School: Maoilinn (B.), Áth Treasna

Location:
Meelin, Co. Cork
Teacher:
Diarmuid de Brún

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Maoilinn (B.), Áth Treasna | The Schools’ Collection

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0350, Page 073

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Black Quarter. Young cattle are very liable to this disease especially when put into fresh grass - 'after-grass'.
There is no cure whatever for it but it can be prevented by many simple remedies.-
A pig-ring, or any brass ring (one is sufficient) when put into the flesh on underneath part of neck or on the tail will prevent Black-quarter. The following supplied this cure:- Michael Jones, The Line; John Angland, Meentinna; David Quinlan, Rowels; Jerh. Duane Clashroe, P. Burke Gooseberryhill; W, Brosnan Knockscovane.

Informant
Michael Jones
Gender
male
Informant
John Angland
Gender
male
Address
Meentinny West, Co. Cork
Informant
David Quinlan
Gender
male
Address
Rowls (Noonan), Co. Cork
Informant
Jeremiah Duane
Gender
male
Address
Clashroe, Co. Cork
Informant
P. Burke
Gender
male
Address
Gooseberryhill, Co. Cork
Informant
Wm. Brosnan
Gender
male
Address
Knockskavane, Co. Cork
Language
English

Cornelius Sheahan got the following cure from his father Denis Sheahan, Meenbeg, Meelin:-
A piece of rabbit-skin is obtained and a slit or hole is made in the skin of the calf, heifer at the shoulder. The rabbit skin is inserted into the hole and sewed to the skin of the animal.
No other person heard of this cure.

Red-water is a disease which is locally regarded as being 'picked-up' from the land. Some land is full of disease especially land that has not been tilled or cultivated and cattle never thrive nor milk well on such land. The following cure for Red-water appears to be fairly common.
Two pieces of iron about a foot long are obtained and

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