School: Páirc Íseal (B.) (roll number 295)

Location:
Lowpark, Co. Mayo
Teacher:
Seán Ó Caiside

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Páirc Íseal (B.) | The Schools’ Collection

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0117, Page 62

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Many old beliefs and customs were attached to May Eve and the month of May itself. For instance may-flowers were scattered around the house to keep away the fairies. Another old belief was that if a person washed his face in the May Eve dew he would not get sunburned during the Summer or he would not get wrinkles. Persons leaving presents of fresh milk and honey for the fairies would have a plentiful supply of butter and milk through-out the whole year. If a person was hit on the head with a bow-tree stick on May Eve he would not grow any more. Long ago the cow's udder was washed with May-flower (?) on May Eve so that she would give plenty milk during the year.

A person going through briars three times on May-Eve and saying "all the butter come to me" would have the power to steal butter. If a person went out on May morning and skimmed the water off the well he would be boss of the village for that year. Another old custom was to tie cowslips to the cow's udder in order that the butter would not be stolen.
There is a rhyme about the month of May as follows:-
"A wet and windy May
Chills the haggard with corn and hay"

On May Eve people gathered different varieties of flowers and herbs which they mashed up. This mashed substance was called "Bealtanach". It was rubbed on the cow's udder and tits on May day. It was then believed that the cow would give a much better supply of milk and butter.

Language
English