School: Stonetown, Louth (roll number 16431)

Location:
Stonetown Lower, Co. Louth
Teacher:
P. Ó Dubháin

Filter stories

Back
/ 302 Forward
Resolution: Low | High
The Famine

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0668, Page 247

Image and data © National Folklore Collection, UCD. See copyright details »

On this page

As regards the famine it did not strike this district too hard the reason why because there were lots of work and Channonrock mill was in full swing at that time and gave lots of employment to this district. It was working day and night making flour. This district was very thickly populated during the famine years - about four times as thickly as now. All the ruins of the hosues are all demolished but there are a lot still occupied that existed during the famine years. All those houses wer improved during those late years.
The blight visited this district, it made its appearance in 1846 but the potatoes were only a partial failure, the next year in 1847 they were almost a total failure having nearly all rotted in the ground. A very rare piece of potato ground escaped, from those pieces they got seed, but the potato acreage was greatly reduced. After the famine people started sowing turnips instead. After the potato failure Indian corn started coming from America and was ground into meal and the poor of the country lived mostly on Indian stirabout. Of

(continues on next page)
Collector
Tommy Kirk
Gender
male
Address
Ballakelly, Co. Monaghan
Informant
Owen Dooley
Gender
male
Age
60
Address
Drumcamill, Co. Louth
Language
English