School: Sruthar (C.)

Location:
Shrule, Co. Mayo
Teacher:
Bríd, Bean Uí Éanacháin

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Sruthar (C.) | The Schools’ Collection

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0102, Page 252

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This was done by tying a wire called snare wire which was shaped into a loop on to pole and by placing it in a passage through which the rabbit was accustomed to pass. Cats' cradles were tricks made by knotting twine in the shape of a cradle between the hands. Sling throwing, pitch and toss, and playing Jack stones, were all the games that were played at the cross-roads on summer evenings. There are some of those games in practice yet. Tea-Totalum was a very popular old game, a square dice is all that was required for this game. It was a game for four, and there were four special letters written on each of the four corners of the dice. Each person chose his own letters and bet money on it. The dice was put spinning and which ever letter it stopped at, the person that had bet on that letter would win according to the meaning and value of the letter. Their means ran as follows: T= take up, P =put down, A=all, N= none.
Hurling dates back tothe time of the "Fir Bolg" and the Tuata De Dannan. My father told me a story about those two great reigning powers. They arranged to have a battle one time on the plains of Moytura. The Fir Bolgs

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Collector
Nóra Ní Dhubhdha
Gender
female
Address
Cahernabrock, Co. Mayo
Informant
James Dowd
Relation
parent
Gender
male
Age
65
Address
Cahernabrock, Co. Mayo
Language
English