Number of records in editorial history: 277039 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 13:10
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scraws. These were large surface sods cut on the bog. The windows were small and consisted of a single pane of glass.
Light was supplied by rush or tallow candles. Tallow candles were made of a grease called tallow. For rush lights a bundle of rushes was pulled and peeled leaving a piece of the skin on one side. These were dipped in oil and burned in a special candlestick. This had a kind of pincers at the top to hold the rush light fast. One of these cadlesticks can be seen at the house of Mr T Goven Donore.
Light was also obtained from splinters of bog deal bound round a rag dipped in oil.

Furniture of olden times
Settle bed
The old houses had each a settle bed in the kitchen. During the day stools not in use were placed on it, and at the nightly Céilidh it was a seat and at night it served as a bed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 12:57
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A cross wall ran along the fireplace parallel to the door and this generally had a little window about a foot square probably to allow some light from the door to reach the fire, or maybe to allow anyone working at the fire to keep an eye on the door. There was an alcove on each side of the fire in which small articles were kept - pipe, tobacco, buttons needles, pins etc. A salt box also hung near the fire so that the salt would be always dry. A Crane stood at one side of the fire buried fast in the floor. This could be moved in or out as required and crooks on it could be raised or lowered to suit.
The floors were made of black clay and near the door and on the hearth were large flags.
Each house had a door and a half-doors. Some half-doors may still be seen in this district. Turf was used for fire. The bank of the fire was of partans or
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 12:49
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In former days houses were generally of the mud wall type. The walls were very thick and built of a special kind of clay known as blue clay. A frame of flags surrounded the door and small windows. The outside was lime-washed. The roof was of thatch which was procured from wheaten straw.
Houses generally had one chimney also built of clay and wattles. Sometimes houses had no chimney and the smoke came out through the door or a hole in the roof. The fire-place was an open one usually along the centre wall but sometimes houses had a fireplace in the corner. On each side of the fire was a hob and under one of these was the ash hole into which the ashes was swept until it could be removed. A shelf was on far side of the fire from the door. It was known as a hurdle and was used to hold all manner of things wool, feathers, etc
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 12:38
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Réidh-na-Scpíne The moor of the Shrine
Ré Mhullín The Flat Hillock
Mauliregan The Hill of the ORegans
Maulatanavalla The hillick of the old town. Some say there was a mill there at one time.
Carrigfadda Carraig Fada
Carraig a gríanán The rock of the Gríanán
Cathair Mór The big fort
Cathair beag the small fort
Tá an dá ceann aca ann fós
Councillius [?] Beside Cathair mór fort. It is supposed unbaptised children were buried here & the marks or remains of graves are seen here.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 11:20
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The river Sullane, speaks once in every seven years. On the following day a drowning is sure to take place in this river.
The river repeats on each occasion the following, "I am the river of death, & where is the man I must drown?".
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 11:16
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An English Agent, acting on the instructions of an 'absentee' landlord, ordered a new road to be cut through Donoughmore Catholic Cemetery (Co. Cork)
The workmen were told to throw the burial mounds as tip dressing on the surrounding fields. The men, threatened with evictions etc. eventually started to work. They had not proceeded very far when one of their number came upon a grave in which a relative of his own was buried. He fell upon his knees & begged of the spirit of his departed relative to intercede with God to put a stop to the sacrilegious work.
The agent, who was inspecting the work, was instantly cast upon the ground, - then elevated to a height of 20 feet in the air, & dashed to earth again - by an unseen hand - & killed instantly.
The workmen said that the noise heard during the horrible incident resembled the swishing of a hundred whips - The ghoulish work was immediately abandoned.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 11:00
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The fairs used be held in Quin Spancillhill and Ardsollus. The old fairs are still held in Quin on the 7th of July and the first of November and in Spancillhill on the 23th and 24th of June. There is no fair held now in Ardsollus nor for the last sixty years. They say the building of the Railway put a stop to the fairs.
There is a special field in Quin and Spanchillhill called the fair-green. There is money called toll on every beast by the owner to the toll collector. When the buyer is paying for the beasts he gets a small sum of money back from the seller which is called a luck-penny. When they are making the bargain the buyer spits on his hand and strikes the seller's hand.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 11:00
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Réidh-na-Scpíne The moor of the Shrine
Ré Mhullín The Flat Hillock
Mauliregan The Hill of the ORegans
Maulatanavalla The hillick of the old town. Some say there was a mill there at one time.
Carrigfadda Carraig Fada
Carraig a gríanán The rock of the Gríanán
Cathair Mór The big [?]
Cathair beag the small [?]
Tá an dá ceann aca ann fós
Councillius [?] Beside Cathair mór fort. It is supposed unbaptised children were buried here & the marks or remains of graves are seen here.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:59
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died, & his relations buried him in the same graveyard as his victim.
A workman, returning to his home at a late hour on the night of the murderer's burial, saw to his amazement, the graveyard moving across the river.
Just before the entire bulk reached the opposite bank, the newly made grave of the murderer detatched itself & remained marooned in the middle of the river, where it may be seen to the present day.
The graveyard is at the opposite side of the river.
A farmer ploughed a field containing a fairy rath (Donoughmore) Suddenly the ground opened, swallowing the man, his horse & plough. The field now remains untilled & cattle avoid it as carefully as humans.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:58
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Long ago a fair was held in Quin on the 1st of November and is still held. Years ago this fair mainly of black cattle, used to gold for a week. This fair was so well known, that buyers came from, all over the country.
Long ago it was the scene of faction fights and even to the present day November fair never passes without a row. They used to have fifty tents in the fair-green selling liquor and food. The tolls are collected at the gate, when the cattle are coming out of the fair-green. The people give a luck penny when they sell a beast
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:56
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There are fairs held twice in the year in Clare-Castle. One on the 30th of May and one on the 11th of November.
The fair in Clare-Castle on 11th of Nov. is the principal fair of the year. It is supposed to be held in the fair-green but it us usually held on the street. Schools are closed on fair-days, as children are not able to walk through the afraid of animals knocking or injuring them.
There is always a large crowd at the fairs an equal number of buyers and sellers. Sometimes the sellers get good prices for their animals at the fairs.
The bargain is made by the buyer spilting on his own hand and then the seller and buyer hit their two hands together. They put mud on the beasts' backs to show that they are sold
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:53
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The biggest horse fairs used be held in Spacillhill on the 24th of June. When the used go to the fair they used have to pay for a drink of water, and ever since the fair of Spancillhill is on a rainy day. The people coming to the fair used lodge in Quin.
There is a fair-green in Quin where the fairs are held. The toll-collecter is Dennis Hassett. There are four fairs held in Quin every year. The 1st of November and the 7th of July are the old fairs, and the 15th of January and the 19th of February are the new fairs.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:51
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Frve......... Fhraoch
Frehaues.. do
Glounbrack Gloun breach
Keim Nabpucka The Pass of the badgers Veím-na-mbrica
Tineel Teine Aoil
Tulligee Tuill na nGaoithe
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:48
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During the Cromwellian Persecution the following strange happening occurred in connection with a graveyard, situated near the banks of the Lee, a few miles from the city of Cork.
The Parish Priest was murdered by a priest hunter. A few weeks later the murderer
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:48
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The Amt of land a 6 horse plough would plough in a Year
there are 42 Townlands in the Parish
Ardagh Eaud. W Five
Ballinaclogh Gullane
Ballyhoulahan Gunane
Ballyviveen Glounbrack
Barley Hill E. W. Kilmane
Benduff Lissard
Bohinagh Maul
Burgatia Maulatanavalla
Cahermore Maulirehan
Carrigrenane Reenas Greenan [?]
Carrigfadda Roury Glen
Cregane Reavilleen
Curraheen Tinneel
Derry Townlands
Dooneen Tulligee
Derryduff Traling
English Island Keimnabricka
Farrancunps [?] Killeinleigh
Frehanes
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:43
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Fairy folk & leprechauns were supposed to revel around a very tiny well in Currabeg (Ovens).
The water was never used, but a dark scum which appeared at certain periods was gathered at midnight & utilised by old women as cures for Ringworm & Warts.
A wandering tinker, stopped at the well one evening, & washed some articles in it. The following day the well appeared at the opposite side of the field.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:28
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Another says:- When strangers come in they always take "a drass" at the churning. (Dawson)
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:25
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Bóithre an ceanntair
Na h-aimneacha atá ar na bóithre seo; Teigheann ceann go Gaillimh, ceann go Muigheo, Mám, ceann go Clochán agus ceann go Rosmuc. Tá sean bhóthair ag dul go Árderrú as teach na Sidheóg acht ní déantar mórán usáid dhó anois. Tá sean bhóthair ag dul go Oorid as Bunscanff. Ba aithghiorra é seo ag muinntir Oorid acht níl sé in usáid anois. Deineadh sé seo sa droch-saoghal. Tá bóthar freisin ag dul ón Derrú go Rosmuc. Déantar usáid dhó sin fós. Deineadh é seo sa droch-shaoghal. Tá aithghiorra freisin ag dul ó Sindile go dtí an Derrú acht is corr uair a déantar usáid dó anois. Tá sean-bhóthair soir ag na h-Illeana ag dul go Gleanntrasa agus téigheann daoine fós air. Téigheann ceann ó Cnuich an Daimh go Guirt Mór. Tá sé in usáid fós.Tomás Ó Niadh, Cros Bhóthair Máma.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:23
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used to be taken every evening by the fairies and used to be back in the morning. One evening when she was coming out of the rath with sticks she fell and broke her arm.
There is a rath in Kidd's field. One Summer when the hay was being saved there were three girls walking through the field. Their names were Dunne. There was no wind out but when they were walking over a certain spot the hay rose around them. One of the girls was going to say, "There is fairies going away", but she had not time to say it because she fainted.
There is a tree in Kidd's field and they call it a raheen. There is a track around the tree and fairies were seen going around it. The men who saw them were Mr. Doyle and Mr. Kidd of Ballypracus, Bunclody. The tree is a white thorn.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:19
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Fir láidre ag cuir dubhlán fá chéile
Uair amháin bhí dubhshlán idir na daoine as Uachtarárd agus na fir as Duithche Sheóigeach. Chasadh siad ar a chéile leath-bealaigh ar thaobh sleibhe in aice le loc Coirib. Bhí fear os cionn gach roinnt(?) acu, mar gheall nach raibh siad in aice le aon dochtúir, no teach, in aice leis an sin. Bhí Suilleabhán os cionn muintir Uachtarárd, dubhairt sé go mbeadh carraidheacht acu. Ó Suuilleabhán a bhí le carraidheacht a dhéanamh le Seóíge as Duithche Sheóigheach, agus 'sé an t-ainm a bhí air Jaicín na mbáiníní agus bhí sé beagnac seacht troigh ar aoirde. Bhí sé reamhar agus láidir. Thosuigh Suilleabhán ag carraidheacht leis. Ba's Gleann é seo agus ní raibh leath an méad ann is a bhí sa bhfear mór. Dubhairt Jaicín, 'má tá sé beag fhéin tá neart ann". Leag Ó Suilleabhán trí uaire é agus fuair muinntir Uachtarárd an lá Troideadh é sea[?]-Aimsreidhe[?]
Máirtín Ó Cheallaigh
Cros Bhóthair Máma.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:17
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man and tried to catch him but he failed. He felt very queer. He went home and got into bed. He was in bed for eight weeks and then he had to go to the Asylum.
There is a rath in Tom-a-Tee, about three hundred yards from the bank of the Slaney, called the Round O. There was a man falling a tree in it and he broke four of his fingers. When the men came next morning to draw home the tree it was growing again.
There is a rath in Mr. Kelly's field, in Drumderry. There is a tree in the middle of it which he should bot interfere with.
There is a rath in Bolinrush and there are bushes growing around it. A man cut bushes there and when he came out he fell dead.
There is a rath in Caragh and a man cut bushes in it. He put the bushes on a car and then he got up on the car himself. When he was coming out of the rath he fell off the car and broke his neck. He was from Carnew.
There is a rath near Tom-a-Tee. A man was ploughing in it and the plough hit a stone. The man fell dead and the ploughing he had done was filled in again.
There is a rath up Hospital Hill and if anyone tills it something will happen him. It is about one mile from Bunclody.
There is a rath called the Round O near Bunclody. A woman named Doyle used to pick sticks there. She
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:07
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St Loughdeen's Well, now situated at Greenagh (Co Cork) is supposed to have moved about one hundred years ago from its original bed at Donoughmore to its present location.
The phenomena is accounted for as follows.
Rounds were paid to the holy well on the twenty fourth of June. The Pattern Day became so popular that a Dancing Platform & Refreshment booths were set up near the Well. Local people were scandalised by the unruly scenes, which followed these innovations.
On one occasion a dispute arose, & fighting soon became so fierce that the waters of the well were dyed with blood of struggling men. At length the disturbance was quelled & visitors & natives dispersed.
On the following morning, a farmer residing in the neighbouring parish of Greenagh, arose early to tend his cattle. He drove the animals to the eastern boundary of a pasture field. Here to
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 10:01
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The leipreachan is known locally as the luiricin. He is said to be about six or seven inches tall. The luiricin is dressed in a red coat and breeches. He has a little cap with a tassel out of it. He lives in the woods. He is seen sitting on the stump of an old tree on a moonlight night making shoes for fairies. If you catch the luiricin he will tell you where gold is hidden. When you catch him you must take his cap and do not give it back to him until you get the gold.You must keep your eyes on him or he will get away. Some people say that when the luiricin is seen the end of the world is coming. He was seen by Mr. Nolan and Bill Murphy of Irish St, in Ryland Wood. Mick Lyons, Church St. saw him near the Hall-Dare's pond, Maide Salac. Mick said that a little man with a red coat jumped out of the ditch. Mick was afraid and ran away. The little man shouted after him but Mick did not come back. Mick Lyons saw him in the Priest's Lane as well
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:54
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prayer. The straws are to be buried and when they are fully decayed the warts will be cured. If you take up the straws before they are decayed you will get twice as many warts as you had before.
The dandelion boiled in milk is supposed to cure consumption.
If you have warts you should wash them in forge-water. You must say the "Our Father" at the same time, and in three days the warts are cured. A man by the name of Michael Nolan washed his hands in it and the warts were cured. (Some wash without speaking)
When you have a cold you should put goose grease on a piece of flannel and put it on your chest.
There is a well in Coolaphooka, about one mile north west of Bunclody and they call it the Spá Well. People used to come to it and drink the water to make them strong.
When you have chilblains you should put parrafin oil on them to cure them.
If you have chilblains you should scoop out a turnip and put salt on the part you scooped out. Then you should put the part back in the turnip again. When you are going to bed you should put the mixture of salt and the piece of the turnip in a rag and put it on the chilblains.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:45
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Mr Lancaster, Main St. Bunclody, cures rupture with salt and "London's Pride".
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:38
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(Related to Mrs. H G Moloney N.T. & myself in 1926 by Mrs. Norry Coughlan (died 1933) then aged 93 residing at Ovens Bridge.)
The terror of Norry's childhood days was a peculiar individual of about 18 years, who wore a long cotton pinafore over his male attire, & who was never seen without a great shining tin bucket on his arm. Needless to state he was the village 'ónsue'
He regarded the bucket as his best friend. He called it "Daisy", & undoubtedly "Daisy" helped him to earn his living, for according to
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:32
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by his bedside. On the day of the funeral it was placed at the head of the grave filled with blooms by the kindly neighbours.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:30
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district one wild winters morning. A great gale had swept the countryside during the night - few people were abroad.- The poor "Natural" tired from his long journey, entered the main lawn on the Bandon Estate. Protected from the rain by the inverted friend 'Daisy' - he strode along, chatting gently to his kind protector. But soon his attention was diverted by the sight of a group of workmen laboriously engaged in trying to reimbed a fine tree which had been almost entirely uprooted by the storm.
The Lord Bandon of that period, stood anxiously by, directing operations. The Onsuc was quickly on the scene. Placing his precious 'Daisy' out of danger, he stood by Lord Bandon's side & remained an interested spectator for a few minutes, apparently deriving great amusement from the excited orders of the latter & futile efforts of the workmen to execute them. Then suddenly he turned from the scene, & restoring Daisy to her place of honour on his head, addressed her thus "Daisy asthore, no wonder you are laughing at the little Lord trying to put up what the Big Lord knocked down".
The "Natural" died at the age of 30. During his last illness Daisy was always kept in view on a table
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:07
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30
Old Ruins
The nearest Castles to me are Lick Castle, Beale Castle, and Ballybunion Castle. There are a lot of other ruins along the bank of the Shannon but these three are the nearest to me. There is an old ruin opposite this school and it is said that there was mass said there in days gone by but it was burned down. The castles round here were important strongholds in ancient times but there is very little of them to be seen at present. Those cases belonged to O'Connor Kerry lived in Beale Castle and it is said that a man named Stack was invited to the Castle and that a quarrel arose and he was murdered. O'Connors wife was a sister to Dermot Mór O'Brien Prince of Thomond, and it is said that he never spoke to her after the sad event in Beale. All that can be seen of Ballybunion Castle is a wall standing abut twenty feet high. Those castles were built in Norman times and Ballybunion Castle was destroyed in 1582. rather than let it fall into the hands of the English. This was about the time of the downfall of the Geraldines
Lick 1382 to 1582
Michael Lynch, 15-7-'38
Doon, Ballybunion
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 09:05
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004
The patron saint the well is Molaoghaire .The words Tobar Molaoghaire are printed with chips of white marble stuck or embedded in cement.There is a concrete cross in the centre of the arch overspreads the well.
There is no local knowledge as far as the writer can ascertain ,as to the date of the Annual Pattern .it is most frequently visited on Sundays and days of special devotion .it is frequented in particular for for the cure of eyes ,or defective vision or any ocular ailment.No rounds are performed or set prayers prescribed .This is a matter for the pilgrim .The water is drunk and is also applied to the eyes.
Some holy object ,medal,beads,tiny statues,using holy water fonts,ivory crosses,etc are left in thanksgiving at or near the well.There is a local tradition that whatever water is taken from the well ,it will never run dry.Even in very fine Summers and after periods of protracted drought ,the well still retains a goodly supply of water which is always pure ,cool and refreshing .
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:54
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There is a horse shoe put on the door to bring luck on the cow. If you got eggs from anyone to hatch with your own you would put a mark on your own to see which would came out.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:52
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Cows
Horses
Donkey
Calves
Hens
Ducks
Chickens
Geese
The names of the cows are Peggie, Buckley, Stack, Kitty, Magpie. How how for driving cows. Suck suck for calves. The cow house is made of tin. When calling the cows we say colly colly. The cows are tied with chains by the neck. Some people tie them around the horns with soft hemp tied on the stack. Tuck tuck for hens.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:45
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chalk them in the coat.
St John's night they make big bonfires.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:44
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St Brigid's day they make wooden crosses and put them on the rafters of their houses. They are usually made of rushes.
St Patrick's Day they wear shamrock on their coats but some of the men wear the Shamrock on their hats.
Shrove Tuesday many people make matches. The two parties go to town and go into a public house and they make a match.
Shrove night they make pancakes. Ash Wednesday we go to Mass to get the holy ashes in our forehead.
Chalk Sunday is the Sunday after Shrove Tuesday. If anyone gets married that day all the youngsters
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:36
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Liars ought to have good memories.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.
Set a beggar on horseback and he'll outride the devil.
A penny for your thoughts.
The sight of you is good for sore eyes.
There are none so blind as they that won't see. She watches as a cat would watch a mouse.
Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast.
A stitch in time saves nine.
A friend indeed is a friend in need.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:32
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:32
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senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:31
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After a while the boy had three big dogs. He took them with him and returned the same path as he went. The giant saw him coming and made at him. The three dogs caught the giant and were about to kill him. The giant spoke and said. If you spares me my life I will give you my palace. The boy tied the two hands of the giant behind his back and left him lying in the field. That night the brother and sister went to see the Giant's palace. The girl stayed there that night the giant came to her and told her to pretend to be sick that her brother was going to get married to a certain lady and when he would he put her out and make her provide for herself.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:26
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The girl did as she was told. When the boy came that night he asked the girl what would cure you. The girl said the livers and lights of the wild "bull of Orage". The following day the boy took his three dogs and brought he livers and lights of the wild bull of Orage. When he came to the Giant's palace the Giant was ripped and had the boy's sister nearly killed. The boy did not bring the livers and lightsto the house with him. He left his dogs minding them. When the boy went to go in the Giant caught him and was about to kill him. The asked to be left pray. The giant asked him where would he like to go to pray. The boy said to the top roof of the castle. The boy was left up. He was only up a small bit when he whistled
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:19
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the giant said that he was only codding him, the boy said that that was his form of praying. How would that be your form of praying said the giant. I am calling the Angels and Saints from Heaven to take my body with them to Heaven when you kill me. Call me said the giant when you are ready. The boy whistled again and his dogs came to him. He got a long rope and let it down to the ground the fox and tiger tangled themselves up in the rope and the boy pulled them up. The lion stood at the door. When all was ready the boy called the giant. When he saw the dogs he ran out the door the lion caught him and killed him.
They were about to eat him but the boy told them not to.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:14
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The boy went away the following day and got married to the lady. He told his sister that day to make the bed.
The sister got a plate with four speers in it and put it under the sheet in the bed. That night the boy died. The speers stuck his heart.
When he was buried the dogs got the livers and lights of the wild bull of Orage again and brought the boy to life. When he came home he was asked who was after killing him. The boy said it was his sister. She was tied to a wild horse's tail. This was done and the dogs saved her.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:09
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could not be killed. The boy went away and returned safely with a big of fowl. When he was eating his dinner a lion came and asked him for food and that she would give him a pup. The boy went away and asked the king. The King told him not to ever see anything hungry while he is here. The boy gave her the food and got the pup. The third day he went, and when he returned a tiger came and asked food of him and that she would give him a pup. The boy gave her the food without asking permission from the king. The King saw him and said you did not ask me for permission. You told me not to ever see anything hungry while I am here. So much the better I like you said the king you must be a king's son
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 07:03
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could cook what he would shoot during the day. The king took the two.
The boy went off the first day with a gun. When he returned in the evening he had a great bag of all kind of fowl and the king was delighted with him. He ate his dinner and took a paper and began to read. A fox came and asked food of him and that she would give him a pup. The boy asked the king for food for the fox. The king told him not to ever see any thing hungry while he was in the king's palace. He gave her the food and she gave him the pup. The following day when the boy was going the king told him not to come home the same path as he would go. The boy said he would kill the giant. The king told him that the giant
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 06:57
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awaiting decision
met the children at the school gate. The two eldest of the children, a boy and girl came out and the servant told them about what the king their father had told him. The two sat into the carriage and went away. They drove to nearest city that night and put up there that night. They set off the following morning for the next city and so on until at last their money was running out. They sold their horses and carriage and went looking for work. The two started off and held travelling for miles and miles until they came to a king's palace. The king came to them and asked them what was troubling them. The boy asked him would he give them work. The king asked him what was he able to do. The boy said he was a good fouler and that his sister
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:30
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awaiting decision
man that hit him with the shovel went to bed that night and he never got up again.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:28
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of her life.
Cards is said to be the Devils game.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:27
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awaiting decision
haunted at the present day.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:23
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:23
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:19
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awaiting decision
the digger, and it is by means of this, that it is drawn.
Two horses are yoked to the potato-digger, one at each side of the shaft.
Potato-diggers are made in Wexford.
The Binder :
At the present time and under present conditions a binder is a very useful implement on the farm.
It is used for cutting corn and tying it when it is cut.
It is drawn by two or three horses.
It is made of a body, a blade, a shaft, the reel or rakes, and a seat.
The blade which is attached to the body is about five feet long.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:12
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awaiting decision
The set of sprongs turn round when the digger moves, and they remove the drill from its place, and reveal the potatoes.
The sock is place beneath the sprongs and when the digger moves, the sock goes under the drill and rises it up, to enable the sprongs to separate the clay from the potatoes.
The wheels are attached to body one at each side.
They are made of metal and are about two and a half or three feet in diameter.
The seat is placed in the middle of the digger, and it is on this the driver sits.
A shaft of wood about seven or eight feet long is attached to the front of
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 04:05
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awaiting decision
The Potato-Digger :
The potato-digger is used for digging potatoes.
It is composed of a set of sprongs,
a sock, two wheels, a shaft, and
a seat.
The set of sprongs is attached to the back of the potato-digger, and are made of iron.
The set is made up of five or six sprongs.
Each sprong is made of a bar of iron about a foot long, and another bar of iron in the shape of a U is attached to the top of it.
All the sprongs are attached to a bar of iron coming from the middle of the digger, and they resemble a wheel.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:56
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into which the seeds fall.
Two wheels are attached to the box,
one at each side.
They are about three and a half or four feet high, and are made of iron.
There is a shaft attached to the front of the box and it is about six or seven long.
It is made of wood and one horse is yoked at each side of it.
The corn is placed in the box, and it is let out into the pipes by means of little wheels.
There are eleven of those little wheels in the bottom of the box, which are turned round when the big wheels turn.
Seed-sowers are also made in Wexford by "Pierce."
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:46
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awaiting decision
One horse is yoked to the sprayer, and it is necessary for him to be very quiet.
Sprayers are not made in Wexford.

The Seed-Sower :
The seed-sower is used for sowing oats, wheat, and barley.
It is made up of a long box, eleven pipes or tubes, two wheels, and a shaft.
The box is made of wood, and it
is about four feet long, and one foot wide.
The pipes are attached to the box, and are about one and a half feet long.
Their bottoms touch the ground, and they make little furrows
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:37
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awaiting decision
wood, but there are some parts which are made of iron.
The barrel is made of wood, and in it is placed the mixture.
The pump; which is made of brass, is placed in the barrel, and the mixture is pumped out through a hole in the bottom of the barrel.
When it comes out through the barrel it passes through a tube, and is sprayed on, and under the potato stalks.
The two wheels are attached to each side of the barrel.
Those wheels are made of wood, but they are covered by iron on the outside.
The shafts are made of wood, and are about five and a half, or six feet long.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:29
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the corn, and chokes and destroys it when it grows up.
It grows as high as the corn, and a yellow blossom comes on it.
When the blossom is sprayed the weed dies.
The potatoes are also sprayed with a sprayer, in order to prevent the blight from coming on the potato stalks.
The potatoes are sprayed with bluestone and washing soda.
The washing soda is melted and it is mixed with bluestone, and then some water is added.
The sprayer is composed of a barrel, two wheels, two shafts and a pump.
The sprayer is mostly made of
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:15
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half in diameter.
There are two shafts attached to the body each about six and a half or seven feet long.
One horse is yoked to the phosphate sower, and there are little wheels at the bottom of box, which deliver the phosphate.
The box of the phosphate-sower is made of wood, and there is a lid on it which is also made of wood.
Phosphate-sowers are not made in Wexford.
They are very useful to the farmer.

The Sprayer :
The sprayer is used for spraying potatoes and "praiseac."
"Praiseac" is a weed which grows in
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:14
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awaiting decision
fúithi go gcuireadh sí cúmhar na fairrge in íochtar, agus íochtar na fairge in-uachtar, sa t-slíge go mbíodh péistí aidhmhéala na fairrge ag teacht ar buis 's ar bais agus ar slais mhaide rámha ag deanamh ceóil spóirt, agus aoibhneas' 's ual-mhuisnigh(?)/ uaill-mhisnig de's na laochra calma a bhí ar bórd, riamh 's coidhche go drángadar go h-Oilean an Uaignis.
Chuir Banrioghan an Oileáin sin céad míle fáilte rómpa. Chuir sí cathaoireacha airgid fé'n mbeirt driotháir críona, agus cathaoir óir fé'n driotháir óg, is bhí iongadh ortha ca' na thaobh gur dhein sí é sin. Níor labhair sí a thuille leótha go raibh sé an am aca dul a choladh agus d'fhiafruig sí annsan den bheirt críona ar mhaith leo coladh i dteannta chéile, agus dúbhradar gur mhaith.
Annsan d'fhiafruig sí dhíobh cad iad na h-ainmeacha a bhí ortha, agus dúbhairt an Mac Críona: "Art Airm-Nirt Rígh Gréag m'ainm-se"; "Traolach, Airm-Nirt m'ainm-se, agus an tarna mac Rígh Gréag, arsa an tarna driothár; "agus tusa?" ar sise leis an mac óg. "Mise", a dhubáirt sé, "Ubhall Airm-Nirt, an mac is óige Ríogh Gréag".
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:08
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awaiting decision
The drill plough is very much like the wheel-plough, except that there are two mould-boards on it.
Drill-ploughs are drawn by two horses, and they are made in Wexford by "Pierce."
The Phosphate Sower :
The phosphate sower is used for sowing phosphate and lime.
It is made up of a body, two big wheels, and two shafts.
The body is made of a box about five or five and a half feet long.
It is about one and a quarter feet wide, and a foot high.
The wheels are made of iron, and they are about four and a
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
fúithi go gcuireadh sí cúmhar na fairrge in íochtar, agus íochtar na fairge in-uachtar, sa t-slíge go mbíodh péistí aidhmhéala na fairrge ag teacht ar buis 's ar bais agus ar slais mhaide rámha ag deanamh ceóil spóirt, agus aoibhneas' 's ual-mhuisnigh(?)/ uaill-mhisnig de's na laochra calma a bhí ar bórd, riamh 's coidhche go drángadar go h-Oilean an Uaignis.
Chuir Banrioghan an Oileáin sin céad míle fáilte rómpa. Chuir sí cathaoireacha airgid fé'n mbeirt driotháir críona, agus cathaoir óir fé'n driotháir óg, is bhí iongadh ortha ca' na thaobh gur dhein sí é sin. Níor labhair sí a thuille leótha go raibh sé an am aca dul a choladh agus d'fhiafruig sí annsan den bheirt críona ar mhaith leo coladh i dteannta chéile, agus dúbhradar gur mhaith.
Annsan d'fhiafruig sí dhíobh cad iad na h-ainmeacha a bhí ortham agus dúbhairt an Mac Críona: "Art Airm-Nirt Rígh Gréag m'ainm-se"; "Traolach, Airm-Nirt m'ainm-se, agus an tarna mac Rígh Gréag, arsa an tarna driothár; "agus tusa?" ar sise leis an mac óg. "Mise", a dhubáirt sé, "Ubhall Airm-Nirt, an mac is óige Ríogh Gréag".
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 03:01
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awaiting decision
The beam is made of iron and it is attached to the top of the body.
A bar of iron, about a foot long, is riveted to the beam.
This bar is rivetted in the centre with a big wheel on one end, and a little wheel on the other end.
Those wheels are made of metal.
The length of the plough is about eight and a half or nine feet long.
Wheel-ploughs are drawn by two horses, and they are made in Wexford.
The Drill Plough :
The drill plough is used for making drills and covering drills.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:54
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body, a beam, and two wheels.
The handles are made of iron, and they are caught by the man who is driving the horses.
The body is composed of a mould-board, a sole-plate, a sock, and a point.
The mould-board is made of metal, and it turns the sod when it is cut.
The sock is made of metal, and a point also made of metal is attached to the top of the sock.
Those two cut the sod, and prepare it for the mould-board.
The sole-plate is attached to the bottom of the body, in order to keep it from wearing out easily.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:46
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the other behind it.
The front one smoothens the drill and the other one covers the seeds when they fall through the tube into the furrow.
The handles are made of iron, and they run parallel to one another at each side of the body.
Turnip-sowers are made in Wexford.
The turnip sower is drawn by one horse.
The Wheel - Plough :
The wheel plough is used for ploughing leas, broken ground and stubbles.
It is made of iron, but there are some parts which are made of metal.
It is made up of two handles, a
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:39
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used for sowing mangolds, turnips, beet, and onion seed.
It is made of metal, and it is about four or five feet long, and two feet wide, and one and a half feet high.
It is composed of a body, two small rollers and two handles.
The body is made of metal and is shaped like a bowl, and it holds about two or three pounds of seed.
There is a tube coming from the body to the ground, and it is through this the seeds come.
The bottom of this tube makes a little furrow in the drill into which the seeds fall.
There are two rollers attached to the body, one in front of the tube and
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:32
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The circumference of a roller is about two and a half feet, but it varies according to the weight of the roller.
Some rollers are made of cement, and those have to be drawn by two horses because they are very heavy.
The small rollers are very light and are drawn by one horse.
There are wooden rollers also, much like the others in shape.
They are very light and are used for rolling mangold drills and turnip drills when the seeds are sown.
Rollers are manufactured in Newtownbarry in the County Wexford.

The Turnip-Sower :
The turnip-sower is
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:23
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two inches in circumference.
One horse is yoked to the hay-rake, and when it has gathered the hay, the hay-rake is turned over by means of a handle.
This handle is made of hickory, and it is about four feet long.
Hay-rakes are made in Wexford by "Pierce" and they are very good and reliable.

A Roller :
A roller is an implement used for rolling corn, broken ground, and meadows.
It is made of granite, and is about four, or four and a half feet long.
Rollers are of different weights but they are generally from four, to eight hundred weight.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:15
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The Hay-rake :
A hay-rake is used for making hay into heaps in the field when it has been cut.
It is made of a hollow bar of iron and thirteen smaller bars of steel.
The bar of iron is about eleven feet long and about nine inches in circumference.
The bars of steel are passed through the other bar so that the portions of the bars, which project at each side are the same length, and are perpendicular to it.
Each of those bars are about three feet nine inches long, and about
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:08
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One night I was coming home from Power's of Newtown (Co Wexford) and when I came to a certain part of the Newtown lane, I saw a figure lying across it
I went back to Power's and told them about it. Anyhow I came again to where the figure was, and when I was passin' it, it rose in the air.
When I went home there was no light in the house and I told my father not to light a candle or his pipe, but he forgot about me after a while, and he lit his pipe and I fainted.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 02:01
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awaiting decision
through the forest oak.
I then heard the chinglin of a trap, and then heard somebody say, "I must go; he is comin."
I then made haste, because I thought there was somewan stalein' my traps, but to my surprise there was a badger cot in the traps.
I sed to myself I would put him into a bag, and bring him home.
After a long time I got him into a bag.
So I put him on my back. I was then very heavy loaded, with the badger, and I said to myself I would make for home.
I was makin' my way down the hillside, when I heard some cries away in the forest oak.
The cries were as follows :-
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 01:52
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rolled off me with fear.
I lit my lamp and she cried right at the back of the ditch.
Then I heard the quackling of a duck.
The Banshee was den in the field.
I shun my light with fear, but to my surprise it was a poor auld fox goin' off with a duck.
I den got up and wiped the sweat off my face.
I believed no more in Banshees or Ghosts.
I continued my journey fearing nothing.
Then I reached my traps, and it was half past eleven.
Rabbits were squealin' an' leppin'.
The night was very dark and dismon, but I made my way
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 01:45
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I was trappen rabbits on the Rock of Carrigbyrne, an' I always used to go see my traps about ten o'clock in the night.
I never believed in ghosts, but wan night I went to a neighbour's house to play cards, and I stayed until a late hour, and I always heard that the Banshee used to come to Lockon Lane.
So I started off to the rock, and just as I was comin' to the Lockon Lane, I heard the Banshee comin' alright, and I lay under a bush to see her passing.
She was crying loudly, and she drew very close to me, and I got very frightened and the cawld sweat
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 01:36
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went out an' I thought I could see him comin' down the Avenue.
I thought I coud see him comin' up to me, an' I stepped out to unyoke the horse, an' be the gogs a man the horse an' car went apast me an' never stopped.
An' I could see it goin down through the bogs, an' I don't know where it went after that.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 01:32
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Wan night ould Hickey was off somewhere.
Anyhow I was waitin' 'till he come home 'till I unyoke the horse.
'Twas about nine o'clock an' I heard a noise outside, an' I thought 'twas Hickey, I went out an' I could see nothin'.
I came in anyhow an' sat down at the fire.
After a little while, I was full sure, I could hear the ould horse comin' down the Avenue.
I went out an' I could see nor hear nothin'.
Begob I went in again an' stayed waitin' for a while, because I knew he'd soon be home.
I was sure he was comin' this time anyway. So I
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 01:24
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said "Rathnageeragh."
He looked down into the room, and it was full of gold and silver, and there were two guns with the money.
He said to her, "You have a lot of fine money, woman".
"Oh! indeed I have, and it is no use to me." She came to the door with him to show him the way home.
She let a great screech and with that a big wind arose, and he was taken back within a mile of his own place.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 01:18
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One night there was a man be the name of Daly of Taghmon comin' home from ramblin.'
When he was goin home he had to pass a rath, and just as he was passin', he was landed in a strange place, and he did not know where he was.
He saw a small light in the distance, and he went to where it was, and when he reached it, it was a small house, and he went in.
He saw an old woman sitting at a spark of fire.
He told her he had gone astray, and asked her what was the name of this place and she
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 01:07
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they were very lonely after. The daughter was married east of Pat the masters old house. There is white thorn bush still in the spot where her house was. One day the daughter's mother that lived in Pat Sheas was going west to Bunaw and she met her daughter on the top of "Leacs". The mother got a fright when she saw her and she was not able to talk to her and she could not stir in the road. But the daughter told her not to afraid and to wash and clean the children for Christmas. The daughter told her too to look at her legs that they were all torn after the briars because she had no stockings and she told her to knit a pair for her. She had no skirt and she told her to buy a skirt and shawl for her and she told her to be sure to clean the children for Christmas. Then she said "Good bye" and that she would not see her anymore. Whe the children grew up they went to America. Two years ago they came home to Ireland looking for there birthplace but they could not find it. They stayed in Kenmare so they went away again. My grandmother knew their mother well.
My grandmother told me this story.
Mary Harrington
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 00:56
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that he would redden it, and then he would put him sitting on it. That moment he got sick and he was dead before two days.
My grandmother that told me this story.
Mary Harrington
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 00:38
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young man that took their photos. Mr. Doyle found out his friends in Templenoe and where his parents were born. They wer all glad, to see him, and to be married to Mary. They went to America again, and Mary and her husband lived very happy afterwards.
My mother that told me this story.
Eileen Sullivan
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 00:17
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sons and a daughter. When the daughter was twelve years old, her mother died so she had to act as a house keeper to the rest of the family. she was the youngest of the family and her name was Mary. She kept the house, and all the place around it very nice and clean. Flowers of all sorts were growing in a small garden in front of the house. In the centre of the island there was large stone, over sixty ton weight, resting eavenly upon the top of a smaller stone that a person would move it with their hands, and it would not fall off. Mary and her brothers used spend the most of their time playing around it. One day a young man came to see the island, he was delighted when the place and all around it so nice and clean. Mary gave him tea, and home made bread, he told her his name was Michael Doyle, and said that he came from Boston, America. He said
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 00:16
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(Drawing of axe) Axe. Found in a house at Millstreet, Bunclody, Co. Wexford. Carried by Straw boys or weddings in the past. At present in possession of W. Forde (N.T.) Church Rd. Bunclody, Co. Wex.
Spear-head.
Wire binding. Similar to that on one opposite. Found in house in Ballyforarcas near house where axe was found.
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 00:11
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There is a stone in a ditch near our house and it is like this (drawing) in Mountgeorge, Boolavogue, Ferns, Co Wexford.
There is a water pond in a stone over Maureen's well like this (drawing) (in Mountgeorge, Boolavogue, Ferns)
There is a stone outside our house, it is round and shaped like this (drawing) (Mountgeorge, Boolavogue, Ferns)
There is another at the bridge (near our house) and it is like this (drawing) These are called mile-stones.
There is a stone on the bridge under our house & it is like this (drawing)
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 00:07
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was always quiet, and used never be crying. One day the youngest child was about seven years old, her mother came in to the house, and asked the eldest girl, did she know her, and she said that "you are my mother". She asked her mother where were you with the past seven years. The mother said that she was in Purgatory all that time, and to-morrow that she was going to Heaven. She asked the girl where was her father and the girl said, "that he should take better care of ye", and that herself was taking care of them all that time.
My mother that told me this story.
Eileen Sullivan
senior member (history)
2019-05-24 00:05
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Long ago people never wore boots until they were 14 years old. Travelling folk never wore boots. Children went barefoot to school in Summer.
Boots are repaired, & some are made by the local shoemaker. There are two shoemakers in Rathdrum. Mr H. Watson & Mr George Ginty.
Clogs were made & worn in this district long ago. There are not as many shoemakers in the district as long ago as boots are made in mass in the factories now.
[?] capped rain boots enables people to walk in snow.
Straw ropes tied round ends of trousers keeps snow out.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 23:59
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Oh, holy mother pierce me through
In my soul each wound renew
of my Saviour Crucified.
God bless the work. Said to people working.
Old people whether there was sorrow or joy on them always said.
"Thanks be to God for everything he sends.
A person on going into a house always said God bless all here.
No person went out on the morning without blessing himself with holy water
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 23:55
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Protestant Soup and the Ark
Refers to the period 1850-56 when Father Meehan celebrated Mass in the Little Ark on the foreshore at Kilbaha.
Percy Keane who was the son of Marcus and Louisa Westby. He became a confirmed drunkard and eventually his wife left him and went to live in Vienna.
They had one child, a daughter, whom she took with her.
When the daughter became marriagable she wished to marry a Catholic there, but the mother (who was a parson's daughter from Mountrath) refused to give her consent, with the result that Miss Keane parted from her and embraced the faith of her husband.
Many of the people in the ballad are still alive, and the singing of it is public, even yet, very often causes a row.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 23:52
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Bhí sagart lá ag dul go h-éochaill. Bhí fear bocht ag imeacht roimh agus asal agus pota aige. Nuair a tháinigh an sagart suas leis dúirt sé leis casadh agus feach arsa an sagart leis an bhfear bocht i lár an bhóthair agus gheobhaidh tú píopa leath coróinneach ann. Cas sé agus nuair a tháinigh sé go dtí an áit adúirt an sagart leis cad a bheadh a'siúl treasna an bhóthair nach deargdaol. Chas sé an sagart "Bhfuair tú é" arsa an agart. "Ní bhfuaireas athair" arsa sé.
"Cad a chonaic tú?" arsa an sagart
"Deargadaol" arsa an fear bocht
"Ó" arsa an sagart "sé an cairseoirsna chuir an leath choróinn ansan shíl sé go dtiocfainn annús dem capall agus beadh seilbh ar m'anam aige.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 23:49
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"Croker" soon saw his mistake, as his life near came to an end,
He saw what a valiant champion, his blood-hounds should contend,
Aloud he cried; "Work on the Ram,
I fear we'll be no more"
"For Brave McGrath will us defeat,
Down by Moyasta Shore."
The army then surrounded him, his arms for to bind,
And said to him, "Brave champion this day you will resign,"
"We will take you now a prisoner,
and you will not be seen anymore,"
"We will send you off in exile,
"Far from Moyasta Shore".
When he saw he was a prisoner,
his excitement further rose,
And with a heart both stout and brave,
he went to meet his foe.
He asunder burst the hand-cuffs, and knocked the police once more,
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 23:44
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So that is twice they were defeated
Down by Moyasta Shore.
He was again surrounded, our champion brave to crush,
It took hundreds of those English curs to get him to Kilrush,
They placed him in a "bridewell" his trial to think over,
And one of Erin's bravest sons,
Is Mc Grath from Moyasta Shore.
Now West Clare can boast of a Champion
Who fought for Erins cause,
And in their blood, he laid English curs,
And smashed all "Balfours" laws,
We hope to see, this champion free,
From their chains once more,
And Croker will remember,
"McGrath from Moyasta Shore".
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 23:41
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ba a scaoileadh isteach ina gcuid talmhan. Bhí go mait ach i gcionn seachtaine bhí an féar ag dul i ganncúir ar na ba bainne. Maidin agus an scoláire bocht ag tabhairt amach nuair a bhíodar ag gabhailt thar áit na bhfathach bhí na ba ag búirthigh nuair a chonacadar an féar breá. Arsa an scoláire bocht leis féin is mór an feall sibh a bheith ag búirthigh leis an ocras. An maidin dar na mháireach agus é ag casadh na ba amach ag gabhailt thar geata na bhfathach thosnuigheadar ag búirthigh arís. "Is mór an feall é" arsa an scoláire . Rug sé ar stampa cloiche mar dé chúis fuil na Éireannaigh ag briseadh glas - bhris sé an glas agus scaoil sé na ba isteach ag inbhear dóibh féin. An chéad greim a strac an céad bó a chuaidh isteach d'airigh an scoláire bocht an foiran ag teacht. Níor bhfada dó go bhfaca sé crainn is clocha á raobadh a bhí sé ansan nuair a tháinigh an fathach bacaigh ag triall air. "Cé hé seo?" arsa an fathach "a thóg seilbh ar m'fhódín dílis talmhan" "Is dócha gur tusa é" arsa sé leis an scoláire bocht ag tarraingt a chlaidheamh dúbalta. "ís mé" arsa an scoláire bocht.
" Cioca ab fhearr leat, iomarscáil nó gábhail de claidthe ar easnuidheacha a chéile?" "B'fhearr liom" arsa an scoláire bocht "an t-iompascáil mar is air a bhí caitighe agam". Tharraing an fathach an claidheamh as an dúbala agus crioth sé seacht bpúint meirg dá faobhar an croth a thug sé di. Luigheadar chuige ansan an scoláire bocht agus an fathaigheach a bhí lán de dhroidheachta agus ba mhór an seo féachaint ar an
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 23:19
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Feirmeoir ba eadh a athair agus b'é an scoláire bocht an mac ba shine a bhí aige, ní raibh sé ag déanamh aon obair corpardha dó. In aice na tine a bhíodh sé ina shuí gach lá. Bhí an fhoghlaim air go h-árd bhí na bliainta ag imeacht agus thuig sé ina aigne nár aon mhaith bheith sa mbaile. dúirt sé leis féin aon oíche amháin go raghadh sé ar siúl maidean dos na mháireach féachaint an bhfaigheadh sé aon slí maireachtaint. D'éirigh sé ar maidin agus d'ith sé a bhricfást agus i mean-lae iseadh chuaidh sé ar siúl. Bhí sé ag siúl rith an lae go raibh crothnún na h-oíche ag teacht air gur seoladh isteach i gclaise sléibhe é. Dúirt sé go ceart go mbeadh tigh feirmeora san áit go bhfaigheadh sé lóistín ann. Bhuail tigh feirmeora air. Chuaidh sé isteach thar doras agus d'fhiafraigh sé de'n mbean tighe an raibh an máistir istigh. Dúirt sí go raibh . Dúirt sé gur ag lorg oibre a bhí sé. "Tá sé ag lorg fear oibre" arsa sí sin leis. "Bhfuil tú ábalta an ba bainne a chrú" arsa sí. "Atáim" arsa sí.
Tháinigh an máistir isteach agus shocruigh sé leis ar feadh trí mhí sa Samhradh. Shocruigh sé síos ansan an oíche sin. Ar maidin dúirt an feirmeoir leis gurb é a bheadh le déanamh aige na ba a seoladh isteach gach amidin is tráthnóna agus faire na ndiaidh i rith an lae. Déirigh sé ar maidin agus rug sé na ba isteach leis. Crúdhadh (ar maidin) iad agus nuair a bhíodar crúidhta chuaidh an feirmeoir leis chun a teaspáint cá mbeidís ag inbhear. "Tá áitreabh fathaighe atá fé draíocht ar thaoibh an bhóthair agus caithfidh tú gan na
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:54
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Dá fheabhas mo ráidthe b'fearr mo tréithe
Déanfainn bruinnealta sásta bán a bréagadh
Agus ó táim comh deas lámhach ná beir son saol mé
An bás
Níl a' cúrsaí an saol seo atáim-se ag pléidhe leat
Nach ar beatha t-anama ó íre is géire.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:50
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Is dóigh leat gur leanbh ó indiu go dtí indé mé
'S mó leath-fear calama chuireas den saol riamh
An Fear
Bfuiris a thinnte gur chailleadar san leath na geaga
'S fear do croithe-se á gcur don saol
Agus mar a imeóirse uiam-se agus gan a bheith ag pléidhe liom
Cuirfeadh in iúl duitse nach siucrím caol dair
An Bás
Ar d'airighis riamh an tachead a thugas do claidhire Caesar
Agus do Rí Herod fallsa an giúirtís bréagach
Nó Rimrod a chuir codladh ar Qualey
Níor d'fhág mé duine ar bith ar sliocht na Féinne
Agus ba dóigh leatsa ar easba ban a chailleadh an méid sin
Ní h-eadh! ach an snáithe bhí caite aca agus mise ba bhaol dóibh
Agus ní fhágfaidh mé tusa go gcuirfidh mé céim ort
Raghaidh mé fé dhuit.
An Fear
Do bhuaileas suas le'm eadan agus cromas ag béiceadh
Dá raghainn i bpoll trachair ní bheadh aon mhaith bheith ag pleidhe leis ó marbhuig sé an méid sin
Nach mar sin féin cromas ag masim go cruinn dó cad a dhéanfainn
Do dheanfainn gnó ceardchan bpáca is ceachta
Nuair a raghainn ar an mbán is árd a bímfinn
Déan fainn sult gáire ia pléisiúr ar áilneacht Éireann
Mo choróin a d'ól in tabhirne agus í d'ól le féile
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 22:49
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084
fire to the Castle in town at all points. But it was repaired while in the hands of Edward into whose hands it fell owing to the default of an heir made to Richard De Clare .However in spite of all on July 20 th 1332 the castle was taken by King Murtogh,and his chief lieutenant, Mac Conmara probably mac Con ,son of Lochlainn son of Lumeadhe Mór,At last after many a well laid siege and fierce assault. Sir Thomas De Clare famous fortress fell it stood the brunt of battle bravely for 52 years of ceaseless strife and was a place according to all con contemporary accounts of extra ordinary strength ,quite beyond the power of men to conquer .it was utterly demolished on this occasion. There is not a trace of of the Clans great fortress now to be seen : all has disappeared.
The Third Castle
This castle is known as De Rokeby's Castle It was built in 1353 ,as we learn from an unknown annalist that Sir Thomas de Rokeby.who had been sent to Ireland as Justician in 1350 "with English troops ,caused both Thomand and Munster with their chief rulers to wit
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 22:43
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"Briene" means a fairy mansion or palace. There are a few smaller forts up in the hill and these were used for keeping cattle and sheep and to guard them from wolves. There is one in "Lisheens" which is the lower "liss" of the kingdom. The one in Kealkil is made of stone and these are called "Cahirs", and it is supposed to be a burial place, and there is an entrance hole to it. There is a townland near Bantry called "Cahir". It is so called because there is a "Cahir" or stone fort there.There is another "Cahir" in Maghanaclaidhe near Kealkil.
It is believed that there are underground tunnels going from one to another. Very few people interfere with these forts. There is a story told of a man, who began to dig out a fort but he got a pain in his leg and died a week after. There is an entrance hole in the side or in the top of each fort and once, a man by the name of Denis Cronin went down into the fort in Brienemore, with a lantern to explore the interior, but when he entered it the lamp quenched and he returned back again, he died six months after.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:32
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Ar Cnoc an Phaoraigh atá an Carraig seo i bparóiste Baile Dubh. Cloch shleamhain mín atá inti. Tá trácht ar an nglas Ghaibhneach ar fuaid na Mumhan. Amach as an bhfarraige a tháinigh sí ag bun abha. Bhí laigh ag dul léi. Innistear dúinn gur ar máithe leis na daoine bochta a thagadh sí i dtír agus go líonadh sí gach coileán Rúidhte pé méad a bheadh ann. Bhí bean éigint ann nár chuir Dia ar a leas. Thug sí léithe criothar cun na glaise gagnaighe do clú. Ach nuair a chonaic an bó an cleas a bhí ag an mnaoi scaoil sí búir aiste agus seo amach chun farraige arís í.
tá rian cos na bó go soiléar ins an gcloch. tá rian trí gcos an stóilín mar a mbíodh lucht crúidte ina shuí. Tá rian an buicéid go soiléar ag rian cos an larigh.
Slinntreacha atá sa chloic tá an taobh dí atá ar thaoibh na gaoithe anoir, Síon idthe. Is féidir na shontreacha a bhriseadh leis an láimh. Is cosúil gur brácht an cloch tríd an talamh gur deineadh claochló uirthi agus gur caitheadh aníos láibh. Tá na mílte troig de bhonn cloc sa cnoc ceadna agus iad measctha go maith sa t-slí nárbh iongach go dteighfeadh an cloch. Is cosamhail leis gurb é sin an uair a tháinigh an gabhneach. Sé sin gur tháinigh sí sara raibh an fuaradh déanta ag an gcloich.
Cow Rock a thugann muintir na h-áite ar an gCarraig seo.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:21
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They say there is money buried under the steps in front of the door of Annesleys house. Mr. Annesleys fore fathers that put it there. Years ago a man from Castletownroche tried to dig it up one night between eleven and twelve o'clock. A ghost woman hunted him as har as his own door. When he went to open the door she gave him a kick and he died shortly afterwards. It is silver that is buried there. Four half soverigns is buried there.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:19
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drawing nearer though they could not see him. The two men went to the other side of the ditch and they could hear the bull roaring over where they had dug. The bull stayed there and when the men saw he was not going away they went home. Next morning before the two men went to work they went to see where they had dug but the hole was filled up again.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:17
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the door.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:17
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sign of a funeral. If a person came into a house and one making a churn if they did not make the churn they would [the] take the butter. When a woman is churning she will not let out a coal. There was a woman making butter one day. She said her butter was gone. She put nine irons into the fire. The woman who had the gone came roaring to
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:15
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Ba cruiadh an saol é ag muintir na h-Éireann le linn an Gorta. Cuireadh na mílte ag Reilig a tSléibhe lámh le Dúngarbhán. Dá olcas é an scéal ag muintir na nDéise. Budh mheasa ná san é in áiteanna eile.
Le linn na h-aimsire son do ghaibh fear bocht ó Ciarraí thar bhrághaid anso. Is ar éigin a bhí ann siúl, seasamh ná labhairt le h-ocras anso agus gam-chúis. Buail duine des na comharsain leis agus do chuir sé caint air. Ba trua-mheileach an scéal a bhí le h-insint aige ar gan dada le n-ithe aga leath ach ocras s'uireasba ag planncadh a chéile. Beidís sásta go leor dá bhfaighidís duilleabar na dtorthaí féin d'fhághailt.
Bhí an scéal comh dona ag an fear bocht so gur caith sé a t-asailín do marbhú agus luige chuige á d'ithe. Bhí go maith agus ní raibh go h-olc an faidh a sheasuigh sé sin ach ní bíonn in aon rud ach seal. Thug an fear isteach é agus thug sé roinnt le n-ithe agus le n-ól do. Thug sé feirín beag i gcóir an bhóthair do.
Sé bhí go buideach beannachtaí é. "Is fíor ar seisean "go mbíonn cabhair Dé an bóthair agus feicidh Dia dealbh fear t-aigne thoidhche". Do bhog sé bóthair abhaile ansan agus ní fhaca ná ní bfuinead tásg na tuairisc de san dúiche seo ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:15
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In olden times, the people used to think that the fairies shot their cows. There was a man called "Paddy Barr" who had a cure. The cure was that he used to scrape nine irons, three of which were, the poker, the pot and the (poker) kettle. Then the (kettle) stuff which he scraped off the nine irons, was put in water and then it was put in a bottle and given to the cow to drink, and it was cured immediately. "Paddy Bar" died , and he left the cure to another man called "James Lynch" who lived in "Trillick" There was a woman living in "Trillick" whose name was "Mrs Deery" and she had a cow which was shot by the fairies, and she sent for "James Lynch." When Mr Lynch came, he gave the water to the cow, and it was immediately cured.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:13
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When calves suffered from an issue of blood, nine irons were put into the fire and made red-hot, then put into new milk and the milk was given to the calves.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 22:03
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Norry's account a modern "Parcels Express Van" would not convey half as many messages as this famous bucket.
From morning to night, in all seasons 'the Natural' tramped through the countryside, from farmhouse to shop, from hilltop to valley, conveying messages in his well polished "Daisy". Hours of happiness were spent in grooming her, & in gazing at his reflection on her shining surface. The bucket was left in the Church porch - most reluctantly - whilst its owner attended Mass.
At weddings, christenings & wakes the Natural appeared, accompanied by his tin friend. On three occasions (the festive ones) it served as a musical instrument. The violin & melodion were loudly accompanied by thumps on Daisy.
The neighbours - with the exception of the children - loved the poor simpleton. He had access to cabin & hall alike. He often astounded the people by quaint comments which indicated a wisdom quite unexpected in one of his type.
His aimless wanderings often led him as far as Bandon (10 miles from Ovens). He visited the
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:57
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One head one foot and four legs? A bed. As round as an apple as flat as pan oneside a woman and the other a man? A penny. What goes round the house and round the house and sleeps in the corner? A brush. What goes to sleep with its finger in its eye? The crane crook. A live in the front dead in the middle cristened behind tell me the riddle? A plough. Through a rock through a reel through an old spinning wheel through a millers hopper through a bag of pepper through a sheep's shin bone such a riddle never was known? A Moth. What is it is black and white and red All over? A newspaper. What is it has one eye and cannot see? A Needle.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:48
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take his human shape anymore.
He was then turned into a goose and flew to a lake in Limerick where he remained until his death.
Though she repented for her misunderstanding and sent many messages to her lord asking him to come back; but he had no power to put away the spell cast upon him by her wickedness.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:46
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Geraldines. In the year 1345 there was a great war on this island this is how Sir Ralph Ulford became the Chief. He ordered the "Taoiseach" to go up to the Dail in Dublin.
Sir Ralph Ulford and his soldiers came there and they attacked the Castle. The Earl's soldiers fought quiet [?] for a while but they had to rise out in the end. The two knights and the chief steward were hung.
Long ago a druid lived in this Castle he was able to turn himself into a serpent. One day his wife forced him to to try one of his tricks. She made certain promises. He leapt into the water and turned himself into a serpent, he opened his mouth as if to swallow his wife, she began to scream. Then she had disobeyed him, now he could not
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:45
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The terror of Norry's childhood days was a peculiar individual of about 18 years, who wore a long cotton pinafore over his male attire, & who was never seen without a great shining tin bucket on his arm. Needless to state he was the village 'ónsue'
He regarded the bucket as his best friend. He called it "Daisy", & undoubtedly "Daisy" helped him to earn his living, for according to
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:38
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and also realized what he had done. The beating which the poor labourer received was very severe and it was all because he had helped the priest escape.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:37
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at "Barr -an- Carraige". After spending some years in this manner, he went to America where he died in 1890.
OBrien was another learned man. He had a hedge school in the townland of Mein where he taught many pupils and was assisted by Miss Fawlvey.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:36
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The dreadful disease of diabetes attacked the descendants of the Prosletyser. Local tradition tells of the dreadful death of the last of the line a few years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:34
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senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:33
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2019-05-23 21:33
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2019-05-23 21:32
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2019-05-23 21:32
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2019-05-23 21:32
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senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:31
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senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:31
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Told by :-
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:31
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this bridge to Saint Finian's Church; this stony path can be traced through Mr. Griffin's field. Sixty years ago it was quite plain to be seen by passers-by from the Killarney road.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:28
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:21
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go Sasain. Acht í gcionn cúpla seachtmain tháínig siad arist. Agus ní rabh an gasúr leó. Sidheoghaí a bhí ionnta nuair a tháínig siad. Tháínig an gasúr fosta [?] na ndiaidh, agus níl na cailíní go rabh siad beó acht ní rabh.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:06
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The wild birds that are most common about this district are-, the robin, the blackbird, the raven, the crow, the sea-gull, the pea-wit, the crane, the wren, the sparrow, the pigeon, the lark, the swallow, the moorhen, the magpie, the thrush, the jack-daw, the cuckoo, and the corn-crake.
All the birds that migrate from this country to a warmer climate are-, the swallow and the cuckoo. They come in the beginning of Summer, and go away when Winter is approaching.
The robin builds her nest in a ditch she makes it out of clay and moisture; she also lays four brown eggs.
The swallow builds her nest in a barn, or in the eaves of houses. It is always so high that we cannot see what kind of eggs she lays.
The cuckoo lays an egg in some other birds nest, and that bird hatches it for the cuckoo.
If boys rob birds nests it is said that they shall be left without a house when they are in
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:04
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COLLECTED BY
Mary Skehan (age 14yrs)
Rath

Manningstown:- Mannanstown ? Lus mór ( according to R. Dunne Rath Medicinal herbs were collected here)

Ardcath:- Árd Catha
Athcarn:- Ath an Chairn
Annsbrook:- Locán Mór
Balgeeth:- Baile na Gaoithe
Blackhill:- Dubh Ais

Bellewstown:- Baile Beilliú - Baile an Coiligh

Boolies:- Builín (milking place)
Coolfore:- Cúl Fuar
Clooney:- Cluain Fhiadh

Crann Fionan:- Crann Fionaín - the tree of the whitish field

Croft:- Páircín
Commons:- Baile na gCurrach
Cloghertown:- Baile an Clotair
Clonalvey:- Cluain Ailbhe
Four Knocks:- Fornocht
Greenanstown:- Baile an Grianáin

The High Cross:- An Crosaire Árd
(Long ago the space at the front of the Parochial house gate was called "The High Cross", and the place on Mibourt's(?) hill at the Mass bush was called the "Low Cross" (R. Dunne Ardcath)
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 21:03
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The Finn was evidently a “No man’s land” alternately overrun by the ONeills and ODonnells. Mrs Doherty Connashesk, and Mr. James McLaughlin tell me that ODonnells had their castle on this side of the river at Dromore (i.e. the right bank) on the side of which now stands a ruins of a corn mill. The stones of the castle were used in erecting the mill. A part of the river was diverted to form a moat round the castle, thus leaving the castle on an island. One of the ODonnell clan neither a warrior nor chief was called a “man of the field” hence Mansfield – the name of the landlords of Killygordon
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:59
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senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:57
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About fifty years ago the Morass ferry boat capsized when crossing the ferry and some of the men got drowned. A man named Dan Mc Gee was in the boat and he crept on the ground under the water till he reached the dry land. He was afterwards called Partan Mc Gee.
Partan means a sea crab.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:56
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Once a man lived in Umericame named Owen McClafferty.
He could drive his naked fist through a board an inch and a half deep.
There was another man named Jack Johnson, who could drive his fist through a door. He could also send his fist through a pack of flour.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:55
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The same man John Friel was a great runner too. One time the Earl of Leitrim offered a High - land ram to any of his tenants who kept sheep. John Friel and my grandfather went to get one each. There was a very good ram amongst the others and John asked the Steward to give him this one. The Steward told him he could not because this was Lord Leitrim's own choice to put along with his own sheep. John said, "If I can catch him in a race can I get him?" "Yes, I will give him to you surely said the Steward for he was sure John couldn't catch him. John ran round the field three times after the ram, (it was a mile round) and on the fourth time caught him and won him.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:53
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About eleven years ago there was a very big storm the biggest one my mother can remember.
It blew the windows out of our house and the slates were rattling on the roof. The roof was taken off a barn belonging to Robert Alcorn and it was carried away up to the upperend of Glinsk.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:52
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James Carr Muineagh had a boat tumbled on her mouth on a nice level green up at the full sea mark at a place called the Ben Point. A man named Gorge Morrow who lived in the town land of Seedaugh was going home from raking that night and he noticed that the boat was in danger of been lifted by the wind so he went up and wakened James.
They thought she would have been lifted before they got down to her again. They tied her down with ropes and kept her safe.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:51
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During the same storm there were six fishing boats wrecked and theyr tied to the quay at Downings.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:49
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The following is a list of names of beggars remembered by my father and mother.
John Cannon
Peter Orange.
Willie Noble
John Clarke.
Pat McGinley.
Teague McGinley.
Mary McGinley the wife of Teague McGinley.
Mickey Hanlin.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:49
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The names of some of the beggars who used to come to this district in my father's and mother's time are as follows,
"John the Bottles, Brian Livers, Own the Tinker, and Pat the Tinker Simey the Tinker and John Love, Peter Orange, Johndy Ban, Pat Boyle and James Boyle and the Key men."
John the Bottles got his name because he gathered bottles from house to house and he
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:47
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There's a sweet garden spot in my memory
It's the place I was born and reared
'Tis long years ago since I left it
But return there I will If I'm spared
My friends and companions of
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:46
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On the 11th March 1937 a man named Pat Logue, Pilot of the boats in Mulroy bay got drowned. He went out in his curragh to take up a Potatoe vessel named the Cragsman to Mulroy quay.
The day was very stormy and the sea was very rough. Pat threw a rope to one of the men on the boat who caught hold of it but it was so stormy that the curragh drifted away and the rope slipped out of the man's
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:45
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A woman came out of a house and asked him to carry a child to Tullyvallen N.S. He brought the child to school and when he was coming home from Drogheda there was no house at all where he had seen the house in the morning.

Collected and arranged by pupils of Standards V to VIII
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:44
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A man named Jack Peoples (Glinsk) who lived in Glinsk a number of years ago was a very strong man because he could carry a four hundred weight stone to any house in the town. This stone was used for grinding barley.
One day a small boat came in along the shore and it was full of fishing nets and this man went down to the boat and he took a number of nets and a plank up the shore on his back
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:43
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Another day the same man - Patrick Kerr, went in a boat called the Grania Mór to Portrush.
A swimming match was to take place in Portrush that day.
The Captain of the boat Peter Mitchel, made the sailors hurry the boat so as to arrive in Portrush in time for the swimming match.
The Captain paid half a crown and got Patrick entered for the swimming contest.
There were twelve swimmers to swim five singles. While
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:42
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Running to the north and parallel to the Kells road is one part of which is known as Claide Stoca. Mullaghroy Lane or Shanagown Lane leading to McGuinness farm. There was a forge at the end of this lane until recently and said to be "haunted" by a "white woman". The gate beside the school is known as "Bellews Gate" said to be haunted by a "white cow". A short distance from Grange Cross, on Slane road there is a hollow on the right hand side. It is said that no matter what efforts are made to put a stone down in it, it rises again.

Cross of Balrenny. There is a white lady seen on back of carts going to the fair and horses terrified. There is a Bean Síde at "Neddy's Gate" on Drogheda road. A woman with a white coat and a white cloth round her neck appears after ten o'clock.
Lights are seen at school gate sometimes.
Twelve yellow candles were seen on several occasions.

There is supposed to be a Bean Sídhe at McDonagh's Gate, near Balrenny. A woman sitting on the gate combing her hair and always crying was seen on several occasions.

Patrick Conlan was going to Drogheda at 10 a.m.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:42
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One day a man in the townland of Ballyheerin called Patrick Kerr was out in a boat lifting fog. His fog net filled with seaweed, and the iron of his pole fell off and sank to the bottom of the sea.
He stripped off his clothes
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:41
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A man named James Reed
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:40
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There is an old man living down in the town land of Balloor named Callaghan and when he was in his prime he could life five hundred weight.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:37
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1. As poor as a church mouse.
2. As poor as Job's cat.
3. All together like Browne's cows.
4. As yellow as a duck's foot.
5. As white as the driven snow.
6. As clean as a new pin.
7. As clear as crystal.
8. As black as tar.
9. As blind as a hatchet.
10. As deaf as a drum.
11. As big as Samson.
12. I got what Davy shot at the Lough.
13. As hoarse as a drake.
14. As long as Pall Strand.
(Pall Strand is the strand above Quigley's Point on Lough Foyle.)
15. As straight as a rush.
16. As good as gold.
17. As blue as a blue-bag.
18. As fat as a butcher.
19. As old as the hills.
20. As sure as shooting.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:36
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:35
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clab depended on to keep a secret - one who talks too freely
ceilidhe I was out on my ceilidhe = I was out visiting.
Lá fheil Miuire This is the term generally used for Assumption Day
Fadar They say when speaking of football. He is a good "fadarer" meaning that he is 'good in attack
The "er" at the end of the word is English.
báirneach barnacle- The English word is never used always báirneach
Braichlin a large shell fish about eh size of the palm of the hand. I think the names comes from braid in a sheep because the edibale part inside the shull is thin and comparatevily large - somewhat like a sheep. This meaning is not given in [?]
Piotach = a small fish - the young of the fish known in Inishowen as Dirseach
Dirseach Known in Standard English as The Coal fish.
Gibneach The horned sand eel.
"Seolog" This is the fish known on the other parts of the coast as magac = pollock.
"crainearach" This is the fish known in other parts of Donegal as "buyin" and in Irish ballan. It frequents places where there is a muddy or dirty bottom and is always caught with bait.
garbhan "Garviu". This is the fish known as becam [?]
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:19
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garbhan and called "bragers" on others parts of Donegal coast. They are usually caught during the months of July and August.
Glassan This is the fish "glasan" the young of the coal fish
Tarrach" or as it called in Inishowen 'Duirseach'
When cooking fish about 30 years ago a glasan was sometimes cooked in the following manner. The inside or guts were taken out taking care to keep the 'melt' intact. The melt was then put inside ansd the fish closed up. It was then put on coals or on an iron on the coals and rasted. This was called a "glasan tarrach"
tarrach = big bellied.
Partan this is the word always heard for a small crab.
Iris The rope hanger of a creel,. Plural iriseacha. I have not heard the plural used.
Bórach This is how I heard this word pronounced here. It is the same as bhuarach = a spancel
cartan This word is still used here. it is a parasite found on sheep.
ceapaire The mutilated form I heard was "capper" the same word as ceapaire meaning bread with butter on it. When a cow was taken to the male for the purpose of copulation the usual question put was Did you earn
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 20:08
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maróg - we say a fat person has a maróg on him.
Gob. a fellow with protruding mouth
crag. big hand.7spldach flat footed & feet inclined outwards.
Food. Cruitín potatoes bruises after boiling for dinner.
Crachan. porridge, ceapaire . tuirrín - soft cake of bread
Mealdar amount of meal brought from mill at once by farmer
duirlean a big lump of round stone also applied to stout [?]
pabióg - a terrible blow with fish
Glam - to catch with hand a girl says - boy made a glam for her.
7) Connected with house, Rigín, puirlean bhatal scrath. scolbh
8 Tubaiste applied in loss of cattle
Aimseach applied when child meets accident a child having to many aimseach is said to have bad luck in life
Aircín the smallest pig in litter. also applied to small man. Gaimirtín. a stupid big fellow.
pachaill a kind of unhandy stout lump of a fellow. Also a lump of clothes on a person's body as what pachaill is that you have under your goic, a kind of fellow who mocks or makes little of others a sarcastic fellow.
Glugaidhe a kind of stupid fellow.
Glug a kind of hollow [?] in cow also noise made by water in boots.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:54
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Ramais = talk without seuse.
Samhains - food made from oaten meal seeds at November.
Stocach. A term for a lump of a boy.
Gasúr, also used for a boy.
Stocaire used here for one sponging or kind of begging.
Streall. we say make me a steall of tea
Gámaidhe. applied to stupid fellow.
Splinnc is used for a high sharp rock sticking out.
speach a back kick, we say horse hit me a speach
spang, a fit
Spailpín sound spuilpín a bad young boy
spág for foot generally in derision also spágach
smiog we say for a person who got weak There wasn't a smiog on him
Smailc for a mouthful. We also say what are you smalling
slog for swalling. slog that into you we say,
Smut for a person having big mouth especially mouth [?]
smur for light ram.
Sodóg for a stout lazy fellow.
Scudal, we call a girl doing hard about a house a scudal
maol for cow without horns.
Magnt [?] we say magnt or space nanturally between two front teeth is sign of beauty also lucky sign.
mútar - the miller's share.
Brígh. We use brígh very often everything that is boiled and part of it soluble in water we call it brígh.
Bolgam we use this in connection with tea
deor. we say you'll not get a deor.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:53
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were seized and "keepers" placed in charge of them. During the night disguised men overpowered the keepers and drove off the beasts.
Early on the following morning a car was heard coming along the Cork Road in the direction of Kinsale. One of the bums who was Wm Clarke, Beadle of the Corporation, better known as Clarke the Bellman requested the driver of the cart to untie the ropes that bound his arms. The driver was John Browne a fine young fellow of 19, supposed to be the natural son of General Sir Thomas Browne Knockduff.
The lad had been reared by relatives of is mother living in Lacknacummeen and what education they could afford to give him was received in the school conducted by one Stokes in Clontead Chapel. Browne has no sympathy with "bums" but certain circumstances of the case appealed to his manhood, and therefore he did not demur at the request of Clarke. The Bellman detained young Browne for some time and asked him to tie his arms again. Browne innocently complied resumed his journey to
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:41
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58. Wakes are sometimes rather rowdy gatherings, especially the wakes of the old people. Among the young people there is sometimes feat throwing and other act of rowdyism.
59. No person now living remembers "keening" taking place at funerals in this district.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:40
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An chead la de'n bhliadhian úr coisceim coillí fada ar an lae. Oidhche brigdhe dá uair go leith cait coinneal ar chul. Lá Padruig coinneal agus coinnleoir ar chul. Oidhche Brigdhe breichine baineadh cinn de criocana, gabh ar do gluain. Deanamh unaidh agus leig isteach Brigdhe. Se beata se beata, se beata.
Padruig Mhic Manuis bhfuol tú ag eisteacht le mo ghit mise mac tí na glora. Lá mise annseo induí, ma mharbhuigeann tusa caora big bhan na muilt beag dubh. Beigh tusa ar na maide roimh la seachtmaine ar an lá induí. Eirigh suas a Mhainus marb an cinn is fearr sa cro, agus rinne se sin. Bí banis mhait suimhneas acú buaidheachas da glor.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:38
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kitchen was bravely resisted, & the people were just about to return to their homes when suddenly they saw the horses halt at the Abbey gates. The drivers urged them on pulling & shouting & beating the animals, but in vain, the horses would not move. Extra help was obtained from Protestant sympathisers but all the efforts failed.
The Abbot advised the people to return to their homes & ignore the incident. At a later hour the monks secured supplies of food & helped the poor as usual.
On the following morning the horses were still at their post; bearing their burden patiently, but quite immovable. Time passed on. Further attempts were made to remove the flour & biscuit - but again the burdens proved unbearably heavy & eventually the work was abandoned.
The food decayed & the horses expired beneath their traces when the last particles of food had crumbled to decay. Even the birds & wild animals boycotted the Soupers Bribe at Kilcrea Gates.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:33
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In Urris a flail is used by the people for thrashing. A flail is a simply made article because it is made from two sticks. The longer one is about five feet and is called the hand-staff and the shorter about three feet namely the 'soople.'
The 'soople' must be made from a strong tough hazel stick because it must stand against a lot of beating. A hole is made through the hand-staff of the hand-staff near the end and a rope is put through the hole and spliced on to the 'soople' and tied tightly with a
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:26
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Fish
...................Famaire
Shark ling
Trout haddock
Dog-fish bull head
salmom whiting
lobster sting-fish
Cod sole
herring cruaban
mackeral cos máglain
fluke blind-hayes
glasan
shellog
skate
leac-ruabhj
sand-eel
eel
mabadh donn
red mallet
gournet7cat-fish
crab
partran
piceach
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:22
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58. Wakes are sometimes rather rowdy gatherings, especially the wakes of the old people. Among the young people there is sometimes [?] throwing and other act of rowdyism.
59. No person now living remembers "keening" taking place at funerals in this district.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:20
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Some people still believe in fairies, nearly always referred to as the "wee folk." They believe that the fairies come out at night usually under thorn bushes. Many people wouldn't dream of cutting down a lone thorn bush. They believe that bad luck is sure to follow the cutting down of one of these bushes.
I knew a man who had a large thorn hedge between two of his fields. The hedge had grown very tall and was injuring the crop in the fields.
I advised him to cut it down but he resolutely refused to do so. I asked him why and he said there might be a "gentle" bush among the hedge and to cut it down would bring him all sorts of bad luck.
The 'Banshee' is still believed in by some families. I have heard people say, when a death has taken place in the district, that they weren't
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:19
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A "Soupers Kitchen" was established at Kilcrea in the Penal Days, when Prosletysing was attempted upon the starving people of the district. One day a wealthy Protestant "souper" sent large supplies of flour & biscuits to Kilcrea Soup Kitchen.
The drivers were ordered to display the stores in lavish fashion on their open drays, & to drive slowly past the monastery gates of Kilcrea, where hundreds of starving people were accustomed to assemble to obtain alms from the charitable monks.
On this particular day, supplies had run short in the Abbey, & the disappointed starving people beheld the great wagon load of food, drawing slowly up the hill. The temptation to visit the
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 19:16
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The fair at Creeslough is held on the 10th of each month. All the farmers around the district take their cattle, sheep and pigs and horses to the fair. The buyers come from all parts to purchase what they need and what they think would make them a shilling of profit. The beasts are all in different places in the fair, cow market, horse market, pig market, (ect) The buying and selling goes on all day. The beasts that are sold are marked. Every dealer has his own mark, and put into yards until the fair is over. Then everyone knows his own animals. The seller gets paid
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 18:35
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around the time when St Ruth fought at Aughrim? I questioned Mr. O'Brien but failed to elicit anything definite in regard to dates.
The patron saints of Banagher are Rynagh & Kieran. There are many & various accounts given of the former. One is that her mother, a widow, having fallen grievously ill, Rynagh asked her mother's brother, a holy bishop, to cure her. He agreed to come part of the journey between their respective dwelling - places & Rynagh & her mother, having performed their part in safety, the relatives met at Banagher & the mother of our of our saint was cured. Later on, when her mother died, Rynagh founded a convent in Banagher on the edge of the Shannon, on the spot where the present "Old Barracks" stand. Indeed some
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 18:25
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to the wall of the old churchyard (the cemetery around the Old Church) and that the man digging the potatoes unearthed the opening of this tunnel. When Cromwell's men had made escape on the river impossible, the hunted priest sought refuge in Garrycastle, which is in the opposite direction to the Shannon.
Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) lived in Banagher during the time he held a Civil Service post on the locality. His work, as an English novelist, is sound, wholesome & genial. His love of the hunting field, amounting almost to a passion, added considerably to his opportunities of noticing the ways of men. Hawthorne's verdict on Trollope is likely to be final:- "His characters are just as real as if some had hewn a
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 18:17
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out law entered. The mason was so eager to strike that he drew the hatchet before the outlaw entered at all & buried it in the jamb of the door so the outlaw escaped. Some time elapsed between this & when the outlaw & his would be murderer met again at "Suidheachán" down the Gap of Dunloe. The mason was terrified as he had no escape. The outlaw ordered him on his knees say his prayers & prepare for death. When the mason was ready the outlaw only gave him a kick & told him he could go with his life, that he was getting the chance he did not give him. The outlaw finally escaped, probably on one of the timber boats that used call at Black water.
Michael Leahy's Grandfather told him this story. He himself remembers to
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 18:16
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236
weather.
Collector Mary McLoughlin
Drumroosk South,
Foxfield P.O.
Ck-on-Shannon
Obtained from parents and neighbours.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 18:14
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235
Weather Lore
20th December 1937
There are many beliefs about the weather in this locality, if it rains on St. Swithen's day a bad summer is expected. People say that a new moon on Saturday is enough in seven years, because it brings rain. The wind that brings the most rain is the South West Wind. The north wind brings dry hard weather. At the approach of storm the crows are flying low and they are tame. The donkeys and the horses stand with their back to the ditch and the cows go for shelter. If the sky is red where the sun rises a wet day is expected. When there is a rainbow in the morning there will be a showery week. when there are many stars in the sky there will be frosty weather. When you think that a hill is near you, you may expect rain. When the dust rises off the road the rain is coming. When a big number of swans come to a lake there will be rain. The frogs also turn a black colour. If there is a blue blaze in the fire it is a sign of rain. When the smoke goes up straight out of the chimney, it is expected good
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:29
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Richard Armstrong, Sergeant of the Mace, lived in the Front Glen in what is now a roofless house.
On the following Sunday afternoon while leisurely leaning his door, with coat off, he saw the Sovereign hurrying in his direction
"Armstrong", commenced heard in his gruff voice "take that fellow Browne into custody again"
"I am afraid my poor fellow" said the Sergeant that it will go hard against you this time"
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:26
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Kinsale, stabled his horse in his employers premises in Cork Street in the place now occupied by Mr J.W. Prendergast and climbing to the loft was soon fast asleep. From this slumber he was awakened by the Sergeant of the Mace, brought before the Sovereign on the charged of forming one of the conspirators responsible for the seizure of the previous night, but for lack of sufficient evidence was released.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:25
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Now a pause came. "Rest awhile Joe - we must open another barrell". "Don't be too long" said thirsty Joe "Sure I've a thirst on me I wouldn't part with for a five pound note". The crowd were wildly excited - & the in -keeper found difficulty in drawing the plug.
"At last the drink trickled slowly out - into another large measure - "Here, hold on" cried Joe - this slow service would leave any man thirsty - sure I am only a little biteen of a man, & I'll fit nice & handy into the barrell & have a good long drink in peace - Help me in boys".
The 'boys' would undoubtedly have 'helped' him in, but the proprietor thought it was time to cut off supplies. - Joe's thirst was only too well quenched, & his reputation for remaining "perfectly sober" quite destroyed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:23
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were seized and "keepers" placed in charge of them. During the night disguised men overpowered the keepers off the beasts.
Early on the following morning a car was heard coming along the Cork Road in the direction of Kinsale. One of the [?[ who was Wm Clarke, Beale of the Corporation, better known as Clarke the Bellman requested the driver of the cart to untie the ropes that bound his arms. The driver was John Browne a fine young fellow of 19, supposed to be the natural son of General Sir Thomas Browne Knockduff.
The lad had been reared by relatives of is mother living in Lacknacummeen and what education they could afford to give him was received in the school conducted by one Stokes in Clontead Chapel. Browne has no sympathy with "bums"[?] but certain circumstances of the case appealed to his manhood, and therefore he did not demur at the request of Clarke. The Bellman detained young Browne for some time and asked him to tie his arms again. Browne innocently complied resumed his journey to
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:18
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have seen the out law at Inch once.
The fellow who shot the first landlord in Tipperary is supposed to have spent some time in Bonane. It was he composed the song
"I am a bold undaunted fox---
Rory of the Hills"7
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:15
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Leith-Lán- Full of heat when the sun shone on that field it was warm.
Graves-hill, it is said there were graves on the top of the hill.
Ross's park, It is said there is a fort ther elike Ross-na-rí,
Cluain-na gearch, The field of the hens.
Cruich - lán, There is a little river there, and a number of people used to go fishing there every Sunday.
Poll talmhán, A hole sunk very deep in the ground
Ardoulthach, There were people living who were called Ulthacs
Carr bhaile, A village in the shape of a hook.
Sliabh -an- óir, Mountain of gold. When the corn was ripe on the mountain. It was the colour of gold
Lis-a-Loma. The lare fort. There was a fort there and there were no bushes, or anything else, growing there.
Sgéach Chur Bushes or hedges growing there,
Bóthar Buidhe, There is a road there, and it has a shade of yellow colour.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:14
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During one of his terms as Sovereign John Isaac Heard committed a deed which earned for him the leas ainm of "Hangman of Kinsale"
Cattle belonging to a widow in Camphill
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:14
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There are many roads in this district, the main one being the Cavan, Killeshandra road. The Gartinardress road, as it is called, is a branch of the Cavan, Killeshandra road, and meets the Arva, Cavan road at Cornafean cross. The Lahard road is another branch of the main road and joins the Killeshandra, Arva road in Drumbess.
The main road from Cavan to Killeshandra was made in 1846. Another road from Killeshandra to Lahard was made as relief work during the famine but was never finished. The people worked at fourpemce per day, and, being unable to buy boots, wheeled the stones barefooted An old road which joins the main road at Derinacross was in ancient times a coach road. Before bridges were built rivers were crossed at fords. The Erne had fords in the townlands of Slanore, Marahill, and Legaland.
The mass path in this district began in the townland of Drumbess, passed through Lahard and Longhill on to a boreen which was the only road - way leading to Killeshandra. This path can hardly be traced out as the railway demolished it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:10
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Mr Timothy Kiely (71yrs) Ovens Bridge, related the following humourous tale to Annie Cronin (12 ½ yrs) Knockanemore.
"When I was quite a young lad, a funny old character whom we called "Thirsty Joe" lived near Ovens Bridge. Poor Joe earned his nickname from the fact that he could consume more drink - whilst remaining perfectly sober - than any man in the parish.
Joe was left a "windfall" & of course his first call was to the local inn. The village jokers called out "Now Joe lets see you quench your long thirst in fine style". "Sure I will" replied Joe. "Mr - - - if you please, bring out two gorsoons to help you fill up fast - enough for me - I've always dreamt of this day, & sure enough me dream's come true".
So they 'filled up' for thirsty Joe, glass upon glass. Joe's thirst increased, as the crowds plaudits grew louder. "Yerra sir, fill the big measure now - the glass is too small" so they filled a quart, & then a gallon
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:07
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There are many roads in this district, the main one being the Cavan, Killeshandra road. The Gartinardress road, as it is called, is a branch of the Cavan, killeshandra road, and meets the Arva, Cavan road at Cornafean cross. the Lahard road is another branch of the main road and joins the Killeshandra, Arva road in Drumbess.
The main road from Cavan to Killeshandra was made in 1846. Another road from Killeshandra to Lahard was made as relief work during the famine but was never finished. The people worked at fourpemce per day, and, being unable to buy boots, wheeled the stones barefooted An old road which joins the main road at Derinacross was in ancient times a coach road. Before bridges were built rivers were crossed at fords. The Erne had fords in the townlands of Slanore, Marahill, and Legaland.
The mass path in this district began in the townland of Drumbess, passed through Lahard and Longhill on to a boreen which was the only road - way leading to Killeshandra. This path can hardly be traced out as the railway demolished it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 17:03
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great lump out of the earth, & put it under a glass case, with all its inhabitants going about their daily business, & not suspecting that they were made a show of."
Trollope wrote
"The Warden (1855)
Barchester Towers (1857)
"Doctor Thorne"
"Tramley Parsonage"
Orley Farm
The Small House at Allington"
Last Chronicle of Barset
Anna
The Lady Eustace
Diamonds
"Can you forgive her?"
Phineas Finn
The Prime Minister
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:59
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The Duke's Children
& in all about half a hundred novels, many literary essays, personal adventures, & an occasional slight biography.
Another English writer connected with Banagher is Charlotte Bronte. This lady married her father's curate, Mr. Nicholas Bell. When Charlotte died, Mr Bell came to live to the Parsonage in Banagher & remained there till his death. He was buried in the graveyard surrounding the Banagher Protestant Church. His nephew, Major Bell, still resides in Banagher.
When Nicholas Bell died, some of his furniture was auctioned & one lady in Banagher obtained the upright
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:54
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of the River Shannon to guide the people crossing the ford when it was too dark or too deep to see, the river - bed.
Others say the pointed peak was the present Cíaran Hill near the town. At present it by no means presents the appearance of a "peak".
Banagher was regarded, even by such a general as Cromwell, as a point of strategic importance since he built town on the Galway side of Banagher Bridge. This town is still to be seen & is fairly well preserved. His soldiers lived there for many years & sternly enforced his command of "keeping the Irishy across the Shannon in Connaught."
Later on, (according to Mr. O'Brien Main St., Banagher) the French built the second tower on the opposite side of the Bridge. Was this after the famous "Races of Castlebar" or
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:49
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II
Oh prize of each familiar scene,
That decks that lovely vale,
Each castle robed in ivy green,
Each glen, each hill & dale.
Each meadow where I loved to roam,
With mates so dear to me,
Now exiles from their native home,
Beside the rolling Lee.
III
And often in those pleasant hours,
Fond memories fill me so,
Whilst gazing on these lonely towers,
Beside the waters roll.
Of days e'er came the Norman Band,
When our dear Isle was free,
And Irish Chieftains held the land,
Along the winding Lee.
IV
And since that time it e'er has been,
The dearest hope of mine,
To see with its resplendent sheen,
The morn of freedom shine.
And hear once more in ancient halls,
Ring forth its minstrelsy
And Irish Harps hung on their walls,
Beside the rolling Lee.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:47
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There is little authentic local history but there are as usual, much tradition & many incidents, some plainly beyond the bounds of possibility, & some which may be true.
Bealoideas.
Banagher (Beannchar na Sionna nó Beannchar Uí Bhfáilghe) itself is a very old town. It probably sprang up in very ancient times owing to the fact that the Shannon was easily forded just at the place where the Bridge of Banagher now stands.
I have heard Dean Langan (now P.P. of Moate, Westmeath) say when here (he was C.C. here for many years) that the name Beannchor (nó Beannchar) came from two "pointed peaks" of stones in the ford of the Shannon. Probably these heaps of stones, probably in shape like a pyramid, were put into the bed
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 16:45
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The old Castle.
There is the old ruins of an old castle near Mr. Morgans house. It is up on the hill beside an old house where a man the of Moses Neely lived long ago. It belongs to Mrs. B. Morgan now. This castle is situated in Clooncarney. There was a king called king Lavra living in this castle long ago. He had horse's ears.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 16:38
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Beggars or Tramps.
It is very seldom that beggars call at our house. Tramps and tinkers call more often. Sometimes strangers come, but the same ones nearly always call. The mames of those who call are the McGinleys and Tom O'Neill and a man called Birney, who sells combs, and coats, and pinafores and other things. The McGinleys sell tins because they are tinkers. Birney buys his goods in shops with the money that he gets. The McGinleys buy sheets of tin, and then they go home and they make pans, and porridge dishes and a lot of other things. Birney carries his goods in an old bag, which he rips out and makes square. He then puts his goods in the centre of the bag, and he knots two opposite ends of the bag together, and then he knots the two other opposite ends together, and he then puts the pack on his back. Tom O'Neill carries his pack in the same way. The McGinleys put their goods in a little van...
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2019-05-23 16:34
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When I was but a growing boy,
E'er manhood's anxious cares,
Had robbed me of that youthful joy,
The brow of boyhood wears.
How oft with merry laugh & song,
And spirit bounding free,
I roamed the river banks along,
Beside the rolling Lee.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 16:34
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089
for many generations .
From the hill above ,a view of the Shannon and surrounding Country for 50 miles around,every acre of which was the property of O'Brien ,was to be obtained .The herd of deer was the finest in Ireland. Rinucinni is enthusiastic in his praises of the place .In a letter to his brother he says "I have no hesitation in asserting that Bunratty is the most beautiful spot i have ever seen .In Italy there is nothing like the palace and grounds of Lord Thomand nothing like its ponds and park with its 3000 head of deer".His secretary ,Massari in a letter to the same nobleman speaks of the castle and its site as the most delightful place he had seen in Ireland ."Nothing" ,he says could be more beautiful, and the palace is fit for an emperor.
Modern History of Bunratty.
This is quite uneventful .In 1656 the year before Barnaby's death he leased "Bunratty" ;one Quarter ",to John Cooper
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
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Kells, Mullagh and Nobber are the local fairs. In several cases dealings were made at cross roads or at the houses. The best fair in days gone by was the fair of Carlanstown bridge. Mullagh being more of a centre for store cattle the buyers patronised it. It is one of the best fair of store cattle held in Meath at present. There used to be tents and dancing and singing carried on in them. The dealer always bids a few pounds less than the beast is worth and the seller asks a few pounds more than the beast is worth. The dealer keeps advancing and the keeps dropping so in this way they clench the bargain. Some mark the cattle with keel while others clip them with a scissors. Luck money is generally given. It is called a luck penny. The amount of money that is given depends on the price of the beast. The big fairs are the 9th Sept
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2019-05-23 16:25
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and the 16th October. The noted fairs for horses are the 9th September and the 16th October.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:25
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Kells, Mullagh and Nobber are the local fairs. In several cases dealings were made at cross roads or at the houses. The best fair in days gone by was the fair of Carlanstown bridge. Mullagh being more of a centre for store cattle the buyers patronised it. It is one of the best fair of store cattle held in Meath at present. There used to be tents and dancing and singing carried on in them. The dealer always bids a few pounds less than the beast is worth and the seller asks a few pounds more than the beast is worth. The dealer keeps advancing and the keeps dropping so in this way they clench the bargain. Some mark the cattle with keel while others clip them with a scissors. Luck money is generally given. It is called a luck penny. The amount of money that is given depends on the price of the beast. The big fairs are the 9th Sept.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 16:13
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There is an old fort in Williamstown in the parish of Carnaross, about two miles from Kells in the County Meath. There was a family of Danes reared in this old fort, and it is said that they died there also. There is a tunnel leading from this fort to Dulane graveyard, about one mile in distance. This fort is on the estates of Stole Garret who is dead about fifty years. It is now on the lands of Patrick Carpenter. This fort is on the road side. It is a mound of earth and it is circular in shape. The entrance to this fort is now blocked by fallen earth. There is also two more forts quite near this one.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 16:00
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30
Old Ruins
The nearest Castles to me are Lick Castle, Beale Castle, and Ballybunion Castle. There are a lot of other ruins along the bank of the Shannon but these three are the nearest to me. There is an old ruin opposite this school and it is said that there was mass said there in days gone by but it was burned down. The castles round here were important strongholds in ancient times but there is very little of them to be seen at present. Those cases belonged to O'Connor Kerry lived in Beale Castle and it is said that a man named Stack was invited to the Castle and that a quarrel arose and he was murdered. O'Connors wife was a sister to Dermot Mór O'B?? Prince of Thomond, and it is said that he never spoke to her after the sad event in Beale. All that can be seen of Ballybunion Castle is a wall standing abut twenty feet high. Those castles were built in Norman times and Ballybunion Castle was destroyed in 1582. rather than let it fall into the hands of the English. This was about the time of the downfall of the Geraldines
Lick 1382 to 1582
Michael Lynch, 15-7-'38
Doon, Ballybunion
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2019-05-23 15:14
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Usual games played, brack for tea with ring in it. He who gets ring is supposed to be married in near future. If a married man gets it much of the fun is lost. There are also apples nuts etc. The games of snap apple and "grain roasting are still carried on. An apple is hung from the ceiling and the player is supposed to eat without using his hands a variation of this game is where the apple is put in a tub of water. This is a source of great sport and merriment for the hands are tied behind the back and the player often falls or is pushed head foremost into the water. Two grains of wheat or two nuts representing a boy and girl are place on the bar of the fire grate or on a coal shovel over the fire. If the two nuts or grain remain together and jump together the pair will become man and wife. Many boys and girls also though usually the former dress up in old clothes, disguise themselves with masks or vizards as they call them and visit the neighbouring houses where they play all kinds of pranks and create much sports. They are called huggadas and they are usually well supplied with music and at the end of the performance the hat is sent around for money. A general custom here is known as "gate-snatching". In the early hours of the morning of Nov. 1st. gates
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 15:02
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are lifted off and hidden sometimes the gates of neighbours, not on speaking terms are exchanged the ensuing row being a source of great enjoyment to the perpetrators of the dead. Other tricks are also played and of course the victim is always some crunky old man or other individual who has incurred the displeasure of the young boys of the place. Cart-wheels are taken and hidden or exchanged carts are dismantled and taken into houses where they are re-assembled. Doors are tied and chimneys stuffed with straw or hay. Many people will not leave their own houses after dark on Nov. 1st. The belief is that all the souls are supposed to re-visit the places where they lived while on earth and no Catholic will retire on that night without saying at least a prayer for the departed.
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2019-05-23 14:55
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Xmas. The feast is still celebrated in the homes of the people. Few if any leave their own homes on Xmas Eve, even to visit neighbour's houses. But most of the customs still found in parts of Ireland have been forgotten and are no longer observed. Xmas candles have become rare and most of the houses present their usual every night appearance, only very few being lit up in traditional fashions. Holy and ivy are still used as indoor decoration - the evergreen being put up on Xmas Eve and left so until the "Twelfth Day". Paper decorations are also used. Most people wish for a white Xmas. It is said that a "green Xmas makes a fat churchyard", a reference to disease which is according to belief was, sure to follow if the weather for the feast is mild. Great attention is paid to the 12 days succeeding the feast. It is said that the weather for the following twelve months will correspond
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 14:27
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Fairy Lore
5&6 - 10-38
The Lepreacan or geanncanach as he was called is very good to people who are good to him but he is also very spiteful to those who are not good to him. If anyone cut a "lone hawthorn bush" the fairies would revenge it on them by putting thorns in their bed or by bringing ill-luck on them.
In one case a local farmer cut a "lone hawthorn bush" on his land, he borught a cart to take it home but when he put it on the cart it fell off, having done this many times and having seen that he could not load it, he had to leave it where it was.
"A stray sod" In certain fields there is a "stray sod" and if a person happens to put their foot on it they cannot get out until they "turn their coat."
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 14:09
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After a gatherer comes a scatterer
A hard gathering gets a quick scattering
Ráinín - a very small person
wearing a snout a yard long - with displeasure
Crabaire
Gribris
Gob on you
When you get an inch you take a square yard

When you get an inch you take a bandle (bannlámh) (?)

Gribby - applied to a person who has lost his front teeth

As thick as a double dith - one who is easily vexed
As happy as the corpse that rain falls on
Bunk - a bed

Leave your head where you will get it in the morning

Did you sleep in your hair - said to an early riser

When it is misty in the morning people say
"It is misty wet for dry"

A Scutty wran (wren)

If you ask a person on a dark night where he was going he would answer:-
"I am going to the dark wood for a cart load of daylight"

You are like a thing the cat brought in of a wet night
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2019-05-23 13:59
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Don't be making Fitzsummins Mother of yourself
- said to an inquisitive person.

If a person was seen very early in the morning -
- it is very up you're early

Don't be making a horse's mouth of yourself
Don't be talking like a half-penny book
Don't be always CHAWING the rag
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:53
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In this district the road is often referred to as the "Street".
There is a road from Sallygarden in Creewood to Cross of Balrenny. It is running due east and west. The Devlin river flows under that road. It is called the Kells road because it is leading to Kells.
Interesting this is a road from Farrell's Cross leading north and returning east and south to intersect at Crosslane. The circular section is known as Ballymachugh. The road due north and south instersecting at Grange Cross and leading to Collon and Slane is known as School road. Part of this is called "Board of Works". It is a deep cutting in the hill said to have been made in the famine times. The daily wage was fourpence a day and one meal of indian meal stirabout. It was on this road the old village of Newtown was situated. (account of village given elsewhere).
Close to this village was the "Windy Granary" from which the present school, Church, Parish, get their names, Grangegeith; or "Gráinseach Ghaoithe".
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:44
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Parrickarodgery
Butson's well
Tobarnapiast
Tobarnaboice
Garryagh
Tobardáréich
St. Columcille's well
Tobarbrighide
Tobarlobar
Cross well

St. Columcille's well is visited from 9th to 18th June. There are five "stations" around the well. One decade of Rosary recited at each station. They go round the stations once. After the 1st round they take three drinks of the water. The people wash in the stream running from it and it is supposed to cure sore feet and sore eyes. Votive offerings are left on whitethorn bushes near the well. It is an open well. It is on Wood's farm. 2 miles from the school.

St Brigid's well is on Skelly's farm. There are four trees around it and a flag covering it. 4 rounds - 4 "stations". no fixed prayers. They drink 3 drinks at end of each round. People wash their feet and faces in stream. Feast on 2nd Feb. It is 3 miles north of school,
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:32
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About two hundred years ago the people used to wear rabbit skins on their feet. When washing their feet, they would put salt in the water to harden their feet.
Clogs were made and people used to wear them.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:31
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houses, looking for something to eat. When he would go into a person's house, he would start singing. He never knew the whole song. His usual song was
"Sally come up, and Sally come down,
And Sally come turn your heel around."
Some children, in this district, go barefoot to school in Summer Clogs are often worn in Winter when feeding cattle.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:29
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There was an old man, named Patrick Ford, who never wore boots nor a hat. He is dead about thirty years, and he was over seventy when he died. He had no home, but used to go to the people's
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:28
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About thirty years ago, people would not wear boots until they reached an advanced age. Some people never wore boots at all. Some people, when washing their feet, put tablets in the water. Long ago nearly all people made their own boots, or gave them to some handy person to make. In those times a good deal of the boots were made of twine and cardboard. Clogs were often worn by old people
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:25
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wore an overcoat.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:24
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wore an overcoat.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:24
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In Ballburn, near Castledermott, there lived a shoemaker, named Mr. Weir He always wore clogs with wooden soles, held on by pieces of iron There was a man, named Cundell, in Palatine, who always put rashers in his boots when going walking. He never
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:23
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There is a churn at home. It is about two feet in height, and about one foot wide at the top. The sides are straight. It is about one year old. The handle, a beater, and the case form the churn. Butter is made once a week. The woman of the house does the churning. When the butter comes on the cream the churning becomes heavy. The butter is then made, and is left for a night to harden. Buttermilk is used for making cakes. Fresh buttermilk is a lovely drink.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:19
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There is a woman, named Mrs. Cooper, who has a churn. It is an end-over-end. The churn is about two feet in diametyer at each end. The cream is left in a milk pan for a week. It is then put into the churn, and a pint of hot water is added. The butter is then made by turning the handle of the churn. When it is made it is left for a while to harden. The buttermilk is used for making bread.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:17
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the dash comes up free from any butter. The butter is made twice a week. The churning is done by holding the dash in both hands, and raising it up and down. If it is churned fast it takes twenty minutes until the butter is made. The butter is lifted out on to a small wooden dish. In cold weather hot water has to be put in. Long ago those kinds of churns were used, but there are very few of them now.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:15
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There is a churn called the dash. It is three feet in width at the bottom. The churn is slightly sloped, more than halfway up. Then it widens to about twelve inches at the top. It is about four feet high. There is a wooden dash. When the milk is churned
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:15
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to that of the 12 days between Xmas day and Jan. 6th.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:13
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We have a churn at home. It is three feet high. The top and bottom of the churn are each seventeen inches wide, and the shoulder is fifteen. The sides of the churn are straight. It is about four years old. The various parts of the churn are the iron, called the hoops, and the wood called the staves. We churn once a week. My mother nearly always does the churning. It takes about an hour. The churn is done by the hand. When the churning is finished all the butter rises to the top of the milk. Then we get a pan of cold water and put the butter into it
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:12
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when they came near the stile to see who would be there first. This night one of the men came first and when he reached the stile he saw a lovely comb on the stile and he picked it up and put it in his pocket. He thought no more about the comb until he reached home and then he heard crying outside the window and then he knew it must be the banshees comb and when one of his family handed out the comb on the sock of a plough she left the track of her nails on it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:09
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There was once a man long ago and a Fairy came to him when he was in bed. The fairy told him that if he brought a gamecock, a spaniel dog and a black cat that under a certain tree in the wood that he would find a pot of gold. The fairy came to him three nights and at last this man and two other men went to the wood and started to dig under the tree. Suddenly they struck the treasure and at that moment there arose a great storm and the men fled. In the morning the men came back and found a crock of earth.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:04
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money. He then left the cottage and he went to sleep in a field with the bag of money for a pillow. When he awoke next morning he looked for the money but all he found was a bag of earth and soil.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:03
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There are two towers near Banagher on the banks of the Shannon, and they were supposed to be built by Cromwell at the time that he drove all the Leinster people into Connaght, and it is said that he kept soldiers in the towers to keep them in Connaght. One can go up to the top of the tower by steps on the inside. On a summer's evening a long time ago a man who lived near went up on the tower on to the top of it. This man used to going up but he was not long up when he felt himself being carried and left down on the ground.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 13:02
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In a farm yard there are many domestic animals, such as the cow, the horse, the pig, the sheep, and hens, ducks, turkeys, geese, and peacocks.
When driving cows you say "High-Up" to pigs you say "Boe Boe". To hens "Chuck Chuck" To ducks "Quack Quack" To turkeys "Bee Bee" and to horses "Come On" The cows are tied in stalls by chains or bails. The horses are tied in stalls by chains. Horses are foddered with hay. When a hen is put to hatch eggs, it is a wise thing to [?] the eggs with ink for fear the eggs would get mixed in any way.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:59
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One night there was a crowd of men coming home from playing cards there was frost on the ground and it was moonlight. There were about ten or eleven men altogether and they had to cross fields and to cross a stile. They had a habits of running
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:57
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Some centuries ago men were quarrying in a quarry near Banagher, and they must have come near water, because when they came back from their dinner the quarry was fast becoming a lake. This quarry is outside Banagher it is supposed to be haunted, because years ago people threw a baby in to it, but its body came to the surface and it is supposed to haunt the lake. Also, there is supposed to be a mermaid living there and anyone who goes there can see the mermaids stone where the mermaid is supposed to sit and comb her hair.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:57
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There is a man named Mr. Wright, in Prumplestown, who has over twenty cows. There are names on every one of them. When the man, who looks after them, goes for them, he calls then by their names, and the cows come to him. They are put in houses called cowhouses, and are tied with a chain around the neck.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:55
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pets. There is a story told of a night hunt after a fox. Long ago, when the kennels were in Burton Hall, a great disturbance was heard amongst the hounds, one night. The huntsman going out to see the cause found a fox on the top of the wall above the dogs. He went and called Mr. Burton, who was "Master of the Hounds" He had a couple of hunters brought out at once. He released the hounds, and a great chase began, which ended in a blacksmith's cabin in Co. Wexford, where the fox took cover for safety.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 12:53
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one of the wagon gave a sudden move and he was pinned between them. Men ran to his assistance but he was dead when he was released
His remains were conveyed home on a sidecar drawn by a horse.
There was a place in the centre of the car called the well which used to hold feeding - stuff for the horse when on a long journey.
As the jarvey was returning home the lid of the well was hoisted up and thrown on the road. The driver got down and lifted it and left it in the same position.
He had proceeded only a few years when it was thrown off again. He defended to lift it and when he looked up
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:52
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There are several domestic animals such as the cow, and the horse. Cows are nice gentle animals and will come home from the farthest part of the farm, when called at milking time. The cows are tied around the neck with a chain. Even a child can tie them and milk them without danger. Sometimes horses are wild, and dangerous to handle, and more are great
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:49
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There was once a man called Paddy Moran and he was going home one night when he got lost in a field. He saw a light and he went to it and it was a cottage. He looked inside and he saw a crowd of little men sitting round a table and he went in and sat down along with them. One of the little men told him not to eat any of the food. After a while they started to count some money and they gave him a bag of
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 12:47
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All say that they have seen lights passing from one window to another and this has happened at different times during the night.
Many years ago a woman who lived in this house on returning from the (vial) village after having spent the day in Clones fair was crossing a stile which led to her home was found dead in the stream close to the still and her hands badly gnawed as by her rats
Whether this occurrence has anything to do with the lights, or has not it is locally believed that the pot woman spirit visits her home at night.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:47
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There was once a man who was very fond of playing cards and spent a good deal of his time doing so. One night after he had been to a house to play he was coming home over a bog and he came to a bridge which he had to cross. On the bridge he saw a card table which was lighted by candle light. At this table there sat a man who had a pack of cards the man asked him to play and he was wondering whether he should or not when he looked down at the mans feet and saw they were cloven like the feet of a cow and he got frightened and ran away. After that he would never play cards.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:45
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About 40 years ago, two men named Michael Mc Assey and Edward Neill were going to Tullow when they met a dog about five feet high. The dog turned into a very tall man, with an umbrella in his hand. After a few minutes the tall man turned into a very large copper-coloured beast, with fiery eyes and huge horns. This large animal threw itself on the trap that they were driving, but it did the two men no harm. Edward Neill is buried in Benekerry, and Michael Mc Assey is buried in Tullow.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:42
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About 40 years ago in Burton Hall wood a very large animal was seen. This animal appeared in the shape of a dog. One night, as Mr. Murphy was coming down the wood, this animal ran in front of him. He thought it was his own dog, and started to call him. But when he was coming near his own house the animal disappeared and ran into the river roaring About an hour later that night he came out again, and he saw the same animal, and he got such a fright that he collapsed. Several nights after this he was seen by more people. It is said by the old people that Burton Hall is haunted.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:39
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There was a man coming from Carlow one night and at the top of the Rocks he saw a white lamb running in front of him till he went to Killian Lane. The lamb is seen every third night at the Rocks.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 12:38
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William Tracey, Ballinakilbeg, was telling me that one day, about ten years ago, he was at a threshing at John Mahon's old house, in Johnstown Nearing the end of the rick a strange little animal made a dash out, and made its escape into a rabbit burrow, though a determined effort was made to capture it. It was something bigger than a weasel, and was covered with fur. It somewhat resembled a squirrel, but without the squirrel's remarkable tail, and had a white circle round its neck. It must have fed on the rats and vermin that live in and cause such dustruction in ricks that are left for Spring threshing, as neither rat nor mouse was found in the whole rick. Mr. Tracey learned afterwards that the little animal was a stoat, and is almost extinct in this country.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 12:19
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083
Muscegros ,the Credit is undoubtedly due of erecting the first castle at Bunratty in or about 1251. The mote on which it stood is still visible north of the present Castle, and consists of a flat -topped mound of earth quite unable to support the weight of the ponderous Castle of stone. it was therefore probably built of wood ,and was of little importance.
The second Castle.
Sir Thomas De Clare ,the first of his name who settled in Thomand built the second Castle in 1277 .It consisted of a single stone tower of great strength ,enclosed by a strong surrounding wall ,and further fortified by a deep ditch and palisade but above all by surrounding marshes.it stood near the river on or near the site of the present castle .According to Mac Craith ,De Clares stronghold "a roofed impregnable donjon ,having capacious lime- whited appurtenances and girt with thick outer walls ".This Castle was attacked several times but withstood all attacks.
After the battle of Dysert O Dea in May 1318 ,lady De Clare on hearing of the death of Sir Richard and his supposed son,set
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 12:02
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004
The patron saint the well is Molaoghaire .The words Tobar Molaoghaire are printed with chips of white marble stuck or embedded in cement.There is a concrete cross in the centre of the arch overspreads the well.
There is no local knowledge as far as the writer can ascertain ,as to the date of the Annual Pattern .it is most frequently visited on Sundays and days of special devotion .it is frequented in particular for for the cure of eyes ,or defective vision or any ocular ailment.No rounds are performed or set prayers prescribed .This is a matter for the pilgrim .The water is drunk and is also applied to the eyes.
Some holy object ,medal,beads,tiny statues,using holy water fonts,ivory crosses,etc are left in thanksgiving at or near the well.There is a local tradition that whatever water is taken from the well ,it will never run dry.Even i very fine Summers and after periods of protracted drought ,the well still retains a goodly supply of water which is always pure ,cool and refreshing .
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:34
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Get Meachan Átha Abhann - a parsnip-like herb found growing in the shallow water near the banks of streams. It has a root like a parsnip, and must be pulled fully out of the water. Clean it perfectly and wrap it in 4 cabbage leaves so that no portion of the root is visible. Roast this in the Gríosach for about two hours. The roasted root is next bruised very finely and mixed with butter, and clapped on top of the boil or boils.
The person suffering from the boils must not be present when the roasted herb is taken from the Gríosach. The explanation given for this is that the worm which causes the boil would get the fumes of the roasted herb and would have moved away from the place where the boil is. The herb is supposed to kill the worm that causes the boil.

Collected by
Thomas Carty
Rathkenny N.S.
Slane

from
Michael McKenna
Sallypark
Navan
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:26
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There was once a man named Banagher who was very fond of playing cards and one night when he was coming home from playing cards he met the devil. The devil asked him to play cards and he said if Banagher won he would give him a bag of money. Banagher played the devil and he won and with the money he built Banagher and called it after himself.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:23
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The first four of the following stories were told me by Joe Lynch Banagher, Age:- 45
born near Cloghan spent most of his life in Banagher.
The other stories were told by my father. Thomas Jamieson born in Killaloe but living all his life in Banagher. Age: 40.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:23
approved
rejected
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The first four of the following stories were told me by Joe Lynch Banagher, Age:- 45
born near Cloghan spent most of his life in Banagher.
The other stories were told by my father. Thomas Jamieson born in Killaloe but living all his life in Banagher. Age: 40.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The first four of the following stories were told me by Joe Lynch Banagher, Age:- 45
born near Cloghan spent most of his life in Banagher.
The other stories were told by my father. Thomas Jamieson born in Killaloe but living all his life in Banagher. Age: 40.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The first four of the following stories were told me by Joe Lynch Banagher, Age:- 45
born near Cloghan spent most of his life in Banagher.
The other stories were told by my father. Thomas Jamieson born in Killaloe but living all his life in Banagher. Age: 40.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The first four of the following stories were told me by Joe Lynch Banagher, Age:- 45
born near Cloghan spent most of his life in Banagher.
The other stories were told by my father. Thomas Jamieson born in Killaloe but living all his life in Banagher. Age: 40.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The first four of the following stories were told me by Joe Lynch Banagher, Age:- 45
born near Cloghan spent most of his life in Banagher.
The other stories were told by my father. Thomas Jamieson born in Killaloe but living all his life in Banagher. Age: 40.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:21
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In this field in which the Druid's Altar is situated Slevin used to have his milch cows. On a certain morning when he went out to milk them in the field (in summertime) he was surprised to see a hare standing on her hind legs and drinking one of the cows. The cow was standing perfectly quiet. He hunted the hare and then found that the cow had not a drop of milk left. Next morning he saw the hare at the same game, and again the cow had a no milk.
Next morning he saw the hare again, and on this occasion neither of the three cows had any milk left. Slevin determined to get rid of the hare, and he got Baron Hussey's gamekeeper who was "a great shot" to shoot the hare. This man was called "The Fiddler Grant", as he was a wonderful violinist. The "Fiddler" went with him the next morning and fired at the hare but missed. The same thing happened on the second and third mornings, the "Fiddler" failing to shoot the hare. The "Fiddler" was now very angry. "I'll put an end to this game, even if I don't shoot the hare", said he. Next morning the "Fiddler" came again, but this time he had a silver sixpence in the gun as well as the
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:21
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The first four of the following stories were told me by Joe Lynch Banagher, Age:- 45
born near Cloghan spent most of his life in Banagher.
The other stories were told by my father. Thomas Jamieson born in Killaloe but living all his life in Banagher. Age: 40.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:21
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powder and shot. This time he fired again at the hare and missed. The hare scampered away in a different direction this time, and as she was going out on a gap, she stood on her hind legs, looked back at the Fiddler, let an unearthly screech, and disappeared. The hare was never seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:16
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piano which is proudly shown to visitors as that belonging to Charlotte Bell née C. Bronte.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:15
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(Extract from an old book by one of our teachers eight years ago - in 1930.)
"St Rynagh, Patroness of Banagher, founded her Convent either at the end of the 5th or beginning of the 6th century, on the present site of the old Military Barracks, situated at the Bridge, Banagher. She was the favourite sister of St Finian. St. Richana was conducted by an angel from Co. Wicklow to join St Rynagh at Banagher and became a nun there (where St. Rynagh was probably already living as a religious) St. Richana fled from her lover in Wicklow. After some time she set out from Banagher
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:11
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to return to Wicklow and St. Rynagh asked her how she would return by herself. St. Richana told her that an angel was to accompany her back.
Talacie, the mother of St. Kiernan and St Colman also joined St. Rynagh at Banagher.
St. Rynagh's mother, on one occasion, was stricken down with a terrible sickness or malady, the stench of which was unbearable. St Rynagh set out to see her brother, St. Finian, but he would not came to Banagher. St. Rynagh held him by the hands until he would exercise his power to cure his mother. When St. Rynagh returned her
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:06
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mother was completely cured.
St. Rynagh died in the full order of her sanctity in the year 563" (Extract)
The alone is probably a variation of the story written on Page 3 of this manuscript
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 10:03
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On Hallow Eve the "pookas" go round from house to house dancing and playing music. They are dressed in funny clothes and have masks on their so that they are not recognised.
The ring, water and clay game is played on this night. Three plates are got, clay on one, a ring on an-other and water on the other. Each person is blindfolded and led to the plates. He who puts his hand on the plate with the clay on it will die soon, on the plate with the ring will marry and on the plate with the water will cross the sea. Of course this is only a game.
The game "snap-apple" is also played. The apples are hung by strings from a cross stick which is spun around and the players are expected to take a bite from one of these while they move so quickly. An apple is the reward of success. Sometimes apples are placed in a bath of water and the players try to catch them with their mouths or on a fork held in the mouth.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:56
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Farmers rear a number of cattle in this district. The cows are named Minna, Polly, Twinkle, Daisy, Judy, Speckle, Creamy and Betsy. When we are calling the calves we say suck, suck". In the Winter the cows are in the stables and the people give them hay and turnips. A stake is driven in the ground and chain attached to it forms a cow-tie.
The people also keep horses and sheep. The horses are put in the house in the winter, but the sheep are never put in. The people put a goat with their flocks for luck. They feed their horses on hay and oats.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:44
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In olden times few people went bare-footed all the year round. A man named Bill Dolan from Cloghan never put a boot on his foot.
Frank Taylor of Clononey used to make shoes as his people before him were shoemakers
People began to wear boots the age of two years. We go barefooted in the Summer. The water that we wash in is supposed to cure boils.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:41
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Two men in this district repair shoes, but they do not make shoes. The leather for making shoes is not tanned in this locality.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:40
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There are four blacksmiths in our parish. William Egan, William Gilligan, James Claffey and Timothy Egan. Their fathers and grandfathers were smiths and the trade is being carried down by them to the present day. There are two situated in the street of Ferbane, one in Belmont nearly opposite Mrs McCormack's shop, and one in High St. about five yards in off the road. One in Ferbane is roofed with galvanise and the other is tiled. There is one fireplace in each. The bellows are fitted up over the fire-place. The blacksmith uses hammers, pincers, the anvil and the vice. He shoes horses and asses. He repairs ploughs, spades, shovels, and picks.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:35
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The day after Christmas day is called St Stephen's day, we call it "wren day", because on this day the boys dress up in old clothes and go from house to house gathering money. They have a small piece of holly and a few feathers stuck in it to pretend it is a wren.
Some of the boys dance and some play music, when they have finished they ask for money. Then they say the rhyme.
"The wren, the wren the king of all birds.
St Stephen's day she was caught in the furze.
Although she is little her family is great
I pray young lady give us a treat,
Up with the kettle and down with the pan;
A penny or two pence to bury the wren"
They divide the money among themselves.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:28
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seal. It might be fine for a seal now Ned Scully
gramais
bas The hurl is broken on the 'bas'
scallíon a small onion
cúramach He is too curamach about himself.
racaim abhaile. He is only a 'rachaim abhaile' of a farmer.
bail.. That story is all'bais'
cabóg. An awkward ill mannered person.
púca. Aren't you afraid of the púca?
trálach. I have a trálach in my wrist
oighir. (soreness in the neck)
cric. I have a 'cric' in my neck.
caoin. The bean sidhe was caoin-ing
sceilp. He gave me a sceilp of the stick
Gleann deimhin Ainm áite
bóthar cam Ainm áite
Poll dubh Ainm áite
glac. I want the loan of a 'glac' of sugar.
giobrais
lághach She was a lághach (laughy) creature. Jack Maher [?]
stráchálaidhe. A man always 'behind' with this work
caibín An old hat.
cipín
cogar mogar secret talk i.e. matchmaking
'God increase your store" after receiving present or help
'God bless the cows!' after a drink of milk
'much good it may do him!' said of a grasping person when he gets somethign
One hand was as long as the other with him empty handed
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:17
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calath (craw fish_
colp. calap five 'calap'. cattle
scalp. sticks used in thatching (scallops)
scian. A large knife
fris freeas They made 'fris freas' of it.
bonn leach. stone bruise on the heel
craidhte I was never so cráidhthe in my life
ciotóg he writes with the ciotóg
traithnín I dont care a tráithnín Tom Mooney Oakley
cadhrán Put a few cadhráns on the fire
scideóg
Dia linn Sat 'Deelin' when you sneeze or God bless us
bonamh The sow had bonamhs (bonaves)
amadán
óinseach
girrseach A nice little girrseach
flaitheamhalach He's a 'flaitheamlach' man
lán a mhála He came home and he brought lán a mhála with him.
cabhair. They dont cabhair with Egans now.
sleaghan. Used for cutting turf.
Tisc (Whist)
cipín Give me a cipín to ready pipe.
smidiríni. The eggs were in smidirini.
seal. It night be dry now for a seal (Weather)
Mí ádh I dont know what míadh is on me
Bóthar a phúca (Ainm Aite)
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 09:07
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cam reilig He has 'cam reilig' feet (turned in)
cruibín (cos muice)
sibín they used to have a little sibín in __
A ghrádh
cuis. cais a little foot path on the bog.
togher teochar a kind of cart way on the bog
cailín
crónán
ciaróg
croinín These come up from the Shannon in a big flood.
beul beul the cows
sleibín and 'cis' a kish of turf.
brosna a brosna of sticks
poitín They used make poitín in __
Dromán used in plouighing
brus. brúschar.
glugar. Three of the eggs were glugars.
bogán. ( a soft egg_
fauna. The hen is going to hatch when she lays a fauna (v. small egg)
puisín
goosheen
pilibín
scraith He dug up a scraith
'dyke' and 'gripe' díth
gráineóg. You little graineóg! to a cute child
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 08:58
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Species of Birds.
Some are birds of prey who have to hunt for their food as the raven, the eagle and the hawk. Some other birds are a bit tamer and do not hunt for their food, but eat haws, berries and crumbs. And some birds as kept as pets they are the pigeons and canaries.
Speech of Birds.
The crow and the jackdaw say "caw -caw", the robin say "tweet - twee", the cuckoo says "coo - cu", the corncrake says "corncrake" and the pigeons say "Coo - coo".
A Story.
There is a story that there was a race to see who was king of the birds. When the birds were all in a line to start the little wren got in among the feather of the eagle, but the eagle did not feel him.
So when the race had started, the little birds after a while got tired and dropped behind, but the big ones went on, then they too became tired and then the wren flew out of its hiding place and flew on and won the race.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 08:56
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There were several churchyards in this parish. In Gallen there is a famous churchyard where St Canoc built his monastery. People use it still; a few years ago there were people digging there
And dug up a number of crosses. And they also found a ruin of an old church. About a quarter of a mile outside this parish there is an old graveyard.
This old graveyard is in the townland of Glebe. Only very young children are buried there now. It is on the land owned by Michael Moore. There are no grown-up people buried there now only children who are not to the use of reason. The churchyard is on a sort of a hill, but the field in which the graveyard is situated is level and some trees grow near it.
The churches of Clonmacnoise was to be built at that old graveyard at first. The name of that graveyard is Mullahakilla. The people were digging (ot) out a foundation of a
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 08:56
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There is one historical old on the farm owned Mrs. Guider of Lisanure. It is known as the "Spirit bush". It was said that in ancient times a man was seen there. He was said to have left the mark of his arms and head
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 08:49
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The pigeon, robin, wren, crow, thrush, sparrow, blackbird, tom-tit, jay, hawk, yellowhammer and skylark are common in our district.
Migratory Birds.
Corncrakes, cuckoos, martins, swallows, and swifts are migratory birds.
Birds that come to Us in summer.
The cuckoo, swallow, martin, swift, corncrake, and linnets come to us in Summer.
Birds that come to Us in Winter.
The wild goose, woodcock, snipe, and plover come to us in Winter
Nests
The wren builds a round nest of moss and wool, and makes a tiny hole for to get in. The waterhen builds a nest on rushes or weeds in a river.
The blackbird builds its nest of sticks on top of a chimney or on a high tree. A robin or tom-tit builds in a mossy bank
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 08:13
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began to take the stones building houses and fine building stones they were. They were dug out of the surface of the mountain I suppose hundreds of years ago today. The most of the houses in Lacca + Lisnoc are built out of them. When I saw the Cathair Geal first it was a pleasant sight it being so level and green and in the heart of a wild mountain.
In Lisnoc about 40 years ago there lived a family of the Griffins. I knew the man well. I remember to see him building a new house with some of the stones of the Cathair Geal, a kitchen and one room with a nice double breasted chimney. It was built about 30 yds from his old house so one evening as the masons were cleaning their trowels they spied coming up the mountain side a hare coming straight for the house. He flew over it in a flying leap though it was a good storey high. Of course they were surprised at this so they covered it with bogdeal and thatch and went to live in it. Griffin was a man then of about 40 years of age. He used to be burning lime. A short time after going to live in his new house he used to be out about 4 o'clock in the morning to attend to his Kiln and one morn when the rest of the family got up some one went to see why he was not coming to his breakfast. They found him dead in the back of the Kiln. He had four in family - two sons and two daughters. After a little while the two sons died in much the same mysterious manner. Then one of the daughters got married to a man of the Lyons's from Derry (near Listowel)
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 07:57
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December my brother William and I were going to Listowel fair with pigs. We left as we thought about five o'clock but what happened but our clock was slow. We went away. And we facing Kelly's cottage our horse got very troublesome, very frightened and inclined to turn round. So and we crossing the cottage there were two men in front of it - one of them crosslegged sitting on a chair - the other clipping his head. The one sitting on the chair shouted and we passing - "Oh Hello Norrigan". That man was no other than John Kelly whom I knew well to be dead. I thought our horse would pull us up on the ditch she was so very frightened and she got so quiet when we passed the cottage. Of course we were in Listowel before the market gate was open as it was really only one o'clock when we left. I did get a fright that morning so when I was coming home I went to see where the head was clipping but not a rib of hair was to be seen.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 07:49
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to the cabins, in one door and out the back door. I ran around to see where it would stop and when I was around it was soaring back the bogs towards Knockadereen. The last time it was seen was last January by your brother Jack. (Siobhán's brother - 20 years). We were in bed for about two hours. Our bed is turned towards the front window. He was awakened suddenly by a light shining on his face. He woke me and asked who was coming up the field with the lantern. I said it might be some of the people above as on the hill coming from the road. He got up to the window to see who it was out so late. It came up to the stall and doubled back again - on North thro' the bogs towards Knockadereen. My brother William saw it about 50 years ago (I mean your grandfather) coming the very same route and it disappeared in a gallet under where he was standing. I never came as close to it as I did that night in the Toor Mountain. I do wonder greatly at it sometimes and why it is that it comes the very same route.
Of another time 50 or 55 years ago we used to play cards at Kelly's cottage of Knockadereen. Jack Kelliher that lives there today. Another man named Kelly who lived in the farm at Knockadereen a nephew of the man in the cottage used to be playing with as often until two or three o'clock in the morning. They had a nickname on me "Norrigan". However the man in the farm John Kelly did not live long. He died in the month of October so the following
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 07:29
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One night about 27 years ago I was coming from a fair in Listowel. I was not anyway drunk and as I came along to Toor I saw as I thought a nice red fire a few spades in on Maher's mountain for on I going back in the morning about nine o'clock there were people cutting litter on that very spot. I thought of course that it was so they had left a fire they had for cooking or reddening their pipes lighting after them so I went in. Stooping down to pick up a coal the whole fire rose up into the sky flying along the glen down into the Knockadereen meadows a distance of a mile. Many a time I have seen a light like that. Tadhg Ruadh told me one time a light such as that was a glow-worm but I know it is not. I am sure it is "Jacky-the-Lantern". For years I have known this light to be appearing in the height of the road and coming along the bogs to the front of this house. One night and I coming from rambling I saw it appearing on the road. I stood at the end of the house and it came along to the front on
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 07:19
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four greyhounds overtook me at Parson Bentleys - every two of them tied together with nice bright chains. As they passed me one of them growled at me. I thought they were the biggest hounds I ever saw. Theu were more like boar-hounds. They conveyed me along to the grán (gorrán) bridge sniffing along the roadside sometime passing me out and sometime delaying behind me. When I came to the bridge they disappeared or at least I missed them there. I came on and as I was coming up to Cnocmaol I went in to Corridan's cabin from a shower and it being so late in the night and I being so tired I fell asleep until seven o'clock next morning. Next morning I got up from my bed of hay and went home, fell sick that very evening and was removed to hospital next day, where I remained six months and spent several nights raving about those four terrible hounds with their black covers and girts. I never since went to Kilconlea by night or by day.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 07:08
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took Darby and put him into a sack and took him away to a river to drawn him. After a time as he was passing near a house he met a man and asked him to mind the sack that he was thirsty and wanted a drink. While he was away the man being anxious to know what was in the sack untied the cord and Darby popped out and the man getting frightened ran away. Darby seeing his chance put a few logs of wood into the bay and went hiding. When the man returned he took the sack of wood to the river and threw it in and watched it until it went to the bottom thinking all the time it was Darby. Darby watched all this and when the man was going home he appeared before him at a distance the man thinking it was his ghost ran with his life and is stilling running if he is living while Darby walked home smiling.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 07:01
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the man was mad, but after a time the horse passed manure and Darby coming off searched the manure and found a coin. A man came out of the crowd and asked Darby what kind of a horse he had and Darby said that each time the horse passed manure he found a coin in it. So saying he again galloped the horse through the market until the horse passed more manure and he came down and in the presence of the man picked up another coin. The man asked him to sell the horse but Darby said no that the horse was his sole means of support. The man offered Darby a sum double the value of the horse so he consented giving up the horse and bidding the stranger good bye. This amn took home the horse and when he got home the horse passed more manure so the man searched it and found the third coin and he was proud of his bargain. Next day he drove the horse all day but found no coin in the manure so he held driving and beating the poor animal for a week and found no money. He then thought that Darby was too clever for him and said that he would go and find him and give him the horse and get back his money. He soon found Darby and telling him his business Darby said that he would take back the horse but that he had no money that he had it all spent. The man
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 04:23
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on the table, and when a sheaf is gathered, it is shoved off by means of a rake.
Mowing machines are made in Wexford.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 04:19
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There was a man in Courtnacuddy, which is about three miles from Enniscorthy, and he was very fond of meat, and he used to eat it everyday of the week, including Friday.
One day, Father Dunne, the parish priest, was passing this man's house, and he went in and found the man frying rashers, and he said, "Here you are again, frying meat on Friday."
"Look at all Our Lord suffered for you, on the Cross."
"O Begor," sez the man, "But where would you get another man like Him,"
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 04:10
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There was a woman wan time and she used to smoke a pipe and she used to carry her pipe in her bosom,
and she went to confession wan night and when she was saying
"Through my fault" she said,
"O G-- I'm after breakin my pipe."
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 04:07
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One night I was coming home from a neighbour's house.
When I came to the stile of
Courtnacuddy Churchyard I heard the sound of horses' hooves in the distance, and I stopped on the stile, and I saw a hearse and a coffin in it. I thought it was going into the Churchyard, but it passed by, and I followed it for half a mile, and then I went home, and found out afterwards, that it was a hearse bringing a corpse home to Carlow from the Mental Hospital in Enniscorthy.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 04:01
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"Jackie boy, Jackie boy,
Where are you gone?"
Then the badger in the bag stirred himself up an' sed.
"That's me Daddy be dad." I then thrun him off my back an' ran home.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:56
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There was a fella wan time and he was lightin' his pipe wan night and he passin' the churchyard.
Just as he was puttin' a match to his pipe, somebody else who he couldn't see, put up another pipe to get lit.
The man got such a fright that he went to the priest and told him about it.
The priest told him that instead of smokin' when passin' the churchyard, that he should say a prayer for the repose of the souls there.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:45
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There is also a well to show where "Ferishka" landed, and it is called ever since :
"léim an Fhíor Uisge,"
or the jump of "Ferishka."
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:41
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He was lame, and his name was "Ferishka."
The crossroads at the Leap,
(about one mile from Adamstown).
and where the above contest took place, and some of the fields surrounding are called "Ferishka."
There are at the present time
two stones driven into the ground, which are supposed to be the marks of that leap.
One indicates the spot from where he jumped the other to show where he landed.
The distance of the leap is over forty feet.
These stones are there still, but in the course of tiime they have been altered.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:33
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was going, and the other
replied that he was going to
jump at Rosegarland Sports.
"If you cannot beat me," said
the other, "it is no use going
there for I have been beaten
there already."
Then they had a contest, and
the man, who was going to compete,
was defeated by the man who
was returning.
He then decided that there was
no use in going to the sports, and
he returned to Carlow with his
companion.
There is no record of the
nature of the leap, but there
is a record of the name of the
man who was defeated in
Rosegarland.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:31
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was going, and the other
replied that he was going to
jump at Rosegarland Sports.
"If you cannot beat me," said
the other, "it is no use going
there for I have been beaten
there already."
Then they had a contest, and
the man, who was going to compete,
was defeated by the man who
was returning.
He then decided that there was
no use in going to the sports, and
he returned to Carlow with his
companion.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:24
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The origin of the "Leap", Adamstown.
The predecessors of the present
Leigh's of Rosegarland were a
family by the name of Sinnots,
a powerful clan in South Wexford.
A pattern or sports festival,
which would last for a week or
a fortnight used to be held
in Rosegarland.
The best men from Wexford, and
the surrounding counties
used to compete.
On one of these occasions two
neighbouring men from Carlow,
one, going to the sports, and
the other returning, met on
the cross roads that we call
the Leap.
One asked the other where he
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:15
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Protestants lived in our house before we came to live in it
When we came to live there ghosts used to be seen in it, and we got Mass said in the back room, and even under the stairs, and also in some of the out-houses.
Ghosts have never been seen here since.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:12
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There is a Blessed Well situated on the lands of Mr Hickey, Misterin, and it is unknown by the local people.
It is situated in a bog and it is called Coolbegs.
Long ago when the people used to send away the butter in ferkins, the late Mrs Hickey used to get the water to make the butter out of this well, although there was a pump in the farmyard.
It is said that she always had very good butter.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:06
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One night in the month of October, about seventeen years ago, a woman named Mrs Carton went out to meet her daughter, who was in town.
All of a sudden the Banshee started to wail inside a ditch.
She went on a little further, an' she met a messenger saying that a woman named Mrs Levingstone had just died.
This was the woman who owned the field in which the banshee wailed.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 03:00
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aside. "this man is doatin'"
an' she said, "John, when did you give me the brass button
"Oh; Begor, don't you remember me givin' them to you the day before I went to school."
"Now don't you see", says Mary,
the man doesn't know what he is talking about." And she stuck on to the gold.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:55
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told, and the chaps in school gave him a very uneasy time of it.
Next day he wouldn't go to school at all, and he started off to break stones again.
During the day, the man and the lady came around again and asked him did he find any money, the day of the hunt, but he said he found a little bag of brass buttons.
"Where are they? says the gentleman and John said, "Come home to the Misses, she has them." So they went to the house and asked Mary to give them the brass buttons
"What are you talking about," says she an' she pullin' John
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 02:50
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that the people broke the black potatoes and found in them a little bit of good potato and they ate that. They also scooped out the turnips and ate the inside raw. I heard that emigration was very great to America.
When the old [people were going off they left their houses to whoever would pay their passage to America or maybe a little more. The cause of all the old ruins are, because the purchaser often bought several houses and those he did not want he allowed to fall in ruins, as he didn't want to pay taxes on so many.
The old man that told me said he could name several families that went off to America. Some of them were "Rossiters", "Mangans" "Howlins" and "Parles".
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:45
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An old man earned his living by breaking stones
This day there was a hunt out and a lot of gentlemen were riding after it and a lady lost a purse of gold sovereigns.
The man picked it up and brought it home to his wife and said,
"Look at the grand brass buttons I have found, but there are no holes in them."
"They are alright," she said, "give them to me."
Next morning the woman said,
"John, if you got a little bit of education you'd earn money much lighter you'd better go to school today.
John went to school, as he was
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 02:44
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family. Old people say that the stirabout had the taste of soap. The people also lived on barley-bread and buttermilk. I heard that the corn was very good that year but the potatoes rotted away in the ground. I heard the farmers sent off to the south of England for the seed potatoes for the next year.
the seed was sown in the beds the year after. Old people say that the rent and the taxes were very high the year of the famine and although the grain was plenty they got very little for it.
Publicworks.
An old man told me that the road joining Blackwater and Wexford was made in the year of the Public Works. On that road about a mile and a quarter from the village of Blackwater there was a huge lime and stone bridge. It is said that when the workers were drawing stuff for the roads they discovered three skeletons while digging. Then three crosses were put there and it is from those that this place derived the name "Hill of the Crosses". Those jobs were got done quickly on account of the crowds of people men and women that worked on them. Everyone that had a car got extra money.
I heard that the hunger was so great
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:38
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but, when the storm became worse, he moved to one side of the boat and looking up towards Heaven he said,
"If there is such a Person in Heaven, as God come down here yourself, and help us, because this is no place for a Boy.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-23 02:36
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for the purpose. The furrow was then dug and chopped to make fine and this was spread on the top and made the surface of the ridge smooth.
In dry land the ridges were spread in the same way. A harrow was sometimes used to level the surface and make the clay fine. Furrows about one foot wide were cut with a plough between each ridge. The clay from the furrow was shovelled on to the ridge.
In the village of Kilmuckridge there was what was known as a Stirabout Kitchen. The meal was supplied free to the persons in charge. The stirabout was made the the food ready cooked was given free of charge to anyone making application for a supply.

I heard that there was a stirabout boiler in Blackwater opposite Darby Walshe's house in the street of Blackwater. The house at that time was occupied by a Mr Cunningham who owned the boiler. The people went for the stirabout and got so much according to the size of their
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:35
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Years ago there was a ship goin' to Australia with passengers.
There were many passengers from many countries, especially from Ireland, and a Russian who had no religion.
When they were in the middle of the Indian Ocean, a terrific storm arose, and the passengers were filled with fear, and they commenced to pray to the Mother of God, and to the Father of Jesus Christ to send down their Son to save them.
This Russian at first smiled to himself at their praying, and asking Heavenly help, for he had no religion,
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:29
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in it.
When the strange man saw him, he disappeared into the sky, and he was screaming terribly.
The other man called the chair the "Madman's Chair," after that.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:27
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There was an ould man one time, living near the Barracks, Adamstown,
an' every night when he was goin' to bed a strange man used to go up to him.
Neither of them used to spake.
Wan night, when the strange man came up the stairs, the other man asked him who he was, or what was he wantin'.
"I came from Camross Rock," he said. "And if you go to the top of that rock you will find a chair made from stone."
The man went to the rock next day, an' when he reached the chair, he found the strange man sitting
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:19
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He is the farmer's best friend.
The terrier and the grey-hound are kept to kill rabbits.
They are let loose at night to guard the house.
They are called by different names.

Cats :
Cats are kept to kill rats, and mice, because they destroy food.
Cats are fed three times a day on bread and milk.
When we call them we say
"Puss, puss, puss."
When a cat is young she is called a kitten.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:15
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They are fed three times a day, morning, noon, and night.
When they are fat, they are sold, and the farmer gets a good price for them.
When the farmer is calling them he says, "Haristeac, Haristeac, Haristeac" and they come to him.

Dogs :
Dogs are kept to guard the house
They are fed on potatoes, bread, and milk
The farmer keeps three kinds of dogs, namely, a grey-hound, a sheep-dog and a terrier.
The sheep dog is kept to follow the sheep and cattle.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:08
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sold, and the rest of them are kept for sheep.
The sheep is the hardiest of all animals, because she is able to be out in the fields winter and summer.
When the summer comes the wool is taken off her back, and it is sold for a good price.
The sheep are called by " Jin, Jin, Jin."

Pigs:
Pigs are kept to fatten.
The house in which they are kept is called a pig-sty.
This house is cleaned out every week.
They are fed on potatoes, cabbage
turnips, and meal.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 02:00
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This house is cleaned out every day.
Then there is a good bed of straw put in under them to keep them clean
They are fed three times a day, morning, noon, and night.
When they are fat, they are sold, and the farmer gets a good price for them.

Sheep:
Sheep are always kept out in the fields.
They are fed on turnips, oats, and mangolds.
They have lambs in the spring, and when the lambs are big and fat, some of them are
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 01:55
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fields until evening.
When evening comes they are brought home again to be milked, and the milk is brought to the creamery.
When they are milked, they are put out in the fields for the nights.
When the farmer is calling them he says, "Chew, Chew, Chew."
Cattle:
Cattle are kept to fatten
They are kept in the house day and night.
They are fed on turnips, hay, and meal.
The house in which they are kept is called a cattle house.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 01:50
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They are fed on turnips, hay, straw and meal.
They are milked twice a day, in the morning, and in the evening.
The house in which they are kept is called a cow house.
The cow house is cleaned out every day.
Then there is a good bed of straw put in under them to keep them clean and warm.
The cows are not kept in the house in the summer, they are put out in the fields.
They are brought home in the morning to be milked. When they are milked, the milk is sent to the creamery.
Then they are put out in the
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 01:44
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Then there is a good bed of straw put in under them to keep them clean.
Horses are not kept in the house in the summer.
They are put out in the fields, because the weather is too warm to keep them in the house.
When the farmer is calling them he says, "Come, Come, Come," and the horses come to him.
They have to work very hard in Spring and Autumn.

Cows:
Cows are kept to give us milk.
They are put in the house at night during the winter, because the weather is too cold to keep them out in the fields.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 01:35
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after her, and she went along till she came to Summers' window and the hounds caught her goin' in through it, an' they took a piece out of her hip, but she got in through the window after all.
This hare was supposed to be Mrs Summers; and it is said that woman had always a sore hip after that
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 01:31
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There was a woman named Mrs Summers who lived in Rathkyle, and there was a small farmer living near her who hadn't many cows.
This man could never get any milk from the cows, so he said there was somebody milking them at night.
He got a couple of fellas to watch the cows this night to see who was milking them, and they had two greyhounds with them.
They watched for a long time, but at long last a hare came along and began to suck the cows.
The men set the greyhounds
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 01:25
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There's two giants buried in one of Laffin's fields in Barmoney.
It is said that they stood on Mount Leinster and fired a stone, and they said wherever the stone would fall that they would be buried in that spot.
The stone fell in one of Laffin's fields, and they were buried there.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:52
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:51
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:45
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you will get the treasure but, as it is supposed that a life has to be lost before the treasure is found no one had ventured to try.
6. There is supposed to be another fort at the back of Mr. Bracken's in Ballycumber, Parish of Ballinahown, Co. Offaly. There are bags of gold, silver and pearls in it also, and a golden razor over the fireplace. There is a cat guarding it and if you go and throw her a bone you will get the treasure or some of it. If you spend too long in taking the treasure the bone will have been eaten by the cat and then she will eat you. It is supposed that three lives have to be lost before this treasure is found.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:37
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the highest number of skittles wins the game. "Jack stones" was another game played.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:36
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plucked and boiled in water this water is said to cure blindness in sheep. If you get a sting of a nettle, and you rub a dock leaf to it, it is able to stop the pain. The Plaintain leaf is used to stop bleeding - it is heated at the fire before being wrapped round the cut.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:34
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Cure for Ringworm - Blood of a black cat or a gold ring rubbed on the spot where it is
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:33
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The foxestongue or cuckoo-pint will cure worms in children. The root is cleaned and then boiled for four hours and drunk in sugar and milk.
The dandelion cures the gapes in turkeys.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:32
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Den Shea from Bunaw
Long ago there was a man by the name of Denis Shea who lived east of Mike Mccarty. Every night he used go out walking. His father died in the 26st of June and he went out a few nights after that. He was going up. Near Felix Mccarty at Direenatolog road, and he saw a white woman crossing the toad. He ran home and jumped into bed, and he died a week after that with the shock he got.
Neil O Sullivan got this story from Paddy Shea Bunaw aged 79 years.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:32
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There is the mullen plant. It is a tall plant about four feet high with big leaves, shooting from the sides of it. The leaves are taken and boiled in water, and sugar put on them and the juice is taken as a cure for a cough. If ivy leaves are
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:30
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drawing
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:29
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Long ago there was hardly any shops, and they used to bring the goods around from house to house.
Was money always given For Goods.
Money was not always given for goods. One man would give some chickens for a sack of meal, and another would give some eggs for some sugar.
Words.
People would say I will give you some "boot" for something, and they would give luck money. In this district luck money is still given, and they used to get things on 'tick'.
Some who could not read or write kept sticks for the customers, and whenever they got things on 'tick' they put nicks on the sticks, and then they new how much each customer owed.
Markets.
Markets were held in the Market Yards. The country people brought in butter, meal, cabbage, turnips, potatoes, and other things and exchanged with the towns people
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:28
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went on with a number of the family, and never stopped until he came to Cloherane mountain and high up there he got the horse. He used go to meet the car coming from town, and he used to know the noise of it. One night one of the boys lost a rug, the dog was behind the car and brought the rug with him in his mouth home. He lived fourteen years old, his name was Shep.
Jeremiah Sullivan Gloss.
I got this story from my father age 57.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:22
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The festival of Christmas Day is on the 25th December. It is kept in remembrance of the birth of our Lord.
There are many customs connected with this feast. The houses are decorated with holly and ivy and paper decorations. The shops are decorated with toys and Christmas things. There are Christmas trees decorated with tiny candles and tincel, and presents on them for everyone.
It is always a custom to have a goose or a turkey for the Christmas dinner. And two of three Christmas cakes and a big plum pudding with holly on it.
Then everyone gives presents to their relations, and cards to their friend's. And the band goes out on Christmas Eve and so sing Christmas carols.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:17
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some people get cured.
About six months ago some man left his crutches at the well they are to be seen at the Grotto.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:14
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and sold them in chemists shops. It is also made into liniment this is very useful in the winter time for people who are suffering from rheumatism.
A person could earn about ten shillings a day picking it in while the spring tide lasts which is about five days in every fortnight.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:12
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Múr buidhe is a kind of sea weed found on the shore and can be picked only when the tide is out.
It grows from a stalk that takes root on the rocks and has only a few flat leaves, about five or six feet long and about four inches wide. When picked, it is spread out to dry for a day or two and it can then be packed until it is wanted for use.
It is useful in many ways. Iodine is made from it
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:10
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the child, was in foal and it is said no foal lived in Fehanaugh ever after. Anna Sullivan wrote this story from her grandmother Nancy Sullivan. Aged eighty years.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:09
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of the road. Down through the years the tailors shop has been the meeting place for the inhabitants of Ovens old & young alike. The tailor - a very interesting kindly type of man - (Mr Timothy Hurley - 70 yrs) is a noted raconteur, famous for his wit - a family characteristic for many generations.
On the Coach Road also is situated the farm house of the local poet - Mr. Edward Magner (74 yrs). Up to a few years ago Mr. Magner contributed to local papers & supplied the following verses of his own composition to - Annie Cronin, 12½ yrs, Knockanemore, Ovens - for inclusion in her collection of "Ovens Folk Lore"
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:09
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of the old monastery are still to be seen a few hundred yards to the east of the old Church Keelmacada.
Nothing is now left but a pile of stones surrounded by a grassy mound although until recent years, a stone image of St Ida was to be seen in what was once the gable of the old monastery.
This image or statue is said to have been brought by the Corridon's from Clare and presented to the son of St Eda who was a monk in the monastery at Keelmacada.
In a deep glen covered with bracken and ivy to
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:05
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the south of the old ruin is a grassy slope from which issues a stream called St Macada's well. The Corridon family often go in pilgrimage to this well.
It is said that the old church is sometimes seen enveloped in a bright light which is a sign that death is approaching one of the Corridon family.
Many people have seen the light and in every case the truth of the saying is fulfilled, for a funeral goes to the old church always after its appearance.
A sound of weeping
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:02
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and the Irish "Caoine" is said also to be heard at Keelmacada when the death of a Corridon takes place over the seas.
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:01
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tombs, which are still the burial place of the Corridon family.
The tombs which are three in number are situated within the wall and outside it, is one high mound resembling a grave or tomb, supporting on top a conical slab about three feet high.
On a niche on this slab is a smooth circular stone about as large as an orange which is still used as a mascot or talisman by the Corridon family in times of sickness or disaster of any kind.
According to legendary
senior member (history)
2019-05-23 00:00
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This year is the centenary of a storm that swept over the country and did great damage to houses and properity. It happened on the feast of the Epihany 1838 and tradition tells us that it stripped the roof of the houses and left a great number of people homeless. It made such an impression on the minds of the people that what ever part of the world an Irishman went to he was asked "Did he remmber the night of the high wind"
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:58
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The coach Road is part of the old main road leading directly from Cork to Macroom via Ballincollig. It runs right through the parish of Ovens, bridging the river Bride at Ovens Cross Roads.
It was a famous highway in olden days & is regaining its ancient traffic reputation since the surface was improved in 1930.
Two famous coach houses were situated on the Coach road, one at Barnagore Cross & another at Srelane Cross.
A lone pine tree, growing a few hundred yards from Srelane Cross Coach house, was used in the past as a gallows for highwaymen. The tree has a sinister appearance. Now almost - devoid of branches, its gnarled trunk is covered with ivy (the black leaves of the latter must not - according to local superstition - be plucked on any account).
A very old forge, still plying a busy trade, t a tailor's shop are very ancient landmarks
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:57
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meaning the storm of 1838.
In recent times, on the night of the 26th February 1903 another storm swept along the south of Ireland and did serious damage. Though dwelling houses and outoffices were much better prepared for strong wind than in 1838 the effects of it were much felt by the people.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:55
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and the little ones had fled
We had some grand amusement on the roads of Kerryhead.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:54
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He brought us to his parlour and treated us quite soon,
We gave him that grand chorus
called the Riseing of the Moon
(3)
Next to Micheal O Connell in the Kerryhead estate,
He kindly received us and did us accommodate
He brought us to his parlour,
and gave us punch go leor
But alas! poor Gohn Regan was left trembling at the door.
(4)
The day been far advanced we all thought of home
We came in that direction to a place (place) called the New Road
Where the boys and girls danced
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:51
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The following is a poem made by my grand uncle David Godley about a Hubby, horse.
Come to the west boys, come along with me,
Come to the west, and our hubby you will see.
She is the lily in the summer
She is the lily in the spring,
She is the lily still in winter
when the small birds cease to sing.
(2)
Our first visit was to Pat Kenny
In the mountan glen or Lee,
Situated at the point conveient to the sea.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:47
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The labouring men from the poor parts of Ireland used to go to the markets in the towns in the harvest time looking for work from the farmers and they were called Spailpín (Fank) Fánach.
And when the farmers used be digging the potatoes they hired them for seven or eight shillings a week. They used carry their clothes in a red cloth tied on to a piece of (sticks) a stick across their shoulders. They used get up and go out work
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ing dark in the mornings and when they (wol) would have a ridge of potatoes dug they would come in for their breakfast. It cosisted of potatoes and milk and they used go working again till dinner. When their week's work was done the farmers paid them and they went home.
This was told to me by Frank (F) Casey Ballylangane and is 63 years of age.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
get no call.
He then lay down a rule.
And he goes on through the road side selling an ass.
One day he met two Ferrys boy on the bargain went.
And in a few moments to the barrick they were sent.
Bad luck to you Con Dennhy
Who thought he would gain a stripe by me.
But in spite of you old Tobin,
The sargent left us free.
This story was told to me by a man named John Hanlon of Ballylangane (sixty) who is sixty two years of age.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 23:37
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rejected
awaiting decision
There were many local poets in this district, long ago, but their poetries were never written into books.
Sullivan and Shea who would leap the sky.
And every kick he would give it "up Kerry " was the cry.
You all know David Tobin that travelled the world,
With herrings and fresh mackerels,
That came in from the tide.
And when he get call he
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Arranged by R. Tallon, Fennor (13 years)

Fennor:- Finn Abhair Breagh
Gaulstown:- Baile na nGall
Honey meadow:- Cluain Meala
Keenog:- Caonóg (mossy place)
Mary Lands:- Baile Muire
Mullefin:- Mullac Fionn
Mooretown:- Baile na gCurrach
The Cloghan:- An Clochán
Lurgy:- An Lurga
Athcarne:- Ath Carinn

A.N. Family names
Boynanstown:- Boynanstown
Ballramstown:- Barltamstown(?)
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the old belief was verified - for a son was born.
Mr. Charles Conway (49 yrs) Ovens, relates that one Winters evening about 30 years ago, as he was returning home through Castleinch, he lost his way. After wandering for some time he found himself in the vicinity of the Fairy Rath. He felt rather nervous but just then, to his great relief he saw two figures approaching. They were exceptionally tall, but otherwise ordinary in appearance. He saluted them, but received no reply. They continued to advance towards him, & then, just as suddenly as hey had first appeared, they disappeared.
The district is devoid of any hiding place neither wall, bush or tree affords a shelter. Mr Conway emphasises the fact that the night was very bright.
When he reached home, his parents were not surprised on hearing his story.
His father told him that some of the neighbours had had a similar experience in the past.
A fine specimen of Rath is situated in Grange in the lands of Mr. Dennehy. The entrance is quite visible, but the rath has never been explored.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 22:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
082
On the western side a late 8 century house has been built ,which has up to recently been used as a police barrack.Externally the building is remarkably plain but its great size and solidity produce an impressing effect not easily forgotten .With the exception of Kincora and Clonroad ,both of which are now gone even to the last stone.
Bunratty historically speaking is the most interesting spot in Thomand as its castle is certainly to-day the most important secular building .the present castle and its predecessors for there were three such ,as intimately connected with the chief historical events therein occurring from the 12th to the 17th century .During the 41 odd years of the De Clare occupation of Tradaree and for a further 37 years ,during which the English still held a precarious occupation of the district Bunratty was a stem-centre round which surged a fierce of un-related war a veritably maelstrom of strife ,to close only with the complete expulsion of the invaders.
The First Castle.
To the Anglo Norman ,Robert De
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
My Grandmother Mrs McDonald of Pound Street, told me there was no such thing as a week of working hours, when she was a little girl. People worked from daylight till dark. In big gentlemen's houses, the steward who hired the men and women gave them wages every week. These wages consisted of six shillings and a certain amount of oatmeal and potatoes. My Grandmother's father was a steward on a big farm in the county Kildare and their method of working was to be on the sod at 7 am with their breakfast of porridge down. At dinner time which was from
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
Fear
Is tapaidh do ghlacfainn do slártha
Nach mbíonn an óige ró-dithcille
Agus ní cuimhníonn sí ortsa go dtagann an t-aos di an bás
Ní le t-óige ná do díthceille
Na deich n-aitheannta ná comhlíonais má d'fhoghluimís ith-saol riamh iad
Ná an seacht bpeacaí marbhú traochta
Mar is grán an cás i láthair Dé í
Briseadh na deich n-aitheannta is dóigh liom gur duit féin is baolach
Briseadh an cúigiú aithint ag marbhú agus ag traóchadh agus nár b'olc an slí beatha é
B'fhearr duit mar chéird
Ná beith a fágaint leanbhí gan athair ag gear gol
Agus is beag a bhíonn buidheach díot.
Fear
Ní mise is cionntach bheith ag marbhú gach aoinne
Nach comhairle Mic Muire is cóip a bheith déanta
An nglacfá luach nó duais ó aoinne.
Má ghlacfá chuirfinn urraidhthe isteach ort le púnt is cead
Agus a rá nár chuimhnighis ar ghlaoch cugham
Agus nár mhaith í do dhuais mar gheall ar teacht ar m'éileamh
An Bás
Má ghlacfainn-se luach nó duais ó aoinne
'S maith na h-appaighthe bheadh agam féin leis
Duine nach fiú pingin scilling nó raol é
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:25
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rejected
awaiting decision
This is situated on a farm locally known as "Fortip", called after the owner Fortescue. It later came into the hands of a man named Joseph Slevin of Milltown (adjoining) who had a water mill here for grinding corn.

Criostoir Bhillí Dúnaigh (Christy Villey Dooney) was a small-holder living in the "Sean-Bhaile" a lane in Clogher, a sub-townland of Rathkenny. He used to work with Slevin, who decided to blast the "Druid's Altar" out of the way in preparation for tilling the land. He prepared powder and fuse for the purpose, intending to start on the job next morning. That night Christy Villy was "a céilidh" in a neighbour's house and when going home he saw a light moving round the Cromlech. Further on he had to cross a Kesh (or pathway) over the river coming from "Hussey's Gorse". In the river under the Kesh he found his cow and calf in danger of being drowned. He shouted for help, and the neighbours came and rescued the animals. That was the end of Slevin's attempt on the Cromlech. There are two forts in the same field as the "Druid's Altar".
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:24
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When, after some time bread was baked, cakes were made of oatmeal mixed with water and baked on a griddle. The griddle was a flat piece of iron with two handles. The bread was terrible hard but it seems to have served their teeth for out ancestors took sets of beautiful sound white teeth to the grave.Mrs Loughman told me also that she knew a woman who broke stones and her wages for this was four pence a day. With this she bought Indian meal.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:19
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rejected
awaiting decision
We are not surprised to see that the blight on the potato crop in 1846 and 1847 meant famine when we are told that the potato was the principal food used my the people. Mrs Loughman, Galmoy, aged 87 told me that potatoes were used at two of the three meals taken daily. Breakfast at eight o clock consisted f potatoes, salt and milk. The milk was usually sour. Porridge made from Indian meal and not very skilfully cooked, was used for dinner. Potatoes were again used for supper. Only old people were allowed to have tea, and if any member was given a cup of tea on Sunday morning he was highly honoured. Before cups became common, earthen ware vessels called noggins were used. Wooden dishes made by a turner in a lead were also used. Porridge was served on pewter plates and wooden spoons were used. The pewters were a dull leaden colour and were very heavy. My uncle residing in Tullavolty, has fourteen pewter plates and a teapot of the same metal in his possession. If they are not valuable they are at least rare and ancient. The tables were sometimes made like an armchair, when they were not in use.They could be folded up with the table itself as the back of the chair.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:15
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A Fairy Rath.
The above is situated in Castleinch. For many centuries - owing to local belief that 'fairy land' must not be disturbed - it remained untilled.
Some years ago the land surrounding the rath was sold. The new owner ploughed the rath. A member of the family - an only son died. Then an old superstition was told to the father, that if he replaced the sods on the rath again & restored it to its old elevation - being particularly careful to replace the large stones of the rath - in due course a son would be born.
The instructions were carried out &
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:05
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rejected
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Mills were also worked in Killumney, in the vicinity of the present Co-Operative Creamery. The remains of the walls may be seen at the back of the creamery. A Mr. John Morton was the miller.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:04
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rejected
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An Bás
Tá m'aodaireacht ar fuaid na h-Éireann
Gabhaim don Róimh agus do thír na Déise
Agus ar thír na dTurcach deanfadh a léir scrios
Agus níor lugha nó neomat beadh in Éigipt
Fear
Cé acadiadhacht is mó agat nó comhachta Dé
Agus mórmó nó neomat do shiúlfá an méid sin
Bás
Ní diadhacht is mó agam nó comhachta Dé
Ach tigh a dhuine! Cad a dearfadh
Is mise mé ná an fiolar nó an faoileán bhán
Ná an seabhac in innealach imeallach sléibhte
Ná an nideóg éin a bhíonn in aonar
Is mise cead uair mé ná an gruaig gréine
Ná long fé sheol lá is mó bhí gaoth léi
Fear
Dé bheatha an-tsláinte bás ins an saol
Ó bhás ag gabháil thar bpághaid agus tháingis ar m'eileain
Cuirfidh mise cóir ort comh maith is cuireadh is saol riamh
Agus do thart a mhúchadh le crúsga an trean punch
An Bás
Sin í an fáilte bhí uain féin ort
Ach biadh na beatha iní blurim in aon chor
Nach, siúl leat suas go slua na n-aingeal
Má tuillis is shaol riamh é.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 22:02
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rejected
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A fine mill was worked up to about forty years ago. It was situated in the lands of Mr. William Fitzgerald, Ovens.
In Nov '94 - late in the evening - a fire broke out, owing to fuel shortage for machinery & the mill were completely gutted.
The mill hands resided at Lisheens, Barnagore & Ovens Bridge. They left the neighbourhood after the disaster & their cottages fell into disrepair. The district soon declined in population. At present a few broken down walls at Lisheens Cross mark the site of a once well inhabited village - Lisheens. The district where the fire occured is known as "Burnt Mills"
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 21:51
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'does for' Mary Anne.
Go along the Grange Road, and stop as you pass by
Tis there you'll meet Kate Twomey
Indeed she seldom sighs
For herself & Bob McCarthy will be married By & By.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 21:51
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Arranged by R. Tallon(?) (13 years)

Fennor:- Finn Abhair Breagh
Gaulstown:- Baile na nGall
Honey meadow:- Cluain Meala
Keenog:- (?)
Mary Lands:- Baile Muire
Mullefin:- Mullac Fionn
Mooretown:- Baile na gCurrach
The Cloghan:- An Clochán
Lurgy(?):- An Lurga(?)
Athcarne:- Ath Carinn

A.N. Family names
Boynanstown:- Boynanstown
Ballramstown:- Barltamstown(?)
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 21:47
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rejected
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The following, supposed to be the last composed in the district, was supplied by a lady resident in the parish, who could not supply the composers name - probably the majority of these "nonsense rhymes" were 'made up' by the youth of the parish.
"Skellig List 1894"
First cometh Maggie Mullane, and she dressed in mourning black.
Her heels are out of order from running after Jack.
Jack Kelly is the man we mean, a hero stout & bold.
Maggie's not young or handsome
But she's worth her weight in gold.
There's another lass of Maggie's class
With wrinkles on her brow.
She says to Stephen Hegarty
'Tis time you'd have me now
If we do not prosper on the Road Contract
We'll thrive alright as long as apples grow
for me upon the Chapel Road.
There's another maid just of the proper sort.
And Jack Flynn is trying hard to win her fair young heart.
But he says he cannot marry till he
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 21:28
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(a) "Marriage Customs".
In Ovens it is considered unlucky to marry on a Friday or Wednesday, or on any day during the month of August. The bride follows the old time custom of Munster in wearing something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue.
After the ceremony, when the company assemble for bridal breakfast, the bride's mother breaks a crust of bread over her daughters head. "Hawling Homes" are always given by the bride's parents on the return from the honeymoon.
(b) Shrove Customs
Shrove Tuesday Night is always referred to as Pancake Night. Pancakes are partaken of in every home in the parish. "Skellig Lists" were composed in the parish until quite recently. The rhymes undoubtedly remained " i mbealeidh na ndaoine" for frequently in referring to local characters - of bygone days - the Skellig Lists are quoted.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 21:07
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"Teampall na Muice".
The above is situated a mile & a half from Inniscarra. It contains a Protestant Church surrounded by a graveyard.
Long ago, when the graveyard was completed, a reward of £15 was offered to the relatives of the first person (Catholic) interred here (Catholics had decided to boycott the burial ground, owing to the Protestant Church being in the area)
Shortly after the announcement of the reward, a boy - son of Catholic parents - died. His father killed a pig, placed it in a coffin & buried it in the graveyard, & got the reward .
The corpse was buried in a Catholic burial ground.
The district derives its name "Teampall na Muice" from this incidend, according to local tradition.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 20:56
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When he was about to put the girl to death, the girl spoke, because she had the eleven shirts made, and at that moment her eleven brother's landed beside her in the form of christians, and they put the eleven shirts on them. The youngest put the eleventh shirt on him, and there was only one sleeve in it. From that day the youngest boy had only one arm
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 20:48
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About the year 1895 a regiment of soldiers of "The tenth Hussars" were stationed in Ballincollig. One evening a party of them visited Inniscarra graveyard. Seeing a very well kept vault they guessed that somebody of importance was interred there.
They opened the vault & discovered the coffin of a lady. They wrenched the coffin open. They found a quantity of valuable jewellery upon the corpse. They cut off a finger to obtain a valuable ring. They did not trouble to re-inter the coffin or the remains. They placed the former against an adjoining wall & fled from the churchyard.
A few days later they were traced & punished . Some got terms of imprisonment, varying from five to seven years.The majority of the officers left the regiment, unable to stand local ridicule, for from that day onward's they were nicknamed the Bodysnatchers. The entire regiment was penalised. For years after they were compelled to do extra duty for an hour each evening.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 20:38
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Nettles.
The nettle is a plant with dark green leaves covered with hairs that emit a stinging juice, when boiled is supposed to be a very good medicine for poultry. The following dish is a good treatment for pimples, bad breath, dull eyes and sores. The heads of the growing nettles are cut off, then going down the stem the small bits are chopped off thoroughly having some boiling salted water, plunge the nettles in. Cook as one would any other green vegetable, squeeze dry and add some butter. Nettle-water may be used to bathe a sore or abcess and it will help to heal.
Young shoots from nettles
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 20:27
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During one of his terms as Sovereign John Isaac Heard committed a deed which earned for him the leas ainm of Hangman of Kinsale"
Cattle belonging to a widow in Camphill
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 20:26
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Another night while searching around Hollyhill a glimmer of light attracted the attention of this yeoman officer and his men. The door of a miserable cabin was open. Dashing in Heard beheld a spectacle which though typical of the times was a revelation to the Sovereign.
A family sat on the floor around a cipeán of potatoes: the only light for their meal being a tallow dip.
Heard was heard to mutter as he hurried from this spectacle of abject poverty that he had enough of these night hunts
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 20:23
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"A ghost" echoed the Sovereign "It is Mescil[?] the Whiteboy. I am glad the he escaped from such a pack of cowards"
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 20:21
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"-- is in the house. Send him out at once"
The bean a tighe replied that she knew nothing of the individual named. The Sovereign repeated his command in a more menacing tone. The woman again said she knew nothing of such a man. Heard stood in front of the door, Armstrong a pace aside. Both were powerfully built men.
Suddenly a figure bounded out of the dark interior, and, taking the yeoman officer off his guard, brought him to the ground. Armstrong grappled with the fugitive, Heard scrambled to this feet & shouted to the other to hold on to the Whiteboy. Armstrong keeping his grip was pulled along some distance.
Heard running to the assistance of his
yeoman saw, not the Whiteboy, but the torn shirt which he had left in the hands of Armstrong
Down a steep field went Heard & Armstrong while they shouted to the other yeos.
"Oh! sir" one fellow gasped. "A ghost! a form in white has just flashed by like a streak of lightning"
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:43
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Altúghadh taréis Bídh
Moladh do Dhia nach gann.
Moladh gach am do'n Rígh
Moladh do Íosa Críost,
Ar son a raibh againn de'n bhiadh

Ofráil na Maidne
Gach nidh ar do son-sa a Íosa
Thug anam is intinn dúinn
Gach nidh ar do son-sa a Íosa,
Gach focal gach gníomh gach dhúil.

Brighid agus a brat, Muire agus a Mac
Eadarainn agus gach uile h-olc
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 19:40
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090
to be surrendered on a years warning if my Lord or his Sonne comes to Setle there"but neither (his ) my Lord or his son Henry ,the 7th earl nor any of his race ever occupied Bunratty again.
A lease of "Bunratty Castle "for 99 years was granted by the 8th earl and last to one Robert Amory in 1709 and in 1712 ,the Commissioners acting under parliament specially passed to enable the earl to give leases for ever -contracted with Thomas Amory ,Esq.for a fee -farm grant of same.
By a deed dated Sept 26 the of that year ,for a consideration of £225 ,and a rent of £120 per annum ,a lease for ever to Thomas Amory was perfected of the "Castle",farm and lands of Bunratty about 472 acres ," with free ingress ,egress and regress for a coach or cart thro'the Park o Bunratty to Sixmilebridge .
There is always something very
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:39
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awaiting decision
Altughadh roimh Biadh
Ráth Ríogh a rinne an roinn
Ar ár gcuid agus ar ár bproinn
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:30
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Collected by Annie Dwyer from
Lawrence Dwyer
Clondoogan
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:29
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The Reiligeen
The Shinakeens
The Nursary
Mercury
Ballanrig
Crocpeac
The Fost Field
The Moat
Dromard
The Brick field
The Saly Park
The Lawn
The Vetch field
The Three Cock hat
Cock Park
Crocmalica
Crocwheeldrum
Curán
Crockrin
Tubarastick
Collected by
Maureen Ryan from
Patrick Ryan,
Dangan Castle
Summerhill
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 19:25
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081
one of the best in Ireland for motorists to-day.But it is remarkable how very little is known about the castle.in asking who build it you will be probably bee told (1)that it was built by one De Clare,(2)that the Co Clare was named after him and (3) that he was an ancestor of the Studdert family.
Yet not one of their statements is historically true.The present castle was not built by either of the De Clares.it is quite certain that the county received its name from Clár Mór ,Clare Castle and not from any family English or Irish,and the Studderts who have owned the castle for nearly 200 years ,have never claimed descent from the De Clares. The present castle of Bunratty consists essentially of massive corner towers of great strength ,each of six stories and of most intricate design, connected by huge walls in the substance of which run the stairs.In the centre ,enclosed by these walls are 3 large rooms ,a lower vaulted kitchen,over which are 2 halls or reception rooms,one over the other of equal size.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:25
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awaiting decision
Ackacom
Cruckcrue
Bullfasac
Bollabaine
Lockmuda
Cappquine
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:23
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awaiting decision
Crock a nannee
Glan an aisg
An rae wore
Scatther idir
Balla na mona
Cruck crew
Dhorn na gun
Gortheen
Tobar na Warra
Bull fasach
An moaneen
Bogawn
Bawnog
An Crickeen
Bolla-Bainne
Cleeroag
Lawragan
Cruck Coilleen
An Cooleen
Cruckawn
Cruack na Hone
Cloonack
Cap or rannee
Cruck i do Lear
Cappawine
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:18
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Mullac an Oir
Crocan Dub
Sanahona
Croch i Stocha
The Dunawn
The Raitin
The Bawnoge
Croch a Táther
Croch i Viscín
The Crocstí
The Fí-é-Tor
The Slang
Cáldoire
The Crochán Wawn
The Gottie Yard
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:16
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Mullac an Oir
Crocan Dub
Sanahona
Croch i Stocha
The Dunawn
The Raitin
The Bawnoge
Croch a Táther
Croch i Viscín
The Crocstí
The Fí-é-Tor
The Slang
Cáldoire
The Crochán Wawn
The Gottie Yard
Collected by
Rosaleen Hughes from
Nicholas Duffy,
Summerhill
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 19:09
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080
the whole of north munster Uí Connaill and make them subject to them.the spot offered every temptation to an invading force bent on conquest,but the brave gave the barbarians no peace ,and cleaned them out completely.
In the 13th century the A Norman similarly attracted by the richness, beauty and strategical advantages of this smiling land selected Tradaree as the fittest spot in Thomand to settle in and fortify ,making it a base for further conquest .They also, as we shall see were driven out.
In the S E extremity of this delectable district stands the castle of Bunratty .It is about 60 feet from the river bank of the O Garney river at the edge of a gently sloping hill of several acres across in extent.
The castle is a huge and imposing mass with its lofty and frowning southern arch.it must deeply impress the least emotional traveller who passes that way and thousands do so every day,as it lies on the main lain between limerick and Ennis -a beautiful trunk road
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:03
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awaiting decision
Bosceen
Cappawine
Relckine
Bansha Ban
Carrick a Peak
Clood Weel
Carrick Descter
Drumárd
Mary Nelson from
John Nelson
Summerhill
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 19:01
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awaiting decision
Cruckarany
Durnagun
Scather either
Lock Mother
Cloonocks
Goocene
Moat
Crit the win
Killinahaskeen
Rah woore
Noinin
Slaing
Caillin
Agnes Clarke from
Michael Clarke
Clondoogan
Summerhill
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 18:59
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Reilgeen
Balahoileen
Mercree
Ballinrig
Shiniceen
Croc Pake
Rewán
Culeen

Carmel Ryan from
Christopher Ryan
Reidstown
Laracor
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 18:55
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Cool Derry
The quinicar
Dye House
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 18:55
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awaiting decision
Stickeen
Curraghs
Skyho
Slangs
Criudín
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 18:54
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Catrawn
Bonifaree
Balla Horian
Crág
Mercurry
Duhall
Croc na Killian
Currag Dubh
Mullac an Áoir
Cap ar Ranny
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 18:52
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Tubair
Burra
Boarathull
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 18:51
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079
the shallows .Hence Bunnaite means"estuary of the Passages".
The district of Tradaree of which Bunratty forms a part.seems from the earliest time ,known to history to have excited the cupidity of the invader and no wonder for it has been endowed by nature with many advantages .I was easy of access by water and in case of a reverse was as easily abandoned .It is a fruitful and pleasant land over-flowing with milk and honey.Such an enticing spot did not escape the notice of the piratical Normans,who swarmed up every Creek and river in Ireland in search of the booty.
They arrived in Limerick in 834 and plundered Corcabaskin and Tradaree. The latter was evidently looked upon as the key to Thomand ,and hence we find a little later on that that the foreigners of N Munster assembled around Tradaree and raised a fortifying bank all around it.
They proposed to render Tradaree one garrison and from it to conquer
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 17:38
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The best team of footballers around here was in New Quay and the best team of hurlers was in Ballinafad. New Quay came the second best in the All Ireland Championship once. There was eleven Fahys in the team of fifteen. A man named Jim Fahy was the captain.
The Turlough team played Kilfenora and Carron in Bellharbour and bet them. Their captain was a man named Patrick Burke. He now lives near Galway. The people around here were great for throwing weights also. Two brothers named Maley were the best in Turlough and Bellharbour.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 17:37
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The best team of footballers around here was in New Quay and the best team of hurlers was in Ballinafad. New Quay came the second best in the All Ireland Championship once. There were eleven Fahys in the team of fifteen. A man named Jim Fahy was the captain.
The Turlough team played Kilfenora and Carron in Bellharbour and bet them. Their captain was a man named Patrick Burke. He now lives near Galway. The people around here were great for throwing weights also. Two brothers names M were the best inTurlough and Bellharbour.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 17:30
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I was at a Folk Lore meeting in Mullingar in May. The speaker was a Mr. Sullivan. It was a great pity we had not this meeting in the beginning of the year as we would then have known better how to proceed with this work. However he assured us that the object of this book is to collect "Folk lore" & that so long as the book is filled with true facts of either present or past it doesn't really matter if the work here is not all done by the children.
The pupils here, about 50% of them are orphan girls living in seclusion and they have little chance of meeting with people who can give them much information about the country or people. I therefore their teacher, will write in this book anything of interest I can find out.
(Mrs) Elizabeth Payne
No (2) N.S.
Tyrrellspass
17.6.1938
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 17:07
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Ar mo leaba san oíche aréir dom
Agus mé im codladh comh socair agus go mbfhéidir liom
'Seadh do dhein mé taidbhrcamh go bain scille clé asam
Agus déanfaidh mé cuimhneamh go críoch mo shoghal air
Go bhfeaca mé chugham an bás le litir lán fé saoghla
Freagar gan spás 's na láthair féineach
D'feuchas air comh cruinn agus go mbféidir liom
Chonaic mé dhranndal gránnda lá 'lag mhéirgireach
Liath-the ar dath nn créithe
A cabhailín cnámha agus a dhá coisín caola
'S ón a bhonn go dtí na bharra ní raibh sprid a féithe
Bhí clog na shuan na lámh clé aige
Tóg sé claidheamh chun mé phlaosgadh
Fóil a bhráthair : grádh í an réidtheach
'S le h-eagla an timreas 's ná faighimís réidtheach
Fhaid thar lear thángís ar m'éileamh
Ní ragadh-sa leat thar leas más féidir
Go suidhfir síos agus do scéal a innsint
Cé aca fearr dul leat nó fuireach id dhiaidh
Fios do mheon nó cá bhfuil t-aodhaireacht
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 16:53
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féin dul abhaile agus teacht arís amárach.
Do chas an feirmeoir thar nais agus b'fada leis an dream a bhí i bhfeighil an téide an fhad a bhí sé uatha agus is ortha a bhí an t-áthas nuair d'aireaghadar ag liurigh ortha é.
"Coiméad greim daingean ar an dtéad go raghadh ag triall oraibh" arsa sé leo. Dheineadar amhlaidh agus níor bhfada go raibh sé ar a chuid talmhan fén arís.D'obair nár chuireadar as a mheabhair é len a gcuid ceisteanna. Thug sé tuairisc dóibh ar an áit shíos agus dúirt sé leo go bhfaighfuidhe saibhreas mór a dhéanamh den áit ach go mbeadh ortha a lán oibre a dhéanamh ar dtúis chun staighre do dhéanamh chun dul ag triall ar an áit.
Dheineadar an staighre agus chuir an feirmeoir díol ar gach aoinne a bhíodh ag dul síos. Tháinigh na daoine ina sluiaghtibh ó gach aon áit agus dhein sé mór-chuid airgid mar bhiodh fonn ar gach aoinne ach an áit d'fheiscint. Cé bhuadh a bhí ag an gceol théighidís go léir ag triall ar an sruthán agus le neart draíochta bhíodar ag dul anonn ó dhuine go duine go dtí go rabhadar go léir imithe agus gan aon 'áil ag aoinne aca casadh thar nais bun dóibh fé mar a bhain den chead duine agus is ann dóibh go fóil a dTír na nÓg. Do dhein an feirmeoir carn saobhreas agus ní baol gur thug sé fé na caoire do bhreith thar n-ais mar ní gadh dó é mar mhair sé go sásta searcaigh sámh de bhárr uan na caorach glaise agus a bhuachaill aimsire a chuaidh go Tír na nÓg.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 16:38
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because they have a pony. Some people welcome beggars to their houses and some people do not. When the beggars come to our house, they do not stay very long, but they for a pair of old shoes or a cap or something that they need. When a person gives them something they say little sayings like:- "God bless you, and may you never want". And they sometimes say:- God bless you, and your family". They are usually angry when people don't give them anything. Beggars don't carry their own food with them, but they beg at people's doors for food. Beggars have no homes of their own, but they sleep outside in a field or somewhere else at night, and they travel all over the country. Sometimes different tribes of beggars go around together and they fight. Sometimes beggars stay a long while in people's houses and tell stories. There are three beggars dead that I often heard tell of, their names are Mary King and Rosy and Nancy May Harley, Trenta, Lifford, Co. Donegal.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 16:29
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gréasuidhe leipreachán. Bíonn sé na chomnuige ar taobh an cnuic. Deireann na sean-daoine go gcaiteann sé cota déanta as croiceann. Bíonn sé i gcomnuidhe ag déanamh bróg le h-agaidh na sideóg. Rug fear air oidche amháin agus bhí sé ag déanamh bróg. D'iarr sé air croca óir a thabhairt dó. Tricadóir seadh an leipreachán agus arsa sé leis an fear "tabhair dhom an casúr sin" agus nuair thóg sé an casúr in a láimh thug sé é don leipreachán bhí an leipreachán imtigthe nuair d'féach sé. Lá eile rug bean air, agus d'iarr sí air croca óir a thabhairt di. "Féach ar an teach trí theine" arsa an leipreachán leí. D'féach sí agus ní raibh an teach trí theine chor ar bith, agus nuair d'féach sí arís bhí an leipreachán imtigthe. I croca a bhíonn an t-ór aige. Ba mhaith liom an leipreachán a fheiceál mar ní déanfadh sé aon dochar dom. Chonnaic bean a bhí in a comnuithe in mo comursanacht an leipreachán uair amháin.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 16:26
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gréasuidhe leipreachán. Bíonn sé na chomnuige ar taobh an cnuic. Deireann na sean-daoine go gcaiteann sé cota déanta as croiceann. Bíonn sé i gcomnuidhe ag déanamh bróg le h-agaidh na sideóg. Rug fear air oidche amháin agus bhí sé ag déanamh bróg. D'iarr sé air croca óir a thabhairt dó. Tricadóir siad an leipreachán agus arsa sé leis an fear "tabhair dhom an casúr sin" agus nuair thóg sé an casúr in a láimh thug sé é don leipreachán bhí an leipreachán imtigthe nuair d'féach sé. Lá eile rug bean air, agus d'iarr sí air croca óir a thabhairt di. "Féach ar an teach trí theine" arsa an leipreachán leí. D'féach sí agus ní raibh an teach trí theine chor ar bith, agus nuair d'féach sí arís bhí an leipreachán imtigthe. I croca a bhíonn an t-ór aige. Ba mhaith liom an leipreachán a fheiceál mar ní déanfadh sé aon dochar dom. Chonnaic bean a bhí in a comnuithe in mo comursanacht an leipreachán uair amháin.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 15:31
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Chuaar go dtí bruach an t-srutháin agus do chonacadar scata fear agus bean ag rinnce ar an dtaobh eile. Bhí fonn ortha dul treasna cúcha ach bhí roinnt eagla ortha tabhairt fé. Tháinigh duine den dream eile ag triall ortha agus thug cuireadh dóibh teacht treasna cúcha. D'fiafruigheadar de cá rabhadar nó dé'n ainm a bhí ar an áit.
"Tír na n-Óg ainm na h-áite seo ná tiocfaidh aois ná bhrón ná cathú go bráth ná choidhthe ar aoinne" arsa sé.
"Má thagann sibh treasna cughainn beidh na turtha fáilte róimh agus gheobhaidh sibh fuireach in ár measc choidche".
Chuaidh an buachaill aimsire treasna agus d'iarr an feirmeoir cead ortha dul thar nais abhaile agus go gcasfadh sé ortha lá ar 'ná mháireach. Bhí go maith agus ní raibh go h-olc. D'fhan an feirmeoir tamaill maith ag coinne leis an mbuachaill teact thar nais chuige. Do chuaidh an buachaill ag rinnce leo thall agus d'fhan ina fhocair go tráthnóna. bhí fonn air casadh ansan ach nuair a tháinigh sé dtí an t-sruthán bhí leithead abhann móire ann sa slí ná raibh aon 'áil air teacht treasna. Tháinigh an feirmeoir chuige ón dtaobh eile agus d'iarr air teacht thar nais cuige agus go raghaidís abhaile. Dúirt an buachaill ná raibh aon fághail aige air. "Conas a thiocfainn treasna" arsa sé i gcoinne an tuile mháir atá san abhainn. D'fhéach an feirmeoir treasna air agus iongantar air.
"Cá'il an tuile" arsa sé sin "dur ndóigh níl ansan ach sruthán beag.
"Ní h-amhlaidh é a mhic ó" arsa an buachaill aimsire "ach b'fhéidir gur b'fhearr duit
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 15:00
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and I make people jump when I am left in an unnecessary place. A needle.
(9) What is the smallest bridge in the world?
The bridge of your nose.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 14:55
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(1) Why is an engine driver like a school master?
One minds the train and the other trains the minds.
(2) One day an old woman was crossing a field. She had a red coat on her. In the same field a goat was grazing. When he saw her what changes do you think took place?
The goat turned to butter (butt her) and the woman changed to a scarlet runner.
(3) What do you boil to make hard?
An egg.
(4) What does a kettle suffer most from?
Burns and Boils
(5) When was beef the highest?
When the cow jumped over the moon.
(6) I have a grey mare, she is of great size, the man that would buy her would want to be wise. She tips her toes and away she goes and never never looks behind her. A ship.
(7) Full of holes but still holds water.
A sponge.
(8) I have but one eye and that is without sight, yet it helps me what ever I do. I am sharp without wits, and without sense. I am bright. I am the fortune of some, and of some their delight
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 14:55
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There were several churchyards in this parish. In Gallen there is a famous churchyard where St Canoc built his monastery. People use it still; a few years ago there were people digging there
And dug up a number of crosses. And they also found a ruin of an old church. About a quarter of a mile outside this parish there is an old graveyard.
This old graveyard is in the townland of Glebe. Only very young children are buried there now. It is on the land owned by Michael Moore. There are no grown-up people buried there now only children who are not to the use of reason. The churchyard is on a sort of a hill, but the field in which the graveyard is situated is level and some trees grow near it.
The churches of Clonmacnoise was to be built at that old graveyard at first. The name of that graveyard is Mullahakilla. The people were digging [?] out a foundation of a
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 14:52
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siúl leat agus teapánfaidh mé an áit duit. Níor theastaigh ón bhfeirmeoir imeacht ar dtúis shíl sé gur a' magach a bhí sé ach sa deire d'imigh sé leis. Dúirt an buachaill gur bhfearra lampa nó lochran solais a bhreith leo gur fearr an radharc a bheadh aca ar an áit shíos. Bhí go maith agus ní raibh go h-olc. Gluaiseadar leo agus ba ghairid an mhoill aotha an áit a aimsiú. D'fheachadar araon ar an áit shíos agus deallraigh sé dóibh é bheith i bhfad síos uata ach fuaireadar radharc ar na bánta 's ar na caoire. Dheineadar machnamh ar feadh tamaill féachaint conas a bhfaighidís dul ag triall ortha. Dúirt an feirmeoir go raghaidís abhaile agus go ndeinidís réiteach ar an scéal fé mhaidin. Sé rud a cheapadar ná dréimirí agus téadacha d'fháil chun tabhairt fén áit shíos. Thugadar leo na guirléidí agus roinnt conganta lá ar na mháireach. Ceanglíadar téad mór a bhí aca le dréimire. Bhí greim ag an dream eile ar an dtéad agus bhíodar ag scaoiuleadh leis suim gan áireamh mar a shíleadar go dtí gur srois sé an áit síos i ndeire na scriobhadh.
Luigh an fear síos ortha ansan go raibh sé ag cionn conaire fé slán agus fé mhaise agus d'iarr sé ar fear an tighe chuige. Do chuaidh an feirmeoir síos agus do leath an radharc ortha araon nuair a chonaiceadar áilneacht na h-áite. Dúradar lena chéile go bhféachadís mór thimpeall na h-áite ós rud é go rabhadar ann. Bh na mílte acra talmhan ann de thalamh breá féir glas agus sruthán beag ag rith tré lár na talmhan. Níor bhfada gur airigeadar ceol caoin cneasta ar an dtaobh eile den sruthán
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 14:06
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Bhí feirmeoir ann sa t-sean-aimsir, deirtí a dorcadh oíche Márta, ní mórán eallaí a bhí ag an bhfeirmeoir céana agus dá bhrí sin d-iarr sé ar duine des na buachaillí aimsire dul amach agus uan breá beathuighe a dtugadís uan na caoireach glasa a thabhairt isteach chun í a marbhú. Chuaidh an buachaill amach sa pháirc agus tiomáin an scata caorach isteach go dtí cúinne na páirce agus thug iarracht ar bhreith ar uan na caorach glaise. Ba bheag an mhaith dó mar ritheadar thall is a bhus air ins gach aon áit ar fuaid na páirce. Do dhein sé iarracht nó dhó eile ach ba mar a céile é ní raibh aon 'áil aige breith uirthi. An tríú iarracht a dhein sé d'imig na caoire go léir uaidh ar nós na sí-gaoithe agus chuir sé iongantas air nuair a chonaic sé iad go léir ag éalú uaidh i lár na páirce. Chuaidh sé díreach go dtí an áit a cheap sé a d'imíodar uaidh agus cad a chífeadh sé ansan ach sraith mór d'fód leathan iompuighthe agus ba dhóbair dó titim isteach ann. D'iompaigh sé cúinne an fhóid agus d'fhéach sé síos agus cad a chífeadh sé síos ach bánta míne leire agus an scata caorach ag mbear ortha. D'iompaigh sé thar nais an fód arís agus seo leis abhaile go dtí an mhuintir agus b'ait leo siúd dé chúis na raibh sé ag tabhairt an uan leis. "Cad a bhain duit" adeir an feirmeoir "nár thugais an t-uan leat".
Níor thugas agus ní thabhar-sa ná a bhfuil annso sa tigh an t-uan ceanna leo. D'inis sé dhó a scéal ansan ach ní creidfeadh an feirmeoir é. "Mar a gcreidfar-san mé" arsa an buachaill aimsire
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 13:58
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Beggars or Tramps.
It is very seldom that beggars call at our house. Tramps and tinkers call more often. Sometimes strangers come, but the same ones nearly always call. The mames of those who call are the McGinleys and Tom O'Neill and a man called Birney, who sells combs, and coats, and pinafores and other things. The McGinleys sell tins because they are tinkers. Birney buys his goods in shops with the money that he gets. The McGinleys buy sheets of tin, and then they go home and they make pans, and porridge dishes and a lot of other things. Birney carries his goods in an old bag, which he rips out and makes square. He then puts his goods in the centre of the bag, and he knots two opposite ends of the bag together, and then he knots the two other opposite ends together, and he then puts the pack on his back. Tom O'Neill carries his pack in the same way. The McGinleys put their goods in a little van.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 13:34
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I James O'JHare of Deerpark tells some interesting stories about "Larry" the lad. Commonly he was called this name because of his intimacy with fairies (Some said he was one)
Well Larry was very fond of a game of cards and all the young lads used to collect to his house for a game. Well this night the game was in full swing when Larry thought of getting ready his supper. He put water in the pot and got meal from the bag but was surprised when he had no salt for the porridge.
Now boys he said when hanging on the pot over the fire I am short of salt and you can continue your game as I will be back when the water commences to boil. I have only to take a little run down to Newry and back. Well off he started a distance of 12 miles each way. His cardplayers kept an eye on the pot and what was their surprise to see Larry walking ni with a package of salt in his hand the moment they heard the first sound of boiling water in the pot. Well boys he said I was a bit longer then I expected as I met Paddy - in the town I had to stop and speak to him. The naighbours when questioned next day said he was speaking to Larry in the town just after seven o'clock showing clearly how quickly he travelled probably on a "[boltan?]"
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 13:28
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The churn, the dash, and the lid were washed thoroughly in hot-water and moved into the open air to dry.
Churning with churn which was described in the preceding paragraph was very strenuous work, but matters were slightly improved when the following appliance was introduced. A strong spring was procured, one end of which was attached to a beam in the wall, and the other end was fixed to the churn dash. When the churned pushed down the dash it went up itself by means of the spring, consequently the churner was relieved of a great deal of labour and he was able to finish the work in a shorter space of time.
As time went on there was still another invention brought in. The handle of the dash was connected with a beam in the wall, from the
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:46
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a child that was very bad with whooping cough and his mother carried him for over a mile to a farm where an ass was kept and she had him put nine times under the ass's belly. the seventh son or daugher is said to have the cure of certain diseases.
People travel very long distances to St. Ciaran's Weel at Barnaross every first Sunday of August. At twelve o'clock on Saturday night three fishes appear in the water, and the first three persons who take a drink from the well will be cured.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:44
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hang him up on a thorn and according as he will be withering the wart will be going away.
Local Cures
In this district people sometimes have recourse to old remedies or cures. There are people in this district who compound herbs to cure sores such as whittles, burns and scalds and bad legs. Others who were born on a cretain day or under certain conditions are said to have cures. A posthumous child, that is a child born after it's father's death, is said to have the cure of thrush or dirty mouth. People believe that a little milk left in the bowl after a ferrit will cure a child of whooping cough, or a child that is given a little asse's milk for the same complaint. I heard a story told about
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:39
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Jane O'Connell,
Drakerath,
Carlanstown,
Ceannsnus Mor,
Co Meath
Local Cures
In this locality there are many people who have cures for many kinds of ailments. Long ago when the doctors of the land didn't know very much many cures were performed by ordinary people who got their cures as a gift from God.
Mrs Clarke who lives in Kilbeg has the cure for a whittle or any sore on the hand. Some people around this locality say that the clay from over a priest's grave will cure the toothach by putting in on the tooth. It is also locally believed that to put a live frog into your mouth will cure the toothach. There is a well in Gravelstown called the Holy Well and it possess a cure of vomitting. A disease which very many young children take is thrush and it can be cured by a posthumous child. Mrs Morris Staholmog has the cure of a wart by mixing hurbs and clary together. Another cure for the warts is to get a snail by accident and rub him to the wart. Then
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:35
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Once upon a time there was a man and his name was John Murphy, and the people used to make a fool of him about money.
One night he and some other fellows started off to dig for treasure.
Some others and the fellows that were with him had it planned what they were to do.
So John and some others went off where they made out that the money was. The others got chains and sulphur and went off by themselves, and when they came to the field they began to rattle the chains and the light the sulphur and let on they were spitting it out of their mouths.
So the fellows that were with John used to say "begor, what's that rattling"? "Let them be off with them-selves he would say. "Oh, whats that rattling," again they would say. "It's coming near to us." So they let on to know nothing about
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:28
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the table and out after him.
He caught him by the shoulder of the coat, and says he to him "You put that back where you got it" He got an awful fright.
He dropped the meat and he is running still. (He) The fellow that jumped off the table was only pretending to be wake-ing.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:22
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Proverbs
The following have been collected by
(a) Kitty Ryan, (b) Mary Dwyer, (c) Mary Whelan, (d) Winnie Fogarty, and related by
(a) Mr. Jim Ryan, Dangan, Goldan Age 65 yrs
(b) Mr. Js. Dwyer, Dogstown, New Inn, 55 yrs
(c) Mr John Quirke, Templenoe, Cashel, 60
(d) Mrs Fogarty, Garrans, Cashel, 64
(a) Kitty Ryan
1. God is nearer than the door.
2. A person's mouth often broke his nose.
3. The best hurler is always on the fence.
4. He who marries a mountain woman marries the mountain.
5. Put a beggarman on horse-back and he iwll ride to the devil.
6. Health is better than wealth.
7. A stitch in time saves nine.
8. Deep waters run smooth.
9. Far away cows wear long horns.
10. It is difficult to put a wise head on young shoulders.
11. An excuse is nearer to a woman than her apron.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:16
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and attended to the wound which was quite healed within a week. My grandfather said the weasel (which was female) must have her next in the orchard. Sure enough on investigation they found the nest just where my grandfather was fencing with four small weasels in it.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 12:14
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The Weasel
Collected by Kitty Ryan
About forty years ago my grandfather who was then aged fifteen years was fencing around the orchard at his house in Golden Garden when he espied a weasel on top of the hedge watching him covertly. My grandfather kept on fencing and pretended not to see the little animal at first. After about ten minutes or so, the weasel crept nearer, jumped off the hedge and butted her teeth in my grandfather's leg. He struck at her with the bill-hook but could not get her to loosen her grip. Screaming with pain and fright my granfather ran in to the kitchen and the weasel still held her grip. My granfather ran in with an iron but killed the weasel. Even in her death agony the teeth were still buried in my grandfather's leg from which the blood was flowing profusely. A doctor was sent for at once
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:49
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church there and left it there half-finished. The reason why they [strikethrough] left it was because they had arranged among themselves that if the first person should pass without saying "God bless the work" they would leave it and go to Clonmacnoise.
And they did leave it and went to Clonmacnoise and succeeded in their work there. At Leamanaghan there is also an old graveyard a few fields in front of the school at Leamanaghan I did not hear anything about it, such as old churches being build there.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:40
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There were several churchyards in this parish. In Gallen there is a famous churchyard where St Canoc built his monastery. People use it still; a few years ago there were people digging there
And dug up a number of crosses. And they also found a ruin of an old church. About a quarter of a mile outside this parish there is an old graveyard.
This old graveyard is in the townland of Glebe. Only very young children are buried there now. It is on the land owned by Michael [?] There are no grown-up people buried there now only children who are not to the use of reason. The churchyard is on a sort of a hill, but the field in which the graveyard is situated is level and some trees grow near it.
The churches of Clonmacnoise was to be built at that old graveyard at first. The name of that graveyard is Mullahakilla. The people were digging [?] out a foundation of a
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:20
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They said it would bake more quickly. Some people do it at present.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:18
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 11:14
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Across the Creggan road there is a bridge which is called "Cage's Bridge". The reason why it got that name was because a landlord named Mr Cage was shot a few perches away from it.
The townland of Creggan itself is called after rocks because it was a whole mass of rocks at one time, but most of them are not to be seen at [?] present.
On our own lands in Creggan there is a ruin of an old house. A named Robin Ruas lived in it, the field in which the old house is situated is called Robin Ruas's field.
On the western side of the Creggan road about two miles north-west of Ferbane an old bush is growing. It is called the Beggar's Bush. There is no account of how it got that name.
On the side of the road to Creggan there is an old borreen which is used by Thomas Bennett. That old boreen is called the "Black Boreen". The reason why it got that name was [?] because it was always dark and muddy and closed in with [?] bushes.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 10:56
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It is in ruins now. It is said that there is the mark of a hand on the window of the church. People are buried there and the old people remember going to school, mass to Saint Anne's church. It is not very long since people stopped going to it. I think it was not plundered.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 10:53
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There is a ruined castle in the school district. It was said that the Danes built it and was also said that the Normans built it. It is not really known who built it. It is a very old castle . It is in a field a long way off the road. It is inthe townland of Clonboo parish of Clonmore and county of Tipperary nver heard of it been beseiged. There is a ruined Church near the castle. It is called Saint Anne's
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:52
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One night a few years ago Mr John Dockery was sleeping in a room in Corcoran's. He was not very long in bed when he heard fairies leaping and beating the wall. He said that he thought every bit of mortar on the wall would be torn to bits before he would rise in next morning.
When he did get up next morning he found that the walls had been the same way as they were when he was going to bed.
In our own pasture there is a ring on which the grass is never green and mushrooms grow all round the ring. It is said that gold is hidden in such places.
My grand father Patrick Devery was going to mass one when he saw eight fairies kicking football in Peter Kilmartins scrub.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 10:48
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in the bush. He used to sit down and throw out his arms and leave back his head and that mark remained there. People came from miles to see this wonderful mark that was left. After years it all cleared away but the bush is standing yet and has not been cut by anyone.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 10:45
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There is one historical old [ ] on the farm owned [ ] Mrs. Guider of Lisanure. It is known as the "Spirit bush". It was said that in ancient times a man was seen there. He was said to have left the mark of his arms and head
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 10:36
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some unseen thing, then in the darkness the headless coach appeared followed by a number of mourning women raising a keen like the banshees of old, walked out the door and down to the mill bridge and back. Then it reappeared in the hall, and as it reappeared the crowd rushed out of the mill with the dint of horror and all went to their homes shivering with cold sweat from the fright they got.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:33
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It was in New Quay the best football team was long ago. There were fifteen footballers in New Quay and out of the fifteen there were eleven Fahey's. The Captains name was Jim Fahey. They used to play against Mayo and Tipperary and Meath and to (sic) used to win without no bother. One year they made up their minds to go for the All Ireland Championship. They stayed playing against every county until at last they came against Wexford. It was their last match for the All Ireland Championships and they were beaten by one point. The best hurling team around here long ago were the Ballina-Fad hurling team. They used to play against North Clare and South Galway. They were the Championships (sic) of Clare and Galway two years after each other. They used have no jersey but short trousers.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:30
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It was in New Quay the best football team was long ago. There were fifteen footballers in New Quay and out of the fifteen there were eleven Fahey's. The Captains name was Jim Fahey. They used to play against Mayo and Tipperary and Meath and to (sic) used to win without no bother. One year they made up their minds to go for the All Ireland Championship. They stayed playing against every county until at last they came against Wexford. It was their last match for the All Ireland Championships and they were beaten by one point. The best hurling team around here long ago were the Ballina Fad hurling team.
anonymous contributor
2019-05-22 10:29
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Guider's Mills
Guider's Mill is situated about five miles from Thurles. Long ago plenty of fairies were seen there. A man was seen walking in the vicinity of the mill without any head on followed by a woman and children dressed in white with horns about two feet long out of their heads. The last thing seen was a skeleton surrounded with balls of fire. The skeleton moved three times around the mill then uttered some sarcastic words and vanished from the sight of a shivering mob. Long ago a great concert was held there, that night at midnight terrible noises were heard in the mill, all lights were extinguished by
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:16
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Punt an Woolly
Raheen
Sgeiteen
Bull Fasac
Cooleen
Bonin na Bhotar
Croc na Killian
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:15
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The Busgeen
The Slang
Raheen
Bruchahone
Bruquilldrum
Barmens
Burrucks
Brucawagga
Kilcommons
Collected by Brigid Melia
From Richard Melia, Springvalley, Summerhill
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:12
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Punt on Woolly
Raheen
Sgeiteen
Bull Fasac
Cooleen
Bonin na Bhotar
Croc na Killian
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:10
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Derby Higgins was the name of a man who lived in Ballyheigue long ago. He was full of charms and it was said he used to get up before day in the month of May to get the charms off the sun.
One day his sister Nora Higgins child was sick and he was walking up and down the floor to see would she ask him to cure the child. A person should be asked before he would work his charms.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:09
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The Boolin
The Bruckin
The Shinnigins
Drumard
The Rathmhoor
The Gartry
The Brú
The Rooligin
The Vanna
Mullach an Óir
Dul Fásac
Cuisin
Derryclare
Buckety(?)
Croc-quill-drum
Croc Pake
Bally-na-mona
Kilcommons
Mercury
Tubarastick

From
Rose Kelly - Reidstown
Mary Hoey - Curraghtown
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:06
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(cliffs were) priests rushed into the little creek, where they were immediately pursued and murdered on the spot. The three rocks were then formed there and to this day people look on the place with awe.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:04
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was made in Keelmacada. The monks were (to) put to flight three of them were driven to the cliffs and driven over them into the little lake now known as Lough na mbrater where they met with death and immediately after the three rocks rose up in the middle of the rock.
Others say the Lough na mbrater was the scene of a priest hunt in Cromwell's time. These priests were hiding in a cave close by. Word was given that the soldiers were on their track they immediately left their hiding place, but found they were too late. The cliffs were surrounded by soldiers. The
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 10:01
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A few hundred yards to the south of Keelmacada Church there is a little creek beneath the cliffs which at full tide is like a small lake known as Loch na mBrathar.
The most remarkable thing about this is the three rocks or slabs in the middle are plainly visible at low tide but only the tops are to be seen above water in high tide.
These rocks which in shape and form have the appearance of a head of a human body from the theme of many an interesting old story. Is it, that an attack
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:57
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Bhí fear feasa ann úair amháín agus leigeadh sé air go mgíodh eolas roimh ré aige ar na rudaí a bhí ag teacht. Deireadh go mbíodh eolas aige cén tam a geobhadh duine bás. Níor thaithnigh a chuid tarngaireacta leis an rígh agus bhí saghas faithcíos air roimhe. Shocruigh sé go cuirdead an fear chun bháis. Cheap sé gur mhaith an rud tríall a bhaint as sul a gcrochfaidhe é, le fáthail amach ag fághail amach an raib sé ag rádh na firinne.
Gláoidh an rí air agus dfíafruigh sé de cen úair a bhfuigheadh sé féin bás agus dubhairt sé pé úair a geobhfaidh mé féin bás, geobfaidh tú bás úair a chluig in a dhiaidh sin. Chuir sin sgannradh ar an Rí agus dúbhairt sé leis na gárdai é a sgáolleadh amach.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:55
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Dina Dargan got this from her mother

A man one time in Westmeath saw a hare out in his field milking his cow. She shot the hare and wounded her. The hare ran away and there was a track of blood on the path after her. The man followed the track of blood and he saw the hare jump in a window. He went into the house and he saw a woman wounded.

* * *

A man one time lent his churn to a neighbouring woman to make her butter he got it back again but he had no butter untill the cow calved again but the woman he lent the churn to had plenty of butter all the year,.

* * *

This is how they used to take the butter. A woman one time was supposed to have the "lámh marbh" (or dead hand) She would put her hand into the churn saying
Bailidh soir é
Bailidh aniar é
Bailidh go bealeadh o bó micil liam é.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:55
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She got that from Mrs Quinn, Elm Grove Ballivor.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:48
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Gach áit a theigheadh an fhear bhíodh an lochóg in a dhíaidh. Núair a bhíod sé in a leabaidh ba minic a théigheadh sé in aice leis agus lúigheadh sé ar an.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:47
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Once there was an old jobber living near hand. His name was pat the Boot". One day he was at a fair in Carlanstown about 85 years ago. he met a man with a cow to sell
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:47
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Pat met him and asked him how much for the old hay barn? leaven pounds" the man replied. Will she lie and rise of her own accord or would she want any assistance going up a hill?" Pat said £5-10-0 and he got her.
When his wife went out to milk her the cow would not let her. The man said to her that she did not know how to milk. He took the pail from her and said: Cos go ciunn".
Then she let him milk her and he told her that the woman that used to milk her spoke anything only Irish.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:46
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Uáir amháin bhí fear as Conndae Muigheó ag obair i Ghasara, le h aghaidh feiliméir mhór. Lá amháin bhí sé ag búaladh coirche agus rith a lán luchóg amach as an stáca. Mharbuig an fear na luchóg go léir acht lock amháin agus their air é a mharb
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:40
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heaven." "Oh what it is happy for you" said the cattle dealer I wish I were in your place". "Oh then said Domhnall you can have my place and welcome because I can go to heaven any day I like". The cattle dealer loosed the sack let Domhnall out and went in himself. Domhnall tied the sack and set out for home with all the cattle. Hudin and Dudin came back fetched the sack to the river and threw it in.
When morning came Hudin and Dudin saw all the cattle in Domhnall's field they went down to the house and (follow) found Domhnall sitting comfortably at his fire. "We thought Domhnall" said they "that you were drowned last night". "So I was" said Domhnall "but it was all for the good luck I'll
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:34
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Once upon a time there were three men Hudin and Dudin and Domhnall OLeary. Domhnall was very poor and had only three cattle. As little as he had Hudin and Dudin the two brothers grew jealous of him and came to the place one night and killed this three cattle. Domhnall took the hide off one and was on his way to town to sell it when a magpie alighted on the hide. He caught hold of the bird and put it inside his coat. When he reached town he went into a public house and called for a glass of whiskey. Domhnall pressed on the bird and it gave a squeel."That's not your best whiskey" said Domhnall. The barman took
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:29
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What weight is the moon.
A hundred-weight because it has four quarters.
Why is a sick man like a window
Because he has a pain.
A flock of white sheep on a red hill. Here they go there they go and now they stand still.
The teeth in your gums.
If I bought two tons of coal at ten shillings and six pence a ton. What would the coal come to.
Ashes.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:26
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If a person got sixpence for walking one mile what would he get for walking ten miles.
Sore feet.
Why is a bad boy like a bottle of medicine? Because the bottle of medicine has to be shaken first and taken and the bad boy has to be taken first and then shaken.
What has eyes and cannot see?
A potato
flies high lies low wears shoes and has none
A foot-ball
What part of a car goes into the town first.
The horn.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:23
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What is it that the more you to off it the biugger it gets?
A hole
What can run but cannot walk?
A river.
If I were ion the road and threw a stone through the window what county would I see?
Glasgow
Riddle me Riddle what is that over the head and (over th) under the hat
Your hair.
As round as an apple as deep as a cup all the men in Derry could not lift it up
A Well.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:21
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What part of you can travel faster than a train?
Your eyes.
Nibby Nobby two heads and a body.
A Barrel
Round and Nobby is my body hard and firm is my side. I am ready for any lady in the land to take me by the hand.
A tea-pot.
Two n n two oo an l and a d put them together and spell them for me
London
What town in Ireland can you spell backwards as well as frontwards which has the same
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:18
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name?
Navan.
Its not under your nor its not in you but its on you and it is not a load to you.
Your name.
What has feet and will not walk.
A pot.
What has an eye and does see?
A needle.
What has teeth and will not eat?
A comb.
What has hands and will not wash its face? - a clock
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:15
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Small, Small, Smaller than a mouse and has more windows than a king's house
A Thimble.
Two men dead fighting, two blind men looking on, two cripples ran for the guards, and a dummy shouting, "Hurry on " what is that?
A lie.
Spell Knocknarea over the sea in four letters without a K.
N stands for Knock
R for Rae
O stands for over and
S stands for sea
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:12
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Why would a donkey prefer thistles to hay?
Because he is an ass.
What is the strongest thing?
A snail because he carries his house on his back.
What is the strongest day in the week?
Sunday because the rest are all week days.
A herring and a half cost a penny halfpenny and when half eaten what it is worth?
It is worth turning.
When is a horse not a horse?
When he is turned into a meadow.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:09
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What's the hottest things that grows - A Nettle.
There is a little thing in Diamonds land. It teaches many but little it understands. It is not in Italy but it is in Rome. Amsterdam enjoys it but Holland wants it. It is in every mountain but it is not in any hill. - M
Round the house and round the house dragging her puddings after her.
A hen and her chickens
What has many eyes and never cries - A potato.
Why is an aeroplane like a policeman
Because it takes people up.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:05
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feet high,
Barbed wire on the top,
They stalked with wine and porter,
Every corner of the shop.
senior member (history)
2019-05-22 09:04
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awaitin