School: Tón Ruadh (roll number 12809)

Location:
Tonroe, Co. Mayo
Teacher:
Máirtín Ó Giobaláin

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Weather-Lore

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0115, Page 54

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There are several signs by which we get to know the kind of weather that is drawing near. These signs are not much heeded now, owing to the weather glasses and radio.

The old people generally depended on signs, such as changes in the sky, the sun, the moon, and the stars. They say that if the sun is pale when sinking we are sure to have rain or if the sky is cloudy rain is supposed to be near. If a rainbow is seen in the sky we are supposed to have rain very soon after.
The local signs for rainy weather also are winds blowing from certain directions. They say that if the wind blows from the south west it is a sure sign of rain in the district. If the wind blows from the west it is another sign of rain. The old people say that a sure sign of a storm is a very clear sky. A red mood is also regarded as a sure sign of a coming storm.
Some animals are regarded as weather prophets. The following are regarded as signs of rain. The cat begins

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Collector
Iosaipín Ní Cuinn
Gender
female
Address
Botinny, Co. Mayo
Informant
Mrs B. Mc Guinn
Gender
female
Age
80
Occupation
farmer's wife
Address
Botinny, Co. Mayo
Language
English