Number of records in editorial history: 317934 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 10:30
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16) 'Tis red 'tis yellow, 'tis sparable green, the King cannot reach it, or neither the Queen?
Answer :- A rainbow.
17) Two n's two o's l and a d put them together and spell them for me?
Answer :- London.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 10:29
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Enough bread was made at a time to last for about two days. A cross or X was cut in the cake, to give it a chance of rising and also to not let it burst in the sides.
Bread was baked in a pot-oven, on a griddle and a gridiron.
Bread was baked in front of the fire on a grid iron. A grid iron was a circular piece of iron with bars running from side to side, and another bar at the back on a hinge, which was placed on the floor to give support to the iron. A griddle was a baking utensil made of pot metal. It was quite flat and was hung on the fire to bake bread and cook herrings. Pancakes were made on Shrove Tuesday, and boxty and potato bread was made on Hallow Eve.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 10:25
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it was spread and put in an oven which was covered by burning pieces of sticks or turf.
Indian-meal-bread:- This was made by mixing indian meal and flour in the proportion of two handfuls of indian meal, to one of flour. Then it was mixed and baked in a similar way as the wheaten meal bread.
Oaten-meal-bread:- This was baked on the griddle in front of a glowing turf fire. The quantity of oatmeal required was put out on a clean board or table and mixed to a stiff dough with lukewarm water. It was then rolled out very thin. Then the hearth was scrubbed clean and the cake was set before the fire until baked to a golden brown colour. It was also baked on a griddle.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 10:23
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Answer :- Because she could not lick it.
9) Riddle me riddle me ranteo,
My father got some seeds to sow
The seeds were black
And the ground was white
Riddle me that before the night?
Answer :- Pen, ink and paper.
10) There it is there and it is as old as myself?
Answer :- My finger.
11) Twenty four white cows and a red bull?
Answer :- my teeth and tongue.
12) As I went up a slippery gap I met my Uncle Davy. I cut off his head and left his body go easy?
Answer :- A head of cabbage.
13) It starts at the fireplace. Goes around the house and stops at the door?
Answer :- A brush.
14) Black and white went up the hill, black came down and white stayed still?
Answer :- A hen laying an egg.
15) Why is a shoemaker's shop compared to hell?
Answer :- Because there are so many bad sole there.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 10:08
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There are many riddles given nowdays to test the ingenuity of the hearer such as :-
1) What is half the mon like?
Answer :- The other half.
2) Why does a horse look over the ditch?
Answer :- Because she could not look under it.
3) Under fire over fire and never touches fire?
Answer :- A cake in an oven.
4) Where was Moses when the candle went out?
Answer :- In the dark.
5) As round as a marble, as deep as a cup and all the people in the world could not take it up?
Answer :- A well.
6) Behind the hill there is a cup and every one must take a sup?
Answer :- Death.
7) There was a little house and a mouse couldn't live in it, And all the people in town could not count how many windows in it?
Answer :- A thimble
80) Why does a hen pick a pan?
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 10:05
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Boxty:- Boxty bread was made by grating about twelve, peeled, raw potatoes and putting them in a dish. Then by mashing the same number of peeled and boiled potatoes, and mixing both these ingredients. Then a pinch of salt and some flour was added, and all these were beaten until it was in a dry paste. This was rolled out and baked in a similar as the potatoe-Cake.
This paste could also be made into dumplings, by making balls of them and boiling them in clean boiling water for a period of about an hour.
Indian-meal-bread:- This was made by mixing a certain amount of wheaten meal, a pinch of salt and wetting it with sour milk. When this was made into a paste
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 10:01
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Bread was made from wheat and corn grown locally. Some of the flour was made locally. People do not remember querns being used, but they heard that they were used in the district. The different kinds of bread made were, potato-cake, boxty, indian-meal-bread, oaten-meal-bread, and wheaten-meal-bread.
Potatoe-Cake:- This was made by mashing and peeling boiled potatoes and putting them in a dish. Then by adding a pinch of salt, and enough flour to make it dry, and easily spread. This was rolled out thin, and placed on a grid iron before the fire, for a period of about an hour and a half. When it was baked, it was buttered and taken with tea or milk
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:50
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The couple went on horse back to the church and when they were coming back the horses used to chase each other to see who would reach the bride's house first.
This was called a "drag". Bonfires used to be lit to welcome the newly married couple.
When they would come out from the church they would go for a drive, after this they would return home.
They would let the bride in first and then all would follow in and
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:47
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In olden times the people were very particular about the wedding.
When a party was to be married the parents of the party concerned met in town and made the match.
The people had not much money and they usually gave stock.
Between Christmas and lent they married mostly, this was called Shrove time.
The lucky days were Mondays and Fridays.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:47
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powers an' I bet you you couldn't go in this box". The divil went in and the fifty young fellas followed im. The smith wouldn't let im an' the divil asked 'im to let 'im out an' that he wouldn't come back for another ten years. The smith did so The ten years weren't long goin' an' the divil came along, an' the smith forgot all about the apple tree an' he locked the dure an' was goin off. When they were passin' be the apple tree the divil went up for an apple an' o' coorse he couldn't get down. He was there for two months, an' at last the smith let 'im down. The divil never came back again an' the smith lived happy ever afther.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:45
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Corns 4.
(a) Go out walking in the dew
(b) The juice got from a dandelion is good for corns.
Sprains 5.
(a) Get a plant by the name of cumphrey; boil the root and rub to the sprain
Rheumatism 6.
(a) Get nettles and heat the person until his body is very hot.
(b) eat water-cress
Colds 7.
(a) Eat nettles in May and you will not be sick in the winter.
(b) Drink a cup of hot milk with butter and pepper in it.
(c) There lived in Mill Street a woman named Mrs. Kealy. Every day she used to go to the mountain (Millers Bog) to gather herbs. These she made into a mixture which was good for colds.
Consumption 8.
Get the bark of a certain tree (I could not get the name), boil for two hours with a glass of stout. Let it there for 2 days. Then drink a wine glass of it every morning.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:44
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that brought home their turf.
They made their own cups of wood they called them Noggins.
They made the pot-hanger of a piece of wire.
They used for a light a chip of Bogdeal.
They had no buckets or cans that time but wooden pails.
They also had wooden vessels for gathering their cream instead of crocks that we use now.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:42
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Long ago there were many trades.
The men made everything they wanted for themselves.
They made their own ploughs and harrows and nothing came in from foreign lands.
The women spun flax and made their own sheets and towels.
They also spun wool that made the blankets and their husbands' coats and some of their own wear.
The men made their own big baskets
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:41
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-selves can tell - they kept on losing stock - their horses and their cows - their pigs and their sheep till nothing was left to them but empty fields
empty cattle sheds, and a whited sepulchre of a house
That had perforce to leave it - when the means whereby they lived had dwindled away and now they are scattered in various parts of the country.
Ten years ago The house itself was not exactly demolished, but very much structurally altered, and strange as it may seem is now a flourishing "Hotel" with "R I A C" signs etc and all the other "draws" to fill to capacity - but not for all the gold in the King's mint would I be be "drawn" to that 'Rest for the tired,' even to risk seeing from afar, those Lights in the Night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:40
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Then they would peel the skin off the rods and make them white.
They would make the baskets then.
The best basket maker in this district was Patrick Maloney
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:38
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-selves can tell - they kept on losing stock - their horses and their cows - their pigs and their sheep till nothing was left to them but empty fields
empty cattle sheds, and a whited sepulchre of a house
That had perforce to leave it - when the means whereby they lived had dwindled away and now they are scattered in various parts of the country.
Ten years ago The house itself was not exactly demolished, but very much structurally altered, and strange as it may seem is now a flourishing
"Hotel" with "R I A C" signs etc
and all the other "draws" to fill to
capacity - but not for all the gold
in the King's mint would I be
be "drawn" to that 'Rest for the tired,' even to risk seeing from afar, those Lights in the Night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:33
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rejected
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ag feachaint ortha tamall ina dhiaidh sin agus bhí an dá dhías chómh mór agus chómh hárd san gur chuireas breinnse crainn mór dtimcheall ortha na seasamh. Ins an am go raibh siad aibidh do bhaineamar ag do bhailigheamar isteach sa scioból iad. Do bhailigheamar meithiol fear ag do bhuaileamar agus do ghlanamar iad agus do bhí lán an sciobóil do chruithneacht aici agus is dóigh liom go mbfearr an gas san ná a bhfuil id gáirdín go léir. Do lorgaigheas mála uirthi go lionfainn mála den chruithneacht agus ní raibh an mála aici. Chuadhas amach agus do bhí tigh mór fada fairsing mara raghadh capall isteach le ráil mhóna. Chuadhas isteach sa tigh sin ag lorg mála. Do chonnac brúscar na móna go léir ag corruighe. Dimthigheas agus d'aimsigheas mo chlaidheamh a bhí ar crochadh sa chistin. Do thána thar nais agus do phriocas an brúscar. Lem chlaidheamh agus preabann chugham amach dreanncaide go raibh leath aoirde an tighe ann. Thugas fé lem chlaidheamh agus do bhaineas an ceann de. Bhaineas an croiceann de agus do fuaras snáthaid
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:32
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In the old times the people had many trades.
They had no lamps they had only candles made from rushes.
This is the way they used to make candles.
First they would get a long rush and then they would put some kind of oil in it to make it light.
The old people used also make baskets
This is the way they used to make the baskets.
They would get sallies and boil them
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:30
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told them to set it grinding salt.
It set to work and soon filled the ship and it sank.
But the mill kept grinding and it is said that that was how salt came to be in the sea.
This tiny man was said to be a devil and it was Black Friar's curse that caused the downfall of Mayo Abbey.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:28
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At the sight of the monster the priest fell to the ground.
He knew that his death had come.
In his dying moments he cursed the first ship that would go to the sea with a mill aboard.
He also cursed the ground the woman walked on.
Colman's relatives set out for America with the mill.
On the way the food ran short.
The mill was set grinding meal.
The captain then
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:26
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hair turned white and his white face turned black.
He told her that his penance would be very severe and he asked her whether she would rather lose her body or her soul and she said she body.
He then told her to walk to Lough Mask.
He walked after her and kept reading all the time.
When they reached the lake he pushed her in and a terrible monster arose and devoured her.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:25
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for safety.
But one of the women amongst them was afraid of the sea and she said that she would go to confession first.
She went to one of the secular clergy but he said that eh would not give her Absolution for her sins.
She then went to one of the friar at Ballinsmale Claremorris and he told her to go to the Black Friar of Mayo Abbey.
She went to him and when she told him her sins, his black
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:25
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hair turned white and his white hair turned black.
He told her that his penance would be very severe and he asked her whether she would rather lose her body or her soul and she said she body.
He then told her to walk to Lough Mask.
He walked after her and kept reading all the time.
When they reached the lake he pushed her in and a terrible monster arose and devoured her.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:22
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for safety.
But one of the women amongst them was afraid of the sea and she said that she would go to confession first.
She went to one of the secular clergy but he said that eh would not give her Absolution for her sins.
She then went to one of the friar at Ballinsmale Claremorris and he told her to go to the Black Friar of Mayo Abbey.
She went to him and when she told him her sins, his bla [?]
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 09:22
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and commenced to tell me a strange story of a nights happenings in yonder house across the way.
A lady - a Mrs T---- had just been over to my mother to tell "that of all the nights and of all the noises last night capped them all"
This Mrs T-- lived next door to the haunted house, and had the further additional remarkable news that
"3 fine pigs were found dead in the sty outside"
(These nocturnal noises and weird happenings were invariably accompanied by loss of stock)
My mother's story was told her by Mrs T. seemed but to throw light as it were, on the lights I had seen - they confirmed my fears; and now the yarns I had listened to unmovedly for so many
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 06:35
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ag feachaint ortha tamall ina dhiaidh sin agus bhí an dá dhías chómh mór agus chómh hárd san gur chuireas breinnse crainn mór dtimcheall ortha na seasamh. Ins an am go raibh siad aibidh do bhaineamar ag do bhailigheamar isteach sa scioból iad. Do bhailigheamar meithiol fear ag do bhuaileamar agus do ghlanamar iad agus do bhí lán an sciobóil do chruithneacht aici agus is dóigh liom go mbfearr an gas san ná a bhfuil id gáirdín go léir. Do lorgaigheas mála uirthi go lionfainn mála den chruithneacht agus ní raibh an mála aici. Chuadhas [?] agus do bhí tigh mór fada fairsing mara raghadh capall isteach le ráil mhóna. Chuadhas isteach sa tigh sin ag lorg mála. Do chonnac brúscar na móna go léir ag corruighe. Dimthigheas agus d'aimsigheas mo chlaidheamh a bhí ar crochadh sa chistin. Do thána thar nais agus do phriocas an brúscar. Lem chlaidheamh agus preabann chugham amach dreanncaide go raibh leath aoirde an tighe ann. Thugas fé lem chlaidheamh agus do bhaineas an ceann de. Bhaineas an croiceann de agus do fuaras snáthaid
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 06:09
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Do chonnac aon ghas amháin cruithneachtan a bfearr ná a bhfuil id gháirdín go léir".
Cá bhfeacaís é?" do rá Aiféis.
Bhí úncail dom pósta tamall uainn agus do cailleadh é. Dfás sé seisear (mac) leanbh ina dheaidh. Nuair do bhí deireadh obair an Carraigh déanta againn féin do rugas liom féidhre capall agus do chuadhas go dti bean m'úncail chun trian cruithneachtan a chur dí. Tháinig girrfighthe ón gcnoc agus coiníní agus ditheadar síos go dti an cré í ach dhá léas do bhí innsa chúinne thiar theas den gáirdín. Bhíos féinig lá breágh gréine ag feachaint conas a bhí an chruithneacht ag teacht chun cinn acht bhí sé go léir ithte ach dhá dhías. Thána abhaile agus dinnseas mo scéal dom athair. Suim laetheannta ina dhiaidh sin chuaidh m'athair ag feiscint an dá dhías agus is amhlaidh a bhíodar ag fás go hárd is go láidir. Tháinig sé thar nais agus dubhairt sé go mbeadh ár ndóthain cruithneachtan san dhá dhías ach aire a thabhairt dóibh. Bhíos féinig
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 04:25
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-selves can tell - they kept on losing stock - their horses and their cows - their pigs and their sheep till nothing was left to them but empty fields
empty cattle sheds, and a whited sepulchre of a house
That had perforce to leave it - when the means whereby the lived had dwindled away and now they are scattered in various parts of the country.
Ten years ago The house itself was not exactly demolished, but very much structurally altered, and strange as it may seem is now a flourishing
"Hotel" with "R I A C" signs etc
and all the other "draws" to fill to
capacity - but not for all the gold
in the King's mint would I be
be "drawn" to that 'Rest for the tired,' even to risk seeing from afar, those Lights in the Night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 04:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
-selves can tell - they kept on losing stock - their horses and their cows - their pigs and their sheep till nothing was left to them but empty fields
empty cattle sheds, and a whited sepulchre of a house
That had perforce to leave it - when the means whereby the lived had dwindled away and now they are scattered in various parts of the country.
Ten years ago The house itself was not exactly demolished, but very much structurally altered, and strange as it may seem is now a flourishing "Hotel" with "R I A C" signs etc and all the other "draws" to fill to capacity - but not for all the gold in the King's mint would I be
be "drawn" to that 'Rest for the tired,' even to risk seeing from afar, those Lights in the Night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 04:09
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years before, blossomed out to full-sized real, live ghost stories, culminating in my own startling experience of the lights in the night.
But you will say "what of the lights"
ah, but there are lights and ights and as a matter of fact I had scores of times seen a light in that same room before - could do so any night for, from the same reason known only to the inmates of that house - those lights were never let die out -
not one in that house would sleep in a room that wasn't fully lighted! So much for the lights - what of those poor prople that had of necessity to live in that ghostly
hole of a house?
where are they now ?
Well, they lived on there as only they them -
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:58
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and commenced to tell me a strange story of a nights happenings in yonder house across the way.
A lady - a Mrs T---- had just been over to my mother to tell "that of all the nights and of all the noises last night capped them all"
This Mrs T-- lived next door to the haunted house, and had the further additional remarkable news that
"3 fine pigs were found dead in the sty outside"
(These nocturnal noises and weird happenings were invariably accompanied by loss of stock)
My mother's story was told her by Mrs T. seemed but to throw light as it were, on the lights I had seen - the confirmed my fears; and now the yarns I had listened to unmovedly for so many
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:47
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I didnt wait or want to see it - I had done all the investigating + Confirming I needed - and I at once "took to cover" again this time to dig myself in as it were, and to squeeze my eyes tight to prevent those blinding lights from piercing through closed lids.
I could not sleep - I was too frightened - just tossed + turned about and longed for the lights of dawn - thaat would dispel all such lights + shadows
It came, and found me still wide awake - still seeing vividly that room of lights + fire, but thankful that I hadn't to squeeze my eyes to shut them out.
At nine o clock my mother (God rest her) brought my breakfast to my bed
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:38
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of that same house opposite -
of how their neighbours were being constantly disturbed by the unearthly mighty noises heard within those walls - sounds of heaps of delph being broken - rattling of chains + irons -
all these came back to me as I lay with my head under cover and frightened me still more - and changed then from mere "yarns to full frightfulness of a real ghost story.
I decided to confirm for myself that these lights + colours were but of my imagination, and to have just a quick look once more - a mere flash, a glance would do - I did so - and now I saw right into that room - I saw it blazing in much coloured lights, but if there was more to see
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:23
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before settling down to that best position wherein one best brings on that gentle sleep I looked out the window, which was just at the rear of my bed - out, as expected at the dark - dead dark night, for such it was in the room when I put out my light - what I saw I shall not soon, - ever forget -
where should be dark except for a light in the bedroom opposite it was ALL light - and from right across that haunted house there glowed beams of VARIED COLOURED lights -
lights that settled and centred to a focus in the window of the haunted house. Recovering from the shock + surprise I took "to Cover" - and then I bethought me of all the "Yarns" I had heard
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 03:11
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"The lights in the Night"
This is the story of a haunted house and a haunted, troubled family that lived in my native town but for obvious reason I am leaving out the real name of the family there being several of the family still living.
My home was exactly opposite this haunted house and I slept in the top storey of a 3 storey house from the window of which I could look down to the street and over direct, to the haunted spot at the other side of the street.
I used often read in bed and on this night, having read till 1.30.am I decided to turn in or rather, turn over, being more or less tired from reading rather than feeling sleepy, but
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 02:59
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mend it for you". He then went away towards his home, and when he returned to the Raheen later on he found the dash lying on the ground.
He mended it and went away home again, but on returning later to the mound to his great surprise he found that the mended Dash had been taken away, but in its place a jug of beer had been left in its place.
His companion advised him not to drink the beer, but he would not be advised and drank as much of it as he cared for.
When they both went home one of them went to unyoke the horses, but when he looked for his companion who had taken the beer, there was no tale or tiding of him for the Fairies had carried him away and left him in the North of Ireland.
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 00:15
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Éamonn a’ Chnuic
Deirtear annso gur i nDrom Bán i gCo. Thiobrad Árann a rugadh Éamonn timcheall na bliana 1660. Dar ndóig Éamonn Ó Riain a ainm agus nior tugadh Éamonn a Chnuic air go dtí go mbéigin dó dul ar a theiceadh ó shaighdiuirí Shasana nuair a bhí sé ina fear óg.
De réir na sgéalta bhí muinntear Éamoinn neamh spleadach go leor agus bhí sé ceapaighthe aca sagart a dhéanamh da mhac dá mba thoil Dé é. Chuige sin cuireadh chuig choláiste go dtí an Róimh agus chaith sé stad ann le sagartóireacht.
Uair dá raibh sé sambailt ar a shaoire tá sé ráidhte gur mharbhuigh sé báille a bhí ar dream a tháinig le mnaoi boicht
( comharsa d’Éamonn ) a chur as seilbh toisc ná raibh sé na cumas an cios a d’íoc don tigheara talmhan
senior member (history)
2019-12-16 00:14
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Éamonn a’ Chnuic
Deirtear annso gur i nDrom Bán i gCo. Thiobrad Árann a rugadh Éamonn timcheall na bliana 1660. Dar ndóig Éamonn Ó Riain a ainm agus nior tugadh Éamonn a Chnuic air go dtí go mbéigin dó dul ar a theiceadh ó shaighdiuirí Shasana nuair a bhí sé ina fear óg.
De réir na sgéalta bhí muinntear Éamoinn neamh spleadach go leor agus bhí sé ceapaighthe aca sagart a dhéanamh da mhac dá mba thoil Dé é. Chuige sin cuireadh chuig choláiste
go dtí an Róimh agus chaith sé stad ann le sagartóireacht.
Uair dá raibh sé sambailt ar a shaoire tá sé ráidhte gur mharbhuigh sé báille a bhí ar dream a tháinig le mnaoi boicht
( comharsa d’Éamonn ) a chur as seilbh toisc ná raibh sé na cumas an cios a d’íoc don tigheara talmhan
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:56
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and soon filled the table with oatmeal.
Then Colman and his family had a good meal of stirabout.
A while after, the mill was asked to grind gold.
It did so and after that Colman and his family wanted for nothing.
But some of his relatives heard about the mill and they resolved to steal it from him.
They stole it and since Colman was a powerful man they were afraid of him and they decided to go to America
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:54
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down the mill on the road and a tiny little miller about the size of a bee came out.
The little man told the miller to grind corn.
Immediately the mill began grinding oatmeal until there was a heap of it on the road.
Very doubtfully Colman took the mill and set out for home.
When he reached home he placed the mill on the table and told it to grind.
It promptly responded to his command
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:51
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hawthorn bush by the roadside.
When he drew near it he saw a tiny little man hopping about it.
The man asked Colman how much did he want for the cow.
Colman told him he wanted five pounds for her.
The little man offered him a tiny little mill about the size of an alarm-clock.
Colman looked at the man scornfully and was about to drive the cow away when the little man laid
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:50
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it changed to the centre of a bog in the townland of Cuiltyshinnoge where it still remains, but it deserves to be more widely known.
There is also in Clooncraff a small graveyard. It is supposed to be the oldest one in Ireland. It is said that there was a monastery in it long ago but as there are no ruins of it to be seen the truth of it is not known.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:49
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When the school was in Mayo there lived in Liscolman a man named Colman
He was very poor and had to sell all his stock until nothing remained but an old cow.
He decided at last to sell her because his family were starving.
One morning he set out for the fair of Claremorris with the cow.
When he reached Ballygowan there was
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:47
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awaiting decision
About a month or so before Christmas every year the Rhymers begin to prepare themselves to entertain the people in the country districts, and as a result of their labours to gather some money. At that time they are busy getting together false faces, old flour bags out of which uniforms are made, swords etc.
When all their parapharnalia is complete they don their uniforms and equipment and go from house to house through the country in the night time. Some of them travel far from home sometimes as far as thirty miles and they must find it a very lucrative business.
They always ask permission to enter a house and if that permission is not granted they proceed to the next house. After the New Year the Rhymers generally hold a dance in some country house. No invitations are issued but everybody is welcome and the money which they have collected is spent in providing tea for those present.
In every house the Rhymers present a short little play and the following is the little play commonly done in this district.

Enter first of all Room Room dressed in some fantastic costume, wearing a false face and carrying a sword.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:47
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(Room Room)
Room Room my gallant boys
Give me room to rhyme
I'll show you some activity
About this Christmas time
Act the young and Act the old
The like of me was never seen
On the stage before.
If you don't believe what I say
Enter Prince George and he'll soon clear the way

(Prince George now enters carrying a sword)

(Prince George)
Yes, Yes! Here comes I, Prince George
I come all the way from Spain
I fed my horse on oats and hay
And then he ran away.
(Room Room) You are a liar, sir
(Prince George) Take out your sword and try it, sir

(Room Room)
I'll drive my sword through your heart and then you'll die away, sir

(They fight with their swords for a while - Room Room sees an opening, runs Prince George through and the Prince falls to the ground. Room Room runs about the kitchen)

(Room Room)
Five Pounds for a doctor
Ten pounds for a doctor
No doctor can be found
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:45
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A burned child dreads the fire.
Satan finds mischief for idle hands to do.
Two removals are as bad as a burning.
The best horse jumps the ditch.
Never leave off (un) till tomorrow what you can do to-day.
Wine is sweet but the price is sour.
A stitch in time saves nine
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:43
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Denn church is situated beside the road.
Its walls are made of stone which were quarried out of Denn Hill. Long ago Denn was an independent parish with its own rector who lived in the now ruined rectory. Now the same rector with the help of a Curate preaches in the united of Cavan, Derryheen and Denn.
There is one aisle up the middle of the church with twelve very nice oak pews each side of it which were brought from Scotland.
Last year a new Communion Table was bought by the parishioners in memory of Mrs Shire
There are five windows on the one on the vestry and three on the belfey.
It was built in the year 1,815
The first two wardens were Patrick Fegan and Thomas
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:41
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them have very nice entrances and are situated in very nice surroundings.
There are two lakes and a river convenient to the townland. The lakes are called Lough Elia and Clooncraff Lough and the river is called Dooneen river.
Lough Elia has always from fifty to a hundred swans swimming on it. Dooneen river joins Clooncraff Lough with Dooneen Lake. These lakes abound in fish so they are a great source of pleasure to the boys of the district in the summer months.
The land is very suitable for crops but some of it is hilly and hard to cultivate.
People visit a holy well that is situated in a neighbouring bog and they have great belief in it. There is a story told of this well. This well is supposed to belong to St Lasser and was at one time situated in Clooncraff where the graveyard now is. A woman used the water of this "Holy Well" for washing clothes and during the night
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:30
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(Buncrana)
From the Irish word's, Bun - foot, and Crana - of the trees it is so called because it is at the foot of the river Crana which got its name from the wood's on its bank

Ballymacarry is the name of a town land on the outskirts of the town it is so called from Baile - a town and Carra - a weir

Pound Lane is so called because it was here that the cattle were kept in pound.

Aghilly is the name of a town land, it is so called on account of the Yew trees that grew there in large numbers.

Ardaraven is at the top of Ferris lane, it means Ard - a height and Ramhan - a spade, it is so called because it was so high it could not be ploughed so it had to be tilled with spades.

The loan-Bank is the name of a shed in Ferris lane, it is so called because it was here the first Bank in Buncrana was situated. The bars are still to be seen in the windows.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:20
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I have been told that it means the “eagle of the white house.” The story runs that a child had been born in a white house and taken away by an eagle. Fr. Hegarty inclines to favour “The White House Church” from “Ecclessia”
Gortnamuck – Gort na Muc – the field of the pigs
Lisnamulligan – Lios na Mullachan – the fort of the hilltops
Meenlougher – Mín Luachaire – fine rushes
Raws – na Ratha – wavy land

Tievebrack – Taobh breac – the speckled hillside.
In the district when one hears this pronounced it is more like “Tee-brack” the ‘v’ sound absent as a matter of fact, in old writings it was spelt “Teebrack”
Ballylast – Baile Laist – the town of cargo
Castlefin – Caisleán na Finne – the Castle of the Finn
Cloughfin – Cloch Finn – the stone of the Finn.
Corcullion – “Cor Choillead ?
Gortfad – Gort Fada – the long field.
Knockrawer – Cnoc Romhair – the tilled hill.
Maghereagh – Machaire Fhéidh – the pheasants’ plain.
Sessiagh Allison – Sessiach Allison – Allison’s Sixth
Stranamuck – Sraith-na-Muc – The pig’s row
Tawnacrum – Tamhnach Crom – The bent or stooped arable land
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:18
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The townland I live in is Clooncraff which is situated in the Parish of Aughrim and in the barony of Ballintubber North. Nearly all the townlands in the Parish have Cloon as the first part of their names.
There are nine families living in Clooncraff at the present time but in former times eighty or ninty years ago there were a great deal more living in it. There are at least the ruins of six houses in Clooncraff. Some of the people have left them twenty years ago but the majority of them have left since the famine.
The houses that are in Clooncraff presently are not big slated ones but small thatched comfortable ones. Some of
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:10
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A rainbow in the morning is the shepherds warning
A rainbow at night is the shepherds delight.
When a rainbow is seen in the morning it is a sign that there is a storm coming. When a rainbow is seen in the evening it is a sign that you are going to have good weather.
Seagulls.
When the seagulls are seen coming inland stormy or rainy weather is almost always approaching. The storm is there element and the seagulls enjoy the heaviest gale
When it gets stormy at sea. The seagulls come inland.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:05
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Ballybun. - Baile Bon. The town of the cows.
Ballygonigan - Baile Dhonnagáin Donegan’s town.
Belalt - Béal Ailt The Mouth of the Knoll.
Carrandore - Currach an Dobhair. The flat swamp
Cashelin - Caiseailín a little fort.
Cloghard - Cloch Árd High Stone
Drummurphy - Druim Murchaidh Murphy’s land.
Dungormain - Dún Gormáin’s: Gorman's fort.
Egglebane: - ?
From John McMenamin of this townland, and others.
I...
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:04
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Concam – Cor Cam – The crooked bend
Killygordon – Coill na gCuiridín – The wood of the Wild Parsnips
Leaght – Leacht – Mound of Stones (Grave)
Liscooley – Lios Cúlaighe – The fort of the corners.
Magheraboy – Machaire Buidhe – The yellow Plain.
Meenahoney – Mín an Eoghain - Eoghan's level (land)
Corgary – Cor Garaidh - ?
Correfrin - Cor Aifreann – the Bend of the Mass i.e. where Mass was said.
Dreenan – Draighneán – The place of sloe bushes or blackthorns
Glencavit – Gleann Comhead– The glen of watching.
Knock – cnoc – a hill
Navenny - ?
Sessiaghoneill – "Sessiach Uí Néill" - O'Neill’s Sixth (of land)
Tievecloghogue – "Taobh Clochóg" - The Stony hillside
Trusk - Trosc ?Secluded recess ?

Planters - Names of Townlands
Whitehill
Scotland
Killtown
Blairstown
Garrison Hill
Mounthall
Monellan
Mountainpark
Sallywood
Baywood.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:04
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Heaslip.
The grave yard surrounds the church. There is a wall around part of the grave yard.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 23:03
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I went to see an old man named Barney Smith. He is over seventy and is quite bald. He is a tailor and is very jolly. He did not go to a hedge-school but he said that hedge-school teachers were paid at the rate of 6d per week.
He often heard his father and mother talking about the "Big Wind" . His father was six years old then and an awful lot of damage was done.
People had three meals, each consisting of potatoes which they peeled with their thumbs, they also had indian dumplings and oaten bread. The potatoes were put in a creel at dinner time and the the vegetables were put on the pan and they all crowded round.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:58
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:57
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Sheep and goats give signs of the weather when they are high on the hills we are sure of a fine spell. When the come down to the bottom of the hill we may be sure that there is a storm coming.
Fogs and Mists
When a fog is seen round the top of Slieve Glagh we may be sure there is an storm coming. When the fog is seen round in the hollows we may be sure of a fine spell.
Corns.
When there is a storm coming people who have corns find them paining them very much. When there is good weather coming the people
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:54
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who have corns never find them aching.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:53
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If you give anybody the loan of anything on the 1st May you will not have the like to give again.
Beacause the same thing you will never have on the 1st May.
If you put your shoes on the table you will have bad luck.
If you write a letter and dry it to the fire. Suppose you had no blotting paper. You will be dissappoined that day.
If you put a sod on a foals back you will have good luck with the foal.
If you set a hen on a Saturday you will have no chickens.
If you put a two shilling piece in a
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:48
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can of water when a cow is calving you will have good luck with your calf.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:48
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(When) We have cows calves and a mare at home. We call one our cows Lynch's cow because we bought her from a man named Pat Lynch. Another cow we called Darky because she is a black cow. Another called "Polly" because she has no horns. We call them these names to know one from another when speaking about them. We say Progy when bringing in the cow or puting them out. We say Suck Suck when calling the calves to their drink. We call the cow house the bire. (When) We put a chain on their neck with a link on it when tieing them People tie their head to their leg when the are
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:46
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Belscarra - a townland near the Gortletteragh - Cloone border. The River rushes rapidly between high banks at this place, and the ruins of an ancient scutch mill may still be seen there

Praiseach - a low lying valley between Mullaghbrock and Lurga hills. Through the centre of it the Rinn or Cloone River winds its way. Very often it overflows its banks and did much damage to the crops on all sides.

Cnocán - a small field near James Heslin's house in Annaghmore North

(J McKenna)

Augharuis - a place at the north end of Gortin lough and at the west side of river
J. McKenna

Redhill - at S. end of present townland of Drumkielvey, into which it has been absorbed
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:44
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Tá scálán i m.Baile na Bó, comhgarach do'n bhealach mhór. Tá sé ar thaoibh do láimhe deise de'n ród, mar bhéas duine ag dul ó'n Fhal Carrach go d-tí Dún-Fionnachaidh. An bealach mór atá comhgarach do'n Scálán anois, ní rabh sé ann i n-aimsir na géarleanmhna, ná ins an am a rabh gnáth-úsáid deánta de'n Scálán. Deirtear gur i n-am an ghorta a rinneadh an bealach mór. Tá ceárdcha san am i láthair comhgarach do'n Scalán.
San am a rabh na daoine ag freastal an Scaláin bhi sé suidhte thíos i [?] comhgarach do'n Abhainn bhuidhe. Ní rabh bealach mór ar bith comhgarach aige, agus bhi sé doiligh feicheál mar d-tiocfadh duine air de thaisme, sin nó eolas beacht aige ar an áit. Bhi dóigh mhaith agus áit mhaith éalóidh as. 'Leac an Aifrionn' a bheirtear mar ainm ar an Scálán seo faoi láthair. Léigheadh Aifrionn annseo go minic fadó, agus ins an am sin bhíodh an sagart in a chomhnuidhe amuigh ag an Tearmóinn. Bhi dearmad deanta ag na daoinibh fán áit seo, go d-tí timcheall deich mbliadhna ó shoin. Nuair a chruinnigh an t-Athair Art Ua Frighil S.C muintir na comhursanachta cupla lá le claidhe a chur thart ar an áit, le clocha a chruinniughadh agus chuir sé geabhtha ar thaoibh an bhealaigh mhóir leis na droinibh a
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:44
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theiving People put a horse shoe on the stable door for to have good luck. We call hens "chuck chuck" when calling them. Ducks. Wheet Wheet". Turkeys "Pee Pee" and Goslings "Gussy Gussy". We put a round mark on eggs when setting them for fraid another hen would lay on the nest when the clocker is off at her feed.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:41
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Wooden dishes were made of ash. They were used long ago for salting and washing it. The men that made them were called coopers. They were in two pieces, and put together with wooden screws. They were sold at fairs for 3/6.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:37
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by children
(Collected in (?), Drumgownagh and Gortletteragh districts)
between 1920 and 1935

Place names no longer used or dying out

Gort na Stang
Gaitín Bo
Parcín Múrán
Páircíneabha
Cúlán - a field in Lear
Moinín - a small bog meadow in Mullaghbrack
Stubán - a field full of stones
Tobar Crann - a well in Drumbad

Aughnacliath - a townland at the south end of Lear, in which it is now included

Oldstone - a townland beside the bridge at the south end of Drumhirk, in which it is now included
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:36
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Wooden buckets were made of ash with iron handles in them. They were used for feeding cattle and horses. They are still to be seen at some places. They were made by coopers and were sold for four shillings each. At that time there were no zinc ones.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:30
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Friday
Lucky to start any work e.g. ploughing, sowing, on a Friday morning. This is one of the strongest beliefs in the district presently
Butter
Unlucky to give away any of the butter from the first churning from a cow after calving. You gave your luck away in doing so.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:27
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New Year's Day
Unlucky to throw out ashes or dust or water on that day.
A Weasel
To see a weasel running across the road is a sign of ill luck
Salt.
1. It was not right to bring home beef in a cart at Xmas if the mare was in foal unless the beef was salted.
2. Throw a pinch of salt on milk when giving it away for fear of taking the luck away.
3. Throwing a pinch of salt in a setting of eggs to leave the luck with them & the giver in doing so did not take away from his own luck
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:25
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At Augharuis Mass is said to have been celebrated in the penal days. Once the priest (name unknown) was surprised during the Holy Sacrifice by the yeoman. The priest was killed and the contents of the chalice spilled. It is said that rushes from that spot will not burn.

J. Cabreavy, Mickna
Died 1935. Aged about 88
Farmer and mason, lived all his life in Lear and Mickna
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:22
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bread the same. Some-times they stuck two iron bars in the ground called "greels" and put a griddle on top of the greels. They used to put the cake standing up straight until each side was baked and then left it lying down flat.
When it was baked it was very hard.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:21
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Long ago they used to eat oaten and barley bread. They used to thresh the corn long ago with a horse mill. Then they used to sell the wheat because that time it was three pounds per barrell.
Long ago they baked the bread on a griddle in front of the fire. They used to make potatoecakes also.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:20
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Mescán - meall
Páircíneach - pairc
Galdar - glór ganndail no circe franncaigh

Clibín - gruag agus clábar greamuighthe le chéile ar ainmhighthe

Piogaí - ag mealladh bó chun a bheith ciúin
Currach - páirc íseal in a fhásas féar garbh
Meirlín - Clúdach ar meár (ag cainnt gan fath)
Spinlín - rud árd cumhang
Meitheal - plód daoine ag obair le chéile
Síbín - teach in a ndíoltar deoch gan license
Fúarán - planda
Mí-adh
Gob (gab) - béal
Plochar - casacht
Praiseach - plannda
Cogair
Scrios
Bog a bhuidhe - obair déanta go dona
Scrá - fód bog as an gclais
Scarachán - rud beag suarach
Gaileach - sreang no slat ar a cuirtear iasc
Bundún - cos thinn
(?) - lámh tinn (nó leas ainm ar duine)
Ciath - saigeas bodhar
Póidín - práta beag
Certán - meall (cnap) beag ar bun na coise
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:18
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Long ago they used to make bread out of oaten meal and barley meal. It used to be baked on a griddle and it used to be cut into two halves before it baked.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:18
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Our house is built of mud walls and thatched. The yellow clay was mixed with chopped straw and it had to be tramped well in the mixing.
The house is of three apartments two rooms and a kitchen and there is a dairy attached to it. There is one chimney on the top. Our house is three hundred years old
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:16
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Long ago the houses were built with mud walls. The roofs used to be thatched with oaten straw. The floor was made of clay and the fire was on the hearth against the middle wall. Every house used to have a half door but there are very few now. A settle bed was very common and it used to be in the kitchen along the wall. There no lamps and the used to make candles out of rushes and grease.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:14
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Mr Kellys house was a shop long ago and also Brian Keegans. They were very queer shops long ago. Some of then that were only amateur shops had up stairs. The only difference in the money I know is this. there were four penny bits, two penny bits and ten penny bits. They used to bring eggs and butter and get their goods for them.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:10
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senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:09
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Laidh - saigheas spád
Maidis - tlú

Gabán - clúdach ar béal laoigh óig.
Céarduidhe a fhoghluim a chéard as a stuam fhéin

Arcán - duine an bheag
Bucán - lúb ar geata nó ar doras chun é dhúnadh

Beirtín - ualach beag ar an druim
Nuair a bhíos gach rud i gceart ag duine deirtear "tá a BHEIRTÍN ceangailte aige"

Ceolán - duine gan mhaith
Batán - cnap beag féar nó cóchain
Buncán - cnap beag sa bpáirc
Salach
Banham - muc óg
Caesóg (?) - cráin mhuice óg
Raidhní - duine tanaidhe
Coinlín - bata beag ar lasadh
Páinidh - rud eicínt atá reamhar
Céilidh -

Siubhailthoir - duine a bhíos i gcomnuidhe ag spaisdeóireacht thart

Mar eadh
Clab - béal
Maise
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:08
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a pan and that would be "boxty".
Some more people make a cake and put a ring in it and whoever would get the ring would be the first in the family to get married.
All the boys and girls would gather into one house long ago and they would have great fun, and a party to celebrate the night.
Then all the small boys would go "ducking" for apples in a large tub of water.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:06
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Long ago November's night was a great night for all the young folk.
The people used to have a great feast on that night.
They used to make a feast of cally.
More people used to get a few potatoes and peel them and scrape them with a scraper.
Then they got a cloth and put it round the potatoes and squeezed them and took the water out of them and mixed flour through them and baked it on
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:03
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near my house in the townland of Kilbeg.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:03
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book".
They were taught to write but they did not write much, they did more oral work.
They wrote on slates with slate pencils.
The compensation the teacher got was that he could go for one week with each child and then he would depart and to to some other school.
The name one one teacher was Mr Tracey and he had only one hand.
This school was in a field
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 22:00
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A little over a hundred years ago the present system of National Education was established.
Before that the school consisted of a barn with lines of stones on which the children sat.
The teacher sat on a bench shaped like a stool.
They went to school in the evenings.
They had two books "the Single spelling book " and "the Double spelling
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:58
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long in one place he used to go about from one place to another trying to get better wages.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:57
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to lodge one week in each of the children's houses and he used to be teaching the children of that village all the week and he got his food and lodging free and he sued to get a penny a week from each child.
The books they used were a single spelling book and the Primmer and there used to be only one of each of these books in every school.
the teacher used not stay very
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:55
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Long ago the Irish people had to attend hedge schools.
There were many hedge schools in this district. There was one is Belesker taught by Mr. Mullarkey.
All the children of the village would come to an old barn and there they used to be taught to read, spell and write.
They had no desks so they had to leave their copies or slates on their knees and write.
The teacher used
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:52
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senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:52
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had to take the teacher for a week and then he would go to the next child for another week.
They had no desk so they had to leave their copies on their knees. The teacher boarded in a house near by, the barn.
The scholars used slates and slate pencils for writing and doing sums. The teacher used to get his food free in every house and each child used to give him a penny a week.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:50
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Long ago there were many hedge schools in this locality.
There was one in Brickens taught by Mr Henery. The children had to go to an old barn to be taught.
They used only one book and that was a spelling book. It used to be a block of wood the children had to sit on and a stool the teacher had to sit on.
They sued to make them do reading, writing spelling and sums.
Every child
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:47
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2. There was a great stormy January in the year 1920.
It knocked the roof off out houses.
It gave no signs of its approach.
It came quickly and it knocked a great many trees.
The night of the high wind was the 6th day of January 1,839.
It nearly knocked down all the houses belonging to the poor people and many people died with the fright.
They quenched the fires for fear their roofs would burn.
Many people buuilt
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. About a hundred years ago the old people believed in witchcraft.
It was believed that there was a witch in Ballyhaunis district who had a grudge against the people.
She rose a storm by witchcraft on the 6th day of January 1839 and it was so rough that the people could taste the salt water of the Atlantic and that is still spoken of as the night of the big wind.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 21:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two graveyards in our parish. Their names are Mullaghboy and Potahee. Potahee is situated in the townland of Potahee and Mullaghboy is situated in the townland of Mullaghboy. They are still in use. The graveyards are not round in shape. There are no ruined churches around here. Trees are grown in the graveyards. The graveyards contain old tombs and crosses. The dates are when ever a person dies. Some of the people are buried in the ruin of the churchyard. There are no disused churches in the parish. The unbaptised children were buried along a ditch or in a field. Those places were unconsecrated graveyards. Local families still use certain graveyards though they may be much further distant than the parish graveyard.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Q As I was going to London, I saw a great wonder four and twenty bulldogs tearing the world asunder.
A A harrow.
Q Why should a hen never have untidy feathers?
A Because she carries a comb with her.
Q Why are proud people like a book of music?
A Because they are both of airs.
Q Why is a horse a most remarkable eater?
A Because it eats most when it hasn't a bit in its mouth.
A How many bricks go to the building of a house?
A None, they all have to be carried.
Q What is it that always walks with its head down?
A A nail in my boot.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:46
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Social - foods. Scailcín made from potatoes, which were grated, and then squeezed through a linen sheet, and baked, served with cream and butter. A rare dish which was used for supper when a farmer's crop of potatoes were placed in pits, the work being done by neighbouring hands.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:38
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:37
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awaiting decision
meal and flour into a basin. Then they added soda and salt and mix all together. After that they wet it with milk and mixed it into a dough. Then it was kneaded and put on the griddle to bake. Long ago the people ate salt-meat once a day. The meat they ate long ago was the flesh of the deer, and wild boar which they killed in the chase. Long ago fish and vegetables were always eaten. The people used to eat late at night. There were certain kinds of food eaten at Christmas and Easter. On Easter Sunday eggs were eaten and on Christmas day a goose or a turkey was eaten. Tea was first used in the district at Christmas. The vessels that were used before cups became common were noggins and porringers.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:31
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awaiting decision
o daddy the cow are the piper.
Bad luck to the beast she had a musical taste to eat such a beautiful chanter.
Paddy a vick get a lump of a stick
to drive her to Glenally to cant her.
VI
The cow she was drove a mile or two off
to the side of the town called Glenally.
Where the creature was sold for four guineas in gold
to the clerk of the parish Jim Daly.
They went into a tent the luck penny spent
for the clerk was the devils own spiper.
VII
Who the blazes was there playing the rakes of Kildare
but poor Denny Byrne the piper
Tim gave a bout like a half broken coult
and Denny he looked like a gomack
He said "by the power I thought these eight hours
you were swimming through the "drim" of the stomack.
Now since we met our whistles we'll wet
like devils we'll dance round the piper
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:26
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awaiting decision
astonished as well as delighted.
In these time poor Denny could could not
earn a penny martial law had him stung like a viper.
It kept him within till the bones and they skin
were grinning through the rags of the piper.
III
One heavenly night as the moon shone out bright poor Denny strode home by Drumdaning
And what did he see from the branch of a tree but the corpse of a soldier there hanging.
Says Denny the rogues they have boots they have brogues and the boots they had such a grip sir.
They were sewed gallows tight he pulled with such might the legs and boots came with the piper.
IV
He took up the legs and he took to his pegs till he came to Tim Kennedy's cabin.
Says Tim from within I cannot let you in
You'll be shot if you are caught out there rapping.
He sent him to the shed where the cow was in bed with a wisp he began to wipe her.
They lay down together on the seven foot feather the cow hugging Denny the piper.
V
When breakfast was done Tim sent out his son to make Denny jump like a lamp lighter.
The legs they were there and he roared like a bear
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:23
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awaiting decision
fills the garden with corn and hay
Cut the gad next the neck
Out of the frying pan into the fire
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:20
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awaiting decision
A blind man is a bad judge of colours
Hunger is good sauce
What you wont hear wont sicken you
People meet but hills or mountains dont
Your pocket is your friend
A little help is worth a lot of sympathy
It's time enought to bid the devil good morrow till you meet him
When the cuckoo lies on a bare torn sell your cow and buy corn
Tomuch of one thing is good for nothing
A friend in need is a friend in deed
Every body throws water on the drowned rat
The longest day has a end
The old fool is the worst fool
A wet and windy May
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I
In the year ninty eight I am sorry to state
it was treason to be a Milesian.
Our country was ate by a black bearded set
though history tells us they were hessians
In those troublesome times we had all sorts
of crimes and murders never were riper.
At the side of Glenreen [?] not one acre from me
lived poor Denny Byrne the piper.
II
Neuither wedding nor wake was worth an old
shake to which Denny was not invited.
Emptying the bags and squeezing the he
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:10
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awaiting decision
you licked it
Bread against bread is dry
Half a loaf is better than no bread
Look before you leap
A closed mouth catches no flies
A nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse
A burned child dreads the fire
The old dog for the hard road and the pup for the path
It's easy to bake beside the mill
What you have not in your hand you cannot hold it
Them that are easy got are easy casted
Charity begins at home but should not end there
Keep the bad dog with you and the good dog wont bite
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 20:01
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no turning
Spare the rod and spoil the child
Cut my head and give me a plaster
It's a wise man that carries his coat
A full purse makes a lighht heart
Many hands make light work
Two heads are wiser than one
Whats bread in the bone is hard to knock out of the flesh
Tisnt the day of the wind they day of the scollop
Quinched coals are easy kindled
There is more in your head than a comb would take out
Every cat after its kind
tisnt off the wind you took it or the grass
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 19:52
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It's difficult to cut wool off a goat
Between two stools you'l come to the ground
Eaten bread is soon forgotten
Don't shout until you're out of the wood
Don't count your chickens until they are hatched
Have it yourself or do without it
When the sup is in the wit is out
Too old of a hen to be coasced by chaff
A cat of your age would not play with a wisp
Crying over spilt milk makes it more watery
You do not know the want of water until the well is dry
When it rains it pours
If the cap suits you wear it
Its a long road that has
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:52
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awaiting decision
the ditch and pulled a fern and he made a horse out of it. "Hop up behind me" said the tall man. The man hopped up behind him and off they went. Soon they drew near the wedding house and the tall man said "we are near the wedding house now and the reason I came to night is because I want to make this girl my own". "Tell me" said the man "how can you do this" "Dont you know" said the tall man" "that I'm the old boy."
"I thought so much" said the man "because I found the smell of the brimstone from you all along the road. "That is alright" said the tall man "you and I must go into this house to-night and we will go up on the cross-stick that is over the table." "Hurry on" said the old boy "they are at the supper." In with the two of them and up on the cross stick. "Now" he said to the man when they were up on the cross stick, this girl is going to sneeze three times and if anyone wont say, "God bless her" every time she sneezes she will be mine.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:45
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There was a man standing at a public-house in Castlelack once upon a time and he had fifty pints drunk and the publican told him to go home. He went outside the door and after a few minutes he came back to the door and commenced to kick it asking for another pint before going home. He was standing a long time at the door when a tall man came up to him and asked him what he wanted. The man told him that he wanted another pint before he would go home. The tall man asked him would he come to a wedding and the man said he would go if he would get a pint. The tall man put his fingers in the keyhole and opened the door and brought out a pint. He drank the pint and asked the big man how far was it to the wedding. "Abut one hundred miles" said the tall man. "How could I walk one hundred miles" said the man. "Oh I'm not asking you to walk it" said the tall man. He went over to
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:38
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awaiting decision
But before one third its height was reached young Roach out speed them all
For love had nerved his arm and eye as he scaled the dizzy height
And now his hand he has put forth to pluck the rose so bright.
VII
But cruel faith has ordered this touch he ne'er shall feel
One loving glance at Eileen and his fearful brain does reel
The treacherous stone has given way where on his foot has stood
And now his body plunged beneath the Bandons rapid flood
VIII
On Eileens face no smile was seen as Roche sank 'neath the wave
She joined him here in twelve short months in the land beyond the grave[?]
And here another year its course and Barry Oge has fled
They were gathered to their fathers in their homes amongst the dead.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:33
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had pledged to Roach of Poulnalum
IV
And oft when night was closing amid a burning summers day
From out the Castles frowning falls his barkue does steal away
Or stayed his oar or stopped his hand till one feeble ray of light
Shone forth from Eileens window to guide him through the night
V
McCarthy Reigh, Kilgobbin Lord the lady too did claim
To him as to the others Barry Oge replied the same
The chief who wins my daughter must bare the palm away
And for all that rivals for the prize on our next Ladyday
He who plucks the scarlet rose that grows on yonder tower
Shall call Eileen Barry Oge his own before another hour.
VI
The proudest five of Munster chiefs scaling high the wall
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:29
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Where the Brinny gentle flowing meets the Bandon rapid tide,
The waters ere they mingled washed the Castles rugged Side,
Its ivyed walls and ruined towers once beautiful and grand,
Its the emblem of the greatness of our once proud native land,
II
Its twice two hundred years ago since Barry Óg did dwell,
In his Castle at Downdaniel amid scenes he loved so well,
His little daughter Eileen his darling and his pride
No fairer maid than she lived there in all that county side
III
Many a high born chieftain came with castles and broad land
Would lay with joy at Eileens feet if honoured with her hand
But one there was she better loved than any of the throng
For Harth and hand she long
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:22
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[drawing of closed handcuffs]
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:22
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awaiting decision
[drawing of bottle/vase - no caption]
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:20
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awaiting decision
Territory
The O'Mahony's possessed. "Hy-Eachach Mumhan" now the BARONY OF IVEAGH S.W. Cork - "Cineal na Beice" now Barony of Kinalmakey - "Cineal Aodh" now BARONY OF KINALEA - "Tiobrad" now BARONY IVERAGH IN KERRY - They were dispossessed of their lands by the McCarthy Reaghs, and the O'Sullivans.
Castles
The O'Mahony's had castles at 1. CASTLELACK. 2. BANDON 3 ARDINTENANT. 4 RINGMAHON 5. DUNBEACON. 6 DUNMANUS 7. ROSSBRIN, BLACKCASTLE (Schull) 8 BALLYDEVLIN (Kilmore) 9. DROMDEELY 10 BALLYMADAN (East Carbery)
The last Prince of Kinelmakey was Connor O'Mahony who fell in the Desmond Wars, (aged 23) he fought on the National Side - He was titled Prince of Rathlin and lived in Castle Bernard ___
Battle of Castlelack & Gallauns
There was a battle fought in the Gallaun field in Castlelack in 1010 A.D. The OMahonys v Danes_ The OMahonys were victorious _ Some people say that the Gallauns were errected to the O'Mahony Chiefs who fell in this battle, others say that they were of an earlier date, probably connected with the fort that was once in the field _
underground passage
The Castle which stood in the corner of the Gallaun field was built about 12th Cent. and fell about 16th It is said that when the Castle fell all the gold and jewels were hidden away in a tunnel that ran under the Castle, traces of this tunnel have been found _
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:04
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awaiting decision
19. Hart's of Farnivane 1 fosse
20. Hourihan's of Farnivane 1 fosse
21. Líos na Bainríogna Calnan of Roughgrove 2 fosses
22. Hurley of Roughgrove - 1 fosse
23. James Murphy of Roughgrove - 1 fosse
24. Hurley's of M....... 2 fosses.
25. Woodfort. Giles's of Gurteen 1 fosse
26. Donovan's of Farnilough 1 fosse
27. Lordan. of Farnilough. 1 fodde
28. Allen's of Farnilough 1 fosse
29. O Brien of Newcestown - 1 fosse
30. Dineen of Farnalough 1 fosse
31.
32.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 18:02
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awaiting decision
I
In the year ninty eight I am sorry to state
it was treason by a Milesian.
Our country was ate by a black bearded set
though history tells us they were hessians
In those troublesome times we had all sorts
of crimes and murders never were riper.
At the side of Glenreen [?] not one acre from me
lived poor Denny Byrne the piper.
II
Neuither wedding nor wake was worth an old
shake to which Denny was not invited.
Emptying the bags and squeezing the he
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Rathaliú, one of the three big forts of Munster - it has three fosses around it .
Here lived Cian, son of Maolmoradh King of Munster, who married Sabh daughter of Brian Boroimhe, they had a son Mathgabhuin who was the founder of the O'Mahony Clan. It is from here that the men of Munster marched to the battle of Clontarf. When Sabh went to Queensfort (21) she left this fort, then called "Cathair Mór" to Lugaid, Brian's old nurse, and from her, it was called the Rotaliú.
2. Small Fort in Crowley's Gurranes Lios na mBan - here Sabh held her court for the women. Destroyed.
3. Fort Murphy's Gurranes. one fosse.
4. Fort, one fosse, in Matt Good's "Gurteen Rónan", here Diarmuid Srutha McCarthy is supposed to have buried gold also known as Lisín na Géanna
5. Godsells, 1 fosse, in Scart na muc.
6. Tim Hallaron's Fort. (destroyed) in Scart na muc
7. Michael Curtin's Fort, near the Gallans (destroyed)
8. Lios an Farainn. McDonnell's. Castilack
9. Lios na Licce. Sheehan's Kilmore this is a square fort.
10. Murphy's Kilmore. (destroyed)
11. William Curtin's Kilmore. (destroyed)
12. Cathair - on Cashell Hill. 3 fosses
13. Lios an iusge. Connor's of Lisaniskey.
14. Rockfort. Lynchs of Rockfort.
15. Brother's font. Goods
16. Sleibhín fort.
17. Finnis destroyed fort in Murphy's.
18. Duke's Wood. (destroyed)
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:57
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awaiting decision
They got nothing out of Boylan
To satisfy their greed.
XVI
"No fault no blame
Have I to leave
On Anyone
XVI
"No fault no blame I to leave
On anyone standing by
It was my own hand and my own gun
And the Lord that rules on heigh.
XVII
And sisters do not mourn for me,
Or for me do not cry
For I am not too good for heaven
Nor am I afraid to die.
XVIII
The last words that Pat Boylan spoke
Would render the heart like stone
He said "God be with you, my mother dear
You are now left alone
"I hope you will not weep for me
Or in your silence cry
I am not too good for Heaven
I am not afraid to die".
XIX
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:48
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The day of his sad funeral
It was a grievous sight
To see men from every Parish
To Drumloman taking flight
XX
There was Lavey, Lara and Killincere
Denn and Crosserlough
Mullaghoran Ballentemple and the boys of sweet Kilmore.
XXI
The remains pf Patrick Boylan
That they under shoulders bore
They brought to Drumkilley,
Laid him by his side
And many a tear was shed for Boylan.
XXII
With weary limbs and broken hearts
Each one returned home
To comfort the poor widow
Who lost her only son
XXIII
See cruelty as you may see
Death took from us our joy
For the sun it never shone
Upon a nobler hearted boy.
XXIV
I hope he is in heaven nopw
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:42
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With the angels round him sing
For the soul of Patrick Boylan
Was never stained by sin.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:41
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XI
"Alas," he cries,
"I am shot my boys,
And at me you may laugh."
XII
They brought him to a neighbours house
Took his coat and waistcoat off
The neighbours all assisted
Each one did all they could
But human aid was useless
To stop the flowing blood.
XIII
The priest and doctor
Were sent for
They came just at a call
But all their skill
Or genius work
Could not find out the ball.
XIV
For three long days in agony
He suffered pain and woe
With his bed surrounded
Night and day
By the dominions of the law.
XV
To seek for information
Those boys came with speed
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:38
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awaiting decision
I (P. Connaughton) got those charms from an old woman on condition that I should not disclose her name. Letter (a) she states can be done even at the present time (& should not be printed for the public)
BUTTER;
(a)
Skim the water off the drinking pool from which the cows drink, with the buttermilk porringer and fill a milking pail - take the water home & put some of it into the first churning. During the skimming it must be said "The cream of this farmer is mine"
This must be done at day-break on May morn.
(b)
Tie a woollen thread (yarn) from tráithnín to tráithnín around any "bó páirc" on May morn Any cows coming inside that yarn before sun set of that day her butter goes to the family who tied that yarn.
(c)
Take a piece of clay or mud from between the crúibín of the cow & place that piece under the churn for the first churning. This to be done May Day.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:37
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awaiting decision
For a shooting match did go.
VI
He charged his gun five fingers long
Woth powder and with ball
But little was his notion
It would prove his own down fall.
VII
There was a young man in the crowd,
Said "Boylan, "Load for me"
"Here is my gun my hands are cold"
"I give it unto thee"
VIII
He reached to take his comrade's gun.
To load it then he tried.
He placed his own gun on the ground
With the muzzle by his side.
IX
The trigger flew by magic
As every one may see
And in the twinkling of an eye
Took Boylan's life away.
X
As soon as the report was heard
Each one returned round.
Pat Boylan like an oak tree
Lay dying on the ground.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:31
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awaiting decision
I
Assist me now you muses,
Till I discourse my quill,
Those mournful lines which I pen down,
Would make your blood run trill.
II
It is on the death of a young man,
Who received his death by accident
In 1887.
III
His name was Patrick Boylan
His age was scarce eighteen,
He was one of the finest young men
That ever your eves has seen.
IV
His height was six feet and one half
His weight full eighteen stone
He was an ornament of beauty
Widow's only son.
V
It was on the sixth of January
In the dept of frost and snow,
Pat Boylan with his dog and gun
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:26
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awaiting decision
Shane Burns was a very strong man who lived in former days. When his horse gave up on the roads he did nothing but take him from under the cart and draw it himself. A certain man hearing of Shane's prowess came one day to the forge to challenge Shane to fight On reaching the forge he asked for a match to light his pipe. Shane had no match but taking a red coal from the fire he placed it on the anvil and taking the anvil reached the coal to his opponent on horseback. The opponent on seeing this went away without challenging Shane.
It happened that on another day while at the bog his brother's horse went bogging. This brother was stronger than Shane and while Shane was endeavouring to release the horse his brother was pulling back the horse. When Shane learned what his brother was doing he went home and died of a broken heart, first saying to his brother "Alright so you'll be without a brother."
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:22
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awaiting decision
There is a crock of gold hidden in a fort three fields from the main road in John Smith's
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:20
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awaiting decision
God knows if I'm telling a word of a lie"
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:17
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awaiting decision
heard that she wasn't their they were very troubled. At last they thought of the boghole where they found her body. The parent's deeply regretted their loss.
A boy named Tierney of Carnagh was drowned in a boghole in Carnagh bog. It is said that he and his comrade were jumping bogholes and he slipped in. It is also said that when putting a bag of turf up on his back it hit against a clamp of turf and knocked him into a boghole.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:11
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broken during this storm. The thunder was followed by a down-pour of rain which flooded the most of the land. A house belonging to Mr. James Harten of Urble was flooded. This storm lasted only for three hours and it was terrible how such a flood could rise in that short time.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:09
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awaiting decision
The name of the tailor that is in this district is Mr. Peter Halton Drumhoura. He sews at his home but does not travel from house to house. He does not stock cloth but some tailors in the towns stock it yet. Cloth is not spun locally.
The tailor uses a sewing machine, a scissors, a tape, a thimble, a needle and a smoothing iron. Shirts are made in some of the homes yet from linen or flannelette. About fifty years ago shirts were made from flax grown locally.
Socks and stockings are knitted in nearly every home. The thread is not spun in the homes but is bought in the shops. There is no spinning wheel in this district.
At the death of a relative black is worn. Some people wear a black band on their arm.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:03
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 17:02
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awaiting decision
dance. If they got a penny they would go a way satisfied.
This is called the "Brighidogs" because Brighid means Brigid. The origin of this is supposed to be when Saint Brigid was on earth she was so kind and generous that she gave something to the poor and the stranger and even if she had nothing to give them she begged from the rich people for them.
Long ago they used to bring a rag doll by the way it was a baby that they called Brighidog and were begging for it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 16:54
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This is the way the feast of Saint Brigid is celebrated in this locality.
On the first of February boys and girls amuse themselves by going round from house to house and from village to village gathering money and eggs and bread when they could get it.
The boys dress themselves in girls' clothes and straw hats and false faces and they carry some musical instruments with them. Then one of them would play and the others would
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 16:51
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caught in the floods
Then up with the kettle and down with the pan
And give us some money to bury the wren.
When the boys would say this they would begin singing and and dancing and playing a mouthorgan.
Then the people would give them a penny and if they would not get it they would ask some eggs. When they had all the money collected they would buy sweets and cigarettes and when they had them eaten and smoked they would return home.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 16:49
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awaiting decision
Saint Stephen's Day falls in the twenty sixth of December.
On that day all the young boys put on old clothes and falsefaces and go about gathering money.
Long ago they used to catch a wren the night before Saint Stephen's Day and put old clothes on themselves and tie straw ropes around their feet and knees and be asking money to bury the wren. This is the way they asked it:-
The wren the wren, the king of all birds
Saint Stephen's Day was
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 16:46
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awaiting decision
In the Penal days the people used to hear Mass on the hillsides and in little back lanes.
Mass was said in Ballinsmalla in the penal days.
There was an old chruch also in Ballinsmalla, and there the priest said the Mass.
When the congregation would be gathered the English soldiers would come and kill the priest and all the people they
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 16:44
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could catch.
The people had to get Mass said at night so as the soldiers would not get them.
They would have people hid at corners the way the English soldiers would not come on them.
When the people would want to get Mass said they used to be very much afraid of the people they would tell.
They were afraid they would be spies that the soldiers would
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 15:01
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awaiting decision
Continuation Of Ballaigne Castle.

Which the hall can been see. On this landing also is the "Murder hole". It is circular shaped in the middle of the floor. People to be executed were bound, hand and foot ,and let drop head first into the hold, and at the end of the opening was a pointed stone, and the person's head, on meeting this stone, was instantly killed. The second floor roofs the castle as the top was blown off. There is a window in the castle that cannot be reached, but it is said that it conceals something, as whenever stones are thrown through the aperture no sound is heard.

To. John O'Farrell,
Gragure,
Shanagolden,
Co. Limerick.
13 yrs.
told by Michael Kelly
Ballyneety,
Shanagolden.
Occupation - A herdsman.
Age 45 yrs.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:56
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Social - fords. Sealein made from potatoes which were grated, and then squeezed through a linen sheet, and baked, served with cream and butter. A (?) dish which used for supper when a farmer's crop of potatoes were placed in pits, the work being done by neighbouring hands.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Social - fords. Sealein made from potatoes which were grated, and then squeezed through a linen sheet, and baked, served with cream and butter. A (?) dish which used for supper when a farmer's crop of potatoes were placed in pits, the work being done by neighbouring hands.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:52
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rejected
awaiting decision
Ruins - Ballaigne Castle.

Ballaigne castle is situated two and a half miles from the village of Ardagh, in the barony of shanid. One mile from my house in Graguae.
It was build by the Geraldines of Munster. It stands in a hollow, and is about sixty feet high.
There are no windows in the castle, only slits about a foot high, and six inches wide, and are about seven feet from the ground. When one enters the doorway, he or she sees the sign of the tar over the lentil of the door of the banqueting hall, because the Geraldines always used tar on the heads of their enemies, whom they had first invited to feast. When they were going in or coming out, tar was poured on them.
On the left, as one goes in, is the stairway. Half way up the stairs is a landing. On this landing there is a hole in the wall through
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:46
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rejected
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Stories Of Giants.

Once upon a time, a giant lived in Tynies, a district one mile southeast of Nutgrove N.S., in the parish of Coolcappa. He had a big horse that used to travel all the land every day with his master. The giant died in the year 1864, and he was buried in his land. One could see where he was buried, because the grave is covered by a flag about twenty feet in length, and six feet wide, and a long row of whitethorn trees, bordering the eastern side of the grave.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:40
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rejected
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Hidden Treasure.

My great grandfather, whose name was Patrick Riordan, Newbridge, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. Had a dream one night. That a man came to him, and told him that there was a can of gold hidden in the hearth of a certain house behind a loose brick. He went to the owner of the house next day, and told him about his dream. The owner told him to go home, and to come next night, and they would search for the gold. He came as promised for it, and he saw the brick was removed, and fresh mortar on it, and he said that the gold was searched for,and he went home.
The ruins of the house was to be seen situated on the lands of Altavilla, on the side of Askeaton until a few years ago.

Told by Mrs. Smyth,
Newbridge,
Rathkeale,
Co. Limerick.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:28
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rejected
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Hidden Treasure.

In the townland of Milltown, Askeaton, there is a certain large field called the Cathar. it was said that gold was hidden there in a stone rath, where the Danes lived, and which is surrounded by a stone wall about seven feet high, and five feet wide.
In the centre of the rath is a large hole, and long side the hole is a large chimney. Some men went searching for the gold, and they heard the roar of a bull, and it frightened them. The gold was never found because a bull or some strange element always frightened them away.
Told by Mrs. Smyth.
Newbridge,
Rathkeale,
Co. Limerick.
Age 46 yrs.
To Mary Smyth, daughter,
Newbridge,
Rathkeale,
Co. Limerick.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:22
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rejected
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charged straight for them. They made away as fast as ever they could go. They went into the castle, and looked out to see where was the bull. The bull stopped where the men were digging, and started pawing the ground. When the men saw what the bull was doing, they started laughing and went out to hunt away the bull, but he refused to go for them. Then he changed from a bull into a man, clad in armour, and he waved his sword at them, and told them in Irish language to go home, for he was guarding the treasure for his master, and could not let it be taken. The men went home, and next day one of the men came back to the castle to see where they were working the night before. He could not find it out, and there was no sign of the stone flag.

Told by John Tobin,
Lisbane,
Shanagolden,
Co. Limerick.
Age 72.
To K. Donovan,
Tubrid,
Shanagolden,
Co. Limerick.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 14:17
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rejected
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Hidden Treasure.
Samhain 5th 1937

Many years ago a man named Pat O'Donnell lived in Askeaton. He was a bachelor, and he was very fond of money. Every day he prayed for more and more, and at last his prayer was answered.
One night he dreamt of gold, buried long side Desmond castle, Askeaton. He told no one of his dream. Next night he had the same dream. So he said if he dreamt of it the third night, he would look for it. He dreamt of it the third night. He got two men to go with him the next night to root for the gold.
They came to Desmond castle about twelve o'clock in the night, armed with a pick axe, shovel and a lantern. The gold was supposed to be hid under a large stone flag out side the castle. The three men began to root for the gold. They heard a strange noise behind them. Looking around they saw a terrible looking bull. The bull
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 12:28
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everyone was guided by this:-
"Those who wash on Monday
have all the week to dry.
Those who wash on Tuesday
are not so far awry
Those who wash on Wednesday
wash for need
While those who wash on Thur.
wash for shame
But those who wash on Fri.
Ah! they are Sluts indeed."
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 12:26
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rejected
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In olden days it was considered unlucky to use and "alder rod" for any purpose.
Above all it was never used in giving corporal punishment to a young offender. (In these days a rod was always kept on the top of the dresser, but it was never an alder rod).
This was because the Irish people believed that the Cross on which Our Lord was crucified was made of alder wood.
When a family had to "flit" that is to change their residence they always selected Friday for the "flitting" as it was considered unlucky to move on any other day of the week
In fact old people tell us it was never done under any circumstances.
Monday was always "Washing day" in this locality (thought we are taught now Tuesday is best so as to be able to soak clothes overnight), but around here in olden days
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 12:05
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Old people tell us how, in their young days the boys around this place had a great time at Easter.
For a week or so before they were in the habit of collecting eggs.
They used to ask their neighbouts for their "cludóg" which meant an egg given as a present.
On Easter Sunday morning every boy and girl in the House ate as many eggs as he or she possibly could - the wonder is how they managed to dispose of so many. (we would now call it "Glutony".
Well that did not end the "egg feast" for as soon as dinner was over the lads of the village all repaired to a field and lighted an enormous bon-fire and roasted eggs till they were tired.
These roasted eggs were all eaten by the boys and people say a roasted egg had a beautiful flavour all its own.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:58
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before the instalment of the system, bore witness to similar cases in their experiene, and my father spoke frequently to us of the "stray sod" of the Manor (the Manor is a townland two miles from Johnstown school.) He said it was of rather frequent occurrence that a belated homeward bound peasant or farmer, having to cross the "Manor fields" found them turned into a pathless, unfamiliar wilderness, by reason of that unlucky stray sod which his unwary feet encountered. Morning alone brought relief and sense of direction to the perspiring, weary, footsore victim of the "The Manor's fairy sod."
Though these tiny denizens of the fairy raths were merely mischievous, and not baleful, the people did not care to encounter them, a fact which allowed the gruesome traffic in dead bodies to go on unchecked. Bodies were needed for post-mortem examination so that medical science might advance, and the "sack em ups" as these who pursued this awful avocation were called later on, could deliver their grim cargo unmolested. If they chanced to meet a benighted traveller, they passed silently as the fairy headless horses, and headless drivers - it required but little disguise to deceive the unsophisticated.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:50
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than met the eye.
Around this locality too, some favoured mortals returning home late saw the tiny dwellers of Kilcarne rath disport themselves at a merry game of football in "Finn's field", which was between their fortress and the village, and is still known by the same name. Sometimes these nocturnal ramblers were allowed to pass unmolested by the fairy troupe but at other times they stood on the "stray sod" and wandered round and round the field till daylight restored all to normal condition.
That department of the gentle folk whose business it was to bewail the passing of the old Irish made their presence felt frequently. My mother (R.I.P.) a teacher in the village told us of a little woman she actually saw, who sat combing her long hair while she wept bitterly and moaned in a loud weird manner outside a cabin occupied by a Mrs Clarke and a family of four. The eldest of her girls died that night, and soon after the weird cries were again heard in the village as another person of the same name, tho' only a distant relative, lay dying.
My father and grandfather (R.I.P.), both teachers in same parish - (the latter was one of the first batch of N.T's appointed in having taught a hedge school
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:41
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Sometimes we looked on the Kearneys with envy, but more often still we mentally thanked Fate that they, not ourselves occupied that "gentle" house at the foot of Kicarne Hill, a half mile or so from the Johnstown school, where with youthful eyes dilated with wonder, and mouth agape with awe we listened (more attentively than we were wont to attend to the teacher's words I fear) to the hair raising stories of the antics of the wee people who had their home in the great rath (still to be seen in front of this house.)
Mother's thimble was lost last night - taken from underneath her nose and eyes - and then discovered where it was, where she left it, and where it was not a few minutes before. Her "finding" of it was the signal of a merry burst of fairy laughter from some other part of the house.
At other times the cake on the griddle was turned by unseen hands at the right moment, while oftener still members of the "gentle people" neither usefully no humourously inclined, would mischeivously bang doors "all through the night."
Credulous as we were at that time of our lives we would be inclined to take all this with a grain of salt had not the two succeeding families who occupied that storied house found that there were more within those walls
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:32
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Mr. Courtney the local blacksmith sometimes makes use of stange words when at his work especially when shoeing wheels.
He tells us that he got his formula from his granfather who was also a blacksmith when hammering on the iron he repeats these words
"In mudelis
In caynónis
In furtáris
In óknónis"
When "translated" this very mysterious rhyme reads
"In mud eel is
"In clay none is
"In fur tar is
"In oak none is."
It is said that the mysterious formula was used to impress the spectators who are always to be seen in a forge.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:26
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An old "but" or a rotten tree was growing in the dead man's garden and as there was no fire for those who managed to get into the house by means of a little step ladder each side of the wall, some boys including the late Mr. Collins, who was then a school-teacher cut it, but before long they got papers commanding them to appear in court the next court day in Slane.
This was the bad deed of the old man's enemy, and they were all fined 5/- each.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:22
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About 50 years ago a man who was anything but popular with the people lived in this parish in a little house on the land of Ballinlough.
There were 9 or 10 little thathed houses on the farm along the priest's road and in one of these an old man lived alone.
The man mentioned about had a hatred for this quiet old man, and when he heard that the old man had taken ill suddenly he was delighted and every night he went to the dying man's house and built a piece of a stone-wall until he had the little house completely surrounded by it.
Some of the neighbours sent for the priest to attend the old man but when he arrived he was unable to cross the high wall so the poor sick man had to be carried out on a stretcher to receive the last sacraments and before he was left back in his house his soul had gone to God.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:10
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If one went to Navan to-day she would not see the sights so common in Navan 40 or 50 years ago.
I heard that this day was called "Hiring Day" and young boys and girls who were in search of a "place" as employment was called went out to town and stood with their backs to the walls of shops in the principal streets.
People in search of "servant girls" or boys walked around up and down till they saw a suitable looking person.
Then they questioned her or him as to the wages she expected, her knowledge of work etc. etc.
If all was right the girl or boy was engaged & either went home with the new employer or promised to come on a certain day within the week they were "bound" for 6 months.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:09
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Bleeding nose 9.
If your right nostril is bleeding tie a string to the small finger of your left hand.
Cuts 10.
Cow dung is good for cuts.
Mumps 11.
Put a halter on the person (around his neck) and lead him across running water.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:07
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Corns 4.
(a) Go out walking in the dew
(b) The juice got from a dandelion is good for corns.
Sprains 5.
(a) Get a plant by the name of cumphrey; boil teh root and rub to the sprain
Rheumatism 6.
(a) Get nettles and heat the person until his body is very hot.
(b) eat water-cress
Colds 7.
(a) Eat nettles in May and you will not be sick in the winter.
(b) Drink a cup of hot milk with butter and pepper in it.
(c) There lived in Mill Street a woman named Mrs. Kealy. Every day she used to go to the mountain (Millers Bog) to gather herbs. These she made into a mixture which was good for colds.
Consumption 8.
Get the bark of a certain tree (I could not get the name), boil for two hours with a glass of stout. Let it there for 2 days. Then drink a wine glass of it every morning.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:06
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Since I wrote about "Tops" as a game which held a very important place in boys' lives long ago around here I have head about a man named robert Mullen who lived not far from this locality who spent most of his time in Summer making tops for his youthful customers.
The tops he made were all of ash and they split easily. (The game most commonly played was the effort to split a spinning top,) but boys "in the know" used to bring Robert a bit of box wood and ask him to make a top. This is very hard wood and would not split easily but is was hard on Robert's tools too, so he changed 4d for this top (even though the material was supplied) while other ones were sold at 2d.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 11:03
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Warts 3.
(a) If you find a stone with a hole in it and water in the hole. The water is great for curing warts.
(b) Get a bag and for every wart you have put a cinder in the bag then throw the bag away. The warts will go away.
(c) The white juice you get out of a dandelion is good for warts.
(d) Rub blue-stone to them
(e) Rub a black snail to the wart.
(f) Rub fat meat to them and bury it until it rots.
(g) Rub sulphur to the wart
(h) If you meet a funeral take some of the clay from under the feet of the men who bear the coffin wishing at the same time as you rub the clay to the wart that it may go away.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 10:59
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Toothaches 1.
In the olden days people sought to cure their toothaches by
(a) biting off the legs of a frog
(b) by rubbing pepper to their teeth
(c) Go to a grave-yard and kneel on a grave. Say five "Our Fathers", five "Hail Marys" and five "Glorias" for the soul of the dead person. Take some of the grass off the grave and chew it. Then spit it out. The pain will go away.
Sore-eyes 2.
(a) Relief was got from sore eyes by washing the eyes in cold tea
(b) There is a stream in Ballydaheen near Linehan's lane. This stream comes down from the mountain and is very good for sore-eyes
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 10:35
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as I went up Tara Hill. Tara Hill was shaking four and twenty bull dogs tearing up the nation _ a man harrowing.
The more you feed it the better it gets the minute you give it a drink it dies_ The fire.
Why is a vain girl so much like a drunkard _ Because they are both fond of the glass.
Midy mody round body three feet and a wooden hat_ A pot.
Why does a hen pick a pot _ Because she cant lick it.
What is it that has eyes and still cant see. _ a potato.
A leaper of ditches a clipper of thorns a little brown cow with a pair of leather horns. _ A hare.
What goes up the chimney his head down _ a nail in a sweeps boot.
If a hen and a half lays an egg and a half in a day and a day and a half how many eggs will she lay in the year. _ She will lay 365.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 08:56
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Cuir misé mó seánfhear isteach ins an garraid ag ol bainne reamar is ag ite min oirne Cuir mise ar glas ar a cuid Loirgeanna deoithe agus cuaid mise ag ol leis na buacaille oga
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 08:52
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as I went up Tara Hill. Tara Hill was shaking four and twenty bull dogs tearing up the nation _ a man harrowing.
The more you feed it the better it gets the minute you give it a drink it dies_ The fire.
Why is a vain girl so much like a drunkard _ Because they are both fond of the glass.
Midy mody round body three feet and a wooden hat_ A pot.
Why does hen pick a pot _ Because she cant lick it.
What is it that has eyes and still cant see. _ a potato.
A leaper of ditches a clipper of thorns a little brown cow with a pair of leather horns. _ A hare.
What goes up the chimney his head down _ a nail in a sweeps boot.
If a hen and a half lays an egg and a half in a day and a day and a half how many eggs will she lay in the year. _ She will lay 365.
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 08:44
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Once upon a time there was a man who had a wife who had not the reputation of being a very up to-date house keeper. One day he had a meitheal digging potatoes. When they came into their dinner she had a large dish potatoes set in the centre of the table and a mug of milk for each man. When they all sat down the man of the house, who was at the head of the table saw a large mouse drowned in his mug and looking at his
senior member (history)
2019-12-15 08:37
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She came in and told her mother but when her mother came out the house was half burned.
When the man came home all the house was burned but none of the people was harmed.
7. About three years ago there was a house burned in Tulrahan.
It was Sunday and when the people of the house were going to mass they put down a big fire so that it would not be quenched when they would return.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 23:55
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Mullanboy – Mullach Buidhe – the yellow Hill-top
Tírnagushogue – Tír na gCaiseog – The country of the reeds.
Tiranisk – Tír an Uisce – The flooded country
Cavanweary ?
Coolyslin – Cúl Ísleáin - The back of the hollow
Alt – The knoll.
Calehame -
Cormackilly – Cor Mhic Ceallaigh - Kelly’s corner (of land)
Dresnaugh – Dreasarnach – a place of brambles
Drumbane – Druim Bán – The white back or the untilled back of land
Drumdoit -
Drumnaha – Drum-an-Átha
Dunnaloob – Dún an Lúib / Domh nach Lúib (?)
Gortkelly – Gort Uí Cheallaigh – Kelly’s field
Gontnagrace – Gort na nGrois – The field of the gooseberries

Magheracallaghan – Machaire Ceallachán
Skelpy - Scealpaí – layers of land.
Tullyard – Tullach Árd – The High Mound.
Bohanboy – Bothán Buide – The yellow hut.
Carrick – Carraic – The Rock
Carricknamanna – Carraic na Manach - The rock of the monks.

Cooladawson – Cúl an Dosain – The back of the thicket lands.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 23:36
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Baitín - maide siubhail gearr láidir
Boithrín - bothar cumhang
Striblín - duine ar a bhfuil éadaigh fliuch
Bráird - arbhar úr glas
Dallóg - clúdach ar na súilibh
Gam - amadán
Glám - lán láimhe
Eiris - an lúb i gcliabh nó párdóig
Gad - fáinne déanta as slaitreacha
Bocán - fás na h-aon oidhche nuair a bhíos sé sean
Gibberis - cainnt gan chiall
Paltóg / Dúdóg - buille trom
Láichí - duine cáirdeamhail
Stúc - amadán
Páicí - amadán
Móinín - léana beag sa bportach
Cúlán - ainm páirce
Cnocán - ainm páirce
Bannoc - cáca mine coirce
Maoilín - bó gan adharca
Lúbaidh - ainm ar móinfhéir (ach amór(?))
Scáildí - éan óg gan cleití
Breas - tamall ag an cuinneóig (taom tinnis)
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 23:17
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Pardóg - saigheas cliabh go dtig leat an tóin a bhogadh

Sadóg - pancog tuigh, nó cáca nach n-éirigheann i gceart

Scirlín - féach Raidhní
A Gradh - ag labhairt le cailín
Boiltín - an bata len a mbuailtear arbhar
Bodharán -
Mederán - duine beag feósaidhe
Plúsán - duine a bhíos ag caoineadh gan fath
Straoil - bean mí-shlachtmhar
Gaestín - duine a bhíos ag gaíridhe gan fath
Sipín - bailiuchán de rud eicínt

Crádán - plannda mór a theigheas in achrann in do chuid éadaigh

Buchalán - plannda le blath buidhe a fhásas ar an mbán

Padalán - duine mio-stuamdha (féach Budarán)
Flaitheamhail
Miotán - duine le laimh beag
Ciseán

Clábar / Glár - cré agus uisce meascuighthe tré na chéile
Slean / Sleaghan - spád móna
Caimín - ceann cam ar bata
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 23:07
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Laidh - saigheas spád
Maidis - tlú

Gabán - clúdach ar béal laoigh óig.
Céarduidhe a fhoghluim a chéard as a stuam fhéin

Arcán - duine an bheag
Bucán - lúb ar geata nó ar doras chun é dhúnadh

Beirtín - ualach beag ar an druim
Nuair a bhíos gach rud i gceart ag duine deritear "tá a BHEIRTÍN ceangailte aige"

Ceolán - duine gan mhaith
Batán - cnap beag féar nó cóchain
Buncán - cnap beag sa bpáirc
Salach
Banham - muc óg
Caesóg (?) - cráin mhuice óg
Raidhní - duine tanaidhe
Coinlín - bata beag ar lasadh
Páinidh - rud eicínt atá reamhar
Céilidh -
Siubhailthoir - duine a bhíos i gcomnuidhe ag spaisdeóireacht thart

Mar eadh
Clab - béal
Maise
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:55
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Spadach - móin bhán éadtrom

Traithnín - gasracha féir, go mór mhór nuair a bhéas siad feósaidhe

Bacóg - lán an dhá lámh
Sneid - cos speile
Duirnín - cosa beaga ar an sneid
Ciotóg - an lámh chlé
A Mac - ag labhairt le buachaill óg
Práiscín
Amadán / Breall
Pus
Budarán - duine mio-stuamdha

Stibhín - uirléis chun puill a dhéanadh chun sciolláin phrátaí a chur ionnta

Gugger - na sciolláin a chur
Hí - Cearc - ag ruagadh na cearcaibh
Hí - Muc - ag ruagadh na mucaibh
Cruibín - cos muice
Gasún - buacaill
Griscín - giota feóla a róstadh ar an teine

Smidrín - giota beag ( agus bhris sé an pláta i smidrinibh)

Bróg
Spadán - bán a bhaint gan aoileach
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:53
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Seems now an accomplishment worthy of praise
The habits of people have got so much changed
That there's nothing so good as to look half-deranged
When the brutes of the field are let loose from their stakes
They cut many wild capers, frolicsomes and freaks
But a man that has reason and sense in his head
And that acts like a brute must be greatly misled
These acts, I imagine, are not very grand
In any refined, civilized or Christianized land.
It appeared the whole frolic was learned or borrowed
From lunatics embellished or something more horrid
So no matter what luminaries or chroniclers paint.
This land is no longer an Island of Saints.
So I saw to it that the half-set ear(?) that I conclude
The dance is both awkward, disgustful and rude
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:50
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To you light-footed trippers that are fond of a tune
And goes searching for fun by the light of the moon
Go ahead and don't cease in your course to advance
Till you meet what is termed that terrible dance
For in all this wide world you could not admit
A stranger display than this boorish half-set
And in distrustful lodges the game is conceived
And in its performance great numbers believed
In towns and in villages you can see there
The half-set or whole set performed with care
Yes, befating bullies unfavoured with grace
With instincts immoral, impious, and base(?)
Those swaggering gehts show their armorous taste
By catching their co-partner sometimes by the waist
The hands are more commonly used than the feet
Which looks most, most indelicate and indiscreet
If memory has not my black head forsook
I heard a tune played called the One-horned Buck
And it was played by music men
Yet no other tune fits this gentle half set
When formerly dancing a gig or a reel
The music was timed by the toe and the heel
But now it is a pluck and a drag
And a haul without any attention to music at all
You need not observe either carriage or care
You can Glaum like a maniac or hug like a bear
You can lash like a stallion or star(?) like a buck
Or crouch like a spaniel or bow (?) like a duck
So what was regarded as nice in past days
Seems now ......
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:27
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awaiting decision
have set there, and then they would tell the soldiers when the people would have Mass said again.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:24
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their houses down in hollows after that. There was a great thunder storm a great many years ago.
It got so dark that the people had to light their lamps.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:23
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was a house burned which belonged to Michael Waldren of Cloontumper.
The soldiers were searching the house to see if there were any soldiers hid in it.
The black and tans were drunk and they stayed around the house for a long time.
They started smoking and they threw a match away.
It was not quenched and the thatch took fire.
It continued to burn and the people got up and tried
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:21
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to quench it.
They could not quench it and the house was burned but none of the people were harmed.
6. About three years ago a house was burned.
It belong ed to martin Hunt of Derryfad, Knock.
It was a very windy day and the sparks flew up and caught the thatch.
The man was gone to the fair on that day.
The little girl was out and she saw the blazes on the house.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:18
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She came in and told her mother but when her mother came out the house was half burned.
When the man came home all the house was burned but none of the people was harmed.
7. About three years ago there as a house
burned in Tulrahan.
It was Sunday and when the people of the house were going to mass they put down a big fire so that it would not be quenched when they would return.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:11
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When they came home the house was on fire as well as the stack of hay that was near the house.
It was a thatched house and the thatch went on fire.
All the neighbours tried to quench it but they were not able.
It was burned to the ground.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:10
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morning they saw the last of it smouldering away.
It was not known who did it but the guards were in search of the person and could not find any body.
There was a house nearby burned on Thady Kelly long ago, but the neighbouring people helped to quench it.
It was a ciggarette a cross boy threw up on the thatch that caused it to go on fire.
5. In the time of the black and tans
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:08
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he threw the match in the straw to quench the match.
Then he came out and locked the door and went off to the fair.
In about a half an hour the barn was on fire and it was burned to the ground before anyone could stop it.
4. There was a rick of hay which belonged to Peter McNieve burned on new years night. When the people were coming to mass in the
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:04
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The black and tans were watching the place and they set fire to the hay to keep themselves warm in the bog during the night.
3. About ten years ago John Smyth's barn was burned in Liscolman.
He was going to the fair and he went out in the morning before he went to the fair to lock the barn door.
When he reached the barn he went in and lit his pipe and
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:03
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in a field to dry. Then men would come and pound it and the women used to clove it. A hackle was pulled through it and the remainder was made into linen which was used for making shirts and sheets. Householder's used make their own laces from linen threads and dye them with copperas and bogwood. They used always spin thread for the making of stockings which was on a small scale.
There is no cloth spun or woven nowadays in this locality.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 22:01
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It was said that it was sprinkled with petrol and set fire to.
It burned fiercely for a few hours, then eased but it kept smouldering away for two days and it was completely distroyed.
It was never built again.
2. After the ambush in Hollywell in the year nineteen and twenty there was a rick of hay which belonged to Paddy Grogan of Cloontumper burned.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:57
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blue lights in the fire it is a sign of wet weather.
10. If the clouds are dark it is said to be the sign of rain.
11. When the cat lies with her back to the fire it is a sign of bad weather.
12. When the dog eats grass it is a sign of rain.
13. When the soot falls it is a sign of wet weather.
14. When the moon goes behind the clouds it is the sign of rain.
15. When stars are bright at night it is a sign of good weather.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:56
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There is only one local tailor residing in the village. He always works in his own house.
There were a lot of old tailors residing here long ago such as :-
Michael Fitzgerald, William Fitzgerald, John Fitzgerald, Maurice Roche and John McAsthy. The tailor uses a scissors and a sewing machine and a tape for measuring cloth, a chalk and needles.
The tailor never stocks the cloth but people purchase it in shops.
There is no cloth spun or woven nowadays. Grey tweeds were the types of cloth used.There were woolen articles made here locally. The wool was first was first taken to the mill to be carded. Then it was brought home and made into thread and sent to the weaver. The local weaver was John Linehan.
Flaxen sheets were always made in this district. The flax was cut and then put into a bog-hole. After remaining there for some time it was taken out and spread
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:54
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awaiting decision
16. When there are a great many colours in the rainbow it is the sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:54
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they fly close to the ground rain is very near.
5. When sea-gulls gather on the land wet stormy weather is coming.
6. When stars grow dim rain can be expected but when they twinkle and look sharp it denotes frosty weather.
7. Croaking frogs are a sign of wet weather.
8. When the smoke goes up straight out of the chimney it is said to be a sign of fine weather.
9. When there are
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:51
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1. Red clouds in the west at sunset especially when they are tinged with purple portend fine weather.
2. A coppery or yellow sunset portends rain but the surest sign of wet weather is a halo round the moon.
3. A rainbow in the West tells us the bad weather is coming and when in the East the bad weather is passing away from us.
4. When swallows fly high fine weather is expected but when
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:48
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that he would give them any three wishes they would ask.
When they would go into the fair and he went on his way the man and woman were very happy for the gift the fairy had given them and getting up set out for the fair immediately talked about what would they do with the three wishes when they arrived at the fair. It was only just starting together and they decided to wait for a while.
The old woman took a special interest in one stall which
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:45
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cake and gave a piece to her old man and took a piece herself and both of them started eating. Then up came an old man with a stick and bade them good-morning and asked them for a piece of bread saying he was both tired and hungry. The old lady gave him a piece of bread and told him to sit down and to eat it, which he did.
Having eaten it all the old woman offered him more, which he refused, blessing the old man and woman for their kindness.
He told them
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:44
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purse but lost courage, and the little lutharagan disappeared. Recently a "banshee" was heard in my locality. She foretells and laments the approaching death of a member of the family. She can be heard "keening" around the house on a lonely night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:40
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The name of the Leipreachan locally is "Lutharagan". This lutharagan is supposed to be a little dwarf about the size of a man's fist. He is a cobbler, and is to be seen sitting under a plant or a mushroom working away at his shoes. He is supposed to have a purse of gold, and this is the reason people are so anxious to catch him, but, they never succeed he is always too clever for them. He wears a three-cornered scarlet hat, trimmed with gold lace, and a knee breeches. He has a jug of beer, by his side and a pipe in his mouth.
One fine summer's night my Uncle Patrick Duane was returning home having spent the night gambling in a farmer's house. In a sheltering nook under a bush whom did he see but a little lutharagan working away at an old boot about the size of a thimble. He was singing the "Foggy Dew". He spoke to him. My uncle tried to grasp the
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:22
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Tá lios fa gcodla I nGort na Muc, agus tá Caiseal Carrach I dTuillid, agus tá Dún Mhurrin I n-Oileán. Tá trí rathanna fósta ar an lairigean.
Tá siad uile go léir I radharc a chéile. Tá siad uilig cruinn, agus tá claidhe agus banc cré thart ortha uilig. Tá poll I lios fa gCodla, agus deirtear go dteachaidh sgaifte fear isteach ann uair amháin agus gur thuit clocha anuas agus b’éigean dóbhtha pilleadh amach as arís. Fósta chuaidh sgaifte de na scolairí isteach giota maith sa lios céadna ach níor tharluigh rud ar bith dóbhtha.
Deirtear gur na gaedhil a rinne iad agus go dearnadh iad I n-aimsir na lochlannach. Ní rabh bealaigh móra ar bith ann an t-am sin, agus thugadh an námhaidh isteach bealach na fairrge I dtolamh. Muinntir an cheanntair a chomhnuigheadh ionnta. Bíonn cait le feiceál thart fa lios fa gcodla. Lucht faire a mbíodh in a gcomhnuidhe I lios fa gcodla agus bhíodh siad ag coimhead Caiseal Carrach nó Carrach an taoiseach a bhí ar an cheanntar.
Níor réabadh agus níor tréabadh aon ceann aca ariamh. Chonnaictheas soillse comhgarach don cheann I lairigean, acht níor chualaidh aon duine ceól istoigh I h-haon cheann aca ariamh.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:20
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Lag na Fola.
In aimsir na bPún dlighthe cruinnigh na daoine uilig lá amháin thuas ins an chnoc. Bhí sagart leobhtha agus thoisigh sé ag rádh an Aifrinn. Chualaidh na saighdiúirí go rabh siad sa cnoc agus d’imthigh siad ar a lorg. Marbadh mórán daoine agus doirteadh mórán fola agus ariamh ó shoin tugadh “Lag na Fola”, mar ainm
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:19
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Sgreig Mhór
Oidhche amháin bhí fear ag teacht abhaile o na Cealla Beaga. Nuair a bhí sé ag teacht aníos chonnaic sé rud mór dubh agus dhá adhairc air, I lár an béalaigh mhóir ag Sgreig Mhór. Thionntuigh sé arais agus chuaidh sé síos fa choinne an t-sagairt.
Tháinig sé aníos agus chuir sé an diabhail isteach ins an Sgreig, agus le comhartha go bhfuil sé ann tá cros ins an áit a dteachaidh sé isteach.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:05
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wake the dead.
36. Two R's two M's, two A's and a G. Put them together and spell it for me.
Ans. Grammar
37. What is full and holds more?
Ans. A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 21:00
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near Newmarket.
Kiskeam bridge was falled about eighty years ago. There was a big flood and there were only two eyes in the bridge. The flood was so big that it flowed out over the bridge and falled it. It was about the road and no one could pass. When the flood had gone down there was another eye made in the bridge.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 20:58
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There was a very big storm long ago. It happened the 5th of January 1839. It lasted for one night and that was Little Christmas Night It carried away barns and hay. It falled houses, it killed animals, and blew oats up in the air. It took slates and zinc off the houses.
There was another storm on big Christmas Night in the year 1928. There was no sign of the coming of it. It did an amount of damage in my district. It blew away Mrs John O Sullivans barn. It took slates off the houses.
There was a thunder storm in the year 1908. It killed a girl in Knocknacurra. She was coming home from a bog and she had a gallon in her hand. A flash of lightning struck her.
Michael Riordan of Glounreigh was drinking a cup of tea and with the shock of a flash it threw the cup out of his hand. It killed a calf outside in his yard. There was very heavy rain in the year 1928. It lasted for one night. It drowned two children. There was a poor man living in a house near the river Dallua. When they were all in bed the river over flowed and it went into the house. There were two of his children drowned. They were Fitzgeralds and they were living up
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 20:48
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sticking on to their hoofs, and even the people should put cloths round their legs to keep them from falling. There were often broken bones after a bad frost. Birds suffered most from frost and snow. People would put out bread crumbs and meal on the window sill to the little birds.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 20:46
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There was a blizzard in February 1933. There was a cruel hard wind with sleet and snow. The snow stayed on the ground for a few weeks in some places. Big high mounds of it were to be found. There was heavy frost which kept the snow so long on the ground. Cows were not able to go out for a brink, the water had to be taken into the stalls to them. The storm did great harm. It took the roof off several houses and injured several cattle. The frost was so hard that it would freeze the coat on your back and the hair on your head.
In old days, there was heavier snow, it used to stay on the ground, much longer than now. People used to make paths with a shovel to the stalls, and to the wells.
If they had not enough of food they borrowed from one another.
The floods caused much damage in this country. They often swept away hay and crops, off the fields and in the low lands, small houses were often tumbled down. In past days there was much heavier snow and frost than now. Horses were not able to travel with the snow
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 20:39
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There was a great storm there about six years ago. It falled sheds and blew slates off houses. It falled trees and did other damages.
That storm was in 1933 in the month of September. It held for two days. There was a ship lost going to England. There was a great thunder storm in 1934. The thunder was very great and there was also great rain. There was a cow killed in Cnoc na Neach.
The owner of the cow was John Angland. There were two winds of hay burned. There was a great flood about four years ago. There was great storm and rain the night before. A horse belonging to Denis Casey was feeding in the inch. When the horse came to the gap he backed into the river and every part of him was covered except his head. It held a day. There was no damage caused. There was a great snowfall in 1931. People had to make passages to go anywhere. The snow held for three days. Many animals were perished after those three days. There was a great drought that Spring The heat that was there was unnatural.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 17:07
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There were two men near Tinnerath building a ditch one day. They removed a white hawthorn that grew in the corner of the field. That night one of the men had a thorn in his hand he thought. The farmers wife could see no thorn. They left the ditch alone for a fortnight. The man's hand was very sore all the time. The farmers wife made them go this day and put back the hawthorn and in the morning his hand was as well as ever.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 17:00
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There was a man living near Nash. Some years ago he tilled a part of a rath. One evening he was digging some of it away and a hen and chickens came out of a hole in the ditch and attacked him, he had to clear out and leave the Rath alone after that.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:58
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powers an' I bet you you couldn't go in this box". The divil went in and the fifty young fellas followed im. The smith wouldn't let im an' the divil asked 'im to let 'im out an' that he wouldn't come back for another ten years. The smith did so The ten years weren't long goin' an' the divil came along, an' the smith forgot all about the apple tree an' he locked the dure an' was goin off. When they were passin' be the apple tree teh divil went up for an apple an' o' coorse he couldn't get down. He was there for two months, an' at last the smith let 'im down. The divil never came back again an' the smith lived happy ever afther.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:53
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a snuff box an she said that whoever went into that box couldn't leave it until he'd tell im. When she was goin' away she said, that anywan who went up on his apple tree couldn't leave it until he'd tell 'im. When the ten years were up the divil came along. The blacksmith told im to sit on his armchair. The divil did so an' the blacksmith dilly dallied as long as he could an' the divil couldn't get out of the chair an' he asked the smith to let 'im go an' he wouldn't come back for another ten years. The smith let 'im go. The ten years werent long goin' again an' the ould fella an' fifty young divils came along. The ould boy wouldn't go in so the young divils went in. The blacksmith kept the young fellas within for a long time an' at last the ould fella went in. The smith said to 'im "You've great
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:44
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There was a blacksmith livin' in the Co Wexford wan time an' he was very poor. Wan day a gentleman came ridin' on a horse to the forge dure, he asked the blacksmith to shoe his horse, an' the blacksmith did it, an' the blacksmith asked 'im for his pay, an' the gentleman gav im a hundred pounds for doin' it but he said "You'll have to come with me in ten years for I'm the divil. The blacksmith said he would. But before the ten years were up an angel came to the blacksmith an' she said to 'im "You've got very rich lately, there must have been somewan here who gav you money". The blacksmith said that the divil was there. The angel said that he shouldn't have took anythin from the divil. The blacksmith said that he didn't know twas the divil until he had the horse shod. The angel gav him
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:36
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There is a field near Meylerspark, There is a path in the middle of it. Often people going home were taken off the path and shoved down to the ditch. Many times persons who happened to make a short cut that way were left in the field all night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:34
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There was a man comin' from a fair wan day. He had fifty miles to travel. He was ridin' a horse. A cat ran behind 'im 'an she followed 'im for ages. The man couldn't get away an' in the end the cat got up behind him on the saddle an' the man pulled 'im down would his whip and he killed her dead. When he came home his wife was making his supper. His own cat was at the fire an' he began to rub her back. He tould his wife about the strange cat he saw an the cat at the fire leapt up an' she tore his throat an say she "That is the king of the cats" so off she ran an they never saw her since.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:26
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"Whist"said Jim "tis goin' to start off now any minit" Jim thought the blade was goin' to cut be itself because Bob said twould.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:24
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There was a man workin' at Bob Fitzharris's (where Lar Doyle is livin' now) wan time. Jim Cullen was his name but everyone called him Jim the Psalmer, Wan day Bob went to Ross an' he bought a new blade an' a handle. When he came home said he to Jim "This is a good blade. It will cut be itself is so sharp Jim". Jim then went out to cut the headlands of the meadow afther his dinner. He put the blade down on the meadow an' he sat down an' bit his pipe. Begor afther a couple of hours Bob came out with the tay an' here was me brave Jim an' he sittin' down in the ditch as contented as the flowers of May. "Well Jim " said Bob "Why aint you cuttin the hay with the new blade
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:13
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When he heard the awful news
And Connors like a devil stood
And made no great excuse
The sergeant then released him
When he knew it was no fun
And the news it spread like wild fire
Round the village of Taghmon
With James Keating and James Cullen
And Eddie Brennan's John
And Connors swore he shaved Kehoe
At twenty after one
IV
He parted with the bobbies
And bid them all adieu
And then he went to Marky Browne
More business to do.
He ordered up a coffin mounted up to date
And Pat Kehoe's age 64 was printed on the plate.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 16:02
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a song about him and this is the song.
Listen to a sad calamity
that happened in Taghmon
When a man named Patsy Connors
Went in to have some fun.
He got drunk and was arrested
To the black hole was confined.
And then to cod the bobbies
Sure the buggar was inclined.
II
He wan't long in the black hole
When he began to shout and bawl
Saying "What the devil is the reason
I am here at all
I came in this blessed morning
The peelers to let know
And to acquaint the coroner
On the death of Pat Kehoe"
|
|III
The sergeant then went to the door
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:56
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There was a man be the name o Patsy Connors from this parish, an' he was in Taghmon wan day. He got mad drunk. The guards caught im an put im in the black hole. Begor Patsy didn't know how he'd get out. Didn't he start kickin an goin mad in the prison an sayin " I was sent in to day for a coffin for poor Pat Kehoe he died suddenly, an' what am I doin' here?" Begor the sergeant had to let him out when he heard this. Sure Pat Kehoe wasn't dead at all an' Patsy Connors went an' ordered a coffin for him when the sergeant let im out. The coffin was taken out to Pat Kehoe's place an' when they were goin' in through the gate they met Kehoe comin out in a jennet and car. Some man made
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:47
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wake the dead.
36. Two k's two M's, two A's and a G. Put them together and spell it for me.
Ans. Grammar
37. What is full and holds more?
Ans. A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:45
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asunder.
Ans. A harrow.
28. How many balls of twine would it take to reach the sky.
Ans. One if it were long enough.
29. A bite and every bite I follow and never a bite I ever swallow.
Ans. A scissors.
30. Tom Tom Tiddle walking in the puddle with a pair of yellow legs and a green cap.
31. Fly high fly low cut grass and don't mow.
Ans A galloping horse.
32. What is deeper than the sea?
Ans. A tailors thimble.
33. What is smaller than a midges mouth?
Ans. The bit that goes into it.
34. The king of Manchester sent to his sister a bottomless vessel to hold raw meat.
Ans. A ring.
35. What is the loudest thing in the world?
Ans. Wake candles (because they
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:37
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awaiting decision
Now as regards objects found in the district I have in my possession the head of a spear or javelin that was unearthed when workmen were sinking a trench for the water supply to the Parochial House. The area where it was found was supposed to be the site of a battle. This spearhead was given to me by the late Joseph Creevy before he died.
The horns of an elk were found in the same cutting and given to Rev. Fr. Collier the Missioner.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:37
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awaiting decision
Ans. The moon.
22. As round as an apple as plump as a ball. can climb the church over steeple and all.
Ans. The sun.
23. As round as an apple as deep as a cup all the kings horses could not draw it up.
Ans. A well.
24. Twenty sick (six) sheep went out in a gap one died how many came back?
Ans. Nineteen.
25. A leaper of ditches a clipper of thorns a little brow with leathern horns.
Ans. A rabbit.
26. Four lillylanders, four stickstanders, two lookeders, two crookeders and a lash about.
Ans. A cow.
27. As I went up the hill of wonders. I saw twenty four blackbirds leaving the hill
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:36
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he was met by the king. After a day or two all was ready for the musical item. When the little boy began to play the harp the king was greatly pleased and announced that he the winner. As the boy was slow in considering what he would have, the king said that he would give him half of his kingdom if he would stay with him and play his harp to him.
From that on the boy was no longer a half starved boy that lived in a hut in the wood, but a well fed boy living in a castle in a large plain. The boy sent for his mother to come to the palace as he was declared the winner and the winner of half of the kingdom. The excited mother came and thanked the king for being so kind to her child. After that they lived a long and happy life.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:34
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As the Rev Mr Falconer Killucan, Patrick Bardon The Downs KIllucan, James Glynn N.T. The Downs, Killucan. Rev Paul Walsh P.P. Multyfarnham
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:33
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great chance to make his start in life, as the king had vowed to pay or give a rich reward to the winner. The boy could not afford to go to the king's palace as he was very poor. He was very clever however, and he wrote to his highness to pay his expenses to the palace.
Two or three mornings after the letter had been sent, the boy lay in his little bed, and the shining beams of the sun seemed to peep through the window at him. As he was wondering what the reply would be, the postman came to the door with a loud knock. It was a letter from the king himself, telling him that he would send for him the following day. The overjoyed boy jumped out on the floor, and went down to the kitchen in his night outfit, to his mother who was preparing breakfast, to tell her of the great news.
The boy got ready for his long journey, and started for the appointed place where he was to meet the kings nobles. When the boy got to the sporting grounds of the castle
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:32
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awaiting decision
The Purdons who were stone masons heard of the offer, and supplied him with the horse and money and so got the estate which contains thousands of acres
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:29
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awaiting decision
There was once a widow who with her son lived in a small white washed house in the midst of a big wood. When the boy was young his father who was a wood cutter by profession was killed by a falling tree. They were very comfortable while the father was selling the timber, but when he died, there were just able to struggle along. The handsome youth who had great taste for the harp, was taught by his father because of his importunity. So after some time of hard work and constant practice he was able to play it like any ordinary musician.
The inhabitants of the nearby town heard of the gifted boy and made him entertain them from the night fall to the cock crow. After some time he was able to live comfortably on the money that was given him for his choicest music. The king heard of the youth and said he would give a party, and all those who could play musical instruments were cordially invited to attend.
The young boy heard of this
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:28
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awaiting decision
the unfortunate people who live in little mud cabins in the bog at Derrymore. He had given them notice but our late Parish Priest The Very Rev Dermot Cole P.P. outwitted him and the evictions never took place.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:28
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14. When is a door not a door?
Ans. When it is a jar.
15. When is a boy not a boy?
Ans. When he falls into the water and comes out dripping.
16. Why does an ass eat thistles?
Ans. Because he is only an ass.
17. Little red Annie she sits in the hall and if you go near her she will roar and bawl?
Ans. A bell.
18. As round as an apple as flat as a pan the whole of woman the head of a man?
Ans. A penny
19. When is a pony like a mouse?
Ans. When he under a trap.
20. Which is the cleanest letter in the alphabet?
Ans. H because it is in the middle of washing.
21 There was a thing but one day old and Adam was no more but before that thing was five weeks old Adam was four score.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:26
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awaiting decision
Mr Briscoe Curristown told me that the Darcys were formerly a catholic famiily. They changed their religion to hold their estates in the time of Queen Elizabeth.
Tyrrell an agent was about to evict
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:25
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Lynam in Porterstown. The ruins of Carroll's old homestead is still to be seen in Porterstown. Some decendants of the family still live in Rathwire. He also evicted a family called Hetherton in Porterstown. There is an old wall along the road which is still known as Hetherston's wall. This family are at present living in the bog at Derrymore.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:22
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awaiting decision
The landlord of the district is Lord Longford whose family residence is Packenham Hall Castlepollard Co Westmeath. It was the Longfords built the present village of Killucan, the Protestant Church and the Rectory. The Longfords are buried in their family burial vault in Killucan Protestant Church. The family came over to this country with Cromwell. They were very bad and cruel landlords. They evicted the catholic farmers and gave their lands to protestants and that accounts for the fact that there are so many protestant families in the neighbourhood. Up to twenty years ago there was never a catholic police sergeant in the village. The protestants still own all the good land int he district and their farms are very extensive. It was that great priest and scholar The Very Rev Dr Dooly P.P. V.G. who succeeded in getting the land bought out
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:20
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awaiting decision
letters in the English language?
Ans. N R G
8. What are the three letters that frighten a fox?
Ans. I. C. U.
9. Black and white and read all over?
Ans. A newspaper.
10. Riddle me, riddle me that over the head, under the hat?
The hair of your head.
11. Why do you go to bed?
Ans. Because the bed will not go to you.
12. Hoddy Hoddy with a round body and a big flat hat what is that
Ans. A pot.
13. A man went out one night and he saw an apple tree. There were apples on the tree but he took no apples off nor he left no apples on the tree and he took one and left one.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:15
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to buy them. It was Mr Purdon Lisnabin Killucan who first introduced the breed into this country. It was found they suited the land and fattened quickly. Mr Purdon still keeps prize Hereford cattle and gets big prices for them at the Spring Show in Ballsbridge, Dublin. Some of his stock have been exported to South America and Australia.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:14
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awaiting decision
1. What is always behind time?
Ans. The back of a clock.
2. What is the shyest thing in a house?
Ans. A clock because it has its hands on its face.
3. What is the difference between a hill and a pill?
Ans. It is hard to get up a hill and it is hard to get down a pill.
4. What is the difference between a tree and an aeroplane?
Ans. One sheds its leaves and the other leaves its sheds.
5. What is the longest word in the English language?
Ans. Smiles because there is a mile between the first and last letter.
6. What part of a fish is like the end of a book?
Ans. The fin is.
7. What are the three most energetic
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:12
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awaiting decision
This district is famous for Hereford cattle. Buyers come from all parts of the country
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:11
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awaiting decision
The ancient abbey or monastery in Killucan was dedicated to St Margaret (so I have been informed by James Beatty.
I am not sure if this is correct but the Rev Paul Walsh P.P. would be able to supply the information) This abbey was destroyed by Cromwell. Mr Briscoe Curristown Killucan told me that the Monument Trees that grew on the roads leading to Killucan marked the boundary of the Abbey properly. They grew by the side of the road about 1/4 mile outside the present village. He also told me that toll had to be payed by anyone passing through the abbey property and it was collected where these trees stood. He was very annoyed when the County Council Workmen removed one of the old Monument trees on the Raharney Killucan road, opposite the boundary of Mrs Reilly's land and Joristown.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:04
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awaiting decision
About forty years ago there were two very big racing stables in this district. One owned by Cornelius Hannon Riverstown and another owned by Mr Reid Walker Joristown Killucan. There was a smaller one owned by Mr Algeron Briscoe Curristown.
Some of the greatest race horses in the world came from these stables for such famous sire as St Gris,, Dinneford, Marmitten and Claronet were kept at the Stables. Thousand of pounds were often given for foals by English racehorse owners. The stables gave employment to many men and the farmers had a home market for oats, hay and straw. Many stories are told about some of the sires especially ones relating to their likes and dislikes for certain grooms. They would whine with delight when one man came into their stable and would be gone savage if another came to attend them. The stables are no longer here and much unemployment was caused when they closed down.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:02
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awaiting decision
by the whole house was lit up with the sight of his eyes. There was another girl goin' down the lane from the dance an' she heard the bull comin' an' she began to run. She went to the front dure an' 'twas locked. She had to come back again an' go to the back dure. Just as she was goin' in the back dure the bull was passin' the front dure. The girl went to wan of the windows an' she saw the bull goin' down the field. That bull is mindin' money in the castle in Terrerath, an' in the castle of Abbeybraney.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 15:00
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awaiting decision
The sky is dark and cloudy when we are to have rain. The sun & moon are dark & the moon is encircled by rings. The stars twinkle (?) & the clouds move quickly during showery weather. The southern wind is supposed to bring most rain, generally a flood. Frost comes and it is followed by storm and rain. Dust is blown off the roads when we are to have rain (in summer). Bees & other winged creatures stay inside (?) in bad weather. When smoke is blown from the south rain is due. It is difficult to keep the fire lighting & the smoke is blown down the chimney then.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:56
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awaiting decision
There was a dance in Kilscanlon wan time. When the dance was nearly over the man o' the house an' his daughter went home a bit o' the way with a girl that was at the dance. When they went near the house where the girl lived they heard the noise o' cattle bawlin'. The man said to the two girls "The people are goin' to the fair very early". Then he said to the girl " Sure you won't be afraid goin' the rest o' the way your self". The girl said she wouldn't. Then the man an' his daughter went home. When theycame to the end o' the Kilscanlon lane they heard a bull bawlin' very near 'em, an' they began to run. When they went near their home the bull was gettin' nearer to them an' they began to run faster. When they went into the house the lights were out. When the bull was
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:54
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awaiting decision
There used to be an old custom of putting flaggers or rushes at the doors of houses on the eve of St Johns Day. On St Johns Day there used to be a big bonfire on the top of the
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:53
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awaiting decision
The appearance of the sky, the moon, stars, the direction of the wind & the flight of birds indicate the kind of weather that is expected locally. Dark, rolling clouds are a sign of rain. A haze around the moon is a sign of rain. Bright stars are a sign of frost. A rainbow in the morning is not a good sign. It is a good sign if seen in the evening.
Birds, especially crows, fly high when the weather is good and low when the weather is inclined to be wet or stormy. The wind is one of the best signs of the weather. The north west wind is always supposed to bring us rain in this district.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:51
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the hollow of a tree.
The birds that come to our district in summer are the swallow, swift, cuckoo. The swallow and swift build their nests of mud in barns and cowhouses or under the roofs of dwellinghouses. The cuckoo lays her egg in another birds nest.
The corncrake is heard in the meadows in summer. She makes her nest in the grass and lays seven or eight spotted eggs. The young ones are black in colour. Some people say that the corncrake becomes a waterrail when autumn comes others say she goes into a hole in a ditch and sleeps the whole winter and spring.
The waterhen or moorhen, teal, widgeon, and wild duck build their nests along the banks of a river or pool. The plover builds its nest in a marsh, The carrion crow or scawlcrow is bigger than the ordinary crow and has grey feathers on the top of its head. Farmers do not like the carrioncrow because if follows young lambs and picks out their eyes.
There are many partridges and pheasants in this district also. They build their nests in rush bottoms or in furze, Woodcocks are to be found in the woods in the late autumn.
Old people say that if swallows build under the eaves of a house they bring luck to that house and if they build in a cowshed there will be luck with the cattle during the year.
Some people say if the starling builds its nest
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:49
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awaiting decision
Why is a vain, young lady like a drunkard? = They are both fond of the glass.
What part of a cow goes through a gap first? = Her breath.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:49
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Mr Katin, an' I'm told you're very funny.
When my wife goes up you upbraid her about the money.
I've dealt in many shops likewise with Mr Mackey
And never was refused tay, sugar or tobaccy
So give her what she wants, and depend upon her honour
Since she joined the royal race and wed the great O'Connor.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:49
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Men who could play fiddles or melodeons were invited to the wedding when the bride and bridegroom came out of church there used to be great cheering. Then they all got up on the sidecars. The men started playing the fiddles and melodeons and the horses were driven at a fast rate to the brides house where there was feasting and drinking all through the day. That night there used to be a dance in the bride's old home. In the early hours of the morning the newly married couple were driven to their new home. Now that old custom is past because all the people are brought to the church in motors.
Some years ago if an old widower got married to a young girl the young men of the district used to blow horns outside his house on the wedding night. This led to many rows and bad feeling between families so the priests had to put a stop to it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:48
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A little, white, round house if full of meat but it has no door or window to let me in to eat ? = an egg
As I went out a slippery gap,
I met my uncle, David.
He has iron nose & timber toes to frighten the crows?= a gun
As black as I am I am much admired,
Men & horses I have tired.
Of gold & silver I am made
And in the field I am laid. ? = Ashes
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:46
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Mr Katin the school teacher kept a little shop in Raheen Adamstown and Paddy O'Connor and his wife used to dale there thats the O'Connor I was tellin' yez about the last day. Wan day Mrs O'Connor, Ellen they used to call her, went for some goods to the shop. She wanted them on tick, of course, an' Katin didn't like to give 'em to her. So he rubbed his hands together, an' he walked around the shop. He took out a great red handkerchief an' gev a great blow to his nose. Then he looked hard at Ellen for a while an' cleared his throat an' sez he,
"Ellen, me jewel, an' Ellen me honey,
I'd much rather see you if you had the money"
but at last he gev her the goods. Ellen tould Paddy when she went home what ould Katin said, and Paddy was ragin' an' wan day soon after Paddy was goin' up the the road an' he met Katin. Katin said "Good Morning Pat". Pat was ready with his answer "Good morning
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:42
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in the world. He bred a famous horse called Irish Ivy. This horse won nearly all the big races in England.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:39
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awaiting decision
Ballyhaw (the townsland of the battle)
There were big battles fought here between the Danes and the King of Meath about 840 or 850. Several old fashioned weapons were found when sinking river Mounds which are either camping grounds or burial places are still to be seen.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:36
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Many people went to from Kinnegad to Tara to Dan O'Connell's meeting the largest ever held in Ireland.
Hodgistown near Killucan, old name Ballyour
Edmenton near Killucan old name BallyEdward
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:27
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"Gods help is always nearer than the door" "Never put off (from) until tomorrow what you can do to day" "There is many a slip between the cup and the lip". "A stitch in time saves nine" "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush"
"This is an ill wind that blows no one any good"
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:26
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Spadach - móin bhán éadtrom

Traithnín - gasracha féir, go mór mhór nuair a bhéas siad feósaidhe

Bacóg - lán an dhá lámh
Sneid - cos speile
Duirnín - cosa beaga ar an sneid
Ciotóg - an lámh chlé
A Mac - ag labhairt le buachaill óg
Práiscín
Ammadán / Breall
Pus
Budarán - duine mio-stuamdha

Stibhín - uirléis chun puill a dhéanadh chun sciolláin phrátaí a chur ionnta

Gugger - na sciolláin a chur
Hí - Cearc - ag ruagadh na cearcaibh
Hí - Muc - ag ruagadh na mucaibh
Cruibín - cos muice
Gasún - buacaill
Griscín - giota feóla a róstadh ar an teine

Smidrín - giota beag ( agus bhris sé an pláta i smidrinibh)

Bróg
Spadán - bán a bhaint gan aoileach
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:25
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There are many herbs in the world such as:- nettles, thisles, dock leaves, turkey weed, ferns, and rushes. There is use made of the rushes such as:- thatching ricks,
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:23
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awaiting decision
Long ago a woman named Anne Fay of Longfield, Lisboduff Cootehill was washing some clothes at a spring well under a tree near in fence in this townland. It was commonly believed that this well belonged to the good people and that it should be treated with respect. The washerwoman - it is said, threw the dirty water back into the well" The moment she did this the well disappeared to the other side of the fence and is now in the centre of another field. The water obtained from it is said to cure measles.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:20
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one of Ireland's.
Great jumpers (d)
(I) Mr T. Leahy formerly Mallow
(II) Mr P. Murphy Carragoone Mallow. This man was a champion pole-jumper in the years 1906 and 1907. He able to jump about eleven feet. His opponents were from all parts of Ireland. Two of his principal opponents were his two brothers, Jim and Jack. Jim lives in Beeing Mallow and Jack lives at Bell's Cross Mallow. Patrick and Jack tied for first place but Patrick beat Jack by a half an inch in the final to gain the championship.
Great Mowers (E)
Mr Cronin, Longueville Mallow. It is said that he could mow over an acre in a day.
Great bowlers (F)
Mr M Shea, W. Scully, T. Dorgan, J. Murphy, they are all natives of Ballymagooly and Rahan. These men have won several Cups in the past. The length of their throw is about three hundred yards.
Many years ago at the "Droumrue Races" (Ballyviniter) a local Dr Barry challenged a man named Wigmore to race his horse which the man did and won by five or six yards (distance 3 miles).
Bill Sheehane who knocked down with one blow a furious bull in the Big Meadow and cried chivalrously "get up son of a gun. I never struck a man down"
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:16
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XIV
On these very banks and contested the game,
Where each lad battled with might and with main
Inch by inch stiffly faught with heart and with soul.
Till home went the ball from field centre to goal
XV
Our battles repeated times o'er and o'er.
With vavried success like Briton and Boer.
When victors at last we in triumph marched home
Recounting our feats like the Ceasers of Rome.
XVI
But those happy days they are gone they are gone.
Gone like the eater that hurry along,
Dancing and bubbling on the bright waves of time
To sink in the ocean of the past sublime.
XVII
Youth passed away and old age cometh on
No change in the waters the same as at dawn
O list the refrain of the song they have sung
You're grown old but the river still young.
XVII
These waters to me speaks treasures untold
By moonlight all silver by sunlight all gold
Reflecting all colours the sky ever knew
From the lining of gold to the azure of blue.
XVIV
Like prophets they'll tell of that ever blessed land
Where bright rivers roll through gold beds of sand
Whose beauties unceasing we'll see evermore
The moment we land on the paradise shore.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:14
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awaiting decision
Seems now an accomplishment worthy of praise
The habits of people have got so much changed
That there's nothing so good as to look half-deranged.
When the brutes of the field are let loose from their stakes
They cut many wild capers, frolicsomes and freaks
But a man that has reason and sense in his head
And that acts like a brute must be greatly misled.
These acts, I imagine, are not very grand
In any refined, civilized or Christianized land.
It appeared the whole frolic was learned or borrowed
From lunatics embellished or something more horrid
So no matter what luminaries or chronicles paint.
This land is no longer an Island of Saints.
So I saw to it that the half-set ear(?) that I conlude
The dance is both awkward, disgustful and rude
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:14
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awaiting decision
To you light-footed trippers that are fond of a tune
And goes searching for fun by the light of the moon
Go ahead and don't cease in your course to advance
Till you meet what is termed that terrible dance.
For in all this wide world you could not admit
A stranger display than this boorish half-set.
And in distrustful lodges the game is conceived
And in its performance great numbers believed.
In towns and in villages you can see there
The half-set or whole set performed with care,
Yes, befating bullies unfavoured with grace,
With instincts immoral, impious, ambase(?)
Those swaggering gehts(?) show their armorous taste
By catching their co-partner sometimes by the waist.
The hands are more commonly used than the feet
Which looks most, most indelicate and indiscreet.
If memory has not my black head forsook
I heard a tune played called the One-horned Buck
And it was played by music men
Yet no other tune fits this gentle half set.
When formerly dancing a jig or a reel,
The music was timed by the toe and the heel
But now it is a pluck and a drag
And a haul without any attention to music at all.
You need not observe either carriage or care
You can Glaum(?) like a maniac or hug like a bear
You can lash like a stallion or star(?) like a buck
Or crouch like a spaniel or (?) like a duck.
So what was regarded as nice in past days
Seems now ......
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:09
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awaiting decision
Strong men (a)
Mr John Rea, Quartertown Mallow. The contest took place at Cork Station. Some Dockers were holding a contest among themselves. An american who arrived on the scene challenged the men to lift six hundred weight. After all in turn failing, Mr Rea stepped forward lifted it onto his shoulder and walked some distance. Thus he won a nice bet at the expense of the amazed Dockers.
Other strong men were Peter Leary, Ballydaheen Mallow and Dan Holmes, Fair St, Mallow. It is said that they could bend an iron bar on their neck and bend a sixpenny bit with their teeth.
Another strong man was Mr J. Logan a native of Ballydaheen Mallow, he could raise a half-hundred in each arm, and jump over two sacks of meal on the flat.
Swift Runners (b)
Mr C. Donovan ex-N.J. Some locals believe that he broke the hundred yards record.
Another Swift runner was Mr P. Murphy Bills Cross, Mallow, he was a very swift runner, and won several clips at big Sports Meetings throughout Co. Cork.
Great walkers (c)
Mr Considine Limerick Road, Mallow. He is reputed to be
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 14:06
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awaiting decision
VIII
Hudson, fair Hudson, the American Rhine
Your liabilities are gorgeous and quasi divine
I gazed on your charms from New York to Buffalo
That magic still wanting that hangs round Bunnoe
[?]
I have been in the east and I have been to the West
But these of all waters my heart loves the best
For go where you will or wherever you may roam
There is none to compare with the Eden at home.
X
I travelled the Rhine I travelled the Rhone;
I lived many years on the Tiber of Rome;
What memories the name of old Tiber invokes
The triumph of kings , the succession of Popes.
XI
She witnessed the rise and the fall of old Rome.
From pagan saw Christian mount up to the Throne
O river of rivers, the sweet Annalee
Holds records and memories far dearer to me.
XII
With the boys of my youth; loved companions of yore
How oft, oh how oft we repaired to her shore
And there from the brink with a good header in
Disported ourselves likes the fishes within.
XIII
Talk of your theatres, balls, music, resorts
Of banquets of games and of horse racing sports
But what can compare for health joy and pure fun.
With the river, the boat, the rod and the gun.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 13:56
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awaiting decision
III
I chased the fond river o'er rocks and trough glens
Watched her kissing fair banks as graceful she bends
Saw her beauty increase with each ebb that flow.
And like fairy queen decked, arrive at Bunnoe.
IV
Her roughs and her smooths from her source to the sea
Crooks, vagaries and bends are familiar to me
Among them was pure bliss in the days of my prime
And I loved them with love that was all but devine.
V
The Frenchman may boast of his sights on the Seine,
Where Paris unrivalled stands out like a queen
Her waters are murky, dark silent and slow.
Compared with the waters that flow round Bunnoe!
VI
The German is proud of his own native Rhine
While rushing through valleys she nourishes his vines
Her scenes may enchant, let him quaff his rich wine
I'll revel at home on this of mine
VII
American waters are lengthy through that heaven blest land
Her 'Sippi extends from St Paul to Orleans
The Indians have named her the mother of streams.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 13:48
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I
Moore sings of the valley where bright waters meet
And says in this world there's nothing so sweet;
But he had never seen or he never did know
The Analee waters that roll round Bunnoe.
II
In childhood and boyhood and manhood as well,
How oft on that river I'd linger to dwell
And watch her expand from fount rivulet and stream
To strength grace and beauty like a maid from her teens.
III
Her charms unrivalled continue to grow.
Through Cootehill, Tullyvin, Rathkenny Bunnoe
Perfected in all as she hastens her run
Through Ashgrove, Belturbet, to Erne at Crum.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 12:29
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awaiting decision
Bean a comhnuig i gCill Mhichíl fadó dob eadh Bean Uí Cheallaig. Do bhí bólacht mór bainne aice agus do gaibh bean suibhail isteach cuichi lá, ach má gaibh ní bhfuair sí aon bhraon bainne.
Cuaidh an bean saidhbhir go dtí an leabaidh an oidhche sin, comh maith agus a bhí sí riamh. Do bhí taidhreamh aici
Cheap sí go bhfuair sí bás, agus go dtáinig sí do dtí na Trí Teinte.
Tháinig an t-Aingeal coimhdeachta cúichi agus d'fiafruig dí ar thug sí aon déirc uaithi riamh. Dubhairt sí nár thug
Cuairdig arsan t-Aingeal. Do cuardaig an bhean agus fuair sí seana cóta a thug sí do comharsan uair éigin. Múch sí sin an céad teine. Cuardaig sí arís agus fuair sí ceirtlín snátha a thug sí do duine éigin cun críoch a cur le stoca. Múch sí sin an Dara Teine. Ní raibh aon rud aici
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 12:04
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awaiting decision
ag cur rópas ar na tighthe nó cuirfead an gaoth an clúdach san aer.
Leagadh na siogáin féir agus na cruaich coirce chomh mai [?] Do thainig stoirm eile bhfóghmhar na bliadhna 1910 stoirm le gaoth ndeas a bhí ag séideadh agus bhí stúcai déanta ag beirt ag a raibh gort coirce le céile aca agus do séid an gaoth chomh láidir gur cuireadh na stúcai isteach i dteannta céile agus maith mar a tharla go raibh fhios ag an mbeirt fear cé mhéid scór a bhí acu fhéin agus do bain siad amach ó na cheile iad
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:59
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awaiting decision
Q x Two N's , two O's an L and a D Put them together and spell them for me?
Ans London
Q xi As round as an apple
As deep as a cup,
All the men in Londonderry
Would not lift it up?
Ans A well
Q xii It is deep and it is damp
And it is green above the bank,
And it is fit for a lord or a lady?
Ans A grave
Qxiii
Under gravel I do travel
Over gravel I do stand
I rode the mare that never foaled
And held the bridle in my hand?
Ans A train
Why is a black hen cleverer than a white hen?
Why does a hen pick the pot?
A flock of white sheep in a red hill; here they go, there they go now they stand still?
One half alive one half dead?
Twenty white cows tied to the wall, out comes the read one & licks them all.
A little ladyeen up there with a white peticoat & a green dresseen?
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:49
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man who had a great desire to be rich.
All the people in his place were rich.
There was a forge nearby but it was old now and it was in the place called the "Richland"
It was in the north of Mayo but it is not known now.
The people said that the forge was inhabited by fairies and that at mid-night they changed everything into gold and feasted for a while.
Now, this man
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:46
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14. What is blacker than a crow?
Her feathers.
15. Under a fire and over a fire and never touches the fire.
A cake in an oven.
16. Flies high, flies low, wears shoes and has none?
A football.
17. Long legs crooked thighs, flat head and no eyes?
A tongs
18. What thing has four legs, a head and a foot?
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
My townland is Maghera, in the parish of Drung, and in the barony of Duracarn.
There are three families in it and there are about fifteen people living in the district.
Most the houses are thatched. There are not many old people living in the district except two old women, who dont know Irish but they can tell old stories in English.
It is a great pity that these old people die, because they are very cheerful and look very happy. There is only one ruin in the district and it belonged to the "Martin" family, and they have all died.
In former years the inhabitants of my district were more numerous
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:42
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rejected
awaiting decision
In the year nineteen hundred and twenty one when the black and tans were here in Ireland many burnings occurred.
When the trouble began the police in all barracks in quiet districts were removed to the towns.
On a certain night the Sinn Fein members burned about sixty of those evacuated buildings.
There was one burned near my home in the village of Redpark
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:42
approved
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awaiting decision
than to-day, and when they got an opportunity they emigrated to other countries principally - America. I have often heard my grandmother - Mrs McCaul say that they had to bring cakes of oaten bread and red herrings to support them on their long voyage.
Some of the land is hilly - other parts consists of meadows and in the winter months they are covered with water, while in the summer they are dry and cattle can graze on them.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My townland is Maghera, in the parish of Drung, and in the barony of Duracarn.
There are three families in it and there are about fifteen people living in the district.
Most the houses are thatched. There are not many old people living in the district except two old women, who dont know Irish but they can tell old stories in English.
It is a great pity that these old people die, because they are very cheerful and look very happy. There is only one ruin in the district and it belonged to the "Martin" family, and they have all died.
In former years the inhabitant of my district were more numerous
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the year nineteen hundred and twenty one when the black and tans were here in Ireland many burning occurred.
When the trouble began the police in all barracks in quiet districts were removed to the towns.
On a certain night the Sinn Fein members burned about sixty of those evacuated buildings.
There was one burned near my home in the village of Redpark
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
horses tied to a stall, one red one came up (up) and licked them all?
Your teeth.
49. Goes in dry, comes out wet, the longer you leave it within the stronger it gets?
Tea.
50. What is the difference between a train-driver and a school-teacher?
The train driver minds the trains and the other trains the mind.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:19
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compared to a member of Parliament?
Because they both have M.P. at the end of their names.
45. Wet and damp under the bank, fit for Lord or Lady?
A graveyard.
46. Why is it useless to send a sparrow for a bushel of corn?
Because she can only bring a peck.
47. What has no wings and can fly?
Dust.
48. Twenty-four white
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:17
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between a scholar and a stamp?
One you stick with a lick and the other you lick with a stick.
41. Why is a patient like a window.
Because they both have pains. (panes)
42. Why is Ireland like a (like) bottle?
Because it has Cork at the end of it.
43. Why is the sun compared to a loaf?
Because it rises out of the East (Yeast)
44. Why is a tramp
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:14
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Heat. Because you can catch cold.
37. Why is the letter k. like a pigs tail?
Because it is the end of pork.
38. Why are girls like bells?
Because you can't know what they are like till you give them a ring.
39. What is the difference between a girl and a postage stamp?
One is a female and the other is a mail fee.
40. What is the difference
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 11:11
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Because both are caused by a blow.
32. Where can we always find happiness?
In the dictionary.
33. What is the deepest thing in the world?
A tailor's thimble.
34. To what question can you always answer yes?
What does y-e-s spell?
35. What has no feet and yet wears shoes?
A gravel path.
36. Which is it heat or cold travels the fastest
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 10:20
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a lazy old mother, twelve little children as black as one another.
A clock.
29. A farmer went out ploughing he had "Done" when he began, he had "Done" when he had half done and he had'nt "Done" atall when he had finished.
"Done" was the horse's name.
30. What is the highest table in the world?
The multiplication table.
31. Why is a bubble and a bruise alike?
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 10:16
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A pipe.
23. It opens like a barn, shuts like a trap, many a thing you think of before you think of that.
An umbrella.
24. Its black and white and read all over?
An newspaper.
25. Why is the letter t like an island?
Because it is in the middle of water.
27. What county can go into a bottle?
County Cork
28. A hard working father
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 10:16
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awaiting decision
A pipe.
23. It opens like a barn, shuts like a trap, many a thing you think of before you think of that.
An umbrella.
24. Its black and white and read all over?
An newspaper.
25. Why is the letter t like an island?
Because it is in the middle of water.
27. What county can go into a bottle?
County Cork
28. A hard working fat [?]
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 10:13
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A bed.
19. Why do you go to bed?
Because the bed won't come to you.
20. Why does a hen cross the road?
Because she wants to go to the other side.
21. Why is a horse stronger than a mouse?
Because he can run away with a trap.
22. Head like a thimble, tail like a rat many a thing you think of before you think of that?
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 10:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
14. What is blacker than a crow@
He rfeathers.
15. Under a fire and over a fire and never touches the fire.
A cake in an oven.
16. Flies high, flies low, wears shoes and has none?
A football.
17. Long legs crooked thighs, flat head and no eyes?
A tongs
18. What thing has four legs, a head and a foot?
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 10:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago the old people had many cures for all kinds of diseases.
They used for the Whooping Cough the milk the ferret leaves after him.
For a sore wrist they would tie a black band tightly around it.
The old people used a little whiskey for measles.
For sore eyes they would bathe them in cold black tea.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 10:03
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rejected
awaiting decision
There are some forts around this district.
There is a fort on Michael Ronayne's field of Lurgin there is a big bush in the middle of it and it is said that the fairies were seen dancing round that tree.
There was a man working near that fort and he got a gold cup and a gold teapot.
There is another in Anthony Smyth's land and it is said if anyone would pass there after twelve o'clock he would see the fairies.
One night someone
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:59
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awaiting decision
was of turned wood she saw a beautiful poundereen which she thought she would like to have and forgetting all about the fairy said"
"I wish I had the poundereen" No sooner that she had said the word, than the poundereen was under her shawl.
Backing out of the town she felt sorry having so spent one of the wishes, but still liked the poundereen.
She set out to look for the old man and when she found him in the street she asked him had he made a wish yet and he said
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:53
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"No", She said "Look what I got." The old man said "I wish it was above in your nose."
The poundereen went immediately where the man said and they had to give the other wish to get it down.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:51
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:51
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him what he was doing there and the man said, "Nothing only making fine girls out of old women."
Then the blacksmith went to bed again and when he got up in the morning he told the old woman what he saw and he said he would turn her into a young girl as the other man was doing. So he brought her out to the forge and put her into the fire to turn her into a young girl but when he pulled her out she was dead.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:46
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awaiting decision
There was once an old blacksmith and his wife who lived in a house on the side of the road and they used to keep any one that wanted lodgings for a night.
This night it happened that it was an old woman that came looking for lodgings
They kept her until morning.
In the middle of the night the blacksmith heard great hammering out in his forge so he went out to see what it was.
When he went out what did he see but a man hammering at the anvil and a young lady blowing the bellows. The old man asked
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:42
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awaiting decision
There was once a blacksmith and his wife and they were very poor. Every thing was dying on them until one night when they were all in bed a man came to the door and asked the blacksmith to shoe his horse. When he had four shoes made he went putting them on and when he had three shoes he could not get the fourth leg. The horse had only three legs.
The man then wanted to pay him but the blacksmith would not take any money from him.
He then went and thanked him saying that he would have luck from
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:38
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that on. So from that time on the blacksmith was the richest man in the country.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:37
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:37
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he would and he tried but failed and tried again and succeeded.
Then the little man asked him what was the cause he had stayed up and he said he wished to drive many nails and to oblige strangers and that was a lie.
"That is the last nail ever you will drive again for I am death, the reaper, and I am reaping with me all the liars and greedy people to-night.
He then killed the man.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:35
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knew this and he decided to stay up and to ask money of the fairies and from that forth he would be rich.
So he stayed up and he was planing a stick until it was midnight.
So every chip that fell changed into gold and he admired them much _ still they were the cause of his death.
Just at midnight a little man appeared with a broken scythe and begged him to put a nail in it and that he would tell him his name.
The man said
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man who had a great desire to be rich.
All the people in his place were rich.
There was a forge nearby but it was old now and it was in the place called the"Richland"
It was in the north of Mayo but it is not known now.
The people said that the forge was inhabited by fairies and that at mid-night they changed everything into gold and feasted for a while.
Now, this man
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:28
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awaiting decision
he could not.
The boy said to the priest Listen to me until I tell you."
"The Father and the Son had a fight the other day and only for the Holy-Ghost they would kill one another."
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:24
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a priest living in Knock.
This day he was out walking and he met a little boy and he asked him could he bless himself and he said he could not..
The priest said look at those three goats.
One of them is the Father, the other the Son, and the other the holy-Ghost.
Every time you pass you will remember how to bless your-self.
The priest met the same boy a few days later and asked him could he bless him-self and he said
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:20
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awaiting decision
fallen asleep and did not answer his call and the bird flew away, with the result that when the minister called and called there was no Holy Ghost. He shouted with excitement "Oh Christ, the cat brought him.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:17
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awaiting decision
There was once a minister and he wanted to prove to the people that he could bring down the Holy Ghost by calling three times.
One day when the congregation were gathered in the chruch he began to call the Holy Ghost.
He had arranged with a man to have a white bird to drop down when he would call the thrid time. The man had
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 09:11
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awaiting decision
Mass there were priests in hiding in every district. Tradition tells us that there was an old shed on the townsland of Meadstown near Dunderry where a priest used say Mass regularly. The English soldiers never captured the priest while he was in this district.
In Dunlough the land which to-day belongs to Mr. Cullinan there are ruins of an old house still to be seen where a hunted priest very often said Mass and administered the Sacraments. Those are among the stories which are locally circulated.
senior member (history)
2019-12-14 00:01
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awaiting decision
Where Walkers lil live at Rath Vale now there was a big shed where hundreds of people went to m mass. Father Mochuda was one of the Priests that was shot there.
Plenty of men went to hear Mass there from Tullaghanogue in that year 1788.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:59
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awaiting decision
to get married they used to go on sidecars to a town and go into a public house and dance till evening and then went home merry.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:58
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awaiting decision
Long ago it was the custom when a boy would be looking for his future wife he would go to the house of her parents and bring another man with him and a big bottle of whiskey especially if he thought he was going to get a big fortune. When they would be married that night there would be a great big dance in the house. After they would be married and when they would be eating their breakfast the bride and bridegroom cuts the cake and gives it around while each person to whom it is given puts some money on the plate.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:53
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awaiting decision
In the time of the |Penal Laws when the priests were hunted and forbidden to say
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:49
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awaiting decision
díol iasg ar an Chill. Lá fliuc a bhí ann agus nigh sé a stocaí sa tobar beannuighte agus thiormuigh an tobar.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:48
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awaiting decision
Tá tobar beannuighte i gCill, agus tá scáthlán an Aifreann ann fosta. Tá roilig ann fosta agus deirtear gur ó sin a baisteadh an t-ainm Cill. Seo sgéal a chualthas ó na daoine timcheall na h-áite.
Lá amháin bhí mangaire iasg as an Inbhear ag
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Q x Two N's , two O's an L and a D Pu them together and spell them for me?
Ans London
Q xi As round as an apple
As deep as a cup,
All the men in Londonderry
Would not lift it up?
Ans A well
Q xii It is deep and it is damp
And it is green above the bank,
And it is fit for a lord or a lady?
Ans A grave
Qxiii
Under gravel I do travel
Over gravel I do stand
I rode the mare that never foaled
And held the bridle in my hand?
Ans A train
Why is a black hen cleverer than a white hen?
Why does a hen pick the pot?
A flock of white sheep a red hill; here they go, there they go now they stand still?
One half alive one half dead?
Twenty white cows tied to the wall, out comes the [?] out & kicks them all.
A littler ladyeen up there with a white peticoat & a green dresseen?
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:47
approved
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awaiting decision
Tráthnóna amháin bhí dhá chailín as Chrainn.cheo ag gabhail abhaile ó na Cealla. Bhí acú le dul thar an áit in a rabh an dobharchú in a chomhnuidhe. Shiubhail siad leo gan trup a dheánamh go rabh siad giota maith ar shiubhal ó’n poll.
Shíl siad go rabh siad thar an chontabhairt agus thoisigh siad ag cainnt le fhéin. Go díreach nuair a bhí siad ag gábhail amach ag Crugoch choinaic siad an dobharchú ag teacht.
Sgannruigh siad, agus toisigh siad ag sgréachaigh. D’othain athair cailín amháin acú an glór, agus tháinig se, ach ní sé ábalta dadaimh a dheánamh.
D’iarr sé ar cailín amháin acú a brat a chaitheamh ar an chloich. Rinne sí seo, agus chuaidh an bheirt i bhfolach i gcúl na cloiche. Shíl an dabharchú gurab é an cailín a bhí ann. Bhuail sé an cloch leis an adharc a bhí air, agus thuit sé marbh.
Ba sin deireadh an dobharchú sin.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:45
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awaiting decision
Leabaidh Dhiarmuda agus Gráinne.
Nuair a bhí Fionn indhiaidh Dhiarmuda agus Grainne bhí siad ar chnoc Cró-na-Nád aon uair amháin. Bhí cailleach ag Fhionn agus innseochadh sí do gach lá cá h-áit a rabh siad. Bhí Diarmuid cliste go leór duithse fosna no bhéarradh sé mála gainimh leis suas go dtí an chnoc agus chuirfeadh se isteach ins an uaimh é. Annsin sheasóchadh siad air agus nuair a thiocfadh Fionn ag amharc fa na gcoinne ní thiocfadh leis iad a fhághail ar an tráigh agus b’éigean do imtheacht. Mar an gcéadna bhéarfadh se ualach fraoich leis síos go dtí an tráigh agus sheasóchadh siad air annsin. Nuair a innseochadh an chailleach do Fhionn go rabh siad ar an fhraoch ní thiocfadh leis iad a fhághail annsin ach oiread agus mar sin de níor beireadh ortha.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:45
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awaiting decision
was passing by the fort and he heard the fairies playing and dancing.
There is another fort in Richard Conways field and one night a man was passing there after twelve o'clock and a mam and calf came out of the fort and disappeared again.
The calf was a white colour and the man was black.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ag cur rópas ar na tighthe nó cuirfead an gaoth an clúdach san aer.
Leagadh na siogáin féir agus na cruaich coirce chom mai [?] Do thainig stoirm eile bhfóghmhar na bliadhna 1910 stoirm kle gaoth ndeas a bhí ag séideadh agus bhí stúcai déanta ag beir ag a raibh gort coirce le céile aca agus do séid an gaoth chomh láidir gur cuireadh na stúcai isteach i dteannta céile agus maith mar a tharla go raibh fhios ag an mbeirt fear cé mhéid scór a bhí acu fhéin agus do bain siad amach ó na cheile iad
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:38
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awaiting decision
Bhí stoirm mór ar an 28adh lá Deireadh Fóghmhair 1927. Tráthnóna breagh a bhí ann agus chuaidh muintit Inse Céidhe amach ag iasgaireacht agus tar éis tuitim na h-oidhche d'éirigh stoirn. Do shéid an ghaoth go h-uathbhásach agus do báitheadh deichneabhar acu agus dfhan beirt acu in a gcurach agus cuireadh an curach suas ar Phort Mór taobh thiar d'Each Leam agus do thainig siad slán as.
Ní raibh fear timpeall na h-áite nach raibh amuigh
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:32
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awaiting decision
One night long ago, as a man was going along he heard a Leipreachán hammering. He walked up to him, and asked him to give him his pot of gold, and then the man said "If you have no gold a little drink will do me, and the Leipreachan said "I dont keep gold or silver or whiskey the fairy there behind you has it. The man turned round to get the gold, but the Leipreachán disappeared. if ever you see a Leipreachán, if you want
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:28
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awaiting decision
a robber. So when the sgeadach died, the people planted a bush over his grave to show that he was a robber. The bush still grows there.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:27
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awaiting decision
The people of Culgar district say that there is an old grave at the bottom of the hill near Cloonfallagh school. Growing over the grave is a small bush and a well beside it. It is said that long ago there lived a lad who was called "An Gasuirín Sgeadach". He was a thief and a robber. It was the custom of the people that time, that whenever a robber would die, to put some sign over his grave to show that he was
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:24
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awaiting decision
When swallows fly high it is a sign of fine weather.
When cats scrapes on timber it is a sure sign of a storm.
When the gríosach is blue, it is the sign of bad weather.
If ants are seen on the road it is the sign of bad weather
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:24
approved
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awaiting decision
WHen swallows fly high it is a sign of fine weather.
When cats scrapes on timber it is a sure sign of a storm.
When the gríosach is blue, it is the sign of bad weather.
If ants are seen on the road it is the sign of bad weather
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:22
approved
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awaiting decision
Beware of him that standeth still, and looketh like a sleeper, where the water the milder runs, there it lies the deeper.
You never miss the water till the well runs dry.
Its a long lane that has no turning.
When the old hag is forced she must go.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:21
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awaiting decision
When some people cut their hair they eat salt so that the fairies would have no power over them. The old people say, that unless you eat salt after cutting your hair the fairies would have part of your strength.
Long ago people put coals under the churn for fear the fairies would steal the butter.
If you hear a hen crowing it is the sign of an accident.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:18
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awaiting decision
If a person went into a house, to kindle a cigarette, he would not be let out till he would quench it.
If a weasel crosses the road before you, it is said you will have ill-luck.
It is not right to look into a looking-glass at night without blessing yourself.
If you go out May Day, and wash your face with the dew you will not get sunburnt for the year.
If you break a looking glass, it is said you will have seven years bad luck.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:15
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If a person was dying, and another person, would twist a habit around his neck before he died, he would not suffer pains of Purgatory.
If a cow was choking, and the first person who would see her would go out, and turn a stone over in the wall, the cow would get alright.
If a person was going to the fair, and met a red-haired woman, it is thought he would have no luck that day.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 23:07
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forced him to go through the ceremony of feasting upon the papers. As they were all enjoying themselves in stall-feeding Butler Father Parr, a Friar from Knocktopher, came upon the scene and relieved Butler of his painful operation, when he had almost mastigated all the processes save one. Fearing a repetition of his unpalatable repast he considered it necessary to apply for and obtain the protection of a considerable police force.
On the 14th December 1831, a strong force was assembled at Kilmonganny from the numerous stations about that neighbourhood. It consisted altogether of about forthy men and was commanded by a Chief Constable, whose name was Gibbons. On the morning in question this body, attending the process server whose unjust duty that day was to serve a writ on Mr. Walsh of Rockhall, proceeded from Kilmoganny to Newmarket, thence to Hugginstown where they arrived about eleven o'clock. On its march to Hugginstown the bells of the Roman Catholic Churches of Newmarket, Knocktopher and Ballyhale all of which lie at a distance of about two miles
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:51
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Such expressions as " Seán Báns Mother could not do it any better" "Doing it like Katty Barry" are quite common in the neighbourhood and are applied to persons who always go the wrong way about doing things.

Another expression "He's like Lana mo Chroidhe's dog. He goes a bit of the road with everyone" is used to describe a person who never disagrees with anyone and wants to pull with both sides.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:46
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senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:46
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need not waste the time coming in to eat again, she did so, and when he had eaten he was about to go up the stairs when she asked him where was he going. He said when the people in his country had their supper eaten they always went to bed.
Meanwhile she went out for a bucket of water laving two cakes of bread on the table and when the man came down the stairs he saw the two cakes on the table. He gave half a cake to the dog and hunted him out the door, so that when the woman would see the dog and the half a cake in his mouth she would think that it was the dog that took the bread. While the woman was outside the man took his journey home with the cake and a half of bread quite satisfied with himself and the trick he played on the woman.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:44
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The name of our village is Cill Lucáin but there is no account of who Lucán was or where he came from to this district. Gaelic Scholars such as Rev Fr Paul Walsh P.P. Multyfarnham, have failed to discover any information about this saint. The R.C. Church in Rathwire is St Joseph's.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:37
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There were very few local poets in the neighbourhood of Killucan. The only two who composed verses were Mat McKeogh Derrymore and a man called Garry who lived near the railway station. The songs they composed were crude for the men had no education.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:36
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There are many forts in this district. There is one in Mat Cleary land in Porterstown, two in Paddy Lynams in Porterstown, a big one in Tom Corcorans farm in Banagher, two in Lisnabin, one in Christy Sharrys land near the village. One in Mr Briscoes land in Curristown, one in Paddy Flynn's land in Riverstown, one in James Cooneys land in Anniscannon.
One in Reilly's field at Cnoc Sidhe Bán.
The biggest fort or Rath as it is called locally is the one on the top of the hill in Rathwire. The other forts seem to have been arranged in a circle at a distance from this big forth. People say that Guaire King of Connaught lived on this forth and that his soldiers occupied the others as a means of defence. The farmers never interfere with the forts. They say it is unlucky. They do not like to interfere with a lone bush.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:36
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three times during the day. There is a story told of a man who during the harvest time went around the country when bread was scarce trying for work. The first farmer's house he entered he asked them did they want help for a few weeks, and after explaining what he was capable of doing they hire him for one month. After a few days day he noticed that the work was very hard and that he was not able to stay there any longer.
One day he said to himself that he would leave and go home whether he would get money for the work he had done or not so long as he had enough to eat on the way home. In the house he was working only a small slice of bread was given for the breakfast, dinner, and supper.
One morning he said to the woman of the house to give him his breakfast dinner and supper together so that he
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:35
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There are many forts in this district. There is one in Mat Cleary land in Porterstown, two in Paddy Lynams in Porterstown, a big one in Tom Corcorans farm in Banagher, two in Lisnabin, one in Christy Sharrys land near the village. One in Mr Briscoes land in Curristown, one in Paddy Flynn's land in Riverstown, one in James Cooneys land in Anniscannon.
One in Reilly's field at Cnoc Sidhe Bán.
The biggest fort or Rath as it is called locally is the one on the top of the hill in Rathwire. The other forts seem to have been artanged in a circle at a distance from this big forth. People say that Guaire King of Connaught lived on this forth and that his soldiers occupied the others as a means of defence. The farmers never interfere with the forts. They say it is unlucky. They do not like to interfere with a lone bush.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:25
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The only kind of bread eaten by our ancestors was "whole-meal" - cake of oat-meal or wheat - meal - which was mixed with water and baked on a griddle. This bread was nearly always made up to a few years ago. Sometimes people made a (ch) cake of bread which was called "stampy", this was eaten when flour was scarce. It consisted of a mixture of flour and grated potatoes. People used to bake bread in as bastable without any cover which they call a "ciste bheag".
Many years ago when farmers helped each other to put in the hay it was a custom to give "goody" to all the helpers. A large quantity of milk was boiled and many loaves were broken into it, and everyone was forced to eat many times during the day.
Sometimes no bread was obtainable so that people had to eat potatoes
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:21
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Nearly every kind of wild bird is to be found in the district. The thrush, blackbird, grey and green linnet, storm-thrush, wren, woodpecker, goldfinch, redpoles, skylark, titlark, starling, yellowhammer, wagtail, woodpigeon, sparrowhawk, sparrow, robin, tomtit, bullfinch, crow, jackdaw. The water birds are the moorhen, snipe, teal, widgeon, wild duck, and wild gooes. Then there is the kingfisher, and crane.
The robin builds its nest in the ditch, The skylark in the grass. The blackbird, thrush, wren, goldfinch, pigeon and bullfinches build their nest in bushes. The sparrow, stonychatter, build their nests in walls. The woodpecker and tit build their nests in the hole in a tree. The crow, crane, hawk build their nests on the top of tall trees in a wood. The jackdaw builds its nest in a chimney or in
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:14
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In Mat Cleary's farm in Porterstown is a field called Gleann-a-Halla.

In Tommy Keefe's farm the names of the fields are "Caiseer", Moinín, Páirc-a-Cléir, Puncáin, Tuar, and Breacloon.

In Mick Lynams farm in Porterstown some of the names of the fields are Gaire Moor, Cairigeen, and Mullacultir, (?)

In Mr Anthony Cunningham's farm there are fields called Páirc na Carraige, and Cricín.

In Jonnie Seerys farm there is a field called Cruac na Sinne.. There is a tree growing in it and under the tree there is said to be a pot of gold buried but whoever finds the gold dies.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:05
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There is a holy well outside Killucan. People go to it to get cured of headaches. They wash their faces in the well. It is said that Saint John owned the well. Every evening the Saint used to kneel down to pray on a stone beside the well. It is said that the tracks of the Saints' knees are in the stone. The name of the well is Scarden well.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:00
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According to tradition there was a famous bell taken from the Catholic Church in Clonard, in the time of Cromwell. His soldiers placed it on the top of a mound there but it is said that in some mysterious way it rolled from there into the River Boyne and tradition has it that when the Catholics get back their confiscated property from the Protestant Church there, that the bell will roll back of its own accord to be replaced in its former position in the Church.
It is stated that in the present Protestant Church of Clonard there are two relics of antiquity still preserved and belonging to the time of Saint Finnian. They were the property of the Catholics, but were seized on by the Protestants. One of them is a Baptismal Font, octagonal in shape, beautifully sculptured into named figures representing Saints Finnian, Peter, John the Baptist. The Baptism of our Lord
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 22:00
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in the Jordan and the Twelve Apostles.
The other relic is a stone trough beautifully carved also, and probably used to receive the water flowing from the Baptismal Font.
Clonard is three miles from the village of Kinnegad.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:54
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The four seventh of a chicken, the two thirds of a cat, the half of a goat, could you tell me what is that
Chicago.
How many steps in jacob's ladder?
Three (Faith, Hope, Charity)
Porridge hot and porridge cold, porridge in the pot for a seven year old, if you are a scholar and a scholar you may be, spell me that without a "p".
That
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:51
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Ferret's leavings was a cure for chin-cough.
Rhuburd for rheumatism.
Eelahin for Thawlach.
A posthumus child has a cure for sore mouth.
Buachaill A'tighe for the chin-cough.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:49
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The food eaten in olden times consisted of potatoes and butter - milk. On fast - days Brochán was used. It was made by boiling oat meal and milk.
The people made Súghdeán from the seeds of oats from the mill.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:46
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In Tavanagh village there is a "Killeen". It is situated at the side of a hill. Round it in a circle grows many white thorn bushes. Children under the age of three months were buried there. Long ago, a little church stood there. Mass was said there in the Penal times, but it is said it was burned down. This ground was consecrated, and children were buried there. Three children from Barnagurry, were buried in this "Killeen"
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:46
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(3)
There is a Christmas Story of the little outcast of the bird kingdom. The wee wren which is hunted from hedge to hedge on Christmas Day until he is finally killed to be carried from door to door next day by the "Wren Boys" who solicit subscriptions for his funeral, for his supposed treachery to the Babe of Bethlehem.
When the reapers were questioned by the soldiers of Herod about the Holy Family in their flight to Egypt, they told that the travellers passed when they were sowing the wheat, which happened to be the day before, but which had sprung up miraculously to maturity during the night.
It was then the little Chafer "Wren" squeaked out in reply "Inde, Inde", but of course, the soldiers did not understand the bird informer and gave up the chase.

(4)
It is then that "Mary's little one" the wee robin came into the story. When the soldiers were soliciting information about the Holy Travellers, who had just gone the way, the ground was marked here and there
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:46
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with blood stains from St Joseph's feet caused by the rugged stones, the wee robin busied himself covering the stains over with leaves to hide them from the gaze of the cruel soldiers, and that is how (the old people say) he got his red breast from the blood stains.
That accounts for the love people have for the little red-breast which gets so much care and attention especially at Christmas.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:43
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twenty years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:42
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There is an old graveyard in Castleroyan and a name printed on it. There is another grave in Cultibo, and the name of it is "Cor Duine Marbh."
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:41
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his gold keep your eyes fixed on him.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:40
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When lighting a piece of clean paper in the fire; if it doesn't all burn out, it is a sign that you will soon get money.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:39
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senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:38
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There are four corners in my bed.
And on them four bright angels spread.
Mathew and Mark Luke and John
God bless this bed that I lay on
And if I die before I wake
To God I give my soul to take.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:34
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shoulders came out of the fort and passed him on the road and then they disappeared.
The fort is owned now by Mr. Costella.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:33
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for her and the next morning the Priest said mass on the spot where he saw her and she or any other fairy was never seen there again.
This is a story about Cloonlara fort. Mr. Tarpey, the man that owned the fort, when he was coming home from visiting late one night, as he was passing the fort a funeral of fairies carrying a corpse on their
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:31
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There are a great many forts in this district.
There is one in Belisker and one in Cloonlara.
There are many stories about these forts. It is said that some years ago a fairy woman was seen very late in the night by a Priest in the fort in Belisker and the Priest asked her what she wanted and she said she wanted a mass said
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:31
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Cleary's is about two and a half miles, on the Athlone side of Kinnegad. Long ago there was a herd of deers there. At a certain date each year, they used to release a number of deers, and they used to go in different directions. They used to number each deer. About two days after, all the harriers of the greater part of Ireland, would join in a hunt for the escaped deers.
Whoever would catch the most deers, would be presented with a cup. It is said, that ever since the Fenians this hunt used to be held, and that there was a Fenian bothy in the Deerpark.

The "Bohreen Breatach" is a road that goes through Cloncrave, from Kinnegad to the Killucan road. It is called after a chief that lived there, long ago, named Breatach.

The "Wild Bohreen", is situated about three quarters of a mile, on the Mullingar side of Kinnegad. It is the remains of an old road.

"Killybeg", is an old graveyard in Carberrys field. There are druids and kings buried in it. It is said that there were three kings buried there with their heads down. There is a large heap of earth there, and three headstones standing.
There
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:31
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was a road going through Griffinstown, and the remains of it is there yet.

Towlacht is the name given to the place between Clonard and Tircroghan.

There is a bridge spanning the canal, about a mile and a half, from Kinnegad, and it is called Darcy's bridge. Cloncrave is the name given to a district near it. It was named "Clúan Chraobh", long ago.

Rossan is a place about a mile from Kinnegad. It is named after a chief that lived there, long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:21
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help him to do his work.
In someplaces they used to stay two nights if the people were pleased with their work.
Some people would not let beggars into their houses from other districts.
Some of the beggars carry a little bag for the things they gather during the day.
Beggars are not as plentiful now as they were long ago, because it is against the law to beg.
The names of some beggars are Delaney's, Sweeney's Mohans and Corrigens.
Some beggars were great story tellers.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:18
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senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:18
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In olden times beggars used to go from place to place in big crowds. They used to have no vans as they have now.
They used to make old houses and they used to sleep in them at night, and they used to go round to the houses during the day.
They used to go into every house and ask for something to eat and sometimes they would ask for lodgings for the night.
If anyone gave them lodging they would
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:17
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There is a place called Connemara in Kilmartin's fields. It is called that name, on account of its roughness.

Croca-Dee Ann is a small hill in Park. Park is about two miles on the Edenderry side of Kinnegad. On top of the hill, there is a standing stone, and, at the bottom of it, there is a hole, shaped like a door. It is said, that the fairies go into the hill, by this hole.

The "Sciogarí", is a field in Leeche's farm, at Monganstown. It is covered with small bushes, about two feet high.

The "Bawn Bohreen", starts at Michael Darby's house at Ardnamullen, and ends at Edward Conlon's house at Legar.

Ardnamullen is about a mile and a half from Kinnegad.

"The Table" is a road which runs from the Dublin road, to the Trim road. It starts at Fox's of Hardwood, and ends at Doyles, of Hardwood.

At Griffinstown lodge there was a statue of Adam and Eve, and one Hallowe'en night the statue was taken away.

The "Tochar road" begins at Cleary's of the Deerpark, and ends at Crionions, of Killiskillen.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:15
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went home and his mother asked him where he was.
After that he found out that the funeral he was at was the man that day.
So after that he believed in fairies.
This happened in Killala.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:12
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field.
He soon came to a bridge and he saw a great number of small people and they were carrying a coffin.
He turned and he walked a piece after the funeral.
Soon a man came to him and told him he would have to carry the coffin.
The weight was so heavy that he was not able to carry it.
When he arrived at the grave yard he fell down in a weakness.
When he recovered it was four o'clock in the morning, so he
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:09
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Once upon a time there was a man who did not believe in fairies.
It happened one day that there was a man dead in the village.
So his mother told him to go to the funeral but he went to the pattern instead.
He was dancing all day with a girl and he had to leave her at home.
It was very late when he was coming home and he came a short way across a
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:06
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ring in the salmon and he knew it and he sent it to the lady.
When she saw it she was frightened.
That evening her house was burned and her money lost and she became a pauper.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:05
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that she could not speak and at last she told him to throw it into the sea.
The captain begged that it should be given to the poor, but she had to obeyed.
"God will punish you for this", said the captain, and the lady took a jewelled ring from her finger and threw it into the sea saying "when I see this again I will look for punishment".
This she thought never would be _ but next evening when the cook who was preparing the dinner found the
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:04
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Thomas Waters lives in a labourer's cottage about a mile on the Athlone side of Kinnegad. He is about sixty five years of age and he told me about the holy well of Clonfad.
He said his mother told him that her father used to go up to Clonfad and say three Hail Mary's and drink a mouthful of water in order to cure his pains. This well is situated in James Dardis's land at the turnpike. The turnpike is the boundary between Kinnegad parish and the parish of Rochfortbridge.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 21:02
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can be more precious than some wheat".
So he went to some country where he sought the best wheat that was to be found.
Now, while he was gone the lady could not help boasting about what she was going to get from the captain.
On the appointed day the captain returned and the lady and her servants were on the shore to get the gift.
The lady asked him what he had brought.
He said "Ive brought you the very best wheat in the world.
She was so angry
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:59
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Long, long ago a rich and selfish lady lived in the town of Ballina.
She had many ships and she called to her one of the captains and she told him to bring her a ship load of the most precious thing in the world.
He asked what it was and she said she could not tell and that he must find out himself.
As he was going to the shore he saw many poor people begging for bread _ he said to himself, "what
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:55
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The man went up to the thing that fell, he blessed himself thrice and he struck the white thing.
It jumped up and crowed thrice and disappeared into the wood which was near by.
This happened in county Mayo.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:54
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There was once a man (was) coming from a visiting house and when he was about a mile from home he thought he heard a motor car coming behind him.
He kept on the side of the round and the car came in also.
The man jumped up on the ditch and the car was coming up also and the man jumped into the field.
The car shut off the lights and something black and white fell from it and the car disappeared.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:51
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was the old woman that buried them and he brought her to law and the poor old woman had no witness and it cost her all the money she had and she was always in misery ever after that.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:49
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to the rock she began to dig with a spade.
She continued digging and digging until she dug down.
At last she saw two sheep buried. She was frightened when she saw the sheep and first she thought the sheep were old women and she began to shout loudly.
The owner of the fort came running out to see what was the matter and he saw the old woman.
He went up to her and he saw the two dead sheep. He counted his own sheep. Then he knew that there were two missing.
He thought that it
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:41
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There was once am old woman living in a small little hut at the end of a field in Keebagh.
She was very rich but still she longed for more money.
One night she dreamt that there was a big can of gold under a rock in Liscolman fort, and she made up her mind to get it.
She brought every useful thing that would dig up the rock.
She found it hard to travel because she was very old.
When she came
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:32
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and every year he used to go round asking for "anything at all in the way of the children".
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:31
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When Fr. Grennan was in the Yellow Furze parish one of his parishioners, a young woman took ill and was attended by a Dr. Laffan and Fr. Grennan visited her occasionally.
She died in a few weeks and an old woman (a neighbour of hers) was asked what killed her and this is the funny answer "Between "Grinnan" and "Laffin" they killed her."

Since I wrote about the tramps I have heard another little story about an old man (I do not know his name) from Drogheda direction that was often seen in this parish about 20 or 25 years ago.
HIs wife was dead and had left 9 small children behind her and when she was dying he promised her that he would do his utmost to mind and take care of the poor little motherless creatures.
They all lived with him in a little thatched house on an old by-road
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:18
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On Shrove Tuesday night everybody makes pancakes and eats them. This night is called pancake night.
On Easter Sunday a crowd of people gather together and light a bon-fire. One person brings a teapot and kettle and other things and makes tea and boils eggs and eats them on the grass.
On St Stephen's day a number of boys gather and puts old womens clothes on them and go round to every house. The dance and sing and when they have done they get coppers. If the person gives them nothing they take up the door flay & bury the wren there.
The week before Easter children go around gathering eggs and this is called a cludog.
On Easter Sunday after Mass they light a fire on the top of a hill and make tea and boil the eggs.
On the first day of May people put up a May bush. One of the boys cuts a bush and the rest gather flowers. There are wild flowers and cultivated ones put on it. Long ago the children used to
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:16
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of pigs. It is very dangerous to be on the streets on that fair day because the sellers are always exercising their mounts up and down the streets, showing their horses' speed and stamina to prospective buyers.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:15
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Long ago the fairs were held on the Monday after Epiphany, March the 10th, Holy Thursday, August the 24th and Big Market Saturday which was held on the Saturday before Christmas. This was the biggest fair of the year. During the week before the fair people drift into Athlone from all over the Midlands. Tents are erected in the Market Place and trading used go on even before the market itself began. All kinds of ware used be sold including suits of clothes, bed clothes and various other woollen articles. Cattle, sheep and horsesware sold as well as a large quantity of fowl.
This fair was a great asset to the town, because the people spent a lot of money here, and most of them stayed in Athlone during the Christmas.
Nowadays there are no really large fairs because there is one held every month. The Jan fair is the biggest of the year. It lasts for two days. There are no fowl or clothes sold at this fair. The finest horses in the Midlands, cows, stall-fed heifers and bullocks are sold as well as an average amount
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:11
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it is cured. When a person gets a pain in his side he should stoop three times & the pain will go. A cure for the hic-cough is to drink round the rim of it three times. The cure or heart failure is to drink a cup of hot water before breakfast. When people has a stoppage in their speech. If they go to the sea shore and put a pebble between their teeth it is supposed to cure it. For ague certain people have the cure of it. When a person have it they go to this man, he brings them into a room. then he would go out & after a while he would come in with a spoonful of jam and give it to the person in the midst of it there would be a spider & the person would get better. Another cure for ringworm is to put a fasting spit on it in the morning & bless your self. Another cure for a pain in the head is to dip your head in a well and say "Lord cleanse me for I have sinned" & you will not have a pain in your head for a twelve month. Boil the roots of Hemlock in grease, this cures all sorts of sores. The golden rod is the cure for a pain The cure for King evil was garlic, sut, and lard pounded together put on as a poltice & left on for nine days this was done three times. Groundsel was used as a laxitive. When the plant known as the fire finger was used for reverse results. The second growth of a nettle boiled on new milk is supposed to cure anemia. For to cure ringworm
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:10
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awaiting decision
The market is held on Tuesday and Saturday, of which the latter is the principal when sheep swine and great quantities of gravel are exposed for sale. It is held in an open space under the wall supporting the Castle mound, but the principal meat market is at the shambles near the river and is abundantly supplied with provisions of all kinds. Fish is procured in the lake and the River Shannon and salt-water fish is brought from Galway.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:07
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awaiting decision
The manufacture of felt hats was formerly carried on in Athlone to a great extent, but only a few are now made for the supply of the immediate neighbourhood.
There were two extensive distilleries each producing from 40 thousand to 50 thousand gallons of whiskey annually, two tanneries, two soap and candle manufactories, two public breweries on a large scale and several corn mills. A communication by steam-boat, between this place and Limerick has been lately established, and passage boats meet the steamers at Shannon Harbour and proceed to Dublin by the Grand Canal.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:04
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awaiting decision
There is an old ruin adjacent to the Woollen Factory which was formally an old Franciscan Abbey. There is an old graveyard situated beside the old Abbey. At the time when the Abbey was built it was customary with the people of that period to bury their dead in the Churchyards. So it is not surprising to learn that the Churchyard of the Abbey was converted into a graveyard. When the disease called the cholera swept over Ireland in the year 1848, all the people in Athlone who died from the disease were buried in that graveyard. The people died so quickly that they were thrown into the graves in cartfuls. Two men went round the town with a cart shouting "bring out your dead" every morning. Great fires lighted in the market-place to purify the air. Hundreds of people died in Athlone, both good and bad. John Brennan the local poet put it thus "The pure and the vile all cut down in the mowing".
The graveyard is filled up for years. But it was extended and is still in use. The one family that is being buried there still is the family of Lysters.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 20:03
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to cut a raw potato in three peices and rub it to them. A cure for the pain in the head is vinegar and brown paper put on the place affected. The cure for a thallagh in the wrist is to tie an eelskn round it. A cure for the chin cough is to get a donkey, give him a plate of meal to eat, which must be procured from three different houses, while he ate the meal the child was brought out and put under him three times. Long ago when a child had the mumps the parents would take him out to the pig sty & put him out under the pig three times saying at Hugnamucka Lecknaleckna. After a while the mumps are supposed to dissappear.
Another local cure for the whooping cough was when two people got married of the same name to get a peice of bread from them & eat it fasting & will cure the cough. A weed know as marchmallow is supposed to cure a swelling. A cure for a pein in the head is to eat a wild parsnip. A cure for ringworm is to boil the root of a weed called the farafan & rub it on the ringworm. A cure for the whooping cough is for the Godmother to tie a red string round the child's neck. The cure for a sore throath is to hold the person affected over a pig-sty, and one person to hold the sufferer & another to hold the pigs in order to frighten the child, and when it is removed
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:59
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awaiting decision
man at the back. So one of the groups went first and the man followed them. One of the main would fall now and again till the took him far enough away. While he was away the other group was stealing the fir and they carried it all away.
The man did not take the fir to the fire. They left it a good bit away. As soon as the fire was lit the man came up and sat down at the fire. The men would go down now and again and take up a block now and again and he would say "Throw it on when you have plenty of it" and when he went home and looked the whole of his fir was nearly all away. If anybody had a stack of straw outside they would steal it to light the fire.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:56
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awaiting decision
Everybody has a fire on the 23 June in honour of St. John. On the evening of the bonfire night all the boys in the town gather and gather a lot of bushes. In a big town all the boys go round and collect money and buy oil for the fire. Just when it is getting dark everybody light the fire. An old custom they had everybody puts out a little fire of their own and as the cows are going in at night they throw a coal over the cows backs and they put a coal into every field belonging to them for St. John to bless them. They would lift sticks no matter where they would get them, if you would have any bushes on a slap to keep in cattle you would need to be up and out very early because all the bushes would be away. There was a man who had a lot of fir and it was coming on to the bonfire night all the people gathered and made themselves in two groups and the man and his wife were out watching the fir. There were two doors on the barn, the woman was at the front and the
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:51
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awaiting decision
There is a mass path from Shanna road to the Cavan Line; that is the road out to the chapel. When the people are going to Mass they have to cross the Dam. The people that owned the Dam thought that they could close the mass path but they would not be let. The people must be travelling that road for a long time for we can see the stones.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:49
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Rosary.
On Hallow Eve an apple is hung from the ceiling and you have to catch the apple in your mouth before you get it. Also a dish of flour is put on the table and a sixpence is put in the dish. You search for the sixpence and if you get it in your mouth you can keep it. On that night also gates and carts and other implements are carried away from the owners place to a far distance.
On Hollintide night two nuts are put in the fire by two people, if the nuts shoot away from each other these two people will not be married and if the nuts shoot towards each other they will be married
On all souls night people go round knocking at the door of the houses. They go round in their bare feet the way the people wouldent hear them. they are supposed to be the Holy Souls.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:49
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awaiting decision
There are a lot of games. Tig, Round the gree gravel the grass grows green many a lady is fit to be seen. Washed in milk dressed in silk whoes the last pup down.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:47
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without any butter. For the supper they had a pot of oaten porridge. They supped porridge with sugar and water or else butter-milk.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:42
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home. On Easter Sunday we light a fire and it is called a cludog. We boil eggs and have tea in the open air. When we have finished we play ball until evening.
The first of April is April fool's day. Everyone tries to make a fool of another.
On Ash Wedensday we pin ash-bags on people's backs.
On the first of May we cut a green bush and put flowers on it and call it a May bush. We put it up in honour of the Blessed Virgin.
On the 23rd June the eve of St Johns day we light a bon-fire. Long ago there used to be a pattern at Manus's Cross which consisted of music and dancing and singing and "the blue ribbon army" would be marching up and down.
On the 15th of August people go to lady well in Slane. Hallow Eve falls on the last day of October. All the family gather in the house and duck for pennies and try to catch an apple hanging from the ceiling in their mouths. Then they have a
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:37
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Although she was small and her family great
Rise up old adam and give us a treat.
The festivals were kept the same long ago as now, only there would be bonfires on St John Eve. There were fires on the Fear Breaga hill, on Knock hill and at Cuddens Cottage. All the people would collect and there would be singing and it would last till late in the night.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:35
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awaiting decision
On St. Stephens day all the boys and young men of the district meet and dress themselves up and put on false faces. Then they go around from house to house and dance and when they have finished dancing for money and if they dont get it they bury the wren they caught a few days before. When evening comes they divide the money between them and go
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:32
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awaiting decision
two inches wide and they are fastened by a plain pin.
On the night before May day primroses are strewn on the doorstep to welcome in the May. If St. Swithens day is wet it will be wet for fifty days after. On Hallow Een an apple is hung by a cord to the ceiling and two or three people tie their hands behind their backs and try to bite the apple. Another game that is played is to get a tub of water and put a sixpence into it and then everyone tires to find it.
On Shrove Tuesday night pan-cakes are made and that night is called pan-cake night.
On St. Stephens day the wren boys kill the wren and then go about collecting money from door to door. When they have the money collected they devide it. When they are going around they say the following rhyme
The wren The wren the king of all birds
St Stephens day she was caught in the furze
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:27
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my pretty fair yarrow, and twice a good morrow to thee. By this time tomorrow my pretty fair yarrow you will you who my true lover will be" and the first man they would meet on the next morning would be the man that they were going to get married to. On the twenty ninth of June there used to be a bonfire in this district. All the boys and girls used to gather plenty of sticks and make a big fire. They would let the fire go out of its own accord.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:25
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awaiting decision
On all fools day which occurs on the first day of April everyone tries to make fools of each other. On ash Wedensday ash-bags are tied to a persons coat when the person dosent know anything about it. The ash-bags are made by cutting a stripe of paper about 9 inches long and
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:22
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things. Long ago children used to come round gathering "cludogs" on Easter Saturday. It is not done round here now. On April the first, we try to make fools of each other. You tell a person that some-one wants them, or something like that, and when they go you say "April fool kiss the leg of the black stool. If any one tries to mak a fool of of you any other day you say "April fools day is long gone and you are the fool that carries it on"
On the day before the first of May children go through the fields gathering cowslips and primroses for the May bush. The May Bush is made by putting a bush standing in a promient place and decorating it up with flowers. Primroses and cowslips are generally what is put on it. It is left there till after May Day then it is taken done. Long ago on Hallow Een night young girls would go out and pull a Yarrow and bring it in and put it under their pillow and say "Morrow, good morrow,
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:20
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I arise this day
The power of God to guide me
The might of God to uphold me
The wisdom of God to teach me.
The eye of God to watch over me
The shield of God to shelter me
The host of God to defend me
Against temptations and vices
Against the snares of the devil.
Against every man who meditates injury to me.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:17
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Aililiú mo mháilín, na prátaí is measa dúinn.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:17
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It is said what ever way you act on New Year's day you will act the same way the whole year. If you get a present of money on Hansel Money you will be getting money the whole year. You should never give away money on that day.
It is a custom to make pan-cakes on Shrove Tuesday.
On Ash-Wednesday ash-bags are tied on peoples backs as a joke.
You should not talk on Good Friday from twelve to three. It is said that that was the time our Lord was crucified.
People get up early on Easter Sunday morning to see the sun dancing. We also make an Easter fire durning the day and all goes to it and brings some
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:16
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goideadh uaim
Aililiú mo mháilín na Phrátaí is measa dúinn.
Dont you be dismayed of potatoes being black or white
We'll have good oaten meal, bacon and soppy beef
Our griddles will be baking, brown ale we'll have in store
Money in circulation, fine earning. as we had before.
Every liberator will have Free Trade from shore to shore
And the noble sons of Eire from strange ranging will stay at home
We'll hunt the bucks and does through the groves of the country
Through hills and glens and valleys we'll follow those bigot tribes.
We'll hunt them through Rosscarbery Uibh Laoghaire and Abbeyfeale
And we'll sweetly sound the horn next morning in Sliabh na mBan.
Crying aililiú mo mhailín, mo mhailín a goideadh uaim
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:13
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the twelve months of the year. If there are wet the twelve months of the year will be wet. It is said that if St Swithens day is wet it will rain for fity days it.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:11
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awaiting decision
song named "The Lazy Society". A man called John Brien danced along with a man named Mr Beggy of Castletown. There used to be a test for dancing on this night. This dance used to be held on the eve of an election also. Here is an verse of "The Lazy Society"
And when my dinner is done
Im too lazy to stretch out my paw for it
Its put into my mouth by my son
While my wife she keeps waging my jaws on it.
On Easter Saturday all the Children go round gathering their cludog. They go round from house to house with a little basket. On Easter Sunday they light a fire and boil the eggs. The fire should not be put out. It should burn out itself.
Christmas eve the people all light candles in the windows to welcome our Lord. The people make a pudding on Christmas day. The twelve days of Christmas represent
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 19:05
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you know had might
With lashes we were torn and sore were our hearts and lights
The ship was in the harbour by order of Quarantine
To banish those brave heroes from the Country thats always green
Crying Aililiu mo mháilín, mo mháilín a goideadh uaim
Aililiú mo mháilín na prátaí is measa dúinn.
In the year "98" you know when we gained our Right
Our gallant volunteers they appeared like the Stars so bright
They put down Penal laws all wrath and indignity
Old Erin's foes were scalded you know how they had to flee,
How gallant you behaved on the plains of Waterloo
Old Wellington was slain that day were it not for you
Crying Aililiú mo mhailín, mo mháilín a
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:59
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Come all ye Irish heroes that are seeking for liberty
Do no longer bear with ill-treatment or bigotry.
But tumble off [?] weights we're bearing those many years
Sorely we were treated and cheated with dread and fear.
No comfort night and morning but always the Galley-slaves
Since our parliament was stolen by the rogues from poor Granuaile.
The year of 63 we were treated with treachery
The gallows it was stained with false swearing and perjury
Our backs were exposed to a thong that
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:54
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aici cun an Tríú Teine a mhúchadh agus b'éigin dí suibhal tríd agus ceap sí go raibh a cliathán loiscthe.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:50
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Bean a comhnuig i gCill Mhichíl fadó dhob eadh Bean Uí Cheallaig. Do bhí bólacht móin bainte aice agus do gaibh bean suibhal isteach cuichi lá, ach má gabh ní bhfuair sí aon bhraon bainne.
Cuaidh an bean saidhbhir go dtí an leabaidh an oidhche sin, comh maith agus a bhí sí riamh. Do bhí taidhreamh aici
Cheap sí go bhfuair sí bás, agus go dtáinig sí do dtí na Trí Teinte.
Tháinig an t-Aingeal coimhdeachta cúichi agus d'fiafruig dí ar thug sí aon déirc uaithi riamh. Dubhairt sí nár thug
[?] arsan t-Aingeal. Do cuardaig an bhean agus fuair sí seana cóta a thug sí do comharsan uair éigin. Múich sí sin an céad teine Cuardaig sí arís agus fuair sí [?] snátha a thug sí do duine éigin cun críoch a cur le stoca. Múich sí sin an Dara Teine. Ní raibh aon [?] aici
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:49
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Back to dear Corrembla
To the jolly scenes of yore
Where the River Brosna mingles
With the lovely Abha Mhór
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:49
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be heard two miles away.
One of these horns might still be in Michael Mullin's with the name P. R. on it
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:41
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because it is not the law to beg.
The names of some fo the beggars the Wards, and D|elaneys, Mohans, and Hopins.
The Gipsies come only about twice to the same place in the year.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:40
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lodging.
The people in the houses used to ask them if they gave them lodging would they stay the next say working.
Some of them would not work after getting their lodging.
Sometimes good workers used to come and ask lodgings and they would get it, and then they would work hard all the next day, and then if the people were pleased they would give them the next night's lodging.
The Gipsies are not as plentiful now as they were long ago
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:34
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Long ago the beggars had no vans like they do now.
This is the way they sued to get their lodging.
Some of them would go a long distance till they would meet others with a tent to sleep in and they would stay there then for a night or two.
Then they would go to another place and stay there also for a night or two and so on.
Some more of them would go to the houses and ask for
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:32
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sweet we had for our dinner.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:32
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awaiting decision
About thirty years ago, I had a meitheall of thirty-two men cutting turf in the Moin Rua bog. The turf on the top we called Móin Rámhaire, and from the tenth sod down was called móin Sluasaid.
All the bog-stuff or "corca" was thrown up on the brink, and a man riding a horse kept walking through it to mix it while other men kept throwing buckets of water from the ath-port or hole where turf had been taken out the year before. Sometimes a man with a grafán used to break the lumps with the heel of the grafán and the work was called fallaireacht. Sometimes we dug a drain through the brink to bring the water near where it was wanted to wet the bog-stuff.
Then the bog stuff was shaped into sods with the hands, and this was called "móin ladhaire". The small heaps of dry turf were called púcáns and oaten meal, sour milk, and a little
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:32
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a good dancer.
He won a prize of five pound in Dublin.
Mary Murphy, Brickens was a good walker. She walked to Croagh Patrick and climbed the reek and walked home again in the same day.
Tom Molloy Carromore Ballyhaunis was a great runner.
He could catch a rabbit by running after him.
Pat Murray was a very good jumper.
He could jump a river five feet wide.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:28
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The best runner in this locality was Barney Mc. Grath. When he was in Manchester a silver medal was to be given to the best runner and he won the race.
The best walker in this district is Tom Moore who can walk four miles in a half-a-hour.
The best swimmer in this locality is Bill Smith who won five pounds in Galway.
The best mower is James Burke. He would mow an acre of oats in the day.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:26
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:26
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years of age.
The best swimmer is Jim Jennings of Liscolman. He swam Bekan lake in less than ten minutes.
Te strongest man in our locality is Luke Barnacle, he once wheeled a ton weight in a wheelbarrow.
The best walked in this locality is Tom Kelly. He won a prize of fifty pounds for walking a distance of four miles in twenty minutes.
John Tarpey, Brickens was a very good singer and also
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:24
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A man named Michael Murphy lived in White Church near Cork City about sixty years ago. On May morning he went to steal butter from his neighbour John McCarthy. By doing this he thought he could take away his neighbour's luck, but his plan did not work for he could not make any butter from that on though he had fourteen cows, and his neighbour had only five. The man with the five cows used have three times the quantity of butter that he should have from that on.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:23
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The best dancer is Thomas Flately, he won a prize of ten pounds in Boyle for singing and dancing.
The best jumper is Luke Tighe of Culticrehan, he could jump a wall five feet high.
Patrick Kenny of Red-park was once a famous athlete, he also fought man battles and was arrested very often also.
The oldest man is John Waldron of Bekan. He is about one hundred and six
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:21
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The strongest man I know of is Patrick Duffy, Cloontumper.
In the market place one time he and another man had a contest and he lifted the weights and the other man failed to do so.
The best runner is James Stantion, he ran four miles in fifteen minutes.
The best mower is Michael Kearney Kilbeg, he could mow two acres in one day.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:18
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9. Spell hard water in three letters?
Ice
10. Why does a cow look over the ditch?
Because she cannot look under it.
11. What part of the cow goes in the door first?
Her breath.
12. What is in a riddle more than holes?
Corners.
13. The more you take out of it the bigger it gets?
A hole
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:16
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5. Why does a hen pick the pan?
Because she can not lick it.
6. As round as an apple as flat as a pan, half of a woman and half of a man?
A penny.
7. As round as an apple, as deep as a cup and all the kings horses could not pull it up?
A well.
8. Spell black water in three letters.
Ink.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:15
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of woods in my district.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:14
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1. Spell little red dog in three letters?
Fox.
2. Spell ever-green plant in theee letters?
Ivy.
3. Spell hole udner ground in three letters?
Den
4. Which is it right to say the yoke of an egg are white or the yoke of an egg is white?
The yoke of an egg is yellow.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:14
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Our village is nicely situated beside a large lough. The lough is very deep in places. The name of my village Lisnagabra. Tisrara is the name of the parish. There are some hills in our Parish.
Six families live in our village. We are in the Lacken district. We are in the Barony of Athlone. There is an old man in our village - he is over seventy years. He knows no Irish. His name is :-
John Mac. Donnell,
Lisnagabra,
Four-Roads
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:13
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the priest", what is Baptism".?
Well, said the man, it was a half-a-crown until you came to the parish but you raised it to five shillings.
This happened in Bekan.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:06
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It was in the month of October and all the people were digging potatoes.
One day a priest was going the road and he saw a man digging potatoes.
The priest said to the man, "What sort of potatoes are you digging?
"Raw ones" said the man." "Oh, you are very clever" the priest said, "I wonder do you know your Catechism as well." "Oh", said the man "indeed I do".
Well, then said
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:04
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your milk and now your not satisfied when he is out of it.
This happened in Foxford.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 18:03
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wife and putting two wild eyes in himself pointed at the mug. His wife came over and looking in the mug saw the mouse.
She walked to the door, took the mouse by the tail and threw him out in the street and turning back placed the mug of milk again before her husband who jumped up and got very angry when he saw what she did before the men.
"O" said she "am not I to be pitied having such a cranky man you were not satisfied having a mouse in
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 17:59
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Once upon a time there was a man who had a wife who had not the reputation of being a very up to-date house keeper. One day he had a meitheal digging potatoes. When they came into their dinner she had a large dish potatoes set in the centre of the table and a mug of milk for each man. When they all sat down the man of the house, who was at the head of the table saw a large mois [?] drowned in his mug and looking at his
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 17:55
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man and he said "Come down off the poor old ass."
"It would be more like ye two to be carrying the ass than the ass carrying ye."
So they came down and they carried the ass. As they were going they had to cross a river and the ass fell in.
Sp. Paddy, taking everyone's advice, lost his ass into the bargain.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 17:52
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There was once a man and his Son going to a fair with an ass.
They met a man and he said "Why dont you go up on him? and don't be walking."
They went on further and they met another man and he said "Come down you lazy old strap and put up your son."
The went on further and they met another man and he said "Why don't you go up on the ass? he is well able to carry ye."
When they went on further they met another
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:39
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in his pocket. When they were coming home Jack felt his head very cold and sore. Before they both departed Jack left his sack in a safe place and he put the gold he had already got into the bag in hopes that he might have more gold. The next morning when he woke up he found that the sack had grown bigger and that it was all filled with wet turf instead of gold. When Dinny looked at his pocket he found that it
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:34
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awaiting decision
it and that if he got it he would share it on the poor.
However they went and Jack brought the big sack with him. When they reached the castle the leprechaun invited them in and when he went shaving then he shaved all the hair off Jack's head and he scalped it.
He then brought them out to the place where the turf was and Jack filled his big bag with turf.
Dinny only put a small piece of it
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:31
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was all filled with gold.
Jack was so disappointed that he was cursing all the leprechauns and fairies that ever existed. He was crying all day long and saying that even his hair was gone and he said he would have to wear a wig or he would be the laughing stock of the country.
So Dinny was very happy and he shared his treasure with the poor and the leprechaun invited him to the castle when he wanted
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:27
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anything and all because of his goodness.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:26
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awaiting decision
Jack got up very early next morning and the first thing he did was to look at the turf. He found that it was a big heap of gold. Dinny's was the same.
Jack told Dinny to come next night and to bring a sack with him but Dinny said he would go but that he would not bring a sack.
He said he would only bring a small piece of the turf in his pocket, If he was lucky enough to get
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:24
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shave them first.
When he had them shaved he brought them into a room of the castle and they had a great feast. When the feast was over he brought them out to a big rick of turf and he told them to fill their pockets with it and to look at it in the morning.
Jack filled his pockets with it and he even put some into his cap. Dinny only put a small piece of the turf into his pocket.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:20
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to go back to see if they could get any gold.
Dinny agreed and they both went to the castle. When they were coming near to the castle they saw a leprechaun coming near to the castle and Jack spoke to him and the leprechaun asked them to come in and dine with him and that they would be lucky if they did what he told them. He brought them into the castle and he told them that he would have to
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:18
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awaiting decision
Long ago there lived two men up near Dun-Mac-Reena castle near Irishtown. Their names were Jack Gill and Dinny Mc=Gee.
Dinny was a good hearted man but Jack was mean and miserly.
Often they heard stories and sweet music round the castle. They also heard that there were leprechauns living there. The men were neighbours and one evening before sunset Jack told Dinny
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:15
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The people of the locality were more so because that year they had to go very long distances to get the corn ground and they thought it great ill-luck to temper with the mill.
The man had to go to an anknown place for safety. Instead of getting the gold it brought great hardship to him.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:14
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awaiting decision
There was once a very rich man living in Co Mayo.
He always longed for more money. One night he dreamt there was a pan of gold under Koilmore mill. He went to the mill and he broke it down searching for the gold.
The man kept digging down until he came to where the gold should be but he found no gold.
The owner of the mill was very angry when he saw his mill broken.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:05
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Thousands of people died of starvation all over the country - raw turnips, weeds and sea weeds were eaten. When the summer of eighteen forty six came all Ireland waited with anxious hearts to see would the new crop save them, but the blight appeared again and the crop was ruined.
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:02
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-12-13 16:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision