Number of records in editorial history: 507171 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:25
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what he wanted for the hide and he said a thousand pounds. The man gave him the money and he got the hide. Then Small Fairly went home and that night himself and his mother started counting the money.
Big Fairly was looking in the window and he saw all the they had. Then he went in and asked Small Fairly where he got all the money. Small Fairly said that instead of doing him harm Big Fairly only did him good. He said he got a thousand pounds for the hide of his cow and he told Big Fairly that if h killed all his cattle and sold the hides he would be very rich.
The next day, Big Fairly killed all his cattle and skinned them. The next fair day that came he brought the hides to the fair to sell them but all he got for them was four shillings. When he went home he gave Small Fairly a good beating for the trick he had played on him.
Small Fairly' s mother was a nurse at the king and she nursed the king's cildren. She liked the children very well and she used to give them a lot of nice things and they liked her. After a while she died adn Small Fairly
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:22
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1. Patrick Murphy
2. Bat Murphy
3. Mrs. Caroline Harrington
4. Mrs. Hanora O’Sullivan
5. Mrs. Elizabeth Sullivan
6. Mrs. Annie O’Shea
7. Timothy Lynch
8. Johnny Lynch
Kilkinnihin.
Mrs. Caroline Harrington
1. Insi Cpuillin
2. Rinin
3. Mouncan
4. Oilean Mors
5. The field of the gate
6. Pairc sinsin
7. Gore clar
8. Gore gelaer
9. The garden
10.The three corner field
11.Pairc na cloice goille
12.Paircin caol
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:21
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brought her to the king's well adn put her selling on a chair. Then he went to the king's children and told them that his mother was below at the well and the one that would be at her first would get lovely apples adn sweets from her. Then the children ran off down to the foot of the hill where the well was. They ran against the dead woman and knocked her into the well and thought they had drowned her. Then Small Fairly told the king that if he did not give him five hundred pounds for the loss of his mother he would go to law with him. The king gave him all the money and then Small Fairly went home. That night Small Fairly started counting his money and Big Fairly was looking in the window and he saw all the money Small Fairly had. Then he went in and asked him how he got all the money Small Fairly told that he killed his mother and cut the head off her and brought it to the doctor and he said that the doctor gave him five hundred pounds for it to make gun powder out of it. He told Big Fairly that if he killed his mother and brought her head to the doctor he would get five hundred pounds for it too.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:21
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There is said to be a castle in Lough Acurry and people living in it and cattle and horses. There is supposed to be a barrel of gold in it and the only way to get it out is to get nine black horses with not one spot of white in them. And to get a man to ride each horse round the lake nine times without ever looking back. It is said that it was did once and when they were going round the ninth time they heard a noise and they looked back and saw the barrel of gold rolling back into the Lough. Some people say that a man named Andrew Clarke who is dead now and who lived beside the Lough saw strange cattle and horses grazing on his land and that he seen them dissapearing into the Lough. Lough Accury is on the lefthand side of the road going next Cavan town about five miles west of Bailieboro and about eleven miles east of Cavan.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:16
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one going out but a girl in rags. So her clothes turned back to rags and she never got back to the ball again.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:16
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Once upon a time there was a woman who had three daughters two of whom were nice and one ugly and she liked the nice ones and she would buy lovely clothes for them and she would never buy any clothes for the other one she would let her go in rags. One night the two ladies were at a ball and the ugly one was sitting at the fire and a fairy woman came in and struck her with a whip and she turned into a lovely lady with lovely glass shoes on her and she and she got a mouse trap and made a coach of it and they got four white mice and turned them into four white horses and put the lady into the coach and drove her to the ball and told her to stay no longer than twelve o'clock and before she found the clock struck twelve and she tried to get away in time but she was late and the people asked did they see a lady going out but they said that they saw no
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:14
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his house. he got his horse and hound and followed her all day but in the evening she disappeared. It was getting dark and he did not know where to go for the night. He said a house a little distance away from him and he said he would go as far as it.
When he reached the house he went into it and asked the woman if she would keep him for the night and she said she would. She told him to pull a rib of hair out of her head and to tie his horse outside the house with it. The man refused to do that and the woman said she would kill him if he would not do that. The hound that the man had was a very fierce one and he attacked the woman. He went to tear her to pieces and the woman begged the man to leave her alone. She promised the man that she would give him her wand and that if he lifted up the door he would get get a pot of gold under it.
The man took the wand and he lifted p the door and he found the pot with the two heads of his brothers in it. He struck the two heads with the wand and he turned his two brothers back again into men. Then he struck the old woman with the wand
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:11
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dip it in saltpaper water and dry it.
Spinning.
people used to use flax for spinning. They would spin as much flax into thread as would do them the whole year for sewing. They would spin and make wool for knitting stockings out of sheep's wool that would do the family for a year.
Thatching.
They would get straw and make bundles of it. They would get mortar and mix it well. while one man would get a ladder and put in stopples on. They would use no mortar. They would make the stopples with straw- they would get a hand-full of straw and roll some of the straw at one end of the stopple.
Tradesmen.
A man used to go to houses to make boots long ago and he would be supported till he would have
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:08
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Candle making.
People would pull rushes and dry them. Then they would peel them and roll them in grease. They would leave them to dry and then they could burn them.
Basket making.
People would cut sallows and leave them to season. Then a man would go to the house and make a basket for them.
Forge work.
They would make nails out of nail rod. They would make slanes out of spades by flattening the spades. They used no cranes in this district long ago. They used blocks across in the chimney and long crooks.
Match making.
There were no matches used in our district long ago. Those who smoked used flint and touchpaper to light their pipes. They would put the flint on the touchpaper and strike the flint with the blade of a penknife. They would get paper and
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:06
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“Who will we have for Nuts in May,Nuts in May, Nuts in May
“Who will we have for Nuts in May on a cool and frosty morning”
Then they select one child on the opposite side to pull the other child away and while they are selecting this child they say the words “Who will we have to pull her away, to pull her away, to pull her away Who will we have to pull her away on a cool and frosty morning”. Then the two children start pulling and which everone succeeds in pulling over the other she has her on her side. This continues until all the children are in one line.
“High windows” is a game that is played by a number of school children. First they make a wide ring and they catch hold of each others hands and they leave the space of a window between each child. Then one child gets a bit of grass and she goes round the circle and she says the words “The heart of my hand is burning hot who ever I like to throw it at” Then she mentions some girls name to follow her and catch her. Every hole that the first girl runs through the other girl has to run through the very same hole. When she has the other girl caught she too throws it at some other one and so this continues until every child has got a chance of catching some other one.
“Hide and go seek” is played by a number of children going hiding and one child left to go looking for them. When she has all the children caught some other girl goes looking for them and when she has them all caught some other girl goes seeking and so this continues until ever child has caught
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:05
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senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:05
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senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:04
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There are no fairs held in this locality. The people of the district sell their stock in Ballina, Ardnare and Crossmolina. There are cattle, sheep and horses sold at these fairs.
Up to a few years ago there was a fair held in Newtown-Gore. Neartown fairgreen is situated two miles North of this and it is half way between Ballina and Crossmolina.
This fair fell through as people brought no stock to it after the monthly fairs were establushed in Ballina. Only two fairs used to be held there in the year, one on the 4th August and the other on the 1st November. At the present time it is owned by a man named Edward Hollaran of Knockanillawn.
In olden days there was a fair held in Gallows Hill. Gallows Hill is situated about a mile South East of this school. I never heard why this fair was discontinued. There is no fair green to be seen there now.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:01
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senior member (history)
2021-04-23 15:01
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No. 81. Crannagh Townland Peter Keane
82. Tom Turnbull Tom Molloy
83. Father Murphy Tom Molloy
84. Story of Gortnorabbey old Abbey Paddy Healy
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:59
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There was a barrack in Cloghans up to nineteen years ago. it was build eighty years ago by Mr Perry. The contractor was a man named Arthur Cannon. The Barrack was built for the purpose of stopping the people in Annagh Island from making poteen. There was a boathouse built in connection with it on the shore of Lough Conn.
The police were in a house belonging to Quigley's of Lisdulogue before the Cloghans Barrack was built. The first Sergeant that ever did duty in Cloghans was a Sergeant Lungam with four constables adn the last Sergeant that did duty in it was a Sergeant MacCarthy. It ceased to be used as a barrack in 1920 when it was burned down. it was bought then by a man named Browne and he sold it again to a man named Hamilton who repaired it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:57
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hell now. The servant went and told his master what the priest said. The master was very angry and planned to invite the priest to dinner So when the priest came he was met in the hall by this man and his friends who pointed guns and threatened to shoot him unless he could prove that the old boss was in hell.
So the priest started to read a book and he called the old man three times. At the third call a hole opened in the floor and he came up through it with sparks of fire. The priest asked him where was he at the first call and he said the devil was loosening his chains and the second call he was coming and at the third he came. So there he was with them and they were paralized with fear. They were very glad to beg the priests pardon and to give him any thing in the world only to drive him back to hell again.
So to this day that part of the house is closed up and the big hole in the floor is there for any body to see.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:55
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In olden times when the people used to have to watch their babies and when they went outside they had to put a pair of tongs over the cradle. One day a woman who lived near Carndonagh was rocking her cradle and trying to put her baby to sleep. She went outside to get turf for the fire and when she came in again she saw that the child was gone and a very thing child compared to her own.
She heard a noise behind her, and turned round quickly and saw her own baby standing at the door and putting out his tongue at her. She then knew that the fairies had taken her own baby and left the other one in its place.
She lifted the child out of the cradle and put it in a basket full of straw and then put blazing sticks on top of the straw and let the child to burn to death.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:52
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A long time ago there lived in a big Mansion a certain gentleman who was a terrible tyrant. And his Father who was dying was still worse. When he died there were great ceremonies over him. I is said that some time after a Priest on passing through the estate met one of the servants and in a conversation passed the remark that the old fellow was burning in
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:52
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the country.
For years after on moonlight nights, between the hours of midnight and daybreak, huntsmen with their headless leader, and with hounds in full cry were seen and heard in the district. People living today have heard and seen them.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:50
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bhíodh an sgadán annsan i.e. nuair a bhíonn an béirneáil ann - ach ar barra.
Chuadhmair siar oidhche go Tráig an Cama ag iasgach sgadán. Bhí an comarta againn a bhfearr a bhí ag na sean-daoine riamh ar sgadáin i.e. sgadán ar fhaid an lín sa mogal iochtair - ní shéanfaidís go deó an dógh san. Ach ba bheag ar ár ndream-na fó-sgadán mar sin. Bhórdálmair na líonta agus d'imthigheamair ar a shon go raibh bád eile ag cur ann sar ar fhágamair agus cuala na dhiaidh san gur líon sí sin í féin leo. Ach is amhlaidh a bhí aig ár ndream-na go raibh Uibh Ráthach fé ghabáiste acu in áiteanna eile. Tomas 'ach Síthe an fear is mó mhairbh sgadáin ann. Ní déarfain go raibh aon fear eile a tiocfadh i ngiorracht do sa méid sgadán a mháirbh sé ann. Bhíodh sé i gcomhnuidhe i ndiaidh na sean-daoine agus é ag cur gach tuairisge i dtaobh tuairmí agus cómhartaithe na sean iasgairí.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:46
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There was never such a big wind before or after like the Big Wind of 1839. It started in the night when all the people were sound asleep. At first it was only like a strong breeze, but after a while it arose to a great storm. When it became very bad the people were getting uneasy and so they all got up at the hour of mid-night. Every farmer was tying down his stacks of oats and ricks of hay. At last it got very bad and the people could not stop the hay and oats from going. At last the roofs of houses was flying away with the storm. Some houses fell down altogether. Very few houses could be seen standing when the wind began to abate. The wind lasted for many days, and by the time it stopped walls were knocked.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:41
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that remained in the ground and shake them on ridges because they were too small to spread them, and they had a good crop of potatoes the following year.
During the famine the people had nothing to eat but barley bread and all the wild herbs they found growing. Some of the people had more provisions than others and they distributed some of their food amongst those who had nothing. Several people in this district died of hunger and the disease of fever and often people were found dead on the roadside.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:38
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The greatest storm the people of this district can recall occurred about thirty five years ago on the 27th February 1903. Before the storm the sky was of a blue black colour and the wind was from the east.
It started soon after ten o'clock with a sudden gust of wind and soon it was blowing a fierce gale. Most of the people had retired for the night when the storm began but they were all soon up again as they had to barricade the doors of their houses and cabins lest the storm may put them in. They were also busy trying to prevent the thatch from being swept off their houses and their hay swept away. It was a terrible night to be out as you could scarcely stand with the force of the wind and it was only by shouting at the tops of their voices that people could be heard an account of the roaring of the storm. The storm was at its worst at about 2 a.m. when
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:33
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the wind was changing to the south west and it was then it caused most havoc on land and sea. The gale abated somewhat about 3 a.m. and by morning it had become quite calm once more.
At the dawn of day the effects of the storm were to be seen everywhere. Scarcely a house escaped its fury. the thatch which had been blown off the houses, was to be seen scattered all round the district. Some houses were completely stripped of their thatch and cabins fared no better, Winds and ricks of hay were blown completely away in some cases and for weeks afterwards the people were busy repairing the damage.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:25
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Nearly all the trees were rooted out of the ground. Some of those trees are to be seen lying yet. Many people were out in this storm. It is said that any one that was out in this storm was killed because they were lifted off their feet and flung against something and killed
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:23
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March, and two first days of April, farmers should be very cautious of their cows and cattle. On these days cows are often found in ditches.
The first weeks of July green goose, and gooseberries is considered a rare present, when the gooseberries come in season.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:20
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Will picture thy contagious laugh,
Thy features every line,
Till once again, we seem to quaff,
The joys of Auld Lang Syne.
4.
The Tempest spends its rage around,
The skies are overcast,
But on life's ocean hast thou found,
A refuge from the blast.
In that retreat, so safe and calm
Foretasting Bliss Divine,
Thy guileless heart still feels the balm
of cherished Auld Lang Syne."
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:06
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Heart of Jesus I adore thee, Heart of Mary I implore, Heart of Joseph pure and just. In these three hearts I put my trust. Jesus be our safeguard, Mary be the tower and may the resurrection of the body be our life everlasting. Amen.
Heaven is the branch, Mary is the flower, Lord Jesus in my dying hour I commend my spirit to thee, Lord Jesus receive my soul.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:03
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About eighty years ago there was a great flood. It was on the Lammas Fair Day. The people could hardly get home from the fair with the big floods. The flood was that big on Straths river, it was a foot deep on the road. The men and woman had to paddle through it coming from the fair.
There was a man and woman coming from the fair and they were from a place called the "Ilies" in Buncrana parish, and their names were Ned O'Doherty and Susan MacDaid, and they had to cross a bridge, and they were drowned.
There was a windy night about forty five years ago. The roof of every thatch house was blown.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 14:00
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the "windy night" you could get the pension by producing a son or daughter fifty years of age.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:59
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It is usually Shrove that the people get married in this district. It is said that January and December are the busiest months. From the fourteenth of December till the twenty seventh is the busiest time of that month and for January between the first and the thirteenth. Another lucky week is from the fourteenth of June till the twenty first.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:58
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Sabbath day is bonnie, bright good and gay.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:57
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When a cow calves the first milking is given to the calf and if there is any milk left over it is given to the cow. The first few drops is let fall to the ground and they are supposed to be for the fairies. At the fourth or fifth milking a dish called "beastings" is made by boiling the milk which forms curds. It is customary to give some of these "beastings" to the neighbours in order to have a good blessing on the calf and sow and all her milk.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:54
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their hands and saying the bargain is "clenched." Then the animals are marked by putting mud, on the flank or by clipping the hair at the side with a scissors.
The halter is usually given gratis with the animal, The special fairs of the year are the May, October and November, fairs, One day is for the pigs and the following day for the cattle sheep and horses in the principal fair towns.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:53
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Oat bread: - oat meal is made into a dough with hot water to which sometimes is added a pinch of sugar, it is then kneaded with flour and flattened out until it forms a cake about a quarter of an inch thick, flour is rubbed into it with the palm of the hand. It is then placed upright on a griddle in front of a good bright fire. It is left there to harden a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:52
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for their dinner. They used to get no evening tea but for their supper they got more oaten porridge and milk and sometimes they managed to get an egg between these meals. But the eggs were very scarce in those day and it is often told to us by our grandmother's that the men and women of those days were stronger and healthier than those of the present day.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:50
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tháinig an Sean Hero go dtí an Seipéal chun an fear a phósadh.
An maidin ceadhna do bhí Tomás curtha i gCuige Laighean. Thosuigh Seán ag dul abhaile Do ráinig sé an teach ins an oidhche Dia Sathairn, agus bhí an Sean Hero agus an féar ina leabaidh. Do bhuail sé ar an doras. Tháinig faithchios ar an fear. Cé hé seo, ars an féar a bhí ina leabaidh. Séan, adeir an bhean. "Tá sé ag teacht chun mise a mharbhú, ars an féar. Dubhairt Séan leis féin, sé an rud is fearr dul amach ins an teach an fheir, agus fanacht annseo go dtiocfadh an mhaidin, mar b'feidir go mbeadh faithcios ar na paisthibh da gcloisfeadh siad é. Chuaidh Séan amach agus thuit sé ina chodhladh. Do dhuisigh sé ar maidin Dé Domhnuigh agus ní raibh na fuinneoga na an doras ar oscailt, go mhaith, adéir Séan, rachaidh mé go dtí an Aifreann agus b'feidir go mbeadh siad suas núair a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:45
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There was a woman in bed one night and there came 3 knocks to the window, and she knew she was going to hear something. The next morning when she went she got a coffin under a bush, and she bought it into the kitchen. The man of the house asked her where she got it and she said she got it under a bush so he told her to leave it back where she got it. That evening there came into the kitchen a little red woman and she sat in the corner and said nothing but took "tay". After a time she left. The next day she came again and she did the same thing. He didn't come on the third day but that evening the woman got word that her brother was killed by a fall from a horse, and she said that when anyone belonging who died, there came three knocks to the window.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:42
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amach ag lorg Seáin. Tháinig sí go dtí an plank. Fúair sí an fear as Cuige Laighean ins an abhainn. "O bulló, a deir sí. Tá mo Shéan marbh. Do thosuigh sí ag béacadh. Tháinig na daoine agus do fúair siad doras agus do chuir siad Sean air agus chuaidh siad abhaile agus chuir siad é ar bhórd. An mhaidin ina dhiaidh sin tháinig an Sagart. Thosuigh an bhean ag caoineadh arís agus ag tarrainght amach a cuid gruaige. Dubhairt na Sagart go raibh fear an -mhait aige agus go bposfadh sé iad agus go dtuibhradh sé aire di agus do na páiste. "Ní raibh duine ins an domhan a chuirfinn ins an áit Sheain" adeir sí. An maidin ina dhiaidh sin do thug siad é go roilg i gCill Beagnach agus do chuir siad é ins an uaigh. Bhí an Sagart ins an roilg. "A Athair, adéir sí, tá fhios agam gur fearr an rud an fear sin a phósad. An mháidin ina dhiaidh sin
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:41
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sat up all night and rubbed the butter on the hounds legs and on his own legs. When the race began he ran along with the hounds after the hare and he was only a small piece behind the hounds at the end of the race.
Dan Mac Fadden, my great grand father, was a great walker. He lived in the Chee-Park, a few miles from Rathmullan. He walked to Lough Derg every year and back again without eating anything and he did not break his fast till the next morning.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:39
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A man called "Boxty" Wallace had a mill for making starch for potatoes at Fay's old flan mill at Cullies near Knockbride. This was some time before the Great Famine of 1845-47. The old people said the famine was a case for using the potatoes on this way.
The starch was sent to England for use in bleaching cloth. John McCabe, the faother of Michael McCabe, who was drowned at loch Sillan was employed by Mr. Boxty Wallace to teach his family in his own home.
Two sons became church ministers, another an officer in the police, and another son Foster Wallace and his sister were evicted from the Adam's Estate.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:35
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(were) buried there.
The stones that were put over their graves are there to be seen yet. Tales were told that lights were to be seen round this fort. There is another large stone a little distance away from the fort. It is said that the fairies used to gallop their horses round this stone. tradition connects this stone with the fort which is about one hundred yards away.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:34
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(were) buried there.
The stones that were put over their graves are there to be seen yet. Tales were told that lights were to be seen round this fort. There is another large stone a little distance away from the fort. It is said that the fairies used to gallop their horses roud this stone. tradition connects this stone with the fort which is about one hundred yards away.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:34
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Pallas Co. Limerick and Mr. O'Grady Carrickkettle Kilteely Co. Limerick were opponents to the above athletes and often had their tests in the athletic field. Mr. P. O'Brien Duncummin Emly Co. Tipperary and Mr. John Hurley Gurteen Emly Co. Tipperary witnessed the feats of Daly and Mitchel. They competed for these feats in Dublin.
Mr. Quinlan Lough Hospital Co. Limerick competed with horses by running with them and jumping over them.
Long ago in Ireland various Gaels competed in walking and there were many champions. It is interesting to relate that Mr. Patrick
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:33
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When the cow has been milked the sign of the cross is made with milk on the cows hip so that the fairies would not take away the milk.
A red rag is often tied on a cows tail so that the fairies would not take away the milk or butter.
A "púcóg" or púcán is put on the head of a baadac (bradhach) cow to keep her from rambling.
People say that is you buried a cow without skinning her you would never again have luck with stock.
Cows are given an extra good bed of straw on Christmas night.
Cows are kept in by some people on May Eve lest the fairies would bring the milk or butter.
Some people would not give away milk without putting a drop of water in it lest they would have the butter.
Others believe that if you give away milk on May Day that the person to whom you give it could take the butter from the milk.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:31
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Away back in the eighties Dr. J. C. Daly Borriskane formerly of this district and J. S. Mitchel Esq. Bartoose Emly were the champion weight-throwers of the world. Mr. Nicolas Ryan Clerihan Clonmel Co. Tipperary excelled himself in such a manner that he saved a man's life by raising a car load of corn which was about to pass over a man's body who had fallen off the load. A man named David O'Brien of Ballivistea Emly Co.
Tipperary was reputed to have lifted an exceedingly large stone in the graveyard at Emly. Mr. Reale
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:28
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thatching, in order to keep the thatching down. These twigs are called scalps. The people use the same method nowadays in thatching their farm houses.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:26
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Knockanhai came to search for it. They were digging for a long time and at the end of the time they got the gold. They filled up their pockets with the money. They were just about to leave with the money when a bird appeared on the wall and threw a stone at them. They dropped the gold and they ran away as quickly as they could. But the stone is still to be seen in the Abbey.
There is a sand-pit in John Carroll's land and people say that there is gold to be found there. People say that one day as his wife was walking near this sandpit she saw a tub. She went nearer and took the tub and brought it home. She sold it and people say that they had good luck in their farm since.
There is another sand-pit in Mr. T.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:22
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from Oldtown. Of the latter there is an old story told. Many years ago there lived in that place a notorious gang called the "Oldtown Robbers". This (going) gang lived in mud cabins and used to roam the countryside by night stealing cattle and sheep which they slaughtered and concealed in caves or dens constructed under the ground. These would be called dug outs. Bad as these men were they had some good qualities as they used to distribute their surplus among their poor neighbours.
There is no bogland in Barrysfarm which is almost devoid of trees and very few whitethorn hedges with the exception of the grounds of Lord Kenmare's Castle which are well timbered with heavy trees.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:22
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the wounded who returned from the Holy Land during the time of the "Crusades
Barrysfarm which comprises the eastern side and lands adjoining is much more ancient than the western side, also Emly Road comprises the eastern side of the town where a considerable number of houses have been built recenty. There are no old ruins in the district and it is not known if any old houses existed there in the past. Some years ago a considerable number of people emigrated from this district to America.
The lands are of prime quality being situated in the Golden Vale and are very good for tilling and fattening purposes. A tributary of the bamogue flows at the northern end of the town. This river divides Barrysfarm
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:19
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was being planned the engineer wanted to run it along the Drumboe bank of the river. This would have meant fewer bridges as the line would not have had to be carried across the Finn.
It would also have left the main Ballybofey to fleuties road free from level crossings, of which there are four sets within a distance of the same number of miles from Ballybofey. The Hayes' however would not hear of such a proceeding and in the end the railway was laid over its present could, cross and recrossing both rivers and main road spoiling farms and fields by dissection but at the same time acting as a bulwark against flooding in a number of houses - the sooish[?] district which formerly were within the high-water mark during floods.
[For further reference to the railway see page. ]
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:15
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from Oldtown. Of the latter there is an old story told. Many years ago there lived in that place a notorious gang called the "Oldtown Robbers". This (going) gang lived in mud cabins and used to roam the countryside by night stealing cattle and sheep which they slaughtered and concealed in caves or dens constructed under the ground. These would be called dug outs. Bad as these men were they had some good qualities as they used to distribute their surplus among their poor neighbours.
There is no bogland in Barrys farm which is almost devoid of trees and very few whitethorn hedges with the exception of the grounds of Lord Kenmare's Castle which are well timbered with heavy trees.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:14
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Long ago there lived a man and he was very rich, and there was also a poor man living. The poor man had a son who used to work for the rich man and he used to steal every valuable thing from the rich man. The rich man told his father to send him to robbers to teach him the trade of robbery or that he would kill himself and his the son.
So the father sent him to robbers and they first thing they put him doing was to go up to the rich man's house. They tied him with a rope and they
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:13
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as they pleased. The caretaker took no notice. Bit by bit rare plants shrubs etc were taken away, fences were broken, windows and so on and everything began to go to ruin and decay. Within the last few years the Castle and estate were acquired by the Irish Land Commission and divided amongst the landless people of the district. The building itself was sold to a local family of builders who have entered on the task of demolishing it having sold windows and door frames, slates and such to such as required them. The bare walls now stand crumbling, roofless for the most part deserted and desolate. Father McNulty's prophecy fulfilled to the letter (page 53)
During its occupation by the National Army while the civil conflict was in progress Anti-Treaty prisoners were under detention in the Castle and four of them were executed there on March 14th 1925. Three, Charles Daly, Timothy O'Sullivan and Daniel Enright hailed from Kerry while
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:12
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:11
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Long ago people in this country were able to eat great quantities of plain food. It was the usual thing for country people to be out of bed before daybreak and go to work at the first light of the day, and very often it happened they would be working four hours before the first meal of the day would be eaten.
Breakfast consisted of penty porridge and new milk. Dinner would be consumed at noon and great quantities of potatoes, and home skim milk with some butter would be the meal. At all meals the members of each household, would sit around at a table. Thursday
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:11
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man and he brought him to the rich mans home and let him down the chimney. The man below had a gun ready to shoot him. When he had the dead man shot he brought him to bury him. When the boy thought he would be at the graveyard. He came down the chimney and went into the room where the woman was he said to her and he said "move up I'm frozen with the cold" As she was moving up he was pulling the sheet. When he had it all pulled he said I forgot to close the door. When he had the door closed he
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:11
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man and he brought him to the rich mans home and let him down the chimney. The man below had a gun ready to shoot him. When he had the dead man shot he brought him to bury him. When the boy thought he would be at the graveyard. He came down the chimney and went into the room where the woman was he said to her and he said "move up I'm frozen with the cold" As she was moving up he was pulling the sheet. When he had it all pulled he said I forgot to close the door, When he had the door closed he
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:08
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for the rich man. He said my son is at home and he has his trade. The rich man said how could he have his trade sure he's only gone a few dadys yet. I will not believe you until he will pull the sheet from under myself and my wife to night. The father went home in great trouble and he said to the son the rich man will kill you if you cannot pull the sheet from under him to night.
I might be able to do it said the son. There was a man buried that day and the son went to the graveyard. He took up the
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:08
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bachelor's coats on that day
On May Eve the people long ago used to sprinkle holy water on the bounds of their land so as to keep all harm away. Some people set Pishogues on that Eve. People watch May eve night for fear any one might go to their wells for water for they would have Pishogues on going. On May eve night cows are often milked by people who are not the owner of them but people could set Pishogues on you by milking the cows because they would take all the good of the milk for the year.
St. John's day is the longest day in the year. On St. John's night the people light bon-fires.
On St Martin's night
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:07
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sent occupied the Castle as a kind of headquarters and for several years the Union Jack floated from the building and Irishmen were imprisoned within its walls.
Then came the British evacuation and Drumboe as a military post was handed over to the Irish forces and an irish flag was the next that waved over the Hayes domain. The significance of the change of which that all of the flags was a symbol was not lost on the local people, who looking across the river at the Irish Tricolours used to wonder what the dead generations of Hayes thought about it all - especially the lonely tenant of the haunted room.
During the two military occupations any semblance of preserving the place as private property was, of course, impossible and when in 1925 following administrative adjustments in army affairs the national forces were withdrawn and the place was again empty, the people of the locality got into the habit of going about the grounds.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:05
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the Devil is abroad around the house.
When the lad outside heard that he said let me out and I will do you no harm. When the man heard him saying this he got courage he opened the door and he let him out. When he was gone a good distance he saw a light and he made for it. When the robbers saw him coming they got such a fright that they left all they had and ran away. The boy brought home all the things had.
The next morning the father was going (awar) working
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:03
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turnip. Chip the turnip flat at both ends, scoop out centre starting at the top and removing all the inside of the turnip to within an inch of the bottom and leaving a wall around about it about an inch thick. Two holes were then cut in one side of the turnip to represent the eyes one for the nose and an oblong slit for the mouth. The teeth were made by cutting small pieces of turnip and placing them vertically in the mouth. A piece of lighted candle was then placed inside the empty shell of the turnip and the light allowed to shine through the holes. The turnip when impaled on a stick and placed on a ditch on the roadside on a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:02
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that of the Dowager Lady Hayes is not easily ascertained but Sir Edmund seems to have done his best for all concerned. He never really took up residence however, but collected his rents etc through an agent, until he himself died, also without heirs and the property then passed into the hands of a nephew, son of one of Sir Samuel's sisters. This nephew was a Colonel Woods and is said never to have appeared to claim his inheritances in person in fact he looked on it as an encumbrance and never bothered about it. A relative, a Colonel Bailey, acted as an agent - non-resident - and carried on the management in a half-hearted kind of way, through a caretaker. Gradually all pretence at keep up the old appearances ceased and though a lodge keeper, Frazer by name, still lived inside the gates trespassers became quite bold. Then the British military authorities took a hand and the break-up entered on its final stages.
English soldiers of the army of occupation with Colonel Bailey's con
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:00
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tied a bag to another rope and they let him down the chimney. When he had the bag filled the robbers pulled up the bag and they cut the other rope and they left the man below and they went away then. The man below did not know how he would get out. Then he saw a skin if a goat hanging on the door. He put it on him and he began kicking buckets and pans around the house. The man of the house got up and when he saw the thing going around the house He ran into his wife and he said to her "O
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 13:00
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dark night is ghostly looking enough to startle the bravest.
A crib to catch birds was made by boys in this place up to a few years ago. But boys of today don't seem to be interested in making them. Two pieces of alder sticks were procured each about eighteen inches long, a hole was bored at both ends of each stick about an inch from the end. Two pieces of painted sally rod of the same length were pushed through. the holes to form structure like a picture frame.
Next take two pieces of cord and tie them from A to D
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:56
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through this eyelit to make a running loop, this end was then attached to a small stake driven firmly into the ground. A second small stake was then taken and one end split about half an inch deep. This was placed behind the loop to keep the snare in position. The snare was placed in position in the track made by the rabbits. The unsuspecting rabbit in jumping from [?] seat to the other runs his head through the loop of the snare and in its struggles draws it tight about his neck and remains there to await the pleasure of his captor.
Another past-time for boys was to get a good sized
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:55
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There is supposed to be a crock of gold under a hawthorn bush on the Bridle Path between Finn water & Barnes. This is said to have been the only way from Donegal to Letterkenny long ago.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:54
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2. On the stock ditch between the stock and Corraine there is supposed to be a pot of gold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:54
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There is supposed to be a donkey skin full of gold in a long narrow field in Ardlaghan. This field belongs to Neddy McGinty. If a cow lies on the spot where the gold is she will be all white. This is the only way it will be known. There was one cow which lay on it but no one knew where she did lie.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:54
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There is supposed to be a donkey skin full of gold in a long narrow field in Ardlaghan. This field belongs to Neddy McGinty. If a cow lies on the spot where the gold is she will be all white.This is the only way it will be known. There was one cow which lay on it but no one knew where she did lie.
Ballybofey
2. On the stock ditch between the stock and corraine there is supposed to be a pot of gold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:53
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2. On the stock ditch between the stock and Corraine there is supposed to be a pot of gold.

There is supposed to be a crock of gold under a hawthorn bush on the Bridle Path between Finn water & Barnes. This is said to have been the only way from Donegal to Letterkenny long ago.
(Told by) Michael Doherty, Dooish, Ballybofey
(to) (Written by) Michael Doherty, Corraine, Welshtown
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:52
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and when the (water) water is gon(e) out of them put them in the bason and put flour in ther and put through other then put them in the pan.
They used make potatoe-cakes and the way you would make it is to boil potatoes first and when that thump them. When you would have that don put flouron it and back it then.
They used make oetmeal cakes long ago and they liked them very much to eat because they had no flour cakes at that time.
They used to go to galway fo their stoof and they used carry(it) it on their back home. Some of them died with the hunge on their way home.
They used
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:51
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(14) When the cat is scraping the door it is the sign of bad weather.
(15) When the cat has his back turned towards the fire it is a sign of bad weather.
(16) When the dog eats grass it is a sign of rain
(17) When the goats go out from the mountain it is a sign of bad weather.
(18) When the smoke goes up straight from the chimney it is a sign of good weather.
(19) When the Stars and moon look dim it is a sign of bad weather.
(20) When the Stars are thick in the sky it is a sign of good weather
(21) When the sun is red going down it is a sign of frost.
(22) When the ducks begin to quack it is a sign of bad weather.
(23) When the swallows fly low it is a sign of rain.
_______________________________

[("?] If the trees bear leaves in November The following winter will be cold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:51
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(14) When the cat is scraping the door it is the sign of bad weather.
(15) When the cat has his back turned towards the fire it is a sign of bad weather.
(16) When the dog eats grass it is a sign of rain
(17) When the goats go out from the mountain it is a sign of bad weather.
(18) When the smoke goes up straight from the chimney it is a sign of good weather.
(19) When the Stars and moon look dim it is a sign of bad weather.
(20) When the Stars are thick in the sky it is a sign of good weather
(21) When the sun is red going down it is a sign of frost.
(22) When the ducks begin to quack it is a sign of bad weather.
(23) When the swallows fly low it is a sign of rain.
___________________________
[("?] If the trees bear leaves in November The following winter will be cold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:47
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corn would cure it.
II
To wash in washing soda boiled in milk could cure a corn.
Sprained hand or ankle.
I
To rub goose grease on a sprained hand or ankle would cure it.
II
To hold a sprained hand under a water fall would cure it.
Hic-cough
I
A fright is considered a cure for hic-cough.
II
A pinch of sugar is a cure for a hic-cough.
III
A drink of water while holding the nose is a cure for a hic-cough.
IV
To try and swallow some-
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:45
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on the sore place would cure rheumatism.
Bleeding
I
To put a clean cob-web on a bleeding wound would stop the blood.
II
To tie a bleeding finger tightly with a piece of string would stop the bleeding.
III
To tie a small stone on a vein would stop bleeding.
Bleeding Nose.
I
To put a key at the back of the neck would stop a bleeding nose.
II
To put a stone or a bottle at the back of the neck would stop a bleeding nose.
Corn.
I
To put a leaf of house-leek on a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:43
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nests in springtime. The sparrow builds its nest under the eaves of houses and under the eaves of stables. The larks build their nests in the heather and their eggs are much like the eggs of the yellow hammer. The swallows build under the eaves of schools and under the eaves of houses. The magpie builds its nest of twigs and it kills and eats young birds such as, ducks, chickens, and goslings. The curlew, the snipe, the grouse, the woodcock, the wild ducks, the wild-geese, the water-hen and the pheasant live in bogs. The curlew only lies upon the heather until it becomes flat and then it lays its eggs on it. The young curlews are much like young turkeys. The snipe builds in a very soft place among rushes, and sometimes if the weather is bad the water covers the eggs. The wild ducks build beside lakes or wide streams and they lay about fourteen eggs.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:43
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applied as ointment is a cure for a boil.
II
To leave "Old man's love" on a boil would cure it.
III
To fill a bottle with water, empty it and leave the mouth of it on the top of the boil would draw out the puss.
Sore Eyes.
I.
To wash with cold black tea is considered a good cure for sore eyes.
II
Water in which ivy was boiled would cure sore eyes.
Rheumatism
I
To rub the joints with paraffin oil would cure rheumatism.
II
To rub with nettles is a cure for rheumatism.
III
To heat a red brick and to put it
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:40
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Long ago the people used to make their own wooden articles out of fir trees and ash trees which they grew on their own farms. For example there is an old dash churn in our house and it is made of fir. Probably it was made of a block of fir that was got in the bogs.
It is as good still as when the unknown maker made it only there was a hoop and a new dash and a lid put on it. When some of the neighbours were evicted out of their houses the ruins of which are there still, they brought the churn to our house and went away to America in the time of the Landlord trouble.
My great Grandfather was the last weaver in this district and some of the thread is hanging in our house still. It is flax thread which belonged to him. Mrs. Jacl Mc Kinley, Leaffony has linen sheets and woolen blankets which were woven by him. And Mrs Close of Keaffoney has a table cloth of linen and they are as good still as when they were woven perhaps eighty years ago or more
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:40
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:40
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Sty in the eye -
I
To look through a wedding-ring is a cure for a sty in the eye.
II
To bathe the eye in cold tea is a cure for a sty in the eye.
III
To point a goose-berry thorn three times at the eye is supposed to be a good cure for a sty in the eye.
IV
To wash the eye in buttermilk is a cure for a sty in the eye.
Heart-burn
I
To drink half a cup of water with a pinch of bread soda is considered a cure for a heart burn.
II
To eat a bit of a raw turnip is a cure for a heart burn.
Boils.
I
Sugar and soap ground together and
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:39
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The thrush, the blackbird, the robin, the linnet, the sparrow, the goldfinch, bullfinch, chaffinch, the wren, the lark, the swallow, the cuckoo, the corncrake, the rook, the magpie, the hawk, and the greycrow are common in this district. The cuckoo, the corncrake, and the swallow migrates in Autumn. The blackbird and the thrush usually build their nest in roadside bushes and in woods. The robin builds its nest in a hole in a wall. The goldfinch usually builds its nest in elder bushes. The linnet builds in hawthorn or in elder bushes. The wren builds in hawthorn bushes and it lays eighteen eggs. Although it lays such a large number of eggs the wren is a bird that is not often seen. The corncrake builds its nest in the meadow. The cuckoo never builds a nest. The rooks build in any suitable high tree and they fight for sticks when reparing their
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:36
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There used to be a fair at Castletown in Coroneary townland, which was discontinued because there was a row in which a man was killed.
The late Joe Sharpe of Condra(Drumcondra) heard his uncle Lex McClery saying that he minded the fair of Castletown.
My informant)Billy Bodel) heard Rev George Anderson say that Bagnel Harvey was a relative of the Adam's family of Northland. He(Bodel) said that where present Catholic Church stands in Shercock, there was a castle with 4 Round Towers, in which Allen Adams lived at the time of the fighting Fair of Shercock.
The following are some of the families believed to have
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:32
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Penny cakes, penny cakes,
Build it up with penny cakes,
My fair lady.
Penny cakes to be sold,
To be sold, to be sold,
My fair lady.
Another rhyme for round the green ground is O fetch a bucket of water,
To my lady’s daughter,
One in a rush
Two in a bush
Last pops down.
Another game is the farmer,
All the children stand round in a ring holding hands and one stands in the middle and he or she is the farmer and they all sing the rhyme.
The farmer wants a wife and he picks a wife
The wife wants a child and she picks one
The child wants a nurse and she picks a nurse
The nurse wants a dog and she picks a dog
The dog wants a bone and she picks a bone
The bone stands alone and then the farmer, wife, child, nurse and dog all run and get the bone to follow them.
Another game is ‘old Lizzie dies’.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:31
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1 To cure warts if you see a snail without looking for it rub it to the warts and then hang it on a thorn
2 It is not lucky to cut a 'lone bush' because the 'good people' seek shelter under it.
3 It is not lucky to kill a swan.
4 A crowning hen should not be kept about a house. A whistling woman and a crowing hen ought to be let go with the wind.
5 It is not lucky to keep a (pigen) pidgeon about a house.
6 If a child under a year has it nails cut it will be liable to 'left' that is to steal things.
7 If a cow has two calves someone will die about the house that year
8 It is not lucky to spill salt.
9 The door should not be locked or (bolter) bolted on Hallowe'en as the people that died in the house might come back that night
10 People should not throw out dirty water on May Eve.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:25
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An fóthanán, bóthalán, gleórán, carabán neanntóg caoch, cupóga sráide, agus, an [?] is iad na fiadhaile is díogbhála.
These weeds are harmful because they both spread rapidly and make the soil poor. The thistle and the wild clover grow where the land is good. The roots of the wild bluebell when boiled cures red-mourn [?] cattle by giving them the juice of it to drink.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:21
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The birds are rearing out their young ones now. The most common ones are the blackbird, the crow and the robin. The crows fly about in large numbers and they eat the grains of corn in the spring.
The farmers do not like the crows and they try to shoot them. The farmers do not like the magpie or the hawk because they eat chickens.
The farmers like the robin and wren and thrush and some other small birds because they eat worms and insects that eat the farmers crops.
People judge the weather by the crows. They say if the crows fly high there will be good weather and if they fly low there will be rain. The weather is also judged by the crane, if she flies down the river there will be good weather, and if she flies up the river there will be bad weather.
The crows build their nests in
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:20
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The following old song has been sung in this district for more than one hundred years. At least the oldest men in the district have heard it in their childhood days.
Certain sections of the farming community in this parish do not favour the song, and they accept it as an insult.
The Galbally Farmer
I
One evening of late as I happened to stray,
To the County Tipperary I soon took my way,
To dig the potatoes and work by the day
On hire with a Galbally Farmer.
II
I asked him how far we were bound for to go,
The night it was dark and the north wind did blow,
I was hungry and tired and my spirits were low,
And I had neither whiskey nor cordial.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:17
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Empty vessels make most sound.
One man can bring a horse to a drink but 21 men could not make a horse drink.
A tree may be straight and its roots may be crooked.
All trees to not bear good fruit.
A lie has no legs.
A wise man carries his coat.
A slow fire makes sweet malt.
A time for everything and everything in its proper time.
A place for everything and everything in its proper place.
An idle man tempts the devil.
Little said is easy mended.
Remember the creator in the days of thy youth.
A person who talks most works least.
A wise son makes a glad father.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
Wear out the shoes but don't wear out the sheets.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Never tell a lie.
Better late than never.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:14
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The old Catholic Church in Emly was replaced by a new building in 1873. The old edifice was turned into a Parochial Hall, which still remains. On several occasions poor people were often allowed by the Parish priest to lodge in it. About 50 years ago, a man named Jack Breen was living in the room that once was the Sacristy. One morning when he woke, his bed and himself were outside the door.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
built as relief work in 1847. The rate of pay for the men was 4d per day. The railway passing by this district was built before the Crimean War in 1848-49. Local workers on it received 9d per man per day, which was considered very good hire.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:08
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rejected
awaiting decision
calf. Dye is made from drúicrín [?] which is also a poisonous weed. Nettles are often used instead of vegetables. Thistles are often found in bad land as well as in good land.
The people of formers times used many of those herbs as cures for certain diseases. Nowadays they are not used at all. It is said that they were the best cures of all.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:07
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rejected
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In this district in the year of 1831 a fine old house was burnt to ashes. There were ten people living in the house - eight of a family. One day the father and mother went to town for some food and left the children in. Long ago the people kept a lot of lint in the house. So one of them caught a handful of it and lit the heap that was in the house. Then the house took fire. So when the father and mother came in sight of it they saw the blaze. When they reached the house the children were all in. The mother made a dash in to let some of the children out. Four of them were burned to death and two were damaged. The mothers eye brows were burnt and also her hair.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:06
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rejected
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The road through Knockcarron, and the road from Emly to Knockcarron, the road through Bartoo[?] e, and the Emly-Kilteely Road were
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:04
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rejected
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The most famous of the "travelling people" around here was an old man who was nick-named "Prince O'Sullivan, King of Kerry." He used bring news from all over Ireland, and he used sleep in the corner of some farmer's house on a gabáil of hay
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 12:02
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rejected
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In the Parish of Cordal there is a very interesting and historic well in the townland of Cordal East. It is known by the name of Tubber na Vuene.
A little interesing story is told of this well. A travelling man one fine Summer day felt very thirsty and visiting this well took a drink of water. It was so refreshing that he called it the well of the Wine which means Tubber na Vuene.
There is also a great cure in this Blessed water. People come from far off places visit this well for the eyesight before sunrise in the morning. There is also seen in this well a little fish. If seen by any person suffering from eyesight he will surely be cured.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:56
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bhíodh an sgadán annsan i.e. nuair a bhíonn an béirneáil ann - ach ar barra.
Chuadhmair siar oidhche go Tráig an Cama ag iasgach sgadán. Bhí an comarta againn a bhfearr a bhí ag na sean-daoine riamh ar sgadáin i.e. sgadán ar fhaid an lín sa mogal iochtair - ní shéanfaidís go deó an dógh san. Ach ba bheag ar ár ndream-na fó-sgadán mar sin. Bhórdálmair na líonta agus d'imthigheamair ar a shon go raibh bád eile ag cur ann sar ar fhágamair agus cuala na dhiaidh san gur líon sí sin í féin leo. Ach is amhlaidh a bhí
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:54
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There is a well in Gurtroe called Saint Bartholomew's Well, and long ago, the people used pay "rounds" there. There is a path going into it. It is said that there was a fence built around it in one night
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:52
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rejected
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men is still living.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:50
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pluck some water lilies before she started on her journey. She went down to the lake, and went out to a little bank. She caught hold of a branch and then (stop) stooped to pick some lilies. Unfortunately the branch broke and she fell into the deep water and was drowned. When her sisters were weary waiting for her to return, they decided to go to the lake and so they discovered what had happened.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:50
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rejected
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bhíodh an sgadán annsan i.e. nuair a bhíonn an béirneáil ann - ach ar barra.
Chuadhmair siar oidhche go Tráig an Cama ag iasgach sgadán.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:48
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rejected
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I have a little man outside in the field,
When I pull his leg, his nose will bleed.
A pump.
There was a man in Adam's race,
Who lived in a certain place.
Neither in heaven nor in hell,
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:46
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rejected
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One, if it was long enough.
When is a door a-jar?
When it is partly open.
Two twin brothers were born in March. Their birthday was September the tenth, and when one of them was twenty, the other was twenty too. Explain this.
Both were born in a place called March.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:46
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rejected
awaiting decision
aige agus thug leis an leathphingne eile. Thógadh sé anáirde an deargán mór, d'fheuchadh sé air agus deireadh, "Muise is maith an marga ar phingin é."
An Sgadán:
Níor thóg an sgadán aon baidhte riamh. Dá dtógfadh gheóbhthaí duine éigin a gheóbhadh baidhte do. Agus ní lú' ná bíonn aon nidh riamh istig na ghoille. Níl aon iasg sa bhfairrge is onóraó ná an sgadán. Níor chúl sé riamh ó'n líon agus is minic ná beadh ach a puisín istig sa mhogal. Dá dtabharfadh sé aon únthairt do féin bheadh sé bun-os-cionn leis an líon mar ná bíonn aon greim air. Mar gheall ar sin is ana deacair na líonta sgadán do thabhairt isteach gan cuid de'n iasg a thuiteam asta. Ní lú' a chasann an sgadán ó'n líon ach ahasfadh an rógaire mairciréil chóh tapaidh agus chasfadh coinín. Thíos is mó a bhíonn na sgadáin agus cuirtaí clocha ar an dtéid- buinn cun na líonta do dhoimhniú. Is minic ná chíofá aon chorc ach an corc cinn-lín. Bhíodh na clocha i ngiorracht trí feádh dá chéile. Nuair a theastóchadh uait iad d'árdú ó'n dtalamh annsan d'fhéadfá gach aon tarna chloch do chaitheamh as. Ní hi bhfairrge a chaithfá iad amhthach ach iad do cur go deas cruínn i dteannta chéile isteach i dtóin an bháid mar a mbeidís le fágail airís agat gan puinn duaig nuair a teastóchadh uait. Nuair a bhíodh béirneáil ann ní cuirtaí aon chloch leis an líon mar ní ar tóin a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:39
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rejected
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damp?
Because he is licked and put in a corner.
When is a wet umbrella like fat?
When it is dripping.
Why is the cat's tail like a swan's bosom?
Because it grows down.
What crack is invisible by the naked eye?
The crack of a whip.
What side of the cat's tail is most furry?
The outside.
When may funds be supposed to be unsteady ?
When money is tight.
What trees have fires no effect upon?
Ashes, of course. When they are burnt, they are ashes still.
What man marries a wife and still is
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:36
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rejected
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aige agus thug leis an leathphingne eile. Thógadh sé anáirde an deargán mór, d'fheuchadh sé air agus deireadh, "Muise is maith an marga ar phingin é."
An Sgadán:
Níor thóg an sgadán aon baidhte riamh. Dá dtógfadh gheóbhthaí duine éigin a gheóbhadh baidhte do. Agus ní lú' ná bíonn aon nidh riamh istig na ghoille. Níl aon iasg sa bhfairrge is onóraó ná an sgadán. Níor chúl sé riamh ó'n líon agus is minic ná beadh ach a puisín istig sa mhogal. Dá dtabharfadh sé aon únthairt do féin bheadh sé bun-os-cionn leis an líon mar ná bíonn aon greim air
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:35
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seaside?
The bay and the beach.
Why may we assume that a student is very hungry?
Because he devours his books.
What is the difference between a burglar and a man wearing a wig?
One has false locks, and the other has false keys.
When is money damp?
When it is due in the morning and missed in the night.
When does a bicycle require rest?
When the wheels are tyred.
Why does a donkey eat thistles?
Because he's an ass.
Why does a person sneeze three times?
Because he cannot help it.
Why is a naughty boy like a postage-
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:30
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When is a soldier not a soldier?
When he is in quarters.
What nation does a criminal dread?
Condemnation.
What is the waist of time?
The middle of the hour-glass.
What is the centre of gravity?
V.
What bed is soft, well-covered, and nicely made, yet never meant to be slept in?
A flower-bed.
My first is quality, my second inferiority, and my whole superiority?
Match-less.
Why is an author one of the most unbelieving persons?
Because he always requires proof of his own work.
What two trees remind us most of the
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:27
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rejected
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nó rith ar chuid acu agus an taoide tanaighe.
Bhíodh Seana Dhiarmuid ag tabhairt na n-iasgán ó'n nDaingean i gcliabh ar a drom leis cun baidhti iasgaig bhíodh an tiasg go flúirseach an uair sin agus ní raibh na h-iasgáin annso thíos aig an gCorainn mar atáid anois. Bhíodh Diarmuid a dtabhairt leis i gcliabh ar a drom agus á gcur i dtaisge thíos annso. Lá agus é Bun Cala aniar buail Donnchadh na leathóg leis. Lá ana bhrothallach a b'eadh é. "Tabharfa' mé pingin duit ach an cliabh so thabhairt go Tráigh - Bheag dom," ar seisean le Donnchadh. Ní raibh a thuile air. Thóg Donnchadh an cliabh agus chuir ar a dhrom féin é. Fear mór láidir go raibh goile trír aige a deiridís a b'eadh Donnchadh. "Tabharfat' mé pingin eile dhuit má thugann tú mé féin in aoinfeacht leis an gcliabh," arsa Diarmuid. "Diabhal teip" arsa Donnchadh. Chuir sé an cliabh ar an gclaidhe agus suidh Diarmuid anáirde air. Nuair tháinig sé go barra Baile'n tSagairt, "Ar son Dé ar seisean é, "gaibh anuas tá na braighideáin ag gabháilt síos tríom' ghuaile."
Cun deargán mór a cheannach a bhíodh an phingin uaidh. Ní cheannóchadh sé aon deargán ach ceann mór. Bhí sé lá agus ní raibh ach leathphingne aige agus chuir sé dúil i ndeargán mór ach ní bhfuigheadh sé gan an phingin é. Cuir sé an leathphingne mar éirnist ann agus seo abhaile leis, pé áit thiar i mBun Cala go raibh bothán
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:27
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Because they are made for tou-rists.
Why is 900,000 a bad number?
Because its very naughty.
What is the key-note to good manners?
B natural.
It's neither inside nor outside, and still its under the roof of the house?
The window.
As round as an apple, as flat as a pan, On one side a woman, on the other a man.
A penny.
At what time was Adam married?
Upon his wedding Eve.
Why is the letter A like a honey-suckle?
Because its followed by the B.
When does an individual consist of a great number?
When he is a host.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:26
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nó rith ar chuid acu agus an taoide tanaighe.
Bhíodh Seana Dhiarmuid ag tabhairt na n-iasgán ó'n nDaingean i gcliabh ar a drom leis cun baidhti iasgaig bhíodh an tiasg go flúirseach an uair sin agus ní raibh na h-iasgáin annso thíos aig an gCorainn mar atáid anois. Bhíodh Diarmuid a dtabhairt leis i gcliabh ar a drom agus á gcur i dtaisge thíos annso. Lá agus é bun Cala aniar buail Donnchadh na leathóg leis. Lá ana bhrothallach a b'eadh é. "Tabharfa' mé pingin duit ach an cliabh so thabhairt go Tráigh - Bheag dom," ar seisean le Donnchadh. Ní raibh a thuile air. Thóg Donnchadh an cliabh agus chuir ar a dhrom féin é. Fear mór láidir go raibh goile trír aige a deiridís a b'eadh Donnchadh. "Tabharfat' mé pingin eile dhuit má thugann tú mé féin in aoinfeacht leis an gcliabh," arsa Diarmuid. "Diabhal teip" arsa Donnchadh. Chuir sé an cliabh ar an gclaidhe agus suidh Diarmuid anáirde air. Nuair tháinig sé go barra Baile'n tSagairt, "Ar son Dé ar seisean é, "gaibh anuas tá na braighideáin ag gabháilt síos tríom' ghuaile."
Cun deargán mór a cheannach a bhíodh an phingin uaidh. Ní cheannóchadh sé aon deargán ach ceann mór. Bhí sé lá agus ní raibh ach leathphingne aige agus chuir sé dúil i ndeargán mór ach ní bhfuigheadh sé gan an phingin é. Cuir sé an leathphingne mar éirnist ann agus seo abhaile leis, pé áit thiar i mBun Cala go raibh bothán
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:20
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bhí cé fuair é go raibh pota eile le na thaobh. Níor dhúbhairt sé tada acht imthacht leis amach do dtí an sgeach. Thosuigh sé ag baint nó gur casadh leach cruínn leis. Dírígh sé an leac agus faoí an leac bhí pota breágh óir. Thóig sé leis é agus thug isteach go dtína mháthair é. Uaidhe sin amach ní raibh easpa biadh ná deoch ar féin á ar a mháthair.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:17
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theach féin atá sé. do bhí mise ag brionglóide gur raibh pota óir faoi sgeach gheal. Annsin cuimhnigh an fear bocht go raibh a leithid de sgeach ina gharrdha féin. Núair a chúaidh sé abhaile bhí an ocras air agus ní raibh le n-ithe aige acht builín a raibh caonach liath air. Dith sé agus dól sé a sháith. Thug sé leis a láige agus thosaigh sé ag baint. Fá dheireadh thíar casadh áill leis agus dírígh sé í agus casadh an pota leis. Rith sé isteach agus an pota ina láimh. O arsa a mháthair ní amadán ar fad thú. Annsin d'failigh sí an pota agus chuir síad a brothadh rudaí ar an teine é . Maidin amháin do raib an pota ar an teine tháinig sgoilaire isteach. Thosuigh sé ag breathnughadh sé ar an bpota, agus thug an fá deara é. "Ce'n fáth a bhfuil tú ag breathnughadh ar an bpota le do thoil" ar saisean. "ó ar seisean tá fáth leis. Séard atá sgríobhtha ar bpota fé
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:12
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Swallows flying around a lough.
When water-hens stay in the ditch.
When the seagulls are high.
When the wind whistles is a sure sign of rain.
Midges rising from the heather.
When the smoke swirls in the chimney and comes down again.
When clouds hang low on the hills.
When the wind is on the front door.
Signs of good weather:-
When crows fly high it is a sign of good weather.
Smoke going straight in the heaven's is a sign of good weather.
Red in the west at sunset leave a fine day on the morrow.
A mist in the morning is a sign of good weather.
When frogs have a bright coat there will be good weather.
A backward May leaves a good harvest.
When the weather blade is astir
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:05
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if the stick cut the animal it would poison him.
Long ago the people thatched houses with spars and reed or straw. They thatched in bays. They usually made bays from 21 to 24 inches wide. The spars were put in a straight line and were called stretchers. They had other spars to drive down through the thatch to hold the stretchers. They usually put twenty-one lines of spars from top to bottom.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:04
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Bhí fear bocht ina chómhnaidhe i gConamara fadó. Ní raibh ins an teach acht é féin agus mháthair. Oidhche amháin bhí brionglóid aige go raibh pota óir faoi dhroichead Luimnígh. Do mhair an bhrionglóid dhó ar feadh trí oidhche. An ceathramhadh maidin d'imthígh sé leis nó go dtáinig sé go dtí an droichead. Shiúbhail sé an droichead sóir agus síar faoi agus ós a chíonn. D'fhan sé ag siúbhal mar sin ar feadh seachtmhaine. Do bhí táilliúr ina chómhnaidhe inaice leis an droichead. Núair a chonnaic sé an fear ag siúbhal tháinig sé amach go bhfeicfheadh cé a bhí ann. Núair a chonnaic sé d'fhíafruigh sé dhó céard a bhí sé a dhéanamh. Ó muise brion-glóide a bhí agam go raibh pota óir faoin droichead seo. Ó muise nach tú an tamadán ag tabhairt géilleadh de brionglóide mar sin.
Sílimse gur thíar ag do
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:03
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and red. The green paint was got from grass which was ground in the mouth. The yellow paint was got from the yoke of an egg. The red paint was got from blood from the finger.
Before St. Brigid's day the old people made crosses with rushes. Six rushes were used and they were platted. These crosses were worn on St. Brigid's day (and placed under the rafters in the thatched cabins. One cross each year).
Lus na mbánta was used for curing warts. It was boiled in goat's milk and it was then rubbed to the warts.
The people used slánlus to stop bleeding. It was ground in the mouth and it was put to the cut.
Names of things for making butter in olden times
The stand-churn:- the staff, the lid, the cup. The piggin, the keeler, the skimmel, the firkin, and the cream-tub.
{in the left margin}
St Brigid's Cross.
{drawing of St. Brigid's Cross}
as Mrs Julia O'Connor (76) Farrankeal Knocknagree still makes them.
D. Ó M.
"Judy" as she is known also hangs a red piece of flannel on the tree outside her house every year on St. Brigid's Eve. for protection against harm
D.ÓM.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 11:01
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nó rith ar chuid acu agus an taoide tanaighe.
Bhíodh Seana Dhiarmuid ag tabhairt na n-iasgán ó'n nDaingean i gcliabh ar a drom leis cun baidhti iasgaig bhíodh an tiasg go flúirseach an uair sin agus ní raibh na h-iasgáin annso thíos aig an gCorainn mar atáid anois. Bhíodh Diarmuid a dtabhairt leis i gcliabh ar a drom agus á gcur i dtaisge thíos annso. Lá agus é bun Cala aniar buail Donnchadh na leathóg leis. Lá ana bhrothallach a b'eadh é. "Tabharfa' mé pingin duit ach an cliabh so thabhairt go Tráigh - Bheag dom," ar seisean le Donnchadh. Ní raibh a thuile air. Thóg Donnchadh
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:57
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ar an gceac, ar an lacha, ar an ngé agus ar an gcoileach. "A ndéanfainc síbh cáca dhom, ní déanfaidhe ars' siadsan. Rinne sé cásca agus chuir sí ag broth é. Núair a bhí an cáca bruidte ghlaoidh sí ortha arís. Cé agaibh a íosfas an cása seo. D'fhreagair síad go léar agus dúbhairt íosfadh mise íosfadh mise. Sílm ar sise go n-íosfaighe mé féin é. Dhúin sé amach a doras agus d'fhág sí a comradaí taobh amuigh. Núair a bhreathnuigh sí amach ar maidin bhí lán na sráide caointe acu mar gheáll nach bhfúair siad an cáca.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:56
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On the wren's day the boys used to dress in coloured rags. They used to go around in numbers. One of them carried a pig's bladder and if any person did not give them money they would hit him on the face with the bladder which they dabbed in mud.
For two days previous to St. John's night the boys gathered furze bushes to see who would have the biggest fire in the parish When they lit the fire they danced around it until it died out.
Before St. Patrick's Day the scholars carried an egg each to the women teachers. They made crosses for them to wear on St. Patricks day. These were made with a gabhlóg. They were painted green, yellow
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:54
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They were very thin and worn but the brand was plain. They were made in the sixteenth century. Two Healys lived in Páirch na gCnoc where the remains of houses were dug out. Michael Connell lived there in years later. He also lived in an outhouse in Batt Hickeys yard.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:53
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gCnoc (see Chart) every Sunday and the old people say that the fifers who played there were the best in Ireland at that time. Batt Hickey also found five pieces of silver when he was ploughing about thirty two years ago and gave some of them to Fr. O'Connor who was curate in the parish and he sent them to the Museum asking £1 apiece for them. They were sent back to him because he had asked too much. Nothing is known about them since. He also rooted up the remains of pavements, grates and ashes when the remains of the old house were dug out. (See na Fothracha on Chart)
The pieces of silver found were made in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. Some were about the size of a half-crown and others about the size of a shilling.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:53
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bhfuil aon duine eile agad, tá ar seisean. Chuaidh Ceart ag marcuigheacht ar an gcapall acht níor chaith sí anúas. Is Tusa a bhí ann arsise agus phós sí é.
Scríobhtha síios ó m-athair
Seán Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Gleánn Mór
Sgéal
Bhí cearc beag ann fadó agus ní raibh aicí ach í féin. Lá amháin chúaidh sí amach ag cartadh ins an ngarraidhe. Ní raibh sí ibhfad ag cartadh gur casadh gráine cruithneachtan léithí. Ó ars' sise ní bheidh easba plúir go bráth orm. Chuir sí an gráine agus d'fhás sé go maith. Núair a bhí an gráine fásta chuir sí go dtí an muillean é. Núair a tháinig an gáine amach ghlaoidh sí ar a comrádaí, ar an mada
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:51
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The Claidhe Ábram runs from Olladh to Nohoval Church-yard. It was made one night by the good people and along that ditch they were to carry the corpses to Nohval. It is running through Daniel O'Connor's land to Sonny Buckley's, through Dan Twomey's to Denis Leary's, through Hugh O'Keeffe's to Tom Fitzgeralds, through Dan Buckley's to John Linehan's, through Batt Hickey's to Den Hickey's, through Andrew Moynihan's to Mick Murphy's, through William Breen's to Pat Breen's, through Den Bradley's to Hugh Twomey's and through Andrew Buckley's to the grave-yard. The Claidhe Ábram is the only straight ditch in Cork and Kerry. It is four miles long, seven[?] feet high and six feet wide. It was made about one hundred and ten years ago. There was a fine plantation for dancing in Páirc na
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:49
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in the seventeenth century.
There are some very old roads in the district but some of them are very rugged roads and people do not travel on them. The most of the roads were made during the famine year so as to give employment and relief to the famine stricken of the country.
The old paths are still seen in the fields. They are now used by people going to mass and the boys coming to school. There is a pass way in the field that is opposite the parish chaple. Before bridges were made the people had to put old planks and doors across rivers.
Every Sunday during Summer crowds of young men gather
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:48
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awaiting decision
táinig sí isteach chonnaic sí an builín leagtha ar an mbord. "Cá bhfúair sibh an builín sin: ar sise. "Duine uasal a bhí ag dul thárt ansin a thug dhúinn é" ar síadsan. "Is liomsa é sin" ar sise. "Ní leat" ar síadsan. "Cé is feárr é a thabhairt ná clocar a dhéanamh go do teach" ar sise. Annsin thug síad an builín dhe gus d'imthigh sé leithí. Do bhí sí ag imtheacht nó go sí go dtí teach mhac rí Éireann. "A raibh éinne agaibh thoir ins domhan thoir". "Bhí sé sin sin ann" arsa an t-athair. "Is gearr go mbeidh fhios agam-sa é" arsise. Thóig sí capailín beag aníos as a póca. Téigh a marcuigheacht ar an gcapall sin. Chúaidh sé ag marcuigheacht agus chaith sé anúas ar an talamh. Bhí sé sin ann freisin arsa an t-athair. "Téigh a marcuigheacht ar an gcapall sin" ar sise. Núair a chúaidh sé ag marcuigheacht ar an gcapall agus chaith sé anuas faoín talamh é. "Ní raibh sé sin ann" arsise.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:45
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shows how clanish the people were. The worst evening that Knocknagree remembered was one on which the Barry supporters were lined up on the western side of the village and the Guiney contingent on the eastern. Some were on horseback, some on foot and many carried revolvers. It was customary to bring sticks and pockets filled with stones. Things looked threatening - both parties were gradually closing in and a clash seemed imminent when Revd. John James O'Sullivan C.C. (1905-1911) appeared on the scene in his horse and trap. He drove his horse between the parties and kept moving up and down between them appealing to them to turn back. His appeal was not in vain He succeeded in getting the parties to withdraw and soon the crowds scattered. Many a wife and mother and sister were praying for Fr. John James that day (says Denis).
Note Barry was John Redmond's nominee and Guiney, William O'Briens
Other very clanish families were the Caseys, in Knocknagree the Horans in Rathmore and the OConnors in Gneeveguilla.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:44
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a duck and a duck in the middle?
Three ducks.
70 As I was going to the fair of Ives. I met nine tinkers and their wives. Then nine tinkers had nine cats then nine cats had nine kittens, how many was going to the fair of Ives?
One.
71 Why is smiles the longest word in the English language?
Because it has a mile in the middle of it.
72 When is a gander a goose?
When he is on the table.
73 As round as an apple as deep as a pail it never rings out until it is caught by the tail?
A bell.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:41
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What is the difference between a black hen and a white hen ?
The black hen can lay a white egg and the white hen cannot lay a black egg.
What meat is never cheap?
Deer flesh.
When is a building like a bird?
When it has wings.
Ink, ank, under the bank, ten drawing four.
A woman milking a cow.
What do you break immediately you name it?
Silence.
Why is the sun like a good loaf?
Because its light when it rises.
Why is a field of grass like a person passed your age?
Because its older than yourself.
Why are handcuffs like guide-books?
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:40
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an bhainrioghan leithe nó go dtáinig sí go dtí an chéad teach ar fhága sé an buidéal uisge. Nuair a tháinig an bhainríoghan isteach chonnaic sí an buidéal uisge ar an mbord. "Cá bhfuair síbh an buidéal sin" ar sise. "Duine uasal a bhí a dul thárt a thug dúinne é" ar síad-san. "Is liomsa é sin" ars sise. "Ní leat" ar síadsan. "Cé is feárr leat é a choinghbeál ná clochar a dhéanamh go dtí do theach" ar sise. Annsin thug síad an buidéal dhí agus dimthígh sí léithí. Dimthíg sí léithí go dtí an teach ar fhág sé an claidheamh Núair a chuaidh sí isteach chonnaic sí an claidheamh crochta ar an mballa. "Cá bhfuair sibh an claidheamh sin" ar sise. "Duine úasal a bhí ag dul thárt annsin a thug dúinn é" ar síadsan. "Is liom-sa é sin" ar sise. "Ní leat" ar sise. "Cé is feárr leat é a thabhairt ná clochar a dhéanamh go do theach" ars sise. Thug síad di an claidheamh agus dimthigh sí leithí nó go dtáinig sí go dtí an teach ar fhág sé an builín ann. Núair a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:40
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A bed.
35 As round as a biscuit and as busy as a bee?
A watch.
36 Ink ank under the bank ten drawing four?
A woman milking a cow.
37 What goes up when the rain comes down?
An umbrella.
38 Father, Mother, sister and brother running after one an other all day and cannot catch one another?
Four wheels of a motor.
39 What man wears the highest hat?
The man with the highest head.
40 What burns to keep a secret?
Sealing wax.
41 Round the wood and round the wood and never gets into the wood?
The bark of a tree.
42 A man goes away above the ground and returns under it?
A man with sods on his head.
43 One half dead another half living a tail wagging?
A dog with his head in a pot.
44 Around the house and around the house and whistles in the key hole?
The wind.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:38
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The cure for a burn was linseed oil and lime-water. The cure they had for a bile was to make an ointment of sugar and soap and mixed them together. The cure they had for "crálach" was to tie a strap round the wrist which touched an eel. The cure they had for the whooping cough was to a ask a man with a white horse and he would tell them a cure. A foxes tongue was supposed to take out thorns person's feet. The cure they had for tooth-aches was to burn a sugar paper and snuff up to to the nose. The cure the people had for a sore throat was to rub castor oil and flannel-cloth and tie the cloth around the neck. The cure they had for warts was to make the sign of the cross on the wart with water that would be on a stone, The cure they
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:33
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g siad. Céard a bheadh roimhe ag an gcros bhóthar acht Art agus Meart. D'fhiarfruigh síad de a raibh an uisge aige agus dúbhairt sé go raibh ó ar siadsan nár laga Dia thú. Do bhí teach ósta ar taobh cros-bhóthair. Thug siad iseach ins teach ósta é agus thug ól dó, gur siad ar meisge é. Annsin ghoid siad an buidéal uisge uaidhe agus chúaidh siad abhaile. D'ól an tathair an buidéal agus ba gheárr go raibh sé go maith. Nuair a tháinig síad abhaile d'fhiafruigh an athair cá raibh Ceart. Dúbhairt síadsan go raibh sé ar meisge ins an teach ósta. Nuair a tháinig sé abhaile cuireadh ina sglábhiaidhe é ag obair do'n chuid eile. mhair sé mar sin ar feadh earnáil fhada. Nuair a dhúisigh an bainríoghan chonnaic sí go raibh an claidheamh an buidéal agus an builín imighthe. Annsin chuir sí fios ar an eascoin agus d'fhíafruigh sí dí a raibh éinne ann ó thuit sí ina codladh. Dúbhairt an eascoin go raibh. O arsa an bhainríoghain fúair mé boladh an Éireann. D'imthígh
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:31
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people long ago used to wear clogs which were stuffed with hay.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:24
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What has no legs but can run?
A water-tap.
What three letters frighten a thief?
I. C. U.
What three letters are possessed by a clever man?
A. Y. Z.
What letter of the alphabet is mostly used by a shoe-maker?
The last.
What do we catch but never see?
A passing remark.
Which is the strongest day in the week?
Sunday because the rest are week-days.
Why is a promise like wine?
Because it improves by being kept.
When is a piece of wood like a king?
When it is made into a ruler.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:17
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In 1846 the potato crop failed and everybody was very distressed as they depended solely on potatoes, and now that they had failed a terrible famine set in, and people died in thousands of famine and fever.
In Stewick a mile and a quarter from Askeaton, there stands a large old house and it locally known as "the old hospital" because it was used as a hospital during the great famine. There is another hospital situated near our school but it is not as large as Stewick Hospital.
During the famine people used to eat turnips, nettles, and Indian meal. The meal was boiled in water and was called "Stir a about".
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:13
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Lynche's Fort: This is also situated in Moig but the trees in it were cut down by Mr. Lynch who afterwards suffered from blood poisoning in his hands.
Atavilla Fort: This fort is much the same in shape as the others. One night the people of that district saw lights in the fort, they also heard noises like the galloping of horses, and the noise of travelling carriages.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:10
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slab downward, There is also a tradition, that it was by a poor man, named Sheerane it was split who cut down an ash tree here for fire-wood about 50 years ago.
This inscription besides proving approximately, the date of the erection of Ballinafad Castle, also proves that the Church of Aughanagh was destroyed before 1628, for otherwise there would not have been this interment beside The High Altar.
It proves also that St. Barbe was a Protestant, as there is no request for a prayer for the repose of his soul, a sign that he did not hold the doctrine of Purgatory. We might safely say that the church was in ruins, at least about seventy years at the time of St. Barbe's death, which would bring us very near the destruction of Boyle Abbey. In fact, it is practically certain it was one
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:10
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There are fairs held in Askeaton each month during the year. There is a special date for the fair each year. They are held on different dates each month. Cattle, sheep and sheep, and pigs are sold at the fair, and horses are never sold at the Askeaton fair.
When buyers buy cattle they mark them, with mud or by cutting them with the scissors. Each buyer has his own mark. when the bargain is made the buyer writes a ticket showing the price of the and he gives it to the seller.
There is a great arguments about the luck money. The luck money is usually 1/6 or 2/= a head. The fairs are held in East Square. There are very small at present, as every beast is so dear. Farmers and Labourers usually attend the fairs.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:10
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One dark night long ago, a man went out to the Caldhra fort to look at cattle which he had in it.
The man heard a noise and he looked up and he saw a beautiful coach with light coming through the windows.
There were for beautiful black horses in it and it was flying at about twenty feet in the air.
Suddenly it vanished near the edge of the fort. The next night the man was out in the fort and he saw the coach again but this time there was a man with no head on him standing on top of it.
There were four soldiers standing on top of it also. The man ran home and he said "I will never go to the fort at night again.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:08
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There was a Jewman and an Irishman travelling together. They were two pedlars. One day they were in Dublin and there was a party in a house there and the party was free of charge. When the pedlars saw all the people going into the house they said they would chance going in too. So they followed the people into the house. When they were inside the door was shut and a man went around with a box gathering the money. The pedlars had no money to give him so the Jewman said to the Irishman "Is there any way out of it". "Faix there is says the Irishman". What is it said the Jewman?" "When the man comes around with the box I will faint and let you pick me up and I bet you they will open the door and leave us out". So when the man came the Irishman fainted and the Jewman picked him up and the doors were opened and they were left out. The Jewman even had to get help to carry him out he was so bad by the way. When the two got outside the door they made off.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:05
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agus cíor agus éadaig agus broga. Fanann síad seachtain linn. Bíonn malaí móra leathar leobhtha ar a ndruim. Bhíonn failte rompa. Codhluigeann síád i seomra beag ins an teach. Bíonn biadh leobhtha cor uair agus uaireannta eile tagann muinntir an tighe biadh dóibh. Bíonn síad ag iarraid déirce cor uair. Is é deírce na rudaí a thugann muinntir an tighe dóibh nuair a bhionn síad ag imtigheacht uatha.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:05
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the grave-yard. The old ruins can easily be seen up from the road by its Ivy clad walls. Captain John St. Barbe lies in the grave-yard of Aughanagh, between the grave of Doctor Duggan and the wall of the Church, to the East of Hewston tomb. On removing a large heap of elder branches there appeared nothing but clay. but on sounding this with a crow-bar there was a slab struck four inches beneath the surface. On raising this, was found on the reverse side a carving of a beautiful coat of arms with an inscription : - The coat of arms was a helmet, standing over a field of a number of squares, and surmounted with an eagle. On each side fell down tassels, Under these [amour] armourial bearings was the Epitaph Here lieth the body of Captain John St. Barbe who died May 29th Ano Domini 1628.
The slab was broken in two, under the Epitaph were two versicles. The local tradition has been that Father Egan P.P. (d1848 was buried in this grave and that the people not wishing to have a non-Catholic epitaph of St. Barbe appear over him, turned the
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:03
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The Landlord
The local landlord who resided in this district was Sir Jocelyn Gore-Booth, and before him his father Sir Henry Gore-Booth occupied the position. The family have been settled in the district for generations and they were looked upon as good landlords.
There were evictions carried out in the district known as the "Seven Cartons". (?) In this district there were a lot of poor people living in tumbled down cottages, these were knocked down and the people were sent away on an old sailing ship to America called the "Pomeno". They never landed in America, because the ship sank and all the people were lost.
The local people do not know how the landlord first came into possessions of the land. The gave farms of land to any well wishers they might have had and farms were not sub-divided among members of families on marriage except where there was an extra large farm.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:03
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Children never wore boots in former times. An old woman Peggy Hough, who dies recently never wore a boot. An old cattle drover, who spent his life driving cattle from fair to fair never wore a boot. His name was Máirtín Purcell.
A man names Hart from Birr used attend fairs about 60years ago and sold brogues from a "cish" at about 2/6 a pair.
Clogs were common long ago and one old man Mike Nevin who died a few years ago wore them till he died.
There was a shoe maker Pat Meaney in Tiranascragh 50 years ago. There is no
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:03
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where you found me you will find a big pot of gold. The boy was delighted and he ran out the door but it happened that his mother was coming in with a gallon of milk. The boy was in such a hurry that he knocked the milk out of her hand and spilled it about the house.
When the mother saw the doony max she got vexed and said "Go away you little wretch for you have brought bad luck into my house and she then kicked them outside the door. Then the young lad ran off to the pookapile to find the pot of gold. He dug and dug but he could find no pot of gold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:01
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Tagann síad go dtí ár dteach ó am go h am. Bíonn earraidhe beaga a ndíol aca. Bíonn pictiuiri beaga
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 10:00
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bhiod ag taisteail uatha ó daoine a bhíod ag dul thart ar chaiple. Bhíod earraid a ndíol fado in aice an t-seipéal. Chruinnuigeadh muinntir an bhaile le chéile agus d'fagadh síad a lán earraid ó na daoine a bhíod áth ndíol go dtí go mbíod an t-airgead aca. Ní raibh airgead go fluirseach fadó. Thugadh daoine laetheannta oibre ar earraid a geobhadh síad gan tada. Bhiod leisg ar daoine rudaí a dhíol nó a cheannacht ar an domhnach. Bhíodh an margadh ar siubhal ins na tighthe bíonn an margadh ar siubhail in na tighthe go fóill.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:57
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Mr. Flanagan's wood supplies the needs of a greater number. On the Southern side of the townland, there is another road called the Flunky road.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:56
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Ní raibh morán siopaí i mó cheanntar fadó. Cheannuigeadh na daoine na rudaí a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:56
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A path whereby the priest was want to go. Let all who may pass there
Throw a stone and say a prayer
For the soggarth in that path who is lying low
There is no heather in that path which well I know
Flowering heather in that path doth even grow
His body there was thrown
But his spirit now flown.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:54
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There was a very sad accident in Corrigeenroe in 1876. A young man named Judge was drowned. He was only nineteen years of age. He worked for Mrs. Woulfe Flanagan in Drundoe. On the 10th day of July he and two comrade boys went out to bathe on Lough Arrow.
He was a very good swimmer, but he went out too far and when he called for help his comrades were not able to get as far as him. So he was drowned, and that night his body was taken out of the water by a man named Pat Coughlan. This body was a widow's only son, and it was very sad to see her boy brought home dead next day.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:50
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the penal days.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:47
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I
Beyond the great Atlantic foam,
An Irish exile laboured long,
To save the kindred folk at home,
From the unmerciful and strong;
At length fatigue began to prey,
Upon his hardy stalwart frame,
And then it was, that night and day,
A sad repiner he became.
II
He mourned for the blissful days,
That hitherto he did enjoy,
Ere that the world's world's winding ways,
Did his yound tender ways annoy;
The scenes of youth though long gone by,
Were pictured in his dreams anew,
Which caused him many a tear and sigh,
And any a pang of anguish too.
III
Whilst reflections brought him pain,
It got impressed upon his mind,
That he should steer his course again,
Back for the land he left behind;
Unawed by either wind or tide
Let fates decree be woe or weal,
Necessaries he did provide
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:44
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Games I Play.
During the long summer days I find plenty of time for playing games and also during the long winter nights I play numerous games around the fire.
In the summer I go blackberry-picking and I greatly enjoy this pastime. I also love to go out skipping through the fields and when I return from school in the evening I do all the messages for my mother. In spring I spend my spare time gardening. I own a little garden and I have several kinds of flowers growing there and as the weeds grow more quickly than the flowers I am kept very busy weeding it.
At school we play a game called "tig". A number of children run together and two of the number try to catch the others. A game which we play at home during the winter months is called "The Old Maid". In this game the cards are all dealt out with the exception of the three Queens, each player then throws out any matching cards she has, they then pull
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:40
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And re-embarked for Innisfail.
IV
In ten days hence without a squall,
He reached the land that gave him birth,
Which was more prized by him than all,
The vast enpires of the earth,
The Israelites in days of yore,
Were not more satisfied than he,
When Jordan's water they passed o'er.
To take the land destined for them.
V
But here this weary lone exile,
Stood penniless upon the road,
Though many a long an dreary mile,
Lay 'twixt him and the old abode;
And whilst proceeding on his way,
His eyes were fixed attentively,
Upon the point the homestead lay, Which he desired long to see.
VI
At length he saw the poplar tree,
Which served the garden as a fence,
And saved from whirl-wind and breeze,
The old parental residence;
Twas thither then with trembling feet,
And throbbing heart he did repair,
But when he entered on the street
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:34
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Local Poets.
Long ago poets were more numerous in my district than they are at the present time. The poets of olden times are said to have got the gift of poetry from their ancestors. The people of my district have forgotten all about poets.
There is a young man living in Raughley, named Ewing, who is known to have composed poems. There is an old man living in the same townland and it is said that it was from him Mr. Ewing learned the art of composing.
Another brilliant poetess was Miss Eva Gore-Booth, sister of the present Sir Jocelyn Gore-Booth of Lissadell. Among the many poems which she composed was one entitled "The Little Town of Breffny".
Mr. William Allingham of Glencar is also a famous poet. He wrote a poem entitled "The Winding Banks of Erne".
Ada Shaw,
Nunstown,
Co. Sligo.
Told to me by:-
Miss E. Shaw, (96)
Ballinagalliagh.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:29
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There was a vast difference in the bread used in this district in olden days and the bread used to-day. Flour was almost unknown to the old people.
Potatoes and oat meal took the place of flour the. The meal used in bread making was ground by means of querns. These were worked by the hand. Many of them are to be had and are still to be found in the district. The chief kind of bread used in olden days was boxty, stampy, oat meal bread and potato bread. The
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:25
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In old times there was one of the Glancys of Drumloughan going to get a child christened. She had a brother in law and sister in law with him. They were walking and when they were passing by Garvey's gate they saw a little house and a little red woman outside the door feeding 30 red hens. Glancy wondered because he never saw the house there before. When they were coming home the pair that was with Clancy missed the house and ashed where it was gone to. That night Glancy was telling the neighbours about seeing the little house and the little red woman and an old man that was on his ceílidhe in Glancy's said "I often heard that in olden times there lived a witch woman in a little house near where Garvey's gate is now."
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:21
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boxty was made by mixing a certain complement of grated potatoes wrung dry potatoes. The mixture was shaped in little dumplings and boiled in a pot of water. The potato bread was made from a mixture of potatoes and oat meal and baked on a griddle. The oat meal bread was a sole mixture of oat meal. This bread was baked on a bread iron and oftentimes on the "greesha". Sometimes the people managed to purchase a quarter stone of flour. This was only on rare occasions. The cakes were always signed with the sign of the Cross was always cut on the cake. There is a beautiful story told of the reason why the Irish people always cut the sign of the Cross on bread. Many years ago a poor man bearing a Cross in his hand went to the door of a poor family and asked for bread they had a small amount of bread but small as it was they gave it to him and fasted themselves.
The man blessed them and gave them
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:20
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There was a young girl one time by the name of Woods living in Cattan, parish of Gorthlettera and she died. There was a butcher living near hand and he was doing to her wake this night. When he was going along the road, he
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:20
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ar mo bhean. Bíonn sí ag riopáil mé. "Sé an rud is féarr dul anóis as an áit seo. Anois, adéir Sean, stop annseo go dtí an lá a thiocfaidh mé ar áis thiubhraidh mé airgead duit. Tá mo theach sios annsin agus má bhíonn do obair déantá bhuail do speál ar do ghuailainn, agus teidh sios agus abáir le mo bhean go raibh mé imthighthe go dtí Cuige Laighean. Nuair a tháinig an trathnóna dubhairt an féar leis féin, sé an rud is fearr dul síos chun an Sean Hero d'feicsint. Do thog sé an speal agus do chuir sé é ar a ghuaileann agus do bhuail sé tharais. Bhí aige dul treasna na h-abhann agus bhí plank ar an abhainn. Nuair a bhí sé leath treasna do thuit sé isteach ins an abhainn. Do thuit an speal ar a cheann agus do bhain sé an cheann de.
Tháinig an oidhche, agus do chuir an Sean-Hero filleadh uirrí agus tháinig sí
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:19
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Famine Times.
The old people in my district still tell stories which they heard from their parents about the Great Famine of 1845-47. Owing to the famine the price of potatoes, oats and other crops became so high that oatmeal was sold at a penny per pound. The famine was followed by fever and often the fever cholera appeared and several people in this district, whose names I can't find out, were victims of these diseases.
Many people who worked in the town could not go because business was suspended and nearly all the shops were closed and people were dying daily in hundreds. This famine and fever was so terrible that the population of Sligo fell from 15,000 to 12,000 people.
When the famine first began it was not long until blight appeared on the potatoes and when this happened the people were stricken with despair because with the failure of the potato-crop, which was their last and only hope, the only things they had to eat
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:16
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I heard my mother tell the following. It happened when she was a young girl about 60 years ago.
A woman started from the top of Tooma Hill with a gallon and she went into the fields where the cattle were and she milked one squirt from each cow. She passed along the country as far as Dunnaghmore and milked every cow along the way. The word went around that she was out milking, and several people were afraid to drive their cows home to the lyre so that she couldn't milk them. They were afraid to vex the fairies, for everyone believed she was a fairy. Nobody could ever tell where she went to, or where she came from. It happened about the month of May, and their wasn't half the butter off the cattle's milk that year.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:12
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You need not observe either carriage or care,
If you can glawna like a maniac,
And hug like a bear,
You can lash like a stallion and rear like a buck,
Crouch like a spaniel, and bow like a duck,
So what was regarded as vice in past days,
Seems now an accomplished worthy of praise
The habit of the people has got so much changed,
That there is nothing as good as to look half deranged
When the brutes of the fields and let loose from their stake,
They cut many a wild caper and frolocksome frace,
Thus the nature of brutes without reason or sense,
Those savage displays with great force to commence,
But man with both reason and sense in his head,
That acts like brute must be greatly mislear.
It appears the whole frolic was learned or borrowed
From lunatics, imbicle humowns or something more horrid,
So I say to the half set'er that I'll conclude,
That dance is most awkward, disqustful and rude,
Tis a play that commands neither praise or applause,
Because it transgresses the spiritual laws
(This was written by Poet Higgins)
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:12
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Travelling Folk.
Nowadays travelling folk do not visit my district as often as they used to long ago. Some of them travelling folk are very poor and make barely enough money to support themselves while other "travellers" do quite a good trade. They travel about from place to place in caravans.
They sell small articles such as pins, clothes-pegs, tie pins and several other things but it is seldom that the people buy from them. They are generally not welcome in my district but they seldom remain there for longer than a night at a time.
They beg food in the houses which they pass through on their journey through the country. In backward districts they often stay for a couple of days and the people gather round them to listen to their story-telling or to get their fortunes told.
Ada Shaw,
Nunstown,
Drumcliffe.
Told by
Mr. G. Shaw (60)
Nunstown,
Drumcliffe.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:09
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There was a woman one time and she went to visit a sick friend. She had to pass by two forts. It was just after "duskus" and when she was passing the first fort she heard a cry inside. When she was passsed it a little red woman dressed in different colours came out of the fort and followed her to the house of the sick woman. She went into the house and the little woman sat at the window sill and began to cry. The woman had to leave before daylight and when she came
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:02
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You light - footed trippers that is fond of a tune.
And searches for fun by the light of the moon
Go ahead and don't cease in your to advance
Till you meet what you term a terrible dance
In all the wide would you could not have met
A stranger display than the boorish half - set,
For in distrusted lodges this game was conceived
And in its performance great numbers believed,
Now in towns and in villages you can see there,
The half - set and whole - set performed with care
These beef eating bullies unfavoured with grace,
With instincts immoral impious and base,
These swaggering gents shows their armours taste,
By catching their co-partners, sometimes by the waist,
The hands are more commonly used than the feet,
Which looks most indelicate and indiscreet.
If memory has not my blockhead forsook,
I heard a tune played called the one - horned buck,
And its played I imagine by music - men yet,
On other tune fits the genteel half-sets,
When formerly dancing a jig or a reel,
The music was timed by the toe and the heel,
But now its a drag a pluck and a hawl,
Without any attention to music atall,
The figures are got through all in a few minutes
By spraddling and hising like asses and jenets
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:01
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amach. Cér bás tú nó cé tá ag teastail uaith ar seiseán. Geall na n-aitigheánn tú do mach mé. Ní aithnighimh ar seisean, a gcuimnigheann tú nuaír a tug dhó lon beatha agus lón airgidh domh nuair bhí mé a' dul ag saothrú mo beatha nuaír labair sé ar an lón a tugh sé do d'aithú sé é. Rugh se greimh barr laimhe air gúr baidh sé lé deoraibh é, gúr triomhnigh sé lé braith liní siodha agus srol é. Sin é an mach righ n-Eireánn do marbhuigh na truír fathaigh. Tá míse ag thabairt duith anois agus míle failte.
Fuair siadh-san an sruthan
baidheadh iadh sín[?] agus tainigh mise
(acth) Ní raibh ormsa acth scocaí
paipéar galloighe
Chaill mé leobhta
agus mo beannacth.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 09:00
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The Lore of Certain Days.
In my district certain days are looked upon as being lucky or unlucky.
Certain people shave on Saturday night because they say this prevents them from taking toothache. It is also said that if you do not comb your hair on Friday you will never take toothache.
In my district May-flowers are put over the door of every house and the flowers are supposed to keep the fairies away. When any people in my district buy a new house they would not go to dwell in it on a Saturday because it is said that "Saturdays flitting makes short selling. All early potatoes are out before St. Patrick's Day, also. Some people would not get married in May because this month is said to be unlucky.
Ada Shaw,
Thurstown,
Drumcliffe,
Co. Sligo.
Told by
Miss E. Shaw, (96)
Ballinagalliagh,
drumcliffe.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 08:50
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seiseán. Tá ruamh oír agus ruamh airgidh ann agus bearfaidmís é an ruamh oír liom arís tá an ruamh airgidh ag an Lady ógh agus bheárfaidh mé an talam duith ar seiséan. Tig leath duine dhó chuir in-dhiaidh dhó cuidh bheitidhigh. Tá míse fadha go leór gá seoladh agus ná biodh aón faithsíos go mbháinfaidh aón ceó le bainth duibh. Maidin lá ar na bhárach d'ordhuigh sé peire capaill agus coisdhe all reidh dhó. Rachaidh mé anoís go bhfeicfidh mé m'athaír go h-Eireánn Líon sé an coirdh é suas le ór. Chir an duine uasaíl coisdhe óir agus peíre chapall leís agus é lán oir. Tiomháin sé leís annsín go dián géir agus go deifreach a each caol dónn leís a codladh gairgidhiach agus a claideamh soluis aír thaínigh se go sraidh a athaír. Cuír sé an each caol dónn ag dul anúas agus suas taobh amúigh go dtaínig a atáir
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 08:41
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agus deirígh sé dhé leimh ardh aigeantha agus chuir sé cós sán sthioroip agus fuaír sé an diallaith. Rug sé ar an tsgeán in-a lamh agus thugh sé a h-agaidh ar a gcathair agus cleasáil sí amach gan motion moseamh. Tiomháin sé leís treasna í chuile aith go dtainigh sé isteach go dteach an duine uasail go raibh sé ag obaír dhó. Fuaír an maigisthir amach agus bhaín sé hata amach agus fuaír sé pardhun aighe nó cé ní nó ceardh a teastuigh uaid. Ní feidhir arsa mach righ n-Eireánn mach righ n-aithigheánn tú dó ma buachaill bhó. Is mé ar seiséan agus is mé ar mharbhuigh agus an truír fathaigh. Ní feidhir gúr tú ata ann arsa maighisthir ar seiseán.
Is mé ar seiseán. Bronaimh suás anóis duthaigh na bfathaigh dhuithse ar
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 08:06
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rolling motion which gathers it into larger lumps and makes it easy to take off. Cold water is added now to facilitate the collecting of the butter into larger lumps. The butter is gathered round from the sides of the churn & collected in the centre.
The lid and dash are washed with cold water into the churn. The butter is lifted with a scoop and put into a sieve to drain the milk off the butter. The butter is now washed and pressed to take all the milk out of it before the salt is added. The salt must be thoroughly mixed with the butter and allowed to stand before finishing. It is made into pound rolls as a rule as these are the most popular in the market.
The butter milk is used for domestic uses and is given with meal to calves & pigs.
There are some Irish names still in use in connection with churning.
Capán - a cup inverted over the dash & having a hole in the centre to let the dash pass through.
Another capán is used to take milk out of the churn . It floats in the milk when not in use.
Bainne reamhar - the thick milk - particularly after the cream is taken off.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 07:53
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anyone happens to drop in he is supposed to say, "God bless the work", and to take the dash in his hand if only for a second. This practice is in connection with the old belief that the butter could be taken off the churn by witchcraft.
The churning takes about three-quarters of an hour, but if a separator is used the work can be done in 15 or 30 minutes.
The milk after milking is allowed to thicken in crocks or enamelled dishes. Tubs used to be used but they are generally discarded now, as they are so much more difficult to wash. In warm weather the milk thickens in about twenty-four hours but in winter it takes far longer. To hasten the thickening in cold weather the crocks containing the milk are placed in other vessels containing hot water.
When the churning is about to take place the churn is cleaned and scalded with boiling water. The milk is turned into the churn and tested with a thermometer. If it is too cold it is warmed up to the required degree by adding boiling water. The churning is then started by moving the dash up and down by the hands.
When the grains of butter become as large as grains of wheat the dash is given a
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 07:43
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The churn most commonly used in this district is the dash churn. It is about 1 1/2 feet in height and 2 feet wide at the top, and somewhat wider at the bottom. About a foot from the top it is drawn in a couple of motes. The lower portion is called the body and the upper portion the crib. It has a round-shaped lid with a hole for the dash in the centre, and this lid is fixed in position about three inches from the top. It is made of oak and remains in use for a great many years. Some churns in the district are upwards of 50 years in use and are still quite good.
Other churns in use are the end-over-end churn, the horse driven churn, the spring-pole churn. The latter has the dash attached to a pole which is secured at the other end to a beam in the roof or overhead. In churning it is only necessary to apply force to pull down the dash-end of the opening pole, as on release the pole will spring backwards pulling the dash up with it.
Churning is usually done twice a week in summer and once a week in winter. It is done by the people of the house but if
ordinary member (history)
2021-04-23 06:22
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staves bound together with little iron
hoops. One of the staves was continued
up to form a handle. The noggins were
kept on the dresser. They were pure
white, were kept regularly scoured
with marl.
Another story of ’47. The old man
and his wife were sitting by the
kitchen fire. Their food supply had
almost run out and there was no
prospect of any more. There was a
heap of building stones at the front
of the house. What were they for?
They were for building up the doors
and windows while the old man had
yet strength enough to prevent the
parish dogs or other beasts from
eating himself and his wife when
they grew too weak from hunger to
defend themselves. Its an awful picture to
contemplate.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 05:12
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it is a sign of good weather.
A mist on the rivers is a sign of heat.
Sheep lying in the morning good weather all the day.
A rainbow in the morning is a sure sign of a mild morrow.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 05:11
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Swallows flying around a lough.
When water hens stay in the ditch.
When the seagulls are high.
When the wind whistles is a sure sign of rain.
Midges rising from the heather.
When the smoke swirls in the chimney and comes down again.
When clouds hang low on the hills.
When the wind is on the front door.
Signs of good weather:
When crows fly high it is a sign of good weather.
Smoke going straight in the heaven's is a sign of good weather.
Red in the west at sunset leave a fine day on the morrow.
A mist in the morning is a sign of good weather.
When frogs have a bright coat there will be good weather.
A backward May leaves a good harvest.
When the weather blade is [?]
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 05:04
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Signs of rain:
When crows fly wildly.
When worms come up out of the ground.
When the crows are in scattered groups in the grazing.
A rainbow in the morning.
When crows fold their wings and dive towards the earth.
A blue flame in the greesagh.
When frogs make for the houses.
When the robin sings at the roots of the bushes.
A wind from the north will bring squally showers.
When a donkey stands with his tail to the wind look out for squalls.
Smoke in the kitchen is a sure sign of rain.
When wild-birds come close to the windows.
When crows fly low.
When the wild geese fly again the wind.
When the snail creeps up to the door.
A blackbird at the back window is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 04:56
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Wood, sticks, turf, sods, saw-dust, bog fir, and shows were the usual firing.
Tallow candles were used to give light and there was a candlemaker in every townland. People used to dip wood in oil this also was used for a light. Rushes dipped in oil were called rushlights.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 04:54
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Be sure your sins will find you out.
One penny gets another.
Two heads are better than one.
One swallow never makes a Summer.
A constant drop wears a hole in a stone.
Lies have lame legs.
The darker the hour the nearer the dawn.
Bad weeds grow well.
It takes a liar have a good memory.
Patience and perseverance would take a snail to Jerusalem.
They are lifeless that are faultless.
A good soldier never looks behind.
Better to have no child than one child.
If you want a thing done well do it yourself.
Never trust a friend that is sly and selfish.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 04:43
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About ninety years ago two boys were out herding in Meenolin. They happened to be on a neighbour's hill. There came on a heavy shower of hail and they went under a rock for shelter. They were there for about five minutes when they heard great cheering of men and women.
On looking around they saw about a hundred black horses and a boy and girl on every horses back. The girls wore a long gown of showery. They were waving white handkerchiefs. One of the horses came within about nine yards of the two boys. The girl kept pointing to them. It was supposed to be a wedding company. Then all the horses
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 04:27
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none in Derry, but there was a man in Derry who told him to go to Strabane with him and that he would get one.
There was a horse being auctioned about one mile this side of Strabane. The man told him not to be afraid to bid on him.
He bid on the horse and bought him. He took him home through Derry. As they were coming through Glentoghen the night was dark and the man thought that the rope he was leading the horse by was very slack. When he looked back to see the horse there was nothing there. The horse had disappeared.
He came home that night and told his wife about the loss of twenty gold sovereigns. He said that he had paid them for a horse and now he had none with him. His wife told him not to fret about him that it might be all for luck.
About a week after his wife rose one morning and saw a horse grazing in a field of their own. The
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 04:19
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lived alone in Glentoghen. The man worked at his trade and his wife spun for the neighbours. He left a task for her to perform everyday.
One morning when he was leaving for his work he gave her more to do than usual and he knew that she couldn't atall have it done. He said that if she would not have it spun when he came home he would cut the head off her.
She knowing that she would not have it spun began to cry.
There came a little woman in with a red cloak on her and said, "Good woman what's the matter." She told her story and the little woman said, "Give me the wool and I'll have it spun when he comes home", but you must tell me my name when I come back or else come along with me."
The poor woman sat again at the fire thinking that she would have to leave her home. Her little girl was herding down along the brook. She heard
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 04:13
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About fifty years ago, men were sitting in a wee house at the foot of [?], in Glentoghen and when they were finished one man went for a jar to put the Whiskey into. He saw a hole in the back of the house, and went to put some moss into it. Then when he reached the place he found no hole there. In the distance he could see the hole but on going nearer it always vanished.
He was kept busy like this all night and in the morning he came into the still house. They began to fill the jars. They had a dog with them and the dog began to bark. They all rushed out and could hear a voice saying, "They are all out now" but they could see nobody. They would not go back so they started for home. They were not long at home till the police had the still house on fire. This was the fairies warning them that the police were coming.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:47
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Story (No 37)
There is a Kiln in a field behind our house. Long ago when my Great Grandfather used to drive back the cows past the Kiln in the boreen and into the field, a fairy woman used to jump off the Kiln, and stop the cows in the boreen. The cows could go no further but they often stabbed each other and hurt each other with there horns.
One night when my Great Grandfather was driving the cows, he took a butchers knife with him. He ran at the fairy woman and stabbed her. In the morning when they went to see was the body there, they saw nothing but frog's eggs.
It is thought that the woman was one of the good people, because long ago in the famine years a woman died at that Kiln and was buried under
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:40
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senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:40
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Story (No 36)
This is a story about Kilmacrane which is about five miles from Banteer. My mother lived there before she came to live to Lisrobin. There is a certain field in her people's land, where the fairies play lovely music every night. One night a man was passing by that field with a horse and car. He saw a woman jump inside the fence. He knew about the field. He was anxious to know where the woman would go, so he jumped inside the fence after her. He did not see the woman. He went home and told the story. On the day after he died. His mother told him when he was dying to come back and tell them where he was. One evening they were milking the cows about a week after his death. They saw him coming from the direction of the fairy field. They ran home because they were frightened. They did not wait to hear from him where he was, but it is though that he did not die, but that the fairy woman took him away.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:32
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Story (35)
When my mother got married her parents then lived alone with their son. When the cows were milked every night the son went off roving. The old couple did not do much work and the husband rested on the half-door on fine evenings. One evening as it was just getting late he looked out in the yard and to his amazement he saw a funeral outside. He called his wife to come and see it, but she said he was raving and she did not go to see if it were true.
Some evening after as he was lying again over the half door he saw the funeral and the yard full of people now he called his wife again; this time she went to see and she saw the yard full. She also noticed that the hearse was in front of her own bedroom window. As quickly as they could they bolted the door and went to bed, because they were afraid to stay up. That night the room was torn asunder by the good people.
The next time the husband went to
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:25
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:24
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Story (34)
Not many years ago the people of this place made their own butter and then put it into firkins and took it to Cork to sell it. A woman from Taur whose husband was dead had planned with a neighbour to go to Cork together. Each were to have their own car
The widow got up about one o'clock. She went down to the bottom of the bohereen to wait for the neighbour. Afterawhile she heard a car coming. It was coming nearer and nearer and at last what came on but the hearse and funeral. It passed on and then came the saddle-horses. There was one white horse in the group. It came towards her and her husband who was dead many a year ago was riding on it. He began talking to her. He then bid her "Goodbye and he warned her never again to be out such an late hour.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:18
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Story (33)
A certain bridge was haunted every night by a woman dressed in white I do not know where was the bridge. As each one passed her she handed them a pipe to smoke. They were very frightened and they did not take it. A certain man passed the way. She handed him the pipe. He took it and took a smoke. He handed it back to her again and said "may the Lord have mercy on the Dead." At that moment she disappeared and she was never afterwards seen. Probably she was doing her penance and that his prayer released her and that she went straight to Heaven.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:13
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senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:13
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Story (32)
A McCarthy chieftain was building a Castle near Kanturk. According as he met the people going to Cork with butter he killed them and wet the cement with their blood. Someone said it would never be finished. He heard this and he said that it should be finished.
One day he went to Limerick to arrange some business. The horse shed a shoe
He went into the forge to get a new one on. The smith said he had no iron to make it. Then McCarthy handed him his own gun to make it. There was a charge in the gun and when put into the fire it exploded and shot McCarthy. Meanwhile he had sent his men for glass for the Castle. When they heard of his death they threw it into the river. A bridge was built near this place and it was called Áth na Gloine ever afterwards
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:06
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Story (26)
I live in a Townland called Barr an Churraigh which is in the parish of Newmarket and in the Diocese of Cloyne.
Along the southern part of this townland there is a wood.
In the western part of the wood there is a great mound of earth called Clais Domhnaill. It is said that a giant named Dómhnall jumped from the Both Carthaig to this spot and made that clais with his heels.
senior member (history)
2021-04-23 00:00
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Story (23)
There is a quarry about a half mile from my house. It is said that it was haunted by a Spirit who fought with a man who was coming from town, and the Spirit stuck the man with a knife. The man was never seen or heard of since. The quarry is called Coireál na Spride. The young people have forgotten about it and they are not afraid to pass the quarry.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:57
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Story (22)
I am living in Blueford. The Gleanntán-chaoch is about half a mile from my house. Their is a lios near it. The old people say that a man was found dead near the Gleanntán-chaoch about sixty years ago. People are afraid to pass there in the middle of the night for they think there are fairies there. People are afraid to pass there yet.
The lios is in Blueford. It is in Tom Murphy's land. When you would be passing the lios after night fall you would see lights. When you would be coming towards the lights they would disappear. It is said that the lights might be the good people. I was never out after nightfall.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:52
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the sign of the Saint's hand remained on the stone.
The Protestants of Newmarket would not believe that it was the sign of the Saint's hand. They bribed a man to cut the sign off the hand.
They told him they would give him a large sum of money if he did so.
He got an implement, and went about doing his job, but the moment he touched the stone, he dropped dead on the spot.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:49
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Story (20)
Long ago there lived in the village of Cúilínn three girls. At night these girls never kindled the fire, but in the morning one of them went to the forge near by for the gríosac. They always put it into their aprons, but it never burned them.
One morning as one of the girls was leaving the forge, the smith remarked how white her feet were.
Through pride she looked behind her, and at that moment the fire burned her apron, and fell to the ground.
She went home very sorrowfully.
On that day the three girls were seen in the disguises of three white birds flying over their home, and they flew away and were never again seen.
One of them landed in Laítireán, but as she was flying towards it, she alighted in a field near Newmarket.
A big stone was lying in the field; she rested her hand on the stone, and
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:49
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this story was taken down verbatim from the lips of:
John Cremin
Carrick-a-bric
Strawhall
Fermoy
Co. Cork
He and his wife lived formerly in Thomastown and both vouch for the truth of this story. That its narrator firmly believes the truth of the story is evident from the convincin manner in which he tells it. He himself personally knew all the people mentioned in this story and with
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:45
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have mostly all english names, but our Naster told us that in other districts the cows have all Irish names. All those names are associated by their feature. If the cow was white she would be called Banny. A thief cow is called a [?].
It is by chains we tie our cows. the chains are tied on to a post, there is a runner on the end of the chain so the chains can run up and down the post. The cows have a lot more ease with the chains than with the bails. The people of the district never tie their cows by the horns, but of course, if people had only one or two cows they might tie them. If a crow were cross she could be tied above the hocks with a short
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:36
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The domestic animals are - the dog, the cat, the goose, the hen, the turkey, the duck.
When the people want to call the horse they say Wing! Wing! Wing!. When people a driving cow they say 'How! How! How!' When they are calling the pig they say Boch! Boch! Boch! When they are calling the sheep they say. - Ma! Ma! Ma! When they are calling the goat they say Gine! Gine! When day are calling the dog they say Here! here! to the cat they say Phsee! phsee! When day are calling the goose they say Bathy! Bathy! To the turkey they say Be! be! be! To the hen they say Tuc! tuc! tuc! To the duck they say Tiny! Tiny Tiny. The names of the cow in this locality
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:24
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There are a great many domestic animals at home. They may be divided into two classes. The farm animals, and domestic animals. The farm animals are - the horse, the cow, the pig, the sheep, the donkey.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:20
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Up with the kettle down with the pot.
Give us our answer and let us be off.
I have a little box under my arm.
Two or three pence will do us no harm.
Up with the kettle down with the pot.
Give us our answer and let us be off.
There is a certain night in the year and if a person asked a wish the very min-ute the clock strike twelve he would get it. The Naster told us this story. There was an old woman stayed up one night and the wish was that the Lord would make an Earl of her son. She had
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:16
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with young people to go from house to house St. Stephen's Day. they go, not because they want money but in order to keep up the old customs. Everyone of us has a holly bush decorated with different coloured papers and on the top the wren is supposed to be tied, this is the song they sing at every door.
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds.
St. Stephen's Day he was caught on the purse.
We hunted him up, we hunted down.
One of our wren boys 'knocked him down.
Here he's here as you may see.
Hanging on a holly tree.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:15
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Sunday without Palm to get it Blessed so they thought it no harm to go into the demense to get some. On their way to mass they met one of the owners of the place who enquired of them where they got the Palm knowing that they would be punished for trespassing on the grounds they said they had it growing in their own District, The Black Road. He said he would go there to find out.
They went to the priest and told him the story. He foretold that the day would come when there would (come) be grass growing in the place of his castle and when his demense would be without a single Palm tree. This has come to pass because at the present time there is not a stone upon a stone in the place where the castle once stood.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:13
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people go the town and buy a cake, or it is made at home. In it were placed, a ring, is most likely to be married before the end of the year, the person that gets the stick will beat his wife and who-ever gets the cloth will be an old bachelor.
Next in importance are the Christmas customs. Christmas Night people light a 'Christmas Candle' in order to show light to Jesus and Mary. Christmas Eve the children go to bed very early and they hang their stockings at the head of the bed in the believing that Santa Claus comes and fills them.
It is a very common customs
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:11
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a car was coming up the road and it killed him immediately. "The devil in the form of a cat had led him to his doom."
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:09
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field, as it was getting dark he decided to take a shortcut across a field. When he had gone some distance he again saw the black cat, fear seized him. He tried to turn away but in spite of his efforts he could not. The cat wandered on in the direction of a deep stream. The man had to follow. It became darker still the cat went on, finally they reached the stream the cat crossed on the stones the man followed.
When he was halfway across he screamed "will you lead me on for ever," Oh! God help me this night." The cat screamed with anger and the man slipped off the stone and struck on another stone. He was knocked unconcious. All night he lay there while his family searched for him. In the morning they found him, he was still living because his head was resting on a stone although his body was in the water. They brought him home and sent for a doctor. He was in bed for several months, but when he was able to get up his legs and arms were cramped. and he was hardly able to walk at all.
The second day he was allowed to sit in the sun outside the house. As soon as he was left alone the cat appeared in daylight for the first time. The man was so angry he forgot all about his cramped legs and dashed at the cat, before he reached the middle of the road (he lived near a main road) he fell
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:09
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A Story of Belhavel Castle.
In the townland of Belhavel a priest was going on a sick call to a dying women.
In those days he had no means of being carried so he had to walk.
The Montgomerys lived at a castle near Belhavel and around the castle there was a grand demesne through which there was an avenue. Now the priest took a short cut through the demesne in haste to the sick woman. He had not gone far until a servant was sent to order him back. The priest then pronounced a curse on the people and the place. He said he would live to see the nettles growing in and around the site of the Demesne. Little by little things turned out as he had predicted for at the present time there is not a stone upon a stone in the grand Castle which once had 56 rooms and
sometimes the staff of the family was 52 people.
This is another story about Belhavel Castle. On one palm Sunday there were people going to Killurgue Chapel to hear Mass. They lived up in a place called the Black Road where there were no Palm trees growing and as they did not like to go to Mass on Palm
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:08
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tired of dancing. The children busy themselves getting apples. They hang an apple from the ceiling. All the children gather around and in turn each one of them trys to take a bite from the apple. Grown-ups put apples into a tub of water and whoever could take a bite of the apple without using his hands was allowed to have it.
Other people get nuts and put them in couples into the ashes - one for a girl and another for boy. If the two nuts jump out together the pair were to be married, but if they jumped out in opposite directions the pair weren't to be married! The day before Hallow E'en
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:04
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Willful waste makes woeful want. That means that people trowing away bread and sometimes butter might live to see themselves in want.
Save the pennies and the pounds save themselves. A penny wise and a pound foolish.
Too many cooks spoils the broth. A stitch in time saves nine. This proverbs can be used on several occasions. If a garment wants a stitch it is better to have it done in time. Practice makes perfect.
A person never misses the water till the well runs dry. [?]. A good run is better than a
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:02
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There are many cures made in this locality. - People have great faith in them, and in many cases would never dream of troubling a Doctor, as long as they could get the cure made.
The following are the names iof the different Cures made, also the name sof those who make them.
1/ Cure of the Strain
2/ " " " Gaundice.-
3/ " " " Heart-fever.
4/ " " " Worms.
5/ " " " Head - fever.
6/ " " " (written before)
7/ " " " Smáilicín.
8/ " " " Evil.
9/ Cure of the Burn
10/ Cure of the "Whitlow"
___________________________________
1/ Mrs James McPartland
Cuiltagh
Ballinaglera Parish.
2/
Mr. J. Rutledge
Tullinamoyle
Doobally Parish
3/
4/ Judy Roche (Deceased) Ballinaglera.
5/ Mr Patrick McPartland -
Annagh Upper -
Ballinaglera Parish -
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 23:00
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ion on the hearer. Proverbs are not literally translated. they can be used on several occasions.
All of them convey sense and meaning and wisdom. These are the commonest in this locality- the longest way around is the shortest way home. The old dog for the long road and the pup for the [?]. a long threatening comes at last.
A friend in need is a friend indeed. That is to say that when a person is in need of anything and a friend comes along and helps him well, he is surely a friend. Handy timber made the ship. A burnt child dreads the fire. Seldom seen is much admired.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:56
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which he tried to take off.
It is supposed he was doing penance for the land he tried to take which was not his own.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:55
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another branch from it near this School. It is joined to the old road by a little boreen called Ceann-an Bóithrínn. Some people think that the meaning of the word is the beginning of the road but any child can tell it is the top of the little boreen.
There is another old road called the Long Road. It is a very long road and not many turns. It commences at Donovan's Turn and ends at Ceann-an Bóithrínn. Barley Bog road is very old. It is the oldest to Fermoy. It is mostly bogs are at each side of it, and it is a very bleak cold place. People named Walshs have a
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:55
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One night at about 2 0' clock, two men were coming from Blacklion, and as they were passing through Dowra two big black men appeared. They were so big that they sat in one of the largest houses in the town.
The two men who were coming from Blacklion were in terrible state with fear.
They ran as fast as their legs could carry them.
They had to separate when they were about half way home. One of them got home safely without seeing anything else but the other man did not. When he parted with the other man (did not) he saw a great crowd of men following him and when he was going through a bog one of them threw a big weight into the bog hole.
Then they vanished. The man ran home as quickly as he could in great fear.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:55
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Story (19)
In the townland Connacán Bán there lived two families whose lands were boundring one another. Each possessed big farms. They did not agree about the boundary.
A river ran through their lands and the river was supposed to be the boundary. One man said his land crossed the river and covered the glen close to the river.
One evening late while one of the farmers had gone to the forge, the other came and wired what he supposed to be his own land. Next day when the other farmer appeared, he saw the wire, and he went with implements to take it away.
But he did not succeed. He went home and he got a bad cold
He remained in bed for twelve months and he died.
Some time after his death he was seen walking along near the wire
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:53
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This improves the formation of the roots. In Autumn the potatoes are ploughed out of the ground, picked well, and then put into the 'pit' In order to give it a final run a man comes along with a spring harrow and 'run' it over the land
The stalks should never be used for covering for a 'pit' because the 'germs' of the disease are in the stalks and as well as the potatoes being diseased the germs are in the ground.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:52
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It has been believed that several times the devil has appeared to people. In this story you will hear how the devil appeared to a man in the form of a black cat.
Late one saturday night a man was returning home. The night was very dark and he had a long way to go. When he had gone half a mile he saw a large black cat. At first he did not take any notice of it, but later its' continual mewing began to annoy him. Several times he tried to catch it, but it always evaded him, once he did catch him but it disappeared in his hands. Very much astonished at this he continued his journey. The next day his cow was sick and after this it died.
Several times it appeared to him, and every time it caused him to wander about, as if a spell were upon him, and always some disaster followed in its' wake, some times his cattle would die some times the members of his family would get sick. It was this that caused the belief to arise that it was the devil himself.
Years passed with these occasional visits from the black cat. One Evening the man was returning from putting his cattle in a
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:51
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Now the Kers Pink is the nicest in flavour and it is a new seed but the Champion is very old.
In drills the potatoes are grown. The medium size potatoes are first chosen and old people, especially woman, help in the 'cutting' of them. they cut a scolean' with an 'eye' in it. It is from this 'eye' that the future plant grows. After a few day when the skin has toughened the potatoes are sat. the 'setting' of the potatoes is more or less the children job as the back is always bent and old people cannot 'stick' that at all.
When the stalks are a few inches above ground the farmer rises to them
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:50
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Fionn "no chad do bheir duith bheith annsan?" "So sud orm" adubhairt Diarmuid "gur éirigh féitheacha cúil mo chos liom agus ní fheudfháinn dul a thuilleadh"
Bhailigh an Fhiann le chéile agus bhíodar ag cur 's a' chuitheamh cad do bhféarr do dhéanamh nuair chonnchadar chucha an fathach mór groidhe go bh-feicfeá an saoghal go léir idir a dhá chois agus nach bh-feichfeá aon rud idir a cheann agus an spéir.
"Seasuighidh" a fheara arsa Fionn "Tá fathach mór éigin ag déanamh orainn"
Tháinig sé suas agus do bheannuigh dhóibh le Dia agus le Muire agus le Pádraig. D'fhiafruigh Fionn de cad do b'ainm do nú cia acha buachaill é air lorg máighistir nú maighistir air lorg buachalla. Dubhairt sé gur buachaill é air lorg máighistir agus gur airigh sé nár eitigh Fionn riamh buachaill do thógail agus go dtáinig sé fé n-a dhéighin agus gur b'ainm do Seachran na Sál gCam"
An bhfuil a fhios agat cad iad
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:48
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:47
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V
The peasantry had up to this,
Refrained from either threats or blows,
But patience they did then dismiss,
And closely grappled with their foes;
A deadly conflict then occurred,
Yes, fierce and deadly nothing less,
For death or glory was the word,
And blood ran freely, you may guess.
VI
The frieze clad men in fury great,
Dealt blows both heavy and severe,
Which laid their opponents prostrate,
Upon the field expiring there;
This armed band that fought and fell,
Exactly numbered seventeen,
Not one went back the news to tell,
Not one bewailed their loss I ween.
VII
The loss the other side sustained,
Was one, in that sanguine affray,
The thruth is fully here explained,
Received it now, Sir, as you may.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:45
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common. There are not many old people over seventy years of age living in the district. There is one man living very near my place and he is very old and a great story teller. his name is Jack Peil and his address is
Coole.
Fermoy
Co. Cork
There is another man also called Jack Uniache. He is a very good story teller. He is living in a place at the present, 4 Redmond St;
Fermoy
The land in coolagown is not the best in castlelyon Pearly all the houses are thatched and that is a good sign that the land
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:42
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II
Some seventy years have passed away,
Since John Muldoon in the said place,
Put on the still, upon a day,
That seemed destined for luck and peace;
And many of his neighbours came,
And were partaking of his cheer,
Until a voice did thus proclaim, -
The still hunters are almost here.
III
The news plunged all in deep despair,
Because escape they could not then,
As they had been in front and rave,
Compassed with ruthless armed men;
Those law officials were to blame,
Their brutal might they showed too soon,
For one of them took steady aim,
And shot the faultless John Muldoon.
IV
His sister who was standing by,
And saw her brother's life blood flow,
A missle quickly she let fly,
Which laid the vile assassin low;
Into her father's house she got,
And there protection sought to find,
But oh! that neat beloved cot,
Was instantly to flames consigned.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:41
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another branch from it near this school. It is joined to the old road by a little bareen called Ceannan [?]. Some people think that the meaning of the word is the beginning of the road but any child can tell it is the top of the little bareen.
There is another old road called the Long Road. It is a very long road and not many turns. It commences at Donovan's Turn and ends at Ceannan [?]. Barley Bog road is very old. It is the oldest to Fermoy. It is mostly bogs are at each side of it, and it is a very bleak cold place. People named Walshs have a
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:37
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Do ghluais Fionn Mac Cumhaill agus a shluaighthe lá ag fiadhach. Do thógadar leó lupaois agus lapaois, agus gadhair bheaga thanidhe nár aithnigheas in-aon cor. D'éirigh rompa eilit ag a raibh druim fionnáin, bolg beireáin, cliathan óir agus airgid aici. Do chuireadh sí cnoch de thruslóig, gleann de chois ag bacóid agus páirc bháin de gach aon urthruslóig di.
"Seasuigidh, a fheara" arsa Diarmuid Donn "agus leanfhadh-sa í". Do gluais Diarmuid 'na dhiaidh agus do chuireadh sé cnoch de truslóig, gleann de chois ag bachóid agus páirc bháin de gach aon ur-thruslóig de chómh mhaith lé agus níor bhféidir leis teacht ní ba ghiorra dhi. Do shuidh sé air turtóig agus d'fhan annsan go dtháinig an chuid eile don Fhéinn suas leis.
"Cad d'imthigh ort ar Dhiarmuid?" arsa
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:36
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All the roads in every have certain names. there is a road passing this School called the Pew Line. It begins at bellivue Cross and ends at Tallow Bridge. It is called the Pew Line because (in) it was made recently. There are many branches leading from it. There is one from Higgins Cross to Coolagown calle the Long Long. I is called Higgins Cross because people named Quins were living there before. There is
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:33
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would have that would be fortunate enough to get him. She would never see a poor day according to him. The girls spokes men would not let an inch go with him as far as praising the intended bride. "They best girl ever a ring went on" they would say. No one one in the country side could blow wind in her heels. The consent given a night was appointed for the intended groom to come along to make the match. He would arrive with a quart of whiskey. The best that money could buy. A certain fortune for the girl was promised by her parents.
The guests would be invited friends and neighbours from around the whole country side. The groom would ask his best friend to be the best man and the bride her favourite girl to be brides maid.
On the wedding day the bride wore what was called a mantle and a half of the finest black cloth and a silk bonnet covered with ribbons. She wore strong boots with toe tips. The groom dressed in cordaroy breeches, a swallow
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:32
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fling them at his friends in order to frighten him. He was waiting for some time and his friend was not coming. After a while he said to himself that they were unnatural cries, and throwing away the sods he went towards the gate opposite 'Booney's Barner'. Just at the corner he saw a man. He was dressed in black and fire in his eyes. Jack knew he was no human being. He was afraid to go down the road so he went the fields.
Another night a girl named Kit Bray was coming along a road called Boripe bile. It was very late. When she came to a certain part of
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:30
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Saint John is the patron saint of this district. There is a holy well on the top of Mushera which is dedicated to his honour. It is called Tobhair Naomh Shéain. It is a small well and there is a small wall around it. It is supposed to have sprung up one night while Saint John was praying on the mountain.
Each year on the 24th June a pattern is held near the well and people attend this pattern and pay rounds at the well. Everyone who goes to this well leaves some relic such as buttons or thread. On the 24th June everyone say a few prayers in honour of our patron saint.
On Saint John's eve bonfires are lit all over the parish in honour of Saint John, and people dance and sing around the
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:26
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Holy Family were not far before them. Then the soldiers went on hot pursuit. For that reason people never like the Dearg Daol. When people see it they kill it. When old people see it they make the sign of the cross seven times on it. Then they say "Mo pheacaí ort" and then they kill it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:20
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Dear sir, you know of '98,
At sundry times I head you treat
Of battles that were lost lost and gained
Perhaps you heard the story told
Of Jack O'Hara, brisk and bold,
Who did such gallantry display
In Ballinamuck the Battle Day.
There like famed hector he did strike
For freedom, with his good long pike
And when he was obliged to yield,
And quit the sanguine battle-field,
The said pile, he, on his shoulder bore,
And took his way for Ballinamore;
But with a nimble sturdy gait,
He did proceed on his retreat.
Until he was three miles away
From where the field of carnage lay.
Then out of danger as he thought,
But there alas! he had been caught,
By yeomen, who conveyed him thence,
To Mr Nicholl's residence,
Where Catholics, and not a few,
Protection sought and got it too
From the good master of the place,
Which added lustre to his race
But then, O'Hara, you may guess,
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:10
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Espected not the least redress,
Because, as you may understand,
He was arrested pike in hand;
With pity Mrs Nicholl's viewed
The luckless man and brought him food
Of which she told him to partake
For that he seemed fatigued and weak;
At this the yeomen were displeased,
And with fierce glances on him gazed,
But he who thirsted most for blood,
Was Isaac Clements, there he stood
And with a most appalling shout
He to the helpless man cried out -
Now make good use of that repast,
For truly it must be your last;
To this O'Hara did reply -
I'll eat no more as I'm to die.
Then Isaac raised him to his feet,
And led him out beyond the street
And there anon he took his stand,
But held his captive by the hand
The words that he made use of then
Were short this wretch one of you men
But when O'Hara did espy,
The Yeoman's piece brought to his eye
He with a pluck brought Isaac round;
Who met the ball and hit the ground
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:06
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There are a few stories told locally about The Holy Family. One story is as follows. When The Holy Family were fleeing from Herod's soldiers they met men sowing corn. These men gave them food and drink. Just then the corn which they had sown sprung up. On the following day when the reapers were reaping the corn Herod's soldiers came enquiring of them if they had seen a man woman and infant pass along that way. The workmen told them that they had seen them pass when they were sowing the seed. When the soldiers heard this they thought that they were on the wrong path. They were just in the act of turning back When a Dearg Daol in its peculiar creaking noise said "indé" thus informing the soldiers that the
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:03
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There are no tailors in this district now. Shirts were made in every house long ago. The flax plant was grown by the farmers. At a certain time of the year the farmers pulled the flax plant. Then they made it into small threads. Then thread was made from it. It was then sent to the figheadóir and he made linen cloth from the linen thread. There was a Túirnín lín in every house at that time. The linen cloth was of a brownish colour. Woollen thread was made about eighteen years ago. There is a spinning wheel at John Sullivan's of Upper Ballinagree. People knit stockings at the present day.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 22:00
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géarr ghlas bréige air. agus do beannuigh sé dhíobh le Dia is le Muire is le Pádruig. D'fiafruigh do Fhionn cad do b'ainm do, nú cad as é nú cia ar bh'é féin. D'fhreagair Fionn agus dubhairt sé gur b'ainm do Fionn Mach Cumhaill. "Is maith mar thárla" arsan bodachín "rugadh mach aréar dom agus is é an tríomhadh mach é. Rughadh uaim an dhá mach eile taréis iad a mbhreithe, agus do taibhreadh dom nach bhfaghfhaidhe aon cheann acha díobh chun go dtugfaid Fionn Mach Cumhaill agus a cómhthaidhe oidhche dhá fhaire." Do dubhad agus do gormadh ag Fionn agus dubhairt gur deachair dóibh aon mhóill do dhéanamh anois go rabhadar i bhfad ó'n mbaile agus gur mhithid dóíbh dul fá n'a dheíghin. Dubhairt an bodaichín leis a leisghúil do chur uaidh, nach raibh aon caoi aige gan an oidhche anocht do tabhairt d'á fhaire agus gluiseacht leis go móill. Thánadar leis go dtí an'a thig agus fuaireadar proinn mhaith uaidh. Nuair bhíodar taréis a bproinne do bhuail Fionn amach ag feucaint timceall air, agus do [?] sé ag déanamh air móirseisear
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 21:53
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17
Cístí Óir i bhFolach
Fadó fadó bhí fear ina chómhnuidhe imbaaile gabhann ins an sean chaisleán atá ann Search an Óir ab'ainm dó.Bhí na mílte púnt de óir aige ach mar sin féin ní raibh sé sástaq leis féinagus ba mhaith leis go bfuigheaadh sé cuid eile.Bhí sé pósta le cailín ó America agus ní raibh de clann aige ach cailín amháin.Bhí an cailín sin chomh deas agus cómh -daigheamháil le aon cailín dá bhfaca tú ariamh.Bhí dath an óir ar a gruaig ,dath an airgid ar a cuid éadaigh agus scáth an róis ar a leichinn.
Dubhairt an athair go leigfeadh sí aon fear í a phósadh dá mbeadah sí céád meadhchaint de ór aige ,Bhí gach fear ó gach taobh den tír ag iarraidh é a fháil ach ní raibh siad in-ann aon óir a fháil.Mór timcheall Cillfhionnabhrach agus na h-áite sin bhí siad ag lorg óir ins gach áit fén talamh.
Bhí fear amháin ann agus an oidhche seo nuair a bhi sé 'na chodladh bhí brionglóid aige.Lá ar na bhárach níor dhein se aon rud ach smaoineamh air.Ar feaadh na h-oidhcheanna na dhiaidh sin bhí aige ná go raibh ór ibhfolach leath míIe ó Chaisleán Baile Gabhna .Begór an triamhadh lá do chuaidh sé ann agus slausad agus pice aige .Níor innis sé do aon duine cá raibh sé ag dul.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:38
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Banc eile; Tig na Sítheach i gCinnáird ar líne leis an gCnoicín Ruadh agus Lighthouse an Daingin osgailte.
Chuir Seán Mhicil ós na Dúnta traimilí amach oidhche agus thóg sé cómhartha talmhan. Nuair a tainig sé abhaile d'fhiafruig a athair do cad iad na cómharthaithe talmhan a bhí aige "A leithéid seo," arsa Seán,"An Siorrach osgailte agus solus áirighthe ar an dtaobh thuaidh de'n bparróisde ar Chnoc Bhinn an Ghleanna." "Ach ars," an t-athair , "Cá bhfuighir an solus ar maidin?" Ní raibh an solus ann dar ndóigh ar maidin agus tar éis chuid maith den lá a thabhairt a gcuardach caitheadar fanamhaint gur tuit an oidhche agus gur lasadh a solus airís.
An faoisgeán = portán bog, an baidhte a b'fhearr i gcóir ballach. Caithtaí é cheangal go maith le maith le snáithín ar an ndubhán.
Iasgán an baidhte is fearr do'n ndeargán. Ní raibh aon iasgán thíos annso sa tsrúil tamall ó shoin ach bhíodh na h-iasgairí á dtabhairt leó i gcléibheanna ar an ndream ó Eitir Mhór a' Daingin agus d'fhágaidís annso thíos sa tsrúil iad go dteastuighidís uatha agus cad deirir nár phréamhuig agus nar chatharuigheadar ann. Tá an áit com lán díobh anois gur dóigh leat go rabhadar riamh ann. Agus Deirim-se leat gur tapaidh a dh'fhágfaidís comhartha -cluaise ar naomhóg dá ráinneócadh léi bualadh na gcoinnibh
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:33
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The spot on which O'Hara stood,
Had been surrounded by a wood,
Into which beneath the boughs
He got unharmed by his foes,
And closely as he was pursued
The godless pack he did alude,
Their fruitless search they ne'er gave o'er
Till he was safe at Ballinamore,
There long he lived, and oft did tell,
How he escaped, and Isaac fell.
Note:- The Nicholl's were a Protestant family living in Rossan. They were good Protestants and were always in good friends with their Catholic neighbours.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:33
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We heard this story from our teacher. It is a story in connection with a buried treasure. Long ago (there was) a highway man was being sentenced to death in Limerick city. Before the judge put on the black cap the highway man cried out from the doc "Is there any man here from Kerry". It is said that there was one Kerry man in court that day but he was afraid to speak lest he would be taken as one of the companions of the highway man.
"If there is I will make him a rich man". There is a crock of gold hidden in Meenleitrim between "Feith an pháidín and Feith an mhathsluagh". This story has come down from generation to generation.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:26
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Like all the great Irish Chieftains, he aped the English and their customs and lost his religion into the bargain. Before he died he ordered this slab to be made and all he would let be put on it was a hound following a hare.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:26
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There was a man in the parish of Cloone who went to Mass wet or dry when his wife was alive.
His wife fell sick and died after some time. When she got sick first he sent for the priest but she died soon after that. The man did not go to Mass the Sunday after she died. Some one asked him why he did not go to Mass and he replied "I never will put my foot inside the church door while I am alive because when my own wife was sick the priest would not cure her and he could cure her if he liked."
That happened fifteen years ago. He has never stood inside a church door since, but all his children go to Mass every Sunday.
This is another prayer that I got from my Grandmother.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:25
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Banc eile; Tig na Sítheach i gCinnáird ar líne leis an gCnoicín Ruadh agus Lighthouse an Daingin osgailte.
Chuir Seán Mhicil ós na Dúnta traimilí amach oidhche agus thóg sé cómhartha talmhan. Nuair a tainig sé abhaile d'fhiafruig a athair do cad iad na cómharthaithe talmhan a bhí aige "A leithéid seo," arsa Seán,"An Siorrach osgailte agus solus áirighthe ar an dtaobh thuaidh de'n bparróisde ar Chnoc Bhinn an Ghleanna." "Ach ars," an t-athair , "Cá bhfuighir an solus ar maidin?" Ní raibh an solus ann dar ndóigh ar maidin agus tar éis chuid maith den lá a thabhairt a gcuardach caitheadar fanamhaint gur tuit an oidhche agus gur lasadh a solus airís.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:24
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The following particulars were taken from the records of Gloghan boys school (Roll No 5971) by Francis O'Connor the present Principal Teacher of the school.
Joseph Mc Donogh (Father of Thomas Mc Donogh of 1916 fame) as teacher of Gloghan Boys school. Also a brother of Thomas is a pupil. Brothers name was Joseph.
Name Joseph Mc Donogh (age) 39 (Religion) R C (Married or not) not . (When first appointed to this school) 1-10-1867. (Under Board) 1-3-53
Index to Register of Cloghan M.N School.
Register No. 195
Pupils Name Joseph Mc Donogh
Page in Register 2
Date of entrance 23 Feb 1876
The above particulars are written in Mr Mc Donogh's own handwriting in the records of the school.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:24
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another crossroad on the way he met the same seven men and he was sure that two of them were neighbours of his that were dead a good while. And they said "How are ye John." When he came to Fenagh, he went in to have a drink. He had two crowns in his pocket when he started, but when he went to pay for the drink he hadn't a "rex" in his pocket. When he was coming home he met the same seven men and he asked them if they took his money and they began to laugh at him. He was getting afraid and the next crossroad he met them again, and he put the horse to a trot, and they tried to stop him. He got by them anyway and when he reached his own street they were there again. They wouldn't let him get down off the horse and they kept him there till daylight.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:19
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John Clancy of Faughill was one night going to Fenagh on a bit of business. He was riding a horse. It was a fine moonlight night and when he came to Sunnaghbeg crossroads he met seven men. They said "How are ye John". He thought he knew some of them that was dead a good while. At
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:17
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One time there was an old man living in Mount Ida by the name of Grant. He was very sick and was going to die. Every evening at nightfall a little red woman used to cross out the hills to Grant's house, and she used to go away back in the mornings before daylight. Several people
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:15
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was any more rods cut in the fort, the cattle would never have another drop of milk in their lives. That morning when the cattle came home their "elders" were packed with milk. So the man paid the boy well for minding his cattle and he never cut anymore rods in the fort.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:14
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sé an beart (=berth) a b'fhearr sa bhád do ar square "deagair" (= arán mine-buidhe). Bhíodh cuid des na h-ionaid sa bhád níos ádhmharaí ná a chéile. Deire an bháid ar an siota is adhmharaí de ghná.
Bhí bád an Chala agus bád Chinnáird lá ar an mbanc agus bhí muintir an Chala ag tarrac deargán mar ba mhaith leó agus gan faic ag bualadh le Muinntir Chinnáird. Bhí fear i mbád an Chala a bhí ana mhór le m'shean athair. Nuair a chonnaic seisean ná raibh aon bheartuigheacht a dhéanamh acu chuir sé a lámh síos ar taobh an bháid lasmuich i gan fhios d'aoinne d'á chualacht féin agus dhein sé an uimhir 24 le na meir ar thaobh an bháid. Má seadh is tapaidh a phrioc an fear eile suas é. Níor leig sé faic air ach dubhairt sé leó na doirighthe a tharrac isteach agus ceithre feadh fichead a thabhairt dóibh. Cómh luath is thugadar an fhaid cheart dóibh bhíodar ag tarrac éisg chómh tiugh agus ba mhaith leo chómh maith.
Banc Mór; Íochtar Tíorach osgailte (.i. go bhfeicfá an talamh agus na faillteacha ó Cheann a' Daimh soir go Faill a' Tónacháin) agus Ceann Binne ar Bhaile Riach.
Banc na Péiste: Ní cuimhin liom an cómhra talmhan
Banc Bheaglaoigh: ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,,
Banc Phollóg: An Cloigean = Ceann a' Daimh muchta aig an Siorrach agus Tígh na Síteach i gCinn Áir osgailte.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:14
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There was a man one time in Tunnaghmore, and
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:13
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be knocked again for you built it on our pass". So he moved the house and it never was knocked again.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:12
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men who made and filled in the grave. When coming up a lane at his own house he met a funeral and when he was passing it they left down the coffin and he saw his father in it. And all the neighbours said that his father and mother must have taken away with the fairies.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:10
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went over to the lore bush and there was a bohalaun growing beside the bush and McKiernan said "Bad luck to me but if I had to see that bohalaun last night and pluck it I'd frighten the fairies away". So he pullled the bohalaun and under it didn't he get a crock of gold. He brought it home and put it under the bed, but he never slept a wink after. In about nine days time a voice came to the window one night and told him to lay back the crock of gold and that he'd sleep. So he left it back at the bush and he slept as well as ever after.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:09
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1851. It was opened as a school and a National Honorable Earl Fitzwilliam and a grant from abled it to be built. The area of the site is 1 rood the school, the first page which is date April Material of the walls was Stone and mortar [l]. The external dimensions of the House were in the height to eve 9-6.
The existing records of the school to 1856 to be given fully. Its history, in some records back to its foundation in 1851. An examination es the following facts.
Years of Service Names of Managers
1898 James Devery
31-7-98 Very Revd Kieran Egan PP
1905 Very Revd Canon Monaghan
1922 Very Revd Canon Reddy PP. VG
1933 Very Revd Canon Dean Monaghan PP
1936 Very Revd D Grey P.P.
Very Revd Fr Macnamara PP
Very Revd Monsignor Langan P.P.
Very Revd J Canon Manning
Very Revd Canon Kennedy P.P.
Period Monitors
1851-57 john Thorpe 1963.
1857-81 John Grogan 1871.
1881-95 John Duffy 1891.
1895-1905 Thomas Kenny 1898.
1905-1908 Edward Loomam left 1898.
1908-12 Leo Clarke 1905.
1912-13 Thomas Carrol 1907-10
1913-13 Michael Grogan 1911-14
1913-26 Thomas R. Goodwin 1915-18
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:06
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There was a priest in Aughavas one time called Father Nangle and he used to lodge in James Lee's of Crroneary, for there was no priests house at that time, and the priests used to lodge in country houses. When the harvest time came the priest used to get a stook or two of oats from the people to feed his horse. Well Fr. Nangle got his oats and he went for Alex McCabe of Carrickavoher and Pat Galloghy of Annanghmonnon to thresh the oats for him. The two men went to Fr. Nangle to thresh, but
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:02
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see the going to the well was enough to frighten the fairies that put the dead hand on the churn for the well was a holy one.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 21:01
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and the man said he'd go in and have a bit of a dance. So he went in and the house was full of people and them all dancing and singing and taking "tay". So he sat at the hob and sang and took tay, and he never had a better night in his life. All of a sudden at daylight there was a great rattle and he found himself lying in the corner of the field. He went home and the next night he heard a voice at the window and it said "You had a night to take the sup of milk at first, but if you didn't take it the second time, it would be worse for you". You see the fairies were taking the butter and they wanted the help of a human being.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:59
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sé an beart (=berth) a b'fhearr sa bhád do ar square "deagair" (= arán mine-buidhe). Bhíodh cuid des na h-ionaid sa bhád níos ádhmharaí ná a chéile. Deire an bháid ar an siota is adhmharaí de ghná.
Bhí bád an Chala agus bád Chinnáird lá ar an mbanc agus bhí muintir an Chala ag tarrac deargán mar ba mhaith leó agus gan faic ag bualadh le Muinntir Chinnáird. Bhí fear i mbád an Chala a bhí ana mhór le m'shean athair. Nuair a chonnaic seisean ná raibh aon bheartuigheacht a dhéanamh acu chuir sé a lámh síos ar taobh an bháid lasmuich i gan fhios d'aoinne d'á chualacht féin agus dhein sé an uimhir 24 le na meir ar thaobh an bháid. Má seadh is tapaidh a phrioc an fear eile suas é. Níor leig sé faic air ach dubhairt sé leó na doirighthe a tharrac isteach agus ceithre feadh fichead a thabhairt dóibh. Cómh luath is thugadar an fhaid cheart dóibh bhíodar ag tarrac éisg chómh tiugh agus ba mhaith leo chómh maith.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:58
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There were three men living one time in Drumloughan and one night they went to raid an orchard in Camber. There was an old lane going round the orchard, and when the men came as far as the lane they heard laughing and chatting going on in the orchard. They got stones and pegged them into the orchard, and ll got as quiet as death. They then went into the orchard and stole a bag of apples and started for home.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:56
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and shouting for all they were worth. They seemed to be pegging chairs and tables and pots and pans and mugs at each other. When Garvey got up in the morning their wasn't a chair or a utensil in the house. She still wouldn't give in and he got more stuff for the house, and the same thing happened. When it happened a third night Garvey gave in and moved the house. One day after he was walking by Glancy's fort and in the fort he saw all the chairs, pots and pans that were taken out of his house, and they were as good as the first day.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:53
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Fásann sé sa choill, comhnuigheann sé sa bhaile agus saothruightheann sé saidhbhreas dá mhaighistear.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:53
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This happened in the parish of Drumreilly. There was a girl living there one time and she got very sick and she died. She had a brother living with her, and one morning in the month of May the brother went out very early to look at some cattle. He saw a girl milking one of the cows and he went down as far as her, and he saw then that it was his own sister that was dead a good while. He asked her what he was doing there, and she said that certain people sent her out to get milk and
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:50
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with a dead hand and began to take butter out of the churn with it for ever so long until she had a pail full of butter. The man that came in said, "That's the best dead hand I ever saw". But the woman up and told him that it wasn't the dead hand but the rope her man got that brought them all the butter. She hadn't the words said when all the butter in the pail melted and the rope disappeared. You see when the man got the rope he hadn't a right to tell anybody about it as the fairies get vexed if anybody tells their secrets.
For a whole year afterwards, the man and his wife never got a bit of butter on their churn. They say that the man that came in was a fairy man and that he wanted to make this woman tell.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:49
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léim sé amach as an leabaigh agus d'imthigh ag an doctúir. Dubhairt an doctúir leis na dtiocfadh leis dadhadh a deanfad do. D'imtigh sé leis na baile arais agus fuair a luighe. Cupla lá na seo fuair sé bás agus ní rabh a dat iomraidh ar ní bha mó.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:48
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sé an beart (=berth) a b'fhearr sa bhád do ar square "deagair" (= arán mine-buidhe). Bhíodh cuid des na h-ionaid sa bhád níos ádhmharaí ná a chéile. Deire an bháid ar an siota is adhmharaí de ghná.
Bhí bád an Chala agus bád Chinnáird lá ar an mbanc agus bhí muintir an Chala ag tarrac deargán mar ba mhaith leó agus gan faic ag bualadh le Muinntir Chinnáird. Bhí fear i mbád an Chala a bhí ana mhór le m'shean athair. Nuair a chonnaic seisean ná raibh aon bheartuigheacht a dhéanamh acu chuir sé a lámh síos ar taobh an bháid lasmuich i gan fhios d'aoinne d'á chualacht féin agus dhein sé an uimhir 24 le na meir ar thaobh an bháid.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 20:47
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The weather is going to be fine, when the sun goes down red with a clear sky, and when rain is coming it goes down with a golden colour, and sinks behind the back of clouds. The moon looks dim, and has a ring around it, the stars begin to fall then the clouds collect, and when the sky is covered the rain falls. In the day a rainbow is often seen in the sky. This is always seen in bad weather.
When the wind goes to the south or west we have rain. When rain is coming the walls in most houses get damp, the robin sings on a low branch, and the crows go up very high in the sky. This denotes wind as well as rain.
The cats sit with their backs to the fire, and dogs are always sleeping when rain is near. The sky is also red at sun-rise, and the distant hills look near.
The lakes look dark in colour, the waterfalls are heard very far away, the dust flies off the road, the bees are heard humming at night, the midges bite, other insects are seen to creep about, the smoke whirls as it leaves the chimney, and the fire burns dull when rain is near.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:47
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There is an old lane between Camber and Aughakiltubrid and there are two forts, one at each end of the lane. Every night long ago his girls used to walk this old lane, and when the people used to be going off their Ceilidhe they used to meet them. One
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:44
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There was a man and a woman one time living in a house, and one night there came a knock to the window. The woman told the man not to bother the knock, but the knocking continued on and in the end the man got up and opened the door. There was a crowd of men outside and they asked him to go with them that they wanted him for a little job. He went with them and they brought him away and they came to a house and they went
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:43
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The barrel again. He got afraid and went into the house of a man named Kavanagh. This house was situated in a field some distance off the road. When admitted to the house he fainted and remained there till the following morning. The owner of the field in which this bush was situated ( A Mr. J Doorly Blackmills] had a workman, Tom Connolly who cut down this tree although he was warned by the people. Soon after cutting the bush he fell sick and was sick for three months in the hospital.
James Leonard Tonelemone Cloghan told the writer Francis O'Connor Teacher Cloghan Boys school that he saw this bush, that on it was a sort of seat where the ghost was supposed to sit & that no leaves grew on it. In the ground was a spot where the ghost's feet rested & on this the track of the ghost's feet no grass grew.
The ghost looked like a man & was sometimes seen going across the road and out in the priests field.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:41
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is ag comhradh lé ceile ná go raibh na codlatha ann. Fuaír sé codladh agus dhá muiche d'eírigh an lá is muiche ná sín deirígh míse sé sín mach righ nEireánn nigh a eadhan, chior a cheann agus d'ordhuigh a brichfeasta. Sgaoil sé amach a gcuidh bhá agus tiomain sé leís iadh í dtalamh na bfhathaigh nuair tiomháin sé leís iadh cuaidh sé go bhfeicfeadh sé ce'n sorth chapaill dfagh an fatach dó an raibh sé chomh maith is a bhí sé. Fuaír sé annsin é agus fuair sé a culaith gairgidheach agus a claidheamh soluís agus cuír sé ar iadh. Chuaidh sé anónn agus dfosgail sé an doras agus connaich agus connaich sé an each chaol dhonn agus a deallaith sil sé dul tridh na fruithuighthe bhí se chómh fiadhan sin. Bhuáil sé a srián feín agus a diallaith uirrí. Tarraingh sé amach ar an bpabhail í
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:41
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There was a man of the name of Higgins living in Rossan one time and he was taken away with the fairies. His people went to a man that could bring back people and the man brought him back, but when he came back he was blind in one eye. The only thing he could see with this eye was the fairies, and any night he was out, he could see them dancing in the forts and driving around in their horses and cars with this blind eye. But in the daytime he could see nothing with it. It happened that some time after he was brought back there was a party fight in Mohill on a
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:39
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an corn uathi, ach sar ar ól sé an deoch as, do chuir sé fáinne 'na bhéal. Nuair a bhí an deoch ólta aige do scaoil se an fáinne isteach sa chorn, is ghaibh sé a bhuídheachas leis an mbainríoghain óig. D'imig sí sin isteach agus an corn á chasadh 'na láimh aici. Ní raibh sí imighthe i bhfad nuair bhraith an glór i dtóin an chuirn thíos. D'fhéuch sí isteach ann is chonnaic sí an fáinne, 's thóg sí amach é. D'aithin si láithreach é, mar bhí a h-ainm 'sa sloinne ann. "Is tú atá ann, a Chéaduig", a dúbhairt sí léithi féin.
Do chas sí thar nais arís is chuir sí na fáiltí roimis. "Ba dhóbair go mbeithfá déidheanach", ar sise, mar ní raibh aon t-súil agamsa go bhfeicfinn go deo 'rís thu". "Raghad-sa isteach anois" ar sise, "agus suidhfidh-mé le h-ais Mac a' Rí, agus tair-se isteach annsan am dhiaidh, is déin isteach orm, is bain póg díom".
Chuaidh sí isteach is shuidh sí le h-ais Mac-a-Rí. Do lean Céadach í, is dhein sé isteach uirthi. Chuir sé a dhá láimh ar gach taobh dá h-aghaidh, is do thug sé póg di ó's cómhair a raibh láithreach.
Do chuir sí scarta mór gáire aisti,
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:38
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it was only a little elf or "changeling" that was in the cradle. She asked the tailor what she'd do and the tailor told her to put down a big fire. She did this and the tailor took the changeling out of the cradle and threw it in at the back of the fire. It let a squeel and went up the chimney like a puff of smoke, and when the mother came back to the cradle her own good child was lying in it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:35
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He asked the journeyman to read it and the journeyman looked at it and said "The same is on the other side". When McKiernan heard this he said nothing till the journeyman was gone, and then he went out and dug at the other side of the bush and got another crock of gold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:33
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gcluás é agus síos ins a dtalamh agus dfagh sé annsín ag kickail é feín agus an biór. Anois ar seiséan bfuil pioch ar bith eile le anodha a chuir uirrí . Níl pioch ar bith eile lé anodha a cuír orth. Is leath sá an aith seó. Tá ruamh ar agus ruamh airgeadh annseó. Bhoíl beidh an ruamh óir agam ar seiseán agus bheidh an ruamh airgeadh agath. Cás é féin agus an lady ag cainth agus ag chomhrad lé ceíle no go dthainigh coimh a trathnona. Bfuil sé amach craith sé a laimh leithe. Beannacth leath ar seisean go bfeichfidh mé aristh tú. Tiomhain sé na bá leís abaile agus meteal annsin cé agus bhí faire na failte roimhe nuair a bhí sé in amh mhaith sá mbhaile. Suidh siadh annsín í gcuidheacthan agus dith siadh an supéar agus chaith siadh an h-oidhce ag cainth
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:31
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and shrine was buried 9 feet deep in a garden in the townland of Aughavas.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:31
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A man named Martin Daly lived in Logg, a village on the south side of the hill of Cloghan. Martin Daly died about 25 years ago. He was about 80 years of age when he died.
Logg was part of the estate of Mr. Potts. who lived at Correen Castle Clonfad Bal'sloe (M)
The agent for estate was Mr Lowther.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:30
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through the window, so he got before the house behind a ditch and he used to shew the corpse up over the ditch. The rich man saw the corpse looking over the ditch and thought it was the boy surveying the house. So he took his gun and fired at the corpse and it fell. The woman said to the man that it would be better for them to go out and hide the dead boy for fear the police would get the body and that they'd be taken up for murder. So they got up and went out and hid the corpse and when they came back the sheet was gone off the bed. In the morning the boy came in with the sheet and the rich man said he was the cutest thief in the world so he gave him a lot of gold and jewels and the boy went home and he had so much money that he never needed to steal anything after.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:28
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Ins an Earrach bíonn an feirmeor ag obair go dian. Bíonn sé ag treabhadh, ag fuirsead agus ag cur na síl. Cuireann sé prátaí, turnipí, mangailí, cabáist agus an-cuid rudaí eile.
Chuireann sé prátaí ins an áit ina raibh cruithneacht no eorna curtha an blian roimhe sin. Cuireann sé cruitneacht nó eorna ins an áit ina raibh prátaí nó aon bharra eile go mbíonn aoileach ag teastáil uatha, curtha an blian roimhe. Ins an Earrac bíonn an feirmeoir ag obair go dian agus gach lá bíonn tuirse air.
Tá sean-fhocal ann An té a cuireann san Earrach baineann sé san bFogmhar. Cuireann sé prátaí i driollaí agus deineann sé an phráta do gearadh idtreo is go mbíonn dhá shúil ar gach phíosa. Sgiollán a tugtar ar an gcuid sin. Cuirtear na sgiolláin insan gclais agus scaiptear aoileach ortha. Dúnann sé na driollaí leis an gcéachta agus nuair a thagann siad ós chionn na talmhan cuirtear ath chré suas.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:25
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ar bíth eile a bfuil anodha a 'cur orth bóil tá ar seiseán. Tá cú nimh ar sise tiór tu uaigh thalamh annseó agus nidh ar a ceann nuair atha cogadh ar siubhal ní gadh acth an cú a leiginth amach agus deineann sé an meidh robtha agus a dheánfadh an sionnach imeasgh cearch. Ar chualaidh tú ariamh ce'n cóir marbú a bhí ann, Bhóil ar sise cualaidh mé iadh ag radh dá dtaghfadh gairgidheach ar Eireánn agus biór agaínn dhó deanfadh agus dhá mbheadh sé dhé luisneach in a cluáis agus amach 'san gcluás, eile agus siós ins an talamh. Sin é an cóir marbú ata aír. Dheargh mach righ an biór . Chuaidh sé go dtí an uáigh. Thogh sé suás an lidh leimh sé d'é leimh ardh aigeantha. Cuír se an biór isteach in-a chluás agus amach ins an
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:23
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Long ago there was a great, high wind which blew in the spring time of the year 1839. It up rooted trees, blew roofs off houses and some of these houses were never fixed because they were nearly all mud-walled, thatched houses.
The people were afraid to med for fear of another storm. Some of the old people died with the shock and others took ill.
There was another snowstorm took place in the year 1896. It lasted for seven weeks. The first sign of the storm was a great redness in the sky six days before it happened. It was five and six feet in depth. Some of the people died with starvation because they could not get to any place to get food. They were eating everything they could not get their hands on.
In the following year 1897 a great flood took place. It carried away bridges and animals.
In the year 1868 when the crop was a total failure because of
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:23
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Bhí triúr fear ag dul ‘an torraimh ar maidín agus chonnaic siad an fear in a luighe san chomnair. Shíl siad gur taidhbhse a bhí ann. Rith siad lé na saoghal. D’éirigh Antoin aníos as an chomnair agus chur sé an chomnair ar a dhruim agus shiubhal leis.
Achán dhuine a chonnaic é shil siad gur taidhbhse a bhí ann.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:22
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agus o sin amach rinne Antoin comhnuidhe ar an Clochán Liath. Stad sé d’é’n bhacacas.
Spealadóir an mhaith a bhí ann, agus bhí sé raidhte nach rabh a léithead lé fágail ag piocadh speile no ag cur faobhair ar speil.
San am sin ní rabh motair ar bith ann, agus bhí na Gearrán Iarrain fhéin gann go maith. Má bhí teachtaireacht ar bith le deánamh fa’n Clochán Liath, bhí Antoin i gcomhnuidhe toilteanach lé na deánamh.
Is iamdha siubhail fada a chuir sé de fhéin ag deánamh teachtaireachta ‘un na gCruic.
Thárla fán am a bhfuil mé ag tarraingt an scéil air go rabh faire ins na Cnuic, agus chuaidh Antoin chuig an fhaire agus mur nach rabh gleas iomhchara ar bith eile lé fághail cuireadh Antoin na Chlocháin Léith leis an chomhnair a fhághail. Chuaidh Antoin na Chlochán Léith, agus fuair sé chomhnair. Nuair a d’fhág sé an Clochán Liath thoisig sé ag cur. Chuaidh Antoin ar fascadh ag taobh cruaiche mhónadh. Thoisigh sé ag cur agus bhí Antoin fliuch báidhte. Chuaidh sé isteach san chomhnair agus luigh sé síos. Chuir sé an clár air annsin. Ní rabh sé ibhfad in a luighe go dtí gur thuit sé thart na chodladh.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:21
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Bhí sgaifte againn oidhche amháin ag áirneál ‘dtoigh Phádraig ic Suibhne. Bhí teine bréagh thíos iad na suidhe thart uirthí. Bhí mé fhéin agus Dinny Antoin ann fosta. D’iarr muid ar Dinny sgéal a innse.
“Níl sgéal ar bith agam”, arsa Dinny. “Arú”, arsa mise, “tá cuid mhór sgealtaí agat”.
“Bal”, arsa Dinny, “Tá sgéal amháin agam” agus thoisig sé agus seo an sgéal a d’innis sé.
Bhí sean dhuine a dtugadh siad Antoin Dubh air in a chomhnuidhe ins Cruic.
Is fada an lá marbh é, ach tá cuimhne mhaith agam fhéin air. Bhí feasóg fhada dhubh air, agus sin an tuighe a dtugadh siad Antoin Dubh air. Nuair a bhí sé óg bhíodh sé fhéin agus a mháthair ag dul thart ag cruinniú a gcodach. Bhí siad ar aon lagach cneasta, agus meas mor ag achán duine ortha. Sa deireadh fuair an t-sean bhean bás
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:19
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There are a few old people still living in out district who have heard other old people saying that they remembered the night of the big wind. There is no one knows much about it for it is a long time ago. It was the worst ever remembered by any one we know. It is said that the very trees were pulled out of root and houses blown down and people left homeless, for the houses were all thatched and were not so strongly built as they are now.
The night of the big wind there was a house blown down on our farm. It was the dwelling house and only they had another house in the hollow they were without a home that night. When old people are talking about that house or the ruins of it they refer to it as the house that was blown down on the night of the big wind. there was a big snow storm about forty five years ago. It was so deep, it seems, that the road had to be cleared to get food in.
There was a snow storm last year in March. It was later than any snow storm I remember for it had the ground covered and the people could not get a shamrock for St. Patrick's Day.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:14
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There is a field in our farm in the townland of Tullinageer. Cremorne, Monaghan called the rock field because there is a rock in it.
My father told me that on this rock the priests used to say mass.
In those times they were called friars. Our farm got its name of Friary hill because of the friars preaching and saying mass on this rock in the time of the penal laws in Ireland.
The names of the other fields at home are, the front hill, is sol called because it is in front of the house. The point hill, is so called because there is a point in one corner of it. The long hill gets its name because it is long. The flax hole field is so named because there is a flax hole in the field. The bog field is so called by this name because it is at the bog. The round hill because it has a round height on it. The broad hill because it is broad. The river field, because it is beside the river. The field at the road because it is as the road. The back hill because it is behind the house.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:13
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and she used to do something and all the furniture would be like dancing. The mugs on the dresser and the cups and every thing used to be moving. When she died nothing used to happen and nothing is to be seen now.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:10
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Rugadh Séamus Ó Colmáin i mBéal na Sgairte. Bhí sé na thailliúir agus na fhile. Caith sé cuid dá shaoghal i mBarrach Ruadh. Fuair sé bás i mBaile n Bhuitléaraig. Bhí sé in a giúirlice féin ar setcle. B'é an fear a mheall na franncaigh as a mhainistir i dTigh Molaga.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:09
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Jonah in the whale's belly.
Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall Humpty Dumpty got a great fall. All the king's horses and all the king's men could not put Humpty Dumpty together again?
An egg
How much is this, a halfpenny wet, a halfpenny dry, four pence halfpenny and a halfpenny more a halfpenny behind and a halfpenny before four pence halfpenny and half penny more?
A shilling.
Why is a luggage can like a tree?
Because it is full of trunks.
When is a ship in love?
When she is attached to a buoy(boy)
What fruit is on money?
Dates.
As white as snow and snow it isn't as green as grass and grass it isn't, as red as blood and blood it isn't, as black as soot and soot it isn't. What is it?
A blackberry.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 20:04
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There is a story told of a Church which was to be built on Walsh's land at Admonister. Long ago people were talking about Churches. they were standing near a river. They decided to put a sheave of corn into the river and wherever the sheave would stop they would build a Church there. They put the sheave of corn into the river and it flowed away but it stopped somewhere and they said they would build a Church there. A week later they started to build it by day. What they used to build by day used to be
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 19:58
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Bhí fear ann fadó agus do phós sé bean. Bhíodar go compórdamhail i dtigh breágh. Bhí fiacla bréige aige agus bhí fiacla bréige aici agus do thuit sé amach go raibh na fiacla a bhí aige cosamhail leis na fiacla a bhí aici. Lá amháin bhí an fear ag nígheadh a fhiacla féin agus bhíodar istigh i mbáisín aige. D'iompuigh sé ar a chúl chun an scuab d'fhagháil agus do chonnaic an bhean an báisín lán. Do thóg sí é agus do chaith sí an t-uisce agus na fiacla amach sa gháirdín agus do thuit na fiacla ar chloc agus briseadh iad. Tar éis an lá sin sé an rud a dheinidís ná nuair a bhíodh duine aca ag dul ar thaisteal bhíodh na fiacla aige-sin agus an duine a bhíodh sa bhaile ní bhíodh aon fhiacla aige.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 19:52
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There is a house in Burren which was supposed to be haunted. It is owned now by Griffins. Long ago when the old people lived there they had a servant girl. This girl used to go around begging sometimes and she was called Mary Ann the Mothereen. She had some devilment. Every night when all were sitting around the fire she would get up off her seat
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 19:45
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half sunk
In the earth now tell that ever here dwelt monk Friar, acolyte, or priest.
O! woe that Wrong should triumph thus!
Woe the the olden right, the rule and the renown
Of the Pure souled and meek should thus go down
Before the Tyrannous.
Where wert thou, Justice in that hour?
Where was thy smiling sword? What had those good men done
That thou shouldst tamely see them trampled on
By brutal England's power?
Alas! I rave! ... If Change is here
Is it not oer the land? Is it not too in me?
Yes! I am changed even more than what I see
Now is my last goal near.
My worn limbs fail - my blood moves cold -
Dimness is on mine eyes - I have seen my children die
They lie where I too in brief space shall lie -
Under the grassy mould.
ordinary member (history)
2021-04-22 19:15
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195
Continued
a bad way. They began think how to kill the old giant. There was an old weaver in the village and he had great pluck; so he said if they give him so much money he would kill this old giant, all the people agreed to this? This night he went into the giant's cave and he brought with him ? an ?; the old giant was asleep and the weaver drew the ? and cut the head. The giant jumped up and ran around the cliffs without no head on him. At last he fell into the sea from one of the cliffs and got drowned. The people were very happy when they heard it; they gave the weaver all the money they gathered around the village. He got back the beautiful goose for the rich woman the rich woman: she gave him a lot of money also.
All the villagers's were happy and contented the big giant throubled them no more.
- (The End)
Recorded by :- Patrick Healy
Barnaderg N.S.
Ballyglunin
Co. Galway
ordinary member (history)
2021-04-22 18:59
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194
Folk-lore or Bealondheas
The Big giant and the people
There was once a giant; and he lived in a big cave on the side of the cliff near the sea: He was very cruel to the people he used to steal everything belonged to them. He used to steal corn; potatoes; hens; ducks; good and so on? The people didn't like this atall, atall. At this time their lived in a big wood a very rich woman; she was very kind to the people she used to give them money food and clothing? And all the people liked her very well. How she was so rich were this :- she had a lovely white feathered goose. this beautiful goose used to lay a golden egg every day these golden eggs made her very rich entirly. The old giant heard this and he went and stole the beoutiful goose to his cave? When the people heard this they were in
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 18:41
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The festival of Christmas Day is on the 25th December. It is kept in remembrance of the birth of our Lord.
There are many customs connected with this feast. The houses are decorated with holly and ivy and paper decorations. The shops are decorated with toys and Christmas things. There are Christmas trees decorated with tiny candles and tincel, and presents on them for everyone.
It is always a custom to have a goose or a turkey for the Christmas dinner. And two or three Christmas cakes and a big plum pudding with holly on it.
Then everyone gives presents to their relations, and cards to their friend's. And the band goes out on Christmas Eve and so sing Christmas carols.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:25
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filling a grave with spades and he knew it was his neighbour's grave.
He was in great fear. When the women had the grave filled in it happened they just came to the spot where he was. They were very vexed when they saw him as their business was for the hand of a dead person. In that time women used to have the hand of a dead person and used put it under the churn when churning and they used to have rolls of butter then, but only a few women had the secret.
They followed the man and he ran as fast as he could but if they struck him with the dead hand he would surely have died. So they threw it at him but he escaped by a few inches. The place is haunted to this day.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:22
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filling a grave with spades and he knew it was his neighbour's grave.
He was in great fear. When the women had the grave filled in it happened they just came to the spot where he was. They were very vexed when they saw him as their business was for the hand of a dead person. In that time women used to have the hand of a dead person and used put it under the churn when churning and they used to have rolls of butter then, but only a few women had the secret.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:21
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-nuigheadh na daoine go léir annsin le na gcuid caoiri agus muca beitig caiple agus aisle. Thugadh ceannuighteóirí ó teach go teach ag ceannacht struic. Bhí i bhfad míos mó aonach ann fadó nó mar atá anois Tá páirc speiséalta le h agaidh aon taighe anois. Tá sé ag Gob A' Choice. Na daoine a dhíolann be'tideach fagann síad de bpúnt orta na bhionn síad ag dearcadh go maith. Cuireann na daoine píosa eadaig eicint thart ar a ruball nuair a bhíopnn siad díolra aca. Tugtar ceannrach le bó nuair a díoltar í.
Is é aonach Gob A'Choire an aonach is mó a bhíonn i mo áit féin.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:17
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Is aid seo ainmneacha na filí a bhí i mó bhaile fado. Séan Ó Piotán Padraig Ó Coillean agus Seamus Ó Gallachobhair. Bhí síád in a gcomhnaidhe i Máigh-Mhuilinn. Cailleadh iad thart ar deich sgor bliadhain o shóin. Bhí cuid dá muinntir go maith ag canadh. Bhíod síad ag ceapadh cuid eile i mBearla
Is é iasgeareacht an slighe beatha a bhí aca. Sgríobh síad síos cuid aca. Bhí leigeann agus sgríobh ag cuid de na daoine. Bhí meas mór ag na daoine ar fili an bhaile.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:14
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There is an old graveyard about one mile from where I live. It is there since the famine. The people were buried there at that time. There are old headstones there, most of them are made of stone and some of iron. It is situated at Killcooly. It is still in use. It is a hilly graveyard and is in the shape of a square.
About one hundred years ago there was a man named Kelly herding his sheep outside the graveyard. It was the middle of the night. A neighbour of his had bee buried there about three weeks before. He heard digging inside in the graveyard and the breaking of a coffin.
He looked in and saw two women
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:14
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Bhíodh an t-Aonach ar Chnoc ma Gaoithe fadó. Ta cnoc na gaoithe i GCurran. Bhí páirc mhór shuas ar thaobh an chnuic agus is annsin a chruin
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 18:13
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A sickness called Anthony's Fire was cured by Keoghies (Keogh's) blood that is the father and mother of the person curing it must have been both Keoghs and his blood would cure it. A cure for the thrush it can be cured by a man woman or child who never knew their parents. A Cure for
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:13
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:10
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("Ardán na Mantradh") Chuala mé mo mháthair ag rádh gurbh é an fáth gur ghlaoidh na seandaoine an t-ainm sin ar an árdán (mar gheall ar go raibh Mhantrac déanta ar mullach an ardan)
"Árdán leathar Tugadh an t-ainm sin a'r gheall ar go bhfuil sé nios leithne ná na h-árdáin atá tárt air.
("Árdán maire mhór") Bhaist na seandaoine an t-ainm sin ar an árdán sin mar gheall ar go raibh bean ina comhnuidhe i dteach mhór ar thaobh an árdán sin
"Aedán mór" Is é an fáth gur baisteadh an t-ainm sin ar an árdán sin mar gheall ar go bhfuil sé níos ná na h-árdáin atá thart air.
"An Árdán beag" Bhaist na seandaoine an t-ainm sin ar an árdán mar gheall ar go raibh níos lugha ná na h-árdáin a bhí thart air.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:08
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There is an old graveyard about one mile from where I live. It is there since the famine. The people were buried there at that time. There are old headstones there, most of them are made of stone and some of iron. It is situated at Killcooly. It is still in use. It is a hilly graveyard and is in the shape of a square.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 18:04
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the ninth of November, and they used to sprinkle the blood on the four corners of the house in honour of St Martin, because he was a martyr.
The old people never liked to have the first fire lighted on May day. Before putting on the fire, they used to wait till they saw smoke in another house. Because they say that if anybody passed and saw the smoke in their house they could take your milk and butter away. In olden times they would not put a fire until dinner time for fear their milk or butter would be taken away.
She told me that when her house was being built, a very old woman named Mrs. Tunney gave her four stones to put one in each corner of the house for good luck, two from Knock, one from Saint Patrick's well and one from Croagh Patrick.
She walked to Croagh Patrick several times, and brought a quart of holy water
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 18:00
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The name of my townland is Curskeagh. It is in the Parish of Kiltrustan and in the Barony of Roscommon. There are about nine families in the district and about thirty people.
The names Kelly and Daly are most common. There are very few thatched houses in the district. All that are thatched are small with three windows and most of them have half - doors. They have two rooms and a kitchen but the slated houses are very big and roomy.
There are not many old people in the district - only about four, they know no Irish. Houses are more numerous than long ago. There are a few houses in ruins, people emigrated from them to
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:59
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I was talking with an old woman last night. Her name is Mrs. McLoughlin and she lives in Curryane Swinford. She is sixty two years of age, and she told me of the customs the people had long ago.
She told me she remembered seeing Saint Briget's Cross. It was made of wood and straw. The wood was made in the form of a cross, and the straw plaited in the centre. It was placed in the roof over the bed or on the rafters. They were made of all sizes. They always made these for Saint Bridget's night, in honour of Saint Bridget.
They get holly and ivy on Christmas day, in honour of the birth of our Lord, because they say that it first grew when our Lord was born. She also told me that the old people always killed chicken on the Feast of Saint Martin
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:54
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i mbliadhain 1847 nuair abhí an Gorta Mór ann tháinig fíor isteach san mbaile seo an long bídh dó féin. Cailleadh é tar éis cúpla seachtmain agus rinneadh uaigh dó amuig ins na páirceanna. Níor mhaith leis na daoine é a chur annsin agus d'iomchur siad ar a nguailnibh é go dtí an nulg í i n-Deadh Fhobhair atá deich míle ó'n ait seo. Lár an Guimhridh abhí ann agus bhí sé ag tarraingt ar an Nodlaig.
I n-aice ar bhaile seo tá poll móna agus tá sé an-doimhin agus tá caonach ag fás istigh ann. Tá sgéal ag na sean-daoinibh faoi'n poll sin. Tá sé ráidhte go raibh sgata tinncéir ag gabháil an bhóthair tráthnóna. Bhí an grian ag dul faoi agus cheap siad gho
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:53
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This is a story about St, Bridget and the harrow. At one time St. Bridget was made to carry a harrow with iron pins on it on the top of her head as punishment for some sin committed. She ad to pass through the court yard where a multitude of people was standing by. She felt ashamed as she passed along them. The multitude gazed on her and they saw instead of a harrow, a beautiful wreath on her head with lighted candles on it. An old man amongst the crowd shouted "Naomh brígid M Naomh brígid
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:52
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D'Fhiafruig an cailín de an mbhí maith leis obair eile a dhéanamh le tuilleadh airgid a bheith aige "Da maith liom" ars an fear. Annsin dubhairt sí leis a dhinn canna oscailt, agus nuair d'o{cut off} sé é bhí an canna lán dé ór
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:50
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Bhí fear ann fadá. Seán an t-ainm a bhí air. Lá amháin chuaidh sé go dtí an choill ag leagad crann. Nuair a bhí sé ag teacht abháile chonnaic sé cailín deas agus í gleásta in édaighe bán. D'Fheafruigh sé den fhear cén fáth go raibh sé amuigh chomh mall sin agus dubhairt an fear go raibh sé sa gcoll ag obair agus go raibh sé ag déanamh Fortúin beagh as an obhair sin.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:47
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nuair a bhí sé ag dul isteach ann rug an fear air agus thug sé abhaile é. Cheap an duine uasal gur b'amhlaidh dubhairt an coinín leis theacht isteach agus thug sé céd punt air.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:45
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Eladh nillóg duchán:- Snaite olna a cuir tré cluasa na gcaorach le uisge a tabhairt as na suile
Raithneal a bruith agus an sugh a tabhairt don chaora.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:43
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dun-busladh: Fataí rósta a chur leis.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:41
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Nioscóid. ceisín Builín a chuir leis.
gearrad: Cuireann siad dubhan Calla leis an n-gearradh cun an fuil a stopadh bruitheann siad lotarnaigh agus cuirlann siad leis an lot e.
gag Eéir a cur leis.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 17:39
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The name of my district is Ballinamona. It is in the parish of Cam. There are seventeen families in my district. There are sixty five people in the district. The most common name is Beades. The majority of the houses in my district are slated. There are only three people over seventy years in the district.
The district is west from Athlone. The people who are getting the pention are, Willie Hamrock of Brideswell, Athlone, Co. Roscommon and Michael Beades and Mrs. Allen of the same address. There were more houses in the village long ago. There are two rivers and three ponds in my district. The old houses were called Bessies old house. Another was called Marie's old house and another the tailors old house. The district is six miles from Athlone.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 17:34
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acht imthigheann sé leis ó áit go h-áit ."Siomaidh duine a thug iarraidh teacht fhad leis acht theip ortha. Comh luath is thainig siad fa ghiota dó d'imtigh sé agus bhí sé le feiceal áit éiginteacht eile, b'féidir giota fada ar siubhal.
Tá sgéal ag daoine n h-áite ag mínuighadh an tsoluis agus is é seo é .
Am amháin mórán bliadhanta ó shoin goideadh an chailís agus na suidheacháin amach as teach an phobail i gCockhill . An mhuinntear a ghoid iad, cuir siad iad i bhfolach imeasg ne gcarraigeacha ins an Rockytown .
Deirtear nach bhfuarthas iad ó shoin agus gur sin an fáth go bhfuil an solus le feiceáil ann.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:28
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-a of Moyclare Ferbane. Martin Daly had a good greyhound and a Mr. Lowther brough Daly and his hound to Moyclare. for a days hunting. At the end of the day. Mr. Lowther was very well pleased and told Daly he would give him anything he would ask.
Some time after it happened that Mr. Lowther was evicting a neighbour of Dalys named Henry Gunnnings Gunning.
Daly arrived when the eviction was completed that was when Gunning and his young family were cast out on the road side. Martin Daly approached Mr. Lowther and said Did you not say you would grant me any favour would ask did. I did replied Mr. Lowther. Well said Daly let you let this man back into his house he has a young helpless family. Very well let him go back at a penny a week.
Mr. Thomson was the landlord of Park Stonestown, Cornamona.
Hw was a bad
ordinary member (history)
2021-04-22 17:22
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Three meals daily were eaten long ago. The people used get up early and work for a few hours before their breakfast. The breakfast was eaten at eight o'clock. It consisted of "stirabout" and buttermilk. When the milk was scarce the people had sounds. The sounds were made from oaten meal stept in water. The sound were as good as milk. Then the dinner was generally late and it was made from "gruel" potattoes, meat and "flummery". The gruel was made from a fistful of oaten meal boiled in a pot of water. Then it was as thin as milk. This was lovely with "spuds" and
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:22
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A man named Martin Daly lived in Logg, a village on the south side of the hill of Cloghan. Martin Daly died about 25 years ago. He was about 80 years of age when he died.
Logg was part of the estate of Mr. Potts. who lived at [?]/
The agent for estate was Mr. [?]
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:20
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Nuair a cuaidh an machtíre bán amach d'fhiafruigh an fear eile de cad é an rud a bhí ag olagón istig na seomra an oidhche roimis sin agus is ansan a chuimhnig an mactiíre bán ar an ndeoch a fuair sé agus níor thóg sé é in aon- chor agus bhí sé na dúiseacht agus dúbhairt sé leis an gcailín go raibh draoidheacht ag an gcaillig air agus dá bhfheadfaí í do mharbhúghadh go mbeadh sé féin na rígh. Dúbhairt sé go raibh spota beag donn ar brollach na caillighe agus go raibh ubh aici na pearsain agus dá bhfhéadfaí an spota beag donn do bhualadh leis an ubh go marbhócfaí í. Dúbhairt an cailín leis an gcailín eile dá bhfeadfaí an cailleach do marbhúghadh go mbeadh sí na mnaoi breágh áluinn dathamhail agus dhein sí amlaidh.
Ach nuair a bhuail sí í imtigh sí na braoinín uisge. Bhí an machtíre bán 'na rígh agus fuaradar an triúr clainne thar-nais agus bhí saoghal níos fearr aca ná mar a bhí ag an mbeirt eile.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:20
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Flies high, flies low wears boots and has none." A Football.
What is it that walks with its head down." A nail in your boot.
It is black though not polished, white though not milk." A magpie.
As I looked out my grandfathers window I saw a wonderful thing I saw a steel more crossing a bone bridge a linen goal after it, a brass man driving it, wasn't that a wonderful thing," a woman sewing.
As I went up to Dublin I saw the world a wonder, four + twenty blackbirds tearing the world asunder." a harrow.
What part of a cow goes out a gap first." her breath.
What cuts grass as short as a goose [gander].
What goes round a house all days sits in the corner at night." a broom
What is the smallest thing in the world= a pimple on a midges nose.
What is a smaller than a midges mouth=the bit that goes into it.
Riddle, riddle, ree, what shall it be through a rock, through a reel through an old spinning wheel, through a hopper, through a
ordinary member (history)
2021-04-22 17:15
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IV
It's scenery you'd love to see
One a Summer evening fair.
When the golden sun sinks down to rest.
On Shannon's bosom fair.
It covers teem with various game
The pheasant hare and cock,
And rabbits quick are very thick
Round Carrig's stately rock.
V
It is for sport the famed resort
Of youths from far and near.
And on it's ivied ramparts
Every Sabbath you can hear
The violin's sound, while pressing round
The youths and maidens flock
To sport and play the live long day,
Round Carrig's stately rock.
VI
And now that I am leaving you
Sweet Carrig fare-thee-well.
Farewell to you oh sweet Tervoe
Your every vale and dell.
If the Muse to me for her treasury
Of verses would unlock
I'd give it's due to Sweet Tervoe
And Carrig's stately rock.
[Composed by Rev. Peter O'Shea.]
Kildimo.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:14
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There is a story told here of a weird happening that used to take place on the canal. A young man was killed from one of the large boats. He is supposed to be murdered. This man lived near the Canal and was in the habit of getting on a boat at the locks at Belmont and going as far as Polla to his home. They say at night the boatmen see the shadow stepping on the boat and getting off again. it is said that the shadow was the ghost of the man who was killed.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:12
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so the story remains.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:11
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Killowney churchyard (told by B. Gunning.)
The burial grounds surrounds the ruin of an old Church. All that remains of it is a piece of a wall with a kind of a ledge.
It is the custom when a person is being buried to leave the coffin resting for a few moments on the ledge. Local superstition has it that the person who is latest buried in the graveyard has to guard the fate until the next person comes. Seemingly this has proved on two occasions. One time a man from the village was working in a different part of the country and had been away for some time. One night he came home and as he had to walk a long distance it was late when he arrived. Next morning at the breakfast he began to tell the family the hour he came home at. "I met not a soul on the road" says he "but old John Mack, He was standing at the gate of the churchyard and I dont think answered me when I spoke" "Why said his mother that man was buried a week ago. And
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 17:11
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On the third night they resolved to be courageous and went again to the spot. After a short time they came to a big flag. On rising it they they found a timber box. On opening the box they found it contained only dead leaves. In disgust they caught them and threw them into the river, but to their surprise they sank to the bottom.
It is supposed that the leaves were money which belonged to some chief.
Long ago before people died they changed their money into some other object and put a guard to mind it. The guards in this case were the turkey cock and the solider.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 17:10
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I
You muses nine with no combine,
And grant your powerful aid,
And help my quill, while I fulfil
A promise I have made.
And lend to me sweet poetry
Lest critics keen may mock
Those simple lines which I compile
For Carrigs stately rock.
II
The subject of my verses is well worthy of esteem,
And with poetic beauty
Abundantly doth teem
Commands a view of sweet Tervoe
And Limerick's ship crowned dock
While the lordly Shannon sweeps below
The base of Carrig Rock.
III
From its lofty top no objects stop
Your view for miles around.
Where natures lavish beauties
Luxuriantly abound.
The meadows green below are seen
And the rich and roaming stock
Where the Maigue's deep led a silver thread
Flows on by carrig Rock.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:07
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sí do dtí tig, agus bhí seana cailleach agus a inghean isteagh ann, agus thugadar lóistín na h-oidhche dhi. Ó'n gcaint a bhí ag an mnaoí cheap an bhean go raibh cómhacht ag an gcailleach ar an mactíre bán agus go raibh sé ag obair i bhfeirm agus gach uair gur mhaith leis an mnaoí í d'iompóchadh sí na mactíre bán ann.
Bhí an cailín ag fanamhaint tímpeall na h-áite agus an céad maidin a chuaidh an inghean amach do cuir an do chuir an cailín an cíor ann agus bhí folt breágh órdha uirthi. Do rith sí isteach go dtí a mháthair agus áthas mór uirthi.
Dubhairt an máthair léi rith amach agus fiafhruighe (agus a fiafra) d'en cailín cad ar go ndíolfadh sí an cíor, dubhairt an cailín an mactíre bán d'fheiscint in aonar, do thugadh di é. Ach sar a chuaidh an cailín isteach do thug an cailleach deoch d'on mactíre bán agus ní féadfadh an cailín é a dhúiseacht.
An tarna maidean do chuaidh an inghean amach arís agus bhí balcais cirt uirthi agus chuir an cailín an siosúr ionta agus bhí éadaighe breághtha uirthi. D'fhiafruig an máthair di cad ar go ndíolfadh sí an siosúr agus dubhairt sí an mactíre bán d'fheiscint in-aonar ach do thuit an rud céadna amach agus ní fhéadfadh sí é a dhuiseacht agus an tríomhadh maidin
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:06
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This story was told by Birdie Gunning and is written here by Thomas Butler on 25th day of July 1938.
Situated about a mile from Cloghan in what is known as the townland of Logg there is the remains of an old well. It resembles a deep hole but the common belief is that at one time there was a holy well there, it was called "St. Briget's well." The story goes that a man named Daly lived near the well. One day he was away from home, a servant in the home went to prepare some oaten meal for supper. Finding no water in the house she went to this well although water from the well was never used for household purposes. She boiled the water but could not get the oaten meal mix with it. Although the story goes she kept the mixture boiling for several hours she could not make the gruel next morning the man returned home and discovered that the well had disappeared overnight. People say the the servants and brought a curse on Daly and his family shortly. After they left the place in time.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:03
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On the third night they resolved to be courageous and went again to the spot. After a short time they came to a big flag. On [?] it they they found a timber box. On opening the box they found it contained only dead leaves. In disgust they caught them and threw them into the river, but to their surprise they sank to the bottom.
It is supposed that the leaves were money which belonged to some chief.
Long ago before people died they changed their money into some other object and put a guard to mind it. The guards in this case were the turkey cock and the solider.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 17:01
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The barrel again. He got afraid and went into the house of a man named Kavanagh. This house was situated in a field some distance off the road. When admitted to the house he fainted and remained there till the following morning. The owner of the field in which this bush was situated ( A Mr. J Doorly Blackmills] workman Tom Connolly who cut down this tree although he was warned by the people. Soon after cutting the bush he fell sick and was sick for three months in the hospital.
James Leonard Tonelmenon Cloghan told the writer Francis O'Connor Teacher Cloghan Boys school that he saw this bush. [?]
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:58
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Long ago in this district there lived a man and his wife. One night the wife dreamt that there was some money hid in the garden in Lisnaculla Castle.
In the morning when she awoke she related her dream to her husband and he resolved to dig for it.
Himself and his two comrades went that night with their pickaxes, and shovels to the place, where the woman dreamt it was hidden.
Scarcely however had they begun to dig, than a big turkey cock came fluttering towards them and with his wings blew out the candle which was the only light they had. When he had gone, the men were frightened to death and returned home.
An the next night they went again but met with no greater success, for when they had begun to dig, a soldier on horse back rode welding past them and with his sword cut the wick off the candle.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:56
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This [Story] Song was got from John Horan aged [40 years] is written here by Thomas Butler on the 11th day of April 1938.
Its the latest tale in History I mean to let you know.
That a second Irish party has come for Irelands foe.
Its a [cursed] Irish treaty that Lloyd George has handed down.
To compel our Irish nation more subject to the crown.
Twas refused by John Redmond as he often times did boast.
When he rose that vast Recruiting for to guard the Irish coast.
Our commander De valera fought his battle like a man.
For to rid our Irish from the soldier and the tan.
On the lofty walls of Dublin was the first and gallant stand.
For to sow the seed of freedom and Republic in our land.
If the game was not altered to put down such foreign laws.
We would never stand on foreign land
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 16:54
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The following legend is told of the Castle. Long ago a witch lived in the castle. Every night she lit a candle and placed it in the tower. Every traveller who looked at this candle blasted and died. One of the fenians named Regan resolved to quench it. He placed a magic cap on his head which rendered him invisible and one night he climbed the rocky slopes and having reached the top of the tower seized the candle and threw it into the Shannon. But in doing so the magic cap fell from his head and he was seen by the witch. He immediately fled westward but the witch in her fury seized a crag and hurled it after him. Regan escaped and the tock fell in Corcamore where it remains to the present day. It is called Cloughregan and the print of the witch's fire fingers are supposed to be on the stone.
Another rock (also having the print of fingers) is to be seen in Newtown, supposed to have been hurled by the witch in the [?] of the Shannon in order to injure soldiers who occupied on of the islands of the Shannon.
Some legends mention a giant instead of a witch and St. Patrick instead of Regan.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:51
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1851. It was opened as a school and a National Honorable Earl Fitzwilliam and a grant from [mabled] it to be built. The area of the site is [rood] the school, the first page which is date April Material of the walls was Stone and mortar [bed]. The external dimensions of the House were in the height to eve 9=6.
The existing records of the school to 1856 to be given fully. Its history, in some [?] back to its foundation in 1851. An experiment [?] is the following facts.
[chart]
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:50
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In such terror that hardly they would pass there in the middle of the day.
About a couple of miles down along that glen there is an old chapel of former years where about 3,000 persons used attend from all parts of the country every Sunday not in motor cars but on horse-back, ass cars and even wheels burrows and sometimes in the middle of Mass the army would appear in top of the mountains. There used to be a great rush fir the door and they would make in all directions for the top of the hill and they leave cars and wheel-burrows the blind and the lame and the deaf behind them and they never stop running until they reach “New Market”. They used to be so bad that they had to be taken to hospital some did and more used be badly crippled and the majority of them never
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:49
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Do comáin sé leis trí cnocaibh agus gleann is sléibhte agus an cailín anáirde ar a dhrom aige. Tháinig sé go gleann agus d'oscail sé trap-door a bhí ann agus chuadar isteach agus bhí tig áluinn istig agus d'iompuig an mactíre é féin na fear. Do cuir sé an cailín fé geasaibh ná fhéadfadh sí aon rud do rádh mar geall ar an nduine a bhí pósta aici agus an áit na raibh sí na cómhnaidhe.
Tar éis ceithre bliana do thug an athair cuireadh dá ingheanaibh teacht chun dinnéar. Tháinig mná na tíghearnaí agus bhíodar ana compórdach ach dúbhairt an máthair dá mbeadh mo cailín féin agam anois ní bheadh a tuille uaim. An neomat san chonnacadar an mactíre bán ag teacht isteach an clós agus an cailín ar a dhrom aige.
Bhí áthas mór ar an máthair nuair a chonnaic sí an inghean, d'fhiafhruigh an athair de cá raibh sí agus dubhairt sí ná fhéadfadh sí é fhreagairt. Do thóg an athair a guna anuas ón seilp agus dúbhairt sé lei go lámhachfadh sé í mara neosfadh sí an sgéal do agus do bhí eagla ar an gcailín agus d'innis sí an sgéal do agus rith an mactíre amach an doras ach d'innis sé do ar dtúis dá ngoilfeadh sí go mbeadh a mac ba sine dall, mar bhí trúir clainne aici. Do rith sí amach na dhiaidh, agus bhí sí ag rith go tuitim na h-oidhche agus ansan do shuidh sí síos ar cloch agus go gol sí a dóithín agus tar- éis
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:49
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tamall chonnaic sí deatach agus rith sí do dtí an áit agus bhí bean istig agus bhí buacaillín agus í ag déanamh spóirt di.
Chuaidh sí isteach agus d'iarr sí lóistín na h-oidhche ar an mnaoí, thug sí di é agus chuir sí cóir maith uirthi agus ar maidin nuair a bhí sí ag imteacht do thug sí cíor de agus dúbhairt sí lei aoinne a chífeadh sí agus gruaig gránda aice na beadh aice le déanamh aici ach an cíor a cuir ann agus go mbeadh gruaig breágh aici.
D'imithig sí leis agus an tarna oidhche tháinig sí go dtí tig eile agus do bean agus leanbh dá blian istig agus d'iarr sí ortha a dtabharfaidís lóisdín na h-oidhche dhe agus do thugadar agus ar maidin nuair a bhí sí ag imtheacht do thug an bhean siosúr de agus dúbhairt sí dá bhfeicfeadh sí aoinne le balcais cirt go bhféadfadh sí an siosúr do chuir ann agus go mbeadh eadaighe breaghtha uirthi. D'imig sí lei agus an céad oidhche eile tháinig sí go tig eile agus bhí bean agus leanbh bliana istig ann, thugadar lóistín oidhche dhe agus ar maidin nuair a bhí sí ag imtheacht do thug bean an tíghe fáinne dhe agus dúbhairt sí dá bhfheicfeadh sí tobán éadaighe salacha in aon áit ná beadh aici le déanamh ach an fhainne do cimilt leo agus go mbeidís glan ansan. Do ghaibh sí buidheachas leis an mnaoi agus chuir sí an bóthar de.
An cearthmhadh oidhche bhí sí ag imtheacht agus tháinig
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:47
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The following particulars were taken from the records of [Gloghan] boys school [Roll No 5971] by Thomas O'Connor the present principle of the school.
Joseph Mc Donogh (Father of Thomas Mc Donogh of [?] as teacher of [Gloghan] Boys school. Also brother of Thomas is a pupil. Brothers name was Joseph.
[graphic]
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:45
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St Ita was living in Killiedry convent and she had a farm of land out in Secant where she had the grass of thirty cows. And when the cows were milked she had her ass, and car the vessels would be put in the car and left go away home without any guide through Garravane, Cammons and on to Munteenowne crossing the Spring. There was a big flag in the passage and the load being so heavy he drove his hoof four inches in the rock and any one that thinks it worth their while can go at the present day to see them.
A short distance from Secant there was a purse of money found and some of the coins dated back seven or eight hundred years ago and according to tradition of the people it is the most dreadful glen for fairies and wild beasts and even wild horses and the people are
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:44
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This story was told to James Ryan (aged 12 years) by his father Kieran Ryan Ballysheil and is written here by Thomas Butler on 16th day of March 1938.
Land Lord of Ballysheil
Mr.s Fox was a widow, she was Land Lord of our district Ballysheil. She lived in Berbane she had land of her own in Ballysheil. She would not allow you to sow corn in the one field, years in succession. She would not allow to burn south grass. She would not allow you to shoot game on the land.
Song about the Land Lord
I went into the Land Lord thus to him did say Why do you dispossess me I am clear with you till May.
With an angry frown he turned around no longer need you wait.
I will tumble all the small houses on my estate.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:34
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By a station is meant a visit from the priests of the parish to a house in the district for the purpose of saying Mass there, hearing confession and giving Holy Communion. It is the custom in this part of the country to hold these stations to the present day. They are held twice a year during Lent and in October.
A certain house in each district is named in which Mass is said on the morning of the stations about nine o'clock. The people of that house make great preparations. They give the house a thorough cleaning. The outside is whitewashed. The roof is newly thatched if it is a thatched house. The outhouses are also whitewashed and tidied. The road or path leading to the house also cleaned hedges trimmed
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:24
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seacht míle a rith thángadar go dtí an abhann Ennibh. Léim Liam é agus dhea's sé ar an bruach thall. Léim an t-Albanach é acht nuair a tháinig sé go dtí an bruach uile, tharraing Liam buille air agus chuir isteach i lár na h-abhann é. Bhí fear ag dearcadh ortha agus dubhairt sé le Liam "Is maith an léim atá agat". "Tuige nach mbéadh" arsa Liam, "agus ráis seacht míle agam chuici".
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:17
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Meat was not so commonly used as it is nowadays, and pigs were much less plentiful than at present. Vela, however, was used comparatively often and I have been told by old men that long ago people often killed young calves and salted the veal. This meat was not so nutritious so that of a more mature animal would be, but people did not rear calves in those days except very rarely.
Creameries were unknown then and farmers' wives used to churn all the milk and make butter from it. The butter was packed firmly into a tub or firkin and when this was full after a period of a few months the farmer took the firkin to market.
The two nearest butter markets at that time were situated in Longford and Belturbet of which the farmer was nearer to this district. The price realised for the butter tubs depended largely upon the quality of the butter but even butter of the worst quality was usually bought although of course at a greatly reduced rate. This trade in butter probably accounted for the slaughter of calves and the use of their flesh as food. Later, of course, pigs became common, with the advent of creameries, but at the time of which I write bacon had not yet displaced eggs potatoes and oaten bread as the staple diet of the country people
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:14
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my own way" All right said the priest. The woman then began at the first question in the book and continued repeating word for word every question and answer until the priest, impatient but full of admiration told her to stop. Very unwillingly she did so, not having reached the required question.
The priest used to remain in the station house all day. After breakfast he would chat with the neighbours or perhaps go for a sail if it were near the shore, or go out hunting with some of the men around.
He would then get dinner. Mutton that was usually given. Sometimes the people would have to go to Derry a distance of 24 miles to get meat for dinner. Towards nightfall
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:13
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my own way" All right said the priest. The woman then began at the first question in the book and continued repeating word for word every question and answer until the priest, impatient but full of admiration told her to stop. Very unwillingly she did so, not having reached the required question.
The priest used to remain in the station house all day. After breakfast he would chat with the neighbours or perhaps go for a sail if it were near the shore, or go out hunting with some of the men around.
He would then get dinner. Mutton that was usually given. Sometimes the people would have to Derry a distance of 24 miles to get meat for dinner. Towards nightfall
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:10
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buile de'n bhata do'n chuileóg agus bhris sé srón na máthar.
Bean na Luaiche.
Bhí bean ann fadó agus b'é an t-ainm a tugtaí uirri ná bean na luaiche. Bhí beirt leas deirfiúirí aici agus ní leigfeadh siad í in áit ar bith. Aon oidhche amháin bhí mac rí lé posadh . Bhi rinnce breágh agus pleasúr aige go bpiochadh sé an bean a bá breagtha da mbeadh ann. Thainig an óige uilig go dtí an damhsa agus chuaid na leas-deirifireacha ann chomh maith . Bhí bean na luaiche sa teach lei féin agus in uaigneas ghol sí go mór agus siubhal bean isteach go dtí an teach agus bhí bean na luaiche ina suidhe ag taobh
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:04
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till their two ugly heads rolled on the floor. Back went Séan and the bee and the mouse to the king. "That deed is done said Séan and I want my farm". "You shall have it" said the king "but what do your fighting men want", "Ten ears of corn a day as long as I live said the mouse. "You shall have it" said the king. "A thimble of honey every day as long as I live" said the bee. "With all my heart" said the king. So Séan got his farm the mouse his corn and the bee her honey and they all lived happy in their new home at the foot of the hill.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 16:01
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and he took with him a mouse and a bee. So when they reached the giants house the mouse made a hole in the door. Then Séan slipped his hand in and raised the latch "So far so good" said Séan and he sat down to think how he would kill the giants. The mouse and the bee went in to the room where the giants were in bed. They snored so loudly that the little bee was nearly blown through the window. When the mouse and the bee came to the bed they perched themselves between the two giants. The mouse bit one of the giants ears and the bee stung his nose. "Stop" said the other "if you pinch me again I will cut your head off. Then the two giants started to fight and it wasnt long
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:58
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Do bhí amadán agus a mháthair ag siubhal ar an mbóthar lá amháin. Lá iongantach brothallach i lár an tsamhraidh do b'eadh é. Bhí an mháthair ann tuirseach agus luigh sí síos faoi sgáth crann agus dubhairt sí le n a mac gan tada a leigint ina comhair. Thuit an máthair ina codladh faoi sgáth an chrainnagus dhubhairt an mac ina intinn fein dá dtéigheadh rud ar bith i gcomhair a mháthair nach bfilleadh sé slán. Go gearr ina dhiaidh sin tháinig cuileog agus do luigh sé ar srón na mnaoidh. Do bhí bata mór ina lámh ag an amadán agus nuair a chonnaic an amadán é thug sé
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:53
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There were two giants who lived in Ireland long ago. They had eyes in the backs of their heads. These two giants lived together in a house on the top of a hill. They stole cows, sheep, pigs and hens from the people who lived about. They made the women bake big cakes for them and the men had to bring them turf. At last the king gathered his fighting men together to fight the giants but t he kings men were no match for them and the giants killed them all. Now there was a tiny hut at the bottom of the hill and in it lived a poor widow and her son Séan. One day Séan made up his mind to get rid of the giants and that he would get a reward from the king. Séan went up to the giants hut
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 15:51
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1. The House that Jack built.
Any number of players may take part with one person in charge.
This latter takes some convenient object a stick, clod, (?) and presents it to the first of the others taking part, saying "Take that". "What is that?" the other asks as he takes it, and he is told "That is the house that Jack built" The person who now has it passes it on to the next with the same words as were used when he got it himself. The second passes it to the third and so on until it is passed round all the players and come back again to the one in charge. He now turns again to the first player and again presents him with the object, saying 'Take that', and in answer to the question "What is that" he says "That is the malt (/) that lay in the house that Jack built".
The first player passes it on to the second with the same series of question and answers and thus it is passed round and back to the leader again. Presenting it once
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:44
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grated on a "boxty-grater" - which was made by punching holes in a tin plate. When several potatoes had been grated the raw gratings which contained a considerable quantity of water were wrung in a muslin cloth. The water oozed out through the cloth leaving the gratings comparatively dry. To make this material more adhesive a little flour was minced through the mass and having flattened it out into a cake or several cakes the boxty was baked on the pan. To prevent the cakes from sticking to the pan a little dripping or butter was melted on it beforehand and this had the desired effect.
Boiled boxty was made in exactly a similar way except that the wringings were made into rather thick dumplings with the aid of some flour and boiled in a pot of water for about two hours. The latter type of boxty was not quite so palatable as the fried kind but if it were allowed to cool and warmed on the pan after being cut into thin slices it was quite as good to eat as the "pan boxty". Potato cakes were also very popular in olden times but over indulgence often resulted in a most distressing heart-burn. The potato cake was made by first boiling the potatoe then peeling and masking them and finally by mixing with flour and soda and baking them on the pan.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:38
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In the olden days it was very hard for the Catholics to be educated well. The priests could not say Mass in Churches and they had to say them in backward places on the mountain. One day as a priest was saying Mass on the top of a rock at Multyfarnona. There came a crowd of English soldiers behind him and shot him dead, and it is said where he fell the track of his two knees is to be seen. Everyone that passed by this place used to put a little pebble on a stone and this is how the piles of stones got to be in this place.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 15:36
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Caitheamh Aimsire
Ag túsáil cnapaí; le n-aghaidh seo cuirtear mob n-a sheasamh ar dtúis agus seasann na h-imirtheóirí fad áithrid amach uaidh. Annsin caitheann siad an cnaipe leis an mob agus an té is goire dhó beidh cead aige iad a chrochadh ar dtúis. Is leis gach ceann a tagann anuas n-a "head". Má tá aon "harp" fágtha fós crochann an treas duine ba ghoire do'-n mhob é agus á léir mar sin ná go mbí gach ceann gnótuighthe
Párdógaí asail;
Téigheann buachaill ar a cheithre crúdh ar an urlár agus cuireann beirt bhuachaillí eile a gcosa treasna ar a dhruim. Fághann gach aoinne greim ar bhrógaibh an fhir eile agus féachain an buachaill atá ar an talamh éirigh leó.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 15:36
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75
Bogdeal agus nuair a lasadar an sliseóg (sin é an t-ainm a thabharfadh siad ar an bpíosa).D'fhanfadh se ag lasadh go gceann tamaill fada .Nuair a bheadh sá ag gabháil timcheall an tighe ag lorg aon rud bainfeadh siad úsáid as an sliseóg chun solas a thabhairt dóibh.
Ach nuair a thainig an ola parafin 'na measg rinne na sean-daoine a lampaí féin.Ag an am seo do bhiodh buidéal mór cearnógach dubhaig ghá ndhiol ag na siopadóirí.Bheul chuirfeadh siad clúdach ar an sgrugall....déanta de stáin ,is poll ann.Do líonfadh siadan buidéal le ola agus do chuirfeadh sé snáh ag lasadh an fad a bheadh ola ins an mbuidéal.Go mionn -minich .D;fhág siad an lampa sin ar lasadh ar an hobagus do thóg siad 'na laimh nuiar a bhí siad
an clúdach
snáth buidéal
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:34
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About twenty five years ago a ship named the "Tadorna" was wrecked at Ballycrenane. It was a mixed cargo of mercandise, and different kinds of plants. At the hour of midnight a great noise was heard, as this huge vessel struck a large rock. This report shook some of the houses near by. Alot of small boats came to rescue it and it was in vain, but they rescued the crew. The ship was wrecket and all its contents.
The captain of the ship lodged in a house named Mr Muderway. Some of the people said that he was drunk, and that the people of the house where he lodged bribed him, and got alot of the stuff which he secured next day.
Some of the plants, are to be seen yet, and are called the "Tadorna" plants.
In the year 1839 a great storm arose. The people knew beforehand that it was going to come. because two rainbows appeared in the sky, and some people were well prepared for it. That night roofs were taken houses.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:33
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I heard the following story from father concerning a spirit. In this district over a hundred years ago there lived a man named Tim Connor commonly called Tadhg Og. His life for many years was a persecution. Any evening after sunset he could not go outside the door without meeting a woman dressed in white. She often knocked him down and struck him severely. This went on for almost a year. At last he went to his confessor and the advice he got was to speak to her. The next evening he met her, he asked her what was her reason for haunting him. She said that she had money due after in the town of Listowel and she could not rest until it was paid. He went to Listowel and paid the debt and was never troubled again.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 15:25
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74
caoirigh nó mucha a mharbhuigeadr .Chuireadar an "fat"no an "tallow"sin i gcorcán ar an dteine chun é a leagadh.Nuair a bhí sé leaghta ,sin é an uair a chuirfeadh sé é isteach ins an feadán Do ghearr siad an sn áh anois is d.fag siad a feadóg le fuaraadhNuair a bhí sé fuar do tharaing siad coinnle amach.Rinne siad go leór díobh ag an am gcéadna .
an snáth
an feadán iarainn
An tallow
an clúdach
an poll
(b) An lampa
Fadó ni aon lampa ag muinntir na h-aite seo ach an "sliseóg".Ia amhl;aidh a chuireadar dar portaigh (bogdeal)gha thriomúighadh in -aice na teine .Nuiar a bhí sé tirm ghearadar píosa den
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:24
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and galvaniz was heard whizzing through through the air. It was in the month of August when this happened, and some of the corn which was ripe then the heads were blown off it. Alot of stock were killed, and some people whom houses were blown away were left perish by the side of the road. This storm lasted for twenty four hours, after that heavy rail fell, and it lasted for one day. This heavy rain cut the road, and the water ran into the fields, and some places are yet under water since that time.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:21
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40 year's ago a man was living near Kildinan and he was a great drunkard. One day his wife gave him 4d to go to Cork and said to him "don't make a baste of yourself drinking to-day".
The man went away very disgusted with himself and as he went out through the doorway he put his hand behind the door to get his stick, but, instead of taking the stick he took the crowbar. He did not know of his mistake until he reached the city and heard it clanking on the pavement's
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:19
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ainm dó Liam [Toulscir?] 'na cómhnuidhe n-aice leis. Bhí Liam 'na captaen ar na rebels i Nócha h-Ocht agus bhí céad punt le fághail ag an duine a thuibharfadh isteach é go Donnchadh Brún. Ní raibh aoinne ind-on é a gabháil bhí sé 'na coisidhe cómh maith sin. Bhí go maith is ní raibh go h-olc. Chuir Donnchadh fios ar Albanach tháinig sé agus taisbeánadh tígh Liam dó. Le h-eirigh gréine an maidin 'na dhiaidh sin bhí an t-Albanach 'na sheasamh ag doras tígh liom. Bhuail sé buille áir. Tháinig Liam amach agus d'foscail sé an doras. Nuair a chonnaic sé cé bhí ann dún sé an doras gur d'imthig amach an cúl-doras. Lean an t-Albanach é thar sléibhte agus gleannta agus tar éis
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:17
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There are five graveyards in this parish. Two in the townland of Ballindine two in the townland of Ballinvilla and one in the townland of Kilvine.
In Irishtown the gravel yards are square and the one in Kilvine is round. The churchyards are level. They are still in use. There are still ruins of an old church in Kilvine.
There are some dated 1874, 1885, 1886 and 1880. There are little crosses made of wood in them. A few people remember burials taking place there. There is one or two field called "Lises" where unbaptised children are buried.
Some familes use graveyards where
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 15:14
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32
scríobhta air agus dfhiafruigh sé de ar thuig sé an rud air. Do mhínigh sé do Seán gurb'iada na focla a bhí ar an leic na "is sonaidhe an taobh eile ná an taobh seo"
Ní túisge a bhí an Sgólaire imitighthe nó d'imigh Seán amach agus do thosnuigh sé ag romhar an taobh eile .Fuair sé leach agus corcán d'ór fé.Do mhair sé go sona sásta go deireadh a shaoil.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 15:12
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31
lá ar na bhárach ná phreab sé as a leabaidh .Fuair sé beagan bidh agus thóg sé an bóthar air féin.
Dá fhad an bhóthair níor bhfada bhí sé gha chur deagus do shrois sé an cathair sar a raibh muinntear na cathrach na suidhe.Do chuardaigh sé an droichead ag féáchaint annso is annsúd ,ach ni raibh rian an sparán le fáil.D'fhan sé ann i gcóir na h-oíche i dteach agus an maidin ina dhiaidh thosnuig sé ag cuardaigh arís.céard a casadh air ar an droichid an maidin sin ach sean-fhear liath agus é ag díol rudaí.Thosuig siad ag cainnt.D'inis Seán dó gach tud mar gheall ar an taidhreamh agus fáth a cuaird go Luimneach.D'innis an fear liath dó cunas mar bhi brionglóid mar sin aige féin tri oidhcheannta i ndiaidh a chéile .D'innis se dó frreiain go bhfuair sé amch ins an taibhreamh go raibh corcán lán de ór curtha fé sgeach droighin a bhí ag fás in-ait ar a dtugtar Baile Mhic Chró.
Bhí iomgna ar Seán .Thóg sé an bóthair abhaile air féin agus nuair a shrois se a theach bhí sé traochta.Maidin lá ar na bhárach thosuig se ag romhar mór timcheall na sgeiche .Fé dheireadh thainig sé go leach.D'iompuig sé é síos suas é agus cheap se go mbeadh an corcán óir aige .ní raibh fuithi ach gainnimh.Thóg sé isteach an leachagus chuir sé le h-ais na teine.Tamall indhiaidh sin cé bhuaileadh isteach chuige ach an sgoláire bocht .Do chonnaic an sgoláire an rud a bhí
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:12
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They used to make bread with oaten meal. The flour was made in the mills such as Galway or Ballina. The people often heard of grind-stones being used and that such was used in the district. The kind of bread that they used to make was called oaten bread, potato cake, and boxty bread.
Oaten bread was made with a grane of salt and a grane of sugar with water. Potato cake was made with boiled potatoes, butter, and milk. Boxty bread was made with
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 15:07
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raw potatoes and boiled ones.
Bread was baked once a week. The marks that was put in the cake when it was made was the shape of a cross because it would bake well. The name of the vessel in which the bread was made was called the [lotid?]. The names of the things that the bread was baked in were called the oven pan and griddle.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:59
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As I went over the London bridge I met a London scholar he drew off his cap an' drew off his glove come tell me the name of the scholar.
(Andrew)
It's ink and it's ank and it's green above the bank and it's fit for a Lord or a Lady.
(A Grave)
Ink ank under the bank ten drawing four.
(A woman milking a cow)
What ship never sails out of sight.
(Hardship)
The man that makes it never wears it the man that wears it never sees it.
(A coffin)
Four bottles on the side of a hill none of them corked and none of them spilled
(Cows tits)
Why does a hen pick the dish?
(Because she can not lick it)
Its under the fire its over the fire but it never
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:52
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tuches the fire
(A cake in an oven)
As long as a finger as white as the snow the longer you pull it the shorter it grows
( A Cigerette)
How many two's in five
(Two half crowns)
Broad day light in the middle of the night two dead men got up to fight two cripples ran for the priest and two dumbies shouted hurry on
(A lie)
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:52
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tuches the fire
(A cake in an oven)
As long as a finger as white as the snow the longer you pull it the shorter it grows
( A Cigerette)
How many two's in five
(Two half crowns)
Broad day light in the middle of the night two dead men got up to fight two cripples ran for the priest and two dumbies shouted hurry on
(A lie)
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:51
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We heard this story from our teacher. It is a story in connection with a buried treasure. Long ago (there was) a highway man was being sentenced to death in Limerick city. Before the judge put on the black cap the highway man cried out from the doc "Is there any man here from Kerry". It is said that there was one Kerry man in court that day but he was afraid to speak lest he would be taken as one of the companions of the highway man.
"If there is I will make him a rich man". There is a crock of ga (?) hidden in Meenleitrim between "Feit paivin and Feit an matsluar". This story has come down from generation to generation.
anonymous contributor
2021-04-22 14:51
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30
Scéal, scéal ruball ar an éan, lá ar bhacach buidhe bhí fear ann fadó agus fadó a bhí.Seán Mach Domhnaill ab ainm do agus chómhnaigh sé i ngleanntán doimhin uaigneach ag barr Sléibhe Callanáin nó Calláin in aice Sráid na Cathrach.Go dtí san la indiu ann galodtar baile Mhic an Cró ar an ngleanncéadna.Fear fíor bocht a bhí i Seán agus ba cruaidh an saol abhí aige mar bhí sé deachair do shlighe bheatha a bhaint ina leithéid sin de ghleann feadáin.
Fear a thóg a shaol go bog a bhí ann leis.Do bhiodh sé ag obair go cruaidh i rith an lae ach do chodluigeadh sé go h-eadaartráth la ar na bhárach.Bhíodh sé i gcomhnaidhe ag taibhreamh .Oidhche amháin bhí taibhreamh aige .Cheap sé go dtéigheadh sé go droichead i Cathair Luimnighe go bhfaigheadh sé sparán lan d'ór ar leachanna an droichid .Chonaich se gach rud go cruinn ins an taibhreamh agus do bhí sé sé in ann insint dá mhnaoi cá raibh sé le fáil.Bheul tháinig iongnadh an domhain air nuair bhí an taibhreamh céadna aige há oidhche in dhiadh sin.Dubhairt sé leis féin go dtuibhraadh sé turas go Luimnig chun an t-ór a fháil.Ni túisge a bhí grian moc an tSamhraidh 'na shuidhe
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:49
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(Because she cannot look under it)
What grows down.
(A cows tail)
As long as my finger as white as the snow the longer you pull it the shorter it grows.
(A cigrette)
Londonderry Cork and Kerry spell that with out a K
(It)
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:46
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there people are buried.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:45
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or spun.
I washed them in the dew and dried them in the sun.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:44
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The neighbours help each other at the sowing of the potatoes. Some people help each other at cutting of the seed, others help at the dropping of the potatoes.
In Autumn the potatoes are dug. If the weather is suitable they are dug with a digger. If the weather is wet they are dug with a spade. The digger scatters the potatoes over the field and the gatherers come in two's and gather them into baskets and they are emptied into the pit. The pits are covered with rushes and then clay is put on them about six inches deep. The old local names of potatoes are - Cups, Mullans, Arran Victors, Arran Chiefs, Queens, Champions, Great Scots, and up to dates.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:40
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Potatoes are grown on our farm in Killalough. Three acres is sown under crops each year. The amount often varies. My father prepares the ground. Sometimes there is topdress put on the ground before it is ploughed. The potatoes are sown in drills. The ground is first ploughed with a sellar plough, it is then cross-ploughed, harrowed, grubbed, and then the drills are raised. A drill plough is used in the field and a spade is used in the garden. Wooden ploughs are seldom used now, but they were very common fifty years ago. The spade is bought in the shop. The part of the potato with an eye is cut for seed.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:36
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I
T'was early on Monday morning my wandering steps did lead me ;
By a farmer's habitation through meadows and green lawns,
Where I heard, great lamentations with the small birds they were making ; saying
We'll have no more engagements in the hills of
Mullach bán".
2
Squire Johnson he is running for honour and for treason ;
He never turned traitor, nor betrayed the rights of man,
But now we are in danger, by a wicked deceiving stranger ;
That has promised transportation
to the Boys of Mullach bán.
3
I hear the seas are roaring, the billows they are rolling ;
As the heroes cross the ocean, I thought the seas would dry,
The trout and salmon gaping, the cuckoo left her station ;
So fare you well dear Erinn, and the boys of
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:32
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Mullach bán.
4
Now to end my lamentation, we are all for recreation ;
Who cares for hesitation ; if so without a stranger
We are all for transportation ;
Like the boys of Mullach Bán.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:28
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I'll air myself some windy day upon the top of Tork
I'll purify myself once more and penance I will do
so don't reject a comrade that still is loyal and true
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:26
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Arithmetics, Reading Books, Grammars and History Books. Writing was done with pencil and slate, and quills with ink. All the children were seated on soda or planks on the ground. There were no blackboards. The teachers remained one or two weeks in each district, and then they went to another district.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:24
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Ques. What is neither right nor fair.?
Ans. A Black man's left foot.
Ques. Deep down in the earth, is the place of my birth. I am as black as the night, but your homes I make bright when I burst into flames who can tell me my name.?
Ans Coal.
Ques. When was meat the highest.?
Ans When the cow jumped over the moon.
Ques. Why will there be no men with beards in Heaven.?
Ans. Because men only get into heaven by a close shave.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:22
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eyes open.?
Ans A Hare.
Ques. I dye to live, and I live to die.?
Ans A person who dyes clothes to make a living.
Ques. What is as bad as a hen stealing.?
Ans. A Cock Robin. (Robbing)
Ques what is the last thing taken off going to bed?
Ans Your feet off the floor.
Ques Long legs, crooked thighs, wee head, and no eyes.?
A Tongs.
Ques What bridge is it that no living person ever crossed.?
Ans The bridge of your nose.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:19
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Ques. To whom does the King take off his hat.?
Ans. To his Barber.
Ques. When does a Scotchman resemble a donkey.?
Ans When he stands by his banks and braes.
Ques. What is open when it is shut, and shut when it is open.?
Ans. A Railway crossing, (It is open to the public, when shut to the train. When it is shut to the public it open to the train.)
Ques What sleeps all night with its head down.?
Ans A Hen.
Ques What sleeps all night with its
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:16
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If a person buys any animals and bring them home on Saturday, it is unlucky. Saturday is counted a very unlucky day. If anybody moves out of the house on Saturday, it is unlucky.
Saturday's flit,
Is a short sit.
Garlic has to be planted
on Good Friday and pulled on
15th August, because there is a
cure in garlic, and the cure is in
it that day.
Some people start mowing and ploughing in a certain month and on a certain day, and continued doing so no matter if it is raining or not.
March borrows three days from April. If any old cow or any person who is sick in March
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:15
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rejected
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near the giants castle. Then he cut branches and spread them over the hole. Then he threw earth over the the branches and then Jack went up to the giants castle and knocked aloud. When the giant heard the noise he ran to the door and when he saw Jack he ran after him. When his great feet touched the branches they sank in and the giant fell into the hole. His head struck against a stone and he was killed. Then Jack went up to the giants castle and he found a great pile of gold. All the people were glad to see Jack return and to hear that he had killed the cruel giant.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:12
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with a hood on just leaving a small hole so that she can go in and out. She lays eighteen eggs. They are white and have red spots in them. She sits on the eggs about a month.
The lark builds a nest of moss and hair. She lays four black eggs. She sits on the eggs about three weeks.
The robin is said to have wiped the drops of blood from Our Lords Head and that is why the robin has a red breast.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:11
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Once upon a time there lived an old woman near the town of Fermoy whose name was Petty Coat Loose. When this old woman died she used to be appearing to the people and killing them.
One night there was a man coming home from the fair of Fermoy and he met Petty Coat Loose on his way. She asked him to give her a drive and he said he would why not. So she sat into the car and the horse was'nt able to pull the car. "O" said the man, "you are the heaviest woman I ever met and you must get out of my car". So she got out of the car and she said to the man "Only for you being a good man to give me a drive I would kill you. So the man went home and the horse died
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:10
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The robin, blackbird, thrush, sparrow, wren, yellow-hammer and lark are the birds that are mostly found in our district. They do not migrat. The lark and cuckoo migrates. The robin builds her nest in hedgerows or in barns. She lays five eggs. They are white and are freckled with grey spots. She sits about three weeks.
The blackbird builds a nest of straw and mud. She then lines it with hay. She lays four eggs. They are grey with darker grey spots on them. She sits on the eggs about a month.
The thrush builds a nest of moss and lines it with damp sawdust and grass. She lays four or five sky blue eggs with black spots on them. She sits on the eggs a month.
The sparrow builds a nest of fine straws and lines it with hair and feathers. She sits on the eggs three weeks. The eggs are light blue.
The wren makes a nest of moss
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 14:05
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Marriages most frequently take place about Shrove or at the latest date, Shrove Tuesday, Monday, Tuesday and Saturday are thought unlucky for marriages.
Matches are sometimes made. If a man wanted to get married, he got some of his friends to go with him, to the house of some wealthy farmer. Whose daughter was supposed to have a good fortune. They would bring a bottle of whiskey with them. They would enter at the back door and after a little while they would treat the parents of the girl. If the mother and father were contented with his home they would give the girl her fortune. Sometimes a bank in the bog was given as part of the girl's fortune. Cattle and stock were also given if the parents were not rich enough to give her money. The wedding day was then arranged.
Long ago the people would go to the Church in the old Irish jaunting car to be married. When they were married the went tot he Bride's house where there was a feast. When it was over the Bride and Bridegroom started out for their new home. Long ago a bottle of whiskey was broken over the
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:57
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ar bíth eile a bfuil anodha a 'cur orth bóil tá ar seiseán. Tá cú nimh ar sise tiór tu uaigh thalamh annseó agus nidh ar a ceann nuair atha cogadh ar siubhal ní gadh acth an cú a leiginth amach agus deineann sé an meidh robtha agus a dheánfadh an sionnach imeasgh cearch. Ar chualaidh tú ariamh ce'n cóir marbú a bhí ann, Bhóil ar sise cualaidh mé iadh ag radh dá dtafhfadh gair
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:54
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The scholars of Ireland were challenged to a contest by the scholars of England, and they were thrown into a fluster for they had been neglecting their books of late while those of England had been coached to the last Greek accent. Hard as they studied the scholars of Ireland could not bring their knowledge up to examination pitch by the day of the test & the Highking of Ireland was distracted. The fame of the Island of Scholars was in jeopardy.
Ah but on the eve of the day of crisis a merry old bodagh came over the hills saying that he had a word for the King's ear. He had trouble in gaining a hearing
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:51
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Sleeping on a bride's cake makes one dream of her future husband.
Horse shoes tied to the bride's car and old boots are supposed to bring luck.
If a bride wears
"Something old and something new,
Something borrowed and something blue,"
she considers herself a lucky bride.
It is unlucky for a bride to see her groom before the ceremony on the marriage day.
If a bride has lost her mother by death, she thinks it unlucky to marry before is a year dead.
A bride thinks she is lucky if she is handed a pair of tongs before entering her new home.
It is a common belief that should a bride dress in her wedding outfit before her marriage she will never get occasion to wear it at her wedding.
A bride when she gets married likes to
"Change the name and also the letter because if not it is a Change for worse and not for better."
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:51
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Chin-cough & Whooping Cough.
I A drink of asse's milk is supposed to be a cure for the whooping cough.
II To drink porcupine soup is a cure for the whooping cough.
III Food or milk left after a ferret is a cure the whooping cough.
IV Fumes of boiling tar is a cure for the chin-cough.
V If a man riding on a horse told you a cure for the chin cough it would cure it.
Colds
I To drink boiled milk and pepper is supposed to be a good cure for a cold.
II Boiled milk and onion is a cure for a cold.
III Porridge and porter is a cure for a cold.
IV "Scailtin" is a cure for a cold. "Scailtin" is gruel made from butter milk and oaten-meal.
VI Wine made from the berries of an alder tree is a cure for a cold.
A drink of whiskey and boiling water is a cure for a cold.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:47
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arrange them.
When is a schoolmaster like a man with one eye
When he has a vacancy for a pupil
Why is a large kingdom like a brown study.
Because it is a roomy nation
Why are balloons like vagrants
They have no visible means of support
What goes most against a farmer's grain?
A reaping machine.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:44
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Potatoes were scarce long ago but the people generally took them three times a day. They would boil the potatoes and when they were done they were drained on a potato basket and set in the middle of the floor and the whole family would sit round the basket and eat the potatoes.
They took either buttermilk or herring along with the potatoes and where there was a large family the herring had to do two people.
Whenever the potatoes were finished the people had to take indian porridge three times a day. It was seldom that they got tea.
The bread that they would get to the tea was indian pancake and potato cake mixed with oat meal. At Hallowe'en they would get boxty. This was made with grated raw potatoes and mashed boiled potatoes. Then you mix all together and bake it into a cake and put it in the oven. At Christmas they would generally make a potato pudding and it was made with boiled potatoes and flour mixed through them. This would be put in an oven placed at the side of the fire, turf coals were put on the top of the lid and baked for three hours.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:43
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Blood Poison
I
A lick of a dog's tongue is a cure for blood-poison.
Thorn
I
To leave a piece of a foxe's tongue where a thorn is, will heal and draw the thorn out.
Cut or Wound.
I
A lick of a dog's tongue is a cure for a cut or wound.
II
To leave St Patricks leaf on a cut could cure it.
Burn.
I
Paraffin oil, and bread soda is a cure for a burn.
II
To leave a foxes tongue on a burn it would cure it.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:43
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Long ago there lived a poor widow who had three sons. After a few years the eldest son decided to go and seek his fortune. When he was going he took all the best clothes and nearly all the food out of the house and started off Towards mid-day he sat down to eat his dinner. when a little robin flew up, and asked him to throw him the crumbs. The young man refused and hunted the little bird away Shortly after he was emloyed by a magician to plough a big field, when up out of the ground came a big serpent which devoured him. A year after the second son had to go as they were getting poorer and poorer. Th (en) is man selfish like his eldest brother took everything
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:41
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thing while stooping down.
Up start.
I
The juice of first black-berry is a cure for an up start.
Swellings
I
To rub with potato water is a cure for a swelling.
II
To rub with goose-grease is a cure for a swelling.
III
The juice of chick-weed is a cure for a swelling.
IV
To put a penny on a swelling would keep it down.
Chin Blain.
I
Cold water and salt is a cure for chin-blain.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:41
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and others count Thursday a lucky day. On Whit Sunday if there is a child born it is said that they would kill some thing before they die. The cross day of the year occurs on, Whit Sunday. It means it is unlucky to do anything
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:39
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About a distance of twelve miles from our home there is a beautiful stretch of shimmering water which forms a picturesque lake.
this lake which is circular in its appearance covers an area of about one-quarter square mile. The last time I visited this beautiful spot was about the middle of summer. The beautiful archway round to the lake was lined with beautiful tall trees which were clothed with a mantle of green. The sun was shining upon the still, crystal, waters, until it shone like a sheet of gold. The background of the lake is clothed with evergreens, and these make the scenery more impressive than ever.
The waters of the lake are not very deep, but deep enough to carry small boats. Snow-white swans are to be found within its radius, and these are to be seen in all kinds of weather.
On the upper side of the lake a small stream wends its way down from the surrounding hills, while on the lower side with another stream flows outwards bringing the surplus water and leaving the waters of the lake clean and fresh.
This lake forms an important feature in the
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:37
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live with in five miles of a town or engage in trade or commerce. They could not vote or hold land to the value of thirty shillings. Yet through out all this dreadful period the Catholic schoolmaster taught behind the hedges or in lonely glens while the children took it in turns to keep watch for the approach of the English soldiers, for it was death for the teacher if he was discovered imparting knowledge to Irish children.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:37
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butter came through the porridge.
When people who have plenty and poor people are licking the crumbs round them. People say "Greasing the fat sow."
When the children are very alike people say "She is one and half a dozen of the others."
When some person is playing with something and some-body comes along and gives them something to do, they say when so little keeps you going it is a sin to keep you idle.
When a person is pretending to be telling the truth people say "That is only from the teeth out."
When a person is very lazy and trying to go about without doing anything people say "You are as lazy as butter is greasy".
When a thing is very crooked, it is
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:37
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the cat and the hounds after her Never since or before was there such a hunt seen The cat kept the same distance before the hounds They were not able to gain an inch on her She made for the Killerduff direction and a little house under a hill She got into the house through a little window The dogs caught up to her before she got in the window and they tore the hip off her The huntsmen & Pat searched the house Soon they broke the door open and who did they see but and old woman with her hip torn Pat was glad and he went home rejoicing He told his wife & she and Pat lived happily without the cat after that
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:36
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sé (tríd an pháirc mhór)
"An sruthán fraoigh" bhaist na seandaoine an t-ainm sin air mar gheall ar go bhfuil fraoch ag fás ar a bhruacha
("Sruthan na mBreac Glaodh) (na seandaoine an t-ainm sin air mar geall ar go bhfuil a lán breach le faghail ins an t-sruthán)
(2) Árdán
"Ardán carac" bhaist na seandaoine an t-ainm sin air mar gheall ar go bhfuil a lán árdán beag ar ar a mhullach
"Ardán na gcloc" Tugadh an t-ainm sin air an árdán mar gheall ar go bhfuil a lán cloca ar Mhullach an ardáin
"Ardán Sheamuis" bhaist na seandaoine an t-ainm sin air an árdán mar gheall ar go raibh fear darbh ainm Seámus ina chomhnuidhei dteach mhór ar mhullach an ardáin
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:35
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who had to pay heavy rents for it although it was no use. The few Priests who remained risked their lives among their people ministering the Sacraments on hillsides and in secret glens for there was a price on the head of every priest and the reward was paid by money taken from the Catholics Mass was said in secret places on the hills and the people gathered together on Sundays. Great care would have to be taken least the Government heard and send men to capture the Priest. All Catholics were forbidden to
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:33
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scenery of the country, and is so important that the townland in which it lies has derived its name from it namely - Loughooney.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:33
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Sometimes the butter is made up in little round "prints" about four inches in diameter. The top of this print is decorated by stamping it with a little round wooden disc to which a handle is attached. On the face of this disc a design is engraved in the wood. The design varies. It may be that of a bird, or a flower, or an animal, or a simple scene.
This form of making up butter is fast dying out in the neighbourhood.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:33
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About a quarter of a mile from my home their is a glen owed by Mr. Adams. This glen forms an outstanding feature of beauty in the townland of Corness. There is a waterfall in this glen and I love to sit and listen to the roaring of the waters as they come dashing down the Falls.
At the foot of this waterfall there is a lovely swimming pool. It is not too deep but it is quite deep enough for a person to enjoy a good smim in its cool refreshing waters. It is very still in this valley and when the sun beams down on the trees and flowers it forms the most tranquil and peaceful appearance that you have ever seen. It is so still that even the faintest sound, as it echoed in the rocks and hills would seem like the crash of a machine gun. The hills at the sides of the Falls are clothed the lovely green foliage and as the leaves sparkle in the
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:31
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went the next day at the appointed time 12 o'clock. When they reached the Glebe they met the head groom and Mike. There were other horsemen with them. One of the horsemen said to Pat. "My fine fellow what is that you've got in the bag." "Tis a hen you know," said Pat, "that I am bringing to my friend."
"My fine fellow," said the huntsman. "I think it is a hare you have. Open the bag and let me see."
"Pat" whispered the cat "dont attempt it." Pat twisted and turned every way "Maryah." At last the huntsman grabbed the bag and shook the cat out. Away with
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:29
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it is always best to keep quiet until you get it out of it.
Live horse and you will get grass.
Waste not want not.
Mind the shop and the shop will mind you.
Time will tell, and frost will dry the "praties".
You can't take breeches of a highland man.
Feathering your own nest.
Once bitten twice shy.
One good turn deserves another.
As you rear your pup you have your dog.
You don't know what is in the pot till the lid is lifted.
Short accounts make long friends.
God fits the back for the burden.
It is wonderful the works of a wheel barrow.
People with glass heads should not be throwing stones.
Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
The early bird gets the early worm.
But - the worm is caught for it's
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:29
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do chur air. Is maith an rud é fanact faoi na n-eadaige agus neart alluis do cur. Má bhíonn an diligneach ar duine ar bith tart ar an áit seo is é seo an laigheas ata acha air. Cuireann siad sios canna bainne géar agus bruiteann said é. Oltar án meag de annsin agus cuireann an meag ag cur allius iad agus tagann biseach orra. Nuair bhíos an ruagan ar duine thart ar an áit seo ólann siad sugh slanluis agus tagann biseach orra.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:29
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The most painful of all are corns in hot weather. For those the best is the slime of the fish which is found along the lake in Summer.
Lilywhite root for drawing out the germ of a boil.
For ringworm the butter that is churned in May, mixed with sulpher and rub it on the place, in is put around the mark to spot it from spreading.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:26
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her that he had to bring the cat to Ballycastle to get the shoemaker to make shoes for her as he could get no boots to fit her in a shop. They were to meet him at Glebe. They would have horse with them and hounds too. They were to meet each other at twelve o'clock on the following day. They said that they would chase the Devils out of her. for she must be an old hag. Pat went home and told his story to the cat "And how am I going to get to Ballycastle said the cat "I will put you into a bag and out warm hay around you. I will carry you on my back and no-one will know what I have in the bag "said Pat. "Oh! won't that be grand," said the cat. Away they
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:26
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cor ar bith. Is é seo an chaoi a deintear an bainne asail suas lé n-ól. Cuirtear siucra air agus uisge fuar trid. Oltar e cupla uair ins an lá agus cupla uair ins an oidhche agus bíonn biseach ar an duine annsin in dhiaidh cupla lá.
Nuair a thagann an bruitineach ar duine ar bith tart ar an ait seo is é seo an leighis ata air n a neart uisge fuair a ól agus ruitiní neanntóige a bhrith agus neart de'n sugh a ól agus neart siucra
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:25
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In olden times doctors were very seldom used. An old woman says that she once gave a cure to a doctor for his own illness. The cure was a herb, and the doctor sent away for the seed of it, and grew it himself.
senior member (history)
2021-04-22 13:23
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an galar da leigis.
Ma bhíonn an tsrut ar duine ar bith tart ar an bhaile seo is é seo an chaoi a leighiseanna na daoine thart annseo é. Teidheanna siad go dti asal a bhíos bainne aici agus corr uair bionn arra dul i bfad sul a bfuigeadh siad é. Is minic nach mbíonn sé lé feighail go dti go siubhalann siad cupla baile.
Muna mbíonn an tsruth ar duione cor ar bith is maith an rud bainne asal a ól mar ní tiocfaidh se orra
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