School: Ballyhogue

Location:
Ballyhoge, Co. Wexford
Teacher:
Mrs. Margaret Cahill

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Ballyhogue | The Schools’ Collection

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0902, Page 218

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hurl with a fret-saw and the hurl is planed out and rubbed with sand-paper or glass. He ties 15 or 16 of them in bundles and sends them to town.


James Fitzpatrick

The end-over-end churn has two handles and four legs and a lid and a rubber. There is a glass in the lid and also a gas pipe.

It is about 6 feet high and about four feet wide at the bottom and top
The churns that are in use now are the end-over-end and the hand-churn. The hand-churn is the most modern. I prefer the end-over-end churn because it is the easiest to churn with. The dash churn is so called because it is left on the ground and it is dashed with a dash. The end-over-end is so called because it turns over until the work is done.
Butter is made twice a week in Summer and only once in winter. In a farm house the workmen usually churn.
Strangers who come in during the churning help because when the churning is done they get buttermilk and sometimes butter and other things. If there

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Collector
Mary E. Kavanagh
Gender
female
Informant
Patrick Kavanagh
Gender
male
Age
54
Informant
Brigid Kavanagh
Gender
female
Age
55
Language
English