School: Ballyloghane, Caisleán Nua Thiar (roll number 8783)

Location:
Ballinloughane, Co. Limerick
Teacher:
S. Condún, Úna Nic Ádhaimh

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Bird-Lore

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0487, Page 314

Image and data © National Folklore Collection, UCD. See copyright details »

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The birds in my district are the blackbird, thrush, crow, magpie, bull finch, gold finch, chaff finch, snipe, the wag tail, grouse, robin, the linnet, cuckoo, the land rail, the swallow and the wild pigeon. Some of those birds which I have mentioned go away from us and others stay with us. The swallow the cuckoo and the land rail leave us south and come to us in Spring again. The robin builds her nest in the side of a fence, her nest is lined with hair and is round in shape, she lays about five eggs. The magpie's nest is round in shape she lays about six eggs. The crow's nest is round in shape she lays about five eggs which are big.
The wren is a small bird but she lays more eggs that any of the other birds. The linnet builds her nest ina hole in the wall she las about five eggs. The bird sits on the eggs for about two weeks. Boys are told if they robbed a birds nest that they would get sore hands or would get a disease that could not be cured. If the swallow flies low that is a sign of rain, or the crows flying low would be a sign of rain, when the curlew would be calling that would be a sign of rain. When Our Saviour was dying on the cross the robin came and tried to pick off the thorns off his head and a drop of blood fell on his breast and ever since that spot is there, and the robin is blessed for that, that is why she is called

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Collector
Nora Dillane
Gender
female
Address
Rooskagh West, Co. Limerick
Informant
(name not given)
Relation
parent
Gender
female
Age
49
Address
Rooskagh West, Co. Limerick
Language
English