gaul's Mill & then taken to be ground to the Mill. In the big yard stand the ruins of the offices & stores where the meal & flour were kept. There is a big iron pipe still to be seen. this was used to carry the water that washed the wheat into the river
Near this there's another mill called Stang's Mills what is now badly damaged but the outer walls are still strong and on top of this mill is now built a reservoir that suppllies the Great Southern Railway works etc at Waterford with water. Meal & flour were also ground in this mill the same as the other mill at Gaul's Mill & a good deal of employment was given by these two mills & the quarries to the the people of the Dunkitt district. The people were generally speaking at that time comparatively well off & prosperous.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:44
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dinner was over, they would dance and sing and amuse themselves until morning. When it would be drawing near night, three or four batches of straw-boys would come. They would get plenty drink and they would sing and dance and amuse themselves for an hour or two and then their captains would order them all out.
Some of the "straw-boys" would be dressed with the straw of the whiskey bottles, more of them would have a ribbon draped around their shoulders and waists and have their coats turned inside out, and their "shilaileighs" in their hands.
Some people gave stock as a dowery instead of money if it were needed where they would be going.
In Master Molyneaux's dwelling house in Lyreacrumpane there used to be Mass celebrated and some of the people of the locality, when getting married, were married there.
In some places, where the passages were bad some of the girls would go on horse-back behind the boys, out to the public road.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:36
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Most marriages take place in Shrove. Monday, Wednesday and Friday are said to be unlucky for marriage. Matches are still made in our district. They go to town and they make the match. They then fix a date to go to the attorney to pay the money. When the money is paid they fix a date to get married. When they are married they return home. All the saddle horses that would be at the "drag" would gallop for what they were worth to know who would reach the house first. And the side-car or covered-car in which the married couple would be, the boys of the place would rope it to get the prize of a few gallons of "stout". And when they would arrive home the dinner would be ready for all the wedding party. When the
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:30
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that drove her in among her own cattle in the mountain.
Mrs Murphy threw boiling water at a bailif and burned him and he could not go into her. The bailifs were often burned with boiling water or boiling porridge.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:27
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Though my eyes may behold them with pleasure
My heart is still longing for thee.
Chorus:
III
Let stormy clouds gather above me,
And friendship prove steady and kind,
I well know there is one heart to love me
In the country I am leaving behind.
Chorus:
IV
Now Kitty give over your crying,
And don't be uneasy for me.
It's my fortune I'll be after trying
In that bright emerald isle o'er the sea.
Each moment that passes shall find thee,
Still reigning supreme in my mind
And the image of Kitty shall bind me
To the country I am leaving behind.
Chorus:
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:24
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In Gaul's Mills there's situated a big house with a mill attached. This was at one time owned by the Gaul Burke's already mentioned & then it was owned by a man named Draper.
A man named Chanelly bought it from him & he worked this mill for years. Corn & wheat were Ground at this mill. The wheel was one of the fines't in Ireland & can still be seen.
The corn & wheat were drawn by car from Waterford or brought up the Pill
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:22
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Black cat black kittens
It is hard to knock an old dog off his trot
The day of the wind is not the day for the scollops.
Think twice before you speak once.
As long as the pitcher is going to the well it will be broken at last
Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
Every man knows his own know.
What's seldom is wonderful
LIttle apples will grow again & pockets will hang.
A burned child dreads the fire.
Never take book by the cover
Still water runs deep
Dont bid the devil good morrow until you meet him
Whats good for the goose is good for the gander
Make hay while the sun shines
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:22
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I
There's a dreary dark cloud hanging o'er me,
And a mighty big load on my mind,
When I think of the prospects before me
And the country I am leaving behind.
Chorus:
Then farewell to green hills of Erin,
My darling so faithful and kind
For where'er I may be I'll still think of thee
And the country I'm leaving behind.
II
Though the land be bounded with treasures
And fair maidens of every degree
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:18
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Catch and old cat playing with a straw
Empty vessels make most sound
Little people shoud be seen and not heard.
The longest way around is the shortest way home
Long churning makes bad butter
Constant dropping wears a stone
The old dog for the hard road & the pup for the path
Never throw out the dirty water until you have the clean water in
You will never miss the water until the well runs dry
Never send a boy on a man's errand
It is a long road that has no turn
When the cat is out the mice can dance
What is bred in the marrow comes out in the bone
What is bred in the bone comes out in the blood
A nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse
Live horse till you get grass
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:18
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VI
It was early next morning his uncle came there,
Riding on horse-back like a man in despair,
Saying "Where was he drowned or where did he fall in",
In the deep and false water in the lakes of Gold Finn".
VII
The day of his funeral was a sad sight,
Four and twenty young men and they all dressed in white.
They carried him along till they laid him in the clay,
Saying "Adieu lovely Willie", as they all marched away.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:14
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I
It was early one summer morning when young Willie arose,
And up to his comrades' bedchamber he goes,
Saying "It's a fine morning and to bathing we'll take",
They all marched along till they came to a lake.
II
The first man they met was a keeper of game,
He advised them in sorrow to return again.
...
For his hope was to float on a watery stream.
III
Young Willie stripped off and he swam the lake round
He swam to an island and finding no ground,
Cried "Comrades dear comrades, I feel very weak,"
And these were the last words young Willie did speak.
IV
It was early next morning his sister arose,
And up to her mother's bedchamber she goes,
Saying "Mother, dear mother, I had a sad dream,
That young Willie was floating in a watery stream".
V
It was early next morning his mother came there,
Wringing her hands and tearing her hair,
Saying "Murder, cruel murder, is there anyone nigh,
That would venture his life for the last of my darling boy.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:07
approved
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awaiting decision
The people are much afraid of lizards & if one happens to come into a house no one will touch it but it is caught up by a tongs or put on a shovel & thrown out again.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:06
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that the lizards could not get back into his mouth again. He did as he was told. He fasted for the three days and then he ate the salt meat & then drank no water for twenty-four hours. He went to the running water & lay down on his stomach and opened his mouth - as widly as he could & after a short time one young lizard dropped into the running water & was swept down by the stream. Then another & still another until all the young ones had been swept away. He knew that the old one hadn't yet come for the old woman had told him how he would recognise her He waited for some time & was beginning to despair when out she popped & just landed on a stone & proceeded to drink. The man closed his mouth & ran home as fast as he could and escaped although the lizard made an attempt to follow him but she soon gave up the chase.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:06
approved
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X
"Then Tom what is the reason now you won't marry this one so fair,
Isn't she a fit companion for a duke I do declare,
Then Tom if you don't marry her we'll have you to understand,
Seven years' transportation to a foreign land".
XI
"That is bad but it could be worse", Father Tom did say,
For Our Saviour suffered more than that when he died on Calvary",
Then Father Tom took off his hat, and said "I have no witness here,
But I shall call on the Almighty and He will bring me clear".
XII
Those words were hardly spoken when a horse came swift as wind,
And on that horse a rider, saying "I am not here in time,
I will have this trial called all o'er again, at which I can well reply,
She wants two fathers for her child, that;s Father Tom and I".
XIII
Then Father Tom put on his hat and he began to smile,
He said unto the mother, "May the Lord protect your child".
They looked at one another and seeing this perjury,
This villain was found guilty and his reverence came home free.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 07:01
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knowledge. She listened to his story & then asked him several questions She asked him to tell her when he noticed his illness at first He then told her of his sleep in the field and he told her that he must have got a "Blast" when he was in the field. Then she told him that she could cure him. "He was to go home and fast for three days. After three days he was to eat a pound of salt meat - as salty as possible but not to drink any water He was to suffer the thirst as much as possible and as long as possible Then he was to go to a running stream and he was to bend down on his face & hands and open his mouth near the water & wait until he would see what would come out. She then told him there was a nest of lizards in his stomach and he was to be sure to keep his mouth open until 'all' the lizards would come out. The young ones would come first & then the old one. When they were all out he was to hurry away from the stream as quickly as possible so
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:56
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awaiting decision
A farmer was working in a meadow one day day with a scythe The day was very warm and after his dinner he lay down near the ditch to rest a while and made drowsy by the heat of the day soon fell fast asleep. While he was asleep he snored loudly & had his mouth wide open and a lizard crawled into it & got down his throat into his stomach all unknown to the sleeping man. Soon after this the man began to get thin and as each day went by he got thinner & thinner He went to all the doctors in the country, who gave him all kinds of remedies but none did him any good. He got so thin that he was only a mere shadow and his wife and children were distracted. At last he determined to go to a an old woman who lived a short distance & who was famous for curing people with herbs of which she had a great
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:56
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He had one only daughter and she was a beauty bright,
She said unto her father "This young man I go to see,
Before he went to College he was a school-boy along with me".
VIII
She was invited into the parlour where she drank both ale and wine,
She says, "You are a clever young fellow, I will have you resign,
What makes you be a clergyman, don't you know you are astray,
A clergyman must rise by night and travel hard by day.
What are you but a widow's son, and that both poor and mane
Oughtn't you think it a great honour such a lady to obtain.
IX
I have ten thousand pounds a year and on you I will bestow".
He says "My honourable lady, do not explain your mind,
If you offer me ten thousand more I ne'er shall wed a wife
For in this holy situation I mean to end my life,
Come then clear damsel say no more, I ne'er shall wed a wife".
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:51
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water to quench his thirst. When she reached the can she spat into it several times & dipped her head into it. The spit of the weasel is supposed to be deadly poinson. Also not being over clean the remains of the blood of animals she has killed stays on her whiskers and also are deadly poison When the man saw what she had done he went to where he had hidden the young weasels. He took them up & replaced them in the nest to the delight of the mother. She cuddled them & settled them for a few moments and then she again went to the can where the oaten-meal water was & leaning her fore-paws against the side of the can she succeeded in turning it over on its side & spilled the contents of the can out on to the field. Then she went back to her young. She had repaid the man for his kind act in giving back her young by spilling the can so that he wasn't poisoned
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:48
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me your name,
And likewise your parents' pedigree and from whence you came".
"I am from the County Armagh and they call me Tom O'Neill,
My mother she's a widow and of a low degree,
She has done her whole endeavours to make a priest of me".
V
"Since Tom O'Neill it is your name" the Bishop he did say,
You'll study hard both night and day until I have you ordained,
To help your tender mother who has done so well for thee,
I shall send you home as a credit to your county-boys to see".
VI
When this young man came home ordained, the neighbours him were glad to see,
All who came to see him, came in twos and threes,
And particularly his own dear friends to welcome him thereon,
And you never saw such welcome as was for the widow's son.
VII
There was a man lived in this place as rich as a duke or knight,
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:46
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The people around this district have a distinct horror of interfering with a weasel. They look upon this animal as being very vengeful. They say a man one day interfered with a nest of young weasels and killed them all with a spade. The parents came in through the window that night & & got into the bed where he lay & sucked his blood and in the morning he was dead.
Another story is as follows. One day a farmer was scairting his ditches & he came across a nest of young weasels. He put them into his cap & hid them near by. After some time he saw the mother weasel coming towards the nest. She found the nest empty & searched up & down. She seemed frantic with sorrow at the loss of her young ones. She seemed to trace them to where the man was standing. Then she went off to where he had a can of oatenmeal
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:36
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senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:35
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senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:34
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A person should never go out of the house without taking the churn when a person is churning.
You should always put a coal under a churn when you are churning or you will have bad luck with the butter.
You should never exchange eggs you are going to set or you will take the luck out of them.
If you set the eggs that are going to be hatched, at night, they will be all cocks
If a person gives away a clocking hen some of their horses will die.
If two people wash in the same dish, they will fight if they do not spit in the same water.
If you look at a cat after washing its face, you will die the first in the house.
If a person looks in the mirror three times on Hallow Eve he will see the devil
If when the farmers are going to sell their bonhams, if they do not bring them in a cish they will have bad luck.
If a red haired woman comes into the
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 06:34
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:56
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There is another path from the Hayestown Lane to Camross.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:52
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awaiting decision
The Barrack Lane is an old Lane in Gorman's land Ballywilliam.
There is only a small bit of it there now.
It is said that the Fairies go there every night whether it is, true or not,
I dont no but I would not like to travell it late at night.
How it got its name is that it was leadin down to the old Barrack in the time of the Civil Black and Tan war.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:45
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senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:44
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Tradition has it that Esmond Ryan was buried beside the Furlong tomb in Ardcavan Cemetery, but today there is nothing to mark the spot.
Ryan was married to the sister of Patrick Furlong of Ferrybank and after his execution on the bridge Furlong had his body taken from the river and buried in the Furlong graves in Ardcavan.
Another grave bears the remains of Father Edward Newport, Curate of Castlebridge from 1789, who was promoted to Pastor in 1799 and died February, 1801.
Being harassed by the Yeomanry, he was forced to sleep in the open, and contracted a chill from which he died at the age of 39 years. Father Newport's name still lives in the tradition of the district
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:31
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set out next day and reached the place about ten o'clock in the morning, and worked hard until late in the evening.
Then he began to feel a pain in his ear, it grew worse and worse and by the time he had the tree dug up he was hardly able to stand. However he got home and went to bed. The doctor came but he did no good, and the man died soon after. It is not right to till a rath, or dig up a tree or bush in one.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:25
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In olden times, when people were superstitious, there was a rath near the school of Donard in which there grew a large tree.
All the people around were afraid to pass that way at night for fear of the fairies, for they firmly believed that the fairies were there every night. The workmen who were employed by this man, the owner of the rath, were afraid to till that piece of land around the tree too.
At last the greedy owner of the rath said he would root up the tree himself and till that portion of the rath too. He
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:17
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themselves sitting on the ground.
They were frightened, but anyway they started for home again.
When they came to a turn in the Lane they found they could not go any further for a great river was flowing but after awhile the river disappeared and they got home safely afterwards. It was said no one would come this Lane safely between the hours of eleven and twelve o'clock without seeing or hearing something.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:13
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Long ago there was a man living in this Lane and his name was Crahan.
The neighbours would go every night for a ramble. This night, however, they were playing a game : there was a man lying on the floor, and the rest were trying to rise him up, this game was called "Raising the Dead Cow." However the game was over about eleven o'clock and the boys said they would go home, so thay started for home. Out they went, but when they came to the middle of the Lane they saw seven men playing cards.
They asked the men to take a hand, so they did. When they dealt the cards they found they had no one only
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:12
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Eogan Bél was king of Connaught and he had two sons. He was a brave man and he never suffered defeat. He was very much against the O'Neills of Ulster, and he persecuted them by seizing their stock and destroying their lands The Ulster chiefs got determined to go to war with him, so they fought a fierce battle and Eoghan was wounded. Before he died he called some of his men to him and he told them, to make Cellach the elder son chieftain. Cellach at that time was a disciple of St. Ciaran at Clonmacnois. So the men went, and asked him off St. Ciaran, but he refused them. Cellach stole away at night time and St. Ciaran cursed him, saying that nothing might thrive with him, and that grief might always come to him, death by spear point might displace him. Cellach was made chief, and all went well
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 03:00
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got as far as the Hill of Ramsagh'
which is called after her, when she was petrified. And the men who were sitting down to their dinner were turned into stones in the position they occupied, even the car with the churn of milk in it did not escape; it could be seen on the side of the road, by the field in which the others were in a ring (probably a Druid's Circle), until they were removed at the building of the houses in Marley."

The place where these transformations took place was called the "Maol Oula" or the "Bald or Barren Place"
The Ramsagh Rua is to be seen in Bailey's Field on the left hand side of the road a little above the Kilus of Ramsagh.Some say that this stone, if chipped, bleeds. Others that there is "Ogham" writing on it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:48
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should never look behind.
A stranger should always leave a house by the same door that he came in on, otherwise the people of the house will have bad-luck.
If a stranger comes into a house where churning is being done he should give some help otherwise he will bring away the luck of the butter.
If a hen comes into the house with a straw from its tail or if a cock crows at the doorstep it is a sign that a stranger is coming to the house.
If a cat or a dog crosses the door-step of a room where a corpse is laid out, that dog or cat should be killed and buried.
A corpse never be left alone.
Green is a very unlucky colour to wear, a child should always wear red so that he may not be overlooked.
If a cock crows when a person is going a journey it is a sign he will be disappointed
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:46
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The Ramsagh Rua.
The Patron Day was kept as a holiday by the people; no one in the parish would attempt to work on that day.
There is an old story, "that a man named Anthony put his men to work out in a field one St. Mullin's Day :
his wife, who was called the "Ramsagh Rua" came with their dinners to them and she brought a churn of milk in a car which she pulled in by the side of the road; they were all sitting down to their dinner in a 'ring' in the field where they were at work, when the Saint appeared to them and asked them did they know the day it was on which they were working.
Anthony got afraid and ran away, and he was as far as Drana (Dranagh) when he was turned into stone, which is called to this day, "Struckan - na - Drana."
Anthony's wife took to her heels, too, and she
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:35
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Married on
1 Monday for health
2 Tuesday for wealth
3 Wednesday the best day of all
4 Thursday for losses
5 Friday for crosses
6 Saturday no day at all
The bride and bridegroom should never go to Mass the first Sunday after they are married, they should wait until the second or they will have bad luck.
When thunder and lightning are very bad, the legs of the tongs should be put in the fire and allowed to redden and this will keep the house and people safe.
If when making a garment, a person makes a mistake it is a sign that she will live to wear it.
When a person is coming home from a ramble if he sees a ghost or hears a banshee he
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:33
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senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:30
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Father Murphy got separated from the main body. He was captured by the Government forces and brought to Tullow. Here he was whipped, hanged, beheaded, and his body burned on June 26th or 27th.
"And the Yeos of Tullow
took Father Murphy
And burned his body
upon the rack "
Mary Ann Redmond.
Templeudigan,
Ballywilliam,
Co. Wexford.
I got this story from the Standard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:25
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28th Father John marched to Camolin, on Tuesday 29th he marched to the Three Rocks and on Wednesday 30th he marched to Wexford town and it was taken. Father John was the principal leader in these encounters.
On May 31st the rebel forces were divided into two sections the Southern army and the Northern Army. From that on Father John fought throughout the campaign with the Northern army which fought at Tubberneering, Arklow, Carnew etc.
At the battle of Vinegar Hill on June 21st he took a prominent part.
On the morning of June 26th the Insurgent forces had to fight their way against desperated odds back into the County Wexford from Kilcumney Hill. It was in this action that
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:16
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Fathers name was Thomas Murphy and his mother's maiden name was Whitty. He began his early Education in a hedge school near Ferns the school-master's name was Gunn. He afterwards went to Seville in Spain where he became Doctor of Divinity and he was ordained a priest in 1785. He then returned to Ireland and he was made curate of Boolavogue in the parish of Monageer.
Father John Murphy was five feet nine inches in height, he was well - made strong and agile and was never known to be ill. He had a fair complexion, blue eyes, black hair and was an expert horseman, who was skilled at handball. Father John was a man of peace and did not want to fight.
The Battle of the Harrow began on May 16th Oulart May 27th. On Monday
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:06
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Father John Murphy.
"Then Father Murphy, from old Kilcormack.
Spurred up the rocks with a warning cry
"Arm! Arm!" he cried, "for I've come to lead you
For Ireland's freedom we fight or die."

Father John Murphy was born at Tincury in the year 1750 or 1753. His
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 02:01
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and said. 'Our pikes are as sharp as
ever. Line us up to have one charge
at the Durham Fencibles of Killaduff,
in satisfaction for blowing up poor
Father Murphy.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 01:59
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"When Tom Murphy went and found the Captain Mr Billy (Byrne) at the cannon, working it himself, and he discoloured with perspiration and smoke from the effects of the heavy work he was on, he asked him, (Billy Byrne) to leave him on the cannon, he was in such a state, and to go back to his men for to guide them.
Unfortunately, the ammunition soon ran short and Billy (Byrne) let them know that they would have to retreat to Gorey, but the pikemen, gathered round him
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 01:51
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senior member (history)
2019-03-23 01:50
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"During the battle of Hacketstown where Billy Byrne led the Insurgents, the old men and the girls and the children that were hardy enough started the Rosary at home in Ballymanus and they never left their knees during the battle period. One of them handed the prayer book to the other when they got tired or weary over it and they kept on their prayers until the cannon ceased. Then they got on their feet and waited for no dinner or refreshments.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 01:48
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husband.
If you dry a letter by the fire you will not get a reply to it.
If one magpie cries near a house in the morning, it is a sign that someone in the house will get a letter.
When setting eggs to hatch, they should be always set at night, when the hawk is asleep, this prevents the hawk taking the chickens when they come out.
A setting of eggs should never be given away without charging some money for them.
If the cock crows at twelve o'clock at night, death or misfortune will come into that house.
When the dish cloth falls it is a sign a stranger is coming to visit that house.
When a knife or a fork falls a gentle man visitor will come to visit
When a swarm of bees come around a house good luck will to that house
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 01:28
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awaiting decision
It is an old remark in this district that the piece of choth which is used to leave out (l) a dead person should be always buried with the corpse. If the cloth is thrown out any person who steps on it at night will be going astray all night.
When the head of the house dies the grave should never be made on a Monday.
In every room where a corpse is being waked the clock should be stopped and the fire should be put out.
The doors and windows of every house should be closed when a funeral is passing, if this is not done it is supposed that some-body out of the house will die next.
When a family are moving into a new house they should go on a Friday, and the head of the house should be the first person to open the door.
If a woman loses her wedding ring she will quarrel with her
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 01:06
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awaiting decision
If cattle are dying on a farmer every year it is lucky to put a goat with them.
If a person has no luck in setting eggs to hatch it is lucky to get someone else to put down a setting for you.
Some people would not give away a clucking hen for fear they would give away their luck.
If a person gets the loan of a clucking hen a henny or two (pers) pence has to be given for her for luck.
If two people wash in the same water there is sure to be a row but if they spit in the water it will break the charm.
Some people would not wear green. It is supposed to be unlucky. They say green is for grief and that a suit of black will be worn before the new year is out.
On bonfire night the 29th of June, everybody who attends, is supposed to bring home a sod and scatter it in their fields to keep diseases from the cattle.
When a person sees the moon through glass it is supposed to bring bad luck for the month.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 00:46
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go first.
When a funeral leaves a house the chairs and tables are immediately tuned upside down and the ends of the sheets etc. that were on the bed are dipped in water.
At a wake it is a custom to give out clay pipes filled with tobacco and there is a plate of snuff handed round for every one to take a pinch.
A person who falls in a graveyard is supposed to be buried in it before a year.
The last corpse into a graveyard has to keep watch on the gate until the next corpse comes, and then the other one has to watch.
When one person dies in a district three are supposed to die soon.
If a person meets a funeral he is supposed to go back three steps with it.
It is not right to lift the lid off a coffin to see a corpse. If this is done there will be a death in the same family before twelve months.
It is unlucky to burn withered flowers.
The bride should never leave the church first whoever comes out first dies first.
A bride must wear something old something new borrowed and something blue.
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 00:02
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an (ev) uneven number, or the eggs will not be lucky.
When two people wash in the same dish they will fight.
If a person breaks a looking glass he will seven years bad luck
If a baby child sees himself in a looking glass he will have bad luck.
When a person is going a journey and meets a red haired woman it is a sign of bad luck.
If a person dies away from home his remains should not be brought into his own house.
Churning should not be done under a rafter but between two rafters.
It is a disappointment to put a boot or shoe on a table.
An old boot thrown after a man going to a gamble, fair, or any where else brings him luck.
An old shoe is tied behind the brides car at a marriage.
It brings seven years bad luck to break a looking glass.
When carrying a corpse the feet always
senior member (history)
2019-03-23 00:00
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awaiting decision
Tomas Davis Tom Moore they made themselves famous
With music and poetry they gained their fame.
Theres Mitchell Fitzgerald, Swift, three other great men
In no nation on earth did their equals reside
There was Burke and Grattan two eloquent statesmen
And those were bright gems from the Emerald Isle.
[IV]
And the memory of Tone who fought for our glory
Is equalled by that of famed Red Hugh O Neill
I oft heard their deeds related in story
And Irishmen heard of those
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 23:37
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awaiting decision
There are three forges are in the parrish. The smiths are Mr. Healy, Mr. Harte and Mr. O'Brien. Their fathers were smiths also.
The forge is situated near a cross road. A stream is running by the forge. The forge is like a house. It has one chimney and one window. The roof is made of iron.
There is a horse shoe hanging on the door. One fire place and one bellows are there also. The bellows is made of iron and manufactured in England.
The chief implements are a hammer, a pinchers, a chisel, knife, vice, rasp, a sledge, and a anvil.
The smith shoes horses and asses. He makes spades, shovels, axes and repairs ploughs. When the weather is fine he binds wheels in the open air.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 22:30
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awaiting decision
Palms are blessed on Palm Sunday. Nearly everybody brings Palm to the church to get it blessed. In the country the farmers put the palm in their bedrooms and in their outhouses. It is left there till the next Palm Sunday. It is taken down then and new palm is put up.
In Clones there is a holy well. If a person going away to a foreign country takes a bottle of this water he will return safely.
It is said that clay was lifted from the grave of Dean O'Neill for a short time after he died.
Shamrocks are worn by the people on the 17th March in honour of St. Patrick. The people get little boxes of the shopkeepers and send away shamrocks to friends in foreign countries.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 22:27
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On Christmas Eve many people go out of the town to gather holly. They put it round the walls of their houses and over holy pictures.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 22:26
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awaiting decision
around. When he was coming home with the cows he had to pass through the filed in which the bush was. A man who was out shooting fired a shot as the cows were going through the field. The shot startled the cows. They ran wild and some of them in their mad rush tramped the bush to pieces. John was coming behind and saw what happened. He set about to mend the bush as best he could. He tied up the thin branches with pieces of ropes made from grass.
The bush started to mend and as it did John's luck mended.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 22:25
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awaiting decision
Three forges are in the parrish. The smiths are John Healy, Patrick Harte and Dennis O'Brien. There people have been smiths for many years. The three forges are situated near cross roads one at Rathduff one at the Quarry-Hall and the third at Rockhill Cross. In the forge there are two door, and three windows. The doors are coloured red and the shape of a horse shoe. There is one fire place in the forge and one bellows. The implements are, a hammer, a pinchers, a tongs, rasp, a cold chisel, anvil, vice, sledge, hack-saw, and a punch. He shoes horses and asses and and makes farm implements, such as ploughs, harrows, and gates. He binds wheels in the open air.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 22:24
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awaiting decision
In the townland of Altertate in Mr. Foster's field a lone bush is situated.
One day as John Armstrong, a servant boy in Foster's, was going for the cows he noticed how the bush was more thickly covered with leaves than any other bush in the ditches
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 22:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Mullans about two miles from Roslea there is a lone bush. There are many divisions in it. Some people say that it was the fairies set it up and others say that there is a king buried under it and the bush was put there for a mark. It is said to be very unlucky to cut a piece of it. One time a man named Jack Faux living in the same townland townland cut a piece of it and he had very bad luck afterwards.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 22:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Three forges are in the parrish, Patrick Harte, John Healy, and Dennis O'Brien. There people have been smiths for years. The forges are built near a cross roads and by the side of a road.
The forge has a slate roof, the door is coloured red and the shape of a horse shoe on the door. In the forge there are two fire places and two bellows.
The implements the smiths has are, a hammer, sledge, tongs, knife, rasp, anvil, drilling machine, vice vice, buffer, pinchers, punch, chisel. He shoes horses and asses, he mends and mends farm implements such as ploughs, shovels, spades, harrows, scufflers and gates. He binds wheels in the open air. Stories are not told as regards forge work in the open air.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
house on handsel Monday bad luck will come to the house.
If a person gives a handkerchief to his firmed they will be parted.
If a person does not put up a May bush in his house bad luck will come to that house.
Milk or butter belonging to the first churning of a newly calved cow should never be given away not even for payment.
It is an old custom in this district to give buttermilk and butter to persons without a cow of their own at Xmas and on New Year's Day.
When churning a man is never allowed to kindle his pipe and go out. He can smoke until he is finished but cannot bring out a lighted pipe.
A strange person is supposed to take the churn dash and leave the weight of himself of butter on the milk, if he goes into a house where churning is going on.
Before beginning to churn a piece of live coal is put under the churn, a pinch of salt and a drop of Holy water are put into the churn.
If a person sets eggs, she should set
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A person should never go out of the house without taking the churn when a person is churning.
You should always put a coal under a churn when you are churning or you will have bad luck with the butter.
You should never exchange eggs you are going to set or you will take the luck out of them.
If you set the eggs that are going to be hatched, at night, they will be all cocks
If a person gives away a clocking hen some of their horses will die.
If two people wash in the same dish, they will fight if they do not spit in the same water.
If you look at a cat after washing its face, you will die the first in the house.
If a person looks in the mirror three times on Hallow Eve he will see the devil
If when the farmers are going to sell their bonhams, if they do not bring them in a ish(?) they will have bad luck.
If a red haired woman comes into the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are three forges in the parrish owned by Patrick Harte, John Healy, and Dennis O'Brien. They have been smiths for many years. The forges are situated near cross roads and by the road side.
The forge walls are made of stone with a sheet iron roof. The door is shaped like a horse shoe and only one fire place in the forge. The forge bellows is made in a factory, the chief implements are, a vice, a drill, a rasp, a hammer, punch, a pinchers, a anvil, a tongs, a shovel, a poker and other small implements. The smith shoes horses and asses. They makes ploghs, harrows and scufflers, they repair all sorts of iron implements. They binds wheels in the open air outside the forge door.
The forge water is supposed to cure warts.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night two girls were coming home from their grandmother's. One girl wanted to go around and the other wanted to go across. They went across and when they were going along the path they saw a man before them. They shouted at the man to wait for them, but the man kept going. They were not afraid and when they were trying to get over the thorny gap the man went out through the gap as he was on lenal ground. The girls were afraid to come further. But the man walked before and when they went to their own gate they disappeared.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to live or she will have bad luck.
In some parts of Ireland when she is going in to her father-in-laws house some woman gives her a piece of dough to throw and see would it stick over the door, if it sticks she will have good luck, and if it does not she will have bad luck.
The bride should never fit her wedding ring or fit the clothes that she is going to wear at her marriage until she is getting married or she will have bad luck.
She also has to wear;
Something old and something new,
Something borrowed and something blue.
If you burn flowers you bring sickness into the house.
If you bring hawthorn into the house you bring sickness into it.
If you pull a certain flower called "the Bishop's Cap" you will have bad luck.
You should never churn under a rafter.
A person should never smoke when people are churning or they will take the luck out of the churn.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One day a man was coming home from town. In a field on the roadside the man saw a lot of little men hurling. The man went into the field and asked the little men could he hurl. They said he could and got a "scraw" off the ground and turned it into a hurl. The man hurled and the little men told him to say whatever they would say. The little men said " off she goes" and the men said the same. They flew to a town and went into a public house. They drank a lot of beer. They stopped there for a long time, and the man forgot the word that he was to say. Off she goes" said the little men and they all flew out through the key hole. The men was left alone. He was asleep when a policeman came in. "I caught you at last" he said.
Crís Saomar Cloncully.
The man was to be hung on a Saturday. They used to hang the people would a cart them times when Saturday morning came they got a new asses cart and filled the heel of it with stones. When they were about to hang him the man thought of the word "Off she goes" and the man flew off with the new asses cart. HE went home and told his parents about the little man and all.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A person that dies out side should never be brought into the house but waked in the barn.
If you met a woman when you are going to a fair you will have bad luck.
When my father is going to the fair he always sends a boy out to open the gates so that he will have good luck.
Long ago when the farmers where going to Athlone to sell their stock, if they did not get a drink of puteen in Ballinahown they would have bad luck.
If a person's stock is dying and he puts a goat with them it will bring back the luck to them.
When a rat crosses the road when you are going a journey you will meet with a disappointment.
If you see a magpie when you are going a journey, you should go back or you will meet with bad luck.
The bride should never go to look at the house where she is going
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ring Worm
Rub ink to it and rub oil to it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ring Worm Rub ink to it and rub oil to it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there lived two men in the mountain. One night the two men were sitting at the fire when they heard a knock at the door. In a few minutes in came a little man with a red coat. The tongs was at one side of the fire and the little man reached the tongs from that side to the other side. One man said that he would do for that fellow. He reached for the tongs and struck the little man with it and split his skull. When the men went to bed that night a whole lot of little men came in and started to drag him out of the bed. He could not sleep with the man at last he had to go to America.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When a person dies outside of his house his remains has to be put in through the window.
Who ever leaves out a dead person must put him in his coffin.
The pins and nails that are used to keep up the sheets have to be burned.
When a person is left-out his feet must be facing the place where is going to be buried.
Four people of the same names should carry out the corpse, his feet going first.
Ashes should never be thrown out of the house or sweep out the floor when a corpse is in the house.
The Relatives of the person that is dead should never put clay over his coffin.
If the lid of the coffin is opened it will bring death into that house.
A pillow made of hay should be put under the head of the corpse.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to-morrow.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The busy fly disturbs the kine.....
Low o'er the grass the swallow wings,
The cricket too how sharp he sings,
Puss on the hearth with velvet paws,
Sits wiping oe'r his whisker jaw
Through the clear stream the fishes rise,
And nimbly catch the incautious flies,
Hark how the chairs and tables crack,
Old Betty's joints are on the rac...
Last night the sun went pale to bed,
The moon in shadows hides his head,
T'will surely rain I see with sorrow,
Our jaunt must be put off
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and many of them have told me the story of the rats. Mrs. Lloyd was buried in the family vault at Towerhill being the last of the Lloyd family to be buried there. She was one of the most unpopular landlords that ever owned the property of Towerhill.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
we may expect bad weather also. When the cat is seen sitting with her back to the fire and when the dog eats grass the rain is not far away.
Rain may also be expected when the hens are picking themselves.
When the distant hills appear near us it's a real sign of rain, and another sign of rain is to feel the sharp bite of the midge.
Good weather may be expected when the smoke goes up straight but when it goes down to the ground we may expect rain.
Loud quack the ducks and peacocks cry,
The distant hills are looking nigh,
How restless are the snorting swine,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Alltogether and go to America because of the attention of this same black man.
Any time he ever came home late at night this stranger visitor always accompanied him from the Black Gullet, even if he approached home from the opposite direction, that is from the Hurlers Cross he was sure to have the company of this mysterious person.
At long last he spoke to the priest about it,and he advised him to leave the country altogether. This he did and is now in America.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dublin red is up in the morning its a sure sign of rain. When the sun goes down red we are going to have good weather. A circle out far from the moon is a sign that we are going to have a storm soon, and a circle near the moon denotes a storm in a few days. When stars are falling its supposed to be a sign of rain. "A rainbow in the morning is the Shepherd's warning, a rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight."
The birds too are an indication of the weather to be expected. When the swallows and the crows fly low it's a sign of rain. The lonely cry of the curlew denotes bad weather, and when the cranes are seen flying about
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Some years ago a crock of gold was hidden in the middle of a big hill about two miles from my home. Some time afterwards three men had a dream, and in the dream they were told to come and dig for the gold. They came, and dug until they came to a great flag, they liked the flag and immediately a big black cat jumped out and said a life must be lost before you can get this gold. The men thought it was one themselves that would have to lose his life, and they went away without the gold.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a woman sitting on the other side of car from him. However, being a brave lad, he spoke to her. They chatted on for some time about the weather and the times and so forth. She then asked him his name which he told her. She said to him that if he did a certain thing for her, she would fill the box car with gold for him. He asked what it was, and she replied by asking him if he would promise to do it. He promised and then she told him her extraordinary request. It was to go to China and go to bank of the river Yang-Tse-Kiang and there say a prayer for her. The request astounded him, but he had his promise given. When he returned home, he told his people but they laughed at him. Poor Hannon was unable to get any one to believe him or to get money enough to go to China so he was obliged to give up all hope of fulfilling his promise. Soon after, he got into delicate health and while on his death bed his people asked him to confess now that he was always joking over the woman who asked the strange
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Potatoes are grown on my farm each year. Two acres are sown under them. The amount often varies.
The farmer prepares the ground. Sometimes it is manured before being turned up. The potatoes are sown in drills. At first the ground is ploughed and then harrowed. The manure is spread, and the potatoes are put on the manure ten inches apart. An iron plough is used. The spades are bought in a shop. The potatoes are cut according to the number of eyes in them.
The potatoes are sprayed with limestone and washing soda during the Summer months. The farmers pick the potatoes from the earth with their hands. The potatoes are stored in pits.
[drawing of spade in margin]
The local names are,-, Champions, British Queens, Irish Queens, Epicures, and Kerr-Pinks. Champions grow best on my farm.
Starch was made from potatoes long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are many beliefs in this district in regard to the weather.
It is said that when the sky is checkered, and when there are goat hairs or a wool pack in the sky we may be expecting rain. When the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This house is now in the possession of the Hannon family who purchased it from the previous owner, one Mr Storey.
In the interval before Hanson’s took possession or rather before they took up residence there, the Bean Si was heard wailing there at he hall door for several nights.
A party of men from the neighbour-hood resolved to put the matter to the test. They decided to bring their guns and fire shots at it. They did, and the cries of the Bean Si were heard no more. But in a very short time one of the men, who was in the best of health died suddenly.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
weather can be prepared for. If the sun sets red, the next day will be fine. Frosty weather is not far away when the smoke is seen going up straight from the chimney.
Patrick Haughey.
Informant - Mr. Richard Clinton, Gartlandstown, Crookedwood.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is believed that when there is a change in the moon there is also going to be a change in the weather. A rainbow in the morning is a sign of a windy day, while, if it appears in the evening a calm night can be expected.
When the wind is from the south or south-west wet weather is at hand. When the curlew shouts a storm or wet weather is coming. If the sheep ascent a hill in a row, good weather is coming, but if they go up otherside had weather is near. When a cat is seen scraping a tree with her nails a storm is coming.
If the floor keeps wet, rain
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
when a dog eats grass it is also a sign of rain.
When big hills appear very close to us it is a sign of rain. The Dublin red a colour in the sky in early morning is also a sign of rain.
When clocks come into houses it is a sign of rain and when smoke goes up straight it is a sign of fine weather.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Red clouds in the West at sunset are a sign of fine weather, and a circle round the moon denotes rain.
In this district the wind from the South is a sign of fine weather, and the wind from the West is a sign of rain.
When swallows fly high fine weather may be expected but whey they fly low wet weather is coming. When a cat scratches a stick wet weather is at hand, and
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:42
approved
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awaiting decision
The weather is a subject of interest to everybody. This is a local proverb which often proves true.
"A rainbow in the morning is a sailor's warning.
A rainbow at night is a sailor's delight."
Different signs appear in the sky from time to time which denote changes.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Patrick Haughey.
Informant - Mrs. R. Clinton, Gartlandstown, Crookedwood.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:39
approved
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awaiting decision
30 feet deep. If he comes up 3 feet every day and falls back 2 feet every night, how long will be be coming up.
A. 28 days.
Q. A duck between 2 ducks, a duck before 2 ducks and a duck behind 2 ducks. How many?
A. 3 ducks.
Q. Two black men and a white man went for a drive in a car. The two black men eat the white man what was the number of the car?
A. 281 (two ate one).
Q. Two dead men fighting, two blind men looking on, two cripples running for the peelers, two dummies shouting "Come on". What is that?
A. A lie.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:39
approved
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awaiting decision
A stranger should never be let into the byre when a cow is going to calve.
The first time a cow is milked after calving her elder should be singed with (with) a blessed candle.
You should always make the sign of the Cross before milking. A bottle of Holy water is hung in the byre at Xmas.
Blood of a cock should be sprinkled at the posts of the door of the byre on St. Martin's Eve, to keep all diseases from the cows.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:36
approved
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awaiting decision
request from him. There and then Pat Hannon told his people that he never joked about it. He said he knew that he was going to die but that he had nothing to confess. He said he certainly met the woman and gave her his promise to go to the Chinese River. He died soon afterwards and many people thought that perhaps his not complying with the woman's request had something to do with his death. Nearly all the fairly old people still alive remember Pat Hannon and many including my father were at his funeral.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:35
approved
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awaiting decision
Potatoes are grown in our farm. About one and a half acres are sown under potatoes each year. Sometimes it varies.
My uncle ploughs the ground. Then he harrows it and opens the drills. Sometimes it is manured before being turned up. The potatoes are usually sown in drills and the drills are made with a drill plough. Long ago wooden ploughs were used, but there are none left. The spades are bought in a shop. Some of the potatoes are sprouted and others are cut into sciollans.
[drawing of spade in margin]
The local people help each other in planting and picking them.They are scuffled and earth is put up to them with a double board plough. The potatoes are dug with a digger then they are put into a pit. The pit is in the ground and the potatoes are covered with earth.
Champions, Kerr-Pinks, Arran-Banners, Epicures, British Queens and Irish Queens are the local names for potatoes. Kerr-Pinks grow best in my district.
Potatoes were used instead of starch long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Q. Said a child to it's father how does it come that you are my father and I'm not your son?
A. The child was a daughter.
Q. Ink-ank under the bank, ten drawing four?
A. A woman milking a cow.
Q. There was a blind begger, the blind begger had a brother, the blind begger's brother died what relation was the blind begger to the man that died?
A. A sister.
Q. Little red Nancy with her little red nose, the longer she stands the quicker she goes.
A. A candle.
Q. A frog falls into a well
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:30
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awaiting decision
Q. I got it when I wasn't looking for it and I began to look for it and I could not get it. When I could not get it I brought it home with me?
A. A throm.
Q. A herring and a half for three halfpennies. How many would you get for 11d?
A. 11 herrings.
Q. A man walked into a room and looking at a photograph, he said, "Brothers or sisters I have none, but that man's father is my father's son". What relation was he to the man in the picture?
A. A father.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:29
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awaiting decision
Palm Sunday to bring luck to the cows.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:28
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awaiting decision
The cow byre is built of stone and mortar. It is situated convenient to the dwelling house. It is roofed with tin. When building the byre, it is built according to the number of cows the farmer is able to keep. There is a manger fixed in, by a trunk of a tree where hay is put for the cows, in the Winter. The cows are tied with things called bows, which are made at the forge. The cows are tied by the neck.
There are various customs connected with milking, the sign of the cross should be put on the cow's hip with the froth of the milk when she is milked When a person is milking and and another person passes by, and does not say God bless the work the cow will go dry.
There should be a branch of palm put in the cow byre on
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:27
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awaiting decision
Q. "Good morrow Jack with your score of geese." "I haven't a score nor half a score, but if I had as mutch, half as much, a goose, a goose and a half goose I would have a score." How much had he?
A. Seven geese.
Q. A steel mare, a flax tail and a brass boy driving her?
A. A needle, thread and thimble.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:23
approved
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awaiting decision
an egg and a half in a day and a half. How many hens would lay seven eggs in seven days?
A. Seven hens.
Q. A ½d. wet and a ½d. dry 4½d. and a ½d. by a ½d. behind and a ½d before 4½d and ½d more. How much?
A. One shilling.
Q. Mary is 24 now she is double the age that Ann was when Mary was the age that Ann is now. What is the age of Ann?
A. 18 years.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:16
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awaiting decision
and red all over?
A. A newspaper.
Q. I saw a tree with apples on, I took no apples off nor left no apples on. How many apples were on the tree?
A. Two apples.
Q. A fishes head is 9 inches long and his tail is as long as his head and half his body, and his body is as long as his head and tail. Find the length of the fish?
A. 72 inches.
Q. A hen and a half laid
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:14
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awaiting decision
Q. would it be?
A. Sin
Q. Why does a horse never be hungry on a journey.
A. Because he has always a bit in his mouth.
Q. What is the difference betwen a teacher and a stamp?
A. A teacher licks with a stick and a stamp sticks with a lick.
Q. When can you write black white?
A. When you write the word black with white chalk.
Q. Black and white
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:11
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awaiting decision
Q. Three fourth of a beast with long ears on his head, three fourth of a fish in the sea that is bred, half a bandage below the knee will tell you a town in the Co. West-Meath?
A. Mullingar.
Q. Round the world and always in a corner?
A. A stamp on a letter.
Q. How many hairs in a cat's tail.
A. None they are all on the outside.
Q. If you were out of sun and I was in it, what
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:07
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awaiting decision
Q. What will go up a chimney down but it won't come down a chimney up?
A. An umbrella
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:06
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awaiting decision
were built of yellow clay.
The yellow clay was well wet and rushes were put through it to keep it up. The wet clay was called mortar.
There was a half door on every house. These were a great advantage because the big door could be left open and the shut. The fresh air could get in and the hens or ducks could not and besides during the winter wind, it kept out the draft.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:03
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awaiting decision
There were a lot more houses in this district long ago than there are now and they were thatched. There were no houses in the district that had the fire in the middle of the floor.
The most of the houses
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 20:01
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awaiting decision
and some straw. Four beams were generally used. The floors were of yellow clay and mud. The windows were 18 inches in height and 1 foot in breadth.
Christina Gaffney, Benison Lodge, Castlepollard.
Informant - Mr. Thomas Gaffney, Benison Lodge, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:59
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awaiting decision
The wealthier class used stones and lime but he poorer class could not afford such expense. They used but a little amount of stones with mud which they dug from a gripe and mixed with cut straw, or such stuff as would keep it together.
They were not particular about foundations. They would start building on the surface. They would generally take the advantage of a high ditch for a back wall and raise two feet with stones and the remainder with mud, to the height of five feet. The house was generally two roomed. The chimneys were of sally rods, plastered over with mud. They roofed the house with branches
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:57
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awaiting decision
There are two forges in this locality one in Clonfanlough and one in Shannonbridge, the names of the owners are; Dan Edwards and Peter Larkin. The forge is situated on a cross-roads, it is long and narrow with an anvil near the fire, it has a felt roof, there is a door shaped like a horseshoe on the gable. The bellow is a pear shaped made of wood and leather. The implement the smith uses are; the hammer, sledge, tongs bellows, anvil, vice, dullard, stamp, pritchil.
He shoes horses, and asses. He makes ploughs and harrows. Cart wheels are shod in the open air on a flag-stone. The (in) water in which irons are cooled cures warts.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:54
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awaiting decision
In this district houses were built of very rough material in olden times. There was no cement at that time.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:53
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awaiting decision
family. It was one of the Nugents that rang the first Catholic bell after Emancipation.
There are supposed to be hidden treasures underground. There is an arch to be seen overhead yet and a stone stairs going downwards. There is an underground passage leading from one end to the other.
Patrick Haughey.
Informant - Mr. Thomas Murtagh, Faughalstown, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:51
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awaiting decision
About five years ago it got broken at the point marked B in the sketch. The arms are in Carrigys yard and the top lies on the ground beside the cross.
It is said that htis cross was erected by Saint Feicken at the time he had his chapel in Faughalstown graveyard.
Up to 30 years ago the people had to carry the corpses to the graveyard because the hearse had not come into use.
When they were passing the cross they stopped and said the De profundis.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:47
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awaiting decision
Informant - Mrs. Cotter, Bigwood, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:46
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awaiting decision
About forty years ago the Old Head was both a populous and prosperous headland. It had a population of three-hundred and fifty people most of whom earned their livelihood by hake fishing.
The Old Head is divided into three parts, the eastern division or townland being called Ballymackean. About the year 1900 there were about forty houses in this townland whereas only thirteen now stand When the fish got scarce the fishermen and their[?] families had to go elsewhere to earn their living decreased the population of Ballymakean. The ruins of most of these fishermens' houses are now to be seen. Near where Batt Sullivan's cottage is now there was a family of Connollys. The whole family are now dead. Some of their descendants live in a cottage in Lispatrick. In the next house lived Tadhg[?] Maoil and his wife who are now dead. In another house lived David Flynn and his wife and family. The old people died and the family left the locality. Nearby lived Jack Kingston and his family. They afterwards went to live near Cork Tim Donovan and his family lived next door and are now dead.
Near Mrs. Fitzgerald's cottage, Tadhg Óg and his family lived. Only two of their descendants survive, one living in Bostown[?] and another in America[?]
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:45
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awaiting decision
Map of relief road built during the Famine.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:37
approved
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awaiting decision
ranch road". This road is almost opposite "Cul a cruic". "The old road" used to be the only road from the Crooked Wood to Whitehall house. But during the famine times the road which is now used and The new line were made to give relief.
There was a Mass path from each end of the wood of Knockion to the chapel in the middle of the wood. There was a school path from "Cul a cruic" to Whitehall school. There was a boreen opposite Whitehall
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:36
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awaiting decision
game in it. Later the alley was blown down.
Matthew Bruton.
Informant - Mr James Bruton, Ringtown, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Other names for potatoes grown locally.
Spy's Abundance,
Gladstones,
British Queen,
Duke of York.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
out before it and the umpire who was at the second wicket had to take his place and so on till the eleven men were bowled out.
Then the other team went to the wickets and played in the same way. When any man hit a ball he had to run to the wicket before the bowler bowled the ball again. There were always two men from each team, with books, who took down the number of runs and scores and such things.
All these things had to be counted for the inning which decided the winner.
There was an old wooden ball alley beside a work-shop belonging to Jim Bruton where they used to practise hand ball but they never played a
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:33
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awaiting decision
In this district the farmers sow about two acres of potatoes. First the ground is ploughed and harrowed, then the drills are opened, and the manure is put out. Before they start work the woman of the house cuts the slits and leaves an eye in each slit, and the slits are spread according to the size of the potato. The people gather to together and spread the potatoes and put in the manure. Then the farmer closes the drills with a plough, and in olden days they were closed with a home made spade. (When the potatoes are picked, they are covered with clay and scraws. The names of the potato are Arran Banner, Arran Pilo, Arran Chief, Arran Crest, Golden Wonder, May Queen, Black Champion, Old Champion. And many other kinds.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:28
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awaiting decision
The game I am about to describe was a game of cricket which was played in the Black field which is the field nearest to the road in the townland of Ringtown. The teams that played were Ringstown, which was the best team in the country and Castlepollard. It was won by Ringtown.
Eleven men were on each side. There was no referee but two umpires had to stand at each wicket and count each bowl. There were six bowlers and when these six balls were bowled the umpire said "Over" which meant that the balls had been bowled. The umpire who was at the first wicket went
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:17
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awaiting decision
I am going to describe a hurling match which was played
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:16
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awaiting decision
against another. Long ago in football matches there was no referee as the parish team that was able to keep on the longest won.
Sometimes they used to make a football from hay and one parish would compete against another in kicking it across-country. Whichever parish kicked it over the boundry won.
Josephine Flanagan.
Informant - Patrick Flanagan, Whithall, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:12
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awaiting decision
In olden times cricket was the game most commonly played in this district but of late years hurling and football are more common.
In every game it was generally one parish that played
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:11
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awaiting decision
sold at the cattle fair. Some horses are sold at the cattle fair in Castlepollard but most of them are brought to the November fair in Mullingar.
Peter Bruton.
Informant - Mr. James Bruton, Ringtown,
Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:09
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awaiting decision
with a sheep or a pig and sixpence with a lamb or a bonham. Five shillings is given with an animal worth ten pound or over. When a bargain is made the two strike each others hands to show their agreement.
When an animal is sold the buyer writes his initials on its back with raddle or clip hair off their sides. The best fairs in the year are April and May, October, November and December. Sheep and bonhams are
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:06
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awaiting decision
About the work, and with the aid of his wife had the seven acres cut, bound and stocked in one week, and thus earned 5 pounds in that short space of time.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:06
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rejected
awaiting decision
The local fairs are held in Castlepollard. The cattle fairs are held on the second Tuesday of each month and the pig fair on the previous day. They are held on the square. The fairs used to be held at a crossroads.
Sometimes buyers come to the farmer's house to buy lambs or calves and bring them away in a lorry.
Luck-penny is given with each animal sold half a crown is given with a calf one shilling or two
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:04
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rejected
awaiting decision
Over twenty eight hunded years ago the Old Head of Kinsale was the site of the royal palace of the Iberian king of Southern Ireland. His name was Cearnma. After reigning for forty years he was slain in battle by his cousin Blue Spear.
Dun Cearmna as the Old Head was then called was a royal fort of the Gael for seventeen centuries. Ossian's grandmother was born there by some accounts.
It appears that the Norsemen occupied it too and they called it Olderness from which the name Old Head is derived.
On the site of Cearmna's dun, Myles de Courcey built a castle in 1223. In the same year Myles was created Baron Kingsale the second oldest title in the peerage. The castle was named Dun Mac Patrick. In 1587 Baron Kingsale of that time who was a descendant of Myles de Courceys, gave the castle to Florence Mac Carthy, the greatest chief in Munster. In 1600 the English soldiers from Kinsale seized the castle and imprisoned Florence in London, where he died forty years later.

In 1647 the State had possession of the castle which had been used a beacon warning against the Moors. About 1748 the castle was deserted and was afterwards made a ruin of by French
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:04
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roads but it is now disused. Peter Devany is the name of the smith who worked in it. The Ballyknock smith learned his trade some years ago.
The forge has a slated roof and one fireplace.
The door is made of wood and the floor of big flags. The smith mends all sorts of farm implements such as ploughs, harrows, spades and shovels.
The smith is supposed to be very strong. The water in which he cools his irons is supposed to be able to cure warts.
This is kept in a strone trough.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:01
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awaiting decision
There is a forge situated at Ballyknock crossroads.
The smith's name is James McCabe. There is another forge at Crookedwood cross-
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 19:00
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served Mass. All through the Mass the chapel seemed to be as good as when it was being used.
Then when Mass was finished the priest disappeared and the chapel was in ruins.
Peter Bruton.
Informant - Mr. James Bruton, Ringtown, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One Sunday evening about fifty years ago a crowd were gathered in a house in Garrylucas. It was moonlight and there was a south westerly breeze.
Suddenly a man burst into the house and said that that a large barque was in the bay and likely to become a wreck. They all rushed out and saw a grand three masted vessel close inshore
There was a man, Frank Bowen by name, volunteered to go for the Coast Guards and Life Saving Apparatus and as he thought the case was urgent he went for his horse. Another man, John Healy by name, ran for the coastguard station to try and report the vessel before Frank Bowen. He was nearing his destination when he heard the gallop of a horse behind him. By crossing a field he managed to get her reported before Frank
The Life Saving Apparatus was taken out but when they reached the scene of the supposed wreck they saw the ship sailing away against the wind and over the rocks under full sail. Everybody wondered how this could be because the wind was blowing straight on the shore.
They saw the vessel round the lighthouse and steer for Kinsale Harbour. Before reaching it her course was changed for the Sovereign Islands where she disappeared. They decided that she was a phantom
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:58
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was the parish chapel of Whitehall. The ruins are covered with grass now and there is nothing to be seen but humps about two foot high. There is a story told about this chapel.
A man was passing the ruins of this chapel at about two o'clock in the morning and he saw a priest ready to say Mass near the site of the alter. The priest turned round and said "Is there anybody here to serve Mass?" and the man went up and
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:55
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rejected
awaiting decision
Near the old road in Mr. C. Smyth's field there is the site of an old chapel.
This chapel, about two hundred years ago,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:54
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are never buried in consecrated ground.
There is a special field in Gartlandstrown called the Lurgan where unbaptised babies used to be buried.
Peter Bruton.
Informant - Mr. Peter Maxwell, Milltown, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:54
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rejected
awaiting decision
At Greys Cross Clonmoney. Bunratty is a field containing 7 Irish acres.
Many years ago the entire field was under wheat, and the owner gave the task of harvesting the crop to a man named Michael Gleeson, for the sum of 5 pounds.
Gleeson was a poor man with a large young family. So he set
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:52
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trict in use now. This graveyard is situated in Faughalstown a short idstance from Derravaragh It is known as Faughalstown grave-yard. It is still in use and it is round in shape. There are the ruins of an old Church a short distance from the graveyard and in the floor of the Church there are people buried.
The graveyard is sloped towards the West. Over some of the graves there are big stone objects called head-stones. Unbaptised babies
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:49
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Time he called his servants to -get her and told them that the ghost had departed, and was now with the Minister, and that he could do his best and put it going again if he were able.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:45
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Not far from Dr Kennedys residence lived the local Protestant minister a cross-roads at the letters residence is still called the Minister’s Cross.
The servants of the Bishops com-planned that the house was haunted by a ghost, and the Bishop got to hear of the report. In a few days
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:39
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Called the Mass Rock, and by other Fr Matthew’s Rock, because from it he preached many of his temperance sermons to his listeners from the nearby parishes of Newmarket, Quin, and Sixmilebridge. Near the rock is a pool and it was the waters of this pool that were used by Bishop Kennedy for Baptism.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:37
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rejected
awaiting decision
Called the Mass Rock, and by other Fr Matthew’s Rcok, because from it he preached many of his temperance sermons to his listeners from the nearby parishes of Newmarket, Quin, and Sixmilebridge. Near the rock is a pool and it was the waters of this pool that were used by Bishop Kennedy for Baptism.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:36
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I always take my fiddle just to get a foot in there
And when Im on the Booze my boys I dance the soldier's joy
Then the waiters tell me wait until the clouds roll by.
V
For I always have some trouble but the devil a hair I care
Sure every child of Adams of misfortune had his share
Tis oft times in his sermons Ive heard Father Doolan say
That Solemn was simple in his own sweet way.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:32
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For I have a dog named Totter he is always at my heels
He dances Polka's Hornpipes, Breakdowns and jig's and Reels
And when I am surrounded by the Greasers pon my song
He will take them by the breeches and they dont wait long.
III
I go to every funeral the Caomers (Keeners) for to hear
And when Ive had a glass or two you know Im on the beer
Then when the Caomers tear their hair yell and shout and whine
I break into this chorus boys and tis all damn fine
IV
I go to every wedding Im the Pride of every fair.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:31
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About half-way between the village of Sixmilebridge and the Hurlers Cross is situated the residence of Mr Hamsell of Deerpark this was formerly the palace of Dr Kennedy although he was reared about a mile away in Woodpark House which is now in ruins. At the entrance to Deerpark House is a pond about 5000 Sqr ft in area, and it is said that it was in this water the bishop used to baptize the people.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:29
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There is only one graveyard in this dis-
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:29
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awaiting decision
bought the whole estate from people called Berrys.
When Thomas was born his mother died and he was nursed in Mr O'Neill's of Benison by a grand father of Patrick Nevin's.
When he was twenty one he bought Ballinagal which consisted of four townlands, Dernagarra, Tuitestown, Gartlandstown, and Ballingal.
Laurence Clinton.
Informant - Mr. R. Clinton,
Gartlandstown, Crookedwood.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:26
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I
oh I come from Castleisland where they shoot the men by night
But yet I am no moonlighter for it ne'er was my delight
Yet there is just another game for which Ive gained renown
And that is going a poaching when the sun goes down
Chorus
Sometimes I stop at home when not upon a spree
More times I take my lodgings in the Barracks of Tralee
And sometimes I play my fiddle round about the town
But Poaching is my practise when the sun goes down
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:26
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Captain Smith was the landlord around here. He lives in Ballinagal and he had a lot of tenants but now nearly all the land is bought out.
One man was all he ever evicted and when he saw the man had returned he did not evict him again.
Captain Thomas Smith
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:24
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took over the estate.
Colm Murtagh.
Informant - Mr. T. Murtagh,
Faughalstown, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:23
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and pay their rent. He was looked upon as a good landlord. Any evicted people went to America.
These landlords were soldiers of Cromwell. He brought all his faithful soldiers up on hills and gave them all the land they could see. Lands were divided among members of families at marriage.
Tithes were collected in the district for the protestant Minister.
When Paten died he left his estate to Carey, Mary Vickers and others. They lived in Dublin also. When those people died the land Commission
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:21
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Twas the last I saw of my Colleen Bawn My Inchigeela Lass
VII
I sped by Iniscarra before the break of day
Took passage in a Yankee ship that in Queenstown harbour lay.
The captain being a Fenian man my safety to compass
I soon set sail from Granuále and my Inchigeela Lass.
VIII
But what became of Máirín Óg Eveleary's fairest flower
She drooped as droops the may flower neath beleated winter showers
Ere the Autumn leaves fell from the trees she was laid beneath the grass
My promised Bride the village Pride was My Inchigeela Lass
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:20
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awaiting decision
IX
But were I beside the Lee to-night I would quickly find the spot.
Where Maureen's smiles brought sunshine to her widow's mother's cot
The sun that let the sunbeams on My own Sweet Cailin Deas.
Still quick my way I will always pray for my Inchigeela Lass
X
Eveleary ah Eveleary you are far across the waves
You hold what I prize most on earth my Maureen's moss grown grave.
My present habitation is in Broadway Boston Mass
Where the buachaill Ruadh was always true to His Inchigeela Lass.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:18
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The landlord of Faughalstown was Paten. It is supposed that he lived in Dublin. His agents name was Holmes and he used to come twice a year to Castlepollard to collect the rent. All the people would meet him there
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:16
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there would be a battle fought between the Police and the tenants.
Christina Gaffney, Benison Lodge, Castlepollard.
Informant - Thomas Gaffney, Benison Lodge, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:16
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At school we play the following games in Winter. "Thread Thread the Needle" "Tig" "Every Man pass by" and "Wolf in the Well"
The game I like best is "Every Man pass by all except the Last one" This is how it is played. All the children catch hands and make a line. Then two bigger children catch hands and make a gate - way. One child takes the name of "Oranges" and the other "Lemons". Then the other children run in and out under the gate - way all except the Last one. He is stopped and asked which would he prefer Oranges or Lemons. If he says "Oranges" he goes behind the girl who has the name of "Oranges". If he prefers "Lemons" he goes behind the girl who has the name of "Lemons" This lasts for a long time until the line is finished then they pull "tug o' war" and whichever side breaks loses the game.
Another game I like is "Wolf In the Well" This is how that is played. One child acts as "Wolf" and goes into a hole. Then the other children are sent out to pick potatoes when they come in their hands are dirty their mother sends them down to the Well to wash their hands and they come home running to her and tell her there is a "Wolf in the Well". She and the children then go
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:16
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awaiting decision
Twas the last I saw of my Colleen Bawn My Inchigeela Lass
VII
I sped by Iniscarra before the break of day
Took passage in a Yankee ship that in Queenstown harbour lay.
The captain being a Fenian man my safety to compass
I soon set sail from Granuále and my Inchigeela Lass.
VIII
But what became of Máryeen Óg Eveleary's fairest flower
She drooped as droops the may flower neath beleated winter showers
Ere the Autumn leaves fell from the trees she was laid beneath the grass
My promised Bride the village Pride was My Inchigeela Lass
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:14
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and John Killo were all evicted. Tom Shanley's family went to America. John Killoes family went to live in Abbey Shrule in Co. Longford. The landlord first got possession of the land in the time of Cromwell. All the powers lay in their hands at that time. They kept raising the rent until they had it double, then the people were not able to pay, and the landlord had an excuse to evict them.
The tenants got jail for trivial acts. Rents, tithes and taxes were collected in this and every other district. Where there would be evictions carried out
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:11
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awaiting decision
The landlord of Benison Lodge was Mr Roper. He used to live in Benison Lodge House where Mr O'Neill is now living. The family lived in this district for four generations.
They were looked upon as fairly good landlords, but the agents were very bad at that time.
On Benison Lodge estate there were several evictions carried out on Bratty Road. Tom Shanley, Peter Muldoon, Pat Rafter
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:10
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piper's merry tune
The classy Job of Journey Work she danced as if on glass
For the patron queen of of fair Céim [—] was my Inchigeela Lass.
V
With all the boys along the line I joined that Fenian Band.
And pledged myself to Freedom's cause and to dear old motherland
A rebel I was forced to go through Céimh an Shiadh famed pass
I was forced to flee from Erin's Lee and my Inchigeela Lass
VI
On Mus Kerry's slopes and Sceite heights the waning moon shone pale
As I pressed her to my breast that night in Keimaneigh's[?] lone vale
And when inside the cottage door her nimble form did kiss
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:09
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awaiting decision
I often heard people say that they heard the Banshee cry after somebody had died. I know several different cases where persons maintain that they heard her. They say that she only cries for certain families. She is supposed to be a big woman with a head of long flowing hair which she is always combing. They say that she goes round and round the house crying for the dead person.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:08
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Informant - Patrick Flanagan,Whitehall, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:07
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him was a landlord so that family had being reigning over this district for two centuries. Milltown was only a ranch to his estate which is situated around Rockview. Featherston Haugh did not go around gathering the rent but he had many agents who did the work.
There were no evictions. Some people who did not pay the rent were given three years to take as much use as they could out of the land and then give it up to the landlord.
When Featherston was an old man he sold this ranch to the Land Commission. They divided the land up into farms of about twenty five acres.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:05
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awaiting decision
442
(88) Forty eyes without a nose.
Answer: A thimble.
(89) As I was running about I found something and when I found it I looked for it and when I couldn't get it, I kept it for a day, but if I got it I'd surely throw it away.
Answer; A thorn.
(90) As I went out in yonder gap I met my Uncle Tom, with iron toes and a tea-pot nose and upon my word he frightens crows?
Answer: A gun.
(91) Riddle me, riddle me ruitin.
How many potatoes would make bruitin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:03
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The landlord of Milltown Castlepollard was Featherstown Haugh. He had the title of "captain. He lived at Rockview.
His father before
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:02
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awaiting decision
Ueb". When calling ducks we say "Weete, Weete. To call a dog we call him by his name and whistle. When calling a cat we say "Pussy, Pussy" and when hunting we say "Cutch".
Peter Bruton.
Informant - Mr. J Bruton, Ringtown, Castlepollard.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 18:01
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The drawing home of the hay was another incident that was celebrated with great ceremony. All the neighbours would gather to help the person who would be making the Rick and that night there would be a dance given when all the work was finished to the liking of all. The same applied to the corn and oats. The threshing machine would come to the district and the boys would follow it from house to house and every place it would visit, there would be fun and music and dancing until morning. Hence the work would be done quickly every man helping his neighbour and being helped in return. Any good musician in the district was always in great demand at those gatherings and most of dances were Irish step dance. The usual music was the fiddle and bagpipes,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:59
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awaiting decision
When calling a horse or an ass we say "Pewh". When calling a cow we say "Progy". When calling a goat we say "Gabar". When calling sheep we say "Hutch". When calling a pig we say "Hurish" when hunting a pig we say "Mucks".
When calling hens we say "Chuck", and when hunting them we say "Cearch". When calling chickens we say "Chic". When calling turkeys we say "Yeb",
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:58
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awaiting decision
as gentle as the fawn
That roves oer Desmonds rocky cliffs or the heights of loved Gougane
No goddess rare in Grecian lay could her fair Form surpass
My winsome rogue my Maidin Óg, my Inchigeela Lass.
III
Eveleary ah how sweet the name sounds in an exile's (ye) ears
Though Ive not seen your heath clad hills for close on twenty years
Where I first met my heart's delight twas a Sunday morning at Mass
As I Knelt to pray in that chapel there with my Inchigeela Lass
IV
She tripped along the Lee's green banks one Sunday afternoon
Her nimble feet kept timing with the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:51
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[This song was a great favourite in the district of Drimoleague some years ago. Now it is never heard as very few of the rising generation know it. I obtained the words from Con Mahony Dromasta Drimoleague and he learned them when a boy from his father.]
I
I greet you proud Eveleary's sons and daughters brave and true
Assembled here St Patrick's night old friendships to renew
At this annual opportunity I am loath for to let pass
Until I'll recite a tale tonight of My Inchigeela Lass.
II
She was modest as the cooing dove
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:48
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The coming of wild geese is a sign of frost and hardship.
When there is a blue circle round the moon it is a sign of rain
Long streaks come from the sun when there is a sign of rain.
When there is a sign of rain the smoke does not go up straight, and the soot falls down the chimney.
If the cattle lie down in the morning it will be a fine day
When the cattle are seen lying on the top of hill in the morning it will be a fine day.
When the robin comes into the house there will be hardship.
When the cat sits with her back to the fire there will be rain.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:44
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heroes should feel.
As Bold Robert Emmet the darling of Erin
He heard his death sentence and said with a smile
I am ready and willing to die for you Ireland
And he died a bright gem from the emerald Isle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:43
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Tomas Davis Tom Moore they made themselves famous
With music and poetry they gained their fame.
Theres Mitchell Fitzgerald, Swift, three other great men
In no nation on earth did their equals reside
There was Burke and Grattan two eloquent statesmen
And those were bright gems from the Emerald Isle.
[IV]
And the memory of Love[?] who fought for our glory
Is equalled by that of famed Red Hugh O Neill
I oft heard their deeds related in story
And Irishmen heard of those
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:42
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awaiting decision
Loose disappeared at once and she was never seen again. The priest sent the boy for the prayerbook next day. He warned him to bring it back the way he would find it. The boy did exactly what the priest told him, and brought it back safely. It is said that Petticoat Loose is out on the Red Sea ever since making sugans of the sand.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:39
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awaiting decision
There was a very queer and very witty man long ago, and he sued to say "Weel man which will I marry the Balreask woman or the Carnaross wan".
When he would meet you he would say
"What fly (fun) is up to day"?
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:39
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awaiting decision
Gartlandstown, Crookedwood.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:38
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awaiting decision
cut till he is about two years old. The under part of the horse is clipped early in Spring every year. The working horse is left out all the year, except when he is working hard, and gets nothing to eat except grass. In Winter when the frost is on the ground he is foddered with hay. When the horse is working he is kept in at night and is given oats to eat.
Hens come to their food when "chuck chuck" is shouted. When eggs are being put down to hatch holy water is sprinkled on them for luck. Different sorts of eggs are marked with a cross of soot.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:38
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There were many different kinds of bread made locally in by gone days. All the flour was made from home grown wheat, which was ground in local mills. The oven which was used for baking was like a pot but was flat. Some people call it the pot oven and others called it the bastable. This varied in size according to the size of the family. A person who had to bake bread for a large family always had a large oven and vice versa. Griddle bread was very common in olden days. The griddle was a flat pan with two loops or ears on it, by which it was taken from the fire. Oat-meal bread was also very common. Boxty bread was made as a special treat. This was made from potatoes. I have seen my grandmother make it, when I was a very small child. The potatoes were peeled raw and grated into a pulp with a grater, then the pulp was placed in a very fine muslin cloth, and the juice squeezed from
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:38
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awaiting decision
There is an altar stone cut out in a rock here, and although moss and grass have grown on the rock itself and on the surrounding ground, still the mark of the Altar stone, and the part of the ground which the priest touched with his knee when
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:36
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awaiting decision
Long ago there lived a woman whose name was Petticoat Loose. She was a farmer's wife. She used to kill children before they were baptized. When she died she was damned. Some time after her death she used to appear at a certain stone every night. One night a boy was going home. He had to pass by the stone and so he saw the woman. He was terrified, and ran back part of the way he had come; to the priest's house. The boy told the priest the whole story. He accompanied the boy to the stone. He asked Petticoat Loose what had damned her. She answered, "I spat in my mother's face." The priest said "That did not damn you." "I used to poison the neighbour's poultry," said Petticoat Loose. "That did not damn you," said the priest. "I used to kill children before thy were baptized," said Petticoat Loose. "That is what damned you," said the priest. He paused and then said, "I will banish you to the Red Sea." "I will sink all the ships that will pass." said Petticoat Loose. "You cannot," said the priest, "because you will be head first." The priest had a small prayerbook with him. He scarcely had finished the word "first" when he threw the prayerbook at Petticoat Loose. Petticoat
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:36
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watery, and this is put in a vessel by itself, and the strippings into another. The strippings is twice as rich in butter as the fore-milk.
You dip your finger into the froth of th milk and make the sign of the cross on the cow's hip with it. A good milker always rises foam on the milk.
A wicked cow must have some sort of tie or rope going from its hoof to its horn.
Swallows are very lucky in a byre, but you should not interfere with them.
Once some children robbed a swallow's nest in a byre, and the ilk turned into blood.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:36
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King whose example
Is followed by monarchs to this present day
A nation he would grant for his wisdom was ample
He knew how to rule in a true Kingly way.
There was brave Patrick Sarsfield exiled from his sireland
Exclaimed as he died on the foreigner's soil
May He ever grant freedom to dear old Ireland
And he died a bright gem from the Emerald Isle
[III]
If we boast of our gems sure no one could blame us
When we can produce men like those I shall name
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:33
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discountenance the cause and practice of intemperance.
This side of the medal bears the date 10th April 1838, and the name Father Theobald Mathew.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:33
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[I]
I will sing in Praise of the gems of old Ireland
Whose names are respected by friends and by foes
of men who are proud to acknowledge their sireland
of men who gained fame by words and by blows.
And their hearts brave and true never knew any danger
As cheerfully they for their country died
And it must be acknowledged by friends and by strangers
As those were bright gems of the Emerald Isle
[II]
First there came Brian Boru a great
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:32
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The cow-house is called the byre The cows are chained to the front of the manger. The chains used to be made at the local forge, but now they are bought in the hardware store.
The fore-milk of a cow is
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:31
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of palm used ot be put in the cow-house for luck.
The horse-stable has wooded sides, an iron roof and a paved floor. There is a manger in each division of the stable where the hay is kept for the horse. During the night the horses are tied. The halter is put on the horse's head and is tied by means of a rope to an iron ring on the manger.
Horses are not shod till they are about a year and six months old. For a good while after they are shod first the shoes are changed fairly often, but after a while they are left on till they are worn or fall off.
When the horse has to travel on a slippy road the shoes are sharpened. The horse's tail is not
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:30
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An old woman living in Tierworker get a needle in the sole of her foot, and could not get it out.
She went in a donkey and cart to the priest, and asked him to read an office over it. The Irish had great faith in the Divine Office.
The priest did as she requested, and the needle came out in the upper part of her foot, near the instep, and as well the wound healed up at once.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:28
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A cat sharpening her claws on timber is a sign of rain.
A dog eating grass is a (sgi) sign of rain.
Soot falling is a sign of rain.
When cattle graze early in the morning it is a sign of a wet day.
The South West wind is called the rainy point in this district.
When old people are bad with rheumatism they'll say it is near rain.
Other people say we are near rain when a corn pains.
When clocks, spiders and black snails, creep out the rain is near.
Hens loosen out their feathers with their bills before rain comes.
If the cock crows on a wet day the day will clear.
Goat hair on the sky is a sign of rain.
The sun shining on one field and not on another is the sign of a shower.
A sunny shower never lasts a half an hour.
A purple blaze in the fire is a sign of wind.
A very red sky is a sign of wind.
Sea-gulls come into land when there is a storm at sea.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:28
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for hydrophobia.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:27
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Mr. Hugh O'Farrell gave the High Altar to Kells Catholic Church. It cost £500.
The Sacred Heart Altar was given by Mrs. Christie in memory of her husband.
The Altar of Our Blessed Lady was given by a parishioners of Kells in memory of two former Parish priests of Kells namely Dr. Mac Evoy and Dr. Nickols.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:25
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gleaming through the stained glass windows but on examination he found it was not. He left the Church very uneasy and on his way home called on the Canon who was also the parish priest.
The Canon thought the man was imagining things, but to please him went back with him to the Church. On entering O'Donnell stayed in his wonted place just inside the door while the went straight up to the altar-rails and had a look around. A few feet away he saw on the carpet gleaming a white Saord Host. The morning was a first Friday, and in the rush and crush a particle fell on the ground unnoticed.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:24
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448
repeats it.
_____________
Found by Dorothy Brady,
Cryanstown, Knockvicar,
Boyle.
_____________
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:23
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Cows nearly always haave names such as Kitty, Polly, Horny and Strawberry. When cows are being driven in or out, "houa, houa" is shouted at them.
Calves are called by shouting, "suck, suck".
The cow-house is usually built of stone, with a slated or galvanised roof. Long ago the cows were tied with "sugans" to the manger, but at present they are tied with chains. In former times the floor of the cow-house was made of paving stones, but the modern cow-house has a concrete floor.
Long ago a piece of an ash stick was hung in the horse-stable to bring luck to the horses. A piece
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:23
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447
seven cats. And every cat had seven kits. Kits, cats, women, sacks and men.
How many went to to St. Ives.
Answer: One, myself. I "met" the others and they were going in the opposite direction.
(106) What is neither flesh nor bone but has four legs and a thumb.
Answer: A glove.
(107) I haven't got it, I dont want it and I wouldn't have it.
But if I had it I wouldn't take the old world for it.
Answer: A bald head.
(108) To whom can you most freely tell a secret.
Answer: To a liar, because he'll never be believed if he
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:21
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Once upon a time a little man lived alone in a house. He had a terrible appetite and he was a miser also. He had a store-room and he had it full of potatoes. He had a tiny pot and the full of it used to do him for his dinner. One day he measured the potatoes with the pot to know would he have enough to do him until the new ones would be in. He found that he would be one meal short and so he did not eat any potatoes that day. He was dead the next morning.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:20
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The old people say that it is not lucky to pull flowers that grow in a fort for they belong to the fairies. A fort should never be ploughed A man who ploughed a fort on his land got a paralytic stroke. Some called the forts Danish forts.
In Maperath is a hollow called "the valley of the black pig."
There was schoolmaster there once who had a book on black magic. He turned one of his pupils, a boy into a black pig. Then the black pig went round and rooted up the earth. Since then the hollow is called "The valley of the black pig.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:19
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cat looking out of a window.
Answer: A cat looking in on a window.
(102) How is a little man like a good book.
Answer: Because he is often looked over.
(103) How is hope like an old shoe.
Answer: Because it makes people easy.
(104) Brothers and sisters I have none but this man's father is my father's son.
Answer: Myself.
(105) As I went on to St. Ives, I met seven men, and the seven men had seven wives, and the seven wives had seven sacks. And in those seven sacks were
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:17
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of his belt "Seven at one stroke." Soon after he went to the King and asked a job from him. He got work from the King and everybody in the King's service was afraid of him. They thought him so brave and fierce that no one dared offend him. Everyone thought he had killed seven enemies with one terrible blow. So he became a rich man and he lived happily in the King's service honoured and feared by all.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:16
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445
There came a man without hands,
Climbed up without feet,
Cooked it without fire.,
Answer: A snowflake falls on a tree branch, and the sun comes up and melts it.
(99) A beautiful lady in a garden lived,
Her beauty was fair as the sun,
In one hour of her life she
became a man's wife,
And she died before she was born.
Answer: An Eve.
(100) Man what made it, don't use it, Man what use it, don't know it.
Answer: A coffin.
(101) What is most like a
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:15
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of his belt "Seven at one stroke." Soon after he went to the King and asked a job from him. He got work from the King and everybody in the King's service was afraid of him. They thought him so brave and fierce that no one dared offend him. Everyone thought he had killed seven enemies with one terrible blow. So he became a rich man and he lived happily in the King's service honoured and feared by all.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:13
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Michael Duffy was a great story-teller. His talent did not lie in the story as much as in the way he told it. He was stone blind. Some of his stories were about ghosts and fairies, and others were about rebel men taken out of their beds and beaten at the cross-roads. This man could also whistle and dance jigs and reels.
Peter O'Higgins (brother to Brian) is a great whistler. He sings at Feiseanna. He also sings in Kilskyne Church.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:13
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444
Found by Mairin Nic Dhiarmuda, Behy, Knockvicar, Boyle.
(94) White and black and read all over.
Answer: A newspaper.
(95) Up chip cherry, down chip cherry and all the men in Derry wouldn't put together chip cherry.
Answer: An egg.
(96) White and black went up the hill, black came down and white stayed above.
Answer: A black hen and an egg.
(97) Why do you go to bed.
Answer: Because the bed won't come to you.
(98) A bird flew without wings, Sat on a tree without leaves,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:11
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Once upon a time a tailor bought a pot of jam and a loaf of bread. He cut a slice of the bread and put jam on it. Some of the jam fell on the table and a great many flies landed on it. The tailor snatched up a piece of cloth and killed seven of them. He wrote along the front
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:09
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Jimmy Brow he had a gray mare.
m-m-m-m-m-m m-m-
Her legs were long and her ribs they were bare.
m-m-m-m-m-m-m-m-
One day poor Jimmy went to the town
m-m-m-m-m-m-m-m-
The mare she slipped and she fell down.
m-m-m-m-m-m m-m-m-
When the doctor saw her she said she would die.
m-m-m-m-m-m- m-m-
And then poor Jimmy began to cry.
m-m-m-m-m-m m-m-m-
The bridle and saddle were hung on the shelf.
m-m-m-m-m-m m-m-m-
Oh' the bridle and saddle were hung on the shelf
m-m-m-m-m-m m-m-
If you want any more you can sing it yourself.
m-m-m-m-m-m m-m-
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:07
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Once upon a time a man had three sons. The house had been haunted but this man was not afraid of anything. One night he bought a half barrel of beer and he invited all his friends in. He had a great big fire and they were all around it, when suddenly they heard a voice in the fire. The people got frightened and they rushed out. The man of the house stood up from his chair and listened to the voice again. He put out the fire and threw the half barrel of beer on it. He saw a little man going out at the back of the fire. The stranger said to the man of the house, "From this day until the day of your death you will never know an hours bad luck for you have done a very good turn for me this night." When he had said this he disappeared, and the man of the house never saw him again, but the little man's words came true for the man lived for many, many years after, and during all that time he was well off and happy.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 17:04
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awaiting decision
Jimmy Tevlin of Billywood, Laughan was a plough-man and had no education. One evening he was going to a dance in a hurry after a day's mowing. A dog attacked him and he raised the winkers to hit him and struck his own leg and from that out he was a cripple. But he got the gift of poetry. He could write in English and Irish.
Some of his poems are "A Mother's Lament" and "A Visit to Hell". In the latter poem he said that he saw every landlord in Ireland in hell, and that some were punished more than others.
His poems were not allowed to be published in this country for all the landlords were against him. They found their
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:59
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2. If a man is going to a fair with cattle or any animals and he meets another man on the road, he will not get sale for his beasts, if the other man does not turn back and walk a few paces with him.
3. If any domestic animal dies the owner always says:- "May the bad luck of the year go with you."
4. It is very unlucky to go back home for something if you are going on a journey.
5. It is very unlucky to spill salt, and the reason is this:- When Judas was getting up from the table at the last supper, to go out, he accidentally overturned a salt cellar which was on the table. This little incident is
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:56
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One night a young man was coming home from a dance, at midnight, when suddenly he saw a black man on the road. He got very frightened and stood up on the ditch and began to roar. His father heard him and ran to meet him. When he came to the young man he asked him what he was afraid of, " and he said "dont you see that big black man there." His father looked surprised. "Foolish," he said, "that is your own black cow waiting for you." The young man ran home before his father, and went to bed crying, he was so ashamed of himself for being so easily frightened. He knew, too, that if the story got around, he would never hear the end of it from the neighbours.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:50
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Seo iadh na n-ainmheacha atá ar na h-ainmhidhthe allta atá i mo baile fearinn i mbaile na leacan.
An madhra ruadh, an broch, an coinín, an girrfid agus an easóg. Déineann an madhra ruadh a leabha i bplús nó síos fé cairrigh mór.
An broch. Déineann an broch a leabha i bplús nó uaireannta déineann sé poll ins an dtalamh. Ainmhidhthe
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:49
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was not to walk that same road again while ever he lived or else he would be killed by that very ghost; but that when he would die that should be the first road he should take. The boy promised to carry out the wise man's instructions faithfully. He soon recovered from his sickness and he thanked God with all his heart for having saved his life from the ghost.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:48
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awaiting decision
agus an tíogharna. An aithnighneann tú é arsa fear leis an spailpín. O! arsa an spailpín de geit. 'Is mise nó eisean an dtighearna"
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:47
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awaiting decision
Mr Furlong of Ballyvaldon (noted already) tells me how the game of "buttons" was played. To begin with he said every boy in the old times carried marbles and buttons in a purse tied with a running string. This purse was often carried by a string around the neck.
To play buttons: There was a circle drawn on the plásán of about 3' diameter and each player stood his "stake" of buttons within the circle. Then there was a line drawn say 10' away behind which the players stood to 'pink for 1st shot'/ the throw nearest the circumference was first. An important feature of the game was the maneuvering for position so as to be able to drive out more than one button outside the circle with the one shot. Anyone attempting this had to cry 'slapoo' before attempting. If he succeeded he naturally got the buttons if he failed he had to 'stand' another button in the ring. If his throw remained inside the circle he was 'fat' and had to go back to line. To strike your opponents than gave you a button.
The exchange in this locality of those days was 1 thaw = 3 buttons but I suppose it varied.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:40
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time a man was walking the road at night. Suddenly he heard a dreadful noise among the bushes a little distance away from him. When he drew near the place he saw the form of a man among the bushes. What terrified him entirely was that the form which he saw had no head, but still it spoke to him though the young man never afterwards told what it said. He got such a fright that he could not move a step from where he stood. His hair stood up on his head and a cold sweat broke out all over him. He tried to scream but his tongue was dry and he could not utter a sound. He stood there for what seemed to him ages, though really it could have been only a few minutes. He was shaking all over. He made a couple of attempts to pray but he could say no words. Suddenly he saw the headless form draw back among the trees, and he found that he himself could move. So he hurried home and told the story to his father who was very troubled about his son. He advised him to go to bed and try to sleep and he would send for the doctor on the following day. The son did so and early next morning his father sent for the doctor. This doctor was also a wise man. When he came the father told him the whole story. Then he brought him to the room where the boy was sleeping. The doctor looked at the boy and said, "This boy is after fighting for Ireland and the ghost is the spirit of a person he has slain in battle." When the young man woke the doctor warned him that he
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:27
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awaiting decision
There was once a man who wished to catch a fairy. One night he went to a white-thorn bush and lay down and pretended to be asleep. It was not long until the faires came out and danced around him. One fairy came up to him and the man made a grab for him but he only caught the fairy's glass shoe. He went home and put it on the dresser and he looked at it often that night and during the next day. Just before dark on the following day a stranger came to the door. He was dressed like a poor man and was looking for alms. He got a piece of bread and butter. He began to eat it, but all the time he had his eyes fixed on the little glass shoe on the dresser. Of course he was not really a poor man at all but a fairy, the owner of the tiny shoe, who had come looking for his property. He remained standing at the door, eating the bread and butter as if he was very hungry. After a while he said, "That is a pretty thing you have there on the dresser. Will you sell it? I will give you a few shillings for it." So the bargain was made. The fairy took the shoe and straight away he disappeared. The man put the few shillings he had received into his pocket and went into his house feeling very pleased with himself. But the few shillings he had got from the fairy were soon spent and he became as poor as ever. Had he kept the little glass shoe he would have been rich and happy to the end of his life, but he did not know that until it was too late. He never saw a fairy afterwards.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:24
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awaiting decision
I cut off his head and let his body go easy.
A Head of Cabbage.
Patches upon patches without any stitches riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of breeches.
A Head of Cabbage.
Riddle me Riddle me Randy o my father gave me seed to sow the seed was black and the ground was white riddle me that before it is night
Ans A Woman writing a letter.
Black and white and read all over.
Ans. A newspaper
Long backed father big belly Mother three little children all the same colour
Ans. Pot and Hanger.
It is in the meadow but it is not cut. It is in the shop but it is not sold.
The suns - light.
As high as a wall, as bright as milk, as black as a beetle, as red as blood.
A black - thorn bush.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:23
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I cut off his head and let his body go easy.
A Head of Cabbage.
Patches upon patches without any stitches riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of breeches.
A Head of Cabbage.
Riddle me Riddle me Randy o my father gave me seed to sow the seed was black and the ground was white riddle me that before it is night
Ans A Woman writing a letter.
Black and white and read all over.
Ans. A newspaper
Long backed father big belly Mother three little children all the same colour
Ans. Pot and Hanger.
It is in the meadow but it is not cut. It is in the shop but it is not sold.
The suns - light.
As high as a wall, as bright as milk, as black as a beetle, as red as blood.
A black - thorn bush.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:22
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awaiting decision
It is a barrel-churn which is used at home. The churn itself is two feet high and it is on a wooden stand. As it is in the shape fo a barrel the sides are round
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:21
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awaiting decision
The churn mostly used at present in the barrel-shaped, fixed on a stand with dashes attached to the handle which are used in a turning motion.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:20
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But now there's great changes in our country I see,
By a letter that came here from Ireland to me.
As I read the fond lines, it appears to me plain.
That we soon will be back to our farms again.
For the houses are building
I hear they are grand,
Awaiting for us in our dear native land.
Where we all hoist the green banner with Shamrock's bound down,
And sing the bright praises of sweet Balligown.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:18
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As I wander by Shannon's side. At the close of an Autumn day; Fond thoughts of my lover bide, As thy trees in the soft wind play
Whisp'ring leaves on an Autumn eve,
What can your message be?
Whisper as you're gently falling,
Is my true love calling, Whisper that I may see.
Oh, what says your gentle voice; What does your fancy see? Is my love, my dear love, coming back to me?
Whisp'ring me?
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:16
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awaiting decision
A man named Daniel O Connel went to visit the Burkes once. The maids prepared a meal for him at once. They made tea for him and they put poison into it for they meant to kill him.
Daniel O Connel was a very clever man and he knew they were about to do him harm, so he put his hand into his pocket and pulled up some silver and threw in on the floor. As soon as the coins fell the maids stooped to get them.
As she reached for the money, he took the cup of tea which she was to drink, and left the cup in which the poison was in its place. Then the man took the tea and drank it, as she thought the poison was in the other one, As soon as she drank it she fell dead.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:14
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awaiting decision
The farm animals of this locality are, the cows, the horse the ass, the mule, the ginnet, the calf, the sheep, the goat, the pig. The domestic animals of this locality are, the cat, dog, hen cock, duck, drake, goose, gander, turkey, turkeycock, banten, guinea-hen.
The names of cows get(s) are Kitty Moll Magpie, Fan, Betty, Brindle.
The call for animals,
The calf = Suck, suck.
The cow = pwig, pwig.
The horse = pseo, pseo.
The pig = murt, murt.
The sow = hurish, hurish.
The goat = gin, gin.
The cat = pussy, pussy.
The hen = chuck, chuck
The duck = weaty, weaty
The turkey = gib, gib.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 16:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man whose name was William Crotty and he lived in a cave in the Comeragh Mountains. When he was going to be hanged the people asked him if he had anything to say and he said there was a crock of gold hidden and whoever would find it would not be badly off. So one day a servant boy who was at Quinlans came and told one of the Quinlans that he had seen a stone with the print of a horse-shoe on it. So the man went out and he dug up the stone and he got gold under it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A poultice of soap and sugar us used to cure boils if a person had a sprained foot put it in a running river Chicken= weed was used to cure warts.
If a person had a sore foot
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A person named Miss Herrick, in Borrisokane has the healing power for wild-fire, also a man named David Ryan has the power to cure certain pains.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:52
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rejected
awaiting decision
The frog has changed his yellow vest
And in a russet coat has dressed
My dog so altered is his taste
Quits mutton bones on grass to feast
And see yon rooks how odd their flight
They imitate the gliding kite
A headlong downward seem to fall.
As if they felt the piercing ball.
I will surely rain I see with sorrow.
Our jaunt must be put off to-morrow.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:50
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awaiting decision
My lady love has eyes of blue
Like violets kissed by Summer dew,
Her dimpled cheek and loving smile,
Will always make my life worth while
[?]
Love of my heart, love of my heart,
Sweetest flower I ever knew,
with the setting sun when the day is done.
How my thoughts wander to you.
Though you're far away, how I always pray, That in sunshine and love life may hold you
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:50
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rejected
awaiting decision
Once a woman had a son a priest and he told her that every Mass she would be present at, to put a stone in a box. At the end of the year she opened the box and only found one stone in it. That woman saw by that she only heard one Mass properly. She lived in Comeragh but I don't know what her name was.
Here is another : A man was going to mass one Sunday morning and he met a priest at Kilrossanty School. The man was carrying a bag on his back. The priest asked him what he had in the bag. He said "Potatoes" and the priest asked him if he prayed for every person who gave him alms. The man said "Some I do and some I don't". The priest asked him if he would spill the potatoes out on the road. The man did so and all the people he prayed for who gave him alms separated from those he did not.
The priest said "Those are all you prayed for and there are three times as much you did not pray for". That priest's name was Fr. Tracey and he was a priest that was in Kilrossanty in days gone by.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:47
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rejected
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Gold is supposed to have been hidden in a tunnel which leads from the Old castle Portumna to Elliot's in Jerryglass. Attempts were made by Mr. Molloy to unearth it. When they come to a certain part of the tunnel they were stopped by a black dog who is said to be guarding the gold. No other attempts have been made since to find it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:47
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rejected
awaiting decision
Hark how the chairs and tables crack.
Old Betty's joints are on the rack
Loud quacks the the peacocks cry
The distant hills are looking nigh.
How restless are the snorting swine
The busy flies disturb the kine.
Low o'er the (swo) grass the swallow wings.
The cricket too how sharp he sings
Puss on the hearth with velvet paws
Sits wiping o'er her whiskered jaws
Through the clear stream the fishes rise.
And nimbly catch the incautious flies.
The glow worms numerous and bright.
Illumed the dewy dell last night
At dusk a squalid toad was seen hopping and crawling o'er the green
The whirling wind the dust obeys
And in a rapid eddy plays
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:45
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there under the debris (up) to this day.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:45
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awaiting decision
One of the worst fires occurred in October, 1928 to our beautiful Technical School.
One evening as the people were returning from the Rosary, they heard a great commotion. Someone started shouting "fire!" "fire!" and looking up, they saw the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:44
approved
rejected
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Cappocks Green, sometimes called Capog glas, an unofficial name for the district near the Station in Ardee.
Sraidins ; a field near Maguire's in Riverstown in which rushes and Shepperd's purse grow.
Crocán ; field in Riverstown
Mullnaskia (Mull na Sceach). Field in Riverstown.
Slangs field ; Sleamhan elm in " Riverstown
Croc na gámhan ; field in Riverstown " (Cnoc na gceánn)?
Ballalachtan an unofficial name for townland of Riverstown near Ardee. (Baile Loch Damhain).
Páirc na Pis; in Riverstown
Churchfield " "
Connicums - marshy field near Mullacloe.
Mullybee (Mullach Buidhe) small " " "
Sraith; field near Shanlis.
Crois Éilis : local name for Dunleer Cross in Hale St.
Lios Sinigán (Lios Sionachán silim féin ach bfhéidir gur siongáin) Field near Churchtown
Tobar Stephen field near Churchtown
Carricks; rock field near Churchtown
Annaclabber (Eanach Clababar) " "
Crocnacor " " "
Crocacibby (Currach Cíbe) " " "
Crocnafinny " " "
Mullyarragon " " "
The Gleann (glan); An Gleann = old name for Riverstown.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:44
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dragged for again they found it in that place.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:43
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awaiting decision
In the time when blanrickarde lived in Portumna, there also lived a monastery in his land- Dominican Monks whom he disliked. After some time he wished to get rid of the Monks and so he ordered them out of the monastery but they refused to go, He again ordered them from the place but they refused to
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:43
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to be hungery
Because he always has a bit in his mouth.
The poker the timber and the tongs cost £2 10s 6d what would the coal come to.
Ans, Ashes.
What is it that God never sees. the queen and King seldom see and we see every day.
Ans. His own equals.
What is the best cat in the world
A Trap.
Why is a postage stamp like a lazy school - boy.
Ans. Because both are made stick to their Letters
What walks with its head down.
Ans. A nail in a man's boot.
A messenger from house to house and it stays out at night
Ans A Path.
It never was and never will be look at your hand and you will plainly see.
Ans.- That your little finger will never be as big as the others
Why is a barber the smallest man in the world.
Ans Because he has always to put up a (lather (ladder)
What goes around the whole world and cannot be seen. Ans. The wind.
As I went up a slippery gap I met my uncle Davy
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:42
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him at the back of the castle and raised a slab to his memory. Some time after the castle was ruined.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:38
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awaiting decision
A poem told to me by my father, John Lowe, and told to (me) him by his father William Lowe who died October the 6th 1934 aged 83 years.
The hollow winds begin to blow
The clouds look black the glass is low,
The soot falls down, the Spaniels sleep,
And spiders from their cobwebs creep.
Last night the sun went pale to bed,
The moon in hallows hid its head
The boding shepherd heaves a sigh.
For see a rainbow spands the sky
The walls are damp, the ditches smell
Closed is the pink eyed piper nell.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:37
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time the first half of the cows milked as usual, but when it came to the second half of the cows took a great fright. One of the men looked at the window and saw a quarter of a calf on it. He did not know who put it there or where it came from. In the morning when they got up two of the cows were dead and by degrees they all died and now they cannot keep a cow or a calf.This is quite true as the man who is working there told me.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:33
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441
can't do?
Answer: He can't make two hills without a hollow.
(85) Ink, ank, under the bank,
Ten drawing four?
Answer: A girl milking a cow.
(86) I have a little cow and she lies again' the wall, and she'd eat all the "spadach" from here to Donegal.
Answer: A fire.
(87) " If a fellow met a fellow in a field of beans,
Says a fellow to a fellow
Could a fellow tell a fellow
What a fellow means,"
How many "fs" in that.
Answere: None.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:32
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We have not a churn at home, but I often saw one. The shape of it was round. It was one piece and two beaters inside it. Most of the farmers made butter twice a week in Summer but in Winter they used a smaller churn because they made only butter enough for themselves.
One of the men made the butter. Any man who came in during the churning gave a twist to the handle of the churn as it was an old saying 'It is lucky to take a turn at the churning'.
The churning took at least an hour. It was done by hand. The beaters were moved from side to side. When the butter was made the man who was twisting the churn would feel a heavy fall inside it. That is how he knew when the butter was made. Cold water was poured into the churn in Summer to help the butter to set and sometimes hot water was poured into it in Winter to help them to make it up. It was lifted out by hand, then it was put into a round firkin and washed and salted. Some of it went to the market and the rest of it was sold to the people around. Of course he kept some for himself.
This happened not so long ago - A farmer had great cows for milking abd this evening at milk
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:30
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1 A small piece of live coal is put under the churn.
2 A pinch of salt and some Holy Water is put into the milk for churning.
3 Milk is not to be churned under a rafter but between two rafters off the roof
4 A person is not allowed to leave the house smoking a pipe where churning is going on.
5 If (churning) a person enters a house where churning is going on he is supposed to take the dash and churn a few strokes
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:29
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Cill Abbain - The Church of St Abban.
St Abban called the Angelical - the Golden Branch - was a very famous Saint who lived in the 7th Century.
There is an interesting story told that after his death the overseer of his Monastery in Magh Arnuidhe stole away the Saint's body with the intention of bringing it for burial to Kilabban.
The Cortege was pursued by the South Lagenians and a great dispute arose. The Coffin was drawn by oxen which went around the grave three times right thand wise. They then ran lowing to the river and went down into the ford and were never seen again. Consequently the ford is called in Irish Ath dain Cheilt i.e. the ford of the Oxen Concealing themselves. It would be interesting to know if any ford in the Barrow in the vicinity of Mageney or Kilabban has a name at all resembling this.
It is also stated that two Coffins purporting to be St Abbans were brought for burial to Kilabban and that one was left for burial there and that the other coffin was buried in some other place . It is impossibble to find out now which coffin contaiined the actual remains.

(Gleaned from local History)
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:28
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rejected
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Cill Abbain - The Church of St Abban.
St Abban called the Angelical - the Golden Branch - was a very famous Saint who lived in the 7th Century.
There is an interesting story told that after his death the overseer of his Monastery in Magh Arnuidhe stole away the Saint's body with the intention of bringing it for burial to Kilabban.
The Cortege was pursued by the South Lagenians and a great dispute arose. The Coffin was drawn by oxen which went around the grave three times right thand wise. They then ran lowing to the river and went down into the ford and were never seen again. Consequently the ford is called in Irish Ath dain Cheilt i.e. the ford of the Oxen Concealing themselves. It would be interesting to know if any ford in the Barrow in the vicinity of Mageney or Kilabban has a name at all resembling this.
It is also stated that two Coffins purporting to be St Abbans were brought for burial to Kilabban and that one was left for burial there and that the other coffin was buried in some other place . It is impossibble to find out now which coffin contaiined the actual remains.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:28
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84 What is it that God
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:28
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440
Answer that.
81. that is it that cant go up the chimney down and cant go down the chimney up.
Answer:- An umbrella.
82. How is the Main street of Boyle like the River Shannon.
Answer:- There is a bank on each side of it.
83. Long legged father, big bellied mother and three little children all like other.
Answer: A pot.
Found by Crios Ni Fhiaich, Smutternagh,
Corrigeenroe, Boyle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:25
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It is said that if any of the butter is missing, the person should put a sock in the fire while churning so that the butter cannot be stolen.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:23
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There are different churns for churning in this locality the one we use in our home is a dash churn it is shaped like a barrel. The different parts are; the dash, the joggler, and lid. The butter is made twice a week the churning is done by the women of the house and anyone who comes in gives a hand. It generally take an hour to churn. When the butter comes up between the dash and the lid the person knows it is churning. Water is added to help to separate the butter from the milk.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:16
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303
and he said. Will you come with me to the church tonight and she agreed.
So both went and at the stroke of twelve o'clock the priest came out of the sacristy and again said. Is there anyone to serve Mass. there is said the other priest and he went up to the altar and served Mass
When Mass was over the priest went back into the sacristy and was never heard of or seen again.
Margaret O'Brien
Drumboylan
Teller of story
Mathew Kenny old age pensioner
Drumboylan
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:15
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is used for bread and colds.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:14
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There are different makes of churns nowadays but the old churn is called the dash churn. It is made by a man called a cooper. It is made of timber and is bound with hoops. It has a lid with a hole in the centre and it is worked with a dash. The dash is worked up and down in the milk from the outside with the hands. The churning can be done much easier in Summer as the cream thickens quicker. In Winter some warm water is needed to make it churn quickly. The milk is said to be cracked when the butter begins (begins) to appear on the dash. When the milk is churned the butter is taken off into a wooden basin the basin is washed for the butter. The butter milk
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:13
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302
A Mass story.
This happened about fifty years ago. An old woman was living beside a Catholic church in the Parish of Kiltoghert and she made it a habit to go to the church every evening at dusk to say her rosary. One evening as she was praying at the altar the sexton came and locked the church thinking that here was no one inside and so the old woman had to stay there for the night.
She went up to the altar and sat down knowing well that she would have to stay there till morning. She was about to fall asleep at twelve o'clock when suddenly the sacristy door opened and a priest walked out on the altar and said. Is there anyone to serve Mass. The woman sat still and said nothing. the priest remained for some time on the altar and then went back into the sacristy.
the minute the sexton opened the church next morning the old woman went straight to the Parish priest to tell him what happened
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:13
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During the reign of Landlords in Ireland long ago, many stories are told of their cruelty to their tenants. One true story is told of how they evicted thirty-two familys in one day and knocked their houses to the grounde Those houses were built from Bookeen roade over to Raherneen boreen. When they had the houses knocked they sowed oats in their place.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:12
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Years ago a poet named Peter MacCabe lived in Ballinagh. He lived at the bottom of a mountain. He was born in 1859, and he died in 1921. At the age of sixty he died, and he was buried in Denn in Ballinagh.
He used to come into Cavan on a Tuesday in an old cart. He composed in English. He composed a poem called "Shanahan's Old Sheebe". His ancestors were poets, and they were famous. He was called "Peter the Poet".

Another man, named Simon Dolan lived
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:12
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in Cavan town. He was a very good poet. He died at the advanced age of eighty two. He died in the County Home, and he was buried in Cullies. His ancestors were not poets. He was a very good scholar, and he liked poetry very much. He was deaf, and he was very poor. He went about the country in an old ass and and cart.
He wrote a poem about Brefni, and it was called "The boys of Brefni". He wrote in English and Irish.

Written by;
Carmel Maguire
Pearse St.,
Cavan
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:06
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292
An old story.
Once upon a time a man was building a house and he had to go ten miles for sand. One morning he said he would go two journeys so he started at four o'clock in the morning. When he was half way the wheel came off the cart. He looked around and he saw a man kneeling by a wall and he asked him to help to put on the wheel on the cart. The man said he was doing penance there and that they used not help him in their prayers at night and that he would not help him now.
The man said three Hail Marys in his mind and when he looked around him the wheel was on the cart so the the man continued his journey. This man never forgot the poor souls in his prayers afterwards.
Eileen O'Brien.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:02
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293
A long walk.
About fifty years ago a girl named Anne Sweeny walked from Myoran to Roscommon and returned back the same day. She left home at two o'clock in the morning and came back that night. She was at law with her brother and she had to go to Roscommon for the trial.
Three other women walked to this town from this district on another occasion and returned the same day also, the distance being thirty miles each way. Their names were Mrs Kenny, Mrs Mac Loughlin, and Mrs Gallagher. When coming home one of those women fainted about two miles from home, and word had to be sent to her husband to come and take her home.
In those days there were no cars, motors, bicycles, or traps, so the poor man having no better mode of conveyance took a wheel barrow to take her home.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:02
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next morning she could be found anywhere. But she appeared there for years and years after.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 15:00
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Long ago there was a certain protestant family living in Clonmacnois. There was a lady in the family. who used to get up from her (a) sleep at one o'clock and walk about the house and yard and haggard. Her father put a man in one window of the house one night and told him to shoot the lady the first time he saw he, or if he id not he would get himself shoot the next morning. He shoot the lady and when they went out the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:56
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294
A long walk, continued
When coming down Drumheirney hill beside Leitrim village the axle of the barrow broke and the man carried his wife home on the back the remainder of the journey.
One day I walked to Carrick-on-Shannon which is six miles from my home. I was very tired and footsore and making moans for myself, and a neighbouring old age pensioner told me what those women had done.
Eileen OBrien,
Drumboylan.
Teller of story
Terry Gaffney,
Drimbresna,
Leitrim.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:55
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Crom Cruagh's garden is a small fort in the estate of Mr Robert Gorby, Shrough, Ballymagovern Co. Cavan. This place is surrounded by white thorn bushes. In it there are twelve stones in a round ring, and in the middle of the stones, Crom Cruagha the false God stood. Tradition tells us, that when St Patrick came, he made "the sign over the false God, and it fell into dust.

Written by
Gerard Cassidy
Plunket St.
Cavan
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:55
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and a gentleman dressed in black with a black, tall, hard hat.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:54
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A house in this parish is haunted every night. The people of the house hear a knock at the hall-door and a light step goes up stairs and when it is gone up a while the house begins to shake and chains is heard rattling and all the doors and windows open. No matter how the people of the house shut the doors and windows they are always wide open in the morning. A person was passing by the house one night and heard all this going on inside he went in and was met by a Lady dressed in white
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:53
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295
A long walk.
In olden times people were great walkers. This is an account of a long walk which I heard:-
My grandfather's brother was sick in Roscommon hospital, My grandfather "Matt Crowley" got up one morning and walked to Roscommon which is thirty miles distant. On arriving there he saw his brother. He found him pretty well.
He then heard of Lenabane races, three miles outside the town. He went to the races and spent some time there. He walked home again that day thus covering sixty miles on foot in one day.
This an lived to be eighty-four years of age and has been dead now about six years.
Michael Crowley,
Corrigeen,
Ardcarne Parish,
Co. Roscommon.
Information received from
John Crowley,
Corrigeen.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:51
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Danaidhe - very poorly "donny"
Scolb - scollop
Sleaghan - a kind of spade for cutting turf
Laidhe - a kind of spade
Geanncanach - a small fairy (a small ugly man)
Oró(?) - a house for hens
Bean-sighe - a fairy woman
Drab - dirty rim on a skirt
Clib - a big strong young fellow
Cláb
Seal
Sneid - (sneid) of a scythe
Doirnín

Ceis
Noggin
Cailín
Cáibín
Crúibín
Práisgín
Skillet
Gossoon
Bacaigh
Bothalán
Shuch
Cipín
A Mhic
Barrdóg
Brogue
Loc of tea
Meitheal
Ceilidh
Spree
A Leanbh
Mo Stor
Carrigeen
Préata
Abú
Gráinín
Ciotach
Cogar
Gearrcaile
A Rúin
Cuiseóg
Tráithín
Soc
Bóithirín
(Púdóg - Dallóg)
Ciseán
Galach - name of a kind of clay
Sean toigh
Amadán
Clamp
Girseach
Smidirín
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:48
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Danaidhe - very poorly "donny"
Scolb - scollop
Sleaghan - a kind of spade for cutting turf
Laidhe - a kind of spade
Geanncanach - a small fairy (a small ugly man)
Oró(?) - a house for hens
Bean-sighe - a fairy woman
Drab - dirty rim on a skirt
Clib - a big strong young fellow
Cláb
Seal
Sneid - (sneid) of a scythe
Doirnín

Ceis
Noggin
Cailín
Cáibín
Crúibín
Práisgín
Skillet
Gossoon
Bacaigh
Bothalán
Shuch(?)
Cipín
A Mhic
Barrdóg
Brogue
Loc of tea
Meitheal
Ceilidh
Spree
A Leanbh
Mo Stor
Carrigeen
Préata
Abú
Gráinín
Ciotach
Cogar
Gearrcaile
A Rúin
Cuiseóg
Tráithín
Soc
Bóithirín
(Púdóg - Dallóg)
Ciseán
Galach - name of a kind of clay
Sean toigh
Amadán
Clamp
Girseach
Smidirín
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:47
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and man faded away.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:46
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296
A good runner.
There was once a great runner, who lived in Ardcarne. his name was James Quinn. One day his father and mother went to Boyle. When they came home he had a live hare under a creel. He told them he raced across the hill, and caught him. They would not believe his tale, so he let out the hare again and caught him. When he grew up he became a robber and he was so swift the police could never catch him. He was a very good jumper also.
He had a step at the Feorish River and used to jump across when followed by the police. This step was in a big bundle of rushes. The police dug the rushes and left it floating. When Quinn jumped in them he went down with the stream and was captured.
Tellor of story
John Crowley,
Corrigeen.
Michael Crowley
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:43
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awaiting decision
About forty six years ago the old people were able to make linen from flax and some of it is still to be seen in many places.
It was a very slow method they had for making the flax fit for manufacture. This is how they did it:- when the flax it was pulled by hand. it was then tied up in sheaves. Then it was steeped in a bog hole for a few days. It was brought back and dried and tied up in sheaves again. It was then left to dry. Then it was thoroughly dried by a hurdle.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:39
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room where they were and he did so and they were unable to continue. When they discovered the holy water they thrust it outside and then they were able to continue.
He also many Bible Readers. The principal ones were Dimon and Guess. They used to assemble in a house in the garden and bring their scholars with them to teach them their prayers.
These people were called soupers.
They used to come along the road before the people would come out from Mass and throw pamplets on the road so that the people would read them and they might turn to their religion. When they entered a house they used to leave a bundle of tracts after them so that the people would read them and if anybody dare insult them they would be evicted.
The people of Barnacurragh were not in the Aughrane and they did not fear him but nevertheless his bible readers tried to convert the people to their religion. They used to come occasionally but one day the men took the wheels from under the carriage and they had to walk home so they never came after that.
There is a round tower in Killeroran cemetery which Dennis built and he is buried in Killeroran. There is a little cabin there in which his body was
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About fifty years ago a man and woman and a little girl of about nine years old, were coming from Endrum to Clongowney on a bright moonlight night about half way on their journey they heard as they thought a cat crying as if she was in holt in a trap they passed no remarks on that, but to their great surprise the cat as they thought seemed to follow them sometimes the man would think she was on his side of the road, and then on the other, the woman said she was in the field outside and said she would see. She opened a gate at the road side and to her astonishment what did she see outside, but a man that appeared to be seven feet high with a big cats head on him, it followed them until they came to Endrum river. None of them seeing it but the woman. There all sounds
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:30
approved
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awaiting decision
mass of earth and flung it after the Scotch giant, and it fell into the sea and was known as the Isle of Man and where the mass of earth was taken from was known as Lough Neagh.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:29
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awaiting decision
prefers to lay her eggs in the nest of another bird. Sometimes she chooses the nest of a robin and when the sprawling young cuckoo is hatched it seizes all the food that the parent robin bring home. At last it pushes the rightful heirs out of their own nest altogether, and the perish, half fledged on the ground. Thus the greedy young cuckoo secures more room and more food for itself.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:27
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awaiting decision
their nests beneath the eaves of the houses. We may also hear the call of the cuckoo though Springtime has now passed away.
In the freshness of May he sings all day
In the warmth of June he changes his tune
Julu sees him begin to fly
And with the early days of August go he must.
We are fond of the cuckoo but we often wish some of its habits were different. We wish, for instance that the hen cuckoo would build a nest of her own. She
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:23
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awaiting decision
of a gorse bush or in a tuft of grass is the place to find the nest of the linnet. All the winter he wears a sober suit of gray, but now he has donned his Spring suit of bright reddish brown. The linnets nest is lined with hair and many a journey the little worker takes before the lining is complete. The swallows are our well-known Summer friends in this district, though they do not rank high as songsters. In the still evening we hear them calling shrilly as they swoop to and from
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:20
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awaiting decision
till it is broken and falls off bit by bit. When the house is destroyed the snail is followed comfortably. It is usually from the ash tree that we hear the first Spring song of the chaffinch. All the Winter he has little to say to us but one day in March or April we may hear his song - a few long sweet notes, followed by a downward ripple of music. It can be noticed that he flies with a slight up and down motion, and that his breast glows reddish in the sunshine. Deep in the prickly shelter
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:18
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awaiting decision
1. Droicheadh ar Loch gan caraig gan cloch. .
Keac oidhre
2. Tugann isteach ar druim e agus imthigheann sé amach i na theit
Cliabh móna
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:17
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awaiting decision
The male blackbird is black, and his bill is of a bright orange yellow. The female is of a dull brown and her bill is bright only in Spring. The brown of her back differs only in shade from that of the thrush, which has a greenish tinge. But the thrush's breast is light and speckled. We must therefore not be led astray by the name of the blackbird. If you keep your eye on the thrush when he has a snail you will see it carry the snail to a large stone and knock the shell against the stone
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:17
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awaiting decision
In olden days a dead coach was known to pass this road every morning at three o'clock. It used to be drawn by two black horses. It was often seen by the people around this locality. It used to go to Clonmacnois, one morning a man from Clonmacnois was going to a fair, he crossed the churchyard, he heard the noise, and looking around, he saw the coach, The gate flew open and it came into the church yard and it immediately vanished. It is said that the driver had no head, and when the dogs used to begin barking and roaring and if the people did not let them in they would go mad, when they heard the noise of the dead coach.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:16
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awaiting decision
nuair a chonnaic "Iosaí" Seán ag rith i ndiaidh Seán. Sul ar raib fail ag Seán an sagart a ceapaí bí sé narbhadh ag (seo) "Iosaí"
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:14
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awaiting decision
brushwood and dead leaves. The thrush prefers the hedge because it is a timid bird and from its shelter it can see approaching danger without being seen. Another reason is that on a Winters day it is the most likely place in which to find a stray morsel of food - some seed or berry that has been overlooked till then. When the blackbird is frightened it flies away with a loud alarm cry which he repeats several times. The thrush however gives no cry but flits shyly and silently away.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:13
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awaiting decision
Bhí gnás san t-am sin aon duine a thuibhraidh doigeann sagairt do Riagalcas Sasana gheoibheadh sé deic púnt air.
Tóg Seán an gnás sin agus nuair a cloinfead sé go raibh sagart ina cómhnuidhe i naice eis.
Leigeadh sé air féin go raibh sé ag fagháil bháis, agus nuair a thagadh na sagairt marbhuigheadh Seán iad.
Bhí socraidh sagart ann uair amháin agus chuala seán é. Chuaidh sé leis an socraidh. Chonnaic sé an sagart seo agus rith i-na dhiaidh. Bhí fear suibal ann dárbh bhainn "foscai" [?]
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:12
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district relating to the robin redbreast and how he came to have a red breast. One of the most popular is as follows:- It is said that when the soldiers placed the wreath of sharp thorns on the head of our Saviour that the robin went and picked them out one by one with his beak. The blood from our Saviours head was supposed to have fallen on the robin thus giving him a red breast.
The nest of the blackbird is to be found hidden among the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:09
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awaiting decision
In this district there is no better time for beginning to learn something about the birds than on a snowy Winter day. A bird is far more easily seen among the leafless hedges and trees than among the thick Summer foliage. During the Summer in this district the songs of the different birds are all joined in one great chorus. On the snowy day only the robin redbreast sits on the hedge. There are numerous stories in this
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:07
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awaiting decision
isteach san smután, Nuair a chuaidh se abaile bhí sé ag innseacht do na cómgursanna agus dubhairt siad go raibh faitchíos air agus níor fhág se an teach aon oidhche ó shoin
"O bhéal Antoine Mac Fionnact aig"
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:05
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awaiting decision
About a century ago Dennis Kelly became the heir to the lands which his forefathers had confiscated. Of course he evicted many of his tenants. On one occasion he evicted a poor widow and he was cursed by the priest (Father Wallace).
He said he would never have an heir to his property and it happened. On another occasion he met his favourite Marcas Acrach and he asked him (him) to compose a piece of poetry for him and the man said:-
The chapel is built and the church may fall
And kill Dennis Kelly and jumpers and all.
and that alas proved true
Dennis was a jumper so then he had knowledge of Catholicity. On one occasion he had freemasons in the house. They were excercising their great power. Dennis had a servant boy who was a catholic. He told him to leave a bottle of holy water in the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 14:02
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awaiting decision
Bhí fear ann uair amhain dárbh ainm Seán Na Sagairt. Aon áit a cloinfeadh sé go raibh sagart ina rachaidh sé go dtí an áit agus nuair a gheobhfad sé seans marbúigheadh sé é.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:59
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It is a common thing to hear the cries of the Ban Shee. When she cries the neighbours know that some person is about to die, the Ban Shee is a small white woman she cries after certain families namely, Crowe and any person who has Mc. before his name.
One night long ago a man was going across a hill he found a beautiful comb and brought it home. That night he heard the Ban Shee crying outside the window. Next day the man went to the priest and told him what had happened. The priest told him to put the comb on a fork and hand it out to the Ban Shee the next night, but he told him to point the grains towards her. The man did this and and the Ban Shee took the fork with her
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:58
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The pupils learned History, Arithmetic, English Geography and they learned their writing and Arithmetic on a black-board. The master stayed in each farmer's house for a week.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:57
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awaiting decision
There are many thatched houses in our district. These house require thatching every five or six years. This work is usually done in Winter.
The straw for thatching is pulled in bundles each of which has to be straightened and evened. The straw is left down in bundles on the roof and fastened with what is called a scallop. This is a hazel rod about three feet long and pointed at each end.
In the process of thatching the scallop is put across the bundle of thatch and secured firmly in the old roof at each side. It is finished at the top with "bobins" which are knotted straw.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:53
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awaiting decision
There is a fairy fort in Glebe. Long ago fairies were ween kicking football and dancing there on the moon-lit nights. One day a man named Mick Gorman went to cut sticks in the fort. A fairy with a red jacket
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:49
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:48
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Larry Dillon killed a pig for a priest in this district. Now Larry, the poor will torment me for some of this meat said the Priest. Say the pig was stolen said
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:47
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Larry. Oh no, said the Priest I won't tell a lie.
Larry went back that night to the Priest yard and stole the pig out of the outhouse where it was.
The Priest met Larry the next morning. Larry, said he the pig was stolen last night. Thats right said Larry ,stick to that and you'll have peace.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:45
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able to see the crock of gold. The eel spoke to him and said that some friend of his would have to die before he would get the crock of gold, and be rich for the rest of his life. But the Englishman did not proceed any further and he went back to England, and no more was heard about him.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:43
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There is gold supposed to be hidden in Mr Tom Seery's field, Magherbaun near where I live. Some years ago there was a man in England who dreamth three times about this gold. On the furth day he came over from (his dream) England and he as able to know from his dream where the field was. So he dug half way in the banking. A huge eel came out of the bank. Then he was
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:39
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bride home. He usually travelled on horseback and took his wife home on a “pillion” and a procession of the friends in their carts, usually ass drawn carts. When all arrived home a great feast and all-night dance was held at the house.
When the wedding was over and the party came outside the church a crowd of poor people waited outside and the bridegroom scattered money, different coins, by throwing them high in the air and letting them fall. Then the “beggars” tried to get as many as they could. This was called a “kee-kaw” “cí-cá”. It was done in the district up to a few years ago.
“Straw-boys” did visit the house where the wedding was being held. They were always disguised and had blackened faces. The went into the house uninvited and each tried to have one dance with the “bride”. Oftentimes there was a row between the parties and it often led to bad friends.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:39
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to have taken place after visiting the well. There no particular prayers required for making the station. In order to gain the indulgence people used to go round the well nines times on their knees saying any prayers they wished and finish the station at the Friar's Stone. Holy water from the well and blessed clay from underneath the stone were got by every one who visited the place. The pilgrimage has died out, the well is grown over with grass and for the past fifty years no people do the stations nor visit the place which was once one
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:38
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Marriages most frequently take place in this district in Shrove. Wednesday is considered a lucky day for weddings. May and August are considered very unlucky. Matches are still made and money is given as a dowry. In the olden time stock was given if the bride’s parents had not he necessary money. Marriages did take place in the houses up to the last years of the last century. After the wedding ceremony the party went to the home of the bride and the “breakfast” was ready there. Meat of different kinds was cooked and a barrel of beer was there. They ate and drank and had a big dance that night. A wedding lasted two or even three days.
Sometimes the “bride” did not return to her new home the day she was married but remained in her own home for some times. Then a “hauling” home was held. The bridegroom went to take home his
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:35
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of the most famous in the Irish Midlands.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:34
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hundred yards from where the blessed well is. His head rolled along to Camon's garden and his body was buried on the road side. A large square stone with a cross cut out on it covers the grave of the Friar's body. The blessed well , with a large standing stone, and a small tree, mark the place where the Friar's head rests. At one time the fame of the well was known far and wide. Pilgrims from all over the country came to do stations there. Many miraculous cures are said
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:33
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towns throughout this kingdom next after the feast of St. John the Baptist, which shall be in the year of Our Lord 1704, return his or their names and places of abode to the respective Clerks of the peace, together with his or their age, the parish of which they pretend to be Popish parish priests, the time and place of his or theirs first receiving Popish Orders, and from whom he or they first received the same; and shall then and there enter into sufficeint sureties, each in the penal sum of fifty pounds sterling, that every such Popish priest shall be of peaceable behaviour, and not remove out os such county where his or their place of abode lies into any other part of the kingdom. --- And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid that no Popish parish priest shall keep or have any Popish curate, assistant, or coadjutor; and that all and every Popish priest that shall neglect to register himself pursuant to this act shall depart out of this kingdom before the 20th of July, 1704, on pain of being prosecuted as a Popish regular Clergyman"
In pursuance of the above act Rev. John Fitzpatrick attended the general Quarter Sessions of the Peace, held at Grace's castle in and for the County of Kilkenny, on Wednesday 11th July, 1704, and registered his name.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:31
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There is a blessed well in Mr Michael Camon's garden in Ballysheil.
The history of this well goes back hundreds of years. Old people tell that during the penal times when religious persecution was at its height, a Friar who was hiding in the Strawberry Hill Road was chased by English soldiers from there over to Ballysheil where he was killed on the road about one
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:24
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prosecution was abandoned. Fr. Quinn having the defence money on hands, proposed that it be expended in building a steeple to commermorate the downfall of the "Tithes". The people most unanimously agreed, and the steeple was immediately commenced.
In the churchyard of Lower Kilmacow on a tombstone is the following:-
Here lies ye body of ye
Rev. John Fitzpatrick, who began eternity
on the 13th April, 1727.
Requiescat in pace.
This good priest had to endure the penal laws of King William nd the Bloody laws of Queen Anne. From one of these laws - and act for registering the Popish Clergy - passed in the 2nd year of Anne, A.D. 1704, we learn his place of abode, his age, the place where he received Holy Orders, the name of the Bishop who ordained him, for the act required all those particulars to be stated. "Be it enacted" it says, by the Queen's most excellent Majesty, by and with the consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons in the present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, that all and every Popish parish priest or priests who are now in this kingdom, shall at the next general Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in all the several counties and
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:15
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In the cemetery attached to the present Catholic Church - midway to the right as you go up from the principal entrance to the Church - stood the old church that was in use down to the present century; but when built, or who built it, or who laid the foundation-stone nobody knows. The present Catholic Church was founded in the year 1803, 20th June. The foundation stone was laid by Edward Shea, Esq. of Ullid. The soil is sandy, and the church, therefore, is built upon piles driven into the sand. Bigwood at that time was, celebrated for its woods, and the timber was coveyed from that place. There is a tower and spire on our church whose history may not be without interest.
They were erected in 1838, and her is the immediate reason - Before that year a fierce spirit of resistance to "Tithes" reigned through most parts of Ireland. The spirit did not fail to show itself in Kilmacow. The parson of the place - one Mr. Burke - after canting and driving as he could, threatened law. The Rev. John Quinn, then parish priest, asked the people to contribute half a year's tithes to defend themselves. The people cheerfully did so, and the parson was so frightened by the resoluteness of priest and people that he got simpy shut up. The
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 13:05
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if the priest were caught saying it, punishment to him for life would follow. The age given to this hawthorn tree cannot be vouched for. People tell extravagant stories about it - that it was planted by "Fionn Mac Cumhail" and so on: It is told that on two occasions a person for purposes attempted to cut it, and on each occasion he thought he saw his house on fire. Another man did cut off a large lough and got a sore foot and died. Some attribute his death to the act. In addition to the Mass Tree we have the Holy Well. Not many perches from where the old Catholic Church stood this holy well can be seen. It is called Tuberenán from the Patron Saint of Kilmacow, St. Senan, whose feast is celebrated August 22nd. The "pattern day" used to be celebrated thereabout, and in most cases, with sincere devotion;
The last of the great "pattern days" was held on August 29th 1802. On that day a John Walsh from Lower Miltown, was killed in a squabble. This aroused attention to the - what must have been - abuse. The priests thenceforward opposed it, and the glory of "pattern days" soon gloomed. The well itself is situated in a somewhat low, marshy ground, under Lower Kilmacow. At one end of it is placed a stone with the following inscription "This cross was placed here by Rev. Fr. ---" The remainder can not be deciphered.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:56
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others were wounded. Tobin was brought to the hospital in Kilkenny in a dying state - and tried nevertheless at the March assizes, and sentenced to be hanged and quartered, and in a general way mangled an butchered according to the estimable method of the time. He (John) sleeps in Ullid with his comrades, and has on his tombstone incribed the date 1764, whereas the other "Liberators" have 1763. There is Kilkrony - now called Greenville - in which there were a church and a graveyard, no remains of which, however, now exist. The locality is called Greenville - the old name, Kilkrony, is still preserved in leases, etc - because of the Greens settling there. The great grandfather of "Honest John Greene", late M.P. of our country and a John Greene himself - lived there. His son - commonly called the "Captain" - built the present house. Some anecdotes about the family may be mentioned. There is Kilmaskilloge, now Charlestown! and here too we have no trace of Church or churchyard, now remaining. They were situated between what is called the New Line or road to Waterford and the old road in the townland aforesaid. Outside of the rather pretty village of Upper Kilmacow there is a thorn-tree, not precisely growing, but grown; called the Mass Bush: It tells certainly a sad story - that there is not extant a bush under which, against English Law Mass was said, when,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:54
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In Drogheda there are many fairy forts Om the road
to Rathmullan there stands a little fairy forth called
a Rath. Built on a mound it had a triangular shape
covered with moss and ferns. It is said that if any
farmer who wanted to till his land and interfered with
this rath a curse would fall upon him. This is a legend
attached to t, a girl . was walking through the field and
she heard a tiny strains of music and suddenly she
sat down and be came sleepy. She saw a lot of tiny folks
playing enchanting music and lots more dancing around
her. About a hour as she taught she had been there when
she awoke and she found she had grown very big for a
hour there in fairy land for years.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:46
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The deceased was a rather weighty limestone wrapped in straw. The funeral procession proceeded on its way gravely and solemnly. The procession to the jail proceeded on its way too. There were, it appears about forty or fifty men to guard the prisoners. Both processions met at Newmarket, got mixed up, as was natural, and then, before the military people knew exactly what the whole thing meant, the dear deceased disappeared, and they (the military) found themselves disarmed, and the prisoners liberated. Hence the name of Liberators which those of the mock funeral still get. Then came a scene which one can scarcely speak about calmly and dispassionately. The military, outwitted, and disarmed, begged and besought most abjectly that their arms be restored, that if they returned without them unutterable ruin would be the consequence, and so on. The leaders of the liberators believed this whining, thought that having succeeded in their purpose they might afford to be generous, and so gave back the arms. The churchyard of Ullid tells the result. The scoundrels fired on the people. Scurry was killed on the spot, but some friends of his from Newmarket contrived to bring him the same night to Ullid and buried him there. Kelly died from his wounds on the way home, and is buried in the same churchyard. Tobin and very many
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:38
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certainly deserve notice. Graves, which at any rate, are looked upon with veneration by the people to the present day. All have heard of what is styled the "Battle of Newmarket" September 29th 1763.
At this period many landlords began - notably then - to encroach on the rights of the people by appropriating "Commons", "the gibbets were groaning and the jails bursting". A society was unfortunately formed whose members resolved to oppose themselves for life or death to the infamous system under which they were making an effort to live. Seven or eight of those members were taken in one of their wild attempts to administer a dose of justice according to their own ideas, were tried in Piltown, and, of course found guilty. The news spread rapidly. They were to be lodged in Kilkenny jail. The excitement caused by the matter did not blow itself off in talk. A large body of men from Kilmacow and the surrounding parishes assembled, amongst whom were Walsh of Dangan, Scurry of Knockhouse, Kelly and Tobin of Ballnaboly, Aylward of Buckstown and Darmody of Crobally - all resolved to rescue the prisoners. To effect their end they made used of a stratagem which had been freely made use of by fourteenth-rate story-writers. They got a coffin, nailed on the lid, and seemed inconsolable for the deceased.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:34
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Thy heart. Dissolve me in the
fragrance of thy charity, strengthen
me with thy love, receive me through
thy death. O Lord, make me entirely
pleasing to thee, through the fruits
of thy Sacred Heart.
Amen.
Blessed be the most Sacred Heart
of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament
Just before going to bed make the
letters I.N.R.I on your forehead
with holywater, saying:-
"Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews,
keep us from a sudden and
unprovided death.
Amen
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:27
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nearer to the road than the stream.
In this castle the first of the O'Donovans, who fled from Baunlahan, County Cork, took shelter. He afterwards married the daughter of Gaul Burke. Himself and his father-in-law were killed in the battle between General Preston and the Duke of Ormonde in 1642. Later on a new name and a new owner awaited Gaulskill. One John Bishoppes, an officer in Cromwell's army, who is also buried in this churchyard, took a liking to the place and of course got it. After him it is commonly called Bishoppe's Hall to the present day. At a short distance from the ruins of the old church was erected in 1800 a Protestant house of worship. In 1834, according to the Parliamentary Gazetteer, the number of Protestants attending - when they all did attend - amounted to four, and the number has not been on the increase. After the passing of the Irish Church Disestablishment Bill the parson left for England, and the building is now closed up - why it was ever open being the wonder?
Ullid:-
This too was one of the old parishes. Patron, St. David, 1st March. Dimensions 2½ miles by 1½ miles. Some parts of the walls of the old church - 61 feet in length by 12 - are yet standing, having, as in other cases, a graveyard surrounding.
In the churchyard of Ullid are some graves which
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:27
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third time and saw nothing he said if you shout again
I will kill you. The bird came again and said do not frighten
I am your bird. Will you ask your father for a request. What
is the request she asked. Ask your father can you be
married to your bird first. The morning came
and she asked her father for a request so he
granted the request to her. The time came for
the marriage and the bird jumped out of
the cage. When the other people saw what
was happening they went home. The feast lasted
for a week after the marriage. The old man
and the young man were very fond of
boating and fishing the young lady used
to go meeting them in the evening. One
evening she did not turn up and the young
man said she must be sick. they asked the
servants and they said they did not know
where she had gone. At last the old man
said that he knew where she had gone that
she was . taken away to Tir-na-n-Oige the
land of the ever young. The young
man said that he would not be content
till he would find her. The old man said
that no one ever could find Tir-na-n-Oige.
The man said he would try. He set off and
travelled on and on until very late in
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:19
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hot temperament, and so on one occasion he spoke strongly, as well as truly of the glaring injustice of the "Act of Settlement". He was taken up, of course, and committed to be tried for treason. But John was no without friends. The Fitzpatricks of Upper Ossary, the Kavanaghs, of Carlow, and others, are said to have flocked into Kilkenny, resolved upon rescuing him if necessary. Nay, more, twenty-four youths it is told, dressed in their sisters' clothes, with swords concealed, waited, for the word of condemnation to begin inside the court, but John was acquitted and there could be, to the great disgust, no doubt, of the aforesaid youths, no decent pretext for fighting.
Gualskill:-
This was another of the old parishes - length and breadth about a half a mile each. The walls of the old church still stand, but in a very ruined condition. Dimensions 77 feet by 27 feet. There is on part of the ruins, however, of only 26 feet in length, the beadth of which is about 25 feet. There is here too, a large burial-ground attached, in which, as in Dunkitt, many of the old inhabitants still continue to be buried. Gaul Burke is said to be interred here. Some remains of his castle can be seen in a field between the road which leads from Gaulstown to Charlestown, and the stream from Holly Lake, which flows between both places,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:12
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Door.
The door in the old forge is the shape of a horse shoe.
Open Air.
The black smith makes gates and shoe the wheel in the open air.
Two drawings.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:10
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On our farm at home the names of fields are, Barne's Field and the top Fields
And out in Cod and Cush we have the mushroom field from the number of mushroom in it, the bog field beside the bog, the whin Field because of all the whins in it.
The Quarry Field.
Out in Carrick there is a Quarry Field,
From a quarry there.
Clonmullen Hill
Clonmullen Hill is near Edenderry. It means the Meadow of the Mill.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:07
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Dunkitt
This was one of the old parishes, its length and breadth being each about two miles. The church is in ruins; some of the walls, however, still remain. There is a graveyard attached in which many, particularly of the old inhabitants, are still interred. The ruins of the old church consist of two parts - one making evidently the principal part 52 feet in length, and 27 in breadth; the other a sort of projection 16 feet in length and 22 feet in breadth.
In the churchyard are interred the father, uncles, and ancestors of the lamented John O'Donovan, the eminent Irish scholar. The father, it is said, at his death requested to be buried "with the good men of Dunkitt, but not under the large tombstone" referring to the vault. His son John erected a monument in memory of him and his ancestors, on which the following epitaph is inscribed:-
Here also, near the south wall of the old church, are buried John of Ballynerl and his three sons, the Rev. Edmond O'Donovan, P.P. Kilmacow, Dominick, and William John, the father, was usually "Sháne-na-grann", that is to say "John of the Trees", as it would appear he had a peculiar propensity for planting. He lived at Ballynerl, near Kilmacow in the Barony of Iverk, and died in 1735, aged 63 years, as appears from his tombstone. He was a man not without incidents in his life. One notable is this. Tradition describes him as of a rather
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:02
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any information connected with him, and would be most grateful to anyone who would communicate with me, or would publish anything relating to him in your valuable paper.) I propose sending Father Angelus some notes later
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 12:00
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A few days ago, when passing by that famous tavern known as "The Three Jolly Pigeons", in the Goldsmith country, and immortalised by that wayward child of genius in his play, "She Stoops to Conquer", I was reminded of the fact that it is no longer the custom to give names or particular signs to the modern hotel or wayside inn, the lawful successors of the old-time taverns, once a familiar feature of the Irish countryside. Many of these time honoured landmarks of provincial Ireland have
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:56
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There did a man live in Dromalty whose name was Pat or Pa Hannon. His parents owned the farm now owned by Mr. Owen Ryan, but the name is completely extinct now in the district. One evening Pa Hannon was coming home from Doon driving a horse cart. He was surprised to notice on the way that the horse was pulling, as if he had a very heavy load. He became more surprised still to discover
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:55
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(7,000 & 6,000B.C.)(Photo)
Relic of the Stone Age, six feet long discovered in the Phoenix Park, November 28th 1934.
Stories of Stone Age.
The Stone Age is the first of the three great periods of man's gradual development . This Age falls into two sections :- Palaeolithic (Old Stone Age), Neolithic (New Stone Age).
Between 7,000 and 6,000 years B.C. Larne, Co. Antrim, was colonised by a people said to be from Scotland.
They are assigned to the Neolithic Age. The man of this Age had a knowledge of agriculture and was familiar with pottery - making and weaving. His weapons of stone, tools, chert, flint and bone were more varied, more skillfully shaped than Palaeolithic Name
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:51
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Crawn, Knockhouse, Woolum, Tiermore, Ullid, make up the old parish of Ullid.
Now to proceed to speak of the different old churches which we know, either from strongest tradition, or from remains still existing, once to have been in the parish. Firstly, the church built by the people as soon as they could after they had been deprived by the Protestants of their old church, which stood in Lower Kilmacow. They built it about a quarter of a mile to the West, at your left as you go from Kilmacow to Aglish. No trace of this church so built now remains, but tradition points out the place beyond all doubt.
Sometime after the church had fallen into ruins the following incident occured. There was a Rev. W. Cuffe, a Protestant parson, living in the parish who had or thought he had, rights over the graveyard appertaining thereto. Accordingly, he planted trees therein. The people thought differently, and therefore went one night and simply cut them down. Of course there was law Mr. Cuffe claimed £5 a tree for damages; but Mr. Greene, of Greenville came to Kilkenny, and owing pricipally to his exertions, it came about that the £5 a tree was reduced to the rather miserable sum of 4½d each. The people were so thankful to Mr. Green that a song was composed in his praise, which sad to say is lost.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:48
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Photo of St. patrick
St. Patrick a captive in Ireland - 401
His mission begins - 432
His Death - 461
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:47
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married without the wedding and the dancing etc.
Cross road dancing.
Cross road dancing was also very popular in the district in by gone days. When a party of boys and girls would get together at a cross roads on a Sunday evening, then all the difficult figures of the old Irish Dances would be gone through to the strain of a fiddle or bagpipes, and so would pass the merry hours. In later years, all this old Irish dance and music died out, and in this district about ten years ago, if you asked any of the local boys and girls to perform any of those dances, they would not be able. Now however, many of them have come back owing to the Gaelic League revival.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:45
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This monastery flourished for about 200 years , and the famous "Book of Kells" was kept there. Once it was stolen but was discovered hidden in a wall, with the golden cover torn off.
In the fly-half of this book is written a charter telling the grants made to the Abbey by Irish kings and others. There was a disart attached to the Abbey where pilgrims got food and lodging and spiritual care. In the reign of Henry VIII the abbey was suppressed and the grants confiscated.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:41
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I. To cure "the burst" make a poultice of sheep manure and clap it up to it.
II. A poultice of sheep manure cures blood poisoning too.
III. Cow manure cures burns and never leaves a mark.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:40
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When St Columba came to Kells in 553 he established a monastery there He remained ten years in Kells, and then went to Iona.
We know that about the year 806 when the Danes ravaged Iona the Columbian monks fled to Kells, and took refuge in the Columbian monastery there.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:37
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wanted to know the future. He saw a warrior coming up to the house and he understood that unless he was killed they would all die because they were brought to the feast to be slain by their treacherous host. Unless the warrior was killed and his blood sprinkled on the Fenian knights they must remain fixed on the wooden benches forever.
So Finn went out and fought until sunset. Then he killed the warrior. He brought his head in on his spear and let a drop of blood fall on each of the Fenians except one for on him no blood had fallen and he remained fixed to the bench while the others were free. His companions tried to drag him off but as they did so the skin of his thighs was left on the bench and he had like to die.
Then they killed a sheep and wrapped him up in the skin to heal him. So he was cured but ever after strange to
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:32
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The second Marquis of Headfort gave the site for the present Catholic Church of Kells and a lease of same "while water would run and grass grow."
He also gave a £100 as well as the beautiful picture of the Assumption by Raphael. Later on when this masterpiece of painting was slashed and gashed by some madman, the Marquis came forward again and had the picture sent to Italy, o be repaired and all this at his own expense.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:32
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One day when Finn Ma-Coul and his band of knights were at a feast they were suddenly fixed to the benches and they could not move.
Then Finn began to chew his thumb which he always did when he
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:29
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A large barn was prepared. At the end of the barn a bed was decorated and in it was the corpse. All the relatives had
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:28
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Bu there is a very comical story told of this great athlete. One Saturday night he went to bed, and did not wake till Monday morning. Then he got himself ready to go to Mass. When he got out on the road he wondered why none of the neighbours were making for the chaple.
A bit further on he saw a man working in a field and asked him why he was working on a Sunday.
"Is that the way with you" Says the workman" "Only that I know that the Bradles were good sleepers I would thing that you had a drop taking."
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:27
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Two poets lived in this locality formerly. Their names were David Pickham and John Blake. David Pickham was a native of Gurtavalla and John Blake was a native of Doon.
David Pickham composed a song about the O'Grady's of Castlegarde. Those O'Grady's were Protestants and they built the beautiful castle which is now owned by Mr. Thompson.
Major O'Grady was an Englishman and he was very wealthy. The song was most popular at the time.
Pickham composed another song about the Village of Doon. This used be sung at gatherings and dances.
John Blake composed a song called "Lovely Cappawhite" Blake's mother being from that place.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:25
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Long ago, and even nowadays, people
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:25
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various names such as Daisy, Mollie, Nancie, Sheila etc.
You say "How - how" when driving cows. "you say "prug - prug" when you call them to you.
To the pig you sat "tharais" "hurrish", and "suck -suck" to the calves. You say "chuck - chuck" to the hens, and "fút - fút" to the ducks, because the ducks have their heads up in the air.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:24
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grave, there were shots fired over him.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:22
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Philip Bradly of Kilskyre was a famous jumper. He won two reading lamps as prizes for his jumping. He could jump across wide streams and gripes.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:15
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The Trim Assizes brought a change for the worse in the weather. An execution always brought bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:15
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The Trim (?) brought a change for the worse in the weather. An execution always brought bad weather.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:14
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building. The people around here say that if you sell anything to a protestant the money you get is supposed to be very lucky. A man called Tol Lol used to come round this district up to about twelve years ago. He used to sell and exchange delph for rags and bottles and rabbit skins. That was the last man that used to come round this district. The word "wing" is often used for a penny. The word "tanner" and "kick" is used for sixpence. The word "Bob" is used for a shilling.
The word a "half doller" is used for a half crown and the word "doller" is used for five shillings.
The word a "half note" or a "half quid" is used for ten shillings and the word "quid" is used for a pound and the word "note" is used for a pound also. The market towns of this district are Navan and Drogheda, where people sell eggs, butter, turkeys and fowl and some people that have customers and send eggs to Dublin.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 11:05
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few shops along this road because they would want a lot of groceries for the travellers that would be stopping at the inns. There used to be a shop owned by people named mac Quail, who used to make wooden shovels, beside this school. There was another shop about a quarter of a mile from this school. About three hundred yards south of this school there used to be a bakery owned by people named Murray. About three hundred yards to the east of this school a man named Robert Mullen used to make tops and other toys and he used to sell them. Buying and selling might be carried on after Mass if a man had cattle or sheep for sale and if he saw a man that would buy them hr would tell him to come and look at them, and if the man had seen them before they might make a bargain after Mass. Sunday is supposed to be an unlucky day for selling or buying and Saturday is a bad day to start any business such as
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:58
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St. Brigid is the saint connected with this district. There is a church situated in Killygarry in honour of her.
Tradition has it that on one occasion, when she was hunted by her father, and while running, she met a rock in a field near the church, and knelt down to pray, leaving her knee track full of water, which never could be drained.
She was born in Louth in 451, and spent most of her life locally; afterwards she founded a monastery in Kildare, and died in 525, and was buried in Downpatrick.
There is a well in this district which was opened and blessed by St. Brigid. It is situated in the townland of Stragella on Mrs Tully's farm.
In this well there was a dove which was used for many cures throughout the Three Kingdoms. This cure continued until some of the water was valued and sold.
Afterwards the dove disappeared and the cures no longer remained. In this district most women are called Brigid after the saint.

Written by,
Tomás Mac Gabhann
Stragella
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:57
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The shops as far as I know were just as common a hundred years ago as they are now as they are now, so the people had not to go to the towns to make purchases. There were two inns on the road along here where people travelling to Cavan and districts in that direction from Drogheda would stop for the night and people going from there to Drogheda would stop. The inns were owned by people the name of Brownell and Crinion. Brownell's inn was about two hundred yards from this school and Crinon's inn was about three quarters of a mile from this school. All the produce of Cavan and parts of Westmeath would go this road and the goods that would come into the port of Drogheda for Cavan would come this road, so that this was a very important road before the the railway was built from Drogheda to Oldcastle in the year 1847 and for some years after that. Those inns were called a carman's stage. There were a good
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:54
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Seo páirc atá ag ma ainntín. Tá carnán cloch i gceart lár na páirce. Tá tuim ag fás air an carnán. Tá scéach cuilinn agus draon ag fás ar mar bhéas siad a fás as an fréamh na rúta amhain. Deirtear go rabh sidheogaí ann. Is minic a chuala mé
m'athair agus m'uncail ag trócht ar chapall trí mnhliadan a bhí aca nua
a bhí siadsan na bfir óga. i d'éirigh sé co crosta nar leig an eagla don nduine a dhul isteach na stábla chuige. Sgaoil siad amach é agus dhruid siad ins an draona é. Mais[/] amhain nuair chuidh siad amach ag amarc air. Bhí sé na sheasamh ag taobh na sgitheoga agus a mhuige pleatailte go hiontach galanta agus ribhín dearg ar achan phleata aca. Is cuimhneach lion féin an tam na bhfuigead aon duine cead craobh a
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:49
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Tadlach - pain in the wrist
Langal - a rope on a goat's leg
Spancel - a rope for the legs
Leipreachán - a fairy
Laghach - friendly
Flústar - a pet
Slog - a mouthful
Lán a mhála - (go leor - ó bheirt pháisdí)
Muc - a pig
Cearc - a hen
Tiuc agus Tiucaidhe - come
Gobán - a porringer for a calf's mouth
Dúidín - an old pipe
Poiríní - small potatoes
Brosna - bits of sticks
Dreóilin - a wren
Brachán - gruel for pigs
Clábar - mud or dirt
Lusad - a basket
Gríosgán - griskens
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:42
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Pus
Tae
Puc
Gúm(?)
Loch
Go leor
Flaitheamhail
Gombeen
Prouch
Coinneal
Arís
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:39
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better prices by gouing to the local fairs.
There are also four horse fairs held in Listowel during the year. These are held on the first Thursday of January, April, July and October.
In former years there was a cattle fair held in Lixnaw. This was held in Patrick Quill's field where the Guards' Barrack is now situated.
There was also a lamb and sheep fair held in Ballyduff but these fairs are now discontinued. This lamb and sheep fair was held onthe 1st of June each year. The reason these fairs were discontinued is because the buyers did not attend them.
The Listowel pig fairs are held in the market-place and the cattle fairs are held in the Square.
There is toll paid on the cattle that are bought. Sixpence is the toll to be paid on each head of cattle. There is toll also paid on pigs, twopence on each pig and one penny on
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:38
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St Brigid's well on the farm of Hugh Tully, Stragella

Local Tradition is that St. Brigid washed her face and hands in it. Water cures warts.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:36
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In Pullamore there is a water fall called the "Linn" and on a rock in the stream surrounded by hazel trees there is the track of Brighid's knees. It is said that Brigid hid from her father here - if water is drained from the knee tracks, it will return to them again.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:34
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each bonham. All this money is given to Lord Listowel.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:27
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:27
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:26
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divided it from the townland of Ballinageragh.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:25
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and this is caused by the river Brick because it is not drained. A great many people went from my district to England and America to seek work. There is no river or stream in my townland, but there is a spring well on the side of the road which supplies the people with water.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:17
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to prevent the disease from spreading.
The house was rebuilt later and now John Smith and his wife and children live in it.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:16
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made in one of our fields called Mary Tormey's field.
In Tiercork a broom maker lived. He tied a bunch of heath on a stick, with the skins of briars. He went to Kells every Saturday and sold them as three a penny
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:15
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About sixty years ago, a mam named Burriss bought a second-hand pair of trousers. He was soon struck with a terrible fever. Many of the neighbours called to see him, and they took it. The doctor was sent for, and they were all removed to hospital. No cure could be found for it. They died in short time, and were buried immediately lest the disease should spread farther.
The houses of the neighbourhood were disinfected and Barrisses house was burned to the ground
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:10
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off safely. Afterwards when the Cruises were choosing a crest they adopted as the design for it a crane rising up from a stone with an eel in its mouth.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:09
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relate a seven stone of wool were annually shorn from his body as long as he lived.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:08
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These Cruises were good landlords and devout catholics. Cruise was an insurgent of '98, so the yeos and Hessians were on his track. They surrounded his Cruisetown House, but though he happened to be in residence there that day, he got away. Some of the soldiers saw him make for the river and they followed him. He hid behind some bushes A crane rose from a stone with a eel in its mouth and went off with it.
From this the officer of the gang concluded that there as no one hiding there and gave orders to go in another direction. So cruise got
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:05
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a strain of soft exquisite music seemed to rise from the water and float by them. In their joy and wonder the women claphed their hands and laughed aloud, when instantly the music ceased and the pile of stones fell down. By which sign they knew that they should not have laughed while the angels were singing and they fell on their knees and prayed.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 10:00
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One day when Finn Ma-Cool and his band of knights were at a feast they were suddenly fixed to the benches and they could not move.
Then Finn began to chew his thumb which he always did when he
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:59
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At many of the wells beautiful white stones are found glittering in the sun.
One day some women were gathering these stones after each round of praying in order to build up a monument when suddenly,
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:57
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"Many a gloomy morning rose to be a fine day". This is said to parents to console them when their children are not very promising.
When a child inherits any special talent or the reverse from his parents, people then say, "It is not off the ground he picked it."
When a man or woman is praised for any special gift or talent he may possess the proverb, "What comes by nature costs no money," is quoted.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:54
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One night a man was coming home very late through the bog and he was taking a pinch of snuff. When he was putting it in he heard a voice saying "Not yet, not yet, I am near you, wait".
He looked round but he could see no one. He took out a pinch of snuff and he felt it being taking by invisible fingers. When he drew back his hand the snuff had disappeared. "God and the saints between us and harm" exclaimed the man. "Amen" said a clear voice of some invisible speaker close beside him.
Then the man made the sign of the cross over the hand touched by the spirit and so went unharmed.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:50
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he ah all the stones he wanted for the castle fell.
The fair is held near the Rock of Muff. Long ago when parents wanted to coax their children to be good they promised them 1/2d worth of gooseberries from the Fair of Muff.
This promises was as glibly made in March when gooseberries were not in season, as in July when they were.
Peggy's leg without a boot, and a ginger-bread man were also promised as féiríní for the good children.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:44
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held the axle in one hand and drove the horse with the other all the way to Kells. Tommy Sheridan performed a similar feat.
A weight thrower
Philip Farrelly from Feartagh, Virginia was a great wight thrower. Some say he was nearly as good as Mat the thrasher, and others say he excelled him.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:40
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The Castle of Muff is one mile from Kingscourt. A certain man wanted stones to build a house and asked permission to knock this castle. He was refused, so he went secretly and undermined the castle, and soon
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:39
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he giving exaggerated accounts of things people would say, "Now, Mickey, don't be doing Hiram Calvert."
Anyone was was giving to telling lies was said to be "as great a liar as the town clock."
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:37
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Hugh Muldoon of Rathendrick Clonegrowna lived about 100 years ago. He was so strong that he used to harrow with an ass. He used to play with the kids for fear he'd hurt the big people. Coming from Navan with load of meal (1 ton) the wheel broke down at Martry. The iron band round the wheel came off. He took the wheel off the axle and threw it up in the ditch. He
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:35
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About five or six years ago, a man named Will O'Donnell lived on a small farm near Ballylooby about four miles south west of Cahir in Co. Tipperary on the road to Clogheen.
It was his custom every morning to take his milk to the Creamery, and when his business was done, to make little visit in the Village Church.
On one occasion while making his short visit, he noticed a strange light in the sanctuary. He thought at first it was the sunlight gleaming through the stained glass windows, but on examination he found it was not. He left the Church very uneasy, and on his way home called on the Canon, who was also the parish priest.
The Canon thought the man was imagining things, but to please him
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:28
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the snow to make him white, but they all said they could n't.
When the shepherds left their flocks on Christmas night to visit the crib this little grey lamb followed them all the way, and when they entered the cave he stole softly in after them.
As he stuck in his little head the Divine Babe looked at him, and raised his tiny hand and beckoned him. Over bounded the little grey lamb, wagging his tail with joy. He stuck his little snout up on Our Lady's knees, and looked into the face of the Divine Child. Then, Little Jesus stretched out his hand, and blessed him and behold" his wool became as white as snow. The poor little lamb had got his wish.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:22
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to go and scrape away the clay and take up the corpses.
One man was asked why he did not bury the dead deeper and he said :- "Maybe I'd be here myself to-night"
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:21
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Shepherds watched their flocks in the neighbourhood of Bethlehem on the night Our Lord was born in the stable.
The lambs of the flocks were all white except one. This little one was grey and he felt very unhappy about it. He asked the sun and the rain, and the dew, and the frost, and
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:18
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the old rush candles) All the candles are lit together and the rosary is said. Each one keeps a tight eye on his own candle as there is an ancient belief that the person whose candle goes out the first, dies the first. The person whose candle lasts the longest lives the longest, and gets a rousing cheer.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:16
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When the famine was nearly over the cholera broke out. So many people died that they could not all be buried in the graveyard.
Some had to be buried in the fields without coffins. The graves were so shallow that dogs were known
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:15
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off. Some hours later the poor priest was released by friends.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:14
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Weddings.
It is an old custom that on the return of the married parties, either from the wedding or honeymoon that the neighbours light a bundle of straw from a coal at the roadside, and at the same time give a hearty cheer.
Christmas.
On Twelfth Night (6th Jan). every member of the household has a small little candle (the candles take the place of
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 09:10
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Once a hunted priest was captured by protestants in Co Westmeath.
He was put riding an old starved horse.
Then an noose was put round his neck, and suspended from an overhanging branch of a tree on the road-side.
A bundle of fresh mown hay and some oats was placed a few paces from the horse's head. This was done to tempt the horse for as soon as he would move the priest would be left hanging from the tree.
The priest saw this and at once said to the horse :- If you gang, Bobby, I hang." So the poor horse remained stead fast at his post, not moving a step. At long last the miscreants desisted and went
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:57
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Between Clonascra and Ballinahown there is a motor car to be seen. Every night about twelve o'clock a ghost motor car and a man and lights come into Clonascra turn at a gate and go back to Ballinahown. Any one who meets it can hear the noise and see the lights, but when it comes near them the lights turn like a bicycle light. Then when passing them they can see no lights not hear nothing only an awful freeze of wind. Then when that is over they can see no lights, and hear the noise again be-hind them. The motor never he harms any-one.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:56
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the father sold the house and left the place.
The man who bought the house, went to live there after a while. The first night he went there, he heard the noise, but thinking it was rats that were there, he took no notice of it. The second nightie heard the crying, and it frightened him very much, to hear that lonely cry.
The next night he got a friend to sleep with him, who did not know the houses haunted. The second night he was there he heard the noise, and wo-uld not stay there any longer. The man had an other friend, who said, he didn't believe in ghosts, or wasn't afraid of them.
That man stayed with him for a week, and one night, he got a very bad too-th ache. He told the man, that he would go down to the fire, and smoke a while, see would it ease the pain. His companion told him not to, said he, "you know the story of his house, and I warn you not to go" When he saw how usless it was {Insert [to argue,]} he said he would go down with him.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:55
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This story is about a man, and his wife, and son, who were supposed to be living near Kenmare, nearly two hundred years ago. One day the father and the son were fighting. The son was accused of being careless, but he said he was not, the father then said he would put him out of the house, and it was then the son hit him. No more was said until that nigh, whenever one was in bed. The father got up, and taking a big iron bat with him, he went to the son's room. He was asleep when he went in, and he hit him across the head with it, and kill'ed him. After a while the house became haunted. Every night a terrible noise would be heard and then after a while the noise would stop. Then moan-ing would be heard then the sound of footsteps from the murdered boy's room and then silence. After a while
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 08:46
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There was once a woman coming up from knockmore and when she was passing by a limekilns a horse came out and put his two feet up on her shoulders and she had to drag him to the top of the hill and he came off there and the woman fainted.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 07:47
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A man without eyes, saw plums in a tree.
He neither took plums nor left plums and how can that be
A man with one eye.
Twenty white horses tied up in all stall.
Up comes a red one and licks them all
Teeth and tongue.
What is it that is cut and divided but is never eaten
Ans. a deck of cards.
Round the house and round the house and sweeps in the corner.
Ans. A Brush.
The garden was laid to the beautiful maid
As fair as the flowers in the morn
At the hour of life she was made a wife ad she died before she was born.
Eve.
One head, one foot and four legs.
A Bed.
I went up the road and I went down the road and took the road on my back.
A ladder.
Under the fire and over the fire but never touches the fire.
A cake in an oven
Why is a horse, constantly ridden, likely never
anonymous contributor
2019-03-22 07:20
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An Ancient School
Long ago before there was any National School in this Parish, there was an old school in Listrim. It was held in an out-house of Murt McCarthy's. The subjects they used teach in it was Latin, Irish, History. but they used teach no English because they were not able to speak the English Language at the time. For a blackboard they used have a large sheet of slate hanging up on the wall. For a desk they had another large slate and it was put up on two big stones. They used be teaching for three hours every day and they used to teach every day of the week. They used to have a fire every day.
The teacher's name was Mr. Thomas Scanlan and his wife used be teaching with him. Mr. Scanlan was a very tall man but there wasn't a man in the parish as learned as he. Every day he used to teach about sixty pupils. The slates can be seen today in the house and also the desks and it is a fowlhouse now. I got this story from Mr. Patrick B. Scanlan(70 yrs)
Listrim
Spa
Tralee
Co. Kerry
Thomas Sheehy
Listrim
anonymous contributor
2019-03-22 07:05
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Hedge School
There was a school in a barn in Fenit Island and a grand-uncle of Michael Flaherty's named Morgan Flaherty was teaching in it. He was a small lame man but he had great brains. He used teach sums, addition and subtraction, the "A, B, C" in English and Irish in the barn. All the boys and girls from the district used go to him to be taught.
They would have the subject written on slate and he would examine his pupils one by one, There was a chair in the barn in front of a fire and according as he would examine each pupil, the pupil would sit on the chair and the teacher stand behind him.
When they would have one subject off clearly then the teacher would give them another subject to write on their slates.
Morgan Fitzgerald
I got this story from an old man by the name of Daniel King of Taulaught, Fenit, Tralee, Co. Kerry.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 06:45
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I
There was a widow in this place who had three darling sons,
Their father died and left them when they were very young,
A long time she endeavoured to maintain her darling sons,
Till the youngest became a man at the age of twenty-one.
II
He spoke unto his mother and this to her did say.
I'm sure it will fall to one of us that we must go away,
The land it is too small to maintain us all, and if ye will agree,
I am fully bent and well content a clergyman to be.
III
She spoke unto his brothers and soon they did agree,
They sent him off to College a clergyman to be.
He was not long at College when Rev. Bishop Browne came to see those boys,
And viewed them all round, and this clever young fellow he remarked above them all.
IV
He says "You are a clever young fellow, pray, tell to
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 06:38
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When all nature is in decay.
There you will see that the bloom of the wild flower
Is still fresh and fair.
Here little birds sing, their mellow songs always.
The falcon too and raven old do wingèd homage pay
All seem conscious of the fact that here lies Fionn
Once the might of Innisfail.
(N.B. The would be poet - I'm inclined to believe - is the above mentioned táiliúir: Pádhruigh Ó Muircheartaigh)
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 06:32
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to the east, at the entrance to the glen, where two large flag-stones mark his final resting place.
Thus Kerry can proudly boast that within it repose the remains of two great legendary characters, that of Queen Scota, the warrior Queen of our ancestors the Milesians, in Gleann Scotheen near Tralee, and that of Fionn Mac Cumhaill, Ireland's renowned athlete and chief of Fianna Eireann in Glean-na-Léime, midway between Listowel and Tralee.
Some bards sing the praises of Old Ireland
Of its glens and dells and vales
Of old historic places,
Where lie the leaders of our race.
But there is a spot there in
That just seems dim to all
Where lies Fionn Mac Cumhaill
The leader of the Fianna all.
Just visit this spot in Kerry
And see for yourself today
The leap of the fearless and mighty
In the days long passed away.
Hush! Listen! the wind you will hear
Whistling a dirge o'er the grave where the hero is laid.
Be it Autumn time when you visit this place
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 06:19
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homewards the subject of their conversation was not the usual one, the chase, but the merits of the mighty leap performed by Fionn earlier in the day. One of the Fianna, however, Kiernan by name, did not share in the general admiration expressed for Fionn's prodigious leap, but boastingly remarked that he could duplicate the act. Being prevailed upon to make good his boast, he did so, to the surprise of the Fianna and the great chagrin of Fionn who thought his equal was not in the ranks of the Fianna. Fionn therefore, in order to gain supremacy as leader, declared he would jump the glen backwards. He proceeded to do so, but to the horror of his devoted comrades, he fell short over the centre of the glen and dropped a distance of over two hundred feet to the bottom of the glen, with such force that his head became severed from his body, and we are told it rolled down the valley to a place called Rockfield where it was interred in a field adjacent to the Tralee-Listowel road. A large rock marks the spot of this day.
His footprints on a sandstone rock in the centre of the glen, stand as mute and silent testimony to his ill-fated leap. His body was taken by his comrades and reverently placed in a grave prepared for it, two hundred yards
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 06:07
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he ultimately disbanded them. Thus ended in Kerry the career of what may well be termed the greatest military corps, ancient Ireland can boast of.
After this Fionn and his faithful followers retreated to the then thickly wooded districts about Stack's mountain and Clahanagleeragh where they made a home and a place of concealment against the advance of the army from Connacht under the leadership of the Black Prince, whom he (Fionn) had anticipated to meet in battle if only he had been successful in his efforts to gather an army. Here he spent his time hunting the deer and the lordly elk, and fishing in the river Smearlach Feale and Sheanabha. Many were his exploits.
One day - a tragic day for the Fianna - when they and their leader were hunting in the woodlands of Lyreacrompane they started a stag that took them across a glen at the extreme North end of the Stack's mountain range, known today as Gleann-na-Léime. Fionn, who was leading in the pursuit of the game, reached the glen. Rather than descend one side and ascend the other, he jumped right across it, to add yet another record to a great and varied career.
In the evening of that day, as those of the hunting party were retracting their steps
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 04:16
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young potatoes all got black in the ground and they all got rotten. They had no seed potatoes for the next year so they depended on the wheat crop.
The Wheat was a poor crop also for the seed all got black when it was groing. This disease is called smut.
There were in this locality in The Famine Years a lot of old houses which are now levelled. There were in my district two old houses which I know of very well.
Tom Cox lived in one of them and Tim Dunne lived in the other. Cox house was in a field beside the road and Dunne house was in the field beside of it. These two houses are now levelled. The two fields are now called, Cox's field and Tim's field.
They are now occupied by Philip Jackman, Barmoney, Bree, Co Wexford.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 04:05
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In the Famine times a great blight came on the potato crop and it failed.
This blight came in 1846 in little black spots on the leaves, and after a while the leaves witered away. Then the
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 04:00
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The Famine Years 1846-1847, 6-8-38
In the Famine Years the people of this area suffered more than any other people in the County. They were starving with the hunger, as they had nothing to eat, only yellow-meal-porridge. They were dying in large numbers along the roadside. There are a great many houses levelled since the time of the Famine.
Tomas Asple, Gulbally, Ballyhogue, Co. Wexford, has two ruins of houses on his premises, which were occupied by James Fardy, Galbally, Ballyhogue, Co. Wexford, and Matty Cdy, Townfarney, Bree, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford during the Famine years.
The potato crop were all black by the blight when they were dug by the people. The next year the people had no seed to sow and the Government had to supply them with seed to sow.
Told by: Mr. M Shannon, Galbally, Ballyhogue, Co. Wexford
Written by: Peter Shannon, Galbally, Ballyhogue, Co. Wexford.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:45
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girl would give out the colours.
Two girls would be thinking and when the girl would have the colours given out, the other two would come and guess the colours.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:42
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There was gold hidden in James English's Rath a long time ago. There is a hound minding the place where the money was buried.
Some nights you would see the hound sitting beside the money and if you would go near it he would eat you.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:38
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The game I like best to play is Hand-ball.
We play it sometimes when we get recreation in school and when the evenings get long.
This game can be played by two or four. It is counted by aces. The first two or one to make twenty-one aces wins. When one party is tossing up the ball for the twentieth ace he says "Game Ball."
If the ball goes out over the back wall after being tossed out it is a "Play over." If it goes out over the side-wall before it hops it is "Hand-out. This is a very interesting game for boys who take an interest in it.
Handball is generally played with an Alley-cracker
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:29
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ball, but other's play with a sponge ball. Handball gives you good muscle. Some prefer Football and Hurling.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:25
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Long ago there was a man living in this old lane. It is about a hundred years ago and he used to pretend he was blind.
He used to go around to every house looking for alms. He had a card pinned on to his coat and, "Help the Blind" was written on this card. He had a little house in the lane in which he used to sleep in the nights. He used to steal cabbage, turnips and potatoes on the people, and, on that account, no one liked him.
A crowd of men got around him, one night and they went into the house and had a talk with him. So says one man "I think it is time to put an end to you as you are going on long enough with this work." They killed the old man and nothing was ever heard of him since. That is, how this old lane got its name. It is situated on Patrick Keogh's
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:14
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land, The ruins of this old house is to be seen still.
The Blind lane is on the land belonging to Patrick Kehoe of :-
Ballygalvert, New Ross, Co. Wexford.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:09
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One time there lived in Carrigbyrne a man named James Condon. He and more men went one night to find treasure that one of them was dreaming about. They went up on the rock of Carrigbyrne and raised up a stone and a hen flew out at them and would not let them near it, so they went home. They came back the next morning to look for the treasure, and when they reached the spot they lifted up the stone again and they found a can and a teapot full of little small leaves.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 03:00
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the sign of wet weather.
When the cat has her back to the fire it is the sign of wet weather.
The sea-gulls come in from the sea for shelter and the whistlers go to the mountain.
The dog eats grass when it is going to rain.
"Before the storm there comes a calm."
(4) The sky is blue when there is going to be thunder.
The hills look near when rain is coming.
The sea is very calm when rain is coming.
(5) When the smoke goes to the ground it is the sign of rain.
When the smoke goes up straight it is the sign of fine weather.
Soot falls from the chimney and sparks fly out of the fire when it is going to rain.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 02:52
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(1) The sky would be very dull when rain would be coming.
When the sun sets red there would be fine weather.
When the moon goes down pale there is going to be wet weather.
When the stars are shining bright there is a sign of frost.
When there is a mackeral sky it is a sign of rain.
"A rainbow in the morning is the sailor's warning.
A rainbow in the night is the sailor's delight."

(2) When the wind blows from the east it is the sign of cold weather.
A circle round the moon is a sign of bad weather.
(3) When the swallows are flying low it is
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 02:44
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When the cat is sharpening her nails against wood it is a sign of rain.
"The rainbow in the morning is the sailor's warning."
"The rainbow at night is the sailor's delight" it is a sign of rain.
When the sun goes pale to bed it is a sign of rain
When the stars are bright like
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 02:40
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 02:39
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Big Wind of 1839.
senior member (history)
2019-03-22 02:39
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In the year 1879 and in the month of February there was a great storm.
It lasted one day and one night.
There were many houses damaged and there were many sheds blo