Number of records in editorial history: 288892 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 06:14
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Long ago there were no goals in the football field, they played from ditch to ditch. Killusty played Mullinahone - a neighbouring parish, one time. They met at a convenient place. When the teams assembled the ball was thrown in by an outsider. If a Killusty man got it, he should run to his side of the field and if he were able to do that Killusty would win the match. They could foul all they liked.
When hurling they made use of handles of brushes, pitchforks etc, and had to hurdle from one townland to another.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 06:07
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There is a big fort in Bannixtown, a townland between Cloneen and Killusty. A man went down through the opening in the center, and was never seen again. Every Christmas Eve night all the animals gather into it for shelter. Once a poor man passing the way, took shelter for the night in the fort, and in the morning found himself miles away from it. It is said that forts were kings homes long ago, and afterwards used by the fairies.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 05:54
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Long ago people used get up at five o'clock every morning and have an hour's work done before breakfast. Their food was principally potatoes and thick milk, which was so sour that it would draw tears from their eyes. On a Sunday they used get a little bit of meat. They often had barley bread too.
Before tea was much used, people drank coffee and after a while tea became known. People then worked from light to light. The old people say "we have Christmas everyday now".
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 05:37
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Food in the olden times consisted of potatoes and porridge. Potatoes were used for dinner with milk from which the cream had been removed; with this and a little butter and salt a good dinner was made. Meat was very little used then. For breakfast they had porridge and skimmed milk, and the same for supper. Eggs and meat were only used on special occasions, such as Christmas and Easter. On the latter feast day, people used consume a lot of eggs for breakfast, sometimes up to twelve without any ill effects.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:27
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of Rosegarland. The Back Road is another road. It is known as the Back Road because it is not the Public Road, but a back way for people to go if they were not wanting to go around the bridges. It begins at Howlin's cross and ends about half ways up the Belton Hill.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:21
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The green road got its name because it is covered over with trees and there is a wood at each side of it.
It begins at Waterloo Bridge and ends at Mr Boyce's Gate Lodge.
Another Road is the mine road it begins at Mr Dunne's turn and ends at Mr Chapman's cross.
It is known as the mine road because there are mines up along that road.
The Och Road is a road going from Ballylannon to Rosegarland. It is a sort of a by road. It is about a mile in length. It begins at the Cross of Rochestown and ends at Mr Leigh's
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:11
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Nearly every cross in this district is known by some name or another. There is a cross at Mrs Howlin's shop known as Howlin's Cross. The men gather there every night and have all sorts of games there.
The level crossing is another cross around but that is known as the level crossing because two Railway gates are there. Mc Cutcheon's turn is another cross and it is known by that because Mc Cutcheons live on it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:05
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people by the name of Hanlons live half way up the hill.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 04:04
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the 16th Deceber 1819. Sixteen of his fellow sufferers are also interred near this spot.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:29
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put it in a pot and melt it to give drinks to cattle.
One day a man let out a sheep and when he went to look for her he could not get her because she was buried in a high drift of snow. After a week the man was walking about the field and he saw a hole in the snow and he dug it up and there he got the sheep alive and safe.
Snow that is high in some places and low in other places is called "sneacra sguasibre"
About thirty five years ago there was a terrible thounder storm which did much harm. I heard about a woman and a boy who were coming home from the bog and they had two asses carrying cleeves of turf. The womans ass turned back towards the bog and she followed him. When she returned the boy and his ass were dead. The lightening having killed them.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:25
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up and shut the door. As he did so a purse of gold was blown in to his face and he said "It is an ill wind that blows no body good"
Another storm which was nearly as bad happened about thirty-two years ago. People say it was just as bad as the big wind of 1839 but that things were better protected and there was not as much harm done but still trees were knocked.
Another storm which began when the people were at mass caused terrible disturbance. When they came out of the church they could see nothing but sheaves flying off stacks of oats.
In 1917 there was a great snow storm which occured oo the last night of January and which remained on teh ground until St Patricks day. It began when the people were in bed . It was so high that the people could hardly open their door in the morning. A person would not know the road from the field.
People could not let out their cattle. Most people had to bing in snow and
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:22
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In those days there were no banks and the people who had any money hid it in the roofs fo the houses and it was scattered around the country when the roofs were blown away. I heard of a man who lived near Castlerea with his son in an old cabin.
The storm raged around his cabin. He told his son to get up and put the bold on the door but his sone would not. At last the wind blew the door in and he had to get
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:20
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Trees were up-rooted and roads blocked by the fallen trees. The birds in their nests especially the crows were dashed against the ground and killed. This accounts for the scarcity of crows in this part in recent years.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:19
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1. The old people tell us of a great snow storm which occured on the night of February 15th 1838. Many people and animals perished that night. The snow was up to the thatch of the homes, and the sheep were covered in the fields and had to be dug out while many of them were found dead.
2. On the night of January the 6th 1839 we are told great hurricane came- the most violent that was ever known. Many houses rocked and fell. The people ran into the open and sheltered behind ditches. The roofs were blown off their houses and strange to say- reached the ground in the same position as they were when on the houses.
The storm subsided about 8 a.m. and the smell of the salt water was in everybodys nostrils in the mourning the sea water having been lashed into the country from Galway Bay.
Hay and crops were carried away several miles. The river Suck was thick with hay and oats the following day and people tried to collect it with boats.
3. On the night of April 11th 1917 there was a terrible storm which was very severe in this district
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:12
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The village of Tubbermakee near Ballintubber, was a thickly populated village. There were eighteen houses in it, while there was only one house left after the famine. All the people were evicted from their homes.
There was a certain house and there was a young man dead in it. The Land Lord came and threw the house while he was over board.
The people left their curse on him and he was supposed to be seen haunting the place after his deaths.
There was another poor widow near Donamon in the Co. Roscommon and the Land Lord came to evict her and her children. She had a pot of indian porridge boiling on the fire and she asked him to leave her there until it would be boiled. He took the pot and threw it out and threw down the house.
After his death he was to be seen with the pot
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:11
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Castletogher castle and a white hare guards it. This hare would not allow anybody to touch the gold and he cannot be killed with an ordinary bullet. It is said that he runs through the village when a death is going to occur in it. People say thats it is Nuala that is in it all the time.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:09
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In this village-Kilcooley in recent years three men showed themselves very brave heroes. On a windy day when everything was as dry as snuff a fire broke out in a swarth belonging to a man named Rushe. One the ditch separating his land from another farm a fine rick of turf had been almost on fire save for three neighbouring men- Martin Collins (Jnr) Kilcooley, John Tobin, Ballyglass and Martin Egan Ballyglass who fought the flames with the utmost bravery for three long hours. When that time was accomplished the fire was dead and not one sod of the man's turf caught fire. The owner of the turf who is Martin Collins Snr nicknamed Durken was very grateful as the turf is the most necessary thing in the home and is a thing very hard to rear.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:04
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Williamstown, Co Galway who was able to swim with his toe in his mouth and his hand on his head.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:03
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There was a man named Mike Flynn, from near
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:03
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James Hanley, Farm was able to jump a river which was twenty seven ft wide.
John McDermott, Brackla, and James Morgan, Farm were able to throw a hundred-weigh eighteen feet.
Tim Grady was able to jump fifteen feet high and he was able to catch a hare by running after him.
Jim Leary, Kilbeg, was able to lift two half hundred of flour in each hand over his head and then hit his two hands together.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:02
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His name was Peter Griffin. He was able to carry a sack of oats which was two and a half curts in weight up a ladder which was twenty ft high in a mill.
Told by Michael Larkin (60 years), Trainboy, Ballymoe
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:01
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There was a man named Willie Burke living in Ballymoe. He was able to carry a five curt bag of salt on his back from the railway station of Ballymoe to Ballymoe town which was a distance of two miles.
There was another man who lived in Castlerea.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 03:00
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A man named Charles Kelly, Ballintubber was able to jump a height higher than himself.
Martin Doyle Bookla could mow an acre of meadow in one day.
James Dowling, Roscommon, used to hold out his hand and hold a five stone weight in it for five minutes. This man could jump a wall seven feet high.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 02:57
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This man knew Andy Lavan from Co Mayo who was able to lift a lintle of iron weighing seven curts. He used to rise it two feet of the ground. This same man was able to catch a hare by running after him. Also he was able to throw a stone two hundred yards from where hed be standing, and he could also mow two acres of oats in the one day with a sythe.
Mrs. Hussey who lived in Cloonlaragh carried two curts of oat meal on her back from Castlerea to her own house in Cloonlaragh.
Mrs Brennan wife of John Brennan said that she heard of a man who lived in her village Tubber. He was Michael Fahey and he lived there about fifty years ago. In one day he mowed two and a half acres of oats. This man was able to wrestle any man in the parish.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 02:52
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God Bless Good Friday the day on which our Saviour died nailed to a cross from the cross to his hands, His Heart was bleeding sore. His tender Mother standing by with a dreadful cry and a Heart full Sore.
Amen.
Lord my God I am sorry and beg pardon for all my sins and I detest them above all things because they deserve Thy dreadful punishment and most of all because they offend Thine infinite Majesty and I firmly purpose by Thy holy grace never more to offend Thee and carefully to avoid the occassion of sin.
Sweet Mary Christs Mother you may be at my head St John the Apostle may be at my feet Jesus messenger with Christs oil may be to me in time to put a seal
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 02:50
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all the soup. He was sorry now when he had the goose eaten because he said to himself that they would have nothing for the party.
Lucky enough for Tom they had a goose hatching and he brought her in and killed her. Without ever plucking her he put her in the pot to boil. At last, he went to the barrel ans drank a mug of porter. He din't know how to turn off the tap and all the porter ran along the floor. He said his mother and wife would get all wet, and he got the bag of (oats) loaves and put them here and there all round the room as steps.
He thought that the eggs on which the goose was sitting would be cold and he sat on them himself.. When the mother and wife came home Tom was still on the eggs and when his intended wife saw him she turned away and went home leaving Tom to his mother.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 02:49
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Once upon a time there was a man who wanted a wife. So, one day he sent his mother looking for a wife for him and she got one for him. The next day they bought the wedding. They bought a barrel of porter and a bag of loaves and the mother killed a goose. Next morning she went for the woman. Before she went she left the goose down in a pot to boil and she told Tom who was a foolish sort of a fellow to look after everything until she would return.
When she was gone, Tom looked at the goose to see it is was cooking alright. The steam burned his finger and he put it in his mouth. He thought the soup tasted good so he took up a mug of soup and drank it. After a while he got very hungry and he went to the pot again and took up the goose and ate her and he drank
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 02:47
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I often heard the story of Naula Na Midéog which I am now going to relate. Nuala Na Midéog resided in Glinsk Castle in which is an oven in the wall beside the fire-place for roasting men alive. There is a hole beside each window through which shots were fired.
One time a crowd of men were gathered around the castle trying to capture her but instead she captured some of them and roasted them in the oven. They planned a trick by which they succeeded in catching her.
They made an artificial soldier and put him on wires and then surrounded the castle leaving one door for an entrance. Nuala shot at him, he fell back but got up again. This continued for several
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 01:31
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he ordered them to leave the church. They refused to do so he asked all the rest of the congregation to follow him. He left the church followed by all except those with whom he had the altercation and he conducted them to field on the other side of the road where he celebrated Mass. He then cursed those who remained in the church and it is said that then the church fell and those who were within narrowly escaped death. One gable is all that remains standing of the old church of Killaghhaduff and it is said that this, in accordance with the curse, will at some time fall on the funeral of one of the descendants of those on whom it was imprecated.
The attempted destruction of Swanlinbar Catholic Church
Years after the new church of Swanlinbar had been built the landlord received a demand for a very heavy rent which had been placed on it. The parish priest refused to pay it and the landlord threatened to destroy it as soon as the time given for payment of the rent had expired. On the day of expiration, however, all the able-bodied Catholics from the
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 01:23
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the spring filled the whole valley and formed the present lake.
Taylor's Lough
In the townland of Legavegra is a small lake called Taylor's Lough and this is how it got its name: Years ago there lived a bailiff in Aughnakelly who was a very severe man on the tenants of the surrounding estate. At last they met secretly and decided to kill him and they drew lots as to who should do the deed. One night as bailiff Taylor was coming over Slieve Russell from Ballyconnell in Cavan two men met him and choked him by stuffing mos down his throat. When he was dead they threw his body into the lough and ever since it has been called Taylor's Lough.
Killaghaduff Church
It is said that the Catholic Church of this district was formerly situated at Killaghaduff. An old man of two generations ago told the following story concerning it and said that he was present when the incidents related therein occurred. Some people in the parish made a false accusation against the priest and one Sunday when about to commence Mass
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 01:12
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The handle of St Náile's bell was preserved by a Bastley Drumm of Shanavalley about one hundred years ago. None of the local people know what became of it. The well of St Náile is still to be seen in Kinawley graveyard. It is called Tobar Náile and is said to have lead in its water the property of curing jaundice after the handle of St Náile's bell was immersed in it.
Lough Mac Neane
This is said to be the Ioé-Sá éan which is frequently mentioned in Irish history. It is said to have got its name from two eagles that for ages built their nest on an island in the Lough.
Brackley Lake
It is traditionally stated that long ago on the plain where Brackley lake now stands a game of hurling was in progress and after the game one of the players, who was thirsty, asked an old woman who was standing watching the game where he could obtain a drink of water. She told him to pull up a clump of rushes which grew nearby and he would find water. Acting on her advice he did so but found that he could not replace it after he had drunk as the water gushed up too strongly. Eventually
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:36
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Legend of Benaughlin
Northwest of Swanlinbar is the semi-isolated peak of Benaughlin or Ben Cacalbra said to be the headquarters of the Ulster fairies. Tradition has it that Donn McGuire, the first prince of Fermanagh still haunts th epeak and it is firmly believed that when any of his direct descendants die a "splinne" falls of the rocky face of Benaughlin, locally called Bunn. This chieftain goes by the name Donn na Binne and he is paid to preside over the fairies of Fermanagh. The Donn is said to have frequently assisted McGuire in his battles and an instance is preserved where this assistance turned the seale of a battle fought by McGuire at the Two Mile River. Mcguire had exhausted all his amunition and he invoked the aid of Donn na Binne who, by his invisible agencey strenghtened MaGuires soldiers to win the battle by throwing Irish balls (stones).
Legend of St Náile (Nathaile or Nathanial) of Kinawley-
It is said that St Náile was not the first hermit who built a cell at Kinawley. It is said that St Rabharnóg lived there before him
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:29
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Once upon a
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:29
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fell and all the soldiers were killed. So the priest continued.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:28
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time during the "Penal Days" a priest was saying Mass up on a mountain. When it was near the Consecration the priest was lifting up the host when some soldiers came upon him. unexpectedly. When the soldiers looked at the "host" they saw "Our Lord" pointing behind them. When the soldiers looked behind, the priest disappeared.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:26
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There was a priest saying Mass on the top of a mountain one day. The British soldiers saw him. They caught him and as they were about to behead him, the side of the mountain
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:24
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and old horses that they buy and sell at the fair. They are not allowed to camp near towns they make such a mess and they fight among(themsl) themselves
If and passerby tries to make peace the (tl) tinkers forget their own way and they all attack the other.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:23
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be formed to keep peace. In other countries the tramps are made detectives.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:22
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eyes and looked down. He saw a Lepracaun at the end of his bed. The Lepracaun said "Put on this cloak." He did. When it was on he found himself in the battlefield with Brian Boru. He saw all the battle. The Lepracaun took him home again
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:21
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chesnuts, birds' eggs, grubs, wild apples, the bark's of trees, and birds. He lives in a hollow tree or under a horse mushroom and spends most of his time fixing shoes and making little boots.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:18
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3. When McCarty Mor owned the surroundings of Killarney Queen Elizabeth was reigning in England. McCarty Mor had a quarrel with Queen Elizabeth who sent her soldiers over to subdue McCarty, McCarty heard this and he sent his soldiers to the two passes Mols Gap and Robbers Glen. When the English came they did not come through the passes but they came over the top of Mangerton mountain. McCarty Mor met them at the foot of the mountain and not having many
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:16
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The police arrested him and got the letter. A police man was riding with the (letter) information to Caherciveen. The Fenians saw him and shot him at Mountain Stage.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:15
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is still to be seen.
Caol na Spride. Near Castleisland there is a road, part of which is called Caol na Spride. The road at that spot is very narrow and because spirits were seen there long ago it got its name.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:13
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When the bride was to bring a "bin" to the future home the conditions were:-
1. That the widow have the free taking of what is in it
2. That the "bacach" to his (or her) face (aghaidh) take from it before the "bean-a-tighe without shame.
3. That the old man take from it for the helpless in his infirmity.
4. That in hunger there may be no hinge or top against the mother with young to the year of innocence.
5. That it will be given store to increase itself during the years of plenty.
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:09
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ainm an cailín a fuair an t-eólas
Ríta Ní Chorcráin
Cuimín
Cíll-Áirne
senior member (history)
2019-07-21 00:03
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There was another giant and he was as tall as the tallest tree. He was living in this district but he was to big to go into any house so he said he would have to go to the sea shore to get sand to build a house for himself. He had very large cleeve so large that four cleeves would build the largest castle in the world. He brought two such baskets with him loaded them with sand and was about five miles from his home when the cleeve burst and all the sand [?] out and formed the sand Hills of Knockanorrow.
There was a witch living in her castle in Glynsh. She had an underground road to the castle in this parish. She kept an army an was very wicket and her name was "Nual na Mideoig". She invited the tired Spalpians into her castle to rest but did not go out alive. One day the neighbouring people gathered and followed and she turned into a hare but the hounds followed her. She went to Roscommon and there she ran up a tree. The men came along and killed her. the said if she was in [?] the tree would grow down and it did.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:54
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hast given me all that I posess. I surrender it all to The.
Give me only Thy love and grace with these. I will be rich enough and happy with Thee forever Amen.
I offer up three Hail Marys in honour of the great God and the Blessed Virgin to save me this day from all sinful actions, from snares and temptations of the devil from sickness and disorder from shame or scandal, from hurt or harm sudden and unprovided death. I beseech Thee Almighty God. This used to be said after the Rosary and in the morning.
I love Thee, my Lord and my God with my whole heart and for the love of Thee I love my neighbour. Grant that I may love Thee more and more and give me the grace of perseverance that I may live a holy life die a happy death and glorify Thee eternally in Heaven. To be said in the morning.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:48
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In this district long ago the people used to live on boxty, and potatoes and other kinds of food. Long ago some people had little mills, these mills were called querns, and the people used to grind oats in these mills and make oaten meal for cakes. There was a quern in the village of Castletoher which was owned by Patrick Finnegan Castletoher. (Wiam) Williamstown Co Galway. It is said that in this district long ago the people had no ovens or pans, but they used to leave the , up against a sod of turf untill it would be baked.
The chief food amongst the people long ago was potato cake and boxty and oaten meal bread. Nearly all the people of my district long ago used to make oaten bread.
In my own district now all the people has an oven, and so they can make nice bread. When anyone would be going a
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:38
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If a baker's shovel and tongs cost £1 - 18s - 6d
what would a ton of coal come to?
Ashes.
What is the difference between one yard and two yards?
A fence.
Why is a hungry man like a baker?
Because he needs bread.
What is worse than having a hole in your stocking?
Having one hole in each.
Which loses the most a country when it loses its king or a king when he loses his country?
The country loses a sovereign and the king loses only a crown.
What lady is it whom no-body wants to meet?
Misfortune.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:30
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Siobháinín Ní Thuathail
Cúlruadh, Yigh na hÉille
Cill Maintáin
Seachtmhogha bliadhain d'aois
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:25
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Young people amuse themselves by playing games at all times of the year. In different parts of Ireland children play different games.
The past-time I have in Autumn is, blackberry picking, nut-cracking, spinning tops. In Winter my favourite games are skipping, Tipping tig, Chase the Fox, hoist the flag, porridge, storytelling, draughts and riddles. The game I like best in Winter is "hoist the flag.
Besides the games I play myself the following games are played also in my neighbour-hood, skating, Lazy Mary, Cock Robin, Donkey and cards.
Girls play different games to boys. The games played by boys are Cow-boy, Football and Indians.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:21
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had disappeared. People rushed to the scene and found it was true.
The "Hammerthight" had sunk at the south of Arklow pier head. And to this day the disappearance of the "Hammerthight" has never been accounted for, and to this day it remains a mystery of the sea.
This story was told to me by my Father John Finlay.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:19
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Some years ago Capt. Frank Tyrrell of the firm of Keason Tyrrell, thought he would buy a fast steamship to take the place of schooners and sailing ships. He thought to buy one that would bring him good trade.
Capt. Frank Tyrrell went to Belfast and ordered a new steamship to be built.
The ship was duly built in Belfast and named the "Hammerthight". The ship sailed from Belfast to Arklow. Hundreds of people went down to the pier to see the beautiful ship, they all said it was a fine ship and it would do credit to Arklow.
A crew was signed on and all were hopeful for good trade between Arklow and English ports.
On a very warm Summers day with no wind in the air. The "Hammerthight" sailed down the Harbour on her maiden voyage
Many of the people stood on the Quay to see her sail out gracefully. Many of the people were on their way home when the word went round that the "Hammerthight"
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:12
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As the Holy Family was passing through the gates of Bethlehem a soldier came up and asked Our Blessed Lady what had she under her cloak. She did not answer him only she drew back her cloak and he saw not the Holy Child but a basket of lilies. When she passed through the gates the Holy Child took the place of the lilies again.
When the Holy Family were on their way to Egypt they came to a field where men were sowing corn and Our Blessed Lady asked them what they were sowing, and they answered "stones" Then Our Lady said "Stones shall ye reap"
When Our Lord grew up to be a boy he made his first acquaintance with Judas Iscariot. At play Our Lord formed birds from clay and when He let them go they flew away. When Judas saw this he was angry and he killed one of the birds with a stone. Our Lord reproached him for his
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:07
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cruelty so He then touched the bird and it flew away.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:06
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In the Penal Times there was a priest being chased by the English through the Arklow Rocks. He came to a chasm which he could not jump because he had no horse. He saw a deer coming along and he got up on the deer's back and the deer jumped the chasm leaving the mark of its hoofs on one of the of the rocks. The chasm is now closed up and it is called the Deer's Leap.
The priest went on and as he heard the English coming near him he hid behind a rock. The rock fell out overhanging the sea and the English were cowards and would not go behind the rock to get the priest in case it would fall on them so the priest escaped. The rock is called the Hanging Stone.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:01
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then told the priest that he had not been to Mass. The priest went out and ever afterwards that man was never known to miss Sunday's Mass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 23:01
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There is an old graveyard in Killahurler in a field belonging to Merrigans. It is overgrown with bushes and briars. If you poke through the growth you will find old head stones of rough stone. Some of them are flat. It is impossible to see any writing on them because they are covered with moss.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:57
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In a certain parish there was a man who would not go to Mass for anyone although he was a Catholic. The priest of the parish came to him many times but it was all no use. One Sunday evening the priest came again and asked the man if he were at Mass that day. The man said that he was. The priest said "What priest said Mass"? The man named one of the priests. He had not been to mass and so named the wrong one.
The priest said nothing. The man tried to get up from the seat he was sitting on but found that he could not stir. He
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:50
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In olden days in Ireland the priests had to take to the hills, to escape the "Red Coats". The rocks on which the Priest said Mass were called "Mass Rocks". At the present day one can be seen about seven miles from here at Corrig-Mo-Cléir. The people used to collect at that rock to hear Mass. They used to attend from all over the neighbourhood, while others would act as scouts, in case there would be an invasion of the "Red Coats".
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:44
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One day the Holy Family was going on a journey on a very windy day. Our Lady lost the pin of her cloak which she had wrapped around Our Lord. St Joseph asked a cowherd in a field for a thorn that would do for a brooch but he said that he was too busy to look for one although he had nothing to do but to watch his cows.
When they were passing a forge the smith came out and saw that Our Lady needed a brooch he said "Let me make you one". He took a piece of money from his pocket and beat it into a lovely brooch and gave it to Our Lady.
Our Lady took the brooch, thanked the smith and gave him her blessing. Ever since the smith who washes in the eater which cooled the smith's irons finds himself refreshed and made stronger.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:43
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different to the remaining slabs there, or, to any ordinary head-stone. It is altogether situated in one field, and around it are the remains of a fence, but I am sure there was either a church or a monastery built there long ago, although there are no traces of it there now.
This cemetery is about one acre in size, and people have been buried in it, up to, and including, the famine years. During the famine large numbers of bodies were buried there without a shroud or coffin. About one hundred and fifty yards from this place is a 'golaun', but no person in the district seems to know why it is placed there.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:39
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In the middle of the townland of Dromore, about half-a-mile from this school, is an ancient cemetery on the farm of Michael O'Brien. I have visited this spot on five occasions, and I have found it a very hallowed and interesting place, as there are several head-stones there.
Some of these head-stones are very big and on one of them a chalice is cut and, on another there are three crosses cut, one at the left-hand side of it, the other at the right-hand side, and the third on the top of it.
There is a third large head-stone in this cemetery and I think it must be marking the grave of a priest, or perhaps a bishop, though I did not notice any cuttings on it. This head-stone is facing west
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:39
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At Arklow Rock in olden times when there was a price on a priest's head a Priest was chased by the Yeomen for his life across the Rock and he came to a high gate. The horse had to jump this gate on to the beach and they landed safely, but the Yeomen were too cowardly to take the jump so the Priest got clear.
That is why this place is called the Priest's Gate. The son of one of those Yeomen lived in the very house I am living in at present, and this man's name was Proctor.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:35
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These incidents took place at the time of the Whiteboys.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:34
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why this name was applied to the pond.
This bad work was going on for a long time, until English soldiers found out the place where O'Kelly was in hiding. They attacked him, and a great fight followed which lasted a whole day.
At last the robber was captured, and taken as prisoner to Cork City. There he was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death on the scaffold.
When he was taken to the place of execution, and just as he was about to be hanged, he looked round at the crowd assembled there, to see if he would know anyone.
He did not, but addressed those present, telling them that a large crock of gold lay hidden on the southern side of Dromore Hill between two white-thorn trees, and that anybody who may be fortunate enough to find it, would never be in want.
Though searches have been made for this gold from time to time, it seems nobody ever traced it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:27
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On the eastern side of Dromore Hill there lived in the olden times a well-known robber and his mother, by the name of O'Kelly. Their dwelling place consisted of a cave with a number of huge boulders over it, and also near its mouth.
This place is known by the name of 'Máthair Úi Cheallaig' or 'Muderin' Glen. This boy had a kind of baton called a blunderbus, and with that weapon he used to stun, and sometimes kill, the people he used to rob.
In front of this cave runs a public road, which at that time was the main road running between Cork and Bantry, and any person who used to pass by that place whom the boy may think would have money, or any other, valuables, would be robbed by him, if it was possible for him to do so.
The people whom O'Kelly used to kill he used to throw into a pond close by the cave. This pond in known locally as 'Poll na mbuistéirí'.
Several of his victims were butchers, and that is the reason
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 22:20
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In the lake by the wood,
In the year of the flood,
The ark it is said, navigated,
And Jonas was seen at the cross of Cahirmeen,
When he got from the whale liberated.
The contents of the foregoing six pages have been supplied to me by Mícheál ÓCriain. See page 6.
Eamonn ÓConchúbhair, Drom Mór,
(Mí na Nodlaig, 1937).
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:42
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In those old days the principal food consisted of stirabout and skimmed milk for breakfast, at six o'clock; potatoes and milk for dinner, the evening meal was the same as the breakfast, and was taken at seven o'clock.
The table in the Kitchen could be turned up on one end against the wall, and the frame underneath used as a seat, when the table was not in use. Cabbage dressed with lard was often used at dinner; dried ling fish was a great treat in the Lenten season. Easter Sunday was a great feastday, people in some cases, eating up to a dozen eggs at one meal.
Tea was not used to any great extent in the district, before fifty years ago. People were puzzled how to use it,
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:37
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Sometimes using the leaves. They used pewter mugs for drinking purposes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:36
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A sow when rearing bonhams, should be cared and well fed. The floor should be cemented and swept out every day, and a dry bed of straw put under them to keep them warm. When the bonhams are taken from the sow, they should be left out occasionally to pick up some food that would suit them.
If a cow calved early in the year she should be kept in and well fed and well bedded; combing with a curry comb now and then will help to keep her clean,
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:32
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There are many forts in this locality. I know five of them, two are in Kylevalla, two in Killusty South and one in Killusty. Some time ago a local farmer trying to defy superstition said he would cut one of them himself. So he hired a poor labourer who knew nothing about forts or fairies, to cut it down. So the man did as he was told and the farmer paid him, thinking that nothing would happen himself, but he was mistaken, for when he got up neat morning he found all his hair on the pillow. From that day to this a bit of hair never grew on his head.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:24
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About one hundred years ago, poor scholars used to stay in the houses around, Crehans of Knockellry, a townland near Fethard, and the people who wanted to get educated collected there. Even the famous C.J. Kickham often visited these places. In this way a lot of people got their education.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:21
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There was a cooper living near the railway in Fethard, about three miles from here, who used to make baskets for all the farmers around. These baskets were used for picking potatoes in. He earned from six to eight shillings a week on baskets alone. He used to sell them at three pence a basket. He often made egg coops. This is how he got his name "Cooper Cummins".
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:18
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Marriages usually take place between Christmas and Shrove Tuesday. A lot of people get married during that time. In olden times horses and cattle were given as a dowry, but now a days, it is seldom stock is given, but money instead. In olden times marriages were sometimes celebrated in the houses. Sometimes now when the couple come out of the chapel, they find an old boot tied on to the motor for luck. Wednesday is supposed to be the luckiest day to get married on.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:08
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When a couple gets married, and are living in a different house from the parents of the bride, a "hauling -home" takes place about a month after the parties have been married.
Usually a party or dance is given to celebrate the "hauling - home".
About sixty years ago when people would be getting married, the bridegroom would ride to the chapel, and the bride would ride in a carriage, but when they were married the bride got up behind her husband on the horse, and then both went to the bride's home for breakfast.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 21:02
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In olden days in Ireland the priests had to take to the hills, to escape the "Red Coats". The rocks on which the priest said mass were called "Mass Rocks".
At the presant day one can be seen about seven miles from here at Corriag-Mo-Cleip [?].
The people used to attend from all over the neighbourhood, while others would act as scouts, in case there would be an invasion of the "Red Coats".
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:58
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In olden times when there were no roads, people always had a right of way through their neighbour's land. One can still be seen, starting in Clarebeg, running through Keane's and Purcell's land and joining the Cloneen road for Fethard. All the people from Cloran and Walshbog used this path as a short cut to Fethard Mass.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:54
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People in olden days used to cure warts with a snail, simply by rubbing the snail over the wart, then placing the snail on a bush to die, and by the time the snail would have died, the wart would have vanished. A cure for corns was to go out in the morning bare-foot and run around in the dew, for about ten minutes, and after a week the corns would be cured
For bleeding cuts the cure was to place a cobweb over the cut and it was supposed to stop the blood from coming.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:50
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People in olden days had no food like we have now. For their breakfast they had oatenmeal bread and buttermilk. For dinner, potatoes, milk, salt, and sometimes red herrings, and for supper Indian meal porridge. This was the principal food the people of that day had. When the men would be working, often they lit a fire on the headland and roasted the stalks of the potatoes and ate them. From this kind of food they usually got a pain, and as there were no doctors here at that time many of the poor people died.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:42
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There was a ballalley where the green now is. Many people used to play in that alley every day. There was also a football team in Shrule long ago and there was another in Kinlough. Every month the two teams would play
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:41
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Bhí bean ann fado agus chuaidh sí ag faoistín agus dubhairt an sagart leithe Gniomh Croidhe bhrughadh a dhéanamh agus dubhairt sí "Ó Mo Dhia tá mo phiopín bris [?]
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:33
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Chuaidh fear go Gaillimh fado agus chuaidh sé isteach i siopa agus d'iarr an siopadóir do an gceannochadh sé aon úaireadóir agus dubhairt an fear, "Cé'n ghnó a bheadh agam dhó"? "Innseochadh sé an t-am dhuit," arsa an siopadóir agus cheannuigh sé é. Nuair a bhí sé ag dul abhaile diarr sé don uaireadóir cé'n tám é acht níor innis sé dhó é,
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:17
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to grow as it puts them from growing. Turkey weed kills chickens and young turkeys. People make wine out of dandaline. If cows ate a certain herb it would put a taste in their milk and butter. People also pick the leaves of hazel and give them to pigs and to turkey.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:11
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of it. There is a cure in dandaline for the liver. There is a cure in garlick for colds. People use water cress instead of cabbage in the winter. They boil nettles and give them too turkeys. They boil dog leaves and give them to pigs with other foods. They boil the leaves of ivy and use the duce of it to clean black and blue clothes. If you got burned with nettles if you put a dog leave to it, it would cure the burn. The people break the nettles when they are starting
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:08
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The weeds that do most harm to the land are thistles, nettles, chicken weed, and dogleaves. The most place thistles and nettles grow is in rich land. There is a cure in turkey weed for rheumatism. The people boil it and drink the duce.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 20:07
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stitch in time saves nine".
This means that if people do the thing in time it will save them much trouble. "Honesty is the best policy". "He who rises late never does a good days work". "He who hath a trade hath an estate".
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 17:37
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The Quarter field is situated on the side of a hill. It contains nine acres in the begining of the nineteenth century many families lived lived in this field The field was owned by a Land Lord and he allowed these poor people build houses in it. Each family got a quarter of ground. There was no division between the quarters only paling. They used to set potatoes in the quarter every year and used to gett the manure from the neighbouring farmers. These people had no other way of living only when ever they would work for another farmer for small hire. When the potatoes failed in the years 1845 to 1847 all these people died of starvation. When they were gone my grandfather bought this field with more land surrounding it and my father is in possession of it now
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 17:27
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My grandfather thew the remains of the houses away and it is all one level field at present. If you walk through parts of it on a Summers evening you could see the form of the houses and the little gardens alongside it
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:37
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Fr Michael Murphy was a curate priest in the parish of Ferns in Co. Wexford when the rebellion of 1798 started. During the an English officer by the name of Dermot Mac Morrogh appointed a day on which all arms were to be handed in at Ferns and he promised that all people obeying that order should be protected, but there was treachery in his heart and when the people arrived he meant to attack them.
But one of his men being an Irishman informed Father Murphy of this plot and the priest got together an army of four hundred men and attacked the Yeos at Ferns the fought a fierce battle and the Irish were victorious.
Next they marched to Wexford and fought another battle at Vinegar Hill. They failed at Vinegar Hill. They fought another battle in Arklow on the place were the boys school now stands.
There is a mounument to
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:32
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the memory of Fr. M. Murphy in Arklow. The inscription is written in English Irish and French.
To the memory of Fr. M. Murphy
and his gallant followers who
fought and died for their country
and liberty at Arklow 9th June
1798.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:25
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Between Annsley's shop and Butlers shop Lr. Main St., there is a Lane called the Abbey Lane. It is so called because there was an Abbey at the top of it.
The ruins are still there and in a cave there were gold candlesticks and candles found because a priest said Mass there long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:23
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My home district is Coolmore now, there are four houses in Coolmore. Two of these houses belong to farmers and the other two are rented cottages. The people here know no Irish they never heard Irish spoken but they have a great interest in it. They tell grand stories of the comical characters of days gone by they are old and know all the around. They tell of the lepracaun who is seen on the old ruins of the Castle at Andinary and how a little girl being out saw him and looked at him and he seeing her made a face at her and gave her a fine fright. From the way she described him he was well known.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:23
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What do you call that comes under the bridge?
Yo don't call it because it comes itself.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:16
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On this land of Coolmore there is a fairy fort one day in Summer which I suppose would be built about 1936. My father Mr. H. Hurley and Mr. P. Berry who was assisting him were cutting small bushes and trees for fence. A young man came down the lane and told them to beware of what they where doing, They laughed at him because they did not
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:13
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There is a herb called Canavanbeg. It is boiled and made into tea and given to children. It is said to be a cure for worms. The herb is thrown out and the liqour is used.
Ferret's milk is given as a cure for whooping cough. The way to prepare it is to put a bowl of milk on the floor and place the ferret at the bowl. After this give it to the child who is suffering from whooping cough. Whatever is in the ferrets breath is the cure.
Pennyleaf is given as a cure for scruff on horses legs. It is a tiny little leaf which grows on the Pound Hill at Temple - rainy
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:09
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A fog on Ballymoyle hill is a sure sign of rain. If anybody has rheumatic pains he knows when it is going to rain because the pains get worse. If a bird is seen without its mate it is a sure sign of rain. When the birds are seen out together there is very fine weather to come.
If you see one magpie out alone it is a sure sign of rain, and that is why one magpie is reckoned unlucky for the cock sits on the eggs while the hen is feeding. If you see two magpies together there is fine weather coming, and that is why two magpies are reckoned lucky.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 13:06
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Some years ago there were a few industries in Arklow which have now ceased to exist namely. The Brick-Works, Kynock's Factory, and the Parnell Quarries.
The Brick-Works were in Ferrybank near Sea-Bank terrace. The Works gave employment to many people. In the works they used burn clay and turn it into bricks. The clay was got from behind the works and it was
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:59
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Look over Dunran mountain and if she has her cloak on it is going to rain.
(her cloak on means that the fog is near the ground)
A fog over Glenealy in the morning is a sign that it is going to be a wet day.
When sea-gulls come into the land it is a sign of a storm.
If the sheep are high on the hill it is going to be fine.
If the swallows fly low it is going to rain.
If the curlew roars it is a sign of rain.
If the horse stands with his back to the ditch it is going to rain.
If the smoke goes up straight to the sky it is going to rain.
If the fog comes up the Devil's Glen it is going to be bad weather.
When the frogs change colour it is a sign of bad weather. If they turn black it is going to rain. If they turn yellow it is going to be fine.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:53
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In olden times spinning and weaving was carried on in nearly every home. Miss Kate Cullen, Corr used to spin wool. She had a spinning wheel and it was like two wooden plates with (mak) many spikes on them which were called carders. She used to oil the wool, then card it and afterwards spin it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:51
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In olden times fishing was very common. It is still carried on to the present time. The instruments for fishing are, a rod, a hook, a line, a cork and a bait. The hook is atached to the line and the line is atached to the rod. When a person is going to fish he gets a worm and puts it on the hook. Then he puts the line in the water and when the fish sees it he starts to bite it and thus gets caught in the hook. The person fishing knows that the fish is caught as the cork goes up and down on the top of the water. Sometimes when it is after raining people go "trouling" with a bait instead of a worm.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:47
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stolen. One morning as the ground was covered with snow Bully came came barking to the door and made signals to Mat that the heifers were stolen. So the two started out in search of them. They tracked um as far as Limerick and here they found um between two glens. They went about turning the heifers home when ten men attacked um to take the heifers of um so they started fighting and he beat the ten men but he would never do so without the dog. When five of um would come in front of him and five more behind him the dog would jump up and ketch um by the cape of the coat and bring um to the ground and in that way he beat they ten men and brought home his heifers to Gurtaclohane
Soon after a great man from
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:44
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A stitch in time saves nine.
Plough deep while sluggards sleep you will have corn to sell and keep.
Dont sell your hen on a wet day
Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
An old dog cannot be taught.
A bird in the hand is worth two in a bush.
A child who is burnt dreads the fire.
If the cucoo sings on a bare thorn you may sell your cow and buy corn.
Long churning makes bad butter.
If a fish could hear as well as see no fisherman might ever be.
It is not the big stones alone that build the castle.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:40
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in a cloth and then have some boiled potatoes to mix in the Boxty and some flour. Bake it on a pan or in the bottom of an oven pot without a lid. Before this the Boxty cake was baked on a raked out turf. Fumble a pot over on it and leave it all night and put coals on the oven.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:38
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between Drumcondra townland and Ralaghan townland. Before bridges were built people came through fords.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:37
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The pound road, the high road, the bog road and the broad road are some names for the local roads. There is a very old road which leads to Drumgoon graveyard and people call it the high road.
When people are coming on foot from Cootehill they usually come this road and they say it is a near way. Long ago before the new road was made everybody came this road. There is a pound on the edge of the road and it is called the pound road. When the new road was made the old road was not kept in good repair. This road leads from Killan to Bailieborough. There is a small lake beside the pound, called the pound lake. There is an old pass from Mr. Stuart Sharpe's house to an old house in which Mr. Thompson lived.
There is a ford in the river
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:35
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Mat Sheehy lived in the townland of Gurtaclohane in the begining of the nineteenth century. He was commonly known as Mat the Herder. He was a stout firm man and had great arms. Another great man lived long side him by the name of Sean O Leary. The two of um used to go to Cork once a fortnight with firkins of butter in a horse & car at the same time there was a great fighting man in Cork. One day the Buffer of Cork challenged any man to fight him. Mat came up to Leary and said that it wouldnt take such a great man to beat him. "You better keep your tongue in your pocket" said Leary dont he hear you. At that the Buffer heard him and challenged him to fight and handed him a black torn
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:32
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There is another old ch school near Shercock which is Killan school. It is situated about two miles from Shercock on the edge of the road beside Mr. Reilly's mill. It has a slated roof and the walls are limewashed. It is a very small school and it is about four yards from the roadside. Grass is growing on the roof of it because there is no fire in it.
Some of the slates have been blown off it. The gable of it is beside the bank of a river. There were not enough children attending it and it was closed. Catholics and Protestant went to school together in it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:28
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Almost on the site of this present school there was an old schoolhouse near the gate beside a bush on the edge of the lane The roof was thatched and the walls limewashed. It became so bad that the present school had to be built.
Catholics and Protestants came to the old school and there were a lot of children at it.
Master Lee taught the children in it and he was lodged in Mr Cunningham's house. In those days children went to school until they were full grown people.
Irish was not spoken in days gone by. Children used to write on slates with pencils.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 12:24
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I live in the Townland of Ralaghan. There are eleven houses in it. Ten of these are occupied and one with nobody in it. Four of these houses are slated, three are covered with corrugated iron and three thatched with oat straw. There is one house with nobody in it.
This house was formerly occupied by two men named Hicks. One of these men died about thirty years ago and the other bought a farm in Killyclare. He is now dead and he left one of his farms to a nephew and sold the other to Mr Lynch. The gables which are built with stone and lime are there. The lime was got in Carrick Kilns and the stones were got in a quarry beside the old house. There are plum bushes growing along the walls and there is a well about one perch from the door.
The well is cleaned out every Summer by the owner and there is a big bush growing at the back of the well which is
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 11:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a BOITHRÍN - a road
a BÁINÍN - a white waistcoat
a PUISÍN - a young cat
a CEANNAISG - tie a cows leg to her head
there is a PREACAILL on him - there is a sulk on him
GÚNACH - hemp
he made a SCREOU (?) AT IT - a grab
a GAMAIL - a child
a LEANA - a child
he is a CODRÁLTÍ - he is talking foolish
a GILE - a child
he was SIOCAREACHT - he was shivering
he is ROPAIRE - he is a rogue
he was sitting on his GRUG - he was sitting on his heels
COIRÍ GOB - sitting on your heels
SÉARDÁN - noisy breathing
AG GLUGAOIL - gurgling
an old FOTHRACH - an old ruin
an ÁTH - shallow water
CEÓL - music

there was a LEISCE on him - there was a laziness on him

he is a GROUNTÁNAIGHE - he is a grumbler
a GLUGAR - a bad egg
ATUINN (?) - a bog
a TAOIBHÍN - a piece on a shoe
the TAOBHÁNS - the sticks under the rafters
a LOCHTÍN - a loft
BORTHÁRACH (?) - cabin hunting or rambling

from
Maurice Fitzgerald
Skeheenarinky
(Par. Ballyporeen)
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 10:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a SIBHAIRE - a fairy

TÚNÍNTE - a game
Two boys would catch another each holding a leg and a hand. Two others would do the same and strike them together.

a DÚG of water - a small sup of water
Dríb - dirty water
a PÚICÍN - put over the eyes
CRÚIBÍN - pigs foot
a GOILSEAC - an earwig
a SÍ-GAOITHE - a fairy-wind
a SGOLLÓG - a blackguard
a SEANACHAS - a chat
PLÁMÁS - soft talk
GRÁDH MO CROIDHE - soft talk
TRÍ NA CHÉILE - mixed
a LIOBAR - a strip of cloth
a TRÁNÍN - a long grass
going SGORAIDHEACHT - going visiting
a TÚRTÓG - a height
a CARRAIG - a rock
a BRUSNA - a little bunch
a FIALTÁIN - a glen
a FAGHARCÁN - a knot
SEALTÁN - a glen
SNEACHTA SÉIDEAN - windy snow
a SHULLA - a gush of wind
SÁLÍNÍ - the heels of a car
FIANNÁNACH - withered grass
SPEANACH - roots of burned heath
a SUBADÁN - a stubble
a LEACA - a hilly field
a stupid DONNSA - a stupid person
STAGÚN - a ignorant fellow
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 07:53
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rejected
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some time after that the hatar was seen floating on the water, this name is also given to the village. In Thomas Keavneys land, Turla ballymoe Co Galway there is a field called Gleann na [?] "The field of Hurls" it is that long ago the different villages usto play hurls against one another. Their is also another field in upper Turla it is coll it is said long ago there was a great wood in it and robbers dewelt there, this field is now owned by Malachy Murphy Turla, Ballymoe, Co Galway. In Martin Ryans land there is a stream called ahan it is in Ballyglass Kilsalla Co Galway.
In James Flanagans land, Ballyglass Kilsalla Castlerea there is a well called "gaire Lucais". Their is an old bush in Michael Hartes land it is called Crann an Oir it is called this because it is said that gold is hid under it it is in the village of Ballyglass, Kilsalla Co Galway.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 07:23
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rejected
awaiting decision
At the present day there are many old places which are noted for certain things in the past. In this district there are many of them such as Poll An Aifreann it is said a priest usto say mass in it in the penal times It is in Mark Keavneys land, Kilcooley, Ballymoe, Co Galway it is also that the chalice and the other sacret vessels are buried under a bush in Michal Hartes land, Ballyglass, Kilsalla, Castlerea, Co Galway. In Patricks Coneaughs land in Turla, Ballymoe Co Galway there is a stone called "Cloe Urnage" long ago people usto pray on this stone his house is now built in this field. There is a hole in williamstown, Co. Galway it is called Poll An Aostar it is called this because once upon a time a man came to it to give a drink to his horse he was on horse-back and when the horse saw the water he bean to rear and both of then fell in and got drowned
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 06:14
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to him but the man did not answer. The man on the horse was the spirit of Major Kirwan. When he was at "The Chestnuts" he saw a little woman standing on the stump of an old tree combing her hair and Tom asked her what time it was and she said it was the time for the living to be in and the dead to be out.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 06:11
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awaiting decision
Tom o Hara was once coming home one night very late from cutting wood in the Dalgan woods for Lord de Clifford. He had [?] to delay at the big house putting the timber into heaps. As he was coming home he heard the noise of hooves coming after him. He met a man on a white horse and he spoke
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 06:09
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awaiting decision
never grew and the man died without being hanged.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 03:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The most prominent fairs in this locality are held in Taghmon and Wellingtonbridge. The fairs are not always always held in towns but generally in villages or at crossroads. Buyers come to the houses to buy pigs, horses, and lambs generally.
Some years ago a fair used to be held in the village of Scar but it is not held now as it went down and buyers did not attend it. The fair used to be held in a fair green but when it was changed to another field trade got slack and when it changed to the Bridge of Scar no one ever
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 03:05
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rejected
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door has the shape of a horse shoe
It is situated on a cross-roads and there is a green patch outside the forge for the ploughs, harrows or whatever would be getting mended. Outside also is a pump for getting the water for the forge.
There is only one fire place in it and a bellows to blow the fire. In a box are many tools which the blacksmith uses namely a knife for pairing the horses hoofs and a file to make the nails smooth on the top of the hoof and nails and a pincers to draw the nails of the hoofs when a horse is getting new shoes. On the middle of the floor is an anvil to lay the iron on and a sledge to beat it into whatever shape he likes.
There are two other forges in the vicinity namely, Chapman's and Keanes. Jack Keane works in his forge by himself and Peter Chapman has a journeyman.
All the forges are the same but Jack Keane does not mend ploughs
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 02:06
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A Fairy Story
Once upon a time there was a woman. She had a baby. He was always crying in a cot every time she went to town. When she came home they said we had great sport today. the mother asked the children what was the sport and they answered the child in the cot was playing the bagpipes and when they went in he was crying again. She was told to go to a woman named Moll Anthony. She told her to go a certain place and to bring a broom of heather with her and the third that would pass by to throw the broom at it. When she went home her own child was in the cot and the fairy child gone.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 02:01
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she was coming home from town. I suppose she took a small drop too much. She had to pass a graveyard. But when she came to it, she turned [into] it. She went down through the grave-yard, and she met a big tomb-stone. Down she sat under the tomb-stone. She stayed there for a long time. During the time she was there. and in the middle of the night two or three men came to open a grave to take gold rings off the finger of a corpse that had been buried there. One of the men took out a candle from his pocket, and he said "who will hold this candle". The woman stretched out her long arm from under the tomb-stone and said "I will". The unfortunate men took to their heels. One of the men's boot[s] caught in a briar, and with a great force he broke the lace leaving his boot behind him. One of the other men lost a hat. But they did not venture back to look for neither the boot nor hat.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:55
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A story about a ghost
There was an old woman. One time
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:51
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remainder of his life he had to wear a wig
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:51
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awaiting decision
A story about a fort
There was an old fort, or a clump of white-thorn bushes on a man's land in Killoughy one time. One day he went, and cut some of the bushes to fence a hole in the ditch. So that night he retired to bed as usual. But the next morning when he awoke up, the hair on his head had fallen off. For the
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:49
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the woman's own child and laid it down on the hearth. They took up the fairy child and dissappeared [sic] with him
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:48
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awaiting decision
the woman's own child and laid it down on the hearth. They took up the fairy child and dissappeared [sic] with him
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:48
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rejected
awaiting decision
A story about a fairy
A mother once had her child [unclear] stolen from her by the fairies. They took it out of the cradle and placed in its stead a fairy with a big head. It would do nothing only eat and drink. She went to a woman that lived near her and she asked what would she do. The woman told her to carry the fairy into the kitchen seat it on the hearth. then she said get two egg shells and boil some water in them. This she said would make the fairy laugh, and if he once laughed it would be all over with him. So the fairy spoke and said:
"I am as old as the hills
But from ages or yore
I never saw shells
Used for boiling before."
and with that he began to laugh. after a while a crowd of fairies came in bringing with them
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:43
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day he was sitting down thinking what to do. When he saw a tall lady sitting on a log. She was smoking a pipe. He went up to her and asked her to marry him. She said she would. So they got married and gave a big wedding. He invited his people and friends and in the middle of the dance a lot of little fairies came in and danced all around the floor. All the people started to laugh and talk to each other. The woman got vexed and cleared the house in two minutes. The man said nothing. Then after a while the fairies got up the chimney and went away. So they had no trouble after that because none of the neighbours ever came near the house. The woman said that it was best to live to your-self.
senior member (history)
2019-07-20 01:39
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awaiting decision
A story about the fairies
Once upon a time there was a man who was looking for a wife. No one seemed to like him. One
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 22:16
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awaiting decision
Nóra ní Chualain (93) an seanchaidhe is fearr san gceantar seo acht tá an aois ag goilleamhaint uirthi anois agus ní a cuimhneiomh maith is bhíodh. Ach ta a beirt mhac Colm () agus Tomás (63) (Maidhcín) go rí mhaith. Tá cuid mór de sheanchas na máthar acu agus chuid mór dá cuid scéalta fiannaíochta freisin. Ar bhaile na hAbhann dóibh. Fatharta an tsloinne a bhí ar Nóra sul phós sí.
Togha seanchaidhe agus togha cainteora é "learaí ó Biath ( Labhras Ó Conghaile) go leor den seachas atá sa leabhar seo agus go mór mór gach a bhfuil curtha síos in ainm mhuintir Fhátharta is ó Learaí a foghluimigheadh é. B'fhiú don Chumann le Béaloideas feara chur chuige agus chuig teach Nóra ní Chualáin.
Tá Nóra ní Ghabnáin (74), Indreabhán , go maith nuair bhíonn sí ina sláinte. Tá seanchas aici agus sean-scéalta, agus sean- phaidreacha.
Tá roinnt seanchaidhe maithe ar an gCaoran c.i gcas an bherit Phádraig 'ac Con Fhaola. Ta seanchis chuid mhaith ag Máire Ní Fhátharta (72), Baile an tSléibhe.
Leis an fhírinne rádh tá an áit lán de sheanchas dá mbeadh am ag duine le na bhailiú.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 22:12
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abhí istigh ar an talamh tirm triúr innte. Ar an bpoinnte h-iompuigheadh í agus báthadh Ned ar an bpoinnte acht chuir Learaí maide rámha faoí'n ucht agus snámh sé i dtír. Níor chuir mo dhuine bocht cois i mbád ariamh ó shoin ná i gcurrach ná ní dheachaidh sé ag snámh le teann faitchís. Acht tá sé beó fós agus é ag fághail an pinsion tá sé os cionn 80 bliadhain anois acht ní raibh sé mórán le sgór bliadhain nuair a thárla an timpiste dhó.
Ní deárnádh mórán doighteán ins an áit acht lá amháin dhóigh m'athair agus mo uncail cró beag ar mo
sean-mháthair. Áit é a mbíodh sé ag cruadhadh lín agus dhá bhualadh agus ag déanamh chuile rud eile leis. Bhí teine bheag ins an gcró agus chaith siad slám lín isteach innte agus slám eile agus slám eile gur ghlac an teaichín teine agus rith siad féin annsin.
Acht is dócha go bhfuair siad an t-slis nuair a tháinig an oidhche.
Bhí comnaidhe ar an mBlácach san gCaisleán i naice le Indreabhán. Bhí ocht gcinn déagh de tighe cinn tuighe déanta aige le h-aghaidh a chuid madraí agus dóghadh iad lá amháin. Níl a fhios céard a las iad acht deir cuid de na daoine gur le gráin ar an mblácach a lasadh iad.
Dóighead dhá cruach coirce ar Tom Pheadair freisin acht ní bhfuair sé amach ariamh céard a las iad.
Is minic a bhíonns galraí thart. Taghann an bhruithtíneach gach aon seachtmhadh bliadhain. Taghann sí ar chuile duine s'an teach acht ar aon duine amháin agus ní bhíonn sí ar aon duine acht naoí lá. Taghann an leicneach agus an triuch orra freisin. 'Sé an leigheas a bhíonn aca ar an triuch a dhul amach faoí bholg capaill bháin.
Bhíodh na sean-daoine ag baint luibheanna agus ag cur "orthaí" le h-aghaidh luit eile.
Is beag an fáth a bhíodh ag daoine le beagán troid a dhéanamh. Bhí cúigear buachaillí ag marcaigheacht ar asal Tom Phatsaí lá.
D'árdhuigh an t-asal agus chaith sé anuas iad acht chuaidh siad ag dalladh a chéile agus rinne siad píosa breágh troda agus bhain siad fuil as a chéile.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 22:07
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ten feet thick at base and graduating to the summit to 4 1/2 ft.
The Andersons left Buttevant 1847.
Mrs Roche entered into possession of Buttevant castle in 18(?)
The Brownings of Co. Limerick occupied it and left in 1865.
For many years up to 1893 Rev. W.H. Colter(?) lived there.

The above has been collected from various Archaeological Journals from time to time by
The Sisters of Mercy,
Convent of Mercy,
Buttevant.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 22:02
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bay and a large mullioned window. The ceiling is of solid masonry, it is lofty, octagonal and conical in form.
About 1812 in planting part of the castle grounds the labourers discovered a little way below the surface, a human skeleton, with the appearance of a wig on the skull, which mouldered when exposed to the air, and apparently concealed in the caul were several shillings and sixpences of Elizabeth's reign.
Off a back-staircase is a small doorway 3' x 2'. On opening this door you come on a low short passage, 2 yds. long, which leads you to the mouth of a dark gloomy hole descending almost perpendicularly, just large enough to admit the body of an average-sized man. This aperture is supposed to be the entrance to a subterranean passage communicating with the Franciscan Abbey some 450 yds away. At the Abbey end this passage was closed by Canon C. Buckley P.P. of Buttevant. This passage was used for special and sacred purposes and it is believed that no one who profanely entered it came back alive.
The name "Castle Barry" was changed to "Buttevant Castle" when Sir James Anderson purchased the Buttevant Estate. The castle assumed its present size and character about 1800 or so when Sir James Anderson enlarged it and made its front consist of two ample and stately towers with a porch between them. Originally the front consisted of one tower. This is still perfect as a sample of 13th century masonry with its walls
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:53
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agus déanann sé an-chuid oibre do na daoine annso.
Oibrigheann na táilliúirí sa bhaile anois, fadó do théighidís ó thigh go thigh mar a théigheadh siúinéirí agus ughaimeadóirí. Is gnáthach leis na táilliúirí éadach a bheith sa tigh acu le díol.
Ceannuigheann siad an t-éadach ins an muileann in Ardfhionnáin, agus ó's na siopaí móra agus i mBaile-Átha-Cliath. Bíonn siosúr, deimheas, miosúr, inneal fuaghála, snáth agus snáthaid, méarachan, iarann mór trom agus píosa cailce ag an táilliúir.
Cniotál
Cniotálann bean dárbh ainm dí Cáit Ní Lonnargáin a comhnuigheann ag dún an Fhaoitigh in aice Cill Manaicín stocaí le maisín. Tugann na daoine a dheineann sí stocaí dóibh an snáth dí, ceannuigheann siad an snáth ins na siopaí.
Tá roinnt túirne i mBarra na h-Uidhre ach níl aon ceann sa pharróiste seo.
Oibrigheann Bean Ní Crottaigh ó Barra na h-Uidhre an túirne fós. Slámann sí agus sníomhann sí an olann agus déinann sí stocaí de.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:51
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agus déanann sé an-chuid oibre do na daoine annso.
Oibrigheann na táilliúirí sa bhaile anois, fadó do théighidís ó thigh go thigh mar a théigheadh siúinéirí agus ughaimeadóirí. Is gnáthach leis na táilliúirí éadach a bheith sa tigh acu le díol.
Ceannuigheann siad an t-éadach ins an muileann in Ardfhionnáin, agus ó's na siopaí móra agus i mBaile-Átha-Cliath. Bíonn siosúr, deimheas, miosúr, inneal fuaghála, snáth agus snáthaid, méarachan, iarann mór trom agus píosa cailce ag an táilliúir.
Cniotál
Cniotalann bean dárbh ainm dí Cáit Ní Lonnargáin a comhnuigheann ag dún an Fhaoitigh in aice Cill Manaicín stocaí le maisín. Tugann na daoine a dheineann sí stocaí dóibh an snáth dí, ceannuigheann siad an snáth ins ns siopaí.
Tá roinnt túirne i mBarra na h-Uidhre ach níl aon ceann sa pharróiste seo.
Oibrigheann Bean Ní Crottaigh ó Barra na h-Uidhre an túirne fós. Slámann sí agus sníomhann sí an olann agus déinann sí stocaí de.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:49
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a BOGÁN - an egg without a shell
a FORTNEÁL - a small egg
a SGEACH - a bush
STEALLING the water - washing
he is a BACAC - he is a cripple
BUCÁN - the hinge of a door
he is a DÚDAIRE - he is a stupid fellow
she is an IONSEACH - she is a woman without good
a BOWERÁNÍ (?) - a deaf person
a MODHARÁN
A MEGRIM

there is no SUIDECINT (?) in it - there is no appearance it

there is no CROT in it - there is no shape in it
an AMADÁN - a simple person
an IARSMA - a blackguard
a GOBLACHÁN - one jaw bigger than the other
a STRAOIL - a careless woman
a GABHÁL of hay
a BEART of hay
a SCALP - an old house with a bad roof
a MEITHEAL - a bunch of men working
a GARSÚN - a boy
the LÚDÍN - the finger
a SGUABÍN - a quarrel
a SPAILPÍN - a spade men
a BOTHÁN - a shelter
pieces of BORÁN - pieces of Dry dung
CAORÁNS - pieces of turf
a SGATHÁN - a bush of furze
wait another SGÁTAMH - wait another while
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:37
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nuair a bhíonn an olann daor gheibhtear an-chuid airgid uirthí.
Cúram na gCos
Sa tsean aimsir bhí an-chuid daoine ann nár chaith bróga riamh. Caogadh blian ó shoin ní caitheadh na páistí scoile bróga aon am sa bhliain. Do chaitheadh cuid acu bróga ag dul go dtí an baile mór nó ag dul go dtí an Aifreann. Dá mbeadh siad bocht ní chaithfidis bróga go mbeadh siad ábalta iad a cheannach dóibh féin. Do chómhnuigh sean-bhean dárbh ainm di Máire Ní Bheilbí in aici na scoile seo triocadh blian ó shoin agus níor chaith sí bróga riam.
Indiu, is gnáthach leis na leanbhaí dul cosnocht ó Lá Bealtaine go Mí Meadhan Fhóghmhair. Ní bhíonn an oiread leanbhaí cosnocht ins an Samhradh anois agus a bhíodh rionnt bliana ó sóin. Caitheann an cuid is mó des na beanbhaí bróga ar scoil, ach nuair a théigheann siad a bhaile baineann siad na bróga doibh. Is maith an rud é dul cosnocht ins an Samhrad, deineann sé maitheas do na cosaibh, agus crudhann sé iad.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:31
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The hardships endured were great. There is no exact or approximate record of the numbers who died. They were going around weeping and wailing. Some large farmers gave employment in the tilling of the land, threshing and scutching corn etc. The labourers in recompense received coarse food which consisted of stirabout (porridge) and buttermilk - boiled turnips etc. There was no payment. It was quite common to see large groups of men waiting at some farmers' doors at day break in order to be taken on first.
In excavating for road material on the land of John Smith some time ago, large quantities of bones were found. The remains were supposed to be people buried during the famine period. John Smith's gravel pit is situated in Curnalea near the Ballintleva School.
Coffins made of rushes were used for the remains on some occasions.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:31
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awaiting decision
cheering when the figure would be dragged along.

April fool's day comes next and on that day it is a custom to try and fool every person one would meet. On Good Friday people make hot cross buns and these when mashed up and boiled in water is very good for a sick cow. On Easter Sunday some people get up very early to see the sun dance.

The Sunday after the end of Shrove is called "Chalk Sunday". It is a custom to chalk every body especially old maids and bachelors who did not get married during Shrove. On May day
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:26
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Riddle me that and Ill give in. The judge said that would not do and that and that he was to be hanged. The man explained the riddle and this was it. The man was going into a churchyard and he saw a skull of a person and a birds nest in it. The mother bird flew out and four young ones remained and thats the meaning of the riddle. The judge said that he would give him and wish that he wanted. The man saw a small gooseberry bush near him and said he wanted to be hanged on that bush when it grew up. The judge granted his wish but the bush
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:26
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awaiting decision
An old custom on Hallowe'en was to leave the door open and put on a good fire and leave a can of spring water and some bread on the table
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:25
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awaiting decision
There was a great piper in Ballyteague called Lennon. He was a working man.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:23
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There was a bird called a Kite. They say "As yellow as a Kite's claw".
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:12
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awaiting decision
There is no historical record to show what was the ruling family beyond one hundred or one hundred and twenty years.
During the last century the Fallons appear to be the most plentiful race.
There are four branches of the Fallons
(a) The gentle Fallons
(b) The Simple Fallons
(c) The mateer (mataoir) Fallons
(d) The Pork Fallons
(a) These lived in Ballina house near Dysart and have disappeared.
(b) These are scattered here and there throughout the parishes of Dysart and Cam (The school is built on the boundary between the two parishes.)
(c) The Mataoir Fallons are the most numerous. They got their nickname from the first Fallon who settled down in the district and whose occupation was making straw-mats. These mats were used as mattresses for beds. Some of them were for hens laying in them and were in the shape of boxes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 21:12
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(d) The Pork Fallons were so called because in old times they practised the killing of pigs, and retailing them as pork in the market of Athlone.
The class named under (c) acquired large tracts of land throughout the parishes of Dysart, Cam, and Tisara, and are still the most numerous and wealthiest people in these areas.
One man named Big Billy owned about one thousand acres of land, and had many hands employed, during the famine years and afterwards. They usually worked for their support, which consisted chiefly of oat-meal stirabout and buttermilk.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:29
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rejected
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The cat scrapes his feet when it is going to rain. Under the water and over the water but never touches the water. The ass rises his tail when it is going to rain. A colour is seen on the fire when it is going to rain.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:27
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rejected
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There was once a man and his name was Turk and he lived in Shrule. He was very rich and he had a lot of stock and land. He had very bad luck during his life. He lost all his stock and money and the land was no good. He had two sons and when he died he left a curse on the mill and every night there are seen three lights two for his sons and one for himself.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:07
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frighten the horse very much. The man did not know what to do. In the end he could stand the noise no longer and he left the place altogether.
You should not be cruel to goats. There is a story told showing that you should not. There was a man one time named Mr O'Meara. His goats were always breaking into the cabbage in the garden. He got the goats and tied them to a ditch. When he tied them all his stock started to die. They were dying day after day until he set the goats free.
Collected by:-
May McLoughney
Lahorna
Nenagh
Co. Tipperary.
Obatined from,
Mr. Pat Mcloughney
Lahorna
Nenagh.
Age 55 years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:02
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rejected
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The horse's house is called a stable. The stable is generally roofed with slates. There is a portion put in the stable between each horse. There is a manger in front of the horse's head which hold a supply of hay. In front of each horse there is a trough. The trough holds oats, mangolds and turnips for the horse.
According to story people should not shoe a horse in or near a stable. Once there was a man named Mr Devane and nothing would satisfy him only to have the horse shod in the stable. The smith came and shod the horse in the stable. Every night after that there was shoeing going on in the stable and it used to
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 20:02
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rejected
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There was once a man and his son and they had a wild horse. They went to Confession once with the horse. The father stayed outside to mind the horse and the son went to the chapel. Went he began confession he said "Son and the Holy Ghost" and the priest asked him why he left out "The Father". He said he was out minding the horse. The father then went in and began Confession by saying Father Holy Ghost. The priest asked him why he left out "Son" and he said he was out minding the horse.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:58
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The cow's head is put in between two more beams standing upright. These are then closed, holding the cow's head. Bails are made locally.
Collected by:-
Peter Cullen,
Lahorna
Nenagh.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:57
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rejected
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There was once a giant in Dalgan and he used to live near the fourteen weavers. He used to ask the fourteen weavers to make a suit for him every years and if they refused he would kill them. Every year he would ask a weaver in turn to make a suit for him and he used to give them so long to make the suit. He had seven when himself was killed and the rest of the weavers were put out of their homes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:57
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rejected
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Some of our cows have names. Biddy, Bawny, and Bessie.
The cow house is called a byre. The tie is sometimes a chain fixed onto a pole and then locked around the cows neck. Sometimes bails are used for tying. Two wooden beams are put from wall to wall. One on the ground and the other about two feet above the cow's head.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:56
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Five play this game. Four stand in a square a good distance apart. One stands in the middle and they call him the "Fool". The four that are in the square mark their corners with a stone. They run to each others corners and if the fool manages to get into one of the corners he is no more the fool. Whichever one has no corner is the fool and so on.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:55
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time. This is the way the game is played. A square is measured is measured about seven yard long and about 51/2 yards wide. Anyone who goes outside the square is out of the game.
One boy stands at one end of the square on one leg and about eight at the other end but no boy can stand on two of his feet. The boy who by himself calls one of the boys from the other end and he hops up to him and if he passes him he shouts "Hop Cock Arusa" and all the other boys hop up to him and whoever he knocks takes his place and so on.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:54
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There was once a man and a priest talking to one another. The man did not believe in God. The man said he would believe in God if he would quench a candle by standing a few yards away. The priest stood at the door and he made the sign of the cross and he quenches the candle without a bit of trouble. He then made the sign of the cross again and it lit. The man then believed in God.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:54
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rejected
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There was a candlemaker around Shrule. First of all he would put down a pot of tallow. He had wicks and he would dip the wicks into the tallow and it would freeze. There was an underground passage from the castle and to the churchyard and Cnoc na Beannuighthe. There is a lime kiln in Shrule and another at Cnoc Fada.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:54
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The cows have got names. There names are Polly, Bawny, and Browny.
When calling the goats gin! gin! gin! They are not kept in a house.
When eggs are being set there is a mark put on the eggs. It is supposed to bring luck on the eggs and that all the chickens would come out.
Collected by:-
Elizabeth Starr
Lisquilabeen
Coolbawn
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:53
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rejected
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There is still another game the boys in the town play. It is called "Hop Cock Arusa". The game is played in the Summer
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:52
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Any number of boys can play this game. Two boys turn their backs and the rest of the boys go and hide. They have a certain spot called a "den" and whoever gets into it without the other two boys tipping them they get away again to hide. Whatever two boys are caught last, it is their turn to be "It".
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:51
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chapallaibh ag teacht ón teach phobail dóibh tár éis an phósta. De shuibhal cois ba ghnáthach le mhór cuid na b-póstaidheach a bheith ins an cheanntar seo fadó. Ar an Aifrionn maidin go luath (8.30 a m) ba ghnáthach an lánamhain a phósadh. Rachadh iomlán annsin go d-tí teach taibhirne nó teach bidh eile comhgarach don teach a'phobail fá choinne a mbriocfasta.
Chaitheadh siad tamall maith annsin ag ól, ag damhsa agus ag ceóil, go mbeadh an tráthnóna ann le dul go teach na brighdeóige fá choinne an dinnéara, ceól, damhsa agus ólachán go maidin lá ar n-a bhárach.
An fear nuadh phósta bheir sé gloine nó dó de uisce beatha do gach fear a [?] sé ag obair fá fhad sgairte don bhealach mhór i ndiaidh an phósta. Na tighthe atá comhgarach don bhealach mhór rachaidh sé isteach ionnta, agus bhéarfaidh sé gloine do gach duine san teach. Is deo mhúineadh an t-uisce beatha seo a ghlacaint in do láimh, dá mbéadfá gan a bheith ag ól féin, agus é a chur le do phuisíní i ndiaidh an saoghal úr a mhairstin don lánamhain.
Le fáilte a chur roimh an lánamhain is minic a bhíos gunaí leis na comharsanaí, agus sgaoiltear cupla urchar le chur i n-iúl don lánamhain go bhfuil fáilte rompa i n-a measg.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:51
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This moved his master's heart, and ever afterwards he lead a good life.
We say "chick" to the chickens. To the ducks we say "puddy" and to the geese "baddy". When eggs are put up for hatching a mark is put on them. The top of a hazel stick is burned. It is with this the eggs are marked.
Collected by:-
Maisie Cleary
Kildangan
Puckane
Nenagh
Co. Tipperary.
Obtained from
Mr Martin Cleary,
Kildangan,
Puckane,
Nenagh,
Age 38 years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:51
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rejected
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I play poor snipy. Here is how it is played. You get another fellows hands and you rub them with your hands and you try to pull them away. Here is what you say -
"Poor snipy wet and dripy. Where did you lay your eggs last night".
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:48
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A paper chase is a game played i this town during the long Summer evenings. All the boys gather a bagful of small papers. Then one of the boys say, putting a word on each boy "Hittle, Hottle black bottle you are out". The person whom the word "out" is said on gets out of the crowd. That continued until all but two of the boys are left in the crowd. The other boys run of dropping their share of papers. The two boys who were left behind count one hundred and then they follow the other boys. If they catch any of them they follow after the other boys the next time.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:47
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that the cow will remain quiet.
The pigs house is called a sty. The pigs eats out of a trough. It is shaped like a boat. There is a small partition in the pig sty. The pig eats in one half, and sleeps in another. The goat, and the sheep live mostly in the open air.
Pigs are supposed to be very clean. Once there was a man named Mr. Hogg, who kept a pig that could read, and write. Mr. Hogg was a showman, or a circus man, and all the money he got he spent in drinking whiskey, or porter. One day when the pig didn't act so good his master kicked him and beat him. In the evening he got sorry for having illtreated the animal. He went to the sty and found the pig in tears. He asked the pig why he was crying, and the pig said he grieved because his master lead a foolish life
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:46
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calves we say "high suck" or "suck out of that".
The cowhouse is built on the east side of the farmyard. It is built with stone and covered with slate. There is one door and two windows in it. The cowhouse is called a stall. The cows are tied up in the stalls. If cows are breachy they are tied by the front leg and the horn. The tying is made of rope and the rope is bought in the shop. It is the usual custom if when milking one enters the stall to say "God bless your work". This is answered by "Amen on you too".
There are two horses on our farm at home. The names of the horses are Dolly and Paddy. When driving a horse we say "Gee-up" and "go on".
The stable is built on the east side of the farmyard. There is a manger in the stable for the horse to eat out. The horse is taken to the forge to be shod. The horse is clipped twice a year in Winter and early in Spring.
Every farmer in this locality keeps pigs. They get small wee bonhams from the sow and they have to be minded until they are a week old. The sow rears them for a month or more and then they get food and after ten weeks they are sold at the fair and the farmer receives a good price or may be a bad price as the fair may be. He keeps a few more at home and they grow into big pigs. They are fattened and sold in[?] fat pigs and every farmer kills a pig for his own use. Some farmers fatten as many as forty pigs at atime and send them off by lorry to Cork where they are slaughtered.
Every farmer keeps hens, ducks, geese, turkeys. We hatch
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:41
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The farm animals we have at home are pigs, goats, cows, calves, and an ass. We also have dogs, cats, and fowl.
The cows have names. One of them is called "Poll", and the other is called "Suck."
Our cow house at home is a big one. We call it the cow house. The cows are tied with a chain around the neck. The chain can be opened or shut. It is tied out of the bails. We also put a rope around their legs to keep them from kicking. Sometimes the cows are tied by the horn. Some of the tyings are made of rope, and more of them are made out of the ends of wool. The woolen tyings are made at the mill.
People say when milking you should sing a song, and
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:35
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The animals on our farm at home are seven cows and five calves. The names of the cows are Ricky, Primrose, Daisy, Dandy, Strawberry, Purty, and Prancer. When driving the cows in and out of the field we say "how" and when driving the
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:29
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There is a pot of gold hidden in the Shrule castle. It is said that one of the De Burca's hid the gold there in a cellar in the castle before he died. The people of Shrule once dug for this gold and when they came to did, it there was a big weasel on top of the gold. The people of Shrule say that this weasel was the person who hid the gold. They also say that if you shake holy water on him he will go.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:22
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There are the ruins of a Monastery at the back of Mullin's garden. It is over two hundred years old. This can be proved because there is a tree growing on top of it. There is a big square hole in the ground about the size of three coffins. The hole itself is like a tomb.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:20
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Once there were three houses where Myre Hill now stands. The people in these three houses were very rich. Once their crops failed and at the time they had to pay the rent and rates they were poor and they were not able to pay. Their houses fell in. There is a hill now where the houses were and these people are still going around from place to place. Their names were Myers.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:19
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Dandy, Blossom, Daisy, Lily and Rosey. When driving cows in or out of the field I usually say "How." When driving calves I say "Suck."
The cow-house is a long house with fourteen stalls for cows. It is called the "Stall." The cows are tied by means of stalls. When cows are breachy they are tied by the neck and front leg. The tyings are made of ropes. It is called a fetters. When a cow is cross to milk she is tied by the two hind legs. This is called a spancel. There is no tradition connected with the milking of cows.
In this district horses are taken to the forge to be shod by the blacksmith. Horses are clipped twice a year by a small hand-machine.
When calling pigs I say "Bain". When calling hens I say "Tuk", "Tuk". When calling ducks I say "Feen", "Feen". When calling turkeys I say "Tee" "Tee". When calling geese I say "Badee", "Badee".
The number of eggs put under a hen when hatching is usually thirteen. The eggs are left under the hen for three weeks and then the chickens come out.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:16
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There was once a man named Mr Bleak in the time if De Burca and he owned the Galway house. De Burca took over the Galway house. De Burca took all the good places around Shrule. There used to be races in Shrule. There was a man named Kirwan in Dalgan. This man was very rich. Kirwan and De Burca met at the races. De Burca bet all his land and money that this certain horse would win. Kirwan won the bet and Kirwan grew better and better and ruled the land around Shrule.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 19:10
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mná óige. "Bainfheis" a bheirtear ar an fheásta a bhíos aca an oidhche a bhíos an lánamhain pósta. Níor mhair "na buachaillí tuighe" nó aon bhuidhean cosamhail leó ariamh ins an áit seo.
Oidhche na bainse bíonn an cóisire i d-tigh na brighdeóige. Bheir an fear nuadh-phósta cuireadh do n-a cháirdibh, agus is coír oiread a bheith aige ag an chóisire agus atá ag an mhnaoi óig. Gach duine a gheibh cuireadh don bhainfeis ón mhnaoi óig nó ó n-a muintir is cóir dóibh 'cineál' a bheith leóbhtha. Bíonn le gach cailín nó bean a gheibh cuireadh mar seo, cístí milse, tuirtíní rísíní, nó cuiríni, nó tre, cearcha nó lachain bruighte fá choinne an fhéasta, agus bíonn na fir as na tighthibh céadna gan a dhath leó. Ach ar na bliadhanta deireannacha bíonn uisce-beatha go minic leó.
Na cáirde a fuair cuireadh ón fhear óg níor ghnáthach dadaidh a bheith leó acht i n-amannaibh bíonn uisce beatha leó fosta.
Fá éadach na bridhdeoíge is coír cuid de a bheith sean, cuid de a bheith nuadh. Cuid de a fhághail ar iasacht, agus cuid eile de a bheith gorm. Ní ceart ar aon chor, dadaidh dearg a bheith ins an éadach ag an mhnaoi óig.
Níor ghnáthach le daoine a bheith ag rás ar
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:57
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There was a candlemaker around Shrule. First of all he would put down a pot of tallow. He had wicks and he would dip the wicks into the tallow and it would freeze. There was an underground passage from the castle and to the churchyard and Cnoc na [?] . There is a lime kiln in another at Cnoc [?] .
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:53
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"at the bottom of the river". They told him to put them in the river and he did.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:50
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legs passed the way. They followed the hare until the brother could not see them through the hole in the bag. Soon he saw a man with forty cattle coming the way. The man with the cattle asked what he was doing in the bag and he said that he would be going to Heavin in a bag. The man said that if he would let him into the bag he would give him the forty cattle. He got out of the bag and he put him in the river. The other sons were suprised to see the cattle and they asked him where he got them and he said
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:46
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and the cow to the second and the calf to the youngest son. The two elder sons were able to make a living but the calf was no good to the younger son so he decided to kill the calf. He then brought the skin to the fair to sell. As he was going along the wood he saw a magpie. He caught the magpie by chance. At the time magpies were very dear. He got 40 pound's for the magpie. He went home and he showed the money to his brothers and he said he got it for the skins. The other brothers killed the horse and the cow and they only got a few shillings. They came home and they put brother in a bag to be fired into the river when a hare with three
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:07
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a different place than it was long ago. One time a boy kicked stones into it and it moved and sprung up at the other side of the road. It cures toothaches but when a person would be leaving the well he would have to leave something belonging to him such as a piece of a ribbon or beads or a prayer-book and he would have to drink some of the water or he would not be cured. This was a very great custom long ago but it is gone out of date now. St. Lugna's well is very deep and when you would be getting water out of it is is so deep that you would have to put a stick in the neck of the bottle in order to get it out.
There is a bush growing beside St Kieran's well and whenever you would be passing the bush you would have to pass the left side of it or some bad luck would befall you.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:02
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There are about half a dozen holy wells in this district. these are, St Kierans well in Clareen, St Cuddy's well in Killmacuddy, St John's well in Knockarroon and St Lugna's well in Litter.
St Cuddy's well is in
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 18:00
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the path. As long as the fox runs he is caught at last. Every frog is good enought in his own bog. Let every man's pig root eat drink swallow gobble and pay noghting.. Listen, see and hear and say nothing.
Once upon a time lived in this part of the district an old woman. One day this woman caught a man stealing another man's goods. In a few days after, this woman met the man that owned the goods. He asked her did she see anyone taking his goods, and she answered. Let every man's pig root and I'll say nothing.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:57
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Some of the proverbs that are used locally are.
You can not take the book by the cover. The old dog for the hard road and the pup for
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:55
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But most common way is to send someone to spread them. The drills are [?] and wed in early Summer and are moulded up again when they begin to get strong. The potatoes are taken out by means of a digger and are stored in pits for the Winter.
Some of the local names are Kerr Pinks, the Champion and the Golden Wonder. The Kerr Pinks grow best in this district. During the time of the war there was no starch and the people made some out of Potatoes. They first peeled the potato and the remainder they scraped into cold water. In the morning they poured of the water and used it.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:51
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The potato crop is the chief product on our farm. About two acres are grown yearly. One of the men prepare the ground in early Spring. The ground is first ploughed and tilled, then the drills are opened and the manure spread in them. When the seed is spread the drills are closed. Every seed that is sown in the ground much have an eye in it. There are very few wooden ploughs in the district at the present, but in recent years they had nothing else. All the spades that are used in this district are bought in the shop but in former days the local blacksmith used to make them.
The people usually help one another to sow the potatoes in various ways, but
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:45
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Herbs grow on the land. Soem of them are harmful and destroy crops and others are useful. There is a weed called prassa which usually grows on good soil. It grows rapidly and impoverishes the soil.
There is another weed called chickenweed which grows on low land. it does great harm to crops as it grows up and chokes them and so prevents them from growing.
Some weeds are used as cures for diseases. The dandelion is used as a cure for yellow jaundice. The juice is taken from it and boiled. Then it is drank. There is a weed called yarrow which is a good cure for a toothache.
There is another weed called St. Brigid's
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:36
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81
The herd said that he had covered the cow before he went for him. The Caudie put on a few papers and then a few sticks, then the pound of corks and a few coals. He put the hold gallon of ale and the sugar and ginger in a skillet-pot. He got the bottle of whiskey and said to the herd "give me over a cup" The herd thought he was going to miss it through the other stuff. The "Caudie" filled out a glass of whiskey and gave it to the herd. The herd was going to put it in the pot but the "Causie" said "no, drink it." Then the "Caudie" filled out the other half and drank it himself. Then he helped to boil what he had in the pot. The herd went out to see the cow every chance he got and every time he went the cow was the same way. No matter what he said to Caudie, he (Caudie) would not go out to the co. He took up what he had in the pot and tasted it to see if it was sweet. Then he stirred it. "It is not cool enough yet" said Caudie, give me a vessel. The herd had a big long necked bottle for dosing cattle and a jug for filling it The "Caudie" said "that won't do, give me a mug." The herd had no mug. The Cause said "give me a saucepan." The herd gave him a quart saucepan. He, Caudie, filled up the saucepan and put his feet upon the hob and
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:33
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Nóra ní Chualain (93) an seanchaidhe is fearr san gceantar seo acht tá an aois ag goilleamhaint uirthi anois agus ní a cuimhneiomh maith is bhíodh. Ach ta a beirt mhac Colm () agus Tomás (63) (Maidhcín) go rí mhaith. Tá cuid mór de sheanchas na máthar acu agus chuid mór dá cuid scéalta fiannaíochta freisin. Ar bhaile na hAbhann dóibh. Fatharta an tsloinne a bhí ar Nóra sul phós sí.
Togha seanchaidhe agus togha cainteora é "learaí ó Biath ( Labhras Ó Conghaile) go leor den seachas atá sa leabhar seo agus go mór mór gach a bhfuil curtha síos in ainm mhuintir Fhátharta is ó Learaí a foghluimigheadh é. B'fhiú don Chumann le Béaloideas feara chur chuige agus chuig teach Nóra ní Chualáin.
Tá Nóra ní Ghabnáin (74), Indreabhán , go maith nuair bhíonn sí ina sláinte. Tá seanchas aici agus sean-scéalta, agus sean- phaidreacha.
Tá roinnt seanchaidhe maithe ar an gCaoran c.i scar an bherit Phádraig 'ac Con Faola. Ta seanchais chuid mhaith ag Máire Ní Fhátharta (72), Baile an tSléibhe.
Leis an fhírinne rádh ta an áit lán de sheanchas dá mbeadh am ag duine le na bhailiú.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:29
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80
In Boylan of Hilltown there was a prize cow that the Bylaws thought the word of. The cow was after calving and she lay down and could not get up. Boylan sent his herd over to this man, this cow-doctor "Caudia McGuire" (the same man who made the pudding while his mother was at mass) It was ten miles of ground (with a good trotting pony) from Boylan's to Walterstown, and would do the journey in 2 hours with the pony. When they were going through Duleek, "Caudy"told the herd that it would be better for him to get the medicine that was wanted in Hickeys. The herd had asked him what medicine was wanted. "He said, a half gallon of ale, two pounds of sugar, 2d worth of ground ginger, 1 lb. of corks and a half pint of whiskey. When the herd was getting all these, the "Cause" filled a matchbox full of ashes from Hickey's fire and put it in his own pocket. When they were traveling along, he asked the herd, if there was any out-house in which he could warm the medicine quickly. The herd said there was a harness-room and that it would do for the purpose. When they went into the yard at Hilton they unyoked the pony, and the herd said "will you come over to see the cow now." "Caudie" said "no, not until I have the dose ready"Go over" he said, "and cover her with a few sacks The Caudie then went to light the fire, for it was out.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Timchealls leath chéad bliadhain ó shoin cúpla oidhche roimhe Oidhche Nodlag bhí long ag tigheacht aniar an fairrge. Bhí an-cheó ann an oidhche chéadhna agus d'fhan sí an-fhada isteach leis na carraigeacha ag Baile na hAbhann i n-áit ar a dtugtar "leac an t-Salainn" anois. Chuaidh sí isteach idir dhá charraig agus níor fhéad sí corruighe as sin.
Annsin tháinig soitheach eile agus cuireadh cáblaí as an dá shoitheach agus chinn sé ar an soitheach eile í tharraingt. Bhí go leór sailtreacha adhmaid agus stólta agus trosgáin innte. Cuireadh an t-ádhmad isteach ar na carraigeacha agus cuireadh báid fada taobh amuigh ag faire agus bhí na "Coast Guards" agus na gárdaí taobh istigh. Tháinig currachaí as gach áit agus ghoideadar gach rud dhá raibh innte agus d'fághadar follamh í agus chinn sé ar na gárdaí an t-adhmad a bhí ar na carraigeacha a chosaint acht oireadh.
Briseadh agus réabadh an bád agus níor fághadh acht an ancoire agus tá an ancoire ann fós le feiceál go soiléar agus tá poll an Ancoire mar ainm ar an áit ó shoin agus baineann daoine feamuinn agus carraigín ar an ancoire anois.
Timcheall 40 bliadhain ó shoin báthadh long eile ag Corradh an Chaisleain ar leac Chéip Bhí cat mór dubh innte ba leis an gcaiptín é agus bhí sé an-mhúinte. Sábháiléadh na daoine acht níl aon cúntas againn ce'n chaoí acht is dócha gur b'iad na báid fhada a chuir siad amach agus a shábháil iad mar ar maidin bhí an long iompuighthe isteach ar an leic. Acht deirtear gur ceó a chuir amugha í.
Bhí Ned Mór agus Learaí Ó Biadh ag iasgach i gcurrach lá Snámhtóir maith abhí i Learaí acht ní raibh mórán snáimh ag Ned.
Deirtear nach raibh sa gcurrach acht an bheirt cinnte, acht chonnaic na daoine
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
79
Johnny Maguire, nicknamed "The Caudy", lived in Derby's Lane. When he was young, his father and mother went to Walterstown Mass one Sunday morning and left "The Caudy" and his little brother at home. Caudy often saw his mother making a pudding so when he had the house to himself he started off and made one of bread, eggs and whatever else he could;d get He put a pot near the fire, a three-legged pot) and put into it some boiled water. He had no cloth to put the pudding in when it was made, so he tied it into the tail of his little brother's shirt. The he brought him over to the fire and put the pudding into the pot and left his brother standing with his back to the pot at the fire. Some time shortly afterwards he went over to the door an saw his father and mother coming and he shouted "here they are" and ran. The brother ran after him with the hot pudding still tied in his shirt. They ran through the fields and over hedges and gaps. The backs of the little brother's legs were all scalded.
Written by
Mary B. Kelly,
Monkstown, Brownstown,
Navan,
Given by.
John Byrd (farm-worker)
Monkstown, Brownstown,
Navan
2.March.1938.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
her when she was jumping in through the windows. Then Doolin, the man of the greyhounds, went and looked through the window and he saw an old woman crying inside. Whatever fright he got, he never hunted again after that day. Doolin lived in Walterstown where Thomas Donnelly lives now.
written by
Alphnsus G. O'Kelly
Monkstown, Brownstown,
Navan
Given by
John Byrd (farm-worker)
Kentstown,
Navan.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
23 November 1937
Paid Wheeler, a man who lived about Walterstown, was in Somerville one day. (Somerville is in Kentstown Parish) and he was rambling near Somerville, catching fish, rabbits or anything he could eat. He was going down one of the walks through the woods when he found five eggs on the side of the walk. He put them in his pocket. He then went down to Kentstown Public House (McGuinis are the people who own it) He went in to roast them on the pan. The woman of the house asked him where he got them. He said he got them in Somerville Woods along the side of one of the paths. She said that the gamekeeper (Daly) had set them with poison for foxes that were eating pheasants and pheasant eggs. Paid Wheeler was a native of Walterstown Parish.
Written by
Alphonsus G. O'Kelly
Monkstown, Navan.
Given by
John Byrne (farm-worker)
Monkstown, Browntown,
Kentstown
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 17:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22 November 1937
Peter McDonald and Joe Hoey have the cure of the "filthy mouth". Neither of them ever saw his own father. Neither of them was born when his father died. (Peter McDonald is now living in this parish. Joe Hey also lives in Kentstown Parish) Each of them has only to blow his breath into the sick person's mouth and it gets cured. Peter was born in American and his mother brought him home when he was three years old. They lived some time in Ardee. They are a long while in this parish and now live in a newly built house in the Green Road. Joe Hoey's father died before he, Joe, was born. His mother died when he was a few months old. His grannie left him his present place in Rynahan.
Written by:-
Alphonsus G. O'Kelly
Monkstown.
Navan.
Given by:-
John Byrd (farm-worker)
Kentstown,
Navan,
22 November 1937
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
460
If you give scissors as a present you will lose your friend.
signs of trouble:-
When a rat crosses your path and you on a journey.
When you meet a red-haired woman early in the morning.
When a robin comes in the window.
When you find two knives crossed on a table.
When you spill salt on the floor through accident.
Two spoons in a cup a marriage.
Bad luck to bring hawthorn into a house.
There will be a fight in the house if you have a boot on the table or an umberella opened indoors.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
410
10-1-38
The Enchanted Lake
There is a pond in the village of Turlough. It is situated to Mr. Fitzgeralds dwelling house. Tradition holds that the pond is the home of some mysterious serpent that keeps vigil over a treasure of gold that is hidden in the unfathomable depths below. It is not known how this pond came to contain this enviable treasure but here is one of the many tales enfolded about it.
Some years ago there lived an old gentlemen in Turlough or one of the surrounding districts. He was very wealthy and a miser. However he knew he was soon to depart from this world so he said to himself he would hide his gold lest anyone might spend it when he was dead. So one day he put all his niches into a pot and sealed it well and flung it in the pond just a a point where to look at it from the land it seems bottomless.
When he had this act accomplishment he began to feel sorry for what he had done. He thought that through time his action might be revealed and that somebody would take up his fortune out of the lake. So he said
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About ten years ago a man and his wife were going home from town in their cart. Both of them were drunk but it happened that the man was the worse, and he fell out of the cart and got caught in the reins. He was dragged along by the horse which was running.
The horse stopped outside a house in Ballyhane, and the man was taken in but the people. He died a few hours later.
A few years afterward four boys were on that same road, and they saw a white horse in a field. They said they would go for a ride on him. He ran a round the
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
425
told him all that had happened.
The priest went with him to the grave and left a coat and a stick on it and then went away. On the following day they went back again, and the coat was torn in small bits. From that day onwards Cresham was not haunted again.
Rode Dunne
Received from my mother Mrs Dunne, (30 years)
No 71. Mc Hale Road,
Castlebar,
Co Mayo.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ghost story
About twenty years ago there lived in Castlebar a man named Cresham. The man had a horse a cart, and one day as he was going along the road a little boy came over and got up on it. Mr Cresham was very angry, and he gave a blow of the whip to the little boy, who fell out on the road and was injured on the head.
Immediately his mother came out, and said to the man "I swear by my oath I will haunt you dead or alive for injuring my only son" Afterwards the little boy died, and his mother did not live long after, and she fulfilled her promise. She came back and haunted Mr Creshma by day and by night. Turf, stones and everything was flung at him, everywhere he went. He often was severely cut, and had trips to hospital. Once he was badly injured, and he had to stay in the hospital for a few weeks. When he came out it was as bad as ever again. One day she appeared to him, and told him that if he went to the grave the next night she would not haunt him any more. He went to the priest and
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
424
I got this tory from Thomas McHale, (55 years)
Milebush.
Castlebar
31-3-38
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Loughan. The cemetery is still open. It is circular in shape and contains the ruin of a church. St Kieran of Carnaross was a native of Loughan. He was engaged to keep crows out of corn. While at his work the Mass Bell rang in this Church, and as he wanted to go to Mass, he threw his coat on the hedge in the field and went into the Church. Not a crow came near the corn in his absence but even so, his master heard what he had done and dismissed him. It was then he made up his mind to become a priest and he afterwards founded a Church at Carnaross.
It used to be a common belief that in Loughan graveyard the dead always rose for a while each night at midnight. In order to disprove this a girl kept vigil in the graveyard one night and brought some special piece of a plant which grew in the Cemetery to support her story.
Newtown. Newtown graveyard has also a ruin. Here as in Loughan it is raised in the centre and sloped outwards.
Unbaptised children are always buried outside the pathway which runs round the cemetery. Many people bring their dead long journeys to bury them with their ancestors and many stories are told of the dead coming back to the earth and appearing to their relatives when buried in wrong graves.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:38
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rejected
awaiting decision
There are four grave-yards in the school district. Moynalty New Cemetery - Opened about 35 years.
Moynalty Old Cemetery - surrounding the Protestant Church. It is now closed and no one has been buried there for the past 35 years. There was a good deal of opposition to its closing and a violent protest was made in (?). The last man buried there was Conlon, and the first man buried in the New Cemetery was also Conlon. They were not relatives.
The grave-yard was circular in shape at first and extended beyond where the road now runs. It has a vault in which members of the Kellett family were buried. It was searched many times by the "Black and Tans" when looking for firearms.
After the old cemetery had been closed officially a few people insisted of having their dead interred there. These were heavily fined.
The New Cemetery is almost square in shape and is quite level. The graves are also quite level. It contains a number of beautiful ornamental crosses, and tomb stones and the plots are arranged in rows.
The Old Cemetery is high in the centre and slopes to the boundary walls. Mounds were made over graves and there are many plain limestone crosses, slabs and tombstones. Most of them bear inscriptions.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 16:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Brackney Hill"
belongs to Mr. William Gamble. It was called "Brackney Hill" because it was covered with brackens.
"The Crochain Field" belongs to Mr. Robert Leinster
It was called "The Crochain Field" because it is the shape of a crock.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 15:41
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bread was used largely for food long ago in these parts. The commonest kind of bread used was Oaten bread. It was made by mixing oat meal with water and a little salt and cooked by standing it before the fire against a sod of turf or on a griddle. It was eaten with butter.
Boxty was made from wet potatoes grated and mixed with flour. It was tolled flat with a bottle and baked on a pan. Indian Meal was made into bread and baked on a pan.
Potatoes were made into cakes also. Potato cakes were eaten hot, spread with butter. A potato cake was always eaten with eggs on Easter Sunday.
Pancakes were made by mixing flour to a batter with milk or buttermilk or goats' milk. They were always made for Shrove Tuesday which is still known as "pancake night." The first milk after a cow calves is known as beastings. This was often cooked until it became curd and then baked on a frying pan. Rye bread was also used. It was quite black in colour and very hard.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 14:33
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rejected
awaiting decision
When a dog is eating grass it is a sign of rain.
When a crane is at the river it is a sign of rain.
When swallows and rooks fly low it is a sign of stormy weather.
South-east winds bring the most rain.
When the seabirds fly inland for food it is a sign of stormy weather.
When the sky is red in the morning it is the sign of stormy weather.
When the sky is bright yellow at sunset it is a sign of windy weather.
When the smoke goes up straight it is a sign of rain
When the soot falls down it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 14:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a bíonn ciorcal mór-thimpeall an ghealach deirtear go mbeidh fearthainn ag teacht.
Nuair a bhíonn scamaill duha insan spéir deirtear go mbeadh fearthainn ag teacht.
Nuair a bhíonn an gealach leath-báite beidh fearthainn againn.
Nuair a bhíonn an torr-iasc ag an uisce is comhartha fearthainn é.
Nuair a bhíonn an ceo ar an mbóthar ag eitilt leis an gaoth deirtear gur comhartha fearthainn é.
Nuair a bhíonn an spéir dearg ar maidin agus nuair a bhíonn na fáinleoga agus na préacháin ag eitilt go h-íseal, beidh stoirm ag teacht.
Nuair a théigheann an gaoth go dtí an taobh thuaidh beidh sioc ag teacht.
Taobh theas fearthainn.
Taobh thoir sneachta.
Taobh thiar stoirm.
Nuair a bhíonn an spéir dearg insan tráthnóna agus nuair a bíonn sí luath ar maidin beidh aimsir breá ag teacht.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:36
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rejected
awaiting decision
A tailor was living at Westland. He was called Barney the tailor but his name was Barney Lynch. His son is living in Newtown. He used to go from house to house and make clothes for the people of the district his son is alive yet and living at Newtown.
Stockings and socks are knitted locally. Some are made by hand, but most are made by knitting machines of which there are many in the district.
Miss Brogan Billywood has a spinning wheel but cannot use it. The last spinning wheel worked in the school district was used by Mrs Tyrell of Shancarnan. She spun wool into thread and knitted socks by hand. These socks were white. Since her death about five years ago the spinning wheel has not been used.
The spinning of wool into thread formed an important means of income long ago. No special clothes are worn on special feastdays but black is worn for the death of a relative.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
William Sharpe is about twenty-six years of age and lives in the townland of Drumcondra. He was a pupil at this school.
Patrick Campbell lives in the lane over to this school and is nearly seventy years of age.
The Jiohnstons and Parkers were masons.
Johnnie Swan's intended lived in the six counties.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
VI
For the mixing of the mortar
He doesn't give a cheer
As long as he has that famous man,
Old ceckling [?] Tommie Greea [?]
VII
Now the building is finished.
And it looks very grand
He must go across the border
And take her by the hand.
VIII
This is a beautiful building
For all the men to see
It will be the star of Ralaghan
For all eternity.

This poem was written on the occasion of John Swann building a new house in the townland of Ralaghan in the year 1932.
The Sergeant Hicks mentioned in the song was an ex-policeman who lived in Killyclare
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
On the road going down to Ralaghan town.
The view it was so grand.
We can see the masons on the scaffolds,
And the trowels in their hands.
II
Johny says to his mother,
The building is very slow
I think I will go for Johnstons
And let the Parkers go.
III
They came from Cullies and Maudabawn.
To hear the talking of Johny Swann.
IIII
So off he went (from) for Johnstons
Without much delay.
And if he would wait on Parkers
He would loss his lock of hay. (lose)
For the coins he doesnt know what to will do (doesn't)
He will be in awful fix
For if he goes up with the mare are cart (but)
He will get some off Sergeant Hicks.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On the road going down to Ralaghan town.
The view it was so grand.
We can see the masons on the scaffolds,
And the trowels in their hands.
II
Johny says to his mother,
The building is very slow
I think I will go for Johnstons
And let the Parkers go.
III
They came from Cullies and Maudabawn.
To hear the talking of Johny Swann.
IIII
So off he went (from) for Johnstons
Without much delay.
And if he would wait on Parkers
He would loss his lock of hay.
For the coins he doesnt know what to will do
He will be in awful fix
For if he goes up with the mare are cart
He will get some off Sergeant Hicks.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tháinig sí chugam ina haisling bréige,
A d’fiosruig a chéad-fhear clanna dhíom,
Mar thiocfadh cailin deas a’ mealladh céile,
Is mar ceo a tsléibhe d’éalaigh uaim.
Páirt le mo dhonas ariam gur phós mé,
Bean gan eolas is mé i bhfhad ó thír,
Céile gan cumann ar mhalluigh an t-órd dí,
Ní beinn-sé brónach is a bheit-dhá díth,
Siubhal mé Sasana is páirt d’Éire,
Roinn d’Egypt ‘gus an Gearmáin,
Is a liachtaí maigdean óg ariamh a bhréag mé,
Is gan a dhul dá pléidh leat a Anna Mór.
Nach cruaidh mo leabaidh is nach tanaidh m’éideadh,
Is nach bocht an ceim ag a bhfuilim beo,
Faoi gur phós mé an chaile ar aon chor,
Nach dtiubhradh braon dom de bhainne bó,
A Seagháin Ui Mháille bheirim a bhárr duit,
Ó’n gcrích fáil is ó’n domhan go leir,
Ar mhaith ar mhúineadh, ar chliú gan áireamh
Ar shinteanas láimhe do bhocht is do thréan.
Seagháin Ua Maoláin tháinig as Dún na nGall go hAcaill uair.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cloving Flax:- The seed was sown in May. It was ripe and fit to pull in July it was pulled bound and made into stooks. After a day or two it was brought to a lake or boghole and bogged for about three days. After that it was taken up and spread to bleach in a newly mowed meadow. It would be bleached in a week and then it was made into sheaves and pound. The girls sat down on the floor and cloved it with sticks and cloving tongs. It was then hackled. When it was hackled they had Toe and Flax. The toe was spun in a linen wheel for canvas sheeting. The flax was spun for bandle-cloth shirts. about seven oclock at night when the cloving was going on they would be dancing and singing until morning.
Candles were made from tallow when sheep were killed.Bottom thread platted for a wick. The tallow was melted and put into a long iron stick called a mould. The wick was put into the middle of the tallow. It was left in the mould until it was hard. Then the mould was taken off and the candle was ready for use.
Wool was coloured with the bark of a tree. The bark was cut into small pieces. The pot was lined with them. The wool was put into the pot and left boiling for a day. Black stuff was then added and left boiling for half a day. it was then spread out to dry. clothes were also coloured with the [-?-] leaves.
Brooms were made from heath. They were sold in Ennis. Twopence was paid for every broom.
Soap was made from culp.
Coopers made ferkins and tubes. Ferkins were made from timber-oak.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
James Martin, Drumcondra Coroneary has the cure of the thrush. He never saw his father and anyone who was born after the death of his father can cure thrush.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When I was young, I remember going with my father to an old woman named Gibson for the cure of Red Eyes. This old woman lived at Kill, Cootehill, She burnt white paper under a bowl and rubbed the brownish stuff that was on the inside of the bowl, on the sore eyes and it cured them.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 13:04
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rejected
awaiting decision
Seaghán ua Maoláin a chum an píosa seo
A Chéis a’ Cuirn mo chúig céad slán leat,
Bá dheas an áit a bheith le do thaoibh,
Coillte failleagán is ba ina mbuaraigh,
Is cuideachta shúgach le suidhe chun cláir,
Chuaidh ar m’amharc is dalladh m’inntleacht,
Ní mór gur léir dhom cnoc thar ghleann,
Is anois ó chuaidh mé ó mhaith a dhéanamh,
Mo chreach is mo léan gan mé in Dun na nGall.
A Mhullaigh an réalta is beag mo spéis ionnat,
Is cólaidh mé caith seal in do pháirt.
Neach gan threóir mé chuaidh do d’éileamh,
Is a liachtaí spéir ghlan i gcríochaibh Fáil,
Is fada in-Acaill go dubh chroídheach mé,
Gan spórt, gan aiteas, a’ feitheamh na maol chnoc réidh,
Is i an uaigh mo leabaidh chaol cruaid,
Gus is malrach gan caoineadh mé.
Acaill aoibhinn áluinn is deise bláth,
‘S is milse féar,
Is mall an tráth dhom anois do cháineadh,
Is gur mé an bád bocht chaill a stúir,
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:52
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rejected
awaiting decision
Seán Ua Maolán
Fear as Dún na nGall a phós bean as Acaill. Caighnéara bhí ann. Bhíodar na g-comhnuidhe i Sliabh Mór. Tá áit a thighe ag Seán Mac Aodha – Dumhaich Each. Fritheadh rudaí a bhaineas le caighnéaracht suim bliadhanta ó shin.
Troid uathbhasach idir a féin agus a bhean chéile. B’eigeán? dhá leath do dhéanamh de’n éadach na leabtha.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí suaimhneas annsan ag Gar-lámhach agus thoisigh sé ag tógáil tighe nó cúirte dhó féin. I mBéal an Átha Salaigh thóg sé é. Rinne sé clais an mhór na timcheall – 9 dtroighthe ar leithid agus 9 dtroighthe ar aoirde. Tógadh na clocha agus rinneadh garrdha gabhain diobhtha dhá mhíle siar ó Dubh Guirt.
Ar oileán beag in-aice Dubh Guirt, rinne Gar-lámhach daingean eile dó – ar oileán Dún Mór – rinne sé ceitre tighthe tuas ar a bhárr.
Ursana cloch – cúig troighthe ar airde agus de réir mar a bhí sé éirigh bhí sé ag leathnú. Ní raibh an ceap-táirsighe acht 18 orlach ar leithead.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tarraingt ortha agus a gceannphort marbh, d’imthigheadar i mbárr na bhfásgaí, agus d’fhágadar na beithidhigh in-a ndiaidh mar bhí uathbhás agus sgannradh ortha roim Diarmuid.
Nuair a bhí siad ag dul fríd an Geatha Mór leis na beithidhigh agus sul mar tháinig Diarmuid chomh fada leobhtha, rinneadar moill ag bleaghan na m-bó agus ag déanamh pasóide den bhainne dobhtha féin mar shíleadar nach raibh aon bhaoghal ortha; acht a beag sin bhéadh siad sa m-baile faoi cumhdach a n-daingin roimh Diarmuid, agus annsin thiocfadh leis a dhul ag feadghail i n-aghaidh na gaoithe.
Dbhairt sé dhá mbéadh fear eile aige go dtiubhrfadh se na beithidhigh as Iorras. Bhí sé ag cainnt leis féin agus dubhairt an Gár-lámhach “Tá mise agat” agus ar buille bhoise bhí sé le n-a thaoibh. Thiomáin siad leo aníos abhaile iad nó go d-tainigeadar go dtí áit a d-tugtar Béal na Creiche air.
In a dhiaidh sin sgar Gar-lámhach agus Diarmuid. Chuaidh Diarmuid go Conntae na Gaillimhe agus Gar-lámhach abhaile go Sliabh Mór. Tar éis tamaillín thainic na gadaidhthe aríst in a m-bádaibh isteach ar thráigh Dún Inbhir agus thugadar leo na beithidhigh aríst. Lean Gar-lámhach iad é féin, a bhuachall agus an cailín agus thugadar cochain agus aitinn agus ag tuitim na h-oidhche lasadar teine ar chnocán agus nuair do chonnaic na gadaidhthe an teine ag na daoine ag rith thart air, cheapadar gur sluagh mór daoine bhí ann agus d’imithigheadar i m-bárr na bhfasgaí agus d’fagadar na beithidhigh na n-diaidh.
Aon bullán amhain bhí istigh ins an m-bád achú. Caith sé an bullán amach san uisce agus sin an fáth baisteadh Béal an Bhulláin ar an áit sin.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
D’imthigh leis sios thríd bhaile mór Chathail, agus siar Gleann Chaisil, sios Béal an Mhuirthid, thart siar Muing Sheaghain Chaoich siar as sin an Geata Mór leis, agus nuair a bhí an Geata Mór fágtha aige chonnaic sé na beithidhigh ag dul siar an tráigh, agus chonnaic na gadaidhthe an fear ag teacht in-a dhiaidh faoi shiubhal mór.
Bhí ceannphort na ngadaidhthe ag marcaidheacht, agus nuair a chonnaic sé an fear mór ag teacht in-a dhiaidh agus an siubhal mór a bhí faoi, sgannruigh sé, agus as go bráthach leis chomh tréan agus d’fhéad sé an capall a thiomáint.
Nuair a tháinic Diarmuid suas leis na beithidhigh níor chuir sé éan áird ortha, acht lean sé an marcach, agus sul már shrioch sé a chúirt tháinig sé suas leis agus d’fhuagair sé comhrac air.
Ní raibh éan dul as ag an ngadaidhe, agus b’éigean dó dul ar mhachaire an dubhshláin le Diarmuid agus a throid; agus mar bhí sé i sáinn throid sé go borb agus go fíochmhar le Diarmuid go ndearnadar praiseach d’en talamh, acht ar deireadh thiar thug Diarmuid buille dhá chlaidheamh dhó, agus bhain sé an ceann de, agus d’fhág sé é ag léimnigh le báinidhe ar an mhachaire, agus thionntuigh sé ar a sháil agus thug sé a aghaidh ar na beithidhigh.
Nuair a chonnaic na gadaidhthe eile é ag
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:27
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The Big Wind 1839
Scarcely anything was left standing. The houses were knocked. Hay corn and everything were knocked and scattered around. The people were driven from their homes. Some died and more went to America. That was the time the people that remained around got the plentiness of land. Any one that could pay rent that time could have all the land they wanted. It lasted a day and a night. It was during the night all the harm was done.
There was another big wind about thirtyfive years ago. It was bad enough but not half as bad as the wind in 1839. The houses were blown but they were fixed again. A rick of hay was knocked that belonged to Kellys in Frure. It was blown about a hundred yards away. It lasted for a day and a night. The people did not go to bed all that night.
There was a woman living in Muirisin Foo Deire. The bones of the whale that was roofing her house. She put her coat around her and she went out to see was the house blowing. Her coat was taken from her with the wind and it never touched the ground until it reached Connacht. The women of Connacht knew it was different to their coats.
About fifty years ago there was thunder for a week and no rain.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:24
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awaiting decision
The reason why it is called the Clonmel road is because it leads to Clonmel. The road from Cloneen to Fethard is not so old. It was made the year of the famine 1847.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:24
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awaiting decision
Caib II – Na Gadaidhthe
Nuair a bhí Diarmuid suim aimsire i gConndae na Gaillimhe, tháinig gadaidhthe go hAcaill, ag thabhairt leobhtha maoin bó do bhí ag Gar Lámhach Ó Bláthmhail, agus nuair a thug siad leobhtha iad, d’imthigh an Gar Lámhach siar go Conndae na Gaillimhe, ag iarraidh Diarmuid a’ Reatha Uí Mháille, agus ag innsin dó go dtug na gadaidhthe na beithidhigh leobhtha, agus go dtáinig sé ghá innsin do-san gur imthigh siad, agus ag éileamh a chonganta.
Nuair a chaith sé a dhinnéar d’iarr Diarmuid air imtheacht agus a bheith i n-áirdeall na mbeithidheach, agus go leanfadh sé féin e lá ar n-a bhárach. D’imthigh Diarmuid ar maidin agus a trí contacha leis, agus nuair a bhí sé ag dul sios Gleann na Magh Dubh cailleadh an chéad cú; ghearr sé uaigh dí le n-a claidheamh, agus chuir sé sa talamh í.
Ag dul thar Mám a’ Sgárdáin cailleadh an darna cú thuit sí marbh – agus d’fhosgail sé uaigh le n-a chlaidheamh dhi, agus chuir sé í.
Ag dul síos Gleann Tomais dó, thuit an tríomhadh cú marbh ag a n-a chosaibh; d’fhosgail sé uaigh dhi le n-a claidheamh agus chuir sé í.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:23
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awaiting decision
The road which leads from Cloneen to the foot of Slievenamon is called the mountain road because it runs along the foot of the mountain. It is not tarred because it is not very important. It is a very old road. About one mile from Cloneen there is a bridge crossing the river Anner. It is called Melbourne bridge. The bridge which spans the clodac at Peafield was put up bout 65 years ago. Before the bridge was made they used large stones called stepping stones. There is a mass path from Tubber to Cloneen. The owners of the land which the path is on couldn't stop anyone from going on this path. When you are going from Tubber to Cloneen you cross over the Anner by means of a stick or plank. The Clonmel road is the oldest road from Cloneen.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:18
approved
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awaiting decision
asses, making gates, and mending and making all kinds of farm implements. He has many different kinds of tools such as a hammer, and knives and pincers, and rasp, and nails and an anvil for working on.
It is said that the forge water would cure chilblans (sic), and corns and warts and sore legs, and sore hands, but it must be taken while the Smyth (sic) is not there.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 12:16
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There are two forges in Cloneen. One of them is a disused forge and the other is a newly made forge. It is the property of Ned Gleeson. It is situated a few hundred (sic) yards from the village on the Clonmel road. Ot is roofed with timber and covered with felt. There is one fire place in it and the coal is kept lighting with a big bellows which is worked with the hand. The smith does all his work in the forge, such as shoeing horses, and
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:54
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awaiting decision
g-comharsna maithe as sin suas.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:53
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awaiting decision
gan dhá ghreim ar éan bhlas, agus gan éan ghreim tur. Cruinnigh bocht agus nocht, saidhbhir agus daidhbhir chun an fhéasta, ag ithe agus ag ól, ag déanamh siasma agus grinn, nó go dtáinig cunntas isteach go raibh ceann de na ba ceaptha ag na hallmhuraigh, agus dubhairt Diarmuid a fhágáil annsin nó go dtéidheadh sé féin amach.
Nuair a chaitheadar a ndinnéar go socair sámh, d’éirigh Diarmuid agus rug sé ar a bhata, agus bhain sé crathadh as, agus d’iarr sé ar aireoir na mbó a theacht leis, agus an bhó a theasbáint dó.
Siubhal sé féin agus maor na mbó go dtí talamh na nallmhurach – an áit a raibh an bó – agus d’iarr sé air, an bhó a thiomáint leis go bhfeiceadh sé a dtiocfadh éan duine roimhe. Thiomáin sé leis í agus níor tháinig éan duine roimhe le bac a chur air; agus dubhairt Diarmuid leis, má d’imthigh éan bhó uaidh le bliadhain, a tiomáint leis chomh maith, agus thiomáin sé leis trí cinn eile agus níor leig na hallmhuraigh ortha féin gur imthigheadar.
Nuair a tháinig sé chun a tighe aríst bhí ithe agus ól aca ar feadh dhá lá eile, nó gur sgap na comhursna ar deireadh thíar go buidheach beannachtach.
Seal gearr in-a dhiaidh sin thug sé cuireadh do na hallmhuraigh cun dinnéir. Tháinigeadar chuige, agus bhí fáilte mhór aca roimhe ins an gceantar sin, agus bhíodar i na
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:50
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In this district one tailor is all there is namely James Nevins. At present he is working in his own home but if a person wants to be measured he comes and takes their measurements. He does not keep any cloth but the person brings his own.
Wool is not worn in the district now but when the sheep are sheared the wool is sent to Navan woollen mill and it is made into blankets etc.
When the tailor is at work he sits cross-legged and stockinged-feet on the table.
Long ago the tailor went from house to house and stayed there till his work is done.
The implements used are
Sewing Machine - for sewing the cloth
Scissors - for cutting cloth
An Iron - called a tailor's goose for pressing clothes
Chalk - is used for marking
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:46
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There is a field in Billywood near Moynalty it is now called River Field but in olden times it was called Stony Carroll. In that field there is a hollow stone. On this stone there is a man's head carved and it is called the White Man's grave.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:44
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awaiting decision
tabhairt na mbeithidheach leobhtha dhá aindeoin, agus gan leath an airgid íoctha aca.
Caith Diarmuid smugairle ar a mhaide, agus d’ionnsuigh sé iad, agus rith sé thríotha mar rithfeadh seabhach thríd ailt éanacha, gur bhuail sé iad agus gur thug sé leis an áirnéas, agus bhuail sé an bóthar ag tarraingt a-bhaile agus na beithidhigh leis.
Lean beirt fhear é agus d’agair siad é na bheithidhigh a thabhairt dobhtha, agus go n-íocfadh siad an t-airgead go hiomlán. Fuair sé annsin luac na mbeithidheach, agus thug sé dóbhtha iad.
Bhí allmharaigh móra as Cuan na Marbh ar an aonach ag amharc air, agus dubhradar gur gaisgidheach a bhí ann.
Bhí feilmeara mór i gCuan na Marbh sínte ar theorainn leis na hallmhuraigh seo agus nuair a chonnaic seisean an gaisge a rinne Diarmuid, labhair sé leis agus d’iarr sé d’impidhe air, a theacht siar leis go tír Sheoigheach, agus go dtiubhrfadh sé a inghean dhó le póadh, agus go dtiubhrfadh sé gach uile nidh eile dhó dhá réir, acht a theacht agus a feiceáil agus muna dtaithnigheadh sí leis go dtáinigh leis gan a pósadh. Chuaidh sé siar leis go tír Sheoigheach nó go bhfaca sé an cailín, agus thaitin sí leis, agus dubhairt se le n-a hathair go nglacfadh sé léithi mar mhnaoi.
Pósadh an lánamháin agus d’fhuagair an t-athair fleadh agus féasta ar feadh trí oidhche agus trí lá ag ithe agus ag ól, bhlas na meala ar gach ghreim,
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:28
approved
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for about 1 1/2 years. He returned then owing to not agreeing with his authorities. His successor was was (sic) Mr Fleming he taught for 10 years. His successor was Mr O'Brien, he taught for 16 years. His successor was Mr O'Donnell.
There were no black-boards at this time. They had only slates which were selected from slig quarries. The pencil they used was of slig also.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:25
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The Misses Dwyer taught school on the old road near Kylenagranna Hill, which is about one mile north east of Cloneen. They taught in an old barn. They occupied a portion of land in Kylenagranna. About one mile as the crow flies to Preston another man taught called Mr. Quirke. He was such an excellent teacher that the boys who went to the Dwyers came to him when they got big. In vicinity of Drangan a man called Mr Cusack taught, father of the famous Michael Cusack. He had no settled place of teaching. He went from place to place teaching the children. A man called Mr Brennan taught at Ballyvadlea.
When National Schools were first established he was appointed teacher of Cloneen N.S. He continued teaching
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:25
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awaiting decision
Átha Salaigh, agus nuair a bhí sé ag snaidhmeadh na ngabhlach, bhris an seimhnéire an treathair, agus b’éigin dó stad agus bhí an gabha in-a chomhnaidhe ag droichead na Bairr-Dhéise, deich míle fhichead uaidh agus chaithfeadh duine dul fearsad Acla le dul chuige, agus deis fhagháil air. A Dubhairt an t-athair le Diarmuid – “A mhic caitfid tú dul amach fearsad Acla anocht, agus dul chun an ghabhann, agus deis a chuir ar an treathair”.
Nuair a mheas Diarmuid go raibh sé in-am aige dul cun na feirste, d’imthigh sé, agus chuaidh sé trasna na feirste agus as go bráthach leis chun na Bairr-Dhéise, agus nuair a shroich sé an áit dhúisigh sé an gabha, agus chuir sé deis ar an treathair dhó, agus tháinig sé a-bhaile an fhearsad chéadna ar imthigh sé.
Ó d’fhág sé an teach go dtainig sé a-bhaile aríst – timcheall cúig uaire a chluig rinne sé trí fichid míle de shiubhal, agus nuair a dhúisigh a athair ar maidin, dubhairt sé “A Dhiarmuid chodáil tú ar an bhfeirsid”
Dearc faoi’n leabaidh leig dhom codladh” arsa Diarmuid. Dearc sé faoi’n leabaidh agus fuair sé an treathair deasuighthe agus sin é an t-adhbhar a tugadh Diarmuid a’ Reatha mar ainm air.
Chuaidh Diarmuid lá go h-Each a Ghabhair ag díol a chuid árnéis, agus dhíol sé iad ar an oiread seo airgid, agus nuair chuaidh na ceannathóirí ghá íoc ba mhian leobhtha gan baoghal ar an oiread airgid thabhairt dhó agus gheall siad agus thoisigheadar ag
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:17
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Long ago the people used to make tents on Sundays after mass. Near the chapel they used to make them. The buyers used to exchange goods, as they used not have much money. More people used to give a day's or a couple of days work for goods received. They used to hols bonham and pig markets and fairs at the cross of Bellharbour.
People do not like to buy or sell on a Sunday. Once upon a time a man bought a pig of a Sunday. The pig dies he was half way home. He asked Biddy Early why did the pig die. She said it was because he bought him on the Sabbath. From that on he never bought any thing on the Sabbath.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:12
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awaiting decision
Long ago the people used to have bad houses. There used to be very crooked walls in them. They used never use a line but every mason should get one of his eyes out for he could see straight with his two eyes.
There were no slates then the houses were thatched with straw or rushes. The rushes were cut in the lakes with an old reaping hook.
The fire used to be in the corner of the house. There used to be no chimney but a hole in the thatch and an old bucket without a bottom stuck down in it. There used to be a hole in the wall for a window. The houses used to be very dark inside and they were also very unhealthy.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:11
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago the people used to have bad houses. There used to be very crooked walls in them. They used never use a line but every mason should get one of his eyes out for he could see straight with his two eyes.
There were no slates then the houses were thatched with straw or rushes. The rushes were cut in the lakes with an old reaping hook.
The fire used to be in the corner of the house.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:10
approved
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awaiting decision
To Cure The Measles. Give three charities to the child which has been sent to it by a person whose name was the same before marriage as after marriage.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:09
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awaiting decision
Cut a potato square and carry it in your pocket.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:09
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awaiting decision
To Cure a Wart II Rub the wart with a penny, throw the penny over your right shoulder. When someone finds the penny the wart will go away.
To Cure The Mumps. Put on an ass's bridle on the person who has the mumps and lead him or her three times round inside the pig-sty.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:08
approved
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awaiting decision
There used to be a lot of houses around here long ago that are not in it now. There were sixteen above our house and there are only the ruins in it now. All the houses long ago were thatched. Some of them were thatched with "fraoch", others with sedge out of lakes and more with straw. The fire used to be at the side of the wall. Some of the houses used to have chimneys and some used not. Out the door the smoke used to come in the houses without chimneys. The majority of the houses used to have no windows. The beds used to be in the kitchen. Some people used to have a screen going across the kitchen and the beds inside it. All the houses nearby had only one room. The houses were very unhealthy those times and the people used to have very bad sight on account of the smoke.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:07
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awaiting decision
To Cure The Strain: The person who has the cure says, As Jesus was walking into Jeruslaem, riding on an ass, the ass fell and sprained his leg, bone to bone, lath to lath, in the name of Jesus will cure that. This had to be said three times after the sun rises and before it sets.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:07
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awaiting decision
agus nuair tháinig sé isteach d’fhuagair sé comhrac ar an mBláthmhaileach, agus chuaidh an bheirt aca ar mhachaire an dubhshláin, agus thar éis seal pionnsaidheachta marbhuigheadh an Bláthmhaileach.
Seal gearr i n-a dhiaidh sin phós an Maileach an bhaintreabhach, agus bhí ceathrar mach mar mhuirghin aice – sé sin an mach ba shine leis an mBláthmhaileach agus an triúr eile leis an Máilleach.
Níor thaithnigh an chéad mhach leis a Máilleach chor ar bith, mar ba Bláthmhaileach a bhí ann agus nuair a mhéaduigheadar, bhíod siad ag imirt i gcuideachta, agus facthas do’n Mháilleach go mba bheodhachta an Bláthmhaileach na a thriúr mac féin agus dubhairt sé go mbuailfeadh sé dó - beart ar an mach ba shine – ‘sé sin a Bláthmaileach acht sul mar eirigh leis sin a déanamh, bhuail taom tinnis é, agus fuair sé bás faoi na sguilthí, agus do hadhlacadh é, agus cuireadar leacht os cionn na huaighe mar chomhartha do na daoine gur uaigh bhí annsin.
Bhí annsin an mháthair agus an ceathrar daoine i gcuideachta nó go dtugadar mbá leobhtha cébí áit a bhfuaradar iad agus gur phósadar.
Bhí na daoine ag fairsnuighadh agus ag tidheacht go h-Acaill an tráth sin. Tháinig cúram cloinne ar cheathrar mac na baintreabhaighe, agus nuair mhéaduigheadar i n-a mbuachaillibh óga mac mic an Mháilligh, ba ainm dó Diarmuid a’ Reatha Ó Máille, agus mac mic Bláthmhailigh b’ainm dó Gar-lámhach Ó Bláthmhail.
Bhí athair Dhiarmuda ag foirgint tighe i mBéal an
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:06
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Máire Bean Uí Néill
Sgiathill
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:05
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on his way to Adrigole. He was there three nights before he was found. He was burried in the graveyard in Glengarriff.
He composed Irish and English songs. He compossed one some about himself. Other ones about the police because they summoned him when he was drunk. He was a great drunkard. He was a labourer. He spent some of his time labouring in Wales, and in other places. He made his songs when he was working. He did not write them down.
Brighidh Ní Suileabain
A fuair ó
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:04
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To Cure a Wart I rub a snail on the wart and pout the snail on a thorn and as the snail withers the wart will wither.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:03
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To Cure Jaundice, take an iron spoon of sulphur and mix it with a cup of cream and drink this for nine mornings after other.
To Cure a Burn, make lime water thick like salve and mix it with linseed oil. Apply this fairly thick like salve and roll up in flannel and keep very warm.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:02
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago the houses were a lot different to the houses now a days. They had no doors only a hole in the wall and a bush to keep out the fowl. They had no windows only holes to let in the air. They had no chimneys either only a hole in the roof and an old bucket turned upside down to draw the smoke. They had only hard clay floors. They used to thatch the houses with rushes. Long ago there was only the one room in the house. The beds used to be near the fire. They used to have lights in the nights called páideógs. A páideóg is a piece of cloth dipped in lard. They used faggot and heath for their fires.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:02
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awaiting decision
There was not very many old poets in this district. There is one that I heard about. HIs name was Micheal Shea. He was born in Crostera. He died about the age of seventy near Corraniel
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:01
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awaiting decision
that is in Mr Swann's field.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 11:01
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awaiting decision
Patrick McCabe's father known locally as Ta, ra, ra, lived at the side of the road. He had no overcoat and he wanted to get one, so he watched for a man coming along the road carrying his coat. He went out and walked step for step with the man saying he was going to Cootehill also, and says he to the man, "I'll carry your coat a bit for you." The man gave him the coat. After a little he began to lag behind and pretend he was very weak. He hands the coat to the man saying, "Indeed Sir, I'd carry it for you, only I'm just rising up out of the favour (fever) and, I'm very weak yet", "O Oh", says the man, "you may keep the coat".
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:58
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awaiting decision
a fuair ón a máthair Máire Bean Uí Shuileabháin, Sgiathill
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:56
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went to wedding long ago without being invited. They were boys from the parish. The night of the dance they would dress up in rags and straw. They would come to the house where the wedding was in the night. When they would come to the house they would walk in and ask their supper and drink. They would get it always because it is a custom. When they would have their supper taken, and when they would have the drink got, they would dance for a little but. They would go away then.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:56
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awaiting decision
Coghluinid an teine so mar cogluigheas Criost Árd.
Muire na bun agus Bríghid na barr
Na trí Aingle is aoirde
Ar Flaiteas Mhic Dé na n-Grást
Ag chumhdach ár dteach ar g-cuid agus á ndaoine slán.

Deireann bean an tíghe an Paidir seo nuair a bhíos sí ag coigilt an teine san oidche

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Go n-déanfaid Dia trócaire ar anamnachaibh na marbh

Seo Paidir adeireas nuair atá duine a dul tar Roilig

* * *

A Mhuire is truagh

Deirtear é seo nuair a innsigeas duine sgéál an bhrónach go duine eile.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:54
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rejected
awaiting decision
rant compack.
Ans - A crow running away with a potatoe.
What has everything and so has a needle
Ans - A name.
As round as an apple as flat as a pan one side a woman and the other a man.
Ans = A penny.
What goes up the ladder with his head down.
Ans= A nail in a boot.
A house full, a roon full you couldn't catch a spoonful.
Ans = Smoke.
I have a little house and it wouldn't hold a mouse, and there are as many windows on it as on the Lord Mayors house.
Ans = A Thimble.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:53
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rejected
awaiting decision
The straw-boys
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:53
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awaiting decision
On the New Year's day beginning with the first of the year the character of the coming year with regard to good or bad fortune is foretold by the appearance of things on the morning of the New Year.
Then the first Monday of the New Year is called Hancel Monday and if anybody buys on that day he would not have any luck all the year.

The Monday before Shrove Tuesday is called Collop or Hall Monday - on that day about the dusk of the evening it is a custom for boys and girls to go around and knock loudly at every door singing -
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:53
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awaiting decision
"Nicka Nicka Nan
Give me some pancake and then I'll be gone
But if you give me none
I'll throw a great stone
And down your door shall come"
The next night after that is Shrove Tuesday and the ring is put in the pancake and whoever get the ring at teatime will get married on the following Shrove.

On Ash Wednesday long ago it was a great custom in towns to make a man with straw and to dress him in cast-off clothes then dragged through the streets. This figure was called Jack o' Lent and was to represent Judas Iscariot. There used to be great
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:52
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close to the road on the right, not large, but neat and attractive looking. There it may have been for 2000 years; and may it remain as it is for another 2000 years, the fairies happily esconced within it. As usual, it is erected just above a stream of water. There is no instance of a "fortification", with water inside it, for sanitary reasons. Down by the shore, out of sight of the road, is Glenburnie, once a cottage, as all these larger houses were. Mr Bartholomen M'Corkell built the present house in the fifties. From these he watched his sailing ships enter the lough and proceed to Derry. Will did we know the "Minnichaha", to us the most famous of them all. Soon you come to the parting of the ways. The upper road is the oldest. Let us proceed that way for the present. On the left the Roman Catholic Church on the right Ballybrack. This townland and house belonged to the Boggs family. Then Dr Cary was the occupant, to be followed by Mr Wallis. Beyond Ballybrack House there are for the next mile five "rights-of-way" leading down to the lower road. And so 80 years ago there was a much larger population that at the present time in the fields between the two roads - they were chiefly fishermen. Their very names are gone and the houses have disappeared.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
church over the steeple and all.
Ans = The Moon.
A. B. and an o and an x in the middle a T and a Y come tell me the middle.
Ans = boxty.
Four stiff standers, four diddly danders, two uper looker, two under lookers a slasher and a yagger. Ans = A Cow.
Why does a hen cross the road.
Ans = To get to the other side.
What has four feet a head and cannot walk.
Ans - A bed.
As I went up Muldron, I looked down sculdron, I saw ri, ra, ro, run away with my ranty compack, I swore if I had my widdle comwoddle that they would come back with my
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
close to the road on the right, not large, but neat and attractive looking. There it may have been for 2000 years; and may it remain as it is for another 2000 years, the fairies happily esconced within it. As usual, it is erected just above a stream of water. There is no instance of a "fortification", with water inside it, for sanitary reasons. Down by the shore, out of sight of the road, is Glenburnie, once a cottage, as all these larger houses were. Mr Bartholomen M'Corkell built the present house in the fifties. From these he watched his sailing ships enter the lough and proceed to Derry. Will did we know the "Minnichaha", to us the most famous of them all. Soon you come to the parting of the ways. The upper road is the oldest. Let us proceed that way for the present. On the left the Roman Catholic Church on the right Ballybrack. This townland and house belonged to the Boggs family. THen Dr Cary was the occupant, to be followed by Me Wallis. Beyong Ballybrack House there are for the next mile five "rights-of-way" leading down to the lower road. And so 80 years ago there was a much larger population that an the present time in the fields between the two roads - they were chiefly fishermen. Their very names are gone and the houses have disappeared.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
church ober the steeple and all.
Ans = The Moon.
A. B. and an o and an x in the middle a T and a Y come tell me the middle.
Ans = boxty.
Four stiff standers, four diddly danders, two uper looker, two under lookers a slasher and a yagger. Ans = A Cow.
Why does ahen cross the road.
Ans = To get to the other side.
What has four feet a head and cannot walk.
Ans - A bed.
As I went up Muldron, I looked down sculdron, I saw ri, ra, ro, run away with my ranty compack, I swore if I had my widdle comwoddle that they would come back with my
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:47
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rejected
awaiting decision
As Black as Black as white as snow. Hops on the road like hailstones.
Ans = A Magpie
There was a fiddler in Dublin and the fiddler in Dublin had a brother a fiddler in Cork and the fiddler in Cork had no brother a fiddler in Dublin.
Ans. A Sister.
Two OO two NN. an L D put them together and spell them for me.
Ans = London.
What goes round the house and round the house and sleeps in the corner at night.
Ans =The twig.
As round as an apple as plump as a ball can climb the
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:43
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rejected
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Just before you reach Carrick House,there is a haunted spot on the left, called 'Piper's HIll. Finn M'Cool's piper, living on the other side of the lough passed under the bed of the lough through a passage and nearly emerged on the spot on our side, but not quite. He is still there; at Hallow E'en you may hear him playing; and singing,
"I doot, I doot, I'll ever get oot,
The farther I go the deeper I git".
Passing on, we soon come to an "ancient fortification"
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:41
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He is a SGABHARÓIR - He is a miser
He is a CITÓGAÍ - He is lefthanded
a BUAILTEÁN - a flail
a GEAD - a twig
the TUILLÍ - the treader of a spade
Where is the GABLÓG - where is the fork for cutting furze
a SGIACH - a thing made for washing potatoes

the SÁLÓG - the ashes of a pipe (more correctly bitl(?) of tobacco or ashes left in pipe)

a CRUISÍN - a stick with a knob on the end washing potatoes

he is an ANGISEÓR - he is a miserable person
the DÚIRNÍNS of a scythe - the handle of a scythe
a CRICÓG - a heap of turf
a CRÁINÍN - a thinning top fo a scythe
he is a FOLLIRE - he is a blackguard

he is a MÍ-ADHBHARAC fellow - he is a miserable fellow

the DROMACH - the backband
a CLÁIRINEACH - a man without feet
LÁR-ACHÁS - crawling
a LAGHAR - a handful
the MÁLÍN - a bag for setts
the GRAFÁN
a TROIGHTHÍN - a stocking without a vamp
SCAOLEÁNS(?) - setts
a GIOBAL - a rag
a SGILLET - a small pot
he is TAOSGING water
he is all GIBRIS - he is all foolish talk
don't be CRÚNÁNING - dont' be grumbling
a DÚIDÍN - a pipe
there was a BREALL on him - there was a sulk on him
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:20
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When a child was born once someone prophecied that when it was a certain age it would be drowned. The people built Cathair Druinne castle on the hill where there would be no chance of his being drowned and thought there was no danger. When the day came it rained heavily and the mother and nurse and child were looking out a high window at the rain and by an accident the child fell out the window and was drowned in a tub of water underneath.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
Headed like a thimble
Tailed like a rat
You may guess for ever
But you wouldn't guess that.
Ans. A Pipe
A man went into a field of wheat
He lifted up something that any man could eat. It was neither fish flesh nor bone and in three weeks could walk alone.
And. An egg.
Long legs, crooked thighs
Little head and no eyes.
Ans. Tongs.
In Amsterdam it's common, In Munster it is still. Its always in a mountain but never in a hill
Its always in timber, but never in tree, but it's never in people and it's always in me.
Ans. The Letter M.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:14
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rejected
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(Bothon Castle), King John's Castle or Castle Barry

To the east of Buttevant stand the ruins of Lord Barry's Castle boldly and strongly erected on a rock over the river Awbeg; the inside of the building forms an octagon and was no inconsiderable fortress, before the art of besieging places was discovered.
Croker says:- Buttevant castle was the chief residence of the Clan of Donegan, who rejected every offer of the English to surrender it, and repulsed every attempt made to take it, but it was ultimately surprised and captured by De Barry during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The tradition is that the native occupants were betrayed on this occasion by one of their own soldiers. De Barry having made himself master of the place, put its sleeping inmates to the sword and rewarded the perfidy of the betrayer by striking off his head also. The dissevered and ghastly head of the betrayer as it went bounding down the stairs of one of the towers, yelled forth, in a sepulchral and terrible tone - "Treachery", "Treachery", "Treachery". The blood stains are still pointed out, to visitors, on the floor of a cell-like room and on the anniversary (12th July) of the execution the current belief is that the drummer's head, with a chain attached comes tumbling down the back staircase with a ghastly thud and clank as the perpetual memorial of irredeemable treachery. On the ground floor of the old western tower is a prettily shaped circular room, with a deeply-recessed
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:14
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rejected
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cats heard of the lady's sight being restored. They heard the brother moving about the loft; they came down and tore him to pieces. And ever since a ghost is seen at twelve O clock walking from Cabra house to the old barns. The man was a native of Kingscourt.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:13
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teasbánadh a thabairt dúinn, agus chímid go bhfuil an tobar fior mar is iomdha teasbánadh i dtaobh báis daoine, agus iad eirghe slán a fheiceas muid agus bádh é. An t-ainm a bhí ar an naomh – Naomh Colman. I ndhiaidh an mhéid sin tháinig allmhuicidhe go huachtar Acla, agus bhí sé annsin ag allmhuiceacht, agus ní raibh mórán ann le creachadh acht éanacha agus ceatharaí. Bhí sé lá annsin ag spaisteoireacht, agus chonnaic sé fear agus bean ag teacht isteach fearsad Acla, agus bó leobhtha. Bláthmhail a bhí mar ainm air.
Triomuigheann an tráigh míle ar fad agus míle ar leithead, i riocht is go dtéidheann roinn de’n fhairrge suas Béal na gCliath, agus roinn eile de síos Béal an Bhuláin, agus nuair a bhíonns tráth-rabharta ann shiubhalfá anonn tirim in do bhróga, agus an meath-rabharta bheithfeá go dtí do chom ag dul trasna na feirste.
Máille a bhí mar ainm ar fhear uachtar Acla, agus connaic sé an bheirt seo ag teacht trasna na thágha, agus chuaidh sé chun a n-aircis; ag thug sé leis iad go huachtar Acla agus an bhó, agus nuair a chuaidh an fear a thug sé leis a chodhladh, bhí faitchíos ar go mabhóchthaoi e, agus d’imthigh sé fein agus a bhean leobhtha nuair a fuair siad fear a’ tighe in-a chodhladh.
Ní raibh a fhios aca cé rachadh siad mar badh í an oidhche a bhí ann, acht bhíodar ag siubhal rompa nó go dtáinig an lá agus níor stadadar to dtí go ndeachaidh siad go Sliabh Mór agus rinneadar árus beag dhóbhtha féin annsin.
Ní fada a bhíodar imthighthe nó go gcualaidh fear a’ tighe go rabhadar ag Sliabh Mór, agus tháinig sé ar maidin go moch cun a’ tighe,
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:11
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There was once a man who went to the fair of Bailieborough. He got a pack of cards and went to play a game of fifteen on an old stone wall in the middle of the town. They played a long time until one of them went home feeling very ill. The others went too. The sick man walked until he came to the old barns, near the old castle of Cabra. He got up on the old loft and he fell asleep. There was a large number of cats staying there led by a big black cat who said to the other young cats, "There is a lady in Shirley's castle. She is blind and if you get a bottle of water from the new garden well her sight will be restored." The man heard this and he got a bottle of water from the well, and he went and threw it on the lady's eyes. At once her sight was restored. The lady gave him two thousand pounds for himself. His brother went and slept on the loft again. At once the
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:06
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:03
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Diarmuid a’ Reatha agus an Gar-lámach
Ins an am a raibh Innis na Naomh mar ainm ar Éirinn, tháinig naoimh go h-Acaill agus do thainig beirt acú go Cill Damhnaid – beirt cailíní beaga darbh ainm Damhnaid, agus baisteadh an t-ainm sin ar an áit, ar an adhbhar sin, agus bhí tobar beannuighthe acú annsin, agus d’fan siad ann go bhfuair siad bás.
Thanaic ceann eile go híochtar Acla, darbh ainm Naomh Mionnán, agus rinne sé tobar ann, agus tugadh d’ainm ar an gcnoc – Croc Mhionnáin – bhí an tobar ar bhord na fairrge, agus bí aill mhór ann agus tugadh mar ainm air Dubh-cinn Aille.
Tháinig mac-gall agus chaith se salachar eicint isteach ins an tobar agus do thriomuigh sé, Chaill an fear a chiall mar gheall ar an tobar a shalughadh, agus d’éag sé.
Tháinig naomh eile aca chun a’ Chaisil dárbh ainm Naomh Sgeachóg, agus chuir sé crann sgeiche ins an talamh, agus do mhéaduigh sé i n-a chrann mhór. Tháinig fear agus bhain sé géag dhe, agus rinne sé maide cas-ádhmad báid de, agus chuir sé i n-a bhád é. Chuaidh sé chun fairrge lá ar n-a bhárach ins an mbád, agus briseadh air í, agus ní raibh a-bhaile leis acht na maidí rámha agus an cábla.
Deir gach uile duine gur mar gheall ar an ngéig do bhain sé de’n chrann naomhtha a briseadh an bád.
Tháinig annsin an cúigeadh naomh go Sliabh Mór, agus rinne sé áitreabh ann, agus atá tobar ann a mbímid ag tabhairt turais le
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 10:03
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Rainbow in the morning shepherds warning.
Rainbow in the night shepherds delight
When a dog eats grass it is the sign of rain.
When the cat washes her face it is the sign of rain
When the herring gull comes in land it is the sign of rain
When the swallow flies low it is the the sign of rain.
When the sheep come down the mountain it is the sign of rain.
When goats comes home it is the sign of rain.
When you see a blue light in the fire it is the sign of rain.
When the cat or dog sits beside the fire it is the sign of rain.
When there is dampness on the wall it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:59
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To live by labour I did try and I got but little pay.
Provisions high and wages low
I couldnt maintain and to earn an honest living
I was forced across the main
Chorus
So I parted from the shore
Old Ireland your darling and I will always you adore.
The music of my heart and joy recalls to part
Back to the Green fields of Erin.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:58
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To live by labour I did try and I got but little pay.
Provisions high and wages low
I couldnt maintain and to earn an honest living
I was forced across the main
Chorus
So I parted from the shore
Old Ireland your darling and I will always you adore.
The music of my heart and joy recalls to part
Back to the Green fields of E.rin
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:56
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On Hallow Eve the wren-boys went out and went around to the gardens and pulled up the cabbage and left them in front of the door.
On St Stephens day men dressed up in straw and went around the town singing and dancing.
St Johns Eve:
On St Johns Eve the people lit a great fire and this fire was called a bonfire.
Hallow Eve:
On Hallow Eve a nut was thrown into the fire one for a boy and one for a girl if the two nuts jumped out of they going to get married and if they stayed in the fire there were going to get married. A song they always was
Here I am a Munster man,
From Ennis all the way,
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:52
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"Dhá mbéinn in-Achaill no in-Umhall Uí Mháille
I g-Caisleán a’ Bharraigh nó i d-teach Chuim Fhéil
Nó i m-baile a’ Creachair ag dul le fánaidh,
Dhéanfainn gáire a chluinfeadh an saoghal;
Is iomdha oig-fhear lúthmhar láidir
A chuirfeadh failte romham, is céad
Is a Maghnuis Suibhne, chraithfinn lamh leat,
Is d’olfainn cárt leat gan focal bréig.
Gaisgidheach mise a siubhal thart Éire,
An Frainnc, an Gréig is an Ghearmáin,
Thug me Oisín liom is Fianna Éireann,
Osgar tréan is Goll an áird;
Thug mé an t-óg is an críon dá réir liom,
An fear is treine ‘s is milltighe cháil
Bhéarfad tusa liom a Padraic Daeid
Leig dhe do phléidhe liom, is gluais mar chách
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:51
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As green as grass
As thin as a needle
As quick as the wind.
As fit as a fiddle
As slow as a snail
As sweet as honey
As white as a corps
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:47
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Dhruid sé in aice is chraith sé lámh liom,
Is dubhairt “A Phadhraig cionnus ataoi?”
“Tá me breoidhte lag in mo chnámha,
Ó shníomh mé an mála atá a’ dul thrí mo thaoibh”
“Leag tharad é is gluais mar chách liom,
Go gleann aoibhinn áluinn i n-a bhfuil gach éan”
Impidhe ort a ghadaidhe ghrádhna,
Tabhair dhom spás go ceann dhá mhí,
Go dteigid mé go Baile Chruaidh chun Uí Eaghra
An fear is áilne faoi éadaighe Chríost;
Annsiud a bhíomar-ne i dtigh tábhairne
I measg na sár-fhear ag ól na dighe,
Bhéarann go dian duit dá bhfághainn mo shláinte,
‘S is fada ó’n áit seo bhéinn aríst.
Deirim leat-sa má bhíonn tú in Éirinn,
Faoi luighe na gréine no i gCrích Fáil,
Go dtabhrad cuireadh dhuit i láthair bheinnse,
Is go mbeidh mé i n-éinfheacht leat in mo luighe ar chlár;
Cuir fios ar an Eaglais sul dá n-éagfair,
Déan aithrighe ghéar le Righ na nGrás,
Béidh tú borramhail i measg na naomh,
Acht diúltaigh an saoghal seo, is do na mnáibh.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:46
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The coopers were Sullivans Bridge St, Jermyns Kilconny, Timoney Main St Rielly Kilconny, and Mc Adam. Holborn Hill. They made butts, ferkins, tubs, and churns. The tools they used were, a drawing knife, an inch shave, and an anvil. They made wooden hoops. The difference between a butt and a firkin is that a ferkin is bigger and a firkin holds 70 lbs and a butt 50 lbs.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:39
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awaiting decision
now. There was another house in Castle Togher and the man who ownes was John Greene, Castle Togher. Williamstown, Co. Galway. There was another house in Castle Togher and there is a bed in the kitchen it was a very small house. This man was not poor he had a cow and a good piece of land and some money. Long ago the people used to keep the cows and the hen's in the end of the house. There is another old house in Knockadonnell, and the who owner it is Pat Connolly. Knockadonneillys Ballymoe Co. Galway. He does keep hens in the end of the house he is a loft in the house
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:38
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As white as snow.
As stiff as a poker.
As fat as a barrell.
As dead as a door nail.
As proud as pounch.
As cold as ice.
As cross as a lion.
As light as a feather
As black as the Earl of Hells waistcoat.
As soft as jelly
As big as a house
As flat as a pancake.
As straight as a rush.
As old as the hills
As weak as dishwater
As long as a pole
As red as blood
As hard as hell
As soft as butter
As cold clay
As swell as sugar.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:38
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awaiting decision
Padhraig Daeid agus an Bás
Ar dhroichead Luimnigh casadh an bás orm
I n-a ghadaidhe ghránda, is a chúl le claidhe,
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:37
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awaiting decision
Long ago in my district the people had old thatched houses and some of them had houses built in the ditch for instance. Brigid Quinn Ballyhaigue, Ballymoe, Co Galway. It was built with, sods and old sticks, and she used to thatch it every six months. There was another old house built in the same way his name was Andy Marnells, Ballyhaigue, Ballymoe, Co Galway. There was another house in Tubber his name was Martin Wynnes, Tubber, Ballymoe, Co Galway. It was built with stone and mortar. There was another house in Ballyhaigue and the the man was who Michael Keaveney, Ballyhaigue, Ballymoe, Co Galway, and he changed into the new house in Ballyglass. There was another house in Knockadonnell, and the man who owened it was Patrick Conboy, Ballymoe, Co Galway. It was a slated roof but it is knocked
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:35
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Travelling Folk were treated very kindly long ago because they might be priests, bishops or some other holy man with old clothes on them trying to get away.
They were brought into the house, made sit at the fire and got what was going. They were kept in the house all night in a shake down bed. They were of different people than the people now becaus they did what the people told them but now they would curse you before they would leave you.
Some of them were farmers put out of their houses and they could do nothing else only beg. They behaved just like the other people and they were liked very well. There was no work for them long ago but now there is plenty of work but they are to lazy to do it.
When they were leaving the house, they did not bring much food with them
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:35
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Dubhairt sé go d-tiocfadh an lá nuair a bhéadh lán adhairce d’ór ar bhuin.
Dubhairt sé go mbéad bothar mine déanta annseo is annsiúd, agus go mbéadh coistí agus caranna ag rith orra agus go rachadh sgéal i mbárr bhata níos tapula ná a thiocfadh an seabhach ins an aér ó Baile Átha Cliath go Cuan an Fhóid Dhubh
Sgéal innsitthe faoi Bhrian agus an baintreabhach – mar d’íoc sé an cíos dí agus mar thuit sé ‘na chodladh an oidhche sin ag dul abhaile dhó. Mar cuir sé a chóta faoin a cheann – mar bhí aisling aige – mar fuair sé Áilleachán i mbuncille na laimhe deise a chóta.
An Long Mhaol - an t-Ultach ar an aonach. Ceannuigh Brian na bulláin a uilig a bhí aige – gan airgead ar bith aige – i g-cionn bliadhna mar thainic an t-Ultach – ní raibh airgead roimhe – an long mhaol ag an caladh
Posadh an t-Ultach agus inghean Bhriain – féasta bhí acú. Bhí blas na meala ar gach aon greim, agus gan dhá ghreim ar aon bhlas, agus gan aon greim tur.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:34
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There are many tailors in this district which I know of for instance Edward Lyons Ballyhiague Co. Galway is a good tailor he makes clothes for mens and boys he also makes over coats for men. There is another tailor namely Luke Boyle Turla Ballymoe Co. Galway he used to make clothes for boy but he does not make them now. There is another tailor in Bookla Ballymoe Co. Galway namely Michael Connaughton. This tailor makes clothes for both men and women he also stocks cloth.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there lived a widow and she had one son and he was silly. One day she sent him for a needle to a neighbour house and when he was coming home he was carried on a load of hay and he put the the needle in the load of hay and he could not get it. When he went home his mother told him the next time he got a needle to put it in his jacket.
The next day she sent for a pound of butter. When he got the butter he put it in side his jacket and when he went home it was all melted. His mother told him that he should have put it in between two leaves of cabbage.
The next day she sent him for a can of water and he put the water between two leaves of cabbage and
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:27
approved
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awaiting decision
Dubhairt sé go dtiocfadh an lá nuair a bheadh rotha iarainn ar chóistí teineadh ó dheas agus ó thuaidh, agus go mbeadh na clocha ag cainnt ar na bóithre. Sin iad na clocha míle.
Dubairt sé go dtiocfadh na liatha luatha agus go dtiocfadh an lá a séanfadh duine a bhó in-a dhoras féin; go dtiocfadh dhá ní eile, gur dhaoire an falach ná an rud a bheadh istigh ann; go beadh claidhtheacha ar na bóithre agus geataí ar na cros-bhóithre le lucht treaspáis a choinneál siar.
Dubhairt sé go dtiocfadh an lá nuair nach mbeadh bláth ar an bhfraoch agus go mbéarfaidhe fear i gCúige Mumhan, agus go mb’feairrde d’Éirinn gan a bhreith.
Dubhairt sé go dtiocfadh an lá nuair ba charadach an nach a bhéarfadh greim bidh d’á athair agus thiocfadh nidh eile is measa – beid na measa ghá dtomhos dubh.
Dubhairt sé go ndéanfaidhe droichead ar an Abhainn Mhóir ag Comhraic, agus nach gcríochnóchthaoi choidhche é. Tá se amhlaidh. Tá cloch amháin le cur ann go fóill, agus atá se mar sin ó rinneadh é, agus ní fhuil misneach ag duine ar bith an chloch sin a chur air – mar atá contabhairt ann is dóigh.
Dubhairt sé go dtiocfadh an lá nuair a bheadh na daoine ghá gcur i bpríosún, gan choir gan cháin, agus go mba chríonna an fear a rachadh thar fairrge, agus go dtiocfadh bliadhain an óir agus bliadhain an bhróin in-a dhiadh, bliadhain bheag eile nó dhó, agus is beag a bhéas beó in-a ndhiaidh.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
soldiers on his way to Roscommon. There were two swans on the lake where he used to fish and they stayed there until they died. Crann Com is still standing but the people are not allowed to cut a branch the old people say it would bleed. There was a large hole in Kilcooley Ballymoe and he used to read mass there also. There is only one person in the district called after him and he is Croan Keegan Ballyglass Ballymoe
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The saint of this district was St. Croan. He was a priest in this parish long ago when the penal Laws were in force. Our school and the grave yard are called after him. There was a lake in Michael Heartes's land Ballyglass Ballymoe and there he used to fish in a boat. The lake is dry now but in the winter it rises. He belonged to a family of the Egans that lived in this parish. He used to read Mass every day in the chapel every day.
When he used to have mass finished he used to leave the mass book and chalice under Crann Con in Michael Hearte's field Ballyglass Ballymoe. The chalice was made of silver and lined with gold. He never worked any miracles for the people. After reading Mass he used to go down to another priest that lived in Roscommon. He was killed by
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:15
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rejected
awaiting decision
Seo iad Targaireachta a Rinne Brian Ruadh Ó Cearbháin
Bhí sé na comhnuidhe i bhFál Ruadh in aice le h-Inbhear da Barunacht Iorrus.
An chéad targaireacht a rinne sé, dubhairt sé go mbéadh teach mór ar gach cnocán; droichead ar gach fiodán; buataisí ar na brealláin, agus Béarla ag na tachráin.
Dubhairt sé go ndéanfaidhe bóithre mine ar fud na h-Éireann; go ndóighfeadh coinneál leith-phighne airgead na h-Éireann uilig; ní raibh éan pháipéar punnta ag imtheacht an uair sin, ná eolas ar bith aca ionnta, ginidheacha buidhe a bhí ann agus airgead glas agus airgead ruadh.
Dubhairt sé go gcuirfidhe droichead miothail ar abhainn na Daoile ag Crois-Mhaoilfhíona, agus go gcuirfhidhe droichead lóbáin ar abhainn na Muaidhe i mBéal an Átha, agus go gcaillfidhe suim daoine go fóill leis, agus go dtiocfadh an saoghal nuair a bheadh droichead ar gach sruthán.
Dubhairt sé go mbeadh hataí ar na tachráin, agus go dtiocfadh saoghal na mban óg gan náire.
Dubhairt sé go dtiocfadh na cruacha cáithe, agus go dtiocfadh an shliocht oighre dúithe clann Sheaghain, duine a dhóighfeadh an méid tighthe a bheadh o Crois-Mhaoilfhíona go Bearna na Gaoithe le choinnlí dubha, agus go mbeadh bóthar ar gach bogán, agus go mbeadh súile ribe ar na bóithre.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:04
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awaiting decision
In eighteen thirty there was a great wind storm.
In eighteen twenty two, Creeny Bridge was flooded.
In eighteen ninety six there was a great wind and snow storm.
In eighteen ninety five part of the river dried up.
In eighteen eighty there was a great flood the people could not go out of their houses for a week.
In nineteen hundred there was a great flood.
In nineteen ten there was a
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:02
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a lord from Galway and he married secondly. The lord himself was very rich and old and his wife was very young. His wife was very wicked and she would not give anything to the poor. The lord had a daughter. The daughter was very handsome and much like the wife that died. The father liked his daughter very much. The other wife did not like her at all. The wife clipped off her hair once and sent her off to Limerick town and sold her there. That night the bean sidhe came and haunted the wife. The Lord set out in search of his daughter. He sailed
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a goal and a point at the same time. Mr Gillic was the captain of the Star Football.
Mr Casey was another great footballer.
Tom McGovern was a great footballer.
Tom Maguire was another good footballer.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:01
approved
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awaiting decision
one knee and broke it. He then said go again to the black-smith and for every pound in the last one make him put a stone in the next one. She went once more and told the smith. When he had it finished she took it on her shoulder and started from the forge, but she had to rest every ten yards and it was very late. He tested it on his knee and he said it might do.
He then went to a cleeve-maker and got him to make a very big cleeve. He then put rushes in the bottom of it and put his mother into it and went to the Kings palace where expect to make a living. He left his mother in a house near the palace and went to it himself. On his way in the guards went to stop him but he struck one of theme with the stick and killed. He also killed the next then the rest ran away and in he went. The King wished to kill him because he thought he would kill all his soldiers. The King had a mill which was owned by the the Devil at night and the King thought if he sent him there that Devil would
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 09:00
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awaiting decision
Dockens are used for taking the sting of a nettle out and when you are holding them to the sting say,
Docken docken in and out take the sting of a nettle out.
If you do not I will cut your throat, docken docken in and out.
Vegetate is good for pigs, horses and cattle. Comfroy is good for curing.
Dandelion is used for giving to chickens and hens.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 08:58
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awaiting decision
John Nailius was supposed to be a great footballer when he was young. It is said that when his team was loosing a match out in the field that he took a free from the fifty yards line and burst the ball into two halves. He put one half of it over the bar and the other half under it. He scored
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 08:56
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rejected
awaiting decision
The vegetables used in this district are, carrots, cabbage, potatoes, celery, parsley, lettuce, vegetable-marrow, onions and curleys.
Long ago the people took the juice out of the carrots and put it into the milk before they started to churn. This was done to colour the butter.
Cabbage is good for the blood and also curleys. Celery and parsley is used for making soup tasty and is also good for the blood
Vegetable-marrow is used for making jam. Onions are taken with potatoes and onion sandwiches are taken before going to bed and they make you sleep.
Herbs
Beet-root is used for making the blood pure. Sugar-beet is also grown in this country and it is made into sugar.
Shives are used for giving to turkeys, to make them grow strong.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:57
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awaiting decision
Almost in every house in my district there is a churn. I have a churn at home and it is many a time I made a churning with it. This churn was made by Thomas Dowd, Glinsk, Ballymoe, Co Galway, and it is nine months old.
It is about two feet and a half in hight and the bottom and top is about one foot wide. This is a machine churn and some people calls it a head over heel churn. My mother makes a churning about twice a week. There is an old story told about churning and it is this. If you were making a churning and a man to some in and light his pipe and to go out again
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:56
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awaiting decision
There was a metal worker in Shrule long ago. He used to go around Shrule gathering
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:56
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east and west until he came to Boston town. He asked a man did he see his daughter and he said that he bought a girl off a man from Limerick town. The lord gave a big reward to the man and afterw- ards they married
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:55
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37 Fine feathers make fine birds.
38 Rome was not built in a day
39 Wilfull wast makes woful want.
40 Many hands make light work
41 Two many hands makes spoil the brath
42 Don't trouble trouble until trouble troubles you
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:54
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13. A change of work is as good as a rest.
14. A rolling stone gathers now moss.
15. Sleep is a brother to death.
16. Practice makes perfect.
17. Its easy light a quenched coal.
18. God's help is nearer than the door.
19. No matter how humble it be there is now place life home.
20. Hunger is good sauce.
21. The devil you know is better than the devil you don't know.
22. All that glitters is not gold.
23. A stich in time saves nine.
24. A closed mouth catches no flies.
25. Old tunes are sweetest old friends are dearest.
26. Deep waters run smooth.
27.What isn't worth asking isn't worth getting.
28.Don't judge the book by the cover.
29. When it rains it pours.
30. He who says least says best
31. Empty vessels make most sound
32. Speak of the devil and he will appear
33. Birds of a feather flock together.
34. Unity is strength
35. United wee stand divided wee fall
36. Better late than never
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:47
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awaiting decision
There is also a holy well in Tom Keegans field Ballyglass Ballymoe Co Galway. This well is called "Tobar na Slainte". It is surrounded by white thorn bushes. There is a well also in Thomas Clarkes field, Ussey, Ballymoe, Co Galway. One day a woman was washing clothes in it. She threw down the clothes into the well and as soon as she did so the well disappeared.
Written by joseph Finnegan
Kilallagh
Castle ea
Co Galway
Eire
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:46
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rejected
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There was once a lord from Galway and he married secondly. The lord himself was very rich and old and his wife was very young. His wife was very wicked and she would not give anything to the poor. The lord had a daughter. The daughter was very handsome and much like the wife that died. The father liked his daughter very much. The other wife did not like her at all. The wife clipped off her hair once and sent her off to Limerick town and sold her there. That night the bean side[?] came and haunted the wife. The Lord set out in search of his daughter. He sailed
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:45
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awaiting decision
Ballymoe Co Galway and his name was Michael Morgan this man managed to live out during the Famine years he used to get Indian meal from the land lord but one day he was gone out and his brother Martin a leap, put down the Indian meal and when it was done he took it up and he ate too much and when his brother came in he was dead
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:43
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In the famine times the people suffered severely from the hunger and much sickness. There was a man called "Sanford Wills" and one day he set up boiler in the market square in Castlerea and made Indian meal porridge and any Catholic that was to get a feed of this porridge had to change his faith and he would be fed. Many people changed their faith and got back to be Catolics again. During the famine times the people were only able to get two (only) ounces of tea one stone of flour ounces of sugar. In the T, famine times the people had to shake the potatoes and harrow them into the ground but most of them did not grow. There was a man living in Pullac.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:40
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be found in this distinct Edward Marnell Ballyhiague Ballymoe Co Galway was another great poet.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:39
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In this parish long ago several men composed songs about different happenings in this parish. James Tiernan Ballymoe Castlrea Co. Galway composed a song about a fight that was on the road to Lisnageera in the year nineteen hundred and eight. The name of the song was The Road to Lisnageera and this song has ever since been sang in this district. He composed another song and its name was "The Congested Melodeon." The young men in Bookla joined together and bought a melodeon.
Martin Walshe Bookla Ballymoe Co. Galway composed a book of poems and songs about his district. This man died in America a few years ago. His books are to
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:36
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Local Song Continued
Says Ody Shief come out of that
How dare you spoil my yankee hat
But very soon he was lying flat
On the road to Lisnageera
Says Michaeal Shiel it isn't right
When we have drink that we should fight
We should go home so nice and quiet
Like men through Lisnageera .
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:35
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Coming home from school the other night just jogging on so nice and quiet I heard a man to shout for light. On the road to Lisnageera I crossed the wall the truth to tell and saw the boys that I knew well says one of them "you can go to hell" we're the boys from Lisnageera.
Too-ra lu ra lu ra lu you never travelled with such a crew you'd get a black eye and maybe two. On the road to Lisnageera.
Mr. Joe was the first his voice to rise he shook the stars up in the skies but very soon he got a hise on the road to Lisnageera. Up spoke Jack Fahey so fine and tall he swore his oath he'd kill them all and like a shower of hail you'd see them fall on the road to Lisnageera.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:33
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awaiting decision
them. The three parts of Ballyglass are straight in a line so that one could see the other at any time. Hares and rabbits that lived in those forts changed into stones when they were ran after by hound.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:33
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In this parish forts are very common and they are all circular in shape. There are about ten of them in this district. They are big mounds of earth with big old trees growing on their banks. There is a big fort in Patrick Tarmey's field and it is on a hill. It is situated in Ballyglass and around about it is a big ditch.
There is another fort in Tom Burke's field and it is long in shape. In it there are big rocks and big old trees growing on its banks. Long ago the fairies were heard in it There is another fort in Dan Flanagan's field in Ballyglass The people of this parish never sloughed the forts or sowed crops in
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:30
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awaiting decision
hare comes here every morning and takes all I have. Will he come this morning said Donagh. Yes said the giant he will be soon here now. In the next moment the hare was at the door. Be off said Donagh and he running after him. He caught the hare and ordered to give the giant all his belongings. The are changed into stones aroud the forth Change them back again he said. The fairy struck them with her wand and the were immediately changed into there former shape Then he took them to the giant go bills and went back to the king.
The king then told him that he had to clean the bed from three savage wolf-hounds that were never let out. Donagh went out and opened the door. The wolfs grinned at him but struck the three one blow. They then bursted out and Donagh done the work. He ran after the hounds and brought theme back. The next morning Donagh asked the king would he marry his mother. No said the king she is too old and ugly. At that Donagh to stick and struck it in the kings and killed him. So ends the story of "Donagh of Ireland"
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:20
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him. So the king told Donagh that he had to go to hell for bills and books which he himself forgot to bringn. Off he went and when he came to the place he went in and ran the devils out with his iron walking-stick. Then he looked for the bills but he not get them. Then he looked under the taole and whow was there only the devil that was in the mill and he sitting on the bills. He struck him with the stick and took the bills and went back to the king.
When he came back, the king told him to go to the giant who lived there below. Off he went but when he came to the house he could see no door only one in the roof. He stood out from it and gave one jump and in a second he was in the hands of the giant, but Donagh got the best of him. Then they began a friendly conversation. Donagh asked the giant who lived with him at first but the kings giant said that himself and his family were there but the faries of yonder forth brought them all and that a fairy
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:13
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kill him. So he told Donagh to go and mill a bag of wheat. Off he went and when he was going in the Devil went to kill him but Donagh onely took him by the horns and threw him out.
When he had it done he brought the flour home to the King. Then the king sent him to a giant with three heads and to take a horse load of the golden slates which covers his palace. He went off and when he came to the palace and he jumped to the slates and began letting them fall into the horse-cart. When the kings giant came out he told him to come down but Donagh said he would not. The giant then took the cart and horse and threw him at him but Donagh threw it down and killed the horse and knocked the giant. Then he came down and put the giant under the cart and made him carry the gold slates to the king.
The king was greatly pleased then but yet he wished to kill
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 07:04
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awaiting decision
one knee and broke it. He then said go again to the black-smith and for every pound in the last one make him put a stone in the next one. She went once more and told the smith. When he had it finished she took it on her shoulder and started from the forge, but she had to rest every ten yards and it was very late. He tested it on his knee and he said it might do.
He then went to a cleeve-maker and got him to make a very big cleeve. He then put rushes in the bottom of it and put his mother into it and went to the Kings palace where expect to make a living. He left his mother in a house near the palace and went to it himself. On his way in the guards went to stop him but he struck one of theme with the stick and killed. He also killed the next then the rest ran away and in he went. The King wished to kill him because he thought he woul kill all his soldiers. The King had a mill which was owned by the [?] Devil at night and the King thought if he sent him there that Devil would
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 06:55
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awaiting decision
In Ireland long ago there were a period of laws called The Penal Laws. Under those laws Catholics were not allowed to practice their religion and they suffered very much. If a priest was caught saying Mass his head would be cut off and sent to Dublin. All those laws were made by the English. So that in this way priests had to say Mass in deep pits. There are of some of those pits still to be found in certain places. For instance in Mark Keavney field Kilcooley Ballymoe Co Galway. This pit is called Poll an Aifrinn. In this pit there is a white thorn tree and under this tree the altar was situated. There is a village near Glennamaddy and the name of it is Gluin. Because the track of St Patrick's knees are on a hill near by.
LW
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 06:52
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Martin MacCormac is famous for wicker work also, he makes scibs and cleeves out of sally rods. At present he lives in the village of Castletoher, Williamstown, Co Galway. John Mac Dermot of Tobinstown Ballymoe Co Galway could also make skibs and cleeves out of sally rods. There were an old craft to catch wild birds. In the dusk of the evening a man would carry to the bog the makings of a stook of oats when he would arrive at the bog he would set up a stook, and he himself would hide under it, after a while the birds would come and start picking the grain, as the birds would pick the straw would noise and the man would not be heard moving then he would strech his hand and catch the nearest bird, this he would do every evening and catch a bird each evening.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-19 06:42
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There were many men in this parish who in former times won fame. The most important of these was Dennis Egan Ballyglass, Ballymoe. He was able to jump twenty feet. He was also able to jump six feet high and was able to throw the half hundred twenty six feet. William Burke Cloonee Ballyglass who was the strongest man in the parish. He was able to carry eight hundred. He was also able to mow one Irish acre of meadow each day for a week.
Thomas Hurley of Kilcooley, Ballymoe was a very strong man. He was able to lift two hundreds in his mouth. He was also a noted footballer.
Pat Egan of Templetougher was the best runner in the parish he was able to run one mile in four minutes. One day he was going along the road and there were seven horse-carts of hay in front of him and leaped up on the last
anonymous contributor
2019-07-19 06:41
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because he was brief in stature and any time he would ask for an old saying they used to say, "there are good goods in small parcels".
In this school-house there were no desks or no seats and the pupils used to have to bring four sods each. They used to have to bring one sod each for the fire and the other three to make a seat for themselves for writing on and for sitting on during the day. At that time there were no copy-books in Ireland and the people used slates and slate pencils. Shortly after this copy-books were first made in Ireland. These copy-books consisted of three hundred leaves and when each pupil had his copy-book finished he was at liberty to stay at home from school. At this time there was no writing-pins like what the school-boys have now and on that account they used to write with pointed quills.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-19 06:28
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sword in hand. Brown commanded Tobin in the king's name to stand aside and allow him to pass. Tobin defied him and said, he could call, in five minutes more soldiers to defend the bridge than Brown could do in five hours. Brown defied him to do so . Mick blew his whistle and up jumps volunteers from behind ditches, hedges, and walls. Brown begged for mercy and his life which Tobin granted on condition that Brown returned home and never come this way again.
After this Tobin left the district. The grave of his father John Tobin is in Kilcroan graveyard.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-19 06:21
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Mick Tobin was the hero of Ballyhiague Bridge. There lived in Tobinstown about the year 1798 a man named John Tobin after whom the village was called. Our hero, Mick Tobin was son of this man. Mick was a rebel, and after the French landed in Killala, Mick took an active part in training volunteers. After Father Conry was executed by the English soldiers, Mick Tobin got word through some secret sources that Denis Brown who lived between Westport and Castlebar and who was in the pay of the English and accountable for the execution of Father Conry was on his way to the parish to carry out executions. He had on former occassions executed people in Knockanara by hanging them up to trees, wheels of carts, and by flogging them.
When Mick Tobin got word that this Brown was on his way accompanied by English horse soldiers Mick collected his clan of volunteers and by night erected the double ditch running from the river into the bog as a defence- and with his sword met Denis Brown and his soldiers on the bridge in Ballyhiague.
Brown and his soldiers were fully armed. Tobin stood alone on the bridge which he defended with
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 04:31
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John Molloy, St. Leonards, tells me there is a Druid's altar over in the parish of Newbawn - 8 miles from this school. It is on Quigley's land of Faree
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 04:20
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The white-border Cap & the hair Net.
Old women 50 or sixty years ago wore nice white caps with 'crimpy' borders. These caps were washed, starched, and ironed most carefully. There was a special iron shaped like a narrow finger for doing the 'crimpy' borders. This iron was called the "tally iron."
A thick black or brown hair net was worn round the large bun of hair. This net had elastic at the edges so that it gripped well. It kept the hair very neat and tidy. Some nets were made of 'chenille' others were knitted with woollen thread.

Neck Handkerchiefs
The women all wore small shawls made of cashmere, some black, some green, some grey, shepherd's plaid three corner ways across the shoulders, with loose ends in front. These were edged with heavy fringe.
For Sunday and best wear the better class had black lace little shawls.
Drawing of small fringed shawl.

Check Aprons
Capacious check aprons (yards and yards of check) belted round the waist were worn during working hours. The two loose ends of the neck handkerchiefs were gripped in the belt of the apron during work.
When work was over in the night, or when a visitor called, the apron was slipped off.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:52
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The Sun Bonnet
Most, if not all, the women who lived near the seaside wore what was called a sun bonnet. They made them themselves out of patterned cotton - all colours.
It took about 3/4 yd of cotton and some light laths or sometimes 'sally' sticks.
They 'pooked' out 4 or 5 inches beyond the face, this gave the name of 'pooka' bonnets.
The writer saw women go to Mass in St Leonards on Sundays, with a 'pooka' bonnet (nicely starched and ironed) on the head, & shawl on shoulders.

Woollen skirts & jackets
Woollen jackets and skirts, fine heavy cloth made by Hickey's, New Ross, from wool fleeces brought in straight from the sheeps' backs by these very women who when made, wore their own home-grown wool.
The skirts contained yards and yards !

'Hooded' Cloaks
The writer remembers most of the elderly women of New Ross wearing hooded cloaks.
These were beautiful, with the costliest of satin lining and special makers to make them.
The cost of a hooded' cloak would not be less than £10, by the time cloth (yds of it), satin for lining, and flowered velvet for trimming, were bought. Add on then the cloak-maker's bill.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:32
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(1) Flummery.
Cutlings steeped in spring water
Not stirred for a day - strain off 1st water
Renew with spring water again - not stirred again for a day.
Now strain off the cutlings and boil the súlaigh. This thickens in boil. Boil for 10 minutes or 1/4 hour.
Very digestible and strengthening for invalids.
Kate Molloy often made it at Mr. Leacy's Yoletown Mills when he would be ill.

(2) Oaten Bread -
From fine oatmeal made - wet with milk or water.
Colour brown. Made thin. Very hard when baked.
Used for dinner when the potatoes would be getting bad & scarce in May & June

Scrubbing wooden vessels
Vessels for milk were made of wood. They were :
(1) Keelers
(2) Pails
(3) Churns
These were scrubbed with sandstone and a wisp of straw till a 'fur' rose on the wood. They were then exposed to the air for hours, to purify them.
Drawing of a Keeler
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:17
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Now we're coming round Sandy Hook
where stormy winds do blow
Our gallant crew are all on board
A-shovelling of the snow.
We'll wash her down and scrub her clean
With scrubbing stne and sand
We'll bid adieu to Jane Walsh, my boys
On the banks of Newfoundland.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 03:13
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"The Banks of Newfoundland"
as sung by Mrs Ellen Doyle
(See page 14)
Will anyone join this merchant ship
That lies in Liverpool docks
Beware of your monkey jacket
With your oil skins on your hands
Beware of the cold north-westerly winds
On the banks of Newfoundland.
Last night as I lay in my bunk
I had a pleasant dream
I dreamt that I was in Liverpool
And I waking down Park lane
A nice young girl by my side
A bottle of rum in her hand
But when I awoke my heart nigh broke
On the banks of Newfoundland.
We had one Irish girl board
Jane Walsh it was her name
Her passage was paid out to New York
From Dublin town she came
She tore her flannel petticoat up
To make mittens for our hands
She could not see her true love free
On the banks of Newfoundland.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:57
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Joe Daly }
Taught at Katty's Rock, Boley.

---- O'Hanlon }
Taught in Boley also.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:53
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Chambers of Taylorstown Castle
M.P. for Clonmines
About 30 years ago a Mr. Chambers
visited Taylorstown Castle and told the present occupiers that he was a direct descendant of the Chambers who held uninterrupted possession of the castle and lands for 300 years down to 1798. They left after '98. He had all the documents he said. He was accompanied by his uncle Mr. Meadows of Thornville, near Wexford.
They were looking for a special stone with some special marks on it, which tradition, down the family, said, gave some clue to the possession of the Chambers.
Members of the Chambers family represented Clonmines in Parliament, when Clonmines was a borough.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:32
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I have just come from Doyle's house, Boley (4 1/2 miles from this school) where I have been shown a harp made over 40 years ago by Mr. Thomas Doyle. It is a marvellous piece of work for an amateur
Only some of its strings are on.
This boy also made violins and other musical instruments before emigrating (as seen on opposite page). What a pity such brains should be lost to dear Eíre !
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:22
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At Doyles of Boley.
There is a beautiful 'silver lustre' teapot 200 years old with Miss Mary Doyle of Boley who gave me the under bits of folklore.
Boley or Lacystown.
Lacystown is the old name of Boley. The Lacys owned the castle there and were 'the' people in the days gone by.
Doyles of Boley (See page 18). Imprisoned during the French Revolution.
Mr. Doyle was valet to Mr. Colclough of Tintern Abbey. They were both imprisoned in France during the French Revolution. Mr. Doyle had his pipes with him. Both he and Mr Colclough studied wood work in prison and each tried to excel the other in their new profession. Doyle escaped out of prison but he had no money to pay his passage home. So he sold the beautiful gold lace which trimmed his pipes and thus provided money.
Tom Doyle in Ohio and the King of the Belgians
Mr. Thos Doyle, brother of Mr. Aidan Doyle (see page 18) emigrated to America about 35 or 40 years ago. He studied aeronautics, and being an expert on air-brakes on trains. He was stationed at Ohio.
When the King of the Belgians went to America to study air-brakes he was brought to Thos. Doyle who explained everything to him.
His Majesty of the Belgians, anxious to know all that was to be known stayed over night at Doyles house in Ohio and early next morning drove a train with Mr. Doyle's aid, so as to have first hand knowledge of air brakes.
He afterwards introduced them into Belgium.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 02:15
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At present this Beads is in the possession of
Mrs. Larry Murphy St. Leonards or Taylorstown
This remarkably old beads has been handed down in branches of the Crane family for 300 years. Mrs. Murphy, who is a Busher of Ballylannen, is a descendant of the Crane family.
It has a silver tubular Cross and silver 'Paters'.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 00:40
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Fadó caitheadh gach feirmeoir úalach féir do thabhairt don sagart paróiste i gcóir a chapaill.
Lá amháin do thug fear éigin úalach féir dó agus dúirt an sagart leis teacht isteach go dtabharfadh sé braoinín dó. Do thug sé braoinín don bhfear i ngloine mór.
"A Phádraig" arsa sé. "An bhfuil fhios agat aois an bhfannín sin"? "Níl fhios agam" arsa Pádraig.
"Tá sé seacht bliain déag" arsa an sagart.
"Bhuel" arsa Pádraig "tá sé ana-bheag dá aois".
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 00:33
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Tá páirc in aice mo thighe. Páirc na n-ubh a tugtar uirthí. Fadó do bhíodh sé lán de uibheacha. Do bhíodh pláoiganna na n-ubh comh cruaidh le cloch. Ní fhásfadh aon bharra ach prátaí ann. Bhíodh na prátaí comh mór le tuirnipí.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 00:26
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Tá páirc in aice mo tighe agus an ainm atá uirthí ná an tSean Bhaile. Bhí baile beag ann fadó agus tá suan de le feiscint fós. Tá coill in aice na páirce sin. Bhí séipéal beag ann fadó agus tá tobar uisce ann agus clocha móra ann leis.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 00:18
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sticks out helps to hold the cord. I then get a 'skivver'.
Then I go out and set the snare. I drive down the stake down in the ground at the side of the rabbit path. I also stick the skivver down about a few inches in front of the stake. I put a cut on the top of it. Shaping the wire in a circle I stick it in the cut. The skivver holds it about four inches from the ground. When the rabbit comes he runs into it. The loop slips and he is captured because the wire squeezes on him.
senior member (history)
2019-07-19 00:13
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creamery it is bought around here, Sixpence worth would make about twenty two snares. The wire, when bought, is rolled up in coils. Then I take out the wire. About four and a half yards of wire is sufficient to make one snare. This I divide into six parts. Then each part is about one and a half feet long. I twist the wire by the aid of an S-hook which I stick in at the end of the wires. When the wire is twisted I take out the hook. Where the hook was there was a loop. I stick the other end of the wire in through the loop at the other end. Then I get a piece of twine. This is about one foot long. I double it in two. This I tie at the end of the wire. I do it by by making a kind of loop around the cord. Then it is tied to the wire very securely. Now, that done, I go out to the grove and cut some stakes. These are generally about seven inches long. On the top of this there is always a piece of wood at the top of the stakes. Then I bring them home. I put the cord on the stake. The piece of wood that
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:49
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Forges:
The forges were Ferrets Kilconny, Quinn Kilconny and Queens Waterlane.
Boat Builders:
The was only boat builder in the town and his name was McAvenue.
Hotels:
The hotels Pattersons Bridge St, Winslows Main St.
Whiskey:
Whiskey was made down at Mc Namaras.
Saddlers:
The saddles were Reilly of Bridge St and Fitzpatricks of the Lawn.
Shoe makers.
The shoe makers were Rielly of Barrack hill and Wiggins of Waterlane
Lime Kilns:
Mees at creeny
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:46
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Rabbit snares are very common in this part of the country. Everyone makes snares to catch rabbits. Even the schoolboys make them. It is very interesting to know how they are made. This is how.
At first you must buy wire. At the
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:42
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A cow's juice is good when she is alive or dead.
A rolling stone catches no moss.
Out of sight out of mind.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
Nearly never killed the man.
Birds of a feather flock together.
Many hand makes light work
Look after the pounds and the pence will look after themselves.
More haste the lest speed.
Time waits for no man.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:41
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ground. Then they get a small gabhlóg and put it standing under one side of it to keep it lifted a little from the ground. Having done that much they get some meal and put it under the box. Then they get a long cord and bring it through the hedge and tie it to the gabhlóg. They watch carefully. When they see a bird hopping in under the box they pull the cord. The box falls on it. It is a prisoner.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:39
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Butchers
The butchers were Fitzpatricks of Main St. and Smalls of Waterlane.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:37
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This is how other cribs are made by some boys. First of all they get a small timber box and bring it out in the garden near a hedge. On this little box there is no lid and that is the best way of all for catching birds. They turn the open part of the box down towards the
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:37
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because they always got soemthing in every house. The women had a pocket for nearly everything so it was not hard for them to carry their food.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:36
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Bakers
Mr Gillick had a bakery on the Diamond. Mr Flood had a bakery in Bridge St. Strains had a bakery in Main St. Yaws had a bakery in Kilconny.
Nailers.
Allens Chapel Road, Priors, Holbom [?] Hill
Carpenters.
The carpenters were Mr Timoney, Reilly, and Mr Pratt.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:34
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There are many other sorts of cribs made to catch birds. First you must get a bucket and half-fill it with meal. When you have this you must get a big meal-bag and spread it over the bucket so the bird might not see the meal. The next thing to be done is to get a long cord and to put a loop on it. Put the loop near the bucket and hold the end of the cord in your hand. When the bird gets in, pull the cord and the bucket will fall on it. She is captured.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:34
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drowned fifty years ago at the Barracks.
A soldier named Connolly threw himself out of a window in the Barracks and was drowned.
Sean Mc Gowan was drowned four months ago at the sandholes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:33
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When there is no dust on the road it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:31
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scollip is put under the bent one Some the scollips are called runners which are placed (under) at the bottom of the roff. The straw is sometimes sprayed before it is put on the roof.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:30
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bird steps on the bow it is a prisoner.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:30
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It is by no means an easy job to make a crib. First of all four-inch sticks are nailed together in the shape of a square.Then it is necessary to cut some elder sticks. They are placed on the timber frame with the larger underneath. As the sticks ascend the crib becomes gradually narrower until finally it is almost at a point. On the top a few narrow, light sticks are placed straight across. Then strong cord to the bottom laths are tied and brought across the crib to tighten it securely. A narrow stick is then doubled and put into the crib and small sticks are left on top of the doubled stick which is known as the bow. That done, a gabhlóg is procured. With the aid of a short stick which rests on the bow the gabhlóg can keep up the crib and immediately the bird steps on the bow it is captured.
A small bit of bread or meal is spread under the bow and when
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:30
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A rainbow in the morning in the shepards warning.
A rainbow in the night is the shepards delight.
When the cat washes behind her ears is the sign of rain.
When two swans dip under the water at the together.
When the west wind
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:28
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blows.
When there is a blue blaze in the fire.
When the curlew flies high and it's cry heard.
When the swallow flies low.
When the herring-gull comes in to land.
Song
One day he made a burst and he got into the street
He robbed and hustled every man whom he chanced to meet
You would think he was a wild boar from the woods of Drumalure.
With a fit of hydrophobia that McGovern
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:25
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failed to cure.
Chorus
Sure when ever I go near him, I have to take a fork.
He's as wicked and as on for fight as the ancient Duke of York.
For Peeler Priest or parson he does not
care a fig.
Sure bad luck attend the day I met Tim Boland's wealion Pig.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:23
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Now a "human killer" is used for killing a cow. This instrument is like a gun and it shoots bullets. Her head is pulled to the ground by a rope and the little gun is put to her forehead
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:22
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very thin sticks must be got and put across the square made by the wide sticks. Some of those sticks must be shorter than the others. Having done this you must twist the cords around the stick. This will help to tighten it. Now it will be almost unbreakable. Then a long stick must be got. A bow must be made of this. Sticks are then put across the bow. These sticks are for the bird to walk on. Now everything is settled and the crib is ready to set.
You then go out and put up the crib. At first you leave the bow down on the ground. Then I put the gabhlóg standing straight on the ground at the back of the bow. Against the gabhlóg you must leave the crib rest. Then it is set. You must put some meal or bread under the bow. When the bird walks on the bow she will stir the gabhlóg and the crib will fall. She is captured.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:22
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The oats are cut when they are ripe. Sometimes they are cut with a reaper and other times with a reaper and binder. When they get over ripe the grain falls out. The reaper only cuts the straw and divides it into sheaves. Then they are built in stooks called single and double stooks. A single stook consists
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:15
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Danish camp and warmed them in time.
Afterwards boys went round the country on the day after Christmas.
St. Stephen's Day asking for money to bury the Wren. Sometimes they sing songs, and one of these is -
"The Wren, the wren, the King of all birds,
On St. Stephen's Day he was lost in the furze.
So up with the kettle and down with the pan.
A penny or twopence to bury the Wren."
Some birds tell what the weather is going to be like. The Crows alight on a hill when the weather is going to be good and alight in low lying land when the weather will be bad.
The Thrush and Blackbird are beautiful warblers and people like
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:14
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Boys and girls often make little toys and amusements in their homes. Nearly every boy made a crib to catch a bird sometime or other. This is how those cribs are made by most boys. At first four sticks, each about an inch wide, are procured. Of these a square is made. Then a piece of cord is necessary. Having tied this at opposite corners it must be crossed by another cord tied at the other corners. Each cord must be about one yard long. Then some
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:10
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to hear them singing early on a Summer's morning.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:10
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for the year.
If you had a sore lip it could be cured by putting linseed meal to it.
If a person had a swelled neck it is said that it could be cured if he saw a pig itching herself on a stone it would take away the swelling.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:10
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medicine. It is said that it gives people a good appetite.
Old people say that "Bishop[ Weed" destroys the grouns wherever it is growing. When potatoes are scarce, "Bishop Weed", "Chicken Weed", and "Dalkins" are given to pigs and "nettles" are given to turkeys.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:07
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The most harmful herbs growing on our farm are _ The "Rag-Weed", "Dockins", "Thistles", "Dandelions", "Bishop Weed," "Ground Ivy", "Chicken Weed", "Poppies", "Dead Nettles" and "Hay Pops" and the "Red Posy".
The rag weed and dockins grow very fast and they destroy the land. Dockins and the rag weed grow only in bad land. The dockin is used to cure the sting of a nettle.
Thistles grow in good land. The dandelion is used for
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:07
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milk. When that is done let the dog lap up the milk. When the dog finds out that the piece of a timber is there he will remove it quite easily.
If you had a very sore throat the best remedy is to drink the soup of a chicken as hot as you could bear it.
When you would cut your finger with a rusty knife you could cure it by burning the knife.
If you had a pain in your back lie down and let another man walk on it.
If there would be a wart on your hand, spit on it every morning before your breakfast and you will cure it.
If a person had a pain in their stomach. drink hot water every morning and they would not get the pain any other time.
By putting moss on a cut finger the blood would stop.
If a pain came into your stomach and if you would spit under a stone the pain would go.
If a person didn't eat any meat on St. Stephen's Day he wouldn't be sick
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:04
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On the day of the marriage horses and side-cars were hired and the party drove to the Church. Poor people walked. There was generally an old "brogue" tied on the bridal car. After the ceremony the party went to the bride's house for dinner. That night there was a dance in the bride's house.
During the night "straw-men" went to the house for drink or money. The leader called the "Sergeant called for three cheers for the bride and groom.
In our townland the local "match-maker" was Mick Carroll.
There is no "matchmaker" now.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:02
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People didn't begin to wear boots in former times until they would be about fourteen or fifteen years of age. There was one old woman that went in her bare feed all the year round named "Máirín Rúa" because she had red hair. All the children in this school go barefoot in Summer but they don't all the year round. The water is always thrown out after washing feet. Boots are repaired by a cobbler named Mick Gavin. There is one shoe maker in Mt Bellew and he is a deaf mute. In former times shoe makers were more numerous than they are nowadays,
A family of the Geraghty's wear clogs coming to this school. Leather was never made locally that I ever heard of. Boots are to be got very cheap now in the factories. That is the why shoe makers are so scarce.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 23:00
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soap and sugar to it.
A person can cure a cut by rubbing salt to it.
If you found water in a hole in a rock accidentally it would cure warts.
By putting tobacco into a tooth which would often ache you would cure it.
If you had the whooping cough and if you asked a man with a white horse what was the best remedy he had, you could cure it by doing whatever he would tell you.
If a swelling came on your head it would go back if you put a penny to it.
When anyone has a sore tooth a very good remedy is to wash it with salt.
If a person had a bad cold the best way to find a remedy for it is to watch everyone passing the road during the day and if ten persons passed that day and the tenth person whatever remedy he would order to be done that is said to be the best remedy.
If a piece of timber is in your hand the best thing to do is to wet all around the piece of timber with
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:58
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Why does a hen cross a road?
(To get to the other side)
What has eyes that never see?
(A potato)
How many weeks belong to the year?
(Forty six, the rest are only lent) (Lent)
What lives in Winter, dies in Summer, and grows with its roots up?
(An icicle)
What does a young girl look for, and doesn't expect to find?
(a hole in her stocking)
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:55
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What is that which has four fingers and a thumb and neither flesh nor bones?
(A glove)
Why is the pig the queerest animal?
(Because its killed first and then it is cured)
What is as black as ink as white as milk and hops on the ground like hailstones?
(A magpie)
A little red man, a little red coat, a staff in his hand, and a stone in his throat?
(A haw)
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:52
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Big mouth, can't talk, three feet, cannot walk, two ears, cannot hear, riddle me that and I will give you a cheer.
(A Pot)
Old Mother Tussel, she has but one eye and a very long tail which she always lets fly and every time she goes through a gap she leaves a wee piece of her tail in the trap.
(A needle and thread)
As I looked over a garden wall, I heard a man giving a great call; his face was flesh, his mouth was horn such a man was never born.
(A Cock Rooster)
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:50
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It is said that if your nose started to bleed the best remedy is to lie flat and put a key to your neck.
When you would get a headache it is a great remedy to twist St. Brigid's cloth around it.
If your hand started to bleed the old people said it was good to put a cobweb.
The old remedy for a boil is a poultice of soap and sugar.
It is supposed to be a good cure for chilblains to dip them in paraffin oil.
If you cut your hand it is good to get a dog to lick it.
It is said to be a good cure for a burn to rub salt to it.
Cahill's blood is supposed to cure ringworm.
When your finger or hand is sore it is believed that the blood of a black cat's tail would cure it.
It is said to be a great cure for a cut to drop some whiskey into it.
If a piece of glass would go into your leg it could be cured by putting
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:45
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Forty Five years ago there was a dancing school in a old house in the side of Corron hill, The name of the dancing master was Dan Lordan and the fiddler was Joe Mitchel. His terms were for three months teaching two nights a week, entrance fee [?], 2/6 ball night, and [?] at the end of the term and [?] per night to the fiddler. There was another dancing master named Leary. He had a school in the same house a few years later. Leary was both dancing master and fiddler. Leary was lame. He carried a crutch and stick. He used to teach steps with one leg and the sick and his payment was the same as the others.
There was a Protestant school at Corron cross. The name of the teacher was Domery. Some of his descendants are still in Kellmeen. The children of this school got soup from Derry Castle. Besise the school at the cross road there is a green plot called Crosaín na Leanbh. There they used to bury babies that were not Baptised.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-18 22:39
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Eastward part of the Old Head. She was carrying on her a cargo of flour which was ruined by the salt water. All the crew were saved. She was got off shortly afterwards, and when being towed into the harbour a man was accidently killed aboard - the ship rolled, the man lost his balance and fell on a Marlin Spike, which went through his body.
A sailing ship "Falls of Garry" ran ashore off the "Flower" (a point of rock sticking out into the sea) between Oyster Haven and Kinsale. She was going to Queenstown for orders and had a cargo of grain. A Pilot boat "Charles George" went out to guide her but could not get alongside, owing to bad weather.
The crew were saved by people on the surrounding cliffs with "Breeches Buoys".
The schooner "Pearl" lost off "The Barrels" (a reefs of rocks to the Westward of the Old Head. All hands were lost. The body of the Captain and that of another man were washed ashore at "Garretstown. Captains body was brought to England for burial.
The other man was buried in "Cove Church" graveyard Kinsale.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-18 22:37
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In Kinsale there are a few old castles. There is one very old one in a place called "Castle Park. " This old castle is called the Queens Armchair", because it is exactly like a huge armchair. It was built by the De Courseys. Thiee is an old legend about how it came to be built. One of the De Courseys who was supposed to have done some brave deed, was told by a king to take as much land as he could ride over in twenty four hours.
He had a white horse, and he rode over the land which is now called De Coursey's land. He built his castle there, which is now called "The Queens Armchair and ever afterwards his is supposed to be seen riding his white horse at 12 oclock every starry night.
By this old castle there is an old graveyard called Ringrone, where the De Courseys are buried. It is still in use but is it nearly full now.
There are even older Graveyards than this one, such as St Multose Churchyard, which is situated by St Multose Church. It is very old, some of the dates on the tombs actually go back to 1116. These dates are plain to be seen still, they are cut deep into stone which I suppose will last for many years yet.
There is another one (at Ringcurran) in a old wing of the church which is the burying place of St. Multose. The date on it cannot be read but above
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:36
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When a cow calves the hair is burned off the udder with a blessed candle. Then the candle is quenched and the smoke allowed to go up the cow's nose.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:32
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Bunratty and the way he had for living was by playing a fiddle. One day a crowd of boys wanted the fiddler to go boating with them and the fiddler said he would. Then the crowd of boys and the fiddler went with each other boating and the boat overturned and all of them were drowned except the fiddler. He put his hands around the fiddle and the fiddle saved him from getting drowned. Then the tide brought the man away and he was never seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:29
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Long ago there was a man living in
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:27
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These fiddles are as good as any fiddle for playing on.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:26
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I wonder if many people have heard of the violin playing itself as it hangs on the wall. It is an evil omen for the fiddler who had been accustomed to play that fiddle. The writer has heard the story told how a certain local fiddler was startled one night by what he described as the fiddle playing itself. The next day he had a 'dead' arm. That is the term used for paralysis amongst the country people. He never played the violin again, and regarded the self-played notes as his "swan song".
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:25
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About two miles to the south of Baltard castle is situated the ruin of St Lenan's church and altar in the parish of Killard now called the new Doonbeg parish because the new and principal church in the Parish is built in Doonbeg.
This spot where St Senan's Church and altar are situated is one of the most remarkable places in Clare. A bell fell from heaven on the spot where the altar was erected.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-18 22:21
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all.
Before the castle was built in Baltard there was a man nick-named "Sammon" standing on the spot where the castle is now and he said that there would be a castle built here yet and the people who were with him did not believe him and he said that three kinds of men would come into it, black coated men, blue coated men, and red coated men and not to dread any great war until the red coated men come.
The castles in Doonmore and Doonbeg seem to be of older origin than Baltard castle and there is not much locally known about them. There
anonymous contributor
2019-07-18 22:20
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There is a place near Partry known as Keel Bridge. Under the arch of the bridge there is a crevice in a stone containing water. There is a drop continually falling from the top of the bridge. If a person with sore eyes goes there and bathes his eyes in the water he will be cured.
There is another place near Ballyhaunis called Tobar Phádraich. There is a well in the place and if a person with a disease drinks the water he would be cured.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:17
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There are three old ruins of castles in this parish. There is one in Baltard one in Doomore and one in Doonbeg. The castle in Baltard is built about one hundred and seventy three years, but it is very much broken down now. There is not a sign of the grand windows that were in it and the staircase that was going up to the top of it is broken down.
The principle thing castles were used for in olden days were for strongholds. It was the English that built them. Baltard castle is built on the brink of the cliff and the cliff is worn in underneath with the waves so some day the whole cliff will fall in to the sea castle and
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:15
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have to go into the ring and the game begins again.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:15
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This is how to play "Cat and the mouse"-
The girls and boys make a big ring, one runs outside the ring, and says "Not you. Not you," Then she says, "But you". The one she tips runs after her and all the others have to hold up their hands very high, so that the two can run in and out through the ring. When the tipped girl is caught, she will
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:11
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middle of the fire. Each one had to tell a story and some of these stories took a week or more to tell night after night. The story teller would begin at the place where stopped the preceeding night.
However as they were all gathered around the fire this night a stranger walked in but hey never got his name, but they christened him "Bradán" and he left the district early one morning and there was no trace of him ever since. Some people say he was seen going northwards and this must be correct as he said he was from the west of Scotland near the Island of Iona. He stayed at this Shebeen shop for a considerable time and related to them all the story of Colmcill's prophecy. Another old man stayed there for years and years., but he was only a very young boy when Bradán was there but he picked up all the prophecy from him, and
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:06
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There were as many as 40 side cars at that castle but now a few motors come from Kilkee for a few hours every day and leave again without partaking of any refreshments.

There was one Shebeen shop in Baltard long ago about the year 1850 and the old man who owned it was very lame and his wife Peg was very lame also. His name was Mickey McMahon but I do not know was he a cousin of the old hedge-teacher, who taught the old hedge school in Killard or not. However he was a very intelligent man and had several charms some of which are related in another part of this book.
As he had no children several people used to go in "Cuaird" there every night and sit around the bog deal fire telling stories. They had no other light at the time but the light that came from the "Smután" of bog deal placed in the
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 22:04
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There were as many as 40 side cars at that castle but now a few motors come from Kilkee for a few hours every day and leave again without partaking of any refreshments.

There was one Shebeen shop in Baltard long ago about the year 1850 and the old man who owned it was very lame and his wife Peg was very lame also. His name was Mickey McMahon but I do not know was he a cousin of the old hedge-teacher, who taught the old hedge school in Killard or not. However he was a very intelligent man and had several charms some of which are related in another part of this book.
As he had no children several people used to go in "Cuaird" there every night and sit around the bog deal fire telling stories. They had no other light at the thime but thel light that came from the "Smután" of bog deal placed in the
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 21:57
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months until they auctioned the timber to the people at about 2d a plank that would cost them not S/(?) at least and some of them would cost more than one pound.
They held the greatest Sport that were ever held in the locality on the day of the Auction.

Dunmore was called from the big fort that is there to the present day. They say if a person would stand on that fort at the present he would see all the other 15 forts of a fine clear day. From the top of the Castle in Baltard a part of seven counties could be seen. Several tourists used to come there 40 years ago and they used to bring large telescopes with them. It was easy to get to the top at that time and six or seven persons could stand on the thick lead roof that rested on large bog deal beams. In fact they used to hold pic-nics on the top.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 21:51
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from Canada. The masts were broken and it had no rudder or sails but all the timber was in tact. The big powerful waves that beat against the coast overturned the vessel on the rocks and the planks and baulks of timber had to taken down carefully from where they were clamped together in the hold. A beam of timber fell on one man's back and broke it and he died in a short time afterwards.
The whole cliff for a mile along was all covered with timber so that the who people of the district got their rooms ceiled and the mud floors floored. In fact they renovated their houses in such a manner that they are considered the best farmers' houses in Ireland up to the present day. The Coast guards from Kilkee came to take charge of the timber and the built grand houses of the planks and lived in the houses for a few
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 21:20
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and mangolds.
The hens, geese, ducks, and turkeys lay eggs every day. When they have thirteen, or fourteen eggs they hatch the eggs and bring out the young. In the house where the fowl are kept there are sticks going from one wall to another, which are called a roost. The fowl fly up there, and sleep on it. When calling the hens we say Tuk! Tuk! which means Come! Come!. When they hear that, they run because they know they have food to get. Bídh! Bídh! is said when calling the turkeys, which means food! food!
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 21:15
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and to plough. One day he was making faggots of furze and as usual she was watching what he was doing. But she tormented him so much that he threw her into the bushes and she couldn't get out, so she began to scream. A man in the next field came to find out what was the matter. On seeing what had happened he ran for the police.
When they came on the scene they asked her who threw her in there she said "Me Own Self" meaning the boy. "Well," said the police if yourself did it you can stay there," and off they went.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 21:10
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Long ago there lived a very old woman by the name of Miss Kiely. She had a big farm but was so hard and mean that neither man or boy would stay with her. One day she met a strayway and she asked him to work for her. He consented as he had no home to go to.
She then asked him his name and he said "Me Own Self." She gave him nothing to eat but three halfpenny herings in the week and his bed was one of the hobs by the fire, and his light was a saucer full of train-oil with a piece of rope for a wick. He had to feed cattle
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 20:11
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winter their wool keeps them warm. On winter they are put in a plot of turnips called a "pen". They also get hay in a "sheep rack."
The dog is a great friend of the farmers. He brings home the cows and takes care of the house. There are many names for dogs. The favourite name for a sheep dog is Shep. The hounds, and the terriers have many other names as:- Valo, Salto, Spot, Keeper, Jill, Duck, Flos, Rex, Yes, Flo, Mixze[?], and Liny[?]. When you want the dog you call him by his name..
Collected by-:
Rita Morrissey
Prospect
Puckane
Obtained from,
Mrs Morrissey,
Propsect,
Puckane,
Nenagh
Age 51 years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 20:05
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The farmer keeps many animals on his farm. The horse is his strongest animal. He keeps him in a stable during winter, and in summer he is let out in the open air. The horse gets hay, and mangles on the stable. Those are put in the manger.
The cow is one of the most useful animals. Some cows have names. The best known is "Polly". The cows are tied when being milked. Those tyings are called bails. Some are tied around the neck by chains. When calling the calves you say Suck! Suck.
Goats are usually kept in a field. They are spancelled to keep them from going about. You say Gin! Gin! when calling the goat.
Sheep are kept out in the field the whole year as in the
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 20:00
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and mangolds.
The hens, geese, ducks, and turkeys lay eggs every day. When they have thirteen, or fourteen eggs they hatch the eggs and bring out the young. In the house where the fowl are kept there are sticks going from one wall to another, which are called a roost. The fowl fly up there, and sleep on it. When calling the hens we say Tuk! Tuk! which means Come! Come!. When they hear that, they run because they know they have food to get. Bia![?] Bia![?] is said when calling the turkeys, which means food! food!
Collected by-:
Sally Darcy
Rockview
Puckane.
Obtained from,
Mr. Darcy,
Rockview,
Puckane,
Nenagh
Age 55 years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 19:54
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"Phew! Phew!"
In winter the horse has a lot of work to do. When the farmer is driving the horse and wants him to go hard he says - "Come up! or Hub off! When he wants him to go easy he says. "Site!" The horses are usually foddered with oaten-straw. In the stable the horses are tied to a stake by a head collar and a rope.
When pigs are being called "Ba! Ba"! is said. They usually have two houses a house in which to eat their food, with no roof on it and a house in which to sleep which has a roof. In Summer the pigs sleep out in the open. Their bed is straw usually.
The sheep lives out on the field always. He eats grass and turnips.
The goat is called the poor man's cow because many of the poorer people have to depend on the goat for milk. The goat has no house to sleep in. She eats ivy, grass
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 19:48
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The domestic animals we have at home are cows, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, hens, geese, ducks and turkeys.
Some of the cows have names such as the Red Cow, the Big Black Cow and the little Black, Slattery's cow and the young cow. When driving the cows into the house into the house or and out into the field we say "How! How!".
The cowhouse is like a shed. The cows are tied around the neck by chains which are stuck in the wall.
On May Eve there is a branch of a May bush hung over the door of the cowhouse to bring luck on the cows. When people are finished milking the cows they cut the Sign of the Cross on the sides of the cows and say "God Bless you."
The horses have names. The names are - Tom, Moll, the Black Horse and the Grey Horse. When calling the horse we say
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 19:42
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Forges were always centres for storytelling.
In 1798 forges were used for making pikes.
Collected by:-
Sally Darcy,
Rockview,
Puckane,
and
Peter Cullen,
Lahorna,
Nenagh.
Obtained from,
Mr Darcy,
Rockview,
Puckane,
Nenagh.
Age 55 years.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 19:41
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The smiths have many implements - bellows, anvils, pincers, rasps, sledges, hammers, vices, knifes, hack-saw, punch, drill, and clift.
The smith shoes asses and horses. Cattle were shod in olden times when they were used for working.
The smiths make ploughs and harrows. Wheels are shod in the open air outside the forge. First of all there is a big stone got and placed in the blacksmith's yard. Then the band of a wheel is placed around the stone. Then the band is covered with sods of turf which are lit. This makes the band red and then it is taken out and placed on the timber part of the wheel.
People made the smith presents of geese and turkeys at Christmas. The smiths were always asked first to a wedding.
They were always looked upon as being very strong. If a person was very strong the people would say he had muscles like a blacksmith.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 18:36
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There are about five holy wells in this district. There is one in Kilmacuddy called St Cuddy's well. There was a monastry near the well and St Cuddy lived there.
People who have toothaches, headaches or a sore throat visit the well. They say prayers and drink some of the water. When leaving the well they must leave a medal or a piece of ribbon otherwise they will not be cured.
It is said that tinkers were passing it one day and they washed their clothes in it. Immediately it dried up and it sprang up in another place. St Cuddy blessed the place and said there would never be famine within three miles of the well.
There is another holy well in Clareen. People visit it in July. It is called St. Kiaran's well. A lot of cures are got by going to this well. A man who lived nearby once tried to dig up the well and a tree fell on him and killed him. A bush called St Ciaran's bush grows in the centre of the road
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 18:31
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in the liss and hid in it. When the giants heard this they built they closed the case and the people all died inside.
The owner of the land interfered with the trees in the liss and next night he saw a coach in the centre of the field. The second night he saw two black dogs and the third night he heard music. It seemed to be that of the bagpipes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 18:29
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There are about a half a dozen fairy forts in the school district. One fort that I know is in Glen Dolan. In front of our house. It is situated. It is called a liss and is surrounded by trees. In the middle of the liss the entrances of a cave is.
Ages ago there was a big village in Glen Dolan and in the village lived six big giants. They were killing all the people and they could not escape so they built a cave
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 18:27
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The name of my home district is Lackaroe. It is thickly populated. There are about eighth families living in it. The name that is most common in the district is Brophy.
The houses are nearly all thatched with the exception of one or two. There are a good number of old people living in it. They tell beautiful stories. They do not know Irish. Houses were more numerious in former times.
There are several old ruins in the
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 18:24
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There are many local roads in the school district such as the Curragh road, the Green road, the new road, the Lacaroe road and the mountain road which is called Litter avenue and Pauls Lane. Pauls Lane leads up to Siskin. It got its name from an old man named Paul Horan who lived on this lane about one hundred years ago.
There is an old road called the coach road. Why it is called the coach road is long ago when the coaches used to be going to Dublin, they used to go this road and change horses at Glen Nolan which was called Cadamstown at that time at a house called Whitefields. There is only a track of the road there now.
About a quarter of a mile from Cadamstown there is a group of trees and it is called the Lodge. Long ago throughout the Summer every Sunday evening there used to be dancing there and Biancony cars used to come with people from all directions. There was an old blind fiddler who lived in old Cadamstown and he used to play for them. They used to make a subscription and get some money for him. This was the only way he could make his living.
One night when they
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 18:18
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Games are played everywhere. The game played in this district by men and boys is hurling. It is a great pastime for them and is a very healthy game.
Children play many games in school such as, high gates, frog in the well and catching. The one I prefer is catching and we play it the oftenest. When the days are wet and we have to remain indoor, we then play four-corner fool.
Games are very good as long as they are played in moderation. The games I play at home in the winter evenings are draughts, cards, and ludo. I prefer reading to any other pastime. When the long winter nights are with us girls begin their knitting. This is a very good occupation in which to spend the winter evenings.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-18 18:09
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The local people help one another in sowing the potatoes. They pick the potatoes from the earth with their hands. The farmer stores the potatoes in lofts and in pits.
The names given to the kinds of potatoes are Kerr's Pinks, Oran Banners, Great Scots, Oran Pilot, May Queens, and many other kinds of potatoes.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 18:08
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water and they would grip the foot and suck all the blood. Some skilful people used these leeches for drawing off blood from swellings in horses caused by hurts or sprains.
anonymous contributor
2019-07-18 17:58
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Then he went to the Block House and got a ship there which was sailing to France. The Block House is situated in Castle-Park near James' Fort. The Block House was used long ago for storing powder.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:57
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because it was the principal church in the parish, before it was knocked down in 1649, but this is all wrong. It was called Cill Árd "the church on the hill", because it is built ona very high rocky hill.
When the tide is out very far in Spring tide a seam of coal can be distinctly seen running out under the sea.

On the top of this hill Micky McMahon the old hedge school teacher taught his little school and the remains can be seen to the present day. This was in the year 1860 and some years before, Himself and his wife lived in the School and they were fed by the people of the locality. They had no children. The school was only 100 yds from the church.

In this Killard strand a three masted schooner came in loaded with timber
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:46
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that had not a cow of its own and the woman of the house used to come out and milk her into the can and when the can was full she used to walk to the next house until she had visited all the houses and she used to fill each woman's can with milk and then she used to go at night to graze in this green field belonging to Murrihy until one day a woman came out with a strainer and when the woman began to milk her into the strainer she got up and flew eastwards and northwards and was never seen again. Some people say she was the same white little cow that landed from the clouds on Inishbofin the island west of Mayo.

Killard is the next town land to the east of Baltard. Some people say that Killard got its name from the church Cill-árd the high church
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:42
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be thine,
I'll buy for her jewels and diamonds so fine,
my sweet little girl from Barnagh.
My country is in bondage I must set it free,
from the foes that opressed our green isle of the sea,
should victory smile in a banner to thee,
I'd fly and live happy in Barnagh.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:39
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darling and kissed her lips too,
my sweet little girl from Barnagh.
My Love she has riches both silver and land,
sheep, cows, and fine horses and a snowy white hand,
a cot in the hillside by fair breezes stand,
my sweet little girl from Barnagh.
When my country is freed it is then shell be mine,
my heart and my riches and all will
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:37
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Beside a green mountain where silver stream run,
there dwells a fair maiden who has my heart won,
her eyes are as a bright as the may morning sun,
my sweet little girl from barnagh.
Her heart is good natured as pure as the dew,
the green mossy banks and where oft' I did woo,
The heart of my
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:34
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a plot entered into by the Whiteboys to assassinate Admiral Evans, Mr. George Bond Low and Mr. Michael Creagh.
The three glens about the mountain of Ceann Abhrath or Seefin are Glenosheen, Lyre-na-Grene or Glen of the Sun and Lyre-na-Fraochán or glen of the "hurts" or whortle-berries.
West of Loch Bó is Cnoch-na-h-Aire = hill of the satire.
Suidhe Finn- a seat where Fionn rested when tired of the chase. The hill of Seefin is called in Agallamh na Seanórach - "Osmetal" which means - mighty stag.

The above has been collected from various Archaeological Journals, from time to time by The Sisters of Mercy, Buttevant.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:29
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and other objects of antiquarian interest.

BEARNA DHEARG:-
a celebrated gap in Sliabh Caoin in the borders of Cork and Limerick. A road from Kilmallock to Cork passed through this gap, which is well known as the place where Mahon was murdered by his Eugenain rivals in 976.
In 1579 the Earl of Desmond set up his standard of rebellion at Ballyhoura
In February 1641 Lord Broghill's troops were quartered on this mountain. Later in the year Lord Mountgarrett, in command of the Irish was on the Ballyhoura hills.
The Townland of Ballyhoura in the Barony of Ossory and Kilmore is in the parish of Rathgogan (Charleville). The owner before the Rebellion of 1641 was Morris Gibbon.
In the time of the Whiteboys, Ballyhoura was a hiding-place for deserters and bad characters and to remedy this a company of infantry was stationed at Lisballyhea, a farm adjoining the lands of Ballyhoura.
During the trial of the prisoners at Cork Assizes 1829 in the "Doneraile Conspiracy Case" Mr. William Burke of Ballyhoura performed an unexampled feat of riding his mare from Ballyhoura to Derrynane Abbey and back again to Cork City in one day - Sunday. This brilliant ride of 90 miles saved the lives of all the prisoners and broke down the informer's story. William Burke died in 1876 - brother of one of the prisoners. Doneraile Conspiracy appears to have been
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:15
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On the old road to Ballyporeen on the side of the road, there is a lough, and according to the people 'tis from that lough that Skeheenarinky got its name.
It is said that in the middle of the lough there grew a green patch, and on that patch there grew a Sgeach, the surface underneath the Sgeach was not firm, so that the water underneath used make it bob up and down. And it is from that dancing bush in the lough that Skeheenarinky got its name.
About a hundred years ago the lough dried up, and the people in the locality got any amount of bog-oak, all the old houses have mantel-trees, which were made from the oak of the lough.
That is a great advantage to the people around because they take their cattle to water there in Summertime.
About forty years ago there was a man drowned there, since then there was a ditch built round there for safety. That man's name was Arthur Flynn, he was a stone-cutter, and on the night of his death, he was drunk, and walked into the lough.

Tim Cleary (per 1911 census)
Skeheenarinky,
Ballyporeen
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 17:03
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Coghluinid an teine so mar cogluigheas Criost Árd.
Muire na bun agus Bríghid na barr
Na trí Aingle is aoirde
Ar Flaiteas Mhic Dé na n-Grást
Ag chumhdach ár dteach ar g-cuid agus á ndaoine slán.

Deireadnn bean an tíghe an Paidir seo nuair a bhíos sí ag coigilt an teine san oidche

* * *

Go n-déanfaid Dia trócaire ar anamnachaibh na marbh

Seo Paidir adeireas nuair atá duine a dul tar Roilig

* * *

A Mhuire is truagh

Deirtear é seo nuair a innsigeas duine sgéál an bhrónach go duine eile.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 16:57
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awaiting decision
arís í agus níor stop sé ariamh gur thug sé suas ag teach a dhearbhráthar i, agus chuir sé breathnughadh isteach an fhuinneóg í agus í ag marcuigheacht ar capall.
Nuair a déirigh sé ar maidin agus nuair a chonnaic sé a mháthair ag breathnughadh isteach air, sgannthruigh sé agus chuaidh sé síos chuig a dhearbhráthair agus dubhairt sé leis í chur aríst agus go dtuibhraidh sé cúig púnt dhó. Thug sé leis í agus chuir sé í agus an chéad oidhce eile thóg sé aríst í agus thug sé suas chuig an bhfuinneóig í agus í ag marcuigheacht ar capall agus pice in a láimh aici.
Nuair a déirigh an dearbhratháir ar maidin agus nuair a chonnaic sé a mháthair agus an capall agus an pice, sgannthruigh sé agus dubhairt sé le na dhearbhratháir í a chuir aríst agus go dtuibhraidh sé deich bpúnt dhó. Níl baoghal ar bith orm í a chuir aríst ars an dearbhratháir mar nuair a bhí mé dá chur indé dubhairt sí liom nach bhfanfhadh sí suimneach san uaigh go deo go dtuibhraidh tusa leath na talamhain dhóm. Thug sé leath na talamh dhó agus bhí an bheirt saidhbhir uaidh sin amach agus níor chorruighe an mháthair ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 16:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí bean ann aon uair amháin agus ní raibh aici act beirt mhac. Bhí an chion aici ar an mac ba shine, acht níor thaitnigh an mac eile léi chor ar bith. Phós sé annsin agus ní leigfheadh a mháthair isteach é agus beigean dó féin agus dá mnaoi fanacht amuigh i sciobál.
Ní raibh acú le n-ithe acht cúpla fata an trathnóna sin agus nuair a bhí sé an oidhce, chuaidh sé chomh fada le teach a mháthar agus ghoid sé mála mór fataí. Nuair a deirigh a mháthair ar maidin lár na bhárach agus nuair a chuala sí go raibh an mála fataí imthighte, bhí sí le buille agus chuaidh sí chomh fada leis an bhfear glic, agus dfhiafhruigh sí de cé ghoid an mála fatai agus dubhairt seisean gur bé an té a mbeadh an sneachta leghtha ar a theach ar maidin a ghoid na fataí.
Nuair a deirigh sí ar maidin, bhí sé an naoi a chlog agus bhí an sneachta leagtha
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 16:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ar chuile teach ar an mbaile agus bhí sí na staic annsin. An chéad oidhce eile ghoid sé bullán mór uaithi agus annsin deirim-se leat gurd fhead siad bheadh ag ithe. Nuair a deirigh sí ar maidin, chuimhnigh sí gur bé a mhac a ghoid é, agus dubhairt sí le na dhearbhrathair dul síos aige agus a rádh leis go mbeadh damhsa mór acú anocht agus go raibh bosca mór sa mbealach a chaithfidh siad é athrugadh go dtí an sciobál agus bhí sí fhéin le dul isteach sa mbosca an chaoi go gcluinfheadh sí cainnt ar an mbullán agus ar na fataí, má sé a mac a ghoid iad.
Chuaidh sí isteach sa mbosca agus thug sí dhá cháca léithe agus thug a mhac síos chuig an sciobal é agus nuair a bhí sé imthigthe chuaidh a dhearbhrathair chuig an mbosca agus bhris sé é agus fuair sé a mháthair istigh ann agus ní rinne sé acht bhreith ar phíosa den arán agus é sháthadh síos ina mhineál agus í thachthadh.
Lár na bhárach tháinig a mhac i gcoinne an bhosca agus nuair a dfhosgail sé é, chonnaic sé a mháthair agus í caillte, agus shíl sé gur bé í phlucadh a rinneadh agus thug sé leis í agus chuir sé í. An oidhce son chuaidh an dhearbhráthair eile chuig an gcill agus thóg sé
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 15:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
when passing it you must keep your right to the bush. Anyone who passes the wrong side of it always meets with an accident.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 15:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
weed. It is said one day as St Brigid was walking through the field and she cut her finger. She put this weed to the cut and it cured it. There is a mark on it and it is said to be the mark of St Brigid's finger.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 15:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
all came, one of the chief men that used to be there named Joe Whitfield his sister was after dying and there was no dancing this night So they all went to the wake and they all keened. When they were finished keening the wife of Joe Whitfield said that they should get out and dance for a while. They did so and danced till morning.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 15:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Lackaroe there was a Catholic Church with a thatched roof. It was blown down with the storm on the 6 January 1839. There was then another built nearer to Cadamstown still in the townland of Lackaroe and the parish of Litter that also was blown down later. Finally the present Church in Cadamstown was built but was never properly finished until 1916 when Father Devaney had it decorated and furnished.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 15:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The great famine of 1846-1847 did not effect this district. A Saint named Cuddy lived here and he said no person would die of famine or plague. The mill was working in Cadamstown during the famine. It had a store of wheat and this was given out to the people of the parish free. There is a site on Knockhill where a family were living in the famine. One day a landlord came and evicted them and threw out their breakfast in the year.
The Government gave relief then. They made the Curragh Road and the Generals Road. Sickness followed the hunger and this killed thousands of people. About that time there was a woman teaching in a school in Lacaroe. Her name was Mrs Elliot. Catholics and Protestants attended her. One day a priest went in and rebuked her for teaching the Protestant Bible. He told her she would die suddenly. One night when she was going to the bedroom the chimney fell in and killed her immediately.
senior member (history)
2019-07-18 15:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ireland suffered much long ago. One of her greatest sufferings was the Great Famine. It occured in the year 1846 and continued the following year 1847.
The potat